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The Winters Tale.

 
dc.contributor Oxford Text Archive
dc.contributor.author Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616
dc.coverage.placeName Oxford
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-14
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T10:36:48Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T10:36:48Z
dc.date.created 1623
dc.identifier ota:5729
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/5729
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/5729
dc.description.abstract "One thousand copies of this facsimile have been printed"--verso of half t.p. Facsim. reprint of ed. published, London : printed by Issac Iaggard and Ed.[ward] Blount, 1623 with original t.p.: Mr. William Shakespeares comedies, histories, & tragedies Original colophon reads: Printed at the charges of W.[illiam] Iaggard, Ed.[ward] Blount, I.[ohn] Smithweeke [i.e. Smethwick], and W.[illiam] Aspley, 1623 Contents: The tempest. The two gentlemen of Verona. The merry wives of Windsor. Measvre, for measure. The comedie of errors. Much adoe about nothing. Loues labour's lost. A midsommer nights dreame. The merchant of Venice. As you like it. The taming of the shrew. All's well, that ends well. Twelfe night, or what you will. The winters tale. The life and death of King Iohn. The life and death of King Richard the second. The first part of Henry the fourth. The second part of Henry the fourth. The life of Henry the fift. The first part of Henry the sixt. The second part of Henry the sixt. The third part of Henry the sixt. The tragedy of Richard the third. The famous history of the life of King Henry the eight. The tragedie of Troylus and Cressida. The tragedy of Coriolanvs. The lamentable tragedy of Titus Andronicus. The tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet. The life of Tymon of Athens. The tragedie of Ivlivs Caesar. The tragedie of Macbeth. The tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke. The tragedie of King Lear. The tragedie of Othello, the moore of Venice. The tragedie of Anthonie, and Cleopatra. The tragedie of Cymbeline
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.format.mimetype text/xml
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Oxford Text Archive Core Collection
dc.relation.replaces http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/0119
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.subject.lcsh Plays -- England -- 16th century
dc.subject.lcsh Plays -- England -- 17th century
dc.subject.lcsh Comedies -- England -- 16th century
dc.subject.lcsh Comedies -- England -- 17th century
dc.subject.lcsh Tragedies -- England -- 16th century
dc.subject.lcsh Tragedies -- England -- 17th century
dc.title The Winters Tale.
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 1288927
files.count 5
otaterms.date.range 1600-1699

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The Winters Tale. Actus Primus. Scoena Prima. Enter Camillo and Archidamus. If you shall chance ( Camillo ) to visit Bohemia, on the like occasion whereon my seruices are now on-foot, you shall see (as I haue said) great dif- ference betwixt our Bohemia, and your Sicilia. I thinke, this comming Summer, the King of Sicilia meanes to pay Bohemia the Visitation, which hee iustly owes him. Wherein our Entertainment shall shame vs: we will be iustified in our Loues: for indeed—— 'Beseech you—— Verely I speake it in the freedome of my know- ledge: we cannot with such magnificence—— in so rare—— I know not what to say—— Wee will giue you sleepie Drinkes, that your Sences (vn-intelligent of our insuffi- cience) may, though they cannot prayse vs, as little ac- cuse vs. You pay a great deale to deare, for what's giuen freely. 'Beleeue me, I speake as my vnderstanding in- structs me, and as mine honestie puts it to vtterance. Sicilia cannot shew himselfe ouer-kind to Bohe-mia: They were trayn'd t . . .
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