Show simple item record

Kim

 
dc.contributor Oxford Text Archive
dc.contributor.author Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-14
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T10:32:28Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T10:32:28Z
dc.date.created 1901
dc.identifier ota:3124
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/3124
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/3124
dc.description.abstract Resource deposited with the Oxford Text Archive.
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.format.mimetype text/xml
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Oxford Text Archive Core Collection
dc.relation.hasversion http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/kipling/rudyard/kim/
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.title Kim
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 3432039
files.count 5
otaterms.date.range 1900-1999

This item is
Publicly Available
and licensed under:
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

 Files for this item

 Download all local files for this item (3.27 MB)

Icon
Name
3124.epub
Size
290.37 KB
Format
Unknown
Description
Version of the work for e-book readers in the EPUB format
 Download file
Icon
Name
3124.html
Size
735.79 KB
Format
HTML
Description
Version of the work for web browsers
 Download file  Preview
 File Preview  
Icon
Name
3124.mobi
Size
1.08 MB
Format
Unknown
Description
Version of the work for e-book readers in the Mobipocket format
 Download file
Icon
Name
3124.txt
Size
579.78 KB
Format
Text file
Description
Version of the work in plain text with all tags and formatting information removed
 Download file  Preview
 File Preview  
Chapter 1 O ye who tread the Narrow Way By Tophet-flare to judgment Day, Be gentle when ‘the heathen’ pray To Buddha at Kamakura! Buddha at Kamakura. He sat, in defiance of municipal orders, astride the gun Zam Zammah on her brick platform opposite the old Ajaib–Gher — the Wonder House, as the natives call the Lahore Museum. Who hold Zam–Zammah, that ‘fire-breathing dragon’, hold the Punjab, for the great green-bronze piece is always first of the conqueror’s loot. There was some justification for Kim — he had kicked Lala Dinanath’s boy off the trunnions — since the English held the Punjab and Kim was English. Though he was burned black as any native; though he spoke the vernacular by preference, and his mother-tongue in a clipped uncertain sing-song; though he consorted on terms of perfect equality with the small boys of the bazar; Kim was white — a poor white of the very poorest. The half-caste woman who looked after him (she smoked opium, and pretended to keep a second-hand furniture . . .
Icon
Name
3124.xml
Size
636.04 KB
Format
XML
Description
Version of the work in the original source TEI XML file
 Download file

Show simple item record