This item is
Publicly Available
and licensed under:
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

 Files for this item

 Download all local files for this item (41.11 KB)

Icon
Name
header2061.xml
Size
5.1 KB
Format
XML
Description
METADATA
 Download file
Icon
Name
leibnez-2061.txt
Size
36 KB
Format
Text file
Description
Version of the work in plain text format
 Download file  Preview
 File Preview  
1898 THE MONADOLOGY by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz translated by Robert Latta 1. The Monad, of which we shall here speak, is nothing but a simple substance, which enters into compounds. By 'simple' is meant 'without parts.' (Theod. 10.) 2. And there must be simple substances, since there are compounds; for a compound is nothing but a collection or aggregatum of simple things. 3. Now where there are no parts, there can be neither extension nor form [figure] nor divisibility. These Monads are the real atoms of nature and, in a word, the elements of things. 4. No dissolution of these elements need be feared, and there is no conceivable way in which a simple substance can be destroyed by natural means. (Theod. 89.) 5. For the same reason there is no conceivable way in which a simple substance can come into being by natural means, since it cannot be formed by . . .