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[Lectures on jurisprudence]

 
dc.contributor Greenstein, Dan
dc.contributor.author Smith, Adam, 1723-1790
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-27
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T10:01:47Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T10:01:47Z
dc.date.created 1766
dc.date.issued 1994-01-28
dc.identifier ota:2034
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/2034
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/2034
dc.format.extent Text data (1 file : ca. 1.43 MB)
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Oxford Text Archive Core Collection
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.subject.lcsh Addresses -- Great Britain -- 18th century
dc.subject.lcsh Lectures -- Great Britain -- 18th century
dc.title [Lectures on jurisprudence]
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 1504778
files.count 2
identifier.ee Smith, Adam, 1723-1790 http://dx.doi.org/10.13051/ee:bio/smithadam0003178
identifier.lccn Smith, Adam, 1723-1790 http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80032761
otaterms.date.range 1700-1799

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| Friday Decr. 24. 1762 i.I Of Jurisprudence. Jurisprudence is the theory of the rules by which civil governments ought to be directed. It attempts to shew the foundation of the different systems of government in different countries and to shew how far they are founded in reason. We will find that there are four things which will be the design of every government: 1 The first and chief design of every system of government is to maintain justice; to prevent the members of a society from incroaching on one anothers property, or siezing what is not their own. The design here is to give each one the secure and peacable possession of his own property. (The end proposed by justice is the maintaining men in what are called their perfect rights.) When this end, which we may call the internall peace, or 2 peace within doors, is | secured, the government will next be desirous of promoting the opulence of the state. This produces what we call police. Whatever regulations are made with re . . .
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