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Moby Dick by Herman Melville (1819-1891) Born in New York City, the son of New England merchant. He worked at odd jobs (clerk, garmhand, teacher) before sailing to the South Seas on the whaler i{Acushnet}. He deserted his ship, lived among cannibals, mutinied on an Australian boat, then spent two years on an American boat returning to the U.S. He successfully romanticized these adventures, publishing seven novels in six years, including i{Moby Dick} (1851), one of the masterworks of American fiction. His popularity waned, and by the time he died he was virtually forgotten. i{Billy Budd} was his last great novel. As his writing declined, Melville sailed again, around Cape Horn to San Francisco on a clipper ship commanded by his brother. File: Contents: moby.0 Preliminary Matter. \ This text of Melville's Moby-Dick is based on moby.1 LOOMINGS\ Call me Ishmael. Some years ago--never mind how moby.2 THE CARPET-BAG\ I stuffed a shirt or two into my old m . . .
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.. < chapter lxvi 2 THE SHARK MASSACRE > When in the Southern Fishery, a captured Sperm Whale, after long and weary toil, is brought alongside late at night, it is not, as a general thing at least, customary to proceed at once to the business of cutting him in. For that business is an exceedingly laborious one; is not very soon completed; and requires all hands to set about it. Therefore, the common usage is to take in all sail; lash the helm a'lee; and then send every one below to his hammock till daylight, with the reservation that, until that time, anchor-watches shall be kept; that is, two and two for an hour, each couple, the crew in rotation shall mount the deck to see that all goes well. But sometimes, especially upon the Line in the Pacific, this plan will not answer at all; because such incalculable hosts of sharks gather round the moored carcase, that were he left so for six hours, say, on a stretch, little more than the skeleton would be visible by morning. In mos . . .