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Poems, 1633 / compiled by Lou Burnard

 
dc.contributor Burnard, Lou Computing Service, University of Oxford
dc.contributor.author Donne, John, 1572-1631
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-27
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T09:49:37Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T09:49:37Z
dc.date.created 1633
dc.date.issued 1987-03-11
dc.identifier ota:1052
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/1052
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/1052
dc.description.abstract In English Title from title page of source text Scolar Press facsimile
dc.format.extent Text data less than 512 KB Contains markup characters
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Oxford Text Archive Core Collection
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.subject.lcsh Poems -- England -- 17th century
dc.subject.other Poems
dc.title Poems, 1633 / compiled by Lou Burnard
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 899504
files.count 3
otaterms.date.range 1600-1699

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} `DRAFT � } <A Donne> <H THE PROGRESSE OF THE SOULE> <P 1> <H FIRST SONG> <S I> I Sing the progresse of a deathlesse soule, Whom Fate, which God made, but doth not controule, Plac'd in most shapes; all times before the law Yoak'd us, and when, and since, in this I sing. And the great world to his aged evening; From infant morne, through manly noone I draw. What the gold Chaldee, or silver Persian saw, Greeke brass, or Roman iron, is in this one; A worke t'outweare {Seths} pillars, bricke and stone, And (holy writs excepted) made to yeeld to none. <P 2> <S II> Thee, eye of heaven, this great Soule envies not, By thy male force, is all wee have, begot, In the first East, thou now begins to shine, Suck'st early balme, and Iland spices there, And wilt anon in thy loose-rein'd careere At Tagus, Po, Sene, Thames, and Danon dine. And see at night thy Westerne land of Myne, . . .
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<H THE PROGRESSE OF THE SOULE> <P 1> <H FIRST SONG> <S I> I Sing the progresse of a deathlesse soule, Whom Fate, with God made, but doth not controule, Plac'd in most shapes; all times before the law Yoak'd us, and when, and since, in this I sing. <H THE PROGRESSE OF THE SOULE> <P 1> <H FIRST SONG> <S I> I Sing the progresse of a deathlesse soule, Whom Fate, with God made, but doth not controule, Plac'd in most shapes; all times before the law Yoak'd us, and when, and since, in this I sing. And the great world to his aged evening; From infant morne, through manly noone I draw. What the gold Chaldee, of silver Persian saw, Greeke brass, or Roman iron, is in this one; A worke t'out weare {Seths} pillars, bricke and stone, And (holy writs excepted) made to yeeld to none, ---------------------------------------------------------- <P 2> <S II> Thee, eye of heaven, this great Soule envies not, By thy male sorce, is all wee have, begot, In the first East, thou now begin . . .
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