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In-1 Introduction The elements of perception may be identified by their simplicity. They are simple in the sense that they cannot be in any way transformed; they are proper elements because they genuinely provide the foundations of empirical claims. The development of the analysis of perception leads to the recognition first of unbridgeable differences in sensory experience, and thence to the limits which sense imposes on theory. Subsequently some contemporary puzzles are recast in a less misleading or more promising form and solutions are proposed. It is possible to identify sensory information about the world and so distinguish this information from any theories in which it may figure. A clear division can be drawn between observation statements which are comparatively complex assertions about what is perceived or what, in principle, could be perceived, and the literally sensed information which at the prese . . .