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Tess of the D"Urbervilles : an authoritative text / by Thomas Hardy

 
dc.contributor Preston, Michael James Department of English University of Colorado Boulder
dc.contributor.author Hardy, Thomas, 1840-1928
dc.coverage.placeName New York
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-27
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T10:58:44Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T10:58:44Z
dc.date.created 1892
dc.date.issued 1984-01-01
dc.identifier ota:0068
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/0068
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/0068
dc.description.abstract 1965, 1975 Norton editions also noted in texts and headers [OTAs 0068,1581]
dc.format.extent Text data (4 files : ca. 242, 242, 241, 172 KB)
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Legacy Collection Digital Museum
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.subject.lcsh English fiction -- 19th century
dc.subject.other Novels
dc.title Tess of the D"Urbervilles : an authoritative text / by Thomas Hardy
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 920750
files.count 5
otaterms.date.range 1800-1899

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\LTess 1t|T\B\B5 \C Thomas Hardy, \rTess of the d'Urbervilles\i, ed. Scott Elledge, second edition (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1979) \C Phase one, chapter one. \N0 Phase the First-+-The Maiden \LTess 1.1|T\B\B5 \C Phase one, chapter one. \N1 On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite worn away at its brim where his thumb came in taking it off. Presently he was met by an elderly parson astride on a gray mare, who, as he rode, hummed a wandering tune. \STess 1.1|T\B\B5 \N12 \`Good night t'ee,\' said the ma . . .
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quite agree to it. Do ye know that riddle about the nott cows, Jonathan? Why do nott cows give less milk in a year than horned?\' \STess 3.17|T\B92 \N43 \`I don't!\' interposed the milkmaid. \`Why do they?\' \PTess 3.17|T\B93 \N1 \STess 3.17|T\B93 \N1 \`Because there bain't so many of 'em,\' said the dairyman. \`Howsomever, these gam'sters do certainly keep back their milk to-day. Folks, we must lift up a stave or two-+-that's the only cure for't.\' \STess 3.17|T\B93 \N5 Songs were often resorted to in dairies hereabout as an enticement to the cows when they showed signs of withholding their usual yield; and the band of milkers at this request burst into melody-+-in purely business-like tones, it is true, and with no great spontaneity; the result, according to their own belief, being a decided improvement during the song's continuance. When they had gone through fourteen or fifteen verses of a cheerful ballad about a murderer who was afraid to go to bed in the dark because he saw certa . . .
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\N16 The cock crew again. \STess 4.33|T182 \N17 \`Hoosh! Just you be off, sir, or I'll twist your neck!\' said the dairyman with some irritation, turning to the bird and driving him away. And to his wife as they went indoors: \`Now, to think o' that just to-day! I've not heard his crow of an afternoon all the year afore.\' \STess 4.33|T182 \N21 \`It only means a change in the weather,\' said she; \`not what you think: 'tis impossible!\' \LTess 4.34|T182 \C Phase four, chapter thirtyfour. \N23 They drove by the level road along the valley to a distance of a few miles, and, reaching Wellbridge, turned away from the village to the left, and over the great Elizabethan bridge which gives the place half its name. Immediately behind it stood the house wherein they had engaged lodgings, whose exterior features are so well known to all travellers through the Froom Valley; once portion of a fine manorial residence, and the property and seat of a d'Urberville, but since its partial demolition a f . . .
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"[servants of corruption"] who, "[after they have escaped the pollutions of the world, are again entangled therein and overcome"]-+-whose latter end is worse than their beginning?\' He laid his hand on her shoulder. \`Tess, my girl, I was on the way to, at least, social salvation till I saw you again!\' he said freakishly shaking her as if she were a child. \`And why then have you tempted me? I was firm as a man could be till I saw those eyes and that mouth again-+-surely there never was such a maddening mouth since Eve's!\' His voice sank, and a hot archness shot from his own black eyes. \`You temptress, Tess; you dear damned witch of Babylon-+-I could not resist you as soon as I met you again!\' \STess 6.46|T268 \N19 \`I couldn't help your seeing me again!\' said Tess, recoiling. \STess 6.46|T268 \N20 \`I know it-+-I repeat that I do not blame you. But the fact remains. When I saw you ill-used on the farm that day I was nearly mad to think that I had no legal right to protect you-+-t . . .

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