Show simple item record

Pride and prejudice

 
dc.contributor.author Austen, Jane, 1775-1817
dc.coverage.placeName Oxford
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-27
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-04T10:58:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-04T10:58:13Z
dc.date.created 1813
dc.identifier ota:0016
dc.identifier.citation http://purl.ox.ac.uk/ota/0016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12024/0016
dc.description.abstract Resource deposited with the Oxford Text Archive.
dc.format.extent Text data 687 KB
dc.format.medium Digital bitstream
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Oxford
dc.relation.ispartof Legacy Collection Digital Museum
dc.rights Distributed by the University of Oxford under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.rights.label PUB
dc.subject.lcsh Fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century
dc.title Pride and prejudice
dc.type Text
has.files yes
branding Oxford Text Archive
files.size 690460
files.count 2
otaterms.date.range 1800-1899

This item is
Publicly Available
and licensed under:
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

 Files for this item

 Download all local files for this item (674.28 KB)

Icon
Name
header0016.xml
Size
3.83 KB
Format
XML
Description
METADATA
 Download file
Icon
Name
pride-0016.txt
Size
670.45 KB
Format
Text file
Description
Version of the work in plain text format
 Download file  Preview
 File Preview  
<T PRIDE AND PREJUDICE><V I><C I> IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man nay be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so ell fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of heir daughters. "My dear Mr. Bennet,' said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?' Mr. Bennet replied that he had not. "But it is," returned she; "for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.' Mr. Bennet made no answer. "Do not you want to know who has taken it?' cried his wife impatiently. " You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.' This was invitation enough. "Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a . . .

Show simple item record