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LETTER TO His EXCELLENCY Governour WRIGHT, Giving an Account Of the Steps taken relative to The CONVERTING THE GEORGIA ORPHAN-HOUSE INTO A COLLEGE.

Together with The LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE that Passed upon that Subject, Between his GRACE the ARCHBISHOP of CANTERBURY and the Reverend Mr. WHITEFIELD.

By G. WHITEFIELD, A. M. Late of Pembroke College, Oxford, and Chaplain to the Countess of Huntingdon.

Provide Things honest in the Sight of all Men. Rom. xii. 14.

LONDON, Printed: CHARLESTOWN, Re-printed and Sold by ROBERT WELLS, at the Old Printing House, Great Stationary and Book Shop.

MDCCLXVIII.

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A LETTER TO His Excellency Governour WRIGHT, &c.

Honoured Sir,

AS your Excellency, together with the members of his Majesty's honourable council, and house of representatives, were pleased at my late visit to the Orphan-house, not only highly to approve of, but also deeply to interest yourselves in, the design of converting the present Georgia Orphan-house into a college; so I am persuaded, you make no doubt, but that ever since my arrival in England, in July 1765, I have exerted my utmost efforts in endeavouring to bring this important affair to a desirable issue. To [Page 4] mention all the various circumstances which have occur­red during that interval, to impede and retard its more speedy prosecution, would be tedious and unnecessary: I would therefore only inform your Excellency, that about fifteen months ago, a memorial was delivered into the hands of the late clerk of his Majesty's most honour­able privy council. That this memorial was by him transmitted to the Lord President, and by his Lordship referred to the consideration of his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury; that by his Grace's permission a literary correspondence ensued; but as that correspondence, and with that, the negotiation itself seems at an end, I think it my duty, not only to lay an account of the whole before your Excellency in particular; but, through your Excellency's hands; before his Majesty's council and house of representatives of the colony of Georgia, toge­ther with all the other American Colonists, and the pub­lick in general, on both sides the water, who have so liberally contributed to the promoting this design.

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TO The KING's most Excellent MAJESTY, THE MEMORIAL of George Whitefield, Clerk,

Sheweth,

THAT about twenty-six years ago, your memoria­list, assisted by the voluntary contributions of charitable and well disposed persons, at a very great ex­pence, and under many disadvantages, did erect a very commodious house with necessary out-buildings, suita­ble for the reception of orphans and other poor and de­serted children; and that with the repair of the build­ings, purchase of negroes, and supporting a large orphan family so many years, he hath expended upwards of twelve thousand pounds sterling, as appears by the ac­counts, which from time to time have been audited by the magistrates of Savannah, and which are humbly presented with this memorial.

That your Memorialist, since the commencement of this institution, hath had the satisfaction of finding, that by the money expended thereon, not only many poor families were assisted and thereby kept from leaving the colony in its infant state; but also that a considerable number of poor helpless children have been trained up, who have been, and are now useful settlers in that and the other neighbouring provinces; that in order to ren­der the institution aforesaid more extensively useful, your Memorialist, as he perceived the colony gradually rising, [Page 6] hath for some years past designed, within himself, to improve the original plan, by making further provision for the education of persons of superiour rank, who thereby may be qualified to serve their king, their coun­try, and their God, either in church or state.

That in his late visit to Georgia, he did with inex­pressible pleasure see the province in a very flourishing state; but with concern perceived that several gentle­men had been obliged to send their sons to the Northern Provinces, who would much rather have had them edu­cated nearer home; and thereby prevent their affections being alienated from their native country, and also con­siderable sums of money from being carried out of Georgia into other provinces.

Your Memorialist begs leave further to observe, that there is no Seminary for Academical Studies as yet founded southward of Virginia; and consequently if a college could be established (especially as the addition of the two Floridas renders Georgia more centrical for the southern district) it would not only be highly serviceable to the rising generation of the colony of Georgia, but would probably occasion many youths to be sent from the neighbouring southern provinces for education. The many advantages accruing to Georgia thereby must ne­cessarily be very considerable.

That in consideration of the foregoing premises, your Memorialist in December 1764, presented a memorial to his excellency the Governour and the honourable the council of the province of Georgia, praying that two thousand acres of land might be granted in trust towards carrying on the de [...]rable end of founding a college; which motion was not only immediately complied with, but the general assembly being then sitting, an address, a copy of which is herewith also sent, was presented from them to his Excellency, expressing their unanimous and [Page 7] highest approbation, with a desire that his Excellency would use his endeavours to have this affair forwarded at home with all possible expedition. That upon the arri­val of your Memorialist, he was informed that this ad­dress was remitted to, and laid before the Lords Com­missioners for trade and plantations; having received re­peated advices that numbers both in Georgia and South-Carolina are waiting with impatience to have their sons initiated in academical exercises, Your Memorialist there­fore prays that a charter upon the plan of New-Jersey College may be granted, upon which your Memorialist is ready to give up his present trust and make a free gift of all lands, negroes, goods and chattels, which he now stands possessed of in the province of Georgia, for the present founding, and towards the future support, of a college, to be called by the name of Bethesda College in the province of Georgia.

Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

I THINK myself highly honoured in the Lord Presi­dent's* referring a late memorial to your Grace's con­sideration; and as highly obliged to your Grace, for the deep attention your Grace hath given to the copy of an intended charter presented to your Grace by the Earl of Dartmouth.—The inclosed will shew what an almost im­plicite regard hath been paid to your Grace's wise re­marks and judicious corrections.—I wish it could have been altogether implicite—But circumstances are such (as hath been hinted to your Grace by Lord Dartmouth) that I cannot in honour and conscience oblige the master [Page 8] of the Georgia College to be a member or minister of the church of England. Such an obligation, I am persuad­ed, hath greatly retarded the progress of the college of New-York; as on the contrary, the letter signed by your Grace, Proprietor Penn, and the late Dr. Chandler, en­gaging, that that institution shall be continued on a BROAD BOTTOM, hath as much promoted the growth of the college of Philadelphia.—The trustees of that semi­nary (as your Grace is pleased to observe) have agreed, "That their provost shall always be a minister of the esta­blished church."—But then I would beg leave to reply, that they are not thereto enjoined by their charter. That is entirely silent concerning this matter—Their agree­ment is purely voluntary.—The wardens of the college of Georgia will not be prohibited by charter from fol­lowing the example of the trustees of the college of Phi­ladelphia—It is more than probable they will never need it. The first master will assuredly be a clergyman of the church of England.—By far the majority of the intend­ed wardens are, and always will be, members of that communion; and consequently the choice of a master will always continue to run in that channel—My heart's desire is, that some worthy duly qualified minister of the church of England may be always and readily found for that grand purpose. But lest this should not always be the case, I dare not, as persons of all denominations have been contributors, confine or fetter the future electors. The monies gained by the New-York lotteries, for the erecting a college in New-York; were thrown in by per­sons of all religious perswasions, in confidence, that the college would hereafter be founded on an enlarged basis. And therefore, very great numbers, may it please your Grace, think, and forever will think, themselves injured by its being confined within its present contracted bound­ary. Hence it is, that many fine promising youths are [Page 9] almost daily sent from the college in their native city to that of New-Jersey—I dread giving the same occasion of resentment and offence—And therefore am determined to avoid it in the wording of the Georgia College charter—For the same reasons I dare not enjoin the daily use of our church liturgy. I love to use it, I have fallen a martyr, in respect to bodily health, to the frequent read­ing it in Tottenham-Court chapel; and it has been con­stantly read twice every sunday in the Orphan-house, from its first institution to this very day—The wardens, when the power is devolved on them, may determine this point as they please—But I cannot enjoin it by charter—And have therefore, in this present draught, not only omitted the paragraph concerning publick prayer, but also that concerning doctrinal articles. Perhaps your Grace may judge, that all things considered, saying no­thing about either, may be a proper medium—Your Grace further wisely observes, That his Majesty should be very well advised whom he names for the first ma­ster.—I trust he will. I believe the Right Honour­able the Earl of Dartmouth will vouchsafe to interest himself in the choice, and likewise be so good as to pre­sent the first master to your Grace's approbation—The terms of the charter being not as yet settled, the choice of a master cannot as yet be fixed upon. When the for­mer are ascertained, the latter may more easily be ap­plied for—In the mean while your Grace may be assured that the lot will not fall upon me. Alas! my shoulders are too weak for the support of such an academical bur­den: my capacity, may it please your Grace, is by no means extensive enough for such a scholastick trust—To be a presbyter at large, is the station which, I think, di­vine providence hath called me to for near these thirty years last past—During that space, I trust my eye hath been in some degree single, and my views disinterested: [Page 10] and my highest, my only ambition, during the feeble re­mains of my future pilgrimage, I trust will be this, viz. That the last glimmerings of an expiring taper may be blessed, and owned by the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls, to guide some wandering sinners to the practical knowledge of himself. I desire to bless his name, that I have been spared long enough to see the colony of the once despised Georgia, and the yet more despised Orphan-house, advanced to such a promising height. My ho­noured friend, and father, good Bishop Benson, from his dying bed, sent me a benefaction for it of ten guineas, and poured forth his most fervent dying breathings for its future prosperity.—That your Grace may yet live many years, to be happily instrumental in promoting its welfare, both spiritual and temporal, when turned into a college, is the earnest prayer of

May it please your Grace,
your Grace's most dutiful, obliged Son and Servant, G. WHITEFIELD.

The Archbishop to Mr. Whitefield.

To the Reverend Mr. Whitefield.

THE Archbishop of Canterbury hath put Mr. White field's draught of a charter for a college in Georgi [...] into the hands of the Lord President, who hath promise [...] to consider it; but desires to know from Mr. Whitefield, what present endowment, and to what value, h [...] proposes for his college.

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Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it Please you Grace,

MY obligations are much increased by your Grace's putting the last draught of the Georgia College so speedily into the hands of the Lord President.—As by this, (I presume) it hath been honoured by your Grace's, so I make no manner of doubt, but it will also meet with his Lordship's approbation. In obedience to your Grace's desire, I herewith send your Grace an account of what present endowment, "and to what value, I propose for the intended College."—Upon a moderate computation, may it please your Grace, I believe its present annual in­come is between four and five hundred pounds sterling. The house is surrounded with eighteen hundred acres of land; a plan of which, and likewise of the house itself, I herein inclose, and humbly present for your Grace's pe­rusal. The number of negroes, young and old, employed on various parts of these lands, in sawing timber, raising rice for exportation, and corn, with all other kinds of pro­vision for the family, is about thirty.—Besides these, the College will be immediately possessed of two thousand acres of land near Alatamaha, which were granted me by the Governour and Council when I was last at Georgia, and a thousand acres more, left, as I am informed, by the late Reverend and worthy Mr. Zouber [...]uhler.—So that, by laying out only a thousand pounds in purchasing an additional number of negroes, and allowing another thousand fot repairing the house, and building the two intended wings, the present annual income may very easily and speedily be augmented to a thousand pounds per annum. Out of this standing fund may be paid the salaries of the master, professors, tutors, &c. and also s [...]a [...]l ex­hibitions [Page 12] be allowed for some orphan or other poor students, who may have their tutorage and room-rent gratis, and act as servitors to those who enter commoners. What these salaries and exhibitions ought to be, may at a proper season be submitted to your Grace's future con­sideration.—At present I would only further propose, that the negro children belonging to the College shall be instructed, in their intervals of labour, by one of the poorer students, as is done now by one of the scholars in the present Orphan-house. And I do not see why an ad­ditional provision may not likewise be made for educating and maintaining a number of Indian children, which, I imagine, may easily be procured from the Creeks, Choc­taws, Cherokees, and the other neighbouring nations. Hence the whole will be a free gift to the colony of Georgia—a complex extensive charity be established; and, at the same time, not a single person obliged, by any publick act of assembly, to pay an involuntary forced tax towards the support of a seminary from which many of the more distant and poorer Colonists children cannot possibly receive any immediate advantage, and yet the whole colony, by the christian and liberal education of a great number of its individuals, be universally benefited. Thus have I most readily, and I humbly hope, gratefully complied with your Grace's desire, which to me is as a command. I am constrained to trespass on your Grace's patience, whilst I congratulate your Grace on the good­ness of God, who, amongst many other signal marks of his peculiar providence, hath honoured your Grace, in making you an happy instrument of establishing two Northern American Colleges, the one at New-York, and the other at Philadelphia: And if (as I pray may be the case) your Grace should yet be made further instrumen­tal in establishing a third College in the yet more Southern distant, but now flourishing, Colony of Georgia, I trust [Page 13] it will be an additional gem in the crown, which I ear­nestly pray that God, the righteous Judge, may give your Grace in that day.—In his great name, I beg leave to subscribe myself,

may it please your Grace,
your Grace's most dutiful, obliged Son and Servant, G. W.

Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

AS I am going out of town for a few weeks, I beg leave humbly to enquire, whether my Lord Pre­sident hath considered the draught of the charter sent him by your Grace some weeks ago. The Governour, Coun­cil, Assembly, and other inhabitants of Georgia, wait with impatience to have this affair brought to a desired issue; and therefore I humbly hope your Grace will ex­cuse the freedom of the request now made by,

may it please your Grace,
your Grace's most dutiful obliged Son and Servant, G. W.
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The Archbishop to Mr. Whitefield.

To the Reverend Mr. Whitefield,

THE Archbishop of Canterbury sends Mr. White­field the inclosed letter from the Lord President, which he received this day, and which he desires may be returned to him.

Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

BY a series of unaccountable incidents and mistakes, your Grace's Letter, with that of the Lord Presi­dent, did not reach me till this afternoon.—I have made bold to copy the letter; and in obedience to your Grace's command, herewith return the original.—Its contents shall be immediately and duly considered, and an answer very speedily remitted to your Grace.—In the mean time, with most humble thanks for the zeal and punctuality shewn by your Grace in the prosecution of this important affair, and earnestly begging an inte­rest in your Grace's prayers, that I may be kept from erring on the right hand, or the left, in this final dis­charge of my publick trust, I beg leave to subscribe myself,

may it please your Grace,
your Grace's most obedient and dutiful Son and Servant, G. W.
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Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

AFTER earnest application to the Father of mercies for directions, I have endeavoured, as in his pre­sence, duly to consider and weigh the contents of the Lord President's letter, which your Grace was so condescend­ing as to transmit for my perusal. His lordship therein is pleased to inform your Grace, That he observes, that the second draught of Mr. Whitefield's charter differs from that of New-York, in not requiring the head of the College to be a member of the church of England, which his Lordship thinks so material a qualification, that for one, he should not be for dispensing with it. And his Lordship is also of opinion, that the publick prayers should not be extempore ones, but the liturgy of the church, or some part thereof, or some other set­tled and established form. Thus far his Lordship. And as I profess myself to be a presby [...]er of the same communion with his Lordship, I cannot but applaud his Lordship's zeal for, and watchfulness over, the honour of the established church—But if his Lordship would be so good as to take a particular view of the point of light in which I stand, I cannot help flattering myself that his Lordship will be so far from thinking, that being a mem­ber of the church of England is a qualification not to be dispensed with in the head of the intended College, that, on the contrary, it ought not so much as to be mentioned, or insisted upon, in the charter at all—For, not to trou­ble your Grace with a repetition of the reasons urged a­gainst such a restraining clause, in my letter of June 17th, I would beg leave further to observe to your Grace, that [Page 16] by far the greatest part of the Orphan-house collections and contributions came from dissenters, not only in New-England, New-York, Pennsylvania, South-Carolina, and Scot [...]and, but in all probability here in England also.—Most of these places I have visited since the several audits of the Orphan hou [...]e accounts, together with the design of turning it into a College, and likewise the address of the council and assembly of the province of Georgia, with his Excellency Governour Wright's answer, highly approving and recommending the design, have been pub­lished.—Being frequently asked "Upon what bottom the intended College was to be founded," I not only most readily and repeatedly answered, Undoubtedly upon a broad bottom, but likewise, in most of the above-men­tioned places, have solemnly declared from the pulpit, that it should be upon a Broad Bottom, and no other.—This, I judged, I was sufficiently warranted to do, from the known long established mild and uncoercive genius of the English government—From your Grace's mode­ration towards protestant dissenters—From the uncon­querable attachment of the Americans to toleration prin­ciples, as well as from the avowed habitual feelings and sentiments of my own heart. This being the case, may it please your Grace, I would humbly appeal to his Lord­ship, whether I can answer it to my God, my conscience, my King, my country, my constituents, and Orphan-house benefactors and contributors, both at home and abroad, to betray my trust, forfeit my word, act contrary to my own convictions, and greatly retard and prejudice the growth and progress of the intended institution, by narrowing its foundation, and thereby letting it fall upon such a bottom, as I am persuaded will give a general disgust, and most justly open the mouths of persons of all denominations against me.—This, as I acquainted your Grace, in the same letter referred to above, is what I dare [Page 17] not do—And therefore, as your Grace by your silence seems to be like minded with the Lord President, and as your Grace's and his Lordship's influence will undoubt­edly extend itself to others of his Majesty's most honour­able privy council, I would beg leave, after returning all due acknowledgments, to inform your Grace, that I in­tend troubling your Grace or his Lordship no more about this so long depending concern—As it hath pleased the great head of the church in some degree to renew my bodily strength, I purpose now to renew my feeble ef­forts, and turn the charity into a more generous, and consequently into a more extensively useful channel.—If I know any thing of my own heart, I have no ambition to be looked upon at present, or remembered for the future, as a founder of a College—But I would fain, may it please your Grace, act the part of an honest man, a disinterested minister of Jesus Christ, and a truly catho­lick moderate presbyter of the church of England—In this way, and in this only, can I hope for a continued heart-felt enjoyment of that peace of God, which passeth all understanding, whilst here on earth, and be thereby prepared to stand with humble boldness before the awful, impartial tribunal of the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls in heaven.—That your Grace may shine as a star of the first magnitude in that day, is the sincere prayer of,

may it please your Grace,
your Grace's most dutiful obliged Son and Servant, G. W.
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Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

THE bearer is my humble friend; one who hath been with me several years, and been my compa­nion in travel through the continent of America. If your Grace would be so good as to send by him the plans and papers relating to the Orphan-house, it would much oblige,

may it please your Grace,
your Grace's most dutiful, humble Servant, G. W.

P. S. I know not whether your Grace or the Lord President hath the copy of the New-Jersey college charter. I gave it to Mr. Secretary Sharp, in order that your Grace and his Lordship might see it. Mr. Sharp being dead, obliges me to trouble your Grace with this particular: I should not otherwise have taken the free­dom.

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Mr. Whitefield to the Archbishop.

May it please your Grace,

AS not only the Governour, Council and Assembly of Georgia, have been for a long season, and are now waiting for an account of what hath been done in respect to the affair of the intended Bethesda college, I find myself under a necessity of giving them and the contributors, on this, as well as the other side, of the water, a plain narration of the steps I have been taking; and at the same time I intend to lay before the publick a draught of the future plan, which, God willing, I am now determined to prosecute. And as the letters which I have had the honour of writing to your Grace, contain most of what I have to say on this subject, I suppose your Grace can have no objection against my publishing those letters, together with the answers returned, and the issue of the correspondence.—To prevent your Grace's having further trouble, as I hear your Grace is at present much indisposed, I shall look upon silence as an approbation, at least as a tacit allowance of what is designed by,

may it please your Grace,
Your Grace's most dutiful, Son and Servant, in the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, G. W.
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THUS, may it please your Excellency, concluded my correspondence with his Grace, and I humbly hope, the province of Georgia, in the end, will be no loser by this negociation.—For, God willing, I now purpose to super­add a publick academy to the Orphan house, as the Col­lege* of Philadelphia was constituted a publick acade­my, as well as charitable school, for some time before its present College charter was granted by the honourable proprietors of Pennsylvania in the year 1755.

In pursuing a like plan, the present Georgia Orphan-house estate, which for near these three years hath been in a state of suspence, may be vigorously and properly im­proved, and thereby an ample and lasting provision made for the future maintenance and education of many poor indigent orphans, as well as more opulent students.—Proper masters likewise may now be sent over to instruct and prepare for academical honours the many youths who are at this time, both in Georgia and the adjacent provin­ces, waiting for admission. In the interim, a proper trust may be formed to act after my decease, or even before, with this proviso, that no opportunity shall be omitted of making fresh application for a College charter, upon a broad bottom, whenever those in power shall think it for the glory of God and the interest of their King and country ro grant the same.—And thus, may it please your Excellency, my beloved Bethesda will not only be con­tinued as a house of mercy for poor Orphans, but be [Page 21] confirmed as a seat of nursery of sound learning and re­ligious education, I trust, to the latest posterity.—That this may be the happy case, as I am persuaded is the de­sire of your Excellency, his Majesty's Honourable Coun­cil, and House of Representatives, in the province of Georgia, so it shall still be, to my latest breath, as it hath been for many years, the earnest endeavour and inces­sant prayer of,

may it please your Excellency,
Your Excellency's, &c. G. W.
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APPENDIX.

To his Excellency JAMES WRIGHT, Esq; Captain-General and Governour in Chief of his Majesty's Province of Georgia, and to the Members of his Majesty's Council in the said Province.
The MEMORIAL of George Whitefield, Clerk,

SHEWETH,

THAT about twenty-five years ago, your Memori­alist, assisted by the voluntary contributions of charitable and well-disposed persons, at a very great ex­pence, and under many disadvantages, did erect a com­modious house, with necessary out-buildings, suitable for the reception of orphans, and other poor and deserted children; and that with the repair of the buildings, pur­chase of negroes, and supporting a large ophan family for so many years, he hath expended upwards of twelve thousand pounds sterling, as appears by the accounts, [Page 23] which from time to time have been audited by the ma­gistrates of Savannah.

That your Memorialist, since the commencement of this institution, hath had the satisfaction of finding that by the money expended thereon, not only many poor families were assisted, and thereby kept from leaving the colony in its infant state, but also that a considerable number of poor helpless children have been trained up; who have been, and now are useful settlers in this and the other neighbouring provinces.

That in order to render the institution aforesaid more extensively useful, your Memorialist, as he perceived the colony gradually increasing, hath for some years past designed within himself, to improve the original plan, by making further provision for the education of per­sons of superiour rank; who thereby might be qualifi­ed to serve their king, their country, or their God, ei­ther in church or state.—That he doth with inexpressi­ble pleasure see the present very flourishing state of the province; but with concern perceives that several gen­tlemen have been obliged to send their sons to the nor­thern provinces; who would much rather have had them educated nearer home, and thereby prevent their affect­ions being alienated from their native country, and also considerable sums of money from being carried out of this into other provinces.

Your Memorialist further observes, that there is no Seminary for Academical Studies as yet founded south­ward of Virginia; and consequently if a college could be established here (especially as the late addition of the two Floridas renders Georgia more centrical for the [Page 24] southern district) it would not only be highly serviceable to the rising generation of this colony, but would pro­bably occasion many youths to be sent from the British West-India Islands and other parts—The many advan­tages accruing thereby to this province must be very con­siderable.

From these considerations, your Memorialist is induced to believe, that the time is now approaching, when his long projected design for further serving this his beloved colony shall be carried into execution.

That a considerable sum of money is intended speedi­ly to be laid out in purchasing a large number of negroes for the further cultivation of the present Orphan house and other additional lands, and for the future support of a worthy able president, professors, and tutors, and other good purposes intended.

Your Memorialist therefore prays your Excellency and Honours to great to him in trust, for the purposes afore­said, two thousand acres of land, on the north fork of Turtle River, called the Lesser Swamp, if vacant, or where lands may be found vacant, south of the river Alatamaha.

GEORGE WHITEFIELD.

Immediately granted.

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The Address of both Houses of Assembly. GEORGIA.
To his Excellency JAMES WRIGHT, Esq; Cap­tain-General and Governour in Chief of his Ma­jesty's province of Georgia.

May it please your Excellency,

WE his Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the council and commons house of assembly of Georgia, in general assembly met, beg leave to acquaint your Excellency, that with the highest satisfaction we learn that the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield has applied for lands, in order to the endowment of a college in this province—The many and singular obliga [...]o [...]s Georgia has continually laid under to that Reverend Gentleman, from its very infant state, would in gratitude induce us, by every means in our power, to promote any measure he might recommend; but in the present instance, where the interest of the province, the advancement of religion, and the pleasing prospect of obtaining proper education for our youth, so clearly coincide with his views, we can­not in justice but request your Excellency to use your ut­most endeavours to promote so desireable an event, [...] to transmit home our sincere and very [...]erv [...]nt wi [...]h [...]s▪ [...]r [Page 26] the accomplishment of so useful, so beneficent, and so laudable an undertaking.

By order of the Upper House.
JAMES HABERSHAM, President,
By order of the Commons House,
ALEXANDER WYLLY, Speaker.

To which his Excellency was pleased to return the fol­lowing Answer.

Gentlemen,

I AM so perfectly sensible of the very great advantage which will result to the province in general, from the establishment of a Seminary for Learning here; that it gives me the greatest pleasure to find so laudable an un­dertaking proposed by the Rev. Mr. Whitefield; the friendly and zealous disposition of that gentleman, to promote the prosperity of this province, has been often experienced, and you may rest assured, that I shall trans­mit your address home, with my best endeavours for the success of the great point in view.

JAMES WRIGHT.
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General Account of monies expended and received for the use of the Orphan-house, in Georgia, from January 7th, 1738 [...]9, to February 9th, 1765.

Dr. Cr.
 l.s.d.    l.s.d.
1746, April 16th. To sundries expended as per audit this day5511:17:9¼.1746, April 16th. By sundry receipts per audit4982:12:8.
1752, Feb. 25th. To ditto -2026:13:7½.1752, Feb. 25th. By ditto -1386:8:7½.
1755, Feb. 19th. To ditto -1966:18:2.1755, Feb. 19th. By ditto -1289:2:3.
1765, Feb. 9th. To ditto -3349:15:10.1765, Feb. 9th. By ditto -3132:19:0¼.
 By the Rev. Mr. Whitefield's benefactions, being the s [...]me expended more than re­ceived, as appears from the several former audits, now carefully examined, viz.10,790:19:6¼.
    Folio 65 -1169:10:   
    Ditto 81 -400:5:   
    Ditto 98 -494:10:4   
        2064:5:10.
 12,855:5:4¾.    12,855:5:4¾.

Before me the Honourable Noble Jones, Esq; senior, one of the assistant justices for the province aforesaid, personally appeared the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield and Thomas Dixon of the province aforesaid who being duly sworn, declare that the accounts relating to the Orphan-house, from Fol. 82 to Fol 98 in this book amounting on the Debit [...]ile to Three thousand three hundred and forty nine pounds fifteen shillings and ten pence sterling, and on the Credit file to Three thousand one hundred and thirty two pounds sixteen shillings and one farthing▪ contain, to the best of their knowledge, a just and true account of all the monies collected by, or given to them or any other for the use or benefit of the said house; and that the disbursements amounting to the sum aforesaid have been faithfully applied to and for the use of the same.

Signed,
  • GEORGE WHITEFIELD,
  • THOS. DIXON.
Signed, N. JONES, Sealed.

Sworn this 9th day of February 1765, before me, in justification whereof I have caused the seal of the general court to be affixed.

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Before me, the Honourable Noble Jones, Esq;; senior, personally appeared Jam [...]s Edward Powell and Grey Elliott, Esqs. members of his Majesty's honourable council for the pro­vince aforesaid, who being duly sworn, declare that they have carefully examined the ac­counts containing the receipts and disbursements, for the use of the Orphan house in the said province, and that comparing them with the several vouchers, they find the same not only just and true in every respect, but kept in such a clear and regular manner, as does honour to the managers of that house; and that on a careful examination of the several former audits, It appears that the sum of two thousand and sixty-four pounds, five shillings and ten pence, has at several times been given by the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield for the use of the said house; and that in the whole the sum of twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty five pounds five shillings and four pence three farthings has been laid out for the same house since 7th January, 1738-9 to this dayAlso that it doth not appear that any charge has over [...] made by the said Rev. Mr. Whitefield, either for traveling-charges or any other expences whatever, and that no charge of salary has been made for any person whatever, employed or concerned in the management of the said house.

signed
  • JAMES-EDWARD POWELL.
  • GREY ELLIOT.
Signed, N. JONES, [...],

Sworn this 9th day of February 1765, before me, in justification whereof I have caused the [...] of the general court to be affixed.

THE END.

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