[Page]
[Page]

QUAKERISM A Judicial Infatuation. &c.

[Page]

QUAKERISM A Judicial Infatuation Represented in Three Dialogues,

Adapted to the meanest Capacities, and containing A full Reply to J. Mott's, pretended Answer to the Letter to a Parishioner, &c. and an Answer to the common Ob­jections of the Quakers against outward Ordinances: With a Detection of R. Barclays Sophistry, in proving Christ's Baptism spiritual without Water; and E. Burlings, arguments upon that head refuted.

By JAMES WETMORE, Missionary from the Hono­rable Society for Propagating the Gospel, &c. And Rec­tor of Christ Church in the Parish of Rys.

2 Pet. iii. 15.16.

Even as our beloved Brother Paul also, according to the Wisdom given unto him hath written unto you.

As also in all his Epistles speaking in them of these Things: In which are some Things hard to be understood, which they that are Unlearned and Unstable wrest, as they do also the other Scriptures, unto their own Destruction.

NEW-YORK, Printed and Sold by J. Peter Zenger, in South-Street, near the Old Slip.

[Page]

A PREFACE To the Reader

Reader;

YOU have here another Attempt to confute the great Errors of the Peo­ple called Quakers, wherein, I think, sufficient is said to make it appear to any serious and considerate Person, That that People are not led by the Spirit of Christ, because they do so plainly, and it must be added so prophanly deny the Com­mands and Ordinances of Jesus Christ.

[Page ii]I. They deny that Baptism and the Lord's Supper in the outward Elements of them, Water, Bread and Wine, are Christ's Com­mands: And yet it is here made plain and Evident from the express Words of Christ and his Apostles.

1. With Respect to Baptism, that Water and the Spirit are joyned together, and both made necessary to our Regeneration: And what Christ has joyned together, Joh. iii 5. let [...] Man presume to put assunder.

It is evident, that the Apostles understood outward Water to be commanded, by their actu­al using of it, as Peter and Phillip did, which the Quakers allow, and yet pretend it is not necessary: Do they think, that the Apostles would have used Water, if they had not thought it necessary? Would they have pre­sumed to do it, if they had not been assured it was the Mind and Will of their Master, that it should be done.

And as Christ joyned Water and the Spirit Joh. iii 5. to St. Paul joyns The Washing of [Page iii]Regeneration with The Renewing of the ho­ly Ghost, Tit. iii 5. which must mean Wash­ing with Water in Baptism, joyned with the Sanctificaticn of the Spirit; For to say that by Water and the Washing of Regeneration is meant the Spirit, and the Renewing of the holy Ghost, where the Spirit and holy Ghost are mentioned at the same Time, is to make Christ and his Apostles speak Nonsence; for it makes them say, We must be born of the Spirit, and of the Spirit: We must be renewed by the Holy Ghost, and by the holy Ghost: Which is ridiculous. The Quakers therefore are very Prophane in making Christ and his Apostles speak Nonsence, and in separating what they have joyned together, and in making that needless which Christ has made necessary, who so evidently required both Wa­ter and the Spirtt.

2. With Respect to the Lord's Supper, no­thing can he plainer, than that we are requir­ed to Eat Bread and Drink Wine, in Re­membrance of Christ's Death, litereally as well as spiritually: For the Quakers them­selves don't deny but that Christ administred [Page iv]the outward Elements: And it is clear, that be commanded expressly saying. Do this in Remembrance of me, Luk. xxii 19. Yet the Quakers reject this Command of Christ, and will not do it in Remembrance of him. They allow that St. Paul meant outward Bread and Wine, whereby we are to shew forth Christ's Death till he come, and then ridi­culously pretend he was not yet come spiritual­ly, though he had long before sent his holy Spi­rit to 'em: And on the other Hand they say, he is now long since come, though that Text evidently means his coming to Judgment, and can be meant of nothing else, since he was long before that come both personally and spiritually: Yet they, I doubt willfully, shut their Eves and say they will not shew forth the Lord's Death by that outward Ordinance.

Thus Water Baptism and the Supper of Bread and Wine are as plainly required as Words can make them; and I defy the Quakers to shew in what Words, they could have been more plainly expressed, if it had been Christ's Design to command them.

[Page vi]In short, I think it must be very plain to any unprejudiced Person, that by the same Method of Interpreting Scripture as they use against Water Baptism, and Bread and Wine, they may Interpret away all the Doctrines of Christ, and even his own Humane Nature of Flesh and Flood it self, and may say that it was all only spiritual, and there is [...]ne but a Christ with­in, and that be only died spiritually, as that Baptism and the Lord's Supper are only spiritu­al: and thus indeed George Fox, their origi­nal Teacher first taught. And then where is Christianity? It is all Delusion and nothing but parable and Allegory; but dreadfull delusions these are. Let therefore every serious Person beware of the fatal Tendency of these Doctrines that deny the literal Meaning of these plain Commands of Christ, of Water Baptism and Bread and Wine. for,

II. It is plain that since they deny these express Commands of Christ, what ever they pretend they are not led by the Spirit of Christ;for his Spirit would teach them, that they are his Laws and that they must be Obedient to them, if they would be saved: Instead of which they make a mere Mock of them.

[Page vii]Let therefore the people of God diligently read what is here offered, and take care not to be deceived by these Seducers, who would tempt them to deny their Baptism, and consequently to deny Christ by denying his sacred Laws and Institutions.

I conclude with the Last Words of St. Paul in his second Epistle, Ye therefore Beloved, seeing ye know these things, beware lest ye also being led away with the Error of the Wicked fall from your own Stedfastness: But grow in Grace and in the Knowledge of our Lord and saviour Jesus christ: to him be Glory [...] now and for ever, AMEN.

S. J
[Page]

THE AUTHOR to the Reader
particularly to those of his own Parish,

Reader.

MY solicitous Concern for the Honour of Christ's Institution, and the Safety of those Souls committed to my Charge, has indu­ced me to appear publickly, in Oppositi­on to the Attempts of those wicked Sedu­cers that labour by all possible Means to propagate their poisonous Errors, and influence Men to neglect, despise and contemn those sacred Rites of Reli­gion, that have always been treated with the greatest Re­verence and Respect by the Church of Christ, yea, by all Christians all the World over, and looked upon, not only as the Ordinances of Christ himself, but also as necessary Means of our Salvation and Happiness, and the proper Instruments of conveving to us the Grace and Comforts of God's holy Spirit; of which holy Ordinances the sacred Scriptures speak with no less Honour and Reverence:

[Page viii]And yet these in [...]uated Enthusiasts (I mean the Quakers) shew the same Zeal and E [...]rnestne [...]s in decr [...]ing these sa­cred Observations as if they were right down Idolatry, and giving Adoration to Stocks and Stones.

MY first Letter was wrote to one of my Flock, sedu­ced by them, desig [...] with all Tenderness and Compassion to represent the dangerous Sna [...]e she was drawn into; to which I received two Answers (such as they were) from the Quakers, before I put that Letter in Print. The first was from James Mott, to which I wrote a large Re­ply, and sent it in Manuscript, of which they have tak­en no Notice. But Edward Bur [...]ing sends me an Answer to the first Letter, to which also I have reply'd by Way of Apendix to my Reply to James Mott, and proposed the Printing of both together, as soon;as their Answers appeared; but instead of Printing the Answer to which I sent a Reply in Manuscript, they have hamered out a new Answer, which is the third to my first Letter, and take no Notice of that Reply This Answer of Mott now in Print, however silly and Contemptible, is migh­tily magnified among their Zealots, and by that Means [...]museth some ignorant People, which has induced me to write the following Dialogues, to give a short Representation of the Wicked Principles and Practices of the Quakers. Wherein also I have represented the Pleas for their Justification as fairly and fully, as I believe they would have done themselves; and have taken in, I think, a full reply to Mott and B [...]rling both: I don't meant [...]ery particular Paragraph, but to the Drift and Substance of their Answers. I have not so much insisted upon the Previledges and Benefits of Baptism in these D [...]s because I had considered these in my Letter, and from the [...] justly inferred, that the Qua­kers [...] Gospel than what the Apostles preached and therefore are under St, Paul's Anathema. And all [...] was necessary to establish this consequence, was to make [...] appear, That the Baptism Christ institu­ted, [Page ix] is with Water, and not what the Quakers pretend to hold to; which I think I have here done ess [...]tually

I HAVE taken no Notice of James Mott's Expositi­on of 1 Pet. iii 21. because I saw no Argument in it; but am since told, that Paragraph is reckoned by 'em the finest flower in his Book; and therefore I will offer a Word or two upon it in this Place. St. Peter says, v. 20. — Fight Souls were saved by Water. v. 21. The [...]ike Figure whereunto Baptism doth now save us. James Mott says, The Water of Noah's Flood was sent to destroy, and not to save. That it was the Ark that was saving, and the Water destroy­ing. I refer to his Book, without reciting the whole Passage, p. 11, 12. From whence I conclude he would infer, that what Noah and his Family were saved by, was no Type of Water Baptism, because the Type was not Water, but the Ark.

NOW if James had been a very little learned in the Greek, he might have found out that nothing in all that 15 vers could be pitched upon for the Type but the Wa­ter, of which Baptism is expressly called the Antitype, for in the Original it is HO ANTELUPON BAP­TISMA rendered The like Figure whereunto Baptism, &c. HO being a Relative of the Neuter, must have an Ante­cedent of the same Gender in the preceeding Verse, which can't be the Ark, for that is Feminine, but the Water only, which is Neuter. So that St Peter certain­ly meant that Water as a Type of Baptism, and not the Ark: And if he did not speak Sense, J. Mott must di­spute it with him.

BUT it is sufficient for me to observe, that the hard­er St. Peter strained himself for the Allusion, by so much the Stronger is the Argument for Water Baptism, [Page x]since Water is expressly mentioned as the Type, even at the Risque of his own Reputation, if the Quakers must stand Expositors.

AND when J. Mott in the same Paragraph expounds the Resurrection of Christ, to be a spiritual raising up of Christ in the Soul: What shall we think he designs to make of the most demonstrative Prove of our Religion [...] And he will do well to tell us. how he will allegoriz [...] the following Words. v. 22. Who is gone into Heaven, and is on the right Hand of God &c. If the Resurrection be spiritual and inward, the Ascension must be so too. The Evidences of our Religion would soon be demolished, if they were left to these ignorant Allegorizers. But in­deed they have no Occasion for such Evidences; if it will serve only to turn Men's Minds inward, to such Manifestations as may be found there, without any Thing outward: For whatever they pretend of other Teach­ers, Christ and his Apostles did not preach such Doctrine, Christ referred Men to his Works, as the fullest Proofs of his Doctrine; and the Apostles preached the Resur­rection of Christ, that God raised him up, not in their Hearts, but out of the Grave.

BUT I will now add no further upon this, but only ask J. Mott, what he imagines St. Peter would think if he was now upon Earth, to find his own plain easy Writ­ings thus wrested by the Unlearned and U [...]stable, as well as those Writings his Brother Paul writ according to the Wisdom given him (that is above others) being a very learned and polite Writer) in whose Epistles St. Pet [...] says, are some Things hard to be understood? His Schollar­ship carried him sometimes above vulgar Capacities, but little did the plain Fisherman think, his Writings should meet with the same Fate, 2 Pet. iii 16.

I SHOULD have added some things farther in the Dialogues, but found them swell to a Bulk faster than [Page xi]expected; perhaps I may find Occasion to [...]dd another Dialogue hereafter. My Aim is to discover Truth, and establish my Flock in the Faith that was once delivered to the Saints, a nd preserve them from the wicked Attempts of such Deceivers, as under a Cloak of great Sobriety and Abstractedness from the World, would draw them in­to Divisions and Parties, and an utter Contempt of what is most valuable in Christianity.

LET me earnestly desire your Prayers with mine, that the Great God of Heaven would succeed my Endeavours for this End, and effectually by his Grace preserve you from all Attempts of wicked Men to seduce you from the Simplicity of the Gospel of JESUS CHRIST.

J. W.
[Page]

QUAKERISM A Judicial Infatuation, &c.

DIALOGUE 1.
Eusebius & Tremulus

Tremulus,

WEllcome Eusebius, I am glad thou art come in, just as I have beer neading this Letter to a Parishioner, which represents the Consequences of Quakerism (as he calls it) very fatal and distructive to the Souls of Men: I would fain know of thee, whe­ther thou dost not think in thy Conscience the People called Quakers to be very good People [Page 2]notwithstanding all that is said against their Prin­ciples? —

Eusebius.

I am glad my coming is acceptible, for indeed I am come with no other Design, but to have a little Discourse with you upon the Sub­ject of Religion, for I have heard of late, you are inclining to Quakerism.

Trem.

I will not deny the Matter, but freely own my self to be, what thou callest a Quaker; but yet if thou canst convince me, 'tis my Duty to be any Thing else, I will hearken to thee.

Euseb.

I hope you are sincere in promising to hearken to Conviction, this is much better than to resolve you never will be convinced; but I conclude you speak it with a Confidence, that I never can convince you, that is, make you own your selves in an Error; this may indeed be a difficult Task, but 'tis a very easy Matter to offer you sufficient Arguments, to prove the Conse­quences of Quakerism fatal to the Souls of Men: And this in reason ought to convince you, and will do it, if you be not obstinately prejudiced or given up to judicial Infatuation.

Trem.

Thou hast Confidence, whatever I have: But why shoulst thou believe me obstinately pre­judiced? Or given up to judicial Infatuation? These are hard Words.

Euseb.

I don't say, I believe you so: I enter­tain Hopes that the Arguments I shall offer will have a proper Influence upon you: Men may be mistaken without being obstinate, or judicially [Page 3]infatuated; and there is ground to hope when this is the Case, that God will have Mercy on them, and bring out them of their Errors, as he did St. Paul. But when Wickedness, Irreligion and Prophaneness is the Prelude to Error, and a will­full Neglect and Contempt of proper Means for their Instruction and Reclaiming, is consequent upon their Wandering, we may well attribute their Continuance in Error, at least to a Spirit of Infatuation, sent by God in Judgment to punish their Wickedness and Obstinacy: And of such there is little Hopes of their being reclaimed.

Trem.

Thou canst not with any Force apply this to the People called Quakers; for they are a sober well [...]posed, good People, which I pre­sume [...]; a therefore I put this Question to the [...] first.

Euseb.

I can make you no such Concessions, their Principles and Practices are very Wicked, whatever Soberness they pretend to.

Trem.

Canst thou discern the Heart, and see that they pretend to more Soberness than they have? Is not this uncharitably censuring?

Euseb.

I don't pretend to see more than is ap­parent enough; allow them to be as remote from Intemperance, Carnality, evil Speaking, &c. as they pretend to aim at, and ten Times so far as the Generality of them are in Practice; yet there is enough appears, to denominate them very wicked.

Trem.

If sober Quakers are very wicked, what [Page 4]are prophane, swearing, drunken Church-Men? You have enough of them.

Euseb.

They are fit for Quakers of the highest Form. I have nothing to say in their Justification. Without Repentance they will go to Hell with drunken, lying, cheating, demure Quakers; and you have enough of them too: And if you pre­tend the contrary, you must tell them that know no beter, if you can find them: But this is known Matter of Fact, That the Devil's School of Debauchery, Lewdness and Impiety, furnisheth the Common Wealth of Quakers. 'Tis here their Teachers are trained up, instead of Colleges and Schools of Learning; here they procced Masters, and then are fit for Quakers of the first Rank.

Trem.

Away with this Railery; I thought you were more moderate.

Euseb.

I speak the Words of Truth in Sober­ness, and assert nothing but such plain Facts as are known to every Body, and if you desire it I will bring plentiful Proof of 'em. It is very hard Men must be called Railers, for saying of People that are openly and boldly wicked, that they are so. That the Quaker Teachers are gene­rally Men that have been excessively wicked, ir­religious, and debauched, needs no Proof but their own publick Confessions, from Time to Time. And as to others that turn Quakers and become first and foremost in the Herd, you and I can tell of our own Knowledge, so far as we are acquainted, that they are People that have lived [Page 5]without God in the World, People that never had any serious Sence of their Duty to God, or Re­gard to Religion; that never lived up to what they professed to believe; whose Irreligion and Wickedness has been the greatest Scandal, to the Religion they were rekoned of: These Things Tremulus you know as well as I, to be sorrowful Truths: And if you want more Proof, I will call them in directly.

Trem.

Thou need'st not call Evidences, I per­ceive what thou intendest, and I don't deny the Matter; many serious good People are Converts from a State of Irreligion and Wickedness; and our Teachers often tell us their Experiences, how very wicked their Hearts and Lives were, before it pleased God to pour his Spirit mightily, upon them, which led them into the Way thou call'st Quakerism.

Euseb.

This is the very Thing I said, their Lives were before a Contradiction to their Pro­fession, and they were a Scandal to the Religion they owned; Christianity would have had more Credit, if they had professed themselves Mabome­tans. And when all Methods of Conviction and Instruction proved ineffectual to reclaim them, and bring them to a Temper and Spirit becom­ing Christianity, God gave them up to a Spirit of Error and Infatuation, as a just Judgment upon them, for refusing to be reformed by the powerful Methods of his Grace; as Saint Paul speaks of some, 2 Thess. ii 11. 12. For this Cause [Page 6]God shall send them strong Delusions, to believe a Lye, that so they may all be damned who believed not the Truth, but bad Pleasure in Unrighteous­ness. We have Reason to fear, this is tne Case with many. And then their Delusions and Lies which they are left to believe, they endeavour to put off for Divine Inspirations, and that Fullness of the Spirit they talk of, is no other but such a Spirit as I have now mentioned.

Trem.

Their turning from their Vices and Wickedness, to live soberly and virtuously, and perswading others to live in the Fear of God, and to keep from such Wickedness as they once lived in, shews that they are true Converts, and not the Servants of the Devil, as thou woulst insnu­ate.

Euseb.

If they turned from Sin to God, that is to the Practice of true Religion and Godliness, and perswaded others to do so, it would be well: But their Conversion is from Bad to Worse, and their Repentance it self needs to be repented of; and all tne Virtue they practice, and would per­swade others to, is cons;istent enough with a State of Sin and Servitude to the Devil, whose Interest they more effectually promote now they are Qua­kers than when they were Debauchees.

Trem.

If thou canst convince me of this, I will look out for a better Religion; but it seems to me, the Grand Promoter of Wickedness has a hopeful Crew of Servants, if the Quakers are his, who shew so much Zeal against Vanity and all sorts of Immorality.

Euseb.
[Page 7]

By the help of Gods Grace I will En­deavour to Convince you, and hope I shall see you settled in a better Religion; for I assure you Quakerism is a bad one.

Trem.

It is bad indeed, if all their Zeal pro­ceed from a Spirit of Error and Infatuation, and while they think they are doing God good Ser­vice, they are effectully promoting the Devil's in­terest. Truly thou semest to be a High-Flyer.

Euseb.

Be not angry, but have a little Pati­ence and I will prove all I have said, I hope to your Satisfaction: I have no Manner of ill Design in what I have said, I tell you what I verily believe, and what I think I have good Reason to believe, and the Matter is of too great Conse­quence to trifie with; it is no Kindness to flatter Men in their Errors, and to hold ones Peace when the Salvation of many Souls is at Stake. My Aim is to fly as high as Heaven and if you will go with me. Truth and Charity must assist our Flight.

Trem.

I am for Truth and Charity? and if the Quakers are so wicked as thou representest them, it will truly be Charitable in thee, to Undeceive so many good honest People, as are in danger of being led away by 'em; but I am very confident thou wilt not be able to make out what thou hast offered; and thy Condemnation will be the grea­ter, for being so Uncharitable towards those good People of God.

Euseb.

They are neither good, nor God's People in any other sense, than as all Creatures bad [Page 8] and good are his. Nor do I think there is any great Danger of good honest People's being led a­way by 'em; those that are good and honest have the Security of God's Providence and Grace, and are so far under the Guidance and Influence of his holy Spirit dwelling in them, as to be secure from the Danger of Infection, by such extravagant, wild and wicked Principles and Practices as the Quaker's be, God never withdraws his Grace and the Influences of his Spirit, from those that by Baptism have been consigned to the Indwelling and Comforts thereof, till by often grieving his holy Spirit, and quenching his kindly Motions. by neglecting to walk worthy of their high and holy Calling, they provoke his Displeasure against them: And such Men can't be called good honest People, though they may be neither Drunkards nor Fornicators.

Trem.

Dost thou think then, that none that are good honest People turn Quakers.

Euseb,

None indeed; if you know of any, Pray name them, and I will alter my Thought upon this Head.

Trem.

I never was sensible, but that all my Neighbours reckoned me a good honest Man, before I turned Quaker; and I think I have given them no Cause to change their Opinion of me since.

Euseb.

Charity oblidgeth us, many times to think better of Men, than they have any Reason to think of themselves; and sometimes People [Page 9] spake better of their Neighbours, then Charity obligeth them to think; but, pray why did you turn Quaker?

Trem.

It pleased God to send a suddain Death into the Neighbourhood, and it very much startled me to think how suddainly I might be snatched into Eternity and how unfit [...] found my self to die: I thought my self too much incum­bred about the things of this World, and too regardless of a further State, and resolved for the future, to be more seriously religious than I had been and one of my Nighbours knowing my Con­dition, lent me a good Book that gave me Light and Comfort, and Satisfaction in this Way.

Euseb.

What Religion did you profess before?

Trem.

I did not make much Profession of any one Sort; indeed I had not that Thought of God and Judgment and Eternity as I hope I now have. I endeavoured to be a good Neighbour, and to be careful about my own Business and to keep clear from the Vices of the Times: I sometimes went to one sort of Worship and sometimes to another, but very seldome to any, however my Neighbours all had a good Opinion of me, and I hope they have no Cause to alter it.

Euseb.

You offer your self for an Instance of a good honest Man turning Quaker, and yet confess, when you came to be started at the Thoughts of saddain Death, it put you into great concern, be­cause you thought your self not fit to die; and i [...]ed you had reason enough to think so; and [Page 10] whatever your Neighbour's Opinion was of you you can't pretend to justify the State you then was in, and therfore you resolved upon mending; in order to which you turned Quaker, that is, from nothing to worse; in short, you seem to have been like many others I can name to you a Man that paid your Debts pretty well, no right down Sot; and if once in a while you got drunk, you was no ways apt to be quarrelsome in your Liquor, but as to any serious Thoughts of your Dependance on God, and the Duties of a Religious Life, they never approached you till you had so long forgotten God, and neglected his gracious Invitations, as to provoke him most justly to give you over to per­petual Wandring, in Darkness and Error, so as never to find the Way of Life.

Trem.

I can't say but it might have been just in God to have dealt so with me, but I trust he has been more merciful; and I have Hope.

Euseb.

You may have great Hope, and yet when you come into Eternity find it cut off, and prove but a spider's Webb you must never call him a good honest man, that lives thoughtless of God and neglectful of Religion, we have many of whom we may say, without Breach of Charity, that they are so sottish and stupid, as to regard the Promisses of Eternal life, and the Discoveries of God's Will in the Gospel, and his kind mercifull Invitations in Christ, as Matters in which they have no manner of Concern: they never trouble themselves what Instances of Obedience and Thankfulness they [Page 11] owe to God, for his unpeakable Favours, to be sure as for any publick Thanks or Praise they give him none, such are stupid Sinners: and their long neglect of God's Invitations, their Irreligion and worldly Immersions, Besides other Sins we don't observe, may denominate them, Wicked and un­godly Men; and it is no Wonder if God permits such to imbrace the foulest Errors: And as this seems to be vours, so its the Case of many others that turn Quakers; they never were good nor honest any further than Men may be, without any serious sense of God or practice of Religion.

Trem.

I will instance in one that I think thou canst not except against, Narcessa is well known to thee and me, she was brought up in the Way of the Church, and her Parents strict Church Folks, and she a sober Woman, and yet turned Quaker.

Euseb.

I don't pretend that all are good and honest that are brought up in the Church; Men may be Hypocrites in the Church of God, and though their outward Conversation appear regular yet their secret Hypocrisy be such as God abhors: The most excellent Part of Religion, is such as no Eye can see but God's, and the Defects here may be as provoking to God as open Immorality; what secret Wickedness Men may indulge them selves in, their nearest Neighbours can't discern; but, as to Narcissa there is enough appears to be an exception against her Goodness, though she be­lieved and did some Things well.

Trem.

I never heard any thing amiss of her. [Page 12] though she is my near Neighbour.

Euseb.

She never received the Communion of the Body and blood of Christ tho' she professed an intire Liking, to the Principles of the Chruch of England for many Years after she was come to Discretion; so that she continued in the Neglect of a very important Duty, and which she believed to be so; and in this sinfull Neglect she persisted, notwithstaning many serious Warnings and Ex­hortations to amend.

Srem.

Perhaps she thought her self not fit for it.

Euseb.

If she knew her self to live in any Habit of Wickedness, and yet for so long Time refused to reform and amend, then she was so far from being good and honest, as to be a hardened ob­stinate Creature, fit to make a Quaker of; and indeed her wicked Neglect of which she knows to be her Duty, was living in a known State of Sin, and contrary, to her own profession, and sufficient Cause why God should at last abondon her, to a state of Error and wandring as a punishment of her Obstinacy. But besides, she was very remiss and negligent for a long time, in attending that Worship of God which she believed it her Duty to be constant and unmoveable in: And when People grow careless and negligent of their Duty to God, and more and more remiss, instead of improving and growing in Grace, it is no wonder if God abandon them to Error and Delusion.

Trem.
[Page 13]

Perhaps that seeming Remissness was unavoidable; she is but fa Woman, and thou know'st her Husband is o another Religion.

Euseb.

This was undoubtedly a Ground of her Remissness and Neglect; and we may well think it almost unaoidable that it should be so: But if People vountarily put themselves into a State of unavoidable Temptation, they have no Ground to depend upon God's Grace, to preserve them from Error and Wickedness. Religion, being the Means of our Eternal Salvation and Happiness in the Fruition of God, should be our chiefest Care and Concern; and no Wordly Interest or Gratifi­cation should induce us to put our selves under Disadvantage in this respect: And for a Woman especially, to dispose of herself for Life so as to put herself voluntarily under such a Clogg and Im­barasment in the Affairs of Religion, shews, that her Care for her Body, is greater then that for her Soul, which is a great Wickedness: This one Care St. Paul recommends above all others in Christans marrying, that it should be with those of their own Religion: 1 Cor. vii 39. She is at liberty to marry to whom she will, but only in the Lord.

Trem.

Well, I don't see what great Consequence this is of; they are sober good, religious People, after they come to be what thou callest Quakers, and if so, it matters little what they were before.

Euseb.

The Consequence of what I have said is considerable. for it showes us what little Ground there is to imagin that God should make choice [Page 14] of these People, to bestow his most distinguishing Favours upon; to make them his choicest Darlings, as they pretend; to dwell personally in them, and reveal his hidden Secrets to 'em, and send them with immediate Commissions to make new Discoveries to the World. But when we see by what Steps, they had prepared and ripened them selves for Vengeance, it will be no Matter of Sur­prize to find them abandoned by God, and given over to the strongest Delusions; that is, permitted to the power of the Devil, to be actuated and in­fluenced by him, so as to become his mere Tools and Engines in seducing others, who are in the like preparatary Dipsositions; thus filling up the I leasure of their Wickedness, they become Vessels of Wrath fitted for Destruction.

Trem.

We must have some other Reasons to convince us that this is the Case, besides a former State of Wickedness and Irreligion. I confess God might justly, if he so pleased, abandon such wicked People to Error and Delusion; and from what St. Paul says, tis undoubtedly true, that he sometimes does so; but thou hast no Rea­son to pitch upon the People called Quakers, to be the abondoned, for some very wicked Men have Grace given them to repent; and they become good Men and great Instruments of Good to others; thus it was with Paul himself, and to the Corinthi­ans he says, such were some of you, but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, &c. 1 Cor. vi 11.

Euseb.

I am far from denying the Grace of [Page 15] Repantance; very wicked Men by the grace of God, may become Converts to Piety and Good­ness: And I allow that their future Life and Practice, must discover whether they receive the Grace of God to Repentance, or for their Ob­stinacy, become abandoned to Infatuation.

Trem.

Well then, let us look to what they are after they become what thou callest Quakers; with­out regarding what they have been before.

Euseb.

We will lock to what they were after; but yet attending to what they have been before, serves to remove all Cause of Wonderment and Surprize, if we find them yet in a State of Wick­edness and gross Error, notwithstanding in some Points of Vertue they appear very zealous, and really think themselves guided by the Spirit of God. For tho' some Sinners by the Grace of God become true Penitents, yet great Wickedness is so far from recommending Men to God's special Favour, that on the contrary, it gives Ground to expect his severe Judgment, and Dereliction in Error, when Men persist long in their Wickedness and Irreligion, after proper Means and Opportu­nities afforded them for their Conviction and Re­claiming. This is the Case with many that turn Quakers, which could not be said of St. Paul or the Corinthians, and yet, either of them might justly have been left to perish in their Sins.

Trem.

So long as former Wickedness don't ob­solutely bar Men from the Grace of God, and his Mercy in Christ, I will hope those thou callest [Page 16] Quakers, have the Benefit thereof untill thou shewest, that their Lvies and Conversations after­wards do not discover the proper Fruits of a true Repentance; if thou canst shew this I will readily give all up, and conclude them to be abandoned of God indeed.

Euseb.

We have not left our selves Time to go through the Consideration of this so perticularly as it deserves, let us therefore agree to meet again to morrow, and call in what Assistance you think fit; for I will Endeavour to convince you, that if ever you hope to be saved, you must make a new Choice of your Religion.

Trem.

I will not shun the Light, if thou hast any to offer, but I believe they Confidence will prove vain, however, I will meet thee as thou proposest; so fare thee well.

Euseb.

Adieu.

[Page 17]

DIALOGUE II.
Eusebius returns at the Time appointed, and finds Tre­mulus waiting for his coming, and withou much Ceremo­ny the Conference begins anew.

Eusebius.

I Hope Tremulus by what I offered yesterday, you are convinced, that those People that turn Quakers, are generally so far from such Dispositions as recommend them to God's extraordinary Favour, and [...]e intimate and immediate Communion and Inspirations of his Holy Spirit; that there is much greater Rea­son to conclude them abandoned for their Wicked­ness, and so permitted to the Devil's Delusions, by his Instigations to be shape [...] to such Opini­ons and Practices as are most ensnaring to them­selves and pernicious to others.

Tremulus.

We concluded yesterday, That their State and Behaviour after they become Quakers shall determine, whether God has given them the Grace of Repentance, or in Judgment sent them strong Delusions to believe a Lye?

Euseb.

The Wickedness I design to prove upon them, is not Swearing, Cheating, Drunkenness, Fornication, and such like; whatever Sins of this Kind any of 'em may be guilty of, shall not be [Page 18] brought into the Charge, nor any other but such a are open and Manifest.

Trem.

I hope thou wilt not call them Wicked, if they are free from such Vices.

Euseb.

There are other Sins which polute the Soul with Guilt as black as these, which reflect as great Dishonour to God, and efectually hinder Men's Salvation and Happiness; and these the Quakers are Guilty of: Such as the rejecting the possitive Commands and Institutions of Jesus Christ, and refusing to comply with the Methods of Divine Grace for the Salvation of Mankind, and conspiring with the Grand A [...]lversary, to hin­der our blessed Redeemer of the Glory of his wonderful Atchievements, and the Honour just­ly due to him, as the King of the Church, and the Delieverer of Mankind; in as much as they instigate others, as themselves are instigated by the Divil, to contemn, despise and neglect those sacred Ordinances and Rites of Worship institut­ed for the Honour of Christ, to express his King­ly Power, and the Wisdom of his Government, and to be Memorials of his Glorious Acts, as well as Means effectually to secure and promote the Salvation and Happiness of Men: And while they are promoting these Hellish Designs, and indeed, that they may promote them the more effectually, they pretend Friendship to Christ, and immediate Inspiration of his Spirit, and Commissions from God, to Authorize them here­to; and what greater Wickedness can Men be guilty of.

Trem.
[Page 19]

If these Things be true, thou needst say no more: But for my Part I am very far from believing they intend or design any such Dishonour or Disrespect to Jesus Christ.

Euseb.

This is undoubtedly the real Tendency and event of their Practices, whatever their De­signs be; they may really believe their Practices have a contrary tendency; this is a natural Ef­fect of those strong Delusions to which they are given up, as a Punishment of their former volun­tary Wickedness and irreligion: And nothing is more agreeable to what St. Paul says, of their believing Lies that so they may be damned, than that being permitted to the Devils Delusions, they should really believe, they are compassing their Salvation, while, for that Reason, they are the more zealously promoting the Devils great Aim and Design, to dishonur Christ, discredit and de­stroy Religion, and bring about their own hea­vier Damnation. Let their Designs be as they will, if their Practices have such a Tendency as I have mentioned, it shews, that their Fruits are not meet for Repentance, and whatever Change may appear in them, they are not converted to God: And if their Practices discover this, you have consented already, that they are deluded by the Devil.

Trem.

Dwell no longer upon this; come to the Proof of these Things thou chargest upon them: Thou sayest they reject the possitive Commands and Institutions of Jesus Christ, pray what be they?

Euseb.
[Page 20]

Baptism and what we call The holy Eu­charist, or The Lord's Supper.

Trem.

They hold to the Baptism of Christ, and the Lord's Supper; and do not deny, reject and contemn them as thou sav'st.

Euseb.

They allow that Christ instituted Bap­tism and a holy Supper, because the Institution thereof is so very clear, that they can have no manner of face ot deny it; but yet they virtually and effectually reject, deny and contemn them, by substituting their own Inventions in the Room of what Christ commanded to be done. So that they deny and contemn those Instances, of Honour and Duty that Christ commanded, and under those Names set up what themselves have invented: And thus, their own Inventions they have exalted above Christ's Institutions, and his Commands they treat with Scorn and blasphem­ous Scurrility, that they may put the stamp of Di­vine Authority upon their own Whims and De­vices.

Trem.

Why this is the very Thing they charge upon thee, and others that are for setting up out­ward Ceremonies.

Euseb.

I am for setting up no outward Ceremo­nies as Institutions of Christ; but those I find set up by Christ himself, and have been observed in all Ages of his Church, I am for paying an Ho­nour to: And whoever reject them, do it upon the Peril of their own Damnation, Mark, xvi 16.

Trem.
[Page 21]

Christ's Baptism and the Lord's Supper don't consist in any outward Ceremonies, but are merely Spirtual and inward; and I wonder how thou canst call the Work of God's Spirit, Men's Whims and Devices.

Euseb.

It was never the Work of God's Spirit, but the whims of Quakers Brains, to call any mere internal Action or Motion Christian Bap­tism, or the Baptism that Christ has instituted in his Church: This is a device of their own. And those very Motions and Impressions which they feel in themselves, and call Inward Baptism, and Spirit Baptism, you can never prove nor perswade me they come from the Spirit of God: God's Spirit indeed dwells in his own faithful People, but not in the Wicked and Reprobate, and those that are abandoned to Error and Delusion. Such Men may feel Motions and inward Impulses, but they come rather from the Devil than from the Spirit of God. And even in good Men that have the Guidance and Comforts of the Holy Ghost, and feel his inward Motions, it would be very im­proper to call those Inspirations Chrisian Bap­tism, because they are never so called in Scripture and what the Scriptures call Baptism, that was commanded and instituted by Christ, believed in and practiced by his Apostles and his Church ever since, was an external Washing to consign the indwelling and Comforts of the holy Ghost, whose gracious Inspirations are therefore a Privi­ledge consequent upon Baptism, but not Baptism it self.

Trem.
[Page 22]

Thus thou wouldst turn Men away from the inward Work of God's Spirit in their own Hearts, to outward Ceremonies and Traditions of Men, and therein place the Substance of Religion. This is what James Mott has taken Notice of, in his little Book lately Printed, and very will ob­serves the contrary Practice in the People called Quakers, which he observes too to have been the Concern of true Ministers in all Ages, to turn Peo­ples Mind to obey the Teaching of God's Sprit in their own Hearts, p 2. And this Work of the Spirit is what we account Baptism in Subtance, and Christ's Baptism, p. 29.

Euseb.

I don't know what Opinion you have of J. Mott's Authority, but for my Part I look upon him a very despicable Creature, and that he has advanced nothing in that silly Book worth a Re­sutation: And particularly as to what you have mentioned from him, if he has any Meaninig, 'tis all Fatshood, and that is what his whole Treatise is built upon.

Trem.

Pray don't speak so contemptibly of J. Mott and his little Book; we reckon he has per­form'd, wonderfully: Besides what he has printed was first approved and is recommended by our wiser Heads, who understand what is Truth and Falshood as well as thy self.

Euseb.

Perhaps your wise Sages have more Un­derstanding than Honesty; but their approving that Book, discovers very little of either: For to say, as J. Mott does, p. 4. That we set up Men's [Page 23] Inventions (for the Substance of Religion) instead of and against the Work of Christ's Spirit in Peo­ples Hearts. This is an absolute Falshood: And the same he sundry Times mentions in his Book, only because we plead for outward Obedience to the Commands of Christ, where he has com­manded outward Actions.

Trem.

But it is an inward Spiritual Work that is to be understood, where you take the Thing con­manded to be an outward Action.

Euseb.

We will try that by and by: But when we believe and teach, that these very outward Actions are accompanied with a spiritual Influ­ence and Energy: That Baptism with Water is a Spiritual Regeneration, wherein we are born of the Spirit as well as Water; that we become hereby entituled to the indwelling, comforting and sanctifying Influences of the holy Ghost; and reckon our selves hereby obliged and bound by professed Stipulation, to conduct our Lives for the future according to his holy Guidence and graci­ous Inspirations: And the same Engagements we renew as often as we receive the holy Supper, and believe we receive larger Measures of the holy Spirit, whose gracious Influences support our spiritual Life: And to this we apply that of the Apostle, We are all made to Drink into one Spirit. When this is well known to be our Doctrine and Belief, set forth in our publick Of­fices, by the publick Writing of our Doctors, and taught publickly and frequently from all our [Page 24] Pulpits, how could this Ignorant Fellow say, and these juggling Deceivers approve it, That we turn Men from the Work of the Spirit in their Hearts and set up any Thing else for the Substance of Religion against it? This is such impudent Fals­hood, that any Man but a Quaker would blush at.

Trem.

They will blush at Falshood as soon as other Men.

Euseb.

Don't you discern this to be a glaring malicious Lye? Pray look into our Liturgy, where you may see what our publick Devotions consist of, then judge if we turn Peoples Minds from the inward Work of Gods Spirit in our Hearts: We give Adoration to the Holy Ghost, as the third Person in the blessed Trinity, equal with the Father and the Son, in the Doxology we repeat at the End of every Psalm and Hymn; Glory be to the Father, and to Son, and to the Holy Ghost, &c. We are constantly exhorted, after the publick Confession of our Sins, to beseech God to give us true Repentance, and his holy Spi­rit, that the Rest of our Life may be pure and holy: For the Royal Family, we pray God, to endue them with his holy Spirit, and to enrich them with his heavenly Grace. And for the Bishops and Clergy, that God would send down upon them the healthful Spirit of his Grace. In the Collect for the Sunday before Lent, we pray God, to send the holy Ghost, and pour into out Hearts that most excellent Gift of Charity, the very Boud of Peace [Page 25] and of all Vertues. In the Collect for Christmass we pray God, to grant that we being Regenerate and made his Children by Adoption and Grace, may daily be renewed by his holy Spirit. In the Collect for the Circumcision of Christ, we pray God to Grant us the true Circumcision of the Spirit, that our Hearts and all our Members being mortifyed, from all wordly and carnal Lusts, &c. And eve­ry Sunday, in the Collect for the Communion we pray God to cleanse the Thoughts of our Hearts, by the Inspiration of his holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love him, &c. Do these Things look like turning Men away from the inward Work of the Spirit? And are nor those maliciously wick­ed, or grossly and scandalously ignorant, that give such Representations of us?

Trem.

Truly I don't know what to say: I thought indeed the main Difference between the Church and those called Quakers consisted in this, That the Quakers are for an inward Work of the Spirit, and the Church depends wholly upon ca [...] ­ward Forms.

Euseb.

The Quaker, have endeavoured to a­muse ignorant People after this sort, and this is the main Drift of J. Mott's silly Book: But it is horrid Falshood, as you may see by what I have cited aready out of our Liturgy, and it that be not enough, I can give you a great deal more. Read the Hymn called Veni Creator, to be sung at the Consecration of Priests.

[Page 26]
Come holy Ghost, Creator, come,
inspire the Soul of thine,
Till every Heart which thou hast made
is fill'd with Grace Divine.
Thou art the Comforter, the Gift
of God, and Fire of Love,
The everlasting Spring of Joy,
and Unction from above.
Thy Gifts are manifold, thou writ it
God's Laws in each true Heart:
The Promise of the Father, thou
dost heavenly Speech impart.
Enlighten our dark Souls, till they
thy sacred Love imbrace.
A fist our Minds (by Nature frail)
with thy celestial Grace, &c.

What further Proof canst thou desire, Tremulus, of our Dependance upon the Grace and Inspira­tions of the holy Spirit, as the very Fountain of our Spiritual Life?

Trem.

Verily I think of you letter than I did, but still I think your outward Forms and Inventions of Men draw Men from depending wholly upon the Spirit as we do.

Euseb.

We will consider by and by how far you depend upon the Spirit. But pray what do you think J. Mott [...]ntends, when he says. That we set up the Inventions of Men (for the [Page 27] Substance of Religion) instead of and against the Work of the Spirit in Peoples Hearts.

Trem.

He means Water Baptism [...] and other outward Ceremonies, which the [...] be undertakes to answer calls The Institutions of Christ.

Euseb.

Edward Burling wrote an Answer to the same Letter, and has the same Impudence to say of Baptism, with Water ‘That we know it is no Institution of Christ, but was instituted by 'Men, and wicked Men too, rather the Pope than Christ.,’

Trem.

And canst thou disprove what they say? If it be not Christ's Institution, it must be Men's Inventions, and ought not to be set up in the Room of Christ's Baptism, which is that of the Spirit, without outward Ceremonies. —

Euseb.

Hold Tremulus, tell me, what Man in­vented Water Baptism?

Trem.

Edward Burling tells thee it was the Pope.

Euseb.

There have been many Popes, pray name the Man.

Trem.

I believe Ed. Burling can tell thee; I don't pretend to know for my part.

Euseb.

We will go back to John the Baptist, you know he baptized our Saviour himself with Water, tell me what Pope he had his Commission from, or what wicked Many. — Why do you seem surprized? The Quakers call Water Bap­tism Johns Baptism, was it from Heaven or of the Pope?

Trem.
[Page 28]

Truly John's Baptism was from Heaven; but his Commission extended only to himself.

Euseb.

Very well, tell me then what Pope our Saviour had his Commission from when he was upon Earth; for we read of his Baptizing, Job. iii 26. Behold the same baptizeth, and all Men come to him.

Trem.

He did not Baptize himself, but it was his Disciples, Joh. iv 2.

Euseb.

'Tis likely he baptized some, but his Disciples many more, which seems to be the true Intent of those Words: For NOT is sometimes used comparatively, as I will shew anon, when we come to consider St. Paul's Meaning, when he says he was sent, not to baptize, but to preach the Gospel. However, if the Disciples of Christ bap­tized either mostly or wholly, then certainly it was with Water; and it could not be said, that Christ himself baptized by their Ministry, if they did not do it by his Command and Institution; was Christ then a Pope or wicked Man?

Trem.

He was neither: We must not go back so far.

Euseb.

You must go to the first Rise of a Thing to find whose Invention it is, and by whom com­manded and instituted, and especially as to what Christ instituted, you must go back to the Time of his living upon Earth, his Institutions all bear date about that Time: New seeing John had a Command from God to baptize with Water, and our Saviour himself was baptized, that he Might [Page 29] fulfill all Righteousness, and baptized with Wa­ter himself, at least by his Ministers, whilst he was upon Earth, and sent his Apostles out with a Commission, after his Resurrection to baptize, without mentioning a Word of changing the Mat­ter they had been used to; and seeing we find it so evident, that the Apostles after our Saviour's Ascension into Heaven did baptize with Water, not in the Name of John or the Pope, but in the Name of the Lord Jesus, Act. viii 16. which the Quakers allow to be Water Baptism: What can you think of their Sense or Honesty to call Wa­ter Baptism the Inventions of Men, and say we set up Men's Inventions against the Work of the Spirit.

Trem.

It is of no great Consequence whose In­vention it is; I confess they seem to be mistaken, and have spoken rashly; but however. Water Bap­tism ought to have been laid, aside after the Baptism with the Holy Ghost, Christ's Baptism, took place.

Euseb.

Mott and Burling ought to tell no Lies to degrade a sacred religious Rite of such venerable Antiquity; and if it should have been laid aside, why was it not? Were there no wise Servants of Christ, na [...]e that understood the Nature of Christi­an Religion, in all the sixteen Hundred Years from Christ, till George Fox's craz'd Head turn'd [...] Jack with a Lantern, or some other distract­ed b [...]ain about that Time, began to hang out new Lights, which those that follow must lay a­side their Reason, as altogether useless, when they [Page 30] have as the Quakers tell us, an inward Light so much better, teaching them all Things that con­cern the Salvation of their Souls.

Trem.

Thou pretendest to hold to an inward Spirit too, why then dost thou ridicule the Qua­kers Light or Spirit in their own Hearts?

Euseb.

I hold an inward sanctifying and com­forting Influence of God's Spirit, but not in all Men, nor in any to set aside the Use of Reason or any instituted Means of Grace, but co-operat­ing with our natural Faculties, assisting them in a due use of such Means as are appointed to in­struct and engage us in the Practice of our Duty. But Pray can you tell what J. Mott means in sundry Passages of his Letter, where he intimates that there is something very remarkable in the Quakers Religion, in respect of an inward Light, to which they turn Men's Minds as to the Spirit of God, for all teaching and Instruction?

Trem.

He intends, that Convictions of Truth come only from God's Spirit in us, that all Men have a Measure of this Sprit that will teach them all Things that concern their Salvation, if they will but attend to it; and that the People called Quakers, instead of perswading Men to outward Performances and Ceremonies, only direct them to bearken to such Teaching as they will find in them­selves without going to any Men to teach them; and that all Religion, Hope and Comfort consists in such inward Feelings and Motions as every [Page 31] Man's Spirit will guide him to, without any manner of outward Performances.

Euseb.

Is it not Mens Duty then to hearken to this inward Spirit, and is it not necessary they should know this to be their Duty, and the only Way to be happy?

Trem.

Undoubtedly, and this is what our Teach­ers perswade Men to, and to depend wholly upon Christ and his Spirit in their own Hearts.

Euseb.

Thus while they are teaching outward­ly and prescribing Men's Duty in the most ne­cessary Part, they juggle them into a Belief, that they have no outward Teaching, but all is in ward and from Gods Spirit, and not from any Man; and certainly all the Labours of all your Teachers are wholy useless upon this Principle; but the Matters of Fact are false, and you cannot but know them so; they depend upon outward Teachings as much as others. In Sewal's Histo­ry of the Quakers, there is a Letter of Samuel Crisp, and another of Evan Je [...]ans, both giving an Account of their Conversion to Quakerism, and they ascribe it to reading Barclay's Apology firstly, and then compleated by others Books and Conversation, and one of them mentions a very hearty shaking of Hands among the Quakers. S [...]xal gives an Account that George Fox perswa­ded and convinced many, and it was by speaking not much but powerfully. This is the same outward Way that all false Teachers take, to per­swade Men of what they would have them believe [Page 32] and receive. If all Men have a Light or Spirit within them, teaching them all Things, why don't they leave them to that Teaching? or else why do they impose such Falshoods upon the World, that they depend upon an inward Spirit, and turn People to that, and not to outward Teach­ings of Men? Can any Body think, but that the Books that the Quakers have written and printed and dispersed, are designed to perswade and turn People to be of their Religion. And though they perswade them against some outward Performan­ces, that we believe and teach to be necessary, yet they have outward Performances of their own instead of them; they pretend to pray as loud as other People, and hold forth their Principles and teaching with a Voice that may be heard with outward Ears, without being in 'em; they have Weekly Meetings, and Monthly and Yearly & Quarterly, according as the Sun passeth through the several Signs in the Zodiak: Thus they ob­serve Times and Seasons, Days and Months and Quarters, according to their own wicked Inventi­ons, honouring their own Traditions above the ordinances of Jesus Christ.

Trem.

I hope thou dost not find Fault that they have some outward Performances.

Euseb.

I find Fault with J. Mott's Falshood, in pretending the Quakers Religion is purely in­ward and, and opposing of it as the Religion of the Apostles and the Gospel of Christ, to out­ward Performances and Rites of Divine Worship, [Page 33] instituted by Christ himself: For though an in­ward sanctifying Work of the Spirit upon the Soul be necessary, as we believe and teach, yet out­ward Acts of Worship and Honour are required of us, and the Instructions of holy Scriptures are necessary to establish our Faith and direct our Practice, and for the explaining and enforcing these, Christ has appointed his Ministers, who ought to be received as the Ambassadors of Christ, and their Business is to teach Men the Way of Salvation, which no ways hinders the Teaching of God's Spirit in the Hearts of his faithful People, but cooperates with it. And so far as the Qua­kers labour to set aside the Use and Necessity of such outward Teaching, they impeach the Wis­dom of Christ, and take part with the Devil, who would gladly overthrow the whole Christian Oe­conomy.

Trem.

How can they fight against Christ, when they perswade People to hear Christ only, speaking in their own Hearts, waiting upon the Lord in Silence, which our Friend Barclay will tell you is by withdrawing their Minds from all Meditations and Thoughts that so Christ with his Light may come in upon ' [...]m.

Euseb.

This which they call waiting upon the Lord in Silence, even from all Thougnts, is one of the most crafty Delusions the Devil could put into their Heads; Christ requires no Service of us but what is performed with the Exercise of our best Reason, but when Men put [Page 34] themselves into such a stupid State of Expectancy, with a perswasion that the first sudden Impression upon their Minds will then certainly come from Christ, and be a Motion of his Spirit, they have delivered up themselves to the Power of the Devil, in the most essectual manner that can be; for, as they have no reason to think that Christ will thus dart Impressions upon their Minds, so they may be assured the Devil will be ready to do it, when he has an Opportunity of being received as Christ himself, and thus to have the Advantage of Guiding them as he pleaseth; and we may well think he has Craft enough to carry on the Juggle, when he is entred so fairly, by insinuating that all is for the Glory of God, and Benefit of their Souls to which he is leading them: This is the most effectual Delusion. —

Trem.

J. Mott shews that the Way Christ mani­fests himself is by inward Feelings, and that thus Christ is in us the Hope of Glory, and calling such Feelings and Manifestations, the Devils Delusions, is turning Men away from Christ, which is pernici­ous Doctrine.

Euseb.

The Devil may transform himself into an Angel of Light, and nothing can put Mens Souls into greater Danger, than perswading them to believe that all such Feelings and Im­pressions as they find upon their Imaginations after shutting up all the Avenues of Sense and Reason, are the Manifestations of Christ: Good Men may feel Impressions and Motions from th [...] [Page 35] Spirit of christ, this I don't deny at all; but there are many inward motions from the Devil too; and such Wicked Men as don't belong to Christ have [...]one of his Spirit. And this I believe of the Quakers; St. Jude says, these be they that sepa­rate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit, v. [...]9. And it is a very false and dangerous Positi­on which J. Mott lays down, That God has gi­ven a Measure of his Spirit in the Hearts of all People, (or all Mankind, as his Manuscript ex­plains it) teaching them all Things that concern their Salvation.

Trem.

How then shall Men come to know the Way to Salvation?

Euseb.

They must diligently read the Holy Scriptures, and attend to the Methods of Grace and Instruction that God has appointed, making the best Use of that Reason and Understanding God has given them to distinguish between Truth and Imposture; And if they are sincerely desire­ous to know and do the Will of God, the must use their utmost Diligence, and pray earnestly to God for his Direction and Help, and there is great Hopes their Labour will not prove vain: But if they only wait and expect and do nothing, instead of having immediate Revelations they will be like to sind the Devil's Delusions.

Trem.

I am willing to be saved, and my Reason tells me, a loose vain and wicked Conversation will not bring me to Heaven.

Euseb.
[Page 36]

You say right, and did you ever hear that any professed Teacher of Religion perswaded Men to live wickedly?

Trem.

I ner heard that, but Men way perform outward Ceremomies, and yet live Wickedly; whereas the Light and Spirit which those called Quaker hold to, effectually subdues all Sin and Wickedness, if Men will but follow it.

Euseb.

What they hold to will naturally lead them to such Wickedness as I have mentioned; but those that are truly led and guided by the Spirit of God, will live holy and pure lives, walking with Zacharis and Elizabeth, in all the Commandments of God blameless. They will not pretend inward Love and Sincerity, to excuse them from outward Obedience to the Command­ments of God; Obedience they will look upon beter than any inward Sacrifice, and to bearken than the Fat of Rams.

Trem.

The Service that God requies is certainly inward in the Heart, he says, My Son give me thy Heart; and our Saviour says, [...]od seeks such to worship him, as worship in Spirit and Truth, and this is what those called Quakers hold to.

Euseb.

God certainly requires inward Obedi­ence, but not only, and when he commands out­ward Actions, will you perform them only in the Heart? Don't God require Justice in all our Dealings? And that every Man speak the Truth unto his Neighbour? And that we should best [...]w our Goods to relieve the Wants of the Poor? Will [Page 37] God take up with any thing less than outward Obedience in these Cases.

Trem.

This is not properly religious Service.

Euseb.

But it ought to be obediently perform­ed from a religious Principle, and if it be accord­ing to God's Command, done out of Obedience to him and in Sincerity of Heart, then herein we give God our Heart and serve him thus far in Spirit and Truth: And it is the same in matters of Religion. To worship God in Spirit and Truth, is, with a true Devotion of Heart and inward Sincerity, to perform all such Acts of Religion as tend to God's Glory and Honour, according to the Commands and Institutions of Jesus Christ our Redeemer; and if we would know what they are we must search the Scriptures, and follow the Footsteps of the holy Apostles and faithful Disci­ples of Christ, that were instructed by the Apostles, who through Faith and Patience now inhe­rit the Promises. Brethren, (saith Paul, Phil. iii 17.) he Followers together of me, and mark those that walk, as ye have us for an Ensample.

Trem.

It is hard to know what the Apostles practised, and there are so many different Interpre­tations of Scripture, that one knows not what to believe without an immediate Revelation.

Euseb.

It is a great Reflection upon the Divine Wisdom and Goodness, to say he has made a Re­velation that can't: answer the Design and F [...]d of it, viz. shew Men the Way to Salvation; and if we must depend upon new Revelations, to what [Page 38] Purpose is the old? It must certainly be useless if the Sense of it needs to be ditermin'd by new Revelations. The Case is not so, the Revelation of the Scripture is plain, and the Way to Salvati­on their described, easy to be known by the un­prejuidic'd and attentive Inquirer. If some Dif­ficulty attends the Inquiry, by reason of the M [...] of Error that Wicked Men have raised, we n [...] patiently endure the Difficulty, endeavour by the greater Diligence to surmount it, and be thankfull for the Assistances we have, Success will reward our Pains.

Trem.

I am not able to answer you; I wish I may find what is right, and am not so [...] to dry Party as to refuse Truth when it appears. If [...] to Baptism and the Lord's Su [...] [...] answer J. Mott's little Book, to my Sa [...], I will acknowledge the Errors of the Quakers [...] very great, and that they are very wicked in en­deavouring to proselite Men to such Principles.

Euseb.

I must appoint you another Meeting let it be to Morrow if you please; I shall not think much of any Pains I can bestow, so long as there is any Prospect of setting you right in an Affair of so great Concernment as this is.

Trem.

I am willing to hear what thau canst say concerning Baptism and the Lord's Supper; and will therefore meet thee again according as thou proposest. Exit Euseb.

[Page 39]

DIALOGƲE II.
Eusebius, Tremilus, & Titius.

Tremulus passed the Evening in meditating upon what pas­sed the day before, and found himself so pressed with the Force of Eusebius's Reasoning, that he wished him­self disengaged from being a Party in next Day's Di­spute, and yet could not but with to hear what was to be offered upon so important a Subject, with a real De­sire to know on which side the Truth lies that he might embrace it to the Salvation of his Soul, He therefore rises early in the Morning, and goes to an in­timate Aquantance, whose Name was Titius, a very zealous Quaker, and rekoned a Man of good Sense, who had been instrumental in bringing Tremuls into the Principles of the Quakers; he finds his Friend Titius just returned from his Morning Walk, and relates to him some Part of the Conference he had with Eusebius, and withal told him, that he found himself so far influenc­ed by Eusebius's Talk, that he questioned what the E­vent of that Days Conference would prove: He told him the Time appointed for their Meeting, and the Sub­ject they were to be upon. Titius offered to go along with him, and assist him if there were Occasion, which Tremulus accepted gladly, and accordingly they went together. By the Way Tremulus gave as full an Account as he could of what had passed, and they had not been long at the Place before Eusebius came according to Ap­pointment; and after giving the Time of the Day, Eu­sebius begins as followeth.

Euseb.
[Page 40]

I Am glad, Tremulus, you have your Friend here to assist you; for I design by God's Assistance to pluk up the very Roots of Quakerism out of your Mind this Day, if there was any Sincerity in your yesterday's Promise.

Trem.

Here is J. Mott's Book, wherein he en­deavours to shew, That the true Baptism of Christ is an inward Work of Christ's Spirit only, and so is the Lord's Supper, without any outward Perfor­mances. If yau can shew that the Disciples and Followers of Jesus Christ are required to observe any outward Baptism, and outward Eating of Bread and Drinking Wine, to remember Christ, I will grant you, that those called Quakers are no Disciples of Christ; For whatever Christ's Bap­tism is, I know we can't be in Christ without it, and unless we eat his Flesh and drink his Blood, we have no Part in him.

Euseb.

The Necessity of Christ's Baptisim I am glad you allow, and Edward Burling will tell you, that Men can't be sav'd without it: Of the Lord's Supper we will discourse by and by; we will first see what is to be said of Baptism: The Letter which J. Mott pretends to answer had gi­ven a plain and easy Account of the Nature and Benefits of Christian Baptism, as set forth in the Writings of the Apostles. What Mott chiefly un­dertakes is to assert, That the Apostles in the Texts cited in the aforesaid Letter, don't mean Baptism with Water, but Spirit Baptism: Now I desire before we proceed farther, you or your [Page 41] Friend Titius would explain to me what he means by Spirit Baptism; and then we will see whether the Apostles ever intended any such Thing in those Places.

Titius.

Thou seemest to invite me to explain J. Mott's Meaning; I should readily do it, but I think be has explain'd himself fully enough, and I believe thou wilt not be able to disprove him, notwithstand­ing thy Considence.

Euseb.

I shall be glad to take his Meaning rightly, and I desire you to do the best you can to defend him: But truly his Meaning is not so plain to me as you seem to imagine. p. 8 He says, it was not Water Baptism that People were saved by, but the Work of Christ, who washeth the Souls of his Peaple by the Spirit of Judgment and Burning, Isa. iv 4.

Titius.

Well that is what be means by Spirit Baptism.

Euseb.

This is a Way of being baptized that I am confident no Nation will be fond of, and I question whether the Body of Quakers will own they expect to be baptised after that Sort; and if ever they come to it, it must be in the next World, and then they will be like to fail of the cleansingand purging Part of the Judgment and Burning, unless you can bring better Proofs for a Purgalo [...]y than the Papists have ever done.

Titius.

We have nothing to do with the Papists Purgatory.

Euseb.
[Page 42]

If there be any State necessary for Men now to pass through, fortold by the Prophet un­der that Allusion, Isa. iv 4. being pu [...]ged from Sin by the Spirit of Judgment and Burning, it must be a proper Purgatory; and the Papists can [...]t find so plain a Proof in all the Bible for their Purgatory, as this Text; and indeed with J. Mott's Interpretation it is a pretty good Proof of a Purgatory, and nothing else under a Christian Dispensation.

Titius.

This is thy Carnal Way of Reasoning.

Euseb.

The Prophet only declares in a Style familiar with the Prophets, the severe Judgments God would bring upon that People to punish their Wickedness, viz. by destroying the wicked Part in so tremendous a manner, that the small Rem­nant should be awakned to Repentance and Righ­teousness; which indeed would be an effectual Washing and Purging the Land. This you will find he plainly related just before at the very End of the former Chapter, which Relation is carried on through this fourth Chapter, Chap. iii 25. Thy Men shall fall by the Sword, and thy Mighty in the War, and her Gates shall l [...]nent and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the Ground. Chap. iv I. And in that Day seven Women shall take hold of one Man, &c. The destroying of their Men by the Sword, and burning up the Gates and City, is the purging their spoken of by the Spirit of Judgment and Burning. And if there be any State for Christians to be washed and purg­ed [Page 43] [...] by like this, [...] certainly a proper Purga­ [...], according to the Papists Sense: But I fancy neither the Papists nor J. Mott will be able to prove a Purgation of Sin by any such State, ne­cessary for all Christians.

Trem.

[...] indeed see any Propriety in J. Mott's ap [...]l [...]g that Text. Titius can tell you [...] by Spirit Baptism beter than he ex­ [...] [...] there.

Titius.

J. Mott plainly [...]ns [...]n inward spiritu­al of the Soul by Christ himself, and to prove the Prophet meant so, he brings the Words of Christ himself to Peter, If I wash thee not, thou hast no Part with me.

Euseb.

This is very impertinently brought to prove the Prophet Is [...]iah's Meaning, for it has no manner of Allusion to it, nor indeed does it say one Word of inward or spiritual; but the Wash­ing there spoken of was outward with Water, that was the Washing St. Peter first refused, but after these Words of our Saviour desired to have his Hands and his Head as well as his Feet washed: There was undoubtedly a spiritual Signification in this Action of our Saviour his washing the Feet of his Disciples; but the Washing expressly spoken of was outward with Water, for so we read. Joh. xiii 5. After that he poureth Water into a Bason and began to Wash the Disciples Feet. then cometh he to Simon Peter, &c. And don't you see now what a mighty Hand J. Mott is to prove Spirit Baptism without Water? If this Text has any [Page 44] Reference to the Baptism of Christ as J. Mott certainly thinks it has then certainly it is out­ward Water as a visible Sign, with an inward and spiritual Grace given thereby, according as we understand Christian Baptism in our Church: I am afraid J. Matt will prove Water so fully himself, that there will be nothing left for me to do.

Trem.

Truly Friend Titius, that Proof is in favour of Water or nothing, I wonder J. Mott brought that as Proof for Baptism which our Op­ponents would have passed by, if he had not himself apply'd it to Baptism. This was poorly done, I protest, ouhad better give up J Mott for a Bl [...]head than drop your Cause so.

Titius.

The Cause is good however J. Mott has managed it, but he has done better in other Places There is certainly a Work of Christ's Spirit upon the Souls of his People, and that is what we are to understand by the Baptism of the Spirit, and all the Baptism necessary for Christians.

Euseb.

We allow, and our Ministers Preach the Necessity of an inward Work of the Spirit as much as any People can do, and our Use for Water in Baptism, as it is designed to signify this, can be no more Hindrance thereto than our Savour's using outward Water with a spiritual Significancy, in the Instance we mentioned but now; and there­fore you may see J. Mott misseth his Mark, when he would make you believe our outward Ceremo­nies are such a Hindrance of the Spirit, and such [Page 45] a Substistuting of something else in his Room, as to make our Religion a new Gospel, rather than the Quakers. That Cant p. 19 20 will not pass, and so J. Mott may ene take it back again, without any further Reply to it. But whatever Necessity there is of an inward Work of the Spirit, in order to Mens being saved eternally, yet those Disposi­tions or Tempers, be they what they will, that are thereby wrought in us, are never meant by the Word Baptism in scripture.

Titius.

I don't know what thou meanest by Dis­positions and Tempeors, but Repentance and Con­version being wrought in us by the Spirt, burning. up the Chaffy Nature, is Christ's Baptism.

Euseb.

Indeed this is what the Quakers seem to intend, at least J. Mott; but yet when he has Oc­casion to evade a pregnant Text of Scripture he calls it something else: But I will omitt my Re­marks upon that at present. you following J. Mott, by that Work of the Spirit which is Spirit Baptism intend, such a Distruction of the Chaffy sinfull Nature, by the Troubles which Men endure from the sight of their sinfull guilty Condition, as brings them to the Sorrows of Repentance and a hearty Conversion from former their Wickedness to serve God for the future.

Titius.

This is the Thing J. Mott means as you may gather from several Passages as P. 18 19. and P. 15. and Especialy P. 16 be calls it the great Work of Repentance and Conversion by which [Page 46] those mentioned Acts, ii 38. should have their Sim Remited and not Water Baptism.

Euseb.

I affirm that nothing of this Nature was, ever called Baptism in Scripture or in the least in­tended where we read of the Baptism of the Holy Ghost; nor had J. Mott Sense enough to make his Answer to several Passages, Consistant with themselves, according to this Nation, the Letter J. Mott pretends to answer, says, Baptism is called regeneration, or the washing of Regenerati­on, Tit. iii 5. J. Mott to prove it must mean Baptism with the Spirit and not Water, he says 'tis plain, it can't be with outward Water, because the Text says, not by works of Righeousness which we have done, but according to his Mercy, and therefore no [...] Water, but Spirit Baptism. This is the Force of his Reasoning; but is not the great Work of Repentance and Conversion Works of Righteous­ness? or are they Works of Sin? certainly repen­ting and turning from Sin to serve God faithfully are works of Righteousness, by this therefore we are, not there said to be saved, as J. Mott would have. but by Baptism with Water, which is the woshing of Regeneration, Entituling us to Gods Mercy and gra [...]us Pardon; you see how poorly he ha [...] answered that Passage.

T [...].

You go so far round for your Fetches, I don't know how to follow you.

Euseb.

Whilst Words have no Determined Sence you may apply them to what you please and [Page 47] s [...]angely amuse ignorant People, and so the Quakers do with the word Spirit Baptism but their Contradictions and Absurdities soon discover themselves when the word has some Signification fixed to it.

Trim.

The A [...]surdities are in thy Head and no where else.

Euseb.

Is not Repentance and Conversion the Work of the Spirit.

Titius.

Doubtless.

Euseb

And is not this that measure of the Spirit you say is in Peoples Hearts to which the Quakers say they turn People not to any Thing outward.

Titius.

Ti [...] the Spirit of Christ in us, working these I [...], which is true Baptism.

Euseb.

N [...]w then see the Absurdity and Non­sence of another of J. Mott's Answers P. 16. where he Endeavours to make silly People believe, that St. Peter did not intend that Baptism with Water, Act. ii. [...]8, would procure Remission of Sins and the Gift of the holy Ghost joyned with Repentance. But says it was only by Repentance and Conversion without Water.

Titius.

Where is the Absurdity of this?

Euseb.

It is Nonsense and Absurdity to say, that by the Baptism of the holy Ghost Men receive the holy Ghost; receiving the holy Ghost in that Text is undoubtedly what is ment in the Evangelist by the Baptism of the holy Ghost; and how can this then [...]an Effect of Repentance and Conver­sion, [Page 48] if Repentance and Conversion be the Baptism of the holy Ghost, if you see not this Absurdity you can see nothing.

Trem.

Tis a very Evident Absurdity, I wonder I did not see it before you pointed it out I had read it over and over and never Discerned it.

Euseb.

His Book is full of such Nonsence, but ignorant People don't discern it because, they don't consider the real Meaning of his Words. in­deed some of them have no real meaning, and I believe they never design this Word Sprit Baptism should have any one certain meaning, but it serves for any thing they have Occasion to use it for. Sometimes meaning one thing and some­times another.

Titius

Thou strainest his Words and put Mea­nings of thy own to 'em.

Euseb

J. Mott says, p. 20. The Spirit is the uniting Substance that joyns the Soul to God, must not all those then that have this Spirit in them, be united to God?

Titius.

'Tis undoubtly so.

Euseb.

Then according to J. Mott. Men are joyned to God before they are joyned to God, and in order to their being joyned to God. This is an­other of his Absurdities arising from this Notion of Christ's Baptism, 'tis p. 15. Where he says, the Spiritual Baptism destroys the first Nature in Man before the Soul can be joyned to God, the Spirit the uniting Substance is in us, then you say we are united, and he works in us before he can be [Page 49] in us uniting us to God. If you can make Sense of such Staff, you have a Talent beyond my Capa­city, to me it is rightdown Nonsense and Obsur­dity.

Trem.

Never justify it Friend Titius, Eusebius, will convert us both, why could we not see this Nonsense before.

Titius.

Spirit Baptism must then be some other Work of the Spirit.

Euseb.

I am tired of exposing the Nonsense of J. Mott's Book, by what I have offered you may see the Insufficiency and Impertinence of his An­swers. If you can advance any Thing from J. Mott, or Edward Burling, or else where, to prove the Baptism of Christ instituted, (without which Burling says Men can't be saved) is inward and spiritual without Water, I will endeavour to Reply to you.

Titius.

John foretold plainly of Christ, that he would baptize with the holy Ghost, John i 33. This then, is Christ's Baptism, Distinguished from John's, which was with Water.

Euseb.

This is Robert Barclay's Sophistry, I have read his Arguments at Large in his Apology and the Syllogisms he makes upon it; but they are all answered by distinguishing between the Work of Christ and his Institution. John speaks of what Christ was to do personally, as a Demon­stration of his Divinity which is Baptizing not literally but metaphorically, and this Promise or Prophesy was actually fullfilled according to [Page 50] the true Intent and Meaning thereof, when after our Saviour's Ascension, he sent down the holy Ghost upon his Disciples, in that miraculous Man­ner, of which read Act. ii. and at sundry Times after: The Baptism Christ instituted, is what he gave Commission to his Apostles to administer, and of this John made no Mention; and this ought to be understood literally, which is with Water, unless Barclay or some other Quaker will give a beter Reason for a metaphorical Interpre­tation than I have yet heard.

Titius.

Christ told his Apostles, Act. i 5. they should be baptized with the Holy Ghost.

Euseb.

He only put them in Mind of what John had fortold, and repeats the Assurance with respect to themselves, that they should re­ceive the miraculous Gift of the Holy Ghost, which came to pass accordingly in a few Days, of which we read Act. ii. But here is not the least Syllable said of that Baptism he had commanded them to administer, this was Christ's own Work, and not theirs.

Titius.

But ought they not to baptize with the same Baptism Christ did?

Euseb.

If you can find a Command for that, it will be something; but you can find none, and indeed the Work exceeds the Capacity of Men: But further, whilst Christ was upon Earth he bap­tized with Water, which I have before taken No­tice of. Joh. iii 36. which is a good President for Water Baptism.

Titius.
[Page 51]

There is a farther Proof for Spirit Bap­tism in Act. xi 16. Then Remembered I the Word of the Lord how that he said, John indeed bap­tized you with Water, but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost.

Euseb.

St. Peter only observes, that it was an Argument with him to admit the Gentiles to the Priviledge of Baptism with Water, because he saw that Christ had accepted them, by bestowing the same Gift upon them that he had bestowed upon the Disciples at first, which was in fulfill­ment of his gracious Promise; this he remem­bred, and when he saw the like special Favour granted to Cornelius and his House, he could not but think them worthy to be admitted into the Society of Christ's Church, by that Baptism Christ had instituted, which was with water. In all these Places there is not one Word said of Christ's Instituting Spirit Baptism, as you call it, or that the Apostles understood the Baptism Christ insti­tuted to be spiritual without Water.

Titius.

If these Proofs don't serve, I will bring you a Text that is plain and possitive, 'tis 1 Cor. xii 13. For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one Body: What can be plainer?

Euseb.

J. Mott and E. Burling think this a plain Proof, that Christ's Baptism is spiritual and without Water; but I can't see any such plain Proof in it: It seems to me the Apostle mean to joyn Water and the Spirit, as we understand Baptism in our Church.

Titius.
[Page 52]

The Spirit is expresely mentioned, but nothing is said of the Water.

Euseb.

According to the literal Signification of the Word Baptize, it implies an outward applica­tion, which can't be understood of any Thing but Water, especially considering Water was then made use of in Baptism. Baptizing signifies ei­ther Washing or Immersion, thus our Savious says, the Jews held the Washing of Cups and Platters, Mark. vii 4. Now to say of a Cup or Pot, that it is well washed, who would not understand natu­rally, the Water had been used about it: And in that Place the original Word is Baptism. But as touching these Corinthians, it is very evident they were baptized with Water as well as by one Spirit. In the first Chapter of this same Epistle St. Paul finding Fault with the Party-Names and Divisions among them, useth this Argument to convince them they ought to be united and o di­vided into parties, that they were not baptized into the Names of those after whom they called themselves, particularly to those that said, I am of Paul, to distinguish themselves from those who said they were of Apollos or Cephas, he fars to them. Chap. i 13. Is Christ divided? Was Paul crucified for you, or were you baptized into the Name of Paul? Intimating that they had but one Head or Master, and that was Christ, who was crucified for them, and into whose Name they were all baptized; now this Baptizing the Quakers allow to be with Water, because Paul [Page 53] thanked God he had only baptized such and such. And indeed the Reason he thanked God for it was, that their dividing Dispositions should have no Advantage from that, as though he had baptized into his own Name, to make a Body or Party of [...]. under his own Name: When there­fore Baptism in his same Epistle is spoken of as a combining the Baptized in a Body, it is natural to understand it of the same Thing, when he says over again, we are baptized into one Body, though he there mentions the Spirit to correspond with the Argument he was upon, for the Spirit and the Water may agree in one Effect, as we always understand it, according to the Words of our Sa­viour. Joh. iii 5. Except a Man be born of Water and the Spirit, &c. and 1 Joh. v 8. The Spirit the Water and the Blood, these three agree in one.

Trem.

I confess this appears to me a solid An­swer.

Titius.

Eusebius confounds us with his far fetch­ed Consequences.

Euseb.

I argue for plain and evident Facts, and the Consequences make themselves: But I have now answered to all the Arguments I think you have to produce in behalf of what you call Spirit Baptism, without Water; what is Metaphorical­ly called Baptizing with the holy Ghost in the se­veral Texts, was the miraulous Gift of the holy Ghost, sent down by Christ himself in a visible Manner: there was an outward appearance of [Page 54] firey Tongues overshadowing them; and there was nothing called Baptizing with the holy Ghost without this miraculous Appearance, and when­ever we shall see this upon a Congregation of Quakers, accompanied with the same inward Ef­fects, as we read Act. ii. we will conclude they have been baptized by Christ himself with the holy Ghost and with Fire, and will take this for such a clear Proof of Christ's accepting their Per­sons, that none forbid Water that they may receive the Baptism Christ has instituted to en­title Men to the Priviledges of his Church, as St. Peter argues in the Case of Cornelius; but if after that they should refuse Water, I should say of them, they have received the Grace of God in vain: But what is the Work which the Quakers call Repentance and Conversion in Comparison of the visible Descent of the holy Ghost? It is no­thing like it, nor have they any Thing among them that ever had the Name of Baptism in Scrip­ture, so far are they from the Conditions of Sal­vation, Mark xvi 16.

Titius.

Thou seemest to lay great Weight upon Water Baptism, but for my Part I can't see any great Benefit by it, and People are as well without as with it.

Euseb.

The Benefits of Baptism are not pro­perly visible, and those have wrong Nations, that conclude there is none, because they can't see 'em. Relative Changes are not visible Things, and yet may be accompanied with singular Benefits; a [Page 55] Man may adopt a Child and make it an Heir to an Estate of a Thousand Pound per Annum, and you see no Change in the Child, as to Temper, Disposition and Manners, till an Education agree­able to such an Heirship has formed him; Bap­tism makes us the adopted Children of God, and though we are immediately put into a State of Priviledges; yet by reason that some Men re­ceive the Grace of God in vain through their own Fault and Neglect, there may in some Cases ne­ver appear any real Effect of such Priviledges, and in other Cases they are not always discerna­ble, The Wind bloweth where it lists, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, &c. so is every one that is born of the Spirit.

Titius.

J. Mott will tell you p. 8 of a great Ab­surdity in perswading People they are regenerated or born again, when they don't know what it is to become Children of God.

Euseb.

And is it not as great an Absurdity to tell People that their Bodies are framed in the Womb, when they can give no Account how it was done? Persons know they have Bodies, and they know they have been baptized according to Christ's Institution; and if they know this, by believing the Scriptures they will know they be­long to Christ, and are Heirs of Happiness and Sal­vation, in the Faith of which they may draw nigh to God with full Assurance, as the Apostle rea­soneth, Heb. x 22. Having their Hearts sprinkled [Page 56] from an evil Conscience, and their Bodies washed in pure Water, that is, having had Christian Baptism.

Titius.

This must be Spirit Baptism can outward Water sprinkle the Heart from an evil Conscience?

Euseb.

You do as J. Mott has done all along through his Book, take for granted what he never proved, nor never will be allowed, viz. that there is any such Thing as Spirit Baptism in your Sense, without Water. The Spirit and Water are joyned together in Christian Baptism; and in this Text, if Sprinkling the Heart be the spiritual Part of Bap­tism, the outward Part and visible Sign is plain­ly enough expressed too, the Washing the Body in pure Water; you can have no Face for mak­ing this an internal Action, nor say that this out­ward Washing is not mentioned as the Christians Confidence. Take the whole Action together, and then think when Men have their Sins remitted by being Baptized, a Belief of this Quiets their Consciences, that were before guilty and condemning, so that a Belief of Remillion takes away an evil Conscience, which is a Conse­quence of being baptized with Water.

Titius.

How can Water remit Sins?

Euseb.

Water it iself can not remit Sins; but 'tis applied in Baptiism by the Command of God for this Purpose, and Christ has promised such a Priviledge to accompany it, it is no hard matter to believe it, if we can take God's Word, who a­lone [Page 57] is the Dispensor of Pardon, and may annex it to what Conditions he pleaseth; and the Pos­sibility of the Thing you may be convinced of from an allowed Instance, I mean John's Baptism which was with Water, and yet entituled Men to the Remission of their Sins upon proper Conditi­ons, Mark i [...].

Titius.

You have not made it appear that ever Christ commandeded Water Baptism.

Euseb.

'Tis evident and the Quakers allow that he commanded some Baptism to be continued in the Church, as a necessary Means of Salvation. I have shewed it can't be what you pretend to, and then you must needs allow it to be Water consigning the Spirit, to perform those inward Opperations which are our spiritual Sanctification: Hence St. Paul saith, He has cleansed and sancti­fied his Church, by the Washing of Water, by (or in the Word

Titius.

J. Mett shews that Text to be no Proof for Water Baptism, because the Word means Christ, who is called the Word of God, p. 10. so that he renders it thus, 'The Washing by the word, or by 'the Spirit, which is the same; for the Spirit of Christ is often in Scripture called Water, and the Work thereof in the Soul Washing. —

Euseb.

There never was so much Absurdity Nonsence and Heresy put together in so few Words: Here is a plain Denyal of a Distinction of Persons in the Trinity, Christ the Word and Spirit he makes Terms reciproeal. But to pass [Page 58] his Hetrodoxy, see the Sense with the reciprocal Use of these Names; the Water he says is the Spirit too, as 'tis often used in Scripture, then the Apostle must say after this Manner,Christ loved the Church and gave himself for it, that he (i. e. Christ) might cleanse and sanctify it by the Work of Christ by Christ. It will be the same Nonsence if it be (with the Work of the Spirit by the Spirit.) But if you will allow the Apostle to speak but common Sense, the Water must be understood literally, and then I will not contend about the following Passage, viz. by the Word, if it be, as J. Mott says, the Spirit, then here is Water and Spirit again together for Sanctification; if it means any Thing else, then Sanctification is attri­buted to the Water of Baptism without mention­ing the Spirit, which is doing some Honour to Water in Baptism.

Trem.

You shew so much of J. Mott's Nonsence, that I begin to think there is nothing else in the Book.

Euseb.

Truly 'tis a heap of poor Stuff; and I am ashamed for my self that I have taken so much Notice of him; but now I have begun, I will go a little further and consider what he says relat­ing to the Lord's Supper.

Titius.

Hold thou hast not yet cleared up this Point; Paul says he was sent not to Baptize, and if his Commission was not to Baptize, that is with Water, there is no reason to think the Rest had any Commission.

Euseb.
[Page 59]

You understand baptizing here to be with Water, though this Text says no more of Water then Matt xxviii, 19, and there is as much Reason to understand Water in that plain Com­mission, as in this of St.Paul, especially consi­dering that in other Places the Quakers, allow Water to be implyed, in the Word Baptize where there is nothing to determine it to a metaphorical Sense as Act. viii 12.16. cited by J. Mott p. 20, so that the other Apostles had a plain Commissi­on to do, what St. Paul saith he was not sent for; so that either his Commission was different from theirs, and then his Words don't disprove an Insti­tution of Water, or else to reconcile his Words to his Practice and the Commission Matt. xxviii, we must understand this Expression not absolutely negative but Comparatively only; thus the Par­ticle Not is often used in Scripture, and such a Manner of Speech is often used without designing an absolute Negative.

Titius.

I don't know any such instances we always take Not to be absolutely Negative.

Euseb.

I could give you a great many Instances; but two or three plain ones will suffice Jer. vii, 22. I spake not unto your Fathers nor commanded them in the day that I brought them up out of the Land of Egypt, concerning burnt Offerings or Sacri­fices, but this thing Commanded I them, &c. Only intimating. that God laid more Weight upon stedfast Obedience, than upon Sacrifices and [Page 60] burnt Offerings. There is a plainer Instance yet Hos. vi, 6. I disire Mercy and not Sacrifice and the Knowledge of God more than burnt Offering; to which our Saviour refers Matt. xii, 7. If [...] had known what this mean [...], I will have Mercy and not Sacrifice, &c. He must be extremly ignorant, that don't know God required Sacri­fices and burnt offering under the Law, but he laid greater weight upon Mercy. so St. Paul had realy a Commission to baptize, but preaching. [...] Gospell was a Work that more required his Masterly Abbities. However same he did.bap­tize even of those Corinthians; and in other Phers of his Travels we find he Baptized, as at Ma­cedonia, Lydia and her House, the Joylor and his House: at Ephesus he found some that were looked upon Disciples of Jesus only having [...] baptized with the Baptism of John. When St. Paul seemed surprised to hear them say, they had not heard any thing of the holy Ghost, he [...] what they were baptized into? Act. xix, which seemes to me a plain Intimation, that St. Paul thought Baptism with Water essential to a Chri­stian or Disciple of Jesus Christ; when he heard they were Disciples he concludes certainly they must have been baptized with Water; and when they tell him they had only been baptized into Johns Baptism, St. Paul lets them know, there was something farther necessary to make them Christians; for even John's Baptism Engaged them to receive the Religion of Christ which [Page 61] was not then published; And when they heard this they were baptized in the Name of the Lord Jesus, [...] make them compleat Disciples of Christ, this being done by St.Paul himself, shews how ne­cessary he thought the Baptism of Christ, and that it was with Water.

Titius.

How due is appear to be Water Baptism, when nothing is said of Water?

Euseb.

Because it is said, that by laying on of St.Paul's Hands they received the holy Ghost af­terwards; and the very same Expressions is allow­ed by the Quakers particularly J. Mott, to mean Water Baptism Act. viii, 16, as yet the holy Ghost was fallen upon none of them, only they were baptized in the Name of the Lord Jesus: now this in Act. xix, being expressed after the same Manner, and the giving of the holy Ghost after­wards, shews, that in both Places the same Thing is meant, viz. Baptism with Water.

Titius.

We don't deny the use of Water Baptism in the Apostles Time; but they did it in their own Freedom J. Mott tells you p. 9, i. e. Upon their own Heads, (as we often say) without any Au­thority or Command of Christ therefore.

Euseb.

This is a pi [...]i [...]ul Shift, and has neither Reason nor Scripture to suport it. They had Authority from Christ by the Commission Matt. xxviii, 19, to baptize; they constantly in every Place, where Men were converted by their Preaching, used Water and called it baptizing, [Page 62] and never called any thing else they did by that Name: of this they speak in such Manner as plainly to intimate the Necessity of it, and the consequent Benefits:And from their Example it has always been esteemed honourable in the Church, and practiced every where with an Opinion of its being a Means to make Men the Disciples of Christ and Entitle them to the Priviledges of Christianity; and indeed this opinion is sufficiently justifyed by the Manner of Expression Act. viii, 16, and xix, 5. they were baptized in Name of the Lord Jesus: for my part I should take this Expression to intimate a Command or Power derived from Christ, to do what is said to be done in his Name; ARISE­IS into the Name means that Baptism with Water, Entituled them to wear the Name of Christ, made them Christians, put them under the Discipline of his Religion, with a Title to the Priviledges of it; still, it will infer as strong­ly Christ's Institution, without which it could have none of these Effects. Besides this, the Letter J. Mott pretends to answer, had argued for a divine Institution or appointment of Water Baptism from Act. xx, 10, 16, to which J. Mott has pretended to Answer.

Titius.

He says the main Part of the Verse was left out, viz. calling on the Name of the Lord by which he says Men's Sins are washed away and not by Water Baptism.

Eusb.
[Page 63]

James can make any thing wasbing, he can make this Effect suit to Burning and Judg­ment and Repentance and Prayer and any thing besides application of Water; but when Annanias says arise and be wasbed with water, and wasb away thy Sins, it is very hard that Water may not claim the Effect called Wasbing rather then Prayer. But that was not at all to the purpose, the Effects were not disputed for in that Passage, but the Institution: and if J. Mott. had said Annanias did not direct Saul to be bapized, then we might have conclnded he thought all that God had oppointed for him to do, was to call on the Name of the Lord? but when Christ [...]rected him there, to know what was ordained or oppoint­el for him and for others in order to become Christians; and there he finds this direction, ar [...]e and be baptizad. we may conclude this to be a sivine appointment; here lay the Argument to which he gives no Answer at all.

Trem.

I confess Eusebius, you have given me a­bundant light and Satisfaction concerning the In­ [...]t [...]uon, Necessity and Benesits of water Baptism I thank you, for the pains you have taken; and for the rest, I can almost give up my self to an implicit belief, having seen so much of the foll and Imper­ [...]nence of J. Mott's anser: but vet if your Pati­once willhold out, let us bait a few words con­ [...]ning the Lord's Supper.

Th [...]ius.

I am sorry Tremlus to see thec so soon mdeu Conquest of Eusebius would not be able to [Page 64] make such Havcck of some of our Friends as he does of J. Mott.

Trem.

They ought to have printed the best An­swer they could make, and I believe they have; and you know how much they all admire this Book of J. Mott; and for that Reason I shall never ad­mire them for the future.

Euseb.

I am glad Tremulus it hath pleased God to open your eyes, and to make me in anv De­gree instrumental, in bringing. you out of this fatal Snare: For whilst rhey labour to fet aside the Institutions of Christ, and brirng Men to con­temn, slight and neglect them, they must be in­stigatcd by the Devil, thus to endeavour the Ex [...]i­pation of Christ's Religion and to overthrow the Constituticn of his Kingdom; and while their Principles reslect so much Dishonour upon Christ and spread such Confusion in his Church, to pre­tend they are immediately sent by God, and have the Witness of the holy Ghost; what can be more wicked and blasphemous? these are Sins of a blacker Nature than Drunkenness, Swearing and Fornication. The great Use and Benefit of J the Lord's Supper I have not lime now to ex­plain to you, but it will be well worth your while to read an exellent Treatise of the present Bishop so London upon that Subject, which I will put into your Hand, and I make no Doubt but it will give you full Satissaction in every Respect.

Trem.

The Quakers don't dem our Saviour's tating Bread, and drinking Wins with his Di [...]ci­ [...]les, [Page 65] and that it had a spiritual Signisication, and thatv be commanded them to do th like.

Titius,

J. Mott t [...]is you, it was only to shew tham how they should seed upon his Body and Blood spritually, when be should come again in Spirit in them.

Euseb.

St. Paul bids the Corinthians shew forth he Lord's Death till he come; I suspect the Qua­kers realty believe no coming of Christ but what 7. Mott calls in Spirit in them, nor no Resurrec­tion of Christ but in their Souls. And if Chfist is not to come bodily and visibly, then neither did he ascend visibly and bodily; and the Conse­quence of making these Things merely spiritual and allegorical (if the Quakers do so) is to de­stroy the Foundation of our Hope, and make the Apostles all Lyars, and the Faith of Christians all vain. But let J. Mott for once be in the Right, if by Passovcr he means the Supper of the Lord, out Saviour celebrated it with his Disciples to shew they should seed upon his Body and Blood spiritually, when he should be spiritually in them. And certainly for a Master to do a Thing before the Eyes of his Servants, to shew them hew to do it, is a very proper familar and easy Way of Instructing, and thus indeed we believe our blested Saviour taught his Disciples what he in tended they shoul]dl do in order to make a shew or Memorial of his Death: But would not any Body think then. they ought to do as they were shewd? Which was to perfrom an outward Ac­tion [Page 66] with a spiritual Signification. And without such outward Action, they never can do as they were shewed. And it is very plain that the Apo­stles, and the Church of Christ ever since, have observed our Lord's Direction in this Point, (ex­cept some Popish Corruptions which our Church hath reformed according to the primitive Model) and especially may we find plain Instruction in this Mater from St. Paul's Directions to the Co­rinthians, whom he commends for observing the Ordinances as he had delivered 'em to them, 1 Cor. xi 2. And though in respect to this Ordi­nance, he finds Fault with scme Irregularities in their manner of Celebration, yet he is so far from intimating an Indifference as to the obser­vation it self, that he asserts the Divine Institution v. 23. And what he had received in Command from Christ. lie goes on to relate to them, which is an outward taking the Bread and Cup, and after giving Thanks and Blessing, to bid them all real­ly cat and Drink, to she forth the Lord's Death, which as he exhorts them to v. 26, 28. so in the preceeding Chapter he relates such Effects and Benefits of receiving these outward Symbols of Christ's Body and Blood, as must certainly prove an Institution of perpetual Use and Necessity, 1 Cor. x 16, 17. The Cup of Blessing which we bless, is it it not the Communion of the Blood of Christ? The Bread which we breaks, is it not the Communion of the Body of Christ? For we [Page 67] being many, are one Bread and one Body; for we are all partakers of that one Bread.

Titius.

St. Paul never writ thus to any other Churches, J. Mott tells us.

Euseb.

The Epistles to the several Churches were adapted to some particuler Emergencies, and we are not to imagin, they contain all Instructions the Apostles gave to these Churches; but as they preached one Religion every where, we may con­clude, that whatever is delivered as Christian Doctrine or Institution to one Church, the same was taught in all the rest, and particular as to this Epistle, we find that all Christians in every Place are concerned in the Contents of it, it is a Catho­lick Epistle, directed to the Corinthians, with all that in every Place call on the Name of Jesus Christ our Lord. 1 Cor. i 2. And the Benefits of this Institution here mentioned are such as are ab­solutely necessary for all Christians, and therefore the Celebration a Duty for all; and accordingly we read that the first Converts to Christianity con­tinued stedfastly in the Apostles Doctrine and Fellowship, and in Breaking of Bread, and in Prayer, Act. ii 24. And at Troas, when the Disciples came together to break Bread, Paul preached unto them, Act. xx 7.

Titius.

J. Mott tells a particular Reason for Paul's observing this Supper among the Corinthians, because they were carnal and weak Believers, and to shew that Christ was not come spiritually in them.

Euseb.
[Page 68]

I am weary of hearing his Nonsense and Absurdities; how could they have Communion to the Body and Blood of Christ, which is cer­tainly a spiritual Priviledge, if Christ was not in them by his Spirit? How could St. Paul say to those very Corinthians, Chap. xii v. 13. We are all by one Spirit baptized into one Body, if the Spirit of Christ was not in them? Does J. Mott think Men may be baptized with the Spirit of Christ, and yet Christ not be in them spiritually? Thus you see the silly ignorant Creature opposite to himself as well as to all Truth and Reason If J. Mott had taken notice of what St. Paul says to these Corinthians, Chap. i v. 4, 5, 6, 7. he would not have pronounced them thus destitute of Christ's Spirit; St. Paul says they were emiched in every thing by him in all Utterance and Know­ledge, so that they came behind in no Gift. And Chap. vi [...]. 5. he says, And such were some of you; but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the Name of the Lord Jesus and by the Spirit of our God: What think you now of those carnal Believers without the Spirit of Christ.

Titius.

You have such turns for every Thing that I will not pretend to say any Thing more to you.

Trem.

Truly Titius I believe you have no more to say; you must needs be sensible that we have been wretchedly imposed upon, espicially by that silly impertinent Book of J. Mott. For my Part I must [Page 69] confess my self fully convinced by what Eusebius bas offered. I think Quakerism a very dangerous Snare, of which I hope by the Grace of God to keep clear of for the Future.

Euseb.

Give God the Glory, and I hope I shall see you stedfast and canstant in the Duties of a pi­ous and religious Life, according to the sacred In­stitutions of Christ.

Trem.

Dear Eusebius, I shall be glad of your intimate Friendship and further Advice relating to the Conduct of my self, that I may make sure the Salvation of my Soul.

Euseb.

You shall always be wellcome to the best Assistance I can give you, and I pray the God of Heaven to direct and bless you.

AMEN. FINIS.
[Page]

Lately printed and sold by John Peter Zenger in Smith-Street, New-York, A Letter to a Parishioner, &c. Which J. Mott pretended to answer in a Pamphlet entituled, the great Work of Christs Spirit, &c.

[Page]

ERRATA.

The reader is desired to Correct the mistake of the Press particularly Page 7 of the Preface for Paul read Peter, P. 9 l. 21. 5. A [...]tit [...]pon, l. 19 for 15. r. 20. verse, p. 10 l. 7 r [...] l. 17. dele for p. 7 l. 27. for offered r. asserted, [...]. r. Instances p. 12, l. 18. for which r. what p. 13 l. 6. r. unavoidable, l. 7 r. voluntarily. p. 15 l. 10 for were r. are p. 31 l. 15. dele all p. 44 l 24. for for r. of, p, 49 l. 15. dele of p. 53 l. 23. for for r. from, l. 28 for the several r. those sevaral p. 54 l. 10. r. none. shall p. 56 l. 18. r. as a ground of, l. 28. r. when 'tis, p. 62 l. 15 for ARISE [...]S r. or if tis to ONOMA, in the Original l. 26. for [...] p. 65 l. a [...]. r. [...]

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.