THE PEERAGE OF SCOTLAND, CONTAINING An HISTORICAL and GENEALOGICAL ACCOUNT of the NOBILITY of that Kingdom, from their ORIGIN to the present GENERATION: COLLECTED From the PUBLIC RECORDS, and ANCIENT CHARTULARIES of this Nation, the CHAR­TERS, and other WRITINGS of the NOBILITY, and the WORKS of our best HISTORIANS.

ILLUSTRATED with COPPER-PLATES.

By ROBERT DOUGLAS, Esq;.

EDINBURGH: Printed by R. FLEMING, And sold by him, and the other Booksellers in Edinburgh; and at London by A. MILLER, R. BALDWIN, D. WILSON, and T. DURHAM, Booksellers. M,DCC,LXIV.

To the RIGHT HONOURABLE JAMES DOUGLAS Earl of MORTON, Lord ABERDOUR, &c. Knight of the most Noble Order of the THISTLE, Clerk Re­gister for the Kingdom of Scotland, &c. &c.

MY LORD,

I Know not how the PUBLIC may receive the ensuing Work; but sure I am, they will not fail to applaud my Judgment in the Choice of a PATRON, eminent for encouraging every Undertaking that may tend either for the Honour or Interest of his Country: Allow me, therefore, the Honour to put the PEERAGE of SCOTLAND under your Lordship's Protection, and to subscribe myself,

MY LORD,
Your Lordship's most obliged, most devoted, and most obedient Servant, ROBERT DOUGLAS.

PREFACE.

THE Necessity of publishing a new PEERAGE of SCOTLAND, and the Utili­ty of it, is acknowledged by all. The Compiler of this present Work has attempted it upon a more regular and accurate Plan than has hitherto appear­ed: How far he has succeeded the World must judge: But if the most assidu­ous Application for many Years; if a painful Enquiry into the public Records, and ancient Chartularies; if an unwearied Search after every Degree of Know­ledge, necessary for carrying on so arduous a Task; if these have any Merit, or deserve the Favour of the Public, the Author flatters himself this Work, on Per­usal, will not be found deficient. Neither has he relied solely upon his own Skill: He acknowledges, with the utmost Gratitude, the Obligations he lies un­der to Walter MacFarlane, Esq; of that Ilk, for the generous and benevolent Communication of that Treasury of Scotch Antiquities of which he is possessed. Nor have the Keepers of the public Archives been wanting in contributing all in their Power to forward the Design.

BUT notwithstanding all that has been done, there doubtless may, and will be, Mistakes, such are unavoidable in a Work of this Kind, though the Author hopes they will not be found numerous, as all Manner of Pains has been taken to avoid them, as well by the Labour bestowed upon the Compilation, as by putting it in the Power of every Peer to correct or add to the History of his own Family, by sending him a Manuscript Copy some Time before Publication, they produc­ing sufficient Documents in Support of any Alteration made: And where the History of any particular Family in this Work varies, either from former Au­thors, or from received Family Opinions, Care has been taken to justify the Dif­ference of Sentiment, by undoubted Authorities quoted on the Margin.

ANY Inaccuracies that may be in Point of Language, 'tis hoped the Reader will overlook. It must be owned that has not been so much attended to. The chief and principal Point the Author had in View, and the great Object of his Attention being, in a plain and distinct Manner, to deduce the History of each Family from its Origin to the present Generation, and to ascertain their Genealogy and Chro­nology by undisputed Documents. This, 'tis hoped, is done, and nothing fur­ther is pretended. Such Escapes or Omissions as have been discovered in parti­cular Families since they were printed off, are carefully inserted in the Addenda at the End of the PEERAGE.

IT will probably be observed by our Readers, that certain Chartularies, and other Vouchers, quoted on the Margin, are said to be penes MacFarlane, though the Originals are actually in the Possession of others; but as that great and inge­nious [Page vi] Antiquary, in his valuable Collection, has authenticated Copies of all these Documents, the Author was obliged to quote those Copies when he had not Ac­cess to the Originals.

'Tis thought proper here also to inform our Readers, that in engraving the Arms of the Nobility, as prefixed to this Work, the Order is followed in which they are ranked in the Roll made up at the Union Parliament in 1706 and 1707, which has been looked on as an authentic Roll ever since.

IT is acknowledged, that, according to our printed Proposals, there should have been added a short System of Heraldry, &c. but as this Volume has swelled to a much greater Bulk than was expected, that Treatise must be reserved for the second Part of this Work, the BARONAGE, or an Account of the GENTRY of Scot­land; and as there are few Peers but have some Descendents who will appear in the BARONAGE, there will then be a proper Opportunity of publishing any re­markable Event that has been omitted here.

THE Addenda, or Alterations since this Work has been put to the Press, the Author has thrown at the End of this Volume; and, for the greater Ease to the Reader, has reduced them to alphabetical Order, by which Means any Thing wanted may easily be found out.

THE Reader is desired to excuse some seeming Inaccuracies that appear in numbering the Pages of this Work. These were occasioned by the Additions made to several Families since they were first printed off, whereby the Num­bers of many Pages are doubled.

SUBSCRIBERS.

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N.
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Q.
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R.
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T.
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W.
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Y.
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Nota, Such of our Subscribers as are here omitted, (and we are informed there are several, both in Scotland and England,) shall be gratefully inserted in the second Volume of this Work.

[Page]THE PEERAGE OF SCOTLAND.

HAMILTON Earl of ABERCORN.

THE first of the illustrious peerage of Scotland that presents to our readers, in alphabetical order, is HAMILTON Earl of ABERCORN, the undoubted heir-male of the great and noble family of Hamilton; a fami­ly who have equally distinguished themselves in the field and at the council-board, and have been no less remarkable in the histories of fo­reign nations, than in the annals of Scotland.

But as the dignity, estate, and honours of this house, have descended in the female as well as in the male succession, for its origin and antiquity, we refer our readers to the Ti­tle Duke of Hamilton, and deduce the family of Abercorn from their immediate predecessor,

X. JAMES, second earl of Arran, and duke of Chatelherault, the tenth generation of the family of Hamilton, in a direct male line. This earl married lady Margaret Douglas, eldest daughter of James earl of Morton, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.

1. James, earl of Arran and duke of Chatelherault, who died without issue.

2. Lord john, who was the first marquis of Hamilton, and carried on the line of the family.

3. Lord Claud, the first of the family of Abercorn.

For the other children, and their marri­ages, vide Title Duke of Hamilton.

XI. Lord CLAUD HAMILTON, third son of James earl of Arran and duke of Cha­telherault, when very young was appointed commendator of the abbacy of Paisley, up­on the resignation of John archbishop of St. Andrews, anno 1553,Crawfurd's Peerage of Scotl. Lodge's Peerage of Ire­land. Scots Compend.&c. which was ratified and approved by pope Julius III. He was a brave and gallant gentleman, of steady honour, and unchangeable integrity; who, by a series of virtuous actions, reflected lustre on his great ancestors, and ennobled the illustrious blood that ran in his veins, During the melancho­ly discords that prevailed in Scotland, under the unhappy reign of queen Mary, he ad­hered to her interest in all her misfortunes. Prompted by his own innate bravery, and his loyalty to his royal mistress, he appear­ed and distinguished himself in the last effort that was made in her cause at the battle of Langside, anno 1568. In vain he displayed the skill and courage of a great commander: the battle was lost, and proved fatal to the queen's party.

Immediately after the battle, lord Claud, with many others, was summoned to attend a parliament, called together by the earl of Murray, then regent, and, upon his refusal, was outlawed,Ibid. and his estate forfeited.

During the regency of the earl of Mar, his lands were given to the lord Semple, who kept a strong garrison in his castle, and exercised all around a severe military disci­pline, displaying every violence and oppressi­on that power can do, to maintain a precari­ous possession. At length this gallant lord, [Page 2] supported by his faithful tenants, rose in arms, besieged the castle,Peerage of Ireland, page 151, vol. III. M. S. Hist. of the family pe­nes com. de Abercorn. and obliged lord Semple to Iurrender at discretion.

During the regency of Morton, lord Claud was a sharer of the oppressions that bore down the Hamilton family. He was obliged to fly to England for safety, not daring to trust the prevailing faction, though his forfeiture had been repealed by the act of parliament con­firming the pacification of Perth, anno 1573. But when the king took the management of affairs into his own hands, and reflected on the different parties that divided the nation, he soon perceived that the flood of persecuti­on, that overwhelmed the Hamiltons, was ow­ing to no other cause but their zealous and steady attachment to his unhappy mother; he therefore restored them to all their estates and honours, and heaped many other favours upon them;Ib. et Chart. in pub. archiv. in particular, he bestowed upon lord Claud, and his heirs-male, or assigneys, by charter, all the lordship and barony of Paisley, with the pertinents belonging to the abbacy and monastery thereof,Ibid. ad an­num 1585. anno 1585. And, as a further testimony of his esteem and regard for him, he was pleased, in considera­tion of his constant loyalty, great losses and sufferings, to create him a peer, by the title of lord Paisley,Ibid. ad an­num 1587. anno 1587.

His majesty likewise granted, by another charter, to lord Claud Hamilton, now lord Paisley, and his heirs-male whatever, the ba­rony and regality of the burgh of Paisley,Ibid. ad an­num 1591. &c. anno 1591.

And,Ibid. ad an­num 1593. by another charter, the five pound land of Sanquhar, &c. anno 1593.

This lord died advanced in age and cha­racter, anno 1621, having married Margaret daughter of George lord Scton, by whom he had four sons and one daughter.

1. James, afterwards earl of Abercorn.

2. Sir Cland Hamilton, who married the daughter and heiress of sir Robert Hamilton of Elieston, in the county of Tyrone in Ire­land, by whom he had six sons and two daugh­ters; of them the Hamiltons of Elicston, Mon­terlony, and several other considerable families in Ireland, are descended. He was gentle­man of the bedchamber to the King, and was made constable and commander of the castle of Toome in the county of Antrim for life, anno 1618.Peerage of Ireland.

3. Sir George Hamilton of Greenlaw and Roserea, in the county of Tipperara in Ire­land, who behaved with great bravery in the service of his majesty king Charles I. He married, Ist, Isabella of the family of Ci­vicot of Bruges in Flanders,M. S. [...]tory of the family penes com. de Aber [...]orn. by whom he had a daughter, Margaret, married to sir Archi­bald Achinson of Gosford: 2dly, Mary, daughter of Walter earl of Ormond and Osso­ry, by whom he had a son James, who died Ibid. unmarried.

4. Sir Frederic Hamilton, a gallant officer, who acquired great reputation under Gustavus Adolphus, and was colonel of a regiment under king Charles I. He married Sidney, daughter of sir John Vaughan, and was an­cestor of the viscount of Boyne in Ireland.Ibid. and peerage of Ireland.

His daughter Margaret was married to William marquis of Douglas.

XII. JAMES, first son of Claud lord Pais­ley, commonly designed master of Paisley, was a man of eminent parts, and much tak­en notice of at court. He was highly esteem­ed by the King, who made him one of the lords of his privy-council, and gentleman of his bed-chamber, when he was but a young man; and gave him by a charter, an­no 1600,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1600. the office of high-sheriff of the county of Linlithgow, with all the fees, &c. thereto belonging, to him and his heirs-male whatever.

And by another charter in 1601,Ib. ad ann. 1601. the lands and manour of Abercorn, Braidmeadows, &c.

The king was afterwards pleased, on ac­count of his great merit, to create him ba­ron of Abercorn; and, by a new charter, to erect the lands of the lordship and barony of Abercorn, the lands of Duddingston, New­ton and Duntarvie, &c. into one free barony, anno 1603;Ib. ad ann. 1063. and in 1606, his majesty fur­ther honoured him with the titles of earl of Abercorn, baron of Paisley, Hamilton, Mount­castle and Kilpatrick, by patent to him and his heirs-male whatever;Crawfurd's Peerage. Peerage of Ireland. Scot [...] Compend. and the same year appointed him one of the commissioners to treat of an union with England.

He likewise granted him by charter, in 1612, the eight-merk land of Moryhagane, Keirmouer, &c. Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1612.

He was appointed one of the lords of the privy-council of the kingdom of Ireland, and was summoned to attend the parliament there with the precedency of an earl; and had a large grant of lands in the barony of Stra­bane, upon which he built a strong and fair castle,Peerage of Ireland. and a church.

He married Mariana, daughter of Thomas lord Boyd,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1589. by whom he had five sons and three daughters.

1. James, his heir.

2. Sir Claud Hamilton, afterwards baron of Strabane.

3. Sir William Hamilton knight, who was long resident at Rome from Henrietta Maria queen-dowager of England; and married Jane, daughter of sir Alexander Colquhoun [Page 3] of Luss, widow of Alan lord Cathcart, but died without issue.

4. Sir George Hamilton, ancestor of the present earl of Abercorn.

5. Sir Alexander Hamilton knight, who married Elizabeth of the family of Beding­field of Oxburgh, and had a son who settled in Germany, and was raised by the emperor Leopold to the rank of a count of the em­pire, where his posterity still enjoy large pos­sessions and privileges.

1. Daughter, lady Anne, married to Hugh lord Semple.

2. Lady Margaret, married to sir Willi­am Cuninghame of Caprington.

3. Lady Lucy, died unmarried.

The earl died before his father, anno 1618, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. JAMES, second earl of Abercorn, who succeeded also to his grandfather, lord Paisley, in 1621.

He was in great favour with his majesty king James VI. who, on account of his own personal merit,Peerage of Ireland. and the great loyalty and faithful services of his noble ancestors, was pleased to advance him to the peerage of the kingdom of Ireland, where he had a vast e­state, by the title of lord Hamilton of Stra­bane, 18th Oct. 1616. But the patent be­ing to his father's heirs-male, and the Irish estates being provided to his younger bro­thers, he, on that account, resigned that ti­tle to king Charles I. who immediately con­ferred it on his next brother, Claud Hamil­ton, with the precedency of the former cre­ation by patent,Ibidem, and M. S. history of the family. bearing date 14th August 1634.

He married Catharine, daughter and sole heiress of Gervais Clifton of Leighton Broom­swold, widow of Esme Stewart duke of Len­nox and Richmond, by whom he had three sons.

1. James, lord Paisley, who died before him, having married a daughter of William Lenthall of Burford in the county of Oxford, Esq; speaker of the house of commons in the long parliament, by whom he had an on­ly daughter, Catharine, married, 1st, to her cousin, William Lenthall, Esq; to whom she had two sons: and, 2dly, to her cousin, Charles earl of Abercorn; of whom here­after.

2. William, was colonel of a regiment, and killed in the wars in Germany, without issue.

3. George, who succeeded to his father's estate and honours, and was third carl of A­bercorn; but dying unmarried at Padua in his fourney to Rome, in him the male-line of the eldest son of James first earl of Abercorn be­came extinct,Peerage of Ireland. we therefore return to

XIII. CLAUD, second son of James first earl of Abercorn, dignified, as already observed, with the title of lord Hamilton of Strabane, by a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1631. Claudo Hamilton Domino de Strabane, &c. married lady Jean Gordon, daughter of George mar­quis of Huntley, by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

1. James, lord Strabane.

2. George, who succeeded his brother.

1. Daughter, Catharine, married, Ist, to James, eldest son of sir Frederick Hamilton, fourth son of Claud, first lord Paisley: 2dly, to Owen Wynne of Lurganbuy, Esq; and 3dly, to John Bingham of Castlebar, Esq;

2. Mariana, married to Richard Perkins of Lifford, Esq;

Claud died anno 1638, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

XIV. JAMES, third lord Strabane, who, from his loyalty and steady adherence to the interest of his masters king Charles I. and II. suffered many hardships and variety of losses.

He was unhappily drowned as he was bath­ing himself in the river Maine, anno 1655; and having no issue, was succeeded by his brother,

XIV. GEORGE, fourth lord Strabane, who married Elizabeth, daughter, and at length sole heiress, of Christopher Fagen of Filtrim, Esq; by whom he had two sons.Peerage of Ireland, and M. S. history of the family.

1. Claud, his heir.

2. Charles, who succeeded his brother.

1. Daughter, Anne, married to John Broun of Neale, Esq;

2. Mary, married to Gerard Dillon, esq; prime serjeant at law to king James VII.

And dying anno 1668, was succeeded by his eldest son,

XV. CLAUD, fifth lord Strabane, and fourth earl of Abercorn, who succeeded as heir-male to George third earl, as remark­ed above.

He followed the fortune of king James VII. at the revolution in 1688, attended that prince in his expedition to Ireland, where he was sworn one of his privy-council, and had a considerable command in his army; in consequence of which he was attainted of high treason, and his title of lord Hamilton of Strabane forseited, by the parliament of that kingdom, after king James had retired into France; and, dying unmarried in 1690, [Page 4] he was succeeded in all his Scotch honours and titles by his brother,Peerage of Ireland, and M. S. history of the family.

XV. CHARLES, fifth earl of Abercorn, who got his brother's attainder reversed in 1692, and was restored to his estate and ho­nours of lord Hamilton of Strabane in Ire­land, which he enjoyed till the general re­sumption of grants was made by the English sumption of grants was made by the English parliament.

He married, as already observed, Catha­rine, only daughter of James lord Paisley, eldest son of James second earl of Abercorn, and widow of William Lenthall of Burford, Esq; by whom he had only one child, who died an infant before himself. And he dy­ing in 1701, without issue, the male line of the second son of the first earl of Abercorn failed, whereby the title of lord Hamilton of Strabane became extinct; and the third son of the first earl dying without issue, as before observed, the estate and honours of Abercorn devolved upon the next heir-male, descended of the fourth son of the said-first earl, to whom we now return.

XIII. Sir GEORGE HAMILTON, fourth son of James first earl of Abercorn, was a man of steady loyalty, great gallantry, and invariably attached to the interest both of king Charles I. and II. During the civil war, he exerted himself with extraordinary courage in the royal cause, under the directi­on of his brother-in-law the marquis, after­wards duke of Ormond; and, after living several years in exile, during the usurpation of Oliver Cromwel, he returned at the resto­ration of king Charles II. who immediately created him a baronet.

He married Mary, daughter of Thomas viscount Thurles, eldest son of Walter earl of Ormond, and sister of the first duke, by whom he had six sons and three daughters.

1.Ibid. James.

2. Sir George, who was a count and ma­jor-general in France, and was killed at the battle of Saverne, having married Frances, daughter and co-heiress of Richard Fennings of Sandbridge in the county of Hereford, Esq; maid of honour to Anne, duchess of York, by whom he had three daughters, all nobly married, viz. Elizabeth, to Richard viscount Ross; Frances, to Henry viscount Dillon; Mary, to Nicholas viscount Kings­land.

3. Anthony, who went to France with king James VII. and was there raised to the rank of a lieutenant-general. He is said to be au­thor of some French pieces that bear the name of count Hamilton.

4. Thomas, who was captain of a ship of war.

5. Richard, who followed king James VII. to France, where he rose to the rank of a lieu­tenant-general.

6. John, who was killed in the king's ser­vice at the battle of Aghrim.

1. Daughter, Elizabeth, married to Phil­bert count of Gramont, brother to Anthony duke of Gramont in France.

2. Lucia, married to Sir Donald O'Brian of Leminegh, Bart.

3. Margaret, married to Matthew Ford of Coolgreny, Esq;

XIV. JAMES HAMILTON, eldest son and apparent heir of Sir George, was a great fa­vourite of king Charles II. whom he attend­ed during his exile, and was one of the gen­tlemen of his bed-chamber, and colonel of a regiment; but going a volunteer aboard the fleet, under the command of James, then duke of York, in one of his sea-expeditions against the Dutch, he had his leg shot off by a cannon-ball, of which wound he died on 6th June 1673, (his father being then alive) and left issue, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John lord Culpeper,Ibid. three sons.

1. James, afterwards earl of Abercorn.

2. Colonel George, who had the com­mand of a regiment at the battle of Steen­kirk, where he was killed, anno 1692, with­out issue.

3. William Hamilton, esq; who married Margaret, daughter of sir Thomas Culpeper, and was ancestor of the Hamiltons of Chilson.

He was succeeded by his eldest son.

XV. JAMES, who also succeeded to his grand-father, anno 1679, and to the titles and honours of Abercorn, upon the death of earl Charles, in 1701, as already remarked, and was the sixth earl of Abercorn.

He was appointed one of the grooms of the bed-chamber to king Charles II. when but 17 years of age.

He was one of the lords of the privy­council to king James VII. and under him had the command of a regiment of horse.

He came early into the revolution, and was created viscount of Strabane, and ba­ron of Mount-castle in Ireland, by king William, anno 1701.

He sat in the Scotch parliament anno 1706,Crawfore Peerage. and continued in it till the union was con­cluded.

He was also of the privy-council to king William, queen Anne, and king George I. and married Elizabeth, daughter and heiress [Page 5] of sir Robert Reading of Dublin, Bart. by whom he had six sons, and four daughters.

1. James his heir.

2. John, who died unmarried, and left a considerable estate to his brother George.

3. George, who was deputy cofferer to the prince of Wales' houshold, and member of parliament for Wells in Somerset-snire in England, and married the daughter and heir­ess of colonel William Coward of Wells, by whom he had six sons, and six daughters.

4. Francis, a clergyman, who enjoyed se­veral benefices in Ireland, married Dorothy, daughter and co-heiress of James Forth of Redwood, secretary to the commissioners of his majesty's revenue, and had issue.

5. William, who was bred to the sea, and was unfortunately cast away with lord Belhaven, anno 1721.

6. Charles, comptroller of the green cloth to the prince of Wales, one of the seven com­missioners for stating and examining the pub­lic accompts in 1742, and receiver-general of his majesty's revenues in the island of Minor­ca, anno 1743.

1. Daughter, lady Elizabeth, married, Ist, to William Brownlaw of Lurgan, Esq; 2dly, to Martin, count de Kearnie, in France.

2. Lady Mary, married to Henry Coo­ley of Carberry, Esq; in the county of Kil­dare.

3. Lady Philippa, married, Ist, to the Rev. Benjamin Pratt, dean of Down, chap­lain of the house of commons in Ireland: and, 2dly, to Michael Connel of London, Esq;

4. Lady Jean, married to lord Archi­bald Hamilton, brother of James duke of Hamilton.

The earl died, anno 1734, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XVI. JAMES, seventh earl of Abercorn, who was appointed one of the privy council of Great-Britain by king George II. anno 1738, and of Ireland the year following.

He married Anne, daughter of colonel John Plummer of Blakesware, in the coun­ty of Hertford, by whom he had six sons, and one daughter.

1. James, now earl of Abercorn.

2. Captain John Hamilton, who had the command of the Lancaster man of war, a gentleman of singular worth and merit, but unfortunately drowned, as he was passing in his boat from his ship to the land at Ports­mouth, in the flower of his age, anno 1755.

3. William, died young.

4. George, who is a clergyman of the church of England, and one of his maje­sty's chaplains.

5. Plummer, died young.

6. William, lieutenant of the Victory man of war, in which he was, with many others, unfortunately cast away.

His daughter, lady Anne, was married to sir Henry MacWorth, Bart.

The earl dying in 1744, was succeeded by his eldest son, James, the present earl.

XVII. JAMES, eighth earl of Abercorn, a lord of the privy-council in Ireland, was called up to the house of lords in that king­dom in March 1735—6.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gules, three cinque­foils; pierced ermin [...]: 2d and 3d, argent, a ship with her sails furled up, sable.

SUPPORTERS; two antelopes argent, their horns, ducal collars, chains, and hoofs, or.

CREST; in a ducal coronet, or, an oak fructed and penetrated transversely in the stem by a frame-saw, proper; the frame or.

CHIEF SEATS.

Duddingston in Mid-Lothian, and Paisley in Renfrew-shire, Scotland;—Witham, in the county of Essex, 32 miles from London, England;—and Stephens-Green, near Dub­lin, Ireland.

SANDILANDS Lord ABERCROMBIE.

AS the rise and descent of the noble and ancient sirname of SANDILANDS, is to be found under the title of Lord Torphi­chen, we shall deduce the descent of this ho­nourable family from their immediate ance­stor, viz.

Sir JAMES SANDILANDS of Calder. He married,Chart. penes du [...]em de Roxburgh. 1st, Margaret, daughter and heiress of Andrew Ker younger of Cessford, by Mar­garet Hepburn, lady Dirleton, by whom he had a son,

John, ancestor of lord Torphichen.

Sir James married, 2dly, Margaret, daugh­ter and heiress of sir John Kinloch of Cru­vie,Chart. penes dom. Torphi­chan. by whom he had a son,

I. JAMES SANDILANDS, the first of this family, who, in right of his mother, got the [Page 6] estate of Cruvie; and obtained a charter from king James V.Chart. in pub. archiv. JacoboSandi­landi de Cru­vie, &c. of the lands of Petcon­cardy, before the year 1542.

He married Catharine, daughter of sir William Scot of Balweerie, by whom he had a Son,

James, his heir,—and three daughters.

1. Margaret, married to Laurence lord Oliphant.

2. Mary, married to David Forrester of Carden.

3. Helen, married to George Towers of Innerleith.

II. JAMES SANDILANDS, designed of Cruvie and St. Monance, succeeded his fa­ther; and got a charter from queen Mary of some lands in Fife.Ibidem. He married Eliza­beth, daughter of Alexander Meldrum of Segie, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. James.

2. David, who acquired some lands in Fife,Ibidem. anno 1586.

3. Andrew, who was tutor to James lord Torphichen, anno 1595.

Elizabeth, Ibidem. married to John Boswell of Balmuto.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. Sir JAMES SANDILANDS of St. Mo­nance,Ibid. Jacobo Sandilandi de St. Monance militi, &c. who got a charter from king James

VI. of the lands of Weddersbie, Wood­head, Bowhouse, Gadwin, &c. dated 1599.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Bethune of Creich, by whom he had a son and successor,

IV. Sir WILLIAM SANDILANDS of St. Monance, who got a charter of the lands of Houston from king James VI.Ibidem.

Also a charter of the lands of Easter and Wester St.Ibidem. Monance, &c. anno 1608.

And another charter of a great many o­ther lands in Fife.Ibid. Guiliel­mo Sandilan­di de St Mo­nance, &c.

He married Janet, daughter of— Bothwell, by whom he had a son,

Sir James Sandilands,—and two daugh­ters.

1. Margaret, married to sir James Lear­month of Balcomy, one of the senators of the college of justice.

2. Christian, married to Adam Bothwell of Pitcaly.

He was succeeded by his only son,

V. Sir JAMES SANDILANDS of St. Mo­nance,Ibidem. who got a charter from king Charles I. of the lands and barony of Fairnyf [...]at.

Also a charter of the lands and barony of Abercrombie,Ibid. Jacobo domino San­dilandi de St. Monance mi­liti. &c.

He was a man of great loyalty and integri­ty; a firm and steady friend of king Charles I. for which he was, by that prince, created lord Abercrombie,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an. 1647. haere­dibus mascu­lis e corpore suo. by letters patent, dated 12th Decem. 1647, to him and the heirs­male of his body.

He married lady Anne Carnegie, daugh­ter of David earl of Southesk, by whom he had a son and successor,

VI. JAMES, second lord Abercrombie; but he dying without issue, and there being no descendents of the patentee's body, the honours became extinct.

ARMS.

Two coats, quarterly; 1st and 4th ar­gent, a bend azure, for Sandilands: 2d and 3d argent, a man's heart ensigned with an imperial crown, proper; and on a chief, a­zure, three mullets of the first.

GORDON Earl of ABERDEEN.

THough it is highly probable that this no­ble family is descended from the great and illustrious house of GORDON, whose ori­gin, grandeur and antiquity, is fully set forth under the title of Duke of Gordon, yet we can­not pretend to ascertain their first ancestor.

Mr. Crawfurd, in his lives of the offi­cers of state, mentions sir William Gordon, who swore fealty to king Edward I. for some lands in the shire of Berwick,Prynne's col­lections, v. 2. anno 1296; and alledges, that these were the lands of Coldingknows, the ancient inheritance of the family of Haddo, &c.

That this sir William got afterwards sun­dry lands from king Robert Bruce, in re­ward of his great merit and faithful services, &c. that he appears to have been uncle to Alicia, the heiress of Gordon; that he had a son,

Sir William Gordon of Coldingknows, who went from the south to the north of Scotland, with his cousin sir Adam, when he got the lands of Strathbogie from king Robert I.

That this second sir William married the daughter and sole heiress of John de Citha­rista, [Page 7] lord of the barony of Methlic;Lives of the officers of state, page 266. and that he was the ancestor of this noble fami­ly, &c.—So far Mr. Crawfurd.

But as we cannot exactly connect the Gor­dons of Coldingknows with these of Methlic and Haddo, of whom there are authentic re­cords for above 300 years, we shall proceed to deduce their descent from undoubted au­thority.

I. PATRICK GORDON of Methlic, liv­ed in the reign of king James I. and made a great figure in Scotland in the beginning of the reign of king James II. to whom he was a firm and steady friend.

He joined the king's forces, under the command of his cousin the earl of Huntly, against the earl of Crawfurd,Hathornden's hist. in vita Jacobi 2di. and lost his life in the cause, at the battle of Arbroath, anno 1445.

He left issue, a son and successor,

II. JAMES GORDON of Methlic, who obtained from king James II. on account of his father's great merit and faithful services, a grant of a part of the barony of Kelly,Chart. in pub. archiv. then vested in the crown, by the forfeiture of Alexander earl of Crawfurd.

And being a man of great oeconomy, he acquired several other lands,Ib. and lives of the officers of state, page 228. which are still in the possession of the family.

He married—daughter of— by whom he had issue, five sons and two daughters.

1. Patrick, his Heir.

2. Robert Gordon of Fetterletter, whose only daughter was married to sir John Gor­don of Gight.

3. Alexander, who was bishop of Aber­deen, after the death of bishop Elphingston.Spottiswood's church hist.

4. George Gordon of Auchterhouse.

5. James, who was rector of Lonmay and prebendary of Aberdeen.

1. Daughter, Isabel, married to Alexan­der Allardice of that ilk.

2. Margaret, married to Alexander Fra­zer of Dorres.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. PATRICK GORDON, promisenously designed of Methlic and of Haddo, who got a charter under the great seal from king James III.Chart. in pub. archiv. Pat. Gordon de Methlic, &c. anno 1481.

Also a charter from king James IV. of the lands of Brokan [...]h,Ib. ad annum 1505. Middletown, &c.

And a charter from king James V. of the lands of Knockenblevy,Ibid. ad ann. 1514. with several others.

He made several acquisitions to his estate from lord Sinclair, the bishop of Aberdeen, and others; all which are contained in a charter under the great seal,Ibid.'& chart. penes com. de Aberdeen. dated anno 1487.

He married Marion, daughter of sir James Ogilvie of Findlater, by whom he had three sons and two daughters.

1. George, his apparent heir.

2. Alexander Gordon of Braikie.

3. James.

His eldest daughter was married to— Barclay of Towie.

His second daughter to—Cumin of Altyr.

He lived to a great age, and died in 1533.

IV. GEORGE, first son and heir-apparent of Patrick Gordon of Methlic and Haddo, died before his father, having married a daughter of—Hay of Dalgittie, by whom he had a son,

V. JAMES GORDON of Haddo and Meth­lic, who succeeded his grandfather, and got charters under the great seal, in the reign of king James V.Chart. in pub. archiv. of a great many lands, too numerous to be inserted here.

In the beginning of queen Mary's trou­bles, he was one of those barons who sign­ed the association for the defence of the young prince,The original of this associ­ation is in the library of the college of Glasgow. king James VI. anno 1567; but no sooner knew that the queen had been imposed upon, than he joined the earl of Huntly, who was her lieutenant in the north, adhered faithfully and firmly to her interest ever after, and obtained from that princess charters of several other lands and baronies.Chart. in pub. archiv.

He married Marjory, daughter of sir Thomas Menzies of Pitsodils, comptroller of Scotland in the reign of queen Mary, by whom he had six sons.They are mentioned in an entail dat­ed 1555 in the public re­gister.

1. Patrick, his apparent heir.

2. Robert Gordon of Faach.

3. James.

4. David, who was ancestor of the Gor­dons of Nethermuir.

5. John Gordon of Tilliehilt.

6. Alexander.

He died anno 1582.

VI. PATRICK GORDON, the eldest son and heir apparent, died before his father, leaving issue, by Agnes his wise, daughter of Alexander Frazer of Muchil, ancestor of lord Frazer, one son,

VII. JAMES GORDON of Methlic and Haddo, who succeeded his grandfather, anno 1582. He obtained charters from king James VI. of the lands of Kirktown, Tarvis, Brak­la, and Tullielt;Chart. in pub. archiv, also the lands of Methlic, Haddo, Orchardlie, and many others.

[Page 8] He married Jean, the daughter of William lord Keith, and sister of George earl-mar­shal, by whom he had two sons.

1. George.

2. William.

He died in the beginning of the year 1624.

VIII. GEORGE, eldest son and apparent heir of James Gordon of Haddo, &c. died before his father,Lives of the officers of state and Mr. Mill's collections, ad ann. 1608. having married Margaret, daughter of Alexander Bannerman of Elsick, by whom he had a son,

IX. Sir JOHN GORDON of Haddo, who was served heir to his grandfather,Ibid. & char­ta in cancel­laria. anno 1624.

He was a man of great parts, loyalty and magnanimity; and was next in command to the marquis of Huntly, in conducting the forces that were raised for the king against the covenanters, anno 1639.

At the battle of Turreff he behaved with great courage and valour; and for his good services was created a baronet by king Charles I. anno 1642.

This sir John, in many other instances, sig­nalized himself in behalf of his majesty. In 1643, he defended his house of Kelly against the covenanters, and being reduced to the last extremity, was obliged to capitulate, which he did upon honourable terms. But he was no sooner in his enemy's power, than he was sent to Edinburgh, and imprisoned in the church, which hath gone by the name of Haddo's-hold ever since that time. And though he had the king's commission, and acted all along by his majesty's authority, yet he was tried,Bp. Guth­ry's memories, and lives of the officers of state. condemned, and executed at the cross of Edinburgh, anno 1644.

His estate was forfeited, and the seque­stration continued till after the restoration.

He left behind him the character of a great and eminent loyalist, and a man in every re­spect worthy of the family from whence he was descended.

He married Mary, daughter of William Forbes of Tolquhoun, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Sir John, his successor.

2. Sir George, who was first earl of A­berdeen.

His daughter was married to Sir John For­bes of Waterston.

Sir John Gordon of Haddo, his eldest son, was restored to his father's title and estate immediately after the restoration, and died anno 1665, having married a daughter of Alexander lord Pitsligo, by whom he had no sons, and but one daughter, who was married to sir James Gordon of Lesmore, whereby his title and estate devolved upon his brother,

X. Sir GEORGE GORDON of Haddo, second son of sir John, who being a man of learning, and particularly eminent for his knowledge in the laws, was made one of the senators of the college of justice anno 1680, president of the session in 1681, and lord high chancellor of Scotland in 1682. And having acquitted himself with honour and re­putation in all these high employments, was, by his majesty king Charles II. in conside­ration of the untainted loyalty of his ance­stors, the great loyalty and sufferings of his father, and his own constant zeal and affec­tion to the interest of the monarchy, &c. created earl of Aberdeen,Chart. in pub. archiv. Haere­dibus mascu­lis e corpore suo &c. viscount of Tor­mantine, lord Haddo, Methlic, Tarvis and Kelly, by letters patent, dated 30th Nov. 1682.

He married Anne,Lives of the officers of state p. 427. daughter and heiress of George Lockhart of Torbrecks, by whom he had two sons and four daughters.

1. George, lord Haddo, who died, before his father, unmarried.

2. William, afterwards earl of Aberdeen.

1. Daughter, lady Anne, married to A­lexander earl of Eglington.

2. Lady Martha, married to John Udney of Udney.

3. Lady Mary, married to Alexander lord Salton.

4. Lady Margaret.

He died in the 83d year of his age, anno 1720, and was succeeded by his son,

XI. WILLIAM, second earl of Aber­deen, who was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scotland, anno 1721; and was al­so re-elected to the next British parliament. In both which he shewed himself a true lover of his country.

He married, 1st, lady Mary Lesly, daugh­ter of David earl of Leven, by whom he had one daughter, lady Anne, married to Wil­liam earl of Dumfries.

He married, 2dly, lady Susan, daughter of John duke of Athol, by whom he had one son.

George, now earl of Aberdeen,—and one daughter,

Lady Catharine, married, 1st, to Cosmo duke of Gordon: 2dly, to colonel Staats-Long Morris.

The earl married, 3dly, lady Anne, daugh­ter of Alexander duke of Gordon, by whom he had four sons, and one daughter.

1. William Gordon of Fyvie, Esq; cap­tain of a troop of dragoons.

[Page 9] 2. Cosino, an officer in the guards.

3. Alexander Gordon, Esq; advocate.

4. Charles.

His daughter, lady Henrietta Gordon, mar­ried to Robert Gordon of Haugh-head, Esq;.

He died anno 1745, and was succeeded by

XII. GEORGE, third earl of Aberdeen, who was elected one of the sixteen Scotch peers to the British parliament called to meet in 1747; and again in 1754.

He married miss Catharine Hanson, daugh­ter of Mr. Oswald Hanson late of Wakefield, in York-shire. by whom he hath two sons, and four daughters.

1. George, lord Haddo.

2. Mr. William.

Ist daughter, lady Catharine.

2. Lady Anne.

3. Lady Susan.

4. Lady Mary.

ARMS.

Azure, three boar's heads couped, within a double tressure flowered and counter-flowered with thistles, roses, and flowers de lisses or.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter a man, re­presenting one of the senators of the college of justice, in robes proper; and on the sini­ster a minister of state, in his robes also.

CREST; two arms, from the shoulder, na­ked, holding a bow proper, to let an arrow fly.

MOTTO; Fortuna sequatur.

CHIEF SEATS,

Haddo-house, &c. in Aberdeen-shire.

ABERNETHY Lord ABERNETHY.

THE family of Abernethy is of great an­tiquiry, and made a considerable figure in Scotland before sirnames were used. And tho' 'tis evident there was no peerage in the family, till Laurence Abernethy of Salton was created a lord of parliament by king James II. yet, in compliance with the example of our historians, who have always looked upon them in this rank, on account of the considerable place they held amongst the great barons, we have here inserted them in the first part of this work, and have followed the same ex­ample in some other families, which the can­did reader will easily discover.

It is the opinion of some antiquaries, that the Abernethies are of Pictish extraction, and that Alan, or Alexander, one of their ance­sters, was a man of the first rank in the reign of king Malcolm Canmore,Abercromb. [...] [...] vol. [...]. p. 446. Stewar [...]'s hist. of the royal family. and married Helen, daughter of Walter first lord high steward of Scotland, &c. But as this is only tradition, we proceed to deduce their descent by incon­testable documents, from

1. HUGH, who flourished in the reign of king David I. son of king Malcolm Canmore, who succeeded to the crown of Scotland, an­no 1124, and died in 1153.

This Hugh is particularly mentioned in se­veral charters and confirmations of William the Lion,Chart. penes fa [...] de Douglas. still preserved. He was father of

II. ORME, a man of considerable distincti­on in the reigns of Mal [...]olm IV. and William the Lion, who succeeded him, anno 1165.

He was in possession of the lands of Dun­loppin in the reign of king Malcolm, which appears from a confirmation of these lands to his son Laurence, by king Alexander III. here­after mentioned. He had also at that time the lands of Balbrennin; for we find him, in the next reign,Ibidem. excambing them, with earl Dun­can, for the lands of Glenduogyn and Balma­dethyn.

This Orme is witness in a charter of king Malcolm's,Chartulary of St. Andrews, penes Mac­Farlane. with Arnsold bishop of St. An­drews, in or before the year 1162; in which year that bishop died.

He obtained from king William a grant of the lands of Abernethyn,Ibidem. in Strathearn, ‘"to him and his heirs, &c."’ from which his son and successors assumed their sirnames.

He got also a charter of confirmation from the same prince,Chart. pence fam de Douglas. of the lands of Glenduogyn and Balmadethyn, which he received from Duncan earl of Fife, in exchange for Balbren­nin, ‘"to and in favours of Orme the son of Hugh, &c."’ to which Andrew bishop of Caithness, Nichol chancellor of Scotland, Ri­chard de Morvile constable, David Oli [...]ard justiciar, are witnesses, in or before the year 1185, in which year the bishop died.

He left issue a son,

Laurence, his heir,—and a daughter, mar­ried to Henry Rule of Balmerino,Simson's es­say on the fa­mily of Dou­glas. with whom he got a ten merk land of old extent; a merk then being one third of a pound weight of silver. He was succeeded by his son,

III. LAURENCE, lord Abernethy, who made a donation of the patronage of the church of Abernethy to the monastery of Arbroath; and legated to the canons regular of St. An­drews ten shillings yearly, payable out of his [Page 10] lands of Bambreich, and that with consent of sir Patrick Abernethy his son and heir,Chartularv of St. Andrews. whose seal is also appended to the said donation.

He got a charter of the lands of Dunlop­pin from king Alexander II. ‘"to Laurence son of Orme, son of Hugh, &c."’ and bears, that it was conformable to a charter of king Malcolm, and confirmation of king William, to his father,Charta penes fam. de Douglas. in these words: Sicut charta Malcolmi regis, et confirmatio domini regis Willielmi patri meo, testantur, et confirmant. The witnesses are, William de Bosch chancel­lor, Malcolm earl of Fife, William Cumin earl of Buchan, justiciar of Scotland, John de Max­well, &c. anno 1222.

He also got a charter of confirmation of the lands of Glendogyn and Balmadethyn from the same prince; to which William earl of Buchan,Ibidem. justiciar, Henry de Baliol, cham­berlain, Henry de Stirling, &c. are witnesses, anno 1223.

He was one of the guarantees of a peace between king Alexander II of Scotland, and king Henry III.Rymer's foed. Angliae, tom. I. p. 428. of England, anno 1244; and dying soon thereafter, was succeeded by his son,

IV. Sir PATRICK ABERNETHY of that ilk,Chartulary of St. Andrews, dom. Patrici­us Abernethy, filius et haeres Laurentii, &c. who, in a donation to the priory of St. Andrews, is designed son and heir of Lau­rence.

He left issue three sons, and one daughter.

1. Hugh, his heir.

2. William Abernethy of Salton,Chartulary of Dryburgh, penes Mac­Farlane, ad annum 1628, et chart. in archiv. fam. de Marr, &c. ancestor of lord Abernethy of Rothemay and Salton, &c.

3. Henry, who is witness in aChartulary of St An­drews. charter of king Alexander III. anno 1260.

His daughter, Margaret, was married to Contract penes fam. de Douglas. Hugh, son and heir to William lord Dou­glas, eldest brother to William the Hardy, in 1259; but by him she had no issue.

He died before the year 1257, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. HUGH lord Abernethy, who, together with the earls of Menteith, Mar, Athol, and Bu [...]han, surprized king Alexander III. at Kin­ross,Fordun, vol. II. p. 91. and carried him captive to Stirling castle, anno 1257.

He was a party contracter for his sister Margaret with Hugh de Douglas, and gave with her in frank marriage,Charta penes fam. de Douglas. a twenty merk land, either in his village of Glencorse, or his fen of Chamberlain-Newton. The contract is dated anno 1259, as before observed.

He made several donations to the monaste­ry of Coupar in Angus,Chartulary of Cupar. anno 1268 and 1269; and was witness to a confirmation,Chartulary of Coldstream, penea Mac­Farlane. by king Alexander III. of a donation to the monaste­ry of Coldstream, anno 1270.

He married Mary, an English lady, for whom he obtained a safe conduct from the king of England,Rymer, tom. II. p. 727. anno 1269. By her he had a son and successor,

VI. ALEXANDER lord Abernethy, who, with the rest of the nobility of Scotland, swore fealty to king Edward I.Ibid. p. 571. of England, anno 1292.

He made a great figure in the reign of king Robert Bruce, though he was sometimes on the Baliol's side, and often in the English interest against his country; which, it is thought, he was chiefly induced to by his connections in England with his mother's friends. And certain it is, he was in great favour with king Edward II.Ib. tom. III. p. 211. who appointed him governor on this side of the Forth, and the mountains of Scotland, and captain-gene­ral of all his subjects fit to bear arms in those parts. This deed bears date 15th of June 1310.

He, together with David de Strabogie earl of Athole, and sir Adam Gordon, were named plenipotentiaries by king Edward,Ibid. p. 300. Abercromby, vol. I. p. 591. then at York, to treat of a peace with king Robert Bruce, anno 1312.

He left issue three daughters.

1. Margaret, married to John Stewart earl of Angus,Chart. penes fam. de Douglas. et chart. in pub. archiv. who got with her the barony of Abernethy, the superiority whereof is still possessed by the family of Douglas, as repre­sentatives of the earl of Angus.

2. Helen, married to David de Lindsay, ancestor of the earls of Crawfurd,Chart. in pub. archiv [...] and father Hay's collections. with whom he got the barony of Downie in the shire of Angus.

3. Mary, married to Andrew Leslie, an­cestor of the earl of Rothes,Cha [...] t [...] penes comitem de Rothes. who got with her the lands and barony of Bambreich, in Fife, which was long in that family's possession.

We shall only here observe, that these three noble families, in consequence of the marri­ages above mentioned, have ever since con­tinued to quarter the arms of Abernethy with their own.

Alexander lord Abernethy dying without sons, in him ended the male line of Hugh, eldest son of sir Patrick de Abernethy of that ilk, &c. whereby the representation of that antient family devolves upon the male-heir of

WILLIAM, second son of the said sir Pa­trick, ancestor of the Abernethies, lords of Salton. Vide title Salton, page 603.

ARMS.

Or, a lion rampant gules, surmounted of a ribbon sable.

GORDON Earl of ABOYNE.

THE immediate ancestor of this branch of the family of GORDON was GEORGE, second marquis of Huntly, the seventeenth generation of that illustrious house, who married lady Anne. Campbell, daughter of Archibald, seventh earl of Argyle, by whom he had three sons.

1. George lord Gordon, who was killed at the battle of Aldford, in his father's lifetime, without issue.

2. Lewis, marquis of Huntly, his father's successor, and ancestor of the present duke of Gordon.

3. Lord Charles, the first of this family.

I. CHARLES, third son of George, second marquis of Huntly, a man of great honour and lovalty, adhered firmly to the interest of both king Charles I. and II. during the time of the civil war, and often exerted his cou­rage in their service, on which account he suffered many hardships.

Soon after the restoration, king Charles, in consideration of his great and faithful ser­vices, was pleased to raise him to the dignity of the peerage, by the titles of lord Gordon of Strathaven and Glenlivet,Chart. in pub. archiv. Haeredib [...]s masculis, &c. ad ann. 1660. and earl of A­boyne, by patent to him and his heirs-male, dated 10th September 1660.

He got afterwards a charter, under the great seal,Ibidem of the whole lands and lordship of Aboyne,Chart. Carolo comiti de A­boyne, &c. dated anno 1661.

He married lady Elizabeth Lyon, daughter of John earl of Strathmote, by whom he had three sons, and one daughter.

1. Charles, lord Glenlivet.

2. George.

3. John.

His daughter, lady Elizabeth, married to John lord Castlehaven, son and heir of George earl of Cromarty.

He died anno 1680, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. CHARLES, second earl of Aboyne, who married his cousin lady Elizabeth Lyon, daugh­ter of Patrick earl of Strathmore, and died anno 1705, leaving issue a son,

John, his heir,—and three daughters.

1. Lady Helen, married to George Kin­naird, Esq; and was mother of Charles, now lord Kinnaird.

2. Lady Elizabeth, died unmarried.

3. Lady Grace, married to James Grant of Knockando, Esq;.

III. JOHN, third earl of Aboyne, succeed­ed, and married miss Grace Lockhart, daugh­ter of George Lockhart of Carnwath, Esq; by lady Eupham Montgomery, daughter of Alexander earl of Eglington, by whom he had three sons.

1. Charles, lord Glenlivet.

2. John.

3. Lockhart.—These two last are officers in the army.

He died anno 1732, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. CHARLES, fourth earl of Aboyne, who married lady Margaret Stewart, daugh­ter of Alexander earl of Galloway, by whom he hath a son,

George, lord Glenlivet,—and two daugh­ters.

1. Lady Catharine.

2. Lady Margaret.

ARMS.

Azure, a cheveron between three boar's heads couped, within a double tressure, flow­ered with flowers de lisses within, and adorn­ed with crescents without, or, for Seton.

SUPPORTERS; two men, armed at all parts, holding each a halberd in his hand pro­per.

CREST; a demi-lion rampant azure.

MOTTO; Stant caetera tigno.

CHIEF SEATS.

Aboyne, &c. in A [...]erdeen-shire.

OGILVIE Earl of AIRLY.

THIS noble family, remarkable for ma­ny instances of loyalty to their sove­reigns, and attachment to the interest of their country, is descended from

GILBERT, second son of Gilibred, and brother of Gileh [...]ist earl of Angus, a man of high distinction, in the reign of king William the Lion, who succeeded to the crown of Scotland, anno 1165, and died anno 1214.

He obtained from that prince a charter,Chart. penes fam. de Dou­glas, and lives of the offic of state, p. 356. Gilberto silio comitis de Angus, terrarum de Pourin, Ogilvie, et Kyneithin, per suas rectas divisas, pro servitio unius milit [...]s, &c.

He is a frequent witness in his brother earl Gilchrist's charters to the abbacy of Arbroath, particularly to one granted by him to that convent, of the church of Monyfod (now Moniseith.) The charter is without date; [Page 12] but as John bishop of Aberdeen,Chartulary of Arbroath, penes Mac­Farlane, p. 124. is also a wit­ness, it must have been granted in or before the 1207, in which year that bishop died.

1. This GILBERT assumed his sirname from his lands and barony of Ogilvie, as was the custom of those early times; and from him we proceed, by indisputable evidence, to deduce the descent of this noble family.

He had a son,

II. ALEXANDER de OGILVIE, who suc­ceeded him, and was one of the inquest who judicially declares, that the lands of Innerpef­fer were hold of, and owed suit of court to,Ibidem. the abbot of Arbroath, &c. dated at Forfar, 17th February 1250.

He was succeeded by his son,

III. PATRICK de OGILVIE. In a char­ter of Roger de Quincy, earl of Winton, con­stable of Scotland, of a donation to the prio­ry of St. Andrews, this Patrick de Ogilvy, William de Haya,Chartulary of St. Andrews, penes eund. p. 407. Gilbert de Ruthven, Alex­ander de Seton, &c. are witnesses, circa an­num 1267.

He was one of the great barons of Scot­land that, with many others, was forced to swear fealty to king Edward I. of England, for his lands in the shire of Forfar,Prynne's col­lections. vol. III. p. 654. in the year 1296.

He lest issue two sons.

1. Sir Patrick, his heir.

2. Sir Robert de Ogilvie, who, according to doctor Abercrombie,Abercromb. hist. vol. I. p. 637. was one of king Ro­bert Bruce's firmest friends.

IV. Sir PATRICK OGILVIE of that ilk succeeded his father, and was a man of singu­lar merit and fortitude. He adhered always firmly to the interest of king Robert Bruce, and,Inventary of wants in the lawie [...]s libr. and adding­ton's collec. for his loyalty and faithful services, ob­tained from that great monarch a grant of the lands of Ketins, pro saciendo quintam par­tem servitii unius militis, &c.

He lest issue two sons.

1. Alexander, his heir.

2. Patrick de Ogileir of Wester-Pourie, first of the family of Auchterhouse, and the direct ancestor of the earls of A [...]ly, of whom afterwards.

Alexander Ogilvie of that ilk succeeded his father in the barony of Ogilvie, and he was succeeded by his son sir Patrick Ogilvie of that ilk,Chartulary of Arbroath, ad annum 1348. of whom the antient and honour­able family of the Ogilvies, promiscuously de­signed of that ilk, and of Easter-Pourie, are descended, which subsisted in the male line till neen the end of the last century, but is now extinct. We therefore return to

V. PATRICK de OGILVIE of Wester­Pourie, second son of the above sir Patrick, who obtained from his nephew, sir Patrick Ogilvie of that ilk, son of his brother Alex­ander, to him, and Marjory his wife,Chart. con­firm. in pub. archiv. the lands of Wester-Pourie, in vicecom. de Forfar, quam quondam Malcolmus de Pourie tenuit et possedit, &c.

His marriage with the above Marjory, on­ly daughter, and at length sole heiress, of sir Robert Ramsay of Auchterhouse, hereditary sheriff of the county of Forfar, brought a considerable addition, both of wealth and dig­nity, to his family.

He was succeeded by his son,

VI. WALTER OGILVIE of Wester­Pourie, afterwards of Auchterhouse, heredi­tary sheriff of Forfar, who came to the pos­session of that great estate and dignity,Chart. in pub. archivis. upon the death of his uncle sir Malcolm Ramsay of Auchterhouse, about the year 1365.

He obtained from king Robert II. unum annuum reditum viginti novem librarum sterlin­garum nobis debitum de thanagio de Kingalty, Ibidem. (now Kinalty) in vicecomitatu de Forfar, anno 1385.

He lest two sons.

1. Sir Walter, his heir.

2. Patrick, Lives of the offic. of state, et chart. in archiv. sam. de Wemyss. said to be ancestor of the O­gilvies of Inchmartine, whose son sir Walter, married the heiress thereof.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. Sir WALTER OGILVIE of Auchter­house, high sheriff of Forfar, who obtained from his cousin, Alexander Ogilvie of that ilk, a charter of confirmation of the lands of Wester-Pourie,Chart. in pub. archiv. wherein he is designed son of Walter, and grand-son of Patrick Ogilvie a­bove mentioned, uncle to sir Patrick Ogilvie of that ilk.

He also got from sir David Lindsay of Glen­esk, who was afterwards earl of Crawfurd, unum annuum reditum viginti librarum sterlin­garum levand. Chart. in ro­tul. Rob. III. de terris de Glenesk, Nordesk, et blackcockmore in vicecom. de Forsar et Kincar­dine, nono die Martii 1390.

This sir Walter, who was a man of great worth and merit, lost his life in the sollow­ing manner: Duncan Stewart, natural son of Alexander earl of Buchan, having entered the shire of Forfar, or Angus, at the head of a lawless gang of robbers, in order to plunder the country; the sheriff, accompanied by his uterine brother, Walter Lighton, ancestor of the family of Ulis-haven, and a numerous pos­se of country people, overtook the said rob­bers, at a place called Glenbrerith,Fordun, vol. II. p. 420. in Angus; where, after a smart skirmish, sir Walter and [Page 13] his brother, with about sixty of their follow­ers, were killed on the spot, anno 1391.

He left issue three sons.

1. Sir Alexander, his heir.

2. Sir Walter of Lintrethan, of whom below.

3. Sir John, Lives of the officers of state. who got from his brother sir Walter the lands and barony of Inner­quharity, anno 1420.Mill's collec­tions, & Had­dington's col­lections in the lawyer's li­brary. He got also a charter from William earl of Angus, wherein he is designed brother to sir Walter of Lintrethan, of some lands in the barony of Kirriemnir, anno 1422.

Sir Walter was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. Sir ALEXANDER OGILVIE of Auchterhouse, whose grandson, another sir Alexander, had only one daughter, Marga­ret, his sole heiress, who conveyed the e­state and dignity of sheriff to James Stuart,Chart. in pub. archiv. and Stuart's hist. of the royal family. earl of Buchan, her husband, who was lord high-chamberlain of Scotland, anno 1471.

The male line of sir Alexander, eldest son of sir Walter of Auchterhouse, thus ending, the representation devolved upon the next heir-male descended of his brother sir Walter of Lintrethan, to whom we now return.

VIII. Sir WALTER OGILVIE of Lintre­than, second son of sir Walter of Auchter­house, was a man of eminent parts and me­rit. He was one of the privy-council to king James I.Fordun. Ry­mer's foedera angliae, tom. X. p. 266. &c. and chart. in pub. archiv. and lord high-treasurer of Scot­land, anno 1425; master of the king's hou­shold, anno 1430; and one of the commis­sioners for renewing the truce with England, anno 1431.

He founded and endowed two chaplainries in the church of Auchterhouse, ‘"For the safety of his own soul, and that of Wal­ter Ogilvie, knight, his father; and for the souls of those killed at the battle of Harlaw, Chart. in ar­chiv. Jacobi I. ad annum 1426. and Haddington's collections. &c. testibus domino Patricio de Ogilvie, et Davide de Ogilvie nepotibus suis, et Waltero de Ogilvie filio suo, &c.

He married Isabel de Dureward, heiress of Lintrethan, with whom he got that ba­rony; and he and his posterity were design­ed by that title, till they were raised to the dignity of the peerage: by her he had issue two sons and one daughter.

1. Sir John, his heir.

2. Sir Walter, ancestor of the earls of Findlater. Vide title Findlater.

His daughter, Giles, was married to Ro­bert Arbuthnot of that ilk.

He died anno 1441, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. Sir JOHN OGILVIE of Lintrethan, who accompanied William earl of Douglas to England,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 277. anno 1450, and returned anno 1451.

He got a charter from king James II. e­recting his lands into one free barony,Haddington's collections, and chart. in pub. archiv. called the barony of Lintrethan, 3d March 1458.

He also got charters, under the great seal, of several lands, anno 1459; and likewise many others from king James III.Ib. inter ann. 1460, et ann; 1469. too nume­rous to be here inserted.

He married Marion, daughter of William lord Seton, by whom he had a son,

Sir James, afterwards lord Ogilvie,— and three daughters.

1. Christian, married to sir John Forbes of Pitsligo.

2. Elizabeth; married to sir Patrick Keith of Innerugie.

3. Marion, married to Henry Stuart of Rosyth.

He died before the year 1480, and was succeeded by his only son,

X. Sir JAMES OGILVIE of Lintrethan, who got a charter of the lands of Kinnell,Haddington's collections. &c. anno 1480, which had been apprized by the king from Hugh lord Frazer, &c.

He was a man of great parts, singular me­rit and integrity, and was often employed in negotiations of the greatest importance.

He was one of the guarantees of a treaty of peace concluded with the English,Rymer, tom, XII. p. 243. anno 1484, and is then designed Jacobus Ogilvie de Airly, miles, &c.

And being highly esteemed both by king and court,Records of parliament in the lawyer's library. was created a peer by the title of lord Ogilvie of Airly, 28th April, and sat as a lord baron in the parliament called by king James IV. 18th May 1491.

Upon the rising of the parliament, he was sent ambassador extraordinary to the king of Denmark, where he managed matters entire­ly to his majesty's satisfaction.

He married, 1st, Elizabeth Kennedy, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Alexander, who got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of part of the barony of Ogil­vie, anno 1494.

He married,Chart. penes ducem de Douglas. 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of Archibald earl of Angus, by whom he had a son,

Walter, ancestor of the Ogilvies of Bal­four, —and a daughter,

Marion, said to have been married to Da­vid Bethune, a younger son of the laird of Balfour in Fise, afterwards archbishop of St. Andrews,MacKenzie's lives of the Scotch writ­ers, vol. III. ad nnn. 1546, and chart. in pub. arch. and cardinal: by him she had issue several children before he entered into holy orders.—Their daughter, Margaret, was married to David lord Lindsay, afterwards [Page 14] earl of Crawfurd, the old earl and the cardi­nal being the parties contracters.

He died before the year 1504, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XI. JOHN, second lord Ogilvie of Airly, who, before his father was raised to the peerage, was designed John of Ballindoch, which appears by a writ appointing sir James Ogilvie of Airly,Haddington's collections. and John Ogilvie of Bal­lindoch, his son and heir, justiciars, cham­berlains and bailies of Arbroath, after the death of sir John Ogilvie of Lintrethan, an­no 1481.

He sat in the parliaments held in Edin­burgh the 3d and 16th of February 1505,Records of parliament. and is then designed John lord Ogilvie of Airly, &c.

He married Jean, daughter of William lord Graham, ancestor of the duke of Mon­trose, by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

1. James, his heir.

2. Anthony, Chart. in pub. archiv. who was abbot of Glenluce, and witness in a charter from king James V. anno 1514.

1. Daughter, Elizabeth, married to Wil­liam Wood of Bonytown.

2. Janet, married to—Lighton of Ulis-haven.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. JAMES, third lord Ogilvie of Airly, who married lady Elizabeth Lindsay,Lives of the officers of state. daugh­ter of David earl of Crawfurd, by whom he had three sons and three daughters.

1. James, his heir.

2. John Ogilvie of Innerkeilor.

3. Archibald.

1. Daughter,—married to David Lyon of Cossins.

2. Isabel, married to David Strachan of Carmelic.

3. Beatrix, married to—Garden of Leys.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. JAMES, fourth lord Ogilvie of Air­ly, who married Helen,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an. 1519. daughter of Henry lord Sinclair, by whom he had issue, five sons and four daughters.

1. James, his heir.

2. John.

3. David Ogilvie of Kinmundie.

4. William.

5. Archibald Ogilvie of Lawton.

1. Daughter,Chart. in pub. archiv. Marion, married to Patrick lord Gray.

2. Margaret, Ibidem. married to David Graham of Fintrie.

3. Anne, married to sir Thomas Erskine of Brechin.

4. Helen, married to sir John Ogilvie of Innerquharity.

He died about 1540, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVI. JAMES, fifth lord Ogilvie of Air­ly, who made an entail of his estate and ba­rony of Lintrethan, and is therein designed eldest son and heir of the noble and potent James lord Ogilvie,Ibid. Had­dington's col­lections. &c. ‘"To himself and the heirs-male of his own body; which failing, to the heirs-male of his four bro­thers, John, David, William, and Archi­bald, successively; then to John Ogilvie his nephew; then to sir John Ogilvie of Innerquharity, and Helen Ogilvie, his sister, spouse to the said sir John; then to John Ogilvie of Innerkeilor, his father's brother, &c. then to Archibald Ogilvie, another brother of his father, &c. &c. all which failing, to his own nearest heirs whatsom­ever,"’ dated 2d December 1566.

He married Catharine, daughter of sir John Campbell of Calder, by whom he had a son,

James, Lives of the officers of state. his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, married to John Erskine of Dun.

2. Helen, married to John lord Inner­meath.

He died before the year 1570, and was succeeded by his only son,

XV. JAMES, sixth lord Ogilvie of Airly, who obtained charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter ann. 1560 & 1584. under the great seal, Jacobo Ogilvie domino de Erlie, of a great many lands and baronies.

He was a man of singular endowments, loyalty, and merit, and adhered firmly to the interest of queen Mary in all her trou­bles, on account whereof he suffered a long imprisonment, and many other hardships, all which he bore with great constancy, till he was released by king James VI. anno 1596.

He was sent his majesty's ambassador to the court of Denmark,Lives of the officers of state. to assist at the coro­nation of king Christiern IV.

He married Jean,M. S. history of the house of Airly in the archives of the family. daughter of William lord Forbes, by whom he had six sons and one daughter.

1. James, his heir.

2. Sir John Ogilvie of Craig.

3. David Ogilvie of Pitmouis.

4. Peter Ogilvie of Smiddy-hill, ancestor of the Ogilvies of Clunie.

5. George Ogilvie of Fernault.

6. Sir Francis Ogilvie of Grange, who got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. Francisco filio domini Ogilvie, &c.

[Page 15] His daughter, Margaret, was married to George earl Marishal.

He died anno 1606, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIV. JAMES, seventh lord Ogilvie of Airly, who got a charter under the great seal,Ibidem. Jacobo domino Airly, &c. and married lady Jean Ruthven, the daughter of William earl of Gowrie,Lives of the officers of state by whom he had a son and successor,

XVII. JAMES, eighth lord Ogilvie of Air­ly, who got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of several lands and baronies.

He was a man of great magnanimity and exemplary loyalty; and, ‘"For his own great merit, and eminent services done to king Charles I. and for the great loyalty and fidelity of his ancestors,Ibidem. Haeredibus masculis in perpetuum. &c."’ was, by letters patent, dated at York 2d April 1639, further dignified with the title of earl of Air­ly; the patent being to him and his heirs­male for ever, &c.

As he had heartily and sincerely espoused the interest of king Charles I▪ from the be­ginning of the civil war, so he continued steadily to adhere to him till the very last, which made him extremely obnoxious to the parliament, whereby he suffered many hard­ships both in his person and estate.

He married lady Isabel Hamilton,Crawfurd's Peerage. daugh­ter of Thomas earl of Haddington, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. James, lord Ogilvie.

2. Sir Thomas, a young man of singular valour and loyalty. He raised a regiment upon his own charges, for the service of his majesty king Charles I. fought valiantly at their head on several occasions, and had al­ways the good fortune to come off victori­ous, till at last he was kiled at the battle of Inverlochie.

3. Sir David Ogilvie of Clova.

His daughter, lady Helen, married to sir John Carnegy of Balnamoon.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVIII. JAMES, second earl of Airly, who, like many of his noble ancestors, was a great loyalist, and continued steady in his majesty's interest, during all the time of the civil war.

He joined the marquis of Montrose as soon as he took the sield, (being then only lord O­gilvie) and behaved always with great cou­rage and intrepidity; but was unluckily tak­en prisoner at the battle of Philiphaugh.

He was a [...]tewards tried and condemned by the parliament at St. Andrews, but had the good fortune to make his escape in his sister's dress, the very night before he was to have been executed; and lived to see the restora­tion, after very great sufferings, which he bore with a noble firmness and resolution.

He married, 1st, Helen Ogilvie, daughter of George lord Banff, by whom he had is­sue,

David, Ibidem. his heir,—and four daughters.

1. Lady Marion, married, 1st, to James lord Cupar: and, 2dly, to John lord Lin­dores.

2. Lady Margaret, married to Alexander lord Halkerton.

3. Lady Mary, married to sir John Wood of Bonytown.

4. Lady Helen, married to sir John Gor­don of Park.

He married, 2dly, the marchioness-dow­ager of Huntly, daughter of the laird of Grant, and mother to the duke of Gordon, but by her he had no issue.

He was succeeded by his son,

XIX. DAYID, third earl of Airly, who married lady Grizel Lyon, daughter of Pa­trick earl of Strathmore, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.Ibidem.

1. James, his apparent heir.

2. John, who now represents the family.

His daughter, lady Helen.

XX. JAMES, lord Ogilvie, the eldest son, having engaged in the rebellion in 1715, was attainted of high treason; but the estate was saved by being in his father's person, who was then alive. He was afterwards par­doned; and married Anne, daughter of Mr. David Erskine of Dun, one of the senators of the college of justice; but dying without issue, was succeeded by his brother,

XX. JOHN, representative of the earls of Airly, and who is still in possession of the estate.

He married Margaret, eldest daughter and heiress of—Ogilvie of Clunic, lineal­ly descended of Peter, fourth son of James sixth lord Ogilvie, by whom he hath two sons and two daughters.

1. David,

2. Walter Ogilvie, Esq; advocate.

1. Daughter, Elizabeth.

2. Helen, married to Roger Robertson of Ladykirk, Esq;

XXI. DAVID, the eldest son, commonly called lord Ogilvie, having engaged in the rebellion in 1745, was attainted of high treason, and escaped to France, where he [Page 16] has the command of a Scotch regiment, call­ed Ogilvie's regiment.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir James Johnston of Westerhall, baronet, by whom he hath one son,

David, commonly called master of Ogil­vie, —and two daughters.

1. Margaret.

2. Johanna.

ARMS.

Argent, a lion passant guardant gules, crown­ed with an imperial crown, and collar'd with an open one.

SUPPORTERS; two bulls sable, unguled and horned vert, with a garland of flowers about their necks.

CREST; a Gentlewoman, from the waist upward, holding a portcullis.

MOTTO; A FIN.

CHIEF SEATS.

Auchterhouse and Cortachie, both in the county of Forfar.

STUART Duke of ALBANY.

ROBERT STUART, third son of king Robert II. by Elizabeth More, was the first who enjoyed this title. He was first earl of Menteith, which title he got by his marriage, and afterwards earl of Fife, by the resignation of the countess thereof.

He was a man of high accomplishments, equally qualified to shine in the arts of peace, or in the troubles of war; for which reason the king, his father, being infirm with age, made him governor of Scotland in his own lifetime; and his brother, king Robert III. after his accession to the crown,Crawfurd's peerage, and several Scotch writers. being like­wise valetudinary, thought fit to continue him in the regency, and dignified him with the title of duke of Albany, anno 1399.

Upon the death of king Robert III. his son king James I. being prisoner in England, the duke of Albany of right became gover­nor of the kingdom for his nephew; in which office he continued till his death.

He commanded the Scotch army in seve­ral engagements against the English,Crawfurd's peerage, and Stuart's hist. of the family of Stuart. and al­ways behaved with such courage and conduct, that he generally came off victorious, though inferior in numbers to the enemy. And as he had discharged his trust, in all the high offices he enjoyed, with great wisdom, pru­dence and integrity, his death, which hap­pened in 1420, was universally lamented.

He married, 1st, Margaret, grandchild and sole heiress of Alan earl of Menteith, with whom he got the estate and honours: he had by her one son,

Murdoch, Stuart's hist. of the Stuarts. his heir,—and five daughters.

1. Lady Isabel, married, 1st, to Alexan­der earl of Ross: 2dly, to Walter [...]alibur­ton of Dirleton.

2. Lady Marjory, married to sir Duncan Campbell of Lo [...]how.

3. Lady Elizabeth, married to sir Mal­colm Fleming of Cumbernauld.

4. Lady Margaret, married to sir Robert Stuart of Innermeath.

5. Lady Beatrix, married to sir James Douglas of Balvenie, son of Archibald earl of Angus.

The duke married,Ibidem. 2dly, Muriella, daugh­ter of sir William Keith great marishal of Scotland, by whom he had four sons.

1. John, earl of Buchan.

2. Sir Robert Stuart, knight.

3. Sir Andrew.

4. John Stuart of Coul, who was also de­signed earl of Buchan, was a man of singular merit, and made a great figure in the world. Vide title Buchan Stuart.

MURDOCH, first son of Robert duke of Albany, succeeded to his father's estate and honours, and also to the government of the kingdom; but he did not inherit all his fa­ther's good qualities. However he was both active and very instrumental in bringing home king James I.Ibidem. which was happily accomplish­ed in 1424, and, as earl of Fife, he placed the king in his chair of state at his coronation in Scoon.

But as the duke became too great for a subject, he was suspected to have a design upon the crown; and being discovered to be engaged in some secret plots and transactions, (the nature of them all our historians are si­lent about,Fordun. lib. 14. cap. 10▪ Abercromby, Crawfurd, &c. probably being very criminal and treasonable) he was, with two of his sons, tried, condemned and executed, and his estate and honours forfeited to the crown, anno 1425.

He married Isabel, daughter and heiress of Duncan earl of Lennox,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. by whom he had four sons and two daughters.

1. Robert, who was sometime designed duke of Albany, but died before his father, without issue.

[Page 17] 2. Sir Walter.

3. Sir Alexander.—These two last suffer­ed with their father.

4. Sir James, who retired to Ireland, where, by a lady of the family of the MacDo­nalds, he had seven sons, three whereof were legitimated by king James III. of whom several considerable families are descended; particu­larly the families of Evandale and Ochiltree.

Duke Murdoch's first daughter was marri­ed to Archibald Campbell of Lochow.

2. Lady Isabel, married to sir Walter Bu­chanan of that ilk.

The next who enjoyed this high title, was ALEXANDER,Stewart's hist. of the royal family. second son of king James II. who was created duke of Albany in 1452. But having been engaged in a most unnatural rebellion against his brother king James III. his wicked practices were discovered; his measures broke; and he himself obliged to retire to France, where he ended his days.

He married, 1st, lady Catharine, daughter of William earl of Orkney and Caithness, it seems, uncanonically; for they were after­wards divorced,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1477. upon account of propinquity of blood; but by her he had a son,

Alexander, who was bishop of Murray.

He married, 2dly, a daughter of the earl of Boulogne, by whom he had a son,

John, duke of Albany, who was a wise, brave, and virtuous prince. He was nine years governor of Scotland in the minority of king JamesV. and behaved in that high office with great fidelity and prudence.

By act of parliament he was declared next heir to the crown,Stewart's hi­story of the royal family. failing issue of king James V. But upon some discontent happening a­mong the nobility, he laid down his office, and retired to France, where he died anno 1536, having married Anna de la Tour of the family of Vendosme, by whom he had no issue: so that the title of Albany lay ex­tinct, until Mary queen of Scotland bestowed it on Henry lord Darnley,Ibidem. son of Matthew earl of Lennox and lady Margaret Douglas, daughter of Archibald earl of Angus by queen Margaret, daughter of king Henry VII. sister of king Henry VIII. of England, and widow of king James IV. of Scotland, and grand-aunt to her majesty queen Mary.

This Henry lord Darnley and Man, creat­ed duke of Albany and earl of Rose by queen Mary of Scotland, she afterwards took to be her husband; and he, with his royal consort, were proclaimed king and queen of Scotland, &. c.

The title of Albany was thus again vested in the crown, and continued in it till king Charles I. conferred it on his son prince Charles, anno 1601; and he (who was after­wards king Charles II.) bestowed that title on his brother the duke of York,Diploma in pub. archiv. anno 1660, which he always kept till he became king of Great-Britain himself, anno 1685.

And lately, this illustrious title, together with that of duke of York, was conferred, by his majesty king George II. on his royal highness prince Edward, second son of the late Frederick prince of Wales.

ARMS.

Quarterly; 1st and 4th or, a lion rampant gules, and in chief a label of three points azure, for the title of Albany: 2d and 3d or, a fess cheque azure and argent, with a la­bel of three points in chief.

KEITH Lord ALTREE.

ROBERT KEIT [...], second son of Wil­liam fourth earl Marishal, being a man of parts and learning, was made commenda­tor of Deer, in the reig [...] of queen Mary, an­no 1560; and being in favour with king James VI.Chart. in ar­chiv. Jacobi VI. got that abbacy erected into a tem­poral lordship, and himself raised to the dig­nity of the peerage, by the title of lord Al­tree, anno 1587, ‘"To him and the heirs­male of his body."’

In the year 1590, he assisted at the coro­nation of queen Anne,Rymer. tom. XVI. pa. 60. consort to his majesty king James VI.

He married Elizabeth, daughter and heir­ess of Robert Lundie of Benholm, by whom he had two daughters.

1. Elizabeth, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to Alexander Hay of Dalgitty.Nisbet's ap­pend.—2. Margaret, married to John Eskine of Dun.

He dying without male-issue, anno 1612, the honours became extinct, and the estate went to the family of Marishal.

ARMS.

Qarterly; 1st and 4th or, a saltire and chief gules: 2d and 3d, a chief pallee of six pieces gules and or.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter an unicorn argent, horned and unguled or; and on the sinister a deer proper.

CREST; a rock proper.

MOTTO; Watch the temptation.

KER Earl of ANCRUM.

THE first person who was dignified with this title,Chart. penes Thom. Dun­das de Fin­gask. was sir ROBERT KER, eldest son of William Ker of Ancrum, by Margaret his spouse, daughter of Alexander Dundas of Fingask, ancestor of the present Thomas Dun­das of Fingask, Esq; and sir Laurence Dun­das, Bart.

This sir Robert was a man of fine parts, and deservedly a favourite at court, being made gentleman of the bed-chamber to king James VI. and continued in the same office under king Charles I. both which princes he served with distinguished honour and fidelity.

At length, in reward of his merit, he was created earl of Ancrum,Chart. in pub. archiv. by letters patent, bearing date 24th June, 1633.

He married, 1st, Elizabeth, daughter of sir John Murray of Blackbarony, by whom he had a son, sir William Ker, who became earl of Lothian, on his marriage with Anne countess and heiress thereof.

He married, 2dly,Peerage of Engl. vol. II. p. 83. lady Anne Stanley, eldest daughter of William earl of Derby, by whom he had a son, Charles, his successor in this title.

CHARLES, second earl of Ancrum, suc­ceeded his father, in virtue of the special li­mitation of the patent, to the heirs-male of earl Robert's second marriage with lady Anne Stanley; and dying without issue, the title devolved upon the family of Lothian, descend­ed of sir William,Report of the lords of session to the house of peers in 1739. the son of earl Robert's first marriage, as the patent settled it on the other heirs-male of the patentee, failing those of the second marriage.

At present it is the title given by courtesy to the eldest son of the marquis of Lothian. Vide that title, page 419th of this work.

ARMS.

Quarterly; 1st and 4th ermine, on a chief-parti argent and gules, a lion passant counter-chained: 2d and 3d gules, on a cheveron argent, three stars or mullets of the first.

SUPPORTERS; two stags proper, collared gules.

CREST; a stag's head and neck couped, argent, collared as the supporters, and charg­ed with three mullets argent, issuing out of an open crown, or.

MOTTO; Tout droit.

Earl of ANGUS.

THE title of ANGUS was long enjoyed by thanes, who made a great figure in Scotland for many ages, and were often for­midable to our kings.

Macbeth, the usurper, was thane of Angus, and his son Luthacus, who was killed at Stra­bogie,Martin's ge­nealogical collections. vol. I. p. 149. in the beginning of king Malcolm Canmore's reign, about the year 1061, was the last of that race.—Soon after his death,

I. GILCHRIST, a man of the first rank, and a great favourite of king Malcolm Can­more, was created earl of Angus by that prince; and was amongst the first who en­joyed the title of earl in Scotland. He lived after the year 1120,Ibidem. having married Finebel­la, sister of—thane of Mearns, by whom he had a son,

II. GILIBREDE, second earl of Angus, who succeeded him, and is mentioned by many of our historians as a great warrior. He lived in the reigns of king David I. king Mal­colm IV. and king William the Lion.

He was one of the chief commanders of the Scotch army (tho' then but a young man) with the earls of March and Menteith, when they invaded England in king Stephen's reign.Ibidem, vol. II. p. 162. and fought a bloody battle against the English near Northall [...]rton, about the year 1138. He was one of the Scotch nobles appointed to settle and adjust all differences betwixt king William the Lion and king Henry II.Rymer's foed. A [...]gliae, tom. I. p. 39. of Eng­land, anno 1174.

He was witness to a charter of king Wil­liam the Lion,Chartulary of Arbroath, penes Mac-Farlan [...]. together with Joceline bishop of Glasgow, and Matthew bishop of Aber­deen, and is then designed Gilibredus comes de Angus, &c. anno 1176.

He married—, a daughter of Patrick earl of March, by whom he had six sons.

1. Gilchrist.

2. Magnus, Dalrymple's collections. created earl of Caithness by king Alexander II. anno 1222.

3. Gilbert, History of the royal family. ancestor of the Ogilvies. Vide title earl of Airly.

4. Adam.

5. William.—These two last are designed sons of the earl of Angus,Chartulary of Arbroath. ante 1200.

6. Anegus filius comitis Gilibrede, who was at the perambulation of the marches be­twixt the lands of the monastery of Arbroath and the barony of Kinbluthmund,Ibidem. 23d Sep­tember 1219.

[Page 19] Earl Gilebrede died about the year 1180, and was succeeded by his eldest son;

III. GILCHRIST, third earl of Angus, who was one of the greatest men of his time,Buchanan, Lesly, &c. and performed many glorious exploits in king William's wars.

When the king was a prisoner, the Eng­lish invaded Cumberland, of which they ima­gined to have made an easy conquest; but the brave Gilchrist, who had the chief com­mand of the Scotch forces, gave them such a warm reception,Ibid. and Abercrombie, vol. I. p. 260. that they were obliged to agree to a truce, whereby Cumberland and Huntington remained in the hands of the Scots.

Soon after this he quelled a most dange­rous insurrection in Galloway,Ibid. which was of more service to his king and country, than many of his other great actions.

He had the honour to be married to the king's sister, which his merit and great ser­vices highly deserved; but was unhappily led into a suspicion of her having dishonoured his bed, which fatally prompted him to put an end to her life, whereupon he was obliged to abscond. He was condemned in absence, his houses demolished, and his estate forfeited.

He wandered long in his own country in the utmost misery and want; till at last he was accidentally met (in the habit of a pea­sant) by the king on the high road to Perth. The king observing something more in his air and mien,Ib. p. 268, and Boethius in vita regis Gulielmi. than his dress denoted, spoke to him, and desired to know who he was. The old general falling on his knees, begged forgiveness; and gave such a lively account of his misfortunes and sufferings, that the king was greatly moved therewith, and not only restored him to his honours and estate, but to the same degree of favour he had for­merly enjoyed.

He made a donation to the abbacy of Arbroath of the church of Monifode,Chartul. of Arbroath. &c. wherein he is designed Gilchrist comes de An­gus, filius Gilebrede, &c. to which his bro­ther, and Duncan his son, are witnesses. He made several other donations to the same ab­bacy, pro salute animae suae, &c.

He married Marjory,Dalrymple's collections. daughter of Henry prince of Scotland, sister of king William the lion, as before observed, by whom he had a son,

IV. DUNCAN, fourth earl of Angus, who succeeded him, and confirmed all his father's donations to the abbacy of Arbroath;Chartul. of Arbroath. in which confirmation he is designed grandson of Gilebrede, &c.

By Maud his wife, he left a son and suc­cessor,

V. MALCOLM; fifth earl of Angus, who mortified to the abbacy of Arbroath,Ibidem. some lands in territorio de Kirriemuir, confirmed by king Alexander II. to which W. de Bosco; chan­cellor, is a witness, anno 1225.

He married Mary, daughter and heiress of sir Humphrey Berklay, knight, by whom he had only one daughter,

VI. MATILDA, or Maud, countess of An­gus, who succeeded to the estate and honours; and in a confirmation of the donations made by her predecessors to the monastery of Ar­broath,Ibidem. she is designed ‘"Matilda comitissa, the great grandchild of Earl Gilchrist, &c."’

She married, 1st, John Cumin, who in her right became earl of Angus; but he died in France anno 1242, leaving issue only one son,

Bertrald, Chron. of Melrose. who died a child anno 1243.

She married, 2dly, Gilbert de Umfraville, to whom she also conveyed the earldom; and as he was head of an ancient and most noble fa­mily of that sirname, who had large possessions both in Scotland and England, we shall de­duce their descent from their first settlement in Great-Britain.

UMFRAVILLE Earl of ANGUS.

I. SIR ROBERT UMFRAVILLE, lord of Tours and Vian in Normandy, a near kinsman of William the conqueror, came o­ver to England with that great prince, anno 1066, and had a considerable command in his army; and as William divided his con­quered lands,Hist. of the extinct peer­ages of Eng­land, penes Macfarlane, v. II. p. 111. and rewarded his officers ac­cording to their merit, so he bestowed upon sir Robert, the valley, forest, and lordship of Riddisdale, in the county of Northumber­land.

He lived after the year 1100, and left a son,

II. ROBERT de UMFRAVILLE, who is often mentioned in the annals of king Henry I.Ibidem. of England.

He was father of

III. GILBERT de UMFRAVILLE, who came to Scotland in the reign of king Da­vid I. with whom he had contracted a friend­ship [Page 20] while he resided in England; and as he was in great favour with him, he shared of his bounty, and got from him several lands in the shire of Stirling, which appears from the donations to the abbacy of Cambusken­neth. It is therefore certain he settled in Scotland, and survived that good prince eight or ten years.

He was witness in several charters of king Malcolm IV.Chartul. of St. Andrews, penes Mac­farlane, and Chartul. of Paisly, penes eundem. betwixt the years 1154 and 1162; and dying before 1165, was succeed­ed by his son,

IV. GILBERT de UMFRAVILLE, who appears to have had considerable possessions in Scotland, where he chiefly resided, though he also had a great estate in England.

He made a donation to the abbacy of Ho­lyroodhouse of a carucate of land in Kinnaird in Stirling-shire,Book of ori­ginal writs, penes Mac­farlane. about the year 1187, pro sa­lute animae suae, &c.

He left a son and successor,

V. RICHARD de UMFRAVILLE, who having great interest in England, was pre­vailed upon to join the barons against king John, anno 1201; for which his lands in England were forfeited, and given to Hugh de Baliol:Hist. of the extinct peers of England. but king Henry III. restored him to his castle of Pruden, &c.

He also appears to have resided more in Scotland than in England, and was succeed­ed by his son,

VI. GILBERT de UMFRAVILLE, who was in great favour with king Alexander III. whom he accompanied to York, where they met king Henry of England, and concluded the marriage betwixt his daughter,Ibidem. princess Margaret, and king Alexander, anno 1252.

A good historian says,Ibid. and Matt. Paris. that this Gilbert de Umfraville was a famous baron, guardian, and chief slower of the North, &c.

He died anno 1262, and left issue a son,

VII. GILBERT de UMFRAVILLE, who succeeded him, and was one of the greatest men of his time.Hist. of the extinct peers of England, &c. He joined the barons of England against king Henry III. but was af­terwards reconciled to that prince.

He married Matilda, countess of Angus, in whose right he became earl of Angus, as be­fore noticed, by which he got a vast acces­sion to his estate and interest in Scotland.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae, that negotiated the marriage between king Alex­ander's daughter,Rymer, tom. II. p. 1082. princess Margaret, and E­ric king of Norway, anno 1281.

In 1284 he was one of the Scotch nobles that obliged themselves to maintain and sup­port queen Margaret's title to the crown, af­ter the death of her grandfather king Alex­ander III.

By the said countess of Angus he left issue two sons.

1. Gilbert.

2. Sir Ingelram, who, being a man of great parts,Fordun, v. II. p. 153. was sent ambassador to France by king John Baliol, anno 1284. He was also one of the Scotch nobles who signed that famous letter to the pope,Ibid. p. 275. asserting the independen­cy of Scotland, anno 1320. But we can give no account of his posterity.

The earl dying anno 1285, was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. GILBERT, second earl of Angus of the name of Umfraville,Rymer, tom. II. p. 471. who was one of the great barons that agreed to the marriage of queen Margaret of Scotland with prince Ed­ward of England, anno 1290.

He was also one of the commissioners chos­en by John Baliol to support his interest a­gainst Robert Bruce,Ibid. p. 553. in the competition for the crown, anno 1292.

After king Robert Bruce began to assert his title to the crown, the earl still continu­ed firm to the Baliol's interest, and having a great estate in England, he turned a most implacable enemy to Scotland.

As soon as king Robert had attained the crown, he endeavoured to reclaim the earl of Angus, and bring him over to his party, but all to no purpose, the earl being intirely devoted to the English interest; for which king Robert deprived him of his estate and honours in Scotland, and annexed them to the crown, anno 1307, where they remain­ed, till king David bestowed them upon sir John Stuart of Bonkill, anno 1330, as will be shown hereafter.

This earl had been long in great favour with king Edward I. and was called by him to the parliament as a baron of England,Hist. of the extinct peer [...] of England, &c. anno 1295; and he and his posterity, as long as the family subsisted, continued to sit in the English parliament, though they still retain­ed the title of earls of Angus.

He did not long survive his forfeiture; but dying anno 1307,Ibidem. was succeeded in his great estate in England by his son,

IX. ROBERT, third earl of Angus, who, in his father's lifetime, was engaged in the wars of Scotland;Rymer, tom. III. p. 94▪ ad ann. 1308. after which he was joined in com­mission with William lord Ross of Hamlake, and Henry lord Beaumont, in the lieutenan­cy of Scotland.

He sat in the parliament of England from the second of Edward II. anno 1308,Hist. of the extinct peers, &c. to the [Page 21] eighteenth inclusive, anno 1326, under the same title, as before observed.

He left issue two sons.

1. Gilbert.

2. Thomas, who was afterwards earl of Angus.

He died about the year 1332, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. GILBERT, fourth earl of Angus, who was one of the sureties for the English in a treaty with the Scots,Rymer, tom. IV. p. 566. anno 1333; was ve­ry active in the wars against the Scots, and was joined in commission with Henry lord Percy,Ib. tom. V. p. 177. and Ralf lord Nevell, to treat of a peace with that nation, in the reign of Edward III. anno 1340.

He was one of the chief commanders of the English army at the battle of Durham, anno 1346; and had often the guardianship of the marches.

In 1353,Ib. p. 787. he was one of the commissioners appointed by the king of England to treat with the Scots about king David's ransom.

He was summoned to, and sat in the par­liament of England, from the sixth of Ed­ward III. to the fourth of Richard II. anno 1381,Hist. of the extinct peers, &c. in which year he died, without is­sue, and was succeeded by his brother,

X. THOMAS, fifth earl of Angus, who was possessed of the property of Harbottle, and left issue two sons.Ibidem.

1. Thomas.

2. Sir Robert, of whom afterwards.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XI. THOMAS, sixth earl of Angus, of whom we have nothing memorable, but that he was father of

XII. GILBERT, seventh earl of Angus, called by some historians earl of Kyme,Ibidem. who, in the reign of king Henry V. was one of the chief commanders of that king's army in France, where he was slain anno 1419, leav­ing no male issue.

He was succeeded by four daughters, who were heirs-portioners to the greatest part of his estate.

But his uncle, and heir-male,

XI. Sir ROBERT,Ibidem. got possession of the lordships of Riddesdale and Kyme; and was made a knight of the garter.

But he died without issue, in the 15th year of Henry VI. 1437, which ended the male line of the Umfravilles earls of Angus,Ibidem. where­by the barony and all their titles of honour became extinct.

ARMS.

Azure, a cinquefoil, within an orle of eight cross crosslets, or.

STUART Earl of ANGUS.

THE next who enjoyed the title of ANGUS in Scotland, after the forfeit­ure of earl Gilbert de Umsraville, anno 1307, was sir John Stewart of Bonkill, son of sir Alexander Stuart of Bonkill, son of sir John Stewart of Bonkill,Dalrymple's collections. who was second son of Alexander lord high steward of Scotland,Hist. of the royal family. who died anno 1283, and brother of James, lord high steward of Scotland, grandfather of king Robert II.

I. This sir JOHN STUART of Bonkill was created earl of Angus by king David Bruce at the solemnity of his coronation,Ibidem. an­no 1330.

He married Margaret, [...]hart. pe­ [...]s ducem [...] Douglas. daughter of sir A­lexander Abernethy, knight, by whom he had a son,

Thomas, his heir.

He was killed at the battle of Halidon­hill, anno 1333, and succeeded by his son,

II. THOMAS, second earl of Angus, of the name of Stuart,Rymer, tom. VI. p. 33, 36, 44, 66, &c. a man of good parts, and often employed to treat with the English, an­no 1356 and 1357.

He married Margaret,Chart. in ar­chivis regis Dav. No. 51 [...] ad ann. 1363. daughter of sir Wil­liam Sinclair of Roslin, by whom he had a son,

Thomas, his heir,—and two daughters,

1. Lady Margaret, married, 1st, to Tho­mas earl of Mar, to whom she had no issue: 2dly,Chart. penes ducem de Douglas. to William earl of Douglas, to whom she had a son, George, of whom afterwards.

Second daughter married to sir Alexander Hamilton of Innerwick.

He was succeeded by his only son,

III. THOMAS, third earl of Angus, who married Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of Donald earl of Mar, but died without issue, anno 1377, whereby his estate and honours devolved upon his nephew,

[Page 22] George, son of his eldest sister Margaret, and the earl of Douglas before noticed,Chart. pen. ducem de Douglas. who, in right of his mother, succeeded to the earl­dom, and was the first earl of Angus of the name of Douglas.

He married princess Mary,Original con­tract, penes [...]undem. daughter of king Robert III. anno 1397, of whom the duke of Douglas is lineally descended. Vide title Duke of Douglas.

ARMS.

A fess cheque azure and argent, surmount­ed of a bend sable, charged with three buckles or.

MURRAY Earl of ANNANDALE.

THE first of this noble family we find upon record, is,

I. Sir WILLIAM MURRAY, knight, who flourished in the reign of king Alexander III. and was forced, with many others of his countrymen,Prynne's col­lections, v. III. to swear fealty to king Edward I. of England, anno 1296.

He was said to have been descended of the ancient Murrays of Duffus, and married Isa­bel, sister of that great patriot Thomas Ran­dolph earl of Murray, by whom he had two sons.

1. William.

2. Patrick, who is witness to his brother's charter, hereafter narrated.

Sir William lived some time after the year 1300, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. WILLIAM, who got a charter from his uncle Thomas Randolph earl of Murray, ‘"To William of Murray his nephew, son of sir William Murray, knight, &c. of the lands and barony of Cumlangum, Ryvel, &c. with their pertinents, lying in the lordship of Annandale;"’ to which his bro­ther Patrick, dominus Willie [...]nus de Carlyle, Roger de Kirkpatrick, Umfred de Bosco, John de Johnston, Gilbert de Johnston his son,Chart. pe­nes vicecom. de Stormont. &c. are witnesses. This charter is with­out date, but must have been before 1331, in which year the earl of Murray died.

He was father of

III. GEORGE MURRAY,Mill's collec­tions, penes Macfarlane. who succeeded him in the lands of Cumlangum, &c. and left issue a son and successor,

IV. Sir ADAM MURRAY, the first of this family we find designed by the title of Cock­pool,Ibidem. who made a considerable figure in Scot­land in the reigns of king Robert II. and III.

He was succeeded by his son,

V. Sir JOHN de MORAVIA, designed do­minus de Cockpool, Ryvel, et Dundrennan.

There is a collation, by Robert archbishop [...] Glasgow, in favours of Mr. Alexander Mur­ray, to the parsonage of Ryvel,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. upon the presentation of sir John Murray of Cockpool, dated 10th January 1406.

He married—, daughter of—, by whom he had issue four sons.

1. Sir Thomas.

2. John..

3. Sir Charles. all successively barons of Cockpool.

4. David, Ibidem. who got a charter from Archi­bald earl of Douglas, of the lands of New­ton, lying within the regality of Lauder, an­no 1421.

Sir John died anno 1410, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

VI. Sir THOMAS MURRAY of Cockpool, who got from Archibald earl of Douglas, then superior of Galloway and Annandale,Ibidem. a charter of the lands of Ryvel, &c.

And also from the same earl,Ibidem. a charter of the lands of Lack, with their pertinents, dated on the feast of St. Luke, anno 1420.

He married—, daughter of—, by whom he had issue one daughter,

Mary, who resigned all right and title she had to the lands of Ryvel, &c. as heir of line to her father,Ibidem. in favours of her cousin, Cuthbert Murray of Cockpool, the heir-male, anno 1452.

Sir Thomas had six natural sons, viz. Ga­vin, Charles, Lancelot, Florido, Herbert, and John Murrays,Ibidem. all mentioned in a charter of the earl of Douglas to sir Thomas, of the lands of Ardbigland, anno 1421.

Sir Thomas dying without lawful issue male, anno 1423, was succeeded by his brother,

VI. JOHN MURRAY of Cockpool, who got an instrument of seisin of the lands of Rampatrick,Ibidem. &c. upon a precept from the chancery, dated 14th July 1424.

He died without issue before the year 1438, and was succeeded by his brother,

VI. Sir CHARLES MURRAY of Cockpool, who,Ibidem. in his brother's lifetime, got a charter from Archibald earl of Douglas, of the lands of Ardbigland, &c. dated 29th Nov. 1421.

[Page 23] Also an instrument of seisin, in favours o [...] sir Charles Murray of Cockpool,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. of the lands of Ryvel, &c. dated the last day of Novem­ber, 1438.

He had issue a son,

Cuthbert, his heir.

He is also said to have had another son, John, Chart. and seisin, penes J. Murray de Murrayquhat. whose son, Patrick Murray, got a char­ter, from Alexander duke of Albany; of the lands of Murrayquhat, with a seisin follow­ing thereon, in favours of the said Patriek. The seisin is dated 29th April 1470; and of this Patrick, John Murray of Murray­quhat, Esq; is lineally descended.

He died anno 1439, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. CUTHBERT MURRAY of Cockpool, who was served heir to his father sir Charles,Ibidem. by a brieve out of the chancery, dated 3d of May 1440.

He was a man of good parts, and was em­ployed in several negotiations in the reigns of king James I.Rymer's faed. Angl. and II.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of— lord Borthwick, by whom he had a son and successor,

VIII. Sir CHARLES MURRAY of Cock­pool,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. who got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands of Howelset, &c. dated 10th Jannary 1449.

Also a charter of the lands of Ryvel,Ibidem. &c. which were resigned to him by his cousin Mary, as before observed, dated 22d April 1452.

He got likewise charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter annum 1450 & 1455. under the great seal, of the lands of Bread-chappel, and a great many others, all to be found in our public records.

And being a man of solid understanding and knowledge,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 397. he was appointed one of the commissioners to treat of a peace with the English,Ibid. p. 434. anno 1457; and was also made war­den of the marches, anno 1459.

He died anno 1469, leaving issue a son,

IX. CUTHBERT MURRAY of Cockpool, who succeeded him. In his father's lifetime he got a charter of the lands of Slaquhat in the barony of Cockpool,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1459.

He was served heir to his father the last day of December 1470.Seisin, penes vicecom. de Stormont.

There are two instruments of seisin, in fa­vours of Cuthbert Murray of Cockpool,Ibidem. of the lands of Ryvel, Howelset, &c. dated in December 1474.

He died anno 1493, leaving issue, by Ma­riota Menzies his spouse, daughter of the laird of Weem, a son,

Sir John, who succeeded him.

It is said he had also another son, father of John Murray,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1518. who got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands of Broughton, and was ancestor of the Murrays of Brough­ton.

X. Sir JOHN MURRAY of Cockpool was served and retoured heir to his father,Seisin, penes vicecom. de Stormont. in the lands of Cockpool, Ryvel, Rampatrick, &c. all lying in the stewartry of Annandale, 17th July 1494.

He got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, Johanni Murray de Cockpool, militi, terrarum de Cockpool, &c. dated anno 1507.

Afterwards he got his whole estate erect­ed into one free barony,Ibidem. and Ryvel into a burgh of barony, by a charter under the great seal, dated anno 1509.

He left issue a son,

Cuthbert,—and a daughter,

Blanch Murray, Ibid. ad an­num 1525. married to John Carru­thers of Holmonds, an ancient family of An­nandale.

He died anno 1526, and was succeeded by his son,

XI. CUTHBERT MURRAY of Cockpool, who,Ibidem. in his father's lifetime, got a charter, under the great seal, Cuthberto Murray, filio et haeredi apparenti Johannis Murray de Cockpool militis, et Janetae Jarden suae sponsae, of several lands lying in the Stewartry of Annandale, &c. dated 4th January 1516.

He got also a disposition from his father,Ibidem. to several other lands, 5th June 1525.

By the said Janet Jarden, a daughter of Applegirth, he left issue a son,

Sir Charles,—and two daughters.

1. Elizabeth, married to Robert lord Crichton of Sanquhar.

2. Agnes, Ibid. ad an­num 1538. married to Simon Carruthers of Mouswald, an ancient family in the shire of Dumfries.

He died in the year 1552, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

XII. Sir CHARLES MURRAY of Cock­pool,Rymer, tom, XV. p. 326. who was one of the guarantees of a treaty with the English, anno 1552, and was a zealous promoter of the reformation.

He got a charter from queen Mary,Chart. in pub. archiv. Caro­lo Murray de Cockpool militi. terra­rum dominicalium de Mouswald, &c. dated anno 1564.

He was infest in a great many lands, which appears from several seisins, viz. one in No­vember 1563,In archivis vicecomitis de Stormont. another in May 1564, a third in September that same year, a fourth in the 1581, &c.

He married Margaret, daughter of Hugh [Page 24] lord Somerville, by whom he had seven sons and one daughter.

1. Cuthbert, who got from king James IV.In archivis vicecomitis de Stormont. a charter of the lands of Northfield anno 1589, wherein he is designed eldest son of sir Charles.

Also a charter of several lands about An­nan,Chart. inpub. archiv. anno 1590; but he died that same year without issue.

2. Sir James, who succeeded his father.

3. Sir George, who was groom of the bed-chamber to king James VI. at whose court he married an English lady of a consi­derable fortune; but having no issue, he be­queathed his estate to his youngest brother John,Testament, penes J. Mur­ray de Mur­rayquhat. afterwards earl of Annandale, anno 1606, and died soon thereafter.

4. Charles, who married—, daughter of John Johnston of Newby, by whom he had a daughter,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. Agnes, married to— Lindsay of Rascarrol, but died before his el­der brother, anno 1619.

5. Sir David, designed of Clonzaird,Ibidem. who died without issue before 1621.

6. Sir Richard, who succeeded his brother sir James.

7. John, created earl of Annandale, of whom hereafter.

His daughter, Jean, was married to John Maxwell of Kirkhouse,Chart. in pub. archiv. and was mother of —earl of Dirleton.

Sir Charles died anno 1605, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

XIII. Sir JAMES MURRAY of Cockpool, who was infest in a great many lands before his father's death.

He got a charter from James Carruthers of S [...]ariggs,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. ‘"To James Murray appearand of Cockpool, of the half merk land of S [...]a­riggs,"’ anno 1590.

He got also a seisin of some other lands in September 1596,Ibidem. &c. and was served and retoured heir to his father on 16th Novem­ber 1605.

There is likewise a seisin,Ibidem. in favours of ‘"Sir James Murray of Cockpool, brother-ger­man and nearest heir to Cuthbert Mur­ray, son and heir apparent to the deceast sir Charles, &c."’ dated 5th September 1606.

He afterwards got charters under the great seal, of a great many lands, viz. one in 1607, another in 1610, a third in 1617, &c.

He also got several charters from king James VI.Chart. in pub. archiv. inter ann. 1606. &. 1616. domino Jacobo Murray de Cockpule militi, of the lands of Seariggs, salmon-fish­ing in Annan, &c. &c. &c.

He married Janet, daughter of sir Willi­am Douglas of Drumlanrig, ancestor of the duke of Queensberry, by whom he had issue three daughters,

1. Margaret, Chart. pen [...] vicecom. [...] Stormont. married to sir Robert Grier­son younger of Lag, to whom she had one son, sir John Grierson of Lag.

As this sir John had no sons, his eldest daughter, Nicholas, was married to David Scot of Scotstarvit, who had issue only one daugh­ter, Marjory, by whose marriage with David 5th viscount Stormont, the Murrays of Cock­pool, earls of Annandale, are lineally repre­sented in the person of the present lord Stor­mont.

2. Elizabeth, Ibidem. married, 1st, to John Grierson of Capenoch: 2dly, to William Grierson of Bargarton.

3. Marian, Ibidem. married to John Murray of Broughton, Esq; sir Richard, her uncle, being the party contracter for her at her marriage, anno 1630.

The three ladies, Margaret, Elizabeth, and Marian, above named, with consent of their mother dame Janet Douglas, submitted to their uncle, sir John Murray of Lochmaben, (afterwards earl of Annandale) all their title to the estate of Cockpool, as heirs of line to sir James, 29th June 1621. His brother sir Richard, as heir-male, claimed the estate, in preference to the daughters of sir James;Minutes of parliament. but sir John determined the right to the estate in favours of the heir-male.

Sir James died without male-issue, anno 1620▪ Whereupon

XIII. Sir RICHARD MURRAY of Cock-pool got a precept forth of the Chancery,Chart. penes vicecom. de Stormont. for infefting him as nearest heir-male to the deceast sir James, his brother-german, &c. dated 2d April 1621.

He was created a baronet by king Charles I. from whom he got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. ‘"Domino Ricardo Murray, baronetto de Cockpool, terrarum et baroniae de Cockpool, infra regionem Novae Scotiae in America,"’ dated anno 1626.

He got also a charter terrarum baroniae de Lockerbic, Ibidem: Hutton, Hoddam, &c. dated in 1635.

He died without issue in 1636, and was succeeded by his brother,

XIII. JOHN,Ib. et Chart. penes vice­com. de Stor­mont. who was served heir-male and of tailie to sir Richard Murray of Cock­pool, his brother-german, 29th August 1637.

He was first designed by the title of Loch­maben, then of Dundrenan,Chart. in pub. archiv [...] &c. and got se­veral charters, under the great seal, by both these titles, before he was made a peer.

He was a man of singular accomplishments, great worth and merit, and in high favour [Page 25] with king James VI. whom he accompanied into England, anno 1603.

He had the honour of knighthood confer­red upon him, was made one of the gentle­men of the bed-chamber, and master of the horse.

And was afterwards raised to the dignity of the peerage,art [...] e [...] suo, [...]ad ann. 24. by the titles of viscount An­nan and earl of Annandale, by letters patent, to the heirs-male of his body, dated 13th March 1624.

He was in no less favour with king Charles I. to whom he was a constant and steady friend.

He acquired a vast estate,id. inter num 1618 [...]1625. which appears by his charters under the great seal, too nu­merous to be here inserted.

He died anno 1640, leaving issue, by Eli­zabeth his spouse, daughter of sir John Schaw, knight, one son,

XIV. JAMES, second earl of Annandale, who succeeded him, [...]bid. ad ann. [...]644. and got a charter under the great seal, Jacobo comiti de Annandale, of several lands, &c. He retired into England, where he lived privately all the time of the civil war.

He succeeded also to the honours of Stor­mont, according to the entail and patent of that family, anno 1642.

He married lady Elizabeth Carnegie, daughter of James earl of Southesk; but dy­ing without issue, in December 1658, the honours of Annandale became extinct, but those of Stormont devolved upon the next heir-male, according to the patent and sub­stitution in the entail, &c. Vide title Stor­mont.

ARMS.

Azure, a crescent between three stars, all within a double tressure, counter-flowered with flower de lisses argent; and a dexter canton of the second, charged with a thistle vert, crowned or, as an augmentation.

SUPPORTERS; two lions argent, crowned or.

CREST; an angel with wings proper.

MOTTO; Noctesque diesque praesto.

JOHNSTON Marquis of ANNANDALE.

THE Johnstons were a bold and hardy race of men, always distinguished for their bravery in repelling the insults of the English borderers, and avenging the injuries done to their country.

They began to make a figure in Scotland in the reign of king Alexander II. who suc­ceeded to the crown, anno 1214: soon there­after they became numerous, and were pos­sessed of considerable estates in many different counties, which is sufficiently documented by charters under the great seal in the public re­gister.

There were two families of this sirname, who both designed themselves by the title of Johnston of that ilk, viz. those of Annandale in the south, and Caskieben in the north; but we cannot pretend to connect them with one another.

Hugo de Johnston was proprietor of lands in East-Lo­thian,Chartulary of [...]oltray in the [...]awier's libra [...]y. in the reign of king Alex­ander II. and was father of

John de Johnston, who made a donation to the monastery of Soltray (pro salute animae suae of part of his lands in East-Lothian,Ibid. fol. 15. of which it seems the family of Keith were su­periors; for the donation is confirmed by Ro­bert de Keith, great marishal of Scotland to which dominus Ricardus de Keith, his brother, Adam de Keith, his uncle, John de Keith, &c. are witnesses. The confirmation is without [...]te, but appears to have been before the [...] 1285.

Thomas le Johnston, Gilbert de Johnston, and Wauter Johnston,Prynne's col­l [...]ct. vol. III. are all found swe [...]ring fealty to king Edward 1. of England, inter 1292 et 1296; but we can give no further account of their posterity.

We therefore proceed to deduce the de­scent of this noble family from their undoubt­ed ancestor,

I. Sir JOHN de JOHNSTON. He was one of the Scotch barons that were forced to swear fealty to king Edward I. when he had over­run Scotland,Ibid. p. 657. anno 1296, and is then design­ed Johannes de Johnston, Chevalier del comi­tat, de Dumfries, &c. The above-named Gilbert is thought to have been his brother.

Sir John was father of

II. JOHN de JOHNSTON, who flourished in the reign of king Robert Bruce,Charta penes vicecom [...] de Stormont. and is particularly mentioned in a charter of Tho­mas Ranulph, earl of Murray, of the lands and barony of Cumlangum, which he gave to his nephew Willi [...]m de Moravia, &c. The charter must have been granted before 1331, in which ye [...]r the earl died.

He lest issue a son and successor,

[Page 26] III. GILBERT de JOHNSTON, who is witness in the same charter with his father to William de Moravia,Charta penes vicecom. de Stormont. and dying about the year 1360, was succeeded by his son,

IV. Sir JOHN de JOHNSTON, who made a great figure in the reigns of king David Bruce and king Robert II.

He engaged and defeated an army of the English,Rymer, A­bercrombie, vol. II. p. 172. who had invaded Scotland, anno 1370.

He was also one of the guardians of the west marches, anno 1371,Fordun, vol. II. p. 385. where he had of­ten an opportunity of exerting his magnani­mity and courage against the English border­ers, and was then designed dominus de John­ston.

He died [...]bout the year 1382 or 1383, and left issue a son,

V. Sir JOHN JOHNSTON, designed domi­nus de eodem, miles, who succeeded him.

About this time there were [...]o [...]ty thousand francs sent by the king of France,Rymer, tom. VII. p. 485. to be di­vided amongst the Scotch nobility, his faith­ful allies, of which sir John Johnston got three hundred, anno 1385.

This sir John, together with sir John Car­lyle, and sir William Stuart of Castlemilk, were appointed by the earl of Douglas, then chief warden of the marches,Ib. tom. VIII. p. 57. sureties for the keeping of a truce with the English, anno 1398.

And dying about the year 1420, was suc­ceeded by his son,

VI. Sir ADAM JOHNSTON, dominus de eodem, who raised his vassals and followers, joined the Scotch army under the command of the brave earl of Ormond, and behaved gallantly against the English at the battle of Sark,Abercrombie, vol. II. p. 340. where the Scots obtained a considerable victory.

He was afterwards very instrumental in suppressing the rebellion of the earls of Dou­glas,Crawfurd's peerage, and Home's hist. of Douglas. for which king James II. made him a grant of the lands of Peddinane in Lanark­shire, &c.

Mr. Crawfurd says, that sir Adam gave these lands to his cousin Herbert de Johnston,Crawfurd's peerage. ancestor of the Johnstons of Westerhall.

There is an instrument of saisin of the twenty merk land of Peddinane, granted to Matthew Johnston, upon a precept from the chancery,Sasa penes comitem de Hyndford. proceeding upon a charter from king James II. dated 19th November 1455.

We find that Herbert de Johnston got se­veral lands in the barony of Kirkmichael,Haddington's collections. in Dumfries-shire, from the earl of Crawfurd, for liberating his person out of the hands of James earl of Douglas, who had taken him captive, believing he intended to desert his interest, and espouse the king's, anno 1462.

This Herbert was also proprietor of some lands in the barony of Bothwel, which he re­signed to James lord Hamilton, in exchange for the lands of Gladstanes,Charta ducem [...] milton. &c. by a charter dated 15th May 1463.

We now return to

Sir Adam, who was often one of the gua­rantees of treaties of peace with the English,Rymer, XI. p. 300, 32 [...]. anno 1449, 1451, &c.

What family his first wife was of, we have not been able to discover, but by her he had a son,

John, his heir.

He married,Sir Rich [...]Maitland hist. of t [...] mily of S [...] ad ann. 1. 2dly, lady Janet Dunbar daughter of George earl of March, widow of John lord Seton, by whom he had another son,

Sir Gilbert Johnston, who married Agnes, daughter and sole heiress of sir Alexander El­phingston of that ilk,Crawfur [...] notes on chanan. with whom he got the lands and barony of Elphingston. He after­wards got a charter of the lands of Drumry,Chart. in [...] archiv. ‘"Gilberto de Johnston, de Elphingston, &c. anno 1471,"’ Rymer, [...] 1 XII. p. 2. and was one of the guaran­tees of a treaty of peace with the English, anno 1484.

Sir Adam died anno 1455, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

VII. Sir JOHN JOHNSTON, dominus de eodem, Rymer, t [...] XI. p. 3 [...] who was one of the conservators of the peace with England, anno 1457.

He was also appointed one of the wardens of the marches, and guarantees of a truce, anno 1459,Ib. p. 434▪ and always acted with vigour and intrepidity against the enemies of his country.

He married Mary, daughter of John lord Maxwell, ancestor of the earls of Nithsdale, by whom he had two sons.

1. James, his heir.

2. John, Chart. in [...] archiv. of [...] family of An [...]nandale. who got from his father the five merk lands of Wamfry, upon the 2d Novem­ber 1476, which, upon the failure of his is­sue, returned to the family.

He died before the year 1484, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. JAMES JOHNSTON, dominus de co­dem, who, as heir to his father, was insest in the lands of Johnston,Saisin ibid. anno 1484.

He was also a man of singular resolution, and behaved with particular conduct and cou­rage at the battle of Kirkconnel,Abercrombi [...] ▪ vol. II. p. 458. where he and the laird of Cockpool had the chief command of the Scotch army, anno 1484.

He left issue a son and successor,

IX. ADAM JOHNSTON, dominus de eo­dem, who, in his saisin of the lands of John­ston, [Page 27] is designed son and heir of James John­ston of that ilk, [...] in [...] fami­ [...] An­ [...]le. 24th May 1488.

He died anno 1508, having married—, daughter of—, by whom he had a son,

X. JAMES JOHNSTON, dominus de eo­dem, who succeeded him, [...] in pub. [...]. and got a charter, under the great seal; of the lands of Johnston, &c. wherein he is designed son and heir of Adam Johnston of that ilk, dated 2d No­vember 1509.

He got charters from king James V. [...]. of a great many other lands; and, like many of his brave ancestors, was a strenuous defender of the liberties of our country, and was in great favour both with king James IV. and V.

He married—, daughter of—, by whom he had issue four sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Robert.

3. Adam Johnston of Cory.

4. James, ancestor of the Johnstons of Wamfry, [...]tract from [...] commis­ [...]ry court [...]ks of [...]mfries. which is instructed by an agree­ment betwixt John Johnston of that ilk, and James Johnston of Wamfry, dated the 12th March 1550, wherein this James is design­ed brother-german to the said John.

He died anno 1528, or 1529, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XI. JOHN JOHNSTON of that ilk, in whose favours there is a seisin of the lands of Johnston, [...]sina in [...]chiv. fami­lae de An­ [...]ndale. &c. proceeding upon a precept from the chancery, for infefting him as heir served and retoured to the deceast James Johnston of that ilk, his father, dated the last of February 1542.

On 2d March thereafter, he resigned his lands of Johnston, in favours of James his eld­est son and apparent heir, [...]hart. in [...]ub. archiv. reserving to him­self the liferent, and a reasonable tierce to E­lizabeth Jardin his spouse, upon which there passed a charter under the great seal, anno 1543.

He got charters,Ibidem. under the great seal, of many other lands, too numerous to be here inserted.

He, like his ancestors, was a man of cou­rage, and effectually checked the inroads of the borderers, which were very frequent in his time.

He signalized himself particularly at the battle of Pinki [...],Rymer, tom. XV. p. 326. anno 1547; and was after­wards one of the commissioners appointed to settle the differences about the disputed lands on the borders, anno 1552.

He married, 1st, Elizabeth, daughter of —Jardin of Applegirth,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

1. James.

2. Robert, whose son and heir was design­ed Robert Johnston of Stapleton,Ib. and writs of the family of Annandale. who was father of Robert Johnston of Raecleugh, tu­tor-in-law to James Johnston of that ilk, an­no 1609.

1. Daughter, Dorothea, married to John Maitland of Auchincastle.

2. Margaret, Contract, pe­nes dom. Ir­vin de Bon­shaw, ad an­num 1566. married to Christopher Ir­ving, Esq; son and apparent heir of Edward Irving of Bonshaw, Esq; in Dumfriesshire.

He married, 2dly, Nicolas, daughter of sir James Douglas of Drumlanrig, by whom he had two sons.

The eldest,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1550. named also James, designed of Lochwood-house.

2. John Johnston of Neist.

He died about the year 1568.

XII. JAMES,Ibidem. first son and apparent heir of John Johnston of that ilk, married Marga­ret, daughter of sir John Hamilton of Samu­elton, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, married to sir Robert Dou­glas of Cashogle.

2. Jean, married to William Livingston of Jerviswood.

He died before his father, about the year 1559, and was succeded by his son,

XIII. JOHN, who succeeded also to his grandfather,Ib. inter an­num 1558, & 1582. anno 1568.

He got charters, under the great seal, of many lands and baronies, in all which he is designed dominus de eodem.

He was likeways a man of spirit and cou­rage, and of great prudence and sagacity.Chart. penes marchion. de Annandale. He was very active in repelling the inroads of the borderers, was appointed warden of the west marches, and justice general, by king James VI. anno 1579.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir Wil­liam Scot of Buccleugh, by whom he had a son,

Sir James,—and two daughters,

1. Elizabeth, married to Alexander Jar­din; younger of Applegirth.

2. Grizel, married to sir Robert Maxwell of Orchardtoun.

He died anno 1586, and was succeeded by his only son,

XIV. Sir JAMES JOHNSTON, who was heir served and retoured to John Johnston of that ilk,Ibidem. his father, in the baronies of John­ston, &c. 27th August 1588, and obtained charters from king James VI.Chart. in pub. archiv. inter ann. 1600. & 1608. of a great ma­ny lands, in which he is designed Jacobus dominus de Johnston, miles, &c.

He was a man of good parts, and a parti­cular favourite of king James VI. who con­ferred the honour of knighthood upon him at [Page 28] the solemnity of the queen's coronation, anno 1590.Rymer, tom. XVI. p. 60. He was appointed warden of the west marches anno 1596, in which office he continued, till he was unhappily killed in a family quarrel,Spottiswood's history. by the lord Maxwel, on 6th April 1608.

By Sarah his wife, daughter of John lord Herries, he left issue a son and successor,

XV. JAMES, (afterwards earl of Hartfiel) who got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of the lands of Moffatdale, Evandale, &c. anno 1628.

He was a man of great loyalty and inte­grity, and was in high favour with king Charles I.Diploma ib. who raised him to the dignity of the peerage, by the title of lord Johnston of Lochwood, by patent to his heirs-male, 20th of June 1633,Ibidem. and created him earl of Hart­fiel, by patent to his heirs male, dated 18th March 1643.

He adhered firmly to the interest of the royal family during all the time of the civil war, for which he was imprisoned, had his estate sequestrate, and suffered many other hardships on account of his loyalty.

He married, 1st, lady Margaret Douglas, eldest daughter of William earl of Queens­berry, by whom he had a son,

James, his heir,—and three daugh­ters.

1. Lady Mary, married, 1st, to sir George Graham of Netherby, by whom she had sir Richard Graham, first viscount Preston, and several other sons. She married, 2dly, sir George Fletcher of Huttonhall in Cumberland, but to him she had no issue.

2. Lady Janet, married to sir William Murray of Stenhope.

3. Lady Margaret, married to sir Robert Dalziel of Glenae.

He married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of sir Samuel Johnston of Elphingston, baronet. And, 3dly, lady Margaret Hamilton, daughter of Thomas earl of Haddington, but left no surviving issue by either.

He died in April 1653, and was succeed­ed by his only son,

XVI. JAMES, second earl of Hartfiel, who, upon the restoration of king Charles II. was constituted one of the lords of his privy coun­cil, and, with his majesty's approbation, ex­changed the title of Hartsiel for that of An­nandale;Diploma in pub. archiv. haeredibus masculis seu [...]emellis, &c. upon which he got a new patent, with the former precedency, ‘"Jacobo comiti de Annandale et Hartfiel, vicecomiti de An­nand, domino Johnston de Lochwood, Loch­maben, Mos [...]atdale, Evandale, &c"’ to his heirs whatsoever, male or female, dated 13th February 1661.

He got also a charter, under the great seal,Ibid. haeredi­bus masculis, seu femellis, sine divisione, &c. of his whole lands, erecting the same into a lordship, earldom, and regality, ‘"To him, and his heirs whatsoever,"’ containing a grant of the office of hereditary constable of the castle of Lochmaben, dated 3d April 1662.

He had also another grant of the office of hereditary steward of the stewartry of Annan­dale, &c.

He married lady Henriet, daughter of Wil­liam marquis of Douglas, by lady Mary Gor­don, his second wife, daughter of George mar­quis of Huntly, by whom he had issue two sons and three daughters.

1. William, his heir.

2. John Johnston, Esq;

1. Daughter, lady Mary, married to Wil­liam earl of Crawfurd.

2. Lady Margaret, married to sir James Montgomery of Skelmorly.

3. Lady Henriet, married to sir John Car­michael of Bonnytoun.

He died on 7th July 1672, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XVII. WILLIAM, second earl of Annan­dale, and third of Hartfiel, who was appoint­ed one of the lords of the privy council to king William, one of the commissioners of the treasury, and president of the parliament of Scotland, anno 1695, in which high office he ac­quitted himself to the general satisfaction, by the candid and distinct manner in which he resumed the debates. He was further dig­nified with the title of marquis of Annandale,Haeredibus suis masculis quibuscunque omni tempo­re futuro. Re­gistrate 1 [...]t Ju­ly 1701. by letters patent to him and his heirs-male whatsover, dated 24th June 1701, and that same year was appointed high commissioner to the general assembly of the kirk of Scot­land.

He was made president of the council by queen Anne, one of the commissioners of the treasury, one of the extraordinary lords of session, conjunct secretary of state, knight of the thistle, anno 1704, and high commission­er to the general assembly of the kirk of Scot­land, anno 1705.

In the parliament 1706, he opposed the u­nion with all his interest, and made several speeches and protests against it, containing the reason of his dissent; all which were en­tered in the records of parliament.

However, after the union was concluded, he was chosen one of the sixteen peers to re­present Scotland in the first British parliament; was re-elected anno 1710, and appointed her majesty's high commissioner to the kirk of Scotland, anno 1711.

He was also appointed one of the privy council to king George I. keeper of the pri­vy [Page 29] seal; and was again elected one of the sixteen peers for Scotland, anno 1715.

He married, 1st, Sophia, daughter and heir­ess of John Fairholm of Craigiehall, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. James, his heir.

2. Lord William, who died unmarried.

Lady Henrietta, his daughter, was married to Charles earl of Hopetoun.

He married, 2dly, Charlotte, daughter of John Venden-Benpeden of Westminster, Esq; by whom he had two sons.

1. Lord George, now marquis of Annan­dale.

2. Lord John, who was elected member of parliament for the burghs of Dumfries, &c. anno 1721, and died unmarried anno 1742.

The marquis died the 14th January 1721, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVIII. JAMES, second marquis of An­nandale; a man of fine parts, and exquisite taste in the arts and sciences.

He died at Naples unmarried, anno 1730, and was succeeded by his brother,

XVIII. GEORGE, third marquis of An­nandale.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, argent, a saltire sable, on a chief gules, three cushions or: 2d and 3d, or, an anchor in pale gules.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter side a lion argent, armed and langued azure, crowned with an imperial crown or: on the sinister, a horse argent, furnished gules.

CREST; on a wreath a spur erect or, winged argent.

MOTTO; Nunquam non paratus.

ARBUTHNOT Viscount ARBUTHNOT.

ALL our antiquaries agree, that this is a local sirname, and was assumed by the proprietors of the lands and barony of Arbuthnot in the Mearns, when sirnames be­gan to be used in Scotland.

The first we find upon record, is,

1. HUGO, promiscuously designed de Ar­buthnot and Aberbothenoth,Sir George Mackenzie's baronage of Scotl. M. S. in the law­yers library, Edinburgh. who, according to a learned author, got possession of the lands of Arbuthnot, by marrying the daughter of Osbertus Oliphard, sheriff of Mearns, in the reign of king Malcolm IV. about the year 1160, from whence he assumed his sirname.

Ricardus de Aberbothenoth,Chartul. of Arbroath. Ib. clericus regis, flourished in the reign of king William the lion; but we cannot connect him with this family.

The said Hugo had a long contest with the bishop of St. Andrews, about the property of the Kirktown of Arbuthnot, which was not determined in his time.

He was succeeded by his son,

II. DUNCANUS de ABERBOTHENOTH,Original de­creet penes vicecomitem de Arbuthnot, insert in Nis­bet's appen­dix, page 87. who continued his father's contest with the bishop of St. Andrews about the property of the Kirktown of Arbuthnot, which was at last determined against him by an assembly of ec­clesiastics held at Perth, anno 1206.

He left issue two sons,

1. Hugo, his heir.

2. Alwinus de Arbuthnot, Chartul. of St. Andrews, penes Wal­terum Mac­farlane de e­odem. who is witness to a donation to the priory of St. Andrews, in the reign of king Alexander II.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. HUGO, third baron of Aberbothenoth, who is a witness in a charter to the mona­stery of Arbroath, together with his father,Chartul. of Arbroath. therein designed dominus Duncanus de Aber­bothenoth, whereby Robertus filius Warnebal­di, et Rescinda sponsa sua, gave to the mona­stery of Arbroath, ‘"totum feodum nostrum in parochia de Fordun, &c."’

He left issue a son and successor,

IV. HUGO de ABERBOTHENOTH, who, on account of the flaxen colour of his hair, was designed Hugo le Blond, dominus de A­berbothenoth.

He was a liberal benefactor to the clergy;Larger Char­tulary of Ar­broath in the lawyers lib­rary, Edin. witness his donations to the monks of Aber­brothock anno 1282. The original of one of these donations, still in the family, has this Hugo's seal appended to it. The impression is a crescent and a star, which, with very little variation, is at this day the arms of the family.

He died about the end of the thirteenth century, and was buried amongst his ancestors at the church of Arbuthnot, where there is a statue of him in stone at full length, still to be seen.

He married a daughter of the antient and honourable family of the Morvilles, by whom he had a son,Orig. et in­crement. fa­miliae Ar­buthnoticae penes vice­comitem de Arbuthnot.

V. DUNCANUS, fifth baron of Aberbothe­noth, who succeeded him, and died at his [Page 30] mansion-house of Arbuthnot in December 1314.Orig. et in­erement. fa­miliae Ar­buthnoticae.

He was succeeded by his son, another

VI. DUNCANUS, sixth baron of Aberbo­thenoth,Ibidem. who survived his father but a short time, and left issue a son and successor,

VII. HUGO de ABERBUTHNOT, who lived in the beginning of the reign of king David II.Ibidem. and left a son and successor,

VIII. PHILIPPUS, eighth baron of Ar­buthnot, and the first we find designed domi­nus ejusdem.

He, like many of his ancestors, was a li­beral benefactor to the church and clergy; witness his large donations fratribus Carmel­burgi de Aberdeen, &c. The original char­ter, which is still extant,Chart. in ar­chivis regis Dav. is dated in April 1355, and is afterwards confirmed by king David II. anno 1366.

He married, first,—Keith, daughter of sir William Keith great marishal of Scotland, but by her he had no male issue.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of sir James Douglas of Dalkeith,Chart. penes comitem de Morton. ancestor of the earl of Morton, by Agnes Dunbar, daugh­ter of the earl of March; by whom he had a son,

Hugh, his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to William lord Moni­penny.

IX. HUGH ARBUTHNOT, dominus e­jusdem, succeeded. It seems this Hugh, with several other gentlemen in the shire of Mearns, upon great provocation, had been ac­cessary to the killing of John Melvil of Glen­bervie;Sir George Mackenzie's baronage, &c. and, claiming the privileges of the clan Macduff, was assoilzied from the said slaughter, as being within the ninth degree of kindred to Macduff earl of Fife.

He married Margaret,Orig. et in­crement. fa­miliae Arbuth­noticae. daughter of sir Ro­bert Keith, ancestor to the earl marishal, by whom he had

Robert, his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to Andrew Menzies, pro­vost of Aberdeen, ancestor of the family of Pitsoddils.

He lived to a very great age, and dying anno 1446, was succeeded by his son,

X. ROBERT ARBUTHNOT, dominus ejus­dem, who married Giles, daughter of sir Wal­ter Ogilvie of Lentrethan, lord high treasurer of Scotland,Chart. in pub. archiv. ancestor of the earl of Airly, by whom he had six sons and one daughter.

1. David, his heir.

2. Hugh Arbuthnot of Balmaquin and Bryck­lie, which estate he got by marrying Janet Bal­maquin,Ibid. Orig. et increment. familiae Ar­buthnoticae. heiress thereof.

3. Robert Arbuthnot of Banff.

4. Alexander, who died without issue.

5. James. Ibidem.

6. William.

His daughter Catharine was married to sir John Allardice of that ilk.Chart. penes vicecom. de Arbuthnot.

This Robert died anno 1450, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XI. DAVID ARBUTHNOT, dominus ejusdem, who made a great figure in the reign of king James II. and bore a considerable share in all the transactions of his time.

He was one of the free barons,Large Chart. of Arbroath. page 74. upon an inquest, for settling the marches of some lands with the abbot and convent of Arbroath, anno 1460.

He married—Durham,Chart. pe­nes vicecom. de Arbuth­not. daughter of —Durham of Grange, an antient family in the county of Angus, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. Hugh Arbuthnot, doctor of medicine, who, being a person of great skill and know­ledge in his profession,Ibidem. was invited over to France, where he settled, married, and had issue.

1. Daughter Elizabeth, Ibidem. was married to —Barclay of Gartly, an antient family in Aberdeenshire.

2 Giles, married to—Fraser of Dores.

3. Catharine, married to Alexander Gra­ham tutor of Morphy.

He died anno 1470, and was succeeded by his son,

XII. Sir ROBERT ARBUTHNOT, miles, dominus ejusdem, who, being a person of great loyalty and integrity, was in high favour with their majesties king James III. and IV. as appears from the great number of letters he had from both these monarchs,Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 89. all written with their own hands, and which are still preserv­ed amongst the archives of the family; copies whereof may be seen at large in Nisbet's ap­pendix, to which we refer our readers, who wish to see a fuller account of this family.

He was likewise a man of great prudence, oeconomy and frugality, and made several con­siderable new purchases, which he added to his paternal inheritance, and for all which he got charters under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. in 1487, 1488, 1493, 1494, &c. and recovered the barony of Fiddes, which had been out of the family above two hundred years.

He sat in the parliament held by king James III.Records of parliament in the lawyers library. at Edinburgh, the 29th of January 1487, and is then designed dominus R [...]bertus Arbuth­not de codem, &c.

[Page 31] He was one of the gentlemen upon the in­quest, in the service of James Wishart of Pit­tarrow, anno 1491, and is witness to the earl marishal's charter to his second son,Haddington's collections. of the lands of Troup, anno 1493.

He made several donations to the religious, and founded and endowed a chaplainry at the church of Arbuthnot,Ibid. and Nisbet, p. 90. pro salute animae suae, et Mariotae Scrimgeour sponsae suae, &c. &c. dat­ed in 1505, and confirmed by king James IV. the same year.

He married, 1st, a daughter of sir James Wishart of Pittarrow, an antient family in the Mearns, by whom he had one only son,

Ambrose, who died in the flower of his age.

He married, 2dly, Mariota, daughter of sir James Scrimgeour of Dudhope, ancestor of the earl of Dundee,Ibidem. by whom he had four sons and six daughters.

1. James, his heir.

2. Mr. Robert Arbuthnot.

3. George Arbuthnot, who died in France without issue.

4. Andrew Arbuthnot of Futhes,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1553 et 1555. who got several charters of lands under the great seal, and married Elizabeth, daughter of Alexan­der Strachan of Thorntoun, by whom he had, 1st, Robert his successor; 2d, Mr. Alexan­der Arbuthnot, principal of the king's college at Aberdeen, who was an ornament to his country, for his great learning and knowledge in all the liberal arts and sciences.

1. Daughter, Elizabeth, married to Tho­mas Fotheringhame of Pourie.

2. Catharine, married, 1st, to—Au­chinleck of that ilk; 2dly, to Gilbert Tur­ring of Foveran.

3. Christian, married to Alexander Fraser of Dores.

4. Giles, married to Graham of Morphie.

5. Janet, married to Alexander Falconer of Halkerton, ancestor of lord Halkerton.

6. Mariota, married to James Bisset of Easter Kinneff.

He died in the year 1506, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XIII. JAMES ARBUTHNOT, dominus e­jusdem. He got a charter from king James IV. dated in 1506,Ibidem. de baronia, castro, et fortalitio de Arbuthnot, &c.

He also got charters of several other lands and got them all erected into one free baro­ny, anno 1511.Ibidem.

He married lady Jean Stuart, daughter of John earl of Athole,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, page 172. by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. David, who, having devoted himself to the service of the church, was made par­son of Menmure, but was killed at the battle of Pinkie, anno 1547.

His daughter, Isabel, was married, 1st, to —Ouchterlonie of Kelly;Chart. penes comitem de Panmure. and, 2dly, to Robert Maule of Panmure, ancestor to the earls of that family.

He died in the flower of his age, anno 1521, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIV. ROBERT ARBUTHNOT, dominus ejus­dem, a man of great worth and merit, and of high character in the reigns of king James V. and queen Mary.Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1550 & [...] 1570. He had a very considerable e­state, which appears by his charters, under the great seal, of several lands and baronies too numerous to be here inserted.

He married, 1st, a daughter of—Ers­kine of Dun, an antient family in the shire of Forfar, by whom he had no surviving issue. He married, 2dly, lady Christian Keith, daugh­ter of Robert lord Keith,Ibidem. eldest son and heir to William earl marishal, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.

1. Andrew, his heir.

2. John Arbuthnot of Mandynes.

3. Alexander Arbuthnot of Pitcarles.

4. Robert, who dedicated himself to the service of the church, was parson of Arbuth­not, and a man of great piety and learning.

1. Daughter, was married to—Cleph­an of Carslogie.

2.—, married to—Straiton of Laurieston.

3.—, married to—Seymour of Balyordie.

4.—, married to—Strachan of Brighton.

Robert of that ilk married,Ibidem. 3dly, Helen, daughter of—Clephan of Carslogie, an antient family in the shire of Fife, by whom he had three sons and four daughters.

1. David Arbuthnot of Findowrie.

2. James Arbuthnot of Blackstoun.

3. Hugh Arbuthnot of Auchterforfar.

1. Daughter,—, was married to— Mortimer of Craigievar, in Aberdeenshire.

2.—, married to—Ogilvie of Bal­four, in the county of Forfar.

3.—, married to—Lindsay of Barnyards.

4.—, married to—Ogilvy of Balnaboth.

He died in October 1579, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XV. ANDREW ARBUTHNOT, dominus ejusdem, who was a man of great prudence and industry, and made several new acquisi­tions to his estate,Ibidem. even in his father's life­time, viz. the baronies of Arrat, Pitforthy, [Page 32] &c. &c. for all which he got charters under the great seal, anno 1553, &c. &c.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of sir A­lexander Carnegie of Kinnaird,Chart. in pub. archiv. ancestor of the earl of Southesk, by whom he had three sons and a daughter.

1. Sir Robert, his heir.

2. James Arbuthnot of Arrat, who mar­ried a daughter of—Livingstone of Du­nipace, by whom he had two sons, viz. sir Robert Arbuthnot of Arrat, who succeeded to the estate of Arbuthnot upon his uncle's decease, and James, tutor of Arbuthnot.

3. Patrick Arbuthnot of Chappletoun.

His daughter, Elizabeth, was married to —Fraser of Dores.

He died in an advanced age, anno 1606, and was succeeded by his son,

XVI. Sir ROBERT ARBUTHNOT of that ilk, who was a man of great parts, both na­tural and acquired; and that his royal master had a just notion of his integrity and abilities,The original, penes vice­com. de Ar­buthnot, Co­pie 112. and Nisbet's ap­pendix, p. 92. appears from his majesty's letter to him, (still extant) in relation to the composing of differences at a general convention, which the king had appointed to meet at Lithgow in July 1608.

He married lady Mary Keith, daughter of William lord Keith,Chart. in pub. archiv. son and heir apparent of William earl marishal, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of George earl of Errol, but dying without issue anno 1615, the estate of Ar­buthnot develved upon his nephew,

XVII. Sir ROBERT ARBUTHNOT of that ilk, who was eldest son of his brother James Arbuthnot of Arrat, as before noticed. He, having got a liberal education both at home and abroad, by the care of his uncle, return­ed from his travels with the character of a polite and accomplished gentleman, and made a very considerable figure in several parlia­ments of king James VI. and king Charles I.

He married, 1st, lady Margaret Keith, daughter of George earl marishal,Ibidem. but she dy­ing soon thereafter, by her he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, a daughter of Simon lord Lovat, by Jean his wife, daughter of James lord Down, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.

1. Sir Robert, afterwards viscount of Ar­buthnot.

2. Andrew Arbuthnot of Fiddes.

3. Alexander, a young gentleman of great courage and loyalty, who was killed at the battle of Dumbar, anno 1650.

4. Simon Arbuthnot of Catterlin.

1. Daughter, Jean, married to sir Alex­ander Burnet of Leyes.

2. Margaret, married to sir Alexander Carnegie of Pittarrow.

3. Janet, married to William Keith of Hallgreen.

He died in 1633, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVIII. Sir ROBERT ARBUTHNOT miles, dominus ejusdem. Ibidem. He always adhered firmly to the interest of his majesty king Charles I. who, for his faithful services, first conferred the honour of knighthood upon him, and then raised him to the dignity of the peerage, by the titles of viscount of Arbuthnot,Register of patents in the Chancery. and lord Innerbervie, by letters patent to his heirs­male, dated 16th November 1641.

He married, 1st, lady Marjory Carnegie, daughter of David earl of Southesk, by whom he had a son,

Robert, his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to sir John Forbes of Monimusk in Aberdeenshire.

He married, 2dly, Catharine, daughter of Hugh lord Lovat, by whom he had another son, and a daughter.

His son, Alexander Arbuthnot of Knox, mar­ried Jean, daughter of Patrick Scot of Rossie, Esq, by whom he had a son and successor,

Alexander Arbuthnot of Knox, one of the commissioners of excise in the reign of king George II. who married Janet, daughter of John Ronald of Larnie, Esq; by whom he had two sons,

1. Robert, married to Elizabeth, daughter of John Riddle of Grange, Esq; by whom he hath three sons, Alexander, John, and Robert.

2. Archibald, married to Margaret Lees, by whom he hath two sons, Romeo and Ar­chibald.

The viscount's daughter, Anne, married William Forbes of Ludquhairn, in Aber­deenshire.

He died in the year 1659, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XIX. ROBERT, second viscount of Ar­buthnot, who married, 1st, lady Elizabeth Keith, daughter of William earl marishal, by lady Elizabeth Seton his wife, daughter of George earl of Winton, by whom he had a son,

Robert, his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to sir Thomas Burnet of Leyes.

He married, 2dly, Catharine, daughter of Robert Gordon of Pitlurg and Straloch, by whom he had three sons and three daughters:

1. Mr. John Arbuthnot of Fordun, ancestor of the present viscount of Arbuthnot, of whom afterwards,

[Page 33] 2. Mr. Alexander, who changed his sir­name to Maitland, on account of his mar­riage with Jean, eldest daughter and sole heir­ess of sir Charles Maitland of Pitrichie, and was one of the barons of his majesty's ex­chequer in Scotland.

3. Mr. Thomas.

1. Daughter, Catharine, married, 1st, to Mr. Robert Gordon of Clunie, and, 2dly, to David Riccart of Riccartoun.

2. Anne, married to Mr. John Horn of Westerhall, advocate.

3. Helen, married, 1st, to John Macfar­lane of that ilk; and, 2dly, to Mr. John Spotswood of that ilk, advocate.

All of them had issue.

He died in 1684, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XX. ROBERT, third viscount of Arbuth­not, who married lady Anne Sutherland, daughter of George earl of Sutherland, by lady Jean Wemyss, daughter of David earl of Wemyss, by whom he had two sons and four daughters.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. John, viscount of Arbuthnot, who suc­ceeded his brother.

1. Daughter, Jean, married to captain Crawfurd of Camlurg.

2. Anne.

3. Mary.

4. Margaret. which three last died without issue.

And dying in 1692, was succeeded by his eldest son,

XXI. ROBERT, fourth viscount of Ar­buthnot, a man of great parts and expectati­on, but died unmarried anno 1710, and was succeeded by his brother,

XXI. JOHN, fifth viscount of Arbuthnot, a man of great honour and probity, who mar­ried Jean, daughter of William Morison of Prestongrange; and dying without issue in 1756, his estate and honours devolved upon his cousin John Arbuthnot, son and heir of Mr. John Arbuthnot of Fordun, to whom we now return.

XX. Mr. JOHN ARBUTHNOT of For­dun, first son of the second marriage of Ro­bert second viscount of Arbuthnot, by Catha­rine, daughter of Robert Gordon of Pitlurg, married Margaret Falconer, daughter of sir James Falconer of Phesdo, one of the sena­tors of the college of justice, by whom he had a numerous issue, of whom two sons and five daughters are still alive.

1. James, a banker in Edinburgh, who died unmarried.

2. John, who succeeded to the estate and honours of Arbuthnot, upon the death of the fifth viscount; as before observed.

3. Doctor Thomas Arbuthnot of Ballglessie, physician in Montrose, who married a daugh­ter of—Forbes of Thornton, in the coun­ty of Kincardine, and hath issue.

1. Daughter, Margaret.

2. Mary, married to John Douglas of Tul­liwhillie, and hath issue.

3. Jean.

4. Ann.

5. Catharine, married to James More of Invernettie.

XXI. JOHN, sixth viscount of Arbuthnot, married, 1st, May Douglas, daughter and co-heiress of—Douglas of Bridgeford, by whom he hath no surviving issue.

He married, 2dly, Jean, daughter of A­lexander Arbuthnot of Findourie, descended of David Arbuthnot, eldest son of the second marriage of Robert Arbuthnot of that ilk, (No. XIV. of this account), by whom he hath issue three sons and two daughters.

1. Robert, master of Arbuthnot.

2. John.

3. Hugh.

1. Daughter, Charlot.

2. Margaret.

ARMS.

Azure, a crescent between three stars, argent.

CREST; on a wreath, a peacock's head couped proper.

SUPPORTERS; two wyverns vert, spout­ing fire.

MOTTO; laus Deo.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Arbuthnot, in the shire of Kincardine, &c.

CAMPBELL Duke of ARGYLE.

THAT the noble and illustrious name of CAMPBELL is of very great antiquity in Scotland, is acknowledged by all our histo­rians.

Cambden derives their origin from the antient kings of Argyle,Cambd. folio edit. p. 706. about the sixth cen­tury.

Mr. Martin of Clermont, a learned and judicious antiquary,Martin's ge­nealogical collections, vol. I. p. 53. and vol. II. p. 59. says, ‘"It is the opini­on of some, that they came originally from France, and assumed their sirname about the reign of king Malcolm Canmore."’

In the traditional accounts of our bards and senachies, it is said, that their predeces­sors were in possession of the lands of Lochow, in Argyleshire, before the restoration of our monarchy by king Fergus II. anno 404;Mr. Duncan­son's hist. of the family M. S. penes ducem de Ar­gyle. Craw­furd's Peer­age, &c. and that the first appellation they used, was O-Dubhin, which, according to an early custom, they assumed from Diarmed O-Dubhin, one of their ancestors, who was a brave and war­like man; and from him, in the Galic lan­guage, they are called Siol Diarmed; that is, the posterity and offspring of Diarmed.

The bards have recorded a long series of the barons of Lochow, descended of the fore­said Diarmed O-Dubhin, who were renown­ed both for courage and conduct: amongst whom was Paul O-Dubhin, lord of Lochow, who was denominated Paul Inspuran, from his being the king's treasurer. But he hav­ing no male issue, his estate went to his daugh­ter Eva, who being married to Gillespick O-Dubhin, a relation of her own, he got their name changed to Campbell, to perpetuate the memory of a noble and heroic action perform­med by him for the crown of France,Ibidem. in the reign of king Malcolm Canmore.

From this Gillespick, therefore, we shall deduce the descent of the illustrious family of Argyle.

I. GILLESPICK O-DUBHIN, or CAMP­BELL, lord of Lochow, according to the M. S. history of the family, lived in the reign of king David I. and married Eva, only daugh­ter and heiress of Paul O-Dubhin before no­ticed, by whom he had a son,Ibidem.

II. DUNCAN CAMPBELL of Lochow, who succeeded him, slourished in the reign of king Malcolm IV. and left issue a son and succes­sor,

III. COLIN CAMPBELL of Lochow, who lived in the reign of king William the Lion, but of whom we have nothing memorable.

He left issue a son,

IV. GILLESPICK, or, ARCHIBALD CAMP­BELL of Lochow, who succeeded him, and flourished in the end of the reign of king Wil­liam,Regiam Ma­jestatem, cap. 17. and beginning of king Alexander II. and is particularly mentioned in the statutes of that last prince, anno 1214, 1215, &c.

He married Finetta,M. S. hist. of the family of Lovat, penes magistrum Gulielmum Fraser scri­bam Edin. daughter of John Frazer, lord of Tweddale, by whom he had a son and successor,

V. DUNCAN CAMPBELL of Lochow, who, in the reign of king Alexander II. married a daughter of the family of Cummyn,Martin's ge­nealogical collections. by whom he had issue two sons,

1. Sir Gillespick.

2. John, Douglas. Walker's chron. Dr. Mackenzie's lives of the Scotch writ­ers, p. 387, &c. a man of great learning and knowledge, and a famous author, who flou­rished betwixt 1250 and 1286, and was an ornament to his country for learning, &c.

Duncan was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. Sir GILLESPICK, or, ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, knight, and lord of Lochow, who made a considerable figure in the end of the reign of king Alexander II. and beginning of the reign of king Alexander III.

In the charter of erection of the burgh of Newburgh,Chartul. of Lindores, pe­nes Walterum Mac [...]arlane, de eodem, p. 205. this Gillespick Campbell, toge­ther with William earl of Mar, John de Lind­say, John de Haya, William Bisset, &c. are witnesses at Strivling, 4th March 1266.

He married a daughter of William de So­merville, baron of Carnwath, by whom he had issue a son,

VII. Sir COLIN MORE CAMPBELL, do­minus de Lochow, who succeeded him, and was a renowned and warlike chieftain. He had the honour of knighthood conferred up­on him by king Alexander III. anno 1280; and from him the chief or head of the family of Argyle is called Macallan-More in the highlands to this day.

In a charter by Malcolm earl of Lennox,Chartul. of Levenax, pe­nes eundem, p. 34. Johanni de Luss, the witnesses are, dominus Jacobus Senescallus Scotiae, dominus Reginaldus de Crawfurd, dominus Colinus Campbell, &c. circiter annum 1281.

He was one of the great barons of Scot­land that were summoned to Berwick on the part of king Robert Bruce,Rymer, tom. II. p. 553. in the competiti­on for the crown betwixt him and Baliol, anno 1292.

[Page 35] It must here be observed, that the Camp­bells, by this time, were become so numerous in Scotland, that it is not easy to distinguish them, except when they are locally designed, there being many of that sirname in Prynne's collections,Prynne's col­lections, and remarks upon Ragman's roll, p. 26, 31, 32, 36, and 45. (men of rank) swearing allegi­ance to king Edward I. of England, betwixt the years 1291 and 1297, viz. Nicol; or Neil Campbell, Colin de Campbell; Duncan Campbell del Isles, Thomas Campbell▪ Dou­gal Campbell, Arthur Campbell, another Dun­can Campbell, sir Dovenald Campbell, &c.

This sir Colin acquired from sir William Lindsay the lands of Symington in Ayrshire,Chartul. of Newbottle, penes Walte­rum Macfar­lane de eod. p. 12 & 13. and made a donation of the superiority there­of to the monks of Newbottle, by a charter, wherein he is designed dominus Colinus Camp­bell, miles, filius quondam domini Gillespick Campbell, &c. anno 1293.

He was slain soon thereafter, at a place called the String of Cowal, in a conflict be­twixt him and the lord of Lorn, leaving is­sue,M. S. hist. of the family. by—Sinclair his spouse, three sons.

1. Sir Neil, his heir.

2. Sir Dovenald Campbell of Reidhouse or Reidcastle, ancestor of the family of Lou­doun. Vide title Earl of Loudoun.

3. John Campbell, Rymer tom. II. p. 725, ad ann. 1296. who was bred to the church.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. Sir NEIL CAMPBELL baron of Lochow, who, in his father's lifetime, made a donation to the monastery of Cambuskenneth,Chartul. of Cambusken­neth, penes Macfarlane, p. 65. No. 50. of part of the lands of Menstrie, and is then designed Nigellus Campbell filius Colini, &c. anno 1282.

He was a man of singular merit, and a true patriot; and tho he submitted to Baliol's government for some time, yet no sooner did the heroic king Robert Bruce begin to assert his title to the crown;Abercrombie vol. I. p. 571. than he joined him most heartily and sincerely, and never after­wards deserted his interest, but did him ma­ny great and signal services when he was in the utmost distress, and assisted at his corona­tion at Scoon, anno 1306.

He afterwards commanded a party of loyal­ists against the lord Lorn,Barber's life of K. Robert. a declared enemy of king Robert and his country, and reduced Argyleshire and Lorn to the king's obedience.

He entered into a memorable association with sir Gilbert Hay, sir Alexander Seton, and other loyalists,The original writ is among the archives of the family of Marr. wherein they bound them­selves till death, to defend the liberties of their country, and king Robert Bruce's right to the crown against all enemies, French, English, and Scots; to which they all put their hands and seals, at Cambuskenneth, the 9th day of September 1308.

After the king was well settle on his throne, sir Neil, being no less an able states­man than a brave soldier, was employed in several important negotiations to the king of England; particularly he, with sir John Men­teith,Rymer, tom. III. p. 163. were appointed plenipotentiaries for Scotland, and Richard de Burgh, earl of Ul­ster, &c. for England, anno 1309.

And after the battle of Bannockburn, he, with sir Roger Kilpatrick, Robert Keith, and Gilbert Hay,Ibid. p. 495. were sent commissioners, to treat of a lasting peace with king Edward in person, then at Durham, anno 1314, tho' at that time it took no effect.

He was likewise one of the great barons at the parliament of Ayr,Anderson's Independ. where the succession to the crown was settled upon the heirs of king Robert Bruce, anno 1315.

King Robert, on account of his loyalty, great and faithful services, made him a grant of several lands then in the crown;Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle. all which are contained in a charter under the great seal, the ninth year of king Robert's reign, anno 1315.

And, as a testimony of his great esteem and regard for sir Neil, he bestowed upon him in marriage his sister,Ibidem. lady Mary Bruce, by whom he had two sons.

1. Sir Colin.

2. John, a man of singular worth and me­rit, and in high favour with his uncle king Robert Bruce, who dignified him with the title of earl of Athole,Nisbet's Ap­pend. p. 178. & Chart. in pub archiv. (then in the crown by the forfeiture of David de Strabogie) to him, and the heirs of his body; but he dying with­out issue, the honours returned to the crown,Ibidem. and were afterwards bestowed upon William Douglas, lord of Liddisdale.

Sir Neil dying in the end of the year 1315, or the beginning of 1316, was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. Sir COLIN CAMPBELL of Lochow, who also was a great loyalist, and always ad­hered to the interest of king Robert Bruce, and his son king David.

He went in the expedition to Ireland, in favours of king Edward Bruce, where his behaviour, for courage and conduct, was so remarkable, that king Robert, upon his re­turn, rewarded him with a grant of divers lands,Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle; &Lives of the officers of state, p. 41. by a charter under the great seal, e­recting all his lands in Argyleshire into one free barony; in which he is designed Colinus filius Nigelli; &c.

In the minority of king David Bruce, he raised four hundred men, upon his own charg­es, for his majesty's service, and therewith retook the castle of Dunoon, then in posses­sion of the English, for which the king re­warded [Page 36] him with the heretable government thereof,Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle. and a yearly pension.

He married a daughter of the family of Lennox, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Sir Archibald.

2. John, ancestor of the Campbells of Barbreck, of whom Succoch, &c. are de­scended.

3. Sir Dougal Campbell, who, having join­ed king John Baliol, his estate was forfeited to the crown, and was afterwards bestowed upon his brother sir Archibald.

His daughter Alicia was married to Allan Lauder of Hatton.

He died anno 1340, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. Sir ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, baron of Lochow,Reg. Majest. Statutes of K. Dav. II. Cap. 52, &c. who adhered always to the in­terest of king David Bruce, with whom he was in high favour, and is often mentioned in the public acts of his reign.

He obtained from that prince grants and charters of a great many lands, which the fa­mily still possess, viz.

Charter of confirmation from king David,Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle; & book of charters pe­nes Macfar­lane, p. 153. dilecto et speciali consanguineo suo Giliaspock Campbell, filio quondam Colini Campbell mi­litis,— terram nostram de Kilmun, &c.

Also a charter, dilecto et fideli suo domino Gilespyk Campbell, domino de Lochow, integrum dominium totius baroniae de Molepath, Ibidem. &c. cum pertinen. dated at Aberdeen, 2d May 1342.

He had likewise a grant of his brother sir Dougal's estate,Crawfurd's Peerage. which was forfeited to the crown for his adhering to Baliol, as before noticed.

He obtained a grant from John Menteith, dominus de Knapdale et de Arran, Ibid. Chart. penes ducem de Argyle, & Lives of the officers of state. of a great many lands,—dilecto et fideli consanguineo suo Giliaspock Campbell, domino de Lochow, dated in vigilia sancti Andreae apostoli, 1352.

He likewise obtained from king Robert II. to him, and his son Colin, and his heirs­male, with consent of John earl of Carrick, the king's eldest son, officium locumtenentis et commissionem specialem intra Carndrone, usque ad Polgillip, Chart. in pub. archiv. confirmed by K. James III. to Colin earl of Argyle. et Polmefreth, et Lochlonge, in­fra vicecomitatum nostrum de Ergyle, et dimi­diam partem wardarum, relieviorum, maritagi­orum, eschetarum suarum, amerciamentorum, e [...]i aliorum lucrorum quorumeunque, et emolumento­rum infra dictas bondas contingen. &c. Lives of the officers of state.

He married, 1st, Mary, a daughter of the family of Menteith:Crawfurd's peerage, p. 16. and Colvil's hist. of the family of Ar­gyle. 2dly, a daughter of sir John Lawmont.

He lest issue a son and successor,

XI. Sir COLIN CAMPBELL, who in se­veral authentic writs is designed dominus de Lochow, Lives of the officers of state, p. 42. and being a man of great courage and resolution, was employed by king Robert II. in restraining the incursions of the high­landers, who then greatly infested the west­ern parts of the kingdom, and reducing them to his majesty's obedience,Ibid. & char­ta penes du­cem de Ar­gyle. had thereupon a grant from the king of sundry lands, which are still in the family's possession, and are ful­ly narrated in the lives of the officers of state.

He married Margaret,Martin's ge­nealogical collections. daughter of sir John Drummond of Stobhall, and sister of queen Annabel Drummond, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Sir Duncan.

2, Colin, Ibid. and Crawfurd's peerage. who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Ardkinglass, of whom are descended the Campbells of Ardintenie, Dunoon, Car­rick, Skipnish, Blyswood, Rochane, Auche­willen, Dergachie, &c.

3. Donald, Chart. in pub. archiv. who, in a charter under the great seal, is designed frater Duncani Campbell, domini de Lochow, 4th August 1442.

His daughter Christian was married to Dun­can Macfarlane of Arrochar.Nisbet's ap­pendix, p. 63.

Sir Colin had also two natural sons, Du­gal and Duncan,Crawfurd's peerage. of whom the Campbells of Dunstaffnage, Enderline, Balvie, Duntroon, and others, are descended.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. Sir DUNCAN CAMPBELL, baron of Lochow, who was a man of great parts and abilities, and arrived to high advancements both in honour and estate.

He was the first of the family who was designed by the title of Argyle, and having great interest with Murdoch duke of Albany, was very instrumental with that prince in bringing about the release and restoration of king James I.

He got a charter from king Robert III.Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands and barony of Menstrie, anno 1393.

He was one of the hostages sent to Eng­land for his majesty's ransom, anno 1424; and it is observable,Rymer, tom. X. p. 308 & 327. that his estate and lord Dalkeith's were computed at 1500 merks sterling per annum, and none of the other ho­stages had above 1200.

And being highly esteemed by king James I.Charta penes ducem de Ar­gyle. he appointed him one of his privy council, his justiciar, and lord lieutenant of the shire of Argyle, &c.

He was in no less favour with king James II. who not only confirmed all those offices to him,Ibid. & crea­tions of the nobility. but raised him to the dignity of a lord of parliament, by the title of lord Camp­bell, anno 1445.

He obtained a charter from that prince, Duncano domino Campbell, pro suis gratuitis [Page 37] servitiis quondam genitori nostro bonae memo­riae, et specialiter apud castrum de Roxburgh, Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle. & chart. inpub. archiv. tempore obsidionis ejusdem, per eundem gratissi­me impensis, et pro suis servitiis nobis etiam impensis et impendend. &c. of a vast number of lands (in dominio nostro de Cowal) in the shire of Argyle, all erected and united into one free and entire barony, baroniam de Car­loch, Rowel, perpetuis futuris temporibus nun­cupand. dated 19th June 1453.

He was a great benefactor to the religious;Ib. & Craw­furd's Peer­age. witness his donations to the monks of the ab­bacy of Sandale, in Kintyre, and his found­ing and endowing the collegiate church of Kilmun, &c.

He married, 1st,Hist. of the royal family, p. 115. lady Margaret Stewart, daughter of Robert duke of Albany, gover­nor of Scotland, by whom he had three sons.

1. Celestine, who died young.

2. Archibald, who carried on the line of the family.

3. Sir Colin, who was ancestor of the Campbells of Glenurchy, Vide title Bread­albine.

He married,Ib. p. 110. 2dly, Margaret, daughter of sir John Stewart of Blackhall, by whom he had also three sons.

1. Duncan, who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Auchinbreck, of whom are descend­ed the Campbells of Glencardel, Glensaddle, Kilduskland, Kilmarie, Wester Kaimes, Kil­berry, and Duna.

2. Neil, who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Ellongreg, of whom sir Neil Camp­bell is the representative, and of whose fami­ly are descended the Campbells of Orman­dale, &c.

3. Arthur, who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Otter, &c.

He died in the end of the year 1453.

XIII. ARCHIBALD, son and apparent heir of lord Duncan,Crawfurd's Peerage. died before his father, hav­ing married Elizabeth, daughter of sir John Somerville of Carnwath, ancestor of lord So­merville, by whom he had a son,

XIV. COLIN, lord Campbell, who suc­ceeded his grandfather;Creations of the nobility, in the law­yers library, Edinburgh. and, being a man of eminent parts and great accomplishments, was in high favour with king James II. who cre­ated him earl of Argyle, anno 1457.

In the beginning of the reign of king James III.Rymer, tom. XI. p. 517. he was appointed one of the commission­ers to treat of a peace with the English, which they happily concluded anno 1463.

Soon after his return from England, he was constituted master of the king's houshold,Ib. p. 541. anno 1464.

In 1465, he, with lord Boyd, were ap­pointed joint lords of justiciary besouth the river Forth,Lives of the officers of state. which office he exercised by himself for many years after lord Boyd's fall.

He was appointed ambassador extraordina­ry to the court of England,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 716 & 774. anno 1471 and 1474.

In 1475, he was again sent one of the com­missioners to England,Ib. tom. XII. page 160. to treat about repair­ing some breaches that had been made in the truce, which they not only adjusted, but got the truce further prorogued till July 1483.

He obtained a grant from the king, dilecto consanguineo suo & consiliario Colino comiti de Argyle pro singulari favore, &c. & pro suis gratuitis servitiis, centum & sexaginta merca­tas terrarum dominii de Knapdale, una cum custodia castri de Castlesoame, &c. dicto Coli­no comiti de Argyle & haeredibus masculis de corpore suo legitime procreatis, quibus deficienti­bus, Duncano Campbell de Glenurcha, Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. &c. The charter is dated 28th February 1480.

In 1483 the king bestowed upon him the lands of Pinkerton in dominio de Dumbar, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1458 & 1480. then in the crown, by the forfeiture of Alexander duke of Albany.

He got also chartets under the great seal,Ibidem. of a vast many lands, too tedious to be here inserted.

Soon after this, Colin earl of Argyle, with the lords Evandale, Glammis, Fleming, &c. were sent ambassadors to France, to renew the ancient league, which was accordingly sealed,The original writ is in the public regi­ster. and sworn to, by king Charles VIII. at Paris, on 9th of July 1484, and by king James in the same manner, at Edinburgh, be­fore the French ambassador.

That same year, he procured an exempti­on for lord Gray,Chart. penes dom. Gray. and others of his friends, from attendance on any court, during his ab­sence, &c.

Upon the earl's return, the king being ful­ly convinced of his great fidelity and merit, was pleased to appoint him lord high chancel­lor of Scotland,Lives of the officers of state. and soon thereafter, he was named one of the commissioners plenipotentia­ries to the congress at Nottingham, where a truce was agreed to, which should begin with the rising of the sun on 29th September 1484, and last till the setting of the sun,Rymer, tom. XII. p. 160: on 29th September 1487.

In 1485, the lord chancellor, with some others, received a special commission from the king, to treat of a marriage for his son the prince of Scotland, with lady Anne de la Pool, daughter of John duke of Suffolk, and niece of king Richard of England;Ibid. p. 230. which match was then agreed to by the estates of England, but the short reign of king Richard, and the revolution, which happened soon af­terwards prevented its taking effect.

[Page 38] In the beginning of 1488, when the trou­bles in Scotland were like to run very high, the king having entire confidence in the lord chancellor, who had always been a most faith­ful and loyal subject,Rymer tom. XII. p. 130. sent him with some o­thers to king Henry VII. of England, to de­sire his good offices and mediation, &c. but nothing from thence could be done in time.

Bishop Elphingston enjoyed the chancel­lor's office,Safe conduct, Colino comi­ti de Argyle cancellario Scotiae, Patri­cio domino Hailes, &c. in Rymer tom. XII. p. 340. 6to Mar. 1488. during his absence on that em­bassy, viz. from 6th March, till after the 11th of June 1488, that the king was slain; so that this great man was in England, while that bloody tragedy was acted, tho' some hi­storians have asserted the contrary.

Soon after his return from England, he was again appointed lord chancellor of Scotland, which office he enjoyed as long as he lived:Lives of the officers of state. p. 47. And as he had acted in the highest offices of state at home, and had been concerned in the most important negociations abroad, so he acquitted himself in every station of life with honour, fidelity and reputation.

He married Isabel Stewart, eldest daugh­ter and co-heiress of John lord of Lorn, whereupon he added the galley to the at­chievment,Chart. inpub. archiv. and the designation of dominus Lorne to his other titles.

By her he had issue two sons and seven daughters.

1. Archibald, earl of Argyle.

2. Thomas, ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie in Angus.

1. Daughter, Lady Margaret, married to George lord Seton, ancestor of the earl of Winton.

2d. Lady Isabel, married to William ma­ster of Drummond, ancestor of the family of Perth.

3. Lady Helen, married to Hugh earl of Eglinton, and had issue.

4. Lady Elizabeth, married to John lord Oliphant, and had issue.

5. Lady Mary, Crawfurd's peerage. married to Aeneas M'Do­nald, natural son and heir of tailzie of John earl of Ross.

6. Lady—, married to Alexander M'Ken­zie of Kintail,Mill's collec­tions, p. 50. ancestor of the earl of Scaforth.

7. Lady Catharine, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to Torquill M'Leod of Lewis, 1498.

He died anno 1493, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XV. ARCHIBALD, second earl of Argyle, who was a man of great abilities and prudence,Chart. in ar­chiv. Jacobi IV. & chartul. of Dumferm­line, p. 463. and was in high favour with king James IV. who made him chancellor of Scotland in 1494,Chart. in pub. archiv. chamberlain in 1495, and master of the houshold in 1498.

He got charters, under the great seal, of a great number of lands and baronies from anno 1493 to 1512.

He commanded the van-guard of the army at the fatal field of Flowdon, where he be­haved with remarkable valour and intrepidi­ty. He there lost his life with his royal ma­ster and the flower of the nobility of Scotland, on 9th September 1513, leaving issue by la­dy Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John earl of Lennox, four sons and five daughters.

1. Colin, his heir.

2. Archibald Campbell of Skipnish,Chart. in pub archiv. ad ann. 1511. whose line ended in an heir-female, in the reign of queen Mary.

3. John, who married Moriella, daugh­ter and heiress of John Calder of that ilk, and was ancestor of the Campbells of Calder,Ibidem. of whom are descended the Campbells of Ard­chattan, Aird, and sir Archibald of Clunies.

4. Donald, who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Kythack in Angus.

1. Daughter, lady Margaret, married to John lord Erskine.

2. Lady Isabel, married to Gilbert earl of Cassilis.

3. Lady Mary, married to John earl of Athole.

4. Lady Jean, Ibidem. married to John Lawmont of that ilk: And all had issue.

5. Lady Anne, Mill's collec­tions, p. 50. married to Simon master of Lovat.

XVI. COLIN, third earl of Argyle, suc­ceeded his father, and was appointed one of the four counsellors to king James V. anno 1525.

In 1528 he was made lord lieutenant of the borders,Chart. penes ducem de Ar­gyle. warden of the marches, heretable sheriff of Argyleshire, justice general of Scot­land, and master of the king's houshold: In all which high offices he behaved with great prudence, candour, and integrity.

He got also charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1520 & 1550. from king James V. of a vast number of lands, Colino comiti de Argyle, &c.

He married lady Janet Gordon, daughter of Alexander earl of Huntly,Crawfurd's peerage. by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Archibald.

2. John, ancestor of the Campbells of Lochnell, of whom the Campbells of Baler­no and Stonefield are descended.

3. Alexander, who was dean of Murray, and died without issue.

His daughter, lady Margaret, was married, 1st to James Stewart earl of Murray, natu­ral son of king James IV. and 2dly, to John earl of Sutherland.

He died anno 1542, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

[Page 39] XVII. ARCHIBALD, fourth earl of Ar­gyle, who was one of the noble Scotch peers, that strenuously opposed the match betwixt Mary queen of Scotland, and king Edward VI. of England; believing, that an union be­twixt the kingdoms must necessarily ensue, which could not but be derogatory to the ho­nour of his country: Upon which a war breaking out with England,Abercromb. hist. of the campaigns, 1548 & 1549. he greatly di­stinguished himself by his valour and conduct both at the battle of Pinkie in 1547, and at the siege of Haddington in 1548.Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1545 & 1555.

He got charters, from queen Mary, Ar­chibaldo comiti de Argyle, of a great number of lands.

He was the first of quality who embraced the Protestant religion, and contributed all that was in his power to bring about a refor­mation.

He married 1st, lady Helen Hamilton, daughter of James earl of Arran, by whom he had a son,

Archibald, his heir.

He married 2dly, lady Margaret Graeme, daughter of William earl of Menteith,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1542. by whom he had a son,

Sir Colin Campbell of Boquhan (who car­ried on the line of this family, of whom af­terwards) —and two daughters.

1. Lady Margaret, married to James Stewart, lord Down.

2. Lady Janet, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to Hector M'Lean of Dowart.

And dying in 1558, was succeeded by his eldest son.

XVIII. ARCHIBALD, fifth earl of Argyle, who was a man of singular accomplishments, and a great promoter of the reformation of religion.

In 1559, he went over to France, to sup­plicate Queen Mary's favour to the Prote­stant religion;Biograph. and immediately upon his re­turn,Britannica. he entered into an association with the earls,Spottiswood and Calderwood's church hist. Glencairn, Morton, &c. for the ad­vancement thereof, which at last they got established by act of Parliament, anno 1560.

Upon the breaking out of the civil war, he espoused the interest of queen Mary hear­tily and sincerely, and was general of her forces at the battle of Langside, and though the queen's troops were entirely routed, yet he still persisted in his loyalty and fidelity to her majesty, of which she was so much con­vinced, that after she was prisoner in Eng­land,Rymer tom. XV. p. 687. ad ann. 1570. she nominated the duke of Chattlerault, the earls of Argyle and Huntly her lieute­nants throughout the whole kingdom.

The earl concurred and greatly promotedIbidem. every measure that was proposed for the reco­very of her majesty's liberty, but when all their endeavours proved fruitless, he at last sub­mitted to the authority of king James VI. and was immediately admitted one of the lords of the privy-council, anno 1571.

He was also appointed justice general, keep­er of the great seal, and lord high chancellor of Scotland by a most ample commission from the king, in which are these words, Feci­mus, constituimus, & ordinamus proedilec­tum nostrum consanguineum & consiliarium Ar­chibaldum comitem de Argyle, dominum Camp­bell &c Lorne, justiciarium nostrum generalem, cancellarium regni nostri, ac magni sigillinostri custodem, pro omnibus vitae suae diebus, &c. &c. Dated at Edinburgh the 17th of January,Chart. in pub. archiv. and lives of the officers of state. the sixth year of the king's reign 1572. which offices he executed with universal ap­probation as long as he lived.

He married 1st, lady Jean Stewart, natu­ral daughter of king James V. whose body lies interred with her father's in the royal vault in the abbay-church of Holyroodhouse.

He married 2dly, lady Jean Cunninghame, daughter of Alexander earl of Glencairn, but by neither had he any issue, and dying in 1575, his estate and honours devolved upon his brother sir Colin of Boquhan, to whom we now return,

XVIII. COLIN, sixth earl of Argyle, se­cond son of the fourth earl, was constituted one of the privy-council to king James VI.Spottiswood's hist. and lives of the officers of state. anno 1577, and lord high chancellor of Scot­land, anno 1579.

He married 1st, Janet Stewart, daughter of Henry lord Methven, by whom he had no issue.

He married 2dly, lady Agnes Keith, daugh­ter of William earl Marishall, widow of James earl of Murray, by whom he had two sons.

1. Archibald, earl of Argyle.

2. Sir Colin Campbell of Lundie, Bart.

He died anno 1584, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIX. ARCHIBALD, seventh earl of Ar­gyle, who, being a brave officer, was com­mander of the forces sent against the earls of Huntly and Errol, at the battle of Glenliver, anno 1594, where the king's troops were de­seated, though the earl behaved with great courage and conduct.

He suppressed an insurrection of the M'Gre­gors in 1603, and a more formidable one of the M'Donalds in the western isles,Ibidem. anno 1614. For which signal services,Chart. penes ducem de Argyle. he obtained a grant, from the king, of the whole country of Kintyre, which was ratified in parliament,Regiam Ma­jestatem, act 6th ad ann. 1609. anno 1617; and was made heretable commissary of the isles.

[Page 40] In 1618 he went into Spain, and signaliz­ed himself in that service against the states of Holland,Guthry's me­moirs. having assisted at taking of several places of strength.

He got charters, from king James VI. Ar­chibaldo comiti Ergadiae, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1600 & 1630. of all his lands.

He married 1st, lady Anne Douglas, daugh­ter of William earl of Morton, by whom he had a son,

Archibald, afterwards marquis of Argyle, —and four daughters.

1. Lady Anne, married to George mar­quis of Huntly.

2. Lady Annabel, married to Robert earl of Lothian.

3. Lady Jean, married to John viscount of Kenmure.

4. Lady Mary, married to sir Robert Montgomery of Skelmorly.

They all had issue.

The earl married 2dly, Anne, daughter of sir William Cornwallis of Brome, ancestor of lord Cornwallis, by Lucy, his wife, daughter and co-heiress of John Nevil lord Latimer, by whom he had a son,

James,—and a daughter,

Lady Mary, married to James lord Rollo, and had issue.

His son James, who, was a man of great valour and courage, was by king James VI. created lord Kintyre, anno 1622, and having served Lewis XIII. in his wars against the Spaniards, where he had the command of a regiment, he acquitted himself with such ho­nour and reputation, that upon his return home, king Charles I. was pleased to raise him to the dignity of earl of Irvine in 1642;Creations of the nobility. but he dying without heirs-male, the honours became extinct.

The earl died at London in 1638,Guthry's me­moirs. and was succeeded by his eldest son.

XX. ARCHIBALD, eighth earl, afterwards marquis of Argyle, who was a man of great learning and singular endowments.

He was one of the privy-council to king Charles I. into whose hand he resigned the jus­ticiary of all Scotland, anno 1628, which had been in his family for several ages, reserving to himself and his heirs the jurisdiction of the western isles and Argyle, and wherever else he had lands in Scotland, all which was ratisied by act of parliament past in his majesty's pre­sence, anno 1633. And in respect of his own merit, as well as the remarkable loyalty of his ancestors, his majesty was pleased to create him marquis of Argyle by letters patent, dat­ed in November 1641.Chart. in pub. regist.

He afterwards got two charters under the great seal,Ib. ad ann. [...]. Archibaldo marchioni de Argyle, &c.

When king Charles's troubles begun, he join­ed the parliament of Scotland, and was a zeal­ous asserter of the Presbyterian church-govern­ment; but after the horrid murder of the king, he contributed much to the reception and coronation of king Charles II. on the 1st of January 1650, and had the honour to put the crown on the king's head at Scoon. But hav­ing afterwards joined and sided with Oliver Cromwell (a common fault in those times) he was soon after the restoration convicted of high treason,Trial of the marquis of Argyle. Crawfurd's peerage. condemned by the parliament, and beheaded at Edinburgh on the 27th of May 1661, and his estate and honours forfeited to the crown.

He was a consummate statesman, and one of the ablest politicians of his time. When he was going to death, he declared his abhor­rence of the murder of king Charles I.

He married lady Margaret Douglas, daugh­ter of William earl of Morton, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.

1. Archibald, afterwards earl of Argyle.

2. Lord Neil Campbell of Armadie, who was twice married, and had issue Dr. Archi­bald Campbell, &c.

1. Daughter, lady Anne, died unmarried.

2. Lady Jean, married to Robert marquis of Lothian.

3. Lady Mary, married, 1st, to George earl of Caithness: and, 2dly, to John earl of Breadalbine.

XXI. ARCHIBALD, lord Lorn, eldest son of the marquis, adhered firmly to the king's interest, during all the time of the usurpati­on, and was captain of his majesty's foot­guards, anno 1650. He continued to serve the king with great steadiness and fidelity, and signalized himself upon several occasions a­gainst the parliament's forces; which so in­censed Oliver Cromwell against him, that in April 1654,Cromwel's act of indem­nity. when he granted a general in­demnity to the Scots, this lord, with some other loyalists, were particularly excepted, and he was made prisoner.

During his confinement,Biographia Britannica. p. 1156. he had his skull accidentally fractured, for which he was o­bliged to be trepaned, &c.

Notwithstanding all his sufferings, he never could be prevailed upon to submit,Crawsurd's peerage, and state tracts. or come to any composition with Cromwell, till he got his majesty's permission by general Middleton so to do, which was dated 31st December 1655. He then returned to his own house, where he lived privately and quietly, still per­sisting in his integrity and loyalty, till king Charles II. was happily restored, anno 1660.

His majesty being perfectly satisfied of this lord's good behaviour, was graciously pleased [Page 41] to restore him to his father's estate, and the honours and precedency of the ancient earls of Argyle:Diploma in archiv. Caro­li II. &c. The onerous cause in the pa­tent (which is dated in 1663) being for his eminent loyalty and zeal for the restoration, &c. And he was the ninth earl of Argyle.

Sometime thereafter he was made one of his majesty's privy-council, and a commissio­ner of the treasury; which offices he discharg­ed with great sidelity; but as he was a stre­nuous asserter and firm friend to the Prote­stant religion, and Presbyterian church go­vernment, he thereby had some considerable enemies at court.

About the year 1680, the test act passed, whereby all ranks of people were enjoined, by act of parliament,Test act in the records. to defend the govern­ment in church and state, as presently esta­blished, &c. under the pains of treason, &c. and this act went very ill down with a great many well-meaning men, particularly with this noble earl, who, having a tender and scrupulous conscience, could not comply with it in these terms, but offered to take it with his own explanation, part whereof was in these words:

‘"I take it, in so far as it is consistent with itself, and the protestant religion; and I do declare, I mean not to bind up myself in my station, but, in a lawful way, to en­deavour any thing I think for the advan­tage of the church or state, not repugnant to the protestant religion and my loyalty; and this I understand as a part of my oath."’ Crawfurd's peerage.

This being declared treason by the learn­ed of the law, he was sent prisoner to the castle of Edinburgh, soon after tried, found guilty, his estate forfeited, and himself sen­tenced to suffer death: but he made his escape in the dress of a lady's page, and got over to Holland, where he remained about four years. However, in the beginning of king James VII.'s reign, he got some officers and sol­diers together in Holland, with which he in­vaded Scotland, and landed in Argyleshire.

He raised about two thousand men, mostly of his own clan. He then emitted a manifesto, declaring, ‘"That he had not invaded his coun­try for any private ends, but in defence of his own just right, and for the recovery of his estate, which was unjustly forfeited in the reign of the late king. And the duke of York having invaded the religion and liberties of the kingdom, he thought it not only just, but his duty to God and his coun­try, to oppose his tyrannical usurpation, and invited all true protestants to join him."’

The earl's little army being defeated and dispersed,Scotch comp. p. 103. and himself taken prisoner, he was again sent to the castle of Edinburgh, and soon thereafter beheaded at the mercat-cross, in consequence of his former sentence, upon the 30th of June 1685; it being the opini­on of the lawyers, that as he was already dead in law, he could not be tried again for this last act of rebellion.

He left issue,Crawfurd's peerage. by lady Mary Stewart his wife, daughter of James earl of Murray, four sons and two daughters.

1. Archibald, afterwards duke of Argyle.

2. John Campbell of Mammore, father of the present duke, of whom afterwards.

3. Colonel Charles Campbell.

4. Colonel James Campbell, who married Margaret Lesly, daughter of David lord New­ark; and had issue.

1. Daughter, lady Anne, married 1st to Richard earl of Lauderdale, and 2dly to Charles earl of Murray.

2. Lady Jean, married to William mar­quis of Lothian.

XXII. ARCHIBALD, tenth earl, after­wards duke of Argyle, eldest son of Archi­bald the ninth earl, came over with the prince of Orange, from Holland, in 1688; and was owned by the convention of estates to be earl of Argyle, before his father's forfeiture was rescinded.

He was a great promoter of the revolution, and was sent to London by the nobility and gentry of Scotland, with sir James Montgo­mery and sir John Dalrymple, to make an offer of the crown of Scotland, in name of the convention of estates, to the prince and princess of Orange,

Who, on the 11th of April 1689, were crowned king and queen of Scotland; and on the 11th of May following, the earl, with the other commissioners tendered the oath of co­ronation to their Majesties, which they took accordingly.

He afterwards, for the king's service, sen [...] over to Flanders a regiment, both officers and soldiers of his own name and clan, who upon many occasions signalized their bravery and courage.

This noble earl was made one of the pri­vy-council in May 1689, and one of the lords of the treasury in 1690.

He was also made colonel of the Scotch horse guards, and one of the extraordinary lords of Session, and, at last for his many emi­nent services, he was created duke of Argyle, marquis of Kintyre and Lorne, earl of Camp­bell and Cowal,Chart. in cancellaria [...]. Haeredibus masculis qui­buscunque. viscount of Lochow and Glen­isla, lord Inverara, Mull, Morvien and Tyrie, by letters patent to his heirs-male whatsom­ever, bearing date at Kensington, the 23d of June 1701.

[Page 42] He married Elizabeth, daughter of sir Lio­nel Talmash of Helingham, by his wife E­lizabeth, dutchess of Lauderdale, daughter and heir of William Murray earl of Dysart, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. John, duke of Argyle.

2. Archibald, earl of Islay, thereafter duke of Argyle.

His daughter, lady Anne, married James Stewart earl of Bute.

Archibald, first duke of Argyle, died in 1703, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XXIII. JOHN, second duke of Argyle, whose genius leading him to a military life, he went early into the British service, and bravely distinguished himself thro' the whole course of queen Anne's wars.

In 1701, he had the command of a regi­ment of foot; was made one of the extraordina­ry lords of session in 1704; one of the knights of the thistle, and her majesty's high com­missioner to the parliament of Scotland, anno 1705.

He remarkably signalized himself at the battle of Ramillies in 1706, and at the at­tack of the counterscarp of Menin, of which place he took possession.

He commanded at reducing the fort of Ple­pondale, assisted at the siege of Ostend, and was very serviceable at the battle of Aude­nard, anno 1708.

He assisted at the siege of Lisle (of which city he took possession;) also at the siege of Ghent and Bruges in 1709.

In the same year he particularly aggrandiz­ed himself at the siege of Tournay, and at the terrible attack of the wood in the great battle of Malplaquet, upon which desperate command he was ordered by the duke of Marlborough, who, ('tis alledged) then be­gun to be jealous of his rising glory.

He was created baron of Chatham, earl of Greenwich in England, and was general and commander in chief of her majesty's forces in Spain, anno 1710; was governor of Mi­norca, and one of the privy-council in Eng­land, and was made knight of the most noble order of the garter.

On the death of queen Anne, he was one of the lords justices till the arrival of king George I. and was soon thereafter made gen­tleman of the bed-chamber, and groom of the stole to his royal highness George prince of Wales, and commander in chief of all his majesty's forces in North-Britain.

In 1715, a rebellion broke out in Scot­land, and the earl of Mar had the address to get together no less than six or seven thou­sand Highlanders, who marched from Perth about the 12th of November. The duke of Argyle marched out from Stirling about the same time to oppose them. They came to an engagement at Sheriffmuir upon the 13th, where the duke of Argyle's courage and con­duct was very remarkable; for tho' the rebels were far more numerous (and many of the clans fought very gallantly) yet they were forced to retreat to Perth, and the duke of Argyle returned to Stirling; however, the rebels never came to a head again.

In the year 1718, he was made lord stew­ard of the houshold, and was created duke of Greenwich, but the patent was limited to the heirs-male of his body.

He was colonel, first, of the queen's regi­ment of horse, and then of the royal blue horse guards. He was likeways master-gene­ral of the ordnance, and field-marshal of Great Britain.

He was no less conspicuous for his spirited eloquence in the house of peers, than for his courage and conduct in the field. He parti­cularly distinguished himself in the noble de­fence he made of the privileges of the town of Edinburgh, when it was moved that they should be taken away, on account of the mur­der of captain Porteous.

Upon the whole, he merited the celebrat­ed character which Pope gives him:

ARGYLE, the state's whole thunder born to weild,

And shake alike the senate and the field.

He married, 1st, Mary, daughter of John Brown Esq; but she died without issue.

He married, 2dly, Mrs. Jean Warburton, one of the maids of honour, both to queen Anne, and queen Caroline, when princess of Wales, and by her had five daughters.

1. Lady Caroline, married, 1st, to Fran­cis earl of Dalkeith, eldest son of Francis duke of Buccleugh. And, 2dly, to Charles Townshend, Esq; second son to lord viscount Townshend, now secretary at war.

2. Lady Anne, married to William earl of Strafford.

3. Lady Jane, died young.

4. Lady Betty, married to the honourable James Stewart M'Kenzie, son of James earl of Bute.

5. Lady Mary, married to Edward vis­count Coke, son and heir apparent to the earl of Leicester.

The Duke died in October 1743, in the 63d year of his age, and having no sons, the titles of Duke of Greenwich and baron of Chatham expired with him, but he was suc­ceeded in his estate and other titles by his bro­ther,

[Page 43] XXIII. ARCHIBALD, third duke of Ar­gyle, who was born at Hamhouse, in Eng­land, in June 1682, and was educated at the university of Glasgow. He afterwards ap­plied himself to the study of the law at U­trecht; but upon his father's being created a duke, he laid aside the scheme of appearing at the bar, and betook himself to a military life, served under the great duke of Marlbo­rough, was colonel of the thirty-sixth regi­ment of foot, and governor of Dambarton castle: But his genius pointing more strong­ly to the statesman than the soldier, he did not continue long in the army, but applied himself chiefly to that study, which made the after part of his life so shining and conspi­cuous.

In 1705, he was made treasurer of Scot­land, and took his seat in the parliament, where he made so great a figure, that in 1706 he was nominated one of the commissioners for the treaty of union, and got a patent, cre­ating him earl and viscount Islay, lord Oron­say, Dunoon and Arrois, &c.

In 1708; he was made an extraordinary lord of session, was elected one of the sixteen peers for the first British parliament, and was chosen member to every future session, ex­cepting that called to meet in November 1713.

In 1710, he was made justice-general of Scotland; and in 1711 he was called to the privy council.

In 1714, upon the accession of king George I. he was nominated lord register; and tho' he had long before given up all command in the army, yet, upon the breaking out of the rebellion 1715, he again betook himself to arms, in defence of the house of Hanover, and, by his prudent conduct in the west high­lands, prevented general Gordon, at the head of 3000 men, from penetrating into the coun­try, and raising levies. He afterwards join­ed his brother at Stirling, and was wounded at the battle of Dumblane.

In 1725, he got the privy seal, and was trusted with the direction of Scotch affairs.

In 1734, upon his resigning the privy seal, he was made keeper of the great seal, which he enjoyed till his death.

Upon the dece [...]se of his brother, he be­came dake of Argyle, hereditary justice ge­neral, [...]euten [...]t, sheriff and commissary of Argyleshire, and the western isles, hereditary great master of the houshold, hereditary keep­er of Dunstaffnage, Carrick, and several other castles.

He was a man of great natural and acquired endowments, quick, penetrating, and tho­roughly versant in the knowledge of man­kind; of an accurate and distinct elocution, and a ready judgment. His thorough know­ledge of the laws of his country qualified him to shine in the great council of the nation, and in the cabinet of his sovereign. His great sagacity and uncommon abilities, pointed him out as a proper person for the chief manage­ment of all Scotch affairs; and the propriety of the choice will appear from his attention to promote trade and manufactures, to en­courage learning and learned men, and for­ward every improvement for the good of his country.

During his administration; the manufac­ture of linen cloth was raised to an uncom­mon pitch, both in quality and quantity. The universities received distinguishing marks of his favour, by establishing new profes­sions, and in every shape promoting their good: particularly, he encouraged the pro­fession of physic in the university of Edin­burgh, which is now a school for that sci­ence, famous all over Europe.

He procured from his late majesty, king George II. for the infirmary of Edinburgh, the invalid money, to the extent of about 8000l. a sum that enabled the managers of that hospital to enlarge their plan considerab­ly, the utility of which is daily felt by the numbers of poor patients, both civil and mi­litary, who find relief from this charity.

After 1745, in order to destroy the seeds of future rebellions, he advised his majesty to employ the highlanders in the army; a proposal worthy of the patriot who contrived it, magnanimous in the king who approved it, and most honourable to themselves who executed it; for it must be owned that, to this wise counsel, 'tis in some measure ow­ing, that Cape Breton, Canada, &c. &c. are now under the government of this kingdom, as the courage and intrepidity of these brave and heroic men, wherever they were called, doubtless contributed greatly to the conquests.

Such was Archib [...]d in a public sphere; nor was he less distinguished in private life. His eminent learning, and strong natural ta­lents, contributed to make him pass his hours of recess from business agreeably to himself, and for the instruction and good of others. He was qualified for every subject of conver­sation, with the greatest philosopher, or the meanest and most ingenious mechanic. For the amusement of the closet, he collected the most valuable private library in Great Bri­tain, where he unbent his mind from the cares of ministerial affairs, and added to the immense stock of knowledge he had already acquired.

The noble and magnificent palace which [Page 44] he has built at Inverara, will stand a lasting monument of the regard he had for his fami­ly, who before had no house suitable to their dignity.

This great man enjoyed all the faculties of his mind found and entire till his death, which happened very suddenly, on the 15th day of April 1761, in the 79th year of his age; and was, according to his own orders, buried at Kilmun, in the parish of Dunoon in Ar­gyleshire, the burying-place of the family. And having no issue, his estate and honours devolved upon his cousin and heir-male ge­neral John Campbell, (now duke of Argyle) eldest son and heir of the honourable John Campbell of Mammore, to whom we now return.

XXII. JOHN CAMPBELL of Mammore, second son of Archibald ninth earl of Argyle, and brother-german of the first duke, mar­ried Elizabeth, daughter of John lord El­phingston, by whom he had seven sons and six daughters.

1. John, his heir.

2. Charles, who died unmarried.

3. Neil, who died abroad, also unmarried.

4. William, who married Miss Bernard, daughter of—Bernard, Esq; and hath issue.

5. 6. and 7. died young.

1. Daughter, Mary, married to James earl of Roseberry.

2. Anne, married to Archibald Edmond­stone of Duntreath.

3. Isabella, married to captain Alexander Montgomery.

4. Jean, married to John Campbell of Carrick.

5. Primrose, married to Simon lord Lovat.

6. Elisabeth, died unmarried.

He died anno 1729, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XXIII. JOHN CAMPBELL of Mammore, (now duke of Argyle) who went early into the army, and in 1713 he commanded the detachment of the troops as a colonel of the queen's guards, that first took possession of the main guard of Dunkirk, at the treaty of peace, in order to its being demolished.

During the rebellion in 1715, he served as aid-de-camp to John then duke of Argyle, who commanded the king's army; and dur­ing the rebellion 1745, he had the honour to command all his majesty's troops and gar­risons in the west of Scotland. He served in the rank of brigadier-general at the battle of Dettingen in the year 1741, where the Bri­tish troops were victorious over the French; and thereafter as major-general in sundry o­ther campaigns in Flanders and Germany dur­ing that war; and, while a commone [...], was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-general. He was groom of the bed-chamber to the late king, while prince of Wales, and continued to be so to his majesty during the whole of his reign. He was for many years colonel of the royal Scotch fuzileers, and thereafter of the royal Scots-grey dragoons, which he now commands. He is also lieutenant-general on the staff in England, and governor of Lime­rick castle in Ireland.

His father and he represented the county of Dumbarton in every parliament since the union. In April 1761, he was re-elected for that county, but succeeding immediately thereafter to the estate and honours of Argyle, he was, on the 5th day of May 1761, elec­ted one of the sixteen peers for representing the peerage of Scotland in parliament, and is now the fourth duke.

In the 1720, he married the honourable Miss Bellenden, daughter of John lord Bel­lenden, and maid of honour to the then prin­cess of Wales, by whom he had four sons and one daughter.

1. John, now marquis of Lorn.

2. Henry, an officer in the army, aid-de­camp to general sir John Ligonier, and kil­led at the battle of La-felt.

3. Lord Frederick, counsellor at law, late­ly elected member of parliament for the di­strict of Glasgow, &c. and also for the di­strict of Ayr, Irvine, &c.

4. Lord William, now an officer in the royal navy.

His daughter, lady Mary, married, 1st, to Charles earl of Aylesbury, by whom she had one daughter, lady Mary Bruce, married to Charles duke of Richmond and Lennox. She married, 2dly, general Henry Seymor Con­way, brother to the earl of Hartford, by whom she hath also one daughter.

John, marquis of Lorn, eldest son and heir apparent of John fourth duke of Argyle, being likeways bred to the army, served se­veral campaigns abroad, is now a major-ge­neral, colonel of a regiment of dragoons, and of the regiment of sencible men in Argyle­shire. He represented the burghs of Glas­gow, Dumbarton, &c. in the three last parlia­ments.

On the 3d day of March 1759, he mar­ried Elizabeth, dutchess dowager of Hamilton and Brandon, by whom he hath issue.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, girony of eight pieces, or and sable, 2d and 3d argent, a gal­ley [Page 45] (or lymphad) sable, sails furled up, flag and pinnets flying, and oars in action, for the lordship of Lorn.

CREST; on a wreath of his tinctures; a boar's head couped or.

MOTTO; on an escrol, Ne obliviscari [...]s.

SUPPORTERS; two lyons guardant gules, armed and langued azure, standing on a com­partment, whereon are these words, Vix ea nostra voco; behind the shield are placed a battoon and sword accollè saltireways, the one being gules semee of thistles or, and ensigned with an imperial crown and the crest of Scot­land, and the other a sword proper, hilted and pommelled or, being the two badges of the great master houshold and high justiciar of the kingdom of Scotland.

CHIEF SEATS.

Inverara in Argyleshire, Cambleton in Kin­tyre, Roseneath in Dumbartonshire, &c.

Earl of ATHOLE.

THIS is one of the most antient and most honourable titles in the king­dom of Scotland. It has been enjoyed by more of the royal family than any other, and was first conferred upon

I. MALCOLM, son of king Donald VII. brother of king Malcolm Canmore. He was one of the greatest men of his time, was cre­ated earl of Athole by king David I. and was a consenter and witness to the foundation-char­ter of the monastery of Scoon,Buchanan &c. Chartul. of Scoon, penes vicecomitem de Stormont. by king A­lexander I. anno 1115: To which he was afterwards a benefactor.

A learned historian says of him,Torpheus's hist. of the earls of Ork­ney, cap. 22. p. 100. Omnium Scotiae principum nobilissimus, patruelis quippe Davidis regis Scotiae, in praesens regnantis, &c.

He married a daughter of Haco earl of Orkney,Ibidem. by whom he had a son,

II. MALCOLM, second earl of Athole, who succeeded him,Chartul. of Scoon. and ratified his father's donations to the religious at Scoon.

He also made a donation to the abbacy of Dumfermline,Chartul. of Dumfermline penes Mac­farlane, p. 512. of the tythes of the church of Mullen, for the safety of his soul, and his predecessors, kings of Scotland; to which king William is a witness, in 1166.

Also a donation to the priory of St. An­drews,Chartul of St. Andrews, penes eund. p. 304 of the patronage of the church of Dull, &c. pro salute animae suae & Kertildae sponsae suae, to which Duncan earl of Fife, Henry and Duncan, his two sons, are wit­nesses, ante 1174.

By the said Kertilda he left issue two sons.

1. Henry.

2. Duncan.

And was succeeded by the eldest son,

III. HENRY, third earl of Athole, who confirmed his father's grants to the abbacy of Dumfermline and St. Andrews, to which last,Ibid. p. 305. Margareta comitissa, sponsa ejus, Alex­ander de Seton, Colinus, nepos ejus, &c. are witnesses.

By the said Margareta comitissa he left issue three daughters.

1.—, whose name is not upon record.

2. Isabel.

3. Ferelith.

The earl dying without male issue, the title of earl returned to the crown, but was afterwards enjoyed by the husbands of the three daughters successively, as will be shown hereafter.

Immediately upon the death of Henry 3d earl of Athole, king Alexander II. confer­red the honours upon

IV. ALANUS de LONDONIIS, ostiarius regis, who was the fourth earl of Athole, hav­ing married—, eldest daughter of the third earl.

This is attested by a confirmation of Ala­nus, ostiarius regis comes Atholiae, Chartul. of Arbroath, pe­nes M'Far­lane. of the wood and forest of Orphack in Aberdeenshire, to the monastery of Arbroath, which formerly had been given by Thomas de London, ostiari­us regis pater suus, &c. and is afterwards confirmed by king Alexander II.Ibidem. anno 1223.

He dying without issue, that same year, the title was immediately conferred upon

V. THOMAS of Galloway, fifth earl of Athole, who was son of Uchtred, and bro­ther of Alan lord of Galloway, and married Isabel,Cambden. second daughter of earl Henry.

This is attested by donations made and confirmed to the abbacy of Dumfermline,Chartul. of Dumfermline and book of charters, pe­nes M'Far­lane, vol. I. p. 59, ad an­num 1226. by Thomas de Galouyea, comes Atholiae, & Isabel­la comitissa, ejus sponsa, &c.

He died in 1234, and left issue a son,

PATRICK, sixth earl of Athole, who was burnt in his own lodging, in the town of Haddington, [...] 'tis said by the instigation of sir John Bisset,Fordun, Bu­chanan, Dal­rymple's col­lect. &c. anno 1242, and having no issue, [Page 46] the title again returned to the crown, but was immediately con [...]erred upon

IV. Sir DAVID HASTINGS, who was seventh earl of Athole, having married Fere­lith, third daughter of earl Henry, and aunt to Patrick the sixth earl; which is instructed by a good author,Fordun, lib. IX. cap. 59. who says, Post ejus obitum (comitis Patricii) David de Hastingis ejus ac­cipit comitatum; provenit item sibi ex parte ux­oris suae, quae erat matertera Patricii comitis oc­cisi, &c.

In a treaty of peace betwixt king Alexan­der II. of Scotland, and king Henry III. of England, we find David de Hastings comes A­tholiae, Rymer tom. I. p. 428. one of the guarantees of the treaty, anno 1244.

There is also an original charter of a do­nation,Chart. in the lawyers libra­ry, Edinr. made by Ferelith countess of Athole, to the abbacy of Cupar in Angus, of the lands of Dunfuther, Pro salute animae suae & aniniae domini David de Hastings, comitis A­tholiae, quondam viri sui, &c.

He died in a pilgrimage to the Holy land, anno 1269,Fordun, lib. X. cap. 27. leaving issue one daughter, his sole heiress, viz.

Adda, married to John de Strabolgie, de­scended of Duncan earl of Fife, who got from king William the Lyon, the lands of Stra­bolgie, which he gave to his second son,

DAVID, who, from the possession of these lands, assumed the sirname of Strabolgie, of which there are many authentic documents in the chartulary of Murray,Chartul. of Murray, penes Wal­terum Mac­farlane de e­odem. p. 76, 65, 104 and 338, &c. but we shall here mention only one, viz. A convention be­twixt Andrew bishop of Murray & nobilem virum David de Strabolgie, silium quondam Duncani comitis de Fife, &c. dated 6th Oc­tober 1232.

This David was succeded by his son,

V. JOHN de STRABOGIE, who, having married Adda, as above noticed, was imme­diately cinctus cum gladio comitatus Atholiae, &c. and was the eight earl.

This John, comes Atholiae, & Adda comitissa, confirm a donation to the monks of Cupar,Sir James Bal­four's collec­tions in the lawyers lib­rary, Edinr. of the lands of Innmith, quas David comes Atholiae, pater Addae comitissae, dedit, &c. the confirmation is dated anno 1283.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae that en­gaged to acknowledge and receive Margaret, daughter of Eri [...] king of Norway,Rymer, tom. II. p. 266. and grand­child of king Alexander III. as undoubted hei [...] to the crown of Scotland, &c. anno 1284.

He was also one of the judges chosen o [...] the side of Robert Bruce, lord of Annandale, competitor for the crown,Ibid. p. 553. anno 1292.

And was concerned in all the public trans­actions of those times on the side of Robert Bruce,Ibid. p. 558, 594, 644, 776, &c. anno 1294 and 1296.

He died before the year 1300, leaving is­sue a son and successor,

VI. DAVID de STRABOGIE, ninth earl of Athole, who married Isabella, daughter of Ri­chard, natural son of John king of England, by whom he got a vast estate in that kingdom,Sir James Bal­four's collect. which at last proved the ruin of the fami­ly.

He did not long survive his father, but was succeeded by his son,

VII. JOHN de STRABOGIE, tenth earl of Athole, who was one of those worthy pa­triots, that joined king Robert Bruce as soon as he began to assert his title to the crown; and was with him at the battle of Methven, but was afterwards unfortunately taken priso­ner, and carried to London.

And, having formerly been obliged, with many of his brave countrymen, to swear feal­ty to king Edward I. he was,Dugdale's baronage of England, and all the Scotch historians. on that account, tried for high treason, found guilty, condemn­ed, and executed in the flower of his age, with two of king Robert's brothers, at Westmin­ster, anno 1308.

He was succeeded by his son,

VIII. DAVID de STRABOLGIE, eleventh earl of Athole, who, for several years, was a faithful subject, and in high favour with king Robert Bruce.

He was sent prisoner to London, for ad­hering to king Robert's interest, anno 1306, and is then designed filius & haeres comitis Atholiae, &c. Rymer, tom. II. p. 1014. And being afterwards released he returned to king Robert, who made him lord high constable of Scotland,Chartul. of Arbroath. anno 1311, and conferred many other favours upon him.

But he having large possessions in England, was strongly attached to that kingdom. At last he withdrew his allegiance from his law­ful sovereign and benefactor,Rymer, tom. IV. p. 437. joined the inter­est of the Baliols, and went to England, where he was well received by king Edward, from whom he got grants of many lands, and pen­sions to a considerable extent.

King Robert, on account of the great me­rit of his ancestors, and sufferings of his fa­ther, was very tender in degrading or for­seiting him, and used all possible means to re­claim him, but in vain.

At length, the office of constable of Scot­land, which had formerly been given during the king's pleasure only,Chart. pe­nes comitem de Errol. was bestowed upon that worthy patriot sir Gilbert Hay of Errol, here­ [...]ably to him and his heirs for ever, anno 1315.

In 1327, there was a treaty of peace be­twixt Scotland and England concluded at [Page 47] Northamton, whereby it was provided, that no Scotch, or Englishman could possess lands or titles in Scotland, unless he resided in that kingdom. This earl then absolutely refus­ing to return to his allegiance,Rymer, and hist. of Scot­land. was outlawed, and his estate and titles forfeited to the crown, anno 1327. Which he resented highly, and was ever after an implacable enemy to his country. In the minority of king David Bruce, he accepted of the command of a body of Eng­lish troops, in favours of Edward Baliol, and was killed at the battle of Kilblain, anno 1335.

He married Jean or Johanna,Dugdale's baronage of England. eldest daugh­ter and co-heiress of John Cummin lord of Badenoch, by whom he got a considerable ac­cession to his estate, and by her had a son,

David de Strabolgie, his heir.

'Tis alledged, he had several other sons, who, after their father's forfeiture, laid aside the sirname of Strabogie, but still resided in Scotland. 'Tis said also, that of these younger sons, the M'Intoshes, Dusss, and some other families in the North, are descended.

IX. DAVID de STRABOLGIE, twolsth earl of Athole, still retained that title, tho' he resided in England,Rymer, tom. IV. p. 664, tom. V. 177, ad ann. 1340. and is designed filius & haeres Davidis de Strabogie, comitis Atholiae, & dilectus, & fidelis consanguineus regis Ang­liae, &c. &c. in many public acts.

He married Elizabeth,Dugdale's baronage of England. daughter of Henry lord Ferrers of Groby, by whom he had two daughters, co-heiresses to all his estates in England.

1. Elizabeth, Ibidem. married to sir Thomas Per­cy, knight, son to Henry lord Percy.

2. Philippa, Ibidem. married to sir Ralph Percy, a younger son of the same sir Henry.

He died on 22d October 1375, was buried at Ashford in Kent,Book of an­tient funeral monuments, penes M'Far­lane. and was the last earl of Athole of this family.

CAMPBELL Earl of ATHOLE.

THE title of ATHOLE being now in the crown, by the forfeiture of David de Strabolgie, as before noticed, king Ro­bert Bruce immediately conferred it upon his own nephew,

Sir JOHN CAMPBELL of Moulin,Dalrymple's historical col­lections, p. 379. created earl of Athole, who was second son of sir Neil Campbell of Lochow, by lady Mary Bruce, sister of the king.

He was a man of singular worth and merit, and in high favour with his uncle king Ro­bert.

We find him designed earl of Athole in many authentic documents; particularly, there is a charter, granted by John Campbell comes Atholiae, domino Rogero de mortuo mari terra­rum de Billandre, Chart. penes Rait of Hall­green, & Mr. Nisbet, vol. I. p. 294. confirmed by a charter un­der the great seal of king David II.

There is also a charter, of king David II. Rober [...]o de Erskine, militi, domino ejusdem, of an annuity out of the burrough maills of Dun­dee,Dalrymple's collections. and lands of Pitcarrach, then in the crown, by the demise of John Campbell earl of Athole, &c.

But he dying without issue, the title of A­thole again returned to the crown.

DOUGLAS Earl of ATHOLE.

THE next who enjoyed this title, was WILLIAM DOUGLAS, lord of Liddis­dale, eldest lawful son of sir James de Lon­donia, ancestor of the earl of Morton.

He was invested with the title of earl of Athole by king David II. anno 1341.Chart. in pub. archiv. Home's hist. of Douglas, Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 178. The heroic exploits and glorious actions performed by this truly great man in the service of his king and country, being faithfully recorded by Fordun, Buchanan, and many other Scotch historians; to these we refer our readers.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir John Graham of Abercorn,Ibidem. &c. Vide title Morton.

And having no male issue, he resigned his title of Athole in favours of Robert earl of Strath­ern, great steward of Scotland, afterwards king Robert II. whereby it was again vested in the crown.

WALTER Earl of ATHOLE, STRATHERN, and CAITHNESS.

KING Robert II. was pleased to bestow the earldom of Athole upon the lord Walter Stewart,Chart. in pub. archiv. his second son by queen Eu­pham Ross, anno 1375.

He afterwards had both the earldoms of Strathern and Caithness conferred upon him, and got a charter, under the great seal, Wal­tero comiti Atholiae & Cathaniae, Ibidem. &c.

He married the daughter and heiress of sir David Barclay, lord of Brechin, by whom he had two sons.

1. David, who died in England, an ho­stage for king James I.'s ransom,Rymer, tom. X. p. 308. and is then designed David primogenitus comitis Atholiae, &c. anno 1424.

2. Alan, earl of Caithness, who was kil­led at the battle of Inverlochie, anno 1428. Both without issue.

Tho' this Walter earl of Athole had in­numerable honours and favours conferred up­on him by the king and royal family, yet he was the chief actor in that horrid murder of his nephew king James I. for which he was most justly condemned and executed, and all his estates and honours were forfeited to the crown, where the title of Athole remained, till king James II. bestowed it upon his ute­rine brother, sir John Stewart of Balveny, &c.

STEWART Earl of ATHOLE.

WE shall here briefly deduce the descent of this great branch of the illustrious family of STEWART from Alexander, lord high steward of Scotland, who died anno 1283, and was great grandfather of king Robert II.

I. ALEXANDER, sixth lord high steward of Scotland, married Jean, daughter and heir­ess of Angus Macrory, lord of Bute, by whom he had several children.

1. James, his successor, seventh lord high steward of Scotland, grandfather of king Ro­bert II.

II. 2. Sir JOHN STEWART, who married Margaret, daughter and heiress of sir Alexan­der de Bonkyll, knight, whereby he was af­terwards designed sir John of Bonkill, &c. He is found, amongst many others of his coun­trymen,Prynne's col­lections, v. III. swearing fealty to king Edward I. when he had over-run Scotland, anno 1296.

He joined Wallace and Douglas in defence of the liberties of his country, and, in his bro­ther's absence,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 149. commanded his vassals and mi­litary tenants at the memorable battle of Falkirk, where he behaved gloriously, and lost his life in that fatal engagement, anno 1298.

By the said Margaret de Bonkill, he left issue seven sons and one daughter.

1. Sir Alexander of Bonkill, of whom An­gus, &c.

2. Sir Alan of Dreghorn, of whom Len­nox, &c.

3. Sir Walter of Dalswinton, of whom Galloway, &c.

4. Sir James, ancestor of this noble fa­mily, Buchan, Traquair, &c.

5. Sir John, of whom Castlemilk, &c. are descended.

6. Hugh.

7. Robert.

His daughter Isabel was married to Tho­mas Randolf,Ibid. and Abercrombie: earl of Murray, to whom she brought the barony of Garlies.

III. Sir JAMES STEWART, fourth son of sir John of Bonkyll,Stuart's hist: of the royal family, p. 168. was killed at the battle of Halidonhill, anno 1333, leaving issue three sons.

1. Sir John Stewart knight, who died with­out male-issue.

2. Sir Alan, designed of Ochiltree, who died also without issue.

IV. 3. ROBERT STEWART of Shanbothy and Innermeath,Ibid. p. 169. who left two sons and one daughter.

1. John, of Innermeath.

2. Robert, ancestor of the Stewarts of Rosyth.

His daughter, Catharine, married John Bethune of Balfour.

V. JOHN STEWART, lord of Innermeath, designed also of Lorn, married the daughter and co-heiress of John de Ergadia, lord of Lorn,Ibidem. by whom he had five sons and two daughters.

[Page 49] 1. Robert, his successor.

2. Archibald.

3. Sir James, who carried on the line of this family.

4. Alexander, ancestor of the Stewarts of Grantully.

5. William.

1. Daughter, Christian, married to James Dundas of that ilk.

2. Isabel, married to sir William Oliphant of Aberdalgy, ancestor of lord Oliphant.

VI. Sir JAMES STEWART, called the black knight of Lorn, third son of John lord of Innermeath and Lorn,All Scotch historians. married queen Jane, daughter of John duke of Lancaster, son of Edward III. king of England, and widow of king James I. of Scotland, by whom he had three sons.

1. Sir John, afterwards earl of Athole.

2. James, earl of Buchan.

3. Andrew, bishop of Murray.

VII. Sir JOHN STEWART, first son of sir James and queen Jane, was a man of extra­ordinary parts and great capacity, either for peace or war, and in great favour with his uterine brother king James II. who raised him to the dignity of the peerage,Haddington's collections. by the title of earl of Athole, anno 1457.

In a truce concluded betwixt king James and the English, this John earl of Athole is one of the guarantees,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 397 & 426. anno 1457; and in another truce, anno 1459.

He got from the same prince a charter of the lordship of Balvenie, &c. in Banffshire, ‘"To John earl of Athole, and the heirs-male procreate betwixt him and Margaret his spouse;Charta penes ducem de A­thole. which failing, to the heirs whatsomever of the earl's body; which failing, to revert to the crown, &c."’ dat­ed 25th May 1460.

In the year 1463, John Stewart, earl of Athole,Rymer tom. XI. p. 502. and lord Balvenie, was appointed am­bassador extraordinary to the court of Eng­land. He got two charters from king James III.Chart. in pub. archiv. of several lands; one dated 20th March 1473, the other 7th November 1477, Jo­hanni comiti Atholiae, avunculo regis, et haeredi­bus masculis, quibus deficientibus, haeredibus qui­buscunque, &c.

He was lieutenant to his nephew king James; was greatly instrumental in reducing to his obedience the lord of the isles, then in rebellion; was the principal manager of a trea­ty betwixt that king and the rebels in 1488, delivering himself an hostage for the king's performance of his part;Stuart's hist. of the royal family, page 171. and was imprisoned in the castle of Dumbar by that party, &c.

He married, 1st, lady Margaret Douglas, daughter of Archibald duke of Turenne, and earl of Douglas, called the Fair Maid of Gal­loway, by whom he had two daughters.

1. Lady Janet, Nisbet's ap­pendix, p. 184. married to Alexander earl of Huntly.

2. Lady Catharine, Ib. and sir James Bal­four's collect. married to John lord Forbes.

He married,All documen­ted in Nis­bet's append. p. 184 &185. 2dly, lady Eleanor Sinclair, daughter of William earl of Orkney and Caith­ness, by whom he had two sons and eight daughters.

1. John, earl of Athole.

2. Andrew, bishop of Caithness.

1. Daughter, lady Elizabeth, married to Andrew lord Gray.

2. Lady Jean, married to sir Robert Gor­don of Pitlurg.

3. Lady Catharine, married to Neil Stew­art of Bruich.

4. Lady Isabel, married to Alexander Ro­bertson of Strowan, senior.

5. Lady—, married to Donald Ro­bertson of Strowan, junior.

6. Lady Marjory, married to sir John Camp­bell of Glenurchie.

7. Lady Margaret, to William Murray, ninth baron of Tullibardin.

8. Lady Anne, to John earl of Lennox.

The earl died in an advanced age, anno 1512, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. JOHN, second earl of Athole, who married lady Mary Campbell, daughter of Colin earl of Argyle, by whom he had a son,

John, Ibid. p. 185; all documen­ted. his heir,—and five daughters.

1. Lady Janet, married, first, to Alexan­der master of Sutherland: 2dly, to Hugh Kennedy of Girvan-mains: 3dly, to Henry Stewart, lord Methven: and, 4thly, to Wil­liam lord Ruthven.

2. Lady Helen, married to John lord Lind­say of Byres.

3. Lady Elizabeth, married to Kenneth M'Kenzie of Kintail, ancestor of the earl of Seaforth.

4. Lady Jean, married to James Arbuth­not of that ilk.

5. Lady Isabel, married to James Herring of Lethinty and Glasclune.

This earl was killed at the battle of Flow­don,stuart's hist. of the royal family. anno 1513, and was succeeded by his only son,

IX. JOHN, third earl of Athole, who was a man of great hospitality and grandeur, and had a vast estate,Chart. inpub. archiv. inter ann. [...]1520 and 1530. which appears by his char­ters, under the great seal, from king James V.

He married, 1st, Grizel, daguhter and co­heir of sir John Rattray of that ilk,Ibid. and Nisbet's app p. 136 by whom he had two sons and six daughters.

[Page 50] 1. John, earl of Athole.

2. Sir James Stewart of Balvenie.

1. Daughter, lady—, married to John Grant of that ilk.

2. Lady Jean, married to sir John Ot­terburn of Reidhall.

3. Lady—, married to the laird of Balfour.

4. Lady—, married to—Wood of Balbegno.

5. Lady Elizabeth, married to William Stewart, apparent heir of Grantully.

6. Lady Barbara, married to Robert Men­zies, apparent heir of James Menzies of that ilk.

This earl married,Chart. in pub. archiv. 2dly, Janet, daughter of John lord Forbes, but by her he had no issue.

He died in 1542, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. JOHN, fourth earl of Athole, a man of great honour,Spottiswood's church hist. loyalty and integrity. He dissented from the confession of faith drawn up by the parliament in 1560.

He was one of the queen's privy council, after she came from France, and was made justiciar in the northern parts; but he joined the other party after the prince was born, was on the king's side during his minority, and was made chancellor of Scotland in 1577.

He got charters, under the great seal, Jo­hanni comiti Atholiae, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1550 & 1570. haeredibus et assignatis suis quibuscunque, of a great many lands too nu­merous to be here inserted.

He married,Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 188. 1st, lady Elizabeth Gordon, daughter of George earl of Huntly, by whom he had two daughters.

1. Lady Elizabeth, married, 1st, to Hugh lord Lovat:Ibidem. 2dly, to Robert earl of Lennox and March: and, 3dly, to James Stewart, earl of Arran.

2. Lady Margaret, married to George lord Abernethy of Salton.

The earl married, 2dly, Margaret, daugh­ter of Malcolm lord Fleming, by whom he had a son,

John, Ibidem. his heir,—and three daughters.

1. Lady Grizel, married to David earl of Crawford.

2. Lady Jean, married to Duncan Camp­bell of Glenurchy.

3. Lady Anne, married to Francis earl of Errol.

He died suddenly at Stirling, not without suspicion of poison, anno 1579, and was suc­ceeded by his only son,

XI. JOHN, fifth earl of Athole, who se­cretly favoured the lords against the court and the earl of Arran, anno 1585, but was ap­pointed one of the privy council to king James VI. anno 1590.

He married lady Mary Ruthven,Ibid. and lives of the officers of state. daughter of William earl of Gowrie, by whom he had four daughters.

1. Lady Dorothea, married to William earl of Tullibardin, whose son John came to be earl of Athole.

2. Lady Mary, married to James Stewart, lord Innermeath, and earl of Athole.

3. Lady Jean, married, 1st, to Henry Stewart, lord St. Colme: and, 2dly, to Mr. Nicol Ballenden.

4. Lady Anne, married to Andrew Stew­art, master of Ochiltree.

The last three had no surviving male-issue.

This earl died in 1594, and having no male-issue, the titles and honours of earl of Athole were conferred by his majesty upon John Stewart,Chart. in the regist, of pri­vy seal. lord Innermeath, by patent, haeredibus masculis de corpore suo legitime pro­creatis seu procreandis, quibus deficientibus, no­bis nostrisque successoribus libere reverten. &c. Dated 6th March 1595—6.

This John earl of Athole and lord Inner­meath married, first, lady Margaret Lindsay, sister of David earl of Crawford, by whom he had a son,

James, his heir.

He married, 2dly, lady Mary Ruthven, daughter of William earl of Gowrie, relict of John, the last earl of Athole, by whom he had no issue; and dying in 1615, was suc­ceeded by his son,

James, earl of Athole, and lord Innermeath, who married lady Mary, second daughter of John, fifth earl of Athole; and dying with­out issue anno 1625, the title of Athole, ac­cording to the last mentioned patent, return­ed to the crown: But it being afterwards found, that the honours of Athole ought to have descended to the heir-female, upon fai­lure of heirs-male, king Charles I. therefore conferred them upon John Murray, only son and heir of William, second earl of Tullibar­din, by lady Dorothea Stewart, eldest daugh­ter and heir of John fifth earl of Athole, con­sequently heir of line to John the first earl, uterine brother to king James II. whose ho­nours and estates appear to have been granted to his heirs whatsomever, according to his charters from the king before and hereafter mentioned.

MURRAY Duke of ATHOLE, Earl of TUL­LIBARDIN, &c.

ALL our historians agree; that the sir­name of MURRAY is amongst the most antient of any in Scotland. Some de­rive their origin from a warlike people called the Moravii,Martin's ge­nealogical collections, vol. 1st, page 367, &c. who came from Germany, and are said to have performed many great ex­ploits in Scotland, in favours of king Cor­bred I. against the Romans.

Others are of opinion, they assumed that sirname from the county of Murray, where they had large possessions in very early times.

Certain it is, the progenitors of this great and illustrious family had considerable estates, both in Perthshire and the northern counties, in the tenth and eleventh centuries. But we shall pass over all traditional accounts, and proceed to our documents.

I. FRISKINUS de MORAVIA was pro­prietor of a vast many lands and baronies in different counties, and made a great figure in Scotland in the reign of king David I. who succeeded to the crown anno 1124, and died anno 1153.

This Friskin was father of

II. WILLIAM de MORAVIA, who got a charter, under the great seal of king William the lyon, Willielmo de Moravia, [...]ilio Fris­kini, of the lands of Strabrock, Duffus, Rossile, Inchikel, Macher, Kintrai, &c. All which were possessed by his father Friskin in the reign of king David I.Quas terras Friskinus pa­ter suus te­nuit, tempore regis David; &c. Chart. penes comi­tem de Bu­chan. The charter has no date; but as Felix, bishop of Murray, was wit­ness to it, it must have been granted in or be­fore the year 1171, in which that bishop died.

William had issue two sons, betwixt whom he divided his lands.

1. Hugh.

2. William, of whom the Murrays of Pettie, Bothwell, &c. are descended. Vide title Lord Bothwell.

III. HUGH, the eldest son, got possession of the lands of Dussus; which then was the chief seat of the family, and had a son;

IV. WALTER, who, in an agreement a­bout the division of some lands with Archi­bald bishop of Murray,Chartul. of Murray, pe­nes Macfar­lan [...], p. 10. is designed Walterus de Moravia de Duffus, filius quondam domini Hugonis de Moravia; &c. anno 1226.

Walter was father of

V. FRISKINUS de MORAVIA, who, in an agreement about the marches of some lands with Simon bishop of Murray, is designed Friskinus de Moravia, dominus de Duffus, fili­us Walteri, Ib. p. 92. &c. anno 1248.

This Friskinus had no male-issue, and but two daughters,

VI. 1. HELEN; married to sir Reynold de Cheyne, who with her obtained the ba­rony of Duffus.Ib. and Nis­bet's append. p. 192.

2. Christian, married to William de Fede­rith.

In a charter by Malise, earl of Strathern, to his sister Annabella of the lands of Kin­cardine, the above Friskinus de Moravia de Duffus, together with sir Malcolm de Mo­ravia, are witnesses.Chart. penes ducem de Montrose. The charter is dated at Selkirk the 28th of June, the 22d year of king Alexander II.'s reign, anno Domini 1236.

This sir Malcolm was the undoubted an­cestor of the Murrays of Tullibardin, and was son of sir John de Moravia, high sheriff of Perth, who probably was a grandson of the first Friskin, and brother of Hugh, tho' we cannot, at this distance of time, positively as­certain the relation.

From this sir John therefore (by good au­thority) we shall deduce the descent of this illustrious family, which hath flourished in Perthshire, with great lustre, about six hun­dred years.

I. Sir JOHN de MORAVIA, or MURRAY, appears to have been a man of the first rank; and made a considerable figure in the end of the reign of king William the lion, and be­ginning of king Alexander II. who succeeded to the crown of Scotland anno 1214.

He is particularly named in a donation to the abbacy of Arbroath,Chartul. of Arbroath, pe­nes Macfar­lane, p. 247, and 248. together with Gui­do abbot of Lindores, who died anno 1219.

He was sheriff of Perth in the beginning of the reign of king Alexander II.Ibid. and Chartul. of Murray, pe­nes [...]und. and writs of the family of Su­therland. and had a brother, Gilbert, who was consecrated bishop of Caithness anno 1222.

He died about the year 1225, and left is­sue a son arid successor,

II. Sir MALCOLM de MORAVIA, who is witness in the charter above-narrated, penes ducem de Montrose, dated at Selkirk, anno 1236,Sir James Balfour's col­lections. Nis­bet's append. p. 192. and appears to have had large possessi­ons in Perthshire, by many authentic docu­ments still extant.

[Page 52] He was also high sheriff of the county of Perth, and left issue two sons.

1. Sir John.

2. Sir William, who carried on the line of this family.

Sir John de Moravia,Haddington's collections in the lawyer's library. first son of sir Mal­colm, made a donation to the abbacy of Bal­merino, of a tenement in Perth, to which Willi­am, his son and heir, is a witness, anno 1280, but we can trace his genealogy no further.

III. Sir WILLAM de MORAVIA, or MUR­RAY, second son of sir Malcolm, got a charter from Johannes de Moravia, Chartul. of Coldingham, penes Mac­farlane. filius & haeres do­mini Malcolmi, Willielmo de Moravia, fra­ri suo, terrarum de Aldy, &c.

He got also from his father, sir Malcolm, the lands of Lamabude (now Langbride) by a charter,Chart. penes ducem de A­thole, Chron. de Melross, &c. in which Archibald bishop of Mur­ray, William de Haya de Locharret, and Mi­chael de Wemyss, knights, are witnesses.

He married Adda, daughter of Malise, se­nescal of Strathern, by Muriel his wife, daugh­ter and heiress of Congal, filius Duncani, fi­lii Malcolmi, &c. by her he obtained the lands and estate of Tullibardin,Chart. penes ducem de A­thole. Nis­bet, p. 193. which was ratified and confirmed to him by a charter from Henry, son of umquhil lord Malise, stew­ard of Stathern, ‘"To sir William de Moravia, son of umquhil sir Malcolm de Moravia, &c."’ dated on Tuesday, in the eve of All Saints, in the year 1284; which lands are still in the possession, and continued to be the chief title of the family, till they succeeded to the ho­nours of Athole.

This sir William was one of the magnates Scotiae, Rymer, tom. II. p. 553 & 644. summoned to Berwick by king Ed­ward I. anno 1292, and was forced to yield and submit, with many more of his country­men, to the determination of that monarch, in favours of John Baliol.

By said Adda his wife he left issue a son and successor,

IV. Sir ANDREW MURRAY, second ba­ron of Tullibardin, who made a donation to the monks of Inchaffrie,Chartul. of Inchaffrie ad annum 1331. pro salute animae suae, &c. and, who, having joined the interest of the Baliols against king David Bruce, was tried, condemned, and beheaded at Perth, anno 1332, leaving issue a son,

V. Sir WILLIAM MURRAY, third baron of Tullibardin, who, upon the resignation of Adda de Moravia,Chart. penes ducem de A­thole. his grandmother, obtained a new grant of the barony of Tullibardin from Malise earl of Strathern, then superior there­of, to which William de Montefix, justiciari­us Scotiae, is a witness, who executed that of­fice, anno 1335.

He left issue a son,

VI. JOHN de MORAVIA, fourth baron of Tullibardin, who succeeded him, and got a grant,Nisber's apend. p. 194 from sir Alexander de Abernethy knight, of the lands of Pickerling in the ba­rony of Bambreich in Fife, &c.

He was succeeded by his son,

VII. Sir WALTER MURRAY, fifth baron of Tullibardin, who obtained a ratification and charter of confirmation,Chart. in archiv. regis David. under the great seal, of the lands of Tullibardin, Concusse, Pickerlingi &c. dated in 1362.

He also got charters of a great many other lands, which are fully narrated in Nisbet's appendix, page 198.

This sir Walter gave a considerable dona­tion to the monastery of Culross,Ibidem. pro salute animae suae, &c.

He died anno 1390, leaving issue, by Mar­garet le Baird his spouse, a son,

VIII. Sir DAVID MURRAY, sixth baron of Tullibardin, first designed of Gask, who succeeded him, and was knighted by king James I. anno 1424.

He founded the collegiate church of Tulli­bardin,Ib. & chart. penes ducem de Athole. and largely endowed it, which after­wards became a good provision for the remote branches of the family.

The arms of this sir David and his lady, dame Isabel Stewart, are still to be seen in that church.

He got a charter, from king James I.Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Tullibardin, &c.

He married Isabel,Ib. and Nis­bet's append. where they are document­ed. daughter of sir John Stewart of Innermeath lord of Lorn, by whom he had five sons and three daughters.

1. Sir William, his heir.

2. John Murray of Drysall.

3. Patrick, of whom are descended the Murrays of Auchertyre, Woodend, Balman­no, Glendoick, the earl of Dysart, &c.

4. James, ancestor of the Murrays of Strowan.

5. Alexander, ancestor of the Murrays of Tibbermuir.

1. Daughter, Mariot, married to sir Mal­colm Drummond of Cargil in 1445.

2. Isabel, married to Malcolm Drummond of Coneraig.

3. Christian, married to Murdoch Men­teith of Rucky, who had one daughter marri­ed to—Haldane of Gleneagles, and ano­ther to—Napier of Merchiston, &c.

Sir David died in 1446, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

IX. Sir WILLIAM MURRAY, seventh [Page 53] baron of Tullibardin, who was one of the greatest men of his time, and was appointed sheriff of Banff,Haddington's collections. anno 1457.

He was also sheriff of Perth, under king James II. and III. was knighted by the lat­ter, and was one of the plenipotentiaries in a treaty with the English,Rymer tom. XI. p. 423. anno 1459.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir John Colquhoun of Luss, lord high chamberlain of Scotland, and by her, it is said, he had seven­teen sons, of whom many different families of the Murrays are descended.Nisbet's ap­pendix, p. 197.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. Sir WILLIAM MURRAY, eighth ba­ron of Tullibardin, who was in high favour with king James III. and obtained from that prince a charter of the stewartry of Strathern, and lordship of Balquhidder, anno 1482. It is granted, dilecto nostro ac familiari militi Willielmo de Moravia, de Tullibardine, &c. which he got ratified in parliament,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1492.

He was employed in concluding a treaty with the English,Rymer, tom. XII. p. 571. anno 1495.

He married Catharine,Chart. penes ducem de A­thole. daughter of Andrew lord Gray, by whom he had four sons and two daughters.

1. Sir John, All documented in Nis­bet's append. who married Elizabeth Crich­ton, but died without issue.

2. Sir William, his father's heir.

3. Sir Andrew Murray, of Arngosk, an­cestor of the viscount of Stormont.

4. David Murray of Strathgeith, who mar­ried Catharine Edmondstone.

1. Daughter, Christian, married to George lord Seton.

2. Elizabeth, married to Thomas Stewart of Grantully.

Tho' sir William was now very aged, he still had the favour and esteem of king James IV,Chart. in pub. archiv. & chart. penes ducem de Athole. who was pleased to grant him a dispen­sation, and free him from all further atten­dance either on court or on the king's host, anno 1507.

He died 1509, and was succeeded by his son,

XI. WILLIAM, ninth baron, who is de­signed filius & haeres, quondam domini Willi­elmi Murray de Tullibardin, Chart. penes ducem de A­thole, & in pub. archiv. inter 1510 & 1520. in a charter un­der the great seal, dated anno 1510. He got also several other charters from king James IV. of many lands, &c.

He married lady Margaret, daughter of John earl of Athole,Chart. penes ducem de A­thole. by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. William.

2. Andrew Murray.

3. David Murray.

His daughter, Helen, was married to Alex­ander Seton of Parbroath.

XII. WILLIAM MURRAY, tenth baron of Tullibardin, succeeded his father, and got a charter, under the great seal in 1542, con­taining an entail of his estate to himself in liferent, and to William his son and apparent heir in see, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing to Alexander and James Murrays his sons, and the heirs male of their body; which failing, to Andrew Murray, brother-german to William Murray of Tullibardin, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to Da­vid Murray,Chart. in pub. archiv. brother to the said William, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to William Murray, son to David Murray of A­licht, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to Alexander Murray of Strowan, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to John Murray of Wallacetown, and the heirs­male of his body; all which failing, to his own nearest and lawful heirs whatsome­ver.

He married Catharine, daughter of sir John Campbell of Glenurchy,Ibid. ad an­num 1538. ancestor of the earl of Breadalbine, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.

1. Sir William.

2. Alexander, a colonel in the service of the States of Holland.

3. James Murray of Purdorvis.Ib. ad annum 1582.

4. Andrew Murray.

1. Daughter, Annabella, married to John lord Erskine, afterwards earl of Mar and re­gent of Scotland.

2. Eupheme, married, 1st, to Robert Steuart of Rosyth,Ibidem. 2dly, to Robert Pitcairn, commen­dator of Dumfermline, and, 3dly, to Patrick Gray of Innergowric.

3. Catharine, Chart. penea dom. Aber­cairny. married to Robert Moray of Abercairnie.

4. Jean, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to James Henderson of Fordel.

He died in 1562, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. Sir WILLIAM MURRAY, eleventh ba­ron of Tullibardin, who was a great promoter of the reformation,Mr. Keith's collections. and sat in the parliament 1560, which established the reformed religi­on.

Upon the queen's return from France in 1561, he got much into her favour, and had the honour to entertain her majesty several times at his house of Tullibardin: He was made one of her privy-council, and comp­troller of the houshold in 1565.

He was one of those great barons that enter­ed into an association for the preservation of [Page 54] the young prince, and for prosecuting the murderers of the king;Sir James Melvil's me­moirs. and always retained a most dutiful respect, and behaved with the utmost submission to her majesty.

He, with the master of Erskine, had the tuition of the young king, and were joint keepers of the castle of Stirling; in which of­fices he acquitted himself with great fidelity and universal approbation;Records of council in the signet office. and the king, as soon as he took the management upon himself, ap­pointed him one of his privy-council.

He married lady Agnes Graham, daughter of William earl of Montrose,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had three sons and two daughters.

1. John, his heir.

2. Sir William Murray of Pitcairly.

3. Mungo Murray of Dunork.

1. Daughter, Margaret, married to sir Ro­bert Bruce of Clackmannan.All doccu­mented in Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 199.

2. Jean, married to sir John Hepburri of Waughton.

He died in 1583, and was succeeded by his eldest sou,

XIV. Sir JOHN MURRAY, twelfth baron of Tullibardin, who having been bred up with his majesty king James VI. from their in­fancy, and being a man of singular worth and merit, the king always had him in high esteem. He was one of his privy-council,Acts of parli­ment in 1592. and master of his houshold in 1592.

He obtained a charter, under the great seal, containing an entail of his lands of Letter-Ba­nachy, &c. to himself in liferent, and to his eldest son in fee, and to the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his second son, and so to all his sons,Chart. penes dom. Moray de Abercairny ad annum 1604. one after another; which fail­ing, to his brother William; which failing, to his brother Mungo, &c.

His majesty's esteem and regard for him still increasing, he was pleased to raise him to the dignity of a peer of the realm,Creations of the nobility, in the law­yers library, Edinburgh. Chart. penes ducem de A­thole. by the title of lord Murray of Tullibardin, by letters patent, dated 25th April 1604, and earl of Tullibar­din on 10th July 1606.

He married Catharine, daughter of David lord Drummond, by whom he had five sons and four daughters.

1. William.

2. Captain John Murray.

3. Patrick Murray of Castletoun, after­wards earl of Tullibardin.

4. Mungo Murray, who became viscount of Stormont by a special provision, but died without issue.

5. Robert Murray.

1. Daughter, lady Anne, married to Pa­trick lord Glammis, and earl of Kinghorn.

2. Lady Lilias, married to sir John Grant of that ilk.

3. Lady Margaret, to James Haldane of Gleneagles.

4. Lady Catharine, to David Ross of Bal­nagowan.

JOHN, first earl of Tullibardin, died in 1609, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XV. WILLIAM, second earl of Tullibar­din, who, when a young man, together with his cousin; David viscount of Stormont, had the good fortune to be greatly instrumental in the rescue of the king at Perth, from the attempt of the earl Gowrie and his brother against the sacred persori of his majesty, anno 1600. For that signal service, he got the sheriffship of Perthshire (which had heretably belonged to the house of Ruthven) conferred upon him during the king's pleasure;Nisbet's app. p. 200. and it has mostly continued in the family of Athole ever since.

He married Dorothea, eldest daughter and heir of line of John, fifth and last earl of A­thole of the name of Stewart, by whom he had one son,

John, who afterwards became earl of A­thole,—and one daughter,

Lady Anne, married to sir John Moncrief of that ilk.

This earl, a little before his death, know­ing that his son was heir of line to the earldom of Athole, and being unwilling that the e­state and honours of Athole and Tullibardin should be conjoined in the same person, made a resignation of his title of Tullibardin into the king's hands,Chart. in cancellaria, 1mo Aprilis 1686. iu favours of his brother Patrick, in order to make two distinct families, which was accordingly confirmed, by a patent, under the great seal,Ib. Haeredi­bus masculis quibuscunq. Patricio comiti de Tullibardine, anno 1628.

This Patrick, third earl of Tullibardin, got several charters under the great seal;Ibidem. and mar­ried Elizabeth Dent, an English lady, by whom he had two sons.

1. James, his heir.

2. William, designed of Redcastle, a youth of great hopes, valour rind honour, was early engaged in the service of king Charles I. but unfortunately taken prisoner at the battle of Philiphaugh, and executed at St. Andrews,Bp Guthrie' [...] memoirs. anno 1646.

Earl Patrick was succeeded by his eldest son,

JAMES, fourth earl of Tullibardin, who got a [...] charter, under the great seal, Jacobo comiti de Tullibardine, Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. and married, 1st, his cousin lady Anne Murray, fourth daugh­ter of John earl of Athole; and, 2dly, lady Lilias Drummond, daughter of John, second earl of Perth, with whom he had two sons, who died unmarried, whereby the estate and [Page 55] honours of Tullibardin devolved on John earl of Athole, his cousin and nearest heir-male.

We now return to

William Murray, second earl of Tullibardin, who died anno 1626, and was succeeded by

XVI. JOHN MURRAY, his only son by lady Dorothea Stewart, eldest daughter of John fifth earl of Athole, and undoubted heir of line to John the first earl of that illustrious house.

It seems the writs of the family had not hitherto been carefully looked into, which occasioned several mistakes in this peerage; but these were all at last rectified: for, as the estate and honours of Athole, by the char­ters dated 1460, 1473, and 1477, before recited, in Title, Stewart earl of Athole, de­scended to the heirs of the patentee's body whatever, this John's title to that dignity appears to have been unquestionable; and he was accordingly served and retoured heir, in the aforesaid title and dignity, to John earl of Athole, brother uterine to King James II. who was great grandfather's grandfather, or tritavas to his mother Dorothea.Retour penes ducem de A­thole, et in cancellaria. The retour, which is dated 6th day of August 1628, bears, that the king was bound in honour and conscience to ratify and confirm the fore­said honour and dignity to the said John Mur­ray, &c. &c.

The king accordingly, by a new patent under the great seal, ‘"ratifies the foresaid service and retour, and admits, receives, and confirms the said John Murray to the sole undoubted lawful and just title of earl of Athole, with all the dignities, &c. thereunto belonging, in all time coming, to be enjoyed by the said John, and his heirs, with the same order of dignity, as it was possessed by the said John earl of Athole, brother to king James II."’ And the patent, which is dated 16th February 1629,Diploma comitatus A­tholiae Johan­ni comiti, &c. in pub. archiv. contains a clause of novo damus of the dignity of earl of Athole to the said John, and his heirs, with salvo, that it should not prejudge his and their right to the foresaid antient peerage, &c. &c. &c.

This John earl of Athole was a man of sin­gular worth and probity. As soon as the ci­vil war broke out, he attached himself en­tirely to his majesty's interest, in which he persisted with great firmness and fidelity. He raised about two thousand of his own men for the king's service,Nisbet's ap­pendix. and declared he would op­pose every measure that was contrary to the honour and dignity of the crown.

He married Jean, daughter of sir Duncan Campbell of Glenurchie, by whom he had two sons,—and one daughter.

1. John, his heir.

2. Mungo, who was lieutenant of his ma­jesty's guards at the restoration.

His daughter, lady Anne, Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 202. was married to her first cousin, James earl of Tullibardin, who died without issue, as before noticed.

This earl died in 1642, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVII. JOHN earl of Athole, who adhered firmly to the interest both of king Charles I. and II. In 1653, he raised for the king a­bove two thousand men, for which he suffer­ed great hardships before the restoration; but, in consideration thereof, his majesty was pleased to constitute him one of his pri­vy-council, and master of his houshold, in 1661.

He got a charter under the great seal hae­reditarii officii senescallatus de Fife; Chart. in pub. archiv. was made justice general of Scotland anno 1663, captain of his majesty's guards in 1670, lord privy seal in 1672, and one of the extraordinary lords of session. And, in further regard of his eminent services,Chart. in ar­chiv. haeredi­bus masculise corpore suo. he was created marquis of Athole, by letters patent, dated 7th Fe­bruary 1676, limiting that title of marquis to the heirs-male of his body.

His majesty king James VII. having like­ways a great opinion of his loyalty and me­rit, gave him the command of the troops sent to suppress the insurrection of the earl of Ar­gyle in the West.

In the year 1687, he was created one of the knights of the thistle, and the revolution happening soon thereafter, he retired from all public business, and spent the remainder of his days, at some of his fine seats in Perthshire, in great peace and tranquillity.

He married lady Emilia Stanly, daughter of that loyal and valiant patriot James earl of Derby in England, (who was beheaded for his inviolable attachment to the royal family in 1651) by his wife lady Charlotte, daughter of Claud duke de la Tremovile, a duke and peer of France. By her he had six sons,—and one daughter.

1. John, his heir.

2. Charles, earl of Dunmore.

3. Lord James Murray of Dowally, who left two daughters, one married to the lord Rollo, the other to—Farquharson of Invercauld.

4. Lord William, who became lord Nairn, by marrying the heiress thereof.

5. Lord Edward Murray.

6. Lord Mungo, who died in the expedi­tion to Darien in 1697.

His only daughter, lady Emilia, was mar­ried to Hugh lord Fraser of Lovat.

[Page 56] This marquis died in 1703, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

XVIII. JOHN marquis of Athole, a man endowed with many eminent virtues and qua­lities. He came early into the revolution, and was made secretary of state by king Wil­liam in 1695; created earl of Tullibardin in his father's lifetime 1696, and made his ma­jesty's high commissioner to the parliament anno 1697.

He was appointed one of the privy council to queen Anne, immediately upon her acces­sion to the crown anno 1702. He was con­stituted lord privy seal in April,Chart. in pub. archiv. Hae­redibus mas­culis e corpore suo, quibus de­ficien. haere­dibus mascu­lis de corpore defuncti Jo­hannis mar [...] chionis de A­thole sui pa­tris, ad ann. 1703. and created duke of Athole 30th June 1703, by patent, to the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to the heirs-male of the body of John marquis of Athole, his father. His titles were, duke of Athole, marquis of Tullibardin, earl of Strath-Tay and Strathardle, viscount of Bal­quhidder, Glenalmond and Glenlyon, lord Murray, Balvenie, Gask, &c. He was also made knight of the most noble order of the thistle.

In 1706, he opposed the union with all his interest, and not only argued and spoke against every article of it, but he entered several spi­rited protests against it, which are preserved in the public records.

After the union was concluded, the duke retired to Perthshire, where he lived some years in great splendor and magnificence.

In 1712, he again came to court, and was made one of her majesty's privy council. In 1713, he was made lord privy-seal, and was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scotland to the third and fourth British parliaments.

He married, 1st, lady Catharine eldest daughter of William and Anne duke and dut­chess of Hamilton, by whom he had six sons, —and one daughter.

1. John marquis of Tullibardin, a youth of great hopes, who was killed at the battle of Mons in 1709.

2. William marquis of Tullibardin, who, being engaged in the rebellion in 1715, was attainted of high treason, and made his escape to France; but returning in 1745, was taken prisoner in 1746, and sent to the tower of Lon­don, where he died in 1747, without issue.

3. James, now duke of Athole.

4. Lord Charles, who died without issue.

5. Lord George, who, having engaged in the rebellion 1745, was attainted of high treason, went abroad, and died at in Holland, anno 1760, leaving issue by A­melia his spouse, daughter and sole heiress of —Murray of Strowan and Glencarse, three sons and two daughters.

1. John Murray, Esq; married to lady Charlotte Murray, daughter of the present duke of Athole, and elected member of par­liament for the county of Perth in April 1761.

2. James.

3. George.

1. Daughter, Amelia, married, 1st, to John lord Sinclair; and, 2dly, to James Far­quharson of Invercauld, Esq;

2. Charlotte.

Duke John's sixth son, lord Basil, died young.

His only daughter of the first marriage, lady Susan, was married to William earl of Aberdeen, and was mother of the present earl, &c. &c.

He married, 2dly, Mary, daughter of Wil­liam lord Ross, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Lord John, who was elected member for the county of Perth to the three last parliaments of king George II. is colonel of a regiment, and a lieutenant-general of his majesty's forces.

2. Lord Edward, who married an Eng­lish lady, by whom he had issue a son, John, now a captain in the army, and a daughter.

3. Lord Frederick, a captain of the royal navy, who died unmarried.

His daughter, lady Mary, married James lord Deskford, son and heir apparent of James earl of Finlater and Seafield, and has issue.

William, marquis of Tullibardin, having been attainted of high treason in 1716, as before noticed, the duke, his father, upon a petition, obtained an act of parliament, set­tling, after his own death, all the estates and honours belonging to the family of Athole, on lord James his third son, in the same man­ner as if lord William had died before his fa­ther, and had never been attainted. And the duke dying in 1724, the estate and ho­nours devolved accordingly upon

XIX. JAMES, now duke of Athole, who, at the time of his father's death, was member of parliament for the county of Perth.

In 1712, he had a company in the first re­giment of foot-guards, and afterwards was lieutenant-colonel to the earl of Orkney's re­giment.

In 1733, he was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scotland, in the room of the earl of Sutherland deceased. He was afterwards made lord privy-seal, one of his majesty's privy-council, and a knight of the most noble or­der of the thistle.

Upon the death of the earl of Derby, in 1735, without issue, the estate and honours of Derby went to sir Edward Stanly his heir­male; but the peerage of lord Strange in Eng­land, [Page 57] the lordship of Man and the Isles, came to the present James duke of Athole, being heir of line and at law, by which he is pos­sessed of some of the highest and noblest pri­vileges of any subject in Great-Britain.

His grace married, 1st, dame Jean Lanoy, widow of sir Timothy Lanoy in Middlesex, and daughter of sir John Frederick of West­minster, baronet, by whom he had a son,

—, marquis of Tullibardin, who died young,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Jean, married to John earl of Crawfurd, and died without issue.

2. Lady Charlotte, married to her cousin John Murray, Esq; son of lord George, as above.

The duke married, 2dly, Jean, daughter of John Drummond of Megginch, Esq;

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st, azure, three mullets ar­gent, within a double tressure, flowered and counter-flowered with flowers-de-lis or, for Murray. 2d quarter is quarterly 1st and 4th, or, a fess-cheque argent and azure for Stew­art. 2d and 3d pally of six or and sable for the title of Athole. 3d gules, three legs arm­ed proper, conjoined at the upper part of the thighs, flexed in a triangle, garnished and spurr'd or, for lord of the isle of Man. The 4th as the 1st.

CREST; on a wreath, a demi-savage wreath­ed about the head and waist vert, holding in his right hand a dagger proper, the pommel and hilt or, and in his left a key of the latter.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter side, a lyon gules, gorged with a collar azure, and there­on three mullets argent, for Tullibardin; on the sinister, a savage wreathed about the head and waist as the crest, his feet in fetters of iron, and the chain over his right arm.

MOTTO; Furth fortune and fill the fetters,

CHIEF SEATS.

The castle of Blair in Athole, and Dunkel near the river Tay, the castle of Tullibardin, and Huntingtower, all in Perthshire; the castle of Douglas in the Isle of Man, and Grosvenor-square, London, &c.

CUMMIN Lord of BADENOCH.

THE sirname of CUMMIN is of great antiquity, but the origin is doubtful. Some deduce them from Hungary,And. Win­ton's M. S. Chron. of Scotland in the lawyer's library, Edr. others say they are of Norman extract.

There were certainly several considerable and flourishing families of that sirname in Scotland in very early times, and many great men amongst them who were an ornament to their country, tho' some of them had the misfortune to act against it.

They flourished for the space of 250 years, viz. from 1080 to 1330, about which last aera they begun to decline; but there arc still some considerable gentlemen's families in Scot­land descended of them.

The first we can give an account of, with any certainty, is

I. COMES ROBERTUS CUMMIN, who appears to have been a man of the first rank in the reign of king Malcolm Canmore, and was killed with that prince at the battle of Alnwick,Chron. of Melross. anno 1093, leaving issue two in­fant sons.

1. John de Cummin.

2. William, a man eminent for natural and acquired endowments, and highly esteem­ed by king David I.Ib. and lives of the officers of state, p. 8. who constituted him lord high chancellor of Scotland in the begin­ning of his reign. In 1142, he was prefer­red to the episcopal see of Durham by Maud,Ibid. p. 9. & D [...]rymple's Collections, p. 174. the empress, and died before the year 1159.

II. JOHN de CUMMIN succceded Robert, but we never find him designed Comes, tho' he made a considerable figure in the reign of king Alexander I.Martin's ge­nealogical collections, vol. II. p. 75. and of this John, 'tis said, all the Cummins in Scotland are descended.

He was father of

III. Sir WILLIAM CUMMIN, who mar­ried Hexetilda,Chartul. of Kelso, penes Mac [...]arlane. grandchild of Donald king of Scotland, and by her had a son and successor,

IV. WILLIAM de CUMMIN, who flou­rished in the reigns of king Malcolm IV. and king William the Lyon; and, according to Winton,Martin's ge­nealogical collections, vol. II. p. 75. was Camerarius to king William; but, according to Mr. Martin and others, he was ostiarius domini regis, &c.

He was succeeded by his son,

V. Sir RICHARD CUMMIN, who made a donation of the church of Linton-Roderick, [Page 58] in Tweedale,Register of Kelso, p. 243. to the monks of Kelso, pro sa­lute Henrici comitis domini sui, &c. before the year 1152, in which year prince Hen­ry died.

He was one of the hostages sent to Eng­land, upon king William's obtaining his li­berty,Rymer, tom. I. p. 39. anno 1174.

He left issue three sons.

1. Sir John.

2. Sir Walter, Chartul. of Dumfermline penesMacfar­lane, p. 210. who was created earl of Menteith in the beginning of king Alexan­der II.'s reign. He was one of the sureties at that prince's marriage,Rymer, tom. I. p. 241. with Johanna, daugh­ter of John king of England, anno 1220, and married Isabel countess of Strathern,Home's hist. of Douglas. &c.

Sir Richard's third son, sir William, was afterwards earl of Buchan.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. Sir JOHN, who was called the Red Cummin, and was the first we find designed lord of Badenoch.

He was a man of great abilities, and was sent ambassador to Lewis IX. king of France, by king Alexander II. anno 1240, where he negotiated some affairs of importance, greatly to the king's satisfaction.

According to Cambden, he married Ada, daughter of Patrick Galloway, earl of Athole; but, according to Buchanan (by whom he is also designed earl of Mar) he married Mary, daughter of Alan lord of Galloway, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir,—and three daughters.

1. Jean, Dugdale's baronage of England. or Johanna, married to David de Strabolgic, earl of Athole.

2.—, married,Crawford's Peerage. 1st, to sir Godfrey de Murray: 2dly, to Alexander de Ergyle, lord of Lorn.

3.—, married to sir Andrew Murray,Ibidem. lord of Bothwell.

He was succeeded by his only son,

VII. JOHN CUMMIN, lord of Badenoch, called the Black Cummin, inferior to no sub­ject then in the kingdom for wealth and pow­er,Prynne's col­lections, v. III. p. 651. and was designed John Cummin senior de Badenoch, &c.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae who a­greed to stand by,Rymer, tom. II. p. 266. and support queen Marga­ret, grandchild to king Alexander III. and defend her title to the crown of Scotland a­gainst all mortals, anno 1284.

He was appointed one of the six governors of this kingdom anno 1286,Ibid. p. 431 and 471. and agreed to the marriage of the queen with king Edward of England's eldest son, anno 1290.

After queen Margaret's death, he became one of the competitors for the crown, as son and heir of John, who was son and heir of Richard,Prynne, vol III. p. 515. son and heir of William, son and heir of Hexetilda, daughter and heiress of Goth­rick, son and heir of Donald, king of Scotland. But it is well known how that affair was de­termined by king Edward of England, in fa­vours of John Baliol;Rymer, tom II. p. 558. and we find him soon thereafter swearing allegiance to king Edward I, of England, as over-lord of Scotland, anno 1292.

However,Ibid. p. 776. liberati sunt Johannes Cummin de Badenoch, et Johannes Cummin de Badenoch, jun. &c. both he and his son were carried prisoners to England, and were not set at li­berty till the year 1297, and he died soon thereafter.

He married Marjory daughter of John, and sister of king John Baliol, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir.

'Tis said he had also a daughter married to Archibald Douglas,Home's hist. of the family of Douglas, Abercrombie, &c. lord of Galloway, ance­stor of the duke of Douglas.

He was succeeded by his son,

VIII. JOHN CUMMIN, lord of Badenoch, who was a man of extensive property, pow­erful by his wealth and dependents, cunning, artful and dissembling, fond of dignity and rank; and, provided he could obtain his wishes, extremely careless by what means, however base and dishonourable.

Scotland had now for a considerable time groaned under the yoke of English servitude; Baliol had meanly given up his pretended right to the crown to Edward; Bruce had secretly intimated to his friends his intention of asserting his title to the royal dignity, and redeeming the liberty of his country. Cum­min, ever mindful of his own interest, enter­ed into the design, and made a solemn engage­ment with Robert to assist him with all his power in mounting the throne; provided, upon the success of the affair, he should be restored to the vast possessions his family had enjoyed, which would have aggrandized him much beyond any other subject, and placed him in a condition little inferior to royal: but, upon maturer consideration, and weigh­ing the matter in the balance of self-interest,Rymer, For­dun, Aber­crombie, &c. &c. he began to doubt the event; the attempt was hazardous; he dreaded the strength of Eng­land; every chance seemed against the cause; if it failed, he was undone: how to mend the step he had taken was to be determined; his own black heart suggested the detestable re­medy, either from the hopes of great re­wards from the English, or perhaps with a view to the crown itself, in virtue of his mo­ther, who was Baliol's sister; he divulged the whole schemes of the Scotch patriots to the king of England. Bruce was then in Lon­don, but happily in time discovered he was be­trayed, [Page 59] and, not without difficulty, made his escape to Scotland, where finding clear proof of the villainy of Cummin, he caused pursue him to the church of Dumfries; whither; from conscious guilt, he had fled for refuge; and punished him as his crime deserved. Not the house of GOD, not even the altar; was to be allowed an asylum to protect such infamous treason and persidy. He fell indeed by too honourable hands, as a hangman or common executioner should have performed what was done by the Boyd, the Fleming, and the Lindsay, on 10th February 1306.

Having no issue, he was the last lord of Badenoch, of the name of Cummin.

LINDSAY Earl of BALCARRAS.

AS the rise and descent of the great and antient sirname of Lindsay is to be found under the Title of Earl of Crawfurd, to that we refer our readers, and shall here begin with the immediate ancestor of the Lindsays of Edzell, of whom the earl of Balcarras is the undoubted male representative.

XI. ALEXANDER, second earl of Craw­furd, the eleventh generation of that illustri­ous house in a direct male-line, was son of David the first earl, by lady Catharine Stew­art, daughter of king Robert II. He was one of the hostages for king James I.'s ransom, anno 1424,Rymer, tom. X. p. 307. was afterwards in great favour with that prince, and made a considerable fi­gure in his reign.

He married Marion daughter and co-heir­ess of David Dunbar of Cockburn,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad ann. 1425. son of George earl of March, by whom he had se­veral sons.

1. David, who died before his father, without issue.

2. Alexander, his successor, whose male­line is also extinct.

3. Walter Lindsay of Edzell,Ibid. and M. S. hist. of the fa­mily of Craw­furd, penes comitem de Balcarras. ancestor of the present earl of Balcarras, who is now the undoubted heir-male of the most noble and antient earls of Crawfurd.

From this Walter therefore we deduce the descent of this noble family.Extracted from the writs of the family by Mr. Hary Malcolm, a learned anti­quary.

XII. WALTER LINDSAY of Edzell, third son of Alexander second earl of Crawfurd, was a man of great parts and sagacity. He was tutor in law to his nephew David earl of Crawfurd and duke of Montrose. He pur­chased the lands of Aird in 1458,Chart. in the public regi­ster. and acquir­ed also the lands of Winthank, Pitcorthie, Panbride, &c. anno 1472.

He married, 1st, Sophia, daughter of—Li­vingston of Saltcoats, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Isabel daughter of Wil­liam lord Livingston, by whom he had a son and successor,

XIII. Sir DAVID LINDSAY, design'd of Edzell and Beaufort, who got charters, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Kilbride, and several others; and married, 1st, Catharine daughter of—Fotheringhame of Powrie, by whom he had a son,

Walter, M. S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd. his apparent heir;—and four daughters.

1. Margaret, married to Andrew Straiton of that ilk, or Lauriston.

2. Agnes, married to George Moray of Abercairnie.

3.—, married to sir Robert Menzies of Weem.

4.—, died unmarried.

Sir David married, 2dly, Agnes Ogilvie, widow of Alexander Straiton of Lauriston, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 3dly, Elizabeth daughter of —Spence of Bodum, by whom he had a son,

Sir Alexander Lindsay of Vainvy and Ke­thick; —and a daughter,

Janet, married to—Ramsay of Bana­bruck. He died in 1527.

XIV. WALTER,Ibidem. first son and apparent heir of sir David Lindsay of Edzell, a man of great spirit and fortitude, married—Er­skine, daughter of the laird of Dun, by whom he had four sons,—and two daughters.

1. Sir David of Edzell and Glenesk.

2. Alexander Lindsay, Keith's cata­logue of the Scotch bi­shops, p. 119. who married a daughter of—Barclay of Mathers, and was father of David bishop of Ross, who was father of sir Jerom Lindsay, lord lyon king at arms.

3. Robert Lindsay of Kirkton.

4. John Lindsay.

1st daughter—, married to sir— Scot of Balwearie.

2.—, married to—Anstruther of that ilk.

This Walter was killed at the fatal field of Flowdon,M. S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd. anno 1513, his father being then alive, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XV. Sir DAVID LINDSAY of Edzell and [Page 60] Glenesk, who succeeded also to his grandfa­ther, anno 1527, and made a great figure in the reign of king James V.Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1530 & 1550. He got charters, under the great seal, of the lands of Auchter­allan, Tulliehilt, Newpark, Auchtertyre, and several other lands and baronies; by which it appears he was then possessed of a vast estate.

He married,Chart. penes dom. Gray. 1st, Janet daughter of Pa­trick lord Gray, by whom he had no issue.

He married,M. S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd. 2dly, Catharine daughter of John Campbell of Calder, son of Archibald earl of Argyle, by whom he had five sons, —and two daughters.

1. Sir David, his heir.

2. Mr. John Lindsay, ancestor of the earl of Balcarras, of whom afterwards.

3. Robert Lindsay of Bath-hall.

4. Sir Walter Lindsay of Balgay, who was killed by David earl of Crawfurd in 1605.

5. Mr. James Lindsay, parson of Fetter­cairn.

1st daughter, Elizabeth, married to Pa­trick lord Drummond, ancestor of the fami­ly of Perth.

2. Margaret, Stuart's hist. of the royal family. married to John lord Inner­meath.

It is proper to observe here, that David earl of Crawfurd, who had been barbarously used by his sons, disponed the estate and ho­nours of Crawfurd to this sir David Lindsay of Edzell, his nearest heir-male. The dispo­sition is dated on 20th December 1541. The earl died in 1542, and sir David succeeded to the estate and honours of Crawfurd accord­ingly; but he afterwards conveyed them back to the master of Crawfurd, the earl's grand­son, upon this express condition, that the title and estate should return to the family of Edzell,Mackenzie. M. S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd, and Craw­furd's peerage p. 85. as next heir-male, failing the male-line of the said master; and at the same time re­serving to himself, for his life only, the title, and such a provision as supported him accord­ing to his quality.

This David, lord of Edzell and earl of Crawfurd, died in September 1558, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVI. Sir DAVID LINDSAY of Edzell and Glenesk,Chart. in pub. archiv. who got a charter from king James VI. of the lands of Edzell and others, dated in 1586.

Also a charter of the lands of Garlobank and others,Ibidem. in vicecomitatu de Forfar, wherein he is design'd, David dominus de Edzell, miles, &c. He got charters of several other lands, too numerous to be here inserted.

He married, 1st, lady Helen Lindsay, daugh­ter of David earl of Crawfurd, by whom he had two sons,—and four daughters.

1. David of Edzell.

2. Alexander of Canterland, whose son John succeeded to the estate of Edzell.

1st daughter, Helen, married, 1st, to— Melvil of Baldowie, 2dly, to Andrew Ar­buthnot of Feddes, brother to Robert viscount Arbuthnot.

2.—, married to—Symmer of Bratinstut.

3.—married to Mr. Lambie.

4. Margaret, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to sir David Carnegie of Coluthie, ancestor of the earl of Southesk.

Sir David married for his second wife Isa­bel, daughter of lord Forbes, but by her he had no issue.

He was a man of good parts and learning, and was made one of the senators bf the college of justice, upon his brother Mr. John's resig­nation, who was then made secretary of state.

He died anno 1620, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVII. Sir DAVID LINDSAY of Edzell and Glenesk,Ibidem. who got a charter of the lands of Waterston, &c. in his father's lifetime, and married Margaret daughter of sir—Wi­shart of Pittarrow, by whom he had a son,

Alexander,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to James Keith of Ben­holm, son of George fifth earl Marishall, to whom she had two daughters; 1. Elizabeth, married to Sir Archibald Primrose of Dalme­ny, ancestor of the earl of Roseberry; 2. Anne, married to Patrick Smith of Braco, grandfa­ther to David Smith now of Methven, Esq;

Alexander, only son and apparent heir of sir David,M S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd. died in 1638, having married lady Anne, daughter of David earl of Wemyss, by whom he had only one child, who died with­out issue.

And sir David dying in 1648, without any surviving male-issue, was succeeded by his nephew John, son of Alexander of Canter­land, before-mentioned, to whom we now return.

XVII. ALEXANDER LINDSAY of Can­terland, second son of Sir David Lindsay of Edzell and Glenesk,Chart. in pub. archiv. who got a charter from King James VI. of the lands of Canterland and others,Ibidem. married Helen daughter of— Haldane of Gleneagles, by whom he had a son,

XVIII. JOHN LINDSAY of Edzell and Glenesk,Ibidem. who succeeded to his uncle sir Da­vid, as before observed, and was served and re­toured heir to him anno 1648.

He ought also to have succeeded to Ludovic thirteenth earl of Crawfurd,Ibid. and M. S. hist. of the fa­mily of Craw­furd. being his undoubt­ed heir-male, but was deprived of these honours [Page 61] for reasons mentioned at large under the Title, Earl of Crawfurd.

He married,Chart. in pub. archiv. and M. S. hist. of the family of Crawfurd. 1st, lady Jean Carnegie, daugh­ter of John earl of Northesk, by whom he had two sons,—and one daughter.

1. David, his heir.

2. Capt. John Lindsay, who was a great loyalist, and adhered firmly to the interest of the royal family, for which he suffered great­ly. He died without issue.

His daughter was married to—M'In­tosh of that ilk, and had issue.

He married, 2dly, Jean daughter of Alexan­der lord Spynie, by whom he had no chldren.

He was succceded by his eldest son,

XIX. DAVID LINDSAY of Edzell, who, in the second parliament of king James VII. claimed the honours of Crawfurd, as heir­male to Ludovic the thirteenth earl, but his claim was dismissed, though the reasons do not appear on record.Memoirs pe­nes comitem de Balcarras. The family of Balcar­ras alledge, that the duke of Queensberry, then commissioner, put the negative without in­structions, but upon what authority we cannot pretend to say.

He married Agnes only daughter of James brother-german of—Graham of Fintry,M. S. hist. of the family. by whom he had three sons,—and one daughter.

1. David, his heir.

2. John. Both died without issue.

3. James. Both died without issue.

His daughter Margaret married Alexan­der Watson of Atherny, and had issue.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XX. DAVID LINDSAY of Edzell, who likeways dying without issue, anno 1744, in him ended the male-line of the eldest son of sir David Lindsay of Edzell and Glenesk, No. XV. of this genealogy. And the earl of Balcarras, next heir-male, being lineally de­scended of the second son of the said Sir Da­vid, to him we now return.

XVI. Mr. JOHN LINDSAY, second son of the said sir David Lindsay of Edzell and Glenesk, was a man of parts and learning. He acquired great knowledge in the laws, and was made one of the senators of the college of justice in 1584; and being in great favour with king James VI.Spottiswood's history, and Crawfurd's peerage. was made lord privy-seal in 1595, one of the commissioners of the treasury, and secretary of state, in 1596; upon which he resigned his lord of session's place in favours of his brother sir David, as before noticed. He was also one of the eight magnates Scotiae who were appointed by the king for the government of the nation, and were called Octavians.

He acquired the estate of Balcarras (which is still the chief seat of the family) upon which,Chart. in pub. archiv. he got a charter from king James VI. anno 1591.

This great man married Margaret, daugh­ter of Alexander Guthry, widow of lord Borth­wick of Lochkill, king's advocate, by whom he had a son,

Sir David,—and three daughters.

1. Catharine, married, 1st, to sir John Lindsay of Woodhead,Chart. in pub. archiv. ann. 1577 & 1596. or Ballinsho, third son of David earl of Crawfurd by Margaret Be­thune, by whom she had colonel Henry Lind­say, who died at Hamburgh in 1639 without issue.—She married, 2dly, John Brown of Fordel, in vicecom. de Perth.

2. Janet, married to David Auchmoutie of that ilk, and was mother of sir David, and of a daughter,—married to—Kin­near of that ilk.

3. Margaret, married to sir John Strachan of Thornton.

He died of the stone on the 3d Septem­ber 1598, and was succeeded by his only son,

XVII. Sir DAVID LINDSAY of Balcar­ras, who got from king James VI. a charter, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Balcarras, Boswel, Pitcorthy, Innerdivote, Balmakine, Cumberlands, &c. He was a man of great learning, and employed much of his time in the study of the arts and sciences, particularly that of chymistry, in which he excelled most of his cotemporaries.

He was in great favour with king Charles I. who raised him to the dignity of the peer­age by the title of lord Lindsay of Balcarras,Chart. in the public regi­ster. by letters patent, dated 27th June 1633. He was a great loyalist, and adhered always to the interest of the royal family with firm­ness and integrity.

He married lady Sophia Seton, daughter of Alexander earl of Dumsermline, by whom he had a son,

Alexander,—and two daughters.

1. Sophia, married to sir Robert Moray, justice clerk in king Charles II.'s reign.

2. Isabel, married to Thomas Boyd of Pink­hill.

He died in 1641, and was succeeded by his son,

XVIII. ALEXANDER, second lord Balcar­ras, who was a man of great abilities, singular prudence, and loyalty, and remarkable for his steady adherence to the royal family. He act­ed a principal part in all the great affairs of state during the time of the civil war. He was created earl of Balcarras, for his great loy­alty and eminent services, &c. 9th January, [Page 62] anno 1651,Chart. in pub. archiv. haered. masculis, tal­liae vel pro­visionis. by patent, to his heirs-male, of tailzie, and provision, &c.

He was made heretable governor of the castle of Edinburgh, secretary of state, and commissioner to the general assembly; and per­sisting in his loyalty went abroad after the king, and died in Holland on the 30th August 1659.

He left issue,M. S. hist of the family; & Crawfurd's Peerage. by his wife lady Anne M'Ken­zie, daughter of Colin earl of Seaforth, two sons and two daughters.

1. Charles, both earls of Balcarras.

2. Colin, both earls of Balcarras.

1. Daughter, lady Sophia, married to co­lonel Charles Campbell, son of Archibald earl of Argyle.

2. Lady Henriet, married to Sir James Campbell of Auchinbrcck.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

CHARLES, second earl of Balcarras, who dying unmarried in 1662, was succeedcd by his brother,

XIX. COLIN, third earl of Balcarras, who was an ingenious man, of great affability, and polite behaviour.

Soon after the restoration, he had a troop of an hundred gentlemen given him, was made one of the lords of the treasury, and had a pension of 1000 l. a-year for life.

He was highly esteemed, both by king Charles II. and king James VII. and was one of the privy-council to both these princes.

After the revolution, he lived several years abroad, where he employed most of his time in improving his mind by conversing with the learned; and then returned to his own coun­try, where he lived many years in a hospi­table manner at his house of Balcarras in Fife.

He married,Ibidem. 1st, Margaret, daughter of Lewis de Nassau, lord Beverwart in Holland, who died of her first child.—He married, 2dly, lady Jean Carnegie, daughter of David earl of Northesk, by whom he had a daugh­ter,

Lady Anne, married to Alexander earl of Kellie.

He married, 3dly, lady Jean Ker, daugh­ter of William earl of Roxburgh, by whom he had a son,

Colin, lord Cumberland, who died unmar­ried,—and a daughter,

Lady Margaret, married to John earl of Wigtoun.

He married, 4thly, lady Margaret Camp­bell, daughter of James earl of London, by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

1. Alexander, both earls of Balcarras.

2. James, both earls of Balcarras.

1. Daughter, lady Eleanor, married to James Fraser, Esq; brother of the lord Sal­ton.

2. Lady Elizabeth, died unmarried.

He died in 1722, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XX. ALEXANDER, fourth earl of Bal­carras, who was possessed of many good quali­ties. He was a man of stanch honour, great generosity, universal benevolence and sincere friendship, which qualities acquired him the general love and esteem of mankind.

In 1734, he was elected one of the sixteen peers to sit in the British parliament, and was a lieutenant-colonel in the army.

He married a daughter of David Scot of Scotstarvit, but died without issue in 1746. He was succeeded by his brother,

XX. JAMES, now earl of Balcarras, who, like many of his noble ancestors, was em­ployed in his country's service both by sea and land for many years, and always acquit­ed himself with honour and reputation; but is now retired to a country life at his beautiful seat of Balcarras, which he has greatly improved with fine inclosures, plant­ing, &c.

He married miss Anne Dalrymple, daugh­ter of sir Robert, who was son of sir Hugh, lord president of the session, by whom he hath a numerous issue.

1. Alexander, lord Cumberland,

2. Robert.

3. Colin.

4. James.

5. William.

6. Charles.

1. Daughter, lady Anne.

2. Lady Margaret.

CHIEF SEAT.

At Balcarras in Fife, six miles south of St. Andrews, and twelve miles east from King­horn.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gules, a fess cheque, argent and azure, for Lindsay: 2d and 3d, or, a lion rampant, gules, surmoun­ted of a ribbon, sable, within a border, a­zure, for Abernethy, charged with stars, or.

SUPPORTERS; two lions sejant, guard­ant, gules, each having a collar, azure, charged with three stars, or.

CREST; on a wreath, a tent proper.

MOTTO; Astra, castra, numen, lumen.

BALLENDEN Lord BALLENDEN.

THIS sirname appears to be local, and to have been first assumed by the proprie­tors of the lands of Ballenden in the shire of Selkirk.

The immediate ancestor of this noble fa­mily was,

I. PATRICK BALLENDEN, who got the lands of Auchinoule from John earl of Morton;Chart. in pub. archiv. upon which he got a charter from king James IV. to him and Maryota Douglas his spouse, their heirs, &c. dated 20th March 1499.

By the said Maryota Douglas he left issue a son,

Thomas, his heir,—and a daughter,

Catharine Ballenden, married to Oliver Sin­clair of Pitcairns, general to king James V. at the unfortunate battle of Solway. This mar­riage appears from a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, to Oliver Sinclair, and Catharine Ballen­den his spouse, dated anno 1537.

II. THOMAS BALLENDEN of Auchinoule succeeded his father,List of the of­ficers of state, in the lawiers library, Edin­burgh; and Nisbet, vol. I. p. 334. and being a man of parts, was in great favour with king James V. who appointed him director of chancery, and lord­justice-clerk, anno 1541.

He left issue two sons.

1. Sir John.

2. Patrick Ballenden of Stenhouse, sheriff of Orkney, designed brother-german of Sir John Ballenden justice-clerk,Chart. in pub. archiv. in two char­ters, under the great seal, dated in 1568 and 1577.

Thomas dying anno 1546, was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. Sir JOHN BALLENDEN of Auchinoule, who had his father's office of lord-justice-clerk conferred upon him,Nisbet, vol. I. p. 334, and Crawfurd's peerage. which he enjoyed above 20 years, in the reigns of queen Mary and king James VI.

He got a charter, under the great seal, of several lands,Chart. in pub. archiv. domino Johanni Ballenden de Auchinoule militi, justiciariae clerico, &c. an­no 1577.

He married, 1st, Barbara daughter of sir Hugh Kennedy of Girvan-mains, by whom he had two sons.

1. Sir Lewis.

2. Adam Ballenden, Keith's cata­logue of bi­shops, p. 79. doctor of divinity, and bishop, first of Dumblain, then of Aberdeen.

He married, 2dly, Janet daughter of— Seton of Touch,Chart. in pub. archiv. and got two charters, un­der the great seal, to him, and Janet Seton his spouse, dated anno 1574.

By her he had issue three daughters.

1. Elizabeth, married,Chart. in pub. archiv. 1st, to sir James Lawson of Humbie; 2dly, to sir John Cock­burn of Ormistoun, lord-justice-clerk.

2. Margaret, Stewart's hist. of the royal family, p. 190, 191. married to William Stewart writer in Edinburgh, and was mother of sir Lewis Stewart of Kirkhill.

3. Marion, married to John Ramsay of Dalhousie.

Sir John was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. Sir LEWIS BALLENDEN of Auchi­noule,List of the lords of ses­sion in the lawiers libra­ry, Edin­burgh. who being a man of great knowledge in the laws, was appointed one of the senators of the college of justice, also lord-justice-clerk, anno 1584.

He got charters from king James VI. of a great many lands,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1578 & 1587. wherein he is designed, Dominus Ludovicus Ballenden de Auchinoule, mi­les, clericus justiciarie, &c. &c.

He got also two charters of the parks,Ibidem. woods, and the keeping of the palace of Lin­lithgow, in 1587 and 1590.

He married Margaret daughter of William lord Livingston, by whom he had a son,

Sir James, his heir,—and one daughter,

Maryota, married to Patrick Murray of Fallahill, ancestor of Philiphaugh, which ap­pears by a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, to them, dated 14th July 1598.

Sir Lewis died anno 1591, and was succeed­ed by his son,

V. Sir JAMES BALLENDEN, who, in his father's lifetime, was designed by the title of Broughton,Ibidem. and got a charter, under the great seal, of Magdalen's lands, lying near Linlithgow, ‘"Jacobo Ballenden de Broughton, filio & haredi apparenti domini Ludovici Ballenden de Auchinoule, &c."’ dated anno 1589.

He married Margaret daughter of sir Wil­liam Ker of Cessford, sister of Robert first earl of Roxburgh, by whom he had a son and heir,

Sir William,—and one daughter,

Margaret, married to Henry lord Cardross, ancestor of the earl of Buchan.

He died in November 1606, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

VI. Sir WILLIAM BALLENDEN of Brough­ton and Auchinoule, who was a man of good parts, and of great honour and integrity. He adhered firmly to the royal family during all the time of the civil war; wherefore king [Page 64] Charles II. in consideration of his great loy­alty and faithful services, raised him to the dignity of the peerage,Chart. in pub. archiv. Hae­redumque su­orum mascu­lorum &c. by the title of lord Ballenden of Broughton, by letters patent, dated 10th June 1661, to his heirs-male.

He was appointed heretable usher to the exchequer in Scotland,Chart. in can­cellaria. Hae­redibus & as­signatis qui­buscunque. by a charter, under the great seal, to him, his heirs, or assignies whatever, dated 12th December 1663.

He was also nominated one of the lords of the privy-council, and treasurer-depute.

He never married, but, with consent of the crown, made a resignation of his estate and honours in favours of his cousin, John Ker, fourth son of William earl of Roxburgh, whereby he became obliged to carry the name and arms of Ballenden.

He died anno 1670, and was accordingly succeeded by his said cousin,

VII. JOHN, second lord Ballenden, and heretable usher of exchequer, who married lady Mary More, widow of William earl of Dalhousie, and daughter of Henry earl of Drogheda in Ireland, by Alice his wife, daughter of William lord Spencer in Eng­land, by whom he had five sons,—and four daughters.

1. John master of Ballenden, his heir.

2. Ker, who succceded his brother.

3. Robert.

4. William.

5. Sir Henry, appointed gentleman usher to the house of lords.

1st daughter, Margaret, died unmarried.

2.—, married to Ephraim Miller of Hertingforbury, Esq;

3. Mary, married to the honourable John Campbell of Mammore, Esq; now duke of Ar­gyle.

4. Diana, married to John Bulteel of Fleet in Devonshire, Esq;

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. JOHN third lord Ballenden, and he­reditary usher of exchequer, who dying with­out issue, at his seat in Hertfordshire, anno 1741, his estate and honours devolved upon his brother,

VIII. KER fourth lord Ballenden, and he­reditary usher of exchequer, who was an offi­cer in the royal navy, and, anno 1750, mar­ried a daughter of Mr. George Campbell storekeeper at Woolwich, by whom he had a son and successor,

IX. JOHN fifth lord Ballenden, hereditary usher of exchequer, &c. &c.

ARMS.

Gules, a hart's head couped, attired with ten tynes, between three cross croslets fitchy, or, all within a double tressure, counter-flow­er'd with flower-de-lisses of the last.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter side, a lady holding in her right hand a sword erect, and a pair of scales pendant, both proper; on the sinister, another such lady holding in her left hand a branch of palm.

MOTTO; Sic itur ad astra.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Broughton-house in Mid-Lothian, and —in Hertfordshire, &c.

ELPHINGSTON Lord BALMERINO.

THE immediate ancestor of this noble family was son of

ROBERT, third lord Elphingston, who married Elizabeth, daughter of sir John Drummond of Innerpessry, by whom he had three sons.

1. Alexander, his successor.

2. George, rector of the Scotch college at Rome.

3. Sir James, the first of the family of Balmerino.

I. Sir JAMES ELPHINGSTON, third son of Robert third lord Elphingston, designed of Barnton, was a man of great parts and a­bilities, and highly esteemed by king James VI. who constituted him one of the senators of the college of justice,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1586, one of the lords of the treasury, then called Octa­vians, anno 1595, secretary of state in 1598, and lord president of the session soon there­after; in all which high offices he acquitted himself with great integrity, judgment, and sufficiency.

He was also appointed one of the commis­sioners to treat of an union with England, which at that time took no effect.

King James, in consideration of his faith­ful services and great merit, was pleased to erect the lands, belonging to the abbacy of Balmerino, into a temporal lordship and ba­rony, in favours of sir James Elphingston of Barnton, knight, secretary of state, one of the [Page 65] lords of secret council, and senator of the col­lege of justice,Chart. in pub. archiv. haere­dibus mascu­lis, talliae & provisionis. and raised him to the dignity of the peerage, by the title of lord Balmerino, to him, and his heirs-male, tailzie, and pro­vision, by a charter, under the great seal, dat­ed the 20th of February 1603.

He was possessed of a great estate, which appears from no less than nine charters under the great seal,Ib. inter 1661 & 1609. in the public registers; parti­cularly he purchased from Robert Logan of Restalrig the lands and barony of Restalrig, anno 1604, upon which lands he got a char­ter, under the great seal, Jacobo domino de Balmerinoch, Ibid. ad annum 1605. terrarum baroniae de Restalrig, dated 16th May 1605.

This circumstance of the purchase of the ba­rony of Restalrig, evidently disproves a story, which has long prevailed with many, that Lo­gan was forfeited by the king, after he was dead, for the immediate purpose of bestowing his lands on his favourite secretary Balmeri­no; Logan was not forfeited till the 24th June 1609: 'Tis plain from the above char­ter, that Balmerino purchased these lands at least four years before, and it may be further observed, that tho' Logan had once a good estate, he appears to have been denuded of all, and entirely bankrupt some years before his death. For,

His lands of Mount Lothan and Nether Go­gar, were purchased by Andrew Logan of Coatfield, anno 1596.

His lands of Fastcastle, and others in the shire of Berwick, were acquired by Archi­bald Douglas of Pittendreich, anno 1602.

His lands of Restalrig, by lord Balmerino, in 1604, as before observed.

And his lands of Quarrelholes, &c. in 1605.Ibidem. All which is fully instructed by char­ters under the great seal, &c.

We now return to James lord Balmerino, who married,Ib. ad annum 1592. 1st, Clara, daughter of sir John Menteith of Carse, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of Hugh Maxwel of Tealing, by whom he had a son,

James, lord Coupar, (vide Title, Coupar.) and two daughters.

1. Anne, married to Andrew lord Fraser.

2. Mary, married to John Hamilton of Blair.

He died anno 1612, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. JOHN, second lord Balmerino, who, betwixt 1612 and 1616,Ibidem. got charters, under the great seal, of his lands of Balmerino, Rest­alrig, and many others.

He was likewise a man of great parts and learning. At the beginning of the civil wars, he was on the parliament's side but he no sooner observed them making too great en­croachments upon the royal prerogative, than he joined the king's party, and continued stea­dy in his majesty's interest till his death.

He married Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Ker of Fernyhurst, sister to Andrew lord Jed­burgh and Robert earl of Somerset, by whom he had a son and successor,

III. JOHN, third lord Balmerino, who married Margaret, daughter of John earl of Loudon, by whom he had a son,

John, his successor

He died anno 1704.

IV. JOHN, fourth lord Balmerino, was a man of eminent parts, great capacity, and a true lover of his country.

At the parliament 1706, he opposed the union with all his interest; however, some years after it was concluded, he was elected one of the sixteen peers to represent Scot­land in the British parliaments, called to meet anno 1710 and 1713, and was made general of the mint and sheriff of Edinburgh.

He married, 1st, lady Christian Montgo­mery, daughter of Hugh earl of Eglington, by whom he had two sons, and two daughters,

1. Hugh, master of Balmerino, who was kil­led at the siege of Lisle in 1708, without issue.

2. James, afterwards lord Balmerino.

1st daughter, Margaret, married to sir John Preston of Prestonhall, and had issue a son, and a daughter.

2. Jean, married to Francis earl of Murray, and was mother of James now earl of Murray.

He married, 2dly, Anne daughter of Dr. Arthur Ross, archbishop of St. Andrews, by whom he had two sons, and one daughter.

1. Arthur, afterward lord Balmerino.

2. Alexander Elphingston, died unmarried.

His daughter,—, died also without issue.

This worthy lord died in 1736, and was succeeded by his son,

V. JAMES fifth lord Balmerino, a man of great worth, honour, and integrity. He was one of the senators of the college of justice, and always behaved with judgment and im­partiality.

He married lady Betty Carnegie, daughter of David carl of Northesk, but died without issue, and was succeeded by his brother,

V. ARTHUR, sixth lord Balmerino, a man of great honour, courage, and intrepidity. He was bred to the army, and, in the queen's time, was captain of a company of foot.

[Page 66] In 1745 he engaged in the rebellion, and, after the battle of Culloden, was taken priso­ner, carried to London, tried before the house of lords, found guilty of high treason, condemned, and beheaded on Towerhill the 18th of August 1746, in the fifty-eight year of his age, where he behaved with uncom­mon constancy and resolution.

As this lord's behaviour was magnanimous and great, during his confinement, and at his execution, we shall take the liberty here to insert a few passages from a paper published, by the authority of the sheriff of London, af­ter his death.

A little before he was carried to Towerhill, he demanded an interview with lord Kilmar­nock, who was in the same unhappy situation with himself, which was granted: After it was ended, the two lords saluted one another, and Balmerino ‘"bid lord Kilmarnock an eternal happy adieu, and, with a chearful counte­nance, added, My dear lord, I wish I could alone pay the reckoning, and suffer for us both, &c."’

During the time the scaffold was putting in order for the execution of lord Balmerino, the sheriff, that attended at the first exe­cution, went to Balmerino's apartments, as a notice to his lordship that his time was come; upon whose entrance his lordship said, ‘"I sup­pose lord Kilmarnock is no more;"’ and hav­ing asked how the executioner performed his duty; upon receiving the account, said, ‘"Then it was well done; and now, gentlemen, said his lordship, I will detain you no longer, for I desire not to protract my life."’ He then saluted the company, in a manner so chearful, as drew tears from every eye but his own, and hastened to the scaffold.

But before we view his lordship on the scaffold, 'tis but just to the memory of that great, but unhappy man, to acquaint the pu­blic what was his deportment in his retire­ment here: 'Twas graceful, without affecta­tion; chearful, but not presumptuous: He conversed freely with his friends, twice re­freshed himself with a bit of bread and a glass of wine, and desired the company to drink to him, Ain degrae ta haiven; but, above all, he called frequently upon God, and seemed both willing and prepared to die.

When he mounted the scaffold, he did it with so undaunted a step, as surprised every spectator that was unacquainted with the greatness of his soul.

He walked round the scaffold, bowed to the people, read the following inscription on his coffin: Arthurus dominus de Balmerino, de­collatus 18 die Augusti 1746, aetatis suae 58; said it was right, and, with seeming plea­sure, looked on the block, which he called his pillow of rest.

He then called for the executioner, who, being introduced to him, was about to ask his forgiveness; but my lord stopt him, and said, ‘"Friend, you need not ask me forgive­ness, the execution of your duty is com­mendable;"’ then presenting the executio­ner with three guineas, said, ‘"Friend, I never had much money; this is all I have; I wish it was more for your sake, and am sorry I can add nothing else to it but my coat and waistcoat,"’ which he instantly took off, and placed on his coffin for the executioner. Hav­ing prepared himself for the block, he took his last farewel of them; and, having once more taken a view of the great number of spectators, his lordship said, ‘"I am afraid there are some who may think my behavi­our bold;"’ and, speaking to a gentleman near him, added, ‘"Remember, sir, what I tell you; it arises from a confidence in God, and a clear conscience."’

Then observing the executioner with the ax in his hand, took it from him, and having felt the edge, return'd it him again, at the same time showing him where to strike the blow, and animating him to do it with resolution, ‘"For in that, friend, said he, will consist your mercy."’

His lordship then, with the same surprising countenance, kneeled down at the block, and having, with his arms extended, said this short prayer, ‘"O Lord, reward my friends, forgive my enemies, and receive my soul,"’ sub­mitted, and gave the signal to the executioner.

He married a daughter of Capt. Chalmers, by whom he had no issue, whereby the male-line of this family is extinct.

ARMS.

A cheveron, sable, charged with three buckles, argent, betwixt three boars heads, erased gules.

CREST; a dove, argent, with a snake proper linked about its legs.

MOTTO; Prudentia fraudis nescia.

SUPPORTERS; two grissins proper beak'd, and armed, or.

OGILVIE Lord BANFF.

THIS branch of the noble family of Fin­later is descended from

Sir WALTER OGILVIE of Finlater and Deskford, who flourished in the reign of king James II. and left issue two sons.

1. Sir James, his successor.

2. Sir Walter Ogilvie of Boyn.

This sir Walter married Margaret,Chart. in ar­chiv. Jacobi [...]3tii. daugh­ter of sir James Edmonstone of that ilk, by whom he had two sons.

1. Sir George, ancestor of the Ogilvies of Boyn, Rothemay, &c.

2. Sir Walter, progenitor of the family of Banff.

I. Sir WALTER OGILVIE, second son of sir Walter of Boyn, was promiscuously de­signed by the titles of Dunlugus and Banff.

In a charter granted to him by George earl of Huntly, of the lands of Auchannachie, in the forestry of Boyn,Haddington's collections in the lawyer's library, Edr. p. 262. he is designed Walte­rus Ogilvie de Banff, armiger noster, &c. an­no 1491; which charter is confirmed by king James IV. 3d December, anno 1495.

He got also charters, under the great seal, Waltero Ogilvie de Dunlugus, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1520 & 1530. of the lands of Dunlugus, Castleton, Baldony, Blacklaw, and many others.

He married Alison, daughter and co-heiress of sir Patrick Home of Fastcastle, by whom he got a considerable estate, and had issue two sons and one daughter.

1. Sir George, his heir.

2. Walter, who got part of the lands of Dunlugus from his father,Ibidem. by a charter, under the great seal, Waltero, filio Walteri de Dun­lugus, &c.

His daughter,Lives of the officers of state. Magdalene, married to sir A­lexander Fraser of Philorth.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. Sir GEORGE OGILVIE of Dunlugus, who,Chart. in pub. archiv. in his father's lifetime, got charters, under the great seal, of half of the barony of Dunlugus, and several other lands. He got likewise a charter from king James VI.Ibidem. ter­rarum de Lee, mains de Boyne, cum molendi­no, &c. anno 1577.

Also a charter, dimidietat. terrarum de Ord­newton &. Auldtown de Ord, Chancelton, Kil­ragonie, Boighead, Ibidem. &c. anno 1579, about which time he had the honour of knighthood conferred upon him,Ibidem. and got a charter, Geor­gio Ogilvie de Dunlugus, militi, terrarum ba­roniae de Carnousie, &c. anno 1580.

He got charters,Ibidem. under the great seal, of many other lands and baronies, too numerous to be here inserted.

He married Beatrix,Nisbet, vol. I. p. 239. & 302. daughter of George lord Seton, ancestor of the earl of Winton, by whom he had two sons and one daugh­ter.

1. Sir Walter, his heir.

2. George, Chart. in pub. archiv. who got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Car­nousie, &c.

His daughter, Janet, married to William Forbes of Tolquhon.

He lived to the uncommon age of an hun­dred and five years, died in 1612, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. Sir WALTER OGILVIE of Dunlugus, who,Ibidem. in his father's lifetime, got a charter of the lands of Alwith of Innerichtie, anno 1596.

He got also a charter, Waltero Ogilvie, fi­lio et haeredi apparenti Georgii de Dunlugus, di­midietat. terrarum dominicalium de Moncoffer, Dovany, &c. cum piscaria in aqua de Dovern' dated in 1609.

He married Helen, daughter of sir John Urquhart of Cromertie, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Sir George.

2. Walter, who got a charter, Waltero O­gilvie, filio Walteri, Ibidem. superioritatis firmae & di­oriae terrarum de Auchorsk, &c. dated anno 1613.

His daughter Beatrix married to sir Alex­ander Seton of Pitmedden.

He died before 1617, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. Sir GEORGE OGILVIE of Dunlugus, who got a charter from king James VI. Terrarum de Newtown & Auldtown de Ord, Ibidem. Chanceltoun, Kilragavin, Boighead & Budboig de Ord, cum molendino, &c. anno 1617.

He was created a baronet by king Charles I. on 10th July 1627; and that same year got a charter,Ib. ad annum 1627. under the great seal, Domino Georgia Ogilvie, baroneto de Banff, terrarum ba­roniae de Inchdrewr, &c. comprehending a great many other lands and baronies.

He was a man of singular good parts, a great loyalist, and of remarkable courage and intrepidity.

He was a firm and steady friend to king Charles I. never deserted his interest during all the time of the civil war, and signalized himself against the covenanters, on several oc­casions, particularly at the bridge of Dee in 1639, where the loyalists were commanded [Page 68] by Aboyne and Banff, and the covenanters by the earl of Montrose.

And it is observable, for the honour of this sir George, that he kept 2000 men together for the king in Aberdeenshire, for some time after the agreement in 1639,Burnet's hist. p. 143, 144. that Montrose got the command for the king.

And, for his eminent loyalty and many faithful services, his majesty was plcased to raise him to the dignity of the peerage, by the title of lord Ogilvie of Banff,Chart. in pub. archiv. Haere­dibus mascu­lis e corpore suo. by letters patent, to the heirs-male of his body, dated 31st August 1642.

After the murder of the king, he still per­sisted in his attachment to the royal family, and contributed all that was in his power to bring about a restoration, which he lived to see accomplished in 1660, and died in 1663. He married, 1st, Helen, daughter of sir Alex­ander Irvine of Drum, by whom he had one daughter,

Helen, married to James earl of Airly.

He married, 2dly, Mary daughter of sir Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, by whom he had a son,

George, his heir, and two daughters.

1. Mary, married to Walter Innes of Auch­luncart.

2.—, married to—Gordon of Badinscoth.

V. GEORGE, second lord Banff, succeed­ed, and was also a great loyalist. In his fa­ther's lifetime, he got a charter from king Charles I.Chart. in pub. archiv. Georgia Ogilvie juniori de Banff, of the lands and barony of Inchdrewr, com­prehending the lands of Laudlaw, &c. with the salmon-fishings on the water of Doveron, dated in 1626.

He married Agnes Falconer, daughter of Alexander lord Halkerton, by whom he had two sons and four daughters.

1. George, his heir.

2. Sir Alexander Ogilvie of Forglen, an­cestor of the present lord Banff, of whom af­terwards.

1st daughter, Agnes, married to Francis Gordon of Craig of Achindore.

2. Mary, married to John Forbes of Bal­fluig.

3. Helen, married to sir Robert Lauder of Bielmouth.

4. Janet, married to John Leith of Leith­hall, to whom she had John Leith of Leith­hall, Patrick, George of Blackhall, Laurence, and Anthony Leiths, and one daughter.—Vide the Baronage.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. GEORGE, third lord Banff, who mar­ried lady Jean Keith, daughter of William earl marishal, by whom he had a son and suc­cessor,

George,—and a daughter,

Mary, married to John Joice of Collonaird,

VII. GEORGE, fourth lord Banff, married Helen daughter of sir John Lauder of Foun­tainhall, baronet, one of the fenators of the college of justice, by whom he had two sons.

1. John George, his heir.

2. Alexander, who succeeded his brother.

VIII. JOHN GEORGE, fifth lord Banff, succeeded his father, and married Mary, daugh­ter of Capt. James Ogilvie, but died without issue, and was succeeded by his brother,

VIII. ALEXANDER, sixth lord Banff, who being bred to the sea, had the command of one of his majesty's ships of war, and did his country signal service in cruising on their ene­mies, protecting their trade, &c. but died also without issue, which ended the male line of the eldest son of George second lord Banff, whereby the estate and honours devolved upon his cousin Alexander, now lord Banff, grand­son of sir Alexander of Forglen, to whom we now return.

VI. Sir ALEXANDER OGILVIE of For­glen, second son of George second lord Banff, was created a knight baronet anno 1701, and was appointed one of the senators of the col­lege of justice anno 1706.

He married Mary daughter of sir John Al­lardice of that ilk, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.

1. George, married to Jean daughter of Patrick Meldrum of Laithers, but died with­out issue.

2. Alexander, father of the present lord Banff.

3. John.

4. Peter.

1st daughter, Agnes, married to sir Alex­ander Reid of Barra.

2. Mary, married to Andrew Hay of Mountblairic.

3. Helen, married to—Smollet, son and heir of sir James Smollet of Bonhill.

VII. ALEXANDER OGILVIE, design'd junior of Forglen, second son and apparent heir of sir Alexander of Forglen, married Jean Friend, daughter of squire Friend of Bellarichie of Ireland, by whom he had a son,

Alexander, now lord Banff,—and a daughter,

[Page 69] Alexander, junior of Forglen, died before his father, and was succeeded by his son,

VIII. ALEXANDER, who succeeded also to the honours of Banff, as before observed, and is the seventh lord.

He married Jean, daughter of William Nis­bet of Dirleton, Esq; by Jean, daughter of Mr. Robert Bennet advocate, by whom he hath issue three sons, and three daughters.

1. Alexander master of Banff.

2. William.

3. Archibald.

1. Daughter, Jane.

2. Sophia.

3. Janet.

ARMS.

Argent, a lion passant guardant, gules, crowned, or, for Ogilvie: 2d and 3d, ar­gent, three papingoes, vert, beak'd and mem­ber'd, gules, for Home of Fastcastle.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter, a man in armour with a target, all proper; and on the sinister, a lion rampant, gules.

CREST; a lion's head erased, gules.

MOTTO; Fideliter.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Inchdreur in the county of Banff, For­glen, &c.

HAMILTON Lord BARGENY.

THE first of the noble family of Bar­geny was,

I. Sir JOHN HAMILTON, a natural son of John,Chart. in pub. archiv. marquis of Hamilton, who was le­gitimate on 11th March 1600, and was first designed sir John Hamilton of Letrick, after­wards of Bargeny.

He got a liberal education, was a man of fine accomplishments, and acquired considerable estates in Carrick, particularly the lands and barony of Bargeny, which is still possessed by the family, and hath continued to be their chief title ever since.

He obtained,Ibidem. from king Charles I. charters of many lands, domino Johanni Hamilton, domi­no de Bargeny militi, &c. inter 1630 & 1635.

He got also a charter of the lands and barony of Cambusnethan,Ibidem. in which he is designed do­minus Johannes Hamilton de Bargeny, senior, &c. anno 1636.

He married a daughter of doctor Alexander Campbell, bishop of Brechin, by whom he had a son,

Sir John,—and four daughters.

1. Catharine, married to sir John Drum­mond of Machany.

2. Helen, married to sir James Somerville of Cambusnethan.

3.—, married to sir William Weir of Stonbyres.

4. Mary, married to Alexander Cleland of that ilk.

He died anno 1637, and was succeeded by his son,

II. Sir JOHN HAMILTON of Bargeny, a man of singular worth and merit. He was a great loyalist, and steady friend of king Charles I. dur­ing all the time of the civil war; wherefore, in reward of his great merit and faithful services,Charta, Hae­redibus mas­culise corpore suo, in archiv. familiae de Bargeny, ad ann. 1639. the king was pleased to create him a peer, by the title of lord Bargeny, anno 1639; the patent being to the heirs-male of his body.

In 1648, he put himself in arms, with o­ther loyalists, in order to rescue the king then a prisoner in the isle of Wight. And after the king's murder, he still persisted in his loy­alty to king Charles II.Act of indem­nity, printed in the appen. to the lives of the officers of state. on which account he suffered many hardships, and was particularly excepted out of Oliver Cromwel's act of in­demnity, anno 1654.

He married, 1st, lady Jean, daughter of William, marquis of Douglas, by whom he had a son,

William, his heir,—and five [...]

1. Margaret, married, 1st, to sir [...] Kennedy of Colzean: 2dly, to sir David [...] gilvie of Clova; and had issue to both.

2. Anne, married to sir Patrick Houston of that ilk, and had issue.

3. Grizel, who died unmarried.

4. Marjory, married to William Bailie of Lamington.

5. Catharine, married to William Cuning­hame of Enterkin, and had issue.

He married,Lodge's peer­age of Ire­land, vol. I. page 328. 2dly, lady Ulric More, daughter of Henry earl of Drogheda, widow of Henry Hamilton earl of Clanbrazil in Ireland, by whom he had no issue.

He was succeeded by his son,

III. WILLIAM, second lord Bargeny, who married lady Mary Cunninghame, daughter of William earl of Glencairn, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. John, master of Bargeny.

2. William, who succeeded his father. His daughter Nicholas, married to sir A­lexander Hope of Carse, and had issue.

[Page 70] IV. JOHN, master of Bargeny, first son and apparent heir of William the second lord, mar­ried a daughter of sir Robert Sinclair of Long-formacus, by whom he had no sons, and but one daughter,

Johanna, married to sir Robert Dalrymple of North Berwick, of whom more hereafter.

The master dying in his father's lifetime without male-issue, and the father (the se­cond lord) dying soon thereafter, his estate and honours devolved upon his second son,

IV. WILLIAM, third lord Bargeny, who married, 1st, a daughter of sir James Prim­rose of Carrington, by whom he had only one daughter,

Grizel, married to Thomas Buchan of Cairnburgh, advocate, by whom she had three daughters; 1. Mary; 2. Anne; 3. Ni­cholas.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of Robert Dundas of Arniston, one of the sena­tors of the college of justice, by whom he had a son and successor,

V. JAMES, fourth lord Bargeny, who dy­ing without issue, in him ended the male-line of the patentee's body, whereby the honours became extinct; but the estate, by a decision of the house of peers, went to John Dal­rymple, son of Johanna, daughter of John the master, preferable to sir Alexander Hope of Carse, who was son of Nicolas, daughter of William the second lord; and Mr. Buchan's daughters, whose mother Grizel was daughter of William, third lord Bargeny, as before ob­served.

The family of Bargeny being now repre­sented by John, son of the said Johanna, to [...]er we now return.

V. JOHANNA HAMILTON, only child of John master of Bargeny, eldest son of William the second lord, married sir Robert Dalrymple of North-Berwick, eldest son of sir Hew, lord president of the session, by whom she had three sons and two daughters.

1. Sir Hew, who succeeded his grandfa­ther in the estate of North-Berwick.

2. John, who, in right of his mother, got the estate of Bargeny, by a decree of the house of peers, as before noticed, upon which he was obliged to change his name to Hamilton.

3. Robert, a physician.

1st daughter, Marion, married to the ma­ster of Rae.

2. Elizabeth, married to William Duff of Crumbie, Esq;

VI. JOHN HAMILTON, Esq; now of Bargeny, son of Johanna, married lady Anne, daughter of James earl of Wemyss.

ARMS.

Quarterly; 1st and 4th, Hamilton: 2d and 3d, Arran; all within a bordure gabonated, argent and azure; the 1st charged with hearts, gules, and the 2d with mullets of the 1st.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter, an antelope, argent, collar'd, gules, charged with three cinque-foils, ermine; on the sinister, a sa­vage with a shoulder-belt, gules, charged with cinque-foils, ermine, and wreath'd about the head and middle with laurels, vert, holding in his left hand a garb, or.

CREST; a crescent, gules.

MOTTO; Je espere.

CHIEF SEAT.

At Bargeny in Carrick.

DOUGLAS Viscount of BELHAVEN.

THE first who enjoyed this title was sir ROBERT DOUGLAS of Spot, son of Malcolm Douglas of Mains, who was lineally descended of Nicol Douglas, a son of the fa­mily of Dalk [...]ith, in king Robert II.'s time.

This sir Robert, when a young man, was page of honour to prince Henry, son of king Charles I. Then he was made his master of horse. After the death of that excellent prince, he was constituted gentleman of the bed-chamber, master of the houshold, and one of the privy-council to king Charles I.

His majesty was likewise pleased, for his eminent loyalty and faithful services, to cre­ate him viscount of Belhaven,Chart. in pub. archiv. Hae­redibus mas­culis e corpor [...] suo. by letters pa­tent, dated 24th June 1633, to the heirs­male of his body.

He married Nicolas, daughter of sir Robert Moray of Abercairny, but dying without issue in January 1639, the honours became ex­tinct.

He was interred in the vestry of the Ab­bey church of Holyroodhouse, under a sine and stately monument, with an inscription, where­in most of his remarkable actions are mention­ed.—Vide Craw [...]urd's Peerage, p. 35.

HAMILTON Lord BELHAVEN.

THE immediate ancestor of this noble branch of the great and illustrious fa­mily of Hamilton was,

JAMES, first lord Hamilton, who flou­rished in the reigns of king James I. and II. was the seventh generation of that antient house, in a direct male-line, and married Ja­net, daughter of sir Alexander Livingston, an­cestor of the earls of Linlithgow, by whom he had issue several sons.

1. James, second lord Hamilton, his suc­cessor.

2. Andrew, of whom the family of Bel­haven is lineally descended.

I. ANDREW, second son of James, first lord Hamilton,M. S. hist. of this family, penes dom. Belhaven. acquired the lands of Broom­hill, which continued to be the chief title of the family till they were nobilitate.

He left issue three sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Robert, who carried on the line of this family.

3. James Hamilton of Greenhill.

He died about 1480, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. JOHN HAMILTON of Broomhill, who married a daughter of—Hamilton of Torrence,Writs of the family penes dom. Belha­ven. by whom he had only two daughters; and having no male-issue, dis­poned his estate to James, second lord Ha­milton, who generously gave it back to his brother,

II. ROBERT HAMILTON of Broomhill, second son of Andrew,Ibidem. who married Isabel, daughter of—Hamilton of Dalserf, by whom he had a son and successor,

III. JOHN HAMILTON of Broomhill, who married, 1st, Elizabeth, daughter of— Hamilton of Udston, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir.

He married,Ibidem. 2dly, Margaret, daughter of —Dalziel of that ilk, by whom he had another son,

Robert Hamilton of Alanshaw.

And dying about 1550, was succeded by his eldest son,

IV. JOHN, who got charters, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1555 & 1570. Johanni Hamilton de Broomhill ter­rarum ecclesiasticarum de Stenhouse, &c.

He married Anne daughter of—Ha­milton of Kilbrachmont,Chart. penes dom. Belha­ven. in vicecom. de Fife, by whom he had a son and successor,

V. Sir JAMES HAMILTON of Broomhill, who married a daughter of—Hamilton of Udston,Ibidem. by whom he had a son,

VI. Sir JOHN HAMILTON of Broomhill, who succeeded him; and being a man of fine parts, was in great favour and esteem with king Charles I.

He was a great loyalist, and adhered firmly to the king's interest during all the time of the civil war, for which his majesty was pleased to raise him to the dignity of the peerage,Chart. in pub. archiv. by the title of lord Belhaven and Stenton, by letters patent, dated 18th December 1647.

In July 1648, he marched into England with the Scotch army under the conduct of duke Hamilton, and behaved with the utmost resolution at Preston, where the Scots were routed, but he had the good fortune to escape, and got safe back to Scotland.

He married Margaret,Writs of the family of Bel­haven. natural daughter of James second marquis of Hamilton, by whom he had three daughters.

1. Margaret, married to sir Samuel Baillie of Lamington, and had issue.

2. Anne, who carried on the line of this family, of whom afterwards.

3. Elizabeth, married to Alexander first viscount of Kingston.

John, first lord Belhaven, having no male-issue, made a resignation of his estate and ho­nours, in the king's hands, in favours of his cousin, sir John Hamilton of Biel, who mar­ried his grandchild;Chart. in pub. archiv. [...]o­hanni Hamil­ton de Bi [...]l, militi, baro­netto, et haere­dibus mascu­lis quibus­cunque, &c. upon which he got a new patent and charter, under the great seal of king Charles II. ‘"to the said sir John, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his heirs-male whatsoever."’ The patent is dated at Whitehall, the 10th day of Feb­ruary 1675.

The lord Belhaven died anno 1679, and, according to the above-mentioned patent, his estate and honours devolved upon the said sir John, who being married to his grandchild by his daughter Anne, to her we now return.

VII. ANNE, second daughter of John first lord Belhaven, married sir Robert Hamil­ton of Silvertounhill, a cadet of his own fa­mily, by whom she had an only child,

VIII. MARGARET, married to the said sir John Hamilton of Biel, who, upon the [Page 72] death of the first lord, succeeded to his estate and honours as before observed.

John, second lord Belhaven, was eldest son and heir of sir Robert Hamilton of Pressmanan, one of the senators of the college of justice, descended from the family of Udston, whose lineal ancestor was Andrew Hamilton,Writs of the family of Bel­haven, and Nisbet, vol. I. page 176. third son of sir David lord of Cadzow, who flou­rished in the reigns of king Robert II. and III.

, This lord was a man of great honour, and integrity, and his behaviour in the parliaments 1681 and 1685 showed him to be a strenu­ous defender of the Pr [...]testant religion.

He was a great promoter of the revolution in 1688, and was very active, at the conven­tion of estates of Scotland, to get the crown settled upon the prince and princess of Orange, and had the command of a troop of horse in their service at the battle of Killiecrankie in 1689.

Upon the accession of king William and queen Mary to the crown, he was appointed one of their privy-council, and soon after one of the commissioners for executing the office of lord-register.

He was likewise, by queen Anne, consti­tuted one of the lords of her privy-council, and one of the commissioners of the treasury, all which offices he executed with honour and integrity.

In the parliament 1706, he strenuously opposed the union of the two kingdoms, con­ceiving it derogatory to the honour of his country.

Upon that great occasion he made several learned and [...]laborate speeches, which are still preserved, and show the uprightness of his heart, that nothing could prevail with him to concur with the court in a measure that he judged to be inconsistent with the interest and independency of his country, for which posterity do him the justice to celebrate his name with honour, as a patriot, as well as an orator.

He died soon thereafter, anno 1708, and, by the said Margaret Hamilton, left issue two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. James Hamilton, Esq; advocate, assist­ant solicitor to the two boards of customs and excise. This gentleman married Anne, daugh­ter of John Walkingshaw of that ilk, who died without issue in 1732.

John, second lord Belhaven, was succccd­ed by his eldest son,

IX. JOHN, third lord Belhaven, who was a man of good parts, great, worth and merit.

He was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scotland, anno 1715, and a lord of the bed-chamber to George then prince of Wales, afterwards king George II.

He had the command of a troop of horse, raised by the county of Haddington, in the time of the rebellion 1715, and served as a volunteer at the battle of Dumblain, where he gave distinguishing proofs of his valour and intrepidity.

In 1721 he was appointed governor of Bar­badoes, but unfortunately perished at sea, in the beginning of his voyage thither, in the Royal Anne galley, near the Lizard Point, where the ship having struck on the Stag rocks, about midnight, was staved in pieces, and, of two hundred and forty persons, only two men and a boy were saved, being drove ashore on pieces of the wreck.

He married Mary, daughter of Andrew Bruce, merchant in Edinburgh, a cadet o [...] the family of Earlshall, by whom. he had four sons and one daughter.

1. John, now lord Belhaven.

2. Andrew Hamilton, Esq; an officer in the army, who died unmarried.

3. James Hamilton, Esq; advocate, de­pute-sheriff of the county of Haddington, and assistant-solicitor to the boards of excise and customs.

4. Robert Hamilton, Esq; who, betaking himself to a military life, was a major in the expedition to America, under the late lord Cathcart, and died a batchelor soon after his return from Carthagena.

His daughter Margaret, was married to Alexander Baird, Esq; son to sir William Baird of Newbeath.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. JOHN, fourth lord Belhaven, who is high sheriff of the county of Haddington, ge­neral of the mint, and one of the commissio­ners and trustees appointed for the encourage­ment and improvement of trade, manufactures, and fisheries, in Scotland.

ARMS.

Gules, a sword erect; in pale, proper, the pommel and hilt, or, between three cinque-foils, argent.

CREST; on a wreath, a nag's head, coup­ed of the last, and bridled of the first.

SUPPORTERS; two horses, argent, bridled as the crest.

MOTTO; Ride through.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Biel, near Dunbar, in East-Lothian, and Pressmanan, in the same county.

HAY Lord BEWLIE, and Earl of CARLYLE.

THIS noble family deduces its origin from

PETER HAY of Megginch, who flourish­ed in the reign of king James V. and was descended of the house of Leys, one of the oldest cadets of the illustrious family of Errol.

He married Margaret,Lives of the officers of state, p. 157. daughter of— Crichton of Ruthven, by whom he had three sons and two daughters.

1. Patrick, his successor, who was father of George earl of Kinnoul, chancellor of Scot­land. —Vide Title Kinnoul.

2. Sir James of Kingask, the first of this family.

3. Edmund, a man of great knowledge and learning.Ibidem. He was professor of the civil and canon law, and rector of a college at Doway.

1. Daughter, Catharine, married, 1st, to Robert Moncur of Balumby: 2dly, to George Drummond of Blair.

2. Janet, Ibid. p. 158. married to sir Patrick Murray of Auchtertyre.

I. Sir JAMES HAY of Kingask, second son of Peter Hay of Megginch, being a man of great parts and learning, was highly esteem­ed by king James VI. from whom he got a charter of the lands of Grangemuir,Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. ly­ing in the shire of Edinburgh, and constabula­ry of Haddington; Jacobo Hay de Kingask, &c. dated 25th June 1606.

He got also a grant of the whole revenue of the priory of Bewlie,Ibidem. anno 1607, and was appointed one of the senators of the college of justice, and comptroller of Scotland, anno 1608; was made one of the lords of the pri­vy council, and raised to the dignity of the peerage by the title of lord Hay of Bewlie, anno 1609;Ibidem. all which appears by a charter, under the great seal of king James VI. grant­ed to Walter Danielston of Colgreen, cum consensu pradilecti consiliarii sui Jacobi domi­ni Bewlie computorum rotulatoris, &c. dated 6th April 1610.

He died in 1614, having married Marga­ret, daughter of John Murray of Polmais, by whom he had a son and successor,

II. JAMES, second lord Bewlie, who hav­ing got a liberal education, was a man of great accomplishments, both natural and acquired.

He was particularly distinguished and taken notice of by king James VI. even when a young man, and accompanied that prince in­to England anno 1603, and afterward became a mighty favourite. In 1614, upon his father's death, he was made comptroller of Scotland.

In 1615,Peerage of England. he was created a peer of Eng­land, by the title of lord Hay of Souly, in the county of York. He was afterwards made earl of Carlyle, and viscount Doncaster, and was the first Scotsman that was dignified with English titles after James VI. became king of Great-Britain.

In 1618, he was appointed ambassador from the British court to the emperor Ferdinand II. and at his return into England, made report of Frederick count Palatine's being elected king of Bohemia, and of the state of affairs in those parts.Lives of the officers of state, p. 157.

He was twice ambassador extraordinary at the court of France; first, to negotiate, and then to compleat the marriage of king Charles I. with his royal consort princess Henrietta Maria, daughter of king Henry IV. In all which negotiations he acquitted himself, to the great satisfaction of his royal master,Ibid. and Ry­mer. Dug­dale's baro­nage of Eng­land, &c. who made him one of the lords of his bed-cham­ber, groom of the stole, master of the ward­robe, and knight of the most noble order of the garter.

He was also first gentleman of the bed-chamber to king Charles I. from whom he got a grant of the island of Barbadoes, which continued in the possession of the proprietary and his heirs above thirty years.

Anno 1661,Historical account of the British plantations in N. America, vol. I. p. 131. the crown purchased it of lord Kinnoul, heir to the earl of Carlyle, &c.

According to my lord Clarendon, he had got above four hundred thousand pounds in the government's service, all which he enjoy­ed, and spent most liberally.

He was particularly noted for his elegant and sumptuous way of living and entertain­ing.Account of the extinct peers of Eng­land, printed in 1711, vol. II. p. 54, pe­nes Macfar­lane. When in France, he spared ho cost to represent the wealth, and display the grandeur of the English nation; particularly, at one of his ante-suppers, an attendant eat for his own share a pye reckoned at 20 l. sterling.

He married, 1st, Honora, daughter and sole heiress of Edward baron Denny,Ibidem. by whom he had issue a son,

James, earl of Carlyle,—and a daugh­ter,

Lady Anne, who died young.

He married, 2dly, lady Lucia Percy, daugh­ter of Henry, earl of Northumberland, by whom he had a daughter,

Agnes, Lives of the officers of state, p. 157. married, 1st, to sir George Preston of Craig [...]iller; 2dly, to James earl of Glen­cairn, and had issue.

He died at Whitehall in 1636, was inter­red in St. Paul's cathedral, and succeeded by his son.

[Page 74] III. JAMES, second earl of Carlyle, and third lord Bewlie,Peerage of England, vol. I. p. 175. who married lady Margaret Rus­sel, daughter of Francis, earl of Bedford, and died without succession anno 1660, whereby all his titles of honour became extinct.

But that of Carlyle was conferred upon Charles Howard, descended of the most il­lustrious family of Norfolk, who was created baron Dacres of Gillisland,Ibid. vol. II. p. 407. viscount Howard of Morpeth, and earl of Carlyle, by letters patent, dated 20th April 1661.

STEWART Lord BLANTYRE.

AS this branch of the illustrious family of Stewart is sprung from the antient house of Garlies, whose lineal descent from Alex­ander, lord high steward of Scotland, is to be found under the title of Earl of Gallo­way, we shall begin to deduce the pedigree of this noble family from their immediate ancestor,

Sir ALEXANDER STEWART of Gar­lies and Dalswinton, the sixth generation in the account of Galloway, who was a man of dignity and rank, and knighted by king James II.

He married dam Euphame Graham, by whom he had three sons.

1. Sir Alexander, his successor, ancestor of the earl of Galloway.

2. Sir Thomas, of whom this family is lineally descended.

3. Sir Walter, of whom the earl of Bles­sington, the Stewarts of Shambully, and o­thers, are descended.

I. Sir THOMAS STEWART, second son of sir Alexander of Garlies, got from his fa­ther the lands of Minto and Marbottle,Chart. in pub. archiv. which is confirmed by a charter, under the great seal of king James III. dated anno 1476.

He married Isabel, daughter and co-heiress of sir Walter Stewart of Arthurlie, by whom he got large possessions in the shires of Ren­frew and Clydsdale; and got charters, under the great seal,Ibidem. of the lands of Busby, House­hill, and a great many others, to him and I­sabel Stewart, their heirs, &c. dated anno 1489.

By her he had issue two sons and three daughters.

1. Sir John, his heir.

2. William, who was bishop of Aberdeen, and treasurer of Scotland.

1st daughter, Agnes, married to John Stewart of Cardonald.

2. Marion, married to Adam Maxwell of Southbar, son of lord Maxwell.

3. Margaret, married to Charles Pollock of that ilk.

He died anno 1500, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. Sir JOHN STEWART of Minto, who got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of the lands of Busby and others, to him, and Ja­net Fleming his spouse, dated 23d February 1502.

He was a man of great resolution and forti­tude, and highly esteemed by king James IV. whom he accompanied to the field of Flow­don, where he lost his life with his royal ma­ster, anno 1513.

By the said Janet, daughter of David, son and apparent heir of Robert lord Fleming, he left issue a son and successor,

III. Sir ROBERT STEWART of Minto, who was provost of Glasgow anno 1525. He got a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, of the lands of Minto, Marbottle, &c. to him, and Janet Murray his spouse, anno 1529.

By the said Janet Murray (a daughter of the family of Polmais) he left issue four sons and one daughter.

1. Sir John.

2. Robert, prior of Whithorn.

3. Malcolm.

4. Walter.

His daughter, Elizabeth, married to John Maxwell of Calderwood.

He died anno 1554, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. Sir JOHN STEWART of Minto, who was served heir to his father,Retour pen [...]s dom. Blan­tyre. 20th May 1555. He assisted at the coronation of king James VI. anno 1576, was provost of the town of Glasgow, and had the command of the castle thereof.

He married,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 166. 1st, Janet Hepburn, a daugh­ter of the family of Bothwel, by whom he had a son,

Sir Matheio, his successor, whose male-line is now extinct.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of sir James Stew­art of Cardonald,Ibidem. descended of the illustri­ous [Page 75] house of Lennox, by whom he had one son,

Walter, who carried on the line of this family,—and four daughters.

1. Janet, married to sir Archibald Stew­art of Castlemilk.

2. Agnes, married to John Wallace of Achans and Dundonald.

3. Marion, married to William Cleland of that ilk.

4.—married to Alexander Baillie of Carphin, ancestor of Parbroath.

Sir John died anno 1583, and was buried in the cathedral church of Glasgow, under a stately monument▪

V. WALTER, only son of the second marriage of sir John Stewart of Minto, de­signed commendator of Blantyre, was a man of great accomplishments, both natural and ac­quired, and having been bred; with king James VI. under that famous scholar George Buchanan, was always in favour and greatly esteemed by his majesty.

He got charters, under the great seal, Waltero, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1587 & 1595. commendatorio de Blantyre, of all the lordships, baronies, regalities, offices, &c. which belonged to the episcopal see of Glas­gow, with many other lands and baronies.

In the year 1580, when but a young man, he was made one of the gentlemen of the bed-chamber to the king,Lives of the officers of state, and Stuart's hist. of the royal family. and one of his privy-council; one of the senators of the college of justice, and lord privy-seal, anno 1582; one of the octavians of exchequer in 1595, and lord high treasurer of Scotland, anno 1596; all which high offices he discharged with ho­nour and reputation.

The preamble to the grant of the office of treasurer,Chart. in pub. archiv. 6to Martii 1596. Waltero, commendatorio de Blantyre, contains many honourable clauses, shows the particular esteem and regard his majesty had for him, and is fully narrated in the lives of the officers of state.

We must here observe what is alledged by former authors, that he was not created a peer till the 10th of July 1606; but this must be a mistake, for he was certainly raised to that dignity at least seven years sooner, though we have not seen the patent. This appears from a charter,Ibid. ad ann. 1598. under the great seal, erecting all his lands, therein mentioned, into one free barony, to be called the lordship and barony of Blantyre for ever, and is expresly granted, ‘"Waltero domino Blantyre, the saurario S. D. N. regis, haeredibus masculis &c."’ dated 18th January 1598.

In 1604, he was named one of the com­missioners to treat of an union with England,Records of parliament. which at that time took no effect.

This great man married Nicolas, daughter of sir James Somerville of Cambusnethan, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Sir James Stewart, knight of the bath, a youth of great hopes, who, in his father's lifetime, was killed in a duel by sir George Wharton, anno 1609, without issue.

2. William, master of Blantyre.

3. Walter Stewart, Esq; doctor of phy­sic, father of Frances,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, page 167. dutchess of Lennox and Richmond; and of Sophia, married to Henry Bulkly, Esq; master of the houshold to king Charles II.

His daughter, Margaret, married to George lord Salton.

He died anno 1616, and was succeeded by his son,

VI. WILLIAM, second lord Blantyre, who, in his father's lifetime,Chart. in pub. archiv. got charters, under the great seal, Willielmo, magistro de Blantyre, of the lands and barony of Blantyre, and several others, inter 1608 & 1616.

He married Helen,Stuart's hist, of the royal family. daughter of sir William Scot of Ardross, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Walter, master of Blantyre.

2. Alexander, who succeeded his brother.

His daughter,—was married to sir John Swinton of that ilk.

He died in 1638, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. WALTER, third lord Blantyre, who married Margaret,Ibidem▪ daughter of sir William Muir of Rowallan, but dying without issue, in 1641, was succeeded by his brother,

VII. ALEXANDER, fourth lord Blantyre, who married Margaret, daughter of sir John Schaw of Greenock, by whom he had a son,

Alexander, who succeeded him,—and a daughter,

Helen, Ibidem. married to James Muirhead of Broadsholm.

VIII. ALEXANDER, fifth lord Blantyre, married,Ibidem. Ist, Margaret, daughter of sir John Henderson of Fordel, who died with­out issue.

He married, 2dly, Anne, daughter of sir Robert Hamilton of Pressmanan, one of the senators of the college of justice,Ibidem. and sister of John lord Belhaven, by whom he had issue five sons and four daughters.

1. Walter, his heir.

2. Robert, who succeeded his brother.

3. John Stewart, Esq; advocate.

4. James, who died at sea.

5. Hugh Stewart, Esq;

[Page 76] 1st daughter, Marion, married to James Stirling of Keir.

2. Frances, married to sir James Hamilton of Rosehaugh.

3. Helen, married to John lord Gray.

4. Anne, married to Alexander Hay of Drumelzier, Esq;—They all had issue.

He died in 1704, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. WALTER, sixth lord Blantyre, who was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scot­land anno 1710, but died without issue anno 1713, and was succeeded by his brother,

IX. ROBERT, seventh lord Blantyre, who married, Ist, lady Helen Lyon, daughter of John earl of Strathmore, by whom he had a son,

Alexander, who died young.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of William Hay of Drumelzier, by whom he had six sons and four daughters.

1. Walter, his heir.

2. William, the present lord.

3. Alexander.

4. John.

5. James.

6. Charles.

Ist daughter, Margaret.

2. Helen, married to Oliver Colt of Auld­hame, Esq;

3. Marion.

4. Elizabeth, married to William Colqu­houn of Garscaden, Esq;

He died in 1743, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. WALTER, eighth lord Blantyre, a youth of great expectations, who died at Paris, with­out issue, in May 1751, and was succeeded by his next brother,

X. WILLIAM, ninth lord Blantyre.

ARMS.

Or, a fess-cheque, argent and azure, sur­mounted of a bend ingrailed, and in chief a rose, gules.

CREST; a dove, with an olive leaf in its mouth.

SUPPORTERS; on the dexter side, a sa­vage, wreath'd about his head and middle with laurel, and holding over his shoulder a bat­toon, all proper; and on the sinister, a lion, gules.

MOTTO; Sola juvat virtus.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Erskine in Renfrewshire; at Cardonnel castle in the same county; at Leithington in East-Lothian; and at the Craig of Blantyre in Clydsdale.

BORTHWICK Lord BORTHWICK.

THE traditional accounts of the origin of this antient family are various. Some say, they are descended of one Andreas, a son of the lord of the castle of Burtick in Livo­nia, who accompanied queen Margaret from Hungary to Scotland,Martin's ge­nealogical collections, vol. II. anno 1057, and got possession of some lands in the south or west parts of this country, and that his posterity assumed their sirname of Borthwick from the place from whence this Andreas came: Others are of opinion, that it is a local sirname.

It is evident, from our histories, that they were long a great, numerous, and flourishing family in Scotland; they had large possessions in lands; and the noble alliances they made, by their frequent marriages with the greatest families in the kingdom, sufficiently appear from the following narration: We shall there­fore deduce their descent, by unquestionable authority, from

I. THOMAS de BORTHWICK, who ob­tained some lands near Lauder,Chart. pen [...] dom. Andre­am Lauder de Fountainhall, Bart. in the shire of Berwick, from Robert Lander of Quarrel­wood, in the reign of king David II. who succeeded to the crown of Scotland anno 1329.

He lest issue a son and successor,

II. Sir WILLIAM de BORTHWICK, who was in possession of the lands of Catkune,Chart. pen [...] Mr. Sinclair de Herdman­ston. in the reign of king Robert II▪ which appears from a charter dated in 1378.

He left issue a son,

Sir William,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to William Abernethy, ancestor of lord Abernethy,Chart. in pub. archiv. of Salton, who was designed, Filia domini Willielmi de Borth­wick militis, anno 1413.

He was succeeded by his son,

III. Sir WILLIAM BORTHWICK, who was witness in a charter of James,Chart. penes ducem de Queensberry. second earl of Douglas, to his son sir William Douglas, [Page 77] of the lands and barony of Drumlanrig, &c. circa annum 1387.

He was one of the guarantees of a treaty of peace with the English,Rymer, tom. VIII. p. 54. anno 1398, and died soon thereafter, leaving issue a son,

Sir William,—and two daughters.

1. Janet, married, 1st, to James Dou­glas, lord Dalkeith; 2dly, to George Crich­ton, earl of Caithness.

2.—, married to sir John Oliphant.

IV. Sir WILLIAM succeeded, and was designed Willielmus de Borthwick, Chart. in pub. archiv. dominus de eodem, miles, in several authentic writs.

Before this family acquired the lands of Borthwick, they were promiscuously designed by the titles of Catkune, Legertwood, and Heriotmuir, but were afterwards designed Borthwicks of that ilk.

This sir William was a man of great parts, was often employed in negotiations of impor­tance, and was concerned in most of the pu­blic transactions of his time.Rymer, tom. VIII. p. 185. He was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the English in December 1400.

He was again appointed one of the com­missioners for prolonging the truce anno 1404,Ibid. p. 369. and obtained a safe conduct to treat with the English about other matters, particularly with the earls of Fife and Douglas,Ibid. p. 389, 411 & 417. then prisoners in England, anno 1405.

He got another safe conduct from the king of England,Ibid. p. 584. Willielmo de Borthwick, de Le­gertwood, militi, anno 1408.

And got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. from Robert duke of Albany, governor of Scotland, of the lands and barony of Borthwick, in the shire of Sel­kirk, which formerly belonged to Robert Scot, dated 4th day of June 1410.

He was again one of the ambassadors ap­pointed to the court of England in the years 1411 and 1413.Rymer, tom. VIII. p. 703, and tom. IX. p. 45.

Also, in the year 1421, to treat about the king's liberty,Ibid. tom. X. p. 125. which is the first time we find him designed dominus de Borthwick.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae that sat on the assize of the duke of Lennox and Murdoch duke of Albany's two sons,Fordun, vol. II. p. 484. anno 1424.

This William appears to have been created lord Borthwick before the year 1430; for, in October that year,Ibid. p. 490. at the baptism of the king's two sons, there were several knights created, and, amongst the rest, William, son and heir of William lord Borthwick, was one.

He obtained, from king James I. a licence to build a castle upon the lands of Lochwarret, viz. Chart. in pub. archiv. Ad construendam arcem in illo loco qui vulgariter dicitur le Motte de Lochwarret, by a charter, under the great seal, anno 1430. A stately castle was accordingly built, called Borthwick castle, which afterwards became the chief seat and title of the family.

He was succeeded by his son,

V. WILLIAM, second lord Borthwick, who made a considerable figure when but a young man. He was one of the hostages for king James I.'s ransom,Rymer, tom. X. p. 344 and 348. anno 1424; and hav­ing got liberty to return to his own country, we find him appointed one of the ambassadors to the court of Rome, anno 1425; but it seems he had again returned prisoner to England; for it appears he only obtained his liberty anno 1427,Ibid. p. 369. and had the honour of knighthood con­ferred upon him anno 1430, as before observed.

This lord was also a man of knowledge in state affairs,Records of parliament▪ sat in the first parliament held by king James II. anno 1437, and in several other parliaments afterwards.

We find him no less than three times sent ambassador to the court of England,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 423, 426 and 476. anno 1459 and 1461, and dying soon thereafter, left issue three sons and one daughter.

1. William, his heir.

2. Sir Thomas Borthwick of Colylaw,Chart. in pub. archiv. knight.

3. James, who obtained from his father the lands of Glengilt,Ibidem. on which he got a charter, anno 1467, and was the first of the Borth­wicks of Glengilt.

His daughter,Ibid. ad an­num 1463. Margaret, married to sir John Maxwell of Calderwood.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. WILLIAM, third lord Borthwick, who got a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, of the lands of Glengilt, &c. anno 1482.

He sat in the parliament called by king James III.Records of parliament. to meet anno 1467, who appointed him magister hospitii, and was in several par­liaments thereafter.

He was sent ambassador, with some others, to negotiate a treaty with the English,Rymer, tom. XI. p. 774, tom. XII. p. 243 and 677. anno 1473, and on two embassies afterwards, anno 1484 and 1498.

He married Maryota de Hope-Pringle,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had two sons and four daughters.

1. William, his heir.

2. Alexander Borthwick of Nenthorn, of whom the present lord Borthwick is lineally descended, as will be shewn hereafter.

1st daughter,Craw [...]urd's peerage. Agnes, married to David earl of Cassilis.

2. Catharine, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to William earl of Glencairn.

3. Mary, Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 72. married to James Hope-Pringle of Gallashiels.

4. Margaret, Ibid. p. 173. married to sir Oliver Sin­clair of Roslin.

He was killed, with many of his brave countrymen, and their royal leader, king [Page 78] James IV. at the fatal field of Flowdon, anno 1513, and succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. WILLIAM, fourth lord Borthwick, who got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1530 & 1536. under the great seal, of the lands and moat of Lochwarret, Midleton and Buteland, the lands of Borthwick, Le­gertwood and Heriotmuir, Willielmo domino Borthwick, &c.

He married Margaret Hay, daughter of John lord Yester, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Catharine, Mill's genea­logical collec­tions, penes Macfarlane. married to sir James Crichton of Frendraught, ancestor of viscount Fren­draught.

2. Janet, Ibidem. married to Alexander Lauder, son and heir of Alexander Lauder of Hatton.

He died anno 1542, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. JOHN, fifth lord Borthwick, who was retoured heir to his father, anno 1543, and made an entail of the lordship and barony of Borthwick, failing heirs-male of his own body,Chart. in pub. archiv. ‘"to and in favours of Gavin Borth­wick of Fenton, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to Michael Borth­wick of Glengilt, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to William Borth­wick of Soltry, and the heirs-male of his body, &c."’ dated 10th January 1544; upon which there passed a charter, under the great seal, Johanni domino Borthwick, dated 15th of the same month.

It must here be observed, that as the heirs­male of the above John, Gavin, and Michael, are all extinct, the succession therefore de­volves upon the heir-male of William of Sol­try, who was the next person in the substi­tution, of whom the present lord Borthwick is the undoubted representative.

This John lord Borthwick was a great loy­alist, a firm and steady friend of queen Mary, and never deserted her interest in her greatest distress, on which account he suffered many hardships.

He married lady Elizabeth Lindsay, daugh­ter of David earl of Crawfurd,Ibidem. by Isabel his wife, daughter of—Lundy of that ilk, by whom he had a son,

William, his heir,—and a daughter,

Maryota, Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 72. married to Andrew Hope-Pringle of Gallashi [...]ls.

He died before the year 1572, and was succeeded by his son,

IX. WILLIAM, sixth lord Borthwick, who got a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, of the lands, lordship, and barony of Borthwick, the lands of Moat of Lochwarret, Middleton, Heriotmuir, &c. Willielmo domino Borthwick, anno 1572.

He married Grizel,Nisbet's ap­pend. ad ann. 1582. daughter of sir Walter Scot, ancestor of the duke of Buccleugh, by whom he had a son,

X. JAMES, seventh lord Borthwick, who succeeded him.Chart. penes marchionem de Tweddale. He married Margaret Hay, daughter of William lord Hay of Yester, an­cestor of the marquis of Tweddale, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir.

And dying anno 1599, was succeeded by,

XI. JOHN,Chart. in pub. archiv. eighth lord Borthwick, who was charged to enter heir to his father, an­no 1602, and got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Heriotmuir, Lochwarret, &c. Johanni domino Borthwick, &c. anno 1610.

This John,A charter in the records o [...] privy seal an­no 1632. with the three preceeding ge­nerations, are further documented by a char­ter from king Charles I. dated anno 1632.

He was a man of great honour and loyal­ty, and adhered firmly to the interest of the royal family during all the time of the civil war.Two origina [...] letters of Oli­ver Cromwel in October and Novem­ber 1650, with the ar­ticles of capi­tulation, pe­nes dom. Borthwick. After the murder of the king, he held out his castle of Borthwick against Oliver Cromwell, and at last, when he saw no ap­pearance of relief, was forced to surrender, and obtained very honourable terms, viz. Li­berty to march out with his lady and family unmolested, and got fifteen days time allow­ed them to remove their effects.

He married lady Elizabeth Ker, daughter of William earl of Lothian, by lady Anne his wife, heiress of that earldom, by whom he had a son and successor,

XII. JOHN, ninth lord Borthwick, who got a charter,Chart. in pub archiv. under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Heriotmuir, &c. Jo­hanni doinino Borthwick, anno 1663.

He married lady Elizabeth Ker, daughter of Robert earl of Lothian, and died without issue anno 1672, which ended the male line of William, fourth lord Borthwick, eldest son of the third lord, whereby the representation devolved upon the heir-male of Alexander his second son, to whom we now return.

VII. ALEXANDER, second son of William third lord Borthwick, was designed by the title of Nenthorn, by a charter from the said lord, as superior of the lands of Nenthorn, in the shire of Berwick,Ibid. ad an­num 1495. ‘"to Alexander Borth­wick, his second son, and Margaret his spouse, upon the resignation of James Wil­son, &c. &c."’ confirmed by a charter, under the great seal, 27th June 1495.

[Page 79] By the said Margaret, daughter of— Lawson of Humbie, he left issue a son and successor,

VIII. WILLIAM BORTHWICK, who was designed by the title of Soltry, in the entail of John, fifth lord Borthwick, before-menti­oned, and is further instructed by a precept of clare constat, Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1522. to William, son to Alexander Borthwick of Nenthorn, &c. dated 21st March 1522.

He was chamberlain to queen Mary, made a considerable figure in her reign, and left issue two sons.

1. William, his heir.

2. Alexander, ancestor of the Borthwicks of Sauchland, of whom Patrick Borthwick, merchant in Edinburgh, is said to be the male representative.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. WILLIAM BORTHWICK of Soltry, instructed by an instrument of seasine, in fa­vours of William Borthwick of Soltry, son and heir of William Borthwick of Soltry, his father, of the lands of Scholla and Camp­slack, proceeding on a precept of clare con­stat, Seasine in the public regi­ster, ad an­num 1550. by John, fifth lord Borthwick, to his cousin William Borthwick elder, son of A­lexander Borthwick of Nenthorn, &c. dated 10th April 1550.

He lived after the year 1590, and left issue two sons.

1. Colonel William.

2. Alexander, great grandfather of Henry now lord Borthwick,

X. Colonel WILLIAM BORTHWICK, el­dest son of William of Soltry, was designed by the title of Johnstonburn,Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. He be­took himself to a military life, was a colonel under Gustavus Adolphus, and was father of

William Borthwick, a great loyalist, who raised a company of men in desence of king Charles I. and left issue a son, colonel Wil­liam Borthwick, who was killed at the battle of Ramillies, anno 1706, without issue, which ended the male line of William of Soltry's eldest son; and as the representation fell to Henry, the present lord Borthwick, lineally desc [...]nded of Alexander the second son, to him we now return.

X. ALEXANDER BORTHWICK, second son of William of Soltry, and brother-ger­man of colonel William of Johnstonburn, &c.

In a principal assignation, Robert Ker, son to Ralph Ker of Reidpath, to this Alexander Borthwick,Original pe­nes dominum Borthwick. he is designed second lawful son to William Borthwick of Soltry, 15th July 1633.

There is a principal minute of sale,Ibidem. betwixt Alexander Borthwick, brother-german to co­lonel William Borthwick of Johnstonburn, and Andrew Haitly of—, of some hus­band lands in Nenthorn, dated 23d February 1643, &c.

He married Sibilla, daughter of William Cairns of Pilmore, by whom he had a son and successor,

XI. WILLIAM BORTHWICK, designed of Maysheill and Pilmore,Ibidem. who is instructed by a disposition from the above Alexander Borthwick, some time in Johnstonburn, now in Gilkerstoun, to William Borthwick, chi­rurgeon burgess of Edinburgh, his eldest law­ful son, of a tenement of land in Musselburgh, dated 25th January 1666.

He married a daughter of Mr. Henry Stewart of the family of Garntully, advo­cate, by whom he had a son,

XII. Captain HENRY BORTHWICK of Pilmore, his successor,Ibidem. who is instructed by an act extracted in a process before the lords of session, at the instance of Henry Borthwick of Pilmore, Esq; decerned and confirmed heir to the deceast William Borthwick, chirurgeon burgess of Edinburgh, his father, 21st No­vember 1702.

He married Mary, daughter of sir Robert Pringle of Stitchell, by whom he had a son,

Henry, now lord Borthwick.

He was killed at the battle of Ramillies, anno 1706, and succeeded by

XIII. HENRY, tenth lord Borthwick, who, anno 1734,Retour in cancellaria. gave in his claim for the titles and honours of Borthwick. He proved his de­scent as above, was served heir-male to the last lord Borthwick, before an inquest, anno 1750, and has voted at every election of the peers since 1734.

ARMS.

Argent, three cinque-soils, sable. SUPPORTERS; two angels, proper, wing­ed, or.

CREST; a negroe's head couped, proper.

MOTTO; Qui conducit.

CHIEF SEAT.

Borthwick Castle in Lothian.

MORAY Lord of BOTHWELL.

THough it is acknowledged by our an­tiquaries, that the sirname of Moray is amongst the most antient of any in Scotland, yet as their origin is a little uncertain, of which we have given some hints under the Title of Duke of Athole, we shall proceed to deduce the descent of this noble family, by authentic documents, from the first of the name that is to be found upon record in this kingdom.

I. FRISKINUS de MORAVIA made a great figure in Scotland in the reign of king David I. who succeeded to the crown anno 1124.

He had large possessions in lands in Mur­ray, Sutherland, and even in the more sou­thern counties, of which there are many un­questionable vouchers in the chartulary of Murray, &c. &c.

He left issue two sons.

1. William.

2. Hugo, Chartul. of Murray, p. 156, Chartul. of Arbroath, p. 121, penes Macfarlane. who appears to have been ance­stor of the family of Sutherland. Vide Title Sutherland.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. WILLIELMUS de MORAVIA, who was in great favour at the court of king Wil­liam,Chartul. of Murray, &c. penes eund. was witness to many of his charters and donations, and was himself a liberal benefac­tor to the religious.

He got from that prince a charter of the lands of Strabrock,Chart. penes comitem de Buchan. Duffus, Rossile, Inchikil, Machir, Kintrai, &c. quas terras pater suus tenuit tempore regis David, &c. This char­ter is without date,Keith's cata­logue of bi­shops, p. 80, and sir James Dalrymple's collections. but as Felix bishop of Murray was witness to it, it must have been betwixt 1165 and 1171, in which last year the bishop died.

There is a charter from Richard bishop of Murray of the lands of Logynanedel and Lo­gyndykes,Chartul. of Murray, p. 138. Willielmo, silio Friskini, & hae­redibus suis, &c. dated in 1190.

In a charter of king William, de decimis solvendis, Ibid. p. 66. &c. Willelmus, filius Friskini, together with Matthew bishop of Aberdeen, William de Lindesai, Robert de London, William de Haya, Ranulphus de Soulis, &c. are witnesses. This charter is also without date, but, by the witnesses, must have been betwixt 1185 and 1199, in which last year the bishop of Aberdeen died.

There is another charter, by king, Willi­am, of a donation of the church of Forres and Dyke,Ibid. p. 73. to Richard bishop of Murray, and his successors, &c. Testibus comite David fratre regis, A. abb. de Dumfermling, Willi­elmo filio Friskini, & Hugone filio suo, &c.

This William left issue two sons, Hugo and sir William, betwixt whom he divided his lands.

Hugo de Moravia, the eldest, got the lands of Duffus,Chartul. of Murray, p. 74,79,91,&c. then the chief seat of the family, of which there are many documents in the chartulary of Murray. He was father of Walter de Moravia,Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 197. whose only son, Fris­kinus de Moravia, died without male-issue, whereby the line of the family was carried on by William's second son,

III. Sir WILLIAM de MORAVIA, the undoubted progenitor of the Morays of Both­well, &c. Chartul. of Moray, and Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 82. who, in a charter of king Willi­am, is designed Willielmus de Moravia, fili­us Willielmi, filii Friskini, &c. The char­ter has no date, but, as Bricius bishop of Murray was witness to it, it must have been betwixt 1202, in which year the bishop was consecrated, and 1214, in which year king William died.

There is a donation sanctae trinitati de Spy­nie, made by Willielmus de Moravia, filius Willielmi, filii Friskini, &c. to which Hugh his brother, and Archibald de Douglas, are witnesses;Chartul. of Moray, p. 100. and Andrew bishop of Murray confirms donationem illam quam Willielmus, filius Willielmi, filii Friskini, fecit, ecclesiae de Spynie, &c. about the year 1224.

This William was highly esteemed by king Alexander II. who conferred the honour of knighthood upon him; and we find him of­ten designed miles, &c.

He married the daughter of sir David Oli­fard,Chartul. of Glasgow. son of Walterus de Olifard, justiciarius Loudoniae, and proprietor of the lands of Both­well, &c.

With her he got the whole lordship of Both­well,Chart. penes ducem de Ha­milton. (whereof the lands of Drumsargart were a part) which afterwards became the chief seat and title of the family.

He got with her also the lands of Small­ham in the shire of Berwick,Chartul. of Dryburgh, and remarks on Ragman's roll, p. 26. &c. and by her he had a son,

Sir Walter, his heir.

'Tis said he had several other sons, of whom some considerable families of the name of Murray are descended; but we cannot pretend to ascertain or connect them.

He died anno 1225, and was succeeded by his son,

IV. Sir WALTER MORAY, who, succeed­ing also to the estate and lordship of Bothwell, [Page 81] in right of his mother; was the first of the name of Moray that was designed by that title.

In a composition betwixt Andrew, bishop of Murray,Chartul. of Murray, p. 125. & Gilbertum hostiarium, Walte­rus de Moravia, filius quondam Willielmi de Moravia, &c. is a witness, anno 1226.

There is another composition betwixt An­drew bishop of Murray & nobilem virum Wal­terum de Moravia, Ibid. p. 79. filium quondam Willielmi de Moravia, &c. to which Walter de Mora­via, son of Hugo, William de Moravia, Alex­ander vicecomes de Elgin, &c. are witnesses, anno 1229.

In a convention betwixt Andrew, bishop of Murray, and David de Strabogie, son of Dun­can earl of Fife,Ibid. p. 76. Walterus de Moravia, miles, Walterus de Duffus, Walterus de Innes, &c. are witnesses, anno 1232.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae who were guarantees in a treaty of peace betwixt king Alexander II.Rymer, tom. I. p. 428. of Scotland and king Henry III. of England, where he is designed Walterus de Moravia, miles, filius domini Willielmi, &c. anno 1244.

This sir Walter, with the earls of Fife, Dunbar,Ibid. p. 556. Carrick, Strathern, and several o­thers, were appointed to settle the marches betwixt Scotland and England, anno 1255.

He was undoubtedly one of the greatest men of his time,Chartul. of Murray, &c. and had vast possessions, which appears from the many donations he made, to the religious, of lands lying in diffe­rent counties.

This Walterus de Moravia granted a dis­charge to the monks of Dryburgh for ever, of all the multures which they paid out of the lands they held of him,Chartul. of Dryburgh, penes Mac­farlane, p. 98, 99. in territorio de Smal­ham, in vicecom [...] de Berwick, &c. This writ is dated at Bothwell, in crastino sancti Matthaei apostoli, anno 1278.

He married a daughter of Malcolm earl of Fife,History of the family of Mo­ray, penes A­bercairny, M. S. p. 16. by whom he had issue two sons.

1. Sir William.

2. Sir Andrew de Moravia, who succeeded his brother.

Sir Walter died in 1280, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

V. Sir WILLIAM de MORAVIA, whom we find promiscuously designed de Bothwell and de Drumsargard, and sometimes by both titles. He was also made panetarius Scotiae by king Alexander III. with whom he was in great favour.

In the act declaratory of the succession of the crown of Scotland to king Alexander III. and his heirs,Rymer, tom. II. p. 266. he is designed Willielmus de Moravia, miles, filius Walteri, &c. anno 1284.

He was one of the magnates Scotiae that wrote to the king of England about the mar­riage of his eldest son with queen Margaret of Scotland,Rymer, tom. II. p. 471, & critical re­marks on Ragman's roll, p. 16. and is there designed Guillam de Moreff, de Drumsargard, &c. anno 1290.

He made a donation of the patronage of the church of Woolston to the see of Glasgow.Chartul. of Glasgow, and Crawfurd's Peerage, p. 39. Critical re­marks, &c. ad annum 1290 & 1292. Dominus [...] Andreas de Moravia, his brother, and Robert bishop of Glasgow, are witnesses, [...]nd he is therein designed dominus de Both­well, Drumsargard, & panetarius Scotiae, &c.

He also gave to the said see the patronage of the church of Smalham,Ibidem. to which his seal [...]s affixed, being three stars, &c.

He was one of the great barons summoned to Berwick,Rymer's foe­dera Angliae, tom. II. as an auditor of the claims of the Bruce and the Baliol, anent the succession to the crown, in which he is designed dominus de Bothwell, panetarius Scotiae, &c. anno 1291.

This Willielmus de Moravia, Ibid. p. 547 and 553. panetarius Scotiae, with Donald earl of Mar, Gilbert earl of Angus, the earl of Carrick, William de St. Clare, Patrick de Graham, Michael de Wemyss, William de Moreff, de Tullibar­din, &c. were sureties for the delivering up of several castles to the English, anno 1292.

He made several donations to the religious,Memoirs of the family of Moray, penes Abercairny, M. S. p. 22, &c. which appears by five distinct charters in the chartulary of Glasgow, wherein he is design­ed dominus Willielmus de Moravia, dominus de Bothwell, & panetarius Scotiae, dated anno 1292 and 1293.

He was a great patriot, and did many brave actions in the service of his country; but dy­ing without issue, anno 1294, was succeeded by his brother,

V. Sir ANDREW de MORAVIA, dominus de Bothwell, & panetarius Scotiae, &c. who was a man of singular courage and intrepidity, and a true lover of his country. He joined the brave sir William Wallace upon his first taking up arms in defence of the liberties of Scotland, and had no small share in the glory acquired by handfuls of Scots against conside­rable bodies of the English under the conduct of the glorious Wallace. He particularly di­stinguished himself at Stirling, where he had the misfortune to lose his life on the 13th of September 1297, the Scots having obtained a most glorious victory. Fordun says,Fordun, vol. II. p. 171. ‘"Ex cusus parte, de numero nobilium Scottae, solus Andreas de Moravia, pater Andreae, nobilis, vulneratus occubuit."’

He married a daughter of sir John Cumin lord of Badenoch,Winton's hist [...] in the lawier [...] library, Edr. by whom he had two sons.

1. Sir Andrew, his heir.

2. Sir John de Moravia, (according to Mr. Crawfurd) who got from his father the lands of Drumsargard, &c. and, as appears from au­thentic [Page 82] documents, and the M. S. history of the Moravii panetarii Scotiae, acquired, by the marriage of Mary,Chart. penes dom. Aber­eairny. daughter of Malise earl of Strathern, the lands of Ogilvie and Abercair­ny in Perthshire, where he fixed his residence, and from whom is lineally descended the fa­mily of Abercairny, who have, ever since that time, possessed those lands in a regular course of succession.

Sir Walter was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. Sir ANDREW de MORAVIA, dominus de Bothwell, panetarius Scotiae, designed the Noble, who inherited all his father's virtues. No age has produced a greater hero or truer patriot.

He was joined in command with sir Wil­liam Wallace to march an army into England,All Scotch hi­storians. where they performed glorious exploits with surprising courage and conduct, anno 1298.

As soon as king Robert Bruce began to as­sert his title to the crown, he joined him, and never deserted his interest in all his vicissitudes of fortune,Chart. in pub. archiv. Stu­art's hist. of the royal fa­mily. whereby he became so great a fa­vourite of that prince, that he bestowed up­on him in marriage his own sister, lady Chri­stian Bruce, &c.

He was not only a faithful friend and fol­lower of that great monarch, but continued to adhere firmly and inviolably to the interest of his son king David Bruce.

He particularly signalized himself at the battle of Duplin,Fordun, vol. II. p. 307, 310, 312, 316, 320, 321, 332. anno 1332; and, upon the death of the earl of Mar, in consideration of his great and eminent qualities, was unani­mously chosen regent or governor of Scot­land, in the minority and absence of king David, which high office he executed with the universal applause and approbation of the whole nation till his death, which happened anno 1338.

By the said lady Christian Bruce he left is­sue two sons.

1. John, his successor.

2. Thomas, who succeeded his brother.

VII. JOHN de MORAVIA, dominus de Bothwell, &. panetarius Scotiae, made several donations to the religious at Elgin out of his lands in the north country, which are fully narrated in the chartulary of Murray, and he is particularly designed dominus de Bothwell, & panetarius Scotiae, Chartul. of Murray, p. 272. in a donation he made of a chaplainry on the lands of Alterly, which he largely endowed pro salute animae fuae, &c. dated in April 1351; and dying anno 1352, without issue, was succeeded by his brother,

VII. THOMAS de MORAVIA, dominus de Bothwell, Rymer, tom V. p. 724. et panetarius Scotiae, who was nomi­nated one of the hostages to be sent to Eng­land for king David Bruce's ransom, and is designed frater et haeres Johannis de Moreff, &c. in September 1351, tho' the king's li­berty was not obtained till six years thereafter.

He was a man of great parts, and singular endowments, and was often employed in ne­gotiations of the greatest importance.

He was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the English for king David's re­demption,Ibid. tom. VI▪ p. 44, 56. which was happily accomplished anno 1357; and he is then designed Thomas de Moravia, panetarius Scotiae, &c.

He ratified and confirmed his brother's do­nations to the religious at Elgin.Chartul. of Murray, p. 275, ad an­num 1353.

And died anno 1366, leaving issue no sons, and but one daughter,

VIII. JEAN de MORAVIA, his sole heir­ess, who was married to Archibald third earl of Douglas, lord of Galloway, &c. and brought with her the whole lordship of Bothwell, &c. into that family.—Vide Title, Duke of Dou­glas.

The male line of sir Andrew, eldest son of sir Andrew de Moravia, dominus de Both­well, & panetarius Scotiae, (No. VI. of this account) thus ending, Mr. Moray of Aber­cairny, the undoubted descendant and repre­sentative of sir John de Moravia above-men­tioned, is now heir-male of the noble and il­lustrious lords of Bothwell, panetar i [...] Scotiae, &c. &c.

Vide Title, Abercairny, in the second vo­lume of this work.

Note:

It may here be observed, that though the property of the lands of Drumsargard belonged to sir John de Moravia, yet the family of Bothwell retained the superiority to themselves, which went with the heir of line to the family of Douglas, together with the lordship of Bothwell. This is instructed by many authentic documents.

Jean de Moravia, heiress of Bothwell, and countess of Douglas, survived her husband, and made a donation, In pura viduitate, pro salute animae, recolendae memoriae Archibaldi comitis de Douglas, quondam viri sui, &c. anno 1401, as is contained at large in the chartulary of Glasgow.

After her death, her grandson, Archibald, fifth earl of Douglas, added that of Drumsargard to his other titles, which appears from Erectio praebendarum de Cambuslang, Torbolton, &c. in ecclesia cathedrali Glasguen. consentiente mag­ [...]isico & potenti domino Archibaldo comite de Douglas, domino de Bothwell, Drumsargard, &c. &c. anno 1429, a full copy whereof is published in the appendix to the lives of the officers of state, No. 6. p. 434.

The family of Hamilton having acquired the barony of Drumsargard, continued to get their charters of these lands confirmed by the earls of Douglas, as superiors thereof, till that family was forseited in the end of the reign of king James II. after which the lords Hamilton got charters from king James III. confirming the lands of Drumsargard, and some others in the lordship of Bothwell, then in the crown by the forseiture of the earls of Douglas, &c. which lands they got added and annexed to the barony and lordship of Hamilton, anno 1463. All which is fully instructed by many original charters amongst the writs of the family of Hamilton.

RAMSAY Lord BOTHWELL.

SIR JOHN RAMSAY designed (by Haw­thornden) of Balmain; was a son of —Ramsay of Corston,Creations of the nobility in the advocates library, Edin­burgh, and Hawthorn­den's history. who was heir­male of the Ramsays of Carnock; being a man of spirit and good parts; was a great favourite of king James III. who created him lord of Bothwell about the year 1486.

He was a firm and steady friend of the king, never deserted his interest, and was with him when he was murdered anno 1488. It is certain he was not killed with him, as has been related by former authors; but, be­ing very obnoxious to the party who had the management of all public affairs at that time, was outlawed, and his estate and honours for­feited by the convention or parliament,Hawthornden in vita Jacobi IV. in the beginning of the reign of king James IV.

However, some time thereafter, he was re-habilitate as to his person and estates, by a charter, under the great seal, erecting his lands of Balmain,Chart. in pub. archiv. Flasky, Esly, and Pitna­more, in the shire of Kincardine, into one free barony, to him, and his heirs, &c. anno 1510; and of him sir Alexander Ramsay, now of Balmain, is lineally descended. But he was never restored to his honours, the lord­ship of Bothwell having been erected into an earldom, in favours of Patrick, third lord Hales, immediately after this lord's forfei­ture, &c.

HEPBURN Earl of BOTHWELL.

IT is the general opinion of our antiquaries that this is a local sirname taken from the lands and barony of Hebborne, or Hayborne, in the county of Northumberland, where there were several considerable families of that sirname in very early times; and Ralph Heborne is mentioned as proprietor of these lands as late as the reign of king Charles II. and probably his posterity still continue there.

Though the Hepburns made a much great­er figure in Scotland than ever they did in England, yet the precise time of their arri­val here is uncertain. The first of them we find upon record is,

I. ADAM HEBBURN, who remarkably di­stinguished himself in Scotland in the reign of king Robert Bruce, with whom he was in great favour, and obtained from that Prince a charter of the lands of south and north Hales, and Traprene, in the shire of Had­dingtoun, upon the forfeiture of Hugh Gour­lay of Beinstone.

As also another charter of the lands of Mordington,Inventary of old authentic writs, &c. in the advocates library, Edr. Ronaldstoun, &c. in the shire of Berwick, all holding of Patrick Dunbar, earl of March, and lying within that earl­dom.

This Adam Hebburn gave a charter of some lands,Nisbet, vol. I. p. 237. lying in the village of Mording­ton, to John Renton burgess of Berwick, an­no 1320.

He left issue two sons.

1. Sir Patrick.

2. John Hebburn, who obtained from Pa­trick Dunbar, earl of March, the lands of Over and Nether Merkhill in East Lothian, which is confirmed by king David II.Chart. in ar­chivis regi [...] David. anno 1363. The earl, in that charter, calls him alumnus suus, or foster-brother. He was an­cestor of the family of Waughton, from which are descended the Hepburns of Smeaton, Ber­ford, Beinstone, Humbie, &c.

Adam was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. Sir PATRICK HEBBORNE of Hales, who got a safe-conduct to go to England to negotiate some affairs of importance,Rymer, tom [...]. VI. p. 408. anno 1363, and, amongst other Scotch barons, ap­pends his seal to the act of parliament which declares John earl of Carrick,Chart. in pub. archiv. the king's el­dest son, the true heir of the crown, &c. anno 1371; and on his seal, which is still ex­tant, are two lions pulling at a rose,Hay's vindi­cation of Eli­zabeth More. placed on a chiveron, which continued always to be the paternal arms of the earls of Bothwell.

He, and sir Patrick Hebburn younger of Hales, his eldest son, behaved with remark­able intrepidity and resolution, and eminently signalized themselves,Fordun, vol. II. p. 406. at the famous battle of Otterburn, betwixt James earl of Douglas, and Henry Percy, eldest son to the earl of Northumberland, the 5th of August 1388.

III. Sir PATRICK HEBBURN younger of Hales, a man of great honour, courage, and intrepidity, married a daughter and one of the co-heiresses of the de Vallibus, or Vauses, lords of Dirleton, in the shire of Haddington, by whom he got a great accession to his estate;Nisbet, and Chart. in pub. archiv. and, on account of this marriage, the Hep­burns of Hales carried the bend in the 2d and [Page 84] 3d quarters of their armorial bearing. By her he had issue two sons.

1. Sir Adam.

2. Archibald Hepburn, Chart. in pub. archiv. who got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands of Fleming­ton, &c.

This brave man was killed fighting valiant­ly against a party of English commanded by George Dunbar,Fordun, vol. II. p. 433. earl of March, who was then a rebel to his king and country, at Marston­muir in the Merse, 22d June 1402, his father being then alive.

IV. Sir ADAM HEPBURN of Hales, eldest son of sir Patrick, succeeded his grandfather, and was one of the Scotch barons who went up to Durham to meet his sovereign king James I.Rymer, tom. X. p. 308, 348. on his return from England in 1423, and was also one of the hostages for his ransom 1424.

He was one of the three Scotch commanders who defeated the English at the battle of Pi­perden in the Merse,Fordun, vol. II. p. 501. 10th September 1436.

He left issue four sons and two daughters.

1. Patrick, afterwards lord Hales.

2. William Hepburn.

3. George Hepburn of Whitsom, from whom are descended the Hepburns of Riccarton and Blackcastle, &c.

4. John, bishop of Dumblane, and one of the lords of council anno 1467.

1st daughter, Elizabeth, was married to Alexander Montgomery,Crawfurd's peerage, p. 128. eldest son and ap­parent heir of Alexander lord Montgomery, ancestor to the earl of Eglington.

2. Janet, married to John lord Sommer­ville.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. Sir PATRICK HEPBURN of Hales, who, during his father's life, was designed of Dunsyre, in the year 1450.

He acquired from John lord Halyburton the lands of Little Lamberton,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1449 & 1452. alias Sheriff-bigging, in the shire of Berwick, together with the office of heretable sheriff of that county, which continued with his successors for several generations. He also got charters, under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Hales, East and West Reston, and many others; and being a man of great merit and fortune, king James III. was pleased to create him a baron or lord of parliament,Chart. penes com. deErrol. ante annum 1456.

He was twice appointed one of the conser­vators of the peace betwixt Scotland and Eng­land anno 1449 and 1459.Rymer, tom. XI. p. 254 and 397. He was guaran­tee of another treaty anno 1484,Ib. tom. XII. p. 241 & 340. and was ap­pointed ambassador extraordinary to the court of England anno 1488.

He was a man of singular resolution and courage, which he had an opportunity of ex­erting upon several occasions.

He left issue two sons and two daughters.

1. Adam, lord Hales.

2. George Hepburn, Chartul. of Arbroath, and abbot Miln's lives of the bi­shops of Dun­keld. who being bred to the church, was made dean of Dunkeld, and thesaurer of the diocese of Murray.

1st daughter, Margaret, married to Patrick Halyburton,Chart. inpub. archivis, ad annum 1451. son and heir of John lord Haly­burton.

2. Eupheme, married to Andrew Mac­Dougal,Ibidem. son and apparent heir of Dougal MacDougal of Macherston in the shire of Roxburgh.

VI. ADAM, second lord Hales, succeeded his father,Ibidem. during whose life he was designed Adam Hepburn of Dunsyre.

He left issue five sons and four daughters.

1. Patrick, lord Hales, afterwards earl of Bothwell.

2. Sir Adam Hepburn of Craigs, knight, who made a considerable addition to his pa­trimony, by marrying Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Walter Ogston of that ilk; and dying without male-issue, his estate was divided amongst his three daughters.

1. Elizabeth, married to sir Alexander Li­vingston of Dunipace, in the shire of Stir­ling.

2. Helen, married to sir Patrick Hepburn of Waughton in Haddington-shire.

3. Janet, married to James Auchinleck of Kemnie, ancestor of the Auchinlecks of Bal­manno, in the county of Perth.

George Hepburn, third son of Adam second lord Hales, being bred to the church, was first made provost of the collegiate church of Bothwell,Keith's cata­logue of the Scots bishops, &c. p. 175. chosen abbot of Arbroath anno 1593, preferred to the office of lord high treasurer of Scotland anno 1509, and bishop of the Isles in 1511; and, though a church­man, he was a man of extraordinary courage and resolution, and was slain at the fatal battle of Flowdon, on 9th September 1513.

4. John Hepburn, a man of great parts and learning, who, being also bred to the church,Martin's reli­quiae Sancti Andreae. was made prior of St. Andrews, and, in the beginning of the reign of king James IV. was made privy-seal. He founded the Leonardine college of St. Andrews, and built a fine wall, with turrets at proper distances, round all the east, and part of the south side of that town, upon his own charges.

5. James Hepburn was first rector of Par­toun, and, in 1515, was made abbot of Dun­fermline, and lord high treasurer of Scotland that same year.Keith's enta­logue of bi­shops, p. 8 [...] In 1516, he was made bi­shop of Murray, where he continued till his death in 1524.

[Page 85] 1st daughter, Margaret, married to Alex­ander lord Kilmawers,Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. who was created earl of Glencairn in 1488.

2. Agnes, Ibidem. married to William lord Li­vingston, ancestor to the earl of Linlithgow.

3. Elizabeth, Ibidem. married to sir Alexander Home of that ilk, ancestor to the earl of Home.

4. Helen, Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 80. married to John lord Sommer­ville.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. PATRICK, third lord Hales, who, being a young nobleman of a considerable fortune, and no less ambition, and of a bold and enterprising genius, became one of the chief ringleaders of that horrid rebellion a­gainst king James III. which proved so fatal to that monarch.

Upon the accession of king James IV. to the throne, he was prime minister, and had the sole disposal of all places depending on the state. In the very first year of that reign he obtained a charter, under the great seal, of the lordships of Bothwell and Crich­ton, which were then in the crown by the forfeiture of the former proprietors, John Ramsay lord Bothwell, and William lord Crichton;Records of parliament. which lordships were erected into an earldom 5th October 1488, and the lord Hales was created earl of Bothwell,Chart. in pub. archiv. per cinc­turam gladii, says the original record.

A little after that, he was made hereditary lord high admiral of Scotland; warden, first of the middle, and then of the west marches; and master of the king's houshold. He got charters,Ibidem. under the great seal, Patricio comi­ti de Bothwell, of a vast number of lands and baronies, inter 1492 & 1502.

He was one of the ambassadors sent to Eng­land to negotiate a marriage for the king of Scotland with the princess Margaret,Rymer, ad annum 1502. daugh­ter of king Henry VII. which afterwards took effect.

He married lady Janet Douglas,Chart. penes com. de Mor­ton. daughter of James earl of Morton, by his wife lady Jean Stewart, lawful daughter of king James I. by whom he had three sons and three daughters.

1. Adam, his heir.

2. John Hepburn, who, being bred to the church,Keith's cata­logue of bi­shops, p. 97. was made bishop of Brechin, anno 1517, where he continued till his death in 1558.

3. Patrick Hepburn, who, being educated by his uncle John, prior of St. Andrews, be­came his successor in that priory, anno 1522, and was secretary of state from 1524 to 1527 inclusive. Ibidem. He was made bishop of Murray in 1535, which dignity he enjoyed till his death in 1573.

1st daughter,Chart. in pub. archiv. lady Janet, married to George lord Seton, and had issue.

2. Mary, Ibidem. married to Archibald earl of An­gus, without issue.

3. Margaret, Ibidem. married to Henry lord Sin­clair, and had issue.

VIII. ADAM, second earl of Bothwell, succeeded his father. He was a man of great courage and valour, and always adhered to the interest of king James IV.

He was possest of a vast estate, which ap­pears by his charters and infeftments in the public registers from 1503 to 1511.Ibidem. He was killed,Hawthorn­den's hist. of the James's. with the king, and many of his brave countrymen, at the battle of Flowdon, in 1513.Chart. in pub. archiv. and Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 174. Having married lady Agnes Stew­art, daughter of James earl of Buchan, by whom he left two sons and two daughters.

1. Patrick, his heir.

2. William Hepburn of Rollandstoun,Chart. in pub. archiv. in the shire of Berwick.

1st daughter,Ibidem. Mary, married to sir John Stewart of Minto.

2. Margaret, Ibidem. married to John Murray of Falahill, hereditary sheriff of Selkirkshire, an­cestor of the family of Philiphaugh.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. PATRICK, third earl, who got a char­ter,Ibidem. under the great seal, Patricio comiti de Bothwell, of the lands and barony of Tamp­tallon, &c. anno 1528.

He married a daughter of Alexander master of Home, ancestor of the present earl of Home, by whom he had a son, Patrick, his heir. He died anno 1534.

X. PATRICK, fourth earl, got a charter, under the great seal,Ibidem. of the lands of Loch­warret, Park-Hakra, &c. Patricio comiti de Bothwell, anno 1537,Ibidem. and married his cousin Agnes, daughter of Henry lord Sinclair, by whom he had a son,

James, his heir,—and a daughter,

Lady Jean, married, 1st, to John Stew­art, prior of Coldinghame, to whom she had Francis, earl of Bothwell, &c. She marri­en, 2dly, John Sinclair, earl of Caithness, whose estate she also heir'd.

He was succeeded by his only son,

XI. JAMES, fifth and last earl of Bothwell, of this family, who was created duke of Ork­ney by Mary queen of Scotland, whom he afterwards had the honour to marry.

As a full account of his life and transactions are to be found in several histories, we shall say no more of him here; but, being accused of the murder of king Henry, queen Mary's [Page 86] second husband, he underwent a trial, and was acquitted by his peers, and the sentence was ratified by the parliament in April 1567.

He was afterwards accused of the same crime, was chased out of the kingdom, out­lawed, and forfeited, in the first parliament held by James earl of Murray.

He fled to Denmark, where he died without issue, anno 1577.

STEWART Earl of BOTHWELL.

THE title of Bothwell being now in the crown, by the forfeiture of James the last earl, king James VI. was pleased to be­stow it upon Francis Stewart, Esq; son of,

I. JOHN, prior of Coldinghame, natural son of king James V.Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 105. who married lady Jean Hepburn, daughter of Patrick the fourth, and sister of James the fifth earl of Bothwell, by whom he had two sons.

1. Francis, afterwards earl of Bothwell.

2. John Stewart, Esq;

He died at Inverness, at a northern circuit with his brothers the earl of Murray and lord Robert,Ibidem. anno 1563.

II. FRANCIS, eldest son of the prior, was created earl of Bothwell, and lord high ad­miral of Scotland, by king James VI. and got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Hales, Auldumstocks, Mor­ham, cum officiis vicecom. de Edinburgh prin­cipalis, & infra constab. de Haddington, & vicecom. de Berwick, baliatus de Lauderdale, & officium magni admiralitatis, &c. Francisco comiti de Bothwell, inter 1584 & 1587.

Chancellor Maitland, being the earl's mor­tal enemy, got him imprisoned in the castle of Edinburgh for witchcraft, &c. He made his escape from thence, and made an assault upon Maitland, in the night-time, at the ab­bey of Holyroodhouse, but failing in his at­tempt, he got sase off, and fled first to Bute, then to England; at last he returned to Scot­land, was pardoned and received into favour by the king; but falling into some bad prac­tices again, and being suspected of having a design to seize the king's person,Stuart's hist: of the royal family. he was out­lawed and forfeited, and again made his escape, went first to England, then to France, Spain and Italy, in which last place he died, in 1624.

He left issue, by lady Margaret Douglas his wife, daughter of David earl of Angus, and relict of Walter Scot of Buccleugh, three sons and three daughters.

1. Francis.

2. John, commendator of Coldinghame, who got charters, under the great seal, Jo­hanni Stewart, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1618 & 1621. filio Francisci comitis de Both­well, terrarum baroniae de Coldinghame, &c.

3. Henry, who got also a charter of the same barony,Ibidem. Henrico filio dicti comitis, &c.

1st daughter, lady Elizabeth, married to James, father of William lord Cranston.

2. Lady Margaret, Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 10 [...] and 106. married to Alan lord Cathcart.

3. Lady Helen, married to John Macfar­lane of that ilk, and by him was mother of Walter Macfarlane of that ilk.

III. FRANCIS, first son of Francis earl of Bothwell, was restored to his father's estate and honours,Rehabilitati [...] in pub. archiv by a writ under the great seal, Francisco Stewart, filio primogenito quondam Francisci comitis de Bothwell, &c. anno 1624.

He married lady Isabel Seton, daughter of Robert earl of Winton, relict of James first earl of Perth; but whether he had issue or not we never could learn, so can trace his genealogy no further.

BRECHIN Lord BRECHIN.

DAVID, earl of Huntington and Garioch, son of Henry prince of Scotland, who was son of king David I. had a natural son, Henry, on whom he bestowed the lordship of Brechin, from which he assumed his sirname, for,Chartul. of St. Andrews. in a donation to the canons of St. An­drews, he is designed,

I. HENRICUS de BRECHIN, filius comi­tis David, &c. and he is mentioned as a wit­ness in several charters and donations to Dun­dee,Chartul. of Arbroath. Scoon, Arbroath, &c.

By Juliana, his wife, he left issue a son,

II. WILLIAM de BRECHIN, who suc­ceeded him, and founded the hospital of Bre­chin;Chart. in pul archiv. in the foundation charter whereof he is designed Willielmus de Brechin, filius Henri­ci, filii comitis David, &c.

He made a great figure in the reigns of [Page 87] king Alexander II. and III. and was employed in most of the public transactions of his time. He was joined in commission with the earls of Menteith,Rymer's foe­dera Angliae, ad ann. 1255, tom. I. p. 566, tom. II. p. 266, 1083, &c. Buchan, and Mar, to treat with the English de negotiis regni, &c. He was likeways an arbitrator betwixt sir Peter Maule of Panmuir, domina Christina de Valoniis, his spouse,Chartul. of Arbroath. and the abbot of Arbroath, about the settling of their marches, which at last was amicably adjusted, anno 1254. He was one of the privy council to king Alexander III.

He married—Cummin, daughter of William earl of Buchan, by whom he had a son and successor,

III. DAVID, third lord Brechin, a man of great courage and magnanimity, and was at the battle of Methven,Rymer. where he remark­ably distinguished himself, anno 1306.

He married—Bruce, daughter of Ro­bert earl of Carrick,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 35. and sister of king Ro­bert Bruce, by whom he had a son,

David, lord Brechin, who succeeded him, —and a daughter,

Margaret, married to sir David Barclay of Cairns, in vicecom. de Fise, of whom after­wards.

IV. DAVID,Fordun, Bu­chanan, &c. fourth lord Brechin, was one of those great men who signed that fa­mous letter to the pope, asserting the inde­pendency of our country, anno 1320; but, having been guilty of some treasonable prac­tices, particularly of having been privy to a design of betraying Berwick into the hands of the English, anno 1321, he was tried, condemned, and executed; and having no issue, his estate and honours went with his sister Margaret to the above sir David Bar­clay her husband.

BARCLAY Lord BRECHIN.

IV. SIR DAVID BARCLAY, who became lord of Brechin, by marrying Mar­garet, daughter of the third, and sister of the fourth and last lord of the sirname of Brechin, was a man of great valour, and a true lover of his country.

He adhered firmly to the interest of king Robert Bruce,Abercrom­bie's martial atchievments. and did him many signal ser­vices. He and his wife gave a considerable donation to the monks of Balmerino,Register of Balmerino. for the safety of their souls, &c.

They left issue a son,

Sir David,—and a daughter,

Jean, married to sir David Fleming of Biggar,Chart. penes com. de Pan­muir, ad an­num 1381. whose only daughter, Marion, was married to William Maule of Panmuir, of whom more hereafter.

He was succeeded by his son,

V. Sir DAVID BARCLAY, sixth lord of Brechin, who was a great patriot, a man of singular courage and activity, and performed many glorious actions in favours of king Da­vid Bruce.

He had the missortune to be engaged in some fatal disputes with the Douglasses,Buchanan. and at last, at the instigation of William lord of Liddisdale, was put to death, anno 1348.

He left issue only one child,

VI. MARGARET BARCLAY, who was married to Walter earl of Athole, son of king Robert II. with whom he got the lord­ship of Brechin, and added that to his other titles,Chart. in pub. archiv. which appears by a charter, under the great seal, Waltero senescallo domino Brechin, &c.

This Walter was made earl of Athole after the death of his nephew prince David, and earl of Strathern after the death of his bro­ther.

Margaret, by her said husband, left issue two sons.

1. Sir David.

2. Alan, earl of Caithness, who was kil­led at the battle of Inverlochie, without issue, anno 1428, or, according to others, in 1431.

VII. Sir DAVID, the eldest son, designed filius & h [...]eres comitis Atholiae, was one of the hostages for the ransom of king James I.Rymer's soe­dera Angliae, tom. X. p. 308, 309, &c. an­no 1424, and died in England, leaving issue a son,

VIII. ROBERT, who was concerned in that execrable murder of king James I. of which bloody scene the earl of Athole, this Robert's grandfather, and the king's uncle were the chief promoters.

The earl was most justly execute,All Scotch hi­storians. and all the estates and honours of the family were annexed to the crown.

But sir Thomas Maule of Panmuir claimed the lordship of Brechin,Chart. in pub. archiv. & pe­nes com. de Panmuir. as being lineally de­scended of Jean Barclay, daughter of sir David Barclay fifth, and sister of the sixth lord of Brechin, and nearest heir to Margaret Bar­clay, countess of Athole, to whose heirs it [Page 88] was provided, failing heirs of her body; but his claim was at that time rejected by the court, though the family of Panmuir got pos­session of the lands of Brechin afterwards, by purchase, which is still used as one of the titles of the family, they being lineal repre­sentatives both of the Brechins and Barclays, lords of Brechin.

CAMPBELL Earl of BREADALBINE.

THE immediate ancestor of this great branch of the family of Argyle was,

Sir DUNCAN CAMPBELL of Lochow, (the twelfth generation of that illustrious house in a direct male-line) created lord Campbell of Ar­gyle by king James II. who married lady Mar­garet (or Marjory) Stewart, daughter of Robert duke of Albany, second lawful son of king Ro­bert II. by whom he had three sons.

1. Celestine, who died young.

2. Archibald, ancestor of the duke of Argyle.

3. Sir Colin Campbell, the first of this fa­mily.

1. This sir COLIN was a man of good parts, great courage and magnanimity. He travelled much into foreign countries, and was one of the knights of Rhodes or Malta, where, by his valour and conduct, he ac­quired immortal honour.

He was always a firm friend of the royal family, to whom he was nearly related, and was at great pains to bring the cruel murder­ers of king James I. to condign punishment.

He got the lands of Glenurchy from his fa­ther,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1468 & 1476. to which he added several considerable acquisitions afterwards, as appears from many charters in our public records.

Particularly he obtained from the crown a grant of the lands and estate of Lawers, for his many faithful services, &c. upon which he got a charter under the great seal.Ibidem. And though there is a full account of this family to be sound in Nisbet's appendix, page 221 &. infra, yet we shall here briefly deduce their genealogy, marriages, and most remark­able occurences, from the first, sir Colin, to the present earl.

Sir Colin married, 1st, lady Mary Stew­art, daughter of Duncan earl of Lennox, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Margaret Stewart, el­dest daughter and co-heiress of John lord Lorn; on account of which marriage this family have always quartered the arms of Stewart of Lorn with their own. By her he had a son,

Sir Duncan, his heir,

He married,Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 222 3dly, Margaret, daughter of Robert Robertson of Strowan, by whom he had another son,

John, who was bred to the church, and was bishop of the Isles, in 1506,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to sir Archibald Napier of Merchiston.

He took to his fourth wife,Ibidem. Margaret, daughter of Luke Stirling of Keir, by whom he had a third son,

Sir John, who was ancestor of the Camp­bells of Lawers, and earl of Loudon, by a son of this family marrying the heiress thereof.

Of this marriage he had also a daughter,

Helen, married to William Stewart of Ba­lindoran, a grandson of Murdoch duke of Al­bany, of whom several families of the name of Stewart in Perthshire are descended.

Sir Colin died in the beginning of the year 1498, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. Sir DUNCAN CAMPBELL, who, in his father's lifetime, was designed of Glen­urchy, by a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. dated 26th February 1480. He was much in favour with king James IV. being a man of good parts, great courage, and a faithful and loyal subject.

He got from that prince a grant of a roy­al bailiary, for his faithful services, dated 3d September 1498;Ibidem. and also grants of several other lands, as by charters in 1502 and 1503.

He married lady Margaret Douglas,Chart. penes ducem de Douglas. daugh­ter of George earl of Angus, by whom he had issue three sons and one daughter.

1. Sir Colin, his heir.

2. Archibald, who was ancestor of the Campbells of Glenlyon.

3. Patrick Campbell, Chart. in pub. archiv. who, failing issue of his brother Archibald, was next in the sub­stitution to succeed to the estate of Glenlyon.

His daughter,—, was married to— Toshach of Monyvaird, an antient family in Perthshire.

He accompanied the king to the fatal field of Flowdon, where he lost his life, with his royal master, anno 1513. He was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. Sir COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenurchy.

[Page 89] a man of great merit and accomplishments. He married lady Margaret Stewart,Lives of the officers of state, and Stuart's hist. of the royal family. daughter of John, earl of Athole, uterine brother of king James II. by whom he had issue three sons and one daughter.

1. Duncan, all successively lairds of Glen­orchy

2. John, all successively lairds of Glen­orchy

3. Colin, all successively lairds of Glen­orchy.

His daughter, Catharine, was married to sir William Murray of Tullibardin.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. Sir DUNCAN,Chart. in pub. archiv. who married Marga­ret, daughter of sir John Colquhoun of Luss, by whom he had only one daughter, Mar­garet, married to John MacDougal of Raray in Lorn; and dying in 1534, without male­issue, was succeeded by his brother,

IV. Sir JOHN CAMPBELL of Glenorchy, who got a charter,Ibid. inter an­num 1536 & 1540. under the great seal, of several lands, and married Marian, daughter of sir Archibald Edmonstone of Duntreath, by whom he had two daughters.

1. Margaret, married to Alexander Home of Argathie.

2. Christian, married to Edward Redheugh of Cultabragin.

Sir John dying without male-issue, was suc­ceeded by his brother,

IV. Sir COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenorchy, a man of prudence, wisdom and sagacity. He was a great promoter of the reformation,Spottiswood's church hist. and was joined in commission with the earls of Morton, Gowrie, and others, for settling and establishing the policy and church go­vernment, anno 1573.

He built the house of Taymouth in Bread­albane, which is still the chief seat of the fa­mily.Chart. in pub. archiv. He got charters, under the great seal, of several lands and baronies, and married Catharine,Nisbet's ap­pendix. daughter of William, lord Ruth­ven, by whom he had issue four sons and five daughters.

1. Sir Duncan, his heir.

2. Colin Campbell of Ardbeath.

3. Mr. Patrick Campbell of Achinryre.

4. Archibald Campbell, who got part of the ba [...]ony of Monzie, by marrying the daughter and heiress of Andrew Toshach of Monzie; but he died without issue.

1st daughter, Beatrix, married to sir John Campbell of Lawers, ancestor of the earl of Loudoun; the Campbells of Aberuchil being descended of a younger son of this family.

2. Margaret, married to James, earl of Glencairn, and had a numerous issue.

3. Mary, married to John, earl of Men­teith, and had issue.

4. Elizabeth, married to sir John Camp­bell of Ardkinlas, and had issue.

5.—, married to—Napier of Merchiston.

Sir Colin died in 1584, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. Sir DUNCAN CAMPBELL of Glenor­chy, who, being a man of singular endow­ments, and possest of many excellent quali­ties, was in great favour with king James VI.Rymer, tom. XVI. p. 60. He was one of the great barons who assisted at queen Anne's coronation, anno 1590,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1590 & 1600. and got charters, under the great seal, of several lands.

In the year 1617, he was made heretable keeper of the forests of Mamlorn,Ibidem. Berinakan-Sauche, or Bendaskerlie, Finglenbeg, and Finglenmore, with many ample privileges, which before had been in his family only by temporary gifts from the crown.

He was made knight baronet in 1627, and high sheriff of the county of Perth for life.

He married, 1st, lady Jean Stewart,Nisbet's ap­pendix. daugh­ter of John, earl of Athole, chancellor of Scot­land, by whom he had issue seven sons and five daughters.

1. Sir Colin, his heir.

2. Sir Robert Campbell of Glenfalloch, who succeeded his brother.

3. Duncan, who died young.

4. John Campbell of Achinryre.

5. Archibald Campbell of Monzie, of whom are descended the Campbells of Lochlan, Fi­nab, and others.

6. Duncan, both died young.

7. Alexander, both died young.

1st daughter, Jean, married to sir John Campbell of Calder, and had issue.

2. Anne, married to sir Patrick Ogilvie of Inchmartin, and had issue.

3. Margaret, married to sir Alexander Menzies of Weem.

4.—, married to—Irvin of Drum.

5.—, married to—MacDougal of Donnolioch.

Sir Duncan married, 2dly, Julian, daugh­ter of Patrick, lord Sinclair, by whom he had a son,

Patrick, who obtained from his father the lands of Edinample,—and a daughter,

Jean, married to John, earl of Athole, and had issue.

He died anno 1631, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. Sir COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenorchy, who got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, terra­rum baroniae de Lude, &c. He married lady Juliana Campbell,Retour in the register. daughter of Hugh, earl of [Page 90] Loudoun, but died without issue, anno 1640, and was succeeded by his brother,

VI. Sir ROBERT CAMPBELL of Glenor­chy,Nisbet's ap­pendix. formerly of Glenfalloch, who married Isabel, daughter of sir Lauchlan MacIntosh of Forecastle, captain of the Clanchattan, by whom he had issue five sons and nine daughters.

1. Sir John; his heir.

2. Sir Colin of Mochaster, ancestor of Colin Campbell of Carwhin, who got a char­ter,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1664 & 1672. under the great seal, ‘"Colino Campbell, filio secundo genito domini Roberti Campbell de Glenorchy, militis, terrarüm de Larg,&c."’

3. William Campbell of Glenfalloch.

4. Alexander Campbell of Lochdochart.

5. Duncan Campbell of Auchlyne.

1st daughter, Margaret, married to John Cameron of Lochiel, and was mother of the brave sir Evan Cameron.

2. Mary, married to sir James Campbell of Ardkinlas.

3. Jean, married to Duncan Stewart of Appin.

4. Isabel, married to Robert Irvin of Fid­derit, son of Alexander Irvin of Drum.

5. Juliana, married to John MacLean of Lochbowie.

6.—, married to—Robertson of Lude.

7.—, married to—Robertson of Fascalzie.

8.—, married to—Toshach of Monyvaird.

9.—, married to—Campbell of Glenlyon.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. Sir JOHN CAMPBELL of Glenorchy, who was a man of good parts, great honour, and universally esteemed. He got charters, under the great seal,Ibidem. of several lands. He married,Nisbet's ap­pendix. 1st, lady Mary Graham, daughter of William, earl of Menteith, Strathern and Airth, lord justice general in the reign of king Charles I. by whom he had a son,

Sir John, afterwards earl of Breadalbane, —and a daughter,

—, married to sir Alexander Menzies of Weem.

He married, 2dly, Christian, daughter of John Muschet of Craighead, by whom he had several daughters, of whom are deseend­ed Campbell of Stonefield, MacNaughton of that ilk, Campbell of Airds, and Campbell of Ardchattan, &c. &c.

He was succeeded by his son,

VIII. Sir JOHN CAMPBELL of Glenorchy, a man of sound judgment, great capacity, and accounted one of the ablest statesmen of his time. He gave many instances of his loyalty and attachment to king Charles II. during the usurpation, and gave great assistance to gene­ral Middleton and his forces in the High­lands. He used his utmost endeavours with general Monk to declare for a free parlia­ment, which he thought was the most effec­tual way to restore the king. For all which his good services, king Charles was pleased to create him a peer, by the title of earl of Caithness, 28th June 1677, which title he afterwards exchanged for that of Breadal­bane, &c. with his majesty's approbation; upon which he got a new pat [...]nt, with the former precedency, ‘"To him, and any of his sons,Diploma in cancellaria, S. D. N. R. ad ann. 1681 by his first wife, whom he should think fit to name, by a writ under his hand, any time of his life, &c. &c."’ The words of the patent are, ‘"Creamus, &c. praefatum Johannem Campbell, & quemcun­que ex filiis suis, inter eum & demortuam dominam Mariam Rich, ejus primam spon­sam procreatum, quem dictus Johannes Campbell, per script [...]m & denominationem sub manu sua, quocunque tempore ejus vitae, nominare & designare idoneum judicabit; haeredesque masculo [...] ex corpore dicti sui filii (ita designand.) procreandos; quibus defici­entibus, haeredes masculos procreatos, seu procreandos, ex corpore dicti Johannis Camp­bell; quibus deficientibus, propinquiores & legitimos ejus haeredes masculos; quibus de­ficientibus, propinquiores & legitimos ejus haeredes quoscunque, comites de Breadalbane & Holland, vicecomites de Tay & Paintland, dominos Glenorchy, Benederaloch, Ormelie, & Weik, &c. data 13tio Augusti 1681."’

He was likeways in great savour with king James VII. was one of his privy council, and served him faithfully while he continued on the throne; but after he went away, and there appeared no further hopes of his re­turning, the great love and affection he had to his native country made him bend all his thoughts to get peace and tranquillity settled in the nation; and therefore he used his ut­most endeavours to get the clans to lay down their arms, judging it impossible for them to accomplish their designs.

His behaviour at this period of life has been censured by some, though his conduct in general is sufficiently vindicated.

He was a great enemy to the union in 1706, thinking it inconsistent with the ho­nour and independency of his country. It is alledged he was engaged with my lord Mar in the rebellion anno 1715; but his advanced age, and the great loyalty of his son, the lord Glenorchy, made his conduct in that affair to be overlooked.

[Page 91] He married, 1st, lady Mary Rich, daugh­ter of the noble and valiant Henry, earl of Holland in England, by whom he had issue two sons.

1. Duncan, who died unmarried.

2. John, lord Glenorchy, who became his heir.

He married, 2dly, lady Mary Campbell, countess dowager of Caithness, and daughter of Archibald, marquis of Argyle, by whom he had a son,

Mr. Colin Campbell, who died in the flower of his age.—He had likeways a daughter,

Lady Mary, married to Archibald Cock­burn of Langton, Esq;

The earl died in 1716, in the 81st year of his age, and was succeeded by his son,

IX. JOHN, second earl of Breadalbane, who was one of the sixteen peers for Scot­land to two British parliaments, called to meet in 1734 and 1741; was lord lieutenant of the county of Perth; and was a firm friend of the present establishment both in church and state.

He married, 1st, lady Frances Cavendish, daughter and co-heiress of Henry, duke of Newcastle, but she died without surviving issue.

He married, 2dly, Henrietta, sister to Ed­ward, first earl of Jersey, and daughter of sir Edward Villiers, knight, son of Edward, vis­count Grandison, by whom he had a son,

John, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Charlotte, a lady of fine accom­plishments, died unmarried.

2. Lady Harriot, who, in 1736, was ap­pointed one of the ladies of the bedchamber to their royal highnesses Amelia and Caroline.

This earl died in 1752, and was succeeded by his son,

X. JOHN, third earl of Breadalbane, who, in 1718, was made master of horse to the princess royal. In 1720 he was envoy extra­ordinary and plenipotentiary to the court of Denmark.

In 1725 he was created one of the knights of the bath.

In 1727 he was member of parliament for the burrow of Saltash in the county of Corn­wall; and, after his father's death, was e­lected one of the sixteen Scotch peers to the last British parliament, anno 1754.

He married, 1st, lady Amabell de Gray, eldest daughter and co-heiress of Henry, duke of Kent, by whom he had a son,

Henry, who died young,—and a daugh­ter,

Lady Jemima, who, in May 1740, was married to the lord viscount Royston, eldest son and apparent heir of Philip, earl of Hard­wicke, lord high chancellor of Great-Britain, and succeeded to her grandfather Henry, duke of Kent, as marchioness of Gray, in June thereafter.

Her mother, lady Amabell, dying at Lon­don, in March 1726, the earl, in 1730, mar­ried, 2dly, Mrs. Arabella Pershall, grand­daughter and heiress of sir Thomas Pershall of Great Sugnal, in the county of Stafford, baronet, by whom he got a very considerable estate in that county, and by her had issue.

1. George, who died in his infancy.

XI. 2. JOHN, lord Glenorchy, married to Willielmina, second daughter of William Maxwell of Preston, Esq; a cadet of the noble family of Nithsdale, and sister of Ma­ry, countess of Sutherland.

ARMS.

Quarterly; 1st and 4th, girony of eight pieces, or and sable: 2d, or, a fess-cheque, argent and azure: 3d, argent, a galley, sable, her oars in action, and her sails furled close.

CREST; on a wreath, a boar's head eras­ed, proper.

SUPPORTERS; two stags of the latter, attired and unguled, or.

MOTTO; Follow me.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Castle-Kelchurn in Glenorchy, Argyle­shire; Finlarig and Taymouth in Breadalbane; St. James's Place, London; and Great-Sugnal in Staffordshire.

WEMYSS Lord BRUNTISLAND.

THE immediate ancestor of this family was,

Sir DAVID WEMYSS of that ilk, the fifteenth generation of the noble and an­tient family of Wemyss, in a direct male­line, who flourished in the reign of king James V. He married Catharine, daughter of Henry lord Sinclair, by whom he had two sons.

[Page 92] 1. Sir John Wemyss of that ilk, his successor.

2. Sir James Wemyss, who was designed of Caskieberry, which lands he got by mar­rying Janet Wardlaw, heiress thereof, de­scended of the antient family of Tory. By her he had issue a son,

James Wemyss of Caskicberry, whose grandson,

Sir James Wemyss of Caskieberry, was made general of the artillery in the reign of king Charles I. but was deprived of that of­fice by the parliament, for being at duke Ha­milton's engagement, 10th July 1649.

He afterwards got an act for making of leather cannon, and several other engines of war.

He was a steady friend of the royal fami­ly, was a colonel of horse under king Charles II. with whom he was in great favour.

He was father of

Sir James Wemyss of Caskieberry, who was created a lord of parliament for life by king Charles II. by the title of lord Brunt­island; upon which he got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, dated at Whitehall 18th April 1672.

He married Margaret countess of Wemyss, daughter of David the second earl, by whom he had a son,

David, third earl of Wemyss, &c. &c. &c.

Vide Title, Wemyss Earl of Wemyss.

CUMMIN Earl of BUCHAN.

THE immediate ancestor of this noble family was,

V. Sir RICHARD CUMMIN, (the fifth generation of the antient house of Badenoch) who flourished in the reigns of king Malcolm IV. and king William the Lion. He left is­sue three sons.

1. Sir John, his successor, lord of Bade­noch.

2. Sir Walter, afterwards earl of Menteith.

VI. 3. Sir WILLIAM, designed dominus de Tindail, the first of this family, who married Margaret,Chartul. of Arbroath, pe­nes Mactar­lane. daughter and heiress of Fergus earl of Buchan, in whose right he became possessed of that earldom.

He made a great figure in the reign of king Alexander II.Chartul. of Coldingham, penes eund. p. 29. who constituted him justiciar of Scotland, anno 1220; and that same year he was one of the magnates Scotiae that con­cluded the marriage betwixt king Alexander II. of Scotland,Rymer, tom. I. p. 241, ad annum 1220. and Johanna, eldest daughter of John king of England.

The year thereafter he was one of the Scotch nobles that agreed to the tocher,Ibid. p. 252. and settled the jointure of the said princess Jo­hanna, sister of king Henry III. of England, and he is then designed comes Buchaniae &c. ju­sticiarius Scotiae, anno 1221.

He was witness also to a charter of Lau­rence lord Abernethy,Chart. in ar­chiv. familiae de Douglas. under the same desig­nation, anno 1222.

He made a donation to the abbacy of Ar­broath,Chartul. of Arbroath. with consent of Margaret, countess of Buchan, his spouse, confirmed by king Alexander II. anno 1222.

He founded the abbay of Deer in Buchan for Cistertian monks, pro salute animae suae, &c. and died anno 1233,Obiit Williel­mus comes de Buchan, anno 1233, qui ab­batiam de Deer funda­vit, &c. Chron. of Melross. leaving issue, by the said Margaret, a son,

William, his heir,—and a daughter, —, married to William earl of Mar. She died in the year 1267.Obiit comi­tissa de Mar, soror com. de Buchan, anno 1267. For­dun, vol. II. p. 109.

He was succeeded by his son,

VII. WILLIAM, second earl of Buchan, who was also justiciar of Scotland.

This earl, with some others of his clan, which at that time was very numerous and powerful, carried off king Alexander III. then about thirteen years old, from Kinross to Stir­ling, anno 1255, for which he was forfeited by a meeting of the estates,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. but was after­wards pardoned, and again received into fa­vour, anno 1258. He died that same year, leaving issue two sons and five daughters.

1. Alexander, his heir.

2. William, who,Chartul. of St. Andrews, penes Mac­farlane, p. 344. in a donation to the priory of St. Andrews, is designed frater A­lexandri comitis de Buchan, &c. but we can give no account of his posterity.

1st daughter,Chartul. of Kelso, penes eund. Bridget, married to Patrick Dunbar, earl of March.

2. Egidia, Chartul. of Arbroath. married, 1st, to Malise earl of Strathen, 2dly, to sir Philip Meldrum, knight, anno 1262.

3. Agnes, Martin's ge­nealogical collections. married to Robert de Umsra­ville, lord of the manour of Ridderdale in England.

4.—, married to William lord Bre­chin, and had issue.

5.—, married to William lord Soulis,Ibidem. and had issue two sons, William, and John lord Soulis.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. ALEXANDER, third earl of Buchan, [Page 93] who was one of the greatest men of his time. He began to make a figure in his father's life­time, and after his death was made justiciar of Scotland by king Alexander III.

He was one of the Scotch nobles appointed to hold a convention with the English to ad­just several affairs of state,Rymer, tom. I. p. 670. anno 1258, and is then designed Alexander comes de Buchan, ju­sticiarius Scotiae, &c.

In 1284 he was one of the magnates Sco­tiae that bound themselves to maintain and de­fend the right of king Alexander's grandchild,Ib. tom. II. p. 266. the princess of Norway, to the crown of Scot­land, &c. and is then designed comes de Bu­chan, constabularius & justiciarius Scotiae. Buchanan, &c. He was appointed one of the six governors of the kingdom after the death of king Alexander III. anno 1286.

He was also one of the Scotch nobles that agreed to the marriage of the same princess,Rymer, tom. II. p. 471, 1083. then queen of Scotland, with prince Edward, eldest son to the king of England, anno 1290.

He made many donations to the religious, which appears from the chartularies of Mur­ray, Arbroath, &c.

He married Elizabeth, or Isabel, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of Roger de Quin­ci, earl of Wincester, by Helen his wife, daugh­ter of Alan lord of Galloway, constable of Scot­land, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. William, who,Book of ori­ginal writs, penes Mac­farlane, vol. II. p. 159. in an authentic char­ter, is designed filius junior Alexandri comi­tis de Buchan, &c.

He died betwixt the years 1290 and 1292, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. JOHN, fourth earl of Buchan, con­stable of Scotland, who was also one of the greatest men in the kingdom.Rymer, tom. II. p. 553, 594. He was one of the arbiters chosen on the part of John Ba­liol, in the competition for the crown between him and the Bruce, anno 1292.

He was sent ambassador to treat of a peace with France,Ibidem. which was happily concluded, anno 1303.

He married Isabel, daughter of Duncan, earl of Fife, says Mr. Crawfurd; but, ac­cording to others,Martin's col­lections. lady Mary, daughter of John Baliol, by whom he had a son,

John, Rymer, tom. IV. p. 5 [...]4, and tom. V. p. 177. his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Alicia, married to sir Henry Beaumont in England, who afterwards assumed the title of earl of Buchan.

2. Rosamond, or,Winton's chronicle. according to others, Margaret, married to sir John Ross, knight.

After king Robert Bruce's accession to the crown in 1306, this earl continued steady in his attachment to the Baliols, and at last turn­ed an implacable enemy to his country; for which he was outlawed, and his estate and honours were forfeited to the crown. He retired to England, where he died anno 1329.

X. JOHN, his only son, married Jean, second daughter of William de Valoniis, earl of Pembroke, but died without issue, which, 'tis said, ended the male-line of the Cum­mins earls of Buchan. But

Jordanus de Cummin, a relation of this fa­mily, got the lands of Inneralachy from A­lexander earl of Buchan, is witness to many of his charters, and is said to have been an­cestor of the Cummins of Culter, who had a charter of these lands from king James III.Chart. in pu [...]. archiv. anno 1477.

STEWART Earl of BUCHAN.

THE title of Buchan continued in the crown from the forfeiture of John the fourth earl, until king Robert II. bestowed it upon ALEXANDER STEWART,Stuart's hist: of the royal family. his fourth son, to whom he gave also the lands and lord­ship of Badenoch, to be held by him as freely as John Cummin held the same. He like­ways created him earl of Buchan, anno 1374.

This Alexander earl of Buchan married Eupheme countess of Ross;Chart. in ro­tul. Roberti [...]di. but dying with­out issue, anno 1394, was buried in the chan­cel of the cathedral church of Dunkeld; and his brother Robert,Ibid. History of the royal family, and Lives of the [...]fficers of [...]. duke of Albany, gover­nor of Scotland, got his earldom, which he bestowed upon his valiant son John of Coul, lord of Railston and Tillicultry, who became earl of Buchan and Ross, and was also cham­berlain of Scotland, anno 1406.

He was a man of great abilities either for peace or war,Ibid. Bucha­nan, &c. and had the command of 7000 auxiliaries that were sent to France to the as­sistance of king Charles VI. where he per­formed many great and glorious actions, which are fully related both by Scotch and French historians; and, for his great merit, he was made constable of France.

After having gained immortal honour to himself and his country in that kingdom, he was slain at the battle of Verneuil, anno 1424.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of Archi­bald earl of Douglas, by princess Margaret, his wife, daughter of king Robert III. by whom he had only one child,

[Page 94] Lady Margaret, married to George lord Seton, ancestor of the earls of Winton; in consequence of which marriage the Setons have ever since continued to quarter the arms of Buchan with their own.

This earl having no male issue, the title of Buchan again returned to the crown; but king James II. gave a pension of forty merks yearly to the said George lord Seton, and lady Margaret his spouse, and the longest li­ver of them two, in lieu of the earldom.

STEWART Earl of BUCHAN.

THE next who was dignified with the title of earl of Buchan was JAMES, son of sir James Stewart, called the Black Knight of Lorn, the sixth generation, in a direct male-line, from Alexander lord high steward of Scotland, great grandfather of king Ro­bert II.

This sir James married queen Jean,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p. 173. daugh­ter of John duke of Somerset, son of John of Gaunt duke of Lancaster, son of Edward III. king of England, widow of king James I. of Scotland, by whom he had three sons.

1. John, earl of Athole.—Vide page 49 of this work.

2. Sir James, afterwards earl of Buchan.

3. Andrew, bishop of Murray.

I. Sir JAMES STEWART, second son of the Black Knight of Lorn by queen Jean, and uterine brother of king James II. married, 1st, Margaret, daughter and sole heiress of sir Alexander Ogilvie of Auchterhouse, he­retable sheriff of the county of Forfar. He got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. & Chart. penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock. under the great seal, to James Stewart, knight, (the king's uncle) and Mar­garet Ogilvie, his spouse, of the lands and barony of Strathalva, and others, dated 4th March 1466.

He was a man of great accomplishments, both natural and acquired, was a faithful counsellor to king James III. with whom he was in great favour, and who raised him to the dignity of the peerage,Ibidem. by the title of earl of Buchan, lord Auchterhouse, &c. an­no 1469.

He was appointed warden of the south marches,Lives of the officers of state. and lord high chamberlain of Scot­land, anno 1471.

He got a charter, under the great seal, of the whole earldom of Buchan, Jacobo comiti de Buchan, Chart. in pub. archiv. domino de Auchterhouse, avunculo regis, &c. dated 4th October 1477; and a charter,Chart. penes com. de Tra­quair. under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Traquair, dated 3d February 1478.

He got also charters of a great many other lands and baronies,Ibid. et chart. in pub. arch. too numerous to be here inserted, inter 1477 & 1488.

He was a most loyal and faithful subject to king James III. and, after his murder, car­ried his resentment to the highest pitch against all those who had a hand in embroiling his affairs.

By the said Margaret Ogilvie, his first wife, he left issue a son,

Alexander, his heir.

He married,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. 2dly, Margaret Murray, a daughter of Philiphaugh, an antient family in the county of Selkirk, by whom he had another son,

James, Ibidem. ancestor of the earl of Traquair,—and three daughters.

1. Lady Agnes, married, 1st, to Adam earl of Bothwell, 2dly, to Robert lord Max­well.

2. Lady Elizabeth, married to John Home of Coldingknows, ancestor of the earl of Home.

3. Lady Isabel, who had a daughter, Ja­net, by king James IV. married to Malcolm lord Fleming.

This James earl of Buchan and lord Auch­terhouse, Margaret Ogilvie his spouse, and sir Alexander Stewart, their son and appa­rent heir,Chart. pene Johannem Erskine de Carnock. granted an obligation to Thomas Ogilvie of Clova, concerning some lands in Angus, on 30th August 1493, upon which he got a charter; and the earl's seal bears, quarterly, 1st, three garbs; 2d, a fess cheque; 3d, not distinct; 4th, a spread eagle.

The earl died before 1499, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

II. ALEXANDER,Ibidem. earl of Buchan, who grants a procuratory to William apparent lord Ruthven, and David Kinneir of that ilk, for resigning several of his lands into the king's hands, 14th September 1499.

In his father's lifetime he married, 1st, Isabel Ogilvie, but of what family we know not; and got a charter,Chart. in pub archiv. under the great seal, to sir Alexander Stewart, son and apparent heir of James earl of Buchan, and Isabel Ogil­vie his spouse, of the lands and barony of Ket­ness, Leuchat, &c. anno 1491.

By her he had issue a son,

John, his heir.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of William lord Ruthven, but by her he had no [Page 95] issue; and, after his death, she married John Erskine of Dun,Chart. in pub. archiv. which appears by a charter, under the great seal, Johanni Erskine, & Margaretae de Ruthven, comitissae de Buchan, ejus sponsae, of several lands, anno 1508.

The earl died anno 1505, and was succeed­ed by his son,

III. JOHN, earl of Buchan, who got a pre­cept from John lord Glammis,Precept penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock, &c. superior of the lands and barony of Tannadas, &c. for infeft­ing John Stewart, as heir to Alexander earl of Buchan, his father, in the lands of Mames and others in the said barony, 30th May 1506.

He got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, of several other lands, Johanni comiti de Buchan, anno 1514.

He was infeft in the lordship of Auchter­house, baronies of Narva,Chart. penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock. Kynalty, Essye, Ketness, &c. all lying in the shire of Forfar, 28th November 1517.

He was one of the privy-council to king James V. with whom he was in great favour.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir John Scrimzeour of Dudhope, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. John, designed master of Buchan.

2. James Stewart, Esq; who married Christian,Stuart's hit. of the royal family, and Chart. penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock. daughter of John Strang of Bal­easkie, by whom he had a son, James, (who married the countess of Athole, and died without issue) and two daughters, Margaret and Isabel.

The earl's daughter,—, married to Thomas Dempster of Muiresk, Esq;

IV. JOHN, master of Buchan, eldest son and apparent heir of earl John, married, 1st, lady Mary Stewart, daughter of James earl of Murray, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of Walter Ogilvie of Boyne, by whom he had one daughter,

Christian, Ibidem. afterwards countess of Buchan.

The master, with many of the nobility of Scotland, was killed at the battle of Pinkie, anno 1547, his father being then alive, who dying anno 1551, his estate and honours de­volved upon his grandchild,

CHRISTIAN, countess of Buchan, daugh­ter of John master of Buchan, who,Chart. penes Johannem. Erskine de Carnock. in a deed granted to Thomas Copland of Udo, is designed fiar of the earldom of Buchan, anno 1555.

DOUGLAS Earl of BUCHAN.

V. THE said CHRISTIAN,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, and Chart. in pub. archiv. countess of Bu­chan, married ROBERT, second son of sir Robert Douglas of Lochleven, and bro­ther-german of William earl of Morton, who, in her right became earl of Buchan.

They had issue a son,

James, their heir,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, married, 1st, to Mr. Ri­chard Douglas, brother to the earl of Whit­tinghame, 2dly, to Alexander Iryin of Drum, but died without issue.

2. Elizabeth, married to Andrew Fraser of Murchil, ancestor of lord Fraser.

They were succeeded by their son,

VI. JAMES DOUGLAS, earl of Buchan, who was served heir in general to Robert earl of Buchan,Retour penes magistrum Erskine de Carnock. lord Glendouachy, &c. his father, before an inquest of fifteen landed gentlemen, at Banff, the 2d day of April 1583.

James earl of Buchan is also served heir general of Christian countess of Buchan,Ibidem. at Edinburgh, before the macers, 24th day of May 1588.

He married Margaret Ogilvie, daughter of Walter lord Deskford, ancestor of the earl of Finlater, by whom he had a daughter,

Mary, his sole heiress.

He died 24th August 1601, was buried at Auchterhouse, and succeeded in his estate and honours by his only child,

MARY DOUGLAS, designed countess of Buchan,Retour penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock. in the principal decreet of ranking anno 1606, who chose for her curators sir Walter Ogilvie of Finlater, knight, sir Ar­chibald Douglas of Kilor, knight, Walter lord Blantyre, William earl of Tullibardin, sir Michael Elphingston, knight, John Li­vingston of Dunipace, and John Murray of Touchaddam, 26th April 1615.

This Mary countess of Buchan is served heir in general of James earl of Buchan,Ibidem. her great grandfather's great grandfather, at Banss, 29th September 1627.

She is also served heir in general to John earl of Buchan,Ibidem. her grandfather's grandfather, and to John master of Buchan, her great grand­father, in the same year 1627.

ERSKINE Earl of BUCHAN.

VII. THE foresaid MARY DOUGLAS, coun­tess of Buchan, married JAMES ER­SKINE, eldest son, of the second marriage, of John earl of Mar, lord high treasurer of Scot­land, by lady Mary Stewart, daughter of Esme duke of Lenox, who, in her right, became earl of Buchan.

They got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, Jacobo comiti Buchaniae, & Mariae Douglas comitissae, suae sponsae, of the lands and barony of Auchterhouse, and a great many others, betwixt 1615 and 1618.

This countess Mary resigned the earldom and titles of Buchan in favours of James Er­skine and herself, and the longest liver of them two, in liferent, and the heirs-male to be pro­create betwixt them; whom failing, to the said James's heir-male whatever. This is con­firmed by a charter,Chart. penes comitem de Buchan. under the great seal, dated 25th November 1625.

It may here be observed, that, by a decreet of the lords of session, 25th July 1628, it is found, that the earls of Buchan had the pre­cedency of the earls of Eglington, Montrose, Cassilis,Records of parliament. Caithness, and Glencairn; and this is ratified by parliament, 28th June 1633.

This earl was a man of good parts, great honour and probity, was highly esteemed both by king James VI. and king Charles I. which last appointed him one of the lords of his bedchamber; and being a great favourite at court, he lived most of his time in England.

By the said Mary countess of Buchan he left issue two sons and two daughters.

1. James, lord Auchterhouse.

2. John, who died without issue.

1st daughter, lady Mary, married to Alex­ander lord Pitsligo, and had issue.

2. Lady Margaret, married to sir James Graham, son of John earl of Menteith.

The countess dying in England, the earl married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of sir Philip Knevil of Bucknam castle, in the county of Norsolk, baronet, by whom he had one daughter,

Dorothea, married to—Walker, in the county of Middlesex, Esq; and several other children, who all died young.

He died before the year 1630, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. JAMES, lord Auchterhouse, second earl of Buchan, of the Erskine family, who was served heir general of Mary Douglas,Chart. penes Johannem Erskine de Carnock. countess of Buchan, his mother, on 16th September 1628.

He was served heir general also of Marga­ret Ogilvie,Ibidem. countess of Buchan, grandmother of his grandfather's great grandfather, 20th April 1630, and that same year was served heir in general of Patrick Ogilvie of Auch­terhouse, the great grandfather of his grand­father's great grandfather, &c.

He got a charter, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. Jacobo comiti Buchaniae, terrarum & comita­tus de Buchan, baroniae de Mountblairie, Glen­douachy, castri de Banff, &c. &c. anno 1630.

He was a great loyalist, a steady friend of the royal family, and never deserted their in­terest during all the time of the civil war, whereby he suffered many hardships,Bishop Guth rie's memoirs and was fined by Oliver Cromwel in the sum of 1000l. Sterling, on 12th April 1654.

He married lady Mary Ramsay, daughter of William earl of Dalhousie, by whom he had a son,

William, his heir,—and four daughters.

1. Lady Margaret, married, 1st, to—Fraser of Inneralachy, 2dly, to Charles lord Fraser.

2. Lady Anne, married to James Canaries, D. D.

3. Lady Henriet, married to Thomas For­bes of Tolquhoun.

4. Lady Jean, married to George Gray of Halkerton, Esq;

He was succeeded by his son,

IX. WILLIAM, third earl of Buchan, who, in a deed, dated 8th April 1677, grants procuratory for resigning the honours, &c. Chart. pene Johannem Erskine de Carnock. to himself, and the heirs-male of his body; whom failing, to Henry lord Cardross, and the heirs-male of his body; whom fail­ing, to William, John, and Charles Erskines, his brothers, suceessively, and the heirs-male of their bodies; whom failing, to Mr. Wil­liam Erskine cup-bearer to his majesty, and the heirs-male of his body; whom failing, to sir Charles Erskine of Alveth, and John Erskine, his brother, successively, and the heirs-male of their bodies; whom failing, to earl William's nearest heirs-male whatever; whom failing, to his heirs and assignies what­ever. And this deed is ratisied by him 23d October 1678.

This earl was a man of great honour and integrity, and being much in favour with king James VII. he never deserted his inte­rest, but thought himself bound in duty to join those who took up arms in favours of the king against the prince of Orange, for which he suffered greatly, and being at last taken [Page 97] prisoner by king William's troops, was shut up in Stirling castle, where he continued confined till he died, anno 1695; and having no issue, his estate and honours, according to the last mentioned patent, devolved upon David Erskine, lord Cardross, his next heir­male, of whom the present earl of Buchan is lineally descended, as will be shown under the title of Earl of Buchan and Lord Cardross.

ERSKINE Earl of BUCHAN, and Lord CARDROSS.

THE immediate ancestor of this noble fa­mily was,

JOHN, earl of Mar, (the thirteenth gene­ration of that illustrious house in a direct male-line) who was lord high treasurer of Scotland, and highly esteemed by his majesty king James VI.

Amongst many instances of the royal fa­vour, he had the honour and title of Cardross conferred upon him, his heirs and assgnies whatsomever,Chart. in pub. archiv. by a charter, under the great seal, dated 27th March 1604.

He married, 1st, Anne, daughter of Da­vid lord Drummond, by whom he had a son,

John, earl of Mar, his successor.

He married, 2dly, lady Mary Stewart, daughter of Esme duke of Lennox, son of John lord d'Aubigney, son of John earl of Lennox, whose grandmother was lady Mary Stewart, daughter of king James II. By this lady he had a numerous issue.

1. Sir James Erskine, who married Mary, countess and heiress of Buchan, in whose right he became possessed of that earldom; but his male-line is extinct, as is shown in the pre­ceeding title.

I. 2. HENRY ERSKINE, to whom John earl of Mar, his father, ‘"made over, assigned, and disponed the lordship of Cardross, with all the rights and privileges thereto belong­ing, anno 1615;"’ which was confirmed to him by two charters,Ibidem. under the great seal, of the lordship, mains, and barony of Cardross, &c. inter 1615 & 1618.

He had likeways the abbay of Dryburgh, with the lands and tythes thereof, bestowed upon him, which, for that purpose, were dissolved from the crown,Records of parliament. by a special act of parliament in his favours.

He married Margaret, only daughter of sir James Ballenden of Broughton, and sister of William, first lord Ballenden, by whom he had a son,

David, his heir,—and one daughter,

Mary, married to sir John Buchanan of that ilk, and had issue.

He died anno 1636, and was succeeded by his son,

II. DAVID, second lord Cardross, who got charters, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. of the whole lordship and barony of Cardross, &c. Davidi domino Cardross, inter 1664 & 1670.

In 1645, he married 1st, Anne, daughter of sir Thomas Hope of Craighall, by whom he had a son,

Henry, his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, married to William Cunninghame of Boquhan, Esq; and had issue.

In 1655, he married, 2dly, Mary, daugh­ter of George Bruce of Carnock, sister of Ed­ward and Alexander earls of Kincardine, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.

1. Alexander, who died unmarried.

2. Colonel William Erskine, a man of great worth and honour, who was depute-governour of Blackness castle, and married Magdalen, daughter of sir James Lumsdain of Innergelly, by whom he had colonel Willi­am Erskine of Tory.

3. Colonel John Erskine of Carnock, a man of singular probity, stanch revolution-principles, and strongly attached to presbyte­rian church-government. He was lieutenant and governour of Stirling castle, and after­wards of Dumbarton. He was four times married, had several children, and dying anno 1743, was succeeded by his eldest son, Mr. John Erskine of Carnock, advocate, professor of Scotch law in Edinburgh; who is also mar­ried, and hath issue.—Vide Vol. II. of this work.

4. Captain Charles Erskine, who was killed at the battle of Steinkirk, anno 1692.

1st daughter, Veronica, married to Walter Lockhart of Kirkton, Esq; in the shire of La­nark, and had issue.

2. Magdalen, married to Alexander Mo­nypenny of Pitmillie, Esq; in the county of Fife, and had issue.

3. Mary, died unmarried.

He died anno 1671, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

[Page 98] III. HENRY, third lord Cardross, who was a great promoter of the revolution, and a particular favourite of King William. He was one of his privy council, general of the mint, colonel of a regiment of dragoons, &c. and one of the commissioners appointed by parliament for treating of an union with Eng­land, which, at that time, took no effect.

He married Catharine, daughter and heir­ess of sir James Stewart of Strabrock or Kirk-hill, in West Lothian, Bart. by whom he had four sons and three daughters.

1. David, afterwards earl of Buchan.

2. Mr. Charles Erskine advocate, who mar­ried —daughter and heiress of—Scot of Edenshead, Esq; by whom he had a son and two daughters, who all died young.

3. Captain William Erskine, deputy-go­vernor of Blackness castle, who married Mar­garet, daughter of colonel John Erskine, de­puty-governor of Stirling castle, and had issue, two sons and three daughters.

4. Mr. Thomas Erskine, advocate, who married Rachel, daughter and heiress of —Liberton of that ilk, by whom he had issue, three daughters.

Lord Cardross's 1st daughter, Catharine, married, 1st, to sir William Denholm of West­shiels; 2dly, to Daniel Campbell of Shawfield, Esq; to whom she had one daughter.

2. Mary, married to James Nimmo, Esq; cashier-general of excise, to whom she had three daughters.

3. Anne, married to Archibald Edmon­stone of Duntreath, Esq; to whom she had one daughter.

He died anno 1693, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IV. DAVID, fourth lord Cardross, who, upon the death of his cousin William, third carl of Buchan, succeeded to that earldom, as next heir male, anno 1695, as before observ­ed, and was the fourth earl of Buchan of the name of Erskine.

This earl was a man of great honour, and a firm friend to the present establishment, both in church and state. He was one of the privy council to King William; also to Queen Anne, who appointed him one of the com­missioners of exchequer, and governor of the castle of Blackness.

In the parliament 1706, he strennously op­posed the union, believing it to be inconsist­ent with the honour and independency of Scotland; and when he found it would be concluded in spite of all the opposition it met with, he entered a solemn protest against it, which, being still upon record, shows the sin­cere attachment he had to what he thought the ancient privileges of his native country. Soon thereafter, he was removed from all his places of public trust: But, upon the accessi­on of King George I. to the crown, he was appointed one of the commissioners of trade and police, lord-lieutenant of the counties of Stirling and Clackmannan, and was elected one of the sixteen Scotch peers to the three succeeding British parliaments, viz. 1715, 1722, and 1727.

In the year 1729, he was appointed his Majesty's high commissioner to the general assembly of the church of Scotland, and exe­cuted all the offices he enjoyed with fidelity and honour.

He married, 1st, Frances, daughter and sole heiress of Henry Fairfax of Hurst, in the county of Berks, only son of Henry, second son of Thomas lord Fairfax, by whom he had nine sons and seven daughters.

1. Henry David.

2. David, lord Auchterhouse.

These two sons died young.

3. Henry David, now earl of Buchan.

4. Fairfax Erskine.

5. George Lewis, born deaf and dumb; but as there has been great pains bestowed upon his education, he has been taught to speak, though not articulately; writes well upon any subject, and discovers a wonderful genius for literature, &c.

6. George Augustus, and three more, died young.

1st daughter, lady Catharine, married to William Fraser of Fraserfield, Esq; son of Alex­ander lord Salton.

2. Lady Francis, married to colonel Gard­ner.

3. Lady Althea.

4. Lady Willielmina Carolina, who, with three others, died infants.

The earl married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daugh­ter of sir William Blacket, Bart. by whom he had no issue.

And dying at London, 14th October 1745, was succeeded by his son,

V. HENRY DAVID, fifth earl of Buchan, who married Agnes, daughter of sir James Stewart of Goodtrees, Bart. by whom he hath issue, three sons and two daughters.

1. Stewart, lord Cardross.

2. Henry.

3. Thomas.

1st daughter, lady Agnes.

2. Lady Isabella.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st, azure, three garbs, or; 2d grand quarter, 1st and 4th, azure, a bend be­tween [Page 99] six cross crosslets fitchy, or; 2d and 3d, argent, a pale, sable; 3d grand quarter, 1st and 4th, or, a fess-cheque argent and azure; 4th argent, three lions gemel, gules, surmount­ed of a lion rampant, sable; and over all, by way of surtout, an escutcheon, gules, charged with an eagle displayed, or looking towards the sun in his splendor, placed in the dexter chief point.

Crest, on a wreath a dexter arm, couped below the shoulder, and erect, grasping a bat­ton, or rugged club, both proper.

Supporters, two ostriches of the latter.

MOTTO, Judge nought.

CHIEF SEAT,

Formerly at Cardross, in Perthshire, now at Uphall in West Lothian, &c.

SCOT Duke of BUCCLEUGH.

ALL our historians agree, that the sir­name of SCOT is of great antiquity in this country, and was certainly assumed in the reign of king Malcolm Canmore, about which time sirnames begun to be frequently used in Scotland; for we find, by our histo­ries and records, that they were become nu­merous, and made a considerable figure soon after that aera.

Uchtredus filius Scot, is witness to the in­quisition de possessionibus ecclesiae Glasguen. Chartul. of Glasgow. in the reign of king Alexander I. who suc­ceeded to the crown in 1107, and died anno 1124.

Herbertus Scotus is witness to the founda­tion-charter of the abbay of Holyroodhouse,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple's hist. collect. by king David I. anno 1128.

In the beginning of king William's reign, we find John Scot bishop of Dunkeld.Fordun. Mac­Kenzie, Keith, &c. Some say he was an Englishman, but Dr. MacKen­zie makes it plainly appear he was a Scots­man.

Walterus Scotus, and Walterus, filius Wal­teri Scot,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple, p. 411. got charters from king William of the lands of Abrishly, &c.

In the same reign, Gilbertus Scotus is wit­ness in a charter of Eschina,Chartul. of Paisley, in the lawyers library, p. 34. domina de molla, ante 1177.

And Simon de Scot is witness to a charter of Alan, son of Walter lord high steward of Scotland,Ibidem, p. 37. inter 1174 and 1199.

John Scot is witness to a charter of Roger bishop of St. Andrews,Chart. of Col­dinghame, penes M'Far­lane. together with John de Loudon, and Alexander de Dumbar, anno 1193.

And Matthew Scot, a man of great parts and learning, was chancellor of Scotland in the reign of king William,Fordun, MacKenzie, Keith. and bishop elect of Dunkeld, &c.

It is needless to trouble our readers with more examples of the antiquity of the name of Scot; and as we cannot positively ascer­tain the first ancestor of the house of Buck­cleugh, we shall take the succession of the first four generations from a M. S. history of that family,M. S. hist. of the family of Buccleugh, penes M'Far­farlane. written by a good antiquary, who had perused their old writs, the connection whereof is submitted to the judgment of our readers, and is as follows:

1. UCHTREDUS filius SCOT, before men­tioned, was the progenitor of this illustrious family, and from him all the Scots in Scot­land are descended.

This Uchtredus was witness to the foun­dation-charters of the Abbays of Holyrood­house and Selkirk,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple's hist. coll. p. 225. by king David I. anno 1128 and 1130.

The author of the M. S. does not affirm that this Uchtred had taken Scot for his sir­name; only, that being the son of a Scotsman, he was designed filius Scot, to distinguish him from other Uchtreds, which was a numerous christian name in Scotland about that time.

He was father of

II. RICHARD, who certainly assumed the sirname of Scot, and lived in the reigns of king Malcolm IV. and king William the lion.

Richardus Scot is witness to a charter of Robert,Ibidem. bishop of St. Andrews, to the abbacy of Holyroodhouse. This Robert, who found­ed the priory of St. Andrews, died anno 1158; so the charter, which has no date, must have been granted in or before that year.

This Richard is said to have had two sons, Richard and Michael: which was the eldest we shall not pretend to determine.

Richard carried on the line of this family, and

Michael was the undoubted ancestor of the Scots of Balweary, and had considerable pos­sessions in lands about Dumfermline before the year 1200,Chartul. of Dumfermline penes Mac­Farlane. particularly the lands of Gas­cumemefen, &c Vide vol. II. of this work.

III. RICHARD SCOT, son of the above mentioned Richard, in the reign of king A­lexander [Page 100] II. married Alicia, one of the daugh­ters and co-heiresses of Henry de Molla, by whom he got a fair estate in the county of Roxburgh;Chartul. of Kelso penes eundem. out of which he made a donation to the abbacy of Kelso, of eight acres of land, pro salute animae suae, &c.

He was the first of the sirname of Scot we have found settled in the south country.

He left issue a son and successor,

IV. WILLIAM SCOT, who was witness to a charter of Thomas,Chartul. of Coldinghame penes eund. p. 169. prior of Colding­hame, to Robert Brun, together with Walter de Lindesay, vicecom. de Berwick, William and John Lumsdams, &c. tempore Alexandri II.

He was witness to another charter with the persons before mentioned,Ibidem. and Walter de Lindsay, son of the above Walter, ante 1249.

He was also witness to a charter of Wal­terus, senescallus Scotiae, of the patronages of the churches of Dundonald,Chartul. of Paisley penes eundem, p. 67, 109, 198, &c. Sanquhar, &c. to the abbacy of Paisley, and to another donation to the said abbacy, both before the year 1249.

This William wasfather of Sir Richard Scot, &c. Thus far from the M. S. What follows is documented by unquestionable authority.

V. Sir RICHARD SCOT, said to be the son of the last William, was the undoubt­ed ancestor of the family of Buckcleugh, flou­rished, and made a great figure in the reign of king Alexander III.

He married the daughter and heiress of —Murthockstone, or Murdiestone of that ilk,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he got a considerable estate in vicecomitatu de Lanark.

He is one of the great barons of Scotland that swore sealty to king Edward I.Prynne's col­lections, vol. III. p. 664. of Eng­land for lands lying in the county of Lanark, anno 1296, and is then designed Richardus de Scot de Murthockstone, &c. and dying about 1320, was succeeded by his son,

VI. Sir MICHAEL SCOT of Murthock­stone, a man of great worth and merit, and of singular valour and courage.

He was in high favour with king David, Bruce,Fordun, vol. II. p. 343. whom he accompanied in his expedi­tion into England, and lost his life in the ser­vice of his country, at the unfortunate battle of Durham, anno 1346.

He was succeeded by his son,

VII. ROBERT SCOT, who, in his father's lifetime, was designed of Rankelburn, which was the title of the eldest son of Murthock­stone for some time thereafter.

He made a considerable figure in the reign of king Robert II.Chart. in pub. archiv. and dying before the year 1390, left issue a son and successor,

VIII. Sir WALTER SCOT of Murdieston, and Rankelburn, who was sometimes designed by the title of Kirkurd, which afterwards be­came the title of the eldest son of this family.

He was a man of great parts and eminent loyalty, and performed many glorious actions in the service of his king and country, where­fore king Robert II. conferred the honour of knighthood upon him; and, with consent of his eldest son and heir, John earl of Carrick, he changed the holding of his lands and ba­rony of Kirkurd from ward to blench,Chart. pene ducem de Buccleugh. by his royal charter granted to Walter, son and heir of Robert Scot, &c. dated 7th December 1390.

He was killed at the battle of Homildon,Fordun, vol. II. p. 434. anno 1402, and was succeeded by his son,

IX. Sir ROBERT SCOT of Murdieston and Rankelburn, who, with consent and appro­bation of his son and heir, Walter of Kirkurd, made a donation to the monks of Melrose,Chartulary [...] Melrose. of the lands of Hinkery of Selkirkshire, pro sa­lute animae suae, &c. 28th May 1415.

He married—daughter of—, by whom he had three sons.

1. Sir Walter.

2. Robert, Chart. in pub archiv. designed of Haining in a char­ter from king James III. of the lands of Greiviston and Leguillishaunch, dated 5th December 1463.

3. William, Ibidem. who is witness to a charter of his brother Robert of Haining, of the lands of Greivistone to Thomas Midlemass, and his heirs, dated 21st November 1476.

Sir Robert died anno 1425, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

X. Sir WALTER SCOT,Chart. pene ducem de Buccleugh. who was design­ed Walter of Kirkurd, knight, and was served heir to his father, anno 1426.

He exchanged his lands of Murdiestone with Thomas Inglis of Manner,Chart. pene [...]—Inglis de Murdieston, et chart. in pub. archiv. for the lands of Branxholm, Branshaw, Whitlaw, Whitrigs, Goldilands, Todishaw, Todholes, &c. The charter of excambion is dated 23d July 1446.

He also got charters from king James II.Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Eckford, &c. in Roxburgh­shire, Waltero Scot de Kirkurd militi, dated in February 1450.

He was a man of great merit, and was of­ten employed to manage matters of the high­est importance with the English, and always acquitted himself with honour and fidelity.

He, with the duke of Turenne, earl of Douglas, the earls of Angus, Crawford, A­vendale, Alexander lord Gordon, Walter lord Dirleton, Thomas lord Somerville, Herbert lord Maxwell of Carlaverock, &c. were the commissioners who settled a truce with the [Page 101] English,Rymer, tom. II. p. 254. which was to last from 1438 to 1447, and he was one of the guarantees of the treaty.

He was very instrumental in suppressing the rebellion of the earls of Douglas, &c. for which he was rewarded with many lands, viz. the lands of Abington, Pharholm, Glen­donory, &c. in vicecomitatu de Lanark; up­on which he got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. wherein his loyalty and faithful services are fully narrated. Dated anno 1459.

That same year he was appointed one of the conservators of the peace with England,Rymer, tom. II. p. 397, together with the earls of Athole, Ross, An­gus, Huntly, Caithness, &c. &c.

He married Margaret,Chart. penes com. de Mor­ton, et chart. inpub. archiv. ad ann. 1463. daughter of— Cockburn of Henderland, by whom he had three sons,

1. Sir David.

2. James, Chart. in pub. archiv. designed of Kirkurd and Has­senden, who left issue two sons.Ibidem. 1. David Scot of Hassenden,Chart. penes Will. Scot de Burnhead. his successor. 2. John, ancestor of William Scot now of Burnhead.

3. Sir Alexander (a great man) was rec­tor of Wigton,Chart. in pub. archiv. & A­bercrombie, vol. II. p. 476. director of the chancery, and lord register of Scotland, anno 1483, in which office he continued till he lost his life with his royal master king James III.Ibidem. at the field of Stirling, or Bannockburn, anno 1488.

Sir Walter died betwixt 1467 and 1470, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XI. Sir DAVID SCOT, who, in his fa­ther's lifetime, got a charter from king James III. David Scot, filio et haeredi apparenti Wal­tert Scot de Kirkurd, Chart. in pub. archiv. militis, &c. totas et in­tegras terras de Branxholm, cum pertinen. ja­cen. in baronia de Hawick, et vicecomitatu de Roxburgh. Dated in 1463.

He was infeft in the lands of Greenshaw,Chart. penes ducem de Buckleugh. as heir to his father, on 26th September 1470.

He was a man of fine parts, and made a great figure in the reign of king James III. being equally qualified for the cabinet and the field; was concerned in most of the public transactions of his time; was very instrumen­tal in suppressing the insurrections on the bor­ders;Rymer, tom. XII. p. 246, and was one of the conservators of the peace with England, &c.

He was one of the Scotch nobles that sat in the parliament held by king James III.Records of parliament. M. S. in the lawyers lib. at E­dinburgh, anno 1487; and was then designed dominus de Buccleugh, which is the first time we find any of the family designed by that title.

He married—, daughter of Thomas lord Somerville, by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

1. David, his apparent heir.

2. Robert, of Alanhaugh, who got a charter from his father of the lands of Whitechester, Roberto Scot, Chart. penes ducem de Buckcleugh, & chart. in pub. archiv. dilecto filio suo, &c. anno 1483, of whom Mr. Scot of Scotstarvit is lineally descended.

1st daughter, Janet, married to sir James Douglas,Chart. penes ducem de Queensberry, ad ann. 1470. son and apparent heir of sir William Douglas of Drumlanrig, ancestor of the duke of Queensberry.

2. Margaret, Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1489. married to James Haig of Bemerside.

Sir David died anno 1491.

XII. DAVID, his first son and apparent heir, is mentioned in the foresaid charter of Robert Scot of Haining to Thomas Midlemass, of the lands of Grevistone,Chart. in pub. archiv. wherein he is de­signed son and apparent heir of David Scot of Branxholm, knight, &c. Dated anno 1476.

He died before his father, anno 1490, leav­ing issue a son and successor,

XIII. Sir WALTER SCOT, promiscuous­ly designed of Branxholm and Buckcleugh,Chart. penes ducem de Buckcleugh. who was served and retoured heir to his grandfa­ther on 6th November 1492.

This family had now vast possessions in the south of Scotland,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1500 & 1515. which appears by their char­ters, under the great seal, of several baronies of lands granted to Walter Scot of Buckcleugh and Branxholm, knight, &c.

He was one of the witnesses to queen Mar­garet's getting infeftment of her jointure,Rymer, tom: XIII. p. 68. and 73. an­no 1503,

He accompanied king James IV. to the fa­tal field of Floudon, where he remarkably di­stinguished himself; and tho' he had the good fortune to come off the field alive, where he left many of his brave countrymen dead, yet he did not long survive it, but died in 1516, having married Elizabeth, daughter of Walter Ker of Cessford,Chart. penes ducem de Buckcleugh. widow of Philip Rutherford, son and apparent heir of James Rutherford of that ilk, by whom he had a son,

XIV. Sir WALTER SCOT of Branxholm and Buckcleugh, who was served heir to his father on 27th October 1517.

All our historians agree, that this sir Wal­ter was a man of intrepid valour,Ibid. & chart. inpub. archiv. magnanimi­ty and courage, and performed many brave actions in the service of his country, in the minority of king James V.

After that prince begun to take the ma­nagement of affairs into his own hands, he thought himself too much confined, and kept little better than a prisoner by the earl of An­gus; wherefore he sent a private message to sir Walter Scot of Buckcleugh, then one of the greatest men in the south of Scotland, to try to relieve him.

[Page 102] Buckcleugh, being informed that the king and the earl were coming to Melross with a considerable train of attendants, raised about 1000 horse of his friends and followers, in order to rescue his majesty; but Angus hav­ing intelligence of his design, was well pre­pared to receive him. They came in sight of one another near Melross, soon came to blows, and a bloody conflict ensued, where several men of rank fell on both sides, but the earl of Angus had the better.

On his side the brave sir Andrew Ker of Cessford was killed,Buchanan, & M. S. hist. of the family of Buckcleugh, p. 20. which afterwards occasi­oned great feuds betwixt the Kers and the Scots. Sir Walter himself was wounded, and narrowly escaped being taken prisoner. This action happened on the 18th July 1526.

Tho' the attempt was not attended with success, yet the king always retained a grate­ful sense of what sir Walter intended to have done for him, and he continued to be in high favour with his majesty as long as he lived.

After queen Mary's accession to the crown, he strenuously opposed,Ibidem. and greatly suppressed the insurrections on the borders; and the de­feat of the English army, under the command of sir Ralph Ewers and Bryan Stapleton at Ancrum-hills, was chiefly owing to the pru­dent conduct of sir Walter Scot, anno 1544.

He got a charter of the lands of Deloraine,Chart. in pub. archiv. and others, Waltero Scot de Branxholm, mili­ti, anno 1545.

He remarkably signalized his valour and courage at the battle of Pinkie,Rymer. anno 1547; upon which he got from the queen the estate of Henderland, upon the forfeiture of sir John Cockburn, and was made warden of the west marches towards England, in which office he did his country signal service.

He married, 1st, Margaret, daughter of —Carmichael of that ilk, ancestor of the earl of Hyndford, by whom he had three sons.

1. David, who died before his father, without issue.

2. Sir Walter, his apparent heir.

3.—Scot, who served in the wars a­broad, where he gained great reputation, and was a brigadier-general at the siege of Mag­deburg,M. S. hist. of the family of Buckcleugh, p. 22. and life of Dr. Burnet, bi­shop of Sa­rum. anno 1574, and afterward was de­puty for the province of Zealand. His grand­son, Apollonius Scot, was president of the high court of justice at the Hague; and it is said his family still subsists in Holland, and carry the arms of the family of Buckcleugh, with a suitable difference.

Sir Walter married, 2dly, Janet, daughter of John Bethune of Creich, by whom he had three daughters.

1. Grizel, married, 1st, to William lord Borthwick; 2dly, to Walter Cairncross, Esq;

2. Jean, married to John Cranston of that ilk, ancestor of lord Cranston.

3. Dorothea, married to James Crichton of Cranston-Riddell.

The differences betwixt the Scots and the Kers never having been thoroughly made up, sir Walter Ker of Cessford meeting sir Wal­ter Scot on the street of Edinburgh,M. S hist. of the family. a scu [...]fle ensued, in which the latter was slain, in Oc­tober 1552.

XV. Sir WALTER, designed of Kirkurd, son and apparent heir of sir Walter Scot of Branxholm and Buckcleugh, married Grizel, daughter of John Bethune of Creich, sister to his father's second wife, by whom he had a son,

Sir Walter,—and three daughters.

1. Jean, Chart. in pub. archiv. married to sir Thomas Ker of Fernyhirst.

2. Margaret, Ibidem. married to sir John John­ston of that ilk, ancestor of the marquis of Annandale.

3. Elizabeth, Ibidem. married to John Carmichael of Meadowflat, captain of Crawford, whose heir is the earl of Hyndford.

Sir Walter's lady, dam Grizel Bethune, survived him, and married sir Andrew Mur­ray of Blackbarony, of whom the Murrays of Blackbarony, Elibank, &c. are descended.

He died before his father, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

XVI. Sir WALTER SCOT of Buckcleugh,Chart. in pub. archiv. who succeeded also to his grandfather in 1552, to whom he was served heir, anno 1553.

He was a man of great honour and fine accomplishments, a firm and steady friend of queen Mary.

He, with—Ker of Ferny hirst, in hopes that embroiling matters with England might serve the queen's party,Buchanan. made several incursi­ons into the borders about the year 1572, and also endeavoured to take possession of the town of Jedburgh for her majesty.

In 1574, sir Walter,Melvil's me­moirs, & M. S. of the family. with lord Claud Ha­milton, and others, surprised the earl of Len­nox, and eleven or twelve of the chief nobili­ty, at Stirling, whom they had almost carri­ed off prisoners, but were prevented by their own men being too intent upon the plunder.

And notwithstanding his firm adherence to the queen's interest, yet he always maintain­ed a fair character, even with those of the op­posite party.

He married lady Margaret Douglas,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1574. daugh­ter of David earl of Angus; and got a char­ter, under the great seal, Waltero Scot; nunc de Branxhohn, filio et h [...]redi quondam Walteri de Branxholm, equitis aurati, et dominae Mar­garetae [Page 103] Douglas suae sponsae, &c. By her he had a son,

Sir Walter,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, married to Robert Scot of Thirlestane, in the shire of Teviotdale, of whom lord Napier is now the heir.

2. Mary, married to William Elliot of Lairiston, and had issue.

After sir Walter's death, his relict, lady Margaret Douglas, was married to—Stew­art, earl of Bothwell.

He was succeeded by his son,

XVII. Sir WALTER SCOT of Buckcleugh, who, like many of his brave ancestors, was a man of singular courage and intrepidity; and being in high favour with king James VI. was knighted, assisted at the coronation of queen Anne,Rymer, tom. XVI. p. 60. anno 1590, and was made warden of the marches towards England that same year: And having a wonderful genius for war, he carried over a regiment to the Netherlands,Johnston's history. where he served under that fa­mous general, Maurice prince of Orange, and there gained immortal honour.

In 1596, sir Walter, with a small number of his followers,Ibidem. scaled the walls of the castle of Carlisle, and set at liberty William Arm­strong of Kinmount, who had been taken pri­soner and confined by the English, contrary to the laws then subsisting on the borders, which was a most bold and daring action.

In 1597,Rymer. he, with Robert Ker of Cessford, were sent hostages to England, for keeping the peace, &c.

King James, in regard of his great merit and many faithful services, raised him to the dignity of the peerage, by the title of lord Scot of Buckcleugh, by patent, dated 16th March 1606.

He got charters under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1590 & 1600. of ma­ny lands, Waltero domino de Buckcleugh, &c.

He married Mary, daughter of sir William Ker of Cessford,Ibidem. sister of Robert first earl of Roxburgh, by whom he had a son,

Walter,—and two daughters.

1. Mary, married, 1st, to James lord Ross; 2dly, to Alexander earl of Eglington.

2. Elizabeth, married to John master of Cranston, without issue.

He died in 1611, and was succeeded by his son,

XVIII. WALTER, lord Scot of Buckcleugh, who also being much in favour with king James VI.Ibidem. was created earl of Buckcleugh, by letters patent, to his heirs whatsoever, dated 16th March 1619: And being a man of a warlike genius, and of great valour and cou­rage, had the command of a regiment under the states of Holland against the Spaniards, where he acquitted himself with great ho­nour and reputation.

He married lady Mary Hay, daughter of Francis earl of Errol, by whom he had a son,

Francis,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Mary, married to John earl of Mar.

2. Lady Jean, married to John Marquis of Tweedale.

And dying in 1633, was succeeded by his son,

XIX. FRANCIS, second earl of Buck­cleugh, a man of singular merit, great loy­alty, and a firm friend to the royal family; for which,Cromwell's act of indem­nity, in 1654. after his death, Oliver Cromwell imposed a heavy sine of 15,000 l. sterling upon his heir.

He died in 1652, having married lady Margaret Lesly, daughter of John earl of Rothes, widow of lord Balgonie, by whom he had issue two daughters, lady Mary and lady Anne.

Lady Mary, countess of Buckcleugh, mar­ried to Walter Scot of High Chester, after­wards earl of Terras, but she dying without issue in 1662, the honours and estate went to her sister,

XX. Lady ANNE SCOT, who, in 1665, was married to James [...]itzroy duke of Mon­mouth, eldest natural son of king Charles II. by Lucy daughter of Richard Walters of Ha­verford, in the county of Pembroke, Esq; Upon which marriage he took the name of Scot,Chart. penes ducem de Buckcleugh, et chart. in pub. archiv. and they were created duke and dut­chess of Buckcleugh, by letters patent to their heirs whatsoever, dated 20th April 1673.

As the life and fatal end of the duke is fully set forth in many different histories, we shall here only mention some of the most re­markable particulars.

He was born at Rotterdam in 1649, and was bred chiefly at Paris, under the eye of the queen-mother. He had a fine person, and a most graceful behaviour, and was a great favourite of his father, who not only bestowed on him many great and lucrative posts, but was instrumental in procuring him the above marriage, which at that time was one of the greatest in the kingdom.

He came to England in 1662, was creat­ed baron of Tyndale, earl of Doncaster, duke of Monmouth, and knight of the garter in 1663; and the next session of parliament he took his seat in the house of peers.

In 1665, he was made captain of the the king's life guards of horse, captain-gene­ral [Page 104] of the king's forces, and had many other instances of the royal bounty and favour. His brave and gallant behaviour in the wars abroad, gained him the reputation of an able general.

In 1679, there happened an insurrection in Scotland, after the murder of archbishop Sharp, which was raised by the presbyteri­ans, in hopes of overturning episcopacy: The duke had the command of the king's troops, and fought and defeated the rebels at Bothwell-bridge, which put an end to that rebellion.

He afterwards became very popular, espe­cially with the discontented party, and those who were against the duke of York's succes­sion to the crown, who thought of nothing less than making the duke of Monmouth king; and though the duke had been guilty of some very suspicious practices, yet, upon his submission, the king was pleased to par­don him.

Sometime thereafter, being again banish­ed the court, he retired to Holland, where he stayed till the king's death in 1684.

In May 1685, being persuaded to attempt the crown, he invaded the country, from Holland, with seven or eight hundred officers and men; landed at Lyme in Dorsetshire; and emitted a manifesto or declaration, set­ing forth, ‘"That he came in defence of the protestant religion, the laws, rights, and privileges of England, and invited all people to join him, &c."’

The king, being informed of all these pro­ceedings, acquainted his parliament; where­upon both houses voted an address of thanks to his majesty, and the commons ordered in a bill to attaint the duke of high treason, which passed accordingly.

In the mean time, great numbers of people flocked into his army from all hands, and at Bridgewater, and other places, he was pro­claimed king.

The earl of Feversham commanded the king's troops, which were then encamped at Sedge-muir. On the 6th July, at four in the morning, the duke, with his army, thought fit to attack him; but they being upon their guard, gave them such a warm reception, that the duke's army was entire­ly routed, and himself taken prisoner.

He was beheaded on Tower-hill the 15th July 1685, leaving issue by the said dutchess of Buckcleugh, four sons.

1. Charles, earl of Doncaster, born in 1672, and died young.

2. James, born in 1674, who, after his father's attainder, was called earl of Dalkeith, and carried on the line of this family.

3. Henry, born in 1676, created earl of Deloraine.

4. Francis, born in 1678, and died young.

The dutchess dowager of Monmouth and Buckcleugh, in May 1688, married to Charles lord Cornwallis, by whom she had a son,

George, who died young,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Anne, who also died young.

2. Lady Isabella.

The dutchess died in 1732, in the eighty-first year of her age,

XXI. JAMES, earl of Dalkeith, son of the duke of Monmouth, and dutchess of Buck­cleugh, married lady Henriet Hyde, daughter of Laurence earl of Rochester, by whom he had three sons and two daughters.

1. Francis, his heir.

2. James, who died young.

3. Henry, who also died young.

His daughters, lady Anne and lady Char­lotte, died unmarried.

He was made knight of the thistle in 1703, and dying in 1704, was succeeded by his son,

XXII. FRANCIS, earl of Dalkeith, who was made knight of the thistle in 1724, and succeeded to the honours and title of duke of Buckcleugh, upon the death of his grandmo­ther the dutchess, anno 1732, and was chosen one of the sixteen peers for Scotland to the next British parliament.

In 1743, he was restored to two of the duke of Monmouth's titles, by act of parlia­ment, viz. earl of Doncaster, and baron Scot of Tyndale, by which he became a British peer.

In 1720, he married lady Jane Douglas, daughter of James duke of Queensberry, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.

1. Francis, earl of Dalkeith.

2. Charles, who died unmarried at Oxford, in 1747.

1st daughter, lady Anne.

2. Lady Jane.

3. Lady Mary.

He died 22d April 1751.

XXIII. FRANCIS, earl of Dalkeith, eldest son of Francis duke of Buckcleugh, in 1742 married lady Caroline Campbell, eldest daugh­ter of John duke of Argyle, by whom he had four sons and two daughters.

1. John, lord Whitechester, who died young.

2. Henry, the present duke of Buckcleugh.

3. Campbell Scot.

4. James, who died young.

[Page 105] 1st daughter, lady Caroline.

2. Lady Frances, born after her father's death.

He died in April 1750, and was succeeded by his son,

XXIV. HENRY, who succeeded also to his grandfather anno 1751, and is now duke of Buckcleugh, earl of Dalkeith, baron Scot of Buckcleugh and Eskdale, in Scotland; and a peer of England, by the titles of baron Tin­dale in Northumberland, and earl of Don­caster in Yorkshire, &c.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, the royal arms of Britain, with a batton sinister, argent; 2d and 3d, or, on a bend, azure, a star of six points, between two crescents of the field, gules.

Crest, a stag passant, proper.

Supporters, two maidens richly attired in antique habits, their under-robes, azure, and the uppermost, vert, and on their head a plume of three feathers, argent.

MOTTO, Amo.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Dalkeith and East Park, four miles south of Edinburgh; Melrose and Branxholm in the shire of Roxburgh; Adderbury in Ox­fordshire, and Hall-place in Berkshire.

BALFOUR Lord BURLEIGH.

THE sirname of BALFOUR is of great antiquity in the county of Fife, and was first assumed by the possessors of the ba­rony and castle of Balfour, a beautiful seat, lying near the confluence of the waters of Ore and Leven.

We find, by our histories and records, that there were several considerable men of that sirname in this country above five hundred years ago.

Ingelramus de Balfour, vicecomes of Fife, is witness to a charter of mortification to the monastery of Arbroath,Sir Rob. Sib­bald's hist. of Fife, p. 141. by king Alexander II. dated the 15th year of his reign, anno 1229.

In the same reign, Henricus de Balfour is witness to a donation by Malcolmus comes de Angus,Ibid. et char­tul. of Ar­broath. de terris in territorio de Kirriemuir, to the same monastery. And we find that Henricus de Balfour obiit, et tumulatur in eccle­sia abbatiae de Melross, Chron. of Melross. anno 1246.

Michael de Balfour is witness in a charter of Duncan earl of Fife,Char. penes vicecom. de Stormont. together with Willi­am Wishart bishop of St. Andrews, betwixt 1272 and 1279.

Johannes de Balfour is witness to a charter of William de Valoniis,Chartul. of St. Andrews, p. 502. anno 1284.

At king Robert Bruce's parliament, which was held at Air, for settling the succession to the crown,Sir Rob. Sib­bald, &c. anno 1315, the seals of Michael de Balfour vicecomes of Fife, and David de Balfour, are appended to that famous act.

In 1347,Chartul. of Melross. Adam de Balfour obiit, et tumula­tur in ecclesia abbatiae de Melross, &c. &c.

It appears from our histories, that the Bal­sours were a very numerous and flourishing family in Fife in the reign of king David Bruce, when Johannes de Balfour, dominus de eodem, miles, died without sons, and left only one daughter, Margaret, his sole heiress, who married dominus Robertus de Bethune familia­ris regis Roberti II. Sir Ja. Bal­four's annals. Sir Rob. Sib­bald, Craw­furd, &c. who thereby got posses­sion of the barony and mannor of Balfour, which his posterity still enjoys, but he re­tained the name of Bethune, and of him se­veral families of that sirname are descended.

And though there are many considerable families of the name of Balfour in Scotland at this day, yet we must here confine our­serves to the families of Burleigh and Mont­whanie, as these two are united in this noble house.

The ancestor of the family of Burleigh ap­pears to have been,

I. MICHAEL de BALFOUR, of whom af­terwards.

The first of the other family was sir Mi­chael Balfour,Char. penes magist. Cal­derwood de Polton. who obtained the lands of Montwhanie, in exchange for the lands of Pittencriess, by a charter from king David II. dated in 1353. Of this sir Michael, was lineally descended sir James Balfour of Mont­whanie,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1400 et 1550. who married the heiress of Burleigh, in the reign of queen Mary, hereafter men­tioned; all documented by charters in our pu­blic records. We now return to the family of Burleigh.

I. MICHAEL de BALFOUR, first of the house of Burleigh, is witness to a donation of Walter de Moravia to the monks of Culross, together with Thomas Bisset,Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 195. dominus de Fife, circa annum 1362. He appears to have been father of another,

[Page 106] II. MICHAEL de BALFOUR,Chartul. of the priory of St. Andrews, p. 2. who is one of the judges in a perambulation of the lands of Kirkness and Lochore, anno 1395.

He lived after 1420, and was succeeded by his son,

III. Sir JOHN BALFOUR, knight, design­ed of Balgarvie, who got the lands and estate of Burleigh erected into a free barony,Char. in arch. Rob. II. Sir Ja. Balfour, Sir Rob Sib­bald, and Crawfurd. to him and his heirs, by a charter from king James II. anno regni nono, anno domini 1446. He left issue two sons.

1. Michael, Nisbet, vol. I. p. 169. and Chart. in pub. archiv. his heir.

2. James, ancestor of the Balfours of Den­miln, Kinnaird, Forret, and others.

IV. MICHAEL BALFOUR of Burleigh succeeded,Chart. in pub. archiv. and dying about 1490, left issue a son and successor,

V. MICHAEL BALFOUR of Burleigh, who got from his father the lands of Burleigh in Kinross-shire, the lands of Balgarvie in Fi [...]e, the mill of Bannockburn, or Stioch, in Stir­ling-shire; all contained in one charter under the great seal of king James IV.Ibidem. dated 5th July 1490, in which he is designed filius et haeres Michaelis, &c.

He got from the same prince,Ibidem. a charter terrarum in dominio de Stragartnie.

Also a charter of the lands of Easter Bal­garvie.Ibidem.

There is likeways a charter from king James V.Ibidem. terrarum baroniae de Burleigh, Mi­chaeli Balfour de Burleigh, &c.

He married Margaret daughter of— Mushet of Tolgart or Burnbank, by whom he had a son,

VI. DAVID BALFOUR of Burleigh,Ibidem. who succeded him, and got a charter from king James V. terrarum de Star, cum maresia, &c. anno 1527.

Also a charter Davidi Balfour de Burleigh, Ibidem. terrarum de Kinloch, cum dimidietat. molen­dan. ejusdem, &c. anno 1528.

He died before 1542, having married Ag­nes, daughter of—Forrester of Corstor­phine, ancestor of lord Forrester, by whom he had a son and successor.

VII. Sir MICHAEL BALFOUR of Bur­leigh and Balgarvie, knight, who was served heir to his father in 1542, and that same year got a charter of the lands of Strickinness.Ibidem.

There is also a charter under the great seal of queen Mary,Ibidem. Michaeli Balfour de Burleigh, militi, dimidietat. terrarum, et villae de Kinloch, cum molendino, Smiddielands, Brew­lands, &c.

He married Christian, daughter of John Bethune of Creich, by whom he had but one child.

VIII. MARGARET BALFOUR, heiress of Burleigh, who succeeded him, and married sir James Balfour of Montwhanie, lineally de­scended from sir Michael Balfour, who got a charter of the lands of Montwhanie from king David II. anno 1353, before mentioned.

This sir James of Montwhanie, upon his marriage with the heiress of Burleigh, was afterwards designed by that last title.

He was a faithful subject to queen Mary, who appointed him clerk-register;Sir Ja. Mel­vil's memoit he was also governor of the castle of Edinburgh when the queen surrendered herself to the lords at Carberryhill.

Before her majesty went to Lochleven­castle, as an instance of her esteem and re­gard for sir James, she gave him a small gold bell, with her name on it, and an enamelled cup and cover, said to have been king Mal­colm Canmore's; both which are now in the possession of Mrs. Balfour, the heir of line of this sir James.

They had issue five sons and three daugh­ters.

1. Sir Michael, afterwards lord Burleigh.

2. Alexander, designed of Balgarvie, of whom there are several descendants in the male line still subsisting.

3. Sir Henry, who was general in the Unit­ed provinces, and served under the prince of Orange with great reputation.

4. William, who went into Ireland, mar­ried —Hamilton, heiress of Glenally, as­sumed her name, and one of their descendants was created lord Glenally.

5. David, who was a captain in his bro­ther sir Henry's regiment, and perished at sea going over to Holland.

1st daughter,—married to sir Michael Arnot of that ilk.

2.—married to sir—Henderson of Fordell.

3.—married to—Barclay of Collairny.

IX. Sir MICHAEL BALFOUR, their eld­est son, succeeded to both his father's and mo­ther's estates,Chart in pul. archiv. inte [...] ann. 1577 [...] 1600. and got charters from king James VI. of the barony of Montwhanie, Kir­bester, and several other lands and baronies; and also a charter of the lands and barony of Burleigh,Ibid. haere­dibus maseu lis quibuscun cognomen, e [...]arma de Bal four gerenti bus, &c. to his heirs-male whatever, carry­ing the name and arms of Baltour, &c. dated 29th November 1606.

He was a man of good parts, and much esteemed by king James VI. who was pleased to raise him to the dignity of the peerage, by [Page 107] the title of lord Balfour of Burleigh, anno 1604, according to the M. S. account of the family: But according to Mr. Crawfurd, anno 1606; and according to sir James Bal­four, sir Robert Sibbald, and Mr. Nisbet, on 16th of July 1607: And though I have not seen the patent, yet I presume it was to his heirs-general, because his daughter succeed­ed to both his estate and honours, as will be shown hereafter; and he afterwards got a charter under the great seal,Ibidem. Michaeli Balfour, domino Balfour de Burleigh, terrarum baroniae de Kilwinning, &c. to him, et haeredibus et assignatis quibuscunque, dated 7th September 1614.

And being a man of great skill and know­ledge in the management of state affairs, he was employed in several foreign negotiations, and was his majesty's ambassador at the courts of Tuscany and Lorrain, and acquitted him­self with honour and reputation.

He married Margaret, daughter of— Lundin of that ilk, by whom he had an only daughter, his sole heiress, viz.

X. MARGARET, baroness of Burleigh, who succeeded her father in both his estate and honours, as before noticed.

She married Robert, son of sir Robert Ar­not of Ferny, chamberlain of Fi [...]e, who there­upon changed his name to Balfour, and, in her right, became possessed of the lordship of Burleigh.

'Tis said, that immediately upon his mar­riage, he got a letter from the crown, entit­ling him to succeed to the honours also; and certain it is he enjoyed them; for he made a great figure in Scotland as lord Buileigh, during the civil war in the reign of king Charles I. was deeply engaged on the parlia­ment's side, and had a great share in all the public transactions of those troublesome times; for this sir ROBERT, second lord Burleigh, was president to the parliament that met in June 1640, and again to that in November, that same year; also to that which met in January 1641; and was made a privy coun­sellor during life by the parliament, which met in November that year.

He was president to the committee for try­ing malignants in the north, anno 1644; one of the committee of estates, anno 1645; also one of the committe for bringing in public money,Rescind. acts of parl. from p. 33 to 102. and felling malignants lands, anno 1646; and after the murder of the king, he was one of the colonels of Fi [...]e, for putting the kingdom in a posture of defence, anno 1649; and that same year was one of the last committee of estates, one of the commission­ers of exchequer, and one of the lords of the treasury, &c. All which is fully narrated in the records of those times.Bp. Guthrie's memoirs, p. 119 and 262. He was also said to be one of the chief contrivers of the solemn league, and had several private meetings with Oliver Cromwell, anno 1648.

By the said Margaret, baroness of Burleigh, he left issue a son,

John lord Burleigh,—and four daugh­ters.

1. Jean, married to David earl of Wemyss.

2. Margaret, married to sir James Craw­furd of Kilbirnie.

3. Isabel, married to Thomas lord Ruth­ven.

4.—married to her cousin,—Ar­not of Ferny.

They all had issue.

He died anno 1662, and was succeeded by his son,

XI. JOHN, third lord Burleigh, who mar­ried Isabel, daughter of sir William Balfour of Pitcullo, lieutenant of the tower of London, in the reign of king Charles I. by whom he had three sons and six daughters.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. John Balfour of Ferny, who was a lieu­tenant-colonel in the reign of king James VII. and left issue two sons and several daughters. 1. Arthur, who was father of John Balfour, now of Ferny. 2. John, who succeeding by entail to the estate of captain William Craw­furd, now carries the name and arms of Craw­furd, is married, and hath issue.

3. Henry Balfour of Dunbog, who was a major of dragoons, had several children, and is now represented by his son Henry Balfour of Dunbog, Esq; who is married, and hath a numerous issue.

1st daughter, Margaret, married to An­drew lord Rollo, and had issue.

2. Isabel, who died unmarried.

3. Aemilia, married to sir John Malcolm of Innerteil, and had issue.

4. Jean, married 1st to—Oliphant of Gask: 2dly, to sir Robert Douglas of Kirk­ness, and had issue.

5. Susan, married to Robert Douglas of Strathendry, and had issue.

6. Anne, married to captain Robert Sin­clair, but had no issue.

He died 1688, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. ROBERT, fourth lord Burleigh, who was constituted one of the commissioners for executing the office of lord Register of Scot­land, anno 1689.

He married lady Margaret, daughter of George earl of Melvil, by whom he had one son,

[Page 108] Robert, master of Burleigh,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, now representative of the family.

2. Mary, married to Alexander Bruce of Kennet, Esq; and had issue.

He died anno 1713.

XIII. ROBERT, master of Burleigh, only son of the fourth lord, in the year 1707, had the misfortune to kill a man; for which he was tried before the lords of justiciary, found guilty, and condemned to suffer death; but he made his escape from prison in his sis­ter's dress, a few days before he was to have been executed.

He afterwards engaged in the rebellion 1715, was attainted of high treason, where­by the estate and titles of Burleigh were for­feited to the crown.

He died without issue anno 1757; and had it not been for the above attainder, the ho­nours would have devolved upon his eldest sister Margaret, as the peerage appears to have been granted to heirs whatever.

XIII. MARGARET BALFOUR, eldest daughter of Robert fourth lord Burleigh, is now heir of line of that noble family, and, failing heirs of her body, the representation devolves upon Mr. Bruce of Kennet, son and heir of Mary, second daughter of the said lord.

ARMS.

Argent, on a cheveron, sable, an otter's head erased, of the first.

Crest, on a wreath, a rock, and thereon a lady, holding in her right hand the head of an otter, and in her left the head of a swan.

Supporters, on the dexter side, an otter sejant, proper; on the sinister, a swan of the last.

MOTTO, Omni solum forti patria.

CHIEF SEAT,

At the castle of Burleigh in Kinross-shire.

STEWART Earl of BUTE.

The first of this noble family was,

1. SIR JOHN STEWART, who obtained from his father, king Robert II. a grant of a fair estate in the island of Bute,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, Aber­cromby, Nis­bet, &c. (the ancient patrimony of the family of Stew­art,) with the heretable sheriff-ship of Bute, Arran, &c. which was afterwards confirmed by a charter from his brother king Robert III. in which are these words: ‘"Robertus dei gratia,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, and chart. penes com. de Bute.&c. sciatis nos dedisse, &c. di­lecto fratri nostro, Johanni senescallo de Bute, officium vicecomitatus de Bute, Ar­ran, &c. datum 11mo Novembris, anno 1400."’

He got also a charter from his brother, Robert duke of Albany, in these words: ‘"Robertus dux Albaniae, Ibidem. gubernator Scotiae, &c. dedisse, &c. dilecto fratri nostro, Johan­ni Stewart, vicecomiti de Bute, terras de Fynock, in baronia de Renfrew, &c."’ dated at Irvine 1st January 1418.

He married Jean, daughter of sir John Semple of Elieston,Ibidem. ancestor of the lord Semple, by whom he had three sons.

1. Robert.

2. William of Fynock, of whom after­wards.

3. Andrew of Rosline, in the shire of Bute, of whom the Stewarts of Rosline and Balin­shangrie are descended.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

II. ROBERT STEWART of Bute,Ibidem. who was one of the privy council to king James II. anno 1440, and left issue a son and suc­cessor,

III. JAMES STEWART of Bute, who, dy­ing without issue anno 1497, was succeeded by his cousin and heir-male James, son of his uncle William of Fynock, to whom we now return.

II. WILLIAM, second son of sir John Stew­art of Bute, got from his father the lands of Fynock,Ibid. et chart. in pub. arch. upon which he got a charter from king James II. and is therein designed son of sir John, sheriff of Bute, &c. anno 1444.

He left issue two sons.

1. James.

2. William, who afterwards got the lands of Fynock.

It has been falsely alledged by several persons, that sir John Stewart of Bonkle, killed at the battle of Fal­kirk, anno 1298, was the ancestor of this family; but the above genealogy, founded on indisputable authority, sufficiently disproves the assertion.

[Page 109] He was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. JAMES, who succeeded also to the estate and sheriffship of Bute, upon the death of his cousin James, as before observed.

He obtained, for his good and faithful ser­vices, a commission from king James IV. of the heretable [...] constabulary of the castle of Rothsay,Hist. of the royal family, et chart. penes com. de Bute. in the isle of Bute; a royal seat, wherein king Robert III. died. The com­mission is dated anno 1498.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Blair of that ilk, by whom he had two sons.

1. Ninian.

2. Robert, who married a daughter of John Lamond, and was ancestor of the Stewarts of Kilchattan, Ascog, &c.

IV. NINIAN, the eldest son, succeeded, was sheriff of Bute, and got a new grant of the hereditary command of the castle of Roth­say, with a salary of 40 merks yearly, out of the feu-farms of Bute, Kintyre, Cowal, &c. upon which he got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. from king James IV. anno 1502.

He got also charters from the same prince of several different lands and baronies,Ibid. Had­dington's col­lections in the lawyer's lib. Edin. inter 1502 et 1508; particularly, one of the feu­farms of Bute, to him and Janet Dunlop, his spouse, dated in 1506.

He died anno 1508, and, by the said Janet Dunlop, left issue a son and successor,

V. JAMES STEWART, sheriff of Bute, who was infeft in his estate,Hist. of the Stewarts, et chart. penes com. de Bute, and heretable constabulary of Rothsay-castle, 20th of May 1509.

He was afterwards made chamberlain of Bute, keeper of the king's forest there, and got also the lands of Kirktown, in Cumra: All which were confirmed by charters under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1535 et 1550. Jacobo vicecom. de Bute. &c.

He married, 1st, lady Mary Campbell, daughter of Archibald earl of Argyle, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Marian, daughter of John Fairly of that ilk, relict of Thomas Boyd of Linn, brother of Robert lord Boyd, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Robert Stewart, who got a charter, un­der the great seal,Ibid. ad an. 1560. of the five pound land of Over and Nether Kilspock, &c.

VI. JOHN STEWART, sheriff of Bute, suc­ceeded, and got charters under the great seal, Johanni vicecomiti de Bute, Ibid. inter 1568 et 1600. filio Jacobi vice­comitis de Bute, of the lands of Kilchattan, of the lands and barony of Ardmoleis, &c. &c.

He was a man of parts, and highly esteem­ed by king James VI.Ibidem. who appointed him one of the gentlemen of his bed-chamber, captain of the castle of Brodick, and cham­berlain of Arran,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. anno 1580: Which last of­fice he enjoyed only till the family of Hamil­ton was restored, anno 1585.

He married, 1st, Mary, daughter of John Campbell of Skipnish, by whom he had a son.

Sir John, his heir.

He married, 2dly, Fynewald, daughter of sir James MacDonald of Dunveg, Isla, and Glenns, ancestor of the earl of Antrim in Ire­land, by whom he had no issue.

He died anno 1602, and was succeeded by his only son,

VII. Sir JOHN STEWART of Bute, who, being likeways in favour with king James VI. had the honour of knighthood conferred upon him;Ibidem. and got charters under the great seal, Johanni vicecomiti de Bute militi, of se­veral lands and baronies,Chart. in pub. archiv. between 1602 and 1618.

He married Elizabeth, daughter and co­heiress of Robert Hepburn of Foord; with whom he got the lands of Foord,Ibid. and hist. of the Stu­arts. and several others in Haddington-shire, and by her had issue,

1. Sir James, his successor.

2. Colonel Thomas Stewart, who died in France.

VIII. Sir JAMES STEWART of Bute was a man of fine accomplishments,Ibidem. and greatly esteemed by king Charles I. who created him a baronet, anno 1627.

He was served and retoured heir to his fa­ther, and all these his ancestors,Ibidem. anno 1630.

He adhered firmly to the interest of the royal family, during all the time of the civil war,Minutes of parliament. and was fined in 5000 merks by the parliament anno 1646. His estate was after­wards sequestrate, and he suffered many other hardships in the time of the usurpation; but had the good fortune to survive all these troubles, and was most graciously received by the king at London, after the restoration; but did not long survive it.

He married Isabella, daughter of sir Dou­gal Campbell of Auchinbreek, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.

1. Sir Dougal, his heir.

2. Sir Robert Stewart of Tillicoultry, one of the senators of the college of justice, who married, and had issue sir Robert Stewart, co­lonel James Stewart, &c.

1st daughter, Elizabeth, married to Nini­an Bannatyne of Keams.

[Page 110] 2. Anne, married to Alexander MacDo­nald of Sana.

3. Jean, married to Angus Campbell younger of Skipnish.

He died at London anno 1662, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. Sir DOUGAL STEWART of Bute, who married Elizabeth, daughter of sir Tho­mas Ruthven of Dunglass,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. by Mary his Wife, daughter of Alexander, 1st earl of Leven, by whom he had two sons and three daugh­ters.

1. Sir James, his heir, afterwards earl of Bute.

2. Dougal Stewart, Esq; a gentleman of extraordinary parts and merit; who, apply­ing himself to the study of the law, soon so distinguished himself in that profession, that queen Anne was pleased to name him one of the senators of the college of justice, and one of the lords commissioners of justiciary, anno 1710. He served commissioner in divers parliaments, both before and after the union; and discharged that important trust with ho­nour and integrity.

He married Mary, daughter and heiress of John Bruce of Blairhall, by whom he had five sons and three daughters. 1. James Stewart, Esq; who married miss Crawfurd, and hath issue. 2. John Stewart, Esq; who married lady Anne Stewart, daughter of Francis earl of Murray, and hath issue, &c. &c. &c. Vide vol. II. of this work.

Sir Dougal's 1st daughter, Barbara, mar­ried to Alexander Campbell of Barbreck.

2. Margaret, married to Dougal Lawmond of that ilk.

3.—married to—Stewart of Auch­insk [...]och.

He died anno 1672, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. Sir JAMES STEWART of Bute, who was of the privy-council to queen Anne, and was appointed one of the commissioners to treat of an union with England, anno 1702; and being in great favour with her Majesty, was raised to the dignity of the peerage,Chart. in pub. archiv. Jaco­bo comiti de Bute, et hae­red. masculi [...] quibuscun. by the titles of earl of Bute, viscount Kingarf, lord Mountstewart, Cumra, and Inchmarnock, &c. by patent, to his heirs-male whatever, dated 14th April 1703.

In 1706, he opposed the union with all his interest; and when he discovered that a ma­jority of the parliament were determined to go in to it,Stuart's hist. and Craw­furd's peer­age. he left the house, and retired to his seat in the country.

He married, 1st, Agnes, eldest daughter of sir George MacKenzie of Roschaugh, lord advocate, in the reign of king James VII by whom he had a son,

James, lord Mountstewart,—and a daugh­ter,

Lady Margaret, married to John viscount of Garnock, and had issue.

He married, 2dly, Christian, daughter of William Dundas of Kincavel, Esq; advocate, by whom he had a son,

John Stewart, Esq; who died at Rome, without issue.

The earl died anno 1710, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

XI. JAMES, second earl of Bute, who, upon the death of his uncle George MacKen­zie, in 1707, succeeded to the estate of Rose­haugh, in right of his mother.

He was one of the lords of the bed-cham­ber to king George I. one of the commissi­oners of trade for Scotland, lord-lieutenant of Bute-shire, and one of the sixteen Scotch peers to the 5th and 6th British parliaments.

He married lady Anne Campbell, daughter of Archibald duke of Argyle, by whom he had two sons and four daughters.

1. John, lord Mountstewart.

2. James Stewart MacKenzie, who, by the entail of sir George MacKenzie, his great grand-father, succeeded to the estate ef Rose­haugh, and is obliged to bear the name and arms of MacKenzie. He was elected mem­ber of parliament for Argyle-shire in January 1741, for the shire of Bute in 1747, for the burghs of Air, &c. in 1754, and for Ross-shire in 1761. He was appointed envoy-extraordina­ry to the king of Sardinia in 1759. He married lady Betty Campbell, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of John duke of Argyle.

The earl's eldest daughter, lady Mary, mar­ried to sir Robert Menzies of Weem.

2. Lady Anne, married to James lord Ruthven.

3. Lady Jean, married to William Cour­tenay, Esq;.

4. Lady Grace, married to John Campbell younger of Stonefield, Esq; advocate.

He died anno 1722, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. JOHN, third earl of Bute, who, in 1737, was elected one of the sixteen peers for Scotland, to the eighth parliament of Great Britain; and, about the same time, made a knight of the most noble order of the Thistle.

While his present Majesty was prince of Wales, the earl was his groom of the stole, and held the same place after his Majesty's accession to the crown, till he was, in March 1761, promoted to be one of the principal [Page 111] secretaries of state; and sworn of the privy­council.

In May 1761, he was chosen one of the sixteen peers to the ensuing parliament; and upon the resignation of her royal Highness the Princess Amelia, he was appointed ran­ger and keeper of his Majesty's park at Rich­mond.

He married Mary, only daughter of Ed­ward Wortley Montague, Esq; eldest son of Sidney Wortley Montague, second son of Edward earl of Sandwich. Her mother was lady Mary Pierpoint, daughter of Evelyn duke of Kingston. By this lady an immense fortune came to the family of Bute, on the demise of her father, in January 1761; and soon after, his Majesty was pleased to grant her the dignity of a baroness of Great Bri­tain, by the title of baroness Mountstewart of Wortley, in the county of York, and the dig­nity of baron Mountstewart, to her lawful issue-male by John earl of Bute, &c.

Of this marriage, the earl has five sons and six daughters.

1. John, lord Mountstewart.

2. James.

3. Frederick.

4. Charles.

5. William.

1st daughter, lady Mary, married to sir James Lowther, baronet.

2. Lady Jane.

3. Lady Anne.

4. Lady Augusta.

5. Lady Caroline.

6. Lady Louisa.

ARMS.

Or, a fess cheque, argent, and azure, with a double tressure, counter-floree, with flowers de lis, gules.

Crest, on a wreath, a demi-lion, gules.

Supporters, on the dexter side, a horse, ar­gent; on the sinister a stag proper.

MOTTO, Avito viret honore.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Mountstewart in the Isle of Bute, Twicknam in Middlesex, &c.

Earl of CAITHNESS.

SOME historians say, that this title is of very great antiquity, and mention one Duncan earl of Caithness, in the reign of king Kenneth III. but as we have no documents of any earls in Scotland for several ages after that aera, we shall pass by these traditional accounts, and proceed to our documents.

The first we find upon record, who enjoy­ed this title, was one

I. MACWILLIAM, who was designed earl of Caithness,Chartul. of Dumfermline and Martin's genealogical collections, p. 169. in a charter granted by king David I. to the monastery of Dunfermline, the fifth year of his reign, anno 1129. He liv­ed till about 1160, and was succeeded by his son,

II. HAROLD, whom Spottiswood calls earl of Orkney and Caithness. He was a very wick­ed and turbulent man, and committed vast cru­elties against John bishop of Murray,Ibid. Spottis­wood's Ch. hist. & chron. of Melross. for which he was deservedly punished by king William, anno 1179, and his estate and honours forfeit­ed to the crown.

The next who enjoyed this title, was

I. MAGNUS, son of Gilibred earl of An­gus, upon whom king Alexander II.Dalrymple's collections. bestow­ed that title, anno 1222.

He was also designed Magnus, Chartul. of Arbroath, p. 18. filius comitis Anegus, &c. anno 1227.

He was succeeded by his son,

II. MALCOLM,Martin's ge­nealogical collections. earl of Caithness, of whom we have nothing memorable, but that he was succeeded by his son,

III. JOHN, earl of Caithness, who was one of the Scotch nobles that swore fealty to king Edward I. of England,Prynne's hist. vol. III. anno 1296.

He had issue one daughter, Isabel; and hav­ing no sons, the honours again returned to the crown.

He died about the year 1330, and his daughter Isabel married to William earl of Ross,Hist. of Su­therland and Crawfurd's Peerage. to whom she had only two daughters. 1. Eupham, afterwards countess of Ross. 2. Isabel, married to Alexander Frazer of Phi­lorth.

This title continued in the crown till king Robert II. bestowed it upon his own son Da­vid, (by queen Eupham Ross) whom he cre­ated earl of Strathern and Caithness upon his accession to the crown, anno 1371; but he dy­ing without male succession, both these titles devolved upon his brother Walter, earl of A­thole; and he resigned the title of Caithness in favours of his son Alan,Hawthorden, Crawford, Stewart, &c. who was killed at [Page 112] the battle of Inverlochie anno 1428, or, ac­cording to others, in 1431; and he having no male-issue, the title of Caithness returned to his father, which, upon his forfeiture, came again to the crown.

CRICHTON Earl of CAITHNESS.

THE immediate ancestor of this family was Sir William Crichton, dominus de eo­dem, the fifth generation of that antient fa­mily in a direct male line, who flourished in the reigns of king Robert II. and III. and left issue two sons,

1. Sir John Crichton, dominus de eodem, his successor.

I. 2. STEPHEN CRICHTON of Cairns, who also left issue two sons.

1. George, afterwards earl of Caithness.

2. James, ancestor of the Crichtons of Ruthven,Chart. in pub. archiv. which is instructed by many char­ters under the great seal.

II. GEORGE, eldest son of Stephen Crich­ton of Cairns, is instructed by a charter from king James I. under the great seal, to ‘"Ed­ward de Crichton of Krealhouse, Ibidem. super cartam sibi factam, per Georgium de Crichton, filium et haeredem Stephani de Crichton de Cairns, de omnibus et singulis terris suis jacen. in­fra villam de Lanying, in baronia de Cra­mond, infra vicecom. de Edin [...]. tenend. de dic­to Georgio, &c."’ Dated 2d October 1427.

He was a man of an aspiring genius, good parts, and much esteemed by king James II. who constituted him lord high admiral of Scot­land, and conferred several other favours up­on him, whereby he became possessed of a considerable estate,Ibid. inter 1440 & 1450. and got charters, under the great seal, Georgio Crichton, admirallo no­stro, of the lands of Cairns, Brathwell, Black­ness, and several other lands and baronies.

We have not been able to discover who was his first lady, but by her he had issue a son,

James Crichton, who got from his father the lands of Cairns;Ibid. inter 1490 & 1495. upon which he got char­ters, under the great seal, Jacobo Crichton de Cairns, &c. He was ancestor of the Crich­tons of Strathurd.

The admiral married, 2dly, Janet, daugh­ter of sir William Borthwick of that ilk, wi­dow of James Douglas,Chart. penes comitem de Morton. lord Dalkeith, an­cestor of the earls of Morton; and the king's favour for him still increasing, he was pleased further to dignify him with the title of earl of Caithness about the year 1450, the honours being limited to the heirs-male procreate be­twixt him and the said Janet Borthwick, his 2d wife; but by her he had only one daugh­ter, Janet, to whom he gave his lands of Barn­toun, which appears by a charter, under the great seal,Chart. inpu [...]. archiv. ad a [...] num 1452. ‘"Georgio comiti de Caithness, et Janetae comitissae suae sponsae, et Janetae filiae dicti Georgii et Janetae, omnes et singulas terras de Barntoun, cum pertinen. &c. ja­cen. in vicecom. de Edin."’ Dated 12th Ja­nuary, 1452.

The earl dying, anno 1455, without male-issue of his second marriage, the honours re­turned to the crown, but he was succeeded in the estate of Barntoun, conform to the pre­ceeding charter, by

III. Lady JANET CRICHTON, only child procreate betwixt George earl of Caith­ness, and Janet countess thereof,Ibid. ad a num 1460. married to Robert master of Maxwell, who got with her the lands and barony of Barntoun, which is instructed by a charter, under the great seal, dated anno 1460.

SINCLAIR Earl of CAITHNESS.

AS the rise and descent of the antient and illustrious sirname of Sinclair is to be sound under the title of earl of Orkney, we proceed to deduce the descent of this noble fa­mily from their immediate ancestor,

1. WILLIAM SINCLAIR, earl of Orkney, son and heir of Henry earl of Orkney, by Ae­gidia, daughter of William Douglas lord of Nithsdale, and princess Aegidia, daughter of king Robert II. being a man of great autho­rity and power, and singular accomplishments, was highly esteemed by king James II. who employed him in the most arduons affairs of state, and he always acquitted himself with honour and reputation.

[Page 113] He founded and erected a collegiate church near his castle of Roslin,Lives of the officers of state, p. 34. which he largely endowed, anno 1441, and for architecture and workmanship, it is thought a master-piece of its kind at this day.

He was constituted lord high chancellor of Scotland,Ibid. & chart. inpub. archiv. anno 1455, and that same year was sent ambassador to England, to negotiate some affairs of the utmost importance, which he managed with dexterity and success; and up­on his return,Rymer, tom. II. ad ann. 1456, 1461, & 1471. anno 1556, got a grant of the ea [...]ldom of Caithness, and was afterwards pro­miscuously designed comes Orcadiae et Catha­niae, &c.

He married, 1st, lady Margaret, daughter of Archibald earl of Douglas and duke of Tu­renne,Chart. penes ducem de Douglas. by whom he had a son,

William, designed lord Newburgh, ancestor of lord Sinclair's family, (vide title lord Sin­clair) —and a daughter,

Lady Catharine, married to Alexander duke of Albany.

He married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Sutherland of Dunbeath,Lives of the officers of state. by whom he had four sons.

1. William, in whose favours he resigned the earldom of Caithness.

2. Sir Oliver, ancestor of the Sinclairs of Roslin, who got from his father the lands, castle, and barony of Roslin, with several o­thers,Ibid. & chart. inpub. archiv. which appears by charters in the pu­blic register; and it may here be observed, that the family of Roslin have always contended, that sir Oliver was the eldest son of the se­cond marriage, tho' the family of Caithness never yielded it.

The earl's third son, of the second marriage, was sir David Sinclair knight.

4. John, who was bishop of Caithness.

He died before 1480, and, according to the above-mentioned resignation, was succeed­ed in the earldom of Caithness by his son,

II. WILLIAM, second earl of Caithness, who got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1480 & 1490. under the great seal, Wil­lielmo Sinclair, terrarum comitatus Cathaniae; with charters of many other lands and baronies.

He married Mary, daughter of sir William Keith of Innerugy, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Alexander, Ibid. ad an­num 1529. designed of Stempster, of whom the Sinclairs of Dunbeath are descended.

He was killed, with many of his brave countrymen, at the fatal field of Floudon, an­no 1513, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

III. JOHN, third earl of Caithness, who got charters,Ibid. ad an­num 1526. under the great seal, Johanni co­miti Cathaniae, of a great many lands and ba­ronies.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of sir Willi­am Sutherland of Dussus,Ibidem. by whom he had a son,

George, his heir.

He was unhappily killed at an insurrection of the inhabitants of Orkney,Hollinshed's history. on 29th May 1529, and was succeeded by his son,

IV. GEORGE, fourth earl of Caithness, who was constituted justiciar within the bounds of Caithness, by queen Mary, anno 1566, and was one of the peers who sat on the trial of James earl of Bothwell, anno 1568.

He got charters,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter ann. 1565 & 1580. under the great seal, of several lands and baronies, Georgio comiti Ca­thanioe, &c.

He died in an advanced age, anno 1583, leaving issue by lady Elizabeth Graham, his spouse, daughter of William earl of Montrose, two sons and three daughters.

1. John, master of Caithness.

2. George, who married Margaret,Chart. in pub. archiv. daugh­ter of William lord Forbes, and was ancestor of the Sinclairs of May.

1st daughter,Hist. of the family of Su­therland. lady Beatrix, married to A­lexander earl of Sutherland.

2. Lady Elizabeth, married, 1st, to Alex­ander Sutherland of Duffus:Ibidem. 2dly, to Hutch­eon M'Kye of Far, ancestor of lord Rae.

3. Lady Barbara, Ibidem. married to sir Alexan­der Innes of that ilk.

V. JOHN, master of Caithness, eldest son and apparent heir of the fourth earl, got an annuity out of the earldom of Caithness, lands and barony of Cleish, Greenland, &c. upon which he got a charter,Chart. in pub. archiv. under the great seal, Johanni magistro de Caithness, &c.

He married lady Jean Hepburn, daughter o [...] P [...]trick earl of Bothwell and lord Hailes, by whom he had four sons and one daughter.

1. George, afterwards earl of Caithness.

2. Sir James Sinclair of Murchil, ancestor of the present earl, of whom afterwards.

3. John, ancestor of the Sinclairs of Green­land, now of Ratter.

4. David Sinclair.

His daughter, Agnes, married, 1st, to sir George Home of Coldingknows,Ibidem. ancestor of the earl of Home: 2dly, to Andrew earl of Errol: 3dly, to Alexander Gordon of Strath­airn.

He died anno 1577, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. GEORGE, who succeeded also to his grandfather, anno 1583, and was fifth earl of Caithness,Ibid. inter an­nos 1585 & 1600. and got charters, under the great seal, of the whole earldom of Caithness, Georgio comili Cathaniae, &c.

[Page 114] He got also a pension from the king of 90l. Haddington's collect. in the lawyers lib­rary Edin. 11s. 4d. out of the bishops rents of Caith­ness yearly, during his own life, and that of his eldest son's, 21st July 1592.

He lived to a great age, and died anno 1643, leaving issue, by lady Jean Gordon his wife, daughter of George earl of Huntly, two sons.

1. William, lord Berrindale.

2. Francis Sinclair, whose son George suc­ceeded to the earldom of Caithness.

VII. WILLIAM, lord Berrindale, eldest son and apparent heir of the fifth earl, got a charter, under the great seal, Willielmo Sin­clair, Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an. 1592. filio et haeredi apparenti Georgii comitis Cathaniae, terras et villas de Cairns, &c.

He died before his father, having married Mary, daughter of Henry lord Sinclair, by whom he had a son,

VIII. JOHN, designed master of Berrin­dale, who got charters, under the great seal, terrarum baroniae et comitatus de Caithness, Ibid. inter annos 1632 et 1635. &c. &c. Johanni magistro de Berrindale.

He died anno 1639, having married lady Margaret M'Kenzie, daughter of Colin earl of Seaforth, by whom he had a son and succes­sor,

IX. GEORGE, who succeeding to his great grandfather, George the fifth earl, anno 1643, was sixth earl of Caithness, and got charters, under the great seal,Ibid. ad an. 1662. Georgio comiti de Caith­ness, domino Sinclair de Berrindale, terrarum et comitatus de Caithness, &c.

He married lady Mary Campbell, daughter of Archibald marquis of Argyle; but dying without issue, the male-line of William lord Berrindale, first son of George the fifth earl thus ended, and the honours were claimed by the next heir-male, viz.

VIII. GEORGE, seventh earl of Caithness, son of Francis, second son of the said fifth earl, who had the title and honours of Caithness allowed him by parliament; but dying like­ways without issue, anno 1698, the heirs-male of the body of George the 5th earl thus end­ed, and the estate and honours devolved upon John Sinclair of Murchil,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad au. 1592. the next and un­doubted heir-male, being lineally descended of sir James Sinclair of Murchil, brother of the said fifth earl, to whom we now return.

VI. Sir JAMES SINCLAIR of Murchil, second son of John master of Caithness, who was first son and heir of George the 4th earl, got a charter, under the great seal, Jacobo Sinclair de Murchil, Ibidem. terrarum de Halero, ter­rarum de Histitro, cum molendino de Scyter, &c.

He married lady Elizabeth Stewart,Stuart's hist. of the royal family, p 104. third daughter of Robert earl of Orkney, by whom he had issue two sons.

1. Sir James, his heir.

2. Francis, who, betaking himself to a mi­litary life, had a considerable command in Sweden, where he settled, and of him several families there are descended.

VII. Sir JAMES SINCLAIR of Murchil succeeded his father, and married Jean, daugh­ter of William Stewart of Mains and Burray,Ibid. p. 12 brother of Alexander first lord Garlies, by whom he had a son,

VIII. JOHN, who, succeeding to the earldom of Caithness, as above noticed, was the eighth earl, and married Jean Carmichael, of the family of Hyndford, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Alexander, his successor.

2. John Sinclair of Murchil, a man of great probity and honour, and one of the se­nators of the college of justice.

3. Mr. Francis Sinclair.

His daughter, lady Janet, married to Da­vid Sinclair of South-Dun, Esq;

He died in 1705, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. ALEXANDER, ninth earl of Caithness, who married lady Margaret Primrose, daugh­ter of Archibald earl of Roseberry, by whom he hath a daughter,

Lady Dorothea Sinclair, married to James viscount M'Duff, eldest son and heir apparent of William earl Fi [...]e, in the kingdom of Ire­land, &c.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st, azure, a ship at anchor, her oars erected in saltyre, within a double tressure counterflowered, or: 2d and 3d or, a lion rampant, gules: 4th, azure, a ship un­der sail, or. And over all, a cross ingrailed, dividing the four quarters, sable.

Crest, on a wreath, a cock proper.

Supporters, two grissins of the latter, arm­ed and beaked, or.

MOTTO, Commit thy work to God.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Castle-Sinclair, and Thurso castle, in the county of Caithness.

LIVINGSTON Farl of CALENDAR.

THE immediate ancestor of this noble family was,

ALEXANDER, first earl of Linlithgow, who married lady Eleanor Hay, daughter of Andrew earl of Errol, by whom he had two sons.

1. Alexander, earl of Linlithgow, his suc­cessor.

2. Sir James Livingston, afterwards earl of Calendar.

This sir James, from his youth, served in the wars abroad, where he acquired great re­putation for his military capacity.

Upon his return home, he was constituted one of the gentlemen of the bed-chamber to king Charles I.Char. in pub. arch. haered. mascul. omni temp. futuro. and created lord Livingston of Almond, by patent to his heirs-male for ever, dated 19th June 1633.

He afterwards got the lordship of Calen­dar, and several other lands about Falkirk, erected into one free barony, called the lord­ship and barony of Calendar,Ibid. haere­dibus mascu­lis et assignat. quibuscun. by a charter un­der the great seal, to him, his heirs-male and assigneys whatever, dated 12th June 1634.

He got another charter under the great seal, confirming the former, Jacobo domino Livingston de Almond et Calendar, haeredibus masculis et assignatis quibuscunque haereditarie, Ibidem. dated 2d November 1637; and was created earl of Calendar by patent,Ibidem. to his heirs-male whatever, dated 6th October 1641; which was again confirmed to him at Newcastle up­on Line, 22d June 1646.

He married Margaret Hay, daughter of John lord Yester, widow of Alexander earl of Dunfermline, by whom he had no issue.

In the beginning of the civil war, he ac­cepted of a commission in the parliament's service; but, being truly loyal, he no sooner perceived their intentions, than he left them, and joined the king,Guthrie's memoirs. and was named treasu­rer by his Majesty, but rejected by the par­liament 1641, having refused to be one of their chief commanders.

He was afterwards lieutenant-general of the Scotch army, when they attempted to rescue the king, then a prisoner in the isle of Wight, anno 1648; but failing in the enter­prise, he retired to Holland, and his com­mission, to be governor of Carlyle,Records of parliament. was re­scinded by the parliament, 16th January 1649. His estate was sequestrate. He was particularly excepted out of Oliver Crom­well's act of indemnity,Cromwell's act of indem­nity. anno 1654; and his lady, in his absence, had not the least sub­sistence out of his estate, but was allowed to receive the jointure she had by her former husband, the earl of Dunfermline.

After the restoration, the earl having no prospect of heirs of his own body, made a resignation of his estate and honours into the king's hands: upon which he got a new pa­tent in favours of his nephew Alexander, se­cond son of Alexander, second earl of Lin­lithgow, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to the second son of George, third earl of Linlithgow, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to Alexander Li­vingston, son of the deceast sir Alexander Li­vingston of Daldirs, in Stirling-shire, &c. &c. reserving to himself the titles, honours, and dignity of earl of Calendar,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1660. during all the days of his life, &c. This patent is dated at Whitehall the 21st day of November 1660.

He dying anno 1672, was accordingly suc­ceeded in his estate and honours by his ne­phew,

ALEXANDER, second earl of Calendar, second son of Alexander second earl of Lin­lithgow, who married lady Mary, daughter of William duke of Hamilton; but dying without lawful issue, anno 1685, his estate and honours, in virtue of the last mentioned patent, devolved upon his nephew,

ALEXANDER, third earl of Calendar, se­cond son of George, third earl of Linlithgow, who married lady Anne Graham, daughter of James marquis of Montrose, by whom he had a son,

James, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Henriet, who died unmarried.

2. Lady Mary, married to Mr. James Graham of Airth, and had issue.

He died anno 1694, and was succeeded by his son,

JAMES, fourth earl of Calendar, who, up­on the death of his uncle George, third earl of Linlithgow, anno 1695, succeeded to his estate and honours, whereby both earldoms were united in his person.

Vide title Linlithgow.

CAMERON Lord FAIRFAX of CAMERON.

CAMBDEN, and all English histori­ans, agree, that the family of FAIR­FAX is amongst the most ancient, and as well allied as any in England.

About the time of the Norman conquest, anno 1066,Lodge's peerage of Ireland, p, 397. vol. II. they were seated at Touchester or Torchester in Northumberland, whence they removed to Yorkshire.

I. RICHARD FAIRFAX, in the sixth year of king John, anno 1205, was possessed of the lands of Ascham, not far from the city of York.

He was son of John,Ibid. Craw­furd's peer­age, Scots compend. who was son of Hen­ry of Shapenbeck, as per the peerage of Ire­land, and he was succeeded by his son,

II. WILLIAM FAIRFAX, who was liv­ing at Ascham in 1223,Ibidem. and married Alice, daughter and heiress of Nicholas de Bugthorp, by whom he had a son,

III. WILLIAM FAIRFAX, Esq; who was bailiff of York in 1249.

He purchased the lands and manour of Wal­ton from Peter de Bruce, which he after­wards made the chief place of his residence.

He married Mary,Peerage of Ireland, p. 398. widow of Walter Flower, whose father was Took Flower, mayor of York, in the reign of king Richard I.

He le [...]t a son,

IV. THOMAS FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq;: who succeeded him, and married Anne, daughter and heiress of Henry Sezevaux, may­or of York,Ibidem. in the reign of king Henry III. by whom he had three sons.

1. John, his successor.

2. William.

3. Bego.

He died in the 12th year of Edward I. 1284, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. JOHN FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; who lived in the reigns of king Edward I. and II. and married Claricia or Clare, daughter and heiress of William Scot, by his wife,Ibidem. daugh­ter and heiress of sir Roger Bruce of Walton, by whom he had a son,

VI. THOMAS FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; who succeeded him, and married Margaret, daughter of John Malvis, Esq; by whom he had issue,

William, his successor,—and two daugh­ters.

1. Anne, married to—Marton.

2. Clare, married to sir William Malvis.

He died before 1327,Ibidem. and was succeeded by his son,

VII. WILLIAM FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; who married a daughter of sir William Roucliffe of Cowthorp, knight, by whom he had two sons and three daughters.Ibidem.

1. Thomas, his successor.

2. John Fairfax, L. L. D.

1st daughter Margaret.

2. Mary.

3. Alice.

VIII. THOMAS FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; succeeded his father. He was living at Wal­ton in 1350, and married Elizabeth or Mar­garet, daughter of sir John de Etton, lord of Gilling; by which marriage the estate of Et­ton came into this family,Ibid. p. 399 in the time of king Henry VII.

He left issue five sons.

1. William.

2. Thomas.

3. Guy.

4. John.

5. Richard Fairfax.

He was succeeded by his eldest son.

IX. WILLIAM FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; who was patron of the churches of Hal­naby and Scotton, and, per contract in 1395, (18th year of Richard II.) married Constance, daughter of Peter lord de Malo, or Mauloy, and co-heiress of her brother Peter,Ibidem. eighth lord, by whom he had three sons.

1. Thomas.

2. Richard Fairfax, Esq;

3. Bryan, rector of Longtost, and precen­tor of the cathedral of York in 1410.

X. THOMAS FAIRFAX of Walton, Esq; succeeded his father,Ibid. Craw furd's peer­age, and S [...] o compend. and married Margaret, daughter of John, and sister and heiress of Richard Friston of Marston, Esq; by whom he had issue six sons.

1. Richard.

2. Guy.

3. George.

4. Thomas.

5. John.

6. Nicholas.

He died in 1415.

XI. RICHARD FAIRFAX of Walton, eldest, [Page 117] succeeded, and flourished in the reigns of Henry IV. V. and VI. He was chief justice of England, after the 1422, and married Anastatia or E [...]stace,Ibidem. daughter and co-heiress of John Calthorp of Calthorp, Esq; by whom he had six sons and three daughters.

William of Walton, his 1st son, was father of sir Thomas of Walton, who was father of another sir Thomas, who was father of sir Ni­cholas, who was father of sir William Fair­fax of Walton, who married Jane, daughter and heiress of Bryan Stapleton of Notting­ham and Burton, Esq; by whom he had sir Thomas, who, by his majesty king Charles I. was created a peer of Ireland,Peerage of Ireland, by the title of lord viscount Fairfax of Emely, on 10th February 1628; and married Catharine, sister of Henry lord viscount Dumbar, and daugh­ter of sir Henry Constable of Burton, by whom he had Thomas second viscount Fair­fax, of whom the present viscount is lineally descended; and Henry Fairfax, Esq; who was father of Henry Fairfax of Hurst, Esq; whose daughter and sole heiress, Frances, was mar­ried to David earl of Buchan, and was mother of Henry now earl of Buchan.

Richard of Walton's second son was,

2. Bryan Fairfax, L. L. D. who died with­out issue.

3. Sir Guido or Guy, of whom afterwards.

4. Richard Fairfax a priest.

5. Sir Nicholas Fairfax, a knight of Rhodes.

6. Miles Fairfax, Esq;.

His three daughters were,

1. Margaret.

2. Anne.

3. Elein.

XII. Sir GUY FAIRFAX, third son of the above Richard, a man of great learning and knowledge in the laws, was chief justice of the king's bench, in the reigns of king Ed­ward IV. and Richard III. and, notwithstand­ing his great attachment to the house of York, he enjoyed the same office under king Henry VII. and was also attorney-general; and hav­ing obtained from his father the lands and manour of Steeton, he built the castle there, which afterwards was the chief seat of his posterity.

He married Isabel,Ibid. Craw­furd, &c. daughter of sir William Rither of Rither, by whom he had four sons and two daughters.

1. Sir William.

2. Thomas, serjeant at law.

3. Guy.

4. Nicholas.

1st daughter Eleanor, married to sir Miles Wilstrop of Wilstrop.

2. Agnes, married to sir John Waterton of Medly, master of horse to king Henry VI.

Sir Guy died in 1495, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. Sir WILLIAM FAIRFAX of Stee­on, who, like his father, was eminent for his knowledge in the laws, and was made justice of the common pleas by king Henry VIII.

He married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of sir Robert Manners, ancestor of the duke of Rutland, (whose grandmother was sister of king Edward IV.) by whom he had

Sir William, Ibidem. his heir,—and four daughters.

1. Elizabeth, married to sir Robert Auch­tred.

2. Eleanor, married to sir William Picker­ing, knight, marshal of England.

3. Anne, married to sir Robert Norman­ville of Kilnwick in Yorkshire.

4. Dorothy, married to—Constable of Hexby, Esq;.

He died in 1514, and was succeeded by,

XIV. Sir WILLIAM FAIRFAX of Stee­ton, his only son. He was high-sheriff of York the 26th and 31st years of king Henry VIII. and has two letters from that great mo­narch, very much for the honour of his fami­ly, which are still preserved.

He married Isabella, daughter and heiress of John Thivaits of Thivaits and Denton in York­shire, by whom he got the lands and manour of Denton, which afterwards became the chief seat of the family.

He left issue five sons and five daughters.Peerage of Ireland, p. 400.

1. Sir Thomas, who succeeded his father in the estate and manour of Denton.

2. Francis Fairfax, Esq;

3. Edward Fairfax, Esq;.

4. Henry, who married Dorothy, daugh­ter of Robert Aske of Aughton, Esq; and had a numerous issue.

5. Gabriel, who got from his father the lands of Steeton, and of whom are descended the honourable families of Fairfax of Stee­ton and Newton in Yorkshire, which still subsist.

1st daughter Anne, married to sir Henry Everingham of Laxton.

2. Mary, married to Robert Rockley of Rockley, Esq; and had issue.

3. Bridget, married to sir Cotton Gargrave of Hostell, and had issue.

4. Ursula, married to Ralph Valvasor of Hazlewood, Esq;.

5. Agnes, married to Edmund Eltoft of Farnell in Craven, and of Knotingly, Esq;.

Sir William died in 1557, and was suc­ceeded [Page 118] in his estate of Denton by his eldest son,

XV. Sir THOMAS FAIRFAX of Denton, who was sheriff of York in 1571, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1579, and performed many services to his country.

He married Dorothy, daughter of George Gale of Acham-grange Esq; treasurer of the mint at York,Peerage of Ireland. by whom he had five sons and two daughters.

1. Sir Thomas, his heir.

2. Edward of Newhall, an excellent poet, in the reign of king Charles I. author of seve­ral learned and ingenious treatises. He had several children.

3. Henry, both died young.

4. Ferdinando, both died young.

5. Sir Charles Fairfax, colonel of 3000 soldiers at the siege of Ostend, where his bravery gained him immortal honour, accord­ing to Cambden and others, though he had the misfortune to be killed three days before the surrender of the town.

1st daughter Ursula was married to sir Henry Bellasise, baronet, and was mother of Thomas viscount Falconberg.

2. Christian, married to John Aske of Aughton, Esq;.

Sir Thomas died in 1599, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XVI. Sir THOMAS FAIRFAX of Denton, who was a person of great honour, virtue, and skill in the arts both of peace and war.

In 1591 he accompanied Robert earl of Essex to France, in aid of king Henry IV. against the Spaniards, and had the honour to be knighted in the camp before Roan, for his bravery and good behaviour.

He was employed in several negotiations of importance by queen Elizabeth, particular­ly to king James VI. of Scotland, by whom he was highly esteemed.

He was also in great favour with his ma­jesty king Charles I. who was pleased to cre­ate him lord Fairfax of Cameron, in the king­dom of Scotland, by letters patent, dated 4th May 1627.

He married Helen, daughter of Robert Aske of Aughton,Ibid. p. 406. Esq anno 1582, and died in May 1640,Craw [...] ▪ peer­age, and Scots compend. in the 80th year of his age, leaving issue seven sons and two daughters.

1. Ferdinando.

2. Henry Fairfax, Esq; whose son, Henry, became lord Fairfax, of whom afterwards.

3. Major William Fairfax, killed in 1621 in defence of the city of Frankendale in the Palatinate.

4. Colonel Charles Fairfax, ancestor of the family of Menston, &c.

5. John.

6. Peregrine, killed in defence of Rochelle in France.

7. Thomas, slain in Turky anno 1621.

1st daughter Dorothy, married to sir Willi­am Constable, baronet.

2. Anne, married to sir George Went­worth of Wolley, knight.

XVII. FERDINANDO, second lord Fair­fax of Cameron, succeeded his father. He was knighted in 1589.

At the beginning of the civil war, he was made the parliament's general for the associ­ated county of York. In 1642 he repulsed the earl of Newcastle at Tadcaster. In Ja­nuary 1643 he routed the lord Byron, with his Irish forces at Nantwick in Cheshire. In April 1644 he defeated lord Bellasise at Sel­by, and took him prisoner, with 1600 of his men. In July thereafter, he commanded the main battle at Marston-moor, with the earl of Leven, where the king's army, under prince Rupert, was defeated. He thereupon took possession of the city of York, of which he was made governor; with orders, that he and his sons should take in all the garrisons, which still held out, for the king in that country; and which, in a very short time, they effected.

He married, 1st, lady Mary Sheffield, daughter of Edward earl of Mulgrave,Ibidem. ance­stor of the duke of Buckingham, by whom he had three sons and six daughters.

1. Sir Thomas, his successor.

2. Charles, colonel of horse, slain at Mar­ston-moor, on 23d July 1644.

3. John, who died young.

1st daughter Ursula, died unmarried.

2. Elizabeth, married to sir William Cra­ven of Linchwick in Worcester-shire.

3. Eleanor, married to sir William Selby of Twisdale in Northumberland.

4. Frances, married to sir Thomas Wid­drington of Cheeseburn-grange in Northum­berland.

5. Mary, married to Henry Arthlington of Arthlington, Esq;.

6. Dorothy, married to Edward Hutton of Popleton, Esq;.

They all had issue.

His lordship's second wife was Rhoda, daughter and heiress of Thomas Chapman of Shafford, by whom he had only one child, Ursula, who was married to William Cart­wright of Aynho, Esq; whose daughter, Rhoda, was married to Henry, second son of William duke of Devonshire.

Lord Ferdinando died in 1646, and his estate, and all his posts, devolved upon his son,

[Page 119] XVIII. THOMAS, third lord Fairfax of Cameron, the famous general, so noted in English history during the civil wars; whose conduct, on the side of the parliament, to the year 1650, and his concurrence with gene­ral Monk, for the king's restoration, in 1659, are transactions so fully set forth in all the histories of those distracted times, that it is needless to insert them here.

He married Anne, daughter and co-heiress of sir Horatio Vere, by whom he had two daughters.

1. Mary, Ibidem. married to George Villiers duke of Buckingham.

2. Elizabeth, died young.

He dying without male-issue in 1671, his estate and honours devolved upon his cousin,

XVIII. HENRY FAIRFAX of Oglethorp, eldest son and heir of Henry, second son of Henry, first lord Cameron.

He married Frances, daughter and heiress of sir Robert Barwick of Tolstone,Ibidem. by whom he had four sons and five daughters.

1. Thomas, his successor.

2. Henry, sheriff of York, who, in 1691, married Anne, daughter and co-heiress of Ri­chard Harrison, Esq; and had issue.

3. Bryan Fairfax, Esq;.

4. Barwick.

1st daughter Dorothy, married, 1st, to Ro­bert Stapleton of Wigell, Esq; 2dly, to Ben­net Sherard, Esq;.

2. Frances, married to Mr. Rymer.

3. Anne, married to Ralph, son of sir Ralph Ker, in the county of Durham.

4. Ursula, both died unmarried.

5. Mary. both died unmarried.

And he dying in 1680, was succeeded by his son and heir,

XIX. THOMAS, fifth lord Fairfax of Ca­meron, who concurred heartily in the revo­lution in 1688; and, in December that year, was made lieutenant-colonel of the third re­giment of horse-guards. In January 1693, he was promoted to the king's own regiment of horse; and, in 1701, he was made a bri­gadier-general. He represented the county of York in several parliaments, and married Catharine, daughter and heiress of Thomas lord Culpeper,Ibidem. by whom he had three sons and four daughters.

1. Thomas, his heir.

2. Henry, who succeeded his brother.

3. Robert, a major of the guards, and member of parliament for Maidstone.

1st daughter Margaret, married to doctor David Wilkins, arch-deacon of Suffolk.

2. Catharine,

3. Frances,

4. Mary, all died unmarried.

This lord died in 1709, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

XX. THOMAS, sixth lord Fairfax of Ca­meron, who, dying without issue anno 1738, was succeeded by his brother,

XX. HENRY, seventh lord Fairfax of Ca­meron, &c.

ARMS.

Or, three bars gemel, gules, surmounted of a lion rampant, sable; argent, a bend engrailed, gules.

Crest, on a wreath, a lion passant, guar­dant, of the last.

Supporters, on the dexter side, a lion guar­dant, sable; on the sinister, a bay horse.

MOTTO, Fare fac.

CHIEF SEAT.

At Leeds-castle in Kent.

CARLYLE Lord CARLYLE.

THIS sirname is of very great antiquity in the south of Scotland, is certainly local, and was probably first assumed when the town of Carlyle and the northern counties of England were possessed by the Scots.

The first of them we find upon record, is

I. EUDO de Carlyle, who flourished in the reign of king William the Lyon.Chartul. of Kelso, penes Mac [...]arlane, p. 182 & 184. There is a charter of mortification by Eustace de Vescy, of twenty shillings per annum out of the miln of Sprouston, to the monastery of Kelso, in which Eudo de Carleolo is a witness, circa an­num 1207.

He died about 1230, and was succeeded by his son,

II. Sir ADAM CARLYLE knight,Remarks on Ragman's Roll, p. 43. who made a considerable figure in the reigns of king Alexander II. and III. and left issue a son and successor,

III. GILBERT de Carlyle,Prynne's col­lections, vol. III. p. 661. who was one of the great barons of Scotland that swore feal­ty [Page 118] [...] [Page 119] [...] [Page 120] to king Edward I. of England, anno 1296.

He was succeeded by his son,

IV. Sir WILLIAM CARLYLE, designed of Torthorald and Crunington, who was one of the greatest men of his time, and always true to the interest of his country.

He married lady Margaret Bruce,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. p. 35. daughter of Robert Earl of Carrick, and sister of king Robert Bruce.

He obtained from that great monarch a charter,Ibid. & Had­dington's col­lections. "Willi [...]lmo Carlyle, militi, et Mar­garetae, sponsae suae, sorori nostrae carissimae, terrarum de Cronington, &c."

Also another charter,Ibid. & Craw­furd's Peer­age, p. 66. terrarum de Conlyn, una cum tenendariis totius baroniae de Tortho­rald, &c.

By said lady Margaret Bruce he left issue two sons.

1. Thomas.

2. William de Carlyle, who carried on the line of this family, of whom afterwards.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. THOMAS CARLYLE of Torthorald, who was in great favour with king David Bruce, whom he accompanied in his expedi­tion into England, and there lost his life in the service of his country at the battle of Dur­ham, anno 1346, leaving issue only one child,

Susanna.

This appears from a charter of king David Bruce,Chart. in ar­chivis regis Davidis. ‘"Roberto de Corry, et Susannae sponsae suae, siliae et heredi quondam Thomae de Tor­thorald consanguinei nostri, in nostra praesentia, ad fidem et pacem nostram apud bellum com­missum apud Durham desuncti, omnes terras de Conlyn et Ruchane, cum pertinen. quae fue­runt quondam Willielmi de Carleolo infra vicecomitatum de Dumfries, &c."’

This charter is dated at Melross 28th Oc­tober 1363.

The next of this noble family we find up­on record, is

VI. Sir JOHN de Carlyle de Torthorald, said to be son of William second son of sir William of Torthorald, before noticed.

This sir John made a great figure in the reigns of king Robert II. and III. The earl of Douglas being warden of the marches in king Robert IIId's time,Rymer, tom. VIII. p. 57. appointed sir John Car­lyle of Torthorald, sir John Johnston of that ilk, sir William Stewart of Castlemilk, and some others, sureties for the keeping of a truce with the English, anno 1398.

He died about the year 1400, and was succeeded by his son,

VII. Sir JOHN CARLYLE of Torthorald, who is particularly mentioned in an indenture entered into betwixt sir Herbert Maxwell,Indenture in Mill's genea­logical collec­tions, penes Macfarlane. lord of Carlaverock, and John de Sinclair, lord of Herdmanston; submitting the diffe­rences about the property of some lands to the determination of fifteen gentlemen of rank, of whom sir John de Carlyle and sir William de Preston are the two first named.

The indenture is signed 19th January 1427, and the decision pronounced 2d June 1428.

He died before 1435, and left issue a son and successor,

VIII. Sir WILLIAM CARLYLE of Tor­thorald, who was one of the noble knights whom Fordun calls valentes milites et armigeri, Fordun, vol. II. p. 485. that were sent to France with six thousand au­xiliaries upon the marriage of king James I.'s daughter, princess Margaret, with the dau­phine of France, afterwards Lewis XI. anno 1435.

He died before 1466, and was succeeded by his son,

IX. Sir JOHN CARLYLE of Torthorald, who obtained from king James III.Chart. in pub. archiv. a charter of some lands and tenements in Wigtoun, Jo­hanni Carlyle de Torthorald, anno 1466.

He was in great favour with that prince,Creations of the nobility, M. S. in bi­bliotheca ju­ridica, Edr. who raised him to the dignity of the peerage by the title of lord Carlyle of Torthorald, an­no 1470 or 1471, of which there are many documents, viz.

He is one of the lords of that parliament called by king James III. when there was a decreet pronounced against Hugh lord Fraser, in favours of Alexander Fleming, on 13th March 1471.

He also sat as a lord at every parliament thereafter till his death.

He got a charter from king James III. Johanni domino Carlyle, Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1473 & 1495. erecting villam de Torthorald, &c. in burgum baroniae, &c. dated 3d December 1473. He got also charters of several other lands and baronies too nume­rous to be here inserted.

He was sent ambassador to France in 1477, and, in requital of the vast expence he had been at in that embassy, had the barony of Duncow (then in the crown by the forfei­ture of Robert lord Boyd) conferred upon him.Simson's col­lections.

He died anno 1510, leaving issue by Mar­garet Douglas, of the family of Drumlanrig, his wife, a son,

John,—and a daughter,Chart. in pub. archiv. ad an­num 1516.

Catharine, married to Simon Carruthers of Moswald.

X. JOHN, master of Carlyle, designed, in a charter under the great seal,Ibid. ad an­num 1507. son and appa­rent [Page 121] heir of John lord Carlyle, and Margaret Douglas, &c. but he died before his father, leaving issue a son,

XI. Sir WILLIAM CARLYLE, who suc­ceeded his grandfather, anno 1510, and was second lord Carlyle.

He was a man of fine parts, and had the honour of knighthood conferred upon him by king James IV.Creations of the Nobility, M. S. in the Advocates li­brary, Edin. when but a young man, and he is then designed grandson and apparent heir of John lord Carlyle of Torthorald. At the same time David, son and apparent heir of John lord Kennedy,Ibidem. and Robert Cunninghame of Polmais, were created knights.

He lived till the year 1540, having, in his younger days, married Janet, daughter of John lord Maxwell; upon which he got a charter from John lord Carlyle,Chart. in pub. archiv. ‘"To Willam Carlyle his grandson, and Janet Maxwell his spouse, of the lands of Middleby, &c. anno 1497."’

By her he had issue two sons.

1. James, his heir.

2. Michael, who succeeded his brother.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. JAMES, third lord Carlyle, who was one of those noble patriots that entered into that memorable association,M. S. in the Advocates li­brary, p. 167. obliging themselves to stand by queen Mary with their lives and for­tunes, &c. anno 1568.

He married Janet, daughter of—Scrim­zeour, constable of Dundee, but dying with­out issue, was succeeded by his brother,

XII. MICHAEL, fourth lord Carlyle, who got from king James VI. a charter, terrarum baroniae de Carlyle, cum castro de Torthorald; in which he is designed frater et haeres Jacobi domini Carlyle, Chart. in pub. archiv. &c.

He died before 1580, leaving issue three sons.

1. William, his apparent heir.

2. Michael, ancestor of the Carlyles of Lochartur, of whom afterwards.

3. Peter de Carlyle.

XIII. WILLIAM, master of Carlyle, eldest son and apparent heir of Michael fourth lord Carlyle, married—, daughter of—, by whom he had only one daughter,

Elizabeth Carlyle.

The master dying in 1572 without male­issue, his father intended that his second son should have succeeded him, which appears by his charter of alienation in favours of his son Michael, dated at Torthorald 14th March 1573, before these witnesses, Adam Carlyle of Brydkirk, Alexander Carlyle his son and heir apparent, John Carlyle of Brakenquhate, Peter Carlyle, son of the above lord Carlyle, William Johnston in Templand, Bernard Gor­don, James Gordon his brother, &c.

This is afterwards confirmed by a charter, under the great seal, of king James VI. viz. ‘"Jacobus, &c.Ibidem.sciatis nos; &c. confirmasse quondam chartam alienationis factam per quon­dam consanguineum nostrum Michaelem do­minum Carlyle, dilecto filio suo legitimo Mi­chaeli Carlyle, haeredibusque suis masculis, et assignatis haereditarie de totis et integris terris baroniae de Carlyle, cum castro, forta­licio de Torthorald, &c."’ (Here a great many lands are particularly narrated) and this charter of confirmation is dated 4th March 1580.

XIV. ELIZABETH, daughter and sole heir­ess of William master of Carlyle, was married to sir James Douglas of Parkhead. Vide Title Douglas lord Carlyle of Torthorald.

It shall only be observed here, that upon the death of Michael fourth lord Carlyle, his second son and heir-male, Michael, contended long with his niece Elizabeth for the estate of Carlyle, which was at last determined in favours of said Elizabeth, the heir of line, for which reason the heir-male never took up the title, he having no part of the estate. But William Carlyle, late of Lochartur, was the undoubted heir-male of this noble family, and was served and retoured heir to the last lord, as follows, viz. William Carlyle of Lochar­tur,Retour in Chan. ad an­num 1730. son and heir of the deceast Robert Car­lyle of Lochartur, son and heir of the deceast William Carlyle of Lochartur, son and heir of Michael Carlyle second lawful son and heir­male of the deceast Michael lord Carlyle, &c. And which William Carlyle died anno 1756 or 1757, and is succeeded by his brother,

MICHAEL CARLYLE, now of Lochar­tur.

DOUGLAS Lord CARLYLE of TOR­THORALD.

SIR George Douglas of Pittendreich, se­cond son of George master of Angus, and grandson of George the great earl of An­gus, had a natural son,

GEORGE DOUGLAS, the first of this family.

He was a man of good parts, great brave­ry and courage,M. S. hist. of the family of Douglas. and was captain of the castles of Edinburgh and Douglas in the reigns of king James V. and queen Mary.

He married Elizabeth, daughter and co­heiress of James Douglas of Parkhead,Simson's es­says, and Home's hist. of the family of Douglas. by whom he got the lands and barony of Park­head in vicecomitatu de Lanark, and by her had issue three sons and four daughters.

1. Sir James Douglas of Parkhead.

2. Sir George Douglas of Mordington, who was gentleman of the bed-chamber to king James VI. and married Margaret, daughter of Archibald Dundas of Fingask, by whom he had two sons and a daughter. 1. Sir George Douglas, who was ambassador from king Charles I. to Poland and Sweden in 1633 and 1635, but died without issue. 2. James Douglas, who married, and had an only son, who died also without issue. His daughter, Margaret, was married to sir James Lockhart of Lee, of whom the Lockharts of Lee, Carnwath, and Castlehill, are descended.

3. John Douglas, doctor of divinity, an­cestor of Joseph Douglas of Edrington, of whom afterwards.

1st daughter, Elizabeth, married, 1st, to sir Patrick Home of Ayton; and, 2dly, to sir James Dundas of Arniston.

2. Martha, married to Mr. Robert Bruce of Kinnaird.

3. Mary, married to John Carruthers of Holmains.

4. Christian, married to Edward Sinclair, son and apparent heir of sir William Sinclair of Roslin.

Sir George was killed at the battle of Pinkie in 1547, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

Sir James Douglas of Parkhead, who married the before mentioned

XIV. ELIZABETH CARLYLE, daughter and sole heiress of William master of Car­lyle, eldest son of Michael fourth lord Car­lyle.

This sir James claimed the peerage of Car­lyle, in right of his wife the heir of line, up­on which ensued a long and tedious law-suit betwixt him and Michael second son of the said lord Carlyle, the heir-male, as before observ­ed, whereby both parties almost ruined their estates before it was finally decided.Crawfurd's Peerage. Sir James, who was then an old man, being unfortunate­ly killed by William Stewart, anno 1608, lest issue by Elizabeth the heiress, three sons, viz.

1. Sir James, afterwards lord Carlyle.

2. Archibald.

3. John. both died without issue.

He was succeeded by

XV. Sir JAMES DOUGLAS,Remarks up on Ragman [...] roll, p. 43. who, being eldest son of Elizabeth, only daughter and sole heiress of William master of Carlyle, eldest son of Michael fourth lord Carlyle, as before noticed, was created lord Carlyle of Tortho­rald, anno 1609.

He married Grizel,Writs of th [...] family of Kenmure. daughter of sir John Gordon of Lochinvar, by whom he had a son and successor,

XVI. WILLIAM lord Carlyle of Tortho­rald, who sold his estate, and died abroad without issue, which ended the male-line of sir James Douglas, first son of George, captain of the castles of Edinburgh and Douglas.

The male-line of his second son sir George being also extinct, as is before observed, his male representative now is

JOSEPH DOUGLAS of Edrington, son of the deceast Joseph Douglas of Edrington, son of John Douglas doctor of divinity, who was third son of the said captain George, and brother of sir James, who married the baron­ess of Carlyle.

Vide Title Edrington in the second volume of this work.

DALZIEL Earl of CARNWATH.

THIS noble family is of great antiquity in the shire of Lanark, where they flou­rished, and matched with several of the most considerable families, before they settled in Dumfries-shire, where they now have their chief residence.

Some are of opinion, that this is a local sirname,Remarks up­on Ragman's roll, p. 45. and was first assumed by the posses­sors of the lands and barony of Dalziel; but,

The account of their origin, given by Mr. Nisbet, and other historians, is, that in the reign of king Kenneth II. a kinsman, and fa­vourite of that king, being taken prisoner by the Picts, was put to death, and hung up up­on a gallows in view of the Scotch camp. King Kenneth being highly provoked and in­censed at the affront, offered a considerable reward to any of his subjects who would take down, and carry off the corpse; but, for some time, none would venture to undertake the dangerous enterprise. At last, a gentleman of more spirit and courage than the rest, said dal zell, which, in the old Scotch language, signifies, I dare. He effectually performed it to the king's satisfaction, who accordingly rewarded him nobly. His posterity assumed the word DALZELL for their sirname, and that remarkable bearing of a man hanging on a gallows for their arms, with I dare for their motto, in memory of the above brave action, though they now bear only a naked man pro­per.

Notwithstanding the great antiquity of this noble family, the first of them we find upon record is,

I. Sir THOMAS de DALZELL, who was one of the great barons that swore sealty to king Edward I.Prynne's col­lect. vol. III. p. 662. of England, anno 1296.

He was afterwards one of these worthy patriots who joined king Robert Bruce; and always continued steady in his interest till his death.

He left issue a son,

II. Sir ROBERT DALZELL knight, who succeeded him, and was a faithful subject, and firm friend of king David Bruce, for which he got from that prince a grant. ‘"To our tru­sty and well beloved Robert de Dalzell, knight, and the lawful heirs-male of his body, gotten, or to be begotten, &c. all and haill our lands of Selkirk,Char. in arch. regis David. with their pertinents, &c."’ dated at Edin. the 14th May 1365.

He was one of the Scotch barons that be­came surety to Haquin king of Norway and Sweden, that Henry Sinclair earl of Orkney, should faithfully govern the islands of Orkney, &c. anno 1379, and was afterwards sent over to Norway,Torfeius's hist. of the Orkneys, p. 177. by the said earl of Orkney, to king Haquin, anno 1380, and died that same year, immediately after his return home.

He was succeeded by his son,

III. Sir WILLIAM DALZELL, knight, who made a great figure in the reigns of king Robert II. and III.

In his father's lifetime, he obtained from king David Bruce,Char. in arch. regis David. a grant of two pounds Ster­ling out of the burgh of Lanark, by his royal deed, dated 13th August 1366.

He is also mentioned in a charter belong­ing to the earl of Morton,Chart. penes com. de Mor­ton. wherein he is de­signed William de Dalzell, knight, dated anno 1392.

He is a witness in a charter of confirmation of Robert duke of Albany, to Andrew Ha­milton, of the lands of Galstoun, wherein he is designed William de Dalzell,Chart. in pub. archiv. lord of that ilk, dated 11th December 1406.

He is also witness in another charter of confirmation of the duke of Albany, to David de Gardyn, of the lands of Kinninmonth, in which he is designed William de Dalzell,Ibidem. knight, &c. anno 1407.

He died anno 1408, leaving issue two sons,

1. George de Dalzell.

2. Sir John, who succeeded his brother.

IV. GEORGE, first son and apparent heir of sir William de Dalzell, lord of that ilk, got a charter of the lands and barony of Dalzell, to him and the heirs-male of his body; which [...]ailing, to the heirs-male of his father sir William,Remarks up­on Ragman's roll, page 45. et chart. penes dom. Hamil­ton de Dalzell. &c. This is con [...]irmed by a charter under the great seal of king Robert III. and dated 5th July 1395; but he died before 1400, without issue, and was succeeded by his brother,

IV. Sir JOHN de DALZELL, lord of that ilk, second son of the said sir William, who, being a man of parts, was in great favour with king Robert III.Chart. penes comitem de Morton. and had the honour of knighthood conferred upon him when but a young man, anno 1393.

He was joined in commission with some others,Rymer's foed. Angliae. to treat with the English about re­newing the peace; and for his good and faithful services, he obtained from king Ro­bert III. a charter of the lands and revenues of St. Leonard's hospital in the burgh of La­nark. [Page 124] The charter is granted ‘"to our tru­sty and well beloved John de Dalzell in life­rent,Chart. in arch. Roberti III. and to his eldest son Walter de Dal­zell, and the heirs-male of his body in fee; which failing, to his second son A­dam, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his third son Robert, and the heirs-male of his body, &c. dated at Dunfermline, 9th November anno 1400."’

He le [...]t issue three sons, as in the above charter.

1. Sir Walter.

2. Adam de Dalzell, who is witness in a charter of William de Maxweil de Auchin­hede, anno 1423;Chart. in pub. archiv. and in another charter, wherein he is designed Adam de Dalzell de Elliotstoun, anno 1426.

3. Sir Robert de Dalzell.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. Sir WALTER de DALZELL, who, in his father's lifetime, was designed Walter of Ca [...]lourie, and is particularly mentioned in an indenture betwixt sir Herbert Maxwell,Indenture in Mill's collect. penes Mac­Farlane. lord of Carlaverock, and John de Sinclair, lord of Herdmanstoun, anno 1427.

He le [...]t issue a son and successor,

VI. Sir PETER de DALZELL, lord of that ilk, who obtained from king James II. a charter of confirmation of the charter grant­ed by king Robert III. to his grandfather, of the lands of the hospital of St. Leonard in Lanark,Chart. in pub. archiv. &c. dated in 1449.

He died in the beginning of 1450, and was succeeded by his son,

VII. Sir ROBERT DALZELL, who, in a charter to Walter Graham of Walaystoun, is designed Robert de Dalzell,Ibidem. lord of that ilk, 31st December 1450.

He left issue a son and successor,

VIII. ROBERT de DALZELL, lord of that ilk, who was unhappily killed in the town of Dumfrie [...],Hollinshed's history. in a scu [...]le betwixt the lords Max­well and Crichton, anno 1508, leaving issue a son,

IX. ROBERT DALZELL of that ilk, who succeeded him, and is designed Robert de Dalzell of that ilk, in a charter to Mr. John Scrimzeour of Glasbu [...],Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands and baro­ny of Panbride, dated in 1511.

He is also witness in a charter to William Crichton,Ibidem. dated in the same year 1511.

He married Margaret Hamilton daughter of—, by whom he had a son,

X. Sir ROBERT DALZELL of that ilk, who obtained from queen Mary a charter of the lands of Dalzell,Ibidem. with the mill and perti­nents of Lanark, &c. wherein he is designed Robert de Dalzell, son and heir of Robert de Dalzell of that ilk, and of Margaret Hamil­ton, &c. dated 16th August 1559.

He was a faithful and loyal subject to queen Mary, and was one of those worthy patriots who, upon her majesty's escape out of the castle of Lochleven, bound themselves upon honour and conscience to stand by and adhere to her interest,Mr. David Crawfurd's collect. in the lawyer's lib. against all her rebellious sub­jects, anno 1568. He was likeways in her majesty's army at the battle of Langside, where he behaved with singular conduct and resolution.

He married Janet, daughter of Gavin Ha­milton of Raploch,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had issue a son,

Robert,—and a daughter,

Christian, married to John Hamilton of Or­biston.

He was succeeded by his son,

XI. Sir ROBERT DALZELL, who, being a man of spirit and genius, and possessed of an opulent fortune, was knighted by king James VI. and, in consideration of his own personal merit, and the constant fidelity and loyalty of his ancestors, was created lord Dalziel by king Charles I.Ibid. haered. masc. e corp. suo. on 18th September 1628, and earl of Carnwath in 1639, by patent, to the heirs-male of his body.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir Ro­bert Crichton of Cluny,Ibidem. by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. Sir John Dalziel of Glenae, who carri­ed on the line of this family, of whom after­wards.

His daughter, lady Mary, was married to sir James Muirhead of Lachop.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XII. ROBERT, second earl of Carnwath, who, in his father's lifetime, got a charter un­der the great seal,Ibid. ad an­num 1632. Roberto, magistro de Dalzell, terrarum dominii et baroniae de Carnwath, &c. He was a man of great honour, probity, and loyalty.

In the time of the civil wars, he raised for­ces, both horse and foot, upon his own char­ges, for the service of his majesty king Charles I. which he himself commanded, fought upon their head, and always behaved with courage and resolution, for which he suffered greatly, both by sequestration of his estate of Carnwath, and otherways. He ac­companied king Charles II. to the fatal battle of Worcester, where he was taken prisoner, [Page 125] and was close confined for several years: all which hardships he bore with great firmness and constancy.

He married Christian, daughter of sir Wil­liam Douglas of Drumlanrig,Chart. in arch. [...]. de Carn­ [...]wath. ancestor of the duke of Queensberry, by whom he had a son,

XIII. GAWIN, third earl of Carnwath, who succeeded him,Chart. in pub. archiv. inter 1664 & 1672. and got charters under the great seal, Gavino comiti de Carnwath, of several lands and baronies. He married, 1st, Margaret,Chart. in arch. [...]am. de South­ [...]sk. daughter of David lord Carnegie, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. James, his heir.

2. John, who succeeded his brother.

His daughter, lady Jean, married to Claud Muirhead of Lachop.

He married, 2dly, lady Mary Erskine, daughter of Alexander earl of Kelly, but by her he had no issue.

He died in 1674, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIV. JAMES, fourth earl of Carnwath, who married lady Mary Seton,Chart. in arch. [...]am. de Carn­wath. daughter of George earl of Winton, by whom he had one daughter,

Lady Elizabeth Dalziel, married to lord John Hay, son of John marquis of Tweedale.

And dying in 1683 without male-issue, was succeeded by his brother,

XIV. JOHN, fifth earl of Carnwath, who died unmarried in 1702. The male line of Robert, second earl of Carnwath, eldest son of Robert, the first earl, thus ending, the estate and honours devolved upon sir Robert Dalziel of Glenae, lineally descended of sir John Dalziel of Glenae, second son of the said first earl of Carnwath, to whom we now return.

XII. Sir JOHN DALZIEL of Glenae, bro­ther-german of Robert, second earl of Carn­wath, married Agnes, daughter of—Nis­bet of Dean, by whom he had a son,

Sir Robert,—and a daughter.

Mary, married to Alexander earl of Kelly.

He was succeeded by his son,

XIII. Sir ROBERT, who got a charter, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. domino Roberto Dalziel de Glenae, &c. and married, 1st, a daughter of Sandilands lord Torphichen, by whom he had two daughters.

The [...]irst,—, married to—Fergu­son of Isle.

The second,—, married to sir Robert Lowrie of Maxweltoun.

He married, 2dly, lady Margaret, daugh­ter of James earl of Annandale, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 3dly, Violet, daughter of— Riddel of Haining, by whom he had three sons and four daughters.

1. Sir John.

2. Captain James Dalziel, who served in the army under king James VII. but quitted the service at the revolution, having married —Graham, by whom he had a son, John, and a daughter.

3. Colonel Thomas Dalziel, of the Scotch guards, who married Isabel, only daughter of the second marriage of—Ferguson of Craigdarroch, by whom he had a son, David Dalziel, merchant in Glasgow, and three daughters. 1. Jean, married to Thomas Gibson, Esq; one of the principal clerks of session, and hath issue. 2. Agnes. 3. Hen­riet.

Sir Robert's 1st daughter, Agnes, married to sir John Johnston of Westerhall.

2.—, married to Alexander Maxwell of Tinwald, without issue.

3.—, married to—, without issue.

4.—, married to Robert Carruthers of Rammerscales, and had issue.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIV. Sir JOHN DALZIEL of Glenae, who married Henriet, daughter of sir David Mur­ray of Stanhope, by whom he had two sons and one daughter.

1. Sir Robert, his heir.

2. John Dalziel, Esq; an officer of rank in the army, who married a daughter of Wil­liam Tildslie of Lodge, Esq; an English lady, by whom he had a son, who is married, and hath a considerable estate in the island of St. Christophers.

His daughter, Mary, married to William viscount Kenmure, and hath issue.

XV. Sir ROBERT DALZIEL of Glenae, succeeded to the estate and honours of Carn­wath, being the undoubted heir-male, as be­fore noticed, and was the sixth earl.

He was a man of good parts and great be­nevolence, but had the misfortune to engage in the rebellion in 1715, was taken prisoner at Preston, tried by his peers, condemned for high treason, and his estate and honours were [...]or [...]eited to the crown, but he got a pardon for his life.

He married, 1st, lady Grace Montgomery, daughter of Alexander earl of Eglington, by whom he had a daughter,

Lady Margaret Dalziel.

[Page 126] He married, 2dly, Grizel, danghter of A­lexander Urquhart of Newhall, Esq; by whom he had a son and heir,

Alexander.

He married, 3dly, Margaret, daughter of John Hamilton of Bangower, Esq; by whom he had a daughter, who died young.

He married, 4thly, Margaret Vincent, a Yorkshire lady, by whom he had a son,

Robert.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVI. ALEXANDER, who, had it not been for his father's forfeiture, would have been seventh earl of Carnwath.

He married miss Elizabeth Jackson, an English lady, and hath issue.

ARMS.

Sable, a naked man, with his arms extend­ed, proper.

Crest, on a wreath, a dagger, erect, the pommel and hilt, or.

Supporters, two chevaliers in complete ar­mour, each having a target on his exterior arm, proper.

MOTTO, I dare.

CHIEF SEAT.

At Kirkmichael in Annandale.

Earl of CARRICK.

THIS is an ancient and honourable title in Scotland. Cambden says, Olim Car­ricta suos habuit comites.

In the reign of king William the Lion, we find it conferred upon Duncan, son of Gilbert, lord of Galloway, about the year 1180, Rex Willielmus totam Carrictam dedit Duncano, Cambden, p. 693, and Scots chron. M. S. in bibl. jurid. Edin. filio Gilberti domini Galovidiae, &c.

I. DUNCAN, first earl of Carrick, son of Gilbert lord of Galloway, founded the abbay of Crossragwell, and amply endued it out of his own lands,Ibidem. pro salute animae suae, the 20th year of king William, anno 1185.

He likeways made several donations to the monks of Paisley and Melrose.Chartul. of Paisley and Melrose. He lived after the year 1230, and was succeeded by his son,

II. NIGELLUS or NEIL, second earl of Carrick, who was likeways a liberal benefac­tor to the religious,Craw [...]urd's Peerage. as appears from his do­nations to the monasteries of Crossragwell, Sandell,Rymer, tom. I. p. 559. &c. He is particularly mentioned in the Foedera Angliae as one of the magnates Scotiae, anno 1255.

He died anno 1256, leaving issue one daugh­ter,

III. MARGARET, countess of Carrick, his sole heiress, married, 1st, to Adam Kilconath, who, in her right, became earl of Carrick. This earl, with David Cummin earl of A­thole, were sent by king Alexander III.Martin's ge­nealog. vol. I. p. 167. to the assistance of king Lewis IX. of France, with 2000 auxiliaries, anno 1258.

He was afterwards sent by the same prince to the holy land, with 5000 men, where he died without issue, anno 1272.

The countess married, 2dly, Robert de Bruce, lord of Annandale, to whom she brought the title and dignity of earl of Carrick, and was mother,Stuart's hist: of the royal family. by him, of the great king Ro­bert Bruce, as will be shown in the follow­ing title.

BRUCE Lord of ANNANDALE and Earl of CARRICK.

HAD the name of BRUCE been distin­guished by no other person but the great and immortal king Robert, he alone is sufficient, not only to ennoble a name but a nation: but, to his glory and renown, we have that of other kings, and other heroes to be added, to raise this family to the highest pitch of grandeur amongst the illustrious hou­ses of the Scotch nobility.

We shall therefore deduce their descent from the Norman conquest of England, which, we presume, was their first settlement in this island.

Amongst the great number of noble and valiant Normans, that came over to England with William the Conqueror, anno 1066, none made a greater figure than Robert de Bruce, the undoubted ancestor of this family.

[Page 127] I. ROBERT BRUIS,Nobilis miles de Normand. Monasticon Anglicnum, v. II. p. 146. in bibl. jurid. Edin. (or Bruce,) whom sir William Dugdale calls a noble knight of Normandy, seems to have had no small share in the conquest of England.

And as William divided the conquered lands amongst those of his followers, who had most remarkably distinguished themselves for conduct and bravery, so none appears to have got so large a share as this Robert de Bruis; for both Scotch and English historians agree, that he got possession of the castle and ma­nor of Skelton,Abercrom­bie's hist. Dugdales ba­ronage. Mon. anglic. where most of his lands are par­ticularly men­tioned. (which became the chief title of his family) with above ninety lordships in the east, west, and north Ridings of Yorkshire, whereof Gysburn in Cleveland, (which we shall have occasion often to mention hereaf­ter,) was one.

This Robert died about the year 1100, (some say anno 1094,) and left issue a son and successor.

II. ROBET de BRUIS, second lord of Skel­ton, a man of great worth and honour, who, having contracted a friendship with king David I. while he resided in England, and his lady being then dead, by whom he had a son and heir, he came to Scotland with Da­vid, who was a generous prince, and always conferred his favours upon persons of merit.

We shall observe, that during the reign of king Alexander I. his brother David was de­signed comes, and prince of Cumberland, and was superior of the whole lordship of An­nandale. He was also earl of Northumber­land, Huntington,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple's col. p. 168. and 176. and Northampton, in right of his wife Mathilda, which is fully docu­mented from the register of the episcopal see of Glasgow.

That Robert de Bruis came to Scotland with David, and was accounted one of his nobles or vassals, is clear from the said regi­ster of Glasgow, where comes David gives centum solidorum in Hardingestra (in North­ampton-shire) for repairing the church of Glasgow. The original writ bears, ‘"with consent of Mathilda his wife, et procerum et militum meorum Roberti de Brus, Sir William Dugdales bar. tom. II. p. 447. Sir Ja. Dalrymple's collections. &c. inter ann. 1120, and 1124."’

This alone is sufficient proof of Robert's being in Scotland with David. It is no less certain,Register of the church of Glasgow, cir­ [...]iter ann. 1120. that he got possession of the lordship of Annandale, of which there are many do­cuments: and it is affirmed by some histori­ans, that king David procured him in mari­riage Agnes Annand, heiress to the rich lord­ship of Annandale, which contained all the lands from the bounds of Dunegal and Strath­nith, to the lands of Ranulph de Meschines, then earl of Chester, and lord of Cumber­land, which king David confirmed to him, whereby he came to have large possessions both in Scotland and in England.

And being a man of great parts, and equal­ly qualified for the cabinet and the field, was long in high favour both with king David I. of Scotland, and king Henry I. of Eng­land.

In the year 1137, Robert, being at the court of England, king Stephen joined him in commission with Bernard de Baliol, to en­deavour to dissuade or divert king David of Scotland from his intended invasion of Eng­land, for which Robert used all his interest; but David, either neglecting or despising the advice,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple and Sir William Dugdale. pursued his former resolutions, and en­tered England with a considerable army. Up­on which Robert withdrew his allegiance from David for his lands he held of him in Scotland, and was on the English side at the battle of Standard anno 1138,Monasticon Angli. vol. II. p. 146. where he took prisoner his own son Robert, whom he had left in Scotland,Nutrici suae custodiendum emendavit, &c. and was then about 14 years of age. When his father presented him to the king of England, he desired him to deliver him to his nurse to be taken care of,Tom. II. p. 448. &c.

Sir William Dugdale says, he was more sit to be eating wheat bread with his mother, than by force of arms to be defending his patrimony of Annandale, &c.

However, the year thereafter a peace was concluded upon very honourable terms for Scotland, Northumberland having been de­livered up to prince Henry, and Robert con­tinued in friendship and favour with king David ever after.

He was very liberal in his donations to the religious,Monast. Angl. Charta funda­tionis priora­tus de Gys­burn. having in 29th of Henry I. anno 1129, pro salute animae suae, &c. [...]ounded the monastery of canons regular at Gysburn, in honour of the blessed virgin, which he en­dowed with twenty carucates of land, a ca­rucate being then sixty acres.

He gave also to the same monastery the pa­tronage of all the churches within the lord­ship of Annandale, viz. the churches of An­nand, Lochmaben,Dugdales ba­ronage, tom. II. p. 447. Kirkpatrick, Cumbertrees, Renpatrick, Drivesdale, Hoddam, Castlemilk, &c. cum omnibus pertinentiis singularum eccle­siarum, &c.

He gave likeways to the monks of Whit­by in York-shire, the church of Middleburgh, with two carncates and two bovates of land in Newham,Ibid. p. 448. upon condition that they should place certain monks of their convent there, which they accordingly did, &c.

He married first Agnes, daughter of Fulco Poynell,Ibidem. with whom he got the manor of Carleton in England, with the pertinents, &c. By her he had issue a son,

Adam de Bruce.

[Page 128] He married, 2dly, Agnes Annand, by whom he got the lordship of Annandale in Scotland, as before noticed; and by her had issue two sons,

1. William de Bruce, who carried on the line of this family, of whom afterwards.

2. Robert de Bruce, who was taken pri­soner by his father at the battle of Standard, as before observed; but we can give no ac­count of his posterity.

This Robert,Monasticon Anglicanum, p. 142. second lord of Skelton in England, and first lord of Annandale in Scot­land, according to sir William Dugdale, died anno 1141;Ibid. p. 148. Et sepultus est apud Gys­burn in Cle­veland, in monasterio canonicorum quod erat ex­fundatione sua, &c. but according to sir James Dal­rymple anno 1143, and was buried at the monastery of Gysburn.

And as the Bruces lords of Skelton in Eng­land are descended of Adam, eldest son of the above Robert, we shall briefly deduce the ge­nealogy of that family, from Monasticon An­glicanum, till their male line failed.

III. ADAM de BRUCE, third lord of Skelton, first son of Robert, succeeded his father in the lordship of Skelton, and in the greatest part of his estate in England. He and Ivetta his spouse, dedicated the church of Thorp to the cathedral of York.

He enjoyed his great estate honourably and peaceably all his life, and died 20th March 1167, was buried with his father at Gysburn, and succeeded by his son, another

IV. ADAM de BRUCE, fourth lord of Skelton, who also possessed his inheritance in quiet, and dying in July 1185, was interred with his fathers at Gysburn, and left issue a son and successor,

V. PETER de BRUCE, fifth lord of Skelton, who lived in honour and tranquilli­lity all his life, and died 27th January 1211, was buried at Gysburn with his fathers, and succeeded by his son, another

VI. PETER de BRUCE, sixth lord of Skelton, who dying at Marseilles, in his re­turn from the holy land, 13th September 1267, his body was brought home, and in­terred at Gysburn.

He left issue a son and heir,

Peter de Bruce,— and four daughters.

1. Agnes.

2. Lucia.

3. Margaret.

4. Laderina.

VII. PETER de BRUCE, third of that name, and seventh lord of Skelton, succeed­ed his father, and married Helena de Mildain, by whom he had no issue, whereby (after his death) his great estate was divided amongst his four sisters,Monast. Angl. who were all married, and of whom several of the most considerable fami­lies in England are descended.

The male line of Adam de Bruce, eldest son of Robert, second lord of Skelton, and first of Annandale, thus ending about the year 1300, the representation of that illustrious family fell to Robert earl of Carrick, after­wards king Robert Bruce, who was the un­doubted heir male, being lineally descended of the second son of the said second Robert, to whom we now return.

III. WILLIAM de BRUCE, second son of Robert second lord of Skelton, succeeded to the lordship of Annandale in Scotland, in right of his mother, anno 1143, and to the lands of Harle, Hartness, and Cleveland in England, by his father's gift, to be held of him, and his successors, lords of Skel­ton, &c.

He obtained also from king Henry II. of England,Dugdales's baronage of Eng. v. II. p. 449. the privilege of a weekly market, every wednesday, at the manor of Harts­pole.

And to show that he looked upon his chief settlement to be in Scotland, he quitted his father's armorial bearing, and assumed the coat of Annandale,Mr. Nisbet, v. II. p. 19. viz, Or, a chief and sal­tier, gules, &c.

He grants a charter Adamo de Carleolo (one of his vassals) of some lands in Annandale, wherein he is designed Willielmus de Bruce, Charta penes Michaelem Carlyle de Lochartur. dominus vallis Annandiae, &c. The charter is without date; but, by the witnesses, must have been granted inter 1170, and 1180.

He confirmed the donations,Chartul. of Glasgow. which had been formerly given by his father to the monks of Gysburn,Sir Ja. Dal­rymple's coll. &c. of all the churches with­in the territory of Annandale, &c.

And dying before 1183, was succeeded by his son,

IV. ROBERT de BRUCE, third lord of An­nandale, a man of great valour and magna­nimity, and at the same time both pious and religious.

He ratified and confirmed to the abbacy of Gysburn all the grants of his predecessors in these words: Sciatis me confirmasse Deo et ecclesiae Sanctae Mariae de Gysburn donationes il­las quas fecit Robertus de Brus, avus meus, et quas idem confirmavit Willielmus de Brus pater meus, Anglia sacra in bibl. jurid. Edin. de ecclesia de Annand, de ecclesia de Lochmaben, &c. &c. &c..

This is also confirmed by king William the Lyon, testibus Johanne de Huntington o [...]ficiali Glasguensi, Henrico silio comitis David, Adam [Page 129] de Carle [...]lo, Adam filio Herberti; and many others.

He entered into an agreement with Joce­line bishop of Glasgow, with consent of the abbot and convent of Gysburn, whereby the churches in Annandale were made over to the see of Glasgow, to which his son gave his consent,Chartulary of Glasgow in archivis co­mitis de Pan­mure. according to these words in the in­denture: ‘"Teste et concedente Roberto de Bruise filio Roberti de Bruise, &c. circa annum 1190."’

He married Isabel, daughter of king Wil­liam the Lyon,Chron. of Melrose ad annum 1183. begot upon a daughter of Ro­bert de Avenel, lord of Liddisdale, a man of great rank, by whom he had a son,

Robert de Bruise.

After his death, his widow married to Ro­bert de Ross,Dugdale's baronage, tom. I. p. 546. lord of Werk and Hamluke in England, of whom are descended the Rosses of Hamluke, Werk, &c.

Robert,Dalrymple's appendix, p. 353. third lord of Annandale, died an­no 1191, and was succeeded by his only son,

V. ROBERT de BRUCE, fourth lord of Annandale, who, on account of his great va­lour and merit, was sirnamed the Noble.

He married lady Isabel, second daughter of prince David, earl of Huntington and Ches­ter, son of Henry prince of Scotland,Fordun and all Scotch hi­storians. eldest son of king David I. brother of king Malcolm IV. and king William the Lyon, by which royal marriage the Bruces of Annandale came to be among the greatest subjects in Europe; for by this lady (who was one of the three sisters and co-heiresses of John, sirnamed Scot, earl of Huntington, and last count pa­latine of Chester, whose only daughter Maud, had been married to prince David) besides their paternal estates in both kingdoms, Ro­bert came to be possessed of the manors of Uritile and Hatfield, in exchange for those lands that descended to his lady, by the death of the earls palatine her brothers, three whereof,Dugdale's baronage of England. Rymer's foed. Henry, David, and John, died without issue, she also brought him the lordship of Garioch in Scotland, and the ma­nors of Connington and Exton in England.

He died in an advanced age, anno 1245, and was interred with his ancestors in the ab­bay of Gysburn, under a stately monument, leaving issue by the said lady Isabel a son and successor,

VI. ROBERT de BRUCE, fifth Lord of Annandale, who, together with John Cum­min,Rymer's foed. Dugdale, vol. II. 450. Sir Ja. Bal­four, &c. were sent to England with auxiliaries, to the assistance of king Henry III. against the barons, and were both taken prisoners with king Henry and prince Edward, anno 1264.

After the death of queen Margaret, daugh­ter of the king of Norway, grandchild and undoubted heiress of king Alexander III. this Robert claimed the crown in right of his mother.

It was alledged, among many other argu­ments in his behalf, that it was customary in Scotland for the brother of the last king to be preferred before his son; and produced for an example, that Donald,Ibidem. Abercrom­bie &c. brother of Ken­neth Macalpine, attained the crown prefe­rable to Constantine, his brother Kenneth's son.

That king Alexander II. (failing heirs of his own body) looked upon Robert Bruce as his heir, even to the knowledge of Dornagild, his mother's elder sister, who was then alive, and assented to it, at least did not contradict it, having no male issue of her own.

And that it was a constant maxim in Scot­land,Rymer. tom. II. p. 542. &c. &c. for the son of the second daughter to be preferred to the heir female of the eldest daughter.Prynne's coll. vol. III. p. 516, 517.

And further, that king Alexander III. ac­knowledged this Robert to be next heir to the crown, failing heirs of his own body; all which he offered to prove by living witnesses.

But as that subject has been largely hand­led by several able historians, 'tis needless to insist further on it here, since it is well known how king Edward of England de­termined the controversy.

Robert, the competitor, married Isabel de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, earl of Glocester and Hartfield, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Robert de Bruce.

2. Sir Bernard Bruce, who got from his father the lands of Connington in Hunting­ton-shire,Sir William Dugdale's ba­ronage of England. and Exton in Rutland-shire, whose male line failed in the end of the reign of king Edward III.

3. John, ancestor of the Bruces of Clack­mannan. Vide Title Elgin and Kincardin.

His daughter Christian, married to Patrick Dunbar earl of March, one of the competi­tors for the crown.

As Robert Bruce thought that John Bali­ol, in the competition for the crown, was unjustly preferred to him, so he could never be prevailed upon,Baronage of England. Chron. Wal­teri abbatis de Gysburn. either to give up his title, or to acknowledge king Edward to be superi­or, or John Baliol to be king of Scotland, but in great discontent retired to England, where he did not remain long, but returned to his castle of Lochmaben, where he died, and was buried with his ancestors in the ab­bay of Gysburn, anno 1295.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. ROBERT de BRUCE, sixth lord of [Page 130] Annandale, afterwards earl of Carrick, who, in his younger years, together with Adam de Kilconath (in right of his wife, earl of Car­rick) accompanied Edward prince of England,He died in 1270, by the chron. of Melross, and in 1272. by Sir William Dugdale. and king Lewis I. of France to the holy war, where, by his courage and conduct, he gain­ed immortal honour, and where the earl of Carrick died, anno 1272, as before noticed.

Robert, after his return, retired to Eng­land, where he had a considerable estate; and though he never would submit to, or ac­knowledge John Baliol to be king of Scot­land, he continued in the English interest for some time, and with his son Robert (af­terwards king of Scotland) contributed great­ly to the English gaining the battle of Dunbar against the loyalists, anno 1296.

He married Margaret, countess of Carrick, daughter and sole heiress of Neil earl of Car­rick, and widow of the foresaid Adam de Kil­conath,Chronicle of Melross. earl of Carrick, in whose right he also became earl of Carrick, and by her had issue five sons and seven daughters.

1. Robert Bruce, afterwards king of Scot­land.

2. Edward Bruce, a brave soldier, who was very serviceable to his brother in his wars against the English. He was king of Ireland, and was killed at the battle of Dun­dalk, anno 1318.Abercromb. and Stuart's history of the royal family. He left no lawful issue, but several natural sons, viz. Robert, Alex­ander, and Thomas, successively earls of Car­rick, of whom afterwards.

3. Neil de Bruce, who was taken prison­er by king Edward, sent to London, and put to death.

4. Thomas,

5. Alexander.

The said Thomas and Alexander were both taken prisoners by Duncan Macdougal in Galloway,Ibidem. and put to death by king Edward.

1. Daughter, lady Isabel, married, 1st, to Thomas Randulph of Strathdon, lord high chamberlain of Scotland, whose son, Thomas Randulph, earl of Murray, lord of Annandale and the Isle of Man,Several char­ters in the public register. guardian of Scotland, &c. was one of the greatest heroes of his time. She married, 2dly, the earl of Athole; and, 3dly, Alexander Bruce.

2. Daughter, lady Mary, married, 1st, to Sir Neil Campbell, ancestor of the duke of Argyle;Ibidem. and, 2dly, to sir Alexander Fraser, lord high chamberlain of Scotland.

3. Lady Christian, married, 1st, to Grat­ney, earl of Mar; 2dly, to sir Christopher Se­ton of Seton,Ibidem, and all Scotch hi­storians. ancestor of the family of Win­ton; and, 3dly, to sir Andrew Moray of Both­well, chancellor and governor of Scotland.

4. Lady Mathilda, Crawsurd and Stewart. married to Hugh, earl of Ross.

5. Lady Elizabeth, Ibidem. married to sir William Dishington of Ardross.

6. Lady Margaret, Ibidem. married to sir Willi­am Carlyle of Torthorald.

7. Lady—,Ibidem. married to David lord Brechin.

He died anno 1303, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VIII. ROBERT BRUCE, earl of Carrick, seventh lord of Annandale, &c.

In 1297, he joined sir William Wallace; but having large possessions in England, he submitted to king Edward, and fought against the Scotch army at Falkirk, anno 1298, where he had a memorable interview with sir Wil­liam Wallace, narrated at large by several good historians.

In 1299, he revolted from king Edward, and was made one of the guardians of Scot­land, but was again reconciled to Edward in 1304.

In 1305, he was employed by king Ed­ward, with some other Scotchmen, to settle the disordered state of their country: the following year he determined to assert his just title to the crown, was joined by the loyal­ists or patriots, and crowned at Scoon on palm-sunday, the 27th of March 1306.

Soon thereafter he relieved, and entirely redeemed his distressed country from the usurpations and tyranny of a foreign power; but as the great actions of this hero are ful­ly set forth, and recorded by many able hi­storians, and do not properly fall within the plan of this work, we shall only add, that no age or country ever produced a man of more eminent qualities,Abercrombie and all other Scotch histo­rians. either for peace or war, than the famous and renowned king Robert Bruce.

He married, 1st, lady Isabel, daughter of Donald, and sister of Gratney, earl of Mar, by whom he had lady Marjory, who was married to Walter, lord high steward of Scot­land, then the greatest man in the kingdom. Their son Robert was afterwards king of Scotland;Ibidem. and their daughter Egidia, or Giles, married to sir James Lindsay of Crawfurd, and had issue.

King Robert married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of Henry de Bure,Abercromb. earl of Ulsterby, by whom he had issue a son,

David, his heir to the crown,—and three daughters.Chart. in pu­blic. regist.

1. Margaret, married to William earl of Sutherland, and had issue.

2. Mathilda, married to Thomas de Issack, whose daughter, Jean, was married to John de Ergadia,Rymer's soed. lord of Lorn, of whom are descend­ed the lords of Lorn and Innermeath, the [Page 131] Stewarts, carls of Athole, Buchan, Traquair, the laird of Gairntully, &c.

3. Elizabeth, Chart. penes Mr. Oliphant of Gask. married to sir Walter Oli­phant, ancestor of lord Oliphant.

King Robert had likeways a natural son, called Robert Bruce, who was a brave and gallant man, and highly esteemed by his fa­ther, who, in many charters, designs him dilectus filius meus, Chart. penes Mr. Lockhart of Lee. &c. He was also design­ed dominus de Liddel or Liddisdale; and it is not improbable, that it was by his daughter and heiress, that the estate and lordship of Liddisdale came to that great patriot sir Wil­liam Douglas, dominus de Liddisdale.

This Robert was killed at the battle of Duplin,Fordun, &c. fighting in defence of his king and country, anno 1332.

King Robert Bruce died in June 1329, and was succeeded by his son,

IX. King DAVID BRUCE, who was not then nine years of age. He was a prince en­dowed with many excellent qualities, of great courage and conduct; yet he was not always successful.Abercromb. He retired to France after the battle of Halidonhill, in 1333, where he re­mained till 1342.

After his return, he made several expedi­tions into England, (to make a diversion in favour of the French) with very good success; but, at the fatal battle of Durham, he was wounded and taken prisoner, anno 1346.

He was detained long in England, though many treaties were set on foot by his faithful and loyal subjects for his liberty, which, at last,Rymer's foed. and all Scotch historians. was brought about, and accomplished for a ransom of 100,000 merks Sterling, anno 1357.

And as the particular transactions of this long reign are fully recorded by many histo­rians, to these we refer our readers.

He married, 1st, Joanna or Jean, daughter of king Edward II.Autograph. penes com. de Errol, ad an­num 1366. of England; 2dly, he married the widow of sir John Logie of that ilk; but died without issue in the castle of Edinburgh, on 22d February 1371, which ended the male-line of the body of king Ro­bert Bruce,Crawf. peer­age, and hist. of the royal family. formerly earl of Carrick.

Upon king Robert's accession to the crown, he bestowed the title of earl of Carrick upon his valiant and faithful brother Edward king of Ireland,Charta in ro­tul Roberti I. who was third earl of Carrick of the Brucian race; and he being killed, as above, without lawful issue, the king bestow­ed that earldom upon Edward's eldest natural son, Robert Bruce, and his heirs-male, he be­ing fourth earl; and, as he was killed at the battle of Duplin, anno 1332, without male-issue, the earldom went to his brother,

ALEXANDER, fifth earl of Carrick, who was killed at the battle of Halidonhill,Ibid. History of the royal family. anno 1333, leaving only one daughter,

HELEN,Chart. in pub, archiv. countess and heiress of Carrick, married to sir William Cunningham of Kil­mawers; but she dying likeways without issue, the earldom went to Edward's third son,

THOMAS, earl of Carrick,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. who joined Robert Stewart, guardian of Scotland, in 1344, but died also without issue, whereby the earldom of Carrick fell to the crown.

And as that title was never after conferred upon any but the sons of our kings, till king Charles I. bestowed it upon James lord Kin­cleven, we shall therefore briefly mention those who enjoyed it.

I. JOHN STEWART, eldest son of king Robert II. by Elizabeth More, his first wife, was created earl of Carrick by king David Bruce. He was afterwards king of Scotland, by the name of king Robert III.

II. DAVID, prince of Scotland, and duke of Rothsay, eldest son of king Robert III. was created earl of Carrick by his father, but died before him without issue.

III. Prince JAMES, eldest son of king James III. was created earl of Carrick by his father, and was afterwards king of Scotland, viz. James IV.

IV. ALEXANDER STEWART, fourth son of king James IV. was created earl of Carrick and duke of Rothsay, and died young, anno 1516.

V. HENRY, prince of Scotland, eldest son of king James VI. was created earl of Car­rick and duke of Rothsay, and afterwards Prince of Wales. He died before his father, without issue, universally lamented, anno 1612, in the 19th year of his age.

STEWART Earl of CARRICK.

HAVING already given an account of all who enjoyed the ancient and ho­nourable title of CARRICK, before it was conferred upon John lord Kincleven; and as that title is now claimed by a baron of Eng­land, as being descended of this John, we proceed to deduce his descent from his im­mediate ancestor,

I. Sir ROBERT STEWART of Strathdon,Stuart's hist. of the royal family. p. 104. a natural son of king James V. by Eupham. daughter of Alexander lord Elphingstone, was created earl of Orkney by king James VI. anno 1581.

He married lady Jean Kennedy, daughter of Gilbert earl of Cassilis, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.

1. Patrick, earl of Orkney, his successor.

2. John, afterwards earl of Carrick.

3. Sir James Stewart.

4. Sir Robert.

1st daughter, lady Mary.

2. Lady Jean.

3. Lady Elizabeth.

4. Lady—.

They were all married. Vide Title Ork­ney.

II. JOHN, second son of Robert earl of Orkney, being a man of parts, was in great favour with king James VI. who created him lord Kincleven,Crawfurd's peerage of Scotland. anno 1607.

And being in no less favour with king Charles I. was, by that prince, further digni­fied with the title of earl of Carrick, anno 1633.

He married lady Elizabeth Howard,Colin's Peerage of England, vol. III. p. 129. daugh­ter of Charles earl of Nottinghame, and died in 1652, leaving issue only one daughter,

III. Lady MARGARET STEWART, who was married to sir Matthew Mennes,Ibidem. knight of the bath, by whom she had only one child.

IV. MARGARET MENNES, who was married to sir John Heath of Braystade in Kent,Ibidem. knight, to whom she had no sons, and but one daughter.

V. MARGARET HEATH, who was marri­ed to George Verny, lord Willoughby of Brook.

In consequence of which marriage, the fa­mily of Brook now claim the title of earl of Carrick,Ibidem. this Margaret Heath being the line­al, and only representative of John last earl of Carrick, her great grand-father.

George Verny, lord Willoughby of Brook, by the said Margaret Heath,Ibid. p. 130. left issue three sons and one daughter.

1. Thomas, who died before his father, without male issue.

2. Richard, his father's successor.

3. John Verny; Esq; ancestor of John now lord Willoughby of Brook, of whom after­wards.

Their daughter, Margaret, was married to Anthony Duncomb, Esq; afterwards lord Fe­versham.

VI. RICHARD, second son of George lord Willoughby of Brook, succeeded his father, and married Margaret, daughter of Mr. Ne­hemiah Walker of Monmouthshire, by whom he had only one son,

George, Ibidem. who died an infant.

And he dying without issue, in 1752, was succeeded in his estate and honours by his nephew John Peyto, son of his uncle John Verny, to whom we now return.

VI. JOHN VERNY, third son of George lord Willoughby of Brook,Ibidem, vol. V. p. 59. by Margaret Heath, being bred to the law, was appointed one of the king's council, anno 1727.

He was member of parliament for Down­ton, in com. de Wilts, and one of his majesty's justices for South-Wales.

In 1733, he was appointed chief justice of Chester, and in 1738, master of the rolls, and one of the privy council; and died in 1741, having married Abigail, only daughter of Edward Hartly of Eyewood, in the county of Hereford, Esq; one of the auditors of the impress, by whom he had a son,

VII. JOHN PEYTO VERNY, who succeed­ed to his uncle George, anno 1752, as before mentioned, and is now lord Willoughby of Brook.

KENNEDY Earl of CASSILIS.

THE progenitors of this noble and illu­strious family, were considerable pro­prietors, and had large possessions in the west of Scotland, (particularly in Carrick) before sirnames were much used in this country.

That a family of rank and figure in Car­rick, were the undoubted ancestors of the KENNEDIES of Cassilis, and that they as­sumed their sirname from their being head or chief of that family, is sufficiently instructed by the following connexion of authentic do­cuments and charters from father to son: so that these historians, who alledge that the first of this family came from Ireland, must have been in a mistake.

I. DUNCANUS de Carrick flourished in the reign of Malcolm IV. who succeeded to the crown of Scotland, anno 1153. Being pos­sessed of a considerable estate in Carrick, he and his posterity were for some time design­ed by that name.

He left issue a son and successor,

II. NICHOLAUS de Carrick, who made a donation to the nuns of North-berwick of the patronage of the church of St. Cuthbert at Maybole, in the reign of king William the Lion, who succeeded to the crown in 1165, and died anno 1214.

In this donation he is designed Nicholaus de Carrick filius Duncani, Append. to Nisb. 2d vol. p. 39 et chart. in pub. arch. &c.

He was succeeded by his son,

III. ROLANDUS de Carrick, who, in the reign of king Alexander II. obtained a char­ter from Nigellus earl of Carrick, of the bai­liary of Carrick, to be caput totius prosapiae suae (or chief of his kindred) and to have the com­mand of all the men in Carrick, under the said earl and his successors, &c. to him and his heirs for ever; which is afterwrds confirmed by king Alexander III. the 27th year of his reign, anno 1276; in which he is designed Rolandus de Carrick, Ibidem. filius Nicolai, filii Dun­cani, &c. All which is fully narrated and confirmed by king Robert II.Chart. in pub. archiv. anno regni se­cundo.

This family, being evidently possessed of a large estate, and head of a considerable tribe or clan, began to be called Kennadies, from the Galic or Celtic word Kean-na-ty, which signifies head of the house, or chief of the clan; and in that country the word Ken­nady is called Kennaty to this day.

There are several charters in the records, wherein the same persons are designed Car­rick in the body, and Kennady on the mar­gin, in the reign of king Robert II.Ibidem. by which it is certain that Carrick and Kennady wete promiscuously used by the heads of this fami­ly for a considerable time, though their ca­dets generally took the name of Kennady.

Roland was succeeded by his son,

IV. Sir GILBERT de CARRICK, who, in several authentic writs, is designed son of Roland, particularly in a submission of a dif­ference betwixt him and the nuns of North­berwick, in which Robert Bruce, earl of Car­rick, father of king Robert Bruce, and Ro­bert bishop of Glasgow were arbiters. He is therein designed Gilbertus de Carrick, miles, filius Rolandi, &c. and his seal, which is thereto appended, hath the very same shield of arms which the family of Cassilis carries at this day; which shows, that they had the double tressure sloree,Nisbet's ap­pend. et cart. in pub. arch. and contraflorce, with flower de lisses to their arms, long before they matched with the royal family.

This sir Gilbert was often designed Kenna­dy, and had lands in his possession of the same designation, which appears by the following charter of confirmation from the earl of Len­nox to his son,

V. Sir GILBERT de CARRICK, or Ken­nady, who succeeded him. There is a charter of Malcolm earl of Lennox,Chartul. of Levenax, pe­nes MacFar­lane, p. 70. &c. facta Gil­berto de Carrick, filio et haeredi domini Gilberti de Carrick, militis, de terris de Buchmonyn, Ken­nady, Cromiearne, Blairsode, &c. to which Malcolm, son of the above earl, sir Adam More, and Gilbert Drummond, are witnesses.

This sir Gilbert died about the 1290, and was succeeded by his son,

VI. DUNCAN de CARRICK, or Kennady, who made a donation of his patronage of the church of Kilbryde in Carrick to the nuns of North-berwick,Nisbet's ap­p [...]nd. p. 39. wherein he is designed Dunca­nus filius domini Gilberti de Carrick, militis, &c.

As he had begun to drop the name of Car­rick, and was more frequently designed by the name of Kennedy, as caput totius prosapiae, so the cadets of the family, who were now be­come numerous, followed his example, laid aside the name of Carrick altogether, and em­braced that of Kennedy, of which there are many examples in our records; but whether any of them were brothers or sons of this Duncan, I cannot determine, viz.

[Page 134] Alexander Kennedy was chancellor to John Baliol,Remarks on Ragman's roll, p 20. anno 1295.

John Kennedy swore fealty to king Edward I.Prynne's col­lections, vol. III. p. 652. anno 1296.

Hugh Kennedy did the same.Ibid. p. 658.

Fergusius Kennedy, &c. is to be found in the chartulary of Levenax in the beginning of king Robert Bruce's reign,Chartul. of Levenax, p. 71. &c. and proba­bly a son of Duncan.

Duncan was succeeded by his eldest son,

VII. Sir GILBERT de CARRICK, or Kennedy, who obtained a charter from king Robert Bruce, which contains a full remissi­on on for his surrendering the castle of Lochdown to the English;Chart. in pub. archiv. in which charter he is design­ed Gilbertus de Carrick, miles, filius Duncani, &c. ante 1319.

By the same charter, king Robert again re­ceives him into favour, restores him to the government of the castle of Lochdown, and all the lands thereto belonging, which have been part of the property of Cassilis ever since. The witnesses are Edwardus de Brus, Jacobus senescallus Scotiae, Thomas Ranulf, Joannes de Menteith, Nigellus Campbell, Jacobus dominus de Douglas, Alexander Fraser, &c. which is afterwards confirmed by king Ro­bert II.Ibidem. anno regni secundo, 1372.

He got also possession of the lands of Dun­nure, which afterwards became their chief title; and he was the last of this family who was designed by the name of Carrick.

He left issue a son and successor,

VIII. Sir JOHN KENNEDY of Dunnure, who,Ibidem. in many authentic writs, is designed filius Gilberti de Carrick.

He was a man of good parts, was often employed in negotiations of the greatest im­portance, and always acquitted himself with fidelity and honour.

He was one of the commissioners appoint­ed to treat with the English at Newcastle, about king David's redemption,Rymer's foed. tom. V. p. 791. anno 1354, though it was not compleated till 1357.

He got a charter from king David II.Chart. in ar­chiv. regis David. of several lands in comitatu de Carrick infra vice­comitatum de Air, anno 1360.

He likeways acquired from Marjory, daugh­ter of sir John Montgomery, knight, the lands and barony of Cassilis, which hath been in the family's possession ever since. The same was ratified by a charter from king Da­vid II.Ibidem. anno 1362.

In the reign of said king David, he found­ed a church at Maybole, in Carrick, with a chaplainry, which he largely endowed. The foundation charter, in which he is designed Johannes Kennedy dominus de Dunnonure, bears, pro salubri statu mei, Mariae uxoris meae, et liberorum suorum quamdiu egerimus in humanis, et pro anintabus nostris, &c. to which his seal is appended; also sigillum domini Gilberti Kennedy, militis, filii sui et haeredis: all which is narrated at large in a charter of confirmati­on of king Robert II. testibus Johanne, pri­mogenito suo, comite de Carrick, Roberto comite de Menteith, Chart. in pub. archiv. and Mr. Hay's vindication of Elizabeth More, p. 87. Willielmo comite de Douglas, Johanne de Carrick cancellario Scotiae, Williel­mo de Keith marescallo, Jacobo de Lindsay, Roberto de Erskine militibus, &c. dated at Dundonald, anno regni primo.

He obtained, from said king Robert, a char­ter medietat. Chart. in pub. archiv. baroniae de Dalrymple infra vice­comitatum de Air, quae fuit Malcolmi filii Adae de Dalrymple, &c. anno 1371.

Also a charter medietat. baroniae de Dal­rymple, &c. Ibidem. cum pertinen. quae fuit Hugonis filii Rolandi de Dalrymple, &c. anno 1377.

By said Mary, his spouse, he left issue three sons.

1. Sir Gilbert.

2. Sir Hugh Kennedy of Ardstincher,Crawfurd's notes upon Buchanan. who acquired great reputation and honour, for his gallant behaviour in the French wars, against the English, under the command of John Stewart, earl of Buchan; for which he was honoured by the king of France with his arms,Nisbet, v. II. p. 59. viz. Azure, three flower de lisses, or, which he and his successors marshalled in the first and fourth quarters, with those of Ken­nedy in the second and third. Mr. Nisbet further says, that the Kennedies of Bargenie, Kirkhill and Binning, in the shire of Air, are descended of this Sir Hugh, because they car­ry the flower de lisses in their arms,Ibidem. which no other family of the name of Kennedy does; and that the Kennedies of Bargeny were long proprietors of the barony of Ardstincher, which was the designation and inheritance of this sir Hugh, &c.

3. John, who appears to have been an­cestor of the Kennedies of Culzean. John Kennedy of Culzean, who got a charter from king James II.Chart. in pub. archiv. of several lands in Airshire, anno 1449, was his son or grandson, which estate afterwards returned to the family.

Sir John was succeeded by his eldest son,

IX. Sir GILBERT KENNEDY of Dun­nonure, who, when very young, was one of the noble Scotch heirs that were sent hostages to England for king David's ransom,Rymer's foed. tom. VI. p. 35. and 109. anno 1357.

He got a charter from king Robert II.Chart. inpub. archiv. villae de Kirkintulloch, dated anno 1373.

He was a man of singular merit, and in great favour with king Robert III. who first conferred upon him the honour of knighthood, [Page 135] and afterwards gave him grants of a great ma­ny lands in the earldom of Carrick,Chart. in pub. archiv. then in the crown.

There is a confirmation of Duncan earl of Lennox, of a charter granted by dominus Gil­bertus Kennedy, dominus de Dunnure, miles, ter­rarum de Buchmonyn, Kennedy, &c. in fa­vours of John Kennedy son of Fergus, &c. anno 1393; to which dominus Johannes de Maxwell miles, Chartul. of Levenax, p. 71. dominus de Pollock, Alexander de Levenax, Gilbert de Cochrane, &c. are witnesses.

He married, 1st, Mary, daughter of sir James Sandilands of Calder,Crawfurd's notes on Bu­chanan. by whom he had two sons.

1. Gilbert, who died in the French ser­vice without issue.

2. Thomas, Crawfurd's Peerage, p. 73. who, according to Mr. Craw­furd, was ancestor of the Kennedies of Bar­geny; but as I have not seen the old writs of that family, I shall not pretend to determine, whether they are descended of this Thomas, or of sir Hugh of Ardstincher, as before no­ticed, though the former appears to me most probable.

Sir Gilbert married, 2dly, Marian, daugh­ter of sir Robert Maxwell of Calderwood, by whom he had a son,

X. Sir JAMES KENNEDY, who carried on the line of this family, and obtained from king Robert III. a charter of confirmation of the bailiary of Carrick, to be caput totius prosapiae, and to have the command of the militia of Carrick,Chart. in pub. archiv. and Nisbet's ap­pend. p. 39. &c. the king's charter bears, dilecto consanguineo suo Jacobo Kennedy, militi, &c.

He married lady Mary Stewart, daughter of king Robert III. countess dowager of An­gus, and got a confirmation from the same king, now his father-in-law, of the lands and barony of Dalrymple, to him and Mary Stew­art, the king's daughter,Chart. in pub. archiv. his spouse, dated at Dundonald anno 1405.

This sir James was unhappily engaged in a quarrel with his elder brother Gilbert, in which sir James lost his life (his father being then alive) leaving issue, by the said lady Ma­ry Stewart, two sons.

1. Gilbert, afterwards lord Kennedy.

2. James, who devoted himself to the church, entered into holy orders, and became a great ornament to his profession. For true piety, and universal benevolence, he was ex­ceeded by none.Mr. Keith's catalogue of bishops, p. 18. He was promoted to the see of Dunkeld anno 1438, and translated to the bishoprick of St. Andrews, anno 1440. He was one of the privy council to king James II. and chancellor of Scotland in anno 1444.

He was one of the regents of the kingdom in king James III.'s minority, and had the chief direction of all state affairs, which he managed with such prudence and discretion, that his whole conduct was universally ap­proven.

He founded St. Salvator's college in St. Andrews, and nobly endowed it. His other acts of piety and munificence, are too nu­merous to be here narrated.

He died on 10th May 1466, and was in­terred in the noble chapel of St. Salvator's college, in a beautiful and stately monument, which he erected himself.

We shall sum up this great man's charac­ter from Buchanan, who says,Crawfurd's peerage Buchanan, &c. &c. &c. ‘"that he sur­passed all men in point of authority; that his prudence was held in the highest esti­mation; that he was lamented at his death as a public parent, &c."’

XI. GILBERT, first son of sir James Ken­nedy, and lady Many Stewart, succeeded his grandfather in all his lands, and obtained from his uncle king James I. a grant of the here­ditary constablewick of the castle of Loch­down,Chart. in pub. archiv. dated 14th May 1430.

He obtained from king James II. a charter, constituting him heretable bail [...]e of the earl­dom of Carrick,Ibidem. caput totius prosapiae suae, &c. to him and his heirs for ever.

He got also from the same prince,Ibid. inter 1440 & 1452. charters of the lands and barony of Cassilis, and a great many other lands, too numerous to be nar­rated here, which shows what a vast estate the family was then possessed of. He was af­terwards dignified with the title of lord Ken­nedy,Ibidem. anno 1450.

He was nominated one of the six regents in the minority of king James III. though his brother the bishop had the chief management of all public affairs.

He married Agnes, daughter of Herbert lord Maxwell, by whom he had a son,

John, lord Kennedy,—and two daugh­ters.

1. Catharine, married to Alexander lord Montgomery,Ibidem. ancestor of the earl of Egling­ton.

2. Marian, Ibidem. married to sir John Wallace of Craigie.

He was succeeded by his only son,

XII. JOHN, second lord Kennedy, who obtained a charter from king James II. Johan­ni Kennedy silio et haeredi dilecti consunguinei nostri Gilberti domini Kennedy, Ibidem. terrarum de Garbrach Bordilands, &c. anno 1459.

He was a man of good parts, was of the privy council to king James III. and was one [Page 136] of the commissioners appointed to treat of a peace with the English,Rymer. tom. XII. p. 241. and 267. anno 1484.

He married, 1st, Jean, daughter of Alexan­der lord Montgomery, by whom he had a son,

David, afterwards earl of Cassilis.

He married, 2dly, lady Elizabeth Gordon, daughter of George earl of Huntly, widow of William earl of Errol,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had a son,

Alexander, ancestor of the Kennedies of Gervanmains and Barquhanny,—and a daughter,Ibid. ad an. 1495.

Jean, married to Archibald earl of Angus.

He died in 1508, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. DAVID, third lord Kennedy, who, being a man of great honour, courage and intrepidity, was in high favour with king James IV. from whom he obtained a charter, —officium balivatus de Carrick,—dilecto con­sanguineo suo Davidi Kennedy militi et haeredi apparenti dilecti consanguinei sui Johannis do­mini Kennedy, Ibidem. &c. anno 1489.

And a charter of the lands of Bagry and Borlands,Ibidem. to him and Agnes Borthwick his spouse, and the longest liver, &c.

Also a charter of the lands and barony of Cassilis.Ibidem.

He was likeways one of the privy council to king James IV.Production of the decreet of ranking, ann. 1606. in the lawiers libra­ry Edin. who was pleased further to dignify him with the title of earl of Cassilis, anno 1509, or inter November 1509, and March 1510.

He married, 1st, Agnes, daughter of Wil­liam lord Borthwick, by whom he had a son,

Gilbert, his heir.

He married, 2dly, lady Margaret Boyd, daughter of Thomas earl of Arran, by lady Mary Stewart, daughter of king James II. but by her he had no issue.

He was killed in the service of his country, at the battle of Flowdon, on 9th September 1513, and succeded by his son,

XIV. GILBERT, second earl of Cassilis, who being a man of great accomplishments, was often employed in foreign negotiations. He was appointed one of the privy council to king James V.Rymer, tom. XIII. p. 531. & tom. XIV. p. 20. and was sent ambassador to England, with the earls of Lennox and Glen­cairn, to treat of a peace, anno 1516, and again in 1524.

He joined in the association, with several other noble lords, to rescue the king out of the hands of the earl of Angus for; which he suffered greatly, and was put to several hard­ships by the prevailing party of that time.

He married Isabel,Crawfurd's Peerage and Scots comp. daughter of Archibald earl of Angus, by whom he had two sons.

1. Gilbert, earl of Cassilis.

2. Quintin, abbot of Crossragwell, who was a man of singular piety,Crawfurd's Peerage and Scots comp. and great auste­rity of manners; and dying in 1564, was canonized for a saint.

The earl was murdered at Prestick, on 22d December 1527, and succeeded by his eldest son,

XV. GILBERT, third earl of Cassilis, who was highly esteemed by king James V. and was one of the Scotch nobles that accompani­ed that prince to the battle of Solway, anno 1542, where he was taken prisoner, and car­ried to London, with many more of his coun­trymen.Rymer. tom. XIV. p. 796. He was soon afterwards released for a ransom of one thousand pounds sterling.

When a prisoner, he had the opportunity of conversing frequently with king Henry VIII. who had a particular friendship for him, and shewed him several marks of his favour, by which he gained him over to his party; and he used all his interest to promote a match betwixt queen Mary of Scotland, and prince Edward of England, which king Hen­ry had very much at heart, but could not get effectuate.

In 1554,Lives of the officers of state. the earl was made lord high trea­surer of Scotland, in which office he acquitted himself with honour and fidelity.

He was afterwards one of the Scotch peers that were sent to France, to assist at the mar­riage of queen Mary with the dauphine, which accordingly they saw accomplished,Ibidem. on the 24th April 1558.

He married—,Crawfurd's Peerage and Scots comp. daughter of—, by whom he had issue two sons and two daugh­ters.

1. Gilbert, fourth earl of Cassilis.

2. Sir Thomas of Culzean, ancestor of the present sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean baro­net,Chart. in pub. archiv. of whom afterwards.

1. Daughter, lady Jean, married to Ro­bert Stewart earl of Orkney.

2. Lady Catharine, married to Patrick Vaus of Banburrow, knight.

The earl died at Dieppe, in his return from France,Spotswood's church hist. 28th November 1558, not without suspicion of poison.

XVI. GILBERT, fourth earl of Cassilis, suc­ceeded, and was appointed one of the privy council to queen Mary, anno 1562, and con­tinued long faithful and steady to her inte­rest.

Upon the breaking out of the civil war, he joined the queen's sorces,Ibid. Craw­furd's peer­age, Scots compend. and was at the battle of Langside, where her majesty's troops were entirely defeat, anno 1568; but he af­terwards submitted to the authority of the young king.

[Page 137] He got a charter from king James VI.Chart. in pub: archiv. Gilberto comiti de Cassilis domino Kennedy, &c. of a great many lands, anno 1575, and 1576.

He married Margaret Lyon, daughter of John lord Glammis, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, earl of Cassilis.

2. Gilbert, designed master of Cassilis, whose son John succeeded to the earldom, as will be shown hereafter.

He died in 1576, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVII. JOHN, fifth earl of Cassilis, who, be­ing young at his father's death, was carefully educated by his uncle and guardian sir Tho­mas Kennedy of Culzean; and was made lord high treasurer of Scotland,Spotiswood's church hist. in the room of Walter lord Blantyre, anno 1599.

He obtained a charter from king James VI.Chart. in pub. archiv. of a great many lands, anno 1599.

He married Jean, daughter of James, lord Fleming, lady dowager of Thirlestane; but dying without issue, anno 1615, his estate and honours devolved upon his nephew,

XVIII. JOHN, sixth earl of Cassilis, son of Gilbert the master, who was second son of Gilbert, fourth earl of Cassilis, before menti­oned.

He obtained a charter from king James VI. terrarum de Inch cum piscariis in lacu, Ibidem. with many other lands, anno 1622.

He was a man of great honour and inte­grity, and endowed with many excellent qua­lities.

He adhered firmly to the interest of king Charles I. during all the time of the civil war; and after the murder of the king, he was, with the earl of Lothian, lord Bur­leigh, and others, sent commissioners to king Charles II. then at Breda, upon which his majesty came to Scotland, and was crowned at Scoon, anno 1651.

After the battle of Worcester, when all the loyalists were dispersed, the earl of Cassilis could never be pravailed upon to make the smallest concession or acknowledgment to Oli­ver Cromwell,Bishop Bur­net's history. even after he was lord pro­tector.

He married, 1st, lady Jean Hamilton, Daughter of Thomas earl of Haddington,Chart. in pub. archiv. by whom he had a son, and two daughters, viz.

James, lord Kennedy, who was put in see of the estate, by a charter under the great seal; but he died before his father without issue.

1. Daughter, lady Margaret, married to docter Gilbert Burnet, bishop of Sarum.

2. Lady Catharine, married to William lord Cochran, son and heir apparent of Willi­am, earl of Dundonald.

He married, 2dly, lady Margaret Hay, daughter of William, earl of Errol, by whom he had a son,

John, earl of Cassilis,—and two daughters.

1. Lady Mary Kennedy.

2. Lady Elizabeth.

He died anno 1668, and was succeeded by his son,

XIX. JOHN,Retour in chancery. seventh earl of Cassilis, who was served heir to his father and brother, anno 1669.

He got a new charter of all his lands upon his own resignation,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1671.—He came early into the revolution, and was appointed one of the privy council to king William,Crawfurd's Peerage, and Scots comp. anno 1689, and soon afterwards was made one of the lords of the treasury.

He married, 1st, lady Susan, daughter of James, duke of Hamilton, by whom he had a son,—John, lord Kennedy, and a daugh­ter,

Lady Anne, married to John earl of Rug­len, of whom William, now earl of March, is heir and representative.

He married, 2dly, Elizabeth, daughter of —Foix, Esq; by whom he had a son,— James, who died without issue, and a daugh­ter,

Lady Elizabeth.

He died in 1702.

XX. JOHN, lord Kennedy, first son and ap­parent heir of John seventh earl of Cassilis, married Elizabeth, daughter of—Hutchi­son, Esq; by whom he had a son,

John, his heir.

And dying anno 1700, was succeeded by his son,

XXI. JOHN, who succeeded also to his grand-father, anno 1702. He was the eighth earl of Cassilis, and governor of the castle of Dumbarton, &c.

He married lady Susan Hamilton, daugh­ter of John, earl of Selkirk and Ruglen, and died without issue, anno 1759, which ended the male line of Gilbert, eldest son of the third earl of Cassilis, and John, the eighth earl, is, by his own destination, succeeded in his estate by sir Thomas Kennedy of Cul­zean, his undoubted heir male; but the ho­nours being claimed both by him and the earl of March, the heir of line, the controversy is now depending, and will soon be deter­mined by the parliament of Great-Britain.

And as the male heir enjoys the estate, [Page 138] and carries on the line of the family, being lineally descended from sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean, before mentioned, to him we now return.

XVI. Sir THOMAS KENNEDY of Cul­zean, second son of Gilbert, third earl of Cas­silis, married Elizabeth, daughter of— M'Gill of Cranston-Riddel, which appears by charter under the great seal, domino Thomae Kennedy de Culzean et dominae Elizabethae M'Gill suae sponsae, Chart. in pub. archiv. et haeredibus masculis, &c. terrarum baroniae de Culzean, Ibidem. &c. jacen. in balivatu de Carrick, et vicecomitatu de Air, super resignatione Davidis M'Gill junioris de Cranston-Riddel, &c. &c. dated 23d Febru­ary 1591.

And by another charter, Thomae Kennedy de Culzean, militi, et dom. Elizabethae M'Gill sponsae suae, et haeredibus masculis, super cartam illis factamper Johannem com. de Cassilis ter­arum baroniae de Culzean, &c. dated 26th August 1597.

By the said Elizabeth M'Ggil he had issue two sons.

1. James, his successor.

2. Alexander, who carried on the line of this family.

XVII.Precept of clare constat, &c. of the lands of Cul­zean, &c. dated 5. Sept. 1606. JAMES KENNEDY of Culzean, first son of sir Thomas, married Anne Stew­art of the family of—, by whom he had a son,

James, who died without issue, whereby the succession devolved upon,

XVII. Sir ALEXANDER KENNEDY of Culzean, second son of sir Thomas, of which there are many documents, viz.

Disposition by his brother James to him of the lands of Auchaltan,Chart. in ar­chiv. familiae de Cassilis. &c. dated 6th Ju­ly 1621.

Contract of seal betwixt the said James and this Alexander, of the lands of Coffe, &c dated 12th June 1622.

Charter by the said James, to the said Alexander, of an annualrent of 120l. out of Straiton, &c. dated the penu [...] of July, anno praedicto, Ibidem. &c. &c. &c. in all which he is designed brother-german to the said James.

He married a daughter of—Kenne­dy of Ardmillan, by whom he had a son and successor,

XVIII.Retour in Chancery▪ JOHN KENNEDY of Culzean, who was served heir to his father sir Alexander, 8th February 1656, and died anno 1665, leav­ing issue by his wife Margaret, daughter of John lord Bargeny, by lady Jean, daughter of William, marquis of Douglas, a son,

XIX.Retour in Chancery. Sir ARCHIBALD KENNEDY of Culzean, who succeeded and was served heir to his father, in April 1672, and, being in great favour with king Charles II. was creat­ed a baronet, anno 1682.

He married Elizabeth Leslie,Crawfurd's peerage, p. 386. daughter of David lord Newark, by whom he had two sons, and one daughter.

1. Sir John.

2. David Kennedy, Esq; an eminent lawier, &c. His daughter Susan, married to Alexan­der earl of Eglington, to whom she had a nu­merous issue.

He died anno 1710, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XX. Sir JOHN KENNEDY of Culzean Bart. who was served heir to his father in March 1711,Retour in Chancery▪ and died in July 1742, leaving issue by his wife, dame Jean Douglas, of the family of Mains, three sons.

1. Sir John, his successor.

2. Sir Thomas, who now claims the ho­nours of Cassilis.

3. David Kennedy Esq;, advocate.

XXI. Sir JOHN KENNEDY of Culzean Bart.Ibidem. was retoured heir to his father, anno 1743,; and, dying without issue anno 1744, was succeeded by his brother,

XXI. Sir THOMAS KENNEDY of Culzean, who, upon the death of John, eighth earl of Cassilis, succeeded to the estate of Cassilis, as before observed; and, his descent and propin­quity being fully proven before an inquest of fifteen gentlemen, &c. as above deduced, was accordingly served heir-male to him, on the 28th day of January 1760; and if the house of peers determines in his favours, he will be the ninth earl of Cassilis.

ARMS.

Argent, a cheveron, gules, between three cross crosslets, fitchy, sable, all within a double tressure, flowered and counter-flowered, with flowers de liss, of the second.

Crest; on a wreath, a dolphin, najant, azure.

Supporters; two swans, proper.

MOTTO; Avise la sin.

CHIEF SEAT.

At Cassilis in Air-shire, &c.

CATHCART Lord CATHCART.

THIS noble family is of very great anti­quity in the west of Scotland.

The sirname is local, and was first assumed by the proprietors of the lands and barony of Kethcart in Renfrewshire, as early as the reign of king William the Lyon, who succeeded to the crown anno 1165.

The first of them we find upon record, is

I.Chartul. of Paisley, in the lawyers libra­ry, Edr. & pre­face to Sir James Dal­rymple's col­lections, p. 66. REYNALDUS de KETHCART, who is witness in a charter of Alanus filius Walteri, dapiferi domini regis, of the patronage of the church of Kethcart to the monastery of Pais­ley, anno 1178.

He died before 1200, leaving issue a son,

II. WILLIAM de KETHCART, who suc­ceeded him,Chartul. of Paisley penes Macfarlane, p. 129 & 331. is witness to the charter whereby Dungallus filius Christini, judicis de Levenax, excambiates the lands of Knoc, with the ab­bot of Paisley, for lands lying near Walking­shaw, in which Alanus filius ejus, Thomas de Pollock, &c. are witnesses, anno 1199 or 1200.

He was succeeded by his said son,

III. ALAN de CATHCART, whose seal is appended to the resignation of the judge of Levenax to the abbot and convent of Paisley,Ibid. et char­tul. of Leve­nax penes e­und. p. 125 & 126. of the lands of Culbethie; to which Galfridus de Marishall, Petrus et Thomas de Pollock, &c. are witnesses, anno 1234.

In a charter of the great steward of Scotland to sir Adam Fullerton of that ilk, of the lands of Fullerton, in the bailiary of Kyle, this A­lanus de Cathcart, Mill's genea­logical collec­tions, penes eund. p. 133. dominus Johannes de Lindesay, Johannes de Maxwell, Thomas de Blair, &c. are witnesses. The charter is dated Thursday before the feast of St. Barnabas, in June 1240.

He left issue a son,

William de Cathcart,—and a daughter,

Cecilia, married to John de Perthic, which appears by her donation,Chartul of Paisley. penes eundem. to the monastery of Paisley, of all her lands in the village of Ru­glen, wherein she is designed sponsa quondam Johannis de Perthic, &c.

IV. WILLIAM de CATHCART succeeded Alan; and, in the above donation to the mo­nastery of Paisley,Ibid. p. 81. is designed Willielmus de Cathcart, frater dictae Ceciliae, &c. to which dominus Thomas Croc, miles, and several others, are witnesses, anno 1262.

He left issue a son and successor,

V. WILLIAM de CATHCART, who was one of the great barons of Scotland that sub­mitted and swore fealty to king Edward I.Prynne's coll. vol. III. of England, anno 1296.

He was succeeded by his son,

VI. Sir ALAN CATHCART, who is de­signed dominus ejusdem in a donation he made to the dominicans of Glasgow, anno 1336. He was a man of great honour,Chartul. of Glasgow, page 61. courage and loyalty, a sincere patriot, and a firm friend of king Robert Bruce, under whose conduct he performed many gallant actions, particularly at the battle of Loudon-hill,Crawf. peer­age, and Bar­ber's hist, &c. where he remark­ably distinguished himself, and where the Scots obtained a compleat victory over a strong party of the English.

He married the sister and co-heiress of sir Duncan Wallace of Sundrum, by whom he had a son,

VII. Sir ALAN, who succeeded him, and was designed dominus Alanus de Cathcart, Char. in pub. arch. do­minus ejusdem, in several charters of king Ro­bert II. particularly one in 1384, and ano­ther anno 1387, which were afterwards con­firmed by king James I.

In right of his mother, he succeeded also to the baronies of Sundrum and Auchincrew, in Ayr-shire, which are still in the family's possession.

He left issue a son and successor,

VIII. Sir ALAN de CATHCART, who was a man of great abilities, and made a consider­able figure in Scotland in the reigns of king Robert III.Rymer, tom. X. p. 509. and king James I. and was one of the hostages for that last prince's ransom, an­no 1424. He got his father's charters con­firmed by the king,Chart. in ar­chiv Jacobi I. and died about 1440, leaving issue a son,

IX. ALAN de CATHCART, who slourish­ed in the reign of king James I. but died be­fore his father, leaving issue two sons.

1. Sir Alan.

2. John de Cathcart, who obtained a char­ter from king James II.Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Bar­tonholme.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

X. Sir ALAN CATHCART of that ilk, who succeeded also to his grandfather, anno 1440.

He was a man of great prudence and oeco­nomy, added large possessions to his pa­ternal [Page 140] estate, and settled considerable provisi­ons on his younger children.

In 1447,Chart. penes dom. Cath­cart, & Craw­furd's Peer­age. he redeemed several lands within the earldom of Carrick from John Kennedy, lord of the Coffe, that had been wadset by sir Alan Cathcart his grandfather.

He was first knighted by king James II. then raised to the honour of the peerage by the title of lord Cathcart,Nisbet, vol I. p. 246. anno 1442.

In a charter to the earl of Errol,Chart. penes comitem de Errol. anno 1450, he is designed lord Cathcart, &c.

He was also in great favour with king James III. who appointed him warden of the west marches towards England,Rymer's foed. Angliae. anno 1481; and that same year granted a charter, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. Alano domino Cathcart, officii mare­feodi, &c.

In consideration of his great merit and many faithful services,Ibidem. he obtained a grant of the barony and constabulary of the castle of Dundonald, then a part of the royal patrimo­ny, anno 1482.

And, as a further mark of the royal favour, he got a grant of the lands of Trabath in King's Kyle,Crawfurd's peerage, and Nisbet. then in the crown by the forfeiture of lord Boyd. He was likewise master of the artillery, anno 1485.

He lived to a very great age, and died in 1500, having married Janet, daughter of— Maxwell of—, by whom he had six sons and one daughter.

1. Alan, master of Cathcart.

2. John Cathcart of Carleton, who obtain­ed a charter from king James III.Chart. in pub. archiv. of the of­fice of mair of fee of the earldom of Carrick. His son was Alan Cathcart of Carleton.

3. Roger Cathcart, who obtained a charter from king James III. of the lands of Carbieston,Ibidem. and one from king James IV. of the lands of Gass.

4. Alexander Cathcart, who obtained a char­ter from king James III. of the lands of Auchin­crove.

5. David Cathcart of Pennysodoch.

Ibidem.

6. Hugh Cathcart, Chart. penes dominum de Cathcart. ancestor of the Cathcarts of Trevor.

His daughter,Ibidem. Helen, was married to David Stewart of Craigiehall, in vicecom. de Linlith­gow.

XI. ALAN, master of Cathcart, first son and apparent heir of Alan lord Cathcart, obtained a charter from king James IV. of several lands,Chart. in pub. archiv. and died before his father, hav­ing married—, daughter of—, by whom he had a son,

XII. JOHN, second lord Cathcart, who succeeded his grandfather, anno 1500, was a man of considerable distinction in the reigns of king James IV. and V. He obtained char­ters of a great many lands from both these princes,Ibid. & chart. penes dom. Cathcart. viz. the lands and lordship of Cath­cart, Killoquhane, Auchencroff, Sundrum, &c.

He died in 1535, having married, 1st, Mar­garet, daughter of John Kennedy of Blairquhan, by whom he had a son,

Alan, master of Cathcart.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of sir William Douglas of Drumlanrig, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.

2. (and first of this marriage) Robert Cath­cart, who got from his father the lands of Kil­loquhane,Ibidem. and married Margaret, daughter and heiress of Alan Cathcart of Carleton,Ibidem. of whom the present Carleton is lineally descended.

3. John Cathcart, Esq;

4. David Cathcart of Duchry, whose grand­son, in the reign of queen Mary, married the daughter and co-heiress of William Cathcart of Carbieston.

5. Hugh, ancestor of the Cathcarts of Corffe.

1st daughter,—, married to John Craw­ford of Drongan.

2. Elizabeth, married to John Wallace of Craigie.

3. Jean, married to John Shaw of Haily.

4. Margaret, married to John Hunter of Hunterstoun, in vicecom. de Ayr.

XIII. ALAN, master of Cathcart, eldest son of John lord Cathcart, was a man of great courage and resolution, in high favour with king James IV. whom he accompanied to the fatal field of Floudon, where he lost his life, with two of his brothers, Robert and John, anno 1513.

He married,Chart. penes dom. Cath­cart. 1st, Helen, daughter of Ro­bert lord Lyle, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Margaret, daughter of Patrick Maxwell of Newark,Ibidem. by whom he had a son,

XIV. ALAN, third lord Cathcart, who succeeded his grandfather,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1535. He obtained a charter from king James V. of the lands and barony of Sundrum, also of Dal­millington; and another charter, of the lord­ship of Cathcart, from the same prince.

He married Helen, daughter of William lord Semple, by whom he had a son,

Alan, his successor,—and a daughter,Char. in arch. Mariae regin.

Mariotte Cathcart.

He was killed at the battle of Pinkie,Chart. penes dom. Cath­cart. an­no 1547, and was succeeded by his son,

XV. ALAN, fourth lord Cathcart, a man of great interest and reputation in the coun­try, [Page 141] and a zealous promoter of the reformati­on. He joined the king's party from his very infancy, and was at the battle of Langside a­gainst the queen, anno 1568, where her ma­jesty's troops were routed.

In 1579 he was constituted master of the king's houshold,Chart. penes dom. Cath­cart. and had several beneficial grants from the crown during the earl of Mor­ton's regency,Ibidem. which were afterwards re-as­sumed. He got many charters of his own lands from king James VI. viz. dimidietatis terrarum de Gass et Gaveston, quatuor mercat. terrarum de Easter Carbieston, Chart. in pub. archiv. terrarum et ba­roniae de Dalmillington, burgi de Castlemark, et Over et Nether Carbiestouns, &c.

He made an entail of his whole estate, up­on which he got a charter, under the great seal of king James VI. to himself, and his son Alan the master, and the heirs-male of their bodies;Ibidem. which failing, to Gilbert Cathcart of Carleton, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his own nearest heirs-male whatsoever.

He died in 1618, having married Marga­ret, daughter of John Wallace of Craigie, by whom he had a son,

XVI. ALAN, master of Cathcart, who ob­tained a charter of the lands of Ballochbrock,Ibidem. Drumlanfurd, &c.

He died before his father in 1603, having married Isabel, daughter of Thomas Kennedy of Bargeny, by whom he had a son,

XVII. ALAN, fifth lord Cathcart, who succeeded his grandfather in 1618, and got a charter of the lands of Dalmillington, burgh of Castlemark,Ibidem. Over and Nether Carbiestons, &c.

He married,Ibidem. 1st, lady Margaret Hepburn, daughter of Francis, earl of Bothwel, by whom he had no issue.

He married, 2dly, Jean, daughter of sir A­lexander Colquhoun of Luss, by whom he had a son,

Alan, born in 1628.

He died that same year, and was succeeded by his son,

XVIII. ALAN, sixth lord Cathcart, then but an infant, who proved to be a man of great probity and honour. He got a charter from king Charles I. of the lands and barony of Sundrum; and married Marian,Chart in ar­chivis Caroli I. daughter of David Boswel of Auchinleck, by whom he had three sons.

1. Alan.

2. James Cathcart, Esq;

3. David Cathcart, Esq; who was killed in the public service.

He died in 1709; in the 81st year of his age, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIX. ALAN, seventh lord Cathcart, who married Elizabeth,Crawfurd's Peerage. Scots Com­pend. daughter of James, viscount of Stair, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.

1. Alan, master of Cathcart, a youth of great hopes, who perished at sea, in a voyage to Holland; much lamented.

2. Charles, afterwards lord Cathcart.

3. Major James Cathcart.

His daughter, Margaret, was married to sir Ad [...]m Whiteford of Blairquhan, baronet, and had issue.

He died in the 85th year of his age, anno 1732, and was succeeded by his son,

XX. CHARLES, eighth lord Cathcart. In his early youth he betook himself to the study of arms, and learned the first rudiments of that art under the great duke of Marlbo­rough, where his genius soon displayed itself, and his actions pointed the future general.

In 1704, he had a company in general McCartney's regiment of foot, and was soon after made a captain of grenadiers. In 1706, he was promoted to a troop of the Royal Scotch dragoons. In 1707, he was appointed brigade-major. In 1709, he was made ma­jor of the royal regiment of dragoons, then commanded by the earl of Stair. And in 1711, he got a lieutenant-colonel's breviate.

Upon king George I's accession to the throne, he was appointed, first, groom; next, lord of the bedchamber; also colonel of a re­giment of horse in Ireland, and governor of Duncannon castle.

In 1734, he was elected one of the sixteen peers for Scotland to the eighth British par­liament.

In 1740, when the expedition was resolved upon to attack the king of Spain in his Ame­rican settlements, lord Cathcart was pitched upon, as a person whose conduct and courage fitted him for the command of such an impor­tant enterprise, and accordingly was appoint­ed general in chief. He set sail from Spithead in October 1740, but, unhappily both for the expedition and the honour of the nation, he was seized with a dysentery, and died at Do­minica, one of the leeward islands, the 20th of December thereafter.

Charles lord Cathcart had a head that qua­lified him to shine in that distinguished rank to which his birth and merit raised him; but he had more: He had a heart full of benevo­lence, good-will, and friendship for man­kind.

He married, 1st, Margaret, daughter of sir [Page 142] John Shaw of Greenock, by whom he had a son,

Charles, now lord Cathcart,—and two daughters,

1. Eleanora, married to sir John Houston of that ilk, Bart.

2. Mary Anne, married to William, master of Napier.

He married, 2dly, in 1739, Mrs. Sabine, widow of Joseph Sabine of Tuing, in Here­ford, Esq; but dying as aforesaid, by her had no issue, and was succeeded by his son,

XXI. CHARLES ninth lord Cathcart, who also betook himself to a military life, and soon rose to the degree of a major-general, and is adjutant-general to the forces in North-Britain. He was elected one of the sixteen peers for Scotland to the two last British parli­aments, and was also re-elected on the 5th day of May 1761, to the present.

He was appointed his majesty's high com­missioner to the general assembly of the church of Scotland, anno 1755, and has been con­tinued every year since.

He married Jean, daughter of lord Archi­bald Hamilton, by whom he has three sons and three daughters.

1. William, master of Cathcart.

2. Charles Alan.

3. George.

1. Daughter Jean.

2. Mary.

3. Louisa.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th, azure, three cross crosslets, fitchy, issuing out of as many cres­cents, argent: 2d and 3d, gules, a lyon ram­pant, argent.

Crest; on a wreath a dexter hand, couped a­bove the wrist, and erect, proper, grasping a crescent as in the arms.

Supporters; two parrots proper.

MOTTO; I hope to speed.

CHIEF SEATS.

At Sundrum in Air-shire, &c. Charles­street, Berkelay-square, London.

COLVILE Lord COLVILE of CULROSS.

THE sirname of COLVILE is original­ly from France, and it is the general opinion of our historians,Goodal's in­troduction to Fordun's hist. page 60. that they came from Normandy to England, with William the Conqueror, anno 1066, and to Scotland with king David I. who succeeded to the crown, anno 1124.

There were some considerable families of the name of Colvile in England,Dugdale's ba­ronage of England. Rymer's foed. that subsisted several centuries after the conquest, but they appear to be now extinct.

The first of this noble family we find up­on record, is,

I. PHILIPPUS de COLVILE, who slou­rished in the reigns of king Malcolm IV. and king William the Lyon, which last succeed­ed to the crown of Scotland, anno 1165.

In a general confirmation of king Malcolm, of all the donations made by his predecessors to the monastery of Dunfermline,Chartul. of St. Andrews, penes Mac­farlane, p. 193. Philippus de Colvile, Robert bishop of St. Andrews, Herbert bishop of Glasgow, Hugo de Mor­ville chancellor, and many others, were wit­nesses in or before 1159, in which year Ro­bert, bishop of St. Andrews, died.

In another confirmation by the same Prince,Ibid. p. 258. of several donations made to the pri­ory of St. Andrews, Philippus de Colvile, Ricardus de Cummin, &c. are witnesses, anno 1160.

In a convention with king Henry of Eng­land, about king William's liberty, Philip de Colvile is named one of the hostages for the king of Scots,Rymer, tom I. p. 39. together with David the king's brother, earl Duncan, earl Waldave, earl of Angus, Richard de Morville constable, and many others of the chief nobility, anno 1174; which sufficiently shews, that this Philip was a man of the first rank in the reign of king William.

He died betwixt 1180 and 1190, leaving issue a son,

II. THOMAS de COLVILE, who succeed­ed him,Chartul. of Melrose pene Macfarlane, p. 20. and, in a donation to the abbacy of Melrose, is designed Thomas filius Philippi de Colvile, anno 1181.

This Thomas is witness to a charter of A­lanus filius Rolandi de Galoveia constab. Chartul. of Coldingham penes eund. p. 216. Scotiae inter 1189 et 1200.

He was suspected to have been concerned in a conspiracy against king William,Chron. of Melrose. and was imprisoned in the castle of Edinburgh, anno 1210; but, having cleared himself, and made his innocence appear, he was liberate about six months thereafter, received into favour again; and he and Gervasius de [Page 143] Avenel,Rymer, tom. I. p. 184. were obsides regis Scotiae, anno 1214.

He died anno 1219,Chron. of Melrose. Obiit Tho. de Colvile, &c. ann. 1219. leaving issue by Ama­bilis his wife a son and successor,

III. WILLIAM de COLVILE, who, in a donation to the monastery of Newbottle,Chartul. of Newbottle, penes M'Far­lane. p. 3. is designed Willielmus filius Thomae de Colvile, et Amabilis suae sponsae, &c. cir. 1224.

This William was proprietor of the baro­ny of Kinnaird, in the shire of Stirling, which appears by a tack he gave of part of these lands to the abbot and convent of Holyrood­house,Chart. penes eundem. confirmed by king Alexander II. at Edinburgh, the 15th day of September, the 15th year of his reign, anno 1229.

He died before the year 1250, and was suc­ceeded by his son,

IV. Sir JOHN COLVILE, who was pro­prietor of the lands of Oxnam and Ochiltrie,Chartul. of Melrose, and Crawfurd's peerage. in the beginning of the reign of king Alexan­der III. circa annum 1250.

He left issue two sons,

1. Sir Thomas.

2. Adam de Colvile, whom we find swear­ing fealty to king Edward I. of England,Prynne, vol. III. p. 661. an­no 1296.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

V. Sir THOMAS de COLVILE, designed dominus de Oxnam, Ibidem. who also swore allegiance to king Edward I. when he had over-run Scotland, anno 1296.

He afterwards got a charter from king Ro­bert Bruce,Chart in ro­tulis regis Rob. 1. of half of the lands of Whitsom, in Berwick-shire, circa 1320.

He left issue two sons,

1. Robert his heir.

2. William, Chartul. of Newbottle. p. 111. who got a charter under the great seal (from king David Bruce) Wiliel­mo filio Thomae de Colvile, &c. circa annum 1339.

Sir Thomas died before 1324, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

VI. ROBERT de COLVILE,Chartul. of Melrose. Remarks up­on Ragman's roll, p. 27. dominus de Oxnam, who was also designed baro baroniae de Ochiltrie, anno 1324.

This Robert is particularly mentioned and designed dominus de Oxnam, Chartul. of Kelso, p. 444. in a relaxation, to which Thomas de Boswel is a witness, an­no 1330.

He is also witness to a donation to the mo­nastery of Kelso,Ibid. p. 431. under the same designation, anno 1354.

He was succeeded by his son,

VII. Sir THOMAS de COLVILE, dominus de Oxnam et Ochiltrie.

In a charter of Margaret,Chartul. of Aberdeen; and book of charters, pe­nes MacFar­lane, vol. I. p. 59. countess of Dou­glas and Mar, to Alexander Barclay, of the lands of Bourty, in the regality of Garviach, Thomas de Colvile, miles, filius Roberti is a wit­ness, anno 1384.

He left issue a son;

VIII. Sir ROBERT COLVILE, dominus de Oxnam et Ochiltrie, who succeeded him, and is witness in a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1390.

He was one of the hostages for king James I's ransom,Rymer, tom. X. p. 509. anno 1424, and is designed Ro­bertus dominus de Oxnam, miles, &c.

He got a charter, under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. of the lands of Barnwell and Symintoun, in the shire of Air, 26th May 1441.

He married Margaret Colvile, a relation of his own, by whom he had a son and successor,

IX. Sir ROBERT COLVILE, designed of O­chiltrie, who was put in possession of these lands in his father's lifetime,Ibidem. by a charter under the great seal, Roberto filio et haeredi Roberti de Ox­nam, terrarum de Ochiltrie, in vicecommitatu de Air, super resignatione dicti Roberti, sui pa­tris, &c. dated anno 1441.

There is another charter under the great seal, Margaretae Colvile, Ibidem. matri Roberti Colvile de Ochiltrie, super cartam sibi factam per dic­tum Robertum, anno 1441, of some lands in the barony of Ochiltrie, confirmed 9th Janu­ary 1449; also a charter under the great seal,Ibidem. Roberto Colvile de Ochiltrie, militi, et Christi­anae Chrichton, suae sponsae, terrarum baroniae de Ochiltrie, et baroniae de Oxnam, &c. dated 16th February 1450.

There is an indenture betwixt Sir Robert Colvile lord of Oxnam,Principal in­denture, penes ducem de Roxbrugh. and Andrew Ker of Auldtounburn, whereby they are mutually bound to stand by, assist and defend one ano­ther, against all mortals, the king and the earl of Douglas only excepted, dated Jed­worth, 10th June 1453; the Colvile's seal being entire upon red wax, viz. quarterly 1st and 4th, a fess checque of 3 tracts; 2d and 3d, a cross moline, proper; crest; a swan's head, supported by two lions circumscribed, &c.

Sir Robert, by the said Christian, a daugh­ter of sir Robert Crichton of Sanquhar, an­cestor of the earl of Dumfries, left issue two sons,

1. Sir Richard of Ochiltrie, who was slain by the earl of Douglas,Nisbet, vol. I. p. 117. for killing John Au­chinleck of that ilk, anno 1449, without is­sue, his father being then alive.

X. Sir ROBERT his second son,Char. in pub. arch. succeed­ed him, and got a charter under the great [Page 144] seal, Roberto de Colvile, militi, filio et haeredi Roberti de Oxnam, militis, of several lands ly­ing in the barony of Ochiltrie, dated 9th March 1477.

He had two sons,

1. Sir William his heir.

Robert, said to be his second son, designed senescallus Margaretae reginae, Chart. in pub. archiv. got a charter under the great seal, Roberto Colvile et Mar­garetae Logan, ejus sponsae, terrarum de Hilton, &c, lying in the barony of Tillicoultry, and shire of Clackmannan, dated 16th October 1483. He was father of Sir Robert of Hil­ton, who carried on the line of this family, of whom afterwards.

Sir Robert was succeeded by his eldest son,

XI. Sir WILLIAM COLVILE of Ochil­trie and Oxnam, who died anno 1502, leav­ing issue only two daughters, his co-heiresses.

1. Elizabeth, married to Robert Colvile of Ravenscraig, a cadet of this family.

2. Margaret, married to Patrick Colqu­houn of Drumskeith, Esq;

Tho' this sir William died without male issue, and left his estate to his daughters, yet as sir Robert of Hilton, said to be his heir-male, afterwards acquired their estates, sup­ported the dignity of the family, and was un­doubted ancestor of the present lord Colvile, from him therefore we carry on their descent.

XII. Sir ROBERT COLVILE, son of Ro­bert of Hilton, steward to queen Margaret, being a man of parts and merit, was in great favour with, and highly esteemed by king James IV. who appointed him master of his houshold, and director of the chancery.

He got a charter under the great seal,Ibidem. Ro­berto Colvile de Hilton, directori cancellariae, ter­rarum de Symintoun, lying in the bailiarie of Kyle, which were apprised from sir William Colvile of Ochiltrie; the charter is dated 13th August 1502.

Also a charter to him and Elizabeth Arnot his sponse,Ibidem. of the lands of Hilton of Cleish, &c. 14th February 1504.

And a charter of half of the lands and ba­rony of Ochiltrie, cum castro, fortalicio, &c. upon the resignation of Elizabeth Colvile,Ibidem. el­dest daughter of the deceast William Colvile of Ochiltrie knight, with consent of her hus­band Robert, son and heir of William Col­vile of Ravenscraig, &c.

Also a charter of half of the lands and ba­rony of Oxnam,Ibidem. dated 13th April 1508, and 10th April 1509.

This Robert was afterwards designed by the title of Ochiltrie,Ibidem. which appears by char­ters under the great seal, Roberto Colvile de Ochiltrie terrarum baroniae de Ochiltrie, and many other lands and baronies, too numerous to be here inserted.

He attended the king to the fatal field of Floudon, where he lost his life with his roy­al master, anno 1513.

By the said Elizabeth Arnot, daughter and co-heiress of Walter Arnot of Balberton, he left issue two sons,

1. Sir James his heir.

2. Robert, who married Margaret Scou­gal, and got a charter,Ibidem. under the great seal, of part of the lands of easter Wemyss, wherein he is designed brother german of sir James, &c. dated the last day of February, 1539. Also a charter of the lands of Pitkeny, of the same date.

Sir Robert was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIII. Sir JAMES COLVILE of Ochiltrie, who, being also a man of parts and learning, was made director of the chancery by king James V.Ibidem. and one of the senators of the col­lege of justice, at the first institution of that judicature.

He got four charters under the great seal,Ibidem. Jacobo Colvile de Ochiltrie, of several lands and baronies, inter 1520 and 1528.

He made a mortification of 10 l. per annum out of his barony of Ochiltrie,Ibidem. for a chaplain to serve at the holy altar, &c. anno 1527.

In the year 1530, he exchanged his lands of Ochiltrie, with sir James Hamilton of Fy­nart, for the lands of easter Wemyss, which af­terwards became the chief title of the family, and is confirmed by no less than five charters,Ibidem, inter 1530, and 1534. under the great seal, Jacobo Colvile de easter Wemyss, militi, &c.

He married Alison Bruce, a daughter of the family of Clackmannan, by whom he had a son,

Sir James his heir,—and a daughter,

Margaret, Chart. penes magistrum Mart. Lind­say. married to James Lindsay of Dowhill, Esq; an ancient family in the shire of Kinross.

He had also a natural son,

Robert, Chart. in pub▪ archiv. who got from his father the lands and barony of Cleish, and was ancestor of lord Colvile of Ochiltrie.

He was succeeded by his son,

XIV. Sir JAMES,Ibidem. who got a charter un­der the great seal, Jacobo Colvile de easter Wemyss, militi, of the lands and barony of ea­ster Wemyss, &c. 7th November 1554.

Also a charter of the lands of Balgarf and others,Ibidem. anno 1560, confirmed 3d December 1572.

He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Ro­bert Douglas of Lochleven, ancestor of the [Page 145] earl of Morton, by whom he had two sons,

1. Sir James, afterwards lord Colvile.

2. Alexander Colvile, commendator of Culross, ancestor of the present lord Colvile, of whom afterwards.

He had also a natural son, James, who got from his father the lands of Crummy, upon which he got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. anno 1606.

Sir James died anno 1580, and was suc­ceeded by his eldest son,

XV. Sir JAMES COLVILE, who got charters under the great seal, of the lands of east Wemyss,Ibidem. Buckh aven, Tillicoultry, &c. wherein he is designed filius et haeres quondam domini Jacobi, &c. anno 1581.

This Sir James betook himself to a milita­ry life, and served in the wars in France un­der king Henry IV. where, for his bravery and military skill, he acquired great honour and reputation.

Upon his return home he was well re­ceived by the king, and highly esteemed at court.

He got charters under the great seal,Ibidem. Ja­cobo Colvile de east Wemyss militi, of se­veral lands and baronies, anno 1596, and 1597.

And as he was in great favour with his ma­jesty, he obtained a grant of all the lands of the dissolved abbacy of Culross (his nephew John having resigned the liferent thereof into the king's hands) got them erected into a temporal lordship,Ibid. Jacobo domino Col­vile, et haered. masc. de corp. suo, quibus deficien. le­git. et pro­pinq. haered. masc. quibus­cunq. and was raised to the dig­nity of the peerage, by the title of lord Col­vile of Culross, ‘"To him, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his nearest lawful heirs-male whatever, bearing the name and arms of Colvile."’ The patent is dated 20th January 1609.

He married Isabel, daughter of Patrick lord Ruthven, by whom he had two sons, and one daughter.

1. James, who died before his father, un­married.

2. Robert, master of Colvile.

His daughter Jean, married to sir James Campbell of Lawers,Lives of the officers of [...] [...]ate, p. 196. by whom she had John earl of Loudon, lord high chancellor of Scot­land, in the reign of king Charles I.

He died, anno 1620.

XVI. ROBERT, master of Colvile, son and apparent heir of James first lord Colvile, got from his father part of the barony of [...]ast Wemyss, also the lands of Tillicoultry, &c. upon which he got charters under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. Roberto filio domini Jacobi, &c. 19th December 1598, and 8th January 1599.

He died anno 1615, leaving issue a son,

XVII. JAMES, who succeeded him, and got a charter under the great seal,Ibidem. Jacobo filio quon­dam Roberti magistri de Colvile terrarum domi­nii et baroniae de Culross, dated 9th October, 1616.

He succeeded also to his grandfather, anno 1620, was the second lord, and got charters under the great seal, Jacobo domino Colvile de Culross, Ibidem. of several lands and baronies, inter 1620, and 1630.

This lord dying without issue, anno 1640, in him ended the male line of James, first lord Colvile, eldest son of sir James Colvile of easter Wemyss; and as the representation and titles of honour, according to the tenor of the above-mentioned patent, devolved up­on the next heir-male, descended of the second son of the said sir James, to him we now return.

XV. ALEXANDER COLVILE, second lawful son of sir James Colvile of easter Wemyss, and brother german of the pa­tentee, was appointed commendator of Cul­ross, by a charter under the great seal, grant­ed by Henry and Mary, king and queen of Scots, magistro Alexandro Colvile, Ibidem. filio quon­dam Jacobi Colvile de easter Wemyss militis, pro omnibus diebus suae vitae, of all and haill the benefice of the abbacy of Culross, &c. 4th February 1566-7.

He, as commendator of Culross, grants to sir James Colvile of easter Wemyss, his bro­ther, the feu farm-victual-of Lurg and Kin­cardin, by a charter,Ibidem. dated 14th September 1579; which, upon the 21st of the same month, sir James resigned in favours of his nephew John, as will be shewn hereafter.

He married Nicholas, daughter of— Dundass of that ilk, by whom he had two sons.

1. John, his heir.

2. Mr. Alexander Colvile, professor of di­vinity in St. Andrews, who, in a charter un­der the great seal, of the lands of Lurg and Kincardin,Ibidem. is designed brother of John Col­vile, eldest lawful son of the deceast Alexan­der Colvile, commendator of Culross, &c. 20th March, 1587, which, with other three charters, are narrated and confirmed by king Charles II. anno 1664.

The commendator died in the end of the year 1579, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVI. JOHN COLVILE, who, in his fa­ther's lifetime, was designed by the title of wester Cumbry, and got a charter from his uncle, sir James Colvile of easter Wemyss, of [Page 146] the feu-farm-victual of Lurg and Kincardin, 21st September 1579, as before observed, and in that charter he is designed filius primo­genitus venerabilis viri Alexandri commendato­ris monasterii de Culross, Chart. penes dom. Colvile. &c.

Immediately upon his father's death, he was appointed commendator of Culross, and got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. totius bene­ficii monasterii de Culross, durante vita sua, 17th March 1580; but he afterwards re­signed his liferent in the king's hands, in favours of his uncle sir James, as before no­ticed.

He got two other charters under the great seal,Ibidem. of two yards, and some acres of land near Culross, confirmed 15th June, 1581.

He married Elizabeth, daughter of sir James Melvil of Halhill, knight, by whom he had three sons.

1. Alexander his heir.

2. James Colvile.

3. Mr. Samuel Colvile.

These two last are both mentioned in their father's bond of provision,Penes dom. Colvile. 5th May, 1643.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVII. Doctor ALEXANDER COLVILE of Kincardin, professor of divinity at Sedan in France,Ibidem. designed in the above bond of pro­vision, eldest lawful son of John Colvile of Cumbry, commendator of Culross, &c.

He married Anne le Blanc, daughter of monsieur le Blanc, of the city of Sedan in France, by whom he had two sons,

1. John, his heir.

2. Alexander Colvile.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

XVIII. Mr. JOHN COLVILE of Kincar­din, doctor of divinity,Ibidem. who got a disposi­tion from his father, of the lands of Lurg and Kincardin, wherein he is designed his eldest lawful son, anno 1665.

He married Mary, daughter of sir George Preston of Valleyfield, Bart, by whom he had two sons,

1. Alexander, his heir.

2. John Colvile, Esq;

He died, anno 1677, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XIX. ALEXANDER COLVILE of Kincar­din, &c.

There is a contract betwixt the Earl of Kincardin,Principal contract pe­nes eundem. and Mary Preston, widow of John Colvile of Kincardin, in behalf of Alex­ander Colvile, her eldest son, by the deceast Mr. John Colvile of Kincardin, concerning some feu-duties resting to the said earl, out of the lands of Kincardin and Lurg, and some acres about Culross. The contract is dated at Canongate, 6th March 1678.

He married Mary, daughter of sir Charles Erskine of Cambo, Bart. lord lyon king at arms for Scotland, by whom he had five sons, and six daughters.

1. John, afterwards lord Colvile.

2. Charles, who is now a major-general in the British service.

3. Alexander, collector of his majesty's customs at Inverness.

4. George, who was a doctor of medicine in Dundee.

5. William.

1. Daughter Penelope.

2. Mary.

3. Margaret.

4. Isabel.

5. Anne.

6. Catharine.

XX. JOHN, eldest son of Alexander Col­vile of Kincardin, having proved his descent and propinquity as above, before a jury of fifteen gentlemen upon oath, was, upon the 3d April 1722, returned next heir-male to James the last lord Colvile; and therefore, according to the limitation of the dignity by the patent to the heirs-male of the first lord whatever, his claim and right to the peerage was sustained. He was admitted a Scotch peer by the parliament of Great-Britain, anno 1722, and was the third lord Colvile of Culross.

He married Miss Johnston of the kingdom of Ireland, by whom he had five sons, and two daughters.

1. Alexander, now lord Colvile.

2. George, who died in the West-Indies without issue.

3. John, a captain in the army,

4. Charles, also a captain in the army.

5. James, Captain of a ship of war, who died in the East-Indies.

1. Daughter, Margaret, married to cap­tain Castlemain.

2. Elizabeth, who died unmarried.

John, third lord Colvile, died in the ex­pedion to Carthagena, anno 1740, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

XXI. ALEXANDER, fourth lord Colvile, who, having been bred to the sea, is now cap­tain of the Northumberland ship of war, and commodore of an English [...]leet in America.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st, and 4th, argent, a cross moline, sable: 2d, and 3d, gules, a fess cheque, argent and azure.

[Page 147] Crest; on a wreath, a hind's head proper. Supporters; on the dexter side, a rinoceros of the latter on the [...]inister, a savage covered with a lyon's skin, holding on his exteriot shoulder a batton.

MOTTO: Oublier ne puis.

COLVILE Lord COLVILE of OCHILTRIE.

THE first of this branch of the noble and antient family of Colvile, was,

I. ROBERT, son of sir James Colvile of easter-Wemyss, who got from his father the lands and barony of Cleish, in Kinross-shire, upon which he got a charter under the great seal,Chart. in pub. archiv. Roberto Colvile filio nat. Jacobi Colvile de Easter Wemyss militis, of the lands and barony of Cleish, &c. dated 15th July 1537.

He got also a charter,Ibid. ad an. 1533. under the great seal, of the lands of Gorgy, and others.

He was a great promoter of the reforma­tion of religion,Knox's hist. of the Refor­mation. in the reign of queen Mary, and a strenuous asserter of the liberties of his country.

He married Frances Colquhoun, daughter and heiress of Patrick Colquhoun of Drum­skeith, by Elizabeth,Chart. in pub. archiv. his wife, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of sir William Col­vile of Ochiltrie, by whom he had a son,

Robert, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Eupham, married to James Monypennie of Pitmillie.

2. Grizel, Chart. penes Tho. Dundas de Fingask, Esq; married to a valiant and loyal gentleman, Andrew Ecklin of Pitadro, in the county of Fife, anno 1550, who was de­pute-governor of the castle of Edinburgh, in the reign of queen Mary.

Robert of Cleish was killed at the seige of Leith, 7th May 1560, and was succeeded by his son,

II. ROBERT COLVILE, second baron of Cleish,Chart. in pub. archiv. who got a charter, under the great seal, of several lands, dated 28th September 1582.

He married Margaret, daughter of James Lindsay of Dowhill Esq; by whom he had a son and successor,

III. ROBERT COLVILE, third baron of Cleish,Ibidem. who got a charter of the lands and ba­rony of Cleish, anno 1599: also a charter un­der the great seal, Roberto Colvile de Cleish de carbonibus inter terras de Torieburn et tor­rentem earund. Ibidem. &c. dated the 3d February 1603.

He married Beatrix, daughter of John Hal­dane of G [...]eneagles Esq; by whom he had two sons, and one daughter.

1. Robert, his heir.

2. David Colvile, Esq; father of Robert, who succeeded to the honours of this family, of whom afterwards.

His daughter, Margaret, married to Da­vid Wemyss of Fingask.

He died in January 1634, and was succeed­ed by his eldest son,

IV. ROBERT,Chart. in pub. archiv. fourth baron of Cleish, who got a charter, under the great seal, of the lands and barony of Cleish, 1st February 1635.

He was a great loyalist, a firm and steady friend of the royal family, during all the time of the civil war. He was created a ba­ronet by king Charles I. and raised to the dignity of the peerage by king Charles II.Ibidem. by the title of lord Colvil of Ochiltrie, by pa­tent to his heirs-male, dated 4th January 1651.

He married Janet, daughter of sir John Wemyss of that ilk, ancestor of the earl of Wemyss; but dying without issue, anno 1662, his estate and honours devolved upon his ne­phew, and heir-male,

V. ROBERT, son and heir of his brother, David, before mentioned, who was second lord Colvile of Ochiltrie.

He married Margaret, daughter of David Wemyss of Fingask, by whom he had a son,

Robert, his heir,—and two daughters.

1. Margaret, married to sir John Aiton of that ilk, in the shire of Fife.

2.—, married to the reverend Mr. Logan, minister of the gospel at Torie.

He died anno 1671, and was succeeded by his son,

VI. ROBERT, third lord Colvile of Ochil­trie, who died unmarried, whereby the ho­nours appear to be extinct.

Robert Aiton Esq; grand-son of sir John Aiton, by the third lord's eldest sister, is his heir of line, and is now designed Robert Ai­ton-Colvile of Craig-Flower, Esq; is married, and hath issue.

ELPHINSTON Lord COUPAR.

THE first who enjoyed this title, was James Elphinston, second son of James, lord Balmerino, upon whom king James VI. was pleased to bestow part of the lands be­longing to the abbacy of Coupar, which came to the crown by the dissolution of the reli­gious houses. He erected them into a tem­poral lordship, and created him a peer, by the title of lord Coupar, by patent, ‘"to James Elphinston,Dipl. in pub. archiv. lawful son of the lord Bal­merino, and the heirs-male of his body; which failing, to his father, and his heirs-male, and of tailzie, contained in his infeft­ments of the barony of Balumby, &c."’ dated anno 1607.

He married Margaret, daughter of sir James Haliburton of Pitcur, knight; but dy­ing without issue, anno 1669, his estate and honours, in virtue of the above patent, de­volved upon lord Balmerino.

RICHARDSON Lord CRAMOND.

DAME Elizabeth Beaumont, married to sir Thomas Richardson, lord chief justice of the common pleas in England, was created baroness of Cramond for life, by king Charles I. and thereafter sir Thomas Rich­ardson, the lord chief justice's son, is created lord Cramond, and to his heirs-male; in failure of which, to the heirs-male of his fa­ther's body, &c. dated the last day of Febru­ary 1628.

As this is the first female creation we have ever seen, we have subjoined part of the pa­tent from the records.

"Carolus, &c. fecisse, creasse et con­stituisse Elizabetham dominam Richardson, conjugem domini Thomae Richardson, mi­litis, justiciarii principalis in foro causarum communi in palatio Westmonasteriensi, pro toto tempore vitae suae, baronissam de Cra­mond; ac post illius decessum, creamus perque modum successionis dominum Tho­mam Richardson militem, filium et haere­dem dicti principalis justiciarii dominum baronem de Cramond, dando, &c. eidem post decessum dictae dominae, suisque haeredi­bus masculis; quibus deficientibus, haeredi­bus masculis de corpore dicti domini Thomae Richardson patris, post decessum praefatae dominae titulum, &c. baronum parlia­menti, tenend. et habend. praefatum ti­tulum domini baronis de Cramond, post de­cessum praefatae dominae, cum suffragio in parliamento, dummodo personaliter prae­sentes fuerint, et non aliter, &c."

But it does not appear, that any of this family ever sat or claimed to vote in the Scotch parliament.

CRANSTON Lord CRANSTON.

THE sirname of this noble family is of very great antiquity, is certainly local, and was first assumed by the proprietors of the lands and barony of Cranston in Mid-Lo­thian, as soon as sirnames began to be used in Scotland.

They were considerable barons, and had large possessions in the counties of Lothian, Teviotdale, and Berwick, &c. in very ear­ly times, which is sufficiently documented by their donations to the religious, and char