THE PEERAGE OF SCOTLAND: Containing an Historical and Genealogical ACCOUNT OF THE NOBILITY of that Kingdom.

Collected from the Publick Records of the NATION, the Charters and other Writings of the NOBILITY, and from the most approved Histories.

By GEORGE CRAWFURD, Esq

EDINBURGH: Printed for the AUTHOR: Sold by George Stewart, at the Book and Angel in the Parliament-Close. 1716.

THE PREFACE.

THE Nature of this Work seeming to render something of a Preface necessary, I shall, for that Reason, intirely dedicate it to the Ser­vice of the Reader, in as few Words as possibly I can.

Having formerly written a short Essay u­pon the Royal Family of STEWART, to which was prefixed an Historical Account and Description of the Shire of Renfrew: I had no sooner publish'd that little Book; than several Persons of eminent Distinction for their Learning and Knowledge in the Antiquities of the Nation, for whose Judgment I had the most profound Regard, set upon me to write A Peerage of SCOTLAND, a Book very much wanted; which at length, by their Importunity and promised Assistance, I was prevailed with to undertake.

When I first set about this Work, as I did entirely devote and dedicate my Time to the Study of Antiquities, particularly those of our own Country, so I made it my Business to collect all those Historical and Genealogical Tracts that had been done on the No­bility, that I could come to the Knowledge of. The Oldest of that Kind I have met with, was a few loose Sheets on the Ge­nealogies [Page 4] of our Nobility, said to be done by James Lord Ochil­tree, in the Hands of my very worthy Friend, and one of our best Antiquaries, Mr. Baillie of Castlecary; but the Accounts even of the few Families that Lord treats of, are very lame; and I observe where he goes much higher than his own Time, they are purely traditional, and therefore I could not depend on them.

I perused also the large Genealogical Collections concerning the Nobility, by Sir James Balfour, who was Lord Lyon King at Arms, in the Reign of King Charles I. but they are written so very loosely, and I have seen them contradicted so frequently by Writs and Charters, that I give them but little Credit. I sup­pose Sir James never intended these Papers should have gone fur­ther than his own Closet, for he was a Learned and Curious Gentleman, as appears from his Annals, in which he is much more exact, especially as to what occurred in his own Time.

I procured likewise a Copy of the Historical Essay on the Prin­cipal Families of the Kingdom, Alphabetically digested, by the learned Lord Advocate, Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh; but I apprehend these Papers have been only some first Draught of a greater Work Sir George intended, which he lived not to finish: Of this there are many Copies in several Hands, the most exact by very far of any of them I have seen, was that which I had the Use of from Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn, my Brother, who by his own Reading and Knowledge in the Antiquities of the Nation, has rectified a great many of Sir George's Mistakes, at least of his Amanuensis, and has with great Accuracy, em­bellished his own Copy with a vast deal of fine Historical Re­marks, that it well deserves the Character of a curious Ma­nuscript.

I had moreover a Sight of the Genealogies of the Nobility, collected by Mr. Dunlop, the late Principal of the College of Glasgow, who was Historiographer for Scotland, a Gentle­man of great Integrity and Learning, and an excellent Antiquary. I understand he intended to have written A Peerage of SCOT­LAND, and for that End made very full Collections on that Subject: But I observe that most of Mr. Dunlop's Accounts are composed of those Genealogical Descents that the Nobility have in their own Families, and are handed about by their Friends; and that ingenious Gentleman did with great Accuracy and Judg­ment, [Page 5] add Historical Memoirs to the Genealogies, which give them a great Ornament; and he is very exact as to his Autho­rities. The M.S. was communicated to me by my very worthy Friend, Mr. Dunlop, the present Professor of Greek in the Uni­versity of Glasgow, the Principal's Son.

But after I had made all those Collections I have mentioned, and a great deal more of that Kind, I cannot stay to particu­larize, I found I had not any tolerable Foundation for the car­rying on the Work I had undertaken, for the Honour of the Country, (the Design it was principally for) or my own Repu­tation; and therefore, by the Advice and Direction of my in­genious Friends, who had engaged me in the Design, I did with as much Humility and Modesty as I was Master of, address every Peer by myself or some Friend, for the Assistance of their own Charters and Writings, to enable me to do their Families Justice in this Undertaking.

Such Helps as I sought were very generously afforded me by the greater Part of the Nobility, who allowed me the Perusal of their Charter-Chests and original Writings, from which I com­posed the Accounts of their Families as they stand in my Book. Severals indeed I did not see; some were unwilling to shew their Family Writs for divers Reasons, some were Minors, others were Abroad, and out of the Country; and even to such I have done all the Justice was possibly in my Power. But if the Ac­counts of such Families, whose Charters I have not had Access to, be shorter and less connected than others, that was what cannot be supposed I could help: I took Care timeously to ad­vertise every Body concerned, and if they did not incline to shew me their Writs, the Blame cannot be laid on me.

But that I might be the better able to carry on the Work I had undertaken with Advantage, and to form Accounts of those noble Families whose Writs I had not seen, and to supply, if a Hiatus did happen, (as it frequently did) in such Families whose Writings I had perused I searched all the Publick Offices and Libraries about Edinburgh a, and noted every Thing as ex­actly [Page 6] as I could; and the Keepers of these Offices were so obliging as to allow me Access at all Hours, ordinary and extraordinary, whenever I call'd, and to whom therefore I do, with all due Gratitude, return my most humble and hearty Acknowledg­ments.

But after all my Labour, I am so far from being so vain as to imagine this Essay is not capable of any further Improvement, that on the contrary I am sensible, I have, thro' Inadvertency, and the Errors of the Press, especially in Dates and Proper Names of the present Age, fallen into many Mistakes; but I beg the ingenious Reader will pardon these Omissions, which are inevitable in such Books, and where he discovers an Error, he will correct it with his Pen.

Perhaps some may think, that I have been fuller upon some Families, (even some that are extinct) than on others who are much more ancient than those I enlarge more upon. The Reason is plain, the Representatives, Relations, or Descendents of those noble Families shew'd me their Writs, and encouraged my De­sign. If others had done so, I doubt not but I should have been able to have done them as full, and vouched them as well. For I can say, and do here declare on the Word of a Gentleman, That I had no Regard in the doing of Justice in my Province as an Author, to the Encouragement I received from any Man, otherwise than to reckon myself very much obli­ged to such; and I own I did not spare either Time or Pains to discover any Particular, I thought could give an Ornament to the Antiquity, or a Lustre to the Honour of their Families.

But where I have been assisted from the Publick Records or Authentick History, I have been as full on those Families who never incouraged the Design, as I have been upon those who gave me the greatest Assistance every Way; and for the Truth of this, I can and do appeal to severals of the Nobility them­selves, who will find very long deduced, and well vouched De­scents of their Families, in this Peerage, who never encouraged my Undertaking in any Degree. But as I said before, That I had had no Respect to; for my chief and only Regard was, and shall be Truth, and the Honour of our Country, as far as I am capable to discover the one, or defend the other.

[Page 7] As to the Work it self, I shall say nothing: But after so great Labour, and Expence of Time, the Essay (being new and never before attempted) how defective soever it may be, I cannot but hope, will meet with a favourable Reception from the Ingeni­ous, and more particularly have the Approbation and Coun­tenance of Persons of Distinction, who frequently read such Books, and know how useful and acceptable Undertakings of this Kind have ever been accounted in all the Polite Nations of Europe.

[Page 1]THE Peerage of SCOTLAND.

HAMILTON Earl of Abercorn.

THE First of this Collateral Branch of the Family of Hamilton, was Lord Claud Hamilton, third Son of James Duke of Chatlerault, Gover­nour of Scotland by the Lady Mar­garet Douglass, Daughter of James, fourth Earl of Mortoun.

Which Lord Claud, was promot­ed to be Commendator of the Ab­bacy of Paisly, upon the Resigna­tion of John Arch-Bishop of St. An­drews, Anno 1553, which was rati­fied and approven by Pope Julius III.

Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, he adhered to the Interest of Queen Mary, by whom he was constituted one of the principal Com­manders of her Army at the Field of Langside, Anno 1568, where he perform'd the Part of a brave and valiant General, and resolutely per­sisted in her Majesty's Service, for which his Estate was Forfeited, and continued in other Hands, till his Majesty King James VI. in 1585, was pleas'd to restore the long injur'd Family of Hamilton: And in Testi­mony of the great Sense he had of that Gentleman's Sufferings for his Loyalty to Queen Mary, did create him Lord Paisly, Anno 1591: He Married Margaret Daughter of George Lord Seaton, by whom he had Issue,

James, first Earl of Abercorn.

Sir Claud Hamilton the second Son, was first of the Branch of Eliestoun.

The third, Sir George.

The fourth, Sir Frederick, a Colo­nel in the Irish Wars in the Reign of King Charles I.

Beside these Sons, he had likewise a Daughter Margaret, Married to William first Marquess of Douglass, and had Issue.

But before I proceed, 'tis proper to take Notice, That James Master of Paisly being a Man of great Parts, was by King James VI. made one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber; and by reason of his special Merit, was advanc'd to the Dignity of a Lord of Parliament, by the Stile and Title of Lord Abercorn, Anno 1604, being the same Year ap­pointed one of the Commissioners on the Part of Scotland, to Treat of an Union with England; His Ma­jesty being pleas'd further to Dignify him with the Title of Earl of Aber­corn, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 10 of July 1606.a

He Married Marion Daughter of Thomas Lord Boyd, by whom he had five Sons and two Daughters.

1. James his Successor in his Estate and Dignity.

2d. Claud, whom he provided in his Irish Fortune, which he had by the Bounty of King James, after his [Page 2] Accession to the Crown of England, Anno 1603, whom his Majesty by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 8 of May 1618, created a Baron of Ire­land by the Designation of Lord Straband a.

3d. Sir William died sans Issue.

4th. Sir George, of whom is de­scended the present Earl of Aber­corn.

5th. Sir Alexander, Father of Count Hamilton in Germany, dignified by the late Emperor with the Honour of Prince of Nowburgh.

His Daughters were, Anne, married to Hugh Lord Semple, and Margaret to Sir William Cauningham of Capring­toun. He dying on the 3d. of March 1618, (his Father surviving him three Years, Died in the Year 1621) his Estate and Dignity devolved upon James his Son and Heir.

Which James, Earl of Abercorn, married Katharin the Daughter and sole Heir of Gervise Lord Cliftoun, of the Kingdom of England, Widow of Esme, Duke of Lennex, by whom he had James his Son and Heir, who in the Year 1651, disposed of his E­state in Scotland, and retired into England: his Male Issue failing, the Dignity came to Claud Lord Stra­band, his Heir Male, who dying with­out Issue, left his Estate and Title to Charles his next Brother and Heir, who dying without Male Issue, the Title of Lord Straband failed, but the Honour of Abercorn, by reason of an Entail upon the Heirs Male, descended and came to James Hamilton Esq his Cousin, Son and Heir of James Hamilton Esq one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber, in the Reign of King Charles II. (by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of John Lord Culpeper) who was Son of Sir George Hamilton, one of the younger Sons of James first Earl of Abercorn.

Which James, the present Earl, was by King William created Vis­count of Straband, of the Kingdom of Ireland, and is one of the Lords of the Privy Council in that King­dom.

In 1706, to preserve his Scots Peerage, he came over, and sat in that Session of Parliament which con­cluded the Union; He hath married Elisabeth Daughter of Sir Robert Reading, by whom he hath Issue James Lord Paisly.

ARMS.

Two Coats quarterly, first and fourth Gules, three Cinque foiles Ermine, second and third Argent, a Ship with her Sails trus'd up, Sable, supported by two Antelops, for Crest a Saw cutting through a Tree, Motto, Through.

SANDIELANDS Lord Abercromby.

THE first who enjoyed this Dignity, was Sir James San­dielands of St. Monans, de­scended of the Family of Torphichan, who was Created by King Charles I. in Consideration of his good Services Lord Abercromby, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 12 of December 1647,b.

He married Anne Carnegy Daughter of David first Earl of Southesk, by whom he had James his Son and Heir, who dyed without Succession, in the Year 1681, whereby the Dignity became Extinct.

ARMS.

Two Coats quarterly, first Argent, a Bend Azure, second Argent, a Heart proper, crown'd with an Imperial Crown, Or, on a chief Azure, Three Moletts of the First, the Third as Second, Fourth as First.

GORDON, Earl of Aberdeen.

DESCENDED of an Anci­ent Family of that Name, who have been for many Ages possessed of a large Estate in Aberdeen-shire, and sprung of a Branch of the Illustrious House of Gordon, 300 Years ago, of which Family John Gordon of Haddo, was created a Baro­net the 13 of August 1642.

Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, he eminently distinguish'd himself by his Loyalty to King Charles I. ceasing not to hazard ei­ther Life or Fortune in assisting the Royal Cause; He defended his Castle of Haddo with great Resolution and Courage, against the Parliaments Forces, Anno 1644; but the Garrison being treacherously Betray'd by the Souldiers, he was seiz'd, sent Prisoner to Edinburgh, Condemn'd and Exe­cuted the 14 of July 1644a.

This Loyal Gentleman married Mary, Daughter of William Forbes of Tolquhon, by whom he had two Sons, Sir John, who dying without Issue, left his Estate and Title of Baronet to Sir George, his Brother and Heir.

Which Sir George, being a Person of excellent Parts and Learning, but more especially in the Laws, was promoted to be one of the Senators of the College of Justice, Anno 1680, and thereafter on the first of Novem­ber 1681, was constituted President of the Session, in Room of Sir James Dalrymple of Stair, and the next en­suing Year he was promoted to be Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, upon the decease of John Duke of Rothes. Having faithfully Demean'd himself in all those great Imploy­ments, he was by his Majesty (King Charles II.) in Consideration of the untainted Loyalty of his Ancestors in all preceeding Times, the great Loyalty and Sufferings of his Father, and his own constant Zeal and Af­fection to the Interest of the Monar­chy, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 30 of November 1682, advanced to the Dignity and Titles of Earl of Aberdeen, Viscount of Formartin, Lord Haddo, Methlick, Tarves, and Kellie.

He married Anne, Daughter and sole Heir of George Lockhart of Tor­breaks, by Anne his Wife, Daughter of Sir James Lockhart of Lee, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, and by her he had Issue William Lord Haddo, his Son and Heir; likewise four Daughters.

Anne married to Alexander Earl of Eglintoun, and had Issue.

Martha, to John Udney of That Ilk, and had Issue.

Mary, to Alexander Master of Sal­toun, Son and Heir of William Lord Saltoun, and has Issue.

Margaret unmarried.

William Lord Haddo in his Father's time married Mary, Daughter of Da­vid Earl of Leven, by whom he has one Daughter.

ARMS.

Azure, Three Boars Heads Couped Or, within a Border, charged with Thistles, Roses, and Flower-de-Lys, supported by two Doctors in their Docto­ral Habits, Motto, Fortuna Sequatur.

Lord Abernethy.

THE First of this Noble Fami­ly I have found upon Re­cord, was Orme the Son of Hugh, who flourish'd in the Reign of King William: He obtained from that Monarch a Grant of the Lands of [Page 4] Abernethy, whence, according to the Custom of that Time, he assumed a Sirname; he left Issue a Son Hugh, who got from King Alexander II. the Lands of Dunlopyn, to be holden of him and his Heirs in free Forrestry, by a Charter dated the 15 of May, the Eight Year of his Reign. He left a Son

Laurence, Lord Abernethy, who obtained from King Alexander II. a Grant of certain Lands in Roxburgh Shire, by a Charter, dated at Edinburgh the 24 of June, the Ninteenth Year of his Reigna.

Alexander, Lord Abernethy, his Successor, in the Reign of King Robert Bruce, dying without Male Succession, his Inheritance came to be shared betwixt his Three Daughters, and Co Heirs, thus Married

Margaret, to John Stewart Earl of Angus.

Helen, to David Lindsay of Craw­ford.

Mary, to Andrew Lesly of Rothes.

ARMS.

Or, a Lyon Rampant Gules, surmounted of a Riband Sable.

GORDON, Earl of Aboyn.

AMONG many others, who by reason of their special Merits, were advanced to Titles of Honour, upon the Restau­ration of King Charles II. was Lord Charles Gordon, Son of George, second Marquess of Huntly, by the Lady Anne Campbel Daughter of Archbald Earl of Argyle.

Which Charles, highly manifesting his Loyalty to King Charles I. in the time of the Civil War, and firmly adhering to King Charles II. during the Usurpation, was, in Consideration of those his acceptable Services, raised to the Degree and Dignity of Earl of Aboyn, by Letters Patent, the 10 of September 1661, and departing this Life Anno 1680, left Issue by Elisa­beth his Wife, Daughter of John Earl of Strathmore, Charles his Successor.

2d. George.

3d. John in Arms abroad.

And a Daughter Elisabeth, married to John Lord Castlehaven, Son and Heir of George Earl of Cromerty.

Which Charles Earl of Aboyn, married Elisabeth Daughter of Patrick Earl of Strathmore, his Cousin German, and dying Anno 1705, left Issue Charles now Earl of Aboyn, his Son and Heir, a Minor.

ARMS.

Azure, a Chiveron betwixt three Boars Heads, erazed, Or. within a double Tressore flowr'd with Flowr de-Lys within, and contra Crescents without, supported by two Chevaliers compleatly Armed, holding each a Halbard in his Hand, for Crest a Demi Lyon, Gules, armed and langued, Azure, Motto, Stant caetera tigno. b

OGILVIE, Earl of Airly.

THE Ogilvies, according to our Historians, derive their De­scent from Gilbert Son of Gile­bred, and Brother of Gilchrist Earl of Angus, who flourish'd in the Days of King William, he obtained from that Monarch the Barony of Ogilvy, [Page 5] from whence he assumed a Sirname according to the Custom of that Time. Of the Family of Ogilvy, that of Auchterhouse seems to be the prin­cipal Branch, whose Ancestor Sir Wolter Ogilvy, in the Fifteenth of King Robert II. had a Grant for his good Services done to that Prince, Annuum redditum vigesimi noni Li­brorum debiti nobis de Thanagio de Kinclyes in Vic. de Forfar. He like­wise had the Barony of Auchterouse by the Marriage of the Heir-Female of Sir William Ramsay, and was there­after slain at the Battle of Hairlaw, the 29th of July 1411, leaving Issue by his Wife aforesaid, Sir Alexander Ogilvy, Sheriff of Angus, and Sir Walter Ogilvy of Lintrethan, who laid the Foundation of this noble Family.

Which Sir Walter being a Man of Parts and Understanding, was upon the Restauration of King James I. chosen of the King's Council, and constituted Lord High Treasurer of Scotland a: In which Office he con­tinued for the Space of Seven Years, till the 1431, he was made Master of the Housholdb, and he held the Place till the Death of the King, Anno 1437, and giving Way to Fate in 1441, he left Issue by Isobel his Wife, Sir John his Son and Heir, who flourished in the Quality of a Knight under King James IIc. He married Marion, Daughter of Sir William Seaton of That-Ilk, by whom he had Sir James his Son and Heir, and Three Daughters, Christian mar­ried to John Forbes of Pitsligo d Elizabeth to . . . . Kieth of Inve­rugy, and Marion to Henry Stewart of Rosyth.

Which Sir James being a Person of good Parts, was by King James IV. sent Ambassador to Denmark, Anno 1492, in which Negociation he behaved with so much Prudence and Dexterity, that upon his Return he was raised to be a Peer of the Re­alm, by the Title of Lord Ogilvy. He married Elizabeth, a Lady of the Family of the Kennedies, and had John his Successor, and again Eliza­beth, Daughter to Archbald Earl of Angus. By her he had Walter Ogil­vy, the first of the Branch of the Ogilvies of Balfour, of the County of Forfar.

Which John married Jean Daugh­ter of William Lord Graham, and had Issue, James his Successor, Anthony, Abbot of Glenluce, and Two Daugh­ters, Elizabeth married to William Wood of Bonnieton, and Janet to . . . . Lichton of Ulysses-haven, in Vic. de Forfar.

Which James married Elizabeth Daughter to the Earl of Crawfurd e, by whom he had James his Successor, also several Daughters. Margaret mar­ried to David Lyon of Cossins, Isobel to David Strachan of Carmylie; and Beatrix to . . . . . Garden of Leyes.

James next Lord Ogilvy, married Margaret Daughter of Henry Lord Sinclair, and had Issue, James his Suc­cessor, Thomas of whom the Ogilvies of Innerkeilor, Alexander Ogilvy of Kinmundy, Archbald Ogilvy of Laton; also Four Daughters, Marion married to Patrick Lord Gray, Margaret to David Graham of Fintry, and had Issue, Anne to Sir Thomas Erskine of Brechin, Helen to John Lord Inner­meath.

Which James married Catharine, Daughter of Sir John Campbel of Cal­der; and departing this Life in the Month of May 1554, left Issue James his Son and Heir, and two Daugh­ters, Agnes married to John Erskine of Dun, and Helen to John Ogilvy of Innerwharity, and had Issue.

Which James did firmly adhere to Queen Mary during her Troubles; for which he suffer'd a long and te­dious Imprisonment till King James VI. took the Government on him­self, that he was releas'd; and in 1596, sent upon a solemn Embassy to Den­mark, [Page 6] to assist at the Coronation of King Cristern IV. He married Jean, Daughter of William Lord Forbes: By her he had James who succeeded him, Sir John Ogilvy of Craig, Da­vid Ogilvy of Pitmouies, George Ogil­vy of Fornalt, and Sir Francis Ogilvy of Grange; likewise a Daughter Mar­garet married to George Earl Mares­chal; and departing this Life Anno 1606, was succeeded by

James his Son, who married Jean, Daughter of William Earl of Gowrte, and had by her

James his Son and Heir, who ha­ving given several eminent Instances of his Loyalty and Fidelity to King Charles I. at the Beginning of the Troubles, was, in Consideration there­of, as well as the Loyalty and Merit of his Ancestors in all preceeding Times, rais'd to the Honour of Earl of Airly, by Letters Patent, bearing Date at York, April 2d, 1639, and to the Heirs Male of his Body for ever. When the Civil War broke out, this noble Earl did heartily and perso­nally engage himself in the King's Service, and in all Actions and In­terprises of the greatest Hazard and Danger; whereby he became in the first Form of those who were most obnoxious to the Parliament. By Iso­bel his Wife, Daughter of Thomas first Earl of Haddingtoun; he had James his Successor, Sir Thomas, a young Man of great Courage and Valour, who from the Beginning of the War in the Time of King Charles I. served his Majesty very bravely in the Head of a Regiment, which he himself had rais'd, with which he fought several Battles, where he had always Success and Victory, till the Fight at Inver­lochy where he lost his Life; and was very generally lamented, Sir David Ogilvy of Clova; likewise a Daughter Helen, married to Sir John Carnagy of Bonymoon.

Which James was like very faith­ful to the Crown in the Time of the Civil War, during the Reign of King Charles I. for as soon as the Marquis of Montrose took the Field, and decla­red for the King, the Lord Ogilvy frankly engaged his Person in the Ser­vice, and always behaved with sig­nal Courage. At the unfortunate Ad­venture of Philiphaugh he was taken Prisoner, and tried and condemn'd by the Parliament to be executed, but was so happy as to make his Es­cape the very Night before his Execu­tion, in his Sister's Dress, and again engaged in the same Service, and with the same Affection: And after very great Sufferings sustained with great Firmness and Constancy, he liv'd to see the King restored. He married Helen, Daughter of George Lord Banff: By her he had David his Son and Heir, Marion married to James Lord Coupar; and again to John Lord Lindores, Mar­garet to Alexander Lord Halkertoun, Mary to Sir John Wood of Bonnieton, and had Issue, Helen to Sir John Gor­don of Park, and had Issue.

Which David married Grisel, Daughter of Patrick Earl of Strath­more; by whom he had James Lord Ogilvy, John Ogilvy Esq and a Daugh­ter Lady Helen.

ARMS.

Argent, a Lyon passant guardant, Gules, crown'd Or, supported by Two Bulls proper. Crest, a Lady from the middle upward, holding a Portcullis in her Arms. Motto, A Fin.

STEUART, Duke of Albany.

THE First who enjoyed this Title, was Robert Stewart, third Son of King Robert II. by Elisabeth Mure, who in Right of Margaret his Wife, Grandchild and Heir of Allan [Page 7] Earl of Menteth, came to that Ho­nour, and had the Earldom of Fife, by the Resignation of the Countess of Fife; both which Titles he used, till he was rais'd to a higher Honour.

The Earl of Fife and Menteth was a Person of great Parts and Spirit, which he manifested in all his Actions, both in Peace and War. His Father the King had so great an Esteem of his Abilities, that in his old Age, he made him Governor of Scotland; and he continued in the Administration till the Death of the King.

Upon the Accession of his Bro­ther Robert III. to the Crown, the King being aged and valitudinary, thought fit to continue the Earl of Fife his Brother in the Regency, and further dignified him with the Title of Duke of Albany, Anno 1399, and he discharged that great Trust very well throughout the Whole of his Brother's Reign; and the Prince King James I. being a Prisoner in England at the Time of his Father's Death, the Duke came of Right to be Governor of the Kingdom, and he enjoyed the Office till his Death, September 3d, Anno 1420.

He married first Margaret, Daugh­ter and Heir of the Earl of Menteth aforesaid, by whom he had Murdack his Successor, and several Daughters, Isobel married to Alexander Earl of Ross, and again to Sir Walter Halli­burton of Dirleton, Marjory to Sir Duncan Campbell of Lochow, and Eli­zabeth to Sir Malcolm Fleming of Big­gar; next, Mauriella, Daughter of Sir William Keith Mareschal of Scot­land; by her he had John Earl of Buchan, and Sir Robert Stewart Kt.

The Duke of Albany was succeeded by Murdack his Son, both in his Estate and in the Government of Scotland, but he came very far short of his Fa­ther, for being a weak Man, and of small Parts, was scarce able to go­vern his own Family, much less the Kingdom: But that which should attone for all his Oversights, and pre­serve his Memory from all unkind Reflections, was the glorious Part he acted, in conducing so much toward the Restauration of King James I. in which he was the great Instru­ment. Not long thereafter, the King growing jealous of the Duke's Power, which no doubt was very great, and discovering some treasonable Intrigue in which he was concern'd, he was first put under Arrest, and sent Priso­ner to the Castle of Carlaverock; and being shortly after brought to his Trial, he was found guilty of High-Treason by his Peers, for which he lost his Head on the 19th May 1425.

This great but unfortunate Duke, married Isobel, Daughter and Heir of Duncan Earl of Lennox, by whom he had Sir Walter, and Alexander, who being found accessory to their Father's Treason, both suffer'd Death for the same, and Sir James who fled to Ireland, where he spent the after Part of his unfortunate Life, and left a Son behind him, Sir Andrew Stew­art of Stratheven, who came over to Scotland in the Time of King James II. who afterward rose to great Wealth and Honour, and laid the Foundation of the Family of Evan­dale and Ochiltree.

The next illustrious Brench of the Royal Family who enjoy'd this Title, was Alexander of Scotland, second Son to King James II. who was cre­ated Duke of Albany, Anno 1452, which he afterwards forfaulted for his unnatural Rebellion against his Brother King James III. and all his Measures being broke, he retired to France, where he liv'd till his Death. He left Issue by Katharine, Daughter of William Earl of Orkney, from whom he was divorced, a Son Alexander, who was declared illegitimate, and thereupon he enter'd into Orders, and was made Bishop of Murray. Also by Anne his second Wife, Daughter [Page 8] to the Count de Bulloign, the Duke left a Son.

John Duke of Albany, to whom the Administration of the Affairs of the Kingdom was committed in the Minority of King James V. and he discharged that great Trust with in­vincible Constancy and Courage, till the King came to Age, that he reti­red into France, where he had a fair Fortune in Right of his Wife. In the Service of that Crown he exer­cised the highest military Commands under Francis I. with great Honour and Reputation, even till his Death, Anno 1536. The Title by Reason he had no lawful Issue, did extinguish with him.

The next who had this Honour by Creation, was that comely and graceful Prince, Henry Lord Darnly, whom Queen Mary, a few Days be­fore she took him to be her Husband, did with great Solemnity invest in the Title of Duke of Albany; which ceas'd again upon his Marriage, that he was proclaim'd King of Scotland, and had his Name put upon the Coin with the Queen's; Henricus & Maria Rex & Regina Scotorum.

Prince Charles, the second Son of King James VI. was in the Third Year of his Age, Anno 1601, created Duke of Albany, and he bore the Title till by the Death of that incom­parable Prince, Prince Henry his elder Brother, he became Prince and Stew­ard of Scotland, Anno 1612; after which this Title lay dormant, till his Majesty King Charles II. on the Re­stauration, did create his Royal Bro­ther James Duke of York, Duke of Albany, by Letters Patent 31st of December 1660a: And this Title his Royal Highness always us'd till by the Demise of the King his Brother, he came to the Crown by the Name of King James VII.

KER, Earl of Ancrum.

SIR Robert Ker, having long serv'd his Majesty King James VI. and King Charles I. in the Qua­lity of a Gentleman of the Bed­chamber, and being a Person of very fine Parts, was rais'd to the Ho­nour of Earl of Ancrum, the 24th of June 1633. He married first Elisa­beth, Daughter of . . . . . Murray of Blackbarrony, by whom he had William Earl of Lothian; next, Anne, Daughter of William Earl of Darby, to the Heirs of which Marriage the Honour was limited; by her he had Charles his Son, Earl of Ancrum, who died without Issue, and thereby the Title became extinct.

Earls of Angus.

GILBERT is the first Earl of Angus we read of in the Time of King Malcolm III. and Gilchrist Co­mes de Angus his Son, was famous for his warlike Exploits under King William. He married the King's Sister, by whom he had Duncan, Co­mes de Angus, who ratified to the Monks of Arbroath, the Grant of his Father to their Convent, of the Chur­ches of Strathechen and Keriemoir.

Malcolm Comes de Angus was his Son and Successorb, who dying without Issue, the Earldom devol­ved to Matilda, Comitissa de Angus, his Father's Sisterc, who married Sir Gilbert de Umfraville, an English [Page 9] Gentleman, to whom the Lady brought the Title of Earl of Angus. By him she had a Son, Gilbert Earl of Angus, who was forfaulted for adhering to the Interest of the Ba­liols.

STEWART, Earl of Angus.

SIR John Stewart Kt. of Bonkle, Son of Sir John Stewart, who was kill'd at Falkirk, and Nephew to the Lord High Steward of Scotland, was at the Coronation of King David II. created Earl of Angus a, and was afterward slain at Hallydown­hill, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter and Co-Heir of Sir Alexander Abernethy, Kt. Thomas his Son and Heir, who by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Sin­clair of Rosline b, had Thomas his Successor; Margaret Countess of Angus, and Elizabeth Wife of Sir A­lexander Hamilton of Innerweek, Kt.c, and had Issue.

Which Thomas married Margaret, Daughter and Heir of Donald Earl of Marr; but dying without Issue, Anno 1377, his Estate and Title came to Margaret his Sister, who was married first to Thomas Earl of M [...]r, but being left a Widow by him without any Issue, she married again William the first Earl of Douglas, to whom she was second Wife, and by him had a Son Sir Gearge Douglas d, first Earl of Angus.

MURRAY, Earl of Annandale.

THE ancient Family of Cockpool in Dumfries-Shire, took Be­ginning in the Reign of King Robert I. Thomas Earl of Murray then gave Willielmo de Moravia, Nepoti suo, pro homagio & servitio suo, omnes ter­ras, & omnia Tenementa, cum perti­nen. totius Medietatis tenementorum de Cumlongan, & Rivell, in vallis An­nandiaee. This Branch of the Mur­rays were well known by the Title of Cockpool. Cuthbert Murray of Cock­pool, was a Person of great Note in the Time of King James I. as Charles his Son was under James II.f; by whom he was nam'd one of the Com­missioners on a Treaty of Peace with the English, Anno 1457g, Cuthbert his Son flourish'd under King James IV. Of him frequent Mention is made in the Annals of that Reignh. Sir John Murray of Cockpool Kt. his Soni, was the Father of Cuthbert, of the Place foresaid, and he of Sir Charles Murray of Cockpool, who was one of the most zealous Barons for the Reformation of Religion. He married Margaret, Daughter of Hugh Lord Somervel k, by whom he had Sir James, Sir David, and Sir Richard Murray of Cockpool, Bart. who all died without Issue Male, and [Page 10] Sir John Murray of Dundrenan, who was the first Earl of Annandale.

He was early brought into the Court, under the Favour of the Earl of Mortoun, where his accomplish'd Parts and Breeding made him quickly taken Notice of, insomuch as he was in short Time made one of the Gentle­men of the Bed-Chamber to King James VI. Master of the Horse, and knighted: Upon the King's Accession to the English Crown, Sir John Mur­ray waited on his Master into that Re­alm, under no other Character than a Gentleman of the Privy-Chamber, and had so great Credit in the Court, that he quickly got the Reputation of a Favourite. The King bestow'd immense Bounties on him, whereby he came to have one of the best E­states in Scotland; and therefore, that he might have Titles of Honour equal to his Estate, his Majesty was pleased first to raise him to be Vis­count of Annan a, and then Earl of Annandale, by Letters Patent, 13th of March 1624b, wherein his long and faithful Services to his Majesty, are very amply acknowledged. He continued in a good Degree of Fa­vour with King Charles I. which he had enjoyed so many Years under the Father, even till his Death, Anno 1640. By Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of Sir John Schaw, Kt. he had James his Son and Heir, who in the Time of the Civil War, withdrew to England; where he liv'd privately till his Death, 28th of December 1658c, leaving no Issue by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of James Earl of Southesk; so that the Honour became extinct. This Earl entail'd his Estate and Honours to Sir Robert Crichton, his near Kinsman, Nephew to the Earl of Dumfries, who assumed the Sirname of Murray and the Title of Cockpool; and he dying without Issue Male, left Two Daughters by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of John Lord Madertie, who were Co-heirs, Margaret the Elder, married to George Stirling of Herbert-shire, and had Issue; and Anne the Younger, to Lord James Murray of Doually, and had Issue.

JOHNSTON, Marquis of Annandale.

THE first conspicuous Person of this noble Family I have found upon Record, was Sir John Johnston, who was a Knight of great Valour and Fame in the Reign of King Ro­bert II.d. Sir Adam Johnston of that Ilk, was very remarkable for his Loy­alty to his Prince, and Love to his Country in the Time of James II. and was particularly instrumental in sup­pressing the Rebellion of the Earl of Douglas e; for which eminent Service to the Crown, he got a Gift of the [Page 11] Lands of Pitenen in Lanerk-Shirea. John Johnston of that Ilk, his Son, was one of the Conservators of the Peace with England, Anno 1457b, and afterwards signaliz'd his Valour and Courage at the Battle of Kirkon­nel, in the unnatural Invasion of the Duke of Albany, against his own Brother King James III. Anno 1483. By Mary his Wife, Daughter of Max­well of . . . . . . he had James his Heir, and John, of whom the Branch of Wamfray c, of which Lands he became possessed by the Marriage of Catharine, Daughter and Heir of John Boyle of Rysholm.

Which James behaved gallantly in several Encounters on the Borders with the English, in the Reign of King James IV. By . . . . . Daugh­ter of . . . . . his Wife, he had John his Successor, 2d Robert, 3d Adam of Corry, 4th William.

John Johnston of that Ilk, his Son, behaved gallantly at the Battle of Pinky, and was afterwards one of the Commissioners about the debatable Lands in the Border, Anno 1552d. He married first Elizabeth, Daugh­ter of . . . . . . Jerden of Apple-girth, by whom he had John his Successor, Robert of Stabletoun; and a Daughter Dorothea, married to John Mattland of Achincastle e, and again Nicolas Douglass, of the House of Drumlan­rig, by whom he had a Son William, of whom the Branch of the Johnstons of Corhead.

Which John was a Man of great Spirit and Courage, which he mani­fested in suppressing of Inroads on the Borders, which much abounded in his Time. He married Margaret, Daughter of Sir John Hamilton of Sa­muelstoun, by whom he had John his Son and Heir, and a Daughter Mor­garet, married to Sir Robert Douglas of Cashogle.

Which John being a Gentleman of great Sagacity and Conduct, was much in the Favour of King James VI. by whom he was made Warden of the East Marches, and Justici­ary, Anno 1579f; and he dis­charged the Office with singular Cou­rage and Fidelity till his Death, June 5th, 1581g. By Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Scot Younger of Buccleugh h, he had Sir James his Successor, and several Daughters, Janet married to Sir John Carmichael, Captain of Grawfurd, and had Issue; and Grisel to Sir Robert Maxwell of Orchardtoun, and had Issue.

Sir James Johnston of that Ilk, his Son, was likewise a great Favourite of King James VI. he was nam'd Warden of the West Marches, An­no 1596, after his Father, and conti­nued in the Office, till the King's En­trance to England, that all National Animosities were remov'd by the hap­py Union of the Two Nations. He was kill'd in a Family Quarrel by the Lord Maxwell, the 6th of April 1608i, much regreted, says the Reverend Bishop Spotiswood, being a Gentleman full of Wisdom, and very well inclin'd. He married Sarah, Daughter of John Lord Harries, by whom he had Sir James his Son and Heir, who was by the special Favour of King Charles [Page 12] I. rais'd to the Honour of Lord Johnston, 20th June 1633a, and that for the greater Splendor of his Ma­jesty's Coronation; and thereafter by other Letters Patent, bearing Date 18th March 1643, was created Earl of Hartfiel b. In the Time of the Civil War, this noble Earl gave many signal Testimonies of his Loyalty, for which he suffer'd both Imprisonment and the Sequestration of his Estate. He died Anno 1656, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of William Earl of Queensberry, James his Son and Heir; likewise three Daugh­ters, Mary married to Sir George Graham of Nedderby, Ancestor to the Viscount of Preston, Janet to Sir Wil­liam Murray of Stanhope, and had Is­sue, Margaret to Sir Robert Dalziel of Glenae, Ancestor to the Earl of Carn­wath.

James Earl of Hartfiel, upon the Restauration of King Charles II. with the Approbation of the Crown, ex­changed his Title of Hartfiel to An­nandale, Anno 1661, being then one of the Lords of his Majesty's most honourable Privy-Council; and dying 16th July 1674c, left Issue by Hen­rietta his Wife, Daughter of William, first Marquis of Douglas, by Mary his second Wife. Daughter of George Marquis of Huntley, William his Suc­cessor: Also Three Daughters,

1st Mary married to William Earl of Crawfurd, and had Issue.

2d, Margaret, to Sir James Mont­gomery of Skelmurly, Bart. and had Issue.

3d, Henrietta, to Sir John Carmi­chael of Bonnytoun, Baronet, and had Issue.

Which William was after the Re­volution, chosen one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King William and after that one of the Commissio­ners of the Treasury; likeas he was by the special Favour of the said Prince, June 24th, 1701d, rais'd to the Honour of Marquis of Annandale.

Upon the Accession of her Maje­sty Queen Anne to the Crown, the Marquis was made President of the Council, on the Removal of the Earl of Melvil; and thereafter nam'd con­junct Secretary of State, Anno 1704. From which Office he was soon re­moved, the Earl of Mar being put in his Room. In the Parliament 1706, his Lordship opposed the Union, and deliver'd several Speeches and Prote­stations, containing the Reasons of his Dissent, which were all enter'd in the Records of Parliament, where they will remain as lasting Monu­ments to the Honour of his Name.

His Lordship married Sophia, Daughter and sole Heir of Mr. John Fairholm of Craigiehall, by whom he has Issue two Sons and a Daughter,

James, Lord Johnston,

Lord William.

Lady Henrietta, married to Charles Earl of Hopetoun, and has Issue.

ARMS.

Quarterly, first and fourth, Argent a Saltyre Sable, on a Chief Gules, three Cushions Or. Second and Third Or, an Anchor Gules, (for the Name of Fairholm) supported on the Dexter with a Lyon rampant, Gules, armed and lan­gued, Azure, crown'd with an Imperial Crown, Or; and on the Sinister, with a Horse, Argent, furnished Gules. Crest, a wing'd Spur, with this Motto, Nunquam non paratus.

CAMPBELL, Duke of Argyle.

THIS noble antient Family is de­riv'd from a Series of illustrious Ancestors, who possess'd Lochow in Ar­gyle-Shire, according to the traditio­nal Accounts by the Bards and Sana­chies, as early as the Time of King Fergus II. who restor'd our Monar­chy, Anno Christi 404.

The first Appellation they us'd was O Dwbin, which, according to an early Custom they assum'd from Diarmed O Dwbin, one of their Ancestors, a brave and warlike Man, who flou­rish'd under King . . . . from whom they are in the Irish Language call'd to this Time, Seol Diarmed, that is, the Posterity and Offspring of Diarmed.

From this Diarmed O Dwbin, the Bards have recorded a long Series of the Barons of Lochow a, whose Acti­ons they tell us, were very renown'd both for Valour and Courage.

Paul O Dwbin Lord of Lochow his Successor, call'd Paul in Spuran, so denominate from his being the King's Trea­surer, having no Male Issue, his Estate went to his Daughter Eva, who mar­ried Gilespick O Dwbin, a Relation of her own, who got the Name first chang'd from O Dwbin to Cambel, to preserve and perpetuate the Memory of a very noble and heroick Piece of Service perform'd by him in the Ser­vice of the Crown of France, in the Reign of King Malcolm Canmore. By his Lady he left a Son Duncan, who was Lord of Lochow; He was the Father of Colin, and He again of Archbald, called Gilespick, and he of Duncan, Baron of Lochow.

This last mentioned Duncan was the Father of another Gilespick Cambel, Kt. Lord of Lochow, whose Son and Heir Sir Colin More, call'd Dominus Colinus Cambel, Miles, Filius quondam Domini Gileaspick Cambell, did ac­quire from Sir William Lindsay, Kt. the Lands of Symontoun in Air-Shire; the Reddendo of which he made over to the Monks of Newbottle, Die Martis in crastino beati Clementis Martyris & Pontificis, Anno 1293b. I find he was also one of the great Men who were summon'd to Ber­wick upon the Part of Robert de Bruce, in the Competition with John de Ba­liol for the Crown, on the Demise of Queen Margaret c; which is all I have found memorable of him in our pulick Records.

The particular History of the Family of Argyle does represent this Sir Colin More to have been a very renown'd and warlike Chieftain, they tell us, That he was slain, in a Conflict with a great Neighbour of his own, the Lord of Lorn; that after he had defeat his Adversary, pursuing the Victory too eagerly, he was slain at a Place called the String in Cowall, and there interr'd, where a great Obelisk was erected over his Grave d.

His Death occasion'd great Blood­shed in those Parts, and kindled such a Flame betwixt the Two Families [Page 14] of Lochow and Lorn, as was not ex­tinguished for many Years thereaf­ter, even so long as the Argadii, Lords of Lorn, existed.

From this Colin it is that the Head of the Family of Argyle are call'd by the Irish, MackCallan More even to this Time. By his Wife, a Lady of the Family of the Sinclairs a, he had Two Sons, Sir Neil his Successor, and Sir Donald Campbell of Redhouse, of whom the Family of London b, and the other Cadets of this illustri­ous Branch of the Campbels derive themselves.

Sir Neil his Son was honoured with Knighthood, by King Alexander III. in the End of his Reignc. but from the Silence of our Authors, I can parti­cularize none of his Archievements, till the Year 1292, that upon the Demise of Queen Margaret, he was one of the Magnates Scotiae summon'd to Berwick, upon the Part of Robert de Bruce, when he and all the other Competitors for the Crown had re­ferr'd the Decision of their respective Claims to Edward I. of Engalnd d; and when that Prince did declare in Favour of John de Baliol, Sir Neil Campbel did so far acquiesce in the Decision, as to continue faithful to King John, till that unhappy Prince did unking himself by an inglorious Surrender of the Independency of the Crown to a Foreign Potentate the King of England, whom he acknow­ledged Superior and direct Lord of Scotland e.

But no sooner did King Robert Bruce assert his Title to the Crown, and form a rational Project of re­covering his own Right, and of re­deeming his Country from the Sub­jection it was under to a Foreign Power, than Sir Neil Campbel was among the earliest Patriots, who first resorted to him, own'd his Title, and gave quickly so many Proofs of his Zeal and Merit, for the Liberty and Honour of his Country, and of his Loyalty to that heroick Prince; insomuch that he was thought most worthy, and pitched upon to com­mand a Party of Loyalists that were sent to Argyle-Shire, to curb and o­verawe the Lord of Lorn f, who was a declared Enemy to his Coun­try, and of Consequence to the Bru­cian Title; and he perform'd that Service committed to him with Ho­nour and Success, insomuch that in a short Time he recovered the Countries of Argyle and Lorn, and brought them to submit to King Robert, notwithstanding the joint Efforts of the Lord Lorn, and his numerous Accomplices on the con­traryg; which shews him to have been a very resolute and hardy Patriot: After which Sir Neil stuck close to King Robert, and was among the few [Page 15] Scots Patriots, who accompanied him to Scoon, and assisted at the So­lemnity of his Coronation, anno 1306. After which he gave many signal In­stances of his Stedfastness and Loy­alty to that Monarch, even in his worst Circumstances: For when he was very far from being firmly established on the Throne, Sir Niel Campbel entered into an Association with Sir Gilbert Hay, and Sir Alex­ander Seton, wherein, in a most so­lemn Manner, they bound themselves to desend, till the last Period of their Lives the Liberties of their Country, and Right of Robert Bruce, their King, against all Mortals, French, English, and Scots, to which they appended their Seals at the Ab­bay of Cambuskenneth, 9 Sept. 1308.

Anno 1314, he was one of the Commissioners upon the part of Scot­land, authoris'd to Treat with the En­glish for a Peace, which at that Time, took not its desir'd Effect: And the next ensuing Year, he was one of the Barons at the Parliament, held at Air, where they made an Entail of the Crown to King Robert and his Heirsa. About which Time, in Con­sideration of his good Services, and signal Loyalty, he obtain'd a Grant of several Lands, then in the Crown, by the Forfaulture of those who ad­hered to the Interest of the Baliol; and to oblige him the more, the King be­stow'd upon him the Lady Mary Bruce, his Sister in Marriage. He departed this Life, in the latter End of the Year 1315, leaving Issue two Sons, Colin his Successor, and

John Campbel, who was by King David Bruce, dignified with the Title of Earl of Athole, but dying sans Issue, the Honour went no fur­ther in the Family.

Which Sir Colin Campbel of Lochow, began early to distinguish himself for Military Atchievements. He was in the Expedition made into Ireland, anno 1316, in behalf of Edward Bruce, then King of that Realm, where he behav'd with exceeding Gallantry, and perform'd many signal Services: In Consideration whereof, he obtain­ed a Grant of diverse Lands in Argyle Shire, by a Charter yet extant,b, having faithfully demean'd him­self during the whole Course of King Robert's Reign. He continu'd no less stedfast to King David his Son; for whose Service, even when his Af­fairs were lookt upon to be lost, he rais'd 400 Men, and took the Castle of Dunoon, then in the Hands of the English; for which notable Service, when that Prince came to be establish­ed upon the Throne, he made him hereditary Governour, which his De­scendants still enjoyc.

He married a Daughter of the Fa­mily of Lennox d, by whom he had Three Sons and a Daughter, viz. Archbald his Successor.

John Campbel was Author of the Branch of Barbreck, of whom descend­ed Campbel of Succoch

3d. Sir Dougal Campbel, who lost his Estate for adhering to Edward Baloil.

Alicea, his Daughter, was married to Allan Lauder of Hatton e.

He had a natural Son, Niel, of whom the Campbel's of Melfort de­rive their Descent.

He departing this Life about the Year 1340, was succeeded by Arch­bald his Son, who constantly adhered to King David, during his Captivity in England, after the Battle of Dur­ham, and that Prince, upon his Return, to reward his Loyalty, bestow'd upon him several Lands then in the Crown, by the Forfaulture of Sir Dougal Campbel, his own Brother, anno 1357f.

[Page 16] He married Mary, Daughter of Sir John Laumont a, by whom he had Colin his Successor, who obtain'd from King David II. a Charter ra­tifying the Alienation made by Chri­stian, Daughter and Heir of Sir Dou­gal Campbel, of the Lands of Craig­nish, to be holden of him and his Heirs in as ample manner as Duncan Mackdwyne, his Ancestor, held the Barony of Lochow, which bears Date 25 March 1370b. He was em­ploy'd by King Robert II. in restrain­ing the Incursions of the Highlan­ders, who then infested the Western Parts of this Realm, whom he re­duc'd to the King's Obedience: In Consideration whereof, he obtain'd from the said King sundry Lands yet in the Family.

He married Mary Campbel, a Lady of his own Family, by whom he had two Sons, Duncan his Successor.

Colin the second, was Founder of the Family of Arkinlass c, of whom Sir James Campbel, Baronet, is lineal Heir. Of Arkinlass the Families of Arutenet, Dunoon, Carrick, Skipnish, Blythswood, Shawfield, Rachane, Auch­vwillen, and Dergachie are Branches.

Besides which two Sons, he had a Daughter, Christian, maried to Mal­colm Mackfarlane of Arochar d.

He had likewise two natural Sons, Dougal, Progenitor of the Family of Dunstafuage, of whom Colin Camp­bel of Ederlin, and Robert Campbel of Balvie are descended.

The second, Duncan, was first of that Branch of Duntroon.

To Sir Colin Campbel succeeded Sir Duncan his Son: This Duncan being a Person of great Parts, arriv'd to very high Advancements, as well in Honour as Estate: He married first the Lady Marjory Steuart, Daughter of Robert Duke of Albany, Governour of Scotland, and improv'd the Opportunity of his near Ally­ance with Murdoch Duke of Albany, Governour, while King James 1. was detain'd Prisoner in England, so far, that he prevail'd with him, to ran­som and restore the King to his Fa­thers Throne. This prudent Prince, discerning so much his Abilities, he constituted him one of his Privy Council, and his Justiciar, and Lieu­tenant within the Shire of Argyle e, was continued in the same Office to King James II. by whom he was advanc'd to the Dignity of a Lord of Parliament, by the Title of Lord Campbel, anno 1445f. This much as to his civil Actions. I come to his Works of Piety, which were great and many. He gave in pure Alms to the Monks of the Abbey of San­dale, in Kintyre, the Lands of Blair­natiber, for the Safety of his Soulg, and founded the Collegiate Church of Kilmun, by his Charter, 4 August 1442h; which Grant he expresses to be made, In honorem Dei, heatae virginis Mariae & Sancti Mundi, pro sa­lute Animae olim recolendae Memo­riae Jacobi Regis & Joannae Reginae suae; nec non pro salute Animae Jacobi moderni Regis Scotorum meaque propria salute & animae quondam Marjoriae Con­jugis meae & modernae Consortis meae, & quondam Caelestini filii mei primogeniti omnium Autecessorum & Successorum meorum.

This noble Lord left Issue by Mar­jory his first Wife, aforesaid, Daugh­ter of Robert Duke of Albany; three Sons. 1st. Caelestine, dyed sans Issue.

2d. Archbald, from whom the Male Line of this noble Family sprung: He [Page 17] married in his Father's Time Elisabeth. Daughter of Sir John Somervel of Carnwath, Ancestor to the Lord Somer­vel, by whom he had a Son Colin, who succeeded his Grand-father.

3d. Sir Colin, who was first of that Branch of the Family of Glen­urchie, now dignified with the Title of Earl of Broadalbin.

By his second Wife Margaret, Daughter of Sir John Steuart of Black­hall, natural Son of King Robert III. he had three Sons;

Duncan, first of the Branch of Ach­inbreak, of whom Sir James Campbel, Baronet, is lineal Heir Male. This Family hath produc'd the Campbel's of Glencardel, Glensadale, Kilduskland, Kilmorie, wester Keams, Kilberry, and Dana.

Niel, the second Son, was Ances­tor of Campbel of Ellengreg, whereof the Heir is Sir Niel Campbel. Of this Family, is Colin Campbel of Or­mandale, now Major General in the Muscovite Service.

Of the 3d. Son Issued the old Campbel's of Ottar, extinct.

Lord Duncan departing this Life, 1453, was buried in the Church of Kil­mun, where there is a noble Monument erected over him, with the Statue of Himself, as big as the Life, about the Verge of the Tomb, is this In­scription,Hic Jacet
Dominus Duncanus, Dominus le Camp­bel, Miles de Lochow.

To Duncan Lord Campbel succeed­ed immediately Colin his Grand-son and Heir, who was created Earl of Argyle, by K. James II. anno 1457a; being a Man of eminent Parts, was in the Reign of James III. employ'd in the highest Offices in the State, as Privy Seal, Master of the Houshold, and Lord high Chancellor; all which he discharged with great Abi­lity and Integrity: He was in no less Favour with King James IV. after his Accession to the Throne (tho without having any particular Hand in the Contrivances and bar­barous Actions, which were exercis'd in Order thereto) who constituted him again Chancellor, anno 1488b. He enjoy'd that Office till his Death, anno 1492.

He married Isabel, one of the Daughters and Co-heirs of John Steu­art, Lord Lorn, by whom he had two Sons, Archbald his Successor, and Thomas, a younger Son, of whom descended the Family of Lundie in Angus c, likewise five Daughters.

1. Margaret, married to George Lord Seton, and had Issue.

2d. Isabel, to William Master of Drummond, Son and Heir of John Lord Drummond, and had Issue.

3d. Helen, to Hugh, first Earl of Eglintoun, and had Issue.

4th. Elisabeth, to John, second Lord Oliphant, and had Issue.

5th. Mary, to Aeneas Mackdonald, natural Son and Heir of Tailzie to John Earl of Ross.

Archbald Earl of Argyle, his Son, succeeded him, being a noble Man of great Parts and Wisdom: He was by King James IV. promoted to be Chancellor of Scotland, anno 1494d, Lord Camberlain, Anno 1495e, and Master of the Houshold, 1498f. At the Battle of Flow­den, he Commanded the Van-Guard of the Army; and behaving himself with great Valour, was there killed, with his Royal Master King James IV. and the Flower of his Nobility, 9 of September 1513, leaving Issue by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of John, first Earl of Lennox, four Sons, Colin his Successor.

Archbald Campbel of Skipnish, was the second, which failed in an Heir Female, in the Reign of Queen Mary.

Sir John Campbel, third Son, came to the Possession of a fair Estate, by [Page 18] the Marriage of Morella, Daughter and sole Heir of John Calder of that-Ilk, whose Successor is Sir Hugh Campbel of Caldar: Of this Branch of the Family of Argyle, are the Camp­bel's of Archattan, Airds, and Sir Archbald Campbel of Clunies descend­ed.

Donald, fourth and youngest Son, was Abbot of Couper, of whom the Campbel's of Kythack in Angus derive their Descent.

Besides these Sons, he had like­wise four Daughters. Margaret, mar­ried to John Lord Erskin, and had Issue. Isabel, to Gilbert, second Earl of Cassils, and had Issue. Mary, to John Steuart Earl of Athole, and had Issue. And Jean, to Sir John Laumont of Inneryne, and had Issue.

Colin, Earl of Argyle, his Son, was nam'd one of the four Counsellours to King James V. anno 1525; in 1528 he was constituted Lieutenant of the Borders, and Warden of the Marches; which Office he discharged so much to his Majesty's Satisfaction, that he obtain'd first a Grant of the Lord­ship of Abernethy, then in the Crown, by Angus's Forfaulture, and after an ample Confirmation of the hereditary Sheriffship of Argyle Shire, Justiciary of Scotland, and heretable Master of the Housholda.

He married Janet, Daughter of Alexander Earl of Huntly, by whom he had two Sons, and one Daughter, viz. Archbald who succeeded him.

John Campbel, second Son, from whom is descended the Branch of Lochnel, which produc'd the Campbel's of Balerno and Stonfield.

Alexander Campbel, third Son, Dean of Murray, had no Succession.

Margaret, married first to James Steuart Earl of Murray, natural Son of King James IV. and then to John Earl of Sutherland.

He departing this Life, anno 1542, was succeeded by Archbald his Son and Heir; which Archbald was one of the Peers, who upon the Death of King James V. entred into an Asso­ciation to oppose the then intended Match betwixt Queen Mary and King Edward VI. of England, and conse­quential Union of the Crowns, as tending, To the high Dishonour, per­petual Skaith, Dammage and Ruin of the Liberty, and Nobleness of this Realm, as it runs in the Original yet ex­tant, bearing Date the 4th. July, 1543b.

Upon the breaking out of the War with England, he remarkably distinguish'd himself by his Valour and Conduct, both at the Battle of Pinkie, anno 1547, and at the Siege of Haddingtoun, 1548, in Defence of his Queen and Country, related at large by our Historiansc. This noble Lord was the first of his Quali­ty who imbrac'd the Protestant Re­ligion, in the Beginning of the Re­formation, of which he was a hearty Promoter, and continu'd stedfast in the Profession thereof; when a­dying he recommended to his Son, to propogate the preaching of the Gos­pel, according to the reform'd Prin­ciples, and the suppressing Romish Superstition and Idolatry. He dyed anno 1558d, leaving Issue by Lady Helen Hamilton his first Wife, Daughter of James Earl of Arran; Archbald his Son and Heir, and by his second Wife Mary Graham, Daugh­ter of William Earl of Monteith,

Sir Colin Campbel of Buchuan, and two Daughters,

1. Margaret, married to James Steuart Lord Down, Ancestor to the present Earl of Murray, and had Issue.

2d. Janet, to Hector Macklane of Dowart, and had Issuee.

Archbald Earl of Argyle, his Son being a Person of singular accom­plishments, [Page 19] was by the Estates of Scot­land, sent Ambassador to the Queen, then in France, anno 1559, to Suppli­cate her Majesty in Favour of the Reformation: But that taking no Effect, he, together with the Earls of Glencairn, Morton, and others, entred into an Association, wherein they bound themselves to assist one another in advancing the Cause of Religion, which at last they got happily esta­blish'd by Act of Parliament, anno 1560a.

Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, in the Reign of Queen Mary, he espous'd her Interest, and was General of her Forces, at the Battle of Langside, against the Earl of Murray, then Regent. After which he submitted to the Authority of her Son, King James, and came to be so considerable in that Party, that upon the Death of Matthew Earl of Lennox, Regent, anno 1571, he stood a Candi­date for that Post; but the Earl of Marr being preferr'd to the Regency, he was constituted Lord High Chan­cellor. He enjoy'd that Office with universal Reputation for the Space of Three Years, even to his Death, which happen'd in September 1575b, to whose Memory the famous Mr. Johnston c, compos'd this Epigram.

Gens Albina vetus, gemini incunabula Regni
Quae posuit, (fuerant nam duo Regna prius:)
Illa viris armisque potens, totque aucta tropaeis,
Quae dominos rerum tot dedit una Deos;
Hec & avos, atavosque dedit, loca prisca tenemus,
Tecta, Lares, mores, & decora alta ducum.
Sufficeretque vetus nobis ea gloria: verum
Major ad ignoti nos vehit astra poli.
Adscriptique Dei jam sancta in faedera cives,
Magnanimi audemus pro pietate mori.
Gens quae jura prius dederat, nunc accipit. Ergo
Bis felix: quae dat, quae nova jura capit.

This worthy Lord married two Wives, 1st. Lady Jean Steuart, natural Daughter of King James V. 2dly. Jane, Daughter of Alexander Earl of Glencairn, but by none of 'em left any Issue; whereupon his Estate and Honour came to Sir Colin Campbel of Buchuan, his Brother and Heir.

Which Colin was constituted one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King James VI. anno 1577, and Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, upon the Decease of John Earl of Athole, 1579, which, together with several other great Employments in the State, he enjoy'd till his Death, in the Year 1584d.

He was married first to Janet Steu­art, Daughter of Henry Lord Meth­ven, but by her he had not any Issue; and by Agnes his second Wife, Daughter of William Earl Marishal, and Widow of James Earl of Murray, He had two Sons, Archbald who suc­ceeded him, and Sir Colin Campbel of Lundy, Baronet.

Which Archbald Earl of Argyle was constituted General of the Forces rais'd against the Earls of Huntly and Errol, at the Battle of Glenlivet, anno 1594e, and supprest the Insur­rection of the Mackgregors 1603f, and another more formidable by the Mackdonalds, in the Western Isles, 1614g: In Respect whereof, and his other great Merits, he obtain'd a Grant of the Country of Kintyre, anno 1617, which was ratified by a special Act of Parliamenth.

In 1618, he went to Spain, and signaliz'd himself in that Service against the States of Holland, and assisted at taking several Places of Strength, but by his Majesty's Per­mission returning to England, he dyed at London, anno 1638i. He mar­ried first Anne, Daughter of William Earl of Morton, by whom he had Archbald his Successor, and four Daughters.

1. Anne, married to George, second Marquess of Huntly, and had Issue.

[Page 20] 2d. Annabel, to Robert, second Earl of Lothian, and had Issue.

3d. Jean, to John, first Viscount of of Kenmure, and had Issue.

4th. Mary, to Sir Robert Montgomery of Skelmurly, and had Issue.

2dly. He married Anne, Daughter of Sir William Cornwallis of Brome, Ancestor to the Lord Cornwalis in England, by Mary his Wife, third Daughter, and one of the Coheirs of John Lord Latimer a, by whom he had a Son James, created first Lord Kintyre, by King James VI. anno 1622, and by King Charles I. dignified with the Title of Earl of Irvine, by Letters Patent, bearing Date 28 March 1642b, and a Daughter Mary married to James Lord Rollo, and had Issue.

Archbald Earl of Argyle, his Son, was a Man of great Learning, singular Judgment, and other Endowments, which recommended him so much to the Favour of King Charles I. that he constituted him one of the Lords of his Privy Council.

In 1628, he resign'd in his Ma­jesty's hands the Justiciary of all Scotland (which had been in his Family for divers Ages) reserving to himself and his Heirs, the Ju­sticiary of Argyle and the Western Isles, and where ever else he had Lands in Scotland, which was ratified by Act of Parliament, in 1633, where his Majesty was present in Per­son. Not long after which, in re­spect of his own Merit, as well as the remarkable Fidelity and Loyalty of his Family in former Times to the Crown, his Majesty was graciously pleas'd to create him Marquess of Argyle, by Letters Patent, bearing Date 15th. November 1641.

When the Troubles began in that Reign he joyn'd with the Parlia­ment of Scotland, and shew'd himself a Zealous asserter of the Presbyterian Church Government, which was then establish'd.

After the horrid Murder of the King, he contributed much to the dutiful Reception of his Majesty King Charles II. into Scotland, anno 1650, and at the Solemnity of his Corona­tion 1st. January 1651, he assisted soeminently as to put the Crown upon his Head: But upon the Resto­ration of his Majesty, anno 1660, he was attainted of High Trea­son, for corresponding and comply­ing with Oliver Cromwel (the too too common Fault of the Times) and found guilty by the Parliament, was beheaded at Edinburgh, the 27 of May, anno 1661. Imediately before his Execution, he solemnly declar'd, That from his Birth, to that Moment, he was free of any Accession to the Death of King Charlesc, and like a good Christian, pray'd God to bless his present Majesty, in his Person and Government.

This great Peer was married to Margaret, Daughter of William Earl of Mortoun, by whom he had two Sons, Archbald Earl of Argyle. And

Lord Niel Campbel of Ardmaddie, sometime Governour of Dunbar­toun Castle, married first Vere, Daughter of William Earl of Lothian, by whom he had Mr. Archbald Camp­bel his Son and Heir, a Gentleman of eminent Learning, and other Accom­plishments: Also by his second Wife Susanna, Daughter of Sir Alex­ander Menzies of Weim, he had two Sons, Mr. Neil Campbel Advocate, and Mr. Alexander Campbel. The Marquess had likewise three Daugh­ters.

1st. Anne, a Lady of excellent Endowments, never married.

2d. Jean, married to Robert first Marquess of Lothian, and had Issue.

3d. Mary, to George Earl of Caith­ness, sans Issue, after his Death, to John Earl of Broadalbin, and had Issue.

The Title of Marquess of Argyle failing by the Forfaulture of this [Page 21] Archbald, his Majesty was graci­ously pleas'd to restore Archbald Lord Lorn his Son, to the Estate, Title, and Precedency formerly enjoy'd by his Ancestors, Earls of Argyle a.

Which Archbald, Earl of Argyle, was constituted Captain of his Maje­sty's Foot Guards, anno 1650, with this Speciality, That tho all Commissions were then given by the Parliament, yet he would not serve without a Commission from the Kingb. After the Deseat of the Royal Army at Worcester, anno 1651, he took Arms for his Majesty's Service, which in­cens'd Oliver Cromwel so much a­gainst him, that tho he granted a Pardon and general Indemnity to the People of Scotland, by his Proclama­tion the 12 of April 1654, yet was he, with several other Loyalists, par­ticularly excepted; notwithstanding of which, with singular Constancy, he preserv'd his Duty and Fidelity to his Majesty inviolated, in the worst Times, would never capitulate, till he had General Midelton's Or­der from the King so to do, bear­ing Date 31 of December 1655c: Then he made his Composition, without any other Engagment than laying down his Arms, whereupon he retired to his own House, that he might live quietly, and retain'd still his Affection and Fidelity to the King; of which his Majesty was so perfectly sensible, that he was pleas'd to make his eminent Loyalty and Zeal toward the Restoration, the one­rous Cause of restoring him to his Fa­ther's Fortune, anno 1663. Not long after he was nam'd a Privy Counselour, and one of the Commissioners of the Tresaury, which for many Years he discharged with great Fidelity, and thro' all Changes appear'd an earnest Espouser of the Protestant Interest: For seeing to what Pass things were like to come, he propos'd in a Committee of Council, that to the Test might be added some Acts against Popery, which was so ill taken, that all methods imagin­able were devis'd to ruin him, which at last was effected, under a Pre­tence of his putting his own Sense and Explanation upon the Test, when he took d it in these Words,

I have consider'd the Test, and am desirous to give Obedience, as far as I can; I am confident, the Parliament never intended to impose contradictory Oaths; and therefore I think no Man can explain it, but for himself, and re­concile it, as it is genuine, and agrees in its own Sence; and I take it so far as it is consistent with it self, and the Protestant Religion: And I do declare, I mean not to bind up my self, in my Station, but in a lawful Way, to endeavour any thing I think for the Ad­vantage of the Church or State, not repugnant to the Protestant Religion, and my Loyalty: And this I under­stand, as part of my Oath.

For which, by the insinuating Per­swasions of some who bore him no good Will, the King was so far in­cens'd against him, that he not only commanded him Prisoner to the Castle of Edinburgh, but gave Order for his Tryal. Being found Guilty of high Treason, he made his E­scape out of the Castle, very dexte­rously, in the Dress of a Lady's Pagee, got over to Holland, whence with a few Men he invaded this Kingdom, 1685, in the Beginning of the Reign of King James VII. a little before the Duke of Monmouth landed in England, f but never having got together a­bove 2000 Men, was soon after totally routed near Kilpatrick, and taken Pri­soner: He was Beheaded at the Cross [Page 22] of Edinburgh the 30 of June 1685, upon his former Sentence. 'Tis said, he compos'd this EPITAPH a few Hours before his Death.

Thou Passenger, that shalt have so much Time,
As view my Grave, and ask what was my Crime:
No Stain of Error, no black Vices brand,
Did me compel to leave my native Land.
Love to my Country, Truth condemn'd to die,
Did force my Hands forgotten Arms to try,
More from Friends Fraud my Fall proceeded hath,
Than Foes, the Thrice they did attempt my Death.
On my Design, the Providence did frown,
Yet GOD at last, will surely raise his own:
Another Hand, with more successful Speed.
Shall raise the Remnant, bruise the Serpent's Head.

This Archbald, Earl of Argyle, married Mary Steuart, Daughter of James 3d. Earl of Murray, by Mar­garet his Wife, Daughter of Alex­ander Earl of Home, by whom he had four Sons, viz.

Archbald late Duke of Argyle.

John Campbel of Mamore, 2d. Son, Member of Parliament for Dunbarton Shire, married ---- Daughter of John Lord Elphingstoun, and has Issue.

Colonel Charles Campbel 3d. Son.

Colonel James Campbel 4th. Son, married Margaret, Daughter of David Lesly, Lord Newark, and has Issue.

Also two Daughters.

Anne, married first to Richard Earl of Lauderdale, and now to Charles Earl of Murray.

Jean, to William Marquess of Lo­thian, and has Issue.

Archbald Lord Lorn his Son, was one of the few Scots Peers that came over from Holland with the Prince of Orange, the late King William, into Britain, anno 1688. He was own'd by the Convention of Estates as Earl of Argyle, before the Forfaulture of his Father was rescinded, which, by The Claim of Right, was declar'd to be A Reproach to the Nation. He was particularly Active to have the Crown established on the Prince and Princess of Orange, as the English had done; which being by a great Majority carried in the House, his Lordship was sent from the Nobi­lity, with other two from the Barons and Burroughs, to offer the Crown in the Name of the said Convention to their Majesties, and tender'd them the Coronation Oath, for which, and many other good Services, upon their Advancement to the Throne of this Realm, he was admitted one of the Privy Council 1st. of May 1689, and anno 1690, made one of the Lords of the Tresaury, and after that Colonel of the Scots Guards of Horse, and one of the extraordinary Lords of the Session, upon the Decease of William Duke of Hamilton, in the Year 1694: And further, in Consideration of his good Services, he was by his said Ma­jesty created into the Dignity and Titles of Duke of Argyle, Marquess of Kintyre and Lorn, Earl of Campbel and Coual, Viscount of Lochow and Glenyla, Lord Innerara, Mull, Morvern, and Tyrie, by Letters Patent, bearing Date at Kensingtoun the 23 of June, 1701. Likeas, he carried over a Re­giment to Flanders for King William's Service, consisting almost, both Of­ficers and Souldiers, of his own Name and Family, who bravely distinguish'd themselves thro' the whole Course of the War.

He married Elisabeth, Daughter of Sir Lionel Talmash of Helingham, by Elisabeth Dutches of Lauderdale, his Wife, Daughter and Heir of Wil­liam Murray Earl of Dysart, and Sister to Lionel now Earl of Dysart, by whom he had Issue, two Sons and a Daughter.

John, the present Duke of Argyle.

Archbald Campbel Earl of Ilay.

Anne, married to James Steuart, 2d. Earl of Bute.

He departing this Life the 28 of September 1703, was succeeded by

John, the present Duke of Argyle, his Son and Heir, who from his Youth, ac­cording to the Rule of his great An­cestors, betook himself to a Mili­tary Life, was Colonel of a Regi­ment of Foot, at the End of the last War, when not full Seveenteen Years of Age, and even then gave signal Proofs of his Valour.

[Page 23] In the Beginning of this War, he was constituted Brigadeer and Colonel of a Regiment of Foot, Major General, and then Lieutenant General in which Characters he has in a very eminent Mannerdistinguish'd himself thro' the whole Course of this present War; was at the Battle of Ramllies, and at the Siege of Menin, of which he took Possession; commanded and took the Fort of Plasandale, and assisted at the Siege of Ostend; was remarkably Active in the Pight at Audenard, and afterward took Possession of Lille, (the Siege of which Town he had assisted in) as also of Ghent and Bruges, and particularly signaliz'd himself in the Campaign 1709, at the Siege of Tournay, and the Battle of Blareignes; In short, there has scarce been a Battle or Siege this War in Flanders, at which he did not assist in Person.

Upon his Father's Decease, he was constituted one of the Lords of Her Majesty's Privy Council, and Cap­tain of the Scots Guards of Horse, and one of the extraordinary Lords of Session, and Knight of the most noble Order of the Thistle, anno 1704.

In the Year 1705, Her Majesty was pleas'd to add to his other Em­ployments, that of Lord High Com­missioner to Represent Her Royal Person in the Parliament, when not above 23 Years of Age: And upon his Return to Court, in Conside­ration of his many signal Services, he was created a Peer of England, by the Title of Baron of Chatham, and Earl of Greenwich.

In 1710, He was appointed Ge­neralissimo of Her Majesty's Forces in Spain, elected Knight of the Garter, and dispatch'd with the Character of Ambassador-Extraordi­nary, and Plenipotentiary to Charles III. of Spain.

His Grace has married Mary, Daughter of Thomas Brown Esq and Niece to Sir Charles Duncomb, late Lord Mayor of London.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st. and 4th. Girony of Eight, Sable and Or, 2d. and 3d. Ar­gent, a Galley with her Oars in Action, supported by two Lyons Rampant, Gules, Crest a Boars Head eraz'd, Or, Motto, Ne Obliviscaris.

Earls of Athole.

AThole had early Earls in the Reign of King Malcolm IV. Malcolm is then Earl of Athole: He out of his Devotion to God, gave in pure Alms to the Monks of Scoon the Church of Logen-mabed, with four Chappels thereunto be­longinga, for the Safety of his Soul, and to the Abbay of Dumfermling, the Tithes of the Church of Mollin, Pro salute animae suae & animae Sponsae suae & Regum Predecessorum suorum ibidem requiescentium, which was rati­fied by King William b. He left Issue,

Henry his Son and Heir, from whom the Title of Earl of Athole came to Alanus Ostiarius Domini Re­gis: For I have found him design'd Earl of Athole, in a Confirmation he made to the Abbacy of Arbroth, of the Wood of Torfeach in Aberdeen-Shire, formerly given by Thomas de Lundin Ostiarius Regis his Father, to that Convent, which King Alex­ander II. ratified by his Charter, the 12th. of October, the 19th. Year of his Reignc.

From this Family the Title of Earl of Athole was transfer'd to Tho­mas of Galloway, by Marriage of Isa­bel, the Heir Female. Patrick Earl of Athole their Son, was burnt in his own Lodging at Haddingtoun, anno 1241d, whereupon his Estate [Page 24] and Title descended to his Mother's Sister, then the Wife of David Hastings, an English Gentlemana, by whom he had one Daughter, married to John de Strathbolgie b. David Earl of Athole, their Successor, was Constable of Scotland, in the Beginning of the Reign of King Robert I. He's so design'd in a Charter granted by that Monarch, erecting the Lands of Tarves into a Regality, in fa­vour of the Monks of Arbroth, 26th. of February 1311c. And another David Earl of Athole, his Successor, who was constituted Governour of Scotland, by Edward Baliol; for whose Service he rais'd an Army, but was totally routed, and himself killed, at the Battle of Kilblain, by the Scots, under the Conduct of Patrick Earl of March, and Sir Andrew Murray, anno 1335. His Estate by Forsalture falling to the Crown, it so continued till King David II. was pleas'd to be­stow both the Estate and Title of Earl of Athole, upon John Campbel, Son of Sir Neil Campbel of Lochow, by the Lady Mary Bruce his Wife, Daugh­ter of Robert Earl of Carrick, and Sister to King Robert Bruce; but he dying without Succession, the Title became extinct by his Death, but did not long so continue, for King Robert II. was pleas'd to revive it again in the Person of Walter Steuart his second Son, by Eupham Ross his Queen in the 5th. Year of his Reign, anno 1375d. He founded the Collegi­ate Church of Methven, anno 1433, which he amply endow'd with Lands and Tithes within his own Territo­ries, for the Salvation of his Soul, according to the Devotion of these Days; and considerably enrich'd himself by the Marriage of Margaret, eldest of the Daughters and Co-Heirs of Sir David Barclay of Brechin, by whom he had David his eldest Son, who died in England, one of the Hostages for the Ransom of King James I. and Alan Steuart, Earl of Caithness, who was killed, fighting bravely in the Service of his Country at the Battle of Innerlochy, anno 1428e.

This Walter Earl of Athole, was the principal Actor in the horrid Murder of King James I. his Nephew, which proceeded (says our Historians) from a Response he had from some of his Highlanders, that before his Death he should be Crown'd in a solemn Assembly. For this horrid and unnatural Crime, the Sentence of Death was executed upon him, in a most exemplary Manner, famous over all Europe; and his Estate was annexed to the Crown.

STEUART, Earl of Athole.

THE First of this Illustrious Branch of the Family of Steu­art, who attain'd this Dignity, was, John Steuart Son and Heir of Sir James Steuart, for Distinction call'd The black Knight of Lorn, by Jean his Wife, Dowager of King James I. and Daughter of John Earl of Somer­set; which James was created Earl of Athole by his Uterine Brother, King James II.f

In the Reign of King James III. he was constituted his Majesty's Lieu­tenant, against the Lord of the Isles, then in Rebellion; and by his Valour and Conduct, he reduc'd him to the King's Obedienceg: For which signal Service, he had thereupon a special Grant of several Lands, and [Page 25] this Motto added to his Arms, Furth Fortune and fill the Fetters, in 1457, he was one of the Conservators of the Peace with England, and in 14 [...] was join'd in Commission with seve­ral others, to treat of a Peace with the English, which they then con­cluded. He married first Beatrix, Daughter of Archibald fifth Earl of Douglas, by whom he had a Daugh­ter Elisabeth, married to Patrick Lord Gray.

2dly. Eleanor Sinclair, Daughter of William Earl of Orkney, by whom he had John his Successor, 2d. Andrew, Bishop of Caithness, and Daughters.

Jean, married to Alexander Earl of Huntly, and had Issue.

Catharine, to John Lord Forbes, and had Issue.

Isobel, to John Earl of Lennox, and had Issue.

Elisabeth, to Alexander Robertson of Strowan, and had Issue.

He departing this Life 19 Septem­ber 1512; was succeeded by John his Son and Heir, who was killed at Floudoun 9 September 1513, leaving Issue by Mary his Wife, Daughter of Colin Earl of Argyle: John his Son and Heir, and Daughters, Janet mar­ried first to Alexander, Master of Sutherland, and had Issue. Then to Hugh Kennedy of Girvanmains. And 3dly. To Henry Steuart Lord Meth­ven, and had Issue. Helen to John Lord Lindsay, and had Issue. Elisa­beth, to John Mackenzie of Kintail, Ancestor to the Earl of Seaforth.

John, 3d. Earl of Athole married Grisal Daughter and Coheir of Sir John Ratray of That-Ilk, by whom he had

John, 4th. Earl of Athole; his Son who was on the King's side, in the Mi­nority of James VI. He was constitut­ed Chancellour 19 April 1578, in the Room of John Lord Glamis deceas­ed, and continu'd in that Office till his Death, which happen'd 24 April 1579. He was married to Margaret Daughter of Malcolm Lord Fleeming, Widow both of Robert Master of Montrose, and of Thomas Master of Erskine, by whom he had Issue, John, his Successor, and Daughters.

Elisabeth, married to Hugh Lord Lovat, and had Issue. 2dly. To Robert Steuart Earl of March. And 3dly. She became the Wife of James Steuart, then called Earl of Arran.

Grisal, to David Earl of Craw­furd, and had Issue.

Ann, to Francis Earl of Errol, sans Issue.

Jean, to Duncan Campbel of Glen­urchie, and had Issue.

John, fifth Earl of Athole, was one of the Privy Council to King James VI. anno 1590. He married Mary Ruthven, Daughter of William Earl of Gourie, by whom he had Three Daughters.

Dorothea, married to William Earl of Tillibairn, whose Son John in her Right, came afterward to possess this Honour.

Mary, to James Steuart Lord Inner­meath, sans Isue.

Jean, to Henry Steuart Lord St. Colme, and had Issue.

He departed this Life 18 Novem­ber 1594a, whereby the Honour became Extinct, but did not so con­tinue two Years, when King James was pleased to revive it again in the Person of James Lord Innermeath, by Letters Patent, bearing date 13 April 1596b, but he dying without Issue 1605c, the Title of Athole came to Dorothea, Countess of Tillibairn.

MURRAY Duke of Athole.

THIS Noble Family is of great Antiquity, in vice comitatu de Perth, and descends from Sir William Murray, Son of Sir Malcolm [Page 26] Murray Knight. He obtained the Barony of Tillibairn, by marrying of Adda, Daughter of Malyse, Senescal of Strathern, as is clear from an Origi­nal Charter I have seen, bearing Date the Thursday preceeding the Feast of St. Simon and St. Jude, Anno Dom. 1282a. This Sir William was one of the Scots Barons on the Part of John Baliol, who were call'd to Berwick when King Edward was to determine the Controversy about the Crown of this Realm then in Dispute; betwixt Robert de Bruce, and the said John de Baliol, anno 1292b. By the said Adda his Wife he left Issue Sir Andrew his Son and Heir, who gave in pure Alms to the Monks of the Abby of Inchaffry, an Annual Sum payable out of the Barony of Tillibairn, which had formerly been in Dis­pute between him and the said Con­vent, and that for the Health of his Soul, bearing Date on St. Bean's Day, (i. e. 16 December) 1331c. This is that Sir Andrew who took part with Edward Baliol, for which disloyal Action his Estate was forfeited, and he be­headed at Perth in 1332, leaving Issue.

William his Son, who obtained a Grant of the Barony of Tillibairn, u­pon the Resignation of Adda de Mo­ravia, his Grand-mother, in which Sir William de Montefix Justitiario Scotiae ex boreali par [...]e aquae de Forth, is a Witness. This William had Issue.

Sir Walter Murray of Tillibairn his Son and Heir, who dying circa Annum 1390, left Issue by Margaret le Baird his Wife.

Sir David Murray his Son and Heir, who was knighted by King James I. He founded the Collegiate Church of Tillibairn in Strathern, dedicated in Honour of our Blessed Saviour, and dyed about 1446 leaving Issue, Wil­liam his Successor, and a Daughter Marion married to Malcolm Drummond of Cargill, the Ancestor of the Fami­ly of Perth.

Which William, received the Ho­nour of Knighthood from King James III. to whom he faithfully adhered, in Consideration whereof he was constituted Stewart of Strathern, anno 1482, which was ratified by Act of Parliament, in 1491d. He mar­ried Mary Daughter to the Earl Marishal, by whom he had

Sir John, who dyed without Issue.

William, his Successor.

The 3d. Sir Andrew Murray of Arn­gosk, ancestor to the present Viscount of Stormont.

4. David Murray of Strathgeth.

And Christian, a Daughter mar­ried to George Lord Seton, and had Issue.

He departed this Life in a good advanced Age, about the Year 1509, was succeeded by William his Son and Heir, who married Katharin Daughter of Sir Duncan Campbel of Glenurchie, by whom he had Issue.

William, his Successor.

2d. Alexander.

3d. James.

And Daughters, 1. Anabella married to John Earl of Mar, and had Issue. 2. Eu­pham first to Robert Steuart of Rosyth, then to Robert Pitcairn Commenda­tor of Dunfermling, Secretary of State in the Minority of King James VI. 3. Katharin, to Robert Morray of Aber­cairny, 4. Jean to James Henderson of Fordell, and had Issue; he depar­ting this Life anno 1562, was suc­ceeded by

William his Son and Heir, who was of the Privy Council to Queen Mary, and Comptroller of Her Ma­jesty's Houshold, upon the breaking out of the Civil War in that Reign. He was one of the Barons who entred into that memorable Association to Defend the young Prince King James, and to prosecute Bothwell for the Mur­der of of the King; yet (says Sir James Melvil) He always retain'd a dutiful respect to Her Majesty, and only entred into the Association for [Page 27] Safety of the young Prince, and Punish­ment of the Kings Murder. In 1572. he was joined in Commission with Sir Alexander Erskin to be Governour to the young King, and joint Keeper of the Castle of Stirling, and dyed 1583, leaving Issue by Agnes his Wife, Daughter of William Earl of Montrose, John his Successor, Alexander, who was Colonel of a Regiment in the Netherlands.

Margaret, married to Sir Robert Bruce of Clackmanan, and had Issue.

Which Sir John Murray of Tilli­bairn was one of the Privy Council to King James VI. he being a well deserving Person, and enjoying a very ample Fortune, was by the Fa­vour of the said King, advanced to the Dignity of Lord Murray of Tilli­bairn, 25 April 1604, and July 10 1606, to the Dignity of Earl of Til­libairn. He married Katharin Daugh­ter of David Lord Drummond, by whom he had Issue.

1. William his Successor, 2. Sir Pa­trick Murray Knight of the Bath, and one of the Gentlemen of his Majesty's Bed-Chamber, and afterward Earl of Tillibairn. 3d. Mungow Viscount of Stormont, who dyed without Issue. Likewise several Daughters.

Anne, married to Patrick Earl of Kinghorn, and had Issue.

Lilias, married to Sir John Grant of That-ilk, and had Issue.

Margaret, to James Hadden of Glen­eagles, and had Issue.

Katharine to David Ross of Balna­goun.

William Earl of Tillibairn his Son, being accidentally in the Town of Perth, 5 August, 1600 fortuned to be the happy Rescuer of his Majesty King James VI. from a Tumult of the Citizens, after the Death of John Earl of Gourie; for which signal Ser­vice, he obtained a special Grant of the Sheriffship of Perth-shire, which still continues in his Family.

He married Dorothea Steuart eldest Daughter of John the fifth and last Earl of Athole, by whom he had John his Son and Heir, who succeeded to the Title, Dignity, and Precedency of Athole, (he then resigning the Honour of Tillibairn), which John Earl of Athole, faithfully adhered to King Charles I. In the Beginning of his unhappy Troubles he raised his Men for his Majesty's Service, against the the Marquess of Argyle, anno 1641, and dyed 1642, leaving Issue by Jean his Wife, Daughter of Sir Duncan Campbel of Glenurchie, John his Suc­cessor, Mungow who died unmarried, and Anne married to James Earl of Tillibardin, but had no Issue.

Which John Earl of Athole, in De­fence of King Charles II. loyally took up Arms, and had several En­counters with the English Usurpers in the North of Scotland in 1653, when not above 18 Years of Age, for which he suffered in the common Calamity with other Loyalists; in Consideration whereof, upon his Majesty's Restoration, he was con­stituted Justice General in 1661, Lord Privy Seal, 1672; Captain of his Majesty's Guards, and one of the extraordinary Lords of the Session. And further, in Regard of his eminent Services, was created Marquess of Athole, by Letters Patent, bearing date 17 Feb. 1676.

Upon K. James's Accession to the Throne; anno 1685, His Majesty, confiding much in his Loyalty, com­missioned him to go against the Earl of Argyle, then in Arms in the West, where he contributed much to the suppressing of that Rebellion; for which signal Service he was constituted Lieutenant of Argyle-Shire, and in anno 1687, was elected Knight of the most noble Order of the Thistle.

This noble Lord married Aemilia Stanly, Daughter of that valiant and loyal Nobleman James Earl of Dar­by, by whom he had Issue,

John, the present Duke.

Charles, Earl of Dunmore.

Lord James Murray of Dowally, who [Page 28] married Anne Daughter of Sir Robert Murray of Cockpool, and has Issue,

William Lord Nairn, fourth Son.

Lord Edward Murray 5th. Son, mar­ried Katharin Daughter of Skeen of Halyards, and has Issue, and a Daughter Aemilia married to Hugh Lord Lovat, and had Issue. He departed this Life 6 May 1703, was inter'd in the Vestry of the Cathedral Church of Dunkeld under a sumptuous Monu­ment of black and white Marble.

John, the present Duke of Athole has been imploy'd in some of the most eminent Offices in the State, both in this and the former Reign, which he still discharged with the utmost Fidelity. In 1695 he was made Secretary of State, and by Let­ters Patent, bearing date 27 July 1697, created Earl of Tillibairn, in Consideration of his good Services, as well as his near Relation in Blood to King William, and the same Year was Lord High Commissioner to the Parliament.

Upon Her Majesties Accession to the Throne, he was nam'd a Privy Counsellour, and 8 December 1702. constituted Lord Privy Seal, and the 30 April 1703, created Duke of Athole, and in 1704, elected Knight of the most noble Order of St. Andrew.

In the Parliament 1706, which concluded the Union of the Crowns, he was one of the Peers who made a very strong and vigorous Opposition to it, and on the 4 November, when the first Article of the Treaty, was Enacted and Ratified, his Grace enter'd this Protestation, which from the Records of Parliament I transcribed.

I John Duke of Athole, Protest for my self and all others who shall adhere to this my Protestation, that an Incor­porating Union of the Crown of Scotland with the Crown of England, and that both Nations should be represented by one and the some Parliament, as con­tain'd in the Articles of the Treaty of Union is contrary to the Honour, Inte­rest, fundamental Laws and Constituti­ons of this Kingdom, the Birth-right of the Peers, the Privileges of the Ba­rons and Burgesses, and Act 10. Parl. 8. Ja. 6. it is ordain'd, that none of the Leiges presume to take upon them to im­pugn the Dignity and Authority of the Three Estates of Parliament, or to seek or procure the Diminution of the Power and Authority of the said Three Estates under the pain of Treason, and is con­trary to the Claim of Right, Property and Liberty of the Subject. And the 3d. Act of Her Majesty's Parliament, 1703, it is thereby declared high Treason in any of the Subjects of this Kingdom to quarrel or impugn, or endea­vour by writing, or malicious and advis­ed speaking, or any other open Act or Deed to innovate the Claim of Right in any Article thereof.

Likeas on the 7 January, 1707, when the 22d. Article of the Treaty of Union in relation to the Number of Representatives for Scotland in the Parliament of Great-Britain, came to be debated, the Duke gave in this Protest, which in Justice to his Grace I could not forbear to insert.

Forasmuchas the Peers of this Realm who are Hereditary Members of Her Majesty's great Council and Parliament do hereby become Elective, and so Her Majesty is deprived of Her born Counsellours, and the Peers of their Birth-right: And whereas at present they are 160 in Number, they are by this Article reduced to 16, which 16 are to be joined with the House of Lords in England, whose Number at present consists of above 180, whereby its plain, that the Scots Peers share in the Le­gislative and Judicative Powers in the British Parliament is very unequal, to that of the English, tho the one be Re­presentative of as Free and Indepen­dent a Nation as the other, and is therefore a plain Forfaulture of the Peer­age of this Kingdom, contrary to the [Page 29] Honour of the Monarchy, disgraceful to the Kingdom, and prejudicial to the Ba­rons and Burrows of this Realm.

This noble Lord married first the Lady Katharine Hamilton, Daughter of William and Anne Duke & Dutches of Hamilton, a Lady of incomparable prudence, and a singular example of Virtue and Piety, by whom he had Issue,

John Marquess of Tillibairn, a Youth of great Hopes and Expecta­tion, who was killed at the Battle of Mons, 31 of August 1709, to the great Grief of his noble Relations,

William Marquess of Tillibairn.

Lord James

Lord Charles

Lord George

Lord Basil

Lady Susanna All unmarried.

2dly. He married Mary Daughter of William Lord Ross, by whom he has Issue a Son John, an Infant.

ARMS

Quarterly 1st. and 4th Azure, three Molets Argent within a double Tres­sure floured and Counter floured Or, 2d. and 3d. quarterly, 1st. and 4th. pale of six Sable and Or, 2d: and 3d Or, a Fess Cheque Azure and Argent, suppor­ted on the Dexter with a Lyon Rampant Gules coloured Azure, charged with three Molets Argent, and on the Sinister with a Savage proper, wreathed about the Loins with Lawrel, Crest a Demi Savage, holding in his Dexter Hand a Key Or, and in his Sinister a Dagger pro­per, with this Motto, Furth Fortune and fill the Fetters.

ARBUTHNET, Viscount of Arbuthnet.

THIS Family hath been of great Antiquity in the Shire of Kincardin, and long pos­sessed of the Barony of Arbuthnet there. The Name hath been origi­nally writen Aberbothenoth, Duncan de Aberbothenoth is Witness in a Grant by King Alexander II. to the Abbacy of Aberbroth, anno 1242a.

In the Time of Alexander III. Hugh de Aberbothenoth, gave in pure alms to the Monks of Aberbroth the Patronage of the Church of Garvoch pro salute animae suae, Anno Dom. 1282b, and Philip de Aberbothenoth Do­minus ejusdem, was a Benefactor to the Church of Aberdeen, in anno 1367c, in the Time of King David II. He married Margaret Daughter of Sir James Douglass of Dalkeith d, from whom by lineal Succession, was Sir Robert Arbuthnet of that Ilk, who manifesting his Loyalty to K. Charles I. was by that Monarch created Vis­count of Arbuthnet 16 November, 1641. He married first Marion Daugh­ter to David first Earl of Southesk, by whom he had Robert his Son and Heir, and by Margaret his second Wife, Daughter of Simon Lord Lovat he likewise had Issue, and dying anno 1659e, was succeeded by Robert his Son and Heir, who married Mary Daughter of William Earl Marishal, by whom he had Robert, who succeeded him in his Estate and Honour; also by Katharine his second Wife, Daugh­ter of John Gordon of Pitlurg, he had Issue John Arbuthnet of Fordon, Alex­ander, who changed his Sirname to Maitland, by his Marriage with the Heretrix of Pitrichie, he's now one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Ex­chequer [Page 30] in Scotland, 3d Thomas; also several Daughters.

This Lord dying anno 1684, was succeeded by Robert his Son, who de­parted this Life in 1692, leaving Issue by Anne his Wife, Daughter of George Earl of Sutherland, Robert his Son and Heir, who died unmarried anno 1710, and John the present Viscount of Arbuthnet who married Jean Daughter of William Morison of Prestongrange.

ARMS.

Azure a Crescent betwixt three Stars Argent supported by two Dragons, Crest a Peacock's Head proper, Motto Laus Deo.

CUMMIN, Lord of Badenoch.

THIS noble and spreading Fa­mily of Norman Extractiona, is of very great Antiquity in this Realm. The first I have found mentioned, is, Comes Robertus Cummin, who was killed at the Battle of An­wick, anno 1609b. The next is Wil­liam Cummin, who was Lord high Chancellor of Scotland, in the Reign of King David I. anno 1142, he left Issue Sir William, who was Chamber­lain to King William c, and married Hexilda Grand child of Donald King of Scotland d, by whom he had William, Father of Sir Richard Cummin, who gave in pure Alms to the Monks of Kelso the Church of Lyncudric, with half a Carrucate of Land there­unto belonging, pro salute Henrici Comitis Domini sui qui obiit 1152e: He left Issue three Sons,

Sir John of Badenoch.

Sir Walter Earl of Monteith.

Sir William first Earl of Buchan.

Which Sir John for Distinction cal­led The Reid Cummin, had Issue Sir John and three Daughters, the first married to Sir Godfrey de Murray, the 2d to Alexander of Argyle, Lord of Lorn, the 3d to Sir VVilliam Murray of Bothwell.

Sir John Cummin of Badenoch, usual­ly designed The Black Cummin, was chosen one of the six Governours of Scotland, anno 1286, upon the Death of K. Alexander III. In 1290 he was one of the Competitors for the Crown on the decease of Queen Margaret, as Son and Heir of John Son and Heir of Richard, Son and Heir of VVilliam, Son and Heir of Hexilde, Daughter and Heir of Bethock Daughter and Heir of Donald, some time King of Scotland f: He left Issue by Marjory Daughter of John, and Sister to John Baliol once King of this Realm, John his Son and Heirg. This is that John Cummin, who in 1305 entered into a solemn Treaty with Robert Bruce Earl of Carrick, for freeing their Country from English Servitude, which he persidiously discovered to King Edward of England, for which King Robert Bruce killed him in the Church of Drumfrise, 10 February 1306; by whose Death the chief branch of this noble Family expi­red.

LINDSAY, Earl of Balcarass.

THIS Family descends from Mr. John Lindsay of Balcarass, 2d Son of David Lindsay of Edzle, (Earl of Crawfurd,) by Janet [Page 31] his Wife, Daughter of Sir John Camp­bel of Calder.

Which Mr. John being a Man of great Parts and Learning, more e­specially in the Laws, he was con­stituted one of the Senators of the College of Justice in 1584a, and after some time, one of the Commis­sioners of the Thesauryb, and Se­cretary of State, anno 1596, in room of the Lord Thirlstane deceased; all which Offices he enjoyed with an universal Reputation till his Death. In 1598c, he married Margaret, Daughter of . . . . . . Guthry of Lunnen d, by whom he had Sir David his Son and Heir, and Daughters;

Janet married to Sir John Lindsay of Benholm.

Margaret to Sir Alexander Strachan of Thornfoun, and had Issue.

Mary to John Brown of Fordel, and had Issue.

Which Sir David was created Lord Lindsay of Balcarass, by K. Charles I. the 7 June 1633, immediately pre­ceeding his Majesty's Coronation. He married Sophia Daughter of Ale­xander Earl of Dunfermling, by whom he had Alexander his Successor, and two Daughters, Sophia married to Sir Robert Moray, Justice Clerk in the Reign of King Charles II. of the Fa­mily of Abercairny, but had no Issue. Isabel married to Thomas Boyd of Pinkhill, in vice comitatu de Air, sans Issue.

Which Alexander, Lord Balcarass, being a Person of great Prudence, ex­amplary Loyalty, and singular Affecti­on to King Charles II. was by his Majesty's Favour raised to the Digni­ty of Earl of Balcarass, in 1651. U­pon the depression of the Royal cause in Scotland, anno 1654, he fol­lowed the King into Foreign Parts, during the Usurpation, and dyed in Holland in the beginning of the Year 1660, upon him the famous Poet Mr. Cowley wrote this Epitaph,

Balcaras who but th' other Day,
Did all our Love and our Respect command,
At whose great Parts, we all amaz'd did stand,
Is from a Storm, alas! cast suddenly on Land, &c.

He left Issue by Anne his Wife, Daughter of Colin Earl of Seaforth, two Sons, Charles who succeeded him in the Earldom, but dyed unmarried anno 1662, and Colin the present Earl: also three Daughters, 1st. Anne, who embraced the Romish Perswasion and dyed a Nun in France, Sophia married to Colonel Charles Campbel, Son to the late Earl of Argyle, and Henrietta to Sir Duncan Campbel of Auchinbraick, and had Issue.

Colin the present Earl was one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King Charles II. and King James VII. and one of the Commissioners of the Thesaury, he married first Margaret Daughter of Lewis de Nassaw Lord Beverwart in Holland. 2dly. Jean Daugh­ter of David Earl of Northesk, by whom he had one Daughter Anne, married to Alexander Earl of Kelly, and had Issue. To his 3d. Wife, he mar­red Jean Daughter of VVilliam Earl of Roxburgh, by whom he had Colin Lord Cumberland, who dyed unmarried in 1708, and a Daughter Countess of VVigtoun. 4thly. He married Mar­garet Daughter of James Earl of Lon­don, by whom he had Issue,

Alexander Lord Cumberland.

James in Her Majesty's Sea Service.

Lady Elisabeth.

Lady Eleanor, all unmarried.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st. and 4th. Gules, a Fess Cheque Argent and Azure, 2d and 3d. Or, a Lyon Rampant Gules surmounted of a Riban Sable within a border, Azure, charged with Stars Or, supporters two Lyons Sejant, Crest a Tent, Motto, Astra Castra, &c.

BALLENDEN, Lord Ballenden.

THIS Family began its Rise in the Reign of King James V. at which time Thomas Ballen­den of Auchinoule was Justice Clerk, and Director of the Chancery, anno 1541a, he dying anno 1546, left Issue; Sir John his Son and Heir, who was Justice Clerk in the Reign of Queen Mary and King James VI. for upwards of twenty Years: He mar­ried Barbara Daughter of . . . . . . . Kennedy of . . . . . . and left Issue Sir Lewis his Son and Heir and Mr. Adam, Doctor of Divinity, first Bishop of Dunblain, and thereafter of Aber­deen.

Which Sir Lewis was made one of the Senators of the College of Ju­stice, anno 1584, he married Marga­ret Daughter of William Lord Living­ston, and left Issue Sir James his Son and Heir, who married Margaret Daughter of William Ker of Cesfurd, Sister to Robert first Earl of Roxburgh, by whom he had Sir William his Suc­cessor, and a Daughter Margaret mar­ried to Henry Lord Cardross.

Which Sir William having given many signal testimonies of his Loyal­ty to King Charles II. during the Usurpation, in Consideration thereof upon his Majesty's Restoration, he was dignified with the Honour of Lord Ballenden, by Letters Patent bearing date 10 June 1661, and the same Year he was constituted Thesau­rer Depute, and one of the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council, but dying unmarried, he made over his Estate, and got his Title of Lord conveyed to John Ker 4th. Son of William Earl of Roxburgh, who thereupon changed his Name to Ballenden; he married . . . . Mure Daughter to the Earl of Droghe­da in the Kingdom of Ireland, Widow of William Earl of Dalhousy, by whom he had the present Lord, who suc­ceeded his Father in the Honour u­pon his Death, anno 1706.

ARMS.

Gules a Stags Head couped and at­tired with ten Tynes betwixt three cross Croslets, all within a double Tressure Counterflour'd Or.

ELPHINSTON, Lord Balmerino,

THE First of this collateral Branch, raised to the Dignity of Peerage, was Sir James El­phinston 3d Son of Robert Lord Elphin­ston, by Elisabeth Daughter of Sir John Drummond of Innerpeffery, and of Janet his Wife, natural Daughter to King James IV.

Which Sir James having studied the Laws, in short time became so highly esteemed for his Abilities, that he was constituted one of the Sena­tors of the College of Justice, in the Year 1586b, in 1595 one of the Lords of the Thesaury, then called The Octavians c, and Secretary of State anno 1598 in room of John Lind­say of Balcaras deceased: also President of the Session, upon the promotion of Alexander Earl of Dunfermling to be Chancellor, in 1605. In all which Imployments he deported himself with such Learning, Judgment and Sufficiency, that King James, soon after his accession to the Crown of [Page 33] England, created him Lord Balmerino, by Letters Patent, bearing date 25 April 1604, being then appointed one of the Commissioners on the part of Scotland to treat of a nearer Union with England, he took to Wife, first Sarah Daughter of Sir John Monteith of Carse, by whom he had John his Son and Heir, and 2dly. Marjory Daughter of Hugh Maxwell of Tyling, by whom he had James Lord Couper, also two Daughters, Anne married to Andrew Lord Frazer, and had Issue, and Mary to John Homilton of Blair, and had Issue, he departing this Life in anno 1612a, was succeeded by John his Son and Heir, a Person like­wise of great Parts and Learning, as appears by the Part he acted in the Reign of King Charles I. whereof Bishop Guthry in his Memoirs gives a full Account: He married Anne Daughter of Sir Thomas Ker of Fernie­hirst, Sister to Andrew Lord Jedburgh, and to Robert Earl of Somerset and dying anno 1649, by the said Anne his Wife left Issue,

John his Son and Heir, who dyed the 10th. of June 1704, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife Daughter to John Earl of Loudon, John his Son and Heir.

Which John, the present Lord Bal­merino, was one of the Peers, who in 1706, opposed the Union with Eng­land in the Terms of the Treaty then before the House, tho the Matter was then concluded. In 1710 he was made General of the Mint in place of the Earl of Lauderdale deceased: and Sheriff of Edinburgh Shire, then in Her Majesty's Hands, by the Death of William Earl of Dalhousie: and e­lected one of 16 Peers of Scotland to the Parliament of Great Britain, also in 1711 he was named one of the Commissioners for executing the Of­fice of Chamberlain, which he at pre­sent enjoys.

This worthy Lord married first Christian Daughter of Hugh Earl of Eglington, by whom he had Hugh, who was killed at the Seige of Lisle, anno 1708, James now Master of Bal­merino, also two Daughters;

Margaret married to Sir John Pre­ston of Prestounhall, and had Issue.

Jean to Francis Stuart Esq Bro­ther to the Earl of Murray, and has Issue.

Secondly. Anne Daughter of Dr. Ar­thur Ross Arch-Bishop of St. Andrews, by whom he has

Arthur.

Alexander.

Anne, all unmarried.

ARMS.

Argent a Chiveron Sable, charged with three Buckles of the sield betwixt three Boars Heads erazed Gules b, supporters two Griffons proper, Crest a Serpent stinging a Dove, Motto, Pruden­tia fraudis nescia.

OGILVY, Lord Banff.

THE Progenitor of this Fami­ly was Sir Walter Ogilvy of Dunlugass, Son of Sir Walter Ogilvy of Boyn by Margaret his Wife, one of the Daughters and Coheirs of of Sir James Edmonston of That­ilkec.

This Sir Walter acquired a fair E­state by the Marriage of Alison, one of the Daughters and Coheirs of Pa­trick Hume of Fastcastle, tempore Jacobi [...]arti, he left Issue.

George Ogilvy of Dunlugass his Son and Heir, who married Beatrix Daugh­ter of George Lord Seaton, by whom he had Walter his Successor, and a [Page 34] Daughter married to Sir Alexander Frazer of Philorth, he departed this Life anno 1612, in the uncommon Age of 105, upon him Dr. Johnston a wrote this Epitaph.

Vixit Olympides ter septem Banfius aetas,
Ter fuit illustri posteritate minor:
Virtutes numera pancos liquise nepotes,
Cum periis pancos evoluisse dies.

Sir Walter Ogilvy of Dunlugass his Son, married Helen Daughter of Sir John Urquhart of Cromarty, by whom he had George his Son and Heir, who was created Baronet by King Charles I. 30 July 1627: He signalized his Loyalty and Valour at the Bridge of Dee in his Majesty's behalf against the Covenanters, under the Conduct of James Earl of Montrose, an. 1639, and continuing firm in his Loyalty in the time of the Civil Wars, was in respect thereof raised to the Dignity of Lord Banff, by Letters Patent, bearing date 31 of August 1642. He married first Helen Daughter of Sir Alexander Irvin of Drum, by whom he had a Daughter Helen, married to James Earl of Airly, and had Issue. 2dly. Mary Daughter of Sir Alexander Su­therland of Duffus, by whom he had Issue George his Son and Heir, who succeeded him upon his Death, in 1663, he took to Wife Agnes Daughter of Alexander Lord Halker­toun, by whom he had George the pre­sent Lord, and Sir Alexander Ogilvy of Forglen, created Baronet 29 June 1701, and one of the Senators of the College of Justice in 1706.

Which George married . . . . . . . Daughter of William Earl Marishal, by whom he has George Master of Banff, who married Helen Daughter of Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall, one of the Senators of the College of Ju­stice.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st. and 4th. Argent a Lyon passant, guardant, Gules, crown'd with an imperial Crown, Or, 2d and 3d. Argent three Papingoes Vert.

HAMILTON, Lord Bargeny.

DERIVES his Descent from Sir John Hamilton natural Son of John Marquess of Hamilton. This Sir John acquired a fair Estate in Carrick, which he trans­mitted to his Posterity, and left Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Mr. Alexander Campbel Bishop of Brechin, (a Son of the Family of Ar­kinlass,) Sir John his Successor, also several Daughters,

Katharine married to Sir James Drummond of Machany, ancestor to the present Viscount of Strathallan.

Helen to Sir James Somervel of Camnethan, and had Issue.

. . . . to Sir William Weir of Stonbyres, but had no Issue.

Mary to Alexander Cleland of that-Ilk, and had Issue.

Sir John Hamilton of Bargeny, the 2d. of this Family, was by the boun­ty and favour of King Charles I. created into the Dignity of Lord Bar­geny, anno 1639b, in 1648. He cordially put himself in Arms with o­thers his Majesty's loyal Subjects, in order to rescue him, then a Prisoner in the Isle of Wight. After the Murder of his Sovereign, he firmly adhered to King Charles II. for which he was forfeited by Oliver Cromwel, and suf­fered diverse other Hardships.

He married Jean Daughter of William Marquess of Douglass, by whom he had William his Successor, and four Daughters.

1st. Margaret married to Sir John Kennedy of Colzean, and had Issue, and [Page 35] thereafter to Sir David Ogilvy of Clova, and had Issue.

2d. Anne to Sir Patrick Houston of that-Ilk, and had Issue.

3d. Katharine to Mr. William Cuning­ham of Enterkin, and had Issue.

4th. Marjory to William Baillie of Lamingtoun, sans Issue. He dying anno . . . . was succeeded by William his Son and Heir, who married Mary Daughter of William Earl of Glencairn, by whom he had John Master of Bar­geny, who dyed in the Lifetime of his Father leaving Issue by . . . . . his Wife, Daughter of Sir Robert Sinclair of Lochermackhouse, one Daughter Joanna married to Sir Robert Dalrymple of North-Berwick Junior, and has Issue, William his Successor, and Nicolas married to Sir Alexander Hope of Carse, and had Issue.

Which William late Lord Bargeny dying anno 1711, left Issue by . . . . . his first Wife, Daughter of Sir James Primrose of Carringtoun, one Daugh­ter Grisal unmarried, and by Marga­ret his second Wife Daughter of Ro­bert Dundass of Arniston, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, James now Lord Bargeny, a Child very young.

ARMS.

The quarter'd Coat of the Family of Hamilton with a suitable Difference.

DOUGLAS Viscount of Belhaven.

THE First who derived any Honour from this Place, was Sir Robert Douglas of Spot, Son of Malcolm Douglas of Mains, in vice-comitatu de Dunbarton lineally descended of Nicol Douglas a Son of the Family of Dalkeith in King Robert II's timea.

This Sir Robert was at first a Page of Honour to Prince Henry, and then Master of his Horse. Upon the Death of that excellent Prince, he was made one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-chamber to the King, and con­tinued in the same Office to King Charles I. by whom he was also con­stituted Master of the Houshold, and one of the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council; And finally, in Re­compense of all his acceptable Ser­vices he was by Letters Patent bea­ring date 24 June 1633, created Vis­count of Belhaven b, the Honour being limited to the Heirs Male of his Body. He married Nicolas Daugh­ter to Robert Moray of Abercair­ny, but dying without Issue 14 Janu­ary 1639, he was interr'd in the Vestry of the Abby Church of Holy rood-house, where there's erected a Monument over him with his Statue in Alabaster as big as the Life, with this Epitaph, wherein most of his remarkable Acti­ons are taken notice of.

QƲod Reliquum apud nos est hic conditur Ro­berti Vicecomitis de Belhaven, Baronis de Spot, &c. Regi Carolo a secretioribus consiliis, & inter familiares intimi; quippe qui & prius Henrico Valliae gratissimus, ejusque stabulis prae­fectus erat: Illo vero fatis cedente, fratri Carolo, nunc rerum potito, in quaesturam Domus adscitus est, singulari favoris gradu acceptus, re & honori­bus auctus. In juventute Nicolaae Moraviae Abercarniae Comarchae natae ad octodecim non am­plius menses, [...]nicae uxoris in puerperio simul cum faetu extinctae, lectissimo, consortio fruebatur. Ingravescente senectute ab aulico strepitu se sub­trabens in patriam reversus est. Archibaldum & Robertum Duglassios Equites auratos, primaevi fratris filios, terris & bonis, praeter quae Testamen­to legavit aequa lance divisis haered [...]s seripsit; qui memoriae ejus gratitudinis suae pignus hoc monu­mentum poni curarunt.

Ingenium, quod literis cultura non implevit, sagacitate Natura supplevit. Indolis bonitate & Candore, nulli cessit. Facile succendi, at, dum loquimur, facilius defervescere, ei, in moribus, quod aeque ab omnibus vix acciperetur, unicum erat. Fide, in Regem; Pietate, in Patriam; Of­ficiis, in Amicos; Charitate, in Egenos, nulli so­cundus: Cui, in Prosperis, modus & Comitas; In Adversis, Constantia & Magnanimitas, ad su­premum usque diem, invaluere. Obiit Edin­burgi prid. Idus Januarii, anno, ab Incarnati­one Messiae, supra MDCxxix; aetatis vero, ultra Clymactericum magnum, tertio.

HAMILTON, Lord Belhaven.

AMONGST those who pro­fessed the Sense of their Duty and Fidelity to his Majesty King Charles I. in the time of his Distress, was Sir James Hamilton of Broomhill, in whose Defence he Ioyally took up Arms and marched into England with the Scots Army, under the Conduct of James Duke of Hamilton, in 1648, being some time before created Lord Belhaven: He married Margaret natu­ral Daughter to James Marquess of Hamilton, by whom he had three Daughters,

Margaret married to Sir Samuel Baillie of Lamingtoun, and had Issue.

Anne to Sir Robert Hamilton of Sil­vertounhill, and had Issue.

Elisabeth to Alexander Viscount of Kingstoun, he departing this Life in 1679, the Honour devolved upon John Hamilton Son to Sir Robert Hamilton of Presmanan, proceeding on his Resignation some Years before.

Which John Lord Belhaven, I find did particularly signalize himself both in the Parliament 1681 and 1685, discovering then a firm Resolution to support the Protestant Religion. In 1689 he assisted at the meeting of the Scots Nobility at London, and concur­red with them in addressing the Prince of Orange to call a Convention of the Estates in Scotland for the set­ling the Government there.

His Lordship was present at the Convention, where he contributed much to the setling the Crown upon King William and Queen Mary, who upon their Accession thereto, consti­tuted him one of their Privy Council, and one of the Commissioners for exe­cuting the Office of Register.

Upon Her Majesty's accession to the Throne, he was named a Privy Counsellour, and after that, one of the Commissioners of the Thesaury, which he executed with no little Ap­probation.

In the Parliament 1706, when the Union came to be debated, he joined with those who opposed it, and on this Subject made several learned and elaborate Speeches containing his Reasons, for which Posterity will celebrate his Name with Honour as a Patriot of his Country.

He married Margaret Daughter of Sir Robert Hamilton of Silvertoun­hill, by Anne Daughter of John Lord Belhaven, by whom he had only two Sons,

John the present Lord.

Mr. James Hamilton Advocate, mar­ried Anne Daughter of John Walking­shaw of that Ilk. He departed this Life at London 21 June 1708, was succeed­ed by,

John his Son and Heir, who mar­ried Mary Daughter of Andrew Bruce of Edinburgh Merchant, (of the Family of Earls-hall,) by whom he has John Master of Belhaven, and several other Children.

ARMS.

Gules a Sword pale-ways proper be­tween three Cinque Foils Argent, sup­ported by two Horses Argent, Crest an Unicorns Head, Motto Ride Through.

STUART Lord Blantyre.

THIS noble Family took begin­ning in the Reign of James III. in the Person of Sir Thomas Stuart of Minto, Son of Sir William Stuart of Garlies a, who greatly enriched [Page 37] himself by the Marriage of Isobel Daughter and Coheir of Sir Walter Stewart of Arthurly, a by whom he had Sir John his Heir; William, who being bred to the Church, the first step he made into it was to the Recto­ry of Lochmaben; after that he was preferred to the Provestry of Linclu­den and then to the Bishoprick of Aberdeen: b Likewise a Daughter Agnes, married to John Stewart of Car­donald. c Which Sir John married Janet Daughter of - - - - - Lord Fleming, by whom he had Robert his Successur, who by Janet his Wife Daughter of - - - Murray of - - - had Sir John, who carried down the Line of the Family; Robert Prior of Whitern, and Elisabeth married to John Maxwel of Calderwood.

Which Sir John married first a La­dy of the Family of the Hepburns, by whom he had Sir Matthew his Succes­sour in the Barony of Miuto, whose Male-Line became extinct in Sir John Stewart of Minto, who died in the Expedition to Darien, Anno 1697, next Margaret Daughter of Captain James Stewart of Cardonald. By her he had,

Walter Commendator of Blantyre, who being from his Youth bred in the Court of King James VI. was Anno 1580 made one of the Gentlemen of the Bed Chamber, and preferred to be Lord Privy Seal in 1582,d in which Office he continued till the 1596, he was promoted to be Lord High-Thesaurer of Scotland: But he held the Place only two Years, for upon a Disgust occasioned by some Affair of the Church, in which the Thesau­rer had not gone the way of the Court, his Majesty was pleased to take the White Staff from him, which was put into the Hands of the Earl of Cassils. He bore the Diminution very well; for he was a wise Man and quickly recovered so much Grace and Favour that he was made a Peer by the Title of Lord Blantyre, July 10th 1606. He Married Nicolas Daughter of Sir James Somervel of Camnethan, by whom he had Sir James Stewart Knight of the Bath his El­dest Son, who was killed in a Duel by Sir George Wharton Anno 1609, William his Successor, Walter Stew­art Esq e and a Daughter Marga­ret married to George Lord Saltoun, and dying Anno 1616,f was suc­ceded by

William his Son, who died in the be­ginning of the Troubles in the Reign of King Charles I. November 29th 1638,g leaving Issue by Helen his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Scot of Ard­ross, Walter his Successor, Alexander, who succeded his Brother in the Ho­nour: Likewise a Daughter - - - mar­ried to Sir John Swinton of that Ilk.

Which Walter married Margaret Daughter of Sir William Mure of Row­allan, but dying without Issue in the Month of October of the Year 1641 was succeded by,

Alexander his Brother, who by Margaret his Wife Daughter of John Shaw of Greenock had Alexander his Successor, and a Daughter Helen married to James Murehead of Bredie­solm and had Issue.

Which Alexander married first Mar­garet Daughter of Sir John Henderson of Fordel, but by her he had no Issue; next Anne Daughter of Sir Ro­bert Hamilton of Pressmenen one of the Senators of the Colledge of Justice, and departing this Life 20th July 1704, left Issue by the Lady afore­said, [Page 38] Walter his Successour, Robert the present Lord Blantyre, John Stew­art Esq Advocate, Hugh Stewart Esq Likewise four Daughters.

Marion married to James Stirling of Keir and had Issue.

Francess to Sir James Hamilton of Rosehall Baronet.

Helen to John Master of Gray, at that Time Son and Heir apparent of John Lord Gray.

Anne.

Which Walter being a young No­bleman of very fine Parts, and a great Lover of his Country, was in the 1710 chosen one of the Sixteen Scots-Peers to serve in the en­suing British-Parliament. He died at London the 23d of June 1713 un­married, his Estate and Honour de­volving to

Captain Robert Stewart his Brother, who married Lady Helen Lyon Daughter of John Earl of Strathmore, by whom he has Alexander Master of Blantyre.

BORTHWICK, Lord Borthwick.

AS this noble Family was undoub­tedly very antient, and said to be of a Hungarion Extraction, so it was no less illustrious for it's Ally­ances, as the whole course of this Work doth testify, but in regard I had no Access to see any of their Writes, I cannot make a De­duction of them. I shall only remark, that the last Lord, whose very Name I could never so much as learn, died without Issue, since the Restauration of King Charles II. and with him the Honour of the Family failed.

MURRAY, Lord of Bothwel.

ALL our Scots Historians make mention of the Moravii as a bold and Warlike Tribe, who about the middle of the first Century were very assistant to King Corbred I. in his Wars against the Romans, whose Captain Roderick and a great many of his followers were slain in that famous Expedition of Queen Baudicea rela­ted also by Cornelius Tacitus. But that I may proceed to my Design in giving a Historical and Genealogical deduction of the antient and noble Family of the Murrays properly so called, I shall begin with their An­cestor one Friskinus, who was a great Man in the Northern parts in the Reign of King David I. Anno 1124: For it's certain he was not only possessed of the Country of Moravia now called Moray, but likewise that of Sutherland, which he divided betwixt two of his Sons, and from whence they took their respective Sirnames,a and his Descendents even to this Time carry the same Coat of Arms, viz. Three Molets differing only in the Tincture.

William de Moravia Filius Friskini, seems to be a very great Man about the Court of King William, as ap­pears from the frequency of his Wit­nessing the Deeds of that pious Prince to the Cathedral Church of Moray, and to the Bishops of that See,b to which this great Man was likewise himself a Benefactor. He left Issue,

[Page 39] William de Moravia who is intitu­led Willielmus de Moravia filius Wil­lielmi filii Friskini in a Donation which he made in pure and perpetual Alms Ecclesiae sancti Trinitatis de Spi­ny & Collegio Canonicorum ibidem Deo servientium Ecclesiam de Artindoll cum pertinen. coram Hugone fratre suo & Archibaldo de Dowglas.a He left Is­sue, several Sons, of whom diverse antient Families of the Murray's branched,b beside

Walter de Moravia Miles, who is designed filius Domini Willielmi deMo­ravia, c He gave to the Church of Elgin and the Chapter of the Episco­pal See of Moray Ecclesiam de Ineral­lel cum pertinen. pro salute animae suae, and is the same Walterus, as I take it, who is one of the great Men, Magna­tes Scotiae, mentioned as a Guarantee in a Treaty of Peace betwixt our King Alexander II. and Henry III. of England, Anno 1244.d He left a Son

Willielmus de Moravia Filius Walteri de Moravia, who is so designed in the Act declaratory of the Succession of the Scots Crown to King Alexander III. and his Heirs Anno 1284.e And is the same noble Person designed Panetarius Scotiae and Dominus de Bothwel, & Drumsargard f under which Title there are many Dona­tions made by the Heirs of this no­ble House to the Chapter of the Epis­copal See of Moray after they came to have Possessions in the South, and spred there into many noble Branches.

This Willielmus de Moravia Dominus de Bothwel & Drumshargard Panetarius Scotiae was one of the great Barons sum­moned to Bervick as an Auditor of the Claims of the Bruce and the Baliol, a­nent the Succession to the Crowng when that great Affair was in Agitati­on, and which afterward was by King Edward I. of England, determined in favour of John de Baliol, how justly I shall not say.

The same illustrious Person, accor­ding to the Devotion of those Times gave for the Safety of his Soul, Eccle­siae & Capitulo Glasguen: jus Patronatus Rectoriae Ecclesiae de Woolstoun coram Ro­berto Epo Glasguen. & D. Andrea de Moravia fratre suo. h Likewise he gave Dicto Capitulo Glasguen. jus Pa­tronatus Ecclesiae de Smalum i under the Seal of his Arms, Exhiben. dictum Willielm. de Moravia design. Domi­num de Bothwel equestrem, & in scato tres slellulas, multum attrito, much de­faced, says my Authority, but still to be seen by the learned and curious in the great Chartulary of the Episco­pal See of Glasgow in the Scots Col­ledge at Paris, k where they were de­posited by Bishop Beaton at the Re­formation in Scotland. By - - - his Wife Daughter of Sir John Cuming Lord of Badenoch l he had Sir Andrew his Successor, and Sir John de Moravia, Dominus de Drumshargard, [Page 40] who was the Ancestor of the Mur­rays of Abercarny a in Perthshire.

Andrew de Moravia Panetarius Sco­tiae & Dominus de Bothwel was just such a Patriot as his Father, whom he did not long survive; for he lost his Life in the Attempt at Stirling to redeem his Country from the Sub­jection and Slavery it was under to the English on the memorable 13th Sep­tember 1297b leaving Sir Andrew his Son and Heir, who tracing the Steps of his noble and loyal Father in a firm and resolute Adherence to the Interest of his Country, of which he had given such pregnant Instances, and of his eminent Courage and Con­duct in diverse Encounters with the opposite Party, that he was thought worthy to be joined with Sir William Wallace, in the Command of the Ar­my which Anno 1298 entered Eng­land, and performed such Actions of wonderful Courage, that they became very terrible to the Enemy; and thereafter when Robert the Bruce took upon him the Title of King of Scot­land, and declared his Purpose of do­ing all was in his Power toward the Redemption of his Country, and the retriving of the Independency of the Nation, no body appeared more hear­ty in his Interest than Sir Andrew Mur­ray, or stood more firm to that Glo­rious Monarch in all the Vicissitudes of Fortune that befell him: And it was no doubt in Reward of his great Merit, that the King bestowed upon him his Sister, the Lady Christian Bruce, in Marriage,c and gave him diverse Lands of great Value and Extent.

As he continued most faithfull to King Robert, he was no less so to his Son King David the II. to whose Interest inviolably adhering, he was one of those Patriots who joined the Governour and came to his Assistance before the Battle of Duplin, where he signalized his Courage, insomuch as he was upon the Death of the Earl of Mar, the Governour, unanimous­ly elected Regent in his Room, and he held that great Office (except a little time he was a Prisoner in Eng­land) with the universal Approbation of the whole Nation, and the Ap­plause of all Men, even till his Death Anno 1338,d whose Character drawn [Page 41] by the Great Buchannan, I cannot pass over. Speaking of his Death, he says summum apud omnes bonos desiderium sui reliquit, was much regrated by all good Men, and that tantas enim res biennio ac semestri quibus in Magi­stratu fuit, gessit, ut suffecturae cujuslibet magni Ducis aetati viderentur. He was solemnly interr'd with his Ancestors in the Cathedral Church of Elgin un­der a Canopy of free Stone in Ar­mour as big as the Life, with his Coat of Arms over him. Dr. Johnstoun celebrates his praises in a very hand­some Poem, which I shall take the Liberty to insert here by way of Epi­taph.

Obvius armato quoties sese obtulit hosti,
Cum quateret duro Sors fera cuncta pede!
Constans robur erat circum praecordia. Vincit
Dum capitur, nulla vincere vis potuit.
Victor caedit, agit, quatit, bostes, oppida, & arces.
Nemo unquam parvo tempore plura dedit.
Regum aequat merita: in Reges, pro Rege tuetur
Magnanimus patriae libera jura suae.
Vos [...] degeneres patriam sic prodere vestram!
Nempe ut MORAVII restituatur ope.

And tho' Mr. Winton the old Pri­or of Lochlevin be thought no good Poet now a Days, yet because he has endeavoured to preserve the Memory of so well deserving a Person, and to transmit his Character to Posterity in the best fashion he could, I shall like­wise amuse the Reader with his Words in Commendation of the Governour,

Schir Andrew Muref guid and wight,
That was a flout and bald Knight,
That name better was in his Day,
Frae g [...]id King Robert was away.

By the Lady Christian Bruce his Wife he left Issue John de Moravia Paneta­rius Scotiae his Son and Heir, who gave in pure and perpetual Alms, an Annuity of eight Merks Sterling out of his Lands of A [...]kly and Croy in Moray for the Maintenance of a Priest, who was perpetually to per­form Divine Offices at the Altar of the Holy-Cross, in the Cathedral Church of Elgin, Pro anima sua & anima bonae memorie D. Andreae de Moravia patris sui a: But he dying without Issue

Thomas his Brother was Heir to him. This noble Person was in the 1351 sent to England as an Hostage for King David II.b and was af­terward one of the Commissioners appointed to treat about the King's final Redemption Anno 1357c which was then happily brought about; like­as he gave, ratified and confirmed to the Church of Elgin his Brother's dona­tion, adding by a new Deed of his own ten pounds to be distributed among the Chanons on the Day of his Fa­ther Sir Andrew's Anniversaryd. But he dying without Male Issue, left a Daughter Jean his sole Heir, marri­ed to Sir Archibald Douglass Lord of Galloway, thereafter Earl of Douglass, e which brought the Lordship of Bothwell to that illustrious Family.

The Male Line of this Antient Fa­mily was continued in Sir John de Mora­via de Drumshargard, a younger Son of Sir William de Moravia de Bothwell & Drumshargard Panetarius Scotiae before mentioned,f who fixed his Residence at Abercarny in Perthshire, in the Time of King Robert I, of which Lands he became possessed, as also of Ogilvie, Glensherrop, &c. by the Marriage of Mary Daughter of Malise, Earl of Strathern, as from the Earl's Charter to him & Mariae Filiae nostrae sponsae [Page 42] dicti Domini Johannis de Moravi­a de Drumshargard a

Upon the Death of this Earl of Strathern, it being then customary to renew the Infeftment upon the Change of the Superior, as well as of the Vas­sal, Sir John Murray obtained a new Charter from Malise Earl of Strath­ern his Brother in Law, whereby he narrates, quod nobilis vi [...] Malisius bonae memoriae Comes de Strathern infeodavit Dominum Joannem de Moravia de Drum­shargard, Militem, de diversis terris in­frascript. viz. Ogilvie, Abercarny, Glensherop & medietat. de Kincousy, nec non annuo reditu de Mochuverd, cum Hybergis infra Comitatum deStrathern, ac etiam de terris de Egy & Arthsme­then prout in Cartadicti Domini quondam Patris mei eidem Domino Joanni & here­dibus suis confect. plenius contineur b

This noble person gave to the Monks of Arbroth, all his Right and Title to the Lands of Kingoldrum, which had formerly been in Dispute with the Convent, and that for the health of his Soulc; which is all that I have found further memorable of him. By Mary his Wife aforsaid, he had Sir Maurice his Successor, Sir Allexander Murray; and VValter, who got off the Lands of Drumshargard, from which he is afterward designed VVal­terus de Moravia de Drumshargard. d

Which Sir Maurice being a person of great Honour and Merit, was by the Favour of King David II. made Earl of Strathern e but being slain in the Service of his Country at the Battle of Durham Anno 1346, without Issue of his Body, the Title of Earl be­came extinct, his paternal estate de­scending to,

Sir Alexander de Moravia de Drum­shargard his Brother, who was served Heir to his Father Sir John on the 30th of July 134--f He married Janet Daughter of Hugh Earl of Ross, Wi­dow of the Baron of Monimusk and Sister to Euphame Queen of Scotland. The Marriage Articles are very solemn by way of Indenture,g wherein the Queen and David Count Palatine of Strathern her Son do contract for the Lady: But the Write it self being very curious and singular, I shall for the Satisfaction of the learned, insert it in the original Words.

PResens Indentura per modum alpha­beti facta, testatur quod vicesimo quarto die mensis Novembris anno Domi­ni millesimo trecentesimo septuagesimo quinto apud Perth, inter excellentissimam Dominam Dominam Euphemiam Dei gra­tia Reginam Seotie illustrem, & nobi­lem virum ac potentem dominum David Comitem Palatinum de Strathern & Co­mitem Cattanie ex parte una, & Ale­xandrum de Moravia de Drumsergorth ex altera, in hunc modum extitit con­cordatum, videlicz quod dictus Alexander ducet in uxorem Dominam Jonetam de Munymusk sororem dicte Domine Regine; & predicta Domina Regina ac Comes fide­liter promiserunt facere cum toto consilio suo & auxilio dictum Alexandrum habe­re consilium Jurisperitorum & Advoca­torum sumptibus suis propriis & expensis, pro recuperatione sue hereditatis secun­dum visum fuerit quod jus habet ad pro­secutionem. Insuper concordatum est in­ter eosdem, quod dicta Domina Regina in­veniet sufficientem sustentationem predicte sororis sue ad tempus unius anni vel du­orum annorum. Preterea concordatum est [Page 43] inter eosdem quod Walterus de Moravia frater dicti Alexandri, si velit, pro vo­luntatis sue libito seniorem filiam pre­dicte domine Jonete habebit in uxorem. In cujus rei testimonium perimplende & fideliter observande parti hujus indentu­re penes dictum Alexandrum remanenti sigilla predictorum Domine Regine & Co­mitis sunt appensa, parti vero hujus inden­ture penes predictum Dominam Reginam remanenti sigillum predicti Alex. est appensum. Acta die anno & loco supradictis.

The Article whereby the Queen and the Earl of Strathern her Son do oblige themselves to assist and patro­nize Sir Alexander Murray cum confilio suo & auxilio habere consilium Juris­peritorum & Advocatorum pro recupera­tione suae hereditatis, I think, as a person of knowledge in Antiquities has judiciously observed before me, respects Sir Alexander's Title to the Lordship of Bothwel as Heir Male, out of which he was kept by the power of the Earl of Dowglas, and adduces many Arguments to prove that pointa which I must pass over, in regard they do not suit with the Brevity I intend in carrying on this Work, and only remark, that Sir Alexander Murray was overpowered in his Claim, and that he died in the 1410, leaving Issue, by the aforesaid noble Lady his Wife, a Son

Sir Andrew Murray of Ogilvy and A­bercarny, who by Agnes his Wife Daughter of Cunningham of Glengar­nock in Vic. de Air, had Sir Humphry his Successor, who by Catherine his Wife, Daughter of Patrick Lord Graham, had Andrew his Son and Heir, who took to Wife Margaret Daughter of Alex­ander Robertson of Strowan. By her he had a Son George, who in the Lifetime of his Father was killed in the Ser­vice of his Country at the fatal Battle of Floudoun with King James IV. leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, a Lady of the Family of the Lindseys, a Son John, who succeeded his Grand­father, to whom he was served and re­toured Heir in the 1518. He married Nicolas Daughter of William Earl of Montrose, by whom he had William his Son and Heir, and Robert, who was his Brother's Successor. This John was slain in the Defence of the Honour and Independency of his Country by the English at the Battle of Pinkycleugh, the 10th of September 1547 and was succeeded by,

William his Son, who married Mar­garet Daughter of Lawrence Lord Oli­phant, but dying without Issue 1559, his Estate fell to,

Robert his Brother, who in the time of the civil War, in the Reign of Queen Mary, adhered to that unfortu­nate Princess, and was much esteemed by her, as appears by several Docu­ments in the Hands of his Heirs. He married Catherine, Daughter of Sir William Murray of Tillybairdin. By her he had Sir William, Sir David of Gor­thy, who was Governour to Henry Prince of Wales, Mungo Murray Esq Father to Sir Robert Murray, who was Justice Clerk in the Reign of King Charles II, a learned and polite Gen­tleman, and of Sir William Murray of Dreghorn, Mr. John Murray Minister of Dumfermling, also two Daughters, Nicolas married to Robert Viscount of [Page 44] Beil heaven, and Anne to Sir William Moncrief of that Ilk, and dying anno 1595, was succeded by

Sir William his Son,a who being from his Youth, bred up at the Court of King James VI. was first made a Knight, then one of the Gentlemen of the Bed Chamber, and Master of Horse to Queen Anne. He married Christian Daughter of Andrew Mercer of Aldie, by whom he had Sir Robert his Son and Heir, and a Daughter Mary, married to William Murray of Auchter­tyre.

Which Sir Robert in the Lifetime of his Father, married Helen Daughter of Alexander Bruce of Cultmalundie, by whom he had a Son Sir William, and a Daughter Anne, married to Alexander Murray of Strowan, and dying 1640, was succeeded by

Sir Wiliam his Grandson, who sur­vived his Grandfather but a Year, for he dyed in the 1641, and left Issue by Anne his Wife, Daughter of Sir George Hay of Keilour, Ancestor to the pre­sent Earl of Errol, Sir Robert his Suc­cessor, William, and Captain George Murray. Also two Daughters.

Isabel, married to Sir Archbald Stew­art of Burro,

Helen, to Mungo Graham of Gorthie.

Sir Robert his Son was a Gentleman of Parts, and who in a good Degree in­herited the Vertue, Loyalty and Merit of his Ancestors. He dyed the 11 of April 1704, leaving Issue by Anne his Wife, Daughter of that valiant and loyal Gentleman Patrick Graham of Inshbrakie, William his Successor. Robert Murray Esq Colonel John Mu [...] ­ray, Maurice Murray Esq Likewise two Daughters.

Anne, married to David Grahame o [...] Fintrie,

Emilia to James Graham of Garvock.

JOHN RAMSAY, Earl of Bothwell.

SIR John Ramsay of Balmain, the great Favorite of King James the III. was by the said Prince created Earl of Bothwell: b But he did not live long to enjoy the Honour, for he was slain with the King his Master at the Field of Stirling, on the 11th of June 1488.

HEPBURN Earl of Bothwell.

THIS Noble Family is descended of Sir Adam Hepburn, an English Knight, who transplanted himself in­to Scotland, in the Reign of King Da­vid the II. and had the Lands of Hailes by the Grant of George Earl of March.

Patrick Lord Hailes, was by King James the IV. raised to the Honour of Earl of Bothwell Anno 1488. By Mar­garet his Wife, Daughter to the Lord Dalketh, he had Adam his Son and Heir, who was slain at Floudoun Field, leaving Issue by Agnes his wife, Daugh­ter to the Earl of Buchan, Patrick his Son, who was Father of the unhappy James Earl of Bothwell, who was crea­ted by Queen Mary Duke of Orkney, but was in the same Reign forfeited for Treason, whereupon he fled be­yond Sea to Denmark, where he died Anno 1577.

Francis Stewart, Earl of Bothwel.

THE Title of Earl of Bothwel, by the special Favour of King James VI. came next to Francis Stewart Esq Son and Heir of John Prior of Col­dingham, Lord Privy-Seal in the Reign of Queen Mary, a natural Son of King James V. He was also constituted Lord high Admiral of Scotland; but in the same Reign, for his treasonable Design of seizing the King's Person in his own Palace of Holy-rood-house, he was forfeited Anno 1593. The Admirality was bestowed on the Duke of Lennox, and most of his Estate in Lidsdale given to the Lord Buclugh. How the rest went, I do not pretend to account for: All that I am to ob­serve, is, that he transported himself into France, and thence into Italy, where he passed the remainder of his Days.a.

BRECHIN Lord of Brechin.

DAvid of Scotland Earl of Hunting­toun and Garioch, Brother to King William the Lyon, gave the Lordship of Brechin, a Part of his own Appanage, to Henry his natural Son, from whence he took a Surname; for in a Donati­on of John de Scotia Comes de Hunting­toun & Chester to the Cannons of St. Andrews, this Henry is designed de Brechin, filius Comitis David, b and in a Mortification by the said Earl, of a Toft of Land in his Burgh of Dundee, to the Abbay of Aberbrothock, Henrico de Brechin fratre suo is a Witnessc; and likewise in many Royal Charters to Scoon and Aberbrothock. He left Issue by Julian his Wife,

William de Brechin his Son, who de­sign'd himself Willielmus de Brechin, filius Henrici de Brechin, filii Comitis David, in his Foundation of the May­son Dieu Hospital of Brechin, for the Salvation of the Souls of William and Alexander Kings of Scotland, John Earl of Chester and Huntingtoun his Brother, Henry his Father, and Julian his Mo­ther, and for the Welfare of his own Soul, to which Albinus Bishop of Bre­chin, Robert de Monte alto, and several other Persons of Note are Witnesses,d. This William made a very great Figure in all the publick Transactions both in the Reign of King Alexander II. and III. In the 1255, he was one of the great Men, Magnatum, as the Record calls them, with whose Counsel, & aliorum plurium Baronum nostrorum, the King gave a Commission to the Earls of Monteith, Buchan and Mar, to treat with the English, de negotiis regni nostri, anent the Good and Utility of both Realmse. Likeas I find he was an Arbitrator in the Dispute betwixt Sir Peter de Maulea Dominus de Panmure, & Domina Christina de Valoniis his Wife, with the Abbot of Aberbrothock, about the Marches of the Baronies of Aber­brothock & Panmure; which Alexander Cumin Earl of Buchan, Justiciary of Scot­land, had perambulate by the King's special Command, and was at length to the Satisfaction of the Parties amicably composed Anno 1254.f. He also was one of the Privy Council to King Alexander III. and one of the Proceres Scotiae who oblige themselves recepturos Margaretam Norvegiae, g the [Page 46] King's Grandchild, ut heredem Scotiae in failzure of his Issue Male. He married - - - Daughter of John C [...]in Earl of Buchan, by whom he had,

David Lord of Brethin his Son and Heir, who, after the Abdication of Ba­liol, was at the Battle of Methven, and several others, fought in the ensuing Wara, being in the English Interest, and no Friend to the Brucian Title, tho' he had the Honour to be in a very near Degree allied with that il­lustrious Family: For by his Wife, King Robert the Bruce's Sister, he had a Son David, and a Daughter Margaret, married to Sir David Barclay Knight,b.

Which David Lord of Brechin was one of the Barons who wrote that bold and loyal Letter to the Pope Anno 1320: Soon after which, he was so unhappy as to be drawn into a Conspi­racy to deliver the Town of Berwick to the English; but that Combination be­ing happily discovered, he was made Prisoner, and being tryed before the Parliament, was found guilty of high Treason, for as much as he had con­ceal'd and not reveal'd the Design, Ab conjurationis popularibus appel­latus nunquam assenserat: tantum eicrimini dabatur, quod in conscienti­am rei tam f [...]dae ascitus eam tacitam habuit c, and suffered Death for the same, Anno 1321. His Case was much pitied and lamented; for besides that he was the King's Nephew, he was a Person very eminent in the Arts both of Peace and War, Omnium aetatis suij [...]venum & belli &, pacis artibus longe primus habebatur, says my Author. Andd continues he, Dederat etiam suae vir­tutis in Syria bello sacro praeclarum spe­cimen. His Estate was not forfeited as the rest of the Conspirators were, but went to Margaret his Sister, who was his Heir.

BARCLAY. Lord of Brechin.

SIR David Barclay, Lord of Brechin in Right of his Wife the Heir of David de Brechin, was a Person of very signal Fidelity to the Brucian Interest, and is famous in the Wars of King Robert Bruce, to whom he did many remark­able Services.e This Sir David and Margaret his Wife gave in pure Alms to the Monks of Balmerino a Fishing upon the Water of Tay, for the good of their Souls;f and left Issue Sir David, and a Daughter Jean, married to Sir David Fleming of Biggar, by whom he had only one Daughter, Ma­rion, married to William Maule of Pan­mure, Ancestor to the Earl of Pan­mure. g

This last mentioned Sir David Barclay Lord of Brechin was eminent for his Activity and Valour in be­half of King David Bruce, to whom he performed many Actions of Ho­nour and Courage; but at last falling into a fatal quarrel with the Douglas­ses, he was murdered by the Contriv­ance of William Douglas of Lidsdale, Anno 1348.h leaving Margaret his only Child, married to Walter Earl of Athole, i Son to King Robert II.

Walter Earl of Athole, by the aforesaid Margaret his Wife, had Issue David Stewart Knight, who died in Eng­land, one of the Hostages for the Ransom of King James the I. and Alan Earl of Caithness, who was kil­led [Page *46] at the Battel of Inverlochy in 1428, leaving no Issue. The Earl of Athole, tho' his Lady and Children died before himself, kept Possession of this Lordship till he was execute for the Murder King James I. in Anno 1437. But when he was under Sentence of Death, he declared that he possessed the Lordship of Brchin only by the courtesie of Scotland since his Wife's Death, and that he had no other Title to that part of his Estate. Whereupon Sir Thomas Maule of Panmure laid Claim to this Lordship, as nearest Heir to Margaret Barclay Countess of Athole, to whose Heirs it was provided, failing Heirs of her own Bodya, and accord­ingly he took an Instrument in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh, upon the Earl's Declaration immediately before his Execution, wherein his Right and Proximity of Blood to the Lords of Brechin is set downb. And Thomas Bisset of Balwylo, judicially declares, That Dame Jean Barclay, Wife to Sir David Fleming, was Grandmother to Sir Thomas Maule, who was killed at Harlaw c. Notwithstanding of all which, the Council of King James the II. in his Minority, having in sundry Cases procured Decisions to be made in Favours of the Crown, when the Competition run betwixt the Sovereign and the Subject, the Family of Panmure were baulked of their Right, and the Lordship of Bre­chin, in regard the Earl of Athole died possessed of it, was with the rest of his Estate annexed to the Crown.d

But this Lordship being afterward dissolved, it was purchased by Pa­trick Earl of Panmure, and has ever since been used as a Title of that noble Fa­mily, who are undoubted Heirs in Blood of the antient Lords of Brechin, both of the Brechin and Barclay Line.

CAMPBEL Earl of Bradalbin.

THO none of this Family arriv'd to the Dignity of Peerage till the present Earl, yet were they Baron [...] of great Account long before, and were dignified with the Title of Baronet at the Institution of that Honour, Anno 1625. Their first Ancestor Sir Colin Campbel, was a second Son of the Fa­mily of Lochow, near three hundred Years ago, who by his Marriage with Margaret, one of the three Daughters and Co-heirs of John Stewart Lord Lorn, obtained a third Part of that In­heritance. From which Sir Colin they have continued remarkable in a di­rect Line, down to the present Time, spreading themselves into several emi­nent and flourishing Branches by the Way, as are the Campbels of Lawers (sprung from a Son of a second Mar­riage of the first Sir Colin, by a Daughter of the Family of Keir) Glenlyon, Achri­ny, Lochbuskie, Mochaster, Monzie, Glen­faloch, Carquhin, Kilpont, Aberuchil, Glendarual, &c.

The Family of Glenurchie has been remarkable in our Scots History on several Occasions; nor need I be at much Pains to shew the several Matches they have made with some of the most noble Families of this Kingdom, since the whole Course of this Book sufficiently makes mention thereof, only I shall take notice, that John, now Earl of Bradalbin, is Son of Sir John Campbel of Glenurchie Baro­net, by Mary his Wife, Daughter of William Earl of Airth and Monteith. He was created Earl of Caithness by King Charles II. 28 January 1677, in Consideration of the Loyalty of his Ancestors, as well as his own per­sonal [Page **46] Merit; but this Title being adjudged to another, Anno 1681. he was then created Earl of Bradalbin, with Precedency, according to the former Patent. In 1692 he was named a Privy Counsellour, and one of the Commissioners of the Treasury, which for some Time he enjoy'd.

His first Wife was Mary Rich, Daughter of Henry Earl of Holland, of the Kingdom of England, by whom he had Duncan Lord Ormly, who is not to succeed him, and John Lord Glen­urchie. Also by Mary his second Wife, Daughter of Archbald Marquis of Argyle, he had a Son Colin, who died unmarried.

John Lord Glenurchie, married first Frances Daughter and Co-heir of Henry Cavendish Duke of New Castle, but by her he had no Issue; And se­condly Henrietta Daughter of Sir Edward Villiers Sister to Edward late Earl of Jersey, by whom he has John Master of Glenurchie.

ARMS.

Three Coats quarterly, 1st and 4th. Gyrone of eight Pieces Sable and Or, 2d Or, a Fess cheque Argent and Azure, 3d. Argent, a Galey with her Oars in Action, Sable, supported by two Stags Proper. Crest a Stag's Head eraz'd, Motto, Follow me.

CUMIN Earl of Buchan.

THE first of this noble Family was Sir William Cumin, Son of Sir Richard Cumin Knighta, who married Margaret Daughter of Fergus Earl of Buchan b, in Right of whom he came to enjoy that Honour. He was by King Alexander II. constitut­ed Justiciary of Scotland, Anno 1230. which he enjoy'd for many Years. Being a Person of singular Devotion, he founded the Abbay of Deer in Buchan, for Cistertian Monks, and en­dued it with many Lands in those Partsc, and dying Anno 1233d, left Issue by the said Margaret his Wife,

Alexander his Son and Heir, who was constituted Justiciary of Scotland in the Reign of King Alexander III. He was commissioned Ambassador to England, Anno 1284e, and in 1286 was chosen one of the six Regents of this Realm, upon the Decease of the said King Alexander f. His Works of Piety were these; An Hospital of his Foundation at Turref in Buchan, for twelve poor old Men; Another at the New-Burgh of Buchan, and a Confirmation in most ample manner to the Monks of Arbroth of a Grant which Fergus Earl of Buchan, his Grand-father, had formerly made for the Salvation of his Soulg. All which shew not only the Greatness of his Estate, but also of his Piety. He dying Anno 1289h, left Issue by Isabel his Wife, Daughther and one of the Co-heirs of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester (by Helen his Wife, Daughter of Alan Lord of Galloway Constable of Scotland) John Earl of Buchan Constable of Scotland his Son and Heir, who was sent Ambassador to France to treat of a Peace, which was then happily con­cluded, Anno 1303i. Upon King Robert's Accession to the Throne, Anno 1306, he adhered to the English In­terest, for which Action his Estate was seized on, and dying in England in 1329 the 1st. Year of David II. left Issue by Isabel his Wife, Daughter of Duncan Earl of Fife, two Daughters, Alicia [Page 47] Wife of Sir Henry de Beaumont, and Margaret of Sir John Ross Knighta.

STEWART, Earl of Buchan.

THE next that enjoyed any Title from hence was Alexan­der Stewart Lord Badenoch, 4th Son to King Robert II. who was dignify­ed with this Title, Anno 1374. He married Eupham Countess of Ross b, and dying 20th February 1394, was interred in the Middle of the Choir, of the Cathedral Church of Dunkeld, with his Statue over him in a fair Stone, which continued intire, till a Party of Angus's Regiment having garrisoned the Church of Dunkeld at the Revolution, the Soldiers very much defaced it; but upon the Pe­destal, there is this Inscription.Hic jacet Dominus Alexander Senescallus Comes de Buchan & Dominus de Badenoch bonae Memo­riae, qui obiit 20 Die mensts Februarii, Anno Dom. 1394.’

From this Time the Honour of Buchan lay dormant till the Year 1419, when it was meritoriously be­stowed by Robert Duke of Albany, Governor of Scotland, upon John Steuart Lord High Chamberlain of Scotland, his Son. This Earl com­manded the 7000 Scots Auxiliares that were sent to the Assistance of Charles VI. against the English c, whose great and memorable Actions and Services to the Crown of France, are sufficiently recorded in our Scots and French Histories, and leave me very little to say here. He was killed at the Battle of Vernoil, anno 1424d, leaving Issue by Elizabeth his Wife, Daughter to Archibald Earl of Doug­lass, one sole Daughter and Heir, Jean married to George Lord Seaton, Ancestor to the present Earl of Win­toun e, which gave Occasion to the noble Family to carry quarterly in the Atchievement the Coat of Bu­chan, viz, Azure, three Garbs, Or.

ERSKINE, Earl of Buchan

THE Honour and Earldom of Buchan coming to the Crown, (by the Death of John the last Earl without Male-issue), remain'd in the Royal Person of the King, as nearest Heir-male to the said Earl, till the Year 1469, when the same was by King James III. with the whole Lands which formerly composed that Earl­dom, bestowed upon James Stewart, second Son of Sir James Stewart (sir­named, The Black Knight of Lorn) by Queen Jean, Widow of James 1. of Scotland, and Daughter of John Duke of Somerset, who was Son of John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster, 4th Son of Edward III. King of England, from whom the same has through several Descents hereafter deduced, devolved on Earls of the Sirname of Erskine, a Branch of the Illustri­ous House of Mar, by whom it has been enjoyed for the Space of One hundred and thir [...]een Years, since the 1601.

Which James Earl of Buchan was a most faithful Counseller to King James III. by whom he was constitu­ted Warden of the Middle Marches to­ward [Page 48] England a and Lord High Chamberlain of Scotland. He mar­ried first Margaret, Daughter and sole Heir of Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Auchter­house, high Sheriff of the County of Forfar, by whom he had Alexander his Son and Heir; also by Margaret, Daughter of . . . . . . . Murray of Philiphaugh, b he had James Stewart Ancestor to the present Earl of Tra­quair; also two Daughtersc, Agnes married to Adam Earl of Bothwel, afterwards to Robert Lord Maxwel, and Elizabeth to John Hume of Col­ding knows, Ancestor to the present Earl of Hume d.

Which Alexander Earl of Buchan married Jean, Daughter of William Lord Ruthven, by whom he had Issue, John Earl of Buchan his only Son and Heir, who was one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King James V. who, by Margaret his Wife, Daugh­ter of Sir John Scrimgeor of Duddop Knight, had Issue John, who died before him, and one Daughter, who was married to Thomas Dempster of Muirask in Bamff-shire, and had Issue.

Which John, Eldest Son of the said Earl, was with the Flower of the Nobles of Scotland, killed at the Battle of Musteburgh on the 10th of Sep­tember 1547, in the Lifetime of his Father; having been twice married: First, To Mary Daughter of James Earl of Murray, by whom he had no Issue; and, 2dly, To Beatrix; Daughter of Sir Walter Ogilvy of Boyn, by whom he had one Daugh­ter Christiana, who, anno 1551, suc­ceeded her Grandfather in the Earl­dom of Buchan, and married Robert Do [...]glas (Brother of William Earl of Mortoun) in Right of her afterward Earl of Buchan, by whom she had Is­sue James, who succeeded her; and two Daughters,

Janet married to Alexander Irvine of Drum, and had Issue.

Elizabeth married to Andrew Fra­zer of Muchil, in the County of Aber­deen, Ancestor of Charles, now Lord Fraser.

To which Robert and Christiana (Earl and Countess of Buchan) suc­ceeded

James Earl of Buchan, their only Son and Heir, who, by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Walter Lord Desk­ford, Ancestor of James now Earl of Findlater, had Issue one Daughter, Mary, who, anno 1601, succeeded the said James her Father in the Earldom of Buchan.

Which Mary Countess of Buchan married James Erskine eldest Son of the second Marriage of John Earl of Mar, Lord High Treasurer of Scot­land, and Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, by the Lady Ma­ry Stewart, second Daughter of Esme Duke of Lennox: Upon which Mar­riage, the Right of Succession to the Earldom of Buchan (which before had been to the Heirs whatsoever) was by a Charter under the Great Seal, proceeding upon a Resignation, limited to the said Mary Countess of Buchan, and the said James her Hus­band, and the Heirs Male of the said Marriage; which failing, to the said James's nearest lawful Heirs Male whatsoever.

Which James Earl of Buchan being a Person of great Merit and Accom­plishments, and much in the Favour of King Charles I. (to whom he was a Gentleman of his Bed-chamber) lived most of his Time in England, where he had Issue by his said Wife, James his eldest Son and Heir, and John who died unmarried; as also two Daughters.

Mary married to Alexander Lord Pitstigo, and had Issue; and Margaret married to Sir James Graham, Son to the Earl of Monteith.

After the Death of whom, he mar­ried, 2dly Elizabeth, Daughter of Sir Philip Knevit of Bucknam Castle, in the County of Norfolk, Bart. by whom he had Issue, Dorthy married in [Page 51] England to [...] Walker in the Coun­ty of Middlesex, Esq and several o­ther Children, who died young.

To whom succeeded James Earl of Buchan, his eldest Son and Heir, who by his Wife Mary, Daughter of Wil­liam Earl of Dalhousie, had Issue one Son William, who succeeded him, and five Daughters, Marjory the el­dest, married first to [...] Fraser of Inderalachie Esq and 2dly to Charles Lord Fraser. Anne the 2d to James Ca­naries D.D. Henriette the 3d. to Tho­mas Forbes of Tolquhon Esq & Jean the 4th. to George Gray of Hackerton Esq

Which William Earl of Buchan hav­ing joined himself at the Revolution in 1688 to those who took up Arms in Scotland against the late King Willi­am, brought himself thereby into much Trouble: For being soon after taken by that King's Troops, he was committed Prisoner to the Castle of Stirling, where, tho by the Intercession of his Friends his Prison was at last much enlarged, he continued to his Death, which happened anno 1695, without leaving any Issue, having never been married.

To whom succeeded David Lord Cardross, his nearest Heir Male, be­ing great Grandson and Heir to Hen­ry the first Lord Cardross, who was Brother to James Earl of Buchan, Grandfather to the said William last deceased.

Which David Earl of Buchan in anno 1697 married Frances, eldest Daughter, and since sole Heir of Henry Fairfax of Hurst, in the Coun­ty of Berks Esq only Son and Heir of Henry Fairfax Esq second Son of Thomas Viscount Fairfax: By the which Frances Countess of Buchan the said Earl has had nine Sons,

Henry David, Lord Auchterhouse, born in September 1699, who died very young.

David Lord Auchterhouse, born in April 1703, who died an Infant.

Henry David, now Lord Cardross & Auchterhouse, born 17th April 1710.

Fairfax, born Feb. 8th 1712.

George Lewis on Jan. 30 1714, and

George Augustus on December 27th, 1715, who died very young, and three more, who died soon after they were born.

Also seven Daughters.

Lady Katharin Anna, and

Lady Frances; yet in their Mino­rity.

Lady Alethea, and

Lady Willelmina Carolina, who both died Infants; and three others who died soon after they were born.

Which David now Earl of Buchan, was one of the Council of Trade ap­pointed by Parliament in anno 1705, when by an Act past in England, the Importation of Scots Linnen Cloath and Cattle into that Kingdom was prohibited, and Matters seem'd to run high betwixt the two Kingdoms, in which Commission his Lordship behaved himself so as to gain univer­sal Esteem, as he has upon all other Occasions, when employed in the publick Service, wherein he has al­ways eminently distinguish'd himself by his unshaken Zeal and constant ap­pearance for the Honour and Interest of his Country, as well during the Reign of the late King William, in which he was a Privy Counsellor from the Year 1697, till the Death of that Prince, as during that of her late Majesty Queen Anne, by whom he was also constituted of the Privy Council; as also one of the Com­missioners of the Exchequer, and Go­vernour of Blackness Castle; in all which he continued till after the Conclusion of the Treaty of Union, anno 1707, which he opposed in Par­liament to the very last, being of O­pinion, as his Lordship then declared, that several of the Articles agreed up­on, were inconsistent with the Ho­nour of his Country, especially of the Peerage, against which he therefore entred his Protest, and was soon af­ter removed from all publick Trust. But on the Accession of his Majesty King George to the Crown, for the Security of whose Succession his Lord­ship [Page 52] had on all Occasions exerted himself with the outmost Zeal, he had again several Marks of Favour bestowed on him, having been appointed one of the Lords Commissioners of Police, and Lord Lieute­nant of the Shires of Stirling and Clackmannan, as he was also to the general Satisfaction elected one of the sixteen Peers for Scotland to the first Parliament of Great Britain called af­ter his Majesty's Arrival in this Kingdom.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st. Azure, three Garbs, Or, 2d grand quarter 1st and 4th Azure, a Bend betwixt six Cross Croslets, Or, 2d and 3d, Argent, a Pale, Sable, 3d, great Quarter 1st and 4th Or, a Fess Cheque, Azure and Argent, 2d and 3d Azure, 3 Garbs Or, 4th Argent, three Bars Gamels, Gules. Over all a Ly­on Rampant Sable in Surtout an Escout­cheon, Gules, an Eagle displayed, Or, looking toward the Sun in his Splendor, p [...]aced in the Dexter chief Point, supported by two Ostriges proper Crest, a dexter Hard grasping a Batton, Motto, Judge Nocht.

SCOTT Duke of Buckclugh.

THE first of the Sirname of Scott, I have found upon Record, was Ricardus Scottus, who in the Reign of King David I. is Witness to a Charter of Confirmation by Robert Bishop of St. Andrews, to the Abbacy of Holyrood house; a but whether Scottus was his Sirname, or only so called from his Country, is not so clear. Likeas we find in the Reign of King Alexander II. another Ricardus Scot­tus, who obtained a fair Estate in Rox­burgh-Shire, by Marriage of Alicia, one of the Heirs Female of Henry de Molla, out of which he gave in pure and perpetual Alms to the Monks of Kelso, eight Acres of Land, with Pasturage for divers Oxen, in his Tenement of Molle, for the Health of his Soul.b

In the Reign of Alexander III. Sir Richard Scott obtained the Barony of Murthockstoun, now called Murdistoun in Clidsdale, by the Marriage of an Heir Female of the same Sirname, & is desi­gned Ricard le Scott de Murthockstoun, in the Bond of Submission called the Ragman Roll, wherein as a Baron of Lanerkshire, he swears Allegiance to King Edward the I. of England Anno 1296;c whose Successor Ro­bert Scott designed of . . . Murdistoun and Ranelburn, flourished under King Robert II. who with Consent and Ap­probation of Walter his Son and Heir apparent, gave to the Monks of Mel­ross the Lands of Hinkery in Selkirk­shire, pro salute animae suae. d This Walter was a gallant brave Man, and performed many Actions of signal Honour and Courage in the Ser­vice of the Crown, for which he was nobly rewarded. For King Ro­bert, who never failed to reward merit, did with Consent of John Earl of Carrick his eldest Son, change the holding of the Barony of Kirkurd from Ward to Blanch in his Favours, by his Royal Charter of the Date De­cember 7. Anno 1390.e The same Sir Walter, then a Knight, in the 1426, obtained a Charter from the Earl of Douglas, of the Lands of Lempetlaw, for his Services done to the Earl, by his Charter second July 1426;f and afterward exchanged his Lands of Murdistoun with Thomas Inglis of Maner for Maners Lands of Branxholm, Anno 1446g He was [Page 53] a Person of that Character, that dur­ing the Reign of King James II. he was frequently employed in Negotia­tions of Peace betwixt the two Nations, as appears from Mr. Rymer's Foe­dera lately published, and did exert his Valour in a very eminent Degree, in suppressing the Rebellion of the Earls of Douglas, Murray and Ormond, for which he had a Grant from the Crown of the Lands of Abinigton, Fairholm and Glendonary, wherein his Loyalty and signal Services are very fully narrated and set forth in the King's Charter,a under the Great-Seal. By . . . Daughter of . . . his Wife, he had David his Son and Heir, and Alexander.

Which David made a very great Figure, in the publick Transactions, in the Time of King James III. and IV. and was oftner than once appoin­ted one of the Conservators of the Peace betwixt the two Nations. By . . . Daughter of . . . he had Sir Walter his eldest Son, and Ro­bert; likewise a Daughter Janet, mar­ried to Sir James Douglas of Drumlan­rig, b and departing this Life An­no 1492, was succeeded by

Sir Walter his Grandson and Heir, who was served and retoured Heir to his Grandfather, 6. November 1492:c He was famous for his many ex­cellent Qualities under King James V. whose great Favourite he was. In the 1526 he attempted to relieve at Melross his Sovereign out of the Hands of the Earl of Angus; and tho the Attempt proved unsuccessfull, yet the King still retained a very lasting Sense of Sir Walter's Duty and Loyal­ty on that Occasion. After the Death of King James he signalized his Va­lour and Courage at the Battle of Pinky, soon after which he was con­stituted Warden of the West-Marches toward England, and he discharged the Office with great Honour and Integrity, till his Death in the Month of October of the Year 1553.d He married first Elizabeth Daughter of . . . Carmichael, e of . . . and had Sir David his eldest Son, who died with­out Issue, and Sir William Scott Knight his Father's Heir apparent, who like­wise died before himself. His second Wife was Janet Daughter of John Be­thune of Cricht, f by whom he had Grisel married to William Lord Borth­wick, and again to Walter Cairncross Esq Son to John Cairncross of Colme­sly. g And Jean to John Cranstoun of that Ilk.

Sir William Scott of Kirkurd, Son and Heir apparent to Sir Walter Scott of Buckclugh, in the Lifetime of his Father, married Grisel Daughter of John Bethune of Cricht, h by whom he had Sir Walter his Grandfather's Suc­cessor, and three Daughters, Jean married to Sir Thomas Ker of Ferny­herst, Margaret to Sir John Johnstoun of that Ilk, and Elizabeth to John Car­michael of Meadowflat, Captain of Crawfurd.

Which Walter was a Man of ex­cellent Parts and Reputation, and tho a firm Adherer to Queen Mary, yet he has a very good Character e­ven by the Historians of the other Party, particulary Sir James Melvil, who says, He was a Man of rare Qua­lities, wise, brave, stout and modest. He married Margaret, Daughter of Da­vid Earl of Angus, by whom he had Sir Walter his Son and Heir, and two Daughters.

Margaret, married to Robert Scott of Thirlestane, and had Issue.

Mary, to William Elliot of Liriestoun, and had Issue.

Which Walter being a Person of very fine Parts, and in great Favour with King James VI. had the Honour of Knighthood conferred on him, at the Coronation of Queen Anne, in Anno 1590,i and after that was constituted Warden of the West-Marches toward England, and he dis­charged [Page 54] the Trust with singular Cou­rage and Fidelity,a till the King's Accession to the Crown of England, Anno 1603.

Sir Walter being a Person of a war­like Genius, and from his Youth much affecting a military Life, car­ried over a Regiment to the Nether­lands, where he served under that fa­mous General the Prince of Orange, in which valiant Adventures he gained so much Honour, that to counte­nance his signal Merit, King James VI. was pleased to raise him to the Degree and Dignity of a Baron of this Realm, by the Title of Lord Scott of Buckclugh, on the 16. March 1606, and departing this Life 5. December 1611,b lest-Issue by Mary his Wife, (Daughter of William Ker of Cesford, Sister to Robert I. Earl of Roxburgh) Walter his Successor; likewise two Daughters,

Margaret married to James Lord Ross, and again to Alexander Earl of Eglintoun.

Elizabeth to John Master of Cranstoun, c at that Time Son and Heir appar­rent to William Lord Cranstoun, sans Issue.

Which Walter was by the special Favour of King James VI. raised to the Honour of Earl of Buckclugh, by Let­ters patent 16. March 1619.d This noble Earl being likewise a Noblemen of a warlike Temper, had likewise the Command of a Regiment under the States of Holland against the Spaniard, where he served with singu­lar Honour and Reputation, and co­ming over to England in the Begin­ning of the Winter, 1633, died at Lon­don on the 21. of September thereafter.

Leaving Issue by Mary his Wife, Daughter of Francis Earl of Errol, Francis his Son and Heir and two Daughters.

Lady Mary married to John Earl of Mar.

Lady Jean to John first Marquess of Tweddale.

Francis Earl of Buckclugh was a young Nobleman of very fine Parts, and of singular merit, and very loyally affected to King Charles II. for which Cromwel, after the Earl's Death, imposed a Fine of 15000 Lib. Sterl. on his Heir.e He was suddenly snatched away by Death in the Flower of his Age, Anno 1652, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of John Earl of Rothes, two Daughters, Mary Countess of Buckclugh, who married Walter Scot of Hychester, who was there­upon created Earl of Tarras; but the Lady dying without Issue, Anno 1662, her Estate and Honour came to her Si­ster the Lady Anne Scott, who soon thereafter was married to James Duke of Monmouth, natural Son to King Charles II. who changed his Name to Scot, and was, together with the Coun­tess his Wife, created Duke and she Dutches of Buckclugh, by Letters pa­tent, 20. April 1673.f And the Duke of Lennox dying in the End of 1672, his Grace was constituted Lord High Chamberlain of Scotland.

In the Year 1679. upon the In­surrection in Scotland, which com­menced with the Murder of the Arch-Bishop of St. Andrews, he was sent with a sufficient Force, as Generalis­simo to suppress it, where giving them Battle at Bothwel-Bridge, he entirely defeated them, and so suppressed that Rebellion.

But the following Year, having shown himself very zealous in pro­secuting a full Discovery of the Po­pish Plot, and joining with those who were the greatest Sticklers at that Time against Popery, by which means he had very much gain'd the Affecti­on of the People, some of his chiefest (supposed) Friends began to invite him to cast an Eye upon the Crown, and the more to flatter his Hopes there­with, [Page 53] a Report was about this time very industriously spread through the Kingdom, That the King had been lawfully married to Mrs. Walters the Duke's Mother, which so affected his Majesty, that he thought him­self obliged, both in Conscience and Honour to declare the contrary to his Privy Council, and thereupon caused the following Declaration to be entred in the Council Books.

To avoid any Dispute, which may happen in time to come, concerning the Succession to the Crown, he declares in the Presence of Almighty God, that he never gave, nor made any Contract of Marriage, nor was ever married to any Woman whatsoever, but to his present Wife, Queen Catharine, now living.

Sign'd
CHARLES R.

Not long after this, the King was prevailed with, not only to divest him of all the Offices and Places he held under the Crown, but that he should likewise depart the Kingdom, whereupon he retired to Utrecht, and there continued some Time, and then returned to England, but was again banished the Court in 1683, and re­tiring into Holland, continued at the Hague till the Death of the King his Father. But before K. James VII. was well setled on the Throne, anno 1685, he invaded England; but being soon after totally routed at Sigemore, and taken Prisoner, he was beheaded on Towerhill the 15th July 1685.

By the Duke of Monmouth the Dut­chess of Buckclugh had two Sons,

James Earl of Dalkeith, who was elected one of the Knights of the most noble Order of the Thistle, anno 1704, and dyed 14th March 1705, leaving Issue by Henrietta his Wife, Daughter of Laurence Earl of Roche­ster, three Sons and two Daughters, viz.

Francis now Earl of Dalkeith.

Lord James Scot.

Lord Henry Scot.

Lady Anne Scot.

Lady Charlotte Scot.

Lord Henry Scot, 2d Son of Anne Dutchess of Buckclugh, was by Letters Patent, bearing date the 29th of March 1706, in the 5th Year of the Reign of her Majesty Queen Anne, created Earl of De Lorain, Viscount Hermi­tage and Lord Scot of Goldilines, all in the County of Roxburgh.

Her Grace married a second Husband Charles Lord Cornwallis, and by him had Issue, Lord George Scot, and Lady Anne Scot, who both deceased young, and Lady Isa­bella Scot, yet unmarried.

ARMS.

Or, on a Bend Azure, a Star of six Points betwixt two Crescents of the Field, supported by two Women in Rich antique Apparrel, the Crest is a Stag pas­sant, proper, Motto, Amo.

BALFOUR, Lord Burleigh.

THIS Family which originally took its Sirname from the Castle and Barony of Balfour in Fife-shire, hath been of great Antiquity in the foresaid County, there being some of that Name flourishing there, in the time of Alexander IIa. Also it appears, that Michael de Balfour [Page 54] vice comes de Fife, was a Member of Parliament in the Year, 1315a. This Family continued in great Lu­stre till the fifth of King Robert II. and then came to an Heir Female, married to Sir John Beaton Knight, Progenitor to the Laird of Balfour.

Of the Family of Balfour, that of Monquhany, appears to have been a very ancient Branch, for Michael de Balfour, obtained the Barony of Monquhany in vice-comitatu de Fife, in Exchange with Duncan Earl of Fife, for his Lands of Pittencrief b which was ratified by a Charter of King David II. anno 135 [...] c, as Balfour of Burleigh was another Family in good Esteem, and possessed the Baro­ny of Burleigh since the Days of King James IId. These two Families of Monquhany and Burleigh, came to be united in the Person of Sir Michael Balfour of Burleigh, Son and Heir to Sir James Balfour of Monquhany, Clerk Register in the Reign of Queen Mary, by Margaret his Wife, Daugh­ter and Heir of Michael Balfour of Burleigh. This Sir Michael was by the Favour of King James VI. raised to the Peerage of this Realm by the Title of Lord Balfour of Burleigh, 7th August 1606e, being then his Ma­jesty's Ambassador to the Dukes of Tuscany and Lorain, he married . . . . . . Daughter of Lundy of that Ilk, by whom he left one Daughter, Margaret Baroness of Burleigh, his sole Heir, the Honour being to him and the Heirs of his Body lawfully begotten, she married Robert Arnot of Ferny, who changed his Name to Balfour, and in her Right became Lord Burleigh. He was elected Pre­sident to the Parliament, anno 1641, and by his said Wife he had Issue.

John his Successor, and three Daughters.

Jean, married to David Earl of Weems, and had Issue.

Margaret, to Sir John Crawfurd of Kilbirny, Ancestor to the present Viscount of Garnock.

Isabel, to Thomas Lord Ruthven, and had Issue.

John Lord Burleigh, was married to Daughter of Sir Wil­liam Balfour of Pitcullo Lieutenant of the Tower of London, in the Reign of King Charles I. by whom he had three Sons, Robert who succeeded him in his Estate and Honour. John Balfour of Ferny, and Henry Balfour of Dun­boig, also several Daughters,

Margaret, married to Andrew Lord Rollo, and had Issue.

. . . . . . . . to Sir Robert Douglass of Kirkness, and had Issue.

. . . . . . . . to Sir John Malcolm of Lochore, and has Issue.

. . . . to . . . . Douglass of Strenthry. Isabel, unmarried.

Anne to Captain Robert Sinclair.

Robert the present Lord Burleigh, upon King William's Accession to the Crown, anno 1689, was con­stituted one of the Commissioners for executing the Office of Register. He married Margaret Daughter of George Earl of Melvil, by whom he has,

Robert Master of Burleigh,

Margaret,

Mary, all unmarried.

ARMS.

Argent on a Cheveron Sable, an Ottars Head erraz'd of the first, supported on the Dexter with an Ottar, and on the Sinister by a Swan proper, for the Crest, a Maid holding in one Hand an Ottars Head, and in the other a Swans, with this Motto, Omne solum forti Patria.

STEUART, Earl of Bute.

THE descent of this noble Fa­mily is from Sir John Steuart, a Son of King Robert II.a who had by his Fathers Grant a fair Pos­session in the Isle of Bute (the ancient Patrimony of the Royal Steuarts, long before they attained to the Crown) with the hereditary Sheriffship of that County, which King Robert III. his Brother confirmed by this Charter. Robertus dei gratia Rex Scotorum sciatis nos dedisse & hac presenti charta nostra confirmasse dilecto fratri nostro Johanni Senescallo de Bute officium vice comitatus de Bute & Arran datum 11 Nov. 1400b. Likeas he obtained a Charter from Robert Duke of Albany, when Governour of Scot­land, of the Lands of Fynock, which runs thus in the Original,

Robertus Dux Albaniae Gubernator Scotiae sciatis nos dedisse dilecto fratrinostro Johanni Steuart vice comiti de Bute totam dimidietatem terrarum de Fynock in Barronia de Renfrew, &c. apud Villam de Irvin primo die Janu­arii 1418c.

This Sir John Steuart married Jean Daughter of Sir John Semple of Eliot­stoun d, Ancestor to the present Lord Semple, by whom he had three Sons,

Robert his Successor.

Andrew Steuart of Roslyn in vice comitatu de Bute.

William first of the Branch of Fy­nock e in vice comitatu de Renfrew.

Which Robert Steuart of Bute was of the Privy Council to King James II. anno 1440f. The third of this Family was James Steuart of Bute, who obtained from King James III. in Consideration of his good Services before that time performed, the he­reditary Constabulwick of the Castle of Rothsay, (which had been ancient­ly a royal Seat, and where King Robert III. yielded his last Breath) by a Commission still extant among the Earl of Bute's Writes, and bears date, 1st August 1498.

To this last mentioned James suc­ceeded Ninian his Son and Heir, who married Elisabeth Daughter of John Blair of that Ilkg, and departing this Life anno 1509, was succeeded by James his Son, who was Infeft both in his Estate, and in the hereditary Constabulary of Rothsay Castle, 20th. May 1509h. He married first a Daughter of the Family of Argyle and secondly Marion Daughter of John Fairly of that Ilk, in vice comi­tatu de Air, Widow of Thomas Boyd of Linn i, by whom he had John who succeeded him, and Robert Steuart of Kelspock k.

Which John was in special Favour with King James VI. to whom he was one of the Gentlemen of his Bed-Chamber, and in 1580 was con­stituted Captain of the Castle of Brodick, and Chamberlain of Arran l, which he enjoyed till the Family of Hamilton was restored, anno 1585. His first Wife was Mary Daughter of John Campbel of Skipnish, and his second Fynuald, Daughter of Sir James Mackdonald of Duneyveg and Glinns, Ancestor to the Earl of Antrim of the Kingdom of Ireland, and depar­ting this Life about the Year 1602, [Page 56] was succeeded by John his Son and Heir, who was knighted by King James VI. He added to the ancient patrimonial Fortune of his Ancestors, the Lands of Foord in vice comitatu de Haddingtoun, by the Marriage of Elisabeth. eldest of the two Daugh­ters, and Co-heirs of Robert Hepburn of Foord, by whom he left Issue, James his Successor, and Colonel Thomas Steuart who died in France.

Which James had the Honour of Baronet conferred on him by King Charles I. When the civil War broke out in that Reign, he faithfully ad­hered to the King's Interest, for which, beside the Sequestration of most of his Estate, he suffered much personally during the Usurpation, notwithstanding whereof he continu­ed constant and unshaken in his Loy­alty, and living to see the Restaura­tion, he died at London soon after, tho the exact time I cannot assign, and was buried in the Abbay at West­minster. His Wife was Isabel Daughter of Sir Dougal Campbel of Achinbreak, by Isabel his Wife, Daughter of Thomas Lord Boyd, by whom he had Sir Dougal his Successor, and

Sir Robert Steuart of Tillycutry, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, and one of the Lords of her Majesty's Justiciary, who was created Baronet by Patent 29th. April 1707. He married Cicil Daughter of Sir Robert Hamilton of Presmanan, and had Sir Robert Steuart Baronet.

Also three Daughters, 1st Elisabeth married to Ninian Banatyne of Keams, in vice comitatu de Bute, and had Issue. 2d. Anne to Alexander Mack­do [...]ald of Sana, in vice comitatu de Ar­gyle, and afterwards to Walter Camp­bel of Skipnish, of the same County, and had Issue. 3d. Jean to Angus Campbel of Skipnish, Junior and had Issue.

Sir Dougal his Son married Elisa­beth Daughter of Sir Thomas Ruthven of Dunglass, by Mary his Wife, Daugh­ter of Alexander 1st Earl of Leven, by whom he had two Sons, Sir James who succeeded him. Mr. Dougal Steuart of Blairhall, who having ap­plyed himself to the study of the Law, became soon so fam'd in that Profession, that Her Majesty was pleased to name him one of the Senators of the College of Justice, and one of the Lords of the Justiciary, 12 May 1709, and having served Com­missioner in diverse Parliaments, both before and since the commencement of the Union, he still discharged that trust with Honour and Integrity, particularly in relation to the Union of the Kingdoms, where he acted so conscientious and honourable a Part, that Ages to come will equally e­steem him for the Regard he then shew'd for the Honour of his Country, as for his Abilities upon the Bench, which he has in the Opinion of all, to a very eminent degree. He married Mary Daughter of — Bruce of Blairhall, and has Issue.

Also several Daughters, Barbara married to Alexander Campbel of Bar­break, in vice comitatu de Argyle, and has Issue, and Margaret to Dougal Laumont, apparent Heir of Archibald Laumont of that Ilk, and has Issue. He departed this Life in May 1672, and was succeeded by

Sir James his Son and Heir, who upon Her Majesty's Accession to the Throne was named a Privy Coun­sellour, and appointed one of the Commissioners upon the Part of Scot­land to Treat of a nearer Union with England, anno 1702, which then took not effect, and by Letters Patent bear­ing date 14th April 1703, raised to the Honour of Earl of Bute, Viscount of Kingarth, Lord Mont Steuart, Cumra and Inchmarnock. In 1706, he was one of the Peers who dissen­ted from the Union, and when he discovered the Parliament was by a Majority disposed to go into it, he left the House and retired to his [Page 57] Seat in the Country. He married 1st. Agnes eldest Daughter of Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, Lord Advo­cate, in the Reign of King James VII. by whom he had

James the present Earl, and a Daughter Margaret married to John Crawfurd Lord Kilbirny, and Vis­count of Garnock, and had Issue. And by Christian his second Wife Daugh­ter of William Dundass of Kincavill he had a Son John. This Earl died at the Bath in England, 4th June 1710, and was interr'd in the Church of Rothsay among his Ancestors, up­on him I find this Epitaph,

Per multos proavos Regali stemmate cretus,
Qui fuerant fidi Regibus usque suis,
Pulchra fuit cui mens habitans in corpore pulchro,
Cuique Genus Geniusque Ingeniique vigor,
Ornarunt Animum virtusque scientia juris,
Et Regum & Patriae & Relligionis amor
Ille & Apostolico Clero tot fluctibus acto
Vivens & moriens grande levamen erat.

Which James now Earl of Bute had a considerable Accession to his Estate by the decease of George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, his Uncle, to whose For­tune he succeeded in 1707, and which he is obliged by the Destination to give to his second Son, who is to bear the Sirname, and wear the Arms of Mackenzie of Rosehaugh. His Lord ship married the Lady Anne Campbel Daughter of Archibald Duke of Ar­gyle, and has a Daughter Lady Mary.

ARMS.

Or, a Fess checkque, Azure and Ar­gent, within a double Tressure Counter­flour'd Gules, supported on the dexter with a Horse, Argent, and on the sinister with a Stag proper, Crest, a Demi Lyon rampant, Gules, issuing out of an Earls Coronet, with this Motto, Nobilis Ira.

Nota, A Principal Branch of this Fa­mily was Steuart of Kilcattan, in vice co­mitatu de Bute, whose Descendants now enjoy a fair Estate in the Kingdom of Ireland, of whom is Steuart of Ascog, which remains to this Day seated in the Isle of Bute, John Steuart now of As­cog, being the fifth Descendant from John his Predecessor, a younger Son of William Steuart of Kilcattan, in the Minority of King James VI.

Earl of Caithness

IN the Time of King William one Harold was Earl of this Coun­try; but for Rebellion his Estate was forfeited, anno 1187a, and con­tinued in the Crown till the Year 1222b, when King Alexander II. bestowed it upon Magnus the Son of Gilibred Earl of Angus, for the pay­ment of a yearly Duty of ten Pound Sterling to the King and his Succes­sorsc. The Honour continued in this Race till it expired in a Daugh­ter married to the Earl of Ro [...]s, in the Reign of King David II.d

The next who had this Title, was David Steuart Son to King Robert II. by Eupham Ross. He was created Count Palatine of Strathern, and Earl of Caithness, upon his Father's Ac­cession to the Sovereignty, anno gra­tiae 1370, but he dying without Male Succession, it devolved on Wal­ter Earl of Athole, his immediate younger Brother, who dispon [...]d it to Allan Steuart his Son, who was kil­led at the Battel of Innerlochy e, leaving no Issue; so that by his Fa­ther's Forfaulture it came to the Crown.

CRICHTON Earl of Caithness.

CAithness was again erected into an Earldom, in the Person of Person of George Crichton of Cairns, a Lord high Admiral of Scotland, anno 1452, but he dying in the Year 1455b, left only a Daughter Janet married to John Master of Maxwel, whereby the Honour extinguished.

SINCLAIR Earl of Caithness.

WIlliam Sinclair Earl of Orkney Lord high Chancellour of Scotland, in the Reign of King James II. obtained from that Monarch a Grant of the Earldom of Caithness in Compensation of a Claim he had to the Lordship of Nithsdale, bearing date 29th April 1456c. He convoyed this Earldom with the Ho­nour to William Sinclair, one of his Sonsd, who married Mary Daughter of Sir William Keith of Inver [...]gy. He was slain at the Field of Floudon, 1513, leaving Issue by the said Mary his Wife.

John his Son and Heir, and Ale­xander Sinclair founder of the Family of Dunbeth, which John took to Wife Mary Daughter of William Sutherland of Duffus e, by whom he had George who succeeded him. This Earl was killed in an Insurrection of the Inhabitants of Orkney, 29th May 1529f.

George the 3d Earl of Caithness, was constituted Justiciary within the bounds of Caithness by Queen Mary anno 1566, and in 1568 was one of the Peers who sat upon the Trial of James Earl of Bothwell. He married Elisabeth. Daughter of William 2d Earl of Montrose, by whom he had,

John his eldest Son, who died in the Year 1577g, leaving three Sons and a Daughter by Jean his Wife, Daughter of Patrick Earl of Bothwell, George who succeeded in the Earldom: James Sinclair of Murthill Ancestor to the present Earl of Caithness h, and John Sinclair of whom descended Sinclair of Greenland i. Mary, first Wife to Sir John Hume of Col­dingknows, and afterward of Andrew Earl of Errol.

George Sinclair second Son, was Progenitor of the Sinclairs of May k in the Shire of Caithness, his Wife was Margaret Daughter of William Lord Forbes.

He had likewise several Daugh­ters, 1st. Beatrix, married to Ale­xander Earl of Sutherland l, but had no Issue. 2d. Elisabeth to Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, sans Issue, and afterward to Hutcheon Mackcay of Far m, Ancestor to the present Lord Rae. Margaret to William Su­therland of Duffus n. Barbara to Ale­xander Innes of that Ilko.

This Earl died in a good old Age, in 1583p, and was immediately succeeded by

George his Grand-son, who was married with Jean Daughter of George Earl of Huntly, by whom he had William Lord Berrindale, who mar­ried Mary Daughter of Henry Lord [Page 59] Sinclair a, and died in the Lifetime of his Father, leaving behind him a Son, John Lord Berrindale, who died in 1639b, leaving a Son George by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Colin Earl of Seaforth, who succeed­ed to the Earldom upon the decease of his Great Grandfather, in 1643c.

Which George Earl of Caithness married Mary Daughter of Archibald Marquess of Argyle, but died with­out Succession, anno 1676. George Sinclair his Cousin, by reason of his slender Estate, declined to take upon him the Honour, wherefore the Title of Earl of Caithness was conferr'd upon Sir John Campbel of Glenurchy, who had acquired most of the Fortune, anno 1677. But in the Year 1681, the said George Sinclair, Cousin German and Heir Male to the late deceased Earl, laying Claim to the Title, it was allowed him by the Parliament; but he dying unmarried, anno 1698, by reason of the Entail upon the Heirs Male, John Sinclair of Murthill succeeded in the Honour. He mar­ried Jean Carmichael, by whom he had

Alexander the present Earl of Caith­ness.

John.

Francis.

Janet, All unmarried.

ARMS.

Three Coats quarterly, 1st Azure, a Ship at Anchor, her Oars erected in Saltyre, within a double Tressure counter­flour'd Or, 2d and 3d Or, a Lyon Rampant, Gules, 4th Azure, a Ship under Sail Or, overal dividing the Coats, a Cross ingraled Sable, supported by two Griffons, Crest a Cock proper, with this Motto, Commit thy Work to God.

LIVINGSTON Earl of Calender.

SIR James Livingston, First Earl of Calendar, was the 2d Son of Alexander Earl of Linlithgow, by Elea­nor his Wife, Daughter of Andrew Earl of Erroll. Which Sir James being from his Youth bread up in the Wars of Bohemia, Holland, Sweden, and Ger­many, acquired a great Reputation in Martial Affairs: Upon his Return he was constituted one of the Gentle­men of the Bed-Chamber to King Charles I. and by Patent 19th June 1633d, created Lord Livingston of Almont, and Earl of Calendar, anno 1641.

In the beginning of the Civil War, he accepted of a Command in the Parliaments Service; but withdraw­ing himself from them, he freely re­sorted to the Service of his injur'd Sovereign, and was constituted Lieu­tenant-General of the Scots Army, who in the 1648 attempted to rescue the King from his fatal Imprison­ment in the Isle of Wight: But the enterprise miscarrying, he retired to Holland, where he stayed till the Murder of his Majesty. He mar­ried Margaret Daughter of John Lord Yester, Widow of Alexander Earl of Dunfermling, and dying very aged, in 1672, both his Estate and Title descended to

Alexander Livingston his Nephew, who marrying Mary Daughter of Wil­liam Duke of Hamilton, died 1685, leaving no Issue save a natural Son. Sir Alexander Livingston of Glenterren, Baronet, his Fortune and Honour de­volved upon

Alexander Livingston, his Nephew, Son of George Earl of Linlithgow, who deceased in the Year 1694, lea­ving [Page 60] Issue by Anne his Wife, Daughter of James Marquess of Montrose, James his Son and Heir, who upon the Death of his Uncle, Alexander Earl of L [...]nlithgow, anno 1695, suc­ceeded him in that Earldom, and two Daughters,

Lady Henrietta. unmarried.

Lady Mary. unmarried.

FAIRFAX, Lord Cameron.

THE Family of Fairfax, which is unquestionably one of the most Ancient and best allyed in Eng­land, had first its Seat at Toucester, in the County of Northumberland, where we find it at the Conquest of that Kingdom, anno 1060, from whence it removed a [...]fterwards to the County of York, where, anno 1204, the 6th of King John, we find Richard Fair­fax possessed of several Lands, par­ticularly of the Mannor of Askham, to which Richard, succeeded William Fairfax, who, by Alicia his Wife, Daughter and Heir of Nicholas de Bugthorp, had Issue one Son William, who purchased the Mannor of Walton in the same County, by which, he and his Successors were after­wards designed, and yet in the Pos­session of of his Family.

From whom, the 8th in a straight Male Line, was Thomas Fairfax o [...] Walton, to whom anno 1415, the 2d of Henry V, succeeded another Richard, who, by Eustace his Wife, Daughter and Heir of John Caltrop de Caltrop Esq had Issue six Sons, Viz.

1st. William of Walton who succeed­ed him.

2d. Bryan, Doctor of the Laws.

3d. Sir Guy Fairfax, Knight, Justice of the King's Banch.

4th. Richard.

5th. Sir Nicholas, Knight of Rhodes.

6th. Miles Fairfax.

And three Daughters, of whom Ellen the youngest, was Lady Prio­ress of Nunmuncton.

Of which William of Walton, eldest Son of the said Richard, who died the 31st Henry VI. anno 1453, de­scended, after five Generations, Sir Thomas Fairfax, who the 3d of Charles I. was created Viscount Fairfax of Emelay, in the Kingdom of Ireland, and by Katharine his Wife, Daughter of Sir Henry Constable, and Sister of the Viscount Dunbar, had Issue six Sons and five Daughters, of whom Thomas, the eldest Son succeeded him, and Henry the second was Father of Henry Fairfax of Hurst Esq whose Daughter and sole Heir Frances is mar­ried to David now Earl of Buchan.

Of which Thomas, Nicholas now Lord Viscount of Fairfax, is lineal Descendant and Representative, and the One and Twentieth, who has suc­ceeded in this Family in a straight Male-Line, since the said sixth of King John, being the space of 507 Years.

But leaving to others, a more par­ticular Account of that noble House, as not belonging to this present Work, We shall proceed to a younger Son, viz. Sir Guy Fairfax above-men­tioned, 3d Son of Richard Fairfax of Walton, of whom the Lord Came­ron is descended.

Which Sir Guy, got from the said Richard his Father, the Lands and Mannor of Steeton, in the County of York; And being a Person eminent for his Parts and Learning, was made Atturney General, the 3d Edward IV. anno 1464, and Judge of the King's Bench the 17th of the same Reign. He built Steeton Castle, afterwards the Seat of his Family, and had a Chapel there, consecrated by Arch-Bishop Rotheram; He also founded a Chantery at Sheriff-Hutton, anno 7mo. Henry VII. and died in the [Page 61] 11th Year of the same Reign, anno 1495, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Ryther of Ryther, Knight, four Sons, viz. Sir William who succeeded him, Tho­mas, Guy, and Nicholas, and two Daugh­ters, Ellen married to Sir Miles Wilesthorp, Knight, and Maudeline to Sir John Waterson of Medley, Ma­ster of the Horse to King Henry VI.

Which Sir William, eldest Son and Heir of Sir Guy, was a great Lawyer, and Judge of the common Pleas, from the 1st. to the 6th of Henry VIII. and by Elisabeth his Wife, eldest Daughter of George Mannours, Lord Roose, and Sister to Thomas Earl of Rutland, whose Grand-mother was Sister to Edward the 4th King of England, had Issue, one Son William, who succeeded him, and four Daugh­ters,

Ellen, married to Sir William Pickering, Knight, by whom he had Sir William Pickering, so great a Fa­vorite of King Edward VI. and Queen Elisabeth.

Elisabeth, married to Sir Robert Vightred.

Anne, to Sir Robert Normanville, Knight.

And Dorothy to — Constable of Kexby Esq

Which Sir William Fairfax of Steeton, Knight, Son and Heir of Sir William the Judge, married Isabella, Daughter and Heir of John Thwaits, of Thwaits and Denton, in the Coun­ty of York, Esq in whose Right he got the said Mannour of Denton, and had by her five Sons, viz.

Sir Thomas who succeeded him, Francis, Edward, Gabriel, and Henry.

Also six Daughters, 1st Anne mar­ried to Sir Henry Everingham, Mary to — Rockley Esq Bridget to Sir Cotton Gargrave, Ursula and Susanna.

To which Sir William Fairfax there are two Letters from King Henry VIII. one of the 35th and another the 38th of his Reign, in­dorsed, To our Trusty and well be­loved Sir William Fairfax, Knight, which Letters are yet extant, and to be seen at Denton Castle, in the said County of York, whereof he was high Sheriff, the 26th and 31st of the said Henry VIII. and a third time nominated, but died ult. Octob. the 5th of Philip and Mary, Anno Dom. 1557.

He gave to his 5th Son Gabriel the Mannor of Steeton, and several other Lands, being (according to the Superstition of these Times) highly offended with Sir Thomas his eldest Son, for being with the Duke of Bourbon, at the sacking of Rome, in the beginning of the Reformation, but that Loss was sufficiently made up to him, by his succeeding, in Right of his Mother, to the said Estate of Denton, which became, from that time, the principal Seat of the Fami­ly, and of Gabriel the younger Bro­ther, who got Steeton, is descended another Family, known by the Di­stinction of Steeton, also in the County of York, where it has its Residence to this time.

Which Sir Thomas Fairfax of Den­ton, was high Sheriff of the County of York, the 14th of Elisabeth, knighted the 19th of her Reign, and died, alter performing many Services to his Country, the 42d of the same, Anno Dom. 1599, leaving Issue by Dorothy his Wife, Daughter of George Gayle of Acham-Grange, Tresaurer of the Mint at York, five Sons, viz.

Thomas that succeeded him.

Henry and Ferdinando, who both died young.

Sir Charles Fairfax Colonel of a Regiment at Ostend, the time of that famous Siege, where he was slain, after gaining immortal Honour by his brave Actions, as Camden and others have recorded.

And Edward Fairfax of Newhall, an excellent Poet, as appears by seve­ral [Page 62] of his Translations yet extant; also two Daughters,

Ursula, married to Sir Henry Bel­lasis of Newbourgh, in the County of York, Baronet, Mother by him of Thomas first Viscount Fa [...]conberg, An­cestor of Thomas, now Viscount of that Name.

And Christian, married to John Ask Esq

To Sir Thomas Fairfax of Denton, last mentioned, succeeded Sir Thomas, his eldest Son, who, Anno 1582, mar­ried Ellen, Daughter of Robert Ask Esq by whom he had six Sons, viz.

1st. Ferdinando, who succeeded him.

2d. Henry.

3d. Charles, of whom the Family of Menston is descended.

4th. William, and 5th. John, both killed in the defence of the City of Frankendale in the Palatinat.

6th. Peregrine killed in defence of Rochel in France; also two Daughters, Dorothy the eldest married to Sir Wil­liam Constable, Baronet, and Anne the 2d to Sir George Wentworth of Wolley, Knight.

Which Sir Thomas, being of a Mar­tial Spirit, accompanied into France the Earl of Essex, General of the English Army, sent by Queen Elisa­beth to the Assistance of Henry IV. of France, against the Spaniards and Catholick League, where an. 1591, in the lifetime of his Father, he was knighted by the said General, in the Camp before Roan in Normandy, from whence returning, not long after, with the said Army, after having performed many brave Actions for the Honour of his Country, he was, by the Queen, recei­ved with many marks of Distinction and Favour, and imployed by her in se­veral important Affairs, particularly in carrying a Commission into Scotland to King James VI. whom, he lived not only to see seated on the Throne of England, upon the Death of that Queen, but also till the Reign of his Son, King Charles I. in the 3d Year of whom by Patent bearing date, 4th May, 1627. He was created Lord Fairfax of Cameron, and died not before the 17th of he same Reign, anno Dom 1642, Aetat: 80, being full of Years, and no less of Honour, for his many Vertues, and great Skill in the Arts both of Peace and War, of which all allow him to have been a great Master.

To which Thomas Lord Cameron, succeeded Ferdinando his eldest Son, who by the Lady Mary, Daughter of Edmund Earl of Mulgrave, Lord Pre­sident of the North, Ancestor of John now Duke of Buckingham, had Issue,

Thomas Lord Cameron.

Charles, Colonel of Horse, slain at the Battle of Marston-Moor near York, Anno 1644.

And John, who died an Infant.

Also six Daughters. Ursula; who died unmarried;

Ellen, married to Sir William Selby of Twistle, in the County of Nor­thumberland, Baronet.

Frances to Sir Thomas Weddrington, Knight.

Elisabeth, to Sir William Craven, Knt.

Mary, to Henry Arthington of Ar­thington, Esq and

Dorothy, to Richard Hutton of Pop­pleton, Esq all of whom had Issue.

He married 2dly Rhoda, Daugh­ter and Heir of Thomas Chapman, Esq and had by her one Daughter, Ursula, born at Denton, a few Days before the Death of her Father, who died March 31st, 1648, & was succeeded by,

Thomas Lord Cameron, his eldest Son and Heir, who married Anne, Daughter and Co-heir of Horatio Lord Vere, Master of the Ordinance, and General of all the English Forces in the Palatinat, Holland and the Netherlands, by whom he had Issue two Daughters,

Mary the eldest, married to George Duke of Buckingham, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, and Master of the Horse to King Charles II. and Elisabeth died young.

Which Thomas Lord Cameron, so fam'd in English History, by the Name [Page 63] of General Fairfax, was born at Den­ton Castle, 17th January 1611, and going into the Low Country Wars in 1627, gave then (tho but sixteen Years old) such Proofs of a great Spirit and Martial Genius, as occasion­ed his being particularly noticed by the Lord Vere, above-mentioned, one of the greatest Captains of that Age, whose Daughter he afterwards married.

In 1640 he was knighted (his Father being then on Life) and the civil Wars beginning not long after, he came soon, to make no small Figure in them, by the many Proofs he gave, of his great Courage and Conduct, in the Service of the Parliament, whose Cause he early espoused, and in 1645, being then but 34 Years of age, was chosen supreme General of their Armies, which he command­ed, with great Success and Glory, till 1650, in which time, he performed such Actions, as wanted nothing but a better Cause, to have made his Fame immortal: But War being then de­creed against Scotland, by the Parlia­ment, and an Army appointed to march thither, he declared his Re­solution not to command it, or in­vade that Kingdom, and, thereupon, laid down his Commission, which, soon after, was bestowed on Oliver Cromwell, then Lieutenant General under him:

What the Reasons were, that in­duced this great Man, to lay down so high and important a Command, was at that time, variously, reported, some (as Clarendon relates) impu­ting it, to his Affection and Kindness to Scotland, of which he had always been a great favourer, and whereof he was born a Peer; but others, to his not being satisfied, with the Parliaments, having pusht things, so far, against the King, and to his, secretly, favouring the Interest of his Son K. Charles II. then admitted to the Government in that Kingdom, and crowned there; which Opinion was confirmed, by the Part he afterwards acted at the Restau­ration; In order to which, he en­tered, very early, into Measures with General Monk, to whom he gave con­siderable Assistance, in the Prosecu­tion of that glorious Design, upon the happy issue whereof, he had the Honour, to be one of the Commis­sioners which composed the solemn Deputation, sent by the Parliament to the King, upon that great Oc­casion, and arriving at the Hague, was received by his Majesty, with singular Favour and Goodness, and great Marks of Honour and Esteem, which he ever after continued to wards him; notwithstanding where­of, being weary of the great hurry and Confusion, in which he had spent much of his Time; he re­tired, soon after the Restauration, to his House in the Country, where, he passed, in peace and quiet, the re­mainder of his Life, highly beloved and honoured by all good Men, for his many great and heroick Qualities, and shining Vertues, for which, he is justly celebrated, by the greatest Pens of that Age, all sides and Par­ties agreeing, in giving due Praise, to his consummate Merits. He died of a short Sickness, Novemb. 11th. 1671, the 60th Year of his Age, and lyes buried at Bilbrough, near Tork, where a stately Monument was erected to his Memory, being succeeded in his Honour and Estate by,

Henry Fairfax, his Cousin Ger­man, eldest Son and Heir of Henry, 2d Son of Thomas the first Lord Cameron.

Which Henry, married Frances, Daughter and Heir of Sir Robert Barwick of Tolston, Knight, by whom he had Issue Thomas, who succeeded him. Henry, Bryan, and Barwick,

Also four Daughters,

Dorothy, married first to Robert Stapleton of Wighill Esq afterwards to Bennet Sherrard of Whissenden, in the County of Rutland, Esq

Anne, to Ralph Ker of Kocken, Esq [Page 64] in the County of Durham, and Ursula and Mary who died young.

Which Thomas Lord Cameron, mar­ried Katharin, only Daughter and Heir of Thomas Lord Colepepper, and dying 6th January 1710, left Issue

Thomas, now Lord Cameron, about 18 Years of Age: Henry and Robert.

Also three Daughters,

Margaret.

Katharine.

And Mary, All unmarried.

ARMS.

Or, three Bars Gamells Gules, over all a Lyon Rampant Sable, supported on the Dexter with a Lyon Rampant of the 2d, and on the Sinister with a Horse ready prepared; Crest, a Lyon passant guardant Sable, Motto, Lucem, fer, fax.

ERSKINE Lord Cardross.

THE Honour and Title of Lord Cardross, had its beginning in anno 1604, when James VI. of Scot­land, and first of Great Britain, by his Charter under the Great Seal, bear­ing date on March 27th in the said Year, erected the said Lordship, in favours of John Earl of Mar, Lord Treasaurer of Scotland, and Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, his Heirs and Assigns; In pursuance whereof, the said Earl, in anno 1615, assigned and disponed the same, and whole Rights thereto be­longing, to Henry Erskine, his 2d. Son, by the Lady Mary Steuart, his 2d. Wife, Daughter of Esme, Duke of Lennox, a Lady near in Blood to his said Majesty; who, as a further Mark of his Royal Favour, was also pleased to bestow on the said Henry, the Abby of Dryburgh in Teviotdale, for­merly a Seat of Monks of the Order of Promontre; the said Abby, with the Lands and Tythes thereto be­longing, being, by a special Act of Parliament, for that purpose, dissolved from the Crown.

Which Henry Lord Cardross, mar­ried Margaret, only Daughter of Sir James Ballanden of Broughtoun, and Sister of William first Lord Ballanden, by whom he had David his only Son and Heir, and one Daughter, Mary, who was married to Sir John Buchan­nan of that Ilk in the County of Stirling, and had Issue; and dying Anno 1636, was succeeded by,

David Lord Cardross, his only Son, who, an. 1645, married Anne, Daughter of Sir Thomas Hope of Craighall, Lord Advocate, Great Grand-father to the present Earl of Hopeton, by whom he had Issue, Henry, who succeeded him, and a Daughter, Margaret, mar­ried to William Cuningham of Bo­quhan, in the County of Stirling, Mother, by him, of Henry Cun­ningham of Boquhan, Junior, Re­presentative of the Burgh of Stirling, and District thereof in this present Parliament, anno 1712.

Which David married 2dly, (anno 1655,) Mary, 2d Daughter of George Bruce of Carnock, and Sister of Ed­ward and Alexander, both Earls of Kincardin, by whom he had Issue four Sons, and three Daughters.

Alexander the eldest Son, died young.

William the 2d, late Deputy Go­vernour of Blackness Castle, a Per­son of great Integrity and Honour, married Magdalen, Daughter of Sir James Lumsden of Innergelly, in the Shire of Fife, and had Issue by her, William, his eldest Son and Heir, unmarried, and James, yet in his Minority.

John, the 3d. who, upon all oc­casions, has appeared, with great Zeal, in the Cause of Religion and Liberty, and has thereby acquired an universal Esteem, retired into Holland, some Years before the Re­volution, in 1688. When he ac­companyed [Page 65] the Prince of Orange, in his Expedition into England, a little before which, he had a Company of Foot bestowed upon him in Holland; and soon after, upon that Prince's Acces­sion to the Throne, was made Lieu­tenant Governour of Stirling Castle, and afterwards Governour of Dum­barton, and a Lieutenant Colonel of Foot.

In 1695, he was chosen a Di­rector of the Company of Scotland trading to Africa and the Indies, and by them sent, with others, in 1696, into Holland, and other Foreign Parts, to manage the Affairs of that Com­pany; In pursuance whereof, such Progress was made at Hamburgh, and Encouragement given from other Parts, as had, in all appearance, been attended with the desired Success, had it not been for some Things, very unexpected, and surprising, and too well known to need mentioning.

He married 1st. Jean, Daughter and Heir of VVilliam Muir of Cald­well, in the Shire of Renfrew; but she dying soon after, without Issue, he married 2dly, Anne, eldest Daughter, and Co-heir of VVilliam Dundass of Kincavill, in the County of Linlith­gow, Advocate, by whom he has John his eldest Son and Heir, and several other Sons; also one Daughter, Mary, yet unmarried.

Charles the 4th Son, being a Cap­tain of Foot in the Low Countries, in the Service of the late King Wil­liam, was killed there, at the Battle of Stenkirk, the 24th of July 1692:

Veronica, his eldest Daughter, mar­ried to Walter Lockhart of Kirtoun, in the County of Lanerk, and has Issue,

Magdalen the 2d. to Alexander Monypenny of Pitmilly, in the Shire of Fife, and has Issue.

And Mary the 3d died young.

To which David Lord Cardross succeeded, Anno 1671. Henry his eldest Son and Heir, who, eodem anno, married Katharine, 2d Daughter, and at length sole Heir, of Sir James Steuart of Strabrock, in the Country of West-Lothian, by which Katharine, he had Issue.

David who succeeded him, now Earl of Buchan.

Charles Erskine Advocate.

William, deputy Governour of Blackness Castle, who married Marga­garet Daughter of Lieutenant Colonel John Erskine, deputy Governour of Stirling Castle, and has Issue by her, one Son John, in his Infancy, and a Daughter Jean, yet very young:

Thomas, yet in his Minority; and five more, who all died young.

Also three Daughters,

Katharine the eldest, married to Sir William Denham of Westshields, in the County of Lanerk, Baronet, but has no Issue by him.

Mary the 2d, yet unmarried.

And Anne, the 3d. married to Ar­chibald Edmondston of Duntreth, in vice comitatu de Stirling.

Which Henry Lord Cardross, being a Person of universally acknowledged Merit, and, upon all occasions, a stre­nuous asserter of the Rights and Liber­ties of his Country, met with many Hardships in the late Reigns, with which having strugled long, with great firmness and constancy, he at last with­drew into Holland, where he was kindly received by the Prince of Orange, afterwards King of Great Britain, whom he accompanyed in his Expe­dition into England, in 1688, And upon that Prince's Accession to the Throne (of which he was a zealous Promoter) had several Marks of his Favour bestowed on him, being soon after made a Privy Counsellour, Ge­neral of the Mint, and Colonel of a Regiment of Dragoons, As he was, at the same time, appointed by Parliament, one of the Commissioners for treating of an Union with England. Upon all which occasions, he behaved himself, so as to maintain the Cha­racter, he had all along had, of a Per­son of untainted Integrity and Ho­nour; and dying at Edinburgh the [Page 66] 21st of May, 1693, and 44th Year of his Age, was succeeded by,

David Lord Cardross, his eldest Son and Heir, who, upon the Death of William Earl of Buchan, anno 1695, without Issue, became also Earl of Buchan, of whom, and of his Mar­riage, and Issue, see an Account in Title Buchan.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th Gules, an Eagle displayed Or, looking toward the Sun in his Splendor, placed in the dex­ter chief Point, 2d quarterly, 1st and 4th Azure, a Bend betwixt six cross Croslets Or, 2d and 3d Argent, a Pale Sable, 3d quarterly, 1st and 4th Or, a Fess Cheque, Azure and Argent, 2d and 3d Azure, three Garbs Or, sup­ported, on the dexter by a Griffon proper, and on the Sinister, by a Horse ready prepared, Argent, Crest, upon the Point of a Sword, Paleways, a Boars Head craz'd, Or, Motto, Fortitudine.

CARLYLE, Lord Carlyle.

OF this Family, which is of great Antiquity in the Stew­artry of Annandale, was Sir William Cairlyle, Knight, in the Days of Ro­bert I. who was matched with Mar­garet Bruce, Sister to that King, as is evident from a Grant by that Mo­narch, Willielmo Cairlyle milite & Margaretae sponsae suae sorori nostrae Carissimae a de Terris de Crumanstoun.

Sir William Cairlyle, his Son, ob­tained from King Robert the Lands of Culen, una cum Tennendariis totius Baroniae de Torthorald b.

The Family continued in the state of Barons till James III. called Sir John Cairlyle of Torthorald, into the number of his Nobility, by the Title of Lord Cairlyle of Torthorald, anno 1473c. He had by the Grant of the said King, the Lands and Barony of Duncow, then in the Crown by the Forfaulture of Robert Lord Boyd, in recompence of his great Charge in an Embassy to France, anno 1477d. His Wife was Margaret Douglass, and dying anno 1500e, as appears from the Probate of his Testament, his Estate and Title of Lord descen­ded and came to.

William his Grandson and Heir (his own immediate Son dying in his Lifetime) who married Janet, Daughter of — Maxwell of —f; by whom he had James Lord Cairlyle, who married Janet Scrim­geour, Daughter of — Scrimgeour Constable of Dundee, he died Issue­less, anno 1629g.

Michael his Brother became his Heir. This Lord was on the King's side, in the Minority of James VI. and was one of the Peers who bound themselves to maintain his Authority, in 1569, which many of them signed, and this Lord with his Hand at the Pen, he dying about the Year 1580, His Estate, went to Elisabeth, Daugh­ter of William Master of Cairlyle his Grand-child, and sole Heir, who mar­ried Sir James Douglass of Parkhead.

DOUGLASS, Lord Cairlyle.

THIS Family owes its Original to George Douglass, natural Son to Sir George Douglass of Pitten drich, (killed at Pinkie,) who obtain'd the Lands of Parkhead, in Lanerk-shire, by the Marriage of Elisabeth, Daughter and Heir of James Douglass of Parkhead a. He left three Sons,

1st. Sir James Douglass of Tortho­rald, his Son and Heir.

2d. Sir George Douglass of Mording toun, one of the Gentlemen of the Bed chamber to King James VI.b who by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Archibald Dundass of Finzies, had Issue Sir George Douglass, who was Ambassador to Poland and Sweden, from King Charles I. anno 1633, and 1635, and died in that Character; likewise a Daughter Martha, married to Sir James Lockhart of Lee, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, and Justice Clerk, in the Reign of K. Charles II. Mother by him of Sir William Lockhart of Lee, who was Ambassa­dor from King Charles II. to the Crown of France. Sir George Lock­hart of Carnwath, President of the College o [...] Justice, and Sir John Lockhart of Castlehill, also one of the Lords of Council and Session.

3d. John Douglass Doctor in Di­vinity. Also three Daughters,

— married to Sir James Dun­dass of Arnestoun.

Martha, married to Mr. Robert Bruce of Kinnaird, one of the Ministers of the City of Edinburgh, Mary to John Carruthers, of Holmains.

This Sir James Douglass, was kill'd by William Steuart 31st July, 1608c, leaving

Sir James his Son and Heir to suc­ceed him, who marrying Elisabeth, Grandchild and Heir of Michael Lord Carlyle, was in her Right, created into the Dignity of Lord Carlyle of Torthorald: He had a Son James, who suceeded him.

Which James Lord Carlyle, & Tor­thorald married Elisabeth Daughter of Sir John Gordon of Lochenvar; but ha­ving no Issue, he resigned his Honour to William first Earl of Queensberry, anno 1638d, who had acquir'd his Estate, and thereby the Title became extinct in this Family.

ARMS.

Quarterly, 1st and 4th Gules, a Cross florie Or, 2d and 3d Or, a plain Cross Gules, in a Shield of pretence, the pa­ternal Coat of Douglass, viz. Argent, a Heart Gules, crowned with an im­perial Crown Or, on a chief Azure, three Stars of the first, supported by two Peacocks proper, Crest, a Dragons Heade, Motto, Humilitate.

DALZIEL, Earl of Carnwath.

THIS ancient Family original­ly of Dalziel, in vice comitatu de Lanerk, is of great Antiquity in that County, having matched with many worthy Families there, before they remov'd to the Shire of Niths­dale, where now there principal Seat is. Mr. Nisbet, a famous Herauld,f, gives this Story of the Origine [Page 68] of this Sirname, when he is accoun­ting for there old Bearing, which was anciently, A Man hanging on the Gallows, and was given (says he) as a Reward to one of the Progenitors of the Earl of Carnwath, to perpetuate the Memory of a brave and hazardous Ex­ploit perform'd in taking down from the Gallows the Body of a Favorite of King Kenneth II. hung up by the Picts. For, as the Story goes, the King being exceedingly grieved that the Body of his Minion and Friend should be so disgracefully treated, he profer'd a considerable Reward to any of his Subjects who would adventure to rescue his Corps, from the Disgrace his Enemies, had put upon him; But (adds he) When none would undertake this ha­zardous Interprise, at last a certain Gen­tleman came to the King, and said, Dalziel, which signifies I Dare, and actually did perform that noble Exploit to his immortal Honour: And in Me­mory of it, got the foresaid remarkable Bearing, and afterward his Posterity took the Word Dalziel for their Sir­name, and the Interpretation of it, I Dare, as the Motto of their Family.

But the first of this Name I have found upon Record, was Sir Robert de Dalziel, Knight, who faithfully adhering to King David Bruce, du­ring his Captivity in England, ob­tained in Consideration thereof, a Grant from the said Monarch of the Barony of Selkrig, of the date 15th May 1365a, his Successor.

Sir John Dalziel, Knight, tempore Ro­berti III. was in 1392, joined in Com­mission with diverse others to treat about the Prorogation of a Peace with the English b, and the next ensuing Year, he obtained by the Gift of the said King to himself in Liferent, and to Walter Dalziel his Son in Fee, the whole Revenue belonging to St. Leonard's Hospital, within the Burgh of Lanerk, upon Condition that he and his Heirs shall provide a qua­lified Person to celebrate three Masses once every seven Years, for the Sal­vation of Robert III. King of Scotland, Anapbella his Queen, and all their Children for everc.

Hence after several Generations, descended Robert Dalziel of that Ilk, who was killed in the Burgh of Drum­fries, 30th July 1508d, a in Skir­mish betwixt the Lords Maxwel and Crichton, leaving Robert his Son and Heir, Father of another Robert, who approv'd himself a loyal Subject to Queen Mary, when the civil War broke out in that Reign: I find he was one of the Barons, who upon her Majesty's escape from her Imprison­ment in Lochliven, bound themselves upon Conscience and Honour, to ad­here to her, against her rebelious Subjects, as may be seen from the original yet extant, bearing date, 8th May 1568e, and accompanyed her to the Battle of Langside f, where the Queen's Party was totally defeat.

He married Janet, Daughter of Gavin Hamilton of Raploch, Commen­dator of Kilwinning g, by whom he had Robert his Son and Heir, and a Daughter, Christian, married to John Hamilton of Orbestoun, and had Issue. He dying circa annum 1588, was suc­ceeded by,

Robert his Son and Heir, who re­ceived first the Honour of Knight­hood from King James VI. and be­ing a Baron of an opulent Fortune, was in Consideration of his own pro­per Merit, as well as the constant Loyalty of his Ancestors in all times [Page 69] past was by the special Favour of King Charles I. raised to the Honour of Lord Dalziel 18th of September 1628a, and thereafter Created Earl of Carn­wath, anno 1639. He married Margaret, Daughter of Sir Robert Crichton of Cluny b, by whom he had Robert his Successor, Sir John Dalziel of Glenae Ancestor to the present Earl of Carnwath, and a Daughter Lady Mary married to Sir James Muirhead of Lachop.

Which Robert was a Nobleman of great Honour and Reputation, and whose Loyalty and Affection to King Charles I. was very Remarkable, for as i [...] on as the Civil War broke out he was among the first who raised both Horse and Foot upon his own Charge, and served in the Command of them with great Courage and Fidelity, till the very end of the War, for which he suffered very much, both by Se­qu [...]stration and otherways: But all these hardships did not in the least discourage him in venturing Life and Fortune again in the Service of King Charles II. for as soon as an Army was raised to March into England with the King, the Earl accompanied his Majesty into that Kingdom, and was with him in the Fight at Worcester, where his Lordship had the Misfortune to fall into the Enemies Hands, who kept him Prisoner diverse Years which he sustained with great Patience and Magnanimity. He married Christian Daughter of Sir William Dowglas of Drumlanrig, c by whom he had

Gavin his Son and Heir, who mar­ried Margaret, Daughter of David Lord Carnegy, d and departing this Life in the Month of June 1674,e left Issue two Sons and a Daughter, viz. James and John both Earls of Carnwath, and a Daughter Jean, mar­ried to Claud Muirhead of Lachop.

Which James married Mary Daugh­ter of George Earl of Winton f, by whom he had only one Daughter, Elizabeth married to Lord John Hay, Son to John Marquis of Tweddale, and dying anno 1683g, was succeeded by,

John his Brother who died a Ba­tchelour on the 7th of June 1702h, his Estate and Honour devolv­ing on Sir Robert Dalziel of Glenae Baronet his Heir Male. This Earl married Grace Daughter of Alexander Earl of Eglinton, by whom he had a Daughter Lady Margaret Dalziel.

ARMS.

Sable, a naked Man with his Arms expanded proper, Supported by two Chevaliers, proper, Crest, a Dagger erected Saltyre-ways, Azure. Motto, I Dare.

CARRICK, Earl of Carrick.

DUncan of Galloway, Son of Gilbert Lord of Galloway, in the 20th of King William, anno 1185, had by the Bounty of that Prince, the Country of Carrick, erected to him in an Earldomi, out of which he found­ed the Abbacy of Crosragwell, for [Page 70] Cluniack Monks, and amply indued it with Lands and Tithes within his own Territories, and likewise gave to the Monks of Paisty and Melross several Donations out of his Estate, for the welfare of his Soul.a He left a Son,

Niel Earl of Carrick, who imitated the Piety of his Father in his Liberali­ty to the Church, of which his Gifts to the Monasteries of Crosragwell and Sandal are very remarkable Instances. He gave way to Fate on the 23d of June 1250b leaving one Daughter, Margaret his sole Heir, who married first Adam de Kilconcath, who thereup­on was Earl of Carrick, but he dying in the Holy Land anno 1272c with­out any Issue, She married again Robert de Bruce Lord of Annandale, to whom she brought the Title of Earl of Carrick.

BRUCE, Earl of Carrick.

SIR William Dugdale in his Ba­ronage of England, makes men­tion, that among the many valiant and noble Normans who accompanied Wil­liam Duke of Normandy in his Expedi­tion into England, was one Robert de Bruce, who had by the Grant of that Victorious Prince the Lordship of Skeltoun in York Shire, and other Lands in that County of great Value and Extent. A Descendent from him, an­other Robert de Bruce obtained from King David 1st. of Scotland, the Lordship of Annandale, with all the Lands from the bounds of Dunegall to the Limits of Ranulph de Meschines, Lord of Cumberland d. He lef [...],

Robert Lord of Annandale his Son and Heir, who gave to the Episcopal See of Glasgow, cum consensu Roberti de Bruce fi [...]ii sui, the Churches of Moffat Kilpatrick, Drumsdale, Hoddam, and Castlemilk, pro salute animae suae e. He married Isabel, natural Daughter to King Wil [...]iam of Scotland, f by whom he had Robert his Son and Heir, who married a Lady of very Royal Birth. viz. Isabel second Daughter of David Earl o [...] Huntington, in Right of whom his Posterity came to injoy the Crown of this Realm. By her he had

Robert Lord of Annandale, who in the 1290 upon the demise of Queen Mar­garet, laid Claim to the Crown of Scotland, both in regard he was the nearest Male in Propinquity of Blood, to the deceast King Alexander, as well as in respect of a Parliamentary Settle­ment had been made in his Favours by the foresaid Kingg. But the Right of Succession being adjudged against him, by Edward the I. of England, to whom all the different Competitors had re­ferred the Decision of their respective Claims, he absolutely refused even in the presence of King Edward, to ac­quiesce in it: Nor did he ever do Homage to, or acknowledge John Ba­liol as King, and to avoid making any such acknowledgement after the de­finitive Sentence was pronounced, he gave up all his Lands in Scotland, to Robert Earl of Carrick his Eldest Son, and dying anno 1295,h left Issue by Isabel his Wife, Daughter of Richard de Clare Earl of Clare and Hartford, [Page 71] Robert his Son and Heira, and Christian married to Patrick Earl of Dunbar and March.

Which Robert was in his Youth sign­ed with the Cross b, and was one of those many Scotsmen that went with St. Lewis King of France in his last Expedition against the Infidels, and afterward accompanied Edward the I. then Prince of England, to the Holy-Land, where he gained singular Ho­nour and Reputation. Upon his return he obtained the Sole Daughter and Heir of the Earl of Carrick in Marriage, in whose Right he was Stiled Earl of Carrick, and by that Title he was one of the Peers who in 1284, bound themselves in the most solemn man­ner, that in case King Alexander should die without Heirs of his own Body, to own and acknowledge Margaret of Norway his Grandchild, as their Sove­reign & Queen of Scotland. c Upon the Decease of that Princess, when the Suc­cession to the Crown was determined against his Father, he disowned John Baliol as King, and was an irreconcile­able Enemy to him. After the Death of his Father, he asserted his own Title to the Crown, and resolved to pro­secute his Right, but was prevented by Death before a favourable oppor­tunity offered anno 1303d, leaving Issue by Margaret Countess of Carrick his Wife, Robert and Edward both Earls of Carrick, Neil, Thomas and Alex­ander, who all three lost their Lives in the War against the English; like­wise six Daughters:

Isabel married to Sir Thomas Ran­dolph e, Lord High Chamberlain of Scotland.

Mary, to Sir Niel Campbel Knight, Lord of Lochow, and after his Death to Sir Alexander Fraser f, Lord [...] Chamberlain of Scotland.

Christian, first to Gratney Ea [...] Mar, next to Sir Cristopher Se [...]on [...] Winton, and after that to Sir And [...] Murray Lord of Bothwel.

Matilda, to Hugh Earl of Ross.

Margaret, to Sir William Carlyle of Torthorald.

Elizabeth, to Sir William Dishi [...]gton of Ardross h Knight.

327 328 329 To Robert Earl of Carrick succeed­ed Robert his Son, who upon the Death of his Father revived his pre­tentions to the Crown, and being joined by such of the Nobility, and others who were willing to redeem their Country from the Subjection and Slavery it was under; bravely fought his way through innumerable Difficulties to the Crown, into which he was solemnly inaugurated on the 27 of March 1306, by the Name of Robert the first, and that with the uni­versal applause of the whole King­dom, who thought themselves bound in gratitude, to run the fate of that brave Prince, who had so gloriously redeemed them from Tyranny, Slavery and the Yoke of a Foreign Power. Were it here proper to enter on a particular detail of his Actions, I could even add a great deal more for the Honour of his Memory, than what the latest Writers of his Life have said upon that Subject. But in regard of the Brevity of this Work, it shall suf­fice to say, no Age has produced a more extraordinary Man than King Robert the Bruce, examine all the Heroes of Plutarch, and all those great Men that have lived since that Histori­an, and it will be difficult to find any upon Record, who possessed more [Page 72] eminently all those Virtues and Qualities that enter into the Compo­sition of a great Man. All I shall further add, shall he to take notice of his Children, not only such as have been mentioned by our Histori­ans, but others who have been very unaccou [...]tably omitted by them.

King Robert had by Isabel his first Wife, Daughter of Donald Earl of Mar, a Daughter Majory married to Walter Lord High Steward of Scotland, Mo­ther by him to King Robert II. the first of our King's of the Royal Line of the Ste [...]arts a. Also by Mary his 2d Wife, Daughter of Ailmer [...] Bur [...] Earl of U [...]ster, he had David II, who succeeded him in the Sovere [...]gnty of Scot [...]and, who after a Reign of Forty Years, died without any Issue of his Body, and with him the Royal Brucian Family did expireb; likewise three Daughters,

Margaret married to William Earl of Sutherland c, and had Issue.

Matilda to Thomas de Tssack, by whom she had a Daughter Jean married to John de Ergadia Lord of Lorn d.

Elizabeth married to Sir Walter Oliphant, Ancestor to the Lord Oli­phant, who, tho she has not been taken notice of by any other Writer; yet its beyond all dispute, she was King Roberts Daughter, from the Authority of a Charter in the Custody of Oliphant of Gask, which I have seen, bearing Date on the 11th of January 1364,e whereby King David erects the Lands of Gask into a Barony, Dilecto & fideli suo Waltero Olyfant. & El [...]zabethae Sponsae suae dilectae sorori nostrae cum [...]peciali Libertate dicto Wal­tero, & Elizabeth piscandi in aqua de [...]rne tribus diebus septimanae tempore anni probi [...]ito.

Upon the Accession of King Robert I. to the Crown, he gave the Earldom of Carrick to his brave and faithful Brother, Sir Edward Bruce, thereafter King of Ireland, who being slain at the Battle of Dundalk, anno 1318, le [...]t a natural Son Robert Bruce Lord of Lyds­dale, on whom his Uncle King Robert bestowed the Earldom of Carrick, who being slain at the Battle of Duplin anno 1332 was succeeded in his Estate and Title by Alexander his Brother, who lost his Life soon there­after, at the Battle of Halydonbill in 1333, leaving a Daughter Helen Countes [...] [...]f Carrick his Heir, who married first Sir William Cunningham Knight, and thereafter Sir Duncan Wallace of Sundrum, but by neither of them had she any Issue, so upon her Death, the Earldom of Carrick return­ed to the Crown, where it remained, till King David II. gave it to John Stewart Lord Kyle his Nephew, eldest [Page 73] Son and Heir of Robert, then Earl of Strathern (afterward K. Robert II.) who was created Earl of Carrick the 39th of David II.a which Title he bore till he came to the Crown in the 1390, by the Name of Robert III. He an nexed this Honour to the Principality, anno 1404; wherefore the Names of the Successors in this Earldom, are such, as were Princes of Scotland, which are not necessary to be inserted here.

STEUART, Earl of Carrick.

THIS honourary Title was be­stowed by King Charles I. u­pon John Steuart Lord Kincliven, Son of Robert Earl of Or [...]ney, natural Son of King James V. about the Year 1633; but he died not long after the Acquirement thereof, without any surviving Male Issue.

KENNEDY, Earl of Cassils.

THAT the Kennedys are origi­nally from Ireland is without Doubt, but as to the precise Time, when, they transplanted themselves thither, 'tis not certain: The Sir­name is from one Kenneth, the proper Name of some eminent Person of their Family, which they assumed, when Sirnames became fixed and he­reditary; The first of whom, I have found upon Record, was Sir John Kennedy, Knight, who is mentioned in a solemn Treaty with the English, relative to the Redemption of King David Bruce, anno 1357b He added to his ancient patrimo [...]al Inheri­tance the Barony of Cassils, by Ac­quisition, from Marjory, Daughter of Sir John de Montgomery Knight, which was ratified by King David II.c with the special Approbation o [...] Walter Bishop of Glasgow: He founded a Church at Maybole, in Carrick, and endoued it for the Maintainance, and Support, of a Clerk, and three Chaplains, per­petually to perform divine Service, in Honour of God and the Blessed Virgin Mary, and for the healthful Estate of himself, and Mary his Wife, and their Children, while in this Life, and for the Salvation of their Souls, after their Departure hence; and for all the faithful deceased, to which he appends his Seal, at Dun­nure, the pen [...]lt of November 1371,d by the said Mary his Wife. He left Issue two Sons.

Gilbert, his Successor.

Sir Hugh Kennedy of Ardstincher e, who acquired great Reputation and Honour in the French Wars.

Which Gilbert was one of the Ho­stages sent to England, for the Re­demption of King David Bruce, anno 1357f, and standing highly in Fa­vour with Robert III. he received the Honour of Knighthood from the said King, and several Grants of Lands within the Earldom of Carrick, in Consideration of the special Favour he bore him.

His first Wife was Mary, Daughter of Sir James Sandylands of Calder g, by whom he had Gilbert, who died in the French Service, without Issue, and Thomas, first of the Branch of Bargany h of whom Sir Thomas Kennedy of Kirkhill is the lineal Male Representative. Also by Marion i, [Page 74] his second Wife, Daughter of Sir Robert Maxwel of Calderwood: He had a Son, Sir James, on whom his Father settled his Estate, by Reason of his Marriage with the Lady Mary Steuart, Daughter of King Robert III. Countess Do [...]ager of Angus, which occasioned Gilbert, the eldest Son of the first Marriage, and Sir James to fall into a [...]atal Quarrel, in which the latter lost his Li [...]e; but by the said Lady Mary his Wife he had Issue two Sons.

Gilbert, afterward Lord Kennedy. And,

James, who being educated accor­ding to his noble Birth, devoted him­self to the Service of God, and en­tring into Orders, he passed through some inferior Stations in the Church, and came to be promoted to the E­piscopal See of Dunkeld, anno 1438a, and translated thence to the Bishop­rick of St. Andrews, in the Year of our Lord 1440b, in place of Bishop Wardlaw deceased, and not long after he was constituted; Lord high Chan­cellour of Scotland, and one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King James II. In all which Stations, he acquitted himself with such Advan­tage and Reputation, that he became an Ornament to his Profession. In the Year 1456, he founded a College in the City of St. Andrews, dedica­ted in Honour of our Blessed Lord and Saviour, and competently endow­ed it, which still continues a Monu­ment of his Piety. This worthy Man, for his Learning and other Ver­tues, deserves to have his Memory perpetually honoured and esteem'd; not only by those of his own Com­munion, but also of all who regard Learning and Probity. He has large Encomiums by all our Historians, particularly George Buchanan, who says, That In eo viro, praeter virtutes a [...]te commemoratas erant summa domi frugalitas & continentia, foris splendor & Magnificentia, omnes superiores, qui eum [...]sque ad hanc diem secati sunt, Epis­copos superavit. He dyed in a good advanced Age, on the 10th May 1466, & lyes buried in the Collegiat Church of St. Andrews, where you may see a fair Monument, much decayed, more by Reason, of the Brittleness of the Stone, of which 'tis composed, than its Antiquity, having neither Inscri­ption, nor painting, but a plain Coat of Arms.

To Sir Gilbert Kennedy, of Dun­nure succeeded Gilbert, his Grand­son, who obtained from King James I. his Uncle, a Grant of the heredi­tary Constabulwick of the Castle of Lochdon, by a Commission, of the date 14th May, 1430, and standing highly, in Favour with King James II. he was by him constituted heretable Baillie of [...]he Earldom of Carrick, and he and his Heirs Male, in all time coming, by His Majesty's special Ap­pointment, made Caput totius prosa­piae suae, and about the same time came to be called Lord Kennedy c. In 1460, upon King James III. his Ac­cession to the Crown, he was appoin­ted one of the six Governours during the said Kings Minority, which he managed with great Discretion and Applause; and marrying Agnes, Daughter of Herbert Lord Maxwel, had Issue by her. John who succeeded him, and two Daughters, Katharine, married to Alexander Lord Montgome­ry d. Marion, to John Wallace of Craigie e. John, the 2d. Lord of the Fa­mily, was one of the Privy Council to King James III. In the Year 1484f. He was appointed one of the Commissioners upon the part of Scot­land to treat with the English touch­ing [Page 75] a Peace. His first Wife was Jean, Daughter of Alexander Lord Montgomery, by whom he had David his Son and Heir. He second Wife was, Elisabeth Gordon, Daughter to the Earl of Huntly, Widow of William Earl of Errol a, by whom he had a Son Alexander; of whom came the Kennedys of Girvanmains and Bar­qu [...]anny b, and Jean, married to Archibald Earl of Angus c. He dyed about 1508, was succeeded by,

David his Son; who being of the Privy Council to King James IV. was by the special Favour of the said King, honoured with the Title of Earl of Cassils, anno 1509d. He took to Wife, Agnes, Daughter to William Lord Borthwick; by whom he had Gilbert his Successor, and after her Death Margaret Boyd, Daughter of Thomas Earl of Arran, and was killed at the Battle of Floudon, where fell the Flower of the Scots Nobility, together with their Sovereign King James IV. in 1513.

To David Earl of Cassils, succeeded Gilbert his Son, who was of the Privy Council to King James V he was sent Ambassador to England, anno 1524, & in 1526, together with the Earls of Lennox and Glencairn, he attempted to rescue the King out of the Custody of the Earl of Angus; for which he suffered much by the opposite Party, and at last by their Contrivance, was barbarously Murdered at Prestick, 22 December 1527e, leaving Issue by Isobel his Wife, Daughter of Archibald Earl of Argyle, Gilbert, who succeeded him in the Honour. 2d. Quintin, Abbot of Corsragwell, who dyed 1564, and was canoniz'd as a Saint.

Which Gilbert, was with King James V. at the Battle of Soloway, anno 1542, where he was taken Prisoner, but was soon afterward re­leased by King Henry VIII. with several Marks of his Favour, and dispatched home to use his Interest for the bringing about a Match be­twixt Queen Mary, and Edward Prince of England, and so to unite the Crowns, which then met with great Opposi­tion. In the 1554, he was promo­ted to be Lord high Treasaurer of Scotland, upon the Resignation of John Arch-Bishop of St. Andrews; and in 1558, he was one of the Peers who were sent over to France to as­sist at the Marriage of Queen Mary with Francis I. and their Died at Diep the 28th of October 1558, he was married to Elisabeth, Daughter and Heir of John Kennedy of Colzean, by whom he had, 1st. Gilbert. 2d. [...] Thomas Kennedy of Colzean, An­cestor of Sir John Kennedy Baronet. 3d. Jean, married to Robert Steuart Earl of Orkney. And 4th. Katharine, to Sir Patrick Waus of Barnburow, and both had Issue.

Gilbert Earl of Cassils, Son of the former Earl, was named a Privy Counsellour to Queen Mary, in 1562. He adhered to her Interest, upon the breaking out of the Civil War, in that Reign, and assisted her in Person at the Battle of Lang [...]ide, which was sought the 13th May 1568; but after­ward he submitted to the Authority of the young King her Son. He mar­ried Margaret, Daughter of John Lord Glammis, by whom he had two Sons, John, and Gilbert, then designed Ma­ster of Cassils, and departing this Life in 1576f, had the Honour of this EPITAPH from the Great Buchanan.

Hic situs est heros humili Gilbertus in urna,
Kennedus antiquae nobilitatis honos,
Musarum matrisque decus patrisque minister
Et columen patriae consiliumque suae:
Occidit insidiis falla [...]i exceptus ab hoste
Bis tria post vitae lustra peracta suae
Parce hospes lachrymis & inane comprime luctu [...]
Non misere quisquam, qui bene vixit, obit.

[Page 76] John, the next Earl of Cassils, was con­stituted Lord high Thesaurer of Scot­land, anno 1599, upon the Removal of Walter, Prior of Blantyre, and marry­ing Jean, Daughter of James Lord Fleeming, died without Succession, in the 1615, and left his Peerage and E­state to John Son of Gilbert Master of Cassils, his Nephew, who was a Person of great Parts and exemplary Vertues. After the Murder of the King in 1649, he was with the Earl of Lo­thian, the Lord Burligh, Sir John Brody and Sir George Windram, sent Com­missioners from the Estates of Scot­land, to King Charles II. then at Breda, where they concluded a Trea­ty, in Pursuance whereof, His Ma­jesty set Sail for Scotland, and arri­ving there, he was crown'd at Scoon, 1st January 1651. After the total Sup­pression of the roval Cause in Britain, by the Defeat of the Scots Army at the Battle of Worcester 3d September 1651. This Earl was so exemplary in his Loyalty and Fidelity to the King, that even when Cromwel called him­sel [...] Protecter, he could never bring, says an Author of no small Credita, this Lord, to advance one step toward him, in outward Civilities; and sur­viving all our intestine Commotions, he liv'd to see the King restored, but had never any Benefit by the Court, being in Matters of Religion, and in relation to the Church, purely Presby­terian.

He married two Wives; the first was Jean, Daughter of Thomas Earl of Haddingtoun, by whom he had two Daughters, Margaret, married to Dr. Gilbert Bar [...]et, the present Bishop of Sarum, in England; and Katharine to William Lord Cochran, Son and Heir of William first Earl of Dundonald. His 2d Wife was Margaret Daughter of William Earl of Errol, Widow of Henry Lord Ker, by whom he had John his Successor, and a Daughter, Lady Mary, and departing this Life in 1672,

John, his Son, succeeded him in his Estate and Honour: He was nam'd one of the Lords of the Privy Coun­cil, 1st May 1689, and afterwards constituted one of the Commissioners of the Thesaury: He married first Su­sann [...], Daughter of James Duke of Ha­milton, by whom he had a Son and a Daughter, viz.

1st. John, Lord Kennedy, who dying in the Spring of the Year 1700, left Issue by Elisabeth Daughter of — Hutchison Esq only a Son John, the present Earl of Cassils.

2d. Anne, married to John Hamil­ton Earl of Ruglan.

This Earl married to his second Wife, Elisabeth, Daughter of — Foix Esq by whom he had a Son James, and a Daughter Elisabeth, and departing this Life 2d July 1702, was immediately succeeded by John, now Earl of Cassils, his Grand-Son.

ARMS.

Argent, a Chiveron Gules, betwixt three cross Croslets, Sable, within a double Tressour of the 2d. Supporters, two Swans proper, Crest a Dolphine Najant, Azure, Moto, Avie la fine.

CATHCART, Lord Cathcart.

THAT which will sufficiently attest the Antiquity of this noble Family, is, That Rainaldus de Kethcart is Witness in a Grant, by Allan the Son of Walter Dapiefer Re­gis of the Patronage of the Church of Kethcart, to the Monastry of Pasly, [Page 77] and to the Monks serving God there, 500 Years sincea. Alan de Cathcart appends his Seal to the Resignation made by the Judge of Lennox to the Abbot and Convent of Paisly of the Lands of Culbethe, Anno 1234b. Likeas William de Cathcart is one of the Barons mentioned in the Bond of Submission made to King Edward I. of England, now called the Ragman Roll c. He seems to be the Father of the brave Sir Alan Cathcart, who so faithfully adhered to the Interest of his Country in the time of King Robert the I. and fought stoutly for that renowned Monarch in the Battle of Lowdonhill, against a strong Party of the English, whom they routed. Which Mr. Barber our Historian has thus recorded;

A Knight that then was in his Rout,
Worthy and wight, stalward and stout,
Courteous and fair, and of good Fame,
Sir Alan Cathcart was his Name.

This noble Person married the Sister, and at length one of the Coheirs of Sir Duncan Wallace of Sundrum, and had Sir Alan his Son and Heir, who, upon the Demise of his Uncle, came to inherit the Baronies of Sundrum and Achencrew in Air Shire, which still do remain, and may they long continue in the Family. He left a Son Sir Alan to inherit his Fortune, a Baron of great Reputation in the time of Robert III. This last Sir Alan was succeeded by Sir Alan his Grand­son, who in 1447 redeemed several Lands from John Kennedy Lord of the Coffe, which had been wadset by Sir Alan Cathcart his Grand-fatherd, within the Earldom of Carrick. This Alan was knighted by King James II. and in the same Reign was ranked among the greater Barons that are now Lords of Parliament, tho' the precise time I cannot assign. He was in special Favour with King James III. who appointed him War­den of the West Marches toward England, Anno 1481e, and in consideration of his special Services be­fore that time performed, made him a Grant of the Barony, together with the Constabulary of the Castle of Dundonald, Anno 1482, then a part of the Royal Patrimony: But his Master's Favour did not stop to him here, for he by his Royal Deed made over to him the Lands of Trabath in King's Kyle, then in the Crown by the Forfeiture of the Lord Boyd, and made him Master of the Artillery in the Year 1485f. He married Janet Daughter of . . . . Maxwel of . . . . and had Issue, Alan who died in his own Lifetime. 2d, David Cathcart of Pennyfedoch g. 3d, Hugh first of the Cathcarts of Trevour h. 4th. John stiled of Galryne i; and Helen married to David Stewart of Craigyhall in Vic. de Lithgow k. This Lord gave way to Fate in a good advanced Age Anno 1500, and was interred in the Con­vent of the Black Friars of Air l, leaving John his Grandson, Son of Alan his eldest Son, to succeed him in his Estate and Honour: But his Lordship did not follow the Steps of his Ances­tors in the path of Vertue, for, from Motives I know not, he spent much of the Estate that his Progenitors had acquired with so much Honour, that the Family since his time have not appeared with that Lustre they did in former Ages. He married to his first Wife Margaret Daughter of John Kennedy of Blairquhan; by her he had Alan Master of Cathcart, who was killed at the Battle of Flowdon 9th September 1513, having in his Father's time married, first Helen Daughter of Robert Lord Lyle m, by whom he had no Issue, and after her Death Margaret Daughter of Patrick Max­wel of Newark n, by whom he left a Son Alan who succeeded his Grand­father. His 2d Wife was Margaret Daughter of Sir William Douglas of [Page 78] Drumla [...]rig a; by her he had a nu­merous Issue, viz. 1st, Robert, who married Margaret Daughter and Heir of Alan Cathcart of Carltoun b, who was an old Branch of the Family, and of whom the present Family of Carltoun is descended in a lineal Course of Succession. 2d, John, who was with his two elder Brothers, Alan the Master, and Robert of Carltoun, killed at Flowdon c. 3d, David of Duchray d, of whom the present Branch of Carbiestoun his Ancestor in the Reign of Queen Mary, marrying Margaret one of the two Daughters and Coheirs of William Cathcart of Carbiestoun, an old Family of the Name, which was existing in the Time of James II.e. 4th Hugh, of him sprung Cathcart of Corff, now ex­tinct. Besides these Sons, he had also four Daughters. Janet married to John Crawfurd of Drongan f, then an eminent Family in Air Shire. Elizabeth to John W [...]llace of Craigy g, i [...] Vic. de Air. Jean to John Shaw of Haily h, in the foresaid County. Margaret to John Hunter of Hunter stoun i in Vi [...]. de Air, and had Issue. He died in December 1535k, his Estate and Honour devolving upon Alan his Grandson, who lost his Life in the Service of his Country at the Battle of Pinky against the English, upon that fatal Day the 10th of September 1547l, as appears from the Probate of his Testament, dated the same Day he lost his Life, whereby he resigns his Soul to Al­mighty God, and bequeaths his Body to be buried among his Ancestors in the Convent of the Gray-Friars of Air, appointing his Executors to order Mass and Dirige to be said for the hele of his Soul. By Helen his Wife Daughter of William Lord Semple m, he had Alan his Successor, who was a hearty Promoter of our hap­py Reformation from Popery, par­ticularly in the Western Parts, where his Reputation and Interest was very great, and was among the first of the Peers, who armed in De­fence of King James VI. when he was in his Cradle against the Earl of Bothwel, who had maried the Queen his Mother, and signalized himself at the Action of Langside, anno 1568, where Queen Mary's Party was total­ly routed, and always continued on the King's Side, till he came to be peaceably fixed on the Throne, to reward which he was in 1579 con­stituted Master of the King's Hous­holdn, and had several very bene­ficial Grants from the Crown, in the Time of the Earl of Mortoun's Re­gency, which were again reassumed, when his Majesty came to act by his own Counsels. This noble Lord married Margaret Daughter of John Wallace of Craigy, by Margaret Coun­tess of Casils o. By her he had a Son, Alan Master of Cathcart, who died before his Father anno 1603, leaving Issue by Isabel his Wife Daugh­ter of Thomas Kennedy of Barganny, a Son Alan who succeeded his Grandfa­ther upon his Death in December 1618. Which Alan married Margaret Daugh­ter of Francis Earl of Bothwel p and again Jean Daughter of Alexander Col­quhoun of Luss, and departing this Transitory Life anno 1628, left a Son, an Infant at his Death, Alan late Lord Cathcart, a Nobleman of much Good­ness and Probity, who died in the 81. Year of his Age, upon the 13th of June 1709, leaving Issue by Marion his Wife, Daughter of David Boswal of Achinleck, Alan the present Lord, James Cathcart Esq and David who was killed in the publick Service about the time of the Time of the Revolution.

Which Alan married Elizabeth Daughter of James Viscount of Stair, by whom he had three Sons and a Daughter, viz.

Alan Master of Cathcart, who peri­shed at Sea going for Holland, whose [Page 79] Death was much lamented upon the Account of his Affability, excellent Parts, and other rare Qualities.

Charles, who from his very Youth betaking himself to a Military Life, went over to Flanders, where he had a Company in Mackartny's Regiment bestowed on him anno 1704, being then but entered in his eighteenth Year, and soon thereafter was made Captain of the Granadiers. The next Year he had a Troop in the Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons, under the Command of Lord John Hay, in which Station he continued till the 1707, he was made Major of Bri­gade in the Queen's Corps of Dra­goons serving in Flanders, of which his near Kinsman the present Earl of Stair was then Brigadier, in which Character, after he had served two Years, in March 1709, he obtained a Commission to be Major of the said Royal Regiment; and thereafter in 1711, got a Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel in the Army, in all which Stations, with what Applause he ac­quitted himself, is too well known to such as know him, to need any fur­ther Mention here.

Major James Cathcart.

Margaret married to Sir Adam Whiteford of Blairquhan Baronet.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th, Azure, three Cross Croslets, issuing out of as many Crescents, Argent. 2d and 3d, Gules a Lion Rampant Argent. Supporters two Parrots proper. Crest, a Dexter Hand grasping a Crescent. Motto, I hope to speed.

ELPHINSTOUN, Lord Cowpar.

UPON the Distribution made by King James VI. of the Lands which came to the Crown upon the Dissolution of the Religious Houses, his said Majesty of his Royal Bounty erected the Abbey of Cowpar in Ang [...]s in a Civil Lordship, in Favours of James Elphinstoun Son of James Lord Balmerino Anno 1606, but he dying childless in the Year 1669, the Ho­nour devolved to the Lord Balmerino.

CRICHTON, Lord Crichton, Viscount of Frendraught.

OF this ancient Family, which took its Sirname from the Lands of Chrichtoun in the Sheriffdom of Edinburgh a, was John Crichton of That-Ilk, the Father of Sir William Crichton, who was Chancellor of Scotland in the younger Years of King James II. and a great States­man in the Account of that Time. He made his Exit in the 1455b, and left Sir James Lord of Crichton to succeed him in the Barony, and two Daughters, Elizabeth Wife of Alex­ander Earl of Huntley, and Agnes of Alexander Lord Glammis. Which James took to Wife Janet, one of the Daughters and Coheirs of James Dunbar Earl of Murray, and had Issue by her, William Lord Crichton, who was forfeited for Rebellion against James III. but afterward obtaining his Pardon, he was restored to the Barony of Frendraught in the North, of which James Crichton his Son had a Charter in the 5th of King James IV. Anno 1492c. His Successor

Another Sir James Crichton of Fren­draught was by King Charles I. raised to the Honour of Viscount of Fren­draught 20th August 1642d. He mar­ried first Margaret Daughter of Alex­ander 1st Earl of Leven, by whom he had a Daughter married to Sir James Macgill of Rankeilor. 2dly, Marion [Page 80] Daughter of Sir Alexander Irvine of Dr [...]m. By her he had James Vis­count of Frendraught, whose Son William died without Issue; so that Lewis his Uncle fell to the Honour, who following the Fortune of King James VII. into France and Ireland, died without Issue 26th February 1698.

COLVIL, Lord Colvil of Culross.

IN the Reign of King William, Philip de Colvil is frequently made Mention of in the Donations which that Prince gave to the Abbey of Melross, soon after his Accession to the Throne. The Successor of this Philip, Sir John Colvil, was Pro­prietor of the Baronies of Oxname and Ochiltree in the Time of Alex­ander III.a, whose Son Sir William having no Issue Male of his Body, E [...]stachia his only Daughter was Heir to some of his Lands. She became the Wife of Sir Reginald le Cheyn b, and the Estate abovementioned came to Sir Robert Colvil, who con­tinued in the Male Line, till it end­ed a second Time in the Person of Sir William Colvil of Ochiltree, who dying the 14th of King James IV. left two Daughters his Coheirs, Eliza­beth the elder, married to Robert Colvil of Ravenscraig, and Margaret to Patrick Colquhoun Esq

The Barony of Ochiltree was again acquired from the Heirs Female anno 1509, by a Male Relation of the Family Robert Colvil of Hiltoun c, who in the Reign of James IV. was Master of the King's Houshold and Director of the Chanceryd, both which Offices he possest, till he lost his Life with his Master at Flowdon, leaving Issue by Elizabeth Arnot his Wifee, Sir James Colvil of Ochil­tree his Son and Heir, who was Di­rector of the Chancery in King James V's. Time, and one of the Senators of the College of Justice, at the Institu­tion of that Judicature. In the 1530 he exchanged the Estate of Ochiltree with Sir James Hamilton for his Lands of Easter-Weems in Fife, from which he and his Successors were stiled, till they came to be Peers. He mar­ried Alison Bruce f, and had Sir James his Successorg, Alexander Commendator of C [...]lross h, of whom the Colvils of Kincarain are derived, who do now represent this Family: Likewise a Daughter Mar­garet married to James Lindsay of Dowhill. Which Sir James, by Mar­garet his Wife, Daughter of . . . . Douglas of Lochleven, had

Sir James who, from his Youth af­fecting a Military Course of Life, went over to the Wars of France, where he he served under Henry IV. with so much Honour and Reputation, that upon his Return home he was by King James VI. worthily raised to the Degree and Dignity of a Lord, by the Title of Lord Colvil of Cul­ross, Anno 1604, and that he might the better support the Honour, the King thought fit to augment his Fortune, and made him a Grant of the dissolved Abbey of Culross, which heretofore had been a Seat of Cister­tian Monks. He married Isabel, Daugh­ter of Patrick Lord Ruthven, by whom he had James Master of Colvil, a young Nobleman of very bright Parts, who died in the Flower of his Age, much regreted by all that knew him. 2d, Robert Master of Colvil, and a Daughter Jean married to Sir James Campbel of Lawers, Mother by him to John Earl of Lowdon, Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, in the Reign of King Charles I. My Lord Colvil dying about the Year 1620, his Estate and Dignity devolved on Robert his Grandson in whom the Honour came to an End.

COLVIL, Lord Colvil of Ochiltree.

THIS noble Family is sprung from Robert Colvil Son of Sir James Colvil of Easter-Weems a, who in the Twenty second of King James 5th had a Grant to himself and Frances Col­quhoun his Wife and to their Heirs from his Father of the Lands of Cleish in Kinross Shire, whence he and his Descendents were designed till the Time they were raised to the Honour of the Peerage. This Robert was a zealous and hearty Promoter of the Reformation, and a strenuous Asserter of the Liberties of his Country, in the Defence whereof he lost his Life at the Seige of Leith, May 7th 1560b, leaving Issue by the aforesaid Fran­ces his Wife Daughter and Heir of Patrick Co [...]quhoun Esq of Drumskeith, and of Elizabeth his Wife, one of the Daughters and Coheirs of Sir William Colvil of Ochiltree c, Robert his Son and Heir, and a Daughter Eupham married to James Moniepenny of Pit­mily, and had Issue.

Which Robert married Margaret Daughter of James Lindsay of Dove-hill, by whom he had Robert his Son and Heir, who dying in the Month of January of the Year 1634d left issue by Beatrix his Wife Daughter of Sir. John Hadden of Glenegles, Ro­bert, his Son and Heir, David Colvil Esq likewise a Daughter Marga­ret married to David Weems of Fin­zies and had Issue.

Which Robert was made a Knight by King Charles I. and thereafter by his Majesty King Charles II. raised to the Peerage by the Style and Title of Lord Colvil of Ochiltree by Letters patent 4th of January 1651, He married Janet Daughter of Sir John Weems of that ilke, but dying without Issue 25 of August 13 1662f his Estate and honour devolved on.

Robert Colvil Esq his Nephew by his Brother, who departing this Life in the 1671, left Issue by Mar­garet his Wife, Daughter of David Weems of Finzies, Robert the Present Lord Colvil; also two Daughters, Mar­garet Married to Sir John Aiton of that Ilk, in Vic. de. Fyfe and - - - - to the Reverend Mr. Logan Minister at Tor­rie, and had Issue.

ARMS.

A Cross molin sable, supported on the Dexter side with a Reinoceros and on the sinster with a Hercules proper. Crest, a Stag's Head Cupe Argent. Motto, Oublie ne puis.

RICHARDSON, Lord Cramond.

HIS Majesty King Charles the I. was pleased to raise and advance Dame Elizabeth Beaumont, then the Wife of Sir Thomas Richardson, Lord Chief-Justice of the Common Pleas in England, to the honour of Baro­ness [Page 82] of Cramond, and to her and Sir Thomas's Heirs male by Letters patent 28 February 1628,a which was the only Female Creation I have at any Time observed in this Realm.

CRANSTON, Lord Cranston.

THE Family of Cranston is of very great Antiquity in Edinburgh Shire, where in former Times their chief Residence was. Effric deCranston. One of their Ancestors is Witness in a Donation which King William made to the Monastery of Newbotle and to the Monks of that Convent for the Health of his Soul,b Anno 1170, whose Successor and lineal Deseendant Sir John Cranston of that Ilk in the Reign of King James VI. married Margaret Daughter of . . . . Ramsay of Dal­housie, but dying without Male Issue, his Estate by his own Destination and Appointment came to Sarah his Daugh­ter and Heir, whom he married with a Gentleman of his own Name, Sir William Cranston c Son of Sir John Cran­ston of Moriston, a Branch of his own Family, who being a Person of great Merit and Fortune, was by the speci­al favour of King James VI. whom he had the Honour to serve long as Captain of his Majesty's Guard, raised to the Honour of Lord Cranston, by Let­ters patent, 19th of November 1609,d and dying in the Month of June 1627,e was succeeded by John his Son, who married first Helen Daughter of James Lord Lindsay, and again Elizabeth Daughter of Walter Lord B [...]cle [...]gh, f but dying without Issue, was succeed­ed by

William Cranston Esq his Ne­phew, Son of James Cranston Esq his Brother, by Elizabeth his Wife, Daughter of Francis Stewart Earl of Bothwell. This Noble Lord did emi­nently signalize himself in his Loyal­ty to King Charles the II. with whom he marched to the Battle of Worcester, where he had the Misfortune to be taken Prisoner and sent to the Tower, where he long remained, and had his Estate not only sequestrated, but was particularly excepted out of Cromwel's Indemnity in the 1654,g he married Mary Daughter of Alexander I. Earl of Leven by whom he had James his Son and Heir, who married Anne Daughter of Sir Alexander Don of Newton Baronet, by her he had Wil­liam the present Lord, and James Cranston Esq

Which William married Jean Daugh­ter of William Marquess of Lothian, by whom he has James Master of Cran­stoun.

ARMS.

Gules, three Crans Argent, supported on the Right side by a Lady richly ap­parelled, and on the Left by a Stag, proper; Crest a Cran dormant. Motto, Thou shall want or I want.

CRAWFORD, Lord of Crawford.

BEFORE the Reign of King Malcolm III. we had no Sirnames in Scotland so far as can be gathered [Page 83] from the most ancient Records, but the ordinary distinctions then were either personal, or from such Offices as they held, or from the Name of their Father as Malcolm Canmore, Joannes Filius Willielmi, Thor. Longus a Wil­lielmus dictus Niger, Walterus Dapifer, Alan Durward. But after that great Men began to assume Designations from their own Lands, which by cu­stom, became Hereditary Sirnames to their descendents, as Dunbar, Murray, Douglas, Gordon, Ersken, Crawfurd, and innumerable such like Instances could be given.

Dominus Galfridus de Crafurd is the first I have found using this Sirname in the Time of King Mal­colm IV and King William, b who is frequently witnessing the pious Deeds of this last Prince to the Reli­gious of Arbroath, and seems to have had some Relation to the Court un­der that good King.

Dominus Joannes de Crawfurd, Mi­les & Dominus Reginaldus de Craw­furd Vicecomes de Air c in the Reign of King Alexander II. seem to be Brothers, and very proba­bly the Sons of the former, Sir Galfride. We know that Sir John was Baron of the Barony of Craw­ford, in Lanerk Shire and from the Chronicle of Melross, we are in­formed, that he died in the 1248,d His Estate, at least that part of it the Barony of Crawfurd, went to his Daughters.e The Elder married to Archibald de Douglass Dominus loci ejusdem, and the Younger to David de Lindesay Militi Domino de Crawford.

LINDSAY, Earl of Crawfurd.

BY our publick Records, as well as the Archives of this most noble and illustrious Family, it appears, That, William de Lindesay their An­cestor was a Person of very great Note in the Reign of King David I.f and seems to have had some near Rela­tion to that Prince's Court.

David de Lindsay, his Successour made a very great Figure under King William, This is that David de Lindesay, Miles, who got the Ba­rony of Crawfurd by the Marriage of the Daughter of John de Craw­furd, g and was succeeded by David de Lindesay his Son, who was a very warlike Man, and in the 35th of King Alexander II. executed the Of­fice of Justitiarius Laudoniae. h He had Issue David his Successor, and John de Lindesay who was Chamberlain of Scotland in the Time of King Alexander III. Anno 1270,i which David was like­wise a very brave and magnanimous Person. He left Issue, David de Lindesay Miles, the first I have found designed Dominus de Crawfurd k in the Time of King Robert the I. and William [Page 84] de Lindesay Rector of Air and Lord high Chamberlain of Scotland in the 1317. Under King Robert I.

which David Dominus de Crawfurd added to his own Paternal Estate many fair Lands by the Marriage of one of the three Daughters and Cohei [...]s of Alexander de Abernethy Knight, by whom he had David his Successor in the Ba [...]ony of Crawfurd Sir Alexander Lindesay of Genesk, of which Lands he became possessed by the Marriage of Katharine Daughter and Heir of Sir John Stirling Knight,a and Sir William Lindesay of Byres Ancestor to the present Earl of Crawford. b Which David de Lindsay Dominus de Craw­furd was in the 1357, one of the Com­missioners on the Treaty for the Re­demption of King David II. He was succeeded by

Sir James his Son, who by Giles his Wife, Daughter of Walter Lord High Stewart of Scotland, had Sir James Lindsay Dominus de Crawfurd, who is a frequent Witness in the Charters of King Ro­bert II. his Uncle, in which he is always designed nepoti nostro, likewise two Daughters,

Elizabeth Married to Sir John Max­well of Nether Pollock c Knight, and had Issue.

Margery to Sir Henry Dowglass of Loch evin d Knight Ancestor to the present Earl of Morton.

But he dying without Issue male, the Barony of Crawford, and his other Estate came to his Cousin.

Sir David Lindsay of Glenesk, who was by King Robert III. in the 1399 created Earl of Crawfurd e he mar­ried Jean Daughter to King Robert II.f by whom he had Alexander his Successor,g David and Bernard.

Which Alexander was one of the Hostages for the ransom of King James I. in 1423,h he died in 1445 leav­ing Issue.

Alexander his Successor who made a very great Figure under James II. he left Issue David his Successor, Sir Alexander Lindsay of Achte [...]monsie and Elisabeth married to Sir Thomas Maule of Panmure, ancestor to the present Earl of that Name.

Which David was Master of the Household and Lord Chamberlain in the Reign of King James III. With whom he was in great favour and was created a Duke by the Title of Duke of Montrose during his Life, Anno 1488,i He Married E [...]izabeth Daughter of James Lord Hamilton k by her he had Alexander Master of Crawfurd, who dyed before his Father, and John his Successour who was slain at the Battle of Flowden, leaving no Issue, so that his Estate and honour Came to.

Sir Alexander Lindsay of Auchter­monsy his Uncle who by Marion his Wife; Daughter of - - - Dunbar of Monsie had David the succeeding Earl, who married Katherine Daughter of Sir William Stirling of Kei [...], next E [...]iza­beth Daughter of — Lundy of that Ilk, and hadl Alexander Master of Crawfurd and two Daughters Mar­ga [...]et married to James Lord Ogilvie m and E [...]izabeth to John E [...]skine of Dun, n This Earl being justly pro­voked by the folly and insolence of his own Son did disinherit him, and settled his Estate and the Title of Earl with the approbation of the Crown u­pon Sir David Lindsay of Edz [...]e who [Page 85] accordingly succeeded him therein u­pon his Death, Anno 1562a. He married first Janet, Daughter to the Lord Gray, but having no Issue, he generously resigned the Estate and Honour in favours of Sir David Lindsay, the wicked Master of Crawfurd's Son, reserving to himself, during his Life, both the Title, and such a Provision as supported him accord­ing to his Quality. He dying Anno 1570b Sir David Lindsay suc­ceeded in the Honour. He married Margaret, Daughter of Cardinal Da­vid Beaton, Bishop of St. Andrews, by whom he had,

1st. David,

2d. Sir Henry Lindsay, afterwards Earl of Crawfurd.

3d. Sir Alexander Lindsay, one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber to King James VI. who honour'd him with the Title of Lord Spinzie, Anno 1590; also a Daughter Helen, mar­ried to Sir David Lindsay of Edzil, and had Issue.

Which David, married Grisel Daughter of John Steuart Earl of Athole, by whom he had David his Son and Heir, who dying without Issue, his Estate and Honour went to

Sir Henry Lindsay his Uncle, who married Beatrix, Daughter and Heir of George Charters of Kinfauns, by whom he had George, who deceast without any Issue. He married a­gain Margaret, Daughter of Sir James Shaw of Sauchie, in Vicecomi­tatu de Clackmanan, by whom he had Lodovick, who succeeded to the Honour.

This Earl, when the Civil War broke out, Anno 1639, cordially put himself in Arms in behalf of King Charles I. and commanded a Regi­ment of Horse at the Battle of Lans­doun, Anno 1643, where he perform'd the Duty of a Colonel most punctual­ly; and tho' he almost out lived his Fortune by his great suffering for the Royal Cause, yet he did not that of Love to his injur'd Sovereign, con­tinuing fix'd in his Duty till the very end of his Life. He married Marga­ret, Daughter of William Earl of Monteith, but by her he had no Issue, whereupon he made an Entail of his Honour to John Earl of Lindsay, which was ratified by Act of Parlia­ment, Anno 1661, upon the King's Restauration.

LINDSAY, Earl of Crawfurd and Lindsay.

A Younger Branch of this noble Family, was Lindsay of Byres, in Vicecomitatu de Haddingtoun, sprung from Sir William Lindsay, Son of Sir David Lindsay of Crawfurd c, in the Days of King David Bruce: He raised his Fortune by the Marriage of Christian, Daughter and sole Heir of Sir William More of Abercorn d, in Vicecomitatu de Linlithgow; where­upon he assumed into his Atchieve­ment three Mollets, the Co [...]t of the said Family, and exchanged his Lands of Dunnoter, in Vicecomitatu de Kin­cardin, with Sir William Keith Mar­shal of Scotland, for his Lands of Struthers in Fyfe, which hencefurth became the chief and ancient Seat of this noble Family. This Sir William was succeeded by

John his Son and Heir, who in 1457, the 20th of James II. was constituted chief Justiciar benorth the River of Forth, being likewise of the Privy Council to the said Kinge. [Page 86] He married . . . . . . Steuart, Daugh­ter to the Lord Lorn, and had Issue David, who succeeded him in his Ho­nour; John, who succeeded his Bro­ther Patrick, afterward Lord Lind­say; Sir George Lindsay Knight, Sir Walter Precptor of Torphichen, and Lord St. John in the Reign of King James V. Also two Daughters,

1. Margaret, married to Henry Wardlaw of Torrie.

2. Christian, first to John, Son and Heir of George Lord Seaton, and a­gain to Robert Lord Kilmaurs. He departed this Life, Anno 1480.

David his Son succeeded him. He assisted King James III. at the Battle of Bannockburn against his Subjects, and dyed without Issue, Anno 1492, leaving

John his Brother and Heir to suc­ceed him, who likewise dying sans Issue, in 1498,

Patrick his Brother became his Heir. This Lord was constituted Sheriff of Fife by King V. in 1519, which Office he enjoyed till the 1531, when it was heritably conferred u­pon George Earl of Rothes. He married Margaret, Daughter of . . . . . Pitcairn of that Ilk, by whom he had,

1. John, who married Elisabeth, Daughter of Sir Andrew Lundy of Balgony, and had a Son John, who succeeded his Grand-father.

2d. Patrick, first of the House of Kirkforther.

3d. William, of whom came the Lindsay's of Wormistoun; also a Daugter Catharine, married to Sir Alexander Seaton of Parbroath.

To Patrick Lord Lindsay succeed­ed John his Grandson, who married Helen, Daughter of John Earl of Athole, by whom he had Patrick his Son and Heir, and five Daughters, viz.

1. Isabel, married to Norman Lesly, Son and Heir apparent of George Earl of Rothes. 2d. Margaret to David Beaton of Melgum. 3d. Janet, to Henry Son and Heir of Henry Lord Sinclair. 4th. Helen, to Thomas Fotheringh [...]m of Pourie. 5th. Elisabeth, to David Kinnier of that Ilk.

Which Patrick Lord Lindsay, was active for the Reformation of Reli­gion, and was on the King's side. in the Minority of James VI. he married Euphame, Daughter of Robert Douglass of Lochlevin: By her he had a Son and a Daughter, James his suc­cessor, and Margaret married to James Son and Heir to the Earl of Ro­thes. He made Exit out of this World 11th. December 1589a, and was succeeded by

James his Son, who took to Wife Euphame, Daughter of Andrew Earl of Rothes, by whom he had Robert and John successively Lords; also two Daughters,

Helen, married to John, Son and Heir to William Lord Cranstoun.

Catherine, to John Lundy of that Ilk.

He departed this Life 5th Novem­ber 1601; his Estate and Honour de­volving on

Robert his Son, who married Anne, Daughter of Laurence Lord Oliphant, who had only a Daughter married to Alexander Falconer of Halkertoun, he dying 7th Nov 1609, John his Bro­ther, became his Heir; who dying on the 9th of July 1616, left Issue by Christian his Wife, Daughter of Tho­mas first Earl of Haddington, John his Son and Heir, and Helen mar­ried to Sir William Scot of Ardross.

Which John, was by the special Favour of King Charles I. and for the greater Splendour of his Coronation, Anno 1633, raised to the Honour of Earl of Lindsay, being then the first Lord in the Rolls of Parliament. In 1641, he was constituted Lord high Thesaurer of Scotland upon the Removal of John Earl of Traquair; which Imployment he enjoyed till [Page 87] the 1649, he was laid aside by the Estates of Parliament for his vigo­rous Appearance in raising the Army which designed the King's Relief out of the Isle of Wight. After the Mur­der of the King, he adhered to the lawful Heir of the Crown, King Charles II. from whom he received a Commission to raise Forces for his Service, in order to his Restauration, Anno 1651, when unluckily he was with several other Lords surprized by the English at Eliot in Angus, and sent Prisoner to the Tower of London, where he suffered a long and tedious Imprisonment, till he was released by the Restauration of the King, Anno 1660: In Consideration whereof, his Majesty was pleased to restore him to the Thesaurer's Office, which in 1664 he resigned to the Earl of Rothes, his Son-in-Law; and departing this Life, Anno 1676, he left Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of James Marques of Hamilton, two Sons, Wil­liam his Successor; Patrick, who mar­ried Margaret Daughter and Heir of Sir John Crawfurd of Kilbirny, also four Daughters,

1. Anne, married to John Duke of Rothes.

2. Christian, to Thomas Earl of Haddingtoun.

3. Helen, to Sir Robert Sinclair of Stinstoun, Baronet.

4. Elisabeth, to David Earl of Northesk, and all had Issue.

Which William, was constituted President of the Privy Council, Anno 1689, and one of the Lords of the Thesaury. He married first, Mary Daughter of James Earl of Annandale, by whom he had John the present Earl, Colonel James Lindsay who was killed at the Battle of Almanza, Anno 1708, and Henrietta, married to William Baillie of Lamingtoun, and has Issue. 2dly. Henrietta, Daughter of Charles Earl of Dum­fermling, Widow of William Earl of Wigton, by whom he had a Son Thomas, and six Daughters;

Lady Anne.

Lady Christian.

Lady Margaret.

Lady Helen.

Lady Susanna.

Lady Catharine. all unmarried.

He departing this Life, March 6th Anno 1698, was succeeded by John his Son and Heir, who betaking him­self to a Military Life, has had seve­ral considerable Commands in the Army, and was made Brigadeer be­fore the end of the late War. He married Aemelia, Daughter of Alexan­der Lord Down, by whom he had John Lord Lindsay, and William.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th Gules, a Fess Cheque, Azure and Argent, 2d and 3d Or, a Lyon Rampant Gules surmount­ed of a Ribban Sable, Supporters two Lyons Gules; Crest, an Ostrich with a Key in its Mouth, with this Motto, Indure Furth.

MACKENZIE Earl of Cromarty.

THIS Family has its Descent from Sir Roderick Mackenzie, second Son of Sir Colin Mackenzie of Kintail, by Barbara his Wife, Daugh­ter of James Grant of that Ilk, which Sir Roderick being a Person of singu­lar Courage and Conduct was very Instrumental in civilizing the Nor­thern Parts, especially in Ross shire, in Recompence of which acceptable Service King James VI. conferred on him the Honour of Knighthood, and gave him several Lands then in the Crown by Forfeiture. He mar­ried Margaret, Daughter and Heir of [Page 88] Torquill Macleod of the Lewes, where­upon he added to his Arms Or, a Mountain in a flame Azure and Gules, and departing this Life, Anno 1625, left Issue by the said Margaret his Wife

1. Sir John his Successor.

2d. Sir Kenneth of Scatwell.

3d. Colin.

4th. Alexander of Baloon.

5th. Margaret, married to Sir James Mackdonald of Slate, Baronet, and had Issue.

Which John so succeeding, was made Baronet by King Charles I. Anno 1628, three Years after the In­stitution of that Honour. He mar­ried Margaret Daughter and Co-heir of Sir George Erskine of Innertail, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, Brother to Thomas first Earl of Kelly, by whom he had Sir George and Mr. Roderick Mackenzie of Prestonhall, who was promoted to be one of the Sena­tors of the College of Justice, Anno 1702, and dyed 4th January 1712, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Dr. Alexander Burnet Arch-Bishop of St. Andrews, a Son Alexander Mackenzie (alias Frazer) of Frazerdale Esq who changed his Name by reason of his Marriage with Aemelia Baroness of Lovat.

Besides these Sons he had likewise five Daughters,

Margaret, married to Roderick Mackleod of that Ilk, but had no Issue.

Anne to Hugh Lord Lovat.

Isabel, to Kenneth Earl of Seaforth.

Barbara, to Alexander Mackenzie of Garloch.

Catherine, to Sir Colin Campbel of Aberuchill.

He departed this Life the 10th September 1654, and was succeeded by

Sir George his Son and Heir: This noble Lord in the 1654 obtained a Commission from King Charles II. during his Exile, to raise what Forces he could for his Majesty's Service, in order to his Restauration, and there­with joined Lieutenant General John Middleton, who sustained a War with the English for a whole Year, till [...] were defeated by Colonel [...]; then his Lordship capitu [...]ed with the Enemy upon very honourable Terms. This signal Appearance for his distressed Sovereign, probably seemed one Cause that upon his Ma­jesty's Restauration, when he consti­tuted a new Set of Judges in the 1661, he named him one of the Sena­tors of the College of Justice, and one of the Lords of his Privy Coun­cil. Anno 1678, he was constituted Justice General upon the decease of Sir Archibald Primrose, and three Years thereafter he was made Lord Clerk Register, in which Station he continued till the Death of King Charles II, Anno 1685.

King James VII. had no less Value for his Abilities, for in the first Year of his Reign, he renewed his Patent for being Register, and on the 15th of April the same Year, created him Viscount of Tarbat, Lord Macleod and Castlehaven, and continued him in that Imployment till the Dissolu­tion of the Government in 1689.

In the 3d of William and Mary, An. 1692, he was again restored to the Registers Office: Then it was he put furth a Vindication of King Ro­bert III. from the Imputation of Bastardy, an Error all our Historians of former Times, either maliciously or ignorantly had fallen into; and from the national Archives clearly evinced, that Elisabeth More was the first and lawful Wife of King Robert II, when Earl of Strathern; that she was long dead before he came to the Crown; that Robert III. her Son, was not only owned as the eldest lawful Son of his Father in all publick Deeds, after he became King, but also in the time of King David Bruce his Grand-Uncle.

In 1702 the first of Queen Anne he was constituted Secretary of State, and the first of January the next Year [Page 89] raised to the Honour of Earl of Cro­marty, his Age making the Fatigue of the Secretarie's Place uneasie to him, he dimitted, and in Lieu thereof, her Majesty was pleased to give him an Imployment of a much easier Nature, making him Justice General, which he resigned to the Earl of Ilay, Anno 1710. He married first Anne Daugh­ter of Sir James Sinclair of May, by whom he had Issue,

1st. John Lord Mackleod.

2d. Sir Kenneth Mackenzie of Cro­marty, Baronet.

3d. Sir James of Roystoun created Baronet, 8 February 1704, and pro­moted to be one of the Senators of the College of Justice, in 1710.

Also four Daughters, Margaret, married to David Bruce of Clack­mannan, Elisabeth to Sir George Brown of Colstoun, Jean to Sir Thomas Steuart of Balcasky, and Lady Anne.

He married next Margaret Coun­tess Dowager of Weems, but by her he had no Issue, and became a Widow­er by her Death, in 1705.

ARMS.

Four Coats quarterly, 1st Or, a Mountain in a flame Azure and Gules, 2d Azure a Dears Head coboss'd Or, 3d Argent on a Pale Sable, an imperial Crown Or, within a double Tressure, counter-flour'd Gules, 4 Gules 3 Legs armed proper, conjoined in Fess at the upper part of the Thigh, flex'd in a Triangle, garnished and spur'd Or, and supported by two Savages proper, Crest, the Sun in his Splendor, Motto, Luceo non uro.

RAMSAY. Earl of Dalhousie.

AMong those who were Witnesses to the Grant of the Church of Livingstoun, by Thurstanus filius Li­vingi to the Monastery of Holy-Rood-house, in the time of King David I. 600 Years since, Simundus de Ramesie, is there taken notice of for one, from which Simund did Sir William de Ramesie of Dalhousie Knight descend, who firmly adhered to King Ro­bert Bruce, and upon his Accession to the Throne, did Homage for his Lands in Edinburgh Shire. Likeas, he was one of the many Scots Ba­rons who wrote and seal'd that me­morable Letter to the Pope, declaring the Independency of the Kingdom of Scotland, Anno 1320, which is all I have found on Record concerning him. To this Sir William, succeed­ed Sir Alexander Ramsay of Dalhousie, who signally raised the Grandeur of his Family, by his great and loyal Services to King David Bruce, against Edward Baliol, who then call'd him­self King of this Realm; in Con­sideration whereof, he was by the said King David constituted Warden of the Middle Marches, and Constable of the Castle of Roxburgh, Anno 1342, which he had by his Valour taken from the English. This brave Man, who well deserves, and I know will have a Place among the Scots Heroes, was slain by William Douglass of Liddesdale, 7 July 1348, and to him succeeded

Sir William Ramsay his Son, who tracing the Steps of his loyal Father, took up Arms for the Service of his King and Countrey, was in the Wars of England, and acted a very noble Part, in Recompence whereof, no doubt, it was, that he obtained a Grant to him, and Agnes his Wife, of the Lands of Nether Libertoun, Anno 1370, by a Charter still extant under the Great Seal. This Sir William was succeeded by

Sir Alexander his Son, who came nothing behind his Ancestors for Loyalty, Courage and Conduct, which he manifested in a very emi­nent Degree, in the Battle of Nisbet a­gainst the English, and afterwards at Homildon in Northumberland, in which [Page 90] Action he lost his Life in the Service of his Country, 5 May 1401.

Sir Alexander Ramsay of Dalhousie his Son, was one of the Barons of this Realm, who obtained Letters of safe Conduct from the King of Eng­land, to come into that Kingdom, to accompany King James I. home to Scotland, Anno 1423, he being one of the Barons on whom he conferred the Honour of Knighthood, for the greater Splendor of his Coronation, Anno 1424. By . . . . . . Daughter of . . . . . . . his Wife, he left Issue,

Sir Alexander, who flourished under King James II. and III. Being like his Ancestors, a Man of a Martial Spirit, he accompanied the Earl of Angus the King's Lieutenant, in that Expedition against the English, where­upon ensued the Battle of Piperdein, where the Scots obtain'd the Victory over the English.

To this Sir Alexander succeeded Alexander his Grand-son and Heir, Son of George his eldest Son, who dyed before him. This Sir Alexan­der was (according to common Fame) a M [...]n of prodigious Stature, and of Strength answerable to his Hight.

By . . . . . . Douglass his Wife, he had Issue, Nicol his Son and Heir, who succeeded him upon his Death, which happened the 9th September 1513, at the Battle of Flowdon.

Which Nicol Ramsay of Dalhousie, married Isabel Daughter of . . . . . . Lord Livingston, by whom he had,

George his Successor, who loyally adhered to Queen Mary, when the War broke out in that Reign, and was one of the Barons who entred into that memorable Association in her behalf, bearing date the 7th of May 1568. He married Elisabeth, Daughter of . . . . . . . Hepburn of . . . . . . by whom he had,

John, who succeeded him, but he dying without Male Succession, his Estate descended to

Sir George Ramsay his Nephew, who obtaining first the Honour of Knight­hood from King James VI, after­wards by the special Favour of the the said Prince, was raised to the Honour of Lord Ramsay, by Letters Patent, bearing date 25 of August 1618a. He married Margaret, Daughter and sole Heir of Sir George Douglass of Ellenhill, brother of Wil­liam Earl of Morton, by whom he had William his Successor, and Margaret married to William Livingston of Kil­syth. He departed this Life Anno 1630, and was succeeded by

William Lord Ramsay his Son, who was by King Charles I. raised to the Honour of Earl of Dalhousie, 19th June 1633, at the saids King's Coro­nation. He married Catherine, Daugh­ter of David, first Earl of Southesk, by whom he had,

George, his Successor.

Captain John Ramsay, Father to the present Earl; also two Daugh­ters.

1. Mary, married to James Earl of Buchan.

2. Margaret, to John Scrimgeor Earl of Dundee, but had no Issue. 2dly. To Sir Henry Bruce of Clackmanan.

He dying the 11th of February 1674. his Estate and Honour de­volved upon

George his Son and Heir, who mar­ried Anne, Daughter of John Earl of Wigton, Widow of Robert Lord Boyd, by whom he had,

1. William, his Successor.

2. George, who in his Youth car­ried Arms in Holland, and in the Low Countries, in Balfour's Regi­ment: He rose gradually to be En­sign, Lieutenant, Captain and Ma­jor in the same Regiment, after that he was preferred to be Lieutenant Colonel, and not long after, to be Colonel of a Regiment.

In the 1690, he was made Briga­deer after the Action of Valcour, and [Page 91] Colonel of the Scots Regiment of Guards. In the Year 1693, after the Battle of Landen, he was made Ma­jor General, and in 1702, the first of Queen Anne, Lieutenant General of the Army, and Commander in Chief of the Forces in Scotland, which he injoyed till his Death, which hap­pened in November 1705.

Besides which two Sons, he had likewise two Daughters, Jean, mar­ried first to George Lord Ross, next to Robert Viscount of Oxenford, and Anne to James Earl of Hume. This Earl dyed in 1675, and was succeed­ed by

William his Son, who married . . . . . . More, Daughter to the Earl of Drocheda of the Kingdom of Ire­land, by whom he had two Sons and a Daughter, viz.

1. George, who was killed in Hol­land by one Mr. Hamilton, Anno 1696.

2. William, who dyed Colonel in the Scots Regiment of Guards in Spain, Anno 1711, both unmarried.

Elisabeth, married to William Lord Halley of the Kingdom of Ireland, and has Issue.

William, Earl of Dalhousie, dying without Issue, the Honour devolved on Colonel William Ramsay, his Fa­ther's Cousin German, who married Jean, Daughter of George Lord Ross, by whom he had,

George Lord Ramsay.

Charles.

Malcolm.

Anne.

Jean.

ARMS.

Argent, an Eagle display'd, Sable, Supporters, two Griffons display'd of the 2d; Crest, an Unicorns Head coupé, Motto, Ora & Labora.

SCOT Earl of Delorain.

LORD Henry Scot, Son of James Duke of Monmouth, by Anne Dutchess of Buclugh, was in the fifth Year of the Reign of her Ma­jesty Queen Anne, by Letters Patent, bearing date the 29th of March 1706, created into the Dignity and Titles of Earl of Delorain, Viscount of Hermi­tage, and Lord Scot of Goldylinds, all in the County of Roxburgh.

He married Anne Daughter of Wil­liam Duncomb of Batlesdin, in the County of Bedford, Esq and has Issue.

ARMS.

The same with the Family of Bu­clugh, with a proper Difference.

DENNISTON, Lord of Denniston.

THIS Family is one of the most ancient in the Shire of Renfrew, and was of great Repute there, long before the Time of King Robert II, insomuch, that we find Ronnaldus de Denniston, is a Witness to the Inqui­sition, which David Prince of Cumber­land made of the ancient Possessions of the Church of Glasgow, Anno 1116, when John Achaian was pro­moted to that See. Hence descended Sir John Denniston, Knight, who flourished under King David Bruce, he married . . . . . . Daughter of Mal­colm Fleeming Earl of Wigton a, [Page 92] by whom he had Sir Robert his Son and Heir, who obtain'd a Grant from King Robert II. of the Barony of Glencairn, Anno 1370, and dying without Male Issue, in the beginning of King Robert III, his Estate went to his Daughters, and Co heirs,

Margaret, married to Sir William Cuningham of Kilma [...]rs, Ancestor to the Earl of Glencairn, who thereby ac­quired the Baronies of Glencairn, Finlaystoun and Kilmaronock.

Elisabeth, married to Sir Robert Maxwel of Calderwood, who there­upon added to his paternal Coat, the Arms of the Family of Denniston, viz. Argent, a Bend Azure, which is still born by Sir William Maxwel Baronet, his lineal Heir Male. A Branch of this Family, Denniston of Cowgra [...]n, doth still remain in Dunbarton shire.

KEITH, Lord Dingwall.

A Collateral Branch of Keith Earl of Marishal, was Andrew Keith Esq In the Time of King James VI. who coming to Court, he soon grew so popular, that he was first Knight­ed, and then by his Majesty's special Favour attained to the Dignity of a Baron of this Realm, by the Title of Lord Keith of Dingwall, before the Year 1584a. Being a Person of excellent Parts, he was with George Earl of Marishal sent Ambassa­dor to Denmark, to Treat about a Marriage betwixt King James and Anne a Daughter of that Crown, which was happily concluded in 1589, but he dyed soon after, without either Wife or Issue that I find.

PRESTON, Lord Dingwall.

THIS Sirname was first assumed from the Lordship of Preston, in Vicecomitatu Edinburgi, where they have been seated as early as the Reign of Alexander III. The first of whom I have found upon Record, is Sir William Preston Knight, who was one of the Barons of Scotland, who were summoned to Berwick in the 1291b, when the Controversy run high betwixt Robert Bruce and John Baliol, for the Crown of this Realm.

The principal Family of the Name seems to have been Craigmiller: Sir Henry Preston Knight in the 2d of Robert III, is joined in Com­mission with Sir John Swinton, Sir Henry Douglass, and Sir John Dalziel c to treat with the English, touch­ing a Peace betwixt the two Crowns. Of this Family.

Sir Richard Preston was a younger Son in the Reign of James VI, whose high Advancements to Honour, added no small Lustre to this worthy Fa­mily. He was educated at the Court, and being of an agreeable and win­ning Deportment, he soon grew in­to his Majesty's special Favour, at­taining first the Honour of Knight­hood, and e're long, was made one of the Grooms of the Bed-Chamber. Upon King James's attaining the Eng­lish Crown, he accompanied him into that Realm, where he received further Honour, being made one of the Knights of the Bath, at his Majesty's Corona­tion the 30 of July 1603d. Also in 1607, he was further dignify'd with the Title of Lord Dingwall, the Con­stabulary of which Castle, the King then bestowed on him. His faithful Services, together with the King's [Page 93] Countenance, procured him the Mar­riage of Elisabeth Daughter and Heir of the Earl of Desmond in the King­dom of Ireland, into which Dignity he was created, by Letters Patent, bearing date 24 July 1619, and de­parting this Life Anno 1622, the Irish Honour expired, but the Title of Lord Dingwall being to the Heirs of his Body whatsoever lawfully be­gotten, devolved upon the Lady Elisabeth his only Daughter and sole Heir, married to James Duke of Or­mond, by whom she had Issue, Thomas Earl of Ossory, Richard Earl of Aran in Ireland; also two Daughters,

1. Elisabeth, married to Philip Earl of Chesterfield, by whom he had on­ly one Daughter Elisabeth, married to John late Earl of Strathmore.

2. Mary, to William Duke of De­vonshire in England. But to return to Thomas Earl of Ossory (the eldest Son) he being [...]ummoned to the Eng­lish Parliament by the Title of Lord Butler of Moor-Park, was made Knight of the Garter, and Rear-Admiral of his Majesty's Fleet; and being a Person of singular Worth, gave many eminent Proofs of his Prudence and Valour both by Sea [...]nd Land, but was suddenly snatched away by Death in the flower of his Age, Anno 1680. He married the Lady Aemelia de Nas­sau, Daughter to Lewis de Nassau, Lord Beverwart, Son to Maurice Prince of Orange, by whom he had,

James now Duke of Ormond, Charles Lord Butler of Westoun, also three Daughters,

1. Elisabeih, married to William Earl of Darby.

2. Aemelia, unmarried.

3. Henrietta, to Henry Earl of Grantham.

His Father surviving him eight Years, then gave way to Fate, his Estate and Honour devolving upon the present Duke his Grandson, a lively Example of the Valour and Gallantry of his two great Ancestors. In 1689, his Grace was constituted one of the Bed-Chamber to the King, Captain of the second Troop of Guards, and Knight of the Garter. On the Accession of her present Majesty to the Throne, he was appointed Generalissimo of the Forces sent against Spain; in his Return from whence he had a large share in the Service of destroying the French Fleet in the Harbour of Vigo, and was afterwards sent Lord Lieutenant into Ireland; also he was named Generalissimo of her Majesty's Forces in Flanders, upon the Removal of John Duke of Marleborough.

In 1710, he laid Claim to the Honour of Lord Dingwall, as being the Heir gradually and lineally descending from Richard Lord Dingwall: Being found to have Right, his Claim was allowed, and accordingly he Voted by his Proxy in the Election of the Sixteen Scots Peers, (who by the Treaty of Union are to sit in the House of Peers of Great Britain) 10th November the same Year.

He married first Anne, Daughter of Laurence Earl of Rochester, who de­ceased without any surviving Issue; and to his second Wife Mary, Daugh­ter of Henry Duke of Beaufort, by whom he had Thomas Earl of Ossory, who dyed in 1694, Elisabeth and Mary, both living unmarried.

ARMS.

Argent, three Unicorns Heads eras'd, Sable.

DOUGLASS, Duke of Douglass,

THIS Family is a very great and ancient one in Lanark shire, of which there is a particular History [Page 94] wrote by a very learned Pen, who equalizes them to any of the ancient Roman Families, and gives them the preference to all other in Europe, those of crown'd Heads excepted. They have been particularly famous for great Generals, there having been more of this Name, than any other that is to be met with in History; neither was it their native Countrey alone that was indebted to their Va­lour, but they signaliz'd themselves in most places of Europe, and particu­larly in France, where they have had great Commands and Titles, as Duke of Turrin, Count de Longoville, &c. In short, this Family exceeded all the rest in the Kingdom, for the Num­ber of Nobility and Gentry of their own Name, according to those old Lines,

So many so good as of the Douglasses have been,
Of one Sirname was ne'er in Scotland seen.

The Origin of this illustrious House is derived from one Sholto, who in the Reign of Solvathius King of Scotland, Anno Christi 770, having been the principal Man that routed Donald Bane and his Forces, who invaded the Countrey, and being a Dou glass, or a black pale Man, as these Words signify (says my Author) both in old British and Irish, the King royaly rewarded his Services, and made him a Grant of large Possessions in the County of Lanerk, which either he or his Successors cal­led Douglass, and from thence took the Sirname of the Family. This Sholto was the Father of Hugh, of whom there is nothing memorable. He was succeeded in his Inheritance by his eldest Son Hugh II. whose younger Brother William, being sent by Achaius King of Scotland, pursuant to his League with Charlemaign, with 4000 choice Men into Italy against the Lombard's, he performed many glorious Actions, and became the Root of the Family of Scoti at Pla­centia.

But to leave the Family of the Scoti in Italy, William is supposed to be the Son of Hugh Lord of Douglass, and the Father of John, who was the Father of William, the next Lord of the Family, who is Witness among others to the Charter of King William, whereby he confirm'd the Lands of Dalgarnac given by Adger the Son of Dovenald, to the Church of the Holy Cross at Edinburgh, in the former part of that Reign: He left Issue two Sons, Archibald, who succeeded in the Lordship, and Bricius, first Prior of Lisma [...]agoe, afterwards Bishop of Murray a.

Archibald first of the Name, mar­ried one of the Co-heirs of the Baro­ny of Crawfurd of the same Sirame,b and was succeeded by William III, the Father of Sir Hugh de Doug­lass, who lived in the Time of Alex­ander III, and did signalize himself at the Battle of the Largs, where the Scots obtained a glorious Victory over the Norvegians, Anno 1263. He married Marjory, Daughter of Alex­ander, and Sister to Hugh Lord of Abernethy c; but having no Chil­dren by her, at least that survived him, his Brother William, for Di­stinction called the Hardy, succeeded him. In the time of the War with England, upon all Occasions he di­stinguished himself in the Service of his Country. In the 1295, he was chosen Governor of Berwick, then in the Hands of the Scots, which he de­fended with great Resolution and Courage; but afterwards falling into the Enemies hand, he dyed there Prisoner, Anno 1303d, leaving Issue by . . . . . . his Wife, Daughter of Keith of that Ilk, James Lord of Douglass, and Hugh; also by Marga­ret [Page 95] Daughter to Ferrairs Earl of Dar­by, of the Kingdom of England a, Archibald Lord of Galloway, of whom the Family descended, and John, Progenitor to the Earl of Morton.

Which James Lord Douglass, com­monly called The good Sir James, laid the Fundation of the Grandeur of the House of Douglass: He was famous all the World over for his Valour and glorious Actions in the Service of his Country, for which his Memory will still be honoured: He entred early into the Service of King Robert Bruce, and in 1313b he assaulted and took the Castle of Rox­burgh from the English, and the next Year he commanded the left Wing of the Scots Army, at the famous Battle of Bannockburn, where he be­hav'd so well, as to merit the Honour of Knighthood in the Fieldc, after which, he was constituted Warden of the Marches toward England d, and entring Cumberland, wasted that County. In Consideration of his good Services before that time perform'd, he had a Grant of the Castle, Vil­lage, and Forrest of Jedworth e, then erected into a free Forrestry, Cum indictamentis latrociniorum & ministrationem earundem in omnibus terris suis infra regnum nostrum; & si aliquis de hominibus suis per justitiarios nostros fuerint judicati, volumus quod dictus Jacobus, haeredes sui, & eorum ministri habeant liberam earundem mi­nistrationem cum omnibus libertatibus, commoditatibus ad predicta indicta­menta pertinen. in feudo & haereditate perpetuo, salvo tantum communi auxilio pro defensione regni nostri contingenti, And the Seasin is declared to be the giving him the King's Ring with the Emerauld Stone.

An Author reckons this illustrious Person to have been in fifty seven Battles and Re-encounters against the English, thirteen times victorious against the Saracens, and other Infi­dels, thrice as often as he had been Years in Action, which were about twenty four, from King Robert Bruce's Coronation, 1306, to the time of his Death, in 1330, which happened fighting against the Sara­cens, the Enemies of our Faith. Now tho what is above recorded of this noble Lord were alone sufficient to preserve his Memory, yet cannot I omit adding this Epitaph which Mr. Hume gives him.

Quicquid sors potuit mortali in pectore ferre,
Vel facere, hoc didici perficere, atque pati.
Prima ubi luctando vici, sors affuit ausis
Omnibus: & quid non pro patria ausus eram?
Hosti terror ego: nullus me terruit hostis:
Consiliis junxi rob [...] a dura meis.
Praelia quot numerat, titulos, actos (que) triumph [...]
Brucius, hinc totidem pene trophaea mihi.
Qua jam signa feram? major quaerendus & orbi [...],
Atque hostis; famam non cap [...] iste meam.
Arma Saraceno objeci prope littora Calpes
Herculeae, hic tellus me male fausta tegit.
Herculea Graecis memoretur gloria lud [...],
Fallor an Herculea stant potiora mea.

Sir James was succeeded by his Brother Hugh, but an unactive Man, of whom there is little on Record, having no Issue of his own Body. In 1343, he resigned the Lordship of Douglass, in favours of Sir William his Nephew (Son of Archibald Lord of Galloway, who was slain at the Battle of Halydonhill, so fatal to the Scots, Anno 1333) whereupon he obtained from King David Bruce a Charter De omnibus terris reditus & possessiones per totum regnum Scotiae, de quibus quondam Jacobus Dominus de Douglass avunculus suus & Archibaldus pater suus obierunt vestiti, cum re­galitate & libera warena, integre & honorifice, una cum ducatu hominum Vicecomitatum de Roxburgh & Selkrig. In the 1346, he was Warden of the [Page 96] East Marches toward England, and accompanying King David to the Battle of Durham, he was taken Prisoner with his Sovereigna, but was soon afterward released. In 1357, he was one of the Commis­sioners on the part of Scotland, autho­rized to treat with the English about the Redemption of the Kingb, and among other Nobles bound to Edward III, for a hundred thousand Pound Sterling Ransom, in which Deed he's designed Willielmus Domi­nus de Douglass miles. Much about the same time he was dignified with the Honour of Earl of Douglass; for I find him intituled Willielmus comes de Douglass, when he's joined in Commission with diverse Lords to treat with English Commissioners about King David's Inlargementc. This Earl was deeply engaged on the French side, in the memorable Battle of P [...]ictiers (where John King of France was taken Prisoner by the Black Prince) and very narrowly e­scaped, being then Ambassador from King Robert II. to the French Court, where the ancient Alliance betwixt the two Crowns was renewed and confirmed. As for his Works of Piety, I have only discover'd, that he gave in pure Alms to the Abby of Melross, and the Monks serving, and perpetually to serve God there, the Patronage of the Church of Cavers, with its Tithes, for celebrating Di­vine Service there, according to the Tenor of a special Ordination by him made, viz. for certain Priests, who were to perform that Service for the good Estate of his Sovereign Lord King David, and of himself, during his Life, and for the health of his Soul, and his Ancestors and Succes­sors after his Departure hence; and which Donation the said King rati­fied in the 30th of his Reign.

He married first Margaret, Daugh­ter of Donald, Sister, and at length sole Heir of Thomas Earl of Mar d, by whom he had James his Son and Heir, and Isabel, a Daughter, after the Death of her Brother Countess of Mar, who became first the Wife of Sir Malcolm Drummond of Cargill, who in Right of her was intituled Lord Mar e, and thereafter of Sir Alexander Steuart Knight, in whose favour she resign'd the said Earldom, Anno 1404, Causa (says she) Matri­monii contracti inter dominum Alexan­drum Senescal & nos dictam Isabel­lam f, which Honour he enjoy'd till his Death.

This Earl William's second Mar­riage (having Divorc'd his former Wife) was with Margaret, Daughter of Patrick Earl of March g, by whom he had Archibald Lord Galloway, after­ward Earl of Douglass: And his third and last was Margaret, Daughter and Heir of Thomas Steuart Earl of Angus, by whom he had George Douglass first Earl of Angus of that Name: He departed this Life in 1384, and was interr'd in the Abby Church of Melross, according to Mr. Winton, whose Words are these,

[Page 97]
To Douglasdale as I heard say,
An Sickness took him by the way,
And there he dyed in short space,
: : : : : : : : : : :
To Melrose then they took his Body,
And there it bury it right honourably.

This Earl was succeeded by James his Son, between whom and Sir Henry Percy there were glorious Feats of Arms performed in Honour of their Country. He was killed at the Battle of Otterburn, 31 of July 1388, fought betwixt him and Sir Henry Hotspur, Son to the Earl of Northumberland, an Encounter, says one, managed with that unparallelled Courage on both sides, that it was hardly to be matched in History, and was the Oc­casion of an old Rhime, of which this is a part,

It fell about the Lammas Tide,
When Yeoman win the Hay,
The doughtie Douglass gan to ride
In England to take a Prey.

Mr. John Johnston, our famous Poet, has endeavoured on his Part, to perpetuate his Memory by the fol­lowing Elegy,

Quaeritis ô quid agam? en animam jam ago: fata meorum
Hac sequor. Innumero huc vulnere facta via est.
Nesciat hoc hostis: sequitor quam quis (que) secat spem,
Atque aliquis nestri funeris ulter ades.
Finiit, & subito redivivo funere surgens
Mars novus intonuit, victor & ultor obit.

This Heroick Earl was married with the Lady Isabel Steuart, Daugh­ter to King Robert IIa, but dying without lawful Issue, he was succeed­ed in the Earldom by

Archibald Lord Galloway, his Bro­ther, commonly called Archibald the Grim. In 1381 he was sent Ambassa­dor to France, which Negotiation he managed with Success and Honour. This Earl added to his ancient patri­monial Inheritance the Lordship of Bothwel, in Vicecomitatu Lanerici, by Marriage of Elisabeth, only Daugh­ter and sole Heir of Thomas Murray, Lord of Bothwell, and thereupon had an Augmentation to his ancient Arms, viz. Azure, three Molle [...]s with­in a double Tressure, Or. He founded the Collegiate Church of Bothwell, e­stablishing Maintenance for a Pro­vost and eight Prebends, out of the Lands of Osbairnstoun and Nether-Urd, who were continually to perform the Offices of the Church for the Soul of him and his Successors, of the Date 10th Octob. 1398b, and departing this Life in the Month of February 1400c, he was interr'd at Bothwell Church, without any Epitaph on his Monument, leaving Issue by the said Elisabeth his Wife, Archibald his Successor, and a Daughter Marjory, married to David Prince of Scotland, elder Brother to King James I.

Which Archibald was a Nobleman of great Valour, and much addicted to Arms. In 1401, he had a Command in the South against the English, ra­vaged the Country as far as New­castle, carried of the Stores, and then returned Home without any manner of Loss.

This Earl was in such Esteem for his Conduct, Valour, and other bright Qualities, that he was made Captain General of all the Forces then designed to be transported into France, in behalf of the French against the English, where he did such signal Service to that Crown, that King Charles VII. invested him in the Dutchy of Turrin, and to his Heirs Male for ever, and made him Mari­shal of France 464: He had the chief Command in the Battle of Vernoil, where he lost his Li [...]e, 7th of August 1425, and was interr'd in St. Gratians Church in Tours.

This Earl had Issue by his Wife Margaret, Daughter of King Ro­bert III.

Archibald, who succeeded him,

[Page 98] James, Lord Abercorn.

Margaret, married to William Earl of Orkney.

Elisabeth, to John Steuart Earl of Buchan, Constable of France, and Chamberlain of Scotland.

Helen, to Alexander Lauder of Hatton.

Mary, to Sir Simon Glenddining of that Ilka.

Archibald, next Earl of Douglass, his Son, was a Person of great Ac­complishments either for Peace or War: I find him in 1424, appointed to go upon a solemn Embassy into England to treat upon the Redemp­tion of King James I. Henry Bishop of Aberdeen, and Sir William Hay of Err [...]ll, were appointed to accompany him, and to be his Collegues: The first mention of his Martial Actions is in 1420, the first of the Govern­ment of Murdack Duke of Albany, when he, with his Brother-in-law, John Earl of Buchan, were sent into France with 7000 Auxiliaries, wherewith they perform'd many sig­nal Services against the English: He gave way to Fate on the 26 June 1438, and was buried in the Church of Douglass, with this Epitaph on his Monument,Hic jacet Dominus Archibaldus Douglass Dux Turroniae, Co [...]es de Douglass & Longoville, Do­minus Gallovidiae. & Annandiae, locum tenens Regis Scotiae, obiit 26 June, Anno Dom. Mil­lefi [...]o quadringentesimo Trigesimo [...]ctavo.

This Earl had no Issue by his first Wife Matilda b, Daughter of Da­vid Earl of Crawfurd: But Eupham Graham c, Daughter of Patrick Earl of Strathern, his second Wife, bore him two Sons, viz. William, who succeeded him. 2d. David, and Margaret a Daughter, first Coun­tess of Douglass, and thereafter the Wife of John Steuart, Earl of Athole, Uterine Brother to King James II.

To Archibald Earl of Douglass suc­ceeded William his Son, a Youth of great Expectation, of an high Spirit and a sweet Disposition, but the Va­nity of his followers, and his own want of Experience, led him into se­veral Misdemeanors, and being on his Journey to a designed Parliament, he was met, and sumptuously enter­tain'd by William Lord Crichton, then Chancellour, who minded him of the Greatness and Merit of the Family, and his own Duty to the Crown; the Earl in Return acknow­ledged his Fault lay in his Youth and Ignorance, blaim'd his evil Coun­sellors, chided his Dependents, pro­mised Obedience for the future, and gave all the Marks of a sincere and generous Resolution: But after all this, he was invited to the Castle of Edinburgh, and being set at the King's Table, was suddenly remov'd, and instantly murdered, in the 16th Year of his Age, together with his younger Brother David, and Sir Mal­colm Fleeming of Cumbernald, his Friend, Anno. 1441.

To William last mentioned, succeed­ed James Lord Abercorn, his Uncle, for Distinction called The gross Earl, of whom I find nothing remarkable, save that he was Warden of the Marches toward England, in the Reign of King James II. He married Beatrix Sinclair, Daughter to the Earl of Orkney, who bore him six Sons, viz. William, who succeeded him. James Douglass, Knight, who took to Wife Mary, one of the two Daughters and Coheirs of James Dunbar Earl of Murray, in Right of whom he came to possess that Ho­nour. Sir Hugh Douglass 4th Son, was Earl of Ormond. John Lord Bal­veny, and Henry the youngest; also four Daughters,

1. Margaret, married to James Earl of Morton, and had Issue.

2. Beatrix to the Lord Aubignie.

3. Janet, to Robert Lord Fleeming, Ancestor to the present Earl of Wigton.

[Page 99] 4. Elisabeth, to Wallace of Craigie in Vicecomitatu de Aire a.

This Earl died the 24th of March 1443, and was interr'd at Douglass-Church: Upon his Tomb ye may read this Epitaph,Hic jacet magnus & potens Princeps Jacobus Comes de Douglass, Dominus Annandiae & Gal­lovidiae, Liddaliae, & Jedburgh-forestiae, & Dominus de Balvenia magnus Wardanus Regni Scotiae versus Angliam, &c. qui obiit vicesimo quarto die mensis Martii, Anno Domini mille­simo quadringentesimo quadragesimo tertio.

William, Son and Heir of the for­mer Earl, being unwilling that so great an Inheritance as the Earldom of Douglass was, should be divided, married Margaret, Daughter of Wil­liam, and Sister and Heir to William Earl of Douglass his Cousin, A Mar­riage (says one) made him as much hated by his Friends, as feared by his Enemies. This Earl prosecuted Re­venge on Chancellour Crichton, as the Author of his Cousins Death with more Violence than Success, his Affectation of a mighty Pomp and Splendor, procur'd him Envy: His Contempt of the Courtiers begot Hatred, and incurr'd him their Dis­pleasure. They improv'd his Fail­lings, magnified his Designs, and plotted his Ruine; His Power and haughty Conduct rendred him su­spected to his Sovereign K. James II, whose Hand and Dagger put a period to his Life in Stirling Castle, the 13th of February 1452.

James succeeded to William his Brother in the Earldom, he took up Arms against his Prince; and com­ing to a Battle, he was intirely rout­ed by the Earl of Angus, the King's Lieutenant, Anno 1455. Retireing then to the Court of England, he was intertain'd by King Edward, who made him one of the Knights of the most noble Order of the Garter; but invading the Kingdom again with with the Duke of Albany, assisted from England, Anno 1483, he was taken Prisoner, and confined in the Abby of Lindores, where he took upon him religious Orders, [...]nd con­tinued in Devotion till his Life's End, which happned to fall out on 15th of April 1488: He was inter'd before the high Altar, under a Mar­ble Stone, to which was affixed a Tablet of Brassb containing this Inscription, Hic Requiescunt
Ossa Jacobi quondam Comitis de Douglass, in­clyti hujus Monasterii Monachi, qui po [...] [...] vitae discrimina obiit in summa pace [...] di [...] Aprilis, Anno Domini millesimo [...] ­simo octogesimo octavo.

This Earl is thus Characteriz'd by a good Historianc, who says, He was a Nobleman of a Majestick Pre­sence, Valiant, Learn'd, and Wise, but of a resolute and precise Temper, yet somewhat over distr [...]stful of his own Power, and other Performances, and if he had been either a more resolute Ad­venturer, or a more complying and submissive Subject, he might have made Peace on his own Terms. I shall con­clude with Mr. Hume's Epitaph on him, as Follows,

Quid rides rasumque caput, cellaeque recessum?
Quod que cucullatis Fratribus anumeror?
Si fortuna volvente vices fiet modo Princeps,
Plebeius: Monachus saepe Monarcha fuit.
English'd,
Why do you laugh to see my shaven Crown?
My Cell, my Cloister, and my Hooded-Gown?
This is the Power of that Sovereign Queen,
By whom Monks, Monarchs, Monarchs Monks have been.

The principal Branch of the Illustri­ous Family of Douglass, thus expiring, I shall at present confine my Memoirs to the House of Angus, the next great Family of the Name, who, tho inferior to that of the old Earls of Douglass [Page 100] yet exceeded most others for Royal­ties, Greatness, number of Vassals, and Military Glory. They had many Privileges inherent in their Family, as, that [...]e Earls of Angus should have the first Place and Vote in Parlia­ment or Council, that he should carry the Crown in Riding of Parliaments, to be the King's hereditary Lieute­nant, and to have the leading of the Van of the Army in the Day of Battle; all which were confirmed by King James VI. to William Earl of Angus Anno 1591.

George Douglass, first Earl of Angus, was only Son of William first Earl of Douglass, by Margaret his 3d Wife, Daughter and Heir of Thomas Steuart Earl of Angus: He was invested in this H [...]our upon his Mother's Resigna­tion by a Charter, of which this is a part,

Robertus Dei gratia Rex Scotorum, &c. sciatis nos dedisse & hac Charta confirmasse Georgio Douglas totam & integrum Comitatum Angusie, cum Do­minio de Ahernethy jacent. in Vicecomi­tatu de Perth & Berwick, & heredibus masculis corporis dicti Georgi [...]; quibus deficientibus Alexandro Hamilton militi & Elisabethae Steuart sponsae suae sorori dicte Comit [...]sse Angusie, &c. Test. Wal­tero Episcopo sancte Andreae, Joanne E­piscopo Dunkelden. Cancellario, Joanne Comite de Carrick Senescallo Scotiae primogenito nostro, Roberto Comite de Fife & Montieth Custode Scotiae, filio nostro. Apud Edinburg decimo die Aprilis, Anno Regni nostri decimo nono, Anno Dom. 1389.

This George, in the 1397, mar­ried the Lady Mary Steuart, Daugh­ter to King Robert IIIa, by whom he had William his Successor, Sir George Douglass Knight, and a Daugh­ter Elisabeth, married to Sir William Hay of Lockhart b, Ancestor to the present Marquess of Tweddal. All that I have found in History of this Earl, is, that he accompanied the Earl of Douglass to the Battle of Ho­mildon, where he was taken Prisoner, and there falling Sick, he dyed Anno 1402, his Lady re-marrying with Sir James Kennedy Knight, after that she became the Wife of Sir William Graham of Kincardin, whom survi­ving, also she was a fourth time mar­ried to Sir William Edmiston of Dun­treath c.

William, second Earl of Angus, in the 1423, was sent to England one of the Hostages for the Ransom of King James I. his Uncled, at the Solemnity of whose Coronation he had the Honour of Knighthood con­ferr'd on him, an Honour much more valued in ancient Times than we have since sound it to be: And in the Year 1424, he was one of the Peers that sat upon the Trial of Murdock Duke of Albany e, and the 29th of the said Reign he was appointed Warden of the middle Marches to­ward England, and the next Year after, had a special Grant of all the Mannors, Castles, and Lands descend­ed to him from his Ancestors, in as ample manner as they held the same.

In 1436, the English making seve­ral Incursions upon the Borders, un­der the command of the valiant Percy, he was sent against them, where he destroyed several Towns upon the Marches, and routed them at Piperdeen. He departing this Life the following Year 1437f, left Issue by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Hay of Locherret g, my Lord Tweddal's Ancestor, James who succeeded in the Honour.

Which James, in the second of [Page 101] James II. was one of the Conservators of the Peace with England a, a Truce being then concluded be­twixt the two Realms. He married the Lady Jean Steuart, Daughter to King James I, but dying without Issue, he was succeeded both in his Honour and Estate by

Sir George Douglass his Uncleb, a Man of great Parts, and much e­steem'd for Wisdom, Loyalty, and Valour. The first notice of him, is in the 1449, that he was one of the Commissioners on the part of Scot­land, who met with several English Lords at Berwick, and there conclud­ed a League of stricter Amity, as they termed it, betwixt both Na­tions; and soon after he was consti­tuted Warden of the East and Middle Marchesc. In 1457, the 20th of James II, he was sent against the Earl of Douglass, then in Rebellion, which he successfully quell'd; in Con­sideration of which special Service so perform'd by him, he had a Grant of the Lordship and Barony of Dou­glass. Finally he Indents with Henry VI. of England, then dispossessed of the Crown by Edward Duke of York, that for the Earl's Assistance to­wards his Restauration, he obliges himself in verbo Principis, that he shall erect to his Lordship and his Heirs, as much Land betwixt Humber and Trent as shall amount to two thou­sand Merks Sterling a Year; and at the same time by a bold Interprise, he relived Monsieur Brisack and the French Troops under his Command, then besieged in the Castle of Alnwick, in the sight of the English Army, and brought them safe into Scotland, but after all his great and loyal Services, he gave way to Fate, well advanced in Age, 14th November 1462, and was buried with his Ancestors at Abernethy. His Wife was Elisabeth, Daughter of Sir Andrew Sibbald of Balgony in Vicecomitatu de Fife, by whom he had Archibald the next Earl, George Douglass of Bonjed­ward d, and three Daughters,

Jean, married to William Lord Graham e.

Elisabeth, to Sir Robert Graham of Fintrie, and had Issue.

Margaret, to Sir Duncan Campbel of Glenurchie, Ancestor to the Earl of Breadalbin.

Archibald his Son and Heir suc­ceeding, commonly designed The great Earl, he made a considerable Figure in the Reigns of James III, and IV. In 1488, he was one of the associating Lords who at Lawder-Bridge, in presence of the King seized on Thomas Homil and Robert Cochran the mean Favorites of that Prince, and caused Execute them as the Au­thors of the Mismanagement of the publick Affairs, tho I don't find he was in the Prince's Army at Bannockburn, where the unfortunate King lost his Life. In the 24th of James IV, Anno 1492, he was made Warden of the Marches, also one of the King's Privy Council, and the next Year consti­tuted Lord high Chancellor of Scot­land, then void by the Decease of Colin Earl of Argyle, from which he was removed in 1498, George Earl of Huntly being put in his stead.

H [...]s first Wife was Elisabeth, Daugh­ter of Robert Lord Boyd, Lord high Chamberlain of Scotland, by whom he had three Sons,

1. George, Master of Angus.

2. Sir William Douglass of Braid­wood, who was killed at Flowdon, of whom and his Descendants more will be said afterwards.

3. Gavin Douglass third Son, de­voting himself to the Service of the [Page 102] Church, was put into Orders about 1493: His first Preferment was to the Rectory of Heriot, and then to the Provostry of St. Giles, Edinburgh, in which Station he continued till the 1515, he was promoted to the Episcopal See of Dunkeld, then void by the Death of Bishop Brown, where he exercised his Episcopal Function till Death took him away, Anno 1522a.

His second Wife was Catherine, Daughter of Sir William Stirling of Keir, in Vicecomitatu de Perth b, who bore him a Son Archibald Dou­glass of Kilspindy c, and three Daughters. 1st. Marjory, married to C [...]thbert Earl of Glencairn. 2d. Elisa­beth to Robert Lord Lyle, Justice Ge­neral of Scotland, in the Reign of King James IV. 3d. Janet, to Ro­bert Lord Herris, Ancestor to the Earl of Nithsdale.

But its requisite here to observe, That George Master of Angus, mar­ried Margaret, Daughter of John, first Lord Drummond: His Children by her were three Sons,

1. Archibald, who succeeded his Grand-father.

2. Sir George Douglass, who by E­lisabeth his Wife, Daughter and sole Heir of David Douglass of Pittendrich d had Issue David, afterward Earl of Angus, James Earl of Morton, Regent of Scotland, in the Minority of King James VI. Elisabeth, married to Sir John Carmichael of that Ilk, and Mary to Sir George Anchinleck of Balmanno e, in Vicecomitatu de Perth.

3. William, Prior of Coldingham, afterward promoted to be Abbot of Holy-rood-house, Anno 1522, upon the Promotion of George Crichton to the Episcopal See of Dunkeld.

Also six Daughters, Elisabeth mar­ried to John Lord Yester, Progenitor to the Marquess of Tweddale. Janet to John Lord Glammis, Ancestor to the Earl of Strathmore. Janet, to Sir James Douglass of Drumlanrig, An­cestor to the Duke of Queensberry. Alison, married first to Robert Black­ader of that Ilk, in Vicecomitatu de Berwick, and secondly to Sir David Hume of Wedderburn, in dicto Vicecomi­tatu. Margaret, to Robert Crawfurd of Achinnaims, in Vicecomitatu de Renfrew. This George behaving him­self very gallantly at Flowdonfield, there lost his Life, with two hundred Gentlemen of his Name and Family, 9th September 1513; which Disaster so affected his aged Father, that he retired from the World to prepare himself for Death, which he was sen­sible was approaching, and it hap­pened in the Beginning of the next Year 1514.

To Archibald the great Earl of Angus succeeded Archibald his Grand­son, a Person of great Accomplish­ments, either for Peace or War. This noble Person in his Youth tra­velled into France and other Foreign Parts, where he received great Ho­nours from the Princes themselves of these respective Countrys, particu­larly from Henry II. of France, who made him a Knight of the most noble Order of St. Michael. About the Time of his Return, Anno 1515, Scotland was then afflicted with the Death of King James IV. who left his Son very Young, and the Regency to the Queen Mother, who for her better Support married this Earl.

Upon the Resignation of the Go­vernment by the Duke of Albany, he together with the Earls of Aran, Lennox, and Argyle, by a special Act were made Counsellours to the young King James V. Anno 1521, and the Year after constituted Lord high Chancellour of Scotland; he held the Office till the Year 1528, at which time, upon a Disgust taken a­gainst him by the King, he was re­moved and out-law'd, whereupon he retir'd into England, where he was nobly entertain'd by Henry VIII. [Page 103] and taken into the Number of his Privy Council, where he sojourn'd fif­teen Years, till the Death of King James V. Anno 1542. Then returning [...]ome, he was Parliamentarily restor'd to his Estate and Titles of Honour, and at the fatal Battle of Pinkiefield he commanded the Van-guard of the Army against the English, where he behaved very worthily, and living peaceably the remainder of his Days, he departed this Life at his Castle of Tantallon, in the 1557, aged 64, and was interr'd at Abernethy.

This gallant Earl married thrice, his first Wife being Margaret Hepburn Daughter of Patrick Earl of Bothwell, by her he had no Children. Next, he had the Honour to marry Marga­ret of England, Widow of James IV. of Scotland, eldest Daughter of Henry VII. and Sister to Henry VIII. Kings of England, who bore him one Daughter, the Lady Margaret Douglass, married to Matthew third Earl of Lennox, Mother by him of Henry Duke of Albany, Lord Darnly, &c. Father of James VI. first Monarch of Great Britain. His third Wife was Margaret Daughter of John Lord Maxwell, by whom he had a Son James, who dyed in his Childhood. To Archibald Earl of Angus succeed­ed,

Sir David Douglass of Pittendrich, his Nephew, who did not live long to enjoy the Honour: He departing this Life in 1558, leaving Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Sir John Hamilton of Clidesdale, Brother to James Duke of Chatlerault, Widow of Sir John Johnston of that Ilk, a Son Archibald, who succeeded into the Honour; also two Daughters,

Margaret, married to Sir Walter Scot of Buclugh, and after his Death to Francis Steuart Earl of Bothwell.

Elisabeth, to John Lord Maxwell, afterward Earl of Morton.

Which Archibald, for his vertuous Endowments, was Sirnamed The good Earl. He married first Margaret E [...]skine Daughter of John Earl of Mar. Next, Margaret Daughter to the Earl of Rothes, but by neither of these had he any Issue. 3dly Jean, Daughter of John Lord Glammis, who bore him a Daughter Elisabeth, who dyed a Maid.

The first time I find this Earl in publick Business, is in 1573, he was constituted Sheriff of Berwick, and one of the Wardens on the Borders, which he exerced with an universal Reputation for five or six Years, Ju­stice never being better administred.

Upon the fall of his Uncle the Earl of Morton, the King grew jea­lous of him, whereupon he retir'd to England, where he was bountifully entertained by Queen Elisabeth, and there he had Opportunity to con­tract a Friendship with the famous Sir Philip Sidney, very much to their mutual Satisfaction: But after some Years, upon better Information, his Majesty not only restored him to his former Favour and Familiarity, but appointed him Lieutenant on the Borders, which he defended with great Reputation for several Years; but at last being seiz'd with a Sick­ness, which was thought to be Sor­cery, he languished under his Distem­per till about the end of July 1588, at which time he gave way to Fate, with the Character of being a good Man in all respects, well versed in Lear­ning, and tho endowed with many ex­cellent Qualities, his Piety was al­lowed to be the reigning Vertue in him. He was interr'd at the Col­legiate Church of Abernethy; upon him I find this Epitaph,

Morte jacet saeva Angusius, spes illa bonorum,
Terror malorum maximus:
Cui, laude & luctu meritis, pia turba parentat;
Patrem, Parentem ingeminans.
Par studium impietas simulat: quem carpere livor
Vivum solebat, mortuum
Aut veris sequitur lacrymis, aut gaudià fictis
Celat pudenda; & laudibus
Saltem non fictis os pene invita resolvit,
Seque arguit mendacii.
O laus! O veri vis! O victoria! honosque
Cunctis triumphis clarior!
[Page 104] Englished,
Angus by cruel Death lies here,
The good Mans hope, the wickeds Fear,
The Praise and Sorrow of the most
Religious, who, as having [...]st
A Father, mourn, most Men are known
To find a Woe if they have none.
Envy, accustomed to wrong
His guiltless Life, imploys her Tongue
Now a loud Trumpet of his Fame,
And weeps, if not for Grief, for Shame,
Enforc'd to give her self the Lie,
O Power of Truth! O Victory!
By which more Honour is obtain'd,
Than is in greatest Triumphs gain'd.

The Male Line of George Master of Angus terminating in this Earl, the Honour and Estate, by reason of the entail upon the Heirs Male, de­volved on Sir William Douglass of Glenbervy.

Glenbervy is a Barony in the Shire of Kincardin, which was the Possession of the Melvil's: As far back as the Time of Alexander II. Philip de Melvil Knight, executed the Office of She­riff of Aberdeen, in the beginning of that Reigna. In his Line the Barony continued till the the 8th of James III, Anno 1468b, and then determin­ed in Elisabeth, Daughter, and at length sole Heir of Alexander Mel­vil of Glenbervy, married to Sir John Achinleck of that Ilk, an ancient Family in Air-Shirec, by whom he had James his Son and Heir, who marrying Giles Daughter of Sir John Ross of Halkhead, Knightd, left a Daughter Elisabeth his sole Heir, whose Ward and Marriage falling to the King, James IV. he assigned it to Sir William Douglass of Braidwood, Knight, Son to Archibald Earl of Angus e, Anno 1492: Whereupon there happned a Contest betwixt the said Elisabeth and James Achin­leck of that Ilk, her Cousin German, about the Right of Succession: The Matter at length, after long Dispute, was referred by both Parties to cer­tain Noblemen, who determined the Barony of Glenbervy to the said Elisa­beth, and Sir William Douglass her Husband, whereupon he took the Coat of Achinleck, viz. A Cross im­battled, Sable, into his Atchievment. He was killed at the fatal Battle of Flowdon, Anno 1513, leaving Issue by the said Elisabeth his Wife, Archi­bald his Son and Heir, on whom King James V. conferred the Honour of Knighthood. His first Wife was Agnes, Daughter of William Earl Marishall, by whom he had William his Son and Heir: Also by his second Marriage with Mary, Daughter of Sir Alexander Irvine of Drum, he had two Sons,

1. James, a Clergyman, Parson of the Paroch Church of Glenbervy, Grand­father by Robert Douglass of Kilmonth, his eldest Son, of the right reverend Dr. Robert Douglass Bishop of Dum­blain, he was born Anno 1626, and had his Grammar Education in the Country, from whence being sent to the University of Aberdeen, he proceeded to the Degree of Master of Arts, continuing to pursue, his Theological Sudies with great As­siduity, he commenced Preacher about the Year 1650, but what was his first ministerial Charge before he was Parson of Renfrew in the West, does not occurr to me. From thence, after some Years stay, he was re­moved to the Provostry of Bothwell, and not long after that, to the Deanry of Glasgow, & Parsonage of Hamilton, where he continued to exercise his Ministerial Function, till Dr. Robert Lawry, who had presided over the Episcopal See of Brechin, from the Year 1671, to the 1682, departing this Life, Mr. Douglass was conse­crated in his Room, and on the 29th of June 1684 translated to the See of Dumblain, where he continued in the exercise of his Episcopal Functi­on till the 1689, he was deprived [Page 105] of his Bishoprick; since which time, he has made Conscience to live peaceably under King William's Go­vernment, and that of her present Majesty, and is now arrived to the un­common age of 87, exercising him­self daily in Works of Devotion and Piety, patiently waiting till the great Change come of translating him from this World, to the State of endless Felicity in the other.

2. John Douglass, second Son.

To Sir Archibald Douglass of Glenber­vy, succeeded Sir William his Son and Heir, to whom the Honour of Earl of Angus devolved Anno 1588.

This Earl, while a private Gentle­man, accompanyed Queen Mary in her Northern Expedition, Anno 1562, and was active in the Fight at Corrichie, where Alexander Earl of Huntly was slain. Upon the turn of the Refor­mation, in the memorable Year 1560, when both the Doctrine of the Church, and Authority of the Bishop, of Rome was parliamentarly abolished; he did eminently signalize himself by his firm Adherence to, and zealous Profession of the Protestant Religion, of which he was a very great Pro­moter, and of Consequence was a mighty Supporter of King James VI's. Authority during the Administration of the Regents Murray, Lennox, Mar, and Morton; which in that Prince's Minority, very much to his Detriment, he maintained, assisting both with his Money and Counsel; but having no Opportunity of signa­lizing himsely by Arms, we hear no more of moment concerning him, till the time of his Death, which hap­pened 14 April 1591, leaving a numerous Family by Giles his Wife, Daughter of Sir Robert Graham of Morphie, in Vicecomitatu de Kincardin;

1. William his Successor in the Honour.

2. Sir Robert, who got his Father's paternal Estate of Glenbervy, and was created Baronet, by King Charles I. the 30th of May 1625, being the sixth in Number of Precedency in that Honour. His Wife was Elisa­beth, Daughter of Sir George Auchin­leck of Balmanno, by whom he had Sir William his Successor, and Dr. George Douglass Rector of Stepney, Grand-father to Sir Robert Douglass now of Glenbervy, Baronet.

3d Son Gavin Douglass of Bridge­ford.

4th. John Douglass of Barras.

Margar [...] eldest Daughter, mar­ried to John Forbes of Monimusk, in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen. Elisabeth the second, to Sir Alexander Gordon of Cluny. Jean the third, to James Wishart of Pittarow, in Vicecomitatu de Kincardin. Sarah [...]ourth and youngest, to Sir Alexander Strachan of Thorntoun Baronet, and after his Death to Sir George Auchinleck of Bal­manno.

William his eldest Son, succeed­ed in the Honour, was a Noble­man well versed in the Antiquities and History of his Country, especial­ly in that Part relating to Genealo­gies; and from the Scots History, and the Documents of his Family, he wrote a Chronicle of the Douglasses, a much more elaborate Work than that put out in the Year 1644, Dedi­cated to the Marquis of Douglass. This Earl, in the latter part of his Life, made Defection to the Romish Faith, which put him so much under the King's Displeasure, that with leave he retired into France, where he spun out his Time in the Devo­tions of that Church till his Death, in the Year 1616. His wife was Elisabeth, Daughter of Lawrence Lord Oliphant, by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of George Earl o [...] Errol, by whom he had three Sons, and two Daughters, William Lord Angus his Successor, Sir James Douglass after­ward Lord Mordingtoun, S [...]r Francis Douglass of Sandilands, Knight.

Mary, second Wife of Alexander [Page 106] Earl of Linlithgow, Margaret, to Sir Alexander Campbel of Calder, in Vice­camitatu Moraviae, and had Issue.

To this Earl succeeded William his Son, who as he was Master of a most plentiful Fortune, so he kept up the old Scots Hospitality and Grandeur at his Castle [...] Douglass, where he usually resided, having perhaps a more numerous Family and Atten­dance than any Nobleman in the Kingdom. King Charles I, consti­tuted him chief Commander or Lieu­tenant on the Bordersa, and crea­ted him Marquis of Douglass on the 17th of June 1633, the Day immediately preceeding his Majesty's Coronation. Upon the commencing of the Civil War, in that Reign, I do not find this noble Lord engaged much on either side, but kept him­self out of the Broils of these times, as much as any of his Quality in the Kingdom, till the 1645, perceiving the hard Usage of the King, and the Miseries that threatned his native Country, he took up Arms in Defence of both, and joining his Forces with these under the Command of the Great Marquis of Montrose, his Ma­jesty's Captain General in Scotland, He accompanyed him to the Battle of Philiphaugh, where he behaved him­self with great Valour and admi­rable Courage. Upon the loss of the D [...], he had the Misfortune to be taken Prisoner; and notwith­standing all the Disadvantages and Dangers he lay under from the usurping Powers of these Times, con­tinued steady in his Loyalty to his Prince King Charles II, tho in Exile, to the frequent hazard of his Life, and Detriment of his Fortune, Oliver Cromwell imposing a considerable Fine upon him in the 1654.

H [...]s first Marriage was with Margaret Daughter of Claude Hamilton Lord Paisly, Sister to James first Earl of Abercorn, by whom he had two Sons and four Daughters.

1. Archibald, Lord Angus, who upon the breaking out of the Civil War, in the Reign of King Charles I, was on the Parliament's side for some time, but afterward dis­liking the Service; and finding Things carried on to Extremities, he left them, and appeared very for­ward to testify his Loyalty to King Charles II, at whose Coronation, which was solemniz'd the first of January 1651, his Lordship was con­stituted Lord high Chamberlain for the Day. He married first Anne, Daughter of Esmae Steuart Duke of Lennox, by whom he had James who succeeded his Grandfather. 2dly Jean, Daughter of David Earl of Weems, by whom he had Archibald Earl of Forfar, and Margaret fourth Wife of Alexander Viscount of King­stoun. This Lord dyed in the prime of his Age, Anno 1655, his Wife surviving him, re-married with George Earl of Sutherland.

2d. James the 2d Son, whose Genius leading him to the Wars, he went over to France, where he signaliz'd him­self in the Service of Lewis XIV, on every Occasion that offered, and more particularly at the Siege of Doway, where he was killed, his Death preventing his being honoured with a Marshal's Batton. Besides these Sons, he had also three Daugh­ters.

Jean, married to William Lord Alexander, Son and Heir of William first Earl of Stirling.

Margaret, to Sir John Hamilton, who was created Lord Bargany by King Charles I.

Grisel the third, to Sir William Carmichael.

His Lordships second Wife was Mary Daughter of George Marquis of Huntly, by Henrietta his Wife, Daugh­ter [Page 107] of Esmae Duke of Lennox, by whom he had William, created Earl of Selkirk, Anno 1646, and afterward Duke o [...] Hamilton 1661. The second, George Earl of Dunbarton; Colonel James Douglass, third Son, dyed un­married; likewise four Daughters,

1. Henrietta, married to James Earl of Annandale.

2. Catherine, to Sir William Ruth­ven of Douglass, in Vicecomitatu de Berwick.

3. Isabel, to William the first Duke of Queensberry.

4 Jean, to James 4th Earl of Perth, Lord high Chancellour of Scotland, in the Reign of King Charles II. and King James VII.

5. Lucy, to Robert Earl of Niths­dale, and all had Issue.

My Lord Marquis surviving all our intestine Commotions, which were not a few, the detail of which, I need not at this time enter into, he at last gave way to Fate in a good advanced Age, in the Spring of the Year, 1660a.

James succeeded his Grandfather in the Honour, he was sworn one of the Privy Council to King Charles II. about 1670, and so continued to two succeeding Kings, for the space of 30 Years, even to his Death. He married first Barbara, Daughter of John Earl of Mar, by whom he had a Son, James Lord Angus, a very brave Youth, who engaging early in the Wars, signaliz'd his Courage upon every Occasion that offered it self especially at the Battle o [...] Stenkirk, where he was unfortunately slain, 3d. of August 1692, in his 21 Year, generally lamented, being a Noble­man of great Hopes and Expectation, and would have been an Honour and Ornament to his Country, had not an untimely Death too soon depriv'd his illustrous Family of the great Ad­vantages it might have reaped by his Enjoyment of a longer Life. His Lordship married to his second Wife, Mary, Daughter of Robert Marquis of Lothian, by whom he had Archibald his Son and Heir, and a Daughter Lady Jean. He departed this mortal Life in a most Christian manner, and with an entire Resignation to the Will of the Creator, on the 25th of February 1700, at the Age of fifty four, and was interr'd at Douglass without any Funeral Solemnity.

Archibald the present Duke, a young Nobleman of great Hopes, succeeded his Father at six Years old, and Her Majesty Queen Anne was pleased in the nineth Year of his Age, to augment his Lordships Ho­nours, by creating him Duke of Douglass, on the 18th of April 1703: The Reasons for bestowing the Ho­nour upon him, is thus set forth in the Preamble to his Patent.

Quod nos in Regio nostro animo re­volventes fidelissimum & dilectissimum nostrum [...]onsanguineum Archibaldum Mar­chionem de Douglass. ex familia nobili & illustri ortum esse & a progenitoribus qui maximae fi [...]uciae munia illis concre­dita immaculata virtute & singulari fide obierunt quique ob res ab illis clarissime gestis. Regium diadema tuen­do & sustentando summis honoris & dignitatis titulis per nostros Regios predecessores exornati fuerunt: Nos quoque hujus maxime memores & cupi­dae per ulteriorem honoris additionem d [...]ctum Archiba [...]d [...]m Marchienem de Douglass ejusque heredibus masculis ip­sius corporis, sibi animum addere, ut nobiles suos predecessores imitetur; No­veritis i [...]itur nos f [...]sse, constituisse, creasse & inaugu [...]asse Archibaldum Mar­chionem de Douglass Ducem a [...] Douglass, Marchionem de Angus & Abernethy, Vicecomitem de J [...]dburgh Forrest Do­minum Douglass de Lonckle, Prestoun, & Robertoun.

ARMS.

Four Coats quarterly. 1st Azure, a Lyon Rampant crown'd with an imperial Crown Or: 2d Or, a Lyon rampant Gules, surmounted of a Ribban, Sable: 3d Or, a Fesse Cheque, Azure and Argent, surmounted of a Bend, Sable, charged with five Buckles, Or: 4th Argent, three Pyles, Gules; over all in a Shield of Pretence, Argent, a Heart, Gules, ensign'd with an imperial Crown, Or, on a Chief, Azure, three Mollets of the first, supported on the Dexter, with a Savage, wreathed about the Loins with Lawrel, and on the Sinister by a Stag Proper: Crest, a Salamander vo­miting Fire: Motto, Jamais Arriere, all within a Compartment of Stakes im­pal'd.

MAXWEL, Earl of Dirleton.

THE first and last Earl of this Place, was Sir James Maxwel of Innerweek, Knight, Son o [...] John Max­wel of Kirkhouse (a Branch of the Family of Maxwel) by Jean his Wife, Daughter o [...] Sir Charles Murray of Cockpool. Which Sir James was first introduc'd to Court by the means of his Uncle John Earl of Annandale, the great Favorite of James VI. where he soon obtain'd so much of his Majesty's Favour, as to be made a Knight, and one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-chamber. King Charles not only continued him in his Service, but further to reward his long and constant Fidelity in that Im [...]loyment, created him into the Dignity and Titles of Earl of Dirle­ [...]on, and Lord Elbotle, in the Year 1646. He married Elisabeth de Bousoyn, a Foreigner, by whom he had two Daughters,

Elisabeth, married to William se­cond Duke of Hamilton.

Jean, to Charles Lord Cranburn, eldest Son of William Earl of Salis­bury in England, and had Issue.

ARMS.

Argent, Saltyre, Sable.

SUTHERLAND, Lord Duffus.

THE Murray's were the first Pro­prietors of the Barony of Duffus, in the County of Murray, and that as early as the time of King William the Lyon, Hugh de Moravia, being Brother to William de Moravia, who first assum'd the Sirname of Murray: He's Witness in several Grants made to the Episcopal See of Murray, by his Brother, therein designed filius Willielmi filii Fris­kini a.

This Hugh left Issue Walter de Mo­ravia, who cedes his Right of the Wood of Spiny to Archibald Bishop of Murray b, in pure and perpe­tual Alms, Anno Dom. 1226. He was succeeded by Frsikinus de Moravia his Son, who designs himself Dominus de Duffus, in a solemn Contract be­betwixt him and the Bishop of Mur­ray, relative to several Lands that had been in Dispute between Sir Walter his Father, and the former Bishop of that See, dated on St. Cuthberts Day 1248. By Jean his Wife, he left Issue two Daughters his Coheirsc, Mary married to Sir Reginald le Chien, Knight, and [Page 109] Christian to William de Federeth, who divided the Inheritance.

The Lands of Duffus falling to the Share of the eldest Sister, Sir Re­ginald de Chein, and Mary his Wife foresaid, they gave a Donation to the Cathedral of Elgin, 1st May 1269, for the good of their Souls. After some Descents this Barony was trans­ferred by the Marriage of Mary Daughter and Heir of Rynald Chine, Knight, to Nicol a younger Son of Kenneth Earl of Sutherland, who was slain at the Battle of Halydonhill, Anno 1333a, he obtained by his Brother's Grant on the 30th of Sep­tember 1360, the fourty pound Land of Therboll, to be holden of the said Earl, which King David II, confirm­ed by his Charter under the Great Seal, in the 1364b, and by reason of this Marriage, the Sutherlands of Duffus added to their paternal Coat, the three Cross Croslets, the Arms of Chine, which is still in their Atchive­ment. This Nicol was succeeded by Henry Sutherland of Duffus, his Son and Heirc, as he was by Alexander, who obtain'd a Charter of the Lands of Therboll from John then Earl of Suther­land, his Superior, dated the 12th of July 1444. He added much to the Wealth of his Family by the Marriage of the Heir Female of Chisholme of that Ilk,d and thereupon assumed into the Center of his Coat of Arms a Boars Head coupe. Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, Successor to the former, dying without Male Issue, in the Reign of James IV.e Christian his only Daughter and Heir, was mar­ried to William Oliphant of Berrindale: the Barohy of Duffus after a long Dispute, came to William Sutherland of Querrelwood f as Heir Male. He departing this Life in 1529, left Issue by Janet his Wife, Daughter of Alex­ander Innes of that Ilkg, William his Successor, and Alexander a Clergyman, who was Dean of Caithness h.

As to the Descendents of this Wil­liam, seeing they did not stand in the rank of Peers, tho' a considerable Family, I shall not trace them, but come down to the Reign of King Charles II. in whose Time Sir Alex­ander Sutherland of Duffus, was one of the Barons, who by Reason of his special Merit was advanced to the Honour of Lord Duffus, 8th Decem­ber 1650, some Days preceeding his Majesty's Coronation.

He married to his first Wife, Jean Daughter of Colin Lord Kintail, Wi­dow of William Lord Berrindale. 2dly. . . . . . . . . . Daughter of Sir Robert Innes of that Ilk. And next, Marga­ret Daughter of James Earl of Murray, by whom he had James his Successor, and Henrietta a Daughter married to George Earl of Linlithgow.

James late Lord Duffus, married Margaret Daughter to Kenneth Earl of Seaforth, by whom he had Kenneth the present Lord, who succeeded his Father in the 1705. His Lordship ha­ving acquired great Knowledge in Maritime Affairs, was meritoriously advanced to the Command of The Advice, one of her Majesty's Ships of War, in which Character, in seve­ral Expeditions he has behaved with admirable Courage and Bravery. He married Charlota Christina, Daughter of Eri [...] de Siobladhe Governour and Admiral of Gottenburgh in Sweden, by whom he has a Son Erick, Master of Duffus.

The present Lord has two Bro­thers, James Sutherland Esq who changed his Name for that of Dun­bar, by reason of his marrying Mary, Daughter, and Heir of Sir William Dunbar of Hemprigs; he was created Baronet 10th of December 1706, and William Sutherland of Roscommon. i

OSBURN, Viscount of Dumblain.

AMONG many others, whose great Deserts and special Services in­clin'd his Majesty King Charles II. to confer sundry Titles of Honour upon them, was Sir Thomas Osburn, Son and Heir of Sir Edward Osburn Baronet, vice President of the Coun­cil to King Charles I. for the Nor­thern Parts of England, and Lieute­nant General of the Forces that were raised for the Service of that Prince, upon the first breaking out of the Rebellion in England, Anno 1642.

This Sir Thomas faithfully adher­ing to the royal Interest during the Usurpation, and Co-operating with many others his Majesty's loyal Sub­jects, in order to his Restauration, and afterwards constantly applying himself to his Service, with all Fide­lity and Diligence, was sworn of his Privy Council, 3d of May 1672, and made Thesaurer of the Navy, as a further Testimony of his Majesty's Esteem, He was by Letters patent bearing date the 19th July 1673, created Viscount of Dumblain in this Realm; and in 1674, honoured with the Title of Viscount of Lati­mer and Earl of Danby in England, and soon after instal'd Knight of the Garter; afterward concurring in the Revolution, Ann 1688, he was upon the Prince of Orange Accession to the Crown of England, constituted Presi­dent of the Council, and on the 9th of August 1689, created Marquis of Carmarthan, and afterward Duke of Leeds, 4th May 1694; he married Briget, Daughter of Montague Earl of Lindsay, by whom he had

1. Edward, Lord Latimer, who dyed without Issue.

2d. Peregrine, who became Vis­count Dumblain, upon his Father's surrender of the Honour; also four Daughters,

Anne, married to Robert Cock of Hoskham, in the County of Norfolk, Esq and since to Horatio Valpole Esq

Bridget, to Charles Earl of Ply­mouth, to whom she had no Issue, since whose Decease she has married with Philip Bliss, Doctor of Divi­nity.

Catherine, to James Herbert Esq

Martha, to Charles Earl of Bath.

Sophia, first to Donatus Lord Ob­rien, and again to William late Lord Lempster.

His Grace dyed full of Days and Honour, the 29th of July 1712, aged 81 Years, and was succeeded by

Peregrine, Lord Viscount of Dum­blain, and now Duke of Leeds, his Son and Heir. This noble Lord, ha­ving experienced himself in Maritime Affairs, and commanding as an Ad­miral in several Expeditions at Sea, has on many Occasions distinguished his gallant Behaviour, [...] especially at the Business of Cameret, where his Conduct and Bravery were very re­markable. He married Bridget Daugh­ter and Heir of Sir Thomas Hide of Worthmyms, in the County of Hart­fort, by whom he had William Mar­quis of Carmarthan, who dyed at Utrecht, returning from his Travels, 16th of August 1711, aged 21.

Peregrine, now Marquis of Carmar­than, who is married with Elisabeth Daughter of Robert Earl of Oxford, Lord high Thesaurer of Great Bri­tain; also two Daughters,

Lady Bridget,

Lady Mary.

ARMS.

Quarterly Ermine and Azure, a Cross Or.

SETON, Earl of Dumfermling.

THAT the Study and Practice of the Law, has raised many to great Wealth and Honour, is evident enough from sundry Examples of that kind; amongst which Sir Alex­ander Seton, the first of this Family is not the least; he was a Younger Son of George Lord Seton, by Isobel his Wife, Daughter of Sir Wil­liam Hamilton of Sorn, Knight, Lord high Thesaurer of Scotland, in the Reign of James V. he was educated in Italy, where he studied the Laws, in which Profession he became so great a Proficient, that King James VI. upon his return home, constituted him one of the extraordinary Lords of the Session, 12th of March 1585, that he might thereby come to the knowledge of the Forms here used: After which, in February 1587, he was admitted one of the ordinary Senators of the College of Justice, and on the 3d of August 1591, his Majesty advanced him to the Digni­ty of a Lord of this Realm, by the Title of Lord Urquhart; and that he might the better support the Ho­nour he had conferred on him, that Prince took the first Opportunity to augment his Fortune, and in the 21st. of his Reign, upon the Dissolu­tion of the Monastries, made a Grant to him and the Heirs of his Body, lawfully begotten, of the whole Lands and Tithes of the rich Priory of Plus­carden in Murray; his Lordship ascen­ding still higher in Esteem, in Respect of his eminent Knowledge, was pre­ferred to be President of the Session, in the Room of William Baillie of Provan, deceased 12th of May 1593; as also in 1595, to be one of the Commis­sioners of the Thesaury. Rising by these Gradations, in the 36 of the said King, Anno 1604, he was advanced to that eminent Post of Lord high Chancellour of Scotland, and upon the 3d of March the Year after dig­nified with the Honour of Earl of Dumfermling, he was likewise ap­pointed one of the Commissioners to treat of a nearer Union betwix Scot­land and England, which was not compleated at that time; after which continuing in the Chancellours Of­fice with much Honour, for the full Term of 18 Years, He departed this Life 16th of June 1622, and was interr'd at the Paroch Church of Dal­gaty in Fife, with great Funeral So­lemnity.

His first Wife was Lilias, Daughter of Patrick Lord Drummond, by whom he had four Daughters,

1. Anne, married to Thomas second Earl of Kelly.

2. Isabel, to John first Earl of Lau­derdale.

3. Margaret, to Colin Earl of Seaforth.

4. Sophia, to David first Lord Bal­cares.

His second Marriage was with Grisel, Daughter of James, Son and Heir of Andrew Earl of Rothes, by whom he had only a Daughter Jean, married to John first Earl of Twedale.

He married to his third Wife, Mar­garet Daughter to John Lord Yester, by whom he had Charles his Son and Heir, and a Daughter Grisel, who dyed unmarried.

Alexander, Earl of Dumfermling, was succeeded in his Honours and Estate by his Son Charles, who upon the breaking out of the Civil War, in 1638, was at first on the Covenanters side: However, such was his Prudence and Moderation, that he endeavour'd to advance all Motions toward a Peace, and was the first Lord in the King's Commission to treat with the English, in order to compose the unhappy Differences between his Majesty and his Subjects in Scotland, which was by his Endea­vours happily concluded in the Year 1641. And that he might be further [Page 112] able to serve the King with the Church, he was appointed Commissioner to the General Assembly, Anno 1641, wherein he proposed very temperate Counsels, and earnestly recommend­ed to the Clergy, that in return of all his Majesty's Favours toward their Church, they would make Consci­ence by their Doctrine and Example to keep the People in their Duty to God and the King, during the suc­ceeding Times of Anarchy and Usur­pation. This noble Lord affecting to lead a retired Life, I find no Ac­count of him in any of the publick Transactions that ensued, but upon the Dawn of the Restauration of King Charles II. he appeared very forward to express his Loyalty, and to re-establish the old Scots Constitu­tion, to which he firmly adhered, not long after, he was constituted one of the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council, and in 1671 made Lord Privy Seal, in the Room of William Earl of Marshal deceased; which Office he enjoy'd till his Death, Anno 1674. By Mary his Wife, Daughter of William Earl of Morton, he had three Sons and a Daughter,

1. Alexander, who succeeded in the Honour, but dyed unmarried.

2. Charles, killed aboard the Fleet in the great Sea Fight against the Dutch, Anno 1672.

3. James, who succeeded his Bro­in the Honour.

4. Henrietta, married first to Wil­liam Earl of Wigton, and after to William Earl of Crawfurd, and had Issue.

Which James Earl of Dumfermling, in his Youth, having a Genius to War, he betook himself to Arms in the Service of the States of Holland, and was in several memorable Expe­ditions under the Prince of Orange; but quiting those Military Imploy­ments, upon his Accession to the Ho­nour, he lived at home in great Splendor, till the Revolution, in 1688. He was one of the Scots Peers who faithfully adhered to the Interest of King James: And the Viscount of Dundee no sooner took the Field, and declared for the King, than his Lordship brought and join­ed him with a Troop of Horse, upon the Head of which he was personally engaged in the Battle of Killicrankie, where he behaved very bravely, for which he was Forfeited by Authority of the Parliament, 1690. Upon the Capitulation of the Highlanders, when there was no probability of supporting King James's Interest any longer in Scotland, he retired to the Court of St. Germans in France, where the said King, to alleviate his Misfortunes, was pleased to honour his Lordship with the most noble Order of the Thistlo, as a distinguish­ing Mark of his royal Favour (and as he said) An Earnest of what he in­tended to do for him and his Family, when it would please God to restore him to the peaceable Possession of his own; here he sojourned till his Death, in the Year 1694, leaving no Issue that survived him by Jean his Wife, Daughter of Lewis Marquis of Hunt­ly; so that the Honour by Reason of the entail to Heirs Male, wou'd descend to George Seton of Barns, de­scended of Sir John Seton Knight, im­mediate elder Brother to Alexander first Earl of Dumfermling, were it not for the Forfaulture.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st. and 4th. Or: Three Crescents Gules, within a double Tres­sure flowr'd and Counterflowr'd, Or: 2d. and 3d. Argent, on a Fess, Gules: Three cinque Foils of the first, support­ed by two Horses, Argent: Crest, a Crescent, Gules: Motto, Semper.

HUME, Earl of Dunbar,

IN ancient Deeds and Charters, Cos­patricius is styled Comes de Dun­bar, tempore David I. but his Succes­sors came to be designed Earls of March, under which Title they will be more properly spoken of. The first then who enjoyed this Honour since, was Sir George Hume Knight, Son of Alexander Hume of Manderstoun, in Vicecomitatu de Berwick, a Cadet to the Branch of Wedderburn (in prae­dicto Vicecomitatu) who being a Per­son of great Learning, singular Judg­ment, and other great Indowments, was first admitted Gentleman of the Bed-chambera, 18vo. Jacobi VI. Anno 1585, Knighted Anno 1590, and constituted Master of the War­drobeb. Also in 1601, he was made Lord high Thesaurer of Scot­land, Alexander Lord Elphinston re­signing the Office. Upon his Majesty's Accession to the Crown of England, Anno 1603, he accompanyed him in­to that Realm, being then of the Pri­vy Council, and was by his Majesty's special Favour, by Letters patent, bearing date 7th of July 1604, crea­ted a Baron of England, by the Title of Lord Hume of Berwick c, and on the 3d of March 1605, dignified with the Title of Earl of Dunbar d, and instituted Knight of the Garter, Anno 1609.e His Lordship having discharged all the great and weighty Imployments he engaged in with ad­mirable Prudence and Dexterity, at length gave way to Fate on the 29th January 1611, and was interr'd at the Collegiate Church of Dunbar. Over his Grave was a stately Monu­ment erected of black and white Marble, with his Portraiture lying thereon, below this Inscription,Here lyes the Body of the Right Honourable George Hume Earl of Dunbar, Baron Hume of Berwick, Lord high Thesaurer of Scotland, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, and one of his Majesty's most honourable Privy Council, who departed this Life the 29th of Janu­ary, MDCXI.’

This Earl left Issue by Catherine his Wife, Daughter of Sir Alexander Gordon of Gight, Knight, in Vicecomi­tatu de Aberdeen, by Mary his Wife, Daughter to Cardinal David Beaton Bishop of St. Andrews f, two Daughters his Coheirs; Anne, the eldest, married to Sir James Hume of Coldingknows, in Vicecomitatu de Ber­wick, Mother by him to James 3d Earl of Hume; Elisabeth, the second, to Theophilus Earl of Suffolk of the King­dom of England, and had Issue.

ARMS.

Three Coats quarterly: 1st. and 4th Vert, A Lyon rampant, Argent: 2d Argent, Three Papingoes Vert: 3d. Argent, Three Escutcheons, Vert: and in surtout Gules, A Lyon rampant, Argent, within a Border, charged with eight Crosses of the second.

CONSTABLE, Viscount of Dunbar.

THE next who enjoyed any ho­nourary Title from this Place, was Sir Henry Constable of Halsham, Knight, of a good Family, in the Coun­ty of York in England. He was by the [Page 114] Favour of King James VI, raised to the Honour of Viscount of Dunbar in Scotland, by Letters Patent, bear­ing date the 14th of November 1620. He married Mary, Daughter of Sir John Tuffton, Baroneta. John his Son and Successor in the Honour, married Mary Daughter to Robert Earl of Cardigan. To this John succeeded Robert Lord Viscount of Dunbar, who took to Wife Mary Daughter of John Lord Bellaisses, and Robert the next Viscount, married Dorothea, Daughter of Robert Earl of Cardigan, Widow of Charles Earl of Westmoreland, Mother by him, I presume; to Edward the present Lord Viscount of Dunbar, whose paternal Coat of

ARMS.

Is, Or, three Bars, Azure, sup­ported on the Dexter with a Bull, Sable, and on the Sinister with a Lyon rampant, Gules: Crest, a Dra­gons Head: Motto, Sans maivaise Desire.

DOUGLASS, Earl of Dunbarton.

FROM this royal Burongh, hone derived any Title of Honour till King Charles II. raised Lord George Douglass, younger Son of William first Marquis of Douglass, to the Dignity of Earl of Dunbarton, the 9th of March 1675.

This noble Person served Lewis XIV. of France in the Quality of one of his Pages of Honour; afterward taking himself to the Profession of Arms, he rose gradually to be Colonel Bri­gadeer, and at last Major General: He was present in most of the Sieges and Actions betwixt the French and the Confederates, wherein he acquir­ed immortal Honour by his unparal­leled Valour, in 1678. Upon the Conclu­sion of the Peace with the States of Holland, by the Treaty of Nimiguen, He was called over to Britain, and resided most at Court during the re­mainder of King Charles's Reign.

Upon the Accession of King James VII. to the Crown, in the 1685, he was constituted General of the Forces in Scotland; and in that Station he commanded against the Earl of Ar­gyle upon his Invasion of this Realm, whom he so closely pursued, that his Men were soon dispersed, and him­self taken Prisoner, whose Fate I need not re-count here. Also in the 1687, he was elected one of the twelve Knights, Companions of the most noble Order of St. Andrew of Scotland, which his Majesty was then pleased to revive, after it had lyen dormant for 145 Years.

Upon the landing of the Prince of Orange in England, his Lordship stuck closs to King James, and to­gether with the Earls of Aran, Salis­bury, and Leitchfield, attended his Majesty to Rochester, from whence he set Sail for France, whether my Lord Dunbarton soon followed, and dyed at the Court of St. Germans, Anno 1692, leaving Issue by . . . . . . . his Wife, Sister to the Dutchess of Nor­thumberland, George the present Earl of Dunbarton, now in the British Service.

ARMS.

The four quartered Coats of the Fa­mily of Douglass, with the paternal Arms, over all in a Shield of Pretence; for Destinction within a Border quar­tered, 1st Azure: Three Flower-de-Lys Or, 2d Gules, three Lyons passant guar­dant Or, 3d as 2d. 4th as 1st.

SCRIMGEOUR, Earl of Dundee.

ACcording to the Authority of our Historians, this noble and an­cient Family derive their Origine from one Sir Alexander Caron, a brave and valiant Knight, who in the first of Alexander I. Anno Dom. 1107, signaliz'd his Valour against the Northern Rebels, who had attemp­ted no less than the Murder of the King, for which (continue they) he had his Name changed to Scrimge­our, that is a Sharp Fight;

Wherefore he had a special Grant from the King to himself, and the Heirs Male of his Body, to be hereditary Standard-bearers to the Kings of Scotland, and for his Coat of Arms, Gules, a Lyon rampant, Argent, holding in his dexter Paw a crooked Sword Proper, and the word Dissipate for his Motto. Mr. Johnston the Poet, has left us the following Verses to the Honour of his Me­mory,

Quid trepidas? da signa mihi, superabimus amnem;
Terreat an pavidos nos fugitiva cohors?
Dixit, & areptis signis ruit acer in hostem,
Nil rapidi metuens agmina torva vadi:
Hine decus augusto surgit sub Principe, ab armis
Scrimgerae genti fama decusque manent.
Arma alius jactet, nos scimus fortibus armis
Ʋtier, hand dici, malumus esse viri.

This Name has been remarkable in our Scots History on several other Occasions, particularly Sir Alexander Scrimgeor, was among the first who took the Field for King Robert Bruce, and faithfully adhered to him; in Consideration whereof, when that valiant Prince came to be established on the Throne, he gave him sundry Lands about the Burgh of Innerkeith­ing, then in the Crown, by the Attain­der of Sir Philip de Moubray, Knight. Also Sir John Scrimgeor was killed at the fatal Battle of Halydonhill 1333; and another Sir James Scrimgeor Con­stable of Dundee, his Successor, was slain in the Governours Army against Donald Lord of the Isles, at the Battle of Harlaw, Anno 1411. I need not be at much Pains to show the several Matches they have made with some of the most noble Families of this Kingdom, since the whole Course of this Book makes mention thereof, only I shall take notice, that in pro­cess of Time, after having flourished long in the State of Barons, they came to the Honour of Peerage the in Person of Sir James Scrimgeor Con­stable of Dundee, who was raised to the Honour of Viscount of Duddop, by King Charles I. in the Year 1641. Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, he accepted of a Command in those Forces that were sent from Scotland to the Aid of the English Par­liament, against the King, and lost his Life in the Battle of Marstoun Moor, 2d July, Anno 1644, A Person (says one) who for the Nobleness of his Ex­traction, and many personal Endowments, deserved a better fate, at least to have dyed in a better Cause. He left a Son John, by Mary his Wife, Daughter of Robert first Earl of Roxburgh, who succeeded him in the Honour.

This Lord put himself in Arms in behalf of King Charles II. and march­ed with him to the Battle of Worcester, 3d September 1651, after which he suffered much for his Loyalty, but living to see the Restauration, he received some part of amends, being created Earl of Dundee, Anno 1661, and made one of the Privy Council. His Wife was Mary Daughter of William first Earl of Dalhousie, but dying without Issue, in 1668, by reason of an Entail of his Estate, which (purely thro' Inadvertency) ter­minated in the Heirs Male, the King succeeded thereto as ultimus haeres, and the Honour became extinct, and lay dormant till the Year 1688, that the Title of Viscount of Dundee was bestowed on General Graham.

GRAHAM, Viscount of Dundee.

THE Family of Fintry anciently seated in Stirling shire, of which the Viscount of Dundee was sprung, descended from Sir Robert Graham eldest Son of Sir William Graham of Kincardin, by the Lady Mary Steuart his second Wife, Daugh­ter of Robert third King of Scotland. This Sir Robert Graham of Fintry's second Son John Graham of Balargus, was Founder of the Family of Claver­house: He obtain'd from Archibald Earl of Angus a Grant to himself and Marjory his Wife, Daughter of Sir James Scrimgeor of Duddop, Constable of Dundee, of the Lands of Balargus in Forfar-shire, Anno 1482a, where he fixed his Residence, tempore Jacobi Tertii, from whom descended in a di­rect Line, William Graham of Claver­house, who marring Anne, Daughter of Robert Lundy of Balgony, in Vicecomitatu de Fife, had Issue by her William his Successor, and Walter first of the Branch of Duntroon. The next William by his Vertue and good Conduct, much bettered the Condition of his Family, acquiring a great Estate, he obtained the Honour of Knight­hood. His Wife was Marion, Daugh­ter of Thomas Fotheringham of Poury, in Vicecomitatu de Forfar, by whom he had William his Son and Heir, who taking to Wife Jean Carnegy, Daughter of John Earl of Ethy, Sister to David 1st. Earl of Northesk, he had,

John, Viscount of Dundee.

Mr. David Graham.

Margaret, married to Robert Graham of Morphie.

Anne, to Robert Young of Auldbar.

Which John, after he had gone through the Course of his Studies at the University of St. Andrews, he went into Foreign Parts to accomplish himself by Travels, betaking himself to a Military Life, he served at first Volunteer in the French Service, where he learned the Rudiments of War, after some time he engaged in the Service of the States of Holland, 1672. His first step to Advancement was a Cornet's Commission in the Prince of Orange's Guard of Horse; in which Character he did eminently signalize himself in the Battle of Senef, fought betwixt the Confede­rates, under the Command of Wil­liam Prince of Orange, and the French under the Prince of Conde, in August 1674; after this he was immediately preferred to be Captain of a Troop of Horse; in which Station he served with the highest Reputation for his Valour. Leaving the Dutch Service upon some disgust given him, he came over to Britain; by a particular Character from the Prince of Orange to his Royal Highness the Duke of York, he was recommended to King Charles II. who was pleased, as a Testi­mony of the Esteem he had for Mr. Graham, to nominate him one of the Captains of the three independent Troops which were raised to force the Dissenters in the Western Shires to comply with the Constitution of the Church, as established by Law, Anno 1678, the Earls of Hume and Airly, having the Command of the other two.

When the Troops came to be re­gularly modell'd, 1684, he was con­stituted Captain of the Royal Regi­ment of Horse, the late Duke of Queensberry, then Earl of Drumlanrig, being his Lieutenant Colonel.

King James ascending the Throne on the Decease of his Brother King Charles II. 6th February 1685, he was sworn a Privy Councilour, and made a Brigadeer in the beginning of 1686, which was his higest Prefer­ment, till the 1688. Upon the [Page 117] Prince of Orange's landing in England, he marched with his Regiment thither for King James Service: Then his Majesty was pleased to advance him to the Degree of Major General, and on the 12th of November, the 4th Year of his Reign, raised him to the Honour of Viscount of Dundee (the Constabulary of which Burough, together with the Barony of Duddop, being some time before bestowed on him.) This Dignity, his Patent men­tions, was granted him, Propter egre­gia servitia & praeclara admodum officia & nobismetipsis & carissimo nostro Fra­tri Carolo secundo sempiternae memoriae in singulis muneribus & publicae fiduciae provinciis tum civilibus tum mi­litaribus multis retro annis fidei suae de­mandatis fideliter praestita & peracta, fidemque ejus intemeratam; quodque omni occasione sibi data coronae nostrae juribus firmus semper adhaeserat; Hisce igitur multisque aliis magni mementi rationi­bus praeviis, durabilem quandam nostri regii favoris tesseram in ipsum & fami­miliam suam conferre; Noveritis igitur Nos creasse fecisse & inaugurasse Majorem Generalem Joannem Graham de Claver­house, Vicecomitem de Dundee, Domi­num Graham de Claverhouse, & haeredes Masculos ex ejus corpore legitime pro­creatos seu procreandos; quibus dificienti­bus in alios ejus haeredes masculos, &c.

In the beginning of the Year 1689, his Lordship came down to Scotland, and sat some Days in the Convention of Estates, which the Prince of Orange had called, till he discern'd the House disposed by a great Majority to declare the Throne vac­nat, and Forfault King James; as also a Design the Mobb had to As­sassinate him, of which he informed the Meeting, but his Complaint not being regarded; and Justice denyed him, he absented from the Conven­tion; and after having had a private Conference with the Duke of Gordon, at the Postern-Gate of the Castle of Edinburgh, which held out for King James, he retired to Linlithgow with a small Party of Horse, and so by the Way of Stirling-Bridge, rode home to his House in the Country, whereupon the Convention voted him an intercommuned Person, and sent a Messenger to require him to appear before them at Edinburgh; but his Lordship excusing himself u­pon pretence of Danger, there was a Party sent to apprehend him. This necessarly obliged him to go into the Highlands for Refuge, where he raised the Clans by King James's Authority, and having got a Reinforcement of 300 Irish, Headed by Colonel Cannon, with a Body of about 1600 Horse and Foot, he engaged Major Gene­neral Mackay, who was advancing toward him with 4000 Foot, and some Troops of Horse and Dragoons at Kilicrankie in Athole, 27th of July 1689. In the first Charge, his Lord­ship received a Shot of a Musket-Ball in his right Side, of which he instantly expired; and notwithstand­ing this Discouragement, his Men Fought like Lyons, and routed Mackay; yet the Death of my Lord Dundee did more than overballance the others Loss of 2000 Men killed on his side. After the Battle, his Body was found and deposited in the Vault of of the Family of Athole, within the Church of Blair, where I leave him to his Rest, and shall only add this Epitaph done on him by the learned Dr. Archibald Pitcairn,

Ʋltime Scotorum, potuit quo sospite solo
Libertas patriae salva fuisse tuae:
Te moriente novos accepit Scotia Cives,
Accepitque novos te moriente Deos.
Illa tibi superesse negat, Tu non potes illi,
Ergo Caledoniae nomen inane vale:
Tuque vale gentis priscae fortissime ductor,
Optime Scotorum atque ultime, GRAME, vale.
Englished by Mr. Dryden,
O last and best of Scots! who did'st maintain
Thy Country's Freedom from a foreign Reign;
[Page 118] New People fill the Land, now they are gone;
New Gods the Temples, & new Kings the Throne.
Scotland and thou, did each in other live,
Thou coud'st not Her, nor cou'd [...] theesurvive
Farewell thou living that did support the State,
And coud'st not fall, but by thy Countrys fate.

He married Jean Daughter of William Lord Cochran, Son and Heir of William first Earl of Dundonald, by whom he had a Son James, who dyed an Infant, in the Month of December 1689, the Honour devol­ving on

Mr. David Graham his Uncle, who heartily espousing King James's Inte­terest at the Revolution, he was pre­sent with his Brother in the Battle of Kiliecrankie, for which he was Out­law'd, Anno 1690, retiring to the Court of St. Germans, in 1692, the said King, as a special Mark of his Favour, and to testify the great E­steem he had for his Lordship, was pleased to make him a Knight of the most noble Order of St. Andrew, and tho he continued a very zealous Pro­testant, yet he was King James par­ticular Favorite till his Death, which happened in the 1700, unmarried; so that had not his Estate and Ho­nour been forfeited, William Graham of Duntroon would have succeeded him in both the one and the other.

ARMS.

Or, three Pyls wave within a double Tressure counterflour'd, Sable, on a chief of the second: three Escalops of the first.

COCHRAN, Earl of Dundonald.

THIS Family, which original­ly took its Sirname from the Barony of Cochran in Renfrew-shire, is of very great Antiquity, and tho none of the Family arriv'd not to the Dignity of Peerage till the Reign of K. Charles I. yet its undeniable that they were Barons of special Account for many Ages before, and indowed with large Possessions in these Parts, and else­where.

The first of whom I have found upon Record, is Waldenus de Coveran, i. e. Cochran, who in the 1262, is Wit­ness to the Grant which Dungal the the Son of Suayn made to [Walter Steuart Earl of Monteith, of sundry Lands in the County of Argyle a, which came in After-times to be transmited to Forrester of Carden. Another William de Coveran is men­tioned by Pryn, as a Person of a Ac­count in this County, who makes his Submission to King Edward I. Anno Dom. 1296b in the Ragman Roll; also John de Coveran is Witness in the regular Election of James Abbot of Paisly 17th of David II, Anno 1346c. The next remarkable Person of the Family, is Gosiline de Cochran, who flourished under King David Bruce, he is Witness to several Grants made by Robert second, when Earl of Strathern, to the Religious of Paisly, an Abbacy he assumed into his particular Patronage, wherein his Ancestors Donations being made to the Glory of God, are particularly narrated. He left Issue, William de Cochran of that Ilk, his Son, who ob­tained from King Robert II. a Char­ter of the Lands of Cochran to be held in as ample a manner as any of his Progenitors held the same of the Lord high Stewart of Scotland, dated on the 22 of September 1389; as he stood in special Favour with this King, so was he in no less with Robert 3d his Son, to whom it seems he had been serviceable, for when he came to the Crown, he had so greatful a Sense thereof, that in the second Year of his Reign, Anno 1392, he [Page 119] made him a Grant of fourty Shilling Sterling in Annuity arising out of the Profits of the Burgh of Rutherglen a. He was succeeded by Robert his Son, who resigned his Estate in favours of Allan his Son, Anno 1456. This Allan, in 1452 is Witness to the Mortification which Robert Lord Lyle made to the Ab­bot & conventwal Brethern of the Mo­nastry of Paisly, of the Fishing on the River of Clyde, at the place called Crokatshot, for the help of there Pray­ers to advance his spiritual Estate, in in which Deed he's designed Allanus Cochran Armiger, his Father being then alive, and to whom he succeed­ed before the 1480. He married . . . . . . . . Daughter of . . . . . . by whom he had Robert a Son, who was Father of John Cochran of that Ilk, who immediately succeeded his Grand-father, upon his Death.

Which John, for some Considera­tions, I know not, obtained a Licence from his Sovereign Lord King James IV. under the Great Seal, impour­ing him to dispose of either his Lands of Easter Cochran in Renfrew-shire, or his Lands of Pitfour in Perth-shire, Accordingly he alienated a part of his Lands of Cochran to James Arch-Bishop of Glasgow, Anno 1519, to which Deed he appends his Seal, the Impression bearing Three Boars Heads eraz'd, and circumscribed, Sigillum Johannis de Cochran. His Wife was Elisabeth Daughter of John Sem­ple of Fullwood b, who bore him a Son John, who was served and re­toured Heir to his Father on the 12th of May 1539, he dying in the 1557, left Issue by Mary his Wife, Daughter of Lindsay of Dunrod, in Vicecomitatu de Renfrew, a Son.

William, who succeeded him. In 1593, he erected from the Foundation, at Co­chran the ancient Seat of his Family, a very high Tower of Free-stone, and adorned it with large Plantations, he marrying Margaret Daughter of Robert Montgomery of Skelmurly, in Viceomita [...]u de Air, by Mary his Wife Daughter of Robert Lord Semple, had a Daughter Elisabeth, his sole Heir.

He wisely considering the proper way of supporting his Family, was to settle his Daughter in his own own time, and declining to Marry her into a richer Family than his own; he made a prudent and dis­creet Match for her with Alexaader Blair, a younger Son of an ancient and genteel Family in Air-shirec, whose Ancestors had been seated in the County foresaid for many Ages before, so that beside a noble Allia­ance, and a competent Patrimony, he yielded to change his Name to Cochran, which was almost the only Condition the old Gentleman re­quired. This Alexander so taking upon him the Sirname of Cochran, was a vertous and frugal Man, and studied as much the good of the Fa­mily, as if he himself had been born the Heir thereof. In 1622, he acquir­ed the Lands of Cowdoun, with an In­tention to unite them to the ancient patrimonial Inheritance of Cochran; but he afterwards sold them to Sir William his second Son, as a Fund to provide his younger Children; for beside Sir John his eldest Son, he had six other Sons and two Daugh­ters.

Sir William Cochran of Cowdoun.

Alexander, a Colonel in the King's Service, in the Wars of Ireland, which commenc'd in the 1641, with the Murder of upwards of fifty thousand Scots and English by the Native Irish.

Hugh, Author of the Branch of Fergusly, he was a Colonel first under the renoun'd Gustavous Adolphus King of Sweden, and afterward to King Charle I. in the time of the Civil War in Ireland.

[Page 120] Bryse, a Colonel in the time of the Civil War, who lost his Life in the King's Service, Anno 1650.

Captain Ochter Cochran.

Gavin Cochran of Craigmure, was the seventh and youngest Son.

Elisabeth, married to John Lennox of Woodhead in Stirling-shire.

Grisel, to Thomas Dunlop of Housle.

Which Sir John, in the Time of the unhappy Civil War in Britain, firmly adhered to the Interest of King Charles I. and had a Colonel's Commission in the Army. In the Year 1644, he was sent Ambassador to several Princes to sollicit their Assistance in his Majesty's behalfa, which he perform'd with such Dili­gence and Conduct, that in the Treaty of Peace which was set on Foot betwixt the King and the Parliament of Eng­land and the Estates of Scotland, Anno 1646, he was together with the Mar­quis of Huntly and Montrose, the Earls of Nithsdale, Crawfurd, Tra quair, &c. proposed to be excepted from the King's Pardon, which his Ma­jesty generously refusedb. Upon the Murder of the King, he attend­ed King Charles II. into Foreign Parts, and in the 1650, was sent in­to Polland to crave Aid of the Scots Merchants there; but be [...]ore his Re­turn the King and the Scots Army were defeated at Worcester, he continuing with the King, during his Exile, dyed about the time of the Restau­ration without Issue; so that his next Brother Sir William became his Heir.

Which Sir William was very care­fully educated in Grammar learning in his Youth, whence he was remov'd to the University, where having apply­ed himself indefatigably to his Studies, and highly improv'd his natural En­dowments with Academical Learn­ing, he removed from thence after he had taken the Degree of Master of Arts, and studied our Laws; in which Profession he attained to an uncom­mon Perfection. Soon after his en­tering on the Stage of Business, he became much sam'd for his prudent Management and Conduct, by which he acquired a fair Estate, both in the Shires of Renfrew and Air, for the last of which he had the Honour to serve as a Member in the Parliament, 1647, wherein his Abilities were soon discovered by the great and leading Men of the House, and he shewed himself thro' the Course of the Sitting of that Parliament, a good and even Patriot, wholly Intent u­pon the Honour and Safety of the King, whose Interest he did visibly advance, and the Welfare and Tran­quillity of the Nation, then in no small Ferment. He appeared very for­ward to raise the Army for the Relief of his Majesty, then under Restraint, in Consideration whereof, he was by Letters Patent, [...]bearing date at Scars­borough, 27th December 1647, created Lord Cochran of Cowdon. Increasing still more and more in Wealth and Honour, not long after he acquired the Lordship of Paisly, where he fixed h [...]s Seat, and lived with great Splendor and Hospitality for many Years. After the barbarous Murder of the King, his Lordship contributed his best and hearty Endeavours toward bring­ing home King Charles II. to inherit the rightful Possession of the Throne of these Realms, which no doubt was the Cause, when Oliver Cromwel came to be called Protector, he fined my Lord Cochran among other Loy­alists, in 5000 Pound Sterling, by a special Ordinance of the Common­wealth of England, the 12th of April 1654c.

The King being happily restored in the 1660, he was soon after sworn a Privy Counsellour, and by his Maje­sty's special Choice constituted one of the Commissioners of the The saury and Exchequer, which great and weigh­ty [Page 121] Imployment he discharged with admirable Prudence and Integrity, to the general Satisfaction of the whole Nation, of which his Majesty was so fully satisfied, that he was pleased to advance him to the Title of Earl of Dundonald, the 12th of May 1669, and that in Consideration of the special Services he had ren­der'd the Crown in those high and eminent Stations, continuing in great Esteem with King Charles, during the whole Course of his Reign.

He married Euphame Daughter of Sir William Scot of Ardross, in Vice­comitatu de Fife, by whom he had two Sons and a Daughter.

1. William Lord Cochran, who dyed in the flower of his Age, Anno 1680, leaving Issue by the Lady Catherine his Wife, Daughter of John Earl of Cassils, John who succeeded his Grand-father in the Honour, Wil­liam Cochran of Kilmaronock, a Mem­ber of Parliament for the Burgh of Wigtoun, and the other Towns in that District, and one of the Com­missioners for keeping her Majesty's Signet, Sir Alexander Erskin Lord Lyon, and John Pringle of Haining, being joined in Commission with him. He married Grisel, Daughter of James, second Marquis of Montrose, and has Issue; Thomas Cochran of Polkely, third Son, dyed without Children; Alexander Cochran of Bon­shaw, the youngest; also three Daugh­ters, 1st. Margaret, married to Alex­ander Earl of Eglintoun. 2d. Helen, to John Earl of Sutherland. 3d. Jean, to John Viscount of Dundee, and afterward to William Viscount of Kilsyth.

2d Son, Sir John Cochran of Ochil­tree, in Air-shire.

Likewise a Daughter Grisel, mar­ried to George Lord Ross.

This Earl gave way to Nature in the spring of the Year 1686, and was by his own Direction interr'd in the Paroch Church of Dundonald, without any Funeral Monument, but upon his Escutcheon I find the Arms of these noble and ancient Families.

  • Paternal Side.
    • Cochran of that Ilk.
    • Lord Semple.
    • Cunningham of Glengarnock.
    • Lord Cairlyle of Torthorald.
  • Maternal Side.
    • Cochran of that Ilk.
    • Montgomery of Skelmurly.
    • Lindsay of Dunrod.
    • Lord Semple.

To William Earl of Dundonald suc­ceeded John his Grandson and Heir, a Nobleman of great Goodness and excellent Parts; he dyed in the prime of his Years, Anno 1691, regrated by all those who knew him, leaving Issue by the Lady Susanna his Wife, Daughter of William Duke of Hamil­ton, two Sons, William who suc­ceeded in the Honour, but dyed un­married the 19th of November 1705. And

John the present Earl, who mar­ried Anne Daughter of Charles Earl of Dunmore, a Lady who wanted no Vertue to make her an acceptable Wife; she dyed in the 1711, univer­sally lamented, whose Conduct in all Conditions of Life render'd her Loss a lasting Grief to her Relations; he had by her a Son and three Daughters.

William Lord Cochran

Lady Anne,

Lady Catherine,

Lady Susanne, all Young.

ARMS.

Argent, a Chiveron, Gules, betwixt three Boars Heads Azure, supported by two Ratch Hounds of the first, Crest, a Horse, Argent, Motto, Virtute & Labore.

GALLOWAY, Lord Dunkeld.

THE Ancestor of this Family was Mr. Patrick Galloway, first Minister of the Gospel in the Burgh of Pearth a, whence he was translat­ed to the City of Edinburgh, where he exercised his Function till the 1624, he departed this Life, leaving Issue by Mary his Wife, Daughter of Mr. James Lawson, one of the Mini­sters of the City of Edinburgh, a Son

Sir James Galloway of Carnby, who was Master of Requests both to King James VI. and King Charles I.b and conjunct Secretary of State with William Earl of Stirling, Anno 1640, when the Troubles broke out in that Reign, he approved himself a most faithful Servant to his Majesty in the Times of his greatest Exigency, in Testimony whereof he was by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 15th May 1645, created Lord Dunkeld c. He married . . . . . Daughter of Sir Robert Norter, Knight, by whom he had

Thomas Lord Dunkeld, his Son and Heir, who marrying Margaret Daugh­ter of Sir Thomas Thomson of Dudding­stoun, by Jean Daughter of Sir James Scrimgeor of Duddop, had Issue

1. James, late Lord Dunkeld.

2. Andrew Galloway Esq

3. John Galloway Esq

Catherine, married to Thomas Forbes of Watertoun, in Aberdeen shire.

Margaret, to James Ratry of Craig­hall, in Vicecomitatu de Pearth.

Mary, to the Reverend Mr. John Falconer, a Divine.

Which James Lord Dunkeld, being Abroad in the Army, at the Revo­lution freely resorted to the Service of King James VII, and had a Com­mand in the Battle of Killiecrankie, for which he was Forfeited, and re­tiring to the Court of St. Germans, he dyed not long ago.

ARMS.

Argent, a Lyon rampant Azure, the Supporters two Eagles Sable, Crest, a Mound bespread with the Rayes of the Sun, embraced betwixt two Corn-Ears, Saltyre ways, Or, Motto, Higher.

MURRAY, Earl of Dunmore.

KING James VII. was pleased to raise Lord Charles Murray, second Son of John Marquis of Athole, by the Lady Aemilia Stanly, Daughter of James Earl of Darby, to the Honour of Earl of Dunmore, by Letters Patent the 16th of August 1686. His first Preferment was, to be Lieutenant Colonel to a Regiment of Horse com­manded by General Thomas Dalziel, Anno 1679, and Master of Horse to her Royal Highness the Princess Anne, now Queen of Great Britain: He was afterward made Colonel of the same Regiment, upon the Death of the General his Superior Officer, Anno 1685, and Master of Horse to Queen Mary, Wife of King James VII. both which Offices he held till the Revolution depriv'd him: All King William's time he lived retir'dly, but upon the Queen's Accession to the Crown, he was constituted one of her Majesty's Privy Council, the 4th of February 1703, and Captain of the Castle of Blackness, Anno 1707, upon the removal of David Earl of Buchan, and departing this Life in [Page 123] 1710. He left Issue by Catherine his Wife, Daughter of Robert Watts of the County of Hertfort, Esq

1. James Lord Fincastle, dyed without Issue. 2d. John now Earl of Dunmore, Lieutenant Colonel in the English Foot Guards, Commanded by his Grace James Duke of Ormond. 3d. Ro­rert, a Colonel in the Scots Foot-Guards. 4th. Charles. 5th. William. 6th. Thomas, a Page of Honour to her Majesty Queen Anne; also three Daughters,

Henrietta, married to Patrick Lord Kinnaird, sans Issue.

Anne, to John Earl of Dundonald.

Catherine, to John Master of Nairn, Son and Heir of William Lord Nairn.

ARMS.

The Coat of the Duke of Athole, viz. The Arms of the old Steuarts Earls of Athole, quarter'd with the paternal Coat of Murray Earl of Tillie­bardin; and in an Escutcheon over all, a proper Difference taken from his Re­lation to the noble Family of Stanly Earls of Darby, Lord of the Isle of Man.

CRICHTON, Earl of Drumfrees.

THIS Family was a Branch of Crichton in Lothian; in the Time of King Robert Bruce, William Crichton Knight, then obtaining the half of the Barony of Sanquhar in Drumfrees-shire, by the Marriage of Isobel de Ross, one of the Daughters and Co-heirs of Ross of Sanquhar a, whence they came to carry the Coat of Ross, viz. Azure, three Water-Budgets, Or. Hence descended,

Robert Crichton of Sanquhar, tempore Jacobi II. who stood in special Fa­vour with that Prince, from whom he obtained first the Honour of Knighthood; and in the 1452, being also one of the Lords of Privy Council, he greatly inriched himself, by the Marriage of Catherine, the Heir of Sir Nicol Erskine of Kinoule, in Vicecomitatu de Perth, and had Issue,

1st. Robert, his Successor.

The 2d. Edward Crichton, who had by his Father's Grant, the Lands of Kilpatrick, which was confirmed by the King's Charter, Anno 1483b, and at the same time, he had divers Lands then in the Crown, by the Forsaulture of those who assisted the Duke of Albany, and other Rebels. This Branch terminated in a Daugh­ter, in the Reign of James V. mar­ried to James Gordon of Lochinvar.

The 3d. was Alexander, from whom the Crichtons of Crawfurdstoun in Nithsdale descendedc, and their Cadets.

4th. Lawrance Crichton, of Balna­muchty;

Also several Daughters, Elisabeth; married to Sir William Douglass of Drumlanrig, Margaret to David Cair­lyle of Torthorald: But to return to the aforesaid Robert Crichton of Sanquhar. This Robert signalized himself, both for his Loyalty and Valour in the Wars, against Alexander Duke of Al­bany, and James Earl of Douglass, in behalf of King James III, at the Battle of Kirkonel Anno 1483, in Recompence whereof he had several of the Rebels Lands bestowed upon [Page 124] him; in the Grant his Services to the Crown are particularly narrated with Honoura; having thus aug­mented his Fortune, he came in the same Reign to be called Lord Crichton of Sanquhar.

He married Marion, Daughter of John first Earl of Lennox, and had Issue Robert his Successor.

Marion, married to Malcolme Craw­furd of Kilbirny, Ancestor to the Vis­count of Garnock.

Which Robert married Elisabeth, Daughter of . . . . . Murray of . . . . . & had William his Successor, who was Killed by the Lord Semple b, Anno 1550, leaving Issue by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of Malcolm Lord Flee­ming, 1st. Robert his Successor in the Honour, but dyed without Issue, 2d. Edward who after his Brothers Death was Lord Sanquhar.

3d. John Crichton of Rayhill, who married Mary Daughter of Sir John Carmichael of Crawfurd, and had William afterward Earl of Drum­frees, which Edward so succeeding his Brother, married Margaret Daugh­ter of Sir James Douglass of Drumlan­rig, by whom he had Robert his only Son and Heir, who residing at the Court, after King James's Accession to the Crown, acquired great skill in most of the Exercises then in Vogue, particularly in Fencing, whereby he came to value himself much upon his Skill therein, and intending to disparage one John Turner a Fencing-Master in his own School, and he apprehensive of his Design, press'd so rudely upon this Lord, that he put out one of his Eyes; his Lord­ship being afterward in the Court of France, and the King understanding that he lost his Eye by a common Fencing Master, said to the Lord Sanquhar, Vit t' il encore? Is the Man still alive that did it? This Question put him upon meditating a Revenge, and some Years after, coming to England, he hired one Robert Cairlye to Murder Turner, which he did with [...] Pistol at his own House in White­friars, London; whereupon his Lord­ship absconded; and hearing a thou­sand Pound was offered for his Head, he resigned himself to the King's Mercy, and acknowledged the Mur­der, but no Intercession could pre­vail, his Life satisfied the Law, for he was executed before the Gates of Westminster, the 29th of June 1612. He married Mary, Daughter of Sir George Farmour of Easton, in the Coun­ty of Northampton, Ancestor to the Lord Lempster in England, but by her he had no Issue, and therefore so far as he could, made over his Estate to William Crichton his natural Son, and the Honour came to

William Crichton of Rayhill, his Cousin German, and Heir Male, who by the King's Determination, had also most of the Estate; he was by the said King James in 1622 raised to the Honour of Viscount of Air, and King Charles I. some Days preceeding his Coronation in Scot­land, created him Earl of Drumfrees. by Letters patent, bearing date the 10th of June 1633, and to the Heirs of his Body for ever, and departing this Life in 1641; he left Issue by Eu­pham his Wife, Daughter of James Seton of Touch, in Vicecomitatu de Stirling, 1st. William, who succeed- him. 2d. Sir James Crichton of St. Leonards. 3d. John, a Colonel in the German Wars; also two Daugh­ters,

1. Mary, married to Edward Swift, Viscount of Carlingford, in the King­dom of Ireland, and had Issue.

2. Catherine, to Sir John Charters of Aimesfield, in Vicecomitatu de Drumfrees.

Which William was one of Lords of the Privy Council to King Charles II. He married Penelope, Daughter of Sir Robert Swift, Knight, of the [Page 125] County of York by Ursilla his Wife, Daughter of . . . . . . Barnham Esq by whom he had Charles Lord Crich­ton, who died before himself and two Daughters Elisabeth, Wife of Alexan­der Earl of Eglingtoun, and Lady Mary who dyed unmarried.

Charles Lord Crichton, married Sarah Daughter of James first Vis­count of Stair, by whom he had William who succeeded his Grand­father, and four Daughters,

1. Penelope, now Countess of Drumfrees.

2. Margaret.

3. Mary.

4. Elisabeth.

This Earl resigned the Honour, Anno 1690; and got a Patent to his Heirs Male or Female, with the Precedency, according to the former Creationa, and dying in the 1691, he was succeeded by William his Grand­son, who dying a Minor, Anno 1694, the Honour devolv'd upon Penelope his Sister, who is married with Willim Dalrymple Esq Son to John first Earl of Stair, and has Issue, William Lord Crichton, and several other Children.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th, Argent, a Lyon rampant, Azure, 2d and 3d Azure, three Water Budgets, Or, supported by two Lyons, Azure, crowned with an Earls Coronet Proper, Crest, a Dragons Head, Vert, spouting Fire, Motto, God send Grace.

TALMASH, Earl of Dysart.

WIlliam Murray, created Earl of Dysart, by the Favour of King Charles I. Anno 1646b, was the Son of Mr. William Murray Parson of Dy­sert, a younger Brother of the Fami­ly of Wood-end in Perth-shire, branch­ed from Patrick Murray Son of Sir David Murray of Tillibardin, in King James III's Time.

Which William was Educated at Court by Mr. Thomas Murray his Uncle, who was Preceptor, and then Secretary to King Charles I. when Prince of Wales, the Prince and Mr. Murray being about an Age, they contracted a more than ordinary In­timacy in their younger Years; when his Majesty came to the Crown, Anno 1626, he made him one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-chamber, which was a fair and probable way to Preserment; had it not been for the Changes that ensu'd during the Civil War; he was imployed by the King in diverse secret Negotiations of the highest Importance: Likeas, he was with the Earl of Carnwath sent over with Instructions to the Scots Commissioners at Breda, then treating with King Charles II. in order to his Restaurationc, Anno 1650, which he performed with great Diligence and Conduct.

He married Elisabeth Bruce, of the Family of Clackmanan, by whom he had two Daughters, Elisabeth Coun­tess of Dysart, and Margaret, married to William Lord Maynard, in England. This Elisabeth by the special Favour of his Majesty King Charles II. whose great Favorite the Countess was, procured certain Letters Patent, whereby the Dignity and Title of Countess of Dysart was con­ferr'd on her, and after her Death, the Honour of Earl to descend to her Heirs. Her first Husband, was Sir Lionel Talmash of Hellingham in the County of Suffolk, by whom she had two Sons and two Daughters,

Lionel Talmash, the present Earl of Dysert.

Lieutenant General Thomas Talmash, who received his Death-Wounds in the Fight of Cameret, Anno 1694d; also two Daughters, [Page 126] Elisabeth, married to Archibald, first Duke of Argyle.

Catherine, to James Lord Down, Son and Heir of Alexander Earl of Murray, 2do. To John Earl of Suther­land, to whom she had no Issue.

She married after the Death of Sir Lionel Talmash, John Duke of Lauder­dale, to whom she was likewise se­cond Wife, whom surviving also, she dyed in the Year . . . ., being then well advanced in Age, whereupon the Title of Earl, by vertue of the Grant above-mentioned, devolved to Sir Lionel Talmash her Son, the present Earl.

ARMS.

Argent, a Frette, Sable.

MONTGOMERY, Earl of Eglintoun,

EGlintoun is the Name of a Lord­ship and Castle in Air-shire, from whence its Owner took a De­nomination, tempore regis Malcomi, Bryce de Eglintoun, Son and Heir of Eglun, Lord of Eglintoun, who acquired certain Lands from the Community of the Village of Irvine, quas Radul­phus fili [...]s & haeres quondam Hugonis de Eglintoun, dedit Communitati & Burgensibus dicte villae datum in vigilia sancti Mattheii, Anno gratiae millesimo ducentesimo quinto a, from whom in a continued Series descended

Sir Hugh Eglintoun of that Ilk, who was Justiciary of Lothian, Anno 1361b. He married Giles, Daugh­ter of Walter Lord high Stewart of Scotland, Sister to King Robert II, upon whose Advancement to the Throne, he obtained diverse Grants of Lands, and several Imployments, but leaving no Male Issue, his Estate went to his Daughter and Heir, mar­ried to Sir John de Montgomery of Eglesham, Knight, whose Ancestor

Roger de Montgomery, Son to Hugh de Montgomery, a noble Knight of French Extraction, near allyed to William Duke of Normandy; he was one of those Nobles who accompany­ed this victorious Duke into England, & commanded the Body of his Army in the memorable Battle of Hastings in Sussex, Anno 1066, where King Harold was slain, and the Victory and Crown of England accrewed to the Conqueror, for which signal Ser­vice King William bestowed on him very large Gifts, and both gave him the Territory and Honour of Earl of Arundel, with the Earldom of Sals­burry c, being also a Person of singular Devotion, he founded, and most amply endowed the Abby of St. Peters at Salisburry, where he at length took upon him the Habite of a Monk, and dyed 1094, leaving Issue by Mable his Wife, Daughter of William de Talvaise, a great Baron in Bolesm, five Sons, 1st. Hugh, dyed without Issue, Robert, Roger, Philip, and Arnulph.

Which Robert was knighted by the Conqueror the 6th of his Reign, and always enjoyed his Favour, but upon his Death he adhered to Robert Curthose, against Henry I. and assist­ed him in the Battle, where he was routed, and taken Prisoner. This exasperated K. Henry so much, that he banished this Earl, and discounte­nanced his Friends, then it is, and with much Probability supposed, that Philip de Montgomery, come for Scot­land, and fixed his Residence in the County of Tiviotdale upon the Bor­der, where he became a powerful Man. In the Time of Malcolm IV. frequent mention is made of Robert de Mundegumery, i. e. Montgomery, [Page 127] who is one of the many Witnesses to Walter high Stewart of Scotland's Foundation-Charter of the Mona­stery of Paisly, Anno Christi 1160a. The next in Order of Succession taken notice of, if not his Son, is Allan de Mundegumbri, Knight, who held diverse Lands in the Tenement of Innerwick, of the Lord high Stew­art of Scotland b, he's a Witness to the Charter of Robert Avenel of his Wood of Polwarth to Arnold Abbot of Kelso, Anno 1221,c with whom he himself settles about the Tiths of his Lands of Innerwick, which had been in Dispute between him and the Convent; he left Issue, Sir John de Montgomery, Knight, his Son, who shar'd the Inheritance with William de Haukerstoun, which he obtained by Helen his Wife, Daughter and Co­hier of Robert de Kent in Innerwick d, but more of this Sir John I have not discovered, saving that jointly with the foresaid William, he was a Bene­factor to the Monks of Kelso for the Health of his Soule: From this to the Time of Robert II. by many advantageous and honourable Mar­riages, and their great and signal Ser­vices done to the Crown, both in the Wars and otherways, this Family be­came possessed of diverse fair Lordships.

But omitting some Traditions, I descend to Sir John Montgomery of Eglesham, Knight; who married the Daughter and Heir of Sir Hugh Eglintoun of that Ilk, which Sir John was in that Expedition made a­gainst the English at the Battle of Otterburn, Anno 1388, where James Earl of Douglass was slain; here he behaved very valiantly, and took Henry Percy, Son to the Earl of Nor­thumberland Prisoner, and for his Ransom obliged him to build the Castle of Punoon, the chief Messu­age of the Lordship of Eglesham, he had Issue two Sons,

1. Sir Hugh, a brave and gallant Youth, who lost his Life in the Ser­vice of his Country, at the Field of Otterburn, where his Death is par­ticularly remarked in this old Heroick Poem,

He had a Bow bent in his Hand,
Made of a trusty Tree,
An Arrow of a Cloath-yeard long
Into the Head drew he.
Against Sir Hugh Montgomery,
So right his Shaft he set,
The gray Goose Wing that was therein,
In his Heart-blood was weet.

Sir John the second Son succeeded into the Estate, he was sent into England one of the Hostages for the Ransom of King James I. Anno 1423f and at the solemn Inauguration of the said Prince; he was one of the Barons on whom the Honour of Knighthood was conferr'd in 1424, and one of the Peers, who sat u­pon the Trial of Murdo Duke of Al­bany, where we find that unhappy Duke condemn'd to lose his Head, tho the Records are wholly silent as to his Crime. This Lord married Agnes Daughter to the Lord Maxwel, by whom he had

Alexander his Son and Heir, who indeed first raised the Grandeur of the Family, being a Man of great Parts. King James I. choose him a Privy Councilour, and in 1430, con­stituted him jointly in Commission with Sir Alexander Cuningham to be Governour of Kintyre & Knapdale, and the next ensuing Year he was with Alexander Lord Gordon and Mr. John Methven Secretary of State, sent to England to treat of the continuing a Peace betwixt the two Realms, which was at length concluded by them, having survived the many Difficul­ties and Factions of King James I's. Reign. I find he was of the Privy Council to his Son King James II, Anno 1440, from whom he obtained several beneficial Grants from the Crown, in Consideration of his good [Page 128] and laudable Services, not only per­formed to himself, but to his Father of blessed Memory. This Lord was twice sent Commissioner into Eng­land a the first time in the 1444, and the other in 1457. In both the Commissions he's designed Alexander Dominus Montgomery. Simply he took to Wife, Margaret Daughter of Thomas Boyd of Kilmaronock b by whom he had Issue,

Alexander, who dyed in his Lifetime, but left two Sons behind him, by Elisabeth his Wife Daughter of . . . . . Hepburn of Hales c, viz. Alexander who after his Grand-father's Death, was Lord Montgomery, and Robert first of the Montgomerys of Broadstone d, of whom Hugh Earl of Mount-Alexander of the Kingdom of Ireland in the Linal Heir.

George Montgomery of Skelmurly, was this Lords second Son () whose Successor is Sir Robert Montgomery Baronet.

Mr. Thomas Montgomery, the third Son, was Parson of Egelsham.

He had likeways several Daughters, 1. Margaret married to John first Earl of Lennox. 2d. Janet to Sir Robert Cunningham of Kilmaures, Ancestor to the Earl of Glencairn. 3d. . . . . . . to Alexander Hume of that Ilk. 4th. Jean, to John Lord Kennedy. 5th. Agnes, to William Cuningham of Glen garnock; as to the precise Time of this Lords Death, I have not found, but he was succeeded in his Estate and Honour by

Alexander his Grandson, whom he married in his own time to Cathe­rine f Daughter of Gilbert Lord Kennedy, by whom he had Hugh his Successor. 2d. James Montgomery of Smeithston. 3d. John.

Which Hugh, upon the Accession of King James IV. to the Crown, was named of his Council, and in 1489 he obtained a Grant of the Constabulary of his Majesty's Castle of Rothsay g, this King ever treating him with particular Marks of his Favour, and at last was pleased to creat him into the Dignity of Earl of Eglintoun, Anno 1503h, he mar­ried Helen, Daughter of Colin first Earl of Argyle, by whom he had three Sons and several Daughters.

1. John called Master of Eglintoun,

2. Son Sir Neil Montgomery of Lain­shaw, who had a Grant from his Father of the Lands of Lainshaw, Galowbery, Crevoch, Kilbryde, Milstonflet, Brad­furow, the Temple Land of Stewartoun, Holowchaple, Langanfee, Charlewrak, Longford; Crochdow, and Lochdernell in Air-shirei, the Lands of Airdoch and Nether-Craig in Renfrew shire. Moreover by Marriage of Mar­garet, Daughter and sole Heir of Quintine Mure of Skeldon, he consider­ably increased his Fortune, his Estate in all amounting to 100 Merk Land of old Extent, and thereupon he added to his Coat of Arms Argent, three Molets Azure.

He was killed in a Feud by the Lord Boyd in June 1547, ha­ving had two Sons by the said Mar­garet, his Wife; John who married Margaret Daughter of Robert Lord Boyd, but dyed without Succession, and Sir Neil who succeeded him, of whom and his Descendents more shall be said under the Title of Lyle, he marrying Jean, Daughter and sole Heir of John last Lord Lyle.

3d. Son was Mr. William Montgomery of Greenfield, who acquired the Lands of Stane in Air-shire, by Marriage of Elisabeth Daughter and sole Heir of Robert Frances of Stane k. This Branch divided it self afterward by Means of Hugh, a younger Son, who became the Root of the Montgomery's of Achinhood, and his Cadets.

Margaret, 1st. Daughter, married to William Lord Semple. 2d. Mar­jory, to William Lord Somervel. The 3d. Maud to Colin Campbel of Arking­lass e [Page 129] but had no Issue. 4th. Isobel to John Mure of Caldwell, in Vicecomitatu deRenfrew, and had Issue. 5th Elisa­beth, to John Blair of that Ilk. 6th. Agnes, to John Ker of Kersland, in Vicecomitatu de Air, and had Issue.

Here its requisite to observe, that John, Son and Heir apparent to this Earl, when the Feuds run high be­twixt the contending Parties of the Nobility in the Minority of King James V, he was killed in a Scuffle betwixt the Earls of Aran and Angus on the Street of Edinburgh, 30 of April 1520a, leaving behind him a Son and a Daughter by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of Sir Archibald Edmonston of Duntreath b, Hugh who succeeded his Grand-father, and Christian, Wife of Sir William Douglass of Drumlanrig, Ancestor to the Duke of Queensberry.

Which Hugh was of the Privy Council to King James V. as he had been before to John Duke of Albany, Governour of Scotland, in the said King's Minority, and was one of the Lords to whom his Grace committed the Tuition of that Prince, upon his going to France to concert Measures with that Court for carrying on a War with England, Anno 1520c: Yea, the said King had such an E­steem of this Lord, that when he went to France in order to espouse Magdalen, Daughter of Francis I. Anno 1536, he appointed him one of the Governours of Scotland, the Earl of Huntly being joined in Commission with him. His Wife was Marion, Daughter of George Lord Seton, by whom he had only a Son,

Hugh his Successor in the Honour, who, as soon as he came to Man's Estate, married the Lady Jean Hamil­ton, Daughter of James Duke of Chattlerault Governour of Scotland, which Marriage was disolved in the 1562, they standing in the fourth Degree of Consanguinity, the Pope's Dispensation not being obtainedd, & then by, the Permission of the Bishop of Rome, he's allowed to Marry Agnes Daughter of Sir John Drummond of Innerpeffrey, Widow of Sir Hugh Campbel of Lowdon: By her he had four Children.

1. Hugh Earl of Eglintoun.

2. Robert Montgomery of Giffen, who married Margaret Daughter of Sir Matthew Campbel of Lowdon, by whom he had one Daughter, Elisabeth, his sole Heir, married to Hugh Earl of Eglintoun.

Margaret, eldest Daughter, was married to Robert 1st. Earl of Winton, Mother by him of George 2d Earl of Winton, and of Alexander Earl of Eglintoun.

Agnes the second, married to Ro­bert Lord Semple, and had Issue.

This Earl stuck close to Queen Mary in the Time of her greatest Distress: He put himself in Arms in her behalf, and was personally en­gaged in the Battle of Lang-side e, were he, together with the Lord Seton, and many Barons of Account, were taken Prisoners, after which he thought sit to tender his Submission to King James VI. and lived peaceably till his Death, which happened in the Month of June 1585f, his Estate devol­ving on

Hugh his Son, who was bar­barously murdered on the score of a private Quarrel, by John Cuningham of Colnbeith, and his Adherents, the 12th Day of April 1586g, whereby his Country was deprived of an Ho­nour and Ornament, his Prince of a faithful and able Subject, and his Family of a singular Advantage, Mr. John Johnston wrote the following Epitaph in Praise of him.

[Page 130]
Illa opifex sollers rerum, magni amula Olympi
Natura, immensis ambitiosa opibus;
Illa sibi de te certans quae singula, rara,
Vix aliis, dedit haec cunta benigna tibi.
Sic artus, sic ora, animos, sic pectora finxit,
Caeteraque humanis anteferenda notis:
Vix aliqu [...]m ut credas mortali semine cretum,
Ast quales tulerunt secula prisca deos.
Invidiosa nimis visa haec mortalibus. Ergo
Tollere mox properat infidiosa manus.
Pertunam ingentem gravior saepe exitus urget:
Praecipitique vides fulmine magna quati.

He left a Son by Giles his Wife, Daughter to Robert Lord Boyd, Hugh who succeeded him in his Estate and Honour. This Earl in the 1603a, obtained a Grant to himself, his Heirs and Assigneys, upon the Resignation of Mr. William Melvil, erecting the dissolved Abbay of Kilwining for­merly a Seat of Benedictine Monks, with all the Lands and Tithes, either in Property or Superiority which had belonged at any time thereto into a temporal Lordship, with the Patronage of the Churches of Kilwining, Irvine, Dunbartoun, Kilmarnock, Loudoun, Ardrossan, Kil­birny, Dalry, Dunlop, Beith, Stewar toun, Stevenson, Dreghorn, Pearston, Kilbryde, and Kilmachornal.

He married Elisabeth, Daughter of Robert Montgomery of Giffen, but dy­ing without Issue in the 1612b, his Estate by vertue of an Entail made by him, came to Sir Alexander Seton his Cousin German, who changed his Name to Montgomery, but he could not enjoy the Title of Earl, without the King's special Allowance, which soon after, his Majesty was pleased to bestow upon him, for the great Merit of his Ancestors, with the Dignity and precedency formerly enjoyed by Hugh Earl of Eglingtoun, last de­ceased.

This Earl was among the Num­ber of those Peers, who engaged them­selves against the King, Anno 1638, upon the first commencing of our bloody Civil War; he had the Com­mand of a Regiment in the Army that was sent to Ireland, Anno 1642, toward the suppressing the Rebellion, of the Native Irish c: He was like­ways personally engaged in the Battle of Longmarstonmuir, Anno 1643, in the Service of the Parliament of England, against the King, where he behaved with aboundance of Courage, yet his Lordship still retained a Respect and Affection to his Majesty's Person, and no Man more abominated the Murder of the Lords Anointed than he.

He heartily concurred with, and was extremely satisfied with the Restau­ration of King Charles II. by whom he was constituted Captain of his Guard of Horsed, Anno 1650; and the next Year while he was raising Forces in the Western Parts for the King's Service, he was surprised at Dunbarton by a Party of English Horse, and sent Prisoner to the Town of Hull, and afterward removed to Berwick upon Tweed, suffering like­ways the Sequestration of his Estate till the Restauration reponed him, Anno 1660, his first Wife was Anne, Daughter of Alexander first Earl of Linlithgow, by whom he had

1. Hugh his Successor in the Ho­nour.

2. Sir Henry Montgomery of Giffen, dyed without Children.

3d. Sir Alexander, a Colonel in Ireland, in which Kingdom he dyed.

4. Colonel James Montgomery of Coelsfield.

5. Robert, who in his Youth mak­ing choice of a Military Life, went over to the Wars in Ireland, Ann [...] 1642, he was first made a Captain in his Father's Regiment, after which he listed himself in the Service of the Parliament of England, where in Time he arrived to the Degree of a Major General, and acquired the Reputa­tion of a Man of Courage, and a good Officer, he firmly adhered to [Page 131] King Charles II. and in his Majesty's Service he gave many signal Proofs of his Loyalty and Valour on several occasions, especially at that memo­rable Encounter at Dunbar, 3d. of Sep­tember 1650, in which Action he performed the part of a brave and valiant Commander; likeways he commanded in the Quality of Major General of the Horse in the Royal Army at Worcester. 3d of September 1651, where he received diverse Wounds, and had the Misfortune to be taken Prisoner, whence making his Escape out of the Castle of Edinburgh [...]n Disguise, Anno 1659a, he got beyond Sea to the King, and returned with his Master, Anno 1660, being one of the Gentlemen of his Majesty's Bed Chamber. He married Margaret Daughter of James Viscount of Kil­syth, by whom he had James Mont­gomery Esq his Son and Heir.

His Lordships had likeways two Daughters, 1st. Margaret, married to John 1st. Earl of Twedale after his Death to William Earl of Glencairn, the 2d. Anne dyed unmarried. He married to his second Wife Margaret Daugh­ter of Walter Lord Buclugh Widow of James Lord Ross, but by her he had no Succession, and arriving to the 73d Year of his Age, he departed this Life the 7th of January 1661, his Estate and Honour devolving on

Hugh his Son. This noble Earl was a Man of perfect Loyalty in the time of our Civil Troubles, as ap­pears in all the Accounts of those Times, particularly by the Me­moiers of the Bishop of Dunkeld, his Cotemporary. In the 1643, he rais­ed a Troop of Horse, with which he marched in Person, and fought vali­antly at Langmarstonmuir, and several other Battles and Skirmishes, and continuing to adhere faithfully to the Royal Cause, he was therefore ex­cepted out of Cromwel's Indemnity, in the 1654a, by Anne his first Wife, Daughter of James Marquis of Ha­milton, he had one Daughter Anne, married to James Earl of Finlator; also by Mary his second Wife Daughter of John Earl of Rothes, he had

Alexander his Successor.

Francis Montgomery of Giffen, who was one of the Lords of the Privy Council, and one of the Commissioners of the Thesaury in the Reign of K. Wil­liam & Q. Anne. He was appointed one of the Commissioners upon the Part of Scotland to treat upon a nearer Union with England in 1706, which was at that time compleated, he had no Issue by Margaret his first Wife, Daughter and sole Heir of Alexander Earl of Leven, but by Elisabeth Daughter of Sir Robert Sinclair of Lochermackhouse, in Vicecomitatu de Haddingtoun; He had John Mont­gomery Esq a Member of Parliament for the County of Air. Alexander, one of the Colonels in Her Majesty's Foot Guards, who dyed a very hopeful Youth of his Death woun [...]s at the Battle of Almanara, in the 1711; also Elisabeth a Daughter, married to Patrick Ogilvy of Lonmay. This Earl had moreover five Daughters,

1. Mary, married to George Earl of Winton, sans Issue.

2. Margaret, to James 2d Earl of Loudon.

3. Christian, to John 4th Lord Bal­merinoch.

4. Eleanor, to Sir David Dunbar of Baldoon, Baronet, in Vicecomitatu de Wigtoun, and had Issue.

5. Anne, to Sir Andrew Ramsay of Abbotshall, Baronet. He departing this Life, Anno 1669, was succeeded by

Alexander his Son and Heir, who was named one of the Lords of the Privy Council, 1st of May 1689, and dying in the end of the Year 1701, he left Issue by Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of William Earl of Drum­frees, Alexander the present Earl, Ma­jor Hugh and Major John Montgomery, b [Page 132] and Mary married to Sir James Agnew of Lochnaw, and had Issue.

Which Alexander, was one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King William, and one of the Commis­sioners of the Thesaury. In 1700, he had a Patent to sit and Vote in the Parliament of Scotland, as Lord High Thesaurer, all Officers of State tho neither Peers, nor elected as Commissioners, having by the Con­stitution a Place in Parliament, and the Crown a Right, when any one of the Officers were vacant, to appoint one to Represent in Parlia­ment the said Office. Upon the Dis­solution of the Parliament in 1710, he was on the 10th of November the same Year elected one of the sixteen Peers of Scotland to the Parliament of Great Britain; also in 1711, his Lordship was appointed one of the Commissioners of the Chamberlian-Court, which was then erected. He married first Margaret Daughter of William Lord Cochran, Son and Heir of William Earl of Dundonald, by whom he had two Sons, Hugh and Alexan­der, who both dyed in the Year 1696; also four Daughters,

1. Catherine, married to James Earl of Galloway.

2. Eupham, to George Lockhart of Carnwath, and has Issue.

3. Grace, to Robert Earl of Carn­wath.

4. Jean, to Sir Aexander Maxwel of Monrieth, Baronet.

His second Wife was Anne Daugh­ter of George Earl of Aberdeen, by whom he had a Daughter, Lady Mary.

His third Marriage was with Susanna, Daughter of Sir Archibald Kennedy of Colzean, Baronet, by whom he has two Daughters,

Lady Elisabeth.

Lady Helen.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th Azure, three Flower de lyces, Or: 2d and 3d, Gules, three Annulets, Or, ston'd, Azure, all within a Border, Or, flour'd and coun­ter flowr'd, Gules, supported by two Dragons Vert vomiting Fire, and for Crest, a Maid holding in her Dexter Hand a Mans Head, and in the Sinister an Anchor, Motto, Garde bien.

BRUCE, Earl of Elgin.

THAT the ancient and noble Family of Clackmanan, is branch­ed from the Earls of Carrick, all our Antiquaries do agree, tho they do not deduce the Line of that Descent in each Point alike, to the intent that it may clearly appear that it is, I thought fit to take notice, that King David II. made a Grant to Robert Bruce, dilecto consanguineo suo, of the Castle and Barony of Clackmanan, the 39th Year of his Reigna, which is sufficient to show he was of the said King's Kindred.

Sir Edward Bruce of Shires-Mill, a younger Son of Sir Edward Bruce of Clackmanan, by Margaret Daughter of Sir Patrick Blackader of Tilliallan in the Time of King James V. acquir­ing several Lands from John Abbot of Culross, in 1541b, he raised to him­self a fair Fortune. By . . . . . his Wife, Daughter to the Lord Semple c, he had Robert Bruce of Blairhall, Edward Bruce of Kinloss, and George Bruce of Carnock Ancestor to the Earls of Kincairn. Of these his Children, Edward the second [Page 133] being the Person of whom I'm chiefly to speak here, I shall deduce what I found related of him from unquesti­onable Authority.

This Edward being bred a Lawyer, was first made one of the Commis­sarrs of Edinburgh, and after that pre [...]erred to be one of the Senators of the College of Justice by King James VI. 2d December 1597, by the Title of Commendator of Kinloss: And being a Person of great Parts, was by the said King, with the Earl of Mar sent Ambassador to Queen Elisabeth, Anno 1601, to Congratu­late her upon her good Success in re­pressing that Audacious Attempt of the Earl of Essex; and upon the Death of that Queen, being eminent­ly instrumental to the pe [...]ceful En­trance of King James to the Crown of England, by the Intelligence, which he held privately in her Life­time with Sir Robert Cicel, one of her principal Secretaries of State, and accompanying the King into Eng­land, Anno 1603, in Recompence of his faithful Services, he had the Of­fice of Master of the Rolls conferred on him during Life; and as a further Testimony of his Majesty's Favour, he had a Grant of the dissolved Abbay of Kinloss in Murray erected to him and his Heirs in a Temporal Lord­ship, by Letters Patent bearing date 8th of July 1604a, being of the Privy Council to his Majesty in both Kingdoms, he departed this Life in the 62 Year of his Age, on the 14th of January 1610, and was interred in the Chapel of the Rolls in Chancery Lane, London, where there is a fair Monument erected to his Memory, with this Inscription upon it.

FUIMUS
Sacrae Memoriae
Domini Edwardi Bruce, Baronis Bruce, Kin­lossensis, sacrorum scriniorum Magistri dicatum qui obiit 14 Jan. Anno sal. 1610. Aetat. 62. Jacobi Regis 8vo.
Brucius Edwardus situs hic & Scotus & Anglus,
Scotus ut ortu Anglis sic oriundus avis,
Regno in utroque decus tulit auctus honoribus am­plis
Regi a consiliis Regni utriusque fuit,
Conjuge prole, nuru, genero, spe, reque beatus
Vivere nos docuit, nune docet ecce mori.

He left Issue by Magdalen his Wife Daughter of Alexander Clark of Bal­birny, in Vicecomitatu de Fife, two Sons and a Daughter,

1. Edward Lord Kinloss.

2. Thomas Bruce Esq

3. Christian, married to William Earl of Devon-shire of the Kingdom of England, and had Issue; Also

Janet, a natural Daughter, mar­ried to Thomas Dalziel of Binns, Mo­ther by him of Lieutenant General Thomas Dalziel.

Which Edward Lord Kinloss was made Knight of the Bath at the Cre­ation of Henry Prince of Wales, and afterward one of the Gentlemen of the Bed Chamber to K. James VI. in 1613 he had the Misfortune to fall into a fatal quarrel with Sir Edward Sack­ville, afterward Earl of Dorset, upon which says a noble Historianb, They both transported themselves into Flan­ders, attended only by two Chirurgeons, placed at a Distance, and under an Obli­gation not to stir but upon the fall of one of them, they fought under the Walls of Antwerp, where this Lord was killed, whereupon Thomas his Brother became his Heir.

Which Thomas attended King Charles I. into Scotland, and at the Solemnity of his Coronation, was by Letters Patent bearing date the 19th of June 1633, created Earl of Elgin, afterward in the 17 of Charles I. ad­vanced to the Dignity of a Baron of England, by the Title of Lord Bruce of Whorletoun, in the County of York, he married Anne Daughter of Sir Robert Chichester, Knight. 2dly. Diana, Daughter, and one of the Co­heirs of William Lord Burleigh, Son [Page 134] and Heir of Thomas Earl of Exeter, and departing this Life, Anno 1663, he left Issue by Anne his first Wife,

Robert his Son and Heir, who be­ing Lord Lieutenant of the County of Bedford; and having given great Testimony of his Loyalty to King Charles II. under his misfortunate Troubles; as also been instrumental in the Restauration, he was in the 19th of Charles II. created Lord Bruce of Skeltoun, Viscount Bruce of Ampthil, and Earl of Ailesbury. He married Diana Daughter to Henry Earl of Stamford, by whom he had Issue,

Thomas Lord Kinloss.

James Bruce Esq

Diana eldest Daughter, married first to Sir Seymour Shirely, Baro net, and after to John Duke of Rutland.

Anne, to Sir William [...]ich of Sun­ning.

Christian, to John Rolls Esq eldest Son of Sir John Rolls of Stephenson, and afterward to Sir Robert Guyer of Stoke.

Mary, to Sir John Walter of Saresdon, in the County of Oxford, Baronet.

Anne-Charlotte, to Nicolas Bagnal Esq

Henrietta, to Thomas Ogle Esq only Son of Sir Thomas Ogle Governour of Chelsea College.

Which Thomas eldest Son succeed ed him in the Earldom, and married Elisabeth Daughter of Henry Beau­c [...]mp, Son of William Marquis of Hartford, Sister, and at length Heir to William Duke of Somerset, by whom he had Issue,

1. Charles, now Lord Bruce of Kin­loss, who has married Anne Daughter and Co-heir to William Marquis of Halifax, and had Issue a Son Robert, born 1707.

This Earl's eldest Daughter Elisa­beth, was married to George Earl of Cardigan, and Lady Mary dyed young.

His Lordship has since married the Countess of Sanaw in Brabant, by whom he had a Daughter Charlot-Maria.

ARMS.

Or, a Saltyre and Chief, Gules, on a Canton Argent, a Lyon rampant, Azure, Supporters two Savages Pro­per, wreathed about the Head and Loins with Lawrel, Motto, Fuimus.

MURRAY, Lord Elibank.

IS a Cadet of the Family of Black­barony: His Ancestor was Sir Gideon Murray Son of Sir Andrew Murray of Blackbarony, by Grisel his Wife, Daughter of Sir John Beaton of Crich a, Relict of Sir Walter Scot of Buclugh. From a short Abstract of his L [...]e, I find that Mr. Murray in his Youth, resolving to follow the Ministry, while he was a Student in D [...]vinity, he happened unluckily to kill a Man by Accidentb, which made him relinquish that Profession, & become Chamberlain to the Laird of Buclugh; which Trust he managed with great Prudence, and consider­ably improved that opulent Fortune. He was first brought to Acquaintance with the Court, by means of his Ne­phew Robert Earl of Somerset, once the great Favourite of King James VI. who procured him first the Ho­nour of Knighthoodc, Anno 1605: and upon his Lordships Promotion to the Thesaurers Office, on the Decease of George Earl of Dunbar, in the 1611 Sir Gideon Murray was con­stituted Thesaurer Depute, which Office he managed so much to the [Page 135] Advantage of the Crown, that beside the Charge of the Government, he both repaired and enlarged the Pala­ces of Holy-rood-house, Falkland, Lin­lithgow, Dumfermling, and the Castles of Edinburgh, and Dumbartoun, and had the Treasury so full at the King's coming to Scotland 1617, that he de­frayed the whole Charge of the Court, his Majesty appearing with as much Splendor at Holy-rood-house as at White­hall. He departed this Life Anno 1621a, leaving Issue by Margaret Pent­land his Wifeb,

Sir Patrick his Successor;

Walter Murray of Livingstoun; and a Daughter . . . . . . married to Sir William Scot of Harden.

Which Patrick was by King Charles I. Anno 1628c first made a Baroner, and afterward, in respect of his ap­proved Loyalty to the said King, was advanced to the Dignity of Lord Eli­bank, March 18th 1643d. He mar­ried Elisabeth Daughter of Sir James Dundas of Arnistoun, by whom he had a Son, 1st, Patrick his Successor; 2d, . . . . . . Murray of Spot, and several Daughters; Elisabeth, married to Sir Archibald Stiling of Carden.

Patrick Lord Elibank his Son, mar­ried Elisabeth Steuart, Daughter of John 1st, Earl of Traquair, by whom he had Alexander his Son and Heir, who married Anne Daughter of Dr. Alexan­der Burnet Archbishop of St. Andrews, by whom he had Alexander his Succes­sor in the Honour, and two Daughters,

Anne, married to John Lord Mack­leod, Son and Heir of George Earl of Cromarty.

. . . . . . . . to Sir John Mackenzie of Coul, in Vic. de Ross.

Alexander the present Lord, has married . . . . Daughter of George Stir­ling Chirurgeon in Edinburgh, by whom he has Issue the Master of E­libank his Son and Heir apparent.

ARMS.

Azure, A Martlet betwixt Three Stars, within a double Tressure, Arg­ent. Supporters, Two Horses bridle­ed, Argent. Crest, A Lyon Rampant Saliant on a Pole Ax, Sable Motto, Virtute fideque.

ELPHINSTON, Lord Elphinston.

THIS ancient noble Family ori­ginally took the Sirname of El­phinston from their own Lands of that Name in Edinburghshire, the first of whom I have found was John de El­phinston, who is Witness in that Grant which Roger de Quincy Earl of Winche­ster made to the Monks of Dryburgh, de uno Tofto Terrae in Glaswoode circa Annum 1252e.

Another Alexander Elphinston de El­phinston in the Time of King David II, had the Lands of Kinchinbar, in Baro­nia de Stenhouse, in Vicecomit. de Stirling f, from Godofredus de Ross, Dominus ejusdem in feudo & haereditate: He was succeeded by Alexander El­phinston Dominus ejusdem, his Son, who in the 33d of King David II. ex­changed the foresaid Lands with Ale­xander Son of Sir Adam More Knight, for the Lands of Arthbeg in Stirlingshire, since called Elphinston. Sir William Elphinston his Son, was slain fighting gallantly against the English at the Battle of Piperdain, Anno 1436, to whose Valour chiefly our Histori­ans ascribe the Victory; leaving on­ly a Daughter, Agnes his sole Heir, married to Gilbert Son of Sir Adam Johnston of that Ilkg, who thereby came to the Possession of the Lands of Elphinston in Lothian: The rest of the Estate of the Family in Stirling-shire, [Page 136] by a solemn Arbitration, in the 1471, came to Henry Elphinstoun, Brother to the aforesaid Alexander whch he then called Elphinston.

Sir Alexander Elphinstoun of that Ilk, Son and Heir of Sir John Elphinstoun Knight, was by the Bounty and Favour of K. James IV. created Lord Elphinstoun, by whose special Coun­tenance he obtained in Marriage E­lisabeth Barlow an English Lady, one of the Maids of Honour to Queen Margaret. He was slain at the Battle of Flowdon, with the said King his Master, 9th September 1513, leaving Issue, Alexander, who succeeded him in the Honour, Isobel, married to David Lindsay of Dunrod, 2dly, To Robert Maxwell of Calderwood, in Vic. de Lanerk a, Eupham, to John Bruce of Cultmalindie b, Elizabeth to Sir David Somervel of Plain.

Which Alexander married Cathe­rine Daughter of John Lord Erskine, by whom he had Issue, 1st, Robert the next Lord, 2d John Parson of In­ [...]er [...]ochty, 3d, James Elphinstoun of Innerdovat c, 4th, Sir Michael El­phinstoun, Master of the Houshold to King James VI. 5th. William, who was the Author of that Branch of the Elphinstouns of Calderhall in Stirling-Shire; also several Daughters,

Isobel, married to James Hamilton of Haggs, and had Issue.

Marjory, to Sir Robert Drummond of Carnock, and had Issue.

Margaret, to Alexander Livingston of Dunipace.

This Lord was killed at the Battle of Pinkie, 10th of September 1547d, and was succeeded in his Estate and Honour by Robert his Son and Heir, who married Elisabeth Daughter of Sir John Drummond of Innerpeffery, by whom he had, 1. Alexander his Successor, 2. George e; Rector of the Scots College at Rome, 3. Sir James Elphlnstoun, 1st Lord Balme­rinoch; likewise several Daughters.

1st, Agnes, married to Walter Lord Deskford.

2d. Jean to Walter Barclay of Towie, in Vic. de Aberdeen.

3. Elizabeth f, to Sir Robert Innes of that Ilk, and had Issue.

4. Margaret to John Cunningham g of Drumwhasle, in Vic. de Stirling, and had Issue.

He departed this Life, Anno 1602, and was succeeded by

Alexander his Son, who was one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King James VI. by whom he was prefer'd to be Lord high Theasurer of Scotland, Anno 1599, which Office he resigned to the Earl of Dunbar in 1601. By Jean his Wife, Daughter of William Lord Livingstoun, he had

1. Alexander his Successor in the Honour. 2. James Elphinston of Barns, Ancestor to the present Lord Elphinston. 3. John Elphinston of Wortle in Aberdeen-Shire. 4. Micha­el Elphonstin of Quarrel. in Vic de Stirling; also five Daughters.

Anne, married to John Earl of Su­therland, and had Issue.

Jean, to Arthur Lord Forbes, and had Issue.

Elizabeth, to Sir John Bruce of Airth, and had Issue.

Christian, to Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromarty.

Helen, to Sir William Cockburn of Langtoun, and had Issue. And again to Mr. Henry Rollo of Woodside, Grand­father and Grandmother to the pre­sent Sir Henry Rollo of Woodside Knight.

Which Alexander married Eliza­beth, [Page 137] Daughter of Patrick Lord Drum­mond, Sister to James first Earl of Perth a, by whom he had one Daughter Lillias; and departing this Life Anno 1649b, the Title of Lord descended to

Alexander Elphinstoun of Barns his Nephew, who, that the Honour might be properly supported, mar­ried Lillias Daughter and Heir of Alexander Lord Elphinstoun his Uncle: He dying Anno 1654c, left Issue, 1. Alexander. 2d. John, and a Daughter Anne, married to Walter Lord Tor­phichen.

Which Alexander married Anne Daughter of Dr. Alexander Burnet then Archbishop of Glasgow, and after­wards of St. Andrews, but he dying without Issue, Anno 1669d, his Estate and Title came to

John his Brother, who married Isobel, Daughter of Charles Earl of Lauderdale, by whom he had,

1. Charles.

2. John, who dyed in the blossom of his promising Youth, unmarried.

3. Captain William Elphinstoun.

Elisabeth, eldest Daughter, married to John Campbel of Mamore, Son to Archibald Earl of Argyle, and has Issue.

Margaret, to George Count Lesly of Balquhain, and has Issue.

Mary.

Charles Master of Elphinstoun, mar­ried Elisabeth Daughter of Sir Wil­liam Primrose of Caringtoun, by whom he has Issue,

ARMS.

Argent, a Cheveron Sable, betwixt three Boars Heads eras'd Gules, sup­ported by two Savages Proper, Crest, a Lady above the middle, holding in her Dexter-hand a Castle, and in the Sinister a Lawrel, Motto, Caus Causit.

HAY, Earl of Errol.

BOTH our ancient and modern Historians say, that this noble Family had its Rise Anno 980, tempore Kennethi Tertii, when the Danes in­vaded this Nation, and gave Battle to the Scots; whom they had routed near Perth, but for the Courage and Conduct of a certain Labourer, who perceiving his Country-men flying before the conquering Enemy, he and his two Sons stopped them with their Plow Gear in a certain Defile, and upbrading them for their Cowardice, obliged them to rally: whom the Danes supposing to be fresh Suc­cours, he became thereby the means of transferring the Victory to the Scots side: And King Kenneth ad­vanced him into the first Rank of those about him, and rewarded him with as much Land as a Falcon flying from a Fist, should measure out before he settled: To which Exploit, the Arms, Crest, and Supporters of the Family of Errol, are allusive. The praise of this illustrious Person and his Sons are celebrated by the polite Poet Dr. John Johnston, as follows,

Quo ruitis cives? Heia! hosti obvertite vultus [...]
Non pudet infami vertere terga fuga?
Hostis ego vobis; aut ferrum vertite in hostem.
Dixit, & armatus dux praeit ipse jugo.
Quaqua ibat vastam condensa per agmina Danum
Dat stragem. hinc omnis consequiturque fugae.
Servavit cives. Victorem reppulit hostem.
Ʋnus cum natis agminis instar erat.
Hic Decios agnosce tuos magnae aemula Romae,
Aut prior hac; aut te his Scotia major adhue.

In the Reign of King Malcolm IV. William de Haia is Possessor of the Lands of Errol in Forfar-shire, and is among many other noble Persons Wit­ness in that King's Charter to the Ab­bay of Scoon, he gave to the Monastry [Page 138] of Couper in pure Charity, the Lands of Lyderpoyls, which King William by his Royal Charter ratified and con­firmed, Comite Duncano Justiciario, Comite Gilberto de Strathern, Willielmo­filio Thori, being Witnesses therein, sufficiently prove it a very ancient Deeda. He left behind him three Sons, David, Robert, and Malcolm.

Which David was a Benefactor to the Monks of Couper in Angus, by his Gift and Donation of three Acres of arable Land, with the Fishing of one Net upon the River of Tay, Pro anima piae memoriae Regis Willielmi, & anima Willielmi de Haia patris mei & salute mea & Elene sponsae meae & Antecessorum & Heredum meorum, cum consensu Gilberti Heredis mei.

Sir Gilbert Hay of Errol his Son, was one of the first Barons of Scotland, who assisted King Robert I. in re­trieving the Independency of his Na­tive Country, then almost subjected to the English by John Baliol; and as­sisted at the Solemnity of his Coro­nation, Anno 1306. In Considera­tion of his good and faithful Services he had diverse Grants of Lands then in the Crown; and that Monarch be­ing further desirous to put a lasting Mark of Esteem upon him and his Family, he was graciously pleased to make him and his Heirs for ever Lord High Constables or Scotland, by his Charter 12th Nov. 1315b. He di­ed Anno 1330c, and was interred in the Abbay of Couper, to which he and his Ancestors had been Bene­factors. He was succeeded by

Sir William his Son, who adhered firmly to the Interest of King David Bruce, in whose Service he lost his Life at the Battle of Duplin, Anno 1333d, together with the whole Gentlemen of his Name; so that had not his Lady been with Child, and supported it by the Birth of a Postu­mous Son, it had been quite extin­guished. Mr. Johnston the Poet writes thus of him,

Me simul, & mecum spemque & genus omne meorum
Vulnere non uno sustulit una dies.
At vos crudeles Parcae miserescite. nobis
Degener haud tant is spes nova surgat avis.
Audivere Deae Dabitur quod poscitis, ajunt,
Aut dabis, aut conjux te tibi dante dabit.
Stat rediviva igitur, potuitque excisa renasci,
Et tibi gens a te posthuma surget avo.
Si fas morte etiam victuram condere gentem,
Qualia, quanta olim vita datura fuit!

Sir William was succeeded by Sir David his Son, born after his Father's Death, and on that account came not into Action for a long time: He lest a Son

Sir Thomas, who is one of the Ba­rons who recognosced John Earl of Carrick's Right to the Crown, upon his Father's Accession to the imperial Dignity of this Realme. He mar­ried Elisabeth Daughter to King Ro­bert II.f and departing this Life Anno 1406g. he left Issue Wil­liam his Successor, and a Daughter Elisabeth, married to Sir George Lesly Knighth.

Which William was one of the Commissioners deputed by the Estates of Scotland to treat with the English, touching the Redemption of King James I. Anno 1424, which was then happily effectedi, at the Solemnity of whose Coronation he receiv'd the Honour of Knighthood. He mar­ried Alice, Daughter of Sir William Hay of Tester, Progenitor to the Mar­quis of Tweddale k, by whom he had William his Successor in his Estate and Honour, and Gilbert Hay l of Urrie.

This Sir William being a Person of singular Merit, was by the favour of [Page 139] King James II. created Earl of Errol Anno 1452, and departing this mortal Life in the 1455a, he left Issue by Beatrix his Wife, Daughter of James Lord Dalkeith b.

Nicol his Son and Heir, who was one of the Privy Council to King James III. and one of the Com­missioners upon the Part of Scotland nominated to treat with the English, touching the keeping a good Under­standing betwixt the two Realmsc, Anno Dom. 1472: He married Elisa­beth, Daughter to the Earl of Huntly, d by whom he had,

William Earl of Errol his Son and Heir, who married Janet Daughter to John Earl of Athole, by whom he had two Sons, William, and Sir Thomas Hay of Logie, Knighte.

Which William married Elisabeth Lesly, Daughter to the Earl of Rothes f, by whom he had,

William Earl of Errol g, who was constituted Sheriff of Aberdeen, Anno 1510h. He took to Wi [...]e, first Christian, Daughter of John Lord Glamis i, and again Elisabeth Daugh­ter to the Lord Ruthven k. This Lord accompanying King James IV. to the Battle of Flowdon, was there slain with his Sovereign Lord, and the Flower of the Nobil [...]ty on the fatal 9th of September 1513, leaving

William his Son and Heir to suc­ceed him, who was of the Privy Council to King James V. and his special Favorite. He married Helen, Daughter of John Earl of Lennox, by whom he had one Daughter Jean, married to Andrew Earl of Errol her Cousin; his Estate and Honour devolving on

George Hay of Logie, his Heir Malel. He married Margaret, Daughter of Sir Alexander Robertson of Strowan m, by whom he had Andrew his Successor; also two younger Sons, John Hay of Muchill, George Hay of Ardlithan, and two Daughters,

1. Elisabeth, married to William Earl Marishal, and had Issue.

2. Margaret, to Laurence Lord Oli­phant, and had Issue. He departed this Life Anno 1563n. and was succeeded in his Estate and Honour by

Andrew his Son, who was consti­tuted one of the Lords of Queen Marys Privy Council in 1567, when the Civil War broke out in that Reign. I do not find him much engaged in either Party during all the Con­fusions of King James's Minority. He married Jean Daughter of William Earl of Errol o, by whom he had Francis, who succeeded him, and a Daughter Eleanor, married to Alex­ander first Earl of Linlithgow, and had Issue.

His second wife was Mary, Daugh­ter of George Earl of Caithness, Widow of Hume of Coldingknows, by whom he had George Hay of Kilour, Ancestor to the present Earl of Errol. He dy­ing Anno 1585p.

Francis his Son succeeded him, who was one of the Commissioners appointed to treat about a nearer Union of Scotland and England, Anno 1604q. He married first Mary, Sister to James Earl of Murray, next Anne, Daughter of John Earl of Athole, and last of all Elisabeth Daughter of William Earl of Morton, by whom he had William his Son and Heir, and Francis who died unmarried; also four Daughters,

1. Anne, married to George Earl of Winton.

2. Jean, to John Earl of Mar.

[Page 140] 3. Elisabeth, to Hugh Lord Semple.

4. Mary, to Walter Earl of Buclugh.

5. Sophia, to John Viscount Melgum.

This Earl arriving to a great Age, at last his long Life was brought to a period on the 14th of July 1631. Upon him Dr. Arthur Johnston wrote this Epitaph.

Occidit Hayorum Princeps Errolius, orbis
Nunc defiderium, qui fuit ante decus.
Adscripsit procerum numero domus edita Regum
Stemmate, sanguineis nobilitata jugis.
Manibus Heroum sociavit Martia virtus,
Partaque fulminea mille trophea manu.
Donavit coelo pietas spectata. Quid ultra
Vel maruere homines, vel tribuere Dei?

William Earl of Errol his Son, was much in the Favour of King Charles I. and assisted at the said King's Coro­nation, 18 June 1633. He married Anne Daughter of Patrick Earl of Kinghorn, by whom he had Gilbert his Successor, and a Daughter Margaret married to Henry Lord Ker, Son and Heir of Robert Earl of Roxburgh, 2dly to John Earl of Cassils, and de­parting this Life, 17th of December 1636a his Estate and Honour de­scended to

Gilbert his Son and Heir, then very young, and upon that account was not engaged in the Civil War; for I find no mention of him till the Re­stauration of King Charles II. when he was constituted one of the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council, Anno 1661. He married Catherine Daugh­ter of James second Earl of Southesque, but dying without Issue, Anno 1674, both his Estate and Honour, by ver­tue of an Entail to the Heirs Male, came to John Hay of Kilour, Son and Heir of Sir Andrew Hay (by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Patrick Kinnaird of I [...]chture) Son and Heir of Sir George Hay of Kilour (by Mary his Wife, Daugh­ter of . . . . . . Cheyne of Eslemont) Son and Heir of Andrew Earl of Errol, as has been observed.

Which John so succeeding in the Earldom, married Anne Daughter to James Earl of Perth, by whom he had Charles his Successor, James and Thomas, who both dyed unmarried; also two Daughters,

Lady Mary.

Lady Margaret, married to James Earl of Linlithgow.

He dying Anno 1705, was suc­ceeded by Charles his Son,

Which Charles now Earl of Errol, was one of the Peers who in the Par­liament 1706, dissented in every Article of the Union with England, in the Terms of the Treaty then be­fore the House, before the Conclusion of which, his Lordship entred a Pro­testation, which chiefly respected his own Heritable Constabulary, in these Terms,

I Charles Earl of Errol, Lord high Constable of Scotland, do hereby Pro­test, that the Office of high Constable of Scotland, with all the Rights and Pri­viledges of the same, belonging to me Heritably, and depending upon the Mo­narchy, Sovereignty, and ancient Con­stitution of this Kingdom, may not be weakned nor prejudged by the Conclusion of the Treaty of Union betwixt Scotland and England, nor any Article, Clause or Condition thereof, but that the said Heritable Office, with all the Rights and Priviledges thereof, may continue and remain to me and my Successors in­tire and unhurt by any Votes or Acts of Parliament, or other Proceedings what­somever relative to the said Union: And I crave this my Protestation may be admitted and Recorded in the Registers and Rolls of Parliament.

ARMS.

Argent, three Eschutcheons, Gules, supported by two Savages carrying upon their Shoulder, two Oxen, Yoaks, Crest, a Falcon Proper, with this Motto, Serva Jugum.

CHURCH-HILL, Lord Eymouth.

THE first who enjoyed this ho­nourary Title, was John Church­hill Esq Son of Sir Winston Church­hill of Wottonbasset, in the County of Wilts, by . . . . . . his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Drake of the County of Devon, Baronet.

His first step to Advancement in martial Affairs, was the Honour of a Colours in the Royal Foot-Guards, which was procured him by his Royal Highness the Duke of York, while a Youth, rather to humour his forward Inclination that way, than any Advantage to be made by it. He soon after went to France with the Duke of Monmouth, who gave him a Com­pany of his own Regiment, and ser­ved at the Siege of Maestricht, then under the Direction of the present French King. Upon his Return to Eng­land, by a particular Character of his Bravery and Conduct from the Duke of Monmouth, he was made Lieu­tenant-Colonel to Sir Thomas Little­ton Gentleman of the Bed-Chamber, and Master of the Robes to the Duke of York: Not long after which, he was created Lord Church-hill of Ey­mouth in Scotland, by Letters Patent bearing date 21 December 1682a.

King James ascending the Throne, he was immediately made Gentleman of the Bed-Chamber, and Captain of a Troop of his Life-Guard. Also in the first Year of his Reign, 14th of May 1685. he created him a Baron of England, by the Title of Lord Church­hill of Sandridge; But notwithstanding these Honours, upon the Revolu­tion he went over to the Prince of Orange then at Sherburn.

King William was no sooner on the Throne, but he was made Gentle­man of the King's Bed-Chamber; also 9th of April 1689, he was raised to the Honour of Earl of Marlbo­rough. The same Year he commanded the English Forces in Flanders, and was present with Prince Waldeck at the Shock at Walcourt: And Anno 1690, was sent General of the Forces to reduce Cork and Kinsale; which Service he perform'd with great Dis­patch and Conduct.

The next Year, he made the Cam­pagne under King William in Flan­ders, was constituted Governour to the Duke of Gloucester, sworn of his Majesty's Privy-Council, and made one of the Lords Justices; which he serv'd three times successively, in the King's Absence, who, at length, Anno 1701, appointed him General of the Foot, and Commander in Chief of the English Forces in Holland, also Ambassador-Extraordinary, and Pleni­potentiary for the Negotiation at the Hague.

In the first of Queen Anne, he was constituted Captain-General of Her Majesty's Land Forces, both at Home and Abroad, elected Knight of the Garter, and dispatch'd with the Cha­racter of Her Majesty's Ambassador-Extraordinary, and Plenipotentiary to the States of Holland.

Anno 1702, he commanded the Army in Flanders, took Venlo, Rure­mond, Stevenswaert, Liege, &c. and on his Return to England, was made Marquis of Blandford, and Duke of Marlborough.

In the Year 1704, he march'd to the Danube, routed the French and Bavarian Forces at Schellenbergh, and afterwards gave them a total Defeat at Hochstet; was made a Prince of the Sacred Roman Empire; and on his Return to England, had the Honour and Mannour of Woodstock, and Hun­dred of Wooton, voted to him and his Heirs; and next Year settled by Act of Parliament.

[Page 142] In the Year 1705, he march'd to the Moselle, return'd to the Nether­lands, raised the Siege of Liege, and forc'd the French Lines: At the end of which Campagne, he made a Tour to Vienna, where the Empe­ror made him a Grant of the Lord­ship of Mildenheim, in Suabia, former­ly possess'd by Duke Maximilian, Un­cle to the present Duke of Bavaria; from which time, he was distinguish'd throughout the Empire, by the Style and Title of Prince of Mildenheim: And was afterwards invested there­in, and admitted, by his Plenipoten­tiary Mr. Stepney, to sit and vote in the College of Princes.

In the Year 1706, he gave an in­tire Defeat to the French and Bavarian Forces at Ramillies, and gain'd the whole Country of Brabant to the Allies.

In the Year 1708, he (with Prince Eugene of Savoy) defeated the French and Spanish Army at Audenarde, co­ver'd the Siege of Lisle, succour'd Brussels, then besieg'd by the Duke of Bavaria, and re-took Ghent and Bruges.

He married Sarah, Daughter, and at length, one of the Co-Heirs of Richard Jennings of Sandridge, in the County of Hertford, Esq by whom he had four Daughters,

Henrietta eldest Daughter, married to Francis Earl of Godolphin.

Anne, second Daughter, married to Charles Spencer Earl of Sunderland; to whom she is second Wife.

Elisabeth, third Daughter, married to Scroop Egerton Earl of Bridgewater.

Mary, fourth and youngest Daugh­ter, married to John now Duke of Mountague.

ARMS.

Sable, a Lyon Rampant Argent, in a Canton of the Second, the Cross of England.

KING, Lord Eythen.

SIR James King of Birness a in Aberdeen shire, was first train'd up in the Wars of Germany, under Gu­stavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, where he rose gradually, till at last he came to be Lieutenant General; in which Cha­racter he serv'd with the highest Re­putation; afterward upon the break­ing out of the Civil War in England, he repair'd to his Majesty's Service, was constituted General of his Army against the English Parliament, which he ordered with great Wisdom and Dexterity: In Consideration whereof, the King was pleased to create him a Peer of Scotland, by the Title of Lord Eythen b, the 28 March 1642.

OGILVY, Earl of Finlater.

IN the Reign of King Robert II. Sir John Sinclair Knight is pos­sessor of the Barony of Deskford in Banff-shirec. He was succeeded by Ingeram his Son and Heird, as he was by John his Son, who was slain at the Battle of Harlaw, Anno Dom. 1411, leaving Margaret his only Daughter and sole Heir to succeed him in the Barony. In 1437 She was mar­ried to Sir Walter Ogilvy of Achyven, Knight, (a Branch of the Family of Ogilvy,) whereupon he assumed into his Coat of Arms, Argent, a Cross ingrail'd, Sable, which hisPosterity still wear. This Sir Walter, in the 18th of James II. got leave of the King to [Page 143] fortify his Castle of Finlater with an embattled Wall of Lime and Stone, and all other Necessaries for a place of Strengtha. By the said Marga­ret his Wife, he had two Sons,

Sir James Ogilvy of Deskford.

Sir Walter Ogilvy who obtained the Lands and Thanedom of Boyn in the North, by the Marriage of Mar­garet, Daughter and one of the Co­heirs of Sir James Edmonston of that Ilkb. Of this Branch the Ogilvies of Dunlugus and Strathern are sprung. He departed this Life Anno 1456.

Sir James his Son succeeded him; he was made a Knight by King James III. and married Mary Daughter ofc Sir Robert Innes of that Ilk, in Vice­comitatu Moraviae: By her he had,

Sir James, succeeded in the Fortune.

Walter Ogilvy of Glashaugh.

Alexander killed at Flowdoun d.

George a Church-man: Also several Daughters,

Margaret, married to James Aber­cromby of Birkenbog.

Marion, to Patrick Gordon of Haddo, Ancestor to the present Earl of Aber­deen e.

Catherine, to William Crawfurd of Federat, in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen.

Elisabeth, to John Grant of Freuchie.

Mary to Alexander Urquhart Sheriff of Cromarty.

Which Sir James Ogilvy of Desk­ford married Agnes, Daughter of George Earl of Huntly f, by whom he had,

1. Alexander his Successor,

2. James.

3. Patrick.

4. George.

5. Elisabeth, married to Sir James Dunbar of West-field g Sheriff of Murray.

Alexander Ogilvy of Deskford his Son, got from King James V. a Char­ter erecting his Lands of Deskford, Finlater, Cathmore, the Forrest of Glensudech, the third part of the Lands of Inernach, Achinstank, Buch­haw, with the Fishing on the River of Dovern, the Lands of Sandlacht, Castle-field, the Constabulary of Cullen and Achendorn in Banff-shire, the one half of the Lands of Balhall, and the fourth Part of Manmure in Forfar-shire, into one intire Barony in all time coming, to be called the Barony of Ogilvy, of the date 22d of May 1527h. This Alexander Ogilvy of that Ilk, (for so he's after this designed) took to Wife first Jean Abernethy, Daughter of Alexander Lord Saltoun, by whom he had James Ogilvy of Cardal, his only Son. His second Wife was Elisabeth Gordon, a Lady of the Family of Huntly i, by whom he had a Daughter Margaret married to John Gordon Son of Alexander Earl of Huntly. This Laird of Finlater, and Ogilvy, by the Influence and evil Coun­sel of his Wife, was prevailed upon to disinherit his Son, and to settle the most part of his Fortune on John Gordon his Son-in-law, upon Condi [...]on he should change his Name to Ogilvy, and he and his Heirs in all time coming, wear his Coat of Arms: Accordingly the said John Gordon succeeded into the Estate of Finlater, and kept Possession thereof till the 1562, it came to be forfaulted for his being present in the Fight of Corr [...]chie, whereupon James Ogilvy of Cardal, Son and Heir of the said Alexander Ogilvy of that Ilk, represents to Queen Mary, how far he had been wronged by his Father's unjust Act, and there­fore Her Majesty was graciously [Page 144] pleased to restore him to the Estate of Finlater by way of Justice, in the 1564a. When the Civil War broke out in that Reign, he was not so ungrate as to forget the good Offices the Queen had done him, but most loyally adhered to her Interest, and was one of the Barons who en­tred into an Association to stand by her against her rebellious Subjects (as they call them) who had deprived her of her Authority, and would to the outmost of their Power, endeavour her Restauration, bearing date, 8th of May 1568. He married . . . . . . Gordon, Daughter of . . . . . Gordon of Lochenvar b, by whom he had a Son Alexander, who died before him, leaving Issue by Barbara his Wife, Daughter of Sir Walter Ogilvy of Boyn c, a Son,

Walter, who succeeded his Grand­father; he was first knighted by King James VI. before the Institution of the Honour of Baronet: And being a Baron of an ample Fortune, he was by the special Bounty of the said King, raised to the Peerage of this Realm, by the Title of Lord Ogilvy of [...]ford, by Letters patent, bear­ing date 4th of October 1616d.

He married first Jean, Daughter of Robert Lord Elphinston, by whom he had only one Daughter Christian, who was married to Sir Alexander Forbes, afterward created Lord Pitsligo.

His second Wife was Marion, Daugh­ter of William Earl of Morton, by whom he had James his Son and Heir, and two Daughters,

1. Jean, married to James Douglass Earl of Buchan, and afterward to An­drew Lord Gray.

2. Margaret, married to Sir John Grant of that Ilk, in Vicecomitatu de Murray, and had Issue.

Which James Lord Deskford, was by K. Charles I. advanced to the Ho­nour of Earl of Finlater, by Letters patent, bearing date the 20th of Fe­bruary 1638e, and to the Heirs Male of his Body for ever.

He married Elisabeth, Daughter to the Earl of Rothes, by whom he had two Daughters.

Mary Countess of Finlater.

Anne, Wife of William Earl of Glencairn.

This Earl having no Male Issue of his Body, he procured from King Charles I. on the behalf of his Daugh­ter, and her Descendants certain Let­ters Patent, whereby the Dignity and Title of Earl of Finlater was conferred upon her and Patrick Ogilvy of Inch­martin her Husband. This Patrick Earl of Finlater, in the time of the Civil War, suffered much both in his Person and Fortune, for his firm and loyal Adherence to King Charles II. Departing this frail Life, the 30th of March Anno Dom. 1658f. he left Issue by the aforesaid Elisabeth Coun­tess of Finlater his Wife,

James his Son and Heir, who married Anne only Daughter of Hugh Earl of Eglinton, by Anne his Wife, Daughter of James Marquis of Hamil­ton, by whom he had,

1. James the present Earl.

2. Colonel Patrick Ogilvy of Lon­may, who married Elisabeth Daugh­ter of Mr. Francis Montgomery of Gif­fen, and has Issue.

3. Anne, married to George Allar­dice of that Ilk, and had Issue. This Earl dying Anno 1711, his Estate and Honour devolved on

James the present Earl of Finlater and Seafield, his Son, whose personal Endowments were the principal Cause of the great Honour and Preferments he has attained to, both in this and the former Reign.

In his Youth having accomplish­ed himself by Travels into foreign [Page 145] Countries, he studied the Civil Law: After his Return to his native Country, he was admitted Advocate 16th of January 1685, in which honourable Pro­fession he made a very considerable Figure, tho there's nothing memo­rable concerning him, till the Meet­ing of the Convention in March 1689, (where he had the Honour to serve as a Member for the Burgh of Cullen) wherein his Abilities began to be very soon taken notice of, and he was imployed in several Committees to examine and give the Opinion to the Meeting concerning diverse Grie­vances. In the Debates about King James's Forfaulture, he argued learned­ly in favours of that unfortunate Monarch. In the 4th of King Wil­liam and Queen Mary, he was consti­tuted Solicitor; and after that, in 1696, appointed conjunct Secretary of State with John then Earl of Tilli­ardin. He being then only a Knight, his Majesty was pleased to confer upon him the Title of Viscount of Seafield, by Letters Patent bearing Date 28th of June 1698; and thereafter by other Letters Patent of the Date 24th June 1701, to create him Earl of Sea­field.

Upon Queen Anne's coming to the Throne, Anno 1702, he was consti­tuted conjunct Secretary of State with the Duk of Queensberry; but the same Year, upon a Change of the Ministry, he was removed from the Secretary's Imployment, & constitut­ed Lord High Chancellour of Scotland; from which Office he was removed, & in 1704 made a third time conjunct Secretary of State; but the next Year 1705 he was restored to be Chancel­lour, and therein continued till the commencing of the Union, the 1st of May 1707. Then his Lordship was named Lord chief Baron of the Ex­chequer, which he again was pleased to resign, Mr. Smith being put in his Room. All which, and several other high Trusts his Lordship still discharged with great Learning and Sufficiency. Also in 1712, he was elected one of the sixteen Peers of Scotland to the Parliament of Great-Britain, by a Vacancy, through the Demise of William Earl Marshall.

He married Anne Daughter of Sir William Dunbar of Durn, Baronet, by whom he has,

1. James Lord Deskford.

2. Mr. George Ogilvy.

3. Anne, married to Charles Earl of Lauderdale, and has Issue.

4. Janet.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th Argent, a Lyon passant guardant, Gules, crown'd, Or; 2d and 3d Argent, a Cross ingrail'd, Sable, supported by two Lyons rampant, Crest, a Lyon rampant, all Gules, holding a Plumb Line betwixt his Feet, Motto, Tout Jour.

FORBES, Lord Forbes.

THAT which will sufficiently at­test the Antiquity of this nu­merous and far spreading Family, is a Grant by King Alexander II. to Fergus the Son of John, of the Lands and Tenement of Forbes in Aberdeen-shirea, whence the Sirname has been originally assumed. The first conspicuous Person of this Line, was Alexander Forbes, who resolutely de­fended his Castle of Urquhart in Mur­ray, against Edward I. of England b, Anno 1303, upon the storming of which, he and the whole Garrison were put to the Sword: By this [Page 146] fatal Stroak his Family would have perished, had not his Wife preserved it by the Birth of a postumous Son, Alexander, who obtained from Robert Bruce certain Lands in Compensation for what his Father had lost in his, and his Countrys Quarrel. This Alex­ander treading in the Steps of his gal­lant Father, loyally adhered to the better Title of David Bruce, against Edward Baliol, who invaded this Kingdom, and called himself King of this Realm, and by the Assistance of the English routed the loyal Scots Army at the Battle of Duplin, Anno 1332, where many brave Scots-men fell, and among others this Sir Alex­ander Forbes, leaving, says my Au­thora, no Issue but a postumous Child, this Family having the paral­lel Fate with the Family of the Fabii in Rome, of whom 'tis said,

Ʋna dies Fabios ad bellum miserat amnes,
Ad bellum missos perdidit una dies.

Sir John Forbes of that Ilk, the next of the Family, lived in the Time of King Robert II. and seems to be the Son of the former Alexander, who acquired from Thomas Earl of Mar, seve­ral Lands in Aberdeen shire, which the aforesaid King, in the 3d of his Reign, ratified by his Charter under the great Seal. Likeas, he obtained from Alex­ander Bishop of Murray, pro fideli & utili servitio suo & assistentia personali in nostris agendis totam terram nostram de Fyntr [...]ffie 19 of July 1378b. In the 5th of King Robert III. he was con­stituted his Majesty's Justitiary within the bounds of Aberdeen and Coroner of the said County. His Wife was Elisabeth Kennedy, a Daughter of the Family of Dunure in the West, by whom he had three Sons, viz.

Sir Alexander Forbes his Successor.

Sir William Forbes Knight, An­cestor to the Lord Pitsligo.

Sir John, who obtained the Thane­dom of Formartin, by the Marriage of Marjory Daughter and Heir of Sir Henry Preston of Formartin Knight, whereupon he added to his paternal Coat of Arms the three Unicorns Heads, which is still born by his Descendents He was the Founder of the Family of Tolquhon, of whom branched the Forbesses of Foveran, Watertoun, Colloden, &c. and their se­veral Cadets.

Which Alexander obtained the Ho­nour of Knighthood before the 1424. He had a Grant to himself and Elisa­beth Douglass his Wife, and to their Heirs, from John Earl of Buchan, of the Lands of Mikle Fintry, Blacktoun, and Balcross, by his Charter 10th De­cember 1423c. He departed this Life in, or near to the Year 1444, leaving Issue by the said Elisabeth his Wife, James his Successor, and a Daughter Annabella, married to Sir Patrick Gray of Fowlis, Ancestor to the Lord Gray d.

This James was Knighted by King James III. and was the first of his Fa­mily who in that Reign came to be called Lord Forbes He married Egidia Daughter of William Earl Marshal e, by whom he had William, and Pa­trick, first of the Branch of Corse, (which produced the Earl of Granards Family in Ireland, and Forbes of Craigievar in Aberdeen shire, Baronet) and a Daughter married to Malcolm Forbes of Tolquhon e.

Which William made a consider­able Figure in the Reign of King James III. He married Christian, Daughter of Alexander Earl of Hunt­ly f, by whom he had four Sons, Alexander, Arthur, and John, all three successively Lords, 4th. Duncan Au­thor [Page 147] of the Branch of Cor [...]indae, of whom issued the Forbesses of Monymusk, Kilmuck, Lesly, &c.

Which Alexander adhered to King James III. and upon his Death in 1488, he rose in Arms in order to bring them to condign Punishment, who had imbrew'd their Hands in the Blood of the Kinga, but after­ward submitting to King James IV. he departed this Life not long after, leaving no Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter to Thomas Boyd Earl of Aran, so that his Estate and Honour sell to Arthur his Brother, who likewise dying without Issue, his Brother John became his Heir, His Lordship married,

Catherine, Daughter of John Earl of Athole, by whom he had a Daughter Elisabeth, married to Grant of that Ilkb.

His second Wife was Christian Daughter of Sir John Lundy of that Ilkc, by whom he had two Sons,

John Master of Forbes, who died in Edinburgh, 17th July 1537d.

William, who succeeded in the Ho­nour: And three Daughters,

1. Margaret, married to Andrew Fraser of Muchill, in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen, Ancestor to the Lord Fra­ser e.

2. Elisabeth, to Gilbert Keith of Troup. 2dly. To Alexander Innes of that Ilkf.

3. Marjory, to Gilbert Forbes of Brux g.

He married 3dly. Elisabeth Barlow Widow of Alexander Lord Elphinston, by whom he had a Son Arthur Forbes of Putuchie h, in Aberdeen shire, and a Daughter Janet, married first to John Earl of Athole. 2dly to Alex­ander Hay of Dalgety, and again to William Lesly of Balquhain, and had Issuei. He departed this Life Anno Dem. 1547, and was succeded by

William his Son, who was consti­tuted one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber to King James V.k Anno 1539, and always enjoyed his Favour. He married Elisabeth Daugh­ter and Co-heir (with her Sister Mar­garet, Countess Marshal) of Sir William Keith of Inneruggie l, by whom he had,

1. John his Successor.

2. William Forbes of Foderhouse m, in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen.

3. James Forbes of Lethinty.

4. Robert Prior of Monymusk, in Aberdeen-shire, formerly a Cell to the Priory of St. Andrews.

5. Arthur Forbes of Logie.

6. Abraham Forbes of Blacktoun.

1st. Daughter Jean, married to James Lord Ogilvy.

2. Elisabeth to the Lord Sinclair.

3. Christian, to George Johnston of Caskieben, and had Issue.

4. Isabel, to John Gordon of Pitlurg, and had Issue.

5. . . . . . to Barclay of Gairtly in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen.

6. Margaret, to George Sinclair of May n, Son to George Earl of Caitness.

7. Barbara, to Alexander Allardice of that Ilk.

8. Anne, to Sir John Seton of Barus, Son of George Lord Seton, and had Issue. He dying Anno 1593, was succeeded by,

John Lord Forbes his Son, who mar­ried first Margaret, Daughter of Alex­ander Earl of Huntly, by whom he had a Son John, who entred into a religious Order abroad, and died without Succession. 2dly. Janet, Daughter of James Seton of Touch, by whom he had,

Arthur his Successor in his Estate and Honour, who married Jean Daughter of Alexander Lord Elphin­ston, by whom he had a Son William, [Page 148] and a Daughter Barbara, married to George Earl of Seaforth, and had Issue.

Which Alexander affecting a Military Life, went over to Germany, and entred into the Service of the renowned Gustavus Adolphus King of Sweden, against the Imperialists, where he attained to the Degree of a Lieu­tenant General, and acquired the Reputation of an excellent Officer. Upon the breaking out of the Civil War in Britain, he returned to his Native Country, and had a considerable Command in the Army that was sent from Scotland to Ireland, Anno 1643, to suppress the Irish Rebellion. Afterward retiring from the violence of these Times, he returned to Germany, where he spent the Remainder of his Days.

His first Wife was Anne, Daughter of Sir John Forbes of Pitsligo, by whom he had William his Successor. His second Marriage was with Mary Daughter of . . . . . . . . Forbes of Riress by whom he had Colonel James Forbes, Mary, married to . . . . . Rose of Kilravock, and . . . . to . . . . Forbes of Balflug.

Which William married Jean Daughter of John Campbel of Calder, by whom he had William his Son and Heir, Arthur Forbes of Breda, Archibald Forbes of Putachie, and two Daughters.

1. Mary, married to James Lord Duffu [...], sans Issue. 2dly. To Sir Robert Gordon of Gordonstoun, and had Issue.

2. . . . . . . to John Leith of White haugh, in Vicecomitatu de Aberdeen, and had Issue.

He departing this Life Anno 1691, was succeeded by William his Son. This Lord was one of the first of the S [...]ts Nobility who declared for King William, for which, upon his Acces­sion to the Crown, he was named a Privy Counsellour, 1st of May 1689, and constituted Captain of a Troop of Horse, then a Lieutenant Colonel of Dragoons and not long after made Colonel of a Regiment of Dragoons and since the Accession of her Ma­jesty to the Throne, he was Lieu­tenant Colonel to the Horse-Guards commanded by his Grace John Duke of Argyle. His Lordship married Anne Daughter of James Brody of that Ilk, in Vicecomitatu de Elgin, by whom he has,

William Master of Forbes.

James Forbes Esq who married Mary Daughter to Alexander Lord Pitsligo, Also a Daughter Mary.

ARMS.

Azure, three Bears Heads. Coupé, Argent, muzl'd, Gules, supported by two Boars Proper, Crest, a Stag's Head eraz'd, Argent, Motto, Grace me guide.

FORRESTER, Lord Forrester.

THIS Sirname has been assumed from an Office, as Stewart, Durward, Constable, and others were, which their bearing, viz. three hun­ting Horns, seems to confirm. The principal Family appears to be this of Forrester, whose Ancestor Sir Adam Forrester, Citizen of Edinburgh in the 6th of Robert II. acquired the Barony of Corstorphin, from Sir VVilliam More of Abercorn a, whence his Successors took their Designation. Upon the Accession of King Ro­bert III. to the Throne, Anno 1390, he was constituted Lord Privy-Seal [Page 149] a. In the 2d of the said King, he was commissioned to treat with cer­tain English Commissioners for main­taining the Peace betwixt the two Realmsb. Likeas in 1405, he was a second time one of the Com­missioners authorized to treat with the English, about composing of cer­tain Differences betwixt the two Kingdomsc. By Margaret his Wife he had Issue,

Sir John his Son and Heir, who be­ing a Man of good Parts, was Anno 1421 named Lord Privy Seal to Mur­dach Duke of Albany Governour of Scotland d, and in 1423 he was with VVilliam Bishop of Glasgow, George Earl of March, John Montgomery of Ardrossan, Patrick Dunbar of Beill, and VVilliam Borthwick of that Ilk, sent Commissioners to England to Treat with that State, about the Re­demption of King James I.e. Up­on that King's Return home, Anno 1424, he was constituted Master of the Housholdf, and Lord high Chamberlain of Scotland g. After which, in 1428 he was named a Com­missioner with divers others, to treat with the English about a Peace. Thus much for his Civil Actions. His Works of Piety were these, The foun­ding a Chaplaniry at the Altar of St. Ninian, within the Church of St. Giles of Eidnburgh, Pro salubri statu serenissimi Principis Jacobi I. & Joannae sponsae s [...]ae; & pro salute animae quon­dam Adae Forrester de Corstorphin, Mili­tis, Patris mei & Margaretae matris meae to which he mortified sex libras tre­decem solidos & quatuor denarios de tenemento suo in dicto Burgo h. Like­as, he doted a sufficient Subsistence for three Chaplainries in the Chapel of St. John the Baptist, contiguous to the Paroch Church of Corstorphin, founded by Sir Adam Forrester his Fa­theri which in the 1429, he erect­ed into a Collegiate Church, and pro­cured the Annexation of several Lands and Tithes thereunto. He married Jean, Sister to Henry Sinclair Earl of Orkney k; and departing this Life about the 1440, was inter'd in the Church of Corstorphin, under an Arch, with the Portraiture of himself and his Wife, as big as the Life in free Stone, without any monumental Inscription but a Coat of Arms, he had Issue,

1. Sir John his Successor.

2. Henry Forrester of Oxgang.

3. Jean, married to Sir Robert Max­wel of Carlaverock l, Ancestor to the Earl of Nithsdale.

4. Elisabeth, to Sir Alexander Lau­der Knightm.

Which Sir John obtained a Grant from King James I. of the Lands of Blackburn in Linlithgow shire, upon the Resignation of Sir Robert Cuning­ham of Kilmaures, Anno 1424, where­in he's designed filio & heredi appa­renti Joannis Forrester de Corstorphin Militis Camerarii Scotiae. He was suc­ceeded by

Archibald Forrester of Corstorphin, who by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of . . . . . . . Hepburn of . . . . . . hadn Alexander his Son and Heir, in whose Favours he resigned his Estate Anno 1482, reserving a Liferent to himself. He had to Wife Margaret, Daughter of Sir Duncan Forrester of Gairden, Master of the Houshold, in the Reign of King James IV.o, by whom he had Alexander Forrester of Corstorphin, his Son and Heir, who married Janet Daughter to . . . . Lauder of Hatton p, by whom he had Sir James his Son, who succeeded him; [Page 150] but he dying without Male Issue, Anno 1587a, his Estate fell to Henry his Brother, who marrying Helen Daugh­ter of . . . . Preston of Craigmillar, in Vicecomitatu de Edinburgh b, by her he had,

George his Son and Heir, who was first created Baronet by King Charles I. 27th November 1625, and thereafter Lord Forrester, 22 July 1633c. He married Christian, Daughter of Sir William Livingston of Kilsyth, by whom he had several Daughters, viz. Helen married to VVilliam Lord Ross, Margaret to John Shaw of Sornbeg, . . . . . . . to Hamilton of Grange, Jean, to James Baillie of Torwood-head, Son of Lieutenant-General VVilliam Bail­lie, in whose Favours my Lord For­rester resigned the Honour, and to the Heirs of their Body, which fail­ing to his other Heirs therein specified, which was ratified by King Charles II. Anno 1651, but he hav­ing no Issue by her, the Honour by vertue of the said Entail, came to VVilliam Baillie, alias Forrester of Torwoodhead, his Brother, who mar­ried also Lilias the youngest Daugh­ter of George Lord Forrester, by whom he had VVilliam Lord Forrester, who departed this Life, Anno 1705, leaving Issue by . . . . . . his Wife, Daughter of Sir Andrew Birnie of Saline, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, George the present Lord Forrester.

ASHTOUN, Lord Ashtoun of Forfar.

KING Charles I. was pleased to raise Sir VValter Ashoun an En­glish Gentleman Knight of the Bath, and Baronet, to the Honour of Lord Forfar in this Realm, by Letters Pa­tent bearing date 8th November 1628d whose Successor Walter Lord Ashtoun enjoys the Honour.

DOUGLAS, Earl of Forfar.

WHEN King Charles II. was in Scotland, Anno 1651, his Ma­jesty thought fit upon the 3d of April that Year, to grant a Patent to Arch­bald Lord Angus to be Earl of Ormond, Lord Bothwel and Hartside, and to limit the Honour to his Heirs Male by Lady Jean Weems his Spouse, and upon the Restauration, his said Ma­jesty by a new Patent, bearing Date the 2d of October 1661, created Arch­bald Douglass, the Son of the said Marriage, Earl of Forfar, Lord Wan­dale and Hartside, e.

Upon the Advancement of King William to the Throne, Anno 1689, he was named a Privy Councellour and one of the Commissioners for exe­cuting the Office of Lord Privy-Seal, in which he continued several Years. In the first of Queen Anne, he was again made one of her Majestys Privy Council, and one of the Commission­ers of the Thesaury, in which Sta­tion he continued till the Dissolution of that Court, as one of the Conse­quences of the Union of the two Kingdoms, and departing this Life the 12th of December 1712, left Issue by Rabina his Wife, Daughter of Sir William Lockhart of Lee, Ambassa­dor-extraordinary from King Charles II. to the Court of France, Archbald [Page 151] the present Earl his only Son, a Lieu­tenant Colonel of Dragoons in her Majesty's Army.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th, Argent, a Man's Heart crown'd, Proper, on a chief, Azure, three Stars of the 1st. 2d. and 3d. four Coats quarterly, 1st. Mack­doual. 2d. Abernethy. 3d. Wishart. 4th. Stewart, as born by the Duke of Douglass, supported by a Savage, on the Dexter with a Chain about his Neck pendent to it a crown'd Heart proper; on the Sinister, a Buck colour'd with three Molets. Crest, a Phenix in a Flame, Motto, Extinctus orior, and on the Compartment, Jamais Arrier.

Patrick Ruthven, Earl of Forth,

THIS Gentleman was the Son of William Ruthven of Banden, in the County of Perth, whose De­scent was from the Ancient Barons Ruthven, Men famous many Ages since in Scotland, by William a young­er Son of William 1st. Lord Ruthven a, and Christian his second Wife Daugh­ter to Sir John Forbes of Pitsligo b

Which Patrick, the first and only Earl of Forth, in his Youth much af­fecting Military Exercises, went over to Sweden, where he served in the German Wars under that great Prince and famous Souldier Gustavus Adol phus, then King of Sweden, in which valiant Adventures he deported him­self with such Eminent Courage, that he arrived to the Degree of a Lieu­tenant General, and gain'd so much Honour, that upon his Return, King Charles I. was pleased to raise him to the Dignity of a Lord of this Realm, by the Title of Lord Ruthven of Et­trick, Anno 1639, and the same Yearc made him Governour of Edinburgh-Castle, which he kept for the King's Service, and positively refused to de­liver it to the Parliament without his Majesty's special Order, for which Contumacy (as it was then termed) his Estate was forfaultedd Anno 1640. Upon the commencing of the Civil War in England, in 1642, he freely resorted to the Service of his injur'd Sovereign, who appointed him General of his Army; and by Let­ters Patent, bearing Date the 27th of March 1642e, created him Earl of Forth. In the Battles of Edgehill, Brentford, and Newbery, performing the part of a most Prudent, and experienced General, he was further in Consideration of his eminent Ser­vices, in the 1645, created Earl of Brentford in the Kingdom of England. He died very aged, Anno 1651f, leaving one Daughter Jean his sole Heir, married to James Lord Forrester; so that this Honour became extinct, and was since one of the subsequent Titles of John Earl of Melfore.

Argent, three Bars, Gules.

FRASER, Lord Fraser.

ANdrew Fraser of Muchill, in Vice­comitatu de Aberdeen, Son and Heir of Andrew Fraser of Muchill, by [Page 152] Elisabeth his Wife, Daughter of Ro­bert Douglass Earl of Buchan, was the first honoured with this Title by King Charles I. 19th June 1633a. His Wife was Anne Daughter of James Lord Balmerin [...], and dying 10th No­vember 1636b,

Andrew his Son succeeded into his Estate and Honour: He married Anne Daughter of . . . . . Hadden of Gleneagles c, by whom he had,

Andrew is Successor, who departing this Life 24 May 1674d, left Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Hugh Lord L [...]vat, a Son

Charles Lord Fraser, who married Mary Daughter of James Earl of Bu­chan, but had no Issue.

ARMS.

Argent, three Frazes, Argent.

CARY, Viscount of Falkland.

SIR Henry Cary Knight, Son and Heir of Sir Edward Cary of Al­denham, an English-man, Comptrol­ler of the Houshold, and one of the Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber to King James VI. was by his Majesty's special Favour created a Peer of Scot­land, by the Title of Viscount Falk­land, 10th November 1620e. After­ward, he was constituted Lieutenant of Ireland; in which Government he behaved himself with much Prudence, and dying Anno 1633f, by Elisa­beth his Wife, Daughter of Sir Lau­rence Taunfield Lord chief Baron of the Exchequer, he had a Son Lucius and a Daughter, Ann married to James Earl of Hume.

Which Lucius Lord Viscount Falk­land, was a Person singularly well accomplished with Learning, and o­ther excellent Parts: He was chosen Member to the Parliament, Anno 1641g for the Burgh of Newport, in the County of Southampton, where he merited so well of the King, that he was worthily advanced to be one of the Principal Secretary's of State, upon the removal of Sir Henry Vane, which Office he executed with great Applause. Shortly after which, out of his great Zeal to his Majesty's Service, venturing himself in the Battle of New­berry, 20th September 1643, he there lost his Life in his 34 Year. His intimate Friend, no less a Man than the Earl of Clarendon, in his History of the Rebellion, characterizes him thus, That he was a Person of such pro­digious Parts, of Learning and Know­ledge, of that inimitable Sweetness and Delight in Conversation, of so flowing and obliging a Humanity and Goodness to Mankind, and of that primitive Sim­plicity and Integrity of Life, that if there were no other brand upon this odious and accursed Civil War, than that one single loss, it must be most in­famous to all Posterity.

He was married with Letice Daugh­ter of Richard Morison of Tolay-Park, in the County of Leicester Esq h, by whom he had Henry his Son and Heir, a Person of the highest Ac­complishments, excellently vers'd in Learning and good Letters; and not only a great incourager of Poetry, but a principal Ornament of it him­selfi. He wrote a Play called, The Marriage Night, very well esteem'd. His Lordship was elected to serve in [Page 153] the House of Commons upon the Restauration, and was constituted Lord Leiutenant of Oxford-shire, he was out off in the prime of his Years, Anno 1664a, as much missed (says one) when Dead, as lov'd when Living.

Anthony Viscount of Falkland his Sonb, was sworn of the Privy Council 17th of March 1691, serving then a Burgess in Parliament; and 3d of March 1692, appointed one of the Lords Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord high Admiral of England c, he made his Exit out of this to another World, in 1694, and was succeeded in his Estate and Ho­nour by

Edward the present Lord Viscount of Falkland.

ARMS.

Argent, on a bend Sable, three Cinque Foils of the first, the paternal Coat of Cary, supported on the Dexter with a Lyon rampant, Gules, colour'd Or, on the Sinister by a Unicorn, Ar­gent, Motto, In utroque fidelis.

MACKDUFF, Thane, afterward Earl of Fyfe.

A Thane in Ancient Times, is thought by the learned Spel­man and Selden, to have been the King's principal Minister in a Pro­vince, no doubt invested with a Power of Administration of Justice, to which certain honourary Priviledges were annexed. 'Tis thought it was not at the first Institution, properly a Title of Dignity, but of Service. They were of two kinds, either such as served the King in greater Places of Emi­nency, who were called Thani Ma­jores, or Thani Regis, as the Thanes of Fife, Caithness, Argyle, and Murray were, these that served under them were termed Thani Minores: But when the Title of Comes and Dux be­came Hereditary (so the Learned are of Opinion) the Title and Privi­leges of Thani Majores did descend with the Lands from Fathers to their Children, tho the lesser did not, yet they still retained the old Name of Thanes and Thanedoms, as the Ba­ronies of Boyn in Ba [...]ff shire and Cal­der in Murray, &c. are called to this Time: And perhaps the Difference betwixt the two consisted in this, That the greater Thanes derived their Power and Authority immediately from the King, and held them of the Crown in capite, for Knights Service, which by a certain Constitution made them Hereditary, and were of the same kind with them that after­ward came to be Parliamentary Ba­rons. The lesser Thanes, had only Commissions from them, and were held in the ordinary way for Services done, and to be done. All our Hi­stories do agree, that Mackduff, former­ly Thane, was created Earl of Fyfe, by King Malcolme Canmore, Anno 1057d, and that in Consideration of his ex­traordinary Services to that Prince, in assisting him to revenge his Fa­ther's Death upon Mackbeth, and to recover his Crown, for which he gave him and his Heirs these great and noble Privileges,

I. That his Posterity should have the Honour to place the succeeding Kings in the Chair of State, at their Coronations.

II. That they should lead the Van of the Royal Armies.

[Page 154] III. That, if any within the 9th. Degree in Relation to his Family, should be guilty of the unpremeditat­ed Slaughter or casual Homicide of a Gentleman, he should pay twenty four Merks of Silver, and but twelve if a Plebeian, for Expiation of the Crime; flying to a Sanctuary near Newburgh in Fyfe, on the Confines of Strathern: Which was much the same Privilege granted to Mackduff's Kin­dred, as the Cities of Refuge were to the Isralites, Joshua 20. At the Place of Girth, there was an high Cross erected, containing an Inscription of old Macaronick Verses, a Mixture of Latin, Saxon, Danish, and old French Words, to this Purpose,

Maldraradum dragos, Mairia, laghstita, Larges,
Spaland [...] spados, five nig fig knighthite gnares
Lothea lendiscos laricingen lairia lisc [...]
Et Colovurtes sic fit tibi bursia burtus
Exitus, & bladadrum five lim five lam five la­brum
Propter Magridin & hoc oblatum
Accipe s [...]eleridem super limthide lamthida la­brum.

This last Privilege was observed as long as the Family existed, and was claimed and enjoyed by severals with­in the Degree of Consanguinity to the Earls of Fife afterward. The learned Skeen, in his Verborum Significatione, re­marks, that Spence of W [...]rmistoun enjoy­ed this Benefit for the Slaughter of one Kinninmonth: Sir George Mackenzie mentions another, whereby Sir Hugh Abernethy was assoilzied for the Slaughter of John Melvil of Glenbervy: and I have seen an Instrument in the Year of God 1397, wherein Sir Alexan­der Murray of Abercarny did plead the Privileges of Clan Mackduff, for the Slaughter of one John Spalding, as standing in the ninth degree of Kin to the Earl of Fyfe.

To Mackduff Earl of Fyfe, succeed­ed Duffgan Comes, his Son, who is one of the Comites assenting to the Char­ter of Alexander I. to the Trinity-Church at Scoon a, He left a Son Constantine b Earl of Fyfe, who is one of the many Witnesses to King David's Charter to the Monastery of Dunfermling, Anno Dom. 1126. The next Earl to Constantine, was Gille­michel, who is Witness in the Foun­dation Charter of the Abby of Holy­rood-house, and dying 1139c, he was succeeded by Earl Duncan his Son, who is a frequent Witness in Charters by King David to religious Persons and Places; and dying 1154d, Duncan his Son was his Successor: He was Justiciary of Scotland in the time of King William, and a constant Witness in Donations by him to the Church, to which he also himself was a liberal Benefactor: For besides, his erecting the Nunnery of North-berwick; He gave many Donations to Church­men, which was then believed to be the most compendious way to save the Soul. He gave way to Fate in 1203e leaving Malcolm his Son to inherit his Estate and Honour, who in the 1217 founded, and richly indowed the Abbacy of Culross in Perth-shire, in Honour of St. Servan the Confessorf; and departing this Life Anno Christi 1230g, his Estate devolved to Malcolm his Nephewh, who was Father of Colban Earl of Fyfe who died in 1270i leaving Duncan his Son to succeed him. This Earl of Fyfe was elected on of the six Guardians of Scotland, upon the decease of Alex­ander III. in the 1286, and died be­fore the Accession of John Baliol to the Crown. Duncan Earl of Fyfe his Successor, was slain in the Service of his Country at the Battle of Falkirk, Anno 1298k; and to him succeeded Duncan his Son, who was killed at the Battle of Durham, Anno 1346; the Honour and Privileges of the Fa­mily devolving to Isabel his Daughter, who brought the Honour first to Sir William Ramsay Knight, her Husband, and afterwards to Sir Thomas Bisset, [Page 155] but she having no Issue of her Body, resigned the Honour to Robert Earl of Montieth, her Brother-in-law, after­ward Duke of Albany. And so this noble Family was extinguished.

ARMS.

Or, a Lyon Rampant, Gules.

Lord of Galloway.

THE first intituled Lord from this Country, was Fergus de Galweya, who flourished under King Malcolm III. He founded the Mona­stery of Saul-seat, and the Priory of Whitern a for Monks of the Order of Premontre, and was a Benefactor to the Abby of Holy-rood-house, by his Gift of the Village of Dundrenan b, in pure and perpetual Alms: After which he took upon him the Habit of a Monk in that Monastery, Anno 1160. He left two Sons, Uchtred Lord of Galloway, and Gilbert, who fraudulently seized upon his elder Brother, made him his Prisoner, ema sculated him, pulled out his Eyes, and then put him to Death: But upon the Death of this Gilbert, Anno Christi 1185c. Rolland Son of Uch­tred his Brother, recovered the Lord­ship of Galloway, and encreased the Wealth and Honour of his Family by the Marriage of Elisabeth Daugh­ter, and at length sole Heir to Richard Morvil d Constable of Scotland, whereby that Dignity was transfer­red to his Race. By Elisabeth his Wife He had two Sons and a Daughter, viz.

Alan Lord of Galloway.

Thomas de Galloway Earl of Athole.

Ada, Wife of Sir Walter Bisset e.

Which Alan was a great Bene­factor to the Church; for besides that he founded the Abbacy of T [...]ng­land f, He ratified to the Monks of Melross g, Annuum redditum quem habere solebant de Galweya temporibus Predecessoris mei, pro animabus Rollandi patris mei, & Uchtredi avi mei. This Man married Margaret eldest Daugh­ter of David Earl of Huntington, Brother to King William the Lyon, by whom he had three Daughters his Co-heirs.

1. Helen, married to Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester in England, but had no Succession.

2. Christian, to William de Fortibus Earl of Albemarle sans Issue.

3. Dornagilla to John Baliol Knight, who convoyed the Right to the Crown of Scotland to her Son.

This Alan dying Anno Dom. 1233h, was interr'd in the Abby Church of Dundrenan i before the high Altar, and had this Monkish Epitaph,

M. semel & bis C si jungas X ter & I ter,
Hoc anno subiit mortis Alanus iter.
Gloria Scotorum, rosa Cleri, flos laicorum,
Dandi larga manus, jacet hic venerandus Alanus.
Tot bona qui deder at vix fuit, est vel erit.
O tu qui legere vel qui cupis ista videre,
Disce bona facere, sic mortuus non moriere.
Qui legis haec metra, quae continet haec mea petra,
Ores ut petra Christus me ponat in aethra.

Alan thus dying without Male Issue, the Lordship of Galloway fell to the share of Dornagilla his second Daughter, Wife of John de Baliol, Signeur de Castubernard. He founded Baliol College in the University of Oxford k, and with Consent of Dernogilla his Wife, released to the Bishop of Glasgow all Right he had to the Church of Edilstoun, which had been long in dispute between his An­cestors and the Chapter of that Seel, departing this Life Anno 1269m, was interr'd at New-Abbay in Galloway, founded by his Wife in Ho­nour [Page 156] of the Place of his Sepulture, of which Mr. Winton informs us thus,

When Baliol that was her Lord
Spousit, as ye hard record,
H [...]s Sau [...] send till his Creatoure
Or he w [...]s laid in Sepulture
She gart opyne his Body tyte,
And gart take his Hart out quite,
With Spicery right well savorand,
And of kind well fleworand,
That ilk Heart, as men said,
She balm [...] and gart be laid
In a Coffore of Ebore
That she gart be maid thairfore,
Enamylit and perfectly dight
Locket and bunden with Silver bright,
She foundit intil Galoway
Of Cistertians order an Abby,
Dulce Cor she gart thame all
That is Sweet Heart that Abby call,
But now the Men of Galloway
Call that Steid New-Abby.

He left Issue by the said Dornagilla his Wife, John his Son and Heir, and a Daughter married to John Cummin Lord of Badenoch.

Which John, upon the decease of Margaret Queen of Scotland, Anno 1290, competed with Robert Bruce for the Crown of this Realm.

However, both of them at length unanimously resolved to refer the Matter to the Arbitration of Edward King of England, who deter­mined in Favours of this John Baliol, who accordingly was placed on the Throne 29th of November 1292a, by the Name of John I. the Lord­ship of Galloway and the Constabulary of Scotland being thereby involved in the regal Dignity; and so continued [...]ll Robert I. meritonously bestowed the Lordship of Galloway upon Sir Ed­ward Bruce his own Brother, after­ward Earl of Carrick and King of Ire­land, Anno 1313b, by whose Death it again returned to the Crown, and so continued till that victorious Mo­narch erected it to Sir Archibald Douglass, Knight, who being an active Person, served King David Bruce with great Fidelity against the Baliol, whom he totally routed at Annand, Anno 1332, after which he was chosen Governour of Scotland; and fighting gallantly in the Battle of Halydonhill, was there slain in the Defence of his Country, 22 July 1333, leaving Issue by . . . . . . . his Wife Daughter of John Cumin Lord Badenoch, William Lord of Galloway, afterward Earl of Douglass.

STEUART, Earl of Galloway.

THIS collateral Branch of the illustrious Family of Steuart, sprang from Sir Walter Stewart Knightc, who had by the bounty of King Robert Bruce, a Grant of the Barony of Dalswinton, in reward of his good and faithful Services to that glorious Monarchd, not long after his Accession to the Crown. Likeas he had a Charter from his Nephewe John Randolph Earl of Murray, of the Lands and Barony of Garlies, then in Drumfries-shire, but now in the Stewartry of Kircudbrught, without Date, a Thing usual enough in these Days. The next of the Family was,

[Page 157] John Stewart of Dalswinton, who seems to have been a very consider­able Person, both on the account of his Birth, and the many Lands he held in diverse Counties, since we find by the Transactions with the English in the Foedera published by Mr. Rymer, that this John was given one of the Hostages for the Ransom of King David Bruce in the 1357. After him (and apparently his Son) was,

Sir Walter Stewart Lord of Dal­swinton, who lived in the Time of Robert II. & III. He having no Male Issue of his Body, in the 1396 married his only Daughtera to John Stewart Esq Son and Heir of Sir William Stewart Sheriff of Teviotdale b. They with Consent and Assent of each other, in the 1418c, give to Sir John Stewart Lord Grytoun, the Barony of Callie, in comitatu Gallovidioe, which is all I have found memorable concerning him, save that he left a Son,

Sir William Stewart of Dalswinton, who made a considerable Figure in the Reign of King James II. by whom he was made a Knight, sometime be­fore the 1453d. He had Issue three Sons, Alexander his Successor, Sir Thomas Stewart of Minto Knight, An­cestor to the present Lord Blantyre e, Walter, of whom camef the Stew­arts of Tongrie.

Which Alexander Stewart of Garlies obtain'd a Grant of the Barony of Dalswinton, upon the Resignation of Sir William his Father, 13 January 1453g, and in the 1465, he resigns sundry Lands in Teviotdale in favours of Alexander Scot of Howpaslet. By Elisa­beth Stewart his Wife, he had Issue John his eldest Son, who dyed without Successionh, and

Sir Alexander his Successor, who departing this Life Anno 1490i left Issue Alexander a Son, and Agnes a Daughter, who was married to John Lord Maxwel k, and had Issue.

Which Alexander was Knighted in the Time of King James IV. being then a powerful Baron. He was slain at the Battle of Flowdon 9th Septem­ber 1513, leaving Issue a Son Alex­ander to succeed him, by Christian his Wife, Daughter of Sir Archbald Douglass of Cavers, Sheriff of Teviot­dale l.

This Sir Alexander Steuart of Garlies was much favoured by King James V. of whose Privy-Council he was. He married first Catherine Daughter of Sir James Crichton of Cranston-riddel m. 2dly Margaret Daughter of Patrick Dunbar of Clugston, by whom he had two Sons, Alexander, and John Stewart Parson of Kirkmahoe n, Pro­genitor of John Stewart of Phisgill, in Vicecomitatu de Wigtoun. His third Wife was Catherine Daughter to Wil­liam Stewart of Barcly, by whom he had William, first of the House of Clarie, and Robert, who in the Year 1561 purchased the Lands of Cardo­nald in Renfrew shire by the Marriage of Mary Daughter and Co Heir of James Stewart of Cordonald o, and Helen married to William Gordon of Murefade, in Vicecomitatu de Wigton.

Alexander Stewart younger of Gar­lies, was in the Interest of King James VI. in the said King's Minority, and was slain at the surprise of the Town of Stirling by the Earl of Huntly and the Laird of Buclugh, 3d September 1571p, leaving Issue by Catherine [Page 158] his Wife, Daughter and Co-heir of Andrew Lord Herris of Terregles.

Alexander, who succeeded his Grand­father, and obtained the Honour of Knighthood, at the Coronation of Queen Anne, Wife of James VI. Anno 1590a. He married Christian, Daughter of Sir William Douglas of Drumlanrig, Ancestor to the Duke of Queensberry b. By her he had Alexan­der, the first Earl, and William Steuart of Mains, Ancestor to Sir Jame Stewart of Burrow Baronet; likewise two Daugh­ters. 1st. Helen, married to John Dou­glas of Stanhouse. 2d. Jean, to James Kennedy of Colzean. He departing this Life in October 1596c, his Estate descended to

Alexander his Son, who was first knighted by King James VI. then by his Majesty's special Favour raised to the Dignity of Lord Garlies, by Let­ters Patent 2d of September 1607d, his Descent from the illustrous Fami­ly of Lennox, being one of the prin­cipal Reasons for bestowing the Ho­nour. Further, his said Majesty was pleased to create him Earl of Galloway, 9th of September 1523e. He mar­ried Grisel Daughter of Sir John Gor­don of Lochenvar, in Vicecomitatu de Wigtoun: By whom he had, 1st. Alexander Lord Garlies, who mar­ried Margaret Daughter of William Earl of Monteith, by whom he had a Son Alexander, who died young. 2d. Sir James Steuart Baronet; likewise Anne, married to Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw. This Earl died very aged, Ann [...] 1649f, his Estate and Ho­nour devolving on

Sir James his Son and Heir, who dur­ing the Usurpation, was very active in the King's Cause, and on that ac­cound suffered in the common Cala­mity with other Loyalists, surviving the Usurpation eleven Years, he gave way to Fate in June 1671g' leaving Issue by Nicolas his Wife, Daughter of Sir Robert Grierson of Lag, three Sons and a Daughter, viz. Alexander his Successor, Robert Steu­art of Reimstoun, William Steuart of Castle-Steuart, Grisel married to Alex­ander Viscount of Kenmure.

Which Alexander married Mary Daughter of James Earl of Queens­berry, by whom he had Alexander his Successor, who died unmarried, Anno 1694. 2d. James, now Earl of Gal­loway. 3d. Colonel John Steuart of Sorbie. 4th. Andrew Steuart Esq who died in the Expedition to Darien in the 1699. 5th. William Steuart Esq 6th. Robert Steuart Esq also two Daughters, 1st. Margaret, mar­rried to John Clark of Penniecook Juni­or, one of the Barons of Exchequer, and had Issue. 2d. Heurietta, to William Earl of Glen [...]airn.

Which James so succeeding into the Estate and Honour of Galloway, upon the Decease of his Brother, was consti­tuted one of the Lords of her Majesty's Privy-Council. Soon after her Ac­cession to the Throne, his Lordship was appointed one of the Committee of Parliament, 18th of June 1702, for revising the Accompts of Money laid on by the former Sessions of that Parliament. And in the great Af­fair of the Union of the two King­doms. I find his Lordship dissent­ing from the Court in several very momentous Articles of the Treaty, as appears from the Minutes of the last Parliament. He married Cathe­rine Daughter of Alexander Earl of Eglintoun, by whom he has Issue Alexander Lord Gairlies, &c.

ARMS.

A Fess Checquie, Azure and Argent, [Page 159] surmounted of a Bend Gules, within a double Tresure Flower'd and Counter­flower'd of the last, supported on the Dexter with a Savage, and on the Si­nister by a Lyon Rampant Gules. Crest, a Pelican feeding her Young, Proper. Motto, Virescit vulnere virtus.

CRAWFURD, Viscount of Garnock.

THE Sirname of the Family of Kilbirny was first Barclay, descend­ed of Sir Walter Barclay, who executed the Office of Lord high Chamberlain of Scotland, the 9th of King William the Lyon a Anno Dom. 1174b. From this noble Person the several Ancient Families of that Sirname in the Coun­ties of Aberdeen, Fyfe, and Air, de­rive themselves. The first Person of Note of this Branch, was Sir Hugh Barclay of Kilbirny Knight, who flourished under King David II. in the 18th of whose Reign, he gave to his Vassal John Mackmoran, his Lands of Haymore, for Services done by him, and to be donec. This Sir Hugh was succeeded in his Inheri­tance by Hugh his Son, who obtain'd the Honour of Knighthood from Robert III. For I have found him designed Hugo Barclay de Kilbirny miles, Anno 1397d. He left be­hind him, but by whom I have not discovered, two Sons, David the eldest, and Archbald e first of the Branch of Ladyland, in Vicecomitatu de Air, which determin'd in Sir Hugh Bar­clay Knight, who died without Male Issue in 1596. Which David obtain­ed a Grant of the whole Lordship of Kilbirny, and half of Ladyland from King James I. upon the Resignation of his Father Sir Hugh, 26 of May 1431f. He was succeeded by John his Son, who dying without Male Suc­cession the 10th of King James III. 1470g, with him the Male Line of the Barclay's determined, after hav­ing flourished in great Splendor for a considerable space, the Barony of Kilbirny devolving to Marjory his Daughter and sole Heir, married to Malcolm Crawfurd Esquire.

Tho the Crawfurds have not pos­sessed Kilbirny above 243 Years, yet were they a very ancient Family before. A Branch of the House of Lou­doun came first to possess the Barony of Easter-Greenock in Renfrew-shire, about the Time of Robert III. Mal­colm Crawfurd Esq then taking to Wife . . . . . . . . . Daughter and Co-heir of Malcolm Galbraith of Greenock, an ancient Family in those Partsh, by whom he had Malcolm Crawfurd Esq his Son and Heir, who came to be Kilbirny in Right of Marjory Barclay his Wife aforesaid, whereupon he assumed the Coat of Barclay and im­pail'd it with his own: Here it may be remarked, that all the Estate the [Page 160] Family ever had, or yet possesses, was acquired to them by Marriage; or Lands so obtained were exchanged for others lying more contiguous to the rest of their Fortune, which gave occasion to a Friend to apply to them the following Distich,

Aulam alii jactent, at tu Kilbirnie nube,
Nam qua Fors aliis, dat Venus alma tibi.

This Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirny, by Marjory Barclay his Wife, had Issue

Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirny.

James Crawfurd first of the Line of Monock, in Vicecomitatu de Air.

Thomas.

John.

Isobel, married to Sir Adam Cuning­ham of Capringtoun Knighta, in Vicecomitatu de Air, Mother by him of Sir John Cunningham, and of Mar­garet Wife of Andrew Lord Ochiltree,

Malcom Crawfurd, Son and Heir of Marjory Barclay of Kilbirny, had a Char­ter of the Barony of Kilbirny and o­thersb, upon the Resignation of his Mother, 24th of April 1499, which Malcolm married Marion Crich­ton c Daughter to Robert Lord San­quhar, Ancestor to the present Coun­tess of Dramfries, by whom he had two Sons, Robert his Successor, and John Crawfurd Esq

Which Robert had a Charter of the whole Lordship of Kilbirny, following on his Father's Resignation, he re­serving a Competency to himself, 8th of May 1499d, which was ratified by King James IV. by a Charter un­der the Great-Seal; his Death hap­pening not long after, viz. in the 1500e. This Robert Crawfurd of Kil­birny in Anno 1505, had a Dispensa­tion from James Beaton Abbot of Dunfermling, the Pope's Delegate, for marrying Margaret Semple f, not­withstanding of their Consanguinity within the Degrees prohibited by the Canon Law. He dying about 1513, left Issue by the said Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Sir Thomas Semple of Eliotstoun,

Lawrence his Son and Heir, a Per­son of eminent Note in those Days, both for the considerable Lands he held in diverse Counties, and the many Services to his Country; in Consideration whereof, he had seve­ral beneficial Grants from the Crown, in Reward of his good and laudable Services, but living in a Reign of no great Action, there is not any thing to be seen further memorable of him, but that he exchanged the Barony of Crawfurd-John, the anci­ent Inheritance of his Ancestors, with Sir James Hamilton of Finart, for the Lands of Drumray, in the County of Dunbarton, by a solemn Agreement, bearing date 29th of January 1528g, and founded a Chaplainry in the little Church of Drumray, of his own Patronage, for certain Priests, to celebrate Divine Service for the Soul's Health of his late Sovereign Lord King James V. the good State of himself, and Helen Campbel his Wife, during their Lives here; likewise for the Well-fare of their Souls after their Departure out of this World, their Children, Suc­cessors, and all the faithful deceased, to which he appends his Sealh. Liv­ing to the Age of about 41, he depart­ed this Life the 4th of June 1547, hap­pily taken away from seeing the sad Calamity of his Country by abloody War that soon followed after, leaving a numerous Family by Helen Campbel his Wife Daughter of Sir Hugh Camp­bel [Page 161] of Loudoun, Ancestor to the pre­sent Earl of that Name,

Hugh his Successor.

William Crawfurd died without Issue.

Robert Crawfurd Esq

John Crawfurd of Greenock-Easter.

David Crawfurd of Campel.

Thomas, Progenitor of the Craw­furds of Jordan-hill, also of Cartsburn a in Renfrew-shire, who taking him­self to Arms, was early engaged in the Service of his Country, more particularly when in the utmost Dan­ger of being ruined by the English, Anno 1547, & was present in the Battle of Pinkie-field, where he had the mis­fortune to be taken Prisonerb, and for some time remained in Durance, till by a Sum of Money his Ransom was pro­cured. Seeing his native Country im­broil'd in a War, he retired into France An. 1550, & listed himself in the Service of Henry II. in the Quality of one of the Gensd' Arms, then under the Command of James Earl of Aran c, where his prudent Conduct and generous Behaviour gain'd him a ge­neral Esteem. Upon the Demise of Francis II. he returned with Queen Mary to his native Country, Anno 1561, and so far as I can discover, he liv'd in a private Capacity till the Nation was alarmed with the Mur­der of Henry Lord Darnly, Queen Mary's Husband, to whom he had the Honour to be nearly related: Then it was he entred into an Association with the Earls of Argyle, Morton, Athole, Mar, Glencairn, Lindsay, Boyd, and o­thers, for the Defence of the young Prince King James VI. who was in Danger of being murdred by the Earl of Bothwel, as his Father had been: This they solemnly declared, and that they had no other View but the Honour and Safety of Her Ma­jesty's Person, and the Preservation of their Natural Prince, and to bring the Regicide to a fair Trial. How a Civil War broke out, I need not men­tion in this place, the Anarchy and Confusion of the succeeding Times, I rather pass over in Silence, than en­ter on the Detail of so ungrateful a Subject: But true it is, that this Gentleman was on the young King's side against Queen Mary, and com­manded in several Expeditions against the Loyalists, with abundance of Reputation for his Valour and Con­duct, being then Captain of the King's Forces all the time of these unhappy Troubles. He signaliz'd himself in the Siege of the Castle of Edinburgh, as appears at large by Mr. Hume's Annalsd, and in surprising Dun­barton Castle, then he'd out for Queen Mary by John Lord Fleeming, 2d of April 1572e, a Strength which was in these Days thought impreg­nable: In Consideration of which Services, he obtained from the King the Lands of Blackstoun, Barns, Bishops-Meadow, with an Annuity of 200 l. out of the Bishoprick of St. Andrews, to enjoy it during Life, Pro remunerati­one dicto Thomae Crawfurd Capitaneo, militi prudenti ac in rebus bellicis au­daci & experto, ob Castrum Dunbrito­nense omnium judicio inexpugnabile la­bore & industria ipsius Thomae captum & expugnatum f. He married first Marion, Daughter of Sir John Col­quhoun of Luss g, by whom he had only Marion, married to Sir Robert Fairly of that Ilk, in Vicecomitatu de Air; after her Death, Janet, eldest Daughter and Heir of Robert Ker of [Page 162] Kersland, an ancient Family in Air-shire, by whom he had two Sons and a Daughter, 1st. Daniel, who succeed­ed to his Mother's Estate, and there­fore changed his Name to Ker a. 2d. Hugh Crawfurd of Jordan-hill, Heir of his Father's Fortune, and Susanna married to Colin Campbel of Elengreg, in Vicecomitatu de Argyle. Having so prudently settled his Estate, as that both the Families might be supported, he made his Exit out of this to ano­ther World the 3d of January 1603, and lyes buried at the Church of Kilbirny, under a plain Tomb, where you may still discover the Figure of a Man in full length in Armour, with a Coat of Arms, wherein Crawfurd quartered with Barclay is to be seen, and this Inscription upon the Pedestal,‘Here lies Captain Thomas Crawfurd of Jordan-hill, Sixth Son to Lau­rence Crawfurd of Kilbirny, and Janet Ker, eldest Daughter of Ro­bert Ker of Kersland, his Spouse.’

Catherine, eldest Daughter of Lau­rence Crawfurd of Kilbirny, was mar­ried to David Fairly of that Ilkb.

Isabel the second, married to Gavin Blair of Hally, in Vicecomitatu de Air.

To Laurence succeeded Hugh Craw­furd his Son and Heir, of whom there is nothing recorded in History till the breaking out of the Civil Troubles in Queen Mary's time, Anno 1568. He was a forward Asserter of her Right, and faithfully adhered to her Interest. He was the same Year one of the Barons who signed a Bond for De­fence of the Queen's Majesty, against all Persons whatsoever, and against all deadly, (as they speak) and marched in Person with two of his Sons, and several of his Vassals and Retainers to the Field of Lang-fide; which Action happened 13th of May 1568, for which he was obliged to accept of a Remission from the Re­gentc. He first married Marga­ret Daughter of Sir John Colquhoun of Luss d, in Vicecomitatu de Dunbar­toun, by whom he had Malcolns his Son and Heir. Next Elisabeth, Daugh­ter of David Barclay of Ladyland e, who bore him a Son William Crawfurd of Knights-wood in Vicecomitatu de Dun­bartoun: And three Daughters.

1. Margaret, married to James Gal­braith of Kilcroich, in Vicecomitatu de Stirling f, and afterwards to Sir Aulay Mackaulay of Ardincaple.

2. Marion, to John Boyle of Kelburn, Ancestor to the present Earl of Glas­gow, and had Issue.

3. Elisabeth, to David Brody of Castletoun g, in Vicecomitatu de Clackmanan, and had Issue. There being nothing more memorable concerning this Loyal Gentleman, I shall only notice, that he dying in the Year 1576, was succeeded by,

Malcolm his Son and Heir, who took to Wife Margaret Daughter of John Cuningham of Glengarnock, in Vicecomitatu de Air h, by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of John Lord Flee­ming, by whom he had John and Alexander; likewise a Daughter Anne, married to William Cuningham of Leglane, Ancestor to Sir William Cuningham Baronet. He departing this Life, Anno 1592i.

John his Son succeeded, who spent much of his Time in Foreign Parts, and died young, viz. 16th of January 1622k. He left Issue by Margaret [Page 163] his Wife, Daughter of John Blair of that Ilk, by Grisel his Wife, Daugh­ter of Robert Lord Semple, John his Successor, Malcolm Crawfurd of New­toun, James Crawfurd of Knights-wood; Also two Daughters.

1. Margaret, married to Hugh Kennedy of Ardmillan, in Vicecomita­tu de Air, and had Issue.

2. Jean, to John Lindsay of Black­solme, in Vicecomitatu de Renfrew, 2dly. To John Buchanan of Drumiekill, and had Issue.

Which John liv'd in great Plenty and Respect, and agreeably spent his Time in Re-building the House of Kilbirny, a large and magnificent Fa­brick from the very Foundation, which he finished in the 1627. His Wife was Mary, Daughter of James Earl of Glencairn: By her he had John his Successor, James who died unmarried; also two Daughters, Anne married to Alexander Cuningham of Corsehill, in Vicecomitatu de Air, and Margaret to Colonel William Crawfurd elder Brother to Thomas Crawfurd of Carse, sans Issue. He died the 12th of November 1629, his Estate descend­ing to

John his Son, who obtained the Honour of Knighthood from King Charles I. Anno 1642, and had the Command of a Regiment in the time of the Civil War, but lived retir'd dur­ing the Usurpation, which he had the Happiness to survive. He was elect­ed a Member of Parliament for the County of Air a, which began the 1st of January 1661, John Earl of Midletoun being his Majesty's High Commissioner; in which Year he also died at Edinburgh, from whence his Body was convoyed to Kilbirny Church, and was buried among his Ancestors. By Margaret his first Wife, Daughter of Robert Lord Burleigh, he had no Children came to Maturi­ty: But by Magdalen his second Wife, Daughter of David Lord Car­negy, he had two Daughters, Anne married to Sir Archbald Steuart of Blackhall Baronet, and Margaret, on whom, by a special Entail, he settled his Estate, and to the Heirs Male or Female to be procreate betwixt her and Mr. Patrick Lindsay Son of John Earl of Crawfurd, upon Condition every such Heir should carry the Sir­name and Arms of Crawfurd: She died in the 29th Year of her Age, the 4th. of October 1680, leaving Issue by the aforesaid Mr. Patrick Lindsay her Husband, John Crawfurd of Kilbirny her Son and Heir, Patrick Crawfurd Esq Captain Archbald Crawfurd; Likewise three Daughters.

1. Margaret, married to David Earl of Glasgow.

2. Anne, to Master Harry Maul of Kelly, Brother to James Earl of Pan­mure.

3. Magdalen, to George Dundass of Duddingstoun, in Vicecomitatu de Lin­lithgow, and has Issue.

Which John was born the 12th of May 1669. He had his Education in Grammar at Irvine, and his Academi­cal in the University of St. Andrews, where he spent the usual Years. The Revolution coming about in 1689, upon his first Appearance in the World, he engaged with the Party who were active in it. I find he was one of those Persons to whom the Militia of Air-shire was intrustedb, and which on a surmise of an Inva­sion from Ireland (if I be not mistaken) he once commanded. After the Con­vention was turned into a Parliament, He was in the 1693 chosen to serve for Air-shire, which he did without Interruption, till the Dissolution there­of upon the Death of King William, [Page 164] 8th of March 1702. Her Majesty Queen Anne, upon her Accession to the Crown, appointed him one of the Commissioners on the Part of Scotland for treating of an Union be­tween both Nations, and the 4th of February 1703, named him one of the Lords of the Privy-Council. He was again chosen to serve for the County of Air, to her Majesty's first Parliament, which met at Edinburgh the 6th of May 1703, where he merited so well of the Queen, that she was pleased in the second Year of her Reign to make him a Peer, by creating him Viscount of Mount-Craw­furd, which he changed again to the Title of Garnock: And among other Reasons for conferring the Honour, her Majesty declares, this was not the least, propter multa & conspicua officia per Predecessores ejus Crawfurdios de Kil­birny, pro Coronae nostrae & Monarchiae sustentatione peracta. Tho this Lord was one of the Commissioners for the Treaty of Union, Anno 1702, yet I don't find his Name among those ap­pointed for that Affair in the 1706, to which however his Lordship being in the Measures of the Court, contri­buted, when the Articles came to be considered in Parliament. After which he continued in the Council till its Dissolution. In the Month of March 1708 he was taken ill with an Asthma and a Cough, the Malignity of which all the Art of his Physi­cians not being able to remove, it put an End to his Days on the 24th of December thereafter, and upon the 13th of January 1709, he was deposited in a Vault within the Church of Kilbirny among his An­cestors, where I leave him, how soon I have given this Epitaph upon him.

Ante diem, querimur, tua cingi busta cupresso,
Crawfurdae gentis lausque decusque tuae.
Invida [...]rs paucis passa est te vivere lustris,
Et generi & pr [...]vis noluit esse parem:
Saepe laboranti patriae, qui saepe tulerunt
Regi, cum promeret civis iniquus, opem.
At, si vita tibi seros mansisset in annos,
Fulsisset magnis gloria major avis.

By the only Wife he ever had, and who survived him, viz. Margaret Daughter of James Stewart 1st. Earl of Bute, he had Patrick now Vis­count of Garnock, John, James, David, and Charles: Also three Daughters,

Margaret.

Anne.

Magdalen. All Young.

ARMS.

Quarterly 1st and 4th Gules, a Fess Ermine, 2d and 3d Azure, a Chiveron betwixt three Cross Patees Or, supported by two Gray-Hounds, Crest, an Ermine Argent, Motto, Sine labe nota.

A learned Gentleman of this Namea paraphras'd on this Coat of Arms in these fine Elegiacks.

Sanguineum scutum praecingit balteus albens,
Quem variant nigrae sed sine labe notae.
Sic labem ut vitet, mustela Armenica strictum
In ferrum & structos non timet ire rogos:
Martia vis animi, vacuum formidine pectus,
Cana fides, nulla labe notatus honos:
Haec Crafurdiacae gentilia symbola stirpit,
Artibus his veteres emicuere patres.

RUTHVEN, Earl of Gaurie.

FROM the Barony of Ruthven in Perth-shire, did Walter the Son of Alan, Proprietar of the said Lands [Page 165] assume a Denomination, which before that Time appears not to have been Hereditary. However, he was a Person of so much Consideration, that he obtained the Lands of Cowgask in Marriage with Cecily, Daughter of Gilbert Earl of Strathern a. in the Reign of Alexander II.

He left a Son Walter de Roc­hven, who obtained a Confirmation from Malise Earl of Strathern of the Lands above-mentioned, which Gilbert his Father had formerly given Walter filio Alani & Ceciliae filiae suae.

Walter de Rochven his Successor in the 13th of Alexander III. resigns his Right of the Lands of Fowlis per de­cessum aviae suae Ceciliae filiae Domini Willielmi Maule Militis b. This noble Family continued for many Generations in the County of Perth, where they were hereditary Sheriffs among the superior Rank of the Gentry, till the Reign of King James III. that Sir William Ruthven of that Ilk came to be ranked among the Parliamentary Barons. I find he married to his first Wife, Isabel Living­ston c, Relict of Walter Lindsay of Beaufort, by whom he had Sir William his eldest Sond, who was killed at Flowdon e; also a Daughter Jean, married to Alexander Earl of Buchan, and again to John Erskine of Dun, in Vicecomitatu de Forfar f, Mo­ther by him to Sir John Erskin of Dun, Superintendent of Angus. He married 2dly Christian Daughter of Sir John Forbes of Pitsligo g, by whom he had William Ruthven of Banden, in vicecomitatu de Perth h, Grand-father of Patrick Earl of Forth, and a Daughter Elisabeth, married first to William Earl of Errol, and a­gain to Ninian Lord Ross i, and had Issue.

To William Lord Ruthven succeed­ed William his Grandsonk, who augmented his Fortune by the Mar­riage of Janet, one of the three Daughters and Co-heirs of Patrick Lord Dirletoun l, and thereon added to his own Coat of Arms Argent, a Bend Azure. He was made Lord Privy-Sealm Anno 1547, upon the re­moval of John Abbot of Paisly, which he held till the 1553. By the aforesaid Janet his Wife, he had Issue Patrick his Successor, & Alexander of Freeland, and Daughters, 1st. Lilias, married to David Lord Drummond n, 2d. Catherine, to Colin Campbel of Glenurchie, 3d. Cecilia, to Sir David Weems of Weems, 4th. Bar­bara, to Patrick Lord Gray, 5th. Janet, to John Crichton of Strathurd o. 2dly to Laurence Mercer of Addie p, in Vicecomitatu de Perth. 6th. Margaret, to James Johnston of Elphinstoun, in Vicecomitatu de Haddingtoun. 7th. Christian, to Mr. William Lundy of that Ilkq, in Vicecomitatu de Fife.

Patrick Lord Ruthven his Son, was very active in the Reformation of Religion, which indeed was very commendable and Praise-worthy; but that which lyes heaviest on this Lord's Memory, is, the Hand he had in the Murder of David Rizio, a Deed so odious, both in it self, and at­tended with such Circumstances, that none will take upon them to justify. His Wife was Jean, natural Daughter of Archbald Earl of Angus r, by Margaret Daughter of James Steuart of Traquair, by whom he had two Sons, William and Alexander; like­wise [Page 166] two Daughters, Jean, married to Henry Lord Methven, 2dly to An­drew Earl of Rothes a, Isabel to Sir James Colvil of Easter-Weems, in Vice­comitatu de Fife. This Lord gave Way to Fate on the 13 Day of June 1566b, and was succeeded by

William his Son, who was on the King's Side in the Minority of James VI. by whom he was constituted Lord high Thesaurer of Scotland 24th of June 1571c, and created Earl of Gourie 23 of August 1681d; but three Years after he entred into a Conspiracy to seize the King's Per­son, and remove some Councellours from the Court, for which he was at­tainted of Treason, and lost his Head 28th April 1584e, leaving Issue by Dorothea his Wife, Daughter of Henry Lord Methven, & of Janet Daughter of John Earl of Athole, 1st. James. 2d. John, 3d. Alexander, 4th. Patrick Ruthven Doctor of Medicine: Also seven Daughters,

1. Margaret married to John Earl of Montr [...]se.

2. Mary to John Stewart Earl of Athole.

3. Sophia to Lodovick Duke of Lennox, sans Issue.

4. Jean to James Lord Ogilvy.

5. Beatrix, to Sir James Hume of Colding knows in Vicecom. de Berwick.

6. Isabel, to Sir Robert Gordon of Lochenvar, 2dly to Hugh first Lord Londo [...]n.

7. Dorothea, to John Weems of Pitten­crief f, in Vicecomitatu de Fife.

James Son of William Earl of Goury was restored to his Estate and Honour, Anno 1586, but dying young in 1588 John his Brother became his Heir. This Earl, with Alexander Ruthven his Brother, entred into a most hellish Conspiracy to have murder'd the King at his own House in the Town of Perth, on the 5th of August 1600, which was by the good Providence of God detected at the very instant of Execution, both the Earl and his Brother being killed in the Enterprize. Thereafter, upon the 19th of October their dead Bodies were carried to the common Place of Execution in the City of Edinburgh, hanged on a Gibbet, and their Heads cut off and affixed on the Jayl, there to remain till the Wind should blow them off g. The Earl­dom of Goury was annexed to the Crown, and the Sirname of Ruthven discharged by Act of Parliament, and the 5th of August ordered in all time coming to be religiously observed as a Day of Thanksgiving, in remembrance of his Majesty's happy Deliverance.

ARMS.

Three Coats quarterly, 1st and 4th Argent, three Bars Gules. 2d Or, three Bars Gules, 3d Or, on a Bend Azure, three Lozanges of the first, all within a Border Or flowr'd and Counter-flowr'd Gules, supporred by two Goats proper, Crest, a Goats Head cabos'd, issuing out a Crown Or, Moto, Facta Probant, and on the Dexter a Chivaleer garnish'd with the Earl's Coat of Arms, pointing with a Sword upward to an imperial Crown, with this Devise, Tibi soli h.

Francis Abercromby, Lord Glasfurd.

THIS Francis was the Son and Heir of Alexander Abercrom­by of Fiterneir, in Vicecomitatu de [Page 167] Aberdeen, by Jean Daughter of John Seto [...] of Newark, branched from the Family of Birkenbog, seated in the Shire of Banff, before the Time of King Robert I. as appears from the Authorities [...]re citeda: Which Fran­cis having married Anne Baroness of Semple, was in Respect thereof, and in Reward of his Father's Loyalty dur­ing the civil Commotions in the time of King Charles I. honour'd with the Title of Lord Glasfurd, for his own Life, by King James VII. 25th of July 1685.

The Brothers of this Lord are, John Abercromby Esq and Patrick Abercromby Doctor of Medicine, my worthy Friend, who has obliged his Country with a most exact and curious History of Scot­land, refined from the Dross and Er­rors of our former Authors, and put our Affairs in such a Light, that no Nation I know of can shew any Performance of that kind done with greater Exactness and Ingenuity.

CUNINGHAM, Earl of Glencairn.

THE Sirname of Cuningham, which properly signifies the King's Habitation, has no doubt been taken from the Bailliary of Cuningham in the Shire of Air, the Patrimony of the Morvils, formerly Constables of Scot­land, to whom the Cuninghams of Kilmaures were Vassals. The first of them I have found is Robertus filius Varnebaldi de Cuningham, who is Pro­prietar of Kilmaures, in the Reign of K. William the Lyon. He gave in pure & perpetual Alms to the Monks of the Abby of Kelso the Patronage of the Church of Kilmaures, cum dimi [...]ia ca­rucata terrae ad dictam Ecclesiam perti­nen. pro salute animae suae, which is ratified by Richard Morvil before the Year 1189b. He married Richenda Daughter and Heir of Umphray Bar­clay Knightc, They had a Son Ro­bert, who designs himself Robertus filius Roberti filii Warnebaldi de Cun­ingham, in a Grant which he made to the Religious of Arbroth of the Lands of Glenfarquharlin, in Vicecomi­tatu de Kincardin, pro salute animae suae, Patris & Matris suae, ac pro anima­bus omnium antecessorum & successorum: Hence descended Sir William Cuning­ham of Kilmaures Knight, who pur­chased the Lands of Waterstoun in Renfrew shire, from William Water­stoun of that Ilk, Anno 1384d. He left two Sons, William his Successor, and Thomas first of the House of Ca­pringtoun e, of whom came the Cuninghams of Leglan and Enterkin.

Which Sir William Cuningham of Kilmaures, in the Reign of King Robert III. added to his old patrin o­nial Inheritance the Barony of Fyn­lastoun in Renfrew-shire, Kilmaronock in the County of Dunbartoun, Redhall and Collingtoun in Lothian, by the Marriage of Margaret, Daughter, and [Page 168] one of the two Co-heirs of Robert Denniston Lord of Dennistoun a Knight. He founded the Prebenda­ries of Kilmaures b, or more pro­perly the collegiate Church there, by his Charter the 13th of May 1403, consisting of a Provost and six or eight Prebends; and doted certain Lands both within that Barony and elsewhere for their Support and Sub­sistance, which was dissolved upon the Reformation. To the Abbot and Convent of Kilwining, he gave the Lands of Grange for the Health of his Soul, and the safety of the Souls of his Ancestors and Successors for everc. By the said Margaret his Wife he had Issue Robert his Successor, and William first of the Branch of Cuning­ham-head in Air-shired.

This Robert the next of the Line, was one of the Hostages for the Ran­som of King James I. who honour'd him with Knighthood, Anno 1424e, and afterward put him in Commis­sion with Alexander Lord Montgomery in the Joint Government of Kintyre and Knapdale f. He married Janet Daughter of Alexander Lord Montgo­mery, by whom he had

Alexander Lord of Kilmaures his his Son and Heir, who was one of the Lords of the Privy-Council to King James III. He faithfully ad­hered to that Prince in his good and bad Fortune: In Consideration of which he was by a very formal Patent 28th May 1488, created Earl of Glen­cairn g, which Honour he did not long enjoy, for he lost his Life with his Master the King at the Field of Bannockburn, 11th June 1488. He had Issue by Margaret his Wife, Daughter of Patrick Hepburn Lord Hales h, Robert his Successor, and William Cuningham of Craigends i, in Vicecomitatu de Re [...]ew, of whom the Families of Robertland, Carncuren, Bedlan, Achinharvy, and Achenyards are sprung.

Which Robert marrying Marjory Daughter of Archbald Earl of Angus, had Cuthbert Earl of Glencairn his Son, who was of the Privy-Council to King James IV. Anno 1509k. He mar­ried Marion Daughter of John Lord Lindsay l, by whom he had

William Earl of Glencairn his Son and Heir, who was of the Privy-Council, to King James V. He was taken Prisoner at the Battle of Sol­way by the English, Anno 1542, for his Ransom I find he paid 1000 l. Sterl. m. The next ensuing Year he was joined in Commission with Sir George Douglas, William Hamilton of San­quhar, James Learmonth of Balcomy, and Mr. Henry Balnavis of Hall-hill, Secretary of State to treat with the English about a Marriage betwixt Queen Mary and King Edward VI.n which was much opposed by all who were in the French Interest. He married first Catherine Daughter of William Lord Borthwick o. 2dly. Elisabeth Campbel; and dying Anno 1547, he left behind him, 1st. Alex­ander, 2d. Andrew, Ancestor of Sir Alexander Cuningham of Corse-hill p Baronet, 3d. Hugh Progenitor of the Cuninghams of Waterstoun and Carlung q, 4th. Robert, Minister of the Mi­stry [Page 169] or Priory of Fell in vicecomitatu de Air 5. William, who was Bishop of Argyle, also a Daughter Elisabeth married to John Cuningham of Cap­ringtoun.

Which Alexander for Distinction, called The Good Earl, was one of the first of the Peers of Scotland who con­cur'd in the Reformation of the Church from Popery, and was a strenuous as­serter of King James's Title to the Crown, when his Mother Queen Mary resign'd the Government Anno 1567. Upon the Dissolution of the Religious Houses, he obtained a Grant of the Abby of Kilwinning, a Seat formerly of Benedictine Monks, and of which one of his Sons came to be Titular Commendator. He married first Jean Daughter of James Earl of Aran, and had William the next Earl, Andrew the second Son, and James Prior of Lismahago; also a Daughter Mar­garet, Wife of John Wallace of Craigie a, in Vicecomitatu de Air. 2dly Jean Daughter of John Cuningham of Cap­ringtoun, by her he had a Son Alexan­der, and a Daughter Jean, married first to Archbald Earl of Argyle, 2dly. to Sir Humphray Colquhoun of Luss, Knight, in Vicecomitatu de Dunbarton. This Earl dying in the Year of God 1574b, his Estate and Honour descended to

William his Son, who had to Wife Janet Daughter of James Gordon of Lochenvar, who bore him a Son James, and four Daughters, 1st. Jean married to George Haldan of Gleneagles in Vic. de Perth. 2d. Margaret to Hector Macklain of Dowart, in Vic. de Argyle. 3d. Jean to James Crawfurd of Achin­names; after his Death to Alexander Cuningham of Craigends. 4th. Susanna to John Napier of Kilmahew, in Vic. de Dunbartoun.

Which James was one of the Lords of the Privy Council to King James VI. and in some Degree a Favorite of that wise Prince, who named him one of the Commissioners on the Part of Scotland to treat upon a nearer Union with England the Year immediately after his Majesty's Ac­cession to that Crown, viz. in 1604. This noble Earl left Issue by Marga­ret his Wise Daughter of Colin Camp­bel of Glenurquhie, William Earl of Glencairn, John Cuningham of Cams­keith, Catherine married to Sir James Cuningham of Glengarnock, in Vic. de Air, Anne to James Marquis of Ha­milton, Margaret to Sir James Hamil­ton of Evandale, 2dly. to Sir James Maxwel of Calderwood, Mary to John Crawfurd of Kilbirny, Susanna to Alex­ander Lauder of Hatton.

Which Wil