CHEAP REPOSITORY. TURN THE CARPET; OR, THE TWO WEAVERS: A NEW SONG, IN A Dialogue between DICK and JOHN.

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Sold by J. MARSHALL, PRINTER to the CHEAP REPOSITORY for Religious and Moral Tracts) No. 17, Queen-Street, Cheapside, and No. 4, Alder­mary Church Yard; and R. WHITE, Piccadilly, LONDON.

[...] S. HAZARD, at BATH; and by all Booksellers, Newsmen and Hawkers, in Town and Country.—Great Allowance to Shopkeepers and Hawkers.

PRICE ONE HALFPENNY, Or, 2s. 3d. per 100.—1s. 3d for 50—9d. for 25. [Entered at Stationers Hall.]

TURN THE CARPET; OR, THE TWO WEAVERS: A NEW SONG.

I.
AS at their work two Weavers sat,
Beguiling time with friendly chat;
They touch'd upon the price of meat,
So high, a Weaver scarce could eat,
II.
What with my brats and sickly wife,
Quoth Dick, I'm almost tir'd of life;
So hard my work, so poor my fare,
'Tis more than mortal man can bear.
III.
How glorious is the rich man's state!
His house so fine! his wealth so great
Heaven is unjust you must agree,
Why all to him, why none to me?
IV.
In spite of what the Scripture teaches,
In spite of all the Parson preaches,
This world (indeed I've thought so long)
Is rul'd, methinks, extremely wrong.
V.
Wheree'er I look, howe'er I range,
'Tis all confus'd, and hard, and strange;
The good are troubled and oppress'd,
And all the wicked are the bless'd.
VI.
Quoth John, our ign'rance is the cause
Why thus we blame our Maker's laws;
Parts of his ways alone we know,
'Tis all that man can see below.
VII.
See'st thou that Carpet, not half done,
Which thou, dear Dick, hast well begun?
Behold the wild confusion there,
So rude the mass it makes one stare!
VIII.
A stranger, ign'rant of the trade,
Wou'd say, no meaning's there convey'd;
For where's the middle, where's the border?
Thy Carpet now is all disorder.
IX.
Quoth Dick, my work is yet in bits,
But still in every part it fits;
Besides, you reason like a lout,
Why, man, that Carpet's inside out.
X.
Says John, thou say'st the thing I mean,
And now I hope to cure thy spleen;
This world, which clouds thy soul with doubt,
Is but a Carpet inside out.
XI.
As when we view these shreds and ends,
We know not what the whole intends;
So when on earth things look but odd,
They're working still some scheme of God.
XII.
No plan, no pattern can we trace,
All wants proportion, truth, and grace;
The motley mixture we deride,
Nor see the beauteous upper side.
XIII.
But when we reach that world of light,
And view these works of God aright;
Then shall we see the whole design,
And own the workman is divine.
XIV.
What now seem random strokes, will there
All order and design appear;
Then shall we praise what here we spurn'd,
For then the Carpet shall be turn'd.
XV.
Thou'rt right, quoth Dick, no more I'll grumble,
That this sad world's so strange a jumble;
My impious doubts are put to slight,
For my own Carpet sets me right.
[figure]
THE END.
On the 1st of August, 1795, was published,
  • Hints to all Ranks of People.
  • —The Happy Waterman.
  • —The Riot, a Ballad.
  • —The Towboy's Dream, a Ballad.
On the 1st of September,
  • Tom White, Part II.
  • —Noah's Flood.
  • —Dame Andrews, a Ballad.
On the 1st of October.
  • Harvest Home.
  • —Two Farmers, Part I.
  • —Honest Miller, a Ballad.
On the 1st of November,
  • The Parable of the Vineyard.
  • —The Two Farmers, Part II.
  • —The Sorrows of Yamba▪ a Ballad.
On the 1st of December,
  • The Troubles of Life.
  • —Sorrowful Sam.
  • —Merry Christ­mas, a Carol.
On the 1st of January, 1796,
  • New Thoughts on the New Year.
  • —The History of Ma [...]y Wood, the Housemaid.
  • —Robert and Richard, a Ballad.
On the 1st of February,
  • The Touchstone; or, the Way to know a good Christian.
  • —The Apprentice turned Master; or, the Two Shoe­makers, Part II.
  • —The Story of Sinful Sally. Told by herself a Ballad.
On the 1st of March.
  • One [...]mus; or, the Run-away Servant converted.
  • —Idle Jack Brown; or, the Two Shoemakers, Part III.
  • —Shop­keeper, Part I.
On the 1st of April,
  • Conversion of St. Paul.
  • —Jack Brown in Prison; or, the Two Shoemakers, Part IV.
  • —Shopkeeper, Part II.
On the 1st of May,
  • The General Resurrection, Part. I.
  • —The History of Charles Jones the Footman, written by Himself.
  • —The Hackney Coachman; or, the Way to get a good Fare, a Ballad.
On the 1st of June,
  • Carrying Religion into the Common Business of Life
  • —The Cheapside Apprentice.
  • —The Election Song, a Ballad.

And other Pieces on a similar Plan, on the 1st of every Month.

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