INDIAN ZOOLOGY.

SECOND EDITION.

[figure]

LONDON.

Printed by HENRY HUGHS for ROBERT FAULDER.

MDCCXC.

ADVERTISEMENT.

THIS work, or rather fragment, was begun in the year 1769. The descriptive part fell to my share: the expence of the plates was divided between Mr. BANKS, now Sir JOSEPH BANKS, Baronet; JOHN GIDEON LOTEN, Esq a go­vernor in Ceylon; and myself. Twelve only were engraved and published: soon after which, the un­dertaking appeared so arduous that the design was given over. It would be injustice to Mr. LOTEN not to say, that the etchings are taken from his fine col­lection of drawings made in India: for he alleviated the cares of life with the delicious pursuits of the stu­dy of NATURE. I prevaled on my two friends to unite with me in presenting the learned JOHN REIN­HOLD FORSTER with the plates. I also bestowed [Page ii] on him three others, engraven at my own expence, before the work was dropped. These were never published in England; but when Dr. Forster left our island, he took the whole with him, and in 1781 printed, at Halle, in Saxony, an edition very highly improved, and translated into Latin and German. He prefixed to it a most elaborate lu­cubration de Finibus et Indole Aeris, Soli, Maris­que INDICI; described the subjects of the three ad­ditional plates; and inserted, after the description of the fifteenth plate, a most learned dissertation on the genus of the BIRDS OF PARADISE, and on the PHOENIX. He added several notes; and at the end presented his readers with a Faunula of the qua­drupeds and birds of the extensive region of IN­DIA and its islands.

The last year, Mr. Robert Faulder, at New Bond­street, bookseller, applied to me for permission to reprint this very imperfect performance. I con­sented; but advised him by all means to get the additions by Dr. Forster translated, and an improved Faunula to be formed from the best authorities [Page iii] which could be procured: but, having myself ab­jured all future publications, referred him for that labor to any gentlemen willing and able to do jus­tice to the performance. I took the liberty of pointing out three friends, of indisputable abilities, and of whose Tind services I had long and useful experience.

Dr. AIKIN, of Yarmouth, in Norfolk, with great chearfulness undertook the translations: Mr. JOHN LATHAM, of Dartford, Kent, justly celebrated for extending the study of ORNITHOLOGY far beyond any naturalist of our days; and the Rev. Mr. HUGH DAVIES, rector of Aber, in Caernarvonshire, underwent the task of arranging the very numerous subjects of the INDIAN FAUNULA. The more la­borious part, relative to the Insects, fell to the share of Mr. LATHAM: the rest to that of Mr. DAVIES. A more complete enumeration was never formed, considering the extent of the country; and the ma­terials imported into our islands. Science has of late years found its way into our most distant pos­sessions; and we gather its fruits: the Faunula [Page iv] is a suffcient proof of the richness of the harvest. Collectors at home, or in the distant Indostan, will find considerable benefit from this part of the work. It will direct their researches, or instruct them in the arrangement of the new acquisitions. If my past labors can in any shape contribute in the left to the amusement of the individual, or to the pub­lic in general, the reflection cannot fail bestowing on me the most pleasing sensation.

THOMAS PENNANT.

CONTENTS.

  • ESSAY ON INDIA Page 1
  • INDIAN ZOOLOGY, p. 29.
    • I. Sciurus Macrourus. The Long-Tailed Squirrel 31
    • II. Falco Melanoleucos. Black and White Falcon 33
    • III. Otus Bakkamoena. The Little Horn Owl 34
    • IV. Trogon Fasciatus. The Fasciated Couroucou 36
    • V. Cuculus Pyrrhocephalus. The Red-Headed Cuckoo 38
    • VI. Picus Miniatus. The Red Woodpecker 39
    • VII. Perdix Bicalcaratus. Double-Spurred Partridge 40
    • VIII. Columba Melanocephala. The Black-Capped Pigeon 41
    • IX. Muscicapa Flammea. Flammeous Flycatcher 43
    • X. Motacilla Sutoria. The Tailor Bird 44
    • XI. Tantalus Leucocephalus. The White-Headed Ibis 47
    • XII. Gallinula Phanicurus. The Red-Tailed Water-Hen 49
    • XIII. Anser Melainotos. The Black-Backed Goose 50
    • XIV. Anas Poikilohynchus. Spotted-Billed Duck 52
    • XV. Anhinga Melanogaster. The Black-Bellied Anhinga 53
    • XVI. Squalus Tigrinus. The Tiger Shark 55
    • XVII. Labrus Zeylanicus. The Ceylon Wrasse 56
  • [Page vi] INDIAN FAUNULA, p. 57.
    Class I. QUADRUPEDS.
    • Div. I. Hoofed 59
      • Sect I. Whole-Hoofed 59
      • II. Cloven-Hoofed 59
    • II. Digitated 61
      • Sect I. Anthropomorphous 61
      • II. Rapacious. Canine Teeth 62
      • III. Without Canine Teeth 63
      • IV. Without Cutting Teeth 64
      • V. Without Teeth 65
    • III. Pinnated 65
    • IV. Winged 65
    Class II. BIRDS.
    • Div. I. Land Birds 67
      • Order I. Rapacious 67
      • II. Pies 68
      • III. Passerine 75
      • IV. Columbine 80
      • V. Gallinaceous 81
    • Div. II. Water Fowl 82
      • Order VII. Cloven-footed 82
      • VIII. Pinnated Feet 85
      • IX. Web-footed 85
    Class III. AMPHIBIA.
    Classis IV. PISCES.
    • Ordo I. Branchiostegi 91
    • II. Chondropterygii 92
    • III. Apodes 93
    • IV. Jugulares 93
    • V. Thoracici 94
    • VI. Abdominales 96
    Classis V. INSECTA.
    • Ordo I. Eleuterata 99
    • II. Ulonata 111
    • III. Synistata 112
    • IV. Agonata 115
    • V. Unogata 117
    • VI. Glossata 118
    • VII. Ryngota 136
    • VIII. Antliata 139
    Classis VI. VERMES.
    • I. Intestina 141
    • II. Mollusca 141
    • III. Testacea 143
    • IV. Lithophyta 160
    • V. Zoophyta 161

PLATES.

TITLE PAGE. The common Bird of Paradise, with a View of Dory Harbour in New Guinea.

  • I. Long-Tailed Squirrel; and the Tree, Eugenia Malaccensis, to face Page 31
  • II. Black and White Falcon. The Tree, Rhamnus Jujuba. 33
  • III. Little Horn Owl. The Plant, Gloriofa Superba. 34
  • IV. Fasciated Courocou. The Plant, Nummularia Lactea Minima. Rumph. Amboin. 36
  • V. Red-Headed Cuckoo. 38
  • VI. Red Woodpecker. 39
  • VII. Double-Spurred Partridge. 40
  • VIII. Black-Capped Pigeon. 41
  • IX. Flammeous Flycatcher. 43
  • X. Tailor Bird. 44
  • XI. White-Headed Ibis. 47
  • XII. Red-Tailed Water-Hen. 49
  • XIII. Black-Backed Goose. 50
  • XIV. Spotted-Billed Duck. 52
  • XV. Black-Bellied Anhinga. 53
  • XVI. Fig. 1. Tiger Shark. 55
  • Fig. 2. Ceylon Wrasse.

INDIAN ZOOLOGY.

N. B. The birds represented in plates 3, 6, and 8, are, by an over­sight in the letter press, said to be figured of the natural size: the real measures are as follow, viz.

  • PI. 3. The bird measures about 7 inches.
  • PI. 6. The length of the bird is about 9 inches.
  • PI. 8. The bird is rather more than 9 inches long.

Page 40. For BICALCARATUS read BICALCARATA.—The length of this species is about 13 inches.

AN ESSAY ON INDIA, ITS BOUNDARIES, CLIMATE, SOIL, AND SEA.

[Page 3] THE name of India is probably derived from Hind, or Hindu, the appellation of the people inhabiting it, which the Spaniards and Portuguese, the first navigators to India, were accustomed to write Gentu. The Greeks, who penetrated through Persia into India, received from the Persians the name of Hind, as that of the nation; but they also improperly called Indus, the river named by the inhabitants Sind or Sindo. In a later age, the Romans termed the country, India, the people, In­dians, but the river also, Indus; yet they were not unacquainted with the name of Sindi. The Arabians and Persians again em­ployed the names of Sind, and Hind, which occur frequently in their writings. After the Portuguese began to navigate for the purpose of exploring new regions, many of them suspected, that if they were to steer directly westward, they would at length arrive at the farthest islands in the vicinity of India; and because they conceived these islands to lie before those Indian regions (ante illas) they gave them, in the geographical charts made before the discovery of America, the name of Antilles; and that India, which [Page 4] they supposed situated behind the Antilles, they named the West Indies, because it might be reached by sailing westward. Hence appears the reason why in our age the name of Indies is so widely extended.

THAT India whence the animals now to be described are taken, is East India. But even here there is much variation as to the countries to which this name is proper and peculiar. In the first place it is maintained, that India is only wherever the Hindu nation inhabits, or the country called by the Persians, Hindostan, which is comprehended between the rivers Sind and Ganges, closed to the north by the ridge of Imaus or Caucasus; and on the south surrounded by the ocean; so that the whole peninsula on this side the Ganges, belongs to Hindostan.

BUT in a more extended sense, the peninsula beyond the Ganges also is a part of India. And its limits are much more extensive, if under this second signification of India are reckoned all the islands of the Indian sea, from the east and north of Madagascar, as far as New Holland, and thence eastward to the Philippine islands, together with New Guinea; and it is principally with this meaning that the English and Dutch sailors use the word India, and Mr. PENNANT seems to have adopted it in his account of the animals, of India.

FROM what has been said, it will be evident that a disquisition concerning the climate, soil, and seas of India, thus largely under­stood, will be a matter of much difficulty.

MOUNT Imaus, MOUNTAINS. arising in the very borders of Persia, and whose northern ridge separates India from Bokara or Bactria, from Ca­shimire or Caspatyrus, from the kingdom of Tibet, and from the Chinese province of Yunnan, terminates at length in the kingdom [Page 5] of Tonquin, and runs out into other branches. At the root of this mountain the temperature of the air is very various; for in the winter season the country is buried in snow and frost, not, however, for a long time. Those summits alone from which the Sind and Ganges are principally fed, are covered with perpetual snow. Yet even the plain tract at the mouths of the Ganges is not entirely free from frost during winter, since the inhabitants collect ice artificially prepared, for cooling liquors in the heat of summer, GREAT HEATS. although Fahrenbeit's thermometer never sinks below 42. But in the summer season the inhabitants undergo the most intense heats, arising to the 114th, nay even to the 120th degree of Fahrenbeit's thermometer; so that men are scarcely able to breathe, plunge into water up to the chin, and ascend the higher trees that they may inhale a somewhat cooler breeze; whilst they whose occupations oblige them to endure the hot air abroad, not unfrequently fall suddenly dead. The birds too are often killed by the heat, while flying, or sitting on trees, and fall to the ground.

THEN, as the flat country is inundated about the solstice by the swoln waters of the Ganges, which returning into their channel, leave many stagnant pools, the exhalations raised by the sun's heat form a body of intensely hot vapour, extremely noxious, so as to occasion putrid fevers of the highest malignity, which frequently prove fatal within three hours.

LET us now pass into the peninsula of India on this side the Ganges, and examine the nature of its climate and soil. This part of India is divided into two parts by the ridge of mountains called Gatté; and while summer reigns on one side, winter pre­vails on the other. This chiefly proceeds from the winds, which, [Page 6] from October to April, blow constantly from the north; and from April to October, from the south. For the space of some weeks before this change, there is generally scarcely any wind; but at the commencement of the change, such tempests arise as to cause great damage to mariners. On the eastern side of the peninsula, called the coast of Coromandel, the sky from April to October is constantly serene without a shower, but from October to April is the rainy season. On the western or Malabar coast, on the contrary, there is no rain from October to April, but very heavy rains fall from May to September. During the fair season, intense heat infests the whole coast; but in the rainy season, the temperature is at intervals more moderate, and at that time all the rivers swell, and their streams are partly distributed through the fields for the purpose of fertilising them, and partly are received into ponds or great receptacles, where the water is preserved with care, to be let into the fields at proper periods.

THE region of India beyond the Ganges has nearly the same climate with the peninsula on this side; RIVERS. but it is particularly well watered by large rivers. Of these we shall first mention the Bahramputter (Burrampooter) which flows through the whole country of Tibet from the very confines of Cashimire, and, after it has crossed the kingdom of Assam, enters that of Bengal at Ran­gamatty, and at length, just upon the coast of the Indian sea, mixes its waters with those of the Ganges, in an equally copious, stream, and thus enters the sea in a common channel. Next, the rivers Ava, Pegu, and Tenasserim, rising in the Tibet mountains, after watering the kingdoms whose names they bear, enter the bay of Bengal on the western side of the peninsula.

THE Menam and Menam-kom, or Siam and Cambodia rivers, [Page 7] flow down from the mountains which part the province of Yun­nan in China, from India. All the above rivers, the Bahramputter excepted, take their course through large vallies, enclosed on each side by ridges of hills. On the approach of the sun to the tropic of Cancer, the snow on these mountains is dissolved, and all these vallies are overflowed, like Egypt by the Nile. When the rivers return into their channel, the moistened countries are sown chiefly with rice, which yields a very rich increase. The kingdoms of Cochinchina, and Tonquin, are bounded to the east by the sea, and to the west by a ridge of mountains separating them from the kingdoms of Cambodia, and Laos. From this ridge many rivers descend, which, after they have watered the country for a short tract, mingle with the sea.

THE soil of all India hitherto described is rich; and, SOIL. by the cultivation of the populous nations, which from the remotest ages have inhabited these regions, and addicted themselves to agricul­ture, is rendered extremely fertile. And, by reason that so many nations, and such various species of animals, have for such a course of ages putrefied with the vegetables of this fruitful land, the soil, lixiviated with water and mixed with ashes, affords to Europe a great quantity of nitre, the principal ingredient of its gunpowder. Rice is chiefly sown in moist situations, and sup­plies these people, who live a Pythagorean life, with a food of easy preparation, and extremely cheap. There is another kind of rice, which grows even on the hills, and spares the cultivators the labor of watering.

THE marshes are covered with thick beds of reeds; and, MARSHES. near the mouths of the largest rivers, overgrown with impenetrable groves of mangles. Among the cultivated tracts, here and there [Page 8] dry spots are observed, covered with briars and thickets. The parts neglected by human culture are full of woods, which abound with the most beautiful and singular birds, especially parrots, peacocks, pigeons, and others infinitely diversified with the gayest and most varied plumage; together with herds of antelopes, tribes of monkeys, and numbers of lions and tygers. The ele­phant, and rhinoceros, also inhabit these forests, which scarcely ever lose their leaves, but are always verdant, and perpetually loaded with fruits of one kind or another.

NATURE wears a different form in the islands of the Indian sea. ISLANDS. But, that we may the better understand the nature of the climate, and the temperature of the atmosphere, it will be of particular use to consider the course of the winds which prevail in these seas. WINDS. Between both tropics the wind almost. constantly blows from the east; and at the equinoxes, about the line, the course of the wind is directly from east to west. For the sun in the day-time heats the air; and about noon, when it is vertical, the atmosphere glows with heat, and therefore is rarefied; at the same time, the sun, seeming rapidly to move from east to west, on account of the diurnal revolution of the earth, causes noon successively in different regions. Towards evening, when the sun is in the west, the air from both sides of the globe, as likewise from the east, rushes towards the west, and follows the sun, in order to balance the rarefaction of the heated atmosphere: this current of air is the east wind. The greater the distance from the equinoctial line in each hemisphere, the more the wind inclines to the north or south. Now, when the sun arrives at the tropic of Cancer, the east wind follows it; but the east-north-east and north-east ex­tend beyond the tropic of Cancer into the northern hemisphere, [Page 9] whilst, on the contrary, the east-south-east, and south-east scarcely reach farther than the equinoctial line. And when the sun re­cedes to the tropic of Capricorn, the east wind follows it there too; but the east-north-east, and north-east scarcely reach beyond the line, rarely to the tropic; while the east-south-east, and south-east spread far into the southern hemisphere. These observations are generally true concerning the winds within the tropics, and especially in the great Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

EVERY where within the tropics, on approaching within three or four leagues of land, a breeze is met with blowing from sea to land, from nine in the morning to sun-set; and from land to sea, from about ten at night to sun-rise. These observations also hold in general with respect to the winds in the vicinity of lands within the tropics.

IN the Indian sea, from October to April, the east-north-east, and north-north-east winds prevail as far as the line. But during the same season, from the line southwards to about the 14th de­gree, the west, west-south-west, and south-west are the prevailing winds; and beyond this space, the east-south-east, and south-east. From April to October, in the northern hemisphere, the west, west-south-west, and south-west winds reign: to the south of the equinoctial, as far as about the 12th degree, the east, and east-south-east; and beyond that point, the east-south-east, and south-east. These prevailing winds are by sailors termed the Monsoons; and from them some inferences may be drawn as to the tempera­ture of the air. The winds which blow across great tracts of land heated by the sun's rays, acquire a great degree of heat; and the greater space they pass over, the more scorching they prove. But wherever winds blow over the sea, they are cooled [Page 10] by the evaporation of the water: hence all shores and islands, though situated under the hottest sun, enjoy the benefit of tempe­rate sea breezes.

IF we mean to consider too nature of the soil in the Indian islands, ORIGIN OF THE ISLANDS. we must attend to their two-fold form and origin. Some are lofty, and if of moderate size, they have generally a conical shape. On examination of the mountain and strata in this case, it will presently be obvious that the whole island has emerged from the bottom of the sea through the force of subterranean fire; for all parts are full of volcanic remains. Actually burning mountains are likewise not uncommon in these islands. All the high islands which I have surveyed between the tropics, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, were found to contain scoriae, eruc­tated ashes, and liquefied matter, the manifest vestiges of intestine fires. And that the same takes place with regard to the islands of the Indian sea, is rendered probable by so many volcanoes yet to be seen among them, by the testimony of various navigators and eye-witnesses, and by the stones, evidently resembling scoriae and melted rock, brought from thence. It is wonderful that ashes thrown up from volcanoes, and other scoriaceous matters comminuted and mixed with the earth, should constitute a soil inferior to none in fertility; but it is certain that most plants thrive most luxuriantly in this soil, and that trees of all kinds grow in it to a stupendous magnitude.

THERE are within the tropics other islands, low, and little elevated above the surface of the sea. All of this kind are the workmanship of zoophyte vermes, which raise on all sides from the bottom of the sea their mansions of a calcareous matter, whence at length are formed rocks and stony shallows very dan­gerous [Page 11] to navigators. Since for the most part easterly winds are frequent in these seas, these animalcules, as if actuated by instinct, endeavour to exclude the waves driven by the winds, by means of their stupendous works; and therefore, carrying on the artful structure of their calcareous or stony habitations, they extend them in long arms, which at last unite in a circle, within which they include a portion of calm untroubled sea. On the opposite or windward side, the waves continually throw up fragments of corals, which, accumulating by degrees, form a mound against the force of the billows, and on that part the sea is rendered gra­dually shallower; whilst on the other side, immediately under the arms raised by the zoophytes, the sea is of astonishing depth; and not unfrequently a part of the work remains open, for the ingress and egress of the tide. In the coral banks themselves, sand is collected by the waves, which afford soil and aliment for the seeds of shore plants brought thither by the sea; and these plants at length perishing, gradually create and accumulate a vegetable mould. If by chance a cocoa-nut be carried by the sea to these spots, it germinates, and grows into a tall tree, bearing and dis­seminating many nuts, some of which again germinating, soon form a palm-grove, affording shade to birds, and other animals, and supplying navigators, driven to the place by stress of weather, with a grateful food and liquor. The bay included within the arms constructed by the zoophytes is a receptacle for fishes which re­quire a calm unagitated sea, and thus another food from the ani­mal kingdom is presented to strangers. The shallows, too, afford quiet and desirable situations to molluscae, and shell-fish of all kinds, and contribute much towards supplying the inhabitants of the islands with a variety of food.

[Page 12] THE greater islands of the Indian sea, Ceylon, Borneo, Java, Su­matra, Celebes, Luconia, Mindanao, Ceram, Gilolo, Waighen, and the isle of Papua or New Guinea, are all mountainous, and full of burning or extingushed volcanoes. They are covered with ever­green woods and reed-grounds, luxuriant in various tropical fruits, productive of all kinds of spices, USEFUL TREES, &c and of many drugs valuable in medicine and the arts, especially Camphor, Benzoin, Gamboge, Sanders, the Amomums, Costus, Zedoary, Galangal, the Peppers, Snakeroot, Dragons-blood, and many others which need not here be enumerated. These islands, enriched with so many and great advantages, are everywhere inhabited by various animals; their woods and thickets are thronged with innumerable birds; their seas abound in fishes of all kinds, the greatest part of which have never been examined by naturalists; and what vast treasures of shell-fish their shores, marine rocks, and the bottom of their seas contain, may be gathered from hence, that for at lest a century that these seas have been frequented by Europeans, they have continually been offering somewhat new to the curiosity of men whose avarice or vanity has prompted them to collect such stores from all parts. Nor are these regions destitute of inhabitants, differing from each other in colour, shape, manners, dress, religion, and language. For some tribes in the interior recesses of the woods and mountains preserve their antient savage state, treat all strangers as enemies, and devour the slain; others, adopting gender manners, and formed to commerce, and even to submis­sion, become daily more civilized.

THUS much, concerning the limits, climate, soil, and seas of India, I thought necessary to prefix, in order to render what follows more perspicuous.

ON THE BIRDS OF PARADISE, AND THE PHOENIX.

THE Birds of Paradise are a genus of birds scarcely as yet sufficiently known to the ornithologists, because few of them are imported into Europe, and those, too, mutilated in their feet, wings, and other parts, or distorted by having a stick thrust within their skins, and thus too much lengthened. No real naturalist ever had the fortune to see a live Bird of Paradise, or to have observed their manners and economy *; for they inhabit a region visited by very few Europeans, since scarcely any but sailors and merchants are permitted to penetrate into the remotest east, the country of the Paradise-birds. The history of this genus is there­fore still full of falsities, or rather buried in such darkness, that we can scarcely hope to gain more and truer information con­cerning them, till some person, by a journey into these parts, is [Page 14] enabled, by his own observations and experiments, to give the public some accounts more ample and exact than we hitherto possess.

IT is most certain that these birds were never known to the antients; and whatever the Egyptian priests delivered concerning their Phoenix, has little agreement with the Bird of Paradise. But, that there may not be the left doubt remaining on these points, we shll collect what has been said by the antients concerning the Phoenix, and, after the passages are brought in view, briefly ex­amine them. Herodotus, the father of history, relates (1. ii. 73.) that the Phoenix is a bird of the shape and size of an eagle, deco­rated with gold-coloured and purple wings; but he frankly con­fesses that he had never seen the bird, but knew it only by its picture. Pliny (1. x. c. 2.) confirms that the Phoenix is of the size of an eagle, with the splendour of gold around his neck; the rest of the body purple; having a blue tail spotted with rose-colored feathers; combs adorning his face, and a crest of fea­thers, his head. This was the antient opinion concerning the form and colours of the Phoenix; but the same Pliny relates from Manilius, that the conversion of the great year corresponds with the life of this bird, from which period the same course of seasons, and position of the heavenly bodies, is renewed; and that this takes place about noon on the day that the sun enters Taurus. Horapollo delivers the same notion respecting the Phoenix. "They (the Egyptian priests) meaning to signify the conversion of the great year, paint the Phoenix." These notions are then to be explained from the theology of Egypt.

THE Sun, which produces the seasons, is the Egyptian OSIRIS, a deity whose name has the same signification; for Oeisch-iri in the [Page 15] Egyptian tongue, is the maker of seasons. But almost all the male gods, especially, of the Egyptians, expressed the virtues and powers of the Sun. Hence, the vernal sun, when it is peculiarly vigorous, and operates with most power, according to the discipline of the Egyptian priests, was Hercules, whom they therefore called Dsem­menuti, the virtue of God, or of the Gods. The same Hercules, according to Athenagoras (pro Christianis, p. 18.) or, as Damas­cus has it ( [...] ap. Wolff. Anecdot. iii. p. 254.) "that prin­ciple was named, time void of old age, and likewise Hercules." Nor is it to be omitted, that in the obelisk of king Ramesses, the sun is called the lord of seasons, which in the Egyptian language is Sesoeisch, or Sesoosis.

THE annual revolution of the sun makes a year of twelve months; but the Egyptian year, long, was only 365 days; whence, every fourth year, four true solar years exceeded as many Egyp­tian years a single day, which they were not accustomed to inter­calate. Hence the seasons of the year wandered through the whole Egyptian year; and hence of the solar years as first fixed by Julius Ceasar the dictator, 1460 equal 1461 vague Egyptian years. On this account, the Egyptian priests were accustomed to call four years with the day of intercalation, the year of God; and 1461 vague Egyptian years made the great year of God, that is, of the Sun. And they taught, that at this great period, the con­version of the great year took place, at which also the Phoenix regenerated—flew from Arabia to the city of the sun, and de­posited his father's body on the altar.

IT will now appear, why the Orphics, in hymn xi. to Hercu­les 3. address him by the title of various-formed father of time. And Plutarch, in his treadle on Isis and Osiris, asserts, "that [Page 16] the Egyptians fable Hercules to be placed in the sun, and to re­volve with it." For, from these premises, it might justly be said, with Nonnus of Panopolis, 1. xl. p. 683, "that Hercules rolls round the whole earth in the glittering orb of the sun, and carries round with him the year, the son of time." Every common year, therefore, is a year of God; and the great year, the son of time, which, in the Egyptian language, would be Dsphenoeisch, and, on account of the harshness of the first letter, the Creels would make it [...], Phoenix. This origin of the name adds strength to my opinion, since it is perfectly agreeable to the doc­trine of the Egyptians concerning these things, and at the same time exactly expresses all the sacred fables of their priests relative to the Phoenix.

THAT the fabulous Phoenix of the Egyptians has nothing in common with the Birds of Paradise, will be sufficiently manifest from what has been said; yet it is not altogether without reason that we have here treated on the Phoenix; for the first Portuguese navigators to the Indian islands called the Birds of Paradise, passa­ros da sol, Birds of the sun, in the same manner as the Egyptians had regarded the Phoenix as a symbol of the annual revolution of the sun, and the conversion of the great year. The inhabitants of the isle of Ternate call these birds Manu-co-Dewata; Birds of God. The French, English, and Germans have adopted the name of Birds of Paradise. All these names seem to attribute somewhat of a celestial origin to the birds. The name Manu-co-Dewata has induced some writers of natural history to call the bird Manuco­diata (Edwards, t. 110. Marograv. Brasil, 207. Raii Synops. Av. 21. n. 7. Brisson Ornithol. ii. p. 130.) and the illustrious count de Busson, by cutting off part of the name, has made from [Page 17] it his Manucode. Valentyne (vol. iii. p. 306, 313.) has treated at length of the Birds of Paradise. The Portuguese first saw them in Gilolo, Papua, and New Guinea. Many idle fables have been propagated concerning these birds; among which are to be reckoned, that they have no feet, are always on the wing, pass their lives in the air and feed on this element; on which account the inhabitants of these countries are accustomed to cut off their feet. But the people of the Aru islands have taught the Dutch in Banda better; and it is sound that the feet are cut off in order that the birds may be more easily preserved dry. The Indians, too, pay little regard to the feet, because they use the skins of the Birds of Paradise only to adorn their helmets in their games and mock combats. But the Aruans, 70 or 80 years ago, brought these birds with their feet. Pigasette, who accompanied Ferdi­nand Magalhaens in his voyage, testified from ocular demonstra­tion, about 1525, that they were not without feet. But the length and peculiar structure of the scapular feathers, prevent them from sitting on trees in windy weather; and if they are once blown down to the ground, they are utterly unable to raise themselves again by their wings. When taken by the natives, they are immediately killed, because their food is unknown, and they defend themselves courageously with their very strong beaks.

OF the Birds of Paradise there are about six species *. 1. The great Paradise-bird of Aru. 2. The lesser Paradise-bird of Papua. 3. and 4. Two black species. [Page 18] 5. The white Paradise-bird. 6. The unknown Paradise-bird. 7. The lesser King-bird, which is also to be reckoned among the Paradise-birds.

I. PARADISEA APODA. GREATER BIRD OF PARADISE. Latham Syn. ii. 474. Index, i. 194.

THE greater Paradise-bird is generally about two feet in length. Head, small: beak, the length of the head, hard, pale-co­loured. Head and nape of the neck, yellow. Space round the eyes, black. Neck, beautifully resplendent with very soft, shining, emerald-coloured feathers: those of the breast, equally soft, of a pale yellowish-grey. Large chesnut-coloured wings. Back co­vered with the scapulars elongated, stiff, narrow, pale brown, very much resembling the loose feathers of the ostrich. These expand while the bird flies; and therefore it is easy for him to remain in the air. On the sides of the breast and belly are bundles of feathers, much shorter than the anterior ones, stiff, gold-coloured. From the rump arise two stiff feathers of great length, naked in the shafts, terminated with radiated plumes. Several birds of these countries are furnished with such long feathers, as the Belurus (Pylstaart) of Amboyna, the Alcedo Sari­wak, and a species of Papuan parroquet. In size it little exceeds the blackbird. Feet short, with four strong toes. The inhabi­tants of Ternate call this species Burong Papua, Papua birds; and sometimes Manu-co-dewata, and also Soffu, or Sioffu. The Am­boynese call them Manu-key-aru, birds of the islands Key and Aru, [Page 19] because the people of these islands bring them to Banda and Am­boyna for sale. The Aruans give them the name of Fanaan. In fact, these birds are not found in the island Key, which is about 50 miles eastward of Banda, but are met with in the Aru islands (which are 15 miles further to the east than Key) at the dry season of the western monsoon, and return to New Guinea at the commencement of the rainy season, as soon as the east wind begins to blow. They fly in flocks of about 30 or 40, led by a bird which the Aruans call KING, but which is altogether distinct from the lesser Bird of Paradise. This leader is black with red spots, and constantly flies higher than the rest, which never sepa­rate from it, but immediately when it settles, settle too; whence they frequently perish, for if the leader settles on the ground, they are not able to rise on account of the peculiar structure of their feathers. Nor can they fly with the wind, for in that case their very long loose feathers would be totally disordered: they therefore always fly against the wind, and carefully abstain from flight in a storm, which often throws them to the ground.

WHILE flying they are noisy, like starlings; but their cry rather resembles the croaking of ravens, and is particularly audi­ble, when in windy weather the incumbrance of their feathers brings them into imminent danger of falling to the ground. In the Aru islands they perch on the highest trees, especially on those of the small-leaved Waringha with red fruit, on which they chiefly subsist (Ficus Benjamina? Hort. Malab. iii. f. 35. Rumph. Amboin. iii. f. 90.) They are taken by the inhabitants with bird-lime, snares, or blunt arrows. But though many fall alive into the fowlers hands, they are immediately killed, and after em­bowelling, and generally cutting off their feet, they are fumigated [Page 20] with sulphur, and dried; in which state they are sold, for half a dollar in Banda, but in Aru they may be purchased for a large nail or piece of iron. The Dutch ships frequenting the sea be­tween New Guinea and Aru (a distance of 18 or 20 miles) not unfrequently see flocks of Paradise-birds crossing the sea from one to the other of these places, but always against: the wind. If a more tempestuous gale than usual rises during their flight, they seek the upper and calmer regions of the air, and thus continue their course. The natives fasten these birds to their helmets in place of crests, in real and mock sights; and often tie the whole or part of the skins to their swords. During the eastern mon­soon their very long feathers fall; and in the western monsoon, within the space of four months, as the Aruans report, they are replaced by new ones.

II. PARADISEA APODA. LESSER. Latham Syn. ii. 474. Index, i. 194. β.

THE lesser Paradise-bird of Papua. This species is about twenty inches in length. Beak, lead-colored, paler towards the apex. Eyes, small, and surrounded with black. Neck, eme­rald-colored. Head, and back of the neck, dusky-yellowish. Wings, small and chesnut-colored. Breast and belly, brown. Back, yellowish-grey. Long scapulars, about a foot in length, and paler than in the former species; which is in general to be observed of all the splendid colours in this species. The long bare feathers of the tail are constantly rejected by the inhabitants. In other respects, this species has every thing in common with the [Page 21] former. These birds also follow a leader; which, however, has more of a dark purple in his wings; but this leader is distin­guished from the 3d and 4th black kinds. The Papuan inhabi­tants of the island Missowal, (Mixoal, Maysel) relate that these Paradise-birds never migrate, but build nests in the highest trees, where they are found by the Alfubris. The beak and neck are longer in the male than in the female. By the people of Ternate, and Tidore, this bird is called Toffu or Burong Papuwa, Papua-bird. By the Papuans it is named Shag or Shague. The people of East Ceram give it the name of Samaleik; but in the isle of Sorghile, in New Guinea, it is called Tshakke. It was formerly believed that these birds were found in Gilolo or Halamahera, and the adjacent islands to the south and south-east; but it is now certain that they are peculiar to the Papuan isles. These extend from the southern extremity of Gilolo, and northern coast of Ceram, as far as the western part of New Guinea. The largest of them are Missowal (Maysol) lying to the north of Ceram; and Sala­watti, or Salawat, situated near the country or island of Serghile, in New Guinea. This last, in the earliest Portuguese maps, is im­properly called Ceram, and is separated from New Guinea. These Paradise-birds perch on the highest trees of the mountainous region, and are killed with blunt arrows by the people of Misso­wal. Others relate, that the natives medicate the water of which the birds are used to drink, with the India-berries (Menisperman Cocculus Linn.) whereby they are rendered so stupid as to be taken by the hand. These birds commonly feed on the fruit of the Tshampeda-tree, which they persorate with their bills, and thus extract the kernels. It is fabled by some, that when these birds become weak with age, they fly a great height towards the [Page 22] sun, till they fall down dead. The Papuans, after killing and embowelling them, dry the cavity with a hot iron, and enclose them in a joint of bamboo, in order the better to preserve them.

III. and IV.

THE black Paradise-birds. The larger variety of these is sold by the natives without wings and feet, and therefore is very difficult to be described with accuracy. The remains are generally stretched out on a stick to the length of four spans. The feathers of the head, neck, and belly are black, silky, and mixed with a radiant hue of purple and gold. Beak, blackish, an inch long. From both sides spring bunches of feathers, some­what similar to quill-feathers, but in reality very different from them, for this species is always offered to sale with the wings cut off. The feathers in these bunches are extremely soft, with broad webs like peacocks feathers, of a fine shining green, and all reverted; whence Valentyne suspects that they become reverted in the bamboo joints in which they are enclosed by the natives. Tail, wedge-shaped. Tail feathers next the abdomen, hairy; upper ones, longer, and pointed; those immediately beneath these, above a span and a half in length, stiff, with loose doubly com­pound rays, black above, shining below. The birds of this variety are brought only from the part of New Guinea called Serghile. The inhabitants carry the skins dried upon sticks by smoke, and enclosed in bamboo joints, to the island Salawat, and exchange them for hatchets and coarse cloths. The Pa­puans call them Shagawa, and also, Paradise-birds from Serghile: in Ternate and Tidore, they are called Soffu-kokotu, Black Paradise-birds. [Page 23] Serghile is the most northern part of New Guinea, running out to a sharp promontory, situated beyond or to the east of Gilolo and the Papua island, and facing the north.

BESIDES the greater black Paradise-bird, there is a lesser variety. Its feathers are equally long, but not so thick; black above, not shining. This variety is also destitute of the shining peacock feathers found in the first. It likewise wants the three long pointed tail-feathers, which are proper to the greater kind. The Alfubris, or inhabitants of the mountainous part of the isle of Messowal, shoot these birds with arrows, and sell them to the people of Tidore.

V. PARADISEA ALBA, Latham Index, i. 197. β. WAYCHIHU. The same.

THE white Paradise-bird is the rarest of all the species, and has two varieties, one entirely white, the other black and white. The first is very rare, and in habit much resembles the Paradise-bird of Papua. The second variety has its fore-part black, and back-part white, with twelve slender crooked almost naked feathers. This kind is the rarest of all, and is procured only through the people of Tidore, because it is found in those Papuan isles only which are little frequented, particularly in Way­ghihu (called also Wadju, Wardju, and Waygiu.) Some suspect that they are imported from Serghile, in New Guinea.

VI.

IN 1689, a new species of black Paradise-bird was first seen at Amboyna, brought from Missowal, about a foot in length, with a shining purplish hue. Head, middle-sized; bill, straight; back, as in the other species, adorned with purple-blue feathers, but under the wings, and on the belly, yellowish, as in the apodous species. Back of the neck, mouse-colored, greenish In this kind it is observable, that on the scapulae are bundles of green-edged feathers, which can be erected at pleasure, like wings. In place of a tail, it has twelve black, naked, setaceous and thready shafts, like pendulous feathers. Feet strong, with sharp claws. Head small; eyes encircled with black.

VII. PARADISES REGIA. KING. Latham Syn. ii. 475. Index, i. 194.

THE last species is the King-bird, which some reckon among the Paradise-birds; but, according to Valentyne, it is totally different from them. LINNAEUS and BUFFON, however, refer them to the Paradise-birds, chiefly induced by the shape of the bill, and the feathers peculiar to this genus. This bird is about seven inches in length, and somewhat exceeds a titmouse in bulk. Head, and eyes (which are surrounded with a black circle) small. Beak, straight. Crown of the head, flame-colored: nape of the neck, blood-colored: neck and breast, chesnut, with a band of bright emerald. Wings, large for the body; quill-feathers black, with rays spotted and streaked with shining red. Tail, straight, short, and brown. Intermediate tail-feathers, long, [Page 25] thread-shaped, black, exceeding the rest a palm in length, with a lunated feathered tip, of a shining green above, brown below. Belly, spotted: from the sides proceed bundles of broad-rayed feathers, one part of the rays, green, the other, brown. Back, blood-brown, glossy like silk. Feet, like those of a lark; three toes before, one behind.

THIS bird never associates with the other species of Paradise-birds, but flies about the lonely thickets, wherever it sees red ber­ries, nor ever fits upon tall trees.

IN Aru it is called Wowi Wowi: in the Papua isles, Sopclo-o. The Dutch name it Kings-bird. It is chiefly brought from Aru-Sopolo-o; and especially from Wodjir, a well-known town of this island. The Aruans say they have never seen its nest; but sus­pect that it is a stranger from New Guinea, and there brings up its young, but never leaves Aru during the dry season of the western monsoon. It is taken in snares made of Gummatty, or with birdlime prepared from the Sukkom or bread-fruit (Artocar­pus communis Forst. Charact.)

IT is embowelled and dried, and sold in Banda. The Aruans put it in their helmets in their mock fights, and the game Toba­kalil.

THE illustrious BUFFON, or rather his friend Guencau de Mont­beillard, describes six Paradise-birds in his Hist. of Birds, tom iii. edit. in 4to: and torn v. edit. in 12mo, p. 207, 238. These birds seem also to be delineated in Daubenton's splendid Planches Enluminces, No 254, 496, 631, 632, 633, 634. Sonner at like­wise describes and delineates the same six birds. We shall now therefore briefly compare these six birds with what we have above described at length from Valentyn, vol. iii.

[Page 26] I. L'oiseau de Paradis, is Valentyn's, I. Paradisea major Aru­ena; and the Paradisea apoda Linn.

II. Le Manucode, is Valentyn's, 7. Avis regia; Paradisea regia Linn.

III. MAGNIFICENT. Latham Syn. ii. 477. Index, i. 195. Le Magnisique, on Manucode à bouquets, may seem in some respect referable to Valentyn's Paradisea minor Papuana; though I consess it much differs from it.

IV. SUPERB. Latham Syn. ii. 479. Index, i. 196. Le Superbe, on Manucode noir, as delineated in the Planches Enlum. seems to be either a young bird, or a hen, or taken at the moulting season; for Valentyn's 3. Paradisea nigra major, has long setaceous feathers in the tail; and the Hist. of Birds, as well as Daubenton's Le Superbe, are without them. What Gueneau de Monbeillard observes, however, is not to be overlooked; that the specimens in the royal Paris museum are ill kept, and have lost these long feathers by accident.

V. GOLD-BREASTED. Latham Syn. ii. 481. Index, i. 196. Le Sisilet, ou Manucode à six filets. I can scarcely help thinking that this is Valentyn's, 4. Paradisea nigra minor, which by chance or design had lost its long filaments near the ears.

VI. BLUE-GREEN. Latham Syn. ii. 482. Index, i. 197. Le Calybé, seems to be an obscure species.

[Page 27] THE other Paradise-birds of Valentyn are not yet sufficiently ascertained. It is greatly therefore to be wished, that a naturalist should undertake a journey into New Guinea, and the Papua isles, since these regions seem full of new and unexplored natural wonders. In the meantime we hope that these observations con­cerning the Birds of Paradise will not be unacceptable to those who are desirous of an accurate knowledge of the works of Nature.

INDIAN ZOOLOGY.

[Page]

THE LONG-TAILED SQUIRREL.


[Page 31]I. SCIURUS MACROURUS. THE LONG-TAILED SQUIRREL.
Sciurus. Zeylanicus pills in dorso nigricantibus, Raii Syn. Quad. 215. Sc. Macrourus, Gmelin. Lin. i. 148.

THIS species is found in Ceylon and Malabar. In the Cingalese tongue it is called Dandoelana; and, LONG-TAILED-SQUIRREL. from the noise it makes, Roekea.

It is about three times the size of the European squir­rel.

THE ears are tufted with black hairs: the end of the note is pink-coloured: the cheeks, legs, and belly, are of a dull yellow: between the ears is a yellow spot: the crown of the head, and the back, are black: from each ear is a bifurcated line or the same color, pointing down the cheeks: the upper part of the feet is covered with black hairs: the lower part naked and red.

THE tail is near twice the length of the body, of a light ash-color, and extremely bushy. The part next the body quite surrounded with hairs: on the remainder the hairs ore separated, and lie flat.

[Page 32] THE tree is the JAMBU Rumph. Amboin. i. 121. tab. 37. EUGENIA MALAC. EUGENA MALACCENSIS, Sp. Pl. 672. Fl. Zeyl. No 187. It is the most excellent of the Indian fruits, delicious in taste, grateful in smell, pleasing to the eye, and salubrious in its effects.

ITS native place is Malacca; and is only cultivated in Goa and Amboina, on account of its fine qualities, its roseate scent and color, and its happy faculty of allaying the rage of thirst in the burning fevers of the torrid zone.

THE BLACK & WHITE FALCON.


[Page 33] II. FALCO MELANOLEUCOS. BLACK AND WHlTE FALCON.
F. Melanoleucos, Gmelin. Lin. i. 274. Latham, i. 81. Index Ornith, i. 36.

INHABITS Ceylon: its length is sixteen inches, BLACK AND WHITE FALCON. its weight about ten ounces.

THE bill is black: the irides of a reddish yellow: the orbits marked with white specks. The head, neck, back, scapulars, quil-feathers, and some of the middle coverts of the wings, are black; the rest of the coverts, those of the tail, the tail itself, the breast and belly, are of a pure white.

THIS species is called in the Cingalese, Kaloe Koeroel­goya. We are uncertain whether it is trained for the amusement of falconry, as some other kinds are, by the natives of Ceylon.

THE tree is the Vidara of Rumphius, ii. 17. tab. 36. RHAMNUS JUJUBA. the Rhamnus jujuba, Sp. Pl. 282. Fl. Zeyl. No 89. It bears an eatable fruit, of very little flavor.

III. OTUS BAKKAMOENA. THE LITTLE HORN OWL.
Strix indica, Gmelin. Lin. i. 289. Latham, i. 127. Index Ornith. i. 56. No 14.

THIS elegant species is found in Ceylon; LITTLE HORN OWL. is called there Bakkamoena, and is a scarce species even in that island.

IT is represented of its natural size. The irides are scarlet: the horns take their origin from the base of the bill, and point to the side of the head: on their inner side they are dusky, on their exterior white.

THE bill is dusky, surrounded with long bristles: the circle of feathers round the eyes is of a very pale ash­color: the external circle of a yellowish brown.

THE head of a deep ash color: the back dusky: co­verts of the wings grey, marked with narrow, lines of black, pointing downwards: the quil-feathers regularly barred with black and white: the breast buff-colored, marked with small sagital black spots: the legs feathered half way down the naked part of a reddish yellow.

THE plant is one of the most beautiful of the Indies; GLORIOSA SUPERBA. [Page]

THE LITTLE HORN'D OWL.

[Page 35] but at the same time its roots are the most venemous. It is found in Ceylon and Malabar, and, on account of its charming appearance, is called by Linnaus, GLORIOSA SUPERBA, Sp. Pl. 437. By the natives it is styled Na­jajala and Nyaghala, possibly from its being possessed of a poison as potent as that of the serpent Naja, or Cobra de Capello, whose bite is the most fatal of any yet known.

[...]

IV. TROGON FASCIATUS. THE FASCIATED COUROUCOU. *
Trogon fasciatus, Gmelin. Lin. i. 405. Latham, ii. 492. Index Ornith. i. 200.

THIS species is rarely, FASCIATED COUROUCOU. found in the isle of Ceylon, where the Cingalese call, it Rantvan-kondea. A spe­cies bearing some resemblance to it is described by M. Brisson, iv. 165, by the name Le Couroucou Cendre; but the bend on the breast, which distinguishes the Indian species, evinces it to differ from that of Cayenne.

ITS length was ten inches and an half: DESCRIPTION. the weight one ounce five-eighths.

THE bill black, thick, strong, and arched; the base beset with bristles: the orbits naked, and of a deep blue: the irides yellow.

THE head and neck of a very deep dusky blue, fading into a paler as it approaches the breast.

ACROSS the breast is a fascia or band of white; beneath that the whole under-side is of a bright reddish orange­color.

[Page]

THE FACIATED COUROUCOU.

[Page 37] THE back is tawny; the coverts of the tail grey; the coverts of the wings, and the scapulars, elegantly barred with narrow undulated lines of black and white; the quil-feathers dusky, striped with white on their out­ward webs.

THE tail is very long, tipped with black, and com­posed of feathers of unequal lengths; the exterior feathers being much the shortest.

THE legs and feet small and dusky: the toes disposed two backward and two forward, as in the woodpecker tribe.

THE plant is the Nummularia lactea minima. Rumph. NUMMULARIA. Amboin. lib. ix. c. 78.

V. CUCULUS PYRRHOCEPHALUS. THE RED-HEADED CUCKOO.
Cuculus Pyrrhocephalus, Gmelin Lin. i. 417. Latham, ii. 544. Index Ornith. i. 222

THE Cingalese give this species the name of Malkoha: THE RED-HEADED CUCKOO. it inhabits the woods, and lives on fruits

ITS length is sixteen-inches: its weight four ounces.

THE bill is much arched. strong, and of a greenish-yellow color: the crown of the head, and part of the cheeks, are of a bright crimson, entirely surrounded by a band of white. The hind part of the head and neck black, marked with small white spots: the fore part of the neck entirely black.

THE back and wings black: the tail very long, com­posed of feathers of unequal lengths; their lower part black, the ends white.

THE breast and belly white: the legs of a pale blue.

[Page]

THE RED HEADED CUCKOW.
THE RED WOODPECKER.


[Page 39]VI. PICUS MINIATUS. THE RED WOODPECKER.
Picus Miniatus; Gmelin. Lin. i. 432. Latham, ii. 595. Index Ornith. i. 241.

MR. Loten shot this on the Highlands of Java. It is called by the Malayans, THE RED WOODPECKER.Toekan, or the Carpenter, a name they give to woodpeckers in general, from the noise these birds make in boring trees, which resembles that made by a workman.

IT is drawn the size of life. The bill is of a dusky blue: the head of a deep dull red, and adorned with a long crest pointing backwards: on the chin is a spot of yellow.

THE hind part of the neck, the back, the coverts, and secondary feathers of the wings, are of the color of red lead: the fore part of the neck is of a rose-color: the belly white.

THE quil-feathers black, marked with large white spots: the coverts of the tail green: the tail consist of sharp-pointed feathers, like the European kind, and is of a deep blue.

VII. PERDIX BICALCARATUS. DOUBLE-SPURRED PARTRIDGE.
Perdix Bicalcarata, Gmelin Lin. ii. 759. Forster Ind. Zool. 25. Ceylon Partridge, Lathham, iv. 758. Index Ornith. ii. 674.

THE bill of the MALE is red: DOUBLE SPURRED PARTRIDGE. from that to the re­gion of the eyes is a naked red space. The head is varied with black and white streaks. The whole neck, above and below, is black, elegantly marked with sagittal lines, the points tending upwards. The thighs white. The primaries dusky, edged with rufous. The back covered with rufous feathers, dusky on each side of their shafts. Tail dusky. Legs red, on each a pair of strong sharp spurs.

THE head of the female is cinereous. The color of the back and belly rufous, brightest below. The tail dusky. Legs red and unarmed.

THESE were taken near Colombo. The Cingalese call them Haben-Kukella.

[Page]

M&F. DOUBLE SPURR'D PARTRIDGE.
THE BLACK CAP'D PIGEON.


[Page 41]VIII. COLUMBA MELANOCEPHALA. THE BLACK-CAPPED PIGEON.
Columba Melanocephala, Gmelin. Lin. i. 781. Latham iv. 654. Index Ornith. ii. 610.

THIS most elegant species is painted the size of life. BLACK-CAPPED PIGEON. It was found on the ground in the isle of Java, HEAT OF THE TORRID ZONE. hav­ing dropped down dead in one of those hot days that are known only in the torrid zone, when the fowls of the air often perish, unable to respire; when lions, leopards, and wolves, immerge themselves up to their nostrils in the water, to preserve themselves from the scorching fun *; and when even men themselves have been forced to as­cend the highest trees, in order to draw in a more tempe­rate air .

SUCH a day occasioned the discovery of this species.

THE fore part of the head, the cheeks, DESCRIPTION. and beginning of the breast, were white: the hind part of the head black: the chin yellow.

[Page 42] THE rest of the neck, the breast, upper part of the belly, the back, coverts, and secondary feathers of the wings, of a fine green: the quil-feathers of a dark pur­ple.

THE lower belly and vent feathers of a fine yellow: the outside of the thighs green; the inside white; the lower side of the tail crimson: the legs red.

M&F FLAMMEOUS. FLYCATCHER.


[Page 43]IX. MUSCICAPA FLAMMEA. FLAMMEOUS FLYCATCHER.
Muscicapa Flammea, Gmelin. Lin. ii. 942. Forster Ind. Zool. 25. Flammeous Flycatcher, Latham, iii. 338. Index Ornith. ii. 474.

THE bill, head, neck, fore part of the back, FLAMMEOUS FLYCATCHER. and lesser coverts of the wings, black: rest of the back bright orange or flame-color: primaries partly black, partly orange: breast and belly of the last color, sinking into pale yellow towards the lower belly: tail dusky yellow towards the point: legs black.

THE upper part of the head, and whole back, of the supposed female, is ash-colored: about the cheeks and throat dusky: breast orange: belly white: across the primaries a flammeous band, bounded above and below with black: tail black above.

THESE are inhabitants of Ceylon.

X. MOTACILLA SUTORIA. THE TAILOR BIRD. Motacilla Sutoria, Gmelin. Lin. i. 997. Latham iv. 515. Index Ornith. ii. 551.

TAILOR BIRD. HAD Providence left the feathered tribe unendowed with any particular instinct, WONDROUS INSTINCT. the birds of the torrid zone would have built their nests in the same unguarded man­ner as those of Europe; but there the lesser species, hav­ing a certain prescience of the dangers that surround them, and of their own weakness, suspend their nests at the ex­treme branches of the trees; they are conscious of inha­biting a climate replete with enemies to them and their young; with snakes that twine up the bodies of the trees, and apes that are perpetually in search of prey; but, heaven-instructed, they elude the gliding of the one, and the activity of the other.

AN Indian forest is a scene the most picturesque that can be imagined; AN INDIAN FOREST. the trees seem perfectly animated; the fantastic monkies give life to the stronger branches; and the weaker sprays wave over your head, charged with vocal and various-plumed inhabitants. It is an error to [Page]

THE TAYLOR BIRD.

[Page 45] say that nature hath denied melody to the birds of hot climates, and formed them only to please the eye with their gaudy plumage: Ceylon abounds with birds equal in song * to those of Europe, which warble among the leaves of trees, grotesque in their appearance, and often loaden with the most delicious and salubrious fruit. Birds of the richest colors cross the glades, and troops of peacocks complete the charms of the scene, spreading their plumes to a sun that has ample powers to do them justice. The landscape, in many parts of India, corresponds with the beauties of the animate creation: the mountains are lofty, steep, and broken, but cloathed with forests enlivened with cataracts of a grandeur and figure unknown to this part of the globe.

BUT to give a reverse of this enchanting prospect, which it is impossible to enjoy with a suitable tranquillity; you are harassed in one season with a burning heat, or in the other with deluges of rain: you are tormented with clouds of noxious insects: you dread the spring of the Tiger, or the mortal bite of the Naja.

THE brute creation are more at enmity with one ano­ther than in other climates; and the birds are obliged to exert unusual artifice in placing their little broods out of [Page 46] the reach of an invader. Each aims at the same end, NEST. though by different means. Some form their pensile nest in shape of a purse, deep, and open at top; others with a hole in the side; and others, still more cautious, with an en­trance at the very bottom, forming their lodge near the summit *.

BUT the little species we describe, DESCRIPTION. seems to have greater diffidence than any of the others: it will not trust its nest even to the extremity of a slender twig, but makes one more advance to safety by fixing it to the leaf itself.

IT picks up a dead leaf, and, surprising to relate, sews it to the side of a living one , its slender bill being its needle, and its thread some fine fibres; the lining, feathers gossamer, and down. Its eggs are white. The color of the bird light-yellow: its length three inches, its weight only three-sixteenths of an ounce, so that the materials of the nest, and its own size, are not likely to draw down a habi­tation that depends on so slight a tenure.

WHITE HEADED IBIS.


[Page 47]XI. TANTALUS LEUCOCEPHALUS. THE WHITE-HEADED, IBIS.
Tantalus Leucocephalus, Gmelin. Lin. i. 649. Latham, v. 116. Index Ornith. ii. 706.

IN size it is much superior to our largest curlews. The bill is yellow, WHITE-HEADED IBIS. very long, and thick at the base, and a little incurvated: the nostrils very narrow, and placed near the head: all the fore part of the head is covered with a bare yellow, DESCRIPTION. and seems a continuance of the bill; and the eyes are, in a very singular manner, placed very near its base.

THE rest of the head, the neck, back, belly, and secon­dary feathers, are of a pure white; a transverse broad band of black crosses the breast: the quil-feathers, and coverts of the wings, are black: the coverts of the tail are very long, and of a fine pink color;, they hang over and con­ceal the tail.

THE legs and thighs are very long, and of a dull flesh-color; the feet semi-palmated, or connected by webs as far as the first joint.

[Page 48] THIS bird was taken in the isle of Ceylon, PLACE. and kept tame for some time at Colombo; it made a snapping noise with its bill like a stork; and, what was remarkable, its fine rosy feathers lost their color during the rainy season.

RED TAIL'D WATERHEN


[Page 49]XII. GALLINULA PHOENICURUS. THE RED-TAILED WATER-HEN.
Rallus Phoenicurus, Gmelin. Lin. i. 715. Latham, v. 259. Index Ornith. ii. 770.

THIS species is very common in Ceylon, RED-TAILED WATER-HEN. where it is called Kaloe-kerewaka, and seems the same kind that is so often figured on the Indian papers.

ITS length is nine inches; DESCRIPTION. its weight seven ounces and a quarter.

IT has the form of the European kind: the bill a little thicker, of a greenish cast, tinged with red; on the fore­head is a flesh-colored spot.

THE hind part of the head and neck, the back and coverts of the wings, are black: the quil-feathers black, marked with large spots of a bluish cast.

THE crown of the head, the cheeks, and whole under­side of the body, as far as the vent, are of a pure white: the vent feathers, and the tail, of a ferruginous red.

THE-legs and feet long, and of a dirty green, tinged with red.

XIII. ANSER MELANOTOS. THE BLACK-BACKED GOOSE.
Anser Melanotos, Gmelin. Lin. i. 503. Latham, vi. 449. Index Ornith. ii. 839.

NOTWITHSTANDING the isles of the East-Indies swarm with crocodiles, BLACK-BACKED GOOSE. which are animals of insati­able voracity, catching at every living creature that fre­quents their element, yet no country, abounds more with aquatic birds; nature hath happily given them a quick­ness of fight, and an instantaneous locomotive power, which enables them to elude the jaws of an enemy, which, it is well known, cannot turn without the utmost diffi­culty. It is by a fine instinct that the lesser and more agile species of ducks frequent, in flocks innumerable, the shores, the mouths of rivers, and the marshy parts of the isles, and are, with the crocodiles, joint tenants of the waters; while the larger and more clumsy fowl avoid those places, and, dividing into small families, haunt only the lakes and streams that lie * in the deep recesses of the [Page]

BLACK BACK'D GOOSE.

[Page 51] lofty and craggy mountains, protected by the cataracts that prevent the approach of their enemy.

TAME ducks abound so greatly in the isles, INDIAN FOWLING. that the capture of the wild sort is much neglected. Decoys are unknown there: the commonest, method of taking them is this: A man goes into the water with a pot or a hol­low calabash on his head, and walks or swims so low as to conceal his whole body: the birds, imagining the gourds to be brought down accidentally, suffer the fowler to ap­proach them; he pulls them by the legs under water, fastens them to a girdle he wears for that purpose, and then proceeds in his sport. This method is also practised in China, * and was doubtless introduced there, and into India, from Aegypt, the original seat of science.

THE species of goose we now describe, DESCRIPTION. is extremely common in Ceylon, and is equal in size to our wild goose: the bill is long, and black; at the base is a knob, which in old birds is very large.

THE head and neck are white, marked with small black spots: the breast and belly of a pure white: the back and wings are black, but the ends of the primary feathers of a fine variable green.

THE tail is sharp-pointed and black: the legs of the same colour.

XIV. ANAS POIKILORHYNCHUS. SPOTTED-BILLED DUCK.
Anas Poikilorhyncha, Gmelin. Lin. i. 535. Forster, Ind. Zool. 23. Spotted-billed Duck, Latham, vi. 487. Index Ornith. ii. 850.

SPOTTED-BILLED DUCK THE bill of this species is black, tipt with yellow, DESCRIPTION. and marked on each side of the base with a red spot: a white line passes from thence to and beyond the eye. The cheeks, and under side of the neck and body, white, more and more clouded from the chin to the vent, which is totally black: the wings, back, and tail, are black; each feather slightly edged with white; some of the ter­tials wholly white: the speculum of a variable green, bounded above and below with a narrow line of white.

THIS is the common wild duck of Ceylon; and, if I recollect right, is not inferior in size to the English wild duck.

[Page]

SPOTTED BILL DUCK.
[figure]


[Page 53]XV. ANHINGA. MELANOGASTER. THE BLACK-BELLIED ANHINGA.
Plotus Melanogaster, Gmelin. Lin. i. 580. Latham, vi. 624. Index Ornith. ii. 895.

WE give it this epithet, BLACK-BELLIED ANHINGA. to distinguish it from an Ame­rican species with a silvery belly *.

THIS kind is found in Ceylon and Java, but is not peculiar to those islands; a variety, if not the some, being met with in Senegal .

IT fits on the shrubs that hang over the water; and, in a country where every one's ideas are filled with serpents, often terrifies the passengers by shooting out its long slen­der neck, which, in their first surprize, they take for the darting of some fatal reptile.

ITS body is about the size of that of a common duck, DESCRIPTION. but the neck extremely long: the bill strait, long, and sharp-pointed; the upper part of a pale blue, the lower reddish.

THE eye is very piercing.

[Page 54] THE head and neck and upper part of the breast are of a light-brown; each side of the head, and the upper part of the neck, marked with a broad white line.

THE crop is very large.

THE back, scapulars, and coverts of the wings, are marked lengthways, in equal portions, with stripes of black and white.

THE quil-feathers, belly, thighs, and tail, of a deep black; the tail remarkably long and slender.

THE legs and feet of a pale green; the four toes united by webs, after the manner of those of the corvorant.

TIGER SHARK

ZEYLON WRASSE

XVI. SQUALUS TIGRINUS. THE TIGER SHARK.
Squalus. Tigrinus, Gmelin, Lin. i. 1493. Bloche, i. 19. No 4. Gronov. Mus. i. No. 136. Seb. Mus. iii, 105. tab. 34. fig. i. Herman, tab. Assin. p. 302, Forster, Ind. Zool. 24.

THE head of this shark ends obtusely, TIGER SHARK being of an equal thickness: DESCRIPTION. the nostrils are at the end of the nose: at each corner of the mouth, is a strong beard: the fins of the back are rounded and contiguous: it is of the division that has the anal fin. The ground-color is dusky: the body marked with white bands passing from the back, towards the belly: the fins are spotted with the same color.

THIS species grows to the length of fifteen feet, and is said to feed on the testaceous and crustaceous animals of the sea.

XVII. LABRUS ZEYLANICUS. THE CEYLON WRASSE.
Labrus Zeylanicus, Gmelin. Lin. i. 1287. Forster, Ind. Zool. 24. Labrus Polyodon, Seb. Mus. iii. p. 96. tab. xxxi. fig. 7.

CEYLON WRASSE. THIS species resembles in form the elegant European species, DESCRIPTION. the L. Pavo, and L. Iulis. The head is blue: the coverts of the gills green, marked with purple lines: the whole body of a rich green: the dorsal and anal fins purple, edged with pale sky-blue: on the mid­dle of the pectoral fin is an oblong purple spot, environed with light blue: the tail is lunated, the base blue: the two side rays (which appeared by the drawing to be strong) purple; the intervening rays yellow. The size, about a foot and a half.

INHABITS the seas of Ceylon and Java: is called by the Cingalese, Dschirau-Malu: by the Dutch, Papegaay Visch, or Parrot-fish; and is eaten by the common people.

THE INDIAN FAUNULA.
[Page 59] FAUNULA INDICA.

CLASS I. QUADRUPEDS.

DIV. I. HOOFED.

SECT. I. WHOLE-HOOFED.

GENUS. I. HORSE.
  • 1. GENEROUS. HIST. QUAD. vol. i. No 1.
  • 2. Dshikketi. — 2.
  • 3. Ass, wild and tame. — 3.

SECT. II. CLOVEN-HOOFED.

II. OX.
  • 1. Great Indian. 6. — A.
  • 2. Little. 6. — B.
  • 3. Buffalo. — 8.
  • 4. Dwarf. 8. — A.
  • 5. Anoa. 8. — B.
  • 6. Guavera. 8. — C.
III. Sheep.
  • 1. Common. — II.
  • 2. Wild. — H. p. 38.
  • 3. Camera. — F. p. 35.
IV. GOAT.
  • [Page 60]1. Domestic. No 13. a. p. 53.
  • 2. Caucasan? — 14.
V. ANTELOPE.
  • 1. Algazel. — 21.
  • 2. Indian. — 22.
  • 3. Indostan. — 26.
  • 4. White-footed. — 27.
  • 5. Common. — 31.
  • 6. Smooth-horned. β. — p. 80.
  • 7. Chinese? — 36.
VI. DEER.
  • 1. Spotted Axis. — 47.
  • 2. Middle-sized A. — 48.
  • 3. Great A. — 48.*
  • 4. Porcine. — 49.
  • 5. Rib-faced. — 50.
VII. MUSK.
  • 1. Indian. — 56.
  • 2. Guinea. — 57.
VIII. CAMEL.
  • 1. One-bunched. — 58.
IX. HOG.
  • 1. Common. — 61.
  • 2. Baby-roussa. — 65.
X. RHINOCEROS.
  • 1. One-horned. — 67.
XI. ELEPHANT.
  • 1. Great. — 70.

DIV. II. DIGITATED QUADRUPEDS.

SECT. I. ANTHROPOMORPHOUS.

XII. APE.
  • TAIL-LESS.
    • 1. Orang-outan No 72.
    • 2. Satyr. Scbreberr, 64. tab. ii. B.
    • 3. Long-armed. — 74.
    • 4. Lesser L. armed. — 74. a.
    • 5. Shaggy. Lev. Mus.
    • 6. Golok. Phil. Tr. lix. 72.
    • 7. Pygmy. — 73.
    • 8. Barbary? Erxleben, 14.
  • ** WITH SHORT TAILS. BABOONS.
    • 9. Little. — 83.
    • 10. Pig-tail. — 85.
    • 11. Lion-tailed. — 83.
  • *** WITH LONG TAILS. MONKIES.
    • 12. Purple-faced. — 89.
    • 13. Talapoin. — 99.
    • 14. Egret. — 101.
    • 15. Monea. — 102.
    • 16. Chinese. — 104.
    • 17. Cochin-china? — 107.
    • 18. Tawny. — 108.
    • 19. Philippine. — 115.
XIII. MAUCAUCO.
  • [Page 62]1. Tail-less. No 128.
  • 2. Loris. — 129.
  • 3. Tarsier. — 133.
  • 4. Flying. — 135.

SECT. II. RAPACIOUS. CANINE TEETH

XIV. DOG.
  • 1. Faithful. — 136.
  • 2. Bengal. De Buffon, v. tab. xxxiv.
  • 3. Schackal. — 145.
XV. CAT.
  • 1. Lion. — 151.
  • 2. Tiger. — 152.
  • 3. Panther. — 153.
  • 4. Leopard. — *154.
  • 5. Lesser Leopard. — 155.
  • 6. Hunting. — 156.
  • 7. Bengal. — 164.
  • 8. Lynx. — 170. & vol. ii. p. 565.
  • 9. Persian L. — 173.
  • 10. Serval. — 169.
XVI. BEAR.
  • 1. Brown. — 174.
XVII. BADGER.
  • 1. Indian. — 180.
XVIII. OPOSSUM.
  • 1. Molucca. — 182.
  • 2. Javan. — 183.
  • 3. Phalanger. — 190.
XIX. WEESEL.
  • [Page 63]1. Ichneumon. No 211.
  • 2. Civet. — 223.
  • 3. Zibet. — P. 348.
  • 4. Fossane. — 225.
  • 5. Zeylan. Gmelin. Lin. Syst. 89.
  • 6. Malacca. Sonnerat Voy. ii. 144.
  • 7. Fasciated. The same, ii. 193.

SECT. III. WITHOUT CANINE TEETH, GENERALLY HERBIVOROUS.

XX. CAVIA.
  • 1. Surinam. HIST. QUAD. vol. ii. — 238.
XXI. HARE.
  • 1. Common. — 241.
  • 2. Rabbet. — 244.
  • 3. Ogotona. — 249.
XXII. PORCUPINE.
  • 1. Crested. — 253.
  • 2. Long-tailed. — 254.
XXIII. SQUIRREL.
  • 1. White-legged. — 266. γ.
  • 2. Ceylon. Ind. Zool. tab. 1. — 267.
  • 3. Javan. — 269.
  • 4. Bombay — 270.
  • 5. Ruddy. — 271.
  • 6. Fair. — 276.
  • 7. Paim. — 279.
  • 8. Plantane. — 280. γ.
  • 9. Great. Gmelin. Lin. Syst. 149. — 281.
  • Dschinschi. Cmelin. Lin. Syst. 151.
  • [Page 64]
    FLYING.
    • 10. Salient No 81.
    • 11. Arrow. Gmelin. Lin. Syst. 154.
XXIV. JERBOA.
  • 1. Middle. — 292. β.
  • 2. Torrid. — 294.
XXV. RAT.
  • 1. Brown. — 298.
  • 2. Moule. — 301.
  • 3. Oriental. — 304.
XXVI. SHREW.
  • 1. Persuming. — 337.
  • 2. Murine. — 340.
XXVII. HEDGE-HOG.
  • 1. Tendrac — 357

SECT. IV. WITHOUT CUTTING TEETH.

XXVIII. SLOTH.
  • 1. Ursi-form.
  • 2. Two-toed. — 360.

SECT. V. WITHOUT TEETH.

XXIX. MANIS.
  • 1. Short-tailed. — 368.
XXX. ANT-EATER.
  • [Page 65]1. Obscure. Last paragraph. No 372.
  • 2. Talgoi. — p. 50.

DIV. III. PINNATED QUADRUPEDS.

XXXI. WALRUS.
  • 1. Indian. — 374.
XXXII. MANATI.
  • 1. Whale-tailed. — 390.

DIV. IV. WINGED QUADRUPEDS.

XXXIII. BAT.
  • 1. Ternate. — 393.
  • 2. Cordated. — 397.
  • 3. Striped. — 404.
  • 4. Molucca. — 405.

CLASS II. BIRDS.

DIV. I. LAND BIRDS.

ORDER I. RAPACIOUS.

THIS Catalogue is taken from MR. LATHAM'S SYNOPSIS OF BIRDS, in Seven Volumes, Quarto (including the Supplement); and from his IINDEX ORNITHO­LOGGICUS, the most complete Work in its kind which I am acquainted with.

GENUS. I. VULTURE.
  • 1. BENGAL. LATH. I. 19. SYN. pl. 1.
  • 2. Pondicherri. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. p. 182. pl. 104. VII. 6.
  • 3. Indian. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. 183. pl. 105. — 6.
  • 4. Gingi. Sen. Voy. Ind. ii. 184. — 7
  • 5. Cheriway. Jacquin. Vog. pl. 4. — 5.
  • 6. Secretary. Phil. Trans, lxi. p. 55. tab. 2. I. 20. pl. 2.
II. FALCON.
  • 1. Cheela. VII. 33.
  • 2. Kite. Br. Zool. I. 61.
  • 3. Indian. — 34.*d.
  • 4. Pondicheiri. Pl. Enlum, 416. — 41.
  • 5. Javan. Index Orn. p. 27.
  • 6. Maritime. Licht.Mag. iv. 2, 6. 10.
  • 7. Red Indian. Will. p. 81. t. 9. I. 69.
  • [Page 68] 8. Crested Indian. I. 80.
  • 9. White-crested. — 82.
  • 10. Pied. lnd. Zool. I. 81.& VII.20.
  • 11. Behree. VII. 35.
  • 12. Brown. Brown III. Zool. 6. t. 3. I. 96.
  • 13. Criard. VII. 38.
  • 14. Bengal. Edw. Birds, iii. pl. 108. I. 112.
III. OWL.
  • * EARED.
    • 1. Ceylon. Brown III. p. 8. t. 4. I. 120. VII. 41.
    • 2. Coromandel. VII. 44.
    • 3. Bakkamuna. Ind. Zool. I. 127.
  • ** WITHOUT EARS.
    • 4. White. Br. Zool. — 138.
    • 5. Javan. Licbt. Mag. iv. 2. 10. Index 64 Orn. p. 64. — 64

ORDER II. Pies.

IV. SHRIKE.
  • 1. Malabar. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. III. VII. 56. pl. 108.
  • 2. Forked-tail. Pl. Enl. 189. I. 158.
  • 3. Luzonian. Bris. ii. pl. 18. f. 1. — 172
  • 4. Antiguan. Son. Voy. pl. 70. — 171.
  • 5. Crested-red. Edw. Birds, pl. 54. — 170.
  • 6. Jocose. Pl. Enl. 508. — 175
  • 7. Bengal. Edw. Birds, pl. 190. — 175
  • 8. White. Son. Voy. pl. 72. — 189.
  • 9. White-billed. Pl. Enl. 9. f. 1. — 181.
  • 10. Dominican. Son. Voy. pl. 26. — 181.
  • 11. Panayan. Ibid. pl. 70. — 182.
  • 12. Boulboul. VII. 57.
  • 13. Spotted. J. R. Forster.
V. PARROT.
  • 1. Gingi. Pl. Enl. 239. I. 209.
  • [Page 69] 2. Amboina red. Pl. Enl. 240. I. 210.
  • 3. Blue-headed. Pl. Enl. 192. — 211.
  • 4. Indian. Edw. pl. 292. — 237
  • 5. Osbeck's. — 237
  • 6. Red-breasted. Edw. pl. 232. — 212.
  • 7. Black-crowded. Seba, i. pl. 63. f. 4. — 213.
  • 8. Papuan. Sen. Voy. pl. 111. — 215.
  • 9. Bornean. Edw. pl. 173. — 216.
  • 10. Molucca Lory. Pl. Enl. 519. — 274.
  • 11. Coccmeous Lory. Pl. Enl. 143. — 217.
  • 12. Black-capped Lory. Edw. pl. 170. — 273
  • 13. Beautiful Lory. — 217.
  • 14. Crimson Lory. Pl. Enl. 518. — 273
  • 15. Gueby Lory. Pl. Enl. 684. 219.
  • 16. Ceram Lory, and Varieties — 269, 270-1.
  • 17. Variegated Lory. — 220.
  • 18. Purple-capped Lory. Edw. 171. and Pl. Enl. 119. — 271.
  • 19. Lory Parakeet. Edw. 174. — 221.
  • 20. Bontian. — 323
  • 21. Crimson-vented. — 229.
  • 22. Varied-winged. Son. Voy. pl. 43. — 234
  • 23. Lace-winged. Pl. Enl. 287. — 244.
  • 24. Alexandrine. Edw. pl. 292. — 234.
  • 25. Purple-ringed. Albin. ii. pl. 18. — 236.
  • 26. Mustachoe. Pl. Enl. 517. — 238
  • 27. Blossom-headed. Pl. EnI. 144. — 239.
  • 28. Rose-headed. Edw. pl. 233. — 239.
  • 29. Red-winged. Edw. pl. 236. — 246.
  • 30. White-collared. Gen. Birds, 59. — 251.
  • 31. Black Cockatoo, Edw. pl. 316. — 260.
  • 32. Red-crested C. Edw. pl. 160. — 257.
  • 33. Red-vented C. Brown's III. pl. 5. — 258.
  • 34. Great Whire C. Pl. Enl. 263. — 256.
  • 35. Red and White C. — 260.
  • 36. Hawk-headed. Edw. pl. 165. — 266.
  • [Page 70] 37. Red Molucca Lory. Pl. Enl. 519. I. 274.
  • 38. Grand Lory. Pl. Enl. 683. — 275
  • 39. Cochin China. VII. 65.
  • 40. Green and Red Chinese Edw. pl. 231. I. 278.
  • 41. Great-billed. Pl. Enl. 713. — 278.
  • 42. Amboina Gramineous. Pl. Enl. 862. — 279
  • 43. Manilla Green. Bris. iv. pl. 22. f. 2. — 296.
  • 44. Eastern. VII. 64.
  • 45. Amber. — 65.
  • 46. Golden-winged. Edw. pl. 293. I. 309.
  • 47. Blue-rumped. VII. 66.
  • 48. Red and Green. Edw. pl. 6. I. 311.
  • 49. Sapphire-crowned. Edw. pl. 293. — 312.
  • 50. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 520. — 311.
  • 51. Black-winged. Brown III pl. 8. — 316.
  • 52. Collared. Son. Voy. pl. 39. — 317
  • 53. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 40. — 318
VI. HORN-BILL.
  • 1. Rhinoceros. Edw. pl. 281. B. — 342. VII. 69.
  • 2. Helmet. Edw. pl. 281. C. — 343.
  • 3. Philippine. Pet. Gaz. 28.f. 6. and 31.f. 1. — 345.
  • 4. Pied. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 121. — 349. VII. 69.
  • 5. Indian. Pl. Enl. 283. — 351.
  • 6. Panayan. Pl. Enl. 780, 781. — 353.
  • 7. Manilla. Pl. Enl. 891. — 354.
  • 8. White. — 357.
  • 9. Wreathed. Damp. Voy. iii. pl. 3. — 358. VII. 70.
  • 10. Gingi. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 121. VII. 71.
VII. CROW.
  • 1. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 603. I. 381.
  • 2. Short-tailed. Pl. Enl. 258. — 398.
  • 3. Philippine Sh. tailed. Pl. Enl. 89. — 398. A.
  • 4. Bengal Sh. tailed. Edw. pl. 324. — 399.
  • 5. Molucca Sh. tailed. Pl. Enl. pl. 257. — 395. c.
  • [Page 71] 6. Malacca Sh. tailed, Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 110. VII. 81.
  • 7. Malabar Sh. tailed. Id. p. 191. — 82. A.
VIII. ROLLER.
  • 1. Bengal. Pl. Enl. 285. I. 410.
  • 2. Senegal. Edw. pl. 327. — 408.
  • 3. Oriental. Pl. Enl. 619. — 411.
  • 4. Indian. Edw. pl. 326. — 412.
  • 5. Fairy. VII. 87.
  • 6. Grey-tailed. — 86.
IX. ORIOLE.
  • 1. Golden. Br. Zool. II. 449.
  • 2. Black-headed.Edw. pl. 77. — 451
  • 3. Yellow. Edw. pl. 186. — 451. B.
  • 4. Indian. Aldrov. Av. i. pl. in p. 862. — 452. D.
X. GRAKLE.
  • 1. Minor Grakle. Edw. pl. 17. — 455. VII. 90.
  • 2. Greater Minor. — 457.
  • 3. Bald. Pl. Enl. 200. — 457.
  • 4. Paradise. Pl. Enl. 219. — 458.
  • 5. Dial. Edw. pl. 181. — 465.
XI. PARADISE.
  • 1. Great. Edw. pl. 110. — 471.
  • 2. King. Edw. pl. 496. — 475.
  • 3. Magnificent. Pl. Enl. 631. — 477.
  • 4. Creittd. Will. Orn. 92. Index Orm. p. 195.
  • 5. Gorget. II. 478. pl. 20.
  • 6. White-winged VII. 92.
  • 7. Superb. Pl. Enl. 632. II. 479.
  • 8. Gold-breasted. Pl. Enl. 633. — 481.
  • 9. Golden. Edw. pl. 112. — 483.
  • 10. Blue-green. Pl. Enl. 634. — 482.
  • [Page 72] 11. White. Index Orn. p. 107. 12.
  • 12. Setaceous. Gerin. Orn. t.65. f. 1.? 197.12.β.
XII. CARUCUI.
  • 1. Fasciated. Ind. Zool. II. 492. 7. & β.
  • 2. Spotted. Brown. III. pl. 13. — 491
  • 3. Blue-cheeked. VII.93
  • 4. Indian. — 94
XIII. BARBET.
  • 1. Philippine.Pl. Enl. 331. II. 500.
  • 2. Black-throated. Son. Voy. pl. 34. — 511.
  • 3. Great. Pl. Enl. 871.? VII. 95.
  • 4. Green. Pl. Enl. 870. II. 504.
  • 5. Red-crowned. Brown. III. pl. 14. — 505
  • 6. Indian VII. 97.
  • 7. Zeylan. Brown. III. pl. 15. II. 506. VII. 95.
  • 8. Gerini? Gar. Orn. ii. pl. 181. Index Orn. p. 207.
XIV. CUCKOO.
  • 1. Indian spotted. Edw. pl. 59. II. 516.
  • 2. Chinese spotted. Pl. Enl. 764. — 519
  • 3. Black. Pl. Enl. 274. VII. 99.
  • 4. Coromandel crested. Pl. Enl. 872. II. 520.
  • 5. Bengal. Brown III pl. 13. — 525
  • 6. Sacred. Pl. Enl. 294. — 526.
  • 7. Panayan. Son. Voy. pl. 79. — 527.
  • 8. Grey-headed. VII. 102.
  • 9. Sonnerat's. — 102.
  • 10. Yellow-bellied. Pl. Enl. 814. II. 527.
  • 11. Paradise. Brif. iv. pl. 14. A. f. 1. — 529
  • 12. Collared. Pl. Enl. 274. — 529
  • 13. Red-headed. Ind. Zool. — 544
XV. WRYNECK.
  • 1. Wryneck. Br. Zool. — 548.
XVI. WOOD-PECKER.
  • [Page 73]1. Little spottd. Br. Zool. II. 566. β. γ.
  • 2. Cardinal. Son. Voy. pl. 35. — 576.
  • 3. Brown. PL Enl. 748. f. 2. — 577
  • 4. Goa. Pl. Enl. 696. — 582.
  • 5. Bengal. Edw. pl. 182. — 580.
  • 6. Ceylon. Naturforseb. xiii. pl. 1. — 581. β.
  • 7. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 691. — 581.
  • 8. Manilla. Son. Voy. pl. 36. — 583
  • 9. Half-billed. — 586.
  • 10. Red-winged. Ind. Zool. — 595
  • 11. Malacca. VII. III.
XVII. KING-FISHER.
  • 1. Cape. Pl. Enl. 590. II. 610. VII. 114.
  • 2. Black and White. Edw. pl. 9. — 612.
  • 3. Great Bengal. Pl. Enl. 894. — 616. B.
  • 4. Ten-rou joulon. Pl. Enl. 757. — 617.
  • 5. White-collared. Bris. iv. pl. 37. f. 2. A. — 620.
  • 6. Green-headed. Pl. Enl. 783. — 620.
  • 7. Collared. Son. Voy. pl. 33. — 623. D.
  • 8. Black-capped. Son. Voy. pl. 31. — 625. A.
  • 9. Coromandel. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 118. Ind. Orn. p. 252.
  • 10. Red-headed. Gen. Birds. pl. 5. — 629. & A.
  • 11. Purple. Pl. Enl. 778. f. 2. — 630.
  • 12. Bengal. Br. Zool — 631.
  • 13. Crested. Pl. Enl. 756. — 632. 632. β.
  • 14. Eastern. Bris. iv. pl. 37. f. 1. A. — 633
  • 15. Ternate. Pl. Enl. 116. — 634
  • * THREE-TOED.
    • 1. Tridactylous. Son. Voy. pl. 32. Index Orn. i. 260. 645.
XVIII. NUT-HATCH.
XIX. TODY.
  • 1. Variegated. II. 659.
XX. BEE-EATZR.
  • 1. Indian. Edw.pl. 183. — 670.
  • 2. Philippine. Bris. iv. pl. 43. f. 2. — 672. C.
  • 3. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 57. — 674
  • 4. Yellow. Will. Orn. pl. II. — 676.
  • 5. Coromandel. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 119. VII. 120.
  • 6. Yellow-throated. II. 678.
  • 7. Red-headed. Brif. iv. pl. 44. f. 3. A. — 679
  • 8. Molucca. — 684
  • Common. European. — 667
XXI HOOPO.
  • 1. Crested. Br. Zool II. 687. VII. 122.
  • 2. Crested Promerops. Seb. i. t. 30. f. 5. — 691.
  • 3. Red-billed Pr. VII. 124. pl. 110.
  • 4. Blue. — ibid.
XXII. CREEPER.
  • 1. Familiar? Br. Zool. II. 701.
  • 2. Manilla. — 706. A.
  • 3. Red-breasted. Pl. Enl. 246. — 706. 8.
  • 4. Brown and White. Edw. pl. 26. — 707. A.
  • 5. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 30. D. — 708. B.
  • 6. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 576. 1. — 711.
  • 7. Collared. Edw. pl. 265. — 709.
  • 8. Ceylon. — 713. A.
  • 9. Grey. Pl. Enl. 576. f. 2. — 714.
  • 10. Little. Pl. Enl. 576. f. 3. — 714. A.
  • 11. Lotenian. PL Enl. 575. f. 2. 3. — 715
  • 12. Green-gold. Seb. Th. pl. 69. f. 5. — 716.
  • [Page 75] 13. Asiatic. Index Orn. i. 288.
  • 14. Red-backed. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 117. f. 1. VII. 132.
  • 15. Red-spotted. Edw. pl. 81. II. 736
  • 16. Indigo. VII. 130.
  • 17. Yellow-bellied. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 116. f. 1. — 131
  • 18. Tusted. — 132
  • 19. Red-billed. — 133
  • 20. Yellow-winged. — 133
  • 21. Long-billed. — 133
  • 22. Macassar. Seb. i. pl. 63. f. 1. II. 741.
  • 23. Indian. Seb. ii. pl. 19. f. 2. — 741
  • 24. Amboina. Seb. ii. pl. 62. f. a. — 741
ORDER. III. PASSERINE. XXIII. STARE.
  • 1. Contra. Edw. pl. 187. III. 5
XXIV. THRUSH.
  • 1. Pagoda. — 30. VII. 140.
  • 2. Malabar. — 30. VII. 140.
  • 3. Chinese. Bris. ii. pl. 23. f. 1. — 36.
  • 4. Philippine. — 38.
  • 5. Surat. — 38.
  • 6. Pensive. Pl. Enl. 636. 564. — 53
  • 7. Hermit. Pl. Enl. 339. — 54
  • 8. Pigeon. — 64.
  • 9. Dominican. Pl. Enl. 627. 2. — 58.
  • 10. Songster. Son. Voy. pl. 73. — 59
  • 11. Malabar. — 60.
  • 12. Ceylon. Edw. pl. 321. — 62.
  • 13. Orange-headed. VII. 145.
  • 14. Indian. Pl. Enl. 564. 1. III. 66.
  • 15. Grey. — 67.
  • 16. Mindanao. Pl: Enl. 627. 1. — 69.
  • [Page 76] 17. Long-tailed. III. 72. pl. 39
  • 18. Amboina. Seb. i. pl. 62. f. 4. — 73
  • 19. Yellow-crowned. Brown III. pl. 22. — 74. VII. 143.
  • 20. Ash-rumped. Pl Enl. 273. 2. — 74
  • 21. Gingi. VII. 144.
  • 22. Dauma. — 145
  • 23. Black and Scarlet. — 146
  • 24. Rose-colored. Edw. pl. 20. — 142
  • Rock. European. III. — 57
XXV. COLY.
  • 1. Panayan. Son. Voy. pl. 74. — 103.
  • 2. Indian. VII. 147.
XXVI. GROSBEAK.
  • 1. Gold-backed. Brown III. pl. 25. III. 115.
  • 2. Cardinal. Mus. Carls. fase ii. t. 41. — 118.β.
  • 3. Boeton. Seb. i. pl. 60. f. 4. — 119.
  • 4. Madagafcar. Pl. Enl. 134.2. — 119.
  • 5. Java. Edw. pl. 41. 42. — 129
  • 6. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 135. 2. — 129
  • 7. Bengal. Edw. pl. 189. — 133
  • 8. Sumatran. Mus: Carls. fase. iii. t. 71 Index Orn. 384.
  • 9. Yellow? — 139
  • 10. Yellow-rumped. — 140.
  • 11. Malacca. Edw. pl. 355. — 140.
  • 12. Molucca. Pl. Enl. 139. 2. — 141.
  • 13. Cowry. Edw. pl. 40. — 142.
  • 14. Brown? — 147
  • 15. Lineated? Brif. iii. pl. 17. 1. — 149
  • 16. Red-billed. Edw. pl. 271. 2. — 151.
  • 17. Cinereous. Edw. pl. 179. 2. — 154.
  • 18. Indian. VII. 155.
  • 19. Malabar. III. 154.
  • [Page 77] 20. Orange-bellied. Edw. pl. 83. 1. III. 157.
  • 21. Prasine. Mus. Carls.fase. iii. t. 73. Index Orn. i. 396.
  • 22. Dwarf. Jacq. Vog. p. 28. pl. 13. — 158
XXVII. BUNTING.
  • 1. Long-tailed. Will. Orn. t. 45. — 181
  • 2. Panayan. Pl. Enl. 647. — 184
  • 3. Familiar. — 194
  • 4. Red-rumped. Pl. Enl. 101. 2. — 208
  • 5. Blue-faced. Bris iii. Pl. 7.s. 4. — 209
  • 6. Green. — 209
  • 7. Astatic. VII. 160
XXVIII. TANAGRE.
  • 1. Amboina. Seb. i. pl. 38. f. 6. III. 244.
XXIX. FINCH.
  • 1. Lovely. VII.168.
  • 2. White-breasted. Pl. Enl. 224. 2. III. 268.
  • 3. Collared. Edw. pl. 272. — 280
  • 4. Blue-bellied. Edw. pl. 131. — 310
  • 5. Amandavad. Edw. pl. 355. 1. — 311
  • 6. Brown. Pl. Enl. 115. 2. — 312
  • 7. Maia, or Cuba. Pl. Enl. 109. 2. fem. — 315
  • 8. Ceylon. — 317
  • 9. Lunar. Mill. III. pl. 30. — 320
  • 10. Green-rumped. — 320
XXX. FLY-CATCHER.
  • 1. Pied. Br. Zool. Edw. pl. 30. — 324
  • 2. Coromandel. — 331
  • 3. Flammeous. Ind. Zool. — 338
  • 4. Cinnamon. IV. 447. 42.
  • 5. Tusted. III. 334
  • [Page 78] 6. Red-vented. Brown III. pl. 31. III. 335
  • 7. Variety. Yellow-vented. — ibid.
  • 8. Guava. Son. Voy. pl. 28. — ibid.
  • 9. Yellow-breasted. Brown III. pl. 82. — 336
  • 10. Green. — 336
  • 11. Black. Son. Voy. pl. 27. 2. — 338
  • 12. Philippine. — 339
  • 13. Azure. Pl. Enl. 666. 1. — 339
  • 14. Blue-head. Son. Voy. pl. 26. 1. — 339
  • 15. Yellow-throat. Son. Voy. pl. 26. 2. — 340
  • 16. Paradise. Edw. pl. 113. — 345
  • 17. Javan. Mus Carls. fase. iii. t. 75. Index Orn. ii. 490.
  • 18. Cambaian — 490
XXXI. LARK.
  • 1. Sky? Br. Zool. IV. 368.
  • 2. Malabar. Son. Voy. Ind. ii, pi. 113. 1. — 379
  • 3. Gingi. Son. Voy. Ind. ii.pl. 113. 2. — 380
XXXII. WAGTAIL.
  • 1. White? Br. Zool. — 395
  • 2. Collared. Son. Voy. pl. 29. — 396
  • 3. Pied. Raii Syn. pl. 1. f. 1. — 397
  • 4. Javan. Br. Zool. var. 398. — 399.
  • 5. Indian. — 399
  • 6. Yellow. Br. Zool. Timor. — 401. 6. A.
  • 7. Green. Brown III. pi. 23. — 403.
XXXIII. WARBLER.
  • 1. Luzonian. PI. Enl. 235. 1. 2. — 451.
  • 2. Coromandel. 452.
  • 3. Philippine. PI. Enl. 185. 2. — 453
  • 4. Wheat-ear. Br. Zool. — 465
  • 5. Pink. Brown III. pl. 33. — 473
  • [Page 79] 6. Olive. Brown III. pl. 14. IV. 473.
  • 7. Green. Edw. pl. 79. — 474.
  • 8. Cingalese. Brown III. pl. 32. — 474.
  • 9. Superb. — 501. pl. 53.
  • 10. Blue headed. Son. Voy. t. 27. I. Index Orn. ii. 545.
  • 11. Gold-crested Wren. Br. Zool. III. 508.
  • 12. Tailor. Ind. Zool. — 515.
  • 13. Black-necked. VII. 187.
  • 14. Cambaian. Index Orn. ii. 554.
  • 15. Guzurat. Ibid.
  • 16. Asiatic. Ibid.
  • Yellow Wren. Br. Zool. IV. 512.
XXXIV. MANAKIN.
  • 1. Little. — 526.
XXXV. TITMOUSE.
  • 1. Malabar. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 114. I. — 555.
  • 2. Indian. Mus. Carls. fasc. ii. t. 50. Index Orn. ii. 572.
XXXVI. SWALLOW.
  • 1. Panayan. Son. Voy. pl. 76. — 565.
  • 2. Red-headed. — 571.
  • 3. Indian. — 571. pl. 56.
  • 4. Esculent. Bris. ii. pl. 46. f. 2 A. — 578.
  • Chimney. Br. Zool. — 560.
XXXVII. GOAT-SUCKER.
  • I. Asiatic. VII. 195.
  • 2. Indian. — 196.

ORDER IV. COLUMBINE.

  • * TAIL EVEN AT THE END. XXXVIII. PIGEON.
    • 1. Domestic. PL. Enl. 466. IV. 605.
    • 2. Laced. — 610.
    • 3. White-wniged. Edw. pl. 76. — 617. VII. 197.
    • 4. Great-crowned. Edw. pl. 338. — 620.
    • 5. Lesser-crowned. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 100. — 622. 623. pl. 58.
    • 6. Grey-headed. Son. Voy. pl. 66. — 623.
    • 7. Yellow-faced. Brown III. pl. 20. — 624.
    • 8. Purple-shoulder. VII. 201.
    • 9. Asiatic. — 202.
    • 10. Green-winged. Edw. pl. 14. IV. 625.
    • 11. Jamboo. — 627.
    • 12. Red-crowned. Son. Voy. pl. 67. — 628.
    • 13. Parrot. Pl. Enl. 138. Son. Voy. pl. 65. — 629. 630.
    • 14. Aromatic. Pl. Enl. 163. — 631.
    • 15. Nicobar. Pl. Enl. 491. — 642.
    • 16. Common Turtle. Pl. Enl. 394. — 644.
    • 17. Luzonian T. Son. Voy. pl. 22. — 646.
    • 18. Collared. Pl. Enl. 244. — 648.
    • 19. Grey. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 102. — 649.
    • 20. Barred. Edw. pl. 16. — 650. VII. 200.
    • 21. Surat. Index Orn. ii. 609.
    • 22. Cambayan. — 652.
    • 23. Malabar. — 652.
    • 24. Green. Pl. Enl. 142. — 653.
    • 25. Black-capped. Ind. Zool. — 654.
    • 26. Javan. Pl. Enl. 177. — 654.
    • 27. Blue crowned. — 655. — 657.
    • 28. Red-breasted. Son. Voy. pl. 21.
    • 29. Sanguine. Son. Voy. pl. 20. — 657.
    • 30. Malacca. — 661.
  • [Page 81]
    ** LONG AND CUNEIFORM TAILS.
    • 31. Amboina. Brif. i pl. 9. f. 3. IV. 665.
    • 32. Bantam. Mus. Carls. fasc. iii. t. 67. Index Orn. ii. 615.

ORDER V. GALLINACEOUS.

XXXIX. PEACOCK.
  • 1. Crested. Pl. Enl. 433. 434. IV. 668. pl. 60.
XL. TURKY.
  • 1. Horned. Edw. pl. 16. — 680.
XLI. PHEASANT.
  • 1. Wild Cock. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. 94. 95. — 698.
  • 2. Colored. VII. 210.
  • 3. Impeyan. — 208. pl. 114.
XLII. PARTRIDGE.
  • 1. Ceylon. Ind. Zool. IV. 758. VII. 222.
  • 2. Francolin. Edw. pl. 246. — 759.
  • 3. Hackled. — 766. pl. 66.
  • 4. Red. Pl. Enl. 150. 231. — 767.
  • 5. Gingi. — 773.
  • 6. Pondicherri. — 774.
  • 7. Fasciated. — 221.
  • 8. Asiatic. Index Orn. ii. 649.
  • 9. Indian. — 752. 20.
  • 10. Javan. Brown III. pl. 17. — 775.
  • 11. Common Quail. Pl. Enl. 170. — 779.
  • 12. Chinese. Edw. pl. 247. — 783.
  • 13. Noisy. Will. Orn. pl. 29. — 787.
  • 14. Coromandel. — 789.
  • 15. Manilla. Son. Voy. pl. 24. — 790.
  • [Page 82] 16. Cambaian. Index Orn. ii. 655.
* TRIDACTYLOUS.
  • 1. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 23. IV. 792.
XLIII. BUSTARD.
  • 1. Indian. Edw. pl. 250. — 804.
  • 2. Passarage. VII. 228.
  • 3. White-chinned. Mill. III. pl. 33. IV. 806.
XLIV. CASUARY.
  • 1. Galeated. PI. Enl. 313. V. 10. pl. 72.

DIV. II. Water Fowl.

ORDER. VII. Cloven-Footed.

XLV. SPOON-BILL.
  • 1. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 51. Index Orn. ii. 668. β
XLVI. JABIRU.
  • 1. Indian. VII. 23.
XLVII. HERON.
  • * CRANES.
    • 1. Sibirian Crane. Pallas It. ii. t. 1. v. 37.
    • 2. Indian Crane. Edw. 45. — 38. 39.
    • 3. Common Crane. Pl. Enl. 769. — 40.
    • [Page 83] 4. Japan Crane. V. 42.
    • 5. Gigantic. — 45. VII. 232. pl. 115.
  • ** HERONS.
    • 6. Philippine Heron. Pl. Enl. 898. — 72.
    • 7. Coromandel. Pl. Enl. 910. — 75. A.
    • 8. Cinnamon. — 77.
    • 9. Malacca. Pl. Enl. 911. — 78.
    • 10. Violet. Pl. Enl. 906. — 97.
    • 11. Louhaujung. VII. 238.
    • 12. Yellow-necked. — 239.
  • *** BEC-OUVERTS
    • 13. Pondicherry. Pl. Enl. 932. V. 101.
    • 14. Coromandel. Son. Voy. Ind. ii. pl. p. 219. — 102.
XLVIII. IBIS.
  • 1. White-headed. Ind. Zool. — 116.
  • 2. Manilla. Son. Voy. pl. 47. — 117.
  • 3. Black-headed. VII. 240.
XLIX. CURLEW.
  • 1. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 48. V. 122.
L. SNIPE.
  • 1. Woodcock? Br. Zool. — 129.
  • 2. Common Snipe. Br. Zool. — 134.
  • 3. Cape. VII. 244. E.
  • 4. Bengal. Albin. iii. pl. 90. V. 140. D.
  • 5. Madras. Raii Syn. t. I. f. 2. — 141.
  • [Page 84] 6. White Indian. V. 141.
LI. SAND-PIPER.
  • 1. Goa. Pl. Enl. 807. — 165.
LII. PLOVER.
  • 1. Golden? Br. Zool. — 193.
  • 2. Long-legged. Br. Zool. — 195. VII. 252.
  • 3. Philippine. Son. Voy. pl. 46. — 205. C.
  • 4. Wattled. Pl. Enl. 880. — 216.
  • 5. Indian. VII. 254.
LIII. RUNNER. CUESORIUS. LATHAM Index, ii. 751.
  • 1. Coromandel Pl. Pl. Enl. 892. V. 217.
LIV. PRATINCOLE.
  • 1. Maldivian. — 224
  • 2. Coromandel. — ibid.
  • 3. Madras. — ibid.
LV. RAIL.
  • 1. Philippine. Pl. Enl. 774. — 230.
  • 2. Striated Ph. Brif. v. pl. 14. f. 2. — 232. C.
  • 3. Dusky. — 232. B.
  • 4. Banded. Brif. v. pl. 15.f. 1. — 233.
  • 5. Brown. Pl. Enl. 773. — ibid.
  • 6. Ceylon. Brown III. pl. 37. — 235.
LVI. JACANA.
  • 1. Luzonian. Son. Voy. pl. 45. — 245.
  • 2. Indian. VII. 257.
LVII. GALLINULE.
  • [Page 85]1. Madras. Raii Syn. t, I. f. 4. V. 253.
  • 2. Purple. Edw. pl. 87. — 254.
  • 3. Green. — 257.
  • 4. Red-tailed. Ind. Zool. — 259.
  • 5. Crested. — 267.

ORDER VIII. PINNATED FEET.

LVIII. GREBE.
  • 1. Little. Pl. Enl. 945. — 290. A.

ORDER IX. WEB-FOOTED.

LIX. ALBATROS.
  • 1. Wandering. Edw. pl. 88. — 304.
LX. SKIMMER.
  • 1. Black. Pl. Enl. 357, VI. 347.
LXI. TERN.
  • 1. Caspian. Index Orn. ii, 804. β.
  • 2. Philippine. Son. Voy. pl. 85. VII. 267.
  • 3. Panayan. Son. Voy. pl. 84. VI. 363.
  • 4. White. Portlock Voy. pl. p. 312. — 363.VII. 266.
LXII. PETREL.
  • 1. Stormy. Edw. pl. 90. — 411.
LXIII. DUCK.
  • 1. Chinese? Pl. Enl. 374. — 447.
  • 2. Black-backed. Ind. Zool. — 449.
  • [Page 86] 3. Barred-head. VII. 177.
  • 4. Greyhead. Brown. III. pl. 41. 42. VI. 458.
  • 5. Spotted-bill. Ind. Zool. — 487.
  • 6. Falcated. Pl. Enl. 930. — 517. A.
  • 7. Pink-headed. VII. 276.pl. 119.
  • 8. Coromandel. Pl. Enl. 949. 950. VI. 556.
  • 9. Manilla. Son. Voy. t. 54. — 557.
LXIV. PELECAN.
  • 1. White. Edw. pl. 92. — 575.
  • 2. Roseate. Son. Voy. pl. 54. — 579.
  • 3. Manilla. Son. Voy. pl. 53. — 583.
  • 4. Philippine. Brif. vi.pl. 46. — 583.
LXV. DARTER.
  • I. Black-bellied. Ind. Zool. — 624.

CLASS III. AMPHIBIA.

ORDO I. REPTILIA.

GENUS. I TESTUDO.
  • IMBRICATA. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 80. fig. 9.
  • Squamata. Bont. Java. 82.
  • Lutaria. Amen. Acad. i. p. 139. No 23.
  • Serpentina. Mus. Ad. Fr. 2. p. 36.
  • Indica. Schneid. Schild, p. 355. No 14.
II. RANA.
  • Gibbosa. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 71. fig. 4. 5.
  • Ventricosa. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 74. fig. I.
  • Venulosa. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 72. fig. 4.
  • Marginata. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 47.
III DRACO.
  • Volans. Seb. Mus. ii.tab. 86. fig. 3.
IV. LACERTA.
  • Gangetica. Edw. Act. Aug. 49. p. 639. t. 19.
  • Monitor. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 86. fig. 2. 2.
  • Bicarinata.
  • Mauritanica. β. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 108. fig. 2. 7.
  • Iguana. Seb. Mus. i.tab. 95.fig. I. 2.
  • Calotes. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 86. fig. 6.
  • [Page 88] Superciliosa. Seb. Mus, i. tab. 94, fig. 4.
  • Scutata. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 109. fig. 3, 4,
  • Amboinensis, & Var. β.
  • Lacustris. y. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 12. fig. 7.
  • Vittata. Houtt. Act. Ulissing. 9. t. 2.
  • Gecho. Forsk. Fn. Arab. p. 13. No 4.
  • Chameleon. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 82. fig. 2. 4. 5.
  • Agilis. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 79. fig. 5.
  • Tequixin. Plica. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 96. fig. 1.
  • Serpens.
  • Bipes. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 53. fig. 8.

ORDO II. SERPENTES.

V. BOA.
  • Hipnale. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 34. fig. 2.
  • Constrictor. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 36. fig. 5.
VI. COLUBER.
  • Clotho. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 93.
  • Lutrix.
  • Plicatilis. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 57. fig. 5.
  • Alidras.
  • Buccatus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 19. fig. 3.
  • Javanus. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 10. fig. 2.
  • Berus. β. δ Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 9. fig. 8.
  • Typhlus.
  • Reginae. Aeculapii. Afa / . Ad. Fr. i. 13. fig. 3. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. II. fig. 2.
  • Rhombeatus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 24. fig. 2.
  • Miliaris. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 27.
  • Albus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 24. t. 14.fig. 2.
  • Agilis. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 21. fig. 2.
  • [Page 89] Lacteus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 18. fig. 1.
  • Pallidus. Ibid. tab. 7. fig. 2.
  • Caecus. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 90. fig. 1.
  • Naja. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 44. fig. 1.
  • Padera. Mus. Ad. Fr. ii. p. 44,
  • Canus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 31. t. 11. fig. 1.
  • Zeylonicus. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 100. fig. 4.
  • Laticaudatus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 16. fig. 1.
  • Atrow β. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 43. fig. 4. 5.
  • Saturninus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 9. fig. 1.
  • Candidus. Ibid. tab. 7. fig. 1.
  • Scaber. Ibid. tab. 10. fig. 1.
  • Carinatus.
  • Exoletus. Ibid. tab. 10. fig. 2.
  • Triscalis.
  • Pelias.
  • Ocellatus. Seb. Mus ii. tab. I. fig. 3. 8.
  • Hitambocia. Seb. Mus. i. tab. 33.fig. 6.
  • Tigrinus. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 15. fig. 2.
  • Molurus.
  • Ahaetulla. Catesb. Car. ii. tab. 47.
  • Petalarius, Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 9. fig. 2.
  • Filiformis. Ibid. tab. 17. fig. 2.
  • Minervae. Ibid. p. 36.
  • Cinereus. Ibid. p. 37.
  • Mucosus. Ibid. tab. 23. fig. I.
  • Caerulescens. Ibid. tab. 20. fig. 2.
VII. ANCUIS.
  • Meleagris. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 21. fig. 4.
  • Scytale. Ibid. tab. 2. fig. 1. 4.
  • Arer. Ibid. tab. 73. fig. 3.
VIII. CAECILIA.
  • Tentaculata. Ibid. tab. 25. fig. 2.
  • Glutinosa. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 4.fig. I.

CLASSIS IV. PISCES.

ORDO I. BRANCHIOSTEGI.

GENUS. I. OSTRACION.
  • TRIQUETER. Seb. Mus. iii.tab. 24. fig. 6. 12.
  • Trigonus. Artedi Gen. 56. syn. 85.
  • Bicaudalis. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 24. fig. 3.
  • Tricornis.
  • Quadricornis. Edw. Glean, tab. 284. fig. 1.
  • Cornurus. Will. Ichth. t.I. 13. fig. 1.
  • Tuberculatus. Arted. Gen. 55. syn. 84.
  • Cubicus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 24. fig. 4. 5.
II. TETRODON.
  • Testudineus. Amaen. Acad. i. tab. 14. fig. 3.
  • Electricus. Act. Aug. lxxvi. p. 382.tab. 13.
  • Oblongus. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. ii. t. 146. fig. I. Ibid. fig. 2.
  • Rostratus.
  • Hispidus. Aman. Acad. iv. p, 207. No 23.
III. SYNGNATHUS.
  • Tetragonus. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. i. t. 121. fig. 1.
  • Hyppocampus. Will. Ichth. tab. I. 25.
IV. PEGASUS.
  • Draconis. Grow. Zooph. tab. 12. fig. 2. 3.
  • Volans. Mus. Ad. ii. p. 56.
  • Natans. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. i. t. 121. fig. 2. 3.
V. CENTRISCUS.
  • [Page 92]Scutatus. Gron. Mus. ii. tab. 7. fig. 3.
  • Valitaris. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. tab. 4. fig. 8.
VI. BALISTES.
  • Tomentosus. Gron. Mus. i. tab. 6. fig. 5.
  • Verrucosus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 27. fig. 4.
  • Biaculeatus. Will. Ichth. App. tab. 10. fig. 2.
  • Aculeatus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 24. fig. 15.
  • Vetula. Catesh. Carol. ii. tab. 22.
  • Capriscus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 24. fig. 16.
  • Punctacus. Nieuhof. Ind. ii. p. 275.
  • Kleinii. Klein. Miss. Pisc. iii. tab. 3. fig. 12.
VII. CYCLOPTERUS.
  • Lumpus. β. γ. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 103. No I.
  • Nudus. Mus Ad. Fr. i. tab. 27. fig. I.

ORDO II. CHONDROPTERYGII.

VIII. SQUALUS.
  • Catulus. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 90. No 9.
  • Tigrinus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 34. fig. I.
  • Glaucus. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 84. No 5.
  • Canicula. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 88. No 8.
  • Zygaena. Rondel. Pisc. i. p. 389.
  • Acanthias. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 77. No 2.
  • Indicus. Gron. Mus. i. No 133.
IX. RAJA.
  • Pastimca. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 71. No 6.

ORDO III. APODES.

X. MURAENA.
  • Colubrina. Pall. n. nord. Beytr. ii. t. 2. fig. 3.
  • Anguilla. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 142. No 12.
XL GYMNOTUS.
  • Notopterus. Pall. Spicil. Zool. vii. tab. 6. fig. 2.
XII. TRICHIURUS.
  • Indicus. Will. Ichth. App. tab. 3. fig. 3.
XIII. OPHIDIUM.
  • Aculeatum. Will. Ichth. App. tab. 10. fig. I.

ORDO IV. JUGULARES.

XIV. CALLIONYMUS.
  • Ocellatus. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. tab. 4. fig. 13.
  • Sagitta. Ibid. fig. 4. 5.
XV. GADUS.
  • Lota. Brit. Zool. iii. p. 163. No 14.
XVI. BLENNIUS.
  • Cristatus. Gron. Mus. i. No 75.
  • Cornutus.
  • Fasciatus. Bicch. Ausl Fisch. ii. t. 162. fig. I.
  • Supercihosus. Gron. Mus. n. tab 5. fig. 5.
  • Mustelans.
XVII. KURTUS.
  • [Page 94]Indicus. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. ii. tab. 169.

ORDO V. THORACICI.

XVIII. ECHENEIS.
  • Neucrates. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 33. fig. 2.
XIX. CORVPHAENA.
  • Pentadactyla. Block Ausl. Fisch. ii. t. 173.
  • Fasciolata. Pall. Spicil. Zool. viii. tab. 3. fig. 2.
  • Velifera. Ibid. fig. I.
XX. GOBIUS.
  • Schlofferi. Ibid. tab. I. fig. I. 4.
  • Bodaerti. Ibid. tab. 2. fig. 4. 5.
  • Cyprinoides. Ibid. tab. I. fig. 5.
XXI. COTTUS.
  • Grunniens. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 23. fig. 4.
  • Scaber. Bloch. Aust. Fisch. ii tab. 180.
  • Monopterigius. Bloch. Ausl Fisch. ii. t. 178. fig. I. 2.
XXII. SCORPAENA.
  • Horrida. Gron. Zooph. tab. II. 12. 13. fig. I.
  • Volitans. Will. Ichth. App. tab. 2. fig. 3.
  • Antennata. Bloch Ausl. Fisch. iii. t. 185.
  • Didactyla. Pall. Spic. Zool. vii. tab. 4. fig. I. 3.
XXIII. ZEUS.
  • Insidiator. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. iii. tab. 192. fig. 2. 3.
  • Gallus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 26. fig. 34.
  • Ciliaris. Block Ausl. Fisch. tab. 191.
XXIV. PLEURONEC TES.
  • [Page 95]Tricodactylus. Art. Gen. 18. syn. 33.sp. 60.
  • Zebra. Block Ausl. Fisch. iii. tab. 181.
XXV. CHAETODON.
  • Canescens. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 25. fig. 7.
  • Acuminatus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. tab. 33. fig. 3.
  • Pinnatus. Ibid. fig. 6.
  • Cornutus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 25. fig. 6.
  • Argrnteus. Amaen. Acad. iv. p. 249.
  • Rostratus. Orbis. Ibid fig. 17
  • Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. iii. tab. 102. fig. 2.
  • Nigricans. Act. Angl. 1784. ii. tab. 12.
  • Lineatus. Seb. Mus. tab. 25. fig. I.
  • Triostegus. Broussonet Ichth. Dec. i. t. 4.
  • Macrulepidotus. Seb. Mus. iii. t. 25. f. 8.
  • Argus. Will. Ichth. App. p. 2. t. a. f. 2.
  • Srriatus. Seb. Mus, iii. tab. 25. fig. 9.
  • Arcuanus. Ibid. tab. 26. fig. 23.
  • Vagabunqus. Ibid. tab. 5. fig. 18.
  • Ciliaris. Edw. Glean, tab. 283. fig. 4.
  • Saxarilis. Bloch. Ausl. Fisch. iii. t. 206. fig. 1.
  • Rotundus. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 64.
  • Lanceolatus. Edw. Av. tab. 210.
  • Dux. Block. Ausl. Fisch. iii. tab. 195.
  • Pavo. Ibid. tab. 198. fig. 1.
  • Vespertilio. Ibid. tab. 199. fig. 2.
  • Unimaculatus. Ibid. tab. 201. fig. I.
  • Bicolor. Ibid. tab. 206. fig. I.
  • Ocellatus. Ibid. tab. 211. fig. 2.
  • Bengalensis Ibid. tab. 213. fig. 2.
  • Octofasciatus. Ibid. tab. 215. fig. I.
  • Annularis. Ibid. tab. 215. fig. 2.
  • Fiber. Ibid. tab. 212. fig. 2.
  • Teria. Ibid. tab. 199. fig. I. Forsk. Fn. Arab. p. 60. No 82.
XXVI. SPARUS.
  • [Page 96]Insidiator. Pall. Spic. Zool. tab. 5. fig. I.
  • Palpebratus. Pall. n. nord. Beytr. ii. t. 4. fig. I. 2.
  • Spinus. Mus. Ad. Fr. ii. p. 74 *.
XXVII. SCARUS.
  • Schlofferi. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. p. 41.
XXVIII. LABRUS.
  • Lunaris. Gron. Mus. ii. tab. 6. fig. 2.
  • Trichopterus. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. p. 45.
  • Zeylanicus. Ind. Zool, tab. 13. fig. 3.
  • Ferrugineus.
  • Paroticus. Mus. Ad. Fr. ii. p. 76.
  • Linearis. Amaen. Acad. i. p. 315.
XXIX. PERCA.
  • Polymna. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 26. f. 20. 24.
  • Cottoides. Mus. Ad. Fr. ii. p. 84.
  • Stigma.
  • Radula. Aman. Acad. i. p. 313.
XXX. TRIGLA.
  • Minuta.

ORDO VI. ABDOMINALES.

XXXI. SILURUS.
  • Ascita. Mus. Ad. Fr. i. p. 79. t. 30. fig. 2.
  • Costarus. Gron. Mus. ii. tab. 5. fig. 1. 2.
XXXII. TEUTHIS.
  • Hepatus. Catesb. Carol. ii. tab. I. fig. I.
  • Java. Valent. Ind. iii. p. 339. fig. 410.
XXXIII. SALMO.
  • [Page 97]Gasteropelecus. Anostomus. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. t. 3. fig. 4. 5. Gron. Mus, ii. tab. 7. fig. 2.
XXXIV. FlSTULARIA.
  • Chinensis. Pet. Gaz. tab. 68. fig. I.
  • Paradoxa. Pall. Spic. Zool. viii. tab. 4. fig. 6.
XXXV. ESOX.
  • Brasiliensis. Brown Jam. tab. 45. fig. 2.
  • Gymnocephalus.
XXXVI. POLYNEMUS.
  • Paradiseus. Edw. Av. tab. 208.
XXXVII. CLUPEA.
  • Thrissa. Brousson. Ichth. i. tab. 10.
  • Mystus. Amaen. Acad. v. tab. fig. 12.
XXXVIII. CYPRIMUS.
  • Tinea. Brit, Zool. iii. p. 306. No 3. Will. Ichth. t. 2. 5.

CLASSIS V. INSECTA.

ORDO I. ELEUTERATA.

LUCANUS.
  • ALCES. Fab. Sp. Ins. No I. Petiv. Gazoph. tab. 47. f. 15.
  • Gazella. Fab. Mantis. p. I. Oliv. Coleopt. (Lucan) pl. 4. f. 13. a. b.
  • Lama. Pl. 3. f. 8.
  • Carinatus. Lin. S. N. No 5.
SCARABAEUS.
  • Alcides. Feb. Sp. Ins. No 2. Oliv. Col. (Scar.) pl. I. f. 2.
  • Gideon. Lin. 3. pl. 11. f. 102.
  • Centaurus. 4. pl. 11. f. 104.
  • Oromedon. 5. pl. 18. 165.
  • Aeigeon. 6. pl. 26. f. 119.
  • Dichotomus. Lin. 9. pl. 17. f. 156.
  • Claviger. 10. pl. 5. f. 40. a. β.
  • Pan. 12. pl. 5. f. 35. pl. 23. f. 30. β.
  • Simson. 19. pl. 15. f. 142.
  • Geryon. 25. pl. 24. f. 208.
  • Quadrispinosus. 36. pl. 19. f 179.
  • Quadridens. 37. pl. 12. f. 108. a. b.
  • Fnema. Fab. Mant. Ins. No 12.
  • Rhinoceros. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 40. pl. 18. f. 166.
  • Coronatus. No 47. pl. 12. f. 110.
  • [Page 100] Hircus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 52.
  • Piceus. 55. Oliv. Col. (Scar.) pl. 24. f. 211.
  • Aygulus. 57. pl. 13. f. 120. & pl. 4. f. 28. a. b.
  • Analis. Fab. Mant. Ins. 64.
  • Unifasciatus. Gmel. Lin. No 182. Schall. Hall. Naturs. I. p. 240.
  • Scaber. L. Fab. Spec. Ins. 72. Oliv. Ccl. pl. 23. f. I. C.
  • Pygmaeeus. Gmel. Lin. 186. Sch. II Nat. f. 1. p. 239.
  • Longimanus. L. Fab. Sp. Inf. 73. Oliv. Col. pl. 4. f. 27.
  • Verer. Mant. App. p. 377.
  • Barbarus. Spec. Ins. No 83.
  • Marginellus. 88. pl. 13. f. 116.
  • Sabaeus. 99. a. b. pl. 9. f. 85.
  • Pithecius. 102. pl. 9. f. 73.
  • Seniculus, 103. pl. 7. f. 56. a. b.
  • Ammon. 105. pl. 12. f. III.
  • Rhadamistus. 109. pl. 14. f. 136.
  • Lar. Mantiss. Ins. 124. a. b.
  • Bifasciatus. Spec. Ins. III. pl. 13. f. 119.
  • Capucinus. 113. pl. 2. f. 12. pl. 25. f. 12. b.
  • Boas. Mant. Ins. 129.
  • Bonasus. Spec. Ins. 114. pl. 6. f. 43. a-c.
  • Bucephalus. 117. pl. 4. f. 26. pl. 10. f. 92. b.
  • Lancifer. L. 119. pl. 4. f. 32.
  • Spinisey. 131. pl. 12. f. 112.
  • Fricator. Mant. Ins. 140.
  • Miliaris. Sp. Ins. 141. pl. 18. f. 164.
  • Koenigii. 145. pl. 9. f. 77.
  • Pallipes. 153.
  • [Page 101] Aenus. Sp. Ins. 156. Oliv. Coleop. (Scar.) pl. 14. f. 128. a. b.
  • Catta. Fab. Mand. No 115. pl. 23. f. 201.
  • Auglas. pl. 24. f. 212.
  • M [...]lampus. pl. 17. f. 159.
  • Tullus. pl. 19. f. 88. b. & pl. 11. f. 98.
  • Hesperus. p. 14. f. 129.
  • S [...]atus. pl. 21. f. 189. & 1 f. 10. f. 93.
  • Erraticus. Lin. S. Nat. No 29. Faun. Suec. No 383.
  • TROX. Horridus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 3. Oliv. Col. (Trox.) pl. 1. f. 2.
MELOLONTHHA.
  • Serrata. 2. Oliv. Col. (Melol.) pl. 1. f. 5.
  • Lanigera. 10. pl. 4. f. 39. a. b.
  • Glabrat 12. pl. 9. f. 80.
  • Dorsalls. 17.
  • Rusicoills. 24. pl. 9. f. 111.
  • Erythrocephala. 23. pl. 7. f. 80.
  • Rauca. 37. pl. 6. f. 62.
  • Ferruginea. 38. pl. 7. f. 82.
  • Probolcidea. 49. pl. 8. f. 96.
  • Podagrica. 52. pl. 5. f. 51.
  • Mutabilis. 60. pl. 3. f. 24.
  • Vittata. 74. pl. 8. f. 94.
  • Candida. No 8. pl. 8. f. 98.
  • Femoralis. 41. pl. 9. f. 110.
  • Pubeseens. 57. pl. 6. f. 71. 7. p. 43. f. 5.
  • Unicolor. Gmel. Lin. 313. Fuesl. Arc. Ins.
  • Ciliatus. 314. f. 6.
  • Sepicola. Lin. S. Nat. 55. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 24.
  • [Page 102] Syriacus. Lin. S. Nat. No 56. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 25.
  • Leei. Gmel. Lin. 427. N. Att. Stockb. 8. 178 f. 3. No 3. 4.
TRICHIUS.
  • Indus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 2. Oliv. Col. (Ceton.) pl. 6. f. 40.
  • Viridulus. 6. pl. 6. f. 86.
CETONIA
  • Chinensis. 2. pl. 2. f. 5. a b.
  • Nigrita. 3. pl. 10. f. 92.
  • Splendida. 31. pl. 4. f. 21.
  • Elegans. 32. pl. 4. f. 25.
  • Aurichalcea. 43. pl. 9. f. 78.
  • Orichalca. Lin. S. N. iii. App. p. 224.
  • Maculata. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 46. pl. 7. f. 66.
  • Versicolor. 52. pl. 4. f. 23.
  • Veriagata. 55. pl. 5. f. 31. b. & 30.
  • Quadripunctata. Fab. Mant. No 12. pl. 10. f. 93.
  • Capucina. 16.
  • Ephippium. 31. Drur. Ins. 3. pl. 44 f. 3.
  • Bisida. Oliv. Col. (Cet.)No 43. pl. 2. f. 9.
  • Crucisera. 44. pl. 5. f. 29.
  • Impressa. 45. pl. 8 f. 71.
  • Caerulea. 55. pl. 5. f. 31. a.
  • Caerulea. Gmel. Lin. 382. Fuesl. Arch. In pl. 4. tab. 19. f. 30.
  • Bimucronata. 384. P [...]ll. Ic. Ins. Russ. 1. tab. A. f. 13.
HISTER.
  • Maximus. Lin. S. Nat. No OIiv. CoI. (pl. t.) pl. 1. f. 2.
  • Major. L. Fab. Spec. Ins. No 2. pl. 1. f. 4. a. b.
APATE.
  • Capucinus. 4. Sch. El. t. 28.
DERMESTES.
  • [Page 103]Lardarius. L. Fab. Spec. Ins. 1. Schaef. Ic. pl. 42. f. 3.
  • Pellio. 5. pl. 42. f. 4.
  • Ruficollis. 15. Thumb. N. Sp. Ins. 1. p. 8. f. 7.
  • Marginatus. Gmel. Lin. 44. pl. 7. f. 6.
  • Piceus. 45. p. 8.
  • Viridis. 48. p. 9.
BRUCHUS
  • Cacao. No 6.
  • Theobromae. L. 7.
  • Analis. 9.
  • Abdominalis 13.
TRITOMA.
  • Vittata. Fab. Mant. No 4.
HISPA.
  • Bihamata. Lin. S. Nat. No 3.
SILPHA.
  • Indica. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 3. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 38.
OPATRUM.
  • Cinereum. Gmel. Lin. 11. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 4. tab. 21. A. a.
COCCINELLA.
  • Dimidiata. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 5.
  • Cingulata. Fab. Mant. No 24.
  • Sexmaculata. Spec. Ins. No 20.
  • Septempunctata, L. 21. Schaf. Ic. tab. 9. f. 7.
  • Centumpunctata. Gmel. Lin. 118. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 4. tab. 22. f. 13.
  • Transversalis. Fab. Spec. Ins. 24.
  • Sparsa. Gmel. Lin. 120. 7. tab. 42. f. 11.
  • 28-punctata. 48.
  • Minuta. 54. Thumb. N. Sp. Ins. 1. p. 11.
CASSIDA.
  • [Page 104]8-punctata. Fab. Mant. No 18.
  • Marginata. L. Sp. Ins. No 25. Natursorsch. No 9. t. 2.
  • Dorsata. Mantiss. 33.
  • Bicornis. L. Sp. Ins. 29. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 393. 9.
  • Spinisex. L. 31. p. 392. 7.
  • Trisasciata. Mant. 46.
  • Annulata. Spec. Ins. 39. Naturf. 9. t. 2. f. 6.
  • Bipunctata. L. 49.
  • Alatrata. Lin. S. Nat. No 18.
  • Angustata. Gmel. Lin. No 31.
ALURXUS.
  • Femoratus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 2. Drur. Ins. 2. tab. 34. f. 5.
CHRYSMELA.
  • 14-punctata. L. 13.
  • Fervi [...]e. 22.
  • Uudulata. L. 41. Amoen. Ac. 6. p. 393. 14.
  • Nitidi. Mant. No 64.
  • Cruenta. Spec. Ins. 82.
  • Sternicornis. Gmel. Lin. 147. Schal. Hall. Nat. 1. t. 1. f. 1.
  • Gigas. 153. Fuest. Arch. Ins. 4. t. 23. f. 2.
  • Indica. 155. f. 5.
  • Malaccensis. 249. Horn. Shr. Berl. Nat. 8. t. 1. f. 9.
  • Fascicornis. (Altica.) 66. f. 1.
CRYPTOCE­PHALUS.
  • Koenigii. Fab. Sp. Ins. 45.
  • Martinius. Gmel. Lin. No 74. Schal. Hall. Nat. 1. p. 278.
  • Peregrinus. 77. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 4. t. 23. f. 25.
  • Multicolor. 246. Horn. shr. Berl. Nat. 8. t. 1. f. 6.
  • Sumatranus. 247. f. 4.
  • Coffae. 248. f. 7.
  • Orientalis. 249. f. 3.
  • Bataviensis. 250. f. 12.
  • Javanus. 251. f. 2. 5. 8. 11.
CISTELA.
CRIOCERIS.
  • Cincta. 5.
  • Palliata. 6. Act. Hall. 1. p. 279.
  • Picta. Mantiss. 12.
  • Testacea. 20.
  • 4-pustulata. 23.
  • Impressa. 24.
  • Abdominalis. Gmel. Lin. 130.
  • Ochracea. 180. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 7. t. 44. f. 9. p. q.
EROTYLUS.
  • Giganteus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. De Geer, Ins. 5. tab. 16. f. 8.
  • Longimanus. Mant. No 11.
LAGRIA.
  • Abdominalis. Fab. Mant. No 14.
  • Inda. Lin. S. Nat. No 121. Mus. Lud. UIr. 41.
CURCULIO.
  • Palmarum. L. Sp, Ins. No 1. Oliv. Col. (Curc.) pl. 2. f. 16.
  • Indus. L. 5. Be Geer, Ins. 5. pl. 15. f. 22.
  • Paganus. 6.
  • Hemipterus. L. 8. pl. 15. f. 25.
  • Melanocardius. L. 10. Sulz. Ins. 4. tab. 4. f. 11.
  • Barbirostris. 65. Seb. Mus. 4. tab. 95. f. 5.
  • Frigidus. Fab. Mant. App. p. 381.
  • Mucoreus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 74. Muf. Lud. Ulr. 53.
  • Pusio. L. 75. 46.
  • Stigma. L. 79. 48.
  • Hebes. 80.
  • Annulatus. L. 81. 51.
  • Reticulatus. 85.
  • Stultus. Mant. No 117.
  • Anchoraco. L Spec. Ins. 118. De Geer, Ins. 5. tab. 15. f. 4.
  • [Page 106] Argyreus. L. Spec. Ins. 128. Mus. Lad. Ulr. 54.
  • Curvipes. Mant. 183.
  • Lacerta. Spec. Ins. 161.
  • Frigidus. Mant. App. p. 381.
  • Emeritus. L. Spec. Ins. 190. 56.
  • Cinnamomi. Gmel. Lin. 275. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 5. t. 24. f. 20. h. i.
  • Globosus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 193. Drur. Ins. 1. pl. 32. f. 4.
  • Apterus. L. 206. De Geer. Ins. 5. tab. 16. f. 1.
  • Viridanus. 219.
ATTELABUS.
  • Indicus. Mant. No 5. Thunb. N. Spec. Ins. 3. pl. 68. f. 81.
  • Cyancus. 15.
CLERUS.
  • Apiarius. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 9. Schrf. Ic. pl. 48. f. 11.
  • Cyaneus. Mant. No 15.
PRINUS.
  • Trochlearis. Lin. S. Nat. p. 622.
  • Armillatus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 21. Oliv. Col. (Prion.) pl. 5. f. 17.
  • Rostratus. Mant. No 3.
  • Spinosus. 26.
CERAMBYX.
  • Gigas. Fab. Mant. No 20.
  • Fasciatus. Spec. Ins. No 23.
  • Barbicornis. L. 24. Mus. L. Ulr. 68.
  • Rugicollis. Mantiss. 40.
  • Holosericeus 45.
  • Longicollis 46.
  • Sentis. Lin. S. Rat. p. 626. 23.
  • Ferrugineus. 25.
  • Platypus. Gmel. Lin. No 132. De Geer, Ins. 7. l. 49. f. 3.
LAMIA.
  • [Page 107]Vaginator. Fab. Mant. No 8.
  • Grisator. 12.
  • Nigricornis. Spec. Ins. 10.
  • Ariolaror. 14.
  • Reticulator. 16.
  • Rotator. 32.
  • Lusia. Fab. Mant. No 35.
  • Molitor. Spec. Ins. 42.
  • Rubus. L. 44. De Geer, Ins. 5. t. 13. f. 16.
  • Scabrator. 46.
  • Sentis. Lin. S. Nat. No 23.
  • Ferruginous. 25. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 70.
  • Depressus. 26. Schr. Ins. 8. f. 10.
STINOCORUS.
  • Cyaneus. Fab. Spec. Ins. No 2. Forst. Cent. Ins. 40. (palliatus.)
  • Rusticus. 19.
SAPERDA.
  • Vittata. 11.
CALLIDUM.
  • Barbatum. 12.
  • Compressum. Mant. 21.
  • Glaucum. Spec. Ins. 41.
  • Annulare. Mant. 59.
  • Venustum. Gmel. Lin. 298. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 5. t. 26. f. 12.
  • Indicum. 299. f. 16.
LEPTURA.
  • Linearis. Lin. S. Nat. No 25. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 77.
LAMPYRIS.
  • Cincta. Fab. Sp. Ins. 6.
  • Depressa 18.
  • Compressa. Gmel. Lin. No Thunb. N. Sp. Ins. 4. p. 80.
PYROCHROA.
LYMEXYLON.
  • Testaceum. Fab. Spec. Ins. No 1.
CUCUJUS.
  • Rusus. Gmel. Lin. No 10. Swed. Act. Stock. 8. No 3. 21.
CANTHARIS.
  • Melanocephala. Fab. Spec. Ins. 13.
  • Tropica. Lin. S. Nat. No 19. Gron. Zooph. 515. t. 14. f. 7.
ELATER.
  • Flabellicornis. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. Dr. Ins. 3. pl. 47. f. 1.?
  • Speciosus. L. 2.
  • Luridus. 3.
  • Fuscipes. 9.
  • Melanocephalus. 38.
  • Notatus. 45.
  • Pallipes. Fab. Ins. Mant. 46.
BUPRESTIS.
  • Gigantea. L. 3. Petiv. Gaz. t. 147. f. 16. 17.
  • Vittata. 4.
  • Ignita, L. 12. t. 20. f. 8.
  • Aenea. 15.
  • Sternicornis. L. 17. Grew, Mus. t. 13.
  • Chrysis. L. 18. De Geer, Ins. 4. t. 17. f. 25.
  • Fulminans. Mantiss. 29.
  • Impressa. Spec. Ins. 27.
  • Scabra. 30.
  • Plebeia. 41.
  • Impressa. Mant. 61.
  • Bimaculata. Spec. Ins. 45. Sulz. Ins. 57. t. 6. f. 15.
  • 4-maculata. 46.
  • [Page 109] Tristis. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 47. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 93.
  • Nobilis. L. 49.
  • Stricta. Lin. S. Nat. No 4. 87.
CICINDELA.
  • Longicollis. Fab. Mamiss. No 1.
  • Grossa. Spec. Ins. No 1.
  • Cyanea. Mant. 2.
  • Bicolor. Spec. Ins. No 2.
  • Sexpunctata. 14.
  • 4-lineata. 15.
  • Biramosa. Mantiss. 20. Thunb. N. Sp Ins. 1. pl. 26. f. 40.
  • Catena. Spec. Ins. 18.
HYDROPHILUS.
  • Olivaceus. 2.
DYTICUS.
  • Limbatus. Sp. Ins. 5.
  • Rusicollis. Mant. No 6.
  • Fasciatus. Fab. Sp. Ins. 7.
  • Vittatus. Spec. Ins. 10.
  • Griseus. 12.
  • Aciculatus. Gmel. Lin. 64. Fuest. Arch. Ins. 5. p. 123. No 4.
  • Zeylanicus. 83. Gron. Mus. 2. p. 164. No 552.
GYRINUS.
  • Spinosus. 4.
CARABUS.
  • 6-guttatus. 6.
  • Reflexus. 20.
  • Angulatus. Fab. Spec. Ins. 21.
  • Levigatus. 28.
  • Attelaboides. 30.
  • Trilineatus. 31.
  • [Page 110] Bimaculatus. L. Fab. Spec. Ins. 45. Sulz. H. Ins. t. 7. 4. 5.
  • Cinctus. 62.
  • Flexuosus. 66.
  • Indicus. Gmel. Lin. 153. F Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 6. t. 29. f. 11.
  • Splendid us. 154. p. 138. No 41.
  • Marginellus. 155. p. 138. No 42.
PIMELIA.
  • Striata. 1.
  • Gibba. Mantiss. 3.
  • Fasciata. Spec. 18.
SCARITES.
  • Bucephalus. Gmel. Lin. No 20. t. 29. f. 16. 1.
BLAPS.
  • Striata. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 5.
  • Crenata. 6.
TENEBRIO.
  • Laminatus. Mantiss. 1.
  • Punctulatus. 2.
  • Abbreviatus. Spec. Ins. 6.
HELPOS.
  • Maura. 5.
  • Dentipes. 12.
MYLABRIS.
  • Fasciata. 1.
  • Algirica. L. 3.
  • Indica. Gmel. Lin. 16. 6. t. 30. f. 6.
  • Undulata. 18. 8. t. 48. f. 3.
  • Bifasciata. 21. t. 48. f. 2.
LYTTA
  • [Page 111]Syriaca. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 3. Fuest. Arch. Ins. 6. t. 30. f. 1.
  • Ruficollis. Gmel. Lin. 13. 8. t. 48. f. 4.
STAPHYLINUS.
  • Aureus. Mantiss. 1.

ORDO II. ULONATA.

BLATTA.
  • Gigantea. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 36. f. 2.
  • Indica. 8.
  • Petiveriana. 13. Peliv. Gaz. t. 71 f. 1.
  • Orientalis. L. 14. Schaef. Ins. t. 88. f. 2. 3.
  • Ruficollis. Mantiss. 22.
  • Aterrima. Gmel. Lin. 32. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 8. t. 49. f. 9.
MANTIS.
  • Gigas. L. Fab. Spec. Ins. 1. Petiv. Gaz. t. 60. f. 2.
  • Necydaloides. L. 2. Roes. 2. Gryl. t. 19.
  • Atrophica. 3. Pall. Spic. sasc. 9. t. 5. f. 1.
  • Bispinosa. 4.
  • Linearis. Mont. 9.
  • Gongyloides. L. Sp. Ins. 8. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 36. f. 2.
  • Pauperata. 9.
  • Strumaria. L. 11. Roes. Ins. 2. Gryll. t. 2.
  • Tricolor. L. 12. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 117.
  • Cancellata. 13.
  • Siccisolia. L. 14. Roes. Ins. 2. Gryll. t. 17.
  • Pectinicornis. L. 15. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 50. f. 1.
  • Urbana. 26.
  • Pulchra. Mantiss. 34.
ACHETA.
  • Gryllotalpa. Spec. Ins. 1. Roes. Ins. 2. Gryll. t. 14. 15.
  • [Page 112] Monstrosa. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 2. Drur. lns. 2. t. 42. f. 1.
  • Orientalis. 7.
LOCUSTA.
  • Citrisolia. L. 1. Roes. Ins. 2. Gryll. t. 16. f. 1.
  • Elongata. L. 10. t. 18. f. 7.
  • Femorata. Fab. Mant. 12.
  • Ocellata. L. Sp. Ins. 12. Seb. Mus. 4. t. 73. f. 7. 8.
  • Triops. L. 16.
  • Coronata. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 16. 17. De Geer. Ins. 3. t. 38. f. 5.
  • Melanoptera. L. 18.
  • Coriacea. L. 19. Mus. Ad. Fr. 136.
  • Spinulosa. L. 28. Edw. Av. 2. t. 285. f. 3. 4. 5.
  • Indica. Gmel. Lin. No 116. Fuesl. Arch. Ins. 8. t. 53. f. 2.
  • Unicolor. Lin. S. Nat. No 3. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 119.
  • Carinata. 6. 122.
  • Lamellosa. 21. Roes. Gryll. t. 18. f. 7?
  • Rugosa. 25. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 132.
  • Aquilina. 27. 133.
  • Fastigiata. 29. 135.
GRYLLUS.
  • Succinctus. I Fab. Sp. 2. Amen. Ac. 6. p. 398. 36.
  • Rericulatus. 7.
  • Serripes. Mantiss. 8.
  • Turcicus. 10.
  • Punctatus. Sp. Ins. 14. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 41. f. 4.
  • Haematopus. L. 16. De Geer. Ins. 5 t. 40. f. 10.
  • Perspicillacus. L. 50. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 398. 34.

ORDO III. SYNISTATA.

MONOCULUS.
  • Polyphemus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. Rumph. Mus. 21. t. 12.
ONISCUS.
  • [Page 113]Linearis. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 8. Pall. Spic. fasc. 9. t. 4. f. 11.
SEMBLIS.
  • Fuscata. 4.
TERMES.
  • Fatale. L 1. De Geer, Ins. 7. t. 37. f. 1.2.
MYRMELEON.
  • Pardalis. 2.
  • Punctatum. Mant. 7.
ICHNEUMON.
  • Pedator. Spec. Ins. 52.
  • Polycerator. 63.
  • Punctatus. 104.
SPHEX.
  • Fervens. L. 12. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 406.
  • Erythrocephala. 14.
  • Argentata. Mantiss. 6.
  • Maderaspatana. Spec. Ins. 16.
  • Compressa, 19.
  • Ciliata. Mantiss. 24.
  • Vespiformis. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 23.
  • Analis. 27.
  • Affimilis. Mantiss. 33.
  • Tropica. L. Spec. Ins. 37. 408.
  • Maura. Mantiss. 38.
  • Auraca. 45.
  • Nigrita. Spec. Ins. 45.
  • Villosa. 47.
  • Flava. 48.
  • Flavicornis. 50.
  • Indostana. Lin. S. Nat. No 7. 407.
  • Indica. 26. 408.
TIPHIA.
  • [Page 114]Collaris. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 8.
  • Dorsata. Mantiss. 11.
  • Ruficornis. 12.
SCOLIA.
  • 4-pustulata. Sp. Ins. 13.
CHRYSIS.
  • Splendida. I.
  • Oculata. 4.
BEMBEX.
  • Repanda. Mantiss. 6.
  • Interrupta. 8.
VESPA.
  • Cincta. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. Sulz. Ins. t. 27. f. 5.
  • Cornuta. L. Sp. Ins. 7. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 48. f. 3.
  • Calida. L, 23.
  • 4-punclata Mantiss. 55.
  • Hebraea. 58.
  • Flavescens. Sp. Ins. 50.
  • Petiolata. 56.
  • Esuriens. Mantiss. 75.
CRABRO.
  • Cornutus. Fab. Mant. No 3.
  • Repandus. 5.
  • Interruptus. 10.
ANDRENA.
  • Cincta. Sp. Ins. 8.
  • Zonata. L. 11. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 415.
APIS.
  • Plumipes. 35.
  • [Page 115] Bicolor. Sp. Ins. 55.
  • Villosa. 56.
  • Florea. Mantiss. 87.
  • Smaragdula. 91.
  • Cordata? Lin. S. Nat. 15. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 414.
NOMADA.
  • Histrio. Fab. Sp. Ins. 1.
FORMICA.
  • Smaragdina. No 2.
  • Compressa. Montiss. 2.
  • Cinerascens. 12.
  • Elongata. 13.
  • Elevata. Sp. Ins. 16.
  • Bihamata, 29. Dr. Ins. 2. t. 38. f. 7. 8.
  • Maxillosa. 37.
MUTILLA.
  • Indica. Lin.S. Nat. 3.Mus. Lud. Ulr. 419.

ORDO IV. AGONATA.

CANCER.
  • Raninus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 1. Rumph. Mus. t. 7. f. T. V.
  • Ceratopthalmus. Mant. 6. Herbst. Cancr. 174. t. 1. f. 8. 9.
  • Globus. Sp. Ins. 6.
  • Craniolaris. L. 7. Rumpb. Mus. t. 10. f. A. B.
  • Porcellanus. Mantiss. 11. Herbst. Cancr. 92. 12. t. 2. f. 18.
  • Corallinus. 23. Rumpb. Mus. t. 8. f. 5.
  • Floridus. L. Sp. Ins. 16. Herbst. Cancr. t. 3. f. 39.
  • Vocans. L. 17. Petiv. Gaz. t. 78. f. 5.
  • Maculatus. L. 21. Rumph. Mus. t. 10. f. 1.
  • Maenas. L. 25. t. 6. f. 0.
  • Dormia. L. 27. t. 11. f. 1.
  • [Page 116] 6-dentatus. Fab. Mantiss. No 43. Rumph. Amb. t. 1. f. 5.
  • Feriatus L. Sp. Ins. 2 28. Mus. t. 6. f. P.
  • Pagurus. L. 29. t. 11. f. 4.
  • Aeneus. L. 32. Seb. Mus. 3. t. 19. f. 17.
  • Eornicatus. Sp. Ins. App. p. 502.
  • Ochtades. Mantiss. 55. Herbsi. Canc. t. 8. f. 54.
  • Ovis. 66. f. 74.
  • Cylindrus. Sp. Ins. 35.
  • Chabrus. L. 36. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 438.
  • Muricatus. Mantiss. 67. Herbst. Cancr. f. 75.
  • Erinaceus. 71.
  • Superciliosus. L. 72. Seb. Mus. 3. t. 18. f. 11.
  • Punctatus. L. Sp. Ins. 44. Rumph. Amboin. t. 10. f. 6.
  • 7-spinosus. Mant. 75.
  • Horridus. L. Sp. Ins. 51. Rumpb. Mus. t. 9. f 1.
  • Longimanus L. 55. t. 8. f. 2.
  • Longipes. L. 56. t. 8. f. 4.
  • Spinifer. L. 57. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 447.1
PAGURUS.
  • Latro. L. 1. Rumph. Mus. t. 7. f. 4.
  • Diogenes. L. 3. t. 5. f. K. L.
  • Hungarus. Mantiss. 4. Herbs, Cancr. t. 122.
  • Miles. 6. f. 114.
  • Clypeatus. 7.
HIPPA.
  • Adactyla? Fab. Mantiss. No 1.
  • Dorsipes. L. 3. Rumph. Mus.
  • Variolosa. 5.
SCYLLARUS.
  • Arctus. L. Sp. Ins. 1. t. 2. f. 6. D.
ASTACUS.
  • Homarus. L. 3. t. 1. f. A.
  • [Page 117] Emeritus. L. Sp. Ins. 16. Gron. Zooph. 1000. t. 17. f. 8. 9.
SQUILLA.
  • Mantis. L. 1. Rumph. Mus. t. 3. f. 2.
  • Scyllarus. L. 2. Seb. Mus. 3. t. 20. f. 6.
  • Ciliata. Mantiss. 3.
  • Chiragra? Sp. Ins. 3. Rumph. Mus. t. 3. f. F.

ORDO V. UNOGATA.

LIBELLULA.
  • Indica. Fab. Sp. Ins. 8. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 46. f. 1.
  • Fasciata. L. 17. Edw. Av. t. 174.
  • Americana. L. 23.
  • Histrio. Mantiss. 24.
  • Variegata. Lin. S. Nat. 18. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 412. No 86.
AGRION.
  • Ciliata. Fab. Sp. Ins. 3.
  • Linearis. 5. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 48. f. 1.
JULUS.
  • Stigma. 8.
  • Carnisex. 9. Scbroet. Ahh. 1. t. 3. f. 7.
  • Indus. L. 10. Petiv. Gaz. t. 74. f. 3.
  • Fuscus. L. 11. Seb. Mus. 2. t. 24. f. 4. 5.
SCOLOPENDRA.
  • Morsitans. L. 5. Petiv. Gaz. t. 13. f. 3.
  • Dorsalis. 7.
  • Clypeata. 8.
  • Phosphorea. L. 11.
ARANEA.
PHALANGIUM.
  • Caudatum. L. 7. Seb. Mus. 1. t. 70. f. 7. 8.
SCORPIO.
  • Aser. L. 3. Roes. Ins. 3. t. 65.

ORDO VI. GLOSSATA.

PAPILIO.
  • * EQUITES TROES.
    • Paris. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 2. No 1. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 12. f. 1.
    • Theseus. 3. Cram. Ins. 15. t. 180. B.
    • Polytes. L. 4. 8. t. 90. B.
    • Hector. L. 5. 12. t. 141. A.
    • Romulus. t. 43. A.
    • Helenus. L 7. 13. t. 153. A. B.
    • Antenor. 8. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 3. f. 1.
    • Troilus. L. 9. 1. t. 11. f. 2. 3. 5?
    • Palinurus. Fab. Mantiss. No 10.
    • Deiphobus. L. Sp. Ins. 2. No 10. Cram. Ins. 16. t. 181. A. B.
    • Pelaus. 12. 15. t. 177. A. B.C.
    • Pammon. L. 16. 12. t. 141. B.
    • Achates. 19. 16. t. 182. A. B.
    • Polydorus. L. 20. 11. t. 128. A. B.
    • Memnon. L. Var. 23. t. 222. A. B.
    • Priamus. L. 21. 2. t. 23. A. B.
    • Remus. 22. 1. t. 10. A. B.& 11. A. B.
    • Agenor. L. 25. 3. t. 32. A. B.
    • Amphrisius. Mantiss. 23. 19. t. 219. A.
    • [Page 119] Alcandor. t. 40. A. B. D. E.
    • Sarpedon. L. Spec. Ins. 28. 11. t. 122. D. E.
    • Amphimedon. 31. 17. t. 194. A.
    • Aeneas. L. 32. 3. t. 29.C.—F.
    • Lysander. 33. 2. t. 24. E.?
    • Polymnestor. 35. 5. t. 53. A. B.
    • Panthous. L. 36. 11. t. 123. 124.
    • Remus. Mantiss. 24. 12. t. 135. A. 136. A.
    • Pandarus. L. Spec. 37. Mus. Lad. Ulr. 198.
    • Astenous. 38. Cram. Ins. 17. t. 195. A.
  • ** EQUITES ACHIVI.
    • Ripheus. Fab. Mantiss. No 43. Cram. Ins. t. 385. A. B.
    • Pyrrhus. L. Sp. Ins. 2. No 41. t. 220. A. B.
    • Tiridares. 43. t. 161. A. B.
    • Aeclus. Mnntiss. 50. t. 317. A. B.
    • Fabius. Sp. Ins. No 47.
    • Codes. Mantiss. 53.
    • Leilus. L. Sp. Ins. 48. t. 85. C. D.
    • Ulysses. L. 52. t. 121. A. B.
    • Patroclus. L. 53. t. 109. A. B.
    • Diomedes. L. 54. t. 122. A.
    • Varanes. 55. t. 160. D. E.
    • Alcibiades. Mantiss. 65.
    • Pompilius. 66. t. 37. A. B.
    • Sinon. Sp. Ins. 59. Drur. Ins. t. 22. f. 3. 4.
    • Anthcus Cram. Ins. t. 235. B. C.
    • Chiron. 60. t. 200. D. E.
    • Curius. Mantiss. 71
    • Periander. 74.
    • Codius. Sp. Ins. 69. t. 179. A. B.
    • Mencstheus. 74. t. 142. A. B.
    • Xuthus. L. 75. t. 73. A. B.
    • [Page 120] Cresphontes. Sp. Ins. 77. Cram. Ins. t. 89. A. B.
    • Orontes. L. 80. t. 83. A. B.
    • Aegistus. t. 241. C. D.
    • Agamemnon. L. 81. t. 106. C. D.
    • Aegistheus. L. No 82. t. 200. A. B. C.
    • Empedocles. Mantiss. 94.
    • Euryalus. Sp. Ins. 83. t. 74. A. B.
    • Phidippus. L. 85. t. 69. A. B.
    • Nisus. 84. t. 150. A. B.
    • Aurelius. 86. t. 168. A. B.
    • Demoleus. L. 89. t. 231. A. B.
    • Medon. L. 89. t. 205. B.C.
    • Philoctetes. L. 93. t. 20. A.B.C.
    • Nireus. L. 93. t. 187. A. B.
    • Amphimachus. 94. t. 84. A. B.?
    • Amphitrion. 96. t. 157. A. B.
    • Gambrisius. Fab. Mantiss. 113. t. 43. F. G.
    • Drusius. t. 229. A. 23. A.
    • Demophon. L. Sp. Ins. 97. t. 158. A.—E.
    • Eiurypylus. L. 106. t. 122. B. C.
    • Astenous. t. 208. A. B.
    • Sabinus. Sp. Ins. Ap. p. 502. t. 289. A.—D.
    • Jason. Lin. S. Nat. No 38. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 210.
  • *** HELICONII.
    • Calliope. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 107. Cram. Ins. t. 246. C.
    • Melite. L. 108. t. 153. C. D.
    • Mopsa. L. 109. t. 190. D.
    • Mneme. L. 110. t. 190. C.
    • Lybia. 111. t. 177. C. D.
    • Violae. I. 112. t. 298. D. E.
    • Terpsichore. L. 113. t. 298. A. B. C.
    • Serena. 114. ttt, 268. A. B.
    • [Page 121] Urania. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 117. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 225.
    • Psidii. L. 124. Cram. Ins. t. 257. P.
    • Aspasia. Mantiss. 145.
    • Aegle. Sp. Ins. 125. t. 126. C. D.?
    • Thalia. L. 130. t. 246. A.
    • Euryta. L. 131. t. 233. A. B.
    • Aedea. L. 132. Clerck. Ic. t. 41. f. 2.
    • Antiocha. L. 134. Cram. Ins. t. 38. E. F.
    • Erato. L. 146. t. 119. A.
    • Assarica. t. 363. A. B.
  • *** PARANASSII.
    • Quirina. 152.
    • Piera. L. 153. t. 291 C. D.
    • Pasithoe. L. 154. t. 258. E. F.
    • Andromeda. 158.
    • Idea. L. 160. t. 193. A. B.
  • *****DANAI CANDIDI.
    • Brassicae. L. 161. y. 271. E. f.
    • Napi. L. 163. Albin. Ins. t. 52. F. G.
    • Valeria. Cram. Ins. t. 85. A.
    • Libythea. 172.
    • Creona 175. t 95. C—F.
    • Nerissa. t. 44. A.
    • Demopbile. L. 177. Clerck. Ic. t. 28. f. 4.
    • Crocale. Cram. Ins. t. 55. C. D.
    • Hecabe. L. 178. t. 124. B. C.
    • Drusilla. t. 110. C.
    • Paulina. t. 110. E. F.
    • Xiphia. 180.
    • Hedyle. t. 186. C. D.
    • [Page 122] Eucharis. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 181. Cram. Ins. t. 352. CD.E. f.
    • Jugurtha. t. 187. E. F.
    • Alcmeone. 186. t. 141. E.
    • Oenippe. t. 229. B. C.
    • Pyramhe. L. 188. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 245.
    • Catilla. t. 229. E. F.
    • Leucippe. 189. Cram. Ins. t. 36. A.—C.
    • Thetis. t. 238. F. G.
    • Callirhoe. 190. Pl. Enlum. t. 91. f. 1.2.
    • Mesentina. t. 270. A. B.
    • Glaucippe. L. 191. Cram. Ins. t. 164. A.—C.
    • Zelmira. t. 320. C.—F.
    • Euippe. L. 192. t. 91. D.—G.?
    • Coronnis. 193. t. 44. B. C.
    • Hyparete. L. 194. Clerck. Ic. t. 38. f. 2. 3.
    • Evagete. Cram. Ins. t. 221. F. G.
    • Scylla. L. 203. t. 12. C. D.
    • Coronea. 201. t. 68. B. C.
    • Cornelia. Mmitiss. 229.
    • Agathina. t. 237. D.E.
    • Judith. 230.
    • Belisamae. t. 258. A. B. C. D
    • Amata. Sp. Ins. 204.
    • Aenippe. t. 157. C. D.
    • Cypraea. Mantiss. 232.
    • Hitaria. t. 339. E. F.
    • Danaë. Sp. Ins. 205.
    • Sesia. Mantiss. 234. t. 217. C. D. E.
    • Rahel. 235.
    • Ada. t. 363. C. D.
    • Messalina. 236.
    • Zeuxippe. t. 362. E. F.
    • Gnoma. Sp. Ins. 217. t. 361. C. D.
    • Drya. 218. t. 120. C. D.
    • Philea. L. 221. t. 173. E. F.
    • Dorimenes. t. 387. C. D.
    • [Page 123] Acasta. Lin. S. Nat. No 83. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 250.
    • Encedonia. 90. 244.
    • Arsalte. 91. Clerck. Ic. t. 23. f. 2.
    • Damone. 93.
  • †DANIA FESTIVI.
    • Midamus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 227. Cram. Ins. t. 266. A. B.
    • Claudius.Mantiss. 261. t. 266. C.
    • Climene. t. 389. E. F.
    • Liberius. Sp. Ins. 229. t. 210. G. H.
    • Syphax. 234. t. 233. C. D.
    • Eyialeus. Mantiss, 267. t. 189. D. E.
    • Eualthe. Sp. Ins. 235. t. 17. E. F.
    • Caenrus. L. 239. Mus. Lud Ulr. 271.
    • Genutia. Cram. Ins. t. 206. C. D.
    • Pinthaeus. L. 242. t. 258.
    • Chrysippus. L. 245. t. 118. B. C.
    • Hegesippus. 248. t. 180. A.
    • Nicaeus. 255. t. 12. G. H.
    • Gripus. 255. t. 183. C. D.
    • Xanthus. L. 257. t. 183. A. B.
    • Arccsilaus. Mantiss. 305.
    • Eribotes. Sp. Ins. 267.
    • Morvus. 270. t. 48. A. B.
    • Cocytus. Mantiss. 316.
    • Obrinus. L. Sp. Ins. 275. t. 338. C. D.
    • Ancaeus. L. 276. t. 49. E. F.
    • Jairus. 281. t. 6. A. B.
    • Philocles. L. 285. t. 184. D. E. F.
    • Aeropus. L. 287. t. 111. F. G.
    • Mineus. 294. t. 84. C. D.
    • Baldus. 306.
    • Zetes. Lin. S. Nat. No no. Clerck. Ic. t. 43. f. 1.
    • Encdadus. 112. Mus Lud. Ulr. 354.
    • [...][Page 124] Eribote. Lin. S. Nat. No 115. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 233.
    • Perius. 116. 261.
    • Philomelus. 123. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 404. 60.
  • *NYMPHALES GEMMATI.
    • Polynice. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 310. Cram. Ins. t. 195. D. E.
    • Almana. L. 311. t. 58. F. G.
    • Asterie. L. 312. t. 58. D. E.
    • Oenone. L. 313. t. 35. A. C.
    • Erigone. t. 62. E. F.
    • Lemonias. L. 314. t. 35. D. F.
    • Villida. Mantiss. 366.
    • Glycene. 379.
    • Orithya. L. Sp. Ins. 315 t. 32. E. F.
    • Remulia. t. 232. F. G.
    • Feronia. L. 318. t. 192. E. F.
    • Lampetia. L. Mantiss. 378. t. 148. D. D.t. 349. A.B.
    • Roxelana. Sp. Ins. 320. t. 141. C. D.
    • Minerva. 327. t. 116. E. F.
    • Laomedia. L. 333. t. 8. F. G.
    • Cardui. 364. t. 26. E. F.
    • Atlita. Mant. 388.
    • Libye. L. Sp. Ins. 334. Sultz. Ins. t. 17. f. 7.
    • Justina. Cram. Ins. t. 326. C.
    • Hedonia. L. 335. t. 69. C. D.
    • Arsince. L. 345. t. 160. B. C.
    • Panthera.Mantiss 407.
    • Pipleis. L. Sp. Ins. 368. t. 60. A. B.
    • Claudia. 369. Naturforch. 9. t. 2.
    • Bankia. 371. Cram. Ins. t. 26. A. B. & 291. I.
    • Leda. 376. t. 196. C. D.
    • Rohria. Mantiss. 446.
    • [Page 125] Arcensia. Cram. Ins. t. 292. D. E
    • Constantia. t. 133. A. B.
    • Polydecta. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 373. t. 144. E. F.
    • Iphira. 379. t. 209. C. D.
    • Tolumnia. 374. t. 130. F. G.
    • Erminia. t. 176. A. B.
    • Morna. 375.
    • Polibete. t. 234. D. E. & 235. C. D.
    • Juliana. Fab. Sp. Ins. App. p. 503. t. 280. A. B.
    • Egista. t. 281. CD.
    • Helie. Lin. S. Nat. No 152. Clerck. Ic. t. 34. f. 3.
    • Arete. Cram. Ins. t. 313. E. F.
  • **NYMPHALES PHALERATI.
    • Ida. Cram. Ins. t. 42. C. D. & 374. C. D.
    • Cydippe. L, Fab. Sp. Ins. 388. t. 62. A. B.
    • Penthesilia. 390. t. 145. B.C.
    • Melita. t. 28. D. F.
    • Cyane. 392. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 4. f. 1.
    • Vitellia. Mantiss. 474. Cram. Ins. t. 349. E. F.
    • Antilope. t. 183. E. F.
    • Protogenia. Sp. Ins. 395. t. 189. F. G.
    • Atalanta. 397. t. 84. E. F. Var.
    • Charonia. 398. t. 47. A.B. C.
    • Polychloros. L. 404. t. 330. C. D. Var.
    • Juvcnta. t. 188. B.
    • Dirce. L. 407. t. 212. C. D.
    • Hippoclus. t. 222. C. D.
    • C. Aureum. L. 410. t. 19. E. F.
    • Ariadne. L. 412. t. 144. G. H.
    • Proserpina. t. 218. C. D.
    • Bolinae. L. 414. t. 65. E. F.
    • [Page 126] Lisionasse. Cram. Ins. t. 205. A. B.
    • Clytia. L. Sp. Ins. 415. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 296.
    • Thyonneus. Cram. Ins. t. 222. E. F.
    • Archesia. Sp. App. p. 504. t. 219. D. E.
    • Amathea. L. Spec. Ins. No 416. t. 209. A. B.
    • Undularis. Sp. App. p. 504. t. 256. A. B.
    • Monina. Mantiss. No 502.
    • Lamis. t. 238. E.
    • Allica. No 510. t. 280. E. F.
    • Leucothoe L. Sp. Ins. 421 t. 203. E. F.?
    • Melicerta. 423. t. 211. E. F.
    • Heliodore. Mantiss. 516.
    • Ilithuia. Sp. Ins. 426. t. 213. A. B.
    • Pelea. Mantiss. 523.
    • Erymanthis. t. 238. F.G.
    • Venilia. L. Sp. Ins. 431. t. 219. B. C.
    • Alimena. L. 432. t. 221. A. B. C.
    • Phoerusa. L. 433. t. 130. B. C.
    • Manilia. t. 259. A. B.
    • Hippona. 434. t. 90. C. D.
    • Adonia. t. 259. C. D.
    • Agatha. Mantiss. 530.
    • Neaerea. L. Sp. Ins. 441. t. 75. C. D.
    • Aceste. L. 442. t. 121. E. F.
    • Porphyria. t. 259. E. F.
    • Eurinome. 443. t. 70. A.
    • Neste. t. 256. E. F.
    • Dissimilis. L. 444. t. 82. C. D.
    • Assimilis. L. 445. 154. A.
    • Similis. L. 446. t. 30. D.
    • Lotis. t. 230. D. E.
    • Lais. 448. t. 110. A. B.
    • Valentina. t. 327. C. D.
    • Egialea. 449. t. 92. D.
    • Alcippe. t. 389. G. H.
    • Panope. 450. t. 65. C. D.
    • [Page 127] Villida. Cram. Ins. t. 349. C. D.
    • Hippia. Mantiss. 545.
    • Martha. 555.
    • Elea. Sp. Ins. 460. t. 242. D. E.
    • Cytherea. L. 474. Clerck. Ins. t. 39. f. 3.
    • Phalantha. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 485. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 21. f. 1. 2.
    • Tipha. Lin. S. Nat. No 164. Clerck. Ic. t. 32. f. 3.
    • Canace. 173. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 15. f. 1. 2.
    • Idmone. 182. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 310.
    • Elea. 183. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 17. f. 5. 6.
    • Janassa. 185. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 294.
    • Nauplia. 1. 97. Clerck. Ic. t. 46. f. 1. 2.
    • Hypermnestra. 198. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 407. 69.
    • Nesaea. 199. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 302.
  • †PLEBEII RURALES.
    • Amor. Fab. Sp. Ins. 491.
    • Vulcanus. Cram. Ins. t. 208. E. F.
    • Lisias. Mantiss. 615.
    • Etolus. 620.
    • Ganymedes. Sp. Ins. 500. t. 40. C. D.
    • Sphinx. 511. t. 46. F. G.
    • Hyacinthus. 516. t. 36. C. D.
    • Iarbus. Mantiss. 648.
    • Baeticus. L. Sp. Ins. 529. Ernst. Pap. d' Eur. t. 37. f. 76.
    • Strephon. 531.
    • Atymnus. Mantiss. 662. Cram. Ins. t. 331. D. E.
    • Aeolus. Sp. Ins. 535. Pl. Enlum. t. 18. f. 6. 7.
    • Simaethis. 537. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 1. f. 3.
    • Ixion. 540.
    • Nedymond. Cram. Ins. t. 299. E. F.
    • Rosimon. 541.
    • Laius. t. 319. D. E.
    • Amyntor. 543. t. 159. D. E.
    • [Page 128] Triopas. Cram. Ins. t. 310. G. H.
    • Eumolphus. t. 299. G. H.
    • Hylax. Fab. Sp. Ins. 559.
    • Midas. 564.
    • Melampus. t. 362. G. H.
    • Aesopus. 565. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 9. f. 3. 4.
    • Phairus. 566. Cram. Ins. t. 238. C.
    • Aratus. t. 365. A. B.
    • Cephus. 576.
    • Petavius. t. 365. C. D.
    • Haraldus. Mantiss. 744.
    • Ubaldus. t. 390. L. M.
    • Neleus. L. Sp. Ins. 581. Crerck. Ic. t. 45. f. 2.
    • Bochus. Cram. Ins. t. 391. C. D.
    • Priassus. L. 591. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 319.
    • Polybe. Lin. S. Nat. No 218. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 404. 58.
    • Timantes. 241. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 322.
    • Peleus. 249. Clerck. Ic. t. 45. f. 5.
  • ‡PLEBEII URBICOLE.
    • Exclamationis. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 595.
    • Augias. L. 597. Amen. Ac. 6. p. 410. 80.
    • Colon. 598.
    • Alcithoe. Cram. Ins. t. 80. C. D.
    • Alexis. 619.
    • Thrax. L. 620. 6. t. 68. E.
    • Dan. Mantiss. 798.
    • Chromus. t. 284. E.
    • Ladon. t. 284. G.
    • Gnetus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 624. Pl. Enl. t. 18. f. 8. 9.
    • Polydetus. L. 627. Cram. Ins. t. 159. F. G.
    • Coridon. t. 340. C. D. E.
    • Phidias. L. 632. t. 41. C. D.
    • Japetus. t. 365. E. F.
    • [Page 129] Maimon. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 635. Cram. Ins. t. 22. C.?
    • Forestan. t. 391. E. F.
    • Menalcas. 639.
    • Celaemis. t. 393. A. B.
    • Spio. L. 645. Mus Lud. Ulr. 330.
    • Menes. t. 393. H. I.
    • Pygmicus. 646.
    • Butes. Lin. S. Nat. No 261. Clerck. Ic. t. 46. f. 6.
    • Phaleros. 272.
    • Cereus. 273.
SPHINX.
  • Asiliformis. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 6.
  • Nerii. 11. Cram. Ins. t. 224. D.
  • Hypothoiis. t. 285. D.
  • Dentata. 16. t. 125. G.
  • Ancaeus. t. 355. A.
  • Alope. Mautiss. 19. t. 301. G.
  • Ophekes. t. 285. B.
  • Ello. L. Sp. Ins. 17. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 27. f. 3.
  • Acteus. Cram. Ins. t. 248. A.
  • Atropos. L. 23. t. 78. A. & 237. A.
  • Phorbas. 25. t. 55. B.
  • Chiron. t. 137. E.
  • Pagana. 29.
  • Oldenlandiae. 37.
  • Phalaris. t. 149. A.
  • Lycetus. 38. t. 61. D.
  • Panopus. t. 222. A. B.
  • Boerhaaviae. 39. Sultz. Ins. t. 20. f. 3.
  • Eson. Cram. Ins. t. 226. C.
  • Minus. Mantiss. 44.
  • Drancus. t. 132. F.
  • Porcellus. L. Sp. Insl. 44. Ernst. Pap. t. 112. No 161.
  • Convolvuli. L. 46. Cram. Ins. t. 225. D.
  • [Page 130] Celerio. L. Sp. Ins. 50. Cram. Ins. t. 125. E.
  • Nessus. t. 226. D.
  • Crantor Fab. Sp. Ins. No 51. t. 104. A.
  • Alecto. L. 52. t. 137. D.
  • Gnoma. 53. t. 152. A.
  • Menephron. t. 285. A.
  • Hespera. 54.
  • Faro. t. 285. C.
  • Bums. Mantiss. 62.
  • Vampyrus. 66.
  • Ocypete? Lin. S. Nat. No 4. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 344.
  • Megara. 21. Clerck. Ic. t. 47. f. 2.
  • Tisiphone. 23. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 359.
  • Brennus. Cram. Ins. t. 398. B.
SESIA.
  • Ixion. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 2. t. 68. F.
  • Odomaculata. 8.
  • Hippotes. t. 286. A.
  • Haemorrhoidalis. 13. t. 52. C. D.?
  • Fenestrata. 15. t. 251. D.
ZYGAENA.
  • Grus. t. 368. A.
  • Diptera. 44.
  • Aurata. t. 264. A.
  • Creusa. Lin. S. Nat. No 39. Clerck. Ic. t. 46. f. 3.?
  • Cysseus. Cram. Ins. t. 355. B.
  • Atereus. t. 400. A.
  • Bombyliformis. t. 400. C.
BOMBYX.
  • Paphia. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 4. t. 147. A. B.
  • Laocoon. t. 117. A. B. C.
  • Mylitta. 7. t. 146. A.
  • Fabia. t. 250. B.
  • [Page 131] Luna. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 15. Cram. Ins. t. 31. A. B.
  • Fenestra. L. 18. Clerck. Ic. t. 55. f. 1.
  • Polybia. Cram. Ins. t. 369. A.
  • Penelope. 19. t. 45. A.
  • Jana. t. 396. A.
  • Perspicua. L. 21. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 373.
  • Conspicillator. Cram. Ins. t. 97. A. B.
  • Militaris. L. 22. t. 29. B.
  • Numana. t. 227. A. 228. A.
  • Eugenia. t. 398. M.
  • Promula. 34. t. 72. D.
  • Aconyta. t. 131. A.
  • Quadricinta. Maniss. 44.
  • Barbara. t. 368. B.
  • Lusca. 49.
  • Niceta. t. 368. C.
  • Hibisci. Sp. Ins. 45.
  • Glauca. t. 368. D.
  • Imperialis. 62. Drur. Ins. 1. t. 9. f. 1.
  • Lunata. Cram. Ins. t. 369. C.
  • Crassicornis. 63.
  • Silvandra. t. 369. D.
  • Pasinuntia. t. 367. H.
  • Nuda. Mantiss. 105.
  • Evergista. t. 369. E.
  • Hyphinoe. t. 154. B.
  • Flava. Sp. Ins. 82.
  • Petosiris. t. 397. D.
  • Rutila. Mantiss. 131.
  • Chrysorrhea. Spec. Ins. 102. Roes. Ins. 1. ph. 2. t. 22.
  • Nitidula. Mantiss. 153.
  • Cyane. Sp. App. p. 506. Cram. Ins. t. 267. D.
  • Crotalariae. Sp. Ins. 126. 1. t. 5. C. D.
  • Ricini. 127.
  • Lectrix. 132. t. 192. C.
  • Sanguinolenta. 128. t. 183. D.
  • [Page 132] Lepida. Cram. Ins. t. 130. E.
  • Francisca. Mantiss. 200.
  • Monycha. t. 131. C.
  • Jesuita. Sp. Ins. 145.
  • Lactinia. t. 133. D.
  • Gloriosae. 150.
  • Brorea. t. 312. E.
  • Crim. 151.
  • Punctigera. Lin. S. Nat. 151. Clerck. Ic. t. 50. f. 3.
NOCTUA.
  • Strix. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 3. Cram. Ins. t. 145. A.
  • Ulula. 9. t. 174. E.
  • Materna. L. 16. t. 174. A. B.
  • Irynx. Mantiss. 10.
  • Mineus. t. 131. D.
  • Crepuscularis. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 11. t. 159. A.
  • Irrorata. Fab. Sp. App. p. 506.
  • Lyncea. 506.
  • Sinuata. 507.
  • Squalida. Fab. Mant. No 13.
  • Vespertilio. 16.
  • Retorta. t. 116. D.
  • Illibata. Sp. Ins. 13.
  • Obscura. t. 274. B.
  • Umminia. Sp. App. p. 506. t. 267. F.
  • Inara. t. 239. E.
  • Scrobiculata. Sp. Ins. No 14.
  • Carenea. t. 269. E. F.
  • Dioscoreae. 15. t. 30. A.—C.
  • Materna. 16. t. 174. A. B.
  • Hypermnestra. t. 323. A. B.
  • Cephise. t. 227. B.
  • Paphos. Mantiss. 24.
  • Chione. Sp. Ins. 16.
  • Saga. Mantiss. 29.
  • [Page 133] Bajularia. Sp. Ins. 23. Cram. Ins. t. 172. C.
  • Astrea. 21.
  • Convoluta. 30. t. 208. D.
  • Membliaria. t. 269. C. D.
  • Ficus. 33.
  • Lusca. Mantiss. 49.
  • Manlia. 36. t. 92. A.
  • Caricae. 34. t. 133. E. 242. A.B.
  • Leonina. 38.
  • Fulvia. L. 43. Clerck. Ic. t. 55. f. 6.
  • Avida. Fab. Mantiss. 68.
  • Triangulum. 74.
  • Arcuata. 75.
  • Vulpina. Sp. Ins. 50.
  • Tigrina. 52.
  • Mezentina. Cram. Ins. t. 323. F.
  • Cyllaria. t. 251. C. D.
  • Geometrica. 53.
  • Stolida. 54.
  • Undata. 60.
  • Ammonia. t. 250. D.
  • Vittata. No 61.
  • Hyppasia. t. 250. E.
  • Frugalis. 62.
  • Flava. 63.
  • Stigmatizans. 64.
  • Alphea. t. 250. F.
  • Equestris. 65.
  • Javana. t. 274. C.
  • Dorsalis. Mantiss. 103.
  • Luminosa. t. 274. D.
  • Rejecta. Sp. Ins. 66.
  • Achatina. t. 273. E. 288. A.
  • Elata. 67.
  • Archesia. t. 273. F. G.
  • [Page 134] Mercatoria. 79. Cram. Ins. t. 62. C. D.
  • Timais. t. 275. B.
  • Rapta. Mantiss. 120.
  • Orosia. t. 275. D.
  • Partita. Sp. Ins. 80.
  • Melanthus. t. 286. B.
  • Pagana. 90.
  • Joviana. t. 399. B.
  • Orichalcea. 92.
  • Clytia. t. 399. G.
  • Signata. 96.
  • Dominica. t. 399. H.
  • Peponis. 97.
  • Nitidula. Mantiss. 153.
  • Sinuata. Sp. Ins. 116.
  • Amphix. t. 134. C.
  • Histrionica. 117.
  • Perithea. t. 172. D.
  • Pelles. Lin. S. Nat. No 104. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 388.
  • Interrupta. 116. Cram. Ins. t. 185.
PHALAENA.
  • Strigaria. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 12. t. 133. C.
  • Undaria. 20.
  • Monilaria. 23.
  • Rondelaria. 24.
  • Macularia. 27. t. 129. C.
  • Ocularia. 38.
  • Perdica. t. 178. F.
  • Hesperia. t. 251. B.
  • Flavaria. Fab. Mant. No 32.
  • Margaritaria. t. 367. K.
  • Tripunctaria. L. Sp. Ins. 47. t. 22. E.
  • Caudata. 64. t. 104. D.
  • Lateraria. Mantiss. 77.
  • Lactucina. t. 273. B. C.
  • [Page 135] Venaria. Sp. Ins. 52. Cram. Ins. t. 29. A.
  • Zemire. t. 367. 1.
  • Obliquaria. Mantiss. 81.
  • Rosalia. t. 368. F.
  • Ernestina. t. 369. F.
  • Sangarida. t. 381. D.
  • Caudata. Sp. Ins. 64. t. 104. D.
  • Fasciata. 65.
  • Vulpenaria. t. 400. O. P.
  • Arcuata. Matitiss. 104.
  • Pampliilia. t. 368. G.
  • Liturata. 109.
  • Coleta. t. 368. H.
  • Irrorata. Sp. Ius. 77.
  • Carinenta. 78. t. 128. F.
  • Eusebia. t. 369. G. H.
  • Flaveolata. 91. t. 83. C.
  • Fimbriata. t. 398, 0.
  • Janata. L. 121. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 398.
  • Expectata. 123.
  • Cribrata. 133. Cram. Ins. t. 208. C. G.
  • Marginata. t. 400. 1.
  • Aestuata. L. 149. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 397.
  • Capitata. 148.
  • Sulphurata. 152.
  • Flavata. t. 307. C.
  • Violata. Mantiss. 238.
  • Securata. 242.
  • Canenta. t. 250. C.
  • Perspectara. Sp. Ins. 163.
  • Vitrata. Mautiss. 255.
  • Revidata. 258.
  • Derogata. Sp. Ins. 166.
  • Ejectata. 167.
  • Sagittalis. Fab. Sp. Ins. 179.
  • Amando. Cram. Ins. t. 247. E.
  • [Page 136] Fuscalis. Fab. Sp. Ins. 182.
  • Pueritia. Cram. Ins. t. 264. E.
  • Angustalis. Mantiss. 309.
  • Procopia. t. 368. E.
  • Recurvalis. Sp. Ins. 192.
  • Dentalis. 198.
PYRALIS.
  • Koenigiana. 65.
TINEA.
  • Cryptella. 25.

ORDO VII. RYNGOTA.

FULGORA.
  • Diadema. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 3. Seb. Mus. 4. t. 77. f. 7. 8.
  • Truncata. L. 11. Amen. Ac. 6. p. 399. 40.
  • Hyalinata. 12.
  • Festiva. 13.
MEMBRACIS.
  • Spinosa. 5. Sulz. Ins. t. 9. f. 6.
  • Taurus. 10.
TETTIGONIA.
  • Fornicata. Gmel. Lin. 11. Mus Lud. Ulr. 156.
  • Fasciata. Fab. Mantiss. f. Stoll. Cicad. 1. t. 4. f. 17.
  • Spinosa. 6.
  • Vaginata. 7.
  • Conspurcata. Sp. Ins. 13.
  • Repanda. L. 16. De Geer, Ins. 3. t. 33. f. 1.
  • Testacea. Mantiss. 23. Stoll. Cicad. 1. t. 8. f. 41. C.
CICADE.
  • [Page 137]Perspicillata. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1.
  • Ocellata. 2. De Ceer, Ins. 3. t. 33. f. 2.
  • Cunicularia. L. 11.
  • Lanara. L. 12. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 37. f. 11.
  • Tomentosa. 13.
  • Barbata. 14.
  • Hyalina. 31.
  • Lyncea. 37.
NOTONECTA.
  • Nivea. 3.
  • Indica. Mantiss. p. 534.
NEPA.
  • Annulata. Spec. Ins. 2.
  • Rustica. 3.
  • Fusca. Mantiss. 4. Stoll. Cimic. 2. t. 1. f. 1.
  • Rubra. L. 6. 2. t. 7. V.
  • Maculata. Sp. Ins. No 6.
  • Linearis. L. 7. Schaef. Icon. t. 5. f. 5. 6.
CIMEX.
  • Nobilis. L. 2. Stoll. Cimic. 1 t. 1. f. 1.
  • Clavipes. Fab. Mantiss. 5.
  • Maculatus. 11.
  • Rusticus. 26.
  • Lunatcs. Sp. Ins. 9. 2. t. 13. f. 84.
  • Valilii. 32.
  • Histrio. Gmel. Lin. 12.
  • Grandis. 171. Thunb. N. Sp. Ins. 2. No 31. f. 46.
  • Taurus. Sp. Ins. 34.
  • Dentatus. 43.
  • Spinidens. Mantiss. 61.
  • Hamatus. 80.
  • Scaber. Gmel. Lin. 30. Amaen. Ac. 6. p. 400. 43.
  • Pugnator. Fab. Mantiss. 84.
  • [Page 138] Thoracicus. Gmel. Lin. 262. Stoll. Cimic. t. 8. f. 55. A.
  • Hastatus. Fab. Mantiss. 88.
  • Analis. Gmel. Lin. 263. t. 10. f. 72. B.
  • Tenebrosus. Fab. Mentiss. 93.
  • Sulcatus. Gmel. Lin. 271. t. 6. f. 47.
  • Fulvicornis. Fab. Mantiss. 94.
  • Pustualatus. Gmel. Lin. 281. Geer, Ins. 3. t. 34. f. 2.
  • Femoratus. Fab. Sp. Ins. 77.
  • Aurantius. Mantiss. 116. Stoll.Cim. 1. t. 6. f. 39.
  • Punctum. 117. 2. t. 6. f. 40.
  • Nigripes. Sp. Ins. 92. Drur. Ins. 2. t. 36. f. f.
  • Torquatus. 93.
  • Guttatus. Man tiss. 121.
  • Viridulus. L. Sp. Ins. 95. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 172.
  • Peregrinator. Gmel. Lin. 40. 173.
  • Beryllus. Mantiss. 127.
  • Javanicus. Gmel. Lin. 332. Stoll. Cim. t. 11. f. 2.
  • 6-punftatus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. 105. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 175.
  • Brunneus. Gmel. Lin. 334.
  • Rubrofasciatus. Fab. Mantiss. 140.
  • Ruficornis. Sp. Ins. 114.
  • Gramineus. Mantiss. 161.
  • Histrio. 167.
  • Pictus. Sp. Ins. 117.
  • Faber. Mantiss. 181.
  • Cruciatus. Sp. Ins. 122.
  • Indus. L. 140. Mus. Lud. Ulr. 176.
  • Civilis. Mantiss. 186.
  • Familiaris. 190.
  • Varicornis. 194.
  • Malabaricus. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 147.
  • Koenigü 156. Stell, Cimic. 2. t. 1. f. 5.
  • Mendicus. 158.
  • Cruentus. Mantiss. 214.
  • Augur. Sp. Ins. 167.
  • [Page 139] Mactans. Sp. Ins. 168.
  • Erythrozonias. Gmel. Lin. 456. De Geer, Ins. 3.t. 35. f. 12.
  • Sordidus. Fab. Mantiss. 231.
  • Calens. L. Sp. Ins. 213. Gronov. Zooph. 712.
  • Gronovii. L. 214. 711.
  • Cingulatus. Mantiss. 287.
  • Pedestris. Sp. Ins. 224.
  • Fossarum. 226.
  • Filum. 232. De Geer, Ins. 3.t. 35. f. 16.
REDUVIUS.
  • Gigas. 1.
  • Marginatus. 7.
  • Sanctus. Mantiss. 12.
  • Pilicornis. 19.
  • Collaris. Sp. Ins. 15.
  • Sexguttatus. 17.
  • 4-guttatus. 18.
  • Aurantius.
  • Punctum. 19.
  • Bipunctatus. Fab. Mantiss. No 30.
  • Fuscipes. 33.
  • 5-spinosus. Sp. Inf. 27.

ORDO VIII. ANTLIATA.

BIBIO.
  • Lar. 10.
  • Sphinx. Mantiss. 20.
  • Troglodyta. Sp. Ins. 20.
SYRPHUS.
  • Crassus. Mantiss. 7.
  • 4-lineatus. 24.
MUSCA.
ASILUS.
  • Maculatus. Sp. Ins. 21.
MYOPA.
  • Cincta. 4.
BOMBYLIUS.
  • Maculatus. 7.
PEDICULUS.
  • Humanus. L. 1. Soboef. Elem. t. 95
  • Pubis. L. 2. Red. Exper t. 19.f. 1.
  • Vulturis. 4.
ACARUS.
  • Elephantinus. L. Fab. Sp. Ins. No 1. Scbrank. Beytr. t. 6. f. 14. 15.
  • Indus. L 12.

CLASS VI. VERMES.

I. INTESTINA.

N. B. From our ignorance of the productions of India in. this Class, we are obliged to omit many Genera.

GORDIUS.
  • M Edinensis. Sloone Jam. ii. 190. tab. 233. fig. 1.
SIPUNCULUS.
  • Saccatus. Amoen. Acad. iv. 454. tab, 3.

II. MOLLUSCA.

DORIS.
  • Verrucosa. Seb. Mus. ii. tab. 61. fig. 5.
NEREIS.
  • Noctiluca. Amoen. Acad. iii. 203. tab. 3.
  • Gigantea. Seb. Mus. i.tab. 81. fig. 7.
ACTINIA.
  • Swalloo. An edible Species collected in the Molucca Isles.
HOLUTHURIA.
  • Priapus. Amoen Acad. iv. 255.
SEPIA.
  • Octopodia. Br. Zool. iv. No 44. tab. 28. Of a monstrous size in India.
MEDUSA.
  • Porpita. Amen. Acad. iv. 255. tab. 3. fig. 7.8.
[...]
[...]
ASTERIAS.
  • [Page 142]
    * ENTIRE.
    • Luna. Adman. Acad. iv. 256. tab. 3. fig. 14.
  • ** STELLATED.
    • Reticulata. Linck. tab. 41. fig. 72. tab. 0.3. fig. 36.
    • Nodosa. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 5. fig. 7. 8.
    • Laevigata. Grew. Mus. tab. 8. fig. 1.2.
  • *** RADIATED.
    • Ciliaris. Linck tab. 40. fig. 70. tab. 37. & 56,
    • Pectinata Linck. teb. 37. fig. 64. 66.
    • Multiradiata. Linck. tab. 21. fig. 33.
    • Caput Medusae. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 9. & tab. II. Rumph. Mus. 41. tab. 16.
ECHINUS.
  • Esculentus. Rumpb. Mus. 31. tab. 13. B.
  • Globuius. M.L.U. 706.
  • Sphaeroides.
  • Gratilla. M.L.U. 707.
  • Lixula. Ibid.
  • Diadema. Rumph. Mus. tab. 14. B.
  • Lucunter. Gualt. Test. tab. 107. fig. C.
  • Atratus. Rumpb. Mus. iii. tab. 13. fig. 2.
  • Lacunatus. Ibid. tab. 14. fig. 2.
  • Rosaceus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 14. fig. 2.
  • Orbiculus. Gualt. tab. 7. fig. B.

III. TESTACEA:

DIV. I. MULTIVALVIA.

CHITON.
  • Aculeatus. Rumph. Mus, tab. 10. fig. 4.
  • Squammosus. M.L.V. 465*.
  • Punctatus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 1. fig. 13.
LEPAS.
  • Diadema. Rumph. Mus. tab. 14. fig. H.
  • Anarifera. Argenville, tab. 2.6. fig. F. G.
  • Testudinaria. Rumph, Mus. tab. 40. fig. K.
PHOLAS.
  • Dactylus, BORN. 14. I must: not omit my acknowlegements to the magnificent work on Shells by the Chevalier Ignatius a Born, for very considerable additions to this Catalogue. RUMPHIUS, justly styled the PLINY, must have the preference in every authority, as the great collector of most of the articles referred to.

DIV. II. BIVALVIA.

MYA.
  • Vulsella. Rumph, Mus. tab. 90. fig. H.
SOLEN.
  • [Page 144]Vagina. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 45. fig. M.
  • Cultellus Ibid. fig. F.
  • Radiatus. Ibid. fig. E.
  • Anatinus. Ibid. fig. O.
  • Bullatus. Ibid. tab. 44. fig. N.
  • Virens.
TELLINA.
  • * OVATAE.
    • Gargadia. Rumph. Mus. tab. 43. fig. N.
    • Lingua Felis. tab. 45. fig. G.
    • Virgata. tab. 45. fig. H.
    • Angulata. Lift. Conch, tab. 394. fig. 241.
    • Gari. tab. 45. fig. D.
    • Foliacea. tab. 45. fig. K.
    • Laevigata. tab. 45. fig. I.
    • Rostrata. Argenville, tab. 22. fig. O.
    • Truncata.
  • ** SUBORBICULATAE.
    • Remies. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 43. fig. 1.
    • Reticulata. fig. E.
    • Scobinata. Gualt. tab. 76. fig. E.
CARDIUM.
  • Cardissa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 42. fig. E.
  • Retusum. Born. 41. tab. III fig. 1.2.
  • Hemicardium. tab. 44. fig. H.
  • Medium. M.L.U. 485. No 34.
  • Tuberculatum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 48. fig. H.
  • Fragum. tab. 44. fig. G.
  • Unedo. tab. 44. fig. F.
  • Isocardia. tab. 48. fig. 9.
  • [Page 145] Aeolicum. Bonan. ii. fig. 91.
  • Rusticum Rumph. Mus. tab. 44. fig. K.
MACTRA.
  • Plicataria.
  • Sprengleri Gualt. tab. 85. fig. F.
  • Trunculus Bonan. lv. tab. 4. fig. 3. 4.
  • Scortum Argenville, tab. 21. fig. L.
DONAX.
  • Pubescens. M. L. U. 493. No 49*.
  • Trunculus. BORN. lv. tab. iv. fig. 3.4.
  • Scortum liii. tab. iv. fig. 1.
VENUS.
  • Gallina. Bonan. ii. tab. 64. 65.
  • Flexuosa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 43. fig. O.
  • Chione. tab. 42. fig. 9.
  • Meretrix. Argenv. tab. 21. fig. F.
  • Laeta Gualt. tab. 28. fig. V.
  • Castrensis. Rumph. Mus tab. 42. fig K.
  • Fimbriata. tab. 43. fig. F.
  • Squammosa. tab. 44. fig. M.
  • *** IMPUBERES ORBICULATAE.
    • Tigerina. tab. 43. fig. H.
    • Prostrata. M.L.U. 504. No 66*.
    • Incrustata List. Conch, tab. 310. fig. 146.
    • Tigerina Secunda Rumph. Mus. tab 43. fig. H
    • Pectinata. tab. 42. fig. D.
    • Scripta. tab. 43. fig. C.
    • Edentula. M. L. U. 508. No 74*.
    • Punctata. Rumph. Mus. tab. 43. fig. G.
  • [Page 146]
    **** IMPUBERES OVALES. SUPRA RIMAAI SUBANGULATE.
    • Litrerata. Rumph. Mus. tab. 43. fig. B.
    • Rotundata. M.L.U. 509. No 76*.
    • Decussata. M.L.U. 509. No 77.
    • Virginea.
SPONDYLUS.
  • Regius.Rumph. Mus. 156. No 8.
  • Plicatus. tab. 47. Ostrea Electrica.
  • Gaderopus. tab. 47. fig. E. 48. fig. 1. 2.
CHAMA.
  • Gigas. tab. 43. fig. A. B.
  • Hippopus. tab. 42. fig. C.
  • Lazarus. BORN. 83. tab. 5. fig. 12. 13. 14.
  • Arcinella. BORN. Davila, tab. 27. fig. T.
  • Gryphoides. Bonan. ii. fig. 22.
ARCA.
  • *MARGINI INTEGERRIMO, NARIBUS RECURVATIS.
    • Noae. tab. 44. fig. P.
  • **MARGINE CRENATO.
    • Anriquata. tab. 44. fig. 1.
    • Decussata. Bonan. ii. fig. 60.
    • Pallens. M. L. U. 520. No 95.
    • Tortuosa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 47. fig. K.
    • Rhombea. List, Conch. tab. 244. fig. 75.
    • Pectunculus. tab. 239. fig. 73.
OSTREA.
  • [Page 147]
    *PECTINES AURICULATT, AEQUILATERES.
    • Striatula. M. L. U. 523. No 101.
    • Minuta. 524. No 102.
    • Pleuronectes. Rumph. Mus. tab. 45. fig. A. B.
    • Radula. tab. 44. fig. A.
    • Plica. tab. 44. fig. O.
  • **PECTINES AURICULA ALTERA INTUS CILIATO-SPINOSA.
    • Pallium. tab. 44. fig. B. C.
    • Nodosa. tab. 48. fig. B.
    • Lima. tab. 44. fig. D.
    • Cucullata. Born. 114. tab. vi. fig. 11. 12.
  • ***RUDES, OSTREAE DICTAE.
    • Malleus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 47. fig. H.
    • Edulis.? Bonan. 108. tab. 70.
    • Perna.
    • Isogonum. Gualt. tab. 97. fig. A.
    • Ephippium. Rumph. Mus. tab. 47. fig. B.
ANOMIA.
  • Placenta. Lister Conch, tab. 104. fig. B. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 90. fig. 8. 9.
MYTILUS.
  • **PARASITICI UNGUIBUS AFFIXI.
    • Crista Galli. tab. 47. fig. B.
    • Frons. Argenville, tab. 19. fig. D.
  • [Page 148]
    **PLANI COMPRESSI.
    • Margariceferus. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 40. fig. F.
  • ***VENTRICOSIUSCULL.
    • Lithophagus. tab. 46. fig. F.
    • Bilocularis. M. L. U. 540. No 133.
    • Edulis. List. Ang. 182. fig. 28.
    • Pictus. Born. 107. tab. vii. fig. 6. 7.
    • Modiolus. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 46. fig. B.
PINNA.
  • Rudis. tab. 46. fig. L.
  • Pedinata. Gualt. tab. 79. fig. A.
  • Saccata. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 46. fig. N.
  • Digitiformis. M. L. U. 546. No 146.
  • Lobara. 547. No 147.
  • Incurvata. Born. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 46. fig. M.
  • Muricata. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 46. fig. M.

DIV. III. TURBINATA.

ARGONAUTA.
  • Argo. Rumph. Mus. tab. 18. fig.
NAUTILUS.
  • [Page 149]Pompilius. Ruvish. Mus. tab. 17. fig. A. C. D.
  • Spirula. tab. 20. fig. 1.
CONUS.
  • Marmoreus. tab. 32. fig. N. I.
  • Imperialis. tab. 34. fig. H. I.
  • Literatus. tab. 31. fig. D.
  • Generalis. tab. 33. fig. V.
  • Virgo. tab. 31. fig. I. K.
  • Capicaneus. tab. 33. fig. K.
  • Miles. tab. 33. fig. W.
  • **SPIRA PYRAMIDATA.
    • Summus Admiralis. tab. 34. fig. B. C. D.
    • Ebaeus. tab. 32. fig. B. B.
    • Glaucus. tab. 33. fig. G. G.
    • Monachus. tab. 33. fig. C. C.
    • Minimus. Argenville, tab. 12. fig. A.
    • Betulinus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 31. fig. C.
    • Stercus Muscarum. tab. 33. fig. 3. A. A.
    • Nussatella. tab. 33. fig. E. E.
    • Textile. tab. 32. fig. O. P.
    • Aulieus. tab. 33. fig. 3.
    • Striatuj. tab. 31. fig. F.
    • Magus. tab. 32. fig. 2.
    • Tragulinus. tab. 31. fig. V.
    • Ermineus. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 42. fig. 31. 34. 35. 40.
    • Varius. Argenville, tab. 12. fig. R.
    • Spectrum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 32. fig. 1.
    • Tulipa. tab. 34. fig. K. L.
    • Geographus. tab. 31. fig. G.
CYPRAEA.
  • Mappa. tab. 38. fig. B.
  • [Page 150] Arabica. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 38. fig. M.
  • Carneola. tab. 38. fig. K.
  • Testudinaria. tab. 38. fig. C.
  • Talpa. tab. 38. fig. I.
  • Caput Serpentis. tab. 38. fig. F.
  • Mauritiana. tab. 38. fig. E.
  • Vitellus. tab. 38. fig. L.
  • Tigris. tab. 38. fig. A.
  • Lynx. Lister Conch. tab. 683. fig. 30.
  • Isabella. Rumph. Mus. tab. 39. fig. G.
  • Onyx. tab. 38. fig. B.
  • Hirundo. Lister Conch. tab. 674. fig. 20. Born. 184. tab. viii. fig. II.
  • Asellus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 39. fig. M.
  • Cribrana. Lister Conch. tab. 695. fig. 42.
  • Moneta. Rumpb. Mus. tab. 39. fig. C.
  • Annulus. tab. 39. fig. D.
  • Caurica. tab. 38. fig. P.
  • Dracaena. tab. 39. fig. E.
  • Erosa. tab. 39. fig. A.
  • Helvola. tab. 16. fig. 17.
  • Ocellata. Lister Conch. tab. 696. fig. 43.
  • Pediculus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 39. fig. P.
  • Nucleus. tab. 39. fig. 1.
  • Staphylaea. Born. 194. tab. viii. fig. 18.
  • Cicercula. Rumph. Mus. tab. 39. fig. K.
  • Globulus. tab. 39. fig. N.
BULLA.
  • Ovum. tab. 38. fig. Q.
  • Birostris. Lister Conch. tab. 711. fig. 66.
  • Verrucosa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 38. fig. H.
  • Naucum. tab. 27. fig. H.
  • Ampulla. tab. 27. fig. G.
  • Pbysis. Lister Conch, tab. 715. fig. 75.
  • Amplustre. Born. tab. ix. fig. I.
  • Ficus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. K.
  • [Page 151] Rapa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. E.
  • Terebellum. tab. 36. fig. S.
  • Virginea. Lister Conch. tab. 12. fig. 7. tab. 15. fig. 10.
  • Achatina. Born. tab. x. fig. 1. 2.
VOLUTA.
  • Auris Midae. Rumph. Mus. tab. 33. fig. H. H.
  • Oliva. tab. 39. fig. 3.
  • Et Plurimae Variet. Vide Born. 214. 215.
  • Gibbosa.? Lister Conch. tab. 723. fig. 10.
  • Hispidula. Born. y. List. Conch. tab. 722. fig. 9.
  • Bullata. tab. 83. fig. 11.
  • Dactylus. tab. 812. fig. 23.
  • Scabricula. Gualt. tab. 53. fig. D.
  • Sanguisuga. Rumph. Mus. tab. 29. fig. V.
  • Caffra. Gualt. tab. 53. fig. E.
  • Vulpecula. Rumph. Mus. tab. 29. fig. R.
  • Plicaria. Gualt. tab. 54. fig. F.
  • Episcopalis. Rumph. Mus. tab. 29. fig. K.
  • Mitra Papalis. tab. 29. fig. I.
  • Capitellum. Gualt. tab. 37. fig. A.
  • Muricata. Martin Konch. iii. tab. 99.
  • Ceramica. Rumph. Mus. tab. 24. fig. A. tab. 49. fig. L.
  • Pyrum. tab. 36. fig. 7.
  • Aethiopica. tab. 31. fig. B. A.
  • Olla. Gualter. tab. 29. fig. A.
BUCCINUM.
  • *AMPULLACEAE.
    • Galea. Rondel. Test. p. 106.
    • Perdix Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. C.
    • Pomum. tab. 27. fig. B.
    • Sulcosum. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 68. fig. 14. 15.
    • Dolium. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. A.
  • [Page 152]
    **CASSIDEA.
    • Echinophorum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. 1.
    • Comutum. tab. 23. fig. 1.
    • Rufum. tab. 23. fig. 1.
    • Tuberosum. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 73. fig. 10. 11.
    • Flammeum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 23. fig. 2.
    • Pullus. tab. 23. fig. C.
    • Areola. tab. 25. fig. B. & 1.
    • Granulatum. tab. 25. fig. C.
  • ***CASSIDEA LABRO MURICATO.
    • Erinaceus. tab. 25. fig. D. 6. 7.
    • Glaucum. tab. 25. fig A.
    • Vibex. tab. 25. fig. E.
    • Papillosum. tab. 29. fig. M.
    • Glans. tab. 29. fig. P.
  • ****CALLOSA AD COLUM. REFLEXAM.
    • Arcularia. tab. 27. fig. M.
  • *****COLUM. QUASI ABROSA, PAANA.
    • Harpa. tab. 32. fig. K. L.
    • Persicum. tab. 27. fig. E.
    • Smaragdulus. Argenville, tab. 6. fig. P.
  • ******GLABRA.
    • [Page 153]Spiratum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 49. fig. C. D.
    • Glabratum. Argenville. tab. 9. fig. G.
  • *******ANGULATA.
    • Undosum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 29. fig. O.
    • Bezoar. Argmville, tab. 15. fig. G.
  • ********TURRITA, LAEVIA, SUBULATA.
    • Maculatum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 30. fig. A.
    • Subulatum. tab. 30. fig. B.
    • Crenulatum. tab. 30. fig. E.
    • Strigilatum. tab. 30. fig. H.
    • Duplicatum. Bonan. iii. fig. 110.
    • Lanceatum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 30. fig. O.
    • Dimidiatum. tab. 30. fig. C.
STROMBUS.
  • *DIGITATI.
    • Chiragra. tab. 35. fig. A. B.
    • Scorpius. tab. 36. fig. K.
    • Lambis. tab. 35. fig. E. F. H.
    • Millepeda. tab. 36. fig. I.
  • **LABRO LOBATO.
    • Lentiginosus. tab. 37. fig. Q.
    • Gallus. tab. 37. fig. 5.
    • [Page 154] Auris Dianae. Rumph. Mus. tab. 37. fig. R.
    • Luhuanus. tab. 37. fig. S.
    • Gibberulus. tab. 37. fig. V.
  • ***LABRO AMPLIATO.
    • Epidromis. tab. 36. fig. M.
    • Canarium. tab. 36. fig. N.
    • Vittatus. tab. 37. fig. X.
    • Urceus. tab. 37. fig. T.
MUREX.
  • *SPINOSI.
    • Haustellum. tab. 26. fig. E.
    • Tribulus. tab. 26. fig. G.
    • Cornutus. tab. 26. fig. 5.
    • Brandaris. tab. 26. fig. 4.
  • **FRONDOSI.
    • Tripterus. Martin Konch. iii. tab. 111. fig. 1033.
    • Triqueter. fig. 1038.
    • Ramosus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 26. fig. D.
    • Saxarilis. tab. 26. fig. C. a.
  • ***VARICOSI.
    • Rana. tab. 26. fig. G. el.
    • Varietas. Lister Conch. tab. 949. fig. 44.
    • Lampas. Rumph. Mus. tab. 28 fig. C.
    • Olearium. Bonan. iii. fig. 289.
    • Femorale. Rumph. Mus. tab. 26. fig. B.
    • [Page 155] Pyrum. Rumph. Mus. tab. 26. fig. E.
    • Rubecula. Gualt. tab. 49. fig. 1.
    • Anus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 24. fig. F.
  • ****ECHINATI SINE ROSTRO.
    • Hippocastanum. tab. 24. fig. 4.
    • Mancinella. tab. 24. fig. 5.
    • Ricinus. tab. 24. fig. E.
    • Senticosus. tab. 29. fig. N.
    • Melongena. tab. 24. fig. E.
    • Rapiformis. Lister Conch, tab. 894. fig. 14.
    • Lacerus. Idem. tab. 958. fig. 11.
  • *****INERMES ROSTRO ELONGATO.
    • Babylonius Rumph. Mus. tab. 29. fig. L.
    • Javanus. Bonan. iii. fig. 79.
    • Colus. Rumph, Mus. tab. 29. fig. F.
    • Morio. Bonan. iii. fig. 357.
    • Cochlidium. Argenville, tab. 9. fig. A.
    • Spirillus. Martin Konch. tab. 115. fig. 1069.
    • Aruanus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 28. fig. A.
    • Tritonis. tab. 28. fig. B.
  • ******TURRITI SUBULATI ROSTRO BREVI.
    • Vertagus. tab. 30. fig. K.
    • Sulcatus. Bonan. iii. fig. 68.
    • Aluco. Romph. Mus. tab. 30. fig. O.
    • Coronatus. tab. 30. fig. N.
    • Radula. Bonan. iii. fig. 327.
TROCHUS.
  • [Page 156]
    *UMBILICATI.
    • Niloticus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 21. fig. A.
    • Maculatus. tab. 21. fig. c. Bonan. iii. fig. 27. 28.
    • Perspectivus. tab. 27. fig. L.
    • Solaris. tab. 20. fig. K.
  • **IMPERFORATI.
    • Vestiarius. Lister Conch. tab. 650. 51. fig. 46. 48.
    • Labio. Rumph. Mus. tab. 21. fig. E.
  • ***TURRITI.
    • Telescopium. tab. 21. fig. 12.
TURBO.
  • *SOLIDI, IMERFORATI.
    • Cochlus. tab. 19. fig. 4.
    • Petholacus. tab. 19. fig. D. 5. 6. 7.
    • Chrysostomus. tab. 19. fig. E.
    • Pagodus. tab. 21. fig. D.
    • Calcar. tab. 20. fig. 1.
    • Rugosus. Bonan. iii. fig. 12.
    • Marmoratus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 19. fig. A. B.
  • **PERFORATI, SOLIDI.
    • Pica. tab. 21. fig. A.
    • Argyrostomus. tab. 19. fig. 3.
    • Margaritaceus? Bonan. iii. fig. 11.
    • [Page 157] Delphinus. Bonan. iii. fig. 31.
    • Distortus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 20. fig. H.
    • Scalaris. Wentel-trap. tab. 49. fig. A.
HELIX.
  • *TESTA ANCIPITI.
    • Scarabeus. tab. 27. fig. 1.
  • **ANFRACTIBUS CARINATIS.
    • Ringens. Bonan. iii. fig. 330. 331.
    • Carocolla. Argenville, tab. 8. fig. D.
  • ***UMBILICATAE ANFRACTIBUS ROTUNDIS.
    • Cornea. Br. Zool. iv. tab. 83. fig. 126.
    • Ampulkcea. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. Q.
    • Cretacea. Born. tab. xvi. fig. 1. 2.
    • Ungulina. Rumph. Mus. tab. 27. fig. R.
    • Janthina. tab. 20. fig. 2.
  • ****OVATAE IMPERFORATAE.
    • Amarula. tab. 33. fig. F. F.
    • Haliotoidea. tab. 90. fig. R.
NERITA.
  • *UMBILICATAE.
    • Canrena. Bonan. iii. fig. 228. 224. et Argenville, tab. 7. fig. C.
    • Glaucina. Brit. Zool. iv. tab. 87. fig. 141.
    • Rufa. Rumph. Mus. tab. 22. fig. D.
    • [Page 158] Vitellus. Rumph. Mus. tab. 22. fig. A.
    • Albumen. tab. 22. fig. B.
    • Mamilla. tab. 22. fig. F.
  • **IMPERFORATAE, EDENTUTAE.
    • Cornea. Argenville, tab. 7. fig. M.
  • ***IMPERFORATAE, DENTATAE.
    • Pulligera. Lister Conch. tab. 143. fig. 37.
    • Pennata. tab. 604. fig. 29.
    • Polita. α. tab. 600. fig. 7.
    • β Bonan. iii. fig. 221.
    • γ Rumph. Mus tab. 22. fig. 1.
    • Peloronta. tab. 22. fig. K.
    • Albicilla. tab. 22. fig. 8.
    • Grossa. tab. 22. fig. N.
    • Chamaleon. tab. 22. fig. L.
    • Undata. tab. 22. fig. 4.
    • Exuvia. tab. 22. fig. 9.
HALIOTIS.
  • Midae. Argenville, tab. 3. fig. A.
  • Striata. Martin Konch. i. tab. 14. fig. 138.
  • Marmorata. Argenville, tab. 3. fig. B.
  • Asinina. Rumph. Mus. tab. 40. fig. E. F.
PATELLA.
  • *LABIATAE.
    • Equestris. tab. 40. fig. P. O.
  • [Page 159]
    **ANGULATAE.
    • Saccharina. Rumph, Mus. tab. 40. fig. B.
  • ***MUCRONATAE.
    • Lutea. Born. 424. tab. 17. fig. 8.
  • ****INTEGERRIMAE VERTICE OBTUSO.
    • Testudinaria. Argenville, tab. 2. fig. P.
    • Radiata. Born. tab. 18. fig. 10.
    • Compressa. Lister Conch. tab. 541. fig. 25.
    • Fusca. Bonan. i. fig. 4.
DENTALIUM.
  • Elephantimim. Rumph. Mus. tab. 41. fig. 1.
  • Dentalis. tab. 41. fig. C.
  • Entalis. Bonan. i. fig. 9.
  • Politum. Gualt. tab. 10. fig. F.
  • Aprinum. LINNAEI.
  • Eburneum. LINNAEI.
SERPULA.
  • Lumbricalis. Rumph. Mus. tab. 41. fig. 1.
  • Polythalamia. tab. 41. fig. D. E.
  • Arenaria. tab. 41. fig. L.
  • Anguina. tab. 41. fig. 2.
  • Muricata. tab. 41. fig. H.
  • Penis. tab. 41. fig. 7.
TEREDO.
  • Navalis. Planc. Conch. 17. No 2.
SABELLA.

IV. LITHOPHYTA.

TUBIPORA.
  • Musica. Ellis Zooph. pag. 144.
MADREPORA.
  • Fungites. pag. 149.
  • Pileus. Rumph. Amb. vi. t. 88. f. 2. 3.
  • Labyrinthiformis. Ellis Zooph. pag. 160. No 34.
  • Favosa. pag. 167. No 61.
  • Polygama. Amoen. Acad. iv. tab. 3. fig. 15.
  • Fascicularis. Ellis Zooph. pag. 151. No 5.
  • Porites. pag. 172. No 77.
  • Damicornis. Rumph. Amb. vi. tab. 86. fig. 3.
  • Muricata. Ellis Zooph. pag. 171. No 76.
  • Oculata. Seb. Mus. iii. tab. 116. fig. 1. 2.
  • Infundibuliformis. Gualt. Test. tab. 42.
  • Fastigiata. Ellis Zooph. pag. 152. No 8.
  • Ascillaris. pag. 153. No 11.
  • Anthophyllites. pag. 151. No 4.
  • Cristata. pag. 158. No 27.
  • Aspera. pag. 156. No 21.
  • Cinerascens. pag. 157. No 26.
  • Daedalea. pag. 163. No 43.
  • Scabrosa. pag. 156. No 22.
MILLEPORA.
  • Alcicornis. Sloan. Jam. i. tab. 17. fig. 1.
  • Fascialis. Ellis Cor. tab. 30. fig. A. a. b.
  • Cellulosa. tab. 25. fig. D. d.
  • Polymorpha. tab. 27. fig. C.
V. ZOOPHYTA. ISIS.
  • [Page 161]Hippuris. Ellis Zooph. pag. 105. No 2.
  • Ochracea. pag. 105. No l.
GORGONIA.
  • Abies. pag. 103. No 6.
  • γ. pag. 99. No 1.
  • Aenea. Rumph. Amb. vi. tab. 80. fig. 2.
  • Antipaches. tab. 77.
  • Pectinata. Ellis Zooph. pag. 85. No 9.
SPONGIA.
  • Flabelliformis. Rumph. Amb. vi. tab. 80. fig. 1.
  • Fistularis. Sloan. Jam. i. tab. 24. fig. 1.
  • Aculeata. Rumph. Amb. vi. tab. 90. fig. 2.
  • Tubulosa. Seb. Mus, iii. tab. 97. fig. 2.
  • Tomentosa. Ellis Zooph. pag. 187. No 7.
SERTULARIA.
  • Pennaria. Lin. Syst. pag. 1313. No 26.
  • Pennatula. Ellis Zooph. pag. 56. No 31.
VORTICELLA.
  • Conglomerata. Amoen. Acad. iv. tab. 3. fig. 1.
FINIS.

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.