A DECLARATION FROM H …

A DECLARATION FROM His Majestie the KING OF SCOTS, VVherein is declared how the Army shall be fully satisfied all their Arrears, with a large Overplus.

TOGETHER VVith an Assurance of Indempnity to all that have been enga­ged, and active in any the late Wars. That all Armies shall be disbanded, and His Government always regulated by a Free and Full Parliament, triennially called: And the People secu­red of their Liberties, and eased of their Illegal Burthens and Taxes.

ALSO A Letter to the Right Honourable The Lord LAMBERT From a Lover of Peace and Truth.

Being a most faithful Advice how to chuse the safest way to the happy ending of all our Distractions.

LONDON, Printed in the Year 1659.

CHARLS R.

WE having lately received an Overture from some per­sons In England, with a seeming pretence of a Peace and Reconcilement betwizt Us and out Subjects of England, and although they acknowledge themselves few in number, and not so well resolved as to trust us with their Names, yet undertake on the behalf of many thousands, to make good their propositions to us, conditionally, that we grant and assure unto them, their (as they call them, reasonable and modest) requests; whether these mens Intentions are just and upright, as they pretend, or whether with Joab's salutation to Abner, they would entrap us to our destruction; or with Shimei, come the first of all the House of Joseph to meet us, not being able to support themselves in their decaying condition, we shall not be much desirous to enquire after: Only from hence we take oc­casion to let those persons, and all the world know, that we are ready to grant to all our Subjects (some very few excepted) more than they can have the confidence to expect from us: Yet let not any rash judgement condemn us for our large Offers, as being in so low, and forlorn a Condition, as never any Christian Prince for many Ages hath been; That we are forward in promises, though intend little or no performance: We say, were our calamity more heavy upon us (which can hardly be) we shall not be drawn by the greatest allurements and advantages to pass our engagement for any thing we are nor fully resolved co perform, which being chiefly for the general good & peace of all our Subsects, we can­not but hope for a happy success to ensue, and therefore to de­clare that (if peaceably receiv'd) we shall forthwith grant,

1. A general and free pardon to all (seven of those onely ex­cepted, which were the bloody Judges and Murderers of the King our Father.)

2. That all the Armies shall be within six months disbanded, if moneys for their satisfaction can in a Parliamentary way be so soon raised, and that they shall have all Arrears fully payed them, and three months pay over and above to every common Souldier, for their better removal and settlement, in their former or bet­ter way and place of living.

3. That the Armies being so satisfied and disbanded, no Soul­dier shall be continued, but in the antient Garrisonr, accustomed on the Sea Coasta, and that no new Army shall be raised, or any [Page 2]Fleet by us set forth to Sea, upon any occasion whatsoever, but by consent of Parliament.

4. That not any of Our Subjects shall be burdened with Taxes, Excise, Free-quartering, or other illegal payments or pressures, or any Oaths imposed, nor any debarred of their Liberties, que­stioned for their Lives or Estates, for any cause or pretence whatsoever, but by the antient and known Laws of the Land, ac­cording to Magna Charta, and the Petition of Right.

5. That the Purchasers of Crown-Lands and Rents being satis­fied their purchase-mony and interests by the profits thereof, & further payment to their full Reimbursement, The said Lands & Rents may return to the Crown again, we being resolved in the mean time to cast our Self on the love of our Subjects for our fu­ture support: And if the Parliament (that shall next be call'd) shall not think fit to give us a reparation, & such a competent revenue as we might expect, we have learned, and shall submit (if there be occasion) to the condition of the meanest of our Predecessors.

6. That the Purchasers of Bishops and Deans and Chapters Lands and Rents, being in like sort satisfied, their purchase-mo­ny and interest by the profits & further payment, till they be re­imbursed, that then the said Lands and Rents shall be conferred on the Clergy and Ministry, as the next Parliament shall ordain.

7. That as soon as Writs can be issued, a free and legal Parli­ament shall be summoned, and the privileges thereof maintain­ed, without any exemption to any person whatsoever, being le­gally chosen and returned, according to the antient Laws and Customs of Englund in that case provided.

8. That the Parliament shall be desired by us (and with whom we shall concur) to take care for the setling of the Protestant Re­ligion, and the publick worship of God (with liberty for tender Consciences) and for the providing for the Ministry in the first place, as being the most weighty affair, and ought to be preferred before any other Concernment whatsoever, without which no blessing from above can be expected upon our Government.

9. That if the Parliement shall pass an Act of general Pardon, (and if they shall desire those seven persons by us intended to be executed, shall be included, and giving us satisfactory reasons for the same) we shall concur with them therein.

10. That the affairs of the Land and our Government shall be Constantly regulated and managed by Parliaments, and that the Act for Triennial Parliaments shall be by us duly observed.

We acknowledge it is very difficult, if not impossible, to please all, especialy where there are so many divisions, and every man almost of a several mind and opinion: But as we have proposed too ur Self, so shall we endeavour to give all reasona­ble Satisfaction to all our Subjects. And if the Actings of the Representatives in a Free Parliament of their own choice can sa­tisfie them, we shall not be wanting in summoning and concur­ring with them: But if that will not please them, nothing will.

Now, if these condescentions of ours shall have so much free­dome of passage in England, as many a scurrilous and lying Pamphlet fly abroad without our control, we are confident that all of understanding, that are not wilfully blinded, or not over-swayed with present self-interest, thereby knowing our large Offers, must needs be fully convinced of the amplitude thereof, extending to all their grievances.

However, if it shall be instanced wherein we are too short, (for we are ready, for the Good, and Peace of the Nation, to give large satisfaction, and ample assurance to our most invete­rate Enemies;) We having yeelded to all matters of most im­portance, shall not stick at lesser things.

And if any that have been adherers and assisting to our late royal Father and us, shall think we are herein too free and indulgent to such, and so many open and professed Enemies; and that we have made no provision for our Servants, and Friends; we desire them all to consider our own, and also their Conditions, and how things now stand in England; that neither we, nor them­selvs, can otherwise (in any probability) better our selvs, unless by a bloody and hazzardous War; which though we cannot doubt of the lawfullnesse on our part, and consequently a pros­sperous successe, if we shall be necessitated thereto for the recovery of our just right, yet we are assured, that the God of peace will rather prosper a peaceable than violent and forceable entrance: And therefore we hope all those our friends, and lo­ving Subjects, will rest fully satisfied with that we shall do pur­suant to these propositions, we being desirous hereafter to consi­der their sufferings (though not comparable to ours) as God shall enable, and in all just and lawfull ways.

And now we wish, that all the people of England would re­member how they have performed their Protestations, Oaths, Vows, Solemn League and Covenant: But to instance in no [Page 4]more than the Honour and Priviledges of Parliament, the foun­dation of all their laws, which they have so often sworn and vowed to maintain with their liues and fortunes: what face of a Parliament they have now left, which should consist of three Estates, King, House of Peers, and House of Commons: The two first wholly destroyed: And what of the last is in being (not to mention at least 150 that at the beginning of the Wars left them and went to Oxford) when a considerable number of their own party protested against their proceedings, and deserted the House; How many imprisoned, and what great numbers by force expulsed by that late bloody & hypocritical Usurper, which actions of his (though they were a main step to his intended Throne and Tyrannical Goverment) yet are to well relished, By that Tail of a Parliament remaining, that they are resolved neither to readmit the persons so illegally and injurioussly expell­ed, nor to fill up the void places of any removed or dead: so that in a few year [...], what by death and new expulsion., they may reduce themselvs to the number of those infamous Tyrants of Athens, and if they can establish themselvs by their designed Militia, and that they may thereby be able to command their now masters, the Sword-men, and Cashire them, they will mod­d [...] such a nevv Army as shall be in subjection to them, and then Vote themselvs, their Sons, and Nephews, a Parliament for ever,

Let those that have generous English Spirits seriously consider into what a Labyrinth of woe and: misery they have run them­selvs and now lyc under; what a confusion there is in Church and State; that what hath been gotten by blood and rapine, must be so upheld; The Government these Usurpers would settle, not being to be maintained, but by continual Armies & Navies, and he support of these must be Taxes, Excise, Free-quarterings, and chargeable Militia's and other unsupportable burdens to perpetuity▪

Now let the whole Nation beg and implore a blessing from the Father of Mercies, and let them all be of one heart and one mind, to free themselvs of these Iron yokes and heavy pressures, and joyn and concur [...] with us, in esablishing a peaceable Go­vernment, to the great joy and happiness of the honest and true-hearted, and to the sdvancement of the true Protestant Religion and God glory. And let them all unanimously with one Voyce say, Amen.

A true Copy taken from the Original.

A Letter to the Right Honorable The Lord LAMBERT.

SIR,

LEt it not be a Trouble to you to read a few Lines from one unknown, but a much ho­nourer of your Noble Spirit, and therefore desirous to cast in this dram of Advice among those many & weighty Debates now before you.

If I should tell you of divers that had a power or capacity to contribute to, or restore Peace to these Nations, and have neglected the oportuni­ties which they have since repented of, I am confident you would, even your self, point put the men; namely, Essex, Fairfax, Waller, Massey, Brown, Rich, Cromwell, and others.

Sir, We look upon you at this instant as ha­ving the whole strength of the Nation in your hands; but if you expect to hold it long, you will be miserably deceived: Therefore I beseech you make good use of this happy opportunity, and consider how great you may make your self, and how glorious you will be to posterity, if you be a means of laying the Government on the shoul­ders of Him that ought to bear it, which will in an instant restore a happy Peace and Settlement to this distracted Nation: Certainly the great­est est honour, and a better estate than any English Subject enjoyes shall be your reward. But if you doubt how the Souldier, and Persons deeply [Page 6]concerned, that shall concur with you shall be secured and satisfied; See this Deelaration, that to my knowledge hath been near three months in this Town, and perhaps not yet come to your view. Consider of it, and see, if all your own see­kings, both from Our Hand, and another in par­ticulars be not here answered. Lay your Hand on your Heart, for are you not thereby convin­ced? or would you know under what. Govern­ment the people would rest most satisfied, either a Single Person, Council of State, Parliament or Army? Appoint such a way as every man may without fear or danger give in his vote un­discovered. To begin only with this Town; Let the Clerk of every Company, or Constable of every Ward take a Ticket in Paper from e­very man, and put it into a Box locked and seal­ed, and you will find Nine parts of Ten encline to that Constitution we have lived under above these five hundred years: But if not, you will however by this course give great satisfaction to the People, in letting them have each an oppor­tunity of declaring their minds, and thereby you will be rightly informed of their affections; which being weighed in the ballance of your judgement, you may with confidence and assu­rance steer on a straight course to the Haven of Happiness and Safety.

My Lord, I conceive I have done my duty in declaring my mind, and have no more to say, but that you do as God shall put in your Heart, and then go on and prosper.

Octob. 14. 1659.
Your Lordships most humble and faithful Servant, S. L.
A LETTER To the Righ …

A LETTER To the Right Honorable The Lord LAMBERT, From a Lover of Peace and Truth. Being a most faithful Advice how to chuse the safest way to the happy Ending of all our Distractions.

Also, A DECLARATION FROM The KING of SCOTS, How the Army shall be fully satisfied all their Arrears, with a large Overplus.

TOGETHER WITH An Assurance and Indempnity to all that have been engaged and active in any the late Wars. That all Armies shall be disbanded, and his Goverment alwayes regulated by a free and full Parliament, triennially to be cal­led: And, The People secured of their Liberties, and eased of all Illegal Burthens and Taxes.

Printed in the Year, 1659.

A LETTER to the right honorable The Lord LAMBERT.

SIR,

LEt it not be a trouble to you to read a few Lines from one unknown, but a much honorer of your Noble Spirit, and therefore desirous to cast in his dram of Advice among those many and weighty Debates now before you.

If I should tell you of divers that had a power or capacity to contribute to, or restore Peace to these Nations, and have neglected the Opportunities, which they have since repented of, I am confident you would, even your self, point out the men; namely, Essex, Fairfax, Waller, Massey, Browne, Rich, Cromwell, and others.

Sir, We look upon you at this instant as having the whole strength of the Nation in your hands, but if you expect to hold it long, you will be misera­bly deceived: Therefore I beseech you make good use of this happy opportunity, and consider how great you may make your self, and how glorious you will be to posterity, if you be a means of laying the Government on the shoulders of Him that ought to bear it, which will in an instant restore a happy Peace and Settlement to this distracted Na­tion: Certainly, the greatest honour, and a better estate than any English Subject enjoys shall be your reward. But if you doubt how the Souldier and Persons deeply concerned, that shall concur with [Page 2]you shall be secured and satisfied; See this Declara­tion, that to my knowledge hath been neer Three Moneths in this Town, and perhaps not yet come to your view. Are you not thereby convinced, or would you know under what Government the People would rest most satisfied, either a Single Person, Council of State, Parliament, or Army? Ap­point such a way as every man may without fear or danger give in his vote undiscovered: To begin only with this Town; Let the Clerk of every Company, or Constable of every Ward, take a Ticket in Pa­per from every man, and put it into a Box locked and sealed, and you will find Nine parts of Ten encline to that Constitution we have lived under above these five hundred years: But if not, you will however by this course give great satisfaction to the People, in letting them have each an opportunity of declaring their minds, and thereby you will be rightly informed of their affections; which being weighed in the ballance of your judgement, you may with confidence and assurance steer on a straight course to the Haven of Happiness and Safety.

My Lord, I conceive I have done my duty in declaring my mind, and have no more to say, but that you do as God shall put in your heart, and then go and prosper.

Octob. 14. 1659.
Your Lordships most humble and faithful Servant S. L.
CHARLES R.

WE having lately received an Overture from some per­sons in England, with a seeming pretence of a Peace and Reconcilement betwixt Us and our Subjects of England, and although they acknowledge themselves few in number, and not so well resolved as to trust us with their Names, yet undertake on the behalf of many thousands, to make good their propositions to us conditionally, that we grant and assure unto them, their (as they call them, reasonable and modest) requests; whether these mens Intentions are just and upright, as they pretend, or whether with Jo [...]b's Salutation to Abner, they would entrap us to our destruction; or with Shimei, come the first of all the House of Joseph to meet us, not being able to support themselves in their decaying Condition, we shall not be much desirous to enquire after: Only from hence we take occasion to let those persons, and all the world know, that we are ready to grant to all our Subjects (some very few excepted) more then they can have the confidence to expect from us: Yet let not any rash Judgement condemn us for our large Offers, as being in so low, and forlorn a Condition, as never any Christian Prince for many Ages, hath been; That we are forward in promises, though intend little or no performance: We say, were our calamity more heavy upon us, (which can hardly be) we shall not be drawn by the greatest allurements and advantages to passe our engagement for any thing we are not fully resolved to perform, which being chiefly for the general good and peace of all our Subjects, we can­not but hope for a happy Successe to ensue, and therefore do de­clare that (if peaceably receiv'd) we shall forthwith grant,

1. A general and free pardon to all (seven of those only ex­cepted, which were the bloody Judges and Murderers of the King our Father.

2. That all the Armies shall be within six months disbanded, if Moneys for their satisfaction can in a Parliamentary way be so soon raised, and that they shall have all Arrears fully payed them, and three months pay over and above to every common Soldier, for their better removal and settlement, in their former or better way and place of living.

3. That the Armies being so satisfied and disbanded, no Sol­dier shall be continued, but in the ancient Garrisons, accustomed on the Sea Coasts, and that no new Army shall be raised, or any [Page 4]Fleet by us set forth to Sea, upon any occasion whatsoever, but by consent of Parliament.

4. That not any of our Subjects shall be burdened with Taxes, Excise, Free-quarterings, or other illegal payments or pressures, or any Oaths imposed, nor any debarred of their Liberties, questioned for their Lives or Estates, for any cause or pretence whatsoever, but by the ancient and known Laws of the Land, ac­cording to Magna Charta, and the Petition of Right.

5. That the Purchasers of Crown Lands and Rents being satis­fied their purchase mony and Interests by the Profits thereof, and further payment to their full Reimbursement: The said Lands and Rents may return to the Crown again; we being resolved in the mean time to cast our Self on the Love of our Subjects for our fu­ture support: And if the Parliament (that shal next be called) shal not think fit to give us a reparation, & such a competent revenue as we might expect, we have learned, and shal submit (if there be occasion) to the Condition of the meanest of our Predecessors.

6. That the purchasers of Bishops, and Deans and Chapters Lands, and Rents, being in like sort satisfied their purchase mo­ny and Interest by the profits and further payment, till they be re­imbursed, that then the said Lands and Rents shall be conferred on the Clergy and Ministery, as the next Parliament shall ordain.

7. That as soon as Writs can be issued, a free and legal Parlia­ment shall be summoned, and the Privileges thereof maintained, without any exemption to any person whatsoever, being legally chosen and returned, according to the ancient Laws and Customes of EngLand in that case provided.

8. That the Parliament shall be desired by us (and with whom we shal concur, to take care for the setling of the Protestant Re­ligion, and the publick worship of God (with liberty for tender Consciences,) and for the providing for the Ministry in the first place, as being the most weighty affair, and ought to be preferred before any other Concernment whatsoever, without which no blessing from above can be expected upon our Government.

9. That if the Parliament shall passe an Act of general pardon, (and if they shall desire those seven persons by us intended to be executed, shall be included, and giving us satisfactory reasons for the same) we shall concur with them therein.

10. That the Affairs of the Land and our Government, shall be constantly regulated and managed by Parliaments, and that the Act for Triennial Parliaments shall be by us duly observed.

We acknowledge it is very difficult, if not impossible to please all, especially where there are so many divisions, and every man almost of a several mind and opinion: But as we have proposed to our Self, so shall we endevour to give all reasona­ble Satisfaction to all our Subjects. And if the Actings of the Representatives in a Free Parliament of their own choice can sa­tisfie them, we shall not be wanting in summoning and concur­ring with them: But if that will not please them, nothing will.

Now, if these condescentions of ours shall have so much free­dome of passage in England, as many a scurrilous and lying Pamphlet flye abroad without our control, we are confident that all of understanding, that are not wilfully blinded, or not over-swayed with present self-interest, thereby knowing our large Offers, must needs be fully convinced of the amplitude thereof, extending to all their grievances.

However, if it shall be instanced wherein we are two short, (for we are ready for the Good, and Peace of the Nation, to give large satisfaction, and ample assurance to our most invete­rate Enemies;) We having yielded to all matters of most im­portance, shall not stick at lesser things.

And if any that have been adherers and assisting to our late royal Father and us, shall think we are herein to free and indulgent to such, and so many open and professed Enemies; and that we have made no provision for our Servants, and Friends; we desire them all to consider our own, and also their Conditions, and how things now stand in England; That neither we, nor them­selves, can otherwise (in any probability) better our selves, unless by a bloody and hazzardous War; which though we cannot doubt of the lawfulness on our part, and consequently a pro­sperous success, if we shall be necessitated thereto for the recovery of our just right, yet we are assured that the God of peace will rather prosper a peaceable then violent and forceable entrance: And therefore we hope all those our friends, and lo­ving Sujects, will rest fully satisfied with what we shall do pursu­ant to these propositions, we being desirous hereafter to consi­der their sufferings (though not comparable to ours) as God shall enable, and in all just and lawful ways.

And now we wish that all the people of England would re­member how they have performed their Protestations, Oaths, Vows, Solemn League and Covenant: But to instance in no [Page 6]more then the Honour and Priviledges of Parliament, the foun­dation of all their laws, which they have so often sworn and vowed to maintain with their lives and fortunes: What face of a Parliament they have now left, which should consist of three Estates, King, House of Peers, and House of Commons: The two first wholly destroyed: And what of the last is in being (not to mention at least 150 that at the beginning of the Wars left them and went to Oxford) when a considerable number of their own party protested against their proceedings and deserted the House: How many imprisoned, and what great numbers by force expulsed by that late bloody & hypocritical Usurper, which actions of his (though they were a main step to his intended Throne and Tyrannical Government) yet are so well relished, by that Tail of a Parliament remaining, that they are resolved nei­ther to readmit the persons so illegally and injuriously expelled, nor to fill the up the void places of any removed or dead; so that in a few years, what by death, and new expulsions, they may reduce themselves to the number of those infamous Tyrants of Athens, and if they can establish themselves by their designed Militia, and that they may thereby be able to command their now Masters the Sword-men, and Cashire them, they will mod­dle such a new Army as shall be in subjection to them, and then Vote Themselves their Sons, and Nephews, a Parliament for ever.

Let those that have generous English Spirits seriously consider into what a Labyrinth of woe and misery they have run them­selves and now lye under; what a confusion there is in Church and State; that what hath been gotten by blood and rapine, must be so upheld. The Government these Usurpers would settle, not being to be maintained, but by continual Armies and Navies, and the support of those must be Taxes, Excise, Free-quarterings, and chargeable Militia's, and other unsupportable burdens to per­petuity.

Now let the whole Nation beg and implore a blessing from the Father of Mercies, and let them all be of one heart and one mind, to free themselves of these Iron yokes and heavy pressures, and joyn and concur with us, in establishing a peaceable Govern­ment, to the great joy and happinesse of the honest and true-hearted, and to the advancement of the true Protestant Religion and Gods glory. And let them all unanimously with one Voyce say, Amen.

A true Copy taken from the Original.

FINIS.

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