¶ Hereafter foloweth the know­ledge, properties, and the vertues of Herbes.

¶ Of the knowledge & vertues of herbes, and the fyrste letter begyn̄eth with .A.

¶ Agnus castus.

AGnus castus is a herbe that men call Tutsayne or Parke leues, & it hath leues somdele red: lyke to the leues of Orage, & it hath sygnes in his leues, as it were leues of Plantayne, and he hath yelow flowers as great as a pe­ny, and this herbe beryth aboue at the crope blacke beryes when they ben rype, & yf they be not rype they ben yelowe as the flower of it is. And this herbe groweth moche in woo­des & in drye grounde. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is, that he wyll kepe man and woman chaste, for as Dracolidon and Placius sayth that this herbe is called Agnꝰ castus for this skyl, for the vse and the sauour therof maketh men chaste. Also he wyl open the poores, and let out wycked humours, & spyces of the bo­dy. This herbe distroyeth ye moysture of mā ­nes sede. Also Authours seyne, let this herbe be well sod with fenell sede, and a lytel eysell is good to dystroy colde dropsy. Also let hym be sod with Smalledge and Sauge in salte water, and than wasshe the hynder partye of a mānes heade, he helpeth an euyll that men [Page] calle Litargia. Also this distroyeth ye fowle lust of lecherye and it be dronke, but men vse to lay it on them slepyng. And therfore some men eate this herbe rosted, for yf men eate it rawe he wyl lyghtly gēdre heade ache. This herbe is good to dystroy the hardnes and the stoppyng of the lyuer, and of the mylt. Also a playster of this herbe is good to do awaye the ache of a mānes heade that is gendred of wicked humours, this herbe is hote and drye and there be thre spyces of her. &c.

¶ Apium.

APium is an herbe men call Smaledge or Marche, this herbe hath leues lyke to Louage: but the leues be not so longe, also it is not so stronge of sauour as Louage, and it hath sede as it were Percely, and it is lyke to Percely sede. ¶ The vertue of hym is that he wyl make a man to make water, and this herbe openeth the stoppynge of the lyuer. Al­so the sede therof hardeth a mannes wombe. Also the propertye of hym is to drawe all the wycked humours of the body vnto the heade and to the stomacke, & the wombe, and ther­fore it is forbode to women that be with chylde, or that kepeth suckynge chyldren to eate of this herbe leste they be mad, and take ther­of the fallynge euyll. This herbe is hote and [Page] drye, and hath fyue spyces of her. &c.

¶ Auetum.

AVetū is an herbe that is called Auete otherwyse Dyll, this hath leues lyke to Fenel, and the same sauour and bereth her sede as Fenell, but ye sede of this is somwhat brode as the sede of Orage. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyl make a mā to pysse. Also he swageth the rōbulling & the wycked wynde in a mans wombe. Also it distroyeth the poxe, & yf the sede of this herbe be brende and strawed vpon a wounde it heleth soone that woūde, and namely yf a man be scalded on his mēbres, or on his yerde, it shall be hole in the same maner. Also a playster made of this herbe, and layde to the Emerawdes he­leth them soone, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Apumerisus.

APumerisus is an herbe called Cerfoy­le or Cheruyle, this herbe hath smale leues lyke to the leues of Hemeloke, but this herbe is good in sauoure, and hath a whyte flower & longe sede lyke to otes. ¶ The ver­tue is yf that he be dronke with wyne it shall make a man well to make water. Also he de­lyuereth of the reynes & of the bladder, and yf he be dronke with wyne, he letteth out and vnbyndeth the wycked wynde fro the sydes [Page] and the stoppynge of the wombe, and of the lyuer, and of all other woundes, & this herbe withholdeth castynge. Also a playster made of the herbe & tempered with eysell distroyeth wylde fyre, and heleth the canker, this herbe is one of the spyces of Smaledge, it is hote and drye.

¶ Absinthium.

ABsinthium is an herbe that men call worm woode, this herbe hath leues as Mugworte, and the leues be somdele whyte vnder, and he hath a great more, and of the more cōmeth out many braūches, and bereth flowers as Mugworte. ¶ The vertue therof is to comforte the stomacke and clenseth the herte. Galien sayeth that yf this herbe be gy­uen to an euyl, of the whiche euyl the matter is not fully defyed it shal harde the stomacke and let the digestyō, and yf the matter of the euyl be ryped, the herbe shal make a mā laxa­tyfe. This herbe is to put away dronkēnes, also yf this herbe be dronke with spiconarde, it swageth the ache of the stomacke & of the wombe. Also yf this herbe be tempred with hōny and dronke, it heleth the swellyng of a mans mouth, & putteth away the blackenes by a mānes iye, and clereth the iyen. Also yf the ioyce of this herbe be stylled in to a mans [Page] nostrylles, it dryeth vp the moysture that renneth out of hym. Also it kepeth clothes from mothes and thou put it in thy presse, also it kepeth bokes from eatynge of wormes, this herbe is drye and hote & hath two spyces.

¶ Archemesia.

ARchemesia is an herbe that men call Mugworte, it is lyke to wormewood in leues, but they be not fully so rounde, and it hath a longer stalke, and many cōmynge out of one, & it bereth flowers as doth wormwood. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf a mā take a Iourney, and beareth this herbe with hym, he shal not be wery ne haue no trauayle in his waye, also yf this herbe be in a house, there shall no wycked spyryte dwell there, Also this herbe puned with talowe helpeth the akynge and sorenes of a mānes fete, also the powder of this herbe dronke with luke warme water helpeth the akynge of a mans guttes, it is hote and drye.

¶ Affodillus.

AFfodillus is an herbe that men calleth Affadyll lyke to leke, and he hath ye­lowe flowers, and at the top he hath rounde coddes, when the flowers be fallynge they hath sede lyke to an oynyon. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that ye braunches of this herbe [Page] is good to hele the dropsy. Also the flowers therof dronke with wyne, it heleth the bytynge of venymous wormes. Also ye ioyce with the more with a lytell myrre, and a lytell sa­pheron sodde and medled with swete wyne and strayned, it heleth rēnynge iyen, also the moore therof burned in to powder put in to iyen that haue lost her heer shall make heer to growe, & also a harde sharpe clothe be wette in the ioyce of this herbe, and therwith the morfewe or a place that moche bowe is, be anoynted with the cloth in the sōne, the mor­fewe and the bowe shal fal away, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Astrologia longa.

AStrologia longa is an herbe called Mader, it hath leues lyke to Mader, & hath a braunche the lengthe of a cubyte, and many braunches cōmynge out of the more, the braunches of this herbe hath many knot­tes ryght as hath Mader, & som what whyte flowers. ¶ The vertue is it wyll vnbynde the stoppyng of the lyuer, & let passe wycked wyndes. Also yf this herbe be dronke with wyne he purgeth venym in a mans body, or without in the veynes, woūdes, that be tou­chynge. This herbe is hote and drye, and shal be gathered in haruest.

¶ Abrotanum.

ABrotanū is an herbe that men calleth Sothernwoode, and this herbe hath a stalke as it were rewe, and so he is braūched, saue this herbe hath strayter leues then hath Rewe. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that yf the sede therof be broken and dronken with water it helpeth the men that hath the stone, and the palsey, & yf the herbe be dronke with wyne it helpeth hym that is bitten with any venymous wormes. Also the powder of this herbe breaketh harde postumes. Also yf this herbe be brent, and the asshes be medled with olde Oyle, and put to the place where lacked heer, and it shall growe agayne, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Aristologia rotunda.

ARistologia rotūda is an herbe that is called Astrologe or Galyngale, this herbe hath leues lyke to a purse, and hath but one branche and grene leues aboue, & vnder ben whyte, and it flowreth as it were betayn saue the flowers ben whyte. ¶ The vertue as ypocras sayeth is, yf that he be dronken with hote water, it is medycynable for men that ben stopped in the brest, & for the fallyn­ge euyll, and for the potagre, this herbe is hote & drye, and shall be gathered in haruest, [Page] and this is a spyce of red mader.

¶ Ameos.

AMeos is an herbe called Amee, this hath leues lyke to Elderne, but they ben lesse and a longe braunche and flowreth, and sedeth as it were persely, and the sede is lyke to the sede of Persely. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf it be dronke with hōny it sle­eth wormes in a mānes wombe, and vnbyn­deth great stoppynge of wycked wyndes in a mānes wombe, he breketh the stone, he hea­leth a mānes stomacke yf it be colde, he clen­seth the lyuer and the reynes and woūdes, he helpeth the bytynge of venymous beestes, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Alleluya.

ALleluya is a herbe called woodsore or stubworte, this herbe hath .iii. leues of the whiche .ii. ben rownde and a lytell depar­ted aboue and it hath a whyte flower, but no longe stalke. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf it be rosted vpon the coles in leues of the red docke, then he shall frete away deade flesshe, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Agrimonia.

AGrimonia is an herbe called Egrimonye, and the leues be lyke to Tansey, but the leues of this ben greatter, and he hath [Page] a blewe flower, and when the flower is fall he hath sede that wyll hange in a mānes clo­thes, this groweth by dyches, or hedges, and woodes. ¶ The vertue is yf he be eten grene with the rote he heleth ye akynge of the wombe. Also this herbe tempered with eysyl wyll heale a sore hurted with yron. Also yf it be vsed in meates it wyll hele the sorenes of the mylte, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Auancia.

AVancia is an herbe called Auendre, it hath leues lyke to an hare foote, this herbe is called harefote, and he hath a yelowe flower as it were Turmentyll. ¶ The ver­tue is yf he be dryed & made in powder, and put in a lytel wyne or hote water and gyuen to a man that hath the Feuers to drynke, it shall helpe hym soone. Also it helpeth moche woundes, and the canker yf it be dronke.

¶ Altea.

ALtea is an herbe called the Holyhocke or wylde malowe, it hath leues as it were malowe and hath a longe braunche, he sedeth as doth malowe. ¶ The vertue is yf it be shreded with telow, and taken to a man that hath the potagre, he shall be hole within thre dayes. Also yf this herbe be soden with vynegre and with lynsede, and layde vnto a [Page] mans sydes it departeth wycked gatheryng that ben gendred togyther in a mans body it groweth in feldes and hote places.

¶ Amarista.

AMarista is an herbe called Mawthen or docter fenel, this herbe is moch lyke to Camamyll, and flowreth as Camamyll, for it hath whyte flowers, & this herbe styn­keth as it groweth in the felde, and in corne. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that the ioyce therof dronke is good for the canker. Also to hele the pypes of the Emerawdes and there be two spyces of the herbe, one hath a whyte flower, the other a yelowe flower.

¶ Anisum.

ANisū is an herbe called Annies, it hath leues as Comen or Fenel, but the sede is more than Fenell sede. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he vnbyndeth wicked wyndes and great humours, and he openeth the stoppynge of the lyuer. Also he maketh wo­mānes mylke to wax. Also he styrreth man and woman to workes of kynde. Also it maketh a man to make water & to swete. Also it maketh the wombe harde yf it be laxe, this herbe or elles the sede shulde be take moyste, and rosted or perched in maner of medycyne this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Alleum.

ALleū is an herbe called Garlyke, this herbe is cōmen. ¶ The vertue of hym is that he wyll vnbynde all great stoppyn­ges and wycked wyndes in a mānes bodye. Also he helpeth a man to make water, but neuerthelesse he greueth a mānes iyen for the great vnbyndyng and drawyng that he ver­iuously draweth the syght. Also he dystroy­eth a venym within a man. Also he healeth colde sores as it were Tryacle. Also he doth a way the morfewe of bladders in what pla­ce that they ben of the bodye yf it be well rub­bed therwith, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Astarton.

AStarton is an herbe called Lunarye, this herbe groweth amonge stones or hye places, this herbe shyneth by nyght, this herbe hath his moysture yfounde by shepher­des in the felde, and it hath yelowe flowers hole and rownde as cokobell, or flowers of Floxgloue, the leues of this herbe ben zende blewe, & they haue the marcke of the Moone in the myddes as it were .iii. leued grasse, and the leues ben more then .iii. leued grasse, and ben rownde as a peny, it hath a stalke & that is red, it smelleth as it were Muske, and the ioyce is yelowe, this groweth in the newe with [Page] Moone without leues, & euery day waxeth a newe lefe .xv. dayes, and after .xv. dayes he leseth a lefe as the Moone wexeth and way­neth, and where soeuer this herbe be he gro­weth in great quātyte. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that who so eteth his bayns or els of the herbe in ye waynynge of the Moone whē he is in signo virginis, yf he haue the fallyn­ge euyll he shallbe hole. Also who so hath the fallyng euyll bere this herbe aboute his necke and he shalbe hole. And it hath many mo vertues than I can tell at this tyme.

¶ The .ii. letter begynneth with .B.

¶ Betonia.

BEtonia is an herbe cal­led Betayne or byschope pysworte, this herbe hath hole leues, but they be endēted by the sydes without, & it hath a red flower in the croppe of the stalke. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf he be pune and put to the wounde in the heade that is smytten with a stroke, he shall hele the wounde fayre and well, and the better yf it be fresshe. Also this herbe wyll drawe out broken bones of woūdes as some Auctours sayen. Also take the water of Betayne, or els breke the leues [Page] and take the ioyce and put it in to thyne iyes, than shall you fynde yt it is is good for akyn­ge or sorenes of ye iyen. Also take of Betayn a dragma and pune it and medle it with wa­ter that is warme, and drynke it .iiii. tymes fastynge and it wyll breke the webbe aboute the iyen, and clense theym well & fayre. Also yf thou haue waterynge iyen eate euery day a lytel Betayne and it clenseth them. Also yf thou haue akynge iyen, take the leues of Betayne fresshe by them selfe, or els with a lytel water, and then wrynge out the ioyce, & put therto a lytell rose water, warme them well to gyther, and styl it in to thyne iyen, and afterwarde put aboue wolle, and so thou shalt be hole. Also yf thou blede moche at the nose take Betayne and pune it with a lytell salte, and do it to thyne nosethyrlles, as moche as thou mayest with thy thombe and thy medle fynger, and than holde thy nosethyrlle with the same fyngers, and the bsode shall staūche. Also yf thou haue sore tethe, take Betayne and seth it in olde wyne, or in eyfyll tyl it be sodde to the thyrde parte, and holde it in thy mouth, and thou shalt amende. Also yf thou haue the cowghe take two oūces of the powder of Betayne and a lytell hōny, and seth it with esy fyre, and vse it .ix. dayes. Also yf a [Page] mānes yarde be swollen or els sore, take Be­tayne & pune it with lytell wyne, and after laye to the yarde and he shallbe hole. Also yf a man may not holde his mete within hym, take .iiii. dragmes of the powder of Betayn and medle it with hōny that is sodde, & make pellettes as great as a walsche note, & gyue hym .iiii. dayes eche day a pellet, and do hym to drynke .ii. sponefull of that water, & than he shall be hole. Also yf a man be potagre, ta­ke Betayne and pune it & lay it to his feete, and he shall be amēded. Also take a lytel Be­tayne or the powder and eate it erely, and it shall helpe the fro dronkēnes that day, these medycynes ben proued. This herbe groweth in woodes and holly places amonge busshes in derke places, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Balsaminta.

BAlsaminta is an herbe that men cal hor­semynt, this herbe hath leues lyke vnto other myntes, and some men calleth it water mynt, it groweth moche by the water, but it hath a strōger sauer then hath another mynt. ¶ The vertue is that he wyll cōforte the sto­macke, & make a man wel to defy his meate. Also this herbe purgeth a man within the bodye, and maketh hym well to speke. Also the ioyce of this herbe medled with hōny and a [Page] lytel wyne doth away the schylke of a mans stomacke, and other wicked wyndes of hym. Also ye ioyce of this herbe dronke with wyne ysode maketh a woman with chylde esely to bere her chylde, & soone to be delyuered, this is hote and drye, and hath two spyces.

¶ Beta.

BEta is an herbe called Bete, this herbe is cōmen, and groweth in Gardaynes, and there be two spyces therof, and Diacoli­des sayeth, one is whyte another blacke.

¶ The vertue of this herbe is that the ioyce of this herbe putte it in to the nosethyrlles, it clenseth a mans heed. Also this herbe swa­geth the akynge of a mans heed. Also it clen­seth the heed from nyttes, and from other vermyn. Also it repayreth & kepeth the heer of a mānes heed. Also this herbe dystroyeth bot­ches and byles. Also Diacolides sayeth, that vpon the rote of this herbe maye be planted a graffe that wyll afterwarde beare fruyte, as vpon the cole rote.

¶ Borago domestices.

BOrago Domestices is an herbe called Borage, this groweth in Gardaynes, and he hath shorte leues and a blewe flower. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yt he wil clense the red colour of mā. Also this herbe medled [Page] with wyne maketh a man glade and mery, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Bigula.

BIgula is an herbe called Brome Bugle this hath leues som what rounde, and som what tournynge to blacke, and he hath a blew flower and somwhat boystous. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyl hele woundes in a mans heade. Also it breketh and dy­stroyeth the rewme in a mans heade and the akynge, he groweth in woodes, and he is ho­te and drye, and there ben .ii. spyces of hym.

¶ Burneta.

BVrneta is an herbe called Burnet, & it hath a blewe flower as hath Hayhoue, and leues lyke to Tansey, but they be not so great. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll distroy the great humours and the laxa tyue within a man. Also he healeth and ope­neth the stoppynge of the lyuer, and maketh a man to pysse. Also he healeth a man of the yelow euyll. Also the ioyce medled with hō ­ny and dronke, vnbyndeth & healeth the sore of the rybbes and pappes, and there be .ii. spyces of this herbe one groweth in harde lande and hath lytell leues, another groweth in medowes and haue more leues.

¶ Bursa pastoris.

BUrsa pastoris is an herbe called shepar­des purs or tocheworte, this hath leues departed somdele as Burnet, & hath a why­te flower, and when he hath lost his flower, he hath the maner of a purs, in the whiche is sede. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is he wyll soone staunche blode yf he be dronke, it gro­weth in feldes and gardaynes wel nyghe al aboute, and he is hote and drye.

¶ The .iii. letter begynneth with .C.

¶ Camamilla.

CAmamilla is an herbe called Camamyl, this herbe hath leues lyke to the mauthe and white flowers but he smelleth sote, & the maw the stynketh.

¶ The vertue is yf he be dronke with wyne he breketh the stone. Also he stroyeth the ye­lowe euyll. Also he healeth the akynge of the lyuer. Also yf he be chewed he heleth the sore of the mouth, this is hote and drye, and gro­weth moste in gardaynes.

¶ Calamintum.

CAlamintum is an herbe yt is called Ca­lamynt, this herbe hath leues lyke vnto Mynt, but the leues ben whyter and roūder then the leues of Mynt, and more stronger of [Page] sauour, & it hath a whyte stalke. ¶ The ver­tue of this herbe is that he wyl distroy a mā ­nes talent as ypocras sayth, and there be thre spices of this herbe, one that is stony, another that is hery, another that is waterye, & they be hote and drye, and he that is hery maketh a man moyste, he that is stony yf he be dron­ke he maketh a man that hath dronke venym hole. Also this herbe made in playster & layde to any venymous sore, it draweth the venym frō within outwarde. Also who so drynketh this herbe .iii. dayes, it heleth the yelow euyl, he that is herye it helpeth from the lepour, the ioyce of this herbe put in to a mānes eares, it kylleth the wormes therin, it comforteth the stomacke and helpeth to defye, and it with­draweth castynge.

¶ Crassula maior.

CRassula maior, is an herbe called Or­pyn or Ormale, this herbe hath som­what thycke leues as it were Peny worte.

¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf it be layde to a woūde, he shal hele it without any helpe, this herbe groweth in gardaynes.

¶ Crassula minor.

CRassula minor is an herbe called Sto­nor or Stonecrope, it hath lytell leues lyke to Orpin, and it groweth vpon howses [Page] and walles & groweth somwhat hangynge. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is, he wyll make a man to lyue chaste, & is drōke for the ague.

¶ Cituca.

CItuca is an herbe called Hembloke or herbe Benet, it hath leues lyke to Per­sely, and so he flowreth & sedeth as doth Per­sely, but this herbe stynketh. ¶ The vertue is he kepeth may dens pappes from great wax­ynge. Also yf the ioyce of this herbe be dron­ke he distroyeth the great appetite of lechery. Also the ioyce of this with the spume of syl­uer and swynes grece distroyeth the hote po­tagre, and swageth the swellyng, this herbe is colde and drye.

¶ Centuaria maior.

CEntuaria maior is an herbe that mē calleth the more centory or earth gell, this hath leues lyke to the lesse cētory, but they be more whyter, and hath a stalke and yelowe flowers, and flowreth not but in the topps. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf it be sodden with good wyne & gyuen a man to drynke, it healeth the syckenes of the lyuer. Also this herbe sodden in wyne and dronke, dryeth vp wylde humours of a mānes mylt, this hath ben often proued. Also the ioyce of this herbe sodden in water is good to hele a wounde of [Page] another place that is smytten with a canker yf he be anoynted therwith, it is hote & drye, and groweth in drye grounde.

¶ Centuaria minor.

CEntuaria minor is an herbe called the lesse Centory or cristus lader, this hath leues lyke to the more Centory, but the leues ben more grener, and he hath thre braunches cōmynge out of the more, & the flower som­what red. ¶ The vertue is yf the powder or the ioyce be medled with olde wyne & drynke is good to hele the styngynge of an adder, or any other venymous beest. Also yf you haue sore iyen, take the ioyce & anoynte your iyen & thou shalte be hole. Also yf thou haue any venym within the, take and pune this herbe and tempre it with Aysell and drynke it and you shall cast vp all the venym, & it groweth in drye places.

¶ Carin.

CArin is a herbe called caraway, it hath leues lyke somwhat to Fenell, & a lon­ge stalke and rounde sede, more then the sede of Persely. ¶ The vertue of hym is that he dystroyeth wycked wyndes and the coughe, and heleth men that hath the frensy, and by­tyng with venymous beestes. Also this her­be medled with ayselheleth scabbes & tetters, [Page] and restoreth heer there it falleth away, this herbe is hote & dry, & groweth in gardaynes.

¶ Celodonia.

CElodonia is an herbe called Celondyn or Deten wort, this hath leues that ben grene and yelowe flowers, and when he is broke he droppeth mylke, & the leues be som­what lyke to Columbyne. ¶ The vertue of this herbe as Plinius sayeth, yf a swalowes byrde be hurte the dām [...] fetcheth of this herbe and healeth hym agayne. Also it healeth the ache of ye tethe. Also it elenseth a mans heed. Also it healeth the canker and other sores in the month, this is hote and drye.

¶ Cidamū.

CIdamū is an herbe called Hertnote, or Dylnote, or Flete, or Haleworte, this hath leues lyke to Fenel, and whyte flowers and small stalkes, & groweth in woodes and medowes. ¶ The vertue is yt he wyll fetche awaye deade flesshe. Also this herbe put on a fore, or on a place that lacked heer, it heleth it and restoreth heer, this is hote and drye.

¶ Caulis.

CAulis is an herbe called Coleworte, this herbe is cōmen to you. ¶ The vertue of hym is that he wyl clense fresshe woū ­des, and the canker, & hele sore iyen that haue [Page] almoste lost theyr syghte. Also it maketh womans mylke to waxe, and he comforteth the stomacke. Also ye ioyce of this herbe tempred with alym & eysell swageth ye lepre. Also it is good for drōkenes, & groweth in gardaynes.

¶ Coriandrum.

COriandrum is an herbe called Cetriander, he hath leues lyke to erthenote som­dele, & hath a lytel whyte flower & roū de sede somwhat whyte, & he is stronger in sauour. ¶ The vertue is yf the ioyce be dron­ke with honnye, it sleeth all the wormes in a mānes body, & also hardeth a mānes wombe. Also yf the sede of this herbe be ete it driueth away the Feuers that come the thyrde daye, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Capillus veneris.

CApillus veneris is called mayden heer or water wortes, this hath leues like to Ferne, but the leues ben small, and groweth vpon stones and walles, and in the myddle of the leues is as it were a blacke heer. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll breke the stone. Also yf it be dronke with wyne it dy­stroyeth the venym, he is colde and drye.

¶ Crocus.

CRocus is an herbe called Saffron, this hath lytell leues as it were grasse, and [Page] blewe flowers. ¶ The vertue of hym is that he wyl dystroy all maner of abhomynacyon of ye stomacke. Also he maketh a mā to slepe. Also ye flower is good for many medicyns, and namely for cokes co colour theyr potage and it is hote and drye.

¶ Centinodium.

CEntinodium is an herbe called Centi­nodi or swyngrasse, this herbe groweth welnye ouer all. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll breke ye stone, this herbe is hote & dry, & may be gathered at all tymes.

¶ Caprifolium.

CAprifoliū is an herbe called woodbyn­de or withwynde, this groweth in hed­ges or in woodes, and it wyll beclyp a tre in her growynge, as doth yuye, and hath white flowers. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyl hele cankers, and woundes, and blanders, and akynge of the teth, and sores in a mans toen. Also it is good to hele swellynge yt is smyt with venym, this is hote & drye.

¶ Canabaria.

CAnabaria is an herbe called wylde hempe, this hath leues lyke to hempe.

¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is good for the Feuer, and groweth moche by water.

¶ Costus.

COstus is an herbe called Coste or lesse Detayne, this hath leues as Detayne, but they be not so moche, and the leues be more whyter then the leues of Detayne. Also it is sote in sōmer. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he heleth the syckenes of ye brest and of the longes, & also he wyll breke the po­stume. Also he draweth ye humours of mans iyen. Also he is good for the stomacke, and this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Cepe.

CEpe is an herbe called a Onyon, this is cōmen ynowe. ¶ The vertue of this is that he wyll greatly comforte the stomacke. Also he nessheth ye wombe. Also this herbe with hōny and eysell, & dronke is good to hell the bytyng of a mad dogge. Also this herbe medled with womans mylke heleth the akyng of eeren. Also the ioyce of this dronke with any lycour, is good for a man that hath soft sodeynly his speche. Also the ioyce put to a mānes nosethyrlses breketh out the rewme or any other wycked stoppynge, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Columbina.

COlumbina is an herbe called Colum­bayne or Tockefote, or Coluerfote, or [Page] Sawnardes, this herbe hath leues somwhat lyke to Cesidony, but he droppeth no mylke. ¶ The vertue is yt he is good for a man that hath ye quinsy, & shuld be gathered in august.

¶ Cominum.

COminum is an herbe Called Cōmyn, this hath leues lyke to Coryandre, and he hath many braunches cōmynge out of the stalke, and he hath a stronge sauoure. ¶ The vertue is that he dystroyeth wycked wyndes and other euylles of the stomacke. Also he helpeth a man to make water, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Cardiaca.

CArdiaca is an herbe called Cardyake, or Assper, this herbe hath leues som­what lyke to blynde nettell, & he pryc­keth somwhat vpon the tongue, and he hath lytell coddes & therin his sede is. ¶ The ver­tue is that he is good for men that hath the fallynge euyll. Also he is good for sauces.

¶ Cisera.

CIsera is an herbe called Frenche peyse he hath leues lyke a more payse, & also coddes, he hath not so great leues, nor so longe coddes as hath ye other peyse, & he hath spices of her whyte & red, & he groweth in gar­dynes, & her sede in schaps as it were a peyse.

¶ Camelion.

CAmelion is an herbe called wosuesthes­tell or a whyte the stell, this herbe hath whyte leues great and brode, and hath a red flower and groweth in wayes. ¶ The ver­tue of this herbe is great, that yf ye take this herbe when the sonne is in Caprycorne with the new moone, yf ye bere it with the, or vpō the there shall no myschefe fall on the.

¶ Consolida maior.

COnsolida maior is an herbe called con­fery, this hath leues lyke to horshelme but they be not so whyte, & groweth in wa­tery places, and hath two spyces on her, the one hath a whyte flower, the other a red, and lyke they ben of one vertue. ¶ The vertue is yf a man be brosed within hym or broke, take the rote of this herbe, & rost hym well amon­ge asshes, and take hym to the sicke fastynge with hōny, and let hym eate it and he shal be hole. Also this herbe hath broken seues, and he is hote & moyste, and bereth blacke sede.

¶ Consolida minor.

COnsolida minor is called Daysye or Browswort, and he hath leues lyke to the lesse centory and a whyte flower. ¶ The vertue is that he is good to breke botches, yf he be puned and layde therto, this is a spyce [Page] of Confery, and he groweth welny ouer all.

¶ Consolida media.

COnsolida media is called whyte Bo­thyn or whyte Goldes, this herbe hath leues somwhat longe, and they ben entended a lytell without, & hath a whyte flower that is som what lyke to dayse, and it groweth in medowes and lees.

¶ The .iiii. letter begynneth with .D.

¶ Dragancia.

DRagātia is an herbe called Dragance or El­derwort or Cerpentyne, this herbe hath .iii. leues in eche braūche, and they be som what sharp as an nedder. ¶ The vertue is and he be puned with wyne he putteth away all maner of venym. Also he healeth akynge of earen, and they be anoynted therwith. Al­so yf the powder of this herbe be blowne in a mans nose, it clenseth ye nose from rēnyng. Also it is good to distroy the gowte, and the canker, and the festerynge of woundes, this herbe groweth in woodes and hylles, and he is hote and moyste, and must be gathered in the moneth of Iune and Iuly.

¶ Diptanum.

DIptanum is called Detayne or detan­dre, this herbe hath leues lyke to Coste but they be grener than ye leues of Coste, and it hath a lytel whyte flower. ¶ The vertue is yf a woman be with a deed body it wyl dely­uer her therof, this herbe wyll drawe out an thorne, or yron out of a mans foote, or other places, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Daucus asinius.

DAucus asinius is an herbe called birdesnest or Tanke, this herbe hath leues lyke to Hemlocke, and hath a whyte flower. ¶ The vertue is that he is good to hele the dropsey and bytynge of venymous beestes. Also he openeth the stoppynge of the leuer, and of the mylt. Also he vubyndeth a mānes wombe, and maketh hym laxatyue, this her­be groweth in feldes, and beareth his flower lyke to a byrdesneste, and this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Daucus creticus.

DAucus creticus is an herbe called the lesse tanke, this hath leues lyke to wyl­de Popy, but the leues ben more whyter, and he hath a flower that is purpull coloure, this groweth in wete, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Dens leonis.

DEns leonis is an herbe called daunde­lyon or lyons toth, this hath leues lyke to houndestoth, and he hath a yelow flower, and he hath no braunche but as eche flower spryngeth out of the more with a lytell braū ­che, and it droppeth mylke whan it is broke. ¶ The vertue is that the moore of it is good to hele the Feuer cotydyan, and it be dronke with wyne, it groweth all aboute.

¶ Dragancia faminea.

DRagancia feminea is an herbe called Dragaunce female, it hath leues lyke to yuy, but they haue whyte speckes, and it hath a yelow stalke the length of two cubytz, other whyle as it were a croked staf, and lyke to a snake, and she beareth her sede as it were a cluster of grapes, and when the sede is ripe it is yelowe, this herbe groweth in darke places. ¶ The vertue of this is that yf the sede therof be puned with oyle and put to a mans iyen, it healeth the akynge of iyen. Also the ioyce of this herbe with a lytell wolle put to the nosethyrle, clenseth ye nose from all fylth. Also the rote of this herbe puned with white wyne and hōny heleth all woundes, and the canker arysed in. Also he yt froteth his hande well with the rote of this herbe, he may take edders without any parell. Also the ioyce of [Page] this rote dystroyeth the darkenes of the iyen, yf they be anoynted therwith. Also yf this herbe be dronke with wyne, he sterith a man vnto lechery.

¶ The .v. letter begynneth with .E.

¶ Elena campana.

ELena cāpana is an herbe called Enule cāpayne or hors­eldron, this herbe hath leues as it were Comfery, but they be more whyter then the leues of Comfery, and he hath a longe stalke and a yelow flower. ¶ The vertue is yf a man ha­ue waggynge teth and ete therof fastynge, it wyll fastyn his tethe. Also yf a man drynke this herbe it healeth hym from the stone, and helpeth hym to make water. Also yf it be drō ke, it delyuereth a woman of a deade chylde. Also it hardyneth a mannes wombe yf it be laxatyue, this herbe heleth a man of the cou­ghe this herbe is hote and moyste, it groweth in woodes and feldes.

¶ Endiua.

ENdiua is an herbe called endyfe or horse thestyll, this herbe hath leues lyke sow­thystel, this hath pykes in the rygge and a yelowe flower. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is [Page] thet the ioyce therof medled with hote water, and dronke heleth the stoppynge of the mylt and of the lyuer. Also it is good to hele the yelowe euyll, and the feuer tercyan, and the ho­te postume. Also this herbe swageth ye great hete of the lyuer, and of the stomacke, and it is colde and moyste.

¶ Eruca.

ERuca is an herbe called skyrwhyte, this hath leues lyke to bylre, but they be not so longe, and it hath a great rote. ¶ The ver­tue is that the ioyce of the leues wronge out, holde in a mans mouth heleth all the sorenes of the mouth. Also it breketh the stone. Also the ioyce of this herbe sodde and dronke dy­stroyeth blacke coloure. Also it stereth a man moch to lechery, and he vse it. Also it helpeth a man to make water. Also the ioyce of this herbe clenseth a man yf he be anoynted ther­with. Also the ioyce of this herbe delyuereth men and chyldren from the cowghe, this her­be is hote and drye.

¶ Eufragia.

EVfragia is an herbe called Eufrasse: this herbe hath lytell leues lyke to her colour but they be not somoch as he, & he hath a whyte flower. ¶ The vertue is yt he is good to hele sore iyen, he groweth ī medowes & hylles.

¶ Ebulus.

EBulus is an herbe called walworte, it hath leues somdele lyke Erderen and he hath a longe stalke and groweth in feldes.

¶ The vertue is that he is good to dystroye the dropsy, and scabbes, or tetters. Also this herbe draweth wicked humours out of a mā this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Edera.

EDera is an herbe called yue, this is cō ­mon it is called howsys, & towrys, and hath leues lyke to an herbe called bryan, and it bereth fruyte as it were bayes. ¶ The ver­tue therof is yf it be sod and layde on a botche it healeth it soone. Also yf thy heade ake take the ioyce of this herbe with oyle of roses, and seth them togyther in wyne, and anoynt thy hede therwith, and thou shalt be hole. Also yf thou wyl kepe thy heade from akynge in the sonne, take the leues of this herbe, and pune them small, and then tempre them with cysell and the oyle of Roses, and then anoynte thy forheade therwith.

¶ Edera terrestris.

EDera terrestris is an herbe called orpyn, or heyhoue, this hath leues lyke to Car­mynt, but they be not so moche, and hath in the croppe a red flower. ¶ The vertue is yf [Page] it be put in potage amonge flesshe, he wyll make the flesshe tendre and nesshe.

¶ Eborus.

EBorus is an herbe called longe wort, or Pelyder of spayne, this is lyke to Pedelion, but the leues of this herbe be not so mo­che slytte without, and he hath a flower as it were a pasnepe. ¶ The vertue is that he wyl hele scabbes, the morfewe, and tetters. Also he heleth the emerawdes, yf it be layde to the place there it bledeth. Also he purgeth the co­lour of the fleume. Also he helpeth the from the tothache yf it be sod with eysell, and hol­de a quantyte in your mouth. Also this herbe purgeth well the stomacke and the wombe. Also the powder of this herbe medled with a lytel growell shall slee wormes. Also the ioy­ce of this herbe medled with mylke shall slee fleese, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Elabrus.

ELabrus is an herbe called Clouentonge, or Pedelyon, this herbe is moche lyke to longe worte, but not so flat as be the leues of this herbe, & he hath somdele a brode flower, more than a peny, he hath a blacke rote and he is horryble in syght. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that yf the powder therof be medled with growel or with meele it wyl slee rattes [Page] and yf a beest pysse blode, gyue hym this her­be and he is hole.

¶ Epatica.

EPatica is an herbe called liuerwort, this herbe groweth in brymmes of waters, and in welles, and it wyll ioyne to stones, and he groweth moche in walles of stone, & it hath nother stalke, not her flower but small to wnde leues, and the more the leues be bet­ter to medycynes. ¶ The vertue is yt he wyll dystroy and clense the hardenes of the lyuer. Also the leues therof medeled with swynes grece wyll hele woundes. Also it is good to hele the Feuer quartayne.

¶ The .vi. letter begynneth with .F.

¶ Famula.

FAmula is an herbe called sperworte, or la [...] ­secle, this hath leues ly­ke to a spere hed, it hath a stalke, and in the top cōmyng out many smal stalkes, & it hath a why­te flower, and it groweth in waters. ¶ The vertue therof is that he is good to hele the fe­uers, and also for to breke botches and byles, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Fumus terre.

FUmus terre is an herbe called fumeterry this herbe hath leues that ben somwhat whyte vnder, and they ben smal, and it hath a flower of purpul colour, and this herbe groweth in stalkes, but not fullonge. ¶ The vertue is that he comforteth the stomacke. Also he maketh a man to haue appetyde to mete, it helpeth a man to make water, and it openeth the stoppynge of the lyuer, & clereth a mānes blode. Also yf the ioyce therof be dronke it di­stroyeth scabbes and ytchynge, and bladders that ben gendred of wycked humours, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Fragra.

FRagra is an herbe called strawbery, and this herbe is cōmon. ¶ The vertue therof is that he is good to dystroye a webbe in the lyen. Also it is good to hele woundes. Also the ioyce medeled with hōny, and dronke he­leth the akynge of a mannes mylte, this gro­weth in clene and darke places.

¶ Fabaria maior.

FAbaria maior is an herbe called brokele­ues, this herbe hath rownde leues & mo­che lyke to myntes. ¶ The vertue therof is, yf he be puned with shepes talowe, and ma­de hote in maner of a playster, and layde to [Page] any swellynge it wyll hele it, this herbe gro­weth in smal brokes, & moste amonge belton.

¶ Filex.

FIlex is an herbe called Ferne, this herbe is cōmon, and there be .iii. spyces therof, one is called Ferne, and another is called po­lipode, another called Osmonde, and that is the .ii. spyces, another is called verrew & that is the .iii. spyce, polipode is good to make a man laxatyue, and he groweth in trees, Os­monde is good to hele broken bones, and it groweth in dyches and woodes, the .iii. that mē cal euer verrew groweth on walles, and is good to hele the potagre, & he maketh strō ­ge a mānes senewes, & he groweth in woo­des, dyches, and feldes.

¶ Filipendula.

FIlipendula is an herbe that men calleth Filipendull or dropworte, this is lyke to yaron, and he groweth next the groūde, the leues be more than the leues of yaron, it hath a small stalke, and a flower somdele whyte, and in the more small pelettes lyke yshape as it were smal pelettes rownde. ¶ The vertue is yt he wyll dystroy wycked wyndes aboute the lyuer and the mylte. Also he helpeth to di­stroy the stone, it groweth in holowe places, and drye, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Feniculum.

FEnicnlum is an herbe that men calleth Fenell, this herbe is cōmon ynoughe.

¶ The vertue is, the sede when it is drye, it distroyeth wynde in the stomacke. Also it cō ­forteth a mannes stomacke. Also he openeth the stoppynge of the reynes & of the bladder. Also ye ioyce of this herbe stilled in to a mans iye doth away the webbe. Also yf it be dron­ke with wyne, it dystroyeth all maner of ve­nym. Also the ioyce dropped in to the eres sle­eth wormes, that ben within. Also yf it be dronke with wyne it heleth the dropsy. Also it heleth all maner of swellynges. Also yf he be dronke with wyne or water, it maketh a womans mylke to wax. Also yf he be dron­ke with wyne, it kepeth from castyng. Also yf he be medled with oyle it wyll hele ye swel­lynge of a mans yerde. Also yf thou wyll be steryed to lecherye, take and drynke the sede therof with good wyne.

¶ Faxmus.

FAxmus is an herbe called hertwort or odobrame, this hath leues yshape as a hert and hath a flower as were bugle, and a shorte stalke. ¶ The vertue is yf he be broke and layde to a sore it heleth anone, this groweth in feldes and medowes.

¶ Finiculus porcinus.

FIniculus porcinus is an herbe called swynes fenel or worme sede, this her­be hath small leues lyke to yaron, and of a stalke cōmynge many braunches it gro­weth vpon walles, & hath small coddes and small red sede. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is, yf a man ete the sede therof, it distroyeth and sleyeth the wormes within the wombe, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Febrifuga.

FEbrifuga is called fetherfoy or vethut foye, this herbe hath many stalkes cō ­mynge out of one stalke, and it hath a whyte flower as it were Mayes. ¶ The vertue is that he wyl comforte the stomacke. Also it swageth the feuer cotydyan. Also it is good to hele the crampe that cōmeth of a colde stomacke. Also yf this herbe be puned and layde to a sore that is bytten with a ve­nymous worme or beest it shall be hole. Also this herbe tempered with eysell doth awaye the morfew. Also yf this be puned and layde to a wounde, in the whiche is broken bones, it shal hele the bones. Also the rote of this herbe is good to staunche the blodymenson, this is hote and drye.

¶ Filago.

FIlago is an herbe called feldewort, this herbe hath leues a lytell enlong, and it is lyke to hore hounde, it is a lytell herbe and it groweth in wete.

¶ Flāmula minor.

FLāmula minor is an herbe called the lesse sperwort, it hath leues as it were grasse, but it is sharpe as it were a spere. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is yf it be puned and layde to a hande that is byte, it shallbe hole anone.

¶ The .vii. letter begynneth with .G.

¶ Granum.

GRanum is an herbe cal­led Gromell, or lytelwale, this hath leues that ben par­te enlonge, and hath a lytell whyte sede shape as a stone that men call mariery perle. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is good to hele the stone, and the euyl of the bledder, this herbe maketh a man to make water, and this is hote & dry.

¶ Genescula.

GEnescula is an herbe called Genestre, or brome, this hath leues lyke to Spy­gurnell, and they ben a lytell longer, and it hath a yelowe flower. ¶ The vertue is yt he is good to knyt bones & synewes togyther.

¶ Genciana.

GEnciana is an herbe called bladmoyne or felde wort. ¶ The vertue of this her­be is that he clenseth the stoppynge of the sto­macke, the lyuer and the mylte, & it be dronke with hōny and water. Also it healeth the by­tynge of venymous beestes. Alfs;o it delyue­reth a woman of a deade chylde, and this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Galanga.

GAlanga is an herbe that men call Ga­lyngale. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he comforteth the stomacke, & it maketh a man to defye his meate. Also it vnbyndeth and letteth out wycked wyndes out of a mā ­nes body. Also it maketh a mannes mouthe swete. Also it healeth the reynes. Also it ma­keth a man to haue appetyte to a woman, & it is hote and drye.

¶ Granum solis.

GRanum solis is an herbe called wylde Gromell, this hath leues somdele lyke to Gromell, and his sede is lyke somdele to that other gromell sede. Also he hath somdele suche a flower, neuertheles they dyffereth in the stalke, for the stalke of this herbe is sharp and it groweth moche in wete.

¶ Gladiolus.

GLadiolus is an herbe called Gladyoll, or Gladur, this herbe hath leues like to an herbe called Getus, but it is not so grene, it hath a yelow flower & a longe stalke, and it groweth in water.

¶ Graciadei.

GRaciadei is an herbe called graciadei, this hath leues somdele lyke to dens delion, but the leues of this be somwhat sharp, and it hath yelowe flowers, and it groweth in drye lande.

¶ Graciadei maior.

GRaciadei maior is an herbe called gra­ciadei the more, this hath leues lyke to cokyll, & it hath a whyte flower, it groweth in drye grounde, and whan that it is broke it droppeth mylke.

¶ The .viii. letter begynneth with .H.

¶ Hastula regia.

HAstula regia is an herbe called wodrofe, it hath leues lyke to croyes wort, and this herbe is sote in sauour, and a woman smel moche therto it maketh her heade to ake. ¶ The vertue ther­of is yf the more of it be puned with wyne it shall hele sores of the mouthe. Also take the [Page] sede of this herbe and pune it and tempre it with the sowrest eysel that ye can fynde and drynke it, and it shall staunche the flyxe and harde the wombe.

¶ Herba crucita.

HErba crucita is an herbe called Croys worte or Exean, this hath lytell leues and a small stalke, and also a whyte flower. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll hele well woundes.

¶ Herba christofori.

HErba christofori masculus is an herbe called herbe christofer male, this herbe hath leues moche lyke to lesse crowesape, but they ben more whyte and not fully so longe, and it groweth in drye grounde, and also in watery places, and it hath a yelowe flower. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is good to hele the pestylence.

¶ Herba walteri.

HErba walteri is an herbe called herbe water, this hath leues lyke to the leues of Persely, and the leues be thycke, fat, and tender. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll clense woundes and hele them.

¶ Herba Roberti.

HErba Roberti is an herbe called herbe Robert, this hath leues lyke to herbe [Page] Genet, it hath a small flower that is somdelred, it groweth in feldes and in hedges, and in walles. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyll hele woundes, and also the powder wyll slee the Canker.

¶ Herba martis.

HErba martis is an herbe called morta­gon, this herbe hath leues lyke to a let­ter. M. when he is a capytall letter, & in some braūche ht hath .ix. leues, and some more, and some fewer, and bringeth forth her leues and sede togyther, this herbe hath many wonder­full vertues.

¶ Herba Iohannis.

HErba Iohānis is an herbe called saynt Iohanes worte, it hath leues lyke to the lesse Centory, it hath a yelow flower and a longe stalke, and many stalkes cōmyng of one. ¶ The vertue is yf he be in a howse, he suffreth no wycked spryte dwell therin.

¶ Herba Petri.

HErba Petri is an herbe called cowslop this herbe hath leues lyke to herbe xp̄o for femall, but they be more whyter, and it groweth in medowes.

¶ The .ix. letter begynneth with .I.

¶ Iusquiamus.

IVsquianus is an herbe called Henbane or Hēnebel, this herbe hath leues some­what whyte vnder, and the leues be flat a lytel without as it were sowthistel, it hath a flower somwhat white, and it hath a great stalke, and many braunches cōmynge out of one more, & it groweth in hye wayes. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that the oyle made therof is good to dystroye all maner of gowtes, and namely that that cōmeth of melancolye. Also the sede of this herbe layde on a slayte stone and hete with the fyre, and let it smo­ke in the mans mouthe, it sleeth wormes of the teth. Also he swageth the cough and hote postume and hote potegre. Also the more is good for the tothache, and the ioyce of this is good for all maner of woundes, and the sede therof shulde be gathered in August. Also yf thou cast the sede therof in the fyre, all the hē ­nes that ben ouer the fyre shall fall in to the fyre, and it is colde and drye.

¶ Isopus.

ISopus is an herbe called Isope, it hath leues lyke to Sauery, but they be not so brode, & he flowreth as doth sauery. ¶ The vertue therof is that the ioyce therof [Page] medled with eysell, and put in a sore mouth heleth it. Also it sleeth wormes in the wombe and maketh the wombe nesshe. Also yf it be dronke grene or els the powder, it maketh a man wel colowred, it is hote and drye.

¶ Ireose.

IReose is an herbe called Saue, and his leues be lyke to flowerdelyce, & it hath a whyte flower, and groweth in water.

¶ The vertue therof is that he wyll hele the akynge of the senewes. Also it distroyeth the coughe. Also yf it be dronke with wyne it dystroyeth the wycked humoures of the breest. Also it helpeth the bytyng of venymous bee­stes or wormes. Also it distroyeth the crampe Also it delyuereth a woman of a deade chyl­de, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Iris.

IRis is an herbe called flowerdelyse and it is lyke to Saue almoste in all maner fetures, but this herbe hath a flower al­moste of purpull colour, this groweth in wa­ters and gardaynes, and he hath the same vertues that Saue hath.

¶ Iua.

IUa is an herbe called Iue, this herbe hath a rote euen downe to the groūde growyn­ge, and it hath small leues growyng euen by [Page] the grounde. ¶ The vertue is yf a man haue a sore swellyng aboute his eres, take this her be cumbonfitatibus of her in wyne and oyle and cōmyn, and than make a playster therof, and laye to the eares and it shall hele theym. Also take the knobbes of the rote & dry them and clense them, and they haue vertue to ma­ste the laxatyue, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Iasia alba.

IAsia alba is an herbe called wylde Tan sey or gose grasse, but they be more why­ter, and it hath a yesowe flower, and it groweth downe by the grownde, as doth the strawberyes. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good for the clensyng of a mans lymmes, it groweth in medowes, sees, wodes, & wayes.

¶ Iasia nigra.

IAsia nigra is an herbe yt men call matfeson, or bulwede, or yrenhard, or knoppe wede, this hath leues lyke to scabyous, and it hath a purpull colour.

¶ Ippia maior.

IPpia maior is an herbe called pympernel, or sefehele, or wayworte, or more croppe, this hath leues lyke to chyckewede, but the seues of this ben lesse, and it hath a flower of purpull colour, & it groweth in wete. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is good to hele [Page] woūdes, and so dystroy venym, and is good for the postume, and to hele the sore iyen.

¶ Ipia minor.

IPia minor is an herbe that men call cheke wede, this herbe hath leues like to pymper nell, and it hath a whyte flower, and it gro­weth in gardaynes and in feldes. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is, sethe it in rōnynge water and wasshe your scabey handes therin often tymes, and they shall be hole.

¶ The .x. letter begynneth with .L.

¶ Lanisticum.

LAnisticum is an her­be called louage, this her­be hath leues lyke to Lo­uage, but they be somde­le more, & it hath a longe stalke, and it is stronge in sauour. ¶ The vertue is in the sede of her. Also ye morys therof drō ­ke with wyne, is good for the stomacke, and for good dygestyng, this is hote and drye.

¶ Lingua ceruina.

LIngua ceruina is an herbe called hertes tongue, this hath leues lyke to the tonge of a harte, and it groweth in walles and drye places, & hath no sede, nor flower, nor stalke.

¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he wyl ty­pe ye postume and breke it, yf it be sode with oyle of Roses. Also yf it be dronke with olde wyne, it hardyneth the wombe. Also it hea­leth a man of the coughe, this is hote & drye.

¶ Lilium.

LIlium is an herbe that men call Lylye. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that yf thou pune it with talowe, and sethe it with oyle, and laye it to the place there as the colde postume is, it shall rype hym and breke hym. Also take the rotes of lylye, and the rotes of the red docke, and the more of louage, & put all these in wyne & oyle, the space of .ii. dayes and afterward let it seth and clense it, and do therto waxe and oyle, and make anoyntmēt and that is good to hele the sores & hardenes of a mānes mylte. Also take the knobbes of the rotes of the Lylye and rost them amonge the coles, and take oyle Olyue and anoynte there as the sore is.

¶ Ligustrum.

LIgustrum is an herbe called prymerose. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good for to make potage. Also the ioyce put in a man­nes nose wyll dystroy the Megrym. Also the water that the rote is soden in is good to vn­stop the conduytes of vryne.

¶ Lingua bouis.

LIngua bouis is an herbe called Langde [...] befe. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good to do awaye the red colour of a man. Also yf it be dronken it doth away the cardyacle and other wycked humours in a mānes lunges. Also the ioyce of this herbe dronke with hote water, maketh a man to haue a good mynde and good wyt, this must be gathered in Iu­ne or in Iuly, and this is hote and drye.

¶ Lingua serpentis maior.

LIngua serpēris maior is an herbe called Adder tongue, this herbe hath leues ly­ke to Affodyll, but they be more grene, and also more sharp in the ende, this must be gathe­red in the moneth of Apryll.

¶ Lingua serpentis minor.

LIngua serpētis minor is an herbe called the lesse Adder tongue, this herbe hath leues somwhat lyke to Pygyll, and it hath a yelowe flower, and out of the stalke cōmeth many braūches, and it groweth in woodes.

¶ The vertue of this herbe is good to lay to a cut, yf it be brused and layde therto.

¶ Lingua canis.

LIngua canis is an herbe called houndes tongue. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good to dystroy the coughe and the postume, [Page] and it wyll rype a botche. Also this herbe ea­ten is good for shakynge of the heed, and maketh the throte and the breth smothe & souple. Also for the flux of the wombe yf thy fete be wasshed in the water that it is soden in.

¶ Lingua hircina.

LIngua hircina is an herbe called Bucke shorne, or swyneskerce, this herbe hath leues flatred as it were an hertes horne, and it groweth crepynge by the grownde, & it hath a lytell whyte flower, it groweth in watery places. ¶ The vertue is that is clenseth ye sto­macke and refreyneth the great hete, and healeth the brennynge of fyre, yf that it be soden and layde therto.

¶ Lupinus.

LUpinus is an herbe called Lupyne, this herbe hath leues lyke to fyue leued gras, the Lupyne hath .vi. leues, and it hath a whyte flower, and a whyte sede that is somwhat broder, and it bereth coddes somwhat lyke to benecoddes. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is, yf a man haue wormes in his wombe, take the sede and make meele therof, and the ioyce of worm wode and hōny, and make a cake ther­of and ete it, and it vnbyndeth the stoppynge of the lyuer & of the mylte. Also it is good to dystroy the dropsy. Also take the same meele [Page] and the ioyce of arsmert, & make therof paste and lay it to thy eres, and it shal kyl the wor­mes within them or yf thou make a cake therof & hete it, it wyll do the same. Also yf thou wyll take the ioyce of Lekes, and tempre it with the meele, and put it in thy eres, it shall clense theym from all wycked humours and stynkyng. Also take the same meele and tem­pre it with oyle, and it wyl breke and rype all maner of postumes. And this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Labrum veneris.

LAbrum veneris is an herbe that men calleth Sowthystell. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is this, yf a mā haue a hote feuer, take the ioyce therof and tempre it with hote wa­ter, and let hym drynke it and he shall be hole. Also yf a mā haue venym within hym, take this herbe and drye it and make powder therof, and do the powder in good wyne, and let hym drynke it, and it wyll cast vp all the ve­nym, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Lauendula.

LAuendula is an herbe called lauander, yf this be soden in water, and gyuen to a man that hath the palsye, it wyll hele hym, and this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Lactuca.

LActuca is a herbe that is called Lettyse or slope worte. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is this, yf it be eten rawe or soden it engendreth good blode. Also this herbe so­den with a lytel eysel and Saffron and than dronken, it helpeth a man that is stopped in the lyuer and in the mylt. Also yf a man may not slepe, take the sede of this herbe & stampe it to powder, & tempre it with womans myl­ke and make a playster therof on lynt, & lay it to the temples of thy heade, & thou shalt slepe well, or elles drynke the powder therof with mylke. Also take the sede and tempre it with oyle of roses, and make a playster and lay it to thy stomacke, and it is good to distroy the hote postume. Also drynke the ioyce of this herbe, or powder the sede for it is good to he­le ye flyx, but who that vseth this herbe ouer­moche, it wyll dystroy theyr syght, this herbe is colde and somwhat moyste.

¶ Lactuca siluatica.

LActuca siluatica is an herbe called wyl­de Lettyse, this herbe hath leues lyke to the thistel, and they be sharpe and kene, and it hath a flower of purpull colour, and it groweth in feldes and in whete, this herbe is hote and drye. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that it taketh away the dymnes of the iyes, [Page] medle ye ioyce of this herbe with wyne or hō ­ny, and the gall of an Austour, or other foule of pray, and put it all medled in a glasse, and put it in thy iyes .iii. tymes in a day or more, and in shorte space thy iyes shallbe clere, for it is a souerayne medicyne. And bycause this herbe is good for to clere the syght, some say that the Egle cateth this herbe when that he wyll flee hye.

¶ Lactuca leporica.

LActuca leporica is an herbe called Hate thystel, this herbe hath leues lyke vnto Sowthystel, but the leues be not so en­dented, it droppeth mylke. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is thus yf a hare cate of this herbe in sōmer whan he is mad, he shallbe hole.

Also take this herbe & lay it to a mānes syde when he slepeth, or elles that he knowe not therof, and it wyll hele hym of the feuers.

¶ Lollium.

LOllium is an herbe that men call cokle. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is thus, yf it be dronken with Radysshe, and a lytel salt, it is good to hele the Canker, or other woūdes in peryll. Also it is good to comforte the sto­macke and ye lyuer. Also it wyll vnbynde the wormes in a mans stomacke. Also it helpeth a man to make water, and it is good for sore [Page] iyes. Also subfumygacyon therof wyl make a woman to bere her chylde without any pe­ryll or harme. Also it wyll asswage the great paynes of akynge of ye lypur, it is hote & dry.

¶ Laparium rubeum.

LAparium rubeum is an herbe called red docke, yf that a man take the ioyce ther­of and holde it in his mouth, it wyll asswage the tothache. Also yf a man haue the kynges euyl take this herbe and seth it in wyne, and strayne it and gyue it hym to drynke, and he shallbe hole yf he vse it oft. Also yf yt a man rubbe hym with the ioyce, it doth away euyll ytchynges. Also this herbe is good to deliuer wyndes that be stopped in a mans stomacke by balkyng. Also this herbe is good to make scabbes and botches rype. Also it is good to make a man to haue a harde wombe, & this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ Linum.

LInum is an herbe that men cal flex, and it is good yf a man take the sede therof, and sethe it in water, it maketh a man laxa­tyue, and it is good to make a playster therof for akynge sores. Also there is another spyce therof that is called Custula, and it is named in englysshe Dodure, & it groweth amonge flex. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is [Page] good to purge a man of the colour. Also yf a great quantyte therof be taken, and soden in Myrre and oyle togyther, and a playster ma­de therof, it is good for ye raynes and for the breest, and for other akynge lymbes.

Lauriola.

LAuriola is a herbe called lawrell. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that it wyll make a man laxatyue, & it is good to purge a man of flewme and of colour, it is good for a mā that may not cate, for yf the ioyce therof be put in his eres, or yf the sayde herbe be stam­ped, & a suppository be made therof and sayde on cotton, it wyll hele it. Also for them that here not wel, put the ioyce in to his eres, and yf there be any rotten humours it wyll drye them, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Licorisa.

LIcorisa is an herbe that men cal lycoryse the rote of this herbe is swete, & it moy­steth the kyndly hete of a man, and it is good for the coughe. Also yf it be soden in water, it wyll dystroy a mānes thurste. Also it ma­keth a mānes brest, his throte, and his lunges moyste, and in good tempre. Also the water that lycoryse is soden in is good agaynst all syckenes of ye breest, & for y a postume of the rybbes called pleuresy, it is colde & moyste.

¶ The .xi. letter begynneth with .M.

¶ Millefolio minor.

MIllefolio minor is an her­be that is called the lesse Myl­foyle, there is no dyfference of kynde nor vertue betwene mylfoyle the lesse, and Mylfoyle the more, saue the more groweth in gardaynes, and the lesse in wylde places, they be both of one strēgth.

¶ The vertue of this herbe shallbe declared in Mylfoyle the more folowynge by lettre.

¶ Mercurialis.

MErcurialis is an herbe yt men cal Mer­curye. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that he is good yf a man haue akynge in his wombe, gyue hym to drynke ye ioyce and he shallbe hole, it wyll clense the stomacke, and the sede wyll do the same. Also the ioyce tem­pred with whyte wyne is good to hele sore iyes, and yf a worme or other vermyn haue bytten a man, take the ioyce & warme it, and wasshe it. Also yf there be any wormes cropē in to a mans eres, take the ioyce and warme it and put it in to his eares, & he shallbe hole, this is hote and drye.

¶ Menta.

MEnta is an herbe that men cal mynte. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that yf [Page] it be ofte eaten, it wyll slee the wormes in a mans wombe. Also yf a man haue botches or other rennynges or swellynges in his heade, take this herbe and stamp it, and lay it to the sore, and it wyll hele it. Also yf a mānes toth or the flesshe of ye toth ake or stynke: take this herbe and seth it in whyte wyne and in eysel, and take that lycour and wasshe his mouthe therwith, than take the powder of the herbe and rubbe well his teth therwith, and he shal haue a swete smellynge mouthe. Also take thou this herbe and eysell & make sauce, and it wyl make the to haue a talent to thy mete. Also when there shal be gyuen any medicyne to distroy venym, it wylbe good to be gyuen with the ioyce of this herbe, for it hath many vertues, and namely for venym, there be ma­ny spyces therof, and it is hote and drye.

¶ Menta romana.

MEnta romana is an herbe that mē call whyte mynte. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is that the ioyce therof wyl sle wormes in a mannes wombe. Also the ioyce wyll sle wormes in the nose thyrsses of a man. Also the powder therof caste in a mans mete, shall make hym well to defye his meate. Also the ioyce dronke sleeth the wormes of ye wombe, yf it be dropped in ye eres, it sleeth ye wormes.

¶ Malua.

MAlua is an herbe that mē cal malowe. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good yf the leues be stamped and layde to a mans sto­macke, it wyll breke a hote postume in the begyn̄ynge, or els medle this herbe with fresshe swynes grece, and laye it on a hote tyle, & lay it all hote to the postume, and it shal rype it, and breke it. Also it is good to distroy ye hardnes of a mans lyuer and mylte. Also it wyll make a man laxatyue, & it is good for play­sters, it is colde and moyste.

¶ Morell or nyghtshadowe.

MOrell is an herbe that men call nyght shadowe, this herbe is colde and drye in the .ii. degre, the leues, the braunches, and the fruytes therof be ryght good & best when they be grene. ¶ The vertue is they be good for stoppynge of the splen and the lyuer, and best for the Iaundesse to drynke the ioyce of it with a lytell Ruberbe. Also it is good for a postume in the stomacke, in the bowels, or in the lyuer, seth the ioyce therof with barly water and drynke it.

¶ Mastyke.

MAstyke is an herbe that mē cal gūme, and it is hote and drye in the .ii. degre, and it is a gūme of a tre growynge in a parte [Page] of the countre of Grece, in the latter ende of Vcre the men of that countre slytte the trees, and than make the grownde clene all abouts and laye clothes rounde aboute the trees, or some other cōnynge to kepe ye gūme from the grounde in chosynge of it, to knowe whiche is best, to take the best is whyte and clere, the whyte colour is next ye best, and yt is medled with carth and somwhat darke, the best ma­styke hath vertue of constraynynge, comfor­tynge, clensyng, and losynge of humours discendyng from the hede aboue to the iyes and to the teth, and for the dysease of the tempses made of an ascendynge wynde from the sto­macke to the heed. Take powder of mastyke with whyte swete wyne, and the whyte of an egge, and medle them well togyther, and ye wyll ye may put in frankensence, & play­ster it to the temples. Also sethe Mastyke in water and drynke it, and it wyl comfort wel the stomacke and make good degestyon, and it comforteth and relaxeth the stomacke, and put to it fenes sede, and it putteth out wynde out of the stomacke. Also a playster made of Mastyke and bole armonyake, and the why­te of an egge and vynegre, and laye it on the forke of ye stomacke or brest, it wyll constray­ne wel the coloryke vanyte. Also seth masty­ke [Page] in rayne water and drynke it warme, and this medycyne is very good for ye flux of the wombe that cōmeth of a sharp lax that was taken before to stop hym. Also boyle mastyke in rayne water, or Rose water, with two or thre cloues, and drynke it warme, & that comforteth the vomyte, and ye flux of the wombe that cōmeth of sharpnes and vyolence of the medycyne. Also mastyke must haue but lytell boylynge for hurtynge of his vertue, and it shulde be gyuen warme, for it constrayneth the more whan that it is gyuen warme, than whan it is ouer moche hote.

¶ Magerum.

MAgerum is an herbe that is hote & dry in the seconde degre, the flowers and leues be vsed in medycynes, and it shulde be gathered in sōmer whan it flowreth, and dry it in the shadowe, and it may be kepte a yere. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good in comfortynge, losynge, consumynge, and of clensyn­ge, yf the powder of it be dronken in wyne, or els boyle the powder of it in wyne, and it wyll hete wel a stomacke. Also it comforteth the degestyon. Also take the leues & flowers of magerum, and pune them a lytell, & make them hote in a pāne, and lay it to the greuaū ­ce, and it taketh awaye the dysease in the sto­macke [Page] yt cōmeth of wynde. Also for the re [...] me in the heade, take this herbe and bynde it warme aboute thy heade. Also it dryeth the mother and consumeth the superfluyte of it.

¶ Millefolium maior.

MIllefolium maior or yarow is an her­be yt kynge Achylles dyd fynde, and therwith heled his men yt were wounded with yron. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good for woundes, stampe this herbe with swynes grece, and playster it to the wounde, and it shal hele it, and the same is good for an ache in the breste or syde, it is good for hym that may not pysse, take the ioyce of this her­be and vinegre & drynke it, and merueylously it helpeth a wounde that hath taken colde, stampe this herbe in butter, and laye it to the wounde, and it wyll hele it well. Also to de­gest ye stomacke or that lyeth therin, take the ioyce of it, & medle it with water and hōnye, and drynke it warme. Also it is good for dy­seases in the body, take the powder and medle it with wyne or with good ale, and drynke it and it helpeth moche. Also it is good for the herte brennynge. Also for ye heedache stampe this herbe, and playster it to ye heade. Also for bytynge of a wood dogge, stampe this herbe with the graynes of wete, and it healeth it. [Page] Also for hym that may not holde his meate, take and stampe this herbe with wyne, and drynke it warme.

¶ Motherworte.

MOtherworte or mogwort, this herbe is called in latyn Artemesia, and it is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, this herbe helpeth a woman to conceyue a chylde, clenseth the mother, and maketh a woman to haue her flowers, and it dystroyeth the eme­rawdes on this maner. Fyrste it must be ga­thered, than take the powder of motherwort, and of Horehounde togyther, and strawe it on the pappes. Also yf a chylde be deed in the mothers wombe, take motherwort, & stampe it small, and make a playster therof and lay it to her wombe all colde, and with the grace of God she shall haue delyuetaunce without parell, it is good for the stone and the grauell in the raynes of a man or of a woman, yf a man bere this herbe vpon hym, there shall no venymous beest greue hym. It is good for the yelowe Iaundes and it be dronken with wyne, for it conforteth the stomacke, and maketh a man or woman to haue a good colour. Agaynst ache of ye bowels, powdre of mug­wort dronken with hōny easeth greatly, and is good agaynst many other syckenesses.

¶ Maces.

MAces is a spyce that is called Mace, this spyce is hote & drye in the secon­de degre, maces is the tynde or huske that groweth aboute the Nutmege, as ye ryn­de groweth aboute the hasell nutte, it may be kepte .x, yere in his vertue, it is comfortyng, dyssosuyng, and consumyng, the knowledge of fyne maces is thus, it shulde be in coloure lyke to fyne golde, or elles lyke to golde that syluer is gyft with, the whiche hath a sharpe [...]alage with a bytternes, and it soketh lyke to earth, & it is to be refused, for it hath no shar­pe sauour, for a colde stomacke that may not defye nor degeste well, take maces and boyle them in wyne & drynke it. Also a good play­ster the whiche is best for a feble stomacke, and make powdre of mastyke and of maces, and medle them with oyle of Roses & wexe, and make a playster therof and say it on the stomacke of the sycke parson. Also to clense the brayne of superfluous humoures, take a quantyte of maces, and chewe them well in thy mouthe, & holde them there a whyle, and that shall lose the feumosyte of humours that ryse vp to the brayne, & purge the superfluite of it. Also for feblenesse of the stomacke and the lyuer of a colde cause, and for the colyke, [Page] and for the dyseases of the spyrytuall mem­bres, or flewme, boyle maces in the ioyce of fenell, and in the ende of the boyfynge put in a lytell wyne, than strayne it and drynke it, for it is the best remedye for the foresayd dy­seases. Also for the ache of the hert, vse pow­dre of maces in thy meates and drynkes.

¶ Menta.

MEnta is an herbe yt is called red mynt, it is hote and dry in the seconde degre, and there be two other myntes, but I meane howse myntes, the whiche properly is sayde gardayne myntes, for that moste cōmenly is in medycynes both grene and drye, for great holsūnes it shuld be dried in a shadowe place, and so it wyll be kept a yere in great vertue, to dyssolue or lose, to consume, of his proper qualyte, & to comforte of his swete sauoure. ¶ The vertue is this, for the stynkyng of the mouth and fylthe of the gūmes & of the teth, wasshe thy mouth and gūmes with vynegre that myntes be sodden in, and after rub hym with ye powder of myntes, or with dry myn­tes to prouoke the appetyte when a impedy­mēt of ye stomacke cōmeth of colde humours beyng in the mouth of the stomacke, make a salue of myntes and vynegre with a lytel sy­namum and peper, and vse it wel agaynst vo [Page] mytes that cōmeth of feblenes of ye stomacke or of colde causes, sethe myntes in sauge wa­ter and vynegre, and depe it in and laye it on the mouthe of the stomacke with the myntes that be soden therin. Also gyue to the pacient to eate of the same myntes for the sincopyne, and feblenesse in feuers, and without feuers, or of medycyne, or of what cause it be, stamp myntes with vynegre, and a lytell wyne yf the pacyent be without feuer, & yf he be with feuer, stampe myntes with vynegre alone, than make a toste of sowre brede, and toste it well tyl it be almoste brent, then put it in that licour, and let it lye therin tyl it be wel soked, than put it in to his nose and rub his lyppes, and gūmes, tethe, and temples therwith, and bynde it to the poulse vaynes of his armes, & let the pacyent eate the moystnes that is left and swalowe it in. For to clense the mother, take the tender croppes of myntes, and sethe them in water or wyne, and playster it to the share, and to the raynes. Agaynst the congy­lynge in a womans breste, take the small stal­kes of myntes and seth them in wyne & oyle, and playster it aboute the teates. Also be it knowen that whan any medycyne shulde be gyuen agaynst venym, it shuld be gyuē with the ioyce of myntes, for myntes haue a ma­ner [Page] of strengthe of drawynge out venym, or els it shuld be gyuen with wyne that myntes haue be soden in. For stoppynge of the splen and the lyuer, and of the wayes of the vryne of a colde humour and a hote without feuer, take the ioyce of myntes alone, or myntes so den in wyne, or the ioyce of myntes medled with hōny, & gyue it to the pacyent. To slee wormes in the bely, take the ioyce of myntes and drynke it, & thou shalte be hole. Also the ioyce of myntes sleeth wormes in the eares. For a tetter take the ioyce of myntes, and put therto brymstone and vynegre, & medle them wel togyther, and anoynt the tetter therwith and thou shalte be hole. For a wounde in the heade, stamp myntes & lay on the woūde. &c. For payne in the syde, take myntes and seth them in olde wyne or ale, and with it stamp. xviii. graynes of peper, and drynke it in the nyght, and it wyll ease the of thy payne.

¶ The .xii. letter begynneth with .N.

¶ Nux muscata.

NVx muscata is a herbe the whiche is called a nutmeg, it is hote and drye in the seconde de­gre, the best groweth in ynde, & in the tyme of his rypynge it is gathered, and [Page] seuen yere it may be kept, they that be playne and heuy after theyr kynde, be best to be cho­sen. And when they be broken they fal not to powder, but they haue a swete and sharpe sa­uour, yf they lacke any of these aforesayde, they be not good for medycyne. ¶ The ver­tue is of comfortynge by his swete sauoure. For coldnes and feblenes of degestion of the stomacke, take in the mornynge halfe a nut­meg or a hole nutmeg, and eate it. Also for a colde stomacke that is feble of degestion, and for the lyuer, gyue hym wyne that nutmegꝭ is boyled in. Also for ye same boyle nutmegꝭ and mastyke in wyne and drynke it, this is good for the dyseases in the stomacke, and in the bowels to breke wynde. Also in the reco­uerynge of a syckenes to comforte the spyry­tuall membres, boyle nutmegꝭ and mastyke in wyne, and drynke it. Also take a nutmeg and smell to it, and it wyl comforte the spyrytuall membres.

¶ Napo.

NApo this is named Nauew, it desyreth groūde that is fatty, and sandy, it gro­weth best in such grounde, the properte of the Nauewe is, he chaungeth and tourneth in to rape, and after that it tourneth in to nauew, the best doth growe in grounde well dunged [Page] and tourned. Also it proueth well in places that stubble of corne hath ben in ye same yere, yf they growe to thycke, plucke some vp here and there, so that the other may proue the better, and those that ye plucke vp, set them in voyde places. They shuld be sowen in ye ende of Iuly, & in August, the best sauoured Na­uewes be they that be longe & strayghte, and not ouer great, nor braūches in the rotes, but a strayghte rote. Also of Nauewes maye be made a passynge good mete with a lytel salt and vynegre, honny and mustarde, and with swete spyces, and it maye be made without spices, Nauewes be hote in the secōde degre, and they norysshe moche, but they be harde of degestyon, they make the flesshe softe & wyn­dy, but lesse wynde thē rapes. Therfore whē ye seth them in water, cast that water away, and sethe theym in another water, and so his harde substaunce is tempred by that, and so menely bytwene good and euyll they gendre norysshyng, for they that be thus well soden be not harde of degestiō, they make one wyn­dy, and they make stoppynge of vaynes and of poores, but yet they be profytable yf they be soden twyse, & both the waters to be caste away, and they to be soden in the thyrde wa­ter with fatte flesshe.

¶ The .xiii. letter begynneth with .O.

¶ Olibanum.

OLibanum is called Frankensence, this is hote and dry in the thyrde degre, it is a gūme of a tre in ynde, the clenest is the best. Also there be trees of that kynde gro­wyng in Damaske, but not so clere nor good for it is darker of coloure, therfore it is to be refused in medycyne. ¶ The vertue is of comfortynge by his swete sauour. Also of closynge and constraynynge, for the tothache that cōmeth of superfluyte of humours of ye heed, and specyally by the vaynes, make a playster of the powder of Frankensence with wyne, and the whyte of an egge, and medle them to gyther, and playster▪ them aboute the tēples. Also to stop the wayes of the vaynes aboue, take Frankensence, and chewe it well in thy mouth, and that shal stop and let the fluxe of humours cōmynge downe to the nosthyrles, take pylles of Frankensence, and swalowe them downe in ye mornynge, than boyle fran­kensence in wyne, and at euen drynke that whan thou goest to bed. Also these pylles be good to helpe the degestyon of the stomacke, [Page] and good agaynst sore balkyngꝭ. Also to the comfortynge and clensynge of the matryce, and helpynge of concepcyon in the receyuyn­ge the fume of Frankensence byndeth. Also boyle powder of it in wyne, and whan it is metely warme dyp a cloth in it, and laye it so warme to the share of the pacyent, and greatly it comforteth the matryce.

¶ The .xiiii. lettre begynneth with .P.

¶ Plumeus.

PLūmes be colde & moyst some be whyte, and some be blacke, & some be red. They that be blacke and somwhat harde be the best, they be cal­led Damsons, & wlan they be rype gather them, and slyt them, & sprynge vynegre vpon them, and so they may be kept in a vessel of woode a yeare, and fyrste whan they be cut they must be layde in the sōne .xv. dayes to drye. ¶ The vertue of these Dam­sons haue coldnes & clensyng of the inwarde partes, wherfore they be good in feuers that be sharpe, and for costyfnes of bely▪ that com­meth of drynes, or of coloryke humours dry­ynge, yf it be newe gyue it hym to eate, yf it be drye boyle it in water, and gyue it the pa­cyent [Page] to drynke therof, this is good for the fe­uer tercian, for stoppyng of the lyuer, for the Iaūdes and sharp feuers, it softeth the bely, it is good for defaute of appetyte, and also for many other dyseases.

¶ Piper.

PIper this is called Peper, it is hote and drye in the fourthe degre. There be thre maner of Pepers, blacke, whyte, and longe Peper. Diascorides and Constantyne saye, that they be fruytes of trees growyng in yn­de, and some saye that Peper is made blacke with brennyng in the fyre, for whan it is ga­thered there be great multytude of serpentes aboute it, and therfore they put it in the fyre to brenne the serpentes that be a boute it, the Sarasyns dry it in an ouen, bycause it shall not encrease in an other lande, but of all the Pepers the blacke is best, and the moste hol­some. ¶ The vertue is, take Peper and put it in to thy nose thyrlles, and it wyll make the to nese, and seth Peper and fygges in wyne, and drynke it, & it wyll clense the spyrytuall membres of toughe humours, and it is good for the pose that is takē of colde. Also for the same cate powder of Peper with Fygges. Also powder of Peper put in a mans meate comforteth the degestion of ye stomacke. Also [Page] put longe Peper in a rosted apple, and ete it, and it shall comforte the degestyō. Also pow­dre of Peper wyll frete away deed flesshe or prowde flesshe, and longe Peper comforteth more thē blacke. Also blacke Peper hath ver­tue of losyng, comfortynge, and of drawyn­ge, it clenseth the spyrytual membres of colde flewme, and vycyous humours, & best when the powder of it is eaten with fygges, for he hath great strength of hetyng & comfortyng the stomacke, prouokynge appetyte, but to sanguyne & coloryke persones it is not good to vse Peper, for it dryeth and brēneth blode, and it engendreth lepre, and other euyl sycke­nes. Pluto sayeth, that Peper is fowle to s [...] insyght without blacke, and within whyte, a sharpe sauoure and a swete odour, lytell in quantyte, and moche in vertue.

¶ Pympernell.

PYmpernell is an herbe that groweth in sandy places at the foote of the hylles.

¶ The vertue is he is good for ye fystula and canker, & he be puned and layde theron. Also it is good for dymnes of iyen, yf that they be wasshed with the water that it is sodden in. Also the ioyce of this herbe dronken wyl put away all venym from the body. Also this her­be is good to hele woundes.

¶ Pulegium.

PUlegium is a herbe called Pulyol royall it is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, in the tyme of flowerynge it shuld be gathered, and it may be kept in his vertue a yere, when it shall be vsed in medycynes, take the leues with the flowers and strype them fro the stal­kes. ¶ The vertue is of losynge and consu­mynge. For a colde humour in the heed, take powder of it and hete it well in a skyllet, and all hote bynde it to the greuaunce without any lycoure. Also for a great colde taken in the heed, and for a toughe humour or a wate­ry humour, make a gargarysme, seth Pulyol royall, and dry fygges in tarte vynegre, and take a good sponful therof as hote as ye may sustre it, and holde it in thy mouth tyl it be al­moste colde, than put it out & take as moche more, and do so thre or foure tymes, and that shal spurge thy heed wel of flew me Also seth it in wyne and drynke it, and it is good for the dyseases in the stomacke in guttes, & for colde causes, or for wynde in the stomacke. Also it is good for toughe flewme in ye brest, yf thou take powdre of it, and medle it with claryfyde hōny, and make a lectuary therof, and vse to ete therof, or take the herbe therof and boyle it with wyne, hōny, or water, and [Page] vse to drynke therof. Also for ye blacke colour drynke ye ioyce of it, but boyle it with wyne, and thou shalte be hole. Also for a ytchynge byle, lay this herbe in water, & vse to wasshe the ytchyng therin warme, and thou shalt be hole. Also for ache take this herbe all grene, and stampe it and playster it to the ache, and it wyll ease it. Also agaynst the coughe boyle this herbe in wyne, & drynke it luke warme, and this wyll make one pysse well. For the dysease in the bely, stampe this herbe with cō myn and water, and lay it hote to the nauel, and lyghtly it shallbe hole. For the disease in the lyuer, stampe this herbe & tempre it with water and vynegre, & drynke the ioyce therof and thou shalt be hole. For an ache in the leg­ges or armes, take the leues of elder and Pu­lyall royal of eueryche alyke moche, & stamp them togyther wel, and playster it to the gre­uaunce, and it is good for the feuer tercyan, yf thou take the braunches of this herbe, and wrappe it in a good locke of woll, and gyue it to the pacyent, and lethym smell therto be­fore the fyuer come on hym, and that shal do hym great ease. For the heedache, take this herbe and bynde it fast roūde about thy heed, and anone it seaseth the ache. Also yf a wo­man haue a deed chylde in her wombe, stamp [Page] this herbe, & gyue it her to drynke with olde wyne, and she shallbe delyuered of it by the grace of god. For the crampe drynke the ioy­ce with vynegre fastynge, and it wyll put it awaye.

¶ Pencedanum vel Feniculus Porcinus.

PEncedanum, this herbe is called mayth hogges fenell, or mayden wede, this herbe is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, when this herbe is gathered for medicynes, the rote is better then the herbe, when the rotes be ga­thered they maye be kepte all a yeare. ¶ The vertue is he purgeth, it is good for the stran­gulyon or the flyxe, and good for stoppynge of the splen and the lyuer, Boyle this herbe in wyne or water, and gyue it to the pacyent to drynke. Also seth it in oyle & wyne, and play­ster it to the share, and it wyll helpe the stran­gulion or the flyxe. Also the same playster is good for hardenes of the splen, it molyfyeth that. Also agaynst the colde humours of the spyrytuall membres, gyue hym to drynke water with barly, and this herbe soden togyther, and yf it be a feruent colde humour, then seth the barly and the herbe in wyne, and gyue it to the pacyent to drynke with lycoryce.

¶ Petrocilium.

PEtrocilium, this is called persley, this is hote & moyst in the thyrde degre. ¶ The vertue is it multyplyeth greatly mans blode and doth away the tysyke. It helpeth wel to dystroy the Feuer tertian. It is good for the syde and the dropsye. It comforteth the herte and the stomacke. And it is good in potage, and to stoppe chekyns.

¶ Peritorium.

PEritorium, this herbe is called Peritory, and it is hote and drye. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is thus, yf a man haue an euyl sto­macke or elles akynge within hym, take this herbe and seth it in thy potage, and ete therof and thou shal do wel. Also this herbe is good to hele one of ye stone, yf he be bathed with it.

¶ Plastinaca.

PLastinaca, this is called a Pasnep, it is hote & moyste in the seconde degre, there be two maner of Pasneppes, the one is the Pasnep of the gardayne, and the other is the wylde Pasneppe, they be more vsed to meate than to medycyne. ¶ The vertue is to gendre thycke blode & moche, wherfore it styrreth the lust of the body yf it be moche vsed, therfore it is good for a man that is newly recouered out of his great syckenes to vse to eate of it a whyle. Also they be good to be eten rawe, or [Page] soden for the melancoly humours grene and not drye. To make a syrope to styrre the luste of the bodye, & for to comforte the degestion, take rotes of Pas;neppes, and seth them well in water, than take them out and caste away the water, and the rotes that be in gobettes boyle them agayne in water, than put therto hōny well claryfyed, and let them boyle vnto the thyckenes of hōny, and cōtynually styrre it that it cleue not to the vessell and in the my­dle of the boylynge, put in Almondes yf ye haue theym, and in the ende of the boylynge put in Gynger, Galyngale, and a lytel Pe­per, Nutmeg, and other swete sauoured spy­ces. Also Pasneppes maye be sowen in De­cembre, Ianuary, and Marche, in fat groūde and depe doluen, and lose grounde, and best dygged, and they be somwhat wyndy, boyle them in two waters, but cast away the fyrste water. Also there is a Pasney yt is somwhat red, the whiche may be eaten both rawe and soden, & with them and Nauewes togyther ye maye make a very good meate, and fayre and red in colour, the which be soden as Pas­neppes be.

¶ Plantago.

PLantago, this is called Playntayne, it is colde and drye in the seconde degre.

¶ The vertue is this, for hedache take Plantayne and bynde it aboute thy necke, and the ache shal go out of the heed. Also for diseases in the body, seth this herbe in good lycoure in what ye wyl, and vse to drynke it, and it shal clense the mawe, & the other inwardes. Also for hym that bledeth at the nose, gyue hym to drynke the ioyce of it, and it shall sease lyght­ly. Also yf yt the body of any man be wexen harde, stamp this herbe with grece and make a playster of it, and lay it on the hardnes, and lyghtly it shalbe softe and make it hole. Also for bytynge of a serpent, take this herbe and drynke it with wyne. Also for the dysease in the mouth, take the ioyce of this herbe, & hol­de it longe in thy mouth, and ete the leues of this herbe. For hym that may not well pysse, sethe this herbe and drynke it. Also for a rot­ten humour in the brest, and aboute the herte, take the ioyce of this herbe ye wayght of .x. d. and medle it with hōny, and gyue hym to ete a sponefull at one tyme, and that shal spurge the brest. For ache ī fete, take this herbe with vynegre, and drynke it. Also it heleth woundes, and clenseth the fylthe out of woundes. Also it swageth rankelynge, and stauncheth the mencions both with drynke & with play­sters made with powdre of Armonyake, and [Page] of sankdragone, & barly mele, with the white of egges made in a playster, and layde to the sore. For the canker and the payne in the gū ­mes, take the ioyce therof and medle it with hōny and vynegre, and powdre of Alume, and that shall slee the Canker in the mouthe. Also for the feuers stamp thre rotes of Plan­tayne, and tempre it with water, and gyue it hym to drynke that hath the Feuers, and he shal be hole. For the Iaundes stampe Plan­tayne and Letuse togyther, and tempre them with vynegre, & make a playster therof, and lay it to the ryght syde, and vse it tyll thou be hole, & it is good for the bytyng of an adder, drynke the ioyce of it, and lay the substaunce of the herbe to the sore. For the same hange the rote of plantayne aboute the necke of the pacyēt, and meruaylously it helpeth. For the potagre, and for the dysease in the synowes, stamp the leues of it with a lytel salt, & play­ster it well therto, & meruaylously it helpeth.

¶ Porrum.

POrrū, this is called a leke, it is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, it desyreth lose grounde and fat, & well donged, in that they shal best profyte in hote places and temperat, they may be sowen in Decembre in temperet places, and colde. They may be sowen in Ianuary, [Page] February & Marche, whan the grounde is well dygged and dyght, and it maye be sowen by it selfe, or medled with other sedes of herbes in good fat grounde well dygged, and tourned aboue it with good donge, this sede wolde be sowen somwhat thycke, & whē they be somwhat spronge, take vp the great­test lekes, & plante them in forowes, but take away none of theyr rotes when ye set them in the forowes, but when ye set them with a dybble cut awaye the rotes almoste vp to the leke heed, and cut away the vppermost of the leues, they may be planted in Iuly, August, Septembre, and Octobre, they be moche profytable in Marche, and in Apryll next folo­wyng, but in your plantyng you shall not se­ke after fat soft grounde, for menely groūde that is best, and that grounde that is almoste drye is best, there is two maner of settyng of Lekes, one is in forowes as is the maner in Bonony, & the forowe muste be fro the other a spāne large, and the lekes must be set in the forowe .iiii. fyngers brede eche fro other, and when ye make the next forowe cast the earth on the lekes, and trede it downe softely with thy fote. The seconde maner is thus, when the grounde is well dygged and raked, then make holes with a great dybble, & euery hole [Page] fro other a large spanne and more, in whiche the lekes must be set in, but fyl not thy holes, nor put earth on them, but let them be voyde. iii. wekes, when wedes grow amonge them pul them vp, and kepe them clene fro wedes. Dyuers Auctours saye that the lekes that be thus planted be better then any other, or they may wellbe planted amonge great onyons, and when the onyons be taken away, wede the lekes and you shall fynde them fayre and good, and when ye plucke vp leue some in a place, leue some for sede, the whiche sede may be kept thre yeare, and it be hanged vp in the hulles, lekes be best soden, or thre tymes was­shed before they be eaten. ¶ The vertue is for a wounde, take lekes & stamp them wel with hōny, and laye it to the wounde, and it wyll hele it. For the coughe take the ioyce of lekes and vse to drynke it. For the same, take the ioyce of Lekes, and medle it with womans mylke, and vse to drynke it, and it wyll clen­se the longes of all vyces.

¶ Fracturas solidat: duritas (que) relaxat
Vulnus (que) appositum: cito cum sale claudit.

¶ Piretrum.

PIretrum, this is called Pelleter, it is ho­te and drye in the thyrde degre, the rote is vsed in medycynes, fyue yeare he maye be [Page] kepte in his vertue, and knowe ye well that his sharpnes is not knowen anone, it shulde be puned & holden in the mouthe. ¶ The ver­tue is of losyng, and drawynge, and of con­sumynge. To make a gargarysme, take pel­leter and fygges, and boyle them in vynegre or in swete wyne, and it wyll clense the bray­ne of superfluyte of flewme. Also yf it be chewed in the mouthe, it helpeth the palsy in the tongue. Also for the palsy and ye potagre, stampe it and sethe it in wyne and oyle, and playster it to the greuaunce, this playster helpeth moche therfore, yf thou may haue grene pelyter stamp it, and lay it sokynge in wyne xv. dayes, and after boyle it wel and put ther to wexe & oyle, for this is the best oyntement for all the foresayde dyseases.

¶ Papauer.

PApauer, this is called Popy, it is colde and dry. There is two maners of them, the wyte Popy is colde and moyste, and it is good to cause one to slepe, ye sede therof well gathered may be kept .x. yeare. ¶ The vertue is of clensyng, it is put in medycynes with a determynacyon as the sede maye be receyued of whyte Popy or blacke. For to prouoke a slepe, make a playster of eche of them, or one of them with womans mylke, and the whyte [Page] an egge, and laye it to the temples. The wo­men of Salerne gaue to yonge chyldren the Popy, but they wolde gyue theym no blacke Popy, for it made them moch heuy. Also for a hote postume in the begynnynge, & for cha­fynge of the lyuer, take the sede of whyte Popy, or els the herbe of it, and stamp it & medle it with oyle of Roses, and playster it to the greuaūce. Also for drynes in feuer etyke and in other feuers, take and het [...] oyle of vyolet medled with powder of Popy sede, & anoynt the small of the backe therwith.

¶ Polipodium.

POlipodium, this is called Polypodye, it is hote in the thyrde degre, and dry in the secōde degre. This Polypody is a ferne that groweth vpon okes, or on walles, or stones, but the Polypody that groweth on Okes is the best, gather the rotes of it and lay it a day in the sōne, chose that is grene, and that whi­che appereth dry, whan it is broken it is to be refused. ¶ The vertue is of dyssoluynge, of drawyng, of purgynge flewme, and specyal­ly of melancoly, wherfore cōmonly he is put in boylyng, and to flewmatyk, and melancolyous hole men, he is gyuen to preserue theyr helth, and know well that in the boylynge of Polypody shuld be put in some thynge to exclude [Page] and put out ventuosyte as Anyse sede, Fenel sede, for they exclude out moche wyn­de, and vnbyndeth humours. Also for the co­tydyan, and for Illica passio, and to kepe a mans helth, do thus stamp halfe an ounce of Polipody or an ounce, yf ye wyl haue it mo­che laxatyue, than boyle it with prunes and vyolettes in fenell water or anyse, in a great quantyte, than strayne it and gyue it the pa­cyent at euenyng & at mornyng. Also stamp it & seth it in water with fenell sede, & make a good brothe therof with a Chekyn therin, with swete sauoured spyces, and gyue the pacyent to eate. Also make a drynke therof af­ter this maner, stamp it and boyle it in wyne and after put more wyne therto, & so make vp your drynke with swete sauoured spyces.

¶ Pienium.

PIenium, this is called Pyeny, it is hote and drye in the seconde degre, so sayeth Ypocras and Galien the good phylosophers say that the rote therof goth to dyuers medy­cynes, and it wyl last .x. yere, and it is colde. ¶ The vertue is good for the palsy, drye the rote and drynke powdre with Caster soden in wyne. Also the same is good for the stone. Also yf a man be costyue and may not go to draught, take and strawe the powdre therof [Page] on cotton, and put in to his fundement, and drynke the powder in whyte wyne. Also for a man or woman that hath the fallyng euyll, ete it and drynke it in wyne. Also hange the rote aboute his necke, and it wyll saue hym without doubt within .xv. dayes. Also it hel­peth the sores in the mouth. Also yf thou seth it in wyne, it helpeth the splen. Also drynke Pyeny with water and hōny, and do therto powdre of Colyandre, and this is good for the stomacke, for the mylt, & for grauel in the raynes. Also it is good for womē for dyuers dyseases, and seth it in whyte wyne, and gy­ue a woman to drynke therof, & it wyll hele here blader, and make here to pysse the stone, and it wyl hele her of the matry [...]. Also Pye­ny sede whan it is blacke, it maketh delyue­raunce of the bed of the chylde in her wombe, and at euery tyme when she shall vse to drynke it, she must drynke .xv. sedes at one tyme.

¶ The .xv. letter begynneth with .Q.

¶ Quinquefolio.

QVinquefolio, this is called Quynckefoyle, it is colde & drye in the secōde degre, this herbe is good for ache in a mans lymbes and for ache of the heed, mouth, tongue, and [Page] throte that is sore, take and seth this herbe in wyne, and gyue the pacient to drynke therof thre dayes fyrste and last, and he shal be hole. Also stamp it and drynke ye ioyce of it in ale, and it wyll seace the akynge and gnawynge of a man or woman. Also yf a man blede so­re at the nose gyue hym to drynke the ioyce of it with wyne, and anoynt his heed well with the ioyce of this herbe, & anone the blode shall staunche. For to slee a canker, seth it in wyne with the grece of a swyne, and make a play­ster therof, and lay it on the canker, & it shall slee it. Also take powdre of Quynckefoyle, and medle it with hōnyl and therwith rubbe thy mouth, tongue, throte, & the chekes with in, and it wyl spurge it wel. Also for poyson or bytyng of a serpēt, take ye ioyce of quynck­foyle, and drynke it with wyne, and meruey­lously it resysteth venym.

¶ The .xvi. letter begynneth with .R.

¶ Rybbeworte.

RYbbeworte is an herbe that groweth in gardaynes. ¶ The vertue is good for ye feuer quartayne, take the ioyce of this herbe, and drynke it two houres before that ye thynke ye dysease [Page] shal come to you, and by the grace of God it shall go fro you. For them that here not well, put in to theyr eres the ioyce, and yf there be any rotten humours it wyll drye them.

¶ Rednetle.

REdnetle is called a palyfe of ye grekes, it is hote of vertue, for it brēneth them that touche it. ¶ The vertue is good for the Iaundes yf it be soden in wyne and dronke, it clenseth the colour meruaylously. For the olde coughe seth thesedes in water, and put honny therto, and drynke it, and it wyll hele the coughe, and take away the coldnes of the lunges, and swellyng of the bely. Also vyne­gre that the sede of netels is soden in is good agaynst scurfe in the heade, yf the heade be wasshed therwith .ii. or .iii. tymes, and then rynsed with fayre water.

¶ Rosa.

ROsa, this is called red Rose, it is colde in the fyrste degre, & dry in the seconde degre, drye Roses and grene roses be vsed in medicynes, and of grene roses be made many confeccyons. Also drye roses be put in medy­cynes, when a receyte of Roses is made, for they be soone made ī powdre, of roses is ma­de mell roset, sugre roset, syrop of roses, a lec­tuary of roses, water of roses, and oyle of ro­ses. [Page] Melroset is made thus, take fayre pury­fyed hōny, & new red roses, the whyte endes of them clyped a way, then chop them small, and put them in to the hōny, and boyle them menely togither, to knowe when it is boyled ynoughe, ye shal know it by the swete odour and the colour rufe, fyue yere he may be kept in his vertue. ¶ The vertue of the roses be of comfortynge, and by the hōny he hath vertue of clensyng. In wynter and in sōmer it may be gyuen competently to feble, sycke, fluma­tyke, melancolye, and coloryke people. Also Mulsa is made of water and mele roset, and it may be gyuen after the thyrde daye that it cōmeth out of the bathe. For to clense the sto­macke of colde humour, gyue hym melroset with water that fenell sede is boyled in put­tynge therin .iii. graynes of salt, yf the sycke may take it, this shuld be the quantyte of Roses and honny. In .vii. pounde of hōny put a pounde of roses. Sugre roset is made thus, take newe gathered Roses, and stampe them ryght small with sugre, than put it in a glasse and .xxx. dayes let it stande in the sōne, and styrre it well and medle it well togyther, and so it may be kept thre yere in his vertue. The quantyte of sugre and Roses shulde be thus in .iiii. pounde of sugre a pounde of Roses, he [Page] hath vertue of constraynynge, and comfor­tynge of the fluxe in the wombe, take sugre roset and powder of mastyke, of euery one a dragma, and medse them wel togyther and gyue it to the sycke, after that gyue hym rose water that Mastyke and cloues be soden in. Syrop of Roses is made thus, some do take roses dyght as it is beforesayde, & boyle them in water, and ī that water strayned they put sugre and make a syrope therof, and some do make it better, for they put Roses in a vessell hauynge a strayght mouthe, and they put to the roses hote water, and they let it stande a day and a nyght, and of that water puttyng to it sugre they make syrop, and some do put more of roses in the foresayd vessel, and more of hote water, & let it stande as is beforsayd, and so they make a red water, and make ther of a syrope, and some do stampe newe roses, and they strayne out ye ioyce of it, and sugre therwith they make syrope, & this is the best makynge of syrope, and knowe well that sy­rope made of fresshe & newe roses, som what meanely they be laxe, in the ende they bynde, but syrope made of drye roses, fyrste and last they bynde. Syrope of Roses hath vertue of comfortynge, and constraynyng agaynst the fluxe of the wombe, and he vomyte gyue it [Page] hym with rayne water, or with Rose water in a feuer. After lettynge of blode, gyue it to hym with colde water. Also the same for the syncopyne. Oyle of roses is made thus, some boyle roses in oyle and kepe it. Some do fyll a glasse with roses and oyle, and they boyle it in a cawdron ful of water, and this oyle is good. Some stampe fresshe roses with oyle, and they put it in a vessel of glasse, and set it in the sonne .l. dayes, and this oyle is good a­gaynst chafynge of the lyuer, yf it be anoyn­ted therwith. Also it is good for the dysease in the heade that cōmeth of hete, anoynte the forheed, and the temples with oyle of roses, the water of roses hath vertue of comfortyn­ge, and constraynynge agaynst the fluxe of the wombe, and vomyte. Also gyue hym rose water to drynke, or elles Rose water boyled with Mastyke and cloues, it is best agaynst the fluxe and feblenes of vertue yf it come of a fluxe by a sharpe medycyne. Also rose wa­ter is good for the syncopyne, and the cardyacle, gyue it hym to drynke, and spryncle the water on his face, and the water is good for iyes, and in oyntementes for the face, for it taketh away the wembes and the superfluite and strayneth the skynne. Also dry roses put to the nose to smell, do comforte the brayne, [Page] and herte, and quencheth the spyryte. Also agaynst the fluxe of the wombe, and colour, gyue hym roses boyled in rayne water. Also a playster made of Roses, and the whyte of egges and vynegre, & dyp a sponge in it, and lay it on thy mouth of the stomacke, agaynst the Syncopyne, gyue hym to drynke water that Roses haue be boyled in, and gyue hym powdre of roses in a rere egge, to make oyle of roses, take .ii. pounde of oyle, and a poūde and an halfe of roses, and put all in a glasse, and put the glasse in a cawderon full of wa­ter, and hange it therin, and boyle it tyll the thyrde parte be wasted, and after strayne it throughe a lynen clothe, and kepe it for your vse, for this oyle is losynge, and serueth for many thynges. Some do put Rose water in a glasse, and they put Roses with theyr dewe therto, and they make it to boyle in water, then they set it in the sōne tyll it be red, & this water is best, this hath vertue of comfortyn­ge, and constraynynge, and for the fluxe of the wombe, and agaynst vomyte.

¶ Rosemary.

ROsemarye is an herbe that is hote and drye. ¶ The vertue is good agaynst al euylles in the body, take the flowers and put them in a lynnen clothe, and so boyle them in [Page] fayre clene water to the halfe, & coole it and drynke it. Take the flowers and make pow­dre therof, and bynde it to the ryght arme in a lynen cloth, and it shall make the lyght and mery. Also ete the flowers with hōny fastyn­ge with sowre brede, and there shal ryse in the none euyll swellynges. Also take ye flowers, and put them in a chest amonge your clothes or amonge bokes, and mothes shall not hurte them, boyle the flowers in gotes mylke, and than lette them stande all a nyghte vnder the ayre fayre couered, & after that gyue hym to drynke therof that hath the tysyke, & it shall delyuer hym. Boyle ye leues in whyte wyne, and wasshe thy face therwith, thy berde, and thy browes, and there shall no cornes growe out, but thou shall haue a fayre face, put the leues vnder thy beddes heed, and thou shal be delyuered of all euyl dremes. Breke the leues small to powdre, and laye them on a canker, and it shall slee it. Take the leues & put them in to a vessell of wyne, and it shall preserue it fro tartnes and euyl sauour, and yf thou sell that wyne, thou shall haue good lucke in the sale. yf thou be feble with vnkyndly swete, take and boyle the leues in clene water, and whan the water is colde, do therto as moche of whyte wyne, and thē make therin soppes, [Page] and eate well therof, and thou shalte recouer appetyte. Yf thou haue the fluxe, boyle the le­ues in stronge aysell, and bynde them in a ly­nen clothe, and bynde it to thy wombe, and anone the fluxe shall withdrawe. Yf thy leg­ges be blowen with the goute, boyle the leues in water, and then take the leues and bynde them in a lynen cloth about thy legges, and it shall do the good. Take the leues and boyle them in stronge Aysell, and bynde them in a cloth to thy stomacke, and it shall delyuer the of all euyls. Yf thou haue the coughe, drynke the water of ye leues boyled in whyte wyne, and it wyll hele the. Take the rynde of Rose­mary, and make powdre therof, and drynke it for the pose, and it shal helpe the. Take the tymbre therof, and brene it to cooles, & make powdre therof, and thē put it in a lynen cloth and rubbe thy tethe therwith, and yf there be any wormes therin it shal slee them, and kepe thy teth from all euyls. Also make the a boxe of the woode and smell to it, and it shall pre­serue thy youth. Also put therof in thy dores, or in thy house, and thou shal be without daū ­ger of adders and other venymous serpētes, make the a barell therof, and drynke thou of the drynke that standeth therin, & thou nedes to fere no poyson that shall hurte the. And yf [Page] thou set it in thy gardayne, kepe it honestly, for it is moche profytable. Also yf a man ha­ue lost his smellyng of the ayre, or els he may not drawe his breth, make a fyre of ye wode, and take his breth therwith, and gyue it hym to eate, and he shallbe hole.

¶ Ruta.

RVta, this is called Rewe, this is hote and dry in the seconde degre, the leues and the sedes be vsed in medicynes, the sedes may be kepte. x. yeare, and the leues a yeare. ¶ The vertue is of purgynge, dyssoluynge, and consumynge. For the heedache, take the ioyce of rewe, and hete it, and put it in to his nose thyrlles, for it spurgeth out flewme and clenseth the brayne, the ioyce soden with wy­ne is good for ye same. For feblenes of syght, put rewe in a pot with ale, and let the pacy­ent vse to drynke of it. For stoppynge of the splen and lyuer, the strangury and the fluxe, seth Rewe in wyne with rotes of Fenell, or powdre of rewe with the ioyce of Fenel and drynke it warme. Also for an ache or fretyn­ge, stamp rewe with powdre of cōmyn, and playster it to the greuaunce. Also agaynst venym, drynke the ioyce of rewe. For bytynge of a venymous best or worme, playster rewe to the bytynge. For feble iye syght, styll wa­ter [Page] of rewe and roses togyther, and put ther­of in your iyes. Also an oyntement for sore iyes, stampe rewe and fenell togyther of eche lyke moche by weyght, and medle them with hōny and Eufrose, & it is a good oyntement for sore iyes. Take Rewe, Comyn, and Pe­per, of eche a lyke moche by weyght, & gryn­de them smal togyther, and medle them with hōny and vynegre, and it is good for ye ache in the brest, and in the raynes.

¶ The .xvii. letter begynneth with .S.

¶ Sinapium.

SInapium, it is called Mustarde, it is hote and drye in the mydle of the .iiii. degre, & not the herbe but the sede is put in me­dycynes. Fyue yeare he may be kept ī his vertue. ¶ The vertue is of losynge, of drawynge, of makynge thyn, and of consumynge. For the palsye of the tongue, take and chewe the sede in your mouth, & holde it vnder the tongue, and it shal do you good. Also for the palsy in other mēbres, seth the sede in wyne, and laye it to the sore place, and it is best in the begyn­nynge of the dysease. Also take the powdre [Page] of it, and put it in to your nose thyrlles, and it wyll make you to nese, and it clenseth the brayne, and superfluyte of flume. Also seth it in wyne and fygges, and holde it warme in your mouth tyll it be almoste colde, then take as moche more, & do so. v. or. vi. tymes a day, & as moche another day, and this is good for an olde pose of toughe and flumy humour in the heed. Also for stoppynge of the splen and the lyuer, seth the sede in water with rotes of fenell, then strayne it, and put therto honny, and gyue it to the sycke to drynke. For hard­nes of the splen, seth the herbe of it in wyne, and playster it to the greuaunce. For to rype and breke a postume, stampe this herbe well with hogges grece, and lay it to the postume. Also for the strangury, take this herbe, and sethe it in oyle and wyne, and playster it to the greuaunce, and it wyl lose it. Also for the Ciatica, and for olde sores, take mustarde se­de, and the thyrde parte of crōmes of whyte breade, and fygges, hōny, and vynegre, after as the ache of the sore requyreth, the more of the fygges and honny, that is there the more sharper is the strength of the sede, and ye more breade and vynegre that is in it, the more weker is the sede, but I say not that ye shall put this confeccyon to all sores, but to great and [Page] olde sores, his vertue is yf he be eaten, it shar­peth a mans wyt, it clenseth ye bely, it breketh the stone, it purgeth the vryne, menstruosyte and comforteth the stomacke.

¶ Smalage.

SMalage is an herbe that groweth in gardaynes, it is hote and drye in the begyn­nynge of the thyrde degre, & drye in the myd­des of ye same. ¶ The vertue is good for col­de and wicked humours in the stomacke, and comforteth the stomacke, the lyuer, and the lunges, & it is good for woundes, take Sma­lage sede, rew sede, Peper, and salt, & grynde them well togyther, and tempre theym with wyne and drynke it. For ranklynges and to cease the brennynge and akynge, & to brynge them to theyr kynde agayne. Also it is good to drynke for the feuer tercyan.

¶ Saluia.

SAluia is called Sage, & it is hote in the fyrste degre, and drye in the seconde de­gre, the leues onely be taken in medycynes, both grene and drye, he may be kept a yeare. There be two maner of Sages, the garday­ne and the wylde Sage, yf thou wyll haue Sage for medycynes, take the leues of gar­dayne Sage. ¶ The vertue is it consumeth more, & comforteth more then the other doth. [Page] For the palsy seth the leues of Sage ī wyne, and vse to drynke it, for the same seth ye leues in wyne, & playster it to the greuaunce. Also it is good to put in sauce, for the strangury, the flux, and the matryce it clenseth, seth the leues in water, and let the pacient syt ouer it, and receyue the hote fume of it, and it shal do hym moche good. Also it is good for venym or poyson, seth Sage in ale or wyne, and vse to drynke it .iii. dayes, and thou shall be hole by the grace of god. For the stomacke drynke the ioyce of sage with water and honny, and it is good to clense a mans body to vse it both rype and grene, it wyll make a mānes body clene, therfore who that vseth to eate of this herbe or drynke it, it is mernayle that any in­conuenyent shulde greue them that vse it. Yf ye haue an ytchynge on you, wasshe it well with the ioyce of this herbe, and it shall slee the ytchyng. Also drynke Sage with wyne, and a lytell wormwode, and it shall cease the ache vnder the sydes, the wombe, and the sto­macke, it is good for the palsy and dropsy.

¶ Satureia.

SAtureia is called Sauery, it is hote and drye in the .iiii. degree. ¶ The vertue of this is it purgeth the body, seth it in wyne or water and drynke it, & it purgeth the raynes, [Page] the bladder, the menstruosyte in the bowels, it purgeth the lūges & loseth great humours, and compelleth and putteth hym our by the mouth by spyttynge, therfore he is brennyn­ge & styrreth hym that vseth lechery, therfore it is forbyd to vse it moche in meates. Soke it in vynegre or wyne, and drynke it, and it shall make the haue a meke stomacke. Also when it flowreth, it shulde be gathered and dryed, & powdre made therof. Also take the powdre of Sauery, and boyle it with clary­fyed hōny, and vse to eate therof, or boyle it in wyne and drynke it, & it wyll lose toughe flewme in the breste. Also for fretynge in the bely drynke powdre of it in warme wyne, & thou shal be hole. Also yf ye take the lesse Sauery, it hath the same vertue & strengthe that the other Sauery hath. Also make grewell with water and flower, and powdre of Sa­uery, and ete therof, and that shall clense all the spyrytuall membres of a man.

¶ Saxfrage.

SAxfrage is hote and drye in the thyrde degre. ¶ The vertue is good for ye stone, seth the rote of it in wyne, and drynke it. Al­so it is good for the dysease of colyke and the strangury, & the powdre of it be eaten with an egge, it is good for the same. It maye be [Page] kept in his vertue. iii. yeare.

¶ Scabiosa.

SCabiosa is called Scabias, it is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, to dry it there is no profyte in it. ¶ The vertue is good for the scabbes, take the ioyce of it, vynegre, & oyle, and boyle them togither tyl they wax thycke and kepe it for it is good for scabbes. For the Emerawdes seth them in water, thē syt ouer it, and take the fume of it and vse it, and thou shall be hole. Stampe it and seth it in wyne, and the drynke is good to dystroye humours in the stomacke, and drynke it euery daye fa­stynge with Eurose, and thou shall be hole, and thou shal neuer haue the Pestylence bre­dynge within ye whyle thou do vse it. For the lyuer stamp it & seth it in wyne, & drynke it.

¶ Sothernwood.

SOthernwood is an herbe that groweth in the felde. ¶ The vertue of it is good for the coughe, and for byndynge in the bely, and in the brest, and for dysease in the bones, and good for them that maye not well pysse, take the sede of this herbe and stamp it, and drynke it with water, and it is good for all the aforesayd. Also for the dyseases in the sy­de, stampe this herbe with betayne & drynke it, and it helpeth well. Also for the bytynge [Page] of a serpent, and for venym, stamp this herbe and drynke it with wyne, and it is good. Al­so for the colde feuer, stampe this herbe with wyne, and drynke it, and thou shall be hole.

¶ Syngrene.

SYngrene is colde and moyst in the .iii. degre. ¶ The vertue of this herbe, & also the ioyce of the same herbe is ne­cessary for many dyseases, stampe this herbe with grece and playster it to the dysease, and meruaylously it helpeth. For dyseases & dar­kenes of the iyes, stampe this herbe and put of the ioyce in the sore iyes. For chafynge of the lyner, take the ioyce of it & vynegre, and dyp a clothe therin, and playster it to the gre­uaunce. For bytynge or scaldynge, make an oyntment of the ioyce of this herbe, and oyle of roses and waxe, but lay it not to tyll after the thre fyrste dayes, but fyrst anoynt it with grece and suche other. Also for a dysease of a hote cause, this is good to be layde therto.

¶ Stytche worte.

STytche worte or byrdestonge, this is hote and moyste in the fyrste degre. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is this, it is good to hele stytches, woundes, and also the sore iyes.

¶ Scamony.

SCamony is hote and drye in the .iii. degre, the leues onely be best in medy­cynes, it may be kept a yere in his vertue or two for nede. ¶ The vertue is good for the disease in the stomacke, boyle the leues of it in wyne, and drynke it. Also the aforesayd drynke is good for the bely. For the strangu­ry and flux, also a stewe made with boylyn­ge of it in water or wyne, is good for the fore sayd, yf it be boyled in oyle, and playster it to the same aforesayd, it is better.

¶ Sene.

SEne is hote and drye in the .iiii. degre it groweth on the other syde the see, and moste about Babilon, the best be the flowers and the braunches of it. ¶ The vertue is good for many dyseases, as the fal­lynge euyll, for the synecop, for the splen, for the Emerawdes, & for the quartayne, syrope made of it boyled in water, and sugre is good for all the aforesayde, syrope made with the ioyce of Borage is good for the aforesayde. Also Dyascorides cōmaundeth to make Ex­mell of the aforesayde with boylyng of vyne­gre and hōny, & it wyll be good for the afore­sayd. And this herbe may be kept .x. yeare in his strength and vertue.

¶ Selondyne.

SElondyne is hote and drye in the .iiii. degre, & Galyen sayth that it is good for sore iyes. ¶ The vertue is good for sore iyes, take the ioyce of selondyne, & ye rote boyle it well togyther in a pāne, & when it is colde anoynt thy iyes therwith. Take selondyne and wryng out the ioyce, and medle it with whyte wyne, and anoynt thy vysage therwith, and it shall do away frakles of the vysage. The ioyce of selondyne & gotes don­ge medled togyther small in a morter, then yf thou lay it to a canker in a womans pappe, it shall slee the canker. Also take the ioyce of selondyne, and powdre of brym stone, and medle them well togyther, and it wyll helpe to do awaye the morfewe, & seth the rote in wy­ne, and when the pot is taken down, let hym holde his mouthe open ouer it, that the brethe may go in to his body, and that shall slee the canker in the mouthe, it is good for hym that hath dronken venym with his owne stale, and that wyll saue hym.

¶ Sauayne.

SAuayne is hote and drye in the seconde degre. ¶ The vertue is good to slee wor­mes in the wombe, and to brynge them out yf it be soden in wyne, and gyue to the pacyent to drynke. It is good with butter or grece to [Page] make an oyntment for the scabbe that rēneth to hele it and drye it vp, and it is good for the hedache, yf it be stamped and tempered with vynegre, & make a playster therof, and lay it to thy temples & vpon the molde of thy heed.

¶ Scabiose.

SCabiose is colde and moyste in the .ii. de­gre. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is good for the lyuer, stampe it and sethe it in wyne. And it wyll dystroy wycked humours in the stomacke, and drynke it euery daye fastynge with Eurose, and thou shall▪ neuer haue po­stume bredynge within the, as longe as thou dost vse this medycyne.

¶ The .xviii. lettre begynneth with .T.

¶ Townecresses.

TOwnecresses, is hote and drye in the thyrde degre, the se­de wyll endure good .v. yeare. ¶ The vertue is good to staū ­che the flux and the mensyon, yf thou take the sede and brose it in a morter of brasse, and gyue the sycke to drynke therof thre dayes euery day a peny wayght at ones with red wyne warmed, & in these .iii. dayes he shal be staunched, or els he shall dye of that euyll, it is good for the palsy, and for the ma­leflanke, [Page] take the sede and seth it with wyne and do it in a poket, and bynde it to the syde there as the greuaunce is. Also it is good for hym that maye not pysse, take the sede & seth it in wyne and oyle Olyue, & bynde it to thy share. It is good for a mans fundament that goeth out, yf it be taken of colde, then it must be put in agayne, and strawe the powdre on the foundement, thy raynes with hōny, and then strawe the powdre aboue with the pow­dre of Comen, or powdre of Calafine, for all these be kyndly for it. Also take the stalkes of Townecresses, and bren them, and there shal no venymous beest, ne worme abyde the sa­uour, nor smell therof, but he shall dye or els flye awaye.

¶ Tapsubarbesto.

TApsubarbesto is called Melon, it is colde and drye. ¶ The vertue of it is good for the Emerawdes, and it be soden in wyne and scōmed clene. Also it is good to wasshe the greuaunce therwith. It is good also for the fluxe in the belye. To prouoke vomyte, take two dragmes of the powdre of the rote of Melon, and drynke it in wyne, and it wyl prouoke vomyte. Also the sedes prouoketh vryne and causeth the to pysse, and clenseth the raynes & the bladder of grauell & stones.

¶ The .xix. letter begynneth with .V.

¶ Vyolet.

VYolet is colde in ye fyrste degre, and moyste in the se­conde. ¶ The vertue of it is good for a blast in ye iyes, take the rotes of vyolettes, and stampe thē with myrre and saffron, & at nyght lay it to the sore iyes. Also for a wounde in the heade, stamp the le­ues of Vyolettes with honny and vynegre, and playster it to the woūde, and it shall hele it. Also for them that may not slepe for sycke­nes, sethe this herbe in water, and at euen let hym soke well his fete in the water to the an­cles, when he goth to bed, bynde of this herbe to his temples, and he shall slepe well by the grace of Gad. Take Vyolettes, Myrre, and Saffron, and make a playster, and laye it to the sore iyes that be swolen, and it shall cease akynge, and bate the swellynge.

¶ Vua suauis.

VVa suauis, this is called the swete ray­syn, it is hote and moyste. ¶ The ver­tue is of clensynge, scowryng, or smothynge. Raysynges eaten or boyled in wyne is good for the colde coughe. Also seth them in wyne and they be good to playster on the colde po­stume, [Page] and also good for the colde stomacke.

¶ Veruayne.

VEruayne, this is hote and drye in the seconde degre. ¶ The vertue is good for all maner of euylles of venym, yf the pacyent drynke it tempred with wyne, and stamp the herbe, and laye it on euery maner of bytynge of venymous beest, and it wyll drawout the venym and saue the sore, who that vseth it, it wyll make good breth, & do away the stynke of the mouth. Also who that hath the Feuer tercyan, take .iii. rotes and .iii. croppes of the same herbe, and stamp them and tempre them with fayre clene water, and gyue it to the pacient to drynke. Also who that hath the feuer quartayn, let hym take the same drynke. Also it is good for the stomacke, the lyuer, and the lunges. Also take Veruayne, Betayne, and Saxfrage, of euery of theym a lyke moche, and stamp them with whyte wyne tempred, and this is good for them that hath the stone. Also they that bere Veruayne vpon theym, they shall haue loue and grace of great may­sters, and they shall also graunte hym his as­kynge, yf that his askyng be good and ryght­full, this herbe is hote and drye.

¶ The .xx. lettre begynneth with .w.

¶ watercresses.

WAtercresses be hote and drye in the seconde degre. ¶ The vertue of this her­be is good yf ye sethe them in water by them selfe, and drynke it, or seth it ī flesshe and sup of the brothe, and it wyll clense well the inwarde mēbres. Also it is good agaynst the strangulyon and the fluxe.

¶ wylde neppe or woodbynde.

WYlde neppe or woodbynde, this herbe be­reth a flower lyke to the hop, & after the flower he bereth a grene bery, & it hath a great roote. ¶ The vertue of this herbe is moste in the rote, it is good for synowes that be shronken, or cut to make them souple, and to haue theyr owne course ī theyr propre kyn­de. Go to ye rote of wylde Neppe, that is lyke woodbynde, & make a hole in the myddes of the rote, then couer it well agayne yt no ayer go out, nor yt no rayne go in, nor water, powdre, nor the sōne come not to moche to it, let it stande so all a nyght and a daye, then after that go to it, and thou shalt fynde therin a certayne lycour, take out yt licour with a spone, and put it in to a clene glasse, and do so euery day as longe as thou fyndest ought in ye hole, [Page] and this must be done in ye moneth of Apryl, or May, thē anoynt the sore with it agaynst the fyre, then wete a lynen clothe in the same lycour, and lap it aboute the sore, and it shal be hole in shorte space on warantyse, by the grace of god. For the gowte a souerayne me­dycyne, take the rote of wylde Nep, and the rote of the wylde docke soden by it selfe, and cut them in thyn peces, and part awaye the vtter rynde, and cutte them in quarters, then boyle them in clene water. ii. or. iii. houres, then stamp them in a morter as small as can be, then putte therto a quantyte of sote of a chymny, and tempre them with the mylke of a kowe that the here is of one colour, then ta­ke the pysse of a man that is fastyng, & make a playster therof, and boyle it togyther, and as hote as ye maye suffre it, laye it to the gre­uaunce a day and a nyght, & so do. ix. tymes, and it shall, hele the on warantyse by the gra­ce of God.

¶ wormwood.

WOrmwood is hote and drye in the se­conde degre. ¶ The vertue is good for wormes in the wombe, yf it be stamped and the ioyce wrong out, and myngled with swete mylke, and gyue to the pacyēt to dryn­ke, and sethe this herbe in wyne, and make a [Page] playster to ye wombe, make powdre of worm wood, Centory, betayne, of eche a lyke moch by wayght, and medle all well togyther, and the powdre wyl slee wormes in the wombe, both when it is eaten in potage and dronken. Also for the mylte that is swollen of a colde mater, seth it in wyne and let the sycke dryn­ke therof, and that shal hele hym, and make a playster of the substaūce of the herbe, and say it all hote to thy wombe agaynst the greuaū ­ce. Also stampe wormwood & tempre it with vynegre, & with tosted sowre breed groūden therwith, & the ioyce of myntes, and the ioyce of plantayne, of eche a lyke moche, and frye them wel togyther, then make a playster and lay it to the mouthe of the stomacke, and this shall staunche brekynge or castyng, For wor­mes in a mans eres be it serpēt or erewygge, take ye ioyce of wormwood, and put it in the ere. Also for the dropsye seth it in wyne, & gy­ue the sycke to drynke at mornynge and at euenynge, and it shall helpe hym.

FINIS.

¶ Hereafter foloweth the vertue of the Oken tree.

IN the Oke be .iiij. thyn­ges besyde the lefe the which be ryghte profytable to the helth of man, that is to wete the Acorne, and the cup that it groweth in, the galles and the lyme. The carnels in powdre be profyta­ble agaynst the feblenes of the vertiuer of re­tentyfe, yt is to say agaynst feblenes of bray­ne, and agaynst the passyō called diabetican, and agaynst the strangurye, and agaynst the sickenes called dissenturian, and agaynst the stone in the raynes, and the bladder, and it is good for them yt may not holde theyr water. The cuppe of the Acornes is good agaynst vomytes of colour, and agaynst nesyng, and it dryeth, & consumeth flewme in the mouth of the stomacke. The gall after the opynyon of Albert, so that they be not greatly holowe be good agaynst the fluxe, and agaynst sly­dynge and slypernes of guttes, and agaynst the flowres of women, and that powdre hel­peth them of many infyrmytyes. &c. ¶ Also by experyence of Gardyners, and planters, the powdre of the gall mynged with honny, perce a hole in a tre, and put it therin, and the fruyte shal be blacke. Nowe with the lyme of the Oke, Physycyons, and Surgyans do [Page] many cures therwith, & of it is made an oyntment for the palsy, and of a mans yarde, and agaynst an infyrmyte called deabetan̄. Also therof is made a syrop for the dropsy that cō ­meth of colde called yposarco, and it consu­meth watery humours. And also men be cu­red by the fruyte of axes quartayne, tercian, and cotidyan. Also in the tre is a thynge gro­wyng, which women knowe by experyence it maketh them hastely to be deliuered of chylde, which dowche men call it Archemsel, and therof is made bedes. ¶ The last conclusyon of this Oken leues, of this leues is distylled a water, whiche healeth all the fluxe of the wombe called dyssentuaryan, lauaryan, and dyaryan. Also it is good for the flowers of women, and for the Emeraudes. Also this lefe in powdre put in the nose, staūcheth the bledynge therof, and spyttyng of blode. Also this lefe is holsome agaynst the ache of the herte, agaynst the epilacion of the lyuer, and of the splen, & agaynst the nesyng, & agaynst the coughe, and the heade ache, and agaynst the ache of the stomacke, & the wynde of the stomacke, and agaynst the colyke, & the ache of the wombe, and the flākes, and it breketh the stone of the raynes, and the bladder, and also women that be colde, it dysposeth them [Page] to be able to conceyue, it is holsome to all maner of creatures of all maner ages, & for all dyseases to be taken at all tymes of ye yere. &c. ¶ wherfore surgyans knowynge the trouthe leyth Oken leues vpon woundes, and that done they nede none other oyntmēt, it heleth all maner of woūdes, the canker, the fystula, and saynt Anthonies fyre, a vayne made in the water of the Oke heleth the dropsy, and all sepournesse. Also who soeuer ones in the weke eteth one of the leues, he shall neuer ha­ue stynkynge breth, nor the toth ache, nor pu­trefaccyon in his gūmes. &c. nor of his eres.

¶ This is the makynge of Aqua vite perfectissima.

TAke the rote of Saxfrage, & Parcely, Alyssaūder, Fenell, Ty­me, ysope, Pynyryall, Rosemary, Laueder, Prymerose, Mynt, Origan, Sauge, Calamynt, Auence, Bittayn, Saueyn, of eche halfe a quartron, Galynga le, blacke Peper, whyte Peper, longe Peper, Cloues, Nutmegges, of eche an ounce, Ca­mel, Maces, Quylybes, of eche two ounces, Setwale, Peletre of spayne, tre of Aloes, of eche an ounce and an halfe, and stamp thyne herbes, and powdre thy spyces, and put them [Page] togyther in the wyne, and let them stande all nyght, & on the morowe dystyl them through a serpentory, this water hath many vertues, and it is better at the fyrste dystyllacyon of the Canon, then at the thyrde distyllacyon of the Serpentorye. &c.

¶ To graffe and plante.

TO graffe fruyte yt they shall haue no core. Take a graffe and bowe it in both endes combyng, and cutte both endes graftwyse, and so fasten them into ye stocke. And yf it growe so with the tre cutte awaye the great ende, and let ye smaller ende growe, and his fruyte shall haue no core ▪ ¶ yf thou wylt graffe dyuers fruytes vpon one stocke, that hath as many braunches as thou wylte haue graffes on, and in euery braunche set a graffe in maner and fourme as it is sayde be­fore, & euermore chose thy graffe on the sōne syde of the tre that bereth it, and next the top yf you may, & then mayst thou graffe dyuers fruytes in one clift, but none of them may be thycker thē other as thy reason wyll tel the in that workyng. ¶ It is to be noted ye graffers saye, that euery tre yt is set on saynt Lambar­des day, shall proue and come to profyte.

¶ Finis.

¶ Here begynneth the table of this present boke.

A.
  • ¶ Agnus castus.
  • Apium.
  • Auctum.
  • Apium risus.
  • Absinthium.
  • Archemesia.
  • Affodillus.
  • Astrologia longa.
  • Abrotanum.
  • Astrologia rotunda.
  • Ameos.
  • Alleluya.
  • Agrimonia.
  • Auancia.
  • Altea.
  • Amarista.
  • Anisum.
  • Alleum.
  • Astarton.
B
  • ¶ Betonia.
  • Balsaminta.
  • Beta.
  • Borago domestices.
  • Bigula.
  • Burneta.
  • Bursa postoris.
C
  • ¶ Camamilla.
  • Calamintum.
  • Crassula maior.
  • Crassula minor.
  • Cituca.
  • Centuaria maior.
  • Centuaria minor.
  • Carin.
  • Celodonia.
  • Cidamum.
  • Causis.
  • Cortandrum.
  • Capillus veneris.
  • Crocus.
  • Centinodium.
  • Caprifolium.
  • Canabaria.
  • Costus.
  • Cepe.
  • Columbina.
  • [Page]Cominum.
  • Cardiaca.
  • Cisera.
  • Camelion.
  • Consolida maior.
  • Consolida minor.
  • Consolida media.
D
  • ¶ Dragancia.
  • Diptanum.
  • Daucus asinius.
  • Daucus creticus.
  • Dens leonis.
  • Dragancia feminea.
E
  • ¶ Elena campana.
  • Endiua.
  • Eruca.
  • Eufragia.
  • Ebulus.
  • Edera.
  • Edera terestris.
  • Eborus.
  • Esabrus.
  • Epatica.
F
  • ¶ Famula.
  • Fumus terre.
  • Fragra.
  • Fabaria maior.
  • Filex.
  • Filipendula.
  • Feniculum.
  • Faxmus.
  • Finiculus porcinus.
  • Febrifuga.
  • Filago.
  • Flammula minor.
G
  • ¶ Granum.
  • Genescula.
  • Genciana.
  • Galanga.
  • Granum solis.
  • Gladiolus.
  • Gracia dei.
  • Gracia dei maior.
H
  • ¶ Herba cruciata.
  • Herba christofori.
  • Herba walteri.
  • Herba Roberti.
  • [Page]Herba martis.
  • Hastula regia.
  • Herba Iohannis.
  • Herba Petri.
I
  • ¶ Iusquiamus.
  • Isopus.
  • Ireose.
  • Iris.
  • Iua.
  • Iacia alba.
  • Iasia nigra.
  • Ippia maior.
  • Ippia minor.
L
  • ¶ Lanesticum.
  • Lingua ceruina.
  • Lilium.
  • Ligustrum.
  • Lingua bouis.
  • Lingua Serpētis ma.
  • Lingua Serpētis mi.
  • Lingua canis.
  • Lingua hircina.
  • Lupinus.
  • Labrum veneris.
  • Lauendula.
  • Lactuca.
  • Lactuca siluatica.
  • Lactuca leporica.
  • Lollium.
  • Laparium rubeum.
  • Linum.
  • Lauriola.
  • Licorisa.
M
  • ¶ Millefolio minor.
  • Mercurialis.
  • Menta.
  • Menta romana.
  • Malua.
  • Morell or nyght sha­dowe.
  • Mastyke.
  • Magerum.
  • Millefolium maior.
  • Motherworte, or
  • Mugworte.
  • Maces.
  • Menta.
N
O
  • ¶ Olibanum.
P
  • ¶ Plumeus.
  • Piper.
  • Pympernell.
  • Pulegium.
  • Pencedamum vel Fe­niculus porcinus.
  • Petrocilium.
  • Peritorium.
  • Plastinaca.
  • Plantago.
  • Porrum.
  • Piretrum.
  • Papauer.
  • Polipodium.
  • Pienium.
Q
  • ¶ Quinquefolio.
R
  • ¶ Rybbeworte.
  • Rednetell.
  • Rosa.
  • Rosemary.
  • Ruta.
S
  • ¶ Sinapium.
  • Smalege.
  • Saluia.
  • Satureia.
  • Saxfrage.
  • Scabiosa.
  • Sothernwood.
  • Syngrene.
  • Stytcheworte.
  • Scamony.
  • Sene.
  • Selyndyne.
  • Sauayne.
  • Scabiose.
T
  • ¶ Townecresses.
  • Tapsubarbesto.
V
  • ¶ Vyolet.
  • Vua suauis.
  • Veruayne.
W
  • ¶ watercresses wylde neppe or woodbynde.
  • wormwood.
  • [Page]¶ The vertue of the Oken tre.
  • ¶ The Oken lefe.
  • ¶ The makynge of Aqua vite perfectissi­ma.
  • ¶ Graffynge & plan­tynge.
¶ Finis Tabule.

¶ Imprynted by me Robert wyer, dwellynge in saynt Martyns pa­rysshe, at the sygne of saynt Iohn̄ Euangelyst, besyde Charynge Crosse.

ROBERT WYER.

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this EEBO-TCP Phase II text, in whole or in part.