The Springs Glory: OR, A precious Posie for Pretty Maidens:

Who walk in the Meadows to hear the Birds sing,
With pleasure rejoycing to welcome the Spring.
The tune is, Monk hath confounded, &c.
[figure]
[figure]
NOw that brigt Phoebus his rays doth display
warm Zephirus blows with a gentler gale,
Nights they grow shorter to lengthen the day,
and Wood-nymphs do trip it ore hill & ore dals:
The Fawnes and the Satyrs
Nimbly cut Capers,
And dance Levaltors round in a ring,
Then let us bear a part
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowry Garlands to welcome the spring.
Flora's fine Tapestry now doth adorn,
the earth with a Livery pleasant to view,
Trees they do blossome which winter had torn,
and meadows are deckt in a very rare hue:
The Fairies are tripping
And Lambs are skipping,
Pretty birbs chirping in the Woods sing:
Then let us bear a part,
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowry garlands to welcome the spring
With sweet smelling flowers ye sence to delight,
the fields are bespangled like stars in ye skies,
With Cowslips and Primroses, yellow & white
and other rare colours to please mortal eies;
The Daffadown-Dilly
Violet and Lilly
And Tulip [...] lovely pleasure do bring
Then let us bear a part,
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowry garlands to welcome the spring.
Harke how the Nightingale tuneth her notes
her tender breast leaning against a sharp thorn
The thrush & ye blackbird with their prety throats
doth chant forth their melody evening & morn:
The Cuckow well Known
In City and Town,
Her constant old tone the sweetly doth sing;
Then let us bear a part
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowry garlands to welcom the spring.

The second Part,

To the same Tune.
[figure]
[figure]
Now pretty maidens delights for to walk
abroad in the meadows so pleasant & gréen
Whilst with their lovers they prattle and talk,
and pick up the flowers so gay to be séen:
Of which they make Posies
In the gréen closes,
Decked with Roses home for so bring:
Then let us bear a part
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowry garlands to welcom the spring.
Pretty sweet Betty walks out with her love,
rejoycing that Summer is drawing so near,
Whilest Dicky dot [...] call her his Turtle Dove
and vows that no other but she is his dear:
Thus with their courting
And lovely sporting
They are consorting whilst the birds sing:
Then let us, &c.
Nanny doth rise in the morning betimes
to meet her beloved all in a fair grove,
Where he is composing of sonnets and rimes,
to set forth her praise and to welcome his love:
Her body is slender
And her heart tender,
He doth commend her for every thing:
Then let us, &c.
Dolly the Dairy maid smugs up her self
and takes up her milk pale to trace in the [...]
In hopes to meet Roger who scorns to be ba [...]
she often hath try'd him and still he prov'd [...]
But oh what a jumbling
And what a tumbling,
All without grumbling love hath his swing
Then let us, &c,
Now is the time that all creatures rejoyce,
by nature they know when y spring doth ap [...]
They lovingly couple and make choice
before the hot Summer approacheth to near
Let us take pleasure
Whilst we have leasure
Least such a pleasure chance to take wing.
Then let us, &c.
Trim up your Arbors and deck up your be [...]
for this is a time to be merry and glad,
Hang up your garlands & strow your sweet fl [...]
and let not a lover once seem to be sad
For we'le go a Maying
With musick playing
Cupid obeying, love is a King:
Then let us bear a part
And with a joyful heart
Deck flowery garlands to welcom the sprin [...]

Licensed according to Order.

I.P.

Pritend for W. Gilbertson,

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