THE Schools-Probation:

OR, RULES AND ORDERS For certain Set-Exercises to bee per­formed by the Scholars on PROBATION-DAIES.

Made and approved by learned men, for the use of Merchant-Tailor's-School in LONDON.

[printer's or publisher's device]

LONDON, Printed by H. L. for WILLIAM DU-GARD, late of Merchant-Tailors, now Master of a Private School in Coleman [...] Street. 1661.

THE ORDERS OF THE School's-Probation:

1. A PROBATION of the whole School shall bee made onely by the Ma­ster of the School and the three Ushers, and at these four times; viz. The first, on the eleventh daie of March; the second, on the eleventh day of June, the third; on the eleventh daie of Sep­tember; the fourth on the eleventh of Decem­ber; not beeing Sundaies. And if any of the said daies happen on the Sundaie, then upon the next daie following.

[Page 2]2. The Master of the School, eight or nine 2 daies before the said Probation-daie, shall admonish all the Scholars of the School, as well them that be absent by messengers, as them that be present, by himself; First, that they prepare all such necessaries as are required on the Probation-daie: Secondly, that they com to the School on the said Probati­on-daie in the morning, at half an hour after six of the clock at the furthest, and so to con­tinue till eleven; and in the afternoon, likewise at half an hour after twelv, and to continue till five.

3. The Master of the School, the daie be­fore 3 the Probation-daie, shall see that every Scholar in the School bee furnished with suf­ficient paper, pens and ink for the next daie's exercise; and also that every one's name, his age, the daie, month, and year of his coming first to School bee written with his own hand on the outside of his paper, or paper book, or on the top of his first page.

4. The Master of the School shall propound 4 to every Form in the School, for four hours in the forenoon, and as many in the afternoon of the Probation-daie, several ex­ercises to be don in writing by every one of them within the set-time hereafter menti­oned.

5. The Master of the School, and the 5 [Page 3] three Ushers, (while the Scholars are doing their work, and during the prescribed time) shall carefully and with a watchfull eie pro­vide, that no Scholar of any Form do prompt or once lean towards his fellow for help, that the Founders may the better know how they proceed▪ by doing of their own act and exer­cise, without any help.

6. The Master of the School and the three 6 Ushers, at th' end of every hour (during the whole daie) shall see that every emptie space, and also the last line of every exercise bee crossed, that afterwards there may bee no adding of any thing, but that the work of every boy do stand to be viewed hereafter as hee of himself did perform it, in that set time; and that the forenoon's work shall bee al­waies taken from the Scholars at their going away by the Ushers, and delivered to the Master, which at one of the clock shall be de­livered to them again, to write the rest of their task.

7. The Master of the School shall not pro­pound 7 to any form the same Dialogue, Epistle, Theme, Sentence, or Vers twice in one year.

8. No Scholar of any Form shall bee 8 urged to write more of the task prescribed within the limited hour, then hee is well able to perform.

9. If any Scholar shall bee found on three 9 [Page 4] several Probation-daies, either by his own negligence, or his friend's will, to bee absent from the School; or having been present, by his over-slender and weak exercises, to bee unapted and unmeet to learn, or els a non­proficient, that then every such Scholar, that so shall be found absent, unapt, or not com­petently profiting, shall bee (according to the Companie's Order, heretofore provided in the like behalf) dismissed the School.

10. The Master of the School, receiving 10 all the Scholar's exercises don by them on the said Probation-daie, shall caus every Form's papers of exercises to bee sowed to­gether into six several volumes or books, every Form apart by it self, and afterwards lay them up in som convenient place appoin­ted thereunto. And hee shall not in any wise diminish any of them, that the succeeding posteritie as well of the Companie as of the School, by comparing their present exercises with them of former times, may see how much and wherein they exceed or com be­hinde them.

11. The Master of the School, within 11 four daies after the said Probation-daie, shall enter into a book, called The Register of the School's-Probation, conteining 400 leavs of large paper, in form of a brief Table or Ka­lendar; First, That the said Trials were per­formed [Page 5] the 11th daie of that present month, according to the Orders prescribed; Second­ly, all the Scholars of the six Forms, every Form by it self, in this order, viz. the name of every boy, as he sitteth in his Form, his age, and time of continuance; Next, what books, and how far in them hee hath read; Lastly, what exercises hee usually make's, with the Schoolmaster and three Usher's own hands subscribed thereunto: which Table or Kalendar thus entred into the said Register the Master of the School, accompanied with one of his Ushers, shal shew to the Master and Wardens, at their Hall, upon the first or se­cond ordinarie Court-daie, next after fol­lowing, the daie of Probation beeing past four daies before, to th' end that, if they so pleas, they may appoint som persons to re­pair to the School, to take knowledg and view of the exercises don by every boy on the said Probation-daie; and also that they themselvs, or som other for them, may pre­sently, or after, when they think best, com­pare the last things registred with the like things registred at former Probations, to see every boy'es continuance either in any Form, or in the School, and other like circumstan­ces there mentioned. And the Master and Wardens, or som one of them shall subscribe to the Register so brought and confirmed [Page 6] under the School-Master and Usher's hands; and also caus to bee entred into their Court­book the daie on which the said Master of the School with one of his Ushers came and presented the same, for testimonie to the Companie as well of the said dutiful present­ment, as also of their care towards the School, and desire they have to know how their Scholars do proceed: and even then shall bee given to the said Mr of the School xxvis viiid by the name of a Reward to bee distributed equally (for considerations in the This giver is Mr Dow an antient & worthie Ma­ster of the Company, a bountiful Benefactor to the Poor, & a. heartie wel­wisher to the School, and a great lo­ver of learn­ing, & lear­ned men: Giver) to himself and his three Ushers, vis viiid to each of them, for their good care and pains taken in the premisses, and their further encouragement. Provided al­waies herein, that upon any fraudulent deal­ing in the Master of the School, or the three Ushers, the aforesaid Reward shall ceas, and the blame and shame shall rest with them for their wilfull default.

12. It is thought meet that this Probation 12 of the whole School shall be committed unto the honest and faithfull trust and dispo­sition of the Master of the School and the three Ushers alone, without any association, forthese three causes: First, the Founders have good experience of their faithfull go­vernment, and assured confidence of their care of this trust reposed unto them. Secondly, [Page 7] this trial of the Scholars being made by an Act onely in writing, it is without doubt that strange Assembly will but hinder them in their said exercises. Thirdly, the watchful cie of the Master and the three Vshers onely will bee sufficient to make the boies the more serious and earnest in their work, and caus every boie's Act to bee entirely his own work, without any help; whereas if further assembly were, this Probation could not by the Master and the three Vshers bee so care­fully attended, neither the Scholar's works bee so heedfully and dutifully intended and done by them as it should.

13. These Orders with the Exercises fol­lowing shall be written in the book of the School's▪ Probation; and shall bee, by the Master of the School, read and made known unto the three Vshers on the first or second daie of the aforesaid months, March, June, September and December.

A Description of such or the like ex­ercises as every From shall do, forenoon and afternoon, on every Probation-daie.

The First Form, the Forenoon.

THey shall write the ends or terminati­tions I Hours▪ of all the Declensions of Nouns, and one Noun after every Declension.1

They shall write the ends or termi­nations 2 of the Active voice in the four Conjugations.

They shall write the ends orter minati­ons 3 of the Passive voice in the four Conjugations.

They shall write a Substantive Mascu­line,4 and an adjective Masculine toge­ther, thorow every case, in both num­bers; also Substantive and an Adjective Feminine; and a Substantive and an Adjective Neuter.

The Afternon.

THey shall write the Active and Pas­siveHours. voice of some Verb after Amo, 1 every tens in a several line, without [Page 9] nameing either mood, tens, number orHours. person.

They shall write the Active and Pas­sive 2 voice of som Verb after Deceo, as in the former hour.

They shall write the Active and Passive 3 voice of som Verb after Lego, as in the the first hour.

They shall write the Active and Pas­sive 4 voice of som Verb after Audio, as in the first hour.

II The second Form the Forenoon.

THey shall write som Anomalie, orHours. harder Noun Substantive after eve­ry 1 Declension; and also the cognata tem­pora of the present tens, and of the pre­terperfect tens severally; or else som per­son singular of plural of the same tenses of Amo, Doceo▪ Lego, Audio.

They shall write every person singular 2 and plural alone through out both the A­ctive and Passive voice of two irregular Verbs; the one of the first Conjugation, as Lavo; the other of the Second, as sorbeo.

They shall write as in the hour before,3 two Verbs; the one of the third Conju­gation, as dico; the other of the Fourth, as sentio.

[Page 10]They shal translate into Latine, Dicta­ta Hours. or Englishes made out of the Rules of 4 the Concords, or of the Construction of Substantives and adjectives, being uses of the examples.

The Afternoon.

THey shall translate other Dictata, Hours. or Englishes made out of the 1 Rules of Verbs, which have a Nomina­tive, Genitive, or Dative case after them, being uses of the examples.

They shall do likewise out of the rest 2 of the Rules of the Construction of Verbs, and the other parts of speech that follow.

They shall translate a Dialogue, bee­ing 3 a Dictatum or English made out of Corderius's Dialogues.

4. They shall translate an Epistle, bee­ing 4 a Dictatum, or English made out of Tullies's Epistles.

The third Form the forenoon.III

THey shall write the ends or termi­nationsHours. of the five Declensions, and 1 four Conjugations, with a note of the short or long time which peculiarly be­long's [Page 11] to every Declension and Conju­gation.Hours,

They shall write some person singu­lar 2 or plural of the cognata tempora of som anomalie-Verb in every Conjuga­tion thorow both the Active and Pas­sive voices.

They shall make of themselves accor­ding 3 to the Rules, so many uses as they can, of one, two or more examples pro­pounded out of the Rules of the Syn­taxis.

They shall varie som easie Latin sen­tence 4 so many waies as they can.

The Afternoon.

THey shall write in construing-mannerHours. som short Dialogue of Corderius, ex­actly 1 observing the natural & right or­der of construing, and their points; & al­so make uses of the rarest and best phra­ses.

They shall of themselves make ano­ther 2 Dialogue like unto the former.

They shall write in construing-wise,3 som short and easie Epistle of Tullie, and make use of the rarest and best phrases alone.

They shal of themselvs make another 4 Epistle like unto the former.

The Fourth Form, the Forenoon.IV

THey shall write, in construing-wise,Hours. a Dialogue of Corderius longer then 1 the former Form did, and of themselvs make another Dialogue like unto it.

They shall write in construing-wise,2 som easie Epistle of Tullie, and make another like unto it.

They shall varie some Latine sentence 3 so many waies as they can.

They shal make two, three, or more pe­riods 4 of some Theme or Sentence in La­tine, and make two or more verses upon the same.

The Afternoon.

THey shall write the Greek ends orHours. terminations, or els the Paradigmata of 1 the five Declensions of simple Nouns.

They shall write the Greek ends or 2 terminations, or els the Paradigmata of the five Declensions of Nouns contract.

They shall write some person singular,3 dual, or plural of the Active Paradigma­ta of the Greek verbs, Barytona circum­flexa, and in [...].

They shall write som person singular,4 [Page 13] dual, or plural of the Passive or middle Paradigmata of the Greek verbs Baryto­na, Circumflexa, and in [...].

V The fift Form, the Forenoon.

THey shall varie som Latine sentenceHours. in Prose.1

They shal make a longer theme ortrea­tise 2 in Prose then the former form did.

They shall make verses upon the same 3 theme or sentence.

They shall make a Dialogue or an 4 Epistle in Latine.

The Afternoon.

THey shall compare a Noun Adje­ctiveHours. in Greek.1

They shall write som person singular,2 dual, or plural of the Cognata tempora in Greek; first, in the Active voice; second­ly, in the Passive; thirdly, in the Mid­dle.

They shall write som Parodie, or imi­tations 3 of Latine verses.

They shall also make some Parodiae, 4 or imitations of Greek verses.

The Sixt Form, the Forenoon.VI

THe Schoolmaster having opened onHours. the sudden som part of Tullie, shall 1 read one period, word by word without nameing either with what letters any word is to be written, or where any point is to be set, or telling them any thing that may help their understanding of the same period. And the Scholars shall write word by word after the Schoolmaster, and presently translate the same into proper and plain English, lea­ving empty spaces, so often as they are not able to translate it themselvs.

They shall turn the same period into 2 other Latine, one or more waies; and also into Greek.

They shall turnit into Latine Hexame­ters, 3 and Pentameters, or Sapphicks.

They shall make two, three, or more 4 periods in prose upon som theme or sentence propounded, and also verses on the same.

The Afternoon.

THe Schoolmaster having opened, onHour. the sodain, the Greek Testament, Aesop's 1 [Page 15] Fables in Greek, or som other very easieHours. Greek Autor, shall read som short sen­tence, without naming letters, accent, spirit, or point; or telling them any thing, that may help their understanding thereof; and the Scholars shall write word by word, after the Schoolmaster, and presently translate the same into pro­per and plain english, leaving empty spa­ces, so often as they are not able to tran­slate it themselvs.

They shall turn the same sentence into 2 proper and plain Latine, and also into other Greek.

They shall also turn it into Greek Hexa­meters 3 and Pentameters, or Sapphicks.

They shall make two, three, or more 4 periods in Greek prose, and also som Greek verses upon som Greek sentence propounded.

The Utilitie and Benefit of these Probations and Trials.

FIrst, they are provocations to the Teachers and Scholars to be very studious, circum­spect and careful in their several places; that the former by Teaching, and the other by Learning do make good preparation there­unto.

Secondly, they will mak the Teachers so to instruct their Scholars, that they of themselvs may be well able to practise and make use of whatsoever they teach, that all their exercises be don of understanding and knowledg without the help of any other.

Thirdly, they will caus both Teachers and Scholars every day more and more to surpass themselvs in all things; and namely, that the last exercises be for substance, more to the pur­pose; for the tongue, more proper; for order better; for writeing, fairer; and in all cir­cumstance more pleasing the Viewers then the former were.

Fourthly, these Probations and Trials will be to all men infallible and sure testimonies of the Teacher's diligence, and the Scholars profiting; whence [Page 17] Whence as from a fountain, will flow to the Companie, contentment; to parents, satisfacti­on; to teachers, comfort; to Scholars, cheer­fulness; to the School, credit; to posterity, if not matters of emulation, yet patterns of imita­tation, and occasion of far better exercises.

Fiftly, the Company from the exercises don on the probation-dayes, shall truly be informed, when and how often soever they pleas, which Scholars of the highest Form be absolutely the best, and which simply be the worst; where­by the Merchant-Tailors, at the Election day, shall the better know which of the Scholars is most fit to be preferred to St John Baptist College in Oxford, and not depend so much up­on others.

Lastly, although the papers of the Scholar's exercises, written on the probation daies, should presently be cancelled, burnt, or converted into any other use; yet shall the Scholar's benefit ari­sing principally from the making thereof, be the same, as if they were reserved for posteritie. Howbeit, it cannot be denied, but that the keep­ing of them for the view of posteritie will caussom great care both in the preparation, and making thereof.

[Page 18]WEe, whose names are here subscri­bed, allow and think very good and necessarie, that the Orders and Exercises a­foresaid be used by the Schoolmaster, Ush­ers and Scholars of the Merchant-Tailor's school, for their most profit in learning, and commendation of the School, and Foun­ders of the same.

John Overall, Dean of Pauls.
John Dove, Doctor in Divinitie.
John Spencer, Doctor in Divinitie.
Nicolas Felton, Doctor in Divinitie.
John Childerley, Doctor in Divinitie.

THE EXAMINATION OF THE School's-Probation.

The Preface.

WHereas certain Orders are appoint­ed for the Probation of all the Scholars of Merchant-Tailors-School four several times in the year, viz. upon the eleventh daies of March, June, September and December, devised with confirmation of certain learned Doctors to bee don (for good considerations) by the Master of the School, and his three Ushers onely, and to bee entered into the School's Register with the Master and his three Ushers hands sub­scribed thereunto, and then signified to the Master and Wardens of the Companie of Merchant-Tailors at their common Hall, and there entred into their Court-Book; It is further thought meet and convenient for [Page 20] the better satisfaction of the said Master and Wardens and Court of Assistants, as well for the true and faithful performance of the said Probation by the Master of the School and his three Ushers, as also from time to time to know which boies profit most, and be the best and likeliest Scholars in the six several Forms, that the said Pro­bations have their Examination and Trial, and the same to be truly and duly observed and kept for ever; except they shall upon grave and needful considerations, with good advice and consent, alter and change any part thereof. Which said Examination shall bee made and don, at two several times e­very year in manner and form following.

1. Of the Examination, the place and time.

THis examination shall be made by two judicious men, well learned both in Greek and Latin apt and fit for that pur­pose, and being by the Master and War­dens thereunto requested two or three daies before the said forenoon of Examination, and in the South part of the School com­monly called the Chappel, in the forenoon onely, between the eleventh and twentieth daies of the Month of March and Septem­ber. The whole business thereof shall bee so [Page 21] well plotted and foreseen, that all this Ex­amination be fully don between the hours of six and eleven, or soon after, that all that bee present may the better end and depart before twelve of the clock; becaus it is meant, that, at this Examination there shall bee neither eating nor drinking, except a little, to stay one's stomach, as is here­under appointed and mentioned.

2. Of the persons onely to be present; the time of coming together, and reading of Orders.

THe Master and Wardens (beeing the Surveiors of the School) or two of them at the least (the Clark and Beadle attending upon them) shall, together with the two a­foresaid learned men, be at the School at six a clock in the morning at the farthest, with­out any farther assembly of commers what­soever, except the Master of the School for testimonie aswel of the Companies care and pains for their School, as also of his own faithfulness in his place, do desire to call thither two honest men, Fathers or Friends of his Scholars. And then & there the Companie's Clark shall make an end of reading all such Orders as concern this pre­sent [Page 22] business of Examination, at a quarter of an hour before seven of the clock at the farthest.

3. That no impertinent matter is to be in­truded.

IN all this Examination, to the end that all things may be don quietly, in love and amitie, and that the truth. (the onely end of this morning's business) may the more plainly and sufficiently appear, and also the better to end with the time, no one idle question, or impertinent talk, which may hinder the present service, shall in any case, by any person then present be moved.

4. Wherein and how the Scholars are to bee examined.

THe Scholars of every Form shall be ex­amined and tried within the limited time, first in every ones own exercises which he made on the last Probation-daie, in such circumstances, waies and means, whereby the examiners may most evident­ly see, quickly know, and certainly be ass [...] ­red that all the said Exercises were made by every boie's own self, without the prompting or help of auy; and that it is like­ly [Page 23] (if they shall bee thereunto required) they bee able forthwith to make the like. Se­condly, for the Examiners more ample, suffi­cient, and full insight into the ability or un­abi [...]ity of every several boy, they may (if they think fit) so soon as any Form (except the lowest) is com before them, propound and prescribe unto them all, one and the same dictatum, vulgar, or english of two or three lines, presently either to bee turned in­to Latine, or a Latine sentence to bee varied out of som of their late Lectures. Thirdly, if time will permit, all shall be further exami­ned in the books which they then learn, or lately have learned.

5. Of the time to bee spent in examining every Form; and of the best Scholars.

THe two learned men, or, if they, for more speedy dispatch, shall think good, the Master of the School, in the presence of the Master and Wardens, or any two of them, and the Companie's Clark, shall spend half an hour, and not above (to which end is delive­red to the said Master of the School one half­hour glass, with his case to bee used for the better observation of the time) in examin­ing especially eight or ten boies, whom the said Master of the School hath then first, and [Page 24] not before, at any man's request or suit what­soever, nominated to bee the forwardest boies in every one of the five lowest forms. Which said nominated best boies (for the gaining of time) shall immediately before the end of the half hour, or dismission of their fellows, bee brought into the Chappel, or place of Examination, as also all the rest of the Scholars of every one of the said Forms shall bee afterward quietly and with­out any disturbance like wise brought before them. And the said Examination shall be­gin before seven a clock, first, with the Scholars of the first or lowest form, and so asscending and proceeding to the second, third, fourth, and fift Forms in order, until half an hour after nine a clock; and from that time until half an hour after ten, all the Scholars of the sixt or highest Form. Which said two learned men, having with all indiffe­rencie don their best endeavors to know and finde▪ as well out of them that were not no­minated, as them that were nominated, the best and forwardest boies, at the end of their Examinations, shall be intreated to inform the Master and Wardens then present, how the Scholars do profit, and whether the School-Master and Ushers do faithfully and wisely performe their duties, and of such other circumstances as may tend to the good of the School.

6. An entrance to bee made in the Com­panie's Register-Book.

THe Clark of the Companie shall, after every such Examination, make a Record or Entrance, in the Companie's Register▪ book of their Court of assistants, of the daie of everie such Examination, and of the names of the Examiners, and of such of the Companie as were present at every such Ex­amination, together with the conceits and opinions of the learned men, how the Scholars do profit, and whether the School-Master and Ushers do carefully and wisely perform the duty of their place, and shall publish and read the fame at the next Court of Assistants following every such Exami­nation.

7. Of the monie to bee given and distribu­ted.

IN consideration of which pains XLs at each of the two several times in the year shall be paid and given to and amongst the above-mentioned persons in this manner. viz.

To each of the two learned men, Xs—XXs

[Page 26]To the Master of the School, and his three Ushers, [...]iis iiiid a piece, thought good by the Donor so to be divided equally, for the more care to be had by the said Ushers, for the applying the Scholars under them———————Xiiis iiiid

To the Companie's Clark——iiis iiiid

To their Beadle, for warning the Assem­blie, and attending at the School that none come to trouble the Examination—XVId

There shall be paid unto the Master of the School, for beer, ale, and new Mancher­bread, with a dish of sweet Butter, which hee shall have ready in the morning, with two fine glasses set upon the Table, and covered with two fair Napkins, & two fair trenchers, with a knife laid upon each trencher, to the end that such as pleas may take part, to staie their stomachs untill the end of the Examina­tion————————— [...]is

8. An Exposition of the Companie's mean­ing touching this Examination.

IT is not meant, by this Examination, any other matter, but to give the Companie light, how their School standeth with the diligence of the Master, and his three Vshers, and their Scholars good proceeding in lear­ning, and how truly the Probations were by the School-master, and the three Vshers performed.

ORDERS of the SCHOOL concerning the Removing out of one Form into another.

The Infinita Classis, or Pettite Form.

NOne shall expect to bee removed out of theI. Infinita Classis, (or Pettite-Form) unless hee can first give, to the Master of the School, a per­fect Account

  • 1. Of his English Rudiments; and also readily (without stop or studie) decline any Noun in Propria quae maribus, and Quae genus, accord­ing to the five Declensions.
  • 2. Compare a Noun Adjective, and decline a Pronoun,
  • 3. Say by heart at least three Principles of Per­kins's Catechism.
  • 4. Write so much of the Probation of the first Form, as his learning will reach unto.

The I. Form.

NOne shall expect to bee removed out of theII. First Form into the Second, unless hee can (besides the task of the Infinita Classis) give a per­fect Account

  • 1. Of the Conjugations of Verbs, and the decli­ning of any Verb in As in praesenti, without stop or studie.
  • 2. Of Vestibulum Linguae Latinae.
  • 3. Of Sententia Puerilis.
  • 4. Of Cato's Distichs.
  • 5. Of Perkins's Catechism, the whole Book.
  • 6. Of the Exercises of the Probation prescribed to the First Form.

The II. Form.

NOne shall expect to bee removed out of theIII. Second Form into the Third, unless hee can (besides the task of the First Form) give a per­fect Account

  • 1. Of the Regular Syntaxis: i. e. unto Figura, &c.
  • 2. Of Lilie's Rules called Qui n [...]ihi, &c.
  • 3. Twentie Fables in Aesop.
  • 4. Fourtie Colloquies in Corderius.
  • 5. Four Centuries of Janua Linguarum.
  • 6. Ten Epistles of Sturmius.
  • 7. Perkins's Catechism.
  • 8. Of the Exercises of the Probation prescribed to the Second Form.

The III. Form.

NOne shall expect to bee removed out ofIV. the Third Form into the Fourth, unless hee can (besides the task of the former forms) give a perfect Account

  • 1. Of the Rules of Figura and Prosodia.
  • 2. Of the two first Acts of Andria in Terence.
  • 3. Six Elegies of Ovid. Trist.
  • 4. Six Select Colloq. out of Erasmus.
  • 5. Twentie Epistles in Sturmius.
  • 6. Ten Dominica's of the Palat. Catech. Lat.
  • 7. Six Centuries of Janua Linguarum.
  • 8. Of the Exercises of the Probation prescribed to the Third Form.

The IV. Forme.

NOne shall exspect to be removed out of theV. Fourth Form, unless they can (besides the tasks of the former Forms) give a perfect Account

  • 1. Of their Greek Grammar unto the Syntaxis.
  • 2. Of Seidelius: sc. the first six Centuries.
  • 3. Of Cic. Offic. de Senectute, de Amicitia, or the Paradoxes.
  • 4. Of Rhetoric. Elementa, the whole book.
  • 5. Of Eras. Coll. and Andria in Terence.
  • 6. Of Gnomologicon Poeticum.
  • 7. Ovid. Trist. or Metam. the first Book.
  • 8. Of Textor's Epistles.
  • 9. Of the Palat. Catechism. Lat.
  • 10. Of the Exercises of the Probation prescribed to the Fourth Form.

The V. Form.

NOne shall exspect to be removed out of theVI. Fift to the Sixt Form, unless they can (be­sides the tasks of the former Forms) give a perfect Account.

  • 1. Of their Greek Grammar unto the end.
  • 2. Of Seidelius, the 1. Class seven Centuries, consisting of Sentences, wherein are contein­ed onely Regular Verbs.
  • 3. Of Isocrates ad Demonicum, Pythagoras, Phocy­lides and Theognis.
  • 4. Of the first four Chapters of the Epistle to the (Romans.
  • 5. Of Virgil's Eclogs.
  • 6. Of Horace's Epistles.
  • 7. Of Tulli's Select Orations.
  • 8. Of Rhetoric. Elementa.
  • 9. Of the Palatinate Catechism. Lat▪
  • 10. Of the Exercises of the Probation belong­ing to the Fift Form.

The VI. Form.

THe Sixth Form before their Election to theV.I. Universitie, shall (besides the Tasks of the former Forms) prepare themselves to give a perfect Account

  • 1. Of the whole Epistle of Paul to the Romans.
  • 2. Of the Palatinate Catechism in Greek.
  • 3. Of six Chapters of Duport on the Proverbs.
  • 4. Of Seidelius 3d Class of irregular Verbs, and so to the end.
  • 5. Of Isoc. Orat. ad Nicoclem, Nicocles & Plutarch. [...]
  • 6. Of Lucian's Select Dialogues
  • 7. Of Xenophon [...]
  • 8. Of Hom. Il. two first books or more.
  • 9. Of Hesiod and Theocritus.
  • 10. Of the select Greek Epigrams,
  • 11. Of a Tragedie in Eurip. or Sophocles.
  • 12. Of Virgils Aen.
  • 13. Of Horace de Arte Poët. &c. or Juv. or Pers.
  • 14. Of Senec. Traged.
  • 15. Of Salust. Justin. Florus, or Liv. Hist.
  • 16. Of Plin. Epp. and his Panegyrick to Trajan.
  • 17. Of the Exercises of the Probation of the Sixt Form.
  • 18. Of som part of the Hebr. Gram. & Psalter.

[...]

Prima sequentem, honestum est in secundis, tertiisque consistere. Cic. in Bruto.

Non quia diffi [...]ilia sunt, non audemus: sed quia non au­demus difficilia sunt. Sen. Ep. 105.

Magna pars profectûs est velle proficere. Sen. Ep. 72.

[...]

Generosos animos labor nutrit. Senec.

Est quadam prodite tenus si non datur ultra. Horat.

FINIS.

Classis 1

Probat.

NativitieAdmissionContinuance in this form.
monthyearmonthyearyearmonth
      

Class. I.

EXERCITIUM HORAE PRIMAE matutino tempore.

Terminationes Declinationis primae cum paradigmate.

Singulariter.
Nom.aut mensa.
Gen.aemensae
Dat.aemensae.
Acc.ammensam.
Voc. ôamensa.
Abl.âmensa.
Pluraliter.
Nom.aemensae.
Gen.arummensarum.
Dat.īsmensis.
Acc.asmensas.
Voc. ôaemensae.
Abl.īsmensis.

Terminationes secundae Declinationis cum paradigmate.

Singulariter.
Nom.erut aper.
Gen.iapri.
Dat.oapro.
Acc.umaprum.
Voc. ôeraper.
Abl.oapro.
Pluraliter.
Nom.iapri.
Gen.orumaprorum.
Dat.isapris.
Acc.osapros.
Voc. ôiapri.
Abl.isapris.

Terminationis tertiae Declinationis cum paradigmate.

Singulariter.
Nom.aut dogma.
Gen.isdogmatis.
Dat.idogmati.
Acc.adogma.
Voc. ôadogma.
Abl.cdogmate.
Pluraliter.
Nom.adogmat [...].
Gen.umdogmatum.
Dat.busdogmatibus vel dogmatis
Acc.adogmata.
Voc. ôadogmata.
Abl.busdogmatibus vel dogmatis

Terminationes quartae Declinationis cum paradigmate.

Singulariter.
Nom.usut porticus.
Gen.ûsporticûs.
Dat.uiporticui.
Acc.umporticum.
Voc. ôusporticus.
Abl.uportic [...].
Pluraliter.
Nom.usporticus.
Gen.uumporticuum.
Dat.ibusporticibus.
Acc.usporticus.
Voc. ôusporticus.
Abl.ibusporticibus.

Terminationes quintae Declinationis cum paradigmate.

Singulariter.
Nom.esut facies.
Gen.eifaciei.
Dat.eifaciei.
Acc.emfaciem.
Voc. ôesfacies.
Abl.efacie.
Pluraliter.
Nom.esfacies.
Gen.erumfacierum.
Dat.ebusfaciebus.
Acc.esfacies.
Voc▪ ôesfacies.
Abl.ebusfaciebus.

Exercitium horae secunda matutino tempore.
Terminationes Vocis Activae per qua­tuor conjugationes.

Modi Indicativi

Praesens
1oasatamusatisant.
2eoesetemusetisent.
3oisitimusitisunt.
4ioisitimusitisiunt.
Imperfectum
1abamabasabatabamusabatisabant.
2ebamebasebatebamusebatisebant.
3ebamebasebatebamusebatisebant.
4iebamiebasiebatiebamusiebatisiebant.
Perfectum
iistiitimusistisèruntvelère.
Plusquamperfectum
erameraserateramuseratiserant.
Futurum
1aboabisabitabimusabitisabunt.
2eboebisebitebimusebitisebunt.
3amesetemusetisent.
4iamiesietiemusietisient.

Modus Imperativus.

1aetemusateent
atoatoatoteanto.
2eeateamuseteeant
etoetoetoteento.
3eatamusiteant
itoitoitoteunto.
4iiatiamusiteiant
itoitoitoteunto.

Modi Subjunctivi.

Praesens
1emesetemusetisent:
2eameaseateamuseatiseant.
3amasatamusatisant.
4iamiasiatiamusiatisiant.
Imperfectum
1aremaresaretaremusaretisarent.
2eremeresereteremuseretiserent.
3eremeresereteremuseretiserent.
4iremiresiretiremusiretisirent.
Perfectum
ĕrimeriseriterĭmuserĭtiserint.
Plusquamperfectum
issemissesissetissemusissetisissent.
Futurum
eroeriseriterĭmuseritiserint.

Modi Infinitivi

Praesens & Imperfectum
1āre.
2ēre.
3ĕre.
4īre.
Perfectum & Plusquamperfectum
isse.
Futurum
urumesse.
Gerundia
1andiandoandum.
2endiendoendum.
3endiendoendum.
4iendiiendoiendum.
SupinumPriusum.
Posteriusu.
  • Participium
    • Present. temporis
    • Futurum in rus
      • 1 ans.
      • 2 ens.
      • 3 ens.
      • 4 iens.
      • urus.

Exercitium horae tertiae matutino tempore.
Terminationes Vocis Passivae per qua­tuor Conjugationes.

Modi Indicativi

Praesens
  • 1 or, aris vel are, atur: amur, amini, antur.
  • 2 eor, ēris vel ēre, etur: emur, emini, entur.
  • 3 or, ĕris vel ĕre, ĭtur: ĭmur, imini, untur.
  • 4 īor, īris, vel īre, ītur: īmur, imini, iuntur.
Imperfectum
1abar,
2ebar,barisbatur: bamur, bamini, bantur,
3ebar,bare,
4iebar,
Perfectum,
tussum, es, esttisumus, estis, sunt.
fui, isti, it:fuimus, istis, erunt ere.
Plusquamperfectum,
1tus
2tuseram, eras, erat: eramus, eratis, erant.
3tusfueram, fueras, fuerat: fueramus, fuera­tis, fuerant.
4itus
Futurum,
1abor,berisbitur: bimur, bimin [...], bun­tur.
2ebor▪bere,
3arērisētur: emur, emini, entur.
4iar,ēre,

Modus Imperativus

1areeturemur,aminientor
ator, atur:aminor, antor.
2ēreeatureamur,eminieantur
ētor, etor:eminorentor.
3ereaturamur,iminiantur
ĭtor, ĭtoriminoruntur.
4īreiaturiamur,iminiiantur
ĭtorĭtor:iminor, [...]untor.

Modi Subjunctivi

Praesens
  • 1 er, eris vel ere, etur: emur, emini, entur.
  • 2 ear, earis vel eare, eatur: eamur, eamini, eātur.
  • 3 ar, aris vel are, atur: amur, amini, antur.
  • 4 iar, iaris vel iare, iatur: iamur, iamini, iantur.
Imperfectum
1
2ērerrerisretur: remur, remini, rentur.
3ĕrere,
4i
Perfectum
tussim velsis, sittisimus, sitis, sint
fuerim,ris, rit:rĭmus, rĭtis, fue­rint.
Plusquamperfectum
tusessem vel esses, esset:tiessemus, essetis, essent.
fuissem, fuisses, fuisset:fuissemus, fuisse­tis, fuissent.
Futurum
tusero, eris, erit,tierimus, eritis, erint
fuero, fueris, fuerit:fuerīmus, fuerītis, fuerint.

Modi Infinitivi

Praesens & Imperfectum
1ari.
2eri.
3i.
4iri.
Perfectum & Plusquamperfectum,
  • tum— [...]sse vel fuisse.
Futurum,
tum iri, velandumesse.
endum
endum
iendum
  • Participium
    • Praeteriti temporis—tus.
    • Futuri in dus—
      • andus.
      • endus.
      • endus.
      • iendus.

Exercitium horae quartae matutino tempore.
Substantiva cum Adjectivis inflexa per omnes casus, & genera.

1. Masc.

Singulariter,
  • Nom.—hic—magister—bonus.
  • Gen.—magistri—boni.
  • Dat.—magistro—bono.
  • Acc.—magistrum—bonum.
  • Voc. ô—magister—bone.
  • Abl.—magistro—bono.
Pluraliter,
  • Nom.—magistri—boni.
  • Gen.—magistrorum—bonorum.
  • Dat.—magistris—bonis.
  • Acc.—magistros—bonos.
  • Voc. ô—magistri—boni.
  • Abl.—magistris—bonis.

2. Foem.

Singulariter,
  • Nom.—haec—musa—felix.
  • Gen.—musae—felicis.
  • Dat.—musae—felici.
  • Acc.—musam—felicem.
  • Voc. ô—musa—felix.
  • Abl.—musâ—felici,—e.
Pluraliter,
  • [Page]Nom.—musae—felices.
  • Gen.—musarum—felicium.
  • Dat.—musis—felicibus.
  • Acc.—musas—felices.
  • Voc. ô—musae—felices.
  • Abl.—musis—felicibus.

3. Neut.

Singulariter,
  • Nom.—hoc—regnum—triste.
  • Gen.—regni—tristis.
  • Dat:—regno—tristi.
  • Acc.—regnum—triste.
  • Voc. ô—regnum—triste.
  • Abl.—regno—tristi.
Pluraliter
  • Nom.—regna—tristia.
  • Gen.—regnorum—tristium.
  • Dat.—regnis—tristibus.
  • Acc.—regna—tristia.
  • Voc. ô—regna—tristia.
  • Abl.—regnis—tristibus.

Exercitium horae primae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigma Verbi Primae Conjugationis.

Vox Activa.

  • Voco,—vocas,—vocat:
  • vocamus,—vocatis,—vocant.
  • vocabam,—vocabas,—vocabat:
  • vocabamus,—vocabatis,—vocabant.
  • vocavi,—vocavisti,—vocavit:
  • vacavimus, vocavistis, vocaverunt vel vo­cavete.
  • vocaveram,—vocaveras,—vocaverat:
  • vocaveramus,—vocaveratis, -vocaverant.
  • vocabo,—vocabis,—vocabit:
  • vocabimus,—vocabitis,—vocabunt.
  • voca,—vocato, vocet—vocato:
  • vocemus, vocate▪ vocatote, vocent-vocanto
  • vocem,—voces,—vocet:
  • vocemus,—vocetis,—vocent.
  • vocarem—vocares,—vocaret:
  • vocaremus,—vocaretis,—vocarent.
  • vocaverim,—vocaveris,—vocaverit:
  • vocaverĭmus, -vocaverĭtis,—vocavĕrint.
  • [Page]vocavissem,—vocavisses,—vocavisset:
  • vocavissemus, vocavissetis,—vocavissent.
  • vocavero,—vocaveris,—vocaverit:
  • vocaverīmus,—vocaverītis,—vocaverint.
  • vocare.
  • vocavisse.
  • vocaturum esse.
  • vocandi,—vocando,—vocandum.
  • vocatum,—vocatu.
  • vocans,—vocaturus.

Vox Passiva.

vocor,vocarisvocatur:
vocare,
  • vocamur,—vocamini,—vocantur.
vocabar,vocabarisvocabatur:
vocabare,
  • vocabamur,—vocabamini, vocabantur.
vocatussum—es—est
fui,—fuisti,—fuit:
vocatisumus—estis—sunt
suimus,—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere.
vocatuseram—eras—erat
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat:
vocatieramus—eratis—erant
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
vocabor,vocaberisvocabitur:
vel
vocabere,
  • vocabimur,—vocabimini,—vocabuntur.
  • vocare—vocetur vocemur, vocamini—vocentur
  • vocator, vocator: vocemur, vocaminor,—vocantor.
vocer,vocerisvocetur:
vel
vocere,
  • vocemur,—vocemini,—vocentur.
vocarer,vocarerisvocaretur:
vel
vocarere,
  • vocaremur,—vocaremini,—vocarentur.
vocatus,sim—sis—sit
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit.
vocatisimus—sitis—sint
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
vocatusessem—esses—esset
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
vocatiessemus,—essetis,—essent.
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
vocatusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
vocatierimus,—eritis,—erint,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint,
  • vocari.
  • vocatum esse,—vel—fuisse.
  • vocatum ire—vel—vocandum esse.
  • vocatus.
  • vocandus.

Exercitium horae secunde pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigma Verbi secundae Conjugationis.

Vox Activa.

  • teneo,——tenes,—tenet:
  • tenemus,—tenetis,—tenent.
  • tenebam,—tenebas,—tenebat:
  • tenebamus,—tenebatis,—tenebant.
  • tenui,—tenuisti,—tenuit:
  • tenuimus, tenuistis, tenuerunt vel tenuere.
  • tenueram,—tenueras,—tenuerat:
  • t [...]nueramus,—tenueratis,—tenuerant.
  • tenebo,—tenebis,—tenebit:
  • tenebimus,—tenebitis,—tenebunt.
tene—teneatteneamus,tenete—teneant
teneto, teneto:tenetote, tenento.
  • teneam,——teneas,—tenea [...]
  • teneamus,—teneatis,—teneant.
  • [Page]tenerem,——teneres,——teneret:
  • teneremus,—teneretis,—tenerent.
  • tenuerim,—tenueris,——tenuerit:
  • tenuerĭmus,—tenuerĭtis,—tenuerint.
  • tenuissem,——tenuisses,—tenuisset:
  • tenuissemus,—tenuissetis,—tenuissent.
  • tenuero.———tenueris,——tenuerit:
  • tenuerīmus,—tenuerītis,—tenuerint.
  • tenere.
  • tenuisse.
  • tenturum esse.
  • tenendi,—tenendo, tenendum.
  • tentum,——tentu.
  • tenens,——tenturus.

Vox Passiva.

teneor,teneristenetur:
vel
tenere,
  • tenemur,—tenemini,—tenentur.
  • tenebar, tenebaris vel tenebare, tenebatur:
  • tenebamur,—tenebamini,—tenebantur.
tentussum,—es,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti—fuit:
tentisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere,
tentuseram,—eras,—erat,
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat:
tentieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
tenebor,teneberistenebitur.
vel
tenebere,
  • tenebimur,—tenebimini,—tenebuntur.
  • tenere—teneator teneamur, tenemini, teneantur
  • tenetor, tenetor: teneamur, teneminor, tenentor.
tenear,tenearis—teneatur:
vel
teneare,
  • teneamur,—teneamini,—teneant ur.
tenerer,tenereristeneretur:
vel
tenerere,
  • teneremur,—teneremini,—tenerentur.
tentussim,—sis,——sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
tentisimus,——sitis,——sint,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
tentusessem,——esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisse [...]:
tentiessemus,—essetis,——essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
tentusero,—eris,——erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit.
tentierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerimus,—fuerītis,—fuerint.
  • teneri.
  • tentum esse—vel—fuisse.
  • tentum iri—vel—tenendum esse.
  • tentus.
  • tenendus.

Exercitium horae tertiae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigma Verbi tertiae Conjugationis.

Vox Activa.

  • Scribo,—scribis,—scribit:
  • scribimus,—scribitis,—scribunt.
  • scribebam,—scribebas,—scribebat:
  • scribebamus,—scribebatis,—scribebant.
  • scripsi,—scripsisti,—scripsit:
  • scripsimus,—scripsistis,—scripserunt vel scri­psere.
  • scripseram,—scripseras,—scripserat:
  • scripseramus,—scripseratis,—scripserant.
  • scribam,—scribes,—scribet:
  • scribemus,—scribetis,—scribent.
  • scribe,—scribat: scriba. scribite,—scribant
  • scribito, scribito, mus, scribitote, scribunto.
  • scribam,—scribas,—scribat:
  • scribamus,—scribatis,—scribant.
  • scriberem,——scriberes,—scriberet:
  • scriberemus,—scriberetis,—scriberent.
  • scripserim,——scripseris,—scripserit:
  • scripserĭmus,—scripserĭtis,—scripserint.
  • [Page]scripsissem,—scripsisses,—scripsisset:
  • scripsissemus,—scripsissetis,—scripsissent.
  • scripsero,—scripseris,—scripserit:
  • scripserīmus, -scripserītis,—scripserint.
  • scribĕre.
  • scripsisse.
  • scripturum esse.
  • scribendi,—scribendo, scribendum.
  • scriptum,—scriptu.
  • scribens,—scripturus.

Vox Passiva.

Scribor,scriberisscribitur:
vel
scribere,
  • scribimur—scribimini,—scribuntur.
scribebar,scribebarisscribebatur:
scribebare,
  • scribebamur,—scribebamini,—scribebantur.
scriptussum,—es,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti,—fuit:
scriptisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus,—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere.
scriptuseram——ears——erat
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat:
scriptieramus—eratis——erant
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
scribar,scriberisscribetur:
vel
scribere,
  • scribemur,—scribemini—scribentur.
  • scribere—scribatur amur, scribamini—scribantur.
  • scribitor, scribitor: amur, scribaminor, scribūtor.
scribar,scribarisscribatur:
vel
scribare,
  • scribamur,—scribamini,—scribantur.
scriberer,scribererisscriberetur:
vel
scriberere,
  • scriberemur,—scriberemini,—scriberentur.
scriptus,sim——sis——sit
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit.
scriptisimus—sitis——sint
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
scriptusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
scriptiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
scriptusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
scriptierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint.
  • scribi.
  • scriptum esse—vel—fuisse.
  • scriptum iri—vel—scribendum esse.
  • scriptus.
  • scribendus.

Exercitium horae quartae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigma Verbi quartae Conjugationis.

Vox Activa.

  • Munio,—munis,—munit:
  • munimus, -munitis,—muniunt.
  • muniebam,—muniebas,—muniebat:
  • muniebamus,—muniebatis,—muniebant.
  • munivi,—munivisti,—munivit: (vere.
  • munivimus, -munivistis,—muniverunt vel muni-
  • muniveram,—muniveras,—muniverat:
  • muniveramus,—muniveratis,—muniverant.
  • muniam,—munies,—muniet▪
  • muniemus,—munietis,—munient.
  • muni—muniat munia- munite—muniant,
  • munito, munito: mus, munitote,—muniunto.
  • muniam,—munias,—muniat:
  • muniamus,—muniatis,—muniant.
  • munirem,—munires,—muniret:
  • muniremus,—muniretis,—munirent.
  • muniverim,—muniveris—muniverit:
  • muniverĭmus,—muniverĭtis,—muniverint.
  • [Page]munivissem,—munivisses,—munivisset:
  • munivissemus,—munivissetis,—munivissent.
  • munivero,—muniveris,—muniverit:
  • muniverīmus,—muniverītis,—muniverint.
  • munire.
  • munivisse.
  • muniturum esse.
  • muniendi,—muniendo,—muniendum.
  • munitum,—munitu.
  • muniens,—muniturus.

Vox Passiva.

Munior,munirismunitur:
vel
munire,
  • munimur,—munimini,—muniuntur.
muniebar,muniebarismuniebatur:
vel
muniebare,
  • muniebamur, -muniebamini, -muniebantur.
munitussum,—es,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti—fuit:
munitisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere.
munituseram,—eras,—erat,
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat:
munitieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
muniar,munierismunietur:
vel
muniere,
  • muniemur,—muniemini—munientur.
  • munire-muniatur iamur muniamini—muniantur
  • munitor, munitor: iamur muniaminor, muniuntor.
muniar,muniarismuniatur:
vel
muniare,
  • muniamur,—muniamini,—muniantur.
munirer,munirerismuniretur:
vel
munirere,
  • muniremur,—muniremini,—munirentur.
munitussim,—sis,—sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
munitisimus,—sitis,—sint,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
munitusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
munitiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
munitusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
munitierimus,—eritis,—erint,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint,
  • muniri.
  • munitum esse—vel—fuisse.
  • munitum iri—vel—muniendum esse.
  • munitus.
  • muni [...]ndus.
Finis Exercitiorum primae Classis.

Class. II.

EXERCITIUM HORAE PRIMAE matutino tempore.
Anomala quinque Diclinationum.

Primae. Singulariter.
  • Nom.—haec—filia.
  • Gen.—filiae.
  • Dat.—filiae.
  • Acc.—filiam.
  • Voc. ô—filia.
  • Abl.—fil [...]â.
Pluraliter.
  • Nom.—filiae.
  • Gen.—filiarum.
  • Dat.—filiis,—vel—filiabus.
  • Acc.—filias.
  • Voc. ô—filiae.
  • Abl.—filiis.—vel—filiabus.
Secundae▪ Singulariter.
  • [Page]Nom.—hic—filius.
  • Gen.—filii.
  • Dat.—filio.
  • Acc.—filium.
  • Voc. ô—fili.
  • Abl.—filio.
Pluraliter.
  • Nom.—filii.
  • Geen.—filiorum.
  • Dat.—filiis.
  • Acc.—filios.
  • Voc. ô—filii.
  • Abl.—filiis.
Tertiae. Singulariter.—Pluraliter.
  • Nom.—hoc—vas.—vasa.
  • Gen.—vasis.—vasorum.
  • Dat▪—vasi.—vasis.
  • Acc.—vas.—vasa.
  • Voc. ô—vas.—vasa.
  • Abl.—vase.—vasis.
  • Vas vasis, primo; vasorum vasa, secundo.

Exercitium horae primae pomeridiano tempore.

Quartae. Singulariter. Pluraliter.
  • Nom, -haec—domus.—domus.
  • Gen. -domi, -domûs.—domorum,—domnum.
  • Dat.—domi, -domui.—domibus.
  • Acc.—domum.—domos,—domus.
  • Voc. ô domus.—domus.
  • Abl.—domo,—domibus.
  • Tolle me, mu, primo: mi, mis, numeróque se­cundo.
Quintae. Singulariter—Pluraliter.
  • Nom. -hic vel haec-dies.—hi—dies.
  • Gen.—diei.—dierum.
  • Dat.—diei.—diebus.
  • Acc.—diem.—dies.
  • Voc. ô—dies.—dies.
  • Abl.—die.—diebus.

Cognata tempora.

Praesentis
  • 1. Amo,—amabam,—amabo.—ama,—ato—amem,—amarem,—amare.—amandi, do, dum. amans.
  • 2. Doceo,—docebam,—docebo.—doce,—eto—doceam,—docerem,—docete▪ -docendi, do, dum. docens.
  • [Page]3. Lego,—legebam,—legam. lege,—ito—legam,—legerem,—legere.—legendi, do, dum. legens.
  • 4. Audio,—audiebam,—audiam.—audi,—ito-audiam,—audirem, -audire.—audi [...]ndi, do, dum, audiens.
Praeteriti
  • 1. Amavi,—amaveram,—amaverim, -amavero, amavissem,—amavisse.
  • 2. docui,—docueram,—docuerim,—docuero, docuissem,—docuisse.
  • 3. legi,—legeram,—legerim,—legero,—legissem,—legisse.
  • 4. audivi,—audiveram,—audiverim,—audivero, audivissem,—audivisse.
  • 1. amatum,—u.—amaturus.
  • 2. doctum,—u.—docturus.
  • 3. lectum,—u.—lecturus.
  • 4. auditum,—u.—auditurus.

Exercitium horae secundae pomeridiano tempore.
Verba anomala primae & secundae Conjugationis.

Conjug. 1ma Vox Activa.

  • Domo,—domas,—domat;
  • domamus,—domatis,—domant.
  • domabam,—domabas,—domabat:
  • domabamus,—domabatis,—domabant.
  • domui,—domuisti,—domuit:
  • domuimus, -domuistis, -domuerunt vel domuère.
  • domueram,—ras,—rat;
  • domueramus,—ratis,—rant.
  • domabo,—bis,—bit:
  • domabimus,—bitis,—bunt.
  • doma—domet domemus, domate—doment
  • ato,—ato;—domemus, tote,—anto.
  • demem,—es,—et;
  • domemus,—etis,—ent.
  • [Page]domarem,—res,—ret;
  • domaremus,—retis,—rent.
  • domuerim, -ris,—rit;—rĭmus,—rĭtis,—rint.
  • domuissem, ▪isses, -isset; issemus, -issetis,—issent.
  • domuero,—domueris,—domuerit;
  • domuerīmus,—domuerītis▪—domuerint.
  • domare,—domuisse,—domiiturum esse.
  • domandi,—do,—dum.—domitum—tu.
  • domans,—domiturus.

Vox Passiva.

Domor,domarisdomatur;
vel
domare,
  • domamur,—domamini,—domantur.
domabar,domabarisdomabatur;
vel
domabare,
  • domabamur,—domabamini,—domabantur.
domitussum,—est,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti,—fuit;
domitisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus, fuistis, fuèrunt vel fuêre,
domituseram,—eras,—erat,
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuer [...]t,
domitieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
domabor,domaberisdomabitur:
vel
domabere,
  • domabimur, -domabamini, -domabuntur.
  • domare—dometur
  • domator,—domator▪
domemur,domamini—domentur
domaminor,—domantor.
domer,domerisdometur;
vel
domere,
  • domemur,—domemini,—domentur.
domarer,domarerisdomaretur▪
vel
domarere,
  • domaremur, -domaremini, domarentur.
domitussim,—sis,—sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
domitisimus,—sitis,—sint,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
domitusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
domitiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
domitus,ero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
domitierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint.
  • [Page]domari,—domitum esse vel fuisse.
  • domitum iri—vel—domandum esse.
  • domitus,—domandus.

Exercitium horae secundae matutino tempore.

Conjug. 2da Vox Activa.

  • Jubeo,—es,—et:
  • jubemus,—etis,—ent.
  • jubebam,—bas,—bat:
  • jubebamus,—batis,—bant.
  • jussi,—isti,—it:
  • jussimus,—istis,—erunt vel ere.
  • jusseram,—ras,—rat:
  • jusseramus,—ratis,—rant.
  • jubebo,—bis,—bit:
  • jubebimus,—bitis,—bunt.
  • jube—jubeat jubeamus, jubete—jubeant
  • jubeto, -jubeto: jubeamus, jubetote, -jubento.
  • jubeam,—as,—at:
  • jubeamus,—atis,—ant.
  • juberem,—res,—ret:
  • juberemus,—retis,—rent.
  • [Page]jusserim,—ris,—rit:
  • jusserĭmus,—rĭris,—rint.
  • jussissem,—ses,—set:
  • jussissemus,—setis,—sent.
  • jussero,—ris,—rit:
  • jusser [...]mus,—r [...]tis,—rint.
  • jubēre,—jussisse.
  • jussurum esse.
  • jubendi, -jubendo, -jubendum.—jussum, su.
  • jubens,—jussurus.

Vox Passiva:

jubeor,juberisjubetur:
vel
jubere,
  • jubemur,—bemini,—bentur.
jubebar,baris—jubebatur:
vel
bare,
  • jubebamur,—bamini,—bantur.
jussussum▪—es,—est,
vel
fui.—fuisti,—fuit:
jussisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus,—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere.
jussuseram,—eras,—erat,
vel,
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat:
jussieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
jubebor,beberis—bebitur:
vel
bebere,
  • jubebimur,—bebimini,—bebuntur.
  • jubere—jubeator
  • jubetor,—jubetor:
jubeamur,jubemini—jubeantur
jubeminor,—jubentor.
jubear,earis—eatur:
vel
eare,
  • jubeamur,—amini,—antur.
juberer,reris—retur:
vel
rere,
  • juberemur,—remini,—rentur.
jussus,sim,—sis,—sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
jussisimas,—sitis,—sint,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
jussusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
jussiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
jussusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
jussierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint.
  • juberi,—jussum esse vel fuisse.
  • jussum iri vel jubendum esse.
  • jussus,—jubendus.

Exercitium horae tertiae matutino tempore.
Verba anomala tertiae & quartae Con­jugationis.

Conjug. 3tia Vox Activa.

  • Dico,—dicis,—dicit;
  • dicimus,—dicitis,—dicunt.
  • dicebam,—dicebas,—dicebat;
  • dicebamus, -dicebatis,—dicebant.
  • dixi,—dixisti,—dixit;
  • diximus,—dixistis,—dixêrunt vel dixere.
  • dixeram,—dixeras,—dixerat;
  • dixeramus,—dixeratis,—dixerant.
  • dicam,—dices,—dicet;
  • dicemus,—dicetis,—dicent.
  • dic—dicat- dicamus, dicite,—dicant
  • dicito, dicito; dicamus, dicitote, dicunto.
  • dicam,—dicas,—dicat;
  • dicamus,—dicatis,—dicant.
  • [Page]dicerem,—diceres,—diceret;
  • diceremus,—diceretis,—dicerent.
  • dixerim,—dixeris,—dixerit▪
  • dixerĭmus,—dixerĭtis,—dixerint.
  • dixissem,—dixisses,—dixisset;
  • dixissemus,—dixissetis,—dixissent.
  • dixero,—dixeris,—dixerit;
  • dixerīmus,—dixerītis,—dixerint.
  • dicĕre.
  • dixisse.
  • dicturum esse.
  • dicendi,—dicendo,—dicendum.
  • dictum,—dictu.
  • dicens,—dicturus.

Vox Passiva.

Dicor,dicerisdicitur;
vel
dicere,
  • dicimur,—dicimini,—dicuntur.
dicebar,dicebarisdicebatur;
vel
dicebare,
  • dicebamur, -dicebamini, -dicebantur.
dictussum,—es,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti,—fuit;
dictisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus, ▪fuistis, ▪fuèrunt vel fuêre.
dictuseram,—eras,—erat,
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuerat;
dictieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
dicar,dicerisdicitur:
vel
dicere,
  • dicemur—dicemini—dicentur.
  • dicere-dicatur dicamur, dicamini—dicantur
  • dicitor, dicitor, dicamur, dicaminor, dicuntor.
dicar,dicarisdicatur;
vel
dicare,
  • dicamur,—dicamini,—dicantur.
dicerer,dicererisdiceretur:
vel
dicerere
  • diceremur,—diceremini,—dicerentur.
dictussim,—sis,—sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
dictisimus,—sitis—sint,
vel
fuerĭmus,—fuerĭtis,—fuerint.
dictusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
dictiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
dictusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit.
dictierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint.
  • [Page]dici.—dictum esse vel fuisse.
  • dictum ire vel dicendum esse.
  • dictus.—dicendus.

[...]jug. 4ta. Vox Activa.

  • H [...]rio,—hauris—haurit:
  • [...],—hauritis,—hauriunt.
  • [...],—hauriebas,—hauriebat:
  • [...],—hauriebatis,—hauriebant.
  • [...],—hausistis,—hausit:
  • [...],—hausistis,—hauserunt vel hausere.
  • [...],—hauseras,—hauserat:
  • [...],—hauseratis,—hauserant.
  • [...],—hauries,—hauriet:
  • [...],—haurietis,—haurient.
  • [...] hauriat hauriamus, haurite—hauriant
  • [...]—ito:—hauriamus, hauritore, iunto.
  • [...],—haurias,—hauriat
  • [...],—hauriatis,—hauriant.
  • [Page]haurirem,—haurires,—hauriret:
  • hauriremus,—hauriretis,—haurirent.
  • hauserim,—hauseris,—hauserit:
  • hauserĭmus,—hauserĭtis,—hauserint.
  • hausissem,—hausisses,—hausisset:
  • hausissemus,—hausissetis,—hausissent.
  • hausero,—hauseris,—hauserit:
  • hauserĭmus,—hauserĭtis,—hauserint.
  • haurire.
  • hauriturum esse.
  • hausisse.
  • hauriendi—hauriendo—hauriendum.
  • haustum,—haustu.
  • hauriens,—hausturus,

Vox Passiva:

Haurior,hauriris—hauritur:
vel
haurire,
  • haurimur,—haurimini,—hauriuntur.
hauriebar,hauriebarishauriebatur:
vel
hauriebare,
  • hauriebamur, hauriebamini, hauriebantur.
haustussum,—es,—est,
vel
fui,—fuisti—fuit:
haustisumus,—estis,—sunt,
vel
fuimus—fuistis,—fuerunt vel fuere
haustuseram,—eras,—erat,
vel
fueram,—fueras,—fuera [...]:
haustieramus,—eratis,—erant,
vel
fueramus,—fueratis,—fuerant.
hauriar,haurierishaurietur:
vel
hauriere,
  • hauriemur,—hauriemini,—haurientur.
  • [Page]haurire—hauriatur
  • hauritor,—hauritur:
hauriamur,hauriamini—hauriantur
hauriaminor,—hauriantor.
hauriar,hauriarishauriatur:
vel
hauriare,
  • hauriamur,—hauriamini, hauriantur.
haurier,haurirerishauriretur:
vel
haurirere,
  • hauriremur,—hauriremini,—haurirentur.
haustussim,—sis,——sit,
vel
fuerim,—fueris,—fuerit:
haustisimus,——sitis,—sint,
vel
fuerimus,—fueritis,—fuerint.
haustusessem,—esses,—esset,
vel
fuissem,—fuisses,—fuisset:
haustiessemus,—essetis,—essent,
vel
fuissemus,—fuissetis,—fuissent.
haustusero,—eris,—erit,
vel
fuero,—fueris,—fuerit:
haustierimus,—eritis,—erunt,
vel
fuerīmus,—fuerītis,—fuerint,
  • hauriri,——haustum esse vel fuisse.
  • haustum ire vel—hauriendum esse.
  • haustus,——hauriendus.

Exercitium horae quartae matutino tempore.
Dictata Anglicana ex Concordantiarum regulis in Latinum sermonem versa.

1. Praeceptor legit, vos verò negligitis.

The Usher speaketh, and yee regard not.

Hypodidascalus loquitur, vos verò negligitis.

The Preacher crieth, and the people regard not.

Concionator clamat, populus verò negligit.

The Master teacheth, and the Scholars regard not.

Praeceptor doce [...], discipuli verò negligunt.

2. Pater & Praeceptor accersuntte.

Thy Vncle and thy Aunt send for thee.

Patruus & amita accersunt te.

Bacchus and Apollo send for Homer.

Bacchns & Apollo accersunt Homerum.

Ceres and Bacchus will send for Venus.

Ceres & Bacchus accersent Venerem.

3. Multum scire vita est jucundissima.

To learn much is the most pleasant life of all.

Multum discere est vi [...]a jucundissima.

To hear much is the most pleasant life of all.

Multum audire vita est jucundissima.

[Page] To read much is the most pleasant life of all.

Multum legere vita est jucundissima.

4. Amicus certus in re incertâ cernitur.

A skilful Mariner is seen in a tempest.

Nauta peritus in tempestate cernitur.

A valiant Captain is seen in a battle.

Dux fortis in praelio cernitur.

A patient man is seen in adversitie.

Patiens rebus in adversis cernitur.

5. Vir sapit, qui pauca loquitur.

That man is wise that speaketh true things.

Vir sapit, qui vera loquitur.

That man is foolish that speaketh false things.

Vir desipit, qui falsa loquitur.

That man is vain that speaketh many things▪

Vir vanus est, qui multa loquitur.

6. Facundia Ciceronis.

The eloquence of Demosthenes.

Eloquentia Demosthenis.

The learning of Cicero.

Doctrina Ciceronis.

7. Amator studiorum.

A lover of vertue.

Amator virtutum.

A lover of pleasure.

Amator voluptatis.

A lover of sleep and idleness.

Amator somni & ignav [...]ae.

8. Cicero Oratorum eloquentissimus.

Virgil the best of Poëts.

Virgilius Poëtarum Optimus.

Cicero the most excellent of Orators.

Cicero Oratorum praestantissimus.

Achilles the most valiant of the Greeks.

Achilles Graecorum fortissimus.

Exercitium horae primae matutino tempore.

1. Deus est summum bonum.

Riches are the chiefest good of a covetous man.

Divitiae sunt summum bonum avari.

Pleasure is the chiefest good of an Epicure.

Voluptas est summum bonum Epicuri.

Virtue is the chiefest good of a wise man.

Virtus est summum bonum sapientis.

2. Nunquam sera est ad bonos mores via.

The waie to learning is never too late.

Nunquam sera est ad doctrinam via.

The waie to godliness is never too late.

Nunquam sera est ad pietatem via.

The waie to honor is never too late.

Nunquam sera est ad honorem via.

3. Adolescentis est majores natu revereri.

It is the part of a son to obey his Father.

Filii est patri obtemperate.

It is the part of a Scholar to reverence his Master.

Discipuli est praeceptorem revere [...]i.

It is the part of a religious man to worship God.

Religiosi est Deum venerari.

4. Plurimi passim fit pecunia.

Gold is much esteemed every where.

Plurimi passim fit aurum.

Flattery is much esteemed every where.

Plurimi passim fit adulatio.

Riches are much esteemed every where.

[...]lurim [...] passim fiunt divitiae:

Exercitium horae primae pomeridiano tempore.

5. Pudor parvi penditur.

Goodness is little set by,

Bonitas parvi penditur.

Virtue is little set by.

Virtus parvi penditur.

Philosophers are little set by.

Philosophi parvi penduntur.

6. Nihili, vel pro nihilo habentur literae.

The Universitie is esteemed as nothing.

Nihili, vel pro nihilo habetur Academia.

Scholars are esteemed as nothing.

Nihili, vel pro nihilo habentur literarum studiosi.

Homer and Virgil are esteemed as nothing.

Nihili, vel pro nihilo habetur Homerus & Virgi­lius.

7. Semper obtemeprat pius filius patri.

An honest servant alwaies obeyeth his Master.

Semper obtemperat honestus servus Domino.

A good Scholar alwaies obeyeth his Master.

Semper obtemperat bonus discipulus praeceptori.

A good wife alwaies obeyeth her husband.

Semper obtemperat uxor bona marito.

8. Rex pius est Reipublicae ornamento.

A valiant General is an ornament to his Countrie,

Dux fortis est patriae ornamento.

A faithful Magistrate is an honor to the City.

Magistratus fidelis est civitati ornamento.

A frugal Master is an ornament to his family.

Dominus frugi est familiae ornamento.

Exercitium horae secundae pomeridiano tempore.

1. Sylla omnes suos divitiis explevit.

Christ filled all his Disciples with divine grace.

Christus omnes Discipulos gratiâ divinâ explevit.

Socrates filled all his Scholars with w [...]sdom.

Socrates omnes discipulos sapientiâ explevit.

Epicurus filled all his followers with pleasures.

Epicurus omnes secta [...]ores voluptaribus explevit.

2 Q [...]i adipisci veram gloriam volunt, justiciae fungantur officiis.

They which would get true prais, let them dischage the duties of charitie.

Qui adipisci veram gloriam volunt, charitatis fungantur officiis.

Hee that would get true honor, let him discharge the du­ties of pietie.

Qui adipisci verum honorem vult, pletatis fun­gatur officiis.

Hee that would get the reward of virtue, let him dis­charge the duties of labor.

Qui adipisci praemium virtutis vult laboris fun­gatur officiis.

3. Ignavi à discendo citò deterrentur.

Cowardly souldiers are soon discouraged from fighting.

Ignavi milites à pugnando citò deterrentur.

Idle men from work.

O [...]s [...] à labore.

A dullard from his book.

Stupicus à studendo.

4 Vigilandum est ei qui cupit vincere.

Hee must sow that desireth to reap.

Serendum est ei qui, cupit metere.

Hee must labor that desireth to eat.

Laborandum est ei, qui cupit edere.

Hee must fight that desireth to overcom.

Pugnandum est ei, qui cupit vincere.

5. Samia mihi mater fuit, ea habitabat Rhodi.

Marie was my sister, shee dwelt at London.

Maria mihi soror erat, ea habitabat Londini.

Elisabeth was my Aunt, shee dwelt at York.

Elisabetha mihi martertera erat, ea habitabat E­boraci.

Anna was my Grandmother shee dwelt at Worcester.

Anna mihi Avia erat, ea habitabat Branonii.

6. Concessi Cantabrigiam ad capiendum in­genii cultum.

I went to Colchester to eat Oisters▪

Concessi Colcestriam ad edendas ostreas.

My uncle went to Oxford to buy gloves.

Patruus concessit Oxonium ad emendas chiro­thecas.

The Atheist went to Amsterdam to chuse his religion.

Atheus Amsterodamum concessit ad eligendam religionem.

7 Interest magistratûs tueri botos, & ani­madvertere in malos.

It concern's the Master to make much of good servants, and to punish the bad.

Interest domini bonis servis indulgere, animad­vertere in malos.

It concern's the Master to encourage the diligent scho­lars, and to chastize the idle.

Interest Praeceptoris studiosos fovere, otiosos ca­stigare.

It concern's the shepherd to feed the sheep, and to drive away the wolvs.

Interest pastoris tuerioves, lupos arcere.

8. Uxorem aedes curare decet.

It becom's a Pilot to look to his ship.

Nauclerum navem curare decet.

It becom's a General to look to his Armie.

Ducem exercitum curare decet.

It becom's a Master to look to his School.

Ludi-magistrum scholam curare decet.

Exercitium horae tertiae pomeridiano tempore.

Dictatum ex Corderio colloq. lib. 1. cap. 3.

A. Wilt thou break thy fast with mee? B. I have not my breakfast A. What? hast not thou brought it? B. I brake my fast at home. A. Dost thou alwaies so? B. No; but becaus Irose up early, it pleased my mother so to deal with mee. A. Much good may it do you I will therefore eat my breakfast alone. B. And I will studie in the meantime.

Latiné.

A. Vis jen [...]are mecum? B. Non habeo jen [...]acu­lum. A. Quid? non attulisti? B. Ego domi jentaveram. A. Itáne semper facis? B. Minimè; sed quia bene manè surrexeram, sic matri pla­cuit me tractare. A. Profit tibi▪ Ego igitur so­lus jentabo. B. Et ego interim studebo.

Exercitium horae quartae pomeridiano tempore.

Dictatum ex Epist. Ciceronis. ep. fam. l. 14. 22.

IF you are in health, it is well, I am in health. Wee do expect your Carriers daily; which if they com, per­adventure wee shall know what wee ought to do; and wee will advertise you speedily. Look diligently to your health. Farewell. Calends of September.

Latiné.

SIvales, bene est, ego valeo. Nos quotidie Ta­bellarios vestros exspectamus: quisi venerint, fortasse erimus certiores, quid nobis faciendum sit: faciemú [...]que te statim certiorem. Valetudi­nem tuam cura diligenter. Vale. Calend. Septemb­bris.

Finis Exercitiorum IIdae Classis.

Class. III.

EXERCITIUM HORAE PRIMAE matutino tempore.

Fines, sive Terminationes quinque Declinatio­num & quatuor Conjugationum, unâ cum notâ temporis brevis vel longi.
Primae Declinationis terminationes.
Singulariter.
Nom.Gen.Dat.AccusVoc. [...]bl.
Musaăaeaeānä
Epitômeēsēn
Aeneasāsaeaeām ān
A [...]chises.ēsaeaeēnē āê ā
Pluraliter.
aeārùmisāsaeīs & qu [...] ­dam in abu [...].
S [...]cundae Declinationis terminatione [...].
Singulariter.
Nom.GenDat.Accus.Voc.Abl.
Magister.ĕ [...]ūmër
V [...]. [...] [...]ūm [...]r
Satur.ŭ [...] [...]ūm [...]ŭ [...]
Dominus.ŭ [...]ūmĕ
Regnum.ūmūmūm
Orph [...]us.eū [...]ĕ [...]-eī ĕŏsĕï—H̄ūm [...] ŏneūĕō
Barbton.ŏ [...] ŏnŏ [...]
Logo [...].ŏsiŏn
Pluraliter.
[...]ōsūmīsōsis
ă [...]ä
Tertiae Declinationis terminationes.
Singulariter.
Nom.GenDat.Accus.Voc.Abl.
Do [...] [...]ïsäăĕ
C [...].ĕĭsĕī—ĕ
Synapi.ïaptoton    
Sermŏ.ŏĭ [...]ēmŏĕ
Lăc.ăc [...]săcăcĕ
Davĭd. [...]īsēmĭdĕ
Animăl.ălĭsăiă [...]ī—ĕ
Titān.ānĭs ŏsēm ăănĕ
Calcär.ărĭsărărī—ĕ
Bonit [...].āsīsēm ĭmāsī—ĕ
Capŭt.ŭtĭsŭtŭtĕ
Pāx.āXĭsēmāxī—ĕ
Pluraliter.
ês [...]ūn▪bǔsēs—ăs [...]sbŭs
ăūmăă
Quartae Declinationis terminationes
Singulariter.
Nom.Gen.Dat.Acc.VocAblar.
Versus.ŭsūsŭī [...]ūs
Cornuŭŭŭ
Pluraliter.
ūsŭnmĭbŭsūsūsĭbŭs
ăŭbŭ [...]ăăŭbŭs
Quintae Declinationis terminationes.
Singulariter.
Nom.Gen.Dat.Acc.VocAbl.
Facies.ēs [...]ēiēmēs
Pluraliter.
ēsērūmēbŭsēsēsēbŭ [...]

Indicativus Activae Vocis.

Praesens.
  • 1. o—ās—ăt—āmus—atĭs—ānt.
  • 2. ēo—ēs—ĕt—ēmǔs—ētis—ēnt.
  • 3. o—ĭs—ĭt—ĭmŭs—ĭtĭs—ūnt.
  • 4. ĭo—ĭs—ït—īmŭs—ītĭs—ĭunt.
Imperfectum
  • [Page]1. ābām—ābās—ābăt—ābāmŭs, -ābātĭs▪ābānt.
  • 2. ēbām—ēbās—ēbăt—ēbāmŭs—ēbātĭs—ēbānt.
  • 3. ēbām—ēbās—ēbăt—ēbāmŭs-ēbā [...]ĭs-ēbānt.
  • 4. ĭēbām-ĭēbās-ĭēbătĭēbāmŭs-ĭēbātĭsĭēbānt.
Praeteritum perfectum
  • ī— [...]stī—ĭt—ïmüs-ĭstĭs-ērūnt vel ērĕ.
Plusquamperfectum
  • ĕrām-▪ĕrās—ĕrăt—ĕrāmŭs—ĕrātĭs—ĕrānt.
Futurum
  • 1. ābc—ābīs—ābĭt—ābĭmŭs—ābĭ [...]ĭs—ābūnt.
  • 2. ēbo-ēbĭs—ēbĭt—ēbĭmŭs—ēbĭtĭs—ēbūnt,
  • 3. ām—ēs—ĕt—ēmŭs—ētĭs—ēnt.
  • 4. ĭām—ĭēs—ĭĕt—ĭēmŭs—ĭētĭs—ĭēnt.
Imperatiuus.
1.ā—̄ĕtēmŭsātĕ—ēnt
āto-ātoātotĕ—ānto.
2ē—ĕătĕāmŭsētĕ—ĕānt
ēto-ētoētōtĕ-ēnto.
3.ĕ— [...]tāmŭsĭtĕ—ānt
ĭto—ĭtoĭtōtĕ▪ūnto.
4.ī—ĭatĭāmŭsitĕ—ĭānt
īto-īto [...]ōtĕ—ĭūnto.

Modi Subjunctivi

Praesens.
  • 1. ēm—ēs—ĕt—ēmŭs—ētĭs—ēnt.
  • 2. ĕām—ĕās—ĕăt—ĕāmus—ĕātĭs—ĕānt.
  • 3. ām—ās—ăt—āmus—ātĭs—ānt.
  • 4. ĭām—ĭās—ĭ [...]t—ĭāmus—ĭātĭs— [...]ānt.
Imperfectum
  • 1. ārēm—ārēs—ārĕt—ārēmŭs-ārētĭs-ārēnt.
  • 2. ērēm—ērēs—ērĕt—ērēmŭs-ērētïs-ērēnt.
  • 3. ĕrēm—ĕrēs—ērĕt—ĕrēmŭs-ërētĭs-ĕrēnt.
  • 4. īrēm—īrēs—īrĕt—īrēmūs-īrētĭs—īrēnt.
Perfectum
  • ĕrīm—ĕrĭs—ĕrĭt—ērĭmŭs—ērĭtĭs—ĕrīnt.
Plusquamperfectum
  • issem—isses-isset—issemus—issetis—issent.
Futurum
  • ĕro—ĕrĭs—ĕrĭt—ērĭmŭs—ĕrĭtĭs—ĕrīnt.

Modi Infinitivi

Praesens & Imperfectum1. ārĕ.
2. ērĕ.
3. ĕrĕ.
4. īrĕ.
Perfectum & Plusquamperf.—īssĕ.
  • [Page]Futurum—ūrūm esse.
Gerun [...]a1. āndī—āndo—āndūm.
2. ēndī—ēndo—ēndūm.
3. ēndī—ēndo—ēndūm.
4. ĭēndī—īēndo—ĭēndūm.
Supinaūm.
ū.
Participia
Praesentis1. āns.
2. ēns.
3. ēns.
4. ĭēns.

Futuri—ūrüs.

Indicativus Passivae vocis.

Praesent
  • 1. ŏr-ār [...]s vel ārĕ-ātŭr—āmŭr-āmĭnī-āntŭr.
  • 2. ĕŏr-ērīs vel ērĕ-ēt [...]r—ēmūr-ēmĭnī-ēntur.
  • 3. ŏr-ĕrĭs vel ĕrĕ-ētŭr—ĭmŭr-ĭmĭnī-ūntŭr.
  • 4. ĭŏr-īrĭs vel īrĕ-ītŭr—īmür-ĭmĭni-ĭūntŭr.
Imperfectam
băr-bār [...] vel bārē-bātŭr—bāmŭr-bāmĭnī bāntŭr.
1. ā
2. ĕ
3 ē
4. ïē
Persectum
tussūm,—ĕs,—ĕst,
vel
fuī,—fūīstī—fŭīt:
tisumüs,—ĕstĭs,—sūnt,
vel
fuĭmus,—f [...]īstĭs—fuērūnt vel fuērĕ.
Plusquamperfectum
tusĕrām,—ĕrās,—ĕrăt,
vel
fuĕrām,—fŭĕrās,—fŭĕrăt:
tiĕrāmüs,—ērātĭs,—ĕrānt,
vel
f [...]ĕrāmŭs,—fŭĕrātĭs,—f [...]ĕrānt.
Futurum
  • 1. ābŏr,—ābărĭs vel ābĕrĕ,—ābĭtŭr:—ābĭmŭr,—ăbĭmĭnī—ābūntŭr.
  • 2. ēbŏr,—ēbĕrĭs vel ēbĕrĕ,—ĕb [...]tŭr:—ēbĭmŭr,—ēbĭmĭnī,—ēbūntŭr.
  • 3. ăr,—ērĭs vel ērĕ,—ētŭr:—ēmŭr,—ēmïnī,—ēntŭr:
  • 4. ïăr,—ĭērĭs vel ĭērĕ,—ĭētur:—ïēmŭr,—ĭēmīnī,—īēntur.

Modus Imperativus.

1.ārĕ—ētŭrēmŭ [...]ām [...]nī—ēntŭr
ātŏr-ātŏr▪āmĭnŏr-āntōr.
2.ērē—ĕātŭrĕāmŭrēmĭnī—ĕantŭr
ētŏr—ētŏrēmĭnŏr▪ēntŏr▪
3.ērĕ—ātŭrāmūr-ĭmĭnī—āntŭr
ītŏr—ĭtŏrĭmĭnŏr-ūntŏr.
4.īrĕ—ĭātŭrĭămŭrĭmĭnī—ĭāntŭr
ītŏr—ītŏrĭmĭnŏr-ūntŏr.

Modi Subjunctivi

Praesen [...]
  • 1. ĕr—ē [...]ĭs vel ērĕ-ētŭr—ēmŭr—ĕmĭnī—ēntŭr.
  • 2. ĕ [...]r-ĕārĭs vel ĕārĕ-ĕātŭr—ĕ [...]mŭr- [...]mĭnr̄-ĕ [...]nt [...]r▪
  • 3. ăr—ārĭs vel—ārĕ—ātŭr—āmŭr-āmĭnī—āntŭr.
  • 4. ĭăr—ĭārĭs vel ĭāre-ĭātŭr—ĭāmŭr- [...]āmĭnī-ĭāntŭr.
Imperfectum
1. ārĕr—rērĭs vel rērĕ—rētŭr—rēmŭr—rēmĭnī ­rēntŭr.
2. ē
3. ĕ
4. ĭ
Perfectum
tussīm,—sĭs,—sĭt,
vel
fŭĕrīm—fŭĕrĭs—fŭĕrĭt▪
tisĭmŭs,—s [...]tĭs,—sīnt,
vel
f [...]rĭmŭs—fuĕrĭtĭs—f [...]ĕrīnt.
Plusquamperfectum
tusēssēm,—ēssēs,—ēssēt,
vel
f [...]īssēm,—fŭ [...]ssēs,—fuīssēt:
tiēssĕm [...]s,—ēssētĭs,—ēssēnt,
vel
fuīssēm [...]s,—fuīssētĭs,—fŭīssēnt.
Futurum
tusĕ [...]o,—ĕrĭs—ĕrĭt.
vel
f [...]ĕro,—f [...]ĕrĭs,—f [...]ĕrĭt:
tiĕrĭmūs,—ĕrĭtĭs,—ĕrūnt,
vel
fuĕrīm [...]s,—fŭĕrītĭs,—f [...]ĕrīnt.

Modi Infinitivi

Praesens & Imperfectum1. ārī.
2. ērī.
3. ī.
4. īrī.

Perfectum & Plusquamperf.—ūm ēssē vel fuīssĕ.

Futurum—ŭm īrī, velāndūmēssĕ.
ēndūm
ēndūm
ĭēndūm

Particip. Praeteriti temp.—ŭs.

Participium Futuri in dusāndŭs.
ēnd [...]s.
ēndŭs.
ĭēndus.

Exercitium horae secundae matutino tempore.
Cognata tempora Activae & Palsivae vocis per quatuor Conjugationes.

I. Cognata tempora Conjugationis primae.

Vocis Activae

Praesens

Domo—domabam—domabo—doma—ato. domem—domarem—domare—doman-di-do-dum—domans.

Praeteritum

Domui—domueram,—domuerim,—domuero, domuissem,—domuisse.—domitum,—tu—domiturus.

Vocis Passivae

Praesens

Domor—domabar—domabor—domare—ator—domer—domarer—domari—domandus.

Praeteritum A posteriore supino [domitu] fit

Domitus sum vel fui,—domitus eram vel fue­ram,—domitus sim vel fuerim,—domitus essem vel fuissem,—domitus ero vel fuero—domitum esse vel fuisse,—domitum iri vel domandum esse.

II. Cognata tempora Conjugationis secundae.

Vocis Activae

Praesens

Rideo—ridebam—ridebo—ride—eto—rideam—riderem—ridere—ridendi—do dum—ridens.

Praeteritum

Risi—riseram—riserim—risero—risissem risisse—risurum esse—risum—risu—ri­surus.

Vocis Passivae

Praesens

Rideor—ridebar—ridebor—idere—e [...]or ridear—riderer—rideri—ridendus.

Praeteritum à posteriore supino [risu] fit

risus sum vel fui,—risus eram vel fueram,—ri­sus fim vel fuerim,—risus essem vel fuissem, risus ero vel fuero,—risum esse vel fuisse,—risum iri vel ridendum esse.

III. Cognat a temporatertiae Conjugationis.

Vocis Activae

Praesens

Dico—dicebam—dicam—dic—dicito. dicam—dicerem—dicere— [...] ▪ do▪ dum.—dicens.

Praeteritum

Dixi—dixeram—dixerim—dixero—do-—xissem—dixisse—dicturum esse-dictum tu—dicturus.

Vocis Passivae

Praesens

Dicor—dicebar—dicar—dicere—dicitor. dicar—dicerer—dici—dicendus.

Praeteritum à posteriore supino [dictu] fit

dictus sum vel fui.—dictus eram vel fueram, dictus sim vel suerim,—dictus essem vel fu­issem,—dictus ero vel fuero,—dictum esse vel fuisse,—dictum iri vel dicendum esse.

IV. Cognata tempora quartae Conjugationis.

Vocis Activae

Praesens

Munio—muniebam—muniam—muni—ito, muniam—munirem—munire—muniendi­do—dum—muniens.

Praeteritum

Munivi—muniveram—muniverim—munive­ro—munivissem—munivisse—munitum esse—munitum—tu—muniturus.

Vocis Passivae

Praesens

Munior—muniebar—muniar—munire—munitor——muniar——munirer—muniri munitus—muniendus.

Praeteritum A posteriore supino [munitu] fit

Munitus sum vel fui,—munitus eram vel fue­ram,—munitus sim vel fuerim,—munitus essem vel fuissem,—munitus ero vel fuero, munitum esse vel fuisse—munitum iri vel mnniendum esse.

Exercitium horae tertiae matutino tempore.
Usus exemplorum aliquot ex Regulis. SYNTAXEOS.

Exemplum 1.

——Vir bonus est quis? Qui consulta patrum, qui leges, juráque servat.

Usus.
  • 1. Magistratus bonus est quis? qui tuetur bonos, animadvertit in malos.
  • 2. Subditus bonus est quis? qui magistratum tan­quam patrem veneratur, & legibus paret.
  • 3. Vir sapiens est quis? qui praesentia cernit, praeterita repetit, futura providet.
  • 4. Prudens pater est quis? qui liberos ab ipsis sta­tim incunabulis ad timorem & disciplinam Domini, ad verecundiam, vitiorum odium, & amorem virtutis instituit, & semetipsum liberis suis omnis pietatis & sanctitatis exemplar praebet.
  • 5. Pius filius est quis? qui patri semper obtempe rat, & vitae ejus exemplum imitatur.
  • 6. Mansuetus dominus est quis? qui non verbe­rum sed verborum utitur castigatione erga servos.
  • [Page]7. Servus fidelis est quis? qui domino suo simpli­citer & ex animo, tanquam Christo ipsi, obse­quitur.
  • 8. Praeceptor bonus est quis? qui discipulos fide­l [...]ter ad doctrinam erudit, & ad pietatem crebris praeceptis & exemplo formar.
  • 9. Discipulus bonus est quis? qui juxta praescri­ptum praeceptoris vivit, [...]ique se attentem & as­siduum praebet.
  • 10. Pastor bonus est quis? qui oves tondet, non deglubit.

Exemplum. 2.

Virgilius Poëtarum doctissimus.

Usus.
  • 1. Achilles Graecorum fortissimus.
  • 2. Cicero Oratorum eloquentissimus.
  • 3. Crassus Romanorum ditissimus.
  • 4. Aristoteles Philolophorum optimus.
  • 5. Trajanus Imperatorum augustissimus.
  • 6. Hippocrates Medicorum peritissimus.
  • 7. Phalaris tyrannorum crudelissirous.
  • 8. Maecenas patronorum beneficentissimus.
  • 9. Saturnus Deorum antiquissimus.
  • [Page]10. Ulysses Graecorum dolosissimus.
  • 11. Cato Senatorum severissimus.
  • 12. Stentor praeconum clamosissimus.

Exemplum 3.

Postpono famae pecuniam.

Usus.
  • 1. Postponit virtutibus aurum.
  • 2. Postponit sapientiae divitias.
  • 3. Postponit vitae famam.
  • 4. Postponit conscientiae vitam.
  • 5. Postponit aequitati injuriam.
  • 6. Postponit fortitudini ignaviam.
  • 7. Postponit eruditioni sanitatem.
  • 8. Postponit Oratori Poëtam.
  • 9. Postponit Virgilio Homerum.
  • 10. Postponit doctrinae voluptatem.
  • 11. Postponit Minervae Dianam.
  • 12. Postponit Veneri Junonem.

Exercitium horae quartae matutino tempore.
Sententiae Variatio.

Cicero est omnium Oratorum eloquentissimus.

Sing.
  • N. Cicero à nullo Oratore superatur eloquentiâ.
  • G. Summa est Ciceronis prae aliis Oratoribus elo­quentia.
  • D. Haud scio an quisquam Ciceroni sit aequandus eloquentiâ.
  • A. Putásne Ciceronem ulli Oratori cedere elo­quentiâ?
  • V. Quàm singulari, ô Cicero, ornatus es à Deo eloquentiâ!
  • A. Nemo Oratorum Cicerone fuit eloquentior.
Plur.
  • N. Sint alii Oratores eloquentes; at qui cum Ci­cerone comparari possit, nullus est.
  • G. Cicero est facilè princeps omnium Oratorum▪
  • D. Cicero palmam eloquentiae praeripuit aliis Oratoribus.
  • A. Cicero omnes Oratores superat eloquentiâ.
  • V. Heus Oratores! Cicero excellit vos eloquentià,
  • A. Cicero ex omnibus Oratoribus est eloquentis­tissimus.

Exercitium horae primae pomeridiano tempore.
Metaphrasis & usus Colloquii apud Corde­rium lib. 1. cap. 21.

D. Visne describere wilt thou write down praelectio­nem my lesson mihi for mee? A. Cur non ha­bes? Why hast thou it not? D. Quia becaus oc­cupatus fui I was busied hesterno die yesterday. A. Accipe librum meum take my book, & and describe write it out. D. Non ignoras thou art not ignorant me lentiùs scribere that I write very slowly; & tu and thou citiùs descripseris totum, wilt sooner write out the whole, quàm ego than I quatuor aut quinque versiculos, four or five ver­ses▪ A. Quaere tibi alium scriptorem, seek thee another Writer; nunc now ego tibi non possum dare operam, I cannot help thee. D. Cur non? Why not? A. Est mihi aliud negotium, I have another business, idémque pernecessarium, and the same very necessary. D. Nolo te urgere, I will not urge thee, nec possum quidem; neither can I in truth: sed saltem but at least commoda tuam codicem lend me thy book. A. Accipe, take it, utere ut libet, use it as it pleaseth thee, modo nè abutare so that you do not abuse it, D. Nihil est, there is no caus, quod hic verearis that thou should­est fear here▪

[Page]Phrasis,—Describere Praelectionem.

Usus.
  • Describere
    • concionem.
    • dictatum.
    • declamationem.
    • epistolam.
    • thema.
    • Carmina.

Phrasis.—Hesterino die ocupatus fui.

Usus.
  • Pridie hujus diei occupatus fui.
  • Heri occupatus fui.
  • Hodierno die occupatus fui.
  • Proximâ elapsâ septimanâ occupatus fui.
  • Die
    • Lunae occupatus fui.
    • Martis occupatus fui.
    • Mercurii occupatus fui.
    • lovis occupatus fui.
    • Veneris occupatus fui.
    • Saturni occupatus fui.
    • Dominico occupatus fui.

[Page]Phrasis.—Non ignoras me lentiùs scribere

Usus.
  • Non ignorat
    • praeceptor me tardiùs venire.
    • mater me altiùs dormire.
    • pater me impensiùs ludere.
    • magister me segniùs studere.
    • patruus me velociùs currere.
    • amita me pulcriùs pingere.
    • avuncul'me procaciùs ridere.
    • matertera me saepius edere.

Phrasis.—Ego tibi non possum dare operam.

Usus.
  • Ego fratri non possum dare operam.
  • Philanax Basilio non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Priamus Hectori non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Achilles Patroclo non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Maecenas Ovidio non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Cicero Pompeio non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Pater filio non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Praeceptor discipulo non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Uxor marito non potest dare ope­ram.
  • Ulysses Penelope. &c.—non potest dare ope­ram.

Exercitium horae secundae pomeridiano tempore.
Imitatio prioris Dialogi.

Apelles. Phidias.

A. Visne mihi pingere Helenes imaginem? P. Cur non ipse pinxisti? Quia proximâ elapsâ septima nâ aliàs fui occupatus. P. Accipe penecillum meum & pinge. A. Non ignoras me lentiùs pingere; & tu citiùs totum corpus depinxeris, quàm ego unam vel alteram partem. P. Quaere tibi alium pictorem; nunc ego tibi non possum dare operam. A. Cur non? P. Est mihi ali­ud negotium peragendum, idque valdè neces­sarium. A. Nolo te instantiùs urgere, nec au­deo quidem: sed saltem commoda mihi tuum penecillum. P. Accipe, utere ut lubet, modò ne abutare. A. Nihil est quòd hic metuas.

Exercitium horae tertiae pomeridiano tempore.

Metaphrasis & usus Epistolae Ciceronianae. Fam. l. 14. 11.

Cicero Terentiae.

SIvales, if you have your health, bene est, it is well [...], valeo, I am in health. Tullia mostra [our daughter] Tullia venit ad me came unto mee pridiè Idus Junii the daie before the Ides of June [i. e. June 12.] cujus summâ virtute in respect of whose great virtue & singulari humanitate and singular humanitie, gra­viore etiam sum dolore affectus, I am affected with greater grief [or it griev's mee the more] factum esse that it came to pass [or, that it fell out] nostrâ negligen­tiâ by our negligence, ut that longè aliâ in fortunâ es­set she was in a far othergates fortune [or, in a far wors condition] atque than ejus pietas her pietie ac digni­tas and dignitie postulabat did require [or, deserv.] Nobis erat in animo I was minded mittere to send Ciceronem Cicero ad Caesarem to Caesar, & cum eo and with him Cneum Salustium Cneis Salusti­us. Si profectus crit if hee shall take his journie. fa­ciam te certiorem, I will advertise you. Valetudi­nem tuam cura diligenter, look diligently to your health. Vale. Farewell. 17. Calend. Quint. the 17 daie of the Calends of Quintilis. [i. e. Jun. 15.]

Phrasis. Summâ virtute & singulari huma­nitate.

Usus.

Aeneas vir summâ virtute, & singulari pietate.

Erasmus vir summâ doctrinâ & singulari judicio.

Cicero vir summo ingenio, & singulari eloquentiâ.

Virgilius poēta summâ eruditione, & singulari poë­tices facultate.

Phrasis. Graviore sum dolore affectus nostrâ factum esse negligentiâ.

Usus.

Graviore angore affectus sum, nostrâ factum esse incuciâ.

Majori tristitiâ affectus sum, nostrâ factum esse in­cogitantiâ.

Molestiore anxietate affectus sum, nostrâ factum esse imprudentiâ.

Tristiori luxu affectus sum, nostrâ factum esse prae­cipirantiâ.

Phrasis. Longè alia in fortunâ esse, atque ejus pietas ac dignitas postulabat.

Penelope longè alio in statu fuit, atque ejus castitas acconstantia postulabat.

Regulus longè aliâ in conditione fuit, atque ejus fi­des ac magnanimitas merebatur.

Aristides longè aliâ apud Athenienses in ratione fu­it, atque ejus justitia ac veritas flagitabat.

Cicero longè alio in casu fuit, atque ejus fidelitas ac eloquentia poscebat.

Phrasis. Nobis erat in animo, filium ad Caesa­rem mittere.

Usus.

Ciceroni erat in animo, filium ad Cratippum mit­tere.

Patri erat in animo, famulum ad Augustum mit­tere.

Maecenati erat in animo, Virgilium ad Caesarem mittere.

Penelope erat in animo, Telemacum ad Ulyssem mittere, &c.—

Imitatio prioris Epistolae.

Agamemnon Clytemnestrae.

SI vales, bene est; valeo▪g Iphigenia nostra ad me venit pridie nonas Martii, cujus summâ modestiâ, & singulari pietate, graviore luctu sum affectus, nost [...]â factum esse incogitantiâ, ut aliâ in conditione esset, atque ejus nobilitas ac humanitas postulabat, Nobis erat in animo, Orestem ad Menelaüm mittere, & cum eo Pyladem. Si pro­fectus erit, faciam te protinus certiorem. Vale­tudinem tuam cura diligenter. Vale. 17. Calend. Aprilis.

Finis Exercitiorum IIItia Classis.

Class. IV.

EXERCITIUM HORAE PRIMAE matutino tempore.

Metaphrasis Colloquii Corderiani, & ejus­dem imitatio.

Lib. 3. Coll. 24.

Blasius. Magister.

B. Praeceptor, Master, licétne mihi adire Tuto­rem? may I go to my Guardian? M. Quae causa what caus movette? moveth thee? B. Jusserat ille hee commanded ut se bodie convenirem that I should meet him to daie, si liceret per ocium if I were at leisure, M. Quando jusserat? when commanded hee? B. Nudiustertius three daies ago. Ubi illum vidisti? Where sawest thou him? In areâ in the Court è regione templi over against the Church. M. At vide rè menti [...]r [...] but see that you do not lie. B. A me absit men­dacium far bee it from mee to be. Si vis if you will, dabo testes I will bring witnesses ex condi­scipulis of my schoolfellows, qui mecum aderant who were with mee. M. Qui sunt illi? Who are they? B. Daniel & Corderius, Daniel and Corderius, visne ut eos accersam? Will you that

[Page] I go call them? M. Mane, tarrie ego illos con­veniam I will talk with them. S [...]d dic, but tell mee, quid eget Tutor operâ tuâ, what needeth thy Guardian thy help? B. Ad aliquid descri­bendum, to write down somthing. M. Quâ igi­tur horâ at what a clock then vis illum adire? wilt thou go to him? B. Nunc, si tibi placet, Now, if it pleas you. M. Quando huc redibis? When wilt thou return hither? B. Quampri­mum me dimiserit, assoon as hee shall dismiss mee. M. Nunc abi, now go thy way, atque and illi ex me dic salutem plurimam commend me heartily to him. B. Faciam libenter, I will do it willing­ly.

Colloquii prioris imitatio.

Telemachus. Ulysses.

Licétne mihi, Pater, adire matrem? U. Quae te ratio impellit? T. Mandavit illa, ut se ho­die adirem, si liceret per occupationes. U. Quando mandârat? T. Nudiusquartus. U. Ubi illum vidisti? T. In vico, qui est è regi­one coemiterii. U. At cave nè mihi mendaciis imponas. T. A me absint mendacia. Si vis dabo testes ex familiaribus, qui mecum ade­rant.

[Page] U. Qui sunt illi? Nisus & Euryalus, visne ut eos accersam. U. Siste, ego ipsos interrogabo▪ Sed dic, quid eget mater operâ tuâ? T. Ad legendas literas. U. Quo igi­tur die vis illam adire. T. Die crastino. si tibi placet. U. Quando huc revertis? T. Sta­tim à lectis literis. U. Nunc proficiscere, at­que illi ex me salutem plurimam dicito. T. Li­benter saciam.

Exercitium horae secundae matutino tempore.

Metaphrasis Epistolae Ciceronianae, & ejus­dem imitatio.

Epist. Fam. lib. 13. ep. 21.

M. T. C. Servio Sulpitio S. P. D.

Utor valdè-familiariter Asclapone I have very great familiaritie with Asclapo, Patrensi medico, a Physitian, a citizen of Patrae [in Achaia], ejús­que consuetudo and his conversation tum mihi ju­cunda fuit was both pleasant to me, tum etiam ars, and also his art, quam sum expertus which I have had trial of in valetudine in the sickness meorum of my friends: in qua wherein, mihi satisfecit hee gave mee content, tum ipsâ sententiâ both in his judgment, tum etiam and likewise fidelitate in his faithfulness, benevolentiáque and his friend­liness. Igitur therefore hunc tibi commendo; I commend this man to you; & à te peto, and I request this of you, ut des operam that you do your endeavor, ut intelligat, that hee may understand, diligenter me scripsisse that I have written dili­gently de se concerning him, meámque com­mendationem usui magno sibi fuisse, and that my commendation hath been of great use unto him;

[Page]id erit mihi that will bee to mee vehementer gra­tum very acceptable. Vale. Farewell.

Prioris Epistolae imitatio.

Pli [...]. ep. lib. 3. ep.

C. Plinius Trajano.

Arriano Altinate, Equestri gradu viro, admo­dum familiariter utor, ejūsque tum necessitudo mihi dulcis fuit, tum etiam prudentia, quam sum expertus in rebus meorum, in quibus mihi tum ipso judicio, tum etiam consilio & fide satisfecit. Hunc igitur tibi commendo, magnóque opere à te peto, ut cures, ut is intelligat studiosè me scri­psisse de se, meámque commendationem maxi­mo sibi apud te adjumento, & ornamento fuisse: erit id mihi tam gratum quàm quod grati [...]imum. Vale.

Exercitium horae tertiae matutino tempore.

Sententiae variatio. Sent, Cicero vit bonus, dicendi peritus.

Variatio.
  • 1. Cicero est & probus, & eloquens.
  • 2. Cicero est vir cùm probus, tum dicendi peritus.
  • 3. Cicero est vir probus, & idem dicendi peritus.
  • 4. Cicero est vir bonus, simul ac dicendi peritus.
  • 5. Cicero est vir bonus, pariter & dicendi peritus.
  • 6. Cicero est vir aequè bonus, atque eloquens.
  • 7. Cicero est vir perinde bonus, ac dicendi pe­ritus.
  • 8. Cicero est vir haud secus bonus, ac dicendi peritus.
  • 9. Cicero est vir similiter bonus, & dicendi pe­ritus.
  • 10. Cicero est vir haud dissimiliter bonus, & di­cendi peritus.
  • 11. Cicero est vir bonus, juxta ac dicendi pe­ritus.
  • 12. Cicero est vir ex aequo bonus, ac dicendi pe­ritus.
  • 13. Cicero est vir non tantùm bonus, sed etiam dicendi peritus.
  • [Page]14. Cicero est vir non modò bonus, verùm etiam dicendi peritus.
  • 15. Cicero est vir quemadmodum bonus, ità & dicendi peritus.
  • 16. Cicero est vir tam bonus, quàm dicendi peritus.
  • 17. Cicero est vir non minùs bonus, quàm dicendi peritus.
  • 18. Cicero est vir praeter bonitatem etiam di­cendi peritus.
  • 19. Cicero, praeterquam quòd est vir bonus, est etiam dicendi peritus.
  • 20. Cicero vir est, de quo dubites, meliórne sit, an dicendi peritior.
  • 21. Cicero vir est, in quo cum bonitate dicendi peritia ex aequo certat.
  • 22. Cicero vir est, qui bonitatem cum dicendi peritia aequavir.
  • 23. Cicero vir est, cujus probitati respondet di­cendi peritia.
  • 24. Cicero est vir, qui parem probitatem cum dicendi peritiâ aequavir.
  • 25. Cicero, vir magnâ quidem dicendi peritiâ, ve­rùm probitate neutiquam inferior.
  • [Page]26. Cicero vir est pari probitate & dicendi peritiâ▪
  • 27. Cicero vir est in dicendi peritiâ egregius, ne­que suî dissimilis in moribus.
  • 28. Cicero est vir clarus dicendi peritiâ, neque non illustris insigni pro­bitate.
  • 29. Cicero est vir, qui dicendi peritiam morum pro­bitate aequiparat.
  • 30. In Cicerone bonitas aequat dicendi peritiam.
  • 31. Cicero vir est probitate morum dicendique peritiâ juxtà clarus.

Exercitium horae quartae matutino tempore.

Thema & Carmina.

Thema. Literae sunt hominis ornamen­tum.

SOCRATEM ferunt saepius juvenes admonuisse, ut se jugiter in speculo intuerentur, ut, si for­mosi essent, digni eâ specie fierent; sin autem minùs speciosi, eam deformitatem eruditione [...]egerent. Literarum enim studia (ut rectè Cicero) adolescentiam alunt, senectutem oblectant, secundas res ornant, adversis per­fugium ac solatium praebent, delectant domi, non impediunt foris, pernoctant nobiscum, pere­grinantur, rusticantur. Cogitandum igitur est, quàm multos ditârint, quàm multos ad summam dignitatem autoritatémque provexerint literae. Absque his si sit, homines in belluas, in truncos, in lapides, in monstra denique immania trans for­marentur. Atque hinc est, quòd Aristippus dixerit meliùs longè mendicum fieri, quàm in­doctum; ille enim solis pecuniis, hic autem ipsis­simâ caret humanitate. Junium igitur Syllanum bene nummatum, sed indoctum, auream pecudem appellavit Caesar; hominem autem doctrinâ or­natum, animalium pulcherrimum nominabat So­crates. [Page] Quemadmodum enim inter planetas Sol, inter stellas Lucifer, vel inter orbis Primum Mo­b [...]e; sic etiam inter reliquorum hominum genus [...] eminet eruditus, & omnes alios, multis (quod [...]ïunt) parasangis, antecellit. Econtra­rio verò, indoctus, qui à Musis abhorret, est tan­quam lapis super lapidem, qui tantum differt à doctis, quantum vivens à mortuis. Veneranda igitur doctrinae majestas, colenda eruditionis dig­nitas, summo studio, & ambabus ultis amplecten­daeliterae; sine quibus, vita nihil aliud est quàm vivi hominis sepul [...]ura.

Carmina in idem Thema.

Hector Trojanis, Argivis saevus Achilles, Caelicolisque decus Juppiter ipse suis.

Ornamenta viris sic Musae; ut pinguibus arvis Sunt segetes, laetis vitibus uva decus.

Exercitium horae primae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigmata nominum simplicium.

1. Declinationis; cujus terminationes [...]& [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

II. Declinationis: cujus terminati­ones [...]& [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

III. Declinationis; cujus terminati­ones [...]& [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

IV. Declinationis; cujus terminati­ones [...]& [...].

[...]

V. Declinationis; cujus terminationes sunt 8°

  • Vocales. 3. [...]. [...]. [...].
  • Consonantes 5. [...],
  • [...]. [...]. [...]. [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

[Page] [...]

Exercitium horae secundae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigmata nominum contractorum.

I. Declinationis; cujus terminationes [...]& [...].

[...]

II. Declinationis: cujus terminati­ones [...]& [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

III. Declinationis; cujus terminatio unica [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

IV. Declinationis; cujus termina­tiones [...]& [...].

[...]

V. Declinationis; cujus terminationes [...] purum & [...].

[...]

Exercitium horae tertiae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigmata Barytonorum, circumflexorum & in [...], Activoe vocis.

I. Barytonorum [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

II. Circumflexorum [...].

[Page] [...]

III. Verb [...]rum in [...]. [...].

[Page] [...]

Exercitium horae quartae pomeridiano tempore.
Paradigmata verborum Barytonorum, circum­flexorum, & in [...] Passivoe vocis:

I. Barytonorum Pass. [...].

[Page] [...]

II. Circumflexorum Pass. [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

III. Verborum in [...] Pass. [...].

[...]

[Page] [...]

Finis Exercitierum IVtae Classis.

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