Aetatis Suae. 71. 1660.

What? wouldst thou uiew but in one face
all hospitalitie, the race
of those that for the Gusto stand,
whose tables a whole Ark comand
of Natures plentie, wouldst thou see
this sight, peruse Maijs booke, 'tis hee.

For Nathaniell Brooke, att the Angell in Corne hill;

Ia Parry.
[...]

THE Accomplisht Cook, OR THE ART and MYSTERY OF COOKERY.

Wherein the whole Art is revealed in a more easie and perfect Method, then hath been publisht in any Language.

Expert and ready wayes for the Dressing of all sorts of FLESH, FOWL, and FISH; the Raising of Pastes; the best Directions for all manner of Kick­shaws, and the most Poinant Sauces; with the Tearms of CARVING and SEWING.

An exact Account of all Dishes for the Season; with other A la mode Curiosities.

Together with the lively Illustrations of such necessary Figures as are referred to Practice.

Approved by the Fifty Years Experience and Industry of ROBERT MAY, in his Attendance on several Persons of Honour.

London, Printed by R. W. for Nath. Brooke, at the Sign of the Angel in Cornhill, 1660.

To the Right Honourable my Lord Lumley, and my Lord Lovelace; and to the Right Worshipful Sir. VVilliam Paston, Sir Kenelme Digby, and Sir Frederick Corn­wallis; so well known to the Nati­on for their admired Hospitalities.

Right Honourable, and Right worshipful,

HE is an Alien, a meer Stanger in England that hath not been acquainted with your generous House-keepings; for my own part, my more particular Tyes of service to you my Honoured Lords, have built me up to the height of this experience, for which this Book now at last dares appear to the world: those times which I attended upon your Honours were those golden dayes of Peace and Hospitality, when you enjoy'd your own, so as to entertain and relieve others.

Right Honourable, and Right Worshipful, I have not onely been an eye witness, but interested by my attendance; so as that I may justly acknow­ledge those Triumphs and magnificent Trophies of [Page]Cookery that have adorned your Tables; nor can I but confess to the world, except I should be guil­ty of the highest ingratitude, that the onely stru­cture of this my Art and Knowledge, I owed to your costs, generous and inimitable expences; thus not onely I have derived my experience, but your Countrey hath reap't the plenty of your Huma­nity and charitable Bounties.

Right Honourable, and Right Worshipful, Hos­pitality which was once a Relique of Gentry, and a known Cognizance to all ancient Houses, hath lost her Title through the unhappy and cruel Distur­bances of these Times, she is now reposing of her lately so alarum'd Head on your Beds of Honour: In the mean space that our English World may know the Maecenas's and Patrons of this Generous Art, I have exposed this Volume to the Publique, under the Tuition of your Names; at whose Feet I prostrate these Endeavours, and shall for ever remain

Your most humbly devo­ted Servant, ROBERT MAY.

To the Master Cooks, and to such young Practitioners of the Art of Cookery, to whom this Book may be useful.

TO you first, most worthy Artists, I acknowledge one of the chief Motives that made me to ad­venture this Volume to your Censures, hath been to testifie my gratitude to your experienced So­ciety; nor could I omit to direct it to you, as it hath been my ambition, that you should be sensible of my Proficiency of Endeavours in this Art. To all honest well intending Men of our Profession, or others, this Book cannot but be acceptable, as it plainly and profitably discovers the My­stery of the whole Art; for which though I may be envied by some that onely value their private Interests above Poste­rity and the publick good, yet God and my own Conscience would not permit me to bury these my Experiences with my Silver Hairs in the Grave: and that more especially, as the advantages of my Education hath raised me above the Ambitions of others, in the converse I have had with other Nations, who in this Art fall short of what I have known experimented by you my worthy Countreymen. Howso­ever, the French by their Insinuations, not without enough of Ignorance, have bewitcht some of the Gallants of our Nati­on with Epigram Dishes, smoak't rather then drest, so strangely to captivate the Gusto, their Mushroom'd Experi­ences [Page]for Sauce rather then Diet, for the generality howso­ever called A la mode, not being worthy of taken notice on. As I lived in France and had the Language, and have been an eye-witness of their Cookeries, as well as a peruser of their Manuscripts and printed Authours, whatsoever I found good in them I have inserted in this Volume. I do acknowledge my self not to be a little beholding to the Italian and Spanish Treatises, though without my foste­rage and bringing up under the Generofities and Bounties of my noble Patrons and Masters, I could never have arri­ved to this Experience. To be confined and limited to the narrowness of a Purse, is to want the Materials from which the Artist must gain his knowledge. Those Honour­able Persons my Lord Lumley, and my Lord Lovelace, and others with whom I have spent a part of my time, were such whose generous costs never weighed the Expence, so that they might arrive to that right and high esteem they had of their Gusto's. Whosoever peruses this Volume, shall finde it amply exemplified in Dishes of such high pri­ces, which onely these Noblesses Hospitalities did reach to: I should have sinned against their to be perpetuated Boun­ties, if I had not set down their several varieties, that the Reader might be as well acquainted with what is extraor­dinary as what is ordinary in this Art; as I am truly sensi­ble that some of those things that I have set down will amaze a not thorow-paced Reader in the Art of Cookery, as they are Delicates, never till this time made known to the World.

Fellow Cooks, that I might give a testimony to my Coun­trey of the laudableness of our Profession, that I might en­courage young Undertakers to make a progress in the Practice of this Art, I have laid open these Experiences, as I was most unwilling to hide my Talent, but have ever endeavoured to do good to others; I acknowledge that there hath already been several Books publisht, and amongst [Page]the rest some out of the French, for ought I could perceive to very little purpose, empty and unprofitable Treatises, of as little use as some Niggards Kitchens, which the Reader in respect of the confusion of the Method, or barrenness of those Authours Experience, hath rather been puzzled then profited by; as those already extant Authours have trace't but one common beaten road, repeating for the main what others have in the same homely manner done before them: it hath been my task to denote some new Fa­culty or Science, that others have not yet discovered; this the Reader will quickly discern by those new Terms of Art which he shall meet withal throughout this whole Volume. Some things I have inserted of Carving and Sewing, that I might demonstrate the whole Art. In the contrivance of these my Labours, I have so managed them for the general good, that those whose Purses cannot reach to the cost of rich Dishes, I have descended to their meaner Expences, that they may give, though upon a sudden Treatment, to their Kindred, Friends, Allies, and Acquaintance, a hand­some and relishing entertainment in all Seasons of the year, though at some distance from Towns or Villages. Nor have my serious considerations been wanting amongst di­rections for Diet how to order what belongs to the Sick, as well as to those that are in Health; and withal my care hath been such, that in this Book, as in a Closet, is contained all such Secrets as relate to Preserving, Conserving, Candying, Distilling, and such rare varieties as they are most concerned in the best husbandring and housewifering of them. Nor is there any Book, except that of the Queens Closet, which was so enricht with Receipts presented to her Majesty, as yet that I ever saw in any Language, that ever contained so many profitable Experiences as in this Volume; in all which the Reader shall finde most of the Compositions, and mixtures easie to be prepared, most pleasing to the pallat, and not too chargeable to the Purse: since you are at li­berty [Page]to employ as much or as little therein as you please. It is impossible for any Authour to please all people, no more then the best Cook can fancy their pallats whose mouths are alwayes out of taste. As for those who make it their business to hide their Candle under a Bushel, to do onely good to themselves and not to others, such as will curse me for revealing the Secrets of this Art, I value the discharge of mine own Conscience, in doing good, above all their malice; protesting to the whole world, that I have not concealed any material Secret of above my fifty years Experience; my Father being a Cook, under whom in my Childhood I was bred up in this Art. To conclude, the diligent peruser of this Volume gains that in a small time as to the Theory, which an Apprenticeship with some Masters could never have taught them. I have no more to do, but to desire of God a blessing upon these my Endeavours, and remain

Yours in the most ingenuous wayes of Friendship, ROBERT MAY.

A short Narrative of some passages of the Authors Life.

FOr the better knowledge of the worth of this Book, though it be not usual, the Author being living, it will not be amiss to acquaint the Reader with a brief account of some passages of his Life, as also what eminent Persons (renowned for their good House-keeping) whom he hath served throughout the whole series of his Life; for as the growth of the children argueth the strength of the Parents, so doth the judgement and abili­ties of the Artist conduce to the making and goodness of the Work: now that such great knowledge in this so commendable Art was not gained but by long experience, practice, and converse with the most ablest men in their times, the Reader in this brief Narrative may be informed by what steps and degrees he astended to the same.

He was born in the year of our Lord 1588. His Father being one of the ablest Cooks in his time, and his first Tutor in the knowledge or practice of Cookery; under whom having attained to some perfection in that Art, the old La­dy Dormer sent him over into France, where he continu­ed five years, being in the Family of a noble Peer, and first President of Paris; where he gained not onely the French Tongue, but also bettered his knowledge in Cookery: and returning again into England was bound Apprentice in London to Mr. Arthur Hollinsworth in Newgate Market, one of the ablest workmen in London, Cook to the Grocers Hall and Star Chamber. His Prenticeship being out, the Lady Dormer sent for him to be her Cook under his Father, (who then served that Honourable Lady) where were four [Page]Cooks more, such noble Houses were then keept, the glo­ry of that, and shame of this present age; then were those golden dayes wherein were practised the Triumphs and Trophies of Cookery, then was Hospitality esteemed, Neighbourhood preserved, the Poor cherished, and God honoured; then was Religion less talk't on and more pra­ctised, then was Atheism and Schisme less in fashion; and then did men strive to be good rather then to seem so. Here he continued till the Lady Dormer died, and then went again to London and served the Lord Castle-haven, after that the Lord Lumley, that great lover and knower of Art, who wanted no knowledge in the decerning this mystery; next the Lord Mountague in Sussex; and at the beginning of these Wars the Countess of Kent, then Mr. Nevel of Chrissen-Temple in Essex, whose Ancestours the Smiths, of whom he is descended, were the greatest main­tainers of Hospitality in all those parts; nor doth the pre­sent Mr. Nevil degenerate from their laudable examples. Divers other persons of like esteem and quality hath he ser­ved, as the Lord Rivers, Mr. John Ashburnham, of the Bed Chamber, Doctor Steed in Kent, Sir Thomas Stiles of Drury-Lane in London, Sir Marmaduke Constable in York­shire, Sir Charles Lucas; and lastly the Right Honourable the Lady Eng! efield where he now liveth.

Thus have I given you a brief account of his Life, I shall next tell you in what high esteem this noble Art was with the ancient Romans, Plutarch reports that Lucullus his ordinary diet was fine dainty dishes, with works of pastery, Banquetting dishes, and fruit curiously wrought and pre­pared; and that his Table might be furnished with choice of varieties, (as the noble Lord Lumley did) that he kept and nourished all manner of Fowl all the year long. To this purpose he telleth us a story how Pompey being sick, the Physicians willed him to eat a Thrush, and it being said there was none to be had, because it was then Summer; it [Page]was answered, they might have them at Lucullus's house, who kept both Thrushes and all manner of Fowl all the year long. This Lucullus was for his Hospitality so esteemed in Rome, that there was no talk but of his noble House-keeping. The said Plutarch reports, how Cicero and Pompey inviting themselves to sup with him, they would not let him speak with his men to provide any thing more then ordinary; but he telling them he would sup in Apollo (a Chamber so named, and every Chamber proportioned their expences) he by this wile beguiled them, and a sup­per was made ready estimated at fifty thousand pence, eve­ry Roman penny being seven pence half penny English money; a vast summe for that Age, before the Indies had overflowed Europe. But I have too far digressed from the Author, of whom I might speak much more as in relation to his person and abilities, but who will cry out the Sun shines: this already said is enough to satisfie any but the malicious, who are the greatest enemies to all honest en­deavours. Homer had his Zoilus, and Virgil his Bavius; the best Wits have had their detracters, and the greatest Artists have been maligned; the best on't is, such Works as these out-live their Authors with an honourable respect of posterity, whilest envious Critticks never survive their own happiness, their Lives going out like the snuff of a Candle.

Triumphs and Trophies in Cookery, to be used at Festival Times, as Twelfth Day, &c.

MAke the likeness of a Ship in pasteboard, with flags and streamers, the guns belonging to it of Kickses, binde them about with pack thred, and cover them with course paste proportionable to the fashion of a Cannon with Carriages, lay them in places convenient, as you see them in Ships of War, with such holes and trains of powder that they may all take fire; place your Ship firm in a great Charger; then make a salt round about it, and stick therein egg-shells full of sweet water; you may by a great pin take out all the meat out of the egg by blowing, and then fill it with the rose-water. Then in another Charger have the proportion of a Stag made of course paste, with a broad arrow in the side of him, and his body filled up with claret wine. In another Charger at the end of the Stag have the proportion of a Castle with Battlements, Percullices, Gates, and Draw-Bridges made of pasteboard, the Guns of Kickses, and co­vered with course paste as the former; place it at a distance from the Ship to fire at each other. The Stag being plac't betwixt them with Egg-shells full of sweet water (as be­fore) placed in salt. At each side of the Charger wherein is the Stag, place a Pie made of course paste, in one of which let there be some live Frogs, in the other live Birds; make these pies of course paste filled with bran, and yel­lowed over with saffron or yolks of eggs, gild them over [Page]in spots, as also the Stag, the Ship, and Castle; bake them, and [...]ace them with gilt Bay leaves on the Turrets and Tunnels of the Castle and Pies; being baked, make a hole in the bottom of your pies, take out the bran, put in your Frogs and Birds, and close up the holes with the same course paste; then cut the lids neatly up, to be taken off by the Tunnels: being all placed in order upon the Table, before you fire the trains of powder, order it so that some of the Ladies may be perswaded to pluck the Arrow out of the Stag, then will the Claret wine follow as blood run­ning out of a wound. This being done with admiration to the beholders, after some short pawse, fire the train of the Castle, that the pieces all of one side may go off; then fire the trains of one side of the Ship as in a Battle; next turn the Chargers, and by degrees fire the trains of each other side as before. This done to sweeten the stinck of the pow­der, the Ladies take the egg shells full of sweet waters and throw them at each other. All dangers being seemed over, by this time you may suppose they will desire to see what is in the pies; where lifting first the lid off one pie, out skips some Frogs, which makes the Ladies to skip and shreek; next after the other pie, whence comes out the Birds; who by a natural instinct flying at the light, will put out the candles: so that what with the flying Birds and skipping Frogs, the one above, the other beneath, will cause much delight and pleasure to the whole compa­ny: at length the candles are lighted, and a Banquet brought in, the musick sounds, and every one with much delight and content rehearses their actions in the former passages. These were formerly the delights of the Nobili­ty, before good House-keeping had left England, and the Sword really acted that which was onely counterfeited in such honest and laudable Exercises as these.

On the unparallel'd Piece of Mr. MAY his Cookery.

SEe here a Work set forth of such Perfection,
Will praise it self, and doth not beg Protection
From flatter'd greatness. Industry and pains,
For gen'ral good, his aim, his Countreys gains;
Which ought respect him. A good English Cook,
Excelling Modish Mounsieurs, and that Book
Called Perfect Cook, Merete's Pastery
Translated, looks like old hang'd tapestry;
The wrong side outwards; so Mounsieur adieu,
I'me for our Native May's Works rare and new:
And with Antique could have prepar'd and drest
The Nations Quondam grand Imperial Feast,
Which that thrice Crown'd Third Edward did ordain
For his high Order and their Noble Train;
Whereon St. George his famous day was seen,
A Court on earth that did all Courts out-shine.
And how all Rareties and Cates might be
Order'd for a renown'd solemnity.
Learn of this Cook, who with judgement, reason,
Teacheth for every Time, each thing's true season;
Making his Compounds with such harmony,
Taste shall not charge with superiority,
Of pepper, salt, or spice, by the best pallat
Or any one Herb in his Broths, or Sallat.
Where temperance and discretion guides his deeds,
Satis his Motto, where no thing exceeds;
Or ought to waste, for there's good Husbandry
To be observ'd, as Art in Cookery.
Which of the Mathematicks doth partake
Geometrick Proportions when they bake?
Who can in Paste erect, of finest flour,
A compleat Fort, a Castle, or a Tower.
A City Custard doth so subtly winde,
That should Truth seek, shee'd scarce all corners finde:
Plat-forme of Sconces that might Souldiers teach,
To fortifie by Works as well as Preach.
Ile say no more, for as I am a sinner,
I've wrought my self a stomach to a dinner,
Inviting Poets not to tantalize,
But feast (not surfeit) here their Phantasies.
James Parry.

To the Reader of (my very loving Friend) Mr. ROBERT MAY his incomparable Book of Cookery.

SEe here's a Book set forth with such things in't,
As former Ages never saw in print;
Something I'de write in praise on't, but the pen
Of famous Cleave land, or renowned Ben,
If unintoom'd, might give this Book its due,
By their high strains, and keep i [...] alwayes new.
But I whose ruder Stile could never clime,
Or step beyond a home-bred Countrey Rime,
Must not attempt it; onely this I'le say,
Cato's Res Rustica's far short of May.
Here's taught to keep all sorts of Flesh in date,
All sorts of Fish, if you will marinate;
To candy, to preserve, to souce, to pickle,
To make rare Sauces both to please, and tickle
To the pretty Ladies pallats with delight;
Both how to glut, and gain an appetite.
The fritter, pancake, musroom; with all these,
The curious candle made of Ambergreece.
He is so universal, he'l not miss
The Pudding, nor Bononian Sawsages.
Italian, Spaniard, French, he all out-goes,
Refines their Kickshaws, and their Olio's;
The rarest use of Sweet-meats, Spicery,
And all things else belong to Cookery:
Not onely this, but to give all content,
Here's all the forms of every implement
To work or Carve with; so he makes thee able
To deck the Dresser, and adorn the Table.
What Dish goes first of every kinde of Meat,
And so ye're welcome, pray fall too, and eat.
Reader, read on, for I have done: farewell.
The Book's so good it cannot choose but sell.
Thy well wishing Friend, John Town.

The most Exact, or A la Mode wayes of Carving and Sewing.

Tearms of Carving.

BReak that dear, leach that brawn, rear that goose, lift that swan, sauce that capon, spoil that hen, frust that chicken, unbrace that mallard, unlace that coney, dismember that hern, display that crane, disfigure that peacock, unjoynt that bitturn, un­tach that curlew, allay that pheasant, wing that partridge, wing that quail, mince that plover, thigh that pidgeon, border that pasty, thigh that woodcock; thigh all man­ner of small birds.

Timber the fire, tire that egg, chine that salmon, string that lamprey, splat that pike, sauce that plaice, sauce that tench, splay that bream, side that haddock, tusk that bar­bel, culpon that trout, fin that chevin, transon that eel, tranch that sturgeon, undertranch that porpus, tame that crab, barb that lobster.

Service.

FIrst set forth mustard and brawn, pottage, beef, mut­ton, stewed pheasant, swan, capon, pig, venison, bake, custard, leach, lombard, blanchmanger, and jelly; for standard venison roste kid, fawn and coney, bustard, stork, crane, peacock with his tail, hearn-shaw, bittern, woodcock, partridge, plover, rabbets, great birds, larks, dowcets, pam­puff, white leach, amber-jelly, cream of almonds, curlew, [Page]brew, snite, quail, sparrow, martinet, pearch in jelly, pet­ty-pervis, quince bak't, leach, dewgard, fruter-sage, bland­rells, or pippins with carawayes in comfits, wafers, and ipocras.

Sauce for all manner of Fowls.

MUstard is good with brawn, beef, chine of bacon, and mutton; verjuyce good to boil chickens and capons; swan with chaldrons; ribs of beef with garlick, mustard, pepper, verjuyce, ginger; sauce of lamb, pig and fawn, mustard, and sugar; to pheasant, partridge, and coney, sauce gamelin; to hearn-shaw, egript, plover, and crane, brew and curlew, salt, and sugar, and water of Ca­mot; bustard, shovilland, and bittern, sauce gamelin; wood­cock, lapwing, lark, quail, martinet, venison and snite with white salt; sparrows and thrushes with salt and cina­on. Thus with all meats sauce shall have the opperation.

Directions for the order of Car­ving Fowl.

Lift that Swan.

THe manner of cutting up a swan must be to slit her right down in the middle of the breast, and so clean thorow the back from the neck to the rump, so part her in two halves cleanly and handsomely that you break not nor tear the meat, lay the two halves in a fair charger with the slit sides downwards, throw salt about it, and set it again on the table. Let your sauce be chaldron for a swan, and serve it in saucers.

Rear the Goose.

You must break a goose contrary to the former way, take a goose being roasted, and take off both the legs fair like a shoulder of lamb, take them quite from the body, then cut off the belly-piece round close to the lower end of the breast; lace her down with your knife clean through the breast on each side your thumbs breadth from the bone in the middle of the breast; then take off the pinion of each side, and the flesh which you first laced with your knife, raise it up clean from the bone, and take it from the carcase with the pinion; then cut up the bone which lieth before in the breast (which is commonly called the merry-thought,) the skin and flesh being upon it; then cut from the breast-bone another slice of flesh clean tho­row, and take it clean from the bone, turn your carcase and cut it asunder the back-bone above the loin bones: then take the rump end of the back-bone, and lay it in a fair dish with the skinny side upwards, lay at the fore-end of that the merry-thought with the skin side upward, and before that the apron of the goose; then lay your pini­ons on each side contrary, set your legs on each side con­trary behinde them, that the bone end of the legs may stand up cross in the middle of the dish, and the wing pini­ons on the outside of them; put under the wing pinions on each side the long slices of flesh which you cut from the breast bone, and let the ends meet under the leg bones, let the other ends lie cut in the dish betwixt the leg and the pinion; then pour your sauce into the dish under your meat, throw on salt, and set it on the table.

To cut up a Turkey, or Bustard.

Raise up the leg very fair, and open the joynt with the point of your knife, but take not off the leg; then lace down the breast with your knife on both sides, and open the breast pinion with the knife, but take not the pinion off; then raise up the merry-thought betwixt the breast [Page]bone and the top of the merry-thought, lace down the flesh on both sides of the breast-bone, and raise up the flesh called the brawn, turn it outward upon both sides, but break it not, nor cut it not off; then cut off the wing pi­nion at the joynt next to the body, and stick on each side the pinion in the place where ye turned out the brawn, but cut off the sharp end of the pinion, take the middle piece, and that will fit just the place.

You may cut up a capon or pheasant the same way, but of your capon cut not off the pinion, but in the place where you put the pinion of the turkey, you must put the gizard of your capon on each side half.

Dismember that Hern.

Take off both the legs and lace it down to the breast with your knife on both sides, raise up the flesh and take it clean off with the pinion; then stick the head in the breast, set the pinion on the contrary side of the carcase, and the leg on the other side, so that the bone ends may meet cross over the carcase, and the other wing cross over upon the top of the carcase.

Ʋnbrane the Mallard.

Raise up the pinion and the leg, but take them not off, raise the merry thought from the breast, and lace it down on each side of the breast with your knife, bending too and fro like waves.

Ʋnlace that Coney.

Turn the back downwards, and cut the belly flaps clean off from the kidney, but take keed you cut not the kidney nor the flesh; then put in the point of your knife between the kidneys and loosen the flesh from each side the bone; then turn up the back of the rabber, and cut it cross between the wings, and lace it down close by the bone with your knife on both sides, then open the flesh of the rabbet from the bone with the point of your knife against the kidney, and pull the leg open softly with your hand, but pluck it [Page]not off, then thrust in your knife betwixt the ribs and the kidney, slit it out, and lay the legs close together.

Sauce that Capon.

Lift up the right leg and wing, and so array forth, and lay him in the platter as he should fly, and so serve him. Know that capons or chickens be arrayed after one sauce; the chickens shall be sauced with green sauce or verjuyce.

Allay that Pheasant.

Take a pheasant, raise his legs and wings as it were a hen, and no sauce but onely salt.

Wing that Partridge.

Raise his legs, and his wings as a hen, if you mince him sauce him with wine, powder of ginger, and salt, and set him upon a chafing dish of coles to warm and serve.

Wing that Quail.

Take a quail and raise his legs and his wings as a hen, and no sauce but salt.

Display that Crane.

Unfold his legs, and cut off his wings by the joynts, then take up his wings and his legs, and sauce them with powder of ginger, mustard, vinegar and salt.

Dismember that Hern.

Raise his legs and his wings as a crane, and sauce him with vinegar, mustard, powder of ginger and salt.

Ʋnjoynt that Bittern.

Raise his legs and his wings as a heron, and no sauce but salt.

Break that Egript.

Take an egript, and raise his legs and his wings as a he­ron, and no sauce but salt.

Ʋntach that Curlew.

Raise his legs and his wings as a hen, and no sauce but salt.

Ʋntach that brew

Raise his legs and his wings in the same manner, and no sauce but onely salt.

Ʋnlace that Coney.

Lay him on the back and cut away the vents, then raise the wings and the sides, and lay bulk, chine, and sides toge­ther, sauce them with vinegar and powder of ginger.

Break that Sarcel.

Take a sarcel or teal, and raise his wings and his legs, and no sauce but onely salt.

Mince that Plover.

Raise his legs and wings as a hen, and no sauce but one­ly salt.

A Snite.

Raise his legs, wings, and his shoulders as a plover, and no sauce but salt.

Thigh that Woodcock.

Raise his legs as a hen, and dight his brain.

The Sewing of Fish.

The first Course.

TO go to the sewing of fish, muscalade, minews in sew, of porpos, or of salmon, bake't herring with sugar, green-fish, pike, lamprey, salens, porpos rosted, bake't gurnard and bak't lamprey.

The second Course.

Jelly white and red, dates in confect, conger, salmon, dorey, brit, turbut, holibut for standard, bace, trout, mul­let, chevin, soles, lamprey roste, and tench in jelly.

The third Course.

Fresh sturgeon, bream, pearch in jelly, a jole of salmon, sturgeon, welks, apples, and pears rosted with sugar can­dy, figs of molisk, raisins, dates capt with minced ginger, wafers, and ipocras.

The Carving of Fish.

THe carver of fish must see to peason and furmety, the tail and the liver; ye must look if there be a salt por­pos or sole, turrentine, and do after the form of venison; baked Herrings, lay it whole on the trencher, then white herring in a dish, open it by the back, pick out the bones and the row, and see there be mustard. Of salt fish, green­fish, salt salmon, and conger, pare away the skin; salt fish, stock fish, marling, mackrel, and hake with butter, and take away the bones and skins; a pike, lay the womb upon a trencher, with pike sauce enough; a salt lamprey, gob­bin it in seven or eight pieces, and so present it. A plaice, put out the water, then cross him with your knife, and cast on salt, wine, or ale. Bace, Gurnet, Rochet, Bream, Che­vin, Mullet, Roch, Pearch, Sole, Mackrel, Whiting, Had­dock, and Codling, raise them by the back, pick out the bones, and cleanse the rest in the belly. Carp, Brean, Sole, and Trout, back and belly together; Salmon, Conger, Sturgeon, Turbut, Thornback, Houndfish, and Holibut, cut them in the dishes; the Porpos about; Tench in his sauce; cut two Eels, and Lampreys roast, pull off the skin, and pick out the bones, put thereto vinegar and powder. A Crab, break him afunder in a dish, make the shell clean, and put in the stuff again, temper it with vinegar, and pow­der them, cover it with bread and heat it; a Crevis dight him thus, part him asunder, slit the belly, and take out the fish, pare away the red skin, mince it thin, put vinegar in the dish, and set it on the Table without heating. A Jole of Sturgeon, cut it into thin morsels, and lay it round about the dish. Fresh Lamprey bak't, open the pasty, then take white bread and cut it thin, lay it in a dish, and with a spoon take out Gallentine, and lay it upon the bread with red wine and powder of Cinamon; then cut a gobbin of [Page]Lamprey, mince it thin and lay it in the Gallentine, and set it on the fire to heat. Fresh-herting, with salt and wine. Shrimps well picked, Flounders, Gudgeons, Minews, and Muskles, Eels and Lampreys, Sprats is good in sew, mus­culade in worts, oysters in sew, oysters in gravy, minews in porpos, salmon in jelly white and red, cream of almonds dates in comfets, pears and quinces in sirrup, with parsley roots, mortus of hound-fish raise standing.

Sauces for Fish.

MUstard is good for salt herring, salt fish, salt conger, salmon, sparling, salt eel and ling; vinegar is good with salt porpus, turrentine, salt sturgeon, salt thirlepole, and salt whale, lamprey with gallentine; verjuyce to roach, dace, bream, mullet, flounders, salt crab and chevine with powder of cinamon and ginger; green sauce is good with green fish and hollibut, cottel, and fresh turbut; put not your green sauce away for it is good with mustard.

THE Accomplisht Cook, OR, The whole Art and Mystery of COOKERY, fitted for all De­grees and Qualities.

Section 1.

Perfect Directions for the Al a mode Wayes of dressing all manner of Boyled Meats, with their several Sauces, &c.

To make an Olio Podrida.

TAke a pipkin or pot of some three gallons, fill it with fair water, and set it over a fire of Char­coals, and put in first your hardest meats, a Rump of Beef, Bolonia Sausages, Neats Tongues, two dry, and two green, boiled and larded, about two hours af­ter the pot is boiled and scummed: but put in more pre­sently after your Beef is scummed, Mutton, Venison, Pork, Bacon, all the foresaid in gubbins, as big as a Ducks Egg, in equal pieces; put in also Carrots, Turnips, Onions, [Page 2]Cabbidge, in good big pieces as big as your meat, a faggot of sweet herbs well bound up, and some whole Spinedge, Sorrel, Burradge, Endive, Marigolds, and other good Pot­hearbs a little chopped; and sometimes French Barley, or Lupins green or dry.

Then a little before you dish out your Olio, put to your pot, Cloves, Mace, Saffron, &c.

Then next have divers Fowls; as first,

A Goose, or Turky, two Capons, two Ducks, two Phea­sants, two Widgeons, four Partridges, four Stockdoves, four Teals, eight Snites, twenty four Quails, forty eight Larks.

Boil these foresaid Fowls in water and salt in a pan, pip­kin, or pot, &c.

Then have, Bread, Marrow, Bottoms of Artichocks, Yolks of hard Eggs, Large Mace, Chesnuts boil'd and blancht, two Collyflowers, Saffron.

And stew these in a pipkin together, being ready clenged with some good sweet butter, a little white wine and strong broth.

Some other times for variety you may use Beets, Pota­to's, Skirrets, Pistaches, Pine Apple seed, or Almonds, Poungarnet, and Lemons,

Now to dish your Olio, dish first your Beef, Veal, or Pork; then your Venison, and Mutton, Tongues, Sausage, and Roots over all.

Then next your largest Fowl, Land Fowl, or Sea Fowl, as first, a Goose or Turky, two Capons, two Pheasants, four Ducks, four Widgeons, four Stock-doves, four Par­tridges, eight Teals, twelve Snites, twenty four Quails, forty eight Larks, &c.

Then broth it, and put on your pipkin of Collyflowers, [Page 3]Artichocks, Chesnuts, some Sweat-breads fried, Yolks of hard Eggs, then Marrow boil'd in strong broth or water, large Mace, Saffron, Pistaches, and all the foresaid things being finely stewed up, and some red Beets over all, slic't Lemons, and Lemon peels whole, and run it over with bea­ten buttter.

Marrow Pies.

For the garnish of the Dish, make Marrow Pies made like round chewets, but not so high altogether; then have Sweetbreads of Veal cut like small dice, some Pistaches, and Marrow, some Potato's or Artichocks cut like the Sweat­breads; as also some enterlarded Bacon, yolks of hard Eggs, Nutmegs, Salt, Gooseberries, Grapes, or Barberies, and some minced Veal in the bottom of the pie minced with some Bacon or Beef-suet, Sparagus, and Chesnuts, with a little Musk; close them up, and baste them with Saf­fron water, bake them, and liquor it with beaten butter, and set them about the dish side or brims, with some bot­toms of Artichocks, and yolks of hard Eggs, Lemons in quarters, Poungarnets, and red Beets boil'd and carved.

Other Marrow Pies.

Other wayes for variety, you may make other Marrow Pies of minced Veal and Beef-suet, seasoned with Pepper, Salt, Nutmegs, and boil'd Sparagus, cut half an inch long, yolks of hard Eggs cut in quarters, and mingled with the meat and marrow: fill your Pies, bake them not too hard, musk them, &c.

Other Marrow Pies.

Other wayes, Marrow Pies of bottoms of little Arti­chocks, Suckers, yolks of hard Eggs, Chesnuts, Marrow, and interlarded Bacon cut like dice, some Veal Sweetbreads [Page 4]cut also, or Lamb-stones, Potato's, or Skirrets, and Spara­gus, or none; season them lightly with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, close your Pies and bake them.

Olio. Marrow Pies.

Butter three pound, Flower one quart, Lamb-stones three pair, Sweetbreads six, Marrow-bones eight, large mace, Cocks-stones twenty, interlarded Bacon one pound, knots of Eggs twelve, Artichocks twelve, Sparagus one hun­dred, Cocks combs twenty, Pistaches one pound, Nutmegs, Pepper, and Salt.

Season the aforesaid lightly, and lay them in the Pie upon some minced Veal or Mutton, your interlarded Bacon in thin slices of half an inch long, mingled among the rest, fill the Pie, and put in some Grapes, and slic't Lemon, Bar­berries or Gooseberries.

1 Pies of Marrow.

Flower, Sweet-bread, Marrow, Artichocks, Pistaches, Nutmeg, Eggs, Bacon, Veal, Suet, Sparagus, Chesnuts, Musk, Saffron, Butter.

2 Marrow Pies.

Flower, Butter, Veal, Suet, Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Spa­ragus, Eggs, Grapes, Marrow, Saffron.

3 Marrow Pies.

Flower, Butter, Eggs, Artichocks, Sweet bread, Lamb­stones, Potato's, Nutmegs, Pepper, Salt, Skirrets, Grapes Bacon.

To the Garnish of an extraordinary Olio: as followeth.

Two, Collars of Pigbrawn, two Marrow Pies, twelve roste Turtle Doves in a Pie, four Pies, eightteen Quails in a Pie, four Pies, two Sallets, two Jelleys of two colours, two Forc't meats, two Tarts.

Thus for an extraordinary Olio, or Olio Royal.

To make a Bisk divers wayes.

TAke a rack of Mutton, and a knuckle of Veal, put them a boiling in a pipkin of a gallon with some fair water, and when it boils, scum it, and put to it some salt, two or three blades of large Mace, and a Clove or two; boil it to three pints, and strain the meat, save the broth for your use, and take off the fat clean.

Then boil twelve Pigeon-Peepers, and eight Chicken-Peepers in a pipkin with fair water, salt, and a piece of in­terlarded Bacon, scum them clean, and boil them fine, white, and quick.

Then have a roste Capon minced, and put to it some Gravy, Nutmegs, and Salt, and stew it together; then put to it the juyce of two or three Oranges, and beaten Butter, &c.

Then have ten Sweet breads, and ten pallets fried, and the same number of lips and noses being first tender boiled and blanched, cut them like lard, and fry them, put away the But­ter, and put to them Gravy, a little Anchove, Nutmeg, and a little garlick, or none, the juyce of two or three oranges, and Marrow fried in Butter with Sage leaves, and some beaten Butter.

Then again, have some boiled Marrow and twelve Arti­chocks, Suckers, and Peaches finely boiled, and put into [Page 6]beaten Butter, some Pistaches boiled also in some Wine and Gravy, eight Sheeps tongues larded and boiled, and one hundred Sparagus boiled and put into beaten Butter, or Skirrets.

Then have Lemons carved, and some cut like little dice.

Again, fry some Spinage, and Parsley, &c.

These foresaid matterials being ready, have some French bread in the bottom of your dish.

Then dish on it your Chickens, and Pigeons, broth it; next your Quails, then Sweet breads, then your Pallets, then your Artichocks or Sparagus, and Pistaches, then your Lemon, Poungarnet, or Grapes, Spinage and fryed Mar­row; and if yellow, Saffron or fryed Sage, then round the center of your boiled meat put your minced Capon, then run all over with beaten Butter, &c.

  • 1. For variety, Clary fryed with yolks of Eggs.
  • 2. Knots of Eggs.
  • 3. Cocks stones.
  • 4. Cocks Combs.
  • 5. If white, strained Almonds, with some of the broth.
  • 6. Goosberries, or Barberries.
  • 7. Minced meat in Balls.
  • 8. If green, Juyce of Spinage stamped with manchet, and strained with some of the broth and give it a walm.
  • 9. Garnish with boiled Spinedge.
  • 10. If yellow, yolks of hard Eggs strained with some Broth and Saffron.

And many other varieties.

A Bisk other wayes.

TAke a leg of Beef, cut it into two pieces, and boil it in a gallon or five quarts of water, scum it, and about half an hour after put in a knuckle of Veal, and scum it also, boil it from five quarts to two quarts or less; and being [Page 7]three quarters boil'd, put in some Salt, and some Cloves and Mace; being through boil'd, strain it from the meat, and keep the broth for your use in a pipkin.

Then have eight Marrow bones clean scraped from the flesh, and finely cracked over the middle, boil in water and falt three of them, and the other leave for garnish, to be boil'd in strong broth, and laid on the top of the Bisk when it is dished.

Again, boil your Fowl in water and salt, Teals, Par­tridge, Pigeons, Plovers, Quails, Larks.

Then have a joynt of Mutton made into balls with sweet Herbs, Salt, Nutmegs, grated Bread, Eggs, Suet, a Clove or two of Garlick, and Pistaches boil'd in broth, with some interladed Bacon, Sheeps Tongues larded and stewed, as also some Artichocks, Marrow, Pistaches, Sweetbreads, and Lamb-stones in strong broth, and Mace, a Clove or two, some white Wine and strained Almonds, or with the yolk of an Egg, Verjuice, beaten Butter, and slic'd Lemon or Crapes whole.

Then have fryed Clary, and fryed Pistaches in Yolks of Eggs.

Then carved Lemons over all.

To make another curious boil'd meat, much like a Bisk.

TAke a Rack of Mutton, cut it in four pieces, and boil it in three quarts of fair water in a pipkin, with a faggot of sweet Herbs very hard and close bound up from end to end; scum your broth, and put in some salt: Then about half an hour after put in three Chickens finely scald­ed and trust, three Partridges boiled in water, the blood being well soaked out of them, and put to them also three or four blades of large Mace.

Then have all manner of sweet herbs, as Parsley, Time, Savory, Marjoram, Sorrel, Sage; these being finely [Page 8]picked, bruise them with the back of a ladle, and a little be­fore you dish up your boil'd meat, put them to your broth, and give them a walm or two.

Again, for the top of your boil'd meat or garnish, have a pound of interlarded Bacon in thin slices, put them in a pipkin with six marrow-bones, and twelve bottoms of yong Artichocks, and some six Sweetbreads of Veal, strong broth, Mace, Nutmeg, some Gooseberries or Barberries, some Butter and Pistaches.

These things aforesaid being ready, and dinner called for, take a fine clean scoured dish, and garnish it with Pi­staches and Artichock, carved Lemon, Grapes, and large Mace.

Then have sippets finely carved, and some slices of French Bread in the bottom of the dish, dish three pieces of Mut­ton, and one in the middle, and between the Mutton three Chickens, and up in the middle, the Partridge, and pour on the broth with the herbs, then put on your pipkin over all, of Marrow, Artichocks, and the other Materials, then carved Lemon, Barberries and beaten Butter over all, your carved sippets round the dish, &c.

Another made Dish in the French Fashion, called, an Entre de Table, Entrance to the Table.

TAke the bottoms of boil'd Artichocks, the yolks of hard Eggs, young Chicken-peepers or Pigeon-peep­ers finely trust, Sweetbreads of Veal, Lamb-stones blanch­ed, and put them in a Pipkin, with Cock-stones and combs, and knots of Eggs; then put to them some strong broth, white Wine, large Mace, Nutmeg, Pepper, Butter, Salt, and Marrow, and stew them softly together.

Then have Gooseberries or Grapes parboiled, or Bar­berries, and put to some beaten Butter, and Potatoes, Skirrets, or Sparagus boil'd, and put in beaten butter, and some boil'd Pistaches.

These being finely stewed, dish your fowls on fine carved sippets, and pour on your Sweet breads, Artichocks, and Sparagus on them, Grapes, and slic't Lemon, and run all over with beaten Butter, &c.

Sometimes for variety, you may put some boil'd Cab­bidge, Lettice, Collyflowers, Balls of minced meat, or Sau­sages without skins, fryed Almonds, Calves Udder.

Another French boiled meat of Pine-molet.

TAke a manchet of French bread of a day old, chip it, and cut a round hole in the top, save the piece whole, and take out the crumb, then make a composition of a boil'd or a rost Capon, minced and stamped with Almond-paste, mus­kefied bisket bread, yolks of hard Eggs, and some sweet Herbs chopped fine, some yolks of raw Eggs, and Saffron, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Corrans, Sugar, Salt, Marrow, and Pistaches; fill the loaf, and stop the hole with the piece, and boil it in a clean cloth in a pipkin, or bake it in an oven.

Then have some forc't Chickens flea'd, save the skin, wings, legs, and neck whole and mince the meat, two Pi­geons also forc't, two Chickens, two boned of each, and filled with some minced Veal or Mutton, with some inter­laded Bacon or Beef-suet, and season it with Cloves, Mace, Pepper, Salt, and some grated parmisan, or none, grated bread, sweet Herbs chopped small, yolks of Eggs, and Grapes, fill the skins, and stitch up the back of the skin, then put them in a deep dish, with some Sugar, strong broth, Artichocks, Marrow, Saffron, Sparrows or Quails, and some boiled Sparagus.

For the garnish of the foresaid dish, rost Turneps, and rost Onions, Grapes, Cordons, and Mace.

Dish the forced loaf in the midst of the dish, the Chick­ens, and Pigeons round about it, and the Quails or small birds over all, with marrow, Cardons, Artichocks, or Spa­ragus, [Page 10]Pine-apple-seeds or Pistaches, Grapes, and Sweet­breads, and broth it on sippets.

To boil a Chine of Veal, whole or in pieces.

BOil it in water, salt, or in strong broth with a faggot of sweet Herbs, Capers, Mace, Salt, and interlarded Ba­con in thin slices and some Oyster liquor.

Your Chines being finely boiled, have some stewed Oy­sters by themselves with some Mace and fine Onions whole, some Vinegar, Butter, and Pepper, &c.

Then have Cucumbers boiled by themselves in water and salt, or pickled Cucumbers boiled in water, and put in beat­en Butter, and Cabbidge-lettice, boiled also in fair water, and put in beaten Butter.

Then dish your chines on sippets, broth them, and put on your stewed Oysters, Cucumbers, Lettice, and parboil'd Grapes, Boclites, or slic't lemon, and run it over with beat­en Butter.

Chines of Veal otherwayes, whole or in pieces.

STew them being first almost rosted, put them into a deep dish with some Gravy, some strong broth, white Wine, Mace, Nutmeg, and some Oyster liquor, two or three slices of Lemon and Salt, and being finely stewed, serve them on sippets with that broth, and slic't Lemon, Goose­berries, and beaten Butter, boil'd Marrow, fryed Spinage, &c. For variety, Capers or Sampier.

Chines of Veal boil'd with fruit, whole.

PUt it in a stewing pan or deep dish, with some stronge broth, large Mace, a little white Wine, and when it boils scum it, then put some Dates to, being half boil'd, [Page 11]and Salt, some white Endive, Sugar and Marrow.

Then boil some fruit by it self, your meat and broth be­ing finely boil'd, Prunes and Raisins of the Sun, strain some six yolks of Eggs, with a little Cream, and put it in your broth, then dish it on sippets, your Chine, and garnish your dish with Fruit, Mace, Dates, Sugar, slic't Lemon, and Bar­berries, &c.

Chines of Veal other wayes.

STew the whole with some strong broth, white Wine, and Caper-liquor, slices of interlarded Bacon, Gravy, Cloves, Mace, whole Pepper, Sausages of minced meat, without skins, or little Balls, some Marrow, Salt and some sweet sweet Herbs picked of all sorts, and bruised with the back of a ladle; put them to your broth, a quarter of an hour before you dish your chines, and give them a walm, and dish up your chine on French bread or sippets, broth it, and run it over with beaten Butter, Grapes, or slic't Le­mon, &c.

Chines of Mutton boil'd whole, or Loins, or any joynt whole.

BOil it in a long stewing pan or deep dish, with fair wa­ter, as much as will cover it, and when it boils cover it, being scumm'd first, and put to it some Salt, white Wine, and some Carots cut like dice; your broth being half boil'd, strain it, blow off the fat, and wash away the dregs from your Mutton, wash also your pipkin, or stewing pan, and put in again your broth, with some Capers and large Mace: stew your broth and matterials together softly, and lay your Mutton by in some warm broth or dish, then put in also some sweet Herbs, chopped with Onions, boil'd amongst your broth.

Then have Collyflowers ready boil'd in water and salt, and put in beaten Butter, with some boil'd Marrow; then [Page 12]the Mutton and Broth being ready, dissolve two or three yolks of Eggs, with white Wine, Verjuyce, or Sack; give it a walm, and dish up your meat on sippets finely carved, or French Bread in slices, and broth it; then lay on your Colliflowers, Marrow, Carrots, and Gooseberries, Barber­ries, or Grapes, and run it over with beaten butter.

Sometimes for variety, according to the seasons, you may use Turnips, Parsnips, Artichocks, Sparagus, Hop­buds, or Coleworts boil'd in water and salt, and put in bea­ten butter, Cabbidge sprouts, or Cabbidge Lettice, and Chesnuts.

And for the thickning of this broth sometimes, take strained Almonds, with strong broth, and Saffron or none.

Other while grated bread, yolks of hard Eggs, and Verjuyce, &c.

To boil a Chine, Rack, or Loin of Mutton, other wayes, whole, or in pieces,

BOil it in a stewing-pan or a deep dish, with fair water as much as will cover it, and when it boils scum it, and put to it some salt; then being half boil'd, take up the meat, strain the broth, and blow off the fat, wash the stewing-pan and meat: then put in again the crag end of the Mutton, to make the broth good, and put to it some Mace.

Then a little before you take up your Mutton, a hand­ful of picked Parsley, chopped small, put it in the broth, with some whole Marigold flowers, and your whole Chine of Mutton give it a walm or two, then dish it up on sip­pets, and broth it: Then have Raisins of the sun and Cur­rans boiled tender, lay on it, and garnish your Dish with Prunes, Marigold-flowers, Mace, Lemon, and Barber­ries, &c.

Other wayes without Fruit, boil it with Capers, and all manner of sweet hearbs stripped, some Spinedge and Par­sley bruised with the back of a ladle, Mace, and Salt, &c.

To boil a Chine of Mutton whole or in pieces, or any Joynt.

Boil it in a fair glazed pipkin, being well scummed, put a faggot of sweet herbs, as Time, Parsley, sweet Marjoram, bound hard and stripped with your knife, and put some Carrots cut like small dice, or cut like Lard, some Raisins, Prunes Marigold-flowers and salt, and being finely boiled down, serve it on sippets, garnish your dish with Raisins, Mace, Prunes, Marigold-flowers, Carrots, Lemons, boil'd Marrow, &c.

Sometimes for change leave out Carrots and Fruits.

Use all as before said, and adde white Endive, Capers, Samphire, run it over with beaten Butter and Lemon.

Barley Broth. Chine of Mutton or Veal in Barley Broth, Rack or any joynt.

TAke a Chine or Knuckle, and joynt it, put it in a pip­kin with some strong broth, and when it boils, scum it, and put in some French Barley, being first boiled in two or three waters, with some large Mace, and a faggot of sweet herbs, bound up, and close hard tied, some Raisins, Damask Prunes, and Currans or no Prunes, and Marigold-flowers; boil it to an indifferent thickness, and serve it on sippets.

Barley Broth otherwise.

BOil the Barley first in two waters, and then put it to a Knuckle of Veal, and to the broth Salt, Raisins, [Page 14]sweet Herbs a faggot, large Mace, and the quantity of a fine Manchet slic't together.

Otherwise.

Other wayes without Fruit: Put some good Mutton­gravy, Saffron, and sometimes Raisins onely.

Chine or any Joynt.

OTher wayes, stew them with strong broth and white wine, put it in a pipkin to them, scum it, and put to it some Oyster liquor, Salt, whole Pepper, and a bundle of sweet Herbs well bound up; some Mace, two or three great Onions, some interlarded Bacon cut like dice, and Ches­nuts, or blanched Almonds and Capers.

Then stew your Oysters by themselves with Mace, But­ter, Time, and two or three great Onions; sometimes Grapes.

Garnish your Dish with Lemon peel, Oysters, Mace, Capers, and Chesnuts, &c.

Stewed Broth.

TO make stewed Broth; the Meat most proper for it is,

A Leg of Beef, Marrow Bones, Capon, or a Loin or Rack of Mutton, a Knuckle of Veal.

Take a Knuckle of Veal, a Joynt of Mutton, two Mar­row bones, a Capon, boil them in fair water, and scum them; then put in a bundle of sweet herbs well bound up, or none, large Mace, whole Cinamon, and Ginger bruised, and put in a little rag, the spice being a little bruised also: Then beat some Oatmeal, strain it, and put it to your broth: then have boil'd Prunes and Currans strained also, [Page 15]and put it to your broth, with some whole Raisins and Cur­rans; and boil not your fruit too much: then about half an hour before you dish your meat, put in a pint of Cla­ret Wine and Sugar, then dish up your meat on fine sip­pets, and broth it.

Garnish your dish with Lemons, Prunes, Mace, Raisins, Corrans, and Sugar.

You may adde to the former broth, Fennel roots and Parsley roots tied up in a bundle.

Stewed broth new fashion.

OTher wayes for change: take two Joynts of Mutton, Rack and Loin, being half boiled and scummed, take up the Mutton, and wash away the dregs from it, strain the broth, and blow away the fat, then put to the broth in a pipkin a bundle of sweet Herbs bound up hard, and some Mace, and boil in it also a pound of Raisins of the Sun be­ing strained, a pound of Prunes whole, with Cloves, Pepper, Saffron, Salt, Claret, and Sugar: stew all well together, a little before you dish out your broth, put in your meat again, give it a walm, and serve it on fine carved sippets.

To stew a Loin or Rack of Mutton, or any Joynt other wayes.

I.

CHop a Loin into steakes, lay it in a deep dish or stew­ing pan, and put to it half a pint of Claret or white Wine, as much water, some Salt and Pepper, three or four whole Onions, a faggot of sweet Herbs bound up hard, and some large Mace; cover them close, and stew them leasurely the space of two hours, turn them now and then, and serve them on sippets.

II.

Otherwayes for change, being half boiled, chop some [Page 16]sweet Herbs, and put to them, give them a walme, and serve them on sippets with scalded Goosberries, Barberries, Grapes, or Lemon.

III.

Otherwayes for variety, put Raisins, Prunes, Currans, Dates and serve them with slic't Lemon, and beaten Butter.

IV.

Sometimes you may alter the Spice, and put Nutmeg, Cloves, and Ginger.

V.

Sometimes to the first plain way, put Capers, pickled Cu­cumbers, Sampire, &c.

VI.

Otherwayes, stew it between two dishes with fair wa­ter, and when it boils, scum it, and put three or four blades of large Mace, gross Pepper, Salt, and Cloves, and stew them close covered two hours; then have Parsley picked, and some stripped Time, Spinage, Sorrel, Savory, and sweet Marjoram, chopped with some onions, put them to your meat, and give it a walm, with some grated bread amongst, dish them on carved sippets, and blow off the fat on the broth, and broth it: lay Lemon on it, and beaten Butter, or stew it thus whole.

Before you put in your Herbs blow off the fat.

To boil a Leg of Mutton divers wayes.

I.

STuff a leg of Mutton with Parsley, being finely picked, boil it in water and salt, and serve it in a fair dish with Parsley, and verjuyce in sawcers.

II.

Otherwayes: boil it in water and salt, not stuffed, and being boiled, stuff it with Lemon in bits like square dice, and serve it also with the peels square, cut round about it, [Page 17]make sauce with the Gravy and beaten butter, with Lemon and grated Nutmeg.

III.

Otherwayes, boil it in water and salt, being stuffed with Parsley, and make sauce with large Mace, Gravy, chopped Parsley, Butter, Vinegar, Juyce of Orange, Goosberries, Barberries, or Grapes, and Sugar: serve it on sippets.

To boil a leg of Mutton otherwayes.

IV.

Take a good leg of Mutton, and boil it in water and salt, being stuffed with sweet herbs chopped with some beef­suet, some salt and nutmeg.

Then being almost boiled, take up some of the broth in­to a pipkin, and put to it some large mace, a few corrans, a handful of French capers, and a little sack, the yolks of three or four hard eggs minced small, and some lemon cut like square dice; and being finely boiled, dish it on carved sippets, broth it, and run it over with beaten butter, and le­mon shread small.

V. Otherwayes.

Take a fair leg of mutton, boil it in water and salt, and make sauce with gravy, some wine-vinegar, salt-butter and strong broth, being well stewed together with nutmeg.

Then dish up the leg of mutton on fine carved sippets, and pour on your broth.

Garnish your dish with barberries, capers, and slic't le­mon.

Garnish the leg of mutton with the same garnish, and run it over with beaten butter, slic't lemon, and grated nutmeg.

To boil a Leg of Veal.

1. STuff it with Beef-suet and sweet Herbs chopped, nutmeg, salt, and boil it in fair water and salt.

Then take some of the broth, and put to some capers, currans, large mace, a piece of interlarded bacon, two or three whole Cloves, pieces of pears and some artichock­suckers boiled, and put in beaten butter, boil'd marrow and mace: Then before you dish it up, have sorrel, sage, pars­ley, time, sweet marjoram coursly minced, with two or three cuts of a knife, and bruised with the back of a ladle on a clean board, put it into your broth to make it green, and give it a walm or two. Then dish up the leg of veal on fine carved sippets, pour on the broth, and then your other materials, some gooseberries, or barberries, beaten butter and lemon.

2. To boil a Leg of Veal otherwayes.

Stuff it with beef-suet, nutmeg and salt, boil it in a pipkin, and when it boils, scum it, and put into it some salt, parsley, and fennel roots in a bundle close bound up; then being al­most boil'd, take up some of the broth in a pipkin, and put to it some mace, raisins of the sun, gravy; stew them well toge­ther & thicken it with grated bread strained with hard eggs; before you dish up your broth, have parsley, time, sweet mar­joram stript, marigold flowers, sorrel, and spinage picked: bruise it with the back of a ladle, give it a walm, and dish up your leg of veal on fine carved sippets, pour on the broth, and run it over with beaten butter.

3. To boil a Leg of Veal otherwise with Rice, or a Knuckle.

Boil it in a pipkin, put some salt to it, and seum it; then [Page 19]put to it some mace and some rice finely picked and wash­ed, some raisins of the sun and gravy; and being fine and tender boild, put in some saffron, and serve it on fine carved sippets, with the rice over all.

4. Other wayes with paste cut like small lard, boil it in thin broth and saffron.

5. Other wayes in white broth, and with fruit, spinage, sweet herbs, and gooseberries, &c.

To make all manner of forc't Meats or Stuffings for any kinde of Meats; as Legs, Breasts, Shoulders, Loins, or Racks; or for any Poultry or Fowl whatsoever, boil'd, roste, stew­ed, or baked; or boil'd in bags, round like a quaking Pud­ding in a Napkin.

To force a Leg of Veal in the French Fashion, in a Feast for Dinner or Supper.

TAke a leg of veal, and take out the meat, but leave the skin and knuckle whole together; then mince the meat that came out of the leg with some beef-suet or lard, and some sweet herbs minced also; then season it with pepper, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, salt, a clove or two of gar­lick, and some three or four yolks of hard eggs whole or in quarters, pine-apple-seed, two or three raw eggs, pista­ches, chesnuts, pieces of artichocks, and fill the leg, sowe it up, and boil it in a pipkin with two gallons of fair water and some white wine; being scummed and almost boiled, take up some broth into a dish or pipkin, and put to it some chesnuts, pistaches, pine-apple-seed, marrow, large mace, and Artichock bottoms, and stew them well together; then have some fried toste of manchet or roles finely carved. The leg being finely boil'd, dish it on French bread, and fried toste and sippets round about it; broth it, and put on mar­row, and your other materials, with sliced lemon and le­mon-peel, [Page 20]run it over with beaten butter, and thicken your broth sometimes with strained almonds; sometimes yolks of eggs and saffron, or saffron onely.

You may adde sometimes balls of the same meat.

Garnish.

For your garnish, you may use chesnuts, artichocks, pistaches, pine apple-seed, and yolks of hard eggs in halves, or potatoes.

Other whiles: Quinces in quarters, or pears, pippins, gooseberries, grapes, or barberries.

To force a Breast of Veal.

MInce some veal or mutton with some beef-suet or fat bacon, and some sweet herbs minced also, and sea­soned with some cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, two or three raw eggs and salt: then prick it up, the breast being filled at the lower end, and stew it between two dishes with some strong broth, white wine, and large mace; then an hour after have sweet herbs picked and stripped, time, sor­rel, parsley, sweet Marjoram bruised with the back of a la­dle, and put it into your broth with some beef-marrow, and give it a walm; then dish up your breast of veal on fine sippets finely carved, broth it, and lay on it slic't le­mon, marrow, mace, and barberries, and run it over with beaten butter.

If you will have the broth yellow, put saffron into it.

To boil a Breast of Veal otherwise.

MAke a pudding of grated manchet, minced suet, and minced veal, season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, three or four eggs, cinamon, dates, currans, raisins of the sun, some grapes, sugar, and cream; mingle them all together, and fill the breast; prick it up, and stew it be­tween [Page 21]two dishes with white wine and strong broth, mace, dates, marrow; and being finely stewed serve it on sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, lemon, barberries, or grapes.

Sometimes thick it with some almond-milk, sugar, and cream.

To boil a Breast of Veal in another manner.

JOynt it well, and parboil it a little; then put it in a stewing-pan or deep dish with some strong broth, and a bundle of sweet herbs well bound up, some large mace, and some slices of interlarded bacon, two or three cloves, some capers, samphire, salt, some yolks of hard eggs, and white wine; stew all these well together, and be­ing boil'd tender, serve it on fine carved sippets, and broth it. Then have some fried sweet breads. sausages of veal or pork, garlick or none, and run all over with beaten butter, lemon, and fried parsley.

Thus you may boil a Rack or Loin.

To make several sorts of Pudding.

1. Bread Pudding, yellow or green.

GRate four penny loaves, and searce them through a cullender, put them in a deep dish, and put to them four eggs, two quarts of cream, cloves, mace, and some saffron, salt, rose-water, sugar, currans, a pound of beef-suet minced, and a pound of dates.

If green, Juices of spinage, and all manner of sweet [Page 22]herbs stamped amongst the spinage, and strain the juyce, sweet herbs chopt very small, cream, cinamon, nutmeg, salt, and all other things, as is next before said: your herbs must be, time stripped, savory, sweet marjoram, rosemary, parsley, peniroyal, dates; in these seven or eight yolks of eggs.

Another Pudding, called Cinamon Pudding.

TAke five penny loaves, and searce them through a cul­lender, put them in a deep dish or tray, and put to them five pints of cream, cinamon six ounces, suet one pound minced, eggs six yolks, four whites, sugar, salt, slic't dates, stamped almonds, or none, rose-water.

To make Rice Puddings.

BOil your Rice with cream, strain it, and put to it two penny loaves grated, eight yolks of eggs, and three whites, beef-suet, one pound of sugar, salt, rose-water, nut­meg, coriander beaten, &c.

Other Rice Puddings.

Steep your rice in milk over night, and next morning drain it, and boil it in cream, season it with sugar being cold, and eggs, beef-suet, salt, nutmegs, cloves, mace, currans, dates, &c.

To make Oatmeal Puddings, called Isings.

TAke a quart of whole Oatmeal being picked, steep it in warm milk over night, next morning drain it, and boil it in a quart of sweet cream; and being cold, put to it six eggs, of them but three whites, cloves, mace, saffron, pepper, suet, dates, currans, salt, sugar. This put in bags, guts, or fowls, as capon, &c.

If green, good store of herbs chopped small.

To make Blood pudding.

TAke the blood of a hog while it is warm, and steep in it a quart or more of great oatmeal groats, at the end of three dayes take the groats out, and drain them clean; then put to those groats more then a quart of the best cream warmed on the fire: then take some mother of time, parsley, spinage, savory, endive, sweet marjoram, sorrel, strawberry leaves, succory, of each a few chopped very small, and mix them with the groats, with a little fen­nel seed finely beaten, some pepper, cloves, mace, salt, and some beef suet, or flakes of the hog cut small.

Otherwayes you may steep your oatmeal in warm mut­ton broth, or scalding milk, or boil it in a bag.

To make Andolians.

SOak the hogs guts, and turn them, scour them, and steep them in water a day and a night, then take them and wipe them dry, and turn the fat side outermost.

Then have pepper, chopped sage, a little cloves and mace, beaten coriander-seed, and salt; mingle all together, and season the fat side of the guts, then turn that side inward again and draw one gut over another to what bigness you please: thus of a whole belly of a fat hog. Then boil them in a pot or pan in fair water, with a piece of inter­larded bacon, some spices and salt; tye them fast at both ends, and make them of what length you please.

Sometime for variety you may leave out some of the foresaid herbs, and put pennyroyal, savory, leeks, a good big onion or two, marjoram, time, rosemary, sage, nut­meg, ginger, pepper, salt, &c.

To make other blood puddings.

STeep great oatmel in eight pints of warm goose blood, sheeps blood, calves, lambs, or fawns blood, and drain [Page 24]it, as is aforesaid, after three dayes put to it in every point, as before.

Other Blood Puddings.

Take blood and strain it, put in three pints of the blood, and two of cream, three penny manchets grated, and beef suet cut square like small dice or hogs flakes, yolks of eight eggs, salt, sweet herbs, nutmeg, cloves, mace, and pepper.

Sometimes, for variety, Sugar, Corrans, &c.

To make Marrow Puddings of Rice and grated Bread.

STeep half a pound of Rice in milk all night, then drain it from the milk, and boil it in a quart of cream; be­ing boiled, strain it, and put to it half a pound of sugar, bea­ten nutmeg and mace steeped in rosewater, and put to the foresaid materials eight yolks of eggs, and five grated man­chets, put to it also half a pound of marrow cut like dice, and salt; mingle all together, and fill your bags or napkin, and serve it with beaten butter, being boiled and stuck with almonds.

If in guts, being boil'd, toste them before the fire in a silver dish or tosting pan.

To make other Puddings of Turky or Capon in bags, guts, or for any kinde of stuffing, or forcing, or in Cauls.

TAke a rost Turky, mince it very small, and stamp it with some almond paste, then put some coriander­seed beaten, salt, sugar, rose-water, yolks of eggs raw, and marrow stamped also with it, and put some cream, mace soked in sack and white wine, rose-water and sack, strain it into the materials, and make not your stuff too thin, then fill either gut or napkin, or any fowls boiled, baked, or roste, or legs of veal or mutton, or brests, or kid, or fawn, whole lambs, suckers, &c.

Sheeps Haggas Pudding.
To make a Haggas Pudding in a Sheeps Panch.

TAke good store of parsley, savory, time, onions, and oatmeal groats chopped together, and mingled with some beef or mutton-suet minced together, and some cloves, mace, pepper, and salt; fill the panch, sowe it up, and boil it. Then being boiled, serve it in a dish, and cut a hole in the top of it, and put in some beaten but­ter with two or three yolks of eggs dissolved in the butter, or none.

Thus one may do for a Fasting day, and put no suet in it, and put it in a napkin or bag, and being well boiled, but­ter it, and dish it in a dish, and serve it with sippets,

A Haggas otherwayes.

Steep the oatmeal over night in warm milk, next morn­ing boil it in cream; and being fine and thick boiled, put beef-suet to it in a dish or tray, some cloves, mace, nut­meg, salt, and some raisins of the sun, or none, and an oni­on: sometime savory, parsley, and sweet Marjoram, and fill the panch, &c.

Other Haggas Puddings.

CAlves panch, calves chaldrons, or muggets being clenged, boil it tender, and mince it very small, put to it grated bread, eight yolks of eggs, two or three whites, cream, some sweet herbs, spinage, suckory, sorrel, strawberry leaves very small minced, bits of butter, pepper, cloves, mace, cinamon, ginger, currans, sugar, salt, dates, and boil it in a napkin or calves panch, or bake it; and be­ing boil'd, put it in a dish, trim the dish with scraped sugar, [Page 26]and stick it with sliced almonds, and run it over with beaten butter, &c.

To make Liver Puddings.

TAke a good hogs, calves, or lambs liver, and boil it: being cold, mince it very small or grate it, and searce it through a meal-five or cullender put to it some grated manchet, two penny loaves, some three pints of cream, four eggs, cloves, mace, currans, salt, dates, sugar, cinamon, ginger, nutmegs, one pound of beef-suet minced very small; and mingle all together, fill a wet napkin, and binde it in fashion of a ball, and serve it with beaten butter and sugar being boil'd.

Other Liver Puddings.

For variety, sometimes, sweet herbs, and sometimes flakes of the hog in place of beef-suet, fennel-seed, cara­way-seed, or any other seed, and keep the order, as is abovesaid.

To make Puddings of Blood after the Italian fashion.

TAke three pints of hogs blood, strain it, and put to it half a pound of grated cheese, a penny manchet grated, sweet herbs chopped very small, a pound of beef-suet minced small, nutmeg, pepper, salt, ginger, cloves, mace, cinamon, sugar, currans, eggs, &c.

To make Puddings of a Heifers Ʋdder.

TAke an heifers udder, and boil it; being cold, mince it small, and put to it a pound of almond paste, some grated manchet, three or four eggs, a quart of cream, one pound of beef-suet minced small, sweet herbs chopped small also, currans, cinamon, salt, one pound of sugar, nutmeg, saffron, yolks of hard eggs in quarters, preserved [Page 27]pears in form of square dice, bits of marrow; mingle all to­gether, and put it in a clean napkin dipped in warm liquor, binde it up round like a ball, and boil it.

Being boil'd dish it in a clean scoured dish, scrape sugar, and run it over with beaten butter, stick it with slic't al­monds or slic't dates, candied lemon peel, orange, or cite­ron, juyce of orange over all.

Thus also lamb-stones, sweetbreads, turky, capon, or any poultrey.

Forcing for any roots; as Mellons, Cucumbers, Collyflow­ers, Cabbiges, Pompions, Gourds, great Onions, or Pars­nips, &c.

TAke of Musk-mellon, and take out the seed, and cut it round the mellon two fingers deep, then make a for­cing of grated bread, beaten almonds, rose water, and su­gar, some musk-mellon stamped small with it, also bisket­bread beaten to powder, some coriander seed, candied le­mon minced small, some beaten mace and marrow minced small, beaten cinamon, yolks of raw eggs, sweet herbs, saf­fron, and musk a grain: then fill your rounds of mellons, and put them in a flat bottom'd dish, or earthen pan, with butter in the bottom, and bake them in the dish.

Then have sauce made with white wine and strong broth, strained with beaten almonds, sugar, and cinamon; serve them on sippets finely carved, give this broth a walm, and pour it on your mellons with some fine scraped sugar, dry them in the oven, and so serve them.

Or you may do these whole; mellons, cucumbers, le­mons, or turnips, and serve them with any boil'd fowls.

Other forcing, or Pudding, or stuffing for birds or any fowl, or any joynt of meat.

TAke veal or mutton, mince it, and put to it some gra­ted bread, yolks of eggs, cream, corrans, dates, su­gar, [Page 28]nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, mace, juyce of spinage' sweet herbs, salt, and mingle all together, with some whole marrow amongst. If yellow, use saffron.

Other forcing for Fowls, or any Joynt of meat.

MInce a leg of mutton or veal, and some beef suet or venison, with sweet herbs, grated bread, eggs, nut­meg, pepper, ginger, salt, dates, corrans, raisins, some dry candied oranges, coriander seed, and a little cream; bake them or boil them, and stew them in white wine, grapes, marrow, and give them a walm or two, thick it with two or three yolks of eggs, sugar, verjuyce, and serve these puddings on sippets, pour on the broth, and strow on sugar and slict lemon.

Other forcing of Veal, or Pork, Mutton, Lamb, Venison, Land, or Sea Fowls.

MInce them with beef suet or lard, and season them with pepper, cloves, mace, and some sweet herbs grated, Bolonia sawsages, yolks of eggs, grated cheese, salt, &c.

Other stuffings or forcing of grated cheese, calves brains or any brain, as pork, goat, kid, or lamb, or any venison, or pigs brain, with some beaten nutmeg, pepper, salt, gin­ger, cloves, saffron, sweet herbs, eggs, goosberries, or grapes.

Other forcing of calves udder boiled and cold, and stam­ped with almond paste, cheese-curds, sugar, cinamon, gin­ger, mace, cream, salt, raw eggs, and some marrow or butter, &c.

Other stuffings or Puddings.

TAke rice-flower, strain it with Goats milk or cream, and the brawn of a poultrey rosted, minced, and [Page 29]stamped, boil them to a good thickness with some marrow, sugar, rose-water, and some salt; and being cold, fill your poultrey, or in cauls of veal or other joynts of meat, and bake them or boil them in bags or guts, put in some nut­meg, almond paste, and some beaten mace.

Other stuffings of the brawn of a Capon, Chickens, Pigeons, or any tender Sea Fowl.

TAke out the meat, and save the skins whole, leave on the legs and wings to the skin, and also the necks and heads, and mince the meat raw with some interlarded ba­con or beef suet, season it with cloves, mace, sugar, salt, and sweet herbs chopped small, yolks of eggs grated, par­misan or none, fill the body, legs, and neck, prick up the back, and stew them between two dishes with strong broth as much as will cover them, and put some bottoms of ar­tichocks, cardons, or boil'd sparagus, goosberries, barber­ries, or grapes being boil'd, put in some grated parmisan, large mace, and saffron, and serve them on fine carved sip­pets; garnish the dish with roste turnips, or roste onions, cardons, and mace, &c.

Other forcing of Livers of Poultrey, or Kid or Lambs.

TAke the liver, and cut it into little bits like dice raw, and as much interlarded bacon cut in the same form, some sweet herbs chopped small amongst; also some raw yolks of eggs, and some beaten cloves and mace, pepper and salt, a few prunes and raisins, or no fruit, but grapes or goose­berries, a little grated parmisan, a clove or two of garlick; and fill your poultrey, either boil d or roste, &c.

Other forcing for any dainty Fowl; as Turky, Chickens, or Phesants, or the like, boild or roste.

TAke minced veal raw, and bacon or beef suet minced with it; being finely minced, season it with cloves and mace, a few corrans, salt, and some boild bottoms of artichocks cut in form of dice small, and mingle amongst the forcing, with pine-apple-seeds, pistaches, chesnuts, and some raw eggs, and fill your poultrey, &c.

Other fillings or forcing of parboil'd Veal or Mutton.

MInce the meat with beef-suet or interlarded bacon, and some cloves, mace, pepper, salt, eggs, sugar, and some quartered pears, damsons, or prunes, and fill your fowls, &c.

Other fillings of raw Capons.

MInce it with fat bacon and grated cheese or parmisan, sweet herbs, cheese-curd, corrans, cinamon, ginger, nutmeg, pepper, salt, some pieces of artichocks like small dice, sugar, saffron, and some mushrooms.

Otherwayes.

Grated liver of veal, minced lard, fennel-seed, whole eggs raw, sugar, sweet herbs, salt, grated cheese, a clove or two of garlick, cloves, mace, cinamon and ginger, &c.

Otherwayes.

For a leg of mutton, grated bread, yolks of raw eggs, beef-suet, salt, nutmeg, sweet herbs, juyce of spinage, cream, cinamon, and sugar; if yellow, saffron.

Other forcing for Land or Sea-fowl boiled or baked, or a Leg of Mutton.

TAke out of the leg the meat, leave the skin whole, and mince the meat with beef-suet and sweet herbs; and put to it, being finely minced, grated bread, dates, cor­rans, raisins, orange minced small, ginger, pepper, nut­meg, cream, and eggs; being boiled or baked, make a sauce with marrow, strong broth, white wine, verjuyce, mace, sugar, and yolks of eggs strained with verjuyce: serve it on fine carved sippets and flic't lemon, grapes, or gooseberries: and thus you may do it in calls of veal, or lamb, or kid.

Legs of Mutton forc't either rost or boil'd.

MInce the meat with beef-suet or bacon, sweet herbs, pepper, salt, cloves and mace, and two or three cloves of garlick, raw eggs, two or three chesnuts, and work up al­together, fill the leg, and prick it up, then rost it or boil it: make sauce with the remainder of the meat, and stew it on the fire with gravy, chesnuts, pistaches, or pine-apple-seed, bits of artichocks, pears, grapes, or pippins, and serve it hot on this sauce, or with gravy that drops from it onely, or stew it between dishes.

Other forcing of Veal.

MInce the veal, and cut some lard like dice, and put to it; with some minced penny-royal, sweet marjoram, winter-savory, nutmeg, a little camomile, pepper, salt, ginger, cinamon, sugar, and work all together, then fill it into beefs guts of some three inches long, and stew them in a pipkin with claret wine, large mace, capers, and marrow; [Page 32]being finely stewed, serve them on fine carved sippets, flic't lemon, and barberries, and run them over with beaten but­ter and scraped sugar.

Other forcing of Veal, Mutton, or Lamb.

EIther of these minced with beef-suet, parsley, time, sa­vory, marigolds, endive, and spinage; mince all to­gether, and put some grated bread, grated nutmeg, cur­rans, five dates, sugar, yolks of eggs, rose-water, and ver­juyce: of this forcing you may make birds, fishes, beasts, pears, balls, or what you will, and stew them, or fry them, or bake them, and serve them on sippets with verjuyce, su­gar and butter either dinner or supper.

Other forcing for Brest, Legs or Loins of Beef, Mutton, Veal, or any Venison or Fowls rosted, baked, or stewed.

MInce any meat, and put to it beef-suet or lard, dates, raisins, grated bread, nutmeg, pepper, and salt, and two or three eggs, &c.

Otherwayes.

Mince some mutton, with beef-suet, some orange-peel, grated nutmeg, grated bread, coriander-seed, pepper, salt, and yolks of eggs, mingle all together, and fill any brest, or leg, or any joynt of meat, and make sauce with gravy, strong broth, dates, curraris, sugar, salt, lemons, and bar­berries, &c.

Other forcing for roste, or boiled, or baked Legs of any meat, or any other Joynt or Fowl.

MInce a leg of mutton with beef-suet, season it with cloves, mace, pepper, salt, nutmeg, rosewater, cur­rans, raisins, caraway seeds and eggs; and fill your leg of mutton, &c.

Then for sauce for the foresaid, if baked, bake it in an earthen pan or deep dish, and being baked, blow away the fat, and serve it with the gravy.

If roste, save the gravy that drips from it, and put to it flic't lemon or orange.

If boil'd, put capers, barberries, white wine, hard eggs minced, beaten butter, gravy, verjuyce and sugar, &c.

Other Forcing.

MInce a leg of mutton or lamb with beef-suet, and all manner of sweet herbs minced, cloves, mace, salt, currans, sugar, and fill the leg with half the meat: then make the rest into little cakes as broad as a shilling, and put them in a pipkin with strong mutton broth, cloves, mace, vinegar, and boil the leg, or bake it, or roste it.

Forcing in the Spanish fashion in balls

MInce a leg of mutton with beef-suet, and some mar­row cut like square dice put amongst, some yolks of eggs, and some salt and nutmeg; make this stuff as big as a Tennis-ball, and stew them with strong broth the space of two hours; turn them, and serve them on tostes of fine manchet, and serve them with the palest of the balls.

Other manner of Balls.

MInce a leg of veal very small, yolks of hard eggs, and the yolks of seven or eight raw eggs, some salt; make them into balls as big as a walnut, and stew them in a pipkin with some mutton broth, mace, cloves, and flic't ginger, stew them an hour, and put some marrow to them, and serve them on sippets, &c.

Other grand or forc't dish.

TAke hard eggs, and part the yolks and whites in halves, take the yolks and mince them, or stamp them in a morter with marchpane stuff, and sweet herbs chopped very small, and put amongst the eggs or paste, with sugar and cinamon fine beaten, put some currans also to them, and mingle all together with salt, fill the whites, and set them by.

Then have preserved oranges candied, and fill them with marchpane paste and sugar, and set them by also.

Then have the tops of sparagus boil'd, and mixed with butter, a little sack, and set them by also.

Then have boiled chesnuts peeled, and pistaches, and set them by also.

Then have marrow steeped first in rose-water, then fryed in butter, and set that by also.

Then have green quodlings slic't, mixt with bisket bread and egg, and fryed in little cakes, and set that by also.

Then have sweetbreads, or lamb-stones, and yolks of hard eggs fryed, &c. and dipped in butter.

Then have small tuttle-doves or pigeon-peepers and chicken peepers fryed, or finely rosted or boiled, and set them by, or any small birds, and some artichocks and po­tato's boil'd and fryed in butter, and some balls as big as a walnut, or less, made of parmisan, and dipped in butter, and fryed.

Then last of all, put them all in a great charger, the chickens or fowls in the middle, then lay a lay of sweet­breads, then a lay of bottoms of artichocks, and the mar­row; on them some preserved oranges.

Then next some hard eggs round that, fryed sparagus, yolks of eggs, chesnuts, and pistaches; then your green quodlings stuffed: the charger being full, put to them marrow all over the meat, and juyce of orange, and make [Page 35]a sauce of strained almonds, grapes, and verjuyce; and being a little stewed in the oven, dry it, &c.

The Dish.

Sweatbreads, Lambstones, Chickens, Marrow, Almonds, Eggs, Oranges, Bisket, Sparagus, Artichocks, Musk, Saf­fron, Butter, Potato's, Pistaches, Chesnuts. Verjuyce, Sugar, Flower, Parmisan, Cinamon.
To force a French Bread, called Pine-molet, or three of them

TAke a manchet, and make a hole in the top of it, take out the crum, and make a composition of the brawn of a capon roste or boil'd; mince it, and stamp it in a mor­tar with marchpane paste, cream, yolks of hard eggs, mus­kefied bisket bread, the crum of very fine manchet, sugar, marrow, musk, and some sweet herbs chopped small, bea­ten cinamon, saffron, some raw yolks of eggs, and currans; fill the bread, and boil them in napkins in capon broth, but first stop the top with the pieces you took off. Then stew or fry some sweetbreads of veal and forced chickens between two dishes, or Lamb-stones fried, with some mace, mar­row, and grapes, sparagus, sparagus, or artichocks, and skirrets, the manchets being well boil'd, and your chickens finely ftewed, serve them in a fine dish, the manchets in the middle, and the sweatbreads, chickens, and carved sippets round about the dish; being finely dished, thicken the chicken broth with strained almonds, cream, sugar, and beaten butte.

Garnish your dish with marrow, pistaches, artichocks, puff-paste, mace, grapes, pomegarnets, or barberries, and slic't lemon.

Another forc't Dish.

TAke two pound of Beef-marrow, and cut it as big as great dice, and a pound of dates cut as big as small dice; then have a pound of prunes, and take away the out­side from the stones with your knife, and a pound of Cur­rans; [Page 36]and put these aforesaid in a platter, twenty yolks of eggs, a pound of sugar, an ounce of cinamon, and min­gle all together.

Then have the yolks of twenty eggs more, strain them with Rosewater, a little musk and sugar, fry them in two pancakes with a little sweet butter fine and yellow; and be­ing fried, put one of them in a fair dish, and lay the for­mer material on it spread all over; then take the other, and cut it in long slices as broad as your little finger, and lay it over the dish like a lattice window, set it in the oven, and bake it a little; then fry it, &c. Bake it very lea­surely.

Another forc't fried Dish.

MAke a little paste with yolks of eggs, flower, and boiling liquor.

Then take a quarter of a pound of sugar, a pound of marrow, half an ounce of cinamon, and a little ginger. Then have some yolks of Eggs, and mash your marrow, and a little Rosewater, musk, or amber, and a few currans or none, with a little suet, and make little pastes, fry them in clarified butter, and serve them with scraped sugar, and juyce of orange.

Otherwayes.

Take good fresh water Eels, flay and mince them small with a warden or two, and season it with pepper, cloves, mace, saffron: then put currans dates, and prunes small minced amongst, and a little verjuyce, and fry it in lit­tle pasties, bake it in the oven, or stew it in a pan in paste of divers forms; as pasties or stars, &c.

To make any kinde of Sausages.

First, Bolonia Sausages.

THe best way and time of the year is to make them in September.

Take four stone of pork, of the legs the leanest, and take away all the skins, sinnews, and fat from it; mince it fine and stamp it: then adde to it three ounces of whole pepper, two ounces of pepper more grosly cracked or beaten, whole cloves an ounce nutmegs an ounce finely beaten, salt spanish, or peter-salt, an ounce of coriander seed finely beat­en, or caraway seed, cinamon an ounce fine beaten, lard cut an inch long, as big as your little finger, and clean without rust; mingle all the foresaid together, and fill beefers guts as full as you can possible, and as the winde gathers in the gut, prick them with a pin, and shake them well down with your hands, for if they be not well filled, they will be rusty.

These aforesaid Bolonia Sausages are most excellent of pork onely: but some use buttock beef with pork, half one, and as much of the other. Beef and pork are very good.

Some do use pork of a weeks powder for this use before­said, and no more salt at all.

Some put a little sack in the beating of these Sausages, and put in place of coriander caraway-seed.

This is the most excellent way to make Bolonia Sausa­ges, being carefully filled, and tied fast with packthred, and moaked or smothered three or four dayes, that will turn them red; then hang them in some cool cellar or higher room to take the air.

Other Sausages.

SAusages of Pork with some of the fat of a chine of ba­con or pork, some sage chopped fine and small, salt and pepper; and fill them into porkets guts, or hogs, or sheeps guts, or no guts, and let them dry in the chimney leasurely, &c.

Otherwayes.

Mince pork with beef-suet, and mince some sage, and put to it with some pepper, salt, cloves, and mace; make it into ball and keep in for your use, or roll them into little Sausa­ges some four or five inches long as big as your finger; fry six or seven of them, and serve them within a dish with vi­negar or juyce of orange.

Thus you may do of a leg of veal, and put nothing but salt and suet; and being fried, serve it with gravy and juyce of orange, or butter and vinegar; and before you fry them flower them. And thus Mutton, or any meat.

Or you may adde sweet herbs or nutmeg: and thus mutton.

Other Sausages.

MInce some buttock beef with beef-suet, beat them well together, and season it with cloves, mace, pep­per, and salt; fill the guts, or fry it as before; if in guts, boil them and serve them as Puddings.

Otherwayes for change.

If without guts, fry them and serve them with gravy, juyce of orange, or vinegar, &c.

To make Links.

TAke the raring pieces of Pork or Hog-bacon, or fil­lets, or legs; cut the lean into bits as big as great dice square, and the fleak in the same form, half as much; and season them with good store of chopped sage chopt very small and fine; and season it also with some pepper, nutmeg, cloves and mace also very small beaten, and salt, and fill porkets guts, or beefs guts; being well filled, hang them up and dry them till the salt shine through them; and when you will spend them, boil them and broil them.

To make all manner of Hashes.

First, of raw Beef.

MInce it very small with some beef-suet or lard, some sweet herbs, pepper, salt, some cloves and mace, blanched chesnuts, or almonds blanc hed, and put in whole, some nutmeg, and a whole onion or two, and stew it finely in a pipkin with some strong broth the space of two hours; put a little claret to it, and serve it on sippets finely carved, with some grapes or lemon in it also, or barberries, and blow off the fat.

Otherwayes.

Stew beef in gobbets, and cut some fat and lean toge­ther as big as a good pullets egg, and put them into a pot or pipkin with some Carrots cut in pieces as big as a walnut, some whole onions, some parsnips, large mace, a faggot of sweet herbs, salt, pepper, cloves, and as much water and wine as will cover them, and stew it the space of three hours.

2. Beef hashed other wayes, of the Buttock.

CUt it into thin slices, and hack them with the back of your knife, then fry them with sweet butter; and be­ing fryed, put them in a pipkin with some claret, strong broth, or gravy, cloves, mace, pepper, salt, and sweet but­ter; being tender stewed the space of an hour, serve them on fine sippets, with slic't lemon, gooseberries, barberries or grapes, and some beaten butter.

3. Beef hashed otherwayes.

CUt some buttock beef into fine thin slices, and half as many slices of fine interlarded bacon, stew it very well and tender with some claret and strong broth, cloves, mace, pepper, and salt; being tender stewed the space of two hours, serve them on fine carved sippets, &c.

4. A Hash of Bullocks Cheeks.

TAke the flesh from the bones, then with a sharp knife slice them into thin slices like Scotch collops, and fry them in sweet butter a little; then put them into a pipkin with gravy or strong broth and claret, salt, chopped sage, and nutmeg, stew them the space of two hours, or till they be tender, then serve them on fine carved sippets, &c.

Hashes of Neats Feet, or any Feet, as Calves, Sheeps, Dears, Hogs, Lambs, Pigs, Fawns, or the like, many of the wayes following.

BOil them very tender, and being cold, mince them small, then put currans to them, beaten cinamon, hard eggs minced, capers, sweet herbs minced small, cloves, [Page 41]mace, sugar, white wine, butter, slic't lemon or orange, slic't almonds, grated bread, saffron, sugar, gooseberries, barberries, or grapes; and being finely stewed down, serve them on fine carved sippets.

2. Neats-feet hashed otherwayes.

CUt them in pieces, being tender boild, and put to them some chopped onions, parsley, time, butter, mace, pepper, vinegar, salt, and sugar: being finely stewed, serve them on fine carved sippets, barberries, and sugar; some­times thicken the broth with yolks of raw eggs and ver­juyce, run it over with beaten butter, and sometimes no su­gar.

3. Hashing otherwayes of any Feat.

MInce them small, and stew them with white wine, butter, corrans, raifins, marrow, sugar, prunes, dates, cinamon, mace, ginger, pepper, and serve them on tostes of fried manchets.

Sometimes dissolve the yolks of eggs.

4. Neats-feet, or any Feet otherwayes.

BEing tender boil'd and soused, part them and fry them in sweet butter fine and brown; dish them in a clean dish with some mustard and sweet butter, and fry some slic't onions, and lay them all over the top; run them over with beaten butter.

5. Neats-feet, or other Feet otherwayes sliced, or in pieces stewed.

TAke boil'd onions, and put your feet in a pipkin with the onions aforesaid being sliced, and cloves, mace, [Page 42]white wine, and some strong broth and salt; being almost stewed or boil'd, put to it some butter and verjuyce, and sugar, give it a walm or two more, serve it on fine sippets, and run it over with sweet butter.

6. Neats Feet other wayes, or any Feet fry­cassed, or Trotters.

BEing boiled tender and cold, take out the hair or wool between the toes, part them in halves, and fry them in butter; being fryed, put away the butter, and put to them grated nutmeg, salt, and strong broth.

Then being fine and tender, have some yolks of eggs dis­solved with vinegar or verjuice, some nutmeg in the eggs also, and into the eggs put a piece of fresh butter, and put away the frying: and when you are ready to dish up your meat, put in the eggs, and give it a toss or two in the pan, and pour it in a clean dish.

To hash Neats-tongues, or any Tongues.

BEing fresh and tender boil'd, and cold, cut them into thin slices, fry them in sweet butter, and put to them some strong broth, cloves, mace, saffron, salt, nutmegs gra­ted, yolks of eggs, grapes, verjuice: and the tongue being fine and thick, with a toss or two in the pan, dish it on fine sippets.

Sometimes you may leave out cloves and mace; and for variety put beaten cinamon, sugar, and saffron, and make it more brothy.

2. To hash a Neats-tongue otherwayes.

SLice it into thin slices, no broader then a three-pence, and stew it in a dish or pipkin with some strong broth, [Page 43]a little sliced onion of the same bigness of the tongue, and some salt, put to some mushrooms, and nutmeg, or mace, and serve it on fine sippets, being well stewed, rub the bot­tom of the dish with a clove or two of garlick, or mince a raw onion very small and put in the bottom of the dish, and beaten butter run over the tops of your dish of meat, with lemon cut small.

3. To hash a Tongue otherwayes, either whole or in slices.

BOil it tender, and blanch it; and being cold, slice it in thin slices, and put to it boild chesnuts or roste, some strong broth, a bundle of sweet herbs, large mace, white endive, pepper, wine, a few cloves, some capers, marrow or butter, and some salt; stew it well together, and serve it on fine carved sippets, garnish it on the meat with goose­berries, barberries, or lemon.

4. To hash a Tongue otherwayes.

BEing boild tender, blanch it, and let it cool, then slice it in thin slices, and put it in a pipkin with some mace and raisins, slic't dates, some blanched almonds, pistaches, cla­ret or white wine, butter, verjuice, sugar, and strong broth; being well stewed, strain in six eggs, the yolks being boild hard; or raw, give it a walm, and dish up the Tongue on fine fippets.

Garnish the dish with fine sugar, or fine searsed man­chet, and lay lemon on your meat slic't, run it over with beaten butter, &c.

5. To hash a Neats-tongue otherwayes.

BEing boild tender, slice it in thin slices, and put it in a pipkin with some currans, dates, cinamon, pepper, mar­row, [Page 44]mace whole, verjuyce, eggs, butter, bread, wine, and being finely stewed, serve it on fine sippets, with beaten butter, sugar, strained eggs, verjuyce, &c.

6. To stew a Neats Tongue whole.

TAke a fresh Neats tongue raw, make a hole in the low­er end, and take out some of the meat, mince it with some bacon or beef-suet, and some sweet herbs, and put in the yolks of an egg or two, some nutmeg, salt, and some grated parmisan or fat cheese, pepper and ginger; mingle all together, and fill the hole in the tongue, then wrap a caul or skin of mutton about it, and binde it about the end of the tongue, boil it till it will blanch: and being blanched, wrap about it the caul of veal with some of the forcing, rost it a little brown, and put it in a pipkin, and stew it with some claret and strong broth, cloves, mace, salt, pep­per, some strained bread or grated manchet, some sweet herbs chopped small, marrow, fried onions and apples amongst; and being finely stewed down, serve it on fine carved sippets with barberries and slic't lemon, and run it over with beaten butter. Garnish the dish with grated or searced manchet.

7. To stew a Neats Tongue otherwayes whole or in pieces boild, blanch it or not.

TAke a tongue, and put it a stewing between two dish­es, being raw, and fresh, put some strong broth to it and white wine, with some whole cloves, mace, and pep­per whole, some capers, salt, turnips cut like lard, or car­rots, or any roots, and stew all together the space of two or three hours leasurely, then blanch it, and put some marrow to it, give it a walm or two, and serve it on fine sippets finely carved, and strow on some minced lemon [Page 45]and barberries or grapes, and run over all with beaten butter.

Garnish your dish with fine grated manchet finely searced.

8. To boil a Tongue otherwayes.

SAlt a tongue twelve hours, or boil it in water and salt till it be tender, blanch it, and being finely boild, dish it in a clean dish, and stuff it with minced lemon, mince the rind, and strow over all, and serve it with some of the Gallandines, or some of the Italian sauces, as you may see in the book of sauces.

To boil a Neats Tongue otherwayes, of three of four dayes powder.

BOil it in fair water, and serve it on brewice, with boild turnips and onions, run it over with beaten butter, and serve it on fine carved sippets, some barberries, goose­berries, or grapes, and serve it with some of the sawces, as you may see in the book of all manner of sawces.

To Fricas a Neats Tongue, or any Tongues.

BEing tender boil'd, slice it into thin slices, and fry it with sweet butter, then put away your butter, and put some strong broth, nutmeg, pepper, and sweet herbs chopped small, some grapes or barberries picked, and some yolks of eggs, or verjuyce, grated bread, or stamped Al­monds and strained.

Sometimes you may adde some saffron.

Thus udders may be dressed in any of the wayes of the Neats-tongues beforesaid.

To hash any Land Fowl, as Turkie, Capon, Phesants, or Par­tridges, or any Fowls, being rosted and cold.
Roste the Fowls for Hashes.

TAke a Capon, hash the wings, and slice it into thin slices, but leave the rump and the legs whole; mince the wings into very thin slices no bigger then a three­pente in breadth, and put it in a pipkin with a little strong broth, nutmeg, some sliced mushrooms, or pickled mush­rooms, and an onion very thin sliced no bigger then the minced capon; being well stewed down with a little but­ter and gravy, dish it on fine sippets, and lay the rump or rumps whole on the minced meat, also the legs whole, and run it over with beaten butter, slices of lemon, and lemon­peel whole.

Collops, or hashed Veal.

TAke a leg of veal, and cut it into slices as thin as an half-crown piece, and as broad as your hand, and hack them with the back of an knife, then lard them with small lard good and thick, and fry them with sweet butter; being fryed, make sauce with butter, vinegar, some chopped time amongst, and yolks of eggs dissolved with juice of oranges, give them a toss or two in the pan, and so put them in a dish with a little gravy, &c,

Or you may make other sauce of mutton-gravy, juyce of lemon. and grated nutmeg.

A Hash of any Tongues, Neats Tongues, Sheeps Tongues, or any great or small Tongues.

BEing tender boil'd and cold, cut them in thin slices, and fry them in sweet butter; then put them in a pip­kin [Page 47]with a pint of claret wine, and some beaten cinamon, ginger, sugar, salt, some capers, or samphire, and some sweet butter; stew it well down, till the liquor be half wasted, and now and then stir it: being finely and leasurely stewed, serve it on fine carved sippets, and wring on the juyce of a lemon, and marrow, &c.

Or sometimes lard them whole, roste them, and stew them as before, and put a few carawayes, and large mace, sugar, marrow, chesnuts: serve them on fryed tostes, &c.

To make other Hashes of Veal.

TAke a fillet of Veal with the udder, roste it; and be­ing rosted, cut away the frothy flap, and cut it into thin slices; then mince it very fine with two handfuls of French capers, and currans one handful; and season it with a little beaten nutmeg, ginger, mace, cinamon, and a handful of sugar; and stew these with a pound of butter, a quarter of a pint of vinegar, as much caper liquor a faggot of sweet herbs, and a little salt: Let all these boil softly the space of two hours, now and then stirring it; being finely stewed, dish it up, and stick about it fried toste, or stock-fritters, &c.

Or to this foresaid Hash, you may adde some yolks of hard eggs minced among the meat, or minced and min­gled, and put whole currans, whole capers, and some white wine.

Or to this foresaid Hash you may, being hashed, put no­thing but beaten butter onely with lemon, and the meat cut like little square dice, and served with beaten butter, and lemon on fine carved sippets.

To hash a Hare.

CUt it into pieces, and wash off the hairs in water and wine, strain the liquor, and parboil the quarters; [Page 48]then take them and put them into a dish with the legs, shoulders, and head whole, and the chine cut in two or three pieces, and put to it two or three great onions whole, and some of the liquor where it was parboil'd: stew it be­tween two dishes till it be tender; then put to it some pep­per, mace, nutmeg, and serve it on fine carved sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, lemon, some marrow, and barberries.

To hash or boil Rabits divers wayes, either in quarters or sli­ces, or cut like small dice, or whole, or minced.

TAke a Rabit being flayed, and wiped clean, cut off the legs, thighs, wings, and head, and part the chine in­to four pieces or six; put all into a dish, and put to it a pint of white wine, as much fair water, and gross pepper, slic't ginger, some salt butter, a little time, and other sweet herbs finely minced, and two or three blades of mace; stew it the space of two hours leasurely; and a little before you dish it, take the yolks of six new laid eggs, and dissolve them with some grapes, verjuyce, or wine vinegar, give it a walm or two on the fire, till the broth be somewhat thick; then put it in a clean dish, with salt about the dish, and serve it hot.

A Rabit hashed otherwayes.

STew it between two dishes in quarters, as the former, or in pieces as long as your finger, with some strong broth, mace, a bundle of sweet herbs, and salt: Being well stewed, strain the yolks of two hard eggs with some of the broth, and put it into the broth where the Rabit stews; then have some cabbage lettice boil'd in boiling water; and be­ing boil'd, squeeze away the water, and put them in beaten butter, with a few raisins of the sun boil'd in water also [Page 49]by themselves; or in place of lettice use white endive. Then being finely stewed, dish up the Rabit on fine carved sippets, and lay on it mace, lettice in quarters, raisins, grapes, lemon, sugar, gooseberries, or barberries, and broth it with the former broth.

Thus Chickens, or Capons, or Partridge, and strained almonds in this broth for change.

To hash a Rabit otherwayes, with a forcing in his belly of minced sweet herbs, yolks of hard eggs, parsley, pep­per, and currans, and fill his belly.

To hash Rabits, Chickens, or Pigeons, either in pieces, or whole with Turnips.

BOil either the Rabit or fowls in water and salt, or strained oatmeal and salt.

Take Turnips, cut them in slices, and after cut them like small lard an inch long, the quantity of a quart, and put them in a pipkin with a pound of butter, three or four spoonfuls of strong broth, and a quarter of a pint of wine vinegar, some pepper and ginger, sugar and salt; and let them stew leasurely with some mace the space of two hours; being very finely stewed, put them into beaten butter, bea­ten with cream and yolks of eggs, then serve them upon fine thin toasts of french bread

Or otherwayes being stewed as aforesaid without eggs, cream, or butter, serve them as formerly. And these will serve for boiled Chickens, or any kinde of Fowl for gar­nish.

To make a Bisk the best way.

TAke a leg of beef and a knuckle of veal, boil them in two gallons of fair water, scum them clean, and put to them some cloves and mace; then boil them from [Page 50]two gallons to three quarts of broath; being boiled, strain it, and put it in a pipkin; when it is cold, take off the fat and bottom, clear it into another clean pipkin, and keep it warm till the Bisk be ready.

Boil the Fowl in the liquor of the marrow-bones of six peeping chickens, and six peeping pigeons in a clean pip­kin, either in some broth, or in water and salt. Boil the marrow by it self in a pipkin in the same broth with some salt.

Then have pallets, noses, lips boiled tender, blancht and cut into bits as big as a six-pence; also some sheeps tongues boiled, blancht, larded, fried, and stewed in gravy, with some chesnuts blanched; also some cocks combs boiled and blanched, and some knots of eggs, or yolks of hard eggs. Stew all the aforesaid in some roast mutton, or beef gravy, with some pistaches, large mace, a good big onion or two, and some salt.

Then have lamb-stones blanched and slic't, also sweet­breads of veal, and sweetbreads of lamb slit, some great oysters parboild, and some cock-stones. Fry the aforesaid materials in clarified butter, some fried spinage, or Ale­xander leaves, and keep them warm in an oven, with some fried sausages made of minced bacon, veal, yolks of eggs, nutmeg, sweet herbs, salt, and pistaches; bake it in an oven in cauls of veal, and being baked and cold, slice it round, fry it, and keep it warm in the oven with the foresaid fried things.

To make little Pies for the Bisk.

MInce a leg of veal or a leg of mutton with some in­terlarded bacon raw and seasoned with a little salt, nutmeg, pepper, some sweet herbs, pistaches, grapes, goose­berries, barberries, and yolks of hard eggs in quarters; min­gle all together, fill them, and close them up; and being baked, liquor them with gravy and beaten butter, or mut­ton broth.

Make the paste of a pottel of flower, half a pound of but­ter, six yolks of eggs, and boil the liquor and butter to­gether.

To make gravy for the Bisk.

ROast eight pound of buttock beef, and two legs of mutton, being through roasted press out the gravy, and wash them with some mutton broth, and when you have done, strain it, and keep it warm in a clean pipkin for your present use.

To dish the Bisk.

TAke a great eight pound dish, and a six penny french pinemolet or bread, chip it and slice it into large sli­ces, and cover all the bottom of the dish; scald it or steep it well with your strong broth, and upon that some mutton or beef gravy; then dish up the fowl on the dish, and round the dish the fryed tongues in gravy with the lips, pallets, pistaches, eggs, noses, chesnuts, and cocks-combs, and run them over the fowls with some of the gravy and large mace.

Then again run it over with fryed sweetbread, sausage, lamb-stones, cock-stones, fryed spinage, or alexander leaves, then the marrow over all; next the carved lemons upon the meat, and run it over with the beaten butter, yolks of eggs, and gravy beat up together till it is thick, then garnish the dish with the little pies, dolphines of puff-paste, cheseuts, boiled and fryed oysters, and yolks of hard eggs.

To boil Chines of Veal.

FIrst stew them in a stewing pan or between two dishes, with some strong broth of either veal or mutton, some white wine, and some fausages made of minced veal or pork, [Page 52]boil up the chines, scum them, and put in two or three blades of large mace, a few cloves, oyster or caper liquor with a little salt; and being finely boild down, put in some good mutton or beef gravy: and a quarter of an hour be­fore you dish them, have all manner of sweet herbs pickt and stript, as time, sweet marjoram, savory, parsley brui­sed with the back of a ladle, and give them two or three walms on the fire in the broth; then dish the chines in thin slices of fine french bread, broth them, and lay on them some boiled beef marrow, boild in strong broth, some slic't lemon, and run over all with a lear made of beaten butter, the yolf of an egg or two, the juyce of two or three oran­ges, and some gravy, &c.

To boil or stew any Joint of Mutton.

TAke a whole loin of mutton being jointed, put it into a long stewing pan or large dish, in as much fair wa­ter as will more then half cover it, and when it is scumm'd cover it; but first put in some salt, white wine, and car­rots cut into dice work, and when the broth is half boiled strain it, blow off the fat, and wash away the dregs from the mutton; wash also the stew pan or pipkin very clean, and put in again the broth into the pan or pipkin, with some capers, large mace, and carrots being washed, put them in again and stew them softly, lay the mutton by in some warm place, or broth, in a pipkin; then put in some sweet herbs chopped with an onion, and put it to your broth al­so, then have collyflower ready boild in water and salt, put it into beaten butter with some boild marrow: then the mutton and broth being ready, dissolve two or three yolks of eggs, with white wine, verjuyce, or sack, and give it a walm or two; then dish up the meat, and lay on the collyflowers, gooseberries, capers, marrow, carrots, and grapes or barberries, and run it over with beaten butter.

For the garnish according to the season of the year, spa­ragus, [Page 53]artichocks, parsnips, turnips, hop buds, coleworts, cabidge-lettice, chesnuts, cabidge-sprouts.

Sometimes for more variety, for thickning of this broth, strained almonds, with strong mutton broth.

To boil a Rack, Chine, or Loin of mutton a most excellent way either whole or in pieces.

BOil it either in a flat large pipkin or stewing pan, with as much fair water as will cover the meat, and when it boils scum it, put thereto some salt; and being half boiled take up the meat and strain the broth, blow off the fat and wash the stewing pan and the meat from the dregs, then again put in the crag end of the rack of mutton to make the broth good, with some mace; then a little be­fore you take it up, take a handful of picked parsley, chop it very small and put it in the broth, with some whole ma­rygold flowers; put in the chine again, and give it a walm or two, then dish it on fine sippets and broth it, then adde thereto raisins of the Sun, and currans ready boild and warm, lay them over the chine of mutton, then garnish the dish with marygold-flowers, mace, lemon, and barberries.

Otherwayes for change without fruit.

To boil a Chine of mutton in Barley broth, or Chines, Racks, and Knuckles of Veal.

TAke a chine of veal or mutton and joynt it, put it in a pipkin with some strong mutton broth, and when it boils and is scummed, put in some french barley being first boiled in fair water, put into the broth also some large mace, and some sweet herbs bound up in a bundle, a little rosemary, time, winter-savory, salt, and sweet marjoram, binde them up very hard, and put in some raisins of the sun, some good prunes, currans, and marygold-flowers; boil [Page 54]it up to an indifferent thickness, and serve it on fine sippets; garnish the dish with fruit and marigold-flowers, mace, le­mon, and boil'd marrow.

Otherwayes without fruit, put some good mutton gra­vy, and sometimes raisins onely.

To stew a Chine of Mutton or Veal.

PUt it in a Pipkin with strong broth and white wine, and when it boils scum it, and put to it some oyster liquor, salt, whole pepper, a bundle of sweet herbs well bound up, two or three blades of large mace, a whole onion, with some inter larded bacon cut into dice work, some chesnuts, and some capers; then have some stewed oysters by them­selves, as you may see in the Book of Oysters. The chines being ready, garnish the dish with great oysters fried and stewed, mace, chesnuts, and lemon peel; dish up the chines in a fair dish on fine sippets, broth it, and garnish the chines with stewed oysters, chesnuts, mace, slic't lemon, and some fried oysters.

To make a Dish of Steaks stewed in a Frying-pan.

TAke them and fry them in sweet butter; being half fried, put out the butter, and put to them some good strong Ale, Pepper, Salt, a shred onion, and nutmeg; stew them well together, and dish them on sippets, serve them, and pour on the sauce with some beaten butter, &c.

To make stewed Broth.

TAke a knuckle of veal, a joynt of mutton, loin or rack, two marrow-bones, a capon, and boil them in fair water, scum them when they boil, and put to them a bun­dle of sweet herbs bound up hard and close; then adde [Page 55]some large mace, whole cinamon, and some ginger, bruised and put in a fine clean cloath bound up fast, and a few whole cloves, some strained manchet, or beaten oatmeal strained and put to the broth; then have prunes and cur­rans boil'd and strained; then put in some whole raisins, currans, some good damask prunes, and boil not the fruit too much: about half an hour before you dish your meat, put into the broth a pint of claret wine, and some sugar; dish up the meat on fine sippets, broth it, and garnish the dish with slic't lemons, prunes, mace, raisins, currans, scraped sugar, and barberries; garnish the meat in the dish also.

Stewed Broth in the new Mode or Fashion.

TAke a joynt of mutton, rack, or loin, and boil them in pieces or whole in fair water, scum them, and be­ing scummed and half boiled, take up the mutton, and wash away the dregs from the meat; strain the broth, and blow away the fat; then put the broth into a clean pipkin, with a bundle of sweet herbs bound up hard; then put thereto some large mace, raisins of the sun boil'd and strained, with half as many prunes; also some saffron, a few whole cloves, pepper, salt, claret wine, and sugar; and being finely stew­ed together, a little before you dish it up, put in the meat, and give it a walm or two; dish it up, and serve it on fine carved sippets.

To stew a Loin, Rack, or any Joynt of mutton otherwayes.

CHop a loin into steaks, lay it in a deep dish or stewing­pan, and put to it half a pint of claret, and as much water, salt and pepper, three or four whole onions, a faggot of sweet herbs bound up bard, and some large mace; cover them close, and stew them leasurely the space of [Page 56]two hours, turn them now and then, and serve them on sippets.

Otherwayes for change, being half boiled, put to them some sweet herbs chopped, give them a walm, and serve them on sippets with scalded gooseberries, barberries, grapes, or lemon.

Sometimes for variety put raisins, prunes, currans, dates, and serve them with slic't lemon, and beaten butter.

Other times you may alter the spices, and put nutmeg, cloves, ginger, &c.

Sometimes to the first plain way put capers, pickled cu­cumbers, samphire, &c.

Otherwayes.

Stew it between two dishes with fair water, and when it boils, scum it, and put in three or four blades of large mace, gross pepper, cloves, and salt; stew them close covered two hours: then have parsley picked, and some strip'd, fine spinage, sorrel, savory, and sweet marjoram chopped with some onions, put them to your meat, and give it a walm, with some grated bread amongst them; then dish them on carved sippets, blow off the fat on the broth, and broth it, lay lemon on it and beaten butter, and stew it thus whole.

To dress or force a Leg of Veal a singular good way, in the newest Mode.

TAke a leg of veal, take out the meat, and leave the skin and the shape of the leg whole together, mince the meat that came out of the leg with some beef suet or lard, and some sweet herbs minced; then season it with pepper, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves, all being fine beaten, with some salt, a clove or two of garlick, three or four yolks of hard eggs in quarters, pine-apple-seed, two or [Page 57]three raw eggs, also pistaches, chesnuts, and some quarters of boild artichocks bottoms fill the leg and sowe it up, boil it in a pipkin with two gallons of fair water and some white wine; being scumm'd and almost boild, take up some broth into a dish or pipkin, and put to it some chesnuts, pistaches, pine-apple-seed, some large mace, marrow, and artichocks bottoms boild and cut into quarters; stew all the afore­said well together: then have some fryed toast of manchet or rouls finely carved. The leg being well boild (dainty and tender) dish it on french bread, fry some toast of it, and sippets round about it, broth it, and put on it marrow, and your other materials, as slic't lemon and lemon-peel, and run it over with beaten butter.

Thicken the broth sometimes with almond paste strain­ed with some of the broth, or for variety yolks of egs and saffron strained with some of the broth, or saffron onely. One may adde sometimes some of the minced meat made up into balls, and stewed amongst the broth, &c.

To boil a Leg or Knuckle of Veal with Rice.

BOil it in a pipkin, put some salt to it and scum it, then put to it some mace and some rice finely picked and washed, some raisins of the sun and gravy; being fine and tender boild, put in some saffron, and serve it on fine car­ved sippets, with the rice over all.

Otherwayes with paste cut like small lard, and boil it in thin broth and saffron.

Or otherwayes in white broth, with fruit, sweet herbs, white wine and gooseberries.

To boil a Breast of Veal.

JOynt it well and parboil it a little, then put it in a stew­ing pan or deep dish, with some strong broth and a bundle of sweet herbs well bound up, some large mace, [Page 58]and some slices of interlarded bacon, two or three cloves, some capers, samphire, salt, spinage, yolks of hard eggs, and white wine; stew all these well together, being tender boild, serve it on fine carved sippets, and broth it: then have some fryed sweetbreads, sausages of veal or pork, gar­lick or none, and run all over with butter, lemon, and fry­ed parsley over all. Thus you may boil rack or loin of veal.

To boil a Breast of Veal otherwayes.

MAke a pudding of grated manchet, minced suet, and minced veal, season it with nutmeg, pepper, salt, three or four eggs, cinamon, dates, currans, raisins of the sun, some grapes, sugar, and cream; mingle all together, fill the breast, prick it up, and stew it between two dishes with white wine, strong broth, mace, dates, and marrow; being finely stewed serve it on sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, lemon, barberries, or grapes.

Sometime thick it with some almond-milk, sugar, and cream.

To force a Breast of Veal.

MInce some veal or mutton with some beef-suet or fat bacon, some sweet herbs minced, and seasoned with some cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, two or three raw eggs, and salt; then prick it up: the breast being filled at the lower end, stew it between two dishes, with some strong broth, white wine, and large mace; then an hour after have sweet herbs picked and stripped, as time, sorrel, par­sley, and sweet marjoram, bruised with the back of a ladle, put it into your broth with some marrow and give them a walm; then dish up your breast of veal on sippets finely carved; broth it and lay on it slic't lemon, marrow, mace, and barberries, and run it over with beaten butter.

If you will have the broth yellow put thereto saffron, &c.

To boil a Leg of Veal.

STuff it with beef-suet, sweet herbs chopped, nutmeg and salt, and boil it in fair water and salt; then take some of the broth and put thereto some capers, currans, large mace, a piece of interlarded bacon, two or three whole cloves, pieces of pears, some boild artichock suckers, some beaten butter, boild marrow, and mace; then before you dish it up, have sorrel, sage, parsley, time, sweet marjoram coursly minced with two or three cuts of a knife, and brui­sed with the back of a ladle on a clean board; put them in­to your broth to make it green, and give it a walm or two, then dish it up on fine carved sippets, pour on the broth, and then your other matterials, some gooseberries, barber­ries, beaten butter and lemon,

To boil a Leg of Mutton.

TAke a fair leg of mutton, boil it in water and salt, make sauce with gravy, wine vinegar, white wine, salt, but­ter, nutmeg, and strong broth; and being well stewed to­gether, dish it up on fine carved sippets, and pour on your broth.

Garnish your dish with barberries, capers, and slic't le­mon, and garnish the leg of mutton with the same garnish, and run it over with beaten butter, slic't lemon, and grated nutmeg.

To boil a Leg of Mutton otherwayes.

TAke a good leg of mutton and boil it in water and salt, being stuffed with sweet herbs chopped with beef-suet, some salt and nutmeg; then being almost boild, take up some of the broth into a pipkin, and put to it some [Page 60]large mace, a few currans, a handful of french capers, a little sack, the yolks of three or four hard eggs minced small, and some lemon cut like square dice; being finely boild, dish it on carved sippets, broth it, and run it over with beaten butter, and lemon shred small.

Otherwayes.

Stuff a leg of mutton with parsley being finely pick­ed, boil it in water and salt, and serve it on a fair dish with parsley and verjuyce in saucers.

Otherwayes.

Boil it in water and salt not stuffed, and being boild, stuff it with lemon in bits like squaredice, and serve it with with the peel cut square round about it; make sauce with the gravy, beaten butter, lemon, and grated nutmeg.

Otherwayes.

Boil it in water and salt, being stuffed with parsley, make sauce for it with large mace, gravy, chopped parsley, butter, vinegar, juyce of orange, gooseberries barberries, grapes, and sugar, and serve it on sippets.

To boil peeping Chickens, the best and rarest way, A la mode.

TAke three or four french manchets, and being chip­ped, cut a round hole in the top of them, take out the crum, and make a composition of the brawn of a roast capon, mince it very fine, and stamp it in a morter with marchpane paste, the yolks of hard eggs, muskefied bisket bread, and the crum of the manchet of one of the breads, some sugar and sweet herbs chopped small, beaten cina­mon, cream, marrow, faffron, yolks of eggs, and some cur­rans; fill the breads, and boil them in a napkin, in some good mutton or capon broth; but first stop the holes in the tops of the breads, then stew some sweetbreads of veal, and six peeping chickens between two dishes, or in a pipkin with some mace, then fry some lamb-stones slic't in butter [Page 61]made of flower, cream, two or three eggs, and salt; put to it some juyce of spinage, then have some boil'd sparagus, or bottoms of Artichocks boil'd and beat up in beaten butter and gravy. The materials being well boil'd and stewed up, dish the boil'd breads in a fair dish with the chickens round about the breads, then the sweetbreads, and round the dish some fine carved sippets; then lay on the mar­row, fried lamb-stones, and some grapes; then thicken the broth with strained almonds, some cream and sugar, give them a walm, and broth the meat, garnish it wich candied pistaches, artichocks, grapes, mace, some poungarnet, and slic't lemon.

To hash a Shoulder of Mutton.

TAke a shoulder of mutton, roste it, and save the gra­vy, slice one half, and mince the other, and put it into a pipkin with the shoulder blade, put to it some strong broth of good mutton or beef gravy, large mace, some pepper, salt, and a big onion or two, a faggot of sweet herbs, and a pint of white wine; stew them well together close covered, and being tender stewed, put away the fat, and put some oyster liquor to the meat, and give it a walm: Then have three pints of great oysters parboild in their own liquor, and bearded; stew them in a pipkin with large mace, two great whole onions, a little salt, vinegar, butter, some white wine, pepper, and stript time; the materials being well stewed down, dish up the shoulder of mutton on a fine clean dish, and pour on the materials or hashed mutton, then the stewed oysters over all, with slic't lemon and fine carved sippets round the dish.

To hash a shoulder of Mutton otherwayes.

STew it with claret wine, onely adding these few varie­ties more then the other; viz. two or three anchoves, [Page 62]olives, capers, samphire, barberries, grapes, or gooseber­ries, and in all points else as the former. But then the shoulder being roasted, take off the skin of the upper side whole, and when the meat is dished, lay on the upper skin whole, and cox it.

To hash a shoulder of Mutton the French way.

TAke a shoulder of mutton, roste it thorowly, and save the gravy; being well roasted, cut it into fine thin slices into a stewing-pan or dish; leave the shoulder bones with some meat on them, and hack them with your knife; then blow off the fat from the gravy you saved, and put it to your meat with a quarter of a pint of claret wine, some salt, and a grated nutmeg; stew all the foresaid things together a quarter of an hour, and serve it in a fine clean dish with sippets of French bread: then rub the dish bottom with a clove of garlick, or an onion, as you please; dish up the shoulder bones first, and then the meat on that; then have a good lemon cut into dice work, as square as small dice, peel and all together, and strew it on the meat; then run it over with beaten butter, and gravy of mutton.

Scotch Collops of Mutton.

TAke a leg of mutton, and take out the bone, leave the leg whole, and cut large collops round the leg as thin as a half-crown piece; hack them, then salt and broil them on a clear charcole fire, broil them up quick, and the blood will rise on the upper side; then take them up plum off the fire, and turn the gravy into a dish; this done, broil the other side, but have a care you broil them not too dry; then make sauce with the gravy, a little claret wine, and nutmeg; give the collops a turn or two in the gravy, [Page 63]and dish them one by one, or two, one upon another; then run them over with the juyce of orange or lemon.

Scotch Collops of a Leg or Loin of mutton otherwayes.

BOne a leg of mutton, and cut it cross the grain of the meat, slice it into very thin slices, and hack them with the back of a knife; then fry them in the best butter you can get, but first salt them a little before they be fried; or being not too much fried, pour away the butter, and put to them some mutton broth or gravy onely, give them a walm in the pan, and dish them hot.

Sometimes for change put to them grated nutmeg, gra­vy, juyce of orange, and a little claret wine; and being fried as the former, give it a walm, run it over with beaten butter, and serve it up hot.

Otherwayes for more variety, adde some capers, oysters, and lemon.

To make a Hash of Partridges or Capons.

TAke twelve partridges and roste them, and being cold mince them very fine, the brawns or wings, and leave the legs and rumps whole; then put some strong mutton broth to them, or good mutton gravy, grated nutmeg, a great onion or two, some pistaches, chesnuts, and salt; then stew them in a large earthen pipkin or sauce pan; stew the rumps and legs by themselves in strong broth in an­other pipkin; then have a fine clean dish, and take a French six penny bread, chip it, and cover the bottom of the dish, and when you go to dish the Hash, steep the bread with some good mutton broth, or good mutton gravy; then pour the Hash on the steeped bread, lay the legs and the rumps on the Hash, with some fried oysters, pistaches, chesnuts, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel, yolks of eggs [Page 64]strained with juyce of orange and beaten butter beat together, and run over all; garnish the dish with carved oranges, lemons, fried oysters, chesnuts, and pistaches. Thus you may hash any kinde of Fowl, whether water or land Fowl.

To hash a Hare.

FLay it and draw it, then cut it into pieces, and wash it in claret wine and water very clean, strain the liquor, and parboil the quarters; then take them and slice them, and put them into a dish with the legs, wings, or shoulders and head whole; cut the chine into two or three pieces, and put to it two or three great onions, and some of the liquor where it was parboild, stew it between two dishes close covered till it be tender, and put to it some mace, pepper, and nutmeg; serve it on fine carved sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, lemon, marrow, and bar­berries.

To hash a Rabit.

TAke a Rabit being flayed and wiped clean; then cut off the thighs, legs, wings, and head, and part the chine into four pieces, put all into a dish or pipkin, and put to it a pint of white wine, and as much fair water, gross pep­per, slic't ginger, salt, time, and some other sweet herbs being finely minced, and two or three blades of mace; stew it the space of two hours, and a little before you dish it, take the yolks of six new laid eggs, dissolve them with some grape verjuyce, give it a walm or two on the fire, and serve it up hot.

To stew or hash Rabits otherwayes.

STew them between two dishes as the former, in quar­ters or pieces as long as your finger, with some broth, [Page 65]mace, a bundle of sweet herbs, salt, and a little white wine, being well stewed down, strain the yolks of two or three hard eggs with some of the broth, and thicken the broth where the rabit stews; then have some cabidge-lettice boild in fair water, and being boild tender put them in beaten butter with a few boild raisins of the Sun; or in place of let­tice you may use white endive: then the rabits being fine­ly stewed, dish them up on fine carved sippets, and lay on the garnish of lettice, mace, raisins of the Sun, grapes, slic't lemon or barberries; broth it, and scrape on sugar. Thus chickens, pigeons, or partridge.

To hash Rabits otherwayes.

MAke a forcing or stuffing in the belly of the rabits, with some sweet herbs, yolks of hard eggs, parsley, sage, currans, pepper and salt, and boil them as the for­mer.

To hash any Land Fowl.

TAke a capon and hash the wings in fine thin slices, leave the rumps and legs whole, put them into a pipkin with a little strong broth, nutmeg, some stewed or pickled mushrooms, and an onion very small slic't, or as the capon is slic't about the bigness of a three-pence; stew it down with a little butter and gravy, and then dish it on fine sippets, lay the rumps and legs on the meat, and run it over with beaten butter, beaten with slices of lemon-peel.

To boil Woodcocks or Snites.

BOil them either in strong broth, or in water and salt, and being boiled take out the guts and chop them small with the liver, put to it some crumbs of grated white bread, a little of the broth of the cock, and some large [Page 66]mace; stew them together with some gravy, then dissolve the yolks of two eggs with some wine vinegar, and a little grated nutmeg, and when you are ready to dish it, put the eggs to it, and stir it amongst the sauce with a little butter; dish them on sippets, and run the sauce over them with some beaten butter and capers, or lemon minced small, barber­ries or whole pickled grapes.

Sometimes with this sauce boil some slic't onions, and currans boil'd in a broth by it self; when you boil it with onions rub the bottom of the dish with garlick.

Boild Cocks or Larks otherwayes.

BOil them with the guts in them, in strong broth, or fair water, and three or four whole onions, large mace, and salt; the cocks being boild, make sauce with some thin slices of manchet or grated bread in another pipkin, and some of the broth where the fowl or cocks boil, then put to it some butter and the guts and liver minced, then have some yolks of eggs dissolved with some vinegar and some grated nutmeg, put it to the other ingredients, stir them together, and dish the fowl on fine sippets, pour on the sauce with some slic't lemon, grapes, or barberries, and run it over with beaten butter.

To boil any Land Fowl, as Turky, Bustard, Pheasant, Peacock, Partridge, or the like.

TAke a turkey and flay off the skin, leave the legs and rumps whole, then mince the flesh raw with some beef-suet or lard, season it with nutmeg, pepper, salt, and some minced sweet herbs, then put to it some yolks of raw eggs and mingle all together, with two bottoms of boild artichocks, rosted chesnuts blanched, some marrow, and some boild skirrets or parsnips cut like dice, or some plea­sant [Page 67]pears, and yolks of hard eggs in quarters, some goose­berries, grapes, or barberries; fill the skin, and prick it up in the back, stew it in a stewing pan or deep dish, and co­ver it with another; but first put some strong broth to it, some marrow, artichocks boild and quartered, large mace, white wine, chesnuts, quarters of pears, salt, grapes, bar­berries, and some of the meat made up in balls stewed with the turkey; being finely boild or stewed, serve it on fine carved sippets, broth it, and lay on the garnish with slices of lemon and whole lemon-peel, run it over with beaten butter, and garnish the dish with chesnuts, yolks of hard eggs, and large mace.

For the lears or thickning, yolks of hard eggs strained with some of the broth, or strained almond paste with some of the broth, or else strained bread and sorrel,

Otherwayes you may boil the former fowls either boned and trust up with a farsing of some minced veal or mutton, and seasoned as the former in all points, with those ma­terials, or boil it with the bones in being trust up. A tur­key to bake, and break the bones.

Otherwayes bone the fowl, and fill the body with the foresaid farsing, or make a pudding of grated bread, min­ced suet of beef or veal, seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, salt, and grapes, fill the body and prick up the back, and stew it as is aforesaid.

Or make the pudding of grated bread, beef-suet minced, some currans, nutmegs, cloves, sugar, sweet herbs, salt, juyce of spinage; if yellow, saffron. some minced meat, cream, eggs and barberries: fill the fowl and stew it in mutton broth and white wine, with the gizard, liver, and bones, stew it down well, then have some artichock bottoms boild and quartered, some potatoes boild and blanched, and some dates quartered, also some marrow boild in wa­ter and salt; for the garnish some boild skirret or pleasant pears. Then make a lear of almond paste strained with [Page 68]mutton broth, for the thickening of the former broth.

Otherwayes simple being stuffed with parsley, serve it in with butter, vinegar, and parsley boiled and minced; as also bacon boild on it or about it, in two pieces, and two saucers of green sauce.

Or otherwayes for variety, boil your fowl in water and salt, then take strong broth and put in a faggot of sweet herbs, mace, marrow, cucumber slic't, and thin slices of interlarded bacon, and salt, &c.

To boil Capons, Pullets, Chickens, Pigeons, Pheasants or Partridges.

FEarce them either with the bone or boned, then take off the skin whole, with the legs, wings, neck, and head on, mince the body with some bacon or beef-suet, season it with nutmeg, pepper, cloves, beaten ginger, salt, and a few sweet herbs, finely minced and mingled amongst some three or four yolks of eggs, some sugar, whole grapes, gooseberries, barberries, and pistaches; fill the skins and prick them up in the back, then stew them between two dishes, with some strong broth, white wine, butter, some large mace, marrow, gooseberries, and sweet herbs; be­ing stewed serve them on sippets with some marrow and slic't lemon; in winter, currans.

To boil a Capon or Chicken in White Broth.

FIrst boil the capon in water and salt, then take three pints of strong broth, and a quart of white wine, and stew it in a pipkin with a quarter of a pound of dates, half a pound of sine sugar, four or five blades of large mace, the marrow of three marrow bones, a handful of white en­dive; stew these in a pipkin very leasurely, that it may but onely simper, then being finely stewed, and the broth [Page 69]well tasted, strain the yolks of ten eggs with some of the broth. Before you dish up the capon or chickens, put in the eggs into the broth, and keep it stirring that it may not curdle, give it a walm and set it from the fire; the fowls being dished up put on the broth, and garnish the meat with dates, marrow, large mace, endive, preserved bar­berries, and oranges, boil'd skirrets, poungarnet, and cur­nells. Make a lear of almond paste and grape verjuyce.

A rare Frycase.

Take six pigeon and six chicken peepers, scald and truss them being drawn clean, head and all on, then set them, and have some lamb-stones and sweetbreads blanch­ed, parboild and slic't, fry most of the sweetbreads flow­red, have also some asparagus ready, cut off the tops an inch long, the yolks of two hard eggs, pistaches, the mar­row of six marrow-bones, half the marrow fryed green, and white batter, let it be kept warm till it be almost din­ner time, then have a clean frying-pan, and fry the fowl with good sweet butter, being finely fryed put out the butter, and put to them some roste mutton gravy, some large fryed oysters, and some salt; then put in the hard yolks of eggs, and the rest of the sweetbreads that are not fryed, the pistaches, asparagus, and half the marrow: then stew them well in the frying pan with some grated nutmeg, pepper (a clove or two of garlick if you please) a little white wine, and let them be well stewed. Then have ten yolks of eggs dissolved in a dish with grape-verjuyce or wine vinegar, and a little beaten mace and put it to the frycase, then have a french six penny loaf slic't into a fair large dish set on coals, with some good mutton gravy, then give the frycase two or three walms on the fire, and pour it on the sop; in the dish; garnish it with fryed sweet­bread, fryed oysters, fryed marrow, pistaches, slic't al­monds, and the juyce of two or three oranges.

Capons in Pottage in the French Fashion.

DRaw and truss the Capons, set them, and fill their bellies with marrow; then put them in a pipkin with a knuckle of veal, a neck of mutton, a marrow bone, and some sweetbreads of veal, season the broth with cloves, mace, and a little salt, and set it to the fire; let it boil gently till the capons be enough, but have a care you boil them not too much; as your capons boil, make ready the bottoms and tops of eight or ten rouls of French Bread, put them dried into a fair silver dish, wherein you serve the capons; set it on the fire, and put to the bread two ladles full of broth wherein the capons are boiled, and a ladle full of mutton gravy; cover the dish and let it stand till you dish up the capons; if need require, adde now and then a la­dle full of broth and gravy: when you are ready toserve it, first lay on the marrow bone, then the capons on each side; then fill up the dish with gravy of mutton, and wring on the juyce of a lemon or two; then with a spoon take off all the fat that swimmeth on the pottage; garnish the capons with the sweetbreads, and some carved Lemon, and serve it hot.

To boil a Capon, Pullet, or Chicken.

BOil them in good mutton broth, with mace, a faggot of sweet herbs, sage, spinage, marigold leaves and flowers, white or green endive, burrage, bugloss, parsley, and sorrel, and serve it on sippets.

To boil Capons or Chickens with Sage and Parsley.

FIrst boil them in water and salt, then boil some parsley, sage, two or three eggs hard, chop them; then have [Page 71]a few thin slices of fine manchet, and stew all together, but break not the slicesof bread; stew them with some of the broth wherein the chickens boils, some large mace, butter, a little white wine or vinegar, with a few barberies or grapes; dish up the chickens on the sauce, and run them over with sweet butter and lemon cut like dice, the peel cut like small lard, and boil a little peel with the chickens.

To boil a Capon or Chicken with divers Compositions.

TAke off the skin whole, but leave on the legs, wings, and head; mince the body with some beef-suet or lard, puc to it some sweet herbs minced, and season it with cloves, mace, pepper, salt, two or three eggs, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, bits of potato or mushrooms: In the win­ter with sugar, currans, and prunes fill the skin, prick it up, and stew it between two dishes, with large mace, and strong broth, pieces of artichocks, cardones or asparagus, and marrow: being finely stewed, serve it on carved sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, lemon slic't, and scrape on sugar.

To boil a Capon, Chicken with Cardones, Mushrooms, Artichocks, or Oysters.

THe foresaid Fowls being parboild, and cleansed from the grounds, stew them finely; then take your car­dones being cleansed and peeled into water, have a skillet of fair water boiling hot, and put them therein; b [...]ing tender boild, take them up and fry them in chopt lard or sweet butter, pour away the butter, and put them into a pipkin, with strong broth, pepper, mace, ginger, verjuyce, and juyce of orange; stew all together with some strained almonds, and some sweet herbs chopped, give them a walm, and serve your capon or chicken on sippets.

Let them be fearsed, as you may see in the Book of fearst Meats, and wrap your fearst Fowl in cauls of Veal, half roste them, then stew them in a pipkin with the fore­said cardones and broth.

To boil a Capon or Chicken in the French Fashion with Skirrets or French Beans.

TAke a capon and boil it in fair water with a little salt, a faggot of time and rosemary bound up hard, some parsley and sennel roots being picked and finely cleansed, and two or three blades of large mace; being almost boild, put in two whole onions boild and strained with oyster li­quor, a little verjuyce, grated bread, and some beaten pepper, give it a walm or two, and serve the capon or chicken on fine carved sippets. Garnish it with an orange-peel boild in strong broth, and some French Beans boild and put in thick butter, or some skirret, cardones, artichocks, slic't le­mon, mace, or orange.

To boil Capon or Chicken with sugar Pease.

WHen the cods be but young, string them and pick off the husks; then take two or three handfuls, and put them into a pipkin with half a pound of sweet butter, a quarter of a pint of fair water, gross pepper, salt, mace, and some sallet oyl: stew them till they be ve­ry tender, and strain to them three or four yolks of eggs, with six spoonfuls of sack.

To boil a Capon or Chicken with Collyflowers.

CUt off the buds of your flowers, and boil them in milk with a little mace till they be very tender; then take the yolks of two eggs, and strain them with a quarter of, a [Page 73]pint of sack; then take as much thick butter being drawn with a little vinegar and a slic't lemon, brew them toge­ther; then take the flowers out of the milk, put them to the butter and sack, dish up your capon being tender boil'd upon sippets finely carved, and pour on the sauce, serve it to the table with a little salt.

To boil a Capon or Chicken with Sparagus.

BOil your Capon or chicken in fair water and some salt, then put in their bellies a little mace, chopped parsley, and sweet butter; being boild, serve them on sippets, and put a little of the broth on them: then have a bundle or two of sparagus boild, put in beaten butter, and serve it on your capon or chicken.

To boil a Capon or Chicken with Rice.

BOil the capon in fair water and salt, then take half a pound of rice, and boil it in milk; being half boiled, put away the milk, and boil it in two quarts of cream, put to it a little rose water, large mace, or nutmeg, and the foresaid materials. Being almost boil'd, strain the yolks of six or seven eggs with a little cream, and stir altogether; give them a walm, and dish up the capon or chicken, then pour on the rice, being seasoned with sugar and salt, and serve it on fine carved sippets. Garnish the dish with scra­ped sugar, orange, preserved barberries, slic't lemon, or poungarnet kernels, as also the capon or chicken, and marrow on them.

Divers Meats boiled with Bacon hot or cold; as Calves-head, any Joynt of Veal, lean Venison, Rabits, Turkie, Peacock, Capons, Pullets, Pheasants, Pewets, Pigeons, Partridges, Ducks, Mallards, or any Sea Fowl.

TAke a leg of veal and and soak it in fair water, the blood being well soaked from it and white, boil it; [Page 74]but first stuff it with parsley and other sweet herbs chopped small, as also some yolks of hard eggs minced; stuff it and boil it in water and salt, then boil the bacon by its self either stuffed or not, as you please; the veal and bacon being boiled white, serve them being dished up, and lay the ba­con by the veal with the rinde on in a whole piece, or take off the rinde and cut it in four, six, or eight thin slices; let your bacon be of the ribs, and serve it with parsley strow­ed on it, green sauce in saucers, or others, as you may see in the Book of Sauces.

Cold otherwayes.

BOil any of the meats, poultry, or birds abovesaid with the ribs of bacon, when it is boiled take off the rinde being finely cleansed from the rust and filth; slice it into thin slices, and season it with nutmeg, cinamon, cloves, pepper, and fennel-seed all finely beaten, with fine sugar amongst them, sprinkle over all rose vinegar, and put some of the slices into your boild capon or other fowl lay some slices on it, and lay your capon or other fowl on some blank manger in a clean dish, and serve it cold.

To boil Land Fowl, Sea Fowl, Lamb, Kid, or any Heads in the French Fashion, with green Pease or Haslers.

TAke pease, sheal them, and put them into boiling mut­ton broth, with some thin slices of interlarded ba­con; being almost boiled, put in chopped parsley, some anniseeeds, and strain some of the pease, thick them or not, as you please; then put in some pepper, give it a walm, and serve kids or lambs head on sippets, and stick it other wayes with eggs and grated cheese, or some of the pease and flower strained; sometimes for variety you may use saffron or mint.

To boil all other smaller Fowls, as Ruffes, Brewes, Godwits, Knots, Dotterels, Strents, Pewits, Ollines, Gravelens, Oxeyes, Redshanks, &c.

HAlf roast any of these fowls, and stick on one side a few cloves as they roste, save the gravy, and being half rosted, put them into a pipkin, with the gravy, some claret wine, as much strong broth as will cover them, some broild houshold-bread strained, also mace, cloves, pepper, ginger, some fryed onions and salt; stew all well together, and serve them on fine carved sippets: sometimes for change adde capers and samphire.

To boil all manner of small Birds, or Land Fowl, as Plo­vers, Quails, Railes, Black birds, Thrushes, Snites, Wheat­ears, Larks, Sparrows, Martins.

TAke them and truss them, or cut off the legs and heads, and boil them in strong broth or water, scum them, and put in large mace, white wine, washed currans, dates, marrow, pepper, and salt; being well stew­ed, dish them on fine carved sippets, thicken the broth with strained almonds, rose-water and sugar, and garnish them with lemon, barberries sugar, or grated bread strew­ed about the dish. For leire otherwayes, strained sweet­bread, or strained bread and hard eggs, with verjuyce and broth.

Sometimes for variety garnish them with potatoes, farsings, or little balls of farsed meat.

To boil a Swan, Whopper, wild or tame Goose, Crane, Sho­veller, Herne, Ducks, Mallard, Bittor, Widgeons, Gulls, or Curlewes.

TAke a swan and bone it, leave on the legs and wings, then make a farsing of some beef-suet or minced [Page 76]lard, some minced mutton or venison being finely minced with some sweet herbs, beaten nutmeg, pepper, cloves, and mace; then have some oysters parboild in their own li­quor, mingle them amongst the minced meat, with some raw eggs, and fill the body of the fowl, prick it up close on the back, and boil it in a stewing pan or deep dish, then put to the fowl some strong broth, large mace, white wine, a few cloves, oyster liquor, and some boild marrow; stew them all well together: then have oysters stewed by them­selves, with an onion or two, mace, pepper, butter, and a little white wine. Then have the bottoms of artichocks ready boild, and put in some beaten butter, and some boild marrow; dish up the fowl on fine carved sippets, then broth them, garnish them with stewed oysters, marrow, artichocks; gooseberries, slic't lemon, barberries, or grapes, and large mace; garnish the dish with grated bread, oy­sters, mace, lemon, and artichocks, and run over the fowl with beaten butter.

Otherwayes fill the body with a pudding made of gra­ted bread, yolks of eggs, sweet herbs minced small, with an onion, and some beef-suet minced, some beaten cloves, mace, pepper, and salt, some of the blood of the fowl mix­ed with it, and a little cream; fill the fowl, and stew it or boil it as before.

To boil any large water Fowl otherwayes, as Swan, Whopper, wilde or tame Geese, &c.

TAke a goose and salt it two or three dayes, then truss it to boil, cut lard as big us your little finger and lard the breast; season the lard with pepper, mace, and salt; then boil it in beef-broth, or water and salt, put to it pepper grosly beaten, a bundle of bay-leaves, time, and rosemary bound up very well, boil them with the fowl; then prepare some cabidge boild tender in water and salt, [Page 77]squeese out the water from it, and put it in a pipkin with some strong broth, claret wine, and a good big onion or two; season it with pepper, mace, and salt, and three or four anchoves dissolved; stew these together with a ladle full of sweet butter and a little vinegar: and when the goose is boild enough, and your cabbidge on sippets, lay on the goose with some cabbidge on the breast, and serve it up. Thus you may dress any large wilde fowl.

To boil all manner of small Sea or Land Fowl.

BOil the fowl in water and salt, then take some of the broth, and put to it some beefs udder boild and slic't into thin slices, with some pistaches blanched, some slic't sausages stript out of the skin, white wine, sweet herbs, and large mace; stew these together till you think it sufficiently boild, then put to it beet-root cut into slices, beat it up with butter, and carve up the fowl, pour the broth on it, and garnish it with sippets or what you please.

Or thus.

Take and lard them, then half roast them, draw them, and put them in a pipkin, with some strong broth or cla­ret wine, some chesnuts, a pint of great oysters taking the beards from them, two or three onions minced very small, some mace, a little beaten ginger, and a crust of French bread grated; thicken it, and dish them upon sops: if no oysters, chesnuts, or artichock bottoms, turnips, collyflow­ers, interlarded bacon in thin slices, and sweetbreads, &c.

Otherwayes.

Take them and roste them, save the gravy, and being rosted put them in a pipkin, with the gravy, some slic't onions, ginger, cloves, pepper, salt. grated bread, claret wine, currans, capers, mace, barberries, and sugar, serve them on fine sippets, and run them over with beaten but­ter, [Page 78]slic't lemon, and lemon-peel; sometimes for change use stewed oysters or cockles.

To boil or dress any Land Fowl, or Birds in the Italian fashi­on, in a broth called Brodo Lardiero.

TAke six pigeons being finely cleansed and trust, put them into a pipkin with a quart of strong broth, or water, and half wine, then put therein some fine slices of interlarded bacon; when it boils scum it, and put in nut­meg, mace, ginger, pepper, salt, currans, sugar, some sack, raisins of the Sun, prunes, sage, dryed cherries, time, a lit­tle saffron, and dish them on fine carved sippets.

To stew Pigeons in the French fashion.

THe Pigeons being drawn and trust, make a fearsing or stopping of some sweet herbs minced, then mince some beef-suet or lard, grated bread, currans, cloves, mace, pepper, ginger, sugar, and three or four raw eggs. The pigeons being larded and half rosted, stuff them with fore­said fearsing, and put a boild cabidge stuck with a few cloves round about them; binde up every pigeon several with packthred, then put them in a pipkin a boiling with strong mutton broth, three or four yolks of hard eggs minced small, some large mace, whole cloves, pepper, salt, and a little white wine; being boild, serve them on fine carved sippets, and strow on cinamon ginger, and sugar.

Otherwayes in the French fashion.

TAke pigeons ready pull'd or scalded, take the flesh out of the skin, and leave the skin whole with the legs and wings hanging to it, mince the bodies with some lard or beef-suet together very small, then put to them some [Page 79]sweet herbs finely minced, and season all with cloves, mace, ginger, pepper, some grated bread or parmisan grated, and yolks of eggs; fill again the skins, and prick them up in the back, then put them in a dish with some strong broth, and sweet herbs chopped, large mace, gooseberrries, bar­erries or grapes; then have some cabbidge-lettice boild in water and salt, put to them buttter, and the pigeons being boild, serve them on fine sippets.

To boil Pigeons otherwayes.

BEing trussed, put them in a pipkin, with some strong broth or fair water, boil and scum them, then put in some mace, a faggot of sweet herbs, white endive, marigold flowers, and salt; and being finely boild, serve them on sippets, and garnish the dish with mace and white endive flowers.

Otherwayes you may adde cucumbers in quarters either pickled or fresh, and some pickled capers; or boil the cu­cumbers by themselves, and put them in beaten butter, and sweet herbs chopped small.

Or boil them with capers, samphire, mace nutmeg, spi­nage, endive, and a rack or chine of mutton boil'd with them.

Or else with capers, mace, salt, and sweet herbs in a fag­got; then have some cabbidge or collyflowers boild very tender in fair water and salt, pour away the water, and put them in beaten butter, and when the fowls be boild, serve the cabbidge on them.

To boil Pigeons otherwayes.

TAke Pigeons being finely cleansed and trust, put them in a pipkin or skillet clean scowred, with some mutton broth or fair water; set them a boiling and scum them [Page 80]clean, then put to them large mace, and well washed cur­rans, some strained bread strained with vinegar and broth, put it to the pigeons with some sweet butter and capers; boil them very white, and being boild, serve them on fine carved sippets in the broth with some sugar; garnish them with lemon, fine sugar, mace, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, and run them over with beaten butter; garnish the dish with grated manchet.

Pottages.

Pottage in the Italian Fashion.

BOil green pease with some strong broth, and inter­larded bacon cut into slices; the pease being boild, put to them some chopped parsley, pepper, anni­seed, and strain some of the pease to thicken the broth: give it a walm and serve it on sippets, with boild chickens, pigeons, kids, or lambs head, mutton, duck, mallard, or any poultrey.

Sometimes for variety you may thicken the broth with eggs.

Pottage otherwayes in the Italian Fashion.

BOil a rack of mutton, a few whole cloves, mace, slic't ginger, all manner of sweet herbs chopped, and a little salt; being finely boiled, put in some strained almond paste, with grape verjuyce, saffron, grapes, or goose­berries; give them a walm, and serve your meat on sippets.

Pottage of Mutton, Veal, or Beef, in the English fashion.

CUt a rack of mutton in two pieces, and take a knuckle of veal, and boil it in a gallon pot or pipkin, with good store of herbs and a pint of oatmeal chopped amongst the herbs, as time, sweet marjoram, parsley chives, salt, succory, marigold-leaves, and flowers, strawberry-leaves, violet-leaves, beets, borage, sorrel, blood-wort, sage, pen­ny-royal; and being finely boild, serve them on fine carved sippets with the mutton and veal, &c.

To stew a Shoulder of Mutton with Oysters.

TAke a shoulder of mutton, and roste it, and being half rosted or more, take off the upper skin whole, and cut the meat into thin slices, then stew it with claret, mace, nutmeg, anchoves, oyster-liquor, salt, capers, olives, samphire, and slices of orange, leave the shoulder-blade with some meat on it, and hack it, save also the marrow­bone whole with some meat on it, and lay it in a clean dish; the meat being finely stewed; pour it on the bones, and on that some stewed oysters, and large oysters over all with slic't lemon and lemon-peel.

The skin being first finely breaded, stew the oysters with large mace, a great onion or two, butter, vinegar, white wine, a bundle of sweet herbs, and lay on the skin again over all, &c.

To roste a Shoulder of mutton with onions and parsley, and baste it with Oranges.

STuff it with parsley and onions, or sweet herbs, nut­meg, and salt; and in the rosting of it, baste it with the juyce of oranges, save the gravy and clear away the fat, [Page II]then stew it up with a slice or two of orange and an an­chove, without any fat on the gravy, &c.

Other hashes of Scotch Collops.

CUt a leg of mutton into thin slices, as thin as a shil­ling, cross the grain of the leg, sprinkle them light­ly with salt, and fry them with sweet butter, serve them with gravy or juyce of orange, and nutmeg, and run them over with beaten butter, lemon, &c.

Otherwayes the foresaid Collops.

For variety, sometimes season them with coriander-seed, or stamped fennil-seed, pepper, and salt; sprinkle them with white wine, then flowerd, fryed, and served with juyce of orange, for sauce, with sirrup of rose vinegar or elder vinegar.

Other Hashes or Scotch Collops of any Joint of Veal, either a Loin, Leg, Rack, or Shoulder.

CUt a leg into thin slices, as you do Scotch collops of mutton, hack and fry them with small thin slices of interlarded bacon as big as the slices of veal, fry them with sweet butter; and being finely fryed, dish them up in a fine dish, put from them the butter that you fryed them with, and put to them beaten butter, with lemon, gravy, and juyce of orange.

A hash of a Leg of Mutton in the French fashion.

PArboil a leg of mutton, then take it up, and pare off some thin slices on the under, upper side, or round it, prick the leg through to let out the gravy on the slices, then bruise some sweet herbs, as time, parsley, marjoram, savory, with the back of a ladle, and put to it a piece of [Page III]sweet butter, pepper, verjuyce; and when your mutton is boild, pour all over the slices herbs and broth on the leg into a clean dish.

Another hash of Mutton or Lamb, either hot or cold.

ROste a shoulder of mutton, and cut it into slices, put to it oysters, white wine, raisins of the sun, salt, nut­meg, and strong broth (or no raisins) slic't lemon or orange; stew it all together, and serve it on sippets, and run it over with beaten butter and lemon, &c.

Another hash of a Joint of Mutton or Lamb hot or cold.

CUt it in very thin slices, then put them in a pipkin or dish, and put to it a pint of claret wine, salt, nutmeg, large mace, an anchove or two, stew them well together with a little gravy; and being finely stewed, serve them on carved sippets with some beaten butter and lemon, &c.

Otherwayes.

Cut it into thin slices raw, and fry it with a pint of white wine till it be brown, and put them in a pipkin with slic't lemon, salt, fryed parsley, gravy, nutmeg, and garnish your dish with nutmeg and lemon.

Other hashes of a Shoulder of Mutton.

BOil it and cut it in thin slices, hack the shoulder-blade, and put all into a pipkin or deep dish, with some salt, gravy, white wine, some strong broth, and a faggot of sweet herbs, oyster-liquor, caper-liquor, and capers: being stewed down, bruise some parsley, and put to it some beat­en cloves and mace, and serve it on sippets.

Divers made Dishes or Capilotado's.

First, a dish of Chines of Mutton, Veal Capon, Pige­ons, or other Fowls.

BOil a pound of rice in mutton broth, put to it some blanched chesnuts, pine-apple-seeds, almonds or pista­ches; being boild thick, put to it some marrow or fresh butter, salt, cinamon and sugar; then cut your veal into small bits or pieces, and break up the fowl; then have a fair dish and set it on the embers, and put some of your rice, and some of your meat, and more of the rice and su­gar, and cinamon and pepper over all, and some marrow.

Capilotado, in the Lombardy fashion, of a Capon.

BOil rice in mutton broth, till it be very thick, and put to it some salt and sugar.

Then have also some Bolonia sausages boild very ten­der, minced very small, or grated, and some grated cheese, sugar and cinamon mingled together: then cut up the boild or roste capon, and lay it upon a clean dish with some of the rice, strow on cinamon and sausage, grated cheese and sugar, and lay on yolks of raw eggs; thus make two or three layings and more, eggs and some butter or marrow on the top af all, and set it on the embers, and cover it, or in a warm oven.

Capilotado of Pigeons, or wilde Ducks, or any Land or Sea Fowls roasted.

TAke a pound of almond paste, and put to it a capon minced and stamped with the almonds, and some crums of manchet, some sack or white wine, three pints of [Page V]strong broth cold, and eight or ten yolks of raw eggs; strain all the foresaid together, and boil it in a skillet with some sugar to a pretty thickness, put to it some cinamon, nutmeg, and a few whole cloves; then have roast pigeons, or any small birds roasted, cut them up, and do as is afore­said, and strow on sugar and cinamon.

Capilotado for Roast Meats, as Partridge, Pigeons, eight or twelve, or any other the like: or Sea Fowls, Ducks, or Wigeons.

TAke a pound of almonds, a pound of currans, a pound of sugar, half a pound of muskefied bisket bread, a pottle of strong broth cold, half a pint of grape verjuyce, pepper half an ounce, nutmegs as much, an ounce of cinamon, and a few cloves: all these aforesaid stamped, strained, and boiled with the foresaid liquor, and in all points as the former, onely toasts must be added.

Other Capilotado common.

TAke two pound of parmisan grated, a minced kidney of veal, a pound of other fat cheese, ten cloves of garlick boild, broth, or none, two capons minced and stamped roast or boild, and put to it ten yolks of eggs raw with a pound of sugar: temper the foresaid with strong broth, and boil all in a broad skillet or brass pan, in the boiling, stir it continually, till it be incorporated, and put to it an ounce of cinamon, a little pepper, half an ounce of cloves, and as much nutmeg beaten, some saffron; then break up your roast fowls, roast lamb, kid, or fried veal, make three bottoms, and set it into a warm oven, till you serve it in, &c,

Capilotado, or Custard, in the Hungarian Fashion, in the Pot, or baked in an Oven.

TAke two quarts of goats or cows milk, or two quarts of cream, and the whites of five new laid eggs, yolks and all, or ten yolks, a pound of sugar, half an ounce of cinamon, a little salt, and some saffron; strain it and bake it in a deep dish, being baked, put on the juyce of four or five oranges, a little white wine, rose water, and beaten ginger, &c.

Capilotado Francois.

ROast a leg of mutton, save the gravy, and mince it small, then strain a pound of almond paste with some mutton or capon broth cold, some three pints and a half of grape verjuyce, a pound of sugar, some cinamon, beaten pepper, and salt; the meat and almonds being stamped and strained, put it a boiling softly, and stir it con­tinually, till it be well incorporate and thick; then serve it in a dish with some roast chickens, pigeons, or capon: put the gravy to it, and strow on sugar, some marrow, cina­mon, &c.

Sometimes you may adde some interlarded bacon instead of marrow, some sweet herbs, and a kidney of veal.

Sometimes eggs, currans, saffron, gooseberries, &c.

Other made Dishes, or little Pasties, called in Ita­lian Tortelleti.

TAke a roast or boild capon, and a calves udder, or veal, mince it and stamp it with some marrow, mint, or sweet marjoram, put a pound of fat parmisan grated to it; half a pound of sugar, and a quarter of a pound of currans, some chopped sweet herbs pepper, saffron, nutmeg, cinamon four [Page VII]or five yolks of eggs, and two whites: Mingle all together, and make a piece of paste of warm or boiling liquor, and some rose water, sugar, butter, make some great, and some very little, rouls, or stars, according to the judgement of the Cook; boil them in broth, milk, or cream. Thus also fish. Serve them with grated fat cheese or parmisan, sugar, and beaten cinamon on them in a dish, &c.

Tortelleti, or little Pasties.

MInce some interlarded bacon, some pork or any other meat, with some calves udder, and put to it a pound of fresh cheese, fat cheese, or parmisan, a pound of sugar, and some roasted turnips or parsnips, a quarter of a pound of currans, pepper, cloves, nutmegs, eight eggs, saffron; mingle all together, and make your pasties like little fishes, stars, rouls, or like beans or pease, boil them in flesh broth, and serve them with grated cheese and su­gar, and serve them hot.

Tortelleti, or little Pasties otherwayes, of Beets or Spinage chopped very small.

BEing washed and wrung dry, fry them in butter, put to them some sweet herbs chopped small, with some grated parmisan, some cinamon, cloves, saffron, pepper, currans, raw eggs, and grated bread: Make your pasties, and boil them in strong broth, cream, milk, or almond milk: thus you may do any fish. Serve them with sugar, cinamon, and grated cheese.

Tortelleti, of green Pease, French Beans, or any kinde of Pulse green or dry.

TAke Pease green or dry, French Beans, or Garden Beans green or dry, boil them tender, and stamp [Page VIII]them; strain them through a strainer, and put to them some fried onions chopped small, sugar, cinamon, cloves, pepper, and nutmeg, some grated parmisan, or fat cheese, and some cheese-curds stamped.

Then make paste, and make little pasties, boil them in broth, or as beforesaid, and serve them with sugar, cina­mon, and grated cheese in a fine clean dish.

To boil Capon or Chicken with Collyflowers in the French Fashion,

CUt off the buds of your flowers, and boil them in milk with a little mace till they be very tender; then take the yolks of two eggs, strain them with a quarter of a pint of sack; then take as much thick butter, being drawn with a little vinegar, and a slic't lemon, brew them toge­ther; then take the flowers out of the milk, and put them into the butter and sack: then dish up your capon, being tender boild, upon sippets finely carved, and pour on the sauce, and serve it to the table with a little salt.

To boil Capon, Chicken, Pigeons, or any Land Fowls in the French Fashion.

EIther the skin stuffed with minced meat, or boned, and fill the vents and body; or not boned and trust to boil, fill the bodies with any of the farsings following, made of any minced meat, and seasoned with pepper, cloves, mace, and salt; then mince some sweet herbs with bacon and fowl, veal, mutton, or lamb, and mix with it three or four eggs: Mingle all together with grapes, gooseberries, bar­berries, or red currans, and sugar, or none, some pine-ap­ple seed, or pistaches; fill the fowl, and stew it in a stew­ing pan with some strong broth, as much as will cover them, and a little white wine; being stewed, serve them in [Page IX]a dish with sippets finely carved, and slic't orange, lemon, barberries, gooseberries, sweet herbs chopped, and mace.

To boil Partridges, or any of the former Fowls stuffed with any the filling aforesaid.

BOil them in a pipkin with strong broth, white wine, mace, sweet herbs chopped very fine, and put some falt, and stew them leasurely; being finely stewed, put some marrow and strained almonds with rose-water to thicken it, serve them on fine carved sippets, and broth them, garnish the dish with grated bread and pistaches, mace, and lemon, or grapes.

To boil Pigeons, Woodcocks, Snites, Blackbirds, Thrushes, Veldifers, Rails, Quails, Larks, Sparrows, Wheat-ears, Martins, or any small Land Fowl.
Woodcocks or Snites.

BOil them either in strong broth, or water and salt; and being boild, take out the guts, and chop them small with the liver, put to it some crum of white bread gra­ted, a little of the broth of the cock, and some large mace, stew them together with some gravy; then dissolve the yolks of two eggs, with some wine vinegar, and a little grated nutmeg, and when you are ready to dish it, put the eggs to it, and stir it amongst the sauce with a little butter, dish them on sippets, and run the sauce over them with some beaten butter and capers, lemon minced small, barberries, or pickled grapes whole.

Sometimes with this sauce. boil some slic't onions and corrans in a broth by it self: when you boil it not with onions, rub the bottom of the dish with a clove or two of garlick.

Boild Woodcocks or Larks otherwayes.

TAke them with the guts in, and boil them in some strong broth or fair water, and three or four whole onions, large mace, and salt; the cocks being boild, make sauce with some thin slices of manchet, or grated, in an­other pipkin, and some of the broth where the fowl or cocks boil, and put to it some butter, the guts and liver minced, and then have some yolks of eggs dissolved with some vinegar and some grated nutmeg, put it to the other ingredients, and stir them together, and dish the fowl on fine sippets, and pour on the sauce, and some slic't lemon, grapes, or barberries, and run it over with beaten butter.

To boil all manner of Sea Fowl, or any wild Fowl, as Swan, Whopper, Crane, Geese, Shoveler, Hern, Bittor, Duck, Widgeon, Gulls, Curlew, Teels, Ruffs, &c.

STuff either the skin with his own meat, being minced with lard or beef-suet, some sweet herbs, beaten nut­meg, cloves, mace, and parboild oysters; mix all toge­ther, fill the skin, and prick it fast on the back, boil it in a large stewing-pan or deep dish, with some strong broth, claret, or white wine, salt, large mace, two or three cloves, and a bundle of sweet herbs, or none, oyster-liquor and marrow: stew all well together. Then have stewed oy­sters by themselves ready stewed with an onion or two, mace, pepper, butter, and a little white wine.

Then have the bottoms of artichocks put in beaten but­ter, and some boild marrow ready also; then again dish up the fowl on fine carved sippets, broth the fowl, and lay on the oysters, artichocks, marrow, barberries, slic't le­mon gooseberries or grapes: and garnish your dish with grated manchet strowed, and some oysters, mace, lemon, [Page XI]and artichocks, and run it over with beaten butter.

Otherwayes. Bone it and fill the body with a farsing or stuffing made of minced mutton with spices, and the same materials as aforesaid.

Otherwayes. Make a pudding and fill the body, being first boned, and make the pudding of grated bread, sweet herbs chopped, onions, minced suet or lard, cloves, mace, pepper, salt, blood, and cream: mingle all together, as beforesaid in all points.

Or a bread pudding without blood, or onions, and put minced meat to it, fruit, and sugar.

Otherwayes. Boil them in strong broth, claret wine, mace, cloves, salt, pepper, saffron, marrow, minced oni­ons, and thickened with strained sweetbread of veal, or hard eggs strained with broth, and garnished with barber­ries, lemon, grapes, red currans or gooseberries.

To boil all manner of Sea Fowls, as a Swan, Whopper, Geese, Ducks, Teells, &c.

PUt your fowl being clenged and trussed into a pipkin fit for it, and boil it with strong broth or fair spring­water, scum it clean, and put in three or four slic't onions, some large mace, corrans raisins, some capers, a bundle of sweet herbs, grated or strained bread, white wine, two or three cloves and pepper; being finely boild slash it on the breast, and dish it on fine carved sippets, broth it, and lay on slic't lemon and a lemon-peel, barberries, or grapes; run it over with beaten butter, sugar, or ginger, and trim the dish sides with grated bread in place of beaten ginger.

To boil these Fowls otherwayes.

You may adde some oyster-liquor, barberries, grapes, gooseberries, or lemon.

And sometimes prunes, or raisins, or corrans.

Otherwayes. Half roste any of your fowls, slash them [Page XII]down the breast, and put them in a pipkin with the breast downward, put to them two or three slic't onions and carrots cut like lard, some mace, pepper, and salt, butter, savory, time, some strong broth and some white wine, let the broth be half wasted, and stew it very softly: be­ing finely stewed, dish it up, serve it on sippets, and pour on the broth, &c.

Otherwayes. Boil the fowl and not roste them, boil them in strong mutton broth, and put the fowls into a pipkin, boil and scum it, put to it slic't onions, a bunch of sweet herbs, some cloves, mace, whole pepper and salt; then slash the breast from end to end three or four flashes, and being boild, dish it upon fine carved sippets, put some su­gar to it, and prick a few cloves on the breast of the fowl, broth it, and strow on fine sugar and grated bread.

Otherwayes. Put them in a stewing-pan with some wine and strong broth, and when they boil, scum them, then put to them some slices of interlarded bacon, pepper, mace, ginger, cloves, cinamon, sugar, raisins of the sun, sage­flowers or seeds, or leaves of sage: serve them on fine car­ved sippets, and trim the dish sides with sugar or grated bread.

Or you may make a farsing of any of the foresaid fowls, make it of grated cheese and some of their own fat, two or three eggs, nutmeg, pepper, and ginger, sowe up the vents, boil them with bacon, and serve them with a sauce made of almond paste, a clove of garlick, and rosted turnips or green sauce.

To boil any old Geese, or any Geese.

TAke them being powdered, and fill their bellies with oat-meal; being steeped first in warm milk or other liquor; then mingle it with some beef-suet, minced onions, and apples, seasoned with cloves, mace, some sweet herbs [Page XIII]minced, and pepper, fasten the neck and vent, boil it and serve it on brewis with colly flowers, cabbidge, turnips, and barberries, run it over with beaten butter.

Thus the smaller Fowls, as is before specified, or any other.

To boil Wilde Fowl otherwayes.

BOil your Fowl in strong broth or water, scum it clean, and put some white wine to it, currans, large mace, a clove or two, some parsley and onions minced, boil these together: then have some stewed turnips cut like lard, and stewed in a pot or little pipkin with butter, mace, a clove, white wine, and sugar: Being finely stewed, serve your fowls on sippets finely carved, broth the fowls, and pour on your Turnips, run it over with beaten butter, a little cream, yolks of eggs, sack, and sugar. Scraped sugar to trim the dish, or grated bread.

Otherwayes. Half roast your fowls, save the gravy, and carve the breast jagged; then put it in a pipkin, and stick it here and there a clove, and put some slic't onions, chopped parsley, slic't ginger, pepper, and gravy, strained bread, with claret wine, currans, or capers, or both, mace, bar­berries, and sugar; being finely boild, or stewed, serve it on carved sippets, and run it over with beaten butter, and a lemon peel.

To boil these aforesaid Fowls otherwayes, with Muscles, Oy­sters, or Cockels; or fried Wickels, in butter, and after stewed with butter, white wine, nutmeg, a slic't orange, and gravy.

EIther boil the fowls, or roast them, boil them by them­selves in water and salt, scum them clean, and put to them mace, sweet herbs and onions chopped together, some [Page XIV]white wine, pepper, and sugar, if you please, and a few cloves stuck in the fowls, some grated or strained bread with some of the broth, and give it a walm; dish up the fowls on fine sippets or French Bread, and carve the breast, broth it, and pour on your shell-fish, run it over with beaten but­ter, and slic't lemon or orange,

Otherwayes, in the French Fashion.

HAlf roast the fowls, and put them in a pipkin with the gravy, then have time, parsley, sage, marjoram, and savory; mince all together with a handful of raisins of the sun, put them into the pipkin with some mutton broth, some fack or white wine, large mace, cloves, salt, and sugar.

Then have the other half of the fruit and herbs being minced, beat them with the white of an egg, and fry it in suet or butter as big as little figs, and they will look green.

Dish up the Fowls on sippets, broth it, and serve the fried herbs with eggs on them and scraped sugar.

To boil Goose-giblets, or any giblets of any Fowl.

BOil them whole, being finely scalded; boil them in wa­ter and salt, two or three blades of mace, and serve them on sippets finely carved with beaten butter, lemon, scalded gooseberries, and mace, or scalded grapes, barber­ries, or slic't lemon.

Or you may for variety use the yolks of two or three eggs, beaten butter, cream, a little sack and sugar for lear.

Otherwayes. Boil them whole, or in pieces, and boil them in strong broth or fair water, mace, pepper, and salt; be­ing first finely scummed, put two or three whole onions, butter and goosberries, run it over with beaten butter, being first dished on sippets; make a pudding in the neck, as you [Page XV]may see in the Book of all manner of Puddings and Far­sings, &c.

Otherwayes. Boil them with some white wine, strong broth, mace, slic't ginger, butter, and salt; then have some stewed turnips or carrots cut like lard, and the giblets be­ing finely dished on sippets, put on the stewed turnips, being thickened with eggs, verjuyce, sugar, and lemon, &c.

Sauce for green Geese.

1. TAke the juyce of sorrel mixed with scalded goose­berries, and served on sippets and sugar with bea­ten butter, &c.

Otherwayes.

2. Their bellies roasted full of gooseberries, and after mixed with sugar, butter, verjuyce, and cinamon, and ser­ved on sippets.

To make a grand Sallet of minced Capon, Veal, roast Mutton, Chicken, or Neats Tongue.

MInced Capon or Veal, &c Dried Tongues in thin slices, Lettice shred small as the tongue, Olives, Capers, Mushrooms pickled, samphire, Broom-buds, Le­mon or Oranges, Raisins, Almonds, Figs blew, Virginia Po­tato, Caparones, or Crucifix pease, Currans, pickled Oy­sters, Taragon.

How to dish it up.

ANy of these being thin slic't, as is shown abovesaid, with a little minced taragon and onion amongst it; then have lettice minced as small as the meat by it self, olives by themselves, capers by themselves, samphire by it [Page XVI]self, broom-bud by it self, and pickled mushrooms by them­selves, or any of the materials abovesaid.

Garnish the the dish with oranges and lemons in quar­ters or slices, oil and vinegar beaten together, and poured over all, &c.

To boil all manner of Land Fowl, as followeth.

TUrky, Bustard, Peacock, Capon, Pheasant, Pullet, Heathpouts, Partridge, Chicken, Woodcocks, Stock­doves, Turtle-doves, Tame Pigeons, Wilde Pigeons, Reils, Quails, Black birds, Thrushes, Veldifers, Snites, Wheat-ears, Larks, Sparrows, and the like.

Sauce for the Land Fowl.

TAke boild prunes and strain them with the blood of the fowl, cinamon, ginger, and sugar; boil it to an indifferent thickness, and serve it in saucers, and serve in the dish with the fowl, gravy, sauce of the same fowl.

To boil Pigeons.

TAke Pigeons, and when you have farsed and boned them, fry them in butter or minced lard, and put to them broth, pepper, nutmeg, slic't ginger, cinamon, beaten coriander-seed, raisins of the sun, currans; vinegar, and serve them with this sauce, being first steeped in it four or hours, and well stewed down.

Or you may adde some quince or dried cherries boild amongst.

In summer you may use damsins, sweet herbs chopped, grapes, bacon in slices, white wine.

Thus you may boil any small Birds, Larks, Veldifers, Blackbirds, &c.

Pottage in the French Fashion.

CUt a breast of mutton into square bits or pieces, fry them in butter, and put them in a pipkin with some strong broth, pepper, mace, beaten ginger, and salt; stew it with half a pound of strained almonds, some mutton broth, crumbs of manchet, and some verjuyce; give it a walm, and serve it on sippets.

If you would have it yellow, put in saffron, sometimes for change white wine, sack, currans, raisins, and some­times incorporated with eggs and grated cheese.

Otherwayes change the colour green, with juyce of spi­nage, and put to it almonds strained.

Pottage otherwayes in the French Fashion of Mutton, Kid, or Veal.

TAke beaten oatmeal and strain it with cold water, then the pot being boiled and scummed, put in your strain­ed oatmeal, and some whole spinage, lettice, endive, colli­flowers, slic't onions, white cabbidge, and salt; your pot­tage being almost boild, put in some verjuyce, and give it a walm or two; then serve it on sippets, and put the herbs on the meat.

Pottage in the English Fashion.

TAke the best old pease you can get, wash and boil them in fair water, when they boil scum them, and put in a piece of interlarded bacon about two pound, put in also a bundle of mince, or other sweet herbs; boil them not too thick, serve the bacon on sippets in thin slices, and pour on the broth.

Pottage without sight of Herbs.

MInce your herbs and stamp them with your oatmeal, then strain them through a strainer with some of the broth of the pot, boil them among your mutton and some salt; for your herbs take violet leaves, strawberry leaves, suckory, spinage, lang de beef, scallions, parsley and marigold flowers; being well boiled, serve it on sippets.

To make Sausages.

TAke the lean of a leg of Pork, and four pound of beef­suet, mince them very fine, and season them with an ounce of pepper, half an ounce of cloves and mace, a handful of sage minced small, and a handful of salt; min­gle all together, then break in ten eggs, and but two whites; mix these eggs with the other meat, and fill the hogs guts; being filled, tie the ends, and boil them when you use them.

Otherwayes you may make them of mutton, veal, or beef, keeping the order abovesaid.

To make most rare Sausages without skins.

TAke a leg of young pork, cut off all the lean, and mince it very small, but leave none of the strings or skins amongst it; then take two pound of beef-suet shred small, two handfuls of red sage, a little pepper, salt, and nutmeg, with a small piece of an onion; mince them toge­ther with the flesh and suet, and being fine minced, put the yolks of two or three eggs, and mix all together, make it into a paste, and when you will use it, roul out as many pieces as you please in the form of an ordinary sausage, and fry them: this paste will keep a fortnight upon occasion. [Page 83]Otherwayes stamp half the meat and suet, and mince the other half, and season them as the former.

To make Links.

TAke the fillets or a leg of pork, and cut it into dice­work, with some of the steak of the pork cut in the same form; season the meat with cloves, mace, and pep­per, a handful of sage fine minced, with a handful of salt; mingle all together, fill the guts and hang them in the air, and boil them when you spend them. These Links wil serve to stew with divers kindes of meats.

Section 2.

An hundred and twelve Excellent Wayes for the dressing of Beef.

To boil Oxe Cheeks.

TAke them and bone them, soak them in fair water four or five hours, then wash out the blood very clean, pair off the ruff of the mouth, and take out the balls of the eyes; then stuff them with sweet herbs, hard eggs, and fat, or beef-suet, pepper, and salt; mingle all together, and stuff them on the inside, prick both the insides together; then boil them amongst other beef, and being very tender boiled, serve them on brewis, with interlarded bacon and Bolonia sausages, or boild links made of pork on the cheeks, cut the bacon in thin slices, serve them with saucers of mustard, or with green sauce,

To dress Oxe Cheeks otherwayes.

TAke out the bories and the balls of the eyes, make the mouth very clean, soak it, and wash out the blood; then wipe it dry with a clean cloth, and season it with pep­per, salt, and nutmeg; then put it in a pipkin or earthen pan, with two or three great onions, some cloves, and mace; cut the jaw-bones in pieces, and cut out the teeth, lay [Page 85]the bones on the top of the meat, then put to it half a pint of claret wine and half as much water; close up the pot or pan with a course piece of paste, and set it a baking in an oven over night for to serve next day at dinner, serve it on toasts of fine manchet fried; then have boild carrots and lay on it, with the toasts of manchet laid round the dish, as also fried greens to garnish it, and run it over with beaten butter. This way you may also dress a leg of beef.

Or thus.

Take them and cleanse them as before, then roast them, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, save the gravy, and being roasted put them into a pipkin with some claret wine, large mace, a clove or two, and some strong broth; stew them till they be very tender, then put to them some fried onions, and some prunes, and serve them on toasts of fried bread, or slices of French bread, and slices of orange on them; garnish the dish with gra­ted bread.

To dress Oxe Cheeks in Stofadoe, or the Spanish Fashion.

TAke the cheeks, bone them and cleanse them, then lay them in steep in claret or white wine, and wine vi­negar, whole cloves, mace, beaten pepper, salt, slic't nut­megs, slic't ginger, and six or seven cloves of garlick, steep them the space of five or six hours, and close them up in an earthen pot or pan, with a piece of paste, and the same liquor put to it, set it a baking over night for next day dinner, serve it on toasts of fine manchet fried; then have boiled carrots and lay on it, with the toasts of man­chet laid round the dish: garnish it with slic't lemons or oranges, and fried toast, and garnish the dish with bay leaves.

To Marinate Oxe Cheeks.

BEing boned, roste or stew them very tender in a pipkin, with some claret, slic't nutmegs, pepper, salt, and wine vinegar; being tender stewed take them up, and put to the liquor in the pipkin a quart of wine vinegar, and a quart of white wine, boil it with some bay leaves, whole pepper, a bundle of rosemary, time, sweet marjoram, sa­vory, sage, and parsley, binde them very hard the streightest sprigs; boil also in the liquor large mace, cloves, slic't gin­ger, slic't nutmegs and salt; then put the cheeks into a barrel, and put the liquor to them, with some slic't lemons, close up the head and keep them. Thus you may do four or five heads together, and serve them hot or cold.

Oxe Cheeks in Sallet.

TAke oxe cheeks being boned and cleansed, steep them in claret, white wine; or wine vinegar all night, the next day season them with nutmegs, cloves, pepper, mace, and salt, roul them up, boil them tender in water, vine­gar, and salt, then press them, and being cold slice them in thin slices, and serve them in a clean dish with oyl and vinegar.

To bake Oxe cheeks in a pasty or pie.

TAke them being boned and soaked, boil them tender in fair water, and cleanse them, take out the balls of the eyes, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then have some beef-suet and some buttock-beef minced and laid for a bed, then lay the cheeks on it, and a few whole cloves, make your pasty in good crust; to a gallon of flow­er two pound and a half of butter, five eggs whites and all, work the butter and eggs up dry into the flower, then [Page 87]put in a little fair water to make it up into a stiff paste, and work up all cold.

To dress Pallets, Noses, and Lips, of any Beast, Steer, Oxe, or Calf.

TAke the pallets, lips, or noses, and boil them very ten­der, then blanch them, and cut them in little square pieces as broad as a six-pence, or like lard, fry them in sweet butter, and being fryed, pour away the butter, and put to it some anchove, grated nutmeg, mutton gravy, and salt; give it a walm on the fire, and then dish it in a clean dish, with the bottom first rubbed with a clove of garlick, run it over with beaten butter, juyce of oranges, fryed parsley, or fryed marrow in yolks of two eggs, and sage leaves.

Sometime adde yolks of eggs strained, and then it is a fricase.

Otherwayes.

Take the pallets, lips, or noses, and boil them very ten­der, blanch them, and cut them two inches long, then take some interlarded bacon and cut it in the like proportion, season the pallets with salt, and broil them on paper; be­ing tender broild put away the fat, and put them in a dish being rubbed with a clove of garlick, put some mutton gravy to them on a chafing dish of coals, and some juyce of orange, &c.

To fricase Pallets.

TAke beef pallets being tender boild and blanched, season them with beaten cloves, nutmeg, pepper, salt, and some grated bread; then the pan being ready over the fire, with some good butter fry them brown, then put them in a dish, put to them good mutton gravy. and dissolve two or three anchoves in the sauce, a little gra­ted nutmeg, and some juyce of lemons, and serve them up hot.

To stew Pallets, Lips, and Noses.

TAke them being tender boild and blanched, put them into a pipkin, and cut to the bigness of a shilling, put to them some small cowcumbers pickled, raw calves udders, some artichocks, potatoes boild, or muskmillion in square pieces, large mace, two or three whole cloves, some small links or sausages, sweetbreads of veal, some larks or other small birds, as sparrows or oxeyes, salt, butter, strong broth, marrow, white wine, grapes, barberries, or goose­berries, yolks of hard eggs, and stew them all together; serve them on toasts of fine French bread, and slic't lemon; sometimes thicken the broth with yolks of strained eggs and verjuyce.

To marinate Pallets, Noses, and Lips whole.

TAke them being tender boild and blanched, fry them in sweet sallet oyl, or clarified butter; and being fryed make a pickle for them with whole pepper, large mace, cloves, slic't ginger, slic't nutmeg, salt, and a bun­dle of sweet herbs, as rosemary, time, bay-leaves, sweet marjoram, savory, parsley, and sage; boil the spices and herbs in wine vinegar and white wine, then put them in a barrel with the pallets, lips, and noses, and lemons, close them up for your use, and serve them in a dish with oyl.

To dress Pallets, Lips, and Noses, with collops of Mutton and Bacon.

TAke them being boild tender and blanched, cut them as broad as a shilling, as also some thin collops of interlarded bacon, and of a leg of mutton, finely backed with the back of a knife, fry them all together with some [Page 89]butter, and being finely fryed, put out the butter, and put to it some gravy, or a little mutton broth, salt, grated nut­meg, and a dissolved anchove; give it a walm over the fire, and dish it, but rub the dish with a clove of garlick, and then run it over with butter, juyce of orange, and salt about the dish.

To make a Pottage of Beef Pallets.

TAke beef pallets that are tender boild and blanched, cut each pallet in two pieces, and set them a stew­ing between two dishes with a fine piece of interlarded ba­con, a handful of champignions, and five or six sweet­breads of veal, a ladle full of strong broth, and as much mutton gravy, an onion or two, two or three cloves, a blade or two of large mace, and an orange; as the pallets stew make ready a dish with the botoms and tops of French bread slic't and steeped in mutton gravy, and the broth the pallets were stewed in; then you must have the mar­row of two or three beef bones stewed in a little strong broth by it self in good big gobbets: and when the pal­lets, marrow, sweetbreads, and the rest are enough, take out the bacon, onions, and spices, and dish up the foresaid materials on the dish of steeped bread, lay the marrow up­permost in pieces, then wring on the juyce of two or three oranges, and serve it to the table very hot.

To roast a dish of Oxe Pallets with great Oysters, Veal, Sweet­breads, Lamb-stones, peeping Chickens, Pigeons, slices of inter larded Bacon, large Cock-combs and Stones, Marrow. Pistaches, and Artichocks.

TAke the oxe pallets and boil them tender, blanch them, and cut them two inches long, lard one half with small lard, then have your chicken and pigeon peepers [Page 90]scalded, drawn, and trust, set them, and lard half of them, then have the lamb-stones parboild and blanched, as also the combs, and cock-stones, next have interlarded bacon and sage; but first spit the birds on a small bird spit, and between each chicken or pigeon put on first a slice of inter­larded bacon and a sage leaf, then another slice of bacon and a sage leaf, thus do till all the birds be spitted; thus al­so the sweetbreads, lamb-stones, and combs, then the oy­sters being parboild, lard them with lard very small, and also a small larding prick, then beat the yolks of two or three eggs, and mix them with a little fine grated manchet, salt, nutmeg, time, and rosemary minced very small, and when they are hot at the fire baste them often, as also the lamb-stones and sweetbreads with the same ingredients; then have the bottoms of artichocks ready boild, quarter­ed, and fryed, being first dipped in butter and kept warm, and marrow dipped in butter and fryed, as also the fowls and the other ingredients; then dish the fowl, piled up in the middle upon another rost material round about them in the dish, but first rub the dish with a clove of garlick: the pallets by themselves, the sweetbreads by themselves, and the cocks-stones, combs, and lamb-stones by them­selves; then the artichocks, fryed marrow, and pistaches by themselves; then make a sauce with some claret wine, and gravy, nutmeg, oyster liquor, salt, a slic't or quarter­ed onion, an anchove or two dissolved, and a little sweet butter, give it a walm or two, and put to it two or three slices of an orange, pour on the sauce very hot, and garnish it with slic't oranges and lemons.

The smallest birds are fittest for this dish of meat, as wheatears, martins, larks, ox-eyes, quails, snites, or rails.

Oxe Pallets in Jellies.

TAke two pair of neats or calves feet, scald them, and boil them in a pot with two gallons of water, being [Page 91]first very well boned, and the bone and fat between the claws taken out, and being well soaked in divers water, scum them clean, and boil them down from two gallons to three quarts; strain the broth, and being cold take off the top and bottom, and put it into a pipkin with whole cinamon, ginger, slic't and quartered nutmeg, two or three blades of large mace, salt, three pints of white wine, and half a pint of grape verjuyce or rose vinegar, two pound and a half of sugar, the whites of ten eggs well beaten to froth, stir them all together in the pipkin, being well warm­ed and the jelly melted, put in the eggs, and set it over a charcole fire kindled before, stew it on that fire half an hour before you boil it up, and when it is just a boiling take it off, before you run it let it cool a little, then run it through your jelly bag once or twice: then the pallets being tender boild and blanched, cut them into dice work with some lamb-stones, veal, sweetbreads, cocks-combs and stones, potatoes or artichocks all cut into dice work, preserved barberries, or calves noses, and lips, preserved quinces, dryed or green neats tongue, in the same work, or neats feet, all of these together, or any one of them; boil them in white wine or sack, with nutmeg, slic't gin­ger, coriander, caraway, or fennil-seed, make several beds or layes of these things, and run the jelly over them many times after one is cold, according as you have sorts of co­lours of jellies, or else put it all at once; garnish it with preserved oranges, or green cittern cut like lard.

To bake Beef Pallets.

PRovide pallets, lips, and noses, boild tender and blanch­ed, cocks-stones and combs, or lamb-stones, and sweet­breads cut into pieces, scald the stones, combs, and pallets slic't or in pieces as big as the lamb-stones, half a pint of great oysters parboild in their own liquor, quartered dates, [Page 92]pistaches a handful, or pine kernels, a few pickled broom buds, some fine interlarded bacon slic't in thin slices being also scalded, ten chesnuts rosted and blanched; season all these together with salt, nutmeg, and a good quantity of large mace, fill the pie, and put to it good butter, close it up and bake it, make liquor for it, then beat some but­ter, and three or four yolks of eggs with white or claret wine, cut up the lid, and pour it on the meat, shaking it well together, then lay on slic't lemon and pickled bar­berries, &c.

To dress a Neats Tongue boild divers wayes.

TAke a neats tongue of three or four dayes powder­ing, being tender boild serve it on cheat bread for brewis, dish on the tongue in halves or whole, and serve an udder with it being of the same powdering or salting finely blanched, put to them the clear fat of the beef on the tongue, and white sippets round the dish, run them over with beaten butter, &c.

Otherwayes for greater service, two udders and two tongues finely blanched, and served whole.

Sometimes for variety you may make brewis with some fresh beef or good mutton broth, with some of the fat of the beef pot; put it in a pipkin with some large mace, a handfull of parsley and sorrel grosly chopped, and some pepper, boil them together and scald the bread, then lay on the boild tongue, mace, and some of the herbs, run it over with beaten butter, slic't lemon, gooseberries, bar­berries, or grapes.

Or for change, put some pared turnips in boiling fair wa­ter, and being tender boild, drain the water from them, dish them in a clean dish, and run them over with beaten butter, dish your tongues and udders on them, and your collyflowers on the tongues and udders, run them over [Page 93]with beaten butter; or in place of collyflowers, carrots in thin quarters, or sometimes on turnips and great boild oni­ons, or butterd cabbidge and carrots, or parsnips and car­rots buttered.

Neats Tongues and a fresh Ʋdder in Stofado.

SEeason them with peppper, salt, and nutmeg, then lard them with great lard, and steep them all night in cla­ret wine, wine vinegar, slic't nutmegs and ginger, whole cloves, beaten pepper and salt; steep them in an earthen pot or pan, and cover or close them up, bake them, and serve them on sops of French bread, and the spices over them, with some slic't lemon, and sausages or none.

Neats Tongue stewed whole or in halves.

TAke them being tender boild and fry them whole or in halves, put them in a pipkin with some gravy or mut­ton broth large mace, slic't nutmeg, pepper, claret, a little wine vinegar, butter, and salt; stew them well together, and being almost stewed, put to the meat two or three slices of orange, sparagus, skirrets, or chesnuts, and serve on fine sippets; run them over with beaten butter, slic't le­mon, and boild marrow over all.

Sometimes for the broth put some yolks of eggs, beaten with grape verjuyce.

To stew a Neats Tongue otherwayes.

MAke a hole in the butt end of it, and mince it with some fat bacon or beef-suet, season it with nutmeg, salt, the yolk of a raw egg, some sweet herbs minced small, and grated parmisan, or none, some pepper or ginger, and mingle all together, fill the tongue and wrap it in a caul of [Page 94]veal, boil it till it will blanch, and being blanched, wrap about it some of the fearsing with a caul of veal; then put it in a pipkin with some claret and gravy, cloves, mace, salt, pepper, some grated bread, sweet herbs chopped small, fried onions, marrow boild in strong broth, and laid over all, some grapes, gooseberries, slic't orange or le­mon, and serve it on sippets, run it over with beaten but­ter, and stale grated manchet to garnish the dish.

Or sometimes in a broth called Brodo Lardiero.

To hash or stew a Neats Tongue divers wayes.

TAke a Neats Tongue being tender boild and blanched, slice it into thin slices, as big and as thick as a shil­ling, fry it in sweet butter; and being fried, put to it some strong broth or good mutton gravy, some beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, salt, and saffron; stew them well together, then have some yolks of eggs dissolved with grape ver­juyce, and put them into the pan, give them a toss or two, and the gravy and eggs being pretty thick, dish it on fine sippets.

Or make the same, and none of those spices, but onely cinamon, sugar, and saffron.

Sometimes sliced as aforesaid, but in slices no bigger nor thicker then a three-pence, and used in all points as before, but adde some onions fried with the tongue, some mush­rooms, nutmeg, and mace; and being well stewed, serve it on fine sippets, but first rub the dish with a clove of gar­lick, and run over all with beaten butter, a shred lemon, and a spoonful of fair water.

Sometimes you may adde some boild chesnuts, sweet herbs, capers, marrow, and grapes or barberries.

Or stew them with raisins put in a pipkin, with the sliced tongue, mace, slic't dates, blanched almonds, or pistaches, marrow, claret wine, butter, salt, verjuyce, sugar, [Page 95]strong broth, or gravy; and being well stewed, dissolve the yolks of six eggs with vinegar or grape verjuyce, and dish it up on fine sippets, slic't lemon and beaten butter over all.

To marinate a Neats Tongue either whole or in halves.

TAke seven or eight Neats Tongues, or Heifer, Calves, Sheeps, or any Tongues, boil them till they will blanch, and being blanched lard them or not lard them, as you please; then put them in a barrel, then make a pickle of whole pepper, slic't ginger, whole cloves, slic't nut­megs, and large mace; next have a bundle of sweet herbs, as time, rosemary, bay leaves, sage leaves, winter savory, sweet marjoram, and parsley; take the streightest sprigs of these herbs that you can get, and binde them up hard in a bundle every sort by it self, and all into one; then boil us these spices and herbs in as much wine vinegar and white wine as will fill the vessel where the tongues are, and put some salt and slic't lemons to them; close them up being cold, and keep them for your use upon any occasion; serve them with some of the spices, liquor, sweet herbs, sallet oyl, and slic't lemon or lemon-peel. Pack them close.

To Fricase Neats Tongues.

BEing tender boild, slice them into thin slices, and fry them with sweet butter; being fried put away the butter, and put to them some strong gravy or broth, nut­meg, pepper, salt, some sweet herbs chopped small, as time, savory, sweet marjoram, and parsley; stew them well together, then dissolve some yolks of eggs with wine vinegar or grape verjuyce, some whole grapes or barber­ries. For the thickening use fine grated manchet, or al­mond paste strained, and sometimes put saffron to it. Thus [Page 96]you may fricase any Udder being tender boild, as before­said.

To dress Neats Tongues in Brodo Lardiero, or the Italian Way.

BOil a neats tongue in a pipkin, whole, halves, or in gubbins till it may be blanched, cover it close, and put to it two or three blades of large mace, with some strong mutton, or beef broth, some sack or white wine, and some slices of interlarded bacon, scum it when it boils, and put to it large mace, nutmeg, ginger, pepper, raisins, two or three whole cloves, currans, prunes, sage-seed, saf­fron, and dryed cherries; stew it well, and serve it in a fine clean scoured dish, on slices of French bread.

To dress Neats Tongues, as Beefs Noses, Lips, and Pallets.

TAke neats tongues being tender boild and blanched, slice them thin, and fry them in sweet butter, being fryed put away the butter, and put to them anchoves, gra­ted nutmeg, mutton, gravy, and salt; give them a walm over the fire, and serve them in a clean scowred dish: but first rub the dish with a clove of garlick, and run the meat over with some beaten butter, juyce of orange, fryed par­sley, fryed marrow, yolks of eggs, and sage leaves.

To hash a Neats Tongue whole or in slices.

BOil it tender and blanch it, then slice it into thin sli­slices or whole, put to it some boild or roste chesnuts, some strong broth, whole cloves, pepper, salt, claret wine, large mace, and a little bundle of sweet herbs; stew them all together very leasurely, and being stewed serve it on [Page 97]fine carved sippets, either with slic't lemon, grapes, goose­berries, or barberries, and run it over with beaten butter,

To dry Neats Tongues.

TAke salt beaten very fine, and salt-peter of each a like, rub your tongues very well with the salts, and cover them all over with it, and as it wastes put on more; when they are hard and stiff they are enough, then roul them in bran, and dry them before a soft fire, before you boil them let them lie in pump water one night, and boil them in pump water.

Otherwayes powder them with bay-salt, and being well smoakt, hang them up in a garret or seller, and let them come no more at the fire till they be boild.

To prepare a Neats Tongue or Ʋdder to roste, a Stag, Hinde, Buck, Doe, Sheep, Hog, Goat, Kid or Calf.

BOil them tender and blanch them, being cold, lard them, or roste them plain without lard, baste them with butter, and serve them on gallendine sauce.

To roste a Neats Tongue.

TAke a neats tongue being tender boild, blanched, and cold, cut a hole in the butt end, and mince the meat that you take out, then put some sweet herbs finely minced to it, with a minced pippin or two, the yolks of eggs slic't, some minc't beef-suet, or minced bacon, beaten ginger and salt, fill the tongue, and stop the end with a caul of veal, lard it and roste it; then make sauce with butter, nut­meg, gravy, and juyce of oranges; garnish the dish with slic't lemon, lemon-peel, and barberries.

To roste a Neats Tongue or Ʋdder otherwayes.

BOil it a little, blanch it, lard it with pretty big lard all the length of the tongue, as also udders; being first seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, cinamon, and ginger, then spit and roste them, and baste them with sweet butter: be­ing rosted, dress them with grated bread and flower, and some of the spices abovesaid, some sugar, and serve it with juyce of oranges, sugar, gravy, and slic't lemon on it.

To make minced Pies of a Neats Tongue.

TAke a fresh neats tongue, boil, blanch, and mince it hot or cold, then mince four pound of beef-fuet by it self, mingle them together, and season them with an ounce of cloves and mace beaten, some salt, half a preser­ved orange, and a little lemon-peel minced, with a quarter of a pound of sugar, four pound of currans, a little verjuyce and rose-water, and a quarter of a pint of sack, stir all to­gether and fill your pies.

To bake Neats Tongues to eat cold, according to this figure.

TAke the tongues being tender boild and blanched, leave on the fat of the roots of the tongues, and season

[to bake neats tongue to eat cold]

them well with nutmeg, pepper, and salt; but first lard them with pret­ty big lard, and put them in the pie with some whole cloves and some butter, close them up and bake them in fine or course paste, made onely of boiling liquor and flower; and baste the crust with eggs, pack the crust very close in the filling with raw beef or mutton.

To bake two Neats Tongues in a pie to eat hot, according to this figure.

TAke one of the tongues and mince it raw, then boil the other very tender, blanch it, and cut it into pie­ces

[to bake neats tongue in a pie to eat hot]

as big as a walnut, lard them with small lard being cold and seasoned; then have another Tongue being raw, take out the meat, and mince it with some beef-suet or lard: then lay some of the minced Tongues in the bottom of the pie, and the pieces on it; then make balls of the other meat as big as the pieces of tongue, with some grated bread; cream, yolks of eggs, bits of artichocks, nutmeg, salt, pep­per, a few sweet herbs, and lay them in the pie, with some boild artichocks, marrow, grapes, chesnuts blanched, slices of interlarded bacon, and butter; close it up and bake it, then liquor it with verjuyce, gravy, and yolks of eggs.

To bake a Neats Tongue hot otherwayes.

BOil a fresh Tongue very tender, and blanch it; being cold slice it into thin slices, and season it lightly with pepper, nutmeg, cinamon, and ginger finely beaten, then put into the pie half a pound of currans, lay the meat on, and dates in halves, the marrow of four bones, large mace, grapes, or barberries, and butter; close it up and bake it, and being baked, liquor it with white or claret wine, but­ter, sugar, and ice it

Otherwayes.

Boil it very tender, and being blanched and cold, take out some of the meat at the butt end, mince it with some [Page 100]beef-suet, and season it with pepper, ginger beaten fine, salt, currans, grated bread, two or three yolks of eggs, rai­sins minced, or in place of currans, a little cream, a little orange minced, also sweet herbs chopped small; then fill the tongue and season it with the foresaid spices, wrap it in a caul of veal, and put some thin slices of veal under the tongue, as also thin slices of interlarded bacon, and on the top large mace, marrow, and barberries, and butter over all; close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it and ice it with butter, sugar, white wine, or grape verjuyce.

For the paste a pottle of flour, and make it up with boiling liquor, and half a pound of butter.

To roast a Chine, Rib, Loin, Brisket, or Fillet of Beef,

DRaw them with parsley, rosemary, time, sweet mar­joram, sage, winter savory, or lemon, or plain without any of them, fresh or salt, as you please; broth it, roast it, and baste it with butter: a good chine of beef will ask six hours roasting.

For the sauce take strait tops of rosemary, sage leaves, picked parsley, time, and sweet marjoram; and stew them in wine vinegar, and the beef gravy; or otherwayes with gravy and juyce of oranges and lemons. Sometimes for change in saucers of vinegar and pepper.

To roast a Fillet of Beef.

TAke a fillet which is the tenderest part of the beef, and lieth in the inner part of the surloyn, cut it as big as you can, broach it on a broach not too big, and be careful not to broach it through the best of the meat; roast it lea­surely, and baste it with sweet butter, set a dish to save the gravy while it roasts, then prepare sauce for it of good store of parsley, with a few sweet herbs chopped small, [Page 101]the yolks of three or four eggs, sometimes gross pepper minced amongst them with the peel of an orange, and a little onion; boil these together, and put in a little butter, vinegar, gravy, a spoonful of strong broth, and put it to the beef.

Otherwayes.

Sprinkle it with rose vinegar, claret wine, elder vinegar, beaten cloves, nutmeg, pepper, cinamon, ginger, corian­der-seed, fennel-seed, and salt; beat these things fine, and season the fillet with it, then roast it, and baste it with but­ter, save the gravy, and blow off the fat, serve it with juyce of orange or lemon, and a little elder vinegar.

Or thus.

Powder it one night, then stuff it with parsley, time, sweet marjoram, beets, spinage, and winter savory, all picked and minced small, with the yolks of hard eggs mixt amongst some pepper, stuff it and roast it, save the gravy, and stew it with the herbs, gravy, as also a little oni­on, claret wine, and the juyce of an orange or two; serve it hot on this sauce, with slices of orange on it, lemons, or barberries.

To stew a Fillet of Beef in the Italian Fashion.

TAke a young tender fillet of beef, and take away all the skins and sinnews clean from it, put to it some good white wine (that is not too sweet) in a boul, wash it and crush it well in the wine, then strow upon it a little pepper, and a poulder called Tamara in Italian, and as much salt as will season it, mingle them together very well, and put to it as much white wine as will cover it, lay a trencher upon it to keep it down in a close pan with a weight on it, and let it steep two nights and a day; then take it out and put it into a pipkin with some good beef broth, but put none of the pickle to it, but onely beef [Page 102]broth, and that sweet, not salt; cover it close, and set it on the embers, then put to it a few whole cloves and mace, and let it stew till it be enough, it will be very tender and of an excellent taste; serve it with the same broth as much as will cover it.

To make this Tamara, take two ounces of coriander­seed, an ounce of anniseed, an ounce of fennel-seed, two ounces of cloves, and an ounce of cinamon; beat them into a gross powder, with a little powder of winter-savory, and put them into a viol glass to keep.

To make an excellent Pottage called Skinke.

TAke a leg of beef, and chop it into three pieces, then boil it in a pot with three pottles of spring water, a few cloves, mace, and whole pepper; after the pot is scum­med, put in a bundle of sweet marjoram, rosemary, time, winter savory, sage and parsley, bound up hard, some salt, and two or three great onions whole; then about an hour before dinner put in three marrow bones, and thicken it with some strained oatmeal, or manchet slic't and steeped with some gravy, strong broth, or some of the pottage: then a little before you dish up the Skinke, put into it a lit­tle fine poulder of saffron, and give it a walm or two; dish it on large slices of French Bread, and dish the marrow bones on them in a fine clean large dish; then have two or three manchets cut into toasts, and being finely toasted, lay on the knuckle of beef in the middle of the dish, the marrow bones round about it, and the toasts round about the dish brim, serve it hot.

To stew a Rump, or the fat end of a Brisket of Beef in the French Fashion.

TAke a rump of beef, boil it and scum it clean, in a stew­ing pan or broad mouthed pipkin, cover it close, and [Page 103]let it stew an hour; then put to it some whole pepper, cloves, mace, and salt, scotch the meat with your knife to let out the gravy, then put in some claret wine, and half a dozen of slic't onions; having boild, an hour after put in some capers, or a handful of broom buds, and half, a do­zen of cabbidge-lettice being first parboild in fair water, and quartered, two or three spoonfuls of wine vinegar, and as much verjuyce, and let it stew till it be tender; then serve it on sippets of French Bread, and dish it on those sippets; blow off the fat clean off the broth, or scum it, and stick it with fried bread.

A Turkish Dish of Meat.

TAke an interlarded piece of Beef, cut it into thin slices, and put it into a pot that hath a close cover, or stewing-pan; then put into it a good quantity of clean picked rice, skin it very well, and put into it a quantity of whole pepper, two or three whole onions, and let this boil very well, then take out the onions, and dish it on sippets, the thicker it is the better.

To boil a Chine, Rump, Surloin, Brisket, Rib, Flank, Buttock, or Fillet of Beef powdered.

TAke any of these, and give them in summer a weeks powdering, in winter a fortnight, stuff them or plain; if you stuff them, do it with all manner of sweet herbs, fat beef minced, and some nutmeg; serve them on brewis, with roots or cabbidge boild in milk, with beaten butter, &c.

To pickle roast Beef, Chine, Surloin, Rib, Brisket, Flank, or Neats Tongues.

TAke any of the foresaid Beef, as chine or fore-rib, and stuff it with penniroyal, or other sweet herbs, or par­sley [Page 104]minced small, and some salt, prick in here and there a few whole cloves, and roste it; then take claret wine, wine vinegar, whole pepper, rosemary, and bayes, and time bound up close in a bundle, and boild in some claret wine, and wine vinegar, make the pickle, and put some salt to it, then pack it up close in a barrel that will but just hold it, put the pickle to it, close it on the head, and keep it for your use.

To stew Beef in gobbets in the French fashion.

TAke a flank of beef or any part but the leg, cut it into slices or gobbets as big as a pullets egg, with some gobbets of fat, and boil it in a pot or pipkin with some fair spring water, scum it clean, and put to it an hour after it hath boild carrots, parsnips, turnips, great onions, salt, some cloves, mace, and whole pepper, cover it close, and stew it till it be very tender; then half an hour before din­ner, put into it some picked time, parsley, winter-savory, sweet marjoram, sorrel and spinage (being a little brui­sed with the back of a ladle) and some claret wine: then dish it on fine sippers, and serve it to the table hot, garnish it with grapes, barberries, or gooseberries. Sometimes use spices, the bottoms of boild artichocks put into beaten but­ter, and grated nutmeg, garnished with barberries.

Stewed Collops of Beef.

TAke some of the buttock of beef, and cut it into thin slices, cross the grain of the meat, then hack them and fry them in sweet butter, and being fryed fine and brown, put them in a pipkin with some strong broth, a little claret wine, and some nutmeg, stew it very tender; and half an hour before you dish it put to it some good gravy, elder vinegar, and a clove or two: when you serve [Page 105]it put some juyce of orange, and three or four slices on it, stew down the gravy somewhat thick, and put into it when you dish it some beaten butter.

Olines of Beef stewed and roste.

TAke a buttock of beef, and cut some of it into thin sli­ces as broad as your hand, then hack them with the back of a knife, lard them with small lard, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; then make a farsing with some sweet herbs, time, onions, the yolks of hard eggs, beef-suet or lard all minced, some salt, barberries, grapes, or gooseberries; season it with the former spices lightly, and work it up together, then lay it on the slices, and roul them up round with some caul of veal, beef or mutton, bake them in a dish in the oven, or roste them, then put them in a pipkin with some butter, and saffron, or none, blow off the fat from the gravy and put it to them, with some artichocks, potato, or skirrets blanched, being first boild, a little claret wine, and serve them on sippets, with some slic't orange, lemon, barberries, grapes, or goose­berries.

To make a hash of raw Beef.

MInce it very small with some beef-suet, or lard, and some sweet herbs, some beaten cloves and mace, pepper, nutmeg, and a whole onion or two, stew all to­gether in a pipkin, with some blanched chesnuts, strong broth, and some claret; let it stew softly the space of three hours, that it may be very tender, then blow off the fat, dish it, and serve it on sippets, garnish it with barberries, grapes, or gooseberries.

To make a hash of Beef otherwayes.

TAke some of the buttock, cut it into thin slices, and hack them with the back of your knife, then fry [Page 106]them with sweet butter, and being fryed put them into a pipkin with some claret, strong broth, or gravy, cloves, mace, pepper, salt and sweet butter; being tender stewed, serve them on fine sippets, with slic't lemon, grapes, bar­berries, or gooseberries, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

Otherwayes.

Cut some buttock beef into thin slices, and hack it with the back of a knife, then have some fine slices of interlard­ed bacon; stew them together in a pipkin, with some gravy, claret wine, and strong broth, cloves, mace, pepper, and salt; being tender stewed, serve it on French bread sippets.

Otherwayes.

Being rosted and cold cut it into very fine thin slices, then put some gravy to it, nutmeg, salt, a little thin slic't onion, and claret wine, stew it in a pipkin, and being well stewed, dish it and serve it up, run it over with beaten but­ter, and slic't lemon, garnish the dish with sippets, &c.

Carbonadoes of Beef, raw, rosted, or tosted.

TAke a fat surloin and cut it into steaks half an inch thick, or the fore-rib, sprinkle it with salt, and broil it on the embers on a very temperate fire, and in an hour it will be broild enough; then serve it with gravy, and onions minced and boild in vinegar and pepper, or juyce of oranges, nutmeg, and gravy, or vinegar and pepper onely, or gravy alone.

Or steep the beef in claret wine, salt, pepper, nutmeg, and broil them as the former, boil up the gravy where it was steeped, and serve it for sauce with beaten butter.

And thus you may also broil or toste the sweetbreads when they are new, and serve them with gravy.

To Carbonado, broil, or toste beef in the Italian fashion.

TAke the ribs, cut them into steaks, and hack them, then season them with pepper, salt, and coriander-seed, being first sprinkled with rose vinegar, or elder-vinegar, then lay them one upon another in a dish the space of an hour, and broil or toste them before the fire, and serve them with the gravy that came from them, or juyce of orange and the gravy boild together. Thus also you may do hei­fers udders, oxe cheeks, or neats tongues, being first tender broild or tosted.

In this way also you may make scotch collops, in thin slices, hack them with your knife, being salted, and fine and softly broild, serve them with gravy.

Beef fryed divers wayes raw or rosted

  • 1. CUt it in slices half an inch thick, and three fingers broad, salt it a little, and being hacked with the back of your knife, fry it in butter with a temperate fire.
  • 2. Cut the other a quarter of an inch thick, and fry it as the former.
  • 3. Cut the other collops to fry as thick as a half-crown, and as long as a card, hack them, and fry them as the for­mer, but fry them not too hard.

Thus you may fry sweetbreads of the beef.

Beef fryed otherwayes, being rosted and cold.

SLice it in good big slices, then fry them in butter, and serve them with butter and vinegar, garnish them with fryed parsley.

Sauces for the raw fryed Beef.
  • 1. Beaten butter, with slic't lemon beaten together.
  • [Page 108]2. Gravy and butter, &c.
  • 3. Mustard, butter, and vinegar.
  • 4. Butter, vinegar, minced capers, and nutmeg.

For the garnish of this fryed meat, either parsley, sage, clary, onions, apples, carrots, parsnips, skirrets, spinage, artichocks, pears, quinces, slic't oranges, or lemons, or fry them in butter.

Thus you may fry sweetbreads, udders, and tongues in any of the foresaid wayes, with the same sauces and garnish.

To bake Beef in lumps several wayes, or Tongues in lumps raw, or Heifrrs Ʋdders raw or boild.

TAke the buttock, brisket, fillet, or fore-rib, cut it into gobbets as big as a pullets egg, with some equal gob­bets of fat, season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, and bake them with some butter or none.

Make the paste with a quarter of a pound of butter, and boiling liquor, boil the butter in the liquor, make up the paste quick and pretty stiff for a round pie.

To bake Beef red Deer fashion in Pies or Pasties, either Sur­loin, Brisket, Buttock, or Fillet, larded or not.

TAke the surloin, bone it, and take off the great sinnew that lies on the back, lard the leanest parts of it with great lard, being seasoned with nutmegs, pepper, and lard three pound; then have for the seasoning four ounces of pepper, four ounces of nutmegs, two ounces of ginger, and a pound of salt, season it and put it into the pie: but first lay a bed of good sweet butter, and a bay leaf or two, half an ounce of whole cloves, lay on the venison, then put on all the rest of the seasoning, with a few more cloves, good store of butter, and a bay-leaf or two, close it up and bake it, it will ask eight hours soaking: being baked and cold, [Page 109]fill it up with clarified butter, serve it, and a very good judgement shall not know it from red deer. Make the paste either fine or course to bake't hot or cold.

To this quantity of flesh you must have three gallons of fine flower heapt measure, and three pound of butter; but the best way to bake red deer, is to bake it in course paste, either in pie or pasty: make it in rie meal to keep long. Otherwayes you may make it of meal as it comes from the mill, and make it onely of boiling water, and no stuff in it.

Otherwayes to be eaten cold.

Take two stone of buttock beef, lard it with great lard, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, and the lard, then steep it in a boul, tray, or earthen pan, with some wine vinegar, cloves, mace, pepper, and two or three bay-leaves: thus let it steep four or five dayes, and turn it twice or thrice a day: then take it and season it with cloves, mace, pepper, nutmeg, and salt, put it into a pot with the back side downward, with butter under it, and season it with a good thick coat of seasoning, and some butter on it, then close it up and bake it, it will ask six or seven hours baking. Being baked draw it, and when it is cold pour out the gravy, and boil it again in a pipkin, and pour it on the venison, then fill up the pot with clarified butter, &c.

To make minced Pies of Beef.

TAke of the buttock of beef, cleanse it from the skins, and cut it into small pieces, then take half as much more beef-suet as the beef, mince them together ve­ry small, and season them with pepper, cloves, mace, nut­meg, and salt, then have half as much fruit as meat, three pound of raisins, four pound of currans, two pound of prunes, &c. or plain without fruit, but onely seasoned with the same spices.

To make a Coller of Beef.

TAke the thinnest end of a coast of beef, boil it a lit­tle and lay it in pump-water, and a little salt three dayes, shifting it once a day; the last day put a pint of claret wine to it, and when you take it out of the water let it lie two or three hours a draining, then cut it almost to the end in three slices, and bruise a little cochinel and a ve­ry little allom, and mingle it with the claret wine, couler the meat all over with it, then take a dozen of anchoves, wash and bone them, lay them on the beef, and season it with cloves, pepper, mace, two handful of salt, a little sweet marjoram, and time; and when you make it up, roul the innermost slice first, and the other two upon it, being very well seasoned every where, and binde it up hard with tape, then put it into a stone pot a little bigger then the coller; and pour upon it a pint of claret wine, and half a pint of wine vinegar, a sprig of rosemary, and a few bay leaves; bake it very well, and before it be quite cold, take it out of the pot, and you may keep it dry as long as you please.

To bake a Flank of Beef in a Coller.

TAke a flank of Beef, and lay it in pump water four dayes and nights, shift it twice a day, then take it out and dry it very well in clean cloaths, cut it in three layers, and take out the bones and most of the fat: then take three handfuls of salt, and good store of sage chopped ve­ry small, mingle them, and strew it betwixt the three lay­ers, and lay them one upon another; then take an ounce of cloves and mace, and another of nutmegs, beat them very well, and strew it between the layers of beef, roul it up close together, then take some packthread and tye it up [Page 111]very hard, put it in a long earthen pot, which are made of purpose for that use, tie up the top of the pot with cap paper, and let it into the oven; let it stand eight hours, when you draw it, and being between hot and cold, binde it up round in a cloath, tie it fast at both ends with pack­thred, and hang it up for your use.

Sometimes for variety you may use slices of bacon be­twixt the layers, and in place of sage sweet herbs, and sometimes cloves of garlick. Or powder it in salt-peter four or five dayes, then wash it off, roul it and use the same spices as abovesaid, and serve it with mustard and sugar, or Gallendine.

To stuff Beef with Parsley to serve cold.

PIck the parsley very fine and short, then mince some suet not too small, mingle it with the parsley, and make little holes in ranks, fill them hard and full, and be­ing boild and cold, slice it in thin slices, and sere it with vi­negar and green parsley.

To bake Ʋdders either in Pye or Pasty according to this Figure.

TAke a young Udder and lard it with great lard, being seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, cloves, and mace, boil

[to bake udders in pie or pastry]

it tender, and being cold wrap it in a caul of veal, but first season it with the former spices and salt; put it in the pie with some slices of veal under it, season them, and some also on the top, with some slices of lard and butter; close it up, and being baked, liquor it with clarified butter. Thus for to eat cold; if hot, liquour it with white wine, gravy and butter.

To bake a Heifers Ʋdder in the Italian Fashion.

THe Udder being boild tender, and cold, cut it into dice-work like samll dice, and season them with some cloves, mace, cinamon, ginger, salt, pistaches, or pine-ker­nels, somé dates, and bits of marrow; season the afore­said materials lightly and fit, make your pie not above an inch high, like a custard, and of custard paste, prick it, and dry it in the oven, and put in the abovesaid materials; put to it also some custard stuff made of good cream, ten eggs, and but three whites, sugar, salt, rosewater, and some dissolved musk; bake it, and stick it with slic't dates, can­died pistaches, and scrape fine sugar on it.

Otherwayes.

Boil the udder very tender, and being cold slice it into thin slices, as also some thin slices of parmisan and inter­larded bacon, some sweet herbs chopped small, some cur­rans, cinamon, nutmeg, sugar, rosewater, and some butter, make three bottoms of the aforesaid things in a dish, pat­ty-pan, or pie, with a cut cover, and being baked, scrape on sugar on it, or ice it.

Otherwayes to eat hot.

Take an Udder boild and cold, slice it into thin sli­ces, and season it with pepper, cinamon, nutmeg, ginger, and salt, mingle some currans amongst the slices, and fill the pie; put some dates on the top, large mace, barberries, or grapes, butter, and the marrow of marrow bones; close it up and bake it, being baked ice it, and liquour it with white wine verjuyce, or grape verjuyce.

To stew Calves or Neats feet.

BOil and blanch them, then part them in halves, and put them into a pipkin with some strong broth, a lit­tle powder of saffron, sweet butter, pepper, sugar, and some sweet herbs finely minced, let them stew an hour, and [Page 113]serve them with a little grape verjuyce stewed among them.

Neats feet being soust serve them cold with mustard.

To make a Fricase of Neats Feet.

TAke them being boild and blanched, fricase them with some butter, and being finely fryed make a sauce with six yolks of eggs dissolved with some wine vinegar, grated nutmeg, and salt.

Otherwayes.

First bone and pick them clean, then being boild, blanch­ed, and cold, cut them into gubbins and put them in a frying pan with a ladle full of strong broth, a piece of but­ter, and a little salt; after they have fryed a while, put to them a little chopped parsley, green chibbolds, young spear­mint, and time, all shred very small, with a little beaten pepper: being almost fryed, make a lear for them with the yolks of four or five eggs, some mutton gravy, a lit­tle nutmeg, and the juyce of a lemon wrung therein: put this lear to the neats feet as they fry in the pan, then toss them once or twice, and so serve them.

Neats Feet larded and rosted on a spit:

TAke neats feet being boild, cold, and blanched, lard them whole and roste them; being rosted, serve them with venison sauce, made of claret wine, wine vinegar, and tostes of houshold bread strained with the wine through a strainer, with some beat cinamon and ginger; put it in a dish or pipkin and boil it on the fire; with a few whole cloves, stir it with a sprig of rosemary, and make it not too thick.

To make black Puddings of the Beefers Blood.

TAke the blood of the beefer when it is warm, put in some salt and strain it, and when it is through cold put in the groats of oatmeal well picked, and let it stand [Page 114]soaking all night, then put in some sweet herbs, penny-roy­al, rosemary, time, savory, fennil, or fennil-seed, pepper, cloves, mace, nutmegs, and some cream or good new milk; then have four or five eggs well beaten and put into the blood with good beef-suet not cut too small, mix all well together and fill the beefers guts, being first well cleansed, steeped, and scalded.

To dress a dish of Tripes hot out of the pot or pan.

BEing tender boild, make a sauce with some beaten but­ter, gravy, pepper, mustard, and wine vinegar, rub a dish with a little garlick and dish them therein, then run the sauce over them with a little bruised garlick amongst it, and a little wine vinegar sprinkled over the meat.

To make Bolonia Sausages.

TAke a good leg of pork, and take away all the fat, skins, and sinnews, mince and stamp it very fine in a wooden or brass morter, weigh the meat, and to every five pound thereof take a pound of good lard cut as small as your little finger about an inch long, mingle it amongst the meat, and put to it half an ounce of whole cloves, as much beaten pepper, with the same quantity of nutmegs and mace finely beaten also, an ounce of whole caraway­seed, salt eight ounces, cochenel bruised with a little allom beaten and dissolved in sack, and stamped amongst the meat: then take beefers guts, cut of the biggest of the small guts, a yard long, and being clean scowred put them in brine a week or eight dayes, it strengthens and makes them tuff to hold filling. The greatest skill is in the filling of them, for if they be not well filled they will grow rusty; then be­ing filled put them a smoaking three or four dayes, and hang them in the air, in some Garret or in a Seller, for they must not come no more at the fire, and in a quarter of a year they will be eatable.

Section 3.

The A la mode wayes of dressing the Heads of any Beasts.

To boil a Bullocks Cheek in the Italian way.

BReak the bones and steep the head in fair water, shift it, and scrape off the slime, let it lie in steep thus twelve hours; then boil it in fair water with some Bolonia sausage and a piece of interlarded ba­con: the cheeks being tender boild and the other materi­als, dish it up and serve it, with some flowers and greens on it, and mustard in saucers.

To stew Bullocks Cheeks.

TAke them being well soaked or steeped, spit and half roste them, save the gravy, and put them into a pipkin with some claret wine, gravy, and some strong broth, slic't nutmeg, ginger, pepper, salt, and some minced onions fryed, stew it the space of two hours on a soft fire, and be­ing finely stewed, serve it on carved sippets.

Otherwayes.

Take out the bones, balls of the eyes, and the ruff of the mouth, steep it well in fair water and shift it often, being well cleansed from the blood and slime take it out of the water, wipe it dry, and season it with nutmeg, pep­per, [Page 116]and salt, put them in an earthen pot one upon another, and put to them a pint of claret wine, a few whole cloves, a little fair water, and two or three whole onions; close up the pot and bake it, it will ask six hours baking; be­ing tender baked, serve it on tostes of fine manchet.

Or thus.

Being baked or stewed, you may take out the bones and lay them close together, pour the liquor to them, and be­ing cold slice them into slices, and serve them cold with mu­stard and sugar.

To boil a Calves Head.

TAke the head, skin, and all unflayed, scald it, and soke it in fair water a whole night or twelve hours, then take out the brains and boil them with some sage, parsley, or mint; being boild chop them small together, butter them and serve them in a dish with fine sippets about them: Then the head being finely cleansed, boil it in a clean cloth and close it together again in the cloth; being boild, lay it one side by another with some fine slices of boild bacon, and lay some fine picked parsley upon it, with some bur­rage or other flowers.

To hash a Calves Head.

TAke a calves head well steeped and cleansed from the blood and slime, boil it tender, then take it up and let it be through cold, cut it into dice-work, as also the brains in the same form, and some thin slices of interlard­ed bacon being first boild; put some gooseberries to them, as also some gravy or juyce of lemon or orange, and some beaten butter; stew all together, and being finely stewed, dish it on carved fippets, and run it over with beaten butter.

Otherwayes.

The head being boild and cold, slice it into thin slices, with some onions and the brains in the same manner, stew them in a pipkin with some gravy or strong mutton broth, nut­meg, some mushrooms, a little white wine and beaten but­ter; being well stewed together dish them on fine sippets, and garnish the meat with slic't lemon or barberries.

To souce a Calves Head.

FIrst scald it and bone it, then steep it in fair water the space of six hours, dry it with a clean cloth, and sea­son it with some salt and bruised garlick (or none) then roul it up in a coller, binde it close, and boil it in white wine, water, and salt; being boild keep it in that souce drink, and serve it in the coller, or slice it and serve it with oyl, vinegar, and pepper. This dish is very rare, and to a good judgement scarce decernable.

To roste a Calves Head.

TAke a calves head, cleave it and take out the brains, skins, and blood about it, steep them and the head in fair warm water the space of four or five hours, shift them three or four times and cleanse the head, then boil the brains, and make a pudding with some grated bread, brains, some beef-suet minced small, with some minced veal and sage; season the pudding with some cloves, mace, salt, ginger, sugar, five yolks of eggs, and saffron; fill the head with this pudding, then close it up and binde it fast with some packthread, spit it, and binde on the caul round the head with some of the pudding round about it, roste it and save the gravy, blow off the fat, and put to the gravy, for the sauce a little white wine, a slic't nutmeg, and a piece of sweet butter, the juye of an orange, salt, and sugar. Then [Page 118]bread up the head with some grated bread, beaten cinamon, minced lemon-peel and a little salt.

To roste a Calves Head with Orsters.

SPlit the head as to boil, and take out the brains wash­ing them very well with the head, cut out the tongue, boil it a little, and blanch it, let the brains be parboild as well as the tongue, then mince the brains and tongue, a little sage, oysters, beef suet, very small, being finely min­ced mix them together with three or four yolks of eggs, beaten ginger, pepper, nutmegs, grated bread, salt, and a little sack, if the brains and eggs make it not moist enough. This being done, parboil the calves head a little in fair wa­ter, then take it up and dry it well in a cloth, filling the holes where the brains and tongue lay with this farcing or pudding, binde it up close together and spit it, then stuff it with oysters being first parboild in their own liquor, put them into a dish with minced time, parsley, mace, nutmeg, and pepper beaten very small, mix all these with a little vinegar, and the white of an egg, roul the oysters in it, and make little holes in the head, stuff it as full as you can, put the oysters but half way in, and scure them in with sprigs of time, roste it.. and set a dish under it to save the gravy, wherein let there be oysters, sweet herbs minced, a little white wine and a slic't nutmeg. When the head is rosted set the dish wherein the sauce is on the coals to stew a lit­tle, then put in a piece of butter, the juyce of an orange and salt, beating it up thick together; dish the head, and put the sauce to it, and serve it up hot to the table.

To stew a Calves Head.

FIrst boil it in fair water half an hour, then take it up and pluck it to pieces, then put it into a pipkin with great [Page 119]oysters and some of the broth which boild it, (if you have no stronger) a pint of white wine or claret, a quarter of a pound of interlarded bacon, some blanched chesnuts, the yolks of three or four hard eggs cut into halves, sweet herbs minced, and a little horse-raddish-root scraped, stew all these an hour, then slice the brains (being parboild) and strew a little ginger, salt, and flower, you may put in some juyce of spinage and fry them green with butter; then dish the meat, and lay these fryed brains, oysters, chesnuts, half yolks of eggs, and sippet it, serve it up hot to the table.

To hash a Calves Head.

TAke a calves head, boil it tender, and let it be through cold, then take one half and broil or roste it, do it very white and fair, then take the other half and slice it in­to thin slices, fry it with clarified butter fine and white, then put it in a dish a stewing with some sweet herbs, as rose­mary, time, savory, salt, some white wine or claret, some good roste mutton gravy, a little pepper and nutmeg; then take the tongue being ready boild, and a boild piece of interlarded bacon, slice it into thin slices, and fry it in a batter made of flower, eggs, nutmeg, cream, salt, and sweet herbs chopped small, dip the tongue and bacon into the batter, then fry them and keep them warm till dinner time, season the brains with nutmegs, sweet herbs minced small, salt, and the yolks of three or four raw eggs, mix all toge­ther, and fry them in spoonfulls, keep them warm, then the stewed meat being ready, dish it, and lay the broiled side of the head on the stewed side, then garnish the dish with the fryed meats, some slices of oranges, and run it over with beaten butter and juyce of oranges.

To broil a Calves Head.

TAke a calves head being cleft and cleansed, and also the brains, boil the head very white and fine, then boil [Page 120]the brains with some sage and other sweet herbs, as time and sweet marjoram, chop and boil them in a bag, being boild put them out and butter them with butter, salt, and vinegar, serve them in a little dish by themselves with fine thin sippets about them.

Then broil the head or toste it against the fire, being first salted and scotched with your knife, baste it with butter; being finely broild, bread it with fine manchet, or fine flow­er, brown it a little and dish it on a sauce of gravy, minced capers, grated nutmeg, and a little beaten butter.

To boil a Lambs Head in white Broth.

TAke a lambs head, cleave it, and take out the brains, then open the pipes of the appurtenances, and wash and soke the meat very clean, set it a boiling in fair water, and when it boils scum it, and put in some large mace, whole cinamon, slic't dates, some marrow, and salt, and when the head is boild, dish it up on fine carved sippets, and trim the dish with scraping sugar: Then strain six or seven yolks of eggs with sack or white wine, and a ladle full of cream, put it into the broth, and give it a walm on the fire, stir it, and broth the head, then lay on the head some slic't lemon, gooseberries, grapes, dates, and large mace.

To stew a Lambs Head.

TAke a lambs head, cleave it and take out the brains, wash and pick the head from the slime and filth, and steep it in fair water, shift it twice in an hour, as also the appurtenances then set it a boiling on the fire with some strong broth, and when it boils scum it, and put in a large mace or two, some capers quarters of pears, a little white wine, some gravy, marrow, and some marygold-flowers; being finely stewed, serve it on carvéd sippets and broth it, [Page 121]lay on it slic't lemon, and scalded gooseberries or barber­ries.

To boil a Lambs Head otherwayes.

MAke a forcing or pudding of the brains, being boild and cold cut them into bits, then mince a little veal or lamb with some beef-suet, and put to it some grated bread, nutmeg, pepper, salt, some sweet herbs minced small, and three or four raw eggs, work all together, and fill the head with this pudding, being cleft, steeped, and af­ter dried in a clean cloth, stew it in a stewing pan or be­tween two dishes with some strong broth: then take the remainder of this forcing or pudding and make it into balls, put them a boiling with the head, and adde some white wine, a whole onion, and some slic't pippins or pears, or square bits like dice, some bits of artichocks, sage leaves, large mace, and lettice boild and quartered and put in beat­en butter; being finely stewed, dish it up on sippets, and put the balls and the other materials on it, broth it, and run it over with beaten butter and lemon.

Section 4.

The rarest wayes of dressing of all manner of Roste Meats, either of Flesh or Fowl, by Sea or Land, with their Sauces that properly belong to them.

Divers wayes of bredding or dredging of Meats and Fowls.

1. GRated bread and flower.

2. Grated bread, and sweet herbs minced and dried, or beat to powder, mixed with the bread.

3. Lemon in powder; or orange-peel mixt with bread and flower, minced small or in powder.

4. Cinamon, bread, flower sugar, made fine or in powder.

5. Grated bread, fennil-seed, coriander-seed, cinamon, and sugar.

6. For pigs, grated bread, flower, nutmeg, ginger, pep­per, sugar; but first baste it with the juyce of lemons or oranges, and the yolks of eggs.

7. Bread, sugar, and salt mixed together.

Divers bastings for roste meats.
  • 1. FResh butter.
  • 2. Clarified suet.
  • [Page 123]3. Claret wine, with a bundle of sage, rosemary, time, and parsley, baste the mutton with these herbs and wine.
  • 4. Water and salt.
  • 5. Cream and melted butter, thus flay'd pigs commonly.
  • 6. Yolks of eggs, juyce of oranges, and biskets, the meat being almost rosted, comfets for some fine large fowls, as a peacock, bustard, or turkey.

To roste a Shoulder of mutton in a most excellent new way with Oysters and other materials.

TAke three pints of great oysters & parboil them in their own liquor, then put away the liquor and wash them with some white wine, then dry them with a clean cloth and season them with nutmeg and salt, then stuff the shoul­der and lard it with some anchoves; being clean washed, spit it, and lay it to the fire, and baste it with white or cla­ret wine, then take the bottoms of six artichocks, pared from the leaves and boild tender, then take them out of the liquor and put them into beaten butter, with the mar­row of six marrow bones, and keep them warm by a fire or in an oven, then put to them some slic't nutmeg, salt, the gravy of a leg of roste mutton, the juyce of two oran­ges, and some great oysters, a pint, being first parboild, and mingle with them a little musk or amber-greece: then dish up the shoulder of mutton, and have a sauce made for it of the gravy which came from the roste shoulder of mut­ton stuffed with oysters, and anchoves, and blow off the fat, then put to the gravy a little white wine, some oyster liquor, a whole onion, and some strip't time, and boil up the sauce, then put it in a fair dish, and lay the shoulder of mutton on it, and the bottoms of the artichocks round the dish brims, and put the marrow and the oysters on the ar­tichock bottoms, with some slic't lemon on the shoulder of mutton, and serve it up hot.

To roste a Shoulder of Mutton with Oysters otherwayes.

TAke great oysters, and being opened, parboil them in their own liquor, beard them and wash them in some vinegar then wipe them dry, and put to them grated nutmeg, pepper, some broom buds and two or three an­choves; being finely cleansed, washed, and cut into little bits, the yolk of a raw egg or two dissolved, some salt, a little samphire cut small, and mingle all together, then stuff the shoulder, roste it, and baste it with sweet butter, and being rosted make sauce with the gravy, white wine, oyster liquor, and some oysters, then boil the sauce up and blow off the fat, beat it up thick with the yolk of an egg or two, and serve the shoulder up hot with the sauce and some slic't lemon on it.

Otherwayes.

The oysters being opened parboil them in their own li­quor, beard them, and wipe them dry, being first washed out of their own liquor with some vinegar, put them in a dish with some time, sweet marjoram, nutmeg, and le­mon-peel, all minced very small, but onely the oysters whole, and a little salt, and mingle all together; then make little holes in the upper side of the mutton, and fill them with this composition. Roste the shoulder of mut­ton, and baste it with butter, set a dish under it to save the gravy that drippeth from it; then for the sauce take some of the oysters, and a whole onion, stew them together with some of the oyster liquor they were parboild in, and the gravy that dripped from the shoulder, (but first blow off the fat) and boil up all together pretty thick, with the volk of an egg, some verjuyce, the slice of an orange, and serve the mutton on it hot.

Or make sauce with some oysters being first parboild in their liquor, put to them some mutton gravy, oyster li­quor, [Page 125]a whole onion, a little white wine, and large mace, boil it up, and garnish the dish with barberries, slic't le­mon, large mace, and oysters.

Other times for change make sauce with capers, great oysters, gravy, a whole onion, claret wine, nutmeg, and the juyce of two or three oranges beaten up thick with some butter and salt.

To roste a Shoulder of Mutton without Oysters.

TAke a shoulder of mutton and roste it, then make sauce with some gravy, claret wine, pepper, grated nutmeg, slic't lemon, and broom buds, give it a walm or two, then dish the mutton, and put the sauce to it, and garnish it with barberries and slic't lemon.

To roste a Chine of Mutton either plain or with divers stuf­fings, lardings, and sauces.

FIrst lard it with lard, or lemon-peel cut like lard, or with orange-peel, stick here and there a clove, or in place of cloves tops of rosemary, time, sage, winter-savory, or sweet marjoram, baste it with butter, and make sauce with mutton gravy, and nutmeg, boil it up with a little claret and the juyce of an orange, and rub the dish you put it in with a clove of garlick.

Or make sauce with pickled or green cucumbers slic't and boild in strong broth or gravy, with some slic't oni­ons, an anchove or two, and some grated nutmeg, stew them well together, and serve the mutton with it hot.

Divers Sauces for roste Mutton.

  • 1. GRavy, capers, samphire, and salt, and stew them well together.
  • [Page 126]2. Water, onion, claret wine, slic't nutmeg and gravy boild up.
  • 3. Whole onions stewed in strong broth or gravy, white wine, pepper, pickled capers, mace, and three or four slices of a lemon.
  • 4. Mince a little roste mutton hot from the spit, and adde to it some chopped parsley and onions, verjuyce or vinegar, ginger, and pepper; stew it very tender in a pip­kin, and serve it under any joynt with some gravy of the mutton.
  • 5. Onions, oyster liquor, claret, capers, or broom buds, gravy, nutmeg, and salt boild together.
  • 6. Chopped parsley, verjuyce, butter, sugar, and gravy.
  • 7. Take vinegar, butter, and currans, put them in a pip­kin with sweet herbs finely minced, the yolks of two hard eggs, and two or three slices of the brownest of the leg, mince it also, some cinamon, ginger, sugar, and salt.
  • 8. Picked capers, and gravy, or gravy and samphire cut an inch long.
  • 9. Chopped parsley and vinegar.
  • 10. Salt, pepper, and juyce of oranges.
  • 11. Strained prunes, wine and sugar.
  • 12. White wine, gravy, large mace and butter thickned with two or three yolks of eggs.
Oyster Sauce.
  • 13. Oyster liquor and gravy boild together, with eggs and verjuyce to thicken it, then juyce of orange and slices of lemon over all.
  • 14. Onions chopped with sweet herbs, vinegar, gravy, and salt boild together.

To roste Veal divers wayes with many excellent farcings, puddings, and sauces, both in the French, Italian, and English fashion.
To make a Pudding in a Breast of Veal.

OPen the lower end with a sharp knife close between the skin and the ribs, leave hold enough of the flesh on both sides, that you may put in your hand between the ribs and the skin; then make a pudding of grated white bread, two or three yolks of eggs, a little cream, clean washt currans picked and dried, rosewater, cloves, and mace fine beaten, a little saffron, salt, beef-suet minced fine, some slic't dates and sugar; mingle all together, and stuff the breast with it, make the pudding pretty stiff, and prick on the sweetbread wrapped in the caul, spit it, and roast it; then make sauce with some claret wine, grated nutmeg, vinegar, butter, and two or three slices of an orange, and boil it up, &c.

To roast a Breast of Veal otherwayes.

PArboil it, and lard it with small lard all over, or the one half with lard, and the other with lemon-peel, sage-leaves, or any kind of sweet herbs; spit it and roast it, baste it with sweet butter, and being roasted, bread it with grated bread flower, and salt; make sauce with gravy, juyce of oranges, and slic't lemon laid on it.

Or thus.

Make a stuffing or farcing with a little minced veal, and some time minced, lard, or fat bacon, a few cloves and mace beaten, salt, and two or three yolks of eggs; mingle them all together, and fill the breast, scure it up with a prick or scure, then make little puddings of the same stuff you stuffed the breast, and having spitted the breast, prick upon it those little puddings, as also the sweet­breads, roast all together, and baste them with good sweet butter; being finely roasted, make sauce with juyce of oranges and lemons.

To roast a Loyn of Veal.

SPit it, and lay it to the fire, baste it with sweet butter, then set a dish under it with some vinegar, two or three sage leaves, and two or three tops of rosemary and time; let the gravy drop on them, and when the veal is finely roasted, give the herbs and gravy a walm or two on the fire, and serve it under the veal.

Another Sauce for the Loin of Veal.

All manner of sweet herbs minced very small, the yolks of two or three hard eggs minced very small, and boil them together with a few currans, a little grated bread, beaten cinamon, sugar, and a whole clove or two; dish the veal on this sauce, with two or three slices of an orange.

To roast Olives on a Leg of Veal.

CUt a leg of veal into thin slices, and hack them with the back of a knife; then strew on them a little salt, grated nutmeg, sweet herbs finely minced and the yolks of some hard eggs minced also, grated bread, a little beef-suet minced, currans, and sugar: mingle all together, and strew it on the olives, then roul it up in little rouls, spit them, and roul the caul of the veal about them, roaste them, and baste them with sweet butter; being roasted, make sauce with some of the stuffing, verjuyce, the gravy that drops from them, and some sugar, and serve the olives on it.

To roast a Leg or Fillet of Veal.

TAke it and stuff it with beef-suet, seasoned with nut­meg, salt, and the yolks of two or three raw eggs, mix them with the suet, stuff it and roast it; then make [Page 129]sauce with the gravy that dripped from it, blow off the fat, and give it two or three walms on the fire, and put to it the juyce of two or three oranges.

To roast Veal in pieces.

TAke a leg of veal, and cut it into square pieces as big as a hens egg, season them with pepper, salt, some beaten cloves, and fennel-seed; then spit them with slices of bacon between every piece; being spitted, put the caul of the veal about them and roast them, then make the sauce of the gravy and the juyce of oranges. Thus you may do of veal sweetbreads and lambstones.

To roast Calves Feet.

FIrst boil them tender and blanch them, and being cold lard them thick with small lard, then spit them on a small spit and roast them; serve them with a sauce made of vinegar, cinamon, sugar, and butter.

To roast a Calves Head with Oysters.

TAke a Calves head and cleave it, take out the brains and wash them very well with the head, cut out the the tongue, and boil, blanch, and parboil the brains, as al­so the head and tongue; then mince the brains and tongue with a little sage, oysters, marrow, or beef-suet very small, mix with it three or four yolks of raw eggs, beaten ginger, pepper, nutmeg, grated bread, salt, and a little sack: this being done, then take the calves head, and fill it with this composition where the brains and tongue lay; binde it up close together, spit it, and stuff it with oysters, com­pounded with nutmeg, mace, time, grated bread, salt, and pepper: Mix all these with a little vinegar, and the white [Page 130]of an egg, and roul the oysters in it; stuff the head with it as full as you can, and roast it thorowly, setting a dish under it to catch the gravy, wherein let there be oysters, sweet herbs minced, a little white wine and slic't nutmeg; when the head is roasted, set the dish wherein the sauce is on the coals to stew a little, then put in a piece of butter, the juyce of an orange, and salt, beating it up thick toge­ther, dish the head, and put the sauce to it, and serve it hot to the table.

Several Sauces for roast Veal.
  • 1. Gravy, Claret, nutmeg, vinegar, butter, sugar, and oranges.
  • 2. Juyce of orange, gravy, nutmeg, and slic't lemon on it.
  • 3. Vinegar and butter.
  • 4. All manner of sweet herbs chopped small, with the yolks of two or three eggs, and boil them in vinegar, but­ter, a few bread crumbs, currans, beaten cinamon, sugar, and a whole cloave or two, put it under the veal, with sli­ces of orange and lemon about the dish.
  • 5. Claret sauce of boild carrots, and boild quinces stamped and strained, with lemon, nutmeg, pepper, rose vinegar, sugar, and verjuyce, boild to an indifferent height or thickness, with a few whole cloves.

To roast Red Dear.

TAke a side, or half hanch, and either lard them with small lard, or stick them with cloves; but parboil them before you lard them, then spit and roast them.

Sauces for Red Dear.
  • 1. THe gravy and sweet herbs chopped small and boild together, or the gravy onely.
  • [Page 131]2. The juyce of oranges or lemons and gravy.
  • 3. A Gallendine sauce made with strained bread, vine­gar, claret wine, cinamon, ginger, and sugar; strain it, and being finely beaten with the spices, boil it up with a few whole cloves, and a sprig of rosemary.
  • 4. White bread boild in water pretty thick without spi­ces, and put to it some butter, vinegar, and sugar.

If you will stuff or force any Venison, stick them with rosemary, time, savory, or cloves, or else with all manner of sweet herbs, minced with beef-suet, lay the caul over the side or half hanch, and so roast it.

To roast Pork with the Sauces belonging to it.

TAke a chine of pork, draw it with sage on both sides, being first spitted, then roast it; thus you may do of any other joynt, whether Chine, Loin, Rack, Breast, or Spare-rib, or Harslet of a bacon-hog, being salted a night or two.

Sauces.
  • 1. Gravy, chopped sage, and onions boild together with some pepper.
  • 2. Mustard, vinegar, and pepper.
  • 3. Apples pared, quartered, and boild in fair water, with some sugar and butter.
  • 4. Gravy, onions, vinegar, and pepper.

To roast Pigs divers wayes with their different Sauces.
To roste a Pig with the Hair on.

TAke a Pig and draw out his intrails or guts, liver and lights, draw him very clean at vent, and wipe him, cut off his feet, truss him, and prick up the belly close, spit it, and lay it to the fre, but scotch it not, being a quarter [Page 132]rosted, the skin will rise up in blisters from the flesh, then with your knife or hands pull off the skin and hair, and being clean flayed, cut slashes down to the bones, baste it with butter and cream, being but warm, then bread it with grated white bread, corrans, sugar, and salt mixed toge­ther, and thus apply basting upon dregging till the body be covered an inch thick; then the meat being throughly rosted, draw it and serve it up whole, with sauce made of wine vinegar, whole cloves, whole cinamon, and sugar boild to a syrup.

Otherwayes.

You may make a pudding in his belly, with grated bread and some sweet herbs minced small, a little beef-suet also minced, two or three yolks of raw eggs, grated nutmeg, sugar, currans, cream, salt, pepper, &c. Dredge it or bread it with flower, bread, sugar, cinamon, slic't nutmeg, &c.

To roste a Pig the plain way.

SCald and draw it, wash it clean, and put some sage in the belly, prick it up and spit it, roste it, and baste it with butter, and salt it; being rosted fine and crisp, make sauce with chopped sage and corrans well boild in vinegar and fair water, then put to them the gravy of the pig, a little grated bread, the brains, some barberries, and sugar, give these a walm or two, and serve the pig on this sauce, with a little beaten butter.

To roste a Pig otherwayes.

TAke a pig, scald and draw it, then mince some sweet herbs, either sage or penny-royal, and roul it up in a ball with some butter, prick it up in the pigs belly and roste him; being rosted, make sauce with butter, vinegar, the brains, and some barberries.

Otherwayes.

Draw out his bowels, and flay it but onely the head, truss the head looking over his back, and fill his belly with a pudding made of grated bread, nutmeg, a little minced beef-suet, two or three yolks of raw eggs, salt, and three or four spoonfuls of good cream, fill his belly and prick it up, roste it and baste it with yolks of eggs; being rosted, wring on the juyce of a lemon, and bread it with grated bread, pepper, nutmeg, salt, and ginger, bread it quick with the bread and spices.

Then make sauce with vinegar, butter, and the yolks of hard eggs minced, boil them together with the gravy of the pig, and serve it on this sauce.

To roste Hares with their several stuffings and sauces.

TAke a hare, flay it, set it, and lard it with small lard, stick it with cloves, and make a pudding in his belly with grated bread, grated nutmeg, beaten cinamon, salt, corrans, eggs, cream and sugar; make it good and stiff, fill the hare and roste it: if you would have the pudding green, put juyce of spinage, if yellow, saffron.

Sauce.

Beaten cinamon nutmegs, ginger, pepper, boild prunes and corrans strained, muskefied bisket-bread beaten into powder, sugar, and cloves, all boild up as thick as water-grewel.

To roste a Hare with the Skin on.

DRaw a Hare (that is the bowels out of the body) wipe it clean, and make a farsing or stuffing of all manner of swet herbs, as time, winter-savory, sweet mar­joram, and parsley, mince them very small, and roul them in some butter, make a ball thereof and put it in the belly of the hare, prick it up close, and roste it with the skin and [Page 134]hair on it, baste it with butter, and being almost rosted flay off the the skin and stick a few cloves on the hare; bread it with fine grated manchet, flower, and cinamon, bread it good and thick, froth it up, and dish it on sauce made of grated bread, claret wine, wine vinegar, cinamon, ginger, sugar and barberries, boil it up to an indifferency.

Several Sauces belonging to Rabits.

  • 1. BEaten butter, and rub the dish with a clove of gar­lick.
  • 2. Sage and parsley minced, roul it in a ball with some butter, and fill the belly with this stuffing.
  • 3. Beaten butter with lemon and pepper.
  • 4. In the French fashion, onions minced small and fryed, and mingled with mustard and pepper.
  • 5. The rabit being rosted, wash the belly with the gra­vy of mutton, and adde to it a slice or two of lemon.

To roste Woodcocks in the English Fashion.

FIrst pull and draw them, then being washt and trust, roste them, baste them with butter, and save the gra­vy, then broil tostes and butter them; being rosted, bread them with bread and flower, and serve them in a clean dish on the toste and gravy.

Otherwayes in the French Fashion.

BEing new and fresh killed that day you use them, pull, truss, and lard them with a broad piece of lard or ba­con pricked over the breast: being rosted, serve them on broild toste put in verjuyce, or the juyce of orange with the gravy, and warmed on the fire.

Or being stale, draw them, and put a clove or two in the bellies, with a piece of bacon.

To roast a Hen or Pullet.

TAke a Pullet or Hen full of eggs, draw it and roast it; being roasted break it up, and mince the brauns in thin slices, save the wings whole, or not mince the brauns, and leave the rump with the legs whole; stew all in the gra­vy and a little salt.

Then have a minced lemon, and put it into the gravy, dish the minced meat in the midst of the dish, and the thighs, wings, and rumps about it. Garnish the dish with oranges and lemon quartered, and serve them up covered.

Sauce with Oysters and Bacon.

TAke Oysters being parboild and clenged from the grands, mingle them with pepper, salt, beaten nutmeg, time, and sweet marjoram, fill the pullets belly and roast it, as also two or three ribs of interlarded bacon, serve it in two pieces in the dish with the Pullet; then make sauce of the gravy, some of the oyster liquor, oysters and juyce of oranges boild together, take some of the oysters out of the Pullets belly, and lay on the breast of it, then put the sauce to it with slices of lemon.

Sauce for Hens or Pullets to prepare them to roast.

TAke a Pullet or Hen, if lean, lard it, if fat, not; or lard either fat or lean with a piece or slice of bacon over it, and a piece of interlarded bacon in the belly, seasoned with nutmeg and pepper, and stuck with cloves.

Then for the sauce take the yolks of six hard eggs min­ced small, put to them white wine or wine vinegar, butter, and the gravy of the hen, juyce of orange, pepper, falt, and if you please adde thereto mustard.

Several other Sauces for roast Hens.

  • 1. TAke beer, salt, the yolks of three hard eggs minced small, grated bread, three or four spoonfuls of gravy; and being almost boild, put in the juyce of two or three oranges, slices of a lemon and orange, with lemon-peel shred small.
  • 2. Beaten butter with juyce of lemon or orange, white or claret wine.
  • 3. Gravy and claret wine boild with a piece of an onion, nutmeg, and salt, serve it with the slices of oranges or le­mons, or the juyce in the sauce.
  • 4. Or with oyster liquor, an anchove or two, nutmeg and gravy, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.
  • 5. Take the yolks of hard eggs and lemon-peel mince them very small, and stew them in white wine, salt, and the gravy of the fowl.

Several Sauces for roast Chickens.

  • 1. GRavy, and the juyce or slices of orange.
  • 2. Butter, verjuyce, and gravy of the Chick­en, or mutton gravy.
  • 3. Butter and vinegar boild together, put to it a little sugar, then make thin sops of bread, lay the roste chicken on them, and serve them up hot.
  • 4. Take sorrel, wash and stamp it, then have thin slices of manchet, put them in a dish with some vinegar, strain­ed sorrel, sugar, some gravy, beaten cinnamon, beaten but­ter, and some slices of orange or lemon, and strew thereon some cinamon and sugar,
  • 5. Take slic't oranges, and put to them a little white wine, rose water, beaten mace, ginger, some sugar, and butter; set them on a chafing dish of coals and stew them; [Page 137]then have some slices of manchet round the dish finely carved, and lay the chickens being roasted on the sauce.
  • 6. Slic't onions, claret wine, gravy, and salt boild up.

Sauces for roast Pigeons or Doves.

  • 1. GRavy and juyce of orange.
  • 2. Boild parsley minced, and put amongst some butter and vinegar beaten up thick.
  • 3. Gravy, claret wine and an onion stewed together with a little salt.
  • 4. Vine leaves roasted with the pigeons minced and put in claret wine and salt, boild together, some butter and gravy.
  • 5. Sweet butter and juyce of orange beat together, and made thick.
  • 6. Minced onions boild in claret wine almost dry, then put to it nutmeg, sugar, gravy of the fowl, and a little pepper.
  • 7. Or gravy of the Pigeons onely.

Sauces for all manner of roast Land Fowl, as Turky, Bustard, Peacock, Pheasant, Partridge, &c.

  • 1. Slic't onions being boild, stew them in some water, salt, pepper, some grated bread, and the gravy of the fowl.
  • 2. Take slices of white bread and boil them in fair water with two wholes onions, some gravy, half a grated nut­meg, and a little salt; strain them together through a strainer, and boil it up as thick as water grewel; then adde to it the yolks of two eggs dissolved with the juyce of two oranges, &c.
  • 3. Take thin slices of manchet, a little of the fowl, some sweet butter, grated nutmeg, pepper, and salt; stew all together, and being stewed, put in a lemon minced with the peel.
  • [Page 138]4. Onions slic't and boild in fair water, and a little salt, a few bread crumbs, beaten pepper, nutmeg, three spoon­fuls of white wine, and some lemon-peel finely minced, and boild all together; being almost boild, put in the juyce of an orange, beaten butter, and the gravy of the fowl.
  • 5. Stamp small nuts to a paste, with bread, nutmeg, pepper, saffron, cloves, juyce of orange, and strong broth, strain and boil them together pretty thick.
  • 6. Quince, prunes, currans, and raisins boild, muskefied bisket stamped and strained with white wine, rose vinegar, nutmeg, cinamon, cloves, juyce of oranges and sugar; boil it not too thick.
  • 7. Boil carrots and quinces, strain them with rose vine­gar and verjuyce, sugar, cinamon, pepper, and nutmeg, boild with a few whole cloves, and a little musk.
  • 8. Take a manchet, pare off the crust and slice it, then boil it in fair water, and being boild somewhat thick, put in some white wine, wine vinegar, rose, or elder vinegar, some sugar and butter, &c.
  • 9. Almond paste and crumbs of manchet, stamp them together with some sugar, ginger, and salt, strain them with grape verjuyce and juyce of oranges; boil it pretty thick.

Sauces for a Stubble or fat Goose.

  • 1. The goose being scalded, drawn, and trust, put a handful of salt in the belly of it, roast it, and make sauce with sowre apples slic't, and boild in beer all to mash; then put to it sugar and beaten butter. Sometimes for variety adde barberries and the gravy of the fowl.
  • 2. Roast sowre apples or pippins, strain them, and put to them vinegar, sugar, gravy, barberries, grated bread, beaten cinamon, mustard, and boild onions strained and put to it.

Sauces for a young Stubble Goose.

TAke the liver and gizzard, mince it very small with some beets, spinage, sweet herbs, sage, salt, and some minced lard; fill the belly of the goose, and sowe up the rump or vent, as also the neck; roast it, and being roasted take out the farsing and put it in a dish, then adde to it the gravy of the goose, verjuyce, and pepper, give it a walm on the fire, and serve it with this sauce in a clean dish.

The French Sauce for a Goose is butter, mustard, sugar, vinegar, and barberries.

Sauce for a Duck.

ONions slic't, and carrots cut square like dice, boild in white wine, strong broth, some gravy, minced par­sley, savory chopped, mace, and butter; being well stewed together, it will serve for divers wilde fowls, but most pro­per for water fowl.

Sauce for Duck and Mallard in the French Fashion.

  • 1. VInegar and sugar boild to a Syrrup, with two or three cloves, and cinamon, or cloves onely.
  • 2. Oyster liquor, gravy of the fowl, whole onions boild in it, nutmeg, and an anchove. If lean, force and lard them.

Sauces for any kinde of roast Sea Fowl, as Swan, Whopper, Crane, Shoveler, Hern, Bitter, or Geese.

MAke a Gallandine with some grated bread, beaten cinamon and ginger, a quartern of sugar, a quart of claret wine, a pint of wine vinegar, strain the foresaid ma­terials, and boil them in a skillet with a few whole cloves; [Page 140]in the boiling stir it with a sprig of rosemary, adde a little red sanders, and boil it as thick as water grewel.

Green Sauce for Pork, Goslings, Chickens, Lamb, or Kid.

STamp sorrel with white bread and pared pippins in a stone or wooden mortar, put sugar to it, and wine vi­vinegar, then strain it thorow a fine thin cloth, pretty thick, dish it in saucers, and scrape sugar on it.

Otherwayes.

Mince sorrel and sage, and stamp them with bread, the yolks of hard eggs, pepper, salt, and vinegar, but no sugar at all.

Or thus.

Juyce of green wheat, lemon, bread, and sugar.

To make divers sorts of Vinegar.

TAke good white wine, and fill a firkin half full, or a lesser vessel, leave it unstopped, and set it in some hot place in the sun, or on the leads of a house or gutter.

If you would desire to make vinegar in haste, put some salt, pepper, sowre leven mingled together, and a hot steel, stop it up, and let the sun come hot to it.

If more speedy, put good wine into an earthen pot or pitcher, stop the mouth with a piece of paste, and put it in a brass pan or pot, boil it half an hour, and it will grow sowre.

Or not boil it, and put into it a beet root, medlers, cer­vices, mulberries, unripe flowers, a slice of barley bread hot out of the oven, or the blossoms of cervices in their season, dry them in the sun in a glass vessel in the manner of rose­vinegar, fill up the glass with clear wine vinegar, white or claret wine, and set it in the sun, or in a chimney by the fire.

To make Vinegar of corrupt Wine.

BOil it, and scum it very clean, boil away one third part, then put it in a vessel, put to it some charnel, stop the vessel close, and in a short time it will prove good vinegar.

To make Vinegar otherwayes.

TAke six gallons of strong ale of the first running, set it abroad to cool, and being cold, put barm to it, and head it very thorowly; then tun it up in a firkin, and lay it in the sun, then take four or five handfuls of beans, and parch them on a fire-shovel or pan, being cut like chesnuts to roast, put them into the vinegar as hot as you can, and stop the bunghole with clay; but first put in a handful of rye leven, then strain a good handful of salt, and put in also; let it stand in the sun from May to August, and then take it away.

Rose Vinegar.

KEep Roses dried, or dried Elder-flowers, put them in­to several double glasses or stone-bottles, write up­on them, and set them in the sun, by the fire, or in a warm oven; when the vinegar is out, put in more flowers, put out the old, and fill them up with vinegar again.

Pepper Vinegar.

PUt whole pepper in a fine cloth, binde it up and put it in the vessel or bottle of vinegar the space of eight dayes.

Vinegar for Digestion and Health

TAke eight drams of sea onions, a quart of vinegar, and as much pepper as onions, mints, and juniper­berries.

To make strong Wine Vinegar into Balls.

TAke bramble bryers when they are half ripe, dry them and make them into powder, with a little strong vinegar, make little balls, and dry them in the sun, and when you will use them, take wine and heat it, put in some of the ball or a whole one, and it will be turned very speedily into strong vinegar.

To make Verjuyce.

TAke crabs as soon as the kernels turn black, and lay them in a heap to sweat, pick them from stalks and rottenness; then in a long trough with stamping bee­tels stamp them to mash, and make a bag of course hair cloth as square as the Press, fill it with stamped crabs, and being well pressed, put it up in a clean barrel or hogs­head.

To make Mustard divers wayes.

HAve good seed, pick it, and wash it in cold water, drain it, and rub it dry in a cloath very clean, then beat it in a mortar with strong wine vinegar; and being fine beaten, strain it and keep it close covered. Or grinde it in a mustard quern, or a boul with a cannon bullet.

Otherwayes.

Make it with grape verjuyce, common verjuyce, stale beer, ale, butter-milk, white wine, claret, or juyce of cher­ries.

Mustard of Dijon, or French Mustard.

THe seed being cleansed, stamp it in a mortar with vine­gar and honey, then take eight ounces of seed, two ounces of cinamon, two of honey, and vinegar as much as will serve good mustard not too thick, and keep it close covered in little oyster barrels.

To make dry Mustard very pleasant in little Loaves or Cakes to carry in ones Pocket, or to keep dry for use at any time.

TAke two ounces of seamy, half an ounce of cinamon, and beat them in a mortar very fine with a little vi­negar and honey, make a perfect paste of it, and make it into little cakes or loaves, dry them in the sun or in an oven, and when you would use them, dissolve half a loaf or cake with some vinegar, wine, or verjuyce.

Section 5.

The best way of making all manner of Sallets.

To make a grand Sallet of divers Compounds.

TAke a cold roast capon and cut it into thin slices square and small, (or any other rost meat, as chick­en, mutton, veal, or neats tongue) mingle with it a little minced taragon and an onion; then mince lettice as small as the capon, mingle all together, and lay it in the middle of a clean scowred dish. Then lay capers by themselves, olives by themselves, samphire by it self, broom-buds, pickled mushrooms, pickled oysters, lemon, orange, raisins, almonds, blew figs, Virginia Potato, ca­perons, crucifex pease, and the like, more or less, as occa­sion serves, lay them by themselves in the dish round the meat in partitions. Then garnish the dish sides with quar­ters of oranges and lemons, or in slices, oyl and vinegar beaten together, and poured on it over all.

On fish dayes, a roast, broild, or boild pike, boned, and be­ing cold, slice it as abovesaid.

Another way for a grand Sallet

TAke the buds of all good sallets herbs, capers, dates, raisins, almonds, currans, figs, orangado. Then first of all lay it in a large dish, the herbs being finely picked [Page 145]and washed, swing them in a clean napkin; then lay the other materials round the dish, and amongst the herbs some of all the foresaid fruits, some fine sugar, and on the top slic't lemon, and eggs scarce hard cut in halves, and laid round the side of the dish, and scrape sugar over all; or you may lay every fruit in partitions several.

Otherwayes.

Dish first round the center slic't figs, then currans, ca­pers, almonds, and raisins together; next heyond that, olives, beets, cabbidge-lettice, cucumbers, or slic't lemon carved; then oyl and vinegar beaten together, the best oyl you can get, and sugar or none, as you please; garnish the brims of the dish with orangado, slic't lemon jagged, olives stuck with slic't almonds, sugar or none.

Another grand Sallet.

TAke all manner of knots of buds of sallet herbs, buds of potherbs, or any green herbs, as sage, mint, balm, burnet, violet leaves, red coleworts streaked of divers fine colours, lettice, any flowers, blanched almonds, blew figs, raisins of the sun, currans, capers, olives: then dish the sallet in a heap or pile, being mixt with some of the fruits, and all finely washed and swung in a napkin, then about the center lay first slic't figs, next capers and currans, then almonds and raisins, next olives, and lastly either jagged beets, jagged lemons, jagged cucumber, or cabbidge let­tice in quarters, good oyl and wine vinegar, sugar or none.

Otherwayes.

The youngest and smallest leaves of spinage, the smallest also of sorrel, well washed currans, and red beets round the center being finely carved, oyl and vinegar, and the dish garnished with lemon and beets.

Other grand Sallet.

TAke green purslan and pick it leaf by leaf, wash it and swing it in a napkin, then being dished in a fair clean dish, and finely piled up in a heap in the midst of it, lay round about the center of the sallet pickled capers, cur­rans, and raisins of the sun, washed, picked, mingled, and laid round it; about them some carved cucumbers, in slices or halves, and laid round also. Then garnish the dish brims with burrage or clove-jelly-flowers. Or other­wayes with jagged cucumber-peels, olives, capers, and rai­sins of the sun, then the best sallet oyl and wine vinegar.

Other grand Sallet.

ALL sorts of good herbs, the little leaves of red sage, the smallest leaves of sorrel, and the leaves of parsley picked very small, the youngest and smallest leaves of spinage, some leaves of burnet, the smallest leaves of lettice, white endive and charvel all finely picked, washed, and swung in a strayner or clean napkin, and well drained from the water; then dish it in a clean scowred dish, and about the center, capers, currans, olives, lemons carved and slic't, boild beet roots carved and slic't, and dished round also, with good oyl and vinegar.

A grand Sallet otherwayes.

TAke corn sallet, rampons, ellicksander-buds, pickled mushrooms, and make a sallet of them; then lay the corn sallet through the middle of the dish from side to side, and on the other side rampons, then ellicksander buds, and in the other four quarters mushrooms, salt over all, and put good oyl and vinegar to it.

Other grand Sallet.

TAke the tenderest, smallest, and youngest ellicksander­buds, and small Sallet or young lettice mingled toge­ther being washed and picked, with some capers. Pile it or lay it flat in the dish, first lay about the center olives, ca­pers, currans, and about those carved oranges and lemons, or in a cross partition wayes, and salt, run oyl and vinegar over all.

Otherwayes.

Boild parsnips in quarters laid round in the dish, and in the midst some small sallet, or water-cresses finely washed and picked, on the water-cresses some little small lettice finely picked and washed also, then some ellicksander-buds in halves, and some in quarters, and between the quarters of the parsnips some small lettice, some water-cresses, and el­licksander-buds, oyl and vinegar, and round the dish some slices of parnsnips.

Another grand Sallet.

TAke small sallet of all good sallet herbs, then mince some white cabbidge leaves, or striked coleworts, min­gle them amongst the small sallet, or some lilly-flowers slit with a pin; then first lay some minced cabbidge in a clean scowred dish, and the minced fallet round about it; then some well washed and picked capers, currans, olives, or none; then about the rest, a round of boild red beets, oran­ges or lemons carved. For the garnish of the brim of the dish, boild collyflowers, carved lemons, beets, and capers.

BEing finely picked short, well soaked in clean water, and swung dry, dish it round in a fine clean dish, with capers and currans about it, carved lemon and orange round that, and eggs upon the center not boild too hard, and parted in halves, then oyl and vinegar; over all scra­ping sugar, and trim the brim of the dish.

A grand Sallet of Ellicksander-buds.

TAke large ellicksander-buds, and boil them in fair water after they be cleansed and washed, but first let the water boil, then put them in, and being boild, drain them on a dish bottom, or in a cullender; then have boild capers and cur­rans and lay them in the midst of a clean scowred dish, the buds parted in two with a sharp knife, and laid round about upright, or one half on one side, and the other against it on the other side, so also carved lemon, scrape on sugar, and serve it with good oyl and wine vinegar.

Other grand Sallet of Water-cresses.

BEing finely picked, washed, and laid in the middle of a clean dish, with slic't oranges and lemons finely carved one against the other, in partitions, or round the dish, with some ellick sander-buds boild or raw, currans, capers, oyl, and vinegar, sugar, or none.

A grand Sallet of picked Capers.

PIcked capers and currans bashed and boild together, dished in the middle of a clean dish, with red beets boild and jagg'd, and dished round the capers and currans, as also jagg'd lemon, and serve it with oyl and vinegar.

To pickle Samphire, Broom-buds, Kitkeys, Crucifex Pease, Purslane, or the like.

TAke samphire, and pick the branches from the dead leaves or straws, then lay it in a pot or barrel, and make a strong brine of white or bay salt, in the boiling scum it clean; being boild and cold put it to the samphire, cover it and keep it for all the year, and when you have any occasion to use it, take and boil it in fair water, but first let the water boil before you put it in, being boild and be­come green, let it cool, then take it out of the water, and put it in a little bain or double viol with a broad mouth, put strong wine vinegar to it, close it up close and keep it.

Otherwayes.

Put samphire in a brass pot that will contain it, and put to it as much wine vinegar as water, but no salt; set it over a charcoal fire, cover it close, and boil it till it become green, then put it up in a barrel with wine vinegar, close on the head, and keep it for use.

To pickle Cucumbers.

PIckle them with salt, vinegar, whole pepper, dill-seed, some of the stalks cut, charnel, fair water, and some sicamore leaves, and barrel them up close in a barrel.

Pickled Quinces the best wayes.

  • 1. TAke Quinces not cored nor pared, boil them in fair water not too tender, and put them up in a barrel, fill it up with their liquor, and close on the head.
  • 2. Pare them and boil them with white wine, whole [Page 150]cloves, cinamon, and slic't ginger, barrel them up and keep them.
  • 3. In the juyce of sweet apples, not cored, but wiped, and put up raw.
  • 4. In white wine barrelled up raw.
  • 5. Being pared and cored, boil them up in sweet wort and sugar, keep them in a glazed pipkin close covered.
  • 6. Core them and save the cores, cut some of the crab quinces, and boil them after the quinces be parboild and taken up; then boil the cores, and some of the crab quinces in quarters, the liquor being boild, strain it thorow a strainer, put it in the barrel with the quinces, and close up the barrel.

To pickle Lemons.

BOil them in water and salt, and put them up with white wine.

To pickle any kinde of Flowers:

PUt them into a gally-pot or double glass, with as much sugar as they weigh; fill them up with wine vinegar; to a pint of vinegar a pound of sugar, and a pound of flowers; so keep them for sallets or boild meats in a double glass co­vered over with a blade and leather.

To pickle Grapes, Gooseberries, Barberries, red and white Currans.

PIck them and put them in the juyce of crab-cherries, grape verjuyce, or other verjuyce, and then barrel them up.

To Candy Flowers for Sallets, as Violets, Cowslips, Clovegel­ly-flowers, Roses, Primroses, Burrage, Bugloss, &c.

TAke weight for weight of sugar-candy, or double refi­ned sugar, being beaten fine, searsed, and put in a silver dish with rosewater, set them over a charcoal fire, and stir them with a silver spoon till they be candied, or boil them in a candy sirrup height in a dish or skillet, keep them in a dry place for your use, and when you use them for sallets put a little wine vinegar to them and dish them.

For the compounding and candying the foresaid pickled and candied Sallets.

THough they may be served simply of themselves, and are both good and dainty, yet for better curiosity and the finer ordering of a table, you may thus use them.

First, if you would set forth a red flower that you know or have seen, you shall take the pot of preserved gilly­flowers, and suiting the colours answerable to the flower, you shall proportion it forth, and lay the shape of a flower with a purslane stalk, make the stalk of the flower, and the dimensions of the leaves and branches with thin slices of cucumbers, make the leaves in true proportion jagged or otherwayes, and thus you may set forth some blown, some in the bud, and some half blown, which will be very pretty and curious; if yellow, set it forth with cowslips or prim­roses; if blew, take violets or burrage: and thus of any flowers.

Section 6.

To make all manner of Carbanadoes, either of Flesh or Fowl; as also all manner of fried Meats of Flesh, Collops, and Eggs, with the most ex­quisitest way of making Pancakes, Fritters, and Tansies.

To Carbonado a Chine of Mutton.

TAke a chine of mutton, salt it and broil it on the embers, or toast it against the fire; being finely broild, baste it, and bread it with fine grated manchet, and serve it with gravy onely.

To Carbonado a Shoulder of Mutton.

TAke a shoulder of mutton, half boil it, scotch it and salt it; save the gravy, and broil it on a soft fire, be­ing finely coloured and fitted, make sauce with butter, vine­gar, pepper, and mustard.

To Carbonado a Rack of Mutton.

CUt it into steaks, salt and broil them on the embers, and being finely soaked, dish them and make sauce of [Page 153]good mutton gravy, beat up thick with a little juyce of orange, and a piece of butter.

To Carbonado a Leg of Mutton.

CUt it round cross the bone about half an inch thick, then hack it with the back of a knife, salt it, and broil it on the embers on a soft fire the space of an hour; being finely broild, serve it with gravy sauce, and juyce of orange.

Thus you may broil any hanch of Venison, and serve it with gravy onely.

To broil a Chine of Veal.

CUt it in three or four pieces, lard them (or not) with small lard, season them with salt, and broil them on a soft fire with some branches of sage and rosemary between the gridiron and the chine; being broild, serve it with gra­vy, beaten butter, and juyce of lemon or orange.

To broil a Leg of Veal.

CUt it into rowels, or round the leg in slices as thick as ones finger, lard them or not, then broil them softly on embers, and make sauce with beaten butter, gravy, and juyce of orange.

To Carbonado a Rack of Pork.

TAke a rack of pork, take off the skin, and cut it into steaks, then salt it, and strow on some fennel-seeds whole, and broil it on a soft fire, being finely broiled, serve it on wine vinegar and pepper.

To broil a Flank of Pork.

FLay it and cut it into thin slices, salt it, and broil it on the embers in a dripping-pan of white paper, and serve it on the paper with vinegar and pepper.

To broil Chines of Pork.

BRoil them as you do the rack, but bread them, and serve them with vinegar and pepper, or mustard and vinegar.

Or sometimes apples in slices, boild in beer and beaten butter unto a mash.

Or green sauce, cinamon, and sugar.

Otherwayes, sage and onions minced, with vinegar and pepper boild in strong broth till they be tender.

Or minced onions boild in vinegar and pepper.

To broil a fat Venison.

TAke a half hanch, and cut the fattest part into thick slices half an inch thick, salt and broil them on the warm embers, and being finely soaked, bread them, and serve them with gravy onely.

Thus you may broil a side of Venison, or boil a side fresh in water and salt, then broil it and dredge it, and serve it with vinegar and pepper.

Broil the chine raw as you do the half hanch, bread it, and serve it with gravy.

To fry Lambs or Kids Stones.

TAke the stones, parboil them, then mince them small, and fry them in sweet butter; strain them with some [Page 155]cream, some beaten cinamon, pepper, and grated cheese being put to it when it is strained, then fry them, and being fried, serve them with sugar and rose-water.

Thus may you dress calves or lambs brains.

To Carbonado Land or Water Fowl.

BEing roasted, cut them up and sprinkle them with salt, then scotch and broil them, and make sauce with vi­negar and butter, or juyce of orange.

To dress a Dish of Collops and Eggs the best way for service.

TAke fine young and well coloured bacon of the ribs, the quantity of two pound, cut it into thin slices, and lay them in a clean dish, toast them before the fire fine and crisp; then poach the eggs in a fair scowred skillet white and fine, dish them on a dish and plate, and lay on the col­lops, some upon them, and some round the dish.

To broil Bacon on paper.

MAke the fashion of two dripping pans of two sheets of white paper, then take two pound of fine inter­larded bacon, pare off the top, and cut the bacon into slices as thin as a card, lay them on the papers, then put them on a gridiron, and broil them on the embers.

To broil Brawn.

CUt a coller into six or seven slices round the coller, and lay it on a plate in the oven, being broild, serve it with juyce of orange, pepper, gravy, and beaten but­ter.

To fry Eggs.

TAke fifteen eggs and beat them in a dish, then have in­terlarded bacon cut into square bits like dice, and fry them with chopped onions, and put to them cream, nut­meg, cloves, cinamon, pepper, and sweet herbs chopped small, (or no herbs nor spice) being fried, serve them on a clean dish, with sugar and juyce of orange.

To fry an Egg as round as a ball.

TAke a broad frying posnet, or a deep frying pan, and three pints of clarified butter or sweet suet, heat it as hot as you do for fritters; then take a stick and stir it till it run-round like to a whirle pit; then break an egg into the middle of the whirle, and turn it round with your stick till it be as hard as a soft poached egg, and the whirling round of the butter or suet will make it as round as a ball; then take it up with a slice, and put it in a warm pipkin or dish, set it a leaning against the fire, so you may do as many as you please, they will keep half an hour yet be soft; you may serve them with fried or toasted collops.

To make the best Fritters.

TAke good mutton broth being cold, and no fat, mix it with flower and eggs, some salt, beaten nutmeg and ginger, beat them well together, then have apples or pip­pins, pare and core them, and cut them into dice-work, or square bits, and when you will fry them, put them in the butter, and fry them in clear clarified suet, or clarified but­ter, fry them white and fine, and sugar them.

Otherwayes.

Take a pint of sack, a pint of ale, some ale yeast or [Page 157]barm, nine eggs yolks and whites beaten very well: the eggs first, then all together, then put in some ginger, salt, and fine flower, let it stand an hour or two, then put in apples, and fry them in beef-suet clarified, or clarified butter.

Other Fritters.

Take a quart of flower, three pints of cold mutton broth, a nutmeg, a quartern of cinamon, a race of ginger, five eggs, and salt, and strain the foresaid materials; put to them twenty slic't pippins, and fry them in six pound of suet.

Sometimes make the batter of cream, eggs, cloves, mace, nutmeg, saffron, barm, ale, and salt.

Other times flower, grated bread, mace, ginger, pep­per, salt, barm, saffron, milk, sack, or white wine.

Sometimes you may use marrow steeped in musk and rose-water, and pleasant pears or quinces.

Or use raisins, currans, and apples cut like square dice, and as small, in quarters or in halves.

Fritters in the Italian Fashion.

TAke a pound of the best holland cheese or parmisan grated, a pint of fine flower, and as much fine bisket bread muskefied beaten to powder, the yolks of four or five eggs, some saffron and rose-water, sugar, cloves, mace, and cream, make it into a stiff paste, then make it into balls, and fry them in clarified butter. Or stamp this paste in a mortar, and make the balls as big as a nutmeg or mus­ket bullet.

Otherwayes in the Italian Fashion.

Take a pound of rice and boil it in a pint of cream, be­ing boild something thick, lay it abroad in a clean dish to cool, then stamp it in a stone mortar, with a pound of good fat cheese grated, some musk, and yolks of four or five [Page 158]hard eggs, sugar, and grated manchet or bisket bread; then make it into balls, the paste being stiff, and you may colour them with marigold flowers stamped, violets, blew bottels, carnations or pinks, and make them balls of two or three colours. If the paste be too tender, work more bread to them and flower, fry them, and serve them with scraping sugar and juyce of orange. Garnish these balls with stock-fritters.

Fritters of Spinage.

TAke spinage, pick and wash it, then set on a skillet of fair water, and when it boileth put in the spinage, be­ing tender boild put it in a cullender to drain away the li­quor; then mince it small on a fair board, put it in a dish and season it with cinamon, ginger, grated manchet, six eggs with the whites and yolks, a little cream or none, make the stuff pretty thick, and put in some boild currans. Fry it by spoonfuls, and serve it on a dish and plate with sugar.

Thus also you may make fritters of beets, clary, bur­rage, bugloss, or lettice.

To make Stock Fritters, or Fritters of Arms.

STrain half a pint of fine flower, with as much water, and make the batter no thicker then thin cream; then heat the brass moulds in clarified butter; being hot wipe them, dip the moulds half way in the batter and fry them, to garnish any boild fish meats, or stewed oysters. View their form.

[form of fish meats or stewed oysters]

Other fried Dishes of divers forms, or Stock Fritters in the Italian Fashion.

TAke a quart of fine flower, and strain it with some almond milk, leven, white wine, sugar, and saffron; fry it on the foresaid moulds, or dip clary in it, sage leaves, or branches of rosemary, then fry them in clarified butter.

Little Pasties, Balls, or Toasts fried.

TAke a boild or raw pike, mince it and stamp it with some good fat old cheese grated, season them with cina­mon, sugar, boild currans, and yolks of hard eggs, make this stuff into balls, toasts, or pasties, and fry them.

Otherwayes.

Make your paste into little pasties, stars, half moons, scollops, balls, or suns.

Or take grated bread, cake, or bisket bread, and fat cheese grated, almond paste, eggs, cinamon, saffron, and fry them as abovesaid.

Otherwayes Pasties to fry.

Take twenty apples or pippins, pared, cored, and cut into bits like square dice, stew them in butter, and put to them three ounces of bisket bread, stamp all together in a stone mortar, with six ounces of fat cheese grated, six yolks of eggs, cinamon, six ounces of sugar, make it in little pa­sties, or half moons, and fry them,

Otherwayes.

Take a quart of fine flour, wet it with almond milk, sack, white wine, rosewater, saffron, and sugar, make thereof a paste into balls, cakes, or any cut or carved branches, and fry them in clarified butter, and serve them with fine scraping sugar.

To fry Paste out of a Seringe or Butter-squirt.

TAke a quart of fine flour and a little leven, dissolve it in warm water, and put it to the flour, with some white wine, salt, saffron, a quarter of butter, and two ounces of sugar; boil the foresaid things in a skillet as thick as a hasty pudding, and in the boiling stir it continu­ally, being cold beat it in mortar, fry it in clarified butter, and run it into the butter through a butter-squirt.

To make Pancakes.

TAke three pints of cream, a quart of flour, eight eggs, three nutmegs, a spoonful of salt, and two pound of clarified butter; the nutmegs being beaten, strain them with the cream, flour, and salt, fry them into pancakes, and serve them with fine sugar.

Otherwayes.

Take three pints of spring water, a quart of flour, mace and nutmeg beaten, six cloves, a spoonful of salt, and six eggs, strain them, and fry them into pancakes.

Or thus.

Make stiff paste of fine flour, rose-water, cream, saffron, yolks of eggs, salt, and nutmeg, and fry them in clarified butter.

Otherwayes.

Take three pints of cream, a quart of flour, five eggs, salt, three spoonfuls of ale, a race of ginger, cinamon as much, strain these materials, then fry them and serve them with fine sugar.

To make a Tansie the best way.

TAke twenty eggs, and take away five whites, strain them with a quart of good thick: sweet cream, and [Page 161]put to it a grated nutmeg, a race of ginger grated, as much cinamon beaten fine, and a penny white loaf grated also, mix them all together with a little salt, then stamp some green wheat with some tansie herbs, strain it into the cream and eggs, and stir all together; then take a clean frying pan, and a quarter of a pound of butter, melt it, and put in the tansie, and stir it continually over the fire with a slice, ladle, or saucer, chop it, and break it as it thick­ens, and being well incorporated put it out of the pan into a dish, and chop it very fine; then make the frying pan ve­ry clean, and put in some more butter, melt it, and fry it whole or in spoonfuls; being finely fried on both sides, dish it up, and sprinkle it with rose vinegar, grape verjuyce; elder vinegar, cowslip vinegar, or the juyce of three or four oranges, and strow on good store of fine sugar.

Otherwayes.

Take a little tansie, featherfew, parsley, and violets, stamp and strain them with eight or ten eggs and salt, fry them in sweet butter, and serve them on a plate and dish with some sugar.

A Tansie for Lent.

TAke tansie and all manner of herbs as before, and bea­ten almond, stamp them with the spawn of a Pike or Carp, and strain them with the crumb of a fine manchet; sugar, and rose-water, and fry it in sweet butter.

Toasts of divers sorts. First, in Butter or Oyl.

TAke a caste of fine roles or round manchets, chip them. and cut them into toasts, fry them in clarified butter, frying oyl, or sallet oyl, but before you fry them, dip them [Page 162]in fair water, and being fried, serve them in a clean dish pi­led one upon another, and sugar between.

Otherwayes.

Toast them before the fire, and run them over with but­ter, sugar, or oyl.

Cinamon Toasts.

CUt fine thin toasts, then toast them on a gridiron, and lay them in ranks in a dish, put to them fine beaten ci­namon mixed with sugar and some claret, warm them over the fire, and serve them hot.

French Toasts.

CUt French Bread, and toast it in pretty thick toasts on a clean gridiron, and serve them steeped in claret, sack, or any wine, with sugar and juyce of orange.

Section 7.

The most Excellent Wayes of making all Sorts of Puddings.

A boild Pudding.

BEat the yolks of three eggs with rose-water, and half a pint of cream, warm it with a piece of but­ter as big as a walnut, and when it is melted mix the eggs and that together, and season it with nut­meg, sugar, and salt; then put in as much bread as will make it as thick as batter, and lay on as much flour as will lie on a shilling, then take a double cloth, wet it and flour it, tie it fast, and put it in the pot; when it is boild; serve it up in a dish with butter, verjuyce, and sugar.

Otherwayes.

Take flour, sugar, nutmeg, salt, and water, mix them together with a spoonful of gum-dragon, being steeped all night in rose-water, strain it, then put in suet, and boil it in a cloath.

To boil a Pudding otherwayes.

TAke a pint of cream or milk, and boil it with a stick of cinamon, being boild, let it cool, then put in six eggs, take out three whites, and beat the eggs before you put them in the milk, then slice a penny roul very thin, [Page 164]and being slic't beat all together, then put in some sugar and flour the cloath; being boild for sauce, put butter, sack, and sugar, beat them up together, and scrape sugar on it.

Other Pudding.

Sift grated bread through a cullender, and mix it with flour, minced dates, currans, nutmeg, cinamon, minced suet, new milk warm, sugar, and eggs, take away some of the whites, and work all together, then take half the pud­ding for one side, and half for the other side, and make it round like a loaf, then take butter and put it into the midst, and the other side aloft on the top, when the liquor boils, tye it in a fair cloth and boil it, being boild cut it in two, and so serve it in.

To make a Cream Pudding to be boild.

TAke a quart of cream and boil it with mace, nutmeg, and ginger quartered, put to it eight eggs, and but four whites beaten, a pound of almonds blanched, beaten and strained in with the cream, a little rose-water, sugar, and a spoonful of fine flour; then take a thick napkin, wet it, and rub it with flour, and tie the pudding up in it; being boild, make sauce for it with sack, sugar and butter beat up thick together with the yolk of an egg, then blanch some almonds, slice them, and stick the pudding with them very thick, and scrape sugar on it.

To make a green boild Pudding of sweet Herbs.

TAke and steep a penny white loaf in a quart of cream, and onely eight yolks of eggs, some currans, sugar, cloves, beaten mace, dates, juyce of spinage, saffron, cina­mon, nutmeg, sweet marjoram, time, savory, penniroyal minced very small, and some salt, boil it with beef-suet, [Page 165]marrow, (or none) These puddings are excellent for stuf­fings of rroast or boild Poultrey, Kid, Lamb, or Turkey, Veal, or Breasts of Mutton.

To make a Pudding in haste.

TAke a pint of good milk or cream, put thereto a handful of raisins of the sun, with as many currans, and a piece of butter, then grate a manchet and a nut­meg, and put thereto a handful of flour; when the milk boils, put in the bread, let it boil a quarter of an hour, then dish it up on beaten butter.

To make a Quaking Pudding.

SLice the crumbs of a penny manchet, and infuse it three or four hours in a pint of scalding hot cream, covering it close, then break the bread with a spoon very small, and put to it eight eggs, and but onely four whites, beat them together very well, and season it with sugar, rose-water, and grated nutmeg: If you think it too stiff, put in some cold cream, and beat them well together; then wet the bag or napkin and flour it, put in the pudding, tie it hard, and boil it half an hour, then dish it, and put to it butter, rose-water, and sugar, and serve it up to the table.

Otherwayes baked.

SCald the bread with a pint of cream as abovesaid, then put to it a pound of almonds blanched and beaten small with rose-water in a stone mortar, or wallnuts, and season it with sugar, nutmeg, salt, the yolks of six eggs, a quarter of a pound of dates slic't and cut small, a handful of currans boiled, and some marrow minced, beat them all together and bake it.

To make a Quaking Pudding either boild or baked.

TAke a pint of good thick cream, boil it with some large mace, whole cinamon, and slic't nutmeg, then take six eggs, and but three whites, beat them well, and grate some stale manchet, the quantity of a half penny loaf, put it to the eggs with a spoonful of flour, then season the cream according to your own taste with sugar and salt; beat all well together, then wet a cloth or butter it, and put in the pudding when the water boils; an hour will bake or boil it.

Otherwayes.

Take a penny white loaf, pare off the crust, and slice the crumb, steep it in a quart of good thick cream warmed, some beaten nutmeg, six eggs, whereof but two whites, and some salt. Sometimes you may use boild currans, or boild raisins.

If to bake, make it a little stiffer, sometimes adde saffron; on Flesh Dayes use beef-suet, or marrow; (or neither) for a boild pudding butter the napkin being first wetted in water, and binde it up like a ball, an hour will boil it.

To make a Shaking Pudding.

TAke a pint of cream, and boil it with large mace, slic't nutmeg and ginger, put in a few almonds blanched and beaten with rose-water, strain them all together, then put to it slic't ginger, grated bread, salt, and sugar, flour the napkin or cloth, and put in the pudding, tie it hard, and put it in boiling water, (as you must do all puddings) then serve it up with verjuyce, butter, and sugar.

To make a hasty Pudding in a Bag.

BOil a pint of thick cream with a spoonful of flour, season it with nutmeg, sugar, and salt, wet the cloath [Page 167]and flour it, then pour in the cream being hot into the cloth, and when it is boild, butter it as a hasty Pudding. If it be well made, it will be as good as a Custard.

To make a hasty Pudding otherwayes.

GRate a two penny manchet, and mingle it with a quarter of a pint of flour, nutmeg, and salt, a quar­ter of sugar, and half a pound of butter; then set it a boiling on the fire in a clean scowred skillet a quart or three pints of good thick cream, and when it boils put in the foresaid materials, stir them continually, and being half boild, put in six yolks of eggs, stir them together, and when it is boild, serve it in a clean scowred dish, and stick it with some preserved orange-peel thin sliced, run it over with beaten butter and scraping sugar.

To make an Almond Pudding.

BLanch and beat a pound of almonds, strain them with a quart of cream, a grated penny manchet searsed, four eggs, some sugar, nutmeg grated, some dates, and salt; boil it, and serve it in a dish with beaten butter, stick it with some muskedines or wafers, and scraping sugar.

Otherwayes.

Take a pound of almond paste, some grated bisket­bread, cream, rose-water, yolks of eggs, beaten cinamon, ginger, nutmeg, some boild currans, pistaches, and musk, boil it in a napkin, and serve it as the former.

To make an Almond Pudding in Guts.

TAke a pound of blanched almonds, beat them very small with rose-water and a little good new milk or cream, with two or three blades of mace, and some sliced [Page 168]nutmeg; when it is boild, take the spice clean from it, then grate a penny loaf and searce it through a cullender, put it into the cream, and let it stand till it be pretty cool, then put in the almonds, five or six yolks of eggs, salt, sugar, and good store of marrow or beef-suet finely minced, and fill the guts.

To make a Rice Pudding to bake.

BOil the rice tender in milk, then season it with nutmeg, mace, rose-water, sugar, yolks of eggs with half the whites, some grated bread, and marrow minced with am­bergreese, and bake it in a buttered dish.

To make Rice Pudding in guts.

BOil half a pound of rice with three pints of milk, and a little beaten mace, boil it until the rice be dry, but never stir it, if you do, you must stir it continually, or else it will burn; pour your rice into a cullender or strainer, that the moisture may run clean from it, then put to it six eggs, (put away the whites of three) half a pound of su­gar, a quarter of a pint of rose-water, a pound of currans, and a pound of beef-suet shred small; season it with nut­meg, cinamon, and salt; then dry the small guts of a hog, shecp, or beefer, and being finely cleansed for the purpose, steep and fill them, cut the guts a foot long, and fill them three quarters full, tie both ends together, and put them in boiling water, a quarter of an hour will boil them.

Otherwayes.

Boil the rice first in water, then in milk, after with salt in cream; then take six eggs, grated bread, good store of marrow minced small, some nutmeg, sugar, and salt; fill the guts, put them into a pipkin, and boil them in milk and rose-water.

Otherwayes.

Steep it in fair water all night, then boil it in new milk, and drain out the milk through a cullender, then mince a good quantity of beef-suet not too small, and put it into the rice in some bowl or tray, with currans being first boild, yolks of eggs, nutmeg, cinamon, sugar, and barber­ries mingled all together; then wash the second guts, fill them and boil them.

To make a Cinamon Pudding,

TAke and steep a penny white loaf in a quart of cream, six yolks of eggs, and but two whites, dates, half an ounce of beaten cinamon, and some almond paste. Some­times adde rose-water, salt, and boild currans, either bake or boil it for stuffings.

To make a Haggas Pudding.

TAke a calves chaldron being well scowred or boild, mince it being cold very fine and small, then take four or five eggs, and leave out half the whites, thick cream, grated bread, sugar, salt, currans, rose water, some beef­suet or marrow, (and if you will) sweet marjoram, time, parsley, and mix all together; then having a sheeps maw ready dressed, put it in and boil it a little.

Otherwayes.

Take good store of parsley, time, savory, four or five onions, and sweet marjoram, chop them with some whole oatmeal; then adde to them pepper, and salt, and boil them in a napkin, being boild tender, butter it, and serve it on sippets.

To make a Chiveridge Pudding.

LAy the fattest of a hog in fair water and salt to scower them, then take the longest and fattest gut, and stuff [Page 170]it with nutmeg, sugar, ginger, pepper, and slic't dates, boil them and serve them to the table.

To make Liveridge Puddings.

BOil a hogs liver, and let it be thoroughly cold, then grate and sift it through a cullender, put new milk to it, and the fleck of a hog minced small, put it to the liver and some grated bread, divide the meat in two parts, then take store of herbs, mince them fine, and put the herbs into one part with nutmeg, mace, pepper, anniseed, rose-water, cream, and eggs, fill them up and boil them. To the other part or sort put barberries, slic't dates, cur­rans, cream, and eggs.

Other Liveridge Puddings.

BOil a hogs liver very dry, and when it is cold grate it, and take as much grated manchet as liver, sift them through a cullender, and season them with cloves, mace, and cinamon, as much of all the other spices, half a pound of sugar, a pound and half of currans, half a pint of rose-water, three pound of beef-suet minced small, eight eggs, and but four whites.

A Swan or Goose Pudding.

STrain the swan or goose blood, and steep with it oat­meal or grated bread in milk or cream, with nutmeg, pepper, sweet herbs minced, suet, rose-water, minced le­mon-peels very small, and a small quantity of coriander­seed. This for a pudding in a swan or gooses neek.

To make a forced Pudding.

MInce a leg of mutton with sweet herbs, grated bread, minced dates, currans, raisins of the sun, a [Page 171]little orangado or preserved lemon sliced thin, a few cori­ander-seeds, nutmeg, pepper, and ginger, mingle all toge­ther with some cream and raw eggs, and work it together like a pasty, then wrap the meat in a caul of mutton or veal, and so you may either boil or bake them. If you bake them, indorse them with yolks of eggs, rose-water, and sugar, and stick them with little sprigs of rosemary and cinamon.

To make a Pudding of Veal.

MInce raw veal very fine, and mingle it with lard cut into the form of dice, then mince some sweet mar­joram, pennyroyal, cammomile, winter savory, nutmeg, ginger, pepper, salt, work all together with good store of beaten cinamon, sugar, barberries, sliced figs, blanched al­monds, half a pound of beef-suet finely minced, put these into the guts of a fat mutton or hog well cleansed, and cut an inch and a half long, set them a boiling in a pipkin of claret wine with large mace; being almost boild, have some boild grapes in small bunches, and barberries in knots, then dish them on French Bread being scalded with the broth of some good mutton gravy, and lay them on gar­nish of slic't lemons.

To make a Pudding of Wine in guts.

SLice the crumbs of two manchets, and take half a pint of wine, and some sugar, the wine must be scalded; then take eight eggs, and beat them with rose-water, put to them sliced dates, marrow, and nutmeg, mix all toge­ther, and fill the guts to boil.

Bread Pudding in guts.

TAke cream and boil it with mace, and mix beat almonds with rose-water, then take cream, eggs, nutmeg, cur­rans, [Page 172]salt, and marrow, mix them with as much bread as you think fit, and fill the guts.

To make an Italian Pudding.

TAke a fine manchet and cut it in square pieces like dice, then put to it half a pound of beef-suet minced small, raisins of the sun, cloves, mace, minced dates, sugar, mar­row, rose-water, eggs, and cream, mingle all these toge­ther, put them in a buttered dish, in less then an hour it will be baked, then when you serve it scrape sugar on it.

Other pudding in the Italian fashion with blood of Beast or Fish.

TAke half a pound of grated cheese, a penny manchet grated, sweet herbs chopped very small, cinamon, pepper, salt, nutmeg, cloves, mace, four eggs, sugar, and currans, bake it in a dish or pye, or boil it in a napkin and binde it up like a ball, being boild serve it with beaten but­ter, sugar, and beaten cinamon.

To make a French Pudding.

TAke half a pound of raisins of the sun, a penny white loaf pared and cut into dice-work, half a pound of beef-suet finely minced, three ounces of sugar, eight slic't dates, a grain of musk, twelve or sixteen lumps of marrow salt, half a pint of breame, three eggs beaten with it and powred on the pudding, cloves, mace, nutmeg, salt, and a pun-water or a pippin or two pared, slic't, and put in the bottom of the dish before you bake the pudding.

To make a French Barley Pudding.

BOil the Barley, and put to one quart of barley a man­chet grated, then beat a pound of almonds, and strain [Page 173]them with cream, then take eight eggs and but four whites, and beat them with rose-water, season it with nutmeg, mace, salt, and marrow, or beef-suet cut small, mingle all together, then fill the guts and boil them.

To make an excellent Pudding.

TAke crumbs of white bread, as much fine flower, the yolks of four eggs, but one white, and as much good cream as will temper it as thick as you would make pancake batter, then butter the dish, bake it, and scrape sugar on it being baked.

Puddings of Swines Lights.

PArboil the lights, mince them very small with suet, and mix them with grated bread, cream, currans, eggs, nutmeg, salt, and rose-water, and fill the guts.

To make an Oatmeal Pudding.

PIck a quart of whole oatmeal, being finely picked and cleansed, steep it in warm milk all night, next morning

[oatmeal pudding]

drain it, and boil it in three pints of cream, being boild and cold, put to it six yolks of eggs, and but three whites, cloves, mace, saffron, salt, dates slic't, and sugar, boil it in a napkin, and boil it as the bread pud­ding, serve it with beaten butter, and stick it with slic't dates, and scrape sugar; or you may bake these foresaid materials in dish, pye, &c.

Sometimes adde to this pudding raisins of the sun, and [Page 174]all manner of sweet herbs chopped small, being seasoned as before.

Other Oatmeal Pudding.

TAke great oatmeal, pick it and scald in in cream, being first put in a dish or bason, season it with nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, pepper, and currans, bake it in a dish or boil it in a napkin, being baked or boiled, serve it with beat­en butter and scraping sugar.

Otherwayes.

Season it with cloves, mace, saffron, salt, and yolks of eggs, and but five that have whites, and some cream to steep the groats in, boil it in a napkin, or bake it in a dish or pye.

To make Oatmeal-Pudding-pies.

STeep oatmeal in warm milk three or four hours, then strain some blood into it of flesh or fish, mix it with

[oatmeal pudding pies]

cream, and adde to it suet minced small, sweet herbs chopped fine, as time, par­sley, spinage, succory, en­dive, strawberry leaves, vi­olet leaves, pepper, cloves, mace, fat beef-suet, and four eggs, mingle all together, and so bake them.

To make an Oatmeal-pudding boild.

TAke the biggest oatmeal, mince what herbs you like best and mix with it, season it with pepper and salt, tye it straight in a bag, and when it is boild, butter it and serve it up.

Oatmeal Puddings otherwise of fish or flesh blood.

TAke a quart of whole oatmeal, steep it in warm milk over night, and then drain the groats from it, boil them in a quart or three pints of good cream; then the oatmeal being boild and cold, have time, pennyroyal, par­sley, spinage, savory, endive, marjoram, sorrel, succory, and strawberry leaves, of each a little quantity, chop them fine and put them to the oatmeal, with some fennil seed, pepper, cloves, mace, and salt, boil it in a napkin, or bake it in dish, pie, or guts.

Sometimes of the former pudding you may leave out some of the herbs, and adde these, pennyroyal, savory, leeks, a good big onion, sage, ginger, nutmeg, pepper, salt, either for fish or flesh dayes, with butter or beef-suet, boild or baked in dish, napkin, or pie.

To make a baked Pudding.

TAke a pint of cream, warm it, and put to it eight dates minced, four eggs, marrow, rose-water, nut­megs raced and beaten, mace, and salt, butter the dish, and put it in; and if you please, lay puff paste on it, and scrape sugar on it, and in it.

To make a bake Pudding otherwayes.

TAke a pint and a half of cream, and a pound of butter, set them on the fire till the butter be melted, then take three or four eggs, season it with nutmeg, rose-water, su­gar, and salt, make it as thin as pancake batter, butter the dish, and baste it with a garnish of paste about it.

Otherwayes.

Take a penny loaf, pare it, slice it, and put it into a [Page 176]quart of cream with a little rose-water, break it very small, then take four ounces of almond paste, and put in eight eggs beaten, the marrow of three or four marrow­bones, three or four pippins slic't thin, or what way you please, mingle these together with a little ambergreece and butter, then dish and bake it.

Otherwayes.

Take a quart of cream, put thereto a pound of beef-suet minced small, put it into the cream, and season it with nut­meg, cinamon, and rose-water, put to it eight eggs, and but four whites, and two grated manchets; mingle them well together, and put them in a butter'd dish, bake it, and being baked, scrape on sugar, and serve it.

To make Black Puddings.

TAke half the oatmeal, pick it, and take the blood while it is warm from the hog, strain it and put it in the oatmeal as soon as you can, let it stand all night; then take the other part of the oatmeal, pick it also, and boil it in milk till it be tender, and all the milk consumed, then put it to the blood and stir it well together, put in good store of beef or hog suet, and season it with good pudding herbs, salt, pepper, and fennil-seed, fill not the guts too full, and boil them.

To make Black Puddings otherwayes.

TAke the blood of the hog while it is warm, put in some salt, and when it is thorough cold put in the groats or oatmeal well picked; let it stand soaking all night, then put in the herbs, which must be rosemary, time, pennyroy­al, savory, and fennel, make the blood soft with putting in some good cream until the blood look pale; then beat four or five eggs whites and all, and season it with cloves, mace, [Page 177]pepper, fennil-seed, and put good store of hogs fat or beef-suet to the stuff, cut not the fat too small.

To make white Puddings an excellent way.

AFter the hogs humbles are tender boild, take some of the lights with the heart and all the flesh about them, picking from them all the sinnewy skins; then chop the meat as small as you can, and put to it a little of the liver very finely searced, some grated nutmeg, four or five yolks of eggs, a pint of very good cream, two or three spoonfuls of sack, sugar, cloves, mace, nutmeg, cinamon, carraway-seed, a little rose-water, good store of hogs fat, and some salt; roul it in rouls two hours before you go to fill them in the guts, and lay the guts in steep in rose-water till you fill them.

Section 8.

The rarest Wayes of making all man­ner of Souces and Jellies.

To souce a Brawn.

TAke a fat brawn of two or three years growth, and bone the sides, cut off the head close to the ears, and cut five collers of a side, bone the hin­der leg, or else five collers will not be deep enough, cut the collers an inch deeper in the belly then on the back; for when the collers come to boiling, they will shrink more in the belly then in the back, make the collers very even when you binde them up, not big at one end, and little at the other, but fill them equally, and lay them again a soaking in fair water; before you binde them up, let them be well watered the space of two dayes, and twice a day soak and scrape them in warm water, then cast them in cold fair water, before you roul them up in collers, put them into white clouts, or sowe them up with white tape.

Or bone him whole, and cut him cross the flitches, make but four or five collers in all, and boil them in cloaths, or binde them up with white tape; then have your boiler ready, make it boil, and put in your collers of the biggest bulk first, a quarter of an hour before the other lesser, boil them at their first putting in the space of a hour with a quick fire, and keep the boiler continually filled up with warm [Page 179]clean liquor, scum off the fat clean still as it riseth; after an hour let it boil leasurely, and keep it still filled up to the brim; being fine and tender boild, that you may put a straw thorow it, draw your fire, and let your brawn rest till the next morning, then being between hot and cold, take it into moulds of deep hoops, binde them about with packthred, and being cold, take them out and put them in souce-drink made of boild oatmeal ground or beaten, and bran boild in fair water; being cold, strain it thorow a cullender into the tub or earthen pot, put salt to it, and close up the vessel close from the air.

Or you may make other souce-drink of whey and salt beaten together, it will make your brawn look more white and better.

To make Pig Brawn.

TAke a white or red pig, for a spotted is not so handsome, take a good large fat one, and being scalded and drawn, bone it whole, but first cut off the head and the hinder quarters, (and leave the bone in the hinder quar­ters) the rest being boned cut it into two collers overthwart both the sides, or bone the whole pig but onely the head; then wash them in divers waters, and let it soak in clean water two hours, the blood being well soaked out, take them and dry the collers in a clean cloth, and season them in the inside with minced lemon-peel and salt, role them up, and put them into fine clean clouts, but first make your collers very equal at both ends, round and even, binde them up at the ends and middle hard and close with packthred; then let your pan boil and put in the collers, boil them with water and salt, and keep it filled up with warm water as you do the brawn, scum off the fat clean, and being tender boild put them in a whoop as deep as the coller, binde it and frame it even; [Page 180]being cold put it into your souce-drink made of whey and salt, or oatmeal boild and strained, then put them in a pipkin or little barrel, and stop them close from the air.

When you serve it, dish it on a dish and plate, the two collers, two quarters and head, or make but two collers of the whole pig.

To garnish Brawn or Pig Brawn.

LEach your brawn, and dish it on a plate in a fair clean dish, then put a rosemary branch on the top being first dipped in the white of an egg well beaten to froath, or wet in water and sprinkled with flour, or a sprig of rose­mary gilt with gold; the brawn spotted also with gold and silver leaves, or let your sprigs be of a streight sprig of ewe tree, or a streight firs bush, and put about the brawn stuck round with bay-leaves three ranks round, and spot­ted with red and yellow jelly about the dish sides, also the same jelly and some of the brawn leached, jagged, or cut with tin moulds, and carved lemons, oranges, barberries, bay-leaves gilt, red beets, pickled barberries, pickled goose­berries, or pickled grapes.

To souce a Pig.

TAke a pig being scalded, cut off the head, and part it down the back, draw it and bone it, then the sides be­ing well cleansed from the blood, and soaked in several clean waters, take the pig and dry the sides, season them with nutmeg, ginger, and salt, roul them and binde them up in clean clouts as the pig brawn aforesaid, then have as much water as will cover it in a boiling pan two inches over, and two bottles of white wine over and above; first let the water boil, then put in the collers with salt, mace, slic't ginger, parsley-roots, and fennil-roots scraped [Page 181]and picked; being half boiled, put in two quarts of white wine, and when it is boild quite, put in slices of lemon to it, and the whole-peel of a lemon.

Otherwayes in Collers.

SEason the sides with beaten nutmeg, salt, and ginger, or boil the sides whole and not bone them; boil also a piece or breast of veal with them, being well joynted and soaked two hours in fair water, boil it in half wine and half water, mace, slic't ginger, parsley and fennel roots, being boild leave it in this souce, and put some slic't lemon to it, with the whole pieces; when it is cold serve it with yellow, red, and white jelly, barberries, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel.

Or you may make but one coller of both the sides to the hinder quarters, or bone the two sides and make but two collers of all, and save the head onely whole, or souce a pig in quarters or halves, or make of a good large fat pig but one coller onely, and the head whole.

Or souce it with two quarts of white wine to a gallon of water, put in your wine when your pig is almost boild, and put to it four maces, a few cloves, two races of slic't ginger, salt, a few bay-leaves, whole pepper, some slices of lemon, and lemon-peel; before you boil your pig, season the sides or collers with nutmeg, salt, cloves, and mace.

To souce a Pig otherwayes.

SCald it and cut it in four quarters, bone it, and let it lye in water a day and a night, then roul it up (like brawn) with sage leaves, lard in thin slices, and some gra­ted bread mixed with the juyce of an orange, beaten nut­meg, mace, and salt; roul it up in the quarters of the pig ve­ry hard, and binde it up with tape, then boil it with fair [Page 182]water, white wine, large mace, slic't ginger, a little lemon-peel, a faggot of sweet herbs, and salt; being boild put it in an earthen pot to cool in the liquor, and souce there two dayes, then dish it out on plates, or serve it in collers with mustard and sugar.

Otherwayes.

Season the sides with cloves, mace, and salt, then roul it in collers or sides with the bones in it; then take to two gallons of water a pottle of white wine, and when the li­quor boils put in the pig, with mace, cloves, slic't ginger, salt, bay leaves, and whole pepper; being half boild, put in the wine, &c.

Otherwayes.

Season the collers with chopped sage, beaten nutmeg, pepper, and salt.

To Souce or Jelly a Pig in the Spanish Fashion.

TAke a Pig being scalded, boned, and chined down the back, then soke the collers clean from the blood the space of two hours, dry them in a clean cloath, and sea­son the sides with pepper, salt, and minced sage; then have two dryed neats tongues, that are boild tender and cold, that they look fine and red, pare them, and slice them from end to end the thickness of a half-crown piece, lay them on the inside of the seasoned pig, one half of the tongue for one side, and the other for the other side; then make two collers and binde them up in fine white clouts, boil them as you do the soust pigs with wine, water, salt, slic't ginger, and mace, keep it dry, or in souce drink of the pig brawn.

If dry serve it in slices as thick as a trencher cut round the coller, or slices in jelly, and make jelly of the liquor wherein it was boild, adding to it juyce of lemon, ising­glass, spices, sugar, clarified with eggs, and run it through the bag.

How to divide a Pig into Collers divers wayes either for Pig, Brawn, or Soust Pig.

  • 1. CUt a large fat Bore Pig into one coller onely, bone it whole and not chine it, the head onely cut off.
  • 2. Take off the hinder quarters and buttocks with the bones in them, bone all the rest whole, onely the head cut off.
  • 3. Take off the hinder quarters, and make two collers, bone all the rest, onely cut off the head and leave it whole.
  • 4. Cut off the head, and chine it through the back, and coller both sides at length from end to end.
  • 5. Chine it as before with the bones in, and souce it in quarters.

To souce a Capon.

TAke a good bodied Capon, young, fat, and finely pul­led, drawn and trussed, lay it in soke two or three hours with a knuckle of veal well joynted, and after set them a boiling in a fine deep brass pan, kettel, or large pip­kin, in a gallon of fair water; when it boils scum it, and put in four or five blades of mace, two or three races of ginger slic't, four fennel roots, and four parsley roots, scraped and picked, and salt. The Capon being fine and tender boild, take it up, and put it in other warm liquor or broth; then put to your souced broth a quart of white wine and boil it to a jelly, then take it off and put it into an earthen pan or large pipkin, put your capon to it, with two or three slic't lemons, and cover it close, serve it at your pleasure, and garnish it with slices and pieces of le­mon, barberries, roots, mace, nutmeg, and some of the jelly.

Some put to this souc't capon, whole pepper, and a fag­got of sweet herbs, but that maketh the broth very black.

In this manner you may souce any Land Fowl.

To souce a Breast of Veal, Side of Lamb, or any Joint of Mutton, Kid, Fawn, or Venison.

BOne a breast of veal and soke it well from the blood, then wipe it dry, and season the side of the breast with beaten nutmeg, ginger, some sweet herbs minced small, whole coriander-seed, minced lemon-peel, and salt, and lay some broad slices of sweet lard over the seasoning, then roul it into a coller, and binde it up in a white clean cloath, put it into boiling liquor, scum it well, and then put in slic't ginger, slic't nutmeg, salt, fennil and parsley roots, being almost boild put in a quart of white wine, and when it is quite boild take it off and put in slices of lemon, the peel of two lemons whole, and a dozen bay leaves; boil it close covered to make the veal look white.

Thus you may do a breast of mutton, either rouled or with the bones in, and season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt; roul them, and bake them in a pot with wine and water, or any sea or land fowl, being stuffed or forced, and filled up with butter afterwards, and served dry, or lard the fowls, bone them, and roul them.

To souce a Leg of Veal.

TAke a leg of veal, bone it and lard it, but first season the lard with pepper, cloves, and mace, lard it with great lard as big as your little finger, season the veal also with the same seasoning and some salt with it; lard it very thick, then have all manner of sweet herbs minced and strewed on it, roul it up like a coller of brawn, and boil it or stew it in the oven in a pipkin, with water, salt, and white wine; serve it in a coller cold, whole or in slices, or put away the liquor and fill it up with butter, or bake it [Page 185]with butter in a roul, jelly it, and mix some of the broth with almond milk, and jellies in slices of two colours when you serve it.

Otherwayes.

Stuff or force a leg of veal, with sweet herbs minced, beef-suet, pepper, nutmeg, and salt, coller it, and boil or bake it, being cold, either serve it dry in a coller, or in sli­ces, or in a whole coller with gallendines of divers sorts, or in thin slices with oyl and vinegar.

Thus you may dress any meat, venison or fowls.

To souce Bullocks Cheeks, a Hank, Brisket, or Rand of Beef, &c.

TAke a bullocks cheek or flank of beef and lay it in pe­ter salt four dayes, then roul it as even as you can, that the coller be not bigger in one place then another, boil it in water and salt, or amongst other beef, boil it very tender in a cloath as you do brawn, and being tender boild, take it up, and put it into a whoop to fashion it upright and round, then keep it dry, and take it out of the clout, and serve it whole with mustard and sugar, or some gal­lendines. If lean, lard it with great lard.

To Coller a Surloyn, Hank, Brisket, Rand, or Fore­rib of Beef.

TAke the flank of beef, take out the sinews and most of the fat, put it in pickle with as much water as will cover it, and put a handful of peter salt to it; let it steep three dayes and not shift it, then take it out and hang it a draining in the air, wipe it dry, then have a good hand­ful of red sage, some tops of rosemary, favory, marjoram, and time, but twice as much sage, mince them very small, then take a quarter of an ounce of mace, half as many [Page 186]cloves, a little ginger, half an ounce of pepper, and half an ounce of pepper, and half an ounce of peter salt, mingle them together, then take your beef, splat it, and lay it even that it may roul up handsomely in a coller; then take your seasoning of herbs and spices, and strow it all over, roul it up close, and binde it fast with packthread, put it into an earthen pipkin or pot, and put a pint of claret wine to it, an onion, and two or three cloves of garlick, close it up with a piece of course paste, and bake it in a bakers oven, it will ask six hours soaking.

To souce a Coller of Veal in the same manner, or Veni­son, Pork, or Mutton.

TAke out the bones, and put them in steep in the pickle with peter salt, as was aforesaid, steep them three dayes, and hang them in the air one day, lard them (or not lard them) with good big lard, and season the lard with nutmeg, pepper, and herbs, as is aforesaid in the col­ler of beef, strow it over with the herbs and spices, being mingled together, and roul up the coller, binde it fast, and bake it tender in a pot, being stopped close, and keep it for your use to serve either in slices or in the whole coller, garnish it with bayes and rosemary.

To make Jelly for any kinde of soust meats, dishes, or other works of that nature.

TAke six pair of calves feet, scald them and take away the fat betwixt the claws, and also the long shank bones, lay them in soke in fair water three or four hours, and boil them in two gallons of fair spring water to three quarts of stock; being boild strain it through a strainer, and when the broth is cold take it from the grounds, and divide it into three pipkins for three several colours, to eve­ry [Page 187]pipkin a quart of white wine, and put saffron in one, catcheneler in another, and put a race of ginger, two blades of mace, and a nutmeg to each pipkin, and cinamon to two of the pipkins, the spices being first slic't, then set your pipkins on the fire and melt the jelly: then have a pound and half of sugar for each pipkin: but first take your fine sugar being beaten, and put it in a long dish or tray, and put to it the whites of eighteen eggs, and beat them well together with your rouling pin, and divide it into three parts, put each part equally into the several pipkins, and stir it well together; the broth being almost cold, then set them on a charcoal fire and let them stew leasurely, when they begin to boil over take them off, let it cool a little, run them through the bags once or twice, and keep it for your use.

For variety sometimes in place of wine, you may use grapes stamped and strained, wood-sorrel, juyce of lemons, or juyce of oranges.

To jelly Hogs or Porkers Feet, Ears, or Snouts.

TAke twelve feet, six ears, and six snouts or noses, being finely scalded, and lay them in soak twenty four hours, shift and scrape them very white, then boil them in a fair clean scowred brass pot or pipkin in three gallons of liquor, five quarts of water, three of wine vinegar, or verjuyce, and four of white wine, boil them from three gallons to four quarts waste; being scummed put in an ounce of pepper whole, an ounce of nutmegs in quarters, an ounce of ginger slic't, and an ounce of cinamon, boil them together, as is abovesaid, to four quarts.

Then take up the meat and let them cool, divide them into dishes, and run it over with the broth or jelly being a little first settled, take the clearest, and being cold put juyce of orange over all, serve it with bay leaves about the dish.

To make Christall Jelly.

TAke three pair of calves feet, and scald off the hair very clean, knock off the claws, and take out the great bones and fat, and cast them into fair water, shift them three or four times in a day and a night, then boil them next morning in a glazed pipkin or clean pot, with six quarts of fair spring water, boil it and scum it clean, boil away three quarts or more; then strain it into a clean earthen pan or bason, and let it be cold: then pare the dross from the bottom, and take the fat off the top clean, put it in a large pipkin of six quarts, and put into it two quarts of old clear white wine, the juyce of four lemons, three blades of mace, and two races of ginger slict; then melt or dissolve it again into broth, and let it cool. Then have four pound of hard sugar fine beaten, and mix it with twelve whites of eggs in a great dish with your rouling­pin, and put it into the pipkin to your jelly, stir it together with a grain of musk and ambergreece, put it in a fine lin­nen clout bound up, and a quarter of a pint of damask rose-water, set it a stewing on a soft charcoal fire, before it boils, put in a little ising-glass, and being boild up, take it, let it cool a little, and run it.

Other Jelly for service of several colours.

TAke four pair of calves feet, a knuckle of veal, a good fleshly capon, and prepare these things as is said in the christal jelly; boil them in three gallons of fair water, till six quarts be wasted, then strain it into an earth­en pan, let it cool, and being cold pare the bottom, and take off the fat on the top also; then dissolve it again into broth, and divide it into four equal parts, put it into four several pipkins, as will contain five pints a piece each pip­kin, put in a little saffron into one of them, into another [Page 189]churcenela beat with album, into another turnsole, and the other his own natural white; also to every pipkin a quart of white wine, and the juyce of two lemons. Then also to the white jelly one race of ginger pared and sliced, and three blades of large mace, to the red jelly two nutmegs, as much in quantity of cinamon as nutmegs, also as much ginger; to the turnsole put also the same quantity, with a few whole cloves; then to the amber or yel­low colour, the same spices and quantity. Then have eighteen whites of eggs, and beat them with six pound of double refined suger, beaten small and stirred together in a great tray or bason with a rouling pin; divide it into four parts into the four pipkins, and stir it to your Jelly broth, spice and wine, being well mixed together with a little musk and ambergreece. Then have new baggs, wash them first in warm water, and then in cold, wring them dry, and being ready strung with packthred and sticks, hang them on a spit by the fire from any dust, and set new earthen pans under them, being well seasoned with boiling liquor.

Then again set on your jelly on a fine charcoal fire, & let it stew softly the space of an hour or almost, then make it boil up a little, and take it off, being somewhat cool'd, run it tho­row the bag twice or thrice, or but once if it be very clear; and into the bags of colors put in a sprig of rosemary, keep it for your use in those pans, dish it as you see good, or cast it into what mould you please; as for example these.

Scollop shells, Cockel shells, Eggs shells, half Lemon, or Lemon-peel, Wilks, or Winkle shells, Muskle shells, or moulded out of a butter squirt.

Or serve it on a great dish and plate, one quarter of white, another of red, another of yellow, the fourth of another colour, and about the side of the dish oranges in quarters of jelly, in the middle a whole lemon full of jelly finely carved, or cast out of a wooden or tin mould, or run into little round glasses four or five in a dish, on silver trencher plates, or glass trencher plates.

The quantities for a quart of Jelly Broth for the true making of it.

A quart of white wine, a pound and half of sugar, eggs, two nutmegs, or mace, two races of ginger, as much cinamon, two grains of musk and ambergreece, calves feet or a knuckle of veal.

Sometimes for variety, in place of wine use grape ver­juyce; if juyce of grapes a quart, juyce of lemons a pint, juyce of oranges a quart, juyce of wood-sorrel a quart, and juyce of quinces a quart.

How to prepare to make a good Stock for Jellies of all sorts, and the Meats most proper for them, both for service and sick folks; also the quantities belonging to a quart of Jelly.
For the Stock for service.

TWo pair of calves feet finely cleansed, the fat and great bones taken out and parted in halves; being well soaked in fair water twenty four hours, and often shifted, boil them in a brass pot or pipkin close covered, in the quantity of a gallon of water, boil them to three pints, then strain the broth through a clean strong canvas into an earthen pan or bason; when it is cold take off the top, and pare off the dregs off the bottom. Put it in a clean well glazed pipkin of two quarts, with a quart of white wine, a quarter of a pint of cinamon water, as much of ginger water, and as much of nutmeg water, or these spices sliced. Then have two pound of double refi­ned sugar beaten with eggs in a deep dish or bason, your jelly being new melted, put in the eggs with sugar, stir all the foresaid materials together, and set it a stewing on a [Page 191]soft charcole fire the space of half an hour or more, being well digested and clear run.

Take out the bone and fat of any meat for jellies, for it doth but stain the stock, and make it will never be white nor pure clear.

Meats proper for Jelly for service or sick folk.

  • 1. Three pair of calves feet,
  • 2. Three pair of calves feet, a knuckle of veal, and a fine well fleshed capon.
  • 3. One pair of calves feet, a well fleshed capon, and half a pound of harts horn or isingglass.
  • 4. An old cock and a knuckle of veal.
  • 5. Harts horn jelly onely, or with a poultrey.
  • 6. Good bodied capons.
  • 7. Isingglass onely, or with a cock or capon.
  • 8. Jellly of hogs feet, ears and snouts.
  • 9. Sheeps feet, lambs feet, and calves feet.

Neats Feet for a Jelly for a Neats Tongue.

BEing fresh and tender boild and cold, lard it with can­died cittern, candied orange, lemon, or quinces, run it over with jelly, and some preserved barberries, or cherries.

To make a Jelly as white as snow of Jorden Almonds.

TAke a pound of almonds, steep them in cold water till they will blanch, which will be in six hours; being blanched into cold water, beat them with a quart of rose­water; then have a decoction of half a pound of ising­glass, boild with a gallon of fair spring-water, or else half wine, boil it till half be wasted, then let it cool, strain it, and [Page 192]mingle it with your almonds, and strain with them a pound of double refined sugar, the juyce of two lemons, and cast it into egg-shells; put saffron to some of it, and make some of it blew, some of it green, and some yellow; cast some into oranges, and some into lemon rindes candied; mix part of it with some almond paste coloured, and some with cheese-curds; serve of divers of these colours on a great dish and plate.

To make other white Jelly.

BOil two capons being cleansed, the fat and lungs ta­ken out, truss them and soak them well in clean wa­ter three or four hours; then boil them in a pipkin, or pot of two gallons or less, put to them a gallon or five quarts of white wine, scum them, and boil them to a jelly, next strain the broth from the grounds and blow off the fat clean; then take a quart of sweet cream, a quart of the jelly broth, a pound and half of refined sugar, and a quar­ter of a pint of rose-water, mingle them all together, and give them a walm on the fire with half an ounce of fine sear­ced ginger; then set it a cooling, dish it, or cast it in le­mon or orange-peels, or in any fashion of the other jellies, in moulds or glasses, or turn it into colours; for sick folks in place of cream use stamped almonds.

To make Jellies for souces, made dishes, and other works.

TAke six pair of calves feet, scald them and take away the fat between the claws, as also the great long shank bones, and lay them in water four or five hours; then boil them in two gallons of fair spring water, scum them clean, and boil them from two gallons to three quarts, then strain it through a strong canvas, and let the broth cool, being cold clenge it from the grounds, pare off [Page 193]the top, and melt it; then put to it in a good large pipkin, three quarts of white wine, three races of ginger slic't, some six blades of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cinamon, a grain of musk, and eighteen whites of eggs beaten with four pound of sugar, mingle them with the rest in the pipkin, and the juyce of three lemons, set all on the fire, and let it stew leasurely; then have your bag ready washed, and when your pipkin boils up, run it, &c.

Harts Horn Jelly.

TAke half a pound of harts horn, boil it in fair spring water leasurely, close covered, and in a well glazed pipkin that will contain a gallon, boil it till a spoonful will stand stiff being cold, then strain it through a fine thick canvas, or fine boultering, and put it again in another lesser pipkin, with the juyce of eight or nine good large lemons, a pound and half of double refined sugar, and boil it again a little while, then put it in a gally pot, or small glasses, or cast it into moulds, or any fashions of the other jellies. It is held by the Physicians for a special Cordial.

Or take half a pound of harts horn grated, and a good capon, being finely clenged and soaked from the blood, and the fat taken off, truss it, and boil it in a pot or pipkin, with the harts horn, in fair spring water, the same things as the former, &c.

To make another excellent Jelly of Harts horn and Isingglass for a Consumption.

TAke half a pound of isingglass, half a pound of harts horn, half a pound of slic't dates, a pound of beaten sugar, half a pound of slic't figs, a pound of slic't prunes, half an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger a quarter of an ounce of mace, a quarter of an ounce of [Page 194]cloves, half an ounce of nutmegs, and a little red sanders, slice your spices, and also a little stick of liquorish and put in your cinamon whole.

To make a Jelly for weakness in the Back.

TAke two ounces of harts horn, and a wine quart of spring water, put it into a pipkin, and boil it over a soft fire till it be one half consumed, then take it off the fire, and let it stand a quarter of an hour, and strain it through a fine holland cloath, crushing the harts horn gently with a spoon: then put to it the juyce of a lemon, two spoonfuls of red rose water, half a spoonful of cina­mon water, four or five ounces of fine sugar, or make it sweet according to the parties taste; then put it out into little glasses or pipkins, and let it stand twenty four hours, then you may take of it in the morning or at four of the clock in the afternoon, what quantity you please. To put two or three spoonfuls of it into broth is very good.

To make another dish of meat called a Press, for service.

DO in this as you may see in the jelly of the porker, being tender boild, take the feet, ears, snouts, and cheeks, being finely boild, and tender, to a jelly with spices, and the same liquor as is said in the Porker; then take out the bones and make a lay of it like a square brick, season it with coriander or fennil-seed, and binde it up like a square brick in a strong canvas with packthread, press it till it be cold, and serve it in slices with bay leaves, or run it over with jellies.

To make a Sausage for Jelly.

BOil or roste a capon, mince and stamp it with some almond paste, then have a fine dryed neats-tongue, [Page 195]one that looks fine and red ready boild, cut it into lit­tle pieces, square like dice, half an inch long, and as much of interlarded bacon cut into the same form ready boild and cold, some preserved quinces and barberries, sugar and cinamon, mingle all together with some scraped isingglass amongst it warm; roul it up in a sausage, knit it up at the ends and sowe the sides; then let it cool, slice it, and serve it in a jelly in a dish in thin slices, and run jelly over it, let it cool and lay on more, that cool, run more, and thus do till the dish be full; when you serve it, garnish the dish with jelly and preserved barberries, and run over all with juyce of lemon.

To make the best Almond Leach.

TAke an ounce of isingglass, and lay it two hours in water, shift it, and boil it in fair water, let it cool; then take two pounds of almonds, lay them in the water till they will blanch, then stamp them and put to them a pint of milk, strain them and put in large mace and slic't ginger, boil them till it taste well of the spice, then put in your digested isingglass, sugar, and a little rose-wa­ter, run it through a strainer, and put it into dishes.

Some you may colour with saffron, turn-sole, or green wheat, and blue bottels for blue.

To keep Sparagus all the year.

PArboil them a very little, and put them into clarified butter, cover them with it, the butter being cold, co­ver them with a leather, and about a moneth after refresh the butter, melt it, and put it on them again, then set them under ground being covered with a leather.

Section 9.

The best way of making all manner of baked Meats.

To make a Bisk or Battalia Pie.

TAke six peeping pigeons, and as many peeping small chickens, truss them to bake; then have six oxe pallets well boiled, blanched, and cut in little pieces; then take six lamb-stones, and as many good veal sweetbreads, cut in halves and parboild, twenty cocks combs boild and blanched, the bottoms of four arti­chocks boild and blanched, a quart of great oysters par­boild and bearded, also the marrow of four bones seasoned with pepper, nutmeg, mace, and salt; fill the pye with the meat, and mingle some pistaches amongst it, cock-stones, knots, or yolks of hard eggs, and some butter, close it up and bake it, (an hour and half will bake it) but before you set it in the oven, put into it a little fair water: Being ba­ked, pour out the butter, and liquor it with gravy, butter beaten up thick, slic't lemon, and serve it up.

Or you may bake this bisk in a patty-pan or dish.

Sometimes use asparagus and interlarded bacon.

For the paste for this dish, take three quarts of flour, and three quarters of a pound of butter, boil the butter in fair water, and make up the paste hot and quick.

Otherwayes in the summer time, make the paste of cold butter; to three quarts of flour take a pound and a half of butter, and work it dry into the flour, with the yolks of [Page 197]four eggs and one white, then put a little water to it, and make it up into a stiff paste.

To bake Chickens or Pigeons.

TAke either six pigeon peepers or six chicken peepers, if big cut them in quarters, then take three sweetbreads

[to bake chickens or pigeons]

of veal slic't very thin, three sheeps tongues boiled tender, blanched, and slic't with as much veal, as much mutton, six larks, twelve cocks-combs, a pint of great oysters parboild and beard­ed, calves udder cut in pieces, and three marrow bones, season these foresaid materials with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then fill them in Pies of the forms as you see, and put on the top some chesnuts, marrow, large mace, grapes, or gooseberries; then have a little piece of veal and mince it with as much marrow, some grated bread, yolks of eggs, minced dates, salt, nut­meg, and some sweet marjoram, work up all with a little cream, make it up into little balls or rouls, put them in the pie, and put in a little mutton gravy, some artichock bot­toms, or the tops of boild sparagus, and a little butter; close up the pie and bake it, being baked liquor it with juyce of oranges, one lemon, and some claret wine, shake it well together, and so serve it.

To make a Chicken Pie otherwayes.

TAke and truss them to bake, then season them lightly with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; lay them in the pie, and lay on them some dates in halves, with the marrow of three [Page 198]marrow bones, some large mace, a quarter of a pound of eringo roots, some grapes or barberries, and some butter, close it up, and put it in the oven; being half baked, liquor it with a pound of good butter, a quarter of a pint of grape verjuyce, and a quartern of refined sugar, ice it and serve it up.

Otherwayes you may use the giblets, and put in some pistaches, but keep the former order as aforesaid for change.

Liquor it with caudle made of a pint of white wine or verjuyce, the yolks of five or six eggs, sugar, and a quar­ter of a pound of good sweet butter; fill the pie, and shake this liquor well in it, with the slices of a lemon. Or you may make the caudle green with the juyce of spinage; ice these pies, or scrape sugar on them.

Otherwayes for the liquoring or garnishing of these pies, for variety you may put in them boild skirrets, bot­toms of artichocks boild, or boild cabbidge lettice.

Sometimes sweet herbs, whole yolks of hard eggs, in­terlarded bacon in very thin slices, and a whole onion; being baked, liquor it with white wine, butter, and the juyce of two oranges,

Or garnish them with barberries, grapes, or gooseber­ries, red or white currans, and some sweet herbs chopped small, boild in gravy, and beat up thick with butter.

Otherwayes liquor it with white wine, butter, sugar, some sweet marjoram, and yolks of eggs strained.

Or bake them with candied lettice stalks, potatoes boild and blanched, marrow, dates, and large mace; being ba­ked cut up the pie, and lay on the chickens slic't lemon, then liquor the pie with white wine, butter, and sugar, and serve it up hot.

You may bake any of the foresaid in a patty-pan or dish, or bake them in cold butter paste.

To bake Turkey, Chicken, Pea-Chicken, Pheasant Pouts, Heath Pouts, Caponets, or Partridge for to be eaten cold.

TAke a turkey chicken, bone it and lard it with pretty big lard, a pound and half will serve, then season it with an ounce of pepper, an ounce of nutmegs, and two ounces of salt, lay some butter in the bottom of the pie, then lay on the fowl, and put in it six or eight whole cloves, then put on all the seasoning with good store of butter, close it up, and baste it over with eggs, bake it, and being baked fill it up with clarified butter.

Thus you may bake them for to be eaten hot, giving them but half the seasoning, and liquor it with gravy and juyce of orange.

Bake this pie in fine paste; for more variety you may make a stuffing for it as followeth; mince some beef-suet and a little veal very fine, some sweet herbs, grated nut­meg, pepper, salt, two or three raw yolks of eggs, some boild skirrets or pieces of artichocks, grapes, or goose­berries, &c.

To bake Pigeons wilde or tame, Stock-Doves, Turtle-Doves, Quails, Rails, &c. to be eaten cold.

TAke six pigeons, pull, truss, and draw them, wash and wipe them dry, and season them with nutmeg, pep­per, and salt, the quantity of two ounces of the foresaid spices, and as much of the one as the other, then lay some butter in the bottom of the pie, lay on the pigeons, and put on all the seasoning on them in the pie, put butter to it, close it up and bake it, being baked and cold, fill it up with clarified butter.

Make the paste of a pottle of fine flour, and a quarter of a pound of butter boild in fair water, made up quick and stiff.

If you will bake them to be eaten hot, leave out half the seasoning. Bake them in dish, pye, or patty pan, and make cold paste of a pottle of flower, six yolks of raw eggs, and a pound of butter, work it into the flower dry, and being well wrought into it, make it up stiff with a lit­tle fair water.

Being baked to be eaten hot, put it into yolks of hard eggs, sweet-breads, lamb-stones, sparagus, or bottoms of artichocks, chesnuts, grapes, or gooseberries.

Sometimes for variety make a lear of butter, verjuyce, sugar, some sweet marjoram chopped and boild up in the liquor, put them in the pye when you serve it up, and dis­solve the yolk of an egg into it; then cut up the pie or dish, and put on it some slic't lemon, shake it well toge­ther, and serve it up hot.

In this mode or fashion you bake larks, black-birds, thrushes, veldifers, sparrows, or wheat-ears.

To bake all manner of Land Fowl, as Turkey, Bustard, Pea­cock, Crane, &c. to be eaten cold.

TAke a turkey and bone it, parboil and lard it thick with great lard as big as your little finger, then sea­son it with two ounces of beaten pepper, two ounces of beaten nutmeg, and three ounces of salt, season the fowl and lay it in a pie fit for it, put first butter in the bottom, with some ten whole cloves, then lay on the turkey and the rest of the seasoning on it, lay on good store of but­ter, then close it up and baste it either with saffron water, or three or four eggs beaten together with their yolks; bake it, and being baked and cold, liquor it with clarified butter, &c.

To bake all manner of Sea Fowl, as Swan, Whopper, to be eaten cold.

TAke a swan, bone, parboil, and lard it with great lard, season the lard with nutmeg and pepper one­ly,

[forms of sea fowl pies]

then take two ounces of pepper, three of nutmeg, and four of salt, season the fowl and lay it in the pye, with good store of butter, strew a few whole cloves on the rest of the seasoning, lay on large sheets of lard over it, and good store of butter; then close it up in rye paste or meal course boulted, and made up with boiling liquor, and make it up stiff: or you may bake them to eat hot, onely giving them half the sea­soning. Make the pyes according to these forms.

In place of baking any of these fowls in pyes, you may bake them in earthen pans or pots, for to be preserved cold they will keep longer.

In the same manner you may bake all sorts of wild geese, tame geese, bran geese, muscovia ducks, gulls, sho­vellers, herns, bitters, culews, heath cocks, teels, ollines, ruffes, brewes, pewits, mewes, sea pyes, dap chickens, strents, dotterels, knots, gravelins, oxe eyes, redshanks, &c.

In baking of these fowls to be eaten hot, for the garnish put in a big onion, gooseberries, or grapes in the pye, and sometimes capers or oysters, and liquor it with gravy, cla­ret, and butter.

To bake any kindes of Heads, and first of the Oxe or Bullocks Cheeks to be eaten hot or cold.

BEeing first cleansed from the slime and filth, cut them in pieces, take out the bones, and season them with

[forms of heads pies]

pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then put them in a pye with a few whole cloves, a little seasoning, slices of bacon, and butter over all; bake them very tender, and liqnor them with butter and claret wine.

Or boil your chickens, take out the bones and make a pasty with some minced meat, and a caul of mutton under it, on the top spi­ces and butter, close it up in good crust, and make your pyes accord­ing to these forms.

Otherwayes.

BOne and lard them with lard as big as your little finger, seasoned with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, and laid in­to the pye or pasty, with slices of interland­ed

[forms of pies]

bacon, and a clove or two, close it up, and bake it with some butter; make your pye or pasty of good fine crust according to these forms. Being baked fill it up with good sweet butter.

Otherwayes. You may make a pudding of some grated bread, minced veal, beef-suet, some minced sweet herbs, a minced onion, eggs, cream, nutmeg, pep­per, and salt, and lay it on the top of your meat in the pye, and some butter, close it up and bake it.

Otherwayes.

Take a calves head, soak it well and take out the brains, boil the head, and take out the bones, being cold stuff it

[calveshead pie]

with sweet herbs and hard eggs chop­ped small, minced bacon, and a raw egg or two, nutmeg, pepper, and salt; and lay in the bottom of the pye minced veal raw, and bacon; then lay the cheeks on it in the pye, and slices of bacon on that, then spices, butter, and grapes or lemon, close it up, bake it, and liquor it with butter onely.

Otherwayes.

Boil it and take out the bones, cleanse it, and season it with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, put some minced veal or

[forms of pies]

suet in the bottom of the pye, then lay on the cheeks, and on them a pudding made of minced veal raw, and suet, cur­rans, grated bread or parmisan, eggs, saffron, nutmeg, pepper, and salt, put it on the head in the pye, with some thin slices of interlarded bacon, thin slices also of veal, and butter, close it up and make it according to these forms; being baked, liquor it with butter onely.

To bake a Calves Chaldron.

BOil it tender, and being cold mince it, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, cinamon, ginger salt, caraway­seeds, verjuyce, or grapes, some currans, sugar, rose-wa­ter, and dates, stir them all together and fill your pye, bake it, and being baked ice it.

Minced Pyes of Calves Chaldrons, or Mug gets?

BOil it tender, and being cold mince it small, then put to it bits of lard cut like dice, or interlarded bacon, some

[forms of minced pies]

yolks of hard eggs cut like dice also, some bits of veal and mutton cut also in the same bigness, as also lamb, some sgooseberries, grapes, or barberries, and eason it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, fill your pye, and lay on it some thin slices of interlarded bacon, and butter; close it up and bake it, liquor it with white wine beaten with butter.

To bake a Pig to be eaten cold called a Maremaid Pye.

TAke a pig, flay it and quarter it, then bone it, take al­so a good eel flayed, speated, boned, and seasoned

[maremaid pie]

with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then lay a quarter of your pig in a round pye, and part of the eel on that quarter then lay on another quarter on the other, and then more eel, and thus keep the order till your pye be full, then lay a few whole cloves, slices of bacon and butter, and close it up, bake it in good fine paste, being baked and cold, fill it up with good sweet butter.

Otherwayes.

Scald it, and bone it being first cleansed, dry the sides in a clean cloath, and season them with beaten nutmeg, pep­per, salt, and chopped sage; then have two neats tongues dryed, well boild, and cold, slice them out all the length as thick as a half crown, and lay a quarter of your pig in a square or round pye, and slices of the tongue on it, then an­other quarter of pig and more tongue, thus do four times [Page 205]double, and lay over all slices of bacon, a few cloves, but­ter, and a bay leaf or two; then bake it, and being baked, fill it up with good sweet butter. Make your paste white of butter and flower.

Otherwayes.

Take a pig, being scalded, flayed, and quartered, season it with beaten nutmeg, pepper, salt, cloves, and mace, lay it in your pye with some chopped sweet herbs, hard eggs, currans, or (none) put your herbs between every lay, with some gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, and lay on the top slices of interlarded bacon and butter, close it up, and bake it in good fine crust, being baked, liquor it with but­ter, verjuyce, and sugar. If to be eaten cold, with butter onely.

Otherwayes to be eaten hot.

Cut it to pieces, and make a pudding of grated bread, cream, suet, nutmeg, eggs and dates, make it into balls, and stick them with slic't almonds; then lay the pig in the pye, and balls on it, with dates, potato, large mace, lemon, and butter; being baked liquor it.

To bake four Hares in a Pye.

BOne them and lard them with great lard, being first seasoned with nutmeg and pepper, then take four ounces of pepper, four ounces of nutmegs, and eight oun­ces of salt, mix them together, season them, and make a round or square pye of course boulted rye meal; then the pye being made, put some butter in the bottom of it, and lay on the hares one upon another; then put upon it a few whole cloves, a sheet of lard over it, and good store of butter, close it up and bake it, being first basted over with eggs beaten together, or saffron; when it is baked liquor them with clarified butter.

Or bake them in white paste or pasty, if to be eaten hot, leave out half the seasoning.

To bake three Hares in a Pye to be eaten cold.

BOne three hares, mince them small, and stamp them with the seasoning of pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then have lard cut as big as ones little finger, and as long as will reach from side to side of your pye; then lay butter in the bottom of it, and a lay of meat, then a lay of lard and a lay of meat, and thus do five or six times, lay your lard all one way, but last of all a lay of meat, a few whole cloves, and slices of bacon over all, and some butter, close it up and bake it, being baked fill it up with sweet butter, and stop the vent.

Thus you may bake any venison, beef, mutton, veal, or rabits; if you bake them in earthen pans they will keep the longest.

To bake a Hare with a Pudding in his Belly.

[form of hare pie]

FOr to make this pye you must take as followeth, a gal­lon of flower, half an ounce of nutmegs, half an ounce of pepper, salt, capers, raisins, pears in quarters, prunes, with grapes, lemon or gooseberries, and for the liquor a pound of sugar, a pint of claret or verjuyce, and some large mace.

Thus also may you bake a fawn, kid, lamb, or rabit. Make your hare pye according to the foregoing form.

To make minced Pyes of a Hare.

TAke a hare, flay it and cleanse it, then take the flesh from the bones, and mince it with some fat bacon or beef suet raw, season it with pepper, mace, nutmeg, cloves, and salt, mingle all together with some grapes, gooseberries, or barberries; fill the pye, close it up, and bake it.

Otherwayes.

Mince it with beef-suet, a pound and a half of raisins minced, some currans, cloves, mace, salt, and cinamon, mingle all together, and fill the pye, bake it, and liquor it with claret.

To make a Pumpion Pye.

TAke a pound of pumpion and slice it, a handful of time, a little rosemary, and sweet marjoram stripped off the stalks, chop them small, then take cinamon, nutmeg, pep­per, and a few cloves all beaten, also ten eggs and beat them, then mix and beat them all together, with as much sugar as you think fit, then fry them like a froise, after it is fryed let it stand till it is cold, then fill your pye after this man­ner. Take sliced apples sliced thin round wayes, and lay a layer of the froise, and a layer of apples, with currans be­twixt the layers. While your pye is fitted, put in a good deal of sweet butter before you close it. When the pye is baked, take six yolks of eggs, some white wine or verjuyce, and make a caudle of this, but not too thick, cut up the lid, put it in, and stir them well together whilest the eggs and pumpion be not perceived, and so serve it up.

To make a Lumber Pye.

TAke some grated bread and beef-suet cut into bits like great dice, and some cloves and mace, then some veal or capon minced small with beef-suet, sweet herbs, salt, sugar, the yolks of six eggs boild hard and cut into quar­ters, put them to the other ingredients, with some bar­berries, some yolks of raw eggs and a little cream, work up all together and put it in the cauls of veal like little sausa­ges, then bake them in a dish, and being half baked, have a pye made and dryed in the oven; put these puddings in­to it with some butter, verjuyce, sugar, some dates on them, large mace, grapes, or barberries, and marrow; being ba­ked serve it with a cut cover on it, and scrape sugar on it.

Otherwayes.

Take some minced meat of chewits of veal, and put to it some three or four raw eggs, make it into balls, then

[form of lumber pie]

put them in a pye fitted for them according to this form, first lay in the balls, then lay on them some slic't dates, large mace, marrow, and butter; close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with verjuyce, sugar, and butter, then ice it, and serve it up.

To make an Ollive Pye.

TAke time, sweet marjoram, savory, spinage, parsley, sage, endive, sorrel, violet leaves, and strawberry leaves, mince them very small with some yolks of hard eggs, then put to them half a pound of currans, nutmeg, pepper, cinamon, sugar, and salt, minced raisins, gooseberries, or barberries, and dates minced small, mingle all together, then have slices of a leg of veal, or a leg of mutton, cut thin and hacked with the back of a knife, lay them on a clean board, and strow on the foresaid materials, roul [Page 209]them up and put them in a pye; then lay on them some dates, marrow, large mace, and some butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, cut it up, liquor it with butter, verjuyce and sugar, put a slic't lemon into it, and serve it up with scraped sugar.

To bake a Loin, Breast, or Rack of Veal, or Mutton.

IF you bake it with the bones, joynt a loyn very well, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, put it in your pye, and put butter to it, close it up and bake it in good crust, and liquor it with sweet butter.

Thus also you may bake the breast, either in pye or pa­sty; as also the rack or shoulder, being stuffed with sweet herbs, and fat of beef minced together, and baked either in pye or pasty.

In the summer time you may add to it spinage, goose­berries, grapes, barberries, or slic't lemon: and in winter, prunes, and currans, or raisins, and liquor it with butter, sugar, and verjuyce.

To make a Steak Pye the best way.

CUt a neck, loyn, or breast into steaks, and season them with pepper, nutmeg, and salt; then have some few sweet herbs minced small, with an onion, and the yolks of three or four hard eggs minced also: the pye being made put in the meat and a few capers, and strow these ingre­dients on it, then put in butter, close it up, and bake it three hours moderately, &c. Make the pye round and pretty deep.

Otherwayes.

The meat being prepared as before, season it with nut­meg, ginger, pepper, a whole onion, and salt; fill the pye, then put in some large mace, half a pound of currans, and [Page 210]butter, close it up and put it in the oven; being half baked, put in a pint of warmed claret, and when you draw it to send it up, cut the lid in pieces and stick it in the meat round the pye; or you may leave out onions, and put in sugar and verjuyce.

Otherwayes.

Take a loin of mutton, cut it into steaks, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, then lay a layer of raisins

[form of steak pie]

and prunes in the bottom of the pye, steaks on them, and then whole ciamon, then more fruit and steaks, thus do it three times, and on the top put more fruit, and grapes or slic't orange, dates, large mace, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with butter, white wine, and sugar, ice it, and servit hot.

To bake Steak Pyes the French way.

SEason the Steaks with pepper, nutmeg, and salt lightly, and set them by; then take a piece of the leanest of a leg of mutton, and mince it small with some beef-fuet and a few sweet herbs, as tops of time, pennyroyal, young red sage, grated bread, yolks of eggs, sweet cream, raisins of the sun, &c. work all together, and make it into little balls, and rolls, put them into a deep round pye on the steaks, then put to them some butter, and sprinkle it with verjuyce, close it up and bake it, being baked cut it up, then roul sage leaves in butter, fry them, and stick them in the balls, serve the pye without a cover, and liquor it with the juyce of two or three oranges, or lemons.

Otherwayes.

Bake these steaks in any of the foresaid wayes in patty­pan or dish, and make other paste called cold butter paste; [Page 211]take to a gallon of flour a pound and a half of butter, four or five eggs and but two whites, work up the butter and eggs into the flour, and being well wrought, put to it a little fair cold water, and make it up a stiff paste.

To bake a Gammon of Bacon.

STeep it all night in water, scrape it clean, and stuff it with all manner of sweet herbs, as sage, time, parsley, sweet marjoram, savory, violet leaves, strawberry leaves, fennil, rosemary, penny-royal, &c. being cleansed and chopped small with some yolks of hard eggs, beaten nut­meg and pepper, stuff it and boil it, and being fine and tender boild and cold, pare the under side, take off the skin, and season it with nutmeg and pepper, then lay it in your pye or pasty with a few whole cloves, and slices of raw ba­con over it, and butter; close it up in pye or pasty of short paste and bake it.

To bake wild Bore.

TAke the leg, season it, and lard it very well with good big lard seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, and beaten

[form of wild bore pie]

ginger, lay it in a pye of the form as you see, being seasoned all over with the same spices and salt, then put a few whole cloves on it, a few bay leaves, large slices of lard, and good store of butter, bake it in fine or course crust, being baked liquor it with good sweet butter and stop up the vent.

If to keep long bake it in an earthen pan in the above-said seasoning, and being baked fill it up with butter, and you may keep it a whole year.

To bake your wilde Bore that comes out of France.

LAy it in soak two dayes, then parboil it, and season it with pepper, nutmeg, cloves, and ginger; and when it is baked fill it up with butter.

To bake Red Deer.

TAke a side of red deer, bone it and season it, then take out the back sinnew and the skin, and lard the fil­lets or back with great lard as big as your middle finger; being first seasoned with nut­meg

[forms of red deer pie]

and pepper: then take four ounces of pepper, four ounces of nutmeg, and six ounces of salt, mix them well together, and season the side of venison; being well slash­ed with a knife in the inside for to make the seasoning enter; being seasoned, and a pye made according to these forms, put some butter in the bottom of the pye, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, and a bay leaf or two, lay on the flesh, season it, and coat it deep, then put on a few cloves, and good store of but­ter, close it up and bake it the space of eight or nine hours, but first baste the pye with six or seven eggs, beaten well together; being baked and cold, fill it up with good sweet clarified butter.

Take for a side or half hanch of red deer, half a bushel of rye meal, being coursely searced, and make it up very stiff with boiling water onely.

If you bake it to eat hot, give it but half the seasoning, [Page 213]and liquor it with claret wine and good butter.

To bake Fallow Deer for hot or cold.

TAke a side of venison, bone and lard it with great lard as big as ones little finger, and season it with two ounces of pepper, two ounces of numeg, and four ounces of salt; then have a pye made, and lay some butter in the bottom of it, then lay in the flesh, the inside down­ward, coat it thick with seasoning, and put to it on the top of the meat, with a few cloves, and good store of butter, close it up and bake it; the pye being first basted with eggs, being baked and cold, fill it up with clarified butter, and keep it to eat cold. Make the paste as you do for red deer, course drest through a boulter, a peck and a pottle of this meal will serve for a side or half hanch of a buck.

To bake a side or half Hanch to be eaten hot.

TAke a side of a buck being boned and the skins taken away, season it onely with two ounces of pepper, and as much salt, or half an ounce more, lay it on a sheet of fine paste with two pound of beef-suet finely minced and beat with a little fair water and laid under it, close it up and bake it, and being fine and tender baked, put to a good ladle full of gravy, or good strong mutton broth.

To make a Paste for it.

TAke a peck of flour by weight, and lay it on the pastery board, make a hole in the midst of the flour and put to it five pound of good fresh butter, the yolks of six eggs and but four whites, work up the butter and eggs into the flour, and being well wrought toge­ther [Page 214]put some fair water to it, and make it into a stiff paste.

In this fashion of fallow deer you may bake goat, doe, or a pasty of venison.

To make meer sauce, or a pickle to keep venison in that is tainted.

TAke strong ale and as much vinegar as will make it sharp, boil it with some bay salt, and make a strong brine, scum it and let it stand till it be cold, then put in your venison twelve hours, press it, parboil it, and sea­son it, then bake it as before is shown.

Other sauce for tainted venison.

TAke your venison, and boil water, beer, and wine vinegar together, and some bay leaves, time, savo­ry, rosemary and fennil, of each a handful, when it boils put in your venison, parboil it well and press it, and sea­son it as aforesaid, bake it for to be eaten cold or hot, and put some raw minced mutton under it.

Otherwayes to preserve tainted Venison.

BUry it in the ground in a clean cloath a whole night, and it will take away the corruption, savour, or stink.

Other meer sauce to counterfeit Beef or Mutton to give it a Venison colour.

TAke small beer and vinegar, and parboil your beef in it, let it steep all night, then put some turnsole to it, and being baked, a good judgement shall not decerne it from red or fallow deer.

Otherwayes to counterfeit Ram, Weather, or any Mutton for Venison.

BLoody it in sheeps, lambs, or pigs blood, or any good and new blood, season it as before, and bake it ei­ther for hot or cold. In this fashion you may bake mut­ton, lamb, or kid.

To make Ʋmble Pyes.

LAy minced beef-suet in the bottom of the pye, or sli­ces of interlarded bacon, and the umbles cut as big as small dice, with some bacon cut in the same form, and seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, fill your pyes with it and slices of bacon and butter, close it up and bake it, and liquor it with claret, butter, and stripped time.

To make Pies of Sweet-breads or Lamb-stones, according to these Forms.

[forms of sweet-breads or lamb-stones pies]

PArboil them and blanch them, or raw sweet-breads or stones, part them in halves, and season them with pepper, nutmeg, and salt, season them lightly; then put in the bottom of the pye some slices of interlarded bacon, and some pieces of artichoaks or mushrooms, then sweet­breads or stones, marrow, gooseberries, barberries, grapes, or slic't lemon, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor [Page 216]it with butter onely. Or otherwise with butter, white wine, and sugar, and sometimes adde some yolks of eggs.

To make minced Pies or Chewits of a Leg of Veal, Neats Tongue, Turkey, or Capon.

TAke to a good leg of veal six pound of beef-suet, then take the leg of veal, bone it, parboil it, and mince it very fine when it is hot; mince the suet by its self very fine also, then when they are cold mingle them together, then season the meat with a pound of sliced dates, a pound of sugar, an ounce of nutmegs an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half a pint of verjuyce, a pint of rose-water, a preserved orange, or any peel fine minced, an ounce of caraway comfets, and six pound of currans; put all these into a large tray with half a handful of salt, stir them up all together and fill your pies, close them up, bake them, and being baked, ice them with double refined sugar, rose-water, and butter.

Make the Paste with a peck of flour, and two pound of butter boild in fair water or liquor, make it up boiling hot.

To make minced Pies of Mutton.

TAke to a leg of mutton four pound of beef-suet, bone the leg, and cut it raw into small pieces, as also the suet, mince them together very fine, and being minced season it with two pound of currans, two pound of raisins, two pound of prunes, an ounce of carraway­seed an ounce of nutmegs, an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cloves and mace, and six ounces of salt; stir up all to­gether, fill the Pies, and bake them as the former.

To make minced Pies of Beef.

TAke a stone or eight pound of beef, also eight pound of suet, mince them very small, and put to them eight [Page 217]ounces of salt, two ounces of nutmegs, an ounce of pep­per, an ounce of cloves and mace, four pound of currans, and four pound of raisins, stir up all these together, and fill your pies.

Minced in the French Fashion, called Pelipate, or in English, Petits, made of Veal, Pork, or Lamb, or any kinde of Ve­nison, Beef, Poultry, or Fowl.

MIce them with lard, and being minced, season them with salt, and a little nutmeg, mix the meat with some pine-apple-seed, and a few grapes or gooseberries; fill the Pies and bake them, being baked, liquor them with a little gravy.

Sometimes for variety in the winter time you may use currans instead of grapes or gooseberries, and yolks of hard eggs minced among the meat.

Minced Pies in the Italian Fashion.

PArboil a leg of veal, and being cold mince it with beef-suet, and season it with pepper, salt, and goose­berries; mix with it a little verjuyce, currans, sugar, and a little saffron in powder.

Forms of minced Pies.

To make an exraordinary Pie, or a Bride Pie, of severall Compounds, being several distinct Pies on one bottom.

[form of bride pie]

PRovide cock-stones and combs, or lamb-stones and sweet-breads of veal, a little set in hot water and cut to pieces; also two or three oxe pallets blanched and slic't, a pint of oysters, sliced dates, a handful of pine kernels, a little quantity of broom-buds pickled, some fine interlard­ed bacon sliced, nine or ten chesnuts roasted and blanched, season them with salt, nutmeg, and some large mace, and close it up with some butter. For the caudle, beat up some butter, with three yolks of eggs, some white or claret [Page 219]wine, the juyce of a lemon or two; cut up the lid, and pour on the lear, shaking it well together; then day on the meat, slic't lemon, and pickled barberries, and cover it again; let these Ingredients be put into the moddle or scol­lops of the Pie.

Several other Pies belong to the first form, but you must be sure to make the three fashions proportionably an­swering one the other; you may set them on one bottom of paste, which will be more convenient; or if you set them several you may bake the middle one full of flour, it being baked and cold, take out the flour in the bottom, and put in live birds, or a snake, which will seem strange to the be­holders, which cut up the Pie at the table. This is onely for a Wedding to pass away time.

Now for the other Pies you may fill them with several Ingredients, as in one you may put oysters, being parboild and bearded, season them with large mace, pepper, some beaten ginger, and salt, season them lightly, and fill the Pie, then lay on marrow and some good butter, close it up and bake it. Then make a lear for it with white wine, the oyster liquor, three or four oysters bruised in pieces to make it stronger, but take out the pieces, and an onion, or rub the bottom of the dish with a clove of garlick; it being boild, put in a piece of butter, with a lemon, sweet hearbs will be good boild in it, bound up fast together; cut up the lid, or make a hole to let the lear in, &c.

Another you may make of Prawns and Cockles, being seasoned as the first, but no marrow: a few pickled mush­rooms, (if you have them) it being baked, beat up a piece of butter, a little vinegar, a slic't nutmeg, and the juyce of two or three oranges thick, and pour it into the Pie.

A third you may make a Bird Pie; take young Birds, as larks, pulled and drawn, and a force meat to put in the bellies made of grated bread, sweet herbs minced very [Page 220]small, beef-suet, or marrow minced, almonds beat with a little cream to keep them from oyling, a little parmisan (or none) or old cheese; season this meat with nutmeg, ginger, and salt; then mix them together with cream and eggs like a pudding, stuff the larks with it, then season the [...]arks with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, and lay them in the Pie, put in some butter, and scatter between them pine-kernels, yolks of eggs, and sweet herbs, the herbs and eggs being minced very small; being baked make a lear with the juyce of oranges and butter beat up thick, and shaken well together.

For another of the Pies, you may boil artichocks, and take onely the bottoms for the Pie, cut them into quarters or less, and season them with nutmeg. Thus with several Ingredients you may fill up the other Pies.

To make Custards divers wayes.

[form of custard]

TAke to a quart of cream, ten eggs, half a pound of su­gar, half a quarter of an ounce of mace, half as much ginger beaten very fine, and a spoonful of salt, strain [Page 221]them through a strainer; then the forms being finely dry­ed in the oven, fill them full on an even hearth, and bake them fair and white, draw them and dish them on a dish and plate; then strow on them biskets red and white, stick muskedines red and white, and scrape thereon double refi­ned sugar.

Make the paste for these Custards of a pottle of fine flour, make it up with boiling liquor, and make it up stiff.

To make an Almond Custard.

TAke two pound of almonds, blanch and beat them very fine with rose-water, then strain them with some two quarts of cream, twenty whites of eggs, and a pound of double refined sugar; make the paste as before­said, and bake it in a milde oven fine and white, garnish it as before, and scrape fine sugar over all.

To make a Custard without Eggs.

TAke a pound of almonds, blanch and beat them with rose-water into a fine paste, then put the spawn or row of a Carp or Pike to it, and beat them well together, with some cloves, mace, and salt, the spices being first bea­ten, and some ginger, strain them with some fair spring wa­ter, and put into the strained stuff half a pound of double refined sugar, and a-little saffron; when the Paste is dried and ready to fill, put into the bottom of the coffin some slic't dates, raisins of the sun stoned, and some boiled cur­rans, fill them and bake them; being baked scrape sugar on them. Be sure alwayes to prick your custards or forms before you set them in the oven.

If you have no row or spawn, put rice flour instead thereof.

To make an extraordinary good Cake.

TAke half a bushel of the best flour you can get very finely searsed, and lay it upon a large Pastrey board, make a hole in the midst thereof, and put to it three pound of the best butter you can get, with fourteen pound of currans finely picked and rubbed, three quarts of good new thick cream warmed, two pound of fine sugar beaten, three pints of good new ale barm or yeast, four ounces of cinamon fine beaten and searsed, also an ounce of beaten ginger, two ounces of nutmegs fine beaten and searsed; put in all these materials together, and work them up into an indifferent stiff paste, keep it warm till the oven be hot; then make it up and bake it being baked an hour and a half, ice it, then take four pound of double refined sugar, beat it and searce it, and put it in a deep clean scowred skillet the quantity of a gallon, boil it to a candy height with a little rose-water, then draw the cake, run it all over it, and set it into the oven till it be candied.

To make a Cake otherwise.

TAke a gallon of very fine flour, and lay it on the Pastry board, then strain three or four eggs with a pint of barm, and put it into a hole made in the middle of the flour, with some two nutmegs fine beaten, an ounce of ci­namon, and an ounce of cloves and mace beaten fine also, half a pound of sugar, and a pint of cream; put these in­to the flower with two spoonfuls of salt, and work it up good and stiff; then take half the paste, and work three pound of currans well picked and rubbed into it, then take the other part and divide it into two equal pieces, drive them out as broad as you would have the cake, then lay one of the sheets of paste on a sheet of paper, and upon [Page 223]that the half that hath the currans, and the other part on the top, close it up round, prick it, and bake it; being baked, ice it with butter, sugar, and rose-water, and set it again into the oven.

To make French Bread the best way.

TAke a gallon of fine flour, and a pint of good new ale barm or yeast, and put it to the flour, with the whites of six new laid eggs well beaten in a dish, and mixt with the barm in the middle of the flour, also three spoonfuls of fine salt; then warm some milk and fair water, and put to it, and make it up pretty stiff, being well wrought and worked up, cover it in a boul or tray with a warm cloth till your oven be hot; then make it up either in rouls, or fashion it in little wooden dishes and bake it, being baked in a quick oven, chip it hot.

Section 10.

To bake all manner of Curneld Fruits in Pyes, Tarts, or made Dishes, raw or preserved, as Quinces, War­dens, Pears, Pippins, &c.

To bake a Quince Pye.

TAke fair quinces, core and pare them very thin, and put them in a pye, then put in it two races of ginger slic't, as much cinamon broken into bits, and some eight or ten whole cloves, lay them in the bottom of the pye, and lay on the quinces close packed, with as much fine refined sugar as the quin­ces weighs, close it up and bake it; and being well soaked the space of four or five hours, ice it.

Otherwayes.

Take a gallon of flour, a pound and a half of butter, six eggs, thirty quinces, three pound of sugar, half an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half an ounce of cloves, and some rosewater, make them in a pye or tart, and being baked strew on double refined sugar.

Otherwayes.

Bake these quinces raw, slic't very thin, with beaten cinamon and the same quantity of sugar, as before, either in tart, patty-pan, dish, or in cold butter paste, some­times [Page 225]mix them with wardens, pears, or pippins, and some minced citron.

To make a Quince Pye otherwayes, according to this Form.

[form of quince pie]

TAke Quinces and preserve them, being first coared and pared, then make a sirrup of fine sugar and spring water, take as much as the quinces weigh, and to every pound of sugar a pint of fair water, make your sirrup in a preserving pan; being scum'd and boild to a sirrup, put in the quinces, boil them up till they be well coloured, and being cold, bake them in pyes whole or in halves, in a round tart, dish, or patty pan with a cut cover, or in quar­ters; being baked, put in the same sirrup, but before you bake them, put in more fine sugar, and leave the sirrup to put in afterwards, then ice it.

Thus you may do of any Curneld fruits, as wardens, pip­pins, pears, pearmains, green quodlings, or any good ap­ples, in laid tarts, or cuts.

To make a slic't Tart of Quinces, Wardens, Pears, Pippins, in slices raw of divers Compounds.

THese foresaid fruits being finely pared, and slic't in very thin slices, season them with beaten cinamon, and can­ded citron minced, canded orange, or both, or raw orange-peel, raw lemon-peel, fennil-seed, or caraway-seed, or with­out any of these compounds or spices, but the fruits alone one amongst the other; put to ten pippins six quinces, six wardens, eight pears, and two pound of sugar, close it up, bake it, and ice it as the former tarts.

Thus you may also bake it in patty-pan, or dish, with cold butter paste.

To bake Quinces, Wardens, Pears, Pippins, or any Fruits preserved to be baked in Pyes, Tarts, Patty-pan or Dish.

PReserve any of the foresaid in white wine and sugar till the sirrup grow thick, then take the quinces out of it, and lay them to cool in a dish, then set them into the pye, and prick cloves on the tops with some cinamon and good store of refined sugar, close them up with a cut co­ver, and being baked, ice it, and fill it up with the sirrup they were first boiled in.

Otherwayes.

You may bake them in an earthen pot with some claret wine and sugar and keep them for your use.

To make a Trotter Pye of Quinces, Wardens, Pears, &c.

TAke them either severally or altogether in quarters, or slic't raw, if in quarters put some whole ones amongst them, if slic't beaten spices, and a little butter and sugar; take to twelve quinces a pound of sugar, and a quarter of a [Page 227]pound of butter, close it up and bake it, and being baked cut it up and mash the fruit to pieces, then put in some cream, and yolks of eggs beaten together, and put it into the pye, stir all together, and cut the cover into five or six pieces like lozenges or three square, and scrape on sugar.

To make a Pippin Pye.

TAke thirty good large pippins, pare them very thin and make the pye, then put in the pippins, thirty cloves, a quarter of an ounce of whole cinamon, and as much pared and slic't, a quarter of a pound of orangado, as much of lemon in sucket, and a pound and half of refi­ned sugar, close it up and bake it, it will ask four hours baking, then ice it with butter, sugar, and rose water.

To make a Pippin Tart according to this Form.

[form of pippin tart]

TAke fair pippins and pare them, then cut them in quar­ters, coar them and stew them in claret wine, whole cinamon, and slic't ginger; stew them half an hour, then put them into a dish and break them not, when they are cold, lay them one by one into the tart, then lay on some green cittern minced small, candied orange or coriander, [Page 228]put on sugar and close it up, bake it and ice it, then scrape on sugar and serve it.

To make a Pippin Tart, either in Tart, Patty-pan, or Dish.

TAke ten fair pippins, preserve them in white wine, sugar, whole cinamon, slic't ginger, and eight or ten cloves, being finely preserved and well coloured, lay them on a cut tart of short paste; or in place of preserving you may bake them between two dishes in the oven for the foresaid use.

A made Dish of Pippins.

TAke pippins, pare and slice them, then boil them in claret wine in a pipkin, or between two dishes with some sugar, and beaten cina­mon,

[form of pippins dish]

when 'tis boiled good and thick, mash it like marmalade, and put it in a dish of puff-paste or short paste, according to this form, with a cut cover, and being bake dice it.

To preserve Pippins in slices.

TAke pippins and slice them round with the coars or kernels in, as thick as a half-crown piece, and some lemon peel amongst them in slices, or else cut like small lard, or orange peel, first boild and cut in the same manner; then make the sirrup weight for weight, and being clari­fied and scummed clean, put in the pippins and boil them up quick; to a pound of sugar, a pint of fair water, or a pint of white wine or claret, and make them of two colours.

To make a Warden or a Pear Tart quartered.

TAke twenty good wardens, pare them, and cut them in a tart, and put to them two pound of refined su­gar, twenty whole cloves, a quarter of an ounce of cina­mon broke into little bits, and three races of ginger pa­red and slic't thin; then close up the tart and bake it, it will ask five hours baking, then ice it with a quarter of a pound of double refined sugar, rose water, and butter.

Other Tart of Wardens, Quinces, or Pears.

[form of tart]

FIrst bake them in a pot, then cut them in quarters and coat them, put them in a tart made according to this form, close it up, and when it is baked, scrape on sugar.

To make a Tart of green Pease.

TAke green pease and boil them tender, than pour them out into a cullender, season them with saffron, salt, and put sugar to them and some sweet butter, then close it up and bake it almost an hour, then draw it forth of the oven and ice it, put in a little verjuyce, and shake them well together, then scrape on sugar, and serve it in

To make a Tart of Hips.

TAke hips, cut them, and take out the feeds veryclean, then wash them and season them with sugar, cinamon, and ginger, close the tart, bake it, ice it, scrape on sugar, and serve it in.

To make a Tart of Rice.

BOil the rice in milk or cream, being tender boild, pour it into a dish and season it with nutmeg, ginget, cina­mon, pepper, salt, sugar, and the yolks of six eggs, put it in the tart with some juyce of orange; close it, and bake it, being baked scrape on sugar, and so serve it up.

To make a Tart of Medlers.

TAke medlers that are rotten, strain them, and set them on a chafing-dish of coals, season them with sugar, cinamon, and ginger, put some yolks of eggs to them, let it boil a little, and lay it in a cut tart; being baked, scrape on sugar.

To make a Cherry Tart.

TAke out the stones, and lay the cherries into the tart, with beaten cinamon, ginger, and sugar, then close it up, bake it, and ice it; then make a sirrup of muskedine, and damask water, and pour it into the tart, scrape on su­gar, and so serve it.

To make a Strawberry Tart.

WAsh the strawberries, and put them into the tart, season them with cinamon, ginger, and a little [Page 231]red wine, then put on sugar, bake it half an hour, ice it, scrape on sugar, and serve it.

To make a Taffety Tart.

FIrst wet the paste with butter and cold water, roul it very thin, then lay apples in layes, and between eve­ry lay of apples strew some fine sugar, and some lemon-peel cut very small, you may also put some fennil-seed to them; let them bake an hour or more, then ice them with rose water, sugar, and butter beaten together, and wash them over with the same, strew more fine sugar on them, and put them into the oven again, being iced dish them, and serve them hot or cold.

To make an Almond Tart.

STrain beaten Almonds with cream, yolks of eggs, su­gar, cinamon, and ginger, boil it thick, and fill your tart, being baked ice it.

To make a Damsin Tart.

BOil them in wine, and strain them with cream, sugar, cinamon, and ginger, boil it thick and fill your tart.

To make a Spinage Tart of three colours, green, yellow, and White.

TAke two handfuls of young tender spinage, wash it and put it into a skillet of boiling liquor; being ten­der boild have a quart of cream boild with some whole ci­namon, quartered nutmeg, and a grain of musk; then strain the cream, twelve yolks of eggs, and the boild spinage into a dish, with some rose water, a little sack, and some [Page 232]fine sugar, boil it over a chafing-dish of coals, and stir it that it curd not, keep it till the tart be dried in the oven, and dish it in the form of three colours, green, white, and yellow.

To make Cream Tarts.

THicken cream with muskefied bisket bread, and serve it in a dish, stick wafers round about it, and slices of

[forms of cream tarts]

preserved citteron, and in the middle a preserved orange with biskets, the garnish of the dish being of puff-paste.

Or you may boil quin­ces, wardens pears, and pippins in slices or quarters, and strain them into cream, as also these fruits, melacattons, necturnes, apricocks, peaches, plums, or cherries, and make your tarts of these forms.

To make a French Tart.

TAke a pound of almonds, blanch and beat them into fine paste in a stone morter, with rose water, then beat the white breast of a roast cold turkey being minced, and beat with it a pound of lard minced, with the marrow of four bones, and a pound of butter, the juyce of three le­mons, two pound of hard sugar; being fine beaten, slice a whole green piece of citron in small slices, a quarter of a pound of pistaches, and the yolks of eight or ten eggs, mingle all together, then make a paste for it with cold butter, two or three eggs, and cold water, &c.

To make a Quodling Pye.

TAke green quodlings and quodle them, peel them and put them again into the same water, cover them [Page 233]close and let them simper on embers till they be very green, then take them up and let them drain, pick out the noses, and leave on the stalks, then put them in a pye, and put to them fine sugar, whole cinamon, slic't ginger, a little musk, and rose water, close them up with a cut cover, and as soon as it boils up in the oven, draw it, and ice it with rose water, butter, and sugar.

Or you may preserve them and bake them in a dish, with paste, tart, or patty-pan.

To make a Dish in the Italian Fashion.

TAke pleasant pears, slice them into thin slices, and put to them half as much sugar as they weigh, then mince some candied citron, and candied orange small, mix it with the pears and lay them on a bottom of cold butter paste in a patty-pan with some fine beaten cinamon; lay on the sugar and close it up, bake it, and being baked, ice it with rose water, fine sugar, and butter.

For the several colours of Tarts.

IF to have them yellow, preserved quinces, apricocks, necturnes, and melacattons, boil them up in white wine, with sugar, and strain them

Otherwayes, strained yolks of eggs, and cream.

For green tarts, take green quodlings, green preserved apricocks, green preserved plums, green grapes, and green gooseberries.

For red tarts, quinces, pippins, cherries, rasberries, bar­berries, red currans, red gooseberries, damsons.

For black tarts, prunes, and many other berries pre­served.

For white tarts, whites of eggs and cream.

Of all manner of tart stuff strained, that carries his co­lour [Page 234]black, as Prunes, Damsins, &c. for laid or set Tarts, Dishes, or Patty-pans.

Tart Stuff of Damsins.

TAke a pottle of damsins and good ripe apples, being pared and cut into quarters, put them into an earthen pot with a little whole cinamon, slic't ginger, and sugar, bake them, and being cold strain them with some rose-wa­ter, and boil the stuff thick, &c.

Other Tart Stuff that carries his colour black.

TAke three pound of prunes, and eight fair pippins pa­red and cored, stew them together with some claret wine, some whole cinamon, slic't ginger, a sprig of rose­mary, sugar, and a clove or two, being well stewed and cold, strain them with rose-water and sugar.

To make other black Tart Stuff.

TAke twelve pound of prunes, and sixteen pound of rai­sins, wash them clean, and stew them in a pot with wa­ter, boil them till they be very tender, and then strain them through a course strainer; season it with beaten ginger and sugar, and give it a walm on the fire.

Yellow Tart Stuff.

TAke twelve yolks of eggs, beat them with a quart of cream, and bake them in a soft oven; being baked strain them with some fine sugar, rose-water, musk, amber­greece, and a little sack; or in place of baking, boil the cream and eggs.

White Tart Stuff.

MAke the white Tart stuff with cream, in all points as the yellow, and the same seasoning.

Green Tart Stuff.

TAke spinage, boild green pease, green apricocks, green plumbs quodled, peaches quodled, quodled green necturnes, gooseberries quodled, green sorrel, and the juyce of green wheat.

To bake Apricocks green.

TAke young green apricocks, so tender, that you may thrust a pin through the stone, scald them and scrape the outside, oft putting them in water as you peel them till your tart be ready, then dry them and fill the tart with them, and lay on good store of fine sugar, close it up and bake it, ice it, scrape on sugar, and serve it up.

To bake Mellacattons.

TAke and wipe them clean, and put them in a pie made scollop wayes or in some other pretty work, fill the pie, and put them in whole with weight for weight in refined sugar, close it up and bake it, being baked ice it.

Sometimes for change adde to them some chips or bits of whole cinamon, a few whole cloves, and slic't ginger.

To preserve Apricocks or any Plumbs green.

TAke apricocks when they are so young and green, that you may put a needle through stone and all, but all [Page 236]other plumbs must be taken green, and at the highest growth, then put them in indifferent hot water to break them, let them stand close covered in that hot water till a thin skin will come off with scraping, all this while they will look yellow, then put them into another skillet of hot water, and let them stand covered until they turn to a per­fect green, then take them out, weigh them, take their weight in sugar and something more, and so preserve them. Clarifie the sugar with the white of an egg and some water.

To preserve Apricocks being ripe.

STone them, then weigh them with sugar, and take weight for weight, pare them and strow on the sugar, let them stand till the moisture of the apricocks hath wet the sugar, and stands in a sirrup; then set them on a soft fire not suffering them to boil till your sugar be all melted; then boil them a pretty pace for half an hour, still stirring them in the sirrup, then set them by two hours, and boil them again till your sirrup be thick, and your apricocks look clear, boil up the sirrup higher, then take it off, and being cold put in the apricocks into a gallipot or glass, close them up with a clean paper, and leather over all.

To preserve Peaches after the Venetian way.

TAke twenty young peaches, part them in two, and take out the stones, then take as much sugar as they weigh, and some rose-water, put in the peaches, and make a sirrup that it may stand and stick to your fingers, let them boil softly a while, then lay them in a dish, and let them stand in the same two or three dayes, then set your sirrup on the fire, let it boil up, and then put in the peaches, and so preserve them.

To preserve Mellacattons.

STone them and parboil them in water, then peel off the outward skin of them, they will boil as long as a piece of beef, and therefore you need not fear the break­ing of them; when they are boild tender, make sirrup of them as you do of any other fruit, and keep them all the year.

To preserve Cherries.

TAke a pound of the smallest cherries, but let them be well coloured, boil them tender in a pint of fair water, then strain the liquor from the cherries, and take two pound of other fair cherries, stone them, and put them in your preserving-pan, with a laying of cherries and a laying of sugar, then pour the sirrup of the other strained cher­ries over them, and let them boil as fast as may be with a blazing fire, that the sirrup may boil over them; when you see that the sirrup is of a good colour, something thick, and begins to jelly, set them a cooling, and being cold pot them, and so keep them all the year.

To preserve Damsins.

TAke damsins that are large and well coloured, (but not thorow ripe, for then they will break) pick them clean, and wipe them one by one; then weigh them, and to every pound of damsins you must take a pound of Bar­bery sugar, white and good dissolved in half a pint or more of fair water, boil it almost to the height of a sirrup, and then put in the damsins, keeping them with a continual scumming and stirring, so let them boil on a gentle fire [Page 238]till they be enough, then take them off and keep them all the year.

To preserve Grapes as green as Grass.

TAke grapes very green, stone them, and cut them into little bunches, then take the like quantity of refined sugar finely beaten, and strow a row of sugar in your pre­serving pan, and a lay of grapes upon it, then strow on more sugar upon them, put to them four or five spoon­fulls of fair water, and boil them up as fast as you can.

To preserve Barberries.

TAke barberries very fair and well coloured, pick out the stones, weigh them, and to every ounce of bar­berries take three ounces of hard sugar, half an ounce of pulp of barberries, and an ounce of red rose water to dis­solve the sugar: boil it to a sirrup, then put in the barber­ries and let them boil a quarter of an hour, then take them up, and being cool pot them, and they will keep their colour all the year. Thus you may preserve red cur­rans, &c.

To preserve Gooseberries green.

TAke some of the largest gooseberries that are called Gascoyn gooseberries, set a pan of water on the fire, and when it is lukewarm put in the berries and cover them close, keep them warm half an hour; then have another posnet of warm water, put them into that, in like sort quodle them three times over in hot water till they look green; then pour them into a sieve, let all the water run from them, and put them to as much clarified sugar as will [Page 239]cover them, let them simper leasurely close covered, then your gooseberries will look as green as leek blades, let them stand simpering in that sirrup for an hour, then take them off the fire, and let the sirrup stand till it be cold, then warm them once or twice, take them up, and let the sirrup boil by it self, pot them, and keep them.

To preserve Rasberries.

TAke fair ripe rasberries, (but not over ripe) pick them from the stalks, then take weight for weight of dou­ble refined sugar, and the juyce of rasberries; to a pound of rasberries take a quarter of a pint of raspass juyce, and as much of fair water, boil up the sugar and liquor, and make the sirrup, scum it, and put in the raspass, stir them into the sirrup, and boil them not too much; being preser­ved take them up, and boil the sirrup by it self, not too long, it will keep the colour: being cold, pot them and keep them. Thus you may also preserve strawberries.

The time to preserve green Fruits.

GOseberries must be taken about Whitsuntide, as you see them in bigness, the long gooseberry will be sooner then the red, the white Wheat plum which is ever ripe in Wheat Harvest, must be taken in the midst of July, the Pear plumb in the midst of August, the Peach and Pippin about Bartholomew tide or a little before, the Grape in the first week of September. Note that to all your green fruits in general that you will preserve in sirrup, you you must take to every pound of fruit, a pound and two ounces of sugar, and a grain of musk; your plumb, pippin and peach will have three quarters of an hour boiling, or [Page 240]rather more, and that very softly, keep the fruit as whole as you can; your grapes and gooseberries must boil half an hour something fast and they will be the fuller. Note also that to all your Conserves you take the full weight of su­gar, then take two skillets of water, and when they are scalding hot, put the fruits first into one of them, and when that grows cold put them in the other, changing them till they be about to peel, then peel them, and afterwards settle them in the same water till they look green, then take them and put them into sugar sirrup, and so let them gently boil till they come to a jelly; let them stand therein a quarter of an hour, then put them into a pot and keep them.

Section 11.

To make all manner of made Dishes, with, or without Paste.

To make a Paste for a Pie.

TAke to a gallon of flour a pound of butter, boil it in fair water, and make the paste up quick.

To make cool Butter Paste for Patty-pans or Pasties.

TAke to every peck of flour five pound of butter, the whites of six eggs, and work it well together with cold spring water; you must bestow a great deal of pains and but little water, or you put out the Millers eyes. This paste is good onely for patty-pan and pasty.

Sometimes for this paste put in but eight yolks of eggs, and but two whites, and six pound of butter.

To make Paste for thin bake't Meats.

THe paste for your thin and standing bake't meats must be made with boiling water, put to every peck of flour two pound of butter, but let your butter boil first in your liquor.

To make Custard Paste.

LEt it be onely boiling water and flour without butter, or put sugar to it, which will adde to the stifness of it, and thus likewise all pastes for Cuts and Orangado Tarts, or such like.

Paste for made Dishes in the Summer.

TAke to a gallon of flour three pound of butter, eight yolks of eggs, and a pint of cream or almond milk, work up the butter and eggs dry into the flour, then put cream to it, and make it pretty stiff.

Paste Royal for made Dishes.

TAke to a gallon of flour a pound of sugar, a quart of almond milk, a pound and a half of butter, and a lit­tle saffron, work up all cold together, with some beaten cinamon, two or three eggs, rose-water, and a grain of am­bergreece and musk.

Otherwayes.

Take a pottle of flour, half a pound of butter, six yolks of eggs, a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of sugar, and some fine beaten cinamon, and work up all cold.

Otherwayes.

Take to a pottle of flour, four eggs, a pound and a half of butter, and work them up dry in the flour, then make up the paste with a pint of white wine, rose-water, and sugar.

To make Paste for Lent for made Dishes.

TAke a quart of flour, make it up with almond milk, half a pound of butter, and some saffron.

To make Puff Paste divers wayes.
The first way.

TAke a pottle of flour, mix it with cold water, half a pound of butter, and the whites of five eggs, work these together very well and stiff, then roul it out very thin, and put flour under it and over it, then take near a pound of butter, and lay it in bits all over it, double it in five or six doubles; this being done, roul it out the second time, and serve it as at the first, then roul it out and cut it into what form, or for what use you please; you need not fear the curle, for it will divide as often as you double it, which ten or twelve times is enough for any use.

The second way.

Take a quart of flour, and a pound and a half of butter, work the half pound of butter dry into the flour, then put three or four eggs to it, and as much cold water as will make it leith paste, work it in a piece of a foot long, then strew a little flour on the table, take it by the end, and beat it till it stretch to be long, then put the ends together, and beat it again, and so do five or six times, then work it up round, and roul it up broad; then your pound of butter with a rouling-pin, that it may be little, take little bits thereof, and stick it all over the paste, fold up your paste close and coast it down with your rouling-pin, roul it out again, and so do five or six time, then use it as you will.

The third way.

Break two eggs into three pints of flour, make it with cold water, and roul it out pretty thick and square, then take so much butter as paste, lay it in ranks, and di­vide your butter in five pieces, that you may lay it on at five several times, roul your paste very broad, and stick one part of the butter in little pieces all over your paste, then throw a handful of flour slightly on, fould up your paste [Page 244]and beat it with a rouling-pin, so roul it out again, thus do five times, and make it up.

The fourth way.

Take to a quart of flour, four whites and but two yolks of eggs, and make it up with as much cream as will make it up pretty stiff paste, then roul it out, and beat three quar­ters of a pound of butter of equal hardness of the paste, lay it on the paste in little bits at ten several times; drive out your paste alwayes one way, and being made use it as you will.

The fifth way.

Work up a quart of flour with half pound of butter, three whites of eggs, and some fair spring water, make it a pretty stiff paste and drive it out, then beat half a pound of more butter of equal hardness of the paste, and lay it on the paste in little bits at three several times, roul it out and use it for what use you please.

Drive the paste out every time very thin.

A made Dish, or Florentine, of any kinde of Tongue, in Dish, Pie, or Patty-pan.

TAke a fresh neats tongue, boil it tender and blanch it, being cold cut it into little square bits as big as a nut­meg, and lard it with very small lard; then have another tongue raw, take off the skin, and mince it with beef-suet, then lay on one half of it in the dish or patty-pan upon a sheet of paste: then lay on the tongue being larded and finely seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, and salt; then with the other minced tongue put grated bread to it, some yolks of raw eggs, some sweet herbs minced small, and made up in­to balls as big as a walnut, lay them on the other tongue, with some chesnuts, marrow, large mace, some grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, some slices of interlarded ba­con and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor [Page 245]it with grape-verjuyce, beaten butter, and the yolks of three or four eggs strained with the verjuyce.

Made Dish of Tongues otherwayes.

TAke neats tongues or smaller tongues, boil them ten­der and slice them thin, then season them with nut­meg, pepper, beaten cinamon, salt, and some ginger, sea­son them lightly and lay them in a dish on a bottom or sheet of paste mingled with some currans, marrow, large mace, dates, slic't lemon, grapes, barberries, or gooseber­ries, and butter, close up the dish, and being almost baked, liquor it with white wine, butter, and sugar, and ice it.

Made Dish in Paste of two Rabits, with sweet liquor.

TAke the rabits, flay them, draw them, and cut them in­to small pieces as big as a walnut, then wash and dry them with a clean cloth, and season them with pepper, nutmeg, and salt; lay them on a bottom of paste, also lay on them dates, preserved lettice stalks, marrow, large mace, grapes, and slic't orange or lemon, put butter to it, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with sugar, white wine, and butter; or in place of wine, grape verjuyce, and strained yolks of raw eggs.

In winter bake them with currans, prunes, skirrets, rai­sins of the sun, &c.

A made Dish, or Florentine, of a Partridge or Capon.

BEing roasted and minced very small with as much beef marrow, put to it two ounces of orangado minced small with as much green citron minced also, season the meat with a little beaten cloves, mace, nutmeg, salt, and sugar, mix all together, and bake it in puff-paste; when it [Page 246]is baked, open it and put in half a grain of musk or amber­greece, dissolved with a little rose water, and the juyce of oranges, stir all together amongst the meat, cover it again and serve it to the table.

To make a Florentine, or Dish without Paste, or on Paste.

TAke a leg of mutton or veal, shave it into thin slices, and mingle it with some sweet herbs, as sweet mar­joram, time, savory, parsley, and rosemary, being minced very smail, a clove of garlick, some beaten nutmeg, pep­per, a minced onion, some grated manchet, and three or four yolks of raw eggs, mix all together with a little salt, some thin slices of interlarded bacon, and some oyster li­quor, lay the meat round the dish on a sheet of paste, or in the dish without paste, bake it, and being baked, stick bay leaves round the dish.

To bake Potatoes, Artichocks, in Dish, Pye, or Patty-pan, either in Paste, or little Pasties, according to these forms.

[forms of pies]

TAke any of these roots and boil them in fair water, but put them not in till the water boils, being ten­der boild, blanch them, and season them with nutmeg, pepper, cinamon, and salt, season them lightly, then lay on a sheet of paste in a dish, and lay on some bits of butter, then lay on the potatoes round the dish, also some eringo-roots, and dates in halves, beef-marrow, large mace, slic't lemon, and some butter, close it up with an­other [Page 247]sheet of paste, bake it, and being baked, liquor it with grape verjuyce, butter, and sugar, and ice it with rose water and sugar.

To make a made Dish of Spinage in Paste baked.

TAke some young spinage, and put it into boiling hot fair water, having boiled two or three walms, drain it from the water, chop it very small, and put it in a dish with some beaten cinamon, salt, sugar, a few slic't dates, a grain of musk dissolved in rose water, some yolks of hard eggs chopped small, some currans and butter; stew these foresaid materials on a chafing-dish of coals, then have a dish of short paste on it, and put this composition upon it, either with a cut, a close cover, or none; bake it, and be­ing baked, ice it with some fine sugar, rose water, and butter.

Other made Dish of Spinage in Paste baked.

BOil spnage as beforesaid, being tender boild, drain it in a cillender, chop it small, and strain it with half a pound of almond paste, three or four yolks of eggs, half a grain of musk, three or four spoonfulls of cream, a quartern of fine sugar and a little salt; then bake it on a sheet of piste, on a dish without a cover, in a very softly oven, being fine and green baked, stick it with preserved barberries or strow on red and white biskets, or red and white muskedines, and scrape on fine sugar.

A made Dish of Spinage otherwayes.

TAke a pound of fat and well relished cheese, and a pound of cheese-curds, stamp them in a mor­tar with some sugar, then put in a pint of the juyce of [Page 248]spinage, a pint of cream, ten eggs, cinamon, pepper, nut­meg, and cloves; make your dish without a cover, accord­ing to this form, being baked ice it.

[form of spinach dish]

To make a made Dish of Barberries.

TAke a good quantity of them and boil them with cla­ret wine, rose water, and sugar, being boild very thick, strain them, and put them on a bottom of puff paste in a dish, or short fine paste made of sugar, fineflour, cold butter, and cold water, and a cut cover of the sime paste, bake it, and ice it, and cast bisket on it, but before you lay on the iced cover, stick it with raw barberries is the pulp or stuff.

To make a Pescod Dish in Puff paste.

TAke a pound of almonds, and a quarter of a pound of sugar, beat the almonds finely to a paste with some rose water, then beat the sugar amongst them, min­gle some sweet butter with it, and make this stuff up in puff paste like pescods, bake them upon papers, and being ba­ked, ice them with rose water, butter, and fine sugar.

In this fashion you may make pescod stuff of preserved quinces, pippins, pears, or preserved plumbs in puff paste.

Made Dishes of Frogs in the Italian Fashion.

TAke the thighs and fry them in clarified butter, then have slices of salt eels watered, flayed, boned, boiled, and cold, slice them in thin slices and season both with pep­per, nutmeg, and ginger, lay butter on your paste, and lay a rank of frog and a rank of eel, some currans, gooseberries, or grapes, raisins, pine-apple seeds, juyce of orange, sugar, and butter; thus do three times, close up your dish, and being baked ice it.

Make your paste of almond milk, flour, butter, yolks of eggs, and sugar.

In the foresaid dish you may adde fryed onions, yolks of hard eggs, cheese-curds, almond paste, or grated cheese.

To make a made Dish of Marrow.

TAke the marrow of two or three marrow bones, cut it into pieces like great square dice, and put to it a penny manchet grated fine, some slic't dates, half a quarter of currans, a little cream, roasted wardens, pippins or quin­ces slic't, and two or three yolks of raw eggs, season them with cinamon, ginger, and sugar, and mingle all together.

A made Dish of Rice in Puff Paste.

BOil your rice in fair water very tender, scum it, and be­ing boild put it in a dish, then put to it butter, sugar, nutmeg, salt, rose-water, and the yolks of six or eight eggs, put it in a dish of Puff-paste, close it up and bake it, being baked ice it, and cast on red and white biskets, and scraping sugar.

Sometimes for change you may adde boild currans and beaten cinamon, and leave out nutmeg.

Otherwyes, of Almond Paste and boild Rice.

MIX all together with some cream, rose-water, sugar-cinamon, yolks of eggs, salt, some boild currans, and butter; close it up and bake it in Puff-paste, ice it, and cast on red and white biskets and scraping sugar.

Otherwayes, a made Dish of Rice in Paste.

WAsh the rice clean, and boil it in cream till it be somewhat thick, then put it out into a dish, and put to it some sugar, butter, six or eight yolks of eggs, beaten cinamon, slie't dates, currans, rose-water, and salt, mix all together, and bake it in puff-paste or short paste, being baked ice it, and cast on biskets on it.

To make a made Dish of Rice, Flour, and Cream.

TAke half a pound of rice, dust it and pick it clean, then wash it, dry it, lay it abroad in a dish as thin as you can, or dry in a temperate oven; being well dried rub it, and beat it in a mortar till it be as fine as flour; then take a pint of good thick cream, the whites of three new laid eggs well beaten together, and a little rose-water, set it on a soft fire, and boil it till it be very thick, then put it in a platter and let it stand till it be cold, then slice it out like leach, cast some bisket upon it, and so serve it.

To make a made Dish of Rice, Prunes, and Raisins.

TAke a pound of prunes, and as many raisins of the sun, pick and wash them, then boil them with water [Page 251]and wine, of each a like quantity; when you first set them on the fire, put rice flour to them, being tender boild strain them with half a pound of sugar, and some rose-water, then stir the stuff till it be thick like leach, put it in a little earthen pan, being cold slice it, dish it, and cast red and white biskets on it.

To make a made Dish of Blanchmanger.

TAke a pint of cream, the whites of six new laid eggs, and some sugar, set them over a soft fire in a skillet, and stir it continually till it be good and thick, then strain it, and being cold, dish it on a puff-paste bottom with a cut cover, and cast biskets on it.

A made Dish of Custard-stuff, called an Artichock Dish.

BOil custard stuff in a clean scowred skillet, stir it conti­nually till it be somewhat thick, then put it in a clean strainer, and let it drain in a dish, strain it with a little musk or ambergreece, then bake a star of puff-paste on a paper; being baked take it off the paper, and put it in a dish for your stuff, then have lozenges also ready baked of puff-paste, stick it round with them, and scrape on fine sugar.

A made Dish of Butter and Eggs.

TAke the yolks of twenty four eggs, and strain them with cinamon, sugar, and salt, then put melted but­ter to them, some fine minced pippins, and minced citron, put it on your dish of paste, and put slices of citron round about it, bar it with puff-paste, and the bottom also, or short paste in the bottom.

To make a made Dish of Curds.

TAke some very tender curds, wring the whey from them very well, then put to them two raw eggs, cur­rans, sweet butter, rose-water, cinamon, sugar, and min­gle all together; then make a fine paste with flour, yolks of eggs, rose-water, and other water, sugar, saffron, and butter wrought up cold, bake it either in this paste or in puff-paste, being baked ice it with rose-water, sugar, and butter.

To make Paste of Violets, Cowslips, Burrage, Bug­loss, Rosemary Flowers, &c.

TAke any of these flowers, pick the best of them, and stamp them in a stone mortar, then take double refi­ned sugar, and boil it to a candy height with as much rose-water as will melt it, stir it continually in the boiling, and being boild thick, cast it into lumps upon a pie plate, when it is cold box them, and keep them all the year in a stove.

To make the Portingal Tarts for Banquetting.

TAke a pound of marchpane Paste being finely beaten, and put into it a grain of musk, six spoonfuls of rose-water, and the weight of a groat of Oris Powder, boil all on a chafing-dish of coals till it be something stiff; then take the whites of two eggs beaten to froath, put them into it, and boil it again a little, let it stand till it be cold, mould it, and roul it out thin; then take a pound more of almond paste unboiled, and put to it four ounces of cara­way seed, a grain of musk, and three drops of oyl of le­mons, roul the paste into small rouls as big as walnuts, and lap these balls into the first made paste, flat them down [Page 253]like puffs with your thumbs a little like figs, and bake them upon marchpane wafers.

To make a Marchpane.

TAke two pound of almonds blanched and beaten in a stone mortar, till they begin to come to a fine paste,

[form of marchpane]

then take a pound of sifted sugar, put it in the mortar with the almonds, and make it into a perfect paste, put­ting to it now and then in the beating of it a spoon­ful of rose-water to keep it from oyling, when you have beaten it to a puff paste, drive it out as big as a char­ger, and set an edge about it as you do upon a quod­ling tart, and a bottom of wafers under it, thus bake it in an oven or baking-pan; when you see it is white, hard, and dry, take it out and ice it with rose-water and sugar, being made as thick as butter for fritters, so spread it on with a wing feather, and put it into the oven again; when you see it rise high, then take it out and garnish it with some pretty conceits made of the the same stuff, stick long comfets upright on it, and so serve it.

To make Collops like Bacon of Marchpans.

TAke some of your Marchpane paste and work it with red sanders till it be red, then roul a broad sheet of white marchpane paste, and a sheet of red paste, three of the white, and four of the red, lay them one upon an­other, [Page 254]other, dry it, cut it overthwart, and it will look like col­lops of bacon.

To make Almond Bread.

TAke almonds and lay them in water all night, blanch them and slice them, take to every pound of almonds a pound of fine sugar finely beaten, and mingle them to­gether, then beat the whites of three eggs to a high froath, and mix it well with the almonds and sugar; then have some plates and strew some flour on them, lay wa­fers on them and almonds with the edges upwards, lay them as round as you can, and scrape a little sugar on them when they are ready to set in the oven, which must not be so hot as to colour white paper; being a little ba­ked take them out, set them on a plate, then put them in again, and keep them in a stove.

To make Almond Bisket.

TAke the whites of four new laid eggs and two yolks, beat them together very well for an hour, then have in readiness a quarter of a pound of the best almonds blanched in cold water, beat them very small with rose-water to keep them from oyling, then have a pound of the best loaf sugar finely beaten, beat it in the eggs a while, then put in the almonds, and five or six spoonfuls of fine flour, so bake them on paper, plates, or wafers; then have a little fine sugar in a peice of tiffany, dust them over as they go into the oven, and bake them as you do bisket.

To make Almond Cakes.

TAke a pound of almonds, blanch them and beat them very small with a little rose-water where some musk [Page 255]hath been steeped, put a pound of sugar to them fine beaten, and four yolks of eggs, but first beat the sugar and the eggs well together, then put them to the almonds and rose-wa­ter, and lay the cakes on wafers by half spoonfuls, set them into an oven after manchet is baken.

To make Almond Cakes otherwayes.

TAke a pound of the best Jordan almonds, blanch them in cold water as you do marchpane, being blanched wipe them dry in a clean cloth, and cut away all the rotten from them, then pound them in a stone mortar, and some­times in the beating put in a spoonful of rose-water wherein you must steep some musk; when they are beaten small mix the almonds with a pound of refined sugar beat­en and searsed; then put the stuff on a chafing-dish of coals in a made dish, keep it stirring, and beat the whites of seven eggs all to froath, put it into the stuff, and mix it very well together, drop it on a white paper, put it on plates, and bake them in an oven, but they must not be coloured.

To make white Ambergreece Cakes.

TAke the purest refined sugar that can be got, beat it and searce it; then have six new laid eggs and beat them into a froath, take the froath as it riseth, and drop it into the sugar by little and little, grinding it still round in a marble mortar with the pestle till it be thorowly moi­stened, and wrought thin enough to drop on plates; then put in some ambergreece, a little civet, and some anniseed well picked, then take your pie plates, wipe them, butter them, and drop the stuff on them with a spoon in form of round cakes, put them into a very milde oven, and when you see them be hard and rise a little, take them out and keep them for use.

To make Sugar Cakes or Jamballs.

TAke two pound of flour, dry it and season it very fine, then take a pound of loaf sugar, beat it very fine, and searce it, mingle your flour and sugar very well; then take a pound and a half of sweet butter, wash out the salt, and break it into bits into the flour and sugar, then take the yolks of four new laid eggs, four or five spoonfulls of sack, and four spoonfulls of cream, beat all these together, put them into the flour, and work it up into paste, make them into what fashion you please, lay them upon paper or plates, and put them into the oven; be careful of them, for a very little thing bakes them.

To make Jemelloes.

TAke a pound of fine sugar being finely beaten, and the yolks of four new laid eggs, and a grain of musk, a thimble full of caraway seed searsed, a little gum-dragon steeped in rose water, and six spoonfulls of fine flour; beat all these into a thin paste a little stiffer then butter, then run it through a butter squirt of two or three ells long, bigger then a wheat straw, and let them dry upon sheets of paper a quarter of an hour, then tye them in knots or what pretty fashion you please, and when they be dry, boil them in rose water and sugar; it is an excellent sort of banquetting.

To make Jamballs.

TAke a pint of fine wheat flour, the yolks of three or four new laid eggs, three or four spoonfull of sweet cream, a few anniseeds, and some cold butter, make it in­to paste, and roul it into long rouls as big as a little arrow, make them into divers knots, then boil them in fair water [Page 257]Iske simnells; bake them, and being baked, box them and keep them in a stove. Thus you may use them and keep them all the year.

To make Sugar Plate.

TAke double refined sugar, sift it very small through a fine searce, then take the white of an egg, gum-dragon, and rose water, wet it, and beat it in a morter till you are able to mould it, but wet it not too much at the first. If you will colour it, and the colour be of a watery substance, put it in with the rose water, if a powder, mix it with your sugar before you wet it; when you have beat it in the morter, and that it is all wet, and your colour well mixt in every place, then mould it and make it into what form you please.

To make Muskedines, called Rising Comfits or Kissing Comfits.

TAke half a pound of refined sugar, being beaten and searced, put into it two grains of musk, a grain of ci­vet, two grains of ambergreece, and a thimble full of white orris powder, beat all these with gum-dragon steeped in rose water; then roul it as thin as you can and cut it into little losinges with your iging iron, and stow them in some warm oven or stove, then box them and keep them all the year.

To make Cracknells.

TAke half a pound of fine flour dryed and searced, and as much fine sugar searced, mingled with a spoonfull of coriander feed bruised, and two ounces of butter rubbed amongst the flour and sugar, wet it with the yolks of two eggs, half a spoonfull of white rose water, and two spoon­fulls [Page 258]of cream, or as much as will wet it; work the paste till it be soft and limber to roul and work, then roul it very thin, and cut them round by little plats, lay them upon buttered papers, and when they go into the oven, prick them, and wash the tops with the yolk of an egg, beaten and made thin with rose water or fair water; they will give with keeping, therefore before they are eaten they must be dryed in a warm oven to make them crisp.

To make Mackeroons.

TAke a pound of the finest sugar, and a pound of the best jordan almonds, steep them in cold water, blanch them, and pick out the spots; then beat them to a perfect paste in a stone mortar, in the beating of them put rose wa­ter to them to keep them from oyling, being finely beat, put them in a dish with the sugar, and set them over a cha­fing dish of coals, stir it till it will come clean from the bot­tom of the dish, then put in two grains of musk, and three of ambergreece.

To make the Italian Chips.

TAke some paste of flowers, beat them to fine pow­der, and searce or sift them; then take some gum-dragon steeped in rose water, beat it to a perfect paste in a marble morter, then roul it thin and lay one colour upon another in a long roul, roul them very thin, then cut them overthwart, and they will look of divers pretty colours like marble.

To make Bisket bread.

TAke a pound of sugar searced very fine, a pound of flour well dryed, twelve eggs, and but six whites, a handfull of caraway-seed, and a little salt; beat all these together [Page 259]the space of an hour, then your oven being hot, put them into plates or tin things, butter them, and wipe them, a spoonfull into a plate is enough, so fet them into the oven, and make it as hot as to bake them for manchet.

To make Bisquite du Roy.

TAke a pound of fine searced sugar, a pound of fine flour, and six eggs, beat them very well, then put them all into a stone morter, and pound them for the space of an hour and a half, let it not stand still, for then it will be heavy, and when you have beaten it so long a time, put in half an ounce of anniseeds; then butter over some pye plates, and drop the stuff on the plate as fast as two or three can with spoons, shape them round as near as you can, and set them into an oven as hot as for manchet, but the less they are coloured the better.

Bisquite du Roy otherwayes.

TAke to a pound of flour a pound of sugar, and twelve new laid eggs, beat them in a deep dish, then put to them two grains of musk dissolved, rose water, anni­seed, and coriander seed, beat them the space of an hour with a woodden spatter; then the oven being ready, have white tin moulds buttered, and fill them with this bisquite, strow double refined sugar on them, and bake them; when they rise out of the moulds draw them, and put them on a great pasty plate, or pye plate, and dry them in a stove, or put them in a square lattin box and lay white papers be­twixt every range or rank, have a padlock to it, and set it over a warm oven, so keep them, and thus for any kinde of bisket, makeroons, march-pane, sugar plates or pasties, set them in a temperate place where they may not give with [Page 260]every change of weather, and thus you may keep them ve­ry long.

To make Shell Bread.

TAke a quarter of a pound of rice flour, a quarter of a pound of fine flour, the yolks of four new laid eggs, and a little rose water, and a grain of musk; make these into a perfect paste, then roul it very thin and bake it in great muscle shells, but first toste the shells in but­ter melted, when they be baked, boil them in melted sugar as you boil a simnell, then lay them on the bottom of a woodden sieve, and they will eat as crisp as a wafer.

To make Bean Bread.

TAke two pound of blanched almonds and slice them, take to them two pound of double refined sugar, finely beaten and searsed, five whites of eggs beaten to froth, a little musk steeped in rose water, and some anni­seeds, mingle them altogether in a dish, and bake them on pewter plates buttered, then afterwards dry them and stove them.

To make Ginger Bread.

TAke a pound of jordan almonds, and a penny man­chet grated and sifted and mingled amongst the al­mond paste very fine beaten, an ounce of slic't ginger, two thimble fulls of liquoras and anniseed in powder finely searced, beat all in a mortar together, with two or three spoonfulls of rose water, beat them to a perfect paste with half a pound of sugar, mould it and roul it thin, then print it and dry it in a stove, and gild it if you please.

Thus you may make ginger bread of sugar plate, putting sugar to it as abovesaid.

To make Ipocras.

TAke to a gallon of wine, three ounces of cinamon, two ounces of slic't ginger, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, an ounce of mace, twenty corns of pepper, an ounce of nutmegs, three pound of sugar, and two quarts of cream.

Otherwayes.

Take to a pottle of wine an ounce of cinamon, an ounce of ginger, an ounce of nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, seven corns of pepper, a handfull of rosemary flowers, and two pound of sugar.

To make excellent Mead much commended.

TAke to every quart of honey a gallon of fair spring water, boil it well with nutmeg and ginger bruised a little, in the boiling scum it well, and being boild, set it a cooling in several vessels that it may stand thin, then the next day put it in the vessel and let it stand a week or two, then draw it in bottles.

If it be to drink in a short time you may work it as bear, but it will not keep long.

Or take to every gallon of water, a quart of honey, a quarter of an ounce of mace, as much ginger and cinamon, and half as much cloves, bruise them, and use them as abovesaid.

Otherwayes.

Take five quarts and a pint of water, warm it, and put to it a quart of honey, and to every gallon of liquor one le­mon, and a quarter of an ounce of nutmegs; it must boil till the scum rise black, and if you will have it quickly rea­dy to drink, squeese into it a lemon when you tun it, and tun it cold.

To make Metheglin.

TAke all sorts of herbs that are good and wholesom, as balm, mint, rosemary, fennil, angelica, wilde time, hysop, burnet, agrimony, and such other field herbs, half a handful of each, boil and strain them, and let the liquor stand till the next day, being settled take two gallons and a half of honey, let it boil an hour, and in the boiling scum it very clean, set it a cooling as you do beer, and when it is cold take very good barm, and put it into the bottom of the tub, by a little and a little as to beer, keeping back the thick settling that lyeth in the bottom of the vessel that it is cooled in; when it is all put together cover it with a cloth and let it work very near three dayes, then when you mean to put it up, skim off all the barm clean, and put it up into a vessel, but you must not stop the vessel very close in three or four dayes, but let it have some vent to work; when it is close stopped you must look often to it, and have a peg on the top to give it vent when you hear it make a noise as it will do, or else it will break the vessel.

Sometimes make a bag and put in good store of slic't ginger, some cloves and cinamon, boild or not.

Section 12.

To make all manner of Creams, Sack-Possets, Sillabubs, Blamangers, White-Pots, Fools, Wassels, &c.

To make Apple Cream.

TAke twelve pippins, pare, and slice, or quarter them, then put them in a skillet with some claret wine, and a race of ginger sliced thin, a little le­mon peel cut small, and some sugar; let all these stew together till they be soft, then take them off the fire and put them in a dish, and when they be cold take a quart of cream boild with a little nutmeg, and put in of the apple stuff to make it of what thickness you please, and so serve it up.

To make Codling Cream.

TAke twenty fair codlings being peeld and codled ten­der and green, put them in a clear silver dish, filled half full of rose-water, and half a pound of sugar, boil all this liquor together till half be consumed, and keep it stirring till it be ready, then fill up the dish with good thick and sweet cream, stir it till it be well mingled, and when it hath boild round about the dish, take it off, sweeten it with fine sugar, and serve it cold.

Otherwayes.

Codle forty fair codlings green and tender, then peel and core them, and beat them in a mortar, strain them with a quart of cream, and mix them well together in a dish with fine sugar, sack, musk, and rose water. Thus you may do with any fruit you please.

To boil Cream with Codlings.

BOil a quart of cream with mace, sugar, two yolks of eggs, two spoonfuls of rose-water, and a grain of ambergreece, put it into the cream, and set them over the fire till they be ready to boil, then set them to cool, stir­ring it till it be cold; then take a quart of green codling stuff strained, put it into a silver dish, and mingle it with cream.

To make Quince Cream.

TAke and boil them in fair water, but first let the water boil, then put them in, and being tender boiled take them up and peel them, strain them and mingle it with fine sugar, then take some very good and sweet cream, mix all together, and make it of a fit thickness, or boil the cream with a stick of cinamon, and let it stand till it be cold be­fore you put it to the quinces. Thus you may do wardens or pears.

To make Plumb Cream.

TAke any kinde of plumbs, apricocks, or the like, and put them in a dish with some sugar, white wine, sack, claret, or rose water, close them up with a piece of paste between two dishes; being baked and cold, put to them cream boild with eggs, or without, or raw, and scrape on sugar, &c.

To make Gooseberry Cream.

COdle them green, and boil them up with sugar, being preserved put them into the cream strained or whole, scrape sugar on them, and so serve them cold in boild or raw cream. Thus you may do strawberries, raspas, or red currans, put in raw cream whole, or serve them with wine and sugar in a dish without cream.

To make Snow Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, six whites of eggs, a quartern of rose-water, a quarter of a pound of double refined sugar, beat them together in a deep bason or a boul-dish; then have a fine silver dish with a penny manchet, the bot­tom and upper crust being taken away, and made fast with paste to the bottom of the dish, and a streight sprig of rose­mary set in the middle of it; then beat the cream and eggs together, and as it froatheth take it off with a spoon, and lay it on the bread and rosemary till you have filled the dish. You may beat amongst it some musk and amber­greece dissolved, and guild it if you please.

To make Snow Cream otherwayes.

Boil a quart of cream with a stick of cinamon, and thicken it with rice flour, the yolks of two or three eggs, a little rose-water, sugar, and salt, give it a walm, and put it in a dish, lay clouted cream on it and fill it up with whipt cream, or cream that cometh out of the top of a churm when the butter is come, dish out of a squirt or some other fine way, scrape on sugar, sprinkle it with rose-water, and stick some pine-apple-seeds on it.

Otherwayes.

Take three pints of cream, and the whites of seven eggs, strain them together with a little rose-water, and as [Page 266]much sugar as will sweeten it; then take a stick of a foot long, and split it in four quarters, beat the cream with it, or else with a whisk, & when the snow riseth, put it in a cullen­der with a spoon, that the thin may run from it; when you have snow enough, boil the rest with cinamon, ginger, and cloves, seethe it till it be thick, then strain it, and when it is cold, put it in a clean dish, and lay your snow upon it.

To make Snow Cream otherwayes with Almonds.

TAke a quart of good sweet cream, and a quarter of a pound of almond paste fine beaten with rose-wa­ter, and strained with half a pint of white wine, put some orange-peel to it, a slic't nutmeg, and three sprigs of rose­mary, let it stand two or three hours in steep; then put some double refined sugar to it, and strain it into a bason, beat it till it froath and bubble, and as the froath riseth, take it off with a spoon, and lay it in the dish you serve it up in.

To make a Jelly of Almond as white as Snow.

TAke a pound of almonds, steep them in cold water six hours, and blanch them into cold water, then make a decoction of half a pound of isingglass, with two quarts of white wine and the juyce of two lemons, boil it till half be wasted, then let it cool and strain it, mingle it with the almonds, and strain them with a pound of double refi­ned sugar, and the juyce of two lemons, turn it into co­lours, red, white, or yellow, and put it into egg shells, or orange-peels, and serve them on a pie plate upon a dish.

To make Almond Cream.

TAke half a pound of almond paste beaten with rose-water, and strain it with a quart of cream, put it in [Page 267]a skillet with a stick of cinamon and boil it, stir it conti­nually, and when it is boiled thick, put sugar to it, and serve it up cold.

To make Almond Cream otherwayes.

Take thick almond milk made with fair spring water, and boil it a little, then take it from the fire, and put to it a little salt and vinegar, cast it into a clean strainer, and hang it upon a pin over a dish, then being finely drained, take it down and put it in a dish, put to it some fine beaten sugar, and a little sack, muskedine, or white wine, dish it on a silver dish, and strow on red biskets.

Otherwayes.

Take a quart of cream, boil it over night, then in the morning have half a pound of almonds blanched and fine beaten, strain them with the cream, and put to it a quarter of a pound of double refined sugar, a little rose-water, a little fine ginger and cinamon finely searced, and mixed all together, dish it in a clean silver dish with fine carved sip­pets round about it.

To make an Almond Cheese.

TAke almonds being beaten as fine as marchpane paste, then make a sack posset with cream and sack, mingle the curd of the posset with almond paste, and set it on a chafing-dish of coals, put some double refined sugar to it, and some rose-water; then fashion it on a pie-plate like a fresh cheese, put it in a dish, put a little cream to it, scrape sugar on it, and being cold serve it up.

To make an excellent Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, and set it a boiling with a large mace or two, whilest it is boiling cut some thin sippets and lay them in a fine clean dish; then have [Page 268]seven or eight yolks of eggs strained with rose-water, put some sugar to them, then take the cream from the fire, put in the eggs and stir all together, then pour it on the slices of fine manchet, and being cold scrape on sugar, and so serve it.

To make Cream otherwayes.

Take a quart of cream, and boil it with four or five large maces, and a stick of whole cinamon; when it hath boiled a little while, have seven or eight yolks of eggs dis­solved with a little cream, take the cream from the fire and put in the eggs, stir them well into the boiled cream, and put it in a clean dish, take out the spices, and when it is cold stick it with those maces and cinamon. Thus you may do with the whites of the eggs with cream.

To make Cast Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, a pint of new milk, and the whites of six eggs, strain them together and boil it, in the boiling stir it continually till it be thick, then put to it some verjuyce, and put it into a strainer, hang it on a nail or pin to drain the whey from it, then strain it, put some sugar to it and rose-water; dish it in a fair dish, and strow on some preserved pine-kernels, or candied pistaches. In this fashion you may do it of the yolks of eggs.

To make Clouted Cream.

TAke three gallons of new milk, and set it on the fire in a clean scowred brass pan or kettle till it boils, then make a hole in the middle of the milk, and take three pints of good cream and put into the hole as it boileth, boil it together half an hour, then divide it into four milk­pans, and let it cool two dayes if the weather be not too hot, then take it up with a slice or scummer, put it in a [Page 269]dish, and sprinkle it with rose water, lay one clod upon an­other, and scrape on sugar.

To make clouted Cream otherwayes extraordinary.

TAke four gallons of new milk from the Cow, set it over the fire in a clean scowred pan or kettle to scald ready to boil, strain it through a clean strainer and put it into several pans to cool, then take the cream some six hours after, and put it in the dish you mean to serve it in, season it with rose water, sugar, and musk, put some raw cream to it, and some snow cream on that.

To make clouted Cream otherwayes.

TAke a gallon of new milk from the Cow, two quarts of cream, and twelve spoonfulls of rose water, put these together in a large milk pan, and set it upon a fire of charcoal well kindled, (you must be sure the fire be not too hot) and let it stand a day and a night, then take it off and dish it with a slice or scummer, let no milk be in it, and being disht and cut in fine little pieces, scrape sugar on it.

To make a very good Cream.

WHen you churm butter, take out half a pint of cream just as it begins to turn to butter, (that is when it is a little frothy) then boil a quart of good thick and new cream, season it with sugar and a little rose water, when it is quite cold mingle it very well with that you take out of the churm, and so dish it.

To make a Sack Cream.

TAke a quart of cream and set it on the fire, when it is boiled drop in six or eight drops of sack, and stir it [Page 270]well to keep it from curding, then season it with sugar and strong water.

To make Cabidge Cream.

SEt six quarts of new milk on the fire, and when it boils, empty it into ten or twelve earthen pans or bouls as fast as you can without frothing, set them where they may come, and when they are little cold gather the cream that is on the top with your hand, rumpling it together, and lay it on a plate; when you have laid three or four lay­ings on one another, wet a feather in rose water and musk and stroak over it, then searce a little grated nutmeg, and fine sugar, (and if you please, beat some musk and amber­greece in it) and lay three or four layes more on as before; thus do till you have off all the cream in the bouls, then put all the milk to boil again, and when it boils set it as you did before in bouls, and so use it in like manner, it will yield four or five times seething, which you must use as before that it may lie round and high like a cabidge; or let one of the first bouls stand because the cream may be thick and most crumpled, take that up last to lay on uppermost, and when you serve it up searse or scrape sugar on it; this must be made over night for dinner, or in the morning for supper.

To make Stone Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, two or three blades of large mace, two or three little sticks of cinamon, and six spoonfulls of rose water, season it sweet with sugar, and boil it till it taste well of the spice, then dish it, and stir it till it be as cold as milk from the Cow, then put in a little runnet and stir it together, let it stand and cool, and serve it to the table.

To make Whipt Cream.

TAke a whisk or a rod and beat it up thick in a boul or large bason, till it be as thick as the cream that comes of the top of a churm, then lay fine linnen clouts on sau­cers being wet, lay on the cream and let it rest two or three hours, then turn them into a fine silver dish, put raw cream to them and scrape on sugar.

To make Rice Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, two handfulls of rice flour, and a quarter of a pound of sugar, mingle the flour and su­gar very well together and put it in the cream; then beat the yolk of an egg with a little rose water, put it to the cream and stir them all together, set it over a quick fire, keeping it continually stirring till it be as thick as pap.

To make another rare Cream.

TAke a pound of almond paste fine beaten with rose wa­ter, mingle it with a quart of cream, six eggs, a little sack, half a pound of sugar, and some beaten nutmeg; strain them and put them in a clean scowred skillet, and set it on a soft fire, stir it continually, and being well incorporated dish it, and serve it with juyce of orange, sugar, and stick it full of candied pistaches.

To make a white Leach of Cream.

TAke a quart of cream, twelve sponfulls of rose wa­ter, two grains of musk, two drops of oyl of mace, or two large maces, boil them with half a pound of sugar and half a pound of the whitest isingglass; be­ing [Page 272]first steeped and washed clean, then run it through your jelly bag into a dish; when it is cold slice it into chequer work, and serve it on a plate. This is the best way to make leach.

To make other Leach with Almonds.

TAke two ounces of isingglass, lay it two hours in fair water, then boil it in clear spring water, and being well disgested set it to cool; then have a pound of almonds beaten very fine with rose water, strain them with a pint of new milk, and put in some mace and slic't ginger, boil them till it taste well of the spices, then put into it the disgested isingglass, some sugar, and a little rose water, give it a walm over the fire, and run it through a strainer into dishes, and slice it into dishes.

To make a Cream in the Italian fashion to eat cold.

TAke twenty yolks of eggs, and two quarts of cream, strain it with a little salt, saffron, rose water, juyce of orange, a little white wine, and a pound of fine sugar; then bake it in a deep dish with-some fine cinamon, and some candied pistaches stuck on it, and when it is baked, white muskedines.

Thus you may do with the whites of the eggs, and put in no spices.

To make Pyramidis Cream.

TAke a quart of water, and six ounces of harts-horn, put it into a bottle with gum-dragon, and gum ara­bick, of each as much as a walnut; put them all into the bottle, which must be so big as will hold a pint more, for if it be full it will break, stop it very close with a cork, and tye a cloth over it, put the bottle in the beef pot, or boil it [Page 273]in a pot with water, let it boil three hours, then take as much cream as there is jelly, and half a pound of almonds well beaten with rose water, mingle the cream and the al­monds together, strain it, then put the jelly when it is cold into a silver bason, and the cream to it, sweeten it as you please, and put in two or three grains of musk and amber­greece, set it over the fire, and stir it continually till it be seething hot, but let it not boil; then put it in an old fa­shioned drinking glass, and let it stand till it be cold; when you will use it, put the glass in some warm water and whelm it in a dish, then take pistaches boild in white wine and sugar, stick it all over, and serve it in with cream.

French Barley Cream.

TAke a porringer full of French perle barley, boil it in eight or nine several waters very tender, then put it in a quart of cream, with some large mace, and whole cina­mon, boil it a little a quarter of an hour; then have two pound of almonds blanched and beaten fine with rose wa­ter, put to them some sugar, and strain the almonds with some cold cream, then put all over the fire, and stir it till it be ready to boil, take it off the fire, still stirring it till it be half cold, then put to it two spoonfulls of sack or white wine, and a little salt, and serve it in a dish cold

To make Cheesecakes.

LEt your paste be very good, either puff-paste or cold butter paste, with sugar mixed with it; then the whey being dryed very well from the cheese curds which must be made of new milk or better, beat them in a mortar or tray, with a quarter of a pound of butter to every pot­tle of curds, a good quantity of rose water, three grains of ambergreece or musk prepared the trumbs of a small man­chet [Page 274]rubbed through a cullender, the yolks of ten eggs, a grated nutmeg, a little salt, and good store of sugar, mix all these well together with a little cream, but do not make them too soft; instead of bread you may take almonds which are much better; bake them in a quick oven, and let them not stand too long in lest they should be too dry.

To make Cheesecakes otherwayes.

MAke the crust of milk and butter boiled together, put into the flour and made up pretty stiff, to a pottle of fine flour, take half a pound of butter; then take a fresh cheese made of morning milk, and a pint of cream, put it to the new milk, and set the cheese with some runnet, when it is come, put it in a cheese cloth and press it from the whay, stamp in the curds a grated fine small manchet, some cloves and mace, a pound and a half of well washed and picked currans, the yolks of eight eggs, some rose water salt, half a pound of refined white sugar, and a nutmeg or two; work all these materials well together with a quar­ter of a pound of good sweet butter, and some cream, but make it not too soft, and make your cheesecakes ac­cording to these forms.

[forms of cheesecakes]

To make Cheesecakes otherwayes.

MAke the paste of a pottle of flour, half a pound of butter, as much ale barm as two egg shells will [Page 275]hold, and a little saffron made into fine pouder and put in­to the flour, melt the butter in milk, and make up the paste; then take the curds of a gallon of new milk cheese, and a pint of cream, drain the whey very well from it, pound it in a mortar, then mix with it half a pound of sugar, a pound of well washed and picked currans, a grated nutmeg, some fine beaten cinamon, salt, rose water a little saffron made into fine pouder, and some eight yolks of eggs, work it up very stiff with some butter and a little cream.

Otherwayes.

Take six quarts of new milk, run it pretty cold, and when it is tender come, drain from it the whey, and hang it up in a strainer, press the whey from it, and beat it in a mortar till it be like butter, then strain it through a strain­er, and mingle it with a pound of butter with your hand; then beat a pound of almonds with rose water till they be as fine as the curds; put to them the yolks of twenty eggs; a quart of cream, two grated nutmegs, and a pound and a half of sugar, when the coffins are ready to be set into the oven, then mingle them together and let them bake half an hour; the paste must be made of milk and butter warmed together, dry the coffins as you do for a custard, make the paste very stiff, and make them into works.

To make Cheesecakes without Milk.

TAke twelve eggs, take away six whites and beat them very well; then take a quart of cream and boil it with mace, take it off the fire, put in the eggs and stir them well together, then set it on the fire again, and let it boil till it curds; then set it off, and put to it a good quantity of sugar, some grated nutmeg, and beaten mace: then dissolve musk and ambergreece in rosewater, three or four spoonfuls of grated bread, with half a pound of almonds beat small, a little cream, and some currans; then make [Page 276]the paste for them of flour, sugar, cream and butter, bake them in a milde oven; a quarter of an hour will bake them. Make them according to this form.

[form of cheesecake without milk]

Cheesecakes otherwayes.

FOr the paste take a pottle of flour, half a pound of butter, and the white of an egg, work it well into the flour with the butter, then put a little cold water to it and work it up stiff; then take a pottle of cream, half a pound of sugar, and a pound of currans boild before you put them in, a whole nutmeg grated, and a little pepper fine beaten, boil these gently, and stir it continually with twen­ty eggs well beaten amongst the cream, being boild and cold, fill the cheesecakes.

To make Cheesecakes otherwayes.

TAke eighteen eggs and beat them very well, beat some flour amongst them to make them pretty thick; then have a pottle of cream and boil it, being boiled put in your eggs, flour, anst half a pound of butter, some ci­namon, salt, boild currans, and sugar, set them over the fire and boil it pretty thick, being cold fill them and bake them, make the crust as beforesaid.

To make Cheesecakes in the Italian Fashion.

TAke four pound of good fat Holland cheese, and six pound of good fresh cheese-curd of a morning milk cheese, or better, beat them in a stone or wooden mortar, then put sugar to them, and two pound of well washed currans, twelve eggs, whites and all being first well beaten, a pound of sugar, some cream, half an ounce of cinamon, a quarter of an ounce of mace, and a little saffron, mix them well together, and fill your talmouse or cheesecakes pasty wayes in good cold butter paste; sometimes use bea­ten almonds amongst it, and some pistaches whole; being baked, ice them with yolks of eggs, rose-water, and sugar, cast on red and white biskets, and serve them up hot.

Cheesecakes in the Italian Fashion otherwayes.

TAke a pound of pistaches stamped with two pound of morning milk cheese curd fresh made, three ounces of elder-flowers, ten eggs, a pound of sugar, a pound of butter, and a pottle of flour, strain these in a course strain­er, and put them in short or puff-paste.

To make Cheeesecakes otherwayes.

TAke a good morning milk cheese, or better, of some eight pound weight, stamp it in a mortar, and beat a pound of butter amongst it, and a pound of sugar, then mix with it beaten mace, two pound of cutrans well picked and washed, a penny manchet grated, or a pound of al­monds blanched and beaten fine with rose-water, and some salt; then boil some cream, and thicken it with six or eight yolks of eggs, mixed with the other things, work them well together, and fill the cheesecakes, make the curd [Page 278]not too soft, and make the paste of cold butter and water according to these forms.

[forms of cheesecakes]

To make a Triffel.

TAke a quart of the best and thickest cream, set it on the fire in clean skillet, and put to it whole mace, ci­namon, and sugar, boil it well in the cream before you put in the sugar, then your cream being well boiled, pour it into a fine silver piece or dish, and take out the spices, let it cool till it be no more then blood warm, then put in a spoonful of good runnet, and set it well together, being cold scrape sugar on it, and trim the dish sides finely.

To make fresh Cheese and Cream.

TAke a pottle of milk as it comes from the cow, and a pint of cream, put to it a spoonful of runnet, and let it stand two hours, then stir it up and put it in a fine cloth, let the whey drain from it, and put the curd into a bowl­dish, or bason; then put to it the yolk of an egg, a spoonful of rose-water, some salt, sugar, and a little nut­meg finely beaten, put it to the cheese in the cheese fat on a fine cloth, scrape on sugar, and serve it on a plate in a dish.

Thus you may make fresh cheese and cream in the French Fashion called Jonches, or rush cheese, being put in a mould of rushes tied at both ends, and being dished put cream to it.

To make a Posset.

TAke the yolks of twenty eggs, then have a pottle of good thick sweet cream, boil it with good store of whole cinamon, and stir it continually on a good fire, then strain the eggs with a little raw cream; when the cream is well boiled and tasteth of the spice, take it off the fire, put in the eggs, and stir them well in the cream, being pretty thick, have some sack in a posset pot or deep silver bason, half a pound of double refined sugar, and some fine gra­ted nutmeg, warm it in the bason and pour in the cream and eggs, the cinamon being taken out, pour it as high as you can hold the skillet, let it spatter in the bason to make it froth, it will make a most excellent posset; then have loaf sugar finely beaten, and strow on it good store.

To the curd you may adde some fine grated manchet, some claret or white wine, or ale onely.

To make a Posset otherwayes.

TAke two quarts of new cream, a quarter of an ounce of whole cinamon, and two nutmegs quartered, boil it till it taste well of the spice, and keep it alwayes stirring or it will burn too, then take the yolks of fourteen or fif­teen eggs beaten well together with a little cold cream, put them to the cream on the fire, and stir it till it begin to boil, then take it off and sweeten it with sugar, and stir on till it be pretty cool; then take a pint and a quarter of sack, sweeten that also and set it on the fire till it be ready to boil, then put it in a fine clean scowred bason, or pos­set [Page 280]pot, and pour the cream into it, elevating your hand to make it froth, which is the grace of your posset; if you put it through a tunnel or a cullender, it is held the more exquisite way.

To make Sack Posset otherwayes.

TAke two quarts of pure good cream, and a quarter of a pound of the best almonds stamped with some rose water or cream, strain them with the cream, and boil with it amber and musk; then take a pint of sack into a bason, and set it on a chafing-dish till it be blood warm; then take the yolks of twelve eggs with four whites, beat them very well together, and so put the eggs into the sack, make it good and hot, then stir all together in the bason, let the cream cool a little before you put it into the sack, and stir all together over the coals, till it be as thick as you would have it, then take some amber and musk, grinde it small with sugar, and strew it on the top of the posset, it will give it a most delicate and pleasant taste.

Sack Posset otherwayes.

TAke eight eggs, whites, and yolks, beat them well to­gether, and strain them into a quart of cream, sea­son them with nutmeg and sugar, and put to them a pint of sack, stir them all together, and put it into your bason, set it in the oven no hotter then for a custard, and let it stand two hours.

To make a Sack Posset without Milk or Cream.

TAke eighteen eggs whites and all, take out the cock­treads and beat them very well, then take a pint of sack and a quart of ale boil'd, scum it, and put into it [Page 281]three quarters of a pound of sugar, and half a nutmeg, let it boil a little together, then take it off the fire stirring the eggs still, put into them two or three ladlefulls of drink, then mingle all together, set it on the fire, and keep it stir­ring till you finde it thick, then serve it up.

Other Posset.

TAke a quart of cream, and a quarter of a nutmeg in it, set it on the fire and let it boil a little, as it is boiling take a pot or bason that you make the posset in▪ and put in three spoonfulls of sack and some eight spoonfulls of ale, sweeten it with sugar, then set it over the coals to warm a little while, being warmed take it off and let it stand till it be almost cold, then put it into the pot or bason, stir it a little, and let it stand to simper over the fire an hour or more, the longer the better.

An excellent Sillabub.

FIll your Sillabub pot half full with sider, good store of sugar, and a little nutmeg, stir it well together, and put in as much thick cream by two or three spoonfulls at a time, as hard as you can, as though you milkt it in, then stir it together very softly once about, and let it stand two hours before you eat it, for the standing makes the curd.

To make a White Pot.

TAke a quart of good thick cream, boil it with three or four blades of large mace, and some whole ci­namon, then take four whites of eggs, and beat them ve­ry well, when the cream boils up, put them in, and cake them off the fire keeping them stirring a little while, and put in so me sugar, then take five or six pippins, pare and [Page 282]slice them, then put in a pint of claret wine, some raisins of the sun, some sugar, beaten cinamon, and beaten gin­ger, boil the pippins to pap, then cut some sippets very thin and dry them before the fire; when the apples and cream are boild and cold, take half the sippets and lay them in a dish, lay half the apples on them, then lay on the rest of the sippets and apples as you did before, then pour on the rest of the cream and bake it in the oven as a custard, and serve it with scraping sugar.

Bake these in paste, in dish, or pan, or make the paste as you would do for a custard, make it three inches high, and in the forms following.

[forms of white pot]

Otherwayes to make a White pot.

TAke a quart of sweet cream, boil it, and put to it two ounces of picked rice, some beaten mace, gin­ger, cinamon, and sugar, let these steep in it till it be cold, and strain into it eight yolks of eggs and but two whites; then put in two ounces of clean washed and picked cur­rans, and some salt, stir all well together, and bake it in paste, earthen pan, dish or deep bason; being baked, trim it with some sugar, and comfits of orange, cinamon or white biskets.

To make a Wasseb.

TAke muskedine or ale, and set it on the fire to warm, then boil a quart of cream and two or three whole cloves, then have the yolks of three or four eggs dissolved with a little cream; the cream being well boiled with the spices, put in the eggs and stir them well together, then have sops or sippets of fine manchet or french bread, put them in a bason, and pour in the warm wine, with some su­gar and thick cream on that; stick it with blanched al­monds and cast on cinamon, ginger, and sugar, or wafers, sugar plate, or comfits.

To make a Norfolk Fool.

TAke a quart of good thick sweet cream, and set it a boiling in a clean scowred skillet, with some large mace and whole cinamon; having boiled a walm or two, take the yolks of five or six eggs dissolved and put to it, being taken from the fire, then take out the cinamon and mace; the cream being pretty thick, slice a fine manchet into thin slices, as much as will cover the bottom of the dish, pour on the cream on them, and more bread, some two or three times till the dish be full, then trim the dish side with fine carved sippets, and stick it with slic't dates, scrape on sugar, and cast on red and white biskets.

To make Pap.

TAke milk and flour, strain them, and set it over the fire till it boil, being boiled, take it off and let it cool; then take the yolks of eggs, strain them, and put it in the milk with some salt, set it again on the embers, and stir it till it be thick, and stew leasurely, then put it in a clean [Page 284]scowred dish, and serve it for pottage, or in paste, adde to it sugar and rose water.

To make Blamanger.

TAke a capon being boild or roasted and mince it small, then have a pound of blanched almonds beaten to a paste, and beat the minced capon amongst it, with some rose water, mingle it with some cream, ten whites of eggs, and grated manchet, strain all the foresaid things with some salt, sugar, and a little musk, boil them in a pan or broad skillet clean scowred as thick as pap, in the boiling stir it continually, being boiled strain it again, and serve it in paste in these forms, or made dishes with paste royal.

[forms of blancmange]

To make your paste for these forms, take to a quart of flour, a quarter of a pound of butter, and the yolks of four eggs, boil your butter in fair water, and put the yolks of the eggs on one side of your dish, make up your paste quick, not too dry, and make it stiff.

Otherwayes.

Take to a quart of fine flour, a quarter of a pound of butter, a quarter of a pound of sugar, a little saffron, rose [Page 285]water, a little beaten cinamon, and the yolk of an egg or two, work up all cold together with a little almond milk.

Blamanger otherwayes.

TAke a boild or rost capon, and being cold take off the skin, mince it and beat it in a mortar, with some al­mond paste, then mix it with some capon broth, and crumbs of fine manchet, strained together with some rose­water, salt, and sugar; boil it to a good thickness, then put it into paste of the former forms, of an inch high, or in dishes with paste royal, the paste being first baked.

In this manner you may make Blamanger of a pike.

Otherwayes.

Boil or roste a capon, mince it, and stamp it with almond paste, and strain it either with capon broth, cream, goats milk, or other milk, strain them with some rice flour, sugar, and rose water, boil it in a pan like pap, with a little musk, and stir it continually in the boiling, then put it in the forms of paste as aforesaid.

Sometimes use for change pine apple seeds and currans, other times put in dates, cinamon, saffron, figs, and raisins being minced together, put them in as it boils, with a lit­tle sack.

To make Blamanger otherwayes.

TAke half a pound of fine searsed rice flour, and put to it a quart of morning milk, strain them through a strainer into a broad skillet; and set it on a sost fire, stir it with a broad stick, and when it is a little thick take it from the fire, then put in a quartern of rose water, set it to the fire again, and stir it well, in the stirring beat it with the stick from the one side of the pan to the other, and when it is as thick as pap, take it from the fire and put it in a fair [Page 286]platter, when it is cold lay three slices in a dish, and scrape on sugar.

Blamanger otherwayes.

TAke a capon or a pike and boil it in fair water very tender, then take the pulp of either of them and chap it small, then take a pound of blanched almonds beat to a paste, beat the pulp and the almonds together, and put to them a quart of cream, the whites of ten eggs, and the crumbs of a fine manchet, mingle all together, and strain them with some sugar and salt, put them in a clean broad stew pan, and set them over the fire, stir it and boil it thick; being boiled put it into a platter till it be cold, strain it again with a little rose water, and serve it with su­gar.

Otherwayes.

Blanch some almonds and beat them very fine to a paste with the boild pulp of a pike or capon, and crumbs of fine manchet, strain all together with sugar, and boil it to the thickness of an apple moise; then let it cool, strain it again with a little rose water, and so serve it.

To make Blamanger in the Italian fashion.

BOil a capon in water and salt very tender, or all to mash, then beat almonds, and strain them with your capon broth, rice flour, sugar, and rose water: boil it like pap, and serve it in this form; sometimes in place of broth use cream.

[form of Italian blancmange]

Section 13. Or, The first Section for Dressing of Fish.

Shewing the most wayes, and the most excellent, for Dressing of Carps, either Boiled, Stewed, Broiled, Rosted, or Ba­ked, &c.

To boil a Carp in Corbolion.

TAke as much wine as water, and a good handfull of salt, when it boils, draw the carp and put it in the liquor, boil it with a continual quick fire, and being boiled, dish it up in a very clean dish with sippets round about it, and slic't lemon, make the sauce of sweet butter beaten up with slic't lemon and gra­red nutmeg, garnish the dish with beaten ginger.

To boil a Carp the best way to be eaten hot.

TAke a special male carp of eighteen inches, draw it, wash out the blood, and lay it in a tray, then put to it some wine vinegar and salt, put the milt to it, the gall being taken from it; then have three quarts of white wine or claret, a quart of white wine vinegar, and five pints of fair water, or as much as will cover it; put the wine, water, and vinegar, in a fair scowred pan or kettle, with a handfull of salt, a quarter of an ounce of large mace, half [Page 288]a quartern of whole cloves, three sliced nutmegs, six races of ginger pared and sliced, a quarter of an ounce of pep­per, four or five great onions whole or sliced; then make a faggot of sweet herbs, of the tops of streight sprigs of rosemary, seven or eight bay leaves, six tops of sweet mar­joram, as much of the streight tops of time, winter-savory, and parsley; being well bound up, put them into the ket­tle with the spices, and some orange and lemon peels; make them boil a pace before you put in the carp, and boil it up quick with a strong fire; being finely boild and crisp, dish it in a large clean scowred dish, lay on the herbs and spices on the carp, with slic't lemons and lemon peels, put some of the broth to it, and run it over with beaten but­ter, put fine carved sippets round about it, and garnish the dish with fine searsed manchet.

Or you may make sauce for it onely with butter beat up thick, with slices of lemon, some of the liquor, and an an­chove or two, and garnish the dish with beaten ginger.

Or take three or four anchoves and dissolve them in some white wine, put them in a pipkin with some slic't horse-raddish, gross pepper, some of the carp liquor, and some stewed oyster liquor, or stewed oysters, large mace, and a whole onion or two; the sauce being well stewed, dissolve the yolks of three or four eggs with some of the sauce, and give it a walm or two, pour it on the carp with some beaten butter, the stewed oysters and slic't lemon, barberries, or grapes.

Otherwayes.

Dissolve three or four anchoves, with a little grated bread and nutmeg, and give it a walm in some of the broth the carp was boiled in, beat it up thick with some butter, and a clove of garlick, and pour it on the carp.

Or make sauce with beaten butter, grape verjuyce, white wine, slic't lemon, juyee of oranges, juyee of sorrel, or white wine vinegar.

Or otherwayes, take white or claret wine, put it in a pipkin with some pared or sliced ginger, large mace, dates quartered, a pint of great oysters with the liquor, a little vinegar and salt, boil these a quarter of an hour, then mince a handfull of parsley and some sweet herbs, boil it as much longer till half be consumed, then beat up the sauce with half a pound of butter, and a slic't lemon, and pour it on the carp.

Sometimes for the foresaid carp use grapes, barberries, gooseberries, and horse-raddish, &c.

To make a Bisque of Carps.

TAke twelve handsome male carps, and one larger then the rest, take out all the milts, and flea the twelve small carps, cut off their heads, take out their tongues, and take the fish from the bones, then take twelve large oysters, and three or four yolks of hard eggs minced altogether, sea­son it with cloves, mace, and salt, make thereof a stiff fearce, adde thereto the yolks of four or five eggs to binde, and fashion it into balls or rolls as you please, lay them in­to a deep dish or earthen pan, and put thereto twenty or thirty great oysters, two or three anchoves, the milts and tongues of the twelve carps, half a pound of fresh butter, the liquor of the oysters, the juyce of a lemon or two, a little white wine, some of the corbolion wherein the great carp is boild, and a whole onion, so set them a stewing on a soft fire, and make a soop therewith. For the great carp you must scald, draw him, and lay him for half an hour with the other carps heads in a deep pan, with as much white wine vinegar as will cover and serve to boil him and the other heads in, then put therein pepper, whole mace, a race of ginger slic't, nutmeg, salt, sweet herbs, an onion or two slic't, and a lemon; when you have boiled the carps pour the liquor with the spices into the kettle wherein you [Page 290]boil him, when it boils put in the carp, and let it not boil too fast for breaking, after the carp hath boild a while put in the heads, and being boiled, take off the liquor and let the carps and the heads keep warm in the kettle till you go to dish them. When you dress the bisk take a large silver dish, set it on the fire, lay therein slices of French bread, and steep it with a ladle full of the corbolion, then take up the great carp and lay him in the midst of the dish, range the twelve heads about the carp, then lay the fearse of the carp, lay that into the oysters, milts, and tongues, and pour on the liquor wherein the fearse was boild, wring in the juyce of a lemon and two oranges, and serve it very hot to the table.

To make a Bisk with Carps and other several Fishes.

MAke the Corbolion for the Bisk of some jacks or small carps boild in half white wine and fair spring water, some cloves, salt, and mace, boil it down to a jelly, strain it, and keep it warm for to scald the bisk; then take four carps, four tenches, four peaches, two pikes, two eels flayed and drawn; the carps being scalded, drawn, and cut into quarters, the tenches scalded and left whole, also the pearches and the pikes, all finely scalded, cleansed, and cut into twelve pieces, three of each side; then put them into a large stew pan with three quarts of claret wine, an ounce of large mace, a quarter of an ounce of coves, half an ounce of pepper, a quarter of an ounce of ginger pared and slic't, sweet herbs chopped small, as stripped time, savory, sweet marjoram, parsley, rosemary, three or four bay leaves, salt, chesnuts, pistaches, five or six great onions, and stew all together on a quick fire.

Then stew a pottle of oysters the greatest you can get, parboil them in their own liquor, cleanse them from the dregs, and wash them in warm water from the grounds [Page 291]and shells, put them into a pipkin with three or four great onions peeled, then take large mace, and a little of their own liquor, or a little wine vinegar or white wine.

Next, take twelve flounders being drawn and cleansed from the guts, fry them in clarified butter, with a hundred of large smelts; being fryed stew them in a stew pan, with some claret wine, grated nutmeg, slic't orange, butter, and salt.

Then have a hundred of prawns, boiled, picked, and buttered, or fryed.

Next, bottoms of artichocks, boiled, blanched, and put in beaten butter, grated nutmeg, salt, white wine, skirrets, and sparagus in the soresaid sauce.

Then mince a pike and an eel, cleanse them, and season them with cloves, mace, pepper, salt, some sweet herbs minced, some pistaches, barberries, grapes, or gooseber­ries, some grated manchet, and yolks of raw eggs, mingle all the foresaid things together, and make it into balls, or force some cabbidge lettice, and bake the balls in an oven, being baked stick the balls with pine-apple seeds, and pista­ches, as also the lettice.

Then all the foresaid things being made ready, have a large clean scowred dish, with large sops of French bread, lay the carps upon them, and between them some tench, pearch, pike, and eels, and the stewed oysters all over the other fish, then the fryed flounders and smelts over the oy­sters, then the balls and lettice stuck with pistaches, the arti­chocks, skirrets, sparagus, buttered prawns, yolks of hard eggs, large mace, fryed smelts, grapes, slic't lemon, oran­ges, red beets or poungarnets, broth it with the leer that was made for it, and run it over with beaten butter.

The best way to Stew a Carp.

DRess the carp and take out the milt, put it in a dish with the carp, and take out the gall, save the blood, [Page 292]and scotch the carp on the back with your knife; if the carp be eighteen inches, take a quart of claret or white wine, four or five blades of large mace, ten cloves, two good races of ginger slic't, two slic't nutmegs, and a few sweet herbs, as the tops of sweet marjoram, time, savory, and parsley chopped very small, four great onions whole, three or four bay leaves, and some salt; stew them all together in a stew pan or clean scowred kettle with the wine, when the pan boils put in the carp with a quarter of a pound of good sweet butter, boil it on a quick fire of charcoal, and being well stewed down, dish it in a clean large dish, pour on the sauce on it with the spices, lay on slic't lemon and lemon-peel, or barberries, grapes, or gooseberries, and run it over with beaten butter, garnish the dish with dryed manchet grated and searsed, and carved sippets laid round the dish.

In feasts the carp being scaled, garnish the body with stewed oysters, some fryed white batter, some in green made with the juyce of spinage; sometimes in place of sippets use fritters of armes, sometimes horse-raddish, and rub the dish with a clove or two of garlick.

For more variety, in the order abovesaid, sometimes dis­solve an anchove or two, with some of the broth it was stewed in and the yolks of two eggs dissolved with some verjuyce, wine, or juyce of orange; sometimes adde some capers and hard eggs chopped, as also sweet herbs, &c.

To Stew a Carp in the French Fashion.

TAke a carp, split it down the back alive, and put it in boiling liquor, then take a good large dish or stew pan that will contain the carp; put in as much claret wine as will cover it, and wash off the blood, take out the carp, and put into the wine in the dish three or four slic't onions, three or four blades of large mace, gross pepper, and salt; [Page 293]when the stew pan boils put in the carp and cover it close, being well stewed down, dish it up in a clean scowred dish with fine carved sippets round about it, pour the liquor it was boiled in on it, with the spices, onions, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel, run it over with beaten butter, and gar­nish the dish with dryed grated bread.

Another most excellent way to Stew a Carp.

TAke a carp and scale it, being well cleansed and dryed with a clean cloath, then split it and fry it in clarified butter, being finely fryed put it in a deep dish with two or three spoonfuls of claret wine, grated nutmeg, a blade or two of large mace, salt, three or four slices of an orange and some sweet butter, set it on a chafing dish of coals, co­ver it close and stew it up quick, then turn it, and being very well stewed, dish it on fine carved sippets, run it over with the sauce it was stewed in, the spices, beaten butter, and the slices of a fresh orange, and garnish the dish with dry manchet grated and searsed.

In this way you may stew any good fish, as soles, lob­sters, prawns, oysters, or cockles.

Otherwayes.

Take a carp and scale it, scrape off the slime with a knife, and wipe it clean with a dry cloath; then draw it, and wash the blood out with some claret wine into the pipkin where you stew it, cut it into quarters, halves, or whole, and put it into a broad mouthed pipkin or earthen pan, put to it as much wine as water, a bundle of sweet herbs, some raisins of the sun, currans, large mace, cloves, whole cinamon, slic't ginger, salt, and some prunes boiled and strained, put in also some strained bread or flower, and stew them altogether; being stewed, dish the carp in a clean scowred dish on fine carved sippets, pour the broth on the carp, and garnish it with the fruit, spices, some slic't lemon, [Page 294]barberries, or grapes, some orangado or preserved bar­berries, and scrape on sugar.

Otherwayes.

Do it as before, save onely no currans, but prunes strain­ed, beaten pepper, and some saffron.

To Stew a Carp seven several wayes.

  • 1. TAke a carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, wipe it with a dry cloath, and give it a cut or two cross the back, then put it a boiling whole, parted down the back in halves, or in quarters, put it in a broad mouth­ed pipkin with some claret or white wine, some wine vine­gar, and good fresh fish broath or some fair water, three or four blades of large mace, some slic't onions fryed, cur­rans, and some good butter; cover up the pipkin, and be­ing finely stewed, put in some almond milk, and some sweet herbs finely minced, or some grated manchet, and being well stewed, serve it up on fine carved sippets, broth it, and garnish the fish with some barberries or grapes, and the dish with some stale manchet grated and searst, being first dryed.
  • 2. For the foresaid broth, yolks of hard eggs strained with some steeped manchet, some of the broth it is stewed in, and a little saffron.
  • 3. For variety of garnish, carrots in dice-work, some raisins, large mace, a few prunes, and marigold flowers boild in the foresaid broth.
  • 4 Or leave out carrots and fruit. and put samphire and capers, and thicken it with French barley tender boiled.
  • 5. Or no fruit, but keep the order aforesaid, onely ad­ding sweet marjoram, stripped time, parsley, and savory, bruise them with the back of a ladle, and put them into the broth.
  • 6. Otherwayes, stewed oysters to garnish the carp, and [Page 295]some boild bottoms of artichocks, put them to the stewed oysters or skirrets being boild, grapes, barberries, and the broth thickned with yolks of eggs strained with some sack, white wine, or caper liquor.
  • 7. Boil it as before, without fruit, and adde to it capers, carrots in dice-work, mace, a faggot of sweet herbs, slic't onions chopped with parsley and boild in the broth, then have boild collyflowers, turnips, parsnips, sparagus, or chesnuts in place of carrots, and the leire strained with yolks of eggs and white wine.

To make French Herb Pottage for fasting dayes.

TAke half a handfull of lettice, as much of spinage, half as much of bugloss and burrage, two handfulls of sor­rel, a little parsley, sage, a good handfull of purslan, half a pound of butter, some pepper and salt, and sometimes some cowcumbers.

Other Broth or Pottage of a Carp.

TAke a carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, wash it, and wipe it with a clean cloath, then draw it, and put it in a broad mouthed pipkin that will contain it, put to it a pint of good white or claret wine, and as much good fresh fish broth as will cover it, or as much fair water, with the blood of the carp, four or five blades of large mace, a lit­tle beaten pepper, some slic't onions, a clove or two, some sweet herbs chopped, a handfull of capers, and some salt; stew all together, the carp being well stewed, put in some almond paste, with some white wine, give it a walm or two with some stewed oyster liquor, and serve it on French bread in a fair scowred dish, pour on the liquor, and garnish it with dryed grated manchet.

To dress a Carp in Stoffado.

TAke a carp alive, scale it, and lard it with a good salt eel, steep it in claret or white wine, in an earthen pan, and put to it some wine vinegar, whole cloves, large mace, gross pepper, slic't ginger, and four or five cloves of gar­lick, then have an earthen pan that will contain it, or a large pipkin, put to it some sweet herbs, three or four sprigs of rosemary, as many of time and sweet marjoram, two or three bay leaves and parsley, put the liquor to it in­to the pan or pipkin wherein you will stew it, and paste on the cover, stew it in the oven, in an hour it will be baked, then serve it hot for dinner or supper, serve it on fine car­ved sippets of French bread, and the spices on it, with the herbs, slic't lemon, and lemon peel; and run it over with beaten butter.

To Hash a Carp.

TAke a carp, scale, and scrape off the slime with your knife, wipe it with a dry cloath, bone it, and mince it with a fresh water eel being fleaed and boned; season it with beaten cloves, mace, salt, pepper, and some sweet herbs, as time, parsley, and some sweet marjoram minced very small, stew it in a broad mouthed pipkin, with some claret wine, gooseberries, or grapes, and some blanched chesnuts; being finely stewed, serve it on carved sippets about it, and run it over with beaten butter, garnish the dish with stale grated manchet searsed, and some fryed oy­sters in butter, cockles, or prawns.

Sometimes for variety, use pistaches, pine-apple seeds, or some blanched almonds stewed amongst the hash, or as­paragus, or artichocks boild and cut as big as chesnuts, and garnish the dish with scraped horse-raddish, and rub the [Page 297]bottom of the dish in which you serve the meat, with a clove or two of garlick. Sometimes mingle it with some stewed oysters, or put to it some oyster liquor.

To Marrinate a Carp to be eaten hot or cold.

TAke a carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, wipe it clean with a dry cloath, and split it down the back, flour it, and fry it in sweet sallet oyl, or good clarified but­ter; being fine and crisp fryed, lay it in a deep dish or ear­then pan, then have some white or claret wine, or wine vi­negar, put it in a broad mouthed pipkin with all manner of sweet herbs bound up in a bundle, as rosemary, time, sweet marjoram, parsley, winter savory, bay leaves, sor­rel, and sage, as much of one as the other, put it into the pipkin with the wine, with some large mace, slic't ginger, gross pepper, slic't nutmeg, whole cloves, and salt, with as much wine and vinegar as will cover the fish, then boil the spices and wine with some salt a little while, pour it on the fish hot, and presently cover it close to keep in the spirits of the liquor, herbs and spices for an hours space; then have slic't lemons, lemon-peels, orange and orange-peels, lay them over the fish in the pan, and cover it up close; when you serve them hot lay on the spices and herbs all about it, with the slic't lemons, oranges, and their peels, and run it over with sweet sallet oyl, (or none) but some of the liquor it is soust in.

Or marrinate the carp or carps without sweet herbs for hot or cold, onely bay leaves, in all points else as is above­said; thus you may marrinate soles, or any other fish, whe­ther sea, or fresh water fish.

Or barrel it, pack it close, and it will keep as long as sturgeon, and as good.

To Broil or Toste a Carp divers wayes, either in sweet Butter or Sallet Oyl.

TAke a carp alive, draw it, and wash out the blood in the body with claret wine into a dish, put to it some wine vinegar and oyl, then scrape off the slime, and wipe it dry both outside and inside, lay it in the dish with the vine­gar, wine, oyl, salt, and the streight sprigs of rosemary and parsley, let it steep there the space of an hour or two, then broil it on a clean scowred gridiron, (or toste it before the fire) broil it on a soft fire, and turn it often, being fine­ly broiled, serve it on a clean scowred dish, with the oyl, wine, and vinegar, being stewed on the coals, put it to the fish, the rosemary and parsley round the dish, and some about the fish, or with beaten butter and vinegar, or but­ter and verjuyce, or juyce of oranges beaten with the but­ter, or juyce of lemons; garnish the fish with slices of orange, lemon, and branches of rosemary; boil the milt or spawn by it self, and lay it in the dish with the carp.

Or make sauce otherwayes with beaten butter, oyster li­quor, the blood of the carp, grated nutmeg, juyce of orange, white wine or wine vinegar boild together, crumbs of bread, and the yolk of an egg boild up pretty thick, and run it over the fish.

To broil a Carp in Stoffado.

TAke a live carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, wipe it clean with a dry cloath, and draw it, wash out the blood, and steep it in claret, white wine, wine vinegar, large mace, whole cloves, two or three cloves of garlick, some slic't ginger, gross pepper, and salt; steep it in this composition in a dish or tray the space of two hours, then broil it on a clean scowred gridiron on a soft fire, and baste [Page 299]it with some sweet sallet oyl, sprigs of rosemary, time, par­sley, sweet marjoram, and two or three bay leaves; being finely broild, serve it with the sauce it was steeped in, boild up on the fire with a little oyster liquor, the spices on it, and herbs round about it on the dish, run it over with sauce, either with sweet sallet oyl, or good beaten butter, and broil the milt or spawn by it self.

To Roste a Carp.

TAke a live carp, draw and wash it, and take away the gall, and milt, or spawn; then make a pudding with some grated manchet, some almond paste, cream, currans, grated nutmeg, raw yolks of eggs, sugar, caraway seed candied, or any peel, some lemon and salt, make a stiff pud­ding and put it through the gills into the belly of the carp, scale it not, nor fill it not too full; then spit it, and roste it in the oven upon two or three sticks cross a brass dish, turn it, and let the gravy drop into the dish; being finely rosted, make sauce with the gravy, butter, juyce of orange or lemon, some sugar, and cinamon, beat up the sauce thick with the butter, and dish the carp, put the sauce over it with slices of lemon.

Otherwayes.

Scale it, and lard it with salt eel, pepper, and nutmeg, then make a pudding of some minced eel, roach, or dace, some sweet herbs, grated bread, cloves, mace, nutmeg, pep­per, salt, yolks of eggs, pistaches, chesnuts, and the milt of the carp parboild and cut into dice-work, as also some fresh eel, and mingle it amongst the pudding or fearce.

Sauces for Roste Carp.

  • 1. GRavy and oyster liquor, beat it up thick with sweet butter, claret wine, nutmeg, slices of [Page 300]orange; and some capers, and give it a walm or two.
  • 2. Beaten butter, with slices of orange, and lemon, or the juyce of them onely.
  • 3. Butter, claret wine, grated nutmeg, salt, slices of orange, a little wine vinegar, and the gravy.
  • 4. A little white wine, gravy of the carp, an anchove or two dislolved in it, some grated nutmeg, and a little gra­ted manchet, beat them up thick with some sweet butter, and the yolk of an egg or two, dish the carp, and pour it on it.

To make a Carp Pye a most excellent way.

TAke a carp, scale it and scrape off the slime, wipe it with a dry clean cloth, and split it down the back, then cut it in quarters or six pieces, three of each, and take out the milt or spawn, as also the gall; season it with nutmeg, pep­per, salt, and beaten ginger, lay some butter in the pye bottom, then the carp upon it, and upon the carp two or three bay leaves, four or five blades of large mace, four or five whole cloves, some blanched chesnuts, slices of orange, and some sweet butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with beaten butter, the blood of the carp, and a little claret wine.

For variety, in place of chesnuts, use [...]pine-apple seeds, or bottoms of artichocks, gooseberries, grapes, or barber­ries. Sometimes great oysters bake with the carp, and a great onion or two, sometimes sweet herbs chopped, or sparagus boiled.

Or bake it in a dish as you do the pye.

To make paste for the pye, take two quarts and a pint of fine flour, four or five yolks of eggs, and half a pound of sweet butter, boil the butter till it be melted, and make the paste with it.

Paste for a Florentine of Carps made in a Dish or Patty-pan.

TAke a pottle of fine flour three quarters of a pound of butter, and six yolks of eggs, work up the butter, eggs, and flour, dry them, then put to it as much fair spring water cold as will make it up into paste.

To bake a Carp otherwayes to be eaten hot.

TAke a carp, scale it alive, and scrape off the slime, draw it, and take away the gall and guts, scotch it, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt lightly, lay it into the pye, and put the milt into the belly, then lay on slic't dates in halves, large mace, orange, or slic't lemon, goose­berries, grapes, or barberries, raisins of the sun, and butter; close it up and bake it, being almost baked liquor it with verjuyce, butter, sugar, claret or white wine, and ice it.

Sometimes make a pudding in the carps belly, make it of grated bread, pepper, nutmegs, yolks of eggs, sweet herbs, currans, sugar, gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, orangado, dates, capers, pistaches, raisins, and some minced fresh eel.

Or bake it in a dish or patty pan in cold butter paste.

To bake a Carp with Oysters.

SCale a carp, scrape off the slime, and bone it; then cut it into large dice-work, as also the milt being parboild; then have some great oysters parboild, mingle them with the bits of carp, and season them together with beaten pepper, salt, nutmeg, cloves, mace, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, blanched chesnuts and pistaches, season them lightly, then put in the bottom of the pye a good big oni­on or two whole, fill the pye, and lay upon it some large [Page 302]mace and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked li­quor it with white wine and sweet butter, or beaten but­ter onely.

To make minced Pyes of Carps and Eels.

TAke a carp being cleansed, bone it, and also a good fat fresh water eel, mince them together, and season them with pepper, nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, and salt, put to them some currans, caraway seed, minced orange-peel, and the yolks of six or seven hard eggs minced also, slic't dates, and sugar; then lay some butter in the bottoms of the pyes, and fill them, close them up, bake them, and ice them.

To bake a Carp minced with an Eel in the French Fa­shion called Peti Paetes.

TAke a carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, then roste it with a flayed eel, and being rosted draw them from the fire, and let them cool, then cut them into little pie­ces like great dice one half of them, and the other half min­ced small and seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, salt, goose­berries, barberries, or grapes, and some bottoms of arti­chocks boild and cut as the carp; season all the foresaid materials and mingle all together, then put some butter in the bottom of the pye, lay on the meat and butter on the top, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with gra­vy, and the juyce of oranges, butter, and grated nutmeg.

Sometimes liquor it with verjuyce and yolks of eggs strained, sugar, and butter.

Or with currans, white wine and butter boild together, some sweet herbs chopped small, and saffron.

To bake a Carp according to these Forms to be eaten hot.

[forms of carp]

TAke a carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, bone it, and cut it into dice-work; the milt being parboild, cut it into the same form, then have some great oysters par­boild and cut in the same form also; put to it some grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, the bottoms of artichocks boild, the yolks of hard eggs in quarters, boild sparagus cut an inch long, and some pistaches, season all the foresaid things together, with pepper, nutmegs, and salt, fill the pyes, close them up, and bake them, being baked, liquor them with butter, white wine and some blood of the carp, boil them together, or beaten butter with juyce of oranges.

To bake a Carp with Eels to be eaten cold.

TAke four large carps, scale them and wipe off the slime clean, bone them and cut each side into two pieces of [Page 304]every carp, then have four large fresh water eels, fat ones, boned, flayed, and cut in as many pieces as the carps, sea­son them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt; then have a pye ready, either round or square, put butter in the bottom of it, then lay a lay of eel and a lay of carp upon that, and thus do till you have ended; then lay on some large mace and whole cloves on the top, some sliced nutmeg, sliced ginger, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked and cold, fill it up with clarified butter.

Otherwayes.

TAke eight carps, scale, and bone them, scrape and wash off the slime, wipe them dry, and mince them very fine, then have four good fresh water eels, flay and bone them, and cut them into lard as big as your finger, then have pepper, cloves, mace and ginger, severally beaten, and mingled with some salt, season the fish and also the eels cut into lard; then make a pye according to this form, lay some butter in the bottom of the pye, then a lay of carp upon the butter, so fill it, close it up and bake it.

[form of carp pie]

Section 14. Or, The second Section of Fish.

Shewing the most Excellent Way of Dressing of Pikes.

To boil a Pike.

WAsh him very clean, then truss him either round whole, with his tail in his mouth, and his back scotched, or splatted and trust round like a hart, with his tail in his mouth, or in three pieces, and divide the middle piece into two pieces; then boil it in water, salt, and vinegar, put it not in till the liquor boils, and let it boil very fast at first to make it crisp, but afterwards softly; for the sauce put in a pipkin a pint of white wine, slic't ginger, mace, dates quartered, a pint of great oysters with the liquor, a little vinegar and salt, boil them a quarter of an hour, then mince a few sweet herbs and parsley, stew them till half the liquor be consumed; then the pike being boiled dish it, and garnish the dish with grated dry manchet fine searsed, or ginger fine beaten, then beat up the sauce with half a pound of butter, mineed lemon, or orange, put it [Page 306]on the pike, and sippet it with cut of puff-paste or lozenges, some fried greens, and some yellow butter. Dish it ac­cording to these forms.

[form of dished pike]

To boil a Pike otherwayes.

TAke a male pike alive, splat him in halves, take out his milt and civet, and take away the gall, cut the sides into three pieces of a side, lay them in a large dish or tray, and put upon them half a pint of white wine vinegar, and half a handful of bay-salt beaten fine; then have a clean scowred pan set over the fire with as much rhenish or white wine as will cover the pike, so set it on the fire with some salt, two slic't nutmegs, two races of ginger slic't, two good big onions slic't, five or six cloves of garlick, two or three tops of sweet marjoram, three or four streight sprigs of rosemary bound up in a bundle close, and the peel of half a lemon; let these boil with a quick fire, then put in the pike with the vinegar and boil it up quick; whilest the pike is boiling, take a quarter of a pound of anchoves, wash and bone them, then mince them and put them in a pipkin with a quarter of a pound of butter, and three or four spoonfuls of the liquor the pike was boiled in; the pike be­ing boiled, dish it, and lay the ginger, nutmegs, and hearbs upon it, run it over with the sauce, and cast dried searsed manchet on it.

This foresaid liquor is far better to boil another pike, by renewing the liquor with a little wine.

To boil a Pike and Eel together.

TAke a quart of white wine, a pint and a half of white wine vinegar, two quarts of water, almost a pint of salt, a handful of rosemary and time, let your liquor boil before you put in your fish, the herbs, a little large mace, and some twenty corns of whole pepper.

To boil a Pike otherwayes.

BOil it in water, salt, and wine vinegar, two parts water and one vinegar, being drawn, set on the liquor to boil, cleanse the civet and truss him round, scotch his back, and when the liquor boils put in the fish and boil it up quick; then make sauce with some white wine vinegar, mace, whole pepper, a good handful of cockles broiled or boiled out of the shells and washed with vinegar, a faggot of sweet herbs, the liver stamped and put to it, and horse-radish scraped or slic't, boil all the foresaid together, dish the pike on sippets, and beat up the sauce with some good sweet butter and minced lemon, make the sauce pretty thick, and garnish it as you please.

Otherwayes.

Take as much white wine and water as will cover it, of each a like quantity, and a pint of vinegar, put to this li­quor half an ounce of large mace, two lemon-peels, a quarter of an ounce of whole cloves, three slic't nutmegs, four races of ginger slic't, some six great onions slic't, a bundle of six or seven sprigs or tops of rosemary, as much of time, winter savory, and sweet marjoram bound up hard in a faggot; put into the liquor also a good handful of salt, and when it boils put in the fish being cleansed and trussed, and boil it up quick.

Being boiled, make the sauce with some of the broth [Page 308]where the pike was boiled, and put it in a dish with two or three anchoves being cleansed and minced, a little white wine, some grated nutmeg, and some fine grated manchet, stew it on a chafing-dish, and beat it up thick with some sweet butter, and the yolk of an egg or two dissolved with some vinegar, give it a walm, and put to it three or four sli­ces of lemon.

Then dish the pike, drain the liquor from it upon a cha­fing-dish of coals, pour on the sauce, and garnish the fish with slic't lemons, and the spices, herbs and boild onions, run it over with beaten butter, and lay on some barberries or grapes.

Sometimes for change you may put some horse radish scraped, or the juyce of it.

To Boil a Pike in white Broth.

CUt your pike in three pieces, then boil it in water, salt, and sweet herbs, put in the fish when the liquor boils; then take the yolks of six eggs, beat them with a little sack, sugar, melted butter, and some of the pike broth; then put it on some embers to keep warm, stir it sometimes lest it curdle; then take up your pike, put the head and rail together in a clean dish, cleave the other piece in two, and take out the back bone, put the one piece on one side, and the other piece on the other side, but blanch all, pour the broth on it, and garnish the fish with sippets, strow on fine ginger or sugar, wipe the edge of the dish round, and serve it.

To boil a Pike in the French Fashion, a la Sauces d' lmaigne, or in the Germane Fashion.

TAke a pike, draw him, dress the revet, and cut him in three pieces, boil him in as much wine as water, and [Page 309]some lemon-peel, when the liquor boils put in the fish with a good handful of salt, and boil him up quick.

Then have a sauce made of beaten butter, water, the slices of two or three lemons, the yolks of two or three eggs, and some grated nutmeg; the pike being boiled dish it on fine sippets, and stick it with some fried bread, run it over with the sauce, some barberries or lemon, and garnish the dish with some pared and slic't ginger, barberries, and lemon-peel.

To boil a Pike in the City Fashion.

TAke a live male pike, draw him and slit the rivet, wash him clean from the blood, and lay him in a dish or tray, then put some salt and vinegar to it, (or no vinegar) but onely salt; then set on a kettle with some water and salt, and when it boils put in the pike, boil it softly, and being boiled take it off the fire, and put a little butter into the kettle to it, then make a sauce with beaten butter, the juyce of a lemon or two, grape verjuyce or wine vinegar, dish up the pike on fine carved sippets, and pour on the sauce, garnish the fish with scalded parsley, large mace, barberries, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel, and garnish the dish with the same.

To stew a Pike in the French Fashion.

TAke a pike, splat it down the back alive, and let the liquor boil before you put it in, then take a large deep dish or stewing-pan that will contain the pike, put as much claret wine as will cover it, and wash off the blood, take out the pike, and put to the wine in the dish three or four slic't onions, four blades of large mace, gross pepper, and salt; when it boils put in the pike, cover it close, and being stewed down, dish it up in a clean scowred dish with [Page 310]carved sippets round about it, pour on the broth it was stewed in all over it, with the spices and onions, and put some slic't lemon over all, with some lemon-peel; run it over with beaten butter, and garnish the dish with dry gra­ted manchet. Thus you may also stew it with the scales on or off.

Sometimes for change use horse-radish.

To stew a Pike otherwayes in the City Fashion.

TAke a pike, splat it, and lay it in a dish, when the blood is clean washed out, put to it as much white wine as will cover it, and set it a stewing; when it boils put in the fish, scum it, and put to it some large mace, whole cina­mon, and some salt, being finely stewed dish it on sippets finely carved.

Then thick the broth with two or three egg yolks, some thick cream, sugar, and beaten butter, give it a walm and pour it on the pike, with some boild currans and boild prunes laid all over it, as also mace, cinamon, some knots of barberries, and slic't lemon, garnish the dish with the same garnish, and scrape on fine sugar.

In this way you may do Carp, Bream, Barbel, Chevin, Rochet, Gurnet, Conger, Tench, Pearch, Bace, or Mullet.

To hash a Pike.

SCale and bone it, then mince it with a good fresh eel being also boned and fleyed, put to it some sweet herbs fine stripped and minced small, beaten nutmeg, mace, ginger, pepper, and salt; stew it in a dish with a little white wine and sweet butter, being well stewed, serve it on fine carved sippets & lay on some great stewed oysters, some fried in batter, some green with juice of spinage, other yellow with saffron; garnish the dish with them, and run it over with beaten butter.

To souce a Pike.

DRaw and wash it clean from the blood and slime, then boil it in fair water and falt, when the liquor boils put it to it, and boil it leasurely simpering, season it pretty savoury of the salt, boil it not too much, nor in more water then will but just cover it.

If you intend to keep it long, put as much white wine as water, of both as much as will cover the fish, some wine vinegar, slic't ginger, large mace, cloves, and some salt; when it boils put in the fish, spices, and some lemon-peel, boil it up quick, but not too much, then take it up into a tray, and boil down the liquor to a jelly, lay on some slic't lemon on it, pour on the liquor, and cover it up close; when you serve it in jelly, dish and melt some of the jelly, and run it all over, garnish it with bunches of barberries and slic't lemon.

Or being soust and not jellyed, serve it with fennil and parsley.

When you serve it, you may lay round the dish divers small fishes, as Tench, Pearch, Gurnet, Chevin, Roach, Smelts, &c. and run them over with jelly.

To souce and jelly Pike, Eel, Tench, Salmon, Conger, &c.

SCale the foresaid fishes, being scaled, cleansed, and bo­ned, then season them with nutmeg and salt, or no spice at all, roul them up and binde them like brawn, being first rouled in a clean white cloth close bound up round it, boil them in water, white wine, and salt, but first let the pan or vessel boil, put it in and scum it, then put in some large mace and slic't ginger. If you will onely souce them, boil them not down so much; to jelly them, put to them some isingglass, and serve them in collers whole standing in the jelly.

Otherwayes to souce and jelly the foresaid Fishes.

MAke jelly of three tenches, three perches, and two carps, scale them, wash out the blood, and soak them in fair water three or four hours, leave no fat on them, then put them into a large pipkin with as much fair spring water as will cover them, or as many pints as pounds of fish, put to it some isingglass, and boil it close covered till two parts and a half be wasted, then take it off and strain it, let it cool, and being cold take off the fat on the top, pare the bottom, and put the jelly into three pipkins, put three quarts of white wine to them, and a pound and a half of double refined sugar into each pipkin; then to make one red put a quarter of an ounce of whole cinamon, two races of ginger, two nutmegs, two or three cloves, and a little piece of turnsole dried, the dust rubbed out and steep­ed in some claret wine, put some of the wine into the jelly.

To make another yellow, put a little saffron water, nut­meg, as much cinamon as to the red jelly, and a race of ginger sliced.

To the white put three blades of large mace, a race of ginger slic't, then set the jelly on the fire till it be melted, then have fifteen whites of eggs beaten, and four pound and a half of refined sugar, beat it amongst the eggs, being first beaten to fine powder, then divide the sugar and eggs equally into the three foresaid pipkins, stir it amongst the sugar very well, set them on the fire to stew, but not to boil up till you are ready to run it; let each pipkin cool a little before you run it, put a rosemary branch in each bag, and wet the top of your bags, wring them before you run them, and being run, put some into orange rinds, some into scollop shells, or lemon rindes in halves, some into egg shells or muskle shells, or in moulds for Jellies. Or you [Page 313]may make four colours, and mix some of the jelly with almond milk.

You may dish the foresaid jellies on a pie-plate on a great dish in four quarters, and in the middle a lemon fine­ly carved or cut into branches, hung with jellies, and o­range-peels, and almond jellies round about; then lay on a quarter of the white jelly on one quarter of the plate, an­other of red, and another of amber jelly, the other whiter on another quarter, and about the out-side of the plate, of all the colours one by another in the rindes of oranges and lemons, and for the quarters, four scollop shells of four se­veral colours, and dish it as the former.

Pike Jelly otherwayes.

TAke a good large pike, draw it, wash out the blood, and cut it in pieces, then boil it in a gallon or six quarts of fair spring water, with half a pound of isingglass close covered, being first clean scummed, boil it on a soft fire till half be wasted, then strain the stock or broth into a clean bason or earthen pan, and being cold pare the bot­tom and top from the fat and dregs, put it in a pipkin and set it over the fire, melt it, and put to it the juyce of eight or nine lemons, a quart of white wine, a race of ginger pa­red and slic't, three or four blades of large mace, as much whole cinamon, and a grain of musk and ambergreece tied up in a fine clean clout; then beat fifteen whites of eggs. and put to them in a bason four pound of double refined sugar first beaten to fine powder, stir it with the eggs with a rouling-pin, and then put it amongst the jelly in the pip­kin, stir them well together, and set it a stewing on a soft charcoal fire, let it stew there, but not boil up but one walm at last, let it stew an hour, then take it off and let it cool a little, run it through your jelly bag, put a sprig of rosemary in the bottom of the bag, and being run cast it [Page 314]into moulds. Amongst some of it put some almond milk, or make it in other colours as aforesaid.

To make white Jelly of two Pikes.

TAke two good handsome pikes, scale and draw them and wash them clean from the blood, then put to them six quarts of good white wine, and an ounce of ising­glass, boil them in a good large pipkin to a jelly, being clean scummed, then strain it and blow off the fat.

Then take a quart of sweet cream, a quart of the jelly, a pound and half of double refined sugar fine beaten, and a quarter of a pint of rose-water, put all together in a clean bason, and give them a walm on the fire, with half an ounce of fine searsed ginger, then set it a cooling, dish it into dice-work, or cast it into moulds, and some other coloured jellies. Or in place of cream put in almond milk.

To roast a Pike.

TAke a pike, scour off the slime, and take out the en­trails, lard the back with pickled herrings, (you must have a sharp bodkin to make the holes to lard it) the take some great oysters and claret wine, season the oysters with pepper and nutmeg, stuff the belly with the oysters, and in­termix the stuffing with rosemary, time, winter savory, sweet marjoram, a little onion and garlick, sow these in the belly of the pike; then prepare two sticks about the breadth of a lath, these two sticks and the spit must be as broad as the pike being tied on the spit, tye the pike on, winding packthred about it, tye also along the side of the pike which is not defended by the spit and the laths, rosemary and bayes, baste the pike with butter and claret wine with some anchoves dissolved in it; when the pike is wasted or [Page 315]roasted, take it off, rip up the belly and take out the whole herbs quite away, boil up the gravy, dish the pike, put the wine to it, and some beaten butter.

To fry Pikes.

DRaw them, wash off the slime, and the blood clean, wipe them dry with a clean cloth, flour them, and fry them in clarified butter, being fried crisp and stiff, make sauce with beaten butter, slic't lemon, nutmeg, and salt beaten up thick with a little fried parssey.

Or with beaten butter, nutmeg, a little claret, salt, and slic't orange.

Otherwayes, oyster liquor, a little claret, beaten butter, slic't orange, and nutmeg, rub the dish with a clove of garlick, give the sauce a walm, and garnish the fish with slic't lemon, or orange, and barberries. Small pikes are best to fry.

To fry a Pike otherwayes.

THe pike being scaled and splatted, hack the white or in­side with a knife and it will be ribbed, then fry it brown and crisp in clarified butter, being fried take it up, dram all the butter from it, and wipe the pan clean; then put it again into the pan with claret, slic't ginger, nutmeg, an anchove, salt, and saffron beat, fry it till half be consumed, then put in a piece of butter, shake it well together with a minced lemon or slic't orange, and dish it, garnish it with lemon, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

To broil a Pike.

TAke a pike, draw it and scale it, broil it whole, splat it, or scotch it with your knife, wash out the blood clean, [Page 316]and lay it on a clean cloth, salt it and heat the gridiron very hot, broil it on a soft fire, baste it with butter, and turn it often; being finely broiled, serve it in a dish with beaten butter, and wine vinegar, or juyce of lemons or oranges, and garnish the fish with slices of oranges or le­mons, and bunches of rosemary.

Otherwayes.

Take a pike as abovesaid, being drawn wash it clean, dry it and put it in a dish with some good sallet oyl, wine vinegar, and salt, there let it steep the space of half an hour, then broil it on a soft fire, turn it and baste it often with some fine streight sprigs of rosemary, parsley, and time, baste it out of the dish where the oyl and vinegar is; then the pike being finely broiled, dish it in a clean dish, put the same basting to it being warmed on the coals, lay the herbs round the dish, with some orange or lemon slices.

To bake Pikes.

BAke your pikes as you do carp, as you may see in the foregoing Section, onely remember that small pikes are best to bake.

Section 15. Or, The third Section for Dressing of Fish.

The most excellent wayes of Dressing Salmon, Bace, or Mullet.

To calver Salmon to eat hot or cold.

CHine it, and cut each side into two or three pie­ces according to the bigness, wipe it clean from the blood, and not wash it; then have as much wine and water as you imagine will cover it, make the liquor boil and put in a good handful of salt; when the liquor boils put in the salmon, and boil it up quick with a quart of white wine vinegar, keep up the fire stiff to the last, and being throughly boild, which will be in the space of half an hour or less, then take it off the fire and let it cool, take it up into broad bottomed earthen pans, and be­ing quite cold, which will be in a day, a night, or twelve hours, then put in the liquor to it, and so keep it.

Some will boil in the liquor some rosemary bound up in a bundle hard, two or three cloves, two races of slic't gin­ger, three or four blades of large mace, and a lemon-peel. Others will boil it in beer onely.

Or you may serve it being hot, and dish it on sippets in [Page 318]a clean scowred dish; dish it round the dish or in pieces, and garnish it with slic't ginger, large mace, a clove or two, gooseberries, grapes, barberries, slic't lemon, fryed parsley, ellicksanders, sage, or spinage fryed.

To make sauce for the foresaid salmon; beat some but­ter up thick with a little fair water, put two or three yolks of eggs dissolved into it with a little of the liquor, grated nutmeg, and some slic't lemon, pour it on the salmon, and garnish the dish with fine searsed manchet, barberries, slic't lemon, some spices, and fryed greens as aforesaid.

To Stew a small Salmon, Salmon Peal, or Trout.

TAke a Salmon, draw it, scotch the back, and boil it whole in a stew pan with white wine, (or in pieces) put to it also some whole cloves, large mace, slic't ginger, a bay leaf or two, a bundle of sweet herbs well and hard bound up, some whole pepper, salt, some butter and vine­gar, and an orange in halves; stew all together, and be­ing well stewed, dish them in a clean scowred dish with carved sippets, lay on the spices and slic't lemon, and run it over with beaten butter, and some of the gravy it was stewed in; garnish the dish with some fine searsed manchet, or searsed ginger.

Otherwayes, a most excellent way to stew Salmon.

TAke a rand or jole of salmon, fry it whole raw, and be­ing fryed stew it in a dish on a chafing-dish of coals, with some claret wine, large mace, slic't nutmeg, salt, wine vinegar, slic't orange, and some sweet butter; being stew­ed and the sauce thick, dish it on sippets, lay the spices on it and some slices of oranges, garnish the dish with some stale manchet finely searsed and strewed over all.

To Pickle Salmon to keep all the year.

TAke a Salmon, cut it in six round pieces, then boil it in white wine, vinegar, and a little water, three parts wine and vinegar, and one of water; let the liquor boil before you put in the salmon, and boil it a quarter of an hour, then take it out of the liquor, drain it very well, then take rosemary sprigs, bay leaves, cloves, mace, and gross pepper, a good quantity of each, boil them in two quarts of white wine, and two quarts of white wine vinegar, boil it well, then take the salmon being quite cold, and rub it well with pepper and salt, pack it in a vessel that will but just contain it, lay a layer of salmon and a layer of spice that is boild in the liquor; but let the liquor and spice be very cold before you put it to it: the salmon being close packed put in the liquor, and once in half a year, or as it grows dry, put some white wine or sack to it, it will keep above a year; put some lemon-peel into the piekle, let the salmon be new taken if possible.

An excellent way to Dress Salmon, or other Fish.

TAke a piece of fresh Salmon, wash it clean in a little wine vinegar, and let it lie a little in it, in a broad pip­kin with a cover, put to it six spoonfuls of water, four of vinegar, as much of white wine, some salt, a bundle of sweet herbs, a few whole cloves, a little large mace, and a little stick of cinamon, close up the pipkin with paste, and set it in a kettle of seething water, there let it stew three hours; thus you may do carps, trouts, or eels, and alter the taste at your pleasure.

To hash Salmon.

TAke salmon and set it in warm water, take off the skin, and mince a jole, rand, or tail with some fresh eel; [Page 320]being finely minced season it with beaten cloves, mace, salt, pepper, and some sweet herbs; stew it in a broad mouth­ed pipkin with some claret wine, gooseberries, barberries, or grapes, and some blanched chesnuts; being finely stew­ed serve it on sippets about it, and run it over with beaten butter, garnish the dish with stale grated manchet searsed, some fryed oysters in batter, cockles, or prawns; some­times for variety use pistaches, asparagus boild and cut an inch long, or boild artichocks and cut as big as a chesnut, some stewed oysters, or oyster liquor, and some horse rad­dish scraped or some of the juyce, and rub the bottom of the dish wherein you serve it with a clove of garlick.

To dress Salmon in Stoffado.

TAke a whole rand or jole, scale it, and put it in an earthen stew pan, put to it some claret or white wine, some wine vinegar, a few whole cloves, large mace, gross pep­per, a little slic't ginger, salt, and four or five cloves of gar­lick; then have three or four streight sprigs of rosemary, as much of time and sweet marjoram, two or three bay leaves and parsley bound up into a bundle hard, and a quarter of a pound of good sweet butter, close up the earthen pot with course paste, bake it in an oven, and serve it on sippets of French bread, with some of the liquor and spices on it, run it over with beaten butter and barberries, lay some of the herbs on it, slic't lemon and lemon-peel.

To marrinate Salmon to be eaten hot or cold.

TAke a Salmon, cut it into joles and rands, and fry them in good sweet sallet oyl or clarified butter, then set them by in a charger, and have some white or claret wine, and wine vinegar as much as will cover it; put the wine and vinegar into a pipkin with all manner of sweet herbs bound [Page 321]up in a bundle, as rosemary, time, sweet marjoram, parsley, winter savory, bay leaves, sorrel, and sage, as much of one as the other, large mace, slic't ginger, gross pepper, slic't nutmeg, whole cloves, and salt; being well boild toge­ther pour it on the fish, spices and all, being cold, then lay on slic't lemons and lemon-peel, and cover it up close: so keep it for present spending, and serve it hot or cold with the same liquor it is soust in, with the spices, herbs, and lemons on it.

If to keep long, pack it up in a vessel that will but just hold it, put to it no lemons nor herbs, onely bay leaves: if it be well packed it will keep as long as sturgeon, but then it must not be splatted, but cut round wayes through chine and all.

To boil Salmon in stewed Broth.

TAke a jole, chine, or rand, put it in a stew pan or large pipkin with as much claret wine and water as will cover it, some raisins of the sun, prunes, currans, large mace, cloves, whole cinamon, slic't ginger, and salt, set it a stewing over a soft fire, and when it boils put in some thickening of strained bread, or flour, strained with some prunes, being finely stewed dish it up on sippets in a clean scowred dish, put a little sugar in the broth, the fruit on it, and some slic't lemon.

To fry Salmon.

TAke a jole, rand, or chine, or cut it round through chine and all half an inch thick, or in square pieces, fry it in clarified butter; being stiff and crisp fryed make sauce with two or three spoonfuls of claret wine, some sweet butter, grated nutmeg, some slices of orange, wine vinegar, and some oyster liquor; stew them altogether, [Page 322]and dish the salmon, pour on the sauce, and lay on some fresh slices of oranges and fryed parsley, ellicksanders, sage leaves fryed in batter, pippins sliced and fryed, or clary fryed in batter, or yolks of eggs, and quarters of oranges and lemons round the dish sides, with some fryed greens in halves or quarters.

To roste a Salmon according to this Form.

[form of roasted salmon]

TAke a salmon, draw it at the gills and put in some sweet herbs in his belly whole; the salmon being scaled and the slime wiped off, lard it with pickled herrings, or a fat salt eel, sill his belly with some great oysters stewed, and some nutmeg; let the herbs be time, rosemary, win­ter savory, sweet marjoram, a little onion, and garlick, put them in the belly of the salmon, baste it with butter and set it in an oven in a latten dripping pan, lay it on sticks and baste it with butter, draw it, turn it, and put some cla­ret wine in the pan under it, let the gravy drip into it, baste it out of the pan with rosemary and bayes, and put some anchoves into the wine also, with some pepper and nut­meg; then take the gravy and clear off the sat, boil it up, and beat it thick with butter; then put the fish in a large dish, pour the sauce on it, and rip up his belly, take out some of the oysters and put them in the sauce, and take away the herbs.

Otherwayes.

Take a rand or jole, cut it into four pieces, and season it with a little nutmeg and salt, stick a few cloves, and put it on a small spit, put between it some bay leaves, and stick it with little sprigs of rosemary, roste it and baste it with butter, save the gravy, with some wine vinegar, sweet butter, and some slices of orange; the meat being rosted, dish it, and pour on the sauce.

To broil or toste Salmon.

TAke a whole salmon, a jole, rand, chine, or slices cut round it the thickness of an inch, steep these in wine vinegar, good sweet sallet oyl and salt, broil them on a soft fire, and baste them with the same sauce they were steeped in, with some streight sprigs of rosemary, sweet marjoram, time, and parsley; the fish being broild, boil up ths gravy and oyster liquor, dish up the fish, pour on the sauce, and lay the herbs about it.

To broil or roste Salmon in Stoffado.

TAke a jole, rand, or chine, and steep it in claret wine, wine vinegar, white wine, large mace, whole cloves, two or three cloves of garlick, slic't ginger, gross pepper, and salt; being steeped about two hours, broil it on a soft fire, and baste it with butter, or very good sallet oyl, sprigs of rosemary, time, parsley, sweet marjoram, and some two or three bay leaves; being broiled, serve it with the sauce it was steeped in, with a little oyster liquor put to it, dish the fish, warm the sance it was stewed in, and pour it on the fish either in butter or oyl, lay the spices and herbs about it: and in this way you may roste it, cut the jole, rand in six pieces if it be large, and spit it with bayes and rosemary between, and save the gravy for sauce.

Sauces for roast or broild Salmon.

TAke the gravy of the salmon, or oyster liquor, beat it up thick with beaten butter, claret wine, nutmeg, and some slices of orange.

Otherwayes, with gravy of the salmon, butter, juyce of orange or lemon, sugar, and cinamon, beat up the sauce with the butter pretty thick, dish up the salmon, pour on the sauce, and lay on it slices of lemon.

Or beaten butter, with slices of orange or lemon, or the juyce of them, or grape verjuyce and nutmeg.

Otherwayes, the gravy of the salmon, two or three an­choves dissolved in it, grated nutmeg, and grated bread beat up thick with butter, the yolk of an egg, and slices of oranges, or the juyce of it.

To bake Salmon.

[form of baked salmon]

TAke a salmon being new, scale it, draw it, and wipe it dry, scrape out the blood from the back-bone, scotch it on the back and side, then season it with pepper, nutmeg, and salt; the pie being made put butter in the bottom of it, a few whole cloves, and some of the seasoning, lay on the salmon, and put some whole cloves on it, some slic't nutmeg and butter, close it up and baste it over with eggs, or saffron water, being baked fill it up with clarified butter.

Or you may fley the salmon, and season it as aforesaid with the same spices, and not scotch it, but lay on the skin again, and lard it with eel.

For the paste onely boiling liquor, with three gallons of fine or course flour made up very stiff.

To make Minced Pies of Salmon.

MInce a rand of fresh salmon very small, with a good fresh water eel being fleyed and boned; then mince some violet leaves, sorrel, strawberry leaves, parsley, sage, savory, marjoram, and time, mingle all together with the meat, currans, cinamon, nutmeg, pepper, salt, sugar, ca­rawayes, rose-water, white wine, and some minced orangado, put some butter in the bottom of the pies, fill them, and being baked ice them, and scrape on sugar. Make them according to these forms.

[forms of minced pies of salmon]

To make Chewets of Salmon.

MInce a rand of salmon with a good fresh water cel, being boned, fleyed, and seasoned with pepper, salt, nutmeg, cinamon, beaten ginger, caraway-seed, rose­water, butter, verjuyce, sugar, and orange-peel minced, mingle all together with some slic't dates, and currans, put butter in the bottom, fill the pies, close them up, bake them and ice them.

To make a Lumber Pie of Salmon.

MInce a rand, jole, or tail with a good fat fresh eel seasoned in all points as beforesaid, put some five or six yolks of eggs to it with one or two whites, make it into balls or rouls, with some hard eggs in quarters, put some butter in the pie, lay on the rouls, and on them large mace, dates in halves, slic't lemon, grapes, or barberries, and butter, close it up, bake it, and ice it; being baked, cut up the cover, fry some sage leaves in batter, in clarified butter, and stick them in the rouls, cut the cover and lay it on the plate about the pie, or mingle it with an eel cut into dice-work, liquor it with verjuyce, sugar, and butter.

To boil Bace, Mullet, Gurnet, Rochet, Wivers, &c.

TAke a mullet, draw it, wash it, and boil it in fair water and salt with the scales on, either splatted or whole, but first let the liquor boil, being finely boiled, dish it upon a clean scowred dish, put carved sippets round about it, and lay the white side uppermost, garnish it with slict't lemon, large mace, lemon peels, and barberries; then make a lear or sauce with beaten butter, a little water, slices of lemon, juyce of grapes or orange, strained with the yolks of two or three eggs.

To souce Mullets or Bace.

DRaw them and boil them with the scales, but first wash them clean, and lay them in a dish with some salt cast upon them, some slic't ginger and large mace, put some wine vinegar to them, and two or three cloves; then set on the fire a kettle with as much wine as water, when the pan boils put in the fish and some salt, boil it with a [Page 327]soft fire, and being finely boiled and whole, take them up with a false bottom and two wires all together. If you will jelly them, boil down the liquor to a jelly with a piece of isingglass; being boild to a jelly, pour it on the fish, spices, and all into an earthen flat bottomed pan, cover it up close, and when you dish the fish, serve it with some of the jelly on it; garnish the dish with slic't ginger and mace, and serve with it in saucers wine vinegar, minced sennil, and slic't ginger; garnish the dish with green fennil and flowers, and parsley on the fish.

To marinate Mullets or Bace.

SCale the mullets, draw them, and scrape off the slime, wash and dry them with a clean cloth, flour them & fry them in the best fallet oyl you can get, fry them in a frying pan or in a preserving pan, but first before you put in the fish to fry make the oyl very hot, fry them not too much, but crisp and stiff; being clear, white, and fine fried, lay them by in an earthen pan or charger till they be all fried, lay them in a large flat bottomed pan that they may lye by one another, and upon one another at length, and pack them close; then make pickle for them with as much wine vine­gar as will cover them the breadth of a finger, boil it in a pipkin with salt, bay leaves, sprigs or tops of rosemary, sweet marjoram, time, savory, and parsley, a quarter of a handful of each, and whole pepper; give these things a walm or two on the fire, pour it on the fish, and cover it close hot; then slice three or four lemons being pared, save the peels, and put them to the fish, strow the slices of lemon over the fish with the peels, and keep them close covered for your use. If this fish were barreld up, it would keep as long as sturgeon, put half wine vinegar, and half white wine, the liquor not boiled, nor no herbs in the li­quor but fried bay leaves, slic't nutmegs, whole cloves, [Page 328]large mace, whole pepper, and slic't ginger, pack the fishes close, and once a moneth turn the head of the vessel downward; it will keep half a year without barrelling.

Marinate these Fishes following as the Mullet, viz. Bace, Soals, Plaice, Flounders, Dabs, Pike, Carp. Bream, Perch, Tench, Wivers, Trouts, Smelts, Gudgeons, Mackrel, Tur­but, Holly-burt, Gurnet, Rochet, Conger, Oysters, Scol­lops, Cockles, Lobsters, Prawns, Crawfish, Muskles, Snails, Mushrooms, Welks, Frogs, &c.

To marinate Bace, Mullet, Gurnet, or Rochet otherwayes.

TAke a gallon of vinegar, a quart of fair water, a good handful of bay leaves, as much of rosemary, and a quarter of a pound of pepper beaten, put these together, and let them boil softly, season it with a little salt, then fry your fish in special good sallet oyl being well clarified, the fish being fried, put them in an earthen vessel or barrel, lay the bay leaves and rosemary between every layer of the fish, and pour the broth upon it, when it is cold close up the vessel; thus you may use it to serve hot or cold, and when you dish it to serve, garnish it with slic't lemon, the peel, and barberries.

To broil Mullet, Bace, or Bream.

TAke a mullet, draw it and wash it clean, broil it with the scales on or without scales, and lay it in a dish with some good sallet oyl, wine vinegar, salt, some sprigs of rosemary, time, and parsley, then heat the gridiron and lay on the fish, broil it on a soft fire on the embers, and baste it with the sauce it was steeped in; being broild serve it in a clean warm dish with the sauce it was steeped in, the herbs on it, and about the dish, cast on salt, and so serve it with slices of orange, lemon, or barberries.

Or broil it in butter and vinegar with herbs as above­said, and make sauce with beaten butter and vinegar.

Or beaten butter and juyce of lemon and orange.

Sometimes for change, with grape verjuyce, juyce of sor­rel, beaten butter and the herbs.

To fry Mullets.

SCale, draw, and scotch them, wash them clean, wipe them dry and flour them, fry them in clarified butter, and being fryed, put them in a dish, put to them some claret wine, slic't ginger, grated nutmeg, an anchove, salt, and some sweet butter beat up thick, give the fish a walm with a minced lemon, and dish it, but first rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

The least mullets are the best to fry.

To bake a Mullet or Bace.

SCale, garbidge, wash and dry the mullet very well, then lard it with a salt eel, season it, and make a pudding for it with grated bread, sweet herbs, and some fresh eel minced, put also the yolks of hard eggs, an anchove washed and minced very small, some nutmeg and salt; fill the bel­ly, or not fill it at all, but cut it into quarters, or three of a side, and season them with nutmeg, ginger, and pepper, lay them in your pye, and make balls and lay them upon the pieces of mullet, then put on some capers, prawns, or cockles, yolks of eggs minced, butter, large mace, and bar­berries, close it up, and being baked cut up the lid, and stick it full of cuts of paste, lozenges, or other pretty gar­nish, fill it up with beaten butter, and garnish it with slic't lemon.

Or you may bake it in a patty-pan with better paste then that which is made for pyes.

This is a very good way for tench or bream.

Section 16. Or, The fourth Section of Dressing Fish.

Shewing the exactest wayes of Dressing Turbut, Plaice, Flounders, and Lampry.

To boil Turbut to eat hot.

DRaw and wash them clean, then boil them in white wine and water, as much of the one as the other, with some large mace, a few cloves, salt, sliced ginger, a bundle of time and rosemary fast bound up; when the pan boils put in the fish, scum it as it boils, and being half boild, put in some lemon-peel; being through boild, serve it in this broth, with the spices, herbs, and slic't lemon on it; or dish it on sippets with the fore­said garnish and serve it with beaten butter.

Turbut otherwayes Calvered.

Draw the turbut, wash it clean, and boil it in half wine and half water, salt, and vinegar; when the pan boils put in the fish, with some slic't onions, large mace, a [Page 331]clove or two, some slic't ginger, whole pepper, and a bun­dle of sweet herbs, as time, rosemary, and a bay leaf or two; scotch the fish on the white side before you put it a boiling very thick overthwart onely one way; being half boiled, put in some lemon or orange-peel; and being through boild, serve it with the spices, herbs, some of the liquor, onions, and slic't lemon.

Or serve it with beaten butter, slic't lemon, herbs, spi­ces, onions, and barberries. Thus also you may dress ho­lyburt.

To boil Turbut or Holyburt otherwayes.

BOil it in fair water and salt, being drawn and washed clean, when the pan boils put in the fish and scum it; being well boild dish it, and pour on it some stewed oysters and slic't lemon; run it over with beaten butter beat up thick with juyce of oranges, pour it over all, then cut sip­pets and stick it with fryed bread.

Otherwayes.

Serve them with beaten butter, vinegar, barberries, and sippets about the fish.

To Souce Turbut and Holyburt.

TAke and draw the fish, wash it clean from the blood and slime, and when the pan boils put in the fish in fair water, and salt, boil it very leasurely, scum it. and season it pretty savory of the salt, boil it well with no more water then will cover it. If you intend to keep it long, boil it in as much water as white wine, some wine vi­negar, slic't ginger, large mace, two or three cloves, and some lemon-peel; being boild and cold, put in a slic't le­mon or two, take up the fish, and keep it in an earthen [Page 332]pan, close covered, boil these fishes in no more liquor then will cover them, boil them on a soft fire simpering.

To stew Turbut and Holy-burt.

TAke it and cut it into slices, then fry it, and being half fryed put it in a stew pan or deep dish, then put to it some claret, grated nutmeg, three or four slices of an orange, a little wine vinegar, and sweet butter, stew it well, dish it, and run it over with beaten butter, slic't lemon or orange, and orange or lemon-peel.

To fry Turbut or Holy-burt.

CUt the fish into thin slices, hack it with a knife and it will be ribbed, then fry it almost brown with but­ter, take it up draining all the butter from it, then the pan being clean put it in again with claret, slic't ginger, nutmeg, anchove, salt, and saffron beat, fry it till half be consumed, then put in a piece of butter, shaking it well together with a minced lemon, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

To hash turbut, make a forst meat of it; to roste or broil it, use it in all points as you do sturgeon; and marrinate it as you do carp.

The best way to Calver Flounders.

TAke them alive, draw them and scotch them very thick on the white side, then have a pan of white white wine and wine vinegar over the fire with all manner of spices, as large mace, salt, cloves, slic't ginger, some great onions slic't, the tops of rosemary, time, sweet mar­joram, picked parsley, and winter savory; when the pan boils put in the flounders, and no more liquor then will [Page 333]cover them, cover the pan close, and boil them up quick, serve them hot or cold with slic't lemon, the spices and herbs on them, and lemon peel.

Broil flounders as you do bace and mullet, souce them as pike, marrinate and dress them in stoffado as carp, and bake them as oysters.

To boil Plaice hot to butter.

DRaw them, and wash them clean, then boil them in fair water and salt, when the pan boils put them in being very new, boil them up quick with a lemon-peel; dish them upon fine sippets round about them, slic't lemon on them, the peel, and some barberries, beat up some but­ter very thick with some juyce of lemon and nutmeg gra­ted, and run it over them hot.

Otherwayes.

Boil them in white wine vinegar, large mace, a clove or two, and slic't ginger; being boild serve them in beaten butter, with juce of sorrel, strained bread, slic't lemon, bar­berries, grapes, or gooseberries.

To stew Plaice.

TAke and draw them, wash them clean, and put them in a dish, stew-pan or pipkin, with some claret or white wine, butter, some sweet herbs, nutmeg, pepper, an onion, and salt; being finely stewed, serve them with beat­en butter on carved sippets, and slic't lemon.

Otherwayes.

Draw, wash, and scotch them, then fry them not too much; being fryed put them in a dish or stew-pan, put to [Page 334]them some claret wine, grated nutmeg, wine vinegar, but­ter, pepper, and salt, stew them together with some slices of orange.

To bake a Lampry.

DRaw it, and split the back on the inside from the mouth to the end of the tail, take out the string in the back, fley her and truss her round, parboil it and season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, put some butter in the bottom of the pie, and lay on the lamprey with two or three good big onions, a sew whole cloves and butter, close it up and baste it over with yolks of eggs, and bear, or saf­fron water, bake it, and being baked, fill it up with clarified butter, stop it up with butter in the vent hole, and put in some claret wine, but that will not keep long.

To bake a Lampry otherwayes with an Eel.

FLey it, splat it, and take out the garbidge; then have a good fat eel, fley it, draw it, and boneit, wipe them dry from the slime, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, cut them in equal pieces as may conveniently lye in a square or round pie, lay butter in the bottom, and three or four good whole onions, then lay a layer of eels over the butter, and on that a lay of lampry, then another of eel, thus do till the pie be full, and on the top of all put some whole cloves and butter, close it up and bake it, being basted over with saffron water, yolks of eggs, and bear, bake it, and being baked and cold, fill it up with beaten but­ter. Make your pies according to these forms.

[forms of lampry pies]

To bake a Lampry in the Italian Fashion to eat hot.

FLey it, and season it with nutmeg, pepper, salt, cina­mon, and ginger, fill the pie either with the Lampry cut in pieces, or whole, put to it raisins, currans, prunes, dried cherries, dates, and butter, close it up and bake it, be­ing baked liquor it with strained almonds, grape verjuyce, sugar, sweet herbs chopped and boiled all together, serve juyce of orange, white wine, cinamon, and the blood of the lampry, and ice it; thus you may also do lampurns baked for hot.

To bake a Lampry otherwayes in Patty-pan or Dish.

TAke a lampry, roast it in pieces, being drawn and fley­ed, baste it with butter, and being roasted and cold, put it into a dish with paste or puff paste, put butter to it, being first seasoned with pepper, nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, and salt, seasoned lightly, some sweet herbs chopped, gra­ted bicket bread, currans, dates, or slic't lemon, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with butter, white wine, or sack, and sugar.

Section 17. OR. The fifth Section of Fish.

Shewing the best way to Dress Eels, Conger, Lump, and Soals.

To boil Eels to be eaten hot.

DRaw them, fley them; and wipe them clean, then put them in a posnet or stew-pan, cut them three inches long, and put to them some white wine, white wine vinegar, a little fair water, salt, large mace, and a good big onion, stew the foresaid together with a little butter; being finely stewed and tender, dish them on carved sippets, or on ssices of French bread, and serve them with boild currans boild by themselves, slic't lemon, barberries, and scrape on sugar.

Otherwayes.

Draw and fley them, cut them into pieces, and boil them in a little fair water, white wine, an anchove, some oyster liquor, large mace, two or three cloves bruised, salt, spi­nage, sorrel, and parsley grosly minced with a little onion, and pepper, dish them upon fine carved sippets; then broth them with a little of that broth, and beat up a lear with [Page 337]some good butter, the yolk of an egg or two, and the rinde and slices of a lemon.

To stew Eels.

FLey them, cut them into pieces; and put them into a skillet with butter, verjuyce, and fair water as much as will cover them, some large mace, pepper, a quarter of a pound of currans, two or three onions, three or four spoon­fuls of yeast, and a bundle of sweet herbs, stew all these to­gether till the fish be very tender, then dish them, and put to the broth a quarter of a pound of butter, a little salt, and sugar, pour it on the fish, sippet it, and serve it hot.

To stew Eels in an Oven.

CUt them in pieces, being drawn and fleyed, then season them with pepper, salt, and a few sweet herbs chop­ped small, put them into an earthen pot, and set them up an end, put to them four or five cloves of garlick, and two or three spoonfuls of fair water, bake them, and serve them on sippets.

To stew Eels otherwayes to be eaten hot.

DRaw the eels, fley them, and cut them into pieces three inches long, then put them into a broad mouthed pipkin with as much white wine and water as will cover them, put to them some stripped time, sweet marjo­ram, savory, picked parsley, and large mace, stew them well together, and serve them on fine sippets, stick bay­leaves round the dish, garnish the meat with flic't lemon; and the dish with fine grated manchet.

To stew whole Eels to eat hot.

TAke three good eels, draw, fley them, and truss them round, (or in pieces) then have a quart of white [Page 338]wine, three half pints of wine vinegar, a quart of water, some salt, and a handful of rosemary and time bound up hard, when the liquor boils put in the eels with some whole pepper, and large mace; being boiled serve them with some of the broth, beat up thick with some good butter, and slic't lemon, dish them on sippets with some grapes, barberries, or gooseberries.

Otherwayes.

Take three good eels, draw, fley, and scotch them with your knife, truss them round, or cut them in pieces, and fry them in clarified butter, then stew them between two dish­es, put to them some two or three spoonfuls of claret or white wine, some sweet butter, two or three slices of an orange, some salt, and slic't nutmeg; stew all well toge­ther, dish them, pour on the sauce, and run it over with beaten butter, and slices of fresh orange; and put fine sip­pets round the dish.

To dress Eels in Stoffado.

TAke two good eels, draw, fley them, and cut them in pieces three inches long, put to them half as much claret wine as will cover them, or white wine, wine vine­gar, or elder vinegar, some whole cloves, large mace, gross pepper, slic't ginger, salt, four or five cloves of garlick; being put into a pipkin that will contain it, put to them also three or four sprigs of sweet herbs, as rosemary, time, or sweet marjoram, two or three bay leaves, and some par­sley; cover up the pipkin, and paste the cover, then stew it in an oven, in one hour it will be baked, serve it hot for dinner or supper on fine sippets of French bread, and the spices upon it, the herbs, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel, and run it over with beaten butter.

To souce Eels in Collers.

TAke a good large silver eel, flay it (or not) take out the back-bone, and wash and wipe away the blood with a dry cloth, then season it with beaten nutmeg and salt, cut off the head and roul in the tail; being seasoned in the inside, binde it up in a fine white cloth close and streight; then have a large skillet or pipkin, put in it some fair water and white wine, of each a like quantity, and some salt, when it boils put in the eel; being boild tender take it up, and let it cool, when it is almost cold keep it in sauce for your use in a pipkin close covered, and when you will serve it take it out of the cloth, pare it, and dish it in a clean dish or plate, with a sprig of rosemary in the middle of the coller; garnish the dish with jelly, barberries, and le­mon.

If you will have it jelly, put in a piece of isingglass after the eel is taken up, and boil the liquor down to a jelly.

To Jelly Eels otherwayes.

FLey an eel, and cut into rowels, wash it clean from the blood, and boil it in a dish with some white wine, and white wine vinegar, as much water as wine and vinegar and no more of the liquor then will just cover it; being tender boild with a little salt, take it up and boil down the liquor with a piece of isingglass, a blade of mace, a little juyce of orange and sugar; then the eel being dished, run the clearest of the jelly over it.

To souce Eels otherwayes in Collers.

TAke two fair eels, fley them, and part them down the back, take out the back bone; then take time, par­sley, [Page 340]and sweet marjoram, mince them small, and mingle them with nutmeg, ginger, pepper, and salt, strow it on the inside of the eels, then roul them up like a coller of brawn, and put them in a clean cloth, binde the ends of the cloth, and boil them tender with vinegar, white wine, salt, and water; but let the liquor boil before you put in the eels.

To souce Eel otherwayes in a Coller or Roll.

TAke a large great eel, and scoure it with a handful of salt, then split it down the back, take out the back­bone and the guts, wipe out the blood clean, and season the eel with pepper, nutmeg, salt, and some sweet herbs min­ced and strowed upon it, roul it up, and binde it up close with packthread like a coller of brawn, boil it in water, salt, vinegar, and two or three blades of mace, boil it half an hour; and being boild, put to it a slic't lemon, and keep it in the same liquor; when you serve it, serve it in a coller, or cut it out in round slices, lay six or seven in a dish, and garnish it in the dish with parssey and barberries, or serve with it vinegar in saucers.

To souce Eels otherwayes cut in pieces, or whole.

TAke two or three great eels, scour them in salt, draw them and wash them clean, cut them in equal pieces three inches long, and scotch them cross on both sides, put them in a dish with wine, vinegar, and salt, then have a kettle over the fire with fair water and a bundle of sweet herbs, two or three great onions, and some large mace; when the kettle boils put in the eels, wine, vinegar, and salt; being finely boild and tender, drain them from the liquor, and when they are cold take some of the broth and a pint of white wine, boil it up with some saffron beaten [Page 341]to powder, or it will not colour the wine; then take out the spices of the liquor where it was boild, and put it in the last broth made for it, leave out the onions and herbs of the first broth, and keep it in the last.

To make a Hash of Eels.

TAke a good large eel, or two, fley, draw, and wash them, bone and mince them, then season them with cloves and mace, mix with them some good large oyfters, a whole onion, salt, a little white wine, and an anchove, stew them upon a soft fire, and serve them on fine carved sippets, garnish them with some slic't orange, and run them over with beaten butter thickned with the yolk of an egg or two, some grated nutmeg, and juyce of orange.

To make a Spitch-Cock or broild Eels.

TAke a good large eel, splat it down the back, and joynt the back-bone; being drawn and the blood washed out, leave on the skin, and cut it in four pieces equally, salt them, and baste them with butter, or oyl and vinegar; broil them on a soft fire, and being finely broild, serve them in a clean dish, with beaten butter, and juyce of lemon, or beaten butter, and vinegar, with sprigs of rosemary round about them.

To broil salt Eels.

TAke a salt eel and boil it tender, being fleyed and trust round with scuers, boil it tender on a soft fire, then broil it brown, and serve it in a clean dish with two or three great onions boild whole and tender, and then broild brown; serve them on the eel with oyl and mustard in sau­cers.

To roast an Eel.

CUt it three inches long, being first fleyed and drawn, split it, put it on a small spit, and roast it, set a dish under it to save the gravy, and roast it fine and brown, then make sauce with the gravy, a little vinegar, salt, pepper, a clove or two, and a little grated parmisan, or old English cheese, or a little buttargo grated; the eel being roasted, blow the fat off the gravy, and put to it a piece of sweet butter, shaking it well together with some salt, put it in a clean dish, lay the eel on it, and some flices of oranges.

To roast Eels otherwayes.

TAke a good large silver eel, draw it, and fley it in pie­ces of four inches long, spit it on a small spit, with some bay leaves, or large sage leaves between each piece, spit it cross wayes and roast it; being roasted, serve it with beaten butter, beaten with juyce of oranges, lemons, or el­der vinegar, and beaten nutmeg, or serve it with venison sauce, and dredge it with beaten caraway-seed, cinamon, flour, or grated bread.

To bake Eels in Pie, Dish, or Patty-pan.

TAke good fresh water eels, draw and fley them, cut them in pieces, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, lay them in a pie with some prunes, currans, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, large mace, slic't dates, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with white wine, sugar, and butter, and ice it.

If you bake it in a dish in paste, bake it in cold butter paste, roast the eel and let it be cold, season it with nutmeg, pepper, ginger, cinamon, and salt, put butter on the paste, [Page 343]and lay on the eel with a few sweet herbs chopped, and grated bisket bread, grapes, currans, dates, large mace, and butter, close it up and bake it, liquor it and ice it.

Otherwayes.

Take good fresh water eels, fley and draw them, season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, being cut in pieces lay them in the pie, and put to them some two or three onions in quarters, some butter, large mace, grapes, bar­berries, or gooseberries, close them up and bake them; be­ing baked liquor them with beaten butter, beat up thick with the yolks of two eggs, and slices of an orange.

Sometimes you may bake them with a minced onion, some raisins of the sun, and season them with some ginger, pepper, and salt.

To bake Eels otherwayes.

TAke half a dozen good eels, fley them and take out the bones, mince them, and season them with nut­meg, pepper, and salt, lay some butter in the pie, and lay a lay of eel, and a lay of watered salt eel, cut into great lard as big as your finger, lay a lay of it, and another of minced eels, thus lay six or seven layes, and on the top lay on some whole cloves, slic't nutmeg, butter, and some slices of salt eel, close it up and bake it, being baked fill it up with some clarified butter, and close the vent. Make your pie round according to this form.

[form of eel pie]

To bake Eels with Tenches in a round or square pie to eat cold.

TAke four good large eels fleyed and boned, and six good large tenches, scale, splat, and bone them, cut [Page 344]off the heads and fins as also of the eels, cut both eels and tenches a handful long, and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; then lay some butter in the bottom of the pie, lay a lay of eels, and then a lay of tench, thus do five or six layings, lay on the top large mace, and whole cloves, and on that butter, close it up and bake it; being baked and cold, fill it up with clarified butter.

Or you may bake them whole, and lay them round in the pie, being fleyed, boned, and seasoned as the former, bake them as you do a lampry, with two or three onions in the middle.

To make minced Pies of an Eel.

TAke a fresh eel, fley it and cut off the fish from the bone, mince it small, and pare two or three wardens or pears, mince of them as much as of the eel, or oysters; temper and season them together with ginger, pepper, cloves, mace, salt, a little sanders, some currans, raisins, prunes, dates, verjuyce, butter, and rose-water.

Minced Eel Pies otherwayes.

TAke a good fresh water eel, fley, draw, and parboil it, then mince the fish being taken from the bones, mince also some pippins, wardens, figs, some great raisins of the sun, season them with cloves, mace, pepper, salt, sugar, saf­fron prunes, currans, dates on the top, whole raisins, and butter; make pies according to these forms, fill them, close them up and bake them, being baked liquor them with grape verjuyce, slic't lemon, butter, sugar and white wine.

[forms of minced eel pies]

Other minced Eel Pyes.

TAke two or three good large eels being cleansed, mince them and season them with cloves, mace, pepper, nutmeg, salt, and a good big onion in the bottom of your pye, some sweet herbs chopped, and onions, put some gooseberries and butter to it, and fill your pye, close it up and bake it; being baked, liquor it with butter and verjuyce, or strong fish broth, butter, and saffron.

Otherwayes.

Mince some wardens or pears, figs, raisins, prunes, and season them as abovesaid with some spices, but no onions nor herbs, put to them gooseberries, saffron, slic't dates, sugar, verjuyce, rosewater, and butter; then make pyes according to these forms, fill them and bake them, being baked, liquor them with white batter, white wine and su­gar, and ice them.

[forms of minced eel pies]

To boil Conger to be eaten hot.

TAke a piece of conger being scalded and washed from the blood and slime, lay it in vinegar and salt, with a slice or two of lemon, some large mace, slic't ginger, and two or three cloves; then set some liquor a boiling in a pan or kettle, as much wine and water as will cover it; when the liquor boils put in the fish, with the spices, and salt; when it is boild put in the lemon, and serve the fish on fine carved sippets; then make a leir or sauce with beaten butter, beaten with juyce of oranges or lemons, [Page 346]serve it with slic't lemon on it, slic't ginger, and barber­ries; and garnish it with the same.

To stew Conger.

TAke a piece of conger, and cut it into pieces as big as a hens egg, put them in a stew pan or two deep dishes, with some large mace, salt, pepper, slic't nutmeg, some white wine, wine vinegar, as much water, butter, and slic't ginger; stew these well together, and serve them on sip­pets, with slic't orange, lemon, and barberries, and run them over with beaten butter.

To marinate Conger.

SCald and draw it, cut it into pieces, and fry it in the best sallet oyl you can get; being fryed put it in a little barrel that will contain it; then have some fryed bay leaves, large mace, slic't ginger, and a few whole cloves; lay these between the fish, put to it white wine vinegar, and salt, close up the head and keep it for your use.

To souce Conger.

TAke a good fat conger, draw it at two several vents or holes, being first scalded and the finns shaved off, cut it into three or four pieces; then have a pan of fair water and make it boil, put in the fish, with a good quantity of salt, let it boil very softly half an hour; being tender boild, set it by for your use for present spending: but to keep it long, boil it with as much wine as water, and a quart of white wine vinegar.

To souce Conger in Collers like Brawn.

TAke the forepart of a conger from the gills, splat it, and take out the bone; being first fleyed or scalded, [Page 347]then have a good large eel or two, fleyed also and boned, seasoned in the inside with minced nutmeg, mace and salt, seasoned and cold with the eel in the inside, binde it up hard in a clean cloth, boil it in fair water, white wine, and salt.

To roast Conger.

[form of roasted conger]

TAke a good fat conger, draw it, wash it, and scrape off the slime, cut off the finns, and spit it like an S, draw it with rosemary and time, put some beaten nutmeg in his belly, salt, some stripped time, and some great oysters par­boild, roste it with the skin on, and save the gravy for the sauce, boild up with a little claret wine, beaten butter, wine vinegar, and an anchove or two, the fat blown off, and beat up thick with some sweet butter, two or three slices of an orange, and elder vinegar.

Or roste it in short pieces, and spit it with bay leaves be­tween, stuck with rosemary. Or make venison sauce, and instead of rosting it on a spit, roste it in an oven.

To broil Conger.

TAke a good fat conger being scalded and cut into pie­ces, salt them and broil them raw; or you may broil them being first boiled and basted with butter, or steeped in oyl and vinegar, broil them raw, and serve them with the same sauce you steeped them in, baste them with rosemary, time, and parsley, and serve them with the sprigs of those [Page 348]herbs about them, either in beaten butter and vinegar, or oyl and vinegar, and the foresaid herbs: or broil the pie­ces spiatted like a spitch-cock of an eel, with the skin on.

To fry Conger.

BEing scalded, and the finns shaved off, splat it, cut it in­to rouls round the conger, flour it, and fry it in cla­rified butter crisp, sauce it with butter beaten with vine­gar, juyce of orange or lemon, and serve it with fryed par­sley, fryed ellicksanders, or clary in batter.

To bake Conger in Pasty proportion.

[form of conger pastry]
In Pye proportion.

BAke it any way of the sturgeon, as you may see in the next Section, to be eaten either hot or cold; and make your pyes according to these forms.

To stew a Lump.

TAke it either fleyed (or not) and boil it, being splatted in a dish with some white wine, a large mace or two, salt, and a whole onion; stew them well together, and dish them on fine sippets, run it over with some beaten butter, beat up with two or three slices of an orange, and some of the gravy of the fish, run it over the lump, and garnish the meat with slic't lemon, grapes, barberries, or gooseberries.

To bake a Lump.

TAke a lump, and cut it in pieces skin and all, or fley it, and part it in two pieces of a side, season it with nut­meg, pepper, and salt, and lay it in the pye, lay on it a bay leaf or two, three or four blades of large mace, the slices of an orange, gooseberries, grapes, barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with beaten butter.

Thus you may bake it in dish, pye, or patty-pan.

To boil Soals.

DRaw and fley them, then boil them in vinegar, salt, white wine, and mace, but let the liquor boil before you put them in; being finely boild take them up and dish them in a clean dish on fine carved sippets, garnish the fish with large mace, slic't lemon, gooseberries, grapes, or bar­berries, and beat up some butter thick with juyce of oran­ges, white wine, or grape verjuyce, and run it over the fish. Sometimes you may put some stewed oysters on them.

Otherwayes.

Take the soals, flay and draw them, and scotch one side with your knife, lay them in a dish, and pour on them some [Page 350]vinegar and salt, let them lie in it half an hour, in the mean time set on the fire some water, white wine, six cloves of garlick, and a faggot of sweet herbs; then put the fish into the boiling liquor, and the vinegar and salt where they were in steep; being boild, take them up and drain them very well, then beat up sweet butter very thick, and mix with it some anchoves minced small and dissolved in the butter, pour it on the fish being dished, and strow on a lit­tle grated nutmeg, and minced orange mixt in the butter.

To stew Soals.

BEing fleyed and scotched, draw them and half fry them, then take some claret wine, and put to it some Falt, grated ginger, and a little garlick, boil this sauce in a dish, when it boils put the soals therein, and when they are sufficiently stewed upon their backs, lay the two halves open an the one side and on the other, then lay anchoves finely washed and boned all along, and on the anchoves slices of butter, then turn the two sides over again, and let them stew till they be ready to be eaten, then take them out of the sauce and lay them on a clean dish, pour some of the li­quor wherein they were stewed upon them, and squeeze on an orange.

Otherwayes.

Draw, fley, and scotch them, then flour them and half fry them in clarified butter, put them in a clean pewter dish, and put to them three or four spoonfuls of claret wine, two of wine vinegar, two ounces of sweet butter, two or three slices of an orange, a little grated nutmeg, and a little salt; stew them together close covered, and being well stewed, dish them up in a clean dish, lay some sliced lemon on them, and some beaten butter with juyce of oranges.

To dress Soals otherwayes.

TAke a pair of soals, lard them with watered salt salmon, then lay them on a pie-plate, and cut your lard all of an equal length, on each side lear it but short; then flour the soals, and fry them in the best ase you can get; when they are fried lay them on a warm dish, and put to them anchove sauce made of some of the gravy in the pan, and two or three anchoves, grated nutmeg, a little oyl or but­ter, and an onion sliced small, give it a walm, and pour it on them with some juyce, and two or three slices of orange.

To souce Soals.

TAke them very new, and scotch them on the upper or white side very thick not too deep; then have white wine, wine vinegar, cloves, mace, sliced ginger, and salt, set it over the fire to boil in a kettle fit for it; then take parsley, time, sage, rosemary, sweet marjoram, and winter savory, the tops of all these herbs picked, in little branches, and some great onions sliced, when it boils put in all the foresaid materials with no more liquor then will just cover them; cover them close in boiling, and boil them very quick, being cold dish them in a fair dish, and serve them with sliced lemon, and lemon-peels about them and on them.

Otherwayes.

Draw them and wash them clean, then have a pint of fair water with as much white wine, some wine vinegar, and salt; when the pan or kettle boils, put in the soals with a clove or two, slic't ginger, and some large mace; being boild and cold, serve them with the spices, some of the gra­vy they were boild in, slic't lemon, and lemon-peel.

To jelly Soals.

TAke three tenches, two carps, and four pearches, scale them and wash out the blood clean, take out ali the [Page 352]fat, and to every pound of fish take a pint of fair spring water, or more, set the fish a boiling in a clean pipkin or pot. and when it boils scum it, and put in some isingglass, boil it till one fourth part be wasted, then take it off and strain it through a strong canvas cloth, set it to cool, and being cold divide it into three or four several pipkins, as much in the one as the other, take off the bottom and top, and to every quart of broth put to a quart of white wine, a pound and half of refined sugar, two nutmegs, two races of ginger, two pieces of whole cinamon, a grain of musk, and eight whites of eggs, stir them together with a roul­ing-pin, and equally divide it into the several pipkins a­mongst the jellies, set them a stewing upon a soft charcoal fire, when it boils up, run it through the jelly-bags, and pour it upon the soals.

To roast Soals.

DRaw them, fley off the black skin, and dry them with a clean cloth, season them lightly with nutmeg, salt, and some sweet herbs chopped small, put them in a dish with some claret wine and two or three anchoves the space of half an hour, being first larded with small lard of a good fresh eel, then spit them, roast them, and set the wine under them, baste them with butter, and being roasted, dish them round the dish, then boil up the gravy under them with three or four slices of an orange, pour on the sauce, and lay on some slices of lemon.

Marinate, broil, fry, and bake Soals according as you do Carps, as you may see in the thirteenth Section.

Section 18. Or, The sixth Section of Fish.

The Ala mode wayes of Dressing and Ordering of Sturgeon, &c.

To boil Sturgeon to serve hot.

TAke a rand wash off the blood, and lay it in vine­gar and salt with the slice of a lemon, some large mace slic't ginger, and two or three cloves, then set on a pan of fair water, put in some salt, and when it boils put in the fish, with a pint of white wine, a pint of wine vinegar, and the foresaid spices, but not the le­mon; being finely boild, dish it on sippets, and sauce it with beaten butter and juyce of orange beaten together, or juyce of lemon, large mace, slic't ginger, and barber­ries; and garnish the dish with the same.

Otherwayes.

Take a rand and cut it in square pieces as big as a hens egg stew them in a broad mouthed pipkin with two or three good big onions, some large mace, two or three cloves, pepper, salt, some slic't nutmeg, a bay leaf or two, some white wine and water, butter, and a race of slic't gin­ger, stew them well together, and serve them on sippets of [Page 354]French bread, run them over with beaten butter, slic't le­mon and barberries, and garnish the dish with the same.

Sturgeon buttered.

BOil a rand, tail, or jole in water and salt, boil it tender, and serve it with beaten butter and slic't lemon.

To make a hot Hash of Sturgeon.

TAke a rand, wash it out of the blood, and take off the scales, and skin, mince the meat very small, and sea­son it with beaten mace, pepper, salt, and some sweet herbs minced small, stew all in an earthen pipkin with two or three big whole onions, butter, and white wine; being fine­ly stewed, serve it on sippets with beaten butter, minced le­mon, and boild chesnuts.

To make a cold Hash of Sturgeon.

TAke a rand of sturgeon being fresh and new, bake it whole in an earthen pan dry, and close it up with a piece of course paste; being baked and cold, slice it into lit­tle slices as small as a three pence, and dish them in a fine clean dish, lay them round the bottom of it, and strow on them pepper, salt, a minced onion, a minced lemon, oyl, vi­negar, and barberries.

To Marinate a whole Sturgeon in rands and joles.

TAke a sturgeon fresh taken, cut it in joles and rands, wash off the blood, and wipe the pieces dry from the blood and slime, flour them, and fry them in a large kettle in four gallons of rape oyl clarified; being fryed fine and crisp, put it into great chargers, trayes, or bowls; then [Page 355]have two firkins, and being cold, pack it in them as you do boild sturgeon that is kept in pickle, then make the sauce or pickle of two gallons of white wine, and three gallons of white wine vinegar; put to them six good handfulls of salt, three in each vessel, a quarter of a pound of large mace, six ounces of whole pepper, and three ounces of slic't gin­ger, close it up in good sound vessels, and when you serve it, serve it in some of its own pickle, the spices on it, and slic't lemon.

To make a forc't meat of Sturgeon.

Mince it raw with a good fat eel, and being fine minced, season it with cloves mace, pepper, and salt, mince some sweet herbs and put to it, and make your forcings in the forms of balls, pears, stars, or dolphins; if you please stuff carrots or turnips with it.

To dress a whole Sturgeon in Stoffado cut into Rands and Joles to eat hot or cold.

[sturgeon]

TAke a sturgeon, draw it and part it in two halves from the tail to the head, cut it into rands-and joles a foot long or more, then wash off the blood and slime, and steep it in wine vinegar, and white wine, as much as will cover it, or less, put to it eight ounces of slic't ginger, six oun­ces [Page 356]of large mace, four ounces of whole cloves, half a pound of whole pepper, salt, and a pound of slic't nutmegs; let these steep in the foresaid liquor six hours, then put them into broad earthen pans flat bottomed, and bake them with this liquor and spices, cover them with paper, it will ask four or five hours baking; being baked serve them in a large dish in joles or rands, with large slices of French bread in the bottom of the dish, steep them well with the foresaid broth they were baked in, some of the spices on them, some slic't lemon, barberries, grapes, or gooseber­ries, and lemon-peel, with some of the same broth, beaten butter, juyce of lemons and oranges, and the yolks of eggs beat up thick.

If to eat cold, barrel it up close with this liquor and spices, fill it up with white wine or sack, and head it up close, it will keep a year very well, when you serve it, serve it with slic't lemons, and bay leaves about it.

To souce Sturgeon to keep all the year.

TAke a sturgeon, draw it, and part it down the back in equal sides and rands, put it in a tub into water and salt, and wash it from the blood and slime, binde it up with tape or packthred, and boil it in a vessel that will contain it, in water, vinegar, and salt, boil it not too tender; being finely boild, take it up, and being pretty cold, lay it on a clean flasket or tray till it be through cold, then pack it up close.

To souce Sturgeon in two good strong sweet Firkins.

IF the sturgeon be nine foot in length, two firkins will serve it, the vessels being very well filled and packed close, put into it eight handfuls of salt, six gallons of white wine, and four gallons of white wine vinegar, close on [Page 357]the heads strong and sure, and once in a moneth turn it on the other end.

To broil Sturgeon, or toast it against the fire.

BRoil or toast a rand or jole of sturgeon that comes new out of the sea or river, (or any piece) and either broil it in a whole rand, or slices an inch thick, salt them, and steep them in oyl olive, and wine vinegar, broil them on a soft fire, and baste them with the sauce it was steeped in, with branches of rosemary, time, and parsley; being fine­ly broiled, serve it in a clean dish, with some of the sauce it was basted with, and some of the branches of rosemary; or baste it with butter, and serve it with butter and vinegar, being either beaten with slic't lemon, or juyce of oranges.

Otherwayes.

Broil it on white paper, either with butter or sallet oyl, if you broil it in oyl, being broild, put to it on the paper some oyl, vinegar, pepper, and branches or slices of orange. If broild in butter, some beaten butter, with lemon, claret, and nutmeg.

To fry Sturgeon.

TAke a rand of fresh sturgeon, and cut it into slices of half an inch thick, hack it, and being fried, it will look as if it were ribbed, fry it brown with clarified butter; then take it up, make the pan clean, and put it in again with some claret wine, an anchove, salt, and beaten saffron; fry it till half be consumed, and then put in a piece of butter, some grated nutmeg, grated ginger, and some minced le­mon; garnish the dish with lemon, dish it, the dish being first rubbed with a clove of garlick.

To Jelly Sturgeon.

SEason a whole rand with pepper, nutmeg, and salt, bake it dry in an earthen pan, and being baked and cold, slice it into thin slices, dish it in a clean dish, and run jelly on it.

To roast Sturgeon.

TAke a rand of fresh sturgeon, wipe it very dry, and cut it in pieces as big as a goose egg, season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, and stick each piece with two or three cloves, draw them with rosemary, and spit them tho­row the skin, and put some bay leaves or sage leaves be­tween every piece, baste them with butter, and being roast­ed serve them on the gravy that droppeth from them, beaten butter, juyce of orange or vinegar, and grated nut­meg; serve also with it venison sauce in saucers.

To make Olives of Sturgeon stewed or roasted.

TAke spinage, red sage, parsley, time, rosemary, sweet marjoram, and winter savory, wash and chop them very small, and mingle them with some currans, grated bread, yolks of hard eggs chopped small, some beaten mace, nutmeg, cinamon, and salt; then have a rand of fresh sturgeon cut into thin broad pieces, and hacked with the back of a chopping-knife laid on a smooth pie plate, strow on the minced herbs with the other materials, and roul them up in a roul, stew them in a dish in the oven, with a little white wine or wine vinegar, some of the forcing un­der them, and some sugar; being baked, make a leir with some of the gravy, and slices of orange and lemons.

To make Olives of Sturgeon otherwayes.

TAke a rand of sturgeon being new, cut it in fine thin slices, and hack them with the back of a knife; then

[forms of olives of sturgeon]

make a compound of minced herbs, as time, savory, sweet marjoram, vio­let leaves, strawberry leaves, spinage, mince, sorrel, endive, and sage; mince these herbs very fine with a few scalli­ons, some yolks of hard eggs, currans, cinamon, nutmegs, sugar, rose water, and salt, mingle all together, and strow on the compound herbs on the hacked olives, roul them up, and make pies ac­cording to these forms, put butter in the bottom of them, and lay the olives on it; being full, lay on some raisins, prunes, large mace, dates, slic't lemon, some gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, and butter, close them up and bake them, being baked, liquor them with butter, white wine, and sugar, ice them and serve them up hot.

To bake a Sturgeon in Joles and Rands dry in earthen Pans, and being baked and cold, pickled and barreld up, to serve hot or cold.

TAke a sturgeon fresh and new, part him down from head to tail, and cut it into rands and Joles, cast it into fair water and salt, wash off the slime and blood, and put it into broad earthen pans, being first stuffed with penniroyal, or other sweet herbs; stick it with cloves and rosemary, and bake it in pans dry, (or a little white wine to save the pans from breaking) then take white or claret wine, and make a pickle, half as much wine vinegar, some whole pep­per, large mace, slic't nutmegs, and six or seven handfuls of salt; being baked and cold, pack and barrel it up close, [Page 360]and fill it up with this pickle raw, head it up close, and when you serve it, serve it with some of the liquor, and slic't lemon.

To bake Sturgeon Pies to eat cold.

TAke a fresh jole of sturgeon, scale it and wash off the slime, wipe it dry, & lard it with a good salt eel, seasoned with nutmeg and pepper, cut the lard as big as your finger, and being well larded, season the jole or rand with the fore­said spices and salt, lay it in a square pie in fine or course paste, and put some whole cloves on it, some slic't nutmeg, slic't ginger, and good store of butter, close it up and bake it, being baked fill it up with clarified butter.

To bake Sturgeon otherwayes with Salmon.

TAke a rand of sturgeon, cut it into large thick slices, and two rands of fresh salmon in thick slices as broad as the sturgeon, season it with the same seasoning as the former, with spices and butter, close it up and bake it; being baked, fill it up with clarified butter, Make your sturgeon pies or pasties according to these forms.

[forms of sturgeon pies]

To bake a Sturgeon Pie to eat cold otherwayes.

TAke a rand of sturgeon, fley it and wipe it with a dry cloth, and not wash it, cut it into large slices; then have carps, tenches, or a good large eel fleyed and boned, your Tenches and Carps scaled, boned, and wiped dry, season your sturgeon and the other fishes with pepper, nutmeg, and salt, put butter in the bottom of the pie, and lay a lay of sturgeon, and on that a lay of carps, then a lay of sturgeon, and a lay of eels, next a lay of sturgeon, and a lay of tench, and a lay of sturgeon above that; lay on it some slic't ginger, slic't nutmeg, and some whole cloves, put on butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with clarified butter. Or bake it in pots as you do venison, and it will keep long.

Otherwayes.

Take a rand of sturgeon, fley it, and mince it very fine,

[forms of sturgeon pies]

season it with pepper, cloves, mace, and salt; then have a good fresh and fat eel or two fleyed and boned, cut it into lard as big as your finger, and lay some in the bottom of the pye, some butter on it, and some of the minced meat or sturgeon, and so lard and meat till you have filled the pye, lay over all some slices of sturgeon, sli­ced nutmeg, slic't ginger and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked fill it up with clarified butter. If to eat hot, give it but half the seasoning, and make your pyes according to these forms.

To bake Sturgeon Pyes to be eaten hot.

FLey off the scales and skin of a rand, cut it in pieces as big as a walnut, and season it lightly with pepper, nut­meg, [Page 362]and salt; lay butter in the bottom of the pye, put in the sturgeon, and put to it a good big onion or two whole, some large mace, whole cloves, slic't ginger, some large oysters, slic't lemon, gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked, fill it up with beaten butter, beaten with white wine, or claret, and juyce or slices of lemon or orange.

To this pye in Winter, you may use prunes, raisins, or currans, and liquor it with butter, verjuyce, and sugar; and in Summer, pease boild and put in the pye, being baked, and leave out fruit.

Otherwayes.

Cut a rand of sturgeon into pieces as big as a hens egg, cleanse it, and season them with pepper, salt, ginger, and nutmeg, then make a pie and lay some butter in the bottom of it, then the pieces of sturgeon, and two or three bay leaves, some large mace, three or four whole cloves, some blanched chesnuts, gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it, and being baked liquor it with beaten butter, and the blood of the sturgeon boild together with a little claret wine.

To bake Surgeon Pyes in Dice-work to be eaten hot.

TAke a pound of sturgeon, a pound of a fresh fat eel, a pound of a carp, a pound of turbut, a pound

[forms of sturgeon pies in dice-work]

of mullet, scaled, cleansed, and boned, a tench and a lobster, cut all these fishes into the form like dice, and mingle with them a quart of prawns, season them altoge­ther with pepper, nutmeg, and salt, mingle some cockles amongst them, boild artichocks, fresh salmon, and asparagus all cut into dice-work. Then make pyes accord­ing [Page 363]to these forms, lay butter in the bottom of them, then the meat being well mingled together, next lay on some gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, slic't orange or lemons, and put butter on it, with yolks of hard eggs and pistaches, close it up and bake it, and being baked liquor it with good sweet butter, white wine, or juyce of oranges.

To make minced Pyes of Sturgeon.

FLey a rand of it, and mince it with a good fresh water eel, being fleyed and boned, then mince some sweet herbs with an onion, season it with cloves, mace, pepper, nutmeg, and salt, mingle amongst it some grapes, goose­berries, or barberries, and fill the pye, having first put some butter in the bottom of it, lay on the meat and more butter on the top, close it up, bake it, and serve it up hot.

Otherwayes.

Mince a rand of fresh sturgeon, or the fattest part of it very small, then mince a little spinage, violet leaves, straw­berry leaves, sorrel, parsley, sage, savory, marjoram, and time, mingle them with the meat, some grated manchet, currans, nutmeg, salt, cinamon, cream eggs, sugar, and butter, fill the pye, close it up and bake it, being baked ice it.

Minced Pyes of Surgeon otherwayes.

FLey a rand of sturgeon and lard it with a good fat salt eel, roste it in pieces and save the gravy, being rosted mince it small, but save some to cut into dice-work, also some of the eel in the same form, mingle it amongst the rest with some beaten pepper, salt, nutmeg, some goose­berries, grapes, or barberries, put butter in the bottom of the pye, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with gravy, juyce of orange, nutmeg, and butter.

Sometimes add to it currans, sweet herbs, and saffron, [Page 364]and liquor it with verjuyce, sugar, butter, and yolks of eggs.

To make Chewits of Sturgeon.

MInce a rand of sturgeon the fattest part, and season it with pepper, salt, nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, cara­way seed, rose-water, butter, sugar, and orange-peel min­ced, mingle all together with some sliced dates and currans, and fill your pyes.

To make a Lumber Pie of Sturgeon.

MInce a rand of sturgeon with some of the fattest of the belly, or a good fat fresh eel, being minced, sea­son it with pepper, nutmeg, salt, cinamon, ginger, cara­wayes, slic't dates, eight or four raw eggs, and the yolks of six hard eggs in quarters, mingle altogether, and make them into balls or rolls, fill the pye, and lay on them some slic't dates, large mace, slic't lemon, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it; being ba­ked liquor it with butter, white wine, and sugar.

Or onely adde some grated bread, some of the meat cut into dice-work, and some rose-water, baked in all points as the former; being baked cut up the cover, and stick it with balls, with fryed sage leaves in batter; liquor it as aforesaid, and lay on it a cut cover, scrape on sugar.

To make an Olive Pie of Sturgeon in the Italian Fashion.

MAke slices of sturgeon, hack them, and lard them with salt salmon, or salt eel, then make a composi­tion of some of the sturgeon cut into dice-work, some fresh eel, dryed cherries, prunes taken from the stones, grapes, some mushrooms, and oysters; season the foresaid things [Page 365]altogether in a dish or tray, with some pepper, nutmeg, and salt, roul them in the slices of the hacked sturgeon with the larded side outmost, lay them in the pie with the butter un­der them; being filled lay on it some oysters, blanched chesnuts, mushrooms, cockles, pine-apple seed, grapes, gooseberries, and more butter; close it up, bake it, and liquor it with butter, verjuyce, and sugar, serve it up hot.

To bake Sturgeon to be eaten hot with divers forcings or stuffings.

TAke a rand and cut it into small pieces as big as a wal­nut, mince it with fresh eel, some sweet herbs, a few green onions, penniroyal, grated bread, nutmeg, pepper, salt, currans, gooseberries, and eggs; mingle altogether and make it into balls, fill the pie with the whole meat and the balls, and lay on them some large mace, barberries, chesnuts, yolks of hard eggs, and butter; fill the pie and bake it, being baked liquor it with butter, and grape ver­juyce.

Or mince some sturgeon, grated parmisan, or good Hol­land cheese, mince the sturgeon and fresh eel together, be­ing fine minced put some currans to it, nutmeg, pepper, and cloves beaten, some sweet herbs minced small, some salt, saffron, and raw yolks of eggs.

Other Stuffings or Puddings.

GRated bread, nutmeg, pepper, sweet herbs minced very fine, four or five yolks of hard eggs minced ve­ry small, two or three raw eggs, cream, currans, grapes, barberries, and sugar, mix them altogether, and lay them on the sturgeon in the pie, close it up and bake it, and li­quor it with butter, white wine, sugar, the yolk of an egg, and ice it.

To make an Olio of Sturgeon with other Fishes.

TAke some sturgeon and mince it with a fresh eel, put to it some sweet herbs minced small, some grated bread, yolks of eggs, salt, nutmeg, pepper, some goose­berries, grapes, or barberries, and make it into little balls or rolls. Then have fresh fish scaled, washed, dryed, and parted into equal pieces, season them with pepper, nutmeg, salt, and set them by; then make ready shell fish and sea­son them as the other fishes lightly with the same spices. Then make ready roots, as potatoes, skirrets, artichocks, and chesnuts, boil them, cleanse them, and season them with the former spices. Next have yolks of hard eggs, large mace, barberries, grapes, or gooseberries, and butter: make your pie, and put butter in the bottom of it, mix them al­together, and fill the pie, then put in two or three bay leaves, and a few whole clove, mix the minced balls a­mongst the other meat, and roots; then lay on the top some large mace, potatoes, barberries, grapes, or goose­berries, chesnuts, pistaches, and butter; close it up and bake it, fill it up with beaten butter, beaten with the juyce of oranges, dish and cut up the cover, and put all over it slic't lemons, and sometimes to the lear the yolk of an egg or two.

To make minced Herring Pies.

TAke salt herrings being watered, crush them between your hands, and you shall loose the fish from the skin, take off the skin whole, and lay them in a dish; then have a pound of almond paste ready, mince the herrings, and stamp them with the almond paste, two of the milts or rows, five or six dates, some grated manchet, sugar, sack, rose-water, and saffron, make the composition somewhat [Page 367]stiff, and fill the skins, put butter in the bottom of your pie, lay on the herring, and on them dates, gooseberries, cur­rans, barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with butter, verjuyce, and sugar.

Otherwayes.

Bone them, and mince them being finely cleansed with two or three pleasant pears, raisins of the sun, some cur­rans, dates, sugar, cinamon, ginger, nutmeg, pepper, and butter, mingle all together, fill your pies, and being baked, liquor them with verjuyce, claret, or white wine.

To make minced Pies of Ling, Stock-fish, Haberdine, &c.

BEing boild take it from the skin and bones, and mince it with some pippins, season it with nutmeg, cinamon, ginger, pepper, carraway-seed, currans, minced raisins, rose-water, minced lemon-peel, sugar, slic't dates, white wine, verjuyce, and butter, fill your pies, bake them, and ice them.

Otherwayes.

Mince them with yolks of hard eggs, mince also all man­ner of good pot-herbs, mix them together, and season them with the seasoning aforesaid, liquor it with butter, verjuice, sugar, beaten cinamon, and ice them.

[forms of minced pies]

Section 19. Or, The seventh Section of Fish.

Shewing the exactest way of dressing all manner of Shell-Fish.

To stew Oysters the French way.

TAke oysters, open them and parboil them in their own liquor, the quantity of three pints or a pot­tle; being parboild, wash them in warm water clean from the dregs, beard them and put them in a pipkin with a little white wine, and some of the liquor they were parboiled in, a whole onion, some salt, and pep­per, and stew them till they be half done; then put them and their liquor into a frying pan, fry them a pretty while, put to them a good piece of sweet butter, and fry them therein so much longer, then have ten or twelve yolks of eggs dissolved with some vinegar, wherein you must put in some minced parsley, and some grated nutmeg, put these ingredients into the oysters, shake them in the frying-pan a walm or two, and serve them up.

To stew Oysters otherwayes.

TAke a pottle of large great oysters, parboil them in their own liquor, then wash them in warm water from the dregs, and put them in a pipkin with a good big onion or two, and five or six blades of large mace, a little whole pepper, a slic't nutmeg, a quarter of a pint of white wine, as much wine vinegar, a quarter of a pound of sweet butter, and a little salt, stew them finely together on a soft fire the space of half an hour, then dish them on sippets of French bread, slic't lemon on them; and barberries, run them over with beaten butter, and garnish the dish with dryed manchet grated and searsed.

To stew Oysters otherwayes.

TAke a pottle of large great oysters, parboil them in their own liquor, then wash them in warm water, wipe them dry, and pull away the finns, flour them and fry them in clarified butter fine and white, then take them up and put them in a large dish with some white or claret wine, a little vinegar, a quarter of a pound of sweet but­ter some grated nutmeg, large mace, salt, and two or three slices of an orange, stew them two or three walms, then serve them in a large clean scowred dish, pour the sauce on them, and run them over with beaten butter, slic't lemon or orange, and sippets round the dish.

Otherwayes.

Take a pottle of great oysters, and stew them in their own liquor, then take them up, wash them in warm water; take off the finns, and put them in a pipkin with some of their own liquor, a pint of white wine, a little wine vine­gar, six large maces, two or three whole onions, a race of ginger slic't, a whole nutmeg slic't, twelve whole pepper [Page 370]corns, salt, a quarter of a pound of good sweet butter, and a little faggot of sweet herbs; stew all these together ve­ry well, then drain them through a cullender, and dish them on fine carved sippets; then take some of the liquor they were stewed in, and beat it up thick with a minced lemon, and half a pound of butter, pour it on the oysters being dished, and garnish the dish and the oysters with grapes, grated bread, slic't lemon, and barberries.

Or thus.

Broil great oysters in their shells brown and dry, but burn them not, then take them out and put them in a pip­kin, with some good sweet butter, the juyce of two or three oranges, a little pepper and grated nutmeg, give them a walm, and dish them in a fair scowred dish with carved sip­pets, and garnish it with dryed, grated, searsed fine man­chet.

To make Oyster Pottage.

TAke some boild pease, strain them and put them in a pipkin with some capers, some sweet herbs finely chopped, some salt, and butter; then have some great oy­sters fryed with sweet herbs, and grosly chopped, put them to the strained pease, stew them together, serve them on a clean scowred dish on fine carved sippets, and garnish the dish with grated bread.

Otherwayes.

Take a quart of great oysters, parboil them in their own liquor, and stew them in a pipkin with some capers, large mace, a faggot of sweet herbs, salt, and butter; being fine­ly stewed, serve them on slices of dryed French bread, round the oysters slic't lemon, and on the pottage, boild spinage, minced, and buttered, but first pour on the broth.

To make a Hash of Oysters.

TAke three quarts of great oysters, parboil them and save their liquor, then mince two quarts of them ve­ry fine, and put them a stewing in a pipkin with half a pint of white wine, a good big onion or two, some large mace, a grated nutmeg, some chesnuts, and pistaches, three or four spoonfulls of wine vinegar, a quarter of a pound of good sweet butter, some oyster liquor, pepper, salt, and a faggot of sweet herbs; stew the foresaid together upon a soft fire the space of half an hour, then take the other oy­sters and season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, fry them in batter made of fine flour, eggs, salt, and cream, make one half of it green with juyce of spinage, and sweet herbs chopped small, dip them in these batters, and fry them in clarified butter, being fryed keep them warm in an oven; then have a fine clean large dish, lay slices of French bread all over the bottom of the dish, scald and steep the bread with some gravy of the hash, or oyster liquor, and white wine boild together; dish the hash all over the slices of bread, lay on that the fryed oysters, chesnuts, and pi­staches; then beat up a leir or sauce of butter, juyce of le­mon or oranges, five or six, a little white wine, the yolks of three or four eggs, and pour on this sauce over the hash, with some slic't lemon, and lemon-peel; garnish the dish with grated bread, being dryed and searsed, some pistaches, chesnuts, carved lemons, and frved oysters.

Sometimes you may use mushrooms boild in water, salt, sweet herbs, large mace, cloves, bay leaves, two or three cloves of garlick, then take them up, dip them in batter and fry them brown, make sauce for them with claret and the juyce of two or three oranges, salt, butter, the juyce of horse-raddish roots beaten and strained, grated nutmeg, and pepper, beat them up thick with the yolks of two or [Page 372]three eggs, do this sauce in a frying-pan, shake them well together, and pour it on the hash with the mushrooms.

To marinate great Oysters to be eaten hot.

TAke three quarts of great oysters ready opened, par­boil them in their own liquor, then take them out and wash them in warm water, wipe them dry and flour them, fry them crisp in a frying-pan with three pints of sweet sallet oyl, put them in a dish, and set them before the fire, or in a warm oven; then make sauce with white wine, wine vinegar, four or five blades of large mace, two or three slic't nutmegs, two races of slic't ginger, some twenty cloves, twice as much of whole pepper, and some salt; boil all the foresaid spices in a pipkin with a quart of white wine, a pint of wine vinegar, rosemary, time, winter savory, sweet marjoram, bay leaves, sage, and parsley, the tops of all these herbs about an inch long; then take three or four good lemons slic't, dish up the oysters in a clean scowred dish, pour on the broth, herbs, and spices on them, lay on the slic't lemons, and run it over with some of the oyl they were fryed in, and serve them up hot. Or fry them in clari­fied butter.

Oysters in Stoffado.

PArboil a pottle or three quarts of great oysters, save the liquor and wash the oysters in warm water, then after steep them in white wine, wine vinegar, slic't nutmeg, large mace, whole pepper, salt, and cloves; give them a walm on the fire, set them off and let them steep two or three hours; then take them out, wipe them dry, dip them in bat­ter made of fine flour, yolks of eggs, some cream and falt, fry them, and being fryed keep them warm, then take some of the spices liquor, some of the oyster liquor, and some butter, beat these things up thick with the slices of an [Page 373]orange or two, and two or three yolks of eggs; then dish the fryed oysters in a fine clean dish on a chafing dish of coals, run on the sauce over them with the spices, slic't orange, and barberries, and garnish the dish with searsed manchet.

To jelly Oysters.

TAke ten flounders, two small pikes or plaice, and four ounces of isingglass; being finely cleansed, boil them in a pipkin, in a pottle of fair spring water, and a pottle of white wine, with some large mace, and slic't ginger; boil them to a jelly, and strain it through a strainer in­to a bason or deep dish; being cold pare off the top and bottom, and put it into a pipkin, with the juyce of six or seven great lemons to a pottle of this broth, three pound of fine sugar beaten in a dish with the whites of twelve eggs rubbed altogether with a rouling pin, and put amongst the jelly; being melted but not too hot, set the pipkin on a soft fire to stew, put in it a grain of musk and as much ambergreece well rubbed, let it stew half an hour on the embers, then boil it up, and let it run through your jelly bag; then stew the oysters in white wine, oyster liquor, juyce of orange, mace, slic't nut­meg, whole pepper, some salt, and sugar; dish them in a fine clean dish with some preserved barberries, large mace, or poungarnet kernels, and run the jelly over them in the dish, garnish the dish with carved lemons, large mace, and preserved barberries.

To pickle Oysters.

TAke eight quarts of oysters, and parboil them in their own liquor, then take them out, wash them in warm water, and wipe them dry, then take the liquor they were parboild in, and clear it from the grounds into a large pip­kin [Page 374]or skillet, put to it a pottle of good white wine, a quart of wine vinegar, some large mace, whole pepper, and a good quantity of salt, set it over the fire, boil it leasurely, scum it clean, and being well boild put the liquor into eight barrels of quarts apiece, being cold put in the oy­sters, and close up the head.

Otherwayes.

Take eight quarts of the fairest oysters that can be got­ten, fresh and new, at the full of the Moon, parboil them in their own liquor, then wipe them dry with a clean cloth, clear the liquor from the dregs, and put the oysters in a well seasoned barrel that will but just hold them; then boil the oyster liquor with a quart of white wine, a pint of wine vinegar, eight or ten blades of large mace, an ounce of whole pepper, four ounces of white salt, four races of slic't ginger, and twenty cloves, boil these ingredients four or five walms, and being cold put them to the oysters, close up the barrel, and keep it for your use.

When you serve them, serve them in a fine clean dish, with bay leaves round about them, barberries, slic't lemon, and slic't orange.

To souce Oysters to serve hot or cold.

TAke a gallon of great oysters ready opened, parboil them in their own liquor, and being well parboild, put them into a cullender, and save the liquor; then wash the oysters in warm water from the grounds and grit, set them by and make a pickle for them with a pint of white wine, and half a pint of wine vinegar, put it in a pipkin with some large mace, slic't nutmegs, slic't ginger, whole pepper, three or four cloves, and some salt, give it four or five walms, and put in the oysters into the warm pickle with two slic't lemons and lemon peels; cover the pipkin close to keep in the spirits, spices, and liquor.

To roast Oysters.

STrain the liquor from the oysters, wash them very clean and give them a scald in boiling liquor or water; then cut small lard of a fat salt eel, and lard them with a very small larding-prick, spit them on a small spit for that ser­vice; then beat two or three yolks of eggs with a little grated bread, or nutmeg, salt, and a little rosemary and time minced very small; when the oysters are hot at the fire, baste them continually with these ingredients, laying them pretty warm at the fire. For the sauce boil a little white wine, oyster liquor, a sprig of time, grated bread, and salt, beat it up thick with butter, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

To roast Oysters otherwayes.

TAke two quarts of large great oysters, and parboil them in their own liquor; then take them out, wash them from the dregs, and wipe them dry on a clean cloth; then have slices of a fat salt eel, as thick as a half crown piece, season the oysters with nutmeg and salt, spit them on a fine small wooden spit for that purpose, spit first a sage leaf, then a slice of eel, and then an oyster, thus do till they be all spitted, and binde them to another spit with pack­thred, baste them with yolks of eggs, grated bread, and stripped time, and lay them to a warm fire with here and there a clove in them; being finely roasted make sauce with the gravy that drops from them, blow off the fat, and put to it some claret wine, the juyce of an orange, grated nut­meg, and a little butter; beat it up thick together with some of the oyster liquor, and serve them on this sauce with slices of orange.

Otherwayes.

Take the greatest oysters you can get, being opened parboil them in their own liquor, save the liquor, and wash the oysters in some water, wipe them dry, and being cold, lard them with eight or ten lardons through each oyster, the lard being first seasoned with cloves, pepper, and nut­meg beaten very small; being larded, spit them on two wooden scuers, binde them to an iron spit and roast them, baste them with anchove sauce made of some of the oyster liquor, let them drip in it, and being enough. bread them with the crust of a roul grated, then dish them, blow the fat off the gravy, put it to the oysters, and wring on the juyce of a lemon.

To broil Oysters.

TAke great oysters and set them on a gridiron with the heads downwards, put them up an end, and broil them dry, brown, and hard, then put two or three of them in a shell with some melted butter, set them on the gridiron till they be finely stewed, then dish them on a plate, and fill them up with good butter onely melted, or beaten with juyce of orange, pepper them lightly, and serve them up hot.

To broil Oysters otherwayes upon paper.

BRoil them on a gridiron as before, then take them out of the shells into a dish, and chuse out the fairest, then have a sheet of white paper made like a dripping­pan, set it on the gridiron, and run it over with clarified butter, lay on some sage leaves, some fine thin slices of a fat fresh eel being parboild, and some oysters, stew them on the hot embers, and being finely broild serve them on a dish and a plate in the paper they are broild in, and put to them beaten butter, juyce of orange, and slices of lemon.

To broil large Oysters otherwayes.

TAke a pottle of great oysters opened, and parboil them in their own liquor, being done, pour them into a cullender, and save the liquor, then wash the oysters in warm water from the grounds, wipe them with a clean cloth, beard them, and put them in a pipkin, put to them large mace, two great onions, some butter, some of their own liquor, some white wine, wine vinegar, and salt; stew them together very well, then set some of the largest shells on a gridiron, put two or three in a shell, with some of the liquor out of the pipkin, broil them on a soft fire, and be­ing broild set them on a dish and plate, and fill them up with beaten butter.

Sometimes you may bread them in the broiling.

To fry Oysters.

TAke two quarts of great oysters being parboild in their own liquor, and washed in warm water, bread them, dry them, and flour them, fry them in clarified but­ter crisp and white; then have butter'd prawns or shrimps, butter'd with cream and sweet butter, lay them in the bot­tom of a clean dish, and lay the fried oysters round about them, run them over with beaten butter, juyce of oranges, bay leaves stuck round the oysters, and slices of oranges or lemons.

Otherwayes.

Strain the liquor from the oysters, wash them, and par­boil them in a kettle. then dry them and roul them in flour, or make a batter with eggs, flour, a little cream, and salt, rouling them in it, and fry them in butter. For the sauce boil the juyce of two or three oranges, some of their own liquor, a slic't nutmeg, and claret; being boild a little, put [Page 378]in a piece of butter, beating it up thick, then warm the dish, rub it with a clove of garlick, dish the oysters, and garnish them with slices of orange.

To bake Oysters.

PArboil your oysters in their own liquor, then take them out and wash them in warm water from the dregs, dry them and season them with pepper, nutmeg, yolks of hard eggs, and salt; the pie being made, put a few currans in the bottom, and lay on the oysters, with some slic't dates in halves, some large mace, slic't lemon, barberries, and butter, close it up and bake it, then liquor it with white wine, sugar, and butter; or in place of white wine use ver­juyce.

The Forms of Oysters Pies.

[forms of oyster pies]

To bake Oysters otherwayes.

SEason them with pepper, salt, and nutmegs, the same quantity as beforesaid, and the same quantity of oy­sters, two or three whole onions, nor no currans nor sugar, but adde to it in all respects else; as slic't nutmeg on them, large mace, hard eggs in halves, barberries, and butter, li­quor it with beaten butter, white wine, and juyce of oranges.

Otherwayes for change, in the seasoning put to them chopped time, hard eggs, some anchoves, and the foresaid spices.

Or take large oysters, broil them dry and brown in the shells, and season them with the former spices, bottoms of boild artichocks, pickled mushrooms, and no onions, but all things else as the former, liquor them with beaten but­ter, juyce of orange, and some claret wine.

Otherwayes.

Being parboild in their own liquor, season them with a little salt, sweet herbs minced small one spoonful, fill the pie, and put into it three or four blades of large mace, a slic't lemon and on flesh dayes a good handful of marrow rouled in yolks of eggs and butter, close it up and bake it, make liquor for it with two nutmegs grated, a little pep­per, butter, verjuyce, and sugar.

To make an Oyster Pie otherwayes.

TAke a pottle of oysters being parboild in their own li­quor, beard and dry them, season them with large mace, whole pepper, a little beaten ginger, salt, butter, and marrow, close it up, and being baked, make a leir with white wine, the oyster liquor, and one onion, or rub the la­dle with garlick you beat it up withal; it being boild, put in a pound of butter, with a minced lemon, a faggot of sweet herbs, and being boild put in the liquor.

To make Mince Pies or Chewits of Oysters.

TAke three quarts of great oysters ready opened and parboild in their own liquor, then wash them in warm water from the dr [...] dry them and mince them very fine, season them light [...] [...] nutmeg, pepper, salt, cloves, mace, cinamon, carra [...]seed, some minced raisins of the sun, slic't dates, sug [...] [...]urrans, and half a pint of white wine, mingle all to [...]r, and put butter in the bottoms of the pies, fill the [...] and bake them.

To bake Oysters otherwayes.

SEason them with pepper, salt, nutmeg, and sweet herbs strowed on them in the pie, large mace, barberries, butter, and a whole onion or two, for liquor a little white wine, and wine vinegar, beat it up thick with butter, and liquor the pie, cut it up and lay on a slic't lemon, let not the lemon boil in it, and serve it hot.

Otherwayes.

Season them as before with pepper, nutmeg, and salt, being bearded, but first fry them in clarified butter, then take them up and season them, lay them in the pie being cold, put butter to them and large mace, close it up and bake it; then make liquor with a little claret wine and juyce of oranges, beat it up thick with butter, and a little wine vinegar, liquor the pie, lay on some slices of orange and set it again into the oven a little while.

To bake Oysters otherwayes.

TAke great oysters, beard them, and season them with grated nutmeg, salt, and some sweet herbs minced small, lay them in the pie, with a small quantity of the sweet herbs strowed on them, some twenty whole corns of pepper, slic't ginger, a whole onion or two, large mace, and some butter, close it up and bake it, and make liquor with white wine, some of their own liquor, and a minced lemon, and beat it up thick.

Otherwayes.

Broil great oysters dry in the shells, then take them out and season them with grated nutmeg, pepper, and salt, lay them in the pie, and strow on them the yolks of two hard eggs minced, some stripped time, some capers, large mace, and butter; close it up, and make liquor with [Page 381]claret wine, wine vinegar, butter, and juyce of oranges, beat it up thick, and liquor the pie, set it again into the oven a little while, and serve it hot.

To make a made Dish of Oysters and other Compounds.

TAke oysters, cockles, prawns, craw-fish, and shrimps; being finely cleansed from the grit, season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, next have chesnuts roasted and blanched, skirrets boild, blanched, and seasoned; then have a dish or patty-pan ready with a sheet of cool butter paste, lay some butter on it, then the fishes, and on them the skirrets, chesnuts, pistaches, slic't-lemon, large mace, barberries, and butter; close it up and bake it, and being baked fill it up with beaten butter, beat with juyce of oran­ges, and some white wine, or beaten butter with a little wine vinegar, verjuyce, or juyce of green grapes, or a lit­tle good fresh fish broth, cut it up and liquor it, lay on the cover, or cut it into four or five pieces, lay it round the dish, and serve it hot.

To make cool Butter Paste for this Dish.

TAke to every peck of flour five pound of butter, and the whites of six eggs, work it well together dry, then put cold water to it; this paste is good onely for patty­pans and pasties.

To make Paste for Oyster Pies.

THe paste for thin bak't meats must be made with boil­ing liquor, put to every peck of flour two pound of butter, but let the butter boil in the liquor first.

To fry Mushrooms.

BLanch them and wash them clean, if they be large, quar­ter them, and boil them with water, salt, vinegar, sweet herbs, large mace, cloves, bay leaves, and two or three cloves of garlick, then take them up, dry them, dip them in batter, and fry them in clarified butter till they be brown, make sauce for them with claret wine, the juyce of two or three oranges, salt, butter, the juyce of horse-rad­dish root beaten and strained, slic't nutmeg, and pepper; put these into a frying-pan with the yolks of two or three eggs dissolved with some mutton gravy, beat and shake them well togerher in the pan that they curddle not, then dish the mushrooms on a dish, being first rubbed with a clove of garlick, and garnish it with oranges and lemons.

To dress Mushrooms in the Italian Fashion.

TAke mushrooms, peel and wash them, and boil them in a skillet with water and salt, but first let the liquor boil with sweet herbs, parsley, and a crust of bread, being boild drain them from the water, and fry them in sweet sallet oyl; being fryed serve them in a dish with oyl, vine­gar, pepper, and fryed parsley. Or fry them in clarified butter.

To stew Mushrooms.

PEel them, and put them in a clean dish, strow salt on them, and put an onion to them, some sweet herbs, large mace, pepper, butter, salt, and two or three cloves; being tender stewed on a soft fire, put to them some grated bread, and a little white wine, stew them a little more, and dish them (but first rub the dish with a clove of garlick) [Page 383]sippet them, lay slic't orange on them, and run them over with beaten butter.

To broil Mushrooms.

TAke the biggest and the reddest, peel them, and season them with some sweet herbs, pepper, and salt, broil them on a dripping-pan of paper, and fill it full, put some oyl into it, and lay it on a gridiron, broil it on a soft fire, turn them often, and serve them with oyl and vinegar.

Or broil them with butter, and serve them with beaten butter, and juyce of orange.

To stew Cockles being taken out of the Shells.

WAsh them well with vinegar, boil or broth them before you take them out of the shells, then put them in a dish with a little claret, vinegar, a handful of ca­pers, mace, pepper, a little grated bread, minced time, salt, and the yolks of two or three hard eggs minced, stew alto­gether till you think them enough, then put in a good piece of butter, shake them well together, heat the dish, rub it with a clove of garlick, and put two or three toasts of white bread in the bottom, laying the meat on them. Craw­fish, prawns, or shrimps are excellent good the same way being taken out of their shells, and make variety of garnish with the shells.

To stew Cockles otherwayes.

STew them with claret wine, capers, rose or elder vine­gar, wine vinegar, large mace, gross pepper, grated bread, minced time, the yolks of hard eggs minced, and butter; stew them well together. Thus you may stew scol­lops, but leave out capers.

To stew Scollops.

BOil them very well in white wine, fair water, and salt, take them out of the shells, and stew them with some of the liquor, elder vinegar, two or three cloves, some large mace, and some sweet herbs chopped small; being well stewed together, dish four or five of them in scollop shells and beaten butter, with the juyce of two or three oranges.

To stew Muskles.

WAsh them clean and boil them in water, or beer and salt; then take them out of the shells and beard them from gravel and stones, fry them in clarified butter, and being fryed put away some of the butter, and put to them a sauce made of some of their own liquor, some sweet herbs chopped, a little white wine, nutmeg, three or four yolks of eggs dissolved in wine vinegar, salt, and some sli­ced orange; give these materials a walm or two in the fry­ing-pan, make the sauce pretty thick, and dish them in the scollop shells.

To fry Muskles.

TAke as much water as will cover them, set it a boiling, and when it boils put in the muskles, being cleanly washed, put some salt to them, and being boild take them out of the shells, and beard them from the stones, moss, and gravel, wash them in warm water, wipe them dry, flour them, and fry them crisp, serve them with beaten butter, juyce of orange, and fryed parsley, or fryed sage dipped in batter, fryed ellicksander leaves, and slic't orange.

To make a Muskle Pie.

TAke a peck of muskles, wash them clean, and set them a boiling in a kettle of fatr water, (but first let the wa­ter [Page 385]boil) then put them into it, give them a walm, and as soon as they are opened, take them out of the shells, stone them, and mince them with some sweet herbs, some leeks, pepper, and nutmeg; mince six hard eggs and put to them, put some butter in the pie, close it up and bake it, being ba­ked liquor it with some butter, white wine, and slices of orange.

To stew Prawns, Shrimps, or Crawfish.

BEing boild and picked, stew them in white wine, sweet butter, nutmeg, and salt, dish them in scollop shells; and run them over with beaten butter, and juyce of orange or lemon.

Otherwayes, stew them in butter and cream, and serve them in scollop shells.

To stew Lobsters.

TAke claret wine, vinegar, nutmeg, salt, and butter, stew them down somewhat dry, and dish them in a scollop shell, run them over with butter and slic't lemon.

Otherwayes, cut it into dice-work, and warm it with white wine and butter, put it in a pipkin with claret wine or grape verjuyce, and grated manchet, and fill the scollop shells.

Otherwayes.

Being boild, take out the meat, break it small, but break the shells as little as you can, then put the meat into a pip­kin with claret wine, wine vinegar, slic't nutmeg, a little salt, and some butter; stew all these together softly an hour, being stewed almost dry, put to it a little more but­ter, and stir it well together; then lay very thin toasts in a clean dish, and lay the meat on them. Or you may put the meat in the shells, and garnish the dish about with [Page 386]the legs, and lay the body or barrel over the meat with some sliced lemon, and rare coloured flowers being in sum­mer, or pickled in winter. Crabs are good the same way, onely adde them the juyce of two or three oranges, a little pepper, and grated bread.

To stew Lobsters otherwayes.

TAke the meat out of the shells, slice it, and fry it in clarified butter, (the lobsters being first boild and cold) then put the meat in a pipkin with some claret wine, some good sweet butter, grated nutmeg, salt, and two or three slices of an orange; let it stew leasurely half an hour, and dish it up on fine carved sippets in a clean dish, with sliced orange on it, and the juyce of another, and run it over with beaten butter.

To hash Lobsters.

TAke them out of the shells, mince them small, and put them in a pipkin with some claret wine, salt, sweet butter, grated nutmeg, slic't oranges, and some pistaches; being finely stewed, serve them on sippets, dish them, and run them over with beaten butter, slic't oranges, some cut of paste, or lozenges of puff paste,

To boil Lobsters to eat cold the common way.

Take them alive or dead, lay them in cold water to make the claws tuff, and keep them from breaking off; then have a kettle over the fire with fair water, put in it as much bay salt as will make it a good strong brine, when it boils scum it and put in the lobsters, let them boil leasurely the space of half an hour or more, according to the bigness of them, being well boild take them up, wash them, and wipe them with beer and butter, and keep them for your use.

To keep Lobsters a quarter of a year very good.

TAke them being boild as aforesaid, wrap them in course rags having been steeped in brine, and bury them in a cellar in some sea-sand pretty deep.

To force a Lobster.

TAke a lobster being half boild, take the meat out of the shells, and mince it small with a good fresh eel, season it with cloves and mace beaten, some sweet herbs minced small and mingled amongst the meat, yolks of eggs, goose­berries, grapes, or barberries, and sometimes boild arti­chocks cut into dice-work, or boild asparagus, and some almond paste mingled with the rest, fill the lobsters shells, claws, tail, and body, and bake it in a bloat oven, make sauce with the gravy and white wine, and beat up the sauce or leir with good sweet butter, a grated nutmeg, juyce of oranges, and an anchove, and rub the dish with a clove of garlick.

To this forcing you may sometimes adde almond paste, currans, sugar, gooseberries, and make balls to lay about the lobsters, or serve it with venison sauce.

To marinate Lobsters.

TAke lobsters out of the shells being half boild, then take the tails and lard them with a salt eel, (or not lard them) part the tails into two halves the longest way, and fry them in sweet sallet oyl, or clarified butter; being finely fryed, put them into a dish or pipkin, and set them by, then make sauce with white wine, and white wine vinegar, four or five blades of large mace, three or four slic't nut­megs, two races of ginger slic't, so me ten or twelve cloves, [Page 388]twice as much of whole pepper, and some salt, boil them altogether with rosemary, time, winter savory, sweet mar­joram, bay leaves, sage, and parsley, the tops of all these herbs about an inch long; then take three or four lemons and slice them, dish up the lobsters in a clean dish, and pour on the broth, herbs, and spices on the fish, lay on the le­mons, run it over with some of the oyl or butter they were fryed in, and serve them up hot

To broil Lobsters.

BEing boild lay them on a gridiron, or toast them a­gainst the fire, and baste them with vinegar and but­ter, or butter onely, broil them leasurely, and being broild serve them with butter and vinegar beat up thick with slic't lemon and nutmeg.

Otherwayes.

Broil them the tail being parted in two halves long wayes, also the claws cracked and broild, broil the barrel whole being salted, baste it with sweet herbs, as time, rose­mary, parsley, and savory, being broild dish it, and serve it with butter and vinegar.

To broil Lobsters on Paper.

SLice the tails round, and also the claws in long slices, then butter a dripping-pan made of paper, lay it on a gridiron, and put some slices of lobster seasoned with nut­meg, and salt, and slices of a fresh eel, some sage leaves, tops of rosemary, two or three cloves, and sometimes some bay leaves or sweet herbs chopped; broil them on the embers, and being finely broild serve them on a dish and a plate in the same dripping-pan, put to them beaten butter, juyce of oranges, and slices of lemon.

To roste Lobsters.

TAke a lobster and spit it raw on a small spit, binde the claws and tail with packthread, baste it with butter, vinegar, and sprigs of rosemary, and salt it in the roasting.

Otherwayes.

Half boil them, take them out of the shells, and lard them with small lard made of a salt eel, lard the claws and tails, and spit the meat on a small spit, with some slices of the eel, and sage or bay leaves between, stick in the fish here and there a clove or two, and some sprigs of rosemary; roast the barrel of the lobster whole, and baste them with sweet butter: make sauce with claret wine, the gravy of the lobsters, juyce of oranges, an anchove or two, and sweet butter beat up thick with the core of a lemon, and grated nutmeg.

Otherwayes.

Half boil them and take the meat out of the tail, and claws, as whole as can be, and stick it with cloves and tops of rosemary; then spit the barrels of the lobsters by them­selves, the tails and claws by themselves, and between them a sage or bay leaf: baste them with sweet butter, and dredge them with grated bread, yolks of eggs, and some grated nutmeg. Then make sauce with claret wine, vinegar, pep­per, the gravy of the meat, some salt, slices of oranges, grated nutmeg, and some beaten butter; then dish the b r­rels of the lobsters round the dish, the claws and tails in the middle, and put to it the sauce.

Otherwayes.

Make a forcing in the barrels of the lobsters with the meat in them, some almond paste, nutmeg, time sweet marjoram, yolks of raw eggs, salt, and some pistaches, and serve them with venison sauce.

To fry Lobsters.

BEing boild take the meat out of the shells, and slice it long wayes, flour it, and fry it in clarified butter, fine, white, and crisp, or in place of flouting it in batter, with eggs, flour, salt, and cream, roul them in it and fry them, be­ing fryed make a sauce with the juyce of oranges, claret wine, and grated nutmeg beaten up thick with some good sweet butter, then warm the dish and rub it with a clove of garlick, dish the lobsters, garnish it with slices of oranges or lemons, and pour on the sauce.

To bake Lobsters to be eaten hot.

[lobster]

BEing boild and cold take the meat out of the shells, and season it lightly with nutmeg, pepper, salt, cina­mon, and ginger; then lay it in a pie made according to this form, and lay on it some dates in halves, large mace, slic't lemons, barberries, yolks of hard eggs and butter, close it up and bake it, and being baked liquor it with white wine, butter, and sugar, and ice it. On flesh dayes put mar­row to it.

Otherwayes.

Take the meat out of the shells being boild and cold, and lard it with a salt eel or salt salmon, season it with beaten nutmeg, pepper, and salt; then make the pie, put some butter in the bottom, and lay on it some slices of a fresh eel, and on that a layer of lobsters, put to it a few whole cloves, and thus make two or three layers, last of all slices of fresh eel, some whole cloves, and butter, close up the pie; and being baked fill it up with clarified butter

If you bake it this wayes to eat hot, season it lightly, and put in some large mace; liquor it with claret wine, beaten butter, and slices of orange.

Otherwayes.

Take four lobsters being boild, and some good fat con­ger raw, cut some of it into square pieces as broad as your

[forms of lobster pies]

hand, then take the meat of the lobsters and slice the tails into halves or two pieces long wayes as also the claws, season both with pepper, nutmeg, and salt; then make the pie, put butter in the bottom, lay on the sli­ces of conger, and then a layer of lobsters; thus do three or four times till the pie be full, then lay on a few whole cloves and some butter; close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with butter and white wine, or onely clarified butter. Make your pies ac­cording to these forms.

If to eat hot season it lightly, and being baked liquor it with butter, white wine, slic't lemon, gooseberries, grapes, or barberries.

To pickle Lobsters.

BOil them in vinegar, white wine, and salt; being boild take them up and lay them by, then have some bay leaves, rosemary tops, winter savory, time large mace, and [Page 392]whole pepper: boil these foresaid materials all together in the liquor with the lobsters, and some whole cloves; be­ing boild barrel them up in a vessel that will but just con­tain them, and pack them close, pour the liquor to them, herbs, spices, and some lemon-peels; close up the head of the kegg or firkin, and keep them for your use; when you serve them, serve them with the spices, herbs, peels, and some of the liquor or pickle.

To jelly Lobsters, Crawfish, or Prawns.

TAke a tench being new, draw out the garbish at the gills, and cut out all the gills, it will boil the whi­ter, then set on as much clear water as will conveniently boil it, season it with salt, wine vinegar, five or six bay leaves, large mace, three or four whole cloves, and a fag­got of sweet herbs bound up hard together: so soon as this preparative boils, put in the tench being clean wiped, do not scale it, it being boild take it up and wash off all the loose scales, then strain the liquor through a jelly bag, and put to it a piece of isingglass being first washed and steep­ed for the purpose, boil it very cleanly, and run it through a jelly bag; then having the fish taken out of the shells, lay them in a large clean dish, lay the lobsters in slices, and the crawfish and prawns whole, and run this jelly over them. You may make this jelly of divers colours, as you may see in the Section of Jellies, page 188.

Garnish the dish of jellies with lemon-peels cut in bran­ches, or long slices as you fancy, barberries, and fine co­loured flowers.

Or lard the lobsters with salt eel, or stick it with candied oranges, green citterns, or preserved barberries, and make the jelly sweet.

To stew Crabs.

BEing boild take the meat out of the bodies or barrels, and save the great claws and the small legs whole to garnish the dish, strain the meat with some claret wine, gra­ted bread, wine vinegar, nutmeg, a little salt, and a piece of butter; stew them together an hour on a soft fire in a pip­kin, and being stewed almost dry, put in some beaten but­ter, with juyce of oranges beat up thick; then dish the shells being washed and finely cleansed, the claws and little legs round about them, put in the meat into the shells and so serve them.

Sometimes you may use yolks of eggs strained with butter.

To stew Crabs otherwayes.

BEing boild take the meat out of the shells, and put it in a pipkin with some claret wine, and wine vinegar, min­ced time, pepper, grated bread, salt, the yolks of two or three hard eggs strained or minced very small, some sweet butter, capers, and some large mace; stew it finely, rub the shells with a clove or two of garlick, and dish them as is shown before.

Otherwayes.

Take the meat out of the bodies and put it in a pipkin with some cinamon, wine vinegar, butter, and beaten gin­ger, stew them and serve them as the former, dished with the legs about them.

Sometimes you may add sugar to them, parboild grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, and in place of vinegar, juyce of oranges, and run them over with beaten butter.

To butter Crabs.

THe crabs being boild, take the meat out of the bodies, and strain it with the yolks of three or four hard eggs, beaten cinamon, sugar, claret wine, and wine vine­gar, stew the meat in a pipkin with some sweet butter the space of a quarter of an hour, and serve them as the for­mer.

Otherwayes.

Being boild, take the meat out of the shells, as also out of the great claws, cut it into dice-work, and put both the meats into a pipkin together, with some white wine, juyce of oranges, nutmeg, and some slices of oranges, stew it two or three walms on the fire, and the shells being finely cleansed and dried, put the meat into them, and lay the legs round about them in a clean dish.

To make a Hash of Crabs.

TAke two crabs being boild, take out the meat of the claws, and cut it into dice-work, mix it with the meat of the body, then have some pine-apple-seed, and some pistaches or artichock bottoms boild, blanched, and cut in­to dice-work, or some asparagus boild and cut half an inch long; stew all these together with some claret wine, vine­gar, grated nutmeg, salt, some sweet butter, and the slices of an orange; being finely stewed dish it on sippets, cuts, or lozenges of puff-paste, and garnish it with fritters of arms, slic't lemon carved, barberries, grapes, or gooseber­ries, and run it over with beaten butter, and yolks of eggs beaten up thick together.

To force a Crab.

TAke a boild crab, take the meat out of the shell, and mince the claws with a good fresh eel, season it with cloves, mace, some sweet herbs chopped, and salt, mingle all together with some yolks of eggs, some grapes, goose­berries, or barberries, and sometimes boild artichocks in dice-work, or boild asparagus, some almond paste, the meat of the body of the crab, and some grated bread, fill the shell with this compound, and make some into balls, bake them in a dish with some butter and white wine in a soft oven; being baked, serve them in a clean dish with a sauce made of beaten butter, large mace, scalded grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, or some slic't orange or lemon, and some yolks of raw eggs dissolved with some white wine or claret, and beat up thick with butter; brew it well together, pour it on the fish, and lay on some slic't lemon, stick the balls with some pistaches, slic't almonds, pine ap­ple-seeds, or some pretty cuts in paste.

To broil Crabs in Oyl or Butter.

TAke crabs being boild in water and salt, steep them in oyl and vinegar, and broil them on a gridiron on a soft fire of embers, in the broiling baste them with some rose­mary branches, and being broild serve them with the sauces they were broild with, oyl and vinegar, or beaten butter, vinegar, and the rosemary branches they were basted with.

To fry Crabs.

TAke the meat out of the great claws being first boild, flour and fry them, and take the meat out of the bo­dy, strain half of it for sauce, and the other half to fry, [Page 396]and mix it with grated bread, almond paste, nutmeg, salt, and yolks af eggs, fry it in clarified butter, being first dip­ped in batter, put in a spoonful at a time; then make sauce with wine vinegar, butter, or juyce of orange, and grated nutmeg, beat up the butter thick, and put some of the meat that was strained into the sauce, warm it and put it in a clean dish, lay the meat on the sauce, slices of orange over all, and run it over with beaten butter, fryed parsley round the dish brim, and the little legs round the meat.

Otherwayes.

Being boild and cold, take the meat out of the claws, flour and fry them, then take the meat out of the body, butter it with butter, vinegar, and pepper, and put it in a clean dish, put the fried crab round about it, and run it over with beaten butter, juyce and slices of orange, and lay on it sage leaves fryed in batter, or fried parsley.

To bake Crabs in Pie, Dish, or Patty-pan.

TAke four or five crabs being boild, take the meat out of the shells and claws as whole as you can, season it with nutmeg and salt lightly; then strain the meat that came out of body shells with a little claret wine, some ci­namon, ginger, juyce of orange and butter; make the pie, dish, or patty-pan, lay butter in the bottom, then the meat of the claws, some pistaches, asparagus, some bot­toms of artichocks, yolks of hard eggs, large mace, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, dates or slic't orange, and but­ter, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with the meat out of the body.

Otherwayes.

Mince them with a tench or fresh eel, and season it with sweet herbs minced small, beaten nutmeg, pepper, and salt, lightly seasoned, and mingle the meat that was in the bo­dies of the crabs with the other seasoned fishes; mingle [Page 397]also with this foresaid meat some boild or roasted chesnuts, or artichocks, asparagus boild and cut an inch long, pista­ches, or pine-apple-seed, and grapes, gooseberries or bar­berries; fill the pie, dish, or patty-pan, close it up and bake it, being baked, liquor it with juyce of oranges, some cla­ret wine, good butter beat up thick, and the yolks of two or three eggs, fill up the pie, lay slices of an orange on it, and stick in some lozenges of puff-paste, or branches of short paste.

To make minced Pies of a Crab.

BEing boild, mince the legs, and strain the meat in the body with two or three yolks of eggs, mince also

[form of minced crab pie]

some sweet herbs and put to it, some al­mond paste or grated bread, a minced oni­on, some fat eel cut like little dice, or some fat belly of salmon; mingle it altogether, and put it in a pie made according to this form, season it with nutmeg, pepper, salt, currans, and barberries, grapes, or gooseberries, mingle also some butter, and fill your pie, bake it, and being baked, liquor it with beaten butter and white wine. Or with butter, sugar, cinamon, sweet herbs chopped, and verjuyce.

To dress Tartoise.

CUt off the head, feet, and tail, and boil it in water, wine, and salt, being boild, pull the shell asunder, and pick the meat from the skins, and the gall from the liver, save the eggs whole if a female, and stew the eggs, meat, and liver in a dish with some grated nutmeg, a little sweet herbs minced small, and some sweet butter, stew it up, and serve it on fine sippets, cover the meat with the upper shell of the tortoise, and slices or juyce of orange.

Or stew them in a pipkin with some butter, white wine­some of the broth, a whole onion or two, time, parsley, winter savory, and rosemary minc't; being finely stewed, serve them on sippets or put them in the shells, being clean­sed; or make a fricase in a frying-pan with three or four yolks of eggs and some of the shells amongst them, and dress them as aforesaid.

To dress Snails.

TAke shell snails, and having water boild, put them in, then pick them out of the shells with a great pin into a bason, cast salt to them, scour the slime from them, and after wash them in two or three waters; being clean scowred, dry them with a clean cloth; then have rosemary, time, parsley, winter savory, and pepper very small, put them into a deep bason or pipkin, put to them some salt and good sallet oyl, mingle altogether, then have the shells finely cleansed, fill them, and set them on a grid­iron, broil them upon embers softly, and being broild, dish four or five dozen in a dish, fill them up with oyl, and serve them hot.

To stew Snails.

BEing well scowred and cleansed as aforesaid, put to them some claret wine and vinegar, a handful of ca­pers, mace, pepper, grated bread, a little minced time, salt, and the yolks of two or three hard eggs minced; let all these stew together till you think it be enough, then put in a good piece of butter, shaking it together, heat the dish and rub it with a clove of garlick, put them on fine sippets of French bread, pour on the snails, and some bar­berries, or slic't lemons.

Otherwayes.

Being cleansed, fry them in oyl or clarified butter, with [Page 399]some slices of a fresh eel, and some fryed sage leaves; stew them in a pipkin with some white wine, butter, and pepper, and serve them on sippets with beaten butter, and juyce of oranges.

Otherwayes.

Being finely boild and cleansed, fry them in clarified but­ter; being fryed take them up, and put them in a pipkin, put to them some sweet butter, chopped parsley, white or claret wine, some grated nutmeg, slices of orange, and a little salt; stew them well together, serve them on sip­pets, and run them over with beaten butter, and slices of oranges.

To fry Snails.

TAke shell snails in January, February, or March, when they be closed up, boil them in a skillet of boiling wa­ter, and when they be tender boild, take them out of the shells with a pin, cleanse them from the slime, flour them, and fry them; being fryed serve them in a clean dish, with butter, vinegar, fryed parsley, fryed onions, or ellicksander leaves fryed, or served with beaten butter, and juyce of orange, or oyl, vinegar, and slic't lemon.

Otherwayes.

Fry them in oyl and butter, being finely cleansed, and serve them with butter, vinegar, and pepper; or oyl, vine­gar, and pepper.

To make a Hash of Snails.

BEing boild and cleansed, mince them small, put them in a pipkin with some sweet herbs minced, the yolks of hard eggs, some whole capers, nutmeg, pepper, salt, some pistaches, and butter, or oyl; being stewed the space of half an hour on a soft fire, then have some fryed toast of [Page 400]French bread, lay some in the bottom, and some round the meat in the dish.

To dress Snails in a Pottage.

WAsh them very well in many waters, then put them in an earthen pan, or a wide dish, put as much water as will cover them, and set your dish on some coals; when they boil take them out of the shells, and scour them with water and salt three or four times, then put them in a pipkin with water and salt, and let them boil a little, then take them out of the water and put them in a dish with some excellent sallet oyl; when the oyl boils put in three or four slic't onions, and fry them, put the snails to them, and stew them well together, then put the oyl, snails, and onions altogether in a pipkin of a fit size for them, and put as much warm water to them as will make a pottage; with some salt, and so let them stew three or four hours, then mince time, parsley, penniroyal, and the like herbs; when they are minced beat them to green sauce in a mortar, put in some crumbs of bread soked with that broth or pottage, some saffron and beaten cloves; put all into the snails, and give them a walm or two, and when you serve them up, squeese in the the juyce of a lemon, put in a little vinegar, and a clove of garlick amongst the herbs, and beat them in it; serve them up in a dish with sippets in the bottom of it.

This pottage is very nourishing, and excellent good against a Comsumption.

To bake Snails.

BEing boild and scowred season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt, put them into a pie with some mar­row, large mace, a raw chicken cut in pieces, some little bits of lard and bacon, the bones out, sweet herbs chopped, slic't [Page 401]lemon, or orange, and butter; being full, close it up and bake it, and liquor it with butter and white wine.

To bake Frogs.

BEing fleyed take the hind legs, cut off the feet and sea­son them with nutmeg, pepper and salt, put them in a pie with some sweet herbs chopped small, large mace, slic't lemon; gooseberries, grapes, or barberries, pieces of skirret, artichocks, potatoes, or parsnips, and marrow; close it up and bake it, being baked liquor it with butter, and juyce of orange, or grape verjuyce.

Section 20.

To make all manner of Pottages for Fish Dayes.

French Barley Pottage.

CLeanse the barley from dust, and put it in boiling milk, being boild down, put in large mace, cream, sugar, and a little salt; boil it pretty thick, then serve it in a dish, scrape sugar on it, and trim the dish sides.

Otherwayes.

Boil it in fair water, scum it, and being almost boild, put to it some saffron, or dissolved yolks of eggs.

To make Gruel Pottage the best way for service.

PIck your oatmeal, and boil it whole on a stewing fire; being tender boild, strain it through a strainer, then put it into a clean pipkin with fair boiling water, make it pretty thick of the strained oatmeal, and put to it some picked raisins of the sun well washed, some large mace, salt, and a little bundle of sweet herbs, with a little rose-water and saffron; set it a stewing on a fire of charcoal, boil it with sugar till the fruit be well allom'd, then put to it but­ter and the yolks of three or four eggs strained.

Otherwayes.

Good herbs and oatmeal chopped, put them into boil­ing liquor in a pipkin, pot, or skillet, with some salt, and being boild put to it butter.

Otherwayes.

With a bundle of sweet herbs and oatmeal chopped, some onions and salt, seasoned as before with butter.

To make Furmenty.

TAke wheat and wet it, then beat it in a sack with a wash beatle, being finely hulled and cleansed from the dust and hulls, boil it over night, and let it soak on a soft fire all night, then next morning take as much as will serve the turn, put it in a pipkin, pan, or skillet, and put it a boil­ing in cream or milk, with mace, salt, whole cinamon, and saffron, or yolks of eggs, boil it thick and serve it in a clean scowred dish, scrape on sugar, and trim the dish.

To make Rice Pottage.

PIck the rice and dust it clean, then wash it, and boil it in water or milk; being boild down, put to it some cream, large mace, whole cinamon, salt, and sugar, boil it on a soft stewing fire, and serve it in a fair deep dish or a standing silver piece.

Otherwayes.

Boild rice strained with almond milk, and seasoned as the former.

Milk Pottage.

BOil whole oatmeal, being cleanly picked, boil it in a pipkin or pot, but first let the water boil; being well boild and tender, put in milk or cream, with salt and fresh butter, &c.

Ellicksander Pottage.

CHop ellicksanders and oatmeal together, being picked and washed, then set on a pipkin with fair water, and when it boils put in your herbs, oatmeal, and salt, boil it on a soft fire and make it not too thick, being almost boild put in some butter.

Pease Pottage.

TAke green pease being shelled and cleansed, put them into a pipkin of fair boiling water; when they be boild and tender, take and strain some of them, and thicken the rest, put to them a bundle of sweet herbs, or sweet herbs chopped, salt, and butter, being through boild dish them, and serve them in a deep clean dish with salt and sippets about them.

Otherwayes.

Put them into a pipkin or skillet of boiling milk or cream, put to them two or three sprigs of mint, and salt, being fine and tender boild, thick them with a little milk and flour.

Dry, or old Pease Pottage.

TAke the choicest pease, (that some call seed-way pease) commonly they be a little worm eaten, (those are the best boiling pease) pick and wash them, and put them in boiling liquor in a pot or pipkin; being tender boild, take out some of them, strain them and set them by for your use, then season the rest with salt, a bundle of mints and butter, let them stew leasurely, and put to them some pepper.

Strained Pease Pettage.

TAke the former strained pease pottage, put to them salt, large mace, a bundle of sweet herbs, and some pickled capers; stew them well together, then serve them in a deep dish clean scowred, with thin slices of bread in the bottom, and grated manchet to garnish it.

An excellent stewed Broth for Fish dayes.

SEt a boiling some fair water in a pipkin, then strain some oatmeal and put to it, with large mace, whole cinamon, salt, a bundle of sweet herbs, some strained and whole prunes, and some raisins of the sun; being well stew­ed on a soft fire, and pretty thick, put in some claret wine and sugar, serve it in a clean scowred deep dish or standing piece, and scrape on sugar.

Onion Pottage.

FRy good store of slic't onions, then have a pipkin of boiling liquor over the fire, when the liquor boils put in the fryed onions butter and all, with pepper and salt; being well stewed together, serve it on sops of French bread or pine-molet.

Almond Pottage.

TAke a pound of almond paste, and strain it with some new milk; then have a pottle of cream boiling in a pipkin or skillet, put in the milk and almonds with some mace, salt, and sugar; serve it in a clean dish on sippets of French bread, and scrape on sugar.

Otherwayes.

Strain them with fair water, and boil them with mace, [Page 406]salt, and sugar (or none) adde two or three yolks of eggs dissolved or saffron; and serve it as before.

Almond Caudle.

STrain half a pound of almonds being blanched and stamped, strain them with a pint of good ale, then boil it with slices of fine mancher, large mace, and sugar; being almost boild put in three or four spoonfuls of sack.

Oatmeal Caudle.

BOil ale, scum it, and put in strained oatmeal, mace, su­gar, and sliced bread, boil it well, and put in two or three spoonfuls of sack, white wine, or claret.

Egg Caudle.

BOil ale or beer, scum it, and put to it two or three blades of large mace, some sliced manchet and sugar; then dissolve four or five yolks of eggs with some sack, cla­ret, or white wine, and put it into the rest with a little gra­ted nutmeg; give it a walm and serve it.

Sugar or Honey-sops.

BOil beer or ale, scum it, and put to it slices of fine manchet, large mace, sugar or honey. Sometimes currans, and boil all well together.

To make an Alebury.

BOil bear or ale, scum it, and put in some mace, and a bottom of a manchet, boil it well, then put in some sugar.

Buttered Beer.

TAke beer or ale and boil it, then scum it, and put to it some liquoras and anniseeds, boil them well together; then have in a clean flaggon or quart pot some yolks of eggs well beaten with some of the foresaid beer, and some good butter; strain your butter'd beer, put it in the flag­gon, and brew it with the butter and eggs.

Buttered Beer or Ale otherwayes.

BOil beer or ale and scum it, then have six eggs, whites and all, and beat them in a flaggon or quart pot with the shells, some butter, sugar, and nutmeg, put them together, and being well brewed, drink it when you go to bed.

Otherwayes.

Take three pints of beer or ale, put five yolks of eggs to it, strain them together, and set it in a pewter pot to the fire, put to it half a pound of sugar, a penniworth of beat­en nutmeg, as much beaten cloves, half an ounce of beaten ginger, and bread it.

Panado's.

BOil fair water in a skillet, put to it grated bread or cakes, good store of currans, mace, and whole cina­mon; being almost boild and indifferent thick, put in some sack or white wine, sugar, and some strained yolks of eggs.

Otherwayes with slic't bread, water, currans, and mace, and being well boild, put to it some sugar, white wine, and butter.

To make a Compound Posset of Sack, Claret, White Wine, Ale, Beer, or Juyce of Oranges, &c.

TAke twenty yolks of eggs with a little cream, strain them and set them by; then have a clean scowred skillet, and put into it a pottle of good sweet cream, and a good quantity of whole cinamon, set it a boiling on a soft charcoal fire, and stir it continually; the cream having a good taste of the cinamon, put in the strained eggs and cream into your skillet, stir them together, and give them a walm; then have some sack in a deep bason or pos­set-pot, good store of fine sugar, and some sliced nutmeg; the sack and sugar being warm, take out the ci­namon, and pour your eggs and cream very high into the bason, that it may spatter in it, then strow on loaf sugar.

To make a Posset simple.

BOil your milk in a clean scowred skillet, and when it boils take it off, and warm in the pot, bowl, or ba­son, some sack, claret, beer ale, or juyce of orange; pour it into the drink, but let not your milk be too hot; for it will make the curd hard, then sugar it.

Otherwayes.

Beat a good quantity of sorrel, and strain it with any of the foresaid liquors, or simply of its self, then boil some milk in a clean scowred skillet, being boild, take it off and let it cool, then put it to your drink, but not too hot, for it will make the curd tuff.

Possets of Herbs otherwayes.

TAke a fair scowred skillet, put in some milk into it, and some rosemary, the rosemary being well boild [Page 409]in it, take it out and have some ale or beer in a pot, put to it the milk and sugar, (or none.)

Thus of time, cardus, camomile, mint, or marigold flowers.

To make French Puffs.

TAke spinage, time, parsley, endive, savory, and marig­ram, chop or mince them small; then have twenty eggs beaten with the herbs, that the eggs may be green, some nutmeg, ginger, cinamon, and salt; then cut a lemon in slices, and dip it in batter, fry it, and put on a spoonful on every slice of lemon, fry it finely in clarified butter, and being fried, strow on sack, or claret, and sugar.

Soops, or butter'd Meats of Spinage.

TAke fine young spinage, pick and wash it clean; then have a skillet or pan of fair liquor on the fire, and when it boils, put in the spinage, give it a walm or two, and take it out into a cullender, let it drain, then mince it small, and put it in a pipkin with some slic't dates, butter, white wine, beaten cinamon, salt, sugar, and some boild currans, stew them well together, and dish them on sippets finely carved, and about it hard eggs in halves or quarters; not too hard boild, and scrape on sugar.

Soops of Carrots.

BEing boild, cleanse, stamp, and season them in all points as before; thus also potatoes, skirrets, parsnips, tur­nips, virginia artichocks, onions, or beets, or fry any of the foresaid roots being boild and cleansed, or peeled, and floured, and serve them with beaten butter and sugar.

Soops of Artichocks, Potatoes, Skirrets, or Parsnips.

BEing boild and cleansed, put to them yolks of hard eggs, dates, mace cinamon, butter, sugar, white wine, salt, slic't lemon, grapes, gooseberries, or barberries, stew them together whole, and being finely stewed, serve them on carved sippets in a clean scowred dish, and run it over with beaten butter and scraped sugar.

To butter Onions.

BEing peeled, put them into boiling liquor, and when they are boild, drain them in a cullender, and butter them whole with some boild currans, butter, sugar, and beaten cinamon, serve them on fine sippets, scrape on su­gar, and run them over with beaten butter.

Otherwayes.

TAke apples and onions, mince the onions and slice the apples, put them in a pot, but more apples then oni­ons, and bake them with houshold bread, close up the pot with paste or paper; when you use them butter them with butter, sugar, and boild currans, serve them on sippets, and scrape on sugar and cinamon.

Buttered Sparagus.

TAke two hundred of sparagus, scrape the roots clean, and wash them, then take the heads of an hundred and lay them even, binde them hard up into a bundle, and so likewise of the other hundred; then have a large skillet of fair water, when it boils put them in, and boil them up quick with some salt; being boild drain them, and serve [Page 411]them with beaten butter and salt about the dish, or butter and vinegar.

Buttered Collyflowers.

HAve a skillet of fair water, and when it boils put in the whole tops of the collyflowers, the root being cut away, put some salt to it; and being fine and tender boild dish it whole in a dish, with carved sippets round about it, and serve it with beaten butter and water, or juyce of orange and lemon.

Otherwayes.

Put them into boiling milk, boil them tender, and put to them a little mace and salt; being finely boild, serve them on carved sippets, the yolk of an egg or two, some boild raisins of the sun, beaten butter, and sugar.

To butter Quinces.

ROast or boil them, then strain them with sugar and cinamon, put some butter to them, warm them to­gether, and serve them on fine carved sippets.

To butter Rice.

PIck the rice and sift it, and when the liquor boils put it in and scum it, boil it not too much, then drain it, butter it, and serve it on fine carved sippets, and scraping sugar onely, or sugar and cinamon,

Butter wheat and French barley as you do rice, but hull your wheat and barley, wet the wheat and beat it in a sack with a wash beetle, fan it, and being clean hulled, boil it all night on a soft fire very tender.

To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cowcumbers, or Muskmillions.

CUt them into pieces, and pare and cleanse them; then have a boiling pan of water, and when it boils put in the pumpions, &c. with some salt, being boild drain them well from the water, butter them, and serve them on sippets with pepper.

Otherwayes.

Bake them in an oven, and take out the seed at the top, fill them with onions, slic't apples, butter, and salt, butter them, and serve them on sippets.

Otherwayes.

Fry them in slices being cleansed and peeled, either flou­red or in batter; being fryed serve them with beaten but­ter and vinegar, or beaten butter and juyce of orange, or butter beaten with a little water, and served in a clean dish with fryed parsley, ellicksanders, apples, slic't onions fryed, or sweet herbs.

To make buttered Loaves.

SEason a pottle of flour with cloves, mace, and pepper, half a pound of sweet butter melted, and half a pint of ale-yeast or barm, mixed with warm milk from the Cow, and three or four eggs to temper altogether, make it as soft as manchet paste, and make it up into little man­chets as big as an egg, cut and prick them, and put them on paper, bake them like manchet with the oven open, they will ask an hours baking; being baked melt in a great dish a pound of sweet butter, and put rose water in it, draw your loaves, and pare away the crusts, then slit them in three toasts and put them in the melted butter, turn them over and over in the butter; then take a warm dish and put in the bottom pieces, and strow on sugar in a good [Page 413]thickness, then put in the middle pieces and sugar them likewise, then set on the tops and scrape on sugar, and serve five or six in a dish. If you be not ready to send them in, set them in the oven again, and cover them with a pa­per to keep them from drying.

To boil French Beans or Lupins.

FIrst take away the tops of the cods and the strings, then have a pan or skillet of fair water boiling on the fire, when it boils put them in with some salt, and boil them up quick; being boild serve them with beaten butter in a fair scowred dish, and salt about it.

To boil Garden Beans.

BEing shelled and cleansed, put them into boiling li­quor with some salt, boil them up quick, and being boild, drain away the liquor and butter them, dish them in a dish like a cross, and serve them with pepper and salt on the dish side.

Thus also green pease, haslers, broom-buds, or any kinde of pulse.

Section 21.

The exactest way for the Dressing of Eggs.

To make Omlets divers wayes.

The first way.

BReak six, eight, or ten eggs more or less, beat them together in a dish, and put salt to them; then put some butter a melting in a frying-pan, and fry it more or less according to your descretion, onely on one side or bottom.

You may sometimes make it green with juyce of spinage and sorrel beat with the eggs, or serve it with green sauce, a little vinegar and sugar boild together, and served up in a dish with the omlet.

The second way.

TAke twelve eggs, and put to them some grated white bread finely searsed, parsley minced very small, some sugar beaten fine, and fry it well on both sides.

The third way.

FRy toasts of manchet, and put the eggs to them being beaten and seasoned with salt, and some fryed; pour the butter and fryed parsley over all.

The fourth way.

TAke three or four pippins, cut them in round slices and fry them with a quarter of a pound of butter, when the apples are fryed, pour on them six or seven eggs beat­en with a little salt, and being finely fryed dish it on a plate­dish, or dish, and strow on sugar.

The fifth way.

MIx with the eggs pine-kernels, currans, and pieces of preserved lemons; being fryed roul it up like a pud­ding, and sprinkle it with rose-water, cinamon-water, and strow on fine sugar.

The sixth way.

BEat the eggs, and put to them a little cream, a little grated bread, a little preserved lemon-peel, minced or grated very small, and use it as the former.

The seventh way.

TAke a quarter of a pound of interlarded bacon, take it from the rinde, cut it into dice-work, fry it, and being fryed put in some seven or eight beaten eggs with some salt, fry them, and serve them with some grape ver­juyce.

The eighth way.

WIth minced bacon among the eggs fryed and beat­en together, or with thin slices of interlarded bacon, and fryed slices of bread.

The ninth way.

MAde with eggs and a little cream.

The tenth way.

MInce herbs small, as lettice, bugloss, or burridge, sor­rel, and mallows, put currans to them, salt, and nutmeg, beat all these amongst the herbs, and fry them with swet butter, and serve it with cinamon and sugar, or fryed parsley onely, put the eggs to it in the pan.

The eleventh way.

MInce some parsley very small being short and fine picked, beat it amongst the eggs, and fry it. Or fry the parsley being grosly cut, beat the eggs and pour it on, &c.

The twelfth way.

MInce leeks very small, beat them with the eggs and some salt, and fry them.

The thirteenth way.

TAke endive that is very white, cut it grosly, fry it with nutmeg, and put the eggs to it, or boil it being fryed, and serve it with sugar.

The fourteenth way.

SLice cheese very thin, beat it with the eggs, and a little salt, then melt some butter in the pan and fry it.

The fifteenth way.

Take six or eight eggs, beat them with salt, and make a stuffing with some pine-kernels, currans, sweet herbs, some minced fresh fish, or some of the milts of carps that have been fryed or boiled in good liquor, and some mushrooms half boild and slic't; mingle altogether with some yolks or whites of eggs raw, and fill up great cowcumbers there­with being coared, fill them up with the foresaid forcing, pare them, and bake them in a dish, or stew them between two deep basons, or deep dishes; put some butter to them, some strong broth of fish, or fair water, some verjuyce or vinegar, and some grated nutmeg, and serve them on a dish with sippets.

The sixteenth way according to the Turkish mode.

Take the flesh of a hinder part of a hare, or any other venison, and mince it small with a little fat bacon, some pistaches or pine-apple-kernels, almonds, Spanish or hazel nuts peeled, Spanish chesnuts or French chesnuts roasted and peeled, or som crusts of bread cut in slices and toast­ed like unto chesnuts; season this minced stuff with salt; spices, and some sweet herbs, if the flesh be raw adde there­unto butter and marrow, or good sweet suet minced small and melted in a skillet, pour it into the seasoned meat that is minced and fry it; then melt some butter in a skillet or pan, and make an omlet thereof, when it is half fryed put to the minced meat, and take the omlet out of the frying-pan with a skimmer, break it not, and put it in a dish that the minced meat may appear uppermost, put some gravy on the minced meat, and some grated nutmeg, stick some sippets of fryed manchet on it, and slices of lemon. Roast-meat is the best for this purpose.

The seventeenth way.

Take the kidneys of a loin of veal after it hath been well roasted, mince it together with its fat, and season it with salt, spices, and some time or other sweet herbs, adde there­unto [Page 418]some fryed bread, some boild mushrooms or some pi­staches, make an omlet, and being half fryed put the min­ced meat on it.

Fry them well together, and serve it up with some grated nutmeg and sugar.

The eighteenth way.

TAke a carp or some other fish, bone it very well, and adde to it some milts of carps, season them with pep­per and salt, or with other spices, adde some mushrooms, and mince them altogether, put to them some apple ker­nels, some currans, and preserved lemons in pieces shred very small; fry them in a frying-pan or tart pan, with some butter, and being fried make an omlet. Being half fried, put the fried fish on it, and dish them on a plate, roul it round, cut it at both ends, and spread them abroad, grate some sugar on it, and sprinkle on rose-water.

The nineteenth way.

MInce all kinde of sweet herbs, and the yolks of hard eggs together, some currans, and some mushrooms half boild, being all minced cover them over, fry them as the former, and strow sugar and cinamon on it.

The twentieth way.

TAke young and tender sparagus, break or cut them into small pieces, and half fry them brown in butter, put into them eggs beaten with salt and thus make your omlet.

Or boil them in water and salt, then fry them in sweet butter, put the eggs to them and make an omlet, dish it, and put a drop or two of vinegar or verjuyce on it.

Sometimes take mushrooms, being stewed make an om­let, [Page 419]and sprinkle it with the broth of the mushrooms, and grated nutmeg.

The one and twentieth way.

SLice some apples and onions, fry them, but not too much, and beat some six or eight eggs with some salt, put them to the apples and onions, and make an omlet; being fried, make sauce with vinegar or grape verjuyce, but­ter, sugar, and mustard.

To dress hard Eggs divers wayes.

The first way.

PUt some butter into a dish, with some vinegar or ver­juyce, and salt; the butter being melted, put in two or three yolks of hard eggs, dissolve them in the butter and verjuyce for the sauce; then have hard eggs, part them in halves or quarters, lay them in the sauce, and grate some nutmeg over them, or the crust of white bread.

The second way.

Fry some parsley, some minced leeks, and young onions, when you have fried them pour them into a dish, season them with salt and pepper, and put to them hard eggs cut in halves, put some mustard to them, and dish the eggs, mix the sauce well together, and pour it hot on the eggs.

The third way.

The eggs being boild hard, cut them in two, or fry them in butter, with flour and milk or wine; being fried, put them in a dish, put to them salt, vinegar, and juyce of le­mon, make a sweet sauce for it with some sugar, juyce of lemon, and beaten cinamon.

The fourth way.

Cut hard eggs in twain, and season them with a white [Page 420]sauce made in a frying-pan with the yolks of raw eggs, ver­juyce, and white wine dissolved together, and some salt, a few spices, and some sweet herbs, and pour this sauce over the eggs.

The fifth way in the Portugal Fashion.

Fry some parsley small minced, some onions or leeks in fresh butter, being half fried, put into them hard eggs cut into rounds, a handful of mushrooms well picked, washed and slic't, and salt; fry all together, and being almost fryed, put some vinegar to them, dish them, and grate nutmeg on them, sippet them, and on the sippets slic't lemons.

The sixth way.

Take sweet herbs, as purslain, lettice, burrage, sorrel, parsley, chervel, and time, being well picked and washed mince them very small, and season them with cloves, pep­per, salt, minced mushrooms, and some grated cheese, put them to some grated nutmeg, crusts of manchet, some cur­rans, pine-kernels, and yolks of hard eggs in quarters, mingle altogether, fill the whites and stew them in a dish, strow over the stuff being fried with some butter, pour the fried force over the whites being dished, and grate some nutmeg, and crusts of manchet.

Or fry sorrel and put it over the eggs.

To butter a Dish of Eggs.

TAke twenty eggs more or less, whites and yolks as you please, break them into a silver dish, with some salt, and set them on a quick charcoal fire, stir them with a sil­ver spoon, and being finely buttered put to them the juyce of three or four oranges, sugar, grated nutmeg, and some­times beaten cinamon; being thus drest, strain them at the first, or afterward being buttered.

To make a Bisk of Eggs.

TAke a good big dish, lay a lay of slices of cheese be­tween two layes of toasted cheat bread, put on them some clear mutton broth, green or dry pease broth, or any other clear pottage that is seasoned with butter and salt, cast on some chopped parsley grosly minced, and upon that some poached eggs.

Or dress this dish whole or in pieces, lay between some carps milts fried, boild, or stewed, as you do oysters, stewed and fried gudgeons, smelts, or oysters, some fryed and stewed, capers, mushrooms, and such like junkets.

Sometimes you may use currans, boild or stewed prunes, and put to the foresaid mixture, with some whole cloves, nutmegs, mace, ginger, some white wine, verjuyce, or green sauce, some grated nutmeg over all, and some carved lemon.

Eggs in Moonshine.

BReak them in a dish upon some butter and oyl, melted or cold, strow on them a little salt, and set them on a chafing dish of coals, make not the yolks two hard, and in the doing cover them, and make a sauce for them of an onion cut into round slices, and fryed in sweet oyl or but­ter, then put to them verjuyce, grated nutmeg, a little salt, and so serve them.

Eggs in Moonshine otherwayes.

TAke the best oyl you can get, and set it over the fire on a silver dish, being very hot, break in the eggs, and be­fore the yolks of the eggs do become very hard, take them up and dish them in a clean dish; then make sauce made of [Page 422]fried onions in round slices, fried in oyl or sweet butter, salt, and some grated nutmeg.

Otherwayes.

Make a sirrup of rose-water, sugar, sack, or white wine, make it in a dish and break the yolks of the eggs as whole as you can, put them in the boiling sirrup with some am­bergreece, turn them and keep them one from the other, make them hard, and serve them in a little dish with sugar and cinamon.

Otherwayes.

Take a quarter of a pound of good fresh butter, balm it on the bottom of a fine clean dish, then break some eight or ten eggs upon it, sprinkle them with a little salt, and set them on a soft fire till the whites and yolks be pretty clear and stiff, but not too hard, serve them hot, and put on them the juyce of orange and lemons.

Or before you break them put to the butter sprigs of rosemary, juyce of orange, and sugar; being baked on the embers, serve them with sugar and beaten cinamon, and in place of orange, verjuyce.

Eggs otherwayes.

Fry them whole in clarified butter with sprigs of rose­mary under, fry them not too hard, and serve them with fryed parsley on them, vinegar, butter, and pepper.

To dress Eggs in the Spanish Fashion, called, wivos me quidos.

TAke twenty eggs fresh and new, and strain them with a quarter of a pint of sack, claret, or white wine, a quartern of sugar, some grated nutmeg, and salt; beat them together with the juyce of an orange, and put to them a little musk, (or none) set them over the fire, and stir them continually till they be a little thick, (but not too much serve them with scraping sugar being put in a clean warm dish, on fine toasts of manchet soaked in juyce of [Page 423]orange and sugar, or in claret, sugar, or white wine, and shake the eggs with orange comfits, or muskedines red and white.

To dress Eggs in the Portugal Fashion.

STrain the yolks of twenty eggs, and beat them very well in a dish, put to them some musk and rose water, made of fine sugar, boild thick in a clean skillet, put in the eggs, and stew them on a soft fire; being finely stewed, dish them on a french plate in a clean dish, scrape on sugar, and trim the dish with your finger.

Otherwayes.

Take twenty yolks of eggs, or as many whites, put them severally into two dishes, take out the cocks tread, and beat them severally the space of an hour; then have a sirrup made in two several skillets, with half a pound a piece of double refined sugar, and a little musk and am­bergreece bound up close in a fine rag, set them a stewing on a soft fire till they be enough on both sides, then dish them on a silver plate, and shake them with preserved pi­staches, muskedins white and red, and green citron slic't.

Put into the whites the juyce of spinage to make them green.

To dress Eggs called in French, A la Hugenotte, or the Protestant way.

BReak twenty eggs, beat them together, and put to them the pure gravy of a leg of mutton, or the gra­vy of roast beef, stir and beat them well together over a chafing dish of coals with a little salt, adde to them also juyce of orange and lemon, or grape verjuyce; then put in some mushrooms well boild and seasoned. Observe as soon as your eggs are well mixed with the gravy and the other ingredients, then take them off from the fire, keep­ing [Page 424]them covered a while, then serve them with some gra­ted nutmeg over them.

Sometimes to make them the more pleasing and tooth­some, strow some powdered ambergreece, and fine loaf sugar scraped into them, and so serve them.

To dress Eggs in fashion of a Tansie.

TAke twenty yolks of eggs, and strain them on flesh dayes with about half a pint of gravy, on fish dayes with cream and milk, adde salt, and four makeroons small grated, as much bisket, some rose-water, a little sack or claret, and a quarter of a pound of sugar, put these things to them with a piece of butter as big as a walnut, and set them on a chafing-dish with some preserved citron or le­mon grated, or cut into small pieces or little bits, and some pounded pistaches; being well buttered dish it on a plate, and brown it with a hot fire-shovel, strow on fine sugar, and stick it with preserved lemon-peel in thin slices.

Eggs and Almonds.

TAke twenty eggs and strain them with half a pound of almond paste, and almost half a pint of sack, sugar, nutmeg, and rose-water, set them on the fire, and when they be enough, dish them on a hot dish without toast, stick them with blanched and slic't almonds, and wafers, scrape on fine sugar, and trim the dish with your finger.

To broil Eggs.

TAke an oven peel, heat it red hot, and blow off the dust, break the eggs on it, and put them into a hot oven, or brown them on the top with a red hot fire shovel; being finely broild, put them into a clean dish, with some [Page 425]gravy, a little grated nutmeg, and elder vinegar; or pep­per, vinegar, juyce of orange, and grated nutmeg on them.

To dress poached Eggs.

TAke a dozen of new laid eggs, and the meat of four or five partridges; or any roast poultrey, mince it as small as you can, and season it with a few beaten cloves, mace, and nutmeg, put them into silver dish with a ladle full or two of pure mutton gravy, and two or three anchoves dis­solved, then set it a stewing on a chafing-dish of coals; being half stewed, as it boils put in the eggs one by one, and as you break them, put by most of the whites, and with one end of your egg-shell put in the yolks round in order amongst the meat, let them stew till the eggs be enough, then put in a little grated nutmeg, and the juyce of a couple of oranges, put not in the seeds wipe the dish, and garnish it with four or five whole onions boild and broild.

Otherwayes.

The eggs being poached, put them in a dish, strow salt on them, and grate on cheese which will give them a good relish.

Otherwayes.

Being poached and dished, strow on them a little salt, scrape on sugar, and sprinkle them with rose-water, ver­juyce, juyce of lemon, or orange, a little cinamon-water, or fine beaten cinamon.

Otherwayes to poach Eggs.

TAke as many as you please, break them into a dish, and put to them some sweet butter being melted, some salt, sugar, and a little grated nutmeg, give them a cullet in the dish, &c.

Otherwayes.

Poach them, and put green sauce to them, let them stand a while upon the fire, then season them with salt, and a lit­tle grated nutmeg.

Or make a sauce with beaten butter, and juyce of grapes mixt with ipocrass, pour it on the eggs, and scrape on sugar.

Otherwayes.

Poach them either in water, milk, wine, sack, or clear verjuyce, and serve them with vinegar in saucers.

Or make broth for them, and serve them on fine carved sippets, make the broth with washed currans, large mace, fair water, butter, white wine, and sugar, vinegar, juyce of orange, and whole cinamon; being dished run them over with beaten butter, the slices of an orange, and fine scra­ping sugar.

Or make sauce with beaten almonds, strained with ver­juyce, sugar, beaten, butter, and large mace, boild and dished as the former.

Or almond milk and sugar.

A grand Forc't Dish of Eggs.

TAke twenty hard eggs, being blanched part them in halves long wayes, take out the yolks and save the whites, mince the yolks, or stamp them amongst some march-pane paste, a few sweet herbs chopped small, and mingled amongst sugar, cinamon, and some currans well washed, fill again the whites with this forcing, and set them by.

Then have candied oranges or lemons, filled with march-pane paste, and sugar, and set them by also,

Then have the tops of boild asparagus, mix them with a batter made of flour, salt, and fair water, and set them by.

Next boild chesnuts and pistaches, and set them by.

Then have skirrets boild, peeled, and laid in batter.

Then have prawns boild and picked, and set by in bat­ter also, oysters parboild and cockles, eels cut in pieces be­ing fleyed, and yolks of hard eggs.

Next have green quodling stuff, mixt with bisket bread and eggs, fry them in little cakes, and set them by also.

Then have artichocks and potatoes ready to fry in bat­ter, being boild and cleansed also.

Then have balls of parmisan as big as a walnut, made up and dipped in batter, and some balls of almond paste.

These aforesaid being finely fryed in clarified butter, and muskefied, mix them in a great charger one amongst an­other, and make a sauce of strained grape verjuyce, or white wine, yolks of eggs, cream, beaten butter, cinamon and sugar, set them in an oven to warm: the sauce being boild up pour it over all, and set it again in the oven, ice it with fine sugar, and so serve it.

Otherwayes.

Boil ten eggs hard, and part them in halves long wayes, take out the yolks, mince them and put to them some sweet herbs minced small, some boild currans, salt, sugar, cina­mon, the yolks of two or three raw eggs, and some almond paste (or none) mix altogether, and fill again the whites, then lay them in a dish on some butter with the yolks downwards, or in a patty-pan, bake them, and make sauce of verjuyce and sugar, strained with the yolk of an egg and cinamon, give it a walm and put to it some beaten butter; being dished, serve them with fine carved sippets, slic't orange, and sugar.

To make a great compound Egg as big as twenty Eggs.

TAke twenty eggs, part the whites from the yolks and strain the whites by themselves, and the yolks by them­selves; [Page 428]then have two bladders, boil the yolks in one bladder, fast bound up as round as a ball, being boild hard put it in another bladder, and the whites round about it, binde it up round like the former, and being boild it will be a perfect egg. This serves for grand sallets.

Or you may adde to these yolks of eggs, musk and am­bergreece, candied pistaches, grated bisket bread, and su­gar, and to the whites almond paste, musk, juyce of oran­ges, and beaten ginger, and serve it with butter, almond milk, sugar, and juyce of oranges.

To butter eggs upon toasts.

TAke twenty eggs, beat them in a dish with some salt, and put butter to them; then have two large rolls or fine manchets, cut them into toasts and toast them against the fire with a pound of fine sweet butter; being finely buttered, lay the toasts in a fair clean scowred dish, put the eggs on the toasts, and garnish the dish with pepper, and salt. Otherwyes, half boil them in the shells, then butter them, and serve them on toasts, or toasts about them.

To these eggs sometimes use musk and ambergreece, and no pepper.

Otherwayes.

Take twenty eggs, and strain them whites and all with a little salt, then have a skillet with a pound of clarified butter, warm on the fire, then fry a good thick toast of fine manchet as round as the skillet, and an inch thick; the toast being finely fryed, put in the eggs on it into the skil­let, to fry on the manchet, but not too hard; being finely fryed put it on a trencher plate with the eggs uppermost, and salt about the dish.

An excellent way to butter Eggs.

TAke twenty yolks of new laid or fresh eggs, put them into a dish with as many spoonfuls of jelly, or mut­ton gravy without fat, put to it a quarter of a pound of sugar, two ounces of preserved lemon-peel, either grated or cut into thin slices or very little bits, with some salt, and four spoonfuls of rose-water, stir them together on the coals, and being buttered dish them, put some musk on them with some fine sugar; you may as well eat these eggs cold as hot, with a little cinamon water or without.

Otherwayes.

Dress them with claret, white wine, sack, or juyce of oranges, nutmeg, fine sugar, and a little salt, beat them well together in a fine clean dish, with carved sippets, and candied pistaches stuck in them.

Eggs buttered in the Polonian Fashion.

TAke twelve eggs and beat them in a dish, then have steeped bread in gravy or broath, beat them together in a mortar, with some salt, and put it to the eggs, then put a little preserved lemon-peel into it, either small shred or cut into slices, put some butter into it, butter them as the former, and serve them on fine sip­pers.

Or with cream, eggs, salt, preserved lemon-peels grated or in slices.

Or grated cheese in buttered eggs and salt.

Otherwayes.

Boil herbs, as spinage, sage, sweet marjoram, and endive, butter the eggs amongst them with some salt, and grated nutmeg.

Or dress them with sugar, orange juyce, salt, beaten ci­namon, [Page 430]and grated nutmeg, strain the eggs with the juyce of oranges, and so butter them without butter; be­ing well buttered, put some more juyce over them and sugar.

To make Minced Pies of Eggs.

BOil them hard, then mince them and mix them with cinamon, raw currans, caraway-seed, sugar, dates, minced lemon-peel, verjuyce, rose-water, butter, and salt; fill your pie or pies, close them, and bake them; being ba­ked, liquor them with white wine, butter, and sugar, and ice them. Make your pies according to these forms.

[forms of minced egg pies]

Eggs or Quelque-shose.

BReak forty eggs, and beat them together with some salt, fry them at four times, half, or but of one side; before you take them out of the pan make a composition or compound of hard eggs and sweet herbs minced, some boild currans, beaten cinamon, almond paste, sugar, and juyce of orange, strow all over these omlets, roul them up like a wafer, and so of the rest, put them in a dish with some white wine, sugar, and juyce of lemon; then warm and ice them in an oven, with beaten butter and fine sugar.

Otherwayes.

Set on a skillet either full of milk, wine, water, verjuyce, or sack, make the liquor boil, then have twenty eggs beat­en together with salt, and some sweet herbs chopped, run [Page 431]them through a cullender into the boiling liquor, or put them in by spoonfuls, or altogether; being not too hard boild, take them up and dish them with beaten butter, juyce of orange, lemon, or grape verjuyce, and beaten butter.

Blanch Manchet in a Frying-pan.

TAke six eggs, a quart of cream, a penny manchet gra­ted, nutmeg grated, two spoonfulls of rose-water, and two ounces of sugar, beat it up like a pudding, and fry it as you fry a tansey, being fryed turn it out on a plate, quarter it, and put on the juyce of an orange and sugar.

Quelque-shose otherwayes.

TAke ten eggs, and beat them in a dish with a penny manchet grated, a pint of cream, some beaten cloves, mace, boild currans, some rose-water, salt, and sugar; beat altogether, and fry it either in a whole form of a tan­sey, or by spoonfulls in little cakes; being finely fryed, serve them on a plate with juyce of orange and scraping sugar.

Other Fricase, or Quelque-shose.

TAke twenty eggs and strain them with a quart of cream, some nutmeg, salt, rose-water, and a little sugar; then have sweet butter in a clean frying-pan, and put in some pieces of pippins cut as thick as a half-crown peece round the apple being coared; when they are finely fryed put in half the eggs, fry them a little, and then pour on the rest or other half, fry it at two times, stir the last, dish the first on a plate, and put the other on it, with juyce of orange and sugar.

Other Fricases of Eggs.

BEat a dozen of eggs with cream, sugar, nutmeg, mace, and rose water; then have two or three pippins or other good apples, cut in round slices through core and all, put them in a frying pan, and fry them with sweet butter; when they be enough take them up and fry half the eggs and cream in other fresh butter, stir it like a tansey, and being enough put it out into a dish, put in the other half of the eggs and cream, lay the apples round the pan, and the other eggs fryed before, uppermost; being finely fryed dish it on a plate, and put to it the juyce of an orange and sugar.

The best wayes for Dressing of Artichocks.