THE JEWS CATECHISM. Which was lately Translated out of Hebrew into Latine. By the Eminently Learned LƲDOVICƲS DE COMPEIGNE DE VEIL.

[...]

Plato.

LONDON, Printed for Benjamin Harris, at the Stationers Arms in the Piazza under the Royal Exchange, in Cornhill. 1680.

TO THE READER.

HAving the Happiness of being Intimately Ac­quainted with the Learned Author of the Latine Transla­tion of this Excellent Cate­chism, I was the more easily Inclin'd to undertake to Tran­slate it into English (omitting some few Passages) As all Scholars are Oblig'd to that Worthy Gentleman for his Latin Translation, so I doubt not but those Virtuous Per­sons, who shall peruse my En­glish, [Page]will kindly Aceept the pains I have taken herein, though it comes so short of the Eloquence of the Latine. The Book contains an Accu­rate Description of a great part of a Christians Duty, though the Author of the O­riginal was not a Christian: But certainly He was not such an Enemy to Christianity as All the Socinians are: And His Catechism is much more to be Valued than CRELLIUS's Ethicks. The Socinians so Im­pudently usurping the Name of Christians; And yet Deny­ing the LORD that bought them, are certainly to be AB­HORR'D by all those that Love the LORD JESUS in sin­cerity, as JUDAS's Disciples, [Page]who Betray'd Him with a KISS. If this shall be seen by any of the English Students of the Cracovian Catechism, I de­sire they may be prompted to Consider that the Foulness of their grand Errot (if it be an Error, as I conceive they of­ten Doubt it is) cannot be Sur­past by any thing but by the Brightness of his Glory, Whom they so horridly Blaspheme by Denying Him to be the Only True, and Eternal GOD, Grie­ving His Holy Spirit, even by Asserting that DIVINE Wor­ship is Due unto Him, whilst they Assert also that He is no other than a Meer MAN, in­volving themselves in the greatest Guilt of the grossest Idolatry, which carries the [Page]greatest Opposition to the Spi­rit of Our Blessed LORD. There's more Hope of Con­verting a JEW than such an Apostate, one that has in effect Renounc'd His Baptism, viz. By Denying Two of the Three PERSONS in Whose Name He was Baptiz'd. Socinianism, and all other Haer [...]sies we shall Avoid, if we truly, and con­stantly Follow the Rules laid down in this Catechism, which we may do Through CHRIST Enabling Us. When once the Generality of those that have Named the Name of CHRIST shall by the Assistance of His Holy Spirit perform those Du­ties which the JEWS them­selves Acknowledge to be in­cumbent upon All Mankind, [Page]Then shall come to pass that Saying of the Evangelical Pro­phet, ‘The Earth shall be full of the Knowledge of the LORD as the Waters cover the Sea.’

Reader Farewel: And say with me from the Bottom of thy Heart, COME LORD JESUS

THE PROAEME

IT has been of old the Practice of the Jews as it were to Hedge in the Law, and to re­duce it all to certain Heads: So that the Fundamental Points thereof might be always in every mans Mouth. This course was strictly observ'd by the Prophets of whom some contracted the whole Law within the compass of Eleven Articles, others of Three, and at length one of them com­priz'd the Sum, and Substance of all the Law in this one Do­ctrine, [Page]to wit, that which we read Hab. 2.4. The Just shall live by Faith. Now th [...]refore, when by reason of our manifold sins we are opprest with such a multi­tude of Calamities, it is more re­quisite then ever, that we should comprize in some few, and those very brief and weighty Sentences, or forms of words, the Power of the Law, the Reasonableness of Religion, the right way of Exer­cising True Charity, and the In­stitution of good Manners which was in force two thousand Years b [...]fore the Law; That any young man though not very wife, yet not being altogether a Fool, might Rejoyce, and be exceeding glad, to have his mind thus In­structed to yield a due, and con­stant Regard to the Law of GOD. [Page]And would to God those our Masters who are the Rulers in the Synagogues of the Jews dis­pers'd far, and wide on the face of the Earth, would effectually resolve so to explain what is Truth, and Right by their Pre­cepts, and Admonitions, that at length all both young, and old, might attain to a competent un­derstanding of the Divine Na­ture, and also of the true Rule of living a Sober, and Godly Life. Thus it would come to pass that all their Scholars would make a large progress in the way of the most sublime Knowledge, and true Wisdome. Children also, persons weak, and slow in their apprehensions, who are not in any capacity either by conversing with Doctors, persons of pro­found [Page]Learning, or with the Books they have publisht, to pe­netrate into the Depths of the Holy Law, and of the Doctrine concerning good Manners, yet even they may attain to some per­ception of the Truth, if any man expound it unto them after such a manner, as we are now speak­ing of. Having these things upon my Thoughts, and chiefly considering the Glory of God, I the least, and unworthiest of men Abraham Jagel, &c. come forth from the midst of a Multitude enflam'd with Zeal for the LORD, our GOD, and apply my mind unto writing. Nor do I make it my business to express my self in a lofty strain, or in any subtle, and curious form of words, but that my Language [Page]may be plain and easie to be un­derstood like to common talk in familiar conversation. And I have diligently collected the words and deep sayings of wise men, which they have left in writing scatter'd here, and there, concern­ing the Fundamental Points of the Law, not thinking it worth my labour to give an account of the several Authors of those wise Sayings. For I studied to deli­ver a Discourse both clear, and concise concerning that way, which will bring those that persevere in it, to obtain the Lawrel of the Age to come; and they shall also attain great Renown in this pre­sent Age, even whilst they re­main in the number of the Li­ving: This I have done that my Discourse by reason of its Brevi­ty [Page]may be the oftner in the mouths of Children, and may be the more easily learnt of them; so that as they grow in years, they may grow in the Fear of God, and be deter'd from all Wickedness; and that those of riper Age, may never swerve from the Right Way. This small Work I have entituled, The Good Doctrine: For a Good Doctrine I deliver unto you, which I have not drawn from the Rivulet of mine own Mind, but from the Fountain of Wise Men, to whom the Great God communicated his Secrets. Sith th [...]se things are so, let no man desert my Precepts, but let every one that is Learned add his own Instructions to mine, and ex­pound them to Children, and ex­hort [Page]them constantly to adhere thereunto, nor l [...]t him cease from this Labour, till they shall be fully and perfectly exercised therein, yea till they shall be able to re­peat them all without book from the beginning to the end. Then they shall perceive what it is to Fear, and Love God, then they shall arrive to a right understan­ding of the Doctrine delivered by Holy Men, concerning a pure Virtuous Life; finally then their Minds shall have a true compre­hension of the Power of the Di­vine Law. Now, O Lord, Our God, Remember me for good, ac­cording to the Goodness, and In­tegrity of my Undertaking, for so I shall never be put to shame, and confusion in this World, or in that which is to come: But [Page]thou wilt give me my Portion with those that have turn'd many unto Righieousness. For these are they that shall shine as the Brightness of the Firmament For ever, and ever. May this, may this be thy Good Will, and Pleasure.

THE JEWS Catechism.

Scholar.

GOD prosper you.

Master.

God be Gra­cious unto you: But hear my Son, who are you?

Sch.

I am yours, and I fear the Lord of all things, the Maker of the Heavens; and I thank him from the bottom of my Heart that [Page 2]he hath made me a Man, and one of the Seed of Israel.

Mast.

God be Gracious unto thee, my Son; tell me now, I pray thee, to what end hath God made thee of so Excellent a Nature?

Sch.

Surely he hath created all things for his own Glory: He hath made me for this end, that I should be the Instrument of his Honour, that I should Worship, and Revere his Godhead, and that I should freely without a Servile Respect to any Reward perform all those A­ctions, which are pleasing unto Him; Though one day we shall re­ceive a Reward, when enjoying the Sight of God, world without end, we shall live such a Life, as shall forever abound with the greatest, and purest, and indeed with the on­ly True Delight, and Satisfaction.

Mast.

Ʋpon what grounds shall Man that is born of a Woman aspire to that Tranquillity of Mind, and the Possession of Eternal Felicity, which is [Page 3]expected to be enjoy'd in the World to come?

Sch.

If he will wholly Rely on God by a True Faith, and sure Hope, and take on him the Yoke of the Divine Law, which Moses deliver'd to the Children of Israel: This way he will become Just, and Acceptable to God, and at length obtain Eternal Life.

Mast.

What is the main Prop, and Foundation of Faith, and the Law?

Sch.

That there is a God Infi­nite in Goodness, and Infinite in Power, and Majesty, who Made the whole World of Nothing, and made it for his own Pleasure, and that there is none, who can hinder God, but that he may even now change e [...]ther all the parts of the World, or some of its parts.

Mast.

Is there any thing amongst the Jews that may put us in mind of this.

Sch.

Yes surely, the Observation of the Sabbath: This is a Sign, or [Page 4]Token betwixt God, and the Chil­dren of Israel, whereby they are to call to mind that Heaven, and Earth were made in Six Days, and that God rested the Seventh Day, and Hallowed it, and so by the Sacred Rites of this Day consecrated the Children of Israel, and set them a­part to be his Peculiar People; that he would have this to be the Pillar of the Israelites Faith; that he has laid this as the Foundation of his Law.

Mast.

Explain to me now, I pray thee, what is that Faith, of which thou hast here shewn me the Basis, and Foundation?

Sch.

Faith is the Gift of God, whereby our minds are so affected that we sincerely Believe all things, which God has taken care to De­clare unto us by his Prophets.

Mast.

What are those which they have declar'd to be Believ'd by us?

Sch.

Truly they are very many: But there are Thirteen Articles, [Page 5]which 'tis necessary that every man should Believe, that is joyn'd in com­munion with the Israelites. More­over 'tis necessary that his Belief of these Articles be known and mani­fest to all men: And whosoever shall deprave but one of them, he is declar'd to have deserted the Sy­nagogue, and to have renounc'd his Religion, neither shall he be any more called an Israelite.

Mast.

Recite these Thirteen Arti­cles, these Foundations of Pure Reli­gion, shew plainly what they are.

Sch.

This is the First, that we Believe that there is a God, the First Efficient Cause, And the Ʋlti­mate End of all things: That All things high, and low were Created, and are continually Sustain'd By Him: That All things have re­ceiv'd their Being at his Pleasure Alone, and at his Pleasure Alone they Perish: And that the Divine Essence is not diminisht by their de­struction, nor in the least alter'd [Page 6]sith its Fulness, and Perfection is of It self Alone, neither has he need of any other Being: For God Is Light, Power, and Eternal Life; Dominion, and Empire belongs to Him Alone, because He Alone TRULY IS, and enjoys Royal Ho­nour and Majesty.

Another is this, That this God who Made All things in Heaven a­bove, and in Earth beneath, is ONE, SIMPLE, or UNCOMPOUND­ED, so that nothing can be found within, nor with­out*That there were Many Worlds crea­ted by God is an As­sertion common a­mongst the Jewish Writers; which our Author here layes down as a thing not to be doubted, An­notante Ludovico de Compeigne de Veil. any World, which is SIMPLE, or UNCOM­POUNDED, in like manner, as GOD hath the At­tribute of SIM­PLICITY. This is that which we find written Deut. 6.4. Hear O Israel, the LORD Our God is One LORD.

The Third Fundamental Article is, That God being ONE whose Essence admits of no Kind of Mul­tiplicity, or Composition, is neither a Body, nor can be included within any Body: Agreeable to this is that Saying which we find written, Deut. 4.15. Ye saw no manner of Simili­tude.

The Fourth is, That nothing could Be Before this GOD SIM­PLE, and INCORPOREAL, But that He is the First, and the Last, as it is written, Isa. 44.6. I am the First, and I am the Last, and besides me there is no God: which the Great Prophet thus expounds, Deut. 33.27. The Eternal God is thy Refuge; that is to say, the Place of Refuge, in which the Israelites should acqui­esce, and repose all their Hopes, and all their Possessions, is th' Eter­nal God, whom nothing may be Compar'd, or Lik'ned unto. Hence the same Prophet presently after poures forth these words; Happy [Page 8]art thou, O Israel, who is like unto thee, O people saved by the LORD, the Shield of thy Help.

The Fifth is, That to th' Eter­nal God, the only Creator of All things, to Him Alone is Due Wor­ship, and Veneration, and to none besides Him, because All things were Created, and He is the Crea­tor: That it is not Lawful to Pray for any thing to any Created Na­ture, but we must still implore his Aid, who has the Soveraign Power, and Dominion over All things without exception: Whosoever Honours as a God either by Sacri­fices, or any Sacred Rites, or by Prayers, and Supplications, any King, or Angel, or any Power, whether Caelestial, or Terrestrial, that he shall be accursed, and given up to most horrid Torments.

The Sixth, That the Infinitely Good and Great God of his singu­lar Benignity, and Good Will, has chosen out of Mankind sometimes [Page 9]one, sometimes many fit persons, as it pleased him, them he Inspir'd with the knowledge of his Mind, discovering unto them things to come, that by them the desires, and actions of other men might be di­rected to true Godliness, and Ho­nesty.

The Seventh, That Moses did far excel in the Gift of Prophesie all the Prophets in all Ages: That all the Prophets that went before him, even the Patriarchs themselves, and those that lived near the same time, were inferiour to Moses in the Ex­cellency of Prophesie: That He it was whom the God of Jacob esteem­ed a fit person by whom he would give a Just Law to the Israelites, to cherish, and refresh their Souls: Moreover, that Moses arriv'd to that Degree of the Knowledge of God, which no other man could ever approach unto.

Mast.

Dost thou know how many ways the Prophesie of Moses differs [Page 10]from the Visions of the other Pro­phets?

Sch.

In four respects:

  • First, That God spake not to any other Pro­phet, but by an Angel, or Messen­ger separate from a Body; and he afforded His Presence to Moses, when he made known his Mind unto him, as we find it written, Num. 12.8. With him will I speak mouth to mouth.
  • Secondly, That the Spirit of Prophesie did take hold of every o­ther Prophet in Visions by night, or by day whilst he was in a kind of Slumber, that all his Senses were in a manner stupified, which indeed those words of Scripture do plainly declare, v. 6. I the Lord will make my self known unto him in a Dream: But of Moses we find it written, v. 7. My Servant Moses is not so — with him will I speak mouth to mouth.
  • Thirdly, That at the Breathing, of the Divine Spirit the strength of the other Prophets fail'd them, and their Senses were benum'd with [Page 11]horror: but Moses talked with God, as one man is wont to do with ano­ther, without any Trembling or sudden decay of strength.
  • Lastly, That Prophetick Visions were not given to other Interpre­ters of the Divine Will at what time soever they were pleas'd to re­ceive them, but when God accord­ing to his Secret Will was pleas'd to give them, and when they were duly prepar'd for them; but Moses was always prepar'd, and when he would he was Inspir'd with the Di­vine Wisdom, which we may clearly understand by that place of Scrip­ture, Num. 9.8. Stand still, and I will hear what the Lord will command concerning you.
Mast.

I hear what thou sayest, and do fully approve it. Now I would have thee return to the explication of the other Fundamental Points of the Law.

Sch.

The Eighth is, That all the Law from the first words, In the be­ginning, to the last, In the sight of all [Page 12]Israel, was written by Moses, as God had Dictated it unto him: and that there is no Distinction to be made betwixt these words, Exod. 20.2. I am the Lord thy Lord; And those Gen. 36.12. And Timna was Concu­bine, or any other of the like kind: that the Law is every way like it self: that every Verse, and every single Word is equally the Word of God.

The Ninth, That nothing must be added to, nor diminisht from the Law of Moses, no, not so much as one word, or letter, because it is expresly written, Deut. 12.32. Thou shalt not add thereto, nor diminish from it. For herein consists the Per­fection of any thing that nought can be added to it, nor taken from it: But the Law is absolutely Perfect, which the Royal Prophet declares in express terms, Psal. 9.8. The Law of the Lord is perfect: where­fore it does not Admit of any Addi­tion, or Diminution.

The Tenth, That the Infinitely God and Great God doth Behold the Actions of all men, and his Eyes are always upon them, which this Divine Oracle does expresly de­clare, Jer. 32.19. Great in Counsel and mighty in Work, for thine Eyes are open upon all the ways of the Sons of men: And that other Text of Scri­pture, Amos 4.13. And declareth unto man what is his thought. For if he knew the thoughts of man, how much more evident is it that He knows his Actions?

The Eleventh, That God deals with every man according to that kind of Life, which he leads here upon Earth; to those, who keep his Commandments he gives great Rewards, and infflicts great Punish­ments on those that Disobey him, sometimes in this World, some­times in that which is to come, and sometimes in both, according to their several works whether good, or evil: but that the chief Rewards, [Page 14]and the sharpest Punishments are deferr'd till they come to the other World.

The Twelveth is,—

The Thirteenth is, that at a set Time known only to God, it will come to pass that all the Dead shall Live again, that he who does not Believe this, has no Communion in Religion with the Jews; for we have it thus written in the Pro­phet Isa. 26.19. Thy Dead men shall Live, together with my Dead body shall they arise. Awake, and sing ye that dwell in the Dust. Dan. 12.2. And many of them that sleep in the Dust of the Earth shall Awake. But they are Righteous men, who shall be Judg'd fit for the enjoyment of this so great and desirable Good. I pray God we may be of their number, that God may give unto us Eternal [Page 15]Life, that we may be rais'd from the Dead, and live in his Sight.

Mast.

But what's the reason that thou judgest the Beginning or Origin of the World, to be the Root and Foun­dation of the Law, rather than one of those Thirteen Articles of Faith?

Sch.

Because where this is Be­lieved, that the World had a Be­ginning, we may easily infer the Possibility of Prophesie and Signs and Wonders, and the Gathering together of our People, scatter'd far and wide on the face of the Earth, and the Resurrection of the Dead, and of all things else that are contain'd in the Articles of our Religion. And every one may give a ready Answer, if he should be ask'd, why God has done this or that, or will do it, in such a Man­ner, to wit, As He Will'd or De­creed to Create, or Frame the Whole World after this Manner, rather than any other; so he Will'd and Decreed to Effect all [Page 16]these things, about which Debate in such a Manner, as seemed Best to his Infinite Wisdom. There­fore when in the Law there's a Precept given touching the Sab­bath, which puts us in mind of the Creation of the World, it is said, Exodus 31.17. It is a Sign, between me and the Children, of Israel for ever. The sense of which is this, This Sign is the stable Foundation and Support of the Covenant made between me and the Children of Israel, in whose hearts my Law is written, by which they are Distinguish'd from all other Peo­ple and Languages.

Mast.

The nature of Faith being thus Expounded, together with all those things that Depend on it, I would have thee now to explain unto me what that Hope is, which is joyn­ed with it, by whose help men may ar­rive to the enjoyment of the Sovereign Good in the World to come.

Sch.

Hope is a Divine Gift or Endowment, whereby our Mind becomes so Pure, and grows up to such an Height, that those De­lights of the Spirit, which are the Ultimate End or Satisfaction of all our Desires, we are Confident that we shall attain unto, not by our own Righteousness or Good works, but by the Infinite Mercy and Goodness of God towards us. And that whatsoever we shall Really have Need of, as to this present Life, we shall receive in Abund­ance from the Providence of God. For he gives with a liberal hand to all living creatures whatsoever their Nature requires. Let all Men therefore look up and trust in him, that giveth Food to every li­ving Creature in his due time, even to the vilest and most contemp­tible Worms and Flies.

Mast.

How must we behave our selves towards God, that we may re­ceive such blessings from him?

Sch.

As a Servant towards a Ma­ster, as a Child towards a Father; either of them if he expect any good thing from his Governour, labours with all his might that he may yield due observance unto him both in word and deed, both of them beg the good things they expect most earnestly and humbly: And it is most fit and just that we, whether as Children or Servants, should daily perform those Actions which are most acceptable to God, that our Conceptions should be right and orthodox, that our Works should be pious, that we should make our Supplications, and pour forth our Prayers unto God; for he will hear our Prayers and grant our Requests. Hope there­fore is the common Basis or Ground-work, which with the Di­vine Assistance is useful to us in the building up of all other Vertues. Hope fills the Mind with Peace and Tranquillity, and cherishes the [Page 19]Body with the purest and most last­ing pleasure. Hope conduceth to the Study of the Law, and to Ci­vil Conversation; for whosoever puts his whole trust and confidence in God, the grace and favour of God encompasseth him about con­tinually; his Feet shall not slip as those Men that are falling, being always in slippery places, who put their trust in any other thing but in God. This is that which the Anointed of the God of Jacob speaks, Psal. 37.3, 4, 5. Trust in the Lord and do good, so shalt thou dwell in the Land, and verily thou shalt be fed. Delight thy self in the LORD, and he shall give thee the desires of thy heart. Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him, and he shall bring it to pass.

Mast.

What shall his hope fail him that trusts in any other thing but in God?

Sch.

Yes surely, on whatsoever other thing a man relies, he relies [Page 20]on a broken Reed; for if he trust in his great Riches, they suddenly get wings and fly away. And they are always subject to innumerable casualties, and are often lost by some sudden chance. Now if he trust in his rare Knowledge and excellent Learning, lo a short Sickness weakens his Brain, and all his artificial subtil Knowledge comes to nothing. If in the mul­titude of Children, Friends, and Kindred, if in a faithful Wife, their Soul and Spirit is in the hand of God; it may come to pass that in a moment they may die, and so he's deprived of his support: and the same persons it may be whilest they live, for a small offence take up a great prejudice, and become Enemies. Besides, if he be redu­ced to a poor Condition, if he la­bour under any Disease, so that he cannot perform any business, nor provide Food and Raiment for his Family at home, he finds no­thing [Page 21]but brawling and contenti­on, and all his Friends and Ac­quaintants at once fail him; Prov. 19.7. All the Brethren of the Poor hate him; how much more do his Friends go far from him? More­over he becomes an Alien in the sight of the Man-servants and Maid-servants born in his House; for this was the Complaint of Job overwhelmed with Calamities, Job 19.17. My Breath is strange to my Wife, though I entreated for the Childrens sake of my own Body. It will be as great folly for any man to trust in his Bodily Strength, which some Disease may destroy in a moment. The Gout does but seize on some one Joynt, and pre­sently it keeps a Man at home in sadness and solitude, and will not permit him to put his Foot with­out the door. But it is not so with him who has his whole dependence upon God, for he will stand in awe of the Divine Majesty, but will [Page 22]not be awed by any thing else; he will yield Worship and the most humble Subjection to God alone. All his Hopes or Possessions are placed in God, and he will have a care that he give not that Affecti­on which is due to God onely, to a Creature like to himself. He will associate himself, and consult with Men how they may have Commu­nion in Worshiping the Creator, as they ought to do; but he will not be moved at their discord or dissention upon any occasion what­soever, and his thoughts are ad­vanced to such an height by his confidence in God, that he draws off his Mind from the frail and perishing things of this present World, and fixes his whole inten­tion upon the study of the Law and pure Religion; and this he does for the love of Piety, not fear of Punishment; and that he may pass over his Life in true peace and tranquillity of Mind, and may ob­tain [Page 23]in the other World, the most perfect and everlasting Joy and Sa­tisfaction.

Mast.

How ought a man to be thus qualified, that he may attain to the highest degree of this Vertue?

Sch.

Whoever aspires to this height, 'tis necessary that he ob­serve, and always keep in his mind these five things. First, that the infinitely good and great God does night and day, take care and pro­vide for the Sons of Men. And this is that which we find written Psal. 121.4. Behold, he that keepeth Is­rael shall neither slumber nor sleep. He must have as great a confidence in God as can be, and his Heart must never fail him.

He must also remember that the Mercy of God does infinitely ex­ceed the Mercy of all those Men, who have any tender concern for us, and that he takes care of our Affairs both in private and in pub­lick. And moreover that, all the [Page 24]kindness and good offices of other men towards us, do proceed from the love of our merciful God; for he it is that mov'd the hearts of men with compassion towards us, and stirs them up to use all di­ligence in providing for our safety and welfare. He disposes all things in a wonderful contexture and dependence of Cause one upon another; neither is it our Merit that we are so well provided for, but the mere Benignity and Free Mercy of God. From whence we may understand, that whatsoever happens to any of us, whether a small matter or a great, it is ap­pointed and determined by no other than the Great Ruler and Lord of All things. And also that All our Hope is to be fix'd in God, and that we have no Expectation from any other; for if any ones Hope depends upon another, he does as if he should trust with a double mind, which surely is a very [Page 25]great wickedness, because he joyns with the Aid or Assistance of Al­mighty God the Assistance of Man, who first consists of Flesh and Bloud, and after that is turned to Worms and Corruption. There­fore it is written Jer. 17.25. Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh Flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the Lord. More­over, he must have a Mind Chast and Pure, and firmly and con­stantly bent to do that which the Creator commands for the Honour of his Name; and as earnestly re­solv'd to avoid whatsoever he hath forbidden. We who put our Con­fidence in God, would have him to be Present with us, and really to Assist us at all times, and in all places. 'Tis therefore fit and just, that we should addict our selves to do his Will, as we are wont to do our own; yea to renounce our own Will when it stands in compe­tition with his. Whosoever shall [Page 26]most diligently observe this course of Life, God will give them all that they shall desire of him, and whatsoever they would have he will bring it to pass. But those who contemn the Word of God, and are refractory to his Com­mands, shall be branded with a Mark of Eternal Infamy. For this is that which we find written Job 27.8, 9. For what is the hope of the Hypocrite, though he hath gained, &c. will God hear his Cry? &c.

Lastly; we must exercise the whole strength of our Soul in im­ploring the Help of God, who ne­ver fails to assist them who call up­on him, if they call upon him from the bottom of their heart. For this is the scope and drift of that saying of the Psalmist, Ps. 10.17. Thou wilt prepare their heart; thou wilt cause thine ear to hear. Three times in a day at least, at Evening, Morning, and Noon, with bended Knees, with Hands lifted up to Heaven, and [Page 27]high aspiring thoughts, thou ought­est to make Prayers and Supplica­tions unto God, and before thou makest thy Prayers and Supplica­tions, to praise, extoll, and cele­brate the Divine Majesty with Hymns and Odes, and those Psalms which the most sweet Singer in Is­rael, and those Men of the great Synagogue did compose. Thou must not add any thing to them, nor make the least alteration in those Forms of Prayer, which have been constituted and appointed for our use by wise and holy Men; for if here thy Tongue falter in any thing, thou art involv'd in the guilt of a grievous error. Now whatsoever shall befall thee, whether it be Prosperity or Ad­versity, receive it chearfully from thy Creator, and give him thanks for the same, and set forth his Praise, and glorifie his Name; ac­cording to that which we see writ­ten Psalm 116.13. I will take the Cup [Page 28]of Salvation, and call upon the Name of the LORD. Ver. 3, 4. I found trouble and sorrow; then called I upon the Name of the LORD. There­fore let this be always in thy mouth; Such is the Mercy of God towards us, that whatsoever he doth unto us, he doth it for our good. And thou must give thanks to God always, and in all places, for all the Conveniences of this Life, for thy Meat and Drink, and for all things that thou enjoyest, using those Forms of Thanksgiving which our Doctors have compo­sed.

Mast.

Thou hast said enough touch­ing the nature of Faith and Hope; tell me now (I pray thee) what other thing is necessary for the conpleting of true Vertue, by which our Souls may attain to the Fulness of Eternal Joy.

Sch.

There is another Affection of the Mind: this is called Love or Charity.

Mast.

How dost thou define or ex­press the nature of this Affection?

Sch.

Love is a Divine Gift or Endowment, which when the LORD our God hath conferr'd on us, we love him as it is most fit and just, with a Love answerable to his Infinite Excellency and Perfection, and to his exceeding great Mercy and Goodness towards us. By this Affection we are engag'd to take the Yoke of the Law upon us, and to observe all the Divine Pre­cepts. By this we are constrained to study the good of all men, as Creatures made after the Image of God, and to help them upon all occasions according to the utmost of our power; for this is a great part of the Law. Be sure thou never do to another what thou wouldest not that any man should do unto the.

Mast.

But to love and to fear are two contrary things, and repugnant to each other; how can it be then that [Page 30]they who Fear God, and stand in Awe of him, should also love him?

Sch.

When a man deeply consi­ders, and most seriously meditates on the Frame and Making of so ma­ny, and so great, and so admirable Creatures; hereupon he presently apprehends, that the Force and Efficacy of the Divine Wisdom is Infinite, which he worshippeth, praiseth, magnifieth, and so he ve­hemently desires to have some, In­spection into the Divine Essence, most Powerful and Excellent. Those words of David, that most Religious King, have respect to this truth, Psal. 42.2. My Soul thirsteth for God, for the living God; therefore he applies his Mind to the thoughts of those things, and presently he draws off his Mind from them; he fears, he trembles, he perceives himself being of a Na­ture low, vile, obscure to force up his Understanding weak and im­perfect, to the ContemplatIon of a [Page 31]Mind most high and infinite in all Perfection; of which very thing David speaketh thus, Psal. 8.3, 4. When I consider thy Heavens, the work of thy Fingers, the Moon and the Stars which thou hast ordained: What is Man that thou art mindful of him? So it comes to pass, that a man at once Fears and Loves the Divine Majesty, and strictly ob­serves those two things which the Law prescribes, whereof one seems to be contrary to the other, to wit this, Deut. 6.5 Thou shalt Love the LORD thy God with all thy heart, &c. And that chap. 10. ver. 20. Thou shalt Fear the LORD thy God, him shalt thou serve, and to him shalt thou cleave. For this Fear mix'd with Love brings us to a syncere Union with God. For by these Affections we are induc'd to imi­tate Gods way of dealing with his Creatures; he shews himself in the Government of them full of Kindness and Benignity, Just and [Page 32]Faithful, (but these varieties of Affections are onely in the effects, for no Passion or Affection, proper­ly so call'd, can be attributed un­to God) therefore we must en­deavour most earnestly to have our Minds endued with the like dispo­sition, and by these steps to ascend to the true Holiness, as it is writ­ten in the Law, Lev. 19.2. Ye shall be holy, for I the Lord your God am holy.

Mast.

Is any other thing necessary for the obtaining of the Sovereign Good or true Happiness besides this twofold Love, of which thou hast spo­ken, viz. towards God and towards Men?

Sch.

On these two depends the whole Law; for that Deut. 6.5. Thou shalt Love the LORD thy God with all thy Heart, and with all thy Soul, and with all thy Strength; con­tains all those Precepts command­ing and forbidding, which declare what is the Duty of Man towards [Page 33]God. And this Lev. 19.18. Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thy self, in like manner comprises all those Precepts, which pertain to the Duty of every Man towards all other Men, concerning their lawful Commerce or Commutation of their Goods, and the avoiding of all Deceits, Capital Judgments, the Right of Marriage and Inherit­ance; which things the Divine Law contains as it hath respect to Human Society. There's nothing therefore which brings us into the favour of our Almighty LORD and Master, but the observance of those two Precepts, on which de­pend the Six hundred and thirteen.

Mast.

Is it necessary that we should imploy all our Heart, and all our Mind, and all our Strength, in the Exercise of our Love towards Men, which is contained in these words, Thou shalt love thy Neighbour as thy self, in like manner as we ought to do in the Exercise of our Love to­wards [Page 34]the Immortal God?

Sch.

Those two Loves being as it were two Pillars to support the Law, the Exercise of them must needs be of equal necessity; but our Love towards God does with­out all doubt require the whole Heart, and Mind, and Strength; which is the same as if thou shouldst say, That to this end that we might rightly observe the Com­mandments of God, that we may reject and cast out of our minds all vain Thoughts and false Conceits, it is necessary that our Heart be en­flam'd with the Fire of Divine Love, and that it be affected with a certain kind of Fear and Reve­rence, so that rather than we would be disobedient to the Admonitions and Precepts of God, we would choose to have our Lives taken from us, so far should we be from doing any thing contrary to the Divine Law, for fear of the Loss of our Estate. In a word, that if [Page 35]we be in danger to be deprived of our Lives, our Fortunes, and all things which in this Life are most dear unto us, this our Love to­wards God should restrain us from doing any thing contrary to the Commandmets of our LORD and Governour. Therefore our Love towards Men also requires our Heart, and Mind, and Strength.

Mast.

Thou must needs give some light to those thy last words, and ex­pound to me how far those three (Heart, Mind, and Strength) are re­quir'd for the due performance of our Love towards Men.

Sch.

As for the Heart it is re­quir'd that we do not conceive the least hatred in our Heart against any Man, of which the Law speak­eth expresly, Lev. 19.17. Thou shalt not hate thy Brother in thine Heart. For that Hatred which is laid up in the depths of the Heart, for the most part proceeds from Envy; which Hatred carries in it far [Page 36]greater Bitterness, than that which hath its rise from an injury recei­ved, from any Wrangling or Con­tention, or any other thing of the like nature. For the cause of this kind of Hatred being remov'd, that Hot Freth is presently taken away also, and so there is a reme­dy for it. But there can no re­medy be found out for that Hatred which proceeds from Envy; that is always stirring up of Strife, and loathsom Brawlings and Contenti­ons; that destroyed the second Temple, which was not as the first, defiled with Idolatry, Whore­dom, Adultery, Incest, and Mur­der; that hath expell'd the Rem­nant of the Jews from their own Borders, and those Israelites which are yet in the World, it keeps even to this day in Captivity and Exile. Moreover, this was it which caus'd the Expulsion of our People from so many places; this was the cause of all the Calamities, Miseries, and [Page 37]Distresses, which we have suffer'd from the beginning of that most grievous Captivity to this very day; and this still breaths forth a Smoke so thick and so loathsom, that it threatens an Universal De­struction. And that Hatred fix'd in the Heart is called Hatred with­out consideration, (Odium Temerari­um;) for it seizes on a Mans Heart from no other cause but mere En­vy: but this is the most grievous and abominable of all the several kinds of Hatred, because in it there is double Iniquity, Propense Ma­lice, which urges to destroy a man; and Malignity or Ill Will, whereby the Heart is infected or poyson'd. Therefore these words are inclu­ded in the Commandment, with all thine heart; for that is not onely a Mans Duty to be free from the guilt of all such Inhumanity, but also to love every man truly and heartily, to have a perfect abhor­rence from all kind of Envy, Strife, [Page 38]and Contention. This is to Love with all thine Heart. There is an­other kind of Hatred, when one man has in his mind an Aversion to another not from Envy or any private Grudge, but upon account of the cross Manners and ill Dispo­sition of that man to whom he has an Aversion; for the Likeness in Manners does of it self beget a mutual Affection between men; so on the contrary the Disagreement in manners and natural inclinations begets Hatred; which is not so bit­ter as that Hatred which we have al­ready spoken of, but yet it is no easie matter to root it out, therefore we are admonish'd that we keep our selves far from it. For that (with all thy Mind) implies this sence, If any ones manners do not agree with thy Genius, however thou oughtest to bear with him, and to love him; for God surely is worthy, for whose sake thou shouldst do this. The third kind of Hatred is that which proceeds [Page 39]from the immoderate desire of Ri­ches; and to this are those words to be referr'd, and with all thy Strength. Under this kind of Hatred is com­prehended that which Workmen (especially if they are of the same Trade) are apt to conceive one a­gainst another. For Artificers for the most part hate those that addict themselves to the same Art, which we are forbidden to do. And indeed if any Artificer think with himself, that all gifts or endowments, riches and honours, come from the ONE True God, nor can that be the portion of one which he hath de­creed to bestow on another, he will be so far from hating those of his own Profession, that he will rather love them the more, as those that are like him in their course of life. If it so happen that any difference or contention do arise between two men, they may go to Law and plead their Cause, and when the Judge after a full hearing hath [Page 40]determined the Controversie, they should each of them lay aside the person of an Adversary. For the whole Company of the Israelites are like the Body of one and the same distributed into its several parts; but it would be a great madness, in case one Member should by some accident be the cause of some pain to another, for a man in revenge to the part or member offended, to hurt the other part. In like manner, if one man offend another, the person offended ought not to revenge the injury nor to retain any bitter resentments of it; but presently to forgive the Of­fender, and to pray unto God to be merciful to him. This was our ancient Father Abraham's way, as we find it written Gen. 20.17. So Abraham prayed unto God, and God healed Abimelech. Moreover, let every man think seriously of this, that we who never pass over one day, wherein we do not commit [Page 41]some Offence against God, do ne­vertheless find that he is still mer­ciful and gracious unto us. Where­fore if we are his Children, as it is written Deut. 14.1. Ye a [...]e the Children of the LORD your God. If it be our duty to be like to him, we ought surely to be as he is, rea­dy to pardon, and slow to anger; for whosoever is averse from wrath, that is, the desire of re­venge, his sins are forgiven him; God deals with him as he does with those men that have trespass'd against him. We must also endea­vour upon all occasions to con­vince one another with such words, as are most apt to turn away 2 mans mind from all iniquity, lest we should so carry our selves, as to incurr the guilt of the sins that another man hath committed in thought, word, or deed. In this threefold way of acting we should do what we can for the good of one another; for this is the meaning of [Page 42]that passage in the Law, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thy self. What­soever things are pleasant and de­lightsem unto thee, these thou oughtest to endeavour as much as in thee lies, to procure for all those persons that are of thine acquaint­ance, to reconcile Man and Wife that have been at variance, to pre­serve the peace of thy Country. This is that which we find written Psal. 34.14. Seek peace and pursue it. These same persons thou oughtest also to serve with thy thoughts, that is to say, to desire most syncerely that they may be really advantaged by thee; and thou oughtest as con­stantly to pray unto God for their prosperity as for thine own.

Mast.

Thou hast discoursed at large of those two places, wherein all the Law is contained, and consequently our whole duty towards God and to­wards Men. It remains that thou shouldst now declare what, and how many, are those Seeds of Sin, which [Page 43]we ought with all possible care to avoid, lest they hinder us from the at­tainment of the chief Object of our Hope, the Sovereign Good, or the onely True Happiness.

Sch.

The Seed of Sin is three­fold, Obstinacy or Wilfulness, Im­prudence, and Rebellion.

Mast.

What is that which thou cal­lest Wilfulness?

Sch.

The Heart and much of every man is evil from his Child­hood; he cares for nothing but what he conceits will be for his own end, being prone to Lust, and wholly addicted to the satisfaction of his own Inordinate Will; he is so eagerly desirous of Temporal Pleasures, that he does not distin­guish between those that are Law­ful, and those that are absolutely Sinful, so that he may fulfill his sensual desires. When a man does any thing merely to enjoy his plea­sure, and having a perfect know­ledge that what he does is contrary [Page 44]to the Law of God, yet neverthe­less gives way to his inclinations; this is said to be done obstinately or wilfully.

Mast.

But what is that which thou callest Imprudence?

Sch.

Of this I may rightly say there are two kinds. One consists in the fact or thing done; as if a man being ignorant that such a thing is unlawful to be done, un­dertakes to do it because he thought that the doing of it was lawful; For who can understand his Errors? The other is, when any man through Incogitancy or want of Consideration gives up himself to affect such things, which are not in their own nature exceeding wic­ked; but yet it is a part of Vertue to abstain from them. Of this kind are the desires to commit a sin, the speaking of idle words, the taking of too much pleasure in things lawful, and the like; for all these do as it were make a man [Page 45]abash'd at the thought of God his Creator, so that he cannot with any intention apply his mind to the Contemplation of him, nor yield unto him that Worship and Reverence which he requires. Their nature and tendency are such, that they insensibly bring a man to a Habit of wickedness, and involve him in these seven Vices which God hates and abominates, and which cast a man down from the state of a sound mind, and at once deprive him of Life in this World, and in the World to come.

Mast.

What are these seven abo­minable Vices?

Sch.

These are as it were seven Bodies of the Tree of Perversness or Iniquity, grown up to a great height, from whose Branches all sorts of wickedness spring forth. And indeed in the beginning they seem to be light and of little mo­ment, that a man should have any [Page 46]great care to avoid them; but af­terward they most grievcusly op­press a man that yields obedience unto them, and such is their hor­rid force, that it can hardly be, but that he whom they have once depraved becomes incorrigible, for they stain the Soul with the deepest Tincture of Impiety. Wherefore whosoever to keep his mind in a good temper, must with all dili­gence endeavour to avoid those vices, Sloth, Pride, Gluttony, Lust, or the inordinate desire of Corpo­real Pleasures, Anger, or the de­sire of Revenge, Covetousness, Envy; to which some vices the Prophets attributed seven other names, to wit these, Evil, Uncir­cumcised, Unclean, Enemy, the Stumbling Block.&c.

Mast.

Those things which thou hast now spoken of need some explication; wherefore declare the force and nature of every one of these seven vices, and show how those Names which thou [Page 47]laidst down but now, do answer to those Names or Appellations which the Prophets impes'd on the same Vi­ces.

Sch.

Sloth is a vice which so affects a man, that wholly neglect­ing his duty to keep his Mind in a right temper, he sits idle and care­less, and turns his thoguhts to vain frivolous Objects, from medita­ting on the Law of God, from ob­serving his Precepts, and doing the works which he enjoyns us un­to. This is the Fountain of all Vices, and therefore it is called Evil. For this is the meaning of that passage in the Law, Gen. 8.21. The imagination of mans heart is evil from his youth. Such a Creature is Man, he would rather give up him­self to idleness, than take any pains to render his Nature perfect and accomplish'd, neither does he rightly understand wherein the Perfection and Accomplishment of his Mind does consist. And that [Page 48]man is possest with this vice, who loves to be perpetually playing at Dice or Cards, or to be at some other sport; for this does not con­tribute any thing to the advantage of the Commonwealth. Whereas a mans Life is not given him but for this end, that he may spend it in mediating day and night on the Law of God, and in the Exercise of Charity, or in Merchandizing, or in the management of some Me­chanick Art, or in doing some other work which may conduce to the Conservation of the World. A Gamester therefore is in the number of those men, which are not fit to bear to Office of a Judge.

Pride is a Kingdom without a Diadem; thou maist see a man car­rying himself in a lofty manner, as if it were beneath him to hear, or see or take any notice of what is said or done in his presence. But why should Man arrogate so [Page 49]much to himself, who shall one day be turn'd into Worms and Cor­ruption, who fadeth like a Flower, and like Smoke vanisheth away? Therefore the man that is possest with this vice is called Ʋncircumci­sed. Hence is that of the Law, Deut. 10.16. Circumcise the foreskin of your heart. At first Pride stirs up Hatred; all men reject and ab­hor it, for there may be some suit­ableness or agreement with other things, but with Pride it is impos­sible there should be any. From dislike or hatred it comes to pass that men relinquish Society, and keep themselves at a distance from one another, and from hence pro­ceeds ruine and desolation. By this it is manifest, that a proud man is the destruction of a Body Politick, and the disorder of the World. If a proud man be so odious to us here below, sure he is much more odious to the blessed Spirits above; for whosoever is [Page 50]abhorred of all other men, God al­so is displeased with him.

He is said to be a Glutton, in whom there is an insatiable desire of Feasting, that the later Feasts may be more sumptuous than the former; for it is a vehment desire or longing in the bowels of wicked men, who have frequently such Speeches as this in their mouths, Let us eat and drink, for to morrow weshall die; for they live to eat, not eat to live. In the mean time the Belly of such wicked persons is extreme needy; for not one of them when he goes out of this world, has obtained the half part of the things he had desir'd and long'd for. Such a man is call'd unclean; for in as much as we read Psal. 51.12. Create in me a clean heart, O God, 'tis manifest that there is something unclean. But this vice is as it were a stream of filthiness, from whence Pollutions continually flow. This overwhelms [Page 51]a man with all manner of Impu­rities.

Now by Lust we are to under­stand an unbridled desire of Cor­poreal Pleasures; this is an ex­treme and exceeding great wicked­ness. 'Tis called Enemy, for those words may have some meaning that refers to this vice, Prov. 25.21. If thine Enemy be hungry, give him bread to eat; and if he be thir­sty, give hive water to drink. For this wicked desire is a mans greatest Enemy; it brings death to his Soul, because it forces him to com­mit such horrid impieties, which enkindle the wrath of the Divine Majesty against him. A man gi­ven up to his Lust is hated of God; for God is holy, and all wanton­ness and impurity is an abominati­on unto him. This man is also ha­ted of Men, for all have an Aver­sion to such a man, who has no re­gard of his own or others Honour and Reputation. These words [Page 52]may therefore be thus interpret­ed, If the ravenous Appetite of this Enemy should excite thee to wickedness, see thou satisfie him with the Bread of the Divine Law, and the Drink of true Repent­ance, and of the Fear of God; this way thou shalt heap coals of fire upon his head, and shalt re­ceive an ample Reward. Briefly and pertinently spake the wise men of old, If thou meetest with any lewd obscene fellow, constrain him to go with thee to the School which is ap­pointed to expound the Divine Law. God will give thee a reward, who is most bountiful in his Gifts.

Anger is a burning desire of re­venge, whereby a man is as it were all in flames. This is called a Stumbling-block; for of this the Prophet spake when he said, Isaiah 57.14. Take up the stumbling block out of the way of my people. The mind of a man that is enraged and full of Anger, runs violently upon [Page 53]that which is hurtful, and should be avoided as a Ship that is dash'd upon a rock. If a man be not slow to anger, patient, and long-suffer­ing, he renders his own Life, and the lives of others, very mise­rable.

Covetousness is a vast desire deeply fixed in the heart of heap­ing up Riches. This stands in op­position to Liberality as a hard rock in the heart of a Man; the rock yields not a drop of water, nor is moved out of its place by the violence of the winds; so a cove­tous man he hearkens not to those that advise him to relieve the ne­cessities of the Poor, or to do any Office of Charity, that may tend in the least to his detriment. For he is of such a mind, that Riches are much more dear to him than his Soul and Body. And for this cause he is called a Stone. Hence it is that the Prophet speaks, I will take away the stony heart out of your [Page 54]flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh, Ezech. 36.26.

Envy is such an ill disposition of the Mind, whereby a man is so affected that he grieves for the Prosperity of others, and rejoy­ceth in their Calamity. Such a man is like a Basilisk, which hor­rid Monster breaths forth poison, whereas it gets nothing thereby. And a Basilisk sends forth from his eyes poison generated in its heart; so that the eyes of the envious man discover the flame that his Heart hath conceived.

Lo these seven Trunks or full grown Bodies of Iniquity, which when thy Soul shall be all fastned unto, though it be through impru­dence and ignorance of the mis­chievous nature of them; never­theless thou shalt by little and little be drawn aside, so that thou shalt incur the guilt of the most horrid Impieties, and break that Silver Cord, and that Bond whereby [Page 55]Mortals are joyned to the Immor­tal God; for so it is that one sin flows upon another.

These vices do of themselves infect and poison the Soul, and at length they involve it in the guilt of those Impieties, which are the greatest abomination unto God. For as it is written Prov. 6.16. Six things doth the Lord hate, yea seven are an abomination unto him.

By which words we may under­stand this, that whosoever hath his Soul possest with those seven most horrid Vices which I have reckoned up, he will be induced to these six most abominable Impieties, which are so odious unto God, and to do those four primary Mischiefs, whose Cries for vengeance pierce the Heavens, till they deprive the guilty person of his Life both in this and in the other world.

Mast.

What are those six most abo­ninable wickednesses or impieties, which are so odious unto God?

Sch.

The first is, if a man shall most impudently take up such a conceit, that he shall attain Eternal Life, although he omit the per­formance of those Command­ments, which God has absolutely and indispensably joyned him un­to. Another is this, If he distrust the Goodness and Mercy of God, and so conceits that now after he has committed so many crimes, there is no hope left for him, that the Divine Majesty has no hands to be stretched out to those that re­turn into the Paths of Righteous­ness, that he has no compassion for those that have been heinously wic­ked. But if a man be guilty of all manner of wickedness, and with a broken Heart and contrite Spirit beg pardon of God, he will find him to be a God merciful and gra­cious, and easie to be intreated. For God desires not the death of a Sinner, but rather that he turn from the ways of Sin and Corrup­tion, [Page 57]unto soundness and integrity of Life. Is there any of us that has been guilty of so many, so great, and so heinous Offences against God as Manasses was, who made it his business to enflame the wrath of God? but even of him we find it written 2 Chron. 33.13. And prayed unto him, and he was in­treated of him, &c. The third is, when a man resists the truth known, and perceived fully that he may pour out his mind upon sin, and vanity and be wholly addicted to a licentious course of life. The fourth is, To envy another for the Gifts which God has bestowed on him, as Cain envied Abel because God had respect to his Offer­ing.

Mast.

But how does this kind of Envy differ from that which thou hast put in the number of the seven Vices, which are so abominated of God?

Sch.

The difference is, that this Grief or Sickness of Mind does [Page 58]arise from the Observances of those Spiritual Advantages, which a man sees by the Divine Bounty to be conferr'd on others for their well-doing. Of this nature was the ill will of Cain against Abel; for when a man envies another in such manner, he has a foolish con­ceit that he comes not behind any one in good works, and yet he has not received the same reward with others, that so the Supreme Judge has respect of persons, he grieves that he has lived so well, and bends himself to the destruction of ano­ther, who is more beloved of God than himself. In this manner Saul envied David. But that Envy we have formerly spoken of, is the Grief which a man conceives when he sees another man grow Rich or Honourable, &c. And for the most part this kind of Envy falls upon the Spirits of Women, and persons of weak understanding; neither does it like this, urge a man [Page 59]to commit the most horrid wicked­ness.

Mast.

I have heard thy distinction, and most heartily approve it; it re­mains that thou explain the other two most abominable impieties above men­tioned.

Sch.

The Fifth is, if any man remain stubbornly and pertinaci­ously in his own Opinion, even then when men in the highest Authority dissent from him, he is every where called an Old Rebel. He deliver his own Sentiments to be followed by others; of this man we find it written Deut. 17.12. And the man that will do presumptuously. The Sixth is, For a man to be delibe­rate, and to be fixed in his resolu­tion, that he will never repent, but that he will die in his sins.

Mast.

But what are those four pri­mary Mischiefs, which cry aloud unto God for vengeance?

Sch.

The first is if one man kill another willingly and knowingly, [Page 60]for the Altar it self affords no safe­ty to a Murderer; for it is writ­ten in the Law, Exod. 21.14. But if a man come presumptuously upon his neighbour, to slay him with guile, thou stalt take him from mine Altar that he may die. To the same effect is that spoken in the Law, Gen. 4.10. The voice of thy Brothers bloud crieth unto me.

The next is, to defile another mans bed, of which sin it is writ­ten Prov. 6.28, 29. Can one go upon hot coals, and his feet not be burnt? So he that goes in to his neighbours wife. Whosoever toucheth her shall not be innocent.

The third is, the oppressing of the Poor, the forcing the hungry and needy to weeping and wailing; concerning which thus speaks the Divine Oracle, Psal. 12.5. Now will I arise, saith the Lord.

The fourth, to defraud the Hireling of his wages, for that is the same as to deject his Spirits, [Page 61]and make his heart to fail him. To this pertains that of the Law, Deut. 24.15. For he is poor, and set­teth his heart upon it. He that is addicted to these horrible Crimes, and to these seven Vices which are so hated of God, he presently en­tangles himself in Rebellion, the third stock or complication of Ini­quity; that is to say, he knows his Lords will, and of set purpose acts that which is most contrary unto it. There remains no safety, no hope for such a man; for what, how shall he escape, who when he understands what his Lord would have him to do, does the contrary with all his might? Surely his Lords wrath shall burn against him; he will break a Rod of Iron over him; he will bring him into judgment, nor will he suffer him o go unpunished.

Mast.

What, doth not Repentance profit a man that has been guilty of Rebellion, which proves a Soveraign [Page 62]Medicine for Impudence and Obsti­nacy?

Sch. Doubtless there's great vertue and efficacy in Penitence, Affliction of Mind, Prayer, and Good Works; there's no Sin but what will be forgiven him that rightly performs these Duties, and the Hand of God is always stretch­ed forth, to receive those who re­turn into the Paths of Righteous­ness. But there is somewhat more required of him that is stain'd with the guilt of Rebellion, he must re­tain those excellent Advocates to plead for him, the continual Me­ditation of the Divine Law, and the most earnest study of Good­ness and Righteousness, by whose help his Prayer and Penitence be­comes acceptable to God. His Wickedness and Concupiscence keep him at a great distance from God, and hinder the access of his Prayers. Now he that will be cur'd of the Sickness of his Soul, [Page 63]should take the same course with him who labours under any Di­stemper of Body, for he goes to the Physician, of whom he may learn what he must do to recover his Health. In like manner he that is sick in his Soul, should apply himself to some wise man, that has the skill to shew him how he may be cur'd. But sith the Medicine of the Body is so prepar'd, that it is contrary to the nature of the Dis­ease; it follows that the Physician of the Soul must also seek out such Remedies which resist the nature of Concupiscence, which is predo­minant in a diseased Soul.

Mast.

Tell now, I pray thee, what are those Studies and Inclinations, which are opposed to those seven Bodies of Iniquity, which at first footh and flatter, but at length insult and domi­neer intolerably.

Sch.

To Sloth is opposed Dili­gence, to Pride Humility, to Glut­tony the Macerating of the Body [Page 64]by Fasting and Abstinence from delicate Meats, to Lust the despi­sing of Sensual Pleasures, to Wrath­fulness Lenity and Patience, and a certain kind of hardness of Sense, rendering it unapt to take Impressi­ons from the sharpest Reproaches; to Covetousness Beneficence and Liberality, to Envy Benevolence or good will to all men. But now it is necessary that thou spend much time in bending thy mind with all thy force to that temper and dispo­sition, which is most contrary to Lust, till a long continued practice shall apply thy mind to this side, and thou shalt perceive thy Physick works too much, and that thou art in a tendency to the other Ex­treme, and so thou must go back a little, and fix thy self in the laud­able Mean which lies betwixt two Extremes, by the advice and per­suasion of that wise man, whom thou shalt make choice of to be thy Spiritual Guide and Instructer.

Mast.

Is there any thing besides those several things which thou hast now reckoned up necessary for our assistance in combating our Enemy. Concupiscence, which is always burn­ing and urging us to commit wicked­nese?

Sch.

Yes surely, it is necessary that the Mercy and Grace of God help and strengthen us, and deli­ver our Souls from the power of Hell, which will be ever present with us, if we pour out our Pray­ers unto God with our whole Hearts, and give up our selves en­tirely to the study of true Vertue and Godliness; for God draws nigh unto them who call upon him, and he never denies his Assistance to those whose Endeavours are good and upright. Thus he will give Fortitude to resists Sloth and Idleness, he will endue us with the Fear of his Infinite Majesty to sub­due our Pride, he will give us Temperance in opposition to Glut­tony, [Page 66]a wise and solid Mind in op­position to Lust, a sound Judgment and Knowledge of the proper use of Riches in opposition to Cove­tousness, universal Kindness in op­position to Envy. Moreover, he will fill us with the fruit of those Virtues, which at once delights the Soul, cherishes the Limbs, yea and heals with its Balm every Malady of the Body, so it will come to pass, that we shall enjoy great peace and tranquillity, and even in this Life we shall have some fore-taste of the pleasures of the World to come; and after Death we shall be advanced to the high and Illustri­ous Dignity of Holy Men, and to­gether with them shall live for ever in Paradice, in the full enjoyment of all manner of Delights and Sa­tisfactions.

Mast.

But I pray thee, what is that so sweet and pleasant fruit?

Sch.

Love, Joy, Peace, Dili­gence, Innocence, Chastity, Conti­nence, [Page 67]Sanctity, Meekness, and that Fear of God which arises from the knowledge of the Excellency of the Creation, and the obser­vance of the Divine Wisdom in governing the World; and also true Piety and Devotion, and final­ly the Inspiration of the Divine Spirit. For when we shall be ta­ken off from the Wine of the Earth, and from all obscene plea­sures, then God will communicate his secret unto us, and that Power which will bring the Heart into an excellent frame, and at once illu­strate Delights, satisfie the three parts or faculties of the Soul, and will impart unto us those three Gifts, which are the root and prin­ciple of the Persuasion, or lively sence of the Truth, and the foun­dation of the Law; from whence it comes to pass, that even whilest we are inclosed in this earthly, ob­scure, darksom Body, we behold the heavenly light; neither do we [Page 68]like those that are blind and walk in darkness.

Mast.

The words thou hast spoken need some explication; and first what are those three parts of the Soul?

Sch.

Wit or Understanding, Will, and Memory.

Mast.

But which are those three Gifts on which the persuasion or live­ly sence of the truth depends?

Sch.

Faith, Hope, and Charity, of which I spake but now.

Mast.

But what? is it of any mo­m [...]nt whether a man apprehend those things as thou dost now, my dear Scho­lar, onely by what he hath heard, or whether he have a clear knowledge and comprehension of them, after those three Gifts are communicated to the Soul, which thou spokest of but now?

Sch.

I am not able to give an Answer to this Question, for a Blind man cannot judge of Light; but I am of this mind, that the knowledge of these things which are certain, and grounded upon [Page 69]experience, is far more excellent that that which is onely gotten by hearing them discours'd of: Even so as if it should be said to any one, Believe that there are an hundred Pieces of Gold in that Purse, which thou art not permitted to see or touch, but they are provided for thy use, to supply thy necessities; he should not be so well dealt with, as if it were granted to him that he should see the Money, and take out part of it for his present occa­sions, and look upon it, and make use of it at his pleasure; for then indeed he would have a certain knowledge that the Money was laid up for his use. Wherefore I apply my self to you, most wise and learned Sir, that I may be di­rected by your Precepts and Instru­ctions, and may be well grounded in your Principles. Shew me, I pray you, the right way how I may yield syncere obedience to the will of my Creator. Teach me how I [Page 70]may perceive the Infinite Excellen­cy of my Creator, my King, and my God, so far as 'tis possible, for a Man born of a Woman, be­ing of so weak understanding whi­lest he remains in this world, use your utmost endeavour that no sin­ful Affections, nor any defect of Knowledge, may call me back from those holy purposes and intentions, for I was born to this end, that I might persevere in the perform­ance of them.

Mast.

I pray God, by whose provi­dence thou art come hither, to make thy coming prosperous unto thee; hap­py is the Woman that brought thee in­to the world. Surely thou wilt be a comfort to thy Parents; thy speech hath filled me with joy. And I doubt not but one day thou wilt make thy self an example of the highest virtue in Ephrata, and illuminate Judaea with thy Instructions. Now therefore I desire that thou wouldst hearken dili­gently to my words, and lay up my [Page 71]precepts in thy heart, and never de­part from them; for if thou wilt give ear to me with all possible attention, I shall furnish thy mind with such coun­sels as shall most certainly conduct thee to the paths of true wisdom.

Sch.

Speak, Sir, for thy Servant heareth. I have firmly resolved to observe your directions; I will keep my feet from every evil way, that I may follow your Instructi­ons, for my Mind thirsteth most vehemently after your precepts. Do your endeavour then according to the uprightness of your heart, to bring me to that good way, where I may be quiet from fear of evil.

Mast.

Mind this in the first place, my beloved Scholar, that the Fear of God is the root and principle of all Divine Notions and Doctrines; in which as in a large Treasury they are all virtually contained. But that he who has not this fear in his heart, is not fit to be admitted into those Schools [Page 72]that are appointed for the Exposition of the Divine Law, lest he add sin to sin. For so it is, that whosoever has the true fear and reverence of God, the doctrine of the Divine Law will be unto him as a wholesom Medicine. But on the contrary, to him that is void of this Godly Fear, it proves to be deadly poison; for such a man is more cruel than the wild Beasts, as one that abuses the knowledge of the Di­vine Law, and makes it the instru­ment of Malice and Deceit. Where­fore have a care that thou turn not from the right way, turn not to the right hand nor to the left, from the way of that fear we have mentioned, Deut. 6.18. Thou shalt fear the Lord thy God. Now in this point of the Law it is to be understood, that we must reverence the Disciples of wise men, for they will hold forth a Light to thy mind, they will bring thee up in the right way, and instruct thee how to perform every duty, according to the Rule of the Divine Law, which [Page 73]they will clearly expound unto thee. Secondly, learn this, of which I would have thee fully persuaded, Whosoever is approved of Men, has a good sign that he is acceptable to God; for he has the Fear of God before his eyes both in private and in publick. Where­fore every man ought to devote him­self to this Fear, and to behave him­self so, that he may be beloved of all Men, and be the delight of his Breth­ren. Have a care that thou yield not such respect to any man, which may make thee to forsake the Truth; dis­regard all things in comparison of this, for God is holy, and his seal is Truth. Now whatsoever it shall please God the Creator to dispense unto thee, let that satisfie thee, whether it be little or much. Take this for certain, that he is the rich man who lives chearfully, being always content with his own con­dition. But he that abounds with wealth, if he be often vexed and di­sturbed, and sollicitous about the get­ting of more, he is in no wise to be ac­counted a rich man.

Devote every action to the glory of God; let all things have reference to the honour of the Almighty Creator; by the continual changes and alterati­ons incident to this life, be stirred up to the contemplation and acknowledg­ment of thy Creator, going, lying, ri­sing. As for instance, when thou ta­kest thy Meat, think with thy self that thy Meat is so prepared for thee by the infinite wisdom of God, that it has such a quality, that it is turn'd into the substance of thy body. When thou goest to bed, consider that it is by the Divine Bounty that we Mortals enjoy our sleep, which gives rest to our Bo­dies, and renews their strength, that we may be more able to perform the solemn Worship of God, and to do the works of our vocation. Reflect in like manner on the other Functions of the Body, for which be thankful and give glory to God. Thus whatsoever thou doest, thou oughtst to do it with refer­ence to God, who will continually pro­vide for thee, and prosper thee in all [Page 75]thy affairs; he will make all thy ways streight, he will keep thy feet from every path, that would lead thee aside to the right hand or to the left.

Moreover, in all that thou coest, whether in publick or in private, see thou most strictly and carefully observe the Laws of perfect Chastity and Mo­desty; for Wisdom always accompanies those that are of a clean heart.

Take heed to thy self, and use all diligence to avoid the company of wic­ked men, for every one is led by his Companion to vice or virtue, and God abominates all works of iniquity, and all vicious persons. Have a care there­fore that thou never joyn thy self in counsel with such men, nor tread in their steps, whose feet are swift to do mischief. And be confident of this, that if thou hast any familiar intimate conversation with them, although thou dost not imitate their practices; ne­vertheless God will disappoint thy un­dertakings, and both the Love and Holy Fear of the Divine Majesty will [Page 76]at once slide out of thine heart, and all thy ways shall be full of windings and turnings, and inexplicable diffi­culties. Fly from sin, avoid all vice and impurity, and whatsoever has any appearance thereof. Be vigilant and circumspect continually, that thou may­est not fall under the suspicion of any abominable practice. Study to oblige every man, and be not backward to those that stand in need of thy help, according to thy power, so that thou do nothing contrary to the Law of God. For if it come to pass that any man, thy Father, thy Mother, thy Teacher or Instructor, yea thy Prince, though he be the most potent Monarch in the world, should command thee to do any thing contrary to the Law of God, do not obey him, not give ear unto his words; let not the Authority of any man prevail with thee as much as the Divine Majesty. But let the Power of God and his dreadful Tribunal be­get in thee far greater terror, than the Edicts or fierce Threatnings of any [Page 77]King. If thou shalt lead thy life ac­cording to these precepts, God will meet with thy expectations, and defend thee from the snare that any one has laid for thee, and from every evil accident: thou shalt overthrow great and strong Lions, Serpents, and Draggons thou shalt tread under thy feet, and be de­livered from all dangers. Now be­cause thou art so desirous to perceive the secrets of the Divine Law, see thou come every day to my House; I will not grudge to instruct thee all the day long, how thou mayest attain to the perfection of true Virtue and God­liness. Go to then my Son, prepare all the faculties of thy Soul, and from the bottom of thy heart with the most ar­dent devotion pray unto God, that he would open unto thee the Gates of Knowledge and Wisdom. Get the know­ledge get the knowledfe of God; this is the only thing in which thou mayst glory if thou wilt glory in any thing, Fear God and keep his Commandments, for this is the whole Duty of Man.

FINIS.

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