THE Compleat Cook: OR, The Whole ART of COOKERY. DESCRIBING The Best and Newest Ways of Orde­ri [...] and Dressing all sorts of Flesh, Fish, and Fowl, whether boiled, baked, stew­ed, roasted, broiled, frigacied, fryed, souc'd, marrinated, or pickled; with their proper Sauces and Garnishes.

TOGETHER VVith all manner of the most Approved Soops and Potages used, either in England or France.

By T. P. J. P. R. C. N. B. And several other approved Cooks of London and Westminster.

LONDON, Printed, and Sold by G. Conyers at the Golden Ring in Little-Britain, over against Bar­tholomew's-Close-Gate, 1694.

THE EPISTLE TO The Lovers of the Ar [...] OF Cookery.

WE do here present you with the plainest and [...]est digested Method in the Art of Cookery yet extant, [...]r Dressing of all sorts of [Page] Flesh, Fish, Fowl, whether Boil'd, Baked, Stewed, Roast­ed, Broil'd, Frigassi'd, Fryed, Marrinated or Souced; with the best Sauces, New A-la [...] mode, Soops and Potages It's full and plain, so tha [...] from the Maid to the Master Cook all may reap benefit Farewel.

How to Boil all sorts of FISH, FLESH and FOWL, according to the latest and most approved experience in COOKERY.

FISH boil'd and stewed.

Bream stewed.

HAving very well scaled your Bream and throughly washt it, do not forget to preserve its blood, in which you must stew your Bream, by adding thereto [...]aret, two slices of Ginger raced, the pulp [...] three quarters of a pound of Prunes [...]oiled and strained into the Broth, Vinegar, [...]lt, and an Anchovie or two; some sweet [...]erbs with Horse-radish-root stamped and [Page 2] strained: Let not your Fish have more Li­quor than will just cover it; being enough, take some Butter with a little Vinegar, in which the Bream was stew'd, and beat them up together; then dish up your Fish, pour­ing the Butter thereon, and garnish your Dish with Barberries, Oranges and Le­mons.

Base boiled to be eaten hot.

Save the Livers, Rows or Spawns of your Base, then scale and wash them well; having so done, boil them up in Water, Wine-Vi­negar, Salt, some sweet Herbs, Lemons sliced, with three whole Onions; then take a lear of drawn Butter, large Mace, whole Cinamon, a whole Nut-meg quarter'd, with three Anchovies dissolved therein; having disht it up, pour on your lear, and let your garnish be fryed Oysters and Bay-leaves. This seasoning will not be improper for Mullet or any other sort of Fish.

Carps stewed.

Save the blood of your Carp, dress him and take out his Gall; then scotch him on the back, and put him into a Stew-pan with a quart of White-wine, half a dozen [Page 3] blades of large Mace, a dozen Cloves, three [...]aces of Ginger sliced, two slit Nutmegs with a Faggot of sweet Herbs, three large Onions whole, four or five Bay-leaves, and some Salt, stew all these together, but [...]ut not your Carp in till the Pan boil, and [...]hen too with five ounces of sweet Butter: Let your fire be a quick Charcoal fire; when it is enough, dish it in a large dish, [...]ouring thereon your Sauce commixed with [...]he Spices, laying on Lemon sliced with Lemon-pill or Barberries; let your garnish [...]e dried Manchet grated and searsed, with [...]arved Sippets laid round the dish. At great Festivals garnish the body with stew­ed Oysters, and fried batter made of seve­ [...]al colours by the juyce of Herbs, as Violets, Saffron, Spinage, &c. dissolving therein an Anchovie or two.

Another most excellent way.

Take a living Carp and scale it, then dry [...]t with a cloath, and open the belly, taking out the entrails, then wash the blood into a Pipkin with a pint of Claret, with Vine­gar and Water, some sweet Herbs, two whole Onions, half a pound of Butter or more; stew these together three quarters [Page 4] of an hour softly; then laying your Toasts in the bottom of the Dish, serve it up with Sippets, pouring some of the broth on, and garnishing it with Rosemary.

Cockles stewed.

Wash them well with Vinegar, and boil [...] them before you take them out of the Shells, then put them into a Dish with Claret Vi­negar, a handful of Capers, Mace, Pepper, Salt, a little grated Bread and Tyme minced, with the yolks of three Eggs chopped very small; stew these together till they are enough, then put in a good spill of Butter, rubbing the Dish with a clove of Garlick. Crawfish, Shrimps or Prawns may be done the same manner, making what variety of garnish you please with the shells only.

Crabs stewed.

Take Crabs and boil them till they are enough, then take the meat out of the shells, and having put it into a Pipkin, some Claret, Wine-Vinegar, minced Tyme, Salt, grated Bread, Pepper, sweet Butter, Capers, large Mace, and the yolks of four Eggs boiled hard and chopt very small; stew [Page 5] these together till they are enough, then rubbing the Dish with a clove of Garlick, serve them up.

Cods head drest after the best manner.

Cut you [...] Head so large beyond the Gills, that you may have a pretty quantity of the Body with it; then boil it in Water and Salt, then have in readiness a quart of Cockles, with the shell'd meat of two or three Crabs, put these into a Pipkin with almost half a pint of White-wine, a bunch of sweet Herbs, two Onions, a little large Mace, a little grated Nutmeg, and some Oyster liquor; then boil it till the liquor is wasted, then add to it two ladlef [...]ls o [...] drawn Butter, then dish up your Cods head on Sippets, draining it first very well over a Chafmgdish of coals: Then cut your Pease or Spawn in thin slices, and the Li­ver in pieces, take likewise the Gill and pick out the bones, and cut it as you did the other; dish up your Spawn round about the Cods head, and some on the top, and put all over it the Gill and Liver; then pour your lair on it with some drawn But­ter upon that again, sticking all your Gill­bone with Oysters fryed in Butter, and stick [Page 6] them on the Spawn also; then grate o [...] Nutmeg, and dish it up very hot, garnishing your Dish with Lemon and Bay-leave [...]

Eels boil'd.

Take them and draw, fley, and wi [...] them clean, having cut them in pieces, be [...] them in White wine, Water, Oyster liquo [...] large Mace, three or four Cloves bruise [...] Salt, Spinage, Sorrel, Parsley grosly minced an Onion, Pepper, and an Anchovie; di [...] them up on Sippets, broth them with the [...] own broth, beating up a lear with goo [...] Butter, yolks of Eggs, with slices of Lemon, and some Lemon-pill.

Eels stew'd.

Draw your Eels and fley them, and cu [...] them into pieces four inches long, then pu [...] them into a Stew-pan with as much Clare as will just cover them, mingled with som [...] Water, strip some Tyme and put to them with sweet Marjoram, Savory pickled, Parsley and large Mace, be sure to stew the [...] enough, then serve them on Sippets, stic [...] Bay-leaves round the Dish, garnish th [...] Meat with slic'd Lemon, and the Dish with fine grated Manchet.

Flounders or Gudgeons boil'd after an excel­lent manner.

Take a few sweet Herbs, tops of Tyme, sweet Marjoram, Winter-savory, tops of Rosemary, some whole Mace, some pick'd Parsley, and boil them in a quart of White­wine and Water, the quantities not ex­ceeding each other: these ingredients having boiled some time together, then put in your Flounders, and scum your Pan very well; then add to them a crust of Manchet, five ounces of sweet Butter, season all with Salt, Pepper and Verjuice, and so dish it up.

Flounders stew'd.

Take large Flounders and scotch them, then lay them in a deep Dish with a pint of the best Sallet Oyl poured round about, a pint of Claret and White-wine Vinegar equally mixt, and let there be two or three races of Ginger sliced, some whole Cloves, and a blade or two of Mace, a Nut­meg sliced, a faggot of sweet Herbs, with two or three cut Onions, stew all th [...]se together; when they are enough serve them up on Sippets: then take a hand [...] [Page 8] Parsley minced very sinall, and put it green into your lair, letting it boil but a little while, then pour it upon your Fish, gar­nish your Dish with slic'd Lemon and green Parsley.

Gurnet red or gray, by some called Knowds, how boil'd.

Draw your Gurnet and wash it clean, then boil it in Water and Salt, with a fag­got of sweet Herbs; then take it up and pour upon it Butter, Verjuyce, Nutmeg and Pepper, thicken it with the yolks of three new-laid Eggs; let your Dish be garnished with sliced Lemon or Barberries.

Jacks, if small, how to stew.

Take your Jacks and cut off the heads of them, then put them into Balls of forced Meat made of Fish, so that the heads may be upright; indore them over with yolks of Eggs and so bake them; drawing them out, cut them in pieces, and stew them up in a Dish with White-wine, Water, Salt, Vinegar, sweet Herbs, some Anchovies, Mace, sliced Ginger and Nutmeg; but put not in your Pike till the liquor boils, and [Page 9] then let them be accompanied with some small forced Fish-balls, yellow, green and white, which you may colour with juyce of Herbs; having turn'd them once or twice, take out your Jack-heads so forced, and set them round in the Dish; then take out the bodies with a slice, and place them to the best advantage between and about them all over the Dish: Put Smelts fryed very stiff in the mouths of your Jacks, your forced Meats being round about them; for variety you may make use of fryed Oysters, with other small fryed Fish.

Lobsters stewed.

Take some large Lobsters, being boil'd, break the Meat small, though you must break the shells as little as possible may be; then put the Meat into a Pipkin, adding thereto Claret, White wine, Vinegar, sliced Nutmeg, Salt and some Butter, stew these together an hour softly: being stewed al­most dry, put to it some more Butter, stirring it well together, then lay very thin Toasts in your Dish, laying the Meat thereon: or you may put the Meat into the shells, garnish the Dish about with the Legs, and lay the Barrel over the Meat [Page 10] with some sliced Lemon: If in the Sum­mer, garnish your Dish with well-colour'd Flowers; if in the Winter, with such as you can procure pickled.

Lamprels boil'd.

Wash your Lamprels, but take not out the guts, then cut them in pieces about an inch long, putting into a Pipkin twice as much Water as will cover them; seasoning the Liquor with Pepper and Salt, and thickning it with three or four Onions, a little grated Bread, and a little Barm or Ale-yeast; then shred a handful of Par­sley, a little Winter-savory, and Tyme ve­ry small: Let all boil till half the broth be consumed; then put in half a pound of sweet Butter, give it a walm or two and serve it up.

Mullets boil'd.

Take a large Mullet, having trust it round, put it in your Kettle, adding to your Water Salt, and a handful of sweet Herbs, making your Water boil before you put in your Fish, which must be tyed up in a clean cloath: having put in with your Fish a pint of White wine Vinegar, let it boil [Page 11] till your Fish swim; then take the Rivet and a pint of great Oysters, and as much Vi­negar as their Gravie, four blades of Mace, with a little gross Pepper, boil all these in a Pipkin together, till your Oysters are enough, then strain the yolks of four Eggs, with half a pint of Sack; having put in a little Butter and Sugar, put in also your Wine and Eggs, then serve it on Sippets, pouring on the Broth, scrape on Sugar and eat it hot. With this Broth you may boil a Pike, nay, a Capon, if you will but add some roasted Chesnuts steept in Sack.

Musoles stewed.

Take Muscles, wash them clean, and boil them in Beer and Salt, then take them out of the shells, and beard them from Gravel and stones; fry them in clarified Butter, then pour away some of the butter, and put to them a Sauce made of their own Liquor, some sweet Herbs chopped, a little White wine, Nutmeg, the yolks of four or five Eggs dissolved in Wine-Vinegar, Salt and some sliced Orange; give these mate­rials a walm or two in a Pipkin, and so serve them up in Scollop-shells.

Oysters stewed the best way.

Take a pottle or three pints of large great Oysters, parboil them in their own Liquor, then wash them in warm Water, wipe them dry, and pull away the Fins; flower them, and fry them in clarified But­ter very white: then take them up and put them into a large Dish with White-wine, a little Vinegar, five ounces of sweet But­ter, some grated Nutmeg, large Mace, Salt, and three or four slices of an Orange; stew them but a little while, and dish them up on Sippets, pouring on the Sauce, and running it over with beaten Butter, gar­nishing it with sliced Orange or Lemon.

Pike boil'd after an excellent manner.

Take a Pike, and having cleans'd the Civet, trust him round, and scotcht his back, put him into boiling Water and Vinegar, two parts Water, and the third Vinegar, with some Salt; be sure you boil him up quick: Let your Sauce be made of White­wine-Vinegar, Mace, whole Pepper, two dozen of Cockles boiled out of their shells and washed clean, a faggot of sweet Herbs, [Page 13] the Liver stamped and put to it, with a Horse-radish scrap'd or slic'd, boil all these together; dish your Pike on Sippets, and beat up your Sauce with some good sweet Butter and minced Lemon: You may gar­nish your Dish any how as you please.

Pike stewed. (In the same manner may be stewed Carp, Bream, Barbel, Chevin, Ro­chet, Gurnet, Conger, Tench, Pearch, Base or Mullet, or the like.)

This is the City fashion: Take any of the aforesaid Fish, and having drawn and cleans'd it from blood or other impurities, lay it in a Dish, putting thereto as much White-wine as will only cover it, and set a stewing: When it boils, put in the Fish and scum it, and put to it some large Mace, whole Cinamon, and some Salt; being finely stewed, dish it on Sippets, then thicken the Broth with the yolks of three or four Eggs, some thick Cream, Sugar and beaten Butter; give it a walm, and pour it on the Pike with some boil'd Cur­rans, and boil'd Prunes laid all over it; also Mace, Cinamon, some knots of Barberries and sliced Lemon, scraping on some Su­gar.

Plaice boil'd.

Take good large Plaice, and boil them in White wine, Vinegar, large Mace, two or three Cloves and Ginger sliced: Being boil'd, serve them in beaten Butter with juyce of Sorrel strain'd, Bread, sliced Le­mon, Grapes or Barberries.

Plaice stewed.

Make choice of the fairest you can get and having drawn, wash'd and scotch'd them, fry them a little; having so done remove them into a Stew-pan, putting thereto some White-wine, grated Nutmeg Wine-Vinegar, Butter, Pepper and Salt And thus stew them with slices of Orange or Lemons.

Prawns, Shrimps, or Craw-fish stewed.

First boil, then pick, and afterward stew them in some Claret-Wine, sweet But­ter, Nutmeg and Salt; dish them in Scol­lop-shells, and run them over with beaten Butter, with juyce of an Orange or Le­mon.

You may for variety sake take any of the aforesaid Shell-fish, and stew them in Butter and Cream, serving them in Scollop­shells.

Perches boil'd an excellent way.

Lay your Perches scotcht in a deep Dish, with a pint of the best Sallet Oyl you can get, half a pint of White-wine, with the like quantity of Wine-Vinegar, two races of Ginger sliced, some whole Cloves and Mace, a Nutmeg sliced, and a faggot of sweet Herbs with two Onions cut not ve­ry small; let these be the seasoning for your Pan: then let your Liquor boil up your Fish very quick; then blanch them on both sides, and dish them on Sippets; af­ter this, take a little White-wine, Gravie and Vinegar, with grated Nutmeg, and a hand­ful of Oysters cut in pieces, put these all over your Fish, causing them to boil almost in the Dish before you send it up; pour drawn Butter over all, and garnish your Dish with Barberries and Lemons.

Salmon boil'd the best w [...] after the City fashion.

Having chin'd your Salmon, take a sid [Page 16] thereof or more, and cut the pieces into a reasonable bigness, wipe it only from the blood, but do not wash it; then take no more Wine and Water (of each an equal proportion) than will cover it: Having made the Liquor, boil with a handful of Salt, and then put in your Salmon, making it boil up quick, adding a quart of White-wine-Vinegar, keeping up a stiff fire, it will be boil'd in half an hour; then take it off, and let it cool, keeping it in a broad bottom'd Earthen Pan with the Li­quor: but if you intend it shall be eaten hot, dish it up presently, and Sauce it with Butter beaten up thick with Water, adding thereto the yolks of three Eggs dissolved therein, some of the Liquor, grated Nut­meg, sliced Lemon poured thereon: gar­nishing the Dish with fine sierced Man­chet, Barberries sliced, Lemons, Spices, and some greens fryed.

Salmon stewed.

Take a Jole or Rand of Salmon, and first fry it, after that [...]ew it in a Dish on a chafing Dish of Charcoal with some Claret Wine, large Mace, slic'd Nutmeg, Salt, Wine-Vine­gar, sliced Orange, and some sweet Butter: [Page 17] When enough, and the sauce thick, Dish it on Sippets, lay the Spices on it with some slices of Orange; garnish the Dish with some stale Manchet, grated and finely sierced.

Soals boil'd.

Take the Soals, draw and fley them; then boil them in Vinegar, Salt, White­wine and Mace, but let the Liquor boil be­fore you put them in; being enough, dish them up on carved Sippets; let your gar­nish be Mace, sliced Lemons, Goosberries, Grapes or Barberries, and beat up some Butter thick with the juyce of Oranges, and run it over the Fish: For variety sake place all over your Soals some stewed Oy­sters.

Soals stew'd a very good way.

Take a pair of Soals, lard them with water'd Salt-Salmon; then lay them on a smooth board, cutting your lard all of an equal length; on each side lair it but short, then flower your Soals, an [...]y them in strong Ale till they are half done; then put them in a dish with half a dozen spoonfuls of white Wine, three of Wine-Vinegar, three ounces of sweet Butter, some slices of O­range [Page 18] with Salt, and some grated Nu [...] meg, cover the Dish whilst they are ste [...] ing; being enough, dish them up with slic [...] of Lemon, beaten Butter, with the juy [...] of Oranges.

Sturgeon boil'd.

Take a Rand and cut it into square piece [...] as big as a crown piece, stew them in broad-mouth'd Pipkin with three or fo [...] large Onions, some large Mace, three o [...] four Cloves, Pepper, Salt, some sliced Nu [...] meg, two or three Bay-leaves, some Whit [...] wine, and Water, Butter, and a race o [...] sliced Ginger, stew them well together and serve them on Sippets, running the [...] over with beaten Butter, sliced Lemon an [...] Barberries; let the garnish be the same.

Smelts stewed.

Take a deep Dish, and put your Smelts therein, put to them a quarter of a pint o [...] White wine three ounces of Butter, some great Pepp [...] ▪ a handful of Parsley, three o [...] four sprigs of winter Savory, and as much of Tyme shredded small, with the yolks of three Eggs minced: when you put in your Fish, let these accompany, stewing them to­gether, [Page 19] and now and then turning them with the Fish: when enough, serve them up on Sippets, placing a top some bunches of Barberries pickled, scraping Sugar there­on.

Scollops stewed.

Boil them very well in White wine, fair Water and Salt; take them out of the shells, and stew them with some of the Liquor, Elder Vinegar, a few Cloves, some large Mace, and some sweet Herbs chopped very small: being throughly enough, serve them up in their own shells with beaten Butter, and the juyce of Oranges.

Tortoise stewed.

Take a Tortoise and cut off his head, feet and tail; and boil the body in Wine, Salt and Water: being enough, uncase the meat from the shell, and stew it in a Pipkin with some Butter, White wine, some of the Broth, a couple of whole Onions, Tyme, Parsley, Winter-savory, and Rosemary minc'd: when enough, serve it on Sip­pets.

Turbet boil'd, or, as some call it, Calvere [...]

Having drawn your Turbet, wash i [...] clean; then take an equal quantity o [...] Water and Wine with some Salt, and boi [...] it therein; not putting it in till the Par [...] boils, adding thereto some sliced Onions large Mace, a Clove or two, some slice [...] Ginger, whole Pepper, and a bundle o [...] sweet Herbs; scotch the Turbet on the white side very thick overthwart one way only; this must be done before you put it in [...] Being half boiled, put in some Orange-pill; being enough, dish it up with the Spices, Herbs, some of the Liquor, Onions and sliced Lemons.

In the like manner you may dress Holy­burt, only let your Sauce be beaten Butter, sliced Lemon, Herbs, Spices, Onions and Barberries.

Trouts stewed.

Take three or four Trouts or more ac­cording to their bigness, and put them in a Dish with somewhat more than a quarter of a pint of Sack, or instead thereof White wine with a piece of Butter about the quantity of a Tennis-ball, a lit­tle▪ [Page 21] whole Mace, some Parsley, a little Winter-savory and Tyme minced all toge­ [...]her; which done, put them to the Trouts: [...]et these stew about a quarter of an hour, [...]hen take the yolk of a hard Egg, and mince it small, stewing your Trouts there­with, then dish up, pour the Herbs and Liquor all over them; scraping Loaf-sugar [...]hereon, and serving them very hot to the Table.

Whitings stewed, and how to make a Broth thereof.

Take a quantity of Wine, and the like of Water, and put it over the Fire in a deep dish; add thereunto a race of Ginger sliced, a little large Mace, a Nutmeg quarter'd, with a faggot or two of sweet Herbs, as Marjoram, Tyme, &c. with Parsley, not for­getting with Salt to season your Broth: When it hath boiled a little while, put in your Whitings, but be careful you place them so as you intend to serve them up; and putting some Butter to them, let them boil a pace; in a little time they will be enough: When they are boiled, pour away all the Liquor from them into a Pipkin, and set it on the Fire again with your Spice and [Page 22] sweet Herbs that were in it before; then take a handful of Parsley and mince i [...] small, with a little Fennel and Tyme, and let them boil with the Fish-broth; then take the meat of two Crabs, with the Carkass of a Lobster, the yolks of three Eggs, a ladle of drawn Butter; beat all these toge­ther with some of the said Liquor, stirring it in the Pipkin till it thickens; then shift out your Whitings on Sippets, as you [...] would have them, dish up, pouring on your lair as it comes from the Fire; in the same manner you may order Smelts or Gudge­ons. The Broth is not only very pallatable, but exceeding wholesome and comfortable to a weak stomach.

Flesh of all sorts (excepting Fowl) boiled or stewed.

Breast of Veal boil'd.

TAke a good midling Breast of Veal that is white and fat, bone it and beat it well, then wash it dry: after this put to it a handful of sweet Herbs, Parsley, and a little Sage minced small with a few Cloves, [Page 23] [...]ace and Nutmeg beaten, mixing there­ [...]ith a little Salt. Do not forget to wash [...]ver the inside of your Veal with the yolks [...]f Eggs, and strow your Herbs all over, [...]hen over that lay some slices of Bacon cut [...]hin, dipt in the yolks of Eggs; having so [...]one, rowl it up in a Coller, and bind it [...]ard with pretty broad Filleting: When it [...] enough, cut the Coller into nine or ten [...]ieces, laying on every piece some Bacon; [...]ish it on Sippets, and let your lair be Gra­ [...]y and strong Broth, sliced Nutmeg, all [...]eaten up thick with drawn Butter, and [...]wo yolks of Eggs; run these over your [...]eat: let your Dish be garnished with [...]lices of Bacon fryed in the yolks of Eggs.

Breast of Mutton stewed.

Joynt your Breast of Mutton very well, [...]hen farce it with sweet Herbs and minced Parsley; after this put it into a deep stew­ [...]ng Dish with the right side downwards, [...]dding thereto as much White wine and strong Broth as will stew it; then set it o­ver a large chafing-Dish of Coals, putting therein two or three great Onions, a faggot of sweet Herbs, and a little large Mace: being almost enough, take a handful of Spi­nage, [Page 24] Endive and Parsley, and put to it: Then dish it up with so much Broth as is sufficient, thickned with the yolks of Eggs and drawn Butter; then pour on the lair with the Herbs on the top, and on [...] that some Capers and Sampier stew'd there­with, and garnish the dish with Lemon or Barberries.

Beef Collops stewed.

Cut from a buttock of Beef some thin slices, crossing the grain thereof: having hackt them with the Back of your knife, fry them in sweet Butter; being brown, put them into a Pipkin, with some strong Broth, some White wine, a little Nut­meg, and so stew it very tender: About a half hour before you serve it up, add to it some Mutton Gravy, Elder Vinegar, with two or three Cloves; after it is disht, put to it some drawn Butter, with the juyce of Oranges, and some slices thereof on the top of it.

Buttock, Rump, Chine, Brisket, Sur-loyn, Rib, Flank or Fillet of Beef powdered how to boil.

Take your choice of which you please▪ [Page 25] and in hot weather give it no longer powdering than five or six days, but as long again in the Winter; if you stuff it, let it be with all manner of sweet Herbs, with [...]fat Beef minced, and some Nutmeg; so serve it (after it hath boil'd a sufficient while) on Brewis with Cabbidge boil'd in Milk and drawn Butter run all over: gar­nish your dish with Parsley, and Carrets slic'd into several shapes.

Calves feet stewed.

Take your Calves feet and split them in the middle; after you have blanched them, being boil'd very tender, and having taken from them the great bones, place them in a Stewing-dish, with some strong Broth, three pretty large Onions, a Faggot of sweet Herbs, with Salt and a little large Mace: when you perceive it boils, then put unto it a handful of Parsley, Spi­nage and sweet Herbs minced with a large handful of Currans: The Feet being stewed, beat the yolks of two or three Eggs with some Sugar and Butter; and with that thicken your lair, and a lit­tle drawn Butter: dish up your Calves Feet on Sippets, and pour on your Broth.

Calves he [...]d stewed.

First boil your Calves head in water half an hour; then take it up and pluck it all to pieces, and put it into a Pipkin with Oysters and some of the broth it was boil­ed in; adding thereto a pint of Claret, a quarter of a pound of midling Bacon sliced, first parboil'd, ten roasted Chesnuts split, the yolks of four Eggs, sweet Herbs minced, and a little Horse-radish root scraped: Let these stew together an hour, let your Brains be parboil'd and chopt a lit­tle, and strew thereon a little Ginger and grated Bread, or make a little Batter with Eggs, Ginger, Salt and Flower, putting in some juice of Spinage to make them, when fried, look green: when the meat is dish'd, lay these fried Brains, Oysters, the Ches­nuts, and yolk of Eggs thereon, so serve it up hot with Sippets.

Haunch of Venison boil'd.

Take a Haunch of Venison and set it a boiling (having a little powdered it be­fore) then boil up four or five Colly-Flowers in strong broth, and some Milk: [Page 27] When they are boiled, put them forth into a Pipkin, adding to them drawn Butter, and keep them by the Fire in a warm condition: then boil up three or four handfuls of Spi­nage in strong broth: when they are enough, pour out part of the broth from them, and put in a little Vinegar, a ladle­ful of drawn Butter, and a grated Nut­meg; your Dish being▪ ready with Sippe [...]s in the bottom, put in your Spinage there­on round towards the Dishes side: your Venison being boil'd, take it up and lay it in the middle of the Dish, and lay your Colliflowers all over it; then pour on your drawn Butter over that: Lastly, garnish it with Barberries, and your Dish with some green Parsley minced.

For variety sake you may force your Ve­nison with a handful of sweet Herbs, and Parsley minced with Beef-suet, and yolks of Eggs boiled hard; seasoning your forcing with Pepper, Nutmeg, Ginger and Salt.

Lambs head boil'd.

First take out the Brains and make a Pudding thereof; being boil'd and cold, cut it into bits, then mince some Lamb with Beef-suet, and put to it some grated Bread▪ [Page 28] Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, some sweet Herbs minced with four or five raw Eggs: work these all together, and fill the Lambs head therewith: Having well cleansed and dry­ed the head beforehand, then stew it be­tween two Dishes with some strong broth; what remains of this forcing, work it into balls, and let them boil with the head, adding therewith some White wine, a whole Onion, three or four sliced Pippins, some pieces of Artichokes, Sage leaves, large Mace, with Lettice boil'd and quarter'd, and put into beaten Butter; being finely stew'd, dish it up on Sippets, and put the balls with the other materials thereon; then broth it, and run it over with beaten But­ter and Lemon.

Lambs head stewed.

Having cleft the head and taken out the Brains, washing and cleansing it from all its filth and impurity, set it a boiling in some strong broth; having scum'd it after boiling, put in two or three blades of large Mace, some Capers, some Pears quarter'd, a little Claret, Gravy, Marrow, and some Marry-gold Flowers; when stewed enough, serve it on carved Sippets, and broth it, lay­ing [Page 29] on sliced Lemon, scalded Goosberries or Barberries.

Loyn of Lamb stewed.

Let your Loyn be cut into steaks pret­ty large, put it into a Pipkin with so much Water as will cover it: when it simmers scum it, and then put to it Capers, Sam­phire, the bottoms of some Hartichokes, four or five blades of large Mace, half a Nutmeg sliced, Verjuice and Salt; give them the space of an hour to be stewed in, then dish up your Lamb tenderly, blow­ing off the fat: put into the broth scalded Spinage and Parsley minced with scalded Goosberries, a piece of Butter; shake it well, dish it and serve it up on Sippets.

Leg of Lamb boil'd.

Take Kidney suet, and cut it into square pieces about the bigness and length of your Finger; then thrusting your knife into se­ven or eight places of the meat, put those pieces of suet into each particular hole; then boil your Lamb, remembering to turn it often, take heed of overboyling it; then boil a good handful of Parsley tender, [Page 30] mince it small with your knife; then warm a quarter of a pint of White wine Vinegar over some Coals, with Butter about the quantity of an Egg; put in also some clusters of Barberries either boil'd or pickl­ed; then dish up your meat on Sippets, pouring the sauce thereon.

Leg of Pork.

Having laid your Leg of Pork in salt about some nine days, stuff it with Parsley and Sage, or you may boil it without stuffing, having in readiness a handful of boil'd Sage, mince it very small, and put it into a little strong broth with Butter and Pepper, then take up your Turnips, being boiled tender, and toss your Sage and them together with more drawn Butter; having dish'd up your Pork, lay your Turnips over.

Legs of Veal and Bacon boil'd.

Take pretty big Lard, and therewith lard your Leg of Veal all over, joyning some Lemon-pill to your Lard; then get a piece of middle Bacon, and boil the Veal therewith: when your Bacon is enough, [Page 31] cut it into slices, and season it with Pep­per, and dryed Sage incorporated together; dish up your Veal with your Bacon round about it, and send with the serving it up some Saucers of Green-sauce, strowing over it Parsley and Barberries; and that you may not be ignorant of the making it, take two handfuls of Sorrel, and beat it well in a Morter, squeeze out the juice of it, and put thereto a little Vinegar, Su­gar, drawn Butter, and a grated Nutmeg, set it on the Coals till it be hot, then pour it on your Veal and Bacon.

But to make Green-sauce to be served up in Saucers, you must do thus: Take two or three handfuls of Sorrel, beaten in a Morter with two Pippins quartered, after paring adding thereto a little Vinegar and Sugar.

Legs, Necks, and Chines of Mutton boiled.

Take either of the aforementioned Joynts, and lard them with a little Lemon­pill; then boil it in Water and Salt, with a faggot of sweet Herbs; then take a pint and a half of Oysters well wash'd, and put them into a Pipkin, with some of their own liquor, a little strong broth, and half a pint [Page 32] of gravy, as much White wine; put to them two or three whole Onions, some Tyme, grated Nutmeg, and two or three Anchovies, so let them boil together; then beat up three or four yolks of Eggs in a little of the said broth to a convenient thickness, with a ladleful of drawn broth amongst it; then dish it up on Sippets, then over-run it with lair, placing your Oysters on the top thereof; then serve it up gar­nish'd with Barberries or Lemon.

Neats Tongues boil'd.

Take a Neats Tongue and boil it in Wa­ter and Salt, or you may salt it a little, and only boil it in Water till it be tender; then blanch it, dish it and stuff it with minced Lemon, mince the Pill and strow all over it, then run it over with drawn Butter.

Neats Tongues stewed.

Make a hole in the but-end of the Tongue, and take the meat and mince it with Beef-suet, season it with Salt, Nutmeg, sweet Herbs minced, the yolks of two raw Eggs, Pepper, Ginger, and mingling all together, stuff the Tongue therewith, then [Page 33] wrap it in a caul of Veal, and boil it till it will blanch; then with some Claret, Gra­vy, Cloves, Mace, Salt, Pepper, grated Bread, sweet Herbs minced small, fryed Onions, Marrow boil'd in strong broth, stew it in a Pipkin; when it is ready serve it up on Sippets, laying over it Grapes, Goosberries, sliced Lemon or Oranges, run it over with beaten Butter, garnishing the dish with stale grated Bread.

You may otherwise stew Neats Tongues in a Pipkin with Raisins, Mace, sliced Dates, blanched Almonds, Marrow, Cla­ret wine, Butter, Salt, Verjuice, Sugar, strong broth or Gravy, slicing the Tongue with­al: being throughly stewed, dissolve the yolks of half a dozen Eggs in some Vine­gar, and dish it up on fine Sippets, with Lemon, running beaten Butter over all.

Oxe Cheekes boiled.

Take a pair of Ox Cheeks and bone them: then put them six or seven hours in Water to soak, then cleanse them from their blood, paring the rough of the Mouth, taking out the balls of the Eyes; then stuff them with Beef-suet, hard Eggs, sweet Herbs, Pepper and Salt, mingle all together, [Page 34] and let your stuffing be on the inside, prick­ing the two Cheeks together, then boil them alone, or with other Beef; being ten­derly boiled, serve them up on Brewis with interlarded Bacon or Pork Sausages: let there be on each side of the dish saucers of Green-sauce or Mustard.

Oxe Cheeks boil'd to be eaten cold with Sallet.

Bone your Cheeks and cleanse them, then steep them in White wine twelve hours; then season them with Nutmegs, Cloves, Pepper, Mace and Salt, roul them up, boil them tender in Water, Vine­gar and Salt, press them; and being cold slice them into thin slices, and serve them with Oyl and Vinegar.

Pig sucking boil'd.

Take a young sucking Pig, and lay him round with his tail in his Mouth in a Ket­tle, covering it with fair Water, and casting in a good handful of Salt, a handful of Rosemary, Tyme, sweet Marjoram and Winter-savory: when half boiled, take him up and fley the skin from him; then take him and quarter him, and lay him in a [Page 35] Stew-pan, with Prunes, large Mace, Cur­rans; then take him up being enough, and lay him in Sippets with the aforesaid ingre­dients poured upon him.

Rabbets boiled.

Prick down your Rabbets heads to their shoulders, and that is the way to truss them for boiling, gathering up their hind Legs to their Belly: you may lard them with Bacon, if you please, or let it alone, and so boil them up white; being boiled, take the Livers and mince them small with fat Bacon boiled, then put it to half a pint of White­wine, strong Broth and Vinegar, all making but that quantity; then let it boil with some large Mace, add thereunto a little Par­sley minced with some Barberries, and a ladleful of drawn Butter; dish up your Rabbets on your Sippets pouring your lai [...] all over them, and garnish your dish with Lemons and Barberries.

Shoulder of Mutton boiled.

Do not above half boil your Shoulder of Mutton; then slice the fleshy part into thin slices, leaving some about the blade-bone, [Page 36] preserve the Gravy, and put the Mutton into a Pipkin, with some of the broth in which it was boiled; a little grated Bread, Oyster liquor, Vinegar, Bacon sliced thin and scalded, a quarter of a pound of Sau­sages stript out of their skins, large Mace, and a little sliced Nutmeg: When it is al­most stew'd, put in the Gravy: when they have boil'd almost an hour, put to them a pint of Oysters, a faggot of sweet Herbs and some Salt, then stew them a little lon­ger; then take the blade-bone and broil it, put it into your dish, and pour the materials in your Pipkin upon it; garnish it with Oysters fryed in batter, Lemons sliced, and Barberries; it will not be amiss first to rub your dishes bottom with a clove of Garlick.

Shoulder of Mutton stewed with Oysters.

Roast your Shoulder of Mutton half, or a little more, take off the upper skin whole, and cut the flesh into thin slices; then stew it with White wine, Mace, Nutmeg, An­chovies, Oyster liquor, Salt, Capers, Olives, Samphire and slices of Orange; leave some meat on the marrow-bone and blade, and laying them in a dish, pour your stew'd [Page 37] meat on the bones with stew'd Oysters a top of that; some great Oysters above and about them stew'd with large Mace, two great Onions, Butter, Vinegar, white Wine, a bundle of sweet Herbs, and over all these lay the aforesaid skin of the Mutton a lit­tle warm'd in this last liquor.

Tripes drest hot out of the pan.

Boil them very tender, and laying them in a dish, let your sauce be beaten Butter, Gravy, Pepper, Mustard and wine Vine­gar, rubbing your dish first with a clove of Garlick, running the sauce over them with a little Garlick bruised.

Venison stew'd a quick and frugal way.

They which abound with Venison in many cold baked meats, may at any time stew a dish speedily thus: Slice the Veni­son of your Pot, Pye or Pasty; then put it into a Stewing-pan over a heap of coals with some Claret wine, a little Rosemary, four or five Cloves, a little grated Bread, Sugar and Vinegar: having stew'd a while, grate on some Nutmeg, and serve it up. Since in this Section we have lastly treated [Page 38] of Venison, give me leave to tell you how to recover Venison when tainted, although the discourse belong not to this particular place.

Venison when tainted how to recover it.

Take your Venison and lay it in a clean cloth, then put it under ground a whole night, and it will remove the corruption, stink or savour: Or, you may boil Water with Beer, Wine, Vinegar, Bay-leaves, Tyme, Savory, Rosemary and Fennel of each a handful; when it boils put in your Venison, parboil it well, and press it then, season it, and use it as you shall think fitting.

Fowl of all sorts, whether wild or tame, Land-Fowl or Sea-Fowl, boil'd or stew'd.

Capon boil'd in Rice.

TAke a well fed Capon, and boil it in Water and Salt; then take a quarter of a pound of Rice and steep it in fair [Page 39] Water, and having half boiled it, strain the Rice through a Cullender, and boil it in a Pipkin with a quart of Milk, and add thereto half a pound of Sugar, with half an ounce of large Mace; boil it well, but keep it from being too thick, then put in a little Rosewater: after this blanch half a pound of Almonds, and with a little Cream and Rosewater beat them in a Mor­ter very fine; strain them in a Pipkin by themselves; then take up your Capon, setting your Almonds a little against the fire; having placed in your Capon, pour on your Rice handsomely, then broth your Rice.

Capons boiled and larded with Lemons.

First, scald your Capon, and take a lit­tle dusty Oat-meal to make it boil white, then take three ladlefuls of Mutton broth, a faggot of sweet Herbs, two or three Dates cut long in pieces, a few parboil'd Cur­rans, a little whole Pepper, a piece of whole Mace, and one Nutmeg; thicken it with Almonds, and season it with Ver­juyce, Sugar, and a small quantity of sweet Butter; then take up your Capon, and lard it very thick with preserved Lemon; then [Page 40] lay your Capon in a deep dish, for boiled meats, and pour the broth upon it: gar­nish your dish with suckets and preserved Barberries.

Chickens boiled.

After you have scalded your Chickens truss them, and boil them in Water as white as possibly you can; in a little time of boiling they will be enough, then dish them up, having in readiness this sauce. If in Winter time, take a pint of White wine, Verjuyce, half a dozen Dates, a small handful of Pine-kernels, six or seven blades of large Mace, and a faggot of sweet Herbs, boil all these together, till the one half be consumed; then beat it up thick with Butter, and pour it on the Chickens, being dished with three or four white-bread toasts dipped lightly in Allagant; lay on the chickens, yolks of Eggs quarter'd, Lo­zenges, Sheeps tongues fryed in green bat­ter, being first boiled and well blanched, and over all these lay some pieces of Mar­row, and some pickled Barberries.

But if you dress Chickens in the Summer time, having boiled them white, as afore­said: then for the sauce take some of the broth they were boiled in, with some Claret, [Page 41] large Mace, the bottoms of three Harti­chokes; being boiled and cut into square pieces, an Oxe Palate sliced thin, Salt and some sweet Herbs: These being all boiled together, beat it up with Butter; and ha­ving dish'd your chickens, run this sauce all over them, laying on the Chickens Aspa­ragus boiled, hard-lettice, and a handful of Goosberries, both scalded, some slices of Lemon, and serve it up.

Chicken peeping to boil after an incomparable manner.

Take four French Manchets and chip them (or others will serve) and cut a round hole in the top of them, taking out all the crum, and therewith mingle the brawn of a roast Capon, mince it fine, and stamp it in a Morter with Marchpane paste, the yolks of hard Eggs, with the crum of one of the Manchets, some Sugar, and sweet Herbs minced small, beaten Cinamon, Cream, Marrow, Saffron, yolks of Eggs, and some Currans, fill the concav'd or hollowed Manchets, and boil them in a Napkin in some good Mutton broth, stopping the holes on the tops of the Manchets, then stew some Sweet-breads of Veal, and six peep­ing [Page 42] Chickens between two dishes; then fry some Lambstones dipt in batter, made of Flower and Cream, two or three Eggs and Salt; then take the bottoms of Harti­chokes, beaten up in Butter and Gravy. All being ready, dish the boiled Manchets with the Chickens round about, then the Sweet-breads, and round the dish some fine carved Sippets; then lay on the Mar­row, fryed Lambstones, and some Grapes, thickning the broth with strain'd Almonds, some Cream and Sugar, give them a walm, and broth the meat, garnishing it with Grapes, Pomegranats and sliced Lemon.

Cocks, Bustards, Turkey, Pheasant, Peacock, Partridge, Plover, Heathcocks, Cocks of the wood, Moor-bens, or any Land Fowl how to boil.

Take any of these Fowl above specified, and fley off the skin, but leave the rump and legs whole with the pinions, then mince the flesh raw with some Beef-suet, seasoning it with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, sweet Herbs minced, some raw yolks of Eggs, and incorporate all together with three bot­toms of boiled Hartichokes, roasted Ches­nuts blanched, some Marrow, and some boiled [Page 43] skirrets cut indifferently small; according to the bigness of your Fowl, you must proportion the quantity of your ingredi­ents: Then fill the skin and prick it up in the back, stew it in a deep dish, and cover it with another, putting first therein some strong broth, Marrow, Hartichokes boiled and quartered, large Mace, White wine, Chesnuts, Salt, Grapes, Barberries, quar­ters of Pears, and some of the meat made up in balls, and stewed with the Turkey; being throughly stewed, serve it up on fine carved Sippets, broth it, and lay on the garnish with slices of Lemon and whole Lemon-pill, run it over with beaten But­ter, garnishing the dish with Chesnuts, large Mace, and yolks of hard Eggs.

Duck wilde boiled.

Having drawn and trust your wild Duck parboil it, then half roast it; after this carve it, and save the Gravy: take store of Oni­ons, Parsley, sliced Ginger and Pepper, put the Gravy into a Pipkin with washt Cur­rans, large Mace, Barberries, a quart of Claret; let all boil together, scum it clean, put in Butter and Sugar, and dish it up.

Otherways thus:

Truss your Duck, and boil it in Water with a little Claret, then take some of the broth, and put therein Pistachos blanched, Cows Udder boiled, and sliced Sausages stript out of their skins, White wine, sweet Herbs, large Mace, and boil all these to­gether, till you think they are enough, then add thereto Beet-roots boiled and [...]ut in slices, beat it up with Butter; then carve up the Duck, pouring the sauce on the top of her, and garnish the dish according to your own fancy.

Duck tame how boiled.

First parboil your Duck very well, then take strong Mutton broth, a handful of Par­sley and an Onion, and chop them all toge­ther: put all these into a Pipkin with En­dive, pickt and washt Barberries, a Tur­nip cut in pieces, and parboil'd till the rank­ness be gone; then put in a little Verjuyce, half a pound of Butter; boil all together, stirring it till it be enough, and serve it up with the Turnip, large Mace, Pepper, and a little Sugar.

Another excellent way.

Having drawn and trust your Duck, lay it in a Pipkin, and cover it with fair Wa­ter; put therein six or seven blades of Mace, a good handful of Raisins of the Sun, half a dozen sliced Onions, a good piece of sweet Butter; your Duck being half boiled, add to it four or five pieces of Mar­row, so let them continue boiling, till neat near half your broth is consumed; then put in a little Vinegar, garnish your dish with parboil'd Onions and Raisins of the Sun, lay your Duck upon Sippets in your garnish-dish, pouring your broth and Oni­ons on the top of your Duck, scrape on Su­gar and serve it up hot to the Table.

Goose tame boiled.

Take a Goose and powder him three or four days, then take Oatmeal and steep it in warm milk, and therewith fill the belly of your Goose, having first mingled it with Beef-suet, minced Onions and Apples, seasoned with Cloves, Mace, some sweet Herbs chopped, and Pepper, fasten the neck and vent, then boil it and serve it on Brewis [Page 46] with Colliflowers, Cabbidge, Turnips and Barberries, then run it over with beaten Butter.

Goose Gibblets or Swans Gibblels boiled.

Having pick'd and parboil'd your Gib­blets clean; put them into strong broth with Onions, Currans, Mace and Parsley, and so let them boil all together: being well boil'd with the addition of Pepper, and a faggot of sweet Herbs, put in Verjuyce and Butter.

Or you may put them into a Pipkin with a quart of White wine, half an ounce of Sugar, a good quantity of Barberries, Spi­nage, a faggot of sweet Herbs, Turnips boil'd, and Carrets sliced, and put into the Pipkin: having boiled very well, take strong broth, Verjuyce, and the yolks of four new laid Eggs, strain them, and put them into the Pipkin.

Land or Sea fowl how to boil, as a Swan, Hopper, Crane, Wild or tame Goose, Sho­veller, Curlew, Hern, Bittern, Duck, Mal­lard, Widgeon, Teal, Gulls, Pewits, Puf­fins, Barnacles, Sheldrakes, &c.

I shall begin with the Swan, and ac­cordingly you may boil or stew any of the aforementioned Fowl. You must take your Swan and bone it, leaving only the Legs and wings, then make a farcing of some Beef-suet, Mutton or Venison minced with sweet Herbs, beaten Nutmeg, Pepper, Cloves and Mace, then have some Oysters parboil'd in their own Liquor, and with some raw Eggs commix them with the minced meat, then fill the body of the Fowl and prick it upon the back, then boil it in a Stew-pan, putting thereto strong broth, White wine, Mace, Cloves, Oysters liquor, boil'd Marrow; boil these well together, and have Oysters in the mean time stew'd by themselves with Onions, Mace, Pepper, Butter, and a little White wine: Next have the bottoms of Har­tichokes ready boiled, and put to them some beaten Butter and boiled Marrow; dish up your Fowl on some fine carved Sip­pets; [Page 48] then broth it, and garnish it with stew'd Oysters, Marrow, Hartichokes, Goos­berries, sliced Lemon, Barberries and Mace, let the dish be garnish'd with grated bread and Oysters.

Land-fowl of any sort how to dress after the Italian fashion.

Take half a dozen Plover, Partridge, Woodcock or Pigeon, being well cleans'd and trust, put them into a Pipkin with a quart of strong broth, or the same quan­tity of White wine with half Water, put­ing thereto some slices of interlarded Ba­con; after it boils scum it, and then put in some Mace, Nutmeg, Ginger, Salt, Pep­per, Sugar, Currans, some Sack, Raisins of the Sun, Prunes, Sage, Tyme, a little Saf­fron, and dish them on carved Sippets.

Land-fowl of the smaller sort, as Ruffs, Brewes, Godwits, Knots, Doterels, Streats, Pewits, Ollines, Gravelens, Ox-eyes, Red­shankes, &c. how to boil.

Roast any of these Fowl till they are about half enough, sticking some Cloves on the one side of them, preserve the [Page 49] Gravy, then take them and put them into a Pipkin with their own Gravy, some Cla­ret, and as much strong Broth as will co­ver them, with Mace, Cloves, Pepper, Gin­ger, fryed Onions, Salt, and a piece of houshold bread; having stew'd them e­nough, serve them up on carved Sippets.

Otherways how to boil small Land-fowl, as Quails, Plovers, Rails, Black-birds, Thrushes, Snites, Wheat-ears, Larks, Spar­rows, Martins, &c.

Take them and cut off their heads and legs, and boil them in strong broth; scum it when it boils, and put in large Mace, White wine, wash'd Currans, Dates, Mar­row, Pepper and Salt: having stew'd them sufficiently, dish them on fine carved Sip­pets, thicken the Broth with strained Al­monds, Rosewater and Sugar, and garnish them with Barberries, Lemon and grated Bread, strewed about the brims of the dish.

Sea-fowl of any sort how to boil.

Take and boil them in Beef-broth, or Water and Salt, adding thereto Pepper grosly beaten, a bundle of Bay-leaves, Tyme and Rosemary bound up hard toge­ther, and boil them with the Fowl; then [Page 50] prepare some Cabbidge boil'd tender in Water and Salt; then squeeze the Water from it, and put it in a Pipkin with some strong Broth, Claret-wine, and a couple of big Onions, season it with Salt, Pepper and Mace, with three or four dissolved Anchovies; stew these together with a la­dleful of sweet Butter, and a little White wine Vinegar: Your Cabbidge being on Sippets, and your Goose boil'd enough, lay it thereon with some Cabbidge on the breast thereof, and serve it up. This is the most proper manner of boiling any large Sea-fowl.

If of the smaller sort, half roast them, slash them down the breast, and put them into a Pipkin with the breast downward, add to them three or four Onions with Car­rots sliced like lard, some Mace, Pepper and some Salt-butter, Savory, Tyme, some strong broth and White wine, stew it ve­ry softly till half the broth be consumed; then dish it up on Sippets, pouring on the broth.

Veldifers, Woodcocks and Snites how boiled.

Take them with their guts in, and boil [...] them in Water and Salt: being boil'd gut them, and chop them small with the Liver, [Page 51] put to it some grated White bread, some of the broth they were boiled in, large Mace, and stew them together with some▪ Gravy, then in Vinegar dissolve the yolks of three Eggs, and a little grated Nut­meg; when you are about to dish them add the Eggs thereunto, running the sauce over them with some beaten Butter, Ca­pers, Lemon minced, small Barberries or pickled Grapes.

Fish, Flesh and Fowl of all sorts, roasted, boiled, frigassied or fryed.
Fish roasted, broiled, frigassied or fryed.

Cockles frigassied.

HAving boil'd your Cockles out of the shells and cleans'd them well from gravel, then break ten Eggs, and put your Cockles therein with Ginger, Nutmeg and Cinamon, beat them together with some grated bread, with half a pint of Cream; having made your Butter pretty hot in the Frying-pan, put in your Frigassie, ever and anon supplying the sides of the Pan with [Page 52] a little Butter: when it is fryed on the one side, Butter your Plate and turn it, adding some fresh Butter to your Pan, in with it again, and fry it brown; then dish it up▪ squeezing some juyce of Lemons thereon, strowing on Ginger and Cinamon. If you have a desire to have it be coloured green, you may do it with the juyce of Spinage▪ if so, quarter your frigassie.

In like manner you may frigassie Prawns▪ Periwinkles, or any other small shell-Fish.

Carp roasted with an excellent Sauce.

Take a Carp whilst living, draw and wash it, removing the Gall, Milt or Spawn; having so done, make a pudding of Al­mond Paste, grated Manchet, Currans, Cream, grated Nutmeg, raw yolks of Eggs, Carraway-seed, candied Lemon-Pill, and Salt, make it stiff, and put it through the Gills into the Carps belly. You must roast it in an Oven upon two or three cross sticks over a brass Pan, turn it and let the Gravy drop into the Pan till roasted enough: put to it, when disht, a sauce made of White wine or Claret, the Gravy of the Carp, a couple of Anchovies dissolved therein, Nutmeg and Manchet grated, beat them up thick with some sweet Butter, and the [Page 53] yolk of an Egg or two, pour this sauce on your Fish.

Otherways you may take a large live Carp, and when it is scaled and drawn, make a little hole in the belly, and with the Pudding aforesaid, force his belly full, then put it on a spit, having stitcht the hole up close: when it is enough dish it on Sippets, adding to the Gravy, which you must carefully save, some Oyster liquor and drawn Butter; your lair ought to be pretty thick: then garnish your dish with small Fish fryed, as Smelts, Roches, Gud­geons, &c. as also some shell-Fish stew'd or. fryed.

Carp broiled.

Take a full grown Carp, scale it, and scrape off the slime, then wipe it clean, draw it and wash out the blood, then steep it in White wine, Wine-Vinegar, with three or four Cloves of Garlick, large Mace, whole Cloves, gross Pepper, sliced Ginger and Salt; let it steep thus two hours and a half, then put a clear scoured Gridiron on a slow fire, and broil it thereon, baste it with some sweet Sallet Oyl, in which was infused Tyme, Sprigs of Rosemary, Par­sley, sweet Majoram, and some few Bay­leaves: [Page 54] being broil'd enough, or near upon boil up the ingredients it was steeped i [...] for sauce, adding thereto some Oyster li­quor; then dish it with the Spices on your Carp, and the H [...]rbs round about, the [...] [...]un it over with drawn Butter.

Conger roasted.

Take a good large fat Conger, dra [...] wash it and scrape away the slime, then cu [...] off the Finns, and spit it like a Roman S [...] after this put some beaten Nutmeg into the belly thereof, with Salt, stript Tyme, and some large Oysters parboil'd, roast it with the skin on, and preserve its Gravy for sauce. You may otherways roast it cut into pieces three inches long, placing Bay­leaves between every piece: when it is near enough, take the Gravy and boil it up with Claret wine, Wine Vinegar, beaten Butter, and a couple of Anchovies dis­solved, with two or three slices of Orange.

Conger broiled.

Scald a fat Conger, then cut him into pieces, salt and broil it, baste it with Rose­mary, Tym [...] and Savory steept in Oyl; and when enough, serve it up with the sprigs of those Herbs and Parsley about [Page 55] it in beaten Butter and Vinegar.

Conger fryed.

Scald your Conger, and cut off the Fins, then splat it, flower it, and fry it in clarified Butter crisp; sauce it with beaten Butter and Vinegar, juyce of Lemons, garnish it with fryed Parsley, fryed Ellicsanders or Clary in Butter.

Crabs broil'd.

After you have boil'd your Crabs in Water and Salt, steep them in Oyl and Vi­negar, well incorporated by beating; then put your Gridiron over a soft fire, and put your Crabs thereon; as they broil baste them with Rosemary branches; being broil'd, serve them up with Oyl and Vine­gar, or Vinegar and beaten Butter, with the Rosemary Branches they were basted▪ with.

Crabs frigassi'd.

Take out all the meat of the body of your Crabs, and breaking the claws, mince the meat thereof into the rest, and add thereto a little Claret wine, some Fennel minced, and a grated Nutmeg, let these boil, then put in a little drawn Butter, Vi­negar, [Page 56] and the yolks of two Eggs; then put the meat, being enough, into its pro­per shell, and garnish it round with the small leggs, in the buttering put some Ci­namon and Ginger.

Crabs fryed.

Boil some large Crabs, and take the meat out of the great Claws, flowre and fry it, then take the meat out of the body, strain the one half for sauce, and the o­ther reserve for frying, and mix it with grated bread, Almond Paste, Nutmeg and Salt with yolks of Eggs, fry it in clarified Butter, first dipt in Batter; then let your sauce be beaten Butter with juyce of O­range and grated Nutmeg, beaten up thick with some of the strained meat: Then run it over with beaten Butter, placing the little leggs about the meat, and fryed Par­sley round the dish brim.

Eels roasted, or a Spitch-cock Eel.

Make choice of a large Silver Eel, draw [...]t, fley it, and cut it in pieces, somewhat longer than your middle finger; then spit it on a small spit, placing between every piece a Bay-leaf, or instead thereof you may use Sage-leaves; spit your pieces cross ways: being throughly roasted; (for other­wise [Page 57] it is dangerous meat) serve it with Butter beaten up thick, with juyce of O­range or Vinegar and beaten Nutmeg; o­therwise you may dredge it with beaten Carraway seed, Cinamon, and grated Bread, and serve it up with Venison sauce.

Eels roasted the best way.

Strip a good large Silver Eel, and cut it into pieces four inches long; when you have well dry'd them, put them into a Dish; then take some Salt and Mace, Nut­meg and a little Pepper beaten small, with a piece of Lemon-pill, two or three Oni­ons and Tyme small minced; strow these ingredients all made very small on you [...] pieces of Eel with yolks of Eggs, and be sure that you mingle in your seasoning well with your hands; then spit your Eel cross ways on a small spit, putting a Sage leaf between each piece; you may chuse whe­ther you will turn them round constant­ly, letting them stand on the one side till they hiss and grow brown, and then turn the other side to the fire; save your Gravy in the Dish▪ wherein the Eel was seasoned, baste it with drawn Butter; then put to your Gravy Claret, minced Oysters, Nut­meg grated, and a pr [...]try big Onion, give it a [Page 58] walm with a little drawn Butter, and dish up your fish, running your lair over it.

Eels broil'd.

Splat a large Eel down the back, joynt­ing the back-bone; being drawn and the blood washed out clean, leave the skin on cutting it into four equal pieces, Salt them and baste them with Butter, broil them o [...] a soft fire; being enough, serve them with beaten Butter and juyce of Lemon, with sprigs of Rosemary round about them.

Eels broil'd after the best fashion.

Let your Fish be very dry, then wash i [...] over with Butter, strowing good store of Salt over that; having first cut it into seve­ral pieces: then having your Gridiron very clean, set it over the fire, till it be exceed­ing hot, and wash the barrs with Butter; then put on your Fish upon the Gridiron, with the salted side towards the fire, but­tering the upper side; when you think them enough on the one side, turn them upon the other, basting still the upper side; the extraordinary seasoning will so bind the Fish that it will not break; being ready, dish it up with beaten Butter and juyce of Orange.

Ling fryed.

Take a Jole of Ling boil'd and cold, and cut it out into pieces about the bigness of your thumb, then make a batter of a very little flower, and eight yolks of Eggs; your Pan being over the fire with clarified Butter, and very hot, dip your Ling into the batter, and [...]ill your Pan therewith; or you may fry it without batter, only flower­ing it, and so fry it in clarified stuff; being enough, dish it up, and lay on your Ling half a score patched Eggs, then run over the Ling with drawn Butter; you may Oyl your Ling instead of Butter, if you please.

Lobsters roasted.

Take your Lobsters and half boil them, then take the meat out of the shells, lard the meat of the claws, tail, and legs with fat salt Eel; then spit this meat with some salt Eel on a small spit with Sage or Bay­leaves between every piece, stick on the Fish some Cloves with some sprigs of Rose­mary: let the barrel of the Lobster be roasted whole, basting them with sweet Butter; let your sauce be made of Claret wine, the Gravy of the Fish, juyce of O­range, [Page 60] Anchovies, with some Butter and Nutmeg beaten up thick.

Lobsters broiled.

Take the tails of your Lobsters, and split them long-ways into two, then crack your claws and put them over the Gridiron, with the barrel whole salted [...], baste them with sweet Butter, Tyme, Rosemary, Parsley and Savory; being enough, serve it up with Butter and Vinegar.

Lobsters fryed.

Take out the meat of the barrels, and put thereto some Claret wine▪ the yolks of two Eggs, a little minced Fennel and grated Nutmeg, then let it boil up with the meat of the tails and claws with drawn Butter and Vinegar; dish them up on Sippets in Saucers on a plate, garnish them with Fen­nel and Bay-leaves.

Lump fryed.

Take your Lump and fley him, then splat him, and having divided him, cut each side into two pieces, then season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper; your Pan being hot, fry him with clarified Butter, and dish it up with slices of Oranges, Goosber­ries, [Page 61] Grapes, Barberries and Butter.

Lump roasted.

Take it and fley it, and cleanse it well within; then season it with Salt, Mace, Pepper and Nutmeg, put into the belly an Onion, and a Bay leaf, roast it and serve it up with beaten Butter and slices of Lemon.

Mullets fryed.

Let your Mullets be drawn, scaled, scotched, wash'd clean, and then wiped dry; having flowred them, fry them in clarified Butter: being enough, dish them and sauce them with Claret, sliced Ginger, grated Nutmeg, Anchovies, Salt and some sweet Butter beaten up thick together, gar­nish it with slices of Lemon. The largest Mullets are best for boiling, soucing or baking, and the leaft for frying.

Mullets broiled.

Let your Mullets be drawn and cleansed, as above specified, then lay them in a Pan or dish, and put to them some very good Sallet Oyl, Wine Vinegar, Salt, some sprigs of Rosemary, Tyme and Parsley; then lay on your Gridiron over a soft fire, and being made pretty hot, lay on your Fish, basting [Page 62] it with what it was steeped in; when broil'd enough, dish it up, and sauce it with An­chovies, juyce of Lemon, and Butter bea­ten up to a thickness.

Maids fryed.

Having skin'd your Fish, put them into boiling Water seasoned with Salt; having lain there a little while, take them out & dry them well with a cloath; then flowre them, then take half a score Eggs, the yolks only of them, and the whites of three more, some flowre, Nutmeg, Ginger and Salt; then take a little Parsley boiled green and minced small, and beat all these together with a little Sack till the batter become thick: Having set over your Pan with clarified Butter, and being hot dip in the Maids into your batter, and so fry them brown and crisp; being enough, dish them up with Butter, Nutmeg, Vinegar, and the Livers of the Fish beaten together; then take a pretty quantity of Parsley, and fry it crisp and green, and strow it all over your Fish.

Muscles fryed.

Put your Muscles into a Kettle, in which there is as much boiling Water as will co­ver [Page 63] them; being enough, take them up and beard them; then wash them in warm water, wipe them dry and flowre them; being fry­ed crisp, dish them up with Butter, bea­ten up with the juyce of Lemon and Par­sley, strowed over them, fryed crisp and green.

Oysters roasted.

Make choice of your largest Oysters for roasting, which you must first open, and then parboil them in their own liquor: af­ter this wash them clean in some warm Water; wipe them dry, and let them cool; then take some very fine Lard, and lard each Oyster therewith; then spit them on a couple of skuers, strowing on them some Nutmeg, Cloves and Pepper beaten very small; bind these skuers to a spit and so roast them, basting them with Anchovie sauce, and some of their own liquor: being roasted enough, bread them with a crust of a Manchet grated, and dish them with Gravy, the fat whereof you must blow off, unto which add the juyce of Oranges or Lemons.

Oysters broil'd an excellent way.

Open some large Oysters, and put them [Page 64] in a dish with some minced Tyme, Nut­meg and bread grated, and a little Salt; then chuse your largest bottom Oyster shells, and put therein two or three Oy­sters, adding to them a little Butter; then place these shells on a Gridiron, suffering them thereon to boil till the lower side be brown, supplying it still with melted Butter: when they are enough, put into each shell a little Claret, grated Nutmeg, a little of their own liquor, minced Tyme with grated bread, and let them boil again; then with some drawn Butter dish them up. Scollop—shells are much better than their own to broil them in.

Another very good way to broil Oysters.

Take a quart of large Oysters opened and parboil'd in their own liquor, then pour them into a Cullender, saving the li­quor, then wash them very clean in warm Water; after that wipe them dry, beard them and put them into a Pipkin with large Mace, a large Onion, a little Butter, some of their own liquor, White wine, Wine-Vinegar and Salt: having stew'd them well, set some large Oyster shells or Scollop shells over a Gridiron, putting in­to each shell, as many Oysters as it will [Page 65] well nigh contain with some of the stewed liquor; let the fire on which they are broil'd be soft; when they are enough, fill the shells with drawn Butter, and so serve them up.

Oysters fryed.

Take a pottle of large Oysters well cleans'd and parboil'd in their own liquor, then dry them and flowre them, and fry them in clarified Butter; or you may first dip them in a batter made of Eggs, Flowre, and Cream, seasoned with a little Salt: Whilst these are frying, have in readiness some butter'd Prawns or Shrimps stew'd in Cream and sweet Butter, and lay these at the bottom of your Dish, laying your Oysters fryed crisp round about them; run them all over with juyce of Oranges, and beaten Butter; with slices of Lemon on the top of all.

Pike roasted.

Season very well your Pike with Salt, and then lard him all over with pickle Herring; then season him again with bea­ten Pepper, Nutmeg, and some minced Tyme; then tye him with pack thread to your spit, not turning him constantly [Page 66] round, but letting some times the ba [...] stand towards the fire, sometimes the sides then dissolve a couple of Anchovies i [...] Butter, and baste it therewith; after it i [...] half roasted, take a stick of Oysters, wi [...] a Bay-leaf betwixt each and put to it; you roast a couple of Pikes, as that you ma [...] do by tying one to the one side of th [...] spit, and the other to the other side, the you must have a couple of sticks of Oy­sters, placing a dish under them to sa [...] the Gravy, putting thereto some Clare [...] Oyster liquor, minced Tyme, and a grate [...] Nutmeg; your Oysters being roasted, dra [...] them into the Dish withdrawing the Bay leaves, adding thereto an Onion cut into slices; then dish up your Pike or Pikes with the back or brown side upwards; then put a ladleful of drawn Butter to you lair and Oysters, and pour it over your Pikes, garnishing them with Lemons; the best and surest way is to put your Pike in a Dish and bake it, and the same form you put him in, shift him into your dish you send him up in, and so lair him as before.

Pike fryed.

Take a Pike, scald and splat him, hack the inside with a knife, and it will be [Page 67] ribbed, then wipe him dry, flowre him and fry him in clarified Butter, a little Tyme, then take him up, wipe the Pan, and put him in again with Claret, sliced Ginger, Nutmeg, two Anchovies, Salt and Saffron beaten very-well, then fry him till this last liquor be half consumed; then put in some sweet Butter, shake it well, and dish it up with sliced Oranges or Lemon: you may rub the bottom of the Dish with a clove of Garlick, if you like it.

Tike broiled.

Being drawn and wash'd clean, dry it and put it into a Dish with good Sallet Oyl, Wine Vinegar and Salt, there let it steep a little while; then put on your Gridiron and broil your Pike over a soft fire, turn it and baste it often with sprigs of Rosemary, Parsley and Tyme, out of the dish wherein it was steeped; the Pike being broil'd, take the steeping and warm it on the coals, and pour it on your Fish, laying the Herbs round the Dish with slices of Oranges.

Pilehards, Herrings or Sprats broiled.

Gill, wash and dry them, season them with Salt, then broil them over a soft fire, and baste them with Butter; being enough, [Page 68] serve them up with beaten Butter, Mu­stard and Pepper: or, you may sauce them with the juyce of their own heads squeez'd between two Trenchers with some Beer and Salt.

Plaice or Flounders broiled.

Having drawn, wash'd and dryed, then scotch them on both sides, and broil them, let your lair be Butter and Vinegar: You may add to them in the same dish Salmon­peels, or indifferent big Trouts split; if you place the outside uppermost, each Fish will seem double, if the other side upmost, it will appear of a lovely yellow; let your lair be a ladleful of drawn Butter, a little Vinegar, and some grated Nutmeg; a top strow Parsley fryed crisp and green.

Plaice or Flounders frigassi'd.

You must take out the bone in the first place, by running your knife all along up­on the backside of your Fish, raising the Flesh on both sides from head to tail; then cut each Fish into three or four collops ac­cording to their bigness; dry it well, and corn it with a little Salt, then flowre it, and when your clarified Butter is very hot in the Pan, put in your Fish-collops; when [Page 69] almost ready, take it up and set it by the fire, or in some hot place till you have cleans'd your Pan, then put therein a ladle­ful of Butter, some White wine and Oy­ster liquor; it will not be amiss to take the meat of two or three Crabs, and put therein with your Flounder-Collops or Plaice, as also some whole and some minced Oysters, some Tyme minced, a Nutmeg grated, two or three Anchovies; let all these stew in a Pan, not putting in your Collops till these last mentioned ingredi­ents have stewed a pretty while; then dish them on Sippets, and run them over with your lair; let your garnish be slices of O­ranges, and the yolks of hard Eggs chop­ped small: in this manner you may dress any solid or hard Fish, as Mullets, Pike, Bace, Bream, &c.

Salmon roasted whole.

Let your Salmon be drawn at the Gills, then scale it and cleanse it from blood and slime, then lard it with a fat salt Eel, put into his belly some sweet Herbs whole, and fill it up with stew'd Oysters that are large, and some Nutmeg mingle therewith, not forgetting to put in therewith an O­nion, and a little Garlick; then place your [Page 70] Salmon in a Pan upon sticks laid a cross, and put it into an Oven with some Clarer wine in your Pan with Anchovies dissolved therein; as it drops baste it with Butter, and the liquor that is in the Pan: when it is enough, take what is in the Pan and boil it up with Pepper, Nutmeg, Rosemary and Bays; blowing off the fat, beat it up thick with Butter: having laid your Sal­mon in a very large dish, rip up his belly, and take away the Herbs, drawing out one half of the Oysters into the dish, then pour on your sauce and serve it up.

Salmon in pieces roasted.

Take a Jole or Side of Salmon; if the first, cut it into three or four pieces, if the other, into half a dozen pieces; season each piece with Salt, Nutmeg, and a little Cinamon; then stick them with a few Cloves, and spit them on a small broach, laying between every piece a Bay leaf, sticking here and there some sprigs of Rose­mary; as it roasts baste it with Butter. Let your sauce be the Gravy of the Sal­mon, Butter, juyce of Oranges, Cinamon and Sugar; beat up the sauce indifferent thick, and garnish the Dish with grated Bread and slices of Lemons.

Salmon frigassi'd.

Take a piece of fresh Salmon, it matters not whether the middle piece or tail, and cut it into the length and thickness of [...]our fore-finger; then take some sweet Herbs with Parsley and a little Fennel, and mince them very small; then take some Salt, Mace, Nutmeg, Ginger, Cloves, all beaten together, and put them to your Sal­mon, with the yolks of half a score Eggs, and commix these very well to­gether; in the mean time get your Pan in readiness full of clarified stuff and very hot, then with all imaginable expedition scatter your Fish with its ap­purtenances, and be sure that you keep it from frying in lumps; when it is three quarters fryed, pour away your liquor from it, and in its room put in some Oyster li­quor, some White wine, some large Oy­sters, a couple of Anchovies, a large Onion, Nutmeg and minced Tyme: being ready, dish it, and pour thereon the yolks of four Eggs, beaten with some of the aforesaid li­quor, and run it over with drawn Butter, garnish it with Oysters, and serve it up on Sippets.

Salmon fryed.

Take a chine of Salmon, and cut it in­to pieces, flowre it and fry it crisp and brown in clarified Butter, then take a lit­tle Claret, grated Nutmeg, some sweet But­ter, Oyster liquor and White wine Vine­gar; these must be stewed a little while together; then dish up your Salmon, and pour on this sauce: having in readiness Parsley fryed green, or Ellicsanders and Sage leaves fryed in Batter, garnish it with quarter'd Oranges round the dish, with some fryed greens.

Selmon broiled.

Take any part of the Salmon, whether jole or chine, and lay it a steep in Claret and Wine Vinegar, wherein you must put some whole Cloves, a little large Mace, a clove of Garlick, gross Pepper, sliced Gin­ger, and a little Salt; let it steep herein an hour and a half, then broil it over a soft fire, basting it with Butter, sprigs of Rose­mary, sweet Marjoram, Parsley, Tyme, and a few Bay-leaves: when it is near upon broil'd, take the liquor wherein i [...] was steeped, and boil it up with Oy­ster liquor, then dish up your Fish [...], and [Page 73] pour your lair thereon, laying the Herbs advantageously about it.

Soals roasted.

Take your Soals and draw them, then skin them and dry them, then take sweet Marjoram, Tyme, Winter-Savory, and a sprig of Rosemary, and mince these small, add hereunto some Salt and grated Nut­meg, and season your Soals therewith mo­derately; then lard your Soals with a fat fresh Eel, and after this steep them an hour in White wine, and Anchovies there­in dissolved; then take them up, and up­on a small spit roast them, put the dish; wherein they were steeped, under them, baste them with Butter, and being enough, boil up the Gravy, and what it dropt into; then dish them, and pour this lair upon them, laying on some slices of Lemon.

Sturgeon roasted.

Take a jole of fresh Sturgeon, wipe it dry, and cut it into pieces as big as a Turkey's Eggs, season them with Nut­meg, Pepper and Salt, stick each piece with two or three sprigs of Rosemary, and a Clove or two; in the spitting, put between every piece a Sage or Bay leaf, baste t [...]em [Page 74] with Butter; when enough▪ serve it up with Venison sauce or its own Gravy, But­ter, juyce of Orange and Nutmeg, all bea­ten up together.

Sturgeon broil'd.

Take a Rand or Jole that is fresh, salt it and steep it in good Sallet Oyl and White wine Vinegar about an hour, then put it over a soft fire, and baste it with what it was steeped in, with branches of Tyme and Rosemary: being ready, serve it up with some of that it was basted with, and some of the Rosemary; or you may take for sauce Butter and Vinegar beaten up with slices of Lemons.

Sturgeon fryed.

Take a Jole of fresh Sturgeon, and cut it into fine slices of an indifferent thickness, take your knife and hack it, that it may look as if it were ribbed, when it is fryed; let your Pan with clarified stuff be hot before you put it in: being half fry­ed take it up, and cleansing your Pan, put it in again with some White wine, bea­ten Saffron, Salt and an Anchovy: having fryed it a while, put in some Butter, grated Nutmeg, minced Lemon, and grated Gin­ger, [Page 75] then rub your dishes bottom with [...] [...]ttle Garlick and serve it up.

Turburt and Holyburt fryed.

Cut your Turburt into slices about two [...]ches thick, hack it with the back of your [...]nife, then fry it in clarified Butter (ha­ [...]ing first flowred it) till it be brown or [...]alf ready; then take it up, cleanse your [...]an, and in with it again, with White [...]ine, Anchovies, Nutmeg, Salt, Ginger, [...]nd beaten Saffron; fry it thus a while, and [...]hen put in some Butter, serve it up with [...]ices of Lemon.

I should now according to my fore­going method give you an account how Turburt is to be roasted and broil'd: but [...]ecause it is in all respects so done as fresh Sturgeon, I shall desist here, and refer you [...]o the forementioned Heads or Titles.

Shrimps, Prawns, Periwinkles and Craw­fish frigassied.

These you must first uncase, or take the meat out of the shells, which you must put into a dish with a pint of Claret, an O­ [...]ion sliced small, a couple of Anchovies, with a faggot of sweet Herbs: stew these a little while over a chafing-dish of coals [Page 76] with Ginger and Nutmeg; then put th [...] into a Pan, with the yolk of an Egg, Vi [...] gar and Butter, and giving them a toss two, serve them up on Sippets.

Scollops broiled.

Put your Scollops over a Gridiron, th [...] wash the meat in warm Water; being [...] of the shells, slice it and season it with Ci [...] mon, Nutmeg and Ginger; then [...] thereof into each particular shell with so [...] Butter, grated Bread, and a little Vi [...] gar; when they are enough, serve th [...] up in their shells on Plates.

Flesh Roasted, Broiled, Frigass [...] and Fryed.

Brawn broil'd.

TAke a Coller of Brawn, and cut fro [...] it seven or eight thin round slices, [...] this on a Plate, and put into an Oven; wh [...] it is enough, serve it with juyce of [...] range, Pepper, Gravy and beaten B [...] ter.

Bacon broil'd.

Make a sheet of Paper into the fashion of [...] dripping-Pan, then take some interlarded, [...]acon and cut it into very thin slices ta­ [...]ing off the rind: lay this Bacon in your [...]aper, and put it over the fire upon a Gridiron, if the fire be not too hot, it will [...]roil very cleanly.

Calves head broiled.

Having taken out the brains and cleansed [...]he head, boil it very white; then take it up and scotch it with your knife, salt it and [...]aste it with Butter: when it begins to [...]ook brown, baste again and bread it, and having made a sauce of Gravy, beaten But­ter, chopt Capers, and a little Nutmeg grated, serve it up with the brains on a a plate, which you must boil apart from the head with sweet Herbs chopt small, as Sage, sweet Marjoram and Tyme.

Calves feet or Trotters fryed.

Take a handful of young Parsley, and shred it very small: put it into four or five raw Eggs, and beat them together; then take a little Nutmeg, Sugar, a corn or two of Pepper and Salt, and season it therewith▪ [Page 78] Having boiled your feet tender, slit the [...] in halves, and rowl them in Parsley an [...] Egg: your frying-Pan being charg'd wit [...] clarified Butter, and very hot withal p [...] in your feet, they will be presently done which you shall know when the side tha [...] lyes downwards looks yellow, then tu [...] them; by that time they are enough, hav [...] in readiness Parsley boil'd very tender, an [...] beat it till it be as soft, as the pulp of [...] roasted Apple, then put to it a quarter o [...] a pint of Vinegar, two spoonfuls of Suga [...] and a little sweet Butter, heat it well, an [...] pour it over the feet, then scrape on som [...] Sugar, and so serve it up.

Calves head roasted with Oysters.

Slit the Calves head, as (customary) to boil, and take out the brain and the tongue, and parboil them both, & blanch the tongue, then mince them with a little Sage, a few Oysters and beef-suet or Marrow; then put to these four or five yolks of Eggs, beaten Ginger, Pepper, Nutmeg, grated Bread and Salt. Having a little parboil'd your head, dry it in a cloth, and fill the mouth and skull with these ingredients; then stuff it with Oysters and spit it; as it roasts preserve the Gravy in the Pan, in [Page 79] to which you must put a few Oysters, sweet Herbs minced, some White wine, and a little Nutmeg: when the head is enough, pour out the liquor into a clean dish, and set it over a Chafing-dish of coals, adding to the aforesaid materials, a little Butter, the juyce of a Lemon, and some Salt, beat these up thick together, and so dish your head and serve it up.

Calves feet roasted.

Blanch your feet, after you have boil'd them very tender; let them stand till they are cold, then lard them thick with small lard: having so done, roast them on a small spit; being enough, take Butter, Vinegar, Su­gar and Cinamon, & beating them up thick, pour it on your feet, and so serve them up.

Calves feet or Sheeps trotters roasted, after the most approved manner.

Having boil'd the feet tender split them, removing the hair, which is usually about the toes of the Trotters; let your season­ing be small Pepper, Mace, Cloves, Salt and Nutmeg beaten; then take several sorts of sweet Herbs, and pound them well; having so done, take a dozen yolks of Eggs, with a very little Water and Flowre, and [Page 80] beat all these together into a batter; your pan being ready hot with good store of clarifi­ed Butter, dip in your feet into the batter, and lay them into the Pan; fry them not too fast, and add to them some strong broth, Vinegar and Sugar, and so let them stew a while; then dish them up with drawn Butter, and the yolk of an Egg well beaten on Sippets; running the juyce of an Orange over them.

Deer red how to roast.

Take a Haunch or half thereof, lard it with small Lard, or stick it pretty thick with Cloves, parboiling your Venison be­fore you spit it, and then roast it.

Fillet or leg of Veal roasted.

Take Beef-suet or Marrow, the yolks of four raw Eggs, a little Nutmeg and some Salt, and mingle these together, then take a Fillet of Veal and stuff it here­with very thick, then roast it, preserve the gravy to make the sauce: having blown off the fat, put to it the juyce of three O­ranges, and giving it a walm or two, pour in your sauce and dish it up.

Hare roasted.

Having larded your Hare with small Lard, and stuck him with Cloves pretty thick, then make a Pudding of grated Bread, Currans, Eggs, Sugar, grated Nut­meg, beaten Cinamon, and a little Salt; you may do well to add some sweet Cream: with this Pudding made pretty stiff, stuff the Hares belly and roast her: Venison sauce is as proper as any what­ever; but for variety you may take Nut­meg, Ginger, beaten Cinamon, boil'd Prunes, Pepper and Currans strained, Bread grated, Sugar and Cloves, all which you must boil together, till they are as thick almost as Custard.

Some will roast a Hare with the skin on, making a stuffing of all manner of sweet Herbs, minced very small, and wrapt up in Butter made into a Ball: this they put into the Hares belly, pricking it up very close; all the while it is roasting with the skin on it, it must be basted with Butter: being almost enough, then strip the skin off, and stick Cloves on his back and sides, bread it very well with grated Man­chet, Flowre and Cinamon, then froth it up and dish it: the usual sauce is Claret [Page 82] wine, Vinegar, Sugar, Cinamon, Ginger, boil'd up to a moderate thickness.

Legs of Pork broil'd.

Having skin'd part of the Fillet, cut it int [...] thin slices, and hack it with the back of your knife; then take some Pepper and Salt, and mingle them with Tyme and Sage minced extraordinary small; having season'd your Collops herewith, put them on a Gridiron: being enough, dish them up, and sauce them with drawn Butter, Vinegar, Mustard and Sugar.

Lambs head roasted.

Take two or three Lambs heads, and having cleans'd them by soaking them in several waters, and taking out the brains, fill the head with a pudding or what farcing you shall like best; your Lambs heads being almost roasted, put on as many Lambs tongues with as many sticks of Oy­sters as you have heads, let your tongues be parboil'd, blancht and larded, and with your tongues and Oysters have Sweet­breads amongst them; then having some Gravy drawn with Claret wine, put to it two Onions, a faggot of sweet Herbs, a couple of Anchovies, and a large Nutmeg: [Page 83] your Tongues being throughly roasted, slit them and put them into your Wine and Gravy, drawing your Sweet-breads and Oysters at the same time; then dish up your heads on Sippets well soaked in strong Broth, then lay the sides of your Tongues about the Heads by the sides of your Dish, placing your Oysters and Sweet-breads all over your Tongues and Heads; then pour on your lair with a ladleful of drawn But­ter, and serve them up.

Lamb or Kid whole how to roast.

Take the Head of your Lamb and prick it backwards over the shoulder, tying it down; then lard it with Bacon, and draw it with Tyme and Lemon-pill: this being done, make your farcing or pudding of grated Bread, sweet Herbs, Beef-suet, some Flowre, some forced meat minced small; then season it with Cloves, Mace, Ginger, Cinamon and Salt, with some grated Nut­meg; add hereunto the yolks of four Eggs and some sweet Cream, then wrap this composition in the Caul of the Lamb, and stuff the belly thereof with it, and then prick it up close; when it is roasted enough, serve it up with Venison sauce.

Leverets and Rabbits roasted.

In the casing your Leverets, cut not off neither their ears nor hinder legs, but harl one leg through the other, and cut a hole in one ear to contain the other; in this manner roast your Leveret; while it is roast­ing, make your sauce with Winter-Savory, sweet Majoram, Tyme and Parsley minced very small, mince also some yolks of hard Eggs, the Liver of the Leveret parboil'd with some Bacon and Beef-suet, boil these up well in a strong Broth and Vinegar: being boiled, put thereunto drawn Butter, some Sugar and a grated Nutmeg, dish up your Leverets on this sauce with slices of Lemon.

Mutton, a shoulder roasted the best way with Oysters.

Take a quart of large Oysters, and par­boil them in their own liquor; having drain'd the liquor from them, wash them in White wine, then dry them and season them with Salt and Nutmeg, stuff the shoulder very thick with these, and lard it here and there with Anchovies: being at the fire, baste it with Claret wine; then take the bottoms of eight Hartichokes [Page 85] boiled very tender, and cleared from their strings, put these into beaten Butter, with the Marrow of as many Marrow-bones; then set them by the fire, that they may not cool, putting to them the Gravy of the Mutton, some Salt and sliced Nutmeg, with the juyce of two Lemons, and about a pint of great Oysters, being first parboil'd; your Mutton being roasted, dish it up, ha­ving added to your sauce an Anchovy, some White wine, a whole Onion, stript Tyme, and all boil'd up together. Let your Mutton lye in the middle of the dish, placing your Hartichokes round the dish brims, putting the Marrow and Oysters on the Hartichokes bottoms, with some sliced Lemon on the Mutton, and thus serve it.

Mutton, shoulder roasted without Oysters.

Whilst your shoulder of Mutton is roast­ing, make ready your sauce in this manner: take the Gravy, Claret wine, grated Nut­meg, Pepper, sliced Lemon, and Broom­buds, put these in a Pipkin together with a little Salt, let them stew a little while to­gether, then dish up your Mutton, and pour in the sauce into the Dish, garnish it with Barberries and sliced Lemon.

Mutton is a common sort of Flesh among [Page 86] the English, and because generally fed on in Noblemens houses, as well as in those of mean degree, there are found out many ways of dressing the several joynts which belong to the sheep; fearing I shall be too prolix, if I begin to treat thereof, I will wave and give you a short account of what sauces are most used and esteemed for Mutton.

Some are for Gravy, Samphire, Capers and Salt stew'd together; others are for Oyster liquor and Gravy boil'd together, with Eggs, Verjuyce, juyce of Orange, and slices of Lemon all over: A third sort are for Onions chopped with sweet Herbs, vi­negar, Gravy and Salt boil'd together: A fourth is only for Parsley chopped and mingled with Vinegar: A fifth is for Ver­juyce, Butter, Sugar, Gravy with minced Parsley, or pickled Capers and Gravy, or Samphire cut an inch long and Gravy, or Onions, Oyster liquor, Claret, Capers pickled, Cucumbers, Broom-buds, Gravy, Nutmeg and Salt boiled together. Last­ly, whole Onions stew'd in Gravy, White wine, with Pepper, Capers, Mace and slices of Lemon; or Water, Claret, sliced Nutmeg and Gravy boiled up together.

Mutton, a Jegget how to roast.

Some may be ignorant what a Jegget of Mutton is, for their information it is a Leg with half the Loin cut to it; you-must roast it thus: draw it with Tyme and Le­mon-pill; be sure to save the Gravy that proceeds from it, and put thereto a cou­ple of cut Onions, two or three Ancho­vies, and a pretty quantity of Elder Vine­gar; after these have boiled together a little while, put to it some minced Capers and Samphire, with a Nutmeg sliced, add­ing your Gravy and some Oyster liquor. This is a sauce for any joynt of Mutton.

Neats tongue roasted.

After you have boiled and blanched your Tongue, set it by; and when it is cold, cut a hole in the butt-end thereof, and mince the meat you take from thence, with some sweet Herbs finely minced therewith, the yolks of Eggs sliced, some Pippins and Beef-suet chopt very small, some Salt and beaten Ginger; having fill'd the hole of your Tongue with these materials, stop it with a Caul of Veal, lard it with small Lard, and roast it: for your sauce you must have Butter, Gravy, juyce of Orange [Page 88] or Lemon, and some grated Nutmeg, garnish it with sliced Lemon-pill and Barberries.

Neats Tongue and Ʋdder roasted otherways.

Take your Tongue and Udder and par­boil them well, then blanch the Tongue, and lard them both with great Lard; but first you must remember to season them with Pepper, Nutmeg, Ginger and Cinamon, then roast them and baste them with But­ter; and when they are almost roasted bread them with grated Bread, or dress them with Flowre, mingling therewith some of the forenam'd spices beaten small; dish them up with a little Butter, Gravy, Juyce of Orange, Sugar and slices of Lemon.

Neats Tongues and Ʋdders frigassi'd.

Take your Tongue and Udder, and boil them till they be enough; then with your knife, cut them into slices, beginning at the butt-end, and ending within three inches of the tip or small end, which you must cut length-ways for Sippets; then take a handful of several sorts of sweet Herbs, as Tyme, Winter-Savory, &c. mince them very small, and put them to the Tongue and Udder; to these add the yolks of eight Eggs; and so commix all these together: having so done, fry them in clarified But­ter, [Page 89] then turn them out into a stew-Pan, and set it over the fire with White wine, Sugar, Ginger, beaten Cinamon, a little Vinegar, a sprig or two of Rosemary, a handful of Bread grated; as it boils up, put into it a ladleful of drawn Butter, then serve it up with the slices of your tips and small end of Tongue and Udder; after this run your lair all over it.

Neats feet frigassied.

First boil, and then blanch them, split them, and fry them in clarified Butter, or you may bone them, and fry them in But­ter, strong Broth and Salt; having fryed a while, put into the Pan some green Chibbolds and minced Parsley, some beaten Pepper, Tyme and Spearmint chopt very small; when almost enough, make a sauce of the yolks of half a dozen Eggs dissolved in Vi­negar, some Mutton Gravy, a little Nut­meg with the juyce of Oranges or Lemons; after this manner dish them up.

Neats feet roasted.

Your Neats feet must be first boiled and blanched, and when they are cold lard them, and make them fast to a small spit, baste them with Butter, Vinegar, Sugar, and a little Nutmeg; being enough, have in [Page 90] readiness a sauce made of Claret, White wine Vinegar, and toasts of brown wheate [...] Bread strained with the Wine through the Strainer; then add thereto Ginger and beaten Cinamon, a few whole Cloves, put all into a Pipkin, and stir it with a branch of Rosemary till it be reasonably thick.

Oxe-Pallets, &c. roasted after an incompara­ble manner.

Take Oxe-Pallets, Lambstones, Cox­combs and the stones, parboil these and blanch them; then take half a dozen Rails, Snites, Quails, Ox-eyes or Larks, and make them ready for the Spit; having got in readiness interlarded Bacon, Sage, &c. draw on a Bird upon your small spit, then a slice of interlarded Bacon, and a Bay­leaf, then Lambstones, Cox-combs and Stones with some large Oysters larded, then Bacon and a Sage leaf, then a Bird, and so on till you have spitted all the Birds; then take the yolks of three Eggs, fine grated Manchet, Salt, Nutmeg, Tyme and Rosemary minced very small, and with this baste your spitted composition, as soon as you find them begin to roast: in the mean time get the bottoms of Hartichokes boil'd and quater'd, and dip them with Marrow [Page 91] into Batter, and so fry them: the roast be­ing enough, rub the bottom of your Dish with Garlick, then place your Birds in the middle, place the Pallets by themselves, Lambstones by themselves, the Combs, Stones and Sweet-breads apart by them­selves; and lastly, the Hartichokes and Marrow distinct from the rest: let your sauce be Butter, Anchovies, sliced Onion, Salt, Oyster liquor, Nutmeg, Gravy and White wine, set a little over the fire, pour this on, and serve it up, garnish'd with sliced Lemon.

Pig roasted with the skin off.

Take a Pig that's newly kill'd, and be­ing drawn fley him, then wipe him very dry with a cloth; lay him aside and make a hard meat with grated Bread, half a do­zen yolks of Eggs, Cream, minced Tyme, Beef-suet, Salt, Cloves and Mace beaten; with this Pudding made pretty stiff, stuff the belly of your Pig, and skuer it up close, and sticking it full with sprigs of Tyme, lay it down to the fire, with a Dish under it, in which is Claret wine, Tyme, a sliced Nutmeg, a little Vinegar and Salt; as it roasts, baste the Pig herewith; being e­nough, froth it up with Butter: then take [Page 92] the sauce into which it dropt, and putting thereto a large piece of Butter with some minced Lemon, beat it up thick, and dish your Pig therein.

Pig roasted with the hair on.

Having drawn your Pig very clean at vent, taking out his guts, Liver and Lights, wipe him well, cutting off his feet and truss him, and prick up the belly; being laid to the fire, be careful of scorching him; when you perceive the skin to rise up in blisters, pull off the skin and hair, having clear'd him of both, scotch him down the back, and baste him with But­ter and Cream; then take Currans, Salt, Sugar and grated Bread mingled together, and dredge him therewith, continuing so to do till he is breaded above half an inch thick: being roasted enough, serve it up with sauce made of Vinegar, whole Cloves, whole Cinamon, and Sugar boil'd up to a consistency.

Pig roasted after the usual English fashion.

Having scalded your Pig, clear him very well from hairs, and wash him clean, then put Sage and some houshold Bread into his belly, prick it up and roast him; baste him [Page 93] at first with some Butter and Salt, but quickly wipe it off, keeping him continu­ally rub before a quick fire; being almost ready, baste him very well, and then throw on him a great deal of Salt, turning him backwards and forwards before the fire, which will make his crackling very crisp. For the sauce let there be Sage minced small, with Currans well boil'd in Vine­gar and Water, add thereunto the Gravy of the Pig, a little grated Bread, the Brains, some Barberries and Sugar; give these a walm or two, and serve the Pig on this sauce with some beaten Butter.

Rabbets frigassied.

Let your Rabbets be very well parboil'd, then cut them in halves or quarters, flowre them, and put them into your Pan with sweet Butter, let them fry moderate­ly; then get your lair ready made of the yolks of five Eggs well beaten, with half a pint of White wine and strong Broth, a grated Nutmeg, and a handful of Parsley boil'd up green, and chopt small with a little Sugar; you may put thereto some roasted Potatoes or Hartichokes bottoms sliced, let these be put into the Pan with your Rabbets, and keep them shaking over [Page 94] the fire until it be ready to boil; then dish your Rabbets on Sippets, and pour on your lair as thick as drawn Butter, garnish it with Lemon, Barberries, and boiled Parsley.

Scotch Collops fryed or broiled made of Mutton.

Take the bone out of a Leg of Mut­ton, and slice it into very thin slices, cross the grain of the meat; then beat them or hack them with the back of a knife, then fry them in very good Butter, salting them before you put them into the Pan; being fryed, put to them grated Nutmeg, juyce of Orange, Gravy and a little Claret; give it a walm, dish it up and run beaten Butter over it.

Or having boned your Mutton, cut your Collops round the Leg as thick as a trencher, hack them, season them with Salt, and broil them on a clear Charcoal-fire, broil them up quick and turn them; being enough, sauce them with Gravy, juyce of Orange, Nutmeg and Capers.

Scotch-Collops of Veal.

Take a Leg of Veal, and take out the bone, then cut it into thin slices, knock [Page 95] them with the back of a cleaver, season [...]hem lightly with Salt, and take Lard of an [...]ch long, and draw through every piece: [...]aving so done, fry them in clarified stuff, [...]r rather in good sweet Butter: being [...]ear upon ready, make a sauce of Claret, and Anchovy, some Mutton Gravy, and let it stand a very little on the fire, then rub your dish with Garlick, lay in your meat and pour your sauce thereon, garnish it with slices of Lemon.

Sheeps Tongues, Deers Tongues, or Calves Tongues fryed.

Boil your Tongues and peel them, then cut them into thin slices, and put them in­to the yolks of half a dozen Eggs beaten with Nutmeg, Sugar, Salt and Cinamon, with a handful of Currans; neither will it be irrequisite to add the core of a Lemon cut into square pieces; let your Pan be just ready, as you have done this last, and put these ingredients into the Pan by spoonfuls: being fryed (but have a care of the least burning, for that will spoil all) serve them on Sippets, with sauce made of Sack, sweet Butter and Sugar, and serve it hot, scraping on Sugar.

Steaks of Pork broiled.

Take a Loin of Pork, and take off the skin, then cut the leaner flesh into thi [...] slices; then take a Rowling-pin, and bea [...] them as thin and as broad as you can; then laying them on the dresser spread a­broad, strow on them some Slat and Sage minced very small, and put them on your Gridiron, then season the other side as the former: when they are enough, dish them up on drawn Butter, Vinegar and Mustard with a little Sugar.

Veal, the breast roasted with a Pudding in it.

Take a knife and open the lower end of your Breast of Veal close between the skin and the ribs; then take some Veal and mince it small, with Tyme and fat Bacon chopped small, some beaten Cloves and Mace, Salt, and four yolks of Eggs, mingle these well together, and fill your Breast therewith, skuering it up, lay it to the fire, save the Gravy, and beat it up with Butter, and the juyce of Oranges for sauce.

You may make your Pudding thus: Otherways take three or four yolks of Eggs, some grated white-bread, Currans clean [Page 97] picked and well washed, Cream, Rose­water Cloves and Mace finely beaten, a little Saffron, Salt, Beef-suet chopped small, sliced Dates and Sugar, make it up pretty stiff, and fill the breast therewith.

Veal, a chine or neck roasted.

Draw your joynts with Tyme, spit ei­ther one or other, and lay it to the fire; then take some great Oysters parboil'd, and put to them Parsley, Tyme, and Win­ter-Savory minced small, with the yolks of four Eggs boiled hard and minced small; then take Bacon and cut it into slices four square, and somewhat bigger than your Oysters; then have in a readiness two square Rods about the bigness of your little finger, and spit thereon a piece of Bacon, and then an Oyster so long, till you have spitted all your Oysters and Bacon, then tye these rods on your Veal; when it is about three quarters roasted, set under your roast a Dish with some Claret, minced Tyme, and a Nutmeg grated: your Veal being ready, cut off your rods, and slip your Bacon and Oysters into the Wine, putting them into a Pipkin with the yolk of an Egg, and let them boil up thick with drawn Butter; pour this lair all over [Page 98] your Veal, and serve it up: Thus you may roast a Fillet or Leg.

Veal Olives how roasted.

Take a Fillet of Veal, and cut from thence large Collops, and hack them or beat them with the back of your chopping knife or rowling-pin; season them with Cloves, Nutmeg, Mace and Salt; then take some sweet Herbs and Beef-suet, and mince them very small; add to them the yolks of six Eggs; then spread your Collops; and strow on your farcing, rowling them up very close; now spit them and roast them: prepare your sauce against they be ready, made of the Gravy, that drops from them, some Claret wine, strong Broth and sweet Butter beaten up to a reasonable thickness.

Veal, Fillet farced and roasted.

Take Tyme, Winter-Savory, sweet Mar­joram and Beef-suet; and then mince them very small, beat some Cloves and Mace, adding to what is abovenamed, Salt, grated Bread, four or five Dates cut small, and a handful of Pine kernels blanched; mix all these together with Verjuyce, and the yolk of an Egg: having so done, make little [Page 99] holes in your Veal, and stuff it herewith very thick, then roast it well: the sauce must be Butter, Vinegar, Sugar, Cinamon and Ginger beaten, work your sauce up thick, then dishing your Veal, pour on your sauce and garnish it with slices of O­range.

Veal, a Chine broiled.

Cut your Veal into four or five pieces, you may either lard it or let it alone; but if you do, let the Lard be small, then sea­son each piece with Salt; then broil them on a Gridiron over a soft fire with some branches of Sage and Rosemary between the Chine and the Gridiron; being broiled, sauce it with Gravy, Butter, and juyce of Orange beaten up thick.

Venison that is fat, how to broil.

Cut the fattest part of a Hanch of Veni­son into slices about half an inch thick, salt each piece and broil them on a soft fire ve­ry leisurely; when they have soaked a pretty while, bread them, and serve them with Gravy only: Thus you may broil a Chine or side of Venison, being first boiled and seasoned with a little Salt.

Venison, a Hanch roasted.

If your Venison hath been seasoned, wa­ter it first, then stick it with short sprigs of Rosemary, lay it to the fire, roast it not too much; and let your sauce be half a pint of Claret, a handful and a half of grated Bread, some Cinamon, Ginger, Su­gar, and a little Vinegar, boil all these to­gether so long till they are as thick as Pan­cake Batter, then dish up your Venison thereon.

Venison in Collops.

Take a Hanch of Venison, and cut part of it into Collops; then hack it with the back of your knife; and having stuck it with small lard, take a handful of Parsley and Spinage, good store of Tyme, a little Rosemary, with other sweet Herbs, and mince them very small with Beef-suet; put these into a dish together, with the addi­tion of beaten Cloves, Nutmeg, good store of Salt, the yolks of seven Eggs, mingle these all together with your hands, then spit your Collops on a small spit, inter­mixing your Herbs, and so tye them all to­gether: set a dish under them to save the Gravy, in which you must put some Cla­ret; [Page 101] being almost roasted, put your dish over the coals with grated Bread, beaten Cinamon, Vinegar and Sugar; stir these together with your wine, and a ladleful of drawn Butter, make not your lair too thick, and dishing your Venison, pour it there­on.

Fowl of all sorts, both Land and Sea Fowl Roasted, Fryed, Broiled, Fri­gassied.

Capon roasted with Oysters and Chesnuts.

TAke a good fat Capon, and make him ready for the spit, then boil a dozen Chesnuts, being soft pill them, and put them into Claret wine warm'd, with as many large Oysters parboil'd; put these in­to the belly of the Capon, and stop them in with sweet Butter; let your fire be ve­ry good and quick, baste [...] it with sweet Butter, and as soon as it begins to drop preserve the Gravy; then take half a pint of Claret wine, a piece of sweet Butter, a little gross Pepper, half a score, or a score of parboil'd Chesnuts, as many large Oy­sters, [Page 102] stew these all together till half the liquor be consumed: your Capon being ready, put in your Gravy to your sauce, bread up your Fowl, and dish it on your sauce.

Capons frigassied.

Your Capon to be frigassied must be ei­ther boiled or roasted, which you must carve up, taking the Pinions from the Wings, and the Brawn from the Joynt, as they lye in the dish: Thus carved up to lye orderly on the Pan, put to them the yolks of five Eggs, with sliced Nutmeg, and minced Tyme: Being thus all in the dish, mingle them well together, and put them into your Pan with clarified Butter half hot, and fry them till they are yellow, then turn them: after this take some White wine with the yolks of three Eggs, a little strong Broth, Gravy, an Onion cut in quar­ters, Anchovies, and a little Nutmeg grated; then pour out what liquor is in your Pan, and add to it a ladleful of drawn Butter; then put this lair into your Pan, and keep continually shaking it therein over a slow fire till it grows thick; if it should prove too thick, you may thin it with White wine; then dish up your Fowl, and pour [Page 103] in your sauce and serve it up, garnisht with hard yolks of Eggs chopt small, and slices of Lemon.

Chickens frigassied.

Take half a dozen Chickens, draw, fley and cut them into quarters, not removing the Gibblets and Liver; then take your Cleaver, and with the back thereof beat them very well, then fry them brown with Butter; in the mean time get Tyme, sweet Marjoram, and other sweet Herbs, and mince them small, Oxe-Palates, Dates, the bottoms of three or four Hartichokes sliced all together, Salt with beaten Ginger and Mace: The meat being enough, cleanse your Pan, and put in your meat again with strong Broth, Verjuyce, and the rest of the aforementioned materials, and let them fry till the liquor be half consumed; then put in half a pound of Butter, Sugar, scalded Goosberries, minced Lemon, and shake them well together, dish them up on Sip­pets, garnished with grated Bread, sliced Lemon and scalded Goosberries.

The latest way of frigassying Chickens is thus: take them, scald them, and quar­ter them, then break their bones by beat­ing them with a back of the Cleaver, dry [Page 104] them well, and then flowre them; your Pan being hot, put them in with their skin­ny side downward, and fry them brown on both sides: then pour out your liquor, and have a lair in readiness made of Gravy and Claret, which you must put into your Pan, adding thereto pieces of Sausages, cut about half the length of your finger, a pint of Oysters, and an Onion or two, a faggot of sweet Herbs, a grated Nut­meg, a couple of Anchovies; let these boil up in the Pan: then take the yolks of five Eggs, and beat them in strong broth, take your Pan off the fire and pour them in, shaking them whilst they are over the fire; then dish up your Chickens on Sippets, pouring on your lair with Oysters, and placing your bits of Sausages round the dish, garnishing it with Lemon.

Duckling frigassied.

Take Ducklings and cut them in small pieces, flowre and fry them in sweet But­ter: having first dryed them in a clean cloth; then take some Sack, an Onion and Parsley chopt small, a piece of whole Mace, and a little gross Pepper, adding hereunto some Butter, Sugar and Verjuyce: Then take a good handful of Clary, and pick off [Page 105] the stalks: having done this, make a bat­ter of four new-laid Eggs, fine Flowre, some sweet Cream, and a little Nutmeg, fry these in a Pan; and having dish'd your Ducklings, pour on your fryed Clary, &c. upon them.

Ducks or Wigeons frigassied.

Quarter them first, race them, beat them with the back of your Cleaver: having dryed them well, put them into a Pan with sweet Butter, and fry them: when they are almost fryed, put into them a handful of minced Onions, some little Tyme; after put in some Claret wine, with some thin slices of Bacon, and some Spi­nage and Parsley boiled green and minced small: when it hath fryed a little while, break in a dish three yolks of Eggs, with a grated Nutmeg, and a little Pepper, put these into the Pan, then toss it up with a ladleful of drawn Butter; pour on your lair, and let your Bacon be on the top of your Ducks.

Ducks roasted.

Having roasted your Ducks very well, provide in the mean time this following sauce; boil some Onions sliced very thin [Page 106] in a little strong Broth, put thereto a little Gravy, and some drawn Butter: This is the custom of some, but the best and general rule is for all Wild Fowl, to boil up the Gravy with an Onion, a little Nutmeg and Butter. For Water Fowl, it is customa­ry to boil up sliced Onions in strong Broth, with Gravy and a little drawn Butter.

Goose frigassied.

Take a Goose and roast him almost, then carve him and scotch with your knife long ways, and cross it over again to make it look like chequer-work; then wash it over with Butter, and strow Salt upon it; then put it into a dish with the skinny side downward, so set it before the fire in a dripping-Pan, that it may take a gentle heat, then turn the other side; then take it and lay it on your Gridiron over a soft fire: when you think it is enough, baste the upper side with Butter; then dredge it over with flowre and bread grated; then put it over again and froth it, and dish it up: your sauce must be Vinegar, Butter and Mustard, with a little Sugar, put it in­to your dish with a little drawn Butter, and lay your Goose a top of it, garnish it [Page 107] with Lemon, laying on Sausages round the brims of the dish.

Hen roasted.

Make choice of an indifferent young Hen full of Eggs, fit it for the spit, and roast it: being enough, take it up and break it open, and taking the brawn from the joynt, mince it into small slices, but save the wings and legs whole, with the rump also, stew all in the Gravy with a little Salt; after this, mince a Lemon into your sauce; let the minced brawn of the Hen be laid in the middle of the dish, and the legs, wings and rump round about it; garnish the dish with the yolks of hard Eggs minced small, and some slices of Orange or Le­mon.

For a Hen roasted and not broken up; the usual sauce is, the yolks of four Eggs boiled hard and minced, a little drawn But­ter, some Claret wine, Gravy, and the juyce of a Lemon.

Larks roasted with Bacon.

Pull your Larks and draw them, and spit them on a small spit, with a slice of Bacon, and a Sage-leaf between each Lark: being roasted, dish them up with a sauce [Page 108] made of the juyce of two or three O­ranges, Claret, and a little sliced Ginger; then set it on the fire a little while, and beat it up with a piece of Butter, and so serve them up.

With the same sauce you may broil your Larks on a Gridiron, opening their breasts and laying them abroad.

Plover roasted.

Take half a dozen green or gray Plovers, and roast them; being enough, have some Onions boiled (being first sliced) in strong Broth, add thereunto Gravy, and a little drawn Butter; or else Gravy boiled up with an Onion, a little Nutmeg and Butter.

Partridges roasted.

Pull, draw and truss them, then roast them not too dry, sauce them with grated Bread, Water, Salt, and a whole Onion boiled together: when it is boiled, take out the Onion, and in its stead put in minced Lemon, and a piece of Butter; then dish your Fowl, and serve it up with this sauce.

Partridges frigassied.

Truss your Partridges, and roast them till they are three quarters enough, then carve them up; after this fry them with an O­nion chopped very small; add to them half a pint of Gravy, three Anchovies, some grated Bread, drawn Butter, and the yolks of two Eggs beaten with white wine, boil them till they come to a thickness, and dish them up.

Pullets roasted.

Roast your Pullet saving the Gravy: having before stuft the belly thereof with a little Butter, the yolks of two hard Eggs minced, some Claret wine, the juyce of Lemon and Salt, pour your dripping out of the Pan, blowing off the fat, and boil it up with a little Claret; then put to it some drawn Butter, and serve it up with your Fowl.

Pigeons roasted.

Prepare them to truss, then make a farcing with Beef-suet or Marrow, mincing it with the Liver of the Fowl very small, and mingle it with grated Bread, the yolks of hard Eggs minced, Mace and Nutmeg [Page 110] beaten, the tops of Tyme shred very small, and Salt, incorporate these together, with the yolks of hard Eggs and Verjuyce; then cut the skin of the Fowl betwixt the Legs and body before it is trussed; then put your finger to raise the skin from the flesh, but have a care you do not break the skin; then farce it full with this meat, trussing the Legs close to keep it in, then roast them, setting a dish under to save the Gravy, which you must mix with some Claret wine, sliced Nutmeg, a little of that farced Meat and Salt; then give it two or three walms on the fire, and beat it up thick with the yolk of a raw Egg, and a piece of Butter, with a little minced Lemon, and so serve it up.

You may for variety use this sauce, mince a handful of Parsley very small, and wrap it up in a ball of Butter with a grated Nut­meg, put this into the belly of your Pidge­ons: when you spit them, adding thereto some minced Bacon, with a few Mints; take this farcing out when you draw them, and put it into Claret wine, putting thereto grated Bread and drawn Butter, and you may use your Vine leaves roasted and mince them therein.

Qails roasted.

Pull your Quails without breaking their skin, and roast them with some Vine­leaves, or dry the Vine-leaves in a dish be­fore the fire; then mince them very small, and put them into Claret wine, with a lit­tle Vinegar, small Pepper and Salt; being boiled, beat it up thick with a piece of But­ter, and so serve up your Fowls.

Or you may only take some White wine, grated Nutmeg, Vine-leaves minced, and some drawn Butter.

Rabbets roasted.

Spit them not back to back, but skuer them up side to side, so will they roast much better; being roasted enough, take Butter and minced Parsley, being first boiled or roasted in their bellies, and add thereto the Livers minced very small, and so serve them up.

Snipe roasted.

You may either draw them or not, if you do, put an Onion into the belly of the Fowls, and so roast them with a dish under them, in which must be some Cla­ret wine, Vinegar, an Anchovy, Pepper [Page 112] and Salt: when your Fowls are roasted, put thereto a little grated Bread, some But­ter, shaking them well together, and so serve it up: This is very good sauce for a wild Duck, having first rub'd your dish with a clove of Garlick.

If you do not draw your Fowl, then only take the guts and mince them very small into Claret wine, with a little Salt, Gravy and Butter.

Another sauce is thus made, take some Onions and boil them, and add to them some Pepper and Salt, with a little Butter, or raw Onions, Water, Pepper and Salt, with the Gravy of any fresh Meat.

Turkey carbonado'd.

Your Turkey being roasted almost and carved, scotch it with your knife long ways, crossing it over again, that it may look like Chequer-work; then wash it over with Butter, strowing Salt thereon; then setting it in your dripping-Pan, let it take a gentle heat, turning it twice or thrice, then set it on your Griditon over a soft Char-coal fire; when it is enough take it up, and sauce it with Gravy and strong Broth boiled up with an Onion, a little grated Bread, a sliced Nutmeg, an An­chovy, [Page 113] and a ladle of drawn Butter, adding thereto some Salt; then dish up your Tur­key, and pour your sauce all over it; then strow it over with Barberries and garnish it with Oranges or Lemon.

Or you may take some sliced Manchet soaked in some strong Broth with Onions, boil it up in Gravy, Nutmeg, Lemon cut like Dice, and drawn Butter, put this under your Turkey.

Woodcocks roasted.

Having pull'd and drawn them, wash and truss them, then lard them with a broad piece of Bacon over the breast; being roasted, serve them on broiled tosts dipt in Verjuyce, or the juyce of Oranges with the Gravy, and warmed on the fire: This is the French fashion.

The English way of roasting Woodcocks is thus: take them fresh and newly killed, you may know when they are so, by open­ing their bill and smell to it, or plucking a feather from the wing, and thrust it down their throat; if they are tainted, you will know it by the smell of the fea­ther. Having drawn, wash'd and trust them, lay them to the fire, and baste them with Butter; being almost enough, strow [Page 114] grated Bread on them, and be sure to sa [...] the Gravy, into which you must put to [...] that are butter'd: Or, you may only min [...] the guts, being roasted with the Fowl int [...] their Gravy and a little Claret, and so serv [...] them up.

Or you may cut a Manchet into tosts, and put them into Gravy boiled up with an Onion, a little strong Broth, some drawn Butter, and a little Nutmeg; pour this o [...] your tosts, and dish up your Cocks.

Fish, Flesh and Fowl of several sorts baked in Pan, or put into paste made after several forms and fashions.
Fish baked in Pan or Pasty.

A Batilly Pye of Fish.

YOu must make a very large Coffin, and cut it with Batlements, garnish the Coffin with as many Towers, as will con­tain your several sorts of Fish; be sure to dry your Coffin well, and wash it over in the inside with the yolks of Eggs, and flowre it in the bottom to solder it, let the [Page 115] Fish you design for your Pye be either broil­ed or fryed brown; in the middle of your Pye place the head of a Salmon, cut pretty large beyond the Gills, forced and baked in an Oven, the heads of your other sort of Fish must stand upon forced meat; and place your Fish severally one opposite to the other in their several partitions, pouring over all your Fish, Oysters, Cockles, Prawns and Perriwinkles boiled up in their proper lairs (as hath been formerly shown) and thickned up with drawn Butter, remember to place your forced heads over the battle­ments.

Or you may make the like partitions upon a sheet of paste, in a dish with a stand­ing battlement, set round the brims; in which partitions you▪ may dish up all manner of shelled Fish with their distinct lairs.

Cockles and Muscles in Paste.

Having parboil'd them, take out the meat and wash them very clean in the water they were boiled in, and a little White wine; then mince them small with the yolks of three or four new laid Eggs, season them with Salt, Nutmeg and Pep­per, wringing therein the juyce of an O­range [Page 116] or two, then close them within tw [...] sheets of paste, bake it, ice it, and serv [...] it up.

Carp Pye.

Scale your Carp and scrape off the slime then wipe it dry, and split it down the back then cut it into several pieces, not very small, taking away the Milt or Spawn and Gall; having season'd it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt and beaten Ginger, lay some Butter in the Pye-bottom, and put in thereon your pieces of Carp so seasoned, and upon them three or four Bay-leaves, five or six blades of large Mace, as many whole Cloves, some blanched Chesnuts, slices of Orange and sweet Butter, then close it up and bake it; being baked, liquor it with beaten Butter, the blood of the Carp, and some Claret wine; you may bake great Oysters, and a couple of large Onions with the Carp.

Carp baked otherways.

Scald, wash and draw a fair large Carp, season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper, and put it into a Coffin with good store of Butter cast on some Raisins of the Sun, the juyce of two or three Oranges, and [Page 117] top of all, some sweet Butter to keep all [...]e rest moist; before you bake it, sprinkle [...]n some Vinegar.

Otherways.

Having first scalded your Carp, season [...]t with Pepper, Mace, Nutmeg, Cloves, Ginger and Salt, and lay him into a Coffin sit for him; then lay on the top thereof two or three Onions quarter'd, half a pint of large Oysters seasoned with Tyme, then put in the yolks of half a dozen hard Eggs with Butter thereon, then close up your Pye; when it is baked, pour in at the Fun­nel a lair made of the Gravy of the Meat, drawn from it with some Claret wine, drawn Butter, beaten up with the yolks of two Eggs; having shaked it together, dish it up: you may bake a Carp seasoned with Raisins, Currans, Dates and Prunes; and then let your lair be Vinegar and But­ter with Sugar, and the yolks of three new laid Eggs beaten.

Carp minced Pyes.

Cleanse your Carp and bone it, then take a good fat Eel and mince them together; then season them with Nutmeg, Mace, Gin­ger, Pepper, Cinamon and Salt, adding [Page 118] thereto some Carraway seed, minced Le­mon-pill, Currans, and the yolks of five o [...] six hard Eggs chopped small, with slice Dates and Sugar; then laying some But­ter in the bottoms of your Pyes, fill them with these materials, bake them and the [...] ice them.

Crab Pye.

Take half a dozen Crabs, boil them and take the meat out of the shells, then season it a little with Nutmeg and Salt, af­ter this strain the meat of the body with Claret wine, some Ginger, Cinamon, But­ter and juyce of Orange; your Pye being made, put some Butter in the bottom there­of, then lay in the Meat with Sparagus, bottoms of Hartichokes, yolks of three hard Eggs minced, large Mace, Grapes, Barberries, Dates, sliced Orange and Butter; when it is baked, liquor it with some of the meat out of the body, mingled with Cream or drawn Butter.

You may compound your Crab other­ways, as thus: mince it with a fresh water Eel or Tench, and season them with Tyme, sweet Marjoram, and Winter-Savory, bea­ten Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt; add here­unto some roasted Chesnuts, bottoms of [Page 119] [...]artichokes, Sparagus boiled, and cut in­ [...] pieces as long as your thumb, with Pine­ [...]ple seed and Grapes, fill your Pye here­ [...]ith; and being baked, liquor it with But­ [...]r, yolks of Eggs, Claret wine, and juyce of [...]ranges beaten up thick.

Eel Pyes.

Take your silver fresh water Eels, skin and draw them, then season them with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and a blade or two of large Mace; then cut them into pieces about four inches long, and lay them into your Pye, and cut into quarters two or three large Onions, lay thereon some sweet Butter, large Mace, Barberries or Goos­berries; being baked, liquor your Pye with Butter, yolks of Eggs, and juyce of Orange beaten up together.

Eel minced Pyes.

Take a large silver Eel, and having skin'd it, parboil it; then separate the Fish from the bones, and mince it with Pippins, Figs, Wardens and Raisins of the Sun, season it with Pepper, Mace, Cloves, Salt, Sugar, Saffron, Prunes, Currans, Dates and whole Raisins of the Sun, with Butter laid on the top; make your Pyes little in the form [Page 120] of a Beaker; and when baked, liquor the [...] with Butter, juyce of Lemon, Sugar an [...] White wine.

Eets baked the common way.

Take fresh water Eels, and cut the [...] into pieces about the length of your finger season them with Pepper, Salt and Ginger put them into a Coffin with half a pound of sweet Butter, and add to them great Raisins of the Sun, an Onion minced small, or Leeks cut grosly and so bake it.

Eel Pyes otherways.

Your Eels being skin'd, cleans'd and cut into pieces three inches long, put to them sweet Marjoram, Tyme, Winter-Savory, Onions or Leeks with Parsley minced small, then season them with Nutmeg, Mace, Pep­per, Cloves and Salt; having coffin'd them, put all over them a quarter of a pound of Currans and Lemon sliced, over these put Butter, close it, and when it is baked, lair it with White wine and Vinegar, beaten up with the yolks of three Eggs, and some drawn Butter; pour this in at the Fun­nel of the Pye, and shake it well toge­ther.

Flounder Pye.

Take Flounders, draw and wash them, then cut off their Finns and scotch them, then mingle Pepper, Nutmeg, Salt and Mace, and season them therewith; then take Leeks cut small, and strow over the bottom of your Pye; then put in your Flounders, and lay on them the meat of Lobster claws and tail cut into small pieces, the yolks of hard Eggs and Onions minced, with some Grapes or Goosberries if you have them: Lastly, put on Butter, and close your Pye; when baked, lair it with White wine and Parsley minced very small, with the meat of the body of a Lobster, drawn Butter, and the yolk of a new laid Egg, shake these together in your Pye, and serve it up hot to the Table.

Herring minced Pyes.

Take pickled Herrings, and water them well, then strip the skins from them whole and lay them in a Tray, and put to them a pound of Almond paste; but you must first mince your Herrings with two Lights or Rows; add also seven or eight Dates, some grated Manchet, Sugar, Rosewater, a little Sack with Saffron, make all these [Page 122] pretty stiff; then take your skins and fill them with this composition, then lay But­ter in the bottoms of your Pyes, and lay in your Herrings with Dates, a top Goos; berries, Currans and Butter, then close it, and when baked, liquor it with Butter, Vi­negar and Sugar.

Or thus you may make minced Pyes of Herrings or Pilchards; first bone, skin and cleanse them, then mince them small with four or five Burgomy pears pared, or any other sort of Pear that is mellow and pleasant; put to these Raisins of the Sun, some Currans, Dates, Sugar, Cinamon, Ginger, Nutmeg, Butter and Pepper, min­gle all these together, fill your Pyes; and being baked, liquor them with White wine Vinegar and Butter.

Haberdine or Stock-fish Pyes.

First boil it, and then take it from the skin and bones, and mince it with some Pip­pins, season it with Ginger, Nutmeg, Pep­per, Carraway seed, Cinamon, Currans, minced Raisins, Rosewater, minced Le­mon-pill, Sugar, sliced Dates, White wine, Verjuyce and Butter, fill your Pyes here▪ with, bake them and ice them, and serve them up hot to the Table.

You may mince your Haberdine or Stock-fish with yolks of hard Eggs chopped small, and all manner of sweet Herbs minced, mix them together, and season them as aforesaid, then liquor it with But­ter, Verjuyce, Sugar and beaten Cinamon: Lastly, ice your Pye.

Lamprey Pye.

Garbidge your Lamprey, taking out the black blood which is like a string in the back, slit the back and pull it out, then sea­son it with Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt; make your Pye round, then rowl your Lam­prey as your Pye; lay two or three whole O­nions in your Pye, and put in good store of Butter with two or three Bay-leaves, let it stand in the Oven three or four hours, then fill it up with Butter, and keep it for your use.

Otherways to be eaten cold.

Take your Lamprey, and cut it open in the belly, then take out the back-bone; after this scald it, and scrape it well on the skinny side, season it on the inside with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and a little minced Onion, then close it together, as if it were whole, then season the out side: [Page 124] have in readiness a Coffin of Rye-dough, according to the wideness of your Lamprey, turn'd round therein: put in two great Onions in the middle, with Bay-leaves and Butter, so with your funnel, and garnish­ing indore it and bake it; fill it up with clarified Butter when it is cold.

Lump Pye.

Take a Lump and skin him, then cut all the flesh from the bones into pieces bigger than your thumb, season it with several sorts of sweet Herbs, Cloves, Ginger, Mace, Salt and Pepper, with a handful of grated bread; your Pye being made, throw in­to the bottom a handful of this seasoning, and put thereon your pieces of Fish, on them put Marrow, Oysters, the yolks of hard Eggs cut in halves, with sliced Le­mon; lay on the top of that more sea­soning, and then lay on the remaining pieces of your fish, and on the top of them strow on the rest of your seasoning; put a top of all good store of Butter, then close it up and bake it: when it is baked, lair it with White wine, Oyster liquor, drawn Butter, and the yolks of two or three Eggs, shake it well and serve it up.

Lump baked otherways.

Take a Lump and fley it, and split it in two, then season it with Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, and lay it into a Coffin, and on it lay some Bay-leaves, large Mace, an O­range sliced, Goosberries, Grapes, Barber­ries and Butter, close it up; and when it is baked, liquor it with drawn Butter; you may bake it thus, in a dish or Pasty­pan.

Ling Pye made of a Jole of Ling.

Take a Jole of Ling, and boil it till it be almost enough; then take off the skin, and season it with Pepper: having made your Pye, strow the bottom thereof with Onions minced very small, close it, and bake it; then take the yolks and whites of ten Eggs, and boil them between hard and soft; then mince them small, and put them into drawn Butter, toss them toge­ther; then draw your Pye, cut open the lid, and pour this liquor all over it, then put on your lid and serve it up.

Another excellent way.

Let your Lump be skin'd, cleansed and [Page 126] seasoned as aforesaid, and so put it in [...] your Pye, then lay on sliced Ginger, larg [...] Mace, close it up, and put a Funnel there on; put it into an Oven, and let it stan [...] till it be half baked, then draw it up with good sweet Sallet Oyl, then put it in again▪ when it is baked enough, draw it and cut it up, then beat three spoonfuls of Mustard, with some of the Oyl, and pour it there­in, shake it well together, and serve it up.

Lobster Pyes.

Boil your Lobsters, then take the meat out of the shells, and let it stand till it be cold, then lard it with salt Salmon, or a salt Eel, and season it with Salt, Pepper and Nutmeg: having made your Pye, lay in the bottom thereof some sweet Butter, and on it some pieces of fresh Eel, or fresh Salmon, and on it a lair of Lobster, add to it some whole Cloves; and make thus three or four lairs: lay last of all some slices of fresh Eel or fresh Salmon, and some whole Cloves and Butter, then close it up, and when baked, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Or you may take the meat of a Lobster, prepared as aforesaid, and season it with [Page 127] Nutmeg, Cinamon, Salt and Pepper, with a little Ginger; then lay it in a Pye made somewhat in the form of a very large Lobster, and lay on it some Dates cut in two, sliced Lemon, large Mace, Barber­ries, yolks of hard Eggs chopt, and a pret­ty quantity of Butter, close it up, and when baked, liquor it with White wine Vinegar, Butter and Sugar, and having iced it, dish it up.

Mullet Pye.

Gut your Mullet, scale it and wash it, then dry it very well: having so done, lard it with a salt Eel, season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Mace, Salt, and a little Ginger ve­ry lightly; then stuff its belly with a pud­ding made of grated Bread, sweet Herbs, and some fresh Eel minced, add to these the yolks of hard Eggs, an Anchovy wash­ed and minced very small, some Nutmeg, and a little Salt; then lay it in your Pye: then lay on your Fish, Cockles, Prawns, Ca­pers, yolks of hard Eggs minced small, Butter, large Mace and Barberries, close it up; and when it is baked, cut open the lid, stick it full of Lozenges, then fill it up with beaten Butter, laying on some slices of Lemon.

In the same manner you may bake Bace, Tench or Bream.

Muscle Pye.

Take a good quantity of Muscles, wash them very clean, and then set them a boil­ing, making the water to boil before you put them in; being enough, take them out of the shells, beard them very well, and cleanse them from stones and gravel: then take Leeks and some sweet Herbs, and mix them therewith, and chop them very small, adding thereunto some Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, with the yolks of four hard Eggs minced small, put But­ter at the bottom and top of your Pye, and close it up: being baked, liquor it with Butter, White wine, and slices of Lemon.

Oyster Pyes.

Save the liquor of your largest Oysters, season it with Pepper and Ginger, and put your Oysters therein with two or three blades of large Mace; then lay the Oysters with those ingredients into a Pye; add to them an Onion minced small, some Cur­rans, and a quarter of a pound of Butter; when it is baked, cut open the lid, and put in a spoonful of Vinegar, with some drawn [Page 129] Butter, shake it well together, and serve it up.

Oysters baked with other compounds.

Take Oysters, Cockles, Shrimps and Craw-fish, and season them with Salt, Nut­meg and Pepper; after you have well wash'd and cleans'd them from any kind of filth or gravel, then have in readiness Chesnuts roasted and blanched, Skirrrets boiled, blanched and seasoned; then have a Dish or Pasty-pan ready with a sheet of cool But­ter paste, having laid some Butter in the bot­tom, lay on your several sorts of Shell-fish, and on them your Chesnuts, Skirrets with sliced Lemon, large Mace, Barberries and Butter, close it, and when it is baked, fill it up (having cut open the lid) with But­ter and juyce of Oranges beaten up thick: you must make the Paste after this manner, for every half peck of Flowre you must al­low two pound and a quarter of Butter, and the whites of two Eggs, work it well together dry, then put cold Water to it, and your Paste is made, this is only fit for Pasties and Pasty-pans.

Oyster Pyes otherways.

Take very large Oysters and parboill [Page 130] them, season them with beaten Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg; add to these some grated Bread, and withal take a good handful of Tyme, Parsley, Winter-Savory, a couple of Onions, and mince them very small; put all these materials into your Pye with Potato's boil'd, and Chesnuts boil'd and blanched, with the yolks of hard Eggs cut in halves: lay over all Marrow, sliced Lemon, large Mace, Butter, and so close your Pye, which must be made thin, since half an hour is sufficient to bake your ingredients therein contain'd; when it is baked, pour into it a lair made of White wine, Oyster liquor, two yolks of Eggs, and drawn Butter, shake it well to­gether, and letting it stand a little while in the Oven, serve it up.

Another very good way.

Parboil two quarts of large Oysters in their own liquor, throw a little Salt on them, and mingle them with some sweet Herbs minced small; fill your Pye, and put therein some large Mace, sliced Le­mon, a good handful of Marrow rowled in yolks of Eggs and Butter; when it is ba­ked, take Verjuyce, Sugar, Butter, a little [Page 131] Pepper, and two Nutmegs grated, and liquor it therewith.

Oyster minced Pyes.

Take a pottle of large Oysters, parboil'd in their own liquor, beard them, and wash them in warm water from filth and gravel: having dryed them, mince them small, then season them lightly with Cinamon, Mace, Cloves, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Carraway­seed, a few Raisins of the Sun minced small, sliced Dates, Currans, Sugar, and half a pint of Claret, mingle these very well together; and having made your Pyes about the bigness and form of a Tumbler, putting Butter in the bottoms of the Pyes, fill them up herewith and bake them.

Pike baked.

Draw your Pike and wash him well, then lard him with pickle Herring; then take a handful of sweet Herbs, another of Oysters, an Onion, and a little Lemon­pill, mince them all together, add to them Nutmeg, Salt, Pepper, Mace and Cloves: then wash your Pike all over with the yolks of Eggs, both inside and outside, and with the aforesaid ingredients season him; have a Pye in readiness made into the form [Page 132] of a Pike, and lay him therein with Horse­radish scraped, and with two handfuls of Grapes all over him; having laid on a good piece of Butter, close and bake your Pye, then draw it and liquor it with Butter, White wine Vinegar, and the yolk of an Egg; you may add to your lair Oysters, Cockles, Shrimps, Prawns and Craw-fish, with the yolks of hard Eggs, Lemon, An­chovies and Gravy.

Pike baked to be eaten cold.

Take a large Pike, scale him and cleanse him, then lard him with salt Eel, then make a forced meat of Fish, and stuff his belly therewith; then season him with Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Ginger and Nut­meg beaten; then lay him into a Coffin of like form, and bake him, draw your Pye, and pour in at the Funnel, Butter, White wine, and the juyce of Lemon, set it by, and eat it when cold.

Prawn or Shrimp Peteets.

Make your Coffins very little, as to the form let them be round, triangle, or four square, or you may make them long to stand up an end; then take your Shell-fish and fry them in yolks of Eggs, Cinamon, [Page 133] Ginger, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace beaten together; when they are crisp and brown, fill your dryed Coffins with the Fish, put into a lair, made of drawn Butter, Cla­ret wine and Oyster liquor, beaten up with the yolks of Eggs; they will instantly be baked.

Salmon Pye.

Take a Salmon newly caught, scale, draw and wipe it dry, scrape the blood from the back-bone, scotch it on the backside, and season it with Cinamon, Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, Carraways, and a little large Mace, and some Ginger; let the Pye be made in the form of a Salmon, and lay in the bottom thereof some Butter, then lay in your Sal­mon, and put some whole Cloves thereon, some sliced Nutmeg, and good store of Butter, close it up, and baste it over with the yolks of Eggs or Water wherein Saf­fron hath been steeped; when it is baked, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Or thus:

Take the tail of a Salmon, and cut it in­to collops quite through both sides, then butter your collops over and salt them, then half broil them; have a coffin in [Page 134] readiness that is dryed in an Oven, and wash the bottom with the yolks of Eggs: then take a handful of sweet Herbs, the like of Oysters, a little Fennel, and an O­nion all minced small, take a handful of all these together, and strow over the bot­tom of your Pye, being first seasoned with Salt, Nutmeg, Cloves, Ginger and Pepper; then lay in your greatest pieces, strowing them over with the afore-recited seasoning, interlaying large seasoned Oysters with sliced Lemons, next lay on your smaller collops and serve them as the former; lay over all good store of Butter: being baked, pour in a lair which you must have in readiness made of White wine, Oyster liquor, and the yolks of two Eggs beaten together, shake it well together and serve it up.

Salmon minced Pyes.

Take a Jole of Salmon, and a good silver Eel boned, skin'd and seasoned with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Cinamon, beaten Ginger, Carraway-seed, Rosewater, But­ter, Verjuyce, Sugar and Orange-pill minced small; mingle all these together with some sliced Dates and Currans; be­fore you fill your Pies, put Butter [Page 135] in the bottom, then bake them and ice [...]hem.

Salmon baked to be eaten cold.

Scrape the scales off your Salmon, then wash and dry him; after this chine him and season him with good store of Salt, Pepper, Ginger, Mace and Cloves; then lay him on a sheet of Pasty-paste, bordering him round to form your Pye into the fa­shion of a Salmon; then put in sliced Gin­ger, Butter and large Mace on the top, then turn up the other half sheet of your Paste on the back, closing them on the bel­ly side from head to tail, bringing him in­to proportion with his finns, tail, head and gills: Lastly, scale him, leave a funnel to pour in Butter, when it is baked, and set him aside to cool.

Sturgeon Pyes to be eaten hot.

Take a Rand of Sturgeon, and cut it in­to collops about the bigness of a Goose-Egg, then season them with Salt, Nutmeg, Ginger and Pepper: your Pye being made, put into the bottom some Butter, then your collops of Sturgeon with two or three Bay-leaves, some large Mace, whole Cloves, blanched Chesnuts, Goosberries or [Page 136] Barberries, and some Butter; being baked, pour in a lair made of Butter, the blood of the Sturgeon and Claret wine boiled up and beaten together.

Sturgeon Pyes to be eaten cold.

Take a Rand of Sturgeon, skin it, and wipe it dry, then cut it into large slices; then take a Carp or a good large Eel skin'd and boned, then season them with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper; then let a Coffin be ready, and lay therein first Butter, then Sturgeon, then a lay of Eel, and next to that a lay of Tench, cut into slices and season'd as the former Fish; then begin with the first lay, and second it with the rest, till you have laid all your Fish into the Pye; but be sure to have your Sturgeon lye uppermost, and a top of all lay on sliced Nutmeg, sliced Ginger, some whole Cloves next; be not sparing of Butter, then close it up, and when it is baked, liquor it with clarified Butter: if you bake it in Pots, with the seasoning afore specified, you may keep it a long time.

Sturgeon minced Pyes.

Take a Rand of Sturgeon, and mince it very small, adding thereto some of the [Page 137] fattest part of it; then take some Tyme, Marjoram, Winter-Savory, Sage, Parsley, [...]orrel, Straw-berry-leaves, Violet-leaves, [...]nd Spinage, chop these all very small, and mingle them with your minced Sturgeon, add thereunto some grated white Bread, Salt, Nutmeg, Currans, Cinamon, yolks of Eggs, Cream, Sugar and Butter, fill up your Pye herewith, and close it; being baked, draw it and ice it.

Sturgeon Lumber Pye.

Take some of the brawny part of the Sturgeon, with some of the fat of the bel­ly, and chop them small; add hereunto either Carp, Tench, or fresh water Eel minced small, then season it with Carra­way-seed, Ginger, Cinamon, Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper; put to these the yolks of six raw Eggs, and the quarters of four that are boiled hard, incorporate these together, and make them up into balls, and fill your Pye therewith, and lay a top some sliced Dates, large Mace, sliced Lemon, Grapes, Goosberries or Barberries, and Butter, close it up, and being baked, liquor it with But­ter, White wine and Sugar.

Stock-fish baked.

Take your Stock-fish, and water it, then boil it tender, then lay it to cool, and after that take some of the whitest of the Fish and mince it small, add thereunto parboil'd Cur­rans, Raisins of the Sun, season it with Nut­meg, Pepper, Salt, and a piece of sweet Butter; then bake it, draw it, and cut open the lid, and squeeze in the juyce of two O­ranges.

Tench baked with a pudding in his belly.

Scald your Tench, and scour it well▪ being washed clean, dry it: then take grated white Bread, sweet Cream, the yolks of three new laid Eggs, some parboil'd Currans, and some sweet Herbs minced small: Lastly, season it with Pepper and Nutmeg, and make it into a stiff pudding, and therewith fill your Tenches belly: sea­son your Fish on the one side, with a little Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg, and put him into a deep Coffin with some Butter; then close it, and when baked draw it, and cut it open, then strow thereon some preserved Orange minced: after this take Vinegar, Butter, Nutmeg, Sugar, and the yolk of a new laid Egg, and boil them up [Page 139] over a chafing-dish of coals, stirring it con­tinually to keep it from curdling, then pour it into your Pye, and shaking it well toge­ther serve it up.

Turbut baked.

Draw and wash your Turbut very clean, and cut off the finns, then scotch him on both sides, and season him with Tyme, sweet Marjoram, Winter-Savory, and other sweet Herbs with Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace: this seasoning must be for the under side only; for the upper side take only Pepper, Cloves, Mace and Salt, rubbing it well into the scotches: having made your Pye into the shape or form of your Fish, dry it a little in an Oven, taking it out, wash it in the bottom with the yolks of Eggs, and strow thereon some minced Onions, and four or five Anchovies washed clean: then lay in your Turbut with the backside downward; lay about the sides of your Fish some forced fish-balls, with the Liver of your Turbut on the top, also a pint of large Oysters, and the yolks of eight hard Eggs chopped, with a pound of But­ter: then put him into the Oven, and as he bakes, put into your Pye Butter, sup­plying it continually, for it will require a [Page 140] great deal: When baked, draw it, and fill it up with a lair made of White wine Vi­negar, Oyster liquor, and the yolks of half a dozen Eggs beaten up together; shaking it together, let it stand a little while lon­ger in the Oven; then draw it, and cut it open, garnishing it with fryed Oysters, stick­ing it all over with toasts made of white Bread, and run it over with drawn Butter, thus serve it up.

Flesh of all sorts (excepting Fowl) baked in Pan or Pastry.

Battalia or Bisk-Pyes to be made according to each season of the whole year through­out.

HAving form'd your Paste into the fa­shion of a Castle, your ingredients to fill it must be several, viz. young Rabbits, Lambstones, sweet-breads, Pallates sliced, forced meat balls with Chickens, Peepers and Squobs, season all these with Salt, Pep­per, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace beaten small, with minced Tyme, also some Sausages and Oysters, if in season: If it be in May that▪ you [Page 141] make this Pye, you may then take the meat of a Lobster: Having all your ingredients ready by you, and fitted for your Pye, lay first your Rabbets cut in pieces into the Coffin with slices of Bacon; your Pige­ons and Chicken being split, lay one half of a Chicken on each quarter of your Rabbet, then half a Lambstone, next half a Chicken, then a sweet Bread, and lastly your forced meats; over all strow on your Pallates, with Oysters, the Marrow of three bones dipt in the yolks of Eggs, two handfuls of blanched Chesnuts, with some Pine-Apples, laying Butter over all, close up your Pye; being baked, lair it with White wine, with five Anchovies dissolved therein, beat these up with the yolks of Eggs, strong Broth, and drawn Butter.

Instead of Oysters, Chesnuts, &c. in the Summer time you may make use of Harti­chokes, Cabbidge, Lettuce, Colliflowers or Sparagrass. In the Winter time, instead of your Chickens and Pigeons, you may use the smaller sort of Wild-fowl; and so use con­tinually what every season produceth.

Another very good way.

Having made your Pye by taking three quarts of Flower, and three quarters [Page 142] of a pound of Butter, boiling the Butter in Water, and so making up the Paste hot and quick, I say, then take four Oxe-pallates, boil'd, blanched, and chopt into pieces, as ma­ny Lambstones, and half a dozen Veal sweet Breads, parboil'd and quarter'd, a dozen and a half of Coxcombs boil'd & blanched, half a dozen Pigeon peepers, and as many Chick­ens; having filled them for the Pye, place them therein orderly, that is, somewhat of every ingredient laid one upon the other, and all upon the Chickens and Pigeons; then over all strow the yolks of hard Eggs, minced with good store of Butter, close it up, and let it stand an hour and half in the Oven, then draw it and liquor it with Gra­vy, sliced Lemon, and Butter beaten up thick.

Brawn baked to be eaten cold.

Take your raw lean Brawn, and the like quantity of fat Bacon, mince them small, and beat them in a Morter, pound­ing therewith a handful of Sage; then sea­son them with Pepper and Salt, and good store of Ginger, adding thereto the yolks of Eggs and Vinegar, then put your Brawn into a cold Paste, and lay thereon But­ter and Bay-leaves; let the form of [Page 143] your Pye be round or like a Brawn.

Beef either Buttock, Brisket, Fillet or Sur­loyn larded, or not, baked Red Deer fa­shion.

Bone your Beef, and lard the leanest parts, or not, then season it with Nutmeg, Pepper and Ginger of each five ounces, and a pound of Salt; then lay in your Pye good store of Butter, and upon that put your Beef, and on that half an ounce of beaten Cloves, the rest of the seasoning with a good quantity of Butter, and three or four Bay-leaves; being baked, fill it up with clarified Butter, and set it by.

You may serve it up hot, but then there must not be above half the seasoning; ei­ther hot or cold you will hardly distinguish it from Venison.

Beef minced Pyes.

Mince part of a Buttock of Beef very small, with half as much Beef-suet, season it with Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg and Salt, add to these half as much Fruit as there is Meat and Suet, viz. Raisins of the Sun, Prunes and Currans, and herewith fill your Pyes, strow on the the top some minced Lemon-pill and sliced Dates.

Beef how to Coller.

Take a fine fat Flank of Beef, and lay it three days and as many nights in Pump Water; shift it thrice in four and twenty hours, then take it out and dry it, taking out the bones and grosser fat, then cut it in­to three lairs; take a good quantity of Salt and Sage chopped, and mingle them together: strow these between every lair, and lay one upon the other; then take Cloves and Mace of each an ounce, and beat them small, with an ounce of Nutmegs, strowing them also between the lairs of Beef: having roul'd it up very close, take packthread and tye it very hard, then put it into a long tin Pan, or earthen Pot made for that purpose; let the top of the Pot or Pan be tyed round with Cap-paper, set it into the Oven, it will require nine hours baking.

If you will have it look very red, for that is its proper colour, powder it in Salt Pe­tre four or five days, then wash it off, then rowl it up with the seasoning aforesaid.

Calves head Pye or Pasty.

Boil a Calves head till it is almost e­nough, having first clean'd and cleans'd it, [Page 145] then take it up, and take the bones from the Flesh with as little breaking it as you may; when it is cold, force or stuff it with Tyme, sweet Majoram, Penniroyal and Winter-Savory, with the yolks of hard Eggs, raw Veal, and Beef-suet minced ve­ry small; then season it with Nutmeg, Pep­per and Salt; your Pye being ready, lay the Head therein, underlaying it with some raw Veal, then cover the Head with good store of Spices, so close it up; when it is baked, fill it up with clarified Butter: Thus you must do, if you intend to eat it cold, if otherways season the Head with the aforesaid Spices but lightly, and put some Butter a top with Grapes or Goos­berries; when baked, liquor it with Gra­vy, juyce of Oranges, and Butter beaten up pretty thick.

Calves head Pye made otherways.

Having cleft the head, and wash'd the cheeks very clean, boil it till it is almost enough, then take it up, and when cold, cut the flesh from the bones into pieces as big as a shilling; then mince sweet Herbs, and put them to your meat, with Nutmeg, Pep­per, Cloves, Mace and Salt, let some slices of Bacon and Oysters be seasoned with the [Page 146] same; your Pye being ready, put in your meat, with the Bacon, Oysters, and two or three Sage-leaves on the top; then put on slices of Lemon, a handful of Barber­ries, and a good piece of Butter, so close [...] your Pye; when it is baked, cut up th [...] lid, and liquor it with Gravy, Claret, the yolks of Eggs and drawn Butter.

Calves feet Pye.

Take two pair and a half of Calves feet, boil them tender, and blanch them, then bone them, and mince them very small, season them with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Cinamon and Ginger, add to them a pound of Currans, a quarter of a pound of Dates sliced, and the like quantity of Sugar with a little Rosewater, Verjuyce, and stir all these together in a Tray; then lay some. Butter in a Pye, and put in one half of the aforenamed materials, then lay on the Mar­row of two bones, laying on the other half▪ of the meat on the Marrow, sticking some Dates a top, then put it into an Oven; and when it is half baked, liquor it with Butter, White wine, and ice it, then set it into the Oven again till it be baked enough.

Calves Chaldron baked.

Parb [...]il it first, and when it is cool, cut [...] into small pieces, and season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper, add to it some sweet Herbs minced small, then sprinkle it with Verjuyce, and close your Pye; when it is baked lair it with Butter, Vinegar, Nutmeg, Sugar, and the yolks of three new laid Eggs, two spoonfuls of Sack, and the juyce of an Orange.

Calves Chaldron minced Pyes.

Your Chaldron being minced small, af­ter it is tender boiled and cold, put to it some small pieces of lard, some yolks of hard Eggs chopt grosly; add thereunto some Mutton and Lamb cut into small gobbets with Goosberries, Grapes or Bar­berries, then season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper, and fill your Pye therewith, [...]aying on it some pieces of interlarded Ba­con and Butter, close it up, and when ba­ked, liquor it with Butter and White wine.

Coney Livers baked.

Take half a dozen or more, first parb [...]il them, then chop them small with sweet [Page 148] Herbs, as Tyme, Winter-Savory, Pen [...] royal, &c. and the yolks of two hard Egg [...] season them with Ginger, Nutmeg, Pe [...] per and Cinamon, add to them some pa [...] boil'd Currans and Butter, then make som [...] little Pasties, and fill them therewith, th [...] bake them, and serve them up with scrap [...] Sugar.

Fawn or young Roe.

First bone him, then lard him with Ba­con, then season him with Pepper, Salt▪ Cloves, Nutmeg and Mace; make you [...] Pye in the form of a Roe, and close it u [...] on the back, or you may make it after wha [...] fashion you please: when it is baked, lair i [...] with Claret wine, grated Bread, beaten Ci­namon, Vinegar and Sugar boiled up toge­ther, put in also a ladleful of drawn But­ter, and so serve it up.

Fawn baked to be eaten cold.

Bone it as before, then parboil and la [...] it very thick, after this season it with a lit­tle fine Pepper, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace, and as much Cloves as you shall judge suf­ficient; then fill the belly with some Savory, forced Meats, and put it into a Coffin proportioned to its own form, then lay [Page 149] thereon good store of Butter, and close it [...], when it is baked and cold, fill it up [...] the funnel with clarified Butter.

Goat Pasty.

Take the hind quarter of a fat Goat, [...]one it, and skin it, then cut it into a be­ [...]itting shape for your Pasty; having bea­ [...]en it well with a Rolling-pin, season it with Pepper, Salt, minced Tyme and Nutmeg; then set it a soaking in this seasoning all night with Claret, then put it into its Cof­fin and bake it, strowing on the top some [...]inced Beef-suet.

Whilst it is baking, break the bones you took out of the Flesh of the Goat, and put them into a Pipkin with a pint of Cla­ret, and a little strong Broth; then cover your Pipkin with a sheet of course paste, and bake them also: your Pasty being ba­ked enough, fill it with the liquor out of the Pipkin, serve it up, and a very critical Pallate will not be able to discern the diffe­rence between that and Venison.

Gammon of Bacon Pye.

Take a Westphalia Ham, and boil it very tender, then take off the skin & season it with Pepper, and some minced Sage, stick it with [Page 150] Lemon-pill in the upper side; then ma [...] your Pye something high of butter'd Paste [...] and put your Gammon in the middle thereof; then take half a dozen of Pige­ons, and as many Lambstones, with so many sweet-Breads, season them with Pep­per, Cloves, Mace and Cinamon with a lit­tle Salt, lay the Pigeons round about the Gammon, and the Lambstones and sweet-Breads on the top thereof; lay over it large▪ Mace, a few sweet Herbs minced, and put on Butter all over, then close it up, and let it have a gentle soaking; being baked, lair it with Claret wine hoiled up with two or three Onions, a faggot of sweet Herbs, with a handful of Sage minced, and boiled therein, a little strong Broth and drawn Butter, thickned up with the yolk of an Egg, and serve it up.

Hot compounded baked meat.

Take a Leg of Lamb, and divide it in­to parts, with the one you must make some forced Meats, and the other slice into thin slices, then take four Chickens, four Pigeons, six Quails, six Larks, some Black-birds or Thrushes with other small Birds, and quar­ter them, season them severally with bea­ten Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Salt and Nutmeg, [Page 151] mince also a handful of sweet Herbs and Parsley, with Beef-suet, and a handful of Currans, adding thereto some grated Bread; lay your Meat abroad, and spread these ingredients on them, then rowl them up into little Collers; let your Pye be sha­ped round or Battalia like; let your Lamb lye in the bottom, your Pigeons and Chick­ens next, and lastly your Larks and other small Fowl, over these spread bottoms of boiled Hartichokes, Sparagrass and Grapes, if in the Summer time otherwise, Ches­nuts, Dates, Skirrets and Potatoes; you may also put some Lambstones, Marrow, sweet-Breads, and the yolks of two or three hard Eggs, putting Butter on your Pye, close it up; being baked, lair it with Anchovies dissolved in Claret, a little strong Broth and Gravy, with a grated Nutmeg, and a little drawn Butten beaten up with the yolks of two Eggs. This some call a Bastard Biss Pye.

Hare Pye.

Take a Hare, uncase him, then bone and lard him with great Lard, then take two ounces of Pepper, as much of Nut­megs, and eight ounces of Salt, mix these together, and season your Hare herewith; [Page 152] then make your Pye in what form you please of bolted course Rye and Meal, put Butter in the bottom, and lay in your Hare, laying upon it some whole Cloves, a sheet of Lard, and a good quantity of Butter, then baste it over with Saffron water and bake it, then draw it, and liquor it with clarified Butter: you may make your Pye of white Paste, if you intend to eat it hot.

Otherways.

Make your Pye of a Gallon of Flowre, then take two Hares and season them lightly without, with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper, then take half an ounce of Nut­megs, the like of Pepper, a little Salt, Ca­pers, Raisins, Pears in quarters, Prunes, with Grapes, Lemon or Goosberries, and fill the belly herewith; being baked, liquor it with Verjuyce and Sugar, with some large Mace, you may use White wine or Claret in the stead of Verjuyce.

Hare minced Pyes.

Take a Hare and bone him, then mince him small with Beef-suet, and a pound and half of Raisins minced, some Currans, Cloves, Mace, Salt and Cinamon, mingle [Page 153] these together, and fill your several Pyes therewith; when baked, liquor them with Sack or White wine and Sugar.

Hares baked a-la-mode de France.

Take two Hares and parboil them, then take the flesh from the bones and mince it small, put it into a Morter, and beat it in­to a lump, season it and souce it in Wine and Vinegar; lap all this pulp about the Chine of one Hare, so it will seem but one; having larded it very well, put it in­to a Coffin with good store of Butter; be­ing baked, liquor it with melted Butter, Nutmeg, Ginger and Sugar.

Hares baked to be eaten cold.

Your Hare being parboil'd, and the flesh▪ taken from the bones, mingle it with some▪ Westphalia Ham boiled very tender; mince these well together, and beat them in a Morter, then season them with sweet Herbs, Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg, with a little Vinegar, and the yolks of four Eggs, then beat them again, till you have reduced them into a pulpy substance: having your Pye made in some proportion like a Hare, lay in some of the Meat, wash it with the yolks of Eggs, and squeeze [Page 154] it down, then lay a laying of Bacon, cut indifferently small, and wash that likewise, and so do over every lay till all your meat be in the Pye; the last lay must be the Ba­con with Butter a top, then close it, setting the Ears▪ and Head in their proper places, with a Funnel in the middle, and when it is baked, fill it with clarified But­ter, and when you carve it begin at the Tail.

Lumber Pye.

Cut your Beef-suet into square pieces, and mingle them with Pepper, grated Bread, Cloves, Mace, some bits of Veal, sweet Herbs, Salt, Sugar, the yolks of four Eggs quarter'd, with Barberries, and a little Cream; work all these together, and put it into the Cauls of Veal like Sausages, then bake them almost in a Dish; and having a Pye made ready, draw them and lay them therein with Butter, Verjuyce, Sugar, Dates, large Mace, Grapes or Barberries and Marrow; being baked scrape Sugar thereon.

Another very good way.

Take two pound of Beef-suet, one pound of the flesh of Capon boiled, and another [Page 155] of a Leg of Veal parboil'd; mince these small, and add to them some sweet Herbs, and a good handful of Spinage, with minced Pippins, two or three handfuls of grated Bread, a little Rosewater, the yolks of four Eggs, a pound of Currans; last­ly, season it with Salt, Nutmeg, Pepper, Ginger, Cloves and Mace; lay all these materials into the Pye, and lay a top there­of the Marrow of four Marrow-bones, sea­soned with Cinamon, grated Nutmeg, and the juyce of an Orange, with the yolks of Eggs; above all lay sliced Orangado, dryed Citron, Ringo roots, candyed Ginger, pre­served Barberries, Dates, Sugar and Butter, and close it up; when it is baked, liquor it with Verjuyce and Sugar, beaten toge­ther with the yolks of three Eggs, and serve it up.

Lamb Pye.

Cut your Lamb into Steaks, Kidney, and all the fat with it, season it with Salt, Nutmeg, Pepper and Mace; your Pye be­ing made, lay in these ingredients, with a pound of Currans and Pruncs, lay Butter at top, and let it foak in the Oven three hours and a half; when it is baked, liquor it with a pint of White wine, six yolks of [Page 156] Eggs, Sugar, and a quarter of a pound of Butter, beat these up over the fire in a Pipkin till they boil, then cut open the lid, and pour this into it, shaking it well toge­ther.

Lamb Pasty.

Having bon'd your Lamb, cut it four square, then season it with Salt, beaten Pep­per, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and minced Tyme, lay in some Beef-suet, and your Lamb thereupon, making a high border about it; then turning over your sheet, close and bake your Pasty; when it is e­nough, liquor it with Claret, Sugar, Vine­gar, and the yolks of Eggs beaten up toge­ther; if you would have your sauce only savory and not sweet, let it be Gravy only, or the baking of bones in Claret wine.

Leg of Pork Pye.

Skin and bone your Pork, beat it well, and lay it in Claret wine; then season it with Cinamon, Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, Pepper and Salt; then make your Pye Ve­nis [...]n like, and lay the Pork therein, close it and set it into the Oven, it will require a­bove eight hours baking; before you set it [Page 157] in, wash it over with yolks of Eggs or Saffron Water.

Marrow Pyes.

Take Veal, mince it with Beef-suet, and season it with Pepper, Nutmeg and Salt, add to them boiled Sparagrass cut the length of your thumb, yolks of hard Eggs quarter'd, sweet-Breads of Veal cut small, Potatoes or Hartichokes cut in like manner, some interlarded Bacon and Chesnuts, min­gle all these with your Marrow, fill your Pyes and bake them, liquor them with beaten Butter.

Or you may make them of bottoms of Hartichokes, Suckers, yolks of hard Eggs, Chesnuts boil'd, and blanched Marrow, interlarded Bacon cut square, Veal sweet-Breads, Lambstones, Potatoes, Skirrets and Sparagus.

Mutton minced▪ Pyes.

Take the half of a Leg of Mutton, and two pound of Beef-suet, mince these very small; then add to these a pound of Cur­rans, the like of Raisins of the Sun, one pound of Prunes, half an ounce of Carra­way seed, and half an ounce of Nutmegs, three ounces of Salt, Pepper and Mace of [Page 158] each half an ounce, mingle these well to­gether, and fill your Pyes herewith.

Minced Pyes of Beef.

Take four pound of Beef, and the like quantity of Suet, with four ounces of Salt, Nutmeg, Pepper, Cloves and Mace of each one ounce, Currans and Raisins of the Sun of each two pound [...]; your Meat and Suet being chopped very small; mingle all these together and fill your Pyes.

Minced Pyes of Veal.

Take a Leg of Veal, and having par­boil'd it, mince it, when cold, with Beef-suet, then season it with Pepper, Salt and Goosberries, mix it with Verjuyce, Cur­rans, Sugar, and a little beaten Saffron, you may shape them as you please, no Pyes having more variety of forms than these.

Mare-maid Pye, alias Pig-pie.

Take a sucking Pig, skin it, bone it and quarter it, then have a fresh water fat Eel, fley'd, split, boned, and seasoned with Pep­per, Salt and Nutmeg; then make your Pye round, and lay therein the several quarters of your Pig with your Eel, equally distri­buted [Page 159] among them all, lay over all some whole Cloves, slices of Bacon and Butter, close it up, bake it in fine Paste; be­ing enough, draw it, and fill it up with sweet Butter.

Neats tongue baked.

Boil your Neats Tongue very tender, then season it with Nutmeg, Mace and a little Salt; after this make a Pye in the re­semblance of the Tongue, and lay it therein, with five or six blades of Mace upon it, three or four Dates quarter'd, a little O­range sliced, with the core of a Lemon, half a pound of Butter, some Sugar, and so close it up; let it stand an hour and a half in the Oven, then draw it, liquor it with Sack, and the juyce of a Lemon, a little Sugar, the yolks of two Eggs, and a little sweet Butter; these must be set over the fire, and carefully stirred before you pour them in.

Neats Tongue Pye otherways.

Being boiled tender, blanched and cold, mince small some of the Meat, which you must cut out of the butt-end, with some Beef-suet, season it with Pepper, bea­ten Ginger and Salt, Currans, grated Bread, [Page 160] two or three yolks of Eggs, Raisins and O­range minced small, with some minced sweet Herbs, fill your Tongue herewith, then wrap it in a Caul of Veal, laying some thin slices of Veal under the Tongue, with some slices of interlarded Bacon, place on the top of all some Marrow, large Mace, Barberries and Butter; when it is baked, liquor it with White wine, Butter and Sugar.

Neats Tongue minced Pyes.

Your Tongue being boiled tender, when it is cold blanch it and mince it very small with three pound of Beef-suet, then let your seasoning be an ounce of Cloves and Mace beaten, a little Salt, a preserved O­range, and a little Lemon-pill minced, a quarter of a pound of Sugar, three pound of Currans, a little Rosewater, some Sack; mingle these all together, and fill your Pyes.

Neats Tongue baked in a dish.

Having boiled it tender, blanch it; then take the flesh out of the butt-end, and mince it very small with Marrow and Beef-suet, season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, par­boil'd Currans, and a Date cut in pieces; [Page 161] add to these the yolks of two new laid Eggs, and a spoonful of sweet Cream, then work these together with the powder of a dryed Orange-pill, sprinkle some Verjuyce over it, and cast on some Sugar: Stuff your Tongue herewith, and bake it in a Dish, baste it with sweet Butter to keep it from drying; being enough, sauce it with Vinegar, Butter, Nutmeg, Sugar, and the juyce of an Orange.

Olive Pye.

Take Veal or Mutton, and cut it into thin slices, hack them with the back of your knife, and spread them abroad, then take Strawberry-leaves, Sorrel, Violet­leaves, Endive, Sage, Parsley, Spinage, Sa­vory, Marjoram, and a little Tyme; mince these small with the yolks of hard Eggs; add to them half a pound of Currans, Nutmeg, Pepper, Cinamon, Sugar and Salt, some minced Raisins, Goosberries and Dates minced small, mingle these toge­ther, and strow them on your slices of Mutton or Veal, then rowl them up, and put them into a Pye; lay on the top of them some Dates, Marrow, large Mace and Butter, close it up; when baked, li­quor [Page 162] it with Verjuyce, Sugar and Butter and so serve it up.

Oxe-cheek Pye.

Let your Oxe-cheek be young, and boil it tender; when it is cold cut it out into slices; then add thereto Tyme, sweet Mar­joram, Savory and Spinage with an Onion, season your flesh with Pepper, Nutmeg, Mace, Cloves and Salt, put it into your Pye with some seasoned and sliced Pal­lates; then put in two whole Onions withsome Butter, and close it up; when it is baked, liquor it with Claret wine, the yolks of Eggs, Vinegar and Sugar beaten all together.

Oxe-cheek Pye otherways.

Having boil'd it tender, bone it, and season it with Pepper, Nutmeg and Salt; having made your Pye, put into the bot­tom thereof some Beef-suet minced indif­ferently small; then lay on the Cheeks, and over them a pudding made of minced raw Veal, Currans, grated Bread, Suet, Eggs, Saffron, Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, thin slices of interlarded Bacon and Butter, close it up, and when baked, liquor it with Butter.

Oxe-Pallate Pye.

Boil your Pallates tender, and blanch them, cut them in pieces, and add to them the sweet-breads of Lamb or Veal, squab Pigeons, Marrow, Lambstones, Cocks-combs, Pine-kernels, Chesnuts, Oysters and Capers, balls of forced Meat, seasoned with Nut­meg, Ginger, Pepper, Salt, a small quan­tity of Cloves and Mace, Lemon, Grapes or Goosberries, fill your Pye herewith, and lay on the top some Butter; when it is baked, lair it with half a pint of Mut­ton Gravy, the yolks of four raw Eggs, a little White wine, a couple of Anchovies and juyce of Lemon; stir it well about, and set it into the Oven agan, there let it stand till it be almost ready to boil, then take it out and serve it up.

Pallates otherwise baked.

Take Pallates, Lips and Noses boiled tender, with Cock-stones, Cocks-combs, Lambstones and sweet-Breads scalded, slice all these, and put to them half a pint of large Oysters parboil'd in their own li­quor, quarter'd Dates, Pine-kernels, pickled Broom-buds, slices of interlarded Bacon scalded, a dozen Chesnuts roasted and [Page 164] blanched, season all these with Salt, Nut­meg, large Mace, and fill your Pye herewith, laying on the top good store of sweet Butter, with some Marrow; when it is baked, liquor it with Claret, Butter, and the yolks of Eggs beaten together, shake it well together, and garnish it with sliced Lemon, pickled Barberries, Grapes or Goosberries.

Pig Pye.

Take a young Pig and skin it, then bone it and beat it very small, season it with Nutmeg, Ginger, a little Pepper and Salt, rubbed well on it, let your Pye be round and deep, and be not sparing of your But­ter in the baking; it will require five hours baking.

Or thus:

Skin a small fat Pig, and cut it into quar­ters, then season it with Salt, Pepper and Ginger; then lay it in your Pye with some stript and minced Parsley, some sprigs of Winter-Savory, lay upon these the yolks of four Eggs boiled hard and minced, over these put some blades of large Mace, a handful of clusters of Barberries, a handful of well wash'd and clean pick'd Currans, a little Sugar, half a pound of sweet Butter, [Page 165] close it, and let it stand in the Oven two hours, in which time it will be baked, then draw it, and put therein half a pint of White wine and Sugar; being first warm'd over the fire, put on the Pye-lid, and so serve it up.

Or thus you may bake a Pig; scald it, and slit it on the midst, then fley it and bone it; season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg; take some sweet Herbs and chop them small, with the yolks of three new laid Eggs, and some Currans; then lay one half of the Pig into your Pye and Herbs thereon, then lay in your other half, and strow the rest of your Herbs there­on, with a good quantity of Butter: This way is good either hot or cold.

Pig-pye after the newest fashion.

Having fley'd your Pig, cut it into quar­ters, season it with Salt, Ginger and Pep­per, then lay it into your Pye; after this take Parsley and Winter-Savory stript, and mince them small, strow these over the several quarters or smaller pieces, and over them the yolks of four or five hard Eggs chopped small; over these four or five blades of Mace, a dozen bunches or more of Barberries, with a handful of Currans [Page 166] well cleansed, some Sugar, and over all sweet Butter, bake it and liquor it with Verjuyce and Sugar warmed, lay on the lid, and scrape Sugar thereon.

Pork baked to be eaten cold.

Bone first a Loyn of Pork, and cut part thereof into Collops, as big as a Hens Egg, with as many Collops of Veal of the same bigness, and beat them both with the back of a Cleaver; you must season your Veal with minced Tyme, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace, with the yolks of Eggs; your Pork must be seasoned otherways, with minced Sage, Pepper, Salt, and the yolks of Eggs also; then lay a laying of Pork into your Pye, and a laying of Veal upon it, then Pork on that, and Veal up­on that, till all your Meat is in; then close it, and baste your Pye with Saffron water, or the yolks of Eggs; when it is baked and cold, fill it with clarified Butter, let your first and last laying be Pork.

Rabbets baked to be eaten cold.

Parboil your Rabbets and bone-them, then lard them, and season them with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Nutmeg and Mace, then put them into the Pye, with a good [Page 167] quantity of Winter-savory and forced Meats, put on a pound of Butter on the [...]op, and close it, when baked and cold, fill it with clarified Butter.

Red Deer baked.

Having taken out the back sinew and boned your side of Venison, season it and lard the Fillets with great Lard; your proper seasoning is Nutmeg and Pepper of each three ounces, and five ounces of Salt, slash your Venison for the better entring in of your seasoning; your Pye or Pasty being made, lay in the bottom some Butter, a quarter of an ounce of Cloves, two or three Bay-leaves, then lay in your flesh, and thereon a few Cloves, and good store of Butter, close it up, and let it soak in the Oven nine hours at least; before you put it into the Oven, baste it with Saffron wa­ter; when baked, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Another very excellent way to bake Red Deer.

Bone your Venison, and if it be the side, skin it, and beat it with an Iron-pestle, but not too small, then lay it a steeping in Cla­ret wine and Vinegar twenty four hours: [Page 168] having lain that time, take it out, and dr [...] it with a cloth; if it be lean, lard it with great Lard as long and as thick as your fin­ger; season it exceeding well with Nutmeg [...] Mace, Ginger, Pepper and Salt, make your Pye with Rye Paste, deep, round, and ve­ry thick, laying Bay-leaves in the bottom and top, then close it, leaving a funnel in the middle; if you intend to keep it long, when it is baked, pour away all the Gravy, and take Butter and knead it, and wash it in two or three waters, then melt it, and fill up your Pye therewith; you may keep it thus a quarter of a year, you may bake it after this manner. in a Pot, and it will not only keep longer, but require less Butter to fill it up.

Steak-pye of Mutton.

Having made your Pye deep, round and pretty thick, take a Neck and Breast of Mut­ton, and cut them out into pieces as to fry hack it with your Cleaver, and season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, sweet Herbs minced very small, a handful of Capers, two O­nions minced small, the yolks of three or▪ four hard Eggs chopped: thus seasoned, lay in your meat scattering these materials over it, and laying pretty store of Butter on the [Page 169] top, then close it, and let it soak in the Oven three hours at least in a moderate heat.

Steak-pye with a French Pudding in it.

Season your Steaks as afor [...]said, and let them stand in the Tray or Dish two hours; then take a lean piece of Mutton, and mince it small with Beef-suet, and a few sweet Herbs, with two or three leaves of red Sage, grated Bread, yolks of Eggs, sweet Cream, Raisins of the Sun, incorporate these together, and make an indifferent stiff Pudding, rowl them into balls, and when you have laid your Steaks in a deep Pye, put your Pudding balls in also with some Butter; Lastly, sprinkle a little Ver­juyce thereon, and close it up: being ba­ked, take Bay-leaves and fry them in But­ter, and stick them in the walls; serve up your Pye with a cover, squeezing thereon the juyce of Oranges or Lemon.

Otherways.

Cut a Neck and Breast of Mutton be­tween every rib, and beat each distinctly with the back of a Cleaver, then sea­son the pieces with Pepper and Salt; ha­ving laid them into your Pye, put thereon [Page 170] four or five blades of large Mace, and hal [...] a pound of sweet Butter, close it up, an [...] let it stand in the Oven two hours: in the mean time boil some Parsley very tender, and beat it as soft as the pulp of a boiled Turnip, put to it a quarter of a pint of White wine Vinegar, a little sweet Butter, and two spoonfuls of Sugar, heat these o­ver the fire, then draw your Pye, and cut open the lid, and pour this sauce all ove [...] the Pye, then shake it well on your Peel, that the Sauce and Gravy may mingle to­gether, put on the lid, and scrape on some Sugar.

Sweet-breads baked.

Take Sweet-breads and boil them, ad­ding thereto some parboil'd Currans, two or three minced Dates, the yolks of a cou­ple of new laid Eggs, some grated white Bread, season it lightly with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg and Sugar, wring in the juyce of an Orange or a Lemon; lay these materials between two sheets of Puff-paste, and bake it: it will do every whit as well fryed in good sweet Butter.

Sheeps Tongues baked.

Having boiled them tender, blanch [Page 171] them and cut them into thin slices, then sea­ [...]on them with Cinamon, Ginger, and a lit­ [...]le Pepper, and put them into a Coffin of [...]ine Paste, with sweet Butter, and a few [...]weet Herbs minced very small: whilst it [...]s baking, take a little Vinegar, Butter, Nutmeg, Sugar, the yolk of a new laid Egg, one spoonful of Sack, and the juyce of a Lemon; boil all these together on a Chafing-dish of coals, and put it into your Pye; shog it well together and serve it up.

Tongue Pye.

Take a Tongue and Udder, after you have either boiled or roasted it, and slice them into thin slices, and season them with Cinamon, Ginger and Salt; then take half a pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned; your Pye being in readiness, lay in a laying of Tongue and Udder, and another of Raisins, [...]ontinuing so doing till your Pye be fill­ [...]d; put Butter on the top, and close it up; when it is baked, liquor it with this Cau­dle, which you must make whilst it is baking, take Eggs, Vinegar and White wine, Sugar and Butter, beat these up together, till it is ready to boil; then opening your Pye, pour it all over, and serve it up hot.

Veal a Breast, Rack, or Loyn how to bake.

Take which Joynt you please and bon [...] it, season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper then take some sweet Herbs, as Tyme sweet Marjoram, Penniroyal, Winter-savo [...] ry, &c. and mince these small with som [...] Beef-suet, stuff your Loyn or Breast o [...] Veal herewith, and put it into your Pye close it, and bake it in good crust, and li­quor it with Butter, and the juyce of a [...] Orange or Lemon.

Veal (Fillet) Pye.

Cut your Fillet into pieces about the bigness of Walnuts, and season them with Cinamon, Ginger, Sugar and Salt; as to the form you may make what choice you please, lay in your meat with Chesnuts roasted, blanched and quarter'd, Dates sliced, and the Marrow of two Marrow­bones, close it, and when baked, make [...] a caudle of White wine, Cinamon, Sugar and Ginger beaten up together, and poured into your Pye.

The same to be eaten cold.

Make a Pye of hot Butter, paste and fine Flowre, then take a Leg of Veal, and cut [Page 173] [...]ff a large Fillet, then divide that into three [...]qual pieces, and parboil them; when cold, [...]eason them with Salt, beaten Pepper, Nut­ [...]eg, Cloves and Mace, then lay in one [...]illet, and strow on some minced Tyme, [...]aying on some slices of Bacon, scasoned with Pepper and Sage; then lay on the second, and so the third Fillet with Ba­con over every lay; then over all strow some minced Tyme, and a little seasoning, with some large Mace and store of Butter: This done, close up your Pye, baste it with yolks of Eggs; when it is baked and cold, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Forget not to beat your Veal very well with the back of your Cleaver before you season it.

Ʋmble Pye made of a Lambs head and Pur­t'nance.

Boil your meat reasonable tender, take the flesh from the bone, and mince it small with Beef-suet and Marrow, with Li­ver, Lights and Heart, a few sweet Herbs and Currans, season it with Nutmeg, Pep­per and Salt, bake it in the form of an Um­ble Pye, and your Pallate shall hardly di­stinguish which is which.

Venison Pye.

Raise a four square Coffin of hot Butter Paste; then take some Oxe-suet minced small, and lay in the bottom of your Pye: then take your Venison seasoned with bea­ten Pepper, Cinamon, Cloves, Ginger, Salt, Mace and Nutmeg pounded, be sure to flash your Venison, that it may the better enter­tain the seasoning, then lay you meat into your Pye with Butter on the top, and some few Cloves; let your Walls be substantial; when it is baked, and that will not be un­der six hours, cut it up, and put into it a­bout a quart of Venison Sauce.

Venison Pasty of a fallow Deer to eat hot or cold.

Take the side of a Fallow Deer, bone it and lard it with great Lard, then take Pep­per and Nutmeg of each two ounces and a half, of Salt five ounces, and season it here­with; then have a Pasty made of a good thickness, and lay some Butter therein, up­on that lay your Venison the inside down­wards, coat it thick with seasoning, and lay thereon a good quantity of Butter, not forgetting to prick on some whole Cloves, indore it with Eggs, and bake it; when [Page 175] [...]t is cold, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Otherwise in the best manner.

First bake it in its own blood, wipe it clean, but wash it not; then skin it, bone it, and season it as before expressed, then bake it again in fine Paste, Puff-paste, or short Paste.

Land-fowl▪ or Sea-fowl of all sorts baked in Pan or Pasty.

Brand-geess baked to be eaten cold.

TAke your Geese and parboil them, then take out the Breast-bone with as many other bones as you can, with this proviso, you do not unshape your Fowl; then season them with Pepper and Salt, and lard them with good large Lard, and put them into a Coffin and bake them; when it is cold, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Chicken Pye.

Take eight Chicken-peepers, four sweet-Breads [Page 176] of Veal, as many Sheeps Tongues boiled tender, blanched and cut into thin slices with the sweet-Breads, half a dozen Larks or Sparrows, half a score Cocks­combs, a pint and a half of great Oy­sters parboil'd, and the marrow of four Marrow-bones; let all these be seasoned lightly with Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg; fill your Pye three quarters full with these ma­terials, then take some Veal and mince it, with as much Marrow, a little grated Bread, the yolks of three Eggs, minced Dates, Salt, Nutmeg, sweet Marjoram, work up these with a little Cream, and make it into balls, and lay them into your Pye, with some Gravy, bottoms of Harti­chokes, and some Butter over all, lay some Marrow, Chesnuts boiled and blanched, large Mace, and a handful of Goosberries, close up your Pye, and when baked, liquor it with a little Butter, juyce of Oranges and Claret wine.

Or you may bake them thus: having trust them, season them lightly as before, and put them into a Coffin, lay on them sliced Dates, with the Marrow of four Mar­row-bones, some large Mace, six ounces of Eringo roots, some Grapes and Butter, close it up, and being half baked, liquor it [Page 177] with a good quantity of Butter, Grapes, Verjuyce and Sugar, then bake it till it is enough, ice it and serve it up.

Chicken Pyes for Winter.

Season your Chickens after you have trust them, with Cloves, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg beaten and Mace; then take some Parsley and Tyme and mince them small, and mould them into a ball with some Butter, and some of the aforesaid seasoning, stuff the bellies of your Chickens herewith, and then lay them into your Pye with sliced Lemons on the top of them, and the bot­toms of boiled Hartichokes cut into square pieces, close it up, and when it is baked, take the yolk of an Egg, a grated Nutmeg, White wine, Gravy and Butter beaten up together, and lair it therewith.

Chicken Pyes for the Summer.

Take half a dozen Chicken-peepers and truss them, season them with Nutmeg, Salt, Ginger and whole Mace, lay them into your Pye on their backs, and cover them with scalded Goosberries or Cabbage, Lettice, withsome Asparagus boiled, and Butter; when it is baked, liquor it with a pint of White wine, the yolks of half a [Page 178] dozen Eggs, Sugar, and a quarter of a pound of Butter beaten up over the fire till it boileth.

Chickens baked with Grapes.

Having trust and scalded your Chickens, season them with Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg, and lay them into a Pye with half a pound of Butter; when it is baked, cut it up, and lay on the Breasts of your Chicken some Grapes boiled in Verjuyce, Butter, Nut­meg and Sugar, with the juyce of an O­range or Lemon.

Capon baked in Pasty-pan.

Your Capon being roasted and cold, take the flesh from the bones and slice it, but preserve the Thighs and Pinions, add to the flesh of your Capon four sweet-Breads, half a pint of Oysters, three Lamb­stones, and season them all with Nutmeg, Salt, Cloves, Mace, minced Tyme, sweet Marjoram and Penniroyal; lay into your Pasty-pan a sheet of paste, and in the bottom thereof lay your Thighs and Pinions; and upon them strow a minced Onion, on these lay your flesh, and upon it the sweet-Breads, Lambstones and Oysters cut into halves, over all a handful of boiled and blanched Ches­nuts, [Page 179] put Butter on the top, and close your Pan; when it is baked, lair it with Claret wine, strong Broth, Gravy, drawn Butter, some Anchovies dissolved, with a grated Nutmeg, garnish it with slices of Lemon.

In the same manner you may bake a Turkey.

Curlew or Hernshaw baked.

Truss them and parboil them, then season them with Pepper, Salt and Ginger, put them in deep Coffins with a good quan­tity of Butter, and let the heads be vi­sible.

Crane, Bustard or Peacock baked to be eaten cold.

Bone your Bustard, Peacock, Crane or Turkey, parboil and lard it with large Lard, then season it with Salt, Nutmeg and Pepper of each about two ounces and a half; your Pye being ready, lay in the bottom thereof some Butter, with some beaten Cloves, then lay in your Fowl with the rest of the seasoning thereon, with a good quantity of Butter, close it, baste it with Saffron water, and when [Page 180] baked and cold, fill it up with clarified B [...]tter.

Hen baked to be eaten cold.

Having parboiled a young fleshy Hen, cut off the Legs, Wings and Merrythought, then flat the Carkass to lye handsome in the Pye; after this, season the flesh with Salt, Pepper, Cloves and Mace, and put it into a Coffin with Lambsto [...]cs sliced, sweet-Breads, Sausages, some Oysters, the yolks of hard Eggs, and two Onions cut in halves, put on half a pound of Butter and close your Pye; when it is baked lair it with Claret, strong Broth, beaten up with the yolk of an Egg, a grated Nutmeg and drawn Butter.

Hen baked in Pasty-pan.

Slice the flesh from the bones of a young Hen, that hath been roasted or boiled, and is cold, and season it with sweet Marjoram, Tyme, Parsley, and a large Onion minced very small, with Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg beaten; then put your bones into the Pa­sty-pan, first under-laying▪ it with a sheet of fine paste; let your sliced meat lye on the top hereof, and over all put Butter, then close it with another sheet of paste; [Page 181] being baked, batter the yolks of half a do­ [...]en Eggs, being indifferent thick, put to them some strong broth, and a quarter of a pint of Claret wine, with some Parsley boiled green and shred small, stir all these together with a ladleful of drawn Butter; take out the bones before you put in this lai [...], then stir all very well together; then stick the bones a top on the meat, and gar­nish it with slices of Oranges or Le­mons.

Herns baked to be eaten cold.

So bone your Hern, that you do not mishape it; then lard it, and season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves and Mace beaten, then lay it into a Coffin, making the head▪ to ap­pear out of the lid; when it is baked, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Heath-pouts, Pheasant-pouts, or Pea-chikens baked.

Take any of the aforesaid and bone them, and lard them with Lard as big as your little finger almost, then season them with Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and a few Cloves; your Pye being made, lay some Butter in the bottom thereof, then lay on your Fowls with good store of seasoning [Page 182] and Butter; if you intend to eat it cold, then must you also, when it is baked and cold, fill it up with clarified Butter; if you would have your Pye to be eaten hot, sea­son your Fowl but lightly, and put into your Pye with them Beef-suet, and some Veal▪ minced small, some sweet herbs, grated Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt; the yolks of four raw Eggs, bottoms of boiled Hartichokes, Grapes or Goosberries.

Larks or Sparrow Pyes.

Take what quantity of them you think fit, truss them and parboil them, then sea­son them with Pepper and Salt, then lay them in a Pye with Butter on the top and bottom, mingle amongst them some Mar­row, and a few Chesnuts boiled and blanched.

Mallard Pyes.

Take a couple or more of wild Mal­lards, and season them very well with Pep­per and Cloves beaten, some Salt and a lit­tle Nutmeg, lay them into a deep Coffin with store of Butter, and a couple of large Onions minced small; when baked, liquor your Pye with Butter only, or with an Anchovie.

Partridge minced Pyes.

Take a brace of Partridges and mince [...]hem, mince the like quantity of Beef-suet, [...]hen take Orangado and green Citron of [...]ach two ounces; let the Meat be seasoned with beaten Cloves, Nutmeg, Mace, Salt and Sugar; mingle all these together, and close it up in Puff-paste: being baked, open it and put therein half a grain of Am­ber-griese dissolved in Rosewater, stirring it well together serve it up.

Pigeons, Stock-doves, Qails or Rails baked to be eaten cold.

Having made your Pye of a pottle of fine Flowre, and a quarter of a pound of Butter boiled in fair Water made up quick and stiff; then take half a dozen Stock­doves or Pigeons, truss, wash, and wipe them dry, then season them with Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt of each two ounces and a half; laying some Butter in the bottom of the Pye, put in your Fowl and the re­maining seasoning, with good store of But­ter on the top; when it is baked and cold, fill it up with clarified Butter.

If you will eat your Pye hot, then use but half the seasoning, and when it is baked, lair [Page 184] it with Butter, Verjuyce, Sugar, some sweet Marjoram boiled and chopt small, with the yolk of an Egg beaten up all toge­ther.

Sea-fowl of all sorts baked, a Swan, Whop­per, &c.

Let your Swan, Whopper, or any other Sea-fowl be parboil'd, then boned, and af­terwards larded; then take four ounces of Salt, three of Nutmeg, two of Pepper, and season your Fowl herewith, bake them in Rye-paste made up stiff with boiling liquor, if you will eat it cold; if hot, use but half the seasoning, and bake them in fine Paste liquor'd with Claret, Gravy, Butter, an Onion, Capers or Oysters. Thus you may bake Shovellers, Herns, Curlews, Gulls, Wild-Geese, Tame-Geese, and Muscovia Ducks.

Swan Pye to be eaten cold.

In the first place uncase or skin your Swan, then bone him and lard the flesh, sea­son it lightly with Pepper, Salt, Cloves and Mace; then make your Pye Swan-like of Rye dough, and lay your Swan therein, and upon it lay some sheets of Lard and Bay-leaves, and Buttter on the top of [Page 185] that; close it up, and baste it with the [...]olks of Eggs; when it is baked, fill it up [...]ith clarified Butter.

Otherways.

Only pluck your Swan and skin it, not [...]cald it, and take out the bones, then par­ [...]oil it, and season it with Salt, Pepper and Ginger; having larded it, put it into a deep Rye-coffin, with a good quantity of Butter; let it soak very well in the Oven, and being baked, pour in at the Funnel some molten Butter.

Turkey baked in the French fashion.

Having boned your Turkey, lard it with big Lard, then season it with Pepper, Cloves and Mace, Salt and Nutmeg; put into his belly some interlarded Bacon, some Rosemary, Bays, whole Cloves, whole Pepper and Mace, then let it steep all night in White wine; in the morning close it up in a sheet of course paste, and bake it in a Pan with the same liquor it was in, it will require four hours baking; when it is enough, serve it on a Pye-plate stuck with Rosemary and Bays, with Mustard and Sugar in saucers.

Turkey baked to be eaten cold.

Parboil your Fowl, then bone and lard him, season him also with Pepper, Salt Cloves and Mace, put him into a deep Coffin with Butter on the top and bottom, let the head peep through the lid, then baste it with Saffron-water, and when baked and cold, fill it up with clarified Butter.

Wild or tame Goose-pye.

Having broken the bones of your Goose parboil him, then take Pepper, Salt, Cloves and Mace, and season him therewith; then take a couple of Rabbets and lard them very well, then make your Pye of good hot Butter paste; then lay in your Goose with a Rabbet-on each side, with store of Butter on the the top. This is the good House-wives standing Dish.

All sorts of Fish, Flesh and Fowl marinated, pickled or souced.
Fish marinated, pickled or souced.

Carp marinated.

HAving scraped, wash'd, cleans'd and dryed your Carp, split it down the back, flowre it, and fry it crisp in Sallet Oyl, then lay it in a deep Dish, then put into a Pipkin some White wine Vinegar, with a bundle of all sorts of sweet Herbs, with some large Mace, sliced Ginger, gross Pepper, sliced Nutmeg, whole Cloves, and some Salt; boil these together a little while, and pour it on your Fish, then presently cover it up close for two hours to detain the spirits of the Herbs and Spices from flying out; then lay some slices of Lemon thereon and barrel it up.

Conger marinated.

Cut it into pieces, and fry it in clarified Butter, then put it into a barrel, laying be­tween every lay of Fish fryed Bay-leaves, large Mace, sliced Ginger, and a few whole Cloves: Lastly, add to them some Salt and White wine Vinegar, and so head your Cask.

Conger souced.

Take a fat Conger, splat it and bone it, having first fley'd and scalded it, season him with Salt, Mace, and minced Nutmeg, then bind it up hard in a clean cloath, and boil it in Water and White wine, of each an equal quantity, throw some Salt therein and keep it for your use.

Conger pickled.

First fley your Eel, then cut him in pieces, and bind them up together with tape, then boil it in Water, Vinegar and Salt, with a handful of Fennel; when it is boiled, put it into your Soucing-pan with some of the same liquor, Beer, Vinegar, and a handful of green Fennel laid on the top of your Fish.

Caveer pickled.

Wash your Caveer in Vinegar, season it with Salt, then press it two or three days, so that all the liquor may run from it; then mix it with beaten Pepper and Salt then it once more as long as bef [...] and Vine­find it seasoned high enough, wash them an earthen pot, and strow som [...] som [...] it; when you use it, you may either slice it on a plate with Oyl, Vinegar, and sliced Lemon; or temper it in a Dish with Vine­gar; then pour on Oyl, juyce of Oranges, Pepper, and some sliced Lemon, and strow on the pill being shred small.

Eels collar'd.

Take a good large silver Eel, split him down the back, and take forth the bone, wash and dry him, then salt him; after this take minced Oysters, Tyme, sweet Marjoram, Winter-savory, an Onion minced small, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace pounded in a Morter, strow these ingredients on the in­side of the Eel or Eels, then rowl them up close, and bind them with tape, boil them in Vinegar, Water and Salt, a faggot of sweet Herbs, and three whole Onions, adding to this pickle some Ginger, [Page 190] garnish your Dish with Fennel an [...] Flowers.

Eels souced otherways.

Take four large fat Eels, scour them in large draw, wash and cleanse them, then Cloves: into equal pieces a finger and White wine, scotch them on the back, Cask. [...]em a steeping in Wine Vinegar and Salt about two hours, then boil them with sweet Herbs, Onions, large Mace; be­ing boiled, pour away the liquor; when they are cold, take a pint of the liquor, and as much White wine, and boil it up with some Saffron beaten to powder, then take out the Spices, wherein the Fish was boiled, and add them to your White wine, &c. and pour all over your Eels.

Flounders, Plaice or Soals marinated.

Dry well with a clean cloth your Fish, flowre them and fry them in Sallet Oyl, which you must make very hot, and that will make your Flounders fry crisp and brown, then put them into a large earthen Pan, put thereto sliced Nutmeg, Ginger, large Mace, whole Pepper, and a couple of sliced Lemons, over these lay some Bay-leaves fryed, and a little Salt, pouring [Page 191] them as much White wine and Vine­ [...]ar as will cover them.

obsters, Prawns, Shrimps or Craw-fish pickled.

Boil your Lobsters, Prawns, &c. then [...]ake Fennel and bruise it in Salt and Vine­ [...]ar, and with a sprig of Fennel wash them [...]etween the carkass and tail; leave some [...]anched Fennel under the tails, pour on [...]hem White wine, Vinegar, Ma [...]e, Cloves, Nutmeg, and sliced Ginger.

Lobsters marinated.

Half boil your Lobsters, then take out the meat from the shells, and lard the tails with a Salt Eel, then cut the tails long ways, and fry them in sweet Oyl, when enough, set them by; then take White wine Vinegar, Mace, Nutmeg, sliced Gin­ger, Cloves, Pepper, Salt, the tops of Tyme, Rosemary, Sage, Winter-savory, sweet Marjoram, Bay-leaves and Parsley, dish up your Fish, and pour all these ma­terials thereon with the slices of three Lemons, running it all over with But­ter.

Lobsters pickled otherways.

Take Vinegar, White wine and Salt, and boil your Lobsters therein; being boiled set them by: then take large Mace, whole Pepper, and all manner of sweet Herbs and boil them all together in the liquor with the Lobsters, adding thereto some whole Cloves, then barrel them up in a Vessel that will just contain them, pouring the liquor on them, and keep them for your use.

Lumps souced.

Boil your Lump with the skin on, having first scalded and scraped it very well, then take the tail of a Lobster, some large Oysters, Prawns, the yolks of hard Eggs, some sweet Herbs, and mince these all together; then put to them some grated Bread, Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, Ginger, and some Salt, it will not be amiss to add hereunto an Anchovie or two, put these in­to the belly of your Lump, and boil him in White wine, Water, Vinegar and Salt, serve him to the Table with some of the liquor.

You may in this manner souce any Fish, [Page 193] as Soals, Mullets, Dace, Gurnets, Pikes, Carps, Perches, Tenches and Roches.

Mullets souced.

Having scaled and wash'd them clean, lay them in a Dish, and throw some Salt upon them, some sliced Ginger and large Mace, put some Wine Vinegar, and two or three Cloves; then boil it with as much Wine as Water, but put not in the Fish till the Water boils; being boiled enough, put it into a flat-bottom'd earthen-Pan, and pour on the liquor and cover it close.

Mullet marinated.

Take a Gallon of Vinegar, and a quart of Water, a good handful of Bay-leaves, as much Rosemary, and a quarter of a pound of Pepper beaten small; put these toge­ther, and boil them over a soft fire, and season the broth with Salt; then fry your Fish in good clarified Butter, take them up and put them into a barrel that is but just sufficient to contain them, lay the Bay­leaves and Rosemary between every lay of Fish, and pour the broth on it; when it is cold close up the Vessel.

Oysters pickled.

Make choice of your largest Oysters, strain them from the liquor and wash them clean; then set on as much Water as you think will cover them, and when it boileth, put them in and but just scald them, pour them from the liquor, then take some of their own liquor, and mingle it with a little of that in which they were scalded, some Vinegar, large Mace, whole Pepper, Salt, and two or three Bay-leaves, boil all these together; and when your Oy­sters are cold barrel them, and fill them up with liquor, putting thereto, if you like it, a Clove of Garlick.

Another way.

Take a Gallon of very fair large Oysters, they are best about the full of the Moon, parboil these in their own liquor, then take them up and dry them in a clean cloth, and put them into a well seasoned barrel; then take the Oyster liquor well cleansed from the dregs, and boil it with a pint and a half of White wine, half a pint of White wine Vinegar, four or five blades of whole Mace, three quarters of an ounce of Pepper not beaten, three ounces of [Page 195] white Salt, three races of sliced Ginger, and a dozen or fourteen Cloves, pour this liquor into your barrel and head it up close.

Serve them up in a clean Dish with Bay­leaves, Barberries, and sliced Lemon round about them.

Oysters marinated.

Take six quarts of large Oysters, parboil them as aforesaid, then wash them in warm Water, dry them, flowre them, and fry them in a pottle of sweet Sallet Oyl, make them as crisp as you can, and keep them warm till you have made a sauce of White wine, wine Vinegar, half a dozen blades of Mace, sliced Nutmeg, Ginger sliced, a good quantity of Cloves and whole Pepper, with some Salt; boil all these Spices with a fag­got or two of sweet Herbs; having dish'd your Oysters, pour on the liquor and Spices, and garnish it with sliced Lemon.

Pike souced.

Having drawn and cleans'd your Pike ve­ry well, put on your kettle, and when your Water boils, put in your Pike with some Salt, let it boil leasurely with no more li­quor than will cover it: or you may boil it [Page 196] for keeping a considerable while in as much Wine▪ as Water indifferently seasoned with Salt, add thereto a little Vinegar, sliced Ginger, large Mace, Cloves and some Le­mon-pill; being boiled not too much, take it up and lay it by till you have boiled up the liquor to a consistency, then lay it in some deep Pan, and pour your liquor all over it, and cover it up close.

Salmon how to pickle to keep six months or longer.

Take the Salmon and cut it in six round pieces, then boil it in Vinegar and Water, two parts of the former and one of the latter, put not in your Salmon till the li­quor hath boiled half an hour; your Sal­mon being boiled, take it up and drain it, then take Rosemary-leaves, Bay-leaves, Cloves, Mace and whole Pepper, a good quantity of each, and boil them in two quarts of White wine, and as much of Vi­ [...]gar, let th [...]se boil half an hour; your Salmon being cold, rub it well with Pepper and Salt, and put [...] up in a barrel with a lay of Salmon, and another of Spice, that is boiled in the liquor; having filled your Vessel, pour on the liquor. Renew your [Page 197] pickle once a quarter, and your Salmon will keep a compleat twelvemonth.

Salmon pickled in Collers.

Having cut off some of the tail, take the rest of the side, wash and dry it; then wash it with the yolks of Eggs, mince some sweet Herbs, and strow thereon, with a lit­tle Fennel, season it with good store of Salt, Cloves, Nutmeg, Mace, Ginger and Pep­per, then bind it up in Collers with broad tape, then set over your Kettle with Water, Vinegar and Salt, and let it boil with a fag­got of sweet Herbs, sliced Ginger and Nut­meg, then lay it, when boiled, into your Souce-pan, and pour some liquor thereon.

Soals souced.

Take new caught Soals, and scotch them on the White side thick, but not too deep, then boil them in White wine, wine Vine­gar, Cloves, Mace, sliced Ginger and Salt, not putting in your Fish till your liquor boils, which must be no more than will cover them; then put in sliced Onions, Parsley, Tyme, Sage, Rosemary, sweet Marjoram, and Winter-savory; being boiled enough, set your Fish a cooling.

Soals souced and Coller'd.

Take out the bone of your Soals, and ei­ther scrape or skin them, but scraping is most proper; then take Salmon, Oysters, Lobsters, Shrimps or Prawns, and mince these with the yolks of Eggs boiled hard with some Anchovies, add to these a hand­ful or what you think fit of minced Herbs, season all with Nutmeg, Cloves, Ginger, Pepper and Salt; your Soals being dryed and washed over with the yolks of Eggs, spread on them the aforesaid materials, then rowl up your Soals in Collers, binding them hard with Tape; when they are boiled, pickle them in Wine, Water, Vi­negar, Salt, Spices and sweet Herbs boil­ed together.

Sturgeon pickled.

Garbidge your Sturgeon, if it be a Fe­male keep the Spawn to make Ca [...]eer, split him down equally on the back, cut off your Jole to the body-ward, then your first and second Rand very fair, let your tail­piece be the least, bind up these pieces close with flag or tape, and season them with Salt very well, let it boil an hour and a half before you take it up, and all the while [Page 199] it boils, scum off the Oyl, and supply it with liquor, otherways your Sturgeon will be rusty.

Sturgeon souced a better way to keep a long time.

Having drawn your Sturgeon, cut down your Sturgeon on the back into equal Sides and Rands, then wash it from the blood with Water and Salt, then boil it in Water, Vinegar and Salt till it be tender, then lay it in some place to cool, when cold barrel it up close with the liquor it was boiled in.

Sturgeon marinated.

Take the Joles and Rands of Sturgeon, and having cleans'd, dryed and flower'd them, fry them in a large Kettle wherein you must have three Gallons of Rape▪ Oyl clarified; being fryed crisp, set them to cool, in the mean time make your pickle of a Gallon and a half of White wine, two Gallons of wine Vinegar, four or five handfuls of Salt, a quarter of a pound of large Mace, five ounces of whole Papper, two ounces of sliced Ginger; and when it is cold pack it up close, pouring this pickle upon it.

Smelts marinated.

Put a quart of Sallet Oyl or more into a Frying-pan, and when it is hot put in your Fish so many as the Oyl will cover, as it wastes supply it with more; then fry Bay-leaves in the Oyl the Fish was fryed in, then put some Claret wine into an earthen Pan, and put the fryed Leaves into the bottom thereof, and let some of them lye aloft, slice an ounce of Nutmeg, as much Ginger and Mace, a few Cloves and Wine Vinegar, then put in your Fish, so that the Bay-leaves and Spices cover it; when you serve it, let it be with Bay-leaves and the Spices.

Otherways marinated white or red.

Gill some large Smelts and lay them in a Pan, put on them a row of sliced Le­mon, sliced Ginger, Nutmeg, large Mace and whole Pepper, then a row of Smelts, and so continue doing till they are all placed; then put to them White wine, Vi­negar, Salt and Bay-leaves: thus you must do, if you would have them white; but if red, then must your pickle be Red-wine well mingled with Cocheneil, a weeks time will throughly pickle them; when you [Page 201] dish them up, you must divide them as an Anchovie, strowing on Lemon cut four square, with Broom-buds and Barberries.

Turbut souced.

Having fitted your Fish for the Kettle, and your liquor boiling, put your Turbut therein, season it in the boiling very well with Salt, and let it boil leisurely and scum it often.

If you intend to keep it a good while, boil it in as much Water and White wine as will cover it; some Wine Vinegar, sliced Ginger, large Mace, some Cloves, and some Lemon-pill; being boil'd and cold, put in a sliced Lemon, and keep it for your use in an earthen Pan.

Tench souced.

Draw your Tench at the Gills, and cut them off, then will they boil the whiter, have Water on the fire, and season it with Salt, Vinegar, five or six Bay-leaves, large Mace, whole Cloves, some faggots of sweet Herbs bound up hard together; so soon as your liquor boils, put in your Tench wiped clean, but not scaled, being boiled wash off the loose scales; then strain the liquor through a jelly-bag, and put to it some [Page 202] Izing-glass, being washed and steeped for that purpose, and boil it very cleanly, dish your Fish in the Dish you intend to send it up in, then strain the liquor through the bag, pour it on the Fish and let it cool.

This Jelly will serve to jelly Lobsters, Crawfish or Prawns, hanging them in some glass by a thread at their full length, and filling the glass with the Jelly when it is warm; it being cold, turn it out of the glass.

All sorts of Herbs, Roots, &c. pickled, with Sallets and Grand Sallets.

Artichokes.

WHen your Artichokes are ripe, gather them and cut off the stalk within an inch of the Choke, wash them clean and boil them in Water and Salt, then take them up, laying the bottoms upward till they be cold: this being done, provide a Vessel of clear Water and Salt boiled to­gether and cooled, then put the Arti­chokes into it, cover it close, and so you may keep them all the year round: do not [Page 203] make your Pickle too salt; they are good for Pyes at Christmas, or for shew.

Another very good.

Take your Artichokes not too ripe, for then they will be full of strings, pare them round to the bottom, and boil them tender, take them up and set them a cooling, then take White wine and stale Beer, with good store of whole Pepper, so put them into a barrel with a little Salt, keep them close, and they will serve for baked meats and boiled meats all the year.

Ashen-keys pickled.

Having boiled your Ashen-keys, put them into a Pot; and put thereunto some Vinegar, keep it close covered.

Alexander-buds pickled.

You must make choice of your Alexan­der-buds before they run to seed, and take off their tops and loose leaves, so that the Bud may be intire and firm, cut part of the Root to them, and parboil them very well in Water Salt, then put them from the liquor, and when they are cold, put to them Vinegar, Salt, and some stale Bee [...][Page 204] when you use them▪ slit them in the middle.

Bogberries pickled.

Take some Bogberries, and put them into Gallipots, then pour into them some Vinegar and Sugar boiled together, close the top of your Pots, and these will serve for garnish all the year: Thus you may pickle Hog-haws; if not ripe, you must boil them.

Broom-buds pickled.

First tye up your Broom-buds in little bags, then make a strong pickle of Water and Salt, boiling it so long till it will bear an Egg: having put your Broom-buds in­to pots fitting for the purpose, pour in your pickle when it is cold, there let them lye till they look black, then shift them till they look of a bright or green colour; af­ter this, when occasion shall serve, you may take them out and boil them; then pickle them in Vinegar.

Burdock-roots pickled.

Take Burdock-roots and half boil them, having first scraped them very clean, then put them up into convenient Vessels, and [Page 205] pour into them a like quantity of White wine and wine Vinegar, with some Salt and Pepper, when you use them slice them thin.

Barberries pickled.

Pick your Barberries from the Leaves in clusters, when they are ripe, and put them into boiling Water, there let them lye hot half a quarter of an hour, then close them in Gallipots, putting a pickle to them of White wine and Vinegar not made too sharp.

Broom-capers.

Boil the greatest and hardest Broom-buds in wine Vinegar and Bay-salt, scum it clean; when it is cold, you may put in raw ones also, each by themselves, laying a weight up­on them, for all that swim will be black, and the raw ones that are pressed down will be as green as grass, those that are boiled will change colour.

Cucumbers how to pickle.

Cut your Cucumbers in pieces, boil them in spring-Water, Sugar and Dill, a walm or two, take them up, and let your pickle stand until it be cold.

The best way is thus:

After Bartholomew-tide, make choice of your smallest Cucumbers, by some called Gerkins, cleanse them well from all dirt and impurity, then put in the bottom of an earthen Pot or Ferkin, some Bay and Dill­leaves, some whole Pepper, blades of Mace and some Cloves, then place a laying of Cucumbers thereon, then a lay of Bay and Dill-leaves, then a lay of Cucumbers, till you have filled your Vessel, you must thus continue to do; then make a liquor of Water and Dill to make it strong, with some Salt; you may boil this liquor, if you please, but pour it not to them till it be cold, then let your Cucumbers lye herein fifteen or sixteen days, then pour the liquor from them, not all, and fill it up with White wine, Vinegar; this will make your Cucumbers look green, be green and not too sowr.

Caper-rowlers of Radish-cods.

Take them when they be hard, and not over-much open, boil them tender in fair Water, then boil White wine, Vinegar and Bay-Salt together, and keep them therein.

Cucumbers otherways pickled.

Being put into an earthen Pot, let the pickle you put to them be Vinegar, Salt, whole Pepper, Dill-seed, some of the stalks, cut Charnel, fair Water, and some Sycamore leaves.

Clove-Gilliflowers pickled.

Pick a good quantity of Clove-Gilli­flowers, put them into an equal quantity of White wine and Vinegar, with so much Sugar as will make them both sweet and sharp, add to them a few Cloves.

Cowslips pickled.

Pick them, and let them lye only in Vi­negar and Sugar.

Currans red and white pickled.

Take red or white Currans, being not throughly ripe, and give them a walm in White wine and Vinegar, with so much Sugar as will indifferently sweeten it, cover them over in this liquor, and keep them al­ways under it.

Cabbidge stalks pickled.

Take a quantity of Cabbidge stalks from [Page 208] the Cabbidge, so far as the pith is good, about Michaelmas the time is best, shave off the outside, and cut them into quarters, half boil them in Water and Salt, then cut the pith from the outward pill, and pickle it in White wine, a little stale Beer, bruised Pepper, a little large Mace, a few Fennel­seeds and Salt, slice these out with your pickled Sallets.

Charnel pickled.

Give your Charnel two or three walms in boiling Water, your pickle must be only Vinegar.

Dill or Fennel pickled.

Tye up young Fennel in bunches, and give it half a dozen of walms in boiling Wa­ter, then put it up, and let your pickle be Vinegar only.

Elder tops pickled.

About the middle of April break the tops of young sprouts of Elder, about six inches in length, and having a convenient quantity, give them half a dozen walms in boiling Water, then drain them in a Cul­lender; let your pickle be Wine or Beer, adding thereto some Salt, and a little [Page 209] bruised Pepper, stop them up close in the said pickle: This is not only a wholesome Sallet, but also commendable.

Or thus:

Take young sprouts of Elder, and break their tops five inches long; then boil them in Water, and lay them in a Cullen­der to drain: having prepared a pickle of Wine or Beer, with some Salt and bruised Pepper, put them therein and stop them up close.

Elder-buds pickled.

Gather them before they are full blown, and lay them in White wine Vinegar, these will make an excellent Sallet; if they are throughly blown, make thereof Elder Vinegar.

Or thus:

Set Vinegar over the Fire, and give your Buds a walm or two therein, with Salt, Pepper, large Mace and Lemon-pill cut in pieces, then drain your Buds from the li­quor and let them cool, then put them in­to a Pot, and put your liquor, when cold, unto them.

Endive curled.

Let your Endive be first scalded in boil­ing Water, then lay it in a pickle of half White wine, and half Vinegar.

Flowers of any kind pickled.

Put them into a Gallipot with as much Sugar as they weigh, and fill them up with wine Vinegar, a pint to a pound of Sugar.

Grapes and Goosberries pickled.

Having pick'd them, put them into the juyce of Crab, Cherries, Grape-Verjuyce, or any other Verjuyce, and so barrel them up; or take green Grapes, and lay them in a pickle of White wine and Vi­negar.

Green Figs pickled.

Take green Figs, slit them in two, and boil them in Vinegar, some Sugar, large Mace and Cloves, and put them into a Gallipot with the same liquor; they are a good garnish for boil'd meats in Winter.

Hop-buds pickled.

Take your Hop-buds and give them a walm or two in Water and Salt, then lay them in White wine and Vinegar.

Kit-keys, Crucifex, Pease or Purslane pickled.

Take any of the aforesaid, and lay them in as much Wine as Water, with a little Salt, then boil them after this, put them in­to a Pot, and cover them with Vinegar made of White wine.

Lemons pickled.

First boil them in Water and Salt, and then put them into a Vessel fill'd up with White wine.

Lemon or Orange-pill pickled.

Boil then in Vinegar and Sugar, having first parboil'd them in Water, divide the whole Pill into halves, and cut them into thongs according to the extent; you must put them up in the same pickle they were boiled in: This is an excellent Winter Sallet.

Marsh-Mallow-stalks pickled.

The time to gather these is about the [Page 212] latter end of March, for then the stalks will be of a convenient bigness; gather what quantity you think fit, and peel off the outward Pill, when your Water boils, be­ing seasoned with Salt, put them therein, give them half a dozen walms, then take them up, drain them, and let them cool, then make a pickle of stale Beer, some Vi­negar, gross Pepper, and a handful of Salt, according to the quainty of your stalks.

There is a pretty way of ordering them to make them pass for a Dish of Pease, and that is thus: Take some stalks pilled, and cut them into the form of Pease, so many as will make a handsome dishful then set them over the Fire in a Skillet of Water, and let them boil with some Pep­per tyed up in a clean rag; when boiled enough over a quick Fire, put them into a Cullender, and drain them well from the Water, then dish them up like Pease with good store of Butter, with Pepper and Salt round the Dish brims; Pease and these Stalks have a taste very semblable, in so much, that they are frequently called March Pease: I have known them so well shaped, and so curiously ordered, that the Eaters have wondred how Pease should come so soon.

Mallagatoons pickled.

Take them before they are ripe, so that you may split the stone with your knife, then add to them half their weight of Su­gar, then boil them therewith and scum it, lay your Mallagatoons with their skin side downward, let them only simmer: after the same manner you may order Peaches and Apricocks, and put them up in the same pickle they were boiled in.

Mushroms pickled.

Take what quantity of Mushroms you please to pickle, blanch them over the crown, and barb them beneath, throw a­way what looks black, for they are old, put those that are young and fresh (which will look red) into a Pan of boiling Water; having boiled a little time, take them up and drain them, when they are cold, put them into some convenient Vessel, and add thereto some Cloves, Mace, Ginger, Pep­per and Nutmeg, then take the White wine, a little Vinegar and Salt, and pour this li­quor in to your Mushroms, stop them close, and so keep them the whole year.

Purslain pickled.

Gather them at their full growth, but not too old, parboil them and keep them in White wine Vinegar and Sugar.

Or thus:

Wash the Stalks clean, and cut them in­to lengths of six inches, boil them in Wa­ter and Salt indifferent tender, then drain and cool them; after this put to them a pickle of stale Beer and wine Vinegar, adding thereto some Salt; if you stop them up close, they will keep till the Spring following.

Quinces pickled.

First core your Quinces, those which are fairest and largest, the worse sort cut in pieces, and boil them to make your liquor strong, then put in whole Quinces, and let them be a quarter boil'd, then strain your liquor and put to it some Salt, some strong stale Beer; then lay your Quinces into a Pot, and put in the liquor, so stop it up close.

Otherways.

Take Quinces and neither pare or core them with your scroop, boil them indiffe­rently [Page 215] in Water and Salt, then barrel them and cover them in the liquor they were boiled in; or you may pare them and boil them in White wine, into which you must put whole Cloves, sliced Ginger and Cina­mon: Lastly, you may barrel them up raw and put to them only White wine.

Red Cabbidge pickled.

Take your close leav'd Cabbidge, and cut it into pieces or quarters, when your liquor boils, parboil it therein, then take it up, drain it and pickle it in Claret wine Vi­negar.

Reddish tops pickled.

Half boil them, then put them into White wine, Salt, a little stale Beer, Mace and bruised Pepper.

Sparagrass to keep all the year.

Parboil them but a very little, and put them into clarified Butter, cover them with it, the Butter being cold cover it; about a Month after refresh them with new Butter, and bury them under ground in a Pot co­vered over with leather.

Samphire pickled green.

Let your Samphire be fresh gathered, and pickle it in Water and Salt; when you use it, boil it half a dozen walms, then drain it, and when it is cold, put it into a pickle of Vinegar, for your present use; some boil it at first in Water and Salt, and keep it in the same liquor, but the first way is the best.

Otherways.

Pick the branches from the dead leaves of the Samphire, and lay it into a small barrel, then put thereto a strong brine of white Salt well scum'd; when it is cold, put it into the barrel, cover it and keep it the whole year round; when you would use it, let your Water boil in a Pipkin, and put your Samphire therein, then take it up, and when it is cold, put Vinegar to it.

Stalks of Sherdowns or Thistles pickled.

These Sherdowns run up like an Arti­choke, and have the same resemblance in their roots, you must peel both root and stalk, and boil them in Water and Salt, pickle them in White wine: This is very serviceable for either boiled or baked Meats.

Shampinions pickled.

Parboil them a little in Water and Salt, then lay them in a pickle of white wine, white wine Vinegar, bruised Pepper, Salt, and some large Mace.

Sleep-at-noon pickled.

Parboil it in water and salt, then drain it from the water, and when it is cold pickle it in white wine and Vinegar, with a little Pepper and large Mace.

Tarragon pickled.

Strip your Tarragon from the stalk, and put it into a Vessel with half white wine and half Vinegar, stop it close, and keep it for your use.

Turnip tops pickled.

Let your Turnip tops be young, and cut off the withered leaves or branches; when your water boils put them therein, letting them lye till they are pretty tender, then drain them from the water, and let them stand till they are cold; then pickle them in white wine, Vinegar and Salt.

All manner of Sallets and Grand-Sallets.

A grand Sallet for the Spring.

THe necessary and usual ingredients are Cowslip-buds, Violets and their Leaves, Strawberry-leaves, Brooklime, Water­cresses, young Lettice, Spinage, Alexan­der-buds, &c. you must have them all a­part, then take by themselves Samphire, Olives, Capers, Broom-buds, Cucumbers, Raisins and Currans parboiled, blanched Almonds, Barberries, with other pickles; then prepare your standard for the middle of your grand Sallet, let not the Basis be Butter as some absurdly make it, but a Tur­nip or another hard thing, on which it may conveniently stand: Let your standard be like a Castle made of paste, and wash'd over with the yolks of Eggs, and within it a Tree made in like manner, and co­loured green with Herbs, and stuck with Flowers; you must have hereunto annexed twelve supporters round stooping to and fastned to your Castle; then having four [...] [Page 239] taking away the fat betwixt the claws, and also the long shank bones, lay them a soaking in water five hours, and boil them in two Gallons of Water till it is consumed to three quarts; being boiled, strain it through a Strainer; when the broth is cold, take it from the grounds, and divide it into three parts for three several colours, putting each part into a several Pipkin with a quart of White wine, let one be colour'd with Co [...]heneil, the second with Saffron, and let the last have its own complexon, let each Pipkin have some Cinamon, a race of Ginger, and a little Mace, with some Nut­meg, slicing each particular Spice, melt your Jelly, and put into every Pipkin a pound or somewhat more of Sugar, and with it the yolks of half a dozen Eggs beaten very well, stir these well together, and when it is ready to boil, take it off and strain it through bags, so keep it for your use.

HAving treated of the more sub­stantial part of Food and their several ways of dressing, whe­ther Fish, Flesh or Fowl boiled, stew­ed, roasted, fryed, broiled, frigaffied, baked in Paste, or out of Paste, ma­rinated, souced and pickled, each in their orders Alphabetically di­gested, with their several proper Sauces and Pickles; I shall in the next place discourse methodically, and according to order, of the right framing and compounding (accord­ing to the latest and best fashion) all manner of Keck-shaws, as Florentines, Jellies, Leaches▪ Creams, Puddings, Custards and Cheescakes: And the first I shall begin with according to the propounded order is

TARTS.

Almond Tart.

TAke three quarters of a pound of blanch'd Almonds, and soak them a [Page 241] a while in Water, then pound them in a stone Morter, a wooden one will serve, or a deep Tray, put to them some Rosewater; when you have pounded them very well, pound them over again with a little Cream, then set on about a pint and a half of Cream over the fire, and put your pounded Almonds therein with some Ci­namon, large Mace, and a grain of Musk fastned to a thread, stir it continually that it burn not to the bottom till it be thick, then take it off the fire, and beat in the yolks of four or five Eggs, with the whites of two, so season it with Sugar or Oran­gado, and bake it either in a Dish or Paste.

Or you may only strain beaten Almonds with Cream, yolks of Eggs, Sugar, Cina­mon and Ginger, boil it thick, fill your Tart, and when it is baked ice it.

Damsin Tart.

Boil them very well in Wine, strain them with Cream, Sugar, Cinamon and Ginger, then boil them again, and so fill your Tart.

Strawberry Tart.

Wash your Strawberries, which you [Page 242] must procure of the midling size, and put them into your Paste, season them with Cinamon, Ginger, and a little red Wine, on the top lay Sugar, let it stand in the Oven about half an hour, then draw it, ice it and scrape on Sugar.

Cherry Tart.

Stone your Cherries and lay them in the bottom of your Pye, with beaten Cinamon, Ginger and Sugar, then close it up, bake it and ice it; when it is baked, pour into it Muskadine and Damask water well min­gled together, and scrape on Sugar.

Medler Tart.

Your Medlers that are rotten are only fit for the purpose, which you must strain into a Dish, and then set them over a Chafing-dish of coals, season it with Su­gar, Ginger and Cinamon, adding thereto some yolks of Eggs beaten; having boiled half a quarter of an hour, lay it into your paste, being baked, scrape on Sugar.

Pine-apple Tart.

Take three handfuls of Pine-apples, the pulp of as many Pippins, with a prick­ed Quince; when they are well beaten, [Page 243] put to them three quarters of a pint of Cream, a little Rosewater, the yolks of five Eggs, with half a quarter of a pound of Sugar, you may thin it with more Cream, if you find it too thick; let your Paste, in which you put these ingredients, be thin, low and dryed, so close it up and bake it.

A Spring Tart.

Gather what buds are not bitter, also the leaves of Primroses, Violets and Strawberries, with young Spinage, and boil them, and put them into a Cullender, then chop your Herbs very small, and boil them over again in Cream, add thereunto so many yolks with the whites, as will sufficiently thicken your Cream, to which you must add some grated Naples bisket, colour all green with the juyce of Spinage, and season it with Sugar, Cina­mon, Nutmeg, and a little Salt, you may bake it in Puff-paste or otherways.

Taffety Tart.

Having wetted the Paste with Butter and cold water, rowl it very thin, then lay Apples in lays, and between every lay of Apples, strow some fine Sugar and some Lemon-pill cut very small; let them bake [Page 244] an hour, then ice them with Rosewater, Sugar and Butter, and wash them over with the same, then strow more fine Sugar on them, and put them into the same O­ven again, you may serve them either hot or cold.

Cowslip Tart.

Take three quarts of the blossoms of Cowslips, mince them and pound them in a Morter, put to them a quarter of a pound of Naple-bisket grated, a pint of Cream, and put them into a Skillet, and let them boil a little on the fire, then take them off, and beat in the yolks of half a dozen Eggs with some Cream; make it thick over the fire, but let it not curdle, season it with Su­gar, a little Rosewater and Salt; your best way is to let your Cream be cold before you stir in your Eggs, then bake it in Paste or Dish.

Cream Tart.

Take Quinces, Pears, Wardens and Pip­pins, slice them into quarters, boil them and strain them into Cream, as also Mala­gatoons, Necturus, Apricocks, Peaches, Plums or Cherries, fill your Tart, and lay on the top preserved Citron; when it is [...] [Page 261] two sheets of Puff-paste, put to it Butter and Sugar, close it, prick it and bake it, when it is baked, put to it a little Sack, drawn Butter and Vinegar, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

Florentine of Potatoes and Artichokes.

Put these Roots into boiling Water, and when they are boiled tender, blanch them and season them with Nutmeg, Pepper, Cina­mon and Salt, season them but lightly, then lay on a sheet of Paste in a Dish, and upon that some bits of Butter, then lay in your Po­tatoes and Artichokes round the Dish with some Eringo roots and Dates sliced in halves, Beef-Marrow, large Mace, sliced Lemon and some Butter, then close it up with a­another sheet of Paste; when it is baked, liquor it with Grape-Verjuyce, Butter and Sugar, and ice it.

Florentine of Barberries.

Take what quantity you think conveni­ent and boil them with Claret wine and Rosewater, adding thereto some Sugar; being boiled very thick, strain them and put them on a bottom of Puff-paste in a Dish, then close them up with a cut cover of the same Paste: when it is baked, ice [Page 262] it and stick the pulp thereof all over with raw Barberries.

Florentine of Marrow.

Take the Marrow of four Marrow-bones and cut them into squares like large Dice, add hereunto a grated Manchet, some sliced Dates, a quarter of a pound of Currans, some Cream, roasted Wardens, Pippins or Quinces sliced, and the yolks of four raw Eggs, season them with Cinamon, Gin­ger and Sugar, mingle these well together, and lay them in a Dish on a sheet of Paste and bake them.

Florentine of Rice.

Having pick'd your Rice very clean, boil it tender, then lay it in a Dish, and put to it Butter, Sugar, Nutmeg and Salt, with a little Rosewater, and the yolks of half a dozen Eggs, then put these ingre­dients on a sheet of Puff-paste in a Dish, be­ing half baked ice it.

Or you may mix your Rice with some Cream, Rosewater, Sugar, Cinamon, yolks of Eggs, Salt, boiled Currans and Butter, being baked, scrape on some Sugar.

JELLIES.

YOur usual stock for Jellies are Calves feet boiled very tender and blanched, and knucles of Veal with the bones not broken; of these, take what quantity you think fit, and lay them in Water a Night and Day, shift them often in that time into fresh Water, and cleanse them well from the Blood, then boil them in so much fair Water as will cover them, and a lit­tle more; as they boil, scum your Pot, then put to them a little Salt, also tye up in a Linnen bag, some large Nutmeg, Ginger and sliced Cinamon, let these boil soberly the space of two hours and a half; at which time you may try with your spoon whe­ther it will jelly, if not, boil it a little longer, but not down too low, for then it will be apt to change colour; if you find it jelly to your satisfaction and desire, add to your Jelly some Izing-glass, let it then simper a little longer, then take it off and strain it into a Dish or Pipkin, there to stand and cool till you are ready to use it.

Jellies of John-Apples.

Pare them and cut them into less than quarters, then pick out the Kernels, but leave the cores, and as you pare them, drop them into fair Water to keep them from changing colour, then put to them a pound of Ap­ples, three quarters of a pint of Water, and let it boil apace till it be half consumed, then run it through a jelly bag, then take the full weight of them in double refined Sugar, wet the Sugar thin with Water, and let it boil almost to a Candy, then put to it the liquor of the Apples, and two or three slices of Orange-pill, a little Musk, and a little Ambergriese tyed in a Tiffany bag, and let it not boil too softly for fear of losing the colour, then warm a little juyce of Orange and Lemon together, and being half boiled put it therein; having reduced it to a Jelly, you may use it by pouring it on some preserved Oranges laid in a glass for that purpose, or other­ways.

Jellies for soust meats.

Take four pair of Calves feet, scald them and take way the fat between the claws, as also the long shank-bones, lay them [Page 265] in Water five hours, and boil them in three quarts of fair Spring Water to one quart, then strain it and set it a cooling, after this, take away the grounds from it, and divide the purer part into three equal proporti­ons, putting each into a several Pipkin, adding to every Pipkin a quart of wine, likewise a pound of Sugar, being first well beaten in a Dish with the whites of Eggs, stew these together a little while o­ver a soft fire with Nutmeg, Ginger, Mace and Cinamon, and colour them several­ly with Cocheneil, Saffron, &c. and so set them up for your use.

Crystal Jelly.

Take three pair of Calves feet, and two knuckles of Veal, wash them very well, and let them stand twelve hours in Wa­ter, then boil them in spring Water from five quarts to a Gallon; after this let the liquor stand, and when it is cold pare away the bottom and top, then put to it some Rosewater, double refined Sugar, seven spoonfuls of Oyl of Cinamon, the like quantity of Oyl of Ginger, four spoon­fuls of Oyl of Nutmeg, a grain and a half of Musk tyed in a fine linnen cloth; when you have boiled all these together, put it [Page 266] into an earthen Dish, and so let it stand for your use; when it is cold, serve it in slices or otherways.

Or thus a much better way.

Your stock being cold, as aforesaid, take away the top and bottom, and put the rest into a Pipkin, adding thereto some Mace, Cloves, Cinamon, sliced Ginger and Nut­meg, together with a grain of Musk and Ambergriese tyed in a Tiffany-bag, put in also some Rosewater, and if your stock be stiff, a quart of Rhenish wine, or what you think fit thereof to make the Jelly of a pro­per thickness, season it with Sugar conve­nient for your Pallate, and drop in of Oyl of Mace and Nutmeg, three drops of each, set these over the fire for the space of a quar­ter of an hour, then take it off and squeeze into it the juyce of half a score Lemons beaten to a froth with the whites of six Eggs, then set it over the fire till it boils, then take it off and strain it, having two Dishes, the first straining pour in again, and let it run into the other dish till it be clear. [...] [Page 287] and boil it over night, in the morning take three quarters of a pound of Almonds blanched and finely beaten, strain them with the Cream, and add thereto some­what more than a quarten of double re­fined Sugar, some Rosewater, Cinamon and Ginger finely beaten and fierced, then dish it, scrape on Sugar and serve it up.

Almond Cream the best away.

Take half a pound of Almonds (right Jordan, for they are the best) and pound them in a Morter with Rosewater and Su­gar, sprinkling them in by degrees; as you are pounding incorporate these well toge­ther with Rice-flowre and a little Milk, making it no thicker than batter; when your Cream boileth, pour this stuff into your Skillet, and let them boil together with Izing-glass, Nutmeg and Cinamon, with a blade or two of large Mace, keep it stirring over the fire for the space of half an hour, then take it off, and put therein the yolks of half a dozen Eggs well bea­ten in some Cream and Rosewater, with three quarters of a pound of fine Sugar, stir all together, and dish it up; three quarts of Milk will be sufficient for the aforesaid ingredients.

Goosberry Cream.

Take what quantity of Cream you think fit, and boil it with Cinamon, Nutmeg, M [...]ce, Sugar, Rosewater, and the yolks of Eggs beaten; having boiled a little while, take it off and dish it, then have in readi­ness some preserved Goosberries, and stick them on a pin in rows as thick as they can lye on the Cream, garnish your dish with the same, sprinkle on Sugar and serve it up.

Otherways.

Take a quantity of Goosberries codled green, and boil them up with Sugar, then put them into raw or boiled Cream, strained or not, it is better to let them be whole, scrape on Sugar and serve them up.

In like manner you may order Raspiss, Red-currans or Strawberries, or you may serve them in Wine and Sugar without any Cream.

Rice Cream.

Take three quarts of Cream, and three handfuls of Rice-Flowre, with half a poun [...] of Sugar, mingle the two last named very w [...] [Page 289] together, and put it into the Cream; then beat the yolk of an Egg or two, with a little Rosewater, and put it likewise into the Cream, stir these all together continu­ally over a quick fire till it be as thick as pap.

Rice Milk or Cream otherways.

Having boil'd your Rice near upon a quarter of an hour, put it out into a Cul­lender, and pick out the unhuskt Rice from the rest; if it be half a pound of Rice that you use, then must you have three quarts of Milk or Cream; when it boils, put in your Rice with large Mace, whole Cina­mon, and a Nutmeg in halves; when it begins to thicken, take the yolks of half a dozen Eggs, and beat them with Rose­water, and a ladleful of your boiling Cream, then stir it all into your Cream over the fire, then take it off and season it with Su­gar and a little Salt, take out your whole Spice, and dish it up, scrape on it Sugar, and on the brims of your Dish, and serve it up.

Clowted Cream.

Take new Milk from the Cow, and let it over the fire in two or three broad ear­then [Page 290] Pans, when it is ready to boil take it off, and set it by to cool, when it is cold scum it off with your Scummer, and season it with Rosewater, Musk and Sugar.

Another rare Cream.

Take a pound of Almond-paste fine bea­ten with Rosewater, mingle it with a quart of Cream, half a dozen Eggs, a little Sack, half a pound of Sugar, and some beaten Nutmeg; strain them and put them into a clean scoured Skillet, and set it on a soft fire, stir it continually, and being of an indifferent thickness, dish it up with juyce of Oranges, Sugar, and a stick or two of candyed Pistaches.

Another.

When you churn Butter, take out a pint of Cream, just as it is about to turn to Butter, then boil a quart of thick new Cream, season it with Sugar, and a little Rosewater, when it is quite cold, mingle it well with your former Cream, and so dish it.

An extraordinary clowted Cream.

Take two gallons and a half of new Milk, and when it boils, make a hole in [...] [Page 311] Dates, Sack half a pint, a quarter of a pint of Rosewater, ten Eggs, two grains of Am­bergriese, and two of Musk dissolved: Lastly, have in readiness a deep Dish, and lay in the bottom some slices of French Bread, and strew thereon Nutmeg, Cina­mon and Sugar mingled together, and sprin­kle the slices with Sack and Rosewater; then lay on some Raisins of the Sun, some sliced Dates, and good big pieces of Mar­row: And thus make two or three lays of the aforesaid ingredients, with some Musk, and a great deal of Marrow on the top, then take a pottle of Cream, and strain it, with half a quarter of fine Sugar, and a little Salt, with the yolks of twelve Eggs and six whites, then set the Dish into the Oven temperately hot, when baked scrape on some Sugar.

An excellent boiled Pudding.

Beat the yolks only of half a dozen Eggs with Rosewater, and a pint of Cream, warm it with a piece of Butter as big as a Pullets egg; when it is melted, mix them well together, and season it with Nutmeg, Sugar, and Salt, then put in as much Bread as will make it as thick as Batter, with a spoonful of Flowre, then take a double [Page 312] cloth, wet it and flowre it, tye it fast, and put it in the Pot, being boiled, serve it with Butter, Verjuyce and Sugar.

Or you may take Pinamolets or French Bread, grate it and sift it through a Cullen­der, and mix it with Flowre, minced Dates, Currans, Nutmeg, Cinamon, minced Suet, Milk from the Cow, Sugar and Eggs, take away one moiety of the whites, and mingle them all together, then make it round like a loaf, when the liquor boils, put it in tyed up in a double cloth.

Cream Puddings.

Take a pint of Cream, season it with Nutmeg, Cinamon, Ginger and Mace, let your Ginger be quartered, then put to it the yolks of four Egg, and half the quan­tity of Whites, half a pound of Almonds blanched, beaten and strained with the Cream, a little Rosewater, Sugar and a ve­ry little Flowre, then put your Pudding in­to a bag or Napkin, having first wetted and flower'd it; being boiled, let your Sauce be Sack, Sugar and Butter beaten up thick to­gether with the yolk of an Egg; then blanch some Almonds, slice them and stick the Pudding very thick all over, then scrape on Sugar and serve it up.

Green Puddings of Herbs.

Take a quart and somewhat more of Cream, and steep therein the pith of a penny-white-loaf, into which you must beat the yolks of eight Eggs, then add thereto Currans, Sugar, Cloves, beaten Mace, Dates, Cinamon, Nutmeg, sweet Marjoram, Tyme, Savory, Penniroyal minced very small, the juyce of Spinage, Saffron and Salt, boil these with Beef-suet or Marrow, or without either; these Puddings are excellent to be served up alone in a Dish, or good stuffings for boiled or roasted Poultry, Kid, Lamb or Veal.

Another excellent boiled Pudding.

Beat six Eggs into a pint of Cream, put it over the Fire, and scald the crum of a Manchet therein, then put to it half a pound of blanched Almonds beaten small with Rosewater, season it with Sugar, Nut­meg and Salt, some Dates sliced and cut small, some Currans boiled, and some Mar­row minced, beat them all together and bake it.

Almond Pudding in a Dish.

Take a pound of Almonds, blanch and pound them in a Marble-Morter, strain them with a quart of Cream, a grated Manchet fierced, four Eggs, some Sugar, Nutmeg grated, some Dates, and a little Salt, boil it and serve it in a Dish with bea­ten Butter, stick it with Wafers, and scrape on Sugar.

Some use this course by taking a pound of Almond-paste, some grated Naples­bisket, Cream, Rosewater, yolks of Eggs, beaten Cinamon, Ginger, Nutmeg, some boiled Currans, Pistaches and Musk, boil it in a Napkin, and serve it as the for­mer.

Almond Puddings in guts.

Take a pound and a half of Almond-paste, and put thereto some new Milk or Cream, with four or five blades of Mace, and some sliced Nutmegs; when it is boiled, take the Spice clean from it, then grate a penny Manchet, and fierce it through a Cullender, put it into the Cream, and let it stand till it be cold, then put in the Al­monds, eight yolks of Eggs, Salt, Sugar, and good store of Marrow or Beef-suet [Page 315] finely minced, and therewith fill the guts.

Cinamon Puddings.

Take two quarts of Cream, and steep therein two French Rolls, a dozen yolks of Eggs, Dates, an ounce of beaten Cinamon and some Almond-paste; you may some­times use Rosewater and boiled Currans; either boil or bake it, which you please.

Haggus Puddings.

Take a Calves chaldron, boil it, and when it is cold, mince it very small, then take the yolks of four Eggs, and the whites of two, some Cream, grated Bread, Sugar, Salt, Currans, Rosewater, some Beef-suet or Marrow, sweet Herbs, Marjoram, Tyme, Parsley, and mingle all together; then having a Sheep-maw ready dressed, put in the aforesaid materials and boil it.

Others take good store of Parsley, Sa­vory, Tyme, Onions, and Oatmeal groats chopped together; and mingled with some minced Beef-suet, with Cloves, Mace, Pepper and Salt, fill the panch, sow it up and boil it; when it is boiled, cut a hole [Page 316] in it, and put in some beaten Butter, with yolks of the three Eggs.

Another very good way.

Take a Calves chaldron or Muggets, boil it tender and mince it small, put to it grated Bread, the yolks of six Eggs, with as many whites, some Cream, sweet Herbs, Spinage, Succory, Sorrel, Strawberry-leaves minced small, a little Butter, Pepper, Cloves, Mace, Cinamon, Ginger, Currans, Sugar, Salt, Dates, and boil it in a Napkin or Calves-panch; being boiled, dish it and trim it with scraped Sugar, stick it with sliced Almonds, and run it over with bea­ten Butter.

Chiveridge Puddings.

Lay the fattest of a Hog in fair Water and Salt to scowr them, then take the longest and fattest gut, and stuff it with Nutmeg, Sugar, Ginger, Pepper, and sliced Dates, boil them and serve them to the Table.

Swan or Goose-pudding.

Take the blood of either and strain it, and put therein Oatmeal to steep, or grated Bread in Milk or Cream, with Nutmeg, [Page 317] Pepper, sweet Herbs minced, Beef-suet, Rosewater, minced Lemon-pill, with a small quantity of Coriander-seed: This is a ve­ry good Pudding for a Swan or Gooses Neck.

Veal pudding.

Take some of the raw flesh of a Leg of Veal, and mince it very small, then min­gle it with lard cut into square pieces, and mince some sweet Herbs, as Marjoram, Pen­niroyal, &c. with some Spice, as Nutmeg, Ginger, Pepper and Salt, work or incor­porate all together, with Cinamon, Sugar, Barberries, sliced Figs, blanched Almonds, half a pound of Beef-suet finely minced, put these into Hog or Sheep-guts well cleansed, cut them an inch and a half long, tye them and boil them in a Pipkin, with Claret wine, with large Mace; being almost boiled, have some boil'd Grapes in small bunches, and Barberries in knots, then dish them on French Bread; being scald­ed with Mutton Broth of Gravy, garnish your dish with sliced Lemon: this is a most delicate Pudding.

Bread Pudding in guts.

Take some Cream and boil it with Mace, [Page 318] and mix therewith some Almonds blanch­ed and beaten with Rosewater, then take Cream, Eggs, Nutmeg, Currans, Salt and Marrow, and mingle them all together, with as much grated white Bread, as you shall think sufficient, and herewith fill your guts.

Bread Puddings green or yellow.

Grate three penny-white-loaves, and fierce them through a Cullender, put them into a deep dish, and put to them three Eggs, three pints of Cream, Cloves, Mace, Saffron, Salt, Rosewater, Sugar, Currans, three quarters of a pound of Beef-suet, and the like quantity of Dates; if you would have your Pudding green, colour it with Spinage, and all manner of sweet Herbs stamped amongst it, as Savory, sweet Marjoram, Rosemary, Penniroyal, &c. but if yellow, put therein only Saffron-water.

An Italian Pudding.

Take a fine Manchet, and cut it into square pieces like Dice, then put to it half a pound of Beef-suet minced small, Rai­sins of the Sun, Cloves, Mace, Dates, Su­gar, Marrow, Rosewater, Eggs and Cream, mingle all these together, then Butter the [Page 319] bottom of your Dish, and put in the afore­mentioned ingredients, about three quar­ters of an hour it will be baked, then scrape on Sugar.

Some Italians use to take half a pound of grated Parmisan, or old Cheese, a pen­ny Manchet grated, sweet Herbs chopped very small, Cinamon, Pepper, Salt, Nut­meg, Cloves, Mace, four Eggs, Sugar and Currans, bake it in a Dish or Pye, or boil it in a Napkin; being boiled, serve it with beaten Butter, Sugar and Cinamon.

French Pudding.

Take a pound of Raisins of the Sun, two penny white-loaves chopt and cut into dice-work, a pound of Beef-suet finely minced, somewhat more than a quartern of Sugar, twelve or fourteen Dates sliced, a grain of Musk, a dozen and a half pretty big lumps of Marrow, Salt, a pint of Cream, half a dozen Eggs beaten with it, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Salt and a Pippin or two pared, with a couple of Pome-waters sliced and put in the bottom of the Dish before you bake it; if you find your ingredients too many, or your Dish or Pan be too lit­tle to hold them, divide them in two equal parts, and bake them a part.

If you would make a French Barley Pudding, thus you must do; Take a quar [...] of Barley and boil it, then add to it the quantity of Bread, as amounts to a Man­chet, then beat a pound of blanched Al­monds with Rosewater, and strain them with Cream, then take the yolks of eight Eggs, and the whites of four, and beat them with Rosewater, season it with Nut­meg, Mace, Salt, Marrow, or Beef-suet cut small, then filling the guts herewith boil them.

Puddings of Swines Lights.

Take your Lights and parboil them, then mince them very small with Suet, and mix them with grated Bread, Cream, Currans, Eggs, Nutmeg, Salt and Rosewa­ter, so fill the guts.

A very good Pudding.

Take the crums of white Bread, the like quantity of white Flowre, the yolks of four Eggs, and as much Cream as will make it as thick as pancake Batter, then butter your Dish, bake it and scrape on Sugar.

White Puddings the best way to make them.

Take Hogs Umbles and boil them very [Page 321] tender, then take some of the Lights with the Heart, and all the fleshy part about them, picking the sinewy skins from them all, then chop the meat very small, and put to it some of the Liver finely fierced, some grated Nutmeg, the yolks of half a do­zen Eggs, a pint of Cream, two or three spoonfuls of Sack, Sugar, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Cinamon, Carraway-seed, a little Rosewater, good store of Hogs-fat, and some Salt, let your guts lye a steep in Rose­water till you fill them.

Another approved way.

Take three pints of great Oatmeal pick'd very clean, steep it in Milk three or four hours, then drain the Milk from it, and let it lye all night in Water that is warm, in the Morning drain it from the Water, and put to it two pound of minced Beef-suet, half a score Eggs with half their whites, a quarter of an ounce of Nutmegs, as much Sugar, a little Mace, a quart of Cream, and a little Salt, mix them well to­gether, and fill your guts herewith.

Cambridge Pudding.

Sierce grated Bread through a Cullen­der, and mingle it with some Flowre, [Page 322] minced Dates, Currans, Nutmeg, Cinamon and Pepper, minced Suet, new Milk warm, fine Sugar and Eggs, take away some of their whites, and incorporate all together. Take half a Pudding on the one side, and half a Pudding on the other, and put But­ter in the midst, putting the one half of the Pudding aloft upon the other made round like a Loaf; put in your Pudding when the liquor boileth, and when it is e­nough, cut it in the midst and serve it up.

All sorts of Forcings or Farcings for any Roots, Land-fowl, Sea-fowl, or any other joynts of Meat.

Roots, as Mellons, Pompions, &c.

HAving taken the seeds out of your Mel­lon, cut it round two fingers deep, then let your farcing or stuffing be grated Bread, beaten Almonds, Rosewater and Sugar, with some of the Pulp of the Mel­lon stamped with it, also Bisket-bread pul­verized, some Coriander-seed, candied Lemon-pill minced, some beaten Mace [Page 323] and Marrow minced small, beaten Cina­mon, yolks of raw Eggs, sweet Herbs, Saf­fron and Musk a grain, then fill your rounds of Mellons, and put them in a flat bottom'd Dish with Butter in the bottom, and so bake them.

Let your sauce be made of White wine and strong broth strained with beaten Al­monds, Sugar and Cinamon, serve them on Sippets finely carved, give this Broth a walm, and pour it on your Mellons, with some fine scraped Sugar, dry them in the Oven, and serve them.

In the same manner you may do them whole, also Cucumbers, Pompions, Gourds, great Onions, Parsnips, Turnips, Car­rots, &c.

Farcings or Stuffings for any sort of Fowl.

Take Mutton, Veal or Lamb, mince it and put to it some grated Bread, yolks of Eggs, Cream, Currans, Dates, Sugar, Nut­meg, Cinamon, Ginger, Mace, juyce of Spinage, sweet Herbs, Salt, and mingle all together, with some whole Marrow: if you would have your farcing look yellow use Saffron water.

Or you may use this farcing: take a Calves Udder boiled and cold, and stamp [Page 324] it with Almond-paste, Cheese-curds, Sugar, Cinamon, Ginger, Mace, Cream, Salt, raw Eggs, and some Marrow or But­ter.

Another excellent Farcing for any sort of Fowl.

Take part of a Leg of Veal, and mince it with some Beef-suet, sweet Herbs, grated Bread, Eggs, Nutmeg, Pepper, Ginger, Salt, Dates, Currans, Raisins, candyed O­ranges, Coriander-seed, and a little Cream, bake or boil them, you must thicken them with the yolks of Eggs, Sugar and Ver­ [...]uyce, and serve them on Sippets, strow on Sugar, and garnish your Dish with Lemon sliced.

Otherways.

Take Rice-flowre and strain it either with Cream or Goats-milk, and the brawn of a Capon roasted, minced and stamped, boil them to a good thickness, with some Marrow, Rosewater, Sugar and Salt, with some Nutmeg, Almond-paste, and beaten Mace, when they are cold, fill your Poultry herewith, or farce any other joynt of meat proper for farcing.

Farcings of Livers of Poultry.

Take your Livers when they are raw, and cut them into square pieces about the bigness of small dice, cut as much inter­larded Bacon in the same form, with some sweet Herbs chopped very small, add there­unto some yolks of Eggs, beaten Cloves, Mace, Pepper and Salt; and if you please some Prunes and Raisins of the Sun, some grated old Cheshire Cheese, a clove or two of Garlick, and fill your Fowl whether you roast it or boil it.

Fareings for Turkeys, Pheasants, and the bet­ter sort of Fowl.

Take Veal and Beef-suet, and mince them together, and let your seasoning be Cloves, Mace, a few Currans, Salt, and the bottoms of Artichokes boiled, and cut into small squares, mingle these together with Pine-apple-seed, Pistaches, Chesnuts, yolks of Eggs, and fill your Fowl here with.

Farcings for Sea-fowl boiled or baked.

Take some of the flesh of a Leg of Mut­ton, and mince the meat small with Beef-suet, Penniroyal, sweet Marjoram, Tyme and other sweet Herbs, add thereunto [Page 326] grated Bread, Dates, Currans, Raisins O­range minced small, Ginger, Pepper, Nut­meg, Cream and Eggs, farce your Fowl herewith, and boil or roast them, let your fauce be Marrow, strong Broth, White wine, Verjuyce, Mace, Sugar and yolks of Eggs, strained with Verjuyce, serve them in on fine carved Sippets and sliced Lemon, Grapes, &c.

Farcings for Mutton.

Cut a pretty big hole in a Leg of Mut­ton, and the flesh that you take from thence mince with Beef-suet or Bacon, sweet Herbs, Pepper, Salt, Cloves and Mace, and two or three cloves of Garlick, raw Eggs, two or three Chesnuts, work up these in­gredients together, and fa [...]e your Leg there­with; when you have prick'd it up, either roast it or boil it, make sauce with the re­mainder of the meat, and stew it on the fire with Gravy, Chesnuts, Pistaches or Pine-apples, bits of Artichokes, Pears, Grapes or Pippins, and thus serve it.

Farcings for Lamb.

Mince some Lamb with Suet, Parsley, Tyme, Savory, Mary-golds, Endive and Spinage; being finely minced, mingle here­with [Page 327] with grated Bread, grated Nutmeg, Cur­rans, Dates, yolks of Eggs, Rosewater and Verjuyce.

Farcings for Veal.

Having minced some of a Leg of Veal, cut your lard like Dice, and put to it with some minced Penniroyal, sweet Marjoram, Winter-savory, Nutmeg, a little Cammo­mile, Pepper, Salt, Ginger, Cinamon, Sugar, and incorporate these together, then fill some Beef-guts herewith, and stew them in a Pipkin with some Claret wine, let not the guts be above three inches long, infuse in the stewing large Mace, Capers and Mar­row; being enough, serve them on Sippets with sliced Lemon and Barberries, and run them over with beaten Butter, and scrape on Sugar.

Farcings for Venison.

Mince Mutton with Beef-suet, Orange­pill, grated Nutmeg, grated Bread, Cori­ander-seed, Pepper, Salt, and yolks of Eggs, mingle all these together, and stuff your Ve­nison; let your Sauce be Gravy, strong Broth, Dates, Currans, Sugar, Salt, Le­mons and Barberries.

Thus you may farce a Leg or Breast o [...] Veal, Loyns of Beef, Mutton, or any joyn of meat.

Another good Farcing.

Mince a Leg of Mutton or Lamb with Beef-suet, with all manner of sweet Herbs, also Cloves, Mace, Salt, Currans, Sugar, and fill the Leg with half the meat, then make the rest into little Cakes, as broad as a half Crown, and stew them in a Pipkin with strong Mutton Broth, Cloves, Mace and Vinegar, you may either boil, bake or roast the Leg.

A Farced Pudding.

Mince a Leg of Mutton with sweet Herbs, put thereto grated Bread, minced Dates, Currans, Raisins of the Sun, a little Orangado or preserved Lemon sliced thin, a few Coriander-seeds, Nutmeg, Pepper and Ginger, mingle all together with some Cream and yolks of Eggs, work it toge­ther very well, then wrap the meat in a caul of Mutton or Veal, and so either boil or bake it.

A grand farced or forced Dish.

Boil some Eggs till they be very hard, [Page 329] then separate the yolks from the whites, and divide them into halves, then pound the yolks in a stone Morter with March­pane stuff, and sweet Herbs chopped very small, add these unto the Eggs with Sugar and Cinamon finely beaten, mingle all to­gether with Currans and Salt, fill the whites and set them by; then have preserved O­ranges candied, fill them with March-pane­paste and Sugar and set them by; then have boil'd Asparagus minced with Butter and a little Sack; have next boil'd Chesnuts blanched and Pistaches, then Marrow steeped in Rosewater, and fryed in Butter; after this have green Codlings sliced, mix'd with Bisket-bread and Eggs, and fryed in little Cakes; next have Sweet-breads or Lambstones, and yolks of Eggs dipt in Butter and fryed; then have Pigeon-pee­pers and Chicken-peepers fryed, or any small Fowl, and some Artichokes and Po­tatoes boiled and fryed in Butter, and some balls as big as a Walnut made of Parmisan, dipt in Butter and fryed; set these all by se­verally, as you did the first. Put all these in a great Charger, and place the Chickens, o [...] whatever Fowl you have in the middle of the Dish, then lay a lay of Sweet-breads, then a lay of Artichoke-bottoms and Mar­row, [Page 330] and on them some preserved Oranges round that place your hard Eggs, frye [...] Asparagus, yolks of Eggs, Chesnuts an [...] Pistaches then your green Codlings stuffed the Charger being full, put Marrow all o­ver with the juyce of Oranges. Some do it thus: Take two pound of Beef-marrow, and cut it as big as great Dice, and a pound of Dates cut into small squares, then take a pound of Prunes and stone them, and a pound of Currans, put these aforesaid into a Platter, with twenty yolks of Eggs, a pound of Sugar, an ounce of Cinamon; having mingled all these together, take the yolks of twenty Eggs more, strain them with a little Rosewater, a little Musk and Sugar, fry them in two Pancakes with a little Butter; being fryed yellow, lay it in a Dish, and spread the former Materials thereon, then take the other and cut it into thin slices as broad as your little finger, and lay it over the Dish like a Lettice-window, set it in the Oven a little, then fry it.

CUSTARDS.

LEt your paste of your Custards be made up of fine Flowre, done up with boiling liquor, and made stiff; and having made the forms, dry them in an Oven; then take a quart of Cream, half a score Eggs, half a pound of Sugar, a little Mace, half as much Ginger beaten very fine, and a spoonful of Salt, strain them through a strainer, and fill therewith your forms, then bake them fair and white, draw them, dish them, and scrape thereon double re­fined Sugar.

Almond Custard.

Take a pound and half of Almonds, blanch and beat them very fine with Rose­water, then strain them with a pint and half of Cream, fifteen whites of Eggs, and three quarters of a pound of Sugar which is refined, make the Paste as afore specified, and bake it in an Oven moderately heated that it may look fair and white, then draw it and scrape on Sugar.

Custard without Eggs.

Take three quartes of a pound of Al­monds, being blanch'd, pound them with Rosewater in a stone-Morter, then put in some Rice-flowre, and beat them well toge­ther, with some Cloves, Mace and Salt, let the Spices be beaten with some Ginger, and strain them all with some fair spring Water, add unto what was strained half a pound of double refined Sugar, and a little Saffron; your forms being ready dryed, lay in the bottom of them some sliced Dates, Raisins of the Sun stoned, and some boiled Cur­rans, fill them and bake them, being baked scrape Sugar upon them; forget not to prick your forms or Custards, before you set them in the Oven.

Or thus: if you make your Custard in paste, set it in works, and dry it in the O­ven, then beat the spawn of a Pike in a Morter, and strain it with Cream, season it with Sugar, Rosewater, a grated Nutmeg, and a little Mace, beat them well together, fill your forms, and when it is baked, strew comfits thereon.

CHEESE-CAKES.

DRain the whey from your curds made of new Milk, to every pottle of curds allow a quarter of a pound of Butter, a good quantity of Rosewater, three grains of Ambergriese, the crums of a Manchet rubbed through a Cullender, the yolks of ten Eggs, a grated Nutmeg, a little Salt, and good store of Sugar, mix all these well together with a little Cream, but do not make them too soft; instead of Bread, take Almonds which will be much better, put up your ingredients into Puff-paste, and bake them in a quick Oven, and let them not stand too long lest they should be too dry.

Otherways.

Make your crust of cold Butter-paste, to a gallon of Flowre take a pound of But­ter, then take curds made of Cream which are very fresh and new, and put them into [...]our Cheese-cloth, and press out all the Vhey, then stamp in a fine grated Manchet [Page 334] among the Curds, some Cloves and Mace a pound and a half of well-washed Currans the yolks of eight Eggs, some Rosewater Salt, half a pound of refined Sugar, with [...] Nutmeg or two; incorporate these well toge­ther with a quarter of a pound of good sweet Butter and some Cream, make i [...] not too soft, put your materials into past [...] and bake them.

Or thus:

Take three quarts of Flowre, and three quarters of a pound of Butter, a little Yes [...] or Barm, with a small quantity of Saf [...] fron-made into powder, add these to th [...] Flowre, but melt your Butter in Milk, and so make up the Paste; then take the Curd [...] of three quarts of new Milk-cheese, with near upon a pint of Cream, drain the Whey well from the Curds, and pound it in a Mor­ter with half a pound of Sugar, three quar­ters of a pound of Currans washed and well pick'd, a grated Nutmeg, some Cina­mon beaten fine, Salt, Rosewater, a little Saffron pulverized, and half a dozen yolks of Eggs, work it up stiff with Butter and Cream.

Otherways.

Take the yolks of eighteen Eggs, and the whites of half as many, beat them very well, then take three pints of Cream, and boil it with Mace; after this take it off the fire, stir it and put in the Eggs, then set it on the fire, and let it boil till it curdleth, then take it off, and put therein half a pound of Sugar, some grated Nutmeg, and beaten Mace, then dissolve two grains of Ambergriese in four spoonfuls of Rosewa­ter, and put therein with half a handful of grated Bread, half a pound of blanch'd Al­monds beaten small, a little Cream and some Currans, put them in Paste, as afore­said, and let them bake a quarter of an hour which will be sufficient.

Some will take a pottle of Flowre, half a pound of Butter, and the white of an Egg working it well into the Flowre with the Butter, then put a little cold Water to it, and work it up stiff, then take a pottle of Cream, half a pound of Sugar, and a pound of boil'd Currans, a whole Nutmeg grated, and boil these together gently with the yolks of eighten Eggs, stir it con­tinually; when it hath boil'd enough, [Page 336] take it off, and let it cool, then fill you [...] Cheese-cakes.

Cheese-cakes in the French fashion.

Take a pound and a half of Pistache [...] stamped, with two pound and a half of new morning Cheese-curds, three ounces and a half of Elder-flowers, twelve Eggs, [...] pound and a quarter of Sugar, the like quantity of Butter, and a pottle of Flowre, strain these in a course strainer, and fill your forms made of Puff-paste, or other Paste as good as cold Butter paste, &c.

Otherways after the French fashion.

Take six pound of the best Holland ­cheese, and eight pound of new-made morn­ing Milk Cheese-curds, and beat them in a Morter, then put Sugar to them, about a pound or more, and half a pound of well pick'd and washed Currans, fifteen Eggs well beaten, Cream, three quarters of an ounce of Cinamon, half an ounce of Mace, and a little Saffron, mix them well toge­ther, and fill your Cheese-cakes Pasty-ways, made of Puff-paste or cold Butter-paste; being baked, ice them with yolks of Eggs, Rosewater and Sugar.

The best way of making Cheese-cakes.

Take a pretty large morning Milk-cheese of about six pound in weight, pound it in stone or wooden Morter, and with a pound of Water amongst it, and a pound of Sugar, add thereto beaten Mace, two pounds of Currans, a pound of Almonds blanched and beaten with Rosewater, and a little Salt, then boil some Cream, and thicken it with the yolks of Eggs, work these well together, but let not the Curd be two soft, make the Paste of cold Butter and Water, form it Pasty-ways and fill it.

White-pots and Fools.

White-pots the French fashion.

TAke a quart of good thick Cream, and boil it with four or five blades of large Mace, and some whole Cinamon, then take the whites of four Eggs, and beat them well, when the Cream boils up put them in, then take it off the fire, and keep it stirring a little while, and put in [Page 338] some Sugar, then pare half a dozen Pip­pins, slice them and put them into a pint o [...] Claret wine, some Raisins of the Sun, Sugar beaten Cinamon, and beaten Ginger, boi [...] your Apples to a pap, then cut some Sip­pets very thin, and dry them before the fire; when the Apples and Cream are boil'd and cold, take half the Sippets and lay them in a dish, lay half the Apples on them then lay on the rest of the Sippets, the [...] Apples as you did before, then pour on the rest of the Cream, and bake it in the Oven as a Custard, and when you serve it scrape on Sugar.

Rice White-pot.

Take three pints of Cream, and a quar­ter of a pound of Rice well pick'd, some beaten Nutmeg, Ginger and Sugar, boil these together, and set it by till it is cold; then strain into it the yolks of half a score Eggs, a quarter of a pound of Cur­rans well-washed, and some Salt, incorpo­rate these together, and bake it.

You may put these ingredients either into Paste, Earthen-Pan, Dish or deep Ba­son; and when it is baked, garnish your Dish with Sugar, Orange, Comfits and Ci­namon.

White-pot after the Devonshire fashion.

Take Mornings-milk, and soak therein some slices of white Bread, and put therein a little Flowre with the yolks of Eggs bea­ten very small, bruise your Bread, so that it is wholly incorporated with your Milk, Eggs and Flowre, make it about the thick­ness of Pancake batter, then fill a deep earthen-pan herewith, and lay some pieces of Butter on the top, tye a brown paper about the head thereof, and put it into your Oven, when it is baked, on the top there will be a hard crust. You may make them without Flowre and with Rice, or without either, only with Bread.

A Norfolk-fool.

Take three pints of Cream, and boil it with large Mace and whole Cinamon, having boiled a very little time, put there­in the yolks of eight Eggs well beaten, then take it off the fire, and take out your Mace and Cinamon; the Cream being of an indifferent thickness, cut a Manchet in­to fine slices, and cover the bottom of your Dish; then pour on some Cream, then more bread, do this three or four times till the Dish be full; then trim the dish si [...] [Page 340] with fine carved Sippets, and stick i [...] with sliced Dates, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

A Westminster Fool.

Slice a Manchet very thin, and lay it in the bottom of a Dish, and wet them with Sack; then take what quantity of Cream you think fit, and boil it with Eggs and large Mace, season it with Rosewater and Sugar, then stir it well together to prevent curdling, then pour it on the Bread, and l [...]t it cool, when it is cold serve it up.

Possets, Wassels, Syllabubs and Bla­mangers.

A Sack Posset.

TAke three pints of very good new Cream, and a quarter of a pound of Almonds stamped with some Rosewater, strain it with the Cream, then boil it with a little Ambergriese, then put a pint of Sack into a Bason, and set it over the fire till it be blood-warm, then take the yolks of nine Eggs with three whites, having [Page 341] beaten them well, put them into the Sack; then stir them together in the Bason with the Cream; having suffer'd it to cool a little before you put it in, stir so long till you find it as thick as you would have it, then pound Amber small, and mingle it with Sugar, and a little Musk, and strew it on the top of the Posset, it will give it a most delightful taste.

Or thus: take ten Eggs, beat the whites and yolks together, and strain them into a quart of Cream, season it with Nut­meg and Sugar, and put to them a pi [...]t of Canary, stir them well together, and put them into your Bason, then set it ov [...]r a Chafing-dish of coals, and stir it till it be indifferently thick, then scrape on Sugar and serve it.

Another excellent Sack-posset.

Take the yolks of two dozen of Eggs, and five pints of good sweet Cream, and boil it with a good quantity of whole Ci­namon, and stir it continually on a good fire, then strain the Eggs with some raw Cream; when the Cream is so well boil'd that it tasteth of the Spice, take it off the fire, and pour in your Eggs, and stir them well among the Cream; being indifferent [Page 342] thick, have a quart of Sack in a deep Ba­son that will contain the rest of the mate­rials, and pour in your Cream, &c. with a pound of double refined Sugar, and some fine grated Nutmeg, pour it in as high as you can hold your Skillet, let it spatter in the Bason to make it froth: you may, if you please, take off the Curd and add thereto fine grated Manchet, Loaf-Sugar finely beaten, and a little White wine.

A Sack-posset without Milk or Cream.

Take the yolks and whites of twenty Eggs, but remove the Cock-treads, beat these very well, then take a pint and a half of Sack, and a quart of Ale boil'd and scum'd, and put into it a pound of Sugar, and three quarters of a Nutmeg, let it boil a little together, then take it off the fire, stirring the Eggs still, put into them two or three lad lefuls of the liquor, then mingle all together, set it over the fire till it be pretty thick, and serve it up.

A French-Posset.

Take three pints of Cream and a Nut­meg, and set it over the fire, and let it boil, as it is boiling, have a Bason wherein there must be a pint of White wine well sweetned [Page 343] with Sugar, then set it over the coals to warm a little, then put in your Cream, stir it and let it stand simmering over the fire an hour and a half.

A Covent-Garden-Posset.

Take a quart of new Cream, a quarter of an ounce of Cinamon, and a Nutmeg quarter'd, and boil it till it taste of the Spice, and keep it always stirring, or it will burn to, then take the yolks of eight Eggs well beaten, with a little cold Cream, and put them into the hot Cream over the f [...]re, and stir it till it begin to boil, then take it off, and stir it till it be indifferently cold, sweetning it with some Sugar, then take a little more than a quarter of a pint of Sack, and sweeten that also, then set it on the fire till it be ready to boil, then put it in­to a deep Bason, and pour the Cream into it, elevating your hand as high as you can conveniently to make it froth, which is the grace of your Posset, and if you put it through a Tunnel, it is held the most ex­quisite way.

A Worcester Syllabub.

Take a Syllabub pot, and fill it half full of Red-streak'd Sider, with good store [Page 344] of Sugar, and a little Nutmeg, stir it well together, and put in as much thick Cream a spoonful at a time, as fast as you can, as though you milk'd in, then stir it together very softly once about, and let it stand two hours before you eat it, for the standing makes the curd.

If in the Field, only Milk the Cow in­to your Sider, Nutmeg, Sugar, and so drink it warm.

Another very good Syllabub.

Take a pint of Canary or White wine, a sprig of Rosemary, a Nutmeg quarter'd, the juyce of a Lemon, some of the Pill with Sugar, put these together into a Pot all night, and cover them; in the Morning take a pint of Cream, and a pint and half of new Milk; then take out the Le­mon-pill, Rosewater and Nutmeg, and squirt your Milk and Cream into the Pot.

Or take a pint of thick Cream, and a pint of White wine, and put them toge­ther in a deep Bason, with two whites of Eggs, the juyce of a Lemon, some pill, and a little Sugar, then take some rods and whip it, and as the froth ariseth, take it off with a spoon, and put it into [Page 345] a Fruit-dish, and lay fine sierced Sugar thereon.

A Wassel.

Boil three pints of Cream with four or five whole Cloves, then have the yolks of half a dozen Eggs dissolved in Cream, the Cream being well boiled, so that it taste of the Spices, put in your Eggs, and stir them well together▪ then have some Muskadine or Tent, and being warm'd, pour it into a Dish with Sugar, wherein there are fine Sippets of French-bread, then pour on your Cream upon that, then cast on Ginger, Cinamon and Sugar, and stick it with blanched Almonds.

Blamangers.

Take a pottle of morning Milk, and a pound of fine sierced Rice-flowre, strain them through a strainer into a broad Skil­let, and set it on a soft fire, stir it with a broad stick, and when it is a little thick, take it off the fire; then put in half a pint of Rosewater, and set it over the fire again, stir it well, and beat it with your stick from one side of the Pan to the other; when it is as thick as pap take it off, when it is cold, lay it in slices on a Dish, and scrape on Sugar.

Blamanger in the French fashion.

Take a Pike and boil it in fair Water very tender, then take the flesh from the bones and chop it very small, then take a pound of Almond-paste, and beat it with your Fish aforesaid, put to them a quart of Cream, the whites of a dozen Eggs well beaten, and the crums of a French-manchet, mingle all together, and strain them with some Sugar and Salt, then put them in a broad Stew-pan over the fire, stir it and boil it thick; being boil'd, let it stand till it be cold, then strain it again into a clean Dish, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

Blamanger after the Italian fashion.

Take a Capon that is either boil'd or roasted, and being cold, strip off the skin, mince it and pound it in a stone Morter with Almonds blanched, then mix it with some Capon broth, and crums of White­bread strained together with some Salt, Rosewater and Sugar, boil it to a good thickness, then either put it in Paste or serve it in a Dish.

Blamanger after the English fashion.

Take two quarts of fine Flowre, half a [Page 347] pound of Butter, the like quantity of Su­gar, some Saffron, Rosewater, beaten Ci­namon, and the yolks of Eggs, work up all cold together with some Almond­paste.

Potages, Soops, Cawdles, &c.

How to make broth for the feeding of all Pots for Potages, whether English or French fashion.

ACcording to the quantity of what Broth you will have, you must proportion your knuckles of Beef, the flesh of the hin­der part of the Rump of Mutton and Hens; you must seeth the flesh very well with Parsley, young Onions, and Tyme tyed in a bundle with Cloves, Mace, and some bea­ten Cinamon, keeping always some warm Water to fill up your Pot, as your Liquor consumes; when you have boil'd them well, strain the broth, and preserve it for your use.

For first Courses and brown Potages, set your roasted meat to boil with a bundle of [Page 348] Herbs, as aforesaid, after you have taken the juyce of it; having boil'd it a good while, strain it and keep it for your use.

Potages for Flesh-days.

Potages of Partridges with Coleworts.

TRuss your Partridges, lard them and put them into your Pot with good Broth, and put your Coleworts in also, being boiled, pass into your Pot a little melted Lard, let your seasoning be Mace, Cloves, Pepper and Salt; having soak'd your crusts and dish'd your Fowl, garnish them with Sausages and Lemon, strowing Salt on the brims of the Dish.

Potages of Ducks and Turnips.

Having larded your Ducks, give them half a dozen turns on a spit before a quick fire, then draw them and boil them, then take your Turnips and cut them into what forms you think fit, pass them in a Pan (having first flowr'd them) with melted lard; being brown, put them into the [Page 349] Pot where your Ducks are, and boil them well; having soaked your Bread to make your Potage thick, dish your Ducks and Turnips, strowing some Capers, and a lit­tle Vinegar thereon, let your garnish be carved Turnips.

Potage for a grand boiled Meat.

Take strong broth and boil therein what Fowl or other meat you have, then take three pints thereof, with a pint and half of Gravy drawn with Wine, nine An­chovies, four whole Onions, half a pint of Oyster liquor, a handful and half of Ra­spin of French-bread, the juyce of four▪ Le­mons, the yolks of three Eggs beaten into it, when you are ready to use it, with a sliced Nutmeg, so draw it up all toge­ther.

You may use Herbs in the same broth, as Spinage, Sorrel, Endive, Lettice, Pur­slain, with some faggots of sweet Herbs: This is a very rich broth with a high hogo, and is most fitting for great Dishes on great Festivals.

Potage called Skink.

According to the quantity of broth you would have, proportion the flesh of the [Page 350] Legs of Beef, which you must cut into small pieces about the bigness of a Ten­nis-ball or less, break the bones in pieces, and let them soak in Water, washing and cleansing it from the blood, but just cover it in your Pot with Water, when it boils scum it, then put in some Pepper in a cloth, and when it is half boiled, put in four Onions, a little Cloves and whole Mace, with a race or two of Ginger sliced, then take up a ladleful thereof, and steep therein some Saffron tyed up in a rag, bruise it till you have colour'd your broth, then put it into your Pot, and let it boil till your Meat be very tender; having sea­son'd it with Salt, dish it up on Sippets of French-bread, with some of the Meat in the middle of the Dish.

You may for variety put in chopt clove Cabbidge, or bruised Spinage, and cut Endive.

Potage of Pullets and Sparagus.

Truss your Pullets and whiten them, then put them into your Pot with a sheet of Lard over them, fill your pot with strong broth, and season it with Salt, Pepper, Ci­namon, beaten Cloves and Mace, a whole Onion pill'd, and a bunch of sweet Herbs, [Page 351] let them not boil too long; then dry your bread and soak it, lay your Pullets in the middle of your Dish with the Asparagus, gar­nish them with fryed Sparagus, broken Combs, Mushromes, or the Gibblets of your Pullets, with a few Pistaches, lay round the brim of your Dish slices of Lemon and Le­mon-pill.

Potage of Liverings.

Cut a Fillet of Veal into thin slices, and stuff them very well, put the slices thereof into a Pipkin with some of your best broth; having season'd it with Salt, Cina­mon, Mace, Nutmeg, and a very little Pepper, soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Liverings, Mushromes, Sparagus, Mutton juyce and Pistaches.

A most excellent Potage, called Le Potage blanck de Lyon.

Take a pint or a quart of White wine, put it on the fire in a Pipkin, with four or five Pippins pared, eight Dates cut in halves, a faggot of sweet Herbs, large Mace, Cinamon, a quarter'd Numeg, let them boil together, and if you want li­quor, add a pint of strong broth, then take the Marrow of three Marrow-bones and wrap it in the yolks of Eggs and [Page 352] grated Bread to keep it from melting a­way, and when your Pot boils, put i [...] therein, then take the yolks of four Eggs, and beat them in white wine or strong broth, and when your aforesaid ingredients are enough, stir your Eggs therein, and sea­son it to your Pallet with Sugar, then take it off the fire, and serve it up with boiled Ca­pons or Chickens, garnish the Marrow and Dates on the Breast of them, you may put into this broth Spanish Potatoes or Skirrets.

Potage of Quails.

Truss you Quails, whiten and flowre them and pass them with Lard, then put them in the Pot, boil and season them with Salt, soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Quails, with Lemon, Mushromes, Cocks-combs and Pistaches.

Potage restorative or [...]strengthning.

Take the broth where Marrow-bones have been boiled, you may be easily sup­plyed therewith from places accustomed to feasting, boil therein a good quantity of great Turnips; when they are boiled, press the juyce out of them, and put it into the Pot wherein the Turnips were boiled, then [Page 353] take a couple of old red Cocks scalded and beaten to pieces with the back of a Cleaver, then put them into the said broth with a couple of Calves feet, let them boil together, and scum them very well; when they are half boiled, put therein some Rai­sins of the Sun stoned, sliced Liquorish, a few Anniseeds, with a handful of Pine-Apples and Pistaches beaten in a Morter, add thereunto Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and a pint of red Wine; having boiled the Meat to a mash, strain it into a Pipkin, then put to it white Sugar Candy, clarifie it with the whites of Eggs when you boil it a­gain, and run it through your Jelly-bags; take a quarter of a pint of this Morning, Evening, and if you please at Noon.

Potage of Wood-Quests.

Take your Wood-Quests, or other large Pigeons, whiten and lard them, boil and sea­son them with a sprig of Tyme, whole Pepper, a little beaten Ginger, and some large Mace, soak your Bread, and garnish your Wood-Quests with bottoms of Arti­chokes and Sparagus, then serve them.

Potage of Venison.

Take a Hanch of Venison, and cut it in­to [Page 354] six pieces, and place them in the bottom of a Pan or Pot, then put in no more Wa­ter than will cover it, let it boil, then scum it, after that add to it a good quantity of whole Pepper; when it is half boiled, put in four whole Onions, Cloves, and large Mace, some sliced Ginger, Nutmeg, three or four faggots of sweet Herbs, let it boil till the Venison be very tender, and a good part of the broth be wasted; after this pour out the broth from the meat into a Pipkin, keep your Venison hot in the same Pot by adding other hot broth unto it; then take a couple of red-Beet roots, having very well parboil'd them before, cut them into square pieces as big as a shilling, and put them into the broth which is in your Pipkin, and let them boil till they are very tender, add unto the boiling four Ancho­vies minced, then dish up your Venison on Sippets of French-bread, then pour on your broth so much as will near-upon fill the Dish, then take your roots by themselves, and toss them in a little drawn Butter, and lay them all over the Venison; if the Beets be good, it will make the broth red e­nough, which you must have visible round about the Dish sides; but if it prove pale, put to it some Saunders: This is a very savory Potage.

The Queens Potage.

Take Almonds, beat them and boil them with good broth, a bundle of Herbs, and the inside of a Lemon, a few crums of Bread, then season them with Salt, stir them of­ten and strain them. Then take your Bread and soak it with the best broth, which is thus to be made.

When you have boned a Capon or Par­tridge, take the bones and beat them in a Morter, then seethe these bones in strong broth with Mushromes, and strain all through a linnen cloth, and with this broth soak your Bread, as it soaks, sprinkle it with Almond broth, then put unto it a lit­tle minced-meat, either of Partridge or Ca­pon, and still, as it soaks, put in more Al­mond-broth until it be full, then take the Fire-shovel red hot, and hold it over, gar­nish your Dish with Cocks-combs, Pistaches and Pome-granates.

Potage in the Italian fashion.

Boil green Pease with some strong broth and interlarded Bacon cut into slices, the Pease being boil'd, put to them some chopped Parsley, Pepper, Anniseed, and strain some of the Pease to thicken the [Page 356] broth, give it a walm, and serve it on Sip­pets with boiled Chickens, Pigeons, Kids or Lambs-heads, Mutton, Duck, Mallard, or any Poultry; for variety thicken the broth with Eggs.

Potage of Mutton, Veal or Beef in the Eng­lish fashion.

Cut a Rack of Mutton in two pieces, and take a Knuckle of Veal and boil it with good store of Herbs, with a pint of Oat­meal chopped amongst them, let your Herbs be Tyme, sweet Marjoram, Parsley, Sives, Succory, Marry-golds, Strawberrie and Violet-leaves, Beets, Borrage, Sorrel, Blood-wort, Sage, Penniroyal, with a lit­tle Salt; being well boil'd, serve them on carved Sippets, with the meat in the midst thereof.

Otherways.

Take the best old Pease you can get, wash and boil them in fair Water; when they boil scum them, and put in a piece of interlarded Bacon, put in also a bundle of Mints with other sweet Herbs, serve the Bacon on Sippets in thin slices, but boil not your Potage too thick.

The Dukes Potage.

Let your broth be the same of that of the Queens, extracted from roasted bones, then soak a loaf of Bread with the cru [...]t, af­ter that a small hash of Partridges which you must strow upon the Bread so thin as it may hardly appear, soak it and fill it by lit­tle and little, garnish it with your smallest Mushromes, Cock-combs, Kidneys, Pi­staches, Lemon and serve it.

The Princes Potage.

Take either Capons or Partridges and roast them, then take out the bones and mince the brawn small, take also the bones, break them and seethe them with broth in an Earthen-pot, with a bundle of Herbs, then strain them through a linnen cloth, soak your Bread, and lay it on a bed of flesh, or if you will instead thereof a bed of Almond-broth, boil it well, and fill it by degrees, then garnish it with the Pinni­ons; then take three Eggs with a little Al­mond-broth, or any other broth, beat them well together, and pour them on your Po­tage, hold the fire-shovel over it, and so serve it.

Potage of Teals with Hypocrast.

Take Teals, dress and cleanse them well, whiten them, as afore specified, stuff them within with some Lard, then fry them with fresh Seam, then boil them in a Pot, when they are almost boiled, throw in some Prunes with a piece of Sugar, garnish your Potage with the Teals and Prunes.

Potage without the sight of Herbs.

Having minced several sorts of sweet Herbs very small, stamp them with your Oatmeal, then strain them through a strai­ner with some of the broth of the Pot, boil your Herbs and Oatmeal with your Mutton, and some Salt, let your Herbs be Violet-leaves, Strawberry-leaves, Succory, Spinage, Scallions, Parsley and Marry-gold­flowers; having boiled them enough, serve them on Sippets.

Potage of Larks.

Having drawn your Larks, whiten and flowre them, and pass them in a Pan with Butter, Lard or fresh Seam, until they be very brown, then put them in a Pot with good broth, and a bundle of Herbs, and boil them, soak a loaf well, and garnish it [Page 359] with your Larks, adding thereto Beef-pal­lates, Mutton-juyce and Lemon, then serve it.

Potage of young Pigeons.

Scald your Pigeons and boil them in good broth, with a bundle of sweet Herbs, co­ver them with a sheet of Lard, then lay them on a soaked loaf, and garnish them with Hartichokes and Sparagus fryed, green Pease or Lettice.

Potage of Pullets with Colliflowers.

Fit your Pullets for the Pot, and boil them with a faggot of sweet Herbs, season them with Salt, Cloves, Pepper and grated Nutmeg, then let your Bread be soak­ed and garnished with Colliflowers, pour on some Mutton-juyce or Gravy, and serve it up.

An excellent Potage to cleanse the blood.

Put over the fire about a gallon of fair Water, and put therein a handful of great Oatmeal beaten small, and a piece of Rib-Bacon, then take a handful of Brook­lime, as many Water-cresses, Nettle-tops, Elder-buds, Violet-leaves, Primrose-leaves, with young Alexander-leaves, mince all [Page 360] these very small, and put them into your broth with a little large Mace, season it with Salt, when you dish it, put in some Butter.

Potage of young Pigeons roasted.

Having seasoned your broth with Salt and Cloves, put in your Pigeons and boil them, make your Potage brown, then soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Fowl, and pour on your broth.

Potage of green Geese with Pease-broth.

Take your green Geese and boil them by themselves, then take some Pease and boil them in like manner; being well boil­ed, pass them through a very fine strainer, and put your Pease-broth into a Pot, with a faggot of sweet Herbs, pass a little Lard in a Frying-pan, and when it is melted, put it into your broth; soak your bread in your Geese-broth, then pour your Pease­broth over it.

Potage of Goose—gibblets.

Whiten your Gibblets and put them in­to a Pot with good broth, a faggot of sweet Herbs, and a sheet of Lard, let them boil very well, then soak your Bread, and [Page 361] lay them thereon, pour on your broth, and upon all put some minced Capers.

Potage of Pullets with green Pease.

Scald and truss your Pullets, and put them into your Pot with good broth, and scum it well, then pass your Pease in a Pan with Butter or Lard, and soak them with Lettuce steeped in fair Water and whitened, soak also your Bread, and then garnish it with your Pullets, Pease and Lettuce.

Potage of young Rabbets.

Parboil your Rabbets, then pass them in a Frying-pan with Lard, then boil them in good broth with a faggot of sweet Herbs, soak well your Bread, and garnish it with young Rabbets and Mushromes.

Potage of Lambs Purtenances.

Whiten your Purtenances, and seethe them in good broth with a bundle of sweet Herbs, a sheet of Lard or fat Bacon, soak your Bread, lay on your Purtenances, and pour all over it white broth, which broth is thus made.

Take a pint of strong broth from the boiling of your Purtenances, a pine of Sack, ba quart of White wine, and put them in­to [Page 362] a Pipkin together with about a dozen Dates cut in halves, whole Prunelloes, Ci­namon, Ginger, Cloves, Mace, half a pound of white Sugar, with the Marrow of two or three bones, let these boil till the Mar­row be enough, then take it from the fire, and thicken it with the yolks of Eggs, beaten very well and strained through a clean cloth, then garnish it with Lettuce, Suckets, candied Lemon and Wafers, and so serve it up.

Potage of Larks.

Having drawn and trust them, pass them in a Pan with Lard, having first flower'd them, then put them into a Pot with good broth, half a pint of White wine, and half a pound of Sugar; then soak your Bread, garnish it with your Larks, and pour on your broth.

Potage of Veal.

Boil a Knuckle of Veal in good broth, then skin it and put therein some white Suc­cory, soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Knuckle, Succory and Mu­shromes.

You may make Potage of a breast of Veal by first blanching it in fresh Water [Page 363] then boil it in good broth, with a faggot of sweet Herbs, Capers and Samphire.

Potage of Thrushes.

Draw, truss and flowre them, then pass them in a Pan with some Butter, then boil them in good broth, with sweet Herbs, garnish your soaked Bread with your Birds, Beef-pallates and Mushromes.

Potage of Tortoise.

Having taken off the Head of your Tor­toise, boil the body in Water, and when it is almost enough, put into your broth some White wine, a faggot of sweet Herbs, and some Lard; when it is boiled, take the meat out of the shell, throw away the Gall, and cut the rest into pieces, then pass them in a Pan with some Lard, some Nut­meg and Cinamon beaten, a little Ginger and Salt, then stew them in a Dish, and soak your Bread therein, squeeze in the juyce of a Lemon, and Garnish it with cut Sparagus.

Potage of a sucking Pig.

Scald your Pig very neatly, then cut it into half a dozen pieces, whiten them in broth, and boil them with some Herbs, [Page 364] a piece of Lard, see that your Pot be sup­ply'd with good broth, as it consumes in boiling, then soak your Bread, and when your Pig is boil'd enough, place the head in the midst of the Dish, with the quar­ters round about it, and the purtenances round them, pour on your broth and serve it.

Potage of minced Mutton.

Take the flesh of any joynt of Mutton, and mince it with Beef-suet, season it with some beaten Nutmeg, a little Pepper, and some Salt, and stew it in a Stew-pan, soak your Bread in your best broth, then gar­nish it with your minced meats, and Cocks­combs, then pour on your broth with the juyce of Mutton.

Potage of Beef.

Take a Leg of Beef, and stew it till it be so tender that it is ready to fall in pieces, season it with a bundle of Herbs, Cloves, Capers, Samphire, Mushromes, &c. then soak your Bread, and garnish it with your meat.

Potage of Capons and Pullets with Rice.

Having fitted your Capons or Pullets for the Pot, season your broth and boil them [Page 365] therein, then pick your Rice very well, wash and dry it very well before the fire, then boil it in good broth, then soak your Bread and garnish it with your Capons or Pullets; together with the Rice; you may, as you shall think good, put some Saffon into the broth.

Potage of a Calves head fryed.

First boil your Calves head, then bone it, after that cut it into several pieces, then mingle your meat with large Oysters cut into pieces, and season them with Pepper, Nutmeg and Salt, then flowre it and fry it with good sweet Butter, soak your Bread, and lay in your meat and Oysters, pour on your broth, and garnish your Dish with Mushromes, Pomegranats, sliced Lemon and Capers.

Potage of breasts of Mutton with Turnips.

Take the neck-ends of your breasts and boil them, then take some Turnips, pare them and slice them, then fry them (having first flowr'd them) in Butter, and put them to your Mutton, season your broth with Cloves, Pepper, Nutmeg, two or three blades of Mace, a whole Onion peel'd, Salt and a faggot of sweet Herbs; if your Po­tage [Page 366] be too thin, take some flowre and mingling it with Pepper and Verjuyce, put it into your Pot, then soak your bread and serve it.

Potage of Wood-cocks roasted.

First almost roast your Wood-cocks, then boil them with some sweet Herbs, soak your Bread in strong broth, and lay your Wood-cocks thereon, pour on your broth and serve them.

Farced Potages for Flesh-days.

Potage of Capons farced.

TAke out the bones of your Capons at the neck, and fill them up with the flesh of Squabs or Chickens minced small with Beef-suet; when they are well sea­soned, boil them in good broth.

Potage of young Cocks.

Take out their stomach-bone, and fill them up with minced Veal, mingled with the yolks of raw Eggs, Chibbals, Parsley, Pepper, Nutmeg, Ginger and Mace, with [Page 367] some Salt, then truss and whiten them, then boil them in good broth, and serve them as aforesaid.

Potage of Pullets farced.

Dress them and blanch them in fresh Water, then pull up the skin with your finger, and farce them with the brawn of Capon-suet, and the yolks of Eggs minced together, season them with Pepper, Nut­meg, Cloves, Mace and Cinamon beaten small with a little Salt, then boil them in good broth, then soak your Bread, lay your Pullets thereon, and garnish them with the bottoms of Artichokes and Spa­ragus.

Potage of young Pigeons farced.

Scald them, and farce or stuff them, as the Pullets aforesaid, blanch them and boil them in good broth, season them with a sheet of Lard, soak your Bread, lay on your Pigeons, and garnish them with their Wings and Livers, pour on your broth with the juyce of a Leg of Mutton roasted.

Potage of Ducks farced.

Bone them as you did the Capons, and stuff them with the flesh of Chickens, [Page 368] Sweet-breads, Mushromes, or what other things you think fit, minced small with a little Lard, you may add thereunto Chib­bals, Parsley, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cinamon and Mace with lean Pork minced small, and mingled with the raw yolks of Eggs, then sow up your Ducks, blanch them and boil them in good broth well seasoned, temper some Flowre with your broth to thicken it.

Potage of a Leg or Breast of Veal farced.

Take up the skin of your Leg of Veal very neatly, and truss up the knuckle, then whiten it, then take some of the flesh of the Leg, and mince it with Beef-suet, Lard, yolks of Eggs, and fine sweet Herbs, sea­son them and stuff your Leg herewith, then boil it in good broth with Succory, and serve it on your soaked Bread with a little Verjuyce.

If you would make your Potage of a Breast of Veal, open it at the nether end, and stuff it with minc'd meat and Suet, the Crum of a loaf, and all manner of sweet Herbs.

Potage of a Calves head farced.

Boil your Calves head, skin and bone it, [Page 369] take out the brains and eyes, and set them aside, then mince the flesh with Beef-suet▪ Marrow and raw Eggs, then set the eyes and brains in their proper places, when it is farced, sow it neatly up, then whiten it and boil it in good broth, then take some Calves feet, parboil them, cleave them in the middle, and pass them in a Pan with Butter, and put them into your Pot with Capers, then soak your Bread, and garnish it with the Head, Feet and Capers.

Potage of Lambs head farced.

You must order it as you did your Calves head, then farce them with the Li­ver and Lights of Lamb, Beef-suet, and yolks of Eggs, Parsley, and fine Herbs minced small, then boil them in good broth, then garnish your soaked Bread with the heads and purtenances, which you may blanch with the yolks of Eggs tempered with Verjuyce.

Potage of Leg of Mutton farced.

Bone a Leg of Mutton, and mince the flesh very small with Beef-suet and Lard, then farce the skin, and sow it up very finely, having seasoned it before the stuffing with Salt and several Spices, then boil it in good [Page 370] broth with a faggot of sweet Herbs, some Capers and Turnips, garnish your soaked Loaf with the Meat and Turnips.

But the best way is thus: take your Legs of Mutton, and raise up their skin very neatly, and take out the flesh, then mince it with Marrow, sweet Herbs and Spinage, with some White-bread grated ve­ry fine, then season it with Pepper, Nut­meg, Cloves and Mace with some Salt, adding thereto some Currans well pick'd and cleans'd, then put thereto a good quantity of Sugar, and as many Eggs as are sufficient to bind it, mingle all well to­gether, and farce your Leg herewith; when you have baked it in an Oven, garnish your Dish with the remaining meat and White-broth.

Potage of Geese farced.

Take the brisket from your Geese, then make a farcing of what things your own fancy shall judge most proper▪ and stuff them therewith, then flowre them and boil them in good broth, then garnish your soaked Bread with the Geese and Pease­broth, or Pease only.

Potage of Partridges.

Having taken the brisket from them, take some of the Leg of Veal and mince it, then season it with Salt, sweet Herbs and Spices; having stufft your Partridges here­with, boil them in good broth with some Herbs, soak your Bread, and lay your Fowl thereon, garnish your Dish with bottoms of Artichokes and Sparagus.

Potage of Turkey farced.

Bone your Turkey as you did your other Birds, and take the flesh of a Capon, Beef-suet and Marrow, and mince them very small, then put some yolks of Eggs thereto, stuff your Turkey, and boil it in good broth, dish it up on soaked Bread with some boil'd Chesnuts blanched and Mushromes. In the boiling, put in a bundle of Chibbals, Parsley and Tyme tyed together.

All manner of Potages for Lent.

ALl the Lent Potages are made and sea­soned as these for the fasting days, only this excepted, that you put no Eggs in them, but in some you mix Pease-broth, in others broth of Almonds, which you will serve white or marbled, and the garnishes are the same.

Almond broth.

Blanch your Almonds, and pound them in a stone Morter, in the pounding sprinkle them with Rosewater, after you have well pounded them, put them into Fish-broth with crums of Bread, boil these together with Salt-Butter, a little beaten Cloves, Mace, Cinamon, an Onion, and some Le­mon-pill; when it is boiled, pass it through a strainer, and keep it in a Pot for your use.

Or you may make Almond broth with Milk, having blanched and pounded your Almonds with Rosewater, as aforesaid, then put them into fresh Milk with crums of Bread, Salt, Cinamon, a Clove or two, [Page 373] and boil them a little while, then pass it through your strainer, and when you are ready to serve it, sweeten it with Sugar.

Fish-broth.

Take half Pease-broth, and half Water, [...]nd put to them the bones of a Carp, or [...] other Fish-bones with an Onion sticked [...] Cloves, a faggot of sweet Herbs, and a [...] little Salt, boil all well together with some crums of Bread, and some Butter, then pass it through a strainer and pre­serve it for your use.

This is a very good Potage for Craw-fish, boiling it a while with the shells of your Craw-fish, stamped and strained through a linnen cloth, by means whereof your Potage will be coloured red; afterwards strain all, then season your broth and dish it up.

Pease-broth.

Steep your Pease twelve hours or more, having first pick'd them from such as are worm-eaten, then seethe them with Con­duit water [...]uke-warm: this will make your Pease-broth clear and very good.

Here note that your Craw-fish must be served with Pease-potage; Carps with Pease­broth [Page 374] and Almonds; Potage of Herbs with a very little Pease-broth; Potage of Tenches with fryed Flowre, and a little Pease-broth; the Queens Potage with▪ broth of Carp, or other Fish-broth and Almonds; the Princes Potage with Pease-broth, wherein was seethed the Bones of Carps; Tortoise with Pease-broth; Mushromes with Pease-broth, and Soals with the same; Smelts with good broth mingled with Almonds; Sparagus, with Pease-broth and Herbs; Lettuce with Pease-broth; Cabbidge, and fryed Bread, or Coleworts and Milk, with Pease-broth and a good deal of Butter.

Potage of Cabbidge or Coleworts with Pease­broth.

Having steeped your Pease all night, boil them the next day with Mace, an O­nion stuck with Cloves, Pepper and Salt; when your broth is enough, dish it up, and garnish it with Cabbidge or Coleworts sod­den in Milk, with some pieces of fryed Bread, boiled therewith.

Potage of Pumpkin.

Boil your Pumpkin very well, then take some Chibbals, fry them and put them in­to your Pot, season your broth with Salt, [Page 375] and let it simmer again, then serve it up with Pepper and Nutmeg.

Otherways.

Boil it very well, then strain it through a strainer into a Pan, then put to it a pretty quantity of Milk, with some Butter, then soak your Bread, and serve it with Nut­meg, Pepper, and some beaten Cina­mon.

Potage of Turnips with White-broth.

Having scraped your Turnips very clean, put them in a Pot with Water; when they are well boil'd, season them with Salt, Nutmeg beaten, and a bundle of Herbs, and take them off the fire, and put to them some fresh Butter and stir it, then run it over with some Almond broth and serve it.

Potage of fryed Turnips.

Scrape them and quarter them, blanch and flowre them; when they are dry fry them, then boil them in Water with a lit­tle Pepper and an Onion stuck with Cloves; if your broth be not thick enough, mingle some Flowre with a little Vinegar and fry it, and put it to your broth.

Potage of Pease-broth.

Take the clearest of your Pease-broth, and put it into a Pot, then fry some Sor­rel, Chervil, and a little Parsley with But­ter, put these into your Pot also, then sea­son your broth, and let it boil, when it is enough, serve it with Parsley and Roots sodden together.

Potage without Butter.

Take good store of Herbs, season them very well, seethe them with a crust of Bread, stove or soak, and serve them up.

Potage of small Vails.

Take four or five Loaves, and make a hole in the top and take out the crum, boil them, then fry them in butter, being fill'd with Milts of Carps, Mushromes and broken Sparagus, then soak them leisurely on your Potage, and let your garnish be the same with your fillings.

Potage of Muscles.

Scrape and wash them well, then boil them in a Pan of Water, Salt, and an Onion, when they are boiled, take them out and pick them, taking off the shell to some and [Page 377] leaving it to others for to garnish, after they are thus pick'd pass them in a Pan with some Parsley; as for your broth, after it is set­led, leave the bottom lest there be any gra­vel in it, then boil it, and when it boils, fry into it a little Parsley, with some fresh But­ter, then soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Muscles; pouring on your broth.

Potage of Frogs.

Having broken their bones and trust them, blanch them, and drain them very well, then lay them into a Dish till you have made ready some Pease-broth, fry in­to it a little minced Parsley with Butter; having boiled a while, put the Frogs into your broth, but take them out presently, then allay a little Saffron, and put it into your Pot, having soaked your Bread, gar­nish it with the Frogs.

Potage of Salmon.

You must cut your Salmon into pieces and pickle them, then pass them in a Pan with some Butter, stick them with Cloves, then stew them between two Dishes with some Butter, a faggot of sweet Herbs, Su­gar, White wine, a little Salt, large Mace, beaten Cinamon and Pepper well beaten, [Page 378] then stove or soak them, then dry your Bread, and stove or soak it also with some other broth, garnish it with slices of Sal­mon, Figs, Dates or Prunelloes, and pour the sauce over it.

Potage of Bran.

Take Wheat Bran the biggest you can procure, and boil it very well in Water, with one handful of Almonds, and a bun­dle of Herbs, then season it well, then pass it through a strainer, and boil it again, soak your Bread, and fill your Dish with this broth which you may whiten if you please.

Potage of Frogs with Saffron.

Truss up your Frogs and boil them in broth, or with Pease-broth, and season them with Parsley, an Onion stuck with Cloves, and a sprig or two of Tyme, soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Frogs blanched and a little Saffron.

Potage of Frogs with Almonds.

Having trust them up Cherry-like, fry them and stove them up between two Dishes, with a little fresh Butter, a drop of Verjuyce, the juyce of an Orange or Le­mon, [Page 379] and season them with a bundle of Herbs; then to make your broth, boil some with Pease-broth, or Water, Salt, Parsley, Chibbals, a handful of stamped Almonds, after which strain them together, soak your Bread, upon which you may put a little of the Hosh of a Carp, fill up your Dish and garnish it with your Frogs, Lemon and Pomegranate.

Potage of Hops.

Whilst your Pease-broth is boiling, pass some good Herbs in a Pan into it, let your Hops boil in your Potage, after that they are whitened, a little before you serve them, take them up and put unto them some Butter, Salt, Nutmeg, Cinamon, Vinegar, and very little broth; when it is well season­ed, stove or soak your Bread, garnish it with your Hops, and fill your Dish.

Potage of Parsnips.

Make choice of those that are middle sized, scrape and wash them clean, then boil them with Butter, and a faggot of sweet Herbs, and season them with Salt, and a few Cloves, then take them up and peel them, then put them with Butter, and stove them, then soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Parsnips.

Potage of Leeks with Milk.

Cut your Leeks very small, blanch and dry them, then boil them with clear Pease­broth, having boil'd a while put in some Milk, Pepper, Salt, Cloves and Mace, then soak your Bread and garnish it with your Leeks.

Potage of Sparagus.

Take Sparagus, and cut them not very short, then fry them in sweet Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, Cinamon, Mace, Parsley, and minced Chibbals, stove them all toge­ther, then make a broth of Pease or Herbs, which you must strain with the juyce of Mushromes, then soak your Bread and gar­nish it with your Sparagus.

Potage of Colliflowers.

Having blanch'd them in fresh Water, put them into a Pot with good broth, or with Pease-broth well seasoned, with But­ter, Salt and an Onion stuck with Cloves, after they are sod, so that they be not bro­ken, soak your Bread, garnish it with your Colliflowers: it will not be improper to put into your Potage, some Milk, Pepper and Nutmeg.

Potage of Rice.

Boil your Rice with Water or Milk till it is burst; having seasoned your Rice, take out a part thereof to fry, and make a Potage of what remains with Butter, Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg, and an Onion stuck with Cloves.

Potage of Barnicle.

Dress your Barnicles, and lard them with Eel, roast them a very little, then put them into a Pot with Water, some Pease­broth, and a bundle of Herbs, when they are almost enough, pass some Turnips in a Pan, and put them to your Barnicles, thicken your broth with a little fryed Flowre, and a drop of Verjuyce, then stove your Bread, and garnish it with your Barnicle.

Potage of Burts.

Soak your Bread with the best of your broths, and garnish it with your Burts, be­ing first fryed in a Pan, and add thereto some Mushromes, Capers and Samphire cut small, with broken Sparagus, and so serve them up.

A Catalogue of those things that are usually served up on Good-Friday, with some Dishes that are only pro­per for that day.

POtage of Almond milk, Potage of Turnips, Potage of Parsnips, Potage of Sparagus, Potage of Pumpkins, the Dauphins Potage garnished with small pieces of Puff-paste, Potage of Milk, the brown Potage of Onions, Potage of Pease­broth garnished with Lettuce and broken Sparagus, Potage of Colliflowers, Potages of Rice garnished with dryed Leaves, Po­tage of green Pease, &c.

The first course for Good-Friday.

Red-Bets or Red-Parsnips cut square like Dice with brown Butter and Salt.

Red-Beets cut into slices, fryed and served up with white Butter.

Red-Carrots stamped and passed in the Pan with Onions, crums of Bread, Al­monds, Mushromes and fresh Butter, all well allai'd and seasoned.

Red-Carrots fryed with brown Butter and Onions.

Red-Carrots cut into round pieces with a white Sauce, with Butter, Salt, Nutmeg, Chibbals, and a little Vinegar.

White-Carrots fryed, and Carrots fryed in Paste.

Carrots minced with Mushromes.

Tourts or Cakes made of Pistaches, Cakes of Herbs, butter'd Cakes, and Al­mond Cakes.

Parsnips with a white Sauce, and Pars­nips fryed with Butter.

Serfisis with a white Sauce and Butter.

Spinage or Apples butter'd or fryed.

Pap of Flowre, pap of Rice and Almonds strained.

Broken Sparagus fryed and butter'd.

Fricasses of Mushromes, Carrots and Pi­staches served up warm with Sugar, and good store of Butter.

Skirrets with white Sauce and Butter, and Skirrets fryed.

Pumpkins or Jerusalem Artichokes fryed.

Rice sodden till it burst, and mingled with Milk and Sugar.

Other Dishes to be served on Good-Friday.

Potage of Health.

THis Potage must be made of Sorrel, Let­tuce, Beet, Purslain, and a bundle of Herbs, you must boil them all toge­ther with some Salt, Butter, and the Lanta­mure or kissing crust of a Loaf, stoved or soaked, and so served up.

Pease-Potage.

Steep your Pease eighteen hours, then boil them in a Pot with a faggot of sweet Herbs, some Capers, and an Onion stuck with Cloves, serve it up, garnished with fryed Be ad.

Potage of Loaves.

Take half a dozen of Loaves, and open them at the top, and take out the pith or crum, then dry them by the fire, or make them brown in the Pan with fresh Butter, then soak them in broth made on purpose with Mushromes, Pease-broth, Onion stuck [Page 385] with Cloves, and all well seasoned; garnish your Dish with your fryed Bread, then fill it up with Artichokes, Mushromes fry­ed, and Sparagus, besprinkle your Po­tage with juyce of Mushromes, and gar­nish your Dish round about with Pome­granates.

Potage of Sprouts of Coleworts.

Boil them in Water, Salt, Pease-broth, Butter, Onion sticked, and a little Pepper, then soak your Bread, garnish it with your Sprouts, and fill your▪ Dish therewith.

Another very good Dish made of Barley.

Take half a pound of perl'd Barley, and boil it till it begins to break, then put it into a Cullender, and set on your Skillet with other liquor, and when it boils, put in the Barley again, and let it boil till it be very soft; having strain'd the Water from it, take half a pound of blanched Al­monds, and beat them in a Morter, ha­ving beaten them a while, beat them over again with your Barley, then put to them some of the same liquor, some Sack, Rose­water, and season it with Sugar, Nutmeg, Cinamon, and boil them all together over a chafing-dish of coals, then dish it with a la­dleful [Page 386] of drawn Butter, and scrape on Sugar.

Fryed toasts.

Take a couple of stale two-penny loaves, and cut them in round slices through the loaf, then soak them in Sack and strong Ale on the one side, then dry them on a Pye-plate on that side, and do in like man­ner to the other side; then take a pint of Cream seasoned with Nutmeg and Cina­mon, and dip your toasts therein; your Pan being hot with clarified Butter, put them in and fry them brown on both sides, then dish them up, and pour on them Butter, Rosewater and Sack drawn together, lastly scrape on Sugar.

Another very good dish proper for Good­friday.

Take a pint of Flowre, and put thereto half a pint of Cream, some Butter, Su­gar, Cinamon beaten, Nutmeg grated, and make it into a stiff paste with Rosewater, then roll them out into very thin ropes, and gage them round your Pan, being first made hot with clarified Butter, fry them quick, but burn them not, then scrape on Sugar and serve them up.

Another.

Take three handfuls of Primrose-leaves, boil them and drain the Water from them, and mince them small with four Pippins par'd and cored, season them with Cina­mon, and put to them a handful of dry Flowre, a little Sugar, Cream and Rose­water; your stuff must be so thick, that it run not abroad; when your Pan is hot with clarified Butter, drop your ingredi­ents in by spoonfuls, fry them crisp on both sides, dish them and scrape on Sugar.

Another for any Friday.

Take half a pound of Almonds blanch, and pound them, and as they are a pound­ing, put in some Rosewater to keep them from oyling, strain them into Cream, then take Artichoke bottoms and Marrow, your Cream being boiled with Dates, Sugar, whole Cinamon, large Mace and Nutmeg, your Cream being cold, put it into a Dish garnished with Paste on the brims, then put on your Artichokes and Marrow, and bake it for a quarter of an hour, then take out the whole Spices and serve it up.

All manner of Potages for Fasting days out of Lent.

Potage of Craw-fish.

HAving cleans'd your Craw-fish very well, boil them with Wine Vinegar, Salt and Pepper; when they look red pick the feet and tail, and fry them with sweet Butter, then take the bodies of your Craw­fish, and pound them very well with Oni­ons, Cloves, Mace, Ginger, Pepper, Salt, hard Eggs, and the [...]rums of white Bread, let them soak in good broth made of Herbs, or clear Pease-broth; having boil'd these together, strain them and set them before the fire, then take some Butter with minced Parsley, fry it and put it into your Potage, which you must be mindful to season well, your crusts being soaked, put on the hash of a Carp, with the juyce of Mushromes, fill up your Dish, and garnish it with the feet and tails of your Craw-fish, with Pome­granates, and the juyce of Lemons.

Potage of Snails.

You must first wash your Snails in ma­ny waters, then put them into an earthen-Pan or wide Dish, and put to them as much Water as will cover them, then set your Dish over a Chafing-dish of coals; having boil'd a while, take them out of the Shells and scowr them with Water and Salt four or five times, then let them boil a lit­tle while in a Pipkin with Water and Salt, then take them up and lay them in a Dish with some very good Sallet Oyl, when the Oyl boils, put in some sliced Onions, fry them and put the Snails to them, and stew them well together; then take the Snails, Oyl and Onions, and put them into a Pip­king together sizeable for them, and put as much Water to them, as will be sufficient to make a Potage with some Salt, and let them stew four hours, then mince some sweet Herbs, as Tyme, Penniroyal, Parsley, &c. having minced them very well, pound them to a green Sauce, and put in some crums of Bread soaked in the Potage with a little Saffron and beaten Cloves, put all to the Snails, and give them a walm or two: when you serve them up, squeeze in the juyce of a Lemon, put in Vinegar also, [Page 390] and a clove of Garlick among the Herbs, serve them up on Sippets: This is a most excellent Potage.

Potage of Carp.

Having bon'd the Carp, set him aside and take the bones and boil them in Pease▪ potage, with some Onions, hard Eggs, and the crums of white Bread; having boiled strain them, then fry them with Parsley, and put them in the broth again▪ then dry and soak your Bread; after this take the flesh of your Carp, hash it, and when it is boiled, lay it on your Bread, the [...] pour on your broth, filling your Dish, and sprinkle it with the juyce of Lemon and Mushromes.

Potage of Tenches.

You must bone your Tench in the same manner as you did your Carp, then take the flesh and mince it very small, and farc [...] it, seasoning your farcings well, and close up the hole wherein they were put; your Bread being soaked, garnish it with your Tenches, and pour on your broth, it mat­ters not whether the broth be made o [...] Pease, Turnips, Herbs, Tenches, Amonds, Carps or Craw-fish.

Potage of French Barley.

Having pick'd and cleans'd your Bar­ley very well from dust, put it into boiling Milk, being boil'd down, put into it large Mace, Cream, Sugar, and a little Salt, boil it indifferent thick, then put it into a Dish, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

Potage of Carps farced.

Separate the bones from the flesh, then farce them with their own flesh, and close up the hole neatly, through which you con­vey'd your Farcings; then put them into a Dish of broth, and stew or boil them, add thereunto Butter, Chibbals, Verjuyce, large Mace, a faggot of sweet Herbs and Pep­per; then take your bones and boil them, and having boil'd a pretty while strain the broth, and put it to your Carps, then soak your crusts, and lay your Carp thereon, pouring the Potage upon it, garnish it with Capers, Pine-seeds and Mushromes.

Potage of roasted Carps.

Press your Carps, and slit them on the top, then melt some Butter, and endore your Carp therewith, then put it on the Gridiron and broil it. Then take some [Page 392] Turnips, and cut them in two, whiten, flowre and fry them, then put them into some Pease-broth or Water, season them and let them boil, then soak your Bread, and lay your Carps thereon with Butter, Parsley, Chibbals, and a little Vinegar, then garnish it with the Turnips, Samphire, and a few Capers.

Gruel Potage.

Having pick'd your Oatmeal very well, boil it over a soft fire, when it is tender, strain it through a Strainer, then put it into a Pipkin with some Spring water, make your Potage pretty thick of the strained Oatmeal, and add thereto some Raisins of the Sun well pick'd and ston'd, some large Mace, Salt, with a small faggot of sweet Herbs, Rosewater and Saffron, set it a stew­ing on the fire with some Sugar; when it is near upon enough, put to it some Butter with the yolks of Eggs strained.

Or you may take Oatmeal and chop some Herbs amongst it, then put them into boil­ing liquor, with some Raisins or Currans, or both, and when it is boiled to an indif­ferent thickness put Butter to it.

Or you may only take Oatmeal, a bun­dle of sweet Herbs minced small, with some [Page 393] Onions and Salt, boil these together, and season them with Butter.

The Queens Potage.

You may take your choice whether you will have Carps or Tenches, then boil them with Water, Salt, an Onion, Parsley, hard Eggs, and the crums of a white Loaf, when they have boil'd a while, strain your broth, and put it into another Pot with some Butter, then take some Almonds, blanch them and pound them, and mingle with one moiety of your broth; having boiled a while, strain them, and put in an Onion stuck with Cloves, then set it over a gentle fire, then soak your dish with a little of your first broth, and fill up your dish with White-broth, with the yolk of an Egg allai'd with Verjuyce, and the juyce of Mushromes, let it not be too thick, serve it garnished with Lemon and Pome­granate.

The Dutchess of Anjou's Potage.

Take the bones of a Carp, and boil them in Pease-broth that is very clear, with the yolks of Eggs, a bundle of Herbs, and all well seasoned, then dry a loaf and soak it, and fry into it some hash of Carp, and juyce [Page 394] of Mushromes▪ Melts, Livers of Eel-pouts, and all manner of sweet Herbs, dish it up, and garnish it with Pomegranate and sliced Lemon.

Potage of Tortoise.

Cut off their heads, boil them and take the flesh out of the shell, and cut it into pieces, then pass them in a Pan with But­ter, Parsley and Chibbals; having thus past and season'd them, put them into a Dish, and let them soak over a Chafing-dish of coals with some broth, be careful in the re­moving of the gall when you cut your Tortoise in pieces, your Bread being soak­ed, garnish it with your Tortoise, and place Sparagus broken about your Dish, Mu­shromes, slices of Lemon or Oranges.

Potage of Wheat.

Take a quantity of Wheat and wet it; then put it into a bag, and beat it with a wash beetle, being hul'd and cleans'd from the dust, boil it over night, and let it soak on a soft fire till the morning; then being ready to use it, take as much as you think convenient, and put it into a Pipkin or Skil­let with a proper quantity of Milk, and boil it with Mace, Salt, Cinamon, Saffron [Page 395] and the yolks of two or three Eggs, boil it thick, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

Potage of Mushromes farced.

Take your youngest and freshest Mu­shromes, wash them very well, and boil them in Water with an Onion stuck with Cloves, and a sprig or two of Tyme, sea­son your broth, boil it, strain it, and put it into a Pot, then pass your Mushromes in a Pan, with Butter, Parsley, Pine-apple­seed, with Capers, and put them into the Pot again and let them simmer; then soak your Bread, and lay it on a bed of a hash of Carps, then fill it up by degrees with your other materials, after it is filled garnish your Potage with your Mushromes far [...]ed, with the same farce wherewith you made your hash between two Dishes, and with Melts, garnish your Dish with Pomegranate or sliced Lemon and serve it.

Potage of Rice.

Having pick'd your Rice clean, and ta­ken the dust from it, wash it and boil it in Milk; having boil'd a while, put to it some Cream, large Mace, whole Cinamon, Salt and Sugar, boil it on a moderate fire, scrape on Sugar and serve it.

You may boil your Rice, and stran it with Almond Milk, seasoning it as you did the former.

Potage of Soals farced.

Take your Soals and fry them till they are three quarters enough, then open them along the bone, and separate the flesh from it, then take Melts, Oysters, Capers and Mushromes, and pass them in a Pan with Parsley and whole Chibbals, then stuff or farce your Soals with these ingredients; then soak them in broth, fresh Butter, the juyce of a Lemon or Verjuyce, then soak your Bread in fish-broth, and garnish it with your Soals, Mushromes, and their juyce, Melts, and slices of Lemon.

Potage of Milk.

Take whole Oatmeal and pick it clean, then put it into a Pipkin of boiling Wa­ter, when it is very tender, put in Milk or Cream, Salt and fresh Butter with a little beaten Nutmeg and Cinamon.

Potage of Ellicksander.

Take Oatmeal, pick it and cleanse it, then chop amongst it some Ellicksanders, when your Water boils, put in your ingredients [Page 397] with a little Salt, let it boil moderately, and not too thick, and when it is enough, put some Butter to it.

Potage of Smelts.

Having made a broth either of Almonds, Fish, Mushromes or Pease-broth well sea­soned, take your Bread and soak it, and pour a little White-broth over it, of yolks of Eggs allay'd with Verjuyce, and the juyce of Mushromes; then take a quar­tern of Smelts, or what quantity you think fit, fry them in Butter wirh Parsley and Chibbals, and garnish your Dish with them, adding Pomegranates and Lemon.

Potage of Pease.

Shell a quantity of green Pease, and put them into a Pipkin of fair boiling Water, then put in your Herbs, some Oatmeal and Salt, let them boil moderately, and not too thick, and when they are enough, put some Butter to them.

You may boil them in Milk or Cream, putting to them some sprigs of Mint, with a little Salt; if not thick enough, put in some Milk and Flowre well temper'd toge­ther, with the yolk of an Egg.

Potage of Sparagus.

Take a good quantity of Herbs with crums of Bread, season them well and boil them, then take them up, drain and fry them, after they are fryed, put them in the Pot again, then soak your Bread, and gar­nish it with Sparagus, which you must have ready boil'd with Salt, drain'd and season'd with Butter, Salt, Cinamon, and Nut­meg, over all strow your broken Sparagus which is fryed, and serve it.

Potage of old dry Pease.

Take a quantity of Seed-pease which are the best, pick those that are worm-eaten from the rest and wash them; then put them into boiling liquor, being tender boil'd, take out some of them and strain them, and set them by for your use, then season the rest with Salt, a bundle of Mints and But­ter, let these stew leisurely, and strow some Pepper over them.

Put Salt to your strained Pease-potage with large Mace, a bundle of sweet Herbs, and some pickled Capers, stew them well together, lay in the bottom of your Dish slices of bread, and grated manchet to gar­nish it.

Potage of Fish-harslets.

Bone a couple of Carps, and hash them with Butter, and good store of sweet Herbs, then take the bones and boil them in any sort of broth with a faggot of Herbs, But­ter and Salt; then take the skin of your Carps, and make thereof some Harslets, then lay these over your seasoned hash, and roul them up like small Chitterlings; after they are thus rouled up, seethe them in a Dish with Butter, a little Verjuyce, and a Chibbal, then foak your bread and garnish it with your Hash and Harslets, and lay a top Mushromes and broken Sparagus.

A very good Potage.

Put Water in a Pipkin and boil it, then strain some Oatmeal and put to it, with large Mace, whole Cinamon, Salt, a bun­dle of sweet Herbs, some strained and whole Prunes, with some Raisins of the Sun, being well stewed on a soft fire and pretty thick, put in some Claret and Sugar, serve it in a deep Dish and scrape on Sugar.

Potage of Lettuce farced.

Blanch your Lettuce in fresh Water, then make a Farce either of Herbs or Fish, and having farced them with it, let them soak in a Pot with some Pease-broth, season them well with Salt and Butter, and an Onion stuck with Cloves, soak your bread, and garnish it with your Lettuce which you must cut in halves.

Potage of Cabbidge.

Blanch or whiten your Cabbidge or Coleworts, having first cut them into quar­ters, then put them into a Pot of Water with store of Butter, Salt and Pepper, with an Onion stuck with Cloves; when they are well boiled, put to them some Milk, then soak your bread, and garnish it with your Cabbidge or Coleworts.

Potage of Onion.

First have a Pipkin of boiling liquor over the fire, then fry good store of sliced Onions, and put them into the Pipkin with what they were fryed in, also some Pepper and Salt, being well stewed together, serve them on Sippets of French-bread.

Potage of Pumpkin.

Having cut your Pumpkin into pieces, boil it with Water and Salt; after it is well boil'd, strain it and put it into a Pot with an Onion stuck with Cloves, fresh Butter and Pepper, soak your bread, and allay the yolks of four Eggs, and pour them over your broth, so serve it.

Or thus; cut and boil your Pumpkin, as aforesaid, then put it through a straining-pan with some Milk, and boil it with But­ter, season it with Salt, Pepper, Cinamon and an Onion stuck with Cloves; you may, if you please, serve it with yolks of Eggs al­lay'd, or without them.

Potage of Almonds.

Take half a pound of Almond-paste, or what quantity you please, and mingle it with new Milk, then have a quart of Cream boiling in a Pipkin or Skillet, then put in the Milk and Almonds with some Mace, Salt and Sugar, serve it on Sippets of French­bread, and scrape on Sugar.

Or you may strain your Almonds with fair Water, and boil them with Salt, Mace and Sugar, adding some yolks of Eggs dissolved in Saffron.

Potage of Turnips.

You must first scrape and wash them very clean, then cut them into quarters, whiten them and boil them in Water, But­ter, Salt, and an Onion stuck with Cloves, after they are boil'd enough, soak your bread, then put on your Turnips with good store of Butter.

Or having fitted them for the Pot, as aforesaid, cut them in halves, blanch and flowre them, then pas [...] them in a Pan with refined Butter; when your Turnips are brown, take them from the Butter, and put them into a Pot with some Water or Pease-broth, let them boil a pretty while, and forget not to season your broth, then soak your bread, and garnish it with your Turnips, Grapes and Capers.

Potage of green Pease.

Pass your Pease in a Pan with melted Lard, but be sure that it be very new, then set them a soaking in a small Pot, well sea­son'd with Parsley and Chibbals, then soak a Loaf with some Herb-broth, or old Pease­broth, then garnish it with green Pease.

Or you may take the biggest and strain them, after you have boiled them very [Page 403] tender, then fry some Parsley and Chibbals into it minced small, season it well, put some Capers into it, and garnish it with fryed bread.

Potage of Cucumbers farced.

Take Cucimbers, pare them and hol­low them, then whiten them, and having drain'd them, make a farce of Sorrel, yolks of Eggs and their whites, season them and pour them into your Cucumbers, after this put them into some Water or Pease-broth; having boil'd them a while, season them as you shall think fit with Ca­pers, then soak your bread and garnish it with your Cucumbers cut into quarters.

Potage of Oysters.

Blanch your Oysters very well and flowre them, then pass them in a Pan with a little Parsley, then soak them in a Pot, then soak your bread also in other broth, when it is well soaked, garnish it with your Oysters, whereof some must be fryed; you must put to the fryed Oysters, Pomegranates, and sliced Lemon for the garnish.

Potage of Salmon.

Take a Rand of Salmon, and cut it into pieces, then pass it in the Pan, after that soak it a little while in White wine and Sugar, then soak your bread in well season­ed broth; after your Fish hath boil'd a lit­tle, lay it on your Bread with the broth.

Or you may take the Jole, or any other part of the Salmon, and having cut it to pieces▪ and fryed it, season it with Nutmeg, Salt, Ginger and Pepper, then boil it in White wine and Sugar, with a little Vine­gar, a faggot of sweet Herbs, Chibbals, and some blades of large Mace; after it hath boil'd a while, put in some of your best broth, garnish it with Oysters, yolks of Eggs boil'd hard, minced fine with fryed Parsley, Mushromes, Pomegranate and sliced Lemon.

Potage of Frogs with Saffron.

Having trussed your Frogs, boil them in Pease-broth, and season them with Parsley, an Onion stuck with Cloves, and a sprig or two of Tyme; then soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Frogs whitened in fresh Water, adding thereto the yolks of Eggs or Saffron.

Potage of Bran.

Take your largest Bran, and order it as you are directed in the title of Bran-Po­tage, in the Table of Potages for Lent; on­ly for Fasting-days out of Lent, you may put into your Potage some Eggs allay'd with Verjuyce, let your garnish be paste call'd Fleurons.

Potage of Hops.

Take good store of sweet Herbs, chop them indifferent small, and add to them the crums of a White-loaf, then boil them in fair Water, then take them up, drain them and pass them a little in the Pan, and put them into the Pot again, then take Parsley and fry it in Butter with a bundle of Herbs, and put it into your Pot, then boil your Hops with Water and Salt; be­ing boiled enough, drain it and put But­ter to it, then soak your Bread, and serve your Potage whitened with yolks of Eggs allayed in Verjuyce.

Potage of Rasberries.

Take the yolks of half a dozen Eggs, and allay them with the juyce of a pint of Rasberries, then put over a pottle of Milk, [Page 406] and when it boils, pour in your ingredients aforesaid, stir it very well, season it with a little Salt, then dish it and garnish it with Rasberries.

Potage of Parsnips.

Let those you chuse be of the middle size for thickness, then cleanse them, then boil them with Butter, and a faggot of sweet Herbs, season them with Salt, and an Onion stuck with Cloves, then take them up, being boiled enough, and peel them, then stove them with Butter and a little broth, by which means your broth will be thickned, then soak your Bread, garnish it with your Parsnips, and fill your Dish with the Potage.

Potage of Leeks.

Take the white end of your Leeks and cut them small, then take other whites and cut them into lengths for garnish, boil these tyed together, and your chopt heads of Leeks in Pease-broth; being enough, foak your Bread, garnish it with your Leeks, and strow on the top your Leeks cut in lengths.

You may either whiten your Potage with yolks of Eggs allay'd with Verjuyce, or put [Page 407] therein some Milk and Pepper. If you serve them without whitening, boil them in Pease-broth, otherwise in Water, and put to them some Capers, Broom-buds, Pine-apple-seed, and Samphire cut small.

Potage of Barnicle farced.

You must uncase or skin your Barnicle, then take the flesh and mince it well with Butter, Mushromes, yolks of Eggs, Salt, Cinamon beaten, Cloves, Mace, Ginger, Pepper, fine Herbs, as Parsley, Chib­bals and Tyme, with some raw Eggs, to [...]ind the flesh, then farce your Barnicle, and close it up with a Skuer or a Thread, put it in the Pot, and boil it with Pease-broth the clearest you can get, and boil it well, then garnish your Bread therewith after it is soaked.

Potage of Eel-pouts.

Take your Eel-pouts, flowre and fry them, then soak your Bread in the best of your broths, and garnish it, and your Potage with them; then strow on Mushromes, Sparagus, Melts, and whiten them with Almond-broth, or the broth of Craw-fish.

Potage of broken Sparagus.

Having dryed your crusts, soak them in the best of your broths, then garnish them with your Sparagus and Mushromes, with some Sparagus at length.

Potage of Colliflowers.

Whiten your Colliflowers a little, then boil them, and season them well, soak your Bread in what broth you have, and garnish it with your Colliflowers fryed in Butter, Salt and Nutmeg, sprinkle your Potage with Almond-broth.

Another very good Potage.

Peel half a dozen Onions, mince them and boil them with Water and Butter, after they are throughly boiled, strain them through a linnen cloth, and seethe some Fidels in the broth, then season them with Salt and Pepper, after they are boil'd soak your Bread, and garnish it with them.

Potage of Rice.

Blanch your Rice, and when it is very clean from dust, burst it in Milk, then strain it, after that season it, and serve it garnished with Fleurons or Puff-paste round the [Page 409] brims of the Dish. There is a very good Potage of Milk to be made the same way, serving it sugred, and garnished with some Suckets sliced or Macerons.

Potage of green Pease-broth.

Boil your Pease but a very little, then pound them in a Morter, and strain them with the broth of Herbs well seasoned with a bundle of Herbs, then take Chibbals, Parsley and Butter, all being fryed toge­ther, throw it into your Pease-broth, gar­nish it with Lettuce well cleans'd, Succory, Cucumbers and small Pease fryed and sod with Butter, Salt and Pepper, and you may add the bottoms of Artichokes.

Potage of common Pease served green.

First boil your Pease in Water, then take the clearest of your Pease-broth, and when you intend to use it, fry into it Parsley, Charvel, young Sorrel, Butter, Bran and Capers, then boil them thus seasoned, gar­nish your Dish with fryed Bread.

Potage of Barnicle with Turnips.

Dress your Barnicle, and lard it with Eel or Carp, then fry it, then boil it with half Water, and half Pease-broth, well [Page 410] seasoned with Butter, and a bundle of sweet Herbs; when it is almost boiled, cut your Turnips, flowre and fry them with Butter, when they are very brown, put them into the Pot with your Barnicle, if your Potage be not thick enough, fry a little Flowre in­to it, some Capers, Samphire cut small, Pine-apple-seeds, the pulp of a Lemon cut small, and a drop of Vinegar; when it is boiled enough, soak your Bread, and garnish it with your Barnicle and Tur­nips.

If you would not have your Turnips to be seen, strain them and season them with a bundle of Herbs, an Onion, and some sweet Butter, then garnish your Potage with Mushromes and Artichokes.

Potage of Leeks with Pease-broth.

Whiten your Leeks a little, and boil them with Pease-broth well seasoned with Butter and Salt, then soak your bread, and garnish it with your Leeks; in the whitening, allay some yolks of Eggs with broth, and pour it on them; you may add some Milk to them well seasoned, after that your Leeks are well boiled.

Potage of Burt.

Take the tails and heads of your Burts and half fry them, then put them into Castrolle with a very long Sauce well thickned, then soak your Bread with some of the best of your broths, and garnish it at the top with your Burts, with Mushromes and Capers. If you have no Fish-broth, then use your Pease-broth.

Potage of Herbs garnished with Cucumbers.

Take all manner of Herbs that are used for Sallets, and take also a bundle of sweet Herbs, as Tyme, Penniroyal, sweet Mar­joram, Savory, &c. and soak them with Butter over a soft fire, and by little and little pour into them warm Water; after they are well seasoned and boiled, put in the first cut of a Loaf with an Onion stuck with Cloves, the pill of an Orange minced, and some Capers, and garnish it with boiled Lettuce, you may boil some Pease among the Herbs, and strow over all some Cu­cumbers.

Potage of Onion and Milk.

Take some Onions and cut them thin, then fry them brown in Butter, after this [Page 412] boil them in a little Water well seasoned with Salt and Pepper; when it is enough, put Milk to it and boil it, then garnish your soaked Bread therewith.

Potage of Vives or Sea-dragons.

Cleanse them very well, then boil them with Pease-broth, and some White wine, and a faggot of Herbs all well seasoned, then take out your Sea-Dragons, and put them with Ragoust (that is a Sauce pre­pared with a high quick or sharp taste) let them soak very well with Salt, fresh But­ter, minced Capers and Anchovies, then pass the broth through a strainer, and boil it with fresh Butter, Paste, Parsley, and minced Capers, then soak your Bread, and lay over it Mushromes, then garnish it with your Sea-dragons.

Potage of Mushromes farced.

It is made after the same manner as that of the Dutchess of Anjou in the Table of the Potages for Lent, garnish it with Mu­shromes sarced, and with Melts, fill it up with the best of your broth, and serve them up.

Cawdles, Soops, Drinks, &c.

Almond Cawdle.

TAke a pound of Almond-paste, and strain it with a quart of good strong Ale, then boil it with slices of fine Manchet, large Mace and Sugar; when it is almost enough, put in half a pint of Sack.

Oatmeal Cawdle.

Boil a quart of strong Ale and scum it, then put in Oatmeal and sliced Bread, so much as will not make it too thick, with some Mace and Sugar, then dissolve the yolks of half a dozen yolks of Eggs in a quarter of a pint of Sack, or instead there­of use Claret or White wine, then put in a little grated Nutmeg, give it a walm or two and dish it.

Egg Cawdle.

Take a pint and a half of good strong Beer, put it over the fire and scum it, then put in four blades of large Mace, a sliced Manchet and Sugar, the yolks of Eggs [Page 414] dissolved in Claret, let it boil a little and dish it.

Sugar-Sops.

Take what quantity of Beer or Ale you think fit, boil it and scum it, then put to it some Currans (or none at all) slices of fine Manchet, large Mace, Sugar or Honey.

Aleberry.

Having boil'd your Ale and scum'd it very well, put in some Mace, the bottom of a Manchet, boil it well, and sweeten it with some Sugar.

Butter'd-Ale.

Having scum'd your Ale very well, put therein some Liquorice and Anniseeds, boil these well together, then have in readiness, either in a flaggon or a quart Pot, some yolks of Eggs well beaten, with some of the aforesaid Ale, and some good Butter, then strain your butter'd Ale, put it into your Flaggon, and brew it to and fro with your Butter and the Eggs a pretty while.

Or thus you may do it: Take some Ale, put it in a Skillet, and when the scum riseth take it off; then take the yolks and whites of [Page 415] Eggs, and beat them in a quart Pot with their shells, with some Butter, Nutmeg and Sugar, being well brewed drink it, it is best taken going to bed.

Others take Ale and strain it with the yolks of Eggs, and so set it to the fire in a Pewter Pot, adding thereto a good quanti­ty of Sugar, some beaten Nutmeg, and as much Cloves with some beaten Gin­ger.

An excellent Gruel.

Boil fair Water in a Skillet, and put thereto grated White-bread, good store of Currans, Mace and whole Cinamon; being almost boiled, and indifferent thick, put in a little Sack, some Sugar, and some strained yolks of Eggs▪ you may put to it some Butter.

Another as good as the former.

Take a pottle of Water, a handful of Oatmeal of the biggest size, pick'd and beaten in a Morter, then let it boil; when it is half boiled, put in two handfuls of Currans well washed, a faggot or two of sweet Herbs, half a dozen blades of large Mace, a little sliced Nutmeg, and you may infuse a grain of Musk a little while therein; [Page 416] when it is boil'd, season it with Rosewater, Sugar and a little drawn Butter.

Punnado.

Take three pints of Spring-water, and set it over the fire, then cut a French roll into slices, and put it therein; having first dry'd them in a Dish on a few coals, add also two handfuls of Currans well cleans'd, a little large Mace; when it is boiled, sea­son it with Sugar and Rosewater, with a little Salt, rub the bottom of your Dish with Musk.

Lemon Cawdle.

Take a pint and a half of White wine, and the like quantity of Water, and boil these together, then take a Manchet and cut it into thin slices, and put it into your Pipkin with some large Mace, then beat into it the yolks of three Eggs, let it boil a little while to thicken it, then squeeze the juyce of four Oranges or Le­mons into it, and season it well with Su­gar and Rosewater.

Barley Gruel.

Take a quarter of a pound of Barley, [Page 417] and let it boil in three or four Waters, then pound it in a Morter; after this boil it again with an ounce of Harts-horn, ever allowing four ounces thereof to a pound of Barley; having boiled about two hours, strain it through a strainer, then boil it again with a quarter of a pound of Currans, with a faggot of cooling Herbs, as Sorrel, Straw­berry-leaves, and Violet-leaves, with a lit­tle Tyme, also three or four blades of Mace, with some juyce of Sorrel; when it hath taken three or four walms, remove it from the fire, and squeeze into it the juyce of two Lemons, season it with the infusion of Musk in Rosewater with a little Salt; if you make this Gruel to serve to the Ta­ble, add unto your aforementioned ma­terials sweet Herbs instead of the faggot of cold ones, but if you intend it medicinally, follow the former prescription, and assure your self there is nothing better for one in a Feaver.

Pearmain Cawdle.

Take Milk and make a clear Posset thereof with white wine, then take some sliced Pearmains, and boil them in your [...] Posset; being boiled enough, strain them as long as the Apple will run, then set it [Page 418] on the fire again with blades of large Mace, then thicken it with the yolks of Eggs, and season it with Sugar, and the infusion of Musk in Rosewater.

A Coventry Posset.

Have ready in a Pot, Bowl or Bason some warm'd Sack, Claret, Beer, Ale or juyce of Orange, then take your Milk, af­ter it hath boiled in a clear scoured Skil­let, and pour it into your Pot, Bason or Bowl, but let not your Milk be too hot, for that will cause the Curd to be very hard, then Sugar it.

Or you may beat what quantity of Sor­rel you think fit, and strain it with either Sack, White wine or Ale, then boil some Milk, as aforesaid, and let it stand a little to cool, and so pour it into your Vessel, and scrape on Sugar.

Lemonade a-la-mode de France.

THe French make a Lemonade several ways, sometimes by taking two handfuls of Jalsomine, and infuse it in a pottle of Wa­ter, letting it steep twelve ho [...]rs, to every [Page 419] quart of Water put six ounces of Sugar: you may make it of Orange-flowers or Gilli­flower after the same manner.

Or take some Lemons, cut them and take out the juyce, then put it in Water, as aforesaid; then pare-another Lemon, and cut it into slices, put it among the juyce with a due proportion of Sugar.

White and Red Hypocrast.

Take three quarts of the best White wine you can get, half a pound of Sugar, an ounce of Cinamon, some leaves of sweet Marjoram, two or three whole corns of Pepper, strain these through your straining-bag with a grain of Musk, and four or five slices of Lemon you must add; let these in­fuse together three or four hour: if you will have your Hypocrast red, use C [...]aret wine.

Vinegar several ways to make it.

FIll a Ferkin or a lesser Vessel three quar­ters full of White wine, then lay it unstopt in some hot place against the Sun.

If you will make Vinegar in ha [...], take [Page 420] White wine, and put it into an Earthen­pot, and stop the mouth with Paste, then boil it in a Brass-pan, and in half an hour it will be sowre; or you need not boil it all, but only put to it a Beet-root, Medlers, Services, Mulberries unripe, Flowers, a slice of Barley-bread hot out of the Oven, or the blossoms of Services in their season, which you must dry in the Sun in a Glass­vessel in the same manner as you do Rose-Vinegar, then fill up your glass with Cla­ret or White wine, and set it in the Sun, or a Chimney corner by the fire.

Thus you make Vinegar of sound Wine, but if you will make it of what is cor­rupted, first boil it till one third be con­sumed, and scum it very clean, then put it up into a Cask, and put some Churnel, then stop your Vessel very close, and in a little time it will be very good Vinegar.

Ale-eager.

Take what quantity of strong Ale of the first running as you shall think fit, set it a cooling, then head it very throughly with Barm; after this tun it up in a Firkin, and lay it in the Sun; then take four or five handfuls of Beans, and parch them in a fire-shovel, first splitting them in the mid­dle, [Page 421] put these into your Vessel, as hot as you can, with a handful of Rye-leaven, and a good handful of Salt strained, then stop your barrel with Clay, and let it stand in the Sun from May to August.

Rose-Vinegar, or Elder-Vinegar.

Keep Roses or Elder-flowers dryed, and put them into several Glasses, and fill them up with White wine or Claret, and let them stand in the Sun, or by the fire-side; as your bottles are empty, fill them again with wine and fresh flowers.

Pepper-Vinegar.

Fill your bottle with Wine, and infuse therein some whole Pepper tyed up in a cloth, for the space of eight days.

Wine-Vinegar in balls.

Take Bramble Berries when they are half ripe, dry them and make them into powder, then with a little strong Vinegar make it into balls, and dry them in the Sun; when you would use them, beat up the balls with some White wine or Claret, first warm'd, and it will speedily become good Vinegar.

Verjuyce.

Take Crabs as soon as the kernels turn black, and lay them in a heap to sweat, then clear them from their stalks or rottenness, then stamp them in a long trough to mash with stamping beetles; when you have stamped them very well, strain them through a course hair-cloth into your Barrel or Hogs-head.

How to draw Gravy.

WHen your meat is about half roasted, put underneath it a Dish with good store of Onion-broth, which you must make by taking a pottle of strong broth, with a dozen Onions sliced and infused therein, then cut and slash your meat, when you think the Gravy will best run; so lade your broth on the meat to draw down the Gra­vy, you may add to it a little White wine or Claret: when your flesh is roasted, take it off the spit, and press it very well, then put to your Gravy some Oyster liquor, a little Nutmeg, and to every quart of Gravy four Anchovies: this Sauce will be much required in Feasts for most dishes, especially your Range.

How to draw Butter.

TAke half a pint of strong broth, and put it into a Pipkin, and break into it two pounds of Butter, then set it over the fire, and keep stirring of it with your ladle, then break in three pound more, or as much as you have occasion for, adding liquor pro­portionably, stir it continually till all be dis­solved, and that it looks white, thick and smooth; if it chanceth to look yellow, and it is curdled, you will hardly recover it.

How to recover Butter when it is turn'd to Oyl.

Take a Pipkin and put therein a ladleful of strong broth, and put thereto half a pound of Butter broken in pieces, having drawn it white, put in your Oily-butter, keeping it stirring as you pour it in leisure­ly, and be sure not to over-power your o­ther Butter with what is Oily.

Another way in case of necessity.

Having no other Butter in the house than what is turn'd oily in the melting, you must [Page 424] then let it settle in some cool place for a little time, then pour out the most oily part, leaving the dregs and whey behind, then add a little broth to the said dregs, and put it on a hot heap of coals, ladle it well till it become to drawn Butter in a body, then take it off the fire, and keep it still stirring; in the mean time pour in the Oily-butter ve­ry softly, then set it on the fire again, still stirring it till it become strong, thick and white.

Ancient and Modern terms of Art for Carving Fish or Flesh.

  • BArb a Lobster.
  • Tame a Crab.
  • Undertench a Parch­piss.
  • Tranch a Sturgeon.
  • Transon an Eel.
  • Fin a Chevin.
  • Culmon a Trout
  • Tusk a Barbel.
  • Side a Haddock.
  • Splay a Bream.
  • Sauce a Tench.
  • Splat a Pike.
  • Sauce a Place or Flounder.
  • String a Lamprey.
  • Chine a Salmon.
  • Tire an Egg.
  • Timber the fire.
  • Thigh a Wood­cock [Page 425] or any other small Fowl.
  • Border a Pasty.
  • Mince a Plover.
  • Wing a Partridge or Quail.
  • Allay a Pheasant.
  • Untach a Curlew.
  • Unjoynt a Bittern.
  • Disfigure a Peacock.
  • Display a Crane.
  • Dismember a Heron.
  • Unlace a Coney.
  • Unbrace a Mallard.
  • Trush a Chicken.
  • Spoil a Hen.
  • Sauce a Capon.
  • Lift a Swan.
  • Break a Dear.
  • Thigh a Pigeon or Wood quest.
  • Rear that Goose.
  • Leach that Brawn.
  • Cut up a Turky or Bustard.
  • Break an Egript.
  • Untach Brew.

Particular Instructions how to Carve according to these terms of Art.

Thigh a Woodcock.

YOu must raise the Wings and Legs of a Wood-cock, as you do a Hen, only you must open the head for the brains, and as you thigh your Hen, so must you a Snite and Plover, also a Curlew, saving he must have no other Sauce but Salt.

Break a Sarcel.

Take a Sarcel or Teal, raise his Leg [...] and Wings, and no Sauce but Salt, so mu [...] you untach a Brew, with no other Sauce b [...] Salt.

Ʋnjoynt a Bittern.

You must raise his Wings and Legs, and no other Sauce but Salt, so you must break an Egrypt with no other Sauce but Salt.

Dismember a Heron.

Take a Heron and raise his Wings and Legs, and sauce him with Vinegar, Mu­stard, Powder of Ginger, and some Salt.

Display a Crane.

Take a Crane and unfold his Legs, then cut off his Wings by the joynts; after this take up his Wings and Legs, and sauce him with Vinegar, Salt, Mustard, and beaten or pulverized Ginger.

Wing a Partridge or a Quail.

Raise his Legs and Wings, and Sauce him with Wine, pulverized Ginger, and a little Salt; a Pheasant you must serve in like manner, but with no other Sauce but Salt.

Sauce a Capon.

Take a Capon and lift up his right Leg and right Wing, and so array forth and lay him in the Platter, serve your Chickens in the same manner, and sauce them with green Sauce or Verjuyce.

Ʋnlace a Coney.

Turn the Back downward, and cut the flaps or apron from the Belly or Kid­ney, then put in your knife between the Kidneys, and loosen the flesh from the bone on each side, then turn the belly downward, and cut the back cross between the wings, drawing your knife down on each side the back-bone, dividing the legs and sides from the back, pull not the leg too hard when you open the side from the bone, but with your hand and knife neat­ly lay open both sides from the scut to the shoulders, then lay the legs close toge­ther.

Ʋnbrace a Mallard or a Duck.

Raise up the pinions and legs, but take them not off, and raise the merry-thought from the breast, then lace it down each side of the breast with your knife, rigling [Page 428] your knife to and fro, that the furrows may lye in and out.

Dismember a Heron.

You must take off both the Legs, and lace it down the breast on both sides with your knife, then raise up the flesh and take it clean off with the pinion, then stick the head in the breast, and set the pinion on the contrary side of the carkass, and the leg on the other side of the carkass, so that the bone ends may meet cross over the carkass, and the other wing cross over on the top of the carkass.

Cut up a Turkey or Bustard.

You must raise up the leg very fair, and open the joynt with the point of your knife, but take not off the leg, then lace down the breast on both sides with your knife, and open the breast pinion, but take it not off, then raise up the merry-thought betwixt the breast bone and the top thereof, then raise up the brawn, then turn it outward upon both sides, but break it not, nor cut it off, then cut off the wing pinions at the joynt next the body, and stick in each side the pinion in the place you turn'd the brawn out, but cut off the [Page 429] sharp end of the pinion, and take the mid­dle piece, and that will fit just in the place; you may cut up a Capon or Pheasant the same way.

Lift a Swan.

Slit down your Swan in the middle of the breast, and so clean through the back from the neck to the Rump, then part her in two halves, but neither break nor tear the flesh, then lay the two halves in a charger, with the slit sides downwards, throw Salt upon it, set it again on the Table; let you Sauce be Chaldron, and serve it in Saucers.

Rear a Goose.

Your Goose being roasted, take off both legs fair like shoulders of Lamb, then cut off the belly-piece round close to the end of the breast, then lace your Goose down on both the sides of the breast, half an inch from the sharp bone, then take off the pini­on on each side, and the flesh you first laced with your knife, raise it up clean from the bone, and take it off with the pinion from the body, then cut up the merry-thought, then cut from the breast-bone another slice of flesh quite through, then turn up your [Page 430] carkass, and cut it asunder, the back-bone above the Loyn-bones, then take the Rump-end of the back-bone, and lay it in a fair dish with the skinney side upwards, lay at the fore-end of it the Merry-thought with the skinney side upwards, and before that, the Apron of the Goose, then lay your pinions on each side contrary, set your legs on each side contrary behind them, that the bone-ends of the legs may stand up cross in the middle of the dish, and the wing pinions may come on the outside of them; put under the wing pinions on each side the long slice, which you cut from the breast-bone, and let the ends meet under the leg-bones and let the other ends lye cut in the dish betwixt the leg and the pi­nion, then pour in your sauce under the meat, throw on Salt, and serve it to the Table again.

Thus have I given you a taste of such terms and method of Carving as I have met withal, if ought be wanting, you must sup­ply it by your own industrious inquiry.

Bills of Fare, as well for great Feasts as ordinary Services through the whole year.

IN the right ordering of all Bills of Fare, you must consult your own reason, and consider every thing in season, proper and peculiar to every Month: As for ex­ample, Lobsters, Crabs, Crawfish, Salmon, Trouts, and a many Herbs and Flowers are not fully in season in the beginning of the Spring, that is, in March, but they are in May; so again Oysters, several shell-Fish and Wild-fowl, are seasonable in March, but out of season in May: therefore in the place of what is gone out of season, you must chuse what is in season, which you shall un­derstand if you will observe these follow­ing Bills of Fare suitable to the four Quar­ters, or several Seasons of the year.

A Bill of Fare for a great Fe­stival on Flesh-daies in th [...] Spring.
  • [Page 432]A Bisk.
  • A grand Sallet.
  • A Shoulder of Mutton farc'd with Oysters.
  • A dish of stew'd Carps.
  • A great Chicken Pye.
  • A grand Potage call'd Skink.
  • A Turkey.
  • A Calves head hash'd.
  • A Surloyn of Beef.
  • A Lumber Pye.
  • A dish of boil'd Puddings.
  • A Westphalia-Ham, and Squobs or young Pigeons.
  • A Jigget of Mutton stufft with Oysters.
  • A large Pike in the middle of fryed small Fish, as Smelts, Gudgeon, Roch, &c.
  • A Hare larded.
  • A fricasie of Chickens.
  • Marrow-puddings.
  • A Lamb Pye.
  • [Page 433]A whole Lamb larded with a Pudding in its belly.
  • A souced Pig.
  • A Rump of Beef.
  • Coller'd Veal souced and sliced.
  • A dish of Hens roasted.
  • A dish of Quails.
  • A dish of young Turkeys.
  • A dish of large Soals fley'd and fryed.
  • A dish of rich Tarts.
  • A dish of Tanzies of four several colours.
  • A dish of Cowslip-Cream.
  • A great dish of Chickens.
  • A dish of Jellies.
  • A dish of Leverets.
  • Almond-Cream.
  • A dish of Pease in April.
  • A dish of young Ducklings.
  • A Potatoe Pye.
  • A dish of pickled Smelts.
  • A Fricasie of Apples.
  • A chine of boil'd Salmon.
  • A dish of young Rabbets.
  • A set Custard.
  • Baked Venison cold.
  • A Trotter Pye with Taffatee-tarts.
  • A dish of Eel souc'd and coller'd.
  • A dish of coller'd Beef.
For Fish-daies in the Spring, a [...] extraordinarie Bill of Fare.
  • [Page 434]A Bisk of divers sorts of Fish.
  • A dish of pickled Smelts.
  • A dish of rich Puddings boil'd.
  • A Spinage Sallet.
  • A Carp Pye.
  • A dish of fryed Ling with poched Eggs.
  • A Salmon roasted whole.
  • A dish of butter'd Loaves.
  • A Pike boiled.
  • A dish of Perches boiled.
  • A dish of butter'd Eggs.
  • A dish of Mullets and Bace with small Fish
  • A dish of Barrel-cod.
  • A boil'd Carp.
  • A Salmon Pye.
A Second Course.
  • A dish of butter'd Crabs.
  • A dish of fryed Smelts.
  • A dish of fryed Soals.
  • [Page 435]A Spitch-cock-Eel with Shrimps butter'd.
  • A Spinage Tart.
  • An Eel Pye.
  • A dish of Skirrets fryed green.
  • A dish of boil'd Breams.
  • A dish of Anchovies.
  • A dish of boil'd Perches.
  • A dish of butter'd Eggs.
  • A dish of several Tarts.
  • A chine of Salmon broil'd.
  • A dish of fryed Trouts.
  • A Fraze of Shrimps.
  • A Lampry Pye.
  • A dish of broil'd Whitings.
  • A dish of Craw-fish butter'd.
A Bill of Fare for Fish-daies, Fasting-daies, Ember-week or Lent.
  • A Dish of Butter.
  • Rice-Milk.
  • Butter'd Eggs.
  • Boil'd Gurnet.
  • A boil'd Sallet of Herbs.
  • [Page 436]A boil'd Pike.
  • Butter'd Rolls.
  • Stew'd Trouts.
  • Fryed Smelts.
  • Barrel-cod butter'd with Eggs.
  • Salt-Eel or White-herring.
  • Fryed Flounders or Place.
  • Carp Pye.
  • Salt Salmon.
Second Course.
  • Boil'd Carp.
  • Fryed Stock-fish.
  • Boil'd Eels.
  • Baked Puffs.
  • A Custard.
  • A roasted Eel.
  • Butter'd Parsnips.
  • Fryed Oysters.
  • Fryed Manchet.
  • Fryed Rochet.
  • An Oyster Pye.
  • Fryed Smelts.
  • A Pippin Pye.
  • Fryed Flounders.
  • Butter'd Crabs.
  • Fryed Skirrets.
  • A Spinage Pye.
  • Pickled Oysters.
A French Bill of Fare for Fish­days out of Lent.
  • [Page 437]SOals, Pike and Tench with Ragoust.
  • Tenches fryed and picked.
  • Stew'd Carp.
  • Carp farc'd.
  • Carp broil'd.
  • Bream and Salmon with Ragoust.
  • Stew'd Salmon.
  • Oysters in Fritters.
  • Oysters broil'd.
  • Soals farced and broil'd.
  • Soals stewed.
  • Barbels roasted.
  • Barbels stewed.
  • Fryed Burts with the juyce of Oranges.
  • [...]laice roasted.
  • Lampry broil'd.
  • Eel roasted.
  • Eel stew'd.
  • Eel fryed.
  • Pike farced and roasted.
  • Mackerel roasted.
  • Fresh Herring broil'd.
  • [Page 438]Ray fryed.
  • Poor John fryed.
  • Small Fish-Pyes.
  • A Plaice or Flounder-Pye.
The Entercourse.
  • Mushromes fryed.
  • Mushromes stew'd with Cream.
  • A Cream Fraze.
  • Fritters.
  • Melts of Carps fryed.
  • Livers of Eel-pouts.
  • Jelly of Fish.
  • Fryed Artichokes.
  • Sparagus with Cream.
  • Fritters of Artichokes.
  • Almond-Pye.

A Bill of Fare for Summer, for Flesh▪ days.

First Course.
  • A Boiled meat of Cockerels.
  • A chine of Mutton drawn with Le­mon-pill.
  • A dish of young Turkeys larded.
  • [Page 439]Stew'd Carps.
  • A Hanch of Venison boil'd with Colli­flowers.
  • [...] [...]everets larded.
  • A Venison Pasty.
  • Capons roasted.
  • Marrow-puddings.
  • A Lamb-Pye.
  • Geese roasted.
  • A hanch of Venison roasted.
  • Udders and Tongues boil'd with Cabbidge.
  • A piece of boil'd Beef.
Second course.
  • Quails larded and roasted.
  • Young Heron-sews larded.
  • Young green Pease.
  • A dish of Soals.
  • An Artichoke Pye.
  • A dish of Cream.
  • A dish of Ruffs.
  • Butter'd Crabs.
  • Cream and green Codlings.
  • A dish of Chickens.
  • A Kid roasted whole with a Pudding in his Belly.
  • A souced Turbet.
  • A dish of Artichokes.
  • [Page 440]A chine of boil'd Salmon.
  • A cold jole of Salmon.
  • A dish of Knots.
  • A dish of Partridges.
  • A jole of Sturgeon.
  • Goosberry and Cherry-tarts.
  • Young Ducks boil'd.
  • Potten Venison.
  • A Westphalia-ham.
  • Dryed Tongues.
A second Course after the French Fashion.
  • Fcet and Ears of Pork.
  • Stags Feet.
  • Venison Pasty.
  • Gammon of Bacon Pasty.
  • Sweet-breads of Veal fryed.
  • Liver of Roe-Buck in Fraze.
  • Udder of Roe-Buck.
  • Jelly of Harts-horn.
  • Hash of Partridges.
  • Marrow-Fritters.
  • Artichoke-Fritters.
  • Fricase of Artichokes.
  • Mushromes fryed.
  • Head of a Wild-boar.
  • Green Pease.
  • Rams Kidneys.
  • [Page 441]Pallates of Beef.
  • Tanzies.
  • Young Partridges.

A Bill of Fare for Fish-days in Summer.

First Course.
  • A Grand Olio of Fish.
  • A dish of Barley Cream.
  • A grand Sallet with a Rock of Butter in the middle of it.
  • A Carp Pye.
  • Rice boil'd in Cream with Almond-paste.
  • A roasted Pike.
  • Butter'd Eggs.
  • Large Flounders stew'd.
  • Mullet souced.
  • A boiled Sallet.
  • An Eel Pye.
  • A Jole of Ling.
  • A dish of boil'd Whitings.
  • Quaking-puddings.
  • Perches boil'd.
  • A dish of hot Rice-Milk.
  • [Page 442]A dish of Barrel-cod butter'd with Eggs.
Second Course.
  • Large Soals skin'd and fryed.
  • Butter'd Craw-fish.
  • An Artichoke Pye.
  • Strawberry-Cream.
  • Salmon broil'd.
  • A dish of Anchovies.
  • Eel souced in Collers.
  • Smelts fryed.
  • Potargo and Caveer.
  • Salmon-peets boil'd.
  • Tenches jelly'd.
  • Tanzies of several colours.
  • Butter'd Crabs.
  • Jole of Sturgeon.
  • Lobsters.
  • Egg-pye.
  • A fat silver Eel roasted.

Bills of Fare for Autumn.

First Course.
  • A Grand boil'd meat with several sorts of Fowl.
  • [Page 443]A chine of Mutton larded and roasted with Oysters.
  • A grand Sallet.
  • A dish of roasted Pheasants.
  • Hares larded.
  • A leg of Pork and Turnips.
  • A Pasty made of Doe Venison.
  • Turkey larded.
  • A chine of roast Beef.
  • A Marrow-pudding.
  • A Fricasie of Chickens.
  • A dish of Capons.
  • Stewed meat with a Potage.
  • Fillets of Veal larded, farced and roasted.
Or thus:
  • Scotch-collops of Veal.
  • A boil'd breast of Mutton.
  • A Fricasie of Pigeons.
  • A stew'd Calves-head.
  • Four Goslings in a dish.
  • Four Capons.
A second Course of the same.
  • Two brace of Partridges.
  • Half a dozen Quails.
  • Taffatee-Tarts.
  • Curlews.
  • [Page 444]God wits.
  • Warden Pye.
  • Rabbets larded.
  • Cram'd Chickens.
  • Tame Pigeons.
  • Fryed Skirret.
  • Stew'd Peaches.
  • A dish of Wild-fowl.
  • Westphalia Bacon and Tongues.
Or thus:
  • Larded Dotterel.
  • Fruit-Tarts Royal.
  • Wheat-ears.
  • Heath-pout Pye.
  • Smelts marrinated.
  • Gammon of Bacon.
  • Rabbets.
  • Larded Heron.
  • Florentine of Tongues.
  • Roasted Pigeons.
  • Pheasant-pouts.
  • A cold Hare Pye.
  • Tart Royal.
  • A Custard.

A Bill of Fare for Winter▪ Quarter.

First Course.
  • A Coller of Brawn.
  • A chine of Veal larded.
  • A pickled grand Sallet.
  • Pheasants larded.
  • Wild-fowl boiled.
  • An Almond pudding baked.
  • Stew'd broth about Christmas.
  • A dish of roasted Hens full of Eggs.
  • A Venison Pasty.
  • A Hash.
  • A chine of Beef.
  • Minced Pyes.
  • A Swan or Goose.
  • Capons and White-broth.
  • Chine of Pork.
  • A Brawns-head souced.
Second Course.
  • Half a dozen Woodcocks.
  • [Page 446]A dozen Snites.
  • A dish of Anchovies.
  • A Bacon Tart.
  • A dish of Jelly.
  • A Potatoe Pye.
  • Half a dozen Plovers.
  • Half a dozen Teals.
  • Two dozen of Larks larded.
  • Tarts in Puff-paste.
  • Fore-quarter of Lamb.
  • Wild-goose Pye cold.
  • Wild-ducks roasted.
  • Orangado Pye.
  • Wigeons larded.
  • Venison baked and cold.
A Bill of Fare for All-Saints day.
  • A Coller of Brawn and Mustard.
  • A Capon in stew'd broth and Mar­row-bones.
  • A grand Sallet.
  • A shoulder of Mutton stuff with Oysters.
  • A chine of Beef roasted.
  • [Page 447] [...]inced Pyes.
  • [...] Pasty of Venison.
  • [...] couple of roasted Geese.
  • [...] Loyn of Veal.
  • [...] Turkey roasted.
  • A roasted Pig.
  • Capons roasted.
  • A Custard with a double border.
A second Course.
  • [...] Soust Pig.
  • A whole Lamb farced and roasted.
  • [...] Herns larded, roasted.
  • A Potato Pye.
  • A couple of Ducks enlarded.
  • A Pike marrinated.
  • [...] Partridges stewed.
  • A cold Goose Pye.
  • A Warden Pye.
  • A jole of Sturgeon.
A Bill of Fare for Christmas­day.
  • [Page 448]A Coller of Brawn with a large spring of Rosemary iced.
  • Stewed broth of Mutton and Marrow­bones.
  • Boil'd Partridge.
  • A Sur-loyn of Beef.
  • Minced Pyes.
  • A made dish of Sweet-breads.
  • A roasted Swan.
  • A Venison Pasty.
  • A Steak Pye.
  • Venison roasted.
  • A Turkey stuck with Cloves and roasted.
  • Bran Geese roasted.
  • Roasted Capons.
  • Custards.
Second Course.
  • A whole Kid roasted.
  • Two couple of Rabbets, two larded.
  • A Pig souc'd with Tongues.
  • [Page 449]Three Ducks, one larded.
  • Three Pheasants, one larded.
  • A Swan Pye.
  • Three brace of Partridges, one larded.
  • Half a dozen Teal roasted.
  • Half a dozen Plovers, some larded and roasted.
  • A Quince-Pye.
  • Half a dozen Wood-cocks, some larded.
  • Two dozen of Larks roasted.
  • Powdered Geese.
  • Sturgeon.
  • Dryed Neats Tongues.

From these Bills of Fare you may know what is proper to every sea­son, and may make any Bills from these forms, either for great Fe­stivals, or private entertainments. A prudent Cook ought to have always by him these things pickled or preserved.

  • Melted Butter.
  • Cucumbers.
  • Lettuce.
  • Sparagus.
  • Succory.
  • Coleworts or Cab­bidge.
  • Oysters.
  • [Page 450]Pallates of Beef.
  • Pickled Pullets.
  • Young Pigeons.
  • Artichokes.
  • Purslain.
  • Red-Beets
  • Green Pease.
  • Mushromes.
  • Soa [...]s.
  • Combs salted.
  • Mutton Tongues.
  • Rams Kidneys.
  • Butter salted.

The TABLE.

A
  • A Shen-keys and Alexander-buds how to pickle pag. 202
  • Artichokes boil'd, bak'd, pickled p. 201
  • Almond Tarts p. 240. 242
B
  • Bream stewed p. 1. Souced p. 226. Coller'd p. 227
  • Base boil'd p. 2
  • Breast of Veal boil'd p. 22
  • Breast of Mutton stew'd p. 23
  • Beef collops stewed p. 24. Baked p. 143. To Collers p. 144. 225
  • Bustard to boil p. 42. Bustard Pye p. 180
  • Brawn broil'd p. 76. Bak'd p. 142
  • Bacon broil'd p. 77
  • Battalia Pye of fish p. 114
  • Battalia Pyes of fish or flesh for all seasons of the year p. 141
  • Broom-buds, Burdock-roots, Bogberries [Page] Barberries how to pickle p. 204, 205
  • Bullocks cheek souc'd p. 225
  • Blamangers p. 345. French and Italian fa­shion p. 346
  • Butter how to draw p. 423
  • Bills of Fare p. 431, &c.
C
  • Carps stewed p. 2, 3, 4. Roasted p. 52. Broil'd p. 53. Carp Pye p. 117. Marinated p. 187
  • Cods head stewed p. 5
  • Cockles stewed p. 4. Frigassied 51. in Paste p. 115
  • Crabs stewed p. 4. Broil'd and frigassied p. 55. Crab Pye p. 118
  • Conger roasted and broil'd p. 59. Fryed p. 55. Marinated p. 187. Souced and pickled Ibid.
  • Calves feet stewed p. 25. Fryed p. 77. Roasted p. 79. in Pyes p. 147. Souced p. 228
  • Calves head stewed p. 26. Broil'd p. 77. Roast­ed with Oysters p. 78. in Pye or Pasty p. 144, 145.
  • Calves Chathern minc'd in Pye p. 147.
  • Capons boil'd in Rice p. 38. in Paste p. 178. Boil'd and larded with Lemons p. 39. 101. Frigassi'd p. 102. Souced p. 229
  • Chickens boil'd p. 40, 41. Frigassi'd p. 102. Chicken pye p. 175, 176, 177
  • [Page]Cocks to boil p. 42
  • Cony livers in Pye p. 147
  • Cream Pye p. 180. 179
  • Curlew and Hernshaw▪ Pye p. 179
  • Caveer pickled p. 189
  • Cambridge Pudding p. 321
  • Cucumbers, Clove-Gilliflowers, Cowslips, Cur­rans red and white, Cabbidge, Charnel how to pickle p. 207, 208
  • Crystal Jelly p. 265
  • Cream of Barley p. 278. Stone Cream Ibid.
  • Cream with Snow p. 279. Cheese Cream p. 281
  • Creams: red Currans, Rasberries, Almond, Rice and Goosberry, clouted, Italian, Ap­ple, Quince, and Sack Cream p. 282, 283, 284. 287. 293.
  • Custards of Almond Cream p. 331.
  • Custards without Cream p. 332.
  • Cheese-cakes the best way p. 333. French and Italian way p. 334, 335. 337
  • Covent Garden Posset p. 343
  • Cawdles, &c. p. 413.
  • Carving, the terms of it, and directions how to carve according to those terms p. 424, 425, &c.
D
  • [Page]Duck wild and tame to boil p. 43, 44, 45. Roasted p. 105. Duck or Mallard in Pye.
  • Ducklings frigassi'd p. 104
  • Dill how to pickle p. 208.
E
  • Eels boil'd p. 6. Stewed p. 6. Roasted p. 56. Spich-cock p. 57. broil'd p. 58. in Paste p. 119, 120. Collar'd and souc'd p. 189, 190.
  • Endive, Elder-tops, and Elder-buds how to pickle p. 208.
F
  • Flounders, Plaice and Soals boil'd p. 7. Stew­ed p. 7. in Paste p. 121. Marrinated p. 191
  • Fawn or young Roe how to bake p. 148. To be eaten cold Ibid.
  • Flowers of all sorts how to pickle p. 210
  • French Sallets p. 221
  • Florentines of Rice, of Pippins and Prunes, of Veal, of Spinage, of Potatoes and Ar­tichokes, of Barberries, of Marrow and several other ways of making Floren­tines [Page] p. 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262
  • Farcings of all sorts of Roots p. 322
  • Farcings and stuffings for all sorts of fowl p. 323. For Veal, Mutton, Venison, Lamb p. 324, 325, 326
  • French Posset p. 342
G
  • Gurnet boil'd p. 8
  • Goose tame to boil p. 45. Frigassi'd p. 106. bak'd to be eat cold p. 175. Coller'd and souced p. 230.
  • Goat Pasty p. 149.
  • Gammon of Bacon Pye p. 149
  • Grapes, Goosberries, green Figs how to pickle p. 210
  • Grand Sallet for the Spring p. 218, 219
  • Goates flesh coller'd and souc'd p. 230
  • Grand forc'd or farc'd dish p. 228
  • Good-friday service p. 384, 385, 386
  • Gravy how to draw p. 422
H
  • Hanch of Venison boil'd p. 26
  • Heath-cocks and Wood-cocks how to boil p. 42
  • [Page]Hare to roast p. 81. in Pye p. 151. in mince [...] Pye p. 153
  • Hen roasted p. 107. Hen baked p. 181
  • Herring Pye p. 121
  • Haberdine and stock-fish Pye p. 122
  • Hot compounded bak'd meats p. 151
  • Hop-buds pickled p. 211
I
  • Jacks stew'd and roasted p. 11. Boil'd p. 17
  • Jelly for any kind of souc'd meats p. 238. Jellies of John-Apples p. 264. Jellies for souc'd meats p. 164. Of Raspisses p. 167. Of several colours Ibid. Of Pippins, of Oranges p. 268, 269. Of Harts-horn p. 171. Jelly for a weak back p. 272
K
  • Kid whole to roast p. 83.
L
  • Lobster stew'd p. 9. Roasted p. 59. Broil'd p. 60.
  • Fryed p. 61. in Paste p. 127. Marinated p. 191
  • Lampry boil'd p. 9. Lampry Pye p. 123.
  • [Page]Ling fryed p. 59. Ling Pye p. 125
  • Lump fryed p. 60. Roasted p. 61. Lump-pye p. 124. Souc'd p. 192
  • Lambs head boil'd p. 27. Stewed p. 29. Lamb Pye p. 155. Lamb Pasty p. 156
  • Leg of Lamb boil'd p. 29
  • Leg of Pork boil'd p. 30. in Paste 157
  • Leg of Veal and Bacon boil'd p. 30
  • Legs, Necks and Chines of Mutton boil'd p. 31
  • Land-fowl large, how to boil p. 42
  • Land-fowl small, how to boil p. 48. 149. af­ter the Italian manner p. 48
  • Lambs head roasted p. 82. Sides souc'd p. 235
  • Larks roasted with Bacon p. 107. in a Pye p. 182
  • Lumber Pye p. 154
  • Lemons how to Pickle p. 211
  • Lemonade a-la-mode de France p. 418
  • Leaches the best manner p. 274. The French way Ibid. Of Almonds of Cream p. 276, 277
M
  • Mullets boil'd p. 10. Fryed p. 61. Broil'd Ibid. Mullet Pye p. 127. Souc'd p. 193. Mar­rinated Ibid.
  • [Page]Muscles stewed p. 11. Fryed p. 62. in Paste p. 115. 128
  • Maids fryed p. 62
  • Minced Pyes of Beef p. 143. 158
  • Marrow Pyes p. 157
  • Mutton minced Pyes p. 157. Coller'd and souc'd p. 231
  • Minced Pyes of Veal p. 158
  • Maremaid Pye, alias Pig-pye p. 158
  • Mutton-steak Pye p. 168
  • Marsh-Mallows, how to pickle p. 211
  • Mellegotoons and Mushromes p. 213
N
  • Neats Tongues boil'd p. 32. Stewed p. 87. Frigassi'd p. 88. Baked p. 159. Neats tongue Pye p. 160. Minced in a Pye p. 160. 171
  • Neats feet frigassi'd p. 89. Roasted Ibid.
O
  • Oysters stewed p. 12. Roasted p. 63. Broil'd p. 64. Fryed p. 65
  • Oyster Pye p. 129, 130, 131. Pickled 194.
  • Oxe Cheeks boil'd p. 33. To be eaten cold with Sallets p. 34. in Pye p. 162
  • [Page]Oxe Palla [...]s stew'd p. 90. Oxe Pallat Pye p. 162, 163
  • Olive Pye p. 161
P
  • Pike boil'd p. 12. Stewed p. 13. Roasted p. 65. Bak'd p. 131. Souc'd p. 195
  • Plaice boil'd p. 14. Stewed Ibid. Broil'd and Frigassi'd p. 68
  • Prawns, Shrimps and Craw-fish stew'd p. 14
  • Pearches boil'd p. 15
  • Pig sucking boil'd p. 34. Roasted p. 91, 92. Souc'd p. 231
  • Pheasant, Peacock, Partridge, Plover to boil p. 42. Roasted p. 108. or Bak'd in a Pye p. 181, 183
  • Pilchards, Herrings and Sprats broil'd p. 67.
  • Prawns, Shrimps, Crawfish frigassi'd p. 75. Bak'd p. 132.
  • Pork, legs broil'd p. 82. 96. Bak'd to eat cold p. 166. Souc'd p. 233
  • Pigeons Roasted p. 109
  • Pig Pye p. 164
  • Peacock Pye p. 179
  • Purslain to pickle p. 211, 214
  • Puddings quaking, white, black, shaking p. 295, 296, 297. Of Wine several colours, of Mar­row p. 297, 297
  • [Page]P [...]lony Sausage, how to make p. 302
  • Puddings of Liver, Oatmeal, Rice, hasty Pud­dings p. 306, 307, 308. Excellent boil'd pud­dings p. 310. Of Cream, Almond, Cinamon, Hagg [...]s, Veal, Bread, Italian and French Puddings p. 315, 316, 317, 318.
  • P [...]tages of all fashions, English, French, and Italian, whether flesh or fish p. 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 371
  • Potages of all sorts for Lent p. 373, 374, 375. 380, 381
  • Potages for Fasting-days out of Lent p. 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, and to 412
Q
  • Quails roasted p. 110
  • Quinces how to pickle p. 214
R
  • Rabbets boil'd p. 35. Roasted p. 84. 111. Fri­gassied p. 93. Bak'd to eat cold p. 167
  • Red Dear how to roast p. 80. Baked p. 167
  • Radish-tops, and red Cabbidge how to pickle p. 215
  • Rams head souc'd p. 234
S
  • [Page]Salmon boil'd p. 15. Stewed p. 16. Roasted whole p. 69. in pieces p. 70. Frigassi'd p. 71. Fryed and broil'd p. 72. in a Pye bak'd p. 133, 134. Pickled p. 196
  • Soals boil'd p. 17. Stewed Ibid. Roasted p. 73. Souc'd p. 197
  • Sturgeon boil'd p. 18. Roasted p. 73. Broil'd p. 74. Fryed p. 34. Bak'd p. 135, 136, 137. Pickled p. 199.
  • Smelts stewed p. 18. Marrinated p. 200
  • Scollops stewed p. 19. broil'd p. 76
  • Shoulder of Mutton boil'd p. 35. Stewed with Oysters p. 36. 84, 85
  • Sea-fowl of all sorts to boil p. 47, 49. or baked in a Pye p. 185
  • Scotch Collops of Mutton the best way p. 94
  • Scotch-Collops of Veal p. 94
  • Snipes roast p. 111
  • Steak-pye with a French Pudding in it p. 169
  • Sweet-breads baked p. 170
  • Sheeps-tongues baked p. 170
  • Swan Pye p. 184. Swan coller'd p. 235
  • Sparagus and Samphire how to pickle p. 216
  • Sallets of Scurvigrass, boil'd Spinage, Green­pease, Alexander-buds, Watercresses, pickled [Page] Capers, Rose-buds, Clove-gilly-flowers p. 220, 221, 222, 223
  • Sack Posset p. 340, 341
  • Sullabubs p. 344
F
  • Tortoise stewed p. 19
  • Turbut boil'd and calvered p. 20. Fryed p. 75. baked p. 139. Souc'd p. 201
  • Trouts stewed p. 20
  • Tripes fryed the best way p. 37
  • Turkey to boil p. 42. Carbonado'd p. 112
  • Turkey bak'd French fashion p. 185
  • Tongues of Sheep, Deer and Calves fryed p. 95
  • Tench bak'd p. 138. Souc'd p. 201
  • Taragon and Turnips how to pickle p. 217
  • Tarts of Almonds p. 240. 252
  • Tarts of damsins p. 240
  • Tarts of Strawberries Ibid.
  • Tarts of Cherry, Medler and Pine-apple p. 242
  • Tarts for the Spring p. 243
  • Taffety Tarts p. 243
  • Tarts of Cowslips and Cream p. 244
  • Tarts of green Pease and Prunes p. 245
    • Of Goosberries p. 246
    • Of Puff-paste p. 247
    • Of Rice, Wardens and Pippins p. 248
    • [Page]Of Quinces Wardens, Pears and Pip­pins p. 249. Of Spinage Ibid.
  • Tarts after the French fashion p. 251
  • Tarts of Bacon p. 251
  • Of Clary p. 252
  • Of Apricocks p. 253
V
  • Venison stewed p. 37. Roasted p. 100 Pasty to make p. 174. Coller'd p. 236
  • Venison when tainted to recoves it p. 38. Bak'd to eat cold p. 174. Coller'd p. 236
  • Veal Fillet and Leg to roast p. 80. 98. The breast with a Pudding in it p. 96. Chine or Neck roasted p. 97, 98. Broil'd p. 99. in Pye p. 172. Breast souc'd p. 236. Leg souc'd p. 238
  • Ʋmble Pye p. 173
  • Vinegars of all sorts p. 419, 420, 421
W
  • Whiting stewed and broth p. 21
  • Woodcocks roasted p. 113
  • Widgeons souc'd p. 238
  • White-Pots p. 337. Of Rice p. 338
  • [Page]Devonshire White-Pot p. 339. Norfolk Ibid.
  • Westminster fool p. 340
  • Worster Sullabub p. 343
  • A Wassel p. 345.

Books Printed for, or Sold by Simon Miller at the Star, at the West-end of St. Paul's

Quarto.
  • BIshop White upon the Sabbath. The Pragmatical Jesuit, a Play, by Richard Carpenter.
  • The Life and Death of the Valiant and Renowned Sir Francis Drake, his Voyages and Discoveries in the West-Indies, and about the World, with his Noble and Heroick Acts: By Samuel Clarke, late Minister of Bennet-Fink, London.
  • The Life and Death of William the Conquerour, King of England and Duke of Normandy by Samuel Clarke.
  • [Page]Bagshaw of Christ and Antichrist.
  • Astrology Theologiz'd: Shewing by the Light of Nature what influ­ences the Stars have upon mens bo­dies, and how the same may be di­verted and avoided.
Large Octavo.
  • The Rights of the Crown of Eng­land, as it is established by Law; by E. Bagshaw of the Inner Temple, Esquire.
  • An Enchiridion of Fortification.
  • The English Horseman and com­plete Farriar; directing all Gentle­men and others, how to breed, feed, ride and diet all kind of Horses, whether for War, Race or other ser­vice; with a discovery of the Causes, Signs and Cures of all Diseases both Internal and External incident to Horses, Alphabetically digested; with the Humours of a Smithfield Jockey. By Robert Almond, a well known and [Page] [...]kilful Farrier of the City of London, practising therein above forty five years.
  • The Loyal Prophet, a Sermon preached at the Summer Assizes at York in anno 1668. by William Bram­hall, Rector of Gouldsbrough, and one of his Majestie's Chaplains.
Small Octavo.
  • The Midwives Book, or the whole Art of Midwifry discovered, direct­ing Child-bearing Women how to behave themselves in their Concepti­on, Bearing, Breeding and Nursing of Children: In six Books, viz. 1. An Anatomical Description of the Parts of Men and Women. 2. What is requisite for Procreation: Signs of a Woman being with Child, and whether it be Male or Female, and how the Child is formed in the Womb. 3. The Causes and hind­drance of Conception and Barren­ness, [Page] and of the pains and difficulties of Child-bearing, with thei [...] Causes, Signs and Cures. 4. Rule [...] to know when a Woman is near he [...] Labour, and when she is near Conception, and how to order the Chil [...] when born. 5. How to order Wome [...] in Child-birth, and of several Disease [...] and Cures for Women in that con­dition. 6. Of Diseases incident to Women after Conception: Rules for the choice of a Nurse; her Office, with proper Cures for all diseases in­cident to young Children. By Mrs. Jane Sharpe, practitioner in the Art of Midwifry above thirty years.
  • Merry Drollery complete, in two parts; or a Collection of Jovial Po­ems, Merry Songs, Witty Drolleries; intermixt with pleasant Catches, col­lected by W. N. C. B. R. S. I. G. Lo­vers of Wit.
  • Natural and Artificial Conclusions. Daphnis and Chloe a pleasant Ro­mance.
  • [Page]Boteler of War.
  • Ramsey of Poyson.
  • Shephard of the Regulation of the [...]aw.
  • Knowls Rudiments of the Hebrew [...]ongue.
  • Herbert's Child-bearing Woman; [...]r Devotions, Meditations and Pray­ [...]rs for Women in that Condition.
  • The Rebellion of the rude Multi­ [...]ude under Wat Tyler, parallel'd with [...]he late inhumane Rebellion against [...]. Charles the First.
  • The Rebels Arraignment, Convi­ction and Execution in three Ser­mons: By Jo. Brookblanke.
  • The Death of Charles the First la­mented, and the Restauration of Charles the Second congratulated by William Langley.
  • The King of Spain's Cabinet Council divulged.
  • A Description of Jerusalem as it flourished in the time of Christ.
  • Observationes & Experientiae de Fe­bribus, [Page] Authore Gulielmo Drageo Me­dico.
  • Nonnihil de Febribus, Authore Guli­elmo Statholmo Medico.
  • Divine Poems by A. Nasmyth.
  • The Life of Dr. Tho. Morten lat [...] Bishop of Duresme.
  • Morison on the Covenant.
  • The Miraculous Visions of R. Wortley [...] Minister of Edgworth in Bedford-shire.
  • A Discourse of the Piety and Cha­rity of elder Times and Christians▪ parallel'd to the Members of th [...] Church of England, by E. Water­house Esquire.
Large Twelves.
  • The English and French Cook, de­scribing the best and newest ways o [...] ordering and dressing all sorts o [...] Flesh, Fish and Fowl, whether boil­ed, baked, stewed, roasted, broil­ed, frigassied, fryed, souced, marri­nated or pickled; with their proper Sauces and Garnishes, together with all manner of the most approved [Page] Soops, and Potages used either in England or France. By T. P. J. P. R. C. N. B. and several other approved Cooks of London and Westminster.
  • The Moral Practice of the Jesuits, demonstrated by many remarkable Histories of their Actions in all parts of the World; Collected either from Books of the greatest Authority, or most certain and unquestionable Re­cords and Memorials; by the Do­ctors of the Sorbon.
  • Oxford Jests Refined and Enlarged.
  • Smith's Practice of Physick.
  • The Duty of every one that will be saved; being Rules, Precepts, Promises and Examples, directing all Persons of what degree soever, how to govern their Passions, and to live vertuously and soberly in the World.
  • The Spiritual Chymist, or six De­cads of Divine Meditations on seve­ral Subjects, with a short Account of the Authors Life; by William Spur­stow, D. D. sometime Minister of the [Page] Gospel at Hackney, near London.
  • Witty Apothegms, delivered at several times by K. James, K. Charles I. the M. of Worcester, the Lord Bacon and Sir Tho. More.
  • Mans Master-piece; or Contempla­tions of Meditations on several occa­sions, by Sir Peter Temple.
Small Twelves.
  • A new Method of Preserving and Restoring of Health by the Vertue of Coral and Steel.
  • A Help to Prayer.
  • The Understanding Christian's Duty worthily to commemorate the Death of Christ in the blessed Sacra­ment of the Lord's Supper, prest from 1 Cor. 11. 28.
  • The Pious Prentice; or Advice to the Apprentices of London, concern­ing their behaviour to God, their Ma­sters and themselves: By A. Jackson.
  • The King Triumphant, or the Re­bels ruin'd, by Capt. N. Foster.
FINIS.

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this EEBO-TCP Phase II text, in whole or in part.