Numb. 29. Mercurius Publicus: COMPRISING The Sum of Forraign Intelligence; WITH The Affairs now in Agitation in England, Scotland, and Ireland. For Information of the People. Published by Order. From Thursday July 12. to Thursday July 19. 1660.

Thursday Iuly 12.

THis day dyed that eminent Servant of his Majestie, Iohn Lord Culpepper Master of the Rolles, and one of his Majesties most Ho­nourable Privy Council, whose incompara­ble Abilities and readiness at all great Debates are sufficiently known to all that ever heard him or had dis­course with him; who for his Loyalty, Courage, and Wis­dom (more particularly in the Battel at Edge [...]il, as far as concerned this Noble Lord) had the honour to be styled by his late Majesty (when he made him a Peer of England) Praecipuum Coronae nostrae fulcimentum.

Hague, July 8. 1660.

Our Letters from Heydelberg intimate, that on Tuesday the 13 instant will be kept a day of Prayers and Thanks­givings in Heydelberg, Wormes, Frankend [...]le, Heyl­bron, and through all his Electoral Highnesses Domini­ons of the Palatinate, for the happy Restauration of His Sacred Majesty of Great Britain. In the great Church of Heydelberg will be a Sermon, whose Text is to be taken out of the second Book of Samuel, the 19 Chapter, and the 14 and 15 Verses, And he bowed the heart of all the men of Ju­dah, even as the heart of one man, so that they sent this word unto the King, Return thou and all thy servants. So the King returned, and came to Iordan; and Iudah came to Gilgal to go to meet the King, to conduct the King over Iordan.

Before the Town-house therein, there is erected a stately Fountain adorned with all sorts of Fruits and Flowers, from whence shall spring severall sorts of Wine, the rest of the day after the Sermon, is to be spent in Feasting and Jollity, with sounding of Drums and Trumpets, and at night many curious Fire-works are to be performed.

London.

On Wednesday the 11 instant, between one and two in the morning, happened a fire in Thred needle-street, be­tween the Exchange and St. Bennet Finck Church, by the Alley commonly called Sweetings rents, several houses were consumed by it. It is said to have been first percei­ved in a wall between the Cock and a Scriveners house next adjoyning to it, but in which house it began we have no certain information.

Whitehall.

His Majesty in consideration of the eminent loyalty and signal services of that great Warriour and faithful Subject his Excellency the Lord General Monck, hath been graci­ously [Page 449] pleased to confer these high titles of honor on him.

George Duke of Albemarlie, Earl of Torington, Baron Monck of Potheridge, Beauchamp, and Teyes, Captain General and Commander in chief of all his Majesties Forces in his King­domes of England, Scotland, and Ireland, Master of his Majesties horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, and one of his Majesties most honourable Privy Council.

And as a further addition yet to this most Noble person­age, give us leave to tell you of that honour which God himself hath bestowed on him, in making him the chief Instrument in restoring his Sacred Majesty, and in his Majesty Peace, plenty and happiness to the three Kingdomes.

On Friday the 13 instant, his Grace, accompanied by the Duke of Buckingham, and other personages of high qua­lity, went to take his place in the House of Peers.

In the Army you will find some alterations of Officers, yet such, as that the private souldiers may rejoyce in having the Nobles to govern them; and the rest of the Officers (who by their constant adherence to his Excellency, have preserv'd themselves free from the least suspition, and do still continue in command) do now take it for an honour to go a step back to make room for such noble Chieftains.

Whereof first that most honourable personage Aubray Vere Earl of Oxford hath the Regiment that was lately Col. George Smithsons, his Capt. Lievtenant is that loyal Knight, Sir William Blakeston.

Geo. Smithson late Colonel, is now Major of the same Regiment.

Tho. Lilburn late Major, now eldest Captain.

Francis Wilkinson Captain.

William Rhoads Captain.

William Wheatley Captain.

Thomas Fairfax formerly Capt. Lievtenant, now Lieu­tenant to Major Smithson.

For the Regiment of Foot that was lately Col. Fagg's, you have Iohn Viscount Mordaunt Col. and Sir Tho. Wood­cock [Page 450] Lievt. Col. of the same Regiment, who were both brought before the same High Court of Iustice.

Henry Needler late Lievt. Col. is now made Major of the same Regiment.

Ier. Harrison late Major, now eldest Captain.

Hartgill Baron Captain.

The Lord Herbert commands now as Colonel that Regi­ment that was lately Col. Pury's.

And Tho. Pury late Colonel, is now Lievt. Col. of the same Regiment.

Tho. French late Lievt. Col. now Major.

William Nest late Major, now eldest Captain.

Major General Sir Edward Massey is now Colonel of that Regiment that was lately Colonel Geo. Twisleton's.

Geo. Twisleton late Colonel, now Lievt. Col. of that Re­giment.

Sam. Barry late Lievt. Col. now Major.

Dennis Taylor late Major, now eldest Captain.

Iohn Gainsford Captain of that Company late Captain Sowton's.

William Parker Captain.

Ant. Welden Captain.

Tho. Gl [...]dstone Captain of the Company late Captain Thompsons.

William Seymor Captain.

Iohn Bowler Captain of the Company late Captain Shaf­toe's.

Besides these Officers of the Army, there is Major Ed­ward Strange, who (for his faithful service to his Majesty, from the beginning to the end of the War) is now made Governour of Hurst Castle.

There now stands committed to the Black-Rod Sir Iohn Thoregood, who had been one of the High Court of Iustice ▪ which put to death that Heroick Lord Capel, &c. and endeavoured as much for the brave Earl of Norwich, and Sir Iohn Owen.

[Page 451]Sir William Row of Higham-hills in Essex is also com­mitted thither.

So is Mr. Samuel Moyer, unknown to no man that hath but heard of Haberdashers Hall, where he filled the Chair and his own purse.

Mr. George L [...]ngham, a Citizen of London.

Mr. William Wiburn, as good a Citizen as the former.

Colonel Richard Downes, you know whose Iudge he was, and that l [...]r [...]ed, merciful Iudge, M. Richard Keebl [...], who (for his ad­vantage) in Chancery knew not how to deny any thing, and in a High Court of Iustice how to grant any thing.

And after all these, there is one Bowen that belonged to St. Pauls m [...]rk [...] (formerly a Church-yard, till that worldly Saint Alderman Titchbourn turn'd it to a market) who not content to rail at the Bi­shops (who one would think have been slandered long enough) broke out into such impudent language against the House of Peers now sitting, as a man would scarce have thrown at the other House, for which and other enormities he is now honored with an imprison­ment, though Bowen to [...]d the Wi [...]nesse, that for all this he hoped to see another Turn, but what he means by another Turn, a little time will shew.

Besides these mentioned under the Black-Rod, there are three more sent lately to the Tower, particularly Col. Hacker, who car­ried a Partizan and commanded the Guards when our late Soveraign was put to death, where this Colonel was on the Scaffo [...]d, but on Thursday last was for High-Treason committed to the Tower.

And yesterday July 12. Colonel Axtell was sent thither, who commanded the Irish Foot for the Committee of Safety, and is the most injur'd person alive if he have not kill'd forty times more in cold blood then in hot; but how he got the Lord Montgarrets E­state, or how that Noble Lord came to lose it, we need not tell you.

And (after all) the same day was committed M. Thomas Scot (not long since c [...]l'd Secretary Scot) who was sent prisoner out of Flanders, being one of the seven excepted from pardon, a per­son (in the opinion of the people of England) not to be match'd in Scotland, nor any where else but where he now is: And (fo [...] the sa­tisfaction of all good men) both Scotland and Ireland, as the Let­ters thence assure us, are as quite as England, and (maugre all little in­ventions) are like so to continue▪

Constantinople, May 15.

One part of this City called Galata, is lately consumed by fire, except only the Covent and Church of the Jesuits.

Here is dreadfull news come from the Isle of Cephalonia, where by an Earth-quake two Terri­tories called Argustoly and Paloty were destroyed, and above 2000 Inhabitants miserably perished.

From Cashaw, June 18, and 20.

The Corps of the deceased Prince Ragotzkie was carried to Oetschr the 18. of this instant, to which place the Princess his mother (with the Court) removed, expecting the coming of an Ambassador from Vienna. This Princess submits her self, with the residue of the Army, ammuni­tion and provision, to the Devotion of his Impe­rial Majesty. And in regard the Grand Seignior threatens to keep the two Jurisdictions, preten­ding to have won them by the Sword, and will not allow they should do homage to the Empe­rour, or if they do, hee will utterly destroy them with Fire and Sword, (in pursuance where­of hee hath commanded thither a considerable Force) of which advertisement being given to [Page 453] ours, the Prince Palatine, Gen. Susa, and the Pre­sident of the Chamber of Hungary, are with all speed gone from Experies, Gen. Heyster with his forces being advanced before them, and continu­ing their march dayly by break of day, that they may put a Garrison into those two Jurisdictions before the Turks arrive. The Castavian Vice-General Pethoe Sigmund is likewise marched thi­ther from Tockhay the 18 instant with 700 Hus­sars, but ours arrived the same day at Tockhay. The Palatine is in good health, Gen. Susa was somewhat ill-disposed, but is now fully recove­red. The news of the taking of Waradin doth not continue, notwithstanding it still remaineth besieged. Sackmar is taken, and strengthned by Barckay with 2000 Turks.

Dantzick, June 21.

The Moscovites are totally routed about Grod­no by the Polish General Czarneckie, there being kill'd about 7 or 8000 men. The Moscovites Field-Marshal Chowatzkie is begirt with the Poles about Lockwitz; his party useth all endeavours to relieve him, but will hardly effect any thing. The Tartars and Cossacks make a fearfull havock in Moscovie and White-Russia; so soon as th [...] [...] forces come neerer those places, they [...] to put themselves under the Poles [...] Bischaw, a strong Fort, is by a [...] [Page 254] by the Poles, the King himself goeth to the Camp with all his Nobles. Here is a report, as if the Lithuanian Armie should have taken the Town of Welda, but not the Castle.

Warcovia, July 3.

The Moscovites consisting of 22000 men ad­vanced betwixt Slonnin and Miszow, where they were met by the Polish Generals Sapicha and Cznarneckie, the Moscovites endeavouring to take their passage over a ditch, were attaqued with so good success on the Polish side, that they were presently brought into disorder, their whole Infantry consisting of above 8000 men being de­feated, and their Horse, which is thought to a­mount to the number of 16000. being forced to retreat to the woods. The Poles have taken 40 pieces of Ordnance, 100 Colours, with all the baggage and part of the ammunition, the Mosco­vian Gen. Chowanzky having put fire to the rest of the pow­der, and himself taking his flight shamefully for Vilna. It is thought he will fall into the hands of Obosky, who cometh with an Army out of Samogitia. The Polish Gen. Czar­necky (after so great a Victory is now gone for Lockewiz, which is still besieged by 2000 Moscovites, whose qu [...]rters he intends to beat up. From Transilvania it is certified, that Prince Ragotzky was slain in the battel with the Turks, whose mother hath delivered to the Emperour the Hun­garian Counties with the summ of 100000 Rixdollers, u­pon which the Turks are retreated.

Koningsbergh, June 14. 1660.

The Elector of Brandenburgh is expected here within very few daies, it being reported that he is chosen for a Mediator betwixt the King of Poland, and the grand Duke of Moscovy, who seems to be inclinable to that accommodation, though the contrary may be judged by his great preparations, being resolved to enter Lithuania at the head of 20000 men: This hath caused the Nobility of Poland, who seemed to be ready to fall into division among themselves, to unite again more strictly then ever a­gainst the Moscovites, and to ingage to his Polish Majesty to afford him either men to strengthen his Army, or mo­ney to support it.

Elsenor [...], June 17. 1660.

The Swedish men of War formerly detained by Vice-Admiral Ruyter, under the command of the Canon of Co­penhaghen, and released since the subscribing of the Treaty, are now in this harbour, where they are to re­main until all the Swedish forces be drawn out of Zealand▪ In the mean time the Swedes are busie themselves about the demolishing of the fortifications of Cronenburgh, and are transporting off all the Palissado [...]s into the Province of Schonen.

Wismar, July 20. 1660.

The Imperial and Brandenburgish forces do keep still the places they had taken in Pomerania and Meckleburgh, but we hear that for certain the first have received order to remove by the [...]8 instant, and to march into Bohemia. In the mean while the Swedes are making some preparations here and at Stralzund, it being reported that their design is to bring the City of Bremen wholly under their obedience▪ The men of War they do keep before Warnemunde, ha­ving taken a ship going to Copenhaghen, in which were three Deputies of the City of Bostock, whom they keep prisoners.

Berlin, Inne 17. 1660.

The Elector of Brandenburgh is to go from hence this week, for Koningsbergh in Prussia, to mediate a Peace be­tween Poland and the grand Duke of Moscovy, being re­solved, In case the last do refuse such reasonable Propositi­ons as shall be offered unto him, to joyn his forces to the Polish Army against him.

Hague, Iuly 1. 1660.

The 26 of the last moneth, M. Coyet, Extraordinary Envoy of Swedeland, made a visit to the Ambassadors of Denmark, who returned the same civility the next day af­ter. The same day M. Herbert, one of the Deputies of the States General to his Danish Majesty, arrived here; M. Beverweert is gone for England, and is to be very spee­dily followed by the other Ambassadors, who are sent to congratulate the King of England, in the name of the States, who seem to be willing to send likewise some Com­missioners to Munster, to end the difference between that City and their Bishop. The Royal Princess, and the Prince of Orange her son, are yet at Harlem, where they have been sumptuously treated by the Magistrate.

Aix, Iune 28. 1660.

The Bishops of Uzez, Viviers, and Nismes, have each of them set out two hundred men, to hasten the demolish­ing of the fortifications of Orange, for fear of a contrary order, they being very earnest to have the Protestants de­prived of that place of refuge. The number of the work­men that are imployed about the Cittadel of Marseille hath been likewise doubled, and the same is so forwards, that some pieces of Ordnance are already mounted upon the Bullworks, The Edicts formerly spoken of to have been passed for this Province, were about the Soap, whereby that which doth cost now five Livers, would have cost twenty five, and that called of the Franc Salle, concerning [Page 459] the Gabell of the Salt, the rarley whereof had been given to the Cardinal Mazarin's Secretary, with power to de­mand the arrears of it as far as twenty years back, which would have produced a very vast sum of money. As to the business of the Domaine, the Originals of the Grants made by the Counts of Provence having been demanded by the Court, only those excepted that were made to the Officers of the Soveraign Courts, and to the persons of Quality, the first President would not carry them to the Chamber, to avoid the rumour, but caused them to be signed by two of his Confidents, and adding thereunto the names of such of the Councellors as he thought to be his friends, he caused them to be registred, but he hath been since disowned by the Councellors, and the Greffice declared that he was compelled by force to register them.

Paris, Iuly 10. 1660.

Chevalier de Treslon, Ambassador for the King in the North, hath sent M. Blerman his Secretary with the Articles of the Treaty between Swedeland and Denmark, to be subscribed by his Majesty. Made moiselle coming from Court hath staid a while at Champigny. The Abbot of Richelieu hath complained to the Assembly of the Clergy against the Bishop of Autun, for inserting in his new histo­ry of the Cardinals, something prejudicial to the reputati­on of his Unkle the late Cardinal de Richelieu, in the busi­ness of M. de Marillac, and of the late Queen Mother his Benefactrix. The said Bishop to prevent the desire of the Assembly for taking those pieces out of his book, offered to do it of himself, saying it was a stone he had found in his way which he threw at his enemies head, but withall de­sired the Assembly to give liberty to the Historians to write the truth. We have news here that the Court is to be at Fontainebleau the 16 instant, and intends to come hither by the 25. Great hast is making to prepare all at the Lou­ver. Few daies after the Court is to remove to Compiegn, from whence the Cardinal Mazarin will go to la Fere with [Page 460] the Count de Fuensaldagne, there to end the difference be­tween Savoy and Mantua.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

There is a fair and pleasant house in Acton in the County of Middlesex, set about with Elm trees, with Gardens, Orchards, and all sorts of pleasant fruits, it contains twenty fair rooms compleatly furnished, and water to every Office, Coach house Barn Stable, and a Close to keep horses in, to be let f [...]r t [...]a [...]m of y [...]a [...] (the bedding and houshold-stuff to be sold) Enquire at the Golden [...] in Thred needle-street, or of G [...]man [...]ib [...], who lives over against the s [...]id Mo [...]se in Acton, and you may be further informed.

Lost on Tuesday night July 10. 16 [...]0. at the Swan at Hockly, a bald face, brown bay h [...]se, [...]b [...]ut fourteen handful high, trots and gallops, paces a little, If any one can give notice hereof unto Mr. George Tru [...]shaw, at the Pinder of Wakefield [...] Gra [...]es-Inne-lane, or unto Mr. Richard Gilpin at the Swan in Hockly, they shall have twent, shillings for their pains.

A [...] [...]awney bound, with a white brest, a bald face, a cut tail, and a scar on his farther leg behind, was lost o [...] Munday last the 9th day of July; if any one can bring him to Mr. Looder a Taylor, at his house in the Black-Friers neer the old Play-house, or to Mr. G [...]eens a Cook at the Queens Arms in Holborn, he shall be well rewarded for his pains.

I [...] any one hath houses in London or the Suburbs, to the value of 100 150. or 200 l. per annum, or a Colledge Leafe of the value of 100. or [...]00 l. per annum, in the Counties of Bucks, Bedford, Hampshire, or Wilts, good title, which he would put to sale, if he repair to Mr. Samuel Mearne, his Ma [...]esties Book-binder in Little-Britain, he shall be informed of one that will deal with him for such a purchase.

Whereas in some p [...]ints there is mention made of the manner of the reception of Monsieur Pelnitz, was particularized that he was conducted to audience in his Majesties own Coach; we must inform the Reader, that it was not his Majesties Coach, but the Coach of the Earl of Manchester, Lord Chamberlain of his Majesties houshold.

Advertisements of Books.

Newly reprinted, with very large and profitable additions, Via recta ad vitam longam; A Treatise wherein the right way and best manner of living for attaining to a long and healthful life, is clearly demonstrated, and pun­ctua [...]ly applied to every age and constitution of body; by Tob. Venn [...]r, Doctor of Physick in Bathe; with a very necessary and compendious Treatise of the famous [...]ath [...] [...]f B [...]the: Also an accurate Treatise concerning Tobacco, by the same Au­thor. Printed for Abel Roper at the Sun against St. Dunstans Church in Fleet­street.

[Page 461] The Fanatick history; or an exact Relation and Account of the old Anabaptists, and new Quakers, being the sum of all that hath been yet discovered about their most blasphemous Opinions, dangerous practises, and mali­tious endeavours to subvert all civil Government both in Church and State; toge­ther with their m [...]d mimick pra [...]ks, and their ridiculous actions and gestures, enough to amaze any sober Christian, which may prove the death one burial of the [...]a [...]atick Doctrine. Sold by J. Siens, at the Gross-keys in St. Pauls Church-yard.

Speculum Patiu [...]: A Looking-glass of the Fathers, wherein you may see each of them drawn, characterized, and displayed in their co­lours: To which are added the characters of some of the chief Philosophers. Hi­storians, Grammarians, Orators, and P [...]ets. By Edward La [...]kin ▪ Sold by Henry Ev [...]sden as the Grey-bound in St. Pauls Church-yard. The price 2 s. 64.

Cromwell's bloody slaughter-house; or his damnable designs laid and practised by him and his Negro's, in contriving the murther of his sacred Majesty King Charles the first, discovered by a person of honor. Sold by H. Eversden at the Grey-hound in St. Pauls Church-yard. The price is 12 d.

Natura Prodigtorum: or a discourse touching the nature of Prodigies: Together with the kinds causes, and effects of Comets, Eclipses, and Earthquakes; with an Appendix touching the Imposturism of the commonly-re­ceived Doctrine of Prophecies, Spirits, Images, Sigils, Lamen [...], T [...]e Christal, &c. and the propugners of such opinions by John G [...]dbury [...]. Sold by F. C [...]ssinet at the Anchor and Mariner in Tower-street, and Tho. Ballet in St. Dunstans Church-yard in Fleetstreet.

Davids Deliverance and Thanksgiving: A Sermon preach't before his Majesty at Whitehall on the day of Thanksgiving, June 28. 1660. by G. Shel [...]on, D. D. and Dean of his Majesties Chappel Royal. Pub­lished by his Majesties special Command. Sold by T. Garthwait at the little North­door of St. Pauls.

The Pens gallantry; a Copy book containing sundry. ex­amples of all the curious hands new is use; the second Impression, with the addi­tions of Court-hand Copies, exquisi [...]ly performed by the Author Edward Cocker, living on the South side of St. Pauls Church, where he teaches the Arts of Writing and Arithmetick in an extraordinary manner. Sold by William Place in Grayes-Inne-gate in Holb urn and Thomas Rooks at the Holy Lamb at the East end of St. Pauls Church-yard, London.

A Black [...]mith, and no Jesuite: or a true relation how▪ I William Houlbrook Black-smith of Marlborough was betrayed by Cornet George Ioyce, who carried the King prisoner from Hol [...]by▪ and of the unjust in prison­ing of me, and my several examinations before Bradshaw, and his bloody crew, with my answers unto all of them, as you may read in the following discourse. Written in the time of my imprisonment and now put to publick view. Sold by Francis L [...]sh, next door to the Pauls-head Tavern at Pauls-Chain.

London.

On Wednesday the 11 instant, between one and two in the morning, happened a fire in Thred-needle-street, be­tween [Page 462] the Exchange and St. Bennet Finck Church, by the Alley commonly called Sweetings rents, several houses were consumed by it. It is said to have been first percei­ved in a wall between the Cock and a Scriveners house next adjoyning to it, but in which house it began we have no certain information.

Whitehall.

His Majesty in consideration of the eminent loyalty and signal services of that great Warriour and faithful Subject his Excellency the Lord General Monck, hath been graci­ously pleased to confer these high titles of honor on him.

George Duke of Albemarlie, Earl of Torington, Baron Monck of Potheridge, Beauchamp, and Teyes, Captain General and Commander in chief of all his Majesties Forces in his King­domes of England, Scotland, and Ireland, Master of his Majesties horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, and one of his Majesties most honourable Privy Council.

And as a further addition yet to this most Noble person­age, give us leave to tell you of that honour which God himself hath bestowed on him, in making him the chief Instrument in restoring his Sacred Majesty, and in his Majesty Peace, plenty and happiness to the three Kingdomes.

On Friday the 13 instant, his Gr [...]ce, accompanied by the Duke of Buckingham, and other personages of high qua­lity, went to take his place in the House of Peers.

In the Army you will find some alterations of Officers, yet such, as that the private souldiers may rejoyce in having the Nobles to govern them; and the rest of the Officers (who by their constant adherence to his Excellency, have preserv'd themselves free from the least suspition, and do still continue in command) do now take it for an honour to go a step back to make room for such noble Chieftains.

Whereof first that most honourable personage Aubray Vere Earl of Oxford hath the Regiment that was lately Col. George Smithsons, his Capt. Lievtenant is that loyal Knight, Sir William Blakeston; Geo. Smithson late Colonel, [Page 463] is now Major of the same Regiment; Tho. Lilburn late Major, now eldest Captain; Fran. Wilkinson Captain, William Rhoads Captain, William Wheatley Captain, Thomas Fairfax formerly Capt. Lievtenant, now Lievtenant to Major Smithson.

For the Regiment of Foot that was lately Col. Fagg's, you have Iohn Viscount Mordaunt Col. and Sir Tho. Wood­cock Lievt. Col. of the same Regiment, who were both brought before the same High Court of Iustice; Henry Needler late Lievt. Col. is now made Major of the same Re­giment; Ier. Harrison late [...], now eldest Captain, Hartgill Baron Captain.

The Lord Herbert commands now as Colonel that Regi­ment that was lately Col. Pury's, and Tho. Pury late Colo­nel, is now Lievt. Col. of the same Regiment, Tho. French late Lievt. Col. now Major, William Nest late Major, now eldest Captain.

Major General Sir Edward Massey is now Colonel of that Regiment that was lately Colonel Geo. Twisleton's, Geo. Twisleton late Colonel, now Lievt. Col. of that Regiment, Sam. Barry late Lievt. Col. now Major, Dennis Taylor late Major, now eldest Captain, Iohn Gainssord Captain of that Company late Captain Sowton's, William Parker Captain, Ant. Welden Captain, Tho. Gl [...]dstone Captain of the Com­pany late Captain Thompsons, William Seymor Captain, Iohn Bowler Captain of the Company late Captain Shaftoe's.

Besides these Officers of the Army, there is Major Ed­ward Strange, who (for his faithful service to his Majesty, from the beginning to the end of the War) is now made Governour of Hurst Castle.

There now stands committed to the Black-Rod Sir Iohn Thor [...]good, who had been one of the High Court of Iustice, which put to death that Heroick Lord Capel, &c. and endeavoured as much for the brave Earl of Norwich, and Sir Iohn Owen.

Sir William Row of Higham-hills in Essex is also com­mitted thither.

[Page 464]So is Mr. Samuel Mayer, unknown to no man that hath but hear [...] of Haberdashers Hall, where he filled the Chair and his own purse.

Mr. George Langham, a Citizen of London.

Mr. William Wiburn, as good a Citizen as the former.

Colonel Richard Downes, you know whose Iudge he was, and that learned, merciful Iudge, Mr. Richard Keeble, who (for his ad­vantage) in Chancery knew not how to deny any thing, and in a High Court of Iustice how to grant [...]ny thing.

And after all these, there is one Bowen that belonged to St. Pauls market (formerly a Church-yard, till that worldly Saint Alderman Titchbourn turn'd it to a marker) who not content to rail at the Bi­shops (who one would think have been slandered long enough) broke out into such impudent language against the House of Peers now sitting, as a man would scarce have thrown at the other House, for which and other enormities he is now honored with an imprison­ment, though Bowen told the Witnesse, that for [...]ll this he hoped to see another Turn, but what he means by another Turn, a little time will shew.

Besides these mentioned under the Black-Rod, there are three more sent lately to the Tower, particularly Col. Hacker, who car­ried a Patrizan and commanded the Guards when o [...]r late Soveraign was put to death, where this Colonel was on the Scaffo [...]d, but on Thursday last was for High-Treason committed to the Tower.

And yesterday July 12. Colonel Axtell was sent thither, who commanded the Irish Foot for the Committee of Safety, and is the most injur'd person alive if he have not kill'd forty times more in cold blood then in hot; but how he got the Lord Montgarrets E­state, or how that Noble Lord came to lose it, we need not tell you.

And (after all) the same day was committed M. Thomas Scot (not long since call'd Secretary Scot) who was sent prisoner out of Flanders, being one of the seven excepted from pardon, a per­son (in the opinion of the people of England) not to be march'd in Scotland, nor any where else but where he now is: And (for the sa­tisfaction of all good men) both Scotland and Ireland, as the Let­ters thence assure us, are as quiet as England, and (maugre all little in­ventions) are like so to continue.

London, Printed by John Macock, and Tho. Newcombe, 1660.

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