A DICTIONARY OF Barbarous French.

OR, A COLLECTION, By way of ALPHABET, OF Obsolete, Provincial, Mis-spelt, and Made Words In FRENCH.

Taken out of COTGRAVE's Dictionary, With some ADDITIONS.

A Work much desired, and now performed, For the Satisfaction of such as Read Old FRENCH.

By GƲY MIEGE, AUTHOR of the New FRENCH DICTIONARY.

LONDON: Printed by J. C. for Thomas Basset, at the Sign of the George near Clifford's-Inne, in Fleetstreet. 1679.

AVIS.

LE Lecteur saura que, si cet Ou­vrage est de quêque Utilité, on en est obligé à quêques Curi­eux, qui ont fait passer mon Nouveau Dictionaire pour un Dictionaire Imparfait; & à des Envieux, qui ne l'ont pas si tôt veu naître qu'ils ont voulu l'étoufer dans sa naissance. Les uns & les autres ont protesté hautement, qu'il ne valoit rien; parce qu'il y manquoit ce Ramas de Termes barbares, en quoi Cotgrave avoit si bien reüssi. Et ce Prejugé a prevalu quêque tems en Angleterre d'une maniere si étrange, qu'en fin j'ai eté contraint d'y reme­dier. C'est dans cette veuë que j'ai entrepris cet Ouvrage, qui n'est au fond qu'un Recueil de Cotgrave, avec quêques Additions. Et c'est en quoi je l'ai trouvé d'autant plus penible & in­supportable, qu'il n'est rien de plus contrai­re à mon genie que de copier des Volumes. Cependant je l'ai fait, pour fermer la bou­che à ceux qui ne vouloient pas qu'un Dictio­naire [Page] François fût parfait sans ces Barbarismes. Il est vrai que peu de tems apres que je l'eu entrepris, cette Erreur si commune commen­ça à s'évanouir, & mon Dictionaire à étre de bon debit. Neanmoins je n'ai pas laissé que de pousser l'Entreprise à bout, pour contenter les Curieux. Ainsi, pour dire deux mots de cette Piece en passant, sachez, qu'outre les vieux Mots François, quantité de Mots de Province, & d'autres faits à plaisir, il y a quêques Termes d'Art, des Noms de Plantes, d'Animaux, &c. qui auroient pû passer dans mon Nouveau Dictionaire, mais que j'avois rejettez comme des Noms qui sont en effet peu conus & usi­tez. Et, afin que rien ne manquât à cet Ouvrage, j'avois fait dessein d'y mettre plusieurs Mots en usage habillez à la vieille mode, qui ne se trouvent dans le Nouveau Dictionaire que selon l'Ortografe moderne. Il s'y en est même glissé quêques uns sur ce pié là. Mais, com­me je m'apperceu bien tôt que l'Affaire iroit trop loin de cette maniere, & que le Jeu ne valoit pas la Chandelle, je coupai court là dessus. Outre que, si on veut remedier à cet Inconvenient, il n'y a qu'a voir les Regles que j'ai données sur l'Ortografe ancienne & mo­derne dans ma nouvelle Grammaire.

A DICTIONARY OF BARBAROUS FRENCH.

A

  • A Achée, a doleful cry, or la­mentation.
  • Abaque, a plinth, or flat square stone on the capitel of a pillar.
  • Abbatial, Abbot-like.
  • Abbay, a barking, or baying.
  • Abbée, a hole (or overture) for the passage of some part of a stream that's held in by a dam, sluce, &c.
  • Abbougrir, to hinder from growing, to keep from rising; also, to grow crooked, or wither in the top like an ill-thriving tree, to beggar.
  • Abbreviateur, an abbreviator; a maker of briefs, or of writs.
  • Abbreviature, a breviate, a short note.
  • Abducteur, one that leads out, or a­way, a withdrawer, or puller a­way.
  • Abedissimon, a Serpent of the kind of Dragons.
  • Abeillanne, the white muscadine-grape.
  • Abeilland, a dorre, or drone-bee.
  • Abeillion, a nest (or swarm) of bees.
  • Abequer, to feed, as birds do their young.
  • Abequeter, to peck at.
  • Abesté, mounted on horse-back, or that hath an horse to ride on.
  • Abestin, perpetually burning.
  • Abhorrer, to abhor.
  • Abhorrant, Abhorrent, Abhorris­sant, abhorrent, averse from; also unusual, unaccustomed, out of course.
  • Abier, a faulcon-gentle.
  • Abilé, as Habile in the New Dicti­onary.
  • Abiler, as Habiller in the N. D.
  • Abisme, & Abismer. V. Abyme in the N. D.
  • Ablation, a taking from, or away.
  • Ablaye, whereon corn grows, or wherein it hath been sowed.
  • Ablays, corn growing, or in sheaves.
  • Ableret, a small fish-net.
  • Ablution, a washing away.
  • Abominer, to have in abomination.
  • d'Abondant, moreover.
  • Abonnassé, calmed, quieted, appea­sed, pacifi'd.
  • Abonnir, to make good.
  • Abonni, made good.
  • Abordable, assable.
  • Abordade, Abordée, an approach, or drawing near to.
  • d'Abordée, at first, at first sight.
  • Aborné, limited, bounded, or stin­ted, &c.
  • Abornement, a limiting, bounding, or stinting, &c.
  • Aborner, to limit, bound, or stint; also to compound with, or for; to set a certain rent on; to stand at a certain rate for; to receive (or deliver) by former agreement any thing otherwise than in kind.
  • Abortif, abortive, untimely, still-born. Un oeuf abortif, an addle egg, whose shell is not yet hard.
  • Abouchon, groveling, laid on his face, or on all four; also stooping, having or holding the face down­ward.
  • Abourdeler, to tell a feigned thing.
  • Abourjonner, to bud, sprout out, put forth.
  • Abourné, Abournement, Abourner. See them without u.
  • Abouter, to draw to a head, or to bring to an end.
  • Abouvier, to unyoke oxen.
  • Abradant, paring, having, seraping, raising, wearing away.
  • Abrier d'arbalete, the tree of a cross-bow.
  • Abrier (a Verb) to cover, shrowd, shelter, shadow.
  • Abroton, the herb Southernwood.
  • Abruption, thruption, a breaking off, or bursting asunder.
  • Abruvé, Abruver, Abruvoir. See [Page] Abbreuver, &c. in the N. D.
  • Abruy for Abri, a sunny place.
  • Abscis, cut off, divided, separated from.
  • Absconsé, hidden, or concealed.
  • Absconsement, a hiding or concea­ling.
  • Absconser, to hide, or to conceal.
  • Absorber, to sup (or drink) up all, to devour, swallow, consume.
  • Absolte, Absoulte, or Absoute, an absolute pardon, a general absolu­tion.
  • Abstraction, Abstraict, abstraction, a drawing out, or away.
  • Abstrainder, to binde fast, to knit hard.
  • Abuseux, full of abuses, deceitful, guileful.
  • Abusion, an abusing, error, or fallacy.
  • Abutter, to aim, or to shoot at.
  • Acabler, to fasten with, or unto a cable.
  • Acace, a thorny plant.
  • Acacie, a medicinal juice or liquor drawn from the seed of that plant.
  • Academie, besotted, dozed with too much study.
  • Acalli, hardened, inured, accustomed to, that hath got a habit of.
  • Acamusé, flatted, or beaten flat; blunt, or flat-pointed.
  • Acarer, to confront, to set face to face, to bring neer unto, or toge­ther.
  • Acariastre, hair-brained, rash, furious.
  • Acariastreté, mad wilfulness, hair-brained fury.
  • Acasané, loving home, ever within doors.
  • Acaser, to inhabit, sojourn, lodge, or dwell in; also to rent, or let out upon a yearly rent.
  • Accagnardement, laziness, sloth, idle­ness.
  • Accagnarder, to grow lazie, idle, or slothful.
  • Accelerateur, a hastener, or dispatch­er.
  • Acceleration, acceleration, or haste.
  • Acceleré, accelerated, hastened, or dispatched.
  • Accelerer, to accelerate, hasten, or dispatch.
  • Acceptilation, a payment, or verbal discharge of a Debt made from a Creditor unto a Debtor.
  • Accession, access, or coming unto; also accession, addition.
  • Accessoire, cas [...]al, accidental, hap­pening by chance.
  • Accessoirement, accidentally.
  • Acclampé, fastened, pinned, or pegged.
  • Acclamper, to fasten, pin, or peg.
  • Accodepot as Accotepot.
  • Accoeviller, to benum, or besot.
  • Accoinct, Accoint, acquainted, or familiar with; also neat, fine, or spruce.
  • Accointable, easie to be acquainted with.
  • Accointance, Accointement, ac­quaintance, or conversation.
  • Accointer, to make acquainted; al­so to prank up. S'accointer de, to get acquainted.
  • Accoisé, quieted, appeased, or pacifi'd.
  • Accoisement, a quieting, appeasing, or pacifying.
  • Accoiser, to quiet, appease, or pacifie.
  • Accolite, a Novice, or young profi­cient; also the boy that ministers to the Priest at Mass-time.
  • Accommodation, an accommoda­ting, or fitting of a thing.
  • Accompagnable, sociable.
  • Accomparageant, comparing, mat­ching with, resembling unto.
  • Accomparager, to compare, match, equal, confer one thing with ano­ther.
  • Acconditionné, given (or granted) upon condition.
  • Acconditionner, to give (or grant) upon condition.
  • Acconduire, to lead, or bring to, to conduct, or to guide unto.
  • Acconsuyvre, to overtake, or attain unto.
  • Accordance, an accord, or agree­ment; a concord, or concordance, in Musick.
  • Accordant, agreeable, accordant, concordant, well sitting unto.
  • Accordement, an according, con­curring, or agreeing with; a yielding, or granting unto; also a bargaining, or compounding for; also a reconciliation, or compositi­on of differences; an agreeing upon.
  • Accorné, horned.
  • Accort, affable, complying, courteous; also wary, circumspect; also subtil, cunning.
  • Accortement, assably, kindly, cour­teously; warily, circumspectly; subtilly, cunningly.
  • Accortesse, Accortise, affability, compliance, courteousness; wari­ness, circumspection; subtilty, cun­ning.
  • Accoté, underpropped, supported, or born up, reared, or leaned against.
  • Accotement, an underpropping, sup­porting, or bearing up.
  • Accoter, to underprop, support, or bear up. S'accoter contre, to rear himself, or to lean against.
  • Accotepot, a prop (or stay) for a seething pot; a thick piecs of iron (made somewhat like a half Moon) wherewith the one side of the pot is supported.
  • Accoudement, a leaning on the elbow.
  • Accoulpé, accusé d'un crime, bla­med for, charged with a crime.
  • Accouplable, fit to be coupled.
  • Accouplage, a coupling, or conjun­ction.
  • Accourager, Accouragé. V. Encou­rager in the N. D.
  • Accourber, Accourbir, to bow, or bend inwards.
  • Accourement, a concourse, a coming or running of many men together to one place.
  • Accousiné, taken (or acknowledged) for his Cousin.
  • Accousiner, to take (or acknow­ledge) for his Cousin.
  • Accoustement, a hearkening or listening to.
  • Accouster, to hearken, to listen.
  • Accousteur, one that hearkens, or listens.
  • Accouvé, brooded, overshadowed.
  • Accouver, Accouveter, to brood; also, to overshadow, cover, hide.
  • Accravanter, Accrevanter, to over­burden.
  • Accravanté, Accrevanté, overbur­dened.
  • Accrazer, to crush.
  • Accresté, proud or stately.
  • Accrester, to grow proud, or stately.
  • Accresie, growth, increase.
  • Accrever, to burst, or thrust out the guts of.
  • Accroissance, Accroist, growth, in­crease.
  • Accrosser, to clasp, or to grapple together.
  • Accroüé, drooping, as a bird that sits with her feathers loose, or sta­ring about her.
  • Accubes, couches, or resting places, cabins to lye or to rest in.
  • Accueuré, sick at the heart.
  • Accumulateur, a heaper up.
  • Accumulation, a heaping up.
  • Accumulé, accumulated, heaped up.
  • Accumuler, to accumulate, to heap up.
  • Accusant, an Accuser, or Informer against.
  • Accusement, an accusing, or infor­ming against.
  • Accuvé, put into a sat.
  • [Page] Accuver, to put into a fat, to let stand (or let work) in a fat.
  • Acensiver, as Acenser in the N. D.
  • Acerbité, sharpness, or sowrness.
  • Acertené, certified.
  • Acertenement, a certifying.
  • Acertener, to certifie.
  • Acertes, of a certain; also heartily, affectionately, without feigning.
  • Acetabule, an antient measure, con­taining about six spoonfuls of li­quid things, and two ounces and a half of dry; or (according to our weight) an ounce three quar­ters; two carats, twelve grains, and a half.
  • Aceteuse, the herb sorrel.
  • Aceteux, sharp, sowrish.
  • Acetosité, sharpness, sowrness.
  • Achaneri, cankred.
  • Achantique, mastic achantique, a sweet tasting mastick or gum, bred on the top of the calthrop or star­thistle.
  • Achasser, to drive, or chase towards.
  • Achate, the precious stone Achates.
  • Achemé, decked, trimmed, or attired.
  • Achemer, Achemmer, to deck, trim, or attire.
  • Achemeresse, Achemmeresse, an at­tire-woman.
  • Achemes, Achesmes, attires, deck­ings, ornaments for women.
  • Achenal, a channel.
  • Acher, to set the teeth on edge.
  • Acheramin, a kinde of smallage, or crow-foot resembling smallage.
  • Acheteresse, a woman that buyes or purchases.
  • Achetiver, as Chetiver; also, to inthral, or captivate.
  • Achevement, an ending, or bringing to perfection.
  • Achoise, an occasion, an opportunity.
  • Achoison, the same; also, election, or choice; also, an accusation.
  • Achoisonner, to accuse, to pick a quarrel against.
  • Achommer, to rest, or make holy­day; also to stay, or attend.
  • Achon, a kinde of long axe.
  • Achopé, stumbled at, or on.
  • Achoper, to stumble at, or in.
  • Aciever, to temper with steel.
  • Acné, a witless and graceless fellow.
  • Acoint, Acointer. See Accoint.
  • Aconduire. See Acconduire.
  • Aconsuyvre. Seek Acconsuyvre.
  • Acope, a Medicine compounded of beating and mollifying Simples.
  • Acore, the sweet cane.
  • Acorné. See Accorné.
  • Acort. See Accort.
  • Acoter. See Accoter.
  • Acouärdir, to make coward.
  • Acoup, quickly.
  • A-coup-venant, the name of a fair ruddy apple.
  • Acouter. See Accouter.
  • Acquerement, a purchasing.
  • Acquereur, a purchaser; also a chal­lenger or claimer of one that pre­tends a title unto land.
  • Acquesté, purchased, acquired.
  • Acquesteresse, a woman that pur­chaseth.
  • Acquesteur, Acquisiteur, a purcha­ser, acquirer.
  • Acquester, to purchase, to acquire.
  • Acquoisir, to pacifie.
  • Acravanter. See Accravanter.
  • Acrediter. See Accrediter in the N. D.
  • Acrester, Acresté. See Accrester.
  • Acreu. See Accreu in the N. D.
  • Acroamatique, musical, harmonious.
  • Acroc, any thing to hang another thing on.
  • Acromion, the shoulder-pitch, or point, wherewith the hinder and fore-parts of the neck are joyned together.
  • Acrotaires. See Acroteres in the N.D.
  • Actifs, an Order of Friars, that wear tawny habits, and seed on nothing but roots.
  • Actourné, an Atturney.
  • Actournée, a Warrant, or Letter of Atturney.
  • Acuité, sharpness, or keenness.
  • Acuré, Oiseau acuré, that hath had casting given her.
  • Acutelle, the herb Camocks, rest-harrow, petty-whin, ground-furs.
  • Adage, an adage, or proverb.
  • Adagial, proverbial, full of adages.
  • Adanté. See Adenté.
  • Adaptation, an adapting, or sitting of one thing to another.
  • Adarce, a salt foam that cleaves unto reeds and other marsh-herbs in drought and dry weather.
  • Adayé, provoked, urged, or incensed.
  • Adayement, a provoking, urging, incensing.
  • Adayer, to provoke, urge, or incense.
  • Adayeur, a provoker, a quarrelsome man.
  • Adcensement. V. Acensement in the N. D.
  • Addenté. V. Adenté.
  • Additament, increase, or addition.
  • Addomestiqué, tamed.
  • Addomestiquer, to tame.
  • Addorsé. See Addossé in the N.D.
  • Addoüez homme à homme, scuffled together.
  • Adduire, to bring forth, or to bring unto.
  • Adebtz, a kinde of Seignoral Duty within the Jurisdiction of S. O­mer.
  • Adelantade, a Lord Deputy, Presi­dent, or a Lieutenant for a Prince in a Country.
  • Adeneré, prized, valued, rated, set to sale for money.
  • Adenerer, to prize, value, rate; to make money of, to set to sale for money.
  • Adenes, little kernels in the mouth or throat, and diseasing either of them.
  • Ades, presently.
  • Adeser, to touch, or handle slightly. Pic.
  • Adestre, quick, ready, nimble; also apt for any thing he under­takes; also comely, graceful.
  • Adestrer, to make quick, ready, or nimble; to make fit, able, or apt for; also to follow the humour of.
  • Adeuillé, Adeullé, heavy, sad, or mournful.
  • s'Adeuloir, to moan, to mourn.
  • Adex. V. Adebtz.
  • Adextre, as Adestre.
  • Adfiliation, adoption.
  • Adfilié, adopted.
  • Adglutinatif, glewy, clammy.
  • Adglutiné, glued, or fastened with glue.
  • Adglutinement, a gluing, or fasten­ing with glue.
  • Adglutiner, to glue, or fasten with glue.
  • Adheritance, a possission, a Livery and seisin.
  • Adherité, inseisined, put into posses­sion of.
  • Adheritement, a giving possession, a making of Livery and Seisin un­to.
  • Adheriter, to make Livery and Sei­sin of an Inheritance, to put into possession.
  • Adhesion, an adhering, cleaving, or sticking fast unto.
  • Adhorer, to come at a good hour.
  • Adjancer, Adjancé, Adjancement. V. Agencer in the N. D.
  • Adjour, a Commission of summons, or adjournment; also the report or the return thereof made by the Ser­jeant or Summoner.
  • Adipeux, full of fat; also breeding fatness.
  • Adire, a difference.
  • Adiré, wandering, or going out of [Page] the way; also forsook, left, aban­doned.
  • Adirer, to wander, or go out of the way; also to forsake, or bid fare­wel to.
  • Adismé, tythed, on which a tythe is set.
  • Adismer, to tythe, or to set a tythe on.
  • Adjudicataire, he to whom a thing is adjudged, or delivered by Judgment.
  • Adjudication, an adjudging, or de­livering of a thing by Judgment.
  • Adjurateur, an adjuror, or earnest swearer; also one that exacts an oath.
  • Adjuration, an adjuration, or earnest swearing unto; also the exaction of an oath from others.
  • Adjutoire, the upper bone of the arm toward the shoulder.
  • Admener, as Amener in the N. D.
  • Admignoter. V. Amignoter.
  • Adminicule, an aid, help, or sup­port.
  • Administratoire, administring un­to.
  • Admissible, fit to be admitted, or allowed.
  • Admonesté, admonished.
  • Admonestement, an admonishing, or admonition.
  • Admonester, to admonish.
  • Admonesteur, an admonisher.
  • Adnection, an annexing to.
  • Adnuicter. V. Annuicter.
  • Adobber. V. Adouber in the N. D.
  • Adolescent, a youth, or a young man.
  • s'Adolorer, to grieve, or to take grief.
  • Adombré, adumbrated, or shadow­ed.
  • Adombrement, a shadowing.
  • Adombrer, to adumbrate, to sha­dow.
  • Adomestiquer, to tame.
  • Adonc, then, at that time.
  • Adot, a blow, or thump; also trou­ble, or business; also a kind of fish.
  • Adoulcir. V. Addoucir in the N.D.
  • s'Adouloir, s'Adoulourer, to grief.
  • Adpropriance, as Appropriance.
  • Adquiescer, Adquiescement. V. Ac­quiescer in the N. D.
  • Adscrire, to ascribe, to attribute; also to inroll, or reckon among o­thers.
  • Adscrit, ascribed, attributed; in­rolled, or reckoned among others.
  • Adsigné. V. Assigné, in the N. D.
  • Advaluation, a valuing, rating, or setting a price on.
  • Advalué, valued, rated.
  • Advaluer, to value, rate, set a price on.
  • Adveillé, sad, heavy; also watchful, wakeful.
  • Advenamment, handsomly, decently, gracefully.
  • Adventif, Biens adventiss, Goods coming or given by chance, casu­alties, windfals unlooked for.
  • Adveré. V. Averé.
  • Advestir, to invest, or give possession of.
  • Advesture, an investure, a delivering over; also fruit hanging by the root, or standing on the ground; as Advesture de bled, corn stan­ding.
  • Advisager, Advisagé. V. Envisager in the N. D.
  • Advisement, heed, wariness.
  • Advisément, advisedly, warily.
  • Adulateur, a flatterer, or cogger.
  • Adulation, flattery, cogging.
  • Adulatoire, adulatory.
  • Adulte, grown to full age.
  • Adulterer, to commit adultery.
  • Advocassé, pleaded for.
  • Advocasseau, a Pettifogger.
  • Advocasser, to play the Advocate.
  • Advocasserie, a pleading, or playing the Advocate.
  • Advocatie, the duty or place of Ad­vocate; also the countenance or support of a great person in a suit.
  • Advoerie, Advoeson, Advoison, guard, protection, defence.
  • Advolé, fled unto.
  • Advolement, Advolée, a flying un­to.
  • Advoler, to flie unto.
  • Advouaison, an advowing, or a­vouching, a taking into protection.
  • Aduoüateur, an advower, avoucher; also one that acknowledges and challenges his beast, taken damage fesant.
  • Advouërie, Advorie, defence, pro­tection, patronage.
  • Aduré, hardened, stiffened, or made strong.
  • Adurer, to harden, stiffen, or make strong.
  • Aeditue, a Church-warden, or Sex­ton; the Officer who is to look un­to a Church and the Church­goods.
  • Aemorrhoides, for Hemorrhoides, the hemorrhoids.
  • Aeré, airy; also aired.
  • Aereux, airy, full of air.
  • Aerolle, a blister, a wheal.
  • Aeromantie, divination by the air.
  • Aerugineux, full of (or like unto) verdigrease.
  • Afaner, to get hardly, or with much toil.
  • Affaçonner. See Affassonner.
  • Affadi, made or grown unsavoury.
  • Affadir, to make tast less, or unsavoury.
  • Affadissement, unsavouriness.
  • Affaicter. See Affaiter in the N. D.
  • Affaireux, busie.
  • Affaireusement, very busily.
  • Affamement, a starving, or famish­ing.
  • Affan, extream toil, or grief.
  • Affassonner, to form, or to fashion.
  • Affeager, to create a tenure in Fee­simple.
  • Affené, fed, or inseamed with hay, stall-fed.
  • Affener, to feed, or inseam with hay, to stall-feed.
  • Afferant, becoming; also concerning or belonging to.
  • Affermable, to be let out; also af­firmable.
  • Afferme, Affermement, a farming, or letting out.
  • Affertilé, made fertile.
  • Affertiler, to make fertile.
  • Affessé, sit, or settled on the top of.
  • s'Affesser, to sit, or settle it self on the top of.
  • s'Affessir, to grow weary, lumpish, or heavy.
  • Affetardi, made (or become) dull, or lazy.
  • Affetardir, to make dull, or lazy.
  • Affeubler, Affeublage. See Affu­blage, Affubler in the N. D.
  • Affeurré, foddered with straw.
  • Affeurrer, to fodder with straw.
  • Afficter, to annex, or give for a time.
  • Affié, assured, or confirmed.
  • Affiement, an assurance, or confir­mation.
  • Affier, to assure, or give his word for.
  • Affiert, (a Verb Impersonal) it be­cometh; also it concerneth, or be­longeth to.
  • Affieux, a good fellow, a boon-com­panion.
  • Affiliation, adoption.
  • Affilié, adopted.
  • Affilier, to adopt.
  • Affiloire, a whet-stone.
  • Affin, that. See Afin in the N. D.
  • Affin, a Kinsman, or Allie.
  • Affiniter, to ally.
  • s'Afflaquir, to wax flaggy.
  • Afflat, a blowing in.
  • Afflater, to flatter.
  • Affleurir l'eau, to go close by the water.
  • [Page] Afflictif, sad, grievous.
  • Affloui, blurred, also blunted.
  • Afflouir, to blur, also to blunt.
  • Afflux, affluence.
  • Affoiblement, a weakening.
  • Affoisonement, increase.
  • Affolé, foiled, wounded, or bruised.
  • Affolement, Affolure, a foil, bruise, or wound.
  • Affoler, to foil, wound, or bruise.
  • Affoncer, to sink in.
  • Affondé, sunk down to the bottome.
  • Affonder, s'Affonder, to sink, or to go down to the bottom.
  • Affor, Afforage, a piercing or broach­ing of wine, &c.
  • Afforagé, pierced or set abroach; also rated, licensed.
  • Afforer, to pierce a vessel of wine; also to take a rate from the Ma­gistrate, and a licence of the Landlord, for the retail thereof.
  • Affouchié, put into (laid among) fearn.
  • Affouler. See Affoler.
  • Affourager, Affourrer. See Affeur­rer.
  • Affrequane, a Tigre.
  • Affres, fright.
  • Affreté, fastned, clasped.
  • Affrioler. Se Affriander in the N.D.
  • Affrodille. See Afrodille in the N.D.
  • Affronitre. See Afronitre.
  • Affublage. See Affublement in the N. D.
  • Affuir, to fly unto for help.
  • Affuler, as Affubler.
  • Afiliation. See Adfiliation.
  • Afrodisiace, a kinde of stone, or mineral, of a whitish colour min­gled with red.
  • Afrolitre, Afronitre, a kinde of light, brittle, and purple-coloured nitre.
  • Afuselé, fashioned as a spindle.
  • Afuselement, a fashioning of things like spindles.
  • Afuseler, to fashion, or make small towards the end, like a spindle.
  • Afyer. See Tromper in the N. D.
  • Aga, here.
  • Agacé, urged, provoked; set on edge; blunted.
  • Agacement, an urging, or provoking; a setting of the teeth on edge; a blunting of weapons, or the like.
  • Agacer, to urge, or to provoke; also, to set the teeth on edge; also, to blunt a weapon, or the like.
  • Agache. V. Agasse.
  • Agaillardé, grown jocose, or merry.
  • s'Agaillarder, to grow jocose, or merry.
  • Agalloche, the sweet wood called Lignum Aloës.
  • Agamber, to step, or stride over.
  • Aganni, faded, withered, or consu­med.
  • Agannir, to fade, wither, or con­sume.
  • Agart. See Hagard in the N. D.
  • Agasse, a mag-pie.
  • Agasser. See Agacer.
  • Agassin, a corn in the feet or toes; also, the lowest bud or branch of a vine.
  • Agay, the marrow of fowl.
  • Agember. V. Agamber.
  • Agenouillon, kneeling, or upon his knees.
  • Agesimos, a wondring voice, or ex­clamation.
  • Aggere, a heap of stones, earth, or turffs; a bulwark, fort, or block­house; a causey, bank, or dam.
  • Agglué, glued.
  • Aggluer, to glue.
  • Agglutinatif, proper to glue toge­ther.
  • Agglutinement, a gluing together.
  • Agglutiner, to glue.
  • Aggraffe, as Agrafe, a clasp.
  • Aggravanter, to aggravate.
  • Aggravanté, aggravated.
  • s'Aggraver, to be gravelled.
  • Aggressé, assaulted, or set on.
  • Aggressement, an assaulting, or set­ting on.
  • Aggresser, to assault, or set on.
  • Aggripper, to catch hold.
  • Agiar, a bearing-cloth for a childe.
  • Agiers, the ways or turnings of a house or place.
  • Agiographe, a holy writing, holy writ.
  • Agios, sacred, holy.
  • Agiotare, a holy man.
  • Agnafile. V. Aquafile.
  • Agnelette, Agneliere, the coif or biggin of a womb-lodged Infant, the childs shirt.
  • Agnelin, lambs fur, budge.
  • Agobilles, trifles, trash, trumpery.
  • Agonarque, a Master of the Revels.
  • Agoranome, the Clark or Comptrol­ler of a Market.
  • Agoubilles. See Agobilles.
  • Agoué, half-choaked.
  • Agoure de lin, the weed dodder.
  • Agouster, to have a smack or taste of, to give a taste, or season any thing.
  • Agoutter, to drop, as rain from an house-cave.
  • Agouttis, the droppings of a house.
  • Agrailir. V. Agreslir.
  • Agraphiner, to take hold of.
  • Agré, willingly, with a good will.
  • Agreableté, agreeableness.
  • Agreation, an agreement.
  • Agrener. See Aggrener in the N. D.
  • Agrerer, to chuse, or lay out his part of the fruits of his land let out to parts.
  • Agreslir, to make thin, or lean.
  • Agreste, sowr; also rude, or clow­nish.
  • Agricole, a husbandman, a plough­man.
  • Agrier, as Terrage.
  • Agrimenseur, a Surveyor of land.
  • Agriote, the sharp or tart cherry.
  • Agriotat, the syrrop or juice of that cherry.
  • Agrippine, leacherous stuff.
  • s'Agrouper, a horse to knit and ga­ther himself close together, as if he would yerk out behinde.
  • Agu. V. Aigu in the N. D.
  • Aguafile, a kind of Moorish Trum­pet.
  • Aguelette, a thin soft skin or shirt, wherein a child is wrapped in the matrix, besides the after-birth which is more gross.
  • Aguement, sharply.
  • Aguerriment, martial order, war­like discipline.
  • Aguigner, to leer, to aim at.
  • Aguillade, Aguillar, a kinde of fish called Thornhound.
  • Aguillanneuf. See Auguillanneuf.
  • Aguille, and its Derivatives. V. Ai­guille in the N. D.
  • Aguiser, and its Derivatives. V. Aiguiser in the N. D.
  • Aguyon, a gentle wind (called so a­mong Brittish and Norman Ma­riners.)
  • Agyos. V. Agios.
  • Ahan, a loud, painful, and short ex­pression of toil or vexation.
  • Ahané, toiled; ploughed.
  • Ahanable, as terre ahanable, land that requires much labour.
  • Ahaner, Ahanner, to sigh out; also to labour, or to toil; also to plough.
  • Ahanneux, toilsome.
  • Ahen, Ahenner. See Ahan, Ahan­ner.
  • Ahennage, ploughing.
  • Aherdre, to snatch, or pluck,
  • Ahocquer. See Accrocher in the N. D.
  • Ahonti, made ashamed.
  • Ahontir, to make ashamed.
  • Ahutir, to fright, to scare.
  • Ajetter un Oiseau, to cast, or whistle [Page] off a hawk, to let her go.
  • Aiglantier, as Eglantier, sweet briar.
  • Aiglas, Eaglets, young Eagles.
  • Aiglesse, a hen-eagle.
  • Aigneau, and Aignelet, as Agneau, Agnelet in the N. D.
  • Aigneaux, manacles.
  • Aigneler, to lamb.
  • Aignelette, Aigneliere, as Agneliere.
  • Aignelin, white budge, white lamb.
  • Aigras, verjuice.
  • Aigrebelheur, the name of an apple.
  • Aigre-douce, a Sevil-orange, an Orange that is between sweet and sowr.
  • Aigre-sin, a certain Turkish coin; also the Liver-fish.
  • Aigrun, any thing that exasperates a disease or sore.
  • Aigue, water; also a mare. Aigue marine, Sea-water, green colour.
  • Aigueux, waterish, or full of water.
  • Aiguier, a sink.
  • Aiguillat. as Aguillade.
  • Aiguillé, like a needle, or full of needles.
  • Aigument, sharply.
  • Ailasse, a great wing.
  • Ailées, donner les ailées à un Che­val, to give a horse the head.
  • Ailer, to give wings unto, to set wings upon.
  • Aileures, comings, or carlings, two beams that run along the hatches of a ship, and with the Traversins make a long square hole.
  • Aillade, garlick-sauce; also the smell of garlick.
  • Ailler, a Quail-net.
  • Ailloignon, great garlick.
  • Ailporreau, great mountain-garlick.
  • Aimantin, adamantine, like an a­damant, or load-stone.
  • Aime-bal, a lover of dancing.
  • Aime-carnage, bloudy-minded.
  • Aime-esbats, gamesome, sportful.
  • Aime-humains, gentle, sociable.
  • Aime-loix, just, a lover of Justice.
  • Aime-lyre, harp-loving.
  • Aime-maistre, obsequious, dutiful.
  • Aime-Mars, martial, warlike.
  • Aime-noise, a contentious brabler.
  • Aime-nouveauté, a lover of new things.
  • Aime-paix, a peace-lover.
  • Aime-pleurs, given to weeping; al­so cruel, pitiless.
  • Aime-silence, a lover of silence.
  • Aime-tout, most kinde, most loving.
  • Ain. See Haim.
  • Ainçois, Ains, but, but rather, before ere, or ere.
  • Ainsné. See Ainé in the N. D.
  • Ajolié, pranked, or set out.
  • Ajolier, to prank, or to set out.
  • Ajoliver, to be merry, to make much of himself; also to prank, or trick up himself.
  • Ajourner, se faire jour, to be near day.
  • Ajous, surze, gorse.
  • Air, choler, anger.
  • Aïré, angry.
  • Araigne (or Aragne) a spider.
  • Aireau, a plough.
  • Airée, a floor full, a bed full of.
  • Airer, to airy, to make a nest, or airy.
  • Aireste. See Arête in the N. D.
  • Airon, a hern, or heron.
  • Airure, the earing, or plowing of land.
  • Aisance, ease, facility.
  • Aisances, Aisemens, a privy, a house of office.
  • Aiscette, a little plaining axe.
  • Aiser, to take ease, to live at ease.
  • Aisle, Aisné, and their Derivatives. V. Aile, Ainé.
  • Aisneage, eldership.
  • Aissade, an Instrument wherewith Gardeners open or break up the ground.
  • Aisseliere, Aissellaire, the vein which passeth along the arm-hole.
  • Aisseuil. V. Aissieu in the N. D.
  • Aissi, Aissil, a shingle of wood.
  • Aistres. See Agiers.
  • Aitiologie, a shewing of a reason or cause.
  • Alabandique, pierre alabandique, a kind of black stone mingled with purple.
  • Alâchi, slackened, hung flagging; decayed, or grown feeble.
  • Alachir, to slacken, to hang flagging downward; also to decay, to grow feeble.
  • Alâchissement, a slackening, or slackness; a decay, or failing in vigour.
  • Alaigreté, mirth.
  • Alaine (for Halene) breath.
  • Alainer la langue, to hold out the tongue, as a bird or beast that in extremity of heat breathes for air.
  • Alaire. See Allaire.
  • Alampers, a kinde of peach.
  • Alan. See Allan.
  • Alangouri, languishing, pining a­way.
  • s'Alangourir, to languish, to pine away.
  • Alanter. See Allenter.
  • Alaterne, barren privet.
  • Albacore, a certain fish in the In­dian Sea.
  • Albassan, a kinde of white and hard stone, whereof lime may be made.
  • Albastrin, white as alabaster.
  • Albe, as Able.
  • Albereau, a very hard white free-stone, that resembles the Albassan.
  • Albergame, the amorous apple, the golden apple.
  • Albergation, an alienation in see-farm, and for a fine or income.
  • Alberge, a kinde of small peach.
  • Alberger, a kind of small peach tree.
  • Alberger, to alien in fee-farm.
  • Albugine, a whitish film in or over the eye.
  • Albugineux, whitish, like the white of an egg.
  • Alcali, sel alcali, salt calcinated, then beaten to powder, and set on a piece of glass in a moist cellar.
  • Alchange, the herb Alcakengy, or winter-cherry.
  • Alcharade, a scorpion. Rab.
  • Alchechange, or Alchequange, as Alchange.
  • Alchermes, a grain wherewith crim­sons are died.
  • Alchimille, Lions foot, Lady's man­tle, great sanicle, (an herb.)
  • Alcibienne, vipers-herb, snakes bu­gloss.
  • Alcofribas, a greedy glutton.
  • Alcret, as Halecret, a Corslet.
  • Alebastre (for Albâtre) alabaster.
  • Alebastrin, of alabaster.
  • Alebrenne, a salamandar.
  • Alebromantie, divination by barley-meal mixed with wheat.
  • Alectoire, the Cock-stone (a chry­stal-coloured stone, as big as a bean, found in the gizern or maw of some cocks.)
  • Alectorophoneme, the crowing of a cock.
  • Alegerir, to lighten, or make light.
  • Aleine, Aleiner. See Halene in the N. D.
  • Alemelle. V. Alumelle.
  • Alenois, cresson Alenois, garden-cress.
  • Aleron, a little wing; also a twig, or sprig.
  • Alesnes, cockle, corn-rose, wild ni­gella.
  • Aleve, the wild Pine-tree.
  • Aleuf, see Aleu in the N. D.
  • Alexitere, a preservation against poyson.
  • Algame, mixtion of gold and quick­silver.
  • Algarie, a Catheter; a kind of In­strument [Page] wherewith Surgeons pro­voke urine.
  • Alge. See Algue in the N. D.
  • Algesié, the Lote, or Nettle-tree.
  • Algorisme, the art or use of Cy­phers, or of numbring by Cyphers. Fol d'algorisme, a fool by figure, an Ass in grain.
  • Algousant, a Lieutenant.
  • Alhatrat, a Serpent whose biting wounds, but poysons not.
  • Alhidade. See Alidade.
  • Aliage. See Alliage in the N. D.
  • Aliayre. See Alliaire.
  • Aliboron, a busie-body.
  • Alicacubut. V. Alchange.
  • Alicté, bedrid.
  • Alictement, a lying sick in bed.
  • s'Alicter, to lie bedrid.
  • Alié, Alier, as Allié, Allier in the N.D.
  • Alier tremaillé, a trammel net, or double net.
  • Alimenté, sed, nourished.
  • Alimenter, to feed, to nourish.
  • Alimenteux, nourishing.
  • Alimonner, to put into the thill of a cart.
  • Alipte, he that in old time anointed Wrestlers before they exercised.
  • Aliqualement, indifferently, so so.
  • Alis, solid, compacted, hard wrought, laid close together.
  • Alise, or Alize, the sweet berry of the Lote-tree.
  • Alité, for allité, bedred, so sick as to keep his bed.
  • Alkali, as Alcali.
  • Alkerenge. See Alchange.
  • Alkermes, a Confection made of the decoction and infusion of silk into the juice of the grain Chermes (a Sovereign Remedy for all swoun­dings.)
  • Allagant, washing, watering.
  • Allaire, a little walk or alley in a Wood; or a tree growing therein.
  • Allambre, copper.
  • Allan, a kind of big, strong, thick-headed, and short-snouted dog.
  • Allanguir, to make languish or pine away.
  • Allant, a crafty cheating fellow.
  • s'Alaschir. V. s'Alâchir.
  • Allayé, allay'd.
  • Allayer, to allay, to mix gold or sil­ver with baser metals.
  • Alleage. See Alliage in the N.D.
  • Allebouter. See Haleboter.
  • Allebrent. See Albren in the N. D.
  • Alleché, allured, or drawn on.
  • Allecher, to allure, to draw on.
  • Allecter, to wamble, as a queasy sto­mack.
  • Allege, ease; also a lighter-boat.
  • Allegeance, ease.
  • Allegoriser, to use Allegories.
  • Alleinée, Allenée, a breath, air, or puff.
  • Allelyon, Allerion, a bird (in Bla­zon) wanting beak, feet, and legs.
  • Alleran. See Alezan in the N. D.
  • Alles, as ils curent alles, they had a reputation, or they passed currently.
  • Alleud, Alleuf, & Alleut. See Aleu in the N. D.
  • Alleure, for Allure, pace, going.
  • Alleutier, a free-holder.
  • Alleyer, a Merchant to declare up­on his oath to a Toll-gatherer, what and how much ware he carries a­long with him.
  • Alliaire, an herb called Jack of the edge.
  • Allicher, and its derivatives. See Allecher.
  • Allignée, a Vine coupled with an Elm-tree.
  • Allitti, bedrid.
  • Allochons d'un rouët, the teeth of a wheel in a clock, &c.
  • Allode. See Aleu in the N. D.
  • Allodial. See under Aleu in the N. D.
  • Alloigné, driven, chased.
  • Alloigner, to drive far from, to chase.
  • Allotement, a parting, or dividing.
  • Allotir, to part, or to divide.
  • Alloué, a Seneschals Lieutenant.
  • Allouer, to allow; also to impute.
  • Allouvi, as hungry as a wolf; also fleshed or cruel as a wolf.
  • Alloyandier, a roster of short ribs of beef.
  • Alloyé. Seek Allayé.
  • Allumelle. See Alumelle.
  • Allumement, a lighting, a kindling.
  • Allume-sang, bloud-inflaming.
  • Allumetier, a maker or seller of matches for tinder-boxes.
  • Alluvion, an increase of waters.
  • Alluz, all out, or a brimmer drunk up.
  • Almadie, or Almande, a little boat made of the bark of a tree, such as are in use among the savages of Africk and India.
  • Almandine, a course kinde of Ruby.
  • Alme, fair, clear, or calm; also nourishing.
  • Alme-beau, goodly.
  • Almoire. See Armoire in the N.D.
  • Almucantaraths, certain Circles in an Astrolabe, denoting the heights that are above our Hemisphere.
  • Alocation, a placing, or setting in a place.
  • Alode, Alodial. See Aleu in the N. D.
  • Aloe, a lark.
  • Alogique, unreasonable, inconside­rate.
  • Aloine. See Alvine.
  • Alonges, hawk l [...]n [...]s.
  • Alongeail, Alongissement, a leng­thening, or drawing out in length.
  • Aloser, to colour (or cloak) a mat­ter.
  • Aloud. See Aleu in the N.D.
  • Alouër. See Allouër.
  • Alourdi, dulled.
  • Alourdir, to dull.
  • s'Alouser, s'Alozer, to praise him­self.
  • Aloyne. V. Alvine.
  • Alpestre, hilly, mountainous.
  • Alphe, a morphew, or staining of the skin.
  • Alphitomancie, divination by bar­ley-meal.
  • Alphonsin, a coin of gold, worth a­bout 1 shill. sterl.
  • Alquequinges. See Alchange.
  • Alteratif, thirst-increasing.
  • Altercation. See Conteste in the N. D.
  • Altere, a poise of lead which Rope-dancers hold in their hands for a counterpoise; also a piece of lead to lift up for exercise.
  • Alteres, vehement passions of the minde, strong conceits, extasies.
  • Alternation, an interchange, or suc­cession by turns.
  • Alterquer. See Contester in the N. D.
  • Altitonant, thundring from above.
  • Alveole, the hollow part of the jaw wherein a tooth is fastened.
  • Alvette. See Gargatte.
  • Alvine, wormwood.
  • Alvincux, bitter as wormwood.
  • Alumelle, the blade of a sword or knife.
  • Aluté, bedawbed, or besmeared.
  • Aluyne, wormwood.
  • Alys, smooth, sleek, polished.
  • Alysson, the herb mad-wort, moon-wort, or heal-dog.
  • Alzan. See Alezan in the N. D.
  • Alzatin, the fat call wherein the bowels are lapt.
  • Amadées, a certain Order of Grey Friers.
  • Amadis, a neat Speaker.
  • Amadité, quaint, prankt with fine words.
  • Amadoüé, flattered, coxed.
  • Amadouëment, a flattering, or co­xing.
  • [Page] Ama louër, to flatter, to coxe.
  • Amadouëur, a flaterer, a coxer.
  • Amafrose, blindness, caused by the obturation of the Optick sinew.
  • Amainer, to strike sail.
  • s'Amaisonner, to lodge, or harbour himself.
  • s'Amalader, to fall sick.
  • Amalgame, a mixture, or incorpo­ration of quick-silver with other metals.
  • Amalgamer, to mix, or incorporate.
  • Amanché. See Emmanché in the N. D.
  • Amandé, mingled [...] seasoned with almonds.
  • Amandin, a kind of reddish mar­ble.
  • Amanite, the name of a wholesome toad-stool.
  • Amanoter, to manacle.
  • Amanoté, manacled.
  • Amantelé, covered with a cloak.
  • Amaphrose. See Amafrose.
  • Amareur, Amaritude, bitterness.
  • Amarri, the womb of a woman.
  • Amase, Amasement, a Messuage, or Tenement.
  • Amasé, housed, or having a Tene­ment on it.
  • Amassement, a heaping, or gather­ing together.
  • Amasse-miel, that gets honey.
  • Amasseresse, a woman that heaps up.
  • Amastiné, grown dogged.
  • s'Amastiner, to become dogged.
  • Amati, trained up unto; also quelled, abated, allayd.
  • Amatir, to train up unto.
  • Amaurote, a Moor.
  • Amazé. See Amasé.
  • Ambages, Ambagoye, a going about the b [...]sh in speaking.
  • Ambagieux, full of idle circumstan­ces.
  • Amballage, as Emballage in the N. D.
  • Ambarvales, Rogation, or Gang­weeks.
  • Ambe, with, together with.
  • Ambezas, a [...]bes ac [...].
  • Ambi, a wooden instrument of two pieces, used for the putting of a shoulder into joynt.
  • Ambier, to go, to go about; also to bribe for an Office.
  • Ambler, to am [...]le, to pace.
  • Ambligone, a blunt angle, or a tri­angle.
  • Am [...]iopie, da [...]ess, or dimness of sight.
  • Amboucho [...]er. See Emboucholler.
  • Ambulatif, ever walking, or stirring.
  • Ameiller, to milk, or to suck.
  • Amelette, a little pretty soul.
  • Ameliorer, to better, mend, improve.
  • Amelioré, bettered, mended, im­proved.
  • Ameliorement, a bettering, men­ding, or improving.
  • Amelot, a kinde of small bitter-sweet apple.
  • Amenage, carriage.
  • Amendable, finable, that may be fined.
  • Amendaye, a Grove (or Orchard) of Almond-trees.
  • Amendeur, a mender, or amender.
  • Amenée, the circuit of a Bayliff, wherein he may arrest, summon, or adjourn; also an arrest, summons, or adjournment.
  • Amenement, a leading, or bring­ing unto.
  • Ameneur, a bringer or fetcher unto; also a kinde of Sergeant or Bayliff in some parts of France, belonging to particular Lords.
  • Amenité, delightfulness, pleasantness.
  • Ameos, herb-William, bull-wort, Bishops-weed.
  • Ameret, cider made of bitter ap­ples.
  • Ameril. See Emeril in the N. D.
  • Amerine, Abrahams balm, Park-leaves.
  • Amertumer, to make bitter.
  • Amesnagé, managed.
  • Amesnager, to manage an estate.
  • Amesson (for Hameçon) a bait.
  • Amessures, Cas d'amessures, the re­viling, striking, or fetching bloud of a man; or the suspicion of an offence, whose punishment is but pecuniary.
  • s'Amesurer, to live within compass.
  • Ameté, bounded, limited; measured out.
  • Ametiste (for amathyste) an ama­thyst.
  • Amette, a little soul.
  • Amettre. See Admettre in the N.D.
  • Ameubler, Ameublir, to furnish.
  • Ameuri, ripened, or made ripe.
  • Ameurie, to ripen, or to make ripe.
  • Ameute, Chasse amentée, a close running or hunting of dogs toge­ther.
  • Ameuter, to hold up the dogs in hunting close together; to run and hunt very close together; to a­gree.
  • Amezeau, a pipe of wood through which the Sea-water (whereof Salt is made) passes.
  • Amiableté, friendliness.
  • Amidonner, to starch.
  • Amieller, to sweeten; also to draw on by any sweet means.
  • Amielleure, an Oyntment of the thickness and colour of honey.
  • Amiette, ones little love, or sweet­heart.
  • Amignarder, Amignoter. See Mi­gnarder in the N. D.
  • Amiot, a little friend; also a kind of Pear whereof Perry is made.
  • Amission, loss.
  • Ammaires, or Ammarres. See A­mare in the N. D.
  • Ammenteler. See Ementeler.
  • Ammeubler, to furnish.
  • Ammi. See Ameos.
  • s'Ammignonner, to grow pretty; also to set out himself.
  • Ammitonné, lapt in fur like a Cat.
  • Ammodite, a creeping Vermine like a Viper, but of a sandy colour, and full of black spots.
  • Amnestie, for Amnistie, Amnisty.
  • Amnie. See Aguellette.
  • Amobilié, made movable.
  • Amobilier, to make movable.
  • Amoitir, to moisten.
  • Amolir, to remove with much ado; also to depart, or go away.
  • Amollissable, apt to be mollisi'd.
  • Amomite, encens amomite, a whi­tish kind of Incense, which in han­dling becomes soft as Mastick.
  • Amomon. See Amome in the N.D.
  • Amonestement, admonition.
  • Amoraye, a Coin used at Ferara, and worth 12 quadrins.
  • Amorceure, a bait.
  • Amorcher, to prime a gun.
  • Amortissable, quenchable, extingui­shable.
  • Amoureau, a little Love; also the little God of Love.
  • Amourescher, to wooe.
  • Amoustillé, sweetened with Must.
  • Amoustiller, to sweeten with Must or new sweet wine.
  • Amparlier, a Pleader.
  • Ampes, raspises.
  • Ampeser. See Empeser in the N. D.
  • Amphiblistroide, the fifth thin mem­brane of the eye, bringing inward light into the christaline-humour.
  • Amphibole, ambiguous, doubtful.
  • Amphibolie, Amphi [...]ologie, a doubtful or double meaning in one or many words.
  • Amphisbeine, the Amphisbena, a swall spotted and worm-like Ser­pent, that hath a head at both [Page] ends, bites, and goeth both ways.
  • Amphitrite, the Sea,
  • Amphore, an ancient measure of a­bout 36 quarts.
  • Amphytane, a square and golden-colour stone, of the nature of a Load-stone.
  • Ampliateur, an amplifier.
  • Ampois, starch. See Empois in the N. D.
  • Amprise, an enterprise.
  • Amputer, to pare away.
  • Amuletté, a counter-charm.
  • Amuletier, a counter-charmer, a wizard.
  • Amurer, to wall up.
  • Amuse-sol, one that with vain pratling or toying holds fond peo­ple at gaze.
  • Amuseller, for Emmuseller, to mus­sle.
  • Amusoire, a thing to wonder at, a gazing-stock.
  • Amusse, for Aumusse, a fur worn by Canons.
  • Amuté. See Ameuté.
  • Amygdales, kernels rising in the neck or under the root of the tongue; also almonds.
  • Anacampserote, an herb whose touch renews decayed love between man and man.
  • Anacarde, the East-Indian fruit cal­led Anacardium, or bean of Ma­laca.
  • Anacardin, of anacardium.
  • Anacophalaeose, recapitulation.
  • Anachorete, the Hermit called an Anchorite.
  • Ana [...]ile. See Agnasile.
  • Anagal, the herb Pimpernel.
  • Anagnoste, a Reader.
  • Anagrammatiser, to make ana­graws.
  • Anagrammatisme, a making of a­nagrams.
  • Anagyre, the Plant called Bea [...] ­trisoly.
  • Analemme, an instrument whereby the course and [...]ation of the Sun is found.
  • Analogiser, to compare one thing with another.
  • Anangé, fatal.
  • Anaphore, a [...] ascension of the Pla­nets from the East by daily course of the Fir [...]a [...]ent; also a Figure called Repetition, when two Ver­ses begin with o [...] word.
  • Anapotique, a kinde of circular Dial for Winter.
  • Anaquil. See Anasile.
  • Anarche, Anarchique, without Go­vernment.
  • Anastomose, the communication of veins without arteries, whereby they help one another.
  • Anaté, a duck, or drake.
  • Anathematisation, an extreme cur­sing.
  • Ancelle, a hand-maid, a maid-ser­vant.
  • Ancholie, the Columbine herb or flo­wer.
  • Anchraige, anchorage.
  • Anchuses, wild bugloss, orchanet.
  • Ancoigner. See Encoigner.
  • Ancoigneure, as Encongnure, an angle, or corner.
  • Ancon, a long and heavy axe, in former times used amongst souldi­ers.
  • Ancrier, an inkhorn.
  • Ancrier, (adj.) yielding ink.
  • Ancrouëlle, a shrike.
  • Andoille, as Andouille in the N. D.
  • Andoillois, of links, or chitter­lings.
  • Andrin, an ill-savoured black colour of a horse.
  • Androginé, made of both sexes.
  • Anelet. See Annelet.
  • Anematiser, to anathematize.
  • Anemophylace, an Observer of hea­venly Rules.
  • Anestie, the season.
  • Anette, a Duck.
  • Aneurisme, a soft swelling.
  • Aneurissement, an ulcer, or ul [...] ­ration in the skin of a sinew.
  • Anforge, a leathern wallet.
  • Anfractueux, f [...]ll of turnings.
  • Anfractuosité, a turning (or winding) about.
  • Angar, an open shead or br [...]l, wherein husbandmen set their ploughs, &c. out of the Sun and Weather.
  • Angarie, personal service or drudge­ry; that whi h a man is forced to perform in his own person.
  • Angarié, tolled, or put to any drud­gery.
  • Angarier, to toil, or to compel unto any drudgery.
  • Angele, a she-Angel, a woman-An­gel.
  • Angelet, Angelette, Angelot, a little (or pretty) Angel.
  • Angine, the squi [...]sy.
  • Anglantine, a [...]eglanti [...], or sweet-briar; also a certain witty Game wher in onely Po [...]ts content, and to the best do [...] a Silver Eglan­tine, to the second a Marigold is given.
  • Angler, to shut up in a corner.
  • Anglet, an angle, a corner.
  • Angleuk, full of angles, or like an angle.
  • Anglois, (in this sense) a Credi­tor that pretends he hath much money owing, which is never like to be paid him.
  • Anglué, for Englué, covered with bird-lime.
  • Angoissé, grieved, filled with an­guish.
  • Angoisser, to fill with anguish, to grieve.
  • Angoisseusement, with great an­guish.
  • Angoisseuseté, much anguish.
  • Angoisseux, full of anguish.
  • Angonailes, Angonnages, po [...]y sores.
  • Angoüe, as Agoüe.
  • Angoule-vent, a swallow-wind.
  • Angourie, the great long pompio [...].
  • Angousle, a locust, or grashopper.
  • Angué, the herb wall-wort.
  • Anguillade, a lash, or blow with an eels skin.
  • Anguillette, a grig, or little eel.
  • Anguilliere, a pond, or place to keep eels in.
  • Anguillonneux, a crafty fellow, a sly man.
  • Anguleux, as Angleux.
  • Angurie, as Angourie.
  • Anguste, straight, narrow, s [...]ant.
  • Angustie, straightness, narrowness, scant [...]ss.
  • Anheler, to breath on; also, to fetch wind, or draw breath with difficulty; also, to be very greedy of.
  • Anhelé, br [...]thed or; drawn (as the breath) with difficulty; much longed for.
  • Anhelit, difficult breathing.
  • Ani, for Anis, the herb anis, and an [...]se [...]d.
  • Anichiler, for Annihiler, to annihi­late.
  • Aniler, to abate; [...], to darken.
  • Animadversion, an animadversion; also a r [...]proof.
  • Anime, [...]n easie kinde of Armour; also, the name of an [...]i-Indian Gum.
  • Animelles, the stories of [...]. &c.
  • Animeusement. [...].
  • Animeus, [...], resol [...].
  • Anir, an Indian herb us [...]d [...] Dyers.
  • Ani [...], [...] with [...] [...] creased, [Page] or multiply'd.
  • Aniser, to season with anis-seed; al­so to increase, or multiply.
  • Aniveller, to measure by plumb-line, or plumb-rule.
  • Anizé. See Anisé.
  • Anneantir. See Aneantir in the N. D.
  • Annelé, decked with rings; also, made into curls like a ring.
  • Anneler, to deck with rings; also to curl like a ring.
  • Annelet, a little ring.
  • Annicher, to put into a nest.
  • Annicheur, a putter of things into nests.
  • Annichiler, to annihilate.
  • Annion, Privilege d'annion, a years Protection granted by the Prince or Magistrate unto a Debtor.
  • Annombre, annumerated.
  • Annombrer, to annumerate.
  • Annonce-salut, health-declaring.
  • Annonchali, grown careless of him­self.
  • s'Annonchalir, to grow careless of himself.
  • Annone, a kind of Indian fruit; al­so the corn whereof brown bread is made for the people.
  • Annotation, annotation, mark, or observation. Annotation de biens, a seizure of the Goods of Offen­ders, that appear not in person or by Atturney, within a year after they have been summoned.
  • Annoté, noted, marked, or obser­ved.
  • Annoter, to note, mark, or observe.
  • Annulaire, (a Subst.) the Chancellor of France. Termed so in old time, when the Kings Signet was his great Seal.
  • Annulaire, (an Adj.) annular, round like a ring. Doigt annulaire, the ring-finger.
  • Anoirci, blackened.
  • Anoircir, to blacken.
  • Anombrer. See Annombrer.
  • Anonces, Banes of matrimony.
  • Anonchallanti, Anonchaly, negle­cted.
  • Anonciade, Ordre de l'Anonciade, an Order of Knighthood instituted in the year 1350, by a Duke of Savoy.
  • Annorexie, Anorexie, impatiency; also queasiness of stomack.
  • Anoué, almost choaked by letting down too great a morsel.
  • Anouër, almost to choak himself with greedy eating.
  • Ansaret, a certain bitter gum.
  • Ansé, eared, that hath an ear or handle.
  • Ansée, a kinde of basket having two handles or ears, to be car­ried between two.
  • Anseré, as Ansé.
  • Ansette, a little handle or ear of a pot, &c.
  • Ansouple, as Ensouple.
  • Ansule, a little handle.
  • Ante, an Aunt; also the jaumb of a door.
  • Antecesseurs, Ancestors.
  • Anteins, the sail-yard.
  • Anten, the last year.
  • Antenais, shoots or sprigs of a years growth.
  • Antenois, a hog, a year-old sheep, a lamb of the last year.
  • Anthere, the yellow tuft in the mid­dle of a rose.
  • Anthosal, made of rosemary.
  • Anthracite, a precious stone, where­in there seem to be flames or sparks of fire.
  • Anthromantie, Divination by the raising of dead men.
  • Anthropopathie, humane (or mans) passion.
  • Antiborée, a North-Dial.
  • Antibust, Ceinct à Pantibust, girt loosely, carelesly; also girt back­wards.
  • Anticipant, (subst.) an anticipator.
  • Antidore, a requital, one good turn for another.
  • Antidotaire, serving for a counter-poison.
  • Antidoté, furnished with (or pre­serv'd by) antidotes.
  • Antidoter, to furnish with (or pre­serve by) antidotes.
  • Antifortunal, a cross fortune.
  • Antille, a wooden latch of a door, or the ring that serves both to lift up the latch, and pull the door to.
  • Antinomie, contrariety (or oppositi­on) of two Laws.
  • Antinormies, enormous contrarie­ties.
  • Antipelargie, the reciprocal love of Children to their Parents; any requital, or mutual kindness.
  • Antiphones, the reciprocal voices or answers of two companies that sing by turns, as in a Quire.
  • Antiphonnier, the Book of Anthems in a Cathedral Church.
  • Antipodium, a surplusage, or over­plus.
  • Antiporte, an outward gate, or a gate that is just opposite unto ano­ther.
  • Antiquaille, an Antick, an ancient Monument.
  • Antiquaire (Adj.) old, ancient, stale.
  • Antiquement, anciently, after the old manner.
  • Antistrophe, an Antistrophe, or alter­nal conversion of two things which be somewhat alike.
  • Antonnoir, for Entonnoir, a funnel.
  • Antonomasie. See Antonomase in the N. D.
  • Antonomarie, excellent.
  • Antorc, yellow Monks-hood, Aconits mithridate.
  • Antrac, a Carbuncle (stone or sore.)
  • Anubet, the name of a cidar-apple.
  • Anuicter, to defer, or keep until night. S'anuicter, to wax night.
  • Anulaire, as Annulaire.
  • Anuller (for Annuller) to null.
  • Anuot, a blind-worm.
  • Any (for Anis) the herb Anis, or Anis-seed.
  • Aorner, Aornement. See Orner, Ornement in the N. D.
  • Aorolat, as Rolat.
  • Aorte, artere aorte, the mother of arteries.
  • Aouillé, cloyed.
  • Aourser, to burn at the bottom of a pot.
  • Aousté, reaped; ripened.
  • Aouster, to reap; also to ripen.
  • Aousteron, a reaper.
  • Aousteux, full ripe, as most fruit is in August.
  • Aparier, for Apparier, to match, to couple.
  • Apast, for Appats, baits, tempta­tions.
  • Apedeftes, ignorant people.
  • Apensement, purpose, or intent.
  • Apenser, to purpose, or intend. S'a­penser, to bethink himself.
  • Apentis, for Appantis, an addition to a house.
  • Apercher, to pearch.
  • Apert, apparent, plain, manifest.
  • Apert (the Verb) as Appert.
  • Apertement, apparently, plainly, openly.
  • Apertise. See Appertise.
  • Aphorretique, unsetled in opinion.
  • Aphronitre, saltpeter.
  • Aphyer, as Afyer.
  • Apier, a place where bees are kept and tended.
  • Apilé, well-set.
  • Apistolé, baited, cozened; also made a cuckold.
  • Apistoler, to bait, to cozen; also to cuckold one.
  • Apitoyer, to take pity of.
  • [Page] Aplanoyer, Aplanir, for Applanir, to even, to level.
  • Aplegement, as Appleigement.
  • Aplet, a kind of great draw-net.
  • s'Aplomber, to fall down plumb.
  • Apointir, for Appointir, to sharpen a thing at the point.
  • Apollinaire, henbane.
  • s'Apoltronner, to grow coward, or lazie.
  • Aponeurose, the sinewy separation of the muscles.
  • Apophyse, a process in Anatomy.
  • Aporetique, ever doubting.
  • Apostater, Apostatizer, to play the Apostate.
  • Aposteme, an impostume.
  • Apostemer, to swell into an impo­stume.
  • Aposter, for Apposter, to suborn, to get false Witnesses.
  • Apostil, Apostile, for Apostille, a postscript.
  • Apostoles, Letters missive from a Prince; also Writs of appeal sent from the Judge appealed from to him that is appealed unto.
  • Apostolizer, to play the Apostle.
  • Apotherapie, pastime, recreation.
  • Apothecaire, for Apoticaire, an A­pothecary.
  • Apothecairaisse, of an Apothecary, or Apothecary-like.
  • Apoué, satiated, so full as he can eat no more.
  • s'Appaillarder, to turn Whoremon­ger.
  • Appali, made, or grown pale.
  • Appalir, to make pale; to wax pale.
  • Appané, that hath had a portion.
  • Appaner, Appanner, to give a youn­ger son his portion.
  • Appaouvrir, for Appauvrir, to im­poverish.
  • Apparagé, fitly matched, well pai­red.
  • Apparcevoir, for Appercevoir, to perceive.
  • Appareillement, a preparing, or pro­viding for.
  • Appareilleuse, an Attire-woman; also a Bawd.
  • Apparenter aucun, to challenge or acknowledge one for a Kinsman.
  • s'Apparesser, s'Apparessir, to grow idle, or lazie.
  • Apparsondir, for Approsondir, to dig further, to search the bot­tom.
  • Appariation, a matching; also a perpetual Association or Correspon­dency of Jurisdiction between the King and a Lord Spiritual or Temporal, or between a Lord Spi­ritual and a Lord Temporal.
  • Apparietaire, as Apparitoire.
  • Apparissant, appearing.
  • Appariteur, an Apparitor; also a Hangman.
  • Apparitoire, Palitory of the Wall.
  • Apparoissance, appearance; also an eminency, or standing above o­thers.
  • Appastelé, fed with the hand.
  • Appasteler, to feed with the hand.
  • Appasteux, full of allurements.
  • Appeau, for Appel, an appeal; also a challenge.
  • Appeaux, Chimes, or the chiming of bells.
  • Appellement, a calling.
  • Appelleur, a caller.
  • Appelourdé, falsifi'd; cheated; soiled, or stained.
  • Appelourder, to falsifie; also to cheat; also to soil, or stain.
  • Appendicule, a little appendix.
  • Appenné, for Appanagé, that hath an Estate as it were to use only.
  • Appenser, as Apenser.
  • Appercevance, an inkling of a mat­ter.
  • Appert, expert, ready, nimble.
  • Appertement, expertly, readily, nim­bly.
  • Appertise, expertness, readiness, nim­bleness.
  • Appetence, appetency, appetite.
  • Appetit, for échalote, shalot.
  • Appieceter, to piece, or patch.
  • Appigres, the nets, hooks, &c. used by fisher-men.
  • Appiler, to pile, or heap together.
  • Applaner (for Applanir) to level.
  • Applausement, applause.
  • Applege, Appleige, Applegement, a bill of complaint for land; also a giving bond for a thing.
  • Appleger, Appleiger, to complain; also to become pledge, to enter into bond for. Appleger son marché, to warrant the things he sells.
  • s'Appleiger, to put into the Court a bill of Complaint for land.
  • Applommé de sommeil, fast a­sleep.
  • Applommer de sommeil, to cast into a heavy sleep.
  • Appoinct, opportunity.
  • s'Appointiser, to grow sharp at the end.
  • Appoissonné, stored, or furnished, with fish.
  • Appoissonnement, a storing, or fur­nishing, with fish.
  • Appoissonner, to store, or furnish, with fish.
  • Apportement, a carrying or bring­ing to; also a drawing near to the shore.
  • Apportionner, to give a portion.
  • Appostile, an answer unto a Peti­tion, set down in the margent thereof.
  • Appostiler, to answer a Petition, in the margent thereof.
  • Appreci, price, rate, or value set on things.
  • Apprimer, to incourage one about a thing, which before he durst not meddle with.
  • Apprins, learned.
  • Approbatif, approving.
  • Approchement, an approaching.
  • Approfité, made profit of, profited by, received or gathered as the re­venue or fruits of an Inheritance.
  • Approfitement, a bringing of profit unto, a receiving or gathering of the revenue or profits of an Inhe­ritance.
  • Approfiter, to make profit of; to bring profit unto; to receive the profits or revenues of an Inheri­ritance.
  • Appropriance, appropriation.
  • Appropriement, a fitting, confor­ming, accommodating.
  • Approsse, de grosse approsse, vio­lently, vehemently, with great strength.
  • s'Approvisionner, to provide him­self of necessaries.
  • Approuvement, approbation.
  • Appuie-pot, any thing that stays a pot on the fire.
  • Appuré, purifi'd, clarifi'd, cleared, discharged.
  • Appurement, a purifying, or clari­fying, a clearing, a discharging.
  • Appurer, to purifie, to clarifie. Ap­purer un compte, to clear an ac­count. Appurer une debte, to discharge a debt. Appurer une amende, to rate an amercement.
  • Appuyal, a leaning-stock.
  • Appuye, an open and out-standing Terrace or Gallery sit on the out­side with rails to lean upon.
  • Apres-disnées, the fees accruing un­to Judges and their Assistants by giving of afternoon-Orders; or the afternoon-sittings or hearings; or the Affairs transacted in the afternoon.
  • Apres-germain, Cousin apres-ger­main, a Cousin-germane remo­ved.
  • [Page] Aprique, sunny, that lieth open to the Sun.
  • Aprisonner, to take prisoner.
  • Apron, as Aspron.
  • Apte, apt, sit, satable.
  • Aptitude, aptitude, aptness, sutable­ness.
  • Aquatil, watery, lying in the water.
  • Aquiescer, for Acquiescer, to ac­quiesce.
  • Aquilon, the North-wind.
  • Aquilonel, Aquilonien, Northerly.
  • Aquoest (a Gase. word) this.
  • Arable, arable.
  • Aracte, the blood-sucking Serpent.
  • Aragnoide, a membrane of the eye.
  • Aragon, a sort of Oyntment good a­gainst Cramps and Convulsions.
  • Araigné, Araignée, for Aragnée, a spider.
  • Araigneux, full of spiders, or cob­webs; also feeding on spiders; whence souris araigneuse, a shrew­wouse.
  • Araignier, of (or like) a spider, or cobweb.
  • Arain, for Airain, brass.
  • Araire, a Plough.
  • Araisonner, as Arraisonner.
  • Aramme, a Fine set on a Plaintiffs or Defendants head, for not ap­pearing.
  • Aransor, a red herring.
  • Araroye, a round and skree [...]-like Ornament of feathers worn by the West-Indian Savages at their backs.
  • Arasser, See Traier in the N.D.
  • Arbalestrage, the shooting in a Cross­bow.
  • Arban, a days work in every week due by soule Vassals that hold by Villanage unto their Lords.
  • Arbausier, for Arboisier, an a [...]but­tree.
  • Arbaux, as Herbaux.
  • Arbenne, a kind of white Par­tridge.
  • Arbitrateur, Arbitrator, Ʋmpire.
  • Arbitré, arbitrated.
  • Arbitrer, to arbitrate.
  • Arborise, a kind of white free­stone.
  • Arboriser, to study the nature of trees.
  • Arbouce, Arbouse, for Arboise, an arbut, or strawberry.
  • Arbosier, for Arboisier, an arbut­tree.
  • Arboutan, for Arc boutant, a but­tress.
  • Arbreau, a shrub.
  • Arbret, a little tree.
  • Arbriet, the tiller of a cross-bow.
  • Arbrisselet, a little shrub.
  • Arbuste, a shrub; also a Grove of trees that are lopt and cut.
  • Arbuster, to plant a Ground with thick ranks of shrubs.
  • Arbustif, shrubby; also running or growing up by the side of a shrub.
  • Arcanne, red-oker.
  • Arcasse, the Counter in the poop of a ship.
  • Arcelet, as Harcelet.
  • Archade, for Arcade, an arch.
  • Archediacre, for Archidiacre, an Arch-deacon.
  • Archediacone, Arch-deaconry.
  • Archée, a bow-shoot, as far as a bow will carry.
  • Archelette, a little arch, or ark; also a womans car-wire.
  • Archenocher, a chief Mariner.
  • Archeprètre, for Archiprètre, a chief Priest.
  • Archerie, a Match of shooting; also a Ground to shoot in.
  • Archerot, a little Archer, a young Bow-man.
  • Archiatre, a principal Physician.
  • Archier, for Archer, an Archer, or Bowman.
  • Archimandrite, a General or Go­vernour of Hermits.
  • Archimarmitonerastique, an Abbey­l [...]bber.
  • Architecté, contrived, built, set up.
  • Architecter, to contrive, oversee, or set up a building.
  • Architectonique, belonging to Ar­chitecture.
  • Archool, dust.
  • Archure, a mill-hoop, or mill- [...]ase.
  • Arçoir, yester [...]ight.
  • Arçon, (s.) a burning, or setting on fire.
  • Arçonneux, Arçonner, of, or be­longing to a saddle-bow; also sit to hang, or to be carried at a saddle-bow.
  • Arcotie, benumming, stupifying.
  • Arcou, a kinde of latten, or copper, whereof Kettles are made.
  • Arcture, the star Bootes, which fol­loweth Charles's-wain.
  • Arcuer, to arch, bow, or bend.
  • Arcure, an arching, or bowing.
  • Ardans, S. Hermes fires.
  • Ardentement, ardently.
  • Ardid, as Ardit, a farthing.
  • Ardille, clay, or mould.
  • Ardillé, done over with clay.
  • Ardiller, to do over with clay.
  • Ardillier, as Terre ardilliere, tough earth, or clay, whereof brick and tile may be made.
  • Ardit, a farthing.
  • Ardoir, to burn, or be on fire; to be eager in a business; to desire ser­vently; to inflame, or set on fire.
  • Ardoisé, covered with states; of state.
  • Ardoiseux, full of slates.
  • Ardoisin, of slate.
  • Ardouë, a little brook running along a field.
  • Ardre, as Ardoir.
  • Ardu, hard, difficult.
  • Ardy, as Ardit, a farthing.
  • Arechal, for Archal, wire, copper­wire.
  • Areille, for Oreille, an ear.
  • Arene, sand, gravel.
  • Areneux, sandy.
  • Arenger, (for Ranger) to set in or­der.
  • Areniere, a sand (or gravel) pit.
  • Arentelles, gossymere; the long, white, and cobweb-like exhala­tion that flies in the air, in Sunny and Summer days.
  • Arenuleux, full of sand, or gravel.
  • Arer, to plough.
  • Arere, a plough.
  • Ares-metys, presently, by and by.
  • Areste d'une espée, the crest of a sword, a sharp rising in the middle thereof.
  • Aresteux, full of small bones, as a fish.
  • Areteuse, the herb Sorrel.
  • Arex, presently, by and by.
  • Arfie, a horn-fish.
  • Argolice, a raddish-root.
  • Argalie, a Surgions syringe.
  • Arganete, a Wire-drawers bench.
  • Argatile, a kinde of Titmouse.
  • Arge, a lightning which blasteth and maketh black.
  • Argentangine, the silver Squinsy.
  • Argenteux, full of silver.
  • Argentiere, the place wherein me­tals are tried, before Coin be made of them.
  • Argerite, the silver-coloured foam of tryed lead.
  • Argilier, the Pontic Acatia, (a thor­ny shrub.)
  • Argiliere, a clay-pit,
  • Argillette, fine clay, or mould.
  • Arglantier, for Eglantier, an Eglan­tine-tree.
  • Argolet, a light horseman.
  • Argot, &c. See Ergot in the N.D.
  • Argoteuse, a scold.
  • Argouil, a ring of iron.
  • Argousin, the Lieutenant of a Gal­ley.
  • [Page] Argu, la teste pleine d'argu, the head full of proclamations.
  • Argué, argued; chidden, provoked.
  • Arguer, to argue; to chide, to pro­voke.
  • Arguer, an arguer.
  • Arguillonneux, litigious, contentious.
  • Arguties, quirks, subtleties.
  • Argyrite. See Argerite.
  • Ari, dryed up.
  • Aridelle, a jade, a skeleton.
  • Arietant, leaping, or fighting as a ram.
  • Arignée (for Aragnée,) a spider.
  • Arigot, see Argot in the N.D.
  • Aristocratiquement, Aristocratical­ly.
  • Armaire, for Armoire, a cup-board.
  • Armaison, as, ceci est plus d'armai­son que cela, this is stronger than that.
  • Armelin, an ermin.
  • Armeries, as Armoires.
  • Armeurerie, Armour.
  • Armilles, the Iron-rings, or braces, wherein the gudgeons of a (wheels) spindle turn; also certain little round members in Pillars, &c.
  • Arminette, for Erminete, a Joyners hollow axe.
  • Armoiré, bearing arms.
  • Armoires, the flowers called sweet Johns, or sweet Williams.
  • Armoirie, an Arsenal, a store-house for Arms.
  • Armoise, the herb called Mugwort, or Mothwort.
  • Armoisin, taffata.
  • Armonie, for Harmonie, harmo­ny.
  • Armorial, belonging unto armour.
  • Armorier, an Armourer.
  • Armottes, a broth or pap made of meal sleeped in li [...]ur, and sod­den till it be thi [...]k.
  • Armoux, choux armoux, a kinde of green col [...]worts, whose l [...]a [...]es are of an oval form.
  • Armoyer, to tip (or deck) the haft of a knife, or handle of a sword with any work.
  • Armoyse. See Armoise.
  • Arneat, a shrike.
  • Arné, weak-backed.
  • Arnement, a weakning of the back.
  • Arner, to weaken the back.
  • Arnoglosse, plantain.
  • Arollé, See Arrollé.
  • Aromat, aromatical.
  • Aromatic rozat, a certain sweet powder, good for the stomack and heart.
  • Aromaticité, sweet savour, pleasant smell or taste, as of spices.
  • Aromatizé, perfumed, or sweetened with spices.
  • Aromatizer, to perfume, or sweeten with spices.
  • Aron, the herb aron, calves-foot.
  • Aronde, a trunk to shoot in.
  • Arondeau, arondelet, a young swal­low.
  • Aroy, a plough.
  • Arpailleur, a seller of old trinkets, or of old iron; also, a siner of morals.
  • Arpentement, a surveying, a mea­suring of land,
  • Arpilleux, ravenous, devouring.
  • Arquebouse, for Arquebuse, an har­quebuse.
  • Arquemie, for Alchimie, Alcumy.
  • Arquer, to arch, bow, or bend.
  • Arrabler, to snatch away, to get by hook or by crook.
  • d'Arrache-pied, continually, imme­diately, without intermission.
  • Arrachis. Set Arrachement in the N. D.
  • Arraisonné, talked, or discoursed with.
  • Arraisonnement, a talking or di­scoursing with.
  • Arraisonner, to talk, or discourse with.
  • Arramir, to swear.
  • Arrapé, snatched away.
  • Arraper, to snatch away.
  • Arrasade, a salamander.
  • Arre, tart, or a choaking, as a wild pear.
  • Arrecer. See Arresser.
  • Arreche, a fish-bone.
  • Arréement, good a [...]a [...], order, equi­page; also, a giving of money in earnest.
  • Arrené. See Arné.
  • Arrer. See Arrher in the N. D.
  • Arrerager, to come into a [...]ars.
  • Arrerailles, co [...]n sowed late in the year.
  • Arres, for Arrhe, an earnest.
  • Arressement, the rising, or stiffness of the yard.
  • Arresser, to stand, as a mans yard.
  • Arreste, for Arête, a fish-bone.
  • Arrestement, a stopping, or staying.
  • Arreste-nes, ship-staying.
  • Arrhemens, earnest.
  • Arrierage, for Arrerage, arr [...]ars.
  • Arrieré, come or cast behind.
  • Arriere-chambre, a back-chamber.
  • Arriere-coin, a back-corner.
  • Arriere-cour, a back-yard.
  • Arriere-demandé, slightly deman­ded, slowly asked.
  • Arriere-foin, after-grass.
  • Arriere-fosse, a back-ditch, or dike.
  • Arriere-main, a blow given back­ward.
  • Arriere-ouvert, wide open.
  • Arriere-poincté, back- [...]it [...]hed.
  • Arriere-poincter, to back-stitch.
  • Arrierer, to go backward, also to set back.
  • Arriere-taille, a second or later tax.
  • Arriere-vasseur, an Ʋnder-villain.
  • Arigateur, a Waggoner.
  • Arriger, s'arriger, to rise, or stand up stiff, as a mans yard.
  • Arrivement, an arriving, or coming to.
  • Arrobe, a measure coming to 25 pound.
  • s'Arroger, to presume, to ascribe too much unto himself.
  • Arrollé, at work, set to work.
  • s'Arroller, to fall to work, to set himself to it.
  • Arroiie. See Arrobe.
  • Arrouler, to rowl, to tumble.
  • Arrouter, to put into the way. S'ar­router, to meet together.
  • Arroy, array.
  • Arroyé, arrayed.
  • Arroyer, to array.
  • Arrudir, to make rude.
  • Arruner, to put in order.
  • Arry avant, on afore, away there hoe.
  • Ars, the breast, or brisket of a horse.
  • Ars, brûlé, burnt, consumed with heat or fire.
  • Ar [...]cide, a pricy murderer.
  • Arseirole, a pear-like fruit, that comes of a hawthorn grafted on a qui [...]ce.
  • Arsel, See Arzel.
  • Arson, for Arçon, a saddle-bow.
  • Artail, for Orteuil, a toe.
  • Artemon, the mi [...]en Mast or Sail of a ship.
  • Arterial, of, or belonging to Arte­ries.
  • Arteriotomie, an incision of Arte­ries.
  • Arthetiques, Cowslips.
  • Arthritique, Ive arthritique, herb I [...]y.
  • Arthrodie, an half conjunction of two bones, the head of the one being but half lodged in the ca­vity of the other.
  • Artialiser, to make an art of.
  • Artichauliere, a be [...]l, or plot set with a [...]ticlokes.
  • Articulaire, belonging to a joynt.
  • Articulation, a growing or shooting up from joynt to joynt; also the [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] hurting, or bursting of young joynts.
  • Artien, an Artist.
  • Artiere, a small fish called Shar­pling, Stickling, or Stickle-back.
  • Artifier, to make by art or craft.
  • Artiller, to furnish with artillery.
  • Artillier, a Bowyer, or Bow-maker.
  • Artimon. See Trinquet in the N. D.
  • Artiron, for Artison, a greenish worm, cleaving in great numbers to the leaves of Coleworts and o­ther plants; also a kind of moth.
  • Artisonné, moth-eaten, worm-eaten.
  • Artoir, the great toe.
  • Artre, moth; also a Kings-fisher. Artre grise des bois, a wood­louse.
  • Artrose, a natural and movable con­nexion of bones.
  • Artuson. See Artiron.
  • Arzel, a horse with a white foot on the right or further side.
  • Asare, the herb fole-foot, haslewort.
  • Asarole, See Azarole.
  • Asbetir, a kind of flax that will not be b [...]rnt, and yields cloth which fire scours better than water.
  • Ascalabe, Ascalave, Ascalavette, the starry lizard.
  • Ascaride, a small round worm which is in the bowels.
  • Asçavanté, throughly instructed, made skilful in.
  • Asçavanter, to instruct throughly, to make skilful in.
  • Asçavoir, to wit, that is to say.
  • Asche, and Aschée. See Ache, A­chée in the N. D.
  • Ascite, a kind of Dropsie.
  • Ascles, shivers, or splinters of wood.
  • Ascouter (for Ecouter) to hear.
  • Aserches, wild prick-madam, stone-crop, worm-glass.
  • Asereiner, to clear, or chear up.
  • Asgrandissement, for Aggrandisse­ment, an inlarging, or making bigger; also preferment, advance­ment.
  • Asinin, ass-like, of or belonging to an Ass.
  • Asme, Asmatique, V. Asthme, Astm­matique in the N. D.
  • Asnée, an ass-load of.
  • Asne-feuille, a kind of Origan, which Asses love exceeding well.
  • Asnesque, ass-like, sottish, dull, igno­rant, blockish.
  • Asnichon, a young ass.
  • Asnier (a Verb) to ride an ass.
  • Asnonner, to fole, or bring forth an ass.
  • Asoter, Asoté. See Assoter.
  • Aspalathe, a kind of shrub whose aromatical wood is used by Per­fumers.
  • Asparge (for asperge) sparra­grass.
  • Asperer, to sharpen, to exasperate.
  • Aspergé, besprinkled.
  • Aspergement, a besprinkling.
  • Asperger, to besprinkle.
  • Asperger, an holy-water sprinkle.
  • Aspergiere, a bed of sparra-grass.
  • Aspergule, Aspertule, claver, goose-grass.
  • Aspersé, besprinkled.
  • Asphalte (for bitume) bitumen.
  • Asperelle, for Aprelle, an herb called horse-tail.
  • Aspresse (for âpreté) sharpness, ea­gerness, tartness.
  • Asprir, to sharpen, aggravate, ex­asperate.
  • Asprissement, a sharpening, &c.
  • Assagi, become wise.
  • Assagir, to make wise.
  • Assagissement, a becoming wise.
  • Assaieret, pillules d'assaieret, a sort of pills.
  • Assassinement, a murdering of one.
  • Assation, a rosting, a concocting by an outward dry heat.
  • Assavanter. See Asçavanter.
  • Assavoir, for savoir, to wit, viz.
  • Assauvagi, made wild.
  • Assauvagir, to make wild.
  • Asse, the ancient Romans As, a cop­per-coyn worth somewhat more than a penny sterl.
  • Asse-douce, the sweet gum that is­sues from the sacrificed or cut stalks and roots of the African and Cyrenian Laserwort.
  • Assecher, as Asseicher, to dry.
  • Assediacre, an Arch-deacon.
  • Assee, a wood-cock.
  • Asseeur (for Asseyeur) a Cessor in matter of Taxes, &c.
  • Asseiché, dry.
  • Asseicher, to dry.
  • Asseller, to go to the stool.
  • Assemblement, Assemblure, a joyn­ing of things together.
  • Assence, assent, consent.
  • Ascensement, Ascenseur. See A­censement, Acenseur in the N.D.
  • Assene, or Assenne, an assignation, or laying out of a dower or joyn­ture for a widow or wife. Assene & adois, a portion or gift bestow­ed by a father on his younger sons, or on his daughters, for their pre­ferment.
  • Assens, a certain profit made of Fo­rests and high-grown Woods, as the pawnage, mastage, &c.
  • Assentation, flattery.
  • Assentatoire, flattering.
  • Assenti, agreed to; also scented.
  • Assentir, to agree to; also to take the wind or scent of.
  • Asseral, a kind of Turkish drug.
  • Asseré (for aceré) tempered with steel.
  • Assermenté, sworn, put to his oath.
  • Assermenter, to put to an oath.
  • Assertivement, affirmatively, reso­lutely, as one that will stand to what he says.
  • Asservagi, made a slave.
  • Asservagir, to make a slave.
  • Asservissage, Asservissement, thral­dom, slavery.
  • Assessoriat, the Place, or Office of a Judge lateral.
  • Asseulé, forsook, or left alone.
  • Asseuler, to forsake, or leave alone.
  • Asseur (for asseuré) sure, secure.
  • Asseurement, Asseureté, the peace or good behaviour granted unto against another, who, if he break it, commits felony (by some Customs in France;) also protection, safe­guard, or safe conduct.
  • Assiduellement, for Assidument, con­tinually.
  • Assiement, a sitting.
  • Assier (for acier) steel.
  • Assignal, Land assigned or laid out unto a woman for her Joynture or Dower, and which she injoyeth until she have levy'd as much as she brought with her. Assignal de rente, rents assigned unto a woman for the same purpose.
  • Assignat, an assignation, or appoint­ment; an allotment; also a day or place appointed.
  • Assillonnement, a making of balks in ploughing.
  • Assillonner, to balk, or plough up in balks.
  • Assimenter, to cement.
  • Assimilation, a comparing, or liken­ing.
  • Assimilativement, by comparison.
  • Assimilé, compared, likened.
  • Assimiler, to compare, to liken.
  • Assis (a Subst.) assesments, or impo­sitions.
  • Assode, decay'd with sickness, also weary of his life, or careless of himself.
  • Assolé, sunned, seasoned, or dried in the Sun; also settled (as a horse) upon all his feet.
  • Assoler, to s [...], to season or dry in [Page] the Sun. S'assoler, to settle him­self upon all his feet.
  • Assommeiller, to cast into a slum­ber.
  • Assommeresse, main assommeresse, a deadly heavy hand, that fells down whatever it strikes.
  • Assopir, Assopi, Assopissement. See Assoupir, &c. in the N. D.
  • Assorbir, to drink, or to soak up.
  • Assoté, besotted, doting on. L'As­sotée de quêcun, a mans Sweet­heart or Mistriss on whom the fool dotes.
  • Assoter, Assotter, Assotir, to besot, to make dote on.
  • Assoubjecter, to make subject, or bring under.
  • Assouchement, a genealogy, stock, progeny.
  • Assoupli, suppled, or made soft.
  • Assouplir, to supple, or to make soft.
  • Assourdi, made, or grown deaf.
  • Assourdir, to make deaf.
  • Assourdissement, a making deaf.
  • Assouvagir, to asswage.
  • Assubjecter, as Assoubjecter.
  • Assuefaction, an accustoming to a thing.
  • Assumpter, to take up into a high place.
  • Assus, on, upon.
  • Ast, armes d'ast, weapons to be cast as darts.
  • Astace, a lobstir.
  • Astalabore. See Ascalabe.
  • Astelles. See Attelles.
  • Astellier, a stall.
  • Asterion, a fish, whose coat is set with star-like spots.
  • Asterique, starry, star-like, of or be­longing to a star.
  • Asthamatic, pursie, short-winded.
  • Astheme, pursiness, short-wind.
  • Astillier, a Work-house for Masons, a Carpenters Yard.
  • Astipulateur, a Record, or Witness; also one that makes an agreement with another; also a help, or as­sistant.
  • Astivité, craft in buying and sel­ling.
  • Astour. See Atour in the N. D.
  • Astragalomantie, divination by hac­ckle-bones.
  • Astraict. See Abstraict.
  • Astranti, the herb Master-wort.
  • Astrapade (for Estrapade) the strap­pado.
  • Astreinct, forced, compelled, or con­strained; also costive, or belly­bound.
  • Astreindre, to force, compel, or con­strain; also to binde, or make costive.
  • Astrelabe (for Astrolabe) an Astro­labe.
  • Astrologier (for Astrologue) an A­strologer.
  • Astronomien (for Astronome) an Astronomer.
  • Astrucier, one that keeps or catches Ostridges.
  • Astruser, to press (or keep) down.
  • Astuce, craft, subtlety, cunning.
  • Astur, crafty, subtle, cunning.
  • Asur, &c. See Azur in the N. D.
  • Asymbole, scot-free.
  • Atabal. See Attabale.
  • Artant, forthwith.
  • Ataraxie, resolution, constancy; also tranquillity, or quietness of minde.
  • A-tard, late, slowly.
  • Atastre, the plain part or face of an Architrave; also a large fillet, or bend in a pillar, &c.
  • Atedier. See Attedier.
  • Atelles. See Attelles.
  • Atermoyer, &c. See Attermoyer.
  • Aterrer, &c. See Atterrer in the N. D.
  • Athanasie, for Atanasie, the herb tansy.
  • Athaner, to kill.
  • Atheiste (for Athée) an atheist.
  • Atheisterie, Atheism.
  • Atheronne, a kinde of impostume.
  • Athle, a wretched fellow.
  • Athletique, Champion-like, or be­longing to a Champion.
  • Atiffer, as Attiffer in the N. D.
  • Ativelles, trinkets.
  • Atizer, for Attiser, to stir the fire.
  • Atourneresse, as Attourneresse.
  • Atout, with, together with.
  • Atrabiliaire, for Atrabilaire, sub­ject to melancholy.
  • Atrainer, to trail, or drag along.
  • Atre, a hearth.
  • Atrebiliaire, as Atrabilaire.
  • s'Atrister, for s'Attrister, to be grie­ved.
  • Atrophe, that is in a consumption, or to whom meat doth little or no good.
  • Atrophie, a kinde of consumption.
  • s'Atrophier, to consume, or pine a­way.
  • Atruander, as Attruander.
  • Atlens, bounds, limits.
  • Attabale, a kinde of brazen drum used by the Moorish horsemen.
  • Attainct, Attaincte, Attaindre. See Atteint, Atteinte, Atteindre in the N. D.
  • Attalenter, as Entalenter.
  • Attavanat, a horse that's flea-bitten only in the flank or in the neck.
  • Attayne, pettishness.
  • Attayneux, pettish.
  • Attediation, a wearying, or cloy­ing.
  • Attedié, wearied, cloyed.
  • Attedier, to weary, cloy, or trouble with too much of one thing.
  • Attelements, harness for draught­horses or oxen.
  • Attelier, a work-house, or shop for an Artificer.
  • Attelle, a splent, or stick to make a splent of.
  • Attelles, the haumes of a draught­horses collar, the two flat sticks that encompass it.
  • Attenance, a dependency upon, or a belonging unto.
  • Attendant, an attendant. Atten­dant que, whilst that.
  • Attendue, an attendance, or atten­ding.
  • Attenir, to keep back, to detain. S'attenir à, to hang upon.
  • Attenu, bound, or beholden unto.
  • Attenuri, made thin, or slender.
  • Atterissement. See Atterrissement.
  • Attermoyé, that hath a time granted for the payment of a debt.
  • Attermoyement, the granting of a time for the payment of a sum.
  • Attermoyer, to grant a term for the payment of a debt.
  • Atterrasseur, an overthrower, an op­pressor.
  • s'Atterrir, to rot on the earth, to be­come as earth, to fall unto the earth.
  • Atterrissement, an overthrowing to the earth, a covering with earth.
  • Atteyner un chien sur queleun, to turn a dog upon one.
  • Attiffets, attires.
  • Attiler, to deck.
  • Attiltrer. See Attitrer in the N.D.
  • Attiné, provoked; also fastened on.
  • Attiner, to provoke, urge, or incense; also to fasten on.
  • Attinté, decked, or trimmed up.
  • Attinter, to deck, or trim up.
  • Attiques, little notes, or tickets.
  • Attirantons, an Artificers tools.
  • Attirement, a drawing to.
  • Attise-feu, Attise-querelle, a fire­brand of contention, a raiser of sedition.
  • Attisonné, stirred, as the fire; also scorched, or half-burnt.
  • Attisonner (for attiser) to stir the fire.
  • Attorné, attired, decked, or set out.
  • [...][Page] Attorner, to attire, deck, or set out.
  • Attouche, a gentle touch; also a glance at, o [...] short mention of.
  • Attoucher, to handle gently, to mention briefly.
  • Attour, for Atour, Womens attire.
  • Attouré, attired, dressed, set out.
  • Attourné, attired; also atturned as a Tenant.
  • Attournement, an attiring, decking, or dressing; also the Atturnment of a Tenant.
  • Attourner, to attire, deck, or dress; also to atturn, as a Tenant.
  • Attourneresse, a waiting-woman.
  • Attourneur, a waiting-man.
  • Attrabilaire, for Atrabilaire, subject to melancholy.
  • Attrahiere, escheatage, or an escheat.
  • Attraiement, an attracting, or draw­ing unto.
  • Attraire, to attract, or to draw un­to.
  • Attrament, ink, or bleach for Shoo­makers.
  • Attraperie, Attrapoire, a catching.
  • Attrayamment, attractively, inti­cingly.
  • Attrayeres, escheats.
  • Attrectation, a soft and often hand­ling.
  • Attrempé, tempered, moderated, of a temperate or stay'd humour; mixed, seasoned; soaked in moi­sture.
  • Attrempement, a temper, or mode­ration, even-measure, stay'd beha­viour; also a soaking in liquor.
  • Attrempément, temperately, mode­rately, staydly, soberly.
  • Attremper, to temper, moderate, use a [...]st and even measure; also to mix, or season; also to soak in moisture.
  • Attributif, attributive.
  • Attriste-coeur, that grieves the heart.
  • Attrit, rubbed, [...]etted, wasted, worn away.
  • Attrition, a rubbing, fretting, or wearing out.
  • s'Attruander, to loyter, to grow an idle tr [...]ant.
  • Atu [...]ré à une opinion, obstinate in a [...] opinion.
  • Avachi, slackened, or gr [...]wn slaggy.
  • s'Avachir, to slack [...]n, to grow slag­gy.
  • Avail, a wild [...]oar.
  • Availlon, a kinde of shell-fi h.
  • Aval [...]e, [...]; gone; si upon it.
  • Avallage, [...] a small wing dow [...]; also the fall of a river; also a Porters hire for the laying of wine down into a cellar.
  • Avallanche, a great falling, or sink­ing down, as of earth.
  • Avallasse, an inundation; also a swallowing Gulf.
  • Avaller, &c. See Avaler in the N. D.
  • Avalloire, Avallouëre, a hole, or trap-door, to let a thing down by into a lower room.
  • Avalluer, &c. See Evaluer in the N. D.
  • Avanceur, an advancer.
  • Avanchaye, a Grove of Oziers, or such like trees.
  • Avanger, to suffice, or to serve the turn; to furnish throughly, to bear the whole charge of.
  • Avant, (for Avent) the time of Ad­vent, which is about a month be­fore Christmas.
  • Avant-chien, the lesser Dog-star, which appears when the Dog-days begin.
  • Avant-conce [...], fore-conceived.
  • Avant-courement, a fore-running.
  • Avant-coureux (for Avant-coureur) fore-runner.
  • Avant-coureux (Adj.) fore-running.
  • Avant-jouëur, he that begins the Game or Comedy.
  • Avant-jugé. See Prejugé in the N. D.
  • Avant-logis, a room or lodging in the fore-part of a house standing alone; an outward gate with lodgings in it; also a Court­yard, or coming in; and a Court, Porch, or Portal before a house.
  • Avant-main, the fore-part of the hand, or that part which is be­tween the wrist and knuckles; or before-hand.
  • Avant-parleur, a fore-speaker, or one that is too forward to speak.
  • Avant-pas, the start, or an advan­tage in a ra [...]e or cours [...].
  • Avant-penser, to premeditate, or be­think himself before-hand.
  • Avant-perse, the greatest kind of A­pri [...]ck; or as,
  • Avant-pesche, the hasty Peach.
  • Avant-pied, the part of the foot next to the [...]s.
  • Avant-poignet, so much of the hand as is between the wri [...]t and k [...] ­kl [...]s.
  • Avant-propos, a Pro [...].
  • Avant-promenoir, a [...] Walk be­for [...] the d [...]r of a [...]reat [...].
  • Ava [...], d [...] of wares or m [...]rch [...] ­d [...]; leaking of wi [...]es; also [...] charges of the carriage, or mea­suring thereof; also the vails of a Cook, &c.
  • Avau l'eau, down the water.
  • Aubain, a foreiner, and properly such a one as is born in a Country so neer ours as notice may conveni­ently be taken of his original and name. Therein differing from E­spour, who comes one knows not whence.
  • Aubaineté, Aubanité, Escheatage.
  • Aubeau, the white poplar-tree.
  • Aubee, the pith of wood and tim­ber.
  • Aubeine, a kinde of grape; also Escheatage.
  • Aubel, as Aubeau.
  • Aubelieve, a huffler.
  • Aubenable, subject unto Escheatage.
  • Aubenage. See Aubain in the N. D.
  • Auber, to flit, or to remove from place to place.
  • Auberet, for Aubereau, a kinde of Eagle.
  • Aubergé, lodged, harboured.
  • Aubergeon. See Haubergeon.
  • Aubert, coin, money.
  • Aubes, the short boards which are set into the outside of a water­mills wh el.
  • Aubespin (for Aubepine,) the white-thorn, or [...]aw-thorn.
  • Aubicon, a kind of great fig.
  • Aubier, the pith of timber, or that part of it which is subject unto worm- [...]ating.
  • Aubin, as Aubier; also the white of an egge.
  • Aubinage, as Aubaine in the N. D.
  • Aubour, as Aubier.
  • Aubourt, a kind of tr e.
  • Aubun d'oeut, the white of an egg.
  • Aueaigne, dogs [...]ather well-dressed.
  • Auche, a round hasp of iro [...], where­in the barrel of a windlace t [...] ­ [...].
  • Aucunessois, sometimes, now and [...].
  • Audiencé, came to a hearing.
  • Auditif, of a [...]aring pr [...]ty.
  • Audro [...], wit [...], or towards; also [...] i [...], directly upon, all a­ [...] [...].
  • Ave, [...], lean, with [...]red.
  • Aveill [...], for Abeille, [...] [...]oney-bee.
  • Aven, wealth, go [...]ds, [...]i [...]i [...]s.
  • Avenage, a quantity of oats p [...]id [...] a [...]ord i [...] li [...]n or a [...] [...] duty; [...], [...]; a [...] as Au [...] [...] N. D.
  • Ave [...]aire, a [...], a strange [...].
  • [Page] Avenat, oat-meal.
  • Avene (for avoine,) oats.
  • Aveneri, oaten-straw, or stubble.
  • Aveneray, Aveneron, wild oats.
  • Aveneux, strangers, foreiners.
  • Avenger, as Avanger.
  • Avenier, belonging to oats, or feed­ing on oats.
  • Averement, an averring, or avouch­ing; also a searching, or sifting out; also a just estimation of things.
  • Averlan, a good fellow, or merry companion.
  • Averne, hell, or the pit of hell.
  • Avernal, hellish.
  • Averon, as Aveneron.
  • Averroncation, a weeding; a put­ting away of evil; also an ap­peasing.
  • Averronquer, to weed; to put a­way evils; also to appease.
  • Avertin, frensy, lunacy; also stub­borness, or wilfulness.
  • s'Avertiner, to become frantick or lunatick; also to grow stubborn, or wilful.
  • Avertineux, frantick, lunatick; al­so stubborn, or wilful.
  • Avesprement, a drawing towards night.
  • Avesprir, to grow towards night.
  • Avet, a sir-tree.
  • Avette, a little bee.
  • Aveuëment, a view.
  • Avengleté, blindness.
  • Avenglette, à avenglettes, blindly, blindfold.
  • Aufuege, a kinde of pale, red wheat.
  • Augée, a trough (or manger) full.
  • Auget, a little trough, or manger.
  • Augibis, a kinde of grape.
  • Augmentatif, augmentative.
  • Augué, wall-wort.
  • Augurement, a divining.
  • Au-guy-l'an-neuf. The voice of coun­trey-people begging New-years-Gifts in Christmas.
  • s'Aviander, to feed, or victual him­self.
  • Avictuaillé, furnished with victuals.
  • Avictuaillement, a furnishing with victuals.
  • Avictuailler, to furnish with victuals.
  • Avier, to set in the way; also as [...] ­viver.
  • Avigouri, grow [...] lusty.
  • Avilener, to disgrace, or do a vil­lany unto.
  • Aviler, as Avilir, in the N. D.
  • Avilissement, an imbasing, or dis­esteeming.
  • Avillonné, affronted, troubled, mo­lested; also environed.
  • Avillonner, to affront, trouble, or mo­lest.
  • Aviner un vaisseau, to season, or to fill a vessel with wine.
  • Aviné, seasoned or filled with wine; also turned into the nature of wine; also that hath drunk too much wine, or that is given to drinking of wine; also tasting like wine.
  • Avironner, to row with oars.
  • Avisement, heed, forecast, wariness.
  • Avision nocturne, a night-dream, or vision.
  • Avitin, as Biens Avitins, heir­looms, Goods that come by Inhe­ritance.
  • Avivé, quickened, revived.
  • Aviver, Avivre, to quicken, to re­vive.
  • Aulbespin, for Aubepine, the white thorn.
  • Aulbin, & Aulbinage, as Aubin, Aubinage.
  • Aulmosné, given in alms.
  • Aulnée, helicampane, s [...]abwort.
  • Aulonnes, the canvas whereof sails for ships are made.
  • Aulonnier, a kind of strawberry-tree.
  • Aulx (for ail,) garlick. Aulx-oignon, great garlick.
  • Aulx (for autres,) others.
  • Aumaille, great cattle.
  • Aumoire (for armoire,) a cup-board.
  • Aumonner, Aumosner, to bestow in alms.
  • Aumosné, bestowed in alms.
  • Aumosner, to bestow in alms.
  • Aumosnerie, an Alms-house.
  • Aumosnier, (Adj.) charitable.
  • Aumosniere, an alms-purse.
  • Auner, (for unir) to make one, or to joyn into one.
  • Aunir, to close, or shut up.
  • Aunon, a si h called Keeling.
  • Aunoye (for Aunaye,) an alder-grove.
  • Avoie, or Avoye, a sloe-worm, or blind-worm.
  • Avoi [...]e, advowed, avouched.
  • Auque, a g [...].
  • Aure, a [...] air.
  • Aureill [...] (for ore [...]le) an [...]ar.
  • Aureillons, the [...]mps.
  • Aurelles, [...]ll-berries.
  • Aure [...]le (for [...]areole,) sparge, or little law [...]d,
  • Auriflamme, as O [...]flamme in the N. D.
  • Aurillage, an Imposition laid (in some parts of France) upon the P [...]ofits made of Bees.
  • Auriol, Auriou, the greatest kinde of the fish Turdus.
  • Auripeaux, the mumps.
  • Aurislage, as Aurillage.
  • Aureosne (for aurone) the herb Southernwood.
  • Auron, wild (or barren) oats.
  • Auron, as Aureosne.
  • Aurorin, of, or belonging to the morning; also early.
  • Austerons, Reapers; also the fruits of August, or harvest, corn.
  • Austour (for Autour,) the Goshawk.
  • Austral, Southerly.
  • Austre, Austrie, South-wind.
  • Austrin, of the South, warm as the South.
  • Autan, a Southern wind.
  • Authenriquer, to make authentick.
  • Authrice, a woman-Author.
  • Autins, as Utins, in the N. D.
  • Autographe, written with his own hand.
  • Autom, Autumne (for automne,) Autumn.
  • Automnal, Automnel, Autumnal, of Autumn.
  • Auvernas, a kinde of black grapes.
  • Auviez, a kinde of wild pine.
  • Avulse, plucked away.
  • Auxerrois. See Megle.
  • Auxiliateur, a helper.
  • Axillaire, of, or belonging to the arm-hole.
  • Axionomantie, divination by a hatchet and Jeat burnt.
  • Axonne, Axunge, fat of swine.
  • Aygue, water.
  • Ayguer, a sink.
  • Ayguiere (for aiguiere,) an ewer.
  • Aymact (for aimant,) a load-stone.
  • Aymer (for aimer,) to love.
  • Aynets, little rods or twigs where­in herrings are threaded, and laid on hardles to be redded.
  • Ayré, aired.
  • Aysement, a [...]akes or prity.
  • Aysle (for aile,) a wing.
  • Az. See As in the N. D.
  • Azagaye, as Zagaye.
  • Azarole, a kinde of medlar-tree.
  • Azaron, a kinde of herb.
  • Azime, unleavened.

B

  • BAbat, a panting, or often beating.
  • Babaye, as faire la babaye, to g [...]pe, o [...] make a mo [...]th at.
  • Babbiner, as Babiner.
  • Bab [...]ure, butter-milk.
  • Babillerie, prating, [...]t [...]ri [...].
  • [Page] Babine, the lip of a beast.
  • Babiner, to play with the lips, to prattle, or to talk hard.
  • Baboles, (for babioles) gewgaws.
  • Babort, the larboord of a ship.
  • Babote; a little black caterpiller.
  • Babou, as faire la babou, to bob, or to make a mow at.
  • Babouïner, to play the monkey.
  • Babouinerie, apish tricks.
  • Babouleur, a babler, a tale-teller.
  • Babovye, a fib, a tale.
  • Baboyer, to blabber with the lips; also to tell tales.
  • Bacbue, a bottle.
  • Baccal, a wesel.
  • Baccar, the herb Haslewort.
  • Bacces, berries.
  • Bacchanaleries, Bacchanales, Bac­channals, or Bacchus his feasts.
  • Bacchanaliser, to play mad pranks.
  • Bacchanalisante, Bacchanete, a mad­dish woman.
  • Bacche, a kind of wild pear.
  • Bacchique, belonging to Bacchus.
  • Bacclé, bolted on the inside.
  • Baccler, to bolt on the inside.
  • Baccoler, to play at titter-totter, to heave often up and down.
  • Bacées. See Brisées in the N.D.
  • Bacelle, as Chasteleine.
  • Bachat, (for Bassa) a Turkish Bassa.
  • Bachelerie, Batchelorship.
  • Bachelette, a marriageable maid.
  • Bachelier (Adj.) belonging to a Batchelor.
  • Bacheval [...]ur [...]ux, as Chevaleu­reux.
  • Bachot, a small ferry-boat.
  • Bachouë, a kind of basket.
  • Bacille, the herb Sampire.
  • Bacinet. See Bassinet in the N.D.
  • Baclé, and Bacler. See Bacclé, Bac­cler.
  • Bacon, bacon.
  • Bacquaige (for bagage) baggage.
  • Bacquet (for baquet) a pail, a milk-pail.
  • Bacqueter, to drain any water with pails.
  • Bacquier, a slye-fed hog.
  • Bacul (for bacule) a crupper.
  • Baculer, to beat one upon the back.
  • Badauderie, Badaudise, silliness.
  • Badé, a cry, as of bounds.
  • Badecoquille, a small shell-fish.
  • Badelaire, a short and broad back-sword.
  • Badelori, a silly man.
  • Badelorié, besotted.
  • Badigoines, the hanging lips of beasts.
  • Badinement, foolishly, apishly.
  • Baditin, the water-lilly, or water-rose.
  • Baffouer, Baffouement. See them with a single f in the N. D.
  • Baffray, Baffroy, a Beacon.
  • Bagagier, a Carrier of souldiers bag­gage.
  • Bagasse, a Baggage, or a Quean.
  • Bagatelleries, idle tricks.
  • Bagateur, a maker of playing cards.
  • Bagatin, a sort of brass coin.
  • Baglon, a gag.
  • Bagnoire (for baignoir) a bathing-tub.
  • Bagnolet, a wooden dish.
  • Bagois, gibridge.
  • Bagos, a pimp.
  • Bagué, adorned with jewels.
  • Baguenauder, to trifle out the time.
  • Baguenaudeur, a trifler, a loyterer.
  • Baguenaudier, the Sene-shrub.
  • Baguer, to adorn with jewels.
  • Baguetté, commanded, or beaten with a stick.
  • Baguetter, to command like a Ste­ward; also to strike with a stick or switch.
  • Baguetteux, full of switches.
  • Baguier, the male bay-tree.
  • Bahutier (Adj.) of, or belonging to a trunk.
  • Baignerie, a Bath, a private room to bathe in.
  • Baigneur, a bather.
  • Baigneux, that useth much bathing.
  • Baignolet, as Bagnolet.
  • Bail (for bay,) bay.
  • Baile, Bayliff, Serjeant, a Jaylor.
  • Bailif. See Baillif in the N. D.
  • Baillarge, a kinde of small barley.
  • Baille, a Steward, a Sollicitor; al­so an ordinary Bayliff.
  • Baillet, a pale-red; also a horse that hath a white spot or star in his forehead.
  • Baillet, (Adj.) a pale-red.
  • Baillette, a lease, or grant; also a little water-fowl.
  • Bailleures, sweepings.
  • Bailli. See Baillif in the N. D.
  • Bailliager, belonging to a Bayliff.
  • Baillie, Jurisdiction; also a Bayly­wick.
  • Baillisseur, Baillistre, a Guardian.
  • Baillistrerie, Guardianship.
  • Bailliveau, as Baliveau in the N.D.
  • Baillot, a trough.
  • Bailly, as Baillif in the N. D.
  • Baimaux (for Baliveaux) standers, or trees left for increase.
  • Baiocque, a sort of coin.
  • Bair, a kinde of [...]urr.
  • Bairer, (for baiser) to kiss.
  • Baise-nue, high, tall, or reaching to the clouds.
  • Baiseret, a little kiss.
  • Baisler, (for baailler) to gape.
  • Baisse de marest, a low bottom, turneth into a marsh, bog, or quag­mire.
  • Baistieres, the lees of wine, also the dregs of any liquour.
  • Balade, a ballet.
  • Balafreux, a cutter, a swaggerer.
  • Balafrure, a slashing.
  • Balaine, (for balene) a whale.
  • Balan, an acorn, or any thing like it.
  • Balanceur, a weigher of things in a ballance.
  • Balanceux, belonging to a ballance, also full of ballances.
  • Balancier (Adj.) of, or belonging to a ballance.
  • Balancieur, as Balanceur; also the Officer that weighs money assoon as it is coyned.
  • Balane. See Balan.
  • Balauste, the blossom of the wild Pomgranate-tree.
  • Balayeuse, a drudge, or sweeping Wench.
  • Balbucie, a stuttering, or stammer­ing.
  • Baldachin, Baldaquin, a Cloth of State.
  • Balenchouëres, a Game called tit­ter-totter.
  • Baler, to dance.
  • Balestrier, cross-bow like, of a cross-bow.
  • Balet, a beesom, or broom.
  • Balevolter, Balevoter, to wag, as a streamer in the wind.
  • Baley, (for balay) a broom.
  • Balievre, the chaps of a man or beast.
  • Baligaut, a great lobcock.
  • Balise, Balisse, a beacon, or a mark set up for the direction of Saylers in a navigable river.
  • Balite, an ancient Engine, whereout stones are thrown.
  • Balivaginer, to prattle, to use too many words.
  • Baliverner, to tell idle tales.
  • Balladin (for baladin) a great dan­cer.
  • Balladiner, to dance much.
  • Balladinerie, sprightly dancing.
  • Balle. See Bale in the N. D.
  • Balles, twelve gross.
  • Ballet, a cape of a cloak; also a dancing.
  • Balletrou, a sweep-hole.
  • Ballier, and its Derivatives. See [Page] Balayer, &c. in the N. D.
  • Balliverne (for baliverne,) a tale.
  • Ballizer une Riviere, to scowr, or cleanse a River.
  • Ballocher, to totter, as one that goeth on a rope.
  • Ballon (for balon) a bale.
  • Ballot (for balot) the same.
  • Ballote, Balloter, Ballotement. See them with a single I in the N. D.
  • Ballouetter. See baloter in the N.D.
  • Balluque, gold or [...], or gold unfined; also a vessel whereinto gold is poured.
  • Ballustres (for balustres,) ballisters.
  • Balme (for baume) balsam.
  • Balme, a cave, or den.
  • Baloste, a course bed, or mattress; also the chass of oats or barley.
  • Baloié (for balayé) swept.
  • Balong (for barlong) more long than broad.
  • Balongue, a trough, or vessel, &c. which is much more long than broad.
  • Balorde. See Balourde.
  • Balorderie, sottishness, blockishness.
  • Balotade, a bouncing.
  • Balousse. See Baloffe.
  • Balourde, sottish, blockish, foolish.
  • Baloyer (for balayer) to sweep.
  • Balroter, to froth in bubbles.
  • Balsamine, the balsam-apple.
  • Balsane, as balzane.
  • Balser, to bound.
  • Balthée, a belt.
  • Balzan, a horse that hath a white leg or foot.
  • Balzane, the white of a horses leg or foot, or a white spot or mark in any part of his body.
  • Bambelotier, as Bimblotier.
  • Bancage, the Circuit of a Country within which the Inhabitants are bound to repair to a certain Mill, Oven, Wine-press, &c. paying a fee for their several uses unto the Lord thereof; also the Royalty or Priviledge of having such a Mill, &c. also the re [...]eaue or benefit made of it.
  • Bancelle, a little bench, seat, or bank.
  • Bandage, a swath-band; also the gaffle of a cross-bow; also a truc­kle for a pully; also a bending as of a bow.
  • Bandie, as Bancage; also a Privi­ledge of some Lords to forbid all their Tenants to sell their Wines for 40 days together, that in the mean while they may the better vent their own.
  • Bandier, the Lord or owner of the aforesaid Royalty.
  • Bandiment, as Ban in the N. D.
  • Bandon, leave, liberty, free scope to do a thing. A bandon, at ro­vers, at random. Prinse de bè­tes à bandon, the suffering other mens cattel for hire to graze all over his pastures.
  • Bandouillier (for Bandolier) a rob­ber.
  • Banie, Banissement, banishment; also confiscation.
  • Banir (for bannir) to banish.
  • Bannage, Bannal, Bannalité. See them with a single n in the N.D.
  • Banne, a hamper, or great basket.
  • Bannée, as Bancage.
  • Bannerie, low Jurisdiction. Droict de bannerie, the same Royalty as Bancage.
  • Bannerole (for banderole) a little stag or streamer.
  • Banners, Ground-keepers.
  • Banneux, of, or belonging to a ham­per.
  • Bannie, Bannier. See Banie, Banier, under Ban in the N. D.
  • Bannon, Banon, the season wherein the Cattel belonging to a whole Town is turned out into, or may feed all over common Pastures. Cela est en banon, that is com­mon, or for every body's use.
  • Banoyement, a proclaiming, or publishing by sound of trumpet, &c.
  • Banquage, as Bancage.
  • Banquerotier (for Banqueroucier) a bankrupt.
  • Banqueterie, a banquetting, or fea­sting.
  • Banqueteux, of, or belonging to bankets.
  • Banquier (for Banal.) See Banal under Ban in the N. D.
  • Bans, the banes of matrimony.
  • Baptismal, of, or belonging to bap­tism.
  • Baptistaire, or Baptistere. See Ba­tistaire under Batême in the N. D.
  • Baque, a berry.
  • Baquelette, a young wench.
  • Baqueter, as Bacqueter.
  • Bar, the fish called a base.
  • Baradon, a drone, or dorr-bee.
  • Baragant (for barracan) barracan.
  • Barat, truck, exchange; also cheat.
  • Baratelle, as Cagnole.
  • Barater, to truck; also to cheat.
  • Barateur, a trucker, or barterer; also a cheater.
  • Barateux, Baratier, cheating, de­ceitful.
  • Barathre, an abyss.
  • Baratte, a churn.
  • Barbacane, a casemate.
  • Barbaïan, the great horn-owl.
  • Barbaresque, like a barbarous fel­low.
  • Barbaresquement, barbarously, rude­ly.
  • Barbarin, a small river-barbel; also the sea-barbel.
  • Barbarine, a piece of coin.
  • Barbasse, a goat-like beard.
  • Barbasse, as un boue barbasse, a bearded goat.
  • Barbaude, beer, Brewers liquor.
  • Barbaudier, a Brewer.
  • Barbecane, as Barbacane.
  • Barbel (for barbean) a barbel-fish.
  • Barbelé, bearded.
  • Barbelotte, a land-toad.
  • Barbelu (for barbu) bearded.
  • Barber, to barb, shave or trim. Se barber, to get a beard.
  • Barberie, barbing, also a Barbers shop; also the name of an apple.
  • Barberies, feathered Gillovers.
  • Barberiot, a kind of apple.
  • Barbes, pushes, or little bladders un­der the tongues of Cattel.
  • Barber (Adj.) rough, or shag-haired, like a water-dog.
  • Barbeter (for barboter) to make a noise as a seething pot, also to m [...]mble or mutter words between the teeth.
  • Barbette, a small beard; also a wa­ter-bitch.
  • Barbidant, part of a womans &c.
  • Barbiere, a Barbers wife.
  • Barbillon, a little barbel; also the beard of an ear of corn; also the less sin of a fish.
  • Barbillons, the frounce, a disease bred in the tongues of hawks by a cold rh [...]n.
  • Barbillonné, bearded. Un dard barbillonné, a dart that hath a forked or bearded head.
  • Barbin, a little beard.
  • Barboire, a mask, or mummery; al­so a vizard.
  • Barbolle, part of a womans &c.
  • Barbon (for barbot) a barbel-fish.
  • Barbot, Barbotage, the wallowing of a s [...]thing pot.
  • Barbote, an eel-powt.
  • Barbotin, bearded.
  • Barbotte, the chin-piece of an hel­met.
  • Barbouillage, Barbouillement, a blotting, a besmearing.
  • [Page] Barbouilleries, trash, riff-raff.
  • Barbu-marses, starch-corn.
  • Barbute, a riding-hood; also the beaver of an helmet, also a man of arms.
  • Barbuteur, a Sycophant, a secret Tale-teller.
  • Barc, a kinde of smooth red earth, whereof vessels were made in old time.
  • Barce, as Berche.
  • Barchaux, great barks, or boats.
  • Barche, a little bark.
  • Bardachiser, to bugger.
  • Bardacoculé, as Bardococulé.
  • Barde, (for sot) sottish, dull-witted.
  • Bardelle, the canvas saddle where­with Colts are backed.
  • Bardeure, the trapping of a horse.
  • Bardococulage, a being covered all over with Monkish habit.
  • Bardococulé, dressed like a Monk.
  • Bardou, a sot, or blockhead.
  • Baretter, to churn.
  • Barge, a fowl that hath no spleen; also the bank of a river or water.
  • Barguignard, (for barguigneur) a haggler.
  • Barguigne, a haggling.
  • Baricquer, to bray like an elephant.
  • Baril, (for barril) a barrel.
  • Barillet, a little barrel.
  • Barillier, a maker of barrels; also an Officer that looks to the Vessels of a great mans Cellar.
  • Bariner, to churn butter.
  • Bariquade, (for barricade) a barri­cado.
  • Bariqué, barricadoed.
  • Barique. See Barrique in the N.D.
  • Bariquelle, a little boat.
  • Bariteau, a sieve made of hair.
  • Baritonner, to wag, or dangle up and down; also to bray like an Elephant.
  • Barizel, a Leader of Catchpoles, an ordinary Provost-Marshal.
  • Barlonguer, to make (to grow) more long than broad.
  • Barlue, (for berlue) dimness of sight.
  • Barme, the bank of a river, &c.
  • Barnag, all the train and baggage attending a great person in his Journey.
  • Barnez, the Nobility, or Barons.
  • Baron (for mâle,) of the male kinde; also manly, hardy, strong.
  • Barone (for Baronne) a Baroness.
  • Barquette, a little bark.
  • Barrage, a barricado; also a pas­sage-toll.
  • Barragouin. See Baragouin in the N. D.
  • Barragouiner, to speak a strange dialect.
  • Barraté, churned, or tossed as butter is in the churning.
  • Barraut, a little barrel.
  • Barretade, the putting off of the hat or cap by way of salutation.
  • Barrette, a cap, or bonnet.
  • Barrez, the Carmes, or white Friars.
  • Barricave (for Baricave) a low bot­tome.
  • Barriquade, (for barricade) a bar­ricade.
  • Barriqueau, half a barrel.
  • Barriquer, to barricado.
  • Barrit, the braving of an Elephant.
  • Barroir, a turrel, wherewith Coo­pers make holes for the bar-pins of a piece of cask.
  • Barrot, half a barrel.
  • Barroyer, to use delays in a Law­suit.
  • Barroyements, delays in Law.
  • Barry, a barrel; also a kinde of fire-work.
  • Basaner, to make of a swarthy com­plexion.
  • Basanne, as Bazane.
  • Basard, a Market-place.
  • Basauchieux, Lawyers Clarks.
  • Baschat, a Tarkish Bassa.
  • Baschelier, as Bachelier in the N. D.
  • Basclé, as Ba [...]lé.
  • Bascule, Basculle, a scoop; also as Bacule.
  • Basculer, to sit upon his tail; also as Baccoler.
  • Baselie (for basilie,) a Cockatrice.
  • Basenne, as Baze [...]e.
  • Basenné (for basané,) sun-burnt.
  • Basennier, a seller or dresser of co­loured sheep-skins.
  • Basilaire, as Os basilaire, the cuneal or fundamental bone of the head.
  • Basique, belonging to the basis.
  • Basme, (for baume) balsam.
  • Basoche, the whole company of Law­yers Clarks in the Pallace of Pa­ris, having among them a King, and their peculiar Laws; also a certain Court, wherein Wives that beat their Husbands are censured.
  • Basochiens, Revellers, or Associates unto that Company, who for the most part are very unruly; or such as belong unto the Court afore­said.
  • Basse, (for base) a basis. Les basses de la Mer, the shallows of the Sea.
  • Bassecule, as Bascule.
  • Basse-dunse, a measure.
  • Bassement, basely, poorly.
  • Bassenne, the mizzen-sail of a ship.
  • Basse-taille, raised (or imbossed) Imagery.
  • Basseté, baseness, abjection.
  • Basseur, humbleness, lowliness.
  • Bassier, Bassiere, the tub that receives tap-droppings; or a tub to put lees of wine in.
  • Bassieres, the lees of wine.
  • Bassille, crestmarine.
  • Bassine, a deep, or bason-like and foot­less Posnet, used most by Confecti­oners.
  • Bassinement, a warming with a warming-pan.
  • Bassinet, (for petit bassin) a little bason.
  • Bastage, a certain Toll exacted by some Country-Lords, for every horse that passes by them sadled with a pack-saddle.
  • Bastance, what is enough.
  • Bastardage, bastardy.
  • Bastardaille, a crue of bastards.
  • Bastarde, a demy-cannon, or demy-culverin, a smaller piece of any kinde.
  • Baste, (a Subst.) an odde trick, a shrewd turn; also the skirt of a doublet.
  • Basteler, to juggle, or tumble; also to play the fool or buffoon.
  • Bastelerie, Basteliere, juggling, or tumbling, puppet-playing.
  • Bastelet, a little boat.
  • Bastier, a maker of pack-saddles; also a base lubberly fellow.
  • Bastier, (Adj.) sadled with (or usual­ly bearing) a pack-saddle.
  • Bastilde, a fortress.
  • Bastillon, a little fortress.
  • Bastine, the skirt of a doublet or coat; also a pad; also as bar­delle; also a pack-saddle.
  • Bastionner, to fortifie with bastions.
  • Bastissage, a framing, or building.
  • Bastonnadé, banged, cudgelled.
  • Bastonneau, Bastonnet, a little staff, or cudgel.
  • Bastonnée, the stroke of a pump in a ship.
  • Bastonnement, a beating, or cud­gelling.
  • Bastonnier, a Staff-bearer, or Verger; also the Carrier of the Crucifix in Processions; also a great man in any Company.
  • Basty, a Territory (or Demesne) be­longing to a place.
  • Basty (for bâti) built.
  • Bat, a stroke, or beating.
  • Batable, beatable.
  • Batail (for battant) de cloche, a bell-clapper.
  • [Page] Batalogie, obscene discourse.
  • Batant, tout batant, just now; as je vien de là encores tout batant, I come from thence but even now. Or else it is thus rendred; as il les chassa tout batant, he pursued them very hard; il les a mené batant jusques aux portes de la Ville, he pursued them even unto the Gates of the Town.
  • Batans de poisson, the gills of a fish.
  • Bat-beure, a churn-staff.
  • Bate, (for batoir) a rammer, a pa­ving beetle.
  • Batelage, juggling.
  • Batelée, a boat full of.
  • Bateleresque, juggling, or Juggler-like.
  • Batemare, a wag-tail.
  • Batiture de fer, the scales that flie from iron in the hammering there­of.
  • Batsain, a rude alarm given to a whole Country by ringing and beating of pots, kettles, basons, &c.
  • Battans. See Batans.
  • Batte, the bolster of a saddle. Les battes d'une porte, the piece of wood that runs all along upon the edge of a lock-side of a door or gate.
  • Batte-eul, a great linnen Vail, such as Nuns wear.
  • Batteler, as Basteler.
  • Battelerie, as Bastelerie.
  • Battellessisuie, the little yellow wa­ter-wagtail.
  • Battequeüe, the same.
  • Battue, a beating, or stroke with the feet, in a settled and proportioned time, (a term of horsemanship.)
  • Bature, a stripe, a stroke.
  • Battus, as Batus.
  • Batue, as Battue.
  • Bature, as Batture.
  • Batus, an Order of Friars, who in their nightly Processions whip their own backs extremely.
  • Bau, as le Navire a tant de pieds de bau, the ship is so many foot broad. Bau de bite, the forepike, the part of a Ship, wherein the Bits are placed.
  • Bavarder, to drivel, also to prattle.
  • Bavasse, an idle tale.
  • Bavasser, to tattle.
  • Baubance, as Bobance.
  • Baube, a prattler.
  • Bauboyant, faultering.
  • Baue, or Bauch, a sot, an ass.
  • Baucal, or Baucale. See Bocal in the N. D.
  • Bauche, a row of stones or bricks in building.
  • Baucher, to lay even; also to square timber.
  • Baucheron, a Squarer of timber.
  • Bauci, the root of a parship or car­rot.
  • Baud, bold, saucy.
  • Baude-bite, as Bau.
  • Baudement, merrily, jollily.
  • Baudere, beaver.
  • Baudet, an ass.
  • Baudiner, two to ride upon an ass or horse; also to teach something unskilfully, to do any thing like an ass.
  • Baudir, to cheer up.
  • Baudouïnage, Ass-lechery.
  • Baudouïner, to ingender like an Ass.
  • Baudrayer, & Baudrier. V. Bau­droyer in the N. D.
  • Baudroy, a ravenous and ugly fish called the Sea-toad.
  • Bauds, a kinde of white hounds.
  • Bauduffle, the great rush wherewith poor houses are thatched; also lit­ter, or bedunged straw.
  • Baverole, Baverotte, a bib.
  • Bavesche, the socket of a candle-stick.
  • Baveur, as Bavard in the N. D.
  • Baveuse, a certain fish without seale, that covers her self when she lists with her own foam.
  • Baveusement, foamingly.
  • Bauffrer, to devour, or eat greedily.
  • Bauffreur, a devourer.
  • Bauffreure, a devouring, or greedy feeding.
  • Bauffroy, a watch-tower.
  • Baug [...]art, a scoundrel, a scurty or beastly companion.
  • Baviere, (for baveret) a bib. Ba­viere d'un armet, the b [...]r of an helmet.
  • Bauldrier, to dress or carry leather.
  • Bauldrieur, a leather-dresser.
  • Bauldroy, as Baudroy.
  • Bavois, a table or paper containing the estimate of the Rights of Sci­gneuriage, Foiblage, & Brassage, according to the several rates of gold, silver, and b [...]llion then cur­rent, or made current by the Kings Ordinances.
  • Bavoler, to wag, or fly low, like a gnat in winter-time.
  • Bavolet, (for volant) a shittle-cock.
  • Bavoleté, giddy-headed, shittle-brain'd.
  • Bavon, a bib.
  • Bavouer, as bavois.
  • Bauracineux, salt, or clammy.
  • Baus, as Bauds; also the beams or floor-timber of a ship; the great pieces of timber that lie from side to side within the hould.
  • Bausonins, streamers in ships.
  • Baut, jocund, merry.
  • Bayard, bay; also a greedy beholder, or one that stares at a thing.
  • Bayart, a basket or dosser used for the carrying of earth, and fastened for the same purpose about the neck with two leathern thongs.
  • Baybaye, a scornful mow made.
  • Baye, (for un conte) a sib.
  • Bayer, to gape, to gaze.
  • Bayeul, (for bahu) a trunk.
  • Bayeure, a gaping or gazing.
  • Bayle. See Baillif in the N. D.
  • Bazane, sheeps leather dressed like Spanish-leather, and coloured red, green, or yellow, &c.
  • Bazaner, as Basaner.
  • Bazanne, as Bazane.
  • Bazaveresque, a sort of pear.
  • Baze (for base) basis.
  • Bazenne, as bazane.
  • Bazette, toile bazette, linnen cloth which is but half white.
  • Bazilles, crest-marine.
  • Bazoche, as Besoche.
  • Beat, happy, blessed, holy, sacred.
  • Beatiles, Beatilles, toys, trumpery; also women of a low stature.
  • Beau-regard, a Summer-house.
  • Beauvois, the name of a fruitful red Vine.
  • Becasseau, Becasson, a snipe.
  • Beccane, a kinde of black grape.
  • Beccard, the female Salmon.
  • Beccasse (for becasse,) a wood­cock.
  • Beccasseau, Beccasson, Beccassine, for becassine, a snipe.
  • Beccu, beaked, having a beak; sharp or hooked as a birds bill.
  • Beccusse, an uproar.
  • Becdasse, a wood-cock.
  • Becdoye, a dolphin.
  • Bechebois, a wood-pecker.
  • Bechet, a pike-fish.
  • Bechevet, à teste bechevet, the play with pins called heads and points; also the lying of two in a bed, the one right, the other with his head at his feet.
  • Becheur, a digger.
  • Bechique, a medicine for the cough.
  • Bechistre, a tempest, or storm.
  • Bechu, as Beccu.
  • Bechus, a deformed thing in the Sea, that's neither fish nor plant, yet seems to move of it self.
  • [...][Page] Becquade, a b [...]ck.
  • Becque, a ditch or trench made upon the high-way; also a spade.
  • Becqué, beaked (in Heraldry.)
  • Becquebo, a wood-pecker, or highaw.
  • Becquée, a bill, (or a beak) full.
  • Becquefigue (for becfigue) gnat-snapper.
  • Becquer, Becqueter, (for bequeter) to peck.
  • Becquet, as Bequet.
  • Becquillon, a little beak, or bill.
  • Becu, as Beccu.
  • Bedacier, of, or belonging to a Bea­dle, Beadle-like.
  • Bedaine, a short bar of steel or iron; also a forked arrow for a cross­bow; also ill luck; also a fat guts or gorbelly; also the belly.
  • Bedat, an inclosed wood.
  • Bedaud, a darling, or favourite.
  • Bedegar, our Ladies thistle.
  • Bedengue, a certain apple that yields most excellent Cider.
  • Bedier, a sot, a coxcomb.
  • Bedon, a tabret, also the belly.
  • Bedondaine, that part of the belly which is between the navel and privities.
  • Bedonal, Bedonau, a young brock or badger, also a sea-gull.
  • Bedone, a badger.
  • Bedonner, to play upon the taber.
  • Bée, the bleating of sheep; also a hole in a wall, or the like.
  • Béement, a gaping.
  • Been, an Arabian plant.
  • Beer, to gape.
  • Beffleries, tricks, gulleries.
  • Begauder, to loyter.
  • Begude, a cottage.
  • Begue (for mouëtte) a sea-mew.
  • Beguet, a Serjeant or Officer that executes the Orders given, and Commissions sent out by the publick Magistrate.
  • Beguiner, to put on a biggin.
  • Beguines, an Order of old Nuns.
  • Beguoyement (for begayement) stuttering.
  • Behen. See Been.
  • Behistre, a [...]rrible storm.
  • Behistreux, t [...]mp [...]st [...]s, stormy.
  • Behourd, a Juste or T [...]urney of ma­ny together with la [...]es and bat­tle axes; also a bustling voise.
  • Behourdir, to just together with [...]ces, &c. to make a bustling [...]ise.
  • Behourdis, a bustling, or blustering. F [...]u de behourdi [...], a bone-fire.
  • Bejaunage, simplicity, want of expe­rience.
  • Bejaune, a novice, an ignorant fel­low. Payer son bejaune, to pay his welcome (a fee exacted by Scholars of such as are newly ad­mitted into their Society.)
  • Bejaunerie, Bejaunise, as Bejau­nage.
  • Beille, as Begue.
  • Beillottes, acorns.
  • Beisle, the Ʋnder-hatches of a ship.
  • Belaud, as Bedaud.
  • Beler, Beleter (for Beeler) to bleat like a sheep.
  • Beliard (for belier) a ram.
  • Belie, a kind of red in Heraldry.
  • Belin, a ram. Mascher en belin, to mumble as one that wants teeth.
  • Beliné, rammed, also co [...]ened.
  • Beliner, to ram, also to co [...]en.
  • Belinge, as Tiretame in the N.D.
  • Belistraille, Belitraille, a ras [...]ally [...]r [...]e.
  • Belistreau, Belitreau, a young rascal.
  • Belistrément, rascally.
  • Belistrer, Belitrer, to play the rascal.
  • Belistrerie, Belitrerie, rascalliness; also a thing of little or no worth.
  • Bellistresse, a base Quean.
  • Bellastre, pretty fair.
  • Bellateur, a professed Souldier.
  • Bellatrice, a Virago.
  • Belleque, a coot.
  • Bellette (for belette) a weesel.
  • Bellettement, prettily, also fair and softly.
  • Belle-videre, the flower called blue-bells.
  • Bellic, as Belic.
  • Bellin, as Belin.
  • Belliqu [...]usement, martially.
  • Bellirie, a round mirabolan-plani.
  • Bellistrandie, roguery.
  • Bellistrandier, a needy rogue.
  • Belloce, a wild plum.
  • Bellocier, a wild plum-tree.
  • Bellot, pretty.
  • Bellotte, for belette, a weesel.
  • Beluge, as belugue.
  • Belvedere, the name of a shrub.
  • Belugue, a spark of fire.
  • Belusteau, Beluteau, a boulting-cloth.
  • Belutage, Belutement, a sisting of meal.
  • Beluter, to sift; also to swi [...]e.
  • Belzoin (for benjoin) benjamin.
  • Ben, the oily acorn.
  • Benarie, a goat-snapper.
  • Bende, Bendelette, Bender. See Bande, Bandelette, and Bander, in the N. D.
  • Bene, a measure of coals worth a­bout three sous.
  • Benedict, blest, happy.
  • Beneficial, belonging to a Benefice.
  • Beneficience, beneficence.
  • Benest, or Benet, a (simple or silly) fellow.
  • Benestier (for benaitier) a holy-water-pot.
  • Benevole, kinde, or friendly.
  • Benisson, a blessing.
  • Benistre, to bless.
  • Benne, a hamper; also a great sack for corn or coals; also the head or horns of a stag.
  • Bennel, a tumbrel, or dung-cart.
  • Bennerie, low Jurisdiction.
  • Benoict, as Benet.
  • Benoicte, herb avens.
  • Benoist, as Benet.
  • Benoistier (for benaitier) a holy-water-pot.
  • Benzoin (for benjoin) benjamin.
  • Beque, a sea-cob, or sea-gull.
  • Bequebo, a wood-pecker, or high [...]w.
  • Bequée (for bechee) a heak full.
  • Bequenauld, a pratile-basket, a pra­ting boy.
  • Bequenaulde, a prattling girl.
  • Bequer, as Becquer.
  • Bequeru, a Weevels, a little black and corn-devouring vermine.
  • Bequerut, a kind of olive.
  • Bequet, the pike-fish; also the name of a sowrish apple. Bequet de Mer, a dainty, little, and long­nosed rock-fish.
  • Bequillon, a little bill of a bird.
  • Bequu, as Bechu.
  • Ber, a Baron; also a cradle.
  • Berangene, a kind of fruit like a pea [...], growing near the ground as a mellon.
  • Berberris, the barbary-tree.
  • Berche, the piece of Ordnance called a Base.
  • Bercherie, a store of Bases in a ship.
  • Berchot, the little wren, our Lady's ben.
  • Berdin, the shell-fish called a Lem­p [...]t.
  • Berée, a chassinch.
  • Bergama [...]que, as il boucle sa femme a la Bergamasque, he buckles up his wife as the Italian Berga­masks.
  • Berrerette, a drink made of old hard wine and [...]on [...].
  • Bergerolle, Bergerotte, a young Sh [...]pherd [...].
  • Ber [...]hot, as Berchot.
  • Bericles, a pair of spectacles.
  • Berille, as Beril in the N. D.
  • Berlaffe, a slash, or a deep cu [...].
  • [Page] Berlaffer, to slash, or wound extream­ly.
  • Berlaffé, slashed.
  • Berlin, as Berdin.
  • Berlingasse, Berlingue, a piece of coin worth about six pence sterl.
  • Berlong, for Barlong, more long than broad.
  • Berlue, p [...]rblinde.
  • Berluement, purblindness, or dim­ness of sight.
  • Berluquer, to trifle out the time.
  • Bernadet, a kind of dog-fish.
  • Bernage, carriage; also nobleness, gallantness of humour; also mes­lin, or several sorts of corn min­gled.
  • Bernagoë, a Carpenters wimble.
  • Bernaque, the fowl called a Bar­nacle.
  • Berne, a sieve, or van; also a great kettle; also a kind of Moorish garment, or such a Mantle as Irish Gentlewomen wear.
  • Bernie, rug, also a mantle thereof.
  • Berretin, a little cap.
  • Berrouette (for brouëtte) a wheel­barrow.
  • Bers, as Ber, Bers de chariot, the sides, racks, or rails of a Cart.
  • Bersaut, a Quintain for Country-Youths to run at.
  • Berser, Bersé, Bersean. See Bercer, Bercé, Berceau in the N. D.
  • Bertonneau, a Bret, or Turbot.
  • Bertouder, Bertouser, as Bertauder in the N. D.
  • Bervl. See Beril in the N. D.
  • Besacier, a bag-bearer.
  • Besanner, to give leather a grain in dressing, or to dress a sheeps skin like Spanish leather; also as Ba­zaner.
  • Besas, amb [...]sas.
  • Besch, a South-west-wind.
  • Beschage, an opening, or digging up of the ground.
  • Besche-bois, a wood-pecker.
  • Beschevet, as Bechevet.
  • Bescau, the side of a loaf which in the Oven cleaves to another loaf.
  • Besiale, as Champ besiale, a Com­mon.
  • Besicles, a pair of spectacles.
  • Besiclier, a Spectacle-maker.
  • Besier, the herb Orage.
  • Besle, as Beisle.
  • Besmus, a sot.
  • Besoche, as Bezoche.
  • Besongner (for travailler) to work.
  • Besongnette, a little work.
  • Besot, the last, or youngest childe one hath.
  • Besquée, as Bequée.
  • Besse, a shovel headed with iron, or as besche.
  • Bessieres, the tiltings of low-running wine, &c.
  • Besson, twin.
  • Besteau, a bell-clapper.
  • Bestelette, a little beast.
  • Bestement, beastly.
  • Besterie, sottishness.
  • Bestial (for bétail, or bestiaux) cat­tel.
  • Bestion, a little beast.
  • Besto [...]quer, to stab.
  • Bestourner, to amaze.
  • Besycles, a pair of spectacles.
  • Besyclier, a Spectacle-maker.
  • Besyn, fuddled.
  • Bete, as Betty.
  • Betelle, a kind of herb.
  • Betosne (for betoine) betony.
  • Betourné, dizzie, or giddy in the head.
  • Bettes, sipping, quassing; as entrer en bettes, to grow merry, or mel­low in drinking.
  • Bettescher, to tackle a ship; also to set out any thing.
  • Beturre, a sink-hole.
  • Beuffroy, a watch-tower.
  • Beur, as Moyne beur, a lubberly Monk, or a quaffing Monk.
  • Beuratte, a churn.
  • Beurée, the name of a pear.
  • Beurichon, a w [...]en.
  • Beurrette, a churn.
  • Beurrier (Adj.) of, or belonging to butter. Un pot beurrier, a but­ter-pot.
  • Beuvailler, to q [...]ast.
  • Beuvande, small wine, servants wine.
  • Beuver [...]au, a sipp [...]r.
  • Beuveron, a drench for a horse.
  • Beuveter (for beuvoter) to sip.
  • Beuvet [...]e, as Buvette.
  • Beuvoire de Venus, the Fallers thistle.
  • Beuvrage, beverage.
  • Bezanne, as Bezane.
  • Bezarder, to die.
  • Bezer, a cow to run up and down, holding up her tail, when the brizze doth sting her.
  • Beset, as aller à S. Bezet, to run up and down like one that hath a bri [...]e in his tail.
  • Bezeche (for hoyau) a mattock.
  • Bezele, the name of a fish.
  • Biains, as Bians.
  • Biaisement, astop [...], b [...]as-wis [...].
  • Biaiscure, s [...]o [...]ent [...].
  • Bians, days works both of m [...]n and beasts due unto Landlords by all Tenants (who are no Gentlemen) within the County of Poictou.
  • Biaque, [...]r [...]se, or white lead, where­with women paint.
  • Biarn, a white cloth of course wool, with interwoven streaks of blew, whereof the Country-people about Languedoe make cloaks.
  • Biaut, a kinde of Brittish course garment, or jacket, worn loose o­ver the apparel.
  • Bibaille, a present, fairing, or new-years gift.
  • Bibelots, buckle-bones, or the play at huckle-bones.
  • Bibet, a gnat.
  • Bibette, a wheal, or blister.
  • Bibliopole, for Libraire, a Book­seller.
  • Biblot, as Bibelot, or a small square piece in checquer-work, or where­of checker-work is made.
  • Bibul, the stalk of great hemlocks, us d by the Country-people of some places, instead of a Kan or Pot to drink in.
  • Bibule, blotting, or brown paper.
  • Bibus, as une affaire de bibus, ou de neant, a thing of no concern­ment, an insignificant thing.
  • Bicarne, the great verjuice-grape.
  • Bichard, a binde-calf, or a red-deer-calf.
  • Bichecoter, to leacher it.
  • Bichecoterie, a leacherous trick.
  • Bichet, a measure for corn.
  • Bicherte de Lyon, the half of the bichet, about a bushel of Paris.
  • Bicheteau, Bichot, a little [...]i [...]de-calf; also a measure for corn used in Burgundy, and containing a­ [...] [...]ut sive of their bushels.
  • Bichoterie, as Bichecoterie.
  • Bicle, as Bigle.
  • Bicorne, Bicornu, having two [...]orns.
  • Bicque, a Goat, or as biche.
  • Bidaulx, Bidaux, cowardly strag­glers after an Army.
  • Bidenté, that hath two teeth.
  • Bidon, a great cage, or open basket, to keep or feed poultry in.
  • Bidonne, a kinde of Sea-purslan.
  • Biece, a spade.
  • Biecer. to dig.
  • Biendisance, eloquence.
  • Bien-en-allée, a farewel.
  • Bienh [...]uré, happy, prospero [...]s.
  • Bienh [...]urer, to make happy, or pro­sperous.
  • Bienh [...]ureté, happiness, prosperity.
  • Bienseamment, decently.
  • [Page] Bienveigner, Bienvienner, to wel­come.
  • Bienvenement, a welcome.
  • Bien-voulu, well-beloved.
  • Bienvueillant, a well-wisher.
  • Biés, (for biais) byas.
  • Bife, Biffe, a counterfeit jewel, also a fool that would seem wise.
  • Bifer. See Biffer in the N. D.
  • Bifement, Biffeure, Bifferie, a ra­sing, defacing, or blotting out.
  • Biforme, that is of two several forms or shapes.
  • Biformité, double form.
  • Bifourché, consisting of two forked parts.
  • Bifourcation, a forked form.
  • Bifre, (for bievre) a beaver.
  • Bigarruge, motley colour.
  • Bigaut, a fool, an ass.
  • Bigearrement, fantastically.
  • Bigearrer, Bigearrure, Bigerrerie. See Bigarrer, and Bigarrure in the N. D.
  • Biglement, squintingly, askew.
  • Biglesse, a squinting wench.
  • Bigne, a swelling after a knock.
  • Bignoter, as Binoter.
  • Bigorne, a Smiths anvil.
  • Bigorneau, Bigornet, a periwincle, or as Nerite.
  • Bigotage, Bigotation, Bigotie, Bi­gotise, superstitious devotion; al­so hypocrisie.
  • Bigotte, as chausses à la bigotte, close breeches tyed below the knee.
  • Bigotté, turned superstitious, or hy­pocrite.
  • Bigotter, to make superstitious, or to fill with hypocrisie.
  • Biguarruge, as Bigarruge.
  • Bihay, byas.
  • Bihayser, to byas.
  • Bihore, a word wherewith French Carters hasten on their horses.
  • Bihoreau, a kinde of little heron.
  • Bijon, liquid ro [...]en.
  • Billard (Adj.) as pié billard, a splay foo [...].
  • Billardier, that goes in at the knees.
  • Bille-barré, cross-barred.
  • Bille-boquet, a Gardeners line to measure beds and borders withal; also a bob.
  • Biller, to play at billiards; also to soften the [...] of a boat to the wood which rans cross the hams of the horses that are to a [...]aw it.
  • Billeron. See Maille.
  • B [...]llette, a [...]ill [...]t of wood; also a lit [...] [...]owl, [...]ewhat longer than an ordinary one; also a passage-toll.
  • Bille-vezées, trash, trifles.
  • Billion, a million of millions.
  • Billos, certain Imposts leavied upon Wines.
  • Bimauve, the white mallow.
  • Bimbelote, furnished with paultry ware.
  • Bimblotier, a paultry Pedlar.
  • Binage, as Binement in the N. D.
  • Bineur, a labourer, a digger.
  • Bingu, troubled, molested.
  • Binoire, as Bisnoire.
  • Binotage, Binotement, Binotir, the second digging of soil.
  • Binoter, to dig land the second time.
  • Bios, God.
  • Bipartient, parting, or dividing in­to two.
  • Bipedal, double footed; also two foot long or wide.
  • Biquoquet, the peak of a Ladies mourning-hood.
  • Birer, as Virer.
  • Birrasque, a high-going Sea, or a tempest at sea.
  • Bisacquier, a bag-bearer.
  • Bisaguë (for besaguë) a twibil.
  • Bisantin, as Besant in the N. D.
  • Bisarme, as Guisarme.
  • Bis-biane, wheaten bread.
  • Biscantin, drink made of bullace.
  • Biscapit, a double imployment of one sum in an account.
  • Biscaye, a vantage at Tennis.
  • Bischard, a sawn, or hinde-calf.
  • Bischet, as Bichet.
  • Bisclant, Biscle, squinting, looking askew.
  • Biscoter, to swive.
  • Biscuteau, fine bisket bread.
  • Biseau, such a slopeness as is in the point of an iron leaver, &c.
  • Biseté, wrought or stript with plate, as some kinde of stuffs be.
  • Bisette, plate of gold, silver, or cop­per, wherewith some stuffs are stri­ped.
  • Bisexte. See Bissexte in the N.D.
  • Bisneur, as Bineur.
  • Bisnoire, a forked mattock, or pick-axe.
  • Bison, a kind of wild Ox.
  • Bisongne, as Bison; also a rascally fellow; also a raw souldier.
  • Bisouart, a pa [...]ltry Pedlar.
  • Bisse, an adder.
  • Bissestre, ill luck.
  • Bislin [...]s, spruce terms, fine words.
  • Bissole, as Bizole.
  • Bis [...]arde, a bird called Bustard.
  • Bistorie, a kind of launcet.
  • Bistorié, Bistorin, crooked, awry.
  • Bistortier, a rolling-pin, or pestle of wood.
  • Bite, beets. Prendre, du potage de la bite, to do that a maid should not do.
  • Bites, the bits, two great wooden pegs whereto the cable is fastened when an anchor is let fall.
  • Bituminer, to mingle with bitu­men.
  • Bivet, faire bivet, to make an end of a candle stick with a drop of tallow upon the edge of a candle­stick.
  • Bizarderies, fantastical tricks.
  • Bizarreure, diversity of colours or fashions in one subject.
  • Bize, for Bise, the North-wind.
  • Bizeau, as Biseau.
  • Bizet, as Biset in the N. D.
  • Bladier, a Merchant of corn.
  • Bladier (Adj.) of, or belonging to corn.
  • Blaffastre, somewhat pale.
  • Blaier, Seigneur Blaier, the Land­lord that may amerce all such Fo­reiners as turn their Cattel into the vaines pastures, or wast grounds belonging unto his Lordship, which without his permission (paid for) they ought not to have done.
  • Blaime (for pale) pale.
  • Blaimeur, paleness.
  • Blaimir, to grow pale.
  • Blairie, Droit de Blairie, a Lords power to fine, &c. as you have it in the word Blaier. Pais de blai­rie, a Country plentiful of corn.
  • Blanc-doux, a white sweeting.
  • Blanchard, an Order of Friars go­ing in white sheets, and wearing neither hats nor shoes.
  • Blancheastre, (for blanchâtre) whi­tish.
  • Blanche-puce, Blanche pute, the Sea-ground-pine (a whitish herb.)
  • Blanche-putain, the herb rank-goat, or stinking motherwort.
  • Blanche-queuë, the ravenous Kite, called a Kingtail.
  • Blanchet, a wast-coat, a blanket for a bed; also the apple called a White-sweeting.
  • Blanchet, (for blanchâtre) whitish.
  • Blanchette, fine white flour of wheat.
  • Blanchiment, a whiting, or whi­tening.
  • Blanes-ma [...], w [...]it [...] Cloaks, an Order of begging Friars.
  • Blancuier, a bird like a Whittail.
  • Blande, a Salamander.
  • [Page] Blandices, flatterings, allurements.
  • Blandi, flattered, or soothed up.
  • Blandir, to flatter, or sooth up.
  • Blandissant, pleasing, flattering.
  • Blandissement, blandishment, flat­tering, or soothing up.
  • Blandisseur, a flatterer.
  • Blandureau, a kinde of white ap­ple.
  • Blanquet, a sort of the best white wine in Languedoc.
  • Blanquette, a delicate white Sum­mer-pear.
  • Blareau (for blereau) a badger.
  • Blasser, to foment, moisten, or bathe gently with the hand a hurt (espe­cially about a horse.)
  • Blatir, to gather up, draw, or shrink in himself.
  • Blattaire, an herb called Moth­mulleyn.
  • Blatte, a moth, a beetle, a kinde of red wheat, a silk-worm, a wee­sel.
  • Blattier, a Merchant of corn.
  • Blavée, corn-land.
  • Blavelles, Blavcoles, Blaves, blew-bottles.
  • Blavier, of, or belonging to corn.
  • Blaureau (for blereau) a badger.
  • Blayer. See Blaier.
  • Blayeries, a corn-Ground, or corn-Country; also the feeding of cat­tle upon Corn-lands; also the season (from the Annunciation to the end of harvest) wherein cattle may in some places be turned by some pri­viledged persons into common corn-grounds.
  • Blece-esprit, wounding the spirit.
  • Bleecure (for blessure) wound.
  • Bleche, Blecque, over-mellow. Pom­me blecque, an apple that's too ripe, or too mellow.
  • Bledier, of, or belonging to corn. Terre-blediere, Corn-ground.
  • Blemy, grown pale.
  • Blesme, as bleme, pale.
  • Blesmet, somewhat pale.
  • Blesmir, to grow pale.
  • Blesmi, grown pale.
  • Blesmissement, Blesmisseure, pale­ness.
  • Blessable, that may be wounded.
  • Blet, a block-head.
  • Blete, a turf, or peat.
  • Blette, as poire blette, an over-ripe pear.
  • Blisires, as Belistres; also the herb called Bleets.
  • Bloccageux, Bloccailleux, full of rubbish, &c.
  • Blocul, the chiefest pole that up­holds a Tent; also a block­house.
  • Blondir, Blondoyer, to grow light, or flaxen.
  • Blondore, of a golden yellow.
  • Blondoyement, a making, or be­coming light yellow.
  • Blondurel, as Blandureau.
  • Bloquaille, for Blocaille, shards, rub­bish.
  • Bloquil, as Blocul in the first sense.
  • Blosse, as poire blosse, an over-mel­low pear.
  • Blot, for Bloc, a block.
  • Bloti, squat, hidden, or kept close.
  • Blotir, to squat, also to hide, or keep close.
  • Blotte, as Bloutre.
  • Blotter, to blot, to stain.
  • Blouse, a close Tennis-court.
  • Bloutte, a clod of earth.
  • Bloutté, full of clods.
  • Blouttoir, a Rowler.
  • Bluard, blewish.
  • Blute, the blew-bottle.
  • Bluteau, a boulting cloth.
  • Bluterie, a boulting, also a boulting-tub.
  • Bluttage, Blutement, a boulting of meal.
  • Bluttis, a boulting-tub, or a room to boult meal in.
  • Bo, word.
  • Boage, a place in Abbeys full of drawers, wherein they lay up Copes, &c.
  • Bobance, Bobans, riot, luxury; al­so pride, insolency.
  • Bobelin, a patch, or piece set on a shooe or garment.
  • Bobeline, an old patched shooe or garment.
  • Bobeliner, to patch, or to cobble.
  • Bobelineur, a patcher, or cobbler.
  • Bobulaire, big, huge, unweildy like an Ox.
  • Bobulaires, toyes.
  • Bocageux, full of groves.
  • Boccabreve, a kinde of apple.
  • Boccanner, as Boucaner.
  • Boccasin, for Bocassin, a kinde of fine buckram.
  • Boce, for Bosse, a bunch.
  • Bochaise, a wilde chesnut.
  • Bocie, a Limbeck.
  • Boclus, as Bouclus.
  • Bocon, as Boucon.
  • Bocque, a kind of fish, also a slace.
  • Bocquer, to bul, or jurr.
  • Bocquet, a grove.
  • Bode, a young bull.
  • Boesseau, (for boisseau) a bushel.
  • Boësselet, a little bushel.
  • Boëtouyer, to halt, or be lame.
  • Boëttelette, a little box.
  • Bohade, as Bouäde.
  • Bohourd, as Behourd.
  • Bohourder, as Behourder.
  • Bohu, empty, vacant.
  • Boicheron, a wood-cleaver, or wood-seller.
  • Boie, a kinde of great water-snake, that uses to sack whole herds of Kine.
  • Boiffer, to slubber over things in haste.
  • Boiffeur, one that slubbers over things in haste.
  • Boileau, Boilesve, an ordinary drinker of water.
  • Boiler, to will.
  • Boise, a log, also a brace of timber.
  • Boisé, woody.
  • Boissé, hasted, or trimmed with box.
  • Boissel d'osier, a weel, or weer of os [...]er-twigs.
  • Boisselet, a small French bushel.
  • Boisselier, a maker, or seller of bushel-measures.
  • Boissiere, a plot of box-trees.
  • Boissonnerie, excessive drinking.
  • Boiste, for Boëte, a box.
  • Boistellette, a little box.
  • Boistément, lamely.
  • Boistusant, limping, halting.
  • Boite (for boëte) a box.
  • Boitouser, to limp, to halt.
  • Boitte (for boëte) a box. Boitte (for bote) de foin, a bottle of hay.
  • Boivin, a wine-drinker.
  • Bolar, a kinde of asp-resembling tree.
  • Bole d'Armenie, bole-armenie.
  • Bolet, Bolete, a little mushroom, or toadstool.
  • Bolieme, a lip, or chap.
  • Boline, a rope used when a ship sails with a side-wind, or goes near a wind.
  • Boliner, to lay tack aboard.
  • Bolleau (for bouleau) the birch-tree.
  • Bollettes de Cypres, Cyprus nuts, or clogs.
  • Bolouët, a bulwark.
  • Bolus, a morsel, or mouthful; also clay which hath no mineral sub­stance in it.
  • Bombance, as Bobance.
  • Bombarde (for Bombe) a murther­ing piece.
  • Bombarder, to discharge a murther­ing piece.
  • Bombardier, a discharger of mur­thering pieces.
  • [Page] Bombycine, the worse kinde of the Levant-Manna.
  • Bonace, (Adj.) calm, quiet.
  • Bonadies, good morrow.
  • Bonasse (for bonace) a calm.
  • Bondelle, a fish much like a great smelt.
  • Bondener, to argue; also to grum­ble.
  • Bondonné, stopped up with a bung.
  • Bondonner, to stop up with a bung.
  • Bondrée, a kind of short-winged Eagle.
  • Bone, for Borne, bound, limit.
  • Bon-enten-tu, a nimble wit.
  • Bon-Henry, the wild sorrel.
  • Bonhort, as Behourd.
  • Bonifié, made good, or rich.
  • Bonifier, to make good; also to make rich or wealthy.
  • Boniton, a sort of fish.
  • Bonnage, as Bornage.
  • Bonnaire, bountiful, sincere.
  • Bonnaireté, bountifulness, sincerity.
  • Bonnairement, bountifully, sincere­ly.
  • Bonne, (for borne) bound, limit.
  • Bonnes-dames, the herb Orage, or Golden-herb; also Beet.
  • Bonneter, to pull off his cap to one.
  • Bonneton, a little cap.
  • Bonniere, a measure of Land not much differing from the Arpent.
  • Bons-hommes, (for Minimes) an Or­der of Friars.
  • Booie, the water-serpent Boas.
  • Boolingue, as Boulingue.
  • Boote, a Northern star.
  • Boque, as Bocque.
  • Boquet, a Grove of trees.
  • Borax, for Borras, Borax, a green Mineral.
  • Borborigme, the rumbling of the guts; also the murmuring noise of running waters.
  • Bordage, edge, side, or brim; also Villenage. Droict de bordage, the drudgery, or base services re­served by some Lords, upon the letting of their Cottages or small Tenements; which cannot be gi­ven, sold, nor ingaged by the poor slaves that have taken them.
  • Borde, a scattered house in the Country, a farm, or farm-house; also a stalk of pilled hemp.
  • Bordeau, (for bordel) a bawdy-house.
  • Bordeler, to haunt bawdy-houses.
  • Bordelier, a wencher, a whoremon­ger.
  • Bordeliere, the name of a fish that resembles a Bream, and hath nei­ther teeth nor tongue.
  • Bordelois, the name of a very great grape.
  • Bordereau, a ticket, a bill, an ac­count.
  • Bordeux, full of hems, edges, &c.
  • Bordieux, small Tenements, little Cottages.
  • Bordonné, as Bourdonné.
  • Borée, the North-east wind.
  • Borgner, to wink with one eye and look with another.
  • Borgnesse, a woman that hath but one eye.
  • Borgnet, almost blinde of one eye.
  • Borgnoyer, to want an eye, to look or see but with one eye, to wink with one eye.
  • Borgue, a weel for fish.
  • Borlet, for Bourlet, a roul of cloth.
  • Bornage, bounds, or limits. Droict de bornage, the Royalty of laying out bounds for other mens Lands.
  • Bornal de miel, a honey-comb.
  • Bornion à miel, a honey-comb, or bees-nest full of honey.
  • Borrache, a Spanish leather-bottle.
  • Borrais (for borras) Borax.
  • Borrasque (for bourasque) a storm.
  • Borret, a beast about a year old.
  • Borrette, a heifer about a year old.
  • Borriere, as vache borriere, a Cow that hath a Calf running after her.
  • Borrugat, the name of a Sea-fish.
  • Bortiere, the female-salmon.
  • Bos, wood.
  • Bose, the name of an apple, also wood.
  • Boscal, a little Wood.
  • Boscale, Champ boscale, a piece of ground or Common (without any House upon it) wherein divers have certain and several parts.
  • Bosne (for borne) bounds, limits.
  • Bosné, bounded, limited.
  • Bosquillon, a Wood-seller, or a Wood-cleaver.
  • Bossé, swoollen, knobby.
  • Bosseler, to bruise, or make a dint in a vessel of metal or piece of plate.
  • Bosselure, such a kind of bruise.
  • Bossetier, a Stud-maker.
  • Bossetiere, a lettle bunch or knob; a little heap, rising, or swelling of earth; a boss set on a book; a stud on any part of a horses fur­niture.
  • Bossis, high grounds, or little hills raised by the hands of men.
  • Bossuer, to make crooked; also to swell or puff up unevenly.
  • Bot, a wooden shooe, or patten; al­so an ill-favoured big piece of any thing.
  • Botaige, Temps de botaige, the time from the ninth of October to the last of November.
  • Botanique, of, or belonging to herbs.
  • Botanomantie, divination by the vertue of herbs.
  • Botargues, the hard rows of the Murene, or of a kind of Mullet salted, and then dri'd, and eaten, to provoke drinking.
  • Boteau, a bottle of hay, &c.
  • Bothoral, full of wheals.
  • Botineur, a buskin-maker; also one that continually wears boots or buskins.
  • Bortyte, Cadmia in grape-like clu­sters gathered from the roofs of copper-houses, or over the furnaces wherein copper is ordinarily melted or made.
  • Botte, Botter, and Botté. See them with a single t in the N.D.
  • Botteler (for boteler) du foin, to make bottles of hay.
  • Botterol, a Toad.
  • Bou, a boying, or bubbling.
  • Bouäde, the Work of two Oxen, or Ʋse of a small Cart due certain days in Summer by Tenants (that hold by Socage or Villenage) unto their Landlords, for the labouring and dressing of their Vineyards.
  • Bouban, and Boubance. See Bo­bance.
  • Boubax, the name of a kind of O­lives.
  • Boucal, a Weesel, also a vent for the fire or heat of a furnace.
  • Boucan, a he-Goat.
  • Boucaner, to do like a Goat.
  • Boucané, ridden by a Goat.
  • Boucanier, out of date, out of sea­son.
  • Bouccalart, plain Chamlet.
  • Bouchard, a kind of great-eared brown Wheat.
  • Boucharde, a Masons hammer, or pick, pointed at both ends like a diamond.
  • Bouchasses, wild or bastard Ches­nuts.
  • Bouchelette, a little mouth.
  • Boucheron, a faggot-maker.
  • Bouchet, a kind of broth for a sick body; also a drink made of water sweetned with Sugar and Cinna­mon.
  • Bouchette, a little mouth.
  • Bouchimbarbe, Goats beard (an herb.)
  • [Page] Bouchonnet, a little wisp, or stop­ple.
  • Bouconneux, full of stopples, wisps of straw, bunches, clusters.
  • Bouclas, Birch.
  • Bouclette, a small buckle.
  • Bouclure, a buckling; also a swel­ling, or bearing out in the middle; also a buffetting.
  • Bouclus, trenches, or ditches.
  • Boucon, bit, morsel, mouthful. Ba­iller le boucon, to poyson.
  • Bouconnier, a poysonner, one that gives a poysoned bit.
  • Boucque (for bouche) the mouth.
  • Boucquine, a rammish, or lascivious quean.
  • Bouc-soufflé (for boursoufflé) swoln, or puffed up with wind.
  • Boudinal, of, or belonging to a pud­ding.
  • Boudine, the navel.
  • Boudrée, as Bondrée.
  • Bouë de fer, the small flakes that flie from a hot iron when 'tis beaten.
  • Bouée, a buoy for an anchor.
  • Bouër, to heal, to mattar.
  • Bouërande, the weed Cammock.
  • Bouëtte, as Bonnette; also a little box; also a wheel-barrow.
  • Bouëur, a Scavenger.
  • Boufage, as Bouffage.
  • Boufément, puffingly.
  • Boufeux, a great eater.
  • Bouffage, cheek-puffing meat.
  • Bouffanes, puffs in a garment, &c.
  • Bouffant, puffing up.
  • Bouffard, often puffing, also swelling with anger.
  • Bouffe, the part of our cheeks which we puff up in blowing or feeding, a swoln or swelling cheek.
  • Bouffe, puffed, blown, or swoln up.
  • Bouffement, a puffing, blowing, or swelling up.
  • Bouffément, puffingly.
  • Bouffer, to puff, blow, or swell up. Bouffer de courroux, to swell with anger.
  • Bouffeux, a great eater.
  • Bouffiné, greedily eaten.
  • Bouffir, as Bouffer.
  • Bouffissure, a swelling or puffing up; also a kinde of dropsy.
  • Bouffon, Bouffonner, Bouffonnerie. See them with a single f in the N. D.
  • Bouffonesque, Buffoon-like.
  • Bouffonneur, a Buffoon.
  • Bouffron, a Cutle-fish.
  • Boug, the little and venemous green frog, or hedge-toad. Boug coupé, a tortoise.
  • Bouge, valise, a budget, or wallet.
  • Bougeon, a bolt, or arrow with a great bead.
  • Bougié, seared with a wax-candle.
  • Bougier, to sear with a wax-can­dle.
  • Bougiron, Bougironner, and Bou­gironné. See Bougeron, &c. in the N. D.
  • Bougnette, the fork-fish.
  • Bougoir, a sort of candlestick.
  • Bougonner, to bungle.
  • Bougonneur, a bungler.
  • Bougrande, Cammock.
  • Bougrin, buggering, or fit for bug­gery. Chausses à la bougrine, strait Venetians without codpie­ces.
  • Bougrisque, buggering, committing Sodomy.
  • Bouhourd, as Behourd.
  • Bouhourdi premier & second, the first and second Sunday in Lent.
  • Bouillonneux, boyling, or bubbling; also dirty; also full of puffs.
  • Bouillu, for Bouilli, boyled.
  • Boujon, a boult, an arrow with a great or broad head.
  • Boujotte, a pigeon-hole in a dove-coat.
  • Bouissiere, a plot of ground stored with Box.
  • Boular, the little round nest of a Martin, Titmouse, &c.
  • Boulay, a Birch-tree.
  • Bouldure d'un moulin, the conduit of a Mill, wherein the wheel goes.
  • Boulengé, baked, or made into bread.
  • Boulenger, (a Verb) to bake, or make into bread.
  • Bouler, to bowl.
  • Boulerot, a kinde of Gudgeon that lives continually in mud.
  • Boulesche, a great fish-net.
  • Boulette, a little bowl.
  • Boulever, Bouleverd, Boulevert, a balwark.
  • Bouleverse, an over-turning.
  • Boulge, as Bouge.
  • Boulie, (for bouillie) pap.
  • Boulieux, of, or belonging to pap.
  • Boulime, Boulimie, a canine appe­tite.
  • Boulin, a pigeon-hole in the Dove-coat.
  • Boulinage, a laying of tack aboard, or sailing with a side-wind.
  • Boullause, a pout, an eel-pout.
  • Bouller, to cozen, also to box.
  • Boullon, as Boulon.
  • Boullonné, puffed, or drawn out with puffs.
  • Bouloers (or Bouloirs) d'un vis, the circles or circling of a scrue.
  • Bouloire, a Bowling-alley.
  • Boulon, a great peg of wood where­with Carpenters joyn great pieces of timber together. Boulon de fer, a great pin of iron, such as Tradesmen shut in their shop-win­dows withal.
  • Boulouer, a Bulwark.
  • Boulture, a boyling, seething, or bubbling.
  • Boune, for Borne, bound, limit.
  • Bouquanier, as Boucanier.
  • Bouque, for bouquet, a nosegay.
  • Bouque d'Ange, conserve of Lettice-stalks.
  • Bouquer, to kiss another mans thumb; to take or give a kiss; also to strike sail, or to pay custome.
  • Bouquetier, (Adj.) of, or belonging to nosegays, or nosegay-like.
  • Bouquetiere, a woman-seller of nose­gays.
  • Bourache, as Borrache; also a lit­tle candle-case; also an engine (like a candle-case) wherewith fish is caught.
  • Bourachon, a small leather-bottle; also a candle-case; also a drunk­ard, or toss-bottle.
  • Bouras, the tow of hemp, the coursest part of any such like stuff.
  • Bourasse, a leather-bottle.
  • Bourbe, for bourbier, dirt, mire.
  • Bourbelier, the breast, or essay of a wild swine.
  • Bourbeter, to wallow in the dirt, also to mutter.
  • Bourbeteux, full of mud or dirt, al­so loving dirt or mud.
  • Bourbetre, a small fresh-water-fish, that altogether lives on, and lies in mud.
  • Bourbetter, Boubetteux, as Bour­beter, Bourbeteux.
  • Bourblier, as Bourbelier.
  • Bourboulene, the name of a Vine.
  • Bourcier, for Boursier, a Purse-keeper.
  • Bourdaine, a kinde of hedge-tree, exceedingly loved by stags.
  • Bourdant, feasting, passing the time.
  • Bourdé, gravelled as a Cart, &c.
  • Bourdelage, a Tenure in the Domi­nion of Nevers, whereby the Te­nant is bound to pay unto his Landlord a yearly Rent in money, corn, and feathers, or in any two of them; which if he omit three years together, he forfeits his estate.
  • [Page] Bourdelois, a certain Vine or Grape that yields very sowr wine, and therefore it is usually set about Ar­bours, more for the shadow than for the fruit it yields.
  • Bourdelasier, full of jests, or tales.
  • Bourder, to tell tales, to sell a bar­gain to one.
  • Bourdereau, as Bordereau.
  • Bourdeur, a tale-teller, a jester, a guller.
  • Bourdican, a begging Friar.
  • Bourdonnasses, a fashion of great hollow launces used in old time.
  • Bourdonnesque, drone-like.
  • Bourdonneur, a hummer, or buzzer; also a player upon a bag-pipe.
  • Bourdonniere, the gudgeon that's in the top of a bar or hinge-band of a gate.
  • Boureler, &c. See Bourreler under Bourre in the N. D.
  • Bouret, a kinde of shell-fish.
  • Bourgage, a Township, or Borough­ship, the Inhabitants of Houses in Lands belonging to a Town or Borough; also an estate or tenure in Bourgage, held either of the King, or of other Lords of the Borough, and subject to no other than the customary rents and ser­vices thereof.
  • Bourgalois, a Spanish coin worth a­bout 18 d. sterl.
  • Bourgamaistre, (for Bourgmestre) a Burgomaster.
  • Bourgeonneux, full of buds, richly set with pimples.
  • Bourget, a round stool.
  • Bourgrain, buckram.
  • Bourguignotte, a burganet, or Spa­nish murrion.
  • Bourjassotte, the name of a certain fish.
  • Bourjon, Bourjonner, as Bourgeon, Bourgeonner in the N. D.
  • Bourlesque, (for burlesque) burlesk, merry.
  • Bournage, as Bornage.
  • Bournal, and Bournois, as Bornal.
  • Bourrabaquin, a great carousing glass.
  • Bourrachiere, as Corneille bour­rachiere, a roysten crow.
  • Bourrachon, a toss-pot.
  • Bourrade, a storm, or tempest; also the cuffing or ruffling of a bird by a hawk; also the tossing or muz­zling of a hare by a greyhound be­fore he bear her.
  • Bourranflé, puffed up.
  • Bourraquin, as Bourrabaquin, or a Spanish leather-bottle.
  • Bourras, (for borras) borax; also silkrash; also course canvas.
  • Bourrasser, to bastinado.
  • Bourre, (for canard) a Duck.
  • Bourrée, a fagot of twigs, a bundle of any such like stuff.
  • Bourrelet, (for bourlet) a wreath, or roul of cloth.
  • Bourrelier, tormenting, torturing.
  • Bourrette, the uppermost part of the clue or ball of silk yielded by the silk-worm, the coursest of silk.
  • Bourreux, full of flocks, &c.
  • Bourriquet, a kinde of tumbrel or dung-cart; also as Bourrique, an ass.
  • Bourroche (for bourrache) borage.
  • Bours de Chevres, stables for goats.
  • Boursal, a younger Brother.
  • Boursal, (Adj.) of a younger brother. Fief boursal, the portion belonging to a younger brother.
  • Boursalement, by the title of Youn­gership, different from that of the elder Brother, who is to do homage unto the Lord for the whole In­heritance.
  • Boursavit, a purse for a mans yard; also a kinde of big leathern purse.
  • Boursaul, the cane-willow.
  • Boursaux, younger brethren.
  • Boursé, put up in a purse; also bulching, or bearing out, as a full purse.
  • Bourseau, a little blister.
  • Bourselle, a Mariners Compass.
  • Bourser, to put up in a purse.
  • Bourseron, a little purse.
  • Bourseteux, Bourseaux, purse-like; full of purses; belonging to a purse.
  • Boursicouter, to make a purse.
  • Boursiller, the same; also to put his hand into ones purse.
  • Boursillon, a little purse.
  • Boursoufflade, idle vanity.
  • Boursouffleure, any swelling, puf­fing, or blowing up.
  • Bousant, Bousat, a buzzard, or bald kite.
  • Bouscheron, a faggot-maker.
  • Bouse, Bousée de vache, a cow­turd.
  • Bouset, petit bouset, a little odious fellow, a paltry crop of a cow­turd.
  • Bousfler, to puff up, or blow wind into.
  • Bousilles, stuff to daub with.
  • Bousiller, a dawber.
  • Bousin, a soft and mouldring sub­stance that cleaves to the outside of freestone in quarries.
  • Bousinier, as pierres bousinieres, soft and mouldring stones, apt to melt away in water, or by wea­ther.
  • Boussade, the rot, or plague among sheep.
  • Bousse, a bunch, the bunch of a Ca­mels back.
  • Boussin, a bit, or morsel.
  • Boussu, for bossu, crooked.
  • Boustargues, as Botargues.
  • Boutage, Droict de boutage, a cer­tain Duty or Fee exacted by the Lord of Breci (a Member of Bour­ges) for the wine retailed within his Jurisdiction.
  • Boutant, thrusting forward; also budding, or putting forth.
  • Boutant, a buttress, or shore-post.
  • Boutargues, as Botargues.
  • Bousé, thrust forward, also budded or put forth.
  • Boute-cul, a new Monk, or Friar.
  • Boutée, a thrust, a jert, a violent attempt; also a budding.
  • Boutefoire, a certain shitten yew game.
  • Bouteillerie, a cupboard, or table to set bottles on.
  • Bouteillette, a small bottle, or bubble.
  • Bouteilliere, a tympany.
  • Boutement, a thrusting forward.
  • Bouter, for mettre, to put.
  • Bouterolle, the chape of a scab­bard.
  • Bouteuffle, a bubble.
  • Bouticle, for boutique, a shop; also a well, or lepe, for fish.
  • Bouticlier, a shop-keeper, or he that looketh to a shop.
  • Boutiffle, a bubble of water.
  • Boutignan, the name of a kinde of Olive.
  • Boutillier, as Bouteiller in the N. D.
  • Boutine, the navel.
  • Boutis, the rooting of a wild boar; also as boutement.
  • Boutoir, a Farriers buttress.
  • Boutonnerie, a buttoning, or clas­ping; also a budding, or sprouting out; also a cauterizing.
  • Boutonneur, a buttoner, or an in­strument wherewith buttons are pulled through their over-strait holes.
  • Boutouër, the snout of a wild swine.
  • Bouts, a great bottle, or as Oudre.
  • Boutrice, an ashler, or binding-stone in building.
  • Boutton, for bouton, button.
  • Boutture, as Bouture under Bout in the N. D.
  • Bouvaux, a kinde of figs.
  • [Page] Bouveau, Bouvelle, a bullock.
  • Bouvi, as qui sent le bouvi, smelling like an Ox.
  • Bouviere, a river-fish.
  • Bouvine, all kinde of oxen.
  • Bouyau, for boyau, gut, bowel.
  • Bouys, for bouis, the box-tree.
  • Bouze, as bouse.
  • Bouzine, a rustical Trumpet or wind-Instrument, made of pitched bark.
  • Boye, an Executioner.
  • Bozel, a thick or great boultel com­monly in or near unto the basis of a pillar.
  • Bozine, as Bouzine.
  • Braçal, for Brassal, an Archers brace, or bracer.
  • Braçats, vambraces, an armour for the arms.
  • Brace, for Brasse, a fadom.
  • Brachial, Brachieux, of, or belong­ing to the arm.
  • Brachialement, with main force of arms.
  • Braconnier, a hunter.
  • Bradypepsie, slow concoction.
  • Bragard, flaunting, pert, bragga­dochio-like.
  • Bragardement, flauntingly, pertly, braggingly.
  • Bragarder, to flaunt it, to swagger.
  • Bragardise, flaunting, proud vanity, swaggering.
  • Bragmarder, to be leacherous.
  • Brague, a kind of mortaise, or joyn­ing of pieces together.
  • Braguer, to brag, to swagger.
  • Braguerie, bragging, swaggering.
  • Bragues, short and close linnen-bree­ches worn next unto the thighs.
  • Braguesques, large Venecians having Cod-peeces, and gathered, or full of stuff at the knees.
  • Braguette, a cod-piece. Bonnet à quatre braguettes, a four-square cap.
  • Bragueur, as Bragard.
  • Brahiers, linnen-breeches.
  • Brailler, to make a great noise, to cry out.
  • Brain, the branch of a tree.
  • Braisillonner, to roast upon quick coals.
  • Braismer, for bramer, to roar.
  • Braisset, the green toad.
  • Branc d'acier, a cuttelas.
  • Brancal, and Brancas, as Brancar in the N. D.
  • Brance, bearded red wheat.
  • Branchet, as Espervier branchet, a brancher, or young hawk, newly come out of the nest.
  • Branchette, a little branch.
  • Branchiere, a Passage-toll, so called, because the little log that's a signe thereof hangs on the branch of a Tree.
  • Branchieres, the out-places, or parts of the highway wherein the said logs or billets have been a long time hung up.
  • Branchillon, a little branch.
  • Branchue, a kind of Cray-fish.
  • Branchure, a branch.
  • Brand, as Branc.
  • Brandes, healthy grounds.
  • Brandif, brandishing, lusty. Il man­gea un gigot de mouton tout brandif, he eat a whole leg of mutton.
  • Brandilloir, Brandilloire, a swing.
  • Brandonner, to seize land by pitch­ing down into it a staff topped with straw.
  • Brane, boeuf brane, a kind of wilde Ox in Languedoc and Provence fit onely for the Shambles.
  • Branglage, a kind of Toll or Tax.
  • Branquar, as Brancar in the N. D. also the edge of the Deck of a ship.
  • Branque ursine, an herb called Brank­ursine, or Bears breech.
  • Branquetter, as Bransquetter.
  • Branseat, spoil, ravage.
  • Bransloire, a swing, a brandling.
  • Bransquetter, to ravage, or ran­sack.
  • Braque, for Brac, a little hound.
  • Braquemar, ou Braquemard, a wood-knife, hanger, whineyard.
  • Braser, to slope the edge of a stone, as Masons do in windows, &c. for the gaining of light.
  • Brasillé, broyled.
  • Brasiller, Brasillonner, to broyl upon quick coals, or hot embers.
  • Brassage, the fee which the Masters of the Mint have out of every sort of money coyned.
  • Brassart, and Brassat, as Brassal in the N. D.
  • Brassier, a Brazier; also a sling; al­so a cudgel; also the tab that re­ceives the droppings of a tap; also a labouring man.
  • Brassiere, a womans or a childs wastcoat; also the doublet some women wear in child-bed; also the arm or branch of a river; al­so a brace; one of the staves whereby men turn the beam of a Crane, &c.
  • Brassin, a brewing.
  • Brassique, Colewort.
  • Brater un Chariot, to turn, set, or bend a cart on the right or left hand.
  • Bravache, a swaggerer.
  • Bravacherie, a swaggering.
  • Brave (a Subst.) the reward or prize for him that hath done best in Plays or Games.
  • Braveux, he that gives the prize.
  • Brayant, Brayart, braying, or crying like an Ass.
  • Brayer, Brayement. See Broyer, broyement in the N. D.
  • Brayere, a flax-wise.
  • Brayetter la chemise, to put his shirt between the legs. La Lan­gue me brayette, my tongue trips, or faulters.
  • Brayeul, the parts or feathers about the hawks fundament, called the brail in a short-winged, and the pannel in a long-winged hawk.
  • Breant, the bird called a Siskin.
  • Brebiail, Brebiaille, sheep, ews.
  • Brebiette, a little sheep, or ew.
  • Breborions, old dunsical books; also charms against the tooth-ach, &c.
  • Breché, having a breach made in it.
  • Brechedent, one that wants divers teeth, or as Breschedent.
  • Brechet, the brisket.
  • Brecheure d'une Riviere, a breach in a River.
  • Bredaille, a great paunch, or belly.
  • Bredailler, a gor-belly, fat-guts.
  • Brediner, to pronounce imperfectly.
  • Bredouillard, one that speaks or pronounces imperfectly.
  • Bredouille, a lurch at Cards or Ta­bles. Ma p [...]tite bredouille, my little rogue.
  • Bredouiller, to speak, or pronounce imperfectly.
  • Brehaigne, a barren woman or fe­male, or (adjectively) barren.
  • Brei, as Bret.
  • Breil de forest, a thick-grown wood, or corner of a forest, where­in wilde beasts use to lurk.
  • Breits, for Bray, a kind of ship­pitch.
  • Brelaté, slashed.
  • Brelm, Brelandier. See Berlan, Berlandier in the N. D.
  • Brelengue, Brelingue, a piece of coin worth about 8 pence sterl.
  • Breller, to bat-fowl, to catch birds by bat-fowling, also to twinkle, or glitter.
  • Brelles, cives.
  • Brelue, for Berlue, dimness of sight.
  • [Page] Bremant, as il n'a enfant ne bre­mant, he hath neither childe nor chick to care for.
  • Bremer, for Bramer, to cry out like a Hart.
  • Bremme (for brame) a bream.
  • Bren, a turd.
  • Brenasserie, shitten stuff.
  • Breneux, beshitten.
  • Bresche, the name of a very hard and sundry-coloured marble.
  • Bresché, as Breché.
  • Breschedent, as Brechedent; also an Ironical allusion to President.
  • Bresillé, made red as Brasil-wood. Boeuf bresillé, Martlemas-beef.
  • Bresin, the hook of a Crane, and in a ship the Cane-hook.
  • Bressaudes, the crispy mammocks that remain of fri'd hogs grease.
  • Bressaux, a kind of fine cakes, or wafers, or as Pain de Quinque.
  • Bresse, a brush; also a thin leaf or cake of wax, &c.
  • Bresseron, the Sow-thistle.
  • Bressille des yeux, the twinkling of the eyes.
  • Bressiller, to twinkle with the eyes.
  • Bret, a little Engine (made of two sticks joyned together) wherewith Fowlers catch small birds whilst they wonder at an Owl that's set of purpose to amaze them; also as Bray in the N. D. Etre, ou par­ler bret, to stammer.
  • Bretauder, for Bertauder, to cur­tail.
  • Breteler, to brabble.
  • Breteleur, a brabbler.
  • Breteque, Bretesche, Bretesque, and Brethecque, a publick place in a Town wherein Out-cries and Pro­clamations are ordinarily made; also a port, or portal of defence, in the rampire or wall of a Town.
  • Bretonner, to speak thick and short; also to stammer.
  • Bretté, notched like a Saw.
  • Brettesse, the Battlements of a wall.
  • Brettessé, furnished with Battle­ments.
  • Bretteure, a notching.
  • Bretueil, the iron piece called a fow­ler, or port-piece.
  • Brevade, Brevetade, as Brevet un­der Brief in the N. D.
  • Breveter, to abbreviate, to reduce into briefs or breviates.
  • Breuil, as Breil.
  • Breulet, as Bret.
  • Breusse, a bowl of tin.
  • Breusté, broosed, or knapped off.
  • Breuvoer, liquor, or any liquid stuff that's fit to be made into drink.
  • Breze, for braise, a burning coal.
  • Brezil, for bresil, the wood Brazil.
  • Breziller, as Bressiller.
  • Bribe, a piece of bread given to a beggar.
  • Briber, to beg his bread; to eat greedily; to run up and down.
  • Bribeur, a beggar, a greedy eater; a goer up and down.
  • Bribonner, to mumble up his Pray­ers.
  • Briborions, Prayers mumbled up.
  • Bric, as Prendre au bric, to take advantage of a word spoken by another, also to give a dead list.
  • Brichet, as Brechet.
  • Bricot, the stump of a shrub, or little tree; an up-sticking stub of a late­cut shrub or tree.
  • Bricoteau, a quoit of stone.
  • Bridaveaux, hollow, round, and wreathed cracknels of fine flour, sugar, salt, and yolks of eggs in­corporated together with water and white-wine.
  • Bridoye, a goose-bridler (a Nick­name for a Lawyer.)
  • Brief, for brevet, a brief.
  • Brief (an Adv.) in short.
  • Briemart, poor folks drink (made of bran, leaven, and water.)
  • Briere, as Bruyere in the N. D.
  • Brifaut, Brifeau, a greedy eater.
  • Brifec, a morsel eaten greedily.
  • Brifer, to eat greedily.
  • Brigader, to keep company together.
  • Brigaille, a notable smell-smock.
  • Brigande, for brigade, a great body of horse-men.
  • Brigandeau, Brigandereau, a little Robber.
  • Briganderie, a robbing and kil­ling.
  • Brigandin, for Brigantin, the Bri­gantine Vessel.
  • Brigandine, an ancient armour so called.
  • Brigant, for brigand, a highway­robber.
  • Brignon, the name of an excellent plum.
  • Briguerie, an underhand suing for an Office; also a wrangling, or contending; also a sharking, or robbing.
  • Briguet, a mongrel; also one that is nobly born but of one side.
  • Brihat, one that is hot and loud.
  • Bril, a sparkle, a glittering.
  • Brillonner, for briller, to sparkle, or glitter.
  • Brimbalatoire, as Brimballatoire.
  • Brimbaler, sonner trop fort les clo­ches, to set the bells agate.
  • Brimbalé, tumbled headlong, shaken, swagged.
  • Brimbales, the bells worn by Cart­horses.
  • Brimballatoire, swagging, or shaking ill-favouredly.
  • Brimballotier, Brimbeur, Brimblo­tier, a paultry Pedlar, one that hath nought but trash to sell; also a spangle-maker.
  • Brimborions, as Breborions; also the knacks or bawbles wherewith fools caps, &c. are garnished. Il dit ses brimborions (for brevi­aire) he mumbles up his prayers.
  • Brimboter, to mumble.
  • Brindell [...]s de balay, the sprigs or twigs of a beesom.
  • Bringue, a drinking to.
  • Bringuenarder, to swive.
  • Bringuenarilles, wide nostrils.
  • Bringuenaudée, a common whore.
  • Brioche, a brake for hemp; also a rowl or bun of spiced bread.
  • Brioler, to glide, or slide on the ice.
  • Brionie, Briony, white vine.
  • Briquer, to lay bricks, or to build with bricks.
  • Briquerie, a brick-kiln.
  • Briquet, as Briguet; also a young hare.
  • Briquettes, little toys.
  • Briqueux, full of bricks, or fit for bricks.
  • Briquier, a brick-maker, a brick­seller.
  • Brisable, apt to be broke.
  • Brische, a bush made of lime-twigs, and a stale hung at it to draw birds unto it.
  • Briscoter, to leacher.
  • Brise, a piece of ground that's new broke up for tillage, and hath lai [...] long untilled.
  • Brise-grain, corn-breaking.
  • Brisement, a breaking.
  • Brise-ponts, bridge-breaking (said of a River.)
  • Brise-tour, tower-breaking.
  • Brisette, a little scale or husk, a little splint or shiver broken off any thing.
  • Briseur, a breaker.
  • Briseux, breaking, crushing.
  • Brisgoter, as Briscoter.
  • Brisseures, broken pieces.
  • Brit, as Bric.
  • Brive, a bridge.
  • Britascher, as j'ai ouï britascher d'une telle chose, I have heard some such muttering.
  • [Page] Briz, as Bris under Briser in the N. D.
  • Brize, for bize, the North-wind.
  • Brizer, for Briser, to bruise, to break.
  • Brocar, for Brocatel, Satin purfled with gold; also a cutting jest.
  • Brocardé, jeared, derided.
  • Brocarder, to jear, to deride.
  • Brocarderie, a jearing, or deriding.
  • Brocardeur, a jearer, or derider.
  • Brocelles, for Brossailles, thick bushes.
  • Brochant, broaching.
  • Brochard, as Brocar; also a peg of wood.
  • Brochereux, little pickerels.
  • Brocheton, a small pike.
  • Brochoir, a Farriers shooing ham­mer.
  • Brode, broth, pottage, brue; also a Sun-burnt wench. Pain de brode, brown bread; Langage brode, a loose or an effeminate language.
  • Brodes, a leather cloak or mantle.
  • Brodeure (for broderie) imbrode­ry.
  • Brodier, the arse, or bum.
  • Broisse, for brosse, a brush.
  • Brommart, drowsie.
  • Bronchique, as muscle bronchique, one of the four Muscles which open the Larinx.
  • Brondes, green boughs, brouze-wood, or brouzing for cattle.
  • Bronzé, covered with grass.
  • Bronzer, to cover with grass.
  • Brossailleux, full of little bushes.
  • Brossettes, brushes.
  • Brot, a drinking Jack; a flagon, or great tankard. Un brot de vigne, the bud of a Vine.
  • Brotonne, male Southernwood.
  • Brouailles, washing of dishes; also guts and garbage of fowl; any such outcast trash.
  • Brouaz, as Brouhaha.
  • Broudier, as Brodier.
  • Brouë, a little white cloud.
  • Broüée, a mist, or fog; also a blu­ster, hurry, or hurly-burly.
  • Brouër, a mist, or fog.
  • Brouëtteur, one that works with a wheel-barrow.
  • Brouffer, to snurt with the nose, like a horse.
  • Brouhaha, Brouhou, a bluster, hurry, hurly-barly.
  • Brouil, for Brou, the outward husk of a green walnut.
  • Brouillar, Brouillas, a mist, or fog.
  • Brouillasser, Brouillasseur. See Brouiller, & Brouillon in the N.D.
  • Brouilleur, for Brouillon, a trouble-house.
  • Brouillis, for brouillerie, confusion.
  • Brouïné, blasted, or burnt with mists.
  • Brouïr, to rustle, or bluster; also to humme.
  • Brouïssement, a rustling, or bluster­ing; also a humming.
  • Brouser, for Brouter, to brouze..
  • Broussaille, as Brossailles in the N. D.
  • Broussin, a bunch, or knurr in a tree.
  • Broute, the root of the box-tree sea­soned and fit for use.
  • Brouteur, a brouzer; also as Brou­ëtteur.
  • Broutement, Brouteure, a brouzing.
  • Broutilles, beggars scraps.
  • Broutique, a Monkey.
  • Broutonner, for boutonner, to bud.
  • Broüy, burned, parched with heat.
  • Broüyr, to burn, or parch with heat.
  • Bruchet, the craw-bone, or merry-thought of a bird.
  • Bruel, Brueil, the brail, or pannel of a hawk.
  • Bruge-espine, buck-thorn.
  • Brugier, to bellow, or make a hide­ous noise.
  • Brugne, a fashion of Corselet, or Bri­gandine used in old time.
  • Bruiement, Bruiment, a rumbling, rustling, or blustering.
  • Bruiné, blasted and burned with mist; also hoary.
  • Bruinement, a blasting or burning with hot mists; also a glazing over.
  • Bruiner, to blast or burn with hot mists; also to glaze, or set a hoa­ry gloss on.
  • Bruineux, full of hot blasting mists.
  • Brule-langue, as Brusle-langue.
  • Brumal, of, or belonging to winter, or winter-like.
  • Bruman, a son-in-law, the husband of a daughter.
  • Brumbay, brown bay, or dark bay.
  • Brume, the shortest day in the year; also the midst of winter; also winter.
  • Brumestre, the name of a kinde of Vine.
  • Bruncher, Brunchement. See Bron­cher, Bronchement in the N. D.
  • Bruneau, clos bruneau, the bum, the ars [...].
  • Brun-fauve, Deer-coloured.
  • Bruni d'un Cerf, the burnishing of a Stags head.
  • Brunie, as Brugne.
  • Brus [...]able, apt to be burnt.
  • Brusle-ser, iron-burning (a Nick­name for Smiths.)
  • Brusle-grain, corn-burning.
  • Brusle-langue, tongue-scorching, tongue-inflaming.
  • Brusquet, as vin brusquet, brisk, or sharp wine.
  • Brute-bonne, the name of a pear.
  • Brutesse, brutality.
  • Bruthier, a buzzard.
  • Brutif, clownish, also rash, heedless. Parler brutif, to falter in his speech.
  • Brutivement, clownishly, rudely; also rashly, heedlesly; also faul­teringly.
  • Bruy, as Brouy.
  • Bruyement, as Bruiement.
  • Bruyereux, full of heath.
  • Bruyné, as Bruiné.
  • Bryonie, as brionie.
  • Buanderie, a Laundry.
  • Bubailler, to gape, to yawn.
  • Bubbe, a wheal, or blister.
  • Bubelette, Bubette, a red pimple on the nose, &c.
  • Buberiges, dogs leeks, or the herb that bears the purple starry Ja­cint.
  • Bubon, a great bunch, a plague-sore, or a pockie-sore.
  • Buc, a busk.
  • Bucail, Buccail, the course grain cal­led French-wheat.
  • Buccinateur, a Trumpetter.
  • Buccine, a Cornet, or Trumpet for the Wars; also the horn of a Cow-herd or Swine-herd; also the shell-fish called Venus-shell.
  • Bucheronner, to cleave, or cut down wood; to make faggots, &c.
  • Bucine, as Buccine.
  • Buclandere, a Billander.
  • Bucolie, Herd-man-like.
  • Bucoliquement, Hard-man-like.
  • Bucquer, as Buquer; also to but, or jurr.
  • Buée, a buck of cloaths.
  • Buer, to wash a buck, to scowr with lie.
  • Buffe, a cuff, or box on the ear.
  • Buffelin, buff-like; of, or belonging to a buffle.
  • Buffer, to puff, or blow hard; also to spout water on.
  • Buffeté, wrought rough or shag like buff; buffeted, cuffed; deaded as wine that hath taken wind, or hath been mingled with water.
  • Buffeter, to make rough or shag like buff; also to buffet, or cuff; also to marr a vessel of wine by often [Page] tasting it before it is broached, or to fill it up with water after much wine hath been taken out of it.
  • Buffeteurs de vin, such as steal wine out of the Vessels they have in charge, and afterwards fill them up with water.
  • Buffetolt, the fish called a Lump, Padle, or Sea-owl.
  • Buffler, to deceive.
  • Buffroy, a beacon, or watch-tower.
  • Bufon, a toad.
  • Bugie, the bark of a barbary-tree.
  • Bugle, middle Consound, or middle Comfrey.
  • Buglement, a lowing, or bellow­ing.
  • Bugler, to lowe, or bellow.
  • Bugleux, full of bellowing, often or much lowing.
  • Buglesat, of bugloss, made of bugloss.
  • Bugnets, for bignets, fritters.
  • Bugrande, Bugrane, Bugrate, Bu­grunde, Rest-harrow, Cammock.
  • Buie, a water-pot, or pitcher.
  • Buire, an oyl-glass, viol, or cruze.
  • Buirette, a cruet, or little viol, or a cider-jugg.
  • Buisart, Buissart, a buzzard.
  • Buisine, Buissine, a little pipe, a water-pipe.
  • Buissonnages, bushes, or bushy grounds.
  • Buissonné, hid amongst bushes.
  • Buissonner, to lye in wait for a­mong bushes.
  • Buissonnet, a little bush.
  • Buissonneux, bushy, or full of bushes.
  • Buissonnier, (Adj.) of, or belonging to bushes; frequenting or haunting bushes; living or lurking among bushes. Faire l'eschole buisson­niere, to play the truant.
  • Buissonniere, a bushy ground.
  • Bule, a blister, or bubble.
  • Buler, as Bugler; also to send a Bull, as Popes do; to execute or ex­communicate by Bull.
  • Buletin, as Bulletin.
  • Buliste, of, or belonging to a bull; a writer, or maker of bulls.
  • Bullage, the s [...]aling of cloth, the marking thereof with a seal of lead.
  • Bullé, sealed with lead, as a Bull; also that hath obtained the Popes Bull for some particular advance­ment or privilege to himself.
  • Bulletean, a boulter, or boulting-cloth.
  • Bulleter, to boult.
  • Bulletin, a T [...]cket, a Cocket. Bulle­tins are among the Gray-Friars such as have been reformed by the Pope's bulls.
  • Bullette, as Bulletin.
  • Bullettes, such bubbles or bobs of glass as women wear for pendants at their ears.
  • Bulliste, as Buliste.
  • Bullonner, to run, boyl, or burst out in great abundance.
  • Bullot, a certain great, yellow, and sowr apple.
  • Buon, the beak of an ewer or pot, the mouth of a cruet, viol, &c. also a little oyl-pot.
  • Bupreste, the venemous black fly, called a long-leg, or wag-leg.
  • Buquer, to knock, or to rap at a door.
  • Bur, as Bureau in the N. D.
  • Burail, Burat, silk-rash, or any kinde of stuff that's half silk and half woosted.
  • Burate, that which remains in a Churh after the butter is taken out; also as Burail.
  • Bureau, (Adj.) dark brown.
  • Buretté, boulted.
  • Burez, for Buret, the Burret-fish.
  • Burgan, a snail-like shell-fish.
  • Burgrave, the Captain or Governour of a Fortress.
  • Burguespine, for Bourguepine, way-thorn.
  • Burineur, a Graver.
  • Buriot, a young duckling newly crept out of the shell.
  • Burler, to howl; also to jest with.
  • Burne, the solitary place or corner wherein an Owl sits in the day­time.
  • Burnie, as main burnie, ward, cu­stody.
  • Buron, a poor cottage.
  • Burre, for beurre, butter.
  • Burré, buttered.
  • Burrer, to butter.
  • Burrier, a seller of butter; also a great eater of butter, a butter-box.
  • Bursauli, Cane-withy, with the yel­lowish bark.
  • Buschailles, small twigs or sprigs.
  • Buschetter, to gather sticks for the fire.
  • Buschettes, Buschilles, small twigs or sprigs.
  • Buschoier, as Buschetter.
  • Busine, the pipe of a Cistern or Con­duit; also a bag-pipe.
  • Busquer, chercher fortune, to seek his fortune.
  • Bu [...]sirt, a sort of Wine-vessel.
  • Busse de raisins, a great Vessel, wherein raisins be put or trans­ported.
  • Bust, as Buste.
  • Bustarin, a great Lubber.
  • Buste, the whole bulk of a man from his face to his middle; also a Tomb, or Sepulchre.
  • Bustofer, a great Loggerhead.
  • Bustuaire, burnt as a dead body, or expecting the sacrifice of mens bo­dies.
  • Buteux, of, or belonging to a butt, full of butts.
  • Butinement, a making spoyl of.
  • Butineur, a preyer, a pillager.
  • Butineux, full of prey, spoil, booty.
  • Butoesne, for betoine, Betony.
  • Butte, for Bute, a butt.
  • Buttel, for Hotte, a sort of basket, called a Dosser.
  • Buvable, fit to be drunk of.
  • Buvage, liquor.
  • Buveau, a bevel.
  • Buvereau, a Sipper.
  • Buveter, to sip.
  • Buvetier, an Officer that gathers mo­ney for the Judges Collations.
  • Buvette, small houshold-wine.
  • Buvettes, sippings, tipplings; and particularly the Judges Drinkings or Collations.
  • Buvetter, as Buveter, to sip.
  • Buvotter, for Beuvoter, the same.
  • Buxolle, for Boussole, a Mariners Compass.
  • Buydon, a Poulterers Cage or Coop, where he feeds his chickens and other fowl in.
  • Buye, as Buie.
  • Buyele, as Buxolle.
  • Buyer, a Box-tree.
  • Buyrette, as Burete under Bure in the N. D.
  • Buys, for bouïs, Box.
  • Buyser, to bore, or make holes in­to.
  • Buysé, bored, that hath holes made into it.
  • Buysine, as Buisine.
  • Buy [...]ronne, a furnace to melt and fine s [...]n in.
  • Buysart, Buzart, (for Buzard) a Buzzard.
  • Buzine, as Busine.
  • Byble, for bible, the Bible.
  • Byrrasque, for Bourrasque, a storm.
  • Byze, for bize, the North-wind.

C

  • CAbab, the chucking of a Par­tridge.
  • Cababezancé, loaded with bags and wallets, also commented on.
  • Cabacet, as Cabasset.
  • Cabal, the money, or merchandise, which one takes of another, to yield him part of the gain that's made thereof.
  • Cabalanizer, to drink like a horse.
  • Cabalin, of, or belonging to a horse.
  • Cabaliste, a Cabalist, a Professor of the Jewish Traditions.
  • Cabalistique, of, or belonging to the Jewish Cabal or Traditions.
  • Caban, a gabardine, or felt-cloak.
  • Cabaretrer, to frequent ale-houses, or the like.
  • Cabassé, put, or packed up in a frail.
  • Cabasseau, as Cabeseau.
  • Cabasser, to fill a frail with raisins.
  • Cabasset, a sleight helmet. Cabasset de papier, a long hood or miter of paper.
  • Cabasson, the name of a fish.
  • Cabat, and Cabau, as Cabal.
  • Cabeillau, fresh Cod.
  • Cabeçon, as Cavesson in the N.D.
  • Cabestant, the Capitane of a ship.
  • Cabiland, for Cabillau, fresh Cod.
  • Cabirotade, as Capirotade.
  • Cabirots, the spawn of Sturgeons spread upon bread, and eaten with vinegar, oyl, and pepper.
  • Cable, for abbatis, a wind-fall, a tree overthrown by winde or tem­pestuous weather.
  • Caboche, the head.
  • Cabochard, Cabochenu, Cabo­cheux, heady, or obstinate.
  • Cabot, Cabote, the gull-fish, or mull-head.
  • Cabre, a Goat.
  • Cabril, a young Kid.
  • Cabriole, for capriole, a caper in dancing.
  • Cabrioter, to caper, to cut a caper.
  • Cabrol, an issue made of a fistula.
  • Cabrole, the name of a fish.
  • Cabreé, headed like a Cabbidge.
  • Caburlaut, as Cabot.
  • Cabus, as laictue cabusse, headed-Lettice.
  • Cabusser, to grow to a head, like a Cabbidge.
  • Cacasangue, the bloudy flux.
  • Cacassement de poule, the cackling of a hen.
  • Cacasser, to ch [...] as a Partridge.
  • Cache, as Chasse in the N. D. also a hiding-hole or corner.
  • Cachebugade, Aethiopian Hartwort, or Seseli.
  • Cache-col, an ancient velvet attire, or ornament for the neck.
  • Cachectique, in a Consumption, pining away.
  • Cachelaid, Cachelet, a mask, or muffler.
  • Cache-maille, a money-box.
  • Cachement, a hiding, or concealing.
  • Cachément, closely, privately.
  • Cachemi-tula, a Play wherein one must keep a thing privately deli­vered him, and another finde out the keeper among many others; which if he do, he is rewarded, otherwise punished.
  • Cache-museau, a kinde of flawn; also a mufler, or mask, for the face.
  • Cache-nez, a mask, or muffler.
  • Cachercau, as Chartulaire.
  • Cacheur, a hider, or concealer.
  • Cachexie, an indisposition of the body.
  • Cachile, Sea-rocket.
  • Cachoire, as Chassoire.
  • Cachotte, for Cachette, a secret place.
  • Cachotté, laid in the hole of a pri­son.
  • Cachry, Rosemary-seed.
  • Cacidoine, for calcedoine, Chalce­dony, a kinde of Onyx-stone.
  • Cacochymie, evil digestion.
  • Cacoëthe, an incurable bile, or sore.
  • Cacologie, evil speech, slander, de­traction.
  • Cacquetoire, as Caquetoire.
  • Cad d'eau, a great fall, or shower of rain.
  • Cadalice, a bedstead.
  • Cadarce, the tow, or co [...]sist part of silk.
  • Cadavreux, carcass-like, rotten.
  • Cade, the crimzon, or prickly cedar.
  • Cadel, a castling, a star [...]ling, one that hath much need of pampering.
  • Cadelé, pampered, made much of. Lettres cadelées, capital or [...]-Lett [...]s.
  • Cadeler, to pamper; also to write a Text-hand, or make great Let­ters.
  • Cadene, an iron-chain.
  • Cadmie, Cadonia.
  • Cadrilles, a Troop of Horsemen.
  • Caducité, frailty, weakness.
  • Cafard, an hypocrite.
  • Cafarde, as a la cafarde, hypocriti­cally.
  • Cafarder, to pretend devotion, to play the hypocrite.
  • Cafardie, Casardise, hypocrisie, out­ward holiness.
  • Cafas, a kinde of course Taffata.
  • Cafetin, as suere cafetin, refined sugar.
  • Cafezate, the name of a most vene­mous and malignant Serpent.
  • Caffard, as cafard, an hypocrite; also a beetle that flies by night.
  • Caffardise, hypocrisie.
  • Cagade, an idle boasting.
  • Cagarel, Cagaret, the Cackerel-fish.
  • Cagarole de Mer, a Periwinkle.
  • Cagasangue, as Cacasangue.
  • Cageois, a Country-clown, or Boor.
  • Cagerotte, a Chesford, or Cheesfat (of wicker.)
  • Cagnard, Cagnardier, &c. See Cai­gnard, &c.
  • Cagnasque, as parler cagnasque, to speak doggery.
  • Cagnasse, a great Bitch.
  • Cagne, a Bitch.
  • Cagnole, the Mallet-fish.
  • Cagnot, a little Dog; also a kind of little Dog-fish that hates men ex­treamly.
  • Cagot, for bigot, a superstitious man.
  • Cagouille, a dew-Snail.
  • Cagoulle, a Monks hood, or cowl.
  • Caguemaille, Cagueraffe, a greedy wretch, a ravenous oppressor.
  • Cahier, for Cayer, a sheet (or more) of a written book.
  • Cahot, the jogg of a Coach in a rough and uneven way.
  • Cahoter, to jog as a Coach.
  • Cahuaille, a company of Owls.
  • Cahuet, Cahuot, as Cahot.
  • Cahutelle, a little Cottage.
  • Caiche, a mans yard.
  • Caignard, Caignardier, a lazie rogue.
  • Caignarder, to play the lazie rogue.
  • Caignardiere, a lazie quean.
  • Caignart, as Caignard; also a nasty place or corner wherein Beggars lie in the Sun and lowse them­selves.
  • Caigne, a Bitch; also Gods me, or the like Inter [...]ection of wonder.
  • Caignon, the hinder part of the r [...]k.
  • Caignot, as Cagnot.
  • Cailhete, a Corkacy.
  • Caillat, Caillebotes, c [...]dy of milk.
  • Caillel oteux, full of [...]. Licus cailleboteux, craggy, sto [...], or rockie places.
  • Caillement, a c [...]rding.
  • [Page] Cailles, round Beads wherewith French-men play at Trou-ma­dame.
  • Cailleteau, a little flint-stone.
  • Caillette, a fool, a natural; also a Rams cod; also the outward skin of the cods; also a small bead.
  • Cailloëux, as Cailloreux.
  • Caillon, a congealed lump of flegm, bloud, &c.
  • Cailloré, curded, or cardled.
  • Caillorer, to curd, or curdle.
  • Caillorosat, a Lording-apple; also a green and great Pear of a plea­sant taste.
  • Cailloreux, as Caillouëux.
  • Caillouët, the name of a very sweet Pear.
  • Caillouëux, full of small, hard, and sharp stones.
  • Caimand, a Beggar.
  • Caimander, to beg from door to door.
  • Caimanderie, Caimandise, beggar­liness.
  • Caïon, a young, or little Hog.
  • Caique, a kind of ship.
  • Caire, the look of ones face.
  • Cairin, a Turkie-carpet, such as is brought from Caire in Egypt.
  • Caisne, a Bitch.
  • Caissans, the side-teeth, called the Grinders.
  • Calage, the Caulking of a Ship; al­so Oakam, or the Tow wherewith it is caulked.
  • Calabasse, a bottle made of an em­pty'd Gourd.
  • Calamar, a Pennar; also the Cala­mary, or Sleeve-fish.
  • Calame, a Cane, or Reed; Wheaten, or Oaten-straw; Pipe, or Flute, &c.
  • Calament, for calamente, Cala­mint.
  • Calaminaire, as Pierre calaminaire. See Calamine in the N. D.
  • Calamistrer, to curl the hair.
  • Calamite (Adp.) of, or belonging to Reeds, or kept in Reeds.
  • Calamiteux, miserable, poor, unfor­tunate.
  • Calamiteusement, wretchedly, poor­ly, miserably.
  • Calande, a We [...], or Mite.
  • Calandre, as Calendre in the N. D.
  • Calangement, an accusation, or ch [...]r [...]e.
  • Calanger, to accuse of, to charge with.
  • Calar, as Caler; also to be silent, [...] talking, desist from bab­bling.
  • Calathe, a basket, or hamper; also a Vessel to bring milk or cheese to Market in; also a cup for sacri­fice.
  • Calcante, Vitriol.
  • Calcinatoire, calcinatory, or calci­nating.
  • Calcioler, to stand much on a mat­ter, or to urge a thing often.
  • Calcite, as Chalcite.
  • Calcitrer, to kick, or fling; to be stubborn, obstinate, disobedient.
  • Calcul, for gravelle, the gravel.
  • Calculateur, a reckoner.
  • Calculatoire, calculatory.
  • Calculement, a reckoning, or calcu­lating.
  • Calderon, a kind of long and round Whale.
  • Cale, a sorry kind of cap.
  • Calebasse, as Calabasse.
  • Calendrine, a Sleek-stone.
  • Calenge, a claim; also a challenge; also a charge, or accusation; also an arrest; also a seizure of, or complaint against beasts that are found damage sesant.
  • Calengé, claimed; challenged; ac­cused of, or charged with; ar­rested; seized.
  • Calenger, to claim; to challenge; to accuse of, or charge with; to arrest; to seize.
  • Calengié, as Calengé.
  • Calepinages, Dictionaries.
  • Calepiner, to interpret, or translate exactly, or word by word.
  • Calepinerie, a precise interpretation of every single word.
  • Calesson, for Calçon, a pair of draw­ers.
  • Calfactif, apt to heat or warm.
  • Calfat, an Officer in a Gally that looks to the caulking thereof.
  • Calfater, to caulk a ship.
  • Calfaterie, the caulking of a ship.
  • Calfateur, as Calfat.
  • Calfatin, the servant of a Caulker of a Galley.
  • Calfourchons, à calfourchons, a­straddie.
  • Calfreter, for Calf [...]utrer, to caulk a ship.
  • Calibistris, the privy parts.
  • se Calibrer à quelcun, to equal him­self to one.
  • Calicules, little cups or goblets; al­so the rough shells of Chesnuts; also the parings of a corn or ker­nel; also little skins upon any tender part of the body.
  • Calidité, heat.
  • Caliges, flockings; also an armour for the legs; also breeches. Faire caliges, ou caligas, to bewray his hose.
  • Caligineux, dark.
  • Caliginosité, darkness.
  • Calimini, à calimini, hugger-mug­ger, secretly.
  • Calin, a beggarly rogue, or lazie vagabond.
  • Calinaire, a Sweet-heart.
  • Caliot, the name of a Pear.
  • Callabasse, as Calabasse.
  • Callafater, to caulk a ship.
  • Calland, a Customer.
  • Callate, a stoping piece of ground, the descent of a hill.
  • Calle, for Cale, the hold of a ship.
  • Callebasse, as Calabasse.
  • Callebotes, Curds.
  • Callebouté, curded.
  • Calle-feutré, caulked.
  • Caller, as Caler; also to kittle.
  • Calles, Corns in the feet or toes.
  • Calleux, thick-skinned.
  • Callibordes, Crutches.
  • Callifourchons, as Calfourchons.
  • Calique, the name of a fish.
  • Calmar, as Calamar.
  • Calmement, calmly, quietly.
  • Caloches, for galoches, Galoshes.
  • Calomnieux, slandering.
  • Caloniere, a Pot-gun made of a quill or elder-stick.
  • Calosité, for callosité, callosity.
  • Calquas, a Quiver.
  • Calsons, for calçons, wearing-draw­ers.
  • Calvainier, Calvanier, a Hireling for the time of Harvest.
  • Calvaire, for crane, the skull.
  • Calvatré, laid all-along on his back.
  • Calvan, pomme de calvan, a certain Apple that hath a blackish rind.
  • Caly, a kind of herb.
  • Calyce, for Calice, a Chalice.
  • Camamine, the herb Cameline.
  • Camar, for Camard, flat-nosed.
  • Camarine, the name of a stinking herb that provokes vomit.
  • Camarre, a Martingale for a horse.
  • Cambouy, Camboy, the gome, the black and ovly grease of a wrought Cart-wheel.
  • Cambre, or Cambré, arched.
  • Cambrer, to arch.
  • Cameau, for Chameau, Camel.
  • Camelin, as alier le Camelin, to pace like a Camel. S [...]ce Came­line, a certain dainty Italian Sauce.
  • se Cameloter, to become waved like Chamlet.
  • Camerade, for Camarade, a Cama­rad.
  • [Page] Cameraire, a Chamberlain, a Groom of the Chamber.
  • Cameriste, a Chamber-fellow.
  • Camessine, a kind of Pear.
  • Camiete, the name of a certain sweet Apple.
  • Camille, a Messenger.
  • Camin, way.
  • Caminée, chimney.
  • Camion, the pin wherewith women pin in their ruffs, &c. also a kinde of little Cart; also a small muse-role for a horse.
  • Camorre, a kind of cavesson.
  • Camote, the name of an Indian root, which roasted is very good meat.
  • Camouärd, an ugly flat-nosed fel­low.
  • Camoufflet, a smoakie paper held under the nose of a sleeper.
  • Campal, of, or belonging to a Camp.
  • Campane, a Bell; also the herb E­licampane; also an Alembick, or the upper part thereof, which re­sembles a Bell.
  • Campanel, a Bell-bit.
  • Campanette, Hedge-bells; also the Peach-bell, or Steeple-bell-floor.
  • Campanotte jaulne, the yellow Daf­fodil.
  • Campart, as Champart.
  • Campeger, Campiger, to incamp.
  • Camphrer, to mingle with Cam­phire.
  • Campole, the name of a certain white grape.
  • Campoles, the tendrels, or twining sprigs of plants.
  • Campos, leave to play, or a vaca­tion-time for Scholars.
  • Camuser, to make flat-nosed.
  • Camuserie, the being flat-nosed.
  • Camuset, somewhat flat-nosed.
  • Camusette, a little flat-nosed Elf.
  • Canabasser, to canvas, to sift out.
  • Canabasserie, Canabassement, a canvassing, or sifting out.
  • Canabel, a kind of earth which (as Arabians report) falls with rain from the Skie.
  • Canadelle, the smallest of Rock-fishes.
  • Canaliere, the name of a pear.
  • Canart, for canard, a Drake.
  • Cancelaresque, Chancery-like, of, or belonging to Chancery.
  • Cancelé, cancelled.
  • Canceler, to cancel, blot, or put out.
  • Cancelation, a cancelling.
  • Cancelle, a kind of Cray-fish.
  • Canceller, as Canceler.
  • Candelabre, a great Candlestick.
  • Candelette, a Suppository.
  • Candide, white, fair; also prospe­rous, happy; also courteous, fair-conditioned; also upright, sincere, innocent.
  • Candidement, uprightly, sincerely.
  • Canebasse, as Calabasse.
  • Canellere, a Reed-plot.
  • Canelle, for robinet, a cock, or tap.
  • Canellé, of Cinnamon, of a Cinna­mon-colour; also made of, or sea­soned with Cinnamon.
  • Canelline, a little hollow rod.
  • Canepetiere, a kind of land-fowl resembling a Bustard. Il fait de la canepetiere, he cowardly hides himself in every hole.
  • Canepin, the thin inner-rind of the bark of the Linden, and the out­ward of the coat of a Birch­tree, written on in old time in­stead of Paper; also the outward thin and white pilling of a dres­sed Sheeps-skin.
  • Canepineuse, the bark of a Sugar­cane.
  • Caner, to squirt.
  • Canet, a young Duck, or a wild Duck.
  • Caneter, to waddle, or go like a Duck; also to breed young Ducks.
  • Canetier, of a Duck, like a Duck, catching Ducks, feeding or prey­ing on Ducks.
  • Canetillé, purled.
  • Caneton, Canette, a Duckling; also a little Can or Cruse; also the quill of a Spinning-wheel.
  • Canjar, Caniard, a Sea-cob, a Sea-gull.
  • Canichon, a Duckling.
  • Canidé, the name of a bird.
  • Canif, for ganif, a penknife.
  • Canin, dogged, or dog-like. Con­vulsion canine, the cramp of the mouth.
  • Canisse, a little table or hurdle of reeds, whereon fruits are dri'd, or Silk-worms fed.
  • Canivet, a little pen-knife.
  • Cannamelle, the Sweet-cane, or Su­gar-cane.
  • Canneau du col, the nape of the neck.
  • Cannelle, for canelle, Cinnamon.
  • Canne-petiere, as Canepetiere.
  • Cannetille, for Canetille, purl.
  • Cannisade, a cage, or basket of reeds.
  • Cannisse, as Canisse.
  • Cannoniquement, canonically.
  • Cannule, a little Cane, Reed, Pipe, or hollow straw.
  • Cannulé, hollowed like a Reed, or Cane, also channelled.
  • Canolle, a Hawks narel, one of the little holes whereat she draws in and lets out her breath.
  • Canoniste, a Practicer in the Canon-Law.
  • Canore, shrill, harmonious, melo­dious.
  • Canteau, for Chanteau, a corner-piece.
  • Canthare, a duskie and muddy Sea-fish that never changes her mate; also a great jug, or as
  • Cantharide, for Cantaride, a fly cal­led Cantharides.
  • Cantharidise, a Confection of Can­tharides.
  • Canthenot, a certain tawny and unsavoury Sea-fish.
  • Canthonniere, Cantonniere, a com­mon Whore.
  • Canton, for coin de rue, a corner, or cross-way in a street.
  • se Cantonner, se mettre en un coin, to go aside from the rest.
  • Canule, a little Cane, reed, or Pipe.
  • Canus, the name of a Sea-fish.
  • Caparis, the Caper-tree, or shrub.
  • Capdastre, a Subsidy-book.
  • Cup-deseadre, a Corporal.
  • Capdeul, a Gentlemans chief house, falling (almost every where) unto the share of the eldest Heir.
  • Capeau, for chapeau, a hat. Capeau carnu, ou charnu, the Sea-net­tle.
  • Capeer, as Cappeer.
  • Capel, a hat, a little hat.
  • Capelan, a Chaplain; also a kind of Cod-fish.
  • Capelettes, the heads of cloves.
  • Capelin, as Capeline in the N. D.
  • Capellan, as Capelan.
  • Capeluchon, a capuch, or hood.
  • Caperasson, as Caparasson in the N. D.
  • Capesolde, Capesoulde, a Gentleman of good entertainment.
  • Caphard, and its derivatives. See Casard, &c.
  • Capheran, a kind of course Tassata; also a long cassock of the same.
  • Capietrement, privily, closely.
  • Capifou, a Play not much unlike Hide-man-blinde.
  • Capilaire, Capillaire, hairy; or be­longing to hair.
  • Capilament, a hair, or flaw in a stone, &c.
  • Capiscos, School-masters.
  • Capitanerie, the Place of a Cap­tain.
  • [Page] Capitainesse, as Capitanesse in the N. D.
  • Capitalité, a capital offence.
  • Capitation, Pole-money.
  • Capitau, a Captain, or Comman­der.
  • Capite, a Cabbin in a ship; also a little Summer-house.
  • Capitel, a strong compounded Lye, whereof Cauters and other violent remedies are made.
  • se Capitonner de, to cover his head with.
  • Capitoul. So they call in Tholouse twelve principal Magistrates, whereof the first is to be a Gentle­man of that Province, the rest Lawyers and substantial Mer­chants. Capitouls d' Orleans, the Sheriffs of Orleans.
  • Capitulairement, capitally; also in Chapter, or with full consent of the Chapter.
  • Capitulant, having a voice in Chap­ters; also capitulating.
  • Capituleur, he that capitulates.
  • Capnomantie, divination by smoke rising from an Altar, whereon In­cense or Poppy-seed is burnt.
  • Capolie, the name of an Indian fruit much like a Cherry.
  • Cappe, as Cape in the N. D.
  • Cappé, hooded.
  • Cappeer, a ship to lie a try; also to go very neer the wind.
  • Cappet, a hat.
  • Cappette, a little hood; or a cloak having a capuch instead of a cape.
  • Cappitrement, as Capietrement.
  • Cappot, a course Country-cloak.
  • Cappres, for capres, Capers.
  • Capprier, for caprier, a Caper-shrub.
  • Capriere, a Caper-plot.
  • Caprifice, a wild Fig-tree.
  • Caprimulge, a Goat-milker, an un­luckie Night-bird that sucks Goats, and mortifies their udders.
  • Caprin, le caprin, the kind or na­ture of Goats; also Goats flesh.
  • Caprin (Adj.) of a Goat, or like a Goat.
  • Capriot, a caper in dancing.
  • Caprioter, to caper, to cut a caper.
  • Capse, a case, box, or chest.
  • Capsetin, a little case, box, or chest.
  • Capsoos, the Rights and Royalties belonging to the Lord of a place.
  • Capsule, as Capsetin. La Capsule du coeur, the Pericardium where­in the heart lies.
  • Captieusement, captiously.
  • Capucinage, the order, profession, or life of a Capucin.
  • Capulaire, a coffin for a corps.
  • Caputions, Monks, or Capucine-Friars.
  • Caqueduc, a miser, a penny-father.
  • Caquerel, a sprat, a pickled herring, or as Cagarel.
  • Caqueroles, the shells of Snails, Peri­wincles, and such like.
  • Caquerolerie, a shore full of little shells.
  • Caquerotier, a catcher, or eater of shell-fish.
  • Caquesangue, the bloudy flux.
  • Caquetard, for caqueteur, a prattler.
  • Caquetereau, a prattle-basket.
  • Caquetiere, Caqueteuse, a prattling housewife.
  • Caquetoire, a Mill, Oven, or the like, where women meet and prat­tle together.
  • Caquettement, a prattling.
  • Ca-queuë, the herb horse-tail.
  • Caquots, white Lepers.
  • Car, for chariot, a cart.
  • Carabasse, as Calabasse in the N. D. also a Girt, Grampel, Pungar-fish.
  • Carabassé, much used or carried up and down as a Gourd-bottle is.
  • Carabe, a Corracle, or little round Skiff made of Ozier-twigs woven together and covered with raw hides; also yellow amber.
  • Carabin, for Carabine, a Carabine.
  • Carabinage, an assault made by Ca­rabines.
  • Caracol, for limaçon, a snail.
  • Caracteré, characterised, stamped with a peculiar mark.
  • Caracterer, to make characters; al­so to stamp with a peculiar mark.
  • Caraffe, passage or toll-money paid to the Arabian Boothalers, by such as travel without a strong Cara­van towards the Holy Land, &c.
  • Caramot, Caramote, a prawn.
  • Carance, want, or lack of. Carance de biens, a Testimonial under se­veral mens hands, that such an one hath no Goods nor Chattels in such a place.
  • Carasse, a great face.
  • Carathement, a charming of a mans childgetter.
  • Caravelle, a Carvel (the little Ship so called.)
  • Caravellon, a small Carvel.
  • Caravene, a little Boat made like a Trough, and most commonly of one piece.
  • Caravirée, a wry-faced wench, or one that makes ill-favoured wry faces.
  • Carbassat, Wet-sucket, made of the upper part of the long white Pom­pion cut into slices.
  • Carbasse, the Pungar-fish.
  • Carbau, the Cabot-fish.
  • Carboucle, a carbuncle.
  • Carcaillon, a mite, or weevil.
  • Carcamousse, the battering engine called a Ram.
  • Carcant, for Carcan, a carknet, or collar of Gold.
  • Carchiophe, an artichoke.
  • Carcinome, a canker.
  • Carcois, for Carquois, a Quiver.
  • Cardaire, a kinde of Thornback.
  • Cardamome, grain of Paradise, also Ethiopian pepper.
  • Cardanalizé, as Cardinalisé.
  • Cardier, a Card-maker.
  • Cardinale, a kinde of Artillery for shipping, less than the Culverine, and devised at first by the Cardi­nal of Lorrain.
  • Cardons, the stalks of artichoke, or of the white thistle, buried in the ground, or otherwise used, to get them a whiteness.
  • Caré, as Ableret.
  • Care, a disease that benums the head, and makes the whole body more senseless than an Apoplexy; or a sleepiness joyned with weakness of the brain, senses, and motion. Also the look, countenance, or aspect of one.
  • Carence, as Carance.
  • Caret, fil de caret, pack-thread.
  • Carfou, a peal of one bell, and about 8 or 9 a clock at night; also a place where two ways meet to­gether.
  • Cargade, Cargaison, the fraught, or lading of a ship.
  • Cargue, a charge, or onset.
  • Carguer, to charge; also to lade; also to lean all on one side.
  • Cariage, carriage, baggage; all the necessary provision of an Army.
  • Caribe, the most biting kinde of In­dian pepper.
  • Caribot, a lunchion, or big piece of bread, &c.
  • Carie, rottenness, or putrefaction in wood, or any thing else; a worm in wood.
  • se Carier, to rot, putrifie, corrupt.
  • Carieux, rotten, putrified, worm-eaten.
  • Carine, for carêne, the keel of a ship.
  • Cariol, Cariole, the root of a horses [Page] tail, or the bone thereof; the rump-bone.
  • Cariophillate, herb Avens, Bennet, or blessed.
  • Carisi, the name of a pear, also the perry made thereof.
  • Carizé, Kersie.
  • Carler, for Carreler, to pave with bricks.
  • Carlin, the name of a Coin.
  • Carlonne, as vivre à la carlonne, to deal plainly.
  • Carlure, for Carrelure, a pavement with bricks.
  • Carmaignole, for Cornoille, a cor­nil.
  • Carme, a verse, also a charm, also the horn-beam or yoke-tree; also a white Friar, as in the N. D.
  • Carmelitain, an Order of white Fri­ars.
  • Carminatif, wind-dissolving; also flesh-taming, lust-abating.
  • Carminificateur, a maker of Verses.
  • Carnagier, for carnacier, a great flesh-eater.
  • Carnallage, for carnage, slaughter; also flesh-time, the season wherein 'tis lawful to eat flesh.
  • Carnaller, to kill, or slay, especially beasts found damage-feasant (which the party damaged in some places and cases may law­fully do) and eat, or sell their flesh.
  • Carnasseries, fleshy matters.
  • Carnassier, for potelé, plump, fleshy.
  • Carnavalée, a Carnaval Wench.
  • Carne, an edge, or corner. Carne de testons, a quartern of Testons, consisting of four, or of forty.
  • Carneau, (for creneau) a battle­ment of a wall.
  • Carnelé, having battlements.
  • Carnelle, the stamp of a piece of coin.
  • Carneller, to stamp a piece of coin.
  • Carner, a piece of a written book.
  • Carniforme, like flesh.
  • Carnu, for charnu, fleshy.
  • Carobe, as Carrobe.
  • Carocher, a Coach-man.
  • Carolle, a kinde of Dance; also a Carrol, or Christmas song.
  • Caroller, to dance, to revel it, to sing carrols.
  • Carooler, to inrol.
  • Caroside, a branch of the great ar­tery.
  • Carous, as Carousse in the N. D.
  • Carousser, to quass.
  • Carozze for Carosse, a Coach.
  • Carpase, the name of a plant, whose juice being drunk causeth sleep, and in sleeping strangleth.
  • Carpe, for poignet, the wrist.
  • Carpeau, a young Carp.
  • Carpendu, for Capendu, a Short-start, the name of an apple.
  • Carpie, the Yoke-elm.
  • Carpion, Carpionne, a kinde of Trout.
  • Carpir, as Charpir in the N. D.
  • Carpobalsame, the fruit of the bal­sam-tree.
  • Carpot, part of the fruit or profit of a Vineyard, yielded as a Rent by the Tenant unto the Lord there­of.
  • Carquasse, a carcass.
  • Carquois, (Adj.) of, or belonging to a Quiver.
  • Carracon, Carraquon, a small (but strong) Carrick.
  • Carrat de bois à bastir, a certain quantity of timber.
  • Carre, edge, or corner.
  • Carrobe, Carob-bean, St. Johns bread.
  • Carroce, Carroche, a Coach.
  • Carrocier, Carrochier, Carrossier, a Coachman.
  • Carron, a brick.
  • Carronner, to make a brick-floor.
  • Carroube, as Carobe.
  • Carroubier, the Carob-tree, or Bean-tree.
  • Carrouselle, a little hollow reed.
  • Carrozze, a Coach.
  • Carrozzier, a Coachman.
  • Carrube, as Carrobe; also a small weight (among Mintmen and Goldsmiths) making but the 24th part of an ounce.
  • Cartable, a Paper-book.
  • Cartame, bastard Saffron.
  • Cartasonne, the Indian and black-horned Ʋnicorn.
  • Cartée, for cartel, a challenge to fight, in writing.
  • Cartaranche, a certain Salt-mea­sure.
  • Carthame, as Cartame.
  • Carthellages, square pieces of free-stone.
  • Cartibé, a square table of stone, but somewhat more long than broad.
  • Cartisannier, a maker of playing cards.
  • Cartoche, for Cartouche, a Car­tridge.
  • Cartophilaces, Law-books, ancient Records; also the room, chest, or press wherein such Writings are kept.
  • Cartousle, a shrub bearing a mushrom-like fruit; also the fruit it self.
  • Cartuche, for Cartouche, a Car­tridge.
  • Cartulaire, a Paper-book. Juges Cartulaires, Judges that give their Sentences in writing.
  • Carvi, Carway-seed.
  • Carymari carymara, a hurly-burley.
  • Caryote, a Date.
  • Cas, for cassé, hollow, or broken-sounded.
  • Casal, a Mannor-house, a great house; also a Village, or Hamlet.
  • Casard, one that never stirs out of doors.
  • Cascaret, a furious tide, as some­times there is between Bourdeaux and Rochel.
  • Cascavelle, a Country-song.
  • Caseiforme, made round and flat like a cheese.
  • Casever, Casier, a cheese-fat.
  • Casette, a little cottage.
  • Casine, the same.
  • Casois, a Countrey-clown.
  • Casole, a posnet; also a narrow-mouthed pot, somewhat like a per­fuming pot.
  • Casquet, a little cask.
  • Cassable, frail, brittle.
  • Cassard, a chest-like cover; also a buzzard.
  • Cassaudes, Daizies, or Bruise-wort.
  • Casse, for caisse, a box, or case; also a coffin, a dripping pan, an open-mouthed pan or vessel of earth, &c. fit to boyl things, or set plants in; also the hollow part of the sole of a horses foot.
  • Casse-loix, a breaker of Laws.
  • Casse-moeurs, rude, savage, unci­vil.
  • Casse-pot, a kinde of sport in tossing of earthen pots.
  • Casserie, a breaking, or quashing; a discharging, infringing, or can­celling.
  • Casserins, drawers in a press or ca­binet.
  • Cassidonie, for Cassidoine, Cassido­ny.
  • Cassier, the tree that bears the fruit Cassia.
  • Cassignon, a pump, or thin-soled shoe.
  • Cassoire, a whip.
  • Cassole, Cassolle, a box for Perfumes, &c.
  • Casson, a great chest.
  • Cassure, for blessure, a bruise.
  • Castadour, a Pioneer.
  • Castagnole, a chesnut-colour'd Sea-fish.
  • [Page] Castagnon. See Roquan.
  • Castaign (Adj.) of a chesnut-colour.
  • Castaigne, a scallop-like piece of iron in the midst or mout [...] of an old-fa [...]hioned bit.
  • Castaloigne, a Spanish coverlet, or rug.
  • Caste, for chaste, chast, honest.
  • Castillan, a Spanish weight.
  • Castillaniser, to imitate Spanish fa­shions or humours.
  • Castille, for querelle, jarr, conten­tion.
  • Castillier, the wild goosberry-shrub.
  • Caston, the bea [...]il of a ring.
  • Castoreum, as Castorée in the N. D.
  • Castrametation, the pitching, or measuring out of a Camp.
  • Castromantie, as Gastromantie.
  • Catachrese, the abuse, or necessary use of one word for lack of ano­ther more proper.
  • Catachrestique, used (though im­proper) for want of that which would be more proper.
  • Catadoupes, Catadupes, the falls of Nilus.
  • Cataglottiser, to kiss with the tongue.
  • Cataglottisme, a kiss with the tongue.
  • Catagmatique, of, or belonging to broken bones, or breaking of bones; also healing, or closing such brea­ches.
  • Catalepsie, a disease coming of the brain distempered with driness and cold.
  • Catalongne, a white Spanish rug.
  • Cataminy, womens flowers.
  • Catapuce grande, the herb Kick, or Tick; Catapuce petite, garden-Spurge.
  • Catapulte, a sling, or warlike en­gine, whereout great arrows or darts were shot.
  • Catarre, for Catherre, a catharr, or a rheum.
  • Catarre, Catarreux, for Catherreux, rheumatick, troubled with a rheum.
  • Catastre, as Cadastre.
  • Cateclisme, a deluge, or inundati­on.
  • Catefique, sad, heavy, sorrowful.
  • Categide, an airy inflammation.
  • Catel, a chattel; or a thing which (though of it self it be immove­able) is divided and held as moveable; or as Cateud.
  • Catelongne, Catelonne, as Cata­longne.
  • Catepleure, a cross-sail.
  • Caterolle, a rabbets nest.
  • Caterve, a crue.
  • Cateud, a chattel; or not only a moveable (which may follow a bo­dy, and be removed from place to place) but also any immoveable that is no inheritance.
  • Cate [...]l, as Catel.
  • Cathartique, a purging Medicine.
  • Cathechiser, for catechiser, to cate­chise.
  • Cathedrant, sitting as Judge or Moderator.
  • Cathedratique, a certain see or duty belonging to a Bishop, when he is first invested into his See.
  • Cathegorie, for categorie, category.
  • Cathelane, the name of a plum.
  • Cathene, a chain. Mat de cathene, a furious or inraged fool.
  • Catheretique, eating, or gnawing away superfluous flesh or skin.
  • Catherinaire, the herb tobacco.
  • Catherine, the bramble-berry, black-berry.
  • Catherinettes, certain pretty flowers less than pinks, growing in clu­sters, or many together on one stalk.
  • Cathet, perpendicular.
  • Catheux, a kinde of moveables, al­though they adhere to the soyl, or be fastened to a house.
  • Catholicon, a Composition in Phy­sick, so termed, because it purges all kinde of humours.
  • Catholizer, to become a Catholick, to carry himself like one.
  • Catholisation, the being, or becoming a Catholick.
  • Catilinisme, conspiracy.
  • Catinimi, in hugger-mugger.
  • Catoblepe, a kinde of Basilisk, which with her sight kills a mile off.
  • Catoire, a bee-hive.
  • Catonien, grave, grim, or severe.
  • Catopromantie, divination by a looking-glass.
  • Catouiller, for chatouiller, to tickie.
  • Cattel, as Catel.
  • Cavailler, as Cavaller.
  • Cavain, a hole, cave, or hollow place.
  • Cavalcador, a horseman.
  • Cavaler, as Cavaller.
  • Cavalet, a long hollow stick through which they use in some places to blow the fire, instead of bellows.
  • Cavalin, a little horse.
  • Cavallé, ridden, travelled on, toy­led; also staulked, or dogged.
  • Cavaller, to ride; also to toyl, or use like a horse; also to staulk, or dog.
  • Cavallet des planches, the highest or most raised part of Garden-beds.
  • Cavallette, a kinde of locust.
  • Cavallin, Cavalet, as Cavalin.
  • Caubare, a sandy-coloured and very venomous Serpent.
  • Caucheaux, Taxes paid towards the maintaining of common Banks or Causeys.
  • Cauche-poulet, Cauche-vieille, as Cauchemar in the N. D.
  • Caucher, to hatch, or sit on; to tread a hen; to put on stockings.
  • Cauciage, as Caucheaux.
  • Caudelée, a cawdle.
  • Cauderet, a hot bath.
  • Caudice, the stock, stump, or body of a tree.
  • Cauë, a Chough, or Jack-daw.
  • Cavé, made hollow.
  • Caveau, a little cave.
  • Cavechure, a halter.
  • Cavedal, the principal sum lent out to use.
  • Cavelade, a kinde of ray-fish of a very hard substance.
  • Cavelot, a prop.
  • Cavement, a making hollow.
  • Cavenne de Berger, a Shepherds cottage.
  • Caver, to make hollow.
  • Cavereau, Caverneau, a little cave.
  • Caverneux, full of caves; also dwel­ling in caves.
  • Cavesanne, a false rein to lead a horse by.
  • Cavesche, the head.
  • Cavesne, frowardly.
  • Cavesot, a pole-head, or bull-head; the little black vermine whereof toads and frogs do come.
  • Cavessanne, as Cavesanne.
  • Cavessine, a martingal for a horse.
  • Cavette, a little cellar, a little cave or hole under ground.
  • Caüette, a Chough, or Jack-daw.
  • Caveure, a hole, a making hollow.
  • Cauhare, as Caubare.
  • Cavier, Seigneur Cavier, a Lord having low Jurisdiction over his Tenants.
  • Cavillateur, a caviller, a wrangler.
  • Cavillation, a cavil, or cavilling.
  • Cavillatoire, cavilling, wrangling.
  • Caviller, to cavil, or to wrangle.
  • Cavillon, a kinde of little mullet.
  • Cavin, a hollow way, or dry brook.
  • Cavine, the bottom of the mouth wherein the root of the tongue is.
  • Caule, the stem of an herb; also the herb Colewort.
  • Caulebasse, as Calabasse in the N. D.
  • [Page] Caulodis, Cabbidges.
  • Cault, Caumas, hot.
  • Cauné, the name of a kinde of Vine.
  • Caune, a certain fish not much unlike a Perch.
  • Cauny, out of countenance.
  • Cauque, a tent for a wound.
  • Cauqué, tented as a wound; trod­den as a hen.
  • Cauquemare, as Cauchemar in the N. D.
  • Cauquer, to tent a wound; also to tread a hen, as a cock doth.
  • Cauquier, as Cauquer.
  • Causaïan, a litigious person.
  • Causateur, a party in a Suit, or in Law.
  • Causativement, litigiously; also cau­satively, or for a cause.
  • Causeresse, a pratling huswife; a scold.
  • Causse d'un Aisement, the bottom of a Jakes.
  • Caut, crafty, sly, cunning.
  • Cautelle, craftiness.
  • Cauteller, to over-reach, to cozen.
  • Cautement, craftily, s [...]ily, cunning­ly.
  • Cautesse, craft.
  • Cautionnage, bayling, suretiship.
  • Cautionneur, a bail, or surety.
  • Cauvette, a Chough, or Jack-daw.
  • Cay, as Quay in the N. D. also a semicolon.
  • Caymander, Caymanderie. See Cai­mander, Caimanderie.
  • Caymant, a beggar; also a certain great Lizard that lives in hot ri­vers.
  • Cayreux, worm-eaten, or moth-eaten.
  • Caysieron, Casson, a wooden ch [...]st.
  • Cazole, as Casole.
  • Cazot, a cottage.
  • Cebo, an ill-favoured starveling.
  • Ceciliane, the water-chain of a bit.
  • Cecilie, the s [...]oe-worm.
  • Cecine, Martlemas beef.
  • Cecité, blindness.
  • Cedrelate, the great cedar.
  • Cedriac, a kinde of Po [...]e-citron.
  • Cedride, the fr [...]it or berry of the low Cedar.
  • Cedrie, the [...]ozen or pitch that issues from the great cedar.
  • Cedrin, a bird called Siskin.
  • Cegue, for cigue, H [...]mlock.
  • Cein [...], for ceinture, a girdle, a string.
  • Ceinctes, the thick ledges that com­pass the outsides of a ship.
  • Ceincturé, girt.
  • Ceincturer, to gird.
  • Ceincturette, a little girdle.
  • Ceisan, a Vassal.
  • Celade, a Head-piece.
  • Cele, a kind of Preserve.
  • Celebrité, famousness, honour, glory.
  • Celément, secretly, privily.
  • Celerier, the Yeoman of a Cellar.
  • Celerin, the name of a Sea-fish.
  • Celerité, celerity.
  • Celestiel, heavenly.
  • Celeume, the shout or noise that Ma­riners make when they weigh an­chor, or do any Office in the ship with joyned strength.
  • Celiac, flux celiac, a continual thin flux with pain in the belly.
  • Celiaque, troubled with belly-ake and a continual flux.
  • Celibe, single, unmarri'd.
  • Celidoine, for Chelidoine, the herb Celandine.
  • Celier, for Cellier, a Cellar.
  • Celique, for celeste, heavenly.
  • Celivage, bending towards Hea­ven.
  • Celle, the house, or mansion of, and a community of goods among Vil­lains, or persons of a servile con­dition.
  • Celoce, a kind of swift brigantine.
  • Celsitude, Highness.
  • Cement, for Ciment, a kind of mor­ter made of lime and sand.
  • Cemiterre, for Cimeterre, a Simi­tar.
  • Cenacle, as Senacle.
  • Cencer, as Censer.
  • Cenchre, Cenchrite, Cenchryne, a g [...]nish Snake, whose sting causes a L [...]thargy.
  • Cencive, as Cens in the N. D. Al­so an Inheritance hold by, or sub­ject unto Cens; also the title of, or a tenure by Cens.
  • Cendroyé, burnt into ashes.
  • Cendroyer, to burn into ashes.
  • Cenglade, a lash.
  • Cenotaphe, a tomb.
  • Censcable, as Censable in the N. D.
  • Censer, to reckon, esteem, a [...] [...]t a [...]ng [...]; to [...], tell, or master; to tax, or to [...]a­lue.
  • Cen [...]ve, as Ceneive.
  • Censivement, by the title of Cens.
  • Censivier, a Farmer, or Fee-far­mer.
  • Censorin, ce [...]orious.
  • Centa [...]rée, the herb Cent [...]ry.
  • Centesimer, to count, o [...] euil o [...]t by hundreds.
  • Centidoine, for Centinodi [...], Knot-g [...]a [...].
  • Centine d'une rouë, the box (or bol [...]) of the nave of a wheel.
  • Centoire, as Centaurée.
  • Centon, Rapsody.
  • Centonifique, confusedly heaping, or hudling many things together.
  • Cep, Stocks for Malefactors.
  • Cepée, an herb like Brook-lime, or water-Pimpernel.
  • Cephale, the Pollard-fish.
  • Cephalée, a great head-ake.
  • Cephalonomantie, divination by an Asses head broyled on coals.
  • Cepier, a Gaoler; one that looks to the Stocks.
  • Cepride, Balm.
  • Ceramite, Potters earth; also a precious stone of the colour of a tile.
  • Ceranvienne, a certain precious stone that's always very moist, and seems to sweat.
  • Ceraste, the name of a most venomous serpent.
  • Cerat, a plaister made of wax, gums, and certain oyls.
  • Ceraunobule, thundering with bulls, as the Pope.
  • Cerceau, a circle, ring, or hoop; a round, or a round compass; also the Sarcel-feather of a Hawks wing.
  • Cercelé, compassed with a round, or circle.
  • Cerceler, Cerceller, to compass with a round or circle.
  • Cercerelle, for Crecerelle, a Rattle for children; also a sort of Hawk.
  • Cerche, a search, or inquiry. Cer­che ralongée, the Instrument wherewith Masons round and fa­shion Pillars.
  • Cerchesi, as Scr [...]isi.
  • Cerchement, a searching, or inqui­ring after.
  • Cerclé, compassed about.
  • Cerclet, a little circle; also a small wreath of Ozier-twigs to set un­der a dish on a table. Cerelet à feu, a Fire-work made like a wreath.
  • Cerclou [...]re, a pair of weeding-tangs.
  • Cercot, a safeguard.
  • Cerebelle, for cervelle, the hinder part of the head wherein the me­mory is lo [...]ged.
  • Cere [...]rin, [...]eady, rash, gl [...]dy-brain­ed.
  • Cerelle, a kind of Perry.
  • Ceremoniou [...]ement, as Cerimoni­ousement.
  • Cerfo [...]cite, as Serfonet [...]o.
  • [Page] Cerfouïr, to dig the ground about the roots of trees; or as Sarfouïr.
  • Cerimonie, for ceremonie, cere­mony.
  • Ceremonialement, ceremonially, re­verently.
  • Cerimonieux, for ceremonieux, ce­remonious.
  • Cerimonieusement, ceremoniously.
  • Cerin, as Serin in the N. D.
  • Cerin-perse, a bright sky-colour.
  • Cerisee, the revenue that comes in, or profit that's made by cherries.
  • Cerism, the bird called Siskin.
  • Cerne, Cerneau, a circle, a round.
  • Cerner, to compass with a circle, to make a round.
  • Cernoir, a kinde of tool to pick out withal the kernels of walnuts be­ing yet in the shale.
  • Ceroesne, Ceroine, any oyntment or plaister whereof rozen or wax are the principal ingredients.
  • Ceromantie, divination by wax put into water.
  • Cerot, a searcloth, or plaister made of wax, gum, &c.
  • Cerouënne, as Ceroesne.
  • Cerquemage, Cerquemanage, an assignment of bounds between pri­vate mens Lands, as also in Com­mons, High-ways, Rivers, &c.
  • Cerquemané, bounded, limited.
  • Cerquemanement, as Cerquema­nage.
  • Cerquemaner, to lay out the bounds.
  • Cerquemaneurs, certain sworn Offi­cers who have authority to set or plack up meers and bounds be­tween several mens possessions, and to examine and reform incroach­ments made upon high-ways, com­mons, rivers, &c.
  • Cerresine, gum, or liquour becom­ing like rozen or gum.
  • Certain (a Subst.) certainty, or cer­tain truth. Tesmoin de certain, a Witness that assures or says he knows all he says.
  • Certaineté, certainty.
  • Certeau à deux testes, the name of a sort of pear.
  • Certificateur, a certifier, also an Informer, or notice-giver.
  • Certification, a certification; also a certificate.
  • Certioré, c rtified, informed.
  • Cerve, a Hinde.
  • Cervelin, hair-i [...]ted.
  • Cervelliere, a [...]ll, or sallet of iron.
  • Cervical, belonging to the nape, or hinder part of the n [...]k.
  • Cervines [...]ine, the shrub Way-thorn, Buck-thorn, Laxative-ram.
  • Ceruseux, full of ceruse.
  • Ces, (a Subst.) a stay, ceasing, or forbearing; also a putting to si­lence, or forbidding to proceed.
  • Cesolfié, sad, pensive, or perplexed.
  • Cessement, ceasing.
  • Cessible, yeeldable, resignable.
  • Cessionaire, one that gives up his goods, thereby to be put out of the reach or danger of Creditors; and, though he loseth his credit there­by, yet he is not held so base as a Bankrupt.
  • Cessioner, to eat between meals.
  • Cest, Ceste, as Cet, Cette, in the N. D.
  • Ceston, a studded Girdle, which in old time the Bridegroom put about his Bride assoon as they were married, and took off when they went to bed together.
  • Cestrin, a kinde of yellow stone, whereof Beads are made.
  • Cestuy, he. Cestuy ci, this. Cestuy là, that.
  • Cesue, for seve, the sap of trees.
  • Cesure, a cutting, section, division.
  • Cetacé, poisson cetacé, a fish of the kinde of Whales.
  • Cete, for cette, the feminine of cet, this, or that.
  • Cethin, a kinde of wood that cor­rupts not.
  • Cetier, as Setier in the N. D.
  • Ceton, a rowel for a bruised or im­postumed horse.
  • Cetuy, as Cestuy.
  • Ceucheter, to whisper in the ear.
  • Ceve, a whet-stone.
  • Ceves, Cevotes, chives, chibols.
  • Chabins, the sheep of Berry, whose wooll is very thick, and as long as goats-hair.
  • Chable, for cable, a cable.
  • Chabre, the Pungar-fish.
  • Chabrer, as Cabrer in the N. D.
  • Chace, Chacer, Chaceur. See Chasse, Chasser, Chasseur in the N. D.
  • Chacie, Chacicuseté, as Chassie in the N. D.
  • Chacieux, as Chassieux in the N.D.
  • Chacunerie, every ones own. Cha­cun à sa chacunerie, every one to his own home, or about his own bu­siness.
  • Chaffauld, for Echafaud, a Scaf­fold.
  • Chaffaulder, to set up scaffolds; al­so to set upon scaffolds.
  • Chaffourré, dis [...]d, bes [...]ar [...]d.
  • Chaffourrer, to d [...] are, to besmear.
  • Chagrigner, for Ch [...]iner, to vex.
  • Chagrineux, sad, in troubles.
  • Chahuant, as Chathuant, under Chat in the N. D.
  • Chair-bouillé, a sodden fellow, or one whose flesh doth look as if it had been sodden.
  • Chaircuicterie, or Chaircuiterie, the Market or place where bacon or any kinde of hogs-flesh may be had ready boyled.
  • Chaircuictier, a Cook that sells all kinde of hogs-flesh ready boyled; also a bungler.
  • Chaircuté, cut, or hacked.
  • Chaircuter à coups d'espées, to cut, or hack.
  • Chaire, for chaise, a chair.
  • Chaise, for chaire, a pulpit.
  • Chaiz, low Ware-houses or Cellars to lay merchandise in.
  • Chalamine, as Calamine in the N. D.
  • Chalan, a wood-boat, or barge.
  • Chalanger, as Calenger.
  • Chalant, from Chaloir, caring for.
  • Chalcide, a kinde of spotted Li­zard.
  • Chalcite, the recrement of brass, clea­ving to the sides of the furnaces wherein 'tis purified.
  • Chalemelle, Chalemie, a little pipe made of a reed, or of a wheaten or oaten straw.
  • Chalemeller, to play on a little pipe.
  • Chalenée, a boat full.
  • Chalenger, as Calenger.
  • Chalibé, steeled, done over with steel; wherein steel is quenched; belonging unto steel.
  • Chaline, a little thunder in a mor­ning; also drought.
  • Chalissier, a maker of Bedsteds.
  • Challer, a hare to breed young; also to shale, or unsh [...]l [...]ts.
  • se Chaloir de, to [...]a [...]e for.
  • Chalon, as Chalan; also a kinde of fish-net.
  • Chaloppes, the shalings of nuts.
  • Chalu [...], a kind [...] of Ma [...]t.
  • Chalumeux, knotty as a reed.
  • Cham [...]ille, Spu [...]g [...]-time.
  • Chamelleon, as Cameleon in the N. D.
  • Chamara [...], Water-g [...]r [...]nder.
  • Chamarrier, the name of an Office.
  • Cham [...]ellage, Cham [...]ellenage, a duty a fine paid or course unto a Lord upon e [...]ry change of T [...] ­nant; also a V [...] d [...] unto the chief Ʋsher of the Chamber of Ac­counts, upon every Homage made by one of the Kings Tenants.
  • [Page] Chambre, for chanvre, Hemp.
  • Chambrée, a Chamber full of.
  • Chambrerie, Chamberlainship.
  • Chambreux, that keeps much in his chamber.
  • Chambrier, a Chamberlain in an Abbey or Inne; also a Princes Chamberlain.
  • Chambrillé, full of Chambers.
  • Chambrillon, a little chamber; also a young Chamber-maid.
  • Chame, a kinde of Cockle.
  • Chamedrée, Germander.
  • Chamelée, a shrub called Widow-wall.
  • Chameleon, as Cameleon in the N. D.
  • Chamelier, a Camel-keeper, or dri­ver.
  • Chamion, a little dray without wheels.
  • Champaigne, for Campagne, fields.
  • Champayage, a running, or grazing of cattle in the fields.
  • Champayer, Champeyer, to reside, or continue among fields; also to wander in, or walk over the fields; to carry abroad into the fields; to feed in fields; to turn cattle into the fields.
  • Champi, base born; also consening, cheating; also seeming, but not being honest.
  • Champicerie, tour de champicerie, a cheating trick.
  • Champleure, as Chantepleure.
  • Champoyer, as Champayer.
  • Chanci, musty.
  • Chancisseure, a musty taste.
  • Chandeleux, full of candles, be­longing to candles.
  • Chandelier, (Adj.) of, or belonging to a candle or candlestick.
  • Chanes, le grand Chanes, May­weed.
  • Chanfron, the name of an Italian Coyn.
  • Chancinerie, for Chanoinie, Pre­bend hip.
  • Chansi Chansisseure. See Chanci, Chanciss [...]ure.
  • Chansonet, a Canary-bird.
  • Chansonn [...]ur, Chansonier, always singing of Songs.
  • Chanstié, as Chantier in the N. D.
  • Chantepleure, a watering-pot; the cock of a distern; a device for the emptying of a water-vessel.
  • Chantepou [...]t, the lesser C [...]tory.
  • Chanter [...]me, a great song, or hedge-toad.
  • Chanterie, a singing; also a Chan­tery; the place or office of a Chan­ter.
  • Chanterre, a paultry Poet.
  • Chantillonné, sung merrily.
  • Chantillonner, Chantonner, to sing merrily.
  • Chantourné, turned in and out.
  • Chantournement, a turning in and out.
  • Chantourner, to turn in and out, like a small stream in a plain field.
  • Chantrerie, as Chanterie.
  • Chanvreux, full of hemp.
  • Chanvrier, for cheneviere, a hemp-close.
  • Chapel, a hat, a garland. Chapel de roses, a sleight portion.
  • Chapelainie, Chaplainship; also the charge of a Chappel.
  • Chapeler, for Chapler, to chip bread.
  • Chapelier, (Adj.) of, or belonging to hats.
  • Chapeline, as Capeline in the N.D.
  • Chapelis, as Chapplis.
  • Chapelures, for chaplures, chippings of bread.
  • Chaperonner, Chaperonnier, to un­cover his head before one; also to put a hood on.
  • Chaperonniere, a poor Hat.
  • Chapitreur de soin, a scar-crow, one that threatens much and does but little.
  • Chaplis, bread-chippings; also rags of stones, that fly from them in the hewing.
  • Chapoter, for Chipoter, to haggle.
  • Chappel, as Chapel.
  • Chappier, a Cope-maker.
  • Chappins, a kinde of high slippers for low women.
  • Chappler, as Chapler in the N. D.
  • Chapplis, as Chaplis.
  • Chappon, for Chapon, a Capon.
  • Chappoter, for Chipoter, to hag­gle.
  • Chappron, for Chaperon, a hood.
  • Chappronner, as Chaperonner.
  • Chappronnier, as faulcon bon Chappronnier, a [...]awk that takes the hood gently.
  • Chappuis, as Chapuis.
  • Chapron, for Chaperon, a hood.
  • Chaptel, a least of a beast, and of the whole increase thereof, or a beast let out to the halves.
  • Chaptels deniers, the principal sum and charges a Purchaser has paid and been at for land, which the next of Kin offers to redeem.
  • Chap [...]is, a Carpenter.
  • Chapuiser, to work Carpenters-work.
  • Characie, Garden-spurge.
  • Charadrien, a Bird which earnestly beholding one that is sick of the Jaundice, or beheld by him, heals him.
  • Charanson, Charanton, a Mite, or Weevil.
  • Charansonné, eaten up by weevils.
  • Charaveau, a Beetle.
  • Charbonnée, a Carbonado.
  • Charbonnerie, for Mine de charbon, a Coal-pit, or Mine.
  • Charbonnesque, coal-like.
  • Charbonneux, full of coals.
  • Charbot, a Beetle.
  • Charcuter, for gâter une besongne, to spoil a piece of work.
  • Chardonnereau, the bar of a door.
  • Chardonnette, for Chardonnerette, the thistly Artichoke; also a kinde of sawce for Kid. Formage à la chardonnette, cheese whose milk was curded with the juice of the wild Artichoke; or a Lenten cheese made of eggs and the spawn of fishes, and curded with the juice of the Thistle.
  • Chardrier, a Gold-finch.
  • Charée, as Charrée.
  • Charesse, Charesser, as Caresse, Ca­resser in the N. D.
  • Chareti, Charetin, a Waggon-house, a hovel to set carts under.
  • Charette, for Charrete, a Cart.
  • Charevastre, a Buck-cloth.
  • Chargais, the name of a bird.
  • Chargeant, fàcheux, heavy, or trou­blesome.
  • Chargnure, for Charnure, fleshiness.
  • Chariage, and Charier. See Char­riage, and Charrier, under Char in the N. D.
  • Chariotte, a small Chariot for chil­dren; also a kinde of Litter.
  • Charitatif, charitable.
  • Charlaïde, stout, valiant, war­like.
  • Charlataner, Charlater, to play the Mountebank.
  • Charlaterie, consening, or cheating.
  • Charlot, a Cur [...]w.
  • Charmean, a little yoak-tree.
  • Charme-coeur, ravishing, heart-charming.
  • Charme-p [...]ine, pain-charming.
  • Charmeresse, an Inchanteress.
  • Charme-soing, Charme-soucy, care-charming.
  • Charm [...]sement, charmingly.
  • Charmoye, a grove of Yoaks, or of Horn-beam trees.
  • [Page] Charnage, flesh-time; also flesh, or flesh-meat.
  • Charnalité, fleshliness, sensuality.
  • Charnaut, flesh-time.
  • Charnié, a prop, stay, or pole to sup­port a Vine.
  • Charnie, a Plain, Down, open, or uninclosed Ground.
  • Charniere, a binge; also a knuckle, or turning joynt; also a certain device whereby a wooden-leg or arm is made to move. La char­niere des genoux, the whirl-bone of the knees.
  • Charongneux, full of Carrion.
  • Charongnier, feeding on Carrion.
  • Charopper, to boyl one sort of liquor nine or ten times over.
  • Charpentailler, to cut, or hew, as a Carpenter doth timber.
  • Charpentaire, the Sea-onion.
  • Charpi, Charpie, Charpy, for Char­pis, Lint, or Tinder.
  • Charrau, a Cart-way.
  • Charrée, Buck-ashes, the ashes where­of Lye hath been made.
  • Charreton, a little Chariot.
  • Charriere, for Carriere, a carreer.
  • Charroton, for Charretier, a Car­man.
  • Charroyer, for Charrier, to carry in a Cart.
  • Charruage, the Plough-gears; also tilled, or plowed land.
  • Charrué, ploughed.
  • Charruer, to plough.
  • Charte, for Carte, a Card.
  • Charte, for Chartre, a Charter.
  • Charté, having a Charter, holding, or held by Charter.
  • Charté, for cherté, dearness.
  • Chartée, for charretée, a Cart-load.
  • Chartepartie, a bill of lading.
  • Charterie, a Carters trick; also a Hovel to set Carts under.
  • Chartil, Chartin, the frame of a Cart or Waggon without the wheels.
  • Charton, a Carrier.
  • Chartrier, a Gaoler; also a Prisoner.
  • Chaseret, a Cheesefat.
  • Chasereux, belonging to the Cheese­fat.
  • Chasier, a Cheese-press.
  • Chasiere, a Cheese- [...]eck.
  • Chaslict, for chalit, a Trundle-bed.
  • Chasmate, a Chas [...]mate in fortifi­cation.
  • Chassable, chastable sit to be chased.
  • Chasse-bosse, Herb-willow.
  • Chasse-corneille, a kind of small Fowling-piece.
  • Chasse-crainte, fear expelling.
  • Chasse-diable, S. Johns grass.
  • Chasse-erreur, errour expelling.
  • Chasse-fievre, Germander.
  • Chasse-mal, mischief expelling.
  • Chasse-masse, a fire-lock, or horse-mans piece that goes off by a fire-lock.
  • Chasse-monstre, Monster-pursuing.
  • Chasse-mort, death expelling.
  • Chasse-nue, Skie-clearing.
  • Chasse-ordure, cleansing, purging.
  • Chasse-pape, as Chasse-messe.
  • Chasse-peine, pain-expelling.
  • Chasse-peste, plague-expelling; also the Herb-willow.
  • Chasse-poulx, Bears-foot.
  • Chasse-rage, Dittany, Dittander, Pepper-wort.
  • Chasse-rat, the name of a Serpent that commonly feeds on Rats.
  • Chasseresse, a woman- [...]unter.
  • Chasseret, a little hunter.
  • Chasserie, hunting, chasing.
  • Chasserot, much given to hunting.
  • Chasseroton, a small chest.
  • Chasseton, a Scritch-owl; also a little chest of wood.
  • Chassieuseté, blear-eyedness.
  • Chassissé, as fenestre chassissée, a window covered with paper in­stead of glass.
  • Chassitier, a maker of paper-win­dows, or of frames for paper or linnen-windows.
  • Chassoire, a Carters whip.
  • Chassot, the Bull-head-fish.
  • Chastel, for Chateau, a Castle.
  • Chaste [...]lenie, Chastellerie, as Cha­telainie in the N. D.
  • Chastenereie, a plot of ground full of Chesnut-trees.
  • Chastiable, fit to be chastised.
  • Chastieur, a chastiser.
  • Chasti-villain, a whip, or cadgel for a knave; also a Castle, or Citta­del, in or near a good Town.
  • Chastrable, fit to be gelt.
  • Chastrement, a Gelding.
  • Chat-chasteil, ou chateil, a defen­siue Engine of War, somewhat re­sembling the Roman Testudo.
  • Chatel, a Chattel, or moveable.
  • Chatemiterie, hypocrisie.
  • Chatemitiquement, hypocritically.
  • Chatepeleuse, a Mite, or Weevil.
  • Chat-fourré, a Lawyer, or Petti-fogger, who commonly wears a Gown lined with wilde Cats-skin.
  • Chat-garanier, a Pole-cat, a kind of wild Cat that haunts Warrens.
  • Chatillons, small fresh-water Lam­preys.
  • Chatonner, to kittle.
  • Chatonnie, a waggish trick; a kna­vish or unhappy prank; also the art of pilfering.
  • Chatouille, a certain fish very full of small bones.
  • Chatouilloir, any ticklish part of the body, especially the side.
  • Chatrin, a Gaoler.
  • Chat-rocher, a kind of Dog-fish.
  • Chattement, a ki [...]ling, a breeding or bringing forth of young Cats.
  • Chattemiterie, as Chatemiterie.
  • Chatas, a kind of Vine.
  • Chauans, little Owls.
  • Chavassme, a certain measure or quantity of land, in length 120 foot, and in breadth 30.
  • Chauce, for Chausses, breeches.
  • Chauceaux, as Caucheaux.
  • Chaucée, for Chaussée, a Causey.
  • Chauchage, as Chaussage.
  • Chauché, crowded in.
  • Chaucher, to crowd a thing in.
  • Chauche-mare, as Cauchemar in the N. D.
  • Chaude (Subst.) a fierce onset, a vi­olent assault. A la chaude, in an­ger.
  • Chaudeau, a Caudle, or warm broth.
  • Chaude-colle, leacherousness.
  • Chauderonnerie, flesh or fish that's ordinarily boyled in Cauldrons or Kettles.
  • Chaudet, a warm place.
  • Chaudot, a heat, or hot thing.
  • Chauffe-dos, a kind of low chimney having but a hole instead of a fan­nel for the voiding of s [...]oak.
  • Chauffe-pied, a Foot-stove, a little and low Stove that serves to keep the feet warm.
  • Chaufferette, Chauffette, a Chasing­di [...]h.
  • Chauffour, as Chausour, under Chaux in the N. D.
  • Chauffourer, as Chaffourrer.
  • Chaufrain, as Chanfrein in the N.D.
  • Chauguette, a Watch-tower.
  • Chauliere, a plot or bed of Cab­bidges in a Garden.
  • Chaulmage, the cutting or mowing of straw or stubble.
  • Chaulmer, to pick, or gather up straw; also to cut or mow stubble.
  • Chaulmeur, a gatherer of straw; a cutter or mower of stubble.
  • Chaulsepot, a certain little bird.
  • Chaumeny, musty.
  • Chaumer, as Chaulmer, and as Chommer.
  • Chaumes, Lay-lands.
  • Chaumier, of straw.
  • [Page] Chaumin, made of, or covered with stubble.
  • Chaumine, a thatched house.
  • Chaumouflet, Bumbast put into a cornet of paper, then kindled, and the smoak thereof put into the no­strils of a sleeper.
  • Chaussage, shoe-money, expence in shoes; also hosen, or shoes.
  • Chaussepot, as Chaulsepot.
  • Chaussetier, a Hose-maker.
  • Chauver, to make bald. Chauver des oreilles, to clap down the [...]ars.
  • Chauvesourissier, the bat-wing-bone in the lower part of the head.
  • Chauvir, Chauvisser, to grow bald.
  • Chaziere, as Chasiere.
  • Cheant, falling down.
  • Cheau, a Whelp, or Cub.
  • Chebule, the biggest kind of the M [...]olan-plum.
  • Chedins, the head-men of the Pa­ri [...]h.
  • Chef [...]ciet, the Treasurer, or Keeper of the Ves [...]ry.
  • Chef gros, Shoomakers thread.
  • Ches mois, a chief Mannor-house.
  • Cheintre, a baulk or swath of grass, a long [...]de [...], or highway.
  • Ch [...]g [...], as Chef gros.
  • Chell [...]dre, as Chelydre.
  • Che [...]li [...], a R [...]
  • Chelsydre, Chelydre, a most veno­mous and stinking Serpent.
  • Chemage, the passage-toll that's paid at Sc [...].
  • Ch [...]me, as ancient measure holding about t [...] [...]f [...]ls.
  • Ch [...]mer, to de [...]e [...], or be (as the M [...]) in the wai [...]; to pine, or f [...]ll away.
  • Chem [...], to w [...]r.
  • Che [...]er, the [...] or chief H [...]ir in a D [...]s [...]nt, who is to do homage sor [...] whole land that is discen­ded.
  • Ch [...]min [...]ux, a great walker; also [...] to a way, or to a chim­ [...]y; [...] fall of [...] vs.
  • C [...]em [...]r, [...] or b [...]r ging to a [...].
  • Ch [...]mi [...]t, whi [...] [...].
  • Ch [...] [...] or g [...]r.
  • C [...] [...] de cl [...]ant, [...] cer­ [...] [...] whereon Ca [...]ls us [...] [...].
  • Ch [...] [...] Saffron.
  • Ch [...] [...], a chain; also a [...] w [...]rk.
  • Ch [...] [...] of a certain [...]
  • Chene [...]i, H [...] [...].
  • Chenevilles, the broken stalks of Hemp.
  • Chenevette, for Chenevote, a stalk of Hemp.
  • Chenillaux, young Caterpillars.
  • Chenillé, of, or belonging to Cater­pillars; Caterpillar-like; full of, or wrought with Caterpillars. Taffetas chenillé, a kinde of stri­ped Tassata.
  • Chenillier, an Instrument wherewith Gardeners pull down Caterpillars.
  • Chenin (Adj.) dog-like, of or belong­ing to a dog.
  • Chenu, gray-haired.
  • Cheoir, to fall.
  • Chepage, a Gaoler, or Gaolership.
  • Chepier, a Gaoler.
  • Chercée, a kinde of earth-alpick.
  • Cherchage, a seeking for.
  • Chercuictier, as Chaircuictier.
  • Cherer, to cheer, to cherish.
  • Chereté, for cherté, dearness.
  • Cherseuil, for cerfeuil, Chervil.
  • Chermaye, a wood of scarlet oaks; also as Charmoye.
  • Cherme, the Scarlet-oak.
  • Chermes, the Scarlet-b [...]rry.
  • Chermine, the fruit or berry of the scarlet oak.
  • Cherpi, for charpis, lint, tinder.
  • Cherquemmage, as Cherquema­nage.
  • Cherrée, buck-ashes.
  • Chersydre, the Land-adder.
  • Chesaux, the rubbish of decayed houses; also mansions, houses.
  • Chesmer, as Chemer.
  • Chesneau, a water-snake, mortal enemy to oaks; also a young oak.
  • Chesnereau, a little young oak.
  • Chesnette, for Chainette, a little chain; also the hath G [...]rmander.
  • Chesneux, of Oak, or f [...]ll of Oaks.
  • Chesnon, the Ch [...].
  • Chest [...]eté, mis [...]ry, wret [...]ed [...]ss, poorn [...]s; also k [...]ry, shr [...]wdn [...].
  • Chestreux, poor, [...].
  • Chestron, as Che [...]ron.
  • Chetdeux, g [...] f [...]ll [...]g.
  • Ch [...]te, the height [...] [...] of a Ship, from t [...] [...] D [...]k to the [...].
  • Chetiver, to bring to wa [...].
  • Chetiveté, as Chestiveté.
  • Chetivoison, poverty.
  • Chetron, [...] till of a Ch [...].
  • Cheu, fall [...].
  • Chevage, a w [...]r [...] duty paid to the Kings [...], [...] [...]y Ba [...]tard, &c.
  • Cheval [...]r, to [...]; also to [...]; [...] of ca [...]ip to lap out [...]g [...] an [...]r.
  • Chevaleresque, Knightly, of, or be­longing to a Knight.
  • Chevalereux, valiant, couragious.
  • Chevalere usement, valiantly, coura­giously.
  • Chevalet, or petit cheval, a little horse.
  • Chevaleter, as Chevaler.
  • Chevaleureux, as Chevalereux.
  • Chevalin, of, or belonging to a horse.
  • Chevaline, the Herb called Horse­tail, or Shave-grass. La Cheva­line, horse-flesh, or the kinde of ho [...]s [...]s.
  • Chevalet, a little horse; also a tres­sel of wood; also a sort of coyn.
  • Chevance, wealth.
  • Chevauchable, easie to be rid on.
  • Chevauchée, a riding on horseback; also a Princes Progress; a Judges Cheuit, &c. also a furnishing of horses to ride on.
  • Chevauchement, a riding.
  • Chevaucher, for voyager à cheval, to ride a horse.
  • Chevaucheur, for Cavalier, a horse­man.
  • Chevauchons, à chevauchons, a­straddle.
  • Chevecerie, as Chevecherie.
  • Cheveche, an Owl, the rough-footed short-tailed Owl.
  • Chevecher, Chevechier, Chevecier, a S [...]xton.
  • Chevecherie, the V [...]stry, or Treasury of a Church.
  • Chevedage, a dwelling-house.
  • Cheveil, Chevel, chief, principal. Lieu chevel, a Mannor-house, or chief house; Fief chevel, a noble Inheritance held in capite, and capabl [...] of J [...]risdicti [...].
  • Cheveler, to sprig, or spriggle; to put forth a small or hairy [...].
  • Cheveliere, a hair-la [...]; also a dressing of [...]air.
  • Chevelite, a S [...]ker, a small imp of a plant spr [...]nging from the root th [...]r [...]of, or o [...] it s [...]ly rooted.
  • Chevesche, as Cheveche.
  • Chevesne, the Ch [...]i [...], or P [...]llard-fi h.
  • Chevestre, a [...], or [...]alter for a cow, cal [...], &c.
  • Chevestreux, blading, or s [...]raini g the head.
  • Cheve [...]ain, a Captain, a Comman­der.
  • Cheve [...]ier, as Chevecher.
  • Che [...], [...] Ch [...]i [...] [...] [...]. D.
  • Chevi, [...] with r [...]i [...]d.
  • Chevillage, a [...]ggi [...]g.
  • [Page] Chevilleur, a pegger; also a Sor­cerer that holding his finger in a hole, and muttering certain super­stitious Words, will hinder a man from pissing until his finger be re­moved.
  • Cheviniau, a Chevin.
  • Chevir, to compass, prevail with, reclaim. Ils ne pouvoyent tous chevir en la maison, there was not room enough for them all in the house.
  • Chevissance, an agreement, or com­position made.
  • Chevolée, a sprig of a plant; also a fiber, or hair-like thread grow­ing unto the root of a plant.
  • Chevoler, to put forth sprigs.
  • Chevre-pied, goat-footed.
  • Chevrette, a little Goat; a wilde Goat; a great Prawn; a little and low andiron; a small piece of Ordnance.
  • Chevrie, a Bag-pipe.
  • Chevrier, a Goat-herd.
  • Chevrin, Goat-like; of, or belong­ing to a Goat.
  • Cheurme, as Chiorme in the N. D.
  • Chevron, for Chevreau, a Kid.
  • Chevronde, as Severonde in the N. D.
  • Chevronneau, Chevronnet, a small rafter.
  • Chevrot, a Kid.
  • Chevrotter, for Chevreter, to kid.
  • Chevrottement, the breeding, or bringing forth of Kids.
  • Cheusson, a Mite, or Weevil.
  • Chezal, Chezeau, a chief Mansion, or Mannor-house.
  • Chi, as Ci in the N. D.
  • Chiabrena, a shitten-come-shite.
  • Chiappon, a kinde of port in the mouth of a Bit.
  • Chiard, a shitten fellow.
  • Chiasse, dross.
  • Chiasser, to shite; also to be too cu­rious.
  • Chic, de chic à chic, from little to little.
  • Chicambault, the luff-block in a ship.
  • Chicancus, Chicanous, for Chica­neur, a wrangler.
  • Chichard, for Chiche, a penny-fa­ther.
  • Chicharou, bastard Mackarel.
  • Chiche-face, Chiche-maille, a penny-father.
  • Chicheron, the Nipple of ones breast.
  • Chichorée, for Chicorée, Succory.
  • Chicot, a stub, or slump.
  • Chicotin, Chicotrin, the herb Orpin.
  • Chief, for chef, chief, principal.
  • Chien-cerf, a Hart-hound.
  • Chienesse, Dogs, the kinde or na­ture of dogs, a breed of dogs.
  • Chien-lict, a shite-a-bed.
  • Chienner, to whelp.
  • Chiennesse, as Chienesse.
  • Chiennet, a little dog.
  • Chieneter, as Chienner.
  • Chienneterie, doggishness, the kinde or nature of dogs.
  • Chiennetier, a Dog-keeper, one that looks unto Hounds.
  • Chiennette, a young, or little bitch.
  • Chien-rage, Dogs-bane.
  • Chietins, as Theatins.
  • Chisse, an old rag, an off-cast piece of stuff.
  • Chiffetier, a seller of old stuff.
  • Chifflement, a whistling.
  • Chigros, as Chef gros.
  • Chil, as Chyle in the N. D.
  • Chilagogue, a Choler-purging Medi­cine.
  • Chilifier, to concoct, digest, or turn into a milky or white juice.
  • Chiller, as Ciller in the N. D.
  • Chilleure, a seeling, or sowing up of the eyes.
  • Chilonique, à la Chilonique, briefly.
  • Chimage, as Chemage.
  • Chimagrée, as Cimagrée in the N. D.
  • Chimerie, for Chimerique, chime­rical.
  • Chimolie, terre chimolie, a kinde of earth that is good against bur­ning and hot Impostumes.
  • Chinchille, the name of an Indian and Squirrel-like beast.
  • Chine, a red and spungeous Indian root, good against the Gout.
  • Chinfreneau, a knock, or thump.
  • Chinon, as Chignon in the N. D.
  • Chinquer, to quaff, or drink ex­tremely.
  • Chiolé, whelped.
  • Chiot, a whelp, or little dog.
  • Chipault, ragged.
  • Chipouton, a penny-father.
  • Chippe, a ship, or bark; also an old clout, rag, or patch.
  • Chiquaner, for Chicaner, to wran­gle.
  • Chicanique, litigious, pettyfogger-like.
  • Chiquanourris, Chiquanoris, crafty pleaders, or pettyfoggers.
  • Chique, as Chiche.
  • Chiquenaudé, fillipped.
  • Chiquenauder, to fillip.
  • Chiquenie, as Squenie.
  • Chiqueté, cut, or hacked.
  • Chiqueter, to cut, or hack.
  • Chiqueteur, a cutter, or hacker.
  • Chiqueture, a cutting, cut, or gash.
  • Chiquot, a scale in the root or end of a nail; also a sprig, or shoot of a tree; also the stump of a tooth.
  • Chiquoter, to sift, search, or seek out; also to hack with a knife, &c.
  • Chiragre, the Gout in the hands.
  • Chiroacte, nimble of hand.
  • Chiroaine, as Ciroesne.
  • Chirographaire, Creancier chiro­graphaire, a Creditor that hath a Note under the Debtors hand.
  • Chiron, for Ciron, a hand-worm.
  • Chirurgial, belonging to Surgery.
  • Chocailler, as Chocquailler.
  • Chochepierre, a kind of Bull-finch.
  • Chocquailler, to drink much.
  • Choënes, the lines, or chains, and rods wherewith Surveyors mea­sure Land.
  • Choerin, a Barrow-pig.
  • Choier, as Choyer.
  • Choine, Choisne, a loaf of white bread.
  • Choison, opportunity, occasion; also plenty.
  • Cholagague, the thin or small gut wherein the Chylus thickening be­gins to rest.
  • Chole, Cholere, as Colere in the N. D.
  • Choleré, Cholerique, and Chole­reux. See Colerique in the N. D.
  • Cholique, as Colique in the N. D.
  • Choliqueux, troubled with the Col­lick.
  • Chomer, as Chommer in the N. D.
  • Chommable, Jour chommable, a Play-day, a Holy-day.
  • Chommage, a resting, or ceasing from work.
  • Chondrille, Gum-succory.
  • Choner, as Chommer, or Chopiner in the N. D.
  • Chonquetage, a View taken of the Kings Woodsales.
  • Chopinette, a small cup.
  • Choquar, a Chough.
  • Choriage, a keeper of Players Gar­ments.
  • Chore, a Company of Singers, or Dancers; any Company; the Cho­rus between every Act in a Tra­gedy.
  • Choreal, frequenting, or belonging to a Quire.
  • Chorer, a Barrow-pig, a young hog.
  • Choriaux, Quirtsters.
  • Chorion, the after-burden.
  • Choriste, a Singing-man in a Quire.
  • [Page] Chorme, as Chiorme in the N. D.
  • Chouän, a Pollard, or Chevin-finch.
  • Chouärt, flying out.
  • Chouchette, a Chough.
  • Choüé, disappointed.
  • Choul, for chou, Colewort.
  • Chouquet, a block.
  • Chouguette, a Chough.
  • Chourme, as Chiorme in the N. D.
  • Chouzer, to swive.
  • Choyer, to have a great care of.
  • Chraies, choak-pears.
  • Chran, the name of a fish.
  • Chras, as Chraies.
  • Chresme, as Chreme in the N. D.
  • Chresmer, to anoint with holy oyl.
  • Chrestienné, christened.
  • Chrestiennement, (Subst.) a chri­stening.
  • Chrestienner, to christen.
  • Chrisocolle, Gold-sodder.
  • Christe-marine, Crest-marine.
  • Christianizé, made a Christian.
  • Christodin, a new Christian.
  • Chronique, (Adj.) temporal, or re­turning at a certain time.
  • Chroniste, Chronologiste, a Chro­nicler.
  • Chrysocolle, as Chrisocolle.
  • Chrysocome, Gold-flower.
  • Chrysogone, Gold-producing.
  • Chrysolaine, Orache.
  • Chrysopase, Chrysopatie, a green precious stone that hath a golden lustre.
  • Chuat, a whelp.
  • Chucheter, Chuchoter, to whisper.
  • Chupper, to suck up.
  • Churle, the white field-onion, or star of Bethlehem.
  • Chur, fallen.
  • Churquette, a mouse-trap.
  • Chylose, a digestion of sap or [...].
  • Chymique, for Chymiste, a Chy­mist.
  • Chymistique, Chymistical.
  • Chyst, a membrane.
  • Ciané, bright blue of colour.
  • Ciathe, the name of a measure and weight.
  • Ciboile, as Ciboire in the N. D.
  • Cicatricé, Cicatricer, as Cicatrisé, Cicatriser in the N. D.
  • Cicatrisatif, cicatrizing.
  • Cices, Ciches, as Chiches in the N. D.
  • Cicharou, as Chicharou.
  • Cicle, as Sicle or Cycle in the N. D.
  • Cic [...], or Cicoigne, for Cigogne, a Stork.
  • Cicogn [...]au, Cicoig [...]eau, a young Stork.
  • Cicotrin, the herb Orpin; also a kinde of fine scarce.
  • Cicotrine, or Cicrotiné, very finely searced.
  • Cicutuaire, wild Chervil.
  • Cidrage, Peachwort.
  • Cie, for Sie, a Saw.
  • Cielin, heavenly; also belonging to the firmament; or to a canopy, testern, or upper cieling.
  • Cier, for sier, to sawe.
  • Cieure, for sieure, saw-dust.
  • Cigaler, to chirp.
  • Cignean, Swan-like, of a Swan.
  • Cil, for celui, he.
  • Cilindre, as Cylindre in the N. D.
  • Cillier, as Ciller in the N. D.
  • Cimaise, as Cymaise in the N. D.
  • Cimasulte, carving that resembleth rowling waves.
  • Cimet, for Cime, the top of a tree or a hill.
  • Cimettes, as Cymettes.
  • Cimitiere, for Cimetiere, a Church-yard.
  • Cimmerique, as Tenebres Cimme­riques, Cymmerian (or continual) darkness.
  • Terre Cimolée, Cimolie, or Cimo­lienne, Fullers earth.
  • Cin de bois, a knot in wood.
  • Cinabre, for Cinnabre, Cinoper.
  • Cinabrin, red, ruddy, as vermilion.
  • Cincinatule, one that continually curls his hair.
  • Cincture, or Cindre, for C [...]inture, a girdle.
  • Cindré, girt, spotted.
  • Cindrer, to gird, also to spot.
  • Cinefaction, a burning unto ashes.
  • Cinit, a Siskin.
  • Cinnabrisé, mingled, or coloured with cinoper.
  • Cinnamé, sweetned with cinnamon, or sweet as cinnamon.
  • Cinnamome, as Cinname in the N. D.
  • Cinquaine, the name of a certain Vi [...]e that th [...]ives not in a moist soil.
  • Cinquener, to yield five for one.
  • Cinturin, for Ceinturon, a waste-belt.
  • Cion, a storm; also as Scion.
  • Cipres, for Cypres, the Cyprus-tree.
  • Cipsule, as Capsule.
  • Circée, a kinde of Night-shads.
  • Circombilivagination, a wheeling about.
  • Circombilivaginer, to wheel about.
  • Circongirer, the same.
  • Circonjacent, lying about.
  • Circuir, to incompass.
  • Circuition, a circuition. Circuition de paroles, a circumlocution.
  • Circularité, roundness.
  • Circulateur, a Jugler.
  • Circulatoire, circulatory.
  • Circulé, circulated.
  • Circuler, to circulate.
  • Cirette, the name of a pear.
  • Cireux, of wax, full of wax.
  • Cirine, as Cyrine.
  • Ciroesnes, as Ciroines in the N. D.
  • Cironnier, as main cironniere, a hand troubled with worms.
  • Cirre, a lock of curled hair.
  • Cirsotomie, the cutting or opening of the corrupt veins called Vari­ces.
  • Cisaille, the clipping of coyn present­ly after the stamp. Cisailles, Garden-sheers, any great sheers.
  • Cisé, carved, wrought with a chi­sel.
  • Ciselet, a little chisel.
  • Cisellage, a clipping with sheers or cizars.
  • Cisteaux, for Citeaux, an Order of White Friars.
  • Cisternin, of, or belonging to a ce­stern.
  • Cisternon, a little cestern.
  • Cistophore, an antient coyn, worth about two pence farthing.
  • Cistre, as Sistre in the N. D.
  • Cisure, as Scissure.
  • Citadin, a Citizen, or Freeman in a City.
  • Cirouart, as Zedoare.
  • Citoyennerie, Citizenship.
  • Citrin, of a citron, citron-like, pale-yellow as a citron.
  • Citrinité, pale-yellowness.
  • Citronne, the herb Sweet-balm.
  • Citronnelle, a kinde of small balm.
  • Citronnier, (Adj.) as Citrin.
  • Citrulle, for citrouille, a gourd.
  • Civade, a shrimp; also oats, or pro­vender for horses.
  • Civadier, the fourth part of a Quarteron.
  • Civadiere, the Sprit-sail of a ship.
  • Civé, a kinde of blacke sauce for a Hare.
  • Cive, a Scallion, or unset Leek.
  • Civelle, a small Lamprey.
  • Civets, a kinde of sauce.
  • Civettien, perfumed with, or smel­ling of civet.
  • Civois, a bed of scallions, or of un­set leeks.
  • Civot, as Cive-
  • Cizaille, as Cisaille.
  • Cizailler, Cizaille, Cizeler, Cize­leure. [Page] See them with an s, in­stead of z, in the N. D.
  • Cizellage, as Cisellage.
  • Clabaud, a came for a bound; also the harking of a Cur.
  • Clabauderie, a barking, or baw­ling.
  • Clabosser, to ho [...]se, or t [...]ss up and down; also to be dash with dirt.
  • Clac, any thing that makes a clack­ing or clattering noise; the [...]ac­ket that frights away birds from fruit-trees, &c.
  • Clache, a certain engine wherewith small birds are caught.
  • Claguet, the name of an apple.
  • Claigner, as Cligner in the N. D.
  • Claim, a publick demand or claim; also a Bill of complaint put or pre­ferred into a Court.
  • Clain, as Claim; also an Arrest or Seizure of a Debtors Goods upon execution; also a fine of twenty pence due unto Justice for the seizure of beasts Damage sesant; also a penalty inflicted on the Party that yeelds by confession in Court, before the Suit come to contestation.
  • Clair-coulant, running clear.
  • Clairins, a certain Order of Corde­liers, or Gray-Friars.
  • Claironner, to sound a Clarion; al­so to squeak, to speak shrill.
  • Clamable, Claimable, challengea­ble.
  • Clamant, a clai [...]er, a challenger; also a Creditor that seizes b [...] Debtors Goods upon Execution.
  • Clamant, (Adj.) crying out; also claiming, or challenging.
  • Clame, a Fine levied in some places upon such as d [...]fer the payment of their debts; also the fine paid un­to Justice, or a Lord having Ju­risdiction, for the seizure of beasts found Damage-sesant.
  • Clamme, a Pilgrims cloak.
  • Clamporte, as Cloporte in the N.D.
  • Clanche, the [...]atch of a door.
  • Clangueur, a shrill noise, or s [...]aking.
  • Clang [...]eux, shrill, s [...]eaking.
  • Clanponniere, as Clapponiere.
  • Clapoir, Clapoire, a clap.
  • Claponice, Claponier, as Clappo­niere.
  • Clappeter, to clap one with his hand.
  • Clapp [...]nie [...], t [...]e [...]ckle-bone of a [...].
  • Cla [...]re- [...]r, a la [...] ro [...], one that will [...]at [...]er star [...]e with cold and longer, than work to get heat or [...].
  • Claquer, Claqueter les dents, to k [...]a [...]h the teeth.
  • Claquettement, Claquetis, a clat­tering.
  • Claquette, for Cliquette, a Lazer's clicket or clapper.
  • Claré, Claret, somewhat clear.
  • Clas, a k [...]ell, or woful noise.
  • Clavaller, to strengthen the young shoots or slips of a Vine against the fury of strong winds.
  • Clavandier, a Key-bearer; also the chain whereon women use to wear their keys.
  • Clavarins, an Order of black Friars which wore two great paper-keys upon their habits.
  • Cla [...]dication, Claudition, a halting.
  • Clavelade, a thornback.
  • Clavelé, Clavellé, nailed, or fastned with nails; also [...]us [...]fied with the scab, as a sheep.
  • Claveler, Claveller, to nail fast.
  • Clavet, for Claveau, the scab amongst sheep.
  • Clavette, the Craw-bone; also a Spring-pin; th [...] little pi [...]ce of iron wherewith Tradesmen keep in the iron-pins of their shop-win­dows; also the forelock of the carriage of Cannon, or that which fastens it. Clavette du pied, the [...]l, or hinder-bone of the foot.
  • Claveure, a key-hole, or all that part of a lock wherein the key [...]a [...]s or plays; also a chi [...]k.
  • Clavicules, the channel-bones, neck-bones, or craw-bones.
  • Claviere, a woman that hath charge of all the keys in a house.
  • Clavin, a little grapple, or book like a claw.
  • Claune, a Pool, or Pond.
  • Claustier, for Claustral, of, or be­longing to a Cloyster, living in a Cloyster.
  • Claustile, a little clause.
  • Claver, to shut up with hurdles.
  • Cl [...]é, walled, hurdled.
  • Cleigner, for Cligner, to wink.
  • Clematide, Clematite, a kinde of the b [...]th Ha [...]wort.
  • Cleps [...]dre, as hour-glass.
  • Cleps [...]drie, a limited running of sand in an hour-glass.
  • Cler, for Clair, [...]
  • Clercelier [...], a kind [...] of [...] ribbon; also a string wherewith wo [...]n [...]ng their keys to their girdles.
  • Cleré, a kind [...] [...]d Hy [...]ra [...].
  • Clerement, for clairement [...].
  • Cleres-voyes, lattices, or secret holes to spy out at.
  • Clergeau, Clergeon, a petty Clark, an under-Clark, or young Clark.
  • Clergesse, a learred woman.
  • Clergie, Clarkship, learning.
  • Clerical, of, or belonging to the Cler­gy.
  • Clericalement, Priest-like.
  • Clerté, for Clarté, clearness.
  • Clesché, as Clissé.
  • Clide, an antient warlike engine, whereby they used of old to hurl a great number of stones.
  • Clie, for Claye, a hurdle.
  • Clientelle, defence, protection; also a store of Clients.
  • Clifoire, a Plaisterers Tray.
  • Clignemusset, the play called Hide­man-blind.
  • Clignetter, Clignotter, to wink of­ten.
  • Clignottement, a frequent winking.
  • Climactere, for Climacterique, Cli­macterical.
  • Climacterie de 63 ans, the climacte­rical or dangerous year of 63.
  • Climatere, as Climactere.
  • Climée, brass- [...]r.
  • Clincaille, money, coyn.
  • Cline-mucette, as Clignemusset.
  • Clinique, one that is bedrid.
  • Clinquaille, as Clincaille.
  • Clinqueillerie, a ringing of much mo­ney, or of many pans and skellets together; also coin.
  • Clinquet, as Cliquet; also a cer­tain trick in wrestling.
  • Cliquaille, as Clin [...]il [...]e.
  • Cliquefoire, a sp [...]i [...]t.
  • Cliquer, for Cliqueter, to clack.
  • Cliquer, the knocker of a door; also a L [...]rs [...]li [...]ket.
  • Clis [...]e, a little wreath of wicker to set under a dish on the table; also a wattl [...], or hurdle. Treillis de cli [...]e, a gr [...]te o [...] wick [...]r.
  • Cli [...]é, made of wicker.
  • Clitie, or de clitie, a Marigold.
  • Clitori [...], a w [...]rna is privit [...].
  • Cliver, to [...] o [...]twa [...]d, as t [...] [...].
  • Clocheme [...], a [...]alti [...]g.
  • Clocherie, a r [...]gi [...], or peal of [...]ll [...].
  • Clochetier, a Bell- [...].
  • Clochier, for Cl [...]her, a [...], also a Pari [...], [...] and [...] a Bi [...]h [...]p [...]ick, [...] Di [...]s.
  • Cl [...]er, as Cl [...]i [...].
  • Cl [...]i [...], [...].
  • Cl [...]x, [...] [Page] to mud-walls, hedges, or Inclo­sures.
  • Cloistral, for Claustral, Monastical.
  • Clomassoles, the defence which a horse makes with his Nether-lip or gums against his bit.
  • Clonisse, the Cockle called Pa­lour.
  • Cloper, Clopiner, Cloquer, for Clo­cher, to hal [...].
  • Closcuau, the nest-cockle, the last-hatched bird in a nest.
  • Closerie, an Inclosure.
  • Closier, a hedger, an incloser.
  • Clostier, as Claustier.
  • Clot, as jouër au clot, to play at hide and finde.
  • Clouäge, a nailing.
  • Clouelouquer, as Clousser.
  • Clouë, a block.
  • Clouëment, a nailing.
  • Clouestre, a Cloister.
  • Clouët, a little nail, a tack-nail.
  • Clouëure, a nailing.
  • Clouïr, to open and produce young ones, as eggs that have been sitten on their full time.
  • Clouïsse, as Pelarde.
  • Clouiser, for Closser, to cluck like a hen.
  • Clousseuse, a clucking hen.
  • Cloye, for Claye, a hurdle.
  • Clucher, for Closser, to cluck.
  • Clye, for Claye, a hurdle.
  • Clypsedre, as Clepsydre, an hour­glass.
  • Clysterisé, applied as a Glister, or made into a Glister.
  • Clysteriser, to apply a Glister, also to make or put a thing into a Gli­ster.
  • Clytoris, as Clitoris.
  • Coäc, the croaking of frogs.
  • Coäcervation, a heaping together.
  • Coädunation, a joyning together.
  • Coägulation, a coagulation.
  • Coäguler, to coagulate.
  • Coaïlle, course wool.
  • Coaine, for Coenne, the skin of ba­con.
  • Coälescer, to grow together again.
  • Coärcter, to restrain, or bring with­in a narrow compass.
  • Coärcté, restrained, or brought with­in a narrow compass.
  • Coät, the nest-cockle of birds.
  • Coaugmenté, increased together.
  • Coäxer, for Coasser, to croak as a frog.
  • Cobbir, to bruise, or break into pie­ces.
  • Cobeter, or Cobter une cloche, to toll a bell.
  • Cocard as Coquart.
  • Cocarde, as Coquarde.
  • Cocardean, as Coquardean.
  • Coccoguide, the black Cameleon-thistle.
  • Coché, notched.
  • Cochelin, a kinde of Cake full of not [...]hes.
  • Cochepierre, a bird like a Bull-finch.
  • Cochet, a Cockerel, or Cock-chick.
  • Cochevis, the copped Lark.
  • Cochier, for Cocher, a Coachman.
  • Cochin, for Cochon, a pig.
  • Cochonnet, a pretty big pig.
  • Cochonniere, a Sow, a Sow-pig.
  • Cocles, the wind-flower.
  • Cocluchon, as Coqueluchon in the N. D.
  • Cocodrille, for Crocodile, a Croco­dile.
  • Cocuage, cuckoldship.
  • Cocue, Hemlock, Herb-bennet.
  • Cocuye, as Cucuye.
  • Cocytide, homme cocytide, a hel­lish fellow, as cruel as the De­vil.
  • Codicile, a Cedicii, or bill annex­ed.
  • Codicilaire, or Codicillaire, one that is instituted into a Benefice, &c. by Codicil.
  • Codignat, for Codignae, Marma­lade.
  • Coëgal, coequal.
  • Coeliaque, as Celiaque.
  • Coelibat, for Celibat, the state of a Batchelor.
  • Coeneux, dirty.
  • Coëpeller, to chip wood.
  • Coëque, a copartner.
  • Coërtion, or Coërction, coercion, restraint.
  • Coeste, Coeston, a very thick and great Glove used by the ancient Grecians in their Theatre-Com­bats.
  • Coëtivé, cherished, or kept warm.
  • Coëtivement, a cherishing, or kee­ping warm.
  • Coëtiver, to cherish, to keep warm.
  • Coëval, coetaneous, or equal in age.
  • Coeuret, a little heart.
  • Coeur-sailli, faint-hearted.
  • Coserruminer, to soder iron with o­ther metals.
  • Coffré, put into a chest or cosser; also laid up in prison.
  • Coffrer, to put into a chest or coffer. Coffrer aulcun en prison, to lay one up in prison.
  • Coffrier, for Coffretier, a Trunk­maker.
  • Cogitation, cogitation, thought.
  • Cogiter, to cogitate, to think.
  • Cognaciere, a Quince-tree.
  • Cognation, cognation, affinity.
  • Cognil, Cognoil, the bastard Tunny­s [...]h, or a fish like unto a Macke­rel, but greater and thicker.
  • Cognoscitive, the faculty of know­ing, or discerning.
  • Coheir, the female Oak.
  • Coherence, coherency.
  • Cohertion, as Coërtion.
  • Cohibé, restrained, curbed, kept in.
  • Cohiber, to restrain, curb, or keep in.
  • Cohorte, a company of Souldiers.
  • Cohourde, a Gourd.
  • Cohue, a Hall to plead in, a Ses­sions-house.
  • Coi, for Coy, quiet, still.
  • Coiaux, rafters (in building.)
  • Coiche, the feathering of an arrow.
  • Coignacier, the great Quince-tree.
  • Coignasse, the greatest kind of Quince.
  • Coignaufond, leachery, venery.
  • Coigné, wedged, driven, or knocked in, stamped, coyned.
  • Coigneau, privet, or primprint.
  • Coigne-festu, an idle fellow; or one that will neither do good himself, nor suffer others to do any.
  • Coigner, to wedge, or fasten with a wedge; to drive hard, or knock fast in; to stamp or coyn. Coig­ner les larmes, to hold in his tears by force.
  • Coignet, a little wedge; also a lit­tle corner.
  • Coigniaux, a kind of small and bright green vermine.
  • Coignoir, a wedging tool, a wed­ger.
  • se Coincher, as se Conchier.
  • Coine, the skin of bacon.
  • Coingné, as Coigné.
  • Coïnquination, a defiling.
  • Coïnquiné, defiled.
  • Coïnquiner, to defile.
  • Coint, quaint.
  • Coïntelligent, holding corresponden­cy with.
  • Cointement, quaintly.
  • Cointise, quaintness.
  • Coipeau, a chip.
  • Coiraux, fat Oxen.
  • Coisne, as Coine.
  • Coissin, for coussin, a cushion; also a pillow.
  • Coiti, Coitis, Coitte, for Coitre, a tick.
  • Coitte-pointe, a quilted covering for a bed.
  • [Page] Colac, the Shad-fish.
  • Colaphiser, to box.
  • Colatoire du nez, the spungy bone through which the snivel passeth from the brain into the nostrils.
  • Colature, a straining; also the thing strained.
  • Cole, a stormy gale of wind.
  • Cole, for colere, anger, choler.
  • Colet, for Collet, a collar.
  • Coliart, a kinde of Ray-fish.
  • Coliaux, the name of a kinde of O­lives.
  • Colier, for Collier, a neck-lace.
  • Colimbades, Colimbales, small pickled Olives.
  • Colin, gros colin, bran, also dogs meat made of it.
  • Coline, for Colline, a little hill.
  • Colique, (Adj.) of, or belonging to the Chollick.
  • Coliqueux, subject to the Chollick.
  • Colitor, the name of a certain Vine.
  • Collane, a Neck-lace.
  • Collateralité, collaterality.
  • Collaudation, a mutual commenda­tion.
  • Collaudé, commended with others.
  • Collauder, to commend with others.
  • Colle, for Colline, a little hill; also anger.
  • Collectage, a collecting, or gathering together.
  • Collectanes, a certain Order of Fran­ciscan Friars.
  • Collée, a taking (or imbracing) of one about the neck; also a thump, or blow in the neck.
  • Collerage, a pecuniary Duty exacted in some places for the Collers worn by wine-drawing horses or men.
  • Collerette de semme, a small neck-ruff.
  • Colles, cross-walls of stone, &c. in some Vineyards.
  • Colletages, Taxes and Subsidies le­vi'd of the people.
  • Colleter, as Coleter.
  • Colletier, a Jerkin-maker.
  • Colleure, a glewing.
  • Colleux, glewy.
  • Colligance, a binding together.
  • Colligé, gathered, brought, united together.
  • Colligence, a gathering, bringing, or uniting together; also as Colli­gance.
  • Colliger, to gather, bring, or unite together.
  • Collin, a grey and long-beaked Ri­ver-fowl; also as Colin.
  • Colliquatif, subject to the Chollick.
  • Colliquation, a melting, resolving, or diss [...]g; a Consumption of the radical humour, or substance of the body.
  • Collique passion, the Chollick.
  • Colliqueux, sick of the Chollick.
  • Collision, collision, a knocking, or beating together.
  • Collitigant, wrangling, or going to law together.
  • Collizée, as Colisée in the N. D.
  • Collobe, a kind of sleeveless upper garment in fashion among the old Romans.
  • Colloir, Colloire, a Cullander.
  • Collyre, a liquid medicine for the eyes; also a kind of Samian earth, whereof among other things Eye-medicines are made.
  • Colobe, as Collobe; also a furre­hood or tippet worn by Graduate Priests.
  • Colocasie, the Priests pintle; also the root of the Aegyptian bean.
  • Colocinthe, for Coloquinthe, the plant called Coloquintida.
  • Colom, the name of a great gut.
  • Colomb, a dove, or pidgeon.
  • Colombage, board-work on the out­side of walls, &c.
  • Colombain, Dove-like.
  • Colombeau, Colombelle, a little young Pidgeon.
  • Colombine, a whitish and spungy stone found in leaden mines; also a delicate Italian pear.
  • Colomneux, full of pillars, or co­lumns.
  • Colonnation, a making of pillars.
  • Colonnel, for Colonel, a Colonel.
  • Colophone, the herb Scammony, also as Resine Colophonienne, clari­fied, or hard rozen.
  • Coloration, a colouring, a shadow­ing.
  • Colossal, Colossien, Colossus-like, huge, or mighty.
  • Colostration, the indisposition of In­fant-stomacks by the sucking of beest.
  • Colporter, to carry upon the neck or shoulders.
  • Columb, as Colomb.
  • Columelle, the uvula, or a spungious flesh resembling a Cocks spur, and hanging down in the bottom of thereof of the mouth; also the swel­ling thereof.
  • Colure, for Encoulure, the neck of a horse.
  • Colymbades, as Colimbades.
  • Combateur, a fighter.
  • Combe, a narrow Valley or Passage between two hills, wherein com­monly Theeves do lurk.
  • Combiberon, a fellow-drunkard.
  • Combinage, a coupling, or joyning of pairs.
  • Combleau, the breeching, a great cable used about the carriage of a piece of Ordnance.
  • Comblette, the cleft or division of a red Deers foot.
  • Combré, for Cambré, arched.
  • Combrecelle, or Combresselle, a tumbling trick wherein the heels are cast over the head; also a re­ciprocation of Venery.
  • Comestible, eatable, sit to be eaten.
  • Comet [...]ux, like unto a Comet, full of Comets.
  • Comic, for Comique, comical.
  • Comin, the herb Cummin.
  • Command, command, power, autho­rity; also a Mandamus, or an In­junction for Possession, &c. also an Injoyner, Commander.
  • Commande, as Commende in the N. D. also the main Cable of a Ship; also a thing left in trast with another. Droict de Com­mande, a Duty taken yearly by some Lords of every one of their Widows (that holds by Villenage) in acknowledgement and preser­vation of the right of their Autho­rity over them.
  • Commanderesse, a woman that commands; also Command, Rule, or Authority.
  • Comme, for Gomme, Gum.
  • Commedial, a merry discourse.
  • Commemorable, memorable.
  • Commemorer, to commemorate, to remember.
  • Commendaces, Funeral-Orations.
  • Commenderesse, as Commande­resse.
  • Commensalité, a constant eating to­gether at one Table.
  • Commensuration, a joynt-measu­ring.
  • Comment, for Commentaire, a Comment.
  • Commenté, commented, expounded.
  • Commenter, to comment, to expound.
  • Commerage, gossipping.
  • Commerer, to gossip.
  • Commesurable, measurable together, or with one and the same mea­sure.
  • Commin, Cummin.
  • Commination, commination.
  • Comminé, threatned extreamly.
  • Comminer, to threaten extreamly.
  • Comminué, l [...]st [...]ned; beaten, or broken [...] [...]all pl [...]ces.
  • [Page] Comminuer, to lessen; also to beat, or break into small pieces.
  • Commise, a forfeiture. Droict de Commise, the right or power a Landlord hath to seize the Land held by his Vassal or Tenant who disadvows him, gives him the lie, or commits felony.
  • Commissure, a seam in a bone, as in the scull; also any near closing, or joyning of things together.
  • Commistion, a mixing, or mingling of several things together.
  • Commodat, a loan, or lending.
  • Commoderation du Corps, a good disposition of the whole body.
  • Commoditer, to thrive, to grow rich.
  • Commourans, dying together.
  • Commourir, to die together.
  • Commouvoir, to trouble, or to di­sturb.
  • Commué, exchanged.
  • Commuer, to exchange.
  • Communal, a Common.
  • Commutatif, exchanging one for a­nother.
  • Compacté, compacted, well-set.
  • Compacture, a substantial joyning of all the parts of a thing together.
  • Compagn, for Compagnon, Com­panion.
  • Compagnable, sociable.
  • Compagnonné, associated.
  • Compagnonner, to associate.
  • Compaing, for Compagnon, Com­panion.
  • Companage, all kind of food except bread and drink.
  • Comparagé, compared.
  • Comparager, to compare.
  • Comparence, an appearing.
  • Comparent, an appearer.
  • Comparer, (Sub [...].) le comparer du Corps, the price of a mans life, or the buying of a thing with the loss thereof.
  • Compar [...]onnier, Compartisant, Co­part [...].
  • Comparuit, an Order or Testimonial, signifying the appearance of a par­ty.
  • Comparation, for Comparition, ap­pearance.
  • Compassionnaire, having compassi­ [...].
  • Compassionner, to take compassion.
  • Compatibilité, compatibility.
  • Compensible, able to make amends for.
  • Compe [...] une cho [...] par une a [...] ­tre, to make up a thing by ano­ther.
  • Comperage, the being a Gossip; also a gossipping.
  • Compermutant, a barterer.
  • Compermutation, a truck, or ex­change.
  • Compermuté, exchanged.
  • Competer, to be sufficient for; to belong to; also to sue for the same thing that another doth.
  • Compilation, a compilation; also a rapsody.
  • Compissé, all bepissed.
  • Compisser, to piss every where, or to bepiss every place he comes in.
  • Compite, a cross-way.
  • Complaignant, a Complainer.
  • Complanté, planted, or stored with young plants.
  • Complanter, to plant a Vineyard; also to lay out, or deliver over, a Lords part or share in the fruits of a Vineyard, let by him unto parts or halves; or to let a Vine­yard in a manner.
  • Complanterie, a letting out of a Vineyard to halves, or for part of the fruit thereof; also the part or portion due unto the Land­lord.
  • Complication, a complication, or folding together.
  • Compliqué, folded together.
  • Comploteux, given to plots.
  • Comportement, carriage, behavi­our.
  • Compossesseur, a Joynt-possessor.
  • Composté, pickled.
  • Composter, to pickle.
  • Comprehension, a comprehension; al­so an apprehension, or understanding of.
  • Comprer, to buy.
  • Comprins, for compris, comprehen­ded, apprehended.
  • Compromissaire, he unto whom a Controversie is compromitted.
  • Comptable, accountable.
  • Comptereau, a book of accounts.
  • Compulsé, compelled.
  • Compulser, to compel.
  • Compulsoire, a compelling, or com­ [...]sion; also an instrument or means of compulsion; also a Com­mission in [...]yning a Register, Nota­ry, or Clerk, to deliver the Con­tracts, Pleadings, Acts, Orders, or Judgement which a Suitor has n [...]ed [...].
  • Compunction, for Componction, com [...]nction.
  • Compurgateur, a Compurgator, one that by [...]ath [...]stis [...]es the innocency, [...]port, or [...]at [...] of another.
  • Computiste, a Calculator, or Rec­koner.
  • Conare, a Kernel like a Pine-apple, that sticks to the outside of the Brain.
  • Concasse, bruised in pieces.
  • Concasser, to bruise in pieces.
  • Concathenation, Concathenature, concatenation.
  • Concathené, concatenated.
  • Concathener, to concatenate, to link or chain together.
  • Concavé, made concave or hollow.
  • Concentrique, having one and the same center.
  • Concept, for Conception, concepti­on.
  • Conceptacle, any hollow thing apt to receive, hold, or contain.
  • Concerner, to concern.
  • Conchambrier, a Chamber-fellow.
  • Conche, a shell; also a kinde of open vessel like a bason; also order, equipage, or furniture.
  • Conches, certain receptacles for Sea­water.
  • Conchier, to beshite.
  • Conchylion, as Conchyle in the N. D.
  • Conciliabule, a Conventicle.
  • Conciliateur, a reconciler.
  • Conciliation, a reconcilement.
  • Concilipete, one that is going to­wards a general Councel.
  • Concion, a Congregation; also the speech delivered unto them.
  • Concitateur, a raiser, or inciter.
  • Concitation, a raising, or incitati­on.
  • Concité, raised, incited.
  • Conciter, to raise, to incite.
  • Concombriere, a bed of cucum­bers.
  • Concomitance, concomitancy, fellow­ship.
  • Concorder, to pacifie; also to live in concord.
  • Concreé, created together; also con­gealed, or thickened.
  • Concreer, to create together. Se concreer, to thicken.
  • Concret, a conjunction. Also (Ad­j [...]tively) concrete, thickened, or compared together.
  • Concretion, a compaction.
  • Concubin, a man unlawfully kept and used by a woman.
  • Conculcation, a treading under foot.
  • Conculqué, trodden under foot.
  • Conculquer, to tread under foot.
  • Concusieur, an Extorsioner.
  • Concusierer, to u [...] ext [...]sio [...].
  • [Page] Conde, a Butler, or a Yeoman of the Larder.
  • Condemnade, a kinde of Card-play, like unto Lansquenet.
  • Condemner, and its Derivatives. See Condamner, &c. in the N.D.
  • Condensity, condensity, thickness.
  • Condignac, for Codignac, Marma­lade of Quinces.
  • Condigne, condign, well-worthy.
  • Condignement, worthily.
  • Condile, as Condyle.
  • Condisciple, a fellow-disciple.
  • Conditionaire, conditional.
  • Condol, a ridge, or raising of earth.
  • Condoloir, as Condouloir.
  • Condonné, forgiven.
  • Condonner, to forgive.
  • Condore, the name of a great and ravenous Indian bird.
  • Condot, as Condol.
  • Condouloir, to condole.
  • Conduiseur, a Conducter.
  • Condyle, the out-swelling or knots of the thigh, anckle, elbow, and knuckle-bones; also a blow with the fist.
  • Condylome, an excrescence of flesh in the fundament, or in a womans privity's.
  • Conestablie, as Connêtablie in the N. D.
  • Confanon, as Gonsanon in the N.D.
  • Confanonier, a Standard-bearer.
  • Confanons, the wild Poppy.
  • Confermer, for Confirmer, to con­firm.
  • Confessionaire, of, or belonging to auricular Confession.
  • Confessionat, an act of Confession tending to Absolution.
  • Confez, confessed.
  • Confidentiaire, Confidentionnaire, treacherous, faith-breaking.
  • Confiez de Cour, as Plairs de la Cour.
  • Configuration, a likeness, or resem­blance of figures.
  • Confin, (Adj.) Consinant, near neigh­bour, confining, or adjoyning to.
  • Confis, for Confit, pickled, preserved.
  • Confise, Confiscation.
  • Confissable, fit to be preserved.
  • Confler, as Gonfler.
  • Confluer, to run or flow together.
  • Conformateur, a Conformer.
  • Conformation, a conforming.
  • Confort, comfort.
  • Confortatif, comfortable.
  • Conforté, comforted.
  • Conforte-main, a helping hand; also the strengthening and confir­mation of an inferiour person.
  • Conforter, to comfort.
  • Confuté, confuted.
  • Confuter, to confute.
  • Congeable, dismissable, dischargeable. Domaine congeable, a Demesne held at will.
  • Congemination, an often repeating.
  • Congeneré, ingendred together.
  • Congiaire, a dole, or liberal gift of money, or victuals to the people.
  • Congie, a Vessel among the antient Romans, containing very near a Gallon.
  • Conglutination, a conglutination.
  • Conglutiné, conglutinated.
  • Conglutiner, to conglutinate.
  • Congnoistre, for Conoitre, to know.
  • Congreé, congealed, or thickned.
  • Congréement, a congealing, or thickening.
  • se Congreer, to congeal, or to thicken.
  • Congregable, that may be congrega­ted, or congealed.
  • Congregé, congregated, congealed.
  • Congreger, to congregate. Il se con­grege en pierre precieuse, it grows or congeals into a precious stone.
  • Congression, company, assembly, mee­ting.
  • Conjectural, which may be guessed at by conjecture.
  • Conjecturalement, by guess, or con­jecture.
  • Coniguer, to scratch, or claw.
  • Conil, a Rabbet.
  • Conillart, a certain very tender and delicate pear.
  • Coniller, to lurk in corners.
  • Conilliere, a Coney-hole.
  • Conjouissance, Conjouïssement, a rejoycing with.
  • se Conjoyr, to rejoyce with one.
  • Conjoyssement, as Conjouïssance.
  • Conise, Flea-bane.
  • Conjuger, to play the part of a husband.
  • Conjunction, for Conjonction, con­junction.
  • Conjuncture, for Conjoncture, a con­juncture.
  • Conjurateur, a Conspirator.
  • Conjure, for Conjuration, Conspiracy.
  • Connaturel, connatural.
  • Connexé, knit, or joyned together.
  • Connil, as Conil, a Rabbit.
  • Connille, a Doe-coney.
  • Conniller, as Coniller.
  • Connilleur, a Coward.
  • Connin, as Connil.
  • Conniniere, a Warren of Coneys.
  • Connoistre, Connoissance, as Co­noìtre, Conoissance in the N. D.
  • Connon, a long Dray or Cart, ha­ving at the fore-end a pulley for the drawing up of a loading.
  • Conoeïdal, Cone-like, broad and round at the bottom, and sharp at the top.
  • Conopée, a Canopy.
  • Conquasser, as Concasser.
  • Conque, as Conclie.
  • Conquerable, subduable.
  • Conquereur, for Conquerant, a Con­querour.
  • Conquerre, for Conquerir, to con­quer.
  • Conquest, an Estate or Purchase compassed by a mans own indu­stry; also a thing got wherein another is to have a share.
  • Conquesté, conquered.
  • Conquester, to conquer.
  • Conroy, stuff through tawed or cur­ry'd.
  • Consalme de Mer, the great horse-muscle.
  • Consanguin, consanguineous.
  • Consaul, for Conseil, counsel.
  • Consçachance, a full knowledge or notice of.
  • Consçachant, fully acquainted with, or privy unto.
  • Conscinomantie, Divination by a sieve and a pair of sheers.
  • Consecution, a consequence.
  • Conseigneur, a fellow Lord.
  • Conseillerie, Counsellorship.
  • Consemblable, very like unto. Ses Consemblables, his fellows.
  • Consequemment, consequently.
  • Consequentieux, most important, or of great consequence.
  • Consequutif, for Consecutif, conse­cutive.
  • Conserte, a Conference.
  • Conserté, ordained.
  • Consertion, a joyning, or intermin­gling.
  • Conservatoire, the Office of a Con­servator, his Court, or the Room wherein he useth to keep it.
  • Conserve-santé, health-preserving.
  • Consideratif, considerate.
  • Consierge, as Concierge, in the N. D.
  • Consilles, two conduits or pipes in the throat.
  • Consimilitude, likeness.
  • Consin, a mite, or weevel.
  • Consistorié, censured, or determined of in Consistory.
  • Consistorier, to censure, or determine of in Consistory.
  • Consonance, harmony.
  • Consonant, harmonious.
  • [Page] Consoner, to agree, or sound alike.
  • Consorte, wife, bed-fellow.
  • Consoulde, & Consourde, for Con­solde, the herb Consound.
  • Conspection, a conspection.
  • Il Conste, it is clear, plain, or cer­tain.
  • Constitueur, he that constitutes or appoints.
  • Constupré, constuprated, ravished, or deflowred.
  • Constuprer, to constuprate, ravish, or deflowr a Virgin.
  • Consubstantial, of the same sub­stance.
  • Consubstantialité, consubstantiality.
  • Consuivre, as Consuyvre.
  • Consultatif, consulting. Qui a voix consultative, that hath power to give his advice, but not to deter­mine.
  • Consulteur, an adviser.
  • Consumption, for Consomption, consumption.
  • Consuyvre, to overtake, to get, or obtain.
  • Consyre, for Consire, the herb Com­frey.
  • Contadin, a Country-man, a Clown.
  • Conte, for Comte, an Earl.
  • Conté, for Comté, an Earldom.
  • Contemné, contemned, scorned, de­spised.
  • Contemnement, a contemning, scor­ning, despising.
  • Contemner, to contemn, scorn, or despise.
  • Contemneur, a contemner, scorner, despiser.
  • Contemperé, tempered, qualified.
  • Contemperer, to temper, to qualifie.
  • Contemplatiss, certain Friars of St. Mary Maudlins Order, who seed on all sorts of flesh, and wear black upper-habits, and white under-ones.
  • Contemplement, a contemplating.
  • Contempleur, for Contemplateur, a Contemplator.
  • Contempt, contempt, scorn, despight.
  • Contenancer, to countenance.
  • Contendre, to contend, or to strive.
  • Contenue, capacity.
  • Contereau, as Comptereau.
  • Conterolle, as Contre-rolle, in the N. D.
  • Contesse, for Comtesse, a Countess.
  • Contestablement, by way of con­testation.
  • Contexte, a context; the form or stile of a Process, Book, or Dis­course.
  • Contigué, contiguous unto.
  • Contin, mon Contin, my Countrey-man.
  • Continemment, continently, soberly, chastly; also sparingly, abstemi­ously.
  • Continue, continuance.
  • Continuité, continuation, intire­ness.
  • Contractation, a contracting.
  • Contracte, a Contract, or bargain.
  • Contracture, contraction, or shrink­ing.
  • Contrahant, contracting, or making a contract.
  • Contraignable, constrainable.
  • Contraigneur, a constrainer.
  • Contrainctement, forcibly.
  • Contrasté, contended against.
  • Contraster, to contend against.
  • Contradveu, Contre-adveu, an An­swer or Opposition to a Bill of Com­plaint for possession of Moveables.
  • Contre-advoüé, owned, or claimed by several Parties.
  • Contr'amour, a holy and honest love
  • Contr'animé, animated, or incou­raged against.
  • Contr'antidote, a counter-antidote.
  • Contr'applegement, an Answer to a Bill of complaint for the possession of an Immoveable.
  • Contre-bas, downward.
  • Contrebase, a counter-base, the lower part of a basis.
  • Contrebondir, to rebound.
  • Contre-boutant, as Contrefort in the N. D.
  • Contre-bouté, supported, born up.
  • Contre-bouter, to support, or bear up.
  • Contre-carre, a resistance, or oppo­sition; an arguing against; also comparison, or equality.
  • Contre-changer, to counterchange.
  • Contre-chanter, to answer in the same note or tune.
  • Contre-charger, to interchange bur­dens or accusations.
  • Contrechifre, a countercypher, a note explanatory of particular cyphers, or as le chifre d'un Prince.
  • Contrechifrer, to answer cyphers with cyphers; also to expound cyphers; also to requite private affection in private fashion.
  • Contrecourber, to bend one from another, as Wrestlers do their backs.
  • Contre-cueur, as Contrecoeur in the N. D.
  • Contredigué, fortified against banks and ditches.
  • Contrediguer, to set up banks against banks.
  • Contredise, and Contredite, for Contradiction, contradiction.
  • Contr'effort, a counter-effort.
  • Contr'elider, to counter-strike.
  • Contr'eschanger, as Contrechan­ger.
  • Contr'escrire, to confute, or write against; also to copy, or write out.
  • Contr'escript, confuted, or written against; also copied, or writ out.
  • Contr'escript, (a Subst.) a confu­tation; a copy.
  • Contr'essay, a second essay.
  • Contr'estang, a Pool-dam, a back-pool, or counter-pond; a great ditch, or hollow-ground, whereinto the water of a Pond that's to be fished is let.
  • Contr'estre, to be against.
  • Contre-sente, the bruize or craze of a bone, in another or opposite part to the place where the blow that caused it was given; which hap­pens especially in the Scull.
  • Contreferme, an affirmation of that whereof another affirms the con­trary.
  • Contrefermé, the contrary whereof is affirmed or avouched.
  • Contrefermer, to oppose an affirma­tion unto an affirmation.
  • Contreseu, an iron-back or plate for the back of a chimney.
  • Contreflaté, whose flattery is an­swered with flattery.
  • Contreflater, to flatter as fast as another.
  • Contrefortuner, to arm against the injuries of fortune.
  • Contrefrontail, the brow-piece, or upmost post of a door.
  • Contre-gage, a counter-gage, or counter-pawn.
  • Contrehastier, a Rack to turn spits on.
  • Contrehaulte, as Hautecontre in the N. D.
  • Contrejouëur, a counter-player.
  • Contre-lettre, a counter-letter, or counter-ward; a private release in discharge of a bond passed; or a private discharge of a duty or service acknowledged before a publick Notary.
  • Contrelouër, to return praise with praise.
  • Contrelutté, wrestled, or contended against.
  • Contrelutter, to wrestle, or contend against.
  • [Page] Contremanche, a false-sleeve, half-sleeve.
  • Contremand, Contremandement, a countermand, or counterman­ding.
  • Contremarque, a countermark.
  • Contremejane, the second (or after) mizen of a ship.
  • Contrementir, to set one lie against another.
  • Contremettre, to oppose, or set a­gainst.
  • Contremonté, got up against.
  • Contremonter, to go up against.
  • Contremunir, to fortifie against.
  • Contre-offrir, to change his offer.
  • Contre-ouvrier, one that works a­gainst another.
  • Contrepan, a pawn, especially of an immovable.
  • Contrepané, pawned, engaged.
  • Contrepaner, to pawn an immo­vable.
  • Contrepensé, thought otherwise of than before; disliked, or distru­sted.
  • Contrepenser, to think otherwise than he hath done; to dislike, or distrust.
  • Contrepenseur, one that is of ano­ther minde than before.
  • Contrepeter, to answer one crack with another.
  • Contrepicqué, counter-nipped.
  • Contrepicquer, to give one prick for another, to return gird for gird.
  • Contre-pleige, a Counter-surety, one that's bound to save a Surety harmless.
  • Contre-pleigement, a counter-bond.
  • Contre-pleiger, to save a Surety harmless by counter-bond, &c.
  • Contreplié, bent, bowed, or folded back.
  • Contreplier, to bend, bow, or fold back.
  • Contrepoinct, back-stitch; or as Contre pointe in the N. D. A contrepoinct, crossly.
  • Contrepoinctier, for Contrepoin­teur, a Quilter, or Counterpoint-maker.
  • Contrepois, for Contrepoids, coun­terpoise.
  • Contreporteur, a paultry Pedlar that carries his shop before him.
  • Contrequarre, as Contrecarre.
  • Contrequerant, a Rival, or Compe­titor.
  • Contre-quictance, a Counter-acquit­tance.
  • Contre-repliqué, reply'd against.
  • Contre-repliquer, to reply against.
  • Contrerolleur, for Controleur, a Controuler.
  • Contre-sanglot, a girth-leather.
  • Contrescedule, as Contrecedule in the N. D.
  • Contreschanger, as Contrechan­ger.
  • Contreseel, for Contreseau, a Coun­ter-seal.
  • Contresign, for Contreseing, a sub­scription joyned to another.
  • Contresommer, to revoke a Sum­mons.
  • Contresonner, to sound contrary.
  • Contresouflé, blown two contrary ways.
  • Contretaluer, to oppose bank to bank, or causey to causey.
  • Contre-temperament, a contrary temper. Faire un contre-tem­perament à la nature, to alter nature.
  • Contre-teneur, the countertenor-part in Musick.
  • Contretenir, to hold against, or to debate for a thing against ano­ther.
  • Contretenon, a stop in a Watch, or Clock.
  • Contretenu, held against; also claimed, challenged.
  • Contreteste, as faire contreteste, to make head against.
  • Contre-trahison, a treason against treason.
  • Contretrancher, to fortifie against an Enemy intrenched.
  • Contre-traversant, counter-crossing.
  • Contreval, downward; also down.
  • Contrevengé, full revenged.
  • Contrevenger, to revenge one blow, or injury with another.
  • Contreventer, to hold against the wind.
  • Contrevention, for Contravention, the breaking of his agreement.
  • Contre-vitre, a counter-window.
  • Contreuve, a tale invented.
  • Contribuable, liable to contribu­tion.
  • Contributeur, a Contributer.
  • Contr'imiter, to imitate, or coun­terfeit.
  • Contr'invective, an answer to an invective.
  • Contristé, grieved, afflicted.
  • Contrister, to make sorrowful.
  • Controlle, as Contre-rolle in the N. D.
  • Contr'ongle, the water-claw of dogs, &c.
  • Contr'ouverture, a counter-open­ing.
  • Contr'ouvrir, to open against.
  • Contumacer, to be rebellious; also to proceed against one for con­tempt or rebellion.
  • Contumax, refractory, rebellious, contemptuous.
  • Contumelie, contumely, slander, or scandalous rebuke.
  • Contumelieusement, contumeliously, reproachfully, in despightful terms.
  • Contumelieux, contumelious, out­ragious, or injurious in words.
  • Contundre, to braise, or stamp in pieces.
  • Contuteur, a joynt Tutor, or Guar­dian.
  • Convalidé, restored unto health.
  • Convalider, to restore unto health.
  • Convassal, a fellow-Vassal.
  • Convenancé, covenanted.
  • Convenancer, to covenant.
  • Convenant, a Covenant.
  • Convenant, for convenable, conve­nient, fit.
  • Conventioné, for Conventionel, done by agreement.
  • Conventrels, an Order of Friars.
  • Convereau, a fi [...]h somewhat resem­bling, but lesser than the Alose.
  • Converse, a Nun that formerly hath been of loose behaviour.
  • Convert, a Proselyte.
  • Convertissement, a converting, tur­ning, or changing.
  • Convertoir, part of the head, or chapter of a Ionian pillar.
  • Convexion, for Convexité, conve­xity.
  • Convi, a feast.
  • Convice, a reproach, or railing word.
  • Conviement, an inviting, or bid­ding unto a feast.
  • Il Convient, it behoves.
  • Convitieux, railing, reproachful, re­viling.
  • Convoitement, for Convoitise, lust.
  • Convoyé, convoyed.
  • Convoyer, to convoy.
  • Conyle, great Chervil.
  • Conyse, Flea-bane, or Flea-wort.
  • Copeaux, chipt.
  • Copelle, for Coupelle, a Goldsmiths Coppel.
  • Copellé, tested, melted, or fined, as silver in a Test, or Coppel.
  • Copet, as Couperet.
  • Cophin, a basket.
  • Copieusement, copiously, abundant­ly, plentifully.
  • Copieux, copious, abundant, plen­tiful; also a well-spoken per­son.
  • [Page] Copiosité, copiousness, abundance, plenty.
  • Coppe, a measure, the half of a Bur­gundian bushel.
  • Coppeau, for Coupeau, chip.
  • Copper, for couper, to cut.
  • Coppeter, to ring all in, to ring the last peal.
  • Coppier, to rouse and stretch out himself.
  • Coppon, a peck.
  • Cops, a certain fish like unto a Stur­g [...]on.
  • Copté, tolled.
  • Copter, to toll a bell.
  • Copuland, a coupling, or joyning to­gether.
  • Copulasse, an Exercise in Schools, when Scholars dispute, and he that hath done best is placed high­est.
  • Copule, a conjunction, a joyning, or coupling together.
  • Coqu, for Cocu, a Cuckold.
  • Coquage, Cuckoldry.
  • Coquar, an egg, or egg-shell; or as
  • Coquard, a proud Coxcomb.
  • Coquarde, bonnet à la coquarde, a Spanish Cap used by the best sort of men; also any Cap, or Bonnet worn proudly or pertly on the one side.
  • Coquardeau, a proud ass, one that hath more wealth than wit.
  • Coquardise, fond pride.
  • Coquart (Adj.) foolishly proud.
  • Coquasse, a Kettle, or Chaser.
  • Coquassier, a seller of Egg-shells; also a maker or seller of Kettles, or Chasers.
  • Coquatris, a Kockatrice.
  • Coquefredouille, a Milk-sop.
  • Coquelicon; Cock-crowing.
  • Coqueliné, dandled, made a wanton of.
  • Coquelinement, a dandling, or coc­kering.
  • Coqueliner un enfant, to dandle a childe, to make a wanton of it.
  • Coqueluchonné, that wears a hood, or a Spanish Capuch.
  • Coquemare, the Night-mare.
  • Coqueplumer, a proud Coxcomb, a Skare-crow.
  • Coquer, to play the cock, to tread hens like a cock. Se coquer con­tre, to run his head against.
  • Coquerelles, Coquerettes, Coquerez, for Coquerets, the herb Alcaken­gy.
  • Coqueret, the name of an apple.
  • Coques, Cockles.
  • Coqueté, cackled, or clucked; also swaggered.
  • Coqueter, a Cock to call his hens, or to cluck as a Cock among hens; also to swagger like a Cock on his hung-hill.
  • Coquetier, a seller of Eggs.
  • Coquillade, a little fish living a­mong rocks.
  • Coquillard, as Coquardeau; also a small Vessel whereon they serve rear-eggs unto the table.
  • Coquillard (Adj.) full of shells.
  • Coquillé, set thick with shells; also made like a shell.
  • Coquiller, to set thick with shells; or to fashion a thing like a shell.
  • Coquilleux, full of shells.
  • Coquillier, having, or bearing a shell; of, or belonging to a shell.
  • Coquilliere, a woman that makes biggins and caps.
  • Coquillon, a little shell; also a lit­tle hood; also a fools hood; or a hooded fool.
  • Coquin, (Adj.) beggarly; also ro­guish.
  • Coquineau, a beggarly rascal.
  • Coquiner, to beg.
  • Coquiol, for Coquiole, degenerate barley.
  • Coquu, for Cocu, a cuckold.
  • Coralin, of corral, like to corral.
  • Corapei, a Princes Cloth of State.
  • Corbat pescheret, a Cormorant.
  • Corbature, as Courbature.
  • Corbeilleux, full of baskets.
  • Corbieu, Gogs heart.
  • Corbigeau, a Cormorant.
  • Corbillat, a young Raven.
  • Corbillon, for Corbeillon, a little basket.
  • Corbinerie, a stealing.
  • Corbinet, the croaking of Ravens or Crows.
  • Corcalihat, the cry of quails.
  • Corcesque, a kinde of broad-headed javelin, or dart.
  • Corchiere, the battlement of a wall; also as Coursie.
  • Cordace, a kinde of Country-dance.
  • Cordaille de Navire, tackling.
  • Cordée, a string full of; also a rank or file.
  • Cordeleux, full of cords.
  • Cordeliere, a Gray-Friars Girdle.
  • Cordeur de Terres, a Surveyor of lands.
  • Cordiale, the herb Mother-wor [...].
  • Cordialeusé, hearty.
  • Cordiaque, cordial.
  • Cordilles, the young s [...]y of Tunny.
  • Cordonné, twisted; made as, or into a cord.
  • Cordonner, to twist; also to make as, or into, a cord.
  • Cordouan, Cordwan leather.
  • Cordouannier, for Cordonnier, a Shoomaker.
  • Cordouannerie, a Shoomakers trade; also a Shoomakers row or street.
  • Cordueil, hearts grief.
  • Cordule, a small kinde of Lizard.
  • Core, the broad piece that's between the Cross-bars of the Hilt of a Sword.
  • Corgeal, choaking.
  • Corial, a Quirister.
  • Corias, as hard as leather.
  • Corions de souliers, the latchets of shoots.
  • Corman, for Cormorant, a Cormo­rant.
  • Cornabon, a musical cornet.
  • Cornage, hornage; also a yearly Duty of Corn exacted by the Lord Chastelain of Berri, in the Juris­diction of Bourges, upon every Ox that labours in the winter-corn-ground, which is within his Ter­ritory.
  • Cornalique, Cuckold-like.
  • Cornardise, cuckoldry.
  • Corné, horny, having horns.
  • Corne-boeuf, the herb senugreek.
  • Cornée de l'oeil, the horny tunicle, wherein the apple of the eye is placed.
  • Cornelle, as Corneole.
  • Cornemuseur, a bag-piper.
  • Corneole, willow-herb, water-wil­low.
  • Corne-pied, horn-sooted.
  • Corneteux, used in cupping.
  • Corneur, a winder of a horn.
  • Cornice, for Corniche, cornish.
  • Cornichet, the Sleeve, or Calamary fish.
  • Cornier, as Cornillier; also a hor­ner.
  • Cornier, (Adj.) angular.
  • Cornillat, a little young Crow.
  • Cornillé, jurred, or butted with horns.
  • Corniller, to jurr, or butt with the horns.
  • Cornillier, for Cornoiller, the Cor­nil-tree.
  • Corniole, part of a Stags throat [...], or as Gargatre.
  • Cornoalle, for Cornoille, the Cornil-fruit.
  • Cornoallier, the Cornil-tree.
  • Cornuchet, a little Cornet.
  • Coronal, of, or belonging to a Crown, or Crown-like.
  • [Page] Coronne, for Couronne, a Crown.
  • Corp, a blackish Sea-fish.
  • Corpaut, a pot.
  • Corporail, as Corporal, in the N.D.
  • Corporance, Corporence, a mans presence, or constitution of body.
  • Corporu, corpulent, big-bodied.
  • Corpset, a little body; also a pair of womens bodies.
  • Corratage, Corraterie, as Courra­tage.
  • Corratier, as Courratier.
  • Corraye, for Courroie, a thong.
  • Corregiose, as Corrigiole.
  • Correlaire, for Corollaire, a Corol­lary.
  • Corrente, a Strait of the Sea where commonly it runs violently.
  • Corret, an agnail, or little corn up­on a toe.
  • Corriasse, as Corias.
  • Corrigiole, Swines-grass, Birds-tongue.
  • Corrion, a strap.
  • Corroboré, corroborated.
  • Corroborer, to corroborate.
  • Corrodé, worn, or fretted away.
  • Corroder, to wear, or fret away.
  • Corrompable, corruptible.
  • Corrompeur, a corrupter.
  • Corromperesse, a woman that cor­rupts.
  • Corrompure, a corrupting, or cor­ruption.
  • Corrosé, corroded, fretted away.
  • Corrosion, corrosion, or fretting a­way.
  • Corrosiveté, corrosiveness.
  • Corroye, for Courroie, a thong.
  • Corrude, mountain-sparagrass.
  • Corrugation, a frowning, or wrin­kling of the skin.
  • Corruptelle, corruption, deprava­tion.
  • Corruptement, corruptly.
  • Corser, to imbrace, take, or hold by the body; to catch, take, or lay hold of the body.
  • Corsesque, a kinde of broad-headed Javelin.
  • Corsu, corpalent, big-bodied.
  • Corsyre, a kinde of herb.
  • Cortine, for Courtine, a Curtain, (in Fort [...]cation.)
  • Corveable, liable unto base and per­sonal ser [...]ices; of whom a Land­lord may exact certain days work in the year.
  • Corybanter, madly to run up and down, playing on a Cymbal; also to sl [...]p with [...] eyes.
  • Cor [...]mi e, an I [...]-b [...]rry.
  • Coscosions, Co [...]coton [...], Curds.
  • Coscoté, spotted, or pounced.
  • Cosmovague, a wanderer, or tra­veller throughout the world.
  • Cossats de febves, pois, &c. the husks, or cods of beans, &c.
  • Cossi, the warbling note of a Swal­low.
  • Cossonnerie, a Market for Fowl or Venison.
  • Cossot, for Cosson, a mite, or weevil.
  • Cossu, codded, husked.
  • Cost, Costamer, Costmary.
  • Costal, belonging to the sides or ribs.
  • Costau, for còteau, a little hill.
  • Costereauls, a nickname given unto certain footmen that served the Kings of England in their French Wars; or as Cotereaux.
  • Costié, on a side, of the one side; also tainted, or bruised (being ap­plyed unto fruit.)
  • Costier, sideling, of, or on a side; à costiere, aside, sideways.
  • Costin, huile costin, an Oyl made of Costus, a medicinable root.
  • Coston, the stalk of an herb; also the root Costus.
  • Cosée, a Coot, or Moor-hen.
  • Coter, to quote.
  • Cotereaux, as Costerauls; Or a certain Crue of peasantly Out­laws, who in old time did much mischief to the Nobility and Cler­gy.
  • Coterie, company, society; or as Cotterie.
  • Cothurné, shod with high-soled buskins.
  • Cotice, as Cottice in the N. D.
  • Cotignac, for Codignac, Marma­lade.
  • Cotile, as Cotyle.
  • Cotine, Venice-Sumach.
  • Cotis, spar-ribs of Pork.
  • Cotivet, the upper part of a hens or capons neck.
  • Coton, as Coston.
  • Cotouere, as Cottoire.
  • Cotte (for Cote) de maille, a coat of mail.
  • Cotté, coated.
  • Cotte-maillé, armed with a coat of mail.
  • Cotté, underpropped.
  • Cotter, for appuyer, to underprop.
  • Cottereux, as Cotereaux.
  • Cotterie, a servile Tenure, not held in Fee, and yielding only Rent.
  • Cottier, as Roturier in the N. D.
  • Cottierement, ignobly, s rvilely.
  • Cottir, to knock heads together, to crush, or bruise.
  • Cottité, a particular mans rate, part, or portion of an Assessment.
  • Cottizer, Cottization, as Cotiser, Cotisation, in the N. D.
  • Cottoire de Perles, a chain of Pearls.
  • Cotton, for Coton, cotton.
  • Cottonneux, full of cotton, soft as cotton.
  • Cotonniere, the herb Chass-weed, or Cotton-weed.
  • Cottonere, as Cottoire.
  • Coturniqué, in buskins.
  • Cotyle, an ancient measure, contain­ing about 24 spoonfuls.
  • Cotyledons, the mouths or ends of the menstrual veins, whereby the superfluous bloud of all the body falls into the Womb, and gives nourishment unto the Child there, if there be any.
  • Cou, a Whetstone.
  • Couäne, all foamy, or frothy.
  • Couänne, the skin of bacon.
  • Couarder, to play the coward.
  • Couät, the underling, or starveling of any beast or bird.
  • Couble, as Chevaux de couble, pairs, or couples of horses.
  • Coubte, for coude, the elbow.
  • Couchable, sit to be lien on.
  • Couchement, a lying, or laying down.
  • Couche-m'-icy, the weed called Dodder.
  • Coucheur, a layer down; also a bed­fellow.
  • Couchille, the Scarlet-oak.
  • Couchine, the name of a certain apple.
  • Coucon, the little bottom or clue of silk spun by the Silk-worm.
  • Coucourbe, Coucourde, a round Gourd; also a kind of large Stil­latory; or as Courge.
  • Coucourelle, the name of a certain fig.
  • Coudé, standing elbow-wise.
  • Coudeer, to jog with the elbow.
  • Coudepied, the instep.
  • Coudiere, any thing to lean upon with his elbows.
  • Coudoyer, as Coudeer.
  • Coudraye, as Couldraye.
  • Coudre, a Filherd, Hasel, or Small­nut-tree; also their fruit.
  • Coudré, tanned.
  • Coudrer, to tan.
  • Coudroir, a Tan-pit.
  • Couë, for queuë, a tail.
  • Couë, tail d, having a tail.
  • Couët, the name of a certain ap­ple.
  • Couëts, two ropes belongi [...]g to the [Page] mizzen-sail of a ship.
  • Couëtte, a tick to lie or sit on.
  • Coufler, to swell, or be puffed up.
  • Cougourde, Congourle, Couhourde, a bottle-gourd, the round-gourd whereof bottles are made.
  • Couillage, a Tribute paid in times past by Priests for Licenses to keep Wenches.
  • Couillards, as Clide; or certain round and ringing pieces of iron, which in old time they used to shoot out of ships.
  • Couillatris, well-hanged between the legs.
  • Couillebarbe, the name of a cidar-apple.
  • Couilleu, stoned, or that wants not his stones.
  • Couinne, the skin of bacon.
  • Couïonnade, as Coyonnade.
  • Coulac, the shad-fish.
  • Coulagion, the running of a sore, &c.
  • Coulans d'un Jardinier, a Gar­diner's lines, wherewith he mea­sures out his beds and plots.
  • Coulant de riviere, the stream of a river.
  • Couldier, a dwarf.
  • Couldoye, à couldoye, made with an nut-neck like an elbow-
  • Couldrasse, a hedge-toad, a land-toad.
  • Couldray, Couldraye, a plot of small nut-trees.
  • Couldré, as Coudré.
  • Couldrer, as Coudrer.
  • Couldroir, as Coudroir.
  • Coulée, a running of liquor.
  • Coule-sang, a certain Viper by whom a man being bitten, he bleeds to death.
  • Coulet, for Collet, a collar.
  • Couletage, Droict de Couletage, a penny, or half-penny-toll collected and taken of all Wares, or Mer­chandise bought and sold.
  • Couleurée, the Herb Briony.
  • Coulevriner, as Couleuvriner.
  • Couleuvré, Couleuvrin, made after the fashion of an Adder.
  • Couleuvreau, a young Adder.
  • Couleuvriner, to squat, lurk, or lie close; also to glide along.
  • Coulier, for Collier, chollar.
  • Coullebobes, the herb Alcakengy.
  • Coullon, as Coulon.
  • Couloir (Adj.) Callander-like.
  • Coulomb, as Coulon.
  • Coulombier, a Pigeo [...]-ho [...]s .
  • Coulomne, for Colomne, a pillar.
  • Coulon, a Do [...], a Pigeon.
  • Coulonëre, a Culla [...]der; a [...]so a channel, gutter, or any such hol­low along which melted things are to run.
  • Coulouöir, a sliding blow.
  • Coulouré, coloured.
  • Coulourer, for Colorer, to colour.
  • Coulpe, misdeed, fault, offence.
  • Coulper, to blame, to tax, or finde fault with.
  • Coultel, a knife.
  • Coulure, a gentle running, or sliding along; a leaking; a straining.
  • Counil, a Coney, or Rabbet.
  • Counille, a Doe-coney.
  • Counilleau, a young Rabbet.
  • Counin, as Counil.
  • Coupant, a spade, or such another earth-cutting Instument of hus­bandry.
  • Coupau, a Cuckold; also a green Goose.
  • Coupe-bourse, a Cut-purse.
  • Coupement, a cutting.
  • Coupe-oreille, a knife wherewith the ears of Rogues and petty Thieves are cut off.
  • Coupe-queuë, as deux mots à cou­pe-queuë, two words and there's an end.
  • Couperet, a Butchers knife, or clea­ver.
  • Coupet, top, or crest.
  • Coupeuse, a woman that reaps, or cuts Grapes in the time of Vin­tage.
  • Coupeux, cutting, sit to cut. Denis coupeuses, the fore-teeth.
  • Coupier, a Cup-bearer.
  • Couplot de bois, the foot of a serve, &c.
  • Coupon, a great cup, or bowl; also a tray of wood; also a cut of.
  • Coup-orbe, red pimples on the face.
  • Couppe, for Coupe, a cup.
  • Couppebourse, as Coupebourse.
  • Couppelettes de gland, Acorn-cups.
  • Coupperer, as Couperet.
  • Couppier, as Coupier.
  • Couppon, as Coupon.
  • Courance, a squirt.
  • Courans, as Coulans.
  • Courbassé, crook-shouldered.
  • Cour-baston, a short cadgel.
  • Courbatu, worn out, or grown croo­ked with toyling and moyling; also foundered.
  • Courbature, the foundering of a horse.
  • Courbe, a crooked, or bowing piece of timber. Courbes d'une Voul­te, the arching of a Vault.
  • Courbée, as Corvée in the N. D.
  • Courbe-espine, the name of an apple.
  • Courcaillée de cailles, the calling of Quails.
  • Courcie, the Coursey, part of a Galley.
  • Courde, a Gourd.
  • Courdier, a Gourd-plant.
  • Courement, a running.
  • Courin, for Cousin, Cosen.
  • Courle, a Pumpkin.
  • Courlis, a Curlew.
  • Courmaran, a Cormorant.
  • Couroye, for Conroye, a thong.
  • Couroyer, to tan leather.
  • Courpendu, as Capendu in the N. D.
  • Courquaillet, a Quail-pipe.
  • Courracteur, as Courratier.
  • Courran, as Courreau.
  • Courratage, Courraterie, brokage; horse-coursing; busie dealing, or intermeddling between party and party.
  • Courratier, a Broker; also a Mes­senger, or Foot-post. Courratier de chevaux, a Horse-courser.
  • Courreau d'une huisserie, the bolt, or bar of a door.
  • Courretage, as Courratage.
  • Courretier, as Courratier.
  • Courroucément, Courrouceusement, angrily.
  • Courroyer, for Conroyer, to dress leather.
  • Coursable, current.
  • Coursaire, for Corsaire, a Corsair.
  • Courserot, a little Corsair; also a little Courser, or horse of service.
  • Coursey, as Courson.
  • Coursie, as Coureie.
  • Coursier (Adj.) belonging, or like unto a Courser.
  • Coursiere, the Grating in a Man of War.
  • Coursis, swist.
  • Courson, a young Vine-branch, or shoot reserved for store.
  • Coursouër, as Escoursouër.
  • Court, for Cour, Court.
  • Cour, for Court, short.
  • Court-baston, as Cour-baston.
  • Court-d'aleaume, the name of a bitter-sweet apple.
  • Courtes-fes [...]es, a short-arse.
  • Court-festu, drawing of cats.
  • Courtil, a back-yard, or garden.
  • Courtilliere, a kinde of palmer.
  • Courtinages, curtains.
  • Courtineau, a little curtain.
  • Courtisanie, Courtship.
  • Courtisanne, for Courtisane, a Lady.
  • Courtisanneau, a petty Courtier.
  • Courtisanner, to play the Courtier.
  • Courvé, for Courbé, bent, or bowed.
  • Courver, to bend, or bow.
  • [Page] Couse, a jest.
  • Cousiner, to claim kindred for ad­vantage.
  • Cousinette, the name of an Apple.
  • Coussegail, meslin, corn mingled.
  • Cousser, to butt, or jurr, as Rams do.
  • Cousseur, a butter, a jurrer.
  • Coussi, the name of a small black grape.
  • Coussineux, stored with cushions; soft as a cushion.
  • Cousson, the gusset of a shirt or smock; also a mite, or weevil.
  • Coust, Coustange, cost, charge, ex­pence.
  • Coustangueux, costly, chargeable.
  • Coustau, as Côtau, a little hill.
  • Coustelet, a little knife.
  • Cousteleux, full of knives.
  • Coustement, costs, and charges.
  • Couste-pointe, for Courte-pointe, a counterpoint.
  • Cousteux, costly.
  • Coustier, wide; also as Cottier.
  • Coustil, as Coutil.
  • Coustilier, Coustillier, an Armour-bearer unto a Knight; also a Groom of a stable.
  • Coustre, as Coultre.
  • Coustumerie, a Custome-levying or taking; also a place where Cu­stome is due.
  • Coustumier, a customary Tenant, a Copy-holder.
  • Coustumier (Adj.) customary, usual. Bourse coustumiere, a purchase of lana made, or price given for a purchase by a Yeoman or Rotu­rier. Païs Coustumier, a Coun­try governed by particular Cu­stoms. Quint Coustumier, the Portion of younger Brethren left by their father, being (by the cu­stome of divers places) a fifth part only divided among them.
  • Coustumierement, customarily, usu­ally.
  • Coustumiers, old and experienced Lawyers, able to inform the Court what the Law and local Customs are in any case.
  • Cousturiere, for Lingere, a Seam­ster.
  • Cousturiers, certain long Muscles in the outward part of the thigh, which they make pliable to cross one leg over another.
  • Cousyre, Comfrey.
  • Coutau, for Côtau, a little hill.
  • Coute. See Coutes.
  • Coutelasse sur le visage, a flesh over the face with a cuttelas.
  • Coutelassé, slashed, or cut with a cuttelas.
  • Coutelasser, to slash, or cut with a cuttelas.
  • Couteleu, the Pyrot, or hag-fish.
  • Coutes, the seams, or distances that are between plank and plank in a ship.
  • Coutil, a flock-bed.
  • Coutillade, a cut made by an edge-tool.
  • Couton, a faggot-stick, or the thick stalk of cabbage, &c.
  • Coutonner, to cudgel, to bast.
  • Coutre, for Coteret, a faggot made of great sticks.
  • Coutrepoincter, as Contrepointer, in the N. D.
  • Couvade, as ouvée, in the N. D.
  • Couvaison, a brooding.
  • Couve-cendre, a lazy houswife.
  • Couveleque, the lid of a pot.
  • Couveresse, a sitting hen.
  • Couvertoir, a trick, or engine wherewith water-fowl is caught.
  • Couvi, oeuf couvi, an addle egg.
  • Couvine, the canning carriage of a business.
  • Couvoir, a hens nest, also the top of a bed in a garden.
  • Couvoiter, for Convoiter, to covet.
  • Couvrailles, gossymear.
  • Couvre-coeur, the Pericardium.
  • Couvrement, the act of covering.
  • Couvre-ordure, gold; also a wo­mans mask.
  • Couvre-rive, covering the bank.
  • Couyol, as Coyon.
  • Coy, a sink.
  • Coyau, a returned (or hip) rafter.
  • Coyed, as Cayer, in the N. D.
  • Coyement, quietly.
  • Coymeux, a kinde of Cherries.
  • Coyon, a coward.
  • Coyonnade, Coyonnerie, a coward­ly trick.
  • Coypellé, chipped, cut as a stick.
  • Coypeller, to chip, to cut a stick.
  • Coyraul, as Coiraux.
  • Coyté, [...].
  • Coytes. ta [...], great ropes used about the Main-sail of a ship.
  • Coytis, ti k, be [...]-ti k.
  • Coyts, as Coites.
  • Crabbat, comely.
  • Crabron, a [...] [...].
  • Crac, a crack, or thing that cracks.
  • Crachard, for crac [...] it, spittle.
  • Crache-en-ruelle, [...] spawling fel­low.
  • Crache-sil, [...]-pinning, as a [...]pi [...]er.
  • Crage, chalk.
  • Craies, choak-pears.
  • Crailler, as Croailler.
  • Craine, for crane, the scull.
  • Crainser, to shrink, also to crackle.
  • Cramaillere, for Cremaliere, a pot-hook.
  • Cramas, stones torn from rocks by tempest, &c.
  • Crampelle, the name of a fish.
  • Cramponnet, a little cramp-iron.
  • Cranequin, the gaffle of a cross-bow; also as Crennequin.
  • Cranequinier, a cross-bow-man; or as Crennequinier; also an infe­riour Officer, that had of old the care of warlike Engines.
  • Crannequin, as Crancquin.
  • Crapaudaille, a pack of rogues.
  • Crapaudeau, Crapaudon, a little toad.
  • Crappe, the crab-fish called a Pun­gar.
  • Crapule, drunken surfeiting.
  • Craquant, Craquetant, cracking.
  • Craquetis, an often cracking.
  • Cras, chalk,
  • Crasseusement, slovenly, greasily.
  • Crassi, a certain Indian coyn.
  • Crassitie, crassitude, grosness.
  • Cravant, a kinde of goose.
  • Cravanté, overwhelmed.
  • Cravanter, to overwhelm.
  • Crayé, chalked.
  • Crayement, a chalking.
  • Crayer, to chalk.
  • Creable, for croyable, credible.
  • Creac, Creal, a Sturgeon. Creac de buse, a Scate-fish.
  • Creancer, to promise; also to taste another mans meat or drink.
  • Credence, for creance, faith, be­lief.
  • Credible, for croyable, credible.
  • Crediteur, for Creancier, a Credi­tor.
  • Credos, as qui fait credos charge son dos, he that lendeth often loo [...]th.
  • Cree, chalk.
  • Creiche, for Creche, a rack, a [...]a [...]ger.
  • Cremaillée, [...] Cremaliere) a pot- [...]ange [...].
  • Cre [...]t, [...]earing, dreading.
  • Crema [...]cres, [...]o [...]inews o [...] Muscles, wher by t [...] cods [...].
  • Cremeau, as Cresmeau.
  • Cremeu, [...].
  • Cremillée, Cremillere, a pot hang r.
  • Cremer, to pear, to dr [...]ad.
  • Cren, Crené, a snip in a knife, tool, &c. also a [...] th [...] nib of a pe [...].
  • [Page] Crené, snipped, notched, indented.
  • Creneau, for recoin, a nook, or cor­ner.
  • Creneleure, a making into Battle­ments.
  • Crenequin, as Cranequin, or Cren­nequin.
  • Creneure, a nicking, notching, in­denting.
  • Crenne, as Cren.
  • Crennequin, as Cranequin; also a kinde of horse-mans head-piece like a Helmet.
  • Crennequinier, as Cranequinier.
  • Crenquinier, a Serjeant, or Officer that can serve Executions.
  • Crenure, as Creneure, and as Cren.
  • Crepature, a cracking asunder.
  • Crepelu, as Crespelu.
  • Crepets, or Crepez, Fritters, also Wafers.
  • Crepillé, frizzed, curled.
  • Crepiller, to frizzle, or curl.
  • Crepissage, a pargetting.
  • Crepitation, a ratling noise.
  • Creppe, for crepe, crape.
  • Crepusculin, of the twi-light.
  • Crescent, an half-moon.
  • Creseau, Kersie.
  • Creseul, a Crucible.
  • Cresme, as Chresme in the N. D.
  • Cresmeau, as Chrêmeau in the N. D.
  • Cresnette, a Pen-knife.
  • Crespe, Cipres, also Cobweb-lawn. Crespe de chaperon, the crepine of a French hood.
  • Crespé, crisped, crisp.
  • Crespelet, a little crisp.
  • Crespelure, a c [...]ling, o [...] ru [...]fling.
  • Crespément, cripingly.
  • Cresper, to crack, or screek; also to crash between the teeth; to crisp; to sleek.
  • Crespiller, Crespillonner, to crisp.
  • Crespillé, Crespillonné, crisped.
  • Crespinette, a kind of Knot-grass.
  • Crespon, a curled lock.
  • Cresserelle, as Crecerelle in the N. D.
  • Cressiner, to crack.
  • Cressonadiere, Cressonnerie, a bed of Cresses.
  • Cresteaux, Battlements.
  • Crestelé, having Battlements.
  • Crete, gay, spruce, or neat.
  • Cretisme, a lying.
  • Cretonart, the drug termed Zedoa­ry.
  • Cretons, crispy pieces or mammocks of Lard.
  • Crevacé, for crevassé, chinked.
  • Crevailles, bursting.
  • Crevellé, imbattled.
  • Crevette, a Shrimp, or Prawn.
  • Creveure, a chink.
  • Crezion, a Crucible.
  • Criage, a crying, the Cryers Office, or his fee.
  • Criaillement, a bawling.
  • Criblage, a sifting.
  • Cribleux, full of holes as a sive.
  • Cride, a publick Cryer.
  • Cridons, certain thick hairs of a pins length.
  • Crie, a cry, a Cryers fee, a Cryer.
  • Crignon, a field-Cricket, or Grass­hopper.
  • Criminalité, a criminal action.
  • Crimination, a charging with a crime.
  • Criminatoire, criminal.
  • Crimineux, full of crimes.
  • Crineux, hairy.
  • Criniere, a hair-cloth; a hood for a horse; an armour for the neck or mane of a horse; a lock of hair.
  • Crinon, Cricket.
  • Cripaulme, Motherwort.
  • Criquebilles, the privy parts.
  • Criquemelette, a hussing wench.
  • Criquer, for Criqueter, to give a crack.
  • Criquement, a rattling, or bustling.
  • Crissant, cra [...]hing.
  • Cristalin, of, or belonging to Chry­stal, or Chrystal-like.
  • Critiqueur, a Critick.
  • Croac, the croaking of Ravens, Frogs, or Toads.
  • Croaceux, croaking as a Raven, &c.
  • Croailler, Croaillement, and Cro­aillerie. See Croasser, and Cro­assement in the N. D.
  • Croailleur, a croaker.
  • Croailleux, often croaking.
  • Croaquer, to croak as a Raven.
  • Croasseur, one that croaks like a Raven, or Toad.
  • Croce, for Crosse, a Crosier.
  • Crocer, to play at Cricket.
  • Crocette, a Vine-slip.
  • Croceux, as Croaceux.
  • Croché, hooked.
  • Crochement des dents, the outward bending of the teeth.
  • Crocheterie, a picking of locks.
  • Crocheton, a silver coin so called.
  • Crochue, a Quaver in Musick.
  • Crochuement, as Crochement.
  • Crociteur a pick-lock.
  • Crocodilée, a M dicine made of some parts of a Crocodile.
  • Crocomagnie, an Oyntment made of Saffron, also the dregs of Saffron-oyl.
  • Crocquer, as Croquer.
  • Crocqueter, as Croqueter.
  • Crocute, a kind of Monster.
  • Croie, for craie, Chalk.
  • Croier, as Croyer.
  • Croisadeur, that makes the signe of the cross.
  • Croiseau, a stock-dove.
  • Croiset, for Creuset, a Crucible.
  • Croisette, a little cross.
  • Croiseur, one that sets or marks a cross on any thing.
  • Croisi, as Croiseau.
  • Croisie, a cross, a crossing, or mar­king with a cross.
  • Croissance, growth, increase.
  • Croisset, a green frog.
  • Croissette, as Crocette.
  • Croissir, to crack.
  • Croist, growth, increase.
  • Croizer, for Croiser, to cross.
  • Crolant, as bois crolant d'un La­dre, a Lazers-clack, or clicket.
  • Cronique, as Chronique in the N. D.
  • Crope, Croppe, the top of a hill.
  • Croppiere, for croupiere, a crup­per.
  • Croqué, cracked, snatched.
  • Croque-jarret, one that goes in with his hams.
  • Croque-lardon, a smell-feast.
  • Croque-mouche, a fly-catcher.
  • Croque-noisette, a nut-cracker.
  • Croque-notaire, a Protonotary.
  • Croque-quenouille, he that is beaten by his wife with a distaff.
  • Croquer, to crack; to catch, or snatch.
  • Croqueter, to pick out the best bits; also to feed greedily.
  • Croqueterie, gormandizing.
  • Croqueteur, a gormandizer, a gree­dy feeder.
  • Cros, deep holes digged into the earth to preserve corn in.
  • Crosilles, the shells which Pilgrims near about their hats.
  • Croslé, shaken.
  • Crosler, to shake, or quake.
  • Croslier, shaking, quaking.
  • Crosliere, a quag [...]ire.
  • Croslir, to gnash.
  • Crosser, to play at Cricket.
  • Crossette, as Crocette.
  • Crostes, as crottes.
  • Crot, a grot.
  • Crotaphiques, the two muscles of the Temples.
  • Crotenotaire, as Croquenotaire.
  • [Page] Crotes, as Crottes.
  • Crotesque, as Grotesque in the N. D.
  • Croton, as Crotton.
  • Crotpescheret, a kind of black Os­prey.
  • Crotton, a deep hole, a filthy dun­geon.
  • Crouäcement, Crouäs, the croaking of Ravens.
  • Crouë d'un Pressoir, the uppermost board of a Press, and the hole there­of whereinto the Vice-pin enters.
  • Crouillet, the latch of a door.
  • Croule-Univers, all shaking.
  • Croulier, as prez crousier, quag­mire-like, shaking under ones feet.
  • Crouliere, a quagmire.
  • Croupant, creoching. Eau crou­pante, puddle-water.
  • Crousille, the shell-fish called a Scal­lop.
  • Crousiller entre les dents, to crash between the teeth.
  • Crousteau, a great crust, or great scab.
  • Crouslelevé, bescabbed, full of the pox.
  • Crousteleveure, scabbiness, pocki­ness.
  • Croustelles, Croustellettes, little crusts, or scabs.
  • Crouster, to crust, or scab.
  • Crousteux, crusty.
  • Croustons, sharp flinty stones.
  • Croutelevé, as Croustelevé.
  • Croyé, chalked.
  • Croyer, to chalk.
  • Croyeux, chalkie.
  • Crucher, to crouch; also to make hollow like a pitcher.
  • Crucheter, to whisper.
  • Cruchette, a little pitcher.
  • Crucial, cross-like.
  • Crucié, tortured, tormented.
  • Crucier, to torture, to torment.
  • Crucifiement, a crucifying.
  • Crucifix, for Crucifié, crucifi'd.
  • Crucigeres, Cross-bearers.
  • Cruelisé, cruelly used.
  • Cruente, le flux cruente, the bloudy flux.
  • Crujon, Cruon, any round thing, as a mans scull.
  • Crural, of, or belonging to the thigh.
  • Cruzol, Cruzeul, a Founders mould.
  • Crytoportique, a secret walk, or vault under ground.
  • Crysolyte, for Crysolite, a Chryso­lite.
  • Crystalin, for crystal, Crystal.
  • Cubaseau, the little Sea-nettle.
  • Cubebes, Cubebs, an Aromatical and Indian fruit.
  • Cubiculaire, a Groom of the Cham­ber.
  • Cubiculaire (Adj.) of, or belonging to the Chamber.
  • Cubital, of, or belonging to a cubit.
  • Cucube, night-shade.
  • Cucurbite, a Gourd.
  • Cucurbitin, of, or belonging to Gourds.
  • Cucuye, the name of a bird.
  • Cueillement, Cueilleure, a gather­ing.
  • Cuens, an Earl.
  • Cueur, for coeur, the heart.
  • Cueurs, the heart-resembling cher­ries.
  • Cueut, a whetstone.
  • Cueux de plomb, a sow of lead.
  • Cuferin, a horses running at the nose.
  • Cuidé, thought.
  • Cuider, to think.
  • Cuidance, Cuider, thinking.
  • Cuidereau, a Braggadochio.
  • Cuideur, a thinker.
  • Cuidrelles, as Cuydrelles.
  • Cuigner, to hold open with wed­ges.
  • Cuignet, a little corner; also a lit­tle wedge.
  • Cuilier, for cueiller, a spoon.
  • Cuiliere, a ladle.
  • Cuin, a wedge.
  • Cuirace, for Cuirasse, armour.
  • Cuirain, leathern-stuff.
  • Cuirasseux, thick and stiff as a hide.
  • Cuirassine, a slight armour.
  • Cuirie, a leathern Jerkin.
  • Cuissant, for cuisant, smarting.
  • Cuisinal, of, or belonging to a kit­chin.
  • Cuisinement, a dressing of meat.
  • Cuisineux, fit for Cookery, belong­ing to the kitchin.
  • Cuissal, for Cuissar, an armour for the thigh.
  • Cuissedame, the name of a kind of pear.
  • Cuisselette, Cuissette, a little thigh.
  • Cuisse-né, thigh-born.
  • Cuissier, of, or belonging to the thigh.
  • Cuissinet, for coussinet, a little cu­shion.
  • Cuissots, tasses, armour for the thighs.
  • Cuite, a seething, or baking.
  • Cuivreux, full of copper.
  • Culace, Culason, for Culasse, the breech of a gun.
  • Culant, setting on his tail.
  • Culassé, foiled, thrown down.
  • Culasseur, one that foils, or sets ano­ther on his tail.
  • Culeron, the hinder part of the but­tocks of a horse.
  • Culetage, Culetis, a leacherous mo­tion of the back-side.
  • Culeter, to stir the buttocks up and down.
  • Culette, for Culasse, the breech of a gun.
  • Culier, of, or belonging to the arse.
  • Culiere, a crupper for a horse.
  • Culinaire, of, or belonging to a kit­chin.
  • Cul-levé, level-coyl.
  • Cullot, as Culot; also a cushion made to ride post on.
  • Culpe d'un artichau, the pulp or substance of an Artichoke.
  • Cul-pelé, bald-arst.
  • Culrage, as curage.
  • Culte (Adj.) elaborate.
  • Cultellaire, of a knife, like a knife.
  • Cultivage, Cultivation, Cultivement, tillage.
  • Cultiveur, a labourer.
  • Cume (for cuve) de pressoir, the trough which receives the liquor expressed.
  • Cumulativement, abundantly, by heaps.
  • Cumulé, heaped up.
  • Cumuler, to heap up.
  • Cunctation, delay.
  • Cuneiforme, wedge-like.
  • Cuniculeux, full of inward holes, or by-corners.
  • Cunilage, Winter-savoury.
  • Cunoet, a Kennet-apple.
  • Cupide, desirous, greedy.
  • Cupule, the cup of an acorn.
  • Curage, the herb Arsesmart.
  • Curailles de maison, the sweepings of a house.
  • Curarion, cure.
  • Cure, for soin, care, heed, or re­gard.
  • Curestable, a Groom.
  • Curette, a Surgeons Probe.
  • Cureures, as Curailles.
  • Curial, of, or belonging to a Court.
  • Curialiste, a Courtier.
  • Curialité, courtship.
  • Curie, a Tribe, or Ward in a Ci­ty.
  • Curin, a thin (or small) skin.
  • Curoir, as Curette.
  • Curtille, a kind of Vermine.
  • Curtin, the name of an apple.
  • [Page] Cuscoamy, Cuscouil, well hanged, well stoned.
  • Cuscute, a kind of worm; also the weed Dodder.
  • Cusins, Win-berries.
  • Cussonné, worm-eaten.
  • Custode (for Gardien) a Guardi­an. Custode de lit, a bed-cur­tain.
  • Cutané, skinny, or of the skin.
  • Cuticulaire, full of Pores for sweat to come out at.
  • Cuvée, a tub full of.
  • Cuvelier, a Tub-maker.
  • Cuviel, Cuvier, a Bathing-tub; al­so a Dying-fat, or lead.
  • Cuviere, a Cestern to cool drinking-pots in Summer.
  • Cuyderolles, Cuydrelles, Crow-flow­ers.
  • Cuyrassine, as Cuirassine.
  • Cuyvre, for cuivre, copper.
  • Cuyvreux, full of copper.
  • Cyané, Azure.
  • Cyathe, a kind of measure.
  • Cyboïde, Os Cyboïde, a certain bone in the instep.
  • Cyclamine, the herb Hogs-bread; the wilde Vine; Wood-night­shade.
  • Cyclopique, one-eyed.
  • Cycogne, for Cigogne, a Stork.
  • Cycogneau, a young Stork.
  • Cyerce, the North-wind.
  • Cygnean, like a Swan, of, or be­longing to a Swan.
  • Cygneur, a Swan-keeper.
  • Cymace, Cymas, as Cymaise in the N. D.
  • Cymacion, Cymat, a small Ogee in building.
  • Cymettes. See Cyme in the N. D.
  • Cymier, as Cimier in the N. D.
  • Cymiti [...]re, for Cimetiere, a Church­yard.
  • Cynabre, for Cinnabre, Cinoper.
  • Cynamolge, an Arabian bird that used to suck bitches.
  • Cynanthropie, a sort of Frensie.
  • Cynie, for Cynique, a Cynick.
  • Cyniphe, a Gnat, or Dog-fly.
  • Cyniphé, dogged.
  • Cynocephale, a Baboon.
  • Cyntre, as Cintre in the N. D.
  • Cyon, a Whirlwind.
  • Cypere, a kind of Reed.
  • Cypressier, of, or belonging to a Cy­pras-tree-
  • Cyre, as Sire in the N. D.
  • Cyron, for ciron, a ha [...]d-worm.
  • Cyronne, a Sear-cloth.
  • Cys [...]mbre, water-mint.
  • Cystique, the name of a v [...]in.
  • Cythariser, to sing, or whizze as the wind.
  • Cyvade, a Shrimp, or Prawn.

D

  • DAbblée, as Dablée.
  • Dabbordée, at first sight.
  • Dablée, a crop of corn, corn-grow­ing.
  • Daces, tolls.
  • Dacier, a Toll-gatherer.
  • Dacque, the name of a weed.
  • Dacte, for datte, a Date.
  • Dactier, for datier, the Palm, or Date-tree.
  • Dactilaire, of, or belonging to a Date; also Date-like.
  • Dactilomantie, singer-magick.
  • Dactylogie, speech made with the fingers.
  • Dadée, childish toy.
  • Daemon, for Demon, a Devil.
  • Dagard, a young male Deer.
  • Dagasse, a great dagger.
  • Dagobert, the name of a pear.
  • Dagorie, the name of an apple.
  • Dagorne, decrepit.
  • Dague, for epée, a sword,
  • Daguenet, Daguette, a little dag­ger.
  • Daguer, to stab with a dagger.
  • Dail, a sithe to mow with.
  • Daille, the name of a Shell-fish.
  • Dain, for Daim, a Deer.
  • Dain (Adj.) dainty.
  • Dainceau, as Dainteau.
  • Daine, Daing, the name of a Sea-fish.
  • Dainteau, a young Fallow-deer.
  • Daintiers, the doucets of a Deer.
  • Daissellé, made of, or covered with boards.
  • Dalader, a kind of fruitless pri­vet.
  • Daldre, Dale, the name of a Fle­mish Coin.
  • Dalle, a sink.
  • Damage, damage, hurt.
  • Damaisine, a Dams [...]n.
  • Damasceure, Damasquinage, Da­mask-work.
  • Damastic, a kind of Varnish.
  • Dameret, as Damoiseau in the N. D.
  • Damoisel, a young Gentleman.
  • Damoiselet, Gentlewoman-like.
  • Damoiselette, a little Gentlewoman.
  • Damoiselle, for Demoiselle, a Gen­tlewoman.
  • Dam [...]on, the name of an apple.
  • Da [...]din, a M [...]ac [...]ck.
  • Dandiner, to gape and look like an Ass.
  • Dandrilles. See Dendrille.
  • Dansement, Danserie, a dancing.
  • Danseresse, a woman-dancer.
  • Danspied, the hollow part of the sole of the foot.
  • Dante, the name of an Indian beast.
  • Daphnomantie, divination by a Laurel or Bay-tree.
  • Dapifer, the great Master or Stew­ard of the Kings house.
  • Darceau, as Derceau.
  • Dardanaire, Dardanier, an Ingros­ser of any Commodity.
  • Darde, the name of a boyish play.
  • Darderesse, a woman that casteth a dart.
  • Darde-tonnerre, thunder-shooting.
  • Dardeur, a thrower of a dart.
  • Dardiller, to shake like a dart cast with violence.
  • Dare, a huge big belly.
  • Darioles, a kind of small Pasties.
  • Dariolette, a Bawd, or carrier of Love-messages.
  • Darne, a slice.
  • Dassez, fully, enough.
  • Date, piss, urine.
  • Datil, a Date.
  • Dation, a gift, or giving.
  • Dauber, as Dober, to beat.
  • Davesnes, Horse-plums.
  • Davier, a pinser to draw out teeth withal; also a kind of pick-lock.
  • Davoines, as Davesnes.
  • Daurade, for Dorade, the Guilt­head.
  • Daurée, as Dorée.
  • Dausse d'ail, a clove of Garlick.
  • se Dausser, to be divided into seve­ral parts or cloves, like a head of Garlick.
  • Daymon, for Demon, a Devil.
  • Day, as Ders.
  • Dealbatoire, whitening.
  • Deambulatif, and Deambulatoire, as Ambulatif.
  • Debaccher, Debaquer, to take on like a drunken man.
  • Debagouler, to utter madly.
  • Debail, a Guardian.
  • Debardeur, a Lighter-man.
  • Debatable, subject to opposition.
  • Debatement, a debating.
  • Debateur, a debater, contender.
  • Debatis, the unquiet flattering of a Hawk.
  • Debauchement, as Desbauchement.
  • Debellé, conq [...]ed, sab [...]d.
  • Debeller, to conq [...]r, o [...] subdue.
  • De [...]endade, for Debandade. c [...]s [...] ­sion, want of order.
  • [Page] Debexiller, to break into pieces.
  • Debiffé, razed, or scraped out; split asunder.
  • Debiffer, to raze, or scrape out. Se debiffer, to split asunder.
  • Debilitation, a weakning.
  • Debiller, to unlose the rope of a boat, &c.
  • Debitage, retailage.
  • Debite, Debitement, for Debit, sale.
  • Deblée, as Desblée.
  • Debleure, corn-standing.
  • Deboire, an after-tast, which an unsavoury thing leaves behinde in the mouth.
  • Deboité, for Deboëté, put out of joynt.
  • Debonnairement, graciously.
  • Debonnaireté, graciousness.
  • Debosquer, to rush out of a wood.
  • Debourrer, as Desbourrer.
  • Debouté, rejected.
  • Deboutement, a rejecting.
  • Debouter, to reject.
  • Debradé, unarmed.
  • Debraguetter, to unty the Codpiece.
  • Debranchi, lopped.
  • Debranchir, to lop a tree.
  • Debrigandé, stript naked.
  • Debrisé, split asunder; also nimbly footed in dancing.
  • Debrisement, Debrissure, for De­bris, wrack.
  • Debriser, to split asunder.
  • Debteur, for Debiteur, a debtor.
  • Decadenasser, to undo a padlock; also to resolve a riddle.
  • Decal d'argent, want of allay in silver.
  • Decaller, to slacken, or grow soft.
  • Decaptivé, set at liberty.
  • Decaptiver, to set at liberty.
  • Decartelé, quartered.
  • Decempedal, ten foot long.
  • Decence, decency.
  • Decentement, decently.
  • Deceptif, deceitful.
  • Deception, deceit.
  • Decerclé, uncircled.
  • Decercler, to uncircle.
  • Decevable, deceivable, also deceit­ful.
  • Decevance, deceit.
  • Decevant, Deceveur, a deceiver.
  • Dechassement, a driving away.
  • Decheant, decaying.
  • Decidu, fallen off.
  • Decimable, tythable.
  • Decimal, of, or belonging to tythes.
  • Decimesire, of ten months.
  • Decis [...]re, a [...]t to decide.
  • Declaveté, unpegged.
  • Declaveter, to unpeg.
  • Declinement, for Declin, a decli­ning.
  • Decliquer, to rap out.
  • Declive, steep.
  • Declos, wide open.
  • Decognoistre, not to know.
  • Decompter, for déconter, to dis­count.
  • Decore, handsome, comely.
  • Decorement, decoration.
  • Decoucher, as Descoucher.
  • Decoulourement, a discolouring.
  • Decoulourer, for decolorer, to dis­colour.
  • Decourir, to run down; also to purge downwards.
  • Decouronné, uncrowned.
  • Decouronner, to uncrown.
  • Decouru, run down; also purged downwards.
  • Decoustemens, costs and charges.
  • Decramponné, unhooked.
  • Decramponner, to unhook.
  • Decrasse, scowred.
  • Decrasser, to scower.
  • Decrepité, for decrepit, decrepite, very old.
  • Decrepiteux, the same.
  • Decretaliarche, an absolute Com­mander.
  • Decretant, the Creditor, at whose suit the Debtors goods are de­creed to be sold.
  • Decretation, an Order passed in Court for the sale of a Debtors goods, or a proceeding thereby.
  • Decroire, not to believe.
  • Decrustation, a paring off of the crust.
  • Decrusté, bared of crust.
  • Decruster, to pare off the crust.
  • Decuisant, boyling or seething very much.
  • Decuit, boyled or sodden very much; also unsodden, made raw again.
  • Deculpé, discharged of blame.
  • Deculper, to discharge of blame.
  • Decumane, as big as ten.
  • Decuple, ten times as much.
  • Decurie, a band of ten Senators, or Souldiers.
  • Dedalé, intricate, or maze-like.
  • Dedens, for Dedans, in, within.
  • Dedicasse, and Dedication, for Dedicace, a Dedication.
  • Deduite, a deduction.
  • Defaillancé, fainted.
  • Defaille, Defaillement, a default, defect, or sailing; a pining a­way.
  • Defaitte, as Defaite, in the N. D.
  • Defané, unwithered.
  • Defardé, whose painting is wiped off.
  • Defarder, to wipe off painting.
  • Defascher, to appease.
  • Defaucillé, put out of joynt.
  • Defauciller, to put out of joynt.
  • Defaux, the ground or pasture wherein a beast should not be.
  • Defection, defection, or revolt.
  • Defectuosité, defect.
  • Defedation, a defiling.
  • Defence, for Defense, defence.
  • Defendo, the name of a Play.
  • Defensable, Defensible, defensible.
  • Defensif, a kind of medicine.
  • Defensoire, defensory.
  • Defequé, purifi'd.
  • Defequer, to purifie.
  • Defermer, to open.
  • Deferrure, an unshooing of an horse.
  • Defeublé, unmuffled.
  • Defeubler, to unmufflle.
  • Deffaicte, as Defaite in the N. D.
  • Deffaire, and Deffait, as Defaire, and Defait in the N. D.
  • Deffalquer, for Defalquer, to de­faulk.
  • Deffascher, to appease.
  • Deffaveur, Deffavoriser, as Defa­veur and Defavoriser in the N. D.
  • Deffectueux, for Defectueux, de­fective.
  • Deffené, hay-fed.
  • Deffensatrice, a defendress.
  • Deffermé, open.
  • Deffermer, to open.
  • Defferrer, as Deferrer in the N. D.
  • Deffier, Deffiance, as Defier, Defi­ance in the N. D.
  • Deffiamment, diffidently.
  • Deffiler, Deffilé. See them with a single f in the N. D.
  • Deffileure, an untwisting.
  • Deffleurer, as Defleurer in the N. D.
  • Defformité, for difformité, diffor­mity.
  • Deffortune, misfortune.
  • Deffortuné, infortunate.
  • Deffouïr, to dig up.
  • Deffrayer, for Defrayer, to defray.
  • Deffriché, as Defriché in the N. D.
  • Deffroncer, as Defronser in the N. D.
  • Deffrongner, to unwrinkle.
  • Deffroqué, as Defroqué in the N. D.
  • Deffuler, as Defubler.
  • Defiché, unfastened.
  • Deficher, to unfasten.
  • Defiement, a challenging to fight.
  • Defilocher, Defiloter, to ravel.
  • [Page] Definé, pined, or wasted away.
  • Definement, a pining, or wasting a­way. Le definement du monde, the latter end of the world.
  • Definer, to pine, or waste away.
  • Deflamé, quenched.
  • Deflamer, to quench.
  • se Deflicher, to pluck arrows out of his body.
  • Defloration, the change from a flou­rishing colour to the contrary.
  • se Deflorer, to shed or let fall its flowers.
  • Defluer, to flow.
  • Deforcer, to dispossess, to disseise.
  • Deforcé, dispossessed, disseised.
  • Deformé, defaced, disfigured.
  • Deformation, a defacing, a disfi­guring.
  • Deformer, to deface, or disfigure.
  • Defortifié, razed, unfortifi'd.
  • Defortifier, to raze a fortification.
  • Defoulé, trampled on.
  • Defoulement, a trampling on.
  • Defouler, to trample on.
  • Defraudateur, a defrauder.
  • Defraudé, defrauded.
  • Defraudement, a defrauding.
  • Defrauder, to defraud.
  • Defreloqué, tattered.
  • Defreloquer, to make tatters of.
  • Defrichage, as Defrichement in the N. D.
  • Defrichis, grubbings.
  • se Defriper, to scrub with the shoul­ders.
  • Defroissé, crushed in pieces.
  • Defroisser, to crush in pieces.
  • Defroque, spoil, booty.
  • Defroy, a defraying.
  • Defueiller, as Defeuiller in the N. D.
  • Defunctoirement, by descent, or suc­cession after the decease of ano­ther.
  • Degaerie, the Office or Circuit of an Ʋnder-Bayliff.
  • Degalico, waxen poor, gone down the wind.
  • Degan, a kind of Ʋnder-Bayliff.
  • Degasouiller, to sing or warble fast and confusedly.
  • Degasté, destroy'd, ruined, rava­ged.
  • Degastement, a destroying, ruining, or ravaging.
  • Degaster, to destroy, ruine, or ra­vage.
  • Deglouti, devoured.
  • Degloutir, to devour.
  • Deglution, a devouring.
  • Degodalie, skittish.
  • Degondé, lift off the hinges.
  • Degonder, to lift, or heave off the hinges.
  • Degourt, jocund, merry.
  • Degracié, out of favour.
  • Degradement, a degrading.
  • Degravé, ungravelled.
  • Degraver, to ungravel.
  • Degresseur, for Degraisseur, a scow­rer of greasie things.
  • Degroumelé, unclotted.
  • Degroumeler, to unclot a thing that's cluttered.
  • Deguener, for Degainer, to draw his sword.
  • Deguerpi, abandoned.
  • Deguerpir, to abandon.
  • Deguerpissement, an abandoning.
  • Deguerpisseur, that abandons any thing.
  • Deguestré, sloven.
  • Degun, any one.
  • Dehaché, hacked.
  • Dehacher, to hack.
  • Dehait, merry, pleasant.
  • Dehaité, as Dehayté.
  • Dehalé, lean, ill-favoured.
  • Dehayté, loathed as meat, also out of tune.
  • Dehayter, to loath meat, to be out of tune.
  • Dehinch, away hence.
  • Dehonté, shameless.
  • Dehotté, drawn out of the mire.
  • Dehotter, to draw out of the mire.
  • Dehousé, dispatched, rid out of the way; also unbooted.
  • Dehoussé, uncovered; also unrug­ged.
  • Deject, Dejecté, dejected, or cast down.
  • Dejecter, to deject. Se dejecter, to stand on terms.
  • Dejectement, a dejecting; also a contemptible repulse.
  • Deillavier, to starve, to bereave of life.
  • Delâcher, to let go.
  • Delateur, an Informer.
  • Delation, an Information.
  • Delavé, washed away.
  • Delayement, a delaying.
  • Delection, delight.
  • Delecter, to delight.
  • Delez, hard by.
  • Delicateté, delicacy.
  • se Delicter, to cleave asunder.
  • Delineature, delineation.
  • Deliniment, a smoothing.
  • Delinquer, to commit a fault.
  • Deliot, sodden pot-herbs.
  • Delirement, a doting, or raving.
  • Delirer, to dote, to rave.
  • Delitescence, a lurking, or abscon­ding.
  • Delivre, after-birth. A delivre, loosely, freely.
  • Delivreur, a deliverer.
  • Deloché, put out of joynt.
  • Delocher, to put out of joynt.
  • Deloisir, à deloisir, at leisure.
  • Delouër, as Deslouër.
  • Deltoïde, the name of a muscle.
  • Delugé, overslowing.
  • Delurer, to pick.
  • Deluter, to take the dirt off.
  • Demachoiré, unjawed.
  • Demachoirer, to tear a jaw from.
  • Demacqué, spit out of the mouth.
  • Demacquer, to spit out of the mouth.
  • Demainier, an Owner of a Demain.
  • Demaisonné, turned out of a house.
  • Demaisonner, to turn out of a house.
  • Demanché, unhafted.
  • Demange-chair, setting an itch on the flesh.
  • Demangement, Demangerie, an itching.
  • Demangéson, Demangeure (for de­mangeaison) itch.
  • Demantibulé, unjawed.
  • Demaquer, as Demacquer.
  • Demence, madness.
  • Demené (Subst.) a practice.
  • Demenée, a stir, or jog.
  • Demenement, a stirring, or jog­ging.
  • Demener deuil, to lament, or to mourn. Demener joye, to re­joyce. Demener marchandise, to trade. Demener un proces, to follow a suit.
  • se Dementer, to bewail himself. Se dementer de, to medd [...] with.
  • Demeriter, to deserve punishment.
  • Demeurance, a staying, mansion, or dwelling.
  • Demi-ceinct, Demicinct, a half-girdle.
  • Demi-ceinctier, Demicinctier, a maker of half-girdles.
  • Demi-espineux, the name of a muscle.
  • Demi-frere, a half-brother.
  • Demigraine, m [...]gram.
  • Demi-lict, brotherhood, or sisterhood on the one side onely.
  • Demi-membraneux, half-skinny.
  • Demincé, minced, cut small.
  • Demi-nerveux, half-s [...]wy.
  • Demi-saut, a half-leap.
  • Demi-s [...]ur, a half-si ter.
  • Demisphere, an Hemisphere.
  • [Page] Democratiquement, popularly; also scoffingly.
  • Demonachation, an abandoning, or depriving of Monkish profes­sion.
  • Demoniaque (Adj.) devilish, hel­lish.
  • Demonstrance, demonstration.
  • Demoulé, unmoulded.
  • Demouler, to unmould.
  • Demoure, and Demourer, as De­meure, and Demeurer in the N. D.
  • Demourance, as Demeurance.
  • Demoussé, rid (or bared) of moss.
  • Demousser, to rid (or bare) of moss.
  • Demusser, to uncover the eyes.
  • Demy-ceinct, as Demi-ceinct.
  • Demyon, the quarter of a French pint.
  • Demy-teste, a steel-cap.
  • Denaire, the number of ten, or a tenth.
  • Dendrille, the rag wherewith a leaking tub is stopped; also a mans privities.
  • Deneanti, abased.
  • Deneantir, to abase.
  • Deneantise, extream baseness, or vil [...] ­ness.
  • Denegation, a denying.
  • Denerée, Ware, Merchandise.
  • Denerver, to weaken.
  • Deniement, a denial.
  • Denommé, denominated.
  • Denommer, to denominate.
  • Denouncement, a denouncing.
  • Dense, thick.
  • Dentade, a bit of the teeth.
  • Dentaire, a kind of Sanicle.
  • Dental, for Denté, toothed.
  • Dentateur, a Tooth-drawer.
  • Dentée, as Dentade.
  • Dentelé (Su [...]rt.) a kind of mischie­vous Dog-fish.
  • Dentelet, a little tooth; also a meal.
  • Denteliz, teeth, or a tooth-like not­ching in Imagery. &c.
  • Dentier, the part of an Helmet that covers the teeth.
  • Dentir, to breed young teeth.
  • Denudation, a [...]ving bar [...].
  • Deoppila [...], [...]pening.
  • Depais [...]re, to [...]ed.
  • Depar [...]r, to agree.
  • Deparler, to di [...]prai [...].
  • Deparqué, broke out of a Park, got away.
  • se Deparquer. to [...]ak out of a Park, to [...].
  • Departeur, a divid [...].
  • Depar [...]e. for depart [...] [...].
  • Departiment, Departissement, as Departement in the N. D.
  • Depassionner, to be angry.
  • Depellé, flea'd.
  • Depenaillé, as Despenaillé.
  • Deperdition, utter ruine.
  • Deperi, undone.
  • Deperir, to be undone, to perish.
  • Deperissant, perishing.
  • Depié de fief, an aliening part of an Inheritance.
  • Depilé, bald.
  • Depitonné, as Despitonné.
  • Deplayé, extreamly wounded.
  • Deplayer, to wound extreamly.
  • Deplicer, for Deplisser, to undo the plaits.
  • Deplumation, an unfeathering; al­so an inflamed and hard thickness of the eye-lids.
  • Depoché, pulled out of a pocket.
  • Depocher, to pull out of a pocket.
  • Depopuler, Depopulé. See Depeu­pler, Depeuple in the N. D.
  • Depourprer, to unpurple, or make pale.
  • Deppié, as Depié.
  • Depredation, depredation.
  • Depredé, ravaged.
  • Depreder, to ravage.
  • Depri, as Depry.
  • Depriant (a Subst.) a purchaser that upon request agrees with the Lord Censuel for his Lods and Ventes.
  • Deprier, to pray earnestly.
  • Depry, such an agreement.
  • Deps, a kind of Royalty.
  • Depuration, a clarifying.
  • Depuré, clarifi'd.
  • Depurer, to clarifie.
  • Depurgatoire, purging.
  • Derbro, the name of a Sea-fish.
  • Derceau, a little Dace, or Dare-fish.
  • Dereté, disintangled.
  • Deris, for derision, derision.
  • Derme, the skin which covers the extream parts of the body.
  • Derne, a slice.
  • Dernieram, lateward, backward.
  • Deroche, sala from a rock.
  • Derogant, Derogeant, derogating f [...]o [...].
  • Deroguer, for deroger, to derogate.
  • Derompenient, a breaking in pieces.
  • Derompre, to break in pieces.
  • Derompu, broke in pieces.
  • Derrain, Derrainer, Derrenier, for dernier, last.
  • Derrée, for denrée, war [...].
  • Derrider, as Derider in the N. D.
  • Ders, a Cloth of State, a Cano­ [...]y.
  • Derselet, a little Canopy, or Cloth of State.
  • Dertre, for Dartre, a Tetter, or Ring-worm.
  • Desabiller, Desabillé. See Desha­biller, Deshabillé in the N. D.
  • Desaccointé, grown a stranger to one.
  • Desaccointer, to break acquain­tance.
  • Desaccommodé, disaccommodated.
  • Desaccommoder, to disaccommo­date.
  • Desaccordance, a discording.
  • Desaccostable, unaccostable.
  • Desaccroché, unhooked.
  • Desaccrocher, to unhook.
  • Desacré, unhallowed.
  • Desacrer, to unhallow.
  • Desadjusté, disordered.
  • Desadjuster, to disorder.
  • Desadmonnesté, disswaded.
  • Desadmonnester, to disswade.
  • Desadvenant, a portion of an Inhe­ritance left a Vassal, but not suf­ficient for the Homage due unto the Lord.
  • Desadventageusement, disadvan­tageously.
  • Desadventure, misfortune.
  • Desadvest, a dispossession.
  • Desadvestir, to dispossess.
  • Desadvisé, inconsiderate.
  • Desaffamé, whose hunger is satisfi'd.
  • Desaffamer, to satisfie hunger.
  • Desaffleuré, whose flourishing is hin­dred.
  • Desaffleurer, to pluck the flowers from, to hinder the flourishing of.
  • Desaffublé, unmuffled.
  • Desaffubler, to unmuffle.
  • Desagé, under age.
  • Desagencé, disordered.
  • Desageneement, a disordering.
  • Desageneer, to disorder.
  • Desagenouillé, got up from knee­ling.
  • se Desagenouiller, to get up from kneeling.
  • Desajancer, as Desageneer.
  • Desaiguilleter, to undo points.
  • Desaimé, fallen into the dislike of.
  • Desaimer, to des [...]t from l [...]ing.
  • Desairer, to spoil and destroy an A [...]y of Hawks.
  • Desaise, a being ill at [...]as, a disease.
  • Desaise, ill at ease, di eased.
  • Desaisme, as Dessisme.
  • Desalier, to [...].
  • Desamassé, [...].
  • Desamasser. t fall down a [...]ap.
  • Desanger, to extirpate, or destroy t [...] [...]a [...]. of.
  • [Page] Desangé, extirpated.
  • Desanimé, deprived of life.
  • Desanimer, to deprive of life.
  • Desantourat, deflowred as a Virgin.
  • Desapareillé, disordered.
  • Desapareiller, to disorder.
  • Desapareilleur, a disorderer.
  • Desaparié, uncoupled.
  • Desaparier, to uncouple.
  • Desapetissance, a distast, or loathing of meats.
  • Desapetisser, to take away the ap­petite.
  • Desapetissé, loathed as meat.
  • Desapointer, as Desappointer in the N. D.
  • Desappetit, want of appetite.
  • Desarester, to take the bones out of fish.
  • Desarnacher, as Desharnacher in the N. D.
  • Desarranger, to disorder.
  • Desarrengement, a disordering.
  • Desarresser, to cool ones courage.
  • Desarroyé, routed.
  • Desarroyer, to rout.
  • Desassemblé, separated.
  • Desassembler, to separate.
  • Desasseuré, put in fear.
  • Desasseurer, to put in fear.
  • Desassiegé, delivered from siege.
  • Desassieger, to raise a siege.
  • Desassocié, parted from the company of.
  • Desassocier, to dissolve society.
  • Desastré, unfortunate.
  • Desastreusement, fatally.
  • Desastreux, ominous, fatal.
  • Desattisé, put out, as a kindled fire­brand.
  • Desattiser, to put out a firebrand.
  • Desavancé, hindred.
  • Desavancer, to hinder.
  • Desavantagé, indamaged.
  • Desavantager, to indamage.
  • Desaubé, off the hinges.
  • Desaventureux, unhappy, unfortu­nate.
  • Desaugmenter, to decrease.
  • Desavié, bereft of life.
  • Desavier, to bereave of life.
  • Desbandage, a disbanding.
  • Desbandée, à la desbandée, out of their ranks.
  • Desbaraté, disordered.
  • Desbarbouillé, rid of spots.
  • Desbarbouiller, to make clear from spots.
  • Desbardeur, a Lighter-man.
  • Desbasti, pulled down.
  • Desbastiment, a pulling down of buildings.
  • Desbastir, to pull down a building.
  • Desbastonné, disarmed.
  • Desbastonner, to disarm.
  • Desbauchement, a deboshing.
  • Desbaudi, made sad, or ashamed.
  • Desbaudir, to make sad, or ashamed.
  • Desbauger, to rowse a wild Boar from the place he lies in.
  • Desbellé, subdued.
  • Desbeller, to subdue.
  • Desbendade, an unbending.
  • Desbender, for débander, to un­bend.
  • Desbiffer, as Debiffer.
  • Desblaver, to reap corn.
  • Desblayé, rid from.
  • Desblayer, to rid from.
  • Desblée, hinderance, damage; also corn.
  • Desbleer, Desbleyer, as Desblayer.
  • Desbleure, hay, or stubble.
  • Desblouqué, unblocked.
  • Desblouquer, to unblock.
  • Desboëture, a putting out of joynt.
  • Desboire, as Deboire.
  • Desboisté, Desboité, unboxed; put out of joynt.
  • Desboistement, the being out of joynt.
  • Desboister, Desboiter, to unbox; to put out of joynt.
  • Desbord, an overflowing.
  • Desborné, whose bounds are laid open.
  • Desbornement, a laying open of bounds.
  • Desborner, to lay open the bounds.
  • Desbort, as Desbord.
  • Desbossué, made flat.
  • Desbossuer, to make flat.
  • Desbourbé, drawn out of the mire.
  • Desbourber, to draw out of the mire.
  • Desbourgeonner, to pluck, or nip off young buds.
  • Desbourrer, to flie out.
  • Desbours, a disbursement.
  • Desboutonnement, an unbuttoning.
  • Desbraguetter, as Debraguetter.
  • Desbranchir, as Debranchir.
  • Desbraquer, to dismount artillery.
  • Desbride, an ear-wire.
  • Desbrigandiner, to deprive of a bri­gandine.
  • Desbriser, as Debriser.
  • Desbrodequiné, whose buskins are drawn off.
  • Desbrodequiner, to draw buskins off.
  • Desbuissonné, driven out of a thicket.
  • Desbuissonner, to drive out of a thicket.
  • Descaché, disclosed.
  • Descacher, to disclose.
  • Descaillé, uncurded.
  • Descailler, to uncurd.
  • Descalengé, unapprehended; also discharged.
  • Descapuchonné, uncovered.
  • Descapuchonner, to uncover.
  • Descendement, a descending.
  • Descendue, race, progeny.
  • Descensoire, apt to descend.
  • Desceptré, deprived of a Scepter.
  • Desceptrer, to deprive of a Scepter.
  • Desceu, as Insceu in the N. D.
  • Deschambré, separated.
  • Deschambrer, to separate people that lived in a chamber.
  • Deschampé, got out of the fold.
  • Deschamper, to get out of the fold.
  • Deschant, descant.
  • Deschanté, descanted.
  • Deschanter, to descant.
  • Deschargement, a discharging, or unloading.
  • Deschargeoir, a sluce, or water­passage.
  • Descharges, costs and charges in a Suit.
  • Descharongné, torn in pieces.
  • Descharongnement, a tearing in pieces.
  • Descharongner, to tear flesh in pieces.
  • Descharpi, got rid of.
  • Descharper, Descharpir, to take off the nap of cloth. Je ne me puis descharpir de luy, I cannot rid my self of him.
  • Deschaud, & Deschault, as De­chaux, in the N. D.
  • Deschaussoir, a Surgeons tool.
  • Descheance, decay, waste.
  • Deschevalé, unhorsed.
  • Deschevaler, to unhorse.
  • Deschevancé, pillaged.
  • Deschevancer, to pillage.
  • Deschevauché, unhorsed.
  • Deschevaucher, to unhorse.
  • Deschevestré, loosed.
  • Deschevestrer, to take off the halter.
  • Deschiquetement, a cutting, or slitting.
  • Deschiqueter, as Eschiqueter.
  • Deschute, a lapse, or fall.
  • Descigler, as Deciller in the N. D.
  • Descimenter, to lose its morter.
  • Descirer, Desciré, as Déchirer, Dechiré in the N. D.
  • Desclaveté, dismounted.
  • Desclaveter un Canon, to dismount a Cannon.
  • Descliquer, to rap out.
  • Desclos, unclosed.
  • Descogneu, not known.
  • Descognoissance, a not knowing.
  • Descognoistre, not to know.
  • Descollé, beheaded.
  • Descoller, to behead.
  • [Page] se Descombatre de, to rid his hands of.
  • Descombré, [...]leared of incumbrances; also warranted.
  • Descombrement, a clearing of in­cumbrances; also a warranting (in Law.)
  • Descombrer, to clear of incumbran­ces; also to warrant (in Law.)
  • Descompt, for déconte, a discount.
  • Descompter, to discount.
  • Desconfiture, an overthrow.
  • Desconfiz, defeated, discomfited.
  • Desconsort, discomfort.
  • Desconseilleur, an adviser to the contrary.
  • Desconsolé, discomforted.
  • Desconsoler, to discomfort.
  • Desconvenue, sorrow, trouble.
  • Descordelé, untwisted.
  • Descordeler, Descorder, to untwist.
  • Descouché, put out of his lodging; also got up.
  • Descoucher, to put one out of his lodging. Se descoucher, to get up.
  • Descoulourer, Descoulouré, Descou­lourement. See Décolorer, &c. in the N. D.
  • Descoulper, to discharge.
  • Descoulpé, discharged.
  • Descourable, slippery, slitting.
  • Descourtoisie, discourtesy.
  • Descouseur, an unsower.
  • Descousu, for décousu, unsowed.
  • Descousure, an unsowing,
  • Descouvrement, a discovering.
  • Descouvreur, a discoverer.
  • Descri, Descrier, Descrié. See them without s in the N. D.
  • Descriement, a crying down.
  • Descrit de monoie, the calling in of money.
  • Descroire, to give no credit to.
  • Descroisé, uncrossed.
  • Descroi [...]er, to uncross.
  • Descroulé, shaked asunder.
  • Descrouler, to shake asunder.
  • Descrovant, distrusting.
  • Descuire, to leave off [...]ething.
  • Descuvé, tak n out of [...] tab.
  • Descuver, to take out of a tub.
  • Desdaignable, contemptible.
  • Desdaignement, a disdaining.
  • Desdaigneur, a disdainer.
  • Desdamer, to deprive a Lady of her title; also to take a Queen at Draughts.
  • Desdetté, rid out of debt.
  • Desdetter, to rid out of debt.
  • Desdict, recanted.
  • Desdommage, or Dedommage­ment in the N. D.
  • Desdormi, awaked.
  • Desdormir, to awake.
  • Desdormissement, an awaking.
  • Desdouble, unlined.
  • Desdoubler, to unlive.
  • Desdouloir, to leave off sorrow.
  • Desduite, a discourse.
  • Desembarassé, disintangled.
  • Desembarrasser, to disintangle.
  • Desembellir, to disfigure.
  • Desembroché, unspitted.
  • Desembrocher, to pull off the spit.
  • Desembusché, got out from among bushes.
  • Desembucher, (Subst.) that part of a thicket, whereout wilde beasts use to go into the Plains.
  • se Desembuscher, to rush up from among bushes.
  • Desemmuré, taken out of a wall; unwalled.
  • Desemmurer, to take a thing out of a wall; also to unwal.
  • Desempacquete, unpacked.
  • Desempacqueter, to unpack.
  • Desemparable, abandonable.
  • Desempartement, a separation.
  • Desempenné, unfeathered.
  • Desempenner, to unfeather.
  • Desempesché, cleared.
  • Desempescher, to make a clear riddance.
  • Desempestré, disintangled.
  • Desempestrer, to disintangle.
  • Desempli, emptied.
  • Desemplir, to empty.
  • Desemplumé, plumed.
  • Desemplumer, to pluck the feathers off.
  • Desemprisonné, set at liberty,
  • Desemprisonner, to set at liberty.
  • Desenchainé, unchained.
  • Desenchainer, to unchain.
  • Desencloüé, unnailed.
  • Desencloüer, to unnail.
  • Desencordé, unstrung.
  • Desencoulpé, discharged from blame.
  • Desencoulper, to discharge from blame.
  • Desendetté, rid out of debt.
  • Desendetter, to bring out of debt.
  • Desendormi, awaked.
  • Desendormir, to awake.
  • Desendormissement, an awaking.
  • Desenduire, to undawb.
  • Desenforgé, disinforged.
  • Desenfourné, drawn out of an oven.
  • Desenfourner, to draw out of an oven.
  • se Desenfrongner, to leave frown­ing.
  • Desengeance, the race whereof is extingui [...]hed.
  • Desengeancer, to extinguish the race of.
  • Desenger, to pluck up by the root.
  • Desengigné, disinchanted.
  • Desengourdi, unbenummed.
  • Desengrosser, to miscarry (meant of a woman with child.)
  • Desenhorté, dehorted, or disswaded.
  • Desenhorter, to dehort, to disswade.
  • Desenhorteur, a dehorter, disswader.
  • Desennuyance, pastime.
  • Desenroulé, unrolled.
  • Desenrouler, to unrol.
  • Desentassé, unheaped.
  • Desentasser, to unheap.
  • Desenterré, unburied.
  • Desenterrer, to unbury.
  • Desentortillé, untwislen.
  • Desentourner, to turn, or wind off.
  • Desentraillé, bowelled.
  • Desentrailler, to bowel.
  • Desenveloper, to unsold.
  • Desequipper un Navire, to unrig a ship.
  • Deserte, for merite, merit.
  • Deservice, an ill office.
  • Deservi, deserved.
  • Deservir, to deserve.
  • Desesperable, despairable.
  • Desesperade, a kind of mournful Song. Jouer à la desesperade, to throw at all.
  • Desesperance, despair.
  • Desesperément, desperately.
  • Desestime, disesteemed.
  • Desestimer, to disesteem.
  • Desestoussé, unstuffed.
  • Desestousser, to unstuff.
  • Desfacer, for Effacer, to blot out.
  • Desfacher, to appease.
  • Desfacilé, put out of joynt.
  • Desfaire, Desfaict, Desfaicte, as Defaire, Defait, Defaite in the N. D.
  • Desfaroucher, to tame.
  • Desfasché, appeased, quieted.
  • Desfascher, to appease, to quiet.
  • Desfermer, as Deformer.
  • Desferre, cast cloaths; also an in­tangl d business. Ces gens sont de fascheuse desferre, these men are hard to be pleased.
  • Desferre-cheval, the small Pulse cal­led Horse-shooe.
  • Desfiché, unfastened.
  • Desficher, to unfasten.
  • Desfiement, a defying, also a distru­sting.
  • Desfinancé, drained of treasure.
  • Desflammé, quenched, put out.
  • Desflammer, to put out the flame.
  • Desfoncer, Desfoncé. See Defonser in the N. D.
  • [Page] Desfortune, misfortune.
  • Desfortuné, unfortunate.
  • Desfouï, digged out.
  • Desfouïr, to dig out.
  • Desfrais, defraying.
  • Desfroissé, crushed in pieces.
  • Desfrongner, as Desenfrongner.
  • Desfroy, a defraying, or bearing of charges.
  • Desfuite, an excuse, an evasion.
  • Desfulé, uncapped.
  • se Desfuler, to put off his cap.
  • Desgageur, a disengager, or redee­mer.
  • Desgaine, Desgainade, a drawing out of a weapon. Il y marcha bien d'une autre desgaine, he went about it with another man­ner of resolution.
  • Desgainée, and Desgainement, as Desgaine.
  • Desgaroté, unfettered.
  • Desgasté, made havock of.
  • Desgaster, to make havock of.
  • Desgaste-pares, Park-wasting.
  • Desgester un lievre, to put a Hare off her form.
  • Desglacé, thawed.
  • Desglacer, to thaw.
  • Desglouti, swallowed down.
  • Desgloutir, to swallow down.
  • Desgofiller, to rob.
  • Desgonder, as Dégonder.
  • Desgouler, to spue.
  • Desgoustement, a distasting.
  • Desgouziller, to swallow down.
  • D [...]sgozillé, whose t [...]roat is cut.
  • Desgrapher, as Desagraser in the N. D.
  • Desgravir, to fetch, or throw down a climbing thing.
  • Desgresser, Desgressé. See Dégrais­ser in the N. D.
  • Desgrosser, Desgrossé. See Degros­sir, Degrossi in the N. D.
  • Desguerper, to quit.
  • Desguerpissement, a quitting.
  • Desguerpisseur, that quits.
  • Desguerpy, quit, left, abandon­ed.
  • Desguilleter, to unty, or undo points; also to take points from.
  • Desguilleté, untrussed.
  • Desguindé, let down.
  • Desguinder, to let down.
  • Desguiseure, as Déguisement in the N. D.
  • Deshabité, disinhabited.
  • Deshabiter, to disinhabit.
  • Deshaict, or Deshait, sadness.
  • Deshaité, sad; also crazy.
  • Deshaitement, sadness; also crasi­ness.
  • Deshalé de famine, worn away through hunger.
  • Deshanché, whose hips are out of joynt.
  • Deshancher, to put the hips out of joynt.
  • Deshanté, disused, or not haunted.
  • Deshanter, to leave the company of.
  • Desheaulmé, bereaved of his helmet.
  • Desheaulmer, to take a helmet off.
  • Desheritance, a disseisin.
  • Deshingandé, lift off the hinges.
  • Deshingander, to lift off the hinges.
  • Deshonoration, Deshonorement, a dishonouring.
  • Deshonté, shameless.
  • Deshontément, shamelesly.
  • Deshousé, whose boots are pulled off.
  • Deshouser, to pull off boots.
  • Deshoussé, whose horse-cloth is taken off.
  • Desiccation, a drying up.
  • Desidence, idleness.
  • Desidieux, idle.
  • Designatif, designative.
  • Desinence, an end, or close.
  • Desinfecter, to take off the in­fection.
  • Desing, for Dessein, design.
  • Desinteresser, to save harmless, to rid from all interest in.
  • se Desjouer, for quitter le jeu, to leave off playing.
  • Desjoussé, unbusked.
  • Deslaché, let go.
  • Deslacher, to let go.
  • Deslaicté, milked; also weaned.
  • Deslaicter, to milk; also to wean.
  • Deslainé, fleeced.
  • Deslainer, to fleece.
  • Deslaitter, as Deslaicter.
  • Deslascher, as Deslacher.
  • Deslaté, unlathed.
  • Deslater, to unlath.
  • Deslavé, washed away.
  • Deslavement, a washing away.
  • Deslaver, to wash away.
  • Deslayé, softened, soaked.
  • Deslayer, Desleer, to soften, to soak.
  • Desleement, a softning, a soaking.
  • Desloqueté, ragged, torn, tatter'd.
  • Desloqueter, to tear unto rags.
  • Desloüé, dispraised.
  • Deslouër, to dispraise.
  • Deslouëure, the putting of a thing out of its place.
  • Desloyal, unfaithful.
  • Desloyalement, unfaithfully.
  • Desloyauté, disloyalty.
  • Desmaché, unchawed.
  • Desmacher, to unchaw.
  • Desmaçonné, pulled down.
  • Desmaçonner, to pull down stone­work.
  • Desmaillé, cut in pieces as a coat of mail.
  • Desmailler, to cut in pieces a coat of mail.
  • Desmaillure, a cutting of mail in pieces.
  • Desmaisonné, turned out of the house.
  • Desmaisonner, to turn out of the house.
  • Desmanchement, an unhasting.
  • Desmandibuler, to break the jaws of.
  • Desmandibulé, unjawed.
  • Desmarché, stepped back.
  • Desmarcher, to step, or go back.
  • Desmelancolié, cheered up.
  • Desmelancolier, to cheer up.
  • Desmenacer, to revoke a threat.
  • Desmenter, as Dementer.
  • Desmenture, a shrinking.
  • Desmeslement, an opening, or clear­ing.
  • Desmesurement, exceeding great­ness.
  • Desmeu, removed.
  • Desmoëllé, deprived of marrow, weakened.
  • Desmoëller, to take away the mar­row; also to weaken.
  • Desmorché, without pouder in the touch-hole.
  • Desmouvoir, to remove.
  • Desmuni, unfurnished.
  • Desmunir, to unfurnish.
  • Desnaturer, to make unnatural; to weaken nature; to renounce his natural Prince or Country.
  • Desnervé, weakened.
  • Desnerver, to weaken.
  • Desniaiseur, a cheater.
  • Desnigrement, Desnigration, a dis­crediting.
  • Desnouëure, as Dénouëment in the N. D.
  • Desolement, a desolating.
  • Desolément, desolately.
  • Desordonnance, disorder, confusi­on.
  • Desordonner, to bring disorder.
  • Desores, from henceforth.
  • Desourat, deflowred before her time.
  • Desourdi, unwoven.
  • Desourdir, to unweave.
  • Despaisement, the driving one out of his Country; also a leaving of rude Country-fashions.
  • Despaistre, to feed, to graze.
  • Despampé, bared as a Vine of leaves.
  • Despamper, Despamprer, to pull the lea [...]es off a Vine.
  • [Page] Desparagé, disparaged.
  • Desparager, to disparage.
  • Despecé, cut in pieces.
  • Despecement, a cutting in pieces.
  • Despecer, to cut in pieces.
  • Despenaillé, tattered.
  • Despence, &c. See Dépense in the N. D.
  • Despencerie, a Larder.
  • Despendeur, a lavisher.
  • Despendeux, wastful.
  • Despendre, (a Subst.) spending.
  • Despendre, (a Verb.) to spend.
  • Despendu, spent.
  • Despensaire, as Depensaire.
  • Desperché, unpearched.
  • Despercher, to throw off a perch.
  • Desperonné, deprived of spurs.
  • Desperonner, to deprive of spurs.
  • Despersuadé, disswaded.
  • Despersuader, to disswade.
  • Despié, as Depié.
  • Despieça, long ago.
  • Despiecé, torn in pieces.
  • Despiecement, a tearing in pieces.
  • Despiecer, to tear in pieces.
  • Despiteusement, despitefully.
  • Despitonné, coy, squeamish.
  • Desplaisance, grief; also a displea­sure, or ill-turn.
  • Desplanché, unfloored.
  • Desplancher, to unfloor.
  • Desplisser, for déplisser, to un­plait.
  • Desplisseure, an unplaiting.
  • Desplumé, plumed.
  • Desplumer, to pull off the feathers.
  • Despluvié, high-ridged.
  • Despocher, as Depocher.
  • Despoissé, unpitched.
  • Despoisser, to unpitch.
  • Despote, a Soveraign Lord.
  • Despoulser, to thrust out.
  • Despourpré, whose purple hue is lost.
  • se Despourprer, to lose its purple hue.
  • Desprier, to desire to the contrary.
  • Despris, disesteem, contempt.
  • Desprisable, contemptible.
  • Desprisé, disesteemed.
  • Desprisement, a disesteeming.
  • Despriser, to disesteem.
  • Despriseresse, a disdainful wo­man.
  • Despriseur, a disesteemer.
  • Desprisonné, got out of prison.
  • Desprisonner, to get out of prison.
  • Desprouveu, unprovided.
  • Despu [...]elage, Lespucellement, a de­flowring of a Virgin.
  • Despumé, skimmed.
  • Despumer, to skim.
  • Desracher, to pluck off, or tear a­way.
  • Desraison, unreasonableness.
  • Desraisonné, bereft of reason.
  • Desramé, without boughs.
  • Desramer, to bare of boughs.
  • Destrayé, disordered.
  • Desrene, a proof of the denial of a fact.
  • Desrener, to make good the denial of a fact.
  • Desreté, unsnared.
  • Desreter, to unsnare.
  • Desreumé, whose rheum is dried up.
  • Desreumer, to dry up the rheum.
  • Desridant, smoothing, slackening.
  • Desrivement, an unrivetting.
  • Desrobbement, stealth.
  • Desroché, beaten out of a rock; also thrown down a rock.
  • Desrocher, to beat out of a rock; also to throw down a rock.
  • Desroller, to open a roul.
  • Desrondir, to bring out of round­ness.
  • Desroqué, overthrown in wrestling.
  • Desroquer, to overthrow in wrest­ling.
  • Desroté, unty'd, unbound.
  • Desrougi, decay'd in redness.
  • Desrougir, to lose his redness.
  • Desroulé, laid open, unfolded.
  • Desrouler, to lay open, to unfold.
  • Desroute, for deroute, a rout.
  • Desrouté, routed.
  • Desroutéement, clean awry.
  • Desrouter, to put by, to rout.
  • Desroy, disorder, disarray.
  • Desroyé, disordered.
  • Desroyer, to disorder.
  • Desruer, to mistake one street for another.
  • Desrumer, as Desreumer.
  • Desruné, disordered.
  • Desruner, to disorder.
  • Dessacré, prophaned, unhallowed.
  • Dessacrer, to prophane, to unhallow.
  • Dessaisine, a disseisin, or dispossessi­on.
  • Dessaisonné, unkindly.
  • Dessarrier, a woman to cast her childe.
  • Dessauvagé, tamed.
  • Dessauvager, to tame.
  • Desseigné, designed.
  • Desseigner, to design.
  • Desseiller, as Desiller in the N. D.
  • Desseing, for dessein, design.
  • Dessemble, disjoyned.
  • Dessembler, to disjoyn.
  • Dessengler, as Decengler in the N. D.
  • Dessente, the gout proceeding from a rheum.
  • Desserpilleur, a high-way man.
  • Desserre, a sudden opening; a re­leasing.
  • Desserte, as Dessert in the N. D.
  • Desservice, disservice.
  • Desserviteur, a table-attendant.
  • Desseveli, unburied.
  • Dessevelir, to unbury.
  • Dessevré, parted.
  • Dessevrer, to part.
  • Dessiccatif, for Desiccatif, desicca­tive.
  • Dessiegé, freed from a siege.
  • Dessieger, to raise a siege.
  • Dessing, for Dessein, a design.
  • Dessoivé, whose thirst is quenched.
  • se Dessoiver, to quench his thirst.
  • Dessolé, unsoled.
  • Dessoler, to unsole.
  • Dessonger, to awake out of a dream starting.
  • Dessorcelé, unbewitched.
  • Dessorceler, to unbewitch.
  • Dessoté, unbesotted.
  • Dessoter, to unbesot.
  • Dessoulde, en dessoulde, straggling.
  • Dessouldé, unsodered.
  • Dessoulder, to unsoder.
  • Dessous-mis, the name of a Muscle.
  • Dessuetude, disuse.
  • Dessus-mis, put over, set above.
  • Déstacher, for ôter une tache, to take off a spot.
  • Destaillé, hacked; also retailed.
  • Destailler, to hack; also to sell by retail.
  • Destaindre, as Desteindre.
  • Destampé, unpropped.
  • Destamper, to unprop.
  • Desteinct, stained; also put out.
  • Desteindre, to slain; also to put out a light.
  • Desteler, as Desatteler in the N. D.
  • Destenture, a letting, or taking down.
  • Destiltre, Destistre, to unweave.
  • Destituable, destituable.
  • Destombi, unbenummed.
  • Destombir, to unbenum.
  • Destonnement, a jar in sound.
  • Destonner, to change a tune.
  • Destordement, a wringing.
  • Destortillé, unwrapped.
  • Destortiller, to unwrap.
  • Destortoire, as Destournoire.
  • Destoupé, unstopped.
  • Destouper, to unstop.
  • Destourbé, disturbed.
  • Destourbement, disturbance.
  • Destourber, to disturb.
  • Destourbeur, a Disturber.
  • [Page] Destourbier, a disturbance.
  • Destournoire, Destourtoire, a hun­ting pole.
  • Destrabord, starboard, the right side of a ship.
  • Destrainct, strained; also straitned.
  • Destraincte, a distress; a restraint.
  • Destraincte d'amour, an extremi­ty of passion in love.
  • Destraindre, to strain, also to straiten.
  • Destranché, hacked asunder.
  • Destranchement, a hacking asunder.
  • Destrancher, to hack asunder.
  • Destrapé, stamped with the feet; also rid from intanglements.
  • Destraper, to slamp with the feet; also to clear the feet from the things intangling them.
  • Destravé, unshackled.
  • Destraver, to unshackle.
  • Destrempis, as Destrempement, a sleeping in water.
  • Destrencher, as Destrancher.
  • Destriar, a steed, a great horse.
  • Destroquer, to untruck.
  • Destrousse, spoil, booty.
  • Destroussément, flatly, plainly.
  • Destrousseur de gens, a robber.
  • Destruiseur, a destroyer.
  • Desvalizé, robbed.
  • Desvalizement, a robbing.
  • Dezvalizer, to rob one of his Cloak­hag.
  • Desveiné, bereft of all his veins, or bloud.
  • Desveiner, to deprive one of his veins.
  • Desvely, changed through sickness.
  • Desverdiat, defloured as a Virgin.
  • Desvesti, uncloathed; dispossessed.
  • Desvestir, to uncloath; to dispossess.
  • Desvié, misled; also dead.
  • Desvier, to mislead; also to die.
  • Desvisagé, deformed.
  • Desvisager, to deform.
  • Desultoire, Chevaux desultoires, two horses from the one whereof an active rider leaps upon the other in a full career; also led horses kept fresh for Souldiers use.
  • Desumbré, unshaded.
  • Desumbrer, to unshade.
  • Desusage, disuse.
  • Desusitation, a disusing.
  • Desusité, disused.
  • Desusiter, to disuse.
  • Desyvré, unsuddled.
  • Desyvrer, to unsuddle.
  • Det, a Die (to play with).
  • Detaillé, cut into pieces; also sold by retail.
  • Detailler, to cut into pieces; also to sell by retail.
  • Detailleur, a retailer.
  • Detalenté, unwilling.
  • Detapper, to unbung.
  • Detenue, for detention, detention.
  • Detergent, cleansing, scowring.
  • Deterioration, a making worse.
  • Deterioré, made worse.
  • Deteriorer, to make worse.
  • Determinance, an Order, a Decree; a determination of a matter al­ready debated.
  • Detersif, cleansing, scowring.
  • Detiré, stretched out hard.
  • Detirer, to stretch out hard.
  • Detomber, to take out of a tomb.
  • Detouillé disintricated.
  • Detouiller, to disintricate.
  • Detracteur, a slanderer.
  • Detraction, slander.
  • Detraquer quelcun, le débaucher, to take one off from his work.
  • Detravé, out of order.
  • Detrencher, as Destrancher.
  • Detrichouëre, as Dextrochere; also the fold of leather wherewith Yarn-winders preserve their fin­gers from scars; also the sharp iron wherein the quill or spindle of a wheel doth twirl.
  • Detrimenteux, hurtful.
  • Detristé, comforted, cheared up.
  • Detrister, to drive away sadness.
  • Deturper, to defile.
  • Devallant, tumbling down.
  • Devallée, a low ground.
  • Devallement, a tumbling down.
  • Devancier (Adj.) fore-running, pre­ceding.
  • Devanteau, Devantel, Devantier, an apron.
  • Deuës à vetando, Priviledges of forbidding others to fish or gather sticks in his waters or woods.
  • Deveiner, as Desveiner.
  • Devely, changed, or altered.
  • Devergondé, shameless.
  • Devertaper, to open, or unbung.
  • Devest, a disadvesture, or as Dessai­sine.
  • Devestir, to put himself out of posses­sion of.
  • Devestu, put out of possession of.
  • Devexité, a bending downwards.
  • Devideau, a little pair of Yarn-windles.
  • Devideresse, a woman that winds Yarn.
  • Devidet, as Devideau.
  • Devidoire, for devidoir, a pair of Yarn-windles.
  • Devier, as Desvier.
  • Devinailles, Devinaises, Divina­tions
  • Devinance, Devinement, a divi­ning.
  • Devineresse, a woman that foretels things to come.
  • Devineur, a Diviner, Southsayer.
  • Devis, talk, discourse.
  • Devisager, as Desvisager.
  • Devisé, talked, discoursed, devised.
  • Deviser, to talk, to discourse; also to devise.
  • Deument, for deuëment, duly.
  • Devolut, as Devolutaire in the N. D.
  • Devolutif, devolutive, ready, or like to devolve.
  • Devolution, a devolution, or falling into lapse.
  • Devotionné, devoted, affected un­to.
  • Devouté, unvaulted.
  • Devouter, to unvault.
  • Deusdet, as Masse d'armes in the N. D.
  • Deuvet, for duvet, soft down.
  • Dextre (Adj.) dexterous.
  • Dextrier, as Destrier.
  • Dextrochere, the right arm (from the elbow to the wrist) whereon there hangs a Maniple fringed at the bottom, and charged all over with Ermines.
  • Dez en dez, by and by.
  • Diabete, a continual and immode­rate voiding of urine, accompa­nied with extreme thirst.
  • Diablerie, devilishness; also a de­vilish Crue.
  • Diableteau, a little (or young) de­vil.
  • Diableusement, devilishly.
  • Diacartami, a kind of purging com­position.
  • Diacatholicon, a composition pur­ging all kind of humours.
  • Diaciminon, a composition made of Simples fit to dissolve windiness in the stomack.
  • Diaconal, of, or belonging to a Dea­con.
  • Diaconie, Deaconry, the place of a Deacon.
  • Diagalange, a Salve made of Ga­lingale.
  • Diagonal, extending from one corner to another.
  • Diagonalement, from corner to cor­ner.
  • Diagoné, as Diagonal.
  • Diagredé, an ointment made of the gum Diagredi.
  • Diagredi, a strong purging gu [...] de­stilled from the root of the [...] S [...]ammony.
  • [Page] Diagredié, mixt with Scammony prepared.
  • Diaire, a Journal.
  • Diaire, (Adj.) of one day.
  • Diale, the devil.
  • Diallement, devilishly.
  • Dialthée, the name of an Oyntment.
  • Diamantin, of a Diamond, as hard as a Diamond.
  • Diamargariton, an Electuary made of Pearls.
  • Diambre, a confection of Amber, &c.
  • Diamerdis, a confection of Turds, Pilgrims salve; also a shitten fellow.
  • Diametraler, to answer diametral­ly.
  • Diammour, the devil.
  • Diamouron, syrrup of Mulberries.
  • Diamoschum, a kind of cordial powder.
  • Dianier, consecrated to Diana, or that hath vowed chastity.
  • Dianisum, an Electuary made of Anniseeds and other things good to break wind.
  • Diantre, the Devil, the God of dark­ness.
  • Diapason, a Diapason in Musick; a Gage to measure Casks with.
  • Diapente, a Powder or Composition wherein there are five Simples e­qually incorporated.
  • Diaphaner, to make transparent.
  • Diaphenicum, a kind of purging Electuary.
  • Diapré, diapered, diversifi'd with sundry figures.
  • Diaprer, to diaper, to diversifie with flourishes.
  • Diaprerie, Diapreure, flourishing in work, or flourisht work.
  • Diarrhoëtique, that has got a task.
  • Diarrodon, a kind of pain-abating Syrrup.
  • Diarthrose, a connexion of bones that evidently move together.
  • Diasené, Diasenné, a purging Com­position made of Sene, or Triso­ly.
  • Diaspertisant, Diaspermatisant, sow­ing of seed.
  • Diastolé, the dilatation of the heart.
  • Diatipose, a double description, or figuring.
  • Diatolique, continual, without in­termission.
  • Diaule, a measure containing two furlongs.
  • Dicaster, the Judges of the antient Thelans.
  • Dictam, Dictamon, for dictame, Dittander.
  • Diesble, devil.
  • Diesé, a sharp in Musick.
  • Dietique, of, or belonging to Diet; prescribing a diet.
  • Dieutelet, a little God.
  • Diffame, infamy, reproach.
  • Differanté, differed, or disagreed from; at variance with; also di­versified.
  • Differanter, to differ, or disagree from; to be at variance with.
  • Differenter, as Differanter.
  • Difficulter, to make difficult; also to make bones of.
  • Difficulteux, difficult, full of diffi­culties.
  • Diffinitivement, definitively.
  • Difflation, a blowing, or breathing.
  • Diffusement, diffusedly.
  • Digame, one that hath two Wives together; also one that hath had two Wives.
  • Digastrique, having two bellies.
  • Digitation, the form of the fingers of both hands joyned together; or the manner of their so joyning.
  • Digitte, a numeral figure.
  • Digonner, to dig.
  • Dilaceration, a tearing asunder.
  • Dilaceré, torn asunder.
  • Dilacerer, to tear asunder.
  • Dilapidé, dilapidated, ruined.
  • Dilapider, to dilapidate; also to rid of stones.
  • Dilatable, dilatable.
  • Dilayement, delay.
  • Diligenté, hastened, forwarded.
  • Diligenter, to hasten, to forward.
  • Dille, the quill or faucet of a hogs­head, &c.
  • Dillon, a quinsel, for a horse.
  • Dilucide, clear, bright.
  • Dilucidé, dilucidated, cleared.
  • Dilucider, to dilucidate, to clear.
  • Dimenche, for dimanche, Sunday.
  • Dimencheret, a holy-day-servant.
  • Dinanderie, broken ware, Tinkers work; also the place where such stuff is sold or made.
  • Dinandier, a Copper-smith, or Bra­sier.
  • Dinarchie, the joynt Government of two Princes.
  • Dindar, Dindon, a Turky-Cock.
  • Dintiers, the dowcets or cods of a Deer.
  • Diole, the Devil.
  • Dipsade, a Snake, whose biting brings with it a mortal dryness.
  • Dipsode, a thirsty fellow.
  • Diptam, Diptame, the herb Dittany.
  • Dique, for digue, a bank.
  • Directer, to direct; also to acknow­ledge from whence a good cometh.
  • Direption, rapine.
  • Disceptateur, a contender, a stic­kler.
  • Disceptatrice, a woman that de­bates a matter.
  • Discepté, disputed, debated.
  • Discepter, to dispute, to debate.
  • Discole, unruly.
  • Discommodation, damage, hurt, hinderance.
  • Discommodé, discommodated, hurt, indamaged, hindered.
  • Discommoder, to discommodate, hurt, indamage, or hinder.
  • Disconcerté, disordered, confused.
  • Discontinuément, by stops.
  • Disconvenance, a disagreeing with.
  • Disconvenir, to disagree with.
  • Discord, for discorde, discord.
  • Discordamment, jarringly.
  • Discorder, to jarr, to disagree.
  • Discoste, distant, remote.
  • se Discoster de, to rid himself of.
  • Discourtois, uncourteous.
  • Discourtoisement, uncourteously.
  • Discourtoisie, discourtesy.
  • Discrasié, pulled, haled; of an ill complexion.
  • Discrepance, difference.
  • Discrepant, different.
  • Discrucié, extreamly afflicted.
  • Discrucier, to vex, or afflict ex­tremely.
  • Discuteur, a discusser, examiner, debater; also a valuer or praiser of goods.
  • Discution, for discussion, discussion.
  • Diseaux de gerbes, sheafs of corn set ten and ten in a heap.
  • Disenier, as Dixainier in the N. D.
  • Disentourner, to turn off.
  • Disferre, an horse-shooe of two pieces joyned together at the top with an iron pin.
  • Disgregation, a dispersing.
  • Disgregé, dispersed, scattered.
  • Disgreger, to disperse, to scatter.
  • Disjoinctif, disjunctive.
  • Disjoinction, disjunction.
  • Disjoindre, to disjoyn.
  • Dislayer, for delayer, to delay.
  • Dismages, Tythings, or matters be­longing to Tythes.
  • Dismier, a Tyther.
  • Disparagement, disparagement.
  • Disparate, errour; also a senseless and uncivil thing.
  • Disparer, Disparoir, to disappear.
  • Disparoissance, a disappearing.
  • Disparution, a disparition.
  • [Page] Dispathie, an antipathy.
  • Dispensaire, a Book that teacheth how to make all Physical Compo­sitions.
  • Dispositeur, a disposer.
  • Disposte, sound, healthful.
  • Dispostement, lustily.
  • Disputaillé, idly debated.
  • Disputailler, to debate idly.
  • Disputation, a disputation.
  • Disquisition, inquiry.
  • Disruption, a bursting, or breaking asunder.
  • Disseiché, dried up.
  • Disseicher, to dry up.
  • Disseillonner, to open the eyes.
  • Dissemelé, unsoled.
  • Dissemeler, to unsole, or put the soles off a shoe.
  • Dissentiment, dissent, disagreement,
  • Dissention, for dissension, dissen­tion.
  • Dissimulateur, a dissembler.
  • Dissimulatrice, a woman-dissembler.
  • Dissimulément, dissemblingly.
  • Dissipendre, to dissipate.
  • Dissociable, unsociable.
  • Dissociation, a dissociation, or sepa­ration of fellowship.
  • Dissocié, dissociated.
  • Dissoluement, for dissolument, dis­solutely.
  • Dissonant, dissonant, discording, disagreeing.
  • Dissuetude, disuse.
  • Distillable, distillable.
  • Distillement, distillation.
  • Distract, any distraction, or division of a Contract, Right, or Act.
  • District, a District, the Liberties or Precincts of a place.
  • Distroict, as District. Distroict de Moulin, as Banlieuë de Moulin.
  • Ditateur, an inricher.
  • Dite, à sa dite, at his nod, after his will and pleasure.
  • Ditellet, a small Treatise.
  • Divague, straying, wandering.
  • Divagué, strayed, wandered about.
  • Divaguer, to stray, or wander a­bout.
  • Divinance, a divining, or foretel­ling.
  • Divisement, separately, distinctly.
  • Diurne, diurnal, daily.
  • Diuturne, of long continuance.
  • Divulgateur, a divulger.
  • Divulsion, divulsion.
  • Dixain, as Dizain.
  • Dixenier, as Dixainier in the N. D.
  • Dixme, Dixmer, as Díme, Dimer in the N. D.
  • Dixneusiesme, as Dixneuviéme, nineteenth.
  • Dizain, a tenth; also a Stanza of ten Verses; a pair of beads con­taining ten pieces; a French penny.
  • Dizaine, as Dixaine in the N. D.
  • Dizeaux, as Diseaux.
  • Doanne, for Douäne, a Custome-house.
  • Dobbe, a tub.
  • Docilisé, made tractable.
  • Dociliser, to make tractable.
  • Doctorande, Doctors Commence­ment.
  • Doctorie, a Doctors degree, Doctor­ship.
  • Doctrinable, apt to learn.
  • Document, document, precept.
  • Dodacaëdre, a Geometrical figure of 12 faces.
  • Dodechedron, a twelve-corner'd figure.
  • Dodeliné, rocked, dandled, lolled.
  • Dodelinement, a rocking, dandling, or lolling.
  • Dodeliner, to rock, dandle, or loll. Dodeliner de la teste, to carry his head unsteadily.
  • Dodelineur, the rocker of a cradle.
  • Dodelineux, a rocker; also one that nods much; also a fawning com­panion.
  • Dodentral, as Dodrental.
  • Dodine, as Dodelinement. Canards à la dodine, Ducks with French onion-sauce.
  • Dodiner, as Dodeliner.
  • Dodineux, as Dodelineux.
  • Dodo; as apres bu dodo, after drink sleep.
  • Dodrental, nine ounces heavy; nine inches, or a full span long.
  • Dodu, a fat-chops, or chuff.
  • Dodu, (Adj.) fat, plump.
  • Doët, a brook, or spring.
  • Dogguin, a filthy great old Cur.
  • Dogmatiste, a forger of new Sects or Opinions.
  • Doigtier, a thimble.
  • Doil, a Pipe-staff; also any Vessel or Cask of a reasonable big size.
  • Doile, & Doille, as Douille.
  • Doire, for Douaire, a dowry.
  • Dol, deceit, guile.
  • Dolé, planed, or hewed smooth.
  • Doleance, moaning, lamentation.
  • Dolent, sorrowful, heavy.
  • Dolentement, sorrowfully, heavily.
  • Doler, to plane, or hew smooth.
  • Doleur, for douleur, sorrow, grief.
  • Doleux, deceitful.
  • Doliman, as Dolyman.
  • Doloir, to grieve, to moan.
  • Dolouëre, as Doloire in the N. D.
  • Doloureusement, heavily, sorrow­fully; also grievously, till it ake again.
  • Doloureux, woful, sorrowful; also painful. Parties doloureuses, ten­der parts that cannot endure to be touched.
  • Dolousant, lamenting, moaning.
  • Dolouser, to lament, to moan.
  • Dolyman, a Turkish gown.
  • Domanial, of, or belonging to a Lordship.
  • Domestiquement, domestically, pri­vately.
  • Domestiqué, tamed, civilized.
  • Domestiquer, to tame, to civilize.
  • Domicilié, dwelling in a place.
  • Domicilier, a House-keeper.
  • se Domicilier, to go to keep house.
  • Dominatrice, a Commanderess.
  • Domineur, as Dominateur, a Ruler, or Governour.
  • Domino, a kind of hood worn by Ca­nons; a fashion of Vail used by some women that mourn.
  • Dominorié, domineered over.
  • Dominorier, to domineer.
  • Dominotier, a maker of the hood called Domino.
  • Dommageablement, hurtfully, with damage.
  • Dommas, the Priest, or Canon, who by turn is to wear a Cope for a week together.
  • Dompte-venin, Tetter-wort.
  • Dompte-villain, a good cudgel.
  • Dompture, a taming, reclaiming.
  • Donaison, a free gift, or deed of gift.
  • Dondaine, the name of a warlike Engine whereout great round stones were shot; also the burden of a Song.
  • Dondon, a short and fat woman.
  • Dongeon, as Donjon, a Dungeon.
  • Donnée, a gift.
  • Donne-iardon, a jearer.
  • Donnement, a giving, or bestow­ing.
  • Donq, Donques, for Donc, then, therefore.
  • Dontement, a taming.
  • Donte-mer, Sea-taming.
  • Donte-orgueil, pride-taming.
  • Donteresse, she that tames or sub­dues.
  • Donteur, a tamer.
  • Donzelle, an Eel-powt.
  • Dorcade, a Rot-buck.
  • Dorée, the Dorce, or St. Peters fish.
  • Dorelle, bitter Vetch.
  • [Page] Dorelot, a darling.
  • Doreloté, for Dorloté, cockered, dandled.
  • Doreloter, for Dorloter, to cocker, to dandle.
  • Doreloteur, for Dorloteur, a Coc­kerer, a Dandler.
  • Doverin, gilt-work; also a gil­ding.
  • Doriphage, a devourer of gifts, or bribes.
  • Dorlot, a Jewel.
  • Dormailler, to slumber.
  • Dormart, a slug-a-bed.
  • Dormeveille, a being between asleep and awake; or a counterfeiting of sleep.
  • Dormilieuse, as Dormilleuse.
  • Dormille, the sickness of Silk-worms, during which they sleep; also a kind of small Lamprey.
  • Dormilleuse, the Cramp-fish.
  • Dormilleux, sluggish, sleepy.
  • un Dormir, a nap, a sleep.
  • Dormitoire, a sleep-procuring medi­cine.
  • Dorque, a kind of great and round earthen Vessel; also a great fish that's enemy to the Whale.
  • Dorsal, of, or belonging to the back.
  • Dortuit, sleepy, drousie.
  • Dosse d'ail, a clove of Garlick.
  • Dossé, indorsed.
  • Dosserasse, a buttress, or supporter to bear up the great beam of a wall.
  • Dost, for Dot, dowry.
  • Dotal, given in dowry; of, or be­longing to dowry.
  • Dotateur, an indower.
  • Dotter, for radoter, to dote.
  • Douanne, for Douane, a Custom-house.
  • Douannier, an Officer of the Custom-house.
  • Doubé, rigged, or trimmed up, as a ship.
  • Douber, to rig, or trim a ship.
  • Doublage, a relief.
  • Doubleau, a semi-circle; also a dou­ble quarter of timber.
  • Doubleau (Adj.) somewhat double, almost twofold.
  • Double-marcheur, the little, spot­ted, and worm-like Serpent Am­phisbana, supposed by some Au­thors to have a head at both ends, and so to go both ways.
  • Doublement (a Subst.) a doubling, a making twofold, or twice as much.
  • Double-testu, as Double-marcheur.
  • Double-vaisseau, a cauldron, or kit­tle full of boyling water.
  • Doublier, a stately table-cloth of da­mask, diaper, &c. hanging to the ground on both sides of the board.
  • Doubtable, dreadful; also uncer­tain.
  • Doubtance, fear; also doubt, suspi­cion.
  • Doubtement, a doubting, suspecting, fearing.
  • Doucelet, a little sweet.
  • Doucente, the name of a thick, rud­dy, and sappy apple.
  • Doucereux, full of sweetness.
  • Doucettement, sweetly.
  • Doucin, as Doussin.
  • Dove, a Castle-ditch, or Town-ditch (with water in it).
  • Douëlle, a Pipe-staff; also the stric­kle used in measuring of Corn.
  • Douen d'antan, hence over a year.
  • Douës, as Douves.
  • Douët, a Brook, or Spring.
  • Douëtte, à longues douëttes, in long rows, files, ranks.
  • Dougé, small, fine, little, slender.
  • Douger, to trip, as a horse that stumbleth not outright.
  • Douillettement, daintily, tenderly, delicately.
  • Douït, as Douët, a Brook.
  • Doulcin, as Doussin.
  • Douleine, for doucine, a kind of plain.
  • Doulouëre, a plaining-ax.
  • Douloureusement, painfully.
  • se Doulouser, to lament.
  • Dour, a hands breadth.
  • Dourdé, knocked, mawled, thum­ped.
  • Dourder, to knock, mawl, or thump.
  • Dourdier, a slouch.
  • Dousil, a spigot.
  • Doussaine, a certain musical Instru­ment.
  • Doussé, indorsed.
  • Dousser, to indorse.
  • Dousseresse, as Dosserasse.
  • Doussier, an indorsement.
  • Doussin, the Sea-urchin.
  • Doutance, as Doubtance.
  • Douvelle, a Ci [...]ter.
  • Doux-amer, bitter-sweet.
  • Doux-auvesque, Doux-balon, Doux-bellieur three sorts of apples.
  • Doux-glissant, gently gliding.
  • Doux de la Lande, Doux-martin, Doux-veret, three sorts of ap­ples.
  • Douzain, a french penny; also a do­zen.
  • Douze-doigtier, the name of a small gut, or entral.
  • Douzil, a spiggot.
  • Doyenné, a Deanry, or Deanship.
  • Doygé, as Dougé.
  • Drache, the little stalk whereby a Grape cleaves to the bunch.
  • Dragacanth, Dragagant, Gum-dra­gagant.
  • Drageon, a Vine-branch, twig, or sprig.
  • Drageries, Comfets, Sweet-meats.
  • Dragme, for drachme, a dram.
  • Dragoir, for drageoir, a Comset-box.
  • Dragonceau, a young (or little) Dragon.
  • Dragoncelle, as Dragontée.
  • Dragonné, Dragony.
  • Dragonneau, a young, or little Dra­gon.
  • Dragontée, Dragon-wort.
  • Draguinage, a kind of gibridge.
  • Dramant, a miser.
  • Drame, as drachme, a dram.
  • Dramé, pinched, miserably used.
  • Dramer, to pinch.
  • Drapelet, a little linnen clout.
  • Drappeux, full of cloth, or fit to make cloth.
  • Drappier (Adj.) of, or belonging to cloth; also fit to make cloth.
  • Drave, Spanish (or Babylonian) cresses.
  • Dravée, all kind of Pulse.
  • Draule, as Drole, a wag.
  • Draulerie, as Drolerie, waggery.
  • Drege, a kind of Fish-net.
  • Dreloter, as Dorloter, to cocker.
  • Dresseur, a raiser, or erecter.
  • Dressiere, a direct way.
  • Dressouïr, a Setting-iron, or Poa­king-stick for Ruff-bands; a standing thing.
  • Dridiller, to gingle, as a Hawks bells.
  • Drillant, twinkling, sparkling.
  • Driller, to twinkle, or sparkle.
  • Drilles, rags, tatters.
  • Drilleux, ragged, tattered.
  • Drogué, mingled with drugs.
  • Drogueman, an Interpreter.
  • Droguement, a drenching, or mini­string of Drugs.
  • Droguer, to drug, or mingle with Drugs.
  • Droguerie, the season of fishing for Herrings, and other such fish, to be salted and barrelled up.
  • Drogueries, Drugs; also trash.
  • Drogueur, as Droguiste, a Drug­gist.
  • Droicture, Right, Reason, Justice.
  • Droicturé, that hath paid his re­lief, and all other the Duties of Tenancy.
  • [Page] Droicturer, a new Tenant or Vassal to do his Lord all right, and pay him all the rights belonging to him.
  • Droicturier, just, upright; also severe, strict, according to the letter of the Law; also direct, or next. Droicturier Seigneur, a mans true, right, or lawful Lord.
  • Droicturierement, justly, uprightly.
  • Droisser, as Dresser, to direct; e­rect, instruct.
  • Droitier, right-handed; also as Droicturier.
  • Drolatique, waggish, roguish.
  • Droler, to play the wag; also to beat soundly.
  • Dromant, a small and swift Vessel used by Pirats.
  • Droman, as Dromant.
  • Droninae, a spade.
  • Drones, knocks, thumps.
  • Dropace, a depilatory, an ointment to take away hair.
  • Druement, thick, many together.
  • Druge, Swines-bread.
  • Drugé, wet, thoroughly moistened.
  • Drugeon, a little branch, twig, or sprig.
  • Drugeonnement, a putting forth of small branches or twigs.
  • Drugeonner, to put forth twigs.
  • Drugeonneux, full of small branches or twigs.
  • Druger, to wet throughly.
  • Druguement, an Interpreter.
  • Drulle, as Drylle.
  • Dryinade, as Chelydre.
  • Drylle, the maste, or acorn of the female oak.
  • Dubitation, doubtfulness.
  • Ducat, for Duché, a Dukedom, a Dutchy,
  • Ducteur, a leader.
  • Ductile, easie to be hammered, or beaten into thin plates.
  • Duelle, the third part of an ounce.
  • Duisable, Duisant, Duisible, sit, con­venient.
  • Duisson, an accustoming, using, or inuring; a making fit for.
  • Duit, accustomed, used, inured; also convenient, fitting.
  • Duiter, to make fit for his purpose.
  • Dumetté, downy, of down, soft as (or stuffed with) down.
  • Dun, a hill, or rock.
  • Duner, to plain, as a horse that nei­ther halteth outright, nor sets his foot hard on the ground.
  • Dunne, for Dune, a Down.
  • Dunette, a thrush; also a little Down, or sandy hill.
  • Duodene, as Douze-doigtier.
  • Duplication, as Duplique in the N. D.
  • Duplicité, a double mind.
  • Duppe, for Dupe, a coxcomb, sot, or fool.
  • Durable, durable, lasting.
  • Duracines, Peaches, Plums, or Cher­ries, whose pulp cleaves fast unto their stones; also such as are of a hard or firm pulp, and thereby long-lasting.
  • Duraines, Dureines, as Duracines.
  • Duresse, for Dureté, hardness.
  • Duret, somewhat hard; sturdy.
  • Dure-teste, a kind of spotted and hard-headed Spider.
  • Duvetté, as Dumetté.
  • Duyere, a Cony-hole.
  • Dyafane, as Diafane, transparent.
  • Dynanderie, brazen ware.
  • Dynarchie, the joynt rule of two Princes.
  • Dyscole, wayward, froward.
  • Dyscrasié, as Discrasié.
  • Dysopie, vicious, or excessive shame­facedness.
  • Dysurie, difficulty of voiding urine.

E

  • EAge, for âge, age.
  • Eagé, aged, old.
  • Eale, the name of a blackish E­thiopian beast.
  • Eard, the black Poplar-tree.
  • Eaue, for eau, water.
  • Eavier, for evier, a sink, or gutter, for voiding of soul water.
  • Eaulice, the herb Helicampane.
  • Eaurolle, a wheal, or blister.
  • Eauvier, as Eavier.
  • Ebe, the [...]bbing of water.
  • Ebesté, beastly, blockish.
  • Ebouiller, as Esbouiller.
  • Ebouller, to throw, or tumble down.
  • Eboulu, as Esboulu.
  • Ebreché, that hath lost divers teeth.
  • Ebrieté, drunkenness.
  • Ebriosité, continual drunkenness.
  • Ebulition, as Ebullition, ebullition.
  • Eburnin, of, or belonging to ivory.
  • Ecamoter, to change, or alter.
  • Ecarboté, stirred, or scattered, as the fire; also bruised, as an ap­ple.
  • Ecarboter le feu, to stir up, or scat­ter the fire. Ecarboter une pomme, to bruise an apple.
  • Ecardan, nice, dainty.
  • Ecclise, for Eglise, a Church.
  • Ecclisse, as Eclisse, a cheese-fat.
  • Ecclisser, as Esclisser.
  • Ecentrique, without center, out of the center; also without measure, whereof no measure can be taken.
  • s'Echauder, to grow too hot, to be scalded.
  • Echelette, a little ladder.
  • Echevement, as Eschevement.
  • Echidne, a viper, or hydra; any kinde of Serpent.
  • Eclipsement, an eclipsing, or lessen­ing.
  • Ecloe, lant, piss, urine.
  • Eclyptique, as Ecliptique in the N. D.
  • Ecolleté, as Escouleté.
  • Ecoüé, curtailed.
  • Ecouër, to curtail.
  • Ecphrase, a plain declaration, or exposition.
  • Ecreté, uncrested.
  • Ecrioches, crutches.
  • Ecstatique, in an extasie.
  • Eculée, a dish-full.
  • Edent, groveling on his face, or on his teeth.
  • Edificateur, an edifier.
  • Eduction, eduction.
  • Esaisté, topped.
  • Esaister, to top (or cut off the top of) a plant.
  • Esemeridiaire, continuing but one day.
  • Effable, which may be uttered in words.
  • Effacement, a razing, or blotting out.
  • Effaré, scared, amazed.
  • Effarer, to scare, or amaze.
  • Effassure, for Effaceure, a razing, or blotting out.
  • Effemination, effeminacy.
  • Effeminément, effeminately.
  • Efferé, wild; also proud.
  • Effiancé, betrothed.
  • Efficacieusement, efficaciously.
  • Efficacieux, effectual, forcible.
  • Effigial, representing, resembling; also belonging to an Image.
  • Effilé, unwound, loosened.
  • Effiler, to unwind, to loosen.
  • Efflanché, swayed in the back.
  • Efflanqué, as Esflanqué.
  • Efflorescence, the outward skin or rind of any thing.
  • Effoncé, whose bottom is beaten out.
  • Effoncer, to beat out the bottom of a vessel.
  • Effondément, profusely, exceeding­ly.
  • Effondré, howelled; burst open. Che­min effondré, a way full of holes.
  • Effondrer, to draw the guts or garbage out of. Effondrer [...]un [Page] cheval, to strike a horse through the belly. Effondrer un huis, to burst open a door. Effondrer un vaisseau, to beat out the bottome of a vessel.
  • Effondrisse, the grounds of any li­quor.
  • Efforcement, indeavour.
  • Efforcément, earnestly, with tooth and nail.
  • Efforcillons, a disease in a Hawks tongue.
  • Effray, as Effroi, fright, terrour.
  • Effrayable, fearful, dreadful.
  • Effrayablement, in a fearful and terrible manner.
  • Effreinte, a default of hounds.
  • Effrenation, unruliness, rashness.
  • Effrenément, rashly.
  • Effrener, to unbridle, to turn loose.
  • Effrité, frighted.
  • Effriter, to fright.
  • Effroidi, cooled.
  • Effroidir, to cool.
  • Effrondille, the grounds of any li­quor.
  • Effrontement, impudency.
  • Effroüé, crummed.
  • Effrouër, to crum.
  • Effroyant, hideous, terrible.
  • Effroyé, frighted.
  • Effroyer, to fright.
  • Effruicté, whose fruit is gathered.
  • Effruicter, to take or gather the fruit of.
  • Effueillé, for efeuillé, bared of leaves.
  • Effueillement, a baring of leaves.
  • Effueiller, to bare of leaves.
  • Effueilleur, a pruner of trees, a pul­ler of leaves from trees.
  • Effusément, profusely, out of mea­sure.
  • Efielé, without spleen or gall.
  • Egale-nuicts, nights equalling.
  • Egalizement, as Equalizement.
  • Egalizer, as Equalizer.
  • Egaronné, trodden, as a shooe, down at the heels.
  • Egaronner un soulier, to tread a shooe down at the heels.
  • Egasse, set an edge, as a tooth.
  • Egau, the less kinde of the bastard-Mackarel.
  • Egelfin, the Haddock.
  • Egener le labeur, to run through their work.
  • Egestion, a casting out of excre­ments.
  • Egipanes, Satyrs.
  • Egiptiaque, l'Onguent Eg. a cer­tain Salve, or Oyntment, of a cleansing faculty.
  • Egosse, husk.
  • s'Egouffrer, to sink down.
  • Egousser, to shale.
  • Egozillé, whose throat is cut; also vomited, or spued out.
  • Egoziller, to cut the throat of; to vomit, or spue out.
  • Egrefin, a kinde of Haddock.
  • Egrege, excellent.
  • Egromé, uncreamed, fleeted as milk.
  • Egrette, a fowl that resembles an Heron.
  • Egrugé, crummed.
  • Egruger, to crum.
  • Egrumer, to pluck from the cluster.
  • Egrun, any thing that exasperates a disease or sore.
  • Egual, for Egal, equal.
  • Egualle, equalled, matched.
  • Egualement, equally, alike.
  • Egualer, to equal, to make like.
  • Egualizé, equalled, made even with.
  • Egualizement, an equalling, or a making even.
  • Egualizer, to equal, to make even.
  • Eguillat, a kinde of dog-fish.
  • Eguillon, for aiguillon, a sting.
  • Eguilloner, to sting.
  • Eguiser, for aiguiser, to sharpen.
  • Egyptelle, a kinde of white stone with black and red veins.
  • Egyptiac, a kind of salve.
  • Ehancé, as Ehanché.
  • Ehanché, whose hip is out of joynt.
  • Ehancher, to put the bip out of joynt.
  • Ejaculation, ejaculation.
  • Ejaculatoire, ejaculatory.
  • Ejarté, cut off by the hams; also without garters.
  • Ejarter, to cut off at the hams.
  • Eine, the groin.
  • Elaboratoire, a Work-house.
  • Elaboré, as Elabouré.
  • Elabouration, elaboration.
  • Elabouré, elaborated.
  • Elabourer, to elaborate.
  • Elambiqué, distilled.
  • Elambiquer, to distil.
  • Elangoré, languishing.
  • Elarmé, that can weep no more.
  • Elatine, the herb Speedwell.
  • Elation, loftiness; also a raising up.
  • Elebore, for ellebore, Hellebore.
  • Electre, Amber whereof beads and bracelets are made; also a mix­ture of Gold, Copper, and a fifth part of Silver.
  • Elegiaque, belonging to an Elegy, mournful.
  • Elemi, Elemmy, a kind of Gum, or Rosin.
  • Elenchie, Union elenchie, a Pen­dant-pearl of the fashion of an egg.
  • Eleomeli, a sweet and fat liquor is­suing from the old trunks of cer­tain trees in Syria.
  • Elephangines, certain Pills good to strengthen the stomack, and to help digestion.
  • Elephanteau, a young Elephant.
  • Elephantin, of, or belonging to an Elephant.
  • Elephantique, infected with a Le­prosie.
  • Elevatoire, the Instrument where­with Surgeons lift up the broken parts of the Scull, and draw out bullets, &c.
  • Eleveur, a raiser, or lifter up.
  • Elice, the Signe in Heaven called Charles wain.
  • Elicie, a firy vapour drawn from the Clouds.
  • Eligible, eligible.
  • Eliminé, put out of doors; also di­vulged, published.
  • Eliminer, to put out of doors; also to divulge, to publish.
  • Elingue, a Sling.
  • Eliser la monnoye, to clip money.
  • Elixe, quintessence.
  • Elleborine, wild white Ellebore.
  • Ellée, as bailler les ellées à un che­val, to give a horse the head.
  • Ellend, as Eland, an Elk.
  • Elocher, to loosen, or make loose.
  • Elocquer, to shake off.
  • Eloise, a lightning; also a little space of time.
  • Elope, a kind of Sea-fish.
  • Elopien, a kind of harmless Ser­pent.
  • Elourdé, dulled, amazed, astoni­shed.
  • Elourder, to dull, amaze, or asto­nish.
  • Eloyse, as Eloise.
  • Elucidation, elucidation, or cleer exposition.
  • Elucidé, cleared, or made clear.
  • Elucider, to clear, or to make clear.
  • Elue, the wild Pine-tree.
  • Emaceration, Emaciation, an ema­ceration, or falling away in flesh.
  • Emacie, leanness.
  • Emacié, made, or grown lean.
  • Emané, proceeded, issued; also pub­lished, spread abroad.
  • Emaner, to proceed; also to publish, or to spread abroad.
  • Emant, as aimant, the Loadstone.
  • Emantellement, a mantle; also a covering with a mantle.
  • [Page] Emanuer, to manumit.
  • Emargé, noted, or quoted in the margine.
  • Ematite, the Bloud-stone.
  • Embabillé, well-spoken, that hath his tongue at command.
  • Embabionné, as Embabouiné, gul­led, deceived.
  • s'Embadurnoser, to anoint himself.
  • Embagué, inriched with Jewels.
  • Embaguer, to inrich with Jewels.
  • Embaillonné, gagged.
  • Embaillonner, to gag.
  • Embarbouillé, besmeared.
  • Embarbouiller, to besmear.
  • Embarrassement, a cumber.
  • Embarasseur, a cumbersome fellow.
  • Embarré, beaten in, bruised.
  • Embarrer, to beat inward, to bruise; also to rail, or set bars on. Em­barrer son espée en un arbre, to fasten his sword in a tree.
  • Embarrure, a bruising, or beating inward.
  • Embas, below.
  • Embaser, to give a basis, or bottom unto.
  • Embasmé, imbalmed.
  • Embasmer, to imbalm.
  • Embassade, Embassadeur. See Am­bassade, Ambassadeur in the N. D.
  • Embassement, as Soubassement in the N. D.
  • Embastonné, armed with weapons; also cudgelled.
  • Embastonner, to arm with weapons; to cudgel.
  • Embatage, the laying of streaks a­bout a wheel.
  • Embatonner, as Embastonner.
  • Embattage, as Embatage.
  • Embattes, the Easterly winds which commonly raign about the Dog-days.
  • Embaveté, ou Embavieté, that hath a bib on.
  • Embaumement, an imbalming.
  • Embecqué, instructed before-hand.
  • Embecquer, to instruct one before­hand.
  • Embellissage, an imbellishing.
  • Emberni, clad in rug.
  • Embernir, to cover with, or to clad in rug.
  • Embesongné, busi'd, employed.
  • Embesongnement, a busying, or em­ploying; also a business, or busie work.
  • Embesongner, to busie, employ, set on work.
  • Embeurré, buttered.
  • Embeurrer, to butter.
  • Embezars, Ambesas.
  • Emblavé, sown with corn; also whose corn is got up a pretty height above ground.
  • Emblavence de bled, corn sprung a pretty height above ground; or the springing up of corn.
  • Emblaver, to sow the ground with corn.
  • Emblaveures, corn, whether growing, or in sheaves.
  • Emblayement, a cumber.
  • Emblé, stoln. Je me suis emblé de la troupe, I flunk out of the com­pany.
  • Emble-coeur, heart-stealing.
  • Emblemature, a making of Em­blems.
  • Embler, to steal.
  • Emblesne, a Cataplasm, or Poul­tis.
  • Embleures, corn standing.
  • Emblic, a kind of round Mirabo­lan.
  • Emblocquer, to swive.
  • Embobeliné, botched; also begui­led.
  • Embobeliner, to botch; to beguile.
  • Emboëtture, a putting in a box.
  • Emboir, to soke, or drink up; also to imbue, to moisten.
  • Emboistement, as Emboëtement in the N. D.
  • Emboister, as Emboëter in the N. D.
  • Emboisture, as Emboëtement in the N. D. also the ring or plate of iron, &c. that keeps the box of a wheel from wearing.
  • Emboité, Emboitement, Emboiter. See Emboëter, &c. in the N.D.
  • Emboiture, as Emboëtement in the N. D.
  • Embolismal, added as a day unto a year; or increased as the year by so many days.
  • Embolisme, an addition as of a day or more unto a year.
  • Embosqué, wooded.
  • Embosquer une terre, to plant, or set wood. S'embosquer, to shrowd himself in a wood.
  • Embosser, to swell, or rise in bun­ches.
  • Embottelé, made in bundles, or bot­tles.
  • Embotteler, to make up in bundles, or bottles.
  • Embouchoir, a Boot-last, or Boot-tree; also a horn to drench a horse with, or any thing serving to convey a thing into the mouth.
  • Embouchonné, stopt with a stopple; also having a bush (as a Tavern) hanging before it.
  • Embouchouër, as Embouchoir.
  • Embouqueté, trimmed with Nose-gaies.
  • Embourbement, Embourbeure, a bemudding; a beraying with, or sticking fast, in mud.
  • Embouscher en la Mer, to run into the Sea.
  • Embousé, bedunged, berayed with Cows ordure.
  • Embouté, plated, stiffened; or as Embouti, stretched out; also raised, imbossed.
  • Emboutir, to stretch out; also to raise, or imboss.
  • Emboutissement, a stretching out; a raising or imbossing. Embou­tissements de soye, Silk-thrums.
  • Emboutoir, as Boutoir.
  • Embouzé, as Embousé.
  • Emboysture, as Emboiture.
  • Embrabilé, broad-headed.
  • Embraceler, to furnish with brace­lets.
  • Embrase, as Braise in the N. D.
  • Embrasée, an arm full, or fadom.
  • Embrasselé, furnished with a Brace­let.
  • Embrasse-tout, all imbracing.
  • Embrazé, for Embrasé, burned.
  • Embreuvé, moistened.
  • Embreuver, to moisten.
  • Embridé, bridled, kept in.
  • Embrider, to bridle, to keep in.
  • Embrocation, a gentle bathing of the head, or any other part, with a liquor falling from aloft upon it in the manner of rain.
  • Embrocheure, a spitting, or broach­ing.
  • Embronché, amazed with a blow, whose head hangs down after a blow received.
  • Embroncher, to hold down the head; also to hide the face.
  • Embroqué, gently bathed.
  • Embroquer, gently to bathe.
  • Embroüé, dirty'd, soyled.
  • Embrouillasser, as Embrouiller in the N. D.
  • Embrouillement, a pestering, or in­tangling.
  • Embrouilleur, a pesterer or intangler.
  • s'Embruer, to bedabble himself.
  • Embrunché, wainscoted, seeled.
  • Embruncher, to wainscot.
  • Embruni, made (or grown) brown.
  • Embrunir, to make (or to grow) brown.
  • Embu, for imbu, imbued.
  • Embufflé, deceived, led by the nose.
  • [Page] Embuffler, to deceive, to lead by the nose.
  • Emburelucoqué, pestered.
  • Emburelucoquer, to pester.
  • Embut, a funnet; also a pipe to suck with.
  • Emedullé, whereout the marrow is taken.
  • Emeduller, to take out the marrow.
  • Emembré, dismembred.
  • Emendateur, a mender, an amender.
  • Emendation, a mending, or amend­ing.
  • Emendartice, a woman that mends or reforms any thing.
  • Emende, for Amende, fine, penalty.
  • Emendé, mended, amended.
  • Emender, to mend, or amend.
  • Emerillonné, narrowly watched.
  • Emerillonner, to watch narrowly. Emerillonner à feu & à sang, to prosecute with fire and sword.
  • Emute, (for Mute) de Chiens, a cry of hounds.
  • Emicycle, for hemicycle, a semi­circle.
  • Emine, a kind of measure.
  • Emissole, a kind of Dog-fish.
  • Emmaigri, made lean, faln away.
  • Emmaigrir, to make lean. S'em­maigrir, to fall away, to grow lean.
  • Emmaigrissant, making lean.
  • Emmaisonné, furnished with a house.
  • Emmaisonner, to house, to put into (or furnish with) a house.
  • Emmaistrisé, made Master.
  • Emmaladi, made, or grown sick.
  • Emmaladir, to make sick.
  • Emmalicé, spiteful.
  • Emmalissant, growing malicious.
  • Emmancheure, a setting on of a hast, or handle; also the upper part of a sleeve.
  • Emmanchoir, the hole of a hatchet whereinto the handle is put.
  • Emmanné. full of manna.
  • Emmanoté, manacled.
  • Emmanoter, to manacle.
  • Emmantelé, covered with a cloak.
  • Emmaroté, wearing a fools bable.
  • Emmarré, cast into the Sea.
  • Emmarrer, to cast into the Sea.
  • Emmartelé, put into a jealousie.
  • Emmarteler, to put into a jealousie.
  • Emmassé, heaped up.
  • Emmati, allayed, mortify'd.
  • Emmatir, to allay, to mortify.
  • Emmatrelé, hoarse.
  • Emmatricolé, matriculated.
  • Emmayé, decked with May-flowers.
  • Emmayer, to deck with May-flowers.
  • Emmeché, furnished with match; also snuffed.
  • Emmecher, to furnish with match; also to snuff.
  • Emmelie, a quiet kind of Dance.
  • Emmelioré, bettered, improved.
  • Emmeliorer, to better, to improve.
  • Emmentelé, as Emmantelé.
  • Emmenteler, to cover with a cloak.
  • Emmenuisé, made small.
  • Emmenuiser, to make small.
  • Emmerdé, berayd with ordure.
  • Emmerder, to beray with ordure.
  • S'Emmesler, to meddle with.
  • Emmesnager, to set a house in good order.
  • Emmeublé, furnished with movea­bles.
  • Emmeublement, furniture, or a furnishing with moveables.
  • Emmeubler sa maison, to furnish his house.
  • Emmeurer, as Emmurer.
  • Emmi, through, in the midst of.
  • Emmiellement, an inducement.
  • Emmielleure, a sweetning with honey.
  • Emminer, to put into a mine.
  • Emmitouflé, muffled.
  • S'Emmitoufler, to muffle.
  • Emmitré, Crowned with a Miter.
  • Emmitrer, to Crown with a Miter.
  • Emmoeller, as Esmoeller.
  • Emmoncelé, heaped up.
  • Emmonceler, to heap up.
  • Emmont, upward.
  • Emmorionné, covered with a mur­rion or head-piece.
  • Emmorisque, Moorish, or Moor-like.
  • Emmortaisé, joyned, or closed by mortaise.
  • Emmortaiser, to joyn or close by mortaise.
  • Emmouflé, wrapt up warm.
  • Emmoufler, to wrap up warm.
  • Emmuré, walled about.
  • Emmurer, to wall about.
  • Emmusqué, perfumed with Musk.
  • Emmusquer, to perfume with Musk.
  • Emolli, mollify'd, softned.
  • Emollient, mollifying, softning.
  • Emollir, to mollify, to soften.
  • Emorcer, Emorcher, for amorcer, to bait.
  • Emoucé, Emoucer. see Emoussé, Emousser in the N. D.
  • Emouchail, a fly-flap.
  • Emoucher, as Esmoucher.
  • Emouchon, a holy-water sprinkle.
  • Emouvant, moving, stirring up.
  • Empacqué, wilful, obstinate.
  • Empacté, compacted, close together.
  • Empacter, to compact.
  • Empaillé, filled with straw.
  • Empaindre, violently to set upon.
  • Empaint, violently set on.
  • Empainte, a violent onset.
  • Empaletoqué, muffled up.
  • Empalin, a span.
  • Empalmé, struck with the palm of the hand.
  • Empalmer, to strike with the palm of the hand.
  • Empampré, decked with vine-bran­ches.
  • Empanage, as Appanage in the N.D.
  • Empaneré, put into wicker-baskets.
  • Empanerer, to put into wicker-baskets.
  • Empanné, feathered.
  • Empantouflé, wearing slippers. Li­vre empantouflé, a Book with a thick cover.
  • Emparagé, that hath his due part, or portion.
  • Emparché, put into a pound.
  • Emparement, a seising, or laying hold on.
  • Emparence, defence.
  • Emparenter, to joyn in Kinred.
  • Emparfumé, perfumed.
  • Emparfumer, to perfume.
  • Emparlé, homme bien emparlé, a well spoken man.
  • Emparle-silence, a speaking by signes.
  • Emparlier, a Counsellor, Barrester.
  • Empas, shackles.
  • Empasté, crusted, or baked hard; made into past.
  • Empastelé, crammed with rolls of past.
  • Empastement, a pasting, a making of dough into paste.
  • Empaster, to knead.
  • Empatement, as Empiettement.
  • Empatenostré, loaden with Beads.
  • Empatronné, seized on.
  • S'Empatronner de, to seize on.
  • Empatté, as Espaté.
  • Empattement, as Espatement.
  • Empaulmé, taken hold of.
  • Empaulmer, to lay hold on.
  • Empavoisé, shielded.
  • S'Empavoiser, to cover himself with a shield.
  • Empayser, to grow natural to; to thrive.
  • Empeigné, fastned with the teeth of a comb; also scratched with a comb.
  • Empeigner, to comb, or to scratch with a comb. Empeigner le bout d'une douve, to pin the bar of a piece of cask.
  • Empeinte, de cette empeinte, at this push.
  • [Page] Empannaché, as Empanaché, set out with feathers.
  • Empennon, the feather of an arrow.
  • Emperier, Imperial.
  • Emperiere, an Empress.
  • Emperlé, set thick with pearls.
  • Emperler, to set thick with Pearls.
  • Emperruqué, that wears a Perwig.
  • Empesche-maison, a trouble-house.
  • Empesté, infected with the plague.
  • Empester, to infect with the plague.
  • Empestre, an incumbrance.
  • Empestré, pestered.
  • Empestrement, a pestering.
  • Empestrer, to pester.
  • Empetuosité, impetuosity.
  • Emphyteosien, as Emphyteote in the N. D.
  • Emphyteuse, as Emphyteose, in the N. D.
  • Emphyteutique, Seigneur Emphy­teutique, a Lord that raises or improves his rents.
  • Empiece, not of a great while.
  • Empiegé, insnared.
  • Empieme, as Empyeme.
  • Empienne, as Empeigne, the up­per leather of a shooe.
  • Empierré, turned into stone.
  • Empierrement, a turning into stone.
  • Empierrer, to turn into stone.
  • Empietement, an usurpation of ano­ther mans right. Empietement d'une montagne, the foot of a hill.
  • Empietté, as Empieté in the N. D.
  • Empiettement, Empieture, as Em­pietement.
  • Empillé, heaped on.
  • Empiller, to heap on.
  • Empiné, turned into a pine-tree.
  • Empirance, an impairing; also al­lay in coin.
  • D'Empire, à l'empire, worse and worse.
  • Empireume, a mark of fire, or burning.
  • Empistolé, armed with a pistol.
  • Empistoler, to arm with pistols.
  • Emplacé, placed, setled.
  • Emplacement d'une Ville, the seat of a Town.
  • Emplacer, to place, to settle.
  • Emplage, a filling.
  • Emplaidé, sued.
  • Emplaider, to sue.
  • Emplastration, a laying of plaister; a grafting by inoculation; the applying of a salve or plaister.
  • Emplastrure, a plaistering.
  • Emplastreux, full of plaisters, also belonging to, or serving for a plaister.
  • Emplatement, a flatting; also a flat, or broad part of.
  • Emplier, as Employer, to imploy.
  • Emploicte, for Employ, an Imploy; also trade or traffick. Marchan­dise d'emploicte, ware that sells well.
  • Emploicter, to trade.
  • Emploite, as Emploicte.
  • Emplomber, to lead.
  • Emplotonné, made into a bottom, conglomerated.
  • Emplotonner, to make into bot­toms.
  • Employement, an imploying.
  • Emplumassé, set out with feathers.
  • Emply, for Emploi, an Employ.
  • Empoché, put into a pocket.
  • Empocher, to put into a pocket.
  • Empoignure, a handle.
  • Empoinctant, pointing on.
  • Empoincter, as Empointer.
  • Empoint, as bien empoint de faire, likely to do. Mal empoint, in ill plight.
  • Empointer, to point on. Empoin­ter les doigts sur le Luth, to sin­ger a Lute.
  • Empoisonneresse, a she-poysoner.
  • Empoissonné, filled, served, or fur­nished with fish.
  • Empoissonnement, a storing of a pond with fish.
  • Empoissonner, to store with fish.
  • Empor, a Mart-town.
  • Empoudré, filled with dust.
  • Empoudrer, to fill with dust.
  • Empoule, as ampoule, a blister.
  • Empoulé, blistered.
  • Empoulément, swellingly.
  • Empoulure, a blistered part of the body.
  • Empouppant, blowing as wind in the poop of a ship.
  • Empouppé, blown forward by a wind in the poop; also hit in the poop.
  • Empoupper, to blow in the poop of a ship, to set forward as a full wind doth a ship; also to hit the poop.
  • Empraignant, imprinting.
  • Emprainte, for Empreinte, an im­printing.
  • Empreé, turned into a Meadow.
  • Empreer, to make a Meadow of.
  • Empreignée, with child.
  • Empreinct, the Palsie.
  • Empreincte (Adj.) full, with young.
  • Emprendre, to undertake.
  • Empres, hard by.
  • Empreut, one.
  • Emp [...]is, undertaken.
  • Emprise, an undertaking.
  • Emprunelé, belonging to the apple of an eye.
  • Emption, a buying, a purchasing.
  • Empunaisi, filled with stench.
  • Empunaisir, to fill with stench.
  • Emputé, accused, complained of.
  • Emputement, an imputation, asper­sion.
  • Emputer, to accuse, or complain of.
  • Emputeur, a secret accuser, an in­former.
  • Empyeme, an inward collection of corrupt matter in any part of the body, but especially between the breast and lungs.
  • Empyreume, a dry and accidental heat.
  • Emuctoire, as Emonctoire.
  • Emulgeant, milking; or as Emul­gent.
  • Emulgence, a milking, or stroaking.
  • Emulgent, as Veine emulgente, one of the two main branches of the hollow Vein.
  • Emut, as Esmeut.
  • Emutissement, the muting, or drop­pings of birds.
  • Emyne, a kind of measure.
  • Enacquer, to pick a bone.
  • Enaigri, sharpned, exasperated.
  • Enaigrir, to make, or grow sharp; to anger, to exasperate.
  • Enameré, made bitter.
  • Enamerer, to make bitter.
  • Enamouré, inamoured.
  • s'Enamourer de, to fall in love with.
  • s'Enarbrer, a horse to rise so high that he is like to fall backward.
  • Enarché, arched, covered with an arch.
  • Enarcher, to arch, or cover with an arch.
  • Enarmée, the handles of a shield.
  • Enarthrose, a full and perfect uni­ting of bones.
  • Enasé, nose-less.
  • Enaser, to cut off ones nose.
  • Enaspri, sharpened, exasperated.
  • Enasprir, to sharpen, to exasperate.
  • Encacqué, put into a cag.
  • Encacquer, to put into a cag, or little barrel.
  • Encadené, chained.
  • Encadener, to chain, or to lie in a chain.
  • Encagé, put into a cage, or prison.
  • Encager, to put into a cage, or prison.
  • s'Encaillouïr, to become as bard as a flint.
  • Encaissé, put into a case, or chest.
  • Encaisser, to put into a case, or chest.
  • [Page] Encaloché, that wears high wooden shoes.
  • Encaly, hardened, as the skin of a toyling hand.
  • Encant, as Encan in the N. D.
  • Encapé, covered with a hood, or cloak.
  • Encapeliné, wearing a little, flat, narrow-brimmed hat; or armed with a scull of iron.
  • Encapeluchonné, wearing a Cowl, as a Monk.
  • Encaper, to cover with a hood or cloak.
  • Encapitonner, to hood, or cover the head.
  • Encapuchonné, as Encapeluchon­né.
  • Encapuchonner, to hood with a ca­puch.
  • Encarené, laid on the side as a ship.
  • Encarener une Nef, to carry in a ship, to lay her on her side.
  • Encarné, incarnated, made fleshy, or fat.
  • Encarner, to incarnate, to make fleshy, or fat.
  • Encarré, gravelled, or as Encarené.
  • Encarrer, to level at, or as Acarer.
  • Encassé, put into a case, or chest.
  • Encasser, to put into a case, or chest.
  • Encastellé, narrow-heeled, as a horse.
  • s'Encasteller, to grow narrow-heeled.
  • Encastelure, a vicious or painful narrowness in a horses heel; a growing narrow-heeled.
  • Encastillement, an inchacement.
  • Encauché, intangled.
  • Encauste, enamel, or varnish.
  • Encaustique, enamelled, varnished, wrought with fire.
  • Encellé, as Ensellé.
  • Encensier, a star in heaven placed under the sting of the Scorpion.
  • Encensier, (Adj.) perfuming with incense.
  • Encentrer, to graft.
  • Encepé, set in the stocks; also laden with irons.
  • Enceper, to set in the stocks.
  • Encerclé, incircled, incompassed, bound about with hoops.
  • Encercler, to incircle, to incompass, to binde about with hoops.
  • Encernant, invironing, incompas­sing.
  • Encerné, invironed, incompassed.
  • Enchafouiné, out of tune.
  • Enchagriné, vexed.
  • Enchagriner, to vex.
  • Enchainement, a binding with chains.
  • Enchalassé, propped, as a vine.
  • Enchalasser une vigne, to prop, or underset a vine.
  • Enchambré, lodged in a chamber; also mortaised, inclosed within.
  • Enchampre, a chizel; a cutting, carving, or graving tool.
  • Enchancré, cankered.
  • Enchancrer, to canker.
  • Enchante-coeur, heart-charming.
  • Enchanteries, inchantments.
  • Enchanteusement, inchantingly.
  • Enchapelé, crowned with Garlands; also covered with a hat.
  • Enchapeler, to crown with Gar­lands; also to set a hat on the head.
  • Enchapement d'une cheminée, the broad top of a chimney.
  • Enchaperonnement, a covering with a hood; also the out-jutting of a Roof.
  • Enchappé, wearing a Cope.
  • Enchappeler, as Enchapeler.
  • Encharacteré, written, or printed in Characters.
  • Encharacterer, to write, or print in Characters.
  • Encharbouté, rumpled, confused.
  • Enchardonné, weeded, rid of thi­stles.
  • Enchardonner, to weed out thi­stles.
  • Enchargé, charged, injoyned; also over-charged.
  • Encharger, to charge, or give in charge. Encharger l'estomac, to cloy his stomack. Femme qui encharge, a woman that grows big on't.
  • Encharné, whereon flesh is bred. Encharné au coeur, rooted in the heart.
  • Encharnelé, propped, as a Vine.
  • Encharneler une Vigne, to prop, or underset a Vine.
  • Encharner, to flesh, to breed flesh on.
  • Enchassillé de Menuiserie, set in a Wainscot-frame. Presse enchassil­lée, a Printers Press with a Tym­pan.
  • Enchassiller, to set in.
  • Enchatonner, to inchace.
  • Enchaucié, chased, pursued.
  • Enchaulmé, thatched.
  • Enchaulmer, to thatch.
  • Enchausseure, a shooing; also the measure of a foot taken to make a shooe by.
  • Enche, as Anche.
  • Encheinure, as Enchainure in the N. D.
  • Encheminer, to set in the way.
  • Enchemisé, covered with a shirt, or smock.
  • Enchenard, part of a womans &c.
  • Enchepé, set in the stocks.
  • Encheper, to set in the stocks.
  • Encheriment, a raising of a price, a raising in price.
  • Encherner, to flesh.
  • Encherre, as Encherir in the N. D.
  • Enchesneure, a chaining; also a course of things linked together.
  • Enchet, a falling, or dropping in.
  • Enchevallé, set with one foot over another.
  • Enchevaller, to set one foot over a­nother.
  • Enchevestré, ty'd in a halter; also intangled.
  • Enchevestrement, a tying in a halter; also a being intangled.
  • Enchevestrer, to tye in a halter; also to intangle.
  • Enchevestrure, as Enchevestrement. Enchevestrure de cheminée, the mantle-tree of a chimney.
  • Encheux, as Ainçois.
  • Enchiffré, set down in Cyphers.
  • Enchiffrené, whose nose is stopt with a cold.
  • Enchiffrer, to cypher.
  • Enciré, waxed, made of wax.
  • Encirer, to wax, to make of wax.
  • Encis, the murthering of a great-belly'd woman, or of the Infant within her belly.
  • Encisé, cut up, or into.
  • Enciser, to make an incision.
  • Enclaveure, as Enclavement in the N. D.
  • Enclin, for Inclination, inclina­tion.
  • Encliner, to incline; also to decline. S'encliner, to bow down.
  • Enclostré, shut up in a Cloyster.
  • Enclostrer, to shut up in a Cloyster.
  • Enclosture, an inclosure, a Close.
  • Enclotir, to drive a Fox or Coney into an earth, or berry.
  • Encloucher, to tell one what he shall say.
  • Encloyer, to cloy.
  • Enclumeau, a little Anvil.
  • Encoche, a notch.
  • Encocheure, a notching.
  • Encoeur, as Encueur.
  • Encoigné, thrust into a corner; made corner-wise; also wedged in.
  • Encoigneure, as Encongnure in the N. D.
  • [Page] Encoleure, as Encoulure in the N. D.
  • Encollé, having a fair, stiff, and big neck; also put about the neck. Long encollé, necked like a Crane.
  • Encoller, to put about the neck.
  • Encollure, as Encoulure in the N. D.
  • Encoloré, coloured all over.
  • Encombre, as Encombrier; also rubbi [...]h.
  • Encombré, incumbred, pestered.
  • Encombrement, an incumbring, or pestering; also an annoyance, or incumbrance.
  • Encombrer, to incumber, to pester. Encombrer le mariage de sa femme, to alien his Wives land.
  • Encombrier, a cumber, an incum­brance; a mischief, or misfortune.
  • Encomiastique, praising, commen­ding.
  • Encommencé, begun.
  • Encommencer, to begin.
  • Encommenceur, a beginner.
  • Enconché, trimmed, drest.
  • Encontenancé, that hath put a good face on the matter.
  • Encontenancer, to put a good face on the matter.
  • Encontré, incountred, or met with.
  • Encontrer, to incounter.
  • Enconvenancé, covenanted.
  • Enconvenancer, to covenant.
  • Encoqueluché, hooded; also sick of the disease called Coqueluchoe.
  • Encoqueluchonné, wearing a hood, or Spanish Capuch.
  • Encoquillé, as Poisson encoquillé, a Shell-fish.
  • Encorbellement, a shouldering or supporting by Corbels, or Brac­kets.
  • Encordé, bound with cords.
  • Encordelé, corded, made up with cords; also intangled therewith.
  • Encordeler, to cord, to make up with cords; also to intangle with cords.
  • Encordonné, twisted of many strings.
  • Encordonner, to twist of many strings.
  • Encoremes, the signes of urine (e­specially those that swim on the top thereof).
  • Encornal, the hounds of a Mast.
  • Encorné, horned; also put into a horn.
  • Encorner, to trim with horns; al­so to put into a horn.
  • Encorneté, put into a horn, or cornet.
  • Encorneter, to put into a horn, or cornet.
  • Encornure, a trimming with horn; also the horns of a beast.
  • Encorny, hard and smooth as horn.
  • Encoronné, crowned.
  • Encoronner, to crown.
  • Encotonné, stuffed with Cotton.
  • Encotonner, to stuff with Cotton.
  • Encouärdé, made cowardly.
  • Encouarder, to make a coward.
  • Encouärdi, grown cowardly.
  • Encouärdir, to grow cowardly.
  • Encoulpé, accused.
  • Encoulper, to accuse.
  • Encoulpeur, an accuser.
  • Encoultré, furnished with a culter.
  • Encoultrer, to furnish with a culter.
  • Encourement, a punishment, a pe­nalty incurred.
  • Encourrayé, bound (or furnished) with leathern thongs.
  • Encourayer, to binde (or furnish) with leathern thongs.
  • Encourtiné, covered with (or sha­dowed by) a curtain, hid behinde a curtain.
  • Encourtiner, to draw a curtain o­ver, to cover with (to shadow by) a curtain, to hide behinde a cur­tain.
  • Encoutelassé, armed with a cutte­las.
  • Encoutelasser, to arm (or furnish) with a cuttelas.
  • Encrassé, grown thick with filth and ordure.
  • Encrasser, to make thick with filth and ordure.
  • Encrené, notched, indented.
  • Encresmé, full of cream, made of cream.
  • Encresmer, to fill, or furnish with cream.
  • Encreté, bitterness, also blackness.
  • Encreusé, hollowed; also laid up in holes.
  • Encreuser, to hollow; also to lay up in holes.
  • Encrier, an Ink-maker.
  • Encrier, (Adj.) of, or belonging to Ink.
  • Encrou, as Escrou.
  • Encroüé, lodged, as a cudgel in a tree, hanging on, or ledged in.
  • Encrouër, to lodge as a cudgel in a tree, to hang on, or ledge in.
  • Encrousté, pargetted; becrusted, or whereon a scab is set.
  • Encroustement, a pargetting, a bringing of a scab on.
  • Encrouster, to parget; to bring a scab on.
  • Encruché, put into an earthen pot, also as Encroüé.
  • Encrucher, to put into an earthen pot.
  • Encrudi, made, or become raw.
  • Encrudir, to make, or become raw.
  • Encueur, the Scithy (a disease of horses and other cattel.)
  • Encuict, raw, undigested; also hardned through heat.
  • Encuirassé, grown hard, or stiff; al­so bound hard.
  • Encuirasser, to harden, or stiffen; also to binde hard.
  • Enculé, set upon the tail; also set a­slope, or with an imbowed bot­tom.
  • Encusé, accused, detected.
  • Encusement, an accusation, or de­tection.
  • Encuser, to accuse, to detect.
  • Encuseur, an accuser, a detecter.
  • Encuvé, put into a fat, or tub.
  • Encuver, to put into a fat, or tub.
  • Encyliglotte, the tongue-string.
  • Encyrer, as Inciser in the N. D.
  • Enda, in faith, in truth.
  • Endaims, as Andaims.
  • Endamoisellé, effeminated; also at­tired in a Gentlewomans apparel.
  • Endare, he went his way.
  • Endazé, earnest in a business.
  • Endebtement, a being indebted; a bringing into debt.
  • Endelechie, assiduity.
  • Endemené, wanton, waggish, lasci­vious.
  • Endementiers, in the mean while.
  • Endenté, indented.
  • Endenter, to indent.
  • Endernier, the last, or the latter-end.
  • Endesvé, mad.
  • Endesver, to rage, to be mad.
  • Endiabler, to possess with a devil.
  • Endiamenté, set with Diamonds.
  • Endicté, indicted, accused.
  • Endictement, an indictment, or ac­cusation.
  • Endicter, to indict, or accuse.
  • Endicteur, an indicter, accuser, in­former.
  • Endimanché, attired for Holy­days.
  • Endité, as Endicté; also demon­strated, pointed at with a fin­ger.
  • Endizeler les gerbes, to shock up sheaves of corn, to make them up in (ten-sheaved) half-thraves.
  • Endoctrinable, fit to be taught.
  • Endoctriné, taught, instructed.
  • Endoctrinement, an instruction.
  • [Page] Endoctriner, to teach, to instruct.
  • Endoille, as Andouille in the N. D.
  • Endoré, gilt all over; beset, or adorned with gold.
  • Endorer, to gild all over; to beset or adorn with gold.
  • Endormant, the Serpent Cenchris, whose stinging breeds a continual sleeping.
  • Endormie, the herb henbane or poppy.
  • Endormisson de membres, num­ness.
  • Endos, for Endossement, an in­dorsing.
  • Endosé, that hath his share or por­tion of; whose part is limited or prescribed unto him.
  • Endosseure, the back-part of any thing; also an indorsement.
  • Endoüairé, indowed, indued with.
  • Endoüairer, to indow, to indue with.
  • Endoulouri, grieved, pained.
  • Endouté, doubtful
  • Endroict, (Adj.) direct.
  • Endue, skilful.
  • Enduisement, a plaistering, dawb­ing.
  • Enduiseur, a plaisterer, a dawber.
  • Enduit, (Subst.) or Enduite, plai­ster; a bed or lay of plaister.
  • Endurable, sufferable, indurable.
  • Endurant, suffering, induring.
  • Endurement, an induring; also last­ing.
  • Enduvetter, to fill, or stuff with down.
  • Eneaüé, watered; seasoned with, or turned into water.
  • Eneaüer, to turn into water; to mingle, or season with water.
  • Enenda, in faith, in truth.
  • Enervation, enervation.
  • Enervé, enervated, weakened.
  • Enerver, to enervate, to weaken.
  • Enfaissé, made up into a bundle.
  • Enfaisser, to make up into a bun­dle.
  • Enfaistau, a Ridge-tile.
  • Enfaisté, roofed.
  • Enfaisture, a ridge, or ridging.
  • Enfanchonnets, grand-children.
  • Enfançon, a little infant.
  • Enfangé, bemired.
  • Enfangement, a bemiring.
  • Enfanger, to bemire.
  • Enfanson, a little infant.
  • Enfantiere, femme enfantiere, a childe-bearing woman.
  • Enfantil, childish.
  • Enfantilement, childishly.
  • Enfantillage, childishness.
  • Enfantiller, to play like a childe.
  • Enfantinément, childishly.
  • Enfardelé, made up into a bundle.
  • Enfardeler, to make up into a bun­dle.
  • Enfeconder, to make fruitful.
  • Enfelonni, grown cruel.
  • s'Enfelonnir, to grow cruel.
  • Enferger, to fetter.
  • Enferges, Shackles, Fetters.
  • Enferme, infirm, weak.
  • Enfermement, a shutting, or locking up.
  • Enfermerie, an Hospital; a Cloy­ster.
  • Enfermier, an Overseer of the Sick in Hospitals; also the Porter of a Cloyster.
  • Enfestau, a Ridge-tile.
  • Enfesté, kept Holy-day. Maison enfestée, a house with a roof ti­led.
  • Enfester, to keep Holy-day. Enfe­ster un edifice, to tile a house.
  • Enfeuillé, covered with leaves.
  • s'Enfeuiller, to cover himself with leaves.
  • Enfiellé, made bitter as gall; filled, or mingled with gall.
  • Enfieller, to make bitter; to fill, or mingle with gall.
  • Enfieri, grown proud.
  • s'Enfierir, to grow proud.
  • Enfievré, put into an ague.
  • Enfievrer, to put into an ague.
  • Enfinceux, wanton, lascivious.
  • Enfistulé, that hath a fistula.
  • Enflambant, inflaming.
  • Enflambé, inflamed.
  • Enflambement, an inflaming.
  • Enflamber, to inflame. S'enflamber de courroux, to chafe.
  • Enfle-boeuf, the Ox-fly, or long-legged beetle.
  • Enflecheures, the ratlings, the cor­dy steps whereby Mariners climb up to the top of a Mast.
  • Enflement, a swelling.
  • Enflément, swellingly.
  • Enflescher, to pierce with arrows.
  • Enfleure, as Enflure, a swelling.
  • Enfleurer, Enfleurir, Enfleuronnier, to spread with flowers.
  • Enfoiri, beshit.
  • Enfoirir, to beshit.
  • Enfolastré, doting on.
  • Enfondrant, sinking, overwhelm­ing; also yielding as a soft thing to the violence of a hard.
  • Enfondré, sunk, overwhelmed; also extreamly dinted, or beaten far in.
  • Enfondrer, to sink, to overwhelm.
  • Enfondrer un chemin, to make a deep way.
  • Enfondrer un harnois, to make a great dint in an armor.
  • Enfondu, wringing-wet.
  • Enforcé, strengthened.
  • s'Enforcer, as alors s'enforça la feste, then did the feast increase.
  • Enforci, inforced, strengthened.
  • Enforcir, to inforce, to strengthen. S'enforcir, to grow strong, to pick up his crums.
  • Enforme, formed, fashioned.
  • Enformer, to form, to fashion.
  • Enforti, strengthened, fastened; al­so thickned as cloth is by fulling.
  • Enfoué, turned into fire.
  • Enfouër, to turn into fire.
  • Enfourché, forked.
  • Enfourchir, to besork; also to be­stride.
  • Enfourchure, as Fourchure in the N. D.
  • Enfractueux, intricate, perplexed.
  • Enfractuosité, intricacy.
  • Enfrainct, infringed, violated, bro­ken.
  • Enfrangé, edged with fringe.
  • Enfranger, to edge (or set) with fringe.
  • Enfriché, overgrown with weeds, &c.
  • s'Enfricher, to be overgrown with weeds, &c.
  • s'Enfroidurer, to take cold.
  • Enfroqué, covered with a Monks hood or cowl.
  • Enfroquer, to cover with a cowl; to make, or institute a Monk.
  • Enfruité, stored with fruit.
  • Enfruiter, to store with fruit.
  • Enfueillé, stuck with leaves.
  • Enfueiller, to stick with leaves. S'enfueiller, to hide himself among leaves.
  • Enfumé, smoaked; smoaky-colou­red.
  • Enfumé, (Subst.) a dusky Sea-fish, that lives upon slime and ordure.
  • Enfumement, a smoaking.
  • Enfumer, to smoak.
  • Enfurié, inraged, stark mad.
  • Enfusté, put into a cask.
  • Engage, a pawn, a pledge, an in­gagement.
  • Engageur, a pawner, an ingager.
  • Engageure, a pawning, an ingage­ing.
  • Engaigne, a sleight, or craft.
  • Engaigné, as Engigné; also egged, urged, provoked.
  • Engaigner to cozen, gull, or deceive; to charm; to egg, or to set on.
  • Engain, anger; also a cousening trick.
  • [Page] Engane-pastre, a water-wagtail.
  • Enganer, to deceive; a nurse to con­ceal her being with child.
  • Enganté, furnished with gloves. Mittaines engantées, mittains like gloves.
  • Engarber, as Encontenancer; also to cover.
  • Engardé, kept from, hindered.
  • Engarder, to keep from, to hinder. Engarder la hardiesse de, to curb the boldness of.
  • Engastrimyte, that speaks out of the belly, as one that is possessed seems to do.
  • Engauché, as Encauché.
  • Enge, as Engeance.
  • Engé, stored with the kind of; also increased.
  • Engeance, a breed, or generation.
  • Engeancement, a breeding, increa­sing.
  • Engeancer, to breed, to increase.
  • Engelé, frozen, congealed.
  • Engeler, to freeze, to congeal.
  • Engeleure, a Chilblain.
  • Engendreure, Engendrure, beget­ting, procreation.
  • Enger, to produce, or make to grow; to store or fill with the increase or kind of; also to increase.
  • Engerbé, bound up together in a sheaf.
  • Engerber, to bind up in a sheaf.
  • Engeronné, dandled on (or hugged in) the lap.
  • Engeronner, to dandle upon the lap.
  • Engigné, charmed, bewitched; also cousened.
  • Engigner, to charm, to bewitch; also to cousen.
  • Engigneur, a charmer; also a cheat.
  • Enginé, as Engigné.
  • Enginer, as Engigner.
  • Enginier, a maker of Engins.
  • Engiponné, muffled up; also rag­ged, or in rags.
  • Englacé, grown cold as ice.
  • s'Englacer, to wax as cold as ice.
  • Englantine, an eglantine.
  • Engle, for angle, an angle.
  • Englentier, a sweet-briar tree.
  • Engler, to shut up in a corner.
  • Englet, as Anglet.
  • Englobé, contained within the com­pass of.
  • Englober, to contain or to compre­hend within the circumference of.
  • Englobure, an inglobing; also a globe-like circumference or com­pass.
  • Englume, for Enclume, an anvil.
  • Engolsé, swallowed up in a gulf.
  • Engolfer, to swallow up.
  • Engoncé, set fast in; straitned, wanting liberty.
  • Engorgement, a pouring down the throat, a swallowing up, as of a River by the Sea; also a choaking.
  • Engorgeur, a glutton.
  • Engorgeux, greedy.
  • Engoüé, choaked, stifled.
  • Engouër, to choak, or stifle.
  • Engouleur, a glutton.
  • Engoulphe, as Engolfé.
  • Engourmelé, curdled thick.
  • Engousté, put in tast, brought unto a stomack; also inchased.
  • Engraississant, for engraissant, fat­tening.
  • Engraiz, as Engrais, in the N. D.
  • Engrand, longing much.
  • Engrangé, put into a barn.
  • Engrangement, an inning of corn, a putting on't up in a barn.
  • Engranger, to inn corn.
  • Engraveur, an Ingraver.
  • Engravcure, an ingraving.
  • s'Engreger, to grow worse, to be­come sover.
  • Engreigné, as pore engreigné, a measeld hog.
  • Engressé, ingrailed, or invecked, (in Heraldy.)
  • Engressure, an ingrailling, or in­vecking, a kind of small indent­ing in a Coat of Arms.
  • Engressement, for Engraissement, a fattening of cattel.
  • Engriner, to grow greater.
  • Engroigné, sullen, frowning.
  • Engroin, sallenness.
  • Engroissi, made, or grown big.
  • Engrommelé, curdled thick, gathe­red into knobs or knots.
  • Engroüé, choaked up, as the course of a water-mill, by weeds.
  • Enguiné, deceived.
  • Enguiner, to deceive.
  • Enguiponné, as Engiponne.
  • Enguerlandé, wearing a garland.
  • Enguerlander, to crown with a gar­land.
  • Engyronner, to inviron, or to in­compass.
  • Engys, for aupres, near, hard by.
  • Enhaillonné, tattered, ragged.
  • Enhair, to hate.
  • Enhanné, toyled hard.
  • Enhanner, to toys hard.
  • Enhanté, having a staff or handle put to it.
  • Enhanter une pique, to put the staff into the head of a pike.
  • Enharnaché, harnassed.
  • Enharnachement, harnass; also the harnassing of a horse.
  • Enharnacher un cheval, to harnass a horse, to put on all his furni­ture.
  • Enharnichement, as Enharnache­ment.
  • Enhasté, put upon a spit.
  • Enhaster, to put on the spit.
  • Enhault, for en haut, above.
  • Enhazé, very busy. Il est tout enha­zé à pluvoir, it is set to rain.
  • Enherbé, bewitched, or poysoned with herbs.
  • Enherbement, a bewitching, or poysoning with herbs.
  • Enherber, to bewitch, or poyson with herbs.
  • Enheriter, to make one his heir.
  • Enheudé, fettered.
  • Enheuder, to fetter.
  • Enhorner, to tip with horn.
  • Enhort, exhortation.
  • Enhorté, exhorted.
  • Enhortement, an exhorting.
  • Enhorter, to exhort.
  • Enhorteur, an exhorter.
  • Enhui, to day.
  • Enhuilé, oyled, anointed.
  • Enhuiler, to oyl, to anoint. En­huiler un homme qui meurt, to minister the extream Ʋnction to a dying man.
  • Enhydrer, to breed many mischiefs by the cutting off of one.
  • Enhydride, an Adder, or water-Snake.
  • Enjablé, whose head is fitted for the Crows.
  • Enjabler, to make the head of a cask fit for the Crows.
  • s'Enjalouser, to grow jealous.
  • Enjambé, strid over; also incroa­ched on.
  • Enjambée, a stride, or as much ground as one can stride over.
  • Enjambement, a striding over; an incroaching upon.
  • Enjambeure, Enjambure, a stride.
  • Enjaveliner, to arm, or strike, with a Javeline.
  • Enjauler, Enjauleur. See Enjoler, Enjoleur in the N. D.
  • Enjauleuse, an inticing huswife.
  • s'Enjaunir, to wax yellow.
  • Enjeoller, for enjoler, to deceive one with fair words.
  • En-j [...]u, a stake at play.
  • Enig, with.
  • Enigmatique, enigmatical, ob­ [...]ure.
  • Enjobeliné, fooled, abused.
  • Enjobeliner, to fool, to abuse.
  • Enjoinct, for Enjoint, injoyned.
  • [Page] Enjoincté, bas enjoincté, low-joyn­ted.
  • Enjoliveure, an attiring, an at­tire.
  • Enjonché, strewed, or set out with green Rushes, fresh Herbs, &c.
  • Enjoncher, to strew, or set out with green Rushes, fresh Herbs, &c.
  • Enjoyallier, to deck, or adorn with Jewels.
  • Enjuvencé, made young, or youth­ful.
  • Enjuvencer, to make youthful.
  • Enixe, earnest, endeavouring, or la­bouring hard.
  • Enlacé, Enlacer, as Enlassé, Enla­cer in the N. D.
  • Enlaidi, grown ugly.
  • Enlaidir, to make ugly.
  • Enlaidissement, a disfiguring, or making ugly.
  • Enlanguagé, bien enlanguagé, a well-spoken man.
  • Enlié, bound together.
  • Enlier, to binde together.
  • Enlignagé, bien enlignagé, of good kinred.
  • Enlissé, smoothed, sleeked.
  • Enlisser, to smooth, to sleek.
  • Enlisseure, a smoothing, or slee­king.
  • Enlourdi, grown dull, sottish.
  • Ennasin, belonging to the nose.
  • Ennassé, caught, as fish in a wheel.
  • s'Ennasser, to be caught, as fish in a wheel.
  • Ennazé, put on the nose.
  • Ennazer, to put on the nose.
  • Enneigé, full of snow.
  • Ennelé, as Jambes ennelées, Baker-legs.
  • Ennicroche, an intricacy.
  • Ennicroché, perplexed.
  • Enniellé, blasted, as Corn, &c.
  • s'Ennieller, Corn, Vines, or Fruits to be blasted.
  • Ennoirci, blacked, grown (or made) black.
  • Ennoircir, to black, or make black; to grow black.
  • Ennombré, number out, enumerated; told (counted) over.
  • Ennombrer, to enumerate, or num­ber out; to tell (or count) over.
  • Ennossé, almost choaked with a bone.
  • Ennoüé, ty'd up, or on a knot.
  • Ennouër, to tye on a knot.
  • Ennoye, the name of a venomous worm.
  • Ennuagé, overclouded.
  • Ennuager, to overcloud.
  • s'Ennuer, to grow cloudy.
  • Ennuicté, benighted, turned into night.
  • Ennuicter, to benight, to turn into night.
  • Ennuicti, benighted.
  • Enny, as Ennoye.
  • Enombragé, overshadowed.
  • Enombrager, to overshadow.
  • Enombré, as Enombragé.
  • Enombrer, as Enombrager.
  • Enondé, waved, wrought like waves.
  • Enordi, defiled, polluted.
  • Enordir, to defile, to pollute.
  • Enormissime, most enormous, or hai­nous.
  • Enortié, netled, stung with nettles.
  • Enortier, to nettle, or sting with nettles.
  • Enossé, e'en choaked with a bone; also settled in the bones.
  • Enoyselé, fleshed upon birds, as a Hawk.
  • Enperruqué, as Emperruqué.
  • Enquaissé, put up into a chest.
  • Enquaisser, to put up into a chest.
  • Enquant, as Inquant.
  • Enquantellé, well piked.
  • Enquenouiller de filace, to draw a Distaff.
  • Enquerquenner, to yoke Swine.
  • s'Enguester, for s'Enquerir, to in­quire.
  • Enracinable, sit to take root.
  • Enracinement, a rooting, or taking root.
  • Enragément, madly.
  • Enrailler, to stare.
  • Enramé, set thick with boughs; al­so got upon a bough.
  • Enramement, a laying, or sprea­ding of boughs; a climbing on boughs.
  • Enramer, to spread boughs. S'en­ramer, to climb upon boughs.
  • Enranci, grown musty.
  • Enrancir, to grow musty.
  • Enraqué, bemired.
  • Enrassé, stark mad.
  • Enrayé, stayd, or held back, as a wheel by a trigger.
  • Enrayer une rouë, to stay, or hold a wheel back with a trigger.
  • Enrayoir, the wheel-gate, or beam that stops the course of a Water-mill; also a trigger for a wheel.
  • Enregistrable, fit to be registred.
  • Enrencé, grown musty.
  • Enrethé, caught in a net.
  • Enrether, to catch in a net.
  • Enrichisseure, an inriching.
  • Enrimé, as Enrheumé, hoarse.
  • Enrimer, to get the rheum.
  • Enroché, made rockie.
  • Enrocher, to make rockie.
  • Enrocheur, a Wine-porter.
  • Enroidi, grown stiff, become obsti­nate.
  • s'Enroidir, to grow stiff, to become obstinate.
  • Enrollement, for Enrolement, an inrolling, or listing.
  • Enrotulé, inrolled.
  • Enrotuler, to inrol.
  • Enroüément, hoarsely.
  • Enrouëure, hoarseness.
  • Enroulé, for enrolé, inrolled, listed.
  • Enrouler, to inrol, to list.
  • Enrouiller les yeux, to stare, to gaze.
  • Enroupié, snotty.
  • Enrousé, watered.
  • Enrouser, to water.
  • Enruché, put into hives.
  • Enrucher, to put into a hive.
  • s'Enruisseler, to divide it self into little streams.
  • Ens, in, within.
  • Ensablé, filled, or covered with sand; run on the sands.
  • Ensabler, to fill, or to cover with sand; also to run on the sands.
  • Ensablonner, to fill with gravel.
  • Ensaché, put into a bag.
  • Ensacher, to put into a bag.
  • Ensafrané, seasoned with Saffron.
  • Ensafraner, to season with Saffron; or to paint over with Saffron.
  • Ensagi, grown wise.
  • Ensagir, to grow wise.
  • Ensaisiné, fully seized, put into full possession of.
  • Ensaisinement, an inseisining, a put­ting into possession.
  • Ensaisiner, to give seisin, to put into full possession.
  • Ensali, fouled, defiled.
  • Ensalir, to foul, to defile.
  • Ensalissement, a fouling, a defi­ling.
  • Ensaqué, put into a sack.
  • Ensaquer, to put into a sack.
  • Ensavonné, washed with soap.
  • Ensavonner, to wash with soap.
  • Ensceptré, wearing a Scepter.
  • Enscophionné, wearing a Coif.
  • Enseigneurié, made Lord.
  • Ensel, Sword-like, of a Sword.
  • Ensellé, saddled.
  • Enseller un cheval, to saddle a horse.
  • Ensemblement, together.
  • Ensemencement, a sowing.
  • Ensement, likewise.
  • Ensepulturé, buri'd.
  • Ensepulturer, to bury.
  • [Page] Enserpenté, covered with serpents.
  • Enserrement, a shutting fast up.
  • Ensoigne, an Essoin, a lawful ex­cuse for an absent or impotent per­son.
  • Ensoigner, to essoin, to excuse an ab­sent, or discharge an impotent person.
  • Ensoing, as Ensoigne.
  • Ensoitte, hogs bristles.
  • Ensoitter, to dress or furnish with hogs bristles.
  • Ensongnie, Ensonie, as Ensoigne.
  • Ensorcelerie, witchcraft.
  • Ensorceleur, a witch.
  • Ensouffié, blown; also blowing.
  • Ensoulfré, Eusoulfrer. See Ensouf­fré, Ensouffrer in the N. D.
  • Ensouple a Weavers Yarn-beam.
  • Ensoupleau, a Weavers Cloth-beam.
  • Enstocatté, a field inclosed with pikes, and appointed for a single Combat.
  • Ensuairé, wound up in a sheet.
  • Ensuairer, to winde a coarse in a sheet; also to wipe with a hand­kerchief.
  • Ensuble, as Ensouple.
  • Ensuceré, sugared.
  • Ensucerer, to season with sugar.
  • Ensué, sowed up.
  • Ensuer, to sow up, or as
  • Ensuerer, to winde a coarse in a sheet.
  • Ensuyvant, following.
  • Entablature, as Entablement in the N. D.
  • Entablé, boarded.
  • Entaché, spotted, stained, tainted.
  • Entacher, to spot, stain, or taint. Entacher une besongne, to under­take a piece of work.
  • Entacheure, a spot; also a spotting, staining, or tainting.
  • Entail, a mortaise, or incutting.
  • Entailleur, a graver.
  • Entalenté, longing after. Mal en­talenté envers, ill affected to.
  • Entalenter, to breed a longing.
  • Entelechie, absolute perfection, or efficacy; perfect motion, or essence; force moving of it self; also as Endelechie.
  • Entellectual, for Intellectuel, intel­lectual.
  • Entendeur, an understander.
  • Entendible, intelligible.
  • Entendiblement, intelligibly; plain­ly; also learnedly.
  • Entendoire, understanding.
  • Entend-trois, an equivocation of doubtful or double meaning. Il fait de l'entend-trois, be answers of purpose from the purpose.
  • Entendu que, seeing, or considering that.
  • Entenne, for antenne, a sail-yard.
  • Ententif, attentive, diligent.
  • Ententivement, attentively, care­fully.
  • Entenu, beholden.
  • Enteprinse, for Entreprise, an enter­prise.
  • Enterrage, an interring, or burying.
  • Enterreur, a burier.
  • Entesteure, a breeding, or bringing of the head-ach.
  • Enteyser son are jusques à l'oreille, to draw his bow up to the ear.
  • Enthroné, placed in a throne.
  • Enthroner, to place in a throne.
  • Enthusiasme, as Entousiasme in the N. D.
  • Enthyrsé, decked with ivy.
  • Entiché, tainted, corrupted.
  • Entiercé, sequestred into a third hand.
  • Entiercement, a sequestring, or se­questration.
  • Entiercer, to sequester, or put into a third hand.
  • Entiereté, intireness; also constancy, or obstinacy in an opinion.
  • Entimbraillé, Entimbré, that bears a flourish hanging from the top of his helmet.
  • Entiquer, to cleave, or stick fast like a tick.
  • Entoilé, made of, or furnished with linnen or canvas; also intangled, or caught in toyls.
  • Entoiler, to make of, or furnish with linnen; also to intangle, or catch in toyls; to compass or hem in with toyls.
  • Entoisé, bent, as a bow; lift up, as a sword ready to strike.
  • Entoiser un are, to bend a bow. Entoiser une espée, to lift up a sword with an intention to strike.
  • Entombé, interred.
  • Entomber, to interr.
  • Entombi, henummed.
  • Entommeure, as Entoumeure; al­so a funnel.
  • Enton, a little graft.
  • Entonnage, tunnage.
  • Entonnelé, tunned, put into a cask.
  • Entonnelement, a tunning, or put­ting of liquour into a cask.
  • Entonneler, to tun by a funnel.
  • Entorce, for Entorse, a strain.
  • Entorce, as Jambe entorce, a croo­ked leg.
  • Entorecure, as Entorseure.
  • Entorné, rounded; compassed about with.
  • Entors, for entorse, a strain.
  • Entorsé, strained.
  • Entorser, to strain.
  • Entorseure, a straining.
  • Entortillonné, Entortillonner, as Entortillé, Entortiller in the N. D.
  • Entouillé, bewrayed, or defiled; al­so pestered, incumbered, hindered.
  • Entouillement, a filthy incumbrance.
  • Entouiller, to bewray, or defile; also to pester, to incumber.
  • Entoumeure, a gobbet, a great bit.
  • Entourellé, begirt with turrets.
  • Entourement, Entoureure, a sur­rounding.
  • Entourné, invironed; also wound a­bout.
  • Entourner, to inviron; also to winde about. s'Entourner, to turn round.
  • Entournoy, a funnel.
  • Entournure, a round, a circle.
  • Entourtillant, wreathing, rowling a­bout with.
  • Entourtillé, as Entortillé in the N. D.
  • Entourtillon, a wreath, a roll.
  • Entourtillure, a wreathing, a rowl­ing about with.
  • Entourure, a Compass, any thing that compasseth and incloseth a­nother.
  • Entracassé, half broken.
  • Entract, the greenish salve called Trait.
  • Entrage, for Entrée, a fee or custom due at the entering of Merchan­dise into a place; also a fine paid for a Lease.
  • Entrait, a short piece of timber in­dented within another place, thereby to hold it the faster.
  • Entrange, as Entrage.
  • Entrape, any thing that catches or hinders a man as he goes.
  • Entrapé, pestered, troubled.
  • Entraper, to pester, to trouble.
  • Entraverser, to cross over.
  • Entravestissement, an intervesting, or intervesture; a mutual posses­sion, or joynt possessing of. En­travestissement de sang, is be­tween such as are joyned by mar­riage, where the survivor hath all, or the most p [...]rt of that which was joyntly possessed.
  • Entraveur, a setterer, a shackler.
  • s'Entr'accointer, to grow a [...]quain­ted together.
  • s'Entr'accoller, to embrace each o­ther.
  • [Page] s'Entr'accompagner, to keep com­pany together.
  • s'Entr'accrocher, to lay fast hold one of another.
  • s'Entr'accuser, to accuse one ano­ther.
  • s'Entr'advertir, to hold intelligence together.
  • s'Entr'affoler, to hurt one another.
  • s'Entr'aguiser, to sharpen each the other.
  • s'Entr'aimans, mutual friends, lo­ving one another.
  • s'Entr'appeler, to call one another.
  • s'Entr'approcher, to draw near one another.
  • Entr'arraché, plucked up here and there, rooted out from between.
  • Entr'arracher, to pluck up here and there, to root out from between.
  • s'Entr'assener des espées, to strike (or hit) one another with their Swords.
  • Entr'attacher, to tye fast together.
  • Entr'avoir, to have, or possess one a­nother.
  • Entrebaall, a chink, or cleft.
  • Entrebasti, built betwixt.
  • Entrebastir, to build betwixt.
  • Entrebayement, a chink, or cleft.
  • Entrebecqueter, to peck at one ano­ther.
  • Entrebeu, half drunk.
  • s'Entreblesser, to hurt, or wound each other.
  • Entreboyau, a thick and fat skin that fastens Bowels to the back, and each of them to the other.
  • s'Entrebrecher, to break, or make breaches into one another.
  • Entrebrisé, half broken; also di­stinct, distinguished; also uneven, as a thing that is half burst.
  • s'Entrebrouiller, to trouble one a­nother.
  • Entrebruire, to make a humming noise.
  • s'Entrebrusler, to burn each other.
  • s'Entrecaresser, to interchange kindnesses.
  • Entrecassé, half broken.
  • Entrecasser, almost to break. s'En­trecassier les dents, to bruise the teeth by gnashing them hard one against another.
  • s'Entreceder, to yield one to the o­ther.
  • s'Entreceler, to hide, or conceal one another.
  • Entre-cep, the distance between stock and stock.
  • s'Entrecercher, to look for one ano­ther.
  • Entrecesse, intermission, ceasing.
  • s'Entrechamailler, to slash one ano­ther.
  • Entrechangé, interchanged.
  • s'Entrechanger, to interchange; almost to change. Maveuë m'en­trechange, my sight grows dim.
  • s'Entrecharger, to charge one ano­ther.
  • Entrechasse, a cross caper.
  • Entrechaucher, to tread upon, to trample amongst.
  • s'Entrecherir, as s'Entrecaresser.
  • Entrechevaucher, to ride betwixt.
  • s'Entrechoisir, to chuse out one ano­ther.
  • Entrecler, somewhat light.
  • Entrecolomne, the space between pil­lars.
  • Entrecolomnement, a leaving of space between pillar and pillar.
  • s'Entrecommuniquer, to communi­cate one with another.
  • s'Entreconvier, to invite one another.
  • s'Entrecosser, to jut or but toge­ther, as Rams.
  • s'Entrecoudoyer, to justle one ano­ther with the elbow.
  • Entrecoulé, run in between.
  • Entrecouler, to glide, or run be­tween.
  • Entrecoupeure, an half cutting, a cutting off in the midst.
  • Entrecourir, to run on both sides, joyntly to run. s'Entrecourir, to incounter, to run one upon ano­ther.
  • s'Entrecraindre, to stand in fear of one another.
  • Entrecroisé, crossed over.
  • Entrecroisement, a crossing over.
  • s'Entrecroiser, to lie cross one ano­ther.
  • Entrecroisure, a double cross, or in­tercrossing.
  • Entrecueilli, gathered from among.
  • Entrecueillir, to gather from a­mong.
  • Entrecuisses, the cods of a wilde Boar.
  • s'Entredebuoir, to owe one ano­ther.
  • s'Entredefendre, to defend one a­nother.
  • s'Entredemander, to ask one ano­ther.
  • Entredent, the space that is be­tween two teeth.
  • s'Entredepecer, to pull one another in pieces.
  • s'Entredesfaire, to undo one ano­ther.
  • Entredeu, interchangeably due.
  • s'Entrediffamer, to disgrace one a­nother.
  • s'Entredire injures, to revile one a­nother.
  • Entrediscerner, to know one from another.
  • s'Entredommager, to wrong each other.
  • Entredonné, exchanged.
  • s'Entredonner, to exchange. s'En­tredonner courage, to encourage one another.
  • Entredormir, to slumber.
  • Entredoubté, somewhat doubted of.
  • Entredoubter, somewhat to doubt of.
  • s'Entr'embrasser, to hug one ano­ther.
  • s'Entr'empoigner, to catch hold of one another.
  • s'Entr'encourager, to incourage one another.
  • s'Entr'entendre, to play booty to­gether.
  • Entr'eselos, half hatched.
  • Entr'escrire, to interline.
  • Entr'escrit, interlined.
  • s'Entr'essayer, to try one another.
  • s'Entrefaire grandefeste, to make very much of one another.
  • s'Entrefascher, to fall out one with the other.
  • Entrefendre, to part in halves.
  • Entrefendu, parted in halves.
  • Entreferir, to strike at one ano­ther; also to interfere, as a Horse
  • Entrefessier, the space between the Buttocks.
  • Entrefesson, the space between the Privities and the Fundament.
  • Entrefileures de drap, the space be­tween thread and thread.
  • s'Entreflatter, to sooth each o­ther.
  • s'Entrefondre, to run over head and cars into.
  • Entrefossé, the space that is between ditch and ditch.
  • s'Entrefouetter, to whip each other.
  • Entrefouïr, to dig between.
  • Entrefouler, to trample in the midst of.
  • s'Entrefrapper, to strike each o­ther.
  • Entrefrizé, curled one within ano­ther.
  • Entrefrizer, to curl the Hair, &c.
  • s'Entrefroisser, to crush one another in pieces.
  • s'Entrefrotter, to rub one against another; to interfere.
  • Entrefrotture, a rubbing one a­gainst [Page] another; a horses interfe­ring.
  • s'Entregaller, to scratch one ano­ther.
  • Entregenté, that carries himself handsomely.
  • s'Entregenter, to know well how to carry himself in all companies.
  • s'Entregratter, to scratch each o­ther.
  • s'Entregronder, to grumble one at another.
  • s'Entreguerroyer, to make wars one upon another.
  • s'Entrehanter, to converse much to­gether.
  • s'Entrehapper, to catch hold of one another.
  • s'Entreharceler, to harry one ano­ther.
  • Entreheurt, Entreheurtis, an inter­shock.
  • s'Entrehucher, to whoop at one a­nother.
  • Entreiamber, to cross legs.
  • Entreject, a casting, or putting be­tween.
  • Entrejectant, thrusting, or casting between.
  • Entreillizé, cross barred.
  • Entrejoindre, to joyn together. S'en­trejoindre, to embrace each o­ther.
  • s'Entrejouër, to play (or sport) one with another.
  • Entrelaissé, left off, discontinued.
  • Entrelaisser, to leave off, to discon­tinue.
  • Entrelardement, an interlading.
  • Entrelas, a knot hard to be loosed, an intricate business; also an in­terlacing.
  • Entrelasseure, an interlacing. Toicts ornez d'entrelasseures, Roofs decked with interlaced frets.
  • Entrelassis, an interlacing.
  • Entrelié, ty'd together, hound be­tween.
  • Entrelier, to tie together, to binde between.
  • Entreligne, an interline, or inter­lining.
  • Entreligné, interlined.
  • Entreligner, to interline.
  • Entrelire, to read together.
  • s'Entrelouër, to commend one ano­ther.
  • Entreluicter, to wrestle one with another.
  • Entroluire, to give a glimpse, to shine between.
  • Entrelunaires, as Jours entrelu­naires, the days wherein neither the old nor new Moon is seen.
  • Entremander, to send between par­ty and party.
  • Entrement, an entring, or entrance.
  • s'Entremeurir, to wax half ripe.
  • s'Entremignarder, to cocker one a­nother.
  • s'Entremocquer, to deride one a­nother.
  • s'Entremouiller, to wet one ano­ther.
  • Entremoyen, a distance, an inter­medium.
  • s'Entr'empescher, to hinder one a­nother.
  • Entremutiner, to set together by the ears.
  • Entremuye de moulin, a Mill-hop­per.
  • Entremy, par entremy, amongst, or in the midst of.
  • Entrenaistre, to be born between, or among.
  • s'Entrenavrer, to wound each o­ther.
  • Entrenoüé, knotted between; also swum between.
  • Entrenouër, to tie knots between; also to swim between.
  • s'Entrenuire, to prejudice one ano­ther.
  • s'Entr'injurier, to revile one ano­ther.
  • s'Entr'obliger, to binde themselves one to the other.
  • s'Entr'occir, to kill each other.
  • Entr'oeil, the space between the Eyes.
  • Entr'oublié, forgotten in the mean while.
  • Entr'oublier, to forget in the mean while. S'entr'oublier, to forget each other.
  • s'Entrepardonner, to forgive one another.
  • Entreparlement, an interrupting.
  • Entreparler, to interrupt one that speaks.
  • Entrepas, a fast walk, a rack.
  • Entrepend, part of a womans &c.
  • s'Entrepigner, to go together by the ears.
  • Entreplanter, to plant or set be­tween.
  • Entreplié, folded between.
  • Entriplier, to fold between.
  • s'Entrepoindre, to prick one ano­ther.
  • Entrepos, an interposition.
  • Entreposer, to interpose.
  • Entreposition, interposition.
  • Entrepressé, crowded in another.
  • Entrepresser, to crowd in another. S'entrepresser, to thrust hard one another.
  • s'Entrepresser, to lend one to ano­ther.
  • Entreprins, Entreprinse, as Entre­pris, Entreprise in the N. D.
  • s'Entrepromettre une chose, to promise a thing on [...] to another.
  • s'Entreprouver, to try one another.
  • s'Entrequerir, to seek each other.
  • Entrer, (Subst.) an entry, or going into.
  • Entreraclé, scraped about.
  • Entreracler, to scrape about.
  • s'Entreregretter, passionately to wish for one another.
  • s'Entrerencontrer, to meet one ano­ther.
  • Entrerompant, interrupting, stop­ping.
  • Entrerompre, to interrupt, to stop.
  • Entrerougir, to blush a little.
  • Entreroulé, rowled between, rowled now and then.
  • Entrerouler, to rowl between.
  • s'Entreruer de pierres, to pelt one another with Stones.
  • s'Entresaisir bras à bras, to seize one another by the Arms.
  • Entrescieures, frequent (but di­stant) cuts or entries made by a Saw.
  • s'Entresecourir, to assist one ano­ther.
  • s'Entresembler, to resemble one ano­ther.
  • Entresemé, sowed between.
  • Entresemer, to sow here and there.
  • Entreserré, closed in, or between.
  • Entreserrer, to close in, or between.
  • Entresolive, a space between two Rasters.
  • s'Entresouffrir, to endure each o­ther.
  • s'Entresouvenir de, to remember one another of; also half to remem­ber.
  • Entrespace, a space between.
  • s'Entrespier, to spie one anothers doings.
  • s'Entresuir, as s'Entresuivre in the N. D.
  • s'Entresurprendre, to surprize one another.
  • Entresuytte, s'Entresuyvre. See Entresuite, Entresuivre in the N. D.
  • Entretaché, spatted here and there.
  • s'Entretaster, to feel one another.
  • Entretenement, coherency; also wages, or entertainment. Entre­tenement de voix san; respirer, the holding of a note.
  • [Page] Entretisseure, the woof of cloth.
  • Entretistre, to weave between.
  • Entretoise, a cross quarter of timber.
  • Entretortillé, intangled.
  • Entretortiller, to intangle.
  • Entretouillé, intangled.
  • Entretouiller, to intangle.
  • s'Entretrouver, to find each other.
  • Entreveché, intangled, intricated.
  • Entrevecher, to intangle, to intricate.
  • Entreveillé, half awake.
  • Entreveiller, to be waking now and then.
  • Entrever, to understand.
  • Entreverdir, Entreverdoyer, to be greenish.
  • s'Entreverser, to overturn (or over­throw) one another.
  • Entrevesché, Entrevescher, as En­treveché, Entrevecher.
  • Entrevisé, viewed now and then.
  • Entreviser, to view now and then.
  • Entrevisité, visited now and then.
  • Entrevisiter, to visit now and then.
  • Entrevomi, vomited now and then.
  • Entrevomir, to vomit now and then.
  • Entroupelé, flocked together.
  • Entroupeler, Entrouper, to flock together.
  • Entuilé, tiled.
  • Entuiler, to tile.
  • Envahie, an invasion.
  • Envain, as Envent.
  • Envaisselé, put into a vessel. Un bel esprit envaisselé, a good pot­wit.
  • Envasé, as Envaisselé.
  • Envaser, to put into a vessel.
  • Envasquiné, in a long Spanish, or old-fashioned Vardingale.
  • Enucleation, an explanation.
  • Envelopément, obscurely, intricately.
  • Envelopoir, any thing that serves to wrap another in.
  • Envelouté, cloathed with Velvet.
  • Envent, a short blinde Serpent which is thought to sleep all Win­ter.
  • Envergongné, put out of counte­nance.
  • Envermé, grown full of worms.
  • Envermer, to fill with, or grow full of worms.
  • Enverré, displeased with.
  • Enversé, inverted, turned upside-downward, or the inside out­ward; also turned in and out.
  • Enverser, to invert; to turn upside downward, or the inside out­ward; also to turn in and out.
  • Envictailler, Envictuailler, to vi­ctual.
  • Envieillir, to grow old.
  • Envieillissement, a growing old.
  • Envier (au jeu) to vie.
  • Envieusement, enviously, spitefully.
  • Envieux (Subst.) a Sloe-worm.
  • Envinaigré, seasoned with Vinegar.
  • Envinaigrer, to season with Vinegar.
  • Enviné, stored, or seasoned with Wine.
  • Envirollé, whose top, end, or tip is bound about with a ring or hoop of iron, &c.
  • Envis, unwillingly.
  • Envitaillement, a providing of vi­ctuals.
  • Enule-campane, the herb called He­licampany.
  • Enunciation, enunciation.
  • Envoismé, full of neighbours.
  • Envoulté, charmed in his chief mem­ber.
  • Envouté, vaulted, arched.
  • Envoutement, a distasting.
  • Envoye, as Ennoye.
  • Envoyriner, to glaze a window.
  • Envoyseure, mockery.
  • Eolipyles, a kind of hollow brasen bowls.
  • Epaigneul, for Epagneu, a Spaniel.
  • Epalouïr, to melt, or swelter with extream heat.
  • Epanalepse, the name of a Rhetori­cal figure.
  • Epanode, a several rehearsal of two things which at first were spoken of joyntly.
  • Epanons d'un dard, the feathers of a Dart.
  • Enanter, for épouvanter, to dismay.
  • Epatique, for hepatique, the herb Trinity, or noble Agrimony.
  • Epaular, an O [...]k, a great Sea-fish mortal enemy to the Whale.
  • Epe, instead of.
  • Epeiche, a Speight.
  • Epelan, a Smelt.
  • Eperge, a Brush.
  • Ephebe, a marriageable youth.
  • Ephectique, one that after long stu­dy is more doubtful than he was at first.
  • Ephemerique, that lasts but a day.
  • Ephimeris, a Journal.
  • Epicaie, equity.
  • Epicaizer, to judge according to equity.
  • Epiche, a Speight.
  • Epidimial, for Epidemique, epide­mical.
  • Epiecé, rent in pieces.
  • Epiecer, to pull in pieces.
  • Epigastre, all the outward part of the belly from the bulk to the pri­vities.
  • Epigastrique, belonging to that part of the belly.
  • Epiglottide, the cover-weesel, or stop of the throat.
  • Epigrammatiste, a writer of Epi­grams.
  • Epigrer, as Escacher.
  • Epilemie, a Song of the Superscri­ption of a thing.
  • Epilence, a kind of falling-evil in a Hawk.
  • Epinarde, a little fish.
  • Epinices, Songs of Triumph after a Victory.
  • Epinoche, as Espinoche.
  • Epinyctide, a wheal that rises on the skin by night.
  • Epiphore, a rheumatick-dropping of the eyes; also violent impression.
  • Epiphyse, an addition (or appen­dix) to a bone.
  • Episemaisie, a signification of the mind by the countenance or ge­sture.
  • Epistemon, a Teacher.
  • Epistrophe, the ending of two verses with one word.
  • Epistyle, a little pillar set upon a greater; also an Architrave.
  • Epitasse d'une Tragedie, the busiest part of a Tragedy.
  • Epitheme, a liquid and outward Medicine.
  • Epithemé, batbed, moistened.
  • Epithemer, or Epithimer, to bathe, or to moisten.
  • Epithin, the weed Dodder.
  • Epitoge, a long Cloak, or Cassock worn loose over other apparel; also a Graduats hood.
  • Epitome, an Epitomy, or Abridg­ment.
  • Epizeuxe, the name of a Rhetorical figure.
  • Epotique, drunken.
  • Eprenas, a kind of bloudy flux.
  • Eptasyllable, of seven syllables.
  • Epulotique, skin-breeding.
  • Equable, even, alike.
  • Equalisé, equalled, matched, compared.
  • Equaliser, to equal, to match, to compare.
  • Equalité, equality, comparison.
  • Equalizer, as Equaliser.
  • Equanimité, equanimity.
  • Equarri, Equarrir. See Equarré, Equarrer in the N. D.
  • Equarrissement, a measuring, or squaring out by a Squire.
  • Equestre, of, or belonging to horse­men, Knights, or Gentlemen.
  • Equibiens, the Halses, or two holes in the prow of a Ship, through [Page] which the Anchor-cables pass.
  • Equidiametral, equidiametral.
  • Equidistamment, of equal distance asunder.
  • Equidistance, an even distance asun­der.
  • Equidistant, equally distant one from the other.
  • Equilance, the hole wherein the tongue of a Ballance playeth.
  • Equilibré, weighed in equal balan­ces.
  • Equilibrer, to weigh in equal balan­ces.
  • Equinancie, the Squinsie.
  • Equiparable, fit to be compared, or equalled unto.
  • Equiparaison, likeness, resemblance, comparison.
  • Equiparé, matched, equalled, resem­bled, likened.
  • Equiparer, to match, or make equal, to compare, to liken.
  • Equipolence, equality in value.
  • Equipoler, to be of equal value.
  • Equipollé, countervailed.
  • Equipoller, to countervail, to be of equal value.
  • Equippée, equipage; also a sudden prank, a digression. Les equip­pées d'un Lievre, the outright course of a Hare.
  • Equitation, a riding on horseback.
  • Eraige, an Airy of Hawks, or as Herage.
  • Eraigne, as Eraige.
  • Eraillé, Erailler. See Esraillé, Es­railler.
  • Erain, for airain, brass.
  • Eramme, a Fine set on a parties head for want of due appea­rance.
  • Eraser, as Ecraser in the N. D.
  • Erater, to take the Milt out.
  • Erchat, yellow wyre.
  • Erculisse, Liquorice.
  • Erectif, erective, setting bolt-up­right.
  • Eremodicié, forsaken, given over.
  • Ereole, a small weight of two grains.
  • Ergalie, the framing of Vessels and Furnaces for Extractions, &c.
  • Ergastule, a Bridewel.
  • Ergate, a Windbeam, or drawbeam; also a rack for a Cross-bow.
  • Ergoteure, as Ergoture.
  • Ergotique, sophistical, full of quid­dity's.
  • Ergotisme, Sophistry.
  • Ergotiste, a cavilling Sophister.
  • Ergoture, as Ergot in the N. D. al­so an arming, or furnishing with spurs or dew-claws; also Sophi­stry.
  • Erigoteures, the spurs of a Cock.
  • Ermaire, as Armoire, a Cup­board.
  • Erme, as Terres ermes, Land that lies waste and untill'd.
  • Erminé, surred with Ermines.
  • Erminer, to sur with Ermines.
  • Erminette, a little plaining ax.
  • Ermitage, Ermite, as Hermitage, Hermite in the N. D.
  • Erné, as Esrené.
  • Erner, to break, or bruise the reins; to crush, or weaken the back.
  • Erodé, gnawn off, or about.
  • Eroder, to gnaw off, or about; to eat into; also to drive from field to field, from hill to hill.
  • Erogene, the name of a love-procu­ring herb.
  • Eron, a Heron.
  • Erosion, a gnawing or eating in­to.
  • Erraillé, spread wide open, set far asunder. Oeil erraillé, a staring eye.
  • Errailler, to spread wide open; to stare with the eyes; to straddle with the legs or thighs.
  • Erramme, as Eramme.
  • Erramment, out of hand; also at random.
  • Errandonner, to flie away at ran­dom.
  • Erraté, unlimited; nimble, or light.
  • Errater, to take out a mans milt, thereby to make him the nim­bler.
  • Erratique, as fiebvres erratiques, Agues whose fits hold no certain time of return.
  • Errement, as Arrement; also a patch, tract, or way.
  • Errhine, a tent-like medicine put into the nose.
  • Erronnée, the herb Centory.
  • Erronnéement, erroneously.
  • Erubescence, blushing.
  • Eruce, the herb Rocket; also the Canker-worm.
  • Erucé, nibbled finely.
  • Eructation, a belching, or breaking of wind.
  • Erugineux, of the colour of Verdi­grease, rusty, canker'd, corrup­ted.
  • Eruité, weakened.
  • Erysimon, Winter-cresses.
  • Erysipele, a painful and hot swel­ling or impostumation.
  • Es vous, for voici, behold.
  • Esbaaillé, cloven, riven, set wide a­sunder.
  • Esbahi, amazed. A l'esbahi, a­mazedly.
  • s'Esbahir, to wonder.
  • Esbahissement, a marvelling.
  • Esbahy, as Esbahi.
  • Esbailleure, a gaping.
  • Esbalançon, a horses disordered leap out of time and measure.
  • Esbannoy, Esbanoy, pastime, sport, recreation.
  • Esbanoie, Esbanoye, the same.
  • s'Esbanoyer, to recreate himself.
  • Esbarbement, a barbing.
  • Esbarber, as Ebarber in the N. D.
  • Esbarluer, as Esberluer.
  • Esbasé, driven out of his basis.
  • Esbaser, to drive out of its basis. S'esbaser, to slip from its basis, or foundation.
  • Esbatement, a sporting.
  • Esbaudi, cheerful, merry.
  • Esbaudir, to cheer up, to make mer­ry; also to rouse up from sleep.
  • Esberge, a lodging, an Inn.
  • Esbergé, lodged, harboured.
  • Esbergement, as Esberge.
  • Esberger, to lodge, to harbour. Es­berger en soy une faute, to be guilty of a fault; also to take a fault upon himself.
  • Esberlué, dazzled.
  • Esberluer, to dazzle.
  • Esblaré, gastly, or pale of counte­nance.
  • Esblouïsson, a mist cast before the eyes. Esblouisson de la tête, gid­diness of the brain.
  • Esboché, Esbocher, as Ebauché, Ebaucher in the N. D.
  • Esboire, to soak in, to drink up.
  • Esboitement, a lameness, or laming.
  • Esbouffer, to burst out into laughter. S'esbouffer à parler, to burst out in speech.
  • Esbouflé, spouted upon.
  • Esboufler, to spout upon.
  • Esbouilli, throughly boyled; over­boyled, decay'd in boyling, almost dried up with boyling.
  • Esbouillir, to boyl throughly, to o­verboyl, to boyl almost dry; also to work as new beer, &c.
  • Esbouillue, stuff over-boyled.
  • Esbouli, Esboulu, as Esbouilli.
  • Esbourjonnage, a pruning of Vines.
  • Esbourjonner, &c. See Ebourgeon­ner in the N. D.
  • Esbourré, cleansed, winnowed.
  • Esbourrer, to cleanse, to winnow.
  • Esbouiy, dazzled.
  • Esbraillé, unbraced, loosely dressed.
  • [Page] Esbranche, as Esbranchement.
  • Esbrandi, [...]st violently upon. Quand le feu est esbrandi en plusieurs maisons, when fire hath violently seized on many horses.
  • Esbranlement, a shaking, or jog­ging.
  • Esbranle-rocher, rock-shaking.
  • Esbreché, broken, or whereinto a breach is made.
  • Esbrecher, to break, or make a breach into.
  • Esbrillade, a jerk given a horse with the bit or bridle.
  • Esbroüé, hard rubbed (in the wash­ing.)
  • Esbrouëment, a rubbing hard.
  • Esbrouër, to rub hard. Esbrouer des narines, to short.
  • Esbrouëure, as Esbrouëment.
  • Esbruché, scattered, dispersed.
  • Esbrucher, to scatter, to disperse.
  • Esbu, soaked in, drunk up.
  • Esbucheter, to gather up sticks.
  • Esburré, unbuttered, or from which batter hath been taken. Laict esburré, butter-milk.
  • Esburrer, to take butter from, to make butter-milk of.
  • Escabreux, rough, rugged.
  • Escache, as Ecache, a scatch.
  • Escaché, crushed, or squeezed hard together.
  • Escachement, a crushing, or squeez­ing hard together.
  • Escacher, to crush, or squeez hard together.
  • Escacheur, a crusher, or squeezer of things hard together.
  • Escachure, a crushing, or squeezing of things hard together.
  • Escaffette, a kinde of great and long muscled shell wherewith some women skin their milk.
  • Escaffignon, a Sock; also a pump, or a close and single-sol'd shoo of thin leather.
  • Escaigne de fil, ou de soye, a skain of thread, &c.
  • Escaillement, a scaling, or shaling.
  • Escailleur, a scaler, or shaler.
  • Escailleure, a scaling, or shaling. Escailleures de pierres, shards.
  • Escailleux, full of scales.
  • Escaillon, an Horses tush, or tusk.
  • Escalbotté, pilled, unhusked.
  • Escalbotter, to pill, as pease do in boyling.
  • Escalé, as Ecaillé, scaled.
  • Escalle, for Scalle.
  • Escallé, scaled, or taken by scala­do.
  • Escaller, to scale the walls of a town.
  • Escalonnier, as dents escalonnieres, a horses tusks, or tushes.
  • Escalque, an Ʋsher, or Sewer.
  • Escalventré, whose guts are squashed out.
  • Escalventrer, to tread out the guts.
  • Escamme, Escamne, a form, or bench; also a step to get up high­er.
  • Escamoté, disguised.
  • Escamoter, to disguise.
  • Escampe, a scaping, or flying a­way.
  • Escandal, a sounding-plummet.
  • Escandillé, scantled, made according to a pattern or scantling.
  • Escanné, stifled.
  • Escantuole, the Pump of a ship; also a sounding-plummet.
  • Escaper, for échaper, to escape.
  • Escapelin, a remnant of a piece of stuff.
  • Escappe, a small square-edged cir­cle or fillet in a pillar, &c. also the body of a pillar.
  • Escarade, the opening of the nether part of the branch of a Horses hit.
  • Escaras, as Echalas in the N. D.
  • Escarbelotte, a small beetle.
  • Escarbillat, lively, sprightly; also hair-braind, fantastical.
  • Escarboter le feu, to stir up the fire.
  • Esçarbotte, as Escarbot, a Beetle.
  • Escarbouele, as Ecarboucle, a car­buncle.
  • Escarbouillé, crushed, squeezed.
  • Escarbouiller, to crush, to squeeze. Escarbouiller la cervelle, to beat out the brains.
  • Escardé, carded.
  • Escarder, to card, as wool.
  • Escardes, cards for wool.
  • Escardeur, a carder.
  • Escardeure, a carding.
  • Escare, a fish that chews his meat; also a scar.
  • Escarlatin, of scarlet, or of a scar­let hu [...]. Rose escarlatine, a damask Rose.
  • Escarotique, Scar-breeding.
  • Escarouflé, scratched, torn.
  • Escaroufler, to scratch off, to tear.
  • Escarpoulette, a kinde of swing.
  • Escarque, as Escalque.
  • Escarquiller, to set wide open.
  • Escarrabillade, as Escarbillat.
  • Escarre, a Scar.
  • Escarure, a womans square.
  • Escas, the tenth penny of the value of Moveables, wherein a For­reiner succeeds a Freeman.
  • Escassable, as Meubles escassables, Moveables subject unto Escas.
  • Escavessade, a jerk with the cord of a cavesson.
  • Esceer, to cut, or slive; also to pill.
  • Escelles, the arm-holes.
  • Escerveler, to take the brains out of; also to dash the brains out.
  • Escervellement, a braining.
  • Eschabouillé, scorched, over-heated.
  • Eschafaudé, made into a scaffold; also presented on a scaffold; car­ry'd from scaffold to scaffold; set on the pillory.
  • Eschafauder, Eschafaulder, to build scaffolds; to present on a scaffold; to set on the pillory; also to de­vise or practise villany.
  • Eschafaudis, Eschafaut, as Escha­faud, a scaffold; also a pillory.
  • Eschaffaudage, for échafaudage, a setting up of scaffolds.
  • Eschalasseau, a short stake.
  • Eschalassier (Adj.) bearing store of props or stakes, of, or belonging thereto.
  • Eschalier, for Escalier, a stair-case.
  • Eschallat, for Echalas, a stake.
  • Eschalle, a little ringing-bell.
  • Eschallier, a stair-case.
  • Eschallon, a great ladder.
  • Eschalon, for échelon, a ladder-step.
  • Eschalote, for échalote, shalot.
  • Eschambouillure, as Eschaubouil­lure.
  • Eschampé, Eschamper. See Escam­pé, Escamper in the N. D.
  • Eschampre, as Enchampre.
  • Eschandille, a pattern.
  • Eschandillé, as Eschantillé.
  • Eschandillon, for échantillon, a pattern.
  • Eschangé, exchanged, trucked.
  • Eschanger, to exchange, to truck.
  • Eschansonner, to do as the Cup-bearer.
  • Eschanteler, to break into cantles; to cut off the corners or edges of.
  • Eschantillé, curtailed, cut or broken into corners, or cantles.
  • Eschantillonner, to take (or cut) off a pattern.
  • Eschapeler, to chip.
  • Eschappé (a Subst.) an escape, an evasion.
  • Eschaque, scurf, scales, or dandriff in the head.
  • Eschar, as Eschars.
  • Escharalle, a dead and stinking flesh which breeds about wounds.
  • Escharas, for Echalas, a stake.
  • Escharaveau, as Charaveau.
  • [Page] Escharbot, for Escarbot, a beetle.
  • Escharboter, as Escarboter.
  • Escharcement, niggardly, miserably.
  • Escharceté, niggardliness; also base­ness, or want of due alloy in Coyn.
  • Escharcette, as Escharceté in the last sense.
  • Escharde, a splinter; also a scrag­gy girl that looks as if she were starved.
  • Eschardonner, to weed, or pluck up thistles.
  • Eschardonneur, a weeder of thi­stles.
  • Eschardonneuse, a woman that weeds, or plucks up thistles.
  • Eschare, a scar.
  • Escharfaud, or Escharfaut, a scaffold.
  • Escharfaudé, as Eschafaudé.
  • Eschargotté, pruned as a tree, pic­ked round about.
  • Eschargotter, to prune a tree, to pick any thing round about.
  • Escharné, fleshless, deprived of flesh.
  • Escharotique, breeding scars or scabs.
  • Escharpe, for Echarpe, a scarf.
  • Escarpeux, flaunting it with many scarfs about him.
  • Escharre, a scar.
  • Eschars, saving, sparing, hard.
  • Escharsement, as Escharcement.
  • Escharseté, as Escharceté.
  • Eschat, Droicts des Eschats & Ta­vernes, a certain Duty or Imposi­tion upon Wine sold by retail and in Taverns.
  • Eschasses, for Echasses, stilts.
  • Eschasseur, Eschassier, one that goes upon stilts.
  • Eschaubouillant, scalding hot.
  • Eschaubouillé, blistered; or having the Shingles.
  • Eschaubouillure, a blister; an In­flammation called the Shingles.
  • Eschauboulé, as Eschaubouillé.
  • Eschauboulure, as Eschauboulure.
  • Eschaubourré, troubled, in an agony.
  • Eschauder, to scald.
  • Eschaudure, a scalding.
  • Eschaufaison, a warming, or ma­king hot; also an heat; or a disease that comes of immoderate heat.
  • Eschaufeture, as Eschaufaison.
  • Eschauffadasse, a burnt Whore.
  • Eschauffader, as Eschafauder.
  • Eschauffaison, as Eschaufaison.
  • Eschaufferette, Eschauffette, a Cha­sing-dish.
  • Eschauffeture, Eschauffure, a cha­sing.
  • Eschauguette, a Watch-tower, or Beacon.
  • Eschauguetté, watched in a Beacon, or high Tower; beheld from high, or afar off.
  • Eschauguetter, to watch at a Bea­con, or in a high Tower; to see far about; to stand Sentry.
  • Eschauguetteur, a Sentinel in a high Tower or Beacon; also a Scout.
  • Eschays, aller eschays, to straddle.
  • Escheable, escheatable.
  • Escheance, an Escheat.
  • Eschec, for Echee, Chess.
  • Eschef, a fall, wasting, or diminu­tion.
  • Escheler, for Echeler, to scale.
  • Eschelette, for Squelette, a Skele­ton; also a Wall-pecker; also the little stalk of a Grape.
  • Eschellage, as Eschellement.
  • Eschellé, scaled.
  • Eschellement, a scaling, or getting upon by a ladder.
  • Escheller, for Echeler, to scale, to climb up a ladder.
  • Eschellette, a little ladder.
  • Eschelleur, a climbing by a ladder.
  • Eschemeau, the bed of a Vine, the ridge wherein it stands.
  • Eschemer, to swarm, or breed young, as Bees.
  • Eschenal, a gutter, or channel.
  • Eschenillé, rid from Caterpillars.
  • Escheniller, to rid of Caterpillars.
  • Eschequé, checkered.
  • Escheque-mat, for Echee & mat, a Checkmate, at Chess.
  • Eschequier, for Echiquier, a Chess-board.
  • Escherpillerie, robbing on the High­way.
  • Eschervi, the Skirret-root.
  • Eschet, an Escheat, or thing fallen to.
  • Eschevé, eschewed, shunned.
  • Eschevement, an eschewing, or shun­ning.
  • Eschever, to shun, to eschew.
  • Eschevissement, as Eschevement.
  • Escheute, as Echeute, an Escheat.
  • Eschez, as Echees, Chess.
  • Eschif, greedy, ravenous.
  • Eschiffeur, a Cutter, or Pinker.
  • Eschifflé, split, riven.
  • Eschiffler une branche d'arbre, to split, or half break off a branch.
  • Eschimeau, as Eschemeau.
  • Eschinal, the head of a sink covered with a grate.
  • Eschine, for Echine, the chine, the back-bone.
  • Eschiné, broken-backed.
  • Eschinée de pore, a chine of Pork.
  • Eschiner, to break the back of.
  • Eschineux, of a great and strong back.
  • Eschinon, the chine, or upper part of the back between the shoulders.
  • Eschiquetté, checkie.
  • Eschiquoté, pruned.
  • Eschiquoter, to prune a tree.
  • Eschoette, an Escheat.
  • Eschoite, an Escheat.
  • Eschoitter, to succeed another.
  • Escholage, as Escolage.
  • Escholastre, as Escolastre.
  • Eschope, Eschoppe, a little and low shop. Faire essay à l'eschop­pe, to lay a small and thin piece of silver, &c. upon a hot burning coal, thereby to try the value and alloy of it.
  • Esciemment, wittingly, of set pur­pose.
  • Escimé, topped.
  • Escimer, to top, to cut off the tops or heads of.
  • Esclaboché, bespotted, besprinkled with water or dirt.
  • Esclabocher, Esclaboter, to bespot with water or dirt.
  • Esclaffer de rire, to burst out into laughter.
  • Esclaire-tout, all-seeing, all-lighting, all-observing.
  • Esclaireur, an observer, or overseer of others; also an assistant unto a Plaintiff or Accuser.
  • Esclame, lank.
  • Esclandreux, scandalous.
  • Esclandrir, to slander.
  • Esclappe, corpulency, fatness.
  • Esclate, a Sling; also a kind of disease among children.
  • Esclature, a flashing, or glittering; also a Splitting, or bursting into splinters.
  • Esclau, for Esclave, a slave.
  • Esclaver, to bring unto slavery.
  • Esclavine, lank-body'd; also a Sea-gown.
  • Esclayer, to make way through hur­dles.
  • Escleche, a dismembring, or separa­tion; also a part or piece dismem­bred, or separated from.
  • Escleché, dismembred.
  • Escler, for Eclair, a lightning.
  • Esclerci, Esclercir, Esclercissement. See Eclairci, Eclaircir, Eclair­cissement.
  • Esclere, or Esclerre, the herb Celan­dine.
  • Esclerement, clearly, plainly.
  • Esclesche, as Escleche.
  • Esclichoir, a squirt, or stringe.
  • [Page] Esclische, as Escleche.
  • Esclisché, as Escleché, dismembred.
  • Esclischement, a dismembring, or dividing of an intire thing.
  • Esclisse, as Eclisse, a Cheese-fat; also a hurdle.
  • Esclisse, squirted; also made up of ozier, or wicker-twigs; also bound up in splents.
  • Esclisser, to squirt; to make up with ozier, or wicker twigs; also to bind up in splents.
  • Esclistre, lightning.
  • Esclopé, Escloppé, maimed, lame.
  • Esclopper, to maim, to lame.
  • Esclot, a wooden shooe; also a reed, or cane to suck with; a rest in Musick; a Galley-slave.
  • Esclotouëre, a Clap-net.
  • Esclou, the print of a horses foot.
  • Escloy, piss, lant, urine.
  • Escluine, as Esclamme.
  • Esclusant, stopping, as by a sluce.
  • Escodilles, the bulbed roots of Daf­fodils.
  • Escoffier, a Shoomaker.
  • Escoffraye, Escoffrer, a Shoomakers stall.
  • Escofion, a Coyf, or Cawl.
  • Escofraye, as Escoffraye.
  • Escogriffe, a lusk, a great slouch.
  • Escoinson, a scunch, the back-part of the jaumb of a window.
  • Escolage, School-hire.
  • Escolastre, the Rector, or Overseer of a School; also an unlearned, or mean Scholar.
  • Escolastrerie, a Rectorship, or Go­vernment of a School; also mean Scholarship.
  • Escolleté, whose collar is taken off.
  • Escolleter, to take off the collar from a garment.
  • Escolté, as Escouleté.
  • Escome, the blade, or broad end of an Oar.
  • Escomé, the Pit-fish, or Sea-pike.
  • Esconduire, to send away with a denial.
  • Esconduit, sent away with a denial.
  • Esconjuré, driven away by intreaty, or by conjuring.
  • Esconjurer, to dri [...]e away by in­treaty, or conjuring.
  • Esconsé, hidden, concealed.
  • Esconsement, a concealing. Es­consement de Soleil, the Sun-setting.
  • Esconser, to hide, to conceal.
  • Escopetade, the shot of a small piece.
  • Escopetin, as Squiopetin.
  • Escorcé, barked, pilled, pared.
  • Escorcée, Escorcement, a barking, pilling, or paring; also the pilled, or unrinded part of a plant.
  • Escorcer, to bark, pill, or pare.
  • Escorcesque, as Corcesque.
  • Escorceur, a Barker of trees.
  • Escorche-cul, flaying of the but­tocks.
  • Escorcheter, to flay.
  • Escorchouër, a flaying of beasts.
  • Escorçu, having a bark.
  • Escorgée, for Ecourgée, a whip.
  • Escorne, shame, disgrace, scorn.
  • Escorné, that hath lost his horns; out of countenance; also whose corners are broken, or cut off; de­faced, ruined, scorned, disgraced. Arbre escorné, a tree whose branches are lopt off. Dez escor­nez, ground dice, blunt cornered dice.
  • Escornement, depriving of horns; a disgracing.
  • Escorner, to deprive of horns; to take from one a thing which is (or he thinks is) an ornament and grace unto him; to break off the corners of a square thing; to lop trees; to ruine, deface, or disgrace any thing.
  • Escornicher, as Escorner, Escor­cher.
  • Escornizer, as Escorner.
  • Escort, discreet, wary.
  • Escosse, for gousse, the husk of a Bean, or the like.
  • Escossé, unhusked, shaled.
  • Escosser, to unhusk, to shale.
  • Escotté, that is within a shot, or hath paid a shot.
  • Escotter, every one to pay his shot, or to contribute something towards it.
  • Escouärde, as Escouäde, a parcel of Souldiers. Un Cap d'Escou­ärde, a Corporal.
  • Escoube, a Brush; also a maukin for an oven.
  • Escoudé, deprived of his support, of the stay whereon he leaned, of the means whereon he relied.
  • Escoüé, curtailed; also wagged, or shaken up and down.
  • Escouër, to curtail; also to wag, or shake up and down.
  • Escouëtte, a Plaisterers whiting brush.
  • Escouëttes, sheats. Look Escoutes.
  • Escouille, gelt.
  • Escouillement, a gelding.
  • Escouiller, to geld.
  • Escouillon, a wisp, or dish-clout; a mankin, or drag, to cleanse and sweep an oven.
  • Escouillure, a Gelding.
  • Escouisson, as Escoinson.
  • Escoluable, drainable, easie to be dried or consumed; soon gone.
  • Escoulant, as Escoulement, a drain, or strainer; also a sloping place, down which a thing easily glides, or is apt to run.
  • Escoulure, a strainer.
  • Escoullement, Escouller, as Escou­lement, Escouler in the N. D.
  • Escoupellé, topped, or whose top is cut off.
  • Escoupeller, to top, or cut off the top of a tree.
  • Escourgeon, Starch-corn, a kinde of base wheat, which being ground yields very white meal, but light, and little nourishing.
  • Escourre, to thrash; also to beat or shake dusty clothes, &c.
  • Escoursouër, the dale of a ships pump, whereby the water is pas­sed out.
  • Escourté, curtailed, shortened, cut, or chopped off.
  • Escourter, to curtail, shorten, cut, or chop off.
  • Escousse, a shaking, or jogging; al­so a swing. It is also the Femi­nine of Escoux.
  • Escoutement, a hearkening, or li­stening.
  • Escouteur, an hearer, hearkener, or li­stener.
  • Escoutillon, a Scuttle.
  • Escouvelle, a Brush.
  • Escouvillon, as Escouillon.
  • Escouvillonner, to spunge a Piece, to cleanse her before and after she is discharged.
  • Escoux, shaken, jogged, swinged. Paille escousse, wherein no Corn is lest.
  • Escrageant, crushing, or squeezing out.
  • Escragé, crushed, or squeezed out.
  • Escrager, to crush, or squeez out of.
  • Escraigne, a little hovel made of poles set round with their ends meeting at the top, and covered thick with turves, sods, dung, &c.
  • Escrain, as Ecrin, a casket, or lit­tle box.
  • s'Escravanter, to burst, or split him­self.
  • Escriere, pie escriere, a shrike.
  • Escrazé, for écrasé, crushed.
  • Ecrein, for écran, screen.
  • Escreté, unchalked, or deprived of chalkie whiteness.
  • Escrevé, split asunder.
  • [Page] l'Escrever du jour ou de la nuict, the dawning of the day, the twi­light.
  • s'Escrever, to split asunder.
  • Escrevisser, to go backward.
  • Escri, Escriement, an outcry, or ac­clamation.
  • Escrimerie, as Escrime, fencing.
  • Escrin, as Ecrin, a casket.
  • Escriner, to pull off the hair.
  • Escrinier, a Joyner, a Cabinet-ma­ker.
  • Escrivaillé, scribled.
  • Escrivaillerie, scribling.
  • Escrivailleur, a scribler.
  • Escrivainerie, Scrivenership.
  • Escrivisse, for Ecrevisse, a Cray-fish.
  • Escrober, to jog, as a Cart in an uneven way.
  • Escroë, as Ecrouë, a scrowl.
  • Escrotter, to gnaw.
  • Escrou, as Ecrouë in the N. D.
  • Escrouellé, troubled with the Kings evil.
  • Escroupionné, whose crupper is bro­ken, rumpless.
  • Escroustement, an uncrusting.
  • Escru, drap escru, undressed cloth.
  • Escudes, Escudettes, Penny-grass.
  • Escuellette, a little dish.
  • Escueuil, as Ecueil in the N. D.
  • Escuisant, smarting, itching.
  • Escuisse, whose hip or thigh is out of joynt.
  • Escuisser, to put the hip or thigh out of joynt.
  • Esculé, whose tail is burst, heel trod­den down.
  • Esculée, a dish full of.
  • Esculer, to burst the tail off. Escu­ler une aiguille, to break a needles eye. Esculer ses fouliers, to tread his shooes down at the heels.
  • Escumement, a foaming; a skim­ming; a scowring of the Seas.
  • Escumeux, frothy, foamy.
  • Escumier, of foam, or froth.
  • Escurage, a scowring.
  • Escuré, scowred.
  • Escurer, to scower.
  • Escureur, a Scowrer; also a Squir­rel.
  • Escurs, cives, or chives.
  • Escussonnable, fit to be grafted en écusion.
  • Escussonné, defended or covered with a Scutcheon, or Shield.
  • Escussonner, to defend, or cover with a Scutcheon, or Shield; al­so as Enter en écusson.
  • Escuyere, a woman-Es [...]uire; a Gen­tlewoman that attends on a Knight as his Esquire.
  • Escuyrie, as Ecurie in the N. D.
  • Esfarouché, Esfarouchement, Esfa­roucher. See them with an f, instead of s, in the N. D.
  • Esfilé, as Effilé.
  • Esflanqué, swayed in the back; al­so lean, shrunk in the flank, that hath no belly at all. Esflanqué en cheval de postillon, as lean as a Post-horse.
  • Esflanquer, to sway in the back; to make lean, thin-flanked, or small-belly'd.
  • Esflorer, to deprive of flowers.
  • Esfoiré, berayed.
  • Esfrontément, as Effrontément, impudently.
  • Esgail, a fine morning-frost, that shines like glass.
  • Esgargaté de crier, whose throat is almost burst with crying.
  • Esgaronné, trodden down, as a shooe at the heel.
  • Esgaronner un soulier, to tread a shooe down at the heel.
  • Esgarouillé, as yeux esgarouillez, wide-staring, or gloring eyes.
  • s'Esgaudir, to rejoyce, to be merry.
  • Esgeré, ploughed, or broken up, as land for fallows.
  • Esgerer, to plough, or break up land for fallows.
  • Esgommé, ungummed, whose gum is taken away.
  • Esgommer, to ungum, to take away the gum.
  • Esgorgeté, whose throat is cut; also bare-neckt.
  • Esgorgeter, to cut ones throat; also to go bare-necked, or to fold down the collar of a Garment, thereby to bare or discover the neck or bosom.
  • Esgosillé, whose throat is cut.
  • Esgosillement, a throat-cutting.
  • Esgosiller, to cut the throat of.
  • Esgosse, a husk.
  • Esgoüe, cloy'd, over-fall.
  • Esgouër, to cloy.
  • Esgousser, to hale.
  • Esgoutement, a draining by drop­ping.
  • Esgouteur, a drainer, or drier up by drops.
  • Esgoutille, a little hole or gullet through which water can do little more than drop.
  • Esgoutoir, a drain, channel, or sink.
  • Esgrailler, to straddle with the feet or legs.
  • Esgrainer, as Egrener, to shake corn out of its ear.
  • Esgraphé, loosed, pulled asunder.
  • Esgrapher, to loose, to pull asun­der.
  • Esgratignement, a scratching.
  • Esgrette, as Aigrette in the N. D.
  • Esgrugé, grated small; also crum­med, or broken into small pie­ces.
  • Esgrugeoir, a little grater.
  • Esgruger, to grate small; also to break unto crums.
  • Esgrumé, Esgrumelé, unclustered, taken from its cluster.
  • Esgrumeler, to uncluster; to take asunder things that hang loose to­gether.
  • Esgrumé, to pluck grapes from their cluster.
  • Esgruné, crumbled, broken small.
  • Esgruner, to crumble, to break small.
  • Esgual, for Egal, equal.
  • Esgualation, an equalling, levelling, or making like.
  • Esgualé, Esgualer. See Egualé, Egualer.
  • Esgue, an ill-favoured mare.
  • Esgueré, Esguerer, as Egaré, Ega­rer in the N. D.
  • Esgueuler, to cut the throat.
  • Esgueulé, for Egorgé, whose throat is cut.
  • Esguillé, of a needle, full of needles, wrought with the needle, prickt with needles.
  • Eshanché, whose hip or haunch is out of joynt.
  • Eshancher, to put a haunch or hip out of joynt.
  • Eshancheure, a putting of the hip or haunch out of joynt.
  • Esherbé, weeded.
  • Esherbement, a weeding.
  • Esherber, to weed.
  • Eshonté, shameless, brazen-faced.
  • Eshontement, shamelesness.
  • Eshontément, shamelesly, impudent­ly.
  • s'Eshonter, to be shameless, or bra­ [...]en-faced.
  • Esjetté, ejected, cast out, or lanched forth.
  • Esjetter, to eject, cast out, or lanch forth.
  • Esjuné, kept fasting, starved.
  • Esjuner, to keep fasting, to starve.
  • s'Esjouïr, to rejoyce.
  • Esjouïssance, joy, or mirth.
  • s'Esjourner, for Sejourner, to so­journ.
  • Eslagué, pruned, as a tree.
  • Eslaguer, to prune.
  • mslaguoir, a pruning-tool.
  • [Page] Eslainde, an engine wherewith great stones are lifted up.
  • Eslangouré, Eslangui, languishing, fallen into languishment.
  • Eslavé, washed away, washed o­ver.
  • Eslaver, to wash away, or over.
  • Eslay, a career, or course o [...] hors­back.
  • Esle, for aile, a wing.
  • Eslevable, fit to be elevated, raised, advanced; fit to be bred, or brought up.
  • Eslevement, a lifting up; an ad­vancing, or promoting; a swel­ling, or puffing up; a breeding, or bringing up.
  • Esleveur, a lifter up, a [...] advancer, a bringer up.
  • Esleveure, a lifting up, a rising, or swelling up in height, an imbos­sing, a bunch, a thing risen, swoln, or puffed up.
  • Esligible, eligible, fit to be ele­cted.
  • Eslingé, slender, lank.
  • Esloché, shaken, jogged.
  • Eslochement, a shaking, or jog­ging.
  • Eslocher, to shake, or jog.
  • Esloingné, Esloingnement, Esloin­gner, as Eloigné, Eloignement, Eloigner in the N. D.
  • Eslourdement, a dulness, an amaze­ment.
  • Esmané, Esmaner, as Emané, E­maner.
  • Esmarmelé, crushed in pieces.
  • Esmarmeler, to crush in pieces.
  • Esmay, trouble, cark, or care.
  • s'Esmayer, to be careful, sad, pen­sive.
  • Esme, an aim, or level taken; also a purpose, or intention.
  • Esmenuisé, made, or broken small.
  • Esmenuiser, to make, or break small.
  • Esmer, to aim, or level at; to make an offer to strike; to purpose, or intend.
  • Esmerauldin, like, or belonging to an emrald.
  • Esmerillonner, as Emerillonner.
  • Esmerveillable, marvellous, or won­derful.
  • Esmerveillement, a marvelling, or wondering.
  • Esmery, for Emeri, an emeril-stone.
  • Esmesche, snuffed.
  • Esmescher, to snuff.
  • Esmiable, apt to be crumbled.
  • Esmiettement, Esmieure, a crum­bling.
  • Esminage, a measure containing a­bout half a bushel.
  • Esminal, another measure, being the half of the bichot.
  • Esminotte, a measure of about two bushels.
  • Esmoignonné, cut off at the stump, made a stump of.
  • Esmoignonner, to cut off at the stump, to make a stump of.
  • Esmonde real, osmond royal, male fern.
  • Esmondement, a picking, purging, or pruning.
  • Esmont, for Emcut, the mute, or dropping of a bird.
  • Esmorce, touch-powder; also a tick­ling; also the ordure that cleaves to an unwiped or ill-wiped arse.
  • Esmorcellé, piecemealed.
  • Esmorceller, to piecemeal.
  • Esmotellé, whose clods are broken; also consumed, or eaten.
  • Esmoteler, to break clods; also to consume, or eat.
  • Esmoucé, Esmoucer, as Emoussé, Emousser in the N. D.
  • Esmouchail, as Esmouchoir.
  • Esmouché, rid of flies.
  • Esmouche-lourdaut, a deceiver of simple people.
  • Esmoucher, to rid of flies, to drive them away.
  • Esmoucheté, fly-blown; also pinked, or set with little tufts.
  • Esmouchette, the round tuft or head of herbs, wherein their seed is contained.
  • Esmouchettes, for Mouchettes, Snuffers.
  • Esmouchoir, a fly-flap.
  • Esmouellé, for émoellé, deprived of marrow.
  • Esmoulage, a grinding, whetting, sharpening.
  • Esmoulendier, a sheer-grinder.
  • Esmouvement, a moving or stirring up; an agitation, wagging, or shaking up and down.
  • Esmouveur, a mover, or stirrer up.
  • Esmoy, cark, care, or trouble.
  • s'Esmoyer de, earnestly to ask, or enquire of.
  • Esmundé, Esmunder, Esmundeur, as Emondé, Emonder, Emon­deur in the N. D.
  • Esmutir, Esmutissement, as Emu­tir, Emeut in the N. D.
  • Esmyne, a kinde of measure.
  • Esor, as Oyseaux esors, wilde, un­made, or ill-manned Hawks.
  • Espade, a broad short Sword.
  • Espagnolade, a Spanish trick, blow, bob.
  • Espagnolé, made Spanish, or Spa­niard-like.
  • Espagnollette, a band-supporter of wyre in works done over with silk.
  • Espagnoliser, to play the Spaniard.
  • Espagnotter, to woo, to court.
  • Espaillier, as Espalier in the N. D.
  • Espaix, for Espaisseur, thickness, grosness.
  • Espalé, scattered abroad with a shovel.
  • Espaler, Espaller, to scatter (or to spread) abroad with a shovel.
  • Espalmé, pitched over as a ship.
  • Espame, the cramp.
  • Espamé, troubled with a cramp, or convulsion, faln into a swoon; also weakned, or made lean with fasting.
  • Espamer, to cause the cramp, or a convulsion-sit; to weaken, or make lean.
  • Espampé, as roses espampées, ro­ses fully blown.
  • Espamprement, the pruning of a Vine.
  • Espan, for empan, a span.
  • Espandable, which may be shed, spilled, or poured out.
  • Espandement, a shedding, spilling, or pouring out; also a spread­ing.
  • Espani, blown, spread abroad.
  • Espanir, to blow, or spread, as a blooming flower.
  • Espanité, as Espavité.
  • Espapillotté, bespangled; bespot­ted.
  • Espapillotter, to bespangle; to be­spot.
  • Esparcet, a kind of thick grass, or pulse.
  • Esparcete, Pellitory of the wall.
  • Esparcetiere, a plot, or close sowed with Esparcet.
  • Espardement, a scattering, or dis­persing.
  • Espardre, to scatter, to disperse.
  • Esparer, to sting with the heels. Le ciel commence à s'esparer, the skie begins to break.
  • Esparges, for asperges, Sparragrass.
  • Esparre, the bar of iron that is nai­led on a door, and turns at the end on the hinge.
  • Esparsément, scatteringly, here and there.
  • Espartant, scattering, dispersing.
  • Espartillé, dispersed, divided by par­titions, infused by small parcels.
  • [Page] Espartir, to scatter, disperse, part, or divide.
  • Esparvain, a spavin in the leg of a horse, &c.
  • Esparvier, as Epervier, a Spar-hawk.
  • Espase, a sword.
  • Espasé, broad-footed, well under­laid, well spread, or well groun­ded.
  • Esparement, the broad foot, or foo­ting; the groundwork or foun­dation of.
  • s'Espater, to be broad-footed, or well underlaid; to spread, or bear a good breadth at the bot­tom, and thereby to be well-groun­ded or fixed.
  • Espatté, as Espaté.
  • Espattement, as Espatement.
  • Espave, a stray, a beast unowned; any thing whose original or own­er is not known; a Stranger born in a far Country. Espave & effreinte des Chiens, a foul de­fault of dogs, having utterly lost both sight and scent of the Game which they hunted.
  • Espave, (Adj.) masterless, or with­out owner; also forrein, far-born, of unknown birth or beginning.
  • Espavent, a spavin in a horse.
  • Espavité, the right a soverain Lord hath to the Lands or Goods of Strangers dying within his Domi­nions; or the being a stranger, as Espave.
  • Espaulart, a Sea-monster, enemy to Whales.
  • Espaulée, as par espaulées, by fits, now and then.
  • Espauletée, as Espaulée. Refaire une muraille par espauletées, to repair a Wall by parcels, without taking any of it down.
  • Espaulette, a little shoulder; also the wing of a gown, doublet, &c. also a buttress, or shouldering-piece. Massonnerie à espaulet­tes, uneven work in walls, &c.