I do hereby License these Ob­servations to be printed.

Sunderland P.

OBSERVATIONS UPON THE CITIES OF LONDON AND ROME.

By Sir WILLIAM PETTY, Fellow of the Royal Society.

LONDON, Printed for Henry Mortlocke, at the Phoenix in St. Paul's Church-Yard, and I. Lloyd, in the middle Exchange next Salisbury-House in the Strand. 1687.

OBSERVATIONS UPON THE CITIES OF LONDON and ROME.

1. THAT before the year 1630, the Christnings at London exceeded the Bu­rials of the same, but about the year 1655 they were scarce half; and now about two thirds.

[Page 2]2. Before the Restauration of Monarchy in England, Anno 1660, the People of Paris were more than those of London and Dublin put together, whereas now, the People of London are more than those of Paris and Rome, or of Pa­ris and Rouen.

3. Anno 1665 one fifth part of the then People of London or 97 thousand died of the Plague, and in the next year 1666, 13 thou­sand Houses or one fifth part of all the Housing of London were burnt also.

4. At the Birth of Christ, old Rome was the greatest City of the World, and London the greatest [Page 3] at the Coronation of King Iames the Second, and near 6 times as great as the present Rome, where­in are 119 thousand Souls besides Iews.

5. In the years of King Charles the Second his death and King Iames the Second his Coronation (which were neither of them re­markable for extraordinary Sickli­ness or Healthfulness) the Burials did wonderfully agree, viz. Anno 1684, they were 23202, and Anno 1685 they were 23222, the Medium whereof is 23212. And the Christnings did very wonder­fully agree also, having been Anno 1684, 14702, and Anno 1685, 14732, the Medium whereof is 14716, which consistence was [Page 4] never seen before, the said num­ber of 23212 Burials making the People of London to be 696360, at the rate of one Dying per an­num out of 30.

6. Since the great Fire of Lon­don, Anno 1666 about 7 parts of 15 of the present vast City hath been new built, and is with its People increased near one half, and become equal to Paris and Rome put together, the one be­ing the Seat of the great French Monarchy and the other of the Papacy.

FINIS.

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