AN EXPLICATION OF THE DIALL SETT UP IN THE KINGS GARDEN AT LONDON, an. 1669.

IN WHICH VERY MANY SORTS OF Dyalls are conteined; by which, besides the Hou­res of all kinds diversly expressed, many things al­so belonging to Geography, Astrology, and As­tronomy, are by the Sunnes shadow made visible to the eye.

AMONGST WHICH, VERY MANY DIALLS, ESPECIALLY the most curious, are new inventions, hitherto divulged be None.

ALL THESE PARTICULARS ARE SHORTLY, yet clearly sett forth for the common good, By the Reverend Father FRANCIS HALL, otherwise LINE, of the Society of JESUS, Professor of Mathematicks.

PRINTED AT LIEGE, By GUILLAUME HENRY STREEL, in the Yeare of our lord 1673.

Superiorum Permissis.

[pyramidical dial]

A BRIEF EXPLICATION OF THE PYRAMIDICALL DIALL set up in his Majestey Private Garden at White hall July 24. 1669.

THE Dyall being placed upona Pillar by his Majestey order, in the Privy Garden: it was intimated unto me by divers Worthy per­sons as à thing very Expedient, that an Ex­plication should be published, of the use, of the severall Dyalls there contayned. For al­though to divers of them were added à verse or two Explicating how the houre, &c. was to be found by them yet in regard many of them were new, and not te be found in any Author: and others belonging to Astronomy, Cos­mography, &c. not soe easily conceaved by all, they judged very Expedient à Declaration there of should be sett forth whereby such as came dayly to see it, might receave more satisfaction.

Heere upon, havinge soone after the setting up of the Diall, left London, and being arrived at my lodging in the Coun­try, I began the sayd Explication: and being much desirous to adde yet some further ornament to the Diall already placed, I began the making of fowre water Dyalls to be placed at the 4. [Page 2]Corners of the Pyramidicall Dyall in a cōpetent distance from the same. To this undertaking I was moved, as well, by the oportunity of à fountayne in the Privy Garden, soe neere the Dyall: as also for that Experience had taught me, that such Dialls, as formerly I had made to shew the Howre in severall ways by water, were for their rarity and novelty noe lesse plea­sing to the beholder, then the rest.

Being now very busy in these two Employments, and having towards the middle of winter made à considerable progresse therein: I receaved à letter from à friend at London, wherein he told me, that the Diall, for want of à cover (wich accor­ding to his Majestyes gracious order, should have been sett over it in the winter) was much endomaged by the snow lying long frozen upon it; and that, unlesse à cover were provided (of which he saw little hope) another or two such tempe­stuous winters, would utterly deface it. Heereupon I layd aside as well the sayd Explication, as these Waters Dyalls, it seeming to noe purpose, an Explication should come forth, of the Use of the Diall, when it was now rendred Uselesse. Which resolution being understood by some of those worthy persons, who before, had urged for the publishing the sayd Explication they judged that not withstanding the Diall it self should be rendred Uselesse; yet the sayd Explication, was not to be omitted: since thereby would be given occasion to some other skillfull Mathematicien (of which we have many in England) to sett up another in place thereof both more specious and durable, and adorned with more variety of invention.

This reason suting well with the desire I formerly had, of adorning his Majestyes Gardē with some curiosity that might in its kind surpasse what might else where be found, I resolved to take in hād agayne the sayd Explication. Which that it may the [Page 3]better be performed, I will first enumerate the parts or peeces of which the whole Diall consists, and then descend to the Dialls described on each particular peece.

CHAPTER I. Of the severall parts of this Diall: and of the Dialls described on each part, in generall.

THis Diall Standing on à Pillar or Piedestall of stone, consists cheefly of 6. parts or peeces, one lesse then another, and placed one above another in forme of a Pyramis, as yousée in the precedent page.

Of the first Peece.

THe first and largest of these 6. Peeces, or base of the sayd Pyramis, is à round Table of about 40. inches in Diame­ter: and some 8. or 9. inches in thicknes: The Edge whereof is cutt into 20. Equall playnes, which being made hollow like soe many boxes of an inch deepe, are covered each of them with à cleare polishd glasse: and on the inside of each glasse is described à Dyall: whereof some of them shew the Hour ac­cordinge to the Ancient or lewes Manner of counting the Hours: Others according to the counting used by the Babylo­nians: Others according to the Italians: Others according to the way of counting used by Astronomers: and lastly others shew what Hour it is according to our usuall and ordinary way of counting the Hour, used in most parts of Europe. These [Page 4]20. Dyalls thus described on the Edge of this Table or first pee­ce, are all verticall Declining Dyalls: Whose Style or Gnomon, is Eyther à Lions paw, or Unicornes Horn or such like rela­ting to his Majestyes Armes, and paynted on the bottome of the Box, as shall be sayd in the next Chapter.

Moreover upon the upper part of this Table, are placed 8. Reclining Dyalls, all made hollow, and covered with po­lishd, glasse like the former: but differ cheefly in this that they shew only the usuall Hour in different wayes: one of them shew ing the Hout by the shade of the style falling upon the Hour-lines: another by the shade of the Hour lines falling upon the style: à third without any shade Eyther of Hour lines or style, &c.

Upon this Peece stand also 4. Globes, cutt into severall Panes: upon one of which Globes are described severall Dyalls belon­ging to Geography: on an another, Dyalls belonging to Astronomy: the third Dyalls shewing severall things apper­tayning to Astrology, as what planet raigns every Hour: the Horoscope: Aspects of the sunne with the stars, &c.

There are also belonging to this peece, and yssuing out of the sides thereof towards the East, West, North and South 4. Iron branches supporting Each of them à glasse Boule, which shew the Hour, in 4. different wayes to witt by the 4. Ele­ments as shall heereafter be sayd.

Of the second Peece.

THe second Peece of the Pyramis is also a round Table, al­most like the former, but somewhat lesse, having only 30. inches in diameter, and about in thicknes. It stands u­pon the first, held up by 4. iron supporters. The Edge or cir­cumference of this Table is cutt into 16. Equall Playnes, all ma­de [Page 5]hollow, and covered with glasse, like those of the first Ta­ble. But they differ from them in this, that heere the Dyalls are not described on the glasse covers, but on the bottome of the boxes: neyther doethey shew the Hour, but the different Rising of the more remarkable starres, according to the three manner of Risings observed by Astronomers, to witt, the Cosmicall Rising, the Acronycall, and the Heliacall, as shall be decla­red heereafter, when we speak of the Dyalls of this second peece. The style to each of these Dyalls is à little starre paynted upon the inside of the glasse cover, the better to keepe it from the weather.

Out of the sides of this Peece yssue also 4. Branches towards the East, West, North and South, and carry on each of them à glasse Boule to shew the Hour, like those of the first Peece, but in à different way. For one of them shews the Hour by à style without à Shadow: another shews it by à Shadow wit­hout à style, &c. whereas those of the first Table shew it by the 4. Elements, Fire, Water, Aer and Earth, as shall be sayd in their due place.

On the upper part of this Table are plaeed 8. Reclininge Play­nes: 4. where of are covered each of thē with à plate of looking-glasse, on which the Hour lines, or style of à Dyall being paynted, are reflected upon the bottome inclining playnes, of the Third peece, and there shew the Hour, as shall be presently sayd. The other 4. have also Dyalls upon them, which are to be seen each of them in a looking glasse placed upon the sayd botto­me inclining playnes, of the Third peece: of which wee shall now speak.

Of the Third Peece.

THe Third Peece of this Pyramidicall Dyall, is à great Hollow Globe, of about 24. inches in diameter: and is placed immediatly without any supporter, upon the second peece. The superficies of this Globe is cutt into 26. playnes: two whereof being octogones serve for top and bottome. The rest are divided into 8. Equall Reclining playnes. 8. Equall in­clining playnes: and 8. Equall verticall or upright playnes. These playnes are all of them made hollow like those of the first and second peece. The incliners are not covered with glasse, but left open, that they may the better receave and shew the Dyalls reflected, as hath been sayd, from the second peece.

Two of the 8. upright playnes looking toward the North, have noe bottomes: but are covered only with cleare glasse, as serving only for windows to looke in to the Globe, and behold there the Dyals described on the Globe, which are seene as well without the same, as within. The other 6. have not only Each of them à cover of cleare polishd glasse with à Dyall de­scribed thereon, like those of the first peece, but have also à glasse for their bottome; which glasse is thinnely paynted over, with white coulour, to the end the shade of the Hour lines drawn upon the cover, may be seen as well, within the Globe as without. On these bottome glasses are drawn severall pictures, holding eyther à Scepter, or à Troncheon, or the like, the end whereof poynts the Hour, you look for.

Two also of the Recliners looking towards the north, have only à glasse cover serving for à window to look into the Glo­be. The other 6. have double glasse, like the former. Their Dyalls are some drawn upon the cover, others upon the [Page 7]bottome: but all soe contrived, that the Hour cannot beknown by them, but only by looking within the Globe.

More over from the top of this Globe yssue 4. iron Branches towards the 4. parts of the world, each of them carrying à glas­se Boule, proportionably lesse then those of the first and se­cond peece: on which Boule, are also Dyalls described, but different from the former shewing the Hour according to the several ways of counting the Hours. These Boules are payn­ted on the inside with thick coulour to keep out the light, except à little place which is left cleare like à starre for the sunne beames to passe through and shew the Hour: and the place also where the Hourlines are drawn, is only pain­ted on the outside thinnely with white coulour, that the light of the sunne passing through the sayd starre may be seen, and shew the Hour.

Of the fourth Peece.

THe fourth peece stāding on the afore sayd Globe, and held up by 4. iron supporters, like to those which hold up the se­cond peece, but proportionably lesse, is also à round Table of about 20. inches diameter, and 6. in thicknes. The Edge of this Table is cutt into 12. Equall superficies, not play­ne, as hitherto, but concave like soe many concave semicylin­dres: On each of which is described à Dyall, which shews the usuall Hour by the shade of à Flower de luce fixed at the top of each semicylinder.

From the top of this Table yssue forth 4. iron Brāches, carrying each à glasse Boul just like those of the first, second and Third peece, though proportionably lesse. The Dyalls described on these glasse Bouls differ from those of the Third peece, not on­ly because they shew only the usuall Hour; but also because [Page 8]heere the Hourlines are al left cleere for the sunne beames to passe through: that by soe passing they may exhibite the like Dyall on the opposite side of the Boule: which side is for that purpose, thinnly paynted over with white coulour, that the sayd Hours may be seen, and shew the Hour by their passing over à little starre paynted in the middle thereof.

Of the fifth Peece.

THe fifth peece standing upon the 4th. and held up also by 4. iron supporters, is à Globe of about 12. inches diameter: whose superficies in cutt into 14. playnes, 8. whereof are Tri­angles Equall and Equilaterall, the other 6. are Equall Squares. The Dyalls described on these playnes shew only the usuall Hour by the shade of a Flower de luce fastened to the top or bottome of each playne.

Of the last or Highest Peece.

THe Highest peece or top of the Pyramis, is à glasse Boule of some 7. inches diameter, standing upon à foote of iron placed on the middle of the fift peece. The north side of this Boul is thinnly paynted over with white coulour, that the shade of à little golden Ball, that is placed in the middle of the Boule may be seene to passe over the Hourlines, which are drawn upon the sayd white coulour, and note the Hour. The Boule is included between two circles of iron guilded, with à crosse on the top. And thus much concerning the parts of this Pyramidicall Dyall, in generall.

To which may be added, that the first 4. peeces have all their sides covered with little plates of black glasse, fastly ce­mented to the sayd peeces, except those places whereon the [Page 9]Dyalls are drawne: which being, as is sayd, covered also with plates of polished glasse, there appeares almost nothing on the outside af this Dyall, but glasse: which for the greater ornament of the Dyall the angles or corners, where those little plates of black glasse are joyned togeather, are guilded, as al­most all the iron work of the Pyramis, as well supporters, as Branches, style, &c. are eyther wholy, oras much as serves for or­nament, covered in like manner with gold.

CHAPTER II. Of the 20. Verticall Dialls described on the Edge of the first Peece.

BY what is sayd in the precedent Chapter of the first Peece it appeares, that besides the Dyalls described on the 4. great Globes, which stand on the sayd first peece: there are 32. Dyalls belonging thereto: Viz. 20. Verti­call, or Upright Dyalls: 8. Reclining Dyalls: and 4. Sphaericall Dyalls. Of the 20. Verticalls, we shal now speak in this Chapter: of the 8. Recliners in the next: and of the 4. Sphaericall in the 4th. Chapter.

These Verticalls being made hollow Boxes, (as is sayd) co­vered with glasse: the Hour-lines of each of them are drawn upon the glasse: and the style (which is eyther à Lions paw, or Unicornes Horne, &c.) is paynted on the bottome of the box. Whence it followes, that whereas in the ordinary way of making sunne Dyalls, the shade of the style or Gnomon pas­ses over the Hour-lines: heere on the contrary the shade of [Page 10]the Hour-lines passes over the style. Soe that whereas before, when the sunne did not shine, you saw nothing in the botto­me of the box, but à paynted Lion or Unicorne, &c. Soe now as soone as the sunne shines, you may behold there à perfit Dyall with all its lineaments and numbers exactly described, and just like the other drawne upon the glasse cover: as being on­ly the shade thereof caused by the sunne beames passing through the sayd glasse. Which shady Dyall being moved by the motion of the sunne from one part of the sayd bottome to another, shews by passing over the paw of the Lion, for exam­ple, the same Hour of the day, which in the ordinary Dyalls is shewed by the shade of the style passing over the Hours.

These 20. Dyalls, thus deseribed are not all of the same kind, nor shew the time of the day all in the same manner, but in very different wayes, according to the different wayes of numbring the Hours used by severall sorts of people: Some beginning to count their Hours from sunne Rising: others from sunne-setting: others from noone, and others from Mid­night. And agayne, of those, who count from sunne Ri­sing: some count allwayes 12. Hours from sunne Rising till sunne setting for the day: and as many from sunne setting till sunne Rising for the night: whether the dayes or nights be long or short. And these kind of Hours are therefore called the unequall Hours, as being longer or shorter according as the dayes are now longer, now shorter.

Others there are, who also count from sunne Rising, but continue the number till next sunne Rising: counting all­wayes from sunne Rising till sunne Rising 24. Hours. Accor­ding to which, it is all wayes 24. à clock at sunne Rising.

Other on the contrary count allways 24. Hours from sun­ne setting till next sunne setting: soe that when sunne setts, it is all wayes 24. à clock.

Others count also 24. Hours, but begin at Noone, and End at next Noone; and with these it is all wayes 24. à clock at Noone.

Lastly others beginn at Midnight, and count 12. Hours till Noon: and then 12. more till Midnight: and according to the­se, it is all ways 12. à clock, at Noone and at Midnight.

The first of these 5. wayes, and which divides the space be tween sunne Rising and setting into 12. Equall parts, making thereby the Hours unequall (as is sayd) that is longer in sum­mer then in winter, is the Most ancient of all; and are therefo­re called Horae Antiquae. They were anciently used by the le­wes, at is manifest by divers places of holy writt. Soe that when in S. Mathew chap. 27. v. 54. it is sayd to have been dark­nes (at our Saviors passion) from the sixth Hour till the Ninth: it is to be understood according to our manner of reckoning the Hours: that there was darkores from Noon till about 3. à clock after dinner: since according to this counting by une­quall Hours: it is all ways at Noon 6. à clock, and 12. at sunne sett. And for this reason, they are called heere in the Dyall Horae antiquae sive Judaicae. They are also called Horae Planeta­riae: because the Auncient Astrologers supposed à new Pla­net to raigne in each of these unequall Hours.

The second way of counting 24. Hours from sunne Rising till sunne Rising, is used by the Babylonians, and these Hours are therefore called Horae Babylonicae: the Babylonian Hours.

The third way of counting 24. Hours from sunne sett to sun­ne sett, is used cheefly by the Italians: and therefore these Hours are called Horae Italicae: the Italian Hours.

The fourth way counting also 24. Hours from Noone or Midday till next Midday, is used by Astronomers in calcula­ting the places and positions of the starres and Planets in the Heavens, &c. And are therefore called Horae Astro­nomicae: [Page 12]Astronomicall Hours.

The fift and last way: which counts 12. Hours from Mid­night to Noone, and as many from Noone to Midnight, is used as well in Most parts of Europe, as heere in England: and is therefore styled in the Dyall, the usuall or vulgar way: and the Hours, Horae Vulgares; the vulgar or usuall Hours.

Now there being (as hath been sayd 20. Dyalls placed on the Edge of this first peece: there is alotted in the Dyall to each of the 5. sorts, 4. Dyalls: which are soe disposed, that at any time of the day you may behold the time of the day represented in every of those 5. manner of wayes, And that they may be the better conceaved it seemed good to sett downe one of each sort, in the next Page: which by their titles are easily know.

For

  • 1. those 4. whose title is, Per horas numeratas, ab or­tu Solis,
    FIG. 1.
    more antiquo, sive Judaico, and have à Red Lion payn­ted on the bottome, shew by the shady Dyall passing over the paw of the Lion, what à clock it is sayd to be at Whi­tehall, according to the Ancient or lewes account.
  • 2. Those 4. whose title is Per Horas numeratas ab ortu Solis more Babylonico,
    FIG. 2.
    and have paynted on their bottome à Harpe with à Scepter, shew by the shady Dyall passing over the top of the Scepter, what à clock it is at Whitehall according to the Babylonian way of the counting the Hours.
  • 3. Those 4. whose title is,
    FIG. 3.
    Per Horas numeratas ab occasu Solis more Italico, and have on their bottome à Flower de luce, shew by the like shady Dyall passing over the top of the Flower de luce, what à clock it is there according to the Italian account.
  • 4. Those 4. whose title is, Per Horas numeratas à Meridie more Astronomico,
    FIG. 4.
    and have on their bottome à Unicorn, shew by the often mentioned shady Dyall, what à clock it is to be sayd to be according to the count used by Astronomers.
1
[...]er Horas Numeratas ab ortu Solis more Antiquo [...] Iudaico

2
Per Horas Numeratas ab ortu Solis more Babylonico

3
Per Horas Numeratas [...] [...]casu Solis more Ita [...]

4
Per Horas Numeratas a Me­ridie more Astronomico

5
Per Horas Numeratas a Media nocte more Vsitato

Lastly, these 4. whose title is, Per horas numeratas à Meridie & media nocte, FIG. [...]. moreusit ato, and have on the bottome à Lion paynted in its naturall coulour, shew by the shady Dyall, pas­sing over the Lions paw, what à clock it is according to the u­suall and ordinary way of reckoning the Hours.

Soe that for example: yf at the beginning of July (at what time the sunne rises at 4. clock and setts at 8.) I find by looking on the usuall Dyall, that it is just 8. à clock in the morning I shall find à the same time by the Ancient or Judaicall Dyall, to be just 3. à clock: by the Babylonian to be 4. by the Italian 12. and by the Astronomicall to be 20. and thus much for the use of these 20. Verticall Dyalls.

Now the reason of their difference from the ordinary Dyalls which shew the Hour by the shade of the style passing over the Hour-lines is, that the sunne being moved in the same man­ner, whether the shade of the Hour-lines be moved over the style, or on the contrary, the shade of the style moved over the Hour-lines the self same effect, in order to the shewing the Hour, must needs follow both wayes: since the Hour-lines are noe other then the sections, which the playnes of the Hour circles in the Heavers make with the playne of the Dyall: in each of which playnes, the style also is, as insensibly differing from the Axis of the world.

From whence it follows, that the afore sayd Dyalls beyng made according to the ordinary way of making the like verticall declining Dyalls, are to be inverted, to the End they may shew the Hour.

CHAPTER III. Of the 8. Reclining Dyalls Standing upon the first Peece.

THe 8. Reclining Dyalls, being also made hol­low, and covered with glasses like these 20. verticalls we now spoke of, shew only the usuall Hour; but performe it in different, or ra­ther contrary wayes one to another. For of tho­se 4. which stand upon the south part of the Ta­ble; one shews the Hour by the shade of the style passing over the Hour-lines. Another on the contrary shews it by the shade of the Hour-lines passing over the style. A third shews it both ways; as well by shade of style passing over Hours, as shade of Hours passing over style. The fourth shews the Hour without shade eyther of style or Hourlines.

In like manner, of those 4. which stand on the North part of the Table, in one you see the Hour-lines, but noe style. In another you see the style, but noe Hours. In à third you see neyther style nor Hours, unlesse the suune shine, as shall be de­clared by and by. In the fourth, you see indeed both Hours and style: but in à different way from what hath been hit­herto practised: for heere you behold the style in the same su­perficies with the Hour-lines. Whereas in the common prac­tise of Dyalling, the style is allwayes lifted above the super­perficies in which are the Hour-lines, to the end it may cast its shade upon them. And thus much of these 8. Reclining Dyalls in generall. We shall now speak of them in particular and first.

Of those 4. Which stand upon the south part of the Table.

THe first of these 4. whose title is, Per umbram styli, and shews,FIG. 6. (as is sayd) the Hour by the shade of the style pas­sing over the Hour-lines, hath upon the glasse cover, paynted à little starre: which serves for style: and on the bottome are drawn the Hour-lines: over which the shade of the sayd starre passing shews the Hour.

The second whose tittle is, Per umbram Horarum, and shews the Hour by the shade of the Hours passing over the style,FIG. 7. hath upon the glasse cover paynted à Harp, whose strings are the Hour-lines: and on the bottome is paynted à Flower de luce, whose top serves for style. Soe that by the shade of those strings passing over the Flower de luce, the Hour is known.

The third, whose title is, Per umbram tam styli quàm Hora­rum, FIG. 8. and shews the Hour as well by the shade of the Hours pas­sing over the style, as by thes hade of the style passing over the Hours, hath upon the glasse cover à Unicorne paynted with certayn little starres on his back: each of which standing for an Hours, hath its number written over it. On the bottome are drawn the Hour-lines of à Dyall, and by them à Scepter: soe that when the sunne shines you may behold the Unicornes shade being moved by the motion of the sunne, to note the Hour with the end of its Horn: and at the same time, the shade of the sayd little starres, to shew the same Hour by passinge over the Scepter.

The fourth and last of these, whose little is, Sine umbravel styli, vel▪ Horarum, FIG. 9. and shews the Hour without shade of eyther style or Hours, hath paynted upon the glasse cover à Flower de lu­ce, togeather with à Harp, whose strings are the Hourlines: and the top of the Flower de luce is their style. Now out of [Page]

6
PER VMBRAM STYLI

7
PER VMBRAM HORARUM

8
PER VMBRAM TAM STYLI QVAM HORARVM

9
SINE VMBRA VEL STYLI VEL HORARVM

[Page 18]this Flower de luce, you shall see, when the sunne shines, ano­ther Flower de luce of light, to arise, and by passing under the sayd string of the Harp, to note the Hour: and by consequen­ce, to shew (as is sayd) the Hour without shade of sty­le or Hours.

As for the reason of the three first, there needs to adde noe more then what hath been sayd of the 20. verticall Dyalls. But concerning the 4th. the reason why the style or Flower de luce lyes in the same superficies with the Hour-lines, is, that the sayd luminous Flower de luce arising out of the paynted Flower de luce, and shewing the Hour, is reflected from à looking glasse placed upon the bottome of the Dyall.

Of the other 4. Reclining Dyalls, Which stand upon the North Part hof the Table.

THe three first of these Dyalls are soe contrived, that the Hour cannot be other wise known by them, then by loo­king through à little Ring placed on the back of the Dyall: as shall now be explicated.

For in the first,FIG. 10. whose title is, Per Horas latentes, yf you look on the face of the Dyall, you perceave noe Hour lines, but only à style, that is à Flower de luce paynted upon the co­ver: and on the contrary yf you look on the back of the Dyall through the sayd Ring, you shall see the Hour-lines, but noe style, unlesse the sunne shine: for then you shall behold the shade of the sayd Flower de luce to passe over the sayd Hour-lines, and note the Hour.

In the second (whose title is, Per latentem stylum) by loo­king on the face of the Dyall,FIG. 11. you behold only the Hours: that is, you see only à Crown bedecked with starres, each whereof stands for an Hour: And on the contrary by looking [Page]

10
PER HORAS LATENTES

11
PER LATENTEM STYLUM

12
PER LATENTES TAM HORAS QUAM STYLUM

13
PER TAM HORAS QUAM STYLUM PATENTES

[Page 20]on the back through à little Ring, you behold only the style, that is à Scepter, unlesse the sunne shine: for then you see also the shade of those starry Hours to passe over the Scepter and note the Hour.

In the third,FIG. 12. whose title is, Per latentes tam Horas quà sty­lum, you see neyther Hours nor style by looking on the Dyall but yf you looke (as before) on the back: you may behold the Hourlines: and yf the sunne shines, you may perceave also à little starre, to passe over them, and shew the Hour.

Lastly in the Fourth, whose title is, Per tam stylum quàm Ho­ras patentes, FIG. 13. there appeares both style and Hours: but the style is without shade, and the Hours without lines. That is upon the glasse cover are paynted certayne little starres, serving for the Hours: and à Scepter serving for style: out of which Scepter, when the sunne shines, you may be­hold another Seepter of light to yssue, and by passing under the sayd starres, to shew the Hour.

Now for the reason, why in the three first you cannot see the Hour, but by looking through the Ring on the back of the Dyall: it is, because their bottomes being glasse thinnely payn­ted over with white coulour, nothing can be seen by looking on the face of the Dyall, that is drawn on the lower side of the bottome glasse: and on the contrary, by looking on the back, nothing can be seen that is drawn upon the glasse cover, but only the shade there of, when the sunne shines.

The reason of the fourth, is the same which was given for the fourth of those, which stand on the south part of the Table.

CHAPTER IV. Of the 4. glasse Boules standing on the 4. Branches of the first Peece.

THese 4. Boules shew also the usuall Hour in 4. different wayes. For one of them shews the Hour by Fire: another by Water: the third by the Aire: and the fourth by the Earth: as we shall now declare.

Of the first Boule.

THe first there fore, whose title is, Per Ignem, FIG. 14. and shews as is sayd, the Hour by Fire, is à little glasse Boule filled with cleare water. This Boul hath about 3. inches in diame­ter, and is placed in the middle of another Sphaere of about 6. inches in diameter, consisting of severall iron Rings or circles representing the Hour circles in the Heavens. The Hour is heere knowne by applying your hand, to the sayd Hour circles, when the sunne shines: for that circle where you feel your hand burnt by the sunne beames passing through the Boule filled with water, shall shew the true Hour: according to the Latin verse there adjoigned. Cratem tange: manusue Horam ti­bi reddet adusta.

The reason of this Dyall is, that the parallel rayes of the sun­ne passing through the sayd little Boul are bended, by the den­sily of the water, into à cone or pyramis, whose vertex reaches à little begond those Hour circles, and there burnes the hand applyed. For soe many rayes being all united into à poynt, [Page 22]must needs make an intense heat. Which heat is soe power­full in the summer time that it will fire à peece of wood ap­plyed unto it.

Of the second Boule.

THe second Boule, whose title is, Per Aquam, shews the Hour by water:FIG. 15 that is by the rayes of the sunne passing through the water, with which the Boule is filled, as in the praecedēt. Which rayes although they be bended by the density of the water, as before, yet they burn not, being cutt of at their going out of the Boule, by à little white coulour layd thinnely on that part where they break out: making thereby only à round circle of light upon the sayd coulour: the center of which circles shews the Hour amongst the Hour circles, the­re described on the said white coulour: as the Latin verse doth also explicate, Luminis hîc centrum qui tangit, tangit & Horam.

The reason of this Dyall (besides what we now sayd of the bending of the rayes) is, that these Hour-circles being noe other then the sections, which the playnes of the caelestial Hour-circles crossing each other in the center of the boule make in the superficies thereof: and the sayd center of the circle of light madd on te Boule, answearingt perpetually to the center of the sunne, it necessarily followes, that it shew allwayes the true Hour. As any one knowing but the first Principles of Dial­ling will conceave.

Of the Third Boule.

THe Third Boule, whose title is, Per Aërem, and shews the Hour without any style,FIG. 16. is only filled with Aire: and ex­hibites to your sight, when the sunne shines, two little pictures [Page]

14
PER IGNEM

15
PER AQUAM

16
PER AEREM

17
PER TERRAM

[Page 24]of the sunne, like two small starres, within the Boule. Both which, yf by moving your eye, you bring under the same Hour-circles described on the Boule, or at least, paral­lel unto it, they shall shew you the true Hour; according to the there underwritten Latin verse, Unam det geminus Sol Horam, & vera patebit.

Now the reason, why by those little pictures of the sun­ne, seen both under the same Hour-circle, or parallel to it, you find the Hour, is, that those Hour circles described on the Boule, being the sections, which the playnes of the cae­lestiall Hour-circles make in the superficies of the Boule, (as was sayd also of the second Boule) and these two little sun­nes being reflected one of them from the convex superficies of the Boule, and the other from the concave: it followes by the Rules of Reflexion, that those two pictures of the sunne, are both seen in the same playn in which is also the eye which seeth, and the sunne which is seen. Wherefore since the sunne is allwayes in the playne of the true Hour-circle: it necessari­ly followes, that the eye behold both those pictures, at the true Hour. For although one Reflexion cannot sufficien­ly determine the eye to behold the sunne in the true Hour-cir­cle: yet two reflections suffise.

Where is also to be noted, that these three Boules we ha­ve now spoke of, have this praeeminence above all other Dyalls depending on the shade of the style, that they shew the Hour, when by none of those others it can be discerned: that is when the sunne shines soe dimly that it casts noe perceptible shadow.

Of the fourth Boule.

THe fourth Boule whose title is,FIG. 17. Per Terram shews what à clock it is in any part of the world. Which is heere per­formed [Page 25]by à Geographicall description of the whole earth upon the inward superficies of the Boule: togeather with à Meri­dian circle moveable upon the North and South poles: and the Aequinoctiall circle divided into its 24. Equall Hours and fast­ned to the sayd Meridian, at the Hour of 12. at which place al­so, is erected à Flower de luce: and at the North pole is fastned à thrid. The boule being thus prepared, and rightly placed: yf you turne the sayd moveable meridian till the flower de luce cast noe shade upon the Boule, and then bringing the thrid over any part of the world till it crosse the Aequinoctiall circle: yoe shall see the Hour there noted belonging to that part or parts, of the world, over which the sayd thrid passes: accor­ding to the verse there adjoyned: Umbram tolle Orbi, totumue stat Hora per Orbem.

CHAPTER V. Of the 4. great Globes Standing on the first Peece.

Of the first Globe.

THe first therefore or these Globes, whose title is, Horologia Geographica, having about 13. inches in diameter, hath its superficies cutt into 32. playnes; whereof 20. are Trian­gles all equall and equilaterall. The other 12. are Pentagones or fiveangled figures, all of them likewise equall one to another. So­me of these Pentagones are made hollow like Hemisphaeres, [Page 26]others like cones, the rest, as also the Triangles, are left playne. The Dyalls described as well on the Pentagones, as on the Triangles have for style, à sharp poynted iron perpendicularly erected.

The Dyalls described on the Pentagones shew not only the situation, of the more remarkable countryes in the world, but also what severall actions, are perfor­med in them, at the same time: for example, who are now at Dinner, who at supper, who are rising, who sleeping, &c.

For those two,FIG. 18 whose title is, Tempus surgendi, shew by the shade of the style in what part of the world it is time of Rising, or 6. à clock in the Morning.

Those,FIG. 19. whose title is, Tempus Prandendi, shew in the same manner, in what part of the world, it is time of Dining or Midday.

Those whose title is.FIG. 20. Tempus Coenandi, shew in what coun­try it is supper time, or 6. à clock at night.

Those,FIG. 21. whose title is, Tempus Dormiendi, shew where it is Midnight, or time of sleeping.

But those two, whose title, Habentes Solem supra caput, shew by the shade of the style what people, whether by sea or land, have the sunne just over their Heads at such time as you look upon the Dyall.FIG. 22. Which is performed by inverting that part of the Terrestriall Globe, which is included between the two Tropicks. The reason of which inversion is, that the shade [Page]

18
TEMPUS SURGENDI • In Iamaica , • In Guiana , • In Groenlandia , • In Brasilia , • In canarijs , • In Lusitania , and • In Hispania 

19
TEMPUS DORMIENDI • In Nova Albion , • In California , • In Nova Granada , • In No [...] Hispania , • In Virginia , • In Nova Anglia , • In Marilandia , and • In Islandia 

20
TEMPUS PRANDENDI • Apud Mogores , • In Nova Zembla , • In Tartaria , • I [...] Arabia , • In Moscovia , • In Polonia , and • In Dania 

21
TEMPUS CAENANDI • In Cauchinchina , • In Bengala , • In Camba [...]a , • In Persia , • In Sinu-Arab: , and • In Arabia 

22
Habents Solem supra caput

Tropicus Capricorni

AEquator

Tropicus Cancri

Zefata

Nubia

Oceani [...]

AEthiopia

Brasilia

Tabair

Guiana

[Page 28]of the style being allwayes cast towards the contrary part to the sunne, that is, yf the sunne be East, the shade falls to­wards the West, &c. it was necessary the eastern part of the world should heere lye Westwards; and the Northern South­wards. And thus much for the 12. Pentagones, described on the Globe.

Now for the 20. Equilaterall Triangles: the Dyalls des­cribed on them,FIG. 23. & 24. shew only what à clock it is in this or that particular place, according to the usuall way of counting the Hours from Midnight to Noone, and from Noone to Midnight whereof only three examples are heere sett downe. For example, one of these Dyalls shews what à clock it is at Jerusalem: another at Constantinople: another in Jamaica, &c.

Of the second Globe.

THe second Globe, whose title is, Horologium Astro­nomicum ostendens, &c. is just like the former, whe­reof we have now spoken: that is the superficies the­reof is cutt into 12. Pentagones and 20. Triangles. But the Dyalls, described on these Pantagones and Trian­gles, are much different from those of the former. As not shewing the Hour of the day: but divers other things belonging to Astronomy, as the Azimuth or distance of the Sunne from the South: The Almican­tarath, or Height of the Sunne above the Horizon: what Hour he rises and setts: and the like as shall now be sayd.

23
IEROSO LYMIS

24
CONSTANTINOPOLI

First therefore the Dyall, whose title is, Azimuth Solis à Meridie, FIG. 25. shews by the shade of the style (which in each Dyall heere also is perpendicularly erected) how many degrees the Sunne is distant from the true Soutb, at such time as you looke upon the Dyall. The lineaments of this Dyall, are noe others then the sections, which the playnes of the verticall circles crossing Each other on the top of the Style, make with the superficies of the Dyall.

2. The Dyall whose title is,FIG. 26. Altitudo Solis supra Horizon­tem, shews how many degrees the Sunne is elevated above the Horizon. The lineaments of this Dyall are the Sections which the superficies of the Dyall makes with those Cones whose bases are parallel to the Horizon, and whose common vertex is the top of the style: or center of the Earth.

3. The Dyall, whose title is, Incipit Aurora, shews at what Hour beginns Break of Day,FIG. 27. that is when first the Cre­pusculine Arch begins to appeare. The lineaments by which this is heere performed are the Sections, which the superfi­cies of the Dyall, makes with the Cones, whose bases are parallel to the Equator, and whose common vertex, is the top of the style, or Earths center.

4. The Dyall, whose title is, Sol Oritur, shews by the now named Sections of those cones,FIG. 28. whose bases are parallel to the Equator, at what Hour the Sunne riseth: and by consequen­ce, when he setts.

25
Azimuth Solis a Mer

26
Altitudo Solis

27
Sol oritur

28
Incipit Aurora

5. The Dyall, which hath for title, In quo signo Zodiaci sit Sol, FIG. 29. & 30. shews by the sayd sections of the superficies of the Dyall with the cones, whose bases are parallel to the Equator, in what part or signe of the Zodiack the Sunne is. But because the shade, of the top of the style falls twice every yeare, upon the same section, by reason of the Sunnes as­cending and descending from the one Tropick to other: therefore to avoyd confusion, heere are two Dyalls, of the same sort, one serving from the 10th. of December to the 10th. of June: the other from the 10th. of June to the 10th. of December.

6. The Dyall, whose title is, Dies Mensis shews by the like conicall sections now mentioned,FIG. 31 & 32. what Day of the month it is: at least, as neere as can be expected in soe little à for­me. Heere are likewise two Dyalls of the same sort, for the reason now mentioned. And these Dyalls which in this second Globe, we have hitherto spoken of are all of them described on the Pentagones. Those which follow are de­scribed on the Triangles.

7. The Dyall, whose title is, In qua parte Horizontis incipiat Aurora, FIG. 33. shews in what part of the Horizon begins the Break of the Day: that is, in what part thereof begins first to appeare the convex part of the Crepusculine Arch: Whether just in the East, or in the North East, or South East, &c. And by conse­quence, in what part also the Evening Twilight Ends. The li­neaments of this Dyall, are the Sections which the playnes of the verticall circles crossing Each other on the top of the style, Make with the playne of the Dyall.

8. The Dyall, whose title is, Duratio Crepusculi, shews by the now often mentioned Conicall Sections of the superficies of the Dyall,FIG. 34. with the Cones whose bases are parallel to the Equator, How long, as wel the Morning, as Evening Twilight [Page]

29
In quo Signo Zodiaci sit Sol.

a 10 Dec. ad 10 Iunij

30
In quo Signo Zodiaci sit Sol.

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Dec.

31
Dies Mensis

a 10 Dec. ad 10 Iunij

  • Ian
  • Feb:
  • Martius
  • Aprilis
  • Maijus
  • Iun

32
Dies Mensis

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Dec.

  • Nou:
  • Oct:
  • Sept:
  • Aug:
  • Iulius
  • Iunius

33
In qua Parte Horizontis incipiat Aurora

34
Duratio Crepusculi

[Page 34]doth last: That is, how many Hours are from Breacke of Day till Sunne Rising: and from Sunne setting to the End of Twilight, or till dark night.

9. The Dyall, whose title is, In qua coeli plaga existat Sol, shews by the Sections of the Verticall circles,FIG. 35. see n. 7. in what part of the Heaven the Sunne is: Whether in the East or West, outh East, or South West, &c.

10. The Dyall,FIG. 36. whose title is, Amplitudo Ortiva Solis, shews by the Conicall Sections Mentioned n. 3. how many Degrees the Sunne rises wide of the true East poynt whether towards the North, or towards the South.

11. The Dyall,FIG. 37. whose title is, Quot Horae restent ad occasum Solis, shews by the Sections of the Italians (see c. 2. n. 3.) Hour circles with the superficies of the Dyall, How many Hours rest till Sunne sett.

12. The Dyall,FIG. 38. whose title is, Quota pars Diei sit Elapsa, shews by the Sections of the Unequall (see ibid. n. 3.) Hour circles, what part of the Day, or space from Sunne Rising to Sunne setting is now spent, whether the third, or fourth, or fift, &c.

13. The Dyall,FIG. 39. whose title is, Declinatio Solis shews by the Conicall Sections Mentioned n. 3. the Sunnes Declination: that is how many Degrees he is distant from the Equator.

14. The Dyall, whose title is, Qua Hora Sol perveniat ad verum Orientem, FIG. 40. shews by the same Conicall Sections, at what Hour the Sunne comes to be just East: and by consequence, at what Hour after dinner he wilbe just West.

35
In qua Caeli Plaga existat Sol.

36
Solis Amplitudo ortiva

37
Quot Horae restent ad occasum Solis

38
Quota Pars Diei sit elapsa

39
Solis Declinatio.

40
Qua Hora Sol Per­veniat ad Vera orien­tem

15. The Dyall, whose title is, Refractio Solis, shew by the Conicall Sections spoken of n. 2. the Sunnes Refraction;FIG. 41. that is how many minutes he appeares to be Elevated above his true height, by the bending of his rayes in passing through our thick Atmosphaere.

16. The Dyall, whose title is, Quoties umbra contineat Cor­pus Erectum, FIG. 42. shews by the shade of the style falling upon the aforesayd Conicall Sections Mentioned n. 2. how often the shadow of a body perpendicularly Erected upon à playn parallel to the Horizon contaynes the length of the same body.

17. The Dyall, whose title is, Longitudo Diei, shews by the shade of the Style falling upon the Conicall Sections spoken of n. 3. the length of the Day:FIG. 43. that is, how many Hours are bet­ween sunne rising and setting.

Lastly, the Dyall, whose title is, Quot sint Horae Elapsae ab or­tu Solis, FIG. 44. shews, (by the shade of the style falling upon the Sec­tions, which are made in the superficies, of the Dyall, by the playnes of those circles, which divide all the parallels of the Sunnes dayly, motion into 24. Equall parts: according to what was sayd c. 2. n. 2.) How Many Hours have passed since Sunnes Rising.

Of the Third Globe.

THe Third Globe, whose title is, Horologium Uranographi­cum, is about the same bignes with the two former: but the superficies, thereof cutt into 20. Triangles, all Equall and Equilaterall: some whereof are made hollow like Cones; the rest left playne. The Dyalls described on these Triangles, shew what situation or posture, the Heavens have at any time of the Day, when the sunne shineth: that is, what starres are rising, what setting, what stand just over your Head, &c. Soe [Page]

41
Solis Refractio

42
Quoties Vmbra Contineat Corpꝰ erectum

43
Diei Longitu­do.

44
Quot sint Ho­rae ab Ortu Solis

45
Con­stella­tiones Orientes

a 10 Decembris ad 10 Iunij.

  • Aries
  • Taurus
  • Orion
  • Leo
  • Virgo
  • Serpentari

46
Con­stella­tiones Orientes

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Decembris.

  • Pisces
  • Pegasus
  • Libra
  • Virgo
  • Leo
  • Cancer

[Page 38]this Globe standing immoveable, performes, by the shade of the styles belonging to these severall Dyalls, that in effect, which à Caelestiall Globe, whereon all the Fixed Starres, or Constellations are paynted, would doe, if being rightly pla­ced, it were continually turned about, according to the sun­de dayly Motion: where is to be noted that heere are allwayes two Dyalls of Each sort, one serving one half yeare, and the other another, for the reason given in the fift Dyall of the se­cond Globe.

First therefore those two Dyalls, whose title is, Constellatio­nes Orientes, FIG. 45. & 46. shew by the shade of the style, what constella­tion, or company of starres, begin then to rise above the Ho­rizon: provided that you looke upon the Dyall belonging to the time of the yeare in which you are in according to what was now sayd. The lineamēts of these Dyalls, are the Sections, which the playne of the Ecliptike circle makes with the su­perficies of the Dyall, at such time, as those severall constel­lations, noted upon the Dyall, begin to rise.

2. Those two, whose title is, Constellationes Occidentes, shew in like manner, what Constellation begins then to sett, or goe under the Horison. The lineaments of these two Dyalls, are the Sections, which the playn of the Ecliptike circle ma­kes with the superficies of the Dyall, at such time, as this or that constellations begins to sett.

3. Those two Dyalls, whose title is, Constellationes existentes in Meridie, shew what Constellation begins to passe the Me­ridian circle, or full South. Which is heere performed by the Sections, which the playne of the Ecliptike circle ma­kes with the superficies of the Dyall, when the severall Constellations there noted, begin to passe the Meridian circle.

4. Those two, whose title is, Constellationes existentes in ipso [Page 39]Oriente, shew what Constellations stand just East, whether it be in the Horizon, or elevated above the same. Which they performe by those Sections, which the playne of the Ecliptike makes with the playne of the Dyall, when Such Constellations, as are there noted, doe passe the East circle, or first Verticall.

3. Those who, whose title is, Constellationes existentes in ipso Occidente, shew on the contrary what Constellations stands just West. Which is done by the like Sections made by the Eclip­tike, when those Constellations begin to passe the true West.

6. Those two Dyalls, whose title is, Constellationes existen­tes supra Caput, shew what Constellation stands, over your Head. Which is also done by the à fore sayd Sections, made when the Constellations there noted, passe the Zenith, or verticall poynt.

Now these 12. Dyalls being all made (as is sayd) by the Sec­tions of the Eccliptike with the superficies of the Dyall: it will be sufficient to give heere à Diagramme of the two first.

But because these 2. Dyalls shew only what situation the starres, have in the Day time, when the starres cannot be seen, unlesse there should happen à totall Eclipse of the Sunne: the­re are therefore described on the same Globe 6. other Dyalls, shewing what situation the starrs will have at 8. à clock at night; à time proper, to behold them and see the truth of the Dyall.

Wherefore 7o. Those two Dyalls, whose title is, Constel­lationes existentes in Oriente Horâ octavâ Vespertinâ, FIG. 47. & 48. shew what Constellation will stand just Eastward at 8. à clock at night. Which is heere performed, by the Sections, which the superficies of the Dyall makes with those cones, whose bases are parallel to the Equator, and whose common vertex is the top of the style. Or center of the Earth.

8. Those two, whose title is, Constellationes existentes in Oc­cidente Horâ octavâ Vespertinâ, shew by the now named sections, what Constellation will be just Westward, at 8. à clock in the Evening.

Lastly those, two, whose title is, Constellationes existentes in Meridie Horâ octavâ Vespertinâ, shew by the sections, which their superficies make with there aforesayd Cones, what Con­stellation, at 8. à clock at night, will be just South. And these 6. Dyalls being all made by the Sections of the same Co­nes, it will suffise to place heere the Diagramme of the two first. And thus much of the Third Globe.

Of the fourth Globe.

THe fourth and last Globe, whose title is, Horologium Astro­nomicum, is also cutt into 20. Triangles equalland Equi­laterall, just like the precedent. The Dyalls described on these Triangles, belong to Astrology: and are placed heere for those who are delighted with such conjecturall uncertayntyes. The­se Dyalls are as followeth.

1. The Dyalls, whose title is, Domus Astrologica Solis, shews in which of the 12 Astrologicall Houses described according to the way of Regiomontanus,FIG. 49. the Sunne is, at the time you be­hold the Dyall. The lineaments of this Dyall, are the sections which the playnes, of those circles, which crossing Each other [Page]

47
Constellationes in Oriente Hora 8ua Vespert:

a 10 Decembris ad 10 Iunij

  • Cancer
  • Leo
  • Virgo
  • Bootes

48
Constellationes in Oriente Hora 8ua Vesp:

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Dece

  • Perseus
  • Andromeda
  • Cygnus
  • Lyra

49
Domus Astrologica Solis
  • Domus 7 [...] a
  • Domus [...] ua
  • Domus 9na
  • Domus 10ma
  • Domus 11ma

50
Signum Horosco­pans

a 10 Decembris ad 10 Iunij

51
Signum Horosco­pans

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Decembris

[Page 42]on the North and South poynts of the Horizon, divide the Equator into 12. Equall parts, beginning at the East poynt of the Horizon, and soe descending, make with the playne of the Dyall.

2. Those two Dyalls,FIG. 50. & 51. whose title is, Signum Horoscopans, shew the Horoscopon (as Astrologers terme it) that is which of the 12. signes doe begin to rise above the Horizon. Which is heere performed by the Sections, which the playne of the Ecliptike makes at the time they begin to rise, with the super­ficies of the Dyall.

3. Those, whose title is, Signum Culminans shew by the like sections of the Ecliptike with the superficies of the Dyall, what Signe, of the Zodiack is in the Meridian, or full South. Whe­refore these 4. Dyalls being made by the same sections, it suffises also to put à Diagram only of the two first.

4. Those Dyalls, which heere serve for the severall dayes of the weeke shew what Planet raignes, according to the opi­nion of auncient Astrologers, Every Hour of that Day. Soe the Dyall,FIG. 52. FIG. 53. whose title is, Dominatur die Lunae, shews what Planet raignes at any time of the Day on Munday. And in the same Manner, the Dyall, whose title is, Dominatur die Mar­tis shews what Planet raignes at any time on Tuesday. And soe of the rest. The lineaments of these Dyalls, being all alike, to witt the sections, which the playnes of the Unequall Hour cir­cles make with the superficies of the Dyall; it will be sufficient also to put heere the Diagrams of the two first.

5. Those two Dyalls, whose title is, Conjunctio Solis cum Stellis Fixis, FIG. 54. & 55. shew with which of the more remarkeable fixed starres the Sunne is in conjunction; or under the same circle of longitude.

Lastly those two, whose title is, Varii Aspectus Solis cum Stel­lis Fixis, shew the other Aspects of the Sunne, as the Trine As­pect [Page]

52
Die Lunae Dominatur
  • Saturnus
  • Iupiter
  • Mars
  • Sol
  • Venus

53
Die Martis Dominatur
  • Sol
  • Venus
  • Mercuri
  • Luna
  • Saturnus

54
Coniunctio Solis Cum Stellis Fixis
  • Cum L [...]orso ♑
  • Cum Femore ♒
  • Cum Cauda ♓ aust
  • Cum Corna ♈
  • Cum Cauda ♈
  • Cum Oculo ♉
  • Cum Cornu dex ♉

55
Coniunctio Solis Cum Stellis Fixis
  • Cum Fro [...]te ♏
  • Cum La [...]nce aust
  • Cum Spica ♍
  • Cum Alasin ♍
  • Cum Corde ♌
  • Cum Asellis

[Page 44]the Quadrat, &c. with the sayd Fixt starres. These 4. Dyalls being much alike, as made by the sections, which the superficies of the Dyall makes with the cones whose bases are parallel to the Equator, and common vertex is the top of the style, or center of the Earth, it will suffise to place heere also the Diagram of the two first. And thus much of the Dyalls be­longing to the first Peece.

THE SIXTH CHAPTER. Of the Dyalls described on the Edge of the se­cond Peece.

1.THose Dyalls, which described on the Edge of this Table,FIG. 56, & 57. have for title, Stellae Orientes Cosmicè, shew what starre rose Cosmically, (that is to say, rose at the same time when the Sunne rose) on the Day you looke upon the Dyall: provided you looke upon the Dyall belonging to the time of the yeare: heere being two Dyalls of the same Sort, one for the one half of the yeare, and another for the other half.

2. Those Dyalls, whose title is, Stellae Orientes Acronicè, shew what starre will rise Acronically; that is, will rise just at Sunne setting. Where also care is to be had, that you looke upon the Dyall agreable to the time of the yeare.

Lastly, those Dyalls, whose title is, Stellae Orientes Heliacè, shew what starres rise that Day Heliacally: that is what star­re which for some time before had by reason of its nee­renes to the Sunne, lay hid, beginns now to appeare agayne, [Page]

56
Stellae Orientes Cosmice.

a 10 Decemb: ad 10 Iun:

  • Ala Pegasi
  • Triangulum
  • Pessin ♑
  • Cornu ♈
  • Pessin Aurigae
  • oculus ♉

57
Stella Orientes Cosmice

a 10 Iunij ad 10 Decemb:

  • Sagitta
  • Spica ♍
  • Arcturus
  • Cauda ♌
  • Sirius
  • Canicula

58
Per Horas Sine Stylo

59
Per Stylum sine Horis

[Page 46]by getting out of the sunne beames.

Now the lineaments of these Dyalls being all of the same sort: to witt such Conicall sections, as the playne, of the Dyall makes with those Cones, whose bases are parallel to the Equator; and whose common vertex is at the top of the style, that is at the middle of the little paynted starre, which heere in Each Dyall represents the style: This I say being soe it will suffi­se to place heere two Diagrams of the first sort.

THE SEAVENTH CHAPTER. Of the 8. Reflecting Dyalls placed on the top of the second Table.

THe reason why these Dyalls placed upon the second Table were made by reflexion of looking glasses, was not soe much for varie­ty as for necessity. For the Table Standing high, the Dyalls placed on the upper part thereof, could not have been seen, but by being reflected on the bottome or inclining playnes of the great Globe, which stands (as in sayd in the first Chapter) upon this second Table. Whereas now being re­flected they are wery well seen upon the sayd bottome, togea­ther with their titles, as followeth.

1. The Dyalls,FIG. 58. whose title is, Per Horas sine stylo, hath its Hour-lines described and visible on the bottome of the à fore sayd Globe; but by the style which is à Flower de luce, being paynted upon à looking, glasse placed on the Table, appeares not: but only the shadow thereof appeares: which being [Page 47]reflected upon the sayd Hour-lines drawn on the bottome of the Globe, shews the Hour: according to the verse there ad­joyned. En Horas! stylus à lucenti Sole petendus. These Hourlines being noe other then the sections which the playnes of the or­dinary Hour circles, crossing Each other upon the top of the sayd Flower de luce, make with the playn of the Dyall, there needs say noe more but that it is à Reflex Dyall, supposing all­wayes the Sunne as much depressed under the Horizon, as it is defacto Elevated above it.

2. The Dyall, whose title on the contrary is,FIG. 59. Per stylum sine Horis, hath its style (which is à Lions paw) paynted upon the bottome of the Globe: and therefore easy to be seen: but the Hour-lines being drawn upon à looking glasse placed upon the Table, appeare not: only their shadow reflected upon the sayd Lions paw shew the Hour: according to what the verse there intimates, Da mihi Phoebe Horas: Horam (que) tibi ungue notabo. This Dyall being only the former inversd, according to what was sayd of the like inversion in the second Chapter, there needs adde noe more. As also neyther is it needfull to say any more of the other, which there in the self same manner shews the Hour by the Hour-lines reflected upon the end of an Unicornes Horne: according to the verse: Sol mihi luce dat Ho­ras, Horam do tibi Cornu.

3. In the Dyall, whose title is, Sine Horis vel stylo, appeare neyther Hour-lines nor style, unlesse the Sunne shine: for then you see them both: that is you see the shadow of both style and Hour-lines reflected from the looking glasse upon which the sayd Hour-lines are drawn. This Dyall differing nothing from an ordinary Reclining Dyall Declining we need say noe more thereof: as neyther of the other 4. which also differ noe otherwise from ordinary Dyall, then that they are not to be otherwise seene then each of them in à looking glasse placed [Page 48]on the bottome of the great Globe. Wherefore it will suffise to place the Diagrams of the two first.

THE EIGHTH CHAPTER. Of the 4. Dyalls supported by the 4. Branches of the second Peece.

THese 4. Dyalls are drawn Each of them u­pon à glasse Boule of about 5. Inches dia­mether: and shew the usuall Hour, by 4. different wayes. Viz. by à shade without any style: by à style without any shade: by à style and shade: and without eyther style or shade.

1. The Dyall,FIG. 60. whose title is, Per stylum sine umbra, shews the Hour by moving the style, (which heere is à Flower de lu­ce fixed on à moveable Aequator) to and fro till it cast noe shade upon the Boule: which being done, the Hour sought for shall stand just under the style; as the verse there added declares: Nulla sit umbra stylo: Veram stylus indicat Horam. Now the reason, why the style casting noe shade on the Boule, stands over the true Hour, is, that these Hours lying all in the sections, which the playnes of the Hour circles make in the superficies of the Boule, it is neces­sary, that then the top of the style be in the playne of the same Hour circle, in which at that time is also the center of the Sunne.

2. In the Dyall,FIG. 61. whose title is, Per umbram sine stylo, the Hour is found by observing, where the part of the Boule Enlightyned by the Sunne meetes with the part not [Page]

60
Per Stylum Sine Vmbra

61
Per Vmbram sine Stylo

62
Per Stylum &. Vmbra

63
Sine Stylo Vel Vmbra

[Page 50]Enlightened: for this meeting shews the Hour; as the there adjoyned verse Explicates: Vis Horam? lucem (que) inter, tenebras­ue require. The reason whereof is, that the Sunne by rea­son of its immense distance Enlightening without any consi­derable difference, the one half of the Boule, and the Hour poynts being all noted in the Equator of the Boule, or section which the playne of the Equator passing through the center of the Boule, makes in the superficies thereof, the sayd termination of light must needs fall upon the true Hour poynt, provided that the Dyall be once rightly placed.

3. The Dyall,FIG. 62. whose title is, Per stylum & umbram, shews the Hour by the shade of à style perpendicularly Erected upon the superficies of the Boule and therefore differs no­thing from an ordinary Dyall described on the convex super­ficies of à Globe; There are three Such Dyalls placed upon this Boul, to the End, that when the shade of the style ceases, by reason of the convexity of the Boule, to shew the Hour in one, may shew it in another.

Lastly the Boule,FIG. 63. whose title is, Sine stylo vel umbra, shews the Hour without Eyther style or shadow: for yf you pla­ce your self soe as to behold your face in the Middle of the little convex looking glasse which is there paced on the South pole of the Boule, you shall at the same time, if the Sunne shine, behold the picture thereof at the true Hour: according to the verse, there adjoyned: Spectanti Specu­lum, Horam dat tibi Solis imago. The reason whereof is, that the Eye when placed, as is sayd, being in the Axis of the World: and by consequence, in the playne of all the Hour circles, and therefore in the playne of the true Hour circle: in which playn also the center of the Sunne being necessaryly placed, it followes that the sayd picture [Page 51]of the Sunne appeare at the true Hour: since by the Ru­les of Beflexion, the Eye seeing and the poynt seen, are in the same playn with the poynt of the Reflexion.

As for the Hour-lines of these 4. Dyalls, they are noe other then the sections or some poynt of them, which the playnes of the Hour circles makes in the superficies of the Boules. Which playnes in the first, second and fourth, crosse Each other in the eenter of the Boule: but in the third, they Crosse one another at the top of the style.

THE NINTH CHAPTER. Of the Dyalls described on the great Globe which stands on the second Table.

THis Globe having 8. Reclining Playnes. 8. Inclining, and 8. Upright playnes: The Dyalls described on them are as follo­weth.

1. Six of the 8. Upright playnes being made hollow like those 20. on the Edge of the first Table, are covered also with glasse, and Dyalls described on them, just like those 20. the diffe­rence only being, that heere the bottomes are also cove­red with glasses thinnely paynted over with white coulour, to the End the Dyalls may be seen as well within the Glo­be, as without: To which purpose, two of these upright playnes, looking towards the North, are covered only with cleare glasse, as Serving for windows to look into the Globe. On the sayd bottome glasses, are drawn seve­rall [Page 52]pictures, as of their Majestyes; the Queen Mother; the Duke of York. Prince Rupert, &c. In his Ma­jestyes picture the Hour is shewne by the shade of the Hour-lines passing over the top of the Scepter: In the pictures of the two Queens, it is shewn by the like shade passing over the top of à Flower: and in the other three, by pas­sing over the end of à troncheon, which each of them hold in their hands. Under each picture is written à Chrono­graph for the yeare 1669. in which the Dyall was sett up: and Sutable to the person. Which Chronographs, according to the order now named, are as falloweth.

  • 1. Regnet DIV CaroLVs IMperetqVe BrItannIs.
  • 2. FaXIt RegIna Det RegI RegnoVe ProLeM CatharIna.
  • 3. RegIna Mater nato sIbI CaroLo DIV frVatVr.
  • 4. IaCobVs & RegIs frater, & InsIgnIs BrItānIę ADMIraLIVs.
  • 5. FILIVs seCVnDVs RegIs BoheMIae.

These 6. Verticall Dyalls being all alike it will suffise to place heere the Diagrams of the two first.FIG. 64. & 65.

As for the Dyalls described on the Reclining playnes of this Globe, they are in substance like those Recliners placed upon the first Table: Except that, whereas those of the first are most of them made to shew the Hour by looking on the out­side of the Dyall: heere noe Hour can be seene but by looking through the afore sayd windows in to the Globe: which doing, you shall behold in one à starre, in another à Flower de luce she­wing the Hour, by passing over the Hour-lines: in à third you shall behold à Lion with certayn starres on his back, each whe­re of represents an Hour, to passe under à cloud, and soe by [Page]

64
Regnet DIV CaroLVs IMperetqVe BrItannIs

65
FaXIt RegIna Det RegI RegnoqVe proLeM Catha­rIna

[Page 54]successively hiding them, to note the Hour: and the like of the rest of these Recliners. As for the inclining playnes, which are placed on the bottome of the Globe; the Dyalls belonging thereto are already Explicated in the precedent Chapter, as made by reflexion of looking glasses, &c.

THE TENTH CHAPTER. Of the 4. glasse Boules supported by the fowre Bran­ches of the great Globe.

OUt of the top of the great Globe yssue (as was sayd in the first Chapter) fowre Bran­ches each bearing à glasse Boule like those of the first and second Peece: but somewhat lesse in proportion to the Pyramis. These 4. Boules are guilded over except where the Hour lines are drawn: which is thinnly paynted over with white coulour: to the end the Sunne beames passinge through à little starre left cleare on the top of the Boule, and making the like starre of light upon the Hour lines may be seen to note the Hour. These Dyalls shew the Hour according to the different wayes of numbring the Hours, used by severall Na­tions, as was sayd in the second Chapter.

1. The Dyall,FIG. 66. whose title is, Per Horas Italicas, shews by the sayd luminous starre passing over the Hour-lines, what Hour it is to be sayd according to the Italian account, which numbers from Sunne sett to Sunne sett 24. Hours. These Hour-lines are the sections, which the playnes of the Italian Hour circles cros­sing Each other in the middle of the sayd starre placed on the top of the Boule, make in the superficies thereof.

66
Per Horas Italicus

67
Per Horas Babylonica

68
Per Horas Ast­ronomicas

69
Per Horas An­tiquas

2. The Dyalls, whose title is, Per Horas Babylonicas, shews in like manner, what Hour it is according to the Babylonians way of reckoning,FIG. 67. who count 24. Hours from Sunne Ri­sing tille next Sunne Rising. Which it performs by the se­ctions which the playnes of the Babylonian Hour circles cros­sing Each other in the middle of the sayd starre, make in the superficies of the Boule.

3. The Dyall, whose title is, Per Horas Astronomicas, shews by the like starre,FIG. 68. the Hour according to the Astronomicall ac­count, which numbers, 24. Hours from Noon till next Noon. This Dyall is made by the like sections of the usuall Hours cir­cles crossing Each other in the middle of the sayd starre: The numbers sett to the Hours being only different: that is, one à clock in the morning is heere called 13. and two, 14. three à clock, is called 15. &c.

Lastly the Dyall, whose title is, Per Horas Antiquas, sive Judaicas, FIG. 69. shews the Hour according to the Ancient way of numbring the Hours: Viz. counting allwayes 12. Hours from Sunne Rising till the setting thereof. Wherefore the sections by which this Dyall is made, are those which the playns of the unequall Hour circles make in the superficies of the Bou­le: which playns also crosse each other in the middle of the star­re, or style of the Dyall. And thus much of the Third peece, with the Branches belonging to it. The Diagrams of these 4. Boules are as followeth.

THE ELEVENTH CHAPTER. Of the three Vppermost Peece of the Pyramis.

THe Dyalls belonging to the three lower Peeces of the Pyramys, being Explicated in the precedent Chapters, we will now in this Chapter Explicate the rest, that is, the Dyalls appertayning to the three highest, or uppermost part thereof.

The fourth Peece, therefore, consisting, (is is sayd in the first Chapter) of 12. Concave Semicylinders, and Standing upon the Great Globe held up by 4. Supporters,FIG. 70. like those which hold up the second Peece, but lesse: hath upon Each of those Semicylinders à Dyall described shewing the usuall Hour by the shade of à Flower de luce fixed at the top of the Se­micylinder. Out of the top of this Peece yssue 4. Branches car­rying Each à little glasse Boul, shewing also the usuall Hour by the light of the Sunne penetrating through the Hour-lines (which for that purpose are left transparent, the rest of the Boul being guilded over) and passing over à little starre payn­ted on the lower part of the Boul.

The first Peece,FIG. 71. consisting of 8. playn Triangles Equall and Equilaterall: and six Equall Squares and held up also by 4. Supporters, hath in like manner Dyalls described thereon she­wing the usuall Hour by the shade also of à Flower de luce.

The sixt and last Peece, or top of the Pyramis,FIG. 73. is à great glasse Boul Standing upon the fift, supported by à foot of [Page]

70

71

72

73

[Page 59]iron, and Encompassed with two iron circles having on the top à Crosse. This Boul also shews the usuall Hour by the shade of à little golden Ball placed in the middle of the Glasse. The Dyalls belonging to these three peeces, she­wing only (as is sayd) the usuall Hour: it will suffise to sett down à Diagram for Each peece.

As for the reason of these Dyalls, they all shewing only the usuall Hour, there needs say noe more,FIG▪ 37. then what hath already been sayd of the like, Viz. that in the 4th. and 5th. peece, the playnes of the Hour circles Crosse each other upon the top of the Flower de luce: but in the 6th. they Crosse on the center of the little Ball placed in the mid­dle of the great Boule. The Dyalls of the 4. little Boules supported by the branches, are noe other then the Astro­nomicall Dyall of the precedent Chapter inverted, and only differre in the numbers sett to the Hours. And thus much concerning what in this Short Tract was intented, to witt the use and reason of the Dyalls described on the sayd Py­ramis.

END.

GEORGIUS GRAIUS SOCIETATIS JESU, Provinciae Anglicanae Praepositus Provincialis. CUm P. FRANCISCI LINI, Societatis nostrae Explicationem Horologii erecti in Horto Regio anno 1669. tam Latinè, quàm Anglicè scriptam tres ejusdem Societatis Theologi, quibus id com­missum fuit, recognoverint, atque in lucem edi posse probaverint, potestate acceptâ ab Admodum Reverendo P. nostro Joanne Oliva ejusdem Societatis Praeposito Generali, Facultatem concedimus, ut typis mandetur, si ita iis ad quos pertinet videbitur.

GEORGIUS GRAIUS.

PERMISSIO.

PErmittimus ut explicatio Horologii erecti in Horto Re­gio anno 1669. per Patrem FRANCISCUM LINUM, So­cietatis JESU scripta, tam Latinè quàm Anglicè, typis detur.

JO. ERNESTUS BARO DE SURLET, Vicarius Generalis Leodiensis.

ERRATA.

Pag. 1. l. 4. Majestey. Majestyes. p. 1. l. 7. Majestey. Majestyes. p. 4. l. 10. Hout. Hour. p. 11. l. 15. darkores. darknes. p. 16. l. 16. thes hade. the shade. p. 16. l. 26. little. title. p. 18. l. 14. hof. of. p. 22. l. 13. circles. circle. p. 22. l. 22. madd on te▪ made on the. p. 25. l. 19. or. of. p. 30. l. 4. soutb. south. p. 32. l. 7. to other. to the other. p. 34. l. 7. outh. south. p. 38. l. 6. sunde. Sunnes. p. 40. l. 14. there. the. p. 40. l. 20. Astronomicum. Astrologicum. p. 48. l. 8. diamether. diameter.

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