Heic tutus obumbrer

[...]

THE PARLY OF BEASTS; OR MORPHANDRA Queen of the INCHANTED ILAND:

Wherein Men were found, who being trans­muted to Beasts, though proffer'd to be dis-inchanted, and to becom Men again; yet, in regard of the crying sins, and rebellious humors of the Times, they prefer the Life of a Brute Animal before That of a Rational Creture:

Which Fancy consists of various Philosophicall Dis­courses, both Morall, Metaphysicall, Historicall, and Naturall, touching the Declinings of the World, and late Depravation of Human Nature;

With Reflexes upon the present State of most Countries in Christendom.

Divided into a XI Sections.

By JAM HOWELL Esq

Senesco, non Segnesco.

The First TOME.

London, Printed by W. Wilson for William Palmer, at the Palm-Tree in Fleet-street near St. Dunstan's Church, 1660.

MORPHANDRA, OR QUEEN OF THE Inchanted Iland.

m I am Morphandra can turn Man to Brute,
And Brutes to Human Nature re-transmute.
p And I Pererius whom the gods did send
This Rare Admired Princesse to attend.
In formas mutata novas mens dicere gestit
Corpora, & in primas iterum transversa Figuras,
Dii faveant coeptis—

The Scope and Substance of the en­suing SECTIONS.

PErerius, a wandring Prince, after many tra­verses of Fortune, and Tempests in his long Pererrations at Sea, arriv'd at a strange North­west Iland, where ther reign'd a Queen call'd Morphandra, descended of the High-born Circe, daughter of Sol, who (according to the Etymo­logy of her name) had power to transmute and metamorphose Men to Beasts; Pererius having obtain'd leave of her to see and speak with divers of them, viz, an Otter, an Asse, an Ape, a Hinde, a Mule, a Fox, a Boar, a Wolf, a Goat, a Soland-Goose, a Hive of Bees, &c. Morphandra infusing the Faculty both of Re­son and Ratiocination into Them during that intervall of time; As also full and full and free election to resume the shapes of Men, and so re­turn unto their own Countries and Callings: Pererius attempted to perswade them therunto, but in regard of the rebellious Humors, the hor­rid Sacriledges, the new-fangled Opinions, and gingling Extravagances that Human brains are subject unto, specially this last doting and ver­tiginous Age of the World, with the nomberles Indispositions wherunto the Bodies of Men as [Page] well as their Brains are expos'd, They did choose rather to continu still in the state and species of Brute Animals, than become Rational Cretures again: At last Prince Pererius mingling speech with a Hive of Bees, who had bin formerly a Monastery of Nuns, He prevail'd so far by his melting perswasions, and high discours of the pre­rogatives and excellencies of the Human Soul, that He induc'd Them to take on their first Natures again, and so return to their Cloysters; These Discourses are divided into eleven Sections, every Section carrying with it a new Fancy and Mat­ter.

Touching the Etymologies of the feigned Words throughout the whole Work, appropria­ted to the quality of every Country, Climat, and Peeple, the Roots of them must be fetched from the Greek Toung.

He is the tru Author who creates a Fancy.

To the Great Ornament of her Sex, both for Choice Intellectualls, and High Morall Vertues, The right Honorable, and excellent Lady, My Lady MARIE de la FONTAINE.

MADAME,

THis Fancy bearing in the Front the name of a Rare Female, I thought it might well stand with the rules of Congruity to make the Dedication correspond with the Title; And after many revolutions of Thoughts who shold be most proper for my designe, the contemplation of your Honor did cast such strong influences upon Them, that at last They fixed there; Nor will any Discerning Reder question my judgment herein, your Ladiship being so able and fit (as I have the honour to know by experience) to re­ceive this Admired Queen, and give her a suitable en­tertainment; Therfore, Madame, if you please to ad­mit Morphandra into your Closet, I believe she will afford you severall sorts of divertisements, And she haply may work somtimes a Metamorphosis in your Self, for she can transmute Passions as well as Persons, she can turn Melancholy to Mirth, and Pensivenes to Plesure; For as it is in the French (of which Language you are so great a Mistresse) Les Morts font revivre les Vivants, The Dead enliven the Living, wherby is meant; that Books, though the Authors therof be dead [Page] and rotten many Ages before, can beget new spirits in the living Reder.

Now, such is the state of Mankind, that the foresaid Passions will have their interchangable turns, they will follow one another as duly as Night succeeds Day in any Human Creture, be the Humors therof never so equally poiz'd; It is denied to Man to be always at Home within himself, and it will be so to the world's end as long as He is compos'd of the four Elements, and as long as the Naturall humors within Him sym­pathize with the said Elements, who are in restles mu­tation and motion among themselfs for mastery, which made one break out into this excesse of speech, that if the four Humors were ballanc'd aright in the human body, he wold live easily many thousands of years upon earth; Now, that person may be said to be the wisest among mortalls who can rule and controul those Humors, It being a Principle among the Philo­sophers, That as the conduct of the Passions (which arise from the Humors) is the greatest prudence, so the conquest of them is the gretest pro [...]sse, when they grow re­belli [...]us: The ensuing Work hath divers glances up­on this subject, and variety of things besides, for eve­ry Section affords a new Fancy and Matter.

It remains now, Madame, that I shold humbly de­sire, your Honor would please to interpret this Dedi­tory Addresse as a small argument of my great Ac­knowledgment of your so many noble Civilities, for which I stand so truly oblig'd; And this Acknow­ledgment standing upon so public a Record, the Ages to come as well as the present will testifie, how much I am and was,

My highly Honored Lady,
Your most humble and devoted Servant, JAM HOWELL.

To the Severer sort OF REDERS.

SOm of the Antient Sages, who were rank'd among the Phi­losophers of the Upper House, had a Speculation, That the World was but one huge Animal or Living Creture, compos'd of innumerable members and parts, som Homogeneous or similar, others Heterogeneous or dissimilar; And in order to that they held, That God Almighty was the Great Soul which did inform and actuat the whole Bulk with motion and life, with vertu and vigor, for every part to perform its peculiar function towards the preservation of the Whole: According to this Do­ctrin an Argument may be drawn by way of Induction, That if the parts begin to impair, the Whole must be in a declining con­dition; It hath been a Truth which hath pass'd from all times without controul, that Mankind is one of the prime parts of the Universe and Paramount of the Sublunary World, which is de­monstrable by that Dominion which was given him over all his fellow-Cretures in Aire, Water, or Earth; He can make the towring Eagle stoop to his Lure from the middle Region; He can make the vast Leviathan, though a hundred times bigger than himself, to flounce from the deep to do him homage on the Shore; He can make the Elephant, though forty times stronger than himself, to draw up his Ships on the Carine, and do other drudg­eries; This appears also out of that Awe, which by a kind of naturall instinct all other Animals use to shew Him; Insomuch that tryall hath been made, how if a Man should go naked and with a confidence through the Arabian Desarts, where the gre­test concours of wild Beasts useth to be, ther's none will assault him, but in a gazing and awfull kind of posture they will keep their distance: Now, if Man, who is so considerable a part of the world, doth decay in his Species, 'tis a shrewd symptom that the Whole is en decadence, in a declining state; Now, that Man doth impair as well in his Intellectualls and the Faculties of his Soul, as in the motions and affections of his heart, this present Age can afford more pregnant proofs than most of the Ages be­fore; For touching the First, What fond futilous new Opinions [Page] have bin hatch'd of late times, both in Divinity and in the Idae­as of holy things, as well as in all other Sciences, specially in the Art of Policy, wherin such poor Sciolists are crept up, that wold turn antient Monarchies into new popular Common­wealths, and so set a Hydra's head upon an old Lion's neck, or make a Child's shoo to fit a Giant's foot.

Touching the motions of the Heart, ther's nothing of that love and offices of Humanity which were used to be, not onely among private persons and neighbours, but that Allegiance and Love which Subjects were us'd to shew towards their lawfull Prince decaies more and more, whereof ther have been strange examples of late years; In Aethiopia, a large antient Empire, the common peeple did rise up with a petty Companion against their Soveraign, and kill'd him with his two Sons in open field; In Constantinople, two Gran Signors were thrust out of the world by their own Slaves, yet they went not to that heighth of Impudence as to arraign Them before a Barr of Iustice; The Swed hath quite revolted from the Pole, the Portugues from the Spaniard, and so Naples wold have done; What a huge Army did the Basha of Aleppo raise lately? And in the Kingdom of Morocco a mean Fellow, under the seeming shew of Sanctity, what a crew of riff-raff stuff did he drag after him against his lawfull King? But touching these Northwest Ilands, they have out-gon all the rest: These metamorphos'd Animals do point at all these, and other degenerations of the Human Creture: Nor is it the first time that Beasts did speak, for we read of one in the Sa­cred Code who spoke; and besides, Solomon sends in to som of Them for Instruction: The Phrygian Fabler was one of the first who taught them their Abcee, then Anian, Barlandus, and others taught Them Their Primer, and the two ingenious Flo­rentines, Poggius and Gelli may be said to have taught Them their Grammer: But these transmuted Beasts speak in a louder Dialect, who having tryed both Natures, they tell the Hu­man Creture his own, and how he growes daily from bad to worse, according to the Propheticall Lyric Poet,

Aetas Parentum, pejor avis, tulit
Nos nequiores, mox daturos
Progeniem Vitiosiorem.

Made English thus.

Our Fathers who worse than our Gransires were
Got Us worse than Themselfs; And We, I fear,
Will get worse than Them both: Such a sad curse
Hangs on Mankind to grow from Bad to Worse.

[...];
[...];
Poema Tempestivum.

TRees spake before, now the same strength of Art
Makes Beasts to cunn the Alphabet by heart,
And cutt their Breaths to sounds Articulat,
Discoursive congruous accents to prolate,
For Speech is Breath, breath Air let in and out,
But 'tis the Mind that brings the work about;
Such a rare Charter the World's Architect
Vouchsaf'd to give the Human Intellect
To create Words, for 'tis Mankind alone
Can Language frame, and syllabize the Tone.
But here Beasts speak, they mone, chide, and complain,
And at the Barr of Justice Men arraign;
Such are our crying sins, that Beasts resent
Our miseries, and wretched case lament:
Nor let it seem a wonder, because now
Wonders and Monsters so familiar grow,
This is an Age of Wonders, every Clime
Abounds with Prodigies, Ther is no Crime,
Not a notorious Villany or Fact,
No foul Infandous Thing, or ugly Act
That ever Adam's sons did perpetrate,
[Page] But we have flagrant Instances of late.
For Sacrilege, and horrid Blasphemies,
Base Lies, created Fears, and Perjuries,
For Scripture-pride, Extorsion, Avarice,
(The root of all our Ills, and leading Vice)
For public Fraud, false Lights, & fatuous Fires,
Fanatic Fancies clad in Faith's attire;
For Murther, and the crying sin of Blood,
The like but One was never since the Flood.
In summ, We may for these and thousands more
Vye Villanies with any Age before;
Which shews the World is Hecticall, and near
Its Gran and Fatal Climacteric year;
The whole Creation mourns, and doth deplore
The ruthfull state of Human kind; Therfore
If Men can not be warn'd when Men do Teach,
Then let them hearken here what Beasts do Preach.
In Formas mutata novas Mens dicere gestit
Corpora, & in primas iterum transversa Figuras.
Diî faveant coeptis—
J.H.

THE CONTENTS Of the severall SECTIONS.

SECT. I

CONSISTS of divers Interlocutions 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and an Otter, who had bin first an Amstelian Mariner, and being proffer'd to be retransmuted to his first nature by Morphandra, and to be transported by Pererius to his own Country, yet he wold hearken to neither, alledging the strange Chimeras, and extravagant Opinions which Human Brains have been subject unto in this latter Age of the World, &c.

SECT. II

Contains an Interlocutory Discours 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and an Asse, who had bin once an Artonian Peasan, wherin ther are som glances upon the Country it self, and upon the present Government therof; But though Prince Pererius us'd all the perswasions he could, and re-inforc'd Argument upon Argument [Page] to induce him to re-assume Human shape, and so return to his Country, Calling, and Kindred, yet the Asse utterly refus'd it, and his Resons why, &c.

SECT. III

Consists of a Dialog 'tiwxt Morphandra, Pererius, and an Ape, who had bin once a Preach­man in Gheriona, who having bin carried away with every wind of Doctrin, and folling any fa­natic new-fangled Opinion, was transmuted to that Mimicall shape; In which Dialog ther is an account given of the sad case and confusion wher­in Gheriona is involv'd at present.

SECT. IV

A Colloquy 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Hind, who had bin once one of the gretest Beauties in Marcopolis, and for som youthfull levities and wildnes was transmuted to that shape; In this Section ther are various Discour­ses of the state and nature of Women pro & con, &c.

SECT. V.

Discourses 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Mule, who in his Manhood had bin a Doctor of Physic in Tumontia, whom for som Quacking tricks he had plaid, and for som other [Page] Resons, Morphandra metamorphos'd into a Mule; In this Section ther be discourses of the Art of Physic, of the various complexions of Mankind, and of the nomberles diseases of body, and distempers of mind that are incident to the Hu­man Creture, &c.

SECT. VI

Consists of Interchangeable Discourses 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Fox, who had bin a Saturnian born, whom for his cunning dealings and Mountebankish wily tricks, she transformed from a Merchant to that Species; This Section treats of divers things, and particularly how the Art of tru Policy is degenerated, and what poor Sciolists or Smatterers therin are cryed up of late years, &c.

SECT. VII.

A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Boar, wherein ther are various Discourses, and particularly of the rare Sympatheticall Powder that is lately found out, which works sudden and certain Cures without any topicall applica­tions of Medicines to the part affected, &c.

SECT. VIII.

A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Wolf, who had bin a Cuprinian Soldier, whom for his Plundrings, Rapines, and Spoils she transfigur'd to that shape, &c.

SECT. IX.

A discourse 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Goat, consisting of many speculations both Na­turall and Metaphysicall, with other Criticisms, &c.

SECT. X.

A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Soland-Goose, a Carboncian born, who was transmuted to that shape for his foolishnes in re­belling against his own Conterranean King, and so jugling himself into a Slavery from that Free-Government he was formerly under, &c.

SECT. XI

Consists of a Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pe­rerius, and a Hive of Bees, who had bin once a Monastery of Nuns, and were transmuted to those small Insects, because that after a years Proba­tion, and their own praevious free Election, they murmur'd at that Reclus'd Claustrall life, and wish'd Themselfs uncloyster'd again; In this Secti­on ther be divers Discourses of the Immortality and high prerogatives of the Human Soul, as al­so of the Hevenly Hierarchy, and Ioyes Eter­nall, &c.

Bibliopola Lectori.

If you will ope this Work with ease,
You must from Greece go fetch your Keys.
M
P

F Barlowe [...]

R Gaywood fecit

A KEY To enter more easily into the Sense of MORPHANDRA, OR, The Parly of Beasts

  • THe Otter represents a Dutch Skipper, or Ma­riner.
  • The Ass represents a French peasan.
  • The Ape represents an English Preachman.
  • The Mule represents a Spanish Doctor of Physick.
  • The Fox represents a Genoa or an Italian Mer­chant.
  • The Boar represents a German Count.
  • The Wolf represents a Swedish Captain, or Free­botter.
  • The Goat represents the Old Britain, or Inhabi­tant of Wales.
  • The Soland Goose represents a Scotchman.
  • The Hind represents a Venetian Courtisan.
  • The Hive of Bees represents a Monastery of Nuns.

An Etymologicall Derivation of som Words and Anagrams in the Parly of Beasts, according to the ALPHABET.

A
  • AEtonia, the Eagles Countrey, repre­sents High Germany, of [...] aquila.
  • Alpiana represents Sa­voy, being a Countrey indented among the Alps.
  • Artonia, the Countrey of Bread and Wine, repre­sents France, of [...] panis & [...] vinum.
C
  • Carboncia, the Coale-Countrey, represents Scotland.
  • Cuprinia, the Copper-Countrey, represents Swethland.
  • The Cinqfoyl Portugal Cardinal Mazarine, p. 21 The Coppices represents the common Peeple.
  • Cerano, the Anagram of Nocera, an ancient town in Italy.
D
  • Diogenes, p. 56 Sir Kenelm Digby, 148 Dr. Harvey, 141
G
  • Gheriona, the Countrey of Wool, represents England, of [...] terra & [...] lana.
H
  • Hydraulia, the Countrey of Waters, represents Holland, with the Con­federate Provinces, of [...] Aqua, and [...] populus.
  • Hebrinia, Ireland, being [Page] Hibernia, anagramma­tiz'd.
  • The City of Hereford, p. 122
  • The Hollanders are meant, P. 72
L
  • Laroni, the D. of Lor­rain.
  • London Prentices, p 44.
M
  • Marcopolis, the City of S. Mark, represents Venice of [...] civitas & [...].
  • Morphandra, a Queen that can transmute Men into Beasts, of [...] formo & [...] hominem.
N
  • Nopolia, Polonia, ana­grammatiz'd.
O
  • Orosia, a Mountainous Countrey, represents Wales, of [...] Mons. Oxford & Cambridge, p. 38
P
  • Pererius, a wandring Prince of pererrando.
  • Polyhaima, the City of Bloud, represents Lon­don, of [...] civitas & [...] sanguis.
  • The Phrygian King, My­das.
  • The Phrygian Fabler, Ae­sop.
  • The late K. of Engl. p. 35
  • The present K. Ch. p. 39
Q
  • The Queen of Sweden, p. 114
  • Queen Elizabeth, p. 57
R
  • Rinarchus, the Palsgrave of the Rhine, of [...], princeps, &c.
  • Rugilia, the State of Genoa, the Anagram of Liguria, the ancient appellation of that Ter­ritory.
  • Rainsborough, and Ad­mirall [Page] Dean, 40
  • Roundheads variously tormented in Hell, ibid.
  • Rovena, the City of Ve­rona in Lombardy, anagrammatiz'd.
S
  • Saturnia represents Ita­ly, Cilisia, Sicilia, ana grammatiz'd.
  • The Standels represent the Nobles and Gentry.
  • Selenians, or half-Moon men, represent the Turks; of [...], Luna.
T
  • Tumontia, a Countrey swelling with huge Hills, represents Spain Tomanto Empire, the Dominions of the Great Turk; Tomanto being Ottoman, anagramma­tiz'd.
  • Tarragon, Catalunia in Spaine, the ancientest town whereof is Tarra­gona.
  • Therlu, the Anagram of Luther.
  • Therologia, the lan­guage of Beasts; of [...], fera; & [...], sermo.
V
  • Volganians, the Mosco­vits, of the huge River Volga.
W
  • The West-Indies, p. 70
Z
  • Zundanians, the Peeple of Denmark.

[...].
The First Section.
Consisting of divers Interlocutions 'twixt Mor­phandra, Pererius, and an Otter, who had been first an Amstelian Mariner, and being proffer'd to be transmuted to his first nature by Morphandra, and to be transported by Pere­rius to his own Countrey, yet he would hearken to neither, alledging the strange Chimeraes, and extravagant Opinions which Human brains have been subject unto, in this latter Age of the World, &c.

Pererius, Morphandra, an Otter.
Pererius.

MAy those starres be ever propitious which guided my cours to this coast! may those Winds be ever pros­perous which fill'd my sayls, any blew me to this rare Iland, this Theater of Wonders! May this day be ever held Festival, and bear one of the chiefest Rubriques in the Almanack of Time, [Page 2] that makes me so happy with the sight of Morphan­dra, the divine Morphandra! And truly so, being de­scended in so direct a line from the high-born Circe, daughter of Sol, the admired Queen Morphandra! who useth to make Nature her self not only succumbent and passive to her desires, but actually subservient and pliable to her Transmutations and Changes.

Morphandra.

Prince Pererius (for so I understand your quality and appellation to be); Touching the first part of your speech, which reflects upon this place, we shall endea­vour to make it good by the hospitality and enter­tainment we shal command to be given You and your Train, as also by the rare Objects which you shall see: But as for the second part of your speech, which re­lates to my self, and to the power of Transmutations; I must tell you, that what I act this way, is by a special dispensation from above, for the punishment of Hu­mane vice in an analogical or sympathetic way, ac­cording to the quality thereof, and the humors of the men: I say, it is by the permission and Fiat of the Al­mighty, the great God of Nature, that I do operat, not by any prestigious charmes, or confederacy with Cacodaemons; not by fascinations or philtres, by spels or sorceries, as the shallow-pated common people imagine I do, and so traduce me of Witchcraft, and Negromancy; yet, I confess, 'tis by way of Magick I act; for Magick was the first Philosophy among those acute Nations which are neerest the rising Sun, so that Magus or Magitian signified nothing else but a Wise­man, which afterwards came to be traduced, and ta­ken in an ill sense; As it hath been the fate of Tyrant, Sophister, and other words besides, to incurre the same destiny, and I pray the same destiny may not befall the word Parlement.

Pererius.

Most excellent Queen, now that my Starrs have made me so fortunat, as to conduct me hither, let it not be held to great a presumption, if for the enrich­ing of my knowledge, and satisfying my curiosity, I [Page 3] humbly desire to see some of those Human Cre­tures that you have anthropomorphos'd, and trans­form'd to brute Animals.

Morphandra.

I shall willingly comply with your curiosity and desire in this kind; for you shall not only be brought to the sight of them, but you shall mingle speech with them, and interrogat what you shall think fitting con­cerning their present condition.

Pererius.

But, Madam, how can that be? how can I expect that they should be capable of what I speak, and con­sequently What answers or replies shall I hope to re­ceive from them, while they continue in the shapes of brute cretures?

Morphandra.

Let that be your least care; for during that intervall of time, I shall re-infuse into them the faculty both of Reson and Ratiocination, whereby you may confer and discourse freely with them by interlocutions; Nor only so, but for a further argument of the great esteem I have of you Prince Pererius, and for the heightning of your welcom to my Court, as also that you may make som reall returns of your voyage hither, if you can induce and fairly perswade any of them to re­assume the shapes of Human cretures, and to be in­vested again in their former condition, I shall give my free and full assent thereunto; nay, to oblige you yet further, I shall give way that you take them a ship­board with you, and transport them to their own Country, or whither you please besides; Provided that it be a spontaneous act, and that you have their volun­tary election to this effect; for the universal Law tells us, that Volenti non fit injuria, An unforc'd will cannot be wronged.

Pererius.

Most admired Princess, you engage me beyond all measure or meanes of retaliation, beyond all degrees of gratitude, and me-thinks by these high civilities you have wrought a sudden kind of transformation in [Page 4] me, for I find my self all transformed to admiration, to a thing of wonder, by these unparallel'd favours. All that I can say for the present is, that, what air soever I breath; under what climat soever blessed Heavens shall shed their influences upon me, I shall blazon forth your nobleness for such transcendent favors all the world over.

Morphandra.

We use not such Complements under this Meridi­an, such a distance doth not use to be 'twixt the Heart and the Tongue; they are neerer Relatives here. But, before you go to exchange words with these Ani­mals, take this Advertisement before-hand, that ther are no wild or ferocious devouring cretures within the Circumference of this Ile; they live all in a gentle and general community, in an innocuous freedom, and sociableness: The Panther, Bear, and Tyger, put off their belluine fierce nature here; the Lamb will play with the Lion without any apprehensions of fear; the Hart fears not the Hound, nor the Hare the Greyhound, nor the Bore the Lime-hound; the silly Sheep fear not the Wolf or the Butcher's knife; nor Fish nor Fowl fear here the Dragnet or Tramell: but all Animals, both of Air, Earth, and Water, live in an innocent security; the reason being, that we neither kill, much lesse feed upon any Creture here that hath blood, and a sensi­tive life, but upon fruits, pulse, roots, rice, with other nourishing and manducable things, that come forth gently, by the general benignity of indulgent Nature, from the bowels of our common Mother the Earth; And though we make Butter sometimes our aliment, we abhorre Cheese, because the cawle of a sensitive kill'd creture serv'd for the Rennet.

Pererius.

Oh blissful Region! Truly Madam, I am of opinion, that this Iland is a part, or some promontory of Para­dise it self before Adam's fall, which, being slented off, and so got loose, was transported and fixed here; at least, there are some grains of that mettal which went to the composition of the Golden Age of the world still remaining here unconsumed.

Morphandra.
[Page 5]

Well, that I may acquit my self of the promise I made unto you, Prince Pererius, let us fetch a walk in those flowry fields towards the banks of that River, to take in the freshness of the air, with the fragancy of those Vegetals: And now, in a favourable conjun­cture of time, I spy a metamorphosed Creture among those seggs, fit for your purpose; It is an Otter, whom I remember to have transmuted from a Mariner or Seaman, for his deboshments here; and I observe, ther are no people so given to excesses as Seamen when they come ashore; which yet may be somwhat excused, for it is to recompence the hardships they en­dured at Sea: Nor was it an improper change for me to metamorphos the Hydraulian Mariner to that shape; for as the Otter is a kind of Amphibious creture, living partly by water, and partly by land, so a Mariner, Na­vigator, or Fisherman, useth to do: but there was another reson which induced me to this transmuta­tion, for it related to the quality of the Countrey whence he sprung, which is so inlayed, and every where so intercutt, and indented with the Sea, or fresh navigable Rivers, that one cannot tell what to call it, either water or land; besides, the Inhabitants dwell so low, that they lye lower than the Sea in some pla­ces. And now you may make your approaches, and parly with him accordingly, while I walk up the Ri­ver to visit my Nymphs.

Pererius.

Otter, Otter! I conjure thee, as thou wast once a Man, let me interchange som words with thee, and I may chance bring thee som news from thy Countrey, and Kinred.

Otter.

How is this? I not only hear, but I understand the voice of a Man, oimee! I am afraid that Morphandra hath a purpose to re-transform me, and make me put on human shape again: Well, Sir, What's your will with me?

Pererius.
[Page 6]

Let it not give any offence, if I desire to know What Countreyman you were, when you were a Ra­tional Creture?

Otter.

I came first into the World in Hydraulia, not farr from Amstena, and was a Mariner by my Profession.

Pererius.

Well, the most gracious Queen Morphandra hath been pleased to promise me the favor, as to turn you into Man again, if you have a mind to it; and, from that groveling quadrupedal shape, to make you an erect, and a rational Creture once again.

Otter.

Sir, you bid me to my losse, for I live farr more to my contentment in this species, wherein my heart and eyes are horizontal, than when I was in an upright shape.

Pererius.

Consult better with your thoughts, for Morphandra hath not only promised to re-convert you to Man, but also she hath given me leave and liberty to carry you aboard of me, and transport you to your Countrey a­gain; And I have a tite lusty Vessel in the Road, wherein you shall be accommodated with a Cabbin to your contentment, and all things necessary.

Otter.

These civilities might haply deserve thanks from an other, but not from me, in regard you proffer to re­duce me from better to worse; for if Experience be the touchstone of Truth, I find farr more quietude and contentation in this figure of body, than I did former­ly; therefore with this shape, I have put on also a re­solution never to turn Man or Mariner again.

Pererius.

I extremely wonder at this blindness, and unnatural obstinacy of yours: but now that Queen Morphandra hath, during this time of discours betwixt us, re-in­dowed you with the faculty of Reson and speech, I pray impart unto me the cause of your strange aversion thus, to become Man again.

Otter.
[Page 7]

Truly, Sir, though Man doth vaunt, and cry up him­self, to be the Epitome and Lord Paramount among all sublunary Cretures, though he vainly entitle himself, the Microcosm, yet I hold him to be the most miserable of all others; Go to his prime faculty, Reson, which, as he saith, is the specifical difference that distin­guisheth him from us, I have found, that it fills his brain full of distraction, of extravagant opinions, and whimseys, of pining griefs, panting doubts, and pan­nick fears, of violent fancies and imaginations, which oftentimes turn to phrensies; it tortures him with vexation and inquietude of spirit, insomuch, that som of the profoundest Philosophers, as I have heard, affirmed, that the Rational Soul was given to Man for his Self-punishment and Martyrdom; he may be said to be his own Tormentor, and the greatest Tyrant to himself; nay, these cruciatory passions do operat somtimes with such a violence, that they drive him to despair, and oftentimes to murther and destroy him­self, before Nature hath exspird her due cours in him, all which, we, that are guided only by sense, are not subject unto; We only look upon the present object before our eyes, and take no other care but for shelter, and food, and to please our appetit only.

Pererius.

'Tis true, that all these turbulences, and perplexities of spirit proceed from the Rational faculty; but, in com­pensation thereof, we have by this Faculty the prero­gative to know our Creator, to contemplat his works, and the fair fabrique of the World; by this, we have a dominion and Empire over all other Elementary Cretures, both of Air, Earth, and Water; by the reach of this, Man with his crampons and harping-irons can draw ashore the great Leviathan; He can make the Dromedary and Camel to kneel down, and take up his burden; He can make the fierce Bull to endure his yoke; He can bring down the Vulture from his nest; by this he can ride upon the back of the vast Ocean, and with his winged Coursers ride post from [Page 8] one Pole to the other, as you know well by your own Profession, when you were Man and Mariner.

Otter.

Yet these advantages com short, in my judgment, to countervail those calamities that are incident to the Rational Creture, which makes him come puling, cry­ing, & sometimes weeping into the world, as foreteling his future miseries. But now that I have partly dis­played the discomposures and vexations of his mind, I will give a touch of those infirmities that his Body is subject unto, which is no other than a Magazin of malignant humors; a hull, wherein is stow'd a carga­zon of numberless diseases, of putrid and ugly cor­ruptions, insomuch that, as, in his life time, whiles he sleeps in the bosom of his causes within the Womb, ther's no Creture lies neerer the excrementitious parts, so ther is none whose excrements are more fae­tid, and stinking; the fewmets of a Deer, the lesses of a Fox, the crotells of a Hare, the dung of a Horse, and the spraints that I use to void backward, are nothing so foetid; which may be the cause why, after Man's death, ther's no carcase so gastly and noisom as his, so that Toads and Serpents engender often in his scull; nor is his cadaver good for any thing when life is gone. 'Tis tru, Mummy may be made of it, but it must be don by embalment, and great expence of Spices. But ma­ny things in our carcases after death, serve for divers uses, as particularly in mine; my Liver, reduced to powder, is good against the Flix and Cholic; my Stones or testicles against the Palsie; and my Skin is of such value, that the fairest Ladies will be glad to wear it, &c.

Pererius.

'Tis a great truth what you speak of Human bo­dies, but all this comes accidentally; it proceeds from variety of viands, esculents, and beverages, not from the primitive plastick vertu, and ordinance of nature: Moreover, that which makes them so subject to putre­faction, is, because they abound in heat and humidity more than other bodies, which oftentimes makes som [Page 9] parts of the Compositum rott, before life and motion leaves them. But let not these thoughts avert you from a return to your first Beeing, whereby, when this transitory life is ended, you may be made capable to live in the Land of Eternity; whereas all brute Ani­mals, whose Souls soar no higher than the sense, are born to have a being only in this World: Therefore take on a manly resolution to be redintegrated into your first Principles, & so return to your own Country, and Kinred, to go on still in your Calling, which is a useful and thriving Profession, in the practise where­of you may see the Wonders of the Deep, and therby have oportunity more often to invoke your Creator, than in any other Trade.

Otter.

I cannot deny, but the common saying is, that He who cannot pray, must go to Church at Sea; yet I have often known, and I have tryed it in my self, that a Mariner in a storm is a Saint, but when the storm is over he is a Mari­ner again; witness He, who in a dangerous tempest made a Vow to offer a Wax-taper as big as his Main­mast unto Saint Nicolas, if he would preserve him from shipwrack; but being com safe ashore, a Rush-can­dle did serve the turn; so that, nautical piety is of no longer duration than the danger.

Pererius.

Without question, to be a Mariner or Navigator, as it is a necessary and noble Vocation, so it affords more frequent opportunities to improve a Man's devotion to Heven, if one makes right use of it; which cannot be don more properly, than by comparing the frail Vessel wherein he sayls to his own Body; If he con­templat, within the theater of his thoughts, that the Sea whereon he tumbles, is the World; waves and sur­ges are his passions; anger, choler, and discontentments, are the storms and tempests; his body is the bulk or hull of the ship, his neck is the stemm, the keel is his back, the planks are his ribs, the beams his bones, the pintel and gudgeons are his gristles and cartilages, the several seams of the ship are his arteries, veins, and [Page 10] nerfs, his bowels are the ballast, his heart the principal hold, his stomack the cook-room, his teeth the chopping-knives, his lungs the bellows, concoction is the cauldron, hunger the sauce, his belly the lower deck, his kidneys the close cabbins or receptacles, his arms and hands the can-hooks, his midriff the bulk-head, his scull the steerage-room with the round-house, his ears are the two chief scuttles, his eyes are the pharols, the stowage is his mouth, his lips are the hatches, his nostrils serve as gratings to let in air, the beak-head is his chin, his face and forehead the upper deck, Reson is the rudder, the anchor is resolution, constancy the capstane, prudence the pilot, the prow-misen and main-masts, are faith, hope, and charity, which last, reacheth above the Firma­ment: The owner of the ship is God Almighty, and Heven the haven to which he steers his course, &c. Therefore recollect your self, and think seriously upon it; shake off this brutish shape, and repair to the bosom of your own dear Countrey, and Calling.

Otter.

Truly, Sir, to deal freely with you, I am quite out of conceit with, both: Touching the first; for me to re­move hence thither, were to go from a fair flowry field into a great bogg, or a kind of quagmire, for such a thing my Countrey may be called, if you have regard to the quality of the soil, in comparison of This: It is, for the most part, a foggy cobwebb'd air; so canopied over, as it were, with thick fuliginous clowds, as if it were but one great Brew-house; they fence out both the Aquatical Creatures from their right habitations, and the true Prince of the Countrey from his heredi­tary possessions; insomuch, that some do not stick to call them double Usurpers: It is one of the most infimous and lowest part of the terrestrial Globe; which made one say, that they were the neerest confederats and neighbors to Beelzebub. And this may be inferred also out of their natures and disposition: for openly or co­vertly, they have blown the bellows of all the Warrs (now Warr is a fire, struck always in the Devil's tinder­box) that have happen'd round about them, ever since [Page 11] their Revolt from Tumontia, and since they invol'd Ar­tonia, & Gheriòna in their quarrell, who first rais'd them to a Free-State; though I believe they have repented of it since. Add hereunto that som do doubt, Whether God and Nature did ever design that lump of coagu­lated Earth for the Mansion of Mankind; for of it self it produceth neither Bread to eat, nor Stone to build, nor Wool or Silk to cloath him, nor Wood or Cole, or other combustible stuff, for fuel; but the In­habitants use to fish for Fire in the Water, for (fresh) Water in the Air, and for Air out of Foggs; inso­much, that if ever any Countrey may be call'd a Noun Adjective, surely 'tis that, for it cannot stand by it self. I remember, while I woar the shape of Man in that dull Clime, me-thought my blood was like so much Bonny-clabber within my Body, which I find now to be more quick, spriteful, and hot; though my bloud in statu quo nunc be observed, I confess, to be the coldest of any Quadrupedals. Moreover, I found that Mammon and Gain was their chiefest God, and Gold their great­est Idol: but for the public Religion which they pro­fess, they have it but in a luke-warm degree; ther's scarce any heat of holiness, and devotion among most of them.

Pererius.

I find now that you are of a tru Brutish Nature, so to beray your own Nest, and bespatter the native Soyl wherein you first received life. 'Tis true, ther's no Nation that hath not their peculiar humors; but touching those you speak of in your Countreymen, they have many signal Vertues that make a compen­sation for them; for they are one of the most industri­ous race of People upon Earth; so that the whole Countrey may be compar'd to a Hive of Bees, or Bank of provident Ants: They are the only Men that do Miracles now adayes; they are those, who put boun­daries to the raging Ocean, and by rare repercussions beat back his turgid and overwhelming billows, yet they reserve a power to command him in, at pleasure; they are those Men, who know the true Mysteries [Page 12] of Commerce, and how to regular it so, as to bring Trade and Policy to a Science, and certain Principles. How much are they to be commended for their neat­ness? Go to their Ships, they may be said to be as cleanly as a milking-pail; in their Kitchins, the out­side of their Utensils are as bright as the inside; ther's never a room in their house, where so much dust may be found as to draw the name of Slutt upon it: There is no Countrey where there are fewer sorts of indi­gent and poor people, or where they who are poor are better lodg'd, and provided for. 'Tis true, they are somwhat heavy in motion, and dullish, which must be imputed to the quality of the Clime; but this dul­ness is recompenc'd with a grave advisedness, and circumspection in their Counsels; with a constancy, and perseverance afterwards, in their Actions. In fine, they are a peeple who truly understand their own Interest, which may be said to be the prime Prin­ciple of Wisdom, whereby they have fought them­selves, from a company of Fishermen, into a High and Mighty Common-wealth.

Otter.

Truly, Sir, 'tis pitty that you had not a better sub­ject to spend your Oratory upon. Now, Sir, concern­ing my former Profession, let me tell you, that to be a Mariner, or Tarpaling, is one of the most servile and slavish condition of life that can be, it is the most ex­pos'd to hardship and hazard; He was no fool, who made a question, Whether he should number a Sea­man 'twixt the Living or the Dead, being not much above two inches distant from death, viz. the thick­ness of a rotten plank: It may be also doubted, Whe­ther he be a Free-man, or Prisoner, being so coop'd up within so narrow a compass all the while. Touch­ing the hardship and toylsomness of this trade, let me tell you, that to plow, dig, delve, or thresh, are but exercises of ease, compar'd to our labor in distress of wether: How many times, when I went a fishing, did I carry isicles of frost at my nose, and fingers-ends? How oft did I eat Bisket, so mouldy, that danc'd up [Page 13] and down with ugly Maggots? How oft did I stop my nostrils while I drunk stinking Beverage? How oft did the stench of the Pump strike me into a swoon? But I thank the Fates, and Queen Morphandra, I am now in a condition that I need not fear hunger or cold, I have a good warm Coat about me, that will last me all my life long, without patching or mending; which kind of fences against the injuries of Time, and tyranny of the Meteors, indulgent Nature provides for us sensitive Creatures, before we com into the World: whence may be inferr'd, that She takes more care for Our preservation than she doth of Mankinds; Beasts, have skins, Fish have scales, Birds have fea­thers, but Man comes naked and wawling into the World, and cloaths himself afterwards with our spoils: Nor hath he any habitation or ready food, pro­vided him by Nature; whereas other Animals find the Table layed, and the Buttry open for them as soon as they are born, and come out of the bosom of their Causes; whence it may be concluded, that they are the nobler Cretures.

Pererius.

It is given for granted, that Man comes naked into the World, yet he hath the mastery and command, he hath the breaking, daunting, and disposing of all other Cretures for his own turn, both in Air, Earth, & Water, to cloath and feed him, according to his free election and plesure; for all other elementary Cre­tures are made for his use, and principally to that end. Now 'tis a true Maxim, that the end is more noble than the mediums that serve for that end, therefore in that point ther can no comparison be made be­tween us.

Otter.

It is an experimental Truth, that You make use of other Cretures to array and nourish you, but much labor and toyl must be used, before you can bring them to serve your turn; What a deal of work must precede, ere the Tanner and Furrier can make our Skins fit for your wear? What huge varieties of la­bors [Page 14] must go before, ere Wheat come to be made Bread, and Barly Drink? Ther must be ploughing, harrowing, sowing, weeding, reaping, sheafing, stacking, barning, threshing, winnowing, sacking, grinding, bolting, fermenting, and baking, before you can get a bit of Bread to keep you from starving: What a deal of stirr must be us'd, before you can get a Shirt on your back, or a handkercher to wipe your noses withall? There must be planting, cutting down, hundling, watring, rippling, braking, wingling, and heckling of Hemp; which laberinth of labors and fatigues, we sentiant Cretures are free from.

Pererius.

It is without controversie tru, that Man is born to sundry sorts of labors, but it is principally to exercise his spirits, and the faculties of the intellect, and so pre­serve him from the rust of idleness, which makes the greatest Princes and Potentates among men to have som manual Trade, wherewith to passe away som part of their time. But, Otter, let us word away time no longer; let me know positively, whether you will make use of this singular favor, now offered you by Morphandra, with my proposal, and advice, to re­assume your former nature, wherein you may so serve & praise your Creator, that may make you capable of Eternity. In your whole life you cannot meet with so fair an opportunity; for I have a Ship to transport you, and you shall be well cloth'd, and cover'd, with ac­comodation of all things els accordingly; therefore take Time by the Foretop, for he is bald behind, and you cannot take hold of him.

Otter.

You may as soon wash white a Negro, or blanch an Ethiop, as soon as make me turn Man or Mariner again; therefore you do but beat the Air all this while by your perswasions; and whereas you speak of Eternity, it may be an Eternity of torments as well as of bliss, I'le none of that. But one of the greatest Peeple among Mankind, I mean the Selenians, or half-Moon-men, as also the Banians, do believe, that we al­so [Page 15] sensitive Cretures have a better World provided for us, after we have run out our cours here; for we like­wise have Souls in us, and certain expressions that countervail Speech, which is only understood by the Great God of Nature himself, whom we do not use to offend by any transgression of Laws, as you do.

But I feel the Sun dart his rays somwhat quick, therfore I will go to refresh and solace my self in the gentle strems of that River.

[...].
The Second Section:
Containing an Interlocutory Discourse 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and an Asse, who had bin once an Artorian Peasan; wherin ther are some glances upon the Country it self, and upon the present Government thereof. But though Prince Pererius us'd all the perswasi­ons he could, and re-inforc'd Argument upon Argument, to induce him to re-assume Human shape, and so return to his Country, Kindred, and Calling: Yet the Asse utterly refus'd it, and his reasons why, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and an Asse.
Pererius.

INcomparable Lady, you have dilated my heart with a great deal of contentment, by admitting me to the sight of that transmuted Animal I spoke withall last, and that you made him capable all the while to entertain discours with me pro & con, in so admirable a manner.

Morphandra.
[Page 16]

I have my share of that contentment you speke of: But what successe have you had in your design, of working upon his inclinations to becom Man again, and so return to his Country and Calling?

Pererius.

Madame, I have had conference with him of both, but he seems to undervalue, or rather abhorr the one, as much as the other, preferring the Species, and pre­sent state he lives in under your Dominion, to the state and former essence of a Man. Yet I am confident, that if you please to extend your favor further to­wards me, that I may mingle discours with som other, and put him in a capacity to hear, understand, and answer me, I am confident, I say, that I shall pre­vail with him, to be re-invested in his first Beeing.

Morphandra.

I espie upon the flank of that hillock an Asse, whom I remember to have transmuted from an Ar­tonian Peasan to that figure you see him in, whom I will re-indue with Reson and Ratiocination to hear­ken unto your perswasions accordingly: And if you can prevail with him, he shall put on his first Nature again; But as the power comes from me, so the will must proceed from himself to work this effect.

Pererius.

Madame, you will perform hereby the part of an Angel, for I never heard of any Asse that ever spoke (unlesse it were in Fables) but of one, and that was at the appearance of an Angel, which was by way of tru Miracle.

Morphandra.

Yet I have been told, that one of your greatest Phi­losophers Ammonius Alexandrinus, whose Disciple Origen was, hath it upon record, That an Asse was once an Auditor of Wisdom. But touching that Asse you mentioned before, I hear, the Lawyers of your Country have somthing of his nature in them, for they will not speak unlesse Angels appear unto them.

Pererius.
[Page 17]

'Tis a great truth, Madam, for our Lawyers toungs are said to be of an humor, contrary to the Axle-tree of a new Cart, in regard we use to annoint that, be­cause it may keep no creaking or noise, but the Law­yers toungs must be annointed, and oil'd with an Un­guentum Rubrum, that they may make more noise, and to have their tongues more glibb.

Morphandra.

The more is the foolishnesse of men discover'd in this point, who somtimes out of a pride, malice, or envy, somtimes out of a meer litigious humour, use to exhaust their estates, and impoverish themselfs, to enrich others by this means; As I remember to have heard a facetious passage of a wealthy Lawyer, who having built a fair Palace of Free-stone, with Marble intermix'd, and having invited a knowing friend of his to take a view of the new house, and ob­serve the symmetry, proportion, & conveniencies of the fabric, He asked his friend at last, what he thought that House was built of? He answered, I see 'tis built of good Free-stone and Marble, The Lawyer replied, No, Sir, 'tis a deceptio visûs in you, for this house is made of Asses heads and Fools sculls, meaning the multitude of Clients he had had. To such the proverb may sometimes be applied, that as the Asse oftentimes carries gold on his back, yet feeds on thistles, so many poor Clients carry gold in their pockets to feed their Lawyers, yet they fare hard themselfs, and are ready to famish. But to leave off these imperti­nences, you may please to go on in the pursute of your enterprise, to try whether yonder long-ear'd meta­morphos'd Animal will bring your intent home to your aim, and turn Man.

Pererius.

I most humbly kisse your hands, and will towards him. Poor stupid creture, how camest thou to be so unhappily transform'd, or deform'd rather, by as­sumption of this shape? For I understand by Queen Morphandra, that thou wa'st once a Man. How much [Page 18] do I pitty thy condition, compar'd to that which thou wa'st formerly of.

Asse.

Sir, you may reserve your pitty for others, in re­gard I need it not; for I thank the Fates, and Queen Morphandra, I enjoy my self, and the common benefits of nature, viz. Air, Earth, and Water, which are the staple commodities of all sublunary cretures, I say, I enjoy all these more than ever I did, Fenell excepted, which is my onely enemy. 'Tis tru, I was once a Man, an Artonian born, my profession was both a Vineyard-man, and a Roturer, a poor Peasan I was, who for all my labour and toil, could hardly gain what could bear up the two columns of life in me, viz. the Radicall moysture and Naturall heat, much lesse to maintain my wife and family in any vigor.

Pererius.

How could that be in so rich and plentifull a coun­try as Artonia is known to be? where, according to her name, Ceres is said to have her chief Granary, and Bacchus his prime Cellars; where Neptune hath also his principle Salt-pits, and whence Venus com­monly useth to fetch her smocks?

Asse.

'Tis granted, that Artonia in fecundity and self-sufficiency, yields to no other Region under the Sun, which makes some call her a Noun substantive, that can stand by it self; yet it may well be said, that ther's is no Country under the cope of Heaven, where there's lesse want, and more beggars, or more people, and fewer men; The reson of the first, to my grief I speak it, is, that the common stock and wealth of the Coun­try is by Mal-administration so unequally propor­tion'd, and distributed among the Native Inhabitants thereof; for the Court and the Clergy suck the greatest part of the fat, whence grew the Proverb, What the Cheque takes not, the Church takes. I speak not this, be­cause I repine at any acts of piety towards the holy and decent worship of God Almighty, and Legacies left by sweet devoted souls. Touching the first, 'tis too [Page 19] well known, that the very Tallies, besides the Demeans of the Crown, and the Customs, amount communibus annis to near upon twenty millions of Crowns, wher­of 'tis tru, that about four millions were remitted in the year 1648. Then the Gabell of Salt amounts to about seven millions every year, which is look'd unto so narrowly, that a poor Peasan cannot carry a poc­ket or purse-full of salt home to his poor wife, but he must be searched. Then ther are the Taillons, Aydes, Droits, with divers other Impositions and Taxes, which though at first they were pretended to be im­pos'd for the present necessity of the times, yet Sove­raign Princes are known to have the gift of making Temporary things Eternall in this kind; Neverthe­lesse, if this immense tresure went to the King's tre­sure alone, for the common defence and honour of the State, it would not so much trouble them that pay it; but three parts of four are drunk up among hun­gry Officers, whence grew the proverb, that the King's cheese goes away three parts in parings.

Touching the second, by a late computation that was made, the Clergy hath in annuall Revenue a hun­dred and six millions of Crowns, and no wonder, ther being in that Country, besides Cardinals, and fifteen Archbishops, a hundred and fifty Suffragan Bishops, and I know not how many fat Abbots, with other Digni­taries, Monks, and Monasteries without number.

Then comes in the Noblesse, or Gentry, which have all the rest; Insomuch that betwixt these three, the poor Commoner, who yet makes up the bulk of the Nation, useth to be grinded as betwixt so many mil­stones, whence grew this saying, that the Artonian Peasans are born with Chains: Yet they are the suppor­ters of all the other three, and whence they have their subsistence; Insomuch that Artonia may be compar'd to a stately Palace, born up by mud-pillars; While the poor toyling peasan melts the hoar frost with the sweat that trickles down his cheeks, others by good fire-sides drink carowses in the wine which he plants, while he with his panting breath and anhelation [Page 20] thickens the air befor him, others with Carrolls and wanton musicall Catches do attenuat it.

Concerning the second point I spoke of, viz. That no Country hath more peeple and fewer men then Arto­nia, 'tis a truth too well known; and the reson is, that the oppressed Commons do so languish and groan under the insupportable burdens of the foresaid Exactions, and heavy Rents besides to their Landlords, that they use to grow so dejected, pusillanimous, and heartless, their spirits come to be so cowed and cowardiz'd, that not one in twenty hath the courage of a man in him, or is found fit to shoulder a Musket, to trail a Pike, or perform any other military or manly service.

Pererius.

'Tis an apparent truth, that the Artonian Gentry are so numerous, and use to rack the Peasantry so, that it makes them very abject and heartlesse; for here­in the Politicall body may be faid to be like the Natu­rall; wherein if the blood and spirits were drawn all up into the upper parts, the supporting members be­low, as the legs and thighs, cannot have that propor­tion of naturall heat and vigor to quicken themselfs, the blood being all engross'd by the parts above. If the Standells be planted too thick in a Coppice, ther cannot be clean Underwoods, for they will turn all to dwarfish Shrubs. But the common peeple of Artonia may thank their own volatil humors and nature for this, which is so instable, and still so covetous of change, that if they were fed high, and pamper'd with too much plenty, they wold ever and anon rush into civill commotions and tintamarrs, they wold winch, and go about to shake off the reins of Govern­ment, and overthrow their Rider; Therfore being so fiery-mouth'd, 'tis fit they should be ridden with a bitt or curb, nor can it be tearm'd Tyranny, or any Soloecism in Government, that they are us'd so.

Asse.

Sir, under favour you put the saddle on the wrong horse 'tis not the Commonalty, but the Gentry, and they who are in high blood, that have such tumultuous [Page 21] boyling spirits within them, they are those who cause feavers and convulsions in the bowells of their own Country, which I confesse are frequent, whence som observe, that though the air of Artonia be not so hot as that of her next neighbour Tumontia, yet she is more subject to distempers, Calentures, and Tovardil­lios; Therefore 'tis one of the prime policies of Artonia to find her Gentry some work abroad, and employ them ever and anon in forraign Warrs; And ther have been of late two fiery Flamines, one after the other, who have put this policy in practise to some purpose, their sanguin humors symbolizing with the colour of their habit, wherby nere upon a million of souls have perished within these few years. Touch­ing the second of these, his father little dreamt when he sold hatts in Silicia, that his son should mount so high as to wear the Red-corner'd Cap, and give the Law to all Artonia; wherby some hold it to be no small disparagement to so gallant a Nation, and subtle a Clime as Artonia is known to be, to have none of her own children that had brain enough to sit at the helm of her Government, but to suffer a Forrener to lead all her Nobles by the nose, as also to incorporat his fa­mily with the Blood-Royall of Artonia and Alpiana.

Pererius.

Well, let us leave these digressions, for as the pro­verb runs in your country, We have leapt from the Cock to the Asse all this while, we have gone astray from the matter, let's return to the first subject of our discours, and to my main design; Poor long-ear'd patient beast, wilt thou shake off this thy il-favoured braying nature, and the species of a brute, to becom perfect Man again?

Asse.

Sir, though I were acertain'd to be one of Artonia's Peers, I wold not do it; But, Sir, touching my Ears, you need not take me by them in so reproachfull a manner: for you know a Phrygian King did wear once an Asse his ears, and he was the richest that ever was among Mortalls; Besides, my Ears have a prophetic vertu, for when I prick them up, 'tis an infallible pre­sage [Page 22] of foul wether; Touching my braying, it is the tone which Nature hath given me, and all the Indi­vidualls of my kind, and you must grant, that Na­ture the handmaid of God Almighty doth not use to do any thing ill-favouredly; But in lieu of our braying you have a passion, and as I remember your Philo­sophers call it the proper passion of man, that is a far more distorting and ridiculous violent posture, 'tis your Laughter, which happens when your pleasure hath the liberty to scatter it self abroad, and that the senses bear a share therin, for then it causeth such an agitation, that the whole physiognomy of the face is changed, it begins to sparkle in the eyes, and ming­leth it self oft-times with forc'd tears, the fore-head stretcheth it self, the lips grow redd, they tremble and slaver often-times, the voice becomes grosser then ordinary, and resounds, the rest of the body is subject to this agitation, an unusuall heat and vapor shedds it self through all its parts, which swells, and gives a new color, the eye-brows decline, the lidds con­tract themselves, and all the skin about them becomes uneven, and wrinkles it self all over, the eyes exte­nuat, they half shut themselfs, and grow humid, the nose crumples up, and growes sharp, the lipps retire and lengthen, ther is an ill-favor'd kind of gaping, and discovery of the teeth, the cheeks lift up them­selfs and grow more stiff, they have pitts digg'd in them during the time, the mouth is forc'd to open, and discovers the tremblings of the suspended toung, it thrusts out an obstreperous interrupted sound, and oftentimes ther is a stopping of breath, the neck swells and shortens it self, all the veins grow greter, and extended, an extraordinary hue disperseth it self over all the face, which grows reddish, the brest is impe­tuously agitated, and with sudden reiterated shakes, that it hinders respiration, the perfect use of speech is lost, and it is impossible to swallow during the fit, a pain rises in the flanck, the whole body bends, and as it were wreaths and gathers it self together, the hands are set on the sides, and presse them forcibly, [Page 23] sweat gets up on the face, the voice is lost in hic­kocks, and the breath is stifled with sighs; somtimes this agitation gets to so high an excesse, that it produ­ceth the same violent effect as medicaments use to do, which is to put the bones so out of joynt that it cau­seth syncopes; The head and the arms suffer the same throws, with the brest and the thighs, the body hurles it self with precipitation and disorder, and is cast from one side to the other; The hands becom feeble, the leggs cannot support themselves, and the body is constrained to fall, and tumble, nay it cau­seth sometimes dangerous syncopes in the heart, and so brings death. Weeping also the counter-passion hath many of these ill-favor'd motions, what an odd kind of face doth an infant make assoon as he is born? how som of ripe age will screech, cry and howle in so many dis­ordered notes, and singultient accents? Whereas we by our braying hold up our heads only, and so breath out our passions into the open aire, without any forc'd tones, or such variety of distorted postures.

Pererius.

'Tis tru, that Laughter produceth sundry motions and pleasing violences in the human body, but they are recompenced by the joy that accompanieth it, which useth to rowse and raise up our slumbring spi­rits, and melancholly thoughts with an unusuall mirth and complaceny, whence it comes, that after those two, Doctor Diet, and Doctor Quiet, Doctor Merriman is requisit to preserve health; Touching the other passion Sorrow, and the various emissions of it, it is an ease also to the spirits, which without such ventings would be subject to strangulations; But, poor Asse, do not let slip this fair opportunity which gracious Queen Morphandra offers thee, by my intervention, to be redintegrated and made a Rational creture again.

Asse.

I told you before but of the outward servitude and exigents that I endured when I was a Man, which were incident onely to the body: I have not spoken to [Page 24] you any thing of the perturbations of the brain, and the inward agonies of the mind, which did trouble and torment me much more; How was I perpetually vex'd not onely to pay the common Taxes, and other pecuniary erogations, with my domineering Land­lords Rents, but to find daily bread, sustenance, and cloathing for my wife and children; Now children is one of the greatest encumbrances that belong to man­kind; for as the proverb goes, Children are a certain care, and an incertain comfort; But they of my species at present are exempt from this, and a thousand in­conveniencies more which are entayl'd upon man­kind: 'Tis tru, touching our off-springs while they are young, and unable to do for themselfs, we are in­dulgent of them, and that for a short time, but after­wards we lose all care of them, being able to shift for themselfs.

Pererius.

Yes, and with your care you lose all affections unto them besides, but such is the noblenesse of Man's na­ture, that both continu in him during life unto the third and fourth generation; Therefore without fur­ther ado, think upon thy first Beeing, and to be resto­red thereunto: Otherwise thou wilt be more foolish than that poor baffled Asse in the Fable, who when a Horse came unto him, and out of wantonnes had de­sired him to lift up his left hinder leg, and take out a stone that had got into his foot, as soon as he had lift­ed up the legge, the Horse fell a kicking him ill-fa­vourelly on the face, and almost dasht out his brains; Or thou wilt be as foolish as the Asse, who seeing a Spaniell sawn upon his Master, and getting into his lap, where he was stroked, the Asse thought to do so too, but instead of being stroked, he was struck and ba­stinadoed away for his sawcinesse, which shews that an Asse is a more contemptible thing than a Dogge.

Asse.

As contemptible as we are, there are two of us who have a bright place in Heaven, as the Constellation of Cancer will shew you; As contemptible as we are, some [Page 25] of your gretest Philosophers have held grave disputes of our very shadow, and Apuleius's golden Asse makes him famous to eternity; As contemptible as we are, the strongest man that ever was, made use of the jaw-bone of one of us to destroy thousands of his enemies; The great Empresse Poppaea us'd our milk to make her skin the whiter, and you know what a Soveraign thing that milk is against Consumptions, and Dysenteries; nay our very Urine is found to be good against Tilers or Morphews in Ladies faces; Lastly, you know who made his entry into Ierusalem upon one of Us, for which we carry the Crosse upon our sholders as the badg of a blessing to this day, which made a zealous Tumontian break out into these lines upon the sight of that History of Palm-sunday, neer a Church dore.

Asno quien a Dios lleuays
Oxala yo fuera vos,
Supplico os Dios me hagays
Como el Asno en que vays,
y dizen que le oyò Dios.

O happy Asse who God do'st bear,
Such as Thou art, O wold I were.
'Tis said the man did pray so hard
That prayer and person both were heard.
Pererius.

Poor besotted beast, yet thou knowest ther can be no comparison 'twixt the best of Brutes and the basest of human cretures, who by the faculty of Reson can tame and reduce to his subjection the strongest of other Animals, though never so fierce and corpulent, and make them know that He is their Lord and Master.

Asse.

Whereas you speak of fiercenesse, truly Sir I think ther's no Animal so fierce and ferocious, so savage and intractable as Man: for whereas all other cretures [Page 26] can be rul'd, daunted, and broken, easily go­vern'd in time, the Art of governing Men is the most difficult of any, because of their various fancies and imaginations, their crosse-grain'd humors and pride, all which proceeds from the faculty of Reson you speak of; Therefore I was very glad to be rid of it by this transfiguration, and the time seems tedious unto me that I have the use of it now so long to parly with you, for I remember when I was a Man, it fill'd the cells of my brain ever and anon with turbid and tur­bulent cogitations, with strange chimera's and crochets, which disquieted the tranquillity and calm of my mind; And as for my Body, this shape which I now bear is more healthfull farr and neat, for now I am not subject to breed Lice and other Vermin; And whereas this pedicular disease, with a nomberlesse sort of other maladies and distempers, attend Mankind, ther's but one onely disease that our Spe­cies is subject unto, which the Veterenarians or Far­riers call Malila, and that is onely in the head, when som unusuall defluxion of rheume falls thence into the nostrills, which being stopp'd turns to the im­provement of health, but if once it falls upon the lungs we are gone: And observable it is, that being dead, we have cleaner carcases than Men, and di­vers medicinall things are found in them, as our Li­ver, Hoofs, or Bones being reduc'd to powder are good, as the Naturalists note, against the Epilepsy or Comitiall sicknesse, with other diseases; Nor do any crawling nasty worms grow out of our Cadavers, but Beetles, and other airy Insects, which are not so noisome; But I have spent too much time with you, I will therefore go now to browze upon the green leafs of that Bramble.

Pererius.

Well, I find here two Proverbs verified, the one is a homely one, viz. Chanter a un Asne, il vous donnera un pet, Sing to an Asse and he will give you a Bum-crack The other, that one may bring an Asse to the water, but not make him drink unlesse he list himself.

Asse.
[Page 27]

'Tis very tru, I remember well they are proverbs us'd in our Country, but the last shews much the tem­perance of our Species, for we do not eat or drink but when we are a thirst or hungry, for the restauration of the parts that are lost, that is when nature requires it; But you use to gourmandize it upon full stomacks, to force carowses and Whole-ones untill you be full up to the very throat, and so transform your selves to worse then Asses, so that oft-times neither hand nor foot can do their duty: which we never do.

Pererius to himself.

It is a strange and strong incantation that holds this poor Animal in this brutality, I will by the fa­vor of Morphandra try a conclusion next upon som other of a quicker apprehension, and one who had liv'd in a more plentifull and contented train of life whiles he was Man.

[...].
The Third Section.
Consisting of a Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pe­rerius, and an Ape, who had been once a Preachman in Gheriona, who having been carried away with every wind of Doctrine, and following any fanatic new-fangl'd opinion, was transmuted to that mimicall shape; In which Dialog ther is an account given of the sad case and confusion, wherein Gheriona is involv'd at present, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, an Ape.
Morphandra.

I Saw you somwhat earnest in banding arguments with that Asse, but how have you sped? doth he desire to be disasinated, and becom Man again, as I promised he should be, provided his will concurred therunto?

Pererius.

Truly, Madame, I find the old proverb tru, that he who washeth an Asse's head doth lose both time and sope; But, these two Animalls I have treated withall, liv'd in a poor ignorant condition when they were Men: I humbly desire I may mingle speeches with some transmuted Animals, who when they were Rationall cretures did live in plenty, and at ease, and who were bred up in knowledg.

Morphandra.

You shall have your desire, and in that Grove I spie an Ape, who was once a prick-ear'd Preachman in Gheriôna, whom for his mimicall foolish humour, and following any new fond fatuous opinion, I [Page 29] thought it proper to transmute to that shape; Be­sides, I turn'd him to that long-tail'd beast, because they of his country are called Stertmen that is men with long-tailes, for which ther is both Tradition and Story; He came hither Chaplain to a Frigot, and had not the ship quickly tack'd about and got away, I had transfigur'd all the rest.

Ape.

By the earnestnes of your looks and gazing, I be­lieve you would speak with me, therefore I pray what's your pleasure?

Pererius

Poor Ape, thou art an object of much pitty; Queen Morphandra hath been pleased to discover unto me that thou wa'st once a man, and born in Gheriona, a noble Country, and a Nation of no lesse esteem.

Ape.

'Tis tru, the Country is good, but she may be said to be now like Lucian's sick Eagle, shot and pittifully wounded with shafts of her own feathers, Gheriona never shewed she had in her as much to make her happy, as she shews now to make her self unhappy; I fear me, there be som further dreadfull judgments, as the Famine and the Pestilence hanging over her: for it hath been observed that those three scourges of Heven, [...], and [...], the Famine, the Plague, and the civill Warrs are consecutif, and use to follow one another, though the last hath got the start of the other two; But concerning the peeple, I verily believe ther were never any so far degenera­ted since the Devill had to do with mankind, never any who did fool and puppifie themselfs into such a perfect slavery▪ and confusion; You seem to pitty my transfiguration from Man to Ape, but their case is to be much more resented, for they are turned from Men to Wolfs, if you go to their humours, ther's a tru Ly­canthropy among them, els they wold never worry and devour one another in so savage a manner; All which proceeds from a sad disease which hath seiz'd upon many thousands of them, it is a pure Scotomia, an odd [Page 30] kind of Vertigo that reigns amongst them, which turns the head round, and fills it with new chimera's ever and anon; 'Tis tru that my country-men were ever observ'd to be inconstant in the fashion of their cloa­thing, in their outward comportment and garbs, which proceeded from Imitation more then naturall Inclination; But this mimicall apish humor hath ex­tended of late years not onely to their externall habits, but to the inward habitudes of their minds, and taken hold of their Intellectualls, by being carried away with every wind of Doctrine, and fanaticall new­fangled opinions, blown over from other Countreys, and then multiplying amongst them; For though my countrey-men have not any great Genius to invent, yet 'tis observ'd they have a faculty to add to any new invention; and if any new odd opinion in Holy things hath once taken footing among them, they will make it run upon more feet; Now it is in Divinity as in Phi­losophy, Uno absurdo dato sequuntur mille, One absurdity being granted a thousand will follow, as Aristotle the Philosophers-Pope doth affrim, for Errors like ill weeds do grow apace; And truly I must confesse, that this apish humor had seiz'd strongly upon me, which made me distrub the peace of the holy Church wher­in I was born, baptized, and bred, which made Queen Morphandra to transform me justly to this shape you see, being entertain'd Chaplain to a Man of War that arriv'd at this Island, though I had been sensible of mine own errors a good while before.

Pererius.

I know well that there was in Gheriona a comely face of a Church; Ther were such solemnities, vene­rations, and decencies us'd, that might discover som piety in the practice of holy duties; Ther was a public Liturgy that link'd the souls of the whole Nation in an unanimity, wherin ther were such pithy patheticall prayers that reached all occasions, and searched every crany in the conscience; The Sacraments were admi­nistred with a fitting posture of reverence, and genu­flexion, yet far from any superstition; God's houses [Page 31] were kept neat, cleanly, and in repair; There was such a prudent handsom Government, such degrees of promotion, such possessions annex'd to the Church, that made them of that holy function not onely to be esteem'd and reverenc'd, but to be able to do deeds of charity; But now I hear ther's crept up such a nasty race of miscreants, who have no more esteem of God Almighty's House than of a Pig-sty, who have turn'd a pretended Superstition to a palpable Prophanenes, who have plunder'd all that belong'd to pious uses, who have nothing of that veneration, that sweetnes, and comfort that useth to attend tru devotion, which is turn'd to a giddy zeal, or a kind of lust still after more learning, as if Christianity had no consistence or certainty, no sobriety; or end of knowledg, wherin the inward man might acquiesce; These poor simple­tons pretending to imitate the Apostles time wold have the same form of Discipline and Mode to go­vern whole Nations, as it did at first a Chamber-full of men in the Infancy of the Christian Church; They wold mak the same coat serve our Saviour at five and twenty years, as fitted him at five: But you were speaking of other dreadfull judgments that you be­lieve were hanging over Gheriona, and what are the re­sons that induce you to that belief?

Ape.

I remember when I had a human shape I was much addicted to the reading of History, which is a profita­ble knowledge, for the observation of former actions may serve to regulat the future; I took notice of a world of examples that the two nefandous crimes of Sacrilege and Perjury never went unpunished without some signall judgments; Among divers other these two do reign and rage in Gheriona more then they ever did in any Country under the cope of Heven, and must she not then expect the vialls of a just vengeance to fall down upon Her from above? But that you may better understand the state of that calamitous Coun­try, that Country of confusion, I will recount to you what befell me before my transmutation.

Perertus.
[Page 32]

You will oblige me beyond measure, if you impart unto me what you intend, and I shall listen unto you with much patience, and no lesse contentment.

Asse.

It chanc'd one night I had a strange unusuall Dream, I had fallen into so sound a sleep, as if the Cinq-ports (my five outward senses) had been trebly lockt up; My Animula vagula blandula, my little wandring soul made a sally out of Morpheus Horn­gate, as she uses to do often, and fetch vagaries apart, to practise how she may live by her self after our dis­solution, when she is separated from the Body and be­com a Spirit; I had all night long a world of visions, and strange objects appeerd unto me, which return now fresh into my memory; During the said time I thought I was transported to the remotest place, and of the greatest distance that possibly could be from Heven, me thought I was in the Infernall pit, in the kingdom of darknesse, in Hell it self among the devills and damned spirits, I had neither that golden branch, nor the help of a Sybilla Cumana to conduct me up and down as the Trojan Prince had, but a spirit did lead me gently and softly all along untill I came to Pluto's Palace, where a speciall Councell was held to take a strict examination what service the three infernall Furies, Alecto, Tisyphone, and Megaera, with other in­feriour Fiends that were their assistants, had done upon earth towards the advancement of the king­dom of darknesse since their last mission thither, which was presently upon the appeerance of the last blazing Star 1618. Pluto vouchsafed to be present at this so­lemn Councell, and to be President or Chair-man him­self, to which purpose he had a strong Legion of Caco­daemons for his gard, but the busines was prepar'd and facilitated for his hearing before hand by a spe­ciall Committee appointed of purpose for that end (whence I observed, that Committees were first hatch'd in Hell) The three gastly Daughters of Night appeered with fiery conntenances before the Stygian [Page 33] King, in lieu of air they evaporated huge flakes of fire which they took in, and let out with the accents of their words, huge bunches of Vipers hung dang­ling and wavring about their heads, having their tayls rooted in their sculls; A furious clash fell betwixt them who should be Prolocutrix, but in regard that Alecto and Tisyphone had given account of their former missions, the one of the League in Artonia, the other of the Revolt of the Hydraulian, which was about the appearance of the Comet in the tayl of Cassiopaea, it came now in due turn that Megaera should have the priority of speech; So the youngest of the Tartarean girls began as followeth.

May it please your high phlegetontic Majesty to un­derstand, that since the last happy Comet Anno 1618. which by the parallax was found to be in the Heven it self above the Elementary world, we have for for­ty years together been more active and eager in your Majesty's service than ever we were; We have stirred the humors of the foolish Inhabitants of the earth to insurrections, to warr and praeliation; To effect which, our practise hath been to bring on the beggarliest and toughest peeple upon the nicest and softest, we brought the Cuprinian upon the Aetonian, and the Zoundanian, the Tarragon, and Cinqfoyl upon the Tumontian, the Tartar upon the Chinois, the Selenian upon the Marco­polist, the Cosaque upon the Pole, the Carboneian upon the Gherionian; We have continued a bloody lingring Warr in the bowells of Artonia for thirty years to­gether, we have thrust divers Princes out of their an­tient Inheritances, among others the Duke of Laroni and Rhinarchos, we brought two gran Selenian Empe­rours to be strangled by their own slaves, we have often puzzled Vinalia, we have made the Kings of Ar­tonia and Tumontia to bandy so fiercely one against the other, as if the one had been an Infidell the other a Iew, though each of them had one another's sister abed with him every night. But may it please your Ache­rontic Majesty to be inform'd, that the most advanta­geous and signall services we have done, have bin in [Page 34] the lsles of Gheriona and Hebrinia, for whereas we di­vided our selfs before, and went singly among other peeple, we went joyntly thither all three, and brought a Regiment of fiery red-coated Cacodaemons to guard us, because we might be sure to bring our great work home to your Majesty's aime; The Nation fittest for our turn at first were the Carboncian, who have bin so obedient to their Kings, that of above a hundred they brag of, scarce two parts of three died in their beds, but were made away violently; We did incite them first against their own Country-man and Native King, and to appear in a daring high hostile manner before him upon the borders; At which time it cost us a great deal of artifice so to besot the Gherioniams, and to abase their courage, so to entangle them with Factions, having sure Confidents to that end among them, that they durst not present Battle to the Carbon­cian at that time; And this, Sir, was an important piece of service, for had they fought then, or had they bin sensible afterwards of the dishonour they receiv­ed at that time, their King being then amongst them in person, with the flower of his Nobility and Gen­try, and consequently had they stuck to him after­wards to have vindicated that rebellious affront, all those we have fomented since might have bin pre­vented.

We shortly after transmitted the same spirit of Insurrection into Hebrinia, who being encouraged by the good successes of the Carboneian, who got then what tearms he listed, yet could he not sit quiet; and the Hebrinian Commissioners being but harshly entertain'd by the great Councell of Gheriona, who intended to send them over a Governour that should pinch them more than they were before in their con­sciences, and for divers other provocations, we caus'd the Hebrinian also to rise in blood, which he did to som purpose; Then came we to work upon the Ghe­rionian, whom we found as fit to receive our impres­sion as flax is to receive fire, in regard of their long Furseit of peace and plenty; We broke up one great [Page 35] Assembly upon a suddain, because the members ther­of were not for our turn, But then we call'd another which was fit for our purpose, and we steer'd their courses all the while with a great deal of care; The first thing we did was to endue them with a faculty to create fears and jealousies, whereof we made ex­cellent use, and although those fears and jealousies appeared afterwards to every common man as plain as the nose on his face to be but meer forgeries, and supposititious things, yet we did still so intoxicat their intellectualls, that we made them to adore still the coyners of them; And to give your Stygian Majesty among divers others, one most pregnant and unde­niable demonstration what firm footing we got in that Island, we did raise in few years more Pythonesses, which the ignorant vulgar call Witches there, then ever were in that Country since your Majesty temp­ted Eve; and we enabled our said Pythonesses to send their inferiour Imps abroad upon our service; We stood at the King's elbow when he pass'd the Act of continuance, wherein a Carboncian was our chief En­gineer; But the great City Polihaima stood us in most excellent steed to compasse our designes, we made the riffraff and rakehells of that wanton City, whom som call'd Myrmidons, others their Bandogs, to rabble the King out of Town, we brought also thither the silly Swains of the Country like a flock of Geese to gaggle up and down the streets with papers in their hats they knew not about what; We managed the businesse af­terwards so dextrously, and did aggravate things by degrees, that we made their credulous King, because he was so profess'd an enemy to your Majesty, to go disguis'd in serving-man's habit to his Country-men the Carboncians, with whom we prevail'd so far, that they delivered him over as a Sacrifice, and betraid him Iudas like to the Gherionians, who crucified him sufficiently afterwards by tossing and tumbling him up and down, by depriving him of the comfort of all things that use to be dear unto man, as his wife, chil­dren, friends, and servants, by working upon his [Page 36] conscience in a compulsatory way, and stretching it upon the very tenter; In summe, we have reduc'd that Country to a conformity with this of your Ma­jesties, to a perfect Chaos of all confusion, we have brought the sway into the common peeples hands, making all the Nobility and Gentry to crouch and cringe unto them; And never did common peeple more truly act the part, and discover the genius of a common peeple more lively, whose nature is still thirsting after novelties, and Utopian Reformations, though oftentimes they fool themself thereby into a a baser kind of slavery, finding when 'tis too late those specious idaea's, and confus'd forms of Government they apprehended at first, and hugg'd in their own conceits, to be at last but meer absurdities, when they com to the application and practise therof.

And, Sir, the most advantageous instruments we have us'd to bring all this about have bin the Pulpit and the Presse, by these we diffus'd those supposititi­ous fears and jealousies, formerly spoken of, to distract the brains of the silly vulgar; Instead of Lights we put Firebrands in their Churches, who, according as we did dictat unto them, did baul out nothing but sediti­on, war, and blood; We have made som of them to have as good an opinion of the Alchoran as of their own Liturgy; We made new Ordinan­ces to batter down all the antient Canons of the Church, we have made them to un-saint all those who were call'd Apostles, to prophane and plunder all places that were consecrated, we brought som of them to put a division 'twixt the Trinity it self, we have brought them to keep their Fasts more solemnly than the Sabboth, upon which day we made them usu­ally not onely to sit in Councell, but to put in execu­tion their chief designs of blood; To work all this, the main and most materiall thing we made use of was spirituall pride your Majesty's old acquaintance, which pride we have infus'd into the mind of every Mechanic, or Country-Swain, who will boldly now undertake to expound any Text of Scripture new or [Page 37] old upon the warrant of his own giddy brain; Inso­much that we have made that Book which they call the Bible, that was ordained for the Charter of their Salvation, to be the chiefest instrument of their Damna­tion; We have brought those exotic words Plundring and Storming, and that once abominable word Excise to be now familiar among them, they are all made free Denizens, and naturaliz'd among them; We have made those who came petitioners for peace to the great Councill to be ill intreated, and som of them to be murther'd, but those that came for warr to be countenanc'd and thank'd; We made the mo­ther to betray her child, the child the father, the husband the wife, and the servant his master; We have brought a perfect Tyranny over their souls and bodies, upon the one, by tedious imprison­ments and captivity, with a forfeiture of all their livelihoods before conviction, or any preceding charge, upon the other, by forcing them to take contradicto­ry Oaths, Engagements, and Protestations; On that fool­ish superstitious day of Christmas, with other Festi­vals, we have brought them to shut up their Churches, and to open their Shops and Shambles, so that in time they will forget the very memory of the Incarnation of their Saviour; We have brought them to have as little reverence of their Temples as of their Tap-houses, and to hold the Church to be no more than a Char­nell-house of rotten bones; And though they still cringe and stand bare-headed before any wrangling Bench of common pleading, yet we have so stiffned their joynts, and made their heads so tender in that which they call God's House, that there, they can neither bow the one, nor scarce uncover the other; We have made the fundamentall Laws to be call'd but meer formalities; We have made that which was call'd their Great Charter to be torn to a thousand flitters, and stretcht the priviledge of the Commons so wide, that it hath quite swallowed the Royall Pre­rogative, and all other priviledges; We have grub'd up, and cast away those hopefull Plants that grew in [Page 38] their two Seminaeries of Learning, and set in them graffs of our own choice; We have made the wealth of Town and Country, of Poor and Rich, to shine in plunder upon the Souldiers backs; We have made them command free-quarter of those, that were more sitting to ask alms of them; We have made them rifle the Monuments of the dead, to rob the very Laza­retro, to strip the Orphan and Widow; We have made them offer violence to the very Vegetables and inanimat Stones, to violat any thing that was held holy, to make Socks of Surplices, to water their beasts at the Font, and feed them on the Altar, and to term the thing they cal the Sacrament to be but a two-penny Ordinary; We have made them use on the close­stoole that Book wherein the public Devotion of the whole Nation consisted; In fine, we have made them turn supposed superstition to gross prophaness, preach­ing to prating, praying to raving, government to con­fusion, and freedom to fetters; We have so intoxica­ted that dear daughter of yours Polihaima, that she knows not what way to turn her self; And whereas her Apprentices did rise up like so many Cubs of Ty­gers against their lawfull Prince, they are now be­com as came as so many silly sheep against the Soul­diery; We have puzzled their Pericranium with ver­tiginous fancies, and fears among themselfs, that one neighbour dare not trust the other; To conclude, we have eclipsed the glory of that Nation, we have made them by all peeple far and neer that ever had know­ledg, correspondence, or any commerce with them, to be pittied by som, to be laugh'd at by others, to be scorn'd of all, and to becom the very tail of all Na­tions; In fine, Sir, we have brought that Country to such a passe of confusion, that it is a fit place onely for your infernall Majesty to keep your Court in, for ther's never a Crosse there to fright you now: 'Tis tru they retain it still upon their coines of gold and silver, in honour of your Plutonian Highnesse as you are Dis and god of riches.

Megaera having thus given up an account in behalf [Page 39] of her self and her two sisters, they all bowed their snaky heads down to their very feet, which were toed with Scorpions, before the black Throne of Beelze­bub, who giving such a humm that made all Hell to tremble, answered thus,

My pretious and most trusty Tartarean daughters, we highly approve of the super-erogatory service you have don us for the propagation of our Empire upon Earth, and specially in Gheriona; we have sued a long time to have a lease of that Iland, and we hope to ob­tain it, touching Carboncia 'tis not worth the while; Therfore when you have visited those of that Nati­on whom you have sent hither already to peeple this pit, I would have you return thither, and prepare that place for one of our principall habitations, never leave them till you have thrust out Religionem ex solo as well as Regem ex solio; make Law, Religion, Alle­giance, and every thing els Arbitrary, let not one go­vernment last long, but shuffle the Cards so that a new Trump may be turnd up often, create still new fears, and foment fresh divisions among them; let the son seek the fathers throat, let brothers sheath their swords in one anothers bowells, let the Country clash with the Towns, the Towns one against the other, and the Sea with both, till that the whole Nation be at last extinguished that one may not be left to pisse against a wall; Let not a Church or Chappell, Hospi­tall or Colledge stand in the whole Isle. I intend to have a new Almanack of Saints at my comming, for I have som Star-gazers there fit for my purpose; Make haste therefore, and acquit your selfs of your duty for fear a peace be shuffl'd up, and that Artonia and Tumontia appeer in the busines, and espouse the quar­rell of young Caroloman; And if you carry your selfs well in this employment, I may chance give you Car­boncia for your reward.

The three Lethean Futies with a most profound reverence replied, May it please your Majesty, your Ferriman Charon is continually so pestered with such multitudes of Gherionian and Carboncian passengers, [Page 40] that we were forc'd to stay a long time ere we could be transported hither, and we fear we shall be so hin­dred again. Therfore we most humbly desire for our better expedition, that you would vouchsafe to give us a speciall Mandamus that we may be serv'd first, with a non obstante, when we com to the banks of Styx.

You shall dear daughters, said Pluto, and my War­rant shall be addrest to som Gherionian Tarpalins, wherof ther are abundance these few years past, whom Charon hath entertaind for his journey-men.

Having listned all this while unto what pass'd 'twixt Pluto and his Furies, my guiding spirit did lead me up and down Hell to see the various sorts of tor­ments that are there, which indeed are innumerable both old and new; The first I beheld was Ixion who was tyed with ugly Vipers to a wheel that whirl'd about perpetually, and I might perceive a multitude of lesser wheels newly made therabouts, wherunto great nombers of Gherionians, and divers of my ac­quaintants were bound in like manner; I might dis­cern also hard by a huge company of new Windmills, and bodies tyed with black-spotted Snakes at every wing turning round perpetually; A little further ther were a great many broken by Milstones who were whirl'd with them about incessantly; In another place I might see black Whirlpools full of tormented souls turning still round, I asked what was the reson of so many whirling tortures? My good Spirit answered, All these, except Ixion's wheel, are new torments ap­pointed for Gherionian Sectaries, who had destroyed from top to bottom all Government both of Church and State, And as their brains turn'd round upon earth after every wind of Doctrine, so their souls turn here in perpetuall torments of rotation.

A little further I spied Prometheus removed thi­ther from Caucasus, with a ravenous Vulture tearing and feeding upon his liver, which as one part was eaten, renewed presently after, and abundance of new commers were tormented in the same manner, these [Page 41] I was told they were Gherionians also that were punishd like Prometheus, because as he was tortured so for stea­ling fire from Heven, by which was meant for prying too far into the secrets of the gods, so those fiery Ze­lots of Gheriona were tortured, for offring to dive too far into the high points of Predestination, Election, and Reprobation, being not contented sapere ad sobrietatem, but were gaping ever and anon after new lights, and flashes of illuminations to pry into the Book of Life.

Then I came to the bottomles Tub which Danaus daughters were a filling, a nomberles company of other such tubs were there, and Gherionian women and men were incessantly labouring to fill them up with the stenchy black waters of Acheron; I was told that they were those over-curious peeple in Gheriona which wold be never satisfied with spirituall know­ledg, having no other devotion than to be alwaies learning, and never comming to the truth, as these poor restlesse fillers could never come to any bottom.

Then I beheld the most horrid tortures of those Giants who wold have pulld Iupiter out of his Throne, and a world of Gherionians among them, who partaked of the same tortures, because they had conspir'd on earth to destroy their lawfull King.

Not far further I might spy dazling my eyes fiery glowing tubs made Pulpit-like, and I was told they were prepared for those prophane presumptuous Me­chanicks, and other lay-men who use to preach, and so abuse the sacred Oracles of God; And Uzza was not far off, who lay in torments there for being too bold with the Holy Ark.

Not far distant I saw hoops of iron that were made Garter-like of hot candent steel, I was told that they were design'd for the perjur'd Knights of that Order in Gheriona to wear upon their legs when they com thither, for breaking in the late war the solemn Oath they had taken at their Installment, to defend the Ho­nour and Quarrells, the Rights and Dignities of their So­verain, &c.

Nere unto them I might see brasse hoops glowing [Page 42] with fire, and they were Scarfs-like, I was told they were ordained for those Knights of the Bath to wear for Ribbands next their skins when they came thither, for infringing that sacred Sacramentall Oath they took at their election, which was, To love their Soverain above all earthly creture, and for his Right and Dignity to live and die.

A little beyond I saw a Copper-table with chairs of the same, all candent hot, I was told that those were for perjur'd Privy-Councellors who had broke their Oath to their King, which obliged them to be tru and faithfull servants unto him, and if they knew or understood any manner of thing to be attempted, done, or spoken against his Majestie's Person, Honour, Crown, or Dignity, they swore to lett and withstand the same to the uttermost of their power, and cause it to be revealed either to Himself, or any other of his Privy Councill.

Hard by I saw a little Furnace so glowing hot, that it lookt of the colour of a Ruby or Carbuncle, I was told that it was to clap in the Master of a King's Jewell­house when he comes thither, for being so perfidious and perjurious to his Master.

Not far off I might see a huge brasse Caudron full of molten lead, with som Brewers cruelly torment­ed therein, for setting their own Country on fire.

I was curious to know, whether ther were any other infernall tortures besides those of fire; Yes, I was answered, for to speak of fire to a peeple habitu­ated to a cold Climat were not onely to make them slight Hell, but to have a mind to go thither; So my Spirit brought me a little Northward, and shewed me a huge Lough, where ther were frosted Mountains up and down, and I might discover amongst them a world of Blew-caps lying in beds of yce, with their no­ses and toes nipt, the isicles stuck to their fingers ends like horns, and a bleak hispid wind blew incessantly upon them, they made the most pitteous noise that me-thought I had heard in all Hell, for they wawl'd, screech'd, and howl'd out ever and anon this dismall note, Wea is me, wea is me that ever I betraid my gid King.

[Page 43] Among all those damned souls I desired to see what punishment an Atheist had, my Spirit was ready to an­swer me, that ther were no Atheists in Hell at all; 'tis tru they were so upon Earth before they came hither, but here they sensibly find and acknowledge ther is a God by his justice and judgments, for ther is here poena sensûs and poena damni, ther is inward and out­ward torture, The outward torments you behold are nothing so grievous as the inward regrets and agonies the souls have, to have lost Heven wherof they were once capable, and to be eternally forsaken by their Creator the Lord of Light, their chiefest Good; Add hereunto that they know these torments to be end­lesse, easelesse, and remedilesse; Besides these qualities which are incident to the damned souls, they have neither patience towards themselfs in their own suf­frances, nor any pitty towards others, but their na­tures is so accursed that they wish their neighbours torments were still greter then their own; Moreover their torments never lessen, or have any mitigation by tract of time, or degrees of sense, but they persevere al­waies in the same heighth, they are still fresh, and the soul made stronger to bear them; I saw that everlasting Villain who committed one of the first sacriledges we read of, by burning the Temple of Diana, whose tor­ments were so fresh and cruciatory upon him, as they were the first day he was hurl'd in thither; Iudas was in the same degree and strength of torture as he was the first moment he fell thither; Iack Cade, Wat Tyler, Iack Straw, and Ket the Tanner did fry as fresh as they did that very instant they were tumbled down thi­ther; Amongst whom it made my heart to melt with­in me when I saw som of their new-com'd Country­men amongst them, wherof I knew divers; And though society is wont to be some solace to men in mi­sery, yet they conceived no comfort at all by these fresh companions.

It is high time for us now, said my good guiding Spirit, to be gone to the other world, so we directed our cours towards the Ferry upon Styx; But Lord [Page 44] what a nomber of lurid and ugly squalid countenances did I behold as I pass'd; There was one sort of tor­ment I had not seen before, ther were divers that hung by their toungs upon posts up and down, I asked what they were, answer was made, that they were prick-ear'd Preachmen, Iudges, and Lawyers, who against their knowledg as well as against their consciences, did seduce the ignorant peeple of Gheriona and Car­boncia, and incite them to war; And ther was a new tenter-hook provided for one gran Villain, who pro­nounced Sentence of death against his own Soverain Prince, whose Subject he was, and whom by a sacred Oath of Allegiance he was tyed to obey.

A little further I might see multitudes of Com­mittee-men and others, slopping up drops of molten lead in lieu of French Barly-broth, with a rabble of Ap­prentices sweeping the gutters of Hell, with brooms tufted with ugly Adders and Snakes, because they running into the Wars and leaving their wares, had therby broke their Indentures with their Masters, and their Oaths of Allegiance to their lawfull Prince.

Passing then along towards the Ferry, a world of hideous shapes presented themselfs unto my sight; There I saw corroding cares, pannick fears, pining griefs, ugly rebellion, revengefull malice, snaky dis­cord, oppression, tyranny, disobedience, perjury, sa­criledge, and spirituall pride (the sin that first peepled Hell) put to exquisit torments; Couches of Toads, Scorpions, Asps, and Serpents were in a corner hard by; I asked for whom they were prepared, I was an­swered, for som Evangelizing Gherionian Ladies, which did egg on their husbands to War; So having as I thought by a miraculous providence charm'd three-headed Cerberus, by pointing at him with the signe of the Crosse upon my fingers, we passed quietly by to the Ferry, where being com I found tru what Pluto had said before, that ther were divers Gherionian Tarpalins entertain'd by Charon, but they were in most cruell tortures, for their bodies were covered all over very thick and close with canvases pitch'd and [Page 45] tarr'd, which continually burnt and flam'd round a­bout them.

Herewith I got awake again about the dawning of the day, and it was high time to do so;

For lo, the golden Orientall gate
Of gray-fac'd Heven 'gan to open fair,
And Phoebus like a Bridegroom to his Mate
Came dancing forth, shaking his dewy hair,
And hurls his glittring beams through gloomy air.
So Rest to Motion, Night to Day doth yield,
Silence to Noise, the Starrs do quit the field,
My Cinq-ports all fly ope, the phantasy
Gives way to outward objects, Ear and eye
Resume their office, so doth hand and lip;
I hear the Carrmans wheel, the Coachmans whip,
The prentice (with my sense) his shop unlocks,
The milkmaid seeks her pail, porters their frocks,
All cries and sounds return, except one thing,
I heard no bell for Mattens toll or ring.
Being thus awak'd, and staring on the Light
Which silverd all my face and glaring sight,
I clos'd my eyes again to recollect
What I had dreamt, & make my thoughts reflect
Upon themselfs—

I say, that having after such a long noctivagation, and variety of horrid visions, return'd to my perfect expergefaction, I began by a serious recollection of my self to recall to my thoughts by way of reminis­cence those dismall and dreadfull objects that had ap­peerd unto me, for though I was in Hell, yet I did not taste of Lethe all the while, insomuch that I did not forget any thing which I had seen; All the said ob­jects presented themselfs unto me so reall, that if I had bin transported with that opinion wherof many great Clerks have bin, viz. That Devills are nothing els but the ill affections, the exorbitant passions and [Page 46] perturbances of the minde; I say, if I had bin plac'd in such an opinion, this trance wold have convinc'd me; You may easily imagin what apprehensions of horror these Apparitions left in my brain behind them, just as a River when by an inundation she hath swel'd out of her wonted channell, doth use to leave along the neighbouring medowes seggs and other weeds with much riffraff stuff behind her upon her return to her former bed; so did this Vision after that deluge of objects wherwith my brain was overwhelm'd for the time, leave behind them black sudds, and many a ghastly thought within me, which after some rumi­nations wrought in me a perfect change and detesta­tion of those mimicall giddy opinions wherwith I was carried away before, but while I delayed the time of declaring my self that way, I was suddenly surprized, and justly transmuted to this shape and species.

Pererius.

You may perceive by the effects of this visional Dream the excellency and high prerogatives of the Human Soul, who by the ministry of the Imagination can make such sallies abroad, that leaving the grosse tabernacle of the body she can at plesure climb up to the skies, and make a Scale of the stars to conduct her to the Empyrean Heven; she can also descend in a trice to the great Abysse, and take a survey of the kingdom of darknes, And though it be a common Maxim that, ab Orco nulla redemptio, ther is no re­turning from Hell the passage thence being irreme­able, yet the Rational soul while she informs the body hath this priviledg, that she can make egresses and regresses, she can enter and come off clear from Hell it self, when she list, and all this in an instant; Wher­in she may be said to participat of that admired qua­lity which is inhaerent in that most comfortable of all cretures the Light, which is held the Souverain of all sensible qualities by the Philosophers, and to com neerest to the nature of a Spirit, for Light requires but an instantaneous moment or point of time to per­form [Page 47] its office of illumination, and to dilate it self from one Pole to the other throughout the whole Hemi­sphere, whence some infer that Light is incorporeal, because 'tis an unquestion'd principle among the Na­turalists, that all bodies require a succession of time in their motion, which Light needs not; But ther is this difference 'twixt the Imagination of a human soul and Light, that ther besom places wherinto Light cannot enter, but ther is no part of the Universe so impervious where the Imagination may not make his accesses and recesses at plesure, as appeers by yours while you made that progresse during the time of that extasy; And now me-thinks that these, and other ex­cellencies of the Rational soul should incite you to shake off that brutish nature, which hath no other idaea or object of happines, but what sense exposeth for the present time to corporeall things onely; I say the con­templation of what I said before shold move you to becom Man again.

Ape.

Man! Truly Sir, I am sorry the shape I now bear resembleth Man so much, I could wish it were far more unlike, for the horrid and unheard-of sacrileges and perjuries of my own Nation makes me abhor the very name of Man, much more his nature; For I dare confidently assert, that ther were never since the De­vill had power to possesse poor Mortalls such Hetero­clites in Religion, such a Bedlam of Sectaries, who to exalt the Kingdom of Christ wold heave it up on Beel­zebub's back, for 'tis the Devill's Reformation to turn order to confusion, and certainties to incertitudes as they have done; But these Refiners of Government will prove Quack-salvers at last, for in lieu of raising up a Common-wealth, they have pull'd down the two main Pillars which use to support all States, viz. Religion and Iustice, making both Arbitrary, and tumbling all things into a horrid disorder and hurli­burly, insomuch that it may be truly said, these new sorts of Recusants did more hurt than ever the old could have don, if the subterranean plot of Nitre [Page 48] had taken effect; For that had onely destroyed som few of the Royall Race, of the Prelates and Peers then in being, but these hell-hounds have wholly extin­guished and blown up all the three to perpetuity, and all this onely by the stench of their pestiferous breath; Nor have they offered violence to Religion onely, but they have affronted Reson it self, nay they have baffled Common sense; And for all this we may thank Car­boncia, and Polihaima that rotten-hearted City, who like a fat cheese is so full of Maggots; And indeed what could be expected else from these pseudopoli­tians but disorder, confusion, and ataxy, considering how their first reach of policy was to throw the ball of discord 'twixt the Subject and his Souvrain, whom yet they had vowed to make the best belovedst Prince that ever was; Insomuch that darknesse it self is no more opposit to light, as their actions were diametri­call to their words, oaths, and protestations.

Pererius.

Truly they are stupendous things that you have told me, but touching the difference you speak of that they did put 'twixt Prince and Peeple, it was the most compendious way to bring all things to confusion and ruine, to which purpose I shall relate unto you an Apolog; Ther hapned a shreud commotion and distem­per in the Body Naturall 'twixt the Head and the Mem­bers, not onely the noble parts (many of them) but the common inferiour organs banded against Him in a high way of presumption; The heart which is the source of life with the pericardium about it did swell against him, the splene and gall flowed over, the liver gathered ill blood, all the humors turned to choller against him; the arms lifted up themselfs against him, neither back, hamms, or knees wold bow to him, nay the very feet offered to kick him; The ribbs and reins, the hypocon­drium, the diaphragma, the miseraik and emulgent veins were fill'd with corrupt blood against him, nay the hy­pogastrium and the bowells made an intestine warr a­gainst him; While this feud lasted, it hapned that these tumultuary members fell out among themselfs, [Page 49] the hand wold have all the fingers equall, nay the toes wold be all of an even length, and the rest of the subservient members wold be Independent; They grew so foolish that they wold have the fundament to be where the mouth is, the brest where the back, the belly where the brain, and the yard where the nose is; The sholders shold be said to be no more backwards, nor the leggs downwards; a bloody quarrell fell out 'twixt the heart and the liver which of them received the first formation, and whether of the two be the chiefest shop of languification, which question bred so much gall 'twixt the Aristotelians and the Galenists; While this spleene and strange tympany of pride lasted, it causd such an ebullition and heat in the masse of blood, such a stiffnes in the cartilages and gristles, such a lank­nes in the arteries, that it put the whole compositum in a high burning Feaver or kind of ravening Frenzy, which in time grew Hepticall, and so threatned a dissolution of the whole frame of the body.

'Tis to be feard that the same fate attends the Po­liticall body of your Nation as did the Naturall I spoke of; But matters may mend, and as you began to find a Reformation in your self before you were trans­muted to this shape, so the whole Nation may come to their old temper again; Therfore you shal do well, now that you are invited by so pregnant an opportunity, and so reall a proffer, to shake off that Apish or Mon­ky-fac'd figure you now wear, and resume the noble erect shape of Man, to look towards Heven, and be safely transported to the bosom of your own dear Country, where you may by your advantageous holy profession, do a great deal of good offices to your de­luded Compatriots, by the contribution of your en­deavours and talent, to reduce them to their right wits again, and so to the temper of their famous progenitors.

Ape.

Sir, you may as soon Quadrat a Circle, which the Phi­losopher holds to be impossible, as convert a Roundhead, for I have felt his pulse so well, that when a crochet [Page 50] hath got once into his noddle, 'tis like Quick-silver in a hot loaf, which makes it skip up and down to the astonishment of the ignorant beholder; So when a ca­prichio, or some fanaticall idaea hath once entred into the pericranium of this pack of peeple, it causeth such a Vertigo, that all the Druggs of Egypt cannot cure them: Therfore, noble Prince, you may please to practise your eloquence upon som other, but as for me you spend your breath in vain, and all this while you have said as good as nothing, for I so far detest human kind, that, in the mind I am in, I had rather undergo an Annihilation, or to be reduced to a non-Entity, which is so horrid a thing to all created na­tures, that the very devills themselfs abhorr it, then be as I was: Therfore I am resolved never to turn Man again, much lesse a Cherionian, for, in statu quo nunc, I hold him to be not onely the prophanest sect of Chri­stians, but the worst race of Mankind; The wildest Moor, Arab, or Tartar is a Saint in comparison of him.

But I espy an ill-favoured Snayl creeping hard by, with her house upon her back, and stretching forth her ugly horns, which base creture those of my present species do naturally loath, ther being a perfect antipa­thy betwixt us, as well as with all Shell-fish.

[...]
The Fourth Section.
A Colloquy 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Hinde, who had bin once one of the gretest Bewties in Marcopolis, and for som youthfull levities and wildnes was transmuted to that shape; In this Section ther are various discour­ses of the state and nature of Women pro & con, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Hinde.
Morphandra.

IT seems, most princely Pererius, by that clowd I perceive waving in your countenance, that you can­not prevail with any of those transformed cretures with whom you have hitherto conferrd, to comply with your so laudable desires of wearing again the shapes of Men; Therfore I wold wish you to try a con­clusion upon a Female, which sex useth to be more soft and pliable, and ther is one just before you, That love­ly white Hinde (though she hath som black spots about her shingle) which I see browsing upon that hedge, she was once a Woman, therfore try what you can do upon her.

Pererius.

Madame, By treating with this last Animal, I find the old Adage confirmd, that Simia erit Simia, quamvis induatur veste aurea, An Ape will be an Ape though he be clad with Tissue, he will never shake off his brutish nature; But, most sagacious Queen, though Truth, as the proverb runs, begets hatred oftentimes in the minds of those to whom it is spoken, yet, knowing well that noble spirits do disdain to have one thing in the mouth, and another in the heart, I will take the boldnesse to make [Page 52] a free discovery of my mind, though I fear to incur therby your disfavor.

Morphandra.

Sir, you may frankly speak what you please, for ther is no greter a friend to generous souls than Truth.

Pererius.

I doubt, though you have vouchsafed the gift of Ratiotination to those Animals I have tampered with­all, yet you have not bin pleased to give them the full faculty of Reson, in regard I have found them so a­verse to re-assume their first beeing from that of Beasts, which could not surely be if they had the full power of their former Intellect.

Morphandra.

Truly if I had don so, you might have justly thought your self to have been deluded by me, and that I had don you but half a courtesie or a fained promise; Now touching promises a noble mind shold not make any, that he hath not the wil to do, or the power to perform, for the one proceeds from pure dissimulation, and the o­ther from meer foolishnes: But know, that all that inter­vall of time you have held a parly with those transmu­ted Animals you have tried already, they had the same reach and full light of Reson as they had when they were Men.

Pererius.

Oh, how is it possible then that the eyes of their un­derstanding shold not be opend, to discern their own error?

Morphandra.

It may well be that they find and feel more con­tentment, and sweetnes in that life they now lead, wherof men have no sense or knowledg, therfore 'tis no thing of wonder that they desire to continue so; But go and poursue the point of your enterprise, for it may be you may find som other that will be confor­mable to your counsell herein, and 'tis very probable that Hinde may do it.

Pererius.

'Tis observed by wise men, that they who can pre­scribe [Page 53] a way of themselfs to live contentedly and well, are to be plac'd in the first degree of vertu; And they which cannot do it of themselfs, but are content to be directed by the counsell of wiser men, are to be plac'd in the second degree; But they who are not capable to counsell themselfs, nor receive counsell from others, are not worthy to be rank'd in the nom­ber of Rational cretures; Of this last kind those silly Animals are with whom I have held discours, ther­fore 'tis no marvail that my perswasions could not take place with them; But knowing it to be the grea­test part of humanity for one to commiserat and help another, I will push on my endeavours in this point, and see what I can do with that lovely white Hinde, for that sex whereof she was formerly useth to be more tender, and to take impressions more easily: Gentle creture, I come to be the messenger of good tydings unto you.

Hinde.

O! may Heven be blessed, I understand the accents of Man, and have the strings of my toung loosned to talk again.

Pererius.

I hope now to have met with one fit for my purpose, for I hear her thank Heven that she is come again to the gift of speech: Give me leave to ask you, gentle Hinde, how came you to be thus so strangely trans­figured?

Hinde.

It was the great Queen Morphandra who hath put this shape upon me; But, Sir, give me leave to return you a question, Wherfore are you so desirous to know the cause of my transmutation? for I was ne­ver ask'd the reson ever since by any, nor had I my speech return'd unto me till now, ever since I went upon four leggs.

Pererius.

The reson that I desire to know the cause of your transfiguration is for your infinit advantage, as you shall find, therfore I pray dispence with my curiosity, [Page 54] if I desire to know further what country and conditi­on you were of when you were a Rational creture.

Hinde.

Sir, I was born in Marcopolis that rare Maiden City, so much renowned throughout the world for the strangenes of her scituation, for her policy, riches, and power; But though she continu still a Virgin, yet she is married once every year to Neptune whose minion she is, which makes her accounted so salacious; There I had my first birth, and was accounted one of the Beauties of my time, till for som dissolut courses and wildnes of youth, it pleased Morphandra to give me a second kind of generation, and transmute me to this shape you behold.

Pererius.

You may then thank those Stars that guided me hither, for I have obtained leave of Morphandra to talk with you, nor onely so, but she hath bin pleased to promise me that she will re-invest you in you for­mer fair nature if you desire it, therfore I quickly expect your resolution, for the sudden counsells and answers of women are observ'd to be the best, in re­gard that the more you think on a thing, the more your thoughts use to be intangled; Therfore tell me whether you will be a woman again, I or no?

Hinde.

No; ther's a short and sudden Laconicall answer for you.

Pererius.

'Tis short I confesse, but I conceive it to be as rash and inconsiderat, I hope you will think better on it, for what an infinit advantage it is to be transversed from a beast to be a noble Rational creture.

Hinde.

To be a Rational creture is not the thing that I am so averse unto as much as to be a Woman, which sex is so much undervalued and vilified by you, that som of your Philosophers (or Foolosophers more properly) have had the faces to affirm that we were not of the same species with men, and if we were, [Page 55] yet it was by an inferiour kind of creation, being made only for multiplication and plesure; Others have given out, that in point of generation woman by Natures design is still meant for man, and that a female is a thing brought into the world beyond Nature's intention, either by the imperfection of seed, or some other de­fect; Which absurd opinion how contrary it is to the just order of nature, is manifest to any one that hath but a crum of wit, considering how we also concur to your generation, though som of your old doting Wi­sards have held the contrary, holding us to be meerly passive in that point.

Pererius.

'Tis tru, that Aristotle who was one of the Secreta­ries that attended Nature's Cabinet-councell doth affirm, that in the female ther is no active principle of generation, but that she is meerly passive, affording onely blood and the place of conception, the plastic formative vertu residing in the Male's feed; But this opinion is exploded by our modern Physitians and Naturalists, who assert that in the female also ther is an active and plastic principle of generation, with a procreative faculty, as appeers in the engendring of a Mule which is a mix'd species proceeding from the Horse and the Asse, whose whole form is made up by the concurrence of both parents, so that the Horse alone is not sufficient to produce such a creture, but the Asse must co-operat as the efficient cause.

Hinde.

You may well add hereunto that the child often­times resembleth the mother, therfore she must also be an active principle in the formation; If it be so, what a wrong is it to the justice and rules of nature that Women shold be held but little better than Slaves? how comes it that they shold be so vilipended and re­vil'd? As that foolish Naturalist or Ninny, who wish'd ther were another way to propagat Mankind than by copulation with Women; Another blurted out, that if men could live without the society of women, An­gels wold come down and dwell among them; But [Page 56] that stinking Cynick was the worst of all, who passing by a tree where a woman having been abus'd and beaten by her husband, had done her self violently away, he wished that every tree might bear such blessed fruit.

Pererius.

Such speeches as these proceeded from a kind of raillery or way of jesting, not from the judgment or wishes of the parties that spoke them, and it is com­monly seen that they who play upon them with their wits, have them most in their wishes; For ther is no so­ber-minded man but doth acknowledg them to be born for our comfort and dearest companions, and to be of equall degree with us in point of creation and excellence, as also capable of the same Beatitude.

Hinde.

Ther is good reson to think so, for the Creator took the first woman out of the midst of man therby to be his equall, and without any ostentation be it spoken she was made of a more refined matter, viz. of the Rib, which is a purer substance than the red slimy earth wherof Adam was fram'd; And daily experi­ence tells us, that We are composed of purer plasticall ingredients than You, because that if a man, be he ne­ver of so fine a paste, wash his hands with the clearest water in severall clean basons never so often, yet he will leave som foulnes and faeculence behind; but a Woman can do so and leave the water at last so clear, so fair and limpid, as when it came from the fountain or source it self in few times washing.

Pererius.

'Tis tru, she was made of a Rib, but 'twas a crooked one, which makes many of your sex to be so crosse-graind; This causeth many of them to be kept under a greater servitude than otherwise they wold be.

Hinde.

A servitude indeed, or rather a tyranny, and we must purchase this servitude with the weight of gold, you having made that fine Law, that when any wo­man is to be your companion, she must bring mony [Page 57] with her, which you call Dower or Matrimoniall portion forsooth.

Pererius.

This Law is enacted for your good, for knowing that you, in regard of your in-experience and weak­nes, cannot tell how to conserve your estates, the said Dower is consign'd to your husbands to improve it for your further profit, and to maintain you; Inso­much that your husbands cannot be called Patrons of your goods, but your Procurators in conserving them, and if you chance to survive them they all re­turn to you, and most commonly with som advan­tage; In the interim we trudge and toyl without, and you within doors, onely to conserve it, which is but an easie task.

Hinde.

You say very well in that, for unlesse ther be a good houswife at home to keep, in vain doth the husband labour abroad to gather; But wheras you say that we have not that prudence to manage an estate, and go­vern it, I pray call to mind the Kingdom of the Ama­zons, how long and how wisely was it governed by women? Look upon that of Babylonia which was so much amplified by Semiramis, and that of Scythia by Tomiris, especially upon a late notable Queen in Ghe­riona, who rul'd triumphantly near upon 45 years; And whereas you speak of the want of wisdom that we have, I pray what were the nine Muses the In­ventrices of all Sciences? what were the three Graces? what were the twelve Sybills? what are the three spi­rituall Vertues? nay what was Minerva the goddesse of Wisdom, born out of the brain of Iove himself? were they not all women?

Pererius.

'Tis tru that Minerva issued out of Iupiter's brain, but she had no woman to her mother, for so she had not prov'd so wise; And touching the Muses, Graces, and Sybills you speak of, you know as well that the three fatall Sisters, and Erynnis the mother of Dis­cord, were all women as well, together with the [Page 58] three Furies of Hell; But if you look upon Heven, you are but few there, for among the Planets ther are but two of your sex, (viz. Venus and Cynthia) all the rest are male.

Hinde.

You may as well argue, that because among the twelve Celestiall Signes ther are but three human cre­tures, and seven brute Animals, (with two inanimat) that ther are more brute Animals in Heven than Men; But, Sir, under favour, wheras you alledg that among the Hevenly Planets ther are but two females, the rest males, it shews that men are of a more erratic and wandring humour than women; Now Sir, touching that wisdom you speak of, you have more opportuni­ty to get it by conversing with the world abroad, and so pourchasing Experience which is the mirroir of wisdom; Wheras we are kept within doores, and shut up 'twixt a few walls, whence you have a say­ing, That that woman deserves onely respect and honour, whose actions and praises go not out of the walls of her own house: And hereunto that you put us to all the drudge­ry and servile offices at home, while you are joviall and feast it abroad; nor do you onely coop us up so in a kind of prison, but you clap oftentimes a barba­rous kind of lock upon us, wheras you, though you have Inclosures of your own, yet you may go abroad when you list, and, when your lust drives you, feed upon the Common without controul; And is not this pure slavery in us, and tyranny in you?

Pererius.

Concerning the first, Apelles us'd to paint a good Houswife upon a Snayl, which intimated, that she shold be as slow from gadding abroad, and when she went she shold carry her house upon her back, that is, she shold make all sure at home; Now to a good houswife, her House shold be as the Sphere to a Star, (I do not mean a wandring Starr) wherin she shold twincle with neatnes as a Star in its Orb; And how can you call that a prison wherof you keep the keys, and are commandresses in chief? The Imperium [Page 59] domesticum you rule within doors, whither we bring all that we gain abroad, and it is your office to im­prove and augment it, though many of you are so la­vish that you make the poor husband oftentimes to turn a noble to nine-pence, as is intimated by that famous picture of Polygnottus made of one Ocnus, who being a Cordwayner by his Trade, as he was making new Ropes, there was a Wisell hard by that gnawed off the Cordage, by which was meant his Wife; For it is in the wife to husband what the man gets, according to the Poverb, Ask my wife whether I thrive or no, for if she be prodigall she will bring her poor husband quickly to thwitten a mill-post into a pudding-prick.

Touching the second point, of laying artificiall re­straints upon your bodies, it is because som of you can be no further trusted than you are seen; But this ill-favoured custom I confesse is us'd onely in that Coun­try, where women are more hot and lustfull than un­der other climes, for the Naturalists observe without any partiality, that your sex is more salacious than the Masculine, wherof ther might be produced a clowd of examples, I will instance onely in two, and they of the highest rank, viz. in two Empresses, the one a Roman, the other a German; the first was so cunning in her lust, that she wold take in no passenger into her Barge (for women are leaking vesells) untill the Barge was freighted, for fear the resemblance of the child shold discover the tru father, and then she wold take in all commers; The second having buried a most gallant man she had to her husband, her Con­fessor advised her with ghostly counsell, that for the future she shold live like a Turtle during the remnant of her life, because it was impossible to find such an­other Mate again among the whole masse of Mankind; Wherto she answered, Father, since you will have me to lead the life of a Bird, why not of a Sparrow as well as of an­other Bird?

Hinde.

I shall confront your instances by two other exam­ples, as memorable altogether, the first of Zenebia, [Page 60] who wold have no carnall copulation with her hus­band, after she found her self once quick, but wold continue in an admired course of continence all the time of her pregnancy; Moreover the Saint-like Em­presse Bettrice, who in the verdant spring of her age after Henry her husbands death, lived ever after like a Turtle as you speak of, by immuring her self in a Monastic Cell, and burying her body alive as it were when he was gone; But what an extraordinary rare example was that of Queen Artemisia, who living chast ever after her husband Mausolus his death, got his ashes all put in urnes, wherof she wold take down a dramm every morning fasting, and next her heart, saying, That her body was the fittest place to be a Se­pulcher to her most dear husband, notwithstanding that she had erected another outward Tomb for him, that continues to this day one of the Wonders of the world: Furthermore you know, I believe, better then I, Sir, that at this day in many parts of the Orientall world, such is the rare love of wifes to their dead husbands, that they throw themselfs alive into the Fu­nerall Pile to accompany his body to the other life, though in the flower of their years.

Pererius.

It is confessed that many of you have noble spirits, that marvellous rare affections lodge in you, and so you may be deservedly call'd the second part of Man­kind, in regard you are so necessary for the propagati­on thereof, and to peeple the world.

Hinde.

Yet you call us the weaker vessells, but as weak as we are, we are they in whom the whole masse of both sexes is moulded; neverthelesse some use us as Spice-bags, which when the spices are taken out are thrown away into som mouldy corner; And though we have the mould within us wherin you are all cast, though we co-operat, and contribut our purest blood towards your generation, though we bring you forth into the world with such dolorous pangs and throwes, though you are nourished afterwards and nurs'd [Page 61] with our very bloods, yet our os-spring must bear onely your sirnames, as if we had no share at all in him, his memory living onely in you, though Tumontia in this point be more noble than other Countries, by giving the sirname of the Maternall line oftentimes to som of the male children.

Notwithstanding all these indispensible necessities the world hath of women, yet ther is no other species of cretures wherin the female is held to be so much inferiour to the male as we are amongst you, who use to sleight, misprize, and tyrannize over us so much; For ther is one huge race of men, I mean the Volgani­an, who use to beat their wifes once a week as duly as they go to bed to them.

Pererius.

The reson of this is, because ther are so many of you either shrews, or light and loose in the hilts, and 'tis a sad case when Viri fama jacet inter uxoris fempora; Touching the first, ther's an old proverb, that Every one knowes how to tame a shrew but he who hath her, and though ther might be multitude of examples produ­ced, yet I will instance but in a few, the first two shall be Zappora and Xantippe, the one married to Moyses a holy man, the other to Socrates a great Philosopher, how cross-grain'd the one was, the Sacred Oracles wil tell, and for the other, her husband comming one day in when she was in an ill humour, she scolded him out of doors, and at his going out she whipp'd up into an upper room, and poured down a potfull of piss upon his sconce, which made the poor patient hus­band shake his head, and break forth into this speech, I thought that after so much thunder we should have rain. Another damnable scold having revil'd and curs'd her husband a great while, all which time she had the Devill often in her mouth, to whom she bann'd him, at last he said, Hold thy toung wife, and threaten me no more with the Devil, for I know he will do me no hurt, because I have married his Kinswoman; This made the Epigrammatist to sing prettily,

[Page 62]
Conjugis ingentes animos linguamque domare,
Herculis est decimus-tertius iste labor.

Hence grew that cautious proverb, Honest men do marry, but Wise men not.

Hinde.

I, we use to be the common subject of your drol­leries, and you would want matter for your wits to work upon were it not for us; But, touching those humours you pointed at before which are incident to us somtimes, they proceed from the ill usage, and weaknes of the husbands, who know not how to ma­nage a wife, which is one of the prime points of Mas­culine prudence; We say proverbially, that a good Iack makes a good Gill, a discreet husband makes a good wife, though being the weaker vessell, and having no other weapon than her toung she break out somtimes into humors; What a sad thing is it for a woman to have a thing called a husband weaker than her self? how fullsom wold such a fool be? such silly coxcombs as are jealous upon every sleight occasion, and re­strain them so barbarously as was spoken before, deserve to wear such branch'd horns, such spilters and trochings on their heads, as that goodly Stagg bears which you see browsing among those trees, ac­companied with those pretty Fawns, Prickets, Sorrells, Hemuses, and Girls, wherof som are mine which I brought into the world without any pain or help of Midwife, and quickly lost all care of them afterwards.

Pererius.

Well, let's give over these impertinent altercati­ons pro & con, and go to the main busines; I told you that Queen Morphandra is willing, at my intercession, to restore you unto your former nature, and I have a lusty Galeon in port to convey you to Marcopolis, that renowned and rare City.

Hinde.

'Tis tru Marcopolis is a most famous City, having [Page 63] continued a pure Virgin from her infancy these twelve centuries of years and upwards, and 'tis said she shall continue so still, according to the Prophecy, Untill her husband forsake her, viz. the Sea, with whom her marriage is renewed every year; But 'twas ob­serv'd when I liv'd there, that her Husband began to forsake her, that the Adrian Sea did retire and grow shallower about her, which som interpret to be an ill Omen, and portends the losse of her Maidenhead: But, Sir, touching my former nature, truly I wold desire nothing of it again but the faculty of speech that I might talk somtimes; In all other things I prefer by many degrees this species wherin I am now invested by Queen Morphandra, which is far more chaste and temperat, far more healthfull and longer-liv'd: Touch­ing the first, Ther's no creture whose season of carnall copulation is shorter, for the Rutting-time lasts but from the midst of September to the end of October, nor is there any other creture whose enjoyment of plesure is shorter in the act; moreover when we are full, we never after keep company with the male for eight months; Concerning the second, viz. our temperatnes, we never use to overcharge or cloy nature with ex­cesse, besides our food is simple, those green leafs and grasse you see are our nutriment, which our common mother the Earth affords us so gently, we require no variety of Viands, which makes that our breath is sweeter than the fairest Ladies in Marcopolis, and our fewmishes with what else comes from within us is no­thing so unsavoury; Nor need we that monthly pur­gation which is so improperly called Flowers, it being such rank poyson that it will crack a tru crystall glass; Nay 'tis observed, that if a menstruous woman come near an alveary or hive of Bees, they forsake their food all the while, finding the aire to be infected; Nor have we any gall within us, and herein we are like the Dove among Birds, and the Dolphin among fish; onely there's a kind of acid humor that nature hath put in our Singles, the smell wherof causeth our enemies, viz. the Doggs, to fly from us; Moreover, [Page 64] we are not subject to abortions, and that curse which the Creator inflicted upon Woman-kind, that they shold bring forth their children with sorrow and pain, which we are free from; And such is our love to Mankind, that when we have brought forth our young ones, we trust them rather with them than with other beasts, by putting them near high-waies, or dwelling-houses for protection; Touching the third, which is healthfulnesse, it is far beyond that of women, as appears by our longaevity and extension of life, which is next to that of an Elephant, (whose youth begins not till he be threescore year old) according to the Tumontian Proverb, A Hedg lasteth three years, a Dogg three hedges, a Horse three doggs, a Man three horses, a Hart three men, an Elephant three harts; Histo­ries are full of admirable examples how long som of of us have liv'd, let one serve for all, When Arche­silaus dwelt in Licosura, as the Arcadian Annalls re­late, he took a Hinde who wore a collar, wheron was engraven, I was a Fawn when Agapenor was taken in Troy, which by the computation that then was made, was above three hundred years; Nor had Aesculapius, that Archiatros or god of Physic, arrived to so fair an age, and to such a miraculous perfection in that Art, had he not been nurs'd with Hinde's milk; For length of time brings experience, and wisdom with it along, and somtimes the gift of Prophesie, as was that antient Hinde of that great Captain Sertorius, whom 'twas thought Diana had inspir'd with a fatidicall spirit; Insomuch that Sertorius never gave Battle, or attemp­ted any great designe without advising first with that Hart: Add hereunto, that when after so fair an age we come to die, ther's nothing within and without our dead bodies but is usefull for Mankind, how much are our very skins valued? how medicinall is that kind of bone which is found in the left ventricle of a Hart's heart against the Hemerroids? how excellent is our marrow against the Gowt and Consumptions? how our blood fryed with oyle, and applyed to the inferiour parts, presently ste [...]eth the loosnes of the belly, and [Page 65] being drunk in wine is a rare antidote against poyson? what exquisit vertues hath the Hart's horn, with other parts of the body, as the Naturalists observe? Wheras ther is nothing in the most noisom carcases of Women that's good for any thing, except their hair, which is either but an excrescence, or excrement rather, usefull onely to make fantastic foolish Peri­wigs, and it hath bin found, that this hair being buried in som kind of dung turns to Snakes; Therfore, under favor, ther's none of sane judgment, considering the advantages I have by this present shape, will advise me to change it for that of a frail Woman; If I shold do so, I wold be more foolish then that Stagg in the Fable, who seeing a Horse with rich trappings, and carrying a velvet saddle upon his back, repin'd at his happi­nes, and wish'd he were such a creture; The Forester taking notice of it, put the velvet-saddle upon the Stagg's back the next day, and having mounted him, he rid him divers heats up and down the Launds, till the poor Stagg began to faint, and sink under his bur­then, and then he repented himself of that foolish and inconsiderat wish he had made.

[...].
The Fifth Section.
Discourses 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Mule, who in his Manhood had bin a Doctor of Physic in Tumontia, whom for som Quack­ing tricks he had plaid, and for som other re­sons, Morphandra turn'd to a Mule; In this Section there be discourses of the Art of Physic, of the various complexions of Mankind, and of the nomberlesse diseases that are incident un­to Human Bodies, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Mule.
Morphandra.

I Took notice that you courted and complemented that female creture more then ordinary, but how have you prevail'd? have you made her inclinable to a resumption of her former nature? Is she willing to go back to that Syrenian City, that great Mart of all female plesures, Marcopolis, where she slept in the bo­som of her first causes?

Pererius.

Madame, we have a proverbiall saying among us Soldiers, Que la Femme, & la Forteresse qui commence a parlementer, est demy gaignée, The Female and Fortresse which begins to parly is half-gain'd; But I do not find it so here, for this Female wold have bin content­ed to have parlyed with me everlastingly if I had held her discourse, insomuch that she desires nothing of a Woman again but onely the faculty of talking, onely a woman's Toung, touching other parts, she is utterly alienated in her affection towards the whole Sex, al­ledging the inequall value that useth to be put upon [Page 67] Women in relation to Man, who holds himself to be of a superiour Creation: Then she spoke of the domesti­call kind of captivities and drudgeries that women are put unto, with many such good-morrows; But, Madame, in all humblenes I desire, that you wold vouchsafe to enlarge your Princely favors towards me so far, that I may mingle speech with som more solid creture.

Morphandra.

You shall presently be partaker of your desires, for I spy upon the brow of that hillock a Mule nibling the grasse, He was by nativity a Tumontian, and by his profession a Doctor of Physic, whom I transformed to that shape, not that he wanted understanding (as the Horse and Mule are said to do) for that Nation hath generally a competent proportion of that, but partly because Physitians there use to ride upon Mules to visit their Patients, as also because that Na­tion in generall use to be tax'd for their slow pace and phlegmatic disposition, with their dilatory procee­dings in their designs and counsells.

Pererius.

'Tis tru that the Tumantian is tardy and slow in his counsells when he is moulding of a design, and therin he may be said to have a Saturnian motion, but when his design is ripe, and ready to be put in action, then he is nimble enough and follows the motion of Mercury; Add hereunto, that he is not onely slow, but wonderfull secret in his counsells, insomuch that his designs may be called Mysteries while they are sur le tapis, while they are in the agitation of counsell, which makes them afterwards turn from Mysteries to Exploits.

Morphandra.

But ther was another reson that induced me to transmute that Tumontian Physician to a Mule, which was, that he oftentimes useth to retard the cure and sanation of his Patients for drawing more fees from them, and letting them blood in the purse, as also for other Empyricall and Mountibankish Quacking tricks [Page 68] he plaid, comming hither Physitian to a Carack; Ther­fore you may please to make your approaches to him accordingly.

Pererius.

Poor stupid Animal, how camest thou to be thus so pitifully disguis'd and transform'd from thy first species, and so honourable a profession? for among all other vocations of life, they say the Physitian is to be honoured; Art thou desirous to be re-invested and set­led in thy first Nature and Calling, in case Queen Morphandra condescend therunto? for I have power from her to feel how thy pulse beats that way.

Mule.

Truly no, for I have an utter disaffection both to my first Species, to my Country, and Calling, in regard I find far more contentment in this constitution of bo­dy, and course of life; Touching the first, I am, as I am now, free from those vexations of spirit, and per­turbances of mind wherunto Mankind is so misera­bly obnoxious, or rather inslav'd; I feed here upon pure simples, such as the gentle earth produceth and puts out of her prolificall womb, my stomack is never overcharg'd with surfeits, nor my brain intoxicated with strong drink and the juyce of the grape, in every berry whereof ther lurks a kind of Devill, for accor­ding to the modern proverb,

From the berry of the Grape, and grain of the Barly,
Comes many a sore fray and hurli-burly.

Moreover, when I was a Man, my head was distra­cted ever and anon with strange whimseys, and extra­vagant opinions, which now I am free from.

Pererius.

'Tis tru, that human brain is like a garden, wherin sundry sorts of herbs and flowers do grow, but touch­ing your Country-men, they are least subject of any peeple to such distractions and diversity of opinions, in regard of their exact obedience to their Spirituall and Civill Governours: But what is the cause that you [Page 69] are so out of conceit with your Country, where you received your first essence and existence?

Mule.

First, because of the immoderat heat therof, the Sun being too lavish of his beams, which causeth such a sterility and barrennes, that in som places men live like beasts, feeding most of all upon grasse and sallets, onely they have haply a bottle of Oyl, and another of Vinegar in their houses to pour amongst them, they seldom see a loaf of bread or bit of meat, but when noon or night comes, they go abroad and gather the said grasse for their dinners and suppers, and if they chance to have a few toasted Chesnuts 'tis a great banquet; Which barrennes proceedeth not so much from the heat of the Clime, as from the paucity and lazines of the Inhabitants, who are so naturally given to ease and sloth, from cultivating the earth, and do­ing other parts of industry.

Pererius.

It must be granted that Tumontia, in point of fe­cundity, is inferiour to som Regions, as also for nom­ber of men, for if she had enough of both, she wold make a Hen of the Cock, that is, she wold be too hard for her next neighbour Artonia; But touching the first, it carrieth som convenience with it, for it keeps the peeple more temperat, and able to endure hardship; Then the Country is not so subject to be over-run by forren force, for in point of Invasion, an Army wold be hunger-starv'd there before they could march far: Yet I have observed, that as much as ther is of any commodity in Tumontia, it is better then what grows in other Countries, their Wines, their Flesh, their Fruits, their Horses, their Silks, their Wool, &c. is better there than in other places, and let Artonia her neighbour never vaunt so much of her plenty, yet the Tumontian carrieth a better cloak on his back, he wears better shoos on his feet, he hath a better sword by his side, he drinks better wine, eats better fruit, and hath a better horse under him, &c. than the Ar­tonian; And if Riches consists in Tresures, in plenty [Page 70] of Gold and Silver, Tumontia goes far beyond all other Countries in that particular.

Mule.

'Tis tru, that the Tumontian King is Master of the Mines both of Gold and Silver, yet if you go to the common peeple, one may say, Who goes worse shodd than the Shoo-maker's wife? for by mal administration, ther is little of that gold and silver that's current among the Inhabitants, either among Merchant, Yeoman, or Artist, but all is a base Copper-coin, which the King enhanceth or decries at plesure: That tresure you speak of is sent abroad to feed and foment wars in other countries, from which the Timontian King is never free, his sword being alwaies out of the scabbard to secure or enlarge his Territories, which makes the Artonian say, that the Tumontian Ambition hath no Hor­rizon, it is interminable and boundlesse.

Add hereunto that the Tresure you mention is an exoticall commodity, 'tis had from far, from another part of the world, where the Tumonitan is said to be a Buggerer of his common Mother (the Earth) more than any, for he fetches it out from her bowells som­times 50 fathom deep, where the poor slave that digs it sees neither Sun, Moon, nor Stars once in a twelmonth, being chain'd to a kind of infer­nall darknesse under ground, and is as it were buried alive before Nature hath out-run her due cours in him; And it is a sad story to relate, how many millions of human cretures were made away in the discovery and conquest of that huge Continent, what a world of blood was spilt, and innocent souls swept away; Inso­much that if the Tresure which was got ever since, and the Blood which was shed were put in counter­scales, the latter (as one said) wold outpoise the first.

Pererius.

'Tis tru, that the reduction of that vast piece of Earth was somwhat Tragicall, but it was impossible to perform the work otherwise, and secure the Con­querors, in regard of that huge masse of Peeple and swarms of Men which were found there, who could [Page 71] not by fair means be brought to civility: Now it is a dubious question to determin, whether those Savages gain'd more by the Tumontian, or the Tumontian by them; 'Tis tru, that he got by them Gold, Silver, and Gemms, which 'tis confessed are the most pretious productions of Nature; But what did they receive from the Tumontian by way of exchange? They re­cived Religion and vertu, civility and knowledg, government and policy; Therfore the rest of the known World should vail to the Tumontian for this mighty Exploit, and happy Discovery, which it seems the Great God of Nature had reserved for him as a benediction from the beginning; And certainly a mighty blessing it was, if we enter into a due con­templation of the Thing, and acknowledg it so, for therby ther was as much of the Terrestriall Globe found out, in point of extent and amplitude, as the Geo­metricians give out, that did very near equall all the Old World: But what a world of dangers and diffi­culties did the Tumontian overcome in this achiev­ment? At first the incertitude of the businesse, the huge distance, the perills of the tnmbling Ocean did offer themselfs; On the other side, the Expences of the Expedition, and the despair of more provisions when the old stores were spent, as also being to take footing on a new Earth, the Inhabitants might prove stronger than the Invaders &c. It cannot be denied, but such en­cumbrances as these might have distracted & deterrd the highest human nature from such an incertain at­tempt; But at last the Tumontian courage and magnani­mity was such, that it broke through all these difficul­ties: And as the generous Boar, being entangled in the Toyls, doth try all possible ways, hee turns about and strugles how to get out, at last, when all will not serve the turn, he lies down 'twixt quietnes and despair, putting himself upon the mercy of the Huntsman; So the Fortune of that great Action being tied as it were to those apprehensions of fear and doubt which did possesse it, at last she doth prostrate her self at the feet of the Tumontian valour and vertue, tying her self ther­unto [Page 72] by a perpetuall tribut; She brings him after­wards Mines and Mountains of Gold, yea Rivers run­ning with red Oar, Seas full of Pearl, Soiles full of Aromatical Spices, new Species of useful cretures &c. All this did that new World afford Tumontia as a gratefull return for such indefatigable labours, and constancy in poursuance of that glorious Enterprize.

Mule.

Noble Prince, truly Tumontia is infinitely engaged unto you for these high Elogiums you please to give of her, yet, under favor, ther is a strange fate, I am loath to say a curse, which attends that far fetch'd Tresure you magnifie so much; For observable it is, that not long after the conquest of those harmlesse peeple, whom God and Nature had planted there from the first Creation, the revolt of Hydraulia and the confederat Provinces hapned, which consum'd of that Tresure you speak of above five and twenty hun­dred millions first and last, otherwise the Tumontian Kings might have pav'd their Courts, and til'd their Palaces (as it was said else-where) with Gold and Silver; For as I told you before, the least part of this Tresure remains in Tumontia, and that is onely in Mo­nasteries and other Religious Houses, the common coyne is Brasse and Copper, wherin the Hydraulian 'tis thought hath don more mischief to Tumontia than any other way, for copper and brasse being cheap with her, she is so dextrous in counterfeiting the Tarmontian coyne, that whole Sows of Lead, and Masts hollowed within have been found cramm'd with that coyne among her Cargazons, when she came to the Ports of Tumontia to trade.

Pererius.

Well, let's cut off these circumlocutions, and com again to the main point; Have you a disposition of re­turning to your primitive Nature, to your Country, and so learned a Calling? It is impossible for you to meet with a fairer opportunity, and let me tell you, Opportunity is the best moment in the whole extension of time.

Mule.
[Page 73]

Concerning my former Nature, I gave you som touches formerly why I prefer my present condition before it, I had also som reflexes upon my Country, I could say much more of her, but that I am disswaded by the proverb, that 'tis a sorry bird that beraies his own nest: Now Sir, touching my former profession, which you applaud so much, 'tis tru, ther is a kind of lear­ning and lucre that does attend it, but withall ther is a great deal of sordidnes; I will converse no more with ulcers, cankers, and impostumes; I will pry no more into close-stools and urinalls, or rake gold out of ex­crements, as the Poet tells us,

Aurum Virgilius exstercore colligit Ennî,
Fecit Virgilius quod facit & Medicus.

No are the Fees which belong to that Profession in Tumontia any thing considerable, where Doctors of Physic use to attend a Patient, with their Mules and Foot-cloaths in a kind of state, yet they receive but two shillings for their Fee for all their gravity and pains; Add hereunto, that ther are up and down the world so many poor Empiricks of this Trade, that it is nothing of that esteem as it was; which makes the Brittish Epigrammatist sing wittily,

Qui modò venisti nostram Mendicus in Urbem,
Paulùm mutato nomine fis Medicus;
Pharmaca das Aegroto, aurum tibi porrigit Aeger,
Tu morbum curas Illius, Ille tuum.
Pererius.

Touching the first part of your speech, it shews the exact government of Tumontia, where ther is an exact Tax laid upon the Fees both of Physician & Lawyer, which they dare not surpasse; Touching the other part, they are but clinches and passages of Drollery, nor do Phy­sitians much value such gingling conceits all the while they finger our coyn, for all the world doth grant, [Page 74] that the study of Physic is both learned and necessary, and 'tis the chiefest kind of Learning, for therby a man comes to know himself; For the Physitian can say more truly than any other, Nosco meipsum.

Mule.

Though Physitians know themselfs never so well and the constitution of their bodies, yet when they are sick they commonly take their Receipts by pre­scription of others, being distrustfull of themselfs; And whereas you say, the practise of Physic is necessa­ry, I remember to have read, that the point was de­bated before Pope Alexander the sixth, and canvased to and fro, som alledging that Physitians were su­perfluous and not necessary for a Common-wealth, because Rome stood and flourished many hundred years before the use of Physic was first introduc'd, during which time men never liv'd more healthfull and longer; His Holines opinion being desired at last, he said, he was for the affirmatif, and that he held Physicians to be absolutely necessary for a Common-wealth, in regard that were it not for physicians the world wold be so thick of peeple, that one could not live for another: Intimating therby that the Physitians help to make them away.

Pererius.

Yet your experience tells you, that the Physicall Art is noble, and one of the seven liberall Sciences, con­sisting of undoubted and certain Principles, contain­ing a world of Naturall knowledg.

Mule.

Ther is Therapeutic or contemplative Physic, ther is Diagnostic or knowing, and ther is Prognostic Physic; If we consider Physic as she is a Seience, she hath most tru and certain Aphorisms, for she considers onely Universalls, which are eternall and invariable, and breed certitudes in us, because she arrives to the knowledg of things by their causes, and so she may be called Scientificall, and appertains to contemplation, whose onely scope is to discover Tnuth singly of it self; But if we consider Physic as an Art, which proceeds [Page 75] from experience and action, she is incertain and fal­lacious in her operations, in regard of the various con­stitutions of human bodies, for those Drugs and Re­ceipts which do work kindly with som bodies, find crosse operations in others, and many times the tru symptoms of the disease is not known; Moreover we administer to others what we never take our selfs, which made a great aged Physician, being asked how he came to live so long, to answer, I have liv'd so long because never any Drug entred into my guts; Be­sides, when any Pill or Potion hath a kindly opera­tion in the Patient, it is as much by hap as by any good cunning; What a nomber of remedies are ther for one onely disease? whence may be inferred, that ther is not any one peculiar infallible remedy; Insomuch that when the Physitian applies Universalls to Parti­culars, and administers any Purgation, Vomit, or Electuary, it is requisit that both the Physician and Patient be fortunat, ther is a kind of happines required in the busines; Add hereunto, that the complexion of men and women are so diffring, their appetite so ir­regular and disordinat, that it makes all Physicall operations to be so incertain; Now touching the spe­cies of Us Sensitive cretures, they are of so even & strong complexions, their appetites are so regular, their nu­triments and food, their drinks are so simple, that they need not any physicall Drugs; Wheras among Mankind, they make ever and anon an Apothecary's shop of their bellies, being still in a course of Physic, which makes them so miserable, for it is a tru pro­verb, Qui vivit medicè, vivit miserè; Therefore a kind of Tragicall speech was that of Alexander the Great, when upon expiring his last, he cried out, be­ing but then in the Meridian of his age, Pereo turbâ Medicorum, I perish by too many Physitians.

Pererius.

It begets much wonder in me that you should thus traduce your own Calling, and derogate from so learned and laudable a Profession, a Faculty that hath been always accounted to have a high kind of [Page 76] Divinity in it, being founded by Apollo himself.

Mule.

In the shape I now wear, I cannot lye nor flatter, I can neither cogg, cageòle, nor complement, as I did when I was a man, when I used ever and anon to kiss those hands which I wish'd in my thoughts had been cut off, my heart and my toung lying now more levell and even, ther's nearer relation betwixt them; Ther­fore what I told you before was truth, simple truth, wherin the Brute Animal goes beyond the Rational, who is subject to innumerable errors, dissimulations, and the humor of lying.

But to enlarge my self a little further upon the for­mer subject of Physic, which you call so learned an Art, you know that every one is a Fool or a Physitian to him­self naturally, after he hath passed the Meridian of his years, therfore what great learning can ther be in this?

Pererius.

'Tis much truth; I have heard of divers irrational cretures that are learned this way, who by the meer instinct and conduct of nature, can direct them­selfs to things that can cure them.

Mule.

This cannot be denied, and therin many of them are more sagacious than men; The Serpent goes to Fenell when he would clear his sight, or cast off his old scruffy skin to wear a new one; The Stagg, Buck, or Doe, when they are hurt have recourse to Dittany; The Swallow when she finds her young ones have sore eyes, makes use of Celandine, or Swallow-wort; The Snail heals her self with Hemlock; the Wesill, when she prepares to fight with the Mole, useth to raise her spirits by eating Rue; The Stork heals all his infirmities with Origanum; The wild Boar with Ivy; The Elephant fenceth himself from the poison of the Camelion with Olive leaves; The Bear makes use of Mandragora against Pismires; The Patridge and wild Pidgeon do use to purge their superfluities with Bay-leaves; The Dogg, when he feels himself indis­posed [Page 77] in his stomack, runs to the green grasse a little bedewed, &c. But what need I detain you with more instances? take any sensitive creture you please, and you will find, that Nature hath taught him a remedy against all infirmities that are incident unto him, not onely to the species but to every Individuall, and all this without any expence of time or tresure, with­out any study or labour, without any fee or reward, without any teaching or instructions from others; Whence 'tis apparent, that Nature is more carefull and indulgent of Us than of Ratinall cretures, who though they are subject to a thousand infirmities more, yet not one in a thousand knowes how to cure himself; but he must have recourse to the Physician, and so trusts him with his life, and if he chance to work a cure upon him, he useth to give his purse a purgation also, for Though God heals, yet the Physitian carries away the Fees.

Pererius.

'Tis very fitting the labourer shold have his hite, and that every one shold live by his calling, but how can mony be better employed than for the recovery of Health, which is the most precious of all Jewells, without which we can neither serve God, man, or our selfs?

Mule.

It is very tru that Physitians somtimes restore health, but they misse as often, how can they cure an Ague, which is call'd opporbrium Medicorum, the shame of Physitians? besides, ther's an Artonian pro­verb says, A la Goutte le Medecin ne voit goute, The Gout makes the Physitian blind; Yet they have this privilege, that the earth covers all their faults: Now, what a world of distempers and maladies is mans body subject unto? Ther is a common saying that says, He hath as many diseases as a horse, but 'tis false, for man hath many more; besides, a horse hath few or no diseases at all, but what the cruelty of man, doth cause in him, either when he is over-ridden, and so becoms broken-winded, when gall'd backd, foun­der'd, [Page 78] or splinter'd by the carelesnes or cruelty of the Rider, as I said before, wheras a good man should be mercifull to his beast; But ther's never a part of the human body, but it hath I cannot tell how many pe­culiar deseases belonging unto it; Go to the Head, it hath the Cephalagia, the Hemicrania, or the Mi­grain, it hath the Scotomy or Vertigo, the Palsy, Con­vulsion, Epilepsy or Falling-sicknesse, It hath the Phrenitis, Mania or Phrenzy, Catarrs, Apoplexy, with many other; Go to the Lungs, it hath the Astma, Pluritis, Peripneumonia, Empyema, Ptisis, Haemo­crises, with sundry more; Go to the Heart the foun­tain of life, it hath the Syncope or swooning, Palpi­tation, &c. Go to the Stomack, it hath Inappetentia, Fa­mes Canina or the Wolf, it hath the Pica, Malacia, Singultus or the Hicock, spitting of blood, choler, Abscess [...]s or Impostumes, Ulcers, &c. Go to the Liver, it hath Obstruction, the Jaundies, the Dropsie, Cir­rhus, Inflammation, Ulcer, Impostume, &c. Go to the Bowells, they have the Colique, Iliaca Passio or voiding excrements at the mouth, Astrictio alvi, Li­neteria, or smoothnes of the guts, Caeliaca affectio or pappy stools, Diarrhaea or thin scowring, Dysenteria or the bloody-flix, Tenesmus or sorenes of the fun­dament, Fluxus Hepaticus, Lombrici or the Worms, the Hemerroids, Fistula, &c. Go to the Spleen, ther is Dolor lienis, Obstructio, Hypocondriacall melan­choly or the Mother, &c. Go to the Reins, Bladder, and Genitalls, ther is Calculus or the Stone, Inflammatio, Mictus fanguinis, Diabete, when one voids more urine than he drinks, Incontinentia urinae, Ardor, Iscuria, when the passage is quite stopped, the Strangury, when one pisseth drop by drop, Lues Venerea, St. An­thony's Fire, the Chancre, and Botches, &c. Go to the Ioints, ther is Arthritis, and sundry sorts of Gouts, &c. Go to the Eye, ther is Gutta Serena, Suffusio or a Cataract with a film, Ophthalmia, Epiphola or hot rheum, Aegilops, Fistula Lachrymalis, and above twenty more; Go to the Ear, ther is Surditas, Sonitus, Dolot aurium, &c. Go to the Nose, ther is Ozana, [Page 79] Ulcus, Polypus or lump of flesh, Faetor narium, He­moragia or excesse of bleeding, Coryza or the Pose, Sternutatio, withdiversmore; Go to the Toung, ther is Paralysis, Laesus, Gustus inflammatio, Ranula sub lingua, &c. Go to the Teeth, Throat, and Gums, ther is Angina or the Squinzy, ther is fluxus, Uvulae relaxa­tio, with sundry more; Ther is also abundance of pe­culiar diseases that are incident to Women, ther is Chlorosis or the Green-sicknesse, Cancers in the breasts, Suppressio mensium, Fluor muliebris, Fluor uterinus, Histerica passio, Inflammatio, Ulcus uteri, Cirrhus uteri, Cancer uteri, Gangraena uteri, Hydrops uteri, Clausura uteri, Sterilitas, Obortus, Partus dif­fioilis, Faetus mortuus, Secundina retenta, Prosciden­tia, with many more; Out of these premises the con­clusion follows, that Human bodies both male and female are nought else but frail Vessells, or Bottoms wherin are slowed all manner of perishable Com­modities; But these which I have spoken of are cor­poreall, and most of them outward diseases that at­tend the body of mankind, wherof I have not enume­rated the twentieth part; But if you go to his Ratio­nall Soul, she hath also her distempers, the indispo­sition of the inward man is greater, the anxieries and agonies of the mind, the racking torments of the thoughts are more violent, the enchanting passions of love transports him to frenzies. Incertitudes of holy things, and fits of despair work somtimes so power­fully, that he becomes Felo de se, making him to de­stroy himself, and cut off the threed of his life before Lachesis hath wound it half up; And were ther a Phy­sician that could cure the discomposures and sick­nesses of the human soul, he wold be the rarest among mortalls; And were I sure I could have a faculty to do that, I wold turn Man and Physician again.

Pererius.

Ther are other kind of Physicians for those mala­dies, viz. the Ghostly Fathers of the Church, acts and exercises of piety are the lenitifs for such distem­pers, and preservatifs against them; For he who is in [Page 80] peace with Heven, and useth to convers with his Creator, is free from such discomposures, from all tumultuary confusions and perturbances of thoughts; 'Tis confess'd, ther's no human creture has his hu­mors so evenly pois'd within him, that he is always the same, he is somtimes Ioviall and merry, he is som­times Saturnin and melancholy, and it must be so while the Starrs poure different influxes upon us, but especially while the humors within us have a symbo­lization with the four Elements, who are in restles conflict among themselfs who shall have the mastery, as the humors do in us for predominancy; Insomuch that the humors or passions may be said to be to the soul as strings to a musicall Instrument, which som­times use to jarre, sometimes to go in a tru harmo­ny; and this the Physitian who is Natures Student, hath more advantage to know than others: But let us spin out time no longer, for 'tis a tru as well as a trite pro­verb, that Spinning out of time never made good cloth; At a word, will you embrace this comfortable proffer I make you from the gratious Queen Morphandra, and turn Tumontian again?

Mule.

Truly Sir I have neither mind nor maw to it, for in the state wherin I am setled, I use to exercise the operations of nature with more freedom, and much lesse encumbrance, following onely the dictats of sense, and being solely guided therby.

Pererius.

But what are the dictats of sense, compar'd with the intellectuall powers of the human soul? what is the Sense which trades alone with grosse bodies, and qualities emergent thence, compar'd with Reson, a faculty wherby the soul converseth with blessed An­gels and immateriat Beeings, and by Metaphysicall and sublime notions wings her self up into the arms of Him who breath'd her first into the body of man? In the upper Court of the Soul's residence, we may compare the Soul to an Empresse, wisely restraining or giving freedom to the misguided affections, ac­cording [Page 81] to the exact rules of Reson; Here we have Man ruling in Man, dressing and manuring Man as another Paradise, wherin is all possible variety, yet no confusion, no disorder, no unruly passions tyran­nizing over Reson, no disturbance of mind, no distem­per of body, but a most admirable harmony of all things in the whole Universe of Man; Reson is that Diadem wherby the soul doth rule and regulat the will, and the affections, the Chancellor which doth moderat the motions of both; Reson is that Rod wherwith the Soul is kept in awe to obey, without any servile fear, her Creator and chiefest Good; By Reson the Soul discerns ther is a God, deducing arguments from the Creation of the fair fabric of the world, which had either existence from it self, or was pro­duced by another; but it could not give a first beeing to it self, in regard 'tis repugnant to the principles of Nature, that any thing should be the cause of it self; Therfore the Inference is undeniable, that the world was made by another which was pre-existent, and such another that was the Efficient cause therof, not produced by any other former efficient cause, but was of Himself, and by Himself from eternity, which can be no other than God; Another argument the Soul drawes from the necessary dependance of a finit Bee­ing upon an Infinit, for all created natures are finit, both in respect of their essence, and operations; Now, every thing that is finit must necessarily be limited by another, seeing it is impossible that any thing shold give bounds to it self; And ther being not in things finit a progresse to Infinity, We must at length come to some certain Independent Beeing, which is not circumscrib'd or limited by another, but is of it self essentially and virtually infinit, which can be no other than God Almighty; A third argument is drawn from the necessary dependance of a Secondary cause upon a First, for unlesse we do here also grant a progresse to Infinity, which is absurd in mounting up the scale of subordination of causes, we must at length meet with one primary both Efficient and Fi­nall [Page 82] cause, that hath no other cause superiour or pre­cedent unto it, which is onely God: Another argu­ment the Soul draweth, still by the ministry of Reson, to prove a Deity, is the constant cours of the Starrs, those glorious Luminaries, and the continued order of all things else in their first station, through all the vicissitudes of corruption and generation, which doth forcibly intimat an ubiquitary Providence, a wise Rector, Governor, and Commander, upon whose di­rection all things depend; No sooner doth the Soul by such reaches of Reson throughly satisfie her self that ther is a God, but she mounts yet higher, endea­vouring to know what God is; But such is the tran­scendent refulgence of his Majesty, that she finds it impossible to look God in the face, or to know him à priori; yet though she is not able to behold his face, yet she hath leave granted to know him à posteriori, though she cannot define the incomprehensible Deity, yet she may still, guided by light of Reson, describe him by an aggregation of Attributes? To know God by his Attributes is a near approach to his Deity; Yet the Rationall soul goes still nearer, first prying into his Essence, then returning to her self, and con­triving which way she should know more, at length she says within her self, Operatio sequitur Esse, Action follows its Being; Then she busies her self in the con­templation of Gods Actions, which she finds either immanent and inward, or transient and outward; The immanent actions of God are such as are performed intrinsecally within Himself, without any externall respect to the creture, wherby he is said to contem­plat, to know, and love Himself; Here the Soul takes notice of a reflection of the Deity upon it self, and so is heightned to the supposition of a Trinity, the cardi­nall and abstrusest point, the highest pitch she can soar unto; She proceeds to argue, that wheras God doth conceive and know Himself, he doth beget a perfect Image of Himself, from which issueth a perfect Love of Himself, and a complacency; Now, seeing ther is nothing in God which is not God, both the [Page 83] Image of God, and the Love of God seem to be di­stinct Subsistences of the same Essence with Him from whom they proceed, as when an Eye doth see it self, ther is first the Eye seeing, secondly, the Eye seen, or at least the Image of the eye seen, from which acti­on of seeing her arises a desire of enjoyment; This comparison doth in some sort adumbrat the blessed Trinity; First, ther is the Eye; Secondly, ther is a Re­flection or Image of the Eye; Thirdly, ther is a love or complacency which proceeds from both; The first is God the Father, the Second is God the Son, and the third is God the Holy Ghost; Now, al­though these three Subsistencies be all concentred in the Deity, yet they are distinct each one from the other in their operations ad extra, though in immanent, or in actions ad intra, they are individuall: Thus the Human Soul ascends to the knowledge of her Eternall Good, by the ministry and reaches of Reson, therfore me-thinks you should have an Ambition to be endued with that divine Faculty again, and so return to your native soyl from this society of irrationall brute Animals, and be a subject to so great a Monarch as the Tumontian King is, your naturall liege Lord and Prince, whose Dominions are of such a vast expan­sion that they reach to the very Antipodes, the other Hemisphere of the world, whereby he may say, that the Sun never sets, but shines upon som part or other of his Territories every hour of the naturall day, all the while Apollo fetches a carreer about the world.

Mule.

Touching the first part of this your last discours, wherin you so much magnifie the faculty of Reson, and that therby you arrive to the notion of heavenly things, truly Sir, I am of his opinion who held, that all the knowledg which man hath of his Creator is but one degree above blindnesse; What the eye of a Batt is to the Sun in its Meridian, the same is the most perspicacious eye of man's understanding if he look upon his Maker: In the state that now I live do not puzzle my brain with such presumptuous reserches and incertain spe­culations, [Page 84] but am contented with the doctrin and di­ctamens of Sense onely, which are more infallible.

Concerning the last part of your speech, it cannot be denied but that the Tumontian King is one of the greatest Potentats that ever was upon earth, if his Dominions were contiguous and united, but ther is such an unsociable distance between them, that the Artonian will tell you, His Monarchy is like a great Cloak made up of patches; Moreover, I have no great comfort to be his subject now, because he hath gon down the wind for many years, having bin so shreud­ly shaken in the saddle, most of that Country you spoke of which reacheth to the Antipodes being re­volted from him, and he hath very lately disgorged many a good bit to Artonia: Add hereunto, that his peeple in Tumontia are grown miserably poor of late years by such insupportable Taxes, and drainings of men for the Warrs, insomuch that ther are scarce enough left to cultivat the earth: Yet such is the rare obedience, and the phlegmatic humor of the Tumon­tians, that they are still as awfull, they are as con­formable and quiet, as if ther King were as vertuous, as victorious, and the least exacter the ever Prince was; But this they do for their own advantage, for if there were another Governor set up, it wold in­evitably hurl the whole Country into civill tumults and combustion, & so the remedy wold be worse than the disease.

Pererius.

They shew themselfs a prudent peeple in that, for it is in Governments as it is in choice of wifes, Sel­dom comes a better; But the Tumontian hath other com­mendable qualities, for besides his constant obedience to his Prince, He is also constant to his Religion, he is in perpetuall enmity with the common enemy of the Crosse, Moreover he never serves any Prince in the warrs but his own, nor goes he to trade abroad into and Country but to his own Masters Territories: And are not you desirous to be one of that brave Nation again? Therfore let me advise you now once for all, to shake off that dull despicable shape, which useth, [Page 85] in naturall production to have no better mother then an Asse.

Mule.

Truly Sir, you may please (as the proverb runs) to keep your breath to cool your pattage, and spend it no longer upon me, for I am resolved to live and die in this shape; But wheras you brand it with the term of despicable, I wold have you know, that our bodies have more vertues far in them than Man's, and wherof Man makes common use towards his health: Our very foam drunk in warm wine is good against pursines; Som of our hairs mingled with those of an Asse and dried, and so put to a perfume, are good against the Epilepsie, The milt of one of us is good against the Falling-evill, nay the very dust wherin one of us hath tumbled, is good to mitigate the ardors of Love, being sprinkled upon the body; But take heed how you anger us, for our bitings are poysonous: We have sundry other medicinall vertues, which I will here pretermit; Therefore whereas you call this species of ours despicable, we deserve rather more re­spect considering the said vertues; Insomuch that if I should exchange this shape for man's, I should prove a greater fool than that Mule in the Fable, who seeing a goodly barb'd Horse going to the Warrs, and saying within himself, It may be that gallant Horse and I had the same mother, therfore why shold not I have so much courage and stoutnes in me? I wold I had such a rider, such a great saddle, trappings and arms to try my courage; But seeing the Horse led back in the evening all bloody and wounded, he repented himself of his former foolish wish.

[...].
The Sixth Section.
Consisting of interchangeable Discourses 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Fox, who had been a Saturnian born, whom for his cunning dealings, and Mountebankish wily tricks, she transform'd from a Merchant to that species; This Section treats of divers things, and par­ticularly how the Art of tru Policy is degene­rated, and what poor Sciolists or Smatterers are cried up in that Art of late years, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Fox.
Pererius.

MOst admired Queen, I render you my most humble acknowledgments for the continuance of your great favors towards me, which I am now in half-despair that I shall not be able to make use of for perfecting my designs upon these brute Animals; Touching this last, I find in him also an aversnes both to his first Constitution, to his Country, and to his Cul­ling; Concerning the first, he complains of the nom­berles diseases which are incident to every part of that Microcosm of Man, as also the various and vio­lent distempers of the mind, with the stings of con­science, which brute Animals are not subject unto, &c. Touching the second, viz. his Country, he in­veighs against the craggy swellings of it, the excesse of heat, and consequently the sterilities of it, which is such, that ther is not a competency of bread (which is the staff of life) for the twentieth man that breaths in it, &c. Touching the third, viz. His former Calling, he complains of the incertainties, the sordidnesse, and [Page 87] a kind of Atheism that it is subject unto, for while the Physician tampers so much with second causes, it brings him to a forgetfulness of the first, &c. But, Madame, I desire to try conclusions upon som nimbler and witti­er creture than that lumpish mongrell Mule.

Morphandra.

You shall be partaker of your desires presently, for I espy a Fox near that hedge who was a Saturnian Mer­chant, born in Rugilia, whom for his cunningnes in negotiating, and for som Hocos-pocos and Mounte­bankish tricks I transformed to a Fox, who you know is the most politic, the wittiest and wiliest of all Qua­drupedalls, wherof ther are multitudes of examples; One time he cosen'd the Crow, who having got a mor­sell of green cheese, and being perch'd upon the bough of an Oak to eat it, a Fox perceiving it went under the tree, and stood gazing upon the Crow, saying, What a base lying thing is common fame, who saies that thou art a black ill-favour'd Bird? truly me­thinks thou art the fairest that ever I saw, and couldst thou but sing as others do, thou deserv'st to be Queen of Birds; The Crow being tickled with these praises fell a opening her beak, so down fell the cheese, and the Fox made merry with it; But he was more wily with the Wolf, for a Fox having got into a Farmers yard, and skulking up and down in a Moon-shine night, ther being a well in the yard he peep'd into it, and the reflex of the Moon being in the water, he thought it was a new cheese, therupon he whip'd into one of the buckets, and down he went to feed upon it; Being in that plunge, it chanc'd that a Wolf came also skulking therabouts for his prey, and loo­king into the well, the Fox cries out, O brother Wolf, her's most dainty cheer, and ther's enough for us both; so the Wolf leaping into the other bucket drew up the Fox, who being got on the top, and he in the bottom of the well said, Farewell brother wolf, and much good may the new cheese do unto you, so he got free, leaving another in his room; He was also too hard for the Lion, who as he is King of Quadru­pedalls, [Page 88] having put forth a Proclamation, that all horned beasts shold give attendance at Court on such a day to a great Feast, (though his plot was to prey on them) the Ass meeting with a Fox said, Come let's go to Court to see the great shew, for if ther shold be any danger we are free from it, in regard we have no horns, though sufficient ears; I, quoth the Fox, but if the Lion saies that our ears be horns, they must be horns; Moreover I have observ'd the tracks of many beasts going into the Lion's Cave but none comming back: This was onely caution, but it was a trick of wit that the Fox plaid with the Eagle, who having got one of his young Cubbs, and carried it to the top of a high tree where his nest was, to prey upon it, the Fox got a brand or two of fire and put it to the trunck of the tree, which so scar'd the Eagle, that he brought down the young Cubb and laid it in the place he found it; How commonly doth the Fox cosen both Huntsman and Dogg, when being poursued he useth to get into a plowed field, and stretching himself all along in a furrow he often scapes, his skin and the earth being of a colour; Therfore you may make triall now upon a brute Animal that hath some sagacity and wit, as well as activity.

Pererius.

I will towards him; Signor Fox, you need not stare so much nor startle, for I am com neither to hunt you, nor hurt you any way, rather I am com upon a busi­nes that will tend hugely to your advantage; But I desire first to be informd how you came to be trans­form'd or deform'd rather, from the noble shape of Man to this grovling brutish figure.

Fox.

I was once a Rugilian Merchant, and born in that proud City, (for that's her Epithet above all other Ci­ties) where, according to the proverb, ther are Moun­tains without Wood, Seas without Fish, Men without Faith, and Women without Shame; where also the horned hus­bands are said to get their wifes with child a hundred miles off; And being com hither upon a gallant ship, with [Page 89] a Cargazon of divers Commodities, I was transmu­ted to this shape you behold, for my over-cunning and cautelous dealings.

Pererius.

Well, have you a disposition to be redintegrated into your first Beeing, for Queen Morphandra hath bin pleased to promise me you shold be, if your will con­cur with my desire; Therfore tell me freely if you have a mind to see Saturnia again, your native soyle, the Mistresse of the world, the Source of all civility, the Nourse of tru noblenesse and vertu, the prime Propagatresse of Religion and Learning; Where Na­ture hath her chiefest Magazins of Silk, Bacchus his Inner-cellars of sweet Wines, Flora her prime Gar­den of Flowers, and Pomona her principall Orchard of Fruits; where Pandora hath her choisest Residence, Po­licy hath her chiefest School, where Arms and Arts have their chiefest Academy; Have you a desire to be tran­sported to this your dainty and dear Country, and put on the habit and habitudes of Man again?

Fox.

Truly no, for here I live in a better Country, in a better Condition, and in better Company, then I did in Saturnia.

Pererius.

Do not deceive your self, for you will never be able to prove that, though you had all the Logic that ever Athens taught.

Fox.

Touching the first, wheras you magnifie Saturnia so much for her fertility, let me tell you, that to my knowledg ther be divers parts of her so barren and desolat, that you shall not meet with a house in twen­ty miles riding; Rugilia, that part wherin I came first into the world, may be call'd nothing else but a Con­venticle of Rocks and Craggs; In som places you may see three Marquisses on one tree gathering Figgs to keep them from starving: They bragg of a River that hath Junkets in her, som Comfits, some Plumms, som Cinnamon, but these Junkets are but white stones [Page 90] bearing the shape of all these; Ther's no Country hath more Tempests, more Tremblings and Earthquakes, wherof ther have been very lately such formidable examples of utter desolation and subversion of twenty Towns; There is part of the Country which is under a perpetual shadowy darknesse or adumbration, whence the whole Province takes its denomination; Ther's no Clime under the convex of Heven where Meteors and fulgurations are more impetuous and violent.

Touching the second, which was my former Condi­tion, ther's a thing called Conscience which us'd to ty­rannize and torture me when I was a Man, I often found within me a gnawing worm, I often felt sore stings, sore pricks, and remorses of the said Consci­ence, which the Theologues call Synteresis, that ever and anon did discompose the quietude of my thoughts, and disturb me in my gaining profession; But in this state I am free from such perplexities, for now, though I suck the blood of twenty Geese a day, and destroy whole roosts of Hens, the thing call'd Con­science never troubles me. Moreover, besides this rack of Conscience, ther is a vice call'd Covetousnes that Man is subject unto, and when all other vices grow old in him, this vice growes younger and younger. I remember I was slavishly addicted hereunto, I would have flayed a louse could I have made benefit of her skin, but now I am free from that fordid vice, from that kind of idolatry, for according to the saying, he is the worse Idolater who adores Gold, for he may be said therby to worship the Devil, for Pluto is the god of Riches; In the shape I bear, I covet no more but what wil satisfie nature only: Ther is another cursed and cruciatory humor call'd Iealou­sie which much afflicts Mankind, and it reigns more amongst that Nation I was once of than among any other; Jealousie among the thoughts is like Batts among birds, it doth mightily discompose the whole inward man, and disturb the tranquillity of his mind, nay it hurls him often upon desperat and bloody at­tempts.

[Page 91] Touching the third, which is Company, I have now far better, conversing with these innocuous and simple Animals. The society of men is much more dangerous, specially of my quondam Country-men, for upon any occasion of distast one is in danger of a Saturnian Figg, or to be poyson'd by the smoak of a candle, by the suavity of a flower, or by a glove or handkerchief; For four or five Duckets reward, one may be master of any man's life in som places of Saturnia, for he will find a mercenary instrument to murther any body; Add hereunto, that my Country-men are full of re­venge, and vindicatif in the highest degree, they will seldom suffer one to do them a second wrong, but dispatch him away to the other world, which is the occasion of a saying, Take heed of a slow Foe in Saturnia, and of a sudden Friend in Artonia; I could give you ma­ny examples hereof, but I will produce onely two; In Marcopolis, the greatest Mart of the Western world, (though two of her chiefest be but brittle Commodi­ties, viz. Lasses and Glasses) ther were two rich Merchants who had been partners a long time, it chanced that one of them knowing the other to be over familiar with his wife, he dissembled his passion a great while, till his thoughts had contriv'd and concluded a revenge upon him, so he solemnly invi­ted his partner to a Feast, and after dinner he led him to a Garden that he had by the Sea-side, being there alone together he brought him to an Arbor, where among divers other rarities ther was a curious new large Chari made with such artifice, that when one had put himself to sit in it, ther were certain gins and vices wold suddenly rise up and clasp in his body both arms and thighs; His Partner being thus lockt fast in the Chair, he presently gaggs him, and having lockt the Garden dore, he drew a great double-edg'd knife, and being upon the point of stabbing him, the Partner said, Oh be not so inhuman and barbarously cruell as to kill me before confession, therfore have som com­miseration on my soul; Well, replied the murtherer, if thou wilt do one thing, I may spare thee thy life, [Page 92] which is, If thou wilt defie the holy Trinity, and re­nounce all hopes of salvation in it, &c. The Partner (in hopes of future repentance to expiat his offence) repeated those words three times, and the third time as soon as he had done repeating them, he stabb'd him in the breast, and cleft his heart in two, and so threw his body into the Sea to make food for Hadocks; But a while after his body being retreev'd and taken up in a fisher-net just under that wall, the murther was discover'd, and the murtherer being put upon the Strapado he confessed all, and going up the Gibbe to be executed, he broke out into a great fit of laugh­ter; His ghostly Father and Confessor telling him, that he was now going to give account of that horrid mur­ther he had committed before the great Judge of the world, therfore that passion of laughter did not be­com him; Oh, said he, whensoever I think upon that full revenge I had of that villain, my heart danceth within me for joy, for I was not onely reveng'd upon his body but also upon his soul, in which humor he breath'd his last.

Another was as bloody, if not more; In the antient City of Cerano, ther was a Prince who left three sons behind him, Conradus, Caesar, and Alexander; Conradus was us'd to come from his palace in the Country to his Castle in Cerano, where he had appointed a Go­vernour, and a Garrison of souldiers; The Governor having a comly Lady to his wife, the young Prince was struck in love with her, and at last enjoyed her; The Governour having knowledge therof did me­ditat upon a revenge, therupon he sent to Conradus (his Lord and Master) that he had lately discover'd two or three wild Boars in the Forest of Cerano, ther­fore if his Highnesse would please to com thither to­gether with his two brothers, ther wold be very Princely sport for them, and he wold prepare all things ready for the Game; Hereupon the young Prince and his second Brother comming thither ex­presly for that sport, it chanced that Alexander the youngest brother was then out of the way; So the Go­vernor [Page 93] of the Castle having provided a plentifull sup­per for the two Princes and their Retinue, being both gone to bed, he calls his Officers together, and told them, Gentlemen, what does he deserve, who for many good services and hospitalities done unto him, doth in lieu of thanks abuse ones wife, and defiles his bed? They all cried out, He deserves death; Truly Gentlemen, thus hath Prince Conradus us'd me; They cried out again, Let him die, and we will stick un­to you, and be faithfull; So the Governor taking som of those Officers with him in the dead of night, they broke suddenly into the chamber where Conradus was asleep, and heaving up the bed-cloaths, they first cut off his privy-members, then they chop'd off his head, then they quarter'd his body, and strewed them up and down the chamber; So all was hush'd that night; Prince Caesar comming to wait on his Bro­ther the next morning, the Governor usher'd him in, and seeing his Brother's head bleeding on the window, and his limbs scatter'd up and down the room, he said, Oh! is this the wild Boar you writ to him of? Yes, said the Governour, and I remember I writ of two or three; Hereupon he was also knock'd down, and us'd in the same manner? The Tragedy being acted thus far, he takes his Officers, and going upon the Castle walls, he sent to speak with the Syndic and Burgesses of the Town, unto whom he made a Speech, that they had been a long time in servitude or a kind of slavery to Conradus and that Family, and now ther was a fair opportunity offered for them to redeem their liberties, for he had Conradus and his Brother in his custody, and the Officers with the rest of the Garrison were inclin'd to do them away, if the Town wold joyn with them; But the Town shewing an aversnes, or rather a detestation of such disloyalty and treason, sent to Prince Alexander the youngest Brother, and the Citizens of Cerano joyning with the forces he brought with him to expiat his Brother's bloods, they beleaguer the Castle round; Therupon the Governor taking his wife and children with him [Page 94] to the top of the highest Turret, he first threw down headlong his wife, then his three children, and last of all he precipitates himself, and so the Tragedy ended.

Pererius.

A Tragedy indeed, and one of the direfullest that ever I heard of; It must be granted, that the Saturnian spirit is much bent upon revenges, he is in the ex­treams commonly, Quod vult valde vult, quod odit val­de odit; vertues and vices are there in the Superlative degree: But truly if the vertues and vices of that no­ble Nation were weighed in a ballance, I am confi­dent the first wold out-poise the second, for ther might be more instances of actions of high vertu pro­duced, than of vice; I will make mention of one, and that a very modern one, and no Romance; Ther was in the antient Amphitheatricall City of Rovena a young Marquis, who fell desperatly in love with a Merchant's wife, he courted her a long time but could not prevail, at last, the Merchant having a Villa or Country-house, whither he was gone a while for divertisment, the Marquis went a Hawking ther­abouts one day, and letting his Hawk fly of purpose into the Merchant's Orchard, he and his men rid lu­ring after her, and retreeved her in the Orchard where the Marquis himself was entred, having obtain'd leave before; The Hawk being found, the Merchant invites the Marquis to a Treatment, where his wife was present, and very officious to please; Being de­parted, she asks her husband who he was? He an­swer'd, 'Tis the Marquis of such a place, one of the gallantest and most hopefull young Noblemen in all Saturnia, a person full of transcendent parts and high perfections, &c. These praises making deep impres­sions in his wife, and the Marquis poursuing still his design, he at last prevailed, and being admitted to her chamber by a back Garden-dore, he found her a bed, and in a fit posture to receive him; so unbracing him­self to go to her, and having put off his doublet, she told him smilingly, Do you know whom you may [Page 95] thank most for this courtesie? It is my husband, who▪ after the late Treatment you had, fell a long time into such high commendations of you, that I never heard him speak so nobly of any: The Marquis being put to a sudden stand hereby, and struck with a kind of asto­nishment, put on his doublet again and his cloak, saying, Shall I abuse so worthy a friend, and such noble affections? No, I will die first; So taking his leave of the Lady in civill and thankfull posture, he departed the same way he was let in, and never at­tempted her again.

Fox.

Truly it cannot be denied, but this was a most sig­nall example of continence, and no lesse of gratitude, to restrain himself so in the height of such a lust.

Pererius.

Well, will you conform your self to my advice, and turn Man, and Merchant, to converse again with such a noble Nation, a Nation that may prescribe rules of prudence and policy to all Mankind?

Fox.

Sir, you speak of Policy, ther is no tru policy pra­ctised now adaies in the world, it is degenerated to­gether with the nature of man into subtlety and craft; If ther be any left 'tis in Marcopolis, where ther are the truest Patriots and most public Souls that I have known remaining amongst men, otherwise she had never been able to tugg so long with the huge To­manto Empire, and other the greatest Potentats, upon earth; Yet somtimes she hath us'd to sow such ano­ther Tail as mine to her Lions skin, and proceed by craft as well as by strength; Now, though Policy and Craft agree in their Ends, yet they differ in the Means conducing to their Ends; The one proceeds by ho­nourable and gallant manly waies to attain her ends, the other by dishonourable and base subdolous ways, she cares not what Oaths she swallows and breaks af­terwards, she cares not what lies, fears, and jealousies she creates to amuse the silly vulgar, and therby to incite them to Arms and Rebellion, for tearing the [Page 96] bowells of their own Country, and to loose all alle­giance to their natural Prince; She makes no scruple or conscience to make Religion her Mantle to palliat all her designs, and by a horrid kind of prophanenes and blasphemy to make God Almighty the Author of all Rebellions and Sedition: As was lately practised in Gheriona more then in any other Country that ever was under the cope of Heven; And now ther's a com­pany of poor Sir politic Woodbies or Wise-akers, that wold put a Cats head upon a Lions neck, they wold make a petty Common-wealth such as that of Hydraulia, of that antient spacious Monarchy with the Crowns thereunto annexed, Kingdoms which have lasted thou­sands of years without any Interregnums at all till now; And observable it is, that among other benefits (or plagues rather) which Gheriona hath received from Hydraulia for raising her first to a Common-wealth from obedience to her hereditary Prince, one is, that she hath poysoned Gheriona in her Policy as well as in her Religion; For now she hath the fate to have such Wise-askers in Government that can see afar off no far­ther than to the tips of their noses; They wold take down the Royal Saddle, and clap a pair of Panniers on Ghe­riona's back, never looking forward what will follow, viz. an everlasting Warr; Nor do they fall to any ac­count what a disparagement it will be, that so large and noble a Kingdom shold be cast into so petty a mould as that of Hydraulia, who is above thirty times inferiour to Gheriona in extent of Territory, and more then forty times in point of Plenty.

Pererius.

It is a clear truth what you affirm, that tru Policy is much sophisticated in this latter age, and touching the hints you give of Gheriona in point of Government, and the present designes that are afoot to transverse it, I know to Country full well; It may be a feasable thing to turn the great City Polihaima to a kind of Common-wealth, for she hath smelt a great while of a Hans in regard of her many Corporations, which may be said to be petty Republiques of themselfs; [Page 97] but for Gheriona her self, it will be a hard confused task to reduce her to such a Government, it being in­compatible both with the Genius of the Peeple, the Posture of the Country, and Politicall Constitutions established there for so many Ages; They who make inspections into the influxes and vertu of Heavenly Bodies, find, that Mars is the Planet predominant over Gheriona, and 'tis observed, that where he pre­dominats, that Clime and Country is fit for no other Government than Monarchall; Whereas those Coun­tries where the Moon is predominant, as Marcopolis and others, are naturally fittest to be made Republiques; Therefore let those men, who have now the vogue of Power and Counsell in Gheriona, beat their brains never so much, let them scrue up their wits, and stretch all the policy they have as far as possibly they can, yet they will never be able to constitute a lasting durable Government, or settle a firm and generall Peace without a King, that kind of Supream Offi­cer is congeniall with the Nation it self, which will never be fixed till then; Therfore, as I said before, let those men who are now upon the Stage of Power, winde up their wits as high as they can, without this they will be still at a losse, their consultations will be like a skein of ravell'd silk, they will be in a labyrinth of confusions, and the end of one will be still the be­ginning of another.

Now, ther is no Art so incertain, so subject to dif­ficulties, as the Art for Man to rule Man; Ther be many poor Sciolists in Gheriona, who of late years have shot at rovers in prescribing Rules of Government, they take the ashes of the Iudaicall, the Greek, and Roman Com­mon-wealths to apply them to the present times, wheras those Nations were of another temper, of other Religions, and consequently of other kind of In­tellectualls, and diffring Idaeas to the present Age; They shold rather produce examples from Gheriona's own Historians, which wold be far more suitable; But go to the chiefest Politians, Antient or Modern, that ever writ of Governments, you will find all their opinions [Page 98] concenter in this point, That ther is no Government which hath a nearer analogy with that of Heven, that is more lasting upon earth, that is more regular, or that hath any certain principles, but Monarchy; That great Chair-man or Grandee among Philosophers, Aristotle, in his Politiques, upon which ther is such a world of Comments, speaks of sundry species of Governments, as Aristocracy, Democracy, Oligarchy, and Stratocracy, but he puts no Rules for any, onely he hath this as­sertion, that Aristocracy or Optimacy allows no Arti­ficer or Mechanick to be a Cittizen or Counsellor; Much of his discourse is of the first Founders of Common-wealths, then he proceeds to correct the errors of Common-wealths, before he tells us what a Com­mon-wealth is; Moreover, in handling the kinds of Government in generall, he flies forward and back­ward in a disorderly way, but when he descends to particular forms, he is full, not onely of confusion, but contradictions and inconstancies to himself; In som places he seems to deny any naturall Right, much more any Majesty to be in the People, whom he holds to be little inferiour to Beasts; Wheras else-where he af­fordeth a liberty to every City to set up what Go­vernment they please, either by Force or Craft, which in effect is to allow the Peeple to do what they list, if they be able. Now this high-reaching Philosopher cannot much be censured for roving up and down in so incertain a subject, it being impossible for any hu­man brain to prescribe any infallible universall Rules for Government, that may quadrat with the nature of all Climes and Seasons, and be appliable to the humors of all Peeple; Other Sciences have Demon­strations, and undeniable Principles, but the Art of Government hath no such Maxims, in regard of a thousand sort of contingencies that attend human ne­gotiations, as also for the various dispositions of pee­ple, som Nations are so fiery mouth'd, that they must be ridd with a Bitt, if not with a Curb and Martin­gale, but a small Bridle will serve others, nor are the same Constitutions fit for a Continent that are proper [Page 99] for an Iland, nor those of a Maritim Continent fit for a Mediterranean Country, who know not what salt­water is.

Fox.

Touching those modern Smatterers in Policy you speak of, the times abound with such, such that while they take upon them to give Precepts for Go­vernment, they amuse the Reader with Universalls, (and commonly ther is deceit in Universalls) or ra­ther they lead him to a labyrinth of distinctions, wherby they render the Art of mastring Man to be more difficult and distracted, then it is in its own na­ture; But, under favour, the main cause that ther are such difficulties and incertitudes in prescribing gene­rall Rules to govern the Human Creture, is the per­turbances of his mind, his variety of humors, his se­ditious disposition, his inconstancies, and an itching still after innovations; And herein we Irrationall Ani­mals are more obedient, more gentle and docile; But touching the policy you mention, ther be som certain Maxims that may extend to the whole masse of Mankind in point of Government; One is, That the common peeple be kept still in such an awe, that they may not have any power to rise up in Arms, or be sharers in the Government, and so be their own Ca­terers to chuse what Laws they please; Secondly, That ther be a visible standing effectif military strength still in being, to keep them in such an awe, as well to curb them as to conserve them; It being the greatest Soloecism that can be in Government to rely meerly upon the affections of the Peeple, in regard there is not such a wavering windy thing, not such an humorsom crosse-grain'd Animal as the common Pee­ple, ther is not such a Tyrant in the world if once he get on Horse-back; And all Authors that have pre­tended any thing to policy, either old or new, affirm so much in their Writings; If the Governour in chief hath not such a constant visible Power, and movea­ble upon all occasions, the common Peeple will use him as the Froggs in the Fable us'd the Logg of wood [Page 100] whom Iupiter, at their importunity, had dropt down among them for their King, to whom they stood a while in som awe and dread, but afterwards finding no motion in him, they leapt and skipt upon him in contempt and derision; There is another certain prin­ciple of policy, That public Traitors and Rebells to their Prince and Country shold be dispatched to the other world without mercy, for if they be but half punished, they will like Snakes get and cling together again, therfore 'tis a good rule, and that may be a proverb hereafter,

A Rebell and mad Dogg knock in the head,
They will not bite when they are dead.
Pererius.

Had you not told me before, yet I shold have judg'd you a Saturnian by the wisdom of your Discours, your Compatriots being accounted the prudentest men upon earth, for whereas others are said to be wise after the Act, others in the Act, you are said to be wise before, in, and after the Act; Moreover, whereas the Artonian is said to be wiser than he seems to be, the Tumontian not to be so wise as he seems, the Saturnian is wise, and seems to be so; Therfore will you return to that noble Country, and becom Man and Merchant again? of which profession ther are Princes in your Country, you well know.

Fox.

Ther are so, yet I enjoy my self more contentedly in this shape and species, I have now a more constant health, and if I find my self illish at any time, which is seldom, I eat a little of the gumm of that Pine­tree and it cures me; But I am nothing so subject to distempers of body or mind in this condition. Touching the first, when Nature hath finished her course in me, I will leave it for a Legacy to my friends, for 'tis good and medicinall for many uses, my Brain is good against the Falling-sicknesse; my Blood against the Stone, and the Cramp; my Gall instill'd with Oyle takes away [Page 101] the pain in the ears; my Toung worn in a chain is good for all diseases in the Eyes; my Fatt healeth the Alope­cia, or falling off of the hair; my Lights, Liver, and Genitalls are good against the Spleen; my very Dung pounded with Vinegar is a certain cure against the Leprosie; my Milt is good against Tumors; and touch­ing my Skin, which is so much valued by the fairest Beauties, I will bequeath it to the admired Queen Morphandra to make her a Muff, as a small Heriot for her protection of me under her Dominion.

[...].
The Seventh Section.
A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Boar, wherin ther are various Discourses, and particularly of the rare Sympatheticall Powder that is lately found out, which works sudden and certain Cures without any topicall application of Medicines to the part affected, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Boar.
Morphandra.

HOw came you off from that cunning Merchant you dealt withall last? hath he accepted of the Bill of Exchange you presented unto him?

Pererius.

Truly, Madame, I may say, according to the home­ly proverb, that I have received a flapp with a Fox tail, he hath plaid the cunning Sophister with me, he hath protested against that Bill of Exchange, nor will he up­on any tearms resume his former shape, but retain that which he hath, alledging that he is now free from those stings of conscience, from those corroding [Page 102] black jealousies, from that vindicatif humor wherunto Mankind is subject, specially those of his Nation, with other molestations of mind; He saith, that in this feature he is also more healthfull; He braggs likewise how many medicinall vertues are in his bo­dy after its dissolution from the sensitive soul, and how much his skin is valued amongst the fairest La­dies, which he intends to bequeath as a Legacy to your Majesty to make you Muffs of when he hath payed Nature the last debt; And truly, Madame, by his acute answers and replies, I found that he had the full use of the faculty of human Reson, though appeer­ing in that brutish shape, which makes me more and more admire your power.

Morphandra.

This power the great Architect of the world hath given me, I derive this prerogative meerly from Him, not, as I intimated to you before, from any compact or consultation with ill Spirits, although the flat and shallow-braind vulgar think I do it so, by Magicall and Negromantic means.

Pererius.

I know full well, Madame, the ignorance, or ra­ther insulsity of the common peeple to be such, that when they find any extraordinary effects produc'd, transcending the ordinary course of nature, they are presently struck with such an admiration, that they think those effects to be done by the work of the De­vill, though they are operated by strength of Art, and by connexion of naturall Agents and Patients proper­ly apply'd, as of late years ther is found out a Sym­patheticall cure of wounds at a distance, without any reall application of medicines to the part affected, which kind of sanation they hold to be made by some diabolicall compact, though reverà 'tis performed by such ways that do truly agree with the due course of nature, by which she constantly works.

Morphandra.

I pray be pleas'd to impart unto me the mode and manner of that kind of cure, for though it be not [Page 103] Magicall, it must needs be a great mysterious thing.

Pererius.

Madame, I shall most willingly comply with your commands herein; Touching the Sympatheticall Pow­der or Medicine it self, It is made of a Zaphyrian azurd salt, calcind by Solar fire into a Lunar com­plexion, operating principally when the Sun is in the two celestiall Signes of Leo and Cancer; But, Madame, before I can make the thing truly understood, I must lay down som universall Laws or Maxims of nature; First, it is tru without controul, that all actions and motions are performed by Atoms or small invisible bodies, moving to and fro after a different manner proportionable to their severall figures, all naturall things operat thus, and not by I know not what Qualities or Accidents, which have onely a notio­nall subsistence, and no reall being but as they inhaere in the substance; Secondly, ther is a perpetuall con­stant expiration of such Atoms from all naturall bo­dies, caus'd by a compression of other circumambient and neighbouring bodies, driving the parts closer to­gether, or else by the motion of other Atoms crowding into the foraminous parts of that body, interrupting as it were the quietude of the former inmates, and thrusting them out to wander in the air till they meet with som other body where they may get rest; This effluvium or emanation of Atoms by help of autopti­call Glasses, have bin sensibly discerned to flow from the Load-stone and other bodies, whose pores are more plentifull, in form of a kind of mist; In bodies that are actually hot this atomicall expiration is sen­sibly perceptible by the smell, specially to cretures of an acuter sense, for the Atoms hovering in the cir­cumambient air, or upon the ground, are sure guides to the Grey-hound while he poursues the Chace, as if the hunted creture were continually in his sight; These expiring Atoms are also as sensibly discover'd by weight, it being experimentally found, that those Iockies who use to run Horse-races can make them­selfs lighter by many pounds weight in a day or two, [Page 104] which proceeds by this insensible emission of Atoms; Secondly, it is to be observ'd, that these atomicall bo­dies are not of one figure, nor of one grossnesse or magnitude, som being so slender and subtle that they admit of no opposition, but continu their course through all Mediums, and whatever may be seen to stop them in their journey cannot be discerned but by their effects, such are the contagious Atoms of bo­dies infected with the Pest, or other taking-diseases, which are not onely imparted to others by lurking in the Visitant's cloths, but being scattered in the air are transported to remote places and persons, on whom they exercise their tyranny, not discover'd till they break out into open violence; Other Atoms are grosser, and cannot so easily passe by, but are driven back, and forced from their intended voyage, and somtimes driven into the pory parts of other bodies against their wills; Such Atoms are apprehended by our senses, as heat, cold, color, smells, putrefactions, &c. which use to move more slowly than others; Som are so corpulent and strong that they remove fix'd and solid bodies out of their stations, as the Wind, and many others, that are driven to and fro by the impetuosity therof, and forced therby to change their places; These Atoms are in a manner so palpable, that we must needs confesse their reall Beeing and activity; Thirdly, it is another undeniable truth, that all bodies desire rest, and wold still dwell in their own proper stations if they were not ejected by an intru­der, for Rest is the appetite of all naturall bodies, be­cause 'tis the mother of union; Now, ther are som places more fit than others for the receiving and re­taining of the said Atoms, wherin they may lodg more conveniently, and acquiesce a longer time, this proceeds from the fashion and form of the pores wherin they are intromitted, which are proportio­nable and more agreeing with the figures of the A­toms which are of divers shapes, for som are angular, som cylindricall, som are branch'd, som smooth, others are sharp and rough; Ther are in most bodies [Page 105] pores agreeable to these various figures, insomuch that every naturall body is apt and ready to admit such Atoms that are cognate and proportionable to their pores, and to exclude others; Now no Atoms acquiesce any where but in such proportionat pores, they may be driven into other bodies, or they may ac­company other Atoms into pores that do not exactly quadrat with their figures, but cannot take any long repose there, being still extruded by those that do bet­ter fill the place, and correspond with the capacity and proportion of those pores, whence ariseth a na­turall propension and tendency towards those bodies where such pores are found; Nor can those Atoms which are not sutable to the pores wherein they are, stay there quietly, but they are still dislodg'd and shol­der'd out, or pressed to give room to those Atoms whose figures challenge a right to those pores; Inso­much that it may be said, ther is a kind of perpetuall warr 'twixt those Atoms that are proportionat and proper to the pores they are lodg'd in, and those which usurp them; For to have perfect rest in a place, and to claim a naturall right unto it, ther must be a cog­nation 'twixt the atom and the pore which may be call'd Sympathy, such as are all magneticall and at­tractive motions; Fourthly, no distance hinders the motion of these Atoms towards their naturall cognate places, towards which they are perpetually travel­ling, and the nearer they approach to their desired home, the swifter their motion is, and the lesse re­sistance they find in their journey.

These prolegomena or generall notions being pre­mis'd, I com now to the operative vertue of the Sym­patheticall Powder, which, as I describ'd it before, is made of a Zaphyrian salt, calcind by a celestiall fire, operating in Leo and Cancer into a Lunar complexion (as the learned Doctor H. hath it, who discourseth like a tru Phoilosopher of these notions) The heat here of must be such, that it may draw out all adventitious moystur, leaving it intensly dry, and in this condition it must be kept, for if it chance to meet with any humidity it [Page 106] loseth its energy, and must to the aetnereall furnace again; It must be also but a competent heat, for by ex­cesse of heat all the volatile parts and finest atoms which onely work the cure, will be evaporated, and onely the grosser saline parts remain, which neither can be rays'd to accompany the atoms of the extrave­nated blood, nor if they could wold they cure, but by their sharper angles grate the orifices of the capilla­ry veins, and so procure an efflux of blood, and not a consolidation of the wound.

Morphandra.

Noble Prince, these are high Philosophicall Noti­ons that you discourse of, but now that you have spo­ken of the substance of this rare Medicament, how must it be apply'd?

Pererius.

The manner of applying it is in this manner, The blood or bloody matter being taken from the wound on a cloth, or remaining still on the wounding instru­ment, must be lightly covered over with this powder, kept very dry, and afterwards wrapp'd up close from the air, and so preserved in a temperat heat, it must also be kept clean, and clos'd up with neat linnen to fence it from cold, for cold hinders the expiration and breathing forth of the balsamicall Atoms, which shold drain forth the superfluous humidity, and re­strain the efflux of blood; Now, the greatest rarenes of this Sympatheticall Powder is, that by a virtuall con­tact it heals at a distance by the intercourse of the Atoms proceeding from the extravenated blood of the Patient, which Atoms like so many little spirits glide through the aire, and never rest till they come to their desired home, where being gladly entertained, they find an easie entrance at the cognate parts, and pro­portionat pores of the wound; Being admitted there they fall to work, and first, they dilate the superflu­ous humid parts, and make them fit to be expell'd, then by their more then ordinary restrictive power they shrinck together the pores, and squeezing out that noxious corrupt humidity, glew together the dis­united [Page 107] parts, and so cicatrize and cure: And truly, Madame, I could produce diverse pregnant examples of those that were healed by the atomicall energy of this Sympatheticall powder, but I desire one may serve for all; Ther was a knowing Captain who made often use of it, and two of his Officers having drawn blood one of another in a Duell, he got their bloodied Swords and applied his balsamicall Powder, so in lesse then 24 hours they were almost cur'd; But the Cap­tain understanding that their animosities were such, that they were resolved to fight again, he hung the balsam'd bloodied Swords out at his window all night, so comming the next morning to visit his Pa­tients, they told him that they were in cruell pain all night long; And so you shall be still, quoth the Cap­tain, untill you be perfect friends, for I hear that you will fight again; So having made them shake hands, and perfectly reconcil'd them, he cur'd both in a very short time.

Morphandra.

I acknowledge it a singular favour, most gallant Prince, that you have made me understand this great Secret, and the naturall causes thereof, though the common peeple, who use to condemn all they under­stand not, and whereunto their short capacities can­not reach, for Magicall. But, if you persist in your de­sires to convert any of these metamorphos'd Animals, and proceed further in your attempts, I spy amongst those Trees a Boar who was once an Aetonian Count, whom for his deboshments and intemperancies I transmuted to that shape; you may try what you can do upon him.

Pererius.

I will, by the continuance of your noble favor, make towards him; Miserable metamorphos'd Cre­ture! how much do I resent the condition you are now in in comparison of the former! for I understand by Queen Morphandra that you were before not onely a Man, but a personage of high account in Aetonia, that masculine and generous brave Country, which [Page 108] is so full of large flourishing Provinces, of opulent fair Cities and famous Marts, so full of magnificent Palaces, of Mines of Tresure, of fruitfull Orchards, of fragrant Gardens and fat Fields, of navigable Ri­vers; so full of illustrious Families that can extract their pedigrees thousands of years past; so ful of great Princes, wherwith Aetonia may be said to shine as the Firmament with coruscant Starrs, and the Septemvi­rat of Caesarean Electors are as the seven Planets; Are you contented to return to so gallant a Country, to resume the figure of that noble personage you re­presented when you were Man, and live again under Caesar the Prince paramount of all others? If you have a disposition to it, Queen Morphandra hath promised me to transmute you, and I have an accommodation for your transport; Therfore will you shake off that wild savage shape, and becom Man again?

Boar.

Savage! Truly, Sir, I think Man is far more savage and cruell, for the wildest of our Species will not strike at Man till Man hath begun first with him, and wounded him, and all Huntsmen will tell you so; But I could produce many horrid examples of the cruelty and tru culency of Man, and of my quondam Conter­raneans in particular, but let this serve for all; It chanced ther was one that bore malice to a woman great with child, he watching his opportunity found her alone spinning in her house, he first cuts her throat, then ripps up her womb, takes out the Em­bryo and carries it to the back-side where ther was a Sow ready to Farrow, he kills also the Sow, rips up her belly, and taking out the pigs, puts the child of the murther'd woman in their room, then he took the piggs and puts them in the womans belly, and so sow'd it up, proh scelus.

Touching the high Encomiums you give of Aeto­nia, 'tis tru, that she was in former times a gallant piece of the Continent, but now she is pittifully im­pair'd and degenerated from what she was; Ther was a Count there who prov'd most unfortunat, both to his [Page 109] own Country and to himself, who aiming at a Crown made warr against Caesar, to whom he ow'd allegiance; And to abett his cause he brought in for­rein Princes for his Confederats, and so kindled a de­structive lingring Warr in the bowells of his own Country, which for thirty years together did so ha­rasse her, that to this day she is scarce come to her self; Among others, he introduc'd a hungry Northern King who did her a world of mischief, whose Suc­cessor keeps firm footing there still, and whiles the Cu­prinian hath an acre of land in Aetonia, she will never be in a durable secure peace; Touching the multitude of illustrious Families that are in Aetonia, most of them may be said to be but mongrell Princes, for in the forenoon they are Ecclesiasticks, (having rais'd them­selfs out of the ruines of the Church) and in the af­ternoon they are Laicks and Seculars; Now, those va­riety of Princes are rather a weaknesse then a strength to Aetonia, as may be inferred out of that witty Em­blem which the Tomanto Emperor's Embassadors made, being present at the election of one of the Ae­tonian Caesars, who observing what great Princes at­tended him that day, wherof he was told that som of them could raise an Army of themselfs if need re­quir'd; The Ambassadour smilingly said, That he doubted not of the puissance of Aetonia, but it might be said, that the Minds, Counsells, and Actions of the Aetonians were like a great Beast with many Heads and Tails, who being in case of necessity to passe through a hedge, and every Head seeking to find a severall hole to get thorough, they were a hinderance one to the other, every Head drawing after his own fancy, and so hazarded the destruction of all the Heads and Tails; But the Tomanto Empire was like a Beast that had multitude of Tails, but one Head that go­vern'd all the Body, which Head being to get through any passage, all the Tayls follow him in an exact obe­dience without any confusion of diffring fancies or clashing of opinions.

Touching that Caesar you speak of, whom you wold [Page 110] make Prince Paramount of all others in point of Ma­jesty and Might, it cannot be denied but that the Im­periall Eagle, when he was at the highest pitch of power, might be said to have spread his Wings overall the then habitable Earth, he fixed his Talons upon the banks of Euphrates Eastward, upon the Nile South­ward, and he had all the known Western world with­in his pounces; His annuall Revenues were then com­puted at a hundred and fifty Millions, wherof the Sa­lary of the Legionary Soldiers amounted to twenty Millions; But that glorious Empire, that mighty Giantesse, is now shrunck up and shrivell'd into a Pigmey's skin, insomuch that the present Caesar may be said to have onely one of the old Eagle's feathers in his cap: He who was us'd to make the greatest Po­tentats pay homage unto him, is now us'd to be baf­fled by every petty Companion.

Pererius.

Such is the plesure of the All-ruling Providence, with whom the greatest Kingdoms upon Earth are but as so many kettle-pins, which he tips down when he pleases, 'tis He who transvolves Empires, tumbles down Monarchies, and cantonizeth them into petty Common-wealths, whereunto the Philosopher seem'd to allude, when being ask'd what Iupiter did in He­ven, he answer'd, Magnas Ollas frangit, & ex frustis earum parvulas componit, He breaks great Pots, and of their fragments makes little pitchers; This shews the brit­tlenes, the lubricity, and unfixednes of all sublunary things, as well Politicall as Naturall, so that to find out a tru stability and permanence, we must travell beyond Trismegistus's Circle, and seek it in the other world: But let not this alienat your affections to visit again your own Country in human shape, and return to your Religion, wherby when this mortall life is ended you may gain Eternity.

Boar.

Religion I truly ther's scarce any left in Aetonia, for since the time of Therlu, who being fallen into a lust­full love with an Abadesse, unfrock'd himself, and [Page 111] made Religion his Macarell to enjoy her; I say, since that time, the Artonian fancy was never so greedy after new fashions in Apparell, as the Aetonians high and low do daily thirst after new-fangled opinions in matters of Religion, both in point of Doctrine and Discipline.

Add hereunto, that ther is a bosom peculiar vice Aetonia is addicted unto, which is Intemperance, wherwith she hath infected most of her neigh­bours; The Hydraulian can tell you, that the immo­derat use of drink came tumbling down upon her from Aetonia like a huge, and a furious rapid Torrent, whence it found passage over with wind in poop to Gheriona (and her subordinat Kingdoms) which is as good at it being of an Aetonian race originally, and therfore apt to imitat; Nay, as they say, as the Ghe­rionian is good Inventis addere, to improve any new thing, so they go beyond the Aetonians herein, for whereas they use to pelt the brain with small shot, the Gherionian doth storm it with great Cannons, and huge carowses, for he, when he is at it, doth not sip and drink by halfs, or demur upon it by pauses, as the Aetonian doth, or by eating som salt quelque chose be­tween, but he deals in sheer liquor, and is quickly at the bottom of his cup without any intervening talk; Yet the Aetonian carrieth still the report to a Proverb: Hereupon they use to characterise the Aetonian to be an Animal that can drink more then he can carry, and who useth to barrell up more than he can broach in point of knowledg, because commonly he useth to have in him more than he can utter.

Pererius.

It seems very strange to me that you shold thus vi­lifie your own Country, and traduce so goodly and high-built a Nation as the Aetonian is.

Boar.

'Tis tru, they are bulky & built high enough, but it is observ'd, that tall men are like fabriques four or five stories high, where the garret or upper room is worst furnished, you may guesse at my meaning; Moreover, [Page 112] magnitude is not the measure of worth, If the Aetoni­ans wit and valour had been sutable to their outward bulks, the Tomanto Emperor had not carried away so many Territories from them, which mighty Empe­rour hath grown so powerfull by the Divisions, and so fortunat by the Vices of Aetonia.

Pererius.

Come, come, shake off those hispid staring bristles, and fordid skin, that useth to tumble in sloughs and mire, and return to your own noble Country, your Kindred, and that high Quality you were of former­ly, for in the condition you now stand, you are, like our base Misers, good for nothing till you are dead.

Boar.

It is a great truth, and when we are dead ther's no­thing that's bad in us but our Excrements, which also though, in regard of the sharpnes therof, they be not good for compost to fertilize the Earth, yet they are found good for divers sorts of Trees, as the Pomgranat and the Almond Trees, as also for divers sorts of Ap­ple Trees to free them from worms: Our blood being so full of fibres is excellent good against Carbuncles, our brains are good against the biting of Serpents; our lard with wonderfull celerity makes firm broken bones; the ashes of our cheek-bone are good against Ulcers; the liver of a Boar is good against the biting of a mad Dogg, and drowsines of spirit; the gall of a Boar mingled with rosin and hony, is passing good against Ulcers, the Testicles good against the Falling­sicknes; the hoofs of a boar made powder is good against the stopping of the urine; a plaister made of Boar's dung is good against all venomous bitings, as also against the pain in the spleen, or the Sciatica; the ankle of a boar worn about the neck is good against quartan Agues: Moreover 'tis found tru by frequent experiments, that the milk of a Sow in sweet wine is good to help women in travell, and restores milk in their paps, 'tis good also against the bloody flix, and the tissick; Amber sodd in Boar's grease receives nitor, and bewty: Now, all these vertues proceed from our [Page 113] Bodies, because we have not so much corruption within us as Man; Our food also being more simple and fresh, and our appetites more regular; So, Sir, I bid you farewell, for I am going to herb it among that tuft of Trees.

[...]
The Eighth Section.
A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Wolf, who had bin a Cuprinian Soldier, whom for his Plunderings, Rapines, and Spoyles, she transfigur'd to that shape.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Wolf.
Morphandra.

HOw did you bear up with that Boar? could you not get him into the toyl, and make him turn Man again?

Pererius.

Truly no, he did in a manner grind his razers and tusks, and extreamly froam at his own Country-men, taxing them of divers vices; He prickt up his bristles like a Porcupine, as if he would have darted them; So I left him at a Bay.

Morphandra.

I spy another transmuted Animal in that Thicket, it is a Wolf, who was once a Soldier of Fortune, and a Cuprinian Free-booter, you may try whether you can take him by the ears, for you will find him tame enough.

Pererius.

I have leave from gracious Queen Morphandra to conferr with you, and know whether you have an in­clination to return to your Country and Calling again; [Page 114] If you have, she is ready to unlycanthropize you from this Wolfish shape to your former condition.

Wolf.

Touching my Country and Calling they are both alike, they are both naught, therefore I have no affe­ction to either; For the first, 'tis a pittifull cold and coorse Country, being so remote from the Sun, which made a generous Queen lately to leave both Crown and Country; Touching the second, 'tis a profession for the devill, to be hir'd for about three shillings a week to kill men; I was once of that Calling, and I with my Camerades did a world of mischief to the poor Boors up and down the Country, therefore it was ve­ry just that Queen Morphandra should transform me to this shape.

Pererius.

Yet you know, that the profession of Arms is noble, for every Soldier is a Gentleman by his profession; And touching the coldness of your Clime, it puts mettle and the more vigor in the Combatant, for they say that a Cuprinian fights best when he sees his own breath, which is in frosty weather; You know also what great atchievments and exploits your two last Kings have done, to their eternall glory, and the re­nown of your Country.

Wolf.

'Tis tru, the last two Kings have done some feats of Chivalry, yet the world took them to be but Usur­pers; Touching the first, he was killd in the midst of his manhood, wherby Caesar against whom he warr'd got a full revenge of him; And for the present King, the world wonders that it was not sufficient for him to enjoy quietly the Kingdom of Cuprinia, which be­longs by right to Nopolia, but he must make warr against that King, to whom he shold de jure owe al­legiance; And had he conquer'd Nopolia, his ambition had not terminated there, but he haply had visited Saturnia, and so, as the Goths and Vandalls of old, he had troubled the repose of all the Western world; But as far as he hath gone, what miserable devasta­tions [Page 115] hath he made? how hath he ruined the flourish­ing Trade of those Countrys, which are so full of great Mercantile Towns both upon fresh and salt waters, so full of usefull and necessary commodities? And had he compleated his Zundanian designe, he had given Law to all the Occidentall Princes, which Hy­draulia sagaciously smelt out, and so timely prevented him.

Pererius.

And have not you a naturall desire rather to be again one of that warlick and adventurous Nation, than to continu in this hatefull and rapacious nature?

Wolf.

Truly I may be said to be of as rapacious a nature when I was a Cuprinian, for he is us'd to pick any quarrell with those that are weaker than himself, of purpose to devour them; As I remember to have read of the Wolf in the Fable, who finding a young Lamb, and intending to devour him, fell a coining of reasons why he would do it, and so told him, that he and his generation had don him wrong from time to time: Helas, said the Lamb, how could that be? for I am but newly com into the world; I but, quoth the Wolf, you eat up my grasse; The Lamb replyed, How can that be, Sir? for I have yet no teeth in my head; I but you drink up my water, quoth the Wolf again; That can­not be neither, Sir, said the Lamb, for I never knew what water is hitherto, in regard I feed altogether up­on my mothers milk; 'Tis not your reasons, replied the Wolf again, can confute my appetit, for I mean to sup plentifully this night, and so devour'd him. But the same fate may attend the Cuprinian King as befell the Wolf-fish, who living in a River where all the fish were lesser then himself, they all admir'd, honor'd, and fear'd him, as if he had bin their King; He thinking to enlarge his Dominions, thought to go to the Sea to be King there, but meeting with the Dolphin in his way he was presently devour'd; Or as Aesop's Dogg, pas­sing by a River with a good piece of flesh in his mouth, and the shadow of the flesh appeering in the water, [Page 116] he snapt at it thinking it had been real flesh, and so lost that which he had in his mouth; So the Cuprinian King may hap to lose his own Territories, while he thinks to devour others.

Pererius.

Well, well, will you shake off that ugly shape, and put on Man again, and go along with me towards your own Country?

Wolf.

Truly no, for I have tryed both natures, and find this to be far better, for I have now no airy aspiring desires in me, no ambitious thoughts, or other per­turbances and inquietudes of mind; Moreover, I find this shape of body to be far more healthfull, nor is this species lesse honourable; A Wolf was the Crest of the first Arms of Rome, in regard the King who trac'd the foundation of that glorious City, and denominated her after his own name, was nurs'd up miraculously by a Wolf; Ther have bin many famous men of that name, as Lupus Fulvius a Roman Poet, Lupus Servatus a memorable Priest, and Lupus de Oliveto a Saint-like Monk; Ther is a kind of Holines also in this species, for they never engender but in the twelve days of Christ­mas; Ther is likewise a mysterious quality in this spe­cies; for if a Wolf sees a man first, the man grows hoarse; If the tail of a Wolf be hung in the Cratch of Oxen, they cannot eat; If a Horse treads in the foot-steps of a Wolf, he cleaves fast as if he were frozen; Nay, if a Mare big with Foal tread in the place where a Wolf had trodden, it causeth abortion, and will make her pre­sently to cast her Foal; Lastly, strings made of VVolfs guts have that predominance in Music, that if they be put among other strings, ther wil never be any Consort.

[...]
The Ninth Section.
A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Goat, consisting of many quaint Discourses both Naturall and Metaphysicall, with other Criticisms, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, and a Goat.
Pererius.

MAdame, I could not take that VVolf by the ears to lead him home to his own Country, which he bitterly inveighs against; and against the humor of the peeple, as also against his former profession of a Souldier, tacitly intimating, that War is the chief­est seminary of Theeves, according to the proverb, La guerre fait les larrons, & la paix les ameine au gibet, War makes the Thief, and peace brings him to the gallows; Therfore he prefers rather to passe his life peaceably under your Government, than to be in Cu­prinia, where of late years men are so press'd for the Warrs to serve the ambition of their Kings, that the whole Country is so drain'd, that ther's scarce any left but women, old men, and children; Therfore he is very well pleas'd with this lycanthropy.

But, Madame, I spy a bearded Animal nibling upon the brow of that crag, I desire by your favour to have som discours with him, for by his long beard he shold have bin som Philosopher, and so have more wit in him than other animals.

Morphandra.

You shall very willingly, but I will tell you what he was before; He was an Orosian born, and I trans­form'd him to that shape for being a Mountaineer, and for having aspiring thoughts, with other resons.

Pererius.
[Page 118]

I'le go and accost him; Sir, will you please to come down hither into the plain, for I have very good news to impart unto you that will make you skip for joy.

Goat.

I pray excuse me, it is against my nature to de­scend, if I did, I should haply prove more foolish than the Goat in the Fable, who being invited and per­swaded by the fair speeches of the Lion to come down and feed in the medow where he was, being come down the hungry Lion devoured him presently.

Pererius.

You need not apprehend any such fears here, but I will come to you; Queen Morphandra tells me, that you were an Orosian born, a very antient and noble Nation; Have you a disposition to return thither, to resume the shape of Man, and to be again the child of Reson?

Goat.

What do you mean by Reson? I think the shape and species I now am in are capable of Reson, for we can distinguish 'twixt good and bad, 'twixt what is noxious or profitable for us, we have also the same organs, the same cells and receptacles in the brain as man hath for to lodg Reson, and the celestiall bodies pour the same influences upon us as they use to do up­on the human Creture.

Pererius.

It cannot be denied but you have an Instinct that acts according to Reson, and it may be call'd In­stinctive Reson; But the Reson that Beasts have is li­mited to corporeall objects, to the necessities onely of life, to find out food and shelter, and bring up their young ones, its onely direct Reson that's capable of Singulars, its restrain'd to an opinionative faculty, its a meer shadow of ours, much like the objects that our fancy represents to us in sleep; And this Instinct in Beasts is as much inferiour to Reson in Man, as Re­son in man is inferiour to Intelligence and Intuitions in the blessed Angells.

Goat.
[Page 119]

Yet, Sir, it must be granted, that actions whose suc­cesses are so well ordered, actions which have so well regulated a progresse, and concatenation so exactly tying the Mediums to the End, must needs be per­formed by the guidance and light of tru Reson, and such actions you know sensitive cretures daily per­form; With what art do Birds build their nests, the Fox his hole, the Badger his chamber, with what cau­tion do they preserve their young ones, and fence them from the injury of the Hevens? how punctually do they keep their haunts? But what do you think of Pliny's Elephant repeating his Lesson at Moon-shine, or of Ptolomey's Stagg that understood Greek, of Plu­tarch's Dogg who could counterfeit the very convul­sions of death, of the Ape that could play at Chesse, and another that had learnt som touches on the Guit­tern? What think you of Caligula's Horse who was made Consul? had not he Reson in him? What think you of the Asse, who being us'd to carry burdens of Salt over a Foord was us'd to stumble and fall con­stantly in such a place, that therby the salt melting away into water his burden might be the lighter, but his Master lading him with a tadd of Wool, he fell at his usuall place, but being helped up again, and he feeling the pack of wool heavier in regard of the water that got in, he never stumbled any more in the Foord after that time; What think you of the Crow, that in the time of a great drowth finding wa­ter in the bottom of a barrell, and being fearfull to go down, carried so many stones in her beak, that letting them fall down, they forc'd the water to rise upwards towards the top, and so she dranck safely and at ease? I pray were not all these not onely Instin­ctive but Discoursive Resons?

Pererius.

I confesse that he who denies a kind of Reson and Resoning also to brute Animals, may be questiond whether he be master of Reson himself, yet this Reson and Resoning looks upon present and particular no­tions [Page 120] onely; But human Reson extendeth to universall notions out of the reach of sense, which cannot be without abstractions, and som reflections it hath on it self, which Beasts cannot attain; This Reson that is conversant with Universalls is the tru specificall dif­ference 'twixt Man and Beasts; It is the portion and property of Man alone, whereby he hath the Sove­rainty over all over his fellow-cretures throughout all the Elementary World; Ther is Intuitive, ther is Discoursive, and ther is Instinctive Reson, the first is proper to Angels, the last to Brute Animals, and the second to Man, who can contemplat and discourse of generalls and things absent; And these three differ in excellency as the three degrees of Comparison.

Goat.

Yet though you excell us as you say in this kind of Reson, thers many of us that surpasse you in strength and quicknesse of sense, as the Eagle in seeing, for he can look upon the Sun in the Meridian with full open eyes, and not be dazzled; the Hare can hear better, and the Dogg goes far beyond you in smelling, as also the Stagg, therefore when he is removed from one Park to another, you use to muzzle him, and carry him in close Carts that he may not smell the way back again; And there be examples to admiration of this kind.

Pererius.

Though som Beasts smelling be beyond ours in re­spect of celerity, and way of reception, yet in point of dijudication, & differencing the variety of smels which proceeds from the Rationall Soul, we surpasse them; Therfore though we cannot see as Eagles, nor hear as Hares, nor smel as well as Doggs, yet Hands, Speech, and Reson makes amends for all; The composition also of the body being Erect is advantagious, the caus of which Erection (after the beholding of Heven) is the exercise Arts, which cannot be done in another figure; Mans body is likewise the most copious of organs, and though born naked, yet this nakednesse cuts out work for Reson; It abounds also more with Animal spirits [Page 121] and heat, it hath long feet that the body might be more steedy, and his head is built upward like a Ca­stle or Watch-tower in the upper Region.

Goat.

This faculty of discoursive Reson you glory of, that Man is endued withall, though in som respects it be a benefit unto him, and given as a recompence for his frailties, nakedness and weakness, yet in som kind it it may be said to be a disadvantage unto him, for it makes him subject to a thousand vexations of spirit, it fills him with inquisitive thoughts and scruples touching his salvation, it makes him a tyrant to him­self by sundry sorts of perplexities and molestations of mind, for I have known it by experience, let the threed of a man's life be never so well spun, yet it cannot be without bracks and thrumbs: Ther is no creture so troublesome to himself as man, for as rust adheres naturally to Copper, so ill affections and obliquities adhere to human nature: Moreover, you, like us, are but raggs of mortality, yet you are so vain in magnifying your own species, that you make Man the epitome and complement of all created natures; Nay, som have prophanely affirmed, that if all the Angells in Heven had bin a thousand years a forming man, they could not have made him in greater per­fection, and yet when I seriously oftentimes did con­templat Man, and fell into a tru account of his im­becillities, and that world of weaknesses which use to attend his body and mind, I have often cryed out, Eheu nos miseri quàm totus Homuncio nil est! What nom­berles diseases is his frail body, which is the socket of his soul, subject unto? how short are his plesures, and what black sudds commonly they leave behind them? insomuch that they may be said to have wings and stings, for sadnes succeeds his joys as punctually as night follows the day.

Pererius.

Well, well, give over these Satyricall excursions, and think on your dear Country, the healthfullest Country on earth.

Goat.
[Page 122]

It may well be said to be so, for of late years ther were cull'd out within three miles compasse ten men that were a thousand years between them, one sup­plying what the other wanted of a hundred years apiece, and they danc'd the Morris divers hours toge­ther in the Market-place, with a Taborer before them 103 years old, and a Maid Mariam 105. But Orosia is much degenerated from what she was by the Gherio­nian Sectaries, who have infected the Inhabitants with so many pseudodoxall and gingling opinions, which is the recompence she receives from Gheriona for con­verting her first from an Infidell to be a Christian, yet she hath the impudence lately as to call her Heathenish; Moreover, she twits her ever and anon with Leeks and Cheese, though both tend, the one to the commen­dation of the Nation, the other of the Country; For wheras the Orosian doth use to wear the first in his hat constantly upon such a day, it is to a commemorat the time that a famous Battle was fought, wherein other Nations that werein the Army ran away, but the Orosians stood to their ground, and got the day; Now, to signalize and distinguish themselfs from the Fugitifs, they took Leeks in their caps which grew in a Garden hard by; Besides, 'tis known how one of the acutest Nations on earth ador'd the Leek as one of his gods: Touching the other, to have Cheese enough is the mark of a fruitfull Country, and good pasture; This makes me tell you a facetious Epigram,

To make a pure Orosian thirst for blisse,
And daily say his prayers on his knees,
Is to perswade Him that most certain 'tis
The Moon is made of nothing but green Cheese,
And then he'l ask of God no greter boon
Then place in Heven to feed upon the Moon.

Now, during the late combustions in Gheriona, which were causd by a fatuous fire that took hold of som fran­tic spirits, 'tis well known that the Orosian stood firm [Page 123] both to his Prince and Principles, till he was o're­power'd by multitudes.

Pererius.

Well, will you put off that rammish and foetid car­case, and return to your first Principles of Nature, and I will safely conduct you towards your first home?

Goat.

Rammish and foetid! As rammish and foetid as we are, we are of a far more wholsom constitution than Man, let the rare qualities which are in our bodies be judg; 'Tis known by daily experience how our blood hath such an energy in it that it can dissolve Dia­monds, it also scowreth iron better then any file, and being fryed and drunck with wine it cures the bloody­flix; The Load-stone rub'd with Garlick loseth its at­tractive vertu, but being dipt in Goats milk it reco­vers: Ther's no creture hears more perfectly then a Goat, for he hath not onely Ears, but an Acousticon Organ also in the throat: Our hair burnt driveth away Serpents, and cureth decayed genitalls; The marrow of a Goat is singular good against Aches; The gall mix­ed with hony good to clear and fortifie the sight; The very trindles drunck in wine are good against the Jaundise, and to stay Female-fluxes, as also gargariz'd good against old coughs; The fatt sodden with Goats dung is good if applied to the Gout; The but­ter of the fatt of a male Goat is good for an old sore for Kibes, the Kings-Evill, and Fellons, or mixed with hony or oyl of Brambles 'tis good against deafnes; The gall makes white hair grow on a horse; Goats milk is excellent against Consumptions, and you know how the famous Aegistus was nurs'd by that milk. To conclude, ther's nothing within us or with­out us but it is cordiall or medicinall; Our entralls, livers, ashes, horns, milt, spleen, urine, fine hairs, marrow, hoofs, gall, dung, sewet, trindles, milk, and blood, &c.

The Tenth Section.
A Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Soland-Goose, a Carboncian born, who was transmuted to that shape for his foolishnes in rebelling against his own Conterranean King, and so by jugling himself into a Slavery from that Free Government he was formerly un­der, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, a Goose.
Morphandra.

I Saw you in hot discourse a good while with that bearded Beast, how did you feel his pulse beat? will he return to live among those Mountains where he first breath'd air, and put on his primitive nature again?

Pererius.

Madame, I find he hath no list or lust at all to ei­ther, one of his resons is, that the Gherionian his con­fining neighbour hath so intoxicated his Country-men with such fond fanatic opinions, & made them deviat from their tru service and allegiance, both to the King of Heaven, and to his Vicegerent their King up­on Earth; He gave me also some acute resons, both Morall and Metaphysicall, why he wold not turn Man again, alledging at last that the shape he now wears is farr more sound and healthfull, abounding more with naturall heat, which makes his body, and all the parts thereof within and without, to have such medicinall vertues in them, whereas human car­cases, though they had bin Tabernacles to a far no­bler Soul, are good for nothing when she parts with them but to feed and feast worms; Therfore truly, Madame, I am in half despair of prevailing with any of these metamorphos'd Animals, they live so peace­ably [Page 125] under your Dominions, and so contentedly in these shapes.

Morphandra.

You have treated hitherto onely with Terrestriall Creturs, try what you can do upon that Volatil, that sooty-clour'd Soland-Goose, who was by the first in­stitution of nature a Carboncian born, but had liv'd in great plenty and honor in the Gherionian Court, yet out of a crosse-grain'd foolish humor he kick'd against his own King and Country-man, and so fell to be a slave to a new race of Governours, from being a free-born Subject before.

Pererius.

Poor Goose, you need not gaggle, nor fear any thing, for I bring you good tydings, and the best that possibly can befall you; Queen Morphandra by my mediation is pleased to retransfigure you to human shape, and let you go again to Carboncia, your native Soyl and dear Country.

Goose.

Truly, Sir, I have lost all affections to both, I am onely out of conceit with the one, but I abhor the other, I had rather turn Cacodaemon than a Carboncian again; What a pittifull coors cold Clime is Carbon­cia? it hath neither the warm Sun nor Gods blessing, it were a punishment for the worst peeple upon earth to be removed thither; Rather then I shold return to Carboncia, my wishes shall be that of the Poet,

Pone me pigris ubi nulla campis
Arbor aestiva recreatur aurâ,
Quod latus mundi, nebulae, malus (que)
Jupiter urget.

Let me to those black boggy Heaths repair
Where Tree was ne're refresht by Vernall Air,
That side of earth where Jove himself is bad,
And with dark squalid Clowds goes always clad.

Yet the Clime is good enough for the Inhabitants [Page 126] were it worse; They brag of a hundred and odd Kings, but of these Kings above the one half came to violent deaths, judg you then of the disposition of the Peeple; And for their two last Kings, they sold and sent away one to the fatall Block, and made a sacrifice of him to the Gherionian for a summ of mony; And for the other, before they wold Crown him their King, they propos'd that he shold acknowledg his Father a Tyrant, and his Mother an Idolatresse, a thing so ab­horring to Nature.

Pererius.

I find you are extreamly incens'd against your own Country, and your Conterraneans, I pray what's the reson of this strange and violent aversion?

Goose.

I told you partly before, but I will enlarge my self further, and deduce matter from their first rise; Car­boncia and Gheriona were in a sweet and sound peace, with affluences of all felicities, when som Carboncian Soldiers of Fortune return'd from the Cuprinian Warrs richly laden with spoils, they came strutting into the Gherionian Court, the Aetonian plunder shi­ning upon their backs in gold and silver lace; These military Commanders expecting to receive som ho­nors from the Gherionian King for their services in Aetonia, though none of them had received any Com­mission from him, nor fought on his score; Others looking for som office at Court, and missing their aim that way, som of them went to Carboncia discon­tented, and fearing the stock they had got in the Cu­prinian Warr wold quickly consume, and having no other trade but fighting, they fell to devise a way how to cast a bone 'twixt Gheriona and Carboncia, that they might have employment; Therfore they set on som prick-ear'd hot-pated Preachmen (who were in a kind of subjection unto them for their Stipends) to give out, That Gheriona was on her way to Antichrist again; thus the Pulpits did ring of invectives and ca­lumnies against Gheriona's Church-Government; Yet all this while there was not matter enough for an [Page 127] actuall Insurrection, or to fire the Beacons, till by wily artifices of som of the said discontented Great ones Gheriona's Liturgy was sent among them to be put in practise; This was cryed up to be the gretest Idoll that ever came to their Kirk, and so the common peeple in a furious unheard-of manner outrag'd those who read it; The King having notice hereof, sent a gracious Declaration, That wheras he had onely com­mended unto them, not commanded that public form of divine Worship, wherin he himself did punctually and publickly twice a day perform his duty to Heven, he did it out of a pious intention to beget an Unifor­mity as well as an Unanimity of public Devotion in all his Dominions, and as it was already practis'd in Gheriona and Hebrinia, so he desir'd it shold be us'd also in That his Native Country; But since he under­stood it produc'd such tumultuous consequences, he was contented absolutely to revoke it, for it was ne­ver his intent to presse the practise therof upon any conscience, &c. Therfore he requir'd that every one shold return to his former obedience, offring an Am­nestia for what had pass'd; But this wold not serve the turn, for ther was a further designe in it, which was to destroy the Hierarchy, and so make havock of the Patrimony of the Church; Hereupon the whole Country put it self in Arms, and so those Soldiers of Fortune spoken of before brought their work about, and got employment; For Soldiers in time of Peace are like Chimneys in Summer; They thought to rush into Gheriona with an Army, yet they gave it out to the world they came as Petitioners; So the Carboncian shewed Subjects the way to present Petitions to their Souverain upon the Pikes point, to bring a Supplicati­on in one hand, and a Sword in the other, or as one said, the Bible in the left, and the Blade in the other hand.

Pererius.

This was an odious Rebellion in the highest degree, for Subjects to right themselfs by Arms, and wage Warr with their own Souvrain Prince; It is very ob­servable, [Page 128] that when God pleased to punish any of the Kings of Israel, he did not do it with the Iews their own Subjects, but with the Philistines, and other for­rain Nations, whence it may be strongly inferr'd, that it was never allow'd by the Laws of God or Man, that Subjects shold rise up in Arms against their law­full King.

Goose.

Yet the Carboncian rush'd thrice into Gheriona a­gainst their own native King (having therby a greter share in him) in the compasse of lesse then two years, and he was dismissed Fidler-like, with meat, drink, and mony; Though in former times Gheriona was us'd to dismis the Carboncians (whensoever they infested her borders) with other kind of metalls, viz. with good steel and iron in lieu of gold and silver.

Pererius.

These were strange and uncouth hateful traverses, that a Nation shold prove so perfidious to their own Prince, a Prince born in the bowells of their own Country, whose Father, besides Himself, had obliged and laden them with so many signall and singular favors; Therefore ther was here a complication of many ugly things, ther was Rebellion, ther was In­gratitude, and Unnaturalnes, for had he bin born else­where, I shold not have so much wondred at it.

Goose.

Nay, I will tell you more, when their said King had made a long tedious journy of 600 miles going and comming to visit them, he was so gracious, that they did but ask and have any thing; He gave amongst them those antient Demeans that went to maintain the Mitre so many hundred years by the pi­ous donation of Progenitors; He conferr'd honors abundantly upon them of all kinds, and did other wondrous acts of grace, for which the great Coun­cill in Gheriona use to give a supply of Tresure to their Souvrain by way of an humble correspondence, but he did all this to the Carboncian gratis; Yet they pro­ved afterwards the gretest monsters of ingratitude [Page 129] that ever were, for they not onely sided with his Ghe­rionian Insurrectors against him, but when by crosse successes and corrupt counsells he was brought to such an exigent, that he went away in a mean disguise to the Carboncian Army, they most basely for a sum of mony delivered him over to the plesure of his Gheri­onian enemies, who tormented him afterwards be­yond expression by hurrying him from prison to pri­son, and chopp'd off his head at last.

Pererius.

One wold have thought, that the Carboncians wold have valu'd it for a mighty honor, to have their own King in the heighth of his distreses to throw himself thus into their arms, and to put so rare a confidence in them; But who were the chiefest instruments in do­ing all this?

Goose.

The unlucky Kirk-men, who as if they had bin so many of the Devills Chaplains, preach'd nothing but Warr, and against the receiving of the King in Car­boncia in this his extremity; But ther were never so many quick and apparant judgments fell upon any Nation as have tumbled one upon the neck of ano­ther in a few yeers upon this; First, ther hapned an outragious Plague in their chief City, which in one yeers compasse swep'd away the Inhabitants by thousands; What a huge nomber of Witches have bin arraign'd and executed? How many thousand Carboncians were bought and sold for slaves to be hur­ried over to furnish forrain Plantations? What nom­bers of them were starv'd, and som tumbled into their graves alive? How, while they thought to get into the upper-bed, they may be now said to lye upon hard matts on the flat ground, the truckle-bed they lay in afore being taken away from them; And truly it is fit they shold still lie so low, it being the best policy Ghe­riona can use to keep that cold northern dore bolted up, whence so many bleak hispid winds and tempests have broke out upon her.

Pererius.
[Page 130]

It is wholsome Policy indeed, if it be so as you say, to keep under such a crosse-grain'd and stubborn inconstant peeple.

Goose.

I will yet go further, this Rebellion in Carboncia caus'd another in Hebrinia her neighbour, as one fire­brand doth use to kindle another; Examples move, and make strong impressions upon the fancy, Precepts are not so powerfull as Precedents to work upon hu­man nature; The said example of the Carboncians did wonderfully operat upon the imagination of the Hebrinians, and fill'd them with thoughts of emula­tion, that they merited to have as good usage as the Carboncian, their Country being far more beneficiall, and consequently more importing the Gherionians, wherof many thousands had made firm and plentifull fortunes in her; Add hereunto, that the Hebrinians had far more grievances than the Carboncians (who really had none at all) for they were threatned to be more pinch'd in the exercise of their Religion; There was new Plantations intended to be made ther of Carboncians and Hydraulians; There was every day a scrutiny made of conceal'd Lands and dark defective Titles; There were new Imposts laid upon them; they remain'd incapable of any preferments in Church and State, whereas the Carboncians had Ad­vancements and Offices every day in the Gherionian Court, and som of them admitted to sit at the Coun­cil-Table; These motifs impell'd the Hebrinians also to rise up in Arms, hoping they might speed as well as the Carboncian, who obtain'd what he pleas'd; So they rise up to som purpose, for many cruentous and horrid Massacres hapned on both sides, which took away hundreds of thousands; Now, all these things considered, will you have me return among the Car­boncians again?

Pererius.

My principall proposall unto you is to turn Man again, and the Globe of the Earth is large, you may [Page 131] live in what Country you please; You may plant your self in Gheriona, a cheerfull and plentifull Country, and so be neerer the Sun.

Goose.

'Tis tru, that Gheriona abounds with all things that Air, Earth, or Water can afford; But it may be said, that all things are good in her except one, which is that Creture who speaks; It hath bin an antient saying all the world over, in nature of a proverb, That Ghe­riona is a good Country, but the Peeple are bad, in­somuch that her King hath bin call'd the King of De­vills; If this hath bin said of her now, in former times, much more may it be said of her now, most of the Nation being so much deprav'd and degenerated from what they were; Therfore if I were man again I wold be loth to go thither; But to tell you truly, Sir, I am grown a tru Misanthropos, a hater of men, I had ra­ther continu in this shape then be Virbius again; In this shape I have far more variety of plesure, I fish for my food in the Water, I sleep on Earth, and I solace my self in the Hevens, in the Airy Region where I am now to fly.

The Eleventh Section.
Consisting of a Dialog 'twixt Morphandra, Pererius, and a Hive of Bees, who had bin once a Monastery of Nuns, and were trans­muted to those small Insects, because that after a yeers Probation, and their own praevious free Election, they murmur'd at that Reclus'd Claustrall life, and wish'd themselves un­cloyster'd again, &c.

Morphandra, Pererius, a Bee.
Morphandra.

I Belive your perswasions could prevail little with that Volatil Creture, that Soland-Goose, in regard I observ'd how she took wing, and flutter'd away from you in a kind of hast.

Pererius.

Truly; Madame, I may say, that all this while ac­cording to the old proverb, I have bin shooing of Gos­lings, I have spent my labor and breath to little pur­pose in order to my main designe, yet I cannot deny but that I have gain'd a great deal of rare knowledg by communicating with these transmuted Animals, and truly they have made me better acquainted with my self, and with the state of Mankind in generall; But for this last transform'd thing, none of all the rest did brand his own Country-men so bitterly: He lays to their charge originally all those fearfull calamities, those horrid confusions, those cataracts of blood which fell of late years both in Hebrinia and Gheriona; And he said, that all that they have purchased ther­by, is, to have foold themselves into a perfect slavery, and to have brought themselfs under an Iron Rod in lieu of that Golden Scepter under which they liv'd for­merly.

[Page 133] And now, Madame, I have no hopes to do any good, for Hope is like Butter, which the Physicians say is Gold in the morning, Silver at noon, and Lead at night, in relation to the stomack; So I had golden hopes at first to redeem and carry along with me som of these transmuted Animals, that are in such an unnaturall captivity, but my hopes are now turn'd perfect Lead, I am in utter despair to prevail with any; Ther­fore, most admirable Queen, now that the winds blow fair I must think of a departure, and touching those most Princely civilities, & sublime inexpressible favours you have bin pleased to shew, since the happy Fates brought me to take footing in this your rare Island, I will make the whole world witnes of my gratitude, and to ring out Morphandra's glory where­soever I passe; Nay I will procure your most rare and transcendent vertues, which are beyond the power of mortalls, to be engraven with indelible characters of the most burnish'd gold in the Temple of Immortality.

Morphandra.

Most accomplish'd and heroick Prince, those civi­lities and treatments you have received here were due unto you by the common Laws of Hositality, and you might therby have claim'd them as a Right; But truly I shold be very well contented if you were made partaker of your so laudable desires, as to have som of these metamorphos'd Animals re-transmuted, that so you might carry with you som reall returns of your Voyage; Therfore you may please to try one conclusion more, and I spy a fit subject for you to work upon, in yonder great hollow Oak you shall meet with a Swarm of Bees, who have built up their Cells there, wherof I will capacitat som with a perfect fa­culty of Reson and Ratiocination to interweave dis­course with you; They were formerly a Cloyster of Nuns, who though after a due probation, and their own spontaneous free choice, they undertook that au­stere, yet pious and plentifull train of life, yet they fell a murmuring and a humming at the solitude and hardships of that holy Profession, and to think too [Page 134] often on Man with inordinat desires to be discloy­sterd, and lead a more dissolut and free unbridled life; Yonder they are, therfore you may please to make to­wards them, and you cannot tell what successe you may have with those small airy Insects.

Bee.

What are you, Sir, that dare approach this Hive, this precious Cell, and Confectionary of Nature?

Pererius.

Gentle Bees, I come hither for no hurt, but for your infinit advantage; I understand by Queen Morphandra that you were once Intellectuall Cretures, and the children of Reson; nay, you were a degree above or­dinary human happines, being in a contemplative and sweet sacred cours of life, wherin you had se­cluded your selfs from the world with the vanities therof, and espoused your selfs to your Creator, by keeping the perpetuall pure fire of Virginity.

Bee.

'Tis tru, we kept that ceremonious outward fire, but within us we felt too often such flamings, such furnaces or Mongibells of fires, such violent affections and impetuous desires, that made us half mad for the time, the sense of our restraint making these fires far more raging and vehement, for though in exter­nall appeerance and habits, we shew'd som symptoms of mortification, yet we could never extinguish the sparks of the concupiscible appetite, which is so natu­rally inherent in every body.

Pererius.

I thought that by performance of so many penan­ces, by your temperat diet, by your abstemious use and choice of meats, by your so frequent fastings, by your hard lodgings having matts for your beds, and stones for your pillows, by your early risings, by be­ing always employ'd in somthing or other to avoid idlenes, which is the Devills couch; I say, by the pra­ctise of these austerities, I thought you had quench'd those concup iscentiall flames.

Bee.
[Page 135]

The operations of nature can hardly be quite sup­press'd, but their motions are irresistible; nor are these naturall motions given by the Creator to our sex to be a torment unto us, but for delight, and being law­fully and moderatly us'd, they are destinated for the propagation of Mankind: Moreover ther is a saying, who fights against Nature fights against God himself, she be­ing his Hand-maid.

Pererius.

I cannot deny but that Naturam sequi, est Deo obse­que, to follow Nature is to obey God, yet as our gre­test prudence is seen in the conduct of our naturall pas­sions, so our gretest prowesse is seen in the conquest of them, when they grow exorbitant and rebellious; We need not seek for enemies abroad to exercise our valour upon, we have too too many within dores, we have enough of domestic and inmate enemies to cope withall.

Bee.

And will you have us to put on that nature again? But, Sir, besides what we spoke of before, ther was another thing that did torture us in that Monastic life, it was the apprehension of our captivity, being se­quester'd and cut off as it were from the society of Mankind, & in a manner from the Living, 'twixt whom and us (in that state) ther was this difference, that they were to die before buriall, but we were buried before death; Now, ther is nothing so tedious to all natures as imprisonment, which we shew'd when we slept in the bosom of our Causes in our mothers wombs, whence we broke out to get liberty, and to be a Nun is as it were to go into a kind of womb again.

Pererius.

I, but ther you were in a kind of Angelicall condi­tion amongst those walls, you learnt there how to lead the lifes of Angels upon earth, you were as so many fixed Starrs which being the higher are more noble, and nearer the throne of the Almighty, than the Pla­nets, which wandring up and down never keep the same distance betwixt them.

Bee.
[Page 136]

Sir, under favor, we are not of that opinion; For you know the Sun and the Moon are called the Great Luminaries in Heven, therfore they must be the more noble, specially the Sun, wherin God himself is said to have his habitation, or Imperiall Throne, whence he sees the motion of the Universe, and over-looks all his cretures throughout the world; Now, these noble Erratic Starrs are in a perpetuall progresse, which the Moon finisheth in twenty nine daies, Mercury in four-score, Venus nine months, the Sun in a year, Mars in two, Iupiter in twelve, and Saturn in thirty years.

Pererius.

The fixed Starrs have also a motion within their own Orbs, and the Convent wherein you were before might be called a Constellation of fixed Starrs, which I say do move within the circumference of their own Spheres, as you did within the walls of your Mona­stery amongst your selfs.

Bee.

But by the condition wherin we are now stated, we may be said to have a larger Beeing, for we have turn'd our Convent to a Common-wealth, or rather our Mona­stery to a Monarchy, wherin we have as exact an oeco­nomy, and politicall rules of Government, as ever we had in our Monastery; We have a Souvrain King, who although he hath no sting as all the rest have, yet he carrieth such a Majesty that makes us all exactly obedient to his commands; Nor, though he bear no arms himself, was ther ever heard of any Rebellion amongst us against our lawfull Prince, as is so fre­quent amongst Mankind; It being a principle from the very instinct of nature amongst us, that it is both de­testable and damnable for Subjects to rise up against their supream Governour, and go about to right them­selfs by Arms; I say, that in this state we have a very regular Government, we have a King, we have privy Counsellors, we have Commanders in the War, and gregarian Soldiers; We keep close in Winter, and have then our Centinells; We go not abroad till [Page 137] Beans do blossom, and then, if the weather permit, ther's never a day passeth in idlenesse; We first build our Cells and Combs, then make Hony, and then en­gender; We make our Wax and Hony of the freshest and most fragrant flowers, and abhor withered or stinking vegetalls; When the flowers are spent in one place, we have our harbingers abroad to find out an­other; being surprised by night in our expeditions, we sleep in a supine posture with our bellies upward, to preserve our wings from the falling dew; Betimes in the morning we are awakned by our Drummer, who punctually performs his office that way; Then, if the day be mild, we fally forth in a great body, and we have an instinct to foresee winds, tempests, and rain, which makes us keep often within; When we go abroad to work, every one hath his task, and the younger are put to the hardest, while the elder labour within dores; We all feed together, and if we be surprised abroad with a sudden wind, we take up a stone 'twixt our feet to give weight to our bodies, that they may not be blown away; Ther is among us a Censor of manners, and som Officers that watch those which are slothfull, who are afterwards pu­nish'd with death, and for the Drones, which are a spurious kind of brood, we quite banish them; Ther's not the least foulnes seen in our Alvearies or Hives, for we abhor all immundicities and sordidnes; When 'tis towards night, our hummings lessen by degrees, till an Officer fly about and command silence and sleep, which is instantly done; We first build houses for our Workmen and Plebeans, and then palaces for the Nobles and the King; We punish sloth without mercy; we faithfully obey our King, being always about him like a guard, and He in the midst; When the peeple are at work, He goes about and cherisheth them, He onely being exempt from labour; He hath always his Officers ready to punish Delinquents; When He goes forth, the whole Swarm attends him, if He chance to be weary, we bear him upon our shol­ders; Whersoever He rests, there the generall Rande­vous [Page 138] is; Wasps, Hornets, and Swallows are enemies to us; We bury our dead with great solemnity; At the Kings death ther is a generall mourning and fa­sting, with a cessation from labour, and we use to go about his body with a sad murmur for many daies; When we are sick we have attendants appointed us, and the symptoms when we be sick are infallible, ac­cording to the honest plain Poet,

If Bees be sick (for all that live must die)
That may be known by signes most certainly,
Their bodies are discoloured, and their face
Looks wan, which shews that death comes on apace;
They carry forth their dead, and do lament,
Hanging o'th' dore, or in their Hives are pent:
Hunger and cold consumes them, you shall find
They buzz as doth t'th' woods the Southern wind,
Or as the Sea when as the waves return,
Or fire clos'd up in vaults with noise doth burn.

Nor are we profitable onely in our lifes unto Man­kind, by that pretious Hony we confect for their use, which though for the rare vertues and sweetnes therof som held to be the gelly of the Starrs, others the sweat of the Hevens, others the quintessence of the Air, though really it be but our Chylus at the third digestion; I say, that we are not onely in our lifes be­neficiall to mankind, who receives the fruits of our labours, but after death also; Our bodies pounded and drunck with wine, or any other diareticall thing, cures the Dropsie, Stone, and Strangury; The hony scrapt off our dead bodies is extraordinary good a­gainst divers diseases; Moreover we have a kind of transmigration among us, one into the other; Out of our brains, marrow, and chine-bones, Kings and No­bles are bred, out of the rest of our bodies ordinary Bees.

Pererius.

Gentle Bee, you have spoken as much as can be for the advantage of your condition, yet nevertheles [Page 139] you are but fleshles poor sensitive Insects onely, of a short and a kind of ephemeran subsistence; You want that spark of Immortality, the noble Rational Soul, wherby the human Creture goes as far beyond you, as an Angel goes beyond him.

Bee.

I remember when I was a Nun I heard many cha­racters given of the Rational Soul, as were somwhat transcendent, if not presumptuous; The Theolog or Divine call'd her, The Image of God Almighty; The Phi­losopher call'd her, The Queen of Forms; And you call her now, A Spark of Immortality; Yet you know not how, nor where this Spark enters into you, nor where it resides in any particular place above other Souls, nor are you agreed whether she enters into you by divine infusion, or by traduction from the parentall seeds.

Pererius.

I shall endeavour to satisfie you touching these par­ticulars; It must be consider'd, that Man may be call'd the great Amphybium of nature; First, he is a confus'd lump of dead matter, lying as it were upon the lees in the womb, where the vegetable Soul enters first, ma­king it capable of extension and growth; Then the Sen­sitive Soul follows, who by the plasticall vertu falls a forming the members or the organs; Then comes the noblest of all the three, the Rationall Soul, who swayes o're the other two, and is—Divinae particula aurae, she is breath'd from the Creator himself, and which no other creture in Heven or earth can say, she is capable of a spirituall Regeneration afterwards, as the Body is of a Resurrection; At last, when she hath shaken off the slough of flesh, she becomes a Spirit ei­ther good or bad, she becomes a Saint or a Devill, and so receives eternall beatitude or torments; By these de­grees observable it is, that Man hath potentially in himself all created natures, first or last, both in Heven, Earth, and Hell; All which may be compris'd in this Poem, which, though short, containeth the whole story of Mankind from first to last.

[Page 140]
Man is that great Amphybium in whom lye
Three distinct Souls by way of trigony;
He runs through all creations by degrees,
First, He is onely Matter on the lees,
Whence he proceeds to be a Vegetal,
Next Sensitive, and so Organical;
Then by divine infusion a third Soul,
The Rational doth the two first controul;
But when this Soul comes in, and where she dwells
Distinct from others, no Dissector tells,
And (which no creture else can say) that state
Enables her to be Regenerat:
She then becomes a Spirit, and at last
A Saint or Devill, when that she hath cast
The clogg of flesh, which yet she takes again,
To perfect her beatitude or pain:
Thus Man is first or last allied to all
Cretures in Heven, in Earth, or Hells black Hall.
Bee.

Whereas you alledg, that the Intellectuall or Ratio­nall Soul enters by Divine infusion, I remember when I was a Nun, that divers learned men were of opini­on, that she was (like the other two Souls, viz. the vege­tal and the Sensitive) propagated and traduc'd by the seed and sperm of the parents, and that this was done by the hereditary vertu of that gran universall Bene­diction, pronounced by God himself to all his cre­tures, Encrease and multiply; Then they proceeded to urge the common Axiom, that like begets the like; Now, the great God of Nature did constitut all other species perfect in their own kinds, with a procrea­tive power to beget their like by a compleat generati­on; And why shold Man, in whom the ideas of all other created natures are collectively resplendent? Why shold he, I say, com short of this perfection and priviledge? for without it he may be ranck'd among those mutilat defective cretures, who are destitut of power to procreat an Individuum like themselfs.

Pererius.
[Page 141]

This shews the eminency of the human Soul above others in point of extraction, for if she were made of such poor frail ingredients as the seeds of the parents, she wold be perishable with the Body, wheras the is created to be heir of Eternity.

Bee.

I remember the reply to this, That the excellency of the human Soul is not to be derived from her crea­tion and first materialls, but from the Fiat, or eternall Decree, and particular blessing of the Creator, who endowed her from the beginning with such a prero­gative, out of his free will and plesure, to be capable of eternity: But wheras you aver, that the parentall feeds are too grosse ingredients to produce so noble a Soul, I remember ther are great modern Doctors and Physitians who hold, that neither the seed of mother or father go to the impregnation, but that the Female conceives onely by a virtuall contact, as the Load­stone draws Iron, and that she is made pregnant by conceiving the generall Idaea without matter; To make this new assertion good, they compare the womb to the brain, and that what the phantasma or appetit is in the brain, the same phantasma or its ana­logy is excited in the womb, for both of them are call'd Conceptions.

Pererius.

This is a wild extravagant opinion, for one may be­lieve with more reson, that the Tumontian Mares are impregnated, and made to conceive by the South-west winds.

Bee.

I remember another argument that was urged for the traducible generation of the human Soul, which was, that the Rationall Soul begins to operat in the prolificall seed the very first moment of concep­tion, as soon as the prolificall emissions of both sexes are blended by mutuall fermentation, for then the conformative and proper operations of the Rational Soul begin upon the Embryo, who proceeds to majo­ration [Page 142] and augmentation accordingly; And it is no lesse then an absurdity to think, that the Infant after conception shold be majorated by the influence of any other Soul then that from whom he received his formation; Now, that this formation begins instantly after the conception, appeers by the early activity of nature, which hath bin sensibly discover'd in abortive Embryo's by autopicall observations, wherby it hath bin visibly found, that a Septenary Slip put into clear water, a subtle Inspector through a magnifying Glasse may discern all the rudiments of the organicall parts; Ther may be seen there the generall conforma­tive faculty in the seed, wherin will visibly appeer three small bubling conglobations, which are the ma­terialls of the noblest parts, viz. the Brain, the Heart, and the Liver; ther will appeer also two small black Orbs, or atomicall points, which are the rudiments of the Eyes: Whence may be strongly inferred, that if organization, and the conformation of the Infant begins in the very punctillio or first moment of the conception, that the Rationall Soul then works in the seed, as being the most vigorous part of it; From hence it follows, that Man doth absolutely procreat Man, which could not be if the Genitor did not communi­cat the Human Soul unto his Issue; For since Man is compos'd of Soul and Body, if the parent cannot can­not impart both to his ofspring, he may be said to be inferiour to Beasts, who have intrinsic active princi­ples, and power in themselfs to propagat, and beget Individiums of their own species, without the concur­rence of extrinsecall causes.

Pererius.

These are neotericall fancies, and derogatory to the noblenes of the Rational Soul, who hath a far more sublime and spirituall extraction.

Bee.

But to let passe this Quaere, how and when the Ra­tional Soul informs and actuats the Embryo, ther have bin great researches and indagations made, whether this Soul being so distinct from the Vegetal and Sensi­tive [Page 143] in her operations, whether, I say, she hath any particular domicile or cell within the human body for her own residence.

Pererius.

It was never found yet by any inspections which the Naturalists and Anatomisers have made, that the Rationall Soul hath any peculiar lodging, proper onely to her self, and differing from other Animals; But be­ing indivisible, inextensive, and without parts, she is tota in toto & tota in qualibet parte, she is all in the whole, and whole in every part of the compositum, she is diffus'd up and down the whole masse or fabric of flesh, ther being no movement at all without her; For as the beams or light of the Sun displayeth it self every where through the whole Hemisphere, yet hath it no particular mansion in any place more then an­other, so the Rationall Soul, which is a beam of Im­mortality, diffuseth her self through the whole Mi­crocosm of Man to quicken it, yet she hath no parti­cular residence in any part; 'Tis tru, that she is radi­cally in the heart, and principally in the brain, which is as it were her Capitol, and the seat of the Animal-spirits; Thence she issueth forth her commands, and dividing her Empire into a Triarchy, she governs by three Viceroys, the three Faculties, who though they are absolutely distinct by their Commissions, and keep their Courts in severall Regions, yet are they united by so indissoluble a league, and sympathetic alliance, that the prosperitie of one enlargeth the principali­ties of the other, and the detriment of each threatens the integrity of the whole; The Natural or Vegetal Fa­culty claims superiority of time in order of procreati­on, as being Governesse of our Minority, commanding the third part of our lises; The Vital hath prehemi­nence in order of necessity, keeping her Court chiefly in the Heart, which is the first part that lives, and the last that dies; thence she transmits a souvrain and conservatory influence through all the members, without which the whole Man must in the fleetest arti­cle of time be but a Cadaver; The Animal Faculty chal­lengeth [Page 144] supermacy in order of eminence, as regula­ting the sublimer actions, as Sense and Motion, toge­gether with the Memory, Understanding, and Imagina­tion, to which, as to their perfection, the two former are design'd.

Therefore, gentle Bees, think speedily on the free proposall I have made, and of the fair opportunity you have offered you to be reinform'd with Rational Souls, and to return to the Religious Convent you came from, where being wean'd from the frail world, together with the cares and encumbrances therof; Where, by the constant practise of holy duties night and day, you may act the parts of Angels upon earth, and afterwards of tru Angels in the land of Eternity: Therfore shake off this despicable poor humming con­dition, and go again to sing Hymns and Halleluiahs to your Creator.

Bee.

Know, Sir, that we have also a Religion, as well as so exact a Government among us here; Our Hummings you speak of are as so many Hymns to the great God of Nature; And ther is a miraculous example in Cae­sarius Cisterniensis, how som of the holy Eucharist be­ing let fall in a medow by a Priest, as he was return­ing from visiting a sick body, a Swarm of Bees being hard by took it up, and in a solemn kind of procession carried it to their Hive, and there erected an Altar of the purest Wax for it, where it was found in that form, and untouch'd.

But whereas you spoke of Angels, how do the separa­ted Souls of good men, when they are exalted to Heven, differ from the Angels?

Pererius.

As they agree, so they differ in many things; Angels and separated Souls agree, in that both of them are Spi­rits; Both of them are Intellectuall and Eternall Cre­tures; They both behold the beatificall Vision; Both of them are Courtiers of Heven, and act meerly by the understanding, &c. Lastly, They both are Parishioners of the Church Triumphant: Now, as the blessed An­gels [Page 145] and Souls separat do thus agree, So they differ in many things; They differ in their Essentialls, for the principles of Angels are meerly Metaphysicall, viz. Essence and Existence; but a separated Soul continues still part of that Compositum which formerly consisted of matter and form, and is still apt to be reunited ther­unto; Till then, she is not absolutely completed, for all that while she changeth not her nature, but her state of life: Moreover, they differ in the exercise of the Understanding, and manner of knowledge, for a Soul se­parat knows still by discours and ratiotination, which an Angell doth not but by Intuition; They also differ in dignity of Nature, for Angels have larger Illumina­tions, At the first instant of their Creation they be­held the Beatific Vision, the summe of all happines, yet separated Souls are capable to mount up to such a height of glory by degrees as to be like them in all things, both in point of Vision, Adhaesion, and Fruition.

Bee.

Now, Sir, that you speak of Angels, what degrees are ther of them in the Celestiall Hierarchy?

Pererius.

They are divided into three Hierarchies, and in every Hierarchy ther are three Orders; The first consists of Seraphims, the second of Cherubims, the third of Thrones; The second consists of Dominations, of Vertues, and Powers; The third consists of Principalities, of Angells, and Archangells; Now, those of the supremest Hie­rarchy partake of divine Illuminations in a greter me­sure: And you were all born, gentle Bees, to be mem­bers of any of these glorious Hierarchies.

Bee.

I remember when I was a Nun, that som presump­tuous spirits would preach, that Angels were created for Man, and that Man was of so high a creation that he was little inferiour unto them, if not their equall, and that their chief ministeriall function was to guard Him, &c.

Pererius.

They were presumptuous indeed, and in a high [Page 146] degree of prophanenes, as you shall find in these Stanza's of comparison, though som of them are fa­miliar, and too low for so high a subject.

1.
Such as the meanest Star in Sky
Is to the Sun in Majesty;
What a Monk's Cell is to high Noon,
Or a new Cheese unto the Moon;
No more is Man, if one should dare
Unto an Angel Him compare.
2.
What to the Eagle is a Gnat,
Or to Leviathan a Sprat;
What to the Elephant a Mouse,
Or Shepherd's Cott to Caesar's House;
No more is Man, if one should dare
Unto an Angell Him compare.
3.
What to a Pearl a peeble Stone,
Or Cobler's Shop unto a Throne;
What to the Oak the basest Shrub,
Or to Noah's Ark a Brewer's Tub;
No more is Man, if one shold dare
Unto an Angel Him compare.
4.
Then let not Man, half child of night,
Compare with any Hevenly Wight,
He will appeer on that account
A Mole-hill to Olympus Mount;
Yet let this still his comfort be,
He hath a capability
To be of Heven Himself, but on this score,
If he doth not make Earth his Heven before.
Bee.

Noble Prince, you pleas'd to give divers touches of the Immortality of the human Soul, I pray be pleas'd to illuminat and rectifie our understandings touching that point.

Pererius.
[Page 147]

Concerning the immortality and incorruptiblenes of the Rational Soul in the World to com, not onely Christian Divines, but the best of Pagan Philosophers, Poets, and Orators, have done her that right, as is evident in their works; Moreover, the Intellectuall Human Soul doth prove her self to be immortall, both by her desires, her apprehensions, and her operations; Touching the first, Her desires are infinit we know, and never satisfied in this world; Now, it is a Maxim among the School-men, That ther is no naturall pas­sion given to any finit creture to be frustraneous; Se­condly, Her apprehensions or longings after eternall Truths, which are her chiefest employments, and most adaequat objects, declare her Immortall; Thirdly, from her operations, 'tis known, that all corruption comes from matter, and from the clashing of contraries; Now, when the Soul is sever'd from the Body, she is elevated beyond the sphere of matter, therfore no causes of mortality can reach her, wherby her state and operations pronounce her immortall, which operations she doth exercise without the ministery of corporeall organs, for they were us'd to be a clog to her; Add hereunto, that she useth to spiritualize ma­teriall things in the Intellect, to abstract Idaeas from Individualls; She can apprehend negations and priva­tions, she can frame collective notions, all which actings conclude her immateriality, and as 'twas pointed at be­fore, where no matter is found ther's no corruption, and where ther's no corruption ther's no mortality; Now, her prime operations being without the ministery of Matter, she may be concluded immortall by that com­mon principle, Modus operandi, sequitur modum essendi, Operations are according to the essence of every thing; Now, in the World to com, the Soul shall be in a state of pure independent Beeing, for ther will be neither action or passion in that state; Whence may be inferr'd, she shall never perish, in regard that all corruption comes from the action of another thing upon that which is corruptible, therfore that thing must [Page 148] be capable to be made better or worse; Now, if a se­parat Soul be plac'd in her ultimat and utmost state, that she can be made neither, it follows, that she can never lose the Beeing she hath; Besides, since the egress out of the body doth not alter her nature, but onely her condition, it must be granted, that she was of the same nature while she continued incorporated, though in that kind of imprisonment she was subject to be forg'd as it were by the hammer of materiall objects beating upon her, yet so, as she was still of her self what she was; Therefore when she goes out of the passible ore wherein she suffer'd, by reson of the foul­nes and impurity of that ore, she immediately be­comes impassible, and a fix'd subject of her own na­ture, viz. a simple pure Beeing; Both which (as a most noble Knight Sir. K. D. hath it) may be illustra­ted in some mesure by what we find passeth in the coppilling of a fixed metall, which as long as any lead or drosse or any allay remains with it, continueth still melting, flowing, and in motion under the muffle; but as soon as they are parted from it, and that 'tis become pure, defaecated, without mixture, and single of it self, it contracts it self to a narrower room, and instantly ceaseth from all motion, it grows hard, per­manent, and resistent to all force of fire, admitting no change or diminution in its substance by any ex­ternall violence; In like manner it may be said, when the Rational Soul departs from the drossy ore of the Body, and comes to be her single self, she is like ex­alted Gold, and reduc'd to the utmost perfection; She can be no more liable to any diminution, to action or passion, or any kind of alteration, but continues fix'd for ever in the full fruition of unconceivable blisse and glory.

Bee.

Excellent Prince, these are high abstracted notions, transcending the reach of vulgar capacities; But you were pleased to reflect somwhat upon the blisfulnes and joys of the human Soul in the other world, I pray be pleas'd to enlarge your self upon this Theme.

Pererius.
[Page 149]

These joys, as they are beyond expression, so they are beyond all imagination; That vast Ocean of Felicity which the separat Soul is capable to receive cannot flow into her, untill those banks of earth, viz. the cor­poreall walls of flesh be removed; Those infinit joys which the human Soul shall be ravish'd withall in He­ven are unmeasurable, and beyond any mathematicall reaches; They have length without points, breadth without lines, depth without surface; They are even and uninterrupted joys, but to go about to expresse them in their perfection were the same task, as to go about to measure the Ocean in Cockle-shells, or com­pute the nomber of the sands with peeble stones; Touching these faint and fading plesures among the Elements, we use to desire them when we need them, and when we have them, the desire presently langui­sheth in the fruition; Moreover, we use to love earthly things most when we want them, and lesse when we have them; The daintiest meats and drinks nauseat after fulness; Carnall delights cause sadnes after the enjoyment; All plesures breed not onely a satiety but a disgust, and the contentment terminats with the act: 'Tis otherwise with Celestiall things, they are most lov'd when they are enjoy'd, and most coveted when they are had; They are always full of what is desir'd, and the desire still lasteth, but it is a co-ordi­nat desire of complacency and continuance, not an ap­petit after more, because they are perfect of them­selfs; Yet ther is still a Desire, and a Satiety, but the one finds no want, nor can the other breed a surfet; The higher the plesure is, the more full and intense is the fruition, and the oftner 'tis repeted the more the appetit encreaseth; Whence this conclusion fol­lows, that ther can be no proportion at all betwixt the joys of a separat Soul, and those of a Soul embodyed; For the least dram of the spirituall joyes in Heven is more than the whole Ocean of fleshly contentments; One drop of those abstracted, those pure, permanent; [Page 150] & immarcescible delights is infinitly more sweet, than all those mix'd and muddy streams of corporeall and mundan plesures, then all those no other then Utopi­an delights of this transitory world, were they all cast into a Limbeck, and the very Elixir of them distill'd into one vessell.

Bee.

Incomparable Prince, you have conquer'd us with such strong Herculean Resons, you have raised our spi­rits with such high raptures, and so illuminated our understandings, that by the gracious Fiat of the great God of Nature, and the favour of Queen Morphan­dra his handmaid in this particular, we are willing to resume our first shapes, and so return to our dear Country and Cloysters, where the remembrance of this transfiguration, we hope, will turn to our advantage; In the interim, we render you most humble and hear­ty thanks in the highest degree that can be imagin'd, for your flexanimous and hevenly perswasions, which we found so melting and sweet, that we may justly think Bees sat upon your lips, as they did upon Plato's, in your cradle, or that you might be nurs'd with Ho­ny in lieu of Milk, as Pindarus the Prince of Lyricks was; And because Poesie is the gretest light whereby the Rational Soul may be discerned to be a Ray of Divi­nity, we will conclude with som Enthusiasms to blissfull Heven and the Hierarchies therof in this graduall Hymn, beginning with our Creator.

Natures great God, the Cause of causes, be
Ador'd and prais'd to all Eternity,
That supream Good, that quintessentiall Light,
Which quickens all that's hidden, or in sight;
Who breaths in Man the Intellectuall Soul,
Therby to rule all Cretures, and controul
What Water, Earth, or Air; &c.
1.
O holy Souls, O heavenly Saints,
Who from corruption and the taints
Of flesh and blood, from pain and tears,
From pining cares, and panting fears,
And from all passions, except Love
(Which onely reigns with you above)
Are now exempt, and made in endlesse Blisse
Free Denizons, and Heirs of Paradis.
2.
O glorious Angels who behold
The Lord of Light from Thrones of Gold,
Yet do vouchsafe to look on Man,
To be his Guide and Guardian,
Praying always that He may be
Partner of your felicity;
O blisfull Saints and Angells, may yee still
The Court of Heven with Halleluiahs fill.
3.
Seraphick Powers, Cherubs, Thrones,
Vertues and Dominations,
Supernall principalities,
Glories, and Intelligencies,
Who guide the cours of Starrs in sky,
And what in their vast Concaves lye:
May ye for ever great Jehovah's will,
And His commands throughout the world fulfill.
4.
Archangels who the most sublime degree
Do hold in the Triumphant Hierarchy,
And can endure to see, and face alone
The glorious Beatific Vision,
A joy which all joys else transcends so far
As doth a morning Sun the meanest Star.
Archangels, Angels, Saints, Souls sever'd, may yee stil
The Empyrean Court with Halleluiahs fill.

[Page 152]Infantium Cerebri Sextus Post Quadraginta.

Gloria laùsque Deo saeCLorVM in saecVla sunto.

A Chronogrammaticall Verse, which includes not onely this year 1660. but hath Numericall Letters enow to reach above a thousand years further, untill the year 2867.

—Heic Terminus esto.

AN ADVERTISEMENT Relating to ORTOGRAPHY.

THer is a Saying, that hath gain'd the repute of a Proverb, (though it be also a kind of Reproach) That the French neither sings as he pricks, nor thinks as he speaks, nor speaks as he writes; The first proceeds from abundance of spirits, and his volatil airy nature; The second from his Exces of Complements; The third, because he wold have his Language retain still of the Romand or Latin Toung; Therfore when he writes Temps, Corps, Estoille, Advocats, &c. which com from Tempus, Corpus Stella, Advocati, he pronounceth them, Tan, Cors, Etoilis, Avocà; The English may be said to be as guilty hereof, for if the French writes, Apres la tempeste vient le beau temps, and pronounceth, Apre la tampete vien le bou tan, After a Storm comes a Calm; If the French writes, Les Advocats bastissent leuers mai­sons de testes de fols, and pronounceth, Les avocà batisset leur mesons de tete de fous, Lawyers build their houses of Fools heads, (viz. Clients) The English comes not short of him, for wheras he writes, God give you good Evening, he often saies, Godi godin; Wheras he writes, Much good may it do unto you, he often pronoun­ceth, Musgiditty: The French do labor daily to reform this, and to bring both Writing and Pronounciation to be consonant, by retrenching the superfluous letters, for wheras they were used to write, Les Epistres que les Apostres ont Escrit, they now write as they pronounce, Les Epitres que les Apotres ont ecrit: It hath bin the aim of the Author in this Book (and others) to do the like, (though the Presse did not observe his Ortography so [Page] punctually). Now, Strangers use to quarrel with our Language, and throw away the Book in a chase som­times, because our writing and pronunciation are so differing; For when a stranger meets with treasure, measure, feature, reader, weather, people, &c. he pro­nounceth tre-asure, me-asure, fe-ature, re-ader, we-ather, pe-ople; When he meets with witnesse, sicknesse, wittie, prettie, pittie, starre, warre, &c. he pronounceth witness-e, sickness-e, witti-e, pretti-e, pitti-e, starr-e, warr-e, &c. Wheras if we wold write them as wee pronounce them, viz. Tresure, mesure, feture, reder, wether, peeple, witnes, sicknes, witty, pretty, pitty, star, war, &c. (which gives altogether as full a prolation) stran­gers wold not find such a difficulty and distast in lear­ning our Language; It hath bin, and is still the ende­vor of the Author to reform this, as also to bring those words which are derived from the Latin Toung to follow her Ortography rather then the French, wherby divers Letters are sav'd, as Magic, Tysic, Colic, Favor, Lahor, &c. not Magique, Physique, Cholique, Favour, Labour, &c. For as it is a Principle in Philosophy, Encia non sunt frustra multiplicanda, Entities are not to be multiplied in vain, so it may as well hold in Ortogra­phy, That Letters are not to he multiplied to no purpose; Add hereunto the Topicall Rule, (as the Author ob­serves els-where) Frustra sit per plura quod fieri potest per pauciora, More is waste, whe [...] fewer will serve one turn.

THE INDEX.
A more particular Account of the Ingredients that went to the Compo­sition of this Work.

A
  • Fol.
  • THe Art of governing Man the most diffi­cult. 26
  • An Asse's body medici­nall for many things after death. Ibid.
  • The Antipathy 'twixt an Ape and a Snail. 50
  • Aristotle, Secretary of Nature's Cabinet-Councell. 55
  • Ambition hath no Hori­zon. 70
  • Aristotle held, that in the Female there was no active principle of Genera­tion. 55
  • Confutation of the said Opinion. Ibid.
  • Apelles painted a good huswife standing upon a Snail. 58
  • Aristotle inconstant to himself where he treats of Policy. 98
  • The Affections of the Pee­ple an imperfect security to a Prince. 99
  • Of Atoms. 103
  • The Activity of Atoms. 104
  • The Application of the Sympatheticall Powder. 106
  • Aetonia characteriz'd. 108
  • Aetonia full of mongrell Princes. 109
  • The advantages of the Human body. 120
  • [Page] An Asse cannot abide Fennell. 18
  • Artonia a Noun Substan­tive that can stand by it self. ibid.
  • The Artonian Peasan born in chains. 19
  • Of Artonia with the plenty and beggery thereof. 18
  • Of the great Artonian Favorit. 21
  • The Austerities of Nuns. 134
B
  • Bees, how usefull after death. 138
  • Bees bodies pounded good against many diseases. ibid.
  • The Books of the Dead enliven the Living. In the Epist.
  • Brute Animals more easie to be govern'd than Man­kind. 99
  • Of the Beast with many heads, viz. the Common pee­ple. ibid.
  • The Brains of a Fox good against the Falling sick­nes. 100
  • The Blood of a Fox good against the Stone and the Cramp. ibid.
  • A dead Boar hath no­thing bad in him but his Ex­crements. 112
  • The Brains of a Boar good against the bitting of Ser­pents. ibid.
  • The Blood of a Boar good against Carbuncles. ibid.
  • Boar's liver good against the biting of a mad Dogg. ibid.
  • Boar's lard good to make broken bones firm. ibid.
  • Boar's testicles good a­gainst the Falling sicknesse. ibid.
  • Boar's dung good against all venomous bitings, as also against the pain of the Spleen and Sciatica. ibid.
  • A Boar being dead hath many vertues, and why? ibid.
  • How Beasts go in many things beyond Man. 120
  • The Carboncian sells his King. 129
  • A Bees Hive, the chief Confectionary of Nature. 134
C
  • The Conduct of the Passions the greatest prudence, and the Conquest of them the greatest prowesse. In the Epist.
  • Children a certain care, but an incertain comfort. 24
  • Comparisons 'twixt the Body Politic and the Natu­ral. 48
  • Censures pro & con of [Page] Tumontia. 69
  • A rare comparison of the holy Trinity. 83
  • A City in Saturnia where husbands use to get their wifes with child a hundred miles off. 88
  • A Character of Satur­nia. 89
  • Of the gripes of Conscience. 90
  • Of Covetousnes. ibid.
  • The Common peeple a cross­grain'd Animal. 99
  • A Comparison touching the Tomanto Empire. 109
  • The Character of an Ae­tonian. 111
  • Of Cuprinia. 114
  • The Cuprinian com­par'd to a Wolf. 115
  • The Cuprinian had vast designes. 114
  • A Carboncian turn'd to a Soland-Goose, and the re­sons why. 125
  • Carboncia a coors Coun­try. ibid.
  • Carboncia's brag of her Kings. 126
  • Carboncia's late story. ib.
  • Carboncia found Fidlers fare in Gheriona. 128
  • The Country of Gheriona good, but the peeple bad. 131
  • A high Complement. 135
  • Concupiscence not given to Mankind for a torment, but for delight. ibid.
F
  • A Description of the Mor­ning. 48
  • A Discours of Woman­kind. 56
  • A Devill lurks in every berry of the Grape. 68
  • Divers medicinall vertues in a dead Deer. 64
  • Of the Discovery of the New World. 71
  • The Doctor of Physicks Fee but two shillings in Tu­montia. 73
  • A Discours of Physic, and the Art thereof pro & con. 74
  • Diseases belonging to all the parts of Human bo­dy. 78
  • Distempers of the mind more cruciatory than those of the body. 80
  • A Discours touching the Sense and the Soul. ibid.
  • A Discours of Aetonia, and how she is impair'd, 109
  • What Nation is the gretest Drunkard. 111
  • A Discours of the Instin­ctive Reson that Beasts have. 119
  • What a damnable thing it is for Subjects to rise up in Arms against their King. 128
  • A Discourse of Nuns. 134
  • A Discourse whether the Human Soul be by Infusion or Traduction. 140
  • [Page] The Degrees of the Celestiall Hierarchy. 145
  • A discourse of the Immor­tality of the Soul. 147
E
  • Experience the touchstone of Truth. 6
  • Of the English Liturgy. 30
  • Examples pro & con touching the chastity of Wo­men. 59
  • An Emblem of a lavishing wife. ibid.
  • Every one knows how to tame a shrew but he who hath her. 61
  • Examples of notable scolds. ibid.
  • Examples of the rare Lon­gaevity of Deer. 64
  • The Elephant begins his youth at threescore years. ibid.
  • How pittifully the Empire is decay'd. 111
  • Of Aesop's Dogg. 115
  • The fearfull and sudden judgment which fell upon the Carboncians for their Re­bellion. 129
  • Of the fixed Starrs and the Planets, touching their mo­tion. 136
  • Exact Obedience among Bees. ibid.
  • Exact Government among Bees. ibid.
  • An Epitome of the late confusions in Gheriona. 33
  • An Epitome of the confusi­ons throughout the world for forty years. ibid.
F
  • Fable of an Ass. 24
  • Of a foolish Naturalist, who wish'd ther were another way to propagat Mankind than by Women. 55
  • The Fable of the Stagg. 65
  • A Facetious answer of a Pope touching Physitians. 74
  • The Foam of a Mule drunk in warm wine good against Pursines. 85
  • The Fable of the Mule. ib.
  • Divers Fables of the Fox. 87
  • The Fable of the Frogs. 99
  • A Fox toung carried in a chain good against sore eyes. 101
  • Fables 'twixt the Wolf and the Lamb applied. 105
  • The Fable of the Goat and the Lion. 118
  • The Fable of the Horse and the Ass. 24
  • The Fable of the Ass and the Spaniel. ibid.
G
  • God heals, but the Physitian takes the Fee. 77
  • No Government so wise that can fit all Countries, and why? 98
  • The genitalls, lights, and liver of a Fox, good against the Spleen. 101
  • The Gum of a Pine-tree ea­ten [Page] by the Fox when he is ill. 100
  • Goat's blood dissolves Dia­monds, and scours better then any file. 123
  • Goat's milk recovers a Load-stone, when being rub'd with Garlick it hath lost its vertu. ibid.
  • Goat's marrow good a­gainst aches. ibid.
  • Goat's trindles drunk in wine good against the Iaun­dies, &c. ibid.
  • Goat's liver, entralls, ashes, horns, milt, spleen, urine, marrow, hoofs, gall, dung, trindles, sewet, &c. all medicinall. ibid.
  • Gheriona censur'd. 131
H
  • A graduall Hymn to God and his Angels. 150
  • if the Humors were fix'd in Man's body, he might live eternally. In the Epist.
  • History a profitable study. 31
  • The horridnes of Annihi­lation. 49
  • Honest men use to marry, wise men not. 62
  • The hardship the Tumon­tian endures. 69
  • Health, the most precious of Iewels. 77
  • The high prerogatives of Reson. 81
  • A horrid kind of Revenge. 92
  • Another Hellish revenge in Saturnia. 93
  • A late History of ten Morris­dancers in Orosia that made above a 1000 years betwixt them. 122
  • The Horrid Ingratitude of the Carboncian against their native King. 128
  • The Horrid Insurrections in Hebrinia took rise from Carboncia. 130
  • Hope like Butter, gold in the morning, silver at noon, and lead at night. 135
I
  • In som places of the Indies the living wife throws her self into the pile with her hus­band. 60
  • Iealousie among Thoughts like Bats among Birds. 90
  • The Insulsity of the common peeple to think any rare ef­fect to be Magicall. 102
  • Of Instinctive Reson. 118
  • Ill humors adhere to human nature as rust to cop­per. 121
  • Of the Infirmities of Man­kind. ibid.
  • Idlenes the Devils couch. 154
K
  • The highest knowledge a man hath of his Creator but half blindnesse. 83
  • A cruel horrid murder. 103
  • The Kirk-mens horrid in­gratitude. 128
  • [Page] The Kings Cheese goes a­way three parts in pairings in Artonia. 19
  • Why the King of Artonia keeps the common peeple so low. 20
  • The King of Artonia's huge taxes. 19
  • The King of Bees hath no sting. 136
  • The King of Bees hath a solemn Funerall. 189
L
  • A Lawyer like Balaam's Asse, he will not speak unlesse an Angell appear. 16
  • Of Lawyers. 17
  • Lawyers build fair houses of Fool's heads. 17
  • Of Laughter. 22
  • Of the long age of Deer. 64
  • Laughter a passion that hath the most variety of action. 22
  • The Laws of the Kingdom of Bees. 136
M
  • Mirth and sadnes follow one another in human bodies as night succeeds day. The Epist.
  • Magic the first Philosophy. 2
  • Man Paramount of all the sublunary cretures. 7
  • Man a tyrant to himself. ib.
  • Man's body compar'd to a ship. 10
  • A Mariner's life. 12
  • Man the most intractable of all cretures. 26
  • Of the great maiden-City Marcopolis. 63
  • Man hath more diseases than a horse, or any other creture. 98
  • Of M [...]rchants. 70
  • Marther strangely disco­ver'd. 92
  • The marvellous continence of a Saturnian. 94
  • Of Monarchy. 98
  • Som generall Maxims of Policy may extend to all Countries. 99
  • The mode of raaking the Sympatheticall Powder. 103
  • Man more savage then any Beast. 108
  • Of the Method of Provi­dence. 110
  • A Miser and a Hog good for nothing till after death. 112
  • Man tax'd of presumption. 121
  • The Miser like an Ass, that carrieth gold but feeds on thistles. 17
  • The motions of Nature ir­resitible. 135
  • Mans gretest foes are with­in himself. ibid.
  • Man the gretest Amphi­byum of Nature for having three souls. 159
N
  • Of Navigation. 9
  • A notable proverb touching long life. 49
  • The noble gratitude of a Sa­turnian. 94
  • [Page] Not such a Tyrant in the world as the common peeple. 99
  • The Naturall and Politicall body compar'd. 20
  • A notable Fable of the Ass and the Horse applied. 24.
  • Nuns a degree higher the the ordinary cours of happi­nes. 134
  • Nature abhors captivity. 135
O
  • Of fading earthly joys. 149
  • Of hevenly joys. ibid.
  • Otter's stones good against the Palsie. 8
  • Otter's liver reduced to powder good against the Stone and Cholic. ibid.
  • Of old age. 64
  • Of the perturbances of hu­man brains. 68
  • Opportunity the best mo­ment in the whole extention of Time. 72
  • Of Physitians. 87
  • The odd life of a Soldier. 114
  • Orosia vindicated. 122
  • The Orosian faithfull to his King. 123
  • Orosia corrupted by the Gherionian Sectaries. 124
  • Of the three Souls in Man. 159
  • New Opinions, that the seeds of the Parents go not to impregnation, but the Female conceives by virtuall contact. 141
  • Of the three Faculties of the Soul. 143
P
  • The Prerogatives that Man hath over other cretures. 7
  • The Partridge and Pidge­on purge themselfs with Bay­leafs. 76
  • Policy how degenerated of late days. 95
  • The truest Patriots are the Marcopolits. 95
  • Policy and Craft distingui­shed. ibid.
  • The poor Politicians of Gheriona. 96
  • A false Policy that makes Religion her mask. 95
  • Policy or the Art of govern­ing Man the hardest. 97
  • Proverbs of severall Nati­ons.
  • Who preach War are the De­vil's Chaplains. 129
  • The best Policy Gheriona can use is to keep the Car­boncian low. ibid.
  • The Periodicall motions of the Planets. 136
  • Potentially, Man hath in him all created natures. 159
  • A Poem, containing the whole History of Man. 14
  • The Prerogative of Angels above Man in a Poem. 145
Q
  • Queen Morphandra de­scended of a Divine race. In the Prolog.
  • Queen Morphandra did perform all her Transmuta­tions, not by any Magicall ways, but by the Power and Fiat of God.
  • [Page] Of Queen Artemesia, who rear'd a wonderfull Monu­ment for her husband Mau­solus, and besides made her own Body his Tomb, by taking a doss every morning of his ashes. 60
R
  • Reson the specificall diffe­rence that distinguisheth Man from Beast. 7
  • The high prerogatives of Reson. ibid.
  • Of Roundheads. 49
  • Rebells and mad Doggs must be knock'd in the head. 100
  • Rebels but half punish'd, like Snakes cut in few pieces they will cling again together. ib.
  • A rare Cure wrought by the Sympatheticall Powder. 107
  • The Reson that Beasts have is onely Direct, and capable of Singulars. 118
  • Reson distinguished. 120
  • The Rational Soul the Image and Breath of God Almighty. 139
  • The Rational Soul the Queen of Forms. ibid.
  • The Rational Soul a Spark of Immortality. ibid.
  • The Rational Soul hath no particular place of residence in Man, but is diffusive through all parts. ibid.
  • Resons alledg'd, that the Ra­tional Soul is traducible. 141
  • A Rare example of the De­votion of Bees. 144
S
  • Of a Sea-faring life. 9
  • A Strange horrid dream. 32
  • Of the servitude and ill usage of Women. 58
  • The Serpent cures himself with Fennel. 76
  • Of the Sagacity of som Beasts. ibid.
  • The Stagg cures himself with Dittany. ibid.
  • The Snail heals her self with Hemlock. ibid.
  • The Stork heals himself with Origanum. ibid.
  • Spinning out of Time never made good Cloth. 80
  • The Sun never sets on the Tumontian Dominions. 83
  • A strange story of two Sa­turnian Merchants. 91
  • The Saturnian in the ex­treams of Love and Hatred, of Vertu and Vices. 94
  • The Saturnians may pre­scribe rules of Prudence to all Mankind. 95
  • Of late Smatterers in Poli­cy. 99
  • Of the Sympatheticall Pow­der, and the rare vertues thereof. 103
  • The Saturnian more sub­ject to jealousie and revenge then other Nations. 102
  • Strings made of Wolf's guts spoil all Music. 116
  • Strange things of the Wolf. ibid.
  • Soldiers in Peace like Chim­neys in Summer. 127
  • [Page] Symptoms when Bees are sick. 138
  • Some hold Hony to be the sweat of the Hevens, others the gelly of the Starrs, others the quintessence of the Air. ibid.
  • How a Swarm of Bees built an Altar. 144
T
  • The Torments of Hell. 40
  • Two notable Sayings in dis­paragement of Women. 55
  • Two famous Examples of the gallantry of Women. 60
  • Talk, one of the gretest delights of Women. 66
  • The Tumontian in his Councels follows the motion of Saturn, in his actions of Mer­cury. 67
  • The Tumontian excus'd for the blood he spilt in con­quering the New World. 70
  • The Tumontian Monar­chy like a Cloak made up of patches. 84
  • The Tumontian serves no Prince but his own. ibid.
  • The Tumontian trades no where but into his own Kings Country. ibid.
  • The Tumontian in perpe­tuall Feud with the common Enemy. ibid.
  • A Town in Saturnia where there are Mountains without Wood, Sea without Fish, Men without Faith, and Women without shame. 88
  • Tall men like houses five stories high, the upper room worst furnished. 111
  • A strange Tale of an Ass. 119
  • A Tale of a Crow. ibid.
  • Though the Threed of a man's life be never so well spun, yet it hath many bracks. 121
  • Till Beans blossom, Bees never go abroad. 137
  • The difference 'twixt sepa­rated Souls and Angels, and how they agree. 145
V
  • Of the vexations and per­turbances of spirit that Man is subject unto. 7
  • The Variety of labors that go to make Bread. 14
  • The Vexation of spirit Mankind is subject unto a­bove other cretures. 68
  • The Volganians beat their wifes duly once a week. 68
  • The Virtues of Deer. 63
  • When all Vices grow old, Covetousness grows young in Man. 90
  • Of the Vices in Saturnia. 91
  • Of the Vices of Aetonia. III The high Vanities of Man. 145
  • A Visionall Dream. 32
  • The Various torments of Hell. 40
  • [Page] Variety of new torments in Hell. ibid.
W
  • The Wisest of Mortalls is he who controuls his humors. In the Epist.
  • Warr a a Fire struck in the Devil's Tinder-box. 10
  • Women of purer stuff then Men. 56
  • Of rare Women. 57
  • Of good and bad Women. 58
  • The Woman and Fortresse which begin to parly are half won. 66
  • Women held by som to be of an inferior Creation, and not the same species. 54
  • A Woman can wash her hands so long in a Bason of clear water that she cannot foul, Man not. 56
  • Women praised and dis­praised. 57
  • The Warrs with Hydraulia cost the Tumontian a hun­dred and twenty millions of Tresure. 72
  • The Ways Hydraulia found out to counterfeit the Tumontian Coyn. ibid.
  • The VVild Boar heals him­self with Ivy. 76
  • VVhat the Eye of a Batt is to the Sun, the Understanding of Man is to God. 83
  • The great VVilines of a Fox in sundry Fables. 88
  • Of the VVeaknesses and frailties of Man. 121

These severall Books are Printed, and are to be sould by William Palmer at the Palm-Tree in Fleet-street.

1. OCcult Physick; or, The Principles in Nature Anatomized, by Philosophicall operations, taken from Experience, in three Book; by W. Williams, in 8o

2. Phil-Anglus, Some sober Inspections made into the Car­riages and Consults of the late Long Parliament; by Iam▪ Howell Esq in 8o

3. Metamorphosis Anglorum; or, Reflections Historicall and Politicall upon the late Change of Government in England, from the Death of Oliver Lord Protector to this present time; by S. D. Gent.

4. That renowned Piece, Mr. Howell's Dodona's Grove, tran­slated into the new refined French by one of the prime Wits in the Academy of Blaux Esprits in Paris, in 4o

The Art of Stenography, or Short-writing, with a School­master to the Art; by Iohn Willis.

And also there are to be had and sold all the pieces of Dr. Heylyns writing.

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