A DIALOGUE BETWEEN Timotheus and Judas, Concerning a Pamphlet called, The Growth of DEISM in England.

A DIALOGUE Between Timotheus & Judas, Concerning a PAMPHLET, CALLED, The Growth of Deism in England.

LONDON: Printed for S. Manship at the Ship in Cornhil, near the Royal-Exchange, MDCXCVI.

TO THE READER.

ABout the middle of June last, a Gen­tleman put into my Hands a Pam­phlet, called, The Growth of Deism in England; but withall told me, that he had borrowed it, upon promise to restore it with speed, and therefore could allow me just time to peruse it; and so I did, and that was all. My Curiosity leading me to a further and more ferious perusal of it, I sent with what speed I could to London, for one of those Pamphlets, but could not get one till July the 18th. Assoon as I had received it, and read it once or twice, I believed that the Author's Travels in his Youth had spoiled him, and so much [Page]corrupted his Christianity, as not to leave him the Morals of an Honest Infidel. What his Modesty, his Truth and Cha­rity are, his Pamphlet tells us plainly enough, What his Religion is, I wish he himself could tell. If we should allow him to be a poor deformed By-blow of Socinus, we do him great Honour. But who can guess what, or who he is? He has more Disguises on than Father Grey­beard had on the Scaffold in 48. Jan. 30. Whether that Man be still living or no, who can tell? But however that be, the Author of the Growth of Deism has undertaken the like Jobb of Journey-work again, excepting only, that his Master has enlarged his Commission to the Ex­ecution of the whole Body of Christia­nity, with its Prince, or (as he calls him Page 17.) its Patron. I had sent this abroad a little sooner to beg the Honour of its being admitted into his Numerous [Page]Acquaintance, but I feared, being upon his Travels in making his Summer-Vi­sits, it might not find him: But the Season of the Year approaching now, that will call him to his Winter-Quarters in London, I thought it good Manners to send this forth a little before-hand, to wait him there, and Congratulate his Return.

A DIALOGUE BETWEEN Timotheus & Judas Concerning a Pamphlet, called the Growth of Deism in England.

Judas.

SIR, next paying my Respects to you after your Return Home, the chief of my business is, to have your Judgment of a Pamphlet lately written, called, The Growth of Deism in England.

Tim.

I just saw, and heard of it Sir, in my Journey, and that was all.

Judas.

Bless me Sir! It has been abroad several months, and written with that smartness of Stile, and quickness of Wit, that I am amazed to hear you say, you did not hear of it before.

Tim.

If you could have added Evidence of Truth, and Strength of Argument, it had been never the worse. But you know Sir, that I live a Retired Life, and that I have neither Time, nor Mony (like that Author) to Con­tract a Numerous Acquaintance, to spend the Winter in [Page 2]Town, and the Summer in Country Visits. There may be a thousand Books Printed, and I never hear of One of them. And it was meer chance only, that ever I heard of this.

Judas.

But pray Sir, what is your Judgment of it, for I presume you have read it since your Return.

Tim.

Once or twice I have Sir; enough in Conscience to see through the Authors both Honesty, and Argument. But because I do not much trust to my own Judgment in any thing, I will (if you please Sir) wave mine a while, and give you an honest Gentleman's Opinion of it, who was with me lately, and who had scanned it narrowly.

Judas.

With all my Heart Sir.

Tim.

Asking then his Judgment Sir, of it, he told me, that it was ominous to stumble in the Threshold. When I read Sir (said he) the Title of that Pamphlet of the Growth of Deism, I expected to have heard of Arguments to in­validate all Revelation. I expected to have heard of Sampson's Locks and Balaam's Ass in the Old Testament, and of as many Absurdities in Matters of Faith, and Falshoods in Matters of Fact in the New. I believed he would have proved its inconsistency with the Chronology, and Histo­ry of those Times in which it was written, of its pre­scribing Mysteries to be believed, which were contra­dictory to common Understanding, and of matters of Pra­ctice, which were so to common Morals; I expected to have heard that the Apostles were no proper Judges of the Matters of Fact they delivered, that they were corrupt­ed either through Interest, or Design, or rendered Incom­petent through Ignorance, or Profligate Lives, and by consequence, that their Testimony could not be supposed to pass in any Court of Judicature in the World, and that for the same Reasons we might reject the Validity of it too. This I say, I lookt for (at least) from this Man [Page 3]when I read the Title to his Pamphlet (for I expected Pertinence, and not Design) but instead thereof, out comes a Mouse at last, and tells me, that there are a par­cel of Men amongst the Clergy of England, that do not live so good Lives as they should do; as if (said he) there were any Body of Men in the World that did; and that our Saviour had not expresly foretold, that to the End thereof, there would be Tares mixed with the Wheat.

Sir said I, methinks there cannot be a weaker and more Ridiculous Argument brought against the truth of any Doctrine, than the ill Lives of some of its Professors. For if there be any Force in it, there is (with Christianity) an End of all Religion in the World (for none are with­out some Men of bad Lives) and all Mankind (if this Argument be good) must with one dead weight sink into downright Atheism.

To which my Friend replyed, and who knows Sir, saith he, what hidden Reserve this Man had when he made use of it? But Sir (said I) it may be, if this Au­thor's Life were narrowly inspected into, that it might be found no very good Argument for the Truth of that Religion (whatever it be) that he himself professes. To which my Friend returned: We ought Sir, to have better grounds to believe it is, than he has given us in this Pamphlet; for Diabolical Slanders and Malice (said he) are but poor Arguments of a Good Life. But when all is done (said my Friend) if the bad Lives of some of the Clergy of England are an Argument against the Truth of Revelation, the Lives of those that are good, must by a Parity of Reason be an Argument for it, and except, said he, that this Man is lost to all Shame, and Modesty, he cannot deny, but that there are abundance of the Clergy of England, that live answerably to their Faith.

[Page 4]

Upon this I interposed a little, and said, you seem, Sir, to me to be much mistaken. For this Gentleman does not say, that these Arguments have made him a Deist, but some of his Acquaintance.

To which he replied, The Monky, Sir, you know, pulled the Nut out of the Fire with the Cats Foot, but both the Action and Design was wholly the Monky's, and not the Cat's; and this Gentleman makes so many ug­ly Grimaces through his whole Pamphlet, against all Christian Churches, as well as that of England, that it is an easie Matter to see who was Master of this Movement. 'Tis true (said he) he does sometimes seem to boggle a little at the Deists Arguments brought against the Truth, and in Scandal of the Christian Religion, but he does it after such a yawning rate, that you would believe he were more than half a-sleep when he did it.

But however it be as to that matter, yet all they bring against the Church of England, he swallows whole, and does not only allow, but improve them. So that what­ver Disguises he would appear under in other Respects, yet all that is said against the Church of England is plainly his own, and ought to be so esteemed. And therefore (said he) let him put on as many Skins as he will, we see his Ears still, as the Man knew well enough who it was that stunk, though the Woman said 'twas her Dog.

‘But pray Sir, said I, how can this be? When, Page the 8th. we are told that he belongs to the Church of England, and that it was well for him he was of the Bishop's Church, for without a dutiful Allegiance to the Bishops he could not hold the Place he now en­joys.’

I am glad Sir, said my Friend, to hear, that some Men may hold Places under the Church of England, that are not [Page 5]of the De Facto-ship. And this is the only Instance (I think) (though I believe much against his Will and Knowledge) that he has confuted the Objections he made by the Deists against the Church of England. For by this Instance he hath let the World see, that a Man may hold a Place, and yet pay very small Duty to the Bishops. Not that I doubt, said he, but that he is old enough to hold a Place under any Church whatever, and be their Shiboleth the Jure Divino, or De Facto, or any other Title, he is wise enough to hold fast what he has; only it may be, he had rather their Shiboleth were the Title of the People, that so the King might hold his Place under him. And as for his belonging to the Church of England, he may, Sir, said he, for all as I know, if you will allow Judas to belong to Jesus and the twelve, or Ascarides to belong to the Body of a Man. After he had said this, Sir (said I) we will have done if you please with the Title, and I will beg the Favour of you to give me your Judgment of the Body of the Discourse.

Judas.

It is what I have been long a waiting for.

Tim.

I tell you then Sir (said he) that if you will be­lieve all this Author says, you may believe enough; if on­ly what he proves, you can believe nothing. For if you will not take his Word for his Stories, there's an End of them, and I dare boldly say, that take ten Pages together through his whole Book, and there is hardly one Word of Truth in them, or if there be, it may honestly be said of him, what he colourably says of the Deists, Page the 14th. that he stretches his Conclusion beyond his Premises. The main of his Building is raised on the Shiboleths (as he calls them) of the Church of England: The Doctrine of Non­resistance, and the De Facto Title: there is a little Colour of Truth in the First, in the last there is none at all. So that if you do but rightly state the former, and barely deny the [Page 6]latter, his whole Structure falls about his Ears, and he is buried in its Ruins. The rest of his Book is (most of it) Personal Calumniations, just said, and never proved, and for the greatest Part as false, as the Foundations of his Building are rotten.

In short, Sir, said he, it is a Discourse written with that little Truth, and less Argument, with that incom­parable Malice against all settled Churches, particularly that of England, against Christianity it self in all its holy Mysteries, more especially that of the Divinity of our Bles­sed Saviour; that I cannot think those Papers can deserve any better Fate, than to expire in a like Place, where the Authour's famous Ancestor Arius did; and Sir, said he, I honestly confess to you, that those I had of them, have sometimes since given up the Ghost.

Thus Sir, you have heard (in part) the Thoughts of my Friend upon this Pamphlet!; pray now, before we go any further, what are your Thoughts of him?

Judas.

Why truly Sir, to deal plainly with you, I think him a Priest-ridden Ass, one that has more Ears than Brains, that hears and receives whatsoever the Priests please to put into his Head, and has no Judgment to distinguish of things. But as for my Friend, the Author of this Pam­phlet, (so I call him, for so he is) I think him (next the Honourable S. R. H. the best Distinguisher in the World. He had that Acumen Ingenii from his Infancy, that he was used to slit Motes in the Sun, when he was but four Years old, and now he is above threescore, he can, he says, slit a Hair without Spectacles.

In short, Sir, I believe, that you cannot but see, that he has distinguished so nicely between Religion and Priest-Craft, that he has made all Ambitious Priests to stink, even from Aaron down to this Day. And has turned the Edge of the Church of England's Caution to young Travellers, Page 5th. [Page 7]so sharply against their own Throats, that he has distin­guished them forever out of their Gains that way, by mak­ing it plainly appear, that there are as many holy Cheats amongst the Clergy of the Church of England, as amongst those of Rome.

And now Sir, since you have had my Judgment so freely of your Friend, pray let me have yours so of mine, and of his Discourse.

Tim.

I will, Sir, as far as concerns the Church of Eng­land, but no farther, let others answer for themselves. And I will do it only on this Supposition too, that when I charge this Author with what is said against the Church of England, you do not reply, that it was said by this or t'other Deist, and not by him. For besides, that this would breed an endless Confusion in our Discourse, if the Charge that is made against the Church of England be an­swered, it matters not under whose Name it be done. But I cannot think of a juster Way than doing it under this Authors, for the Cause and Quarrel is wholly his, though like a Coward he hides his own Head; and thrusts other Men forward to fight it for him. Do not think therefore, Sir, that in the Judgment I shall give of, and Answer I shall make to this Pamphlet, that like a Gladiator, I will go to fencing with half a dozen Men at once, when 'tis ob­vious, that all the Thrusts they make against the Church of England, are directed by this Author's Hand. Or be the Arguments whose they will, the Malice ('tis plain) is purely his.

Judas.

I do not know, Sir, how my Friend may like this Dealing, but if you will not be led, I cannot drive you, you must take your own Way.

Tim.

Then Sir, to what you said last I reply, that not­withstanding what this Author hath said, blessed be God, the Throats of the Clergy of the Church of England are [Page 8]pretty well yet, but how they would be if this Author had his full Swinge at them, I cannot tell. But pray Sir, by your leave a little. Did the Difference between the Church of England and the Dissenters in Bishop Laud's Time, shew the young Traveller upon his Return that they were both Cheats? Pray what then Sir, must a young Travel­ler think now, upon his Return of the Deists, when he shall read their bitter and malicious Invectives also against the Church of England? Will he not think, that they now, as well as the Dissenters formerly, are contending with the said Church about Power, and that there is Knaves-Craft as well as Priest-Craft, and that Deism is as very a Cheat, as (they say) the Christianity of the Church of England is?

In short Sir, our young Traveller seeing all Christian Churches exploded by these Men, and in the mean time observing so much Malice and Bitterness in their Writings against all Perswasions but those of their own Sect, pray Sir, what must this young Gentleman do, if this Man's Argument be good but turn Atheist and leave them all?

Once more Sir, what if our young Traveller, upon his Return, should find an Army of Factious Republicans in Rebellion against the King and Parliament, and the King and Parliament in Maintenance of their just Rights and Laws in Arms against them: Must the young Traveller presently conclude that this is only a Contest for Power, and that the King and Parliament are as very Cheats as those Rebels? And that their Controversie at bottom only is, How they shall make the best Market of the People? Will he conclude that Government is nothing but a Piece of Kings-Craft, and that Government and Governours are Cheats both alike? Will he conclude, that, as by reason of the zealous Contest between Archbishop Laud on the one Part, and the Presbyterian Kirk on the other, he will be of no [Page 9]Religion, so by reason of these Controversies between the King and the People, he will live under no Go­vernment? Will he therefore betake himself (as if this Man's Argument be good he must) to Hobbs his Natural State of Independency, and like a Bear or a Wolf, retire to Caves and Dens, and bid Defi­ance to all Mankind? Or will he not rather, as he ought (and as he will, if he have made any Im­provements in his Travels) Arm himself in defence of the King and Laws of the Land, against those Factious and Ambitious Rebels, whose only design is to be uppermost themselves?

But to let this pass Sir, that which troubles me most is, to hear this Author so positively affirm the Church of England to be but one Great Bulk of Im­posture, and that all her Priests to a Man (except Mr. Johnson) are so many Knaves and Cheats; At this Rate Sir, he must believe the Church of England to be the Church of Hell, as well as the Church of Rome, and for all as I can see by this Charge, must have a great many more Devils in her than she has.

Judas.

Why truly Sir, my Friend does verily be­lieve the Church of England so to be, and so he will call her, assoon as he can do it with the same security he now does the Church of Rome. Nay Sir, I tell you further, that he believes all setled Churches in Chri­stendom so to be: For he tells you plainly Page 27. ‘That 'tis the trick of all setled Churches to take away the Use of Mens Reason, to render them Slaves and Vassals to their Dictates and Commands; and what are these pray that do so, but Churches of Hell? But particularly as to the Church of England, he has proved it to a Demonstration, that she is so [Page 10] Arrant a Cheat, that she has no other Ends, than to make her self Rich and Great.

Tim.

If this be proved Sir, I am his Convert. But pray Sir, does this Author mean, that the Church of England Cheats us of the Use of our Reason, because she does not teach us to believe, that one of his Friends, Page 25. or rather indeed himself, can write as good a Moral as our Saviour?

Judas.

We will let that pass at present Sir, if you please, and examine this Author (as near as our dis­course will permit, page by page, and if I do not de­monstrate to you, that he has made it clearly appear, that all setled Christian Churches are but so many Cheats, but more particularly the Church of England, I also with the rest of the Fools will give up my Rea­son to them.

Timotheus.

If you do Sir, I am your Proselyte, and will take this opportunity to recover the Use of mine.

Judas.

We will begin with the Church of England Sir: I told you that the main end of that Church was to make Themselves Rich and Great, nay that they do (as my Friend says) even Rival the Sovereign Power. For the proof of this see Pages 6, 7. ‘The Bishop's House (says my Friend) like that of the King's, must be called his Palace, he must keep up his Claim to the Miter and Crosier, to Vie with the Crown and Scepter. The Title of the King's Courts is Anno Regni nostri, of the Bishops, Anno Consecrationis no­strae. In short, is the King Enthroned? The Bishop is Enthronised; Has the King a Divine Right? So has the Bishop, &c. And now, what think you Sir? Is not this Argument a plain Demonstration of the [Page 11] Ambition and Pride of the Bishops? Is it not worth its weight in Gold, as scarce as Mony is now?

Tim.

It may be Sir, for all as I know, and yet not be worth much neither.

Judas.

Why do you think 'tis of no weight Sir?

Tim.

Undoubtedly of very great, and strength too; The whole Convocation must needs sink under the Bur­den of it. Another such Barrel clapt under the Church of England would blow her up infallibly. But now I think of it Sir, this Argument puts me in mind of two other sorts of Men, who, (if this Man's Reason­ing be good) seem as dangerous to the State as the Bishops and Clergy; And you might do well, the next time he comes up to the sitting of Parliament, to advise him to take them a little into his Considera­ton.

Judas.

Pray who are those Sir?

Tim.

Why the Nobility and Lawyers, especially the Lord Chancellor and the Twelve Judges.

Judas.

But pray Sir, how do you think my Friend may make this out, for if it can be done, I can pro­mise for him; for next a Priest, he hates these Men at his Heart.

Tim.

Then first of all Sir, as to the Nobility he may Argue, That has the King his Crown? so have the Nobles their Coronets: Has the King his great Palaces? so have They: Has the King his Robes? so have They: Has the King a Coach and Six, and a numerous Attendants of Lackyes and Foot-boys? so have they. Nay, they have as many Ears and Eyes as the King has, and called by the same Name too; and what is most dangerous of all, they have as many Fingers and Toes and Nails as the King, and who knows, how soon these bold Men, may [Page 12]climb up into his Throne, and scratch out his Maje­sties Eyes.

Judas.

Upon my word Sir, I think this is well thought on; my Friend will improve this I'le warrant you, for he loves the Commonwealth too well, not to hate the Nobility. But pray Sir, how shall he make it out as to the Chancellor and Twelve Judges?

Tim.

Easily enough Sir thus. Has the King his Scepter? my Lord Chancellor has his Mace: Has the King his Purple? the Judges have their Scarlet. Has the King his Throne? they have their Benches. Nay, Does the King wear a Doublet and Breeches? so do these Men too; And what is worst of all, as if they intended to starve his Majesty, these Conquering Judges have Thrust him out of his own great Refectory or Hall, where all his Ancestors did constantly Eat and Drink, and have there erected a Committee of Twelve, to de­termine of all his Majesties good Subjects Lives and Estates. And this Committee of Twelve, being as nim­ble in wresting a Statute, as any of the Committee of Six is a Text, to their own Advantage, get great Estates Themselves, whilst many Honest Men Live and Dye Beggars. Nay, what is more than all this, These Con­quering Twelve will not admit his Majesty to sit in their Courts, so that his Person is as little seen, and known there, as his Name is heard of in the Bishops: But like Moses to Aaron, these Men make themselves Gods to the King, and say, Hitherto shall thy Prerogative come, and no further. And what is more than this still, when these Conquering Twelve have a mind to shew their Power abroad, they take a Jaunt once or twice a year through the Kingdom, and hang up so many of his Majesty's Subjects, that 'tis to be feared, that in a lit­tle [Page 13]time, his Majesty will be King but of a very small moyety of his People. And for this doughty Service of theirs, I may honestly say (without the help of a Whetstone as in Dr. S's Case) they have sixteen hun­dred pounds a year a Man, whilst Honest Mr. Johnson Starves upon Charity.

Judas.

Pray Sir, what would you advise my Friend to do in this Case?

Tim.

Why your Friend may Sir (if he pleases) the next time he comes up to the Session of Parliament, but advise his Majesty, with the Committee of Six, Page 31. ‘to Dissolve this Committee of Twelve, and he will then be King both of the Clergy (as he says) and Laity too. And fix the Obedience of all his Subjects on himself exclusively: For on these two hang all their Law and their Prophets. But were they but once Dissolved, his Majesty need but Ask and Have. Whereas 'tis plain now, that these two Conquering Committees of the Clergy, and Lawyers, cast an Awe upon the Sovereign Power, and suffer­eth it not to provide for the Common Good of the Subject, but will appropriate the Salus Publica, and Influence the Government to serve their own Parti­cular, their own Private Ends, as this Author has most admirably worded it, page 31.’

Judas.

Really Sir, you have hit the Nail on the Head; and don't you fear, but assoon as the Times will bear it, my Friend will be at the Lawyers too, as well as the Clergy. He has given you a smart Touch of his In­clinations that way already, page 23. where he calls the Attorney General, and Judges so many Court Bloodsuckers, and by Consequence, as very or worse Tyrants over the Lives and Estates of the People, than the Bishops are over their Consciences.

Tim.

But now I have thought better of it Sir, I think my self bound to give you Notice, that there may be a little Danger to your Friend from my Ad­vice; for the Judges are of the Fundamental Constitu­tion of this Government.

Jud.

As if my Friend did not know that the Bishops were so too. Alas Sir, I have heard some wise Men say, that there is but One great Fundamental either in Church or State.

Tim.

Pray what is that Sir?

Judas.

Every Action of your Life tells you Sir, 'tis Self-Interest. And can you think Sir, so accomplish'd a Person as my Friend is, will be frighted only with a Hard word, fit only for the Amusement of the Igno­rant Vulgar? If he has taken that Courage Sir, to Ex­amine what he believes, and will not submit to your Fun­damentals in Religion, do you think he will boggle at those of the State? Under the Rose Sir, it would make a Cat laugh to hear you talk of Fundamen­tals.

Tim.

Nay Sir, if your Friend shall think it is for his Interest, let him do it, I shall not hinder him.

Judas.

But pray Sir, let us look back a little. Do you not think that my Friend has by the last Argu­ment plainly demonstrated, that the Bishops of England Rival (as he says) the Sovereign Power?

Tim.

Truly Sir, I cannot as yet bring my self to believe, that living in a pretty good House, with a little Honour and Power by the Bounty of his Prince, can make a Man a King. Nor do I think that Kings would have been so weak as to have bestowed These Honours on the Bishops, if they had believed, that at the same they they had made so many Rivals of [Page 15]their Power. Methinks this Author should have shewn some Mony they had Stampt, have produced some Bills they had Past. He should have named the Embassadors they had Sent and Received, the Wars they had pro­laimed, and the like.

Judas.

The Wars they have proclaimed Sir, pray who are they at Peace with? By the Abjuration of the Covenant and other Acts, he tells you Page the 9th, ‘That they proclaimed War against the Presby­terians, and beat them out of their Livelihoods, and after that drove them five Miles distance from all Market-Towns: And that King Charles the II. was not able to support these his Loving Subjects against the Power of the Bishops.’ And Page the 8th he tells you, ‘That by a new Church Device or Law, they have deprived the rest of the Dissenters of the Priviledges of their Country to which they were Born; and Pages the 18th and 19th, That they have proclaimed War against the Honest Deists too, be­cause they will not believe Things which are in their own Natures Absurdities, and impossible to be be­lieved, such as the Doctrine of the Trinity and other unintelligible Mysteries, which serve only for A­musement, and not for Instruction.’ And lastly Sir, he shews you plainly, ‘That they proclaim War against King William, by allowing him only a De Facto Title as the Principle of their Obedience,’ Page the 13th, ‘And that this is now the Shiboleth of their Party, as Non-resistance was formerly, and that none must be promoted to Church Dignities, but such who come in upon this Title only. So that 'tis plain as is said Page the 12th, That the Church of England is a Party, and are at War with all but [Page 16]those of their own Perswasion, and have their Watch­words to know one another, as well as their Church Devices, to destroy all others but themselves.’

Tim.

This is a heavy Charge indeed Sir, but a Grace of God it may not be true. I will give an An­swer to the Particulars of it by and by. But this you call Sir, Proclaiming of War; and Rivalling of Sove­reignty, do you not?

Judas.

Can you doubt it Sir, is there not waging of War against Men's Livelihoods, as well as Lives?

Tim.

And against Mens Reputations as well as Lives and Estates; and would not they (think you) that do it upon the one, do it upon the other, if it were in their Power?

Judas.

I allow it.

Tim.

Then is your Friend this Author, not only a Rivaller of Sovereignty, but the most barbarous Tyrant living.

Judas.

How is that proved Sir?

Tim.

By his murdering the Reputation of the In­nocent without distinction of Age or Sex, not sparing our Saviour himself, from his Cross down to this day.

Judas.

Pray Sir, how does this appear?

Tim.

Only from his own words Page the 7th, where after he had sufficiently scandalized the Modern Clergy, He tells us, That 'tis not Impossible but that the Ancient Clergy might be possessed with the same spirit of Pride, that has prevailed over the Modern; and who does not know what this Man means by that word, Impossible? Nay he can hardly forbear an open Justification of the Ro­mans Crucifixion of our Saviour himself, and punish­ing him (as he words it) as a Slave. For although [Page 17]he covers it with this supposition, If he laid the Foun­dation of the Power of the Clergy. Yet he must be blind indeed that cannot see what this Man means here by his If's and And's. When the times will per­mit, he will leave them out, and speak plainly. Jesu God! how is it, that we live to see thy Face impu­dently spit in again by Miscreant Infidels, and all this openly, in the Face of the Sun, and a Christian Go­vernment.

Judas.

You mistake Sir, 'tis a Deist says this, and not my Friend.

Tim.

I warned you of this Sir, at the beginning of the discourse; you think your Friend is like Legion in the Gospel, but he is just the contrary. For he himself is the Master Daemon, and hath power over all those Evil Spirits which have taken up their abode in him, and hath Power over them to command them to speak what he pleases, even to the blaspheming of our blessed Lord himself.

But if this Man Sir, would have had us hearken to his condemnation of contentious Humours, and Hostile Inclinations in others, he ought first to have shewed to us, the Peaceableness of his own. If he would have exposed the Quarrelsome and unchristian tempers of Church-men, he ought first to have recommended him­self by a Spirit of Meekness and Charity. Then he might with better confidence (at least) have reproved those of the Church of England, as he does, Page the 8th. from the breach of the second table, and might some­time or other (it may be) have had his wish, that his Soul might be amongst the Philosophers.

But in stead of this, he has sounded a defiance throughout this Pamphlet, not only against the [Page 18]Church of England, but all other Christian Churches whatever, and thrown as much filth upon them, as old rotten Lungs could discharge. Whereby he has proved himself a spurious breed of Celsus, Porphyry, Ju­lian, &c. for he has their Spite, and Malice, he only wants their Wit and Learning. But if this be the Religion of the Deists, Gather not my Soul O God with these Sinners.

Judas.

Pray Sir, let Harangning alone, and come to the Particulars you promised. Does not my Friend make it plainly appear, that the Bishops and Clergy did use the Presbyterians and Dissenters barbarously, by the Church devices of Abjuration of the Covenant and the Test, &c.

Tim.

Good Sir! what makes your Friend so sweet all on a sudden on the Presbyterians? how comes he to appear to them like an Angel of Light in this Page, and yet in the two immediately foregoing, to be kicking with his Cloven Foot at them, to spurn them to death? for there he levels them with the Bishops, and tells us ‘that they both under a pretence of Religion were grasping at Power, and that the Claims of the Presbytery are nothing inferior to those of the Bishops.’

So that as kind as he is to them here, yet he has given them such a Cast of his Office, as plainly to discover to them, that were they guilty of the same fault the Church of England is at present, that is, were they up­permost again, he would not fail to remember them how they Imposed the Covenant as a Condition of their Com­munion, as he now tells the Church of England they did the Abjuration of it. That he would tell them then, as he does the Church of England now, Page the 8th. ‘That no Man could enjoy a place of Profit or Trust [Page 19]under them, though never so dutiful a Subject or honest a Man, unless he had a Conscience by their Law established, by which they deprived Men of the Privileges of their Country to which they were born, &c.’ These and a great many other matters upon occasion, I suppose this good Author could rub his old Temples, and call to Remembrance against the Presbyterians, were they once again uppermost, which I hate to rake in, for I have Dunghil enough before me already.

Judas.

But what's all this to the business Sir? does the Presbyterians dealing barbarously with the Bishops and Clergy, justifie their dealing so with them, and other Dissenters? What can they say for those Church Devices of their making, the Acts of Abju­ration of the Covenant and the Test, &c.

Tim.

If your Friend could make this Good, he might well say they rivall'd the Sovereign Power. It may be he thinks he can. And (indeed) he is pretty near it; he is within one Proposition of it; for if he can but prove that the King and both Houses are all Clergy-Men, he has done his business; but till he has done that, he has done nothing at all.

Now although I do look upon this Author to be a meer swell'd Hypocondriac, whose Spleen does not only Rival, but tyrannically domineer over the Sove­reignty of his Brain, yet I do not believe him so weak nei­ther, but that he knew very well what he did, and un­derstood well enough what he said in this Matter. He knew well enough that these were not Acts of Convoca­tion, but of the Parliament; but because he durst not wreak his Malice where he would, he did it where he durst. But when all is done Sir, I believe this Author [Page 20]would have a pretty hard task to prove, that our Go­vernment, as well as all other Governments in the world, may not make Laws for the Encouragement of the Established Religion, because he does not con­cur in opinion with them. And I fear if this Man and his Friends the Deists, were once uppermost, it would be the first work they would set about themselves. For how hard soever he bear upon the Abjuration of the Covenant, yet he cannot but threaten the Clergy, Page the 16th. with the Abjuration of King James; and I doubt not, but the next thing they would hear of from them, would be, the Abjuration of Jesus Christ, and all his unintelligible Mysteries.

Judas.

And pray Sir, why may we not renounce all unintelligible Mysteries? We must either renounce them, or our Reason, that is, our Nature.

Tim.

Must we then Sir, renounce every thing that we cannot fully comprehend! if we must, then there is an end of Deism, as well as Christianity, for there are Mysteries in the Creation of the World, as well as the Redemption of it. If there be not, I desire this Author the next time he comes up to the Session of Parliament to publish a Comment on the 38th. Chap. of Job, and therein to let us know, that though Job was so ignorant as not to be able to answer God, yet He can; or if he cannot, (which I much doubt) let him give us a Reason, why God may not redeem the world, with the same Incomprehensible Wisdom that he made it.

I do verily believe that God is a Spirit, and that Infinity and Eternity are his Incommunicable Attributes, and yet I do honestly confess, that I am far from being able to frame in my Mind a distinct, positive or ade­quate [Page 21]Idea either of a Spirit or Eternity. If this Au­thor can, he will do well to oblige the world with his Notion; if he cannot, and Christianity must be turned out of Doors by reason of its Mysteries, Deism must take it by the Hand and go with it, and this Au­thor must turn Atheist, and be Gentleman-Usher to lead them both forth. For why should not those mysterious puzzlings in Nature stagger his Faith of God's Creation of the World, as well as that of the Trinity does in God's Redemption of it? they are both alike the works of his Incomprehensible Wisdom.

It is enough for me (methinks) that God lets us see so much of the Creation, as to convince us, that he made us when we were Nothing; and it is enough in the work of the Redemption, to let us know, that he Redeemed us, when we were Lost; and from Both, to give Mankind a full Demonstration of his Infinite Power and Wisdom, of his unspeakable Goodness and Love to them, and by consequence the eternal Obli­gations they lie under to Love him again, and obey him: And therefore, though I am not able sully and distinctly to comprehend the mystery of the Holy Trinity, yet it is enough for me that I see many great ends and purposes of my belief of it, in order to my eternal Salvation. And though I declare it to be past my Reach and Understanding (and it may be if God had made further discoveries of it, it would have been so much the more beyond my Capacity and Comprehension) yet I think my self bound in Duty to sit down satisfied with those God has already made, and with profound Veneration and Thanks­giving to adore the unspeakable Love of God in the great work of our Redemption, though I am not [Page 22]able to comprehend his Mysterious Wisdom therein. And so far is this belief of the Trinity from being like (what this Author says Page 20) the belief of one of Eu­clid's Elements, that I defy him to instance in any one Mystery of the Christian Religion, which is not capable of Useful and Practical Deductions, or to use his own Words, of Application to Moral Duties, and thereby to make us better Men.

I know that St. John says 1 John 5.7. that there are three that bear Record in Heaven; and these three are One. And I have that absolute deference to the Spirit of God, to believe it. But (I fear) if St. John were now Living, and this Author should hear him say those words, that he would make himself very merry with him, and Ask Father John, ‘Whether he meant three Modes, or Properties, or Internal Relations, or External Denominations, or else no more than a Holy three, or three somewhats,’ or (what is truly his meaning) three Nothings. Or were our Saviour now on Earth, and he should hear him say that He and his Father were One, I doubt as he says Page 20. that he would either run mad through despair of finding out the Truth, or which I rather believe, would turn Pharisee, and endeavour to stone him to death, for making himself equal with God.

Judas.

You do not Sir, seem to me fully to take in my Friend's Argument; for he tells you Page the 20th. That though you all agree in the belief of the Trinity, yet you widely differ in what we must believe concerning it. Whereby it is plain, that your differences are so great about it, that you know not what you believe your selves; and how then shall other Men know?

Tim.

It seemeth much to me Sir, that when there [Page 23]are some differences amongst us, they should signify Every thing, but when there are more and greater amongst the Deists, they should signify Nothing. Thus the Author of the Letter to the Deists (a great Friend of, though (he says) no Acquaintance with the Author of the Growth of Deism)" What says he Page ‘147. shall I set my self to seek out a System of Christianity amongst their endless Disputes? Let them first agree upon it amongst themselves; when that is done, it will be time enough for me to con­sider what they say.’

One would think this Author had great Reason to put his Memory into the Gazette, with a Stolen or Strayed such a Day, from such a one, One of his Internal Senses, &c. For it was but Page the 13th. of that Letter that ‘he tells us of the several sorts of Gods the Deists frame to themselves; and Page the 14th. he says they are so many, that to expose their Notions were an endless Task. For he doubts, he says, whether any two of them agree intirely in one System, and by consequence he tells us (the same Page) the mischievous Influences that all such like opinions must needs have upon the whole state of Mankind in the world.’

So that it seems all the mischiefs arising from Di­visions in the world, do not arise from Christianty only, and the Church of England, but the Deists come in for a small share with them. And although this Author require, Page the 148. an Universal Agreement a­mongst Christians in order to his belief of Christiani­ty, yet notwithstanding all these divisions amongst the Deists, he says, he does still believe there is a God. And if so Sir, pray why may not the Christians believe [Page 24]there is a Trinity, though some of them may differ in what we must believe concerning it? I remember Tully says somewhere, That nothing can be a more weak and ridiculous Charge, than such a One, which by Changing the Name only, a Man may turn upon His Adversary. Thus changing the word Christianity into Deism, I may say to the Author of that Letter, ‘shall I set my self to seek out a system of Deism a­mongst their endless Disputes? Let them first agree upon it amongst themselves; when that is done, it will be time enough for me to consider what they say.’

And truly it will not be good Manners for us to go before Them, considering what a strong Palpitation of Heart the Clergy's desire of Precedency caused in your Friend the Author of the Growth of Deism, Page the 19. I confess, because we are naturally most jealous of that we most love, I do not much blame your Friend for being angry with the Clergy, if they do Rival his Mistress. But however Sir, if one sawcy Fellow of them had once in his Life (it may be) stept before Him, yet he ought not (methinks) (like an Italian) to carry his Revenge down to the whole Body, to which he stands related, for his sake only.

Judas.

But pray Sir, was not that pertinently al­ledged to prove the Pride and Insolence of the Clergy; and could he give a better Instance of it, than that A. one of his Majesties Chaplains, did in the Pulpit at Whitehall abuse the Author's Honourable Friend ‘S. R. H. for writing a Treatise, wherein with great Learning and Acurate Judgment, he distinguish'd be­tween Religion and Priestcraft? For to tell you the [Page 25]truth Sir, once more, I think the Honorable Sir R. H. and my Friend to be the best Distinguishers in the World. So that 'tis great Pity, but that Sir H. R. (at least) having, like an Old Roman, fought so stoutly in the Defence of the Liberty of his Country, and his Gods, and wholly vanquish'd the Priests of this Nation, it is Great Pity I say, but that he like them, should have his Honorable Cognomen; and as they had their stiles of Scipio Africanus, Pompeius Magnus, &c. So he also should have of H-us Discriminator.

Tim.

With all my Heart Sir, I am no more a Ri­valler of Titles, than I am of Sovereignty. But to return to our business.

I remember Sir, that Pages the 18th and 19th this Charge you mention, of Love of precedency in the Cler­gy, with a great deal more, is said, and laid against them by this Author. ‘Particularly, that they do not allow of Sir Matthew Hales his Notions, nor will they suffer us to take any thing for Religion, that is distinguished from their particular Interest.’ And Page the 19th, ‘That a Man's Churchmanship will not appear by any Mark so well, as by the Hatred he bears to all Dissenters, and in Conjuncti­on with a deep aversion to all the Ancient Rights, and Just Liberties of his Native Country.’

Judas.

And what Answer Sir, can you make to this Charge?

Tim.

No more than this Sir, that it is so grosly and scandalously false, that this Author gives us thereby undoubted Reason to believe, that the Accomplish'd Tra­veller he mentions Page the 6th, was none Other than Himself, who having got an ugly Habit when he was Young, could never leave it since. For he might with the same [Page 26]Truth and Charity, have charged the inhumane and bloody Barbarities committed by his Forefathers in Dr. Cave's Seculum Arianum upon the Church of England, or have brought in the other Arm of Arsenius, and have Sworn that he was murdered again by the pre­sent Archbishop of Canterbury, as have laid those things (as he has done) to the Charge of that Church.

However Sir, this I must needs say in his Honour, that I think no Man living ever kept closer to his Text than this Author: I think he ought to have Precedency in that Respect, of all the Clergy of England. For, for uncharitable Censures, idle and loose Consequences, unchristian Leasings, joyned with incomparable Spite and Malice, he ought not only to have Preference of the Church of England, but of all Mankind Living. I never heard of his Peer. Shimei was an Ass to him; He could only Rail and Curse; but he had never Tra­velled, and so was unacquainted with the great Accom­plishment of impudent Lying; He was ignorant of that Noble Maxim, Fortiter calumniare, aliquid adhaerebit.

Judas.

But pray what can you say to A's abusing the Honourable Sir R. H. for his Excellent Treatise?

Tim.

Who this A. is, or wherein he has abused this Honourable Person I cannot tell, but I presume, he is of Age, and can Answer for himself. And as for the Honourable Sir R. H. his Book (whoever he be also, for I am no Cunning Man at Cyphers) I have not seen it, and so can give no Account of it. But I am apt to think, that the Niceness of these Mens distinguishing Faculties lies more in their Pockets, than it does in their Heads; and that the Bishops deadly Sin of Priestcraft lies chiefly in this, That they have a little Mony in their Purses, and a little Land belonging to their Bishop­ricks. [Page 27]But truly Sir, I cannot but say to you first of all; That if these Bishops could use their Mony to no better purposes than some of these Honourable Distin­guishers have done, it were great Pity they should ever have any.

Secondly, I say Sir, that if this Author would have had us believe, that his Friends are such nice Distin­guishers in other folks Matters, he ought in order thereunto, to have given us good Proof of their Di­stinguishing with a little more Honour, than some of them are said to have done, in their own.

And lastly Sir, pray give me leave to tell you, that sometimes through an inveterate Wont or Habit a Man may wholly lose his Distinguishing Faculty. Thus, there was an Honourable Knight in, or near the last Age, so wonted to Errantry, that at last he could not Distinguish between a Wind-mill and a Gyant; and there may be Another (for all as I know) in this, that may have been so long accustomed to the Stage, that he may think the Priesthood, Religion, and all things else to be Counterfeit, and may not be able to Distin­guish between the New Testament, and a Play.

Therefore Sir, let these Men put what Value and Estimate they please upon their Distinguishing Facul­ty, yet I do not intend they shall measure my Opini­on of it by theirs.

Judas.

Stay, Pray Sir. You are Riding on the wrong side of the Post, and must turn back again. I am afraid you do not care to hear what I mentioned before, of the Church of Englands prevarication in the Matter of Non-Resistance, which was formerly, as my Friend tells you Page the 12th. ‘the Shiboleth of their Church, as the De Facto Title is now, none being [Page 28]promoted to Dignities but such as come in upon that Title, whereby they proclaim War against King William himself, by allowing him only a De Facto Title as the Principle of their Obedience.’

Tim.

We will come to the De Facto Title by and by; in the mean time we will talk a word or two to the Doctrine of Non-Resistance, or Passive Obedience.

Although this Doctrine of Non-Resistance was never the Shiboleth of the Church of England, yet it always was, and is still believed by all the true and under­standing Members thereof, although not in that ex­travagant Latitude that some Men would have stretcht it unto.

However, as a very Judicious Gentleman observes in his True Notion of Passive Obedience stated (who was far from subscribing to the late bewildred Notion of some Men of Non Resistance) ‘It is no wonder, says he, whilst the bloody and distracting Consequences of the unjustifiable Proceedings against Charles the First­lay fresh in Mens Memories, and when there was a Ground of Suspicion, that the same Tragedy was again designed in Charles the Second's Time, if the Imaginations even of the most understanding were warmed in Opposition to such Principles and Pra­ctices, and by a well designed Zeal were carried on to enlarge the Notion of Non-Resistance, beyond the Limits their cooler Reasonings would Allow.’

However therefore Sir, there might be some few Men in the Late Reigns, of warm Zeal and hot Constitutions, who observing those Evils above men­zioned, did extend this Doctrine to an unruly Lati­tude, yet were there many more, of cooler Thoughts and Complexions, who never allowed it, or believed [Page 29]it in that Latitude. And although they have some­times, when they thought there was great Occasion, Preached the Doctrine of Non-Resistance themselves, yet they did never stretch it beyond its due Bounds and Measures. But only taught, That we were bound either Actively to submit to the Laws of the Land; or if we could not in Conscience do it, then Passively to submit to the Penalties, rather than Resist. For they were fully of Opinion, That Hu­mane Laws are, and ought to be the Measures of our Obedience to our Governours; though Christ's Laws must be the Measures whether this Obedience ought to be Active or Passive.

And this is the Notion of Passive Obedience, which upon the best Judgment I can make, is contained in the Sermon of Obedience in our Homilies: If our Author can make more or less from thence, let him do it, and thereby prove what he says it is, Page the 12th, ‘A Sacred Record of the Injustice of some of those who concurred in the late Revolution.’ Thus Sir, you see, though some Hot, and most of them (some few excepted) unthinking Men, mi­stook themselves in this Point, yet were there a great many Others of more Cool and Sober Thoughts that stood their Ground, and still maintained the Right. And whether the Judgment of the Church of England be to be taken from the first, or last of these, let any Reasonable Man judge.

And now I have dealt pretty well Sir, I trust, with this Author's great Giant, the Doctrine of Non-Re­sistance, I hope we shall do well enough with his Man of Straw that follows.

[Page 30]
Judas.

Do you call the De Facto Title then, a Man of Straw?

Tim.

The Halt and the Maimed are little better; and one would think by this Man's Writing, that he did verily believe the Clergy of England did extend their Doctrine of Non Resistance to Him as well as the King: For no Man surely would have brought only the Blind and the Lame into the Field, if he had thought he should have met with any Opposition.

Judas.

Good Sir, methinks this Charge of the De Facto Title seems to be sound and whole, and of great strength. Can you deny Sir, ‘but that this is now, what Non-Resistance was formerly, the Shiboleth of the Church of England? And that none are promoted to Dignities but such who come in upon this Title;’ as is said Pages the 12th and 13th?

Tim.

I will tell you a Story Sir. I have heard it reported of the Witches of Lapland, that they knew very well when the Father of Lyars tells them a Loud One, by a Noisome Stench (such as they are not able to endure) which follows immediately upon it. If the same should happen to his Sons in England, How offensive must some Mens Neigh­bourhood be? There would be no living within some Furlongs of them.

If this Author had not contracted a great deal of Confidence (to say no worse) in his Travels, how is it possible he should tell the World, that the De Facto Title is the Shiboleth of the Church of England? He may as well tell us, that the Jure Divino is so of an old Republican. For the Unani­mous Association of the Clergy, in defence of his [Page 31]Majesty as Lawful and Rightful King of England plainly shews the contrary.

Judas.

But pray Sir, how comes it to pass then, that there are none preferred to Church Dignities, as my Friend says, but such as come in upon the De Facto Title?

Tim.

This were a Question worth asking, if there were the least shadow of Truth in it: But he that has the Confidence to tell us this groundless, this ri­diculous Story, will tell us in the next place of the Cabbage and Caldron.

Judas.

Why Sir, was not the King made to pay Fif­teen Hundred Pounds a Year to Dr. S. for a De facto-ship only? Page 13.

Tim.

This Man will force us to speak out in spite of our Teeth, and to tell him plainly to his, That if ever Impudent Lying come to be Rewarded (in proportion) as (he says) Title-Making is, he can­not fail to have Sixteen Thousand Pounds a Year at least: And then 'tis to be hoped, he will keep Mr. Johnson from Starving.

But here, before I go any further, I cannot but Remark, that when this Author is laying about him in his mad Fits, he makes no Conscience where his Blows light; so that if he can but down with a Church-man or two, he does not care, if the King fall with them.

For who that had any Regard to the Honour of his Majesty, would reflect so basely on his Wisdom and Government? Who, I say, that had any Ho­nour for the King, could represent him to the World as a Prince of that Weakness and Simplicity, to give the greatest Price, for that which is worth [Page 32]Nothing at all. Nay, for that which is worse than Nothing; ‘worse than the worst of Titles, when he had much better, as he says, of his own be­fore; and by which he opens a Door, not only to let in King James, but to Turn himself out at also, at the same time. And what is worst of all, to suffer Dr. S. to force him to do all this.’

Judas.

Why has not Dr. S. done it Sir?

Tim.

Bless me! What a D. of P's have we got­ten, that the King at the Head of an Hundred Thousand Men should be afraid of him. He must be more than Jesuite Sir, that can bring this Story under the Doctrine of Probability. Rablais would have Blush'd to have put it into his History of Grangousier, and Nothing can Match the Impu­dence of him that told it, but the Folly of him that believes it.

Judas.

But Sir, Can you deny that Dr. S. set up a De Facto-ship?

Tim.

If we do allow he has, is therefore the De Facto-ship the Shiboleth of the Church of England? This Man Reasonings keeps equal Pace with his Stories, and his Logick and Ethicks are just of a Measure: So impossible is it for any Man to Apo­statize from Christianity, except he first turn Renegade to all Honesty and Truth.

Judas.

But pray Sir, are there any of the Clergy preferred, but such as come in upon the De Facto Title? Does not my Friend tell you plainly there are not?

Tim.

Truly Sir, if your Friend makes no more Conscience of what he does, than what he says, his Neighbours that live near him had need to keep [Page 33]their Mounds in good Repair. If there be any likelihood of Truth in this Charge Sir, why does not this Man produce the Subscriptions required of the Clergy to this Title, in order to their Pre­ferment? What will he answer to their Unanimous Associations mentioned before, in which they own King William to be Lawful and Rightful King of England, &c. Will he tell us that none of these Associators were preferred? Bless me! how many vacant Dignities be there then at this time in the Church of England? Enough sure to tempt an In­fidel to turn Christian, or an old Republican to turn Churchman, and be of the De Facto ship.

But now we are talking of Title-making, pray Sir, what Title would this Man be pleased with? The Jure Divino Title he Laughs at; the De Facto he Rails at; that of Conquest, he says, is Cut off by Parliament; the Matrimonial Title is dead. Pray what Title is it Sir, that this Man would have?

Judas.

He tells you Sir, Page the 28th, ‘That one of his Friends saw with his own Eyes our Great and Gracious King accept the Crown of En­gland as the Gift of the People.’

Tim.

One of his Friends saw; that is, himself saw: Very well Sir, and so the King's Title to his Crown must stand upon the Sandy Foundation of the Will of Himself, and some few Republican Demagogues. Pray Sir, who leaves a Loophole for King James his Right now? And not only for His, but for any other Man, or Body of Men, as well as King William, when these Men shall think fit to find a Crack in his Covenants? When it shall [Page 34]be wholly in their Power which shall be Uppermost, the Head or the Rump?

Pray Sir, who Rivals the Sovereignty now? The Jure Divino Bishops, that say God makes the King; or this Man, that says, He makes Him? Who Rivals the Sovereignty now Sir? Those Church-men that Tay (if you will believe all) that his Majesty holds his Kingdoms by his Sword; or this Man that says, He holds them from his Grant? But now I think on't, this passage of our Author sa­tisfies, me very well why he called the Church of Rome the Church of Hell, Page 22. It being now manifest, that the Pope has been a damnable U­surper for some Hundreds of Years, that Prophecy of Jer. 1.10. being never meant of Him, but Per­sonally of our good Author, who is the Holy Fa­ther, of whom it is said, I have set thee this day over the Nations, and over the Kingdoms, to root out, and to pull down, to destroy and throw down, to build and to plant.

Judas.

But by your leave Sir, my Friend shews plainly, Page the 11th, the great Reason the Church of England have to maintain this De Facto Title, for thereby they kill two or three Birds with a Stone.

Tim.

Do they so Sir? then they sate a little nearer together than your Friend has laid his Sto­ries: But I have shewn you just now, that the Church of England may carry her Ammunition home again; for he himself has killed them already.

Judas.

Well Sir, let them be De Facto Men, or what they will, it is plain they are Enemies to the Government.

Tim.

Pray Sir, how does this appear?

Judas.

From their being great Friends to the Ja­cobites who are so; ‘and yet these Jacobites find such Favour with the Bishops, that if the Livings they lose are in the Bishops Gift, he shall pre­sent any Friend which the dispossessed Jacobite shall recommend: Now what can be more by them desired, than to enjoy the Profits of their Livings, and put in what Curate they please;’ as is said Page the 9th.

Tim.

This is another Taste of our Author's Tra­velling Accomplishments. But oh these Bishops! these pestilent Bishops! How heavy do they lie upon many a good Man's Stomach? How Sick do they make this good Author? What Convulsions, what Vomitings do they cause in Him? Even to the casting up of his Christianity, and all Truth and Honesty with it. What great Pity is it that the King and Government will not destroy this Pe­stilent Race of Men; who have been a Part Con­stitutive of it little more than a Thousand Years, that this good Author may recover his Health a­gain.

But pray Sir: If there be any Bishops guilty of this Man's Charge, why did he not Name them? Why did he not tell us who they be, and where they live? Why did he not produce the Bonds of Resignation they have taken from the Curates, and the Articles they agreed on? He has kindness enough for them to have done it if he could. But alas Sir. if he had descended to Particulars, he knew well enough that those Bishops would quickly have vin­dicated themselves, and exposed both the Falseness and Malice of his Charge. He knew that Knaves-Craft [Page 36]lay safest under Generals, and that the un­thinking Multitude would swallow this Pill whole, as he gave it them; and since abusing of the Cler­gy was the Text he was to Preach on, he was re­solved not to wander from it. And whether this was done by false and malicious Invectives, ground­less and scandalous Stories, weak and absurd Con­sequences, it was all one so it was done: This was the Author's great Aim, and this was keeping to his Text. Rem Rem, quocunque modo Rem.

Thus Sir, you see this heavy Charge improved by the highest Aggravations, is the issue only of this Au­thor's bewildred Brain, and that there is no hurt done, but what his unchristian Calumniations have done to himself.

Judas.

But pray Sir, let me urge a Supposition to you made Page 15. ‘Suppose the King should be­stow a Bishoprick upon a De Facto Doctor, and this Doctor should there find his old Acquaintance Dr. H. and being a Stranger in his Diocess, should be willing to instruct himself in the Characters of Men from the good Doctor, would it not fall out so, that the Clergy of the Diocess must be used well or ill, as the most open and notorious Enemy the Government hath, shall design?’

Tim.

And pray Sir, let me have my Suppose too, if you please. Suppose this Bishop does not meet Dr. H. there, what then? Why then there is an end of this Gentleman's Jest. Or suppose he does meet him there, and does not ask him; why then there is an end of the Gentleman's Argument. But suppose he doth both meet him, and ask him; must all follow what this Man says? No surely, [Page 37]this great Prelate did never yet see with other Mens Eyes, or hear with other Mens Ears; and if this Author will have us believe him, he ought to give us better Reasons than he has yet, why he must begin now. If this Man knew of any Grievances in that Diocess from Dr. H's Information, he will do well to Name them; if he does not Name them, 'tis plain he cannot; for he has Charity enough to do it if he could.

I only mention this Sir, to let you see, that allow this Author all the If's and And's he can desire, yet has he not either Logick or Honesty enough to draw from them one true Conclusion. And that it would move a Passion in Job, to hear this Grub-street Author undervalue this great Bishop (of so profound Learn­ing) as a Common-Placer only, Page the 14th. whom all the Learned World admires; between whom and this Crawling Scribler, there cannot be the Thousandth part of Comparison for Worth and Learning, that there is for Poetry, between an Honourable Discrimina­tor and a Ballad-maker.

In short Sir, that which rubs this Man's Back, and makes him Kick so hard against this great Bishop, is, That he is an unfoilable Champion for the Divinity and Satisfaction of our Blessed Saviour; and these are Sins of Priest-craft that he will never forgive him.

Judas.

But pray Sir, can you deny but that the Am­bition and Pride of the Clergy has been often the Ruin of this Government? ‘What was it, (as is said Page the 22th.) but the Insolence of the Priesthood that brought about Father Laud's, and Father Peter's Re­volutions? And Page 26. What an unhappy Effect had the Spirit of Father Laud upon King Charles the First?’

Tim.

In answer to this Sir, I cannot but observe first of all, The Malice of some Men to be bolder than that of the Devil himself. For they tell us they believe, and yet they tremble at Nothing. This Author is an eminent Instance thereof, who has not feared to keep his Spite Boiling against this good Bishop for Fifty Years together, and by an Inhumane Barbarity (like a Wolf or a mad Dog) is taring him out of his Grave, where he had slept in Peace for so long time, after he had fell a Sacrifice to the Rage of such Merciless Wretches as he is. What great Reason does this Man give us to believe, that he himself did in his Youth, mingle his Hands in the Blood of this Sacri­fice, whose Ashes he is now throwing in the Air as the sport of his Old Age? And how does this Wanton­ness in Cruelty at these years, give us just cause also to think, that the same Hands and Heart are ready to make the like Oblation in the Blood of the Priests of the same Church now? For the older Satan grows (they say) still the more Devil.

Thus when Men have once lost their Christianity, their Bowels, like those of Judas and Arius, quickly gush out, and all Pity, Compassion, and Common Charity with them. But maugre all this Man's Spite, the Piety and Devotion of Archbishop Laud will be Conspicuous to all Ages, of which his Diary will be an Everlasting Monument: And if he had any Fail­ings, it was because he was a Man.

This Author thinks he has made a notable Jest upon him, by calling him Father Laud, and joyning him in Company with Father Peters, by which he would in­sinuate that he was a turbulent Papist: But all the World knows, that this good Bishop was no more a [Page 39] Papist, than this Man is a Christian. And if by being joined with ill Company makes this Prelate any thing the worse, how bad must this Man be, who for all as I can see, amongst his Numerous Acquaintance. keeps no other. For if we may guess from his own Con­fession, Page the 5th. his Acquaintance are but of two sorts, and the first he makes Scandalous for their Lives, and the other for their Ʋnderstandings: The first he calls downright Atheists, Page the 5th. And Page the 14th. he makes the others little better than Fools (as he might well enough) from their Ridiculous Reason­ings. And he himself is so outragiously mad against all setled Churches in Christendom, and upon such weak grounds, that he seems to me to be venomously bitten by both of them.

To conclude this Point Sir: It was not Bishop Laud's Counsel to King Charles the First, but such Mens Counsels as this is, to the People, that brought that good Prince to the Block.

Thus Sir, you may see from my Discourse with you on this Pamphlet, how little Wit, joined with a good Stock of Spite and Malice, is required, to abuse the best of Men, and best of Causes. Nay, to banter our Blessed Saviour himself, the Christian Religion, and all the Holy Mysteries thereof, with the whole Body of Christians from our Saviour's Time, down to this day, as well as the Clergy of the Church of England. But however such scurrilous Writings may make some Impression upon Men of sickly Brains, and crazed Re­ligion; yet upon Men of stronger Understandings, and sounder Piety, it has no Influence at all: The issue of the whole is, They laugh at the Jest, and despise the Buffoon.

Judas.

But pray Sir, let me ask you one Question more, if you please, before we have done?

Tim.

I am quite tired, but if it be but one Question, it will not break squares much.

Judas.

How can you Sir, believe this Author such an Enemy to the Church of England as you have re­presented him, when Page 32. he tells you, ‘That he is far from begrudging the Bishops and Clergy that small Maintenance which is by Law Establish­ed: And that he hopes, they have no other Aim in discharging their Offices, but to save our Souls, by imprinting in our Hearts the Reason, the Advan­tages and Excellency of the Law of Christ, &c.

Tim.

Amongst many other matters Sir, proposed to my Friend, whose judgment I gave you in part, at the beginning of this Discourse, this was one; and I will give you his Answer to me upon it; which was as followeth: This Author (said he) in his Travels, had doubtless visited the old Satyr, who could blow Hot and Cold in a Breath. For how does this Poor Mainte­nance of the Bishops, as he calls it here, agree with their Royal Stiles, Dignities, and Greatness, which he instances in, Page the 6th and 7th. as undeniable Ar­guments of their Pride and Ambition? Does not this Man then (said he) envy the Bishops their Estates? But who can believe him after so many malicious In­vectives against them, and their Power? Who can believe (said he) this Author can have any grounds to Hope for what he says at last, that has read what he said before? So that this Gentleman seems to me (said my Friend) to have the Honesty of the good old Fox, who after he had singled out several of the Flock, and devoured them, wiped his Mouth after Dinner, [Page 41]and fell to his Prayers, wishing the remainder of the Geese all increase of happiness, and that they were dou­ble the number upon the Common. Thus said my Friend, I wonder this good Gentleman in his great Fit of Charity and Devotion, had not wished the Estates of the Bishops double also, that he might have the pull­ing of their Feathers, and the larger share in the divi­sion of their Lands.

But I tell you Sir (continued he with vehemence) that there are Thousands, and Thousands of us, Gen­tlemen of the Church of England, who are not to be baffled out of our Religion by an Irreligious Jest or two. We are not Beau's of Sixteen, that we should forego our Faith in our Blessed Saviour, to hearken to the Buffoonry of an old Infidel; Nor shall any Man living perswade us, that Estates are proper only for Men that wait at Taverns, and Plays, and worse Places, while those that wait at the Altar of God must Starve; or that Thousands of Learned, and Honest, and Reli­gious Men must want, that Fools and Knaves and Atheists may abound. We cannot disbelieve the My­steries of Christianity to hearken to this Man's Rea­son, till he has shewn a little more of it, than he has done in this Pamphlet; or let it be as good as it will, he will have much ado to perswade us, that his blas­phemous Friend, Page 25. can write as good a Moral as our Saviour; and the next time he comes up to Par­liament (it may be) will tell us, he can live as good a one too. But if his Friend (said he) be so very good at Writing Morals, I think this Author would do well to desire him to Write One against malicious Ly­ing, and to read it well over himself when it is done. ‘For this puts too Keen an Edge upon an ill-natur'd [Page 42]Infidel, as well as Divine, and is the ugliest sign in the World, of a Mean Birth and Narrow Edu­cation.’

In fine Sir, said he, this Man would feign insinuate by one of his Friends (as he would have us believe) Page 27. That all Religion is wholly lost in the World. I pray God, said my Friend, this be not more this Man's Wish, than his Belief; But if it be lost, I must say (said he) that of all Men living, neither he, nor his Friends, do seem to me to be the Persons that are ever like to find it. But if these Men's Counsels (add­ed he) and Devices should stand, there would quick­ly be an end of all Religion in the World indeed.

Pray Sir, said I, what is your reason for this Opi­nion?

Because (said he) he that has but half an Eye may see, that the end of these Men is to bring us all to Deism, and to beat out all Revealed Religion. But if once Sir (said he) we come to have no Divine stand­ing, Revealed Measure, or Rule of Life and Faith, he must be quite blind that does not see, that a very lit­tle time will bring the greatest part of Mankind, ei­ther to downright Atheism, or Idolatry, which is as bad; and that every Man will make his own God, and every Man his own Worship.

Upon this I replied, Surely Sir, you mistake when you say that these Men intend to pull down all Re­vealed Religion. For the Author of the Growth of Deism says, Page the first, That there is no reason why one should suspect the Gospels of Forgery; and Page 25. ‘He makes one of his Deists to be convinc'd by a late Book of the Reasonableness of Christianity, &c. that he was more indebted to Revelation than he thought [Page 43]of.’ And the Author of the Letter to the Deists con­fesses Page 138. ‘That the generality of Mankind stand in need of some further Assistance than that general Capacity they are naturally endowed with; and that considering the many Frailties of Humane Na­ture, some extraordinary Helps may be useful, Page 141.’ And he does not deny in the same Page, but that God may convey these Helps by Men extraor­dinarily Commissioned by him. Now this Sir, says he, Page 138. ‘is pretended (at least) among Chri­stians, to have been done by the Revelation of Jesus Christ; And if the History of the Gospel be true, (he says) its Divine Authority cannot be questioned. And he believes, Page 142. that Chri­stianity has the sairest Pretensions to this of any Re­ligion now in the World.’

To which my Friend answered. The Author of the Letter to the Deist Sir, (said he) is the best In­terpreter in the World of the Author of the Growth of Deism. He is, I doubt not, as well acquainted with his Mind as his own, though (if you will be­lieve him) not with his Person. They were both convinc'd, as he says Page 148. of the reality of Re­vealed Religion by the same Book, and are both Con­verts, (questionless) of the same Make and Size.

The Author of the Growth of Deism tells us, Page 25. that one of his Deists (but the Author of the Letter, Page 148. tells us with more Honesty, or less Caution, that it was himself) was convinc'd by a late Book, called, The Reasonableness of Christianity, &c. that he was more indebted to Revelation than he thought of; but yet he tells us in the same Page, that he could have written as good a Moral at the Scripture [Page 44]himself, (and had not his Modesty stood a little in his way, I presume would have said a much Better) and by Consequence, that he could have done as well with­out it. Nay, I think verily it had never been menti­oned, but to insinuate some malicious Suggestions against the Church of England.

The Author of the Letter, receives the Gospel no further than (if it be true) as an Improvement of Deism, Page 144. and so far he is ready, for all as I can see Page the 8th. to receive what is written by Apollonius or Mahomet. That Jesus Christ was Com­missioned by God to reveal his Will, is (he says Page 138.) only pretended by Christians; and the utmost he will allow to Christianity, is Page 142. That it has the fairest Pretensions to Revelation of any Religion now in the World. So that our Saviour has only fair Pre­tensions to a Divine Authority, at best; and if this Man lived at Constantinople as he does in England, who knows, whether he might not find out another Fair Pretender there? For Page 136. he tells us, ‘That something more easie, and more evident is still want­ing; and therefore Page 137. he solicits Mr. Lock to give us a more perfect System of the Laws of Na­tural Religion.’

It would Sir (said my Friend) make an Ass speak again to forbid the madness of these Prophets. I know not which the Author of this Letter deserves most, our Laughter, our Pity, or our Scorn. This Prodigal has left his Father's House, and spent his Substance, and would be eating Husks abroad with Swine, rather than the fatted Calf with his Father. It had been enough for Mr. Lock, to have preferred him (as he does) to Grotius, (for I known no Man of that mind [Page 45]but himself;) but to esteem of his Abilities beyond those of our blessed Saviour, and all his Apostles put together, betrays a Judgment more bewildred, than the Fancies of Bedlamites are in Dreams. But the Au­thor of that Letter knew very well, that this Request would undervalue both the Perfection and Authority of the Scriptures; and he had his Cue set him (I doubt not) as well as his Forerunner, the Author of the Growth of Deism.

It was not fit for that Author, who was sent out first by the Party, to try the ways, to Ride at all Ad­ventures, and therefore he glased a little in the Ac­knowledgment of the Truth of Christianity. The Author of the Letter that comes after him, now the Road is beaten, Rides somewhat brisker up against Revelation, with his If's and And's, as If the History of the Gospel be true. And if the Pretences of Christi­anity be well grounded, &c. And if this comes off as well as the former, I doubt not, but in a little time, we shall have a Third spur up full speed in the face of the Christian Religion, and tell us plainty, ‘That 'tis a meer Forgery, and a piece of Priest craft, and that the Romans did but Right, when they punished Jesus Christ the Patron of it, with the Punishment of a Slave.’

For let them pretend what they will of their belief of Christianity, this is their design; and the Morals of Plutarch, or Tully, or Seneca, or Mahomet, are alto­gether of as good Authority with them as the Scrip­tures. For if once you come to talk with them of the mysterious Efficacy of the Sacraments, of the great Ends of our Saviour's Manifestation, in his Birth, Life, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension, which are the [Page 46]great Characteristicks of the Christian Religion, they take their leave of the Scriptures there, and you had as good tell them a Tale out of the Legend of the Sleepers, and they will believe it as soon. These, they cry out upon as unintelligable Mysteries; not that they are so, but are obvious to the Capacity of any Honest and Ordinary Christian; but they do not fall within their Scheme, and what they will not believe, they will not understand.

Sir, said I, what you have said puts me in mind of what the Author of the Growth of Deism saith, Page 28. ‘That he cannot frame to himself an Idea, How the Body and Blood of Christ are verily and indeed received in the Sacrament, when we say there is no other Body there but that of the Bread. The Men of the Church of England tell me (indeed) says he, that they mean it in a spiritual sense; but he had tried, he said, and found it impossible to form an Idea of a Body, verily and indeed in a spiritual sense.’

'Tis true, replied my Friend, he does so, and with Ignorance enough of the Doctrine of the Church of England, and the great Ends of our Saviour's Suffer­ings. For by these words, That the Body and Blood of Christ are verily and indeed taken by the Faithful, is meant no more, than that all those Blessings and Benefits which were purchased for us by the Body and Blood of Christ, are communicated to all Faithful Receivers, in and by those Elements of Bread and Wine, which are the Real, but Mystical Body of Christ.

Now however this Man, for want of a right Faith of the great Ends of our Saviour's Death, cannot (said he) form to himself an Idea thereof; yet, as [Page 47]there is no Christian of common capacity but may frame to himself a very congruous and familiar Notion of what the Church of England means in this Point, so is there of Faithful Receiver, but from the Real Presence of the Invisibe Power of Christ's Spirit quickning and enlivening his Soul by his spiritual Graces and Workings, in and by the faithful Recep­tion of those Elements, but can give an Experimental Testimony to the truth of it.

Upon what my Friend had said, I told him I was verily satisfied now, that these men did intend to reduce all Religion to Deism; but pray Sir, how do you make it appear, that without a standing Re­vealed Rule, Mankind will quickly sink into Atheism, or Idolatry? To which he replyed.

Easily enough, and in a few words. The best way Sir, says he to judge what would be, if such things should happen, is by reflecting on what has been, when they did happen. Now Sir, said he, if ever there were any True Deism in the world, it was in Adam's time; yet if we will believe Maimonides, he tells us in the beginning of his first Book of Idolatry, that Idolatry began in the days of Enos, which was but two hundred and thirty five years after the Creation, scarce in those days the Infancy of a man. After the General deluge (a Judgment on all Mankind for this their scandalous Apostacy) to the days of Abraham are not reckoned quite three hundred years, in which time (the Infancy also of this second World) Idolatry had not only prevailed amongst the Ignorant sort of people, but amongst the wisest and learnedst of Men. For Historians make Zoro­aster contemporary with Abraham, who first started [Page 48]the Worship of two Beginnings. And if Zoroaster lived in Abraham's Time we may reckon him but a third Generation from Adam, Abraham being born threescore years before the Death of Noah, Noah a­bove five hundred before the death of Methusalem, and Methusalem two hundred and forty before the Death of Adam.

Now if a Man of those great Parts, Wisdom and Learning which Zoroaster is said to be of (and who could doubtless write as good a Moral as our Author) was so ridiculously imposed upon by the Devil, as to believe and worship two Beginnings, what gross Idola­try must the more Ignorant of Mankind lye under (think you) in those Days?

Thus Sir, said my Friend, I have in a few words shewn you the speedy Apostacy of those Original Deists from Almighty God in the very Infancy of Times, after the Creation, and after the Flood; and yet those Primitive Deists had several great advantages, which the Deists of these later Ages cannot pretend to. As first of all Sir, said he,

They had the advantage of Tradition, and there­by an easie means of a right Information and them­selves in the knowledge of God, and his Worship, from Adam, the Patriarchs, and their own Fathers.

2ly. They had the advantage of Angelical Messen­gers, and Messages, which God vouchsafed them in those days (before he had given them a standing re­vealed Rule) for the better discovery of himself, and his Will to them. And lastly,

They had this advantage also, that besides those Heavenly Annunciators of his Will, God did constant­ly in all Ages raise up a Noah, a Lot, an Abraham, or [Page 49]some such Preachers of Righteousness, furnishing them with Gifts and Abilities to teach, and instruct Man­kind in the true Knowledge and Worship of the Deity, Who, with the other two above mentioned Means and Advantages, might be to Man, instead of a writ­ten, standing, and revealed Rule and Law.

Now Sir, said he, if notwithstanding all these ad­vantages, both before and after the Flood, these Ori­ginal Deists, in the very Infancy of the Times of both, did sink into so gross Idolatry, as to provoke the Jealousie of God so highly, as to move him once to destroy the whole World, except one Family, and afterwards to renounce (as it were) and cast off all Mankind, except one small Nation: How is it possi­ble to imagine, but that the Deists of these last Ages (who can pretend to none of these advantages) must in a very little time (if once the Light of the Gospel be extinguished) sink into utter Darkness, and turn as gross Idolaters as any the Spaniard sound at Peru, or Mexico? And this Sir, said he, will more plainly appear if we consider further, That some of these De­ists confess, that many of their Brethren are little bet­ter than so already. For the Author of the Letter to the Deists tells us (bewailing the Brotherhood) Page 12. ‘That many of them have such base Idea's of the Deity, as may have a worse Influence upon them than none at all; and that while they did own the Name of God, they did take away the Thing, and substitute a worse instead of it.’ He tells us Pages 12, and 13. ‘of the several Gods these Men frame to themselves, of the Inconsistency of their Notions, that it would be an endless Task to expose them; that two of them did not entirely agree in one System, [Page 50]and that all their Schemes equally lead to Irreli­gion, &c.

He tells us of the Materialists, the Antiproviden­tialists, the Fatalists; and we may add, their almost infinite Divisions, and sub-divisions, all which lead Naturally to downright Atheism, or worse. For it were better, as Plutarch says of himself, to believe that God never was, than to have base and unworthy thoughts of him. But what wickedness may not the Fatalists be guilty of, and charge it upon God when they have done? The Antiprovidentialists will quickly have as little regard to God, as they believe he has to them, and the Materialists will as speedily fetch their Gods out of their ultramundane Retirements, and set them before them in Gold, or Silver, or Brass, or Wood; and when this is done, 'tis not this Gentleman's super­fine Philosophy in proving the Impossibility of thinking matter can help it.

Or what if we should allow (said my Friend fur­ther) that all Deists should agree in a right and true Idea of a God (which will never be) will they there­fore all agree in a like, and a right manner of Wor­ship? What if they shall be to seek for a System of Natural Duties, (as this Author of the Letter acknow­ledges he himself is, Page 135.) ‘And by consequence run of course into such degrees of Superstition, which may (as this Author also says, Page 50.) be of as evil tendency, if not worse, than absolute Irre­ligion.’

So that I say Sir, if Mankind have not a fixed Rule and Law, backed by a Divine Authority to stand to, they will never stand to any thing, but will quickly run into a Thousand Confusions of Superstition and [Page 51]Idolatry, both in respect of God and his Worship. For there is no reason, why any one Man should be guided and directed by the System of another, if he have no Divine Commission from God. For the best of Men may be corrupted by Lust, or Interest, and the wisest may be blinded by Ignorance.

But the Precepts of Nature, as they must be drawn from long Observation of Nature its self, from deep Skill in Philosophy, and great Strength and Trains of Reasonings, whereby a Man may be enabled from his general Observations of Nature, to deduce particular Rules, easie as to their Practice, and familiar as to their Use, for all the Exigencies and Necessities of Humane Life: As they must be drawn from distinct, and right Idea's of the Natures of God and Men, that from thence we may receive exact Schemes of the many and even infinite Obligations Man lies under to his Maker, and of the variety (and almost infinite too) of Duties and good Offices one Man owes to another; and all this, in plain and easie Propositions fitted to the Capa­cities of the meanest that will but seriously attend to them; so must it all be done by an unbiassed Judgment, by an inflexible Honesty, a most profound and univer­sal Knowledge both of God and Man, with the infinite Relations they bear to all things else in Nature. And where shall we find (Sir said he) such a Man, with all these Qualifications? Or if we could, how should all Mankind know he has them, except he be sent from God Divinely inspired, and his Commission sealed by Miracles, or some other Stamp of the Divinity? Now from what I have said Sir (said my Friend) I conclude, That if the Deists before and after the blood notwithstanding those several advantageous Means [Page 52]they had of informing themselves aright of the Na­ture of God, and his Worship, did, for want of a standing, revealed Rule, most scandalously Apostatize from the Worship of the true God, into the grossest Idolatry of the Creature: From this, I say, I con­clude, That the Deists of our days, (who cannot pre­tend to the Advantages of the former, who do already labour under unworthy and scandalous Notions and Idea's of the Being and Nature of God, who confess themselves ignorant of the Duties arising from Natural Religion, and have no Man's Judgment they can rely on, or stand to for their better Information therein:) These Deists I say, must of necessity in a very little time (if once the Scriptures be cast off as a Rule of Faith and Manners, and all Footsteps and Remembrances of Christianity worn out) change the Truth of God in­to a Lie, and in all probability Apostatize into so ridi­culous and multifarious an Idolatry, as to become the Scorn and Laughter of the very Indians. And then, said he, the Author of the Growth of Deism (if he lives to come up to Parliament in those times) may write us (what I fear his Fingers itch to be at) an Account of the Growth of Atheism in England. For who can give a better Account of it, than he that has been one great Cause of it?

Thus Sir, I have given you my Friends last Judg­ment of your Friend, the Author of the Growth of Deism, and his Pamphlet.

Judas.

You may well call it his last Judgment Sir, for there is Condemnation enough in Conscience in it.

Tim.

You seem to Jest and be Merry Sir, but I tell you seriously, that except your Friend mend both his [Page 53]Faith and Manners, I fear he must expect a much greater.

Judas.

You seem to me Sir, to be wholly of the Judgment of your Friend.

Tim.

I confess plainly to you Sir, I am; and I think the Author of the Growth of Deism would have proved himself an honester Man, if he had laid by all his Disguises, and told the World, that the Judgment of those he calls his Friends, was his own too; For ei­ther he thought their Arguments valid or no? If not, why did he not answer them? If he did, why did he not own them?

Judas.

I see Sir, there is little hopes of your Con­viction, and therefore I take my leave of you.

Tim.

Fare you well Sir; May the Day-spring which from on high hath visited us, so enlighten your Mind, that you may understand the Truth aright as it is in Jesus.

FINIS.

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