AN EXACT COLLECTION OF THE Choicest and most Rare EXPERIMENTS AND SECRETS IN Physick and Chyrurgery, (both Chymick and Galenick.) viz. Of Leonard Phioravant, Knight, and Doctour in Physick and Chyrurgery, His Rational Secrets and Chyrurgery, &c.

VVhereunto is annexed PARACELSUS'S One hundred & fourteen Experiments. With certain excellent Works of G. B. à Portu Aquitano.

ALSO, ISAAC HOLPANDUS his SECRETS concerning his Vegetal and Animal Work. With QUERCETANUS his Spagyrick Antidotary for Gun-shot.

ALSO, Certain Collections out of some Manuscripts of Dr. EDWARDS, and other Physitians of note, expert in both Faculties, never before printed: which heretofore were accounted of (by them) as their very choise Medicines.

LONDON, Printed for William Shears, at the Bible in Bedford street in Covent-garden, and in the New Exchange, 1659.

To the Reader.

Courteous Reader,

I Have carefully, though not curiously, dis­robed that worthy Knight, and excellent Doctor in Physick and Chirurgery, Le­onard Phioravant out of his Italian Vesture, and put him into our English habit, that such an excellent Piece may not lye cloystered in the Precinct of one Principality, but that our own Na­tion may participate of the Honie, this Laborious Bee hath brought to his Hive: If all relish not at the first gust, the fault is not in the Work, but their judge­ments that understand him not, nor the jewels presen­ted unto them. Avicen King of Arabia in the A­rabick, Hippocrates and Galen in Greek, and Pli­nie and Celsus in Latine; besides many English and French, have testified their love to their native Countries, by publishing in their own Languages such rare Treasures as these. Nor fear I detraction from any for these my Labours, unlesse it be from some run­nagate Varlets, that carry all their cunning in a Chi­rurgians Box in their Pockets, and their learning in a [Page] Cap-case behind at their backs; who through Igno­rance, neither regarding the quantity, nor quality of those excellent Medicines, abuse, and sophisticate them in making them up, but this must be obtruded unto the Men, not the Medicines; for prevention whereof here­after, that honourable Society of London Physitians have chose out a Chymick Artificer, whom they have placed in their own Colledge, and over whom they have set discreet, and learned overseers to oblige the publike for their care to their Medicines hereafter. So wishing you the happy fruition of health is intended you by these labours; I rest,

  • J. H.
  • W. J.
The Table of the First Book.
  • WHat thing Infirmitie is, and whereof it proceedeth 1
  • To heal the falling sickness 2
  • To help certain grosse scabs in the head 3
  • To help young children of the Rupture 4
  • Of the small Pox that cometh to chil­dren ibid
  • To help the Measles 5
  • Of Kernels or Scrophule ibid
  • Of divers sorts of scabs 6
  • Against Worms in children 7
  • Of certain Warts or Carvoli on the Yeard. 8
  • Of Gonorrhea Passio ibid.
  • Of a Botch caused of the Pox 9
  • Of Pellarella Ibid
  • Of scabs that come through the Pox 10
  • Of certain tumours or swellings in di­vers parts of the bodie 11
  • Of Ach in divers parts of the bodie ibid
  • Of the Cough in the stomack 12
  • Of the white scab in the head 13
  • Of Erisipela 14
  • Of the Squinancie 15
  • Of the Emeroids and Piles 16
  • An easie way to help all sorts of Fevers ibid
  • Another cure of the said Fevers 18
  • Of the continuall Fever 19
  • A great Secret against the continuall Fever 20
  • Of the Fever Tertian ibid
  • Of the Fever of Repression 21
  • Of the Fever Hectick 22
  • A new Order wherewith thou mayest help most part of the Fever Hectick 23
  • Of the Fever Quartane 24
  • To help the Quartain of all sorts 25
  • A great secret against the Quartain 26
  • A secret to help all Fevers in their be­ginning 27
  • A secret of one simple that helpeth all Fevers 28
  • Of the Gout ibid.
  • A Note concerning the cure of the Gout 29
  • Another discourse of the Gout 30
  • What order must be had in the said cure 31
  • To preserve a man from the Gout 32
  • The cure of the Gout with pain in the side ibid
  • A discourse of the Sciatica 33
  • Of pains of the Mother 34
  • Of pains in the head 35
  • Of diseases in the eares 36
  • Of the Infirmities in the eyes ibid
  • Of the Tooth-ach 37
  • Of a stinking breath 38
  • Of spitting bloud 39
  • Of diseases of the Liver 40
  • Of diseases of the Lungs 41
  • Of the Spleen 42
  • Of the flux of the bodie ibid
  • Of costivenesse in the bodie 43
  • Of the Flux of Urine ibid
  • A discourse of the retention of Urine 44
  • Another discourse of the same 45
  • Of the retention through heat ibid
  • Of the retention through drienesse 46
  • Of the retention through cold ibid
  • Of the retention through moistnesse 47
  • Of the difficultie of Ʋrine ibid.
  • Against burning of the Urine 49
  • A discourse upon the carnosity of the yeard 50
  • Another cure for the same ibid
  • To stay the flux of Urine 51
  • To break the stone 52
  • Of the gravell in the Reins 54
  • Against the Itch ibid
The Table of the Second Book.
  • WHat Chirurgery is 55
  • The order in curing Impost­humes 56
  • What Imposthumes are 58
  • Of Imposthumes in the groin ibid
  • The second kind of Imposthumes in the groin 59
  • The third kind in the groin ibid
  • Of Imposthumes under the armes 60
  • Of Imposthumes in the throat ibid
  • Of Imposthumes in the throat caused of melancholy humours 61
  • Of Imposthumes in the throat caused of the Pox ibid
  • Imposthumes in the throat of hot humours 62
  • Imposthumes in the throat caused of cold 63
  • Imposthumes in the throat of hot humours ibid
  • Imposthumes in the eyes 64
  • Imposthumes in the eares ibid
  • Imposthumes in the mouth 65
  • Imposthumes in the joynts ibid
  • Of inward Imposthumes 66
  • Of Ulcers and what they are 67
  • To help Ʋlcers of all sorts 68
  • Of Ulcers in the feet 69
  • Of Ulcers in the legs ibid
  • Of Ulcers in the knees 70
  • Of Ulcers in the groin ibid
  • Of Ulcers in the armes 71
  • Of Ulcers in the breast, back and belly ibid
  • Of Ulcers outwardly 72
  • Of Ulcers in the head ibid
  • Of Ulcers in the mouth 73
  • Of Wounds, and their kinds ibid
  • What Medicines are fittest for wounds 74
  • Of wounds in the head with offence of the brain 76
  • Of wounds in the head with fracture of the bone 77
  • Of wounds in the head where the bone is not offended 78
  • Of Contusions or bruises in all places ibid
  • Of wounds in the neck 79
  • Of wounds in the arms 80
  • Of wounds in the breast ibid
  • Of wounds in the bellie 81
  • Of wounds in the leggs 83
  • Of wounds that pierce into the bodie 84
  • A discourse upon old wounds 85
  • To heal wounds of Gun-shot ibid
  • To heal a wound quickly ibid
  • To help a wound quickly that is in danger 86
  • To stay the flux of bloud in wounds ib.
  • Another for the same 87
  • A defensive for wounds ibid
  • Our secret powder for wounds ibid
The Table of the third Book.
  • TO make our Petra Philosophale 88
  • To make our Balm 90
  • To make our Aromatico 92
  • To make our Electuario Angelica 93
  • Our Sirrupo Solutivo 94
  • Our Sirrup Magistrall 95
  • Our Sirrup against the Melancholie hu­mour 96
  • Our Potion of Lignum Sanctum ibid
  • To make the water of Lignum Sanctum 98
  • An Electuary against the Cough 100
  • Our Magistral Electuary of Sulphur ibid
  • Our Electuarie of Consolida majore 101
  • Unguentum magnum 102
  • Oyle of Hypericon 103
  • Our Oleum Philosophorum of Tur­pentine and Wax 104
  • Our Magno Liquore 105
  • Pillole Aquilone 106
  • Our Quinta essentia solutiva ibid
  • Pillole Magistrale 108
  • Aqua reale that maketh the teeth white 109
  • [Page]Of the secrets of Frankincense ibid
  • To make oyle of Honie 110
  • Our great Cerot 111
  • A Magistrall Ʋnguent that helpeth in manner all sores 112
  • A Magistrall Cerot against the white Scall ibid
  • A divine Cerot against divers infirmi­ties 113
  • A miraculous plaister for Flegmon or Erisipella 114
  • A resolutive plaister of great vertue 115
  • A maturative plaister of great vertue ibid
  • A composition against Ulcers and sores 116
  • A strange composition of great vertue ibid
  • An Unguent of great vertue against Ul­cers ibid
  • A Discourse upon sundry sorts of Ʋn­guents 117
  • Medicines appropriate against all poisons 119
  • A water that preserveth the face and teeth faire 120
  • To take away spots out of the face 121
  • To cause hair to grow ibid
  • To make our Sirrup of Bayes 122
  • To make a Sirrup of Cinnamon and Gin­ger 123
  • Our Sirrup of a Capon 124
  • A magistrall Sirrup of Quinces, the which is restorative 125
  • A Magistrall Sirrup of Lignum San­ctum 126
  • A Sirrup of Juniper berries 127
  • A Sirrup of the Bran of wheat ibid
  • A Sirrup of Salsa Per [...]lia 128
  • To make a potion of China 129
  • A potion of Alchachengie 130
  • A pectorall Potion of our invention ib.
  • To make a Potion of Camedrios and Iva Artetica, which dissolveth all Fe­vers that come of cold 131
  • A potion that helpeth against all infir­mities 132
  • An Infusion of Wine that is good against the Gout 133
  • Another artificiall wine against the stitch in the side and gravell 134
  • To make a Quintessence of great vertue 135
  • To make Diatartaro the which is solu­ble 136
  • A composition of great value to comfort the stomack 137
  • A stomachall plaister to cause digestion ibid.
  • A rare secret for the eyes 138
  • A liquor that comforteth the smelling, and preserveth the head ibid
  • A decoction of the Vine 139
  • A composition of Mercurie the Hearb 140
  • A Medicine of Lapaciole minore, against the Catarre 141
  • Of Pollipodie and his vertues 142
  • Of the Olive, and his vertues 143
  • Of Ciperus and his vertues ibid
  • Of Rue or Hearb-grace, and his vertues 144
  • Of Wormwood, and his vertues 145
  • Of Gratia Dei, and his vertues ibid
  • Of Wallwort, and his vertues 146
  • Of Millefollie or Yarrow and his ver­tues 147
  • Of Gentian and his vertues 148
  • Of Imperatoria, and his vertues 149
  • Of Carduus sanctus, and his vertues ibid.
  • Of sweet Majoram, and his vertues 150
  • Of the hearb Lutiola, and his vertues 151
  • Of Hypericon, and his vertues ibid
  • Of Nettles, and his vertues 152
  • Of Hysop of the Mountain ibid
  • A great secret of a kind of Betonie 153
  • Of the Effects of Wine, and what com­eth thereof 154
  • Of Vinegar, and his qualities 156
  • Of the Faeces of wine, and his secrets 157
  • Of Verjuyce made of Grapes ibid
  • [Page]Certain secrets of Animals, and first of the Oxe ibid
  • Of the Goat, and his vertues 158
  • Of the Horse, and his vertues 159
  • Of the Dog, and his secrets 160
  • Of the Cat, and his secrets ibid
  • Of the Hare, and his secrets ibid
  • Of the Frog, and his secrets 161
  • A discourse upon certain stones, and their qualities, both in Physick and Chirur­gery, and first of the marble ibid
  • Of the stone Lapis Ematites 162
  • Of the Stone of Iron called Loppa 163
  • Of Lapis Judaicus ibid
  • Of Lapis Lazuli 164
  • Of the Flintstone 165
  • Of Alumen scaleola or Gesso ibid
  • Of Lapis Amiantis 166
  • Of the Saphire 167
  • Of Red Corall ibid
  • Of the stone Salt 168
  • The vriues of certain Minerals and mean Minerals, and first of Vitriol 169
  • Strange secrets of Roch Allum 170
  • Of Orpiment and his nature ibid
  • Of Cinaber Minerall 171
  • Of the secrets of Salt, and his vertue ibid
  • Of common Salt, and his vertues 172
  • Certain secrets of Salt peter ibid
  • Certain secrets of Allum du Fesse 173
  • Of Gold ibid
  • Of Silver 174
  • Of Lead ibid
  • Of the secrets of Copper 175
  • Of Tin 176
  • Of Iron ibid
  • Of the secrets of Mercurie 177
FINIS.
To the Reader. …

To the Reader.

HAving taken upon me to write a breif Treatise of Chi­rurgery, in the which I will write the meer verity, and that with as much brevity as may be, because the truth useth but little room, for the Philospher writeth, that the truth is such a light as all men doe hide, covering it with divers a­buses, as the Poets many times doe; for when they write one of their tales, they goe about to hide it, and thus to our purpose: Those that write great volumes cannot choose many times but hide the truth; for in much matter there entereth both good and bad, and therefore I will write no more then is necessary, declaring what Chirurgery is, and in what order it should be used with all his accidents, shewing what Wounds are, with Imposthumes and Ʋlcers, how they ingender, and when they are ingendered, how to cure them and dissolve them: A discourse which will please many, because it is onely truth, and of great importance: Let every one therefore know, that Science with experience doe appear to be one thing, and at this present every one is certain thereof, that the experience of Physick as well as of Chirurge­ry, cannot be good without Science or Method, as a man may term it; but I say, that Experience is better then Science in these two Arts, that is, in Physick and Chirurgery, for Science onely sheweth the vertue, the which may be done with Practise that hath no Theorick; of which I have written sufficiently in my Caprici Medicinale, and that this which I write is truth, I will prove it, for I say, that none can help with the onely Method, but alwayes it is necessary, that there be some experience or practise, therefore those that doe delight to un­derstand, let them follow this my short Treatise, in the which I will treat of things most necessary to be known, and will shew how easie it is to work in that Art, declaring all the difficult matter, so that every one may see and perceive it plain, and afterwards I will shew how to make many new Medicines, as well for Wounds, as for the other sorts of sores, which have not been used neither of old Doctors nor of new; the which Remedies are of such vertue and strength, that the world will wonder at them for their notable quick working, and hereafter I will write what Chirurgery is.

The Contents of the Chapters of this Book.

  • WHat Chirurgerie is fol. 3
  • What Wounds are 7
  • Of Ulcers, and what they are ibid.
  • Of Imposthumes, and their kinds 8
  • Of Fistulaes and their kinds 9
  • Of all sorts of scabs 10
  • Of Formicola, and his effects 11
  • A discourse of wounds, and other kinds of inward sores ibid.
  • An Order to use in healing all manner of diseases appertaining to the Chirur­gian 13
  • Of Medicines to be used in all kind of wounds outward, with case and bre­vitic 14
  • To help Ulcers of all sorts 16
  • The Order to be used in curing Impost­humes of divers sorts 17
  • The Order to cure all manner of Fistu­laes 18
  • To help all manner of Scabs 19
  • To help Mal di formica 20
  • Of the Tow which is laid upon wounds by common Chirurgians 21
  • Of the digestive, with the which they dresse wounds after the aforesaid Tow 22.
  • Of the mundificative Unguent, where­with they dresse the wounds after they are digested, to mundifie them ib.
  • Of their Incarnative wherewith they dresse the wound after it is mundi­fied 23
  • A rare secret, the which this Author did send unto a very friend of his, being in the wars in Africa, the which help­eth all wounds, either by cut, thrust, galling with arrows, or Harquebush­shot, or otherwise ibid.
  • Of those Unguents that cicatrize wounds 24
  • A remedie to help a wound with great speed of our Invention ibid.
  • An excellent secret to heal wounds of Gun-shot or Arrows without any dan­ger ibid.
  • A Discourse upon old wounds that are not yet healed, and their soveraign reme­die 25
  • To dissolve a bruise in short time, when it is new done ibid.
  • To help a wound quickly that is in perill of any accident 26
  • To stop the flux of bloud in wounds with great speed ibid.
  • Another remedie to stay the Flux of bloud in a wound 27
  • Of our Cerot magno, that helpeth a­gainst all sorts of sores and wounds ib.
  • Of our Magistral Unguent that helpeth divers sorts of sores 28
  • To make Oyle of Frankincense 29
  • Of Oyle of Wax and his effect ibid.
  • To help the tooth-ach that is caused of rotten teeth, or that cometh of a descen­sion of the head 30
  • Against a stinking breath 31
  • To help those that have a great Cough in the stomack ibid.
  • To help those that cannot hold their water 32
  • To help those that cannot make water 33
  • To help those that have great burning of their Urine ibid.
  • To help those that have great pain of the Gout 34
  • A remedie against the Pestilence, that preserveth those that use it 35
  • To help Pellaria, a disease which caus­eth the hair and beard to fall away 36
  • To help a carnosity in the yeard ibid.
  • To help a white scall 37
  • To help those Carvoli that come upon the yeard, and their causes 38
  • A Discourse of those sores that come of the Pox, and how to help them quickly 39
  • The cure of one that had the Pox in his head 40
  • The cure of a wound in the head, and the hand ibid.
  • A great secret particular for the Flux [Page] and Dissenteria. 41
  • The cure of one that was poisoned with Arsenick 42
  • The cure of an ulcerated leg 43
  • The cure of the Gout on a certain Gentle­man ibid.
  • Of the causes of the Sciatica, and how yee may help it. 44
  • A most excellent remedie to help the Flux of the body, with a certain discourse [...]thereon 45
  • A Discourse as concerning Corns in the Feet or elsewhere, with their Reme­dies ibid.
  • Of an Infirmitie of Importance, that com­eth upon the extremitie of the Toe, upon the nail 46
  • A Discourse upon the Emeroids, with the order to cure them, with most excellent Medicines of our Invention 47
  • A great Secret to help those that are burst or have the Rupture ibid.
  • A rare secret and divine, to help those that are troubled with the Spleen 48
  • Another great secret to help the Spleen with great speed 49
  • The cure of a certain Spaniard called Ca­rabasall di Cordonet, which was trou­bled with the Pox ibid.
  • The cure of the stitch in the side with re­tention of Ʋrine ibid.
  • The cure of a Spaniard in Naples, who was wounded in the head 50
  • The cure of a certain Gentleman, who had Mal di Formica. ibid.
  • Certain cures that this Authour did, when he travelled into Africa 51
  • The cure of the Flux, wherewith I helped the Armie of the Emperour in Africa 53
  • A goodly remedy found out by me for wounds in the head ibid.
  • The cure of one that had his nose cut off, and set on again 54
  • The cure of an arme of S. Giordano Ursino 55
  • A great chance that happened at the as­sault in Africa ibid.
  • The cure of Wounds being poysoned, and of other sores 56
  • A Remedy found out by me, against the poyson of a Fish. 57
  • Of the taking of Africa and its destructi­on ibid.
  • The cure of a great Wound on the head 58
  • A very strange thing that happened in the aforesaid year. ibid.
  • The cure of a Fistula in the lower parts 59
  • Of many that I cured in Naples 60
  • A cure of Ulcera putrida, which was in the arme 61
  • The cure of Ethesia in the beginning 62
  • The cure of a certain man, wounded in thirteen places ibid.
  • Of Remedies that help many diseases 63
  • Here beginneth the order to make divers and sundry Medicines of our invention, never found out before by any man. And first to make our Petra Philoso­phale, that helpeth against all manner of diseases that happeneth unto man or woman, or any other Animall Ter­restriall 64
  • To make our Balm artificiall, with the or­der to use it, and wherefore it serveth 66
  • To make our Aromatico, the which help­eth against all manner of infirmities, of what quality soever they he 68
  • To make our Electuario Angelico, and the order to use it, and in what disea­ses 69
  • Of the vegetable stone of our invention, to transmute a body of one complexion into another, and to make him sound for ever 70
  • Our soluble Sirrup, with the order to use it 71
  • Our Sirrupo magistrale Leonardo, the which serveth against an infinite number of diseases, and is a rare Medicine 72
  • Our Sirrup against the melancholy hu­mour, and especially where there is ven­tosity in the stomack 73
  • [Page]Our Potion of Lignum Sanctum, which is miraculous to dissolve crude and ma­ligne humours, with the order to use it in the French Pox, and such like diseases 74
  • A most marvellous Water and rare, to cause a man to avoid the Gravell in Ʋrine, and to mundifie the Reines 75
  • To make the water of Ligum Sanctum most wholsome against the Pox, with a a new order 76
  • Our distillation for the Etesia, which is of marvellous vertue, and without compa­rison, with the order to use it 77
  • Our Vegetable Sirrup, which is miracu­lous and divine 78
  • An Electuary that helpeth the Cough with great speed and ease 79
  • Electuario benedicto Leonardo, which purgeth the body without any greif, and is miraculous in his operation 80
  • An Electuary against the evill disposition of the Liver and Stomack 81
  • Our magistral Electuary of Sulphur, the which serveth against divers sorts of infirmities Ibid.
  • Our Electuary of Consolida major, that serveth for many diseases inwardly 82
  • Our imperial Electuary for the Mother 83
  • Pills against Poyson, the which are of marvellous vertue Ibid.
  • Unguento magno Leonardo 84
  • Oil of Hypericon, the which is most mi­raculous for Wounds and Bruises 85
  • To make our Oleum benedictum, the which healeth Wounds divinely 86
  • A magistral Water, the which preserveth the fight a long time, and mundifieth the eyes of all spots Ibid.
  • To make oil of Vitiol compound, the which preserveth nature in his strength 87
  • Oleum Philosophorum de Termentiva & Cera 88
  • Our Magno Liquore, the which is of great vertue 89
  • Pillolae Angelicae, the which evacuate the body without any impediment, and are most profitable 90
  • Pillolae Aquilonae of our invention 91
  • Our Quinta essentia solutiva, which is of marvellous operation in divers matters Ibid.
  • Our Sirrup of Quintessence, the which is of marvellous vertue 92
  • Pillolae magistrales, which are good a­gainst divers infirmities Ibid.
  • A compound Aqua vitae, the which serveth against all cold diseases of the stomack 93
  • A compound oil against Poyson, the which is of a marvellous vertue ibid.
  • A marvellous Sope, that helpeth those which cannot spit but with great pain 95
  • To make the Quintessence of Honey 96
  • To make our Elixer vitae, or Aqua Coe­lestis 97
  • To make Aqua Reale vel Imperiale, the which maketh the teeth white presently, incarnateth the gums, and causeth a good breath 98
  • A kind of Pill most convenient for the eyes, and comforteth the stomack 99
  • A discourse upon a Composition that pre­serveth a man or woman in health a long time 100
  • A marvel'ous Water to be used of all Chi­rurgians in curing of their Patients ib.
  • To make our Caustick 101
  • To make oyle of Antimony ibid.
  • A pretious Liquor above all other 102
  • A secret of marvellous vertue ibid.
  • Our secret of marvellous vertue in act and strength 103
  • To rectifie and preserve the sight of those that are weak sighted ibid.
  • Of Lac Virginis, and the order to make it 104
  • To calciue Tutia, and to bring it into a salt ibid.
  • To precipitate Mares, and to bring it into a red powder, called Crocus martis, the which serveth for divers purposes 105
  • A secret of Turpentine of Ciprus ibid.
FINIS.

Short Amimadversions upon the Book lately Published by one who stiles himselfe NOAH BIGGS, Helmontii Psittacum.

Friend,

YOu set a bigg Saile to a little Vessell: I beleeve your Arke doth not like Noah's, containe all the vitality of Rationals, and Sensibles.

You write Pag. 205. con­cerning Mastication. See­ing all Aliment ought to passe into a liquid Re­duction, or tendance to Chilificative mutation, or Alimentall conversion, therefore Mastificati­on is to be highly commended.

You have like the great Fish, that swallowed Ionah, received in Van Helmont, though not di­gested him; and the same taxe may passe on you, which somtimes did on a Noble Courtier, de­vorasti, non edisti. It was the judgment of [Page 2] Doctor Charlton; a Learned Physitian, a favourer of Van Helmont, that he had a better Faculty, Ever­tere opiniones Veterum, quam extruere, & stabilire Novas.

When was ever Practice amongst the Physiti­ans so narrowly confined, as they kept themselves to one Author? Do not some of them follow Minfect, others Hartman, others Grulingius, others will have their prescriptions made after Querce­tan, Faber, or Poterius, some after Begvinus, Millius, Billich, Burgravius, Becherus, or other Authors; And some disgust all, which are not Paracelsian, or accord with Basilius, Valentinus his Master, and are pleased to practise after their Medicines, with the additions of their own Experiments, out of their reading, and judegment on their severall Authors. I would gladly know who ties himselfe to Sennertus, Riverius, or any one Mo­dern Author, as if universall Learning were contained in the sphere of one Microcosme: Yet you are so much for Helmont, as if he were the great Luminary of the World. I confesse, I honour Van Helmont, but if you do no cures out of the tract of his Method, I beleeve you must study more knowledge in his Medicines then barely how to Translate them, or otherwise you [Page 3] will faile in the honour you aspire unto, and from teaching others, come your selfe to learn from those you unworthily vilifie.

You say Pag. 12. The Schooles are ignorant of the Quiddities, and Dihoties of things, do you your selfe understand either your own, or the essence of the lowest inferiour Animals? Pag. 15. Why did you not by the golden Trident of Chymicall Theoremes, whom as a Lady of Ho­nour you have courted, devoutly kissed, and pro­fesse your strict observance to, becalm this Sea of distraction? And as you say, Pag. 16. write in that, in which there is no beaten path, which you think most honourable, because he that leades hath this advantage above others, if others follow him, he hath the glory of the first undertaking, if not the excuse of prejudice: But had not Van Helmont traced out this Path to you, I could think you would have acquiesced to the ancient opinions, and not have aspired to be reckoned amongst the publick Benefactors of Civill and Humane life.

Pag. 35. You have a jerke at Bartholomeus Ca­richterus, but I beleeve your own learning and judgment will hardly bring you to be a Physitian to so great an Emperour as Maximillian the [Page 4] Second. For your threefold Character you give of a good Purge, Pag. 80. I hardly be­leeve your Patients will be so happy as to meet with such from you. The London Dispensatory hath variety of medicines, some following one Author, and some another, for which purpose it was so enlarged, as thought necessary in respect of the severall variety of judgment, and practises of our Modern Physitians.

You say, Pag. 11. reading is no way con­ducible to knowing: If you had never read Van Helmont, you had never written in this stile. You say, Pag. 11. The disease known is not the halfe way to the cure, but if you know not the disease, I conceive you would hardly, or blindly come to the cure of them. You write, Pag. 15. The Physitians like to the self-conceited Laodiceans, while they presume they keep the keyes of the Sci­ence, they neither enter themselves into the Closet, and inner Parlour of Nature, nor admit, willingly, others that would. But observe your own in­circumspection and levitie: For had you peru­sed their Pharmacopoea, published 1650. A Capite ad Calcèm, you could not have committed so grosse an error, (nor did their former want pre­scriptions of Chymick medicines) but if you [Page 5] please to cast your eye on it, from Pag. 187. ad fi­nem Libri, you may see many good Chymick pre­parations, besides the multitude of other prescrip­tions, which are left to the judgement and choyce of Ingenious Practitioners, to fetch out of other Chymick Authors.

And had you but cast your eye on their care­full expression, in fine Pharmacopoeae, you would have been silent, or written more temperately, which I must expose to your knowledge in their own words.

Ne nos (Amice Lector) in hac operis suscepti meta, simulque cum calamo nostro curam deposuisse tui videamur, certior ut fias, cupimus, nos etiam saluti tuae, publicaeque utilitati, nihilo segnius invigilare, adeoque officinam Chy­micam, seorsum in horto Collegii erigendam curasse, ar­tificemque Idoneum accersivisse, eidemque instruendo & cor­rigendo Collegarum peritissimos destinasse, ut medica­menta, quanto efficaciora, tanto cautius, quanto difficilli­ora, tanto diligentius, quanto pretiofiora, tanto sincerius componerentur. Denique eidem suffragia nostra, locum­que ac lucrum omne gratis dedisse, & concessisse, ut ad tam singularem benevolentiam promerendam pari honesta­te impelleretur. Tu Quisquis es, nobiscum fruere, vove & vale. Now judge of the condition you stand in with knowing men.

[Page 6]Hath not Rome, France, Augusta, Collen, Amsterdam, and other Nations their severall Pharmacopaeas? Must all be drowned, if Noah, your petty Arke hold them not up. Pag. 107, and 108. Concer­ning Glisters, that they never reach to the Ileon, or have any nourishing quality.

Bartholinus in his Physicall exercitations, hath a tract against that opinion; where, by his au­thorities, experiments, and reasons, you might be somewhat staggered, if you do not jurare in ver­ba Magistri: against whom Doctor Heers, in his tractate de Fontibus spadanis, casteth forth bit­terrer language then I will throw upon you; yet I desire you to remember what Doctor Met­calfe of Cambridge not long since said, on the cen­sures of some nimble-tounged Scholars on the grave Academians: You young men think us old men fooles, but we old men know you are so. And be not offended that I advise you, that would be held Magistrum in Artibus, to study also to be Magistrum in Moribus. But I will conclude with these two Grammar verses,

Adde quod ingenuas dedicisse fideliter Artes
Emollit mores, nec sinit esse [...].

And must tell you, for your rash extravagant [Page 7] censures, you are worthy to be transmitted back to the Colledge Censors, or Deanes.

W. I.
FRIEND CULPEPR,

I Had thought the sober animadversions were given you lately upon the publishing of the translation of Pa­pius, would have reformed your insolent Language you formerly used against your bettters; but I see ‘Quo semel est imbuta recens servabit odorem Testa diu.’ The Vessell cannot put off the first foetid smell it received, for in your disponsatory Epistle, and in these of your Mid­wifery with a great deale of rayling, and nonsence, as if it were Cuckow-moneth with you, you chatter still in one note, against Priests, and Physitians, and cry out, Wee are Prisoners, and kept in darknesse, and who are our Jaylors but Schollers: Out of which by your selfe-con­ceited omniscience you undertake to deliver them, from the unsufferable ignorance men and women are now trained up in, and teach them a desperate unwarrantable [Page 2] [...] [Page 3] [...] [Page 4] [...] [Page 5] [...] [Page 6] [...] [Page 7] [...] [Page] [...] [Page 9] [...] [Page] practice. And this is done, you say, ‘to uphold a Company of Lazie Doctors, most of whose covetuousnesse outweighes their witts, as a Milstone outweighes a feather, &c. I can­not but smile at your nonsence similitudes; but I shall ac­count you an exact Mathematician, if you can tell me how many feathers would counterpoyse a milstone, but that task would make your braine as light as your tongue. I all­waies conceived men were bred up in callings, to enable them in future to preserve themselves and their Families, and in their professions to be serviceable to the Common-wealth, and might lawfully live by them. I pray, why do you translate but to live by it not agere stultum, & Zoi­lum? I wonder whether gaine put you not at first (when other Trades failed you) to write, or rather translate Phy­sick in your mother tongue: and it seemeth you rather know how to translate Latine, then transferre it into a Sentence, as you do legere, & non intelegere, neglegere est. But I will admit the excuse, tis the Compositors overfight. You say, If any want wisdome, let him aske it of God, not of the Colledge of Physitians; and yet you undertake to teach them; for you say, You intend to lay down some Rules, whereby a man may as well prevent a sicknesse before it comes, as reme­dy it when it comes, and that you will write of the preservation of man, even from his conception to his grave: a great undertaking, and I beleeve too high [Page 5] Mr. Culpeper for your reading, and will scarce be gained out of your translating some fragments of Galens, and some pieces of modern Anatomy. You say, Physitians of our times keep our understanding in as great bondage as Pharoah kept the Hebrew Midwifes bodies, I pray did the other Physitians before them walke in your tract? but why transcend you the text with your foolish additions? what bondage do you read of either the Aegyptian Mid­wifes, or women suffered under Pharaoh themselves, though the males were overcharged with rigor. You confesse God hath given you some little sparkes of Knowledge, and you will not wrap up your talent in a napkin and bury it in the ground: Truly I thinke you need not hide any you have; and for that of rayling you will not. You desire others to judge charitably of you, for Charity and Honesty you say alwaies walk hand in hand together, and think ill of no man: If your own rule be your judge, you are neither Charitable nor Honest: you say in your Epistle to the Reader, The water may be mud­dy in the stream, which is clear in the Fountain, but yours is clear in neither: You say, The Translators have given us a Translation of the Bible (such a one as it is) but have given all the proper names in Scripture in pure Hebrew words in an English Cha­racter, and yet all the Scripture was written for our instruction: Had you been as well versed in the [Page 12] Translations, as you are in rash Censures, you might have found the Hebrew words exactly interpreted, adjoyned to many translations: not conceived so necessary to be joyned to all; because whosoever understood the language well (as God be praised many of our Nation do) they need­ed not that key to open it to them: Besides you say, whole Sentences in Scripture are so translated, that it would make a man sick to see them, I beleeve you mean read them; but why quoate you not the places, as you did before, the fourth or fifth first Chapters of the Book of Chronicles. If you had said some sentences of Scripture are omitted, or perverted, you might justly have taxed the lazie ignorant Printers, both here and beyond the Seas, in these times, that have not had so much care of their Presses in putting forth those sacred Bookes, as your Printer hath had of yours. You say, The first vertue a Child aimes at so soon as it is born is knowledge. I would gladly learn what Virtue is native; I conceive them dative, and that scientia is rather acquisita, then nata, if it be true nemo nascitur artifex; or the Platonick opinion hold, man is Tabala rasa, capeable of impressions, but hath none writ­ten in it. The desire to be as Gods was the cause of our Pa­rents first fall, knowledge of good and evill, but the know­ledge of Good comes onely from God, the Fountaine of good­nesse, in whose stream you must be dipped, before you desert your pride, and selfe-love, and put on humility. You say, [Page 13] Had not the Priests formerly absconded the mysteries of Truth from us, Sermons would have been so cheape that they would have been cried about streets for three halfpence a dozen; You might have done well to have expressed your selfe, whether you meant our Priests, or the Romane, for I dare justifie a few of the Sermons of our late reverend Divines, as An­drewes, Hierons, Holsworth, Adams, and many others which I could name, are of farr greater worth and esteeme, then your dispensatory, unlesse with some ignorants and women: Though you undervalue Sermons at a lesse rate then sparrowes, when your learned labours are prized at five or six shillings a piece. For Gardiner, I think eve­ry good Christian abhorreth his name and life; and I know no man desires to die his death. Gyant proportions have often Pigmy conceits, but our gentlemans fancy farre out­strips. Bayards leape, who brings Dianas Image from Ephesus to jumpe to England at one leape, where silver shrines must be made for her still. It is a Riddle to my understanding, where the Image and Shrines are; and I should be glad to see you cleare that passage, of the Image fell downe from Jupiter, and that of the silver shrines from impertinent nonsence, and shew how you can make them correspond with our Physitians. Tis true you put an effigies Image, or sculpture before every book you write; I conceive you meane not your owne, I confesse I [Page 4] have that in your Book at Amen Corner, but for your Silver smith and shrines you write of, I hardly beleeve you will have one, unlesse the Midwifes you flatter so, make you one. For Amen Corner, I perswade my selfe, tis a for­midable place to you, for feare of dissection, for you never durst hitherto venture your approbation there before the Doctors for your sufficiency in your trade you were bound to, and some-while brought up in: And for your judgement in Physick, I know you dare not come thither to the test, though you raile against them. Pray let me not trouble your weake braines with a relation of a Gentleman and Scholars, censure upon your Book, who perusing some passages in it in a Booksellers shop, asked whether Culpeper made that obsceane book or no, and being answered he did, replied, truly Culpeper hath made Cul-paper, paper fit to wipe ones breech withall. Where you writ, You could have written deeper notions in Physick then shall be found in this book: I must tell you, you would seeme to be a Physitian, who have scarce aspired to the Apothecary. But the Colledg hath wrapt up their Children in blankets of ignorance, have they not shut them up in a Chamber, as tis related your Patron sometines did you: you say, man may meddle with generalls, but be­fore he meddle with particulars, let him looke to himselfe: But you have Lynceus eyes in others affaires, sed non vides manticae quod in tergo est. He is a [Page 1] saucy insolent Souldier speakes irreverently against the Ge­rall under whose Colours he marcheth, you professe your self studient in Physick, but want some Physick your self to purge away the Malignant humor possesseth you, against the honourable Society of the Colledge of Physitians: A little Hellebor would do well to purge your braines with, if you could but jump over as easily to Italy or Greece, where it growes, as Dianas Image did hither. Were you asleep or awake when you saw it jumpe so farr, otherwise I shall think it like one of the stories in the Mirror of Knighthood. Every bird thinks his own young one fairest suum cuique pulchrum, you acknowledge the direction for Midwives to be your own child, but whether you are more properly a borrower or translator, then Father, Judicent Medici. Tis a slovenly Bird bewrayes his own nest and though you seem to adhere to Hypocrates you shall never be counted Harpocrates for he was borne with one hand on his mouth, and the other on his members, but you will close yours upon neither. But I will conclude with our Mercury, with a story of Mercury out of our Latine Emblems. Mercury having a good conceipt of himselfe (as our Mercury hath) desirous to know what opinions mortalls conceived of him, would needs descend, and fixed on a Statuaries shop, where lighting and comming in, he spies many Images of the Gods and Goddesses, and enquires the price of them but not see­ing his owne, enquires whether he had the Statue of Mer­cury [Page 16] or no, he replied he had, and fetched him forth of a bye corner he had in his shop of whom Mercury demanded what price he would aske for it, the Statuary replyed, Sir, If you mean in good earnest to buy the other Statues you Cheapned, you shall have him into the bargain, whereupon Mercury went away discontented, I leave the Morall to your own application: and your selfe also; wishing you more government in your tongue, and discression in your pen, hereafter, concluding with that saying, His tongue is no slander, whose tongue is all slander,

Your well willer, and a wellwisher to the Substances not shad­dowes of Physick. W. J.

The Epistle to the Reader.

COURTEOUS READER,

THere having come to my hands three severall Bookes; Phioravants Secrets, and also his Chyrurgery, to which is added The Iewell of Practice: Published a good while since by JOHN HESTER, a Spagyrick Pro­fessor, in his time of eminent note: And know­ing the Books very scarce, and out of Print, much desired by Ingenuous Practitioners in Phy­sick, I have for the Publick good communica­ted those three severall Books to my Friend: assu­ring my selfe out of my knowledge of the Books, that there are in them contained many Chymica arcana, which will be much advantagious to Spagyrick Students, with the more confidence, be­cause whosoever desireth to have, and make use of the choycest Secrets delivered in them, may have them faithfully made up, and dispenced in [Page] Amen-Corner, by W. I. Chymist to that honoura­ble Society, and Colledge of London Physitians, who hath heretofore made up the choisest of them, for sundry Physitians, who have earnest­ly desired them, and with good successe used them: And I doubt not, but they will receive as good satisfaction in their compositions, as that worthy Spagyrick, (that from an Italian Coate, put them into an English Vesture) formerly gave them: Desiring you for your fuller approba­tion to peruse his Epistle praefixed before his translation, which I presume, will give you that content is desired from

your Friend, W. I. M. B.

A SHORT DISCOURSE OF THE SECRETS OF THE Most Famous Knight and Excel­lent Physitian and Chirurgion, Lord PHIORAVANT [...].

CHAP. I. What thing infirmitie is, and whereof it proceedeth.

SIcknesse or Infirmitie is no other thing then a distemperature of humours in the bodies of creatures, as well reasonable as unreasonable, which are subject to sickness and to death. And these doe not proceed of any other thing, then of the divers and sundry disorders committed many waies, which disorders every man might very well de­fend himself from, if he would. And these disorders which are thus committed are very many, whereof I will name you a few, and will tell you also of the infirmities which follow them.

There are many which disorder themselves in their eating, [Page 2] and in the varietie and superfluitie of meats, and so corrupt themselves; and of such corruption engendreth ill dispositi­on of the stomack, and losse of appetite, and thence com­eth the Itch, and diseases of the legs, and other like matters, which commonly proceed of much repletion▪ Others disor­der themselves in the excess of Lecherie, of which disorder cometh debilitie of the Reins, want of the sight, weakness of the brains, and oftentimes diseases about the Yard, and o­ther kinde of infirmities hanging upon the French sicknesse. Some disorder themselves in fishing, standing much in the water; and of this accesse cometh coldnesse of the Nerves, pains of the legs and feet, and such other things which such accesse causeth. Other some disorder themselves in hunting, in such sort, as they take heat, cold, weariness, hunger and thirst; of which disorder there followeth Agues, Opilations, Rheums, Numnesse, and such like things; which, with such disorder and great travell, commonly are wont to bee caused. And in divers other manners men may disorder themselves, which at this time I will omit, because I will not be over-tedious to the Reader. It sufficeth, so that I shew the sub­stance of the thing, and to doe it, that every one may un­derstand it. If then the causes are infinite, by which infir­mities or sickness come, and the remedies a great many more then enough to cure them: I mean therefore to set down in the Chapters following the infirmities, together with the remedies, with the which they may be healed, beginning with the infirmities which men have from their birth unto their death, discoursing of them one after an other. And first I will speak of Infants and children, which happen into the falling sicknesse assoon as they are born.

CHAP. II. To help the falling sickness in young Children.

THe Falling Sickness is a disease, the which in young Chil­dren is caused of great humiditie in the head, and the cure thereof according to our Order, is with drying things [Page 3] which dissolveth that humiditie, and the Remedie is this: Take our Cerot Magistrale, and spread it on a cloth the breadth of two fingers square, and strew thereon the powder of Cantharides: the which of his own quality and nature is at­tractive, and bringeth forth great quantity of water: then lay this Cerot in the nuke of the neck, and there let it lye at the least eight or ten daies, taking it off every day, and making it clean, then lay it on that place again. Likewise you shall annoint the head with Oleum Petroleum, the which is very dry­ing and penetrative; because it cometh forth of a Mine under the earth, the which continually doth boil, and so cometh forth with the water, and then is separated. This Oil hath a mar­vellous vertue in himself, that it defendeth the fire, for if a man annoint his hands therewith, he may wash his hands with molten Lead presently, and never hurt him: and that cometh through a certain hidden vertue in that Oil. Also you shall understand, that this Oil will burn being set on fire, and yet it will not hurt or scald any thing which it falleth on, or toucheth it.

CHAP. III. To help young Children of certain grosse Scabs, that come in the head and face.

THese grosse scabs that come in the head and face, are caused of abundance of fatness, and moisture of the milk of the Nurse; for the child being tender and weak of com­plexion, is not apt to digest that superfluous humour, and so Nature driveth it forth in that order, with great abundance of humiditie, And the best remedie is, That you shall give the child every morning one scruple to drinke, of our E­lixar vitae, because it is a friend to Nature, and nourisheth the bodie, and drieth up superfluous moisture, and so the child shall be holpen. Also you shall annoint the child with our Magno liquore, the which is temperate of nature, and doth pe­netrate, and so causeth solution of that humour.

CHAP. IV. To help young Children of the Rupture.

THe Rupture is caused two waies, the one through weak­nesse of the place, and the other through much crying, and the remedie is thus: You shall make a Trusse fit for the childe that shall come very close, and then let them use our Electuarie of Consolida majore, the which is written in my dis­course of Chirurgerie, with divers of my Medicines: And al­so you shall give the child to drink the powder of Alkimil­la in wine; and every night you shall annoint the Rup­ture with our Oleum Philosophorum, made of Turpentine and Waxe: the which is so peircing, that it warmeth the place that is broke, and helpeth it to siccatrize. And so using these three Medicines, thou shalt help him quickly, for this have I proved an infinite of times, and alwaies have had good successe, thanks be to God.

CHAP. V. Of the small Poxe that come to Children.

THe Small Pox are caused of superfluous choller and flegm, the which is mixed with the bloud, and so continuing a cer­tain time it doth encrease so much, that Nature cannot bear it, and so driveth it forth with a great accident of a Fever, the which commonly doth continue four or five daies together, and then cometh forth certain wheals or bladders full of cor­ruption, which within three daies will break and run forth, and many drie. You shall understand that there are some so weak of Nature that they cannot come forth, but remain within, and so having no evaporation outwardly, it doth choak them, and so die, and that is the cause why so many creatures from four yeers old to ten doe die without help. And therefore I con­sidering the true cause of the disease, I have also found out the true remedie to help them, and that is this. When the child feeleth that Accident, give him presently one drachm [Page 5] of our Aromatico to eat: The which hath such force and vertue attractive, that it joyning unto the stomack draweth unto it all the humours that offend, and carrieth them forth both by vo­mit and sege, and so leaveth Nature eased, and the partie out of danger. Then after that anoint him four evenings with our Balsamo artificiato, and lay him down to sweat, and so he shall be well.

CHAP. VI. Of the Fersa or Measels that come to young Children.

THe Measels that cometh to Children, commonly cometh after the small poxe one yeer or two, or three, and is caused of the aforesaid cause; and there is no other diffe­rence between them, but that the person is of more age and strength, and both come with an accident of a Fever, but in this cause they come forth thicker, and they dry without breaking or running. Neverthelesse, this many times causeth death, if it be not holpen quickly, and with the remedies ap­propriate. You shall understand that this doth not come with so great vehemencie as the other doth. You shall onely de­fend the heart and preserve the stomack from corruption, and putrefaction, and so you shall help them quickly. The Re­medies are these: You shall give them four or five mornings this drinke: Take Julep of Violets, ℥ ii. Rosewater, ℥ iiii. Oile of Vitriol four grains, mixe them and drink it cold: for this is a rare Medicine.

CHAP. VII. Of Waxing Kernels, which are called of some Scrophulae.

THese Kernels that commonly come in the throat of young Children, are caused of superfluous melancholy humours corrupted, and are a kinde of Ulcer, very hard to be holpen, and evill to have, for when they are broke they cause exces­sive pain, because thereunto runneth great abundance of hu­mours, [Page 6] and are so hot and corrupt, that it is impossible to help them with outward Medicines onely, because they pro­ceed of an inward cause. Therefore if thou wilt help them, first remove the Cause, and then cure the Effect.

First therefore thou shalt give them our Sirrup against Me­lancholick humours, written in our discourse of Chirurgerie, and then give him a Dose of our Aromatico fasting, and that will evacuate the stomack of choler and flegm, and drie up those humours that run to the sores. The Medicines that you shall use to the sore, are two: The first is our Costick, which being laid on the sore, doth mortifie it in four and twen­tie hours, and taketh away the corruption. Note, that you may not take away the Askar, untill such time as it falleth out of himself, then lay thereon the black Cerot of Godfre­do de Medic. the which Cerot is written also in Galen. And in short space it will be holp, as I have proved divers times.

CHAP. VIII. Of divers sorts of Scabs, and their Remedies.

SCabs proceed of divers and sundry causes; Neverthelesse, they all are caused of putrefied blood, as you may see by dai­ly experience. But the said putrefaction may be caused of divers accidents, as by eating much moist and fat meat. It may be caused of a corrupt humour of the French Pox, and of divers other causes, which I will leave at this time. There­fore if thou wilt help any of the aforesaid causes, it would be necessary to use Purgations, and Unctions: The Purgations are two, and the Unctions also two. The first Purgation is half an ounce of our Electuario Angelico, which take in the morning fasting thereon at the least four hours: then take for ten daies together our Soluble Sirrup; the dose is from ℥. iiii. to ℥. vi. And then if the Scabs come of the Pox, you shall annoint them five or six nights with our Ʋnguento mag­no, and they shall be holpen. But if the scabs come of any other cause, you shall annoint them with Ʋnguento de Lithar­giro simple, after they are well purged. The Unguent is [Page 7] made with Vineger, with the Oil of Roses, and with Li­targe.

CHAP. IX. Against Worms in Children.

THis is a rare secret against the Worms, the which I have used a long time, and alwaies have had good successe. Take the seed of Levant, the which is sweet, and is called in Italian Sementina, and the seeds of Carduus Benedictus, and of a certain Herb growing on the Sea, called Carolina, ana: stamp it very fine, and give thereof one drachm in honey, and it will kill the Worms, also thou shalt understand that I have a great secret against the Worms, the which I will shew thee; for it may be used more safer then any of these Hearbs above na­med: You shall annoint all the bodie over (leaving no part) with our Balm Artificiall, and give the Patient thereof to drink ʒ. i. with Wine or Broth. Thou shalt understand, though the child have no Worms, yet the Medicine will doe him great good, because it helpeth against all manner of diseases that may happen unto children, and also to other persons.

CHAP. X. Of certain Warts or Carvoli, that come on the Yard of a man.

VVHen Children have passed the foresaid diseases, and that they come to the age of fourteen yeers, or fifteen, or more, and that they begin to fall among women, many times by some accidents, they get these Carvoli, or Warts on the Yard. And they are of divers kinds, for some come on the ve­ry skin, and some come on the flesh or end of the Yeard. Some are as though they were burnt or scorched, and other like Ulcers, and other like Warts. Those that come as though they were scorched are of small importance, and may be easily hel­ped, for if you touch them once or twice with our Aqua reali, they will be whole. Those which are Ulcerated are evil to heal, [Page 8] yet you shall use no strong Medicines thereto, but onely dresse them with our Magno liquore, and in short time they will be whole. Those that are like Warts are very evil to be help'd, for you must mortifie them with our Costick, one after another. But if they be not mortified at once, touch them again, and a­gain. if need require; and when they are mortified, help them onely with our Magno liquore, untill they be whole: And with this Order I have cured a number.

CHAP. XI. Of the Running of the Reins.

THe running of the Reins most commonly cometh of the much use of women, or because those women are cor­rupted with a certain distemperature of heat, that is able to corrupt a man using with her. And of this running there may grow divers diseases, as you may see by those that are troubled therewith, if they be not helped as they ought to be. One of the diseases that may come of this, is great pains in the back, because it doth weaken the vertue of the Reins. There may come also a great burning in the Yeard, and botches in the Groin, and such like, all which are hard to bee dissolved. The cure of this disease is, You shall take three times our Pills called Pillolae Aquilonae, every third day once, that being done, he shall use this Electuarie seven or eight daies together.

Take a certain shell which is smooth, and is called of some Calcinelli, and of some Toninole, and of some Tel­line; Take them and burn them, make it into fine pow­der, and take thereof ℥ i. the buds of Cankers or wild Eg­lantine that the Rose cometh of, it is called in Italian Rose canine, ℥. di. Hysope of the Mountain ʒ. ii. white honie crude ℥. vi. Make thereof an Electuarie without fire. The dose is, ℥. i, in the morning fasting, and at night before meat. Note, that when you use this Medicine, you shall eat no Pork, nor Fish, nor slimie things.

CHAP. XII. Of a Botch which is caused of a corrupt humour, which is a kind of Pox.

I Would here shewe the cause more plainer, but that there are divers which have shewed it plaine enough: but I will shew thee the true secret and remedy to help them. First, Thou shalt give them ten mornings together our Soluble Sirrupe, and then take our Aromatico three times, that being done, and that the botch is open, you shall dresse it with our Magno liquore upon a tent, and lay upon the sore our Magistrale Cerotte, and with these two medicines thou shalt help it from the beginning to the ending, as I have seen the experience divers times.

CHAP. XIII. Of Pellarella that causeth the haire to fall off.

PEllarella, or Morphewe, is a kind of Pox, and is one of the first Presagia of that disease, and is a corrupt humour, and so drying, that in short time it mortifieth the haire of the head and beard, and eye-browes, and causeth them to fall off. You shall understand that this disease is such a thing, that it cannot be helped by any meanes, except it be taken in time, before the haire be mortified. Neverthelesse I will shew a secret unto the World, to know when a man hath that disease or no, and in what time he may help it that they shall not fall. The secret is this, Thou shalt understand, that the beginning of Pellarella, is one Carvoli or more that cometh upon the Yeard, the which seemeth to be of little importance, because they are holpen with ease, but within ten, or fifteen daies after they are whole, there will come a certaine alteration in the throate, which will not suffer him to swallow his meat, which doth indure com­monly eight or ten daies, and so goe away by it selfe without any medicine, and in that time the haire is mortified, and then within two or three moneths the haire will fall: so that [Page 10] this is the cause why they cannot be help'd when they fall away, for the time was passed before, and the rootes mortified. There­fore if thou wilt keep thy self from running into such a great danger, thou maiest do it easily if thou take it in time: and the remedie is this. When you have had any of these Carvoli, and that after there cometh an alteration in the throate, then presently purge, and use a defensive unction that the haire may not mortifie. You shall purge him nine dayes every morning with our Sirupo Magistrale, and fast thereon four houres. The dose is from ℥ iii. to ℥ vi. that being done, you shall give him ℥. di. of Electuario Angelica, according to the recept, and in the mean time annoint all his face and head with our Magno liquore, and doing thus, it is not possible that the haire should fall off. This is a secret, the which few men have known, and never written of any before this time, and is of so great importance, that it were necessarie to be known for an universall health, that every man might keep himself from this disease.

CHAP. XIIII. Of Scabbes that come through the Pox.

THe Scabbes that come through the Pox, are of divers sorts; as you may see by experience: yet all may be helped with one order of medicine, because they proceed of no other thing then of the evill disposition of that disease. And these most commonly do proceed and come after Pellarella, and this is the cure. You shall give him our Soluble Sirrup every morning warm, with two ounces of Mel Rosarum, and lay him down to sweat, and cover him well, and then at night annoint him with Vnguento di Lithargiro, and thus doing five, or six daies, he shall be helped. For with this order I have helped an infinite num­ber, to my great honour, and satisfaction of the Patient.

CHAP. XV. Of certaine Tumours, or swellings in divers parts of the body.

SWellings, which use to come to man, are called Tumours a­gainst nature, and may come of divers causes, as by cold, and they do cause inflammations without paine, and most com­monly they come in the articular parts: There are others which are caused of hot humours, and those are called Risepelli: There are other that come of the Pox, and these come in the head, and on the legges and armes, and are of evill digestion, because they are engendered of corrupt, viscous, and crude humours. You shall understand that these three kindes do dif­fer in qualitie, and are also helped with sundry medicines. Those that come of cold, are windie humours, and may be hel­ped with bathes of hearbes, and hot unctions that have virtue to dissolve the wind. The hearbes to make the bath, are these: Nettles, Mallowes, Pelletory of the wall, Bran and Ashes, and make thereof a bath; and then annoint them with our Oleum Philosophorum, made of Turpentine and Wax. Those that come of hot humours, you shall wash with Aqua Vitae, because it openeth the pores, and dissolveth that heat. Those that are come of the Pox, are evill to heale, and his cure must be with great purging: and the chiefest thing that you can give him, is our potion of Lignum Vitae, because it doth make thin those gross humours, and dissolve the swellings, if it be taken according to the order of the recept, the which is written in this Book. And so with this order thou shalt help them per­fectly.

CHAP. XVI. Of Ache in divers parts of the body.

AChes, that come to divers parts of the Bodies, do spring of divers causes, as it is said before of the Swellings, or Tu­mours: but for the most part now in this our time, they are [Page 12] caused of the Pox, and those kinds of Aches are evill to be helped, because they are engendered of viscous humours, and putrefaction of the bloud, and of evill disposition of the Liver. And the cure of those Aches, is to purge the body, and purifie the Liver: and that thou shalt do with our Soluble Sir­rupe, taking it ten dayes: and then take our Electuario Ange­lica, or Pillole Aquilone, and then use your wine of Lignum sanctum, and sweat therewith as much as thou canst, for it is warm and drie, and apperative, and provoketh sweate, and so they shall be helpt. But if it happen that this will not help, then annoint them three or four times with our Vnguento magno, and without all doubt by Gods grace, they shall be helped and sound of that disease.

CHAP. XVII. Of the Cough in the stomack.

THe Cough cometh divers and sundry waies to the sto­mack, as by cold, and that is one of the most common causes that may be, and is of small importance, because it will goe away of it selfe without medicine. There is another kind of Cough that troubleth much old folke, and that is of a Ca­tarrhous humour. The third kind of Cough written of by us, is that which cometh to those that have the Fever Hectick. Also there is another kind which is caused of the French Pox. And these are the foure kindes of Coughes that do commonly happen vnto men and women. The first kind of Cough that happeneth unto man through cold, is easie to be helped, for na­ture of it self will help it without any other helpe: but if thou wilt helpe nature thou maiest with ease, and that shall be with eating drie and apperatiue meates, and drinking good wine, and so the Cough will goe away quickly. But the Cough which cometh to old folk, is caused of a Catarrhous humour, which is nothing else but debilitie of nature, for lack of naturall heat, the which causeth the stomack that it cannot digest his meate in such order as it should, but ingendreth those superfluous humours, that cause the Cough. And this must be helped with [Page 13] keeping of diet; that is, to eat little meat, and to use thing that warm the stomack and help digestion, and this thou shalt doe in this order. Take ʒ. ii. of our Aromatico, which hath vertue to evacuate the stomack, and then use our Quintessence of Wine, and annoint the stomack with our Balm artificiall, and so shalt thou help this kind of Cough. The third kind of Cough, which is caused of the Fever He­ctick, is of evill nature, that I dare say nothing nor shew a Medicine, because the most part that are troubled therewith, go to Church and never return again to their houses, as you may see by experience. The fourth kind of Cough is devi­lish and evill to help, because it is caused of the Pox, and doth not onely hurt the stomack, but causeth great pains to the partie beside. Neverthelesse, thou shalt understand that this is easie to he helped by Gods grace, for them that know the true secret, which is thus: You shall give him eight or ten daies together our Soluble Sirrup, then take two drachms of our Aromatico, and then perfume him with Cinabar five or six mornings, or so long untill that he feel pain in his gums, and then hee shall be whole. For this is a great secret, to help that kind of Cough caused of the Poxe, as I have proved a thousand times with good successe.

CHAP. XVIII. Of the white Scab that cometh in the Head.

THis Scab is of an evill corruption in the superiour parts, which is caused of abundance of moisture, and heat of the Stomack, which sendeth these vapours up to the head, and so goeth out that way. This is of two kindes, the one is hot and dry, and that is with a certain white crust, without any other kind of putrefaction: the other kind is hot and moist, and that causeth a certain crust, which is full of matter under it; so that as they differ in qualitie, they differ also in cure. Those that are hot and dry, must have Medicines that cool the heat, and extinguish the drinesse, and this thou shalt doe with Sirrup of Citarch, and purge often with Cassia, and use [Page 14] cooling things, as Succorie, Melons, Lettice, and such like. The other kinde which is hot and moist, you must first help the heat, and then dry the humiditie, which you shall doe with vomiting, and purging, and keeping diet, and eating of drying meats. The first drying scab you shall annoint one­ly with our Magno liquore, which without help of any other thing, will cure it after they be purged, as is before said. The second kind you shall help, after the bodie is purged with our Cerot Magistrale, strewing thereon Cantharides in fine powder, which have vertue attractive; by which means it mundifieth the head of that superfluous humiditie, and then annoint him with our Ʋnguento magno, and in short space it will be whole, because it is cold and drie. And so by this means thou mayest heal these two kinds of Scabs, as I have done divers times, having respect to the cause. Ye shall understand that this disease is many times taken from the Nurse, the which is infected with the Pox, and so her milk being corrupted, it corrupteth the child, and therfore there must be good consideration thereof in the cure.

CHAP. XIX. Of Risipella.

THis Risipella is an inflammation with swelling and red­nesse, the which commonly cometh in the face, arms and legs, and in no other places of the bodie, and it is caused of alteration of the blood, as I will shew you an example by a pot that you seeth your meat in: When it is set on the fire, and is full of liquor, lacking one or two inches of the top, and when it beginneth to boil through the great heat of the fire, it runneth over the pot: and so by the like example we may say, that Risipella is a great alteration of the blood, through superfluous heat; and this occasion of heat proceed­eth of great quantitie of flegm, that is in the stomack; for because assoon as they have vomited the flegm, they are helped of Risipella, for I have seen the experience thereof divers times. Therefore give them of the juyce of Elder-Roots [Page 15] ℥. iiii. and of Honie of Roses ℥. ii. in the morning fa­sting, for this purgeth the Stomack of flegm, and cooleth the blood, then hold the parts over the fume of hot water, and bathe it with pure Aqua vitae, distilled without flegm: for this is one of the most excellent Medicines that can be found, because it is aperative and attractive, and presently dissolveth that alteration, and taketh away the pain. Also it would be good to use five or six mornings to drinke ℥. i. of Julep of Violets, with six grains of Vitriol, for this mundifieth the stomack, and causeth digestion, and of himself is most wholsome, for that it mortifieth all hot diseases.

CHAP. XX. Of the Squinancie.

THe Squinancie is a certain alteration in the throat, which is caused of a flatuous or windie humor, and this cometh with such a vehemencie, that if it be not holpen quickly, it will choak him, for it stoppeth the conduites where the breath cometh through, and letteth a man to swallow his meat, and the Remedie is this: Take of our Electuario angelica, ℥. di. and then touch the throat within with our Aqua reale three or four times, and without annoint it with Oleum Philosophorum of Turpentine and Wax, because it is very drying: And thus using the aforesaid remedies, thou mayest help them with­out letting blood, or any other thing in short space: for herewith I have cured a great number. You shall understand, that oil of Linseed is very appropriate to that matter, if you give the Patient four ounces. Also the tooth of a Bore made in powder, and drunk the quantitie of ʒ. ii. in Linseed oil helpeth the Squinancie. These I have proved divers times.

CHAP. XXI. Of the Emerodes that come in the Fundament.

THese in Naples be called Moricole, and in Venice, Maroelle, and in Spain, Almorane; and are an alteration of blood in the Emorodiall veins, which many times come forth in the lower parts with great pain, and these are caused of putrified humours of the bodie, and corruption of the blood, which corruption many times cometh of the Pox, or such like diseases. There are also divers kinds, but principally two: The one sort is within the fundament, and causeth great pain when they go to stool: The other sort cometh forth of the fundament, and are not so painfull as the other are. To cure them that are within the Fundament, you shall give the Patient eight or ten mornings our Syrupo Magistrale, and then let him take of our Aromatico, ʒ. ii. and use Glisters wherein is put half an ounce of Aqua reale at a time, and so thou shalt help them. The best remedie for those that come forth is to make incision, or to make a little hole in them, that the blood may come forth which is putrified, and so by evacuation thou shalt help them. Also thou shalt understand, that vomiting is necessarie in the cure of them both, because it openeth the veins. Also oil of Eggs, and oil of Frankin­cense, and oil of Linseed are very profitable to annoint them therewith to ease the pain.

CHAP. XXII. A goodly and easie way to help all sorts of Fevers according to our Order.

THe Fever Quotidian or continuall Fever, or any other kind whatsoever, do proceed onely of two principall causes, that is, of corruption and putrefaction, as you may perceive how that when the Fever is entred, the Patient is all corrupted, beginning at the stomack, the which is first corrupted. For proof you may alwaies see that assoon as a man is sick, pre­sently [Page 17] he looseth his appetite and cannot eat; afterward it corrupteth the blood, for by experience, if you let them blood, it is alwaies found corrupted, and not as it is in a sound bodie. It corrupteth also the senses, so that the sick is not sta­ble senced, nor cannot sleep, or rest by any means whilst he hath that accident. That it is caused also of Putrifaction you may see by them, that have the Fever. For alwaies when the Fever cometh, presently the stomack doth putrifie, and spit­teth forth filthy spittle: Also it doth putrifie the bodie, because their Excrements that they void are putrified and stinking more then others, and their Urine putrified and alterated from his naturall course. Then seeing the Fever is caused of corruption and putrifaction, there are four things necessarie to be done in the cure thereof. The first is, to evacuate the stomack: The se­cond, to purge by urine: The third, to evacuate the bodie: And the fourth is, to purge by sweat: Which four operations may be done one after another with great ease, and will restore the Patient to his health. But you shall understand, that all cannot be holp, for that God almightie hath made us to die, and when that time cometh, medicines will doe no good, but if that time be not yet come, by the help of God, with these Medicines he shall be restored to his former health. The first thing, as I said, is to take a vomit, which doth evacuate the stomack of choler and flegm, that doth much offend the bodie diseased: After that, evacuate the bodie with those things that the Physician thinketh most convenient for that purpose, for there be many purgations to dissolve the body, and to evacuate malign humours: After that, make him purge by urine. Fourthly, and last of all, give him medicines that o­pen the pores, and that provoketh sweat. And thus with these four operations, the most part shall be holp of that infirmitie with great ease, and in short time: And as I have said, this is a most true order that never faileth, except (as I said before) when the Lord will call them. And as for these medicines, you shall find them written in this book severally with their uses and quantities.

CHAP. XXIII. Another cure of the said Fevers.

IF thou wilt help the said Fevers according to our order: when the Patient is greatly alterated therewith, thou shalt use five waies wherewith thou shalt easily help them, the which are these. The first as I said before is Vomit: the second eva­cuation of the body: the third evacuation by urine: the fourth to provoke sweat: and the fifth by unction. Neverthelesse each of these alone is sufficient to help the said Fever: but yet u­sing them all five, there is no doubt but thou maiest dissolve any evill sort of maligne Fever, except as I said before, God will call them out of this World: but to the purpose of the cure. First thou shalt set on five or six boxing glasses, according to the com­plexion and age of the infirmed: then the next morning give him one dose of our Electuario angellica, with Sirrup of Sorrell, and water of Sorrell. Then the next morning following give him some Sirrup appropriate for that disease, and put thereto ℥. ii. of Sirrupo Magistrale, with Rhabarbe: that being ended, give him three or foure times Julep of Violets with Oyle of Sulphur, made per Campana, the dose of the Julep is ℥ ii. and of the Oyle of Sulphur four or five graines mixed together, and this you shall take in stead of Sirrup betimes in the morning, and it will make them sweat and purge by urine, which are most necessary for the sick: and in the mean season you shall annoint them every night with Magno liquore, which will make them rest well, and take away all their paines throughout the body, and so by this meanes the Fever shall be perfectly taken away. Al­so take great heed that you take no more blood then is neces­sary, neither let them keep any straight Diet, but let them keep a good regiment of Life. But when this Feaver doth come through some other cause, then it were necessary to remove the principall cause, if thou wilt cure them: For if it be caused of a Catarre, of necessitie you must dissolve the Catarre first; and then help the Fever. Also if the Fever be caused of a wound, it were necessary first to take away the pain of the [Page 19] wound, and then the Fever will depart. And thus in every kind of Fever, it is most necessary to know the originall from whence it is caused: And this is the true way to cure these in­firmities, which I have proved infinite times.

CAAP. XXIIII. Of the continuall Fever.

THere are many kindes of Fevers, therefore I will mention of them that are most known unto the world, and first of the continuall Fever, that is of those that are onely hot, and continue in one order both day and night, the which is caus'd of alteration and corruption of the humours in the body, which engender so much corruption in the stomack, and in the blood, that they cause that accident of Fever: And the very order to cure it is this. In the beginning of the alteration let him keep a good diet, and drink no wine: and that is done because that corruption is apt to corrupt all that entereth into the body du­ring that alteration, and therefore meates of great substance or nourishment, are sooner turned into greater putrifaction in the body: But when the third day of the Fever is past, then take of our Aromatico ʒ. ii. which will evacuate the stomack of that corruption: and that day that you take this Aromati­co, drink as much crude water as you will: which is done be­cause the stomack shall remaine cleare washed of that corrup­tion, which being done, you shall give him three or four morn­ings our Soluble Sirrup, and give him good meates, and let him drink Wine, because it cannot hurt in any wise, for it cannot putrife in the body: For the sirrup doth evacuate every day the corruption: and when the blood is alterated of that putri­faction, it goeth to the veines, and so disperseth through the whole body. It would be good to set on boxing glasses to take away blood, and also to use drying unctions, as our Balsae­mo artificato, and Oyle of Turpentine and Wax, and thus do­ing (if the Patient be not called of God) thou shalt helpe him within short space. And this is the true secret to use for [Page 20] that Fever, which I have revealed unto the world, that every one might have it at their pleasure.

CHAP. XXV. A great Secret that helpeth the continuall Fever.

THese Fevers that are not accidentall, that is, not caused of a wound or imposthume, or other kind of infirmitie appa­rent, are caused of a certaine humour between the skin and the flesh, which would have exhalation: as you may see by ex­perience in this kind of Fever, how that sweats and boxing is very appropriate to their solution. And in this case I will shew thee a great remedie, with which after convenient purg­ing thou mayest helpe in manner all those kindes of Fevers. And this is the remedie: Take Oippa ofir, the which is a simple well known to all the world, take of that hearb a small quanti­ty, and stampe it a little, and lay it upon the wrist, and bind it hard, and there let it lye untill it have made a blister full of water, which you shall break, and there will come forth great abundance of water, and by that place the Fever shall be dis­solved. And the reason is, because it evacuateth that humour which engendereth the accident: then the cause being remo­ved, the effect will cease, and the Patient shall be whole.

CHAP. XXVI. Of the Fever Tertian.

THe Fever Tertian doth not continue in one manner, but cometh and goeth, and is caused of chollerick humours: for assone as the fit cometh it moveth choller, and in many it provoketh vomite. There are two sorts of those Fevers, The one cometh with an accident, first cold, and then hot: and the other sort cometh alwaies hot, when the accident com­eth: and sometimes that accident cometh twice a day, and that is called a double Tertian, which is hard to helpe, because let­ting blood, the diet, and purging of the body are all hurtful and [Page 21] contrary to that disease, therefore I will open to thee a secret wherewith thou shalt help them. Thou shalt give him three hours before the fit ʒ ss. of Eleborus niger in powder, with ℥. i. of Mel Rosarum: and after it drink ℥. i. of common water, and this you shall take twise, and then use this potion ten dayes every morning. Take Julep of Violets ℥. i. fine Aqua vitae ℥. di. Oyle of Sulphur, that is perfect iiii. graines, and mixe them together, this mundifieth the stomack, and purgeth by urine, and provoketh sweate, and warmeth the blood: which effects are necessary to the solution of that Fever, giving you great charge that you keep no straight diet in any wise, because it weakneth the stomack, cooleth the blood, and hindereth na­ture, so that the Patient can scarce be helped. But with our order thou shalt help the most part of that Fever.

CHAP. XXVII. Of the Fever of Repression.

THis Fever is an alteration of the blood, which is caused of being over hot, and then cold and this is called a Fever prop­ter accidens, and is not holp as the other Fevers are: for thou shalt help onely the Repression, and the Fever will go away without any other help. Thou shalt give the Patient of our Aromatico, ʒ. ii. that being done, give him two Sirrups every day, the one in the morning, the other at night two houres after Supper, as hot as you may suffer to drink, and these are the Sirrups. Take Sirrup of Quinces, Stecados, Mel Rosarum, ana, ℥. i. new Muste boyled, ℥. vi. and in the mean time while you take this Sirrup, it were necessary to make a moist bath with hearbs, as Nettles, Mallowes, Egrimonie, Carduus Benedictus, Rosemary, Origanum, and Calamint, ana lb. iii. Commin, Anniseede, Coli­ander, Sileri montani, ana lb. i. then boyle all those in a great Kettle with water, and then let the Patient sit over the fume, and cover him with clothes untill he sweat. And thus you shall do three times one day after another: and thou shalt helpe him perfectly, as I have had experience.

CHAP. XXVIII. Of the Fever Hectick.

THis Fever is a viscous and putrified humour in the stomack and lunges, the which is caused of a debility and weak­nesse of nature that cannot digest the offensive humours. There are divers sorts of this Fever, neverthelesse they are all evill to be holpt, and are counted uncurable. Neverthelesse, I will shew thee some excellent remedie very wholsom, that may pleasure them, although they are nigh their death. The first medicine that shall do them good, is our Electuario angellica, of which you shall give halfe an ounce in the morning fasting, for this presently joyneth unto the stomack, and draweth to it all the offensive humours, and carrieth them forth by vomit and seege, and so leaveth the stomack eased and clean, that the Patient thinketh himself whole: But yet the stomack be­ginneth againe to fill with a great suffocation, that will not let the Patient take rest, so that this medicine may well ease them, but not helpe them quite. Also our Elixar vitae doth much good in this disease, and also our Balme artificial: if you annoint the stomack therewith at night when you go to bed. Also use our distillation for the Hectick: these may all helpe a little but not cure. The Fever Hectick may come also of a Catarre, of the Pox, and such like causes, and then they require medi­cines according to the cause: as if the Fever be caused of a Catarre, let them use our Magno liquore to drink, the dose is one ounce at a time, with halfe an ounce of Mel Rosarum, and these use for a moneth at the least. And if it be caused of the Pox, let him take Sarsaparilla, or Lignum vitae, Pillole Aquilone, or such like that will helpe the Pox: and thus doing, the cure will have good successe: but when it is caused of debility of Nature (as is said before) they spit blood untill the end.

CHAP. XXIX. A new order wherewith thou maist cure and help the most part of the Fever Hectick.

MAny have thought that the Fever Hectick is altogether desperate and uncurable, and that by no meanes it might be resolved: But because it is caused of divers and sundry ac­cidents, I say that many kindes may be helped and cured: For I find it may come of infinite causes, as aforesaid. There is one kind that cometh through the weaknesse of nature it self, and that beginneth to destroy the Lunges, and that kind I find to be incurable, because it is caused of the evill nature of the man, and not through any accident, and in that case I beleeve it cannot be dissolved by any meanes. Also there are many other Hecticks caused of the French-Pox, of which I have seen and cured an infinite, and they are easie to cure: For curing the Pox, the Fever will be dissolved. There is another kind that dependeth of a salt humour, and some other of a Ca­tarre, and of many other things: Therefore if thou wilt help the said Fever, it were necessary to know the true cause where­of it dependeth, the which in my judgement is hard to be known, if that the Patient himself do not tell it: and there­fore it is necessary for the Physitian to examin them well, and to enquire whether they have had any kind or spice of the Mal Francese before, whereof the said Fever might have his original: and so doing, he with his judgement may be resolved of the nature of that infirmity: and if it chaunce that the said Fever had his originall of the Pox, the Phisician may resolve it with me­dicines appropriate for that disease, with purging him strong­ly, and giving him Lignum Sanctum, or Salsa pariglia, and also perfume him with Olibanum Sinaber and Mirrha, ana: and so by the help of God, and meanes of these medicines thou shalt help them all, or at least the most part of that kind of Fever Hectick. But if the Phisician find that kind of Fever to be caused of a Catarre, then use the medicines that help the Catarre, and so the Fever shall be whole. But when he [Page 24] findeth it to be of the weaknesse of Nature, in that case there is no help that is sure. Neverthelesse, I have cured some of them with great difficultie, and with Medicines of great effi­cacie: And that was with giving them every morning one drachm of good Sope in tablets according to our invention, and that they used for a moneth together: the which Sope hath vertue to drie that abundance of spittle, and to heal the Lungs ulcerated, and it also strengthneth the Stomack marvellously: After that I caused them to use our distillation of a Hen for the Hectick, and this they did continually drink: Also I caused them to use our Balsamo artificiato to annoint therewith every night after Supper, the which is peircing, and comforteth and augmenteth naturall strength, and com­forteth much the infirmed: Also I caused them to use Aro­matico Rosato, the which comforteth the weak Stomack. And by this meanes I have help'd some of them as it well known.

CHAP. XXX. Of the Fever Quartane.

THe Fever Quartane is a motion of a certain accident cold and hot, which is caused of melancholie humours corrupt­ed and putrified, the which every third day doth cause that ac­cident to come, and beginneth with great cold and continu­eth a good while, and then cometh hot. And this Quartane both the ancient Doctors, and these in our time doe count in a manner uncureable. Neverthelesse, I that have sought alwaies to help those diseases which were counted uncurable, amongst the rest have found the true and perfect cure for the Quartane Ague, and to dissolve the melancholie humours, which is done with three Medicines that are rare and marvel­lous to dissolve any Quartane. The first is, Mercurie Preci­pitate without corrosive, giving thereof ten grains, with half an ounce of Sugar Rosate, and that day eat little meat; that being done, take a pound of Iva Artetica, and boil it in eight pound of white wine, and common Honey one pound, untill a [Page 25] third part be consumed, and of that drink morning and eve­ning six ounces warm one hour after supper: And in the mean time annoint every night his Reins with our Balsamum artificiall. Thus doing thou shalt help any Quartane. I have also found other rare waies to cure this Fever Quartane, as hereafter followeth.

CHAP. XXXI. The Order to help the Fever Quartane of all sorts, in short time.

THe Fever Quartane is caused of a melancholie humour as aforesaid, with a continuall distillation of the head, de­scending to the stomack, and augmenting the evill disposition of the body; and by reason of that distillation, provoketh much sweat when the accident of the Fever cometh: And likewise that distillation causeth such cold in the Marrow of the Reins and Back, and an infinite of other disorders which trouble the bodie greatly. But to avoid all these inconve­niences, and to dissolve wholly that accident of the Quartane according to our order, because I have helped more then any Physitian of our time. I will shew thee how with these Remedies following thou shalt help them, though not all, yet the greater part truly most miraculously, and the Order to dissolve it is thus. You shall give the Patient a dose of our Aromatico in the morning to eat, and drink thereon two or three ounces of good wine, and fast thereon six hours, and this Medicine is most convenient the day of the fit, because the infirmitie removeth great quantitie of humours, and the medicine evacuateth them; and thus giving it three times in the day of the fit, it will work a great operation. But if the Fever be in a person of melancholie complexion, then it is where it would be; for you may see that in a melan­cholie person, the Fever hath more force, then in any other complexion, which proveth, that the Fever, and that com­plexion are most like: But in that case you shall cure them in this Order: You shall give him ten or fifteen daies out [Page 26] Sirrup against the melancholie humour, which is written in this Book, which you shall take two hours before day hot, and then sleep one sleep thereon, and thus doe every mor­ning, and every night annoint all the parts of the body with our Balsamo artificiato, and he shall be holpen. But if it hap­pen that this doth not cure him, let not to give him this reme­die, which most surely (God willing) will help him, and that remedie is our Aqua Balsami, of which he shall take every morning two Drachms fasting, and so continue untill the Fe­ver be gone quite: so that of force using all the aforesaid re­medies, the Fever must needs depart. And the reason is this, that our Aromatico evacuateth the stomack of all impedi­ments by vomit, and letteth the descension of the head, which causeth the accident. Our Syrrup evacuateth the melancholie humour, and dissolveth it by his proper qualitie. Our Balsa­mo the which is subtile and penetravive drieth and comfort­eth the place offended, in such order, that it casteth forth all the matter that may offend Nature. Our Aqua balsami also being drunke, doth dry the evill humours, and augment strength, in so much that it quite extinguisheth the said Quar­tane. And this may be used in all manner of persons, and in all times of the year without any doubt of inconvenience: and it is a new remedie that never was set out before of the Ancients, which I have used to the great profit of the Pati­ents.

CHAP. XXXII. Another discourse a marvellous secret against the said Quar­tane.

THe Fever Quartan is caused of melancholie humours, which hath his fit coming every third day, first cold with great thirst, and then cometh the heat, which remaineth with some longer then with other some, and the cause, hereof is hard to be known. Neverthelesse, I seeking out con­tinually naturall things, and the qualitie of the accidents, I doe find that this Fever beginneth alwaies in some particular [Page 27] place, as in the head with a certain pain round about it, or in the nose and ear, or in the Reins and Legs: And there­fore he that can find out the place where first beginneth the accident, may easily help them, because the Fever is dissolved with two things onely, that is, exhalation and exsication, and herein consisteth the secret. The order to make the Exha­lation shall be thus: Make a Cerot of Frankincense, Pitch, Wax, Turpentine, Myrrh and Aloes, upon the which Ce­rot you shall put the powder of Cantharides, and then lay it upon the place where they feel the Fever come first, that is on the particular part where the accident cometh, and this you shall change twice, except the first day of the Fever. And to make the exsication, give him every day in the morning to drinke, ℥. di. of our Aqua balsami for twelve daies, and with the Balsamo artificiato annoint every night his Stomack and Reins, and so he shall be helped, giving you charge also that before you use these Medicines, that he take three times our Aromatico, and so he shall be quite helped.

CHAP. XXXIII. A secret to help all Fevers in their beginning.

VVHen the Fevers are new begun or taken, and that the putrefaction is not yet confirmed, then may it be hel­ped with great ease, but after they have taken their beginning, they are hardly helped. Therefore when the Fever is new begun, you shall give them ʒ ii of our Aromatico fasting in the morning: and the next day about the same hour you shall give them ℥. i. of our Ʋegitabile Sirrup: and the third day you shall give them four Drachms of our Electuario angelica with broth, the which taketh away the Fever altogether. And this opera­tion intendeth onely to the continuall Fever, Quotidian, Ter­tian, and putrified or pestilentiall, but not to the accidentall, or Hectick, nor Quartane: For these three kinds are much differing from the rest, because the accidentall is caused of another infirmitie anterior or going before. The Fever Hectick [Page 28] is caused of weaknesse of nature, and the Quartane is caused of great quantitie of melancholicke humours, and they are cured by contrary meanes unto the first. The accidentall are cured with helping the principall infirmitie: The Hectick is cured by helping of Nature, and preserving the Liver and Lungs from putrefaction: The Quartane is cured with Vo­mits, Unctions, Cerottes, and drying drinks, and these are great secrets to be known: For in this Chapter consisteth a great part of Physick, and Chirurgery if you consider well thereon.

CHAP. XXXIIII. A Secret of one Simple that helpeth in manner all Fevers.

THere are an infinite of medicines that dissolve the Fever, but above all other this seemeth to me of great authority, because it helpeth it with such ease, that it is to be wondered at. With this remedie through the Divine goodness, I have cured a great number, and the Secret is this. You shall gather in the Mo­neth of August a certain hearb, which the Italians do call Oreula, which you shall drie and make into powder, of the which you shall give the sick as much as will lie upon a sixpence, with wa­ter or wine, and give it warm in the morning, and fast there­on three or four houres, and thus doing, the Patient shall be helped with great ease, and in short time: for this is a great secret which may be used in all times and in every occasion, and alwaies it worketh an operation in one manner.

CHAP. XXXV. Of the Gout.

THe Gout which cometh to men, is a distemperature and alteration, which is caused of corrupt and undigested hu­mours, and also of feeding on meats that nourish much, and then to use no exercise, as you may see by the most part of them that be troubled with that disease. Also this disease, both of the old and new Doctors hath been counted uncu­rable, [Page 29] as it is known to every one: But yet I, which have done nothing else but sought out the nature and qualitie of things, have found divers inventions in sundry Arts, as thou mayest read in my Caprici Medicinali, and so amongst the rest, I have found (through the help of God) the true and perfect Secret to help the Gout, so that it shall never come again: Of which disease I have cured a great number in divers Cities of the world, as in Palermo, in Sicilia, in Messina, and in divers places of Calabria, in Naples, in Rome, and in Venice, as it is well known unto the most part of the Inhabitants of those Cities.

CHAP. XXXVI. A Note concerning the Cure of the Gout, taken out of a Letter which this Authour wrote unto a certain noble Seigniour, the Duke of Ʋrbine.

FIrs;t you shall understand, that the Gout of what kind soe­ver it be, either hot or cold, or of any other temperature, they all come of one onely cause, although they work divers Effects, which Effects come through the complexions of them that have that infirmitie: As for example, to shew it more plainly, you may see that in fat men, the Gout cometh alwaies with inflammation and redness and great pain: In lean persons it cometh alwaies with pains, but with lesse inflamation. In cho­lerick and melancholie persons, it cometh with tumours, and that is Nodosa. And the cause of this infirmitie is, of an evill qualitie ingendered in the stomack, in the Liver, and in the blood: And the cure thereof, is to ease the stomack of that evill, and to purge the Liver and the blood, and to mittigate the pain: All which thou mayest doe with these three Reme­dies following, viz. our Pillole Magistrale, our Ʋnction for the Gout, and our Quinta essentia solutivo: for the Pills doe discharge the stomack, and our Quinta essentia solutivo purgeth the Liver and the blood, and our Ʋnction taketh away the pain, for if you remedie the cause which is onely one, the effect will cease. As concerning the Gout you shall cure it in this Or­der: First, when you feel the pain begin to come, you shall take two doses of those Pills in the morning fasting, one day [Page 30] after another, or if you will, rest a day or two according to your strength, that being done, you shall take every mor­ning ʒ. ii. of our Quinta essentia solutivo in half a Porringer full of the broth of Veal, and a little Sugar, and this take five hours before meat; and keep no streight Diet, but eat rea­sonably, and every night after Supper annoint the grief with our Unction for the Gout, and thus through the help of God, and the vertue of these Medicines, the Gout shall be cu­red.

CHAP. XXXVII. Another Discourse upon the same infirmitie of the Gout, and the Order to cure it, taken out of his Book called, Thesaurro della Vita Humana.

ALthough the wise & learned of the world, have alwaies be­leeved that the Gout is of divers kinds, yet they have all been deceived; for that infirmitie is one onely, and cometh of one onely cause, although in some it come in manner of Phleg­mone, and in some other like Risipilla, and in other Nodosa, and in other with pain without alteration, and in some other in divers manners; all which is caused through the diversitie of com­plexions, for that one man is flegmatick, the other sanguine, the other cholerick, and the other adust, and thus by these means, many have thought the Gout to have been of divers kindes, whereas indeed it is onely one, and is cured with one onely order, and dissolved altogether for ever; for that in­firmitie is caused of no other then of rotten humours caused of indigestion, and to say truth, we see that the said infir­mity never commeth in manner, but unto those persons that feed well on meats of great nourishment, which for want of exercise, that Nature might digest it, they wanting naturall heat, cannot have their orderly digestion, and for that cause the humours doe ingrossse out of measure, and ingender that infirmitie, and then Nature that alwaies seeketh to ease her self of that which offendeth her, driveth forth that humour unto the extream parts, as the hands, and feet, or other par­ticular [Page 31] parts, and this is the Gout: And these humours many times are cause of Mal francese, and this is all the secret. He therefore that is advertised by me, shall be most cunning in curing of it.

CHAP. XXXVIII. What order must be used in curing of the said Gout.

SEeing the Gout (as I said before) are grosse humours undi­gested coming of the aforesaid cause, it were most necessa­ry, if thou wilt cure them to do three operations. The first of them is Phlebothomie, which must be done under the tongue, cutting overthwart one of those two veines: For that Phlebo­thomie evacuateth the stomocall humours that are cause of that corruption. The second operation that is to be done, is to as­subtiliate the gross and rotten humours, and to evacuate them quite. The third operation that is to be done, is to preserve nature in good temperature, and to help the digestion, and thus doing, the said infirmity shall be extincted. If therefore thou wilt helpe the Gout, and after they are helped, keep the Patient in good temperature and prosperity of life, it were necessary to do these three operations. After the first is done, as I have said, it were needfull to come to the second, which is to assubtiliate the gross humours, which will be done with four remedies. The first of them is our Quinta essentia solutiva, which subtiliateth the humours, and evacuateth them downwards. The second reme­die is our Electuario angelica, which evacuateth the humours hanging in all parts, and leaveth nature so eased, that it may well prevaile. The third remedie is a Fomentation, which drieth up the humidity of the head and stomack, and by meanes of that operation the disease shall remaine extincted. The fourth and last remedie is our Balsamo against the paines, with which you shall annoint upon the place grieved, for it mitti­gateth the paines greatly. And thus with these four remedies thou shalt help the Gout perfectly, as I have often times done in Venice, and at Rome, and in divers other places of Italy, well known there unto all men.

CHAP. XXXIX. The Order to preserve a man from the Gout, when he is once helped.

AFter that a man through the divine goodnesse of God shall be helped of the Gout, he may if he will preserve himself in health, with these three noble Remedies. The first of them is our Vegitable Quintessence, the which doth cause good digestion, warmeth the stomack, and defendeth it from corruption, by which Effects it will return Nature in manner as it was in youth, and it preserveth the sight and the hearing, and divers good operations which are all necessarie. The se­cond Remedie is our Oleo incompostibile, with which you shall annoint the stomack, and that will cause digestion, comfort the heart, provoke sleep, and keep the stomack, that therein shall breed no evill qualitie of humours. The third Remedie is, our Pillolae aquilonae, which doth evacuate the humour hang­ing, alwaies when it ingendereth in the stomack, they cleanse the head, and are by their nature against all sorts of pains. And thus with these three Medicines, every one may preserve himself from that infirmitie, as it is daily pro­ved, and seen in Venice, and in divers other places in Italy.

CHAP. XL. The cure of a certain Gentleman that was troubled with the Gout, and a great Stitch in his side.

THe Cure of this man was with these five Remedies fol­lowing, that is, with our Aromatico, Quinta essentia solutiva, Pillole angelica, Oleo incompostibile, and Quinta essenti Vegita­bile: For you shall understand, that our Aromatico taketh a­way the pains of the Stomack, so that the other Medicines may work their operations the better. Our Quinta essentia solutiva, taketh away the cause of the infirmity, and the Pills take away the evill qualitie. The Unction taketh away the pain: And the Vegitabile Quintessence, preserveth them that [Page 33] it commeth not again. The Dia Aromatico must be taken in the morning fasting, the dose is ʒ. ii. at once. The Quinta-essentia solutiva you shall take with broth of a Capon and Sugar fasting, without any observations, the dose is two or three drachms at a time. Our Pillole Angelica you shall take two hours before supper, the dose is from ʒ i. to ʒ. ii. The Unction you shall annoint after Supper upon the sore places, so often untill the pain be gone. Our Vegitabile Quintessence you shall drinke every morning half an ounce, and thus con­tinuing thou shalt be perfectly whole by Gods help.

CHAP. XLI. A Discourse upon the Sciatica, and his remedie.

THe Sciatica is so called, because it is upon the bone which is called Scio, and of that it taketh the name Sciatica, the which is caused of an evill qualitie in the Stomack and Liver, the which you may see by the cure; for if ye cure the Stomack, and help the Liver, the Sciatica will cease, and by this means thou mayest see whether I say the truth or no. See­ing then that the Sciatica is caused as is said before, ye shall understand that it is so caused, by reason that the stomack can­not well digest that which it should, and so it causeth crude and undigested humours, of the which Nature would be discharged, he casteth them forth of the stomack, and having no other way to come forth of the Stomack but by the ordinary waies, they doe passe, and of force they must passe by those powers that passe by the Liver, and so the Liver which is able both to resolve the good and the evill qualitie, remaineth still infected of that indisposi­tion, and not being able to digest them according unto the order of Nature, they ingross and become maligne, and then Nature the which with all industrie would discharge himself of that burthen, sending them to the higher parts, sendeth them downwards, and when they come unto Scio, where they must passe with difficultie by certain small muscles, they in­grosse in that place, and cause inflamation and pain, the [Page 34] which Inflamation or swelling, after the bodie is well purged, is resolved with Vesicatores Ventosos, and attractive Cerots and such like things. Also attractive Glisters are most whol­some, because they discharge the humour in the lower parts, and comfort the Sciatica. Neverthelesse, ye shall understand that there are certain and true appropriate Medicines to re­solve it with brevity, the which are these that follow. First, when the Patient is in most extream pain, let him blood un­der the tongue, the which is such a singular remedie, that it causeth the world to wonder thereat: after that purge him with our Soluble Sirrup, six or seven daies, that being done, take away the water which causeth the pain, then comfort the Patient with the Oil that is separated from the flower of flowers, and distilled in a Retort, then all this being done, the Patient shall remain helped to thy great honour. And there­fore he that will cure the Sciatica, it were necessary that hee consider well of the nature and qualitie of the infirmitie, and when they are satisfied to be the Sciatica, in that case cure them according to this our Order, the which by the grace of God, and vertue of these Medicines, they shall remain helped of that indisposition, for this is a great Secret.

CHAP. XLII. Of the Pains of the Mother.

THe Pains of the Mother which women are troubled with­all, is an alteration in the Matrix, that may come of di­vers causes, as of cold, of moistness, of dryness, of melancho­like humours, of flegmatick, and of cholerick, the which is to be proved divers waies. Neverthelesse, I will shew thee the Secret to cure it generally, and the order is thus. You shall give the Patient a dose of Pillolae Aquilonae fasting, and sleep­ing thereon one sleep, for these Pills doe purge the Matrix, then take Electuario Angelica half an ounce, which purgeth the blood and choller: That being done, take Cantharides in powder ℈ i. Galingale, and the roots of Mercury, ana. di. ℈. mix them altogether, and put it into a little piece of Sarce­net, [Page 35] and binde it like a button, and put it into the Matrix as high as you can, and there let it remain four and twentie hours without moving of it, for it purgeth divinely; and herewith thou maist cure any great impediment in the Matrix: That being done, they shall use our Sirrup against the pains of the Mother, the which comforteth and purgeth all humours in the bodie that offend the Mother: And this is a great secret which was found out by me. You shall understand, that who­soever would know the truth of this disease, it were necessarie for him to be expert in Philosophie, because it is an opera­tion of naturall things, the which cannot be well understood without great knowledge in naturall Philosophie.

CHAP. XLIII. Of the pains in the head.

THe pain in the Head is a disease of the brains, which is caused of putrified humours in the stomack, the which is like unto a pot that boileth, causing the vapours to ascend, which if they be evill, the fume is evill to the taste and smell; but if there boil any good thing therein, the fumes are plea­sant both to the smell and taste. And so likewise our stomack being filled with good juyce, filleth the brain with good fumes; but being filled with evill corrupt humours, it hurteth the brain, and causeth pains of the head. The like pains of the head may come of alteration of the blood, and to helpe that accident, you must first remove the cause principall, which is done with purging, and evacuating of the sto­mack of those putrified humours; which thou shalt do with our Aromatico, giving it to the Patient two or thre times, every five daies once. The dose is ʒ ii. and then the pain will cease, of what cause soever it doe come; this done, take the juyce of a Beet root one ounce, Oil of bitter Almonds one drachm; mix them well together, and snuffe it up into the nose every morning untill it come into the mouth, for this doth purge the head marvellously; this being done, it would bee [Page 36]" good to take our Soluble Sirrup four or five mornings cold, and so the Patient shall be holpen.

CHAP. XLIV. Of deafness of the Ears.

DEafnesse in the Ears doe proceed of divers causes, as of a Catarre, cold, and humiditie of the head. But of what cause soever it come, I will shew thee a true secret to cure them quickly. First purge them eight or ten daies with our Sirupo Magistrale, and then take our Pillole Aquilone, three times, and then perfume them five mornings with this: Take Synabar ℥. i. Olibanum, and Myrrh, ana one scruple, mixe them and divide it in five parts, the which you shall occupie at five times, standing over them with your mouth open, that the fume may enter in, for it drieth and resolveth the evill humours in the head that himder the hearing; and thus doing thou shalt be helpt. Neverthelesse, it would be good to put the fat of a silver Eel into the ear, which hath a principall ver­tue to comfort the hearing. Also our Aqua balsami being put into the ear, comforteth the sight and hearing marvel­lously, and all impediments in the head, and evill humours it destroyeth through his qualitie and nature, and augmenteth the good, in such order that using of it thou shalt see great marvells: for these are the true secrets for that disease.

CHAP. XLV. Of the Infirmities of eies, and their causes and cures.

THe Infirmities of the Eies cometh of divers and sundry causes, of the which I will make mention, especially of those that are of most importance, and most dangerous to hurt the sight. There is one that is called in Italian Razoni, and that is caused of the heat of the blood, and his effects are certain small wheals that run round about the eye-lids, and this Infirmitie is of small importance, for onely with lina­ment [Page 37] of Tutia they may be healed, annointing them three or four times. There is another kind of infirmitie in the eyes that cometh to many, and is caused of moisture and heat in the head, and that is a redness with watering and great burning: And although this be troublesome, yet it is not dangerous to heal. For with purging the head and bodie, and with Boxing glasses, and with certain Unctions appropriate they shall re­main whole. There is another kinde of infirmitie in the eie, and that is when the ball of the eie waxeth out of measure in greatnesse, and this is called Dilatatio pupillae, the which is ve­ry hard to heal. For my part I never saw but one remedie that did preserve it, and that is our Balsamo Artificiato, of the which you shall put every night one drop into the eie, and it will doe thee great pleasure, because it is temperate hot, and hath a penetrative vertue and resolutative, by the which meanes it doth hinder the relaxation, and preserveth the eie. There is yet another sort of infirmitie that causeth the eie to be full of pain, and cometh all thick and filthy, and blindeth it, and this indisposition is caused of Morbo Galli­co; and although it seem foul and uncurable: Neverthelesse, it is easie to be cured if you help the principall cause, and fume the head with Cinabar, Myrrh, and Olibanum, they shall be quickly helped. There is another infirmitie that cometh in the eie, the which is a cloud that ingendereth in the point of the eie upon the ball, and hindereth the sight, and that is easie to be helped, for if you drop therein one drop of our Balm twentie or thirtie daies together, it will resolve it throughly. There are divers other infirmities which doe trouble the eyes, the which I will let passe till another time.

CHAP. XLVI. Of the pains in the Teeth.

THe pain of the teeth is an accidentall disease, which cometh of divers and sundry causes, of the which causes, I will shew the chiefest. It cometh sometimes of a Rheum in the head, or of a Catarr, or of humiditie in the [Page 38] head, and divers other wayes. Neverthelesse, let it come which way it will, it proceedeth of the head and stomack, the wihch sendeth up vapours, and then fall down again, and cause that pain, and the remedie is this: First, give them our Ma­gistrale Syrupo five or six daies, the which purgeth the blood, and evacuateth the bodie; that being done, take our Ele­ctuario angelico, three times according to the receipt, for this evacuateth the stomack and purgeth the head; and then take our Aqua reale, and hold it in thy mouth a Pater-noster while, and then spit it forth again, and with this order thou shalt help all manner of pains in the teeth, except they bee rotten stumps; and then the best way is to take them forth with an Instrument: but if thou wilt not take them forth and ease the pain, thou mayest touch them with Aqua fortis untill the mar­row be mortified? that being done, you shall hold our Aqua balsami two or three times in your mouth in a day, untill the pain bee gone, and so with this order thou mayest keep them without pain. Also I will shew thee another easie way. Take Henbane seed, and mix it with white Waxe, then cast it on the coals, and hold thy mouth over it to receive the fume, and then thy pain will cease if they be rotten teeth; and this it doth by stupefaction. Also it will be good to hold in thy mouth Mastick, Pellitorie, and Allom, after ye have pur­ged, for this draweth down the matter.

CHAP. XLVII. Of a stinking breath.

THe stinking breath is a putrefaction the which is caused of the stomack, being corrupted and foul, as you may see by experience of those that have that infirmitie, and the reme­die is this. You shall give them of our Aromatico ʒ. ii. fa­sting, every third day for three times, and then use our Quint­essence for a moneth continually; The dose is ʒ. i. every mor­ning, and after supper two houres, for this comforteth the stomack and the heart, and taketh away the stinking: That being done, take five or six mornings together, every morning [Page 39] f oyle of Turpentine one scruple with white Wine, and so they shall remain helped.

CHAP. XLVIII. Of spitting of blood.

THe spitting of blood is an alteration of blood in the veins, which alteration is so much, that Nature provoketh it to the stomack, from whence it had his Originall, and doth not come of a vein broken as many have said, as thou maist well see the truth; for if the vein were broke, the blood would come forth at one time or instant without any tarrying, and they would die quickly, the which cometh not by spitting of blood, for they spit none untill the alteration cometh: and this is caused of a kind of Fever that cometh inwardly, that ingen­dereth that alteration, and when his fit cometh, the blood doth alter, and the veins swell, and the blood doth come forth at the proper mouthes of the veins, and so they spit it forth; and when they spit blood, it is the beginning of the Fever Hectick. the which when it is confirmed, is uncurable and mor­tall: But if thou wilt take it at the beginning when they spit blood, it may be helped with ease, and that thou shalt doe with giving them three or four times of our Petra Philosopha­le twelve grains, with halfe an ounce of Sugar Rosate, every third day once; that being done, let him take every morning Oil of Vitriol iiii. grains, with Julep of Violets ℥. i. because there is no better medicine in the world that disposeth the al­teration of the blood, then our Petra Philosophale, and the oil of Vitrial mittigateth the heat and extinguisheth the acci­dent. You shall note, that this which I have written is not understood of many as I understand it. And likewise the Medicines to use in that case hath not been put in practise of any man, and the cause is this. That since Physick hath been in use untill this time, the Physicians have not understood of other then the Theorick, and none they cured of pra­ctise and experience, and that is the cause that so few have found the truth. But I that continually doe travell in practise, [Page 40] have found rare things, as I will set forth to the world here­after.

CHAP. XLIX. Of diseases of the Liver.

THe sicknesse of the Liver is caused of divers and sundry accidents of the bodie, as you may see by experience, when a man is never so little sick, by and by the Liver is alte­rated, and doth no more work well, and that is because the Li­ver is the receptacle of the blood and of the Gall, and the master which ruleth and governeth our bodies, and distribu­teth the blood into the veins, and doth purifie it, separating the sharp and evill parts, and sending it to a certain bladder, which we call the Gall; and when it is so full that it can re­ceive no more, it runneth over, and so causeth the body to become yellow, and thereupon the Urine is yellow, and is so evill, that in short time it dryeth that bodie, so that the Liver being dispensator both of the good and bad qualities of the humours, it cannot be but through the infirmities of the bodie. Also when the Liver is over hot and drie, it causeth the Patient to be lean and dry, and with great heat: and when the Liver is troubled with humiditie and cold, it cau­seth the Patient to become full of sores and scabbs, and these are the effects that come of the Liver when it is distempered. But if thou wilt help it from that indisposition, it were ne­cessarie to evacuate the body and stomack of superfluous hu­mours, which thou shalt do with our Soluble Sirrup, giving it eight or ten daies together cold, and then purge the Sto­mack with our Aromatico fasting in the morning; that being done, you shall use remedies that help the Liver, which a [...] many, as Citrake, Liverwort, Scolopendria, Cycorie, and such like; and so observing this order thou shalt help them. For I have had an infinite of experience of it.

CHAP. L. Of diseases of the Lungs.

THe infirmities of the Lungs are of two kindes, that is cold and moist, and hot and drie, the which infirmitie is caused of evill temperature of the body. You shall note, that when the Lungs is infected with cold and moist, it will easily turn to that kind of Hectick that causeth the Cough, and to spit matter at the mouth. But when it is grieved with heat and drinesse, it is in danger to turne to a Tissick, the which dis­ease causeth a man to become lean and drie, and keepeth back his breath, and so the one with another they are mortall diseases, so that there can scarce be found any remedie; and therefore I will begin with the first kind, and then with the second, and then the third, and then with the fourth and last, for the which there is no redemption or hope of life. But for the first and second, there are a number of remedies that doe help, the which be these. First, give the Patient of the juyce of the Roots of blew Lillies, ℥ ii. with Mel Rosarum, ℥. i. in the morning fasting, and that use three times, every third day once: That being done, let him use our Elixar vitae for thir­tie or fortie daies together morning and evening; the dose is ʒ. ii. at a time, and also put therein every time half an ounce of our Magno liquore, and drinke it a little warme, for this is a perfect remedie, with which I have cured an infinite num­ber in my daies. And of all the Medicines that ever I found, I never had any like this, because the juyce of the Lilly-root hath vertue attractive that mundifieth the stomack, and the Elixar vitae comforteth and resolveth all Ulcers in the Lungs, and the Magno liquore dissolveth the Catarr, and healeth the stomack, for I have proved it a number of times, as is said before. I remember me that in the year of our Lord, 1557. I being in Rome cured a young man which was a Painter, that was in the house of the Cardinall de Medici, the which had his Lungs ulcerated, and did spit great quantitie of blood, and had a great Catarr and Cough, and did spit also matter, in the which there was no hope of life. I caused him to [Page 42] use the aforesaid remedies, and so in short time he was hel­ped, and not onely he, but a great number more at sundry times.

CHAP. LI. Of the Spleen.

THe Spleen is never sick but through other diseases, as you may see by experience, how that those that have the Fever Quartane, for the most part have their Spleen alterated and hard, and this proceedeth of evill temperature of the bodie and Liver, that cannot digest the humours, and so Nature sendeth them forth in the weakest parts that are most apt to receive them. So that the Spleen is like a spunge, and very apt to receive that humiditie, that Nature cannot dissolve otherwise, and so by this reason it is most apt to be sick or diseased: therefore if thou wilt cure it, first cure the disease which causeth that alteration, for that being once helped, Nature of it self will help the Spleen without any other Me­dicine, and therefore strive not to help the Spleen with parti­cular Medicines, for it is vain; but look what kinde of dis­ease the Patient is troubled with, and cure that, and then the Spleen will heal well enough. And this is the true way to cure the Spleen.

CHAP. LII. Of the Flux of the bodie.

THe Flux of the bodie is a distemperature of the guts and stomack, which is caused also of an evill disposition in the Stomack, as well as of all other interiours, and is very troublesome to the Patient, and hard to be helped. Never­thelesse, I will shew thee a secret and that is this. Take of our Petra Philosophale twelve grains, which doth evacuate the humour hanging, and dissolveth the Flux. But when it is a hot Flux with a Fever in the Summer, let him stand two hours after supper in a bath of salt-water of the Sea that is cold: for [Page 43] it is of great effect. You shall understand, that our Petra Philosophale must be taken with Sugar Rosote di. ℥. Also when you have done the aforesaid things, you shall take our Sirrup against the melancholy humours five or six mornings. And so using this order, thou shalt help any kind of cruell Flux, as I have proved infinite times.

CHAP. LIII. Of Costivenesse in the body.

THis disease is caused of great drinesse and adustion in the body, through the which cause there cometh many diseases: and that is, that our meat lyeth long in the body: and of that cometh indisposition of the stomack, paines in the head, Flux of Urine, alteration of bloud, augmenting of choller, and such like. Therefore if thou wilt help these in­conveniences, it were necessary to seek the principall cause, and to cause the body to be loose: and that thou shalt doe with our Sirrup Magistrale, using it according to reason every morning. For it evacuateth the lower parts, and cooleth the Liver, and purgeth the bloud, and consumeth chol­ler, and helpeth digestion. And with this onely shalt thou help them perfectly.

CHAP. LIV. Of the Flux of Ʋrine.

THe Flux of Urine is an alteration of the pores, and opening of the reines, caused of indigestion in the body, as you may see by experience. This Flux weakeneth the stomack, and the reines, and taketh away the tast, and letteth sleep: so that many times of these effects come cruell diseases, as Gonorhea, the Strangury, Ulcerations in the Yeard, and such like: and therefore if thou wilt help the aforesaid disease, use this Me­dicine. Let him take of our Aromatico two drachmes, and drink thereon a little water, and then let him use of this Sirrup [Page 44] every morning warm ℥. iiii. Take Sage, Carduus Benedictus, Egrimony, Betony, Citrake, Scolopendria, Cicorie, of each one handfull, red Saunders, Box, ana ℥. iiii. Alloes, Epatick, Coloquintida, Sinne, Turbit, Hermodactiles, ana ℥. i. course Sugar one pound and a half, commom Hony one pound: then lay all the aforesaid things to infuse in five and twenty pound of White wine the space of twelve houres: then boile them close untill half be consumed: then strain it without expres­sion, and put thereto a carrect of Musk dissolved in ℥, iiii. of Rosewater: and of this take every morning three or four ounces, and fast thereon at the least four or five hours, and in the mean time that you use this Sirrup, you shall not eat Hogs flesh, nor Fish, nor salt things, nor Rapes, nor Raddish, nor Parsly, nor any other aperative thing: This being done, take Hysop of the Mountain that is dried lb. ii. and boyle it in thirty pound of White wine, and put thereto one pound of Hony, letting them boyle till the fourth part be consumed, and then strain it, and drink it continually for fourteen or fifteen dayes. And by this means thou shalt have help God willing.

CHAP. LV. A discourse upon the retention of Ʋrine, and his cure.

THe causes of the retention of Urine are many, among the which, there are three principally above the rest, and are so manifest, that every one may understand them: and are these. Stones, as well great, as gravell, viscosity in the Reins and Bladder, and alteration in the pores: And thus through those three accidents, most commonly they cannot make water: the which if thou wilt help, it will be somewhat hard, because you must understand the cause thereof, the which is not easily done of every man: for he that knoweth not the cause, can lesse help the effect, and he that knoweth not the effect, can lesse help them. And therefore, I say, he that will help those that cannot make water, because of the stone in the bladder, he must seringe them to take forth the Urine: but if thou wilt help [Page 45] those that cannot make water through the gravell, you shall give them our Pillole Aquilone: and then give them a Flint­stone made in fine powder, to drink with water of Saxifrage, and thou shalt see thereof miracles. And if thou wilt help them that cannot make water, because of viscosity, give them our Aromatico, and annoint the reins with our Balsamo Ar­tificiato, and also his Testicles, and so by these means you shall help them quickly of that accident: as I have proved di­vers times.

CHAP. LVI. Another discourse upon the retention of Ʋrine; and his remedies.

THe retention of Urine is caused divers wayes, as by over-much heat, or over-much cold, or through too much dri­nesse, or too much moistnesse. And therefore he that will cure this infirmity, must first know the cause, and also the vertue and quality of his Medicines wherewith he will cure them: for if he doe otherwise, he shall walk in the dark, and be as a Di­viner: for many have written receipts, wherewith they shew to help many infirmities, without giving any reason at all. But to the purpose of the retention of Urine, as as I have said, that it may come through four principall causes. So will I shew it in four Chapters, and also their remedies wherewith they may be helped.

CHAP. LVII. Of the retention of Ʋrine that cometh through heat, and his remedies.

THe retention of Urine which cometh through heat, is that which ingendereth the stone and gravell, for through that superfluous heat it ingendereth. And this is one of the four causes of the retention of Urine, the which is helped with Instruments and Medicines concerning the stone. The most certain Medicine is, to be cut and take it forth. Neverthe­lesse, [Page 46] there are many Medicines that may pleasure them of our invention: As concerning the gravell, there are many things that dissolve it, of the which I have spoken of in divers places: As concerning the remedy of the cause, that is easie: for by purging the stomack and the body, the heat will be dissolved, and the body left in good temperature. And the purging of the body shall be done with our Sirrup against the melan­choly humour, and to use our Aromatico, and Electuario Ma­gistrale, de Althea with Sulphur. And thus much concerning that heat.

CHAP. LVIII. Of the retention of Ʋrine through cause of drinesse, and his Me­dicine.

THe retention of Urine through drinesse, is, because the Reines and the Conduits where it passeth are to much dri­ed, and that drinesse is cause of adustion of the Liver, the which must be helped with taking away a little bloud: and to purge the body with Cassia, Sirrup de Pomis, de Succuria, de Lactutia, de Malvis, de Siterache, and such like, that cool and take away the adustion of the Liver: then annoint the Reines, the Members, and Yeard with Hogs grease, because that fat doth mollifie and moisten: and give him to drink Sero lactis, because that inlargeth and moisteneth, and provoketh Urine without burning.

CHAP. LIX. Of the retention of Ʋrine that cometh through cold, and his remedies.

THe alteration of Urine that cometh through cold, is that kinde which maketh a man that he cannot make water, without the help of some warm thing laid upon the body, and upon the bottome of the belly, and the cure thereof is to vo­mit those cold humours out of the stomack, and to purge the [Page 47] body with solutives of warm Nature, and with warm Decocti­ons, with the Decoction of Lignum Sanctum, of Carduus Be­nedictus, and of Rosemary, and annoynt the back with our Oleum Philosophorum, de Terebinthina, & Cera,, or Oyle of Frankincence, or such like things that warm the coldnesse. And so by these means the Patient shall be helped of that retention of Urine.

CHAP. LX. Of the retention of Ʋrine through cause of moistnesse, and his remedy.

THe retention of Urine caused of humidity, is that which causeth the pores to swell through moistnesse, so that the Urine cannot passe, as those say, which are troubled with the carnosity: which carnosity is not alteration of the pores through cause of humidity. For the way to cure this kind of retention, is to purge the body with drying Medicines, as Turbite, Scamonie, Euforbium, Eleborus, and such like: and to use drying Unctions, as Ʋnguento de Lithargirio, or Balsamo, water of Frankincence, Oleum Benedictum of our invention, and such like things, and then eat dry meats; and drink good Wine; and thus the humidity shall be dissolved: So that hereby every one may have the understanding of the cause, and the effect of the same, and the Medicines.

CHAP. LXI. Of the difficulty of Ʋrine, and of what it is caused, with the order to cure it.

THere are divers kindes of difficulty of Urine, and are also caused of divers causes, as aforesaid, of the which one is caused of a corrupt humour of the French Pox, and this is one of the chiefest causes that may be in that matter. For we see manifestly, that the said kind of infirmity corrupteth the blood, ingendereth evill qualities in the Liver, and distem­pereth [Page 48] all the body of those that are troubled therewith. Also we may see, that those which are infected with that kind of disease, most commonly have Warts, or Carvoli, Pellaria, Botches, Scabs, Tumours, paines of the Stomack, in the Armes and Legs, with a number of other more strange ac­cidents that come through that disease, But when that in­firmity infecteth inwardly, it worketh these effects: It bring­eth Emeroides, paines in the Entrals, Fluxes of the body, continuall spitting, Gonorrea, or running of the Reines, such like effects. All the which cause difficulty of Urine, of the which difficulty, there useth to ingender the Stone, Gravell, Viscosity, Stitch in the side, and divers other mis­chiefs very hurtfull unto the body. The difficulty of Urine may also be caused of divers other infirmities, as of a rotten Catarre, descention of the head, of the evill quality of the Liver, and such like, as by excessive cold, or heat of the Reines, but let it be as it will, I know these are hard matters to be helped, because it behooveth certain manuall practise in that faculty, the which I cannot shew in writing: although I have great and high secrets for that indisposition, as con­cerning the Physick part, the which thou mayest find in di­vers places of my works. Neverthelesse, because I will not leave this Chapter unperfect, I will here name unto thee a most excellent rare man of that Profession, the which is both Doctor and Knight, and is most excellent in cutting out the Stone, and the Rupture, and can remedy the great difficulty of Urine, and heale the Rupture, and heale the in­firmities of the eyes, and such like things most excellently, and his name is called Prastecio Stelin Venetiano: the which is at this present dwelling in Venice. And this I have written of that Doctor, because he is one of the most excellent that may be found in that Art.

CHAP. LXII. To help those that have great burning of their Ʋrine.

THis infirmity may come of divers and sundry causes. Neverthelesse, I will treat of some of the principall, and of most importance; and also will shew the true order to help them with ease and brevitie. The first cause assigned by me is the Stone in the Bladder, and this is in a manner uncura­ble. The second cause is, the running of the Reins, the which is taken by companying with women corrupted with the Pox. The third cause is, the proper French Pox, the which is that kind that is called Gonorrea. The fourth kind is a certain corruption that is called Stranguria, the which moveth conti­nually to make water. The fifth cause is the Gravell: there are also other causes, as scorching in the Yeard, carnositie, and such like things, the which I will leave for troubling of the Reader. The first cause which is the Stone, is helped by two remedies, the one is with cutting and taking it forth of the bladder, the other remedie is written in this book. The reme­die for that which is caused by the running of the Reins, shall be to take three mornings our Aromatico, because it resol­veth that heat, and extinguisheth the burning. The remedie for that which is caused of Gonorrea, is none other then to cure the principall disease, and to annoint them with our Ʋnguento magno, and perfume them, and so they shall remain whole. That which is caussed of the Strangurie, is cured by great purging, and by taking oftentimes our Aromatico. That which is caused of the Gravell, is cured by taking often­times our Electuario Angelica, and using to drinke Wine di­stilled with Cherrie stones, and Medler stones. That which cometh through carnositie, is cured with an Unguent made of oil of Sulphur, and Vitriol, Aqua reale, Oil of Fran­kincense, and new Wax, all Medicines devised by us, giving you charge, that before you begin to cure them, to seek out the right cause from whence it proceedeth, and so thou shalt help it with brevitie and great ease.

CHAP. LXIII. A Discourse upon the carnositie in the Yeard, and the Order to cure it.

ALthough we have something touched this Infirmitie be­fore in the Chapter of the burning of the Urine. Ne­verthelesse, in this place, I mean, something to discourse thereof, because that Chirurgions may not be void of such a noble Secret, to doe them honour in their cure of the like disease, for there are many troubled with that infirmitie: You shall understand, that this carnositie is an infirmitie whose originall dependeth of the corruption of the French-Pox, and to shew it plainer, it is an Ulcer in the neck of the bladder where the Urine entreth into the Yeard. And there­fore, if thou wilt help that infirmitie, cure the principall dis­ease, and the carnositie will heal; but if thou wilt cure them with the Candle, take that Unguent which is written for the carnositie in the Chapter of the burning of the Urine; but if thou wilt cure the principall disease, give him three times, Pil­lole aquilone, and then take our Sirrupo Solutivo, ten or twelve daies together; that being done, let him take twentie daies the Wine of Lignum Sanctum, written hereafter in this Book, and those which understand not this Chapter well, let him look over this Book, and he shall finde those Medicines with their Uses.

CHAP. LXIIII. Another Cure for the said Carnositie.

THat Carnositie which hindereth the Urine that it cannot come forth, is a certain kinde of matter that is ingende­red in the mouth of the bladder as is shewed before, the which is like in all points unto the Emeroids, that come in the neck of the Intestivall about the Fundament, and because it is a grosse matter and ulcerated, the Urine passeth with great difficultie, and great burning and pain unto those that are [Page 51] troubled therewith, the which inconvenience if thou wilt help, it were necessary that the bodie were well purged, and that they keep a diet, and drinke the decoction of Hypericon, with a little Honie, and use to eat drie meats, and then make certain small long Candles with Wax, and Frankincense, like un­to searing Candles, then make this Unguent. Take red Lead, white Honie, of each an ounce, fresh Butter two ounces, white Wine as much as will suffice to incorporate all the aforesaid together in a liquid form, then boil it on a soft fire, and have readie ten or twelve quills fresh pulled out of the wing of a fat Pigeon; and note that when ye take them forth of the wing, that they may be full of blood in the ends, then take one of the quills and stir the said Unguent upon the fire continually while it boileth, and when one quill is dried take another, and so doe untill the wine be consumed, then take it from the fire and keep it, and when ye will occupie it, take one of those Candles, and upon the end put the said Un­guent, and put it into the Yeard untill it touch the carnosity, and this doe from time to time untill the Candle passe without pain, and then the Patient shall be whole; for this is a great Secret and hath been proved many times.

CHAP. LXV. A Discourse as concerning those that cannot hold their water, and his Remedie.

THis Impediment cometh of two principall causes, the one is, through heat and moisture of the bodie, and this is commonly in young children, which commonly doe be pisse themselves, because they are by Nature hot and moist. The other cause is through opening of the Pores where the Urine doth passe; the which are so stretched or opened, that they cannot retain the Urine, because the Urine is a voluntary motion, and a naturall motion together, they are hard to a­gree together, because the naturall motion maketh his volun­tarie motion; so that Nature first moveth the man, and there­of cometh the motion; for if a man would make water, and [Page 52] that Nature doth not move the motion, he cannot pisse; for sometime Nature doth not give his naturall motion because of some impediment, for when a man cannot hold his water, it is a sign that Nature hath no retention; and to redresse the same, it were necessarie to reduce Nature into good tempe­rature, so that it may retain the Urine; the which thing thou shalt doe with purging the bodie, and the stomack wherein is the matter that causeth that retention of Urine. And to purge the bodie you shall use our Sirrup against the melancholy hu­mour: And to purge the stomack, you shall take our Electua­rio angelica, and to restrain the pores, you shall use the de­coction of wild Hysop, with the powder of Mastick, for you shall understand, that the purging taketh away the cause, and the decoction of Hysop with the Mastick, doth restrain the pores, and so by these meanes thou shalt remedie quick­ly that infirmitie.

CHAP. LXVI. To break the Stone in the Bladder and also the Gravell, and to cause it to avoid by Ʋrine.

THere is found a certain bird called Solone, of Albertus Magnus in his Book of Secrets; the which birds are ve­ry plenteous in Rome, and are called Palmum bellae, and in Lumbardie, Sassarvoli, the which in English I suppose, is cal­led a Ring Dove, or Wood-colver, or the Stock Dove, which Birds are subject to the Stone, that if you keep them in a Cage, and feed them with such meat as they commonly use, being deprived of their medicine, within the space of four or six moneths at the most, there will ingender a Stone in the belly so great, that their meat cannot passe through them, and so choaketh them, and they die, and that is because the poor Bird cannot goe and help himself with that Medicine which Nature hath taught her. For those that are at libertie in the field, flie unto the Sea-side, and there they find a certain kind of small stone very hard, the which stone hath vertue to dis­solve the stone in the bodie of the Bird, and this Bird knoweth [Page 53] it by the instinct of Nature, and eateth great abundance of them, and so dissolveth the stone in their bellies, and live a long time after it without any trouble of the Stone. You shall understand, that this stone is unpossible to be found in any other place, then in the belly of the said bird, because they are very little, and mans reason cannot discern them from other Stones, the which being beat in powder, with the flowers of Elders, and Cinnamon, of each a like, and given to drink with broth, in short time it will dissolve the Stone, and cause them to avoid it with their Urine most miraculously: But if you ask me the reason, I know not what I shall answer, but I hold it to be his proper hidden qualitie and vertue. For truly this I have taught to many, and have seen the ex­perience thereof sundrie times, and it cured the most part that did use it. For truely the vertue of Stones are very great unto those that know them. I saw once two Stones in Rome of inestimable vertue; The one was a round Corall like unto the Serpentine Purphire, but therein was much green, and was of that vertue that being laid upon the flesh of a man or wo­man, it causeth them to pisse great abundance, so that it were to be wondred at. The other Stone was of Diasper, but bright and thorough shining with certain white veins, and was of such vertue, that being laid on a wound, presently the blood stench­ed so that there fell not down one drop, The which Stones were in the hand of an old Spaniard, who said, he brought them out of India, from Nova Hispania. I have seen also divers and sundry Stones of most strange vertues. You shall under­stand, that those Stones of the Bird must be gotten in this order. You shall get a number of the said Birds, and take the stones out of their bellies, and wash them clean, and keep them to thy use. The quantitie is as much as you can hold upon a Sixpence, as well of the Stones as of the other matters: You shall drinke the said quantitie seven or eight mornings together, and let your Diet be according, and drink good wine, and so in short time you shall be helped.

CHAP. LXVII. Of the Gravell in the Reins.

THe Gravell (as is said before, is a disease of the Urine un­digested, which is caused of superfluous heat of the reins and blood, the which sometimes doth stay it self in the Con­duites, and causeth great pains; and sometimes it doth ingrosse so in the Bladder, that it letteth the Urine, and this is an evill disease to be troubled with, and the remedie is to purge often, and use that water against the Gravell that is written in my discourse of Chirurgerie, for it is one of the most excellent re­medies that can be found for that disease; and the order to use it is also written after the Receipt, and the best Purgation that you can use for that purpose is our Pillole Aquilone.

CHAP. LXVIII. Of a certain Scab or Itch that cometh over all the bodie.

THis Disease cometh in all places of the bodie, and in Na­ples it is called Prurito, and in Rome, Rosura; in Venice, Piz­za; and in Spain, Lomezon: And it is a salt humour that com­eth forth of the veins, and so disperseth through the whole bo­die between the flesh and the skin, and hath in it such an heat, that they cannot abide it, and is caused of alteration of the blood, the which is corrupted and distempered; and the reme­die is, to purge the stomack, and to purifie the blood, which thou shalt doe with giving them three times our Pillole aquilone every third day once; that being done, make this Bath: Take Nettles, Mallows, Pellitorie of the wall, Agrimonie, Sage, and Coleworts, ana. lb. iiii. the Bran of Wheat almost a peck, com­mon Ashes half as much: Mix them altogether in a great ket­tle of water, and let it boil an hour, and then take it from the fire and sit over it, and cover thee with clothes, that thou maiest sweat an hour, then dry thee with warm clothes, and then wash all thy bodie with pure Aqua vitae, and this thou shalt use three times at the least, for the oftner the better, and so thou shalt be perfectly whole.

The Second Book of the Secrets of PHIORAVANTE.

CHAP. I. What Chirurgery is.

CHirurgery is a manuall Art, with the which the Chi­rurgian doth cure Wounds, Ulcers, and Impost­humes: And this was found of Husbandmen, and Experimenters of naturall things. For there is no Art in the world, that hath more need of the know­ledge of divers things then this Art. It is also necessary to the knowledge of naturall things belonging to Chirurgery, to have skill in Husbandry. It is also necessary to understand the Art of Painting, whereby you may set broken bones in their places, and to joyn or close wounds well. It were need­full also to have skill in the Art of Joyning, whereby he may make Instruments for broken bones in the Armes, or Legs, or Hands, or other parts. It would be also necessary to have the Art of a Smith, whereby he may make his Instruments. It is cheifly needfull to be expert in the Art of an Apothecary, to make his Unguents. And last of all, it is most necessary to know the Art of Alchimie, whereby he may distill his Oyles and Waters appertaining unto Chirurgery. Also it is ne­cessary to have a good judgement, and to help in all causes of Chirurgery, and to have a light hand in working. And when the Chirurgian is expert in all the aforesaid things, he may help without any suspition of any thing. And hereafter I will shew thee what Wounds, Ulcers, and Imposthumes are, and all other things appertaining to Chirurgery, and the order to cure them: a discourse grounded on true reason [Page 56] and approved by experience, shewing to all men, which are the true and perfectest Medicines, and which are false and naught: writing and opening the true secrets of Chirurgery, with a new order found out by me, to exercise the same Chi­rurgery with more ease and brevity, so that every one may be satisfied: For they are true, and are Medicines, with the which thou mayest doe much good to the sick: and great honour will redound to the Chirurgian, if he use it accor­ding to our order: for they are Medicines proved of us infi­nite times in divers places of the world, as well in the Feilds as in the Cities, or on the waters▪ in the warres, where we healed Wounds, Gunshot, Ulcers, Imposthumes, and other diseases appertaining unto Chirurgery: and alwayes (thanks be un­to God) I have had good successe, as it is well known in most parts of Christendome. And so I make an end.

CHAP. II. The order to be used in curing Imposthumes of divers sorts, taken forth of the short discourse of the Chirurgery of this Au­thor.

THere are divers kinds of Imposthumes that come unto mans body, and are caused of divers and sundry accidents, and therefore they must be cured in divers orders, and with sun­dry Medicines, according to his nature: for some Impost­humes are caused of contusions or bruised flesh: Some are certain humours, of which Nature would discharge her selfe, and so sendeth them forth: some are caused of cold; other­some are melancholy humours, and others are caused of the Pox: And these are the kinds of Imposthumes that most commonly doe come, and I will shew thee the order to cure them one by one, and then after I will speak of that sort which is caused of contusions, because it is bruised flesh: for every contusion doth putrifie and turn into matter, unto which it were necessary to lay Ma [...]ur [...]tives, and bring it to suppuration, and as soon as thou perceivest there to be any [Page 57] matter, then presently launce it: and his Medicine shall be the yeolk of an Egge mixed with our Magno liquore, and with that dresse it as well within as without, without any other thing, for it will help any great Tumour: but you must make your Unguent fresh every day, and with new Egges. Further­more, as concerning those Imposthumes that come through the indisposition of Nature, and are certain Sborine (a word so called in Italian) by which Nature would prevail: and those would be left unto Nature, untill such time as they break alone, and then thou shalt dresse them with this Unguent. Take Oile of Roses ℥. vi. Litarge of gold finely ground, Tur­pentine, ana ℥. ii. Storax liquida ℥. i. New Wax ℥. iii. boyle them on a soft fire untill it be black, which if it be too hard, you may put thereto oyle of Roses, and make it in form of an Unguent, and therewith dresse those kinds of Imposthumes: and lay thereon the Cerotte of dia Palma, and so with these Medicines thou shalt work miracles. As concerning these Imposthumes that are caused of cold, you shall use hot Me­dicines and attractive, as the Cerotte called Oxicroxi, which is a perfect Medicine in these kinds of Imposthumes: also our Balsamo artificiato, and Aqua balsamo, and such like things which are by nature temperate hot, are very convenient. But those Imposthumes that have their originall of the French Pox, are evill and maligne, because their originall is maligne and evill. The cure of these is with great purging, and to let the Imposthume increase of it selfe, and when it is ready to launce, then launce it, and make this Medicine. Take Ʋnguento magno ℥. ii. Magno liquore ℥. i. Precipitate di. ℥. mixe them well together, and therewith dresse the Imposthume, and lay thereon our Magistrale Cerotte, and it will be perfect whole in short time: Letting you to understand, that in all the aforesaid cures, if you will cure them perfectly, it were ne­cessary that the body were well purged of those corrupt hu­mours that hinder the cure, and to use defensives appropriate to that kind of Imposthume: as the oil of Frankincense, of Turpentine, of Wax, of Hony, Aqua vitae, and such like, which every one is a sufficient defensive, annointing it round about the Imposthume: And hereafter I will shew [Page 58] thee the cure of these Imposthumes particularly by them­selves.

CHAP. III. What Imposthumes are.

IMposthumes are certain Tumours or swellings, that come in divers parts of the body: the which are caused of blood and choller putrified, which cannot passe through the pores, and therefore ingrosse in that place, and so cometh to putri­faction, and that is an Imposthume: which thou shalt help in this order. First purge the body to take away the humours which would goe to the Imposthume: which thou shalt doe with our Magistrale Sirrup, taking it eight dayes together: that being done, give him our Aromatico: this being done, thou shalt quickly help the Imposthume, as I will shew thee hereafter, with their perfect cure.

CHAP. IV. Of Imposthumes that come in the Groine.

THe Imposthumes that come in the Groin are of three kinds, of which one is called in Venice, Pannochi, and at Rome, Tinconie, and at Naples, Dragonello, and in Spain, In­cordio. To these after the body is purged, as is aforesaid, you shall lay a Maturative plaister, the which is made thus. Take Marsh Mallowes, common Mallowes, the mother of Violets, the leaves of Coleworts, Wheat flower, Auxungia, Oil of Lillies, of each alike, and boyle them together, and then stamp them in form of an Ointment, and lay it on the Imposthume untill it look red and is soft, for then it [...]s apt to be launced: Giving you charge, that when you launce them you go not too deep; but onely that the matter may come forth, and then put therein a little tent, and annoint it with our Magno liquore, for because it is the best Medicine that can be found for wounds: for it mundifieth, incarnateth, and [Page 59] siccatrizeth without any other help, and lay upon the Impo­sthume our Magistrale Cerot, and never change your Medi­cines untill you be whole; for this is the true secret found out by me to help these Imposthumes, which I have proved infinite times.

CHAP. V. The second kind of Imposthume that cometh in the Groin.

THe second kind of Imposthume in the Groin is called Glan­dulae, both this and the aforesaid are caused of humours infected with the Pox, and these Imposthumes seldome come to maturation; but if it doe, it will be long first, and it is evil to heal, because it requireth great cure and terrible medicines. But if thou wilt cure them perfectly, it were necessary to cure the principall cause, and that is the Pox. But when these Imposthumes are broke, the best remedie will be this. Take Waxe, Litarge of gold; Oil of Frankincense, ana. and boil them together untill it become black: and therewith dresse these Imposthumes, for this is a perfect remedie, and a great Secret.

CHAP. VI. The third kind of Imposthume that cometh in the Groin.

THe third kind of Imposthume that cometh in the Groin, is caused of much travell or heat of the blood, and these are called Anguinaglie, and they use to come with a great acci­dent of a Fever, cold and then hot, and in seven or eight daies at the most, they come to maturation, and then launce them, and his medicine shall be this: Take Turpentine well washed, the yolk of an Egg, and oyle of Roses, as much of the one, as of the other, and mix them well together, and with this one­ly thou shalt help them, because it digesteth the Imposthume, and mundifieth and incarnateth with great speed; giving you [Page 60] great charge that the bodie be well purged first with our Magi­strale Sirupe.

CHAP. VII. Of Impostumes under the arms.

THese Impostumes are caused of grosse and viscous hu­mours, the which Nature cannot digest by any other part, and these commonly are called Topinaxia, because they are like to a Molehill. And although this seem to be a great matter, yet it causeth little pain, and may be holpen with ease. First purge the bodie with Soluble Medicines, and then lay on this plaister untill it be ripe. Take grated bread, leaven of bread, Cow Milk, Oil of Lillies, ana, and boil them together and lay it on; for this hath vertue attractive and putrifactive, by meanes whereof it will bring it quickly to maturation; and when it is ripe, open it with a launce, and dresse it the first time with the white of an Egg and Salt beaten together with a tent, and lay on a stopine wet with the white of an Egg, the which thou shalt let lie at the least four and twentie hours, and then dresse it with digestive untill it be incarnated, and then lay thereon a plaister of Dia aquilone magno di Mesue, and so thou shalt help them quickly.

CHAP. VIII. Of Impostumes in the throat.

THese Impostumes are of divers and sundry kindes, as you may see by experience; for some are Scrophule, others are melancholie humours, others are caused of the Poxe, and o­thers are caused of heat, or of cold; the which are all cured sundrie wayes, as I will shew thee hereafter.

CHAP. IX. Of Impostumes in the throat caused of melancholie humours.

THese Impostumes in throat caused of melancholie humours are hard and crude, and are long before they come to maturation, and you may not in any wise cut them, because the place is full of Muscles, Arteries, Vene capillari, Cartila­gines, Sinnews, and such like; the which although there come an Impostume there, it shall not hurt them; but if yee cut them with an Instrument you may offend them greatly, and for that cause you may not cut them by any means, but leave it unto Nature, the which will cause it to break, and then use this remedie. First, you shall take our Sirrup against the me­lancholie humour for twelve daies, continually in the morn­ing, fasting; that done, you shall give him our Pillole Aquilo­ne, and help the Impostumes with Ʋnguento negro di Godfre­do di m [...]i, written in the Antidotary of Galen, Cap. 45. for that is miraculous to help those kinds of Impostumes, as I have proved it divers times.

CHAP. X. Of Impostumes in the throat coming of the Pox.

THe Impostumes that come in the Throat which are caused of the Pox, are commonly of evill qualitie, because they are much alterated, and cause great pain, and these likewise are dangerous to be cut for the aforesaid causes: but when they are broken, they goe creeping over the bodie, healing in one place, and breaking out in another, and these are evill to be helped, for them that know not the perfect secret, and the or­der to cure them is this. You shall give them eight or nine mornings our Soluble Sirrup; that being done, you shall give them our Aromatico twice, and then let them use Sarsa Pa­rilia, or our wine of Lignum vitae, and let them sweat ten or twelve daies together, and then perfume them with Sinabar, Myrrhe, and Olibanum, the which fume you shall [Page 62] use onely at the mouth, and so thou shalt help any crude kind of Imposthume coming in the throat: for this Secret never faileth, as I have proved divers times.

CHAP. XI. Of Imposthumes in the throat coming of hot humours.

THese Imposthumes in the throat coming of superfluous heat, are caused of the bloud being alterated with heat, and be­cause of that alteration, it ingendereth gross vapours and vis­cous in Vena Capillari, the which through their grossnesse and want of digestion cannot dissolve, and so ingender that kind of Imposthume in the throat, because in that place there is much blood, and lesse flesh then in any other place, but yet these be not troublesome to help, and his cure is thus: You shall purge him with aperative things, and refriscative that purge the blood; and when the Imposthume is open, you shall dresse it with a digestive untill it be mundified, and then dresse it with Ʋnguentum de Tutia untill it be siccatrized: Also you shall cause them to keep diet ordinary, and to drink no wine but onely this drinke: Take Citrake, Liver-wort, and Scolopendria, ana a handfull, Anniseed ℥. i. common white-Honey one pound, then put them all to infuse in four and twentie pound of fair water, and let it boil untill a third be consumed, and then strein it without expression, and keep it in a glasse close shut, and this shall be his common drink: but let him eat no salt, nor slimie meates in any wise, nei­ther Hogs flesh, nor other hot meats that may alter the blood: And this doing you shall be quickly helped, for the drink coo­leth the blood, and purgeth it, and helpeth the Liver of all in­firmities, as I have proved divers times.

CHAP. XII. Of Imposthumes in the throat caused of cold.

IMposthumes in the throat caused of cold humours are small and without pain, and this goeth creeping by little and lit­tle untill such time as it breaketh of it self, and are an evill kind to help, because all Unguents are an enemie unto them, and all cold meats. Therefore if thou wilt help them, let the Patient use twentie daies together our Quinta essentia soluti­va, which purgeth all cold humours, and warmeth the blood, and causeth the Imposthume to heal with ease; and when they are broken, you shall help them with our Balm artificiall, which doth subtiliate the humours, and mundifie the Impo­sthume, and incarnate and heal: And this Order of curing is effectual and of great profit for them that shall use them. And of this opinion are many excellent Physicians, and chief­ly M. Decio an ancient man, who hath been an experimenter a long time both in Physick and Chirurgerie, with a number of others, which I will leave to name untill another time.

CHAP. XIII. Of Imposthumes in the throat coming of hot humours.

THese Imposthumes coming in the throat of hot humours, is a kind that cometh with rednesse, and causeth great pain, with an accident of a Fever, and in short time they come to maturation, and break, and then the matter will come forth, and the pain will cease; and these kindes are not evill to heal, and the remedies are these. Assoon as they are broke thou must presse it out with thy hand, that being done, you shall have Oleum Benedictum of our invention, annointing the Im­posthume within, and lay thereon our Magistrale Cerot, and so thou shalt help those kindes of Imposthumes. For this is our Secret never written before of any man.

CHAP. XIV. Of Imposthumes in the Eies.

IMposthumes in the eies are like certain white bladders that come about the nose, and the matter that is within them is like the white of an Egg, and these are caused of humiditie and moistness of the head, and because they have a confe­rence with the head, they are evill to heal, for they turn to watering Fistula's, which, when they come to Fistula's, con­tinue for ever. But if thou wilt cure them perfectly that they never come again, you must first purge the head with our Aromatico, and that you shall doe every five daies once for three or four times; that being done, thou shalt annoint the head with Oil of Frankincense the space of a moneth, and into the eie where the Imposthume is, thou shalt put once a day one drop of our Balm artificiall, which will help it and dry the Imposthume, and so in short time thou shalt be hel­ped. For this is the true Secret wherewith thou mayest help those Imposthumes, never known before of any man, and they are much contrary to the Medicines of Mesue, by which our Physicians now adaies make their Medicines.

CHAP. XV. Of Imposthumes in the Eares.

IMposthumes in the eares are caused of cold and viscous humours, which ingrosse in that part of the bodie, and cause great pain untill such time as they are broken, and these Imposthumes are evill to heal. Neverthelesse, I will shew thee a Secret to take away the pains, and to help it quickly, and that is thus. There is found a certain kind of shell in the Sea, the which is of the length of an hand, and somewhat more, the which, in Venice, and in Istria, in Dalmatia, in Pu­glia, and in divers other places of the Adriatick Sea, are cal­led Asture, which is like unto a pair of bellows, the which hath a certain beard, like the hair of a mans head, and it [Page 65] hath a certain attractive vertue, that if they put it into the eare, presently they take away the pain, though it be never so great or extream: the which vertue cometh through the saltnesse of it. For this I have proved divers times, and did learn it of our old Fishermen, which knew it by experience. But if it chance that one be troubled and cannot get that thing, they shall take Cantharides in powder, and put it into the eare, the which will work the same effect, because they be attractive and mundificative: And these are two naturall remedies, found out by true experience, and doth more good then any other that I could find.

CHAP. XVI. Of Imposthumes in the Mouth.

THese Imposthumes are of divers kinds, and may breed of divers causes: but let them come of what cause soever they will, they cause great pain to them that have them, for that they cannot swallow their meat without pain. And there­fore I will shew thee a generall cure for all Imposthumes in the mouth, and that is thus. You shall take our Pillole Aqui­lone twice: that being done, take our Aqua balsami, and hold it in your mouth as long as you can, and this doe three times in a day: then take the juyce of Beet roots ℥. i. oil of bitter Almonds ʒ. i. then snuffe it up at the nose untill it come into the throat: And thus doing, thou shalt help any Imposthume in the mouth, as I have proved divers times. For the Pils clense the head, and evacuate the stomack, and hindereth the alte­ration, the water of Balm doth cure and mittigateth the pain, and the juyce with the Oil mundifieth those secret places at the nose and mouth.

CHAP. XXVII. Of Imposthumes in the Joynts.

THese Imposthumes in the Joynts are evill, and of hard and crude digestion, because they are caused of great abun­dance [Page 66] of grosse and viscous humours, the which through their grossenesse cannot passe the Joynts, and there remain and come to Imposthume, and these cause extream pain, because thereunto commeth great abundance of matter, and the re­medy is thus. First give him a generall purgation, and let him bloud on the common vein, and then lay on this plaister. Take Marsh Mallowes, common Mallowes, Pellitory, and the Mother of Violets, and boyle them in water till it be consu­med, then stamp them, and put thereto Leaven of bread, Barly flower, Hens greace, and Hogs greace, according to thy discretion, and set them on a small fire untill they be incor­porated, then lay this on once a day untill it be ripe, and when it is red and soft open it, and dresse it with our Magno liquore, and lay thereon our Magistrale Cerotte: and so with these two thou shalt help them, except the Imposthume be of the Pox, for then it will doe small good.

CHAP. XVIII. Of inward Imposthumes.

THese Imposthumes inwardly are evill to know, and un­certain to cure, because the Patient himself cannot tell in what place they be, though he feel the pain: and there­fore all that we reason of in that matter, may be to the con­trary. For where a man cannot see with the eye, nor touch with the hand, the matter is doubtfull whether it be, or no [...] and therefore it is best to say little, For these Imposthumes may come of divers causes, and yet cannot tell of what cer­tain cause, and therefore you cannot know which is the true Medicine to help them: but by experience you may doe them some good; For (as I said before) Imposthumes never come but through distemperance of Nature, and alteration of the bloud. Therefore if thou wilt help them, help first the prin­cipall cause, then give them eight or ten mornings our Ma­gistrale Sirrup, and then take twice, our Aromatico: that being done, use morning and evening our Vegitabile Sirrup, and herewith thou shalt help them.

CHAP. XIX. Of Ʋlcers, and what they are.

VLcers are of divers and sundry kinds, and are ingendered of many causes, as hereafter I will shew. But first I will write of those kinds of Ulcers that are caused of Wounds. You shall understand, that wounds in what part of the body so­ever they be, being imposthumated or cancrenated, they change their names, and are no more called wounds, although their originall was a wound. For when it is cancrenated, it is called Ʋlcera corrosiva, because it goeth eating and creeping on the flesh: but when the wound is imposthumated and full of matter, it is called Ʋlcera putrida, that is putrified, and it is because it is filthy and stinketh. But when it is neither can­crenated, nor yet aposthumated, but that through some evill disposition the wound is closed, and that there cometh in it evill qualities without alteration, then is it called Ʋlcera sor­dida, because therein is evill qualitie, and it appeareth but little, but it is evill to heal. There be other sorts of Ulcers also, which are caused of divers and sundry kinds of Tumours: and the most evill and mischeivious are those that are of Tumours caused of the Pox: for unto those there runne abun­dance of evill humours that augment the Ulcer, and they be the worst sort, for they cannot be healed by themselves, except the body be well purged and evacuated of all the humours that are offensive. There is another kinde of Ulcer that cometh of an Imposthume as well hot as cold, and those are more gentle and easie to be helped, if you know the Medi­cines that are apt to help and dissolve those kinds of Ulcers. These are the three kinds of Ulcers that commonly happen unto men and women through divers causes, as before is said, so that these are the principall causes of those maligne Ulcers.

CHAP. XX. To help Ʋlcers of all sorts.

SEeing that Ulcers are of divers and sundry kinds, it were necessary to know of what kind and quality they are, so that thou mayst help them in form and order convenient. And first I will write of the corrosive Ulcers, as of a wound cancrenated, of Mal di formica, and of other sorts of Ulcers that goe creeping upon the flesh. The cure of these kinds of Ulcers is, to apply quickly our Caustick to mortifie the evill, which thou shalt doe thus. Wet a little Bumbast in our Caustick, and therewith wash all the sore, and then leave it so open four and twenty houres without binding it fast, and when four and twenty houres are past, wash the sore with strong Vineger, and water of a like quantity, with charge that there remain none of the Caustick in the sore: then lay there­on Butter washed with a Colewort leafe, untill the asker or dead flesh fall: then take our Cerot Magistrale, with a little Precipitate strewed thereon, and then annoint it with Magno liquore, and lay it upon the sore: for this Cerot helpeth all manner of corosive Ulcers without any other help, and every plaister will serve three or four dayes, taking them off every four and twenty houres, and making them clean, and then lay them on again. And as for the filthy Ulcer that I have shewed of in this Chapter, you shall dresse it onely with our Ʋnguento magno, the which, without any other help, will heal them quick­ly. But you must every four dayes touch them with Aqua fortis drawn from Precipitate, which water draweth forth the offen­sive matter, and leaveth it purified and clean. And in all other sorts of Ulcers, our Balm artificiall, our Magno liquore, Oil of Wax, and Turpentine, the black Cerot of Godfredo di me di, our Cerot Magistrale with Precipitate, are able to help, be they never so evill. And hereafter I will write of Ulcers par­ticularly with their cures.

CHAP. XXI. Of Ʋlcers, that come in the feet, of corns, or of chaps.

ULcers that come in the feet may come of divers causes, and are also of divers kinds, as of chaps, of corns, and such like. When they are chaps they come of an hot matter and fiery, as you may see by experience: For the Patient feeleth great heat in his feet, and is alwayes thirsty, the which giveth manifest signes that the humour is hot: and their cure is with cooling purgations, as our Sirrup against melancholy humours, taking it ten dayes together: then take our Pillole Aquilone twice, and so thou shalt take away the heat in the feet: and to help the crepature or chaps, make this Unguent. Take oil of Roses, Vineger, and liquid Pitch, ana, and boyle them untill the Vineger be consumed, and so being warm, wet a cloth therein, and lay it thereupon, and in short time it will be whole: but if they be cornes, you shall cut them unto the quick, and then lay thereon a cloth wet in Oleum benedictum, which doth comfort and dry, and quickly take away the pain. But when they are scratching, or as it were scorched, you shall lay thereon Ʋnguento de Lithargiro crudo, and so thou shalt help them, as I have seen the experience.

CHAP. XXII. Of Ʋleers in the Legs

THese Ulcers in the Legs are of two kinds, that is, filthy, and corrosive. The filthy Ulcers are caused of cold and moist humours: The corrosive are caused of humours hot and dry: and these are those Ulcers that goe creeping in the flesh, healing in one place, and breaking out in another. The fil­thy Ulcer is stinking and full of matter, and causeth little pain, and their cure is with our Balm artificiall, which hath vertue to penetrate, digest, mundifie, and incarnate, and heal, when that the body is first well purged: but those that are caused of heat and drinesse, you shall cure with the remedy [Page 70] written in the Chapter next abovesaid, and then dresse them with our Magistrale Cerot, and put thereon a little Precipitate, and annoint it with Magno liquore, and so thou shalt help them. But if so be it chance the said Medicine doe not heal it, you shall perfume them five times with Sinabar, Incense, and Myrrhe, and without all doubt thou shalt heal them.

CHAP. XXIII. Of Ʋlcers that come in the Knees.

THese Ulcers in the Knees are grosse humours that cannot passe by the Joynts downwards, and so remain in those places, and cause a fastidious Ulcer, which putteth the Patient to great paines, by reason of abundance of humours that cometh there. And the cure of this Imposthume ulcerated is thus, purge the body with our Soluble Sirrup, seven or eight mornings warme: and then give him di. ℥. of Electuaria An­gelica, and so thou shalt help them quickly: then dresse the Ulcer with Ʋnguento magno, puting therein a little Precipitate and Magno liquore, and so in short time it will heal.

CHAP. XXIV. Of Ʋlcers in the Groin.

THese Ulcers for the most part are Tumours, or Botches, the which through the evill disposition of Nature, and evill Medicines are ulcerated. And of that may come many in­firmities, which I will leave to treat of at this time, and I will shew thee a remedy. Give the Patient seven or eight mor­nings our Soluble Sirrup cold, and then give him our Aroma­tico, and after let him use Lignum Sanctum according to our order, and dresse the Ulcer with this Unguent. Take Ʋnguen­to magno ℥. ii. Magno liquore di. ℥. and common Precipitate ʒ. ii. Mix them well together, for this is the true secret of our in­vention, never made before of any man, the which I have proved infinite times.

CHAP. XXV. Of Ʋlcers in the Armes.

THese Ulcers are not of so evill nature as those in the Legs, because thereunto come not so many humours, and these are commonly caused of the Pox, the Cure is this. Purge them well with our Magistrale Sirrup, seven or eight morn­ings together, then take Pillole Aquilone, and then annoint them with Ʋnguento magno every night until the Ulcers remain whole and without pain. Thus have I used divers times.

CHAP. XXVI. Of Ʋlcers that come in the Breast and Shoulders, and in the Back and Belly.

ULcers that come in the foresaid parts, are all caused of Imposthumes of evill qualities, that have not been well healed of the Chirurgians, which knew not how to re­move the cause, and by that meanes the Imposthumes are be­come malign Ulcers. He therefore that will cure these Ulcers, it shall be necessarie for him to do that which was not done; that is, to remove the cause first, and then the cure will fol­low with more ease and speed, so there be good regard and consideration had thereof. And yet amongst Ulcers there is one kind that will receive no curation, and they are called Cancri, that are crude and of evill digestion, and go creep­ing along the flesh, and have a root as it were a Plant: And for those kinds there is found no better remedie to mit­tigate them, then is our Quinta essentia Vegitabile, for if you put it therein, and lay a cloth wet in the same thereon, it ta­keth away the pain, in such sort, that it is to be wondered at, and will not suffer it to putrifie; it taketh away the stinking, and comforteth the place very much. As concerning the other kind of Ulcer, you must first find out the cause before you can help it, and the cause being found, the cure is easie to find and sure. He therefore that will be diligent, shall not [Page 72] onely heal those kindes of Ulcers, but also all other Ul­cers.

CHAP. XXVII. Of Ʋlcers that come outwardly in all the bodie.

THese Ulcers are a kind of fat sore that causeth abundance of matter, which cometh through superfluous humiditie of the bodie and blood, and these are evill to heal, because their Originall cometh of the inward parts, and the cure is thus: Give the Patient fourteen daies our Potion of Lignum Sanctum, the which is soluble and drying, and purgeth the blood, that being done, annoint the Ulcer with Ʋnguentum de Lethargiro simple, and so they shall be helped perfectly.

CHAP. XXVIII. Of Ʋlcers in the Head.

ULcers in the Head are of divers kinds, as of Wounds, Con­tusions, Swellings, Scabs and white Skalls, and such like, which come of sundry causes, and are holpen divers wayes. For the Wounds Ulcerated, are mortified with our Castick, laying it on four and twenty hours, and then wash it with strong Vinegar, untill all the Castick be come forth, and af­ter help it with our Magno liquore: The like cure is done in Contusions ulcerated, but the Swellings doe differ much, for that they are caused of the Pox, and thou shalt cure them with Soluble Medicines: Viz. Take Sarsa-Parilia, and then perfume him five or six times with Sinaber. The Scabs or Crusts are helped with taking three times our Electuario an­gelica, and then annoint them every night with Magno liquore. The white Scab is holpen with our Magistrale Ce­rot laying on Cantharides, and so let it lie three dayes, then take it off, and lay on another like the first, and let it lie other three daies, and then annoint the head with Oleum Benedictum continually.

CHAP. XXIX. Of Ʋlcers in the mouth, their Kinds and Remedies.

ULcers that come in the mouth are of divers and sundry kinds, for some proceed of heat in the head, others of cold, others are humours Gallico. Those that come of heat in the head, are as it were scorched with great burn­ing within them, and the cure thereof is in letting blood in the veins under the tongue, and the next day give him one dose of our Electuario angelica, and let him wash his mouth with Planten water, wherein is boiled Tutia prepared, Roch Allum, and Honie of Roses, and this is the true order to cure those kind of Ulcers with speed. Those Ulcers which are cau­sed of cold, are a certain hardnesse alterated, which cause little pain; and the cure of these is to drinke our Vegitabi­le Quinta essentia, with Mel Rosarum: and dresse the Ulcer with Oil of Sulphur and Tartur mixed: And herein consist­eth a great Secret worthy to be known, and is of our inven­tion. Ulcers that are caused of Morbo Gallico, if you will cure them, you must first remove the cause, as I have said di­vers times, and touch them with our Castick. and let the Pati­ent hold his mouth open a good while after, that the Water may run out: And then make a Lavatory of Aqua vitae, Honey, and Oil of Vitriol, aad therewith wash the mouth, for these are great Secrets which bring both health to the Patient, and honour to the Professor of this Art.

CHAP. XXX. Of Wounds and their kinds, and of their secret Remedies.

VVOunds are of divers and sundry kinds. Neverthe­lesse, they consist in two, that is Simple, and Com­pound. The Simple wounds are those, where the flesh is one­ly offended. The Compound are those, where there is offence of flesh, sinews, veins, and bones, and the cure of either of them is in three manners. The first is a cure pertaining to [Page 74] Nature and not to Art, and that is it which Dogs and other Animals doe use, who being wounded, use no other Medi­cine then to keep the wound clean with their proper tongues, and keep a Diet, and the rest is left unto Nature which wor­keth well without pains of Medicine, and this is the first. The second is that which is called Canonico, in which there be four operations. The first is, Digestion. The second, Mundification. The third, Incarnation. The fourth, Siccatri­sation. The third order is of our invention, and is done in this order, that is; Whensoever a man hath a wound either simple or compound, the first thing that is to be done therein is, to joyn the parts close together, and stitch them, and dress them with divers sorts of drying Medicines, as I will shew thee hereafter in the cure of Wounds, in sundry parts of the bodie.

CHAP. XXXI. What Medicines are fittest to heal Wounds outwardly with ease, and in short time.

HAving declared alreadie what wounds are outwardly, it is necessary also to shew the true order to cure them with as much ease, and brevitie, as is possible to be done: And first, I will begin with simple wounds that are onely in the flesh, without offence of vein, sinew or bone. Although these sorts of wounds are not to be helped with artifice, but onely to joyn the parts together, and if it be necessary also to stitch them, and so leave it unto Nature, the which in short time will heal it, neverthelesse if thou wilt help it with arti­fice the faster, you shall annoint it once a day with oile of Frankincense made by Distillation, as is shewed in this Book. But those wounds where there are veins cut, have need to be succoured presently with ingenious artifice, and perfect Remedies to ease and heal them with the most speed that can be, because the veins may joyn together, without greater offence of the wound, and this Misterie thou shalt doe in this order: The first is to joyn the wound together quickly, and stitch [Page 75] it close as they use to sow bags, and not to leave great wide stitches as they most commonly do; that being done, dresse it upon the wound with our Magno liquore, wetting therein a cloth, and laying it on as hot as you may suffer it, then strew thereupon our secret powder, and also round about it, for that subtiliateth the matter that runneth to the wound, and taketh it forth with great ease, and without pain of the wound, and therefore this is one of the most safest Remedies in that case, that Nature with Art can make, and hath been proved an infinite of times by me, and al­waies have had goodly experiences thereof. Also understand that these wounds, where the bones and sinews are cut, have need of great artifice, for they are of great importance. But when there is offence onely of the sinews, you shall stitch them presently, and doe as I have said before of veins that were cut, but dresse them not with Magno liquore, but in stead of that take Oleum Benedictum, and oil of Frankincense, of each alike, because these Oiles doe comfort marvellously those sinews that are cut. If it chance so, that a sinew had a puncture, or cut half away, in that case it is necessarie to cut it overthwart, lest it should bring a Spasm in the wound. But in case afterward that the bone be offended, and that there be some part to come forth, it were necessary to leave the wound open untill the bone be come forth, and then incar­nate it; and this thou shalt doe with our Balsamo Artificiato, and lay thereon the Cerot of Godfredo di medi, the which hel­peth with great speed. And this is the order wherewith thou mayest help all those sorts of wounds before named, and the defensive to use in these wounds is this. Take perfect Aqua vitae made of good Wine, and put therein Hypericon, Mille­folly, Viticella, Betonie, and with that Infusion wet clothes, and lay them for a defensive round about the wound, and thou shalt have good successe. Wounds in the head are hel­ped in the order, as those in whom the Sinews are offended. There are divers other sorts of wounds, which may be healed with the aforesaid remedies, as hereafter shall be shewed par­ticularly.

CHAP. XXXII. Of Wounds in the Head, with offence of the brain, and how to cure them.

VVOunds in the head, where there is offence of the brain, are mortall: and there is no Physician that will take them in cure, but he counteth them dead men without any hope. But I by the grace of God and gift of Nature, have found the order to cure and heal them in short time. I re­member that when one was wounded in the head in the fa­mous Citie of Naples, yea, although the brain were not hurt, but that the skin were cut unto the bone, they counted him mortall, but I dressed them, and closed their wounds, and help­ed them in short space, so that they wondred thereat; and that order I used for the space of seven yeers that I tarried there, and caused them to walk in the streets, as it is well known unto all those that dwell there. And among a num­ber of other, I cured a Portingall that was called, Il Seignior Diego di mena, of whom I took away all the bone of the forehead, and every day he came to my lodging to be cu­red, which I did with great speed, so that it caused every one to marvell thereat. Afterward I went to Rome in the time of Pope Paulus the iiii. Carafa, and alwaies I cured in the same order, and did miracles, of which I call to testimonie the Romanes. And among the rest, I cured a certain Gentle­man called M. Alessandor (I cannot remember his Sirname) who was wounded in divers places, and I cured him quickly. After that I cured, and that in short time, a young man that was in manner cut in pieces, and of that M. Jacomo da Pe­rugia, M. Alessandro da Civita, M. Daltilo Hebraeo, all learned Doctors can testifie, for they were present. And such like cures I have alwaies done in Venice: But among the rest I will not leave to write of a great chance, the which is true, and is thus: There is in Venice a rare Poet and Orator and Hi­storiographer, well known unto the world called M. Dio­nigio Antanagi, who through his evill destinie was wounded in the head, so that it penetrated the flesh and the bone, and en­tred half a finger breadth into the brain, and there that ver­tuous [Page 77] man fell to the ground as a dead man, and he lifted himself up to rise, but he could not, but fell down again, and there came a dimness over his eyes, with a vomiting and and a Fever, and the blood would not stint, and he lay in extream pains, which were all mortall signs: then I being called unto that cure, because he and I were of great fami­liaritie, and presently I shut the wound, and put therein our Aqua balsami, and I annointed all his head with our Balsamo artificiato; that being done, presently the blood stenched, and the pain went away, and the night after he took his rest, and in the morning the Fever was also gone: After that, I dres­sed him with Magno liquore, wetting clothes therein, and upon the cloth I strewed the powder of Hypericon: And this Medicine I used eight daies, in the which time he came forth of his bed; and shortly after he was perfectly whole, and be­fore six moneths were past, it was so siccatrized, that no man could perceive any wound. And of this I have to testimony Venice, Rome, Ʋrbine, Caglie, and all Italy. To conclude this Chapter, I say, that wite the aforesaid order, thou mayest cure any such sort of wound.

CHAP. XXXIII. Of Wounds in the Head, with Fracture of the Bone.

VVOunds in the Head, with Fracture of the bone, of the common Physicians and Chirurgians, are counted dif­ficile to be healed, because thereunto belongeth great art or cunning, for they open the flesh and raspe the bone, with ma­ny other things, of which here I account it superfluous to treat of, because that many be helped without them. For alwayes when the Physitian or Chirurgian, doth defend the wound from alteration and corruption, nature it self will work very well, and heal it without any other aid; but with our Me­dicines they may be helped with much more speed, because they let the alteration, and defendeth them from Putrifacti­on, and mittigateth the pain, and the order to cure those kinds of wounds is thus: The first thing that is to be done in those wounds is, to joyn the parts close together, and [Page 78] dresse them upon the wound with our Oleum Benedictum, and upon the oile lay clothes wet in our Magno liquore, as hot as you may suffer it, and so with these Remedies thou shalt help them quickly, because our Oleum Benedictum taketh away the pains, and keepeth it from putrifaction, and repercusseth: Our Magno liquore digesteth, mundifieth, and incarnateth, and healeth. And therefore this is the best Medicine that can be used in these kinds of wounds. For hereof I have had an infinite of experiences, the which have been counted Miracles, and therefore I have let the world to understand thereof, that they may help themselves, if occasion shall serve; therefore he that will follow this our order in curing, shall work Miracles on the earth.

CHAP. XXXIV. Of Wounds in the Head, where the bone is not offended.

VVOunds in the head where the bone is not hurt, are not of so great Importance, but are easie to be helped; for you shall need to doe nothing, but to keep it from pu­trifaction, and defend it from inflammation, which are easie to be done, and so Nature will work well with great speed. To keep the wound from putrifaction, you shall annoint it round about with our Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina & Cera. And to keep it from Inflammation, you shall wash it with our Quintessence, and upon the wound dresse it with our Magno liquore. Thus doing thy cure shall prosper happily, and you shall not need to take away any blood, nor yet to keep any diet, nor yet to keep the house, but to goe where you thinke good, without any perill or danger. And this Order I have used a long time, as divers Cities can testifie.

CHAP. XXXV. Of Contusions▪ or bruises, as well in the head, as other places.

COntusions, or bruises in the head, or any other place of the body, of the antient Physitians hath been counted [Page 79] dangerous to heal. For, they say, that Contusions must be brought to putrefaction, and turned into matter: which opi­nion I doe not allow: For by me those Contusions or bruises, are very easie to be dissolved without maturation: And that I doe with our Oleo benedicto, and Magno liquore, as much of the one as of the other mixt together, and made very hot as you may suffer it, and then wet clothes therein twice a day, and in three or four dayes at the most, they shall be resolved: and this it doth, because this remedy assubtiliateth the hu­mours, and openeth the pores, and draweth forth the matter that is runne unto the place offended, and so by those means they shall be helped. With this remedy I have cured hun­dreds when I was in the warres in Africa, in Anno 1551. when the said City was taken and destroyed by the Camp of Charles the fifth Emperour.

CHAP. XXXVI. Of Wounds in the neck, and the order to be used in curing them.

VVOunds in the neck are very perilous, and hard to be cured, and long before they will heal: and this cometh because in it are all the ligaments of the head, as bones, sinewes, veins, flesh, and skin, all instruments that hold the head and the body together, without the which a man cannot live: and therefore those wounds are so perilous to be hea­led, seeing thereunto runneth so great quantity of humours, that they will not suffer the wound to be healed. The true way therefore to help these wounds, is to stitch them well in his place, and dresse it upon the wound with clothes wet in Oleum benedictum one part, and Magno liquore three parts mixt together, as hot as you can suffer it: and upon the cloth lay the powder of Mille folie: and this thou shalt doe once in four and twenty houres, and so thou shalt help them quickly; gi­ving you great charge, that you change not your Medicine, for this mundifieth, incarnateth, and healeth the wound with­out any further help: For I have proved it an infinite of times.

CHAP. XXXVII. Of wounds in the armes, and their importance, and Medi­cines.

VVOunds in the armes are dangerous, for that there also are a great number of Sinewes, Cartiligines, Veines, Muskles, and other dangerous things, as it is well seen in wounds of the armes, how that many times thereunto run­neth abundance of humours, and there cometh alteration, inflammation, and imposthumation, which hurteth the Patient much. Therefore in this case, I will shew thee a rare secret, wherewith thou shalt help any sort of wound in the arme, without any alteration, and with little pain, and the secret is this: Dresse the wound upon the upper parts with our Magno liquore very warm, without any tenting at all: and this doe once a day and no more, and in any wise change not your Medicine: For with this thou mayest help all wounds in the armes with great speed: and it is one of the greatest secrets that can be used for wounds in the armes, and proved by me infinite times.

CHAP. XXXVIII. Of Wounds in the breast, as well peircing through, as other.

ALl wounds in the breast are troublesome, and very dan­gerous, as well they that peirce into the body, as others. And the cause is, for that the parts of the breast are compoun­ded of Skin, Cartilages, Sinewes, Flesh, and Bones. So that it cannot be but troublesome and perilous. For where the sinew parts be hurt, there ariseth ever great pain, which for the most part bringeth Fevers, and other accidents, and there­fore is evill to cure. The cure of them is with our Balsamo and Quinta essentia. For the one taketh away the pain, and the other keepeth from alteration. But when they are peir­cing into the body, they are most dangerous, because the Chirurgian cannot tell certainly what part within the body [Page 81] is offended or hurt. Either the Liver, or the Lungs, or the Milt, or any other particulars. Moreover, there is another matter which maketh it dangerous, which is, when they are penetrating, the matter that proceedeth from the Wound falleth into the body, as well as out. And remaining in the body causeth putrifaction, then Fevers follow, and commonly death. Wherefore in this case, cause the Patient to vomit, and to keep slender diet, because the humour should not alter to the dammage of the wounded. And to preserve him from putrifaction, you shall annoint all his body over with our Balsamo, and let him drink our Quintessence morning and evening. And this done the cure shall prosper, or else there is no hope by any other meanes.

CHAP. XXXIX. Of Wounds in the belly, and in the reines, and their affects and Medicines.

VVOunds in the belly are doubtfull, and very uncertain to cure, because it is unpossible to know how they are, or of what importance they be: for although yee may see the Orifice where the Weapon went in, yet yee cannot know what offence it hath done in the interiour parts, and therefore they are bard to be helped, and worse to judge of, and for that cause I will not stand long in reasoning thereof: for I have determined not to speak of things uncertain and doubtfull, but onely of things that may be proved by reason and ex­perience. And because those wounds be uncertain, I will write nothing of them, for fear of hiding the truth: but I will write of those in the reines or back, and first I will shew what the reines are, because every one may comprehend my reason. It is to be understood, that our bodies are made all of sensible things: as inwardly, the Stomack, the Heart, the Liver, the Lungs, the Belly, the Milt, the Guts, with a num­ber of other things which are not common, or known to all men, as those which I have spoken of. The rest of the man is made of Cartilagines, of Veines, of Muskles, of Flesh, [Page 82] of Skin, and other particulars of small importance to know, because the wise, learned, and reverend, my Lord Canan Fer­rarese, hath writ thereof better then ever any in the world hath done, and therefore if you beleeve not me, beleeve his writing set forth in print. But to return to our purpose, I say, that God hath compounded the m [...]n naturally of all these things that I have spoken of: and because they are soft and tender, he hath placed the bones in the middest of them to strengthen them, and to keep them streight, &c. And from the shoulder to the thigh, he hath made a great pillar, of many peices of bones joyned together: On the one part whereof groweth the ribs, which holdeth the flesh, skin, and other particulars farre from the interiours: and upon that bone on the outward side, are the magistrall sinewes that de­scend from the head, and bind all the back together, and reach­eth down unto the feet. Therefore (this being true that I have said) wounds in the head are very dangerous in all his actions, and their cure very hard, because all those sences that give nourishment, passe by the reines downward to the lower parts: and most commonly when a man is wounded in those places, he remaineth lame on the leg that is on that part, and being, as it is, hard and dangerous, the cure of it, according to the Canons of the Ancients, is also perilous; because in those places where so many particulars doe meet and com­municate, there ought not in any wise to be putrifaction, or digestion, but to preserve: You may not bring it to maturation, but to keep it from it; you may not incar­nate, but with speed heal it up: and so in this order the cure shall succeed well, and without danger. And this I will shew unto every one, because he shall profit by our doctrine to the glory of God, and health of the wounded. When one is wounded in those parts, I counsell that the Chirurgian pre­sently shall close the wound with all his diligence, putting thereupon of our Quinta essentia, and instead of a defensive our Balsamo, and upon the wound lay a cloth wet in our Magno liquore, and upon the cloth strew our secret powder for wounds, and following this order, he shall be reputed for an excellent Chirurgian above all other: and this is the meer [Page 83] truth as by most evident proof thou shalt more largely find.

CHAP. XL. Of Wounds in the Legs, and those parts.

VVOunds in the Legs are in manner of the same qua­litie as those in the armes, because the Legs are of their proper qualitie and Nature compounded of the like substance that the Armes are, that is, skin, flesh, muskles, veins, sinews, and bones. And these when they are offended, or wounded, are very perilous, because unto them runneth great quan­titie of humours. And in the Legs are certain deadly places as a man may say: As the hinder part of the Caulf of the Leg: And the middle of the inner side of the thigh: The An­cle and the foot are all places troublesome and curious to heal, when they are wounded. And therefore to heal them ac­cording to the manner of the Ancients, it were great trouble to the Chirurgian, and pittie to see the pain of the Patient. Wherefore in no wise use not the Medicines of the Ancients, but when thou hast occasion, joyn unto the skill of thy Art, the use of these Medicines, our Quinta essentia, Balsamo, Mag­no Liquore, Oleo Benedicto, Oleo di Rasa, Oleo Philosophorum, any of these, or such like, which are incorruptible, which by their proper qualitie assubtiliateth contusions, pierceth to the bot­tome of Wounds, keepeth the flesh in his naturall caliditie and humiditie, preserveth from putrifaction, and naturally ma­keth the flesh to joyn and grow together, and that in short space. Therefore consider well which worketh better effect, ours or the Ancients: And use them at thy discretion.

CHAP. XLI. Of wounds that pierce into the bodie, and of their danger.

VVOunds that pierce into the bodie are very perilous and mortall, because the most part of them cannot be cured by ordinary means, and especially when the interiours are [Page 84] ulcerated: In that case the Physitian not seeing it, nor know­ing the truth of the wound, cannot apply convenient Medi­cines, therefore he shall be much lesse apt to heal them, and therefore you must stand to the benefit of Fortune. And of this I will discourse nothing, for that it will be hard for me to shew that thing, that I cannot see with mine eies, nor touch with my hands: And because this discourse cannot be approved of the truth, and of experience, I will not meddle therewith in any wise: Neverthelesse, I will write of those sorts of wounds that are penetrative, and yet not offend the Intrals, for those may be helped with ease, as I have cured a great number, and among the rest in Anno 1551. in the moneth of June (as I remember) the 17. day, being in the Armie of Naples to go to Africa, there happened a great chance which was thus: The Captain Generall of the Gallies of Fiorenza, named Il Seignior Giordano Orsino sitting at the Table with divers Captains and Gentlemen, among the rest there was one Captain falling in talk with another, sitting at the same Ta­ble, took a loafe of bread, and flang it at his face, then Seig­nior Giordano seeing that little respect of the Captain, rose from the Table and took him by the collar, and gave him five Stockadoes in the breast to have slain him, and left him ly­ing: That being done, the said Seignior Giordano repented him, and seeing that he was not yet dead, called for me be­ing in the Galley with Don Garsia de Toledo my General, and when I came, I found the poor Captain almost dead; whom I dressed with our Balsamo artificiato, and twice a day I gave him to drinke of our Quinta essentia, and gave him meats of good nourishment, and I never put tent into the wound, and in three daies he was helped, and of this the whole company, that was in the Gallie can testifie, and especially the said Seignior Giordano who did the fact. Then afterward in Af­frica I cured an infinite number that were wounded in di­vers manners. And of these Experiences I have done and do yet daily, in so much that if I should write of them, it would be tedious, and therefore I will stand no longer about matters concerning wounds, because I have written a Discourse upon Chirurgery, and Il Capricio Medicinale, in the which I have de­clared many things most profitable in the same.

CHAP. XLII. A Discourse upon old wounds which are not yet healed, with their Remedies.

WHen that wounds are evill healed, and that therein cometh Imposthumation, and that the part wounded be indurated and full of pain. Then use this Secret of our Invention, which was never yet seen or heard of by the Ancients, nor yet in our time but of us. When thou findest such a case, wash the wound well, and make it clean round a­bout, and then wash it with our Quinta essentia Vegitabile, and bath it well through, for that the said Quintessence doth open the pores, and assubtiliateth the matter, and causeth the humour to come forth. This being done, annoint all over with our Magno liquore, and this doing, within three daies the Patient shall feel great ease, and in short time after he shall be whole. This is one of the noblest Medicines that can be made, for it taketh away the hardnesse, healeth the wound, and comforteth the place offended.

CHAP. XLIII. A rare Secret to heal wounds of Gun-shot, Arrows or such like in the wars, when they require haste.

IF thou wilt cure those wounds, presently joyn the parts to­gether, and wash it with our Aqua Celestis and Oleum Bal­sami of our invention, and lay a cloth wet in the same thereon.

CHAP. XLIV. To heal a Wound quickly.

VVAsh the wound well with our Aqua Balsami, and close it up, and thereupon lay a cloth wet in the Oile of Frankincense, and so by this means thou shalt help any great wound quickly, for I have proved it infinite times, to my great honour.

CHAP. XLV. To help a Wound quickly, that is in danger of any accident.

VVOunds in some parts of the bodie, are very dangerous of life, and specially where the sinews be cut or pierced, or veins or muskles hurt, or bones broken, and by an infinite of other particulars, which being open, or evill healed, the Patient may be in danger of life, because the winde entreth in, and they cause pains and inflammation, and therefore to avoid all these aforesaid matters, so that the wound shall have no detriment, use this remedy. First, joyn the parts close toge­ther, and put therein our Quintessence, and lay thereon a cloth, wet in our Balm, and bind it fast that the air get not in, for it is very hurtfull. Yee shall understand that these are two of the excellentest Medicines that may be found, because our Quintessence doth assubtiliate the bloud, and taketh it forth, and taketh away the pain, and the Balm doth warm and comfort the place offended, and will not suffer any matter to run thereunto by any means, for this is most true, as I have proved divers and sundry times, and alwaies have had good successe.

CHAP. XLVI. To stay the Flux of Blood in Wounds.

VVHen there is a Flux of Blood in any wound, by reason of some vein that is cut, and that the Chirurgian would stop it. It is necessary that he put into it our Quintessence, and then to stitch it up very close and hard, and upon the wound strew the blood of a man dried, made in powder, and lay upon the blood a cloth wet in our Balm artificiall very warm, and upon that bind the wound very straight with ligaments. And every day twice wash it with our Quintessence, and round about it annoint it with our Balm, and also cast thereon our secret Powder for wounds; and that doe Morning and Evening every day, without opening the wound. And in short time it [Page 87] will remain well. Giving you charge that the wounded per­son doe keep no straight diet, because Nature being weak, re­laxeth the veins, and that causeth the flux of blood.

CHAP. XLVII. Another for the same.

FIrst, stitch the wound close, then cast thereon mans blood, and bind it somewhat hard, so let it remain 24. hours, and when you unbinde it, take heed you remove nothing, and cast thereon more dried blood, and annoint it round about with Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina & Cera, and binde it up again other four and twentie hours, and then bind it gently, and annoint the wound with Oyle of Frankincense, and in short time it will be perfectly whole.

CHAP. XLVIII. A Defence to be laid upon wounds.

TAke perfect Aqua vitae, of good wine, what quantitie you will, and put therein Hypericon, Millefolie, Viticella, and and Betonie, ana, then let it stand certain daies close stopped, and when ye will use it, wet a cloth therein, and lay it round about the wound. And thou shalt have thy intent, to the great satisfaction of the Patient.

CHAP. XLIX. Our Secret Powder for Wounds.

TAke Hypericon flowers and leaves, Millefolie, and Viticella, ana, stamp them well together, and strew it upon the wound, and round about the wound when it is dressed, for it doth defend it from accidents.

The Third Book of the Secrets of LEONARDO PHIORAVANTE.

CHAP. I. In this third book is shewed the order to make divers Composi­tions, appertaining both to Physick and Chirurgery, with the hidden vertues of sundry Vegetables, Animals, and Mi­nerals, well approved by this Authour, and first of his Petra Philosophale, the which helpeth against all diseases that hap­peneth unto man and woman.

THere hath alwayes been a great questioning among the Philosophers, whether that one Med [...]cine might help against all diseases or no. The which I af­firme, and will approve with sufficient reason, that the Petra Philosophale, made of our invention, may help against all the infirmities that cometh unto mans body▪ and two one­ly reasons I will shew thee with brevity: The first of them is this, that all sorts of infirmities have their originall and be­ginning of the Stomack, and to know the truth, yee may see manifestly, that if the body be never so little infirmed, the stomack is also grieved: For yee may see how the Animals terestriall, never help themselves of other infirmity then of the stomack, and when they will help themselves, they eat hearbs, the which causeth them to vomit, and this doth signifie that they have no other infirmity, then the aforesaid; so by the experience of the Animals, I approve that the infirmity is caused of the stomack, and this is the first reason. The se­cond is, that all the Medicines, wherein our Petra Philosophale is put, as soon as they are come into the stomack, it draweth unto it all the evill humours of the stomack, and also of the [Page 89] whole body, and mixeth with them, and so nature sendeth them forth by vomit, or by seege, or both, and so the stomack shall be evacuated of that matter, and the body remain free from all impediments of infirmities, so that by this reason I affirm, that our Petra Philosophale may help against all sorts of infirmities. And to know the truth, I have proved it by experience in all manner of infirmities, and alwayes have found it to doe much good unto all men, and hurt none unto my knowledge, and the order to make this Petra Philosophale, is thus.

Take Sal Niter, roche Allome, Vitrioll Romain, of each two pound.

First, dry the Vitrioll in an earthen pan, and then beat it to powder, and mix it with the other matters, and put there­unto four ounces of Sal Gemmae, then put it in a Goord with his head, and a Receiver well luted, and distill it in a wind furnace, so that yee may make fire with wood, and at the first make small fire, and so increase it according to Art, and al­wayes lay wet clothes on the Head and Receiver, and that thou shalt doe, because the spirits of the water shall not flie away. Yee shall understand, that in the beginning of your distillation, the Receiver will wax red like bloud, and then turn white, and at the last, when yee give it strong fire, it will turn red again, and those are the pure spirits of the Aqua fortis, and then at the end, the Receiver will turn white again, and then it is ended▪ then let it wax [...]old, and then keep it in a glasse close shut, to make our Petra Philosophale.

Then take Mercury one pound, quick Lime ℥. vi. [...]ope ℥. iiii. common Ashe [...] ℥▪ [...]. Mix them together in a Mortar of stone, and then put them into a Retort [...] and distill it with a strong fire untill all the Mercury be come forth into the Receiver, then take it forth▪ and keep it in a glasse to make thy Com­position, the which is made thus▪

Take the water that thou m [...]dest first, and [...] a Goord of glasse being well luted, and then put in the Mercury that thou did [...]st distill before. After that take S [...]l in thin plates ℥ i. Iron also in thin plates ℥. ii. Fine gold in leaves, the weight of [...]. ii. and put them altogether in the glasse, and [Page 90] presently set on the Head, for it will begin to boil, and cause red fumes like bloud, the which thou shalt receive in a Re­ceiver, and presently set thy glasse in the Furnace, and give it fire untill all the water be come forth with the fume. Then let it cool, and keep that close in a glasse, then break that other glasse that stood in the fire, and in the bottome thou shalt find our Petra Philosophale, the which thou shalt grinde fine, and searce it into most fine powder, and then wash it well with Vinegar distilled, and drie it again, and at the last wash it with Rosewater, and drie it very well, stirring it continu­ally over the fire, then keep it as a precious Jewell close in a Glasse.

For the order to use it, I will write hereafter in sundry pla­ces: Yee shall understand, that the water which ye distilled away from the stone; will serve for the same purpose again: But yee must take but halfe the quantity of the aforesaid mat­ters, and when yee have distilled it again from the stone, yee shall preserve it for an infinite number of purposes, as I will shew thee hereafter.

CHAP. II. To make our Balm artificiall, with the order to use it, and where­fore it serveth.

THis Balsamum hath all the vertues of the naturall Balm, although not in quality, yet in vertue, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Veni [...]e Turpentine one pound, Oil of Bayes that is perfect without mixture ℥. iiii. Galbanum ℥. iii. Gumme A­rabie ℥. iiii. Olibanum, Mirrba elect, Gumme Hedera, of each ℥. iii. Lignum Alloes, Galingall, Cloves, Consolida minore, Ci­namon, Nutmegs, Zedoaria, Ginger, Diptamum album, of each ℥. i. Musk of Levant, Ambergriece, of each ʒ. i. Beate all those aforesaid things together, and put them into a Retort of glasse well luted, and put thereto six pound of rectified Aqua vitae without flegme, and so let it stand eight dayes, and then distill it by Sand, and there will come forth a white water [Page 91] mixed with Oil, and so keep thy fire small, untill there come forth a blackish Oil, then change thy Receiver, and set thereto another, and increase thy fire untill all the spirits be come forth, then seperate the Oyle from the black water, and keep them by themselves, and the like shall yee doe by the first water. The first water that is white, is called Aqua del Bal­samo, and the Oil seperated from that, is called Oleum del Bal­samo. The second water that is black, is called Mater Bal­sami, and the Oil seperated from that water, is called Balsamo artificiato, the which would be kept as a precious Jewell.

The first water is most excellent to clear and preserve the sight of the eyes, also the face being washed therewith, it ma­keth it very fair, and preserveth it youthfully, it keepeth back age, it breaketh the gravell in the reines, and provoketh Urine, the which is stopped through carnositie, it helpeth all manner of wounds, in what place of the body soever they be, if yee wash them with the said water, and wet therein clouts and lay thereon, for his operation is so strange, that it seemeth rather divine then humane. It helpeth much against the Etisie, and against all sorts of Catarres, and Cough. If yee wash a Sciatica therewith, and lay thereon a cloth wet in the same, it taketh away the pain presently.

The other water called the Mother of Balm, helpeth Scabs in short time, if yee wash them therewith: so doth it help the white Scall, Lepra, and all sorts of Ulcers that are not corrosive, most miraculously to see, and without any trouble. It serveth also against a number of other infirmities, the which I will let passe at this time.

The Oil of Balm doth serve for an infinite number of things, and especially for wounds in the head, where the bone and pannicle is hurt, putting it therein. It preserveth the face if yee annoint it therewith. It is most excellent against the Plurisie, giving thereof ʒ. i. at a time with the water of Balme.

The Balm artificiall is a miraculous liquour, for if any have the stitch in the side, and take ʒ. ii. thereof, it presently will help him. It is also good against the Cough, and Catarre, and coldnesse in the head and stomack, and for wounds in the [Page 92] head. It is a most Soveraign remedie, if ye annoint all the head therewith once a day, because it pierceth into the brain, and also unto the stomacke beneath. It resolveth a Quartan in short time, if ye annoint all the bodie therewith, leaving no part. And to be short, I know no disease, neither hot, nor yet cold, but that this Balsamum doth good unto, as well the hot diseases as the cold, because it cooleth the hot and heateth the cold, and this it doth by his qualitie and hidden vertue, so that I have found in this precious liquor, such great vertues, that I am not able to declare them all; so that every one, the which is furnished with this precious Balm, may be kept from infirmities, and shall not need to seek the naturall Balm, with so much expences, and danger of the life, as hath been ma­ny times seen.

CHAP. III. To make our Aromatico, the which helpeth against all manner of infirmities, of what qualitie soever they be.

ARomatico Leonardo, is so called, because it was compoun­ded and made by his invention, and is a miraculous Me­dicine, that serveth against all manner of diseases, of what qua­litie soever they be, for it worketh this operation, that is, assoon as it joyneth to the stomack, it draweth to it all the evill humours of the bodie, and imbraceth them, and carrieth them forth by vomit and seege, and so leaveth Nature unbur­dened, the which may prevail to his pleasure because it hath no impediment, and by this reason I approve that our Aro­matico helpeth against all diseases; as is said before, and the order to make it is thus.

Take fine Sugar ℥. iiii. pure Pearls, Muske, Saffron, Lignum Aloes, Cinnamon, ana. ℈. i. Petra Philosophale, ʒ. iiii. mix them together, and make thereof Lozanges with Rosewater accord­ing to Art, the which ye shall keep in a box of wood close shut, and the order to use it is thus, that when the Physician doth go to visit any sick person, and that he will prepare him some Medicine to take inward, the best and most perfect [Page 93] Medicine that he can ordain is our Aromatico, because it eva­cuateth the stomack by vomit, and the bodie downward, and his operation is such, that it doth in manner help any crude sort of infirmitie, and the quantitie is from i. ʒ. to ii. and may he taken in broth, in wine, in water, or mix it with any Pils, or Potion, giving you charge, that when ye put it in any Po­tion, that ye leave none in the bottome of the cup where yee drinke it out, because the Petra Philosophale, is heavie, and will remain in the bottome, for if that remain it will not work at all, giving you also charge, that the said day that ye give this Medicine, that ye let the Patients drinke as much crude wa­ter as they will, and give them little meat to eat that day, and this is the order to use this Medicine.

CHAP. IIII. To make our Electuario Angelico, and the order to use it, and in what diseases.

ELectuario, Angelico Romano is so called, because it was com­pounded of me in the Citie of Rome, in the time of the Pope Paulo quarto, and because this composition worketh di­vinely, I called it Angelico, and is most excellent against ma­ny diseases, it is good against all sorts of Fevers, giving it Per-minorativo, and for the Stitch in the side it is most rare, because it taketh away the viscositie in the Stomack, and ope­neth the Pores, and is good against the Gout; for if they take it every third day once, in ten daies they shall be hel­ped. It is also good against the Cough, Catarr, and for the Milt, and for those that have the Poxe, or the running Gout, and such like influences, and the order to make it is thus:

Take Saffron, Lignum aloes, Cinnamon, red Corall, ana ʒ. iii. Elliborus niger, without preparation, ℥. ii. Electuario de succo rosarum M [...]fue, that is not too much boiled ℥. vi. Sugar Ro­sate ℥. viii. Musk of Levant ʒ. i. Petra Philosophale, ℥. iii. our Quintessence of wine ℥. ii. purified Honie as much as will suffice to make it in form of an Electuarie, mixe them on a small fire in an earthen-pan, and when it is made, keep it in a [Page 94] vessell of glasse, for any other vessell will not be good. This Electuarie ye may mix with any soluble Medicine, but yee must take it fasting, the quantitie is from ʒ ii. to ʒ. iiii. Yee shall understand, that this in a manner reviveth the dead by his great vertue, as hath been seen many thousand times in Venice, and in Rome, most worthy of memorie: And therefore if any Phy­sician desire to get fame in the world, let him use our Electu­ario Angelica, the which worketh miracles on the earth.

CHAP. V. Our Sirrup Solutivo, with the Order to use it.

SOluble Sirrups made in decoction are very wholsome and of great facultie, and specially in the crudity of humours, and the reason is this, because it disperseth the matter, and evacuateth it with great ease, and without danger or trouble of the Patient, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Sage, Rew, Rosemary, Wormwood, Cicorie, Carduus Sanctus, Nettles, Organie, of each a handfull; Figs, Raisons, Dates, sweet Almonds, Sal gem. ana ℥. iiii. Coloquintida, Aloes he­patica, Cinnamon, Mirabolani citrini, ana ℥. ii. common Honey two pound, stamp them all grosly, and put them to infuse in eighteen pound of fair water, then boil it till half be consumed, then strain it, and distill it by a filter, and aromatise it with two carets of Musk, and a pint of Rosewater, and then it is made, the which ye shall keep in a bottle of glasse close stopt, the quantity is from ℥. iiii. to ℥. vi. In Winter you shall take it very warm, and in the Spring and Autumn, ye shall take it but warm. In Summer ye shall take it cold, for this purgeth the gross humours of the bodie, and hurteth not the sto­mack, you may use it in a Fever four or five daies together, and it will help it. In cruditie of humours, as the French Pox, Gouts, Catarrs, Doglie Artetich, and such like matters, where there is no accident of Fever, ye may take it ten or fifteen daies together, and cannot hurt by any meanes, for it purgeth most excellent; it is given against the Cough, against Flux of of the Urine, and pains in the head, and carnositie in the [Page 95] Yeard, for the Emeroids; and in sum, it is good against all diseases c [...]ed of corrupt humours, for it hath such vertue, that it draw [...] from all parts, and evacuateth the humours in­testinall, for of this Sirrup I have had great experience, in such persons as were in manner banished and had lost their taste, and presently using this, they came to their good tempera [...], and I have used it an infinite number of times in persons that were ulcerated, and full of sores, evill handled of Fortune, and of the infirmitie, and finding no meanes to cure them as they should be: I gave them this Sirrup fourteen or fifteen daies, and then they were cured, with a number of other things, the which would be too long to write, and there­fore I would wish every one to use this, not onely in the afore­sad matters, but in all other diseases.

CHAP. VI. Our Sirrupo magistrale Leonardo, the which serveth against an infinite number of Diseases.

THis Sirrup is solutive, and very pleasant to use, and can­not hurt in any wise, the which is seldome seen in other Medicines, and the order to make it is thus.

Take the leaves of Sine, ℥. ii. Fumitorie, Maiden-hair, H [...]rts-tongue, Liverwort, Epitimum▪ Ellemo, Pollipidie of the Oak, the floures of Burrage, of Buglosse, Liquorice, of each ℥. iii. Co­loquintida, Elleborus niger, Aloes Hepatica, Mirabolani Indi, ana ℥. i. Prunes xiiii. Sebestien xii. Tamarise ℥. i. Stamp them grossely, and infuse them in ten pound of Fumitorie water, then boil it untill the consumption of the third part, and then strain it, and in that which is streined put these things: Sir­rup of St [...]cados one pound, Saffron ℈. i. Mel Rosarum, ℥. vi. rectified Aqua vitae, ℥. iiii. Musk ʒ. i. The Mullege of Marsh Mallows ℥. iiii. Benzoin, ℥. i. Rosewater, ℥. iii. and then it is made, the which ye shall keep in a glasse close stopt▪ and keep it in a temperate place, and this you must take warm; the quantitie is from ℥. ii. to ℥. iiii. and it is a most safe Medi­cine to be used without keeping of any diet. It helpeth those [Page 96] much that have Pellaria, Scabs, Emeroids, and such like dis­eases, and may be given unto a woman with child, without any danger, when shee shall have occasion to use any.

CHAP. VII. Our Sirrup against the melancholy humour, and specially where there is ventositie in the Stomack.

IT were necessary for those that will make this Sirrup, to be expert in the Art, for it would be made with great di­ligence, and the order to make is thus:

Take water of Fumitorie, of Hops, of Wormwood, of Mai­den-hair, of each five pound. Then with this water thou shalt make a decoction with these things that follow.

Take Pollipodium of the Oak, one pound, Sine leaves, Epi­timum, ana ℥. iiii. Cordiall flowers two handfulls, Maiden-hair one handfull, Liquorice, Raisons, Cinnamon, of each ℥. ii. The four Cold seeds, ℥. ii. Make thereof a decoction according to Art, and strein it, then take four pound of that Decoction, and put thereto the juyce of Bourage, of Buglosse, of Hops; of each ℥. ii. common Honey, ℥. vi. then with white Sugar make a Sirrup in good form, and aromatise it with Musk and Amber, putting thereto i. ℥. of Plyris without Musk, and then it is made. The dose is from ℥, iii. to ℥. iiii. in the morning warm, and fast thereon at least three or four hours, for this purgeth marvellously the melancholie humours, and all other grosse humours, and dissolveth winde, and comforteth the heart, &c.

CHAP. VIII. Our Potion of Lignum Sanctum, the which is miraculous to dis­solve crude, and ma [...]ign humours, with the order to use it, in the French Pox, and such like diseases.

BEcause the Poxe is a disease contagious, putrified, and cor­rupt, and worketh many evill Effects, as I have written in my Caprici Medicinali. Therefore it were necessary to pre­pare [Page 97] most excellent and rare Remedies to dissolve the same, which Medicines are infinite.

But in this Chapter I will write one, that purgeth the crude and viscous humours downwards, and doth assubtiliate the grosse humours, and drieth all sorts of subtill humours that offend Nature, and sendeth them forth by sweat: It drieth the melancholie humour, and dissolveth choler, and is most wholesome for those that are troubled with that disease, be­cause it drieth much and dissolveth the disease, with many other good effects, as by experience thou mayest see, and the order to make it is thus.

Take the Bark of Lignum Sanctum grossely beaten one pound, and lay it in steep in fourteen pound of fair water, 24 hours, then boil it untill four pound be consumed, then put thereto Pollipodie of the Oak, ℥. ii Cicory one handfull, Aloes hepatica, ʒ. iiii. and let them boil for an hour, and put thereunto the leaves of Sine, Epitimum, ana ℥. i. Coloquintida, ʒ. vi. Sugar ℥. viii. then let it boil till half be boyled away, and that there remain vii. pound, then strein it, and put it in a glasse with xii. grains of Musk, and keep it very close stopt, and this is the Sirrup, the which ye shall take twice a day, that is morning and evening; then make this drink following, the which shall be the common drink at all times to your meat.

Take a pound of Lignum Sanctum, Raspead, and steep it in ten pound of white wine that is ripe, and let it boil an hour, then put thereto fifteen pound of fair water, and let it boil a little more, and then strein it, and keep it in a glasse bottle, for this is to be used all the day time, and the order to use these is thus.

First, when any feeleth himself grieved with the Pox, or a­ny such like disease, he must keep his bed at least twentie daies, and use to take of the first Sirrup or Potion every mor­ning a good draught, being as warm as he may suffer it, then cover him well with clothes that he may sweat as much as he can, then take off the clothes by little and little, and drie him with warm clothes, and so let him repose for two hours, and then let him eat, and his meat must be dry, as Bisket, Rostmeat, Rai­sins of the Sun, Almonds, and sometime a rere Egg, and his drink at meals, and all the day beside, shall be the last made [Page 98] with wine and water: then at night give him of the first Sir­rup as yee did in the morning, and cause him to sweat, and then drie him: and this order thou shalt use twenty dayes together, not coming forth of thy Chamber, and by the grace of God thou shalt be helped of any such greivous in­firmity, as I have seen the experienee thereof an infinite of times, to my great honour, for it may be occupied in all complexions with safety, as by the Ingredients thou mayest see.

CHAP. IX. To make the water of Lignum Sanctum, most wholsome against the Pox, with a new order.

COmmonly they use to take the water of Lignum Sanctum against the Pox, the which surely is most wholesome, but it must be taken in good order and form, and must be made with great discretion, and not as they use it now adayes, for they give it some three or four times, and never the better, although the wood be sufficient enough to help them, and therefore I would wish every one that will use this water, to take it in such order as it ought to be, the which I will shew thee hereafter.

Take Lignum Sanctum, Raspead small one pound, the bark being beaten ℥. iii. infuse them in twelve pound of fair wa­ter one night, and the next morning put therein one pound of Honey, the which is put in, because it is aperative and warm, and helpeth to provoke sweat, and causeth it to have a good taste: then boil it till half be consumed, then put thereto Carduus sanctus ℥. iiii. strong Wine three pound, then boil it untill a third part be consumed, and then it is made; then strain it, and take forth the Carduus sanctus, and put therein twenty pound of fair water, and one pound of Hony, and let it boil untill four pounds be consumed, then strein it and keep it in a glasse bottle, for this is the common drink to drink all the day long, and the order to take it is thus. First before yee will take this water, it were necessary to take our Sirrupo [Page 99] Solutivo seven or eight dayes, after that take of our Electuario Angelica ℥. ss. That being done, in the name of God take this potion of Lignum sanctum in this order. Take in the morning at the appearing of the day ℥. viii. very warm as he may suffer, and presently lay clothes on him, and cause him to sweat two hours, and then dry him with warm clothes, and so let him remain two hours, and then give him to eat, and his meat shall be Bisket, Raisins, Almonds, and sometime a little roast meat, and no other: then in the evening about the 22. hour, yee shall give him the said Sirrup as yee did in the morning, neither more nor lesse, and cause him to sweat, and about the 24. hour give him onely Bisket and Raisins, and the other common drink that was made last, giving you warning that yee make this drink fresh every third day, be­cause it shall not hurt the stomack, and every week once, yee shall take a pill of Marte millitare, and that day thou shalt eat Birds flesh because of weakening: Also ye shall take very great heed to one thing, and that is this. If it happen, that at the beginning of this cure there cometh a Fever, or other accident unto the Patient, that in any wise yee leave not the cure, but follow the order, for that is a certain sign of health: for many times I have given this water, and unto some in the fourth or fifth day the Fever came, and tarried many times ten or twelve dayes, and then the Fever went away with the corrupt disease, and all for company, and so in short time they were cured, so that, as I have said before, when that signe appeareth and is delivered, it is a certain signe of health: Also I will advise thee of another thing, and that is this: If the Patient cannot sweat yee shall annoint him all over with the Oil of Quinces, the which shall cause him to sweat apace; for without sweat the cure will not be perfect, and this order thou shalt keep, at the least forty dayes together within thy Chamber, so that there come no air in, for it will hinder the cure.

CHAP. X. An Electuary that helpeth the Cough with great speed and ease.

THe Cough is caused of a Catarrous humour, and coldnesse of the stomack, and therefore if yee will help it, it were necessary to have a remedy that doth ripen the Catarre, and mollifie the stomack, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Enula Campana ℥. iiii. Marsh Mallowes ℥. xii. Quin­ces ℥. xvi. But if yee cannot get Quinces, yee may take Mar­malade ready made, and boil it in fair water with the said roots untill they be dry, then stamp them in a morter, and strein them through a streiner, then take for every pound of that matter two pound of white Hony, and boil them to­gether, but boil them not too much: then take it from the fire, and put thereunto for every pound of the aforesaid mat­ter ℈. i. of Saffron, and ʒ. i. of Cinamon, and ℥. ii. of Sul­phur, and ℈. i. of Licorice, and then incorporate them well together, and aromatise it with musk and Rosewater, and this yee shall use morning and evening, for this is of so great ver­tue, that it is to be wondred at, because the Mallowes doe mollifie, the Enula Campana doth warm, and causeth digesti­on, and comforteth the Stomack: the Quinces are cordiall and warm, the Sulphur is a great drier, the which destroyeth the evill humours of the body, the Saffron comforteth the heart, the Cinamon is stomackall, the Licorice is mollificative, and digesteth the matter: so that of force this Electuary must help any kind of Cough, except it come of the Pox, for then it will doe small pleasure▪ as I have proved.

CHAP. XI. Our Magistrall Electuary of Sulphur, the which serveth against divers sorts of infirmities.

AS the fire hath vertue to heat and dry materiall things: so hath the Sulphur vertue to warm and to dry the humi­dity [Page 101] and coldnesse of our bodies, for I have occupied it di­vers and sundry times, and alwayes have seen divers and sun­dry good effects, but for the better commodity, and more ease to use it, I have compounded this Electuary, the which thou mayest use with ease and benefit unto a number, and the order to make it is thus.

Take very fine Sulphur that is without earth, and make it into fine powder one pound, Cinamon ℥. ss. Saffron ℈. i. Gin­ger ʒ. ii. Musk dissolved in Rosewater two Carets, white Hony crude, as much as will suffice to make it into an Electuary without fire, then keep it in a dry place; and this ye shall use in the morning fasting, and his quantity from four drachms to seven, This dryeth up Scabs, provoketh Urine, breaketh the stone in the Reins, it helpeth the Cough, dryeth up the watering of the eyes, causeth a good appetite, with divers other things, the which I will leave to the Experimentors.

CHAP. XII. Our electuary of Consolida majore, that serveth for many dis­eases inwardly.

THis Consolida majore, is a hearb so called, because of his effect that it doth in healing of wounds, and other places of the flesh separated, for if yee eat thereof it will help the Rupture, and all sorts of Wounds penetrating, and Ulcers of the Lungs, it dryeth the Milt, and such like effects: but because thou mayest use it more commodious, I have compounded an Electuary, the which is excellent and rare, and is made thus.

Take the root of Consolida majore one pound, and boil it in water untill the water be consumed, then stamp them in a Morter, and passe them through a Streiner, then put thereto as much white Hony as the matter weigheth, and boil them on a small fire, untill it be come to the form of an Electuary, and when it is boiled, put thereto these things.

Take the Rindes of Pomgranates in fine powder ℥. i. Lig­num aloes ʒ. vi. Mirrh, Mastick, Sarcocolla, Sanguis draconis [Page 102] in grain, ana. ʒ. ii. Cinnamon, ʒ. i. Musk of Levant dissolved in Rosewater, one Carret, then incorporate them well while it be warm: You must note, that the bodie must first be well purged, ere ye take this Electuarie, and ye must also keep a diet, that the Medicine may work the better, for this helpeth all the aforesaid disease inwardly, as is said before: You may use it emplaister wise upon the wounds, and on broken bones, and use it inwardly, and so the Patient shall remain helped. With this I have seen men of great age helped, that were burst below, and wounded from one part to the other, and also broken bones and bruises, the which if I should write them, it would not bee credited.

CHAP. XIII. Ʋnguento magno Leonardo.

THis Ʋnguento magno is so called, by reason of his great vertue and operation, for it worketh so strange in some diseases, that it in manner reviveth the Patient, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Otnegra oviv. ℥. vi. Oximel Squilliticum, ℥. ss. mix them together in an earthen dish, untill the Otnegra oviv. be become like ashes, then it is deisitrom, then put therein ℥. ii. of Vi­negar, and wash it well, untill it remain pure and clear, then take Olibanum ℥. ss. Cerusae ℥. i. Beat them fine, and mix it in a stone Morter, with as much Magno liquore, as will serve to incorporate them well, then put thereto the Otnegra oviv. and mix them very well together, that being done, put thereto Auxungia porcina, ℥. viii. And mix them very well together, and then it is made, the which keep in a vessell well glased, for it will keep a long time without corruption, and is apt to help those that are lame, full of pains, and sores and swel­lings, pains of the eyes, the stone in the reins, and such like matters, it helpeth all mannes of French Pox, if ye annoint them therewith, untill the Gums be sore and then leave. But ye shall note, that the bodie must first be well purged before ye annoint them. This Unguent cooleth all corrosive Ulcers, [Page 103] and helpeth them in short time, it helpeth all paines in the eyes, if ye put it therein; and taketh away all burning with speed. And to be short, it helpeth those diseases in most short time, so that it is to be wondered at.

CHAP. XIV. Oyle of Hypericon, the which is most miraculous, for Wounds and bruises.

THis Oyle of Hypericon compounded by us, is of great ver­tue in divers and sundry accidents, and specially in wounds, for it helpeth them without any pain, although the veins, sinews, or bones were hurt or cut, and that in very short time: It preserveth the wound from corruption, and taketh away the pain, and incarnateth and cicatrizeth, as by experience thou mayest plainly see. It dissolveth Contusions, and is most marvellous agaist poison. It helpeth against any crude sort of venemous Fever, if you annoint all the bodie therewith, leaving no part; and the order to make it is thus.

Take the floures, leaves, and seed, of Saint Johns-wort, as many as ye will, and stamp them together, and put them in a Glasse, with as much strong white wine as will cover it well, then set it in the Sun ten daies together, then put thereto as much pure Sallet oile, as the herbs and the wine doth weigh, then let it stand in the Sun other ten daies, giving you warn­ing that you weigh your oyle before you mixe them; that be­ing done, put thereunto for every pound of oyle ℥. ii. of Tur­pentine, and ʒ. i. of Saffron, of Nutmegs, Cloves, Myrrha elect. of each ℥. ss. Frankincense ℥. i. Viticella ℥. ii. for every pound, stamp them altogether, and put them into a great glasse, and set it to boil in Balneo Mariae, with a head and Receiver close shut, and to know when it is boyled enough, is, that there will ascend no more vapours into the head, and that will be within 24. hours, or thereabout, then take forth the Glasse being yet hot, and strain it, and keep it in a Glasse close shut as a precious Jewell. Ye shall note that this Oyle must alwaies be occupied very warm, and in any wise [...]ent no [Page 104] wound, but wet clothes therein, and lay it thereon, and thy cure shall prosper well, for this I have proved a thousand times in divers places.

CHAP. XV. To make our Oleum Benedictum, the which healeth wounds divinely.

THis Oleum Benedictum serveth chiefly for wounds in all parts of the bodie, and especially for wounds in the head: If there were fracture of bone, and offences of the Pannicle, and in other places where sinews were hurt, or muskles, or veins, or in any other noble place of the bodie, with this Oleum Benedictum, and with our Vegitable Quintessence, thou mayest help them easily, and in short time, without any dan­ger or detriment of the wounded person, as is said before, and the order to make it is thus.

Take the whites of Eggs being hard sod in water, ℥. xii. Clear Turpentine ℥ xiiii. Pure Myrrh ʒ. iii. Mixe them, and put it into a Retort of glasse, and give it gentle fire at the first, and then increase it according to Art, untill all the sub­stance be come forth of the Retort, the which will be both water and oyle, the which separate, and keep the Oile by it self in a Glasse as a precious Jewell, for this worketh miracles in wounds of what sort soever they be. Moreover, it causeth hair to grow on the head or beard, the which were fallen away, and that it doth in short time by the onely annointing the place therewith. Also if any have a stitch in his side, and retention of Urine, let him take a Glister, wherein he shall put a little of this Oyle, and he shall be helped; and this effect it doth, because it dri­eth mightily that alteration made in the secret parts of the Reins inwardly, where no locall Medicine can be applyed.

CHAP. XVI. Oleum Philosophorum de Terementina & Cera.

THis Oyle of Turpentine and Waxe, is a most precious Balm, and his vertues are infinite, because it is made of [Page 105] simples in manner uncorruptible, and is most miraculous for those that are corrupted, or strucken with the Pestilence, be­cause it is most penetrative, and of nature drying, and com­forteth all weak parts in mans bodie, of what infirmitie so ever they be, and the order to make it is thus.

Take new yellow waxe, ℥. xii. clear Turpentine, ℥. xviii. Ben­jamine, ℥. ii. Fine rectified Aqua vitae, ℥. xxx. common ashes, ℥. vi. mixe them, and put them into a Retort of glasse well lu­ted, and then distill it in a winde Furnace, untill the sustance be come forth, and in the Receiver thou shalt find three things: The first is Water, the second Oil, the third flegm, the which thou shalt separate one from another, and keep them close stopt in a glasse, the which is most excellent in time of the Pestilence, as well for unction, as for to help the sores, for if you put it into a sore or botch that is broke, presently it ta­keth away the pain, and being mixed with other of our Medicines, as I have shewed in my Regiment of the Pesti­lence, it helpeth them with great speed. If any annoint all his bodie with this Oyle twise a moneth, it will preserve him youthfull, and in health a long time, it preserveth also dead flesh or fish, that is put therein from corruption. Also if any be wounded in any part of the bodie, let him annoint it with this Oyle four or five times, and it shall be whole: Also if any cannot make water, give unto him ʒ. ii. of this oyle to drinke, and presently he shall make water. It is also good a­gainst the Stitch in the side and Plurisie, and Worms, and the Cough and Catarre, and against the Pestilent Fever, and such like indispositions, if ye drinke a little thereof; it hath a number of other vertues, the which I will leave unto the Experimentors.

CHAP. XVII. Our Magno liquore, the which is of great vertue.

THis is of my invention, and the order to make it, is thus Take sweet Sallet oile twentie pound, white wine two pound, boil them together untill the wine be consumed, then [Page 106] put it in a vessell of stone, and put thereunto these things following:

Take the flours of Rosemary three pound, Lignum aloes, ℥. vi. Olibanum, Bdellium, ana. ℥. x. then stop it very close, and bury it in the ground four foot deep, and this would be buried in the beginning of August, and there rema [...]n untill the moneth of March, then take it forth of the ground, and set it in the Sun, and put thereto these matters following, Sage, Rosemary, Rue, Beto­nie, Millefolie, Comferie roots, Tamaro, Viticella ana, one hand­ful: Galingal, Cloves, Nutmegs, Spikenard, Saffron, ana ℥. i. Sarco­colla, Sanguis Draconis in grain, Mastick, ana ℥. ii. Aloes Epatica, Frankincense, ana ℥. viii. yellow Wax, Auxungia ana ℥. xviii. Co­lophonie one pound, Hypericon with the seed and all two pound. Musk ʒ. i. mix these all well together, and boil them in Bal­neo, untill the herbs become dry, and have no more sub­stance, then take it forth, and strain it, and put thereunto for every pound, ʒ. vi. of our Balm artificiall, and when the moneth of September cometh, put thereunto two pound of the fruit of the herb called Balsamina, the which are red, and then it is ended, the which thou shalt keep in a glasse close shut, for the older it is, the better it is, and is of such vertue, that it helpeth the Etici, and Hidropsie, if ye give them eve­ry morning ʒ. ss. with ℥. i. of Sirrup of Roses warm, the space of fortie daies, as I have proved: And this is the true and perfect Unction, that helpeth Petecchie, a disease so called in the Italian: If any were wounded, and had cut veins, sinews, and bones, let him joyn the parts close together, and dresse it with this Oyle very hot upon the upper parts, and in short time it shall be whole, without any alteration. It helpeth al­so the white Scall if ye annoint it therewith: It helpeth cold­nesse in the head, and Catarrs, if ye annoint it within the no­strils at night when ye go to bed: If yee annoint the Sto­mack therewith it causeth perfect digestion of the meat, it provoketh Urine where it is let through carnositie or Gonor­rea, or such like matter; It causeth hair to grow, it preserveth the beard black, and it is good against Worms, and all these Experiments are true, and proved of me divers and sun­dry times, in the aforesaid infirmities, and also in divers [Page 107] others, the which I leave untill another time: Yee shall note, that if yee annoint any all over that is greived with the Pox with this Oil, it will increase his pain, and so by that meanes yee may know whether he be infected or no.

CHAP. XVIII. Pillole Aquilone of our invention.

THese Pills are above all other in operation, as the Eagle is above all other Birds, and therefore I thought good to call them Pillole Aquilone, and the order to make them is thus.

Take conserve of Damask Roses made with Hony ℥ iii. Lig­num Aloes ʒ. i. Oyl of Vitriol twelve graines, Cinnamon elect ii scruples. Petra philosophalis of our invention. ℥ ss. Sugar-can­die ℥ ii. Mix them, and make thereof a paste with Syrupo Acetoso and keep them in a glass. The Vertue of these Pills I will not at this time write: but onely I say they help against all sorts of in­firmities, and hurteth none in any wise. The Dose is from ʒ. i. to ʒ. ii. in the morning fasting, but ye may not gild them in a­ny wise, but drink after them a cup of water or wine, to carrie them down, then sleep thereon, and that day eat little meat. and light of digestion.

CHAP. XIX. Our Quinta essentia solutiva, the which is of marvellous opera­tion in divers matters.

THis Quinta essentia solutiva evacuateth the body with great ease, and without any detriment, and it purgeth all parts of the body that are troubled with grosse and viscous humours, it resolveth swellings, and taketh away the paines, it preserveth the sight, and killeth wormes, and causeth a good appetite, with many other good qualities, the which I will leave at this time, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Aloes, Cinnamon, Turbite, Aloes Epatica, ana ℥. i Colo­quintida [Page 108] ℥. ii. Cloves, Saffron, of each ʒ. i. Musk of Levant ʒ. i. Julep of Violets one pound. Mix all the aforesaid matters toge­ther in a glasse, and put therein two pound of our Quintessence, and so let it stand twelve dayes, and then strain it, and put it into a vessell of glasse close shut, this may be taken with broth, wine, or with what sirrup or potion yee will, the quantity is from ʒ. ii. to ℥. ss. in the morning fasting, without keeping of any diet at all, and it shall work well without any trouble.

CHAP. XX. Pillole Magistrale, the which is good against divers infir­mities.

THese Pills are of great vertue, and specially against all kind of paines coming of corrupt humours, for they purge the putrified humours, and preserve the body from corruption: and the order to make them is thus.

Take Olibanum, Mastick, Mirrh, Sarcocolla, Aloes Epatiee, Elleborus niger, Saffron, Turbith, Colloquintida, ana q. v. Stamp them finely, and for every ounce of the aforesaid matters, put thereunto two Carets of Musk, and then incorporate it with Hony of Roses, and Aqua vitae, of each alike, and this paste thou mayest keep for six moneths in a vessell of Lead, the quantity is from ʒ. ii. to ʒ. iii. in the morning fasting, and drink thereon a little wine. These pills are most excellent to take away the paines of the Gout, and to preserve a man from it, they are also good for those that have the French Pox, because they evacuate the grosse and viscous humours, and maintain the body in good temperature, and using them in those diseases, it preserveth the body in good state. They are also good for women that are troubled with paines of the Mother, and retention of their Termes, for these are apera­tive, and provoke them, and purgeth the Matrix of all impedi­ments contained therein: They serve against the Megrem, and all paines of the head, and also against all kind of putrifi­ed Fevers, as I have seen the experience thereof sundry times.

CHAP. XXI. To make Aqua reale, vel Imperiale, the which maketh the teeth white presently, incarnateth the Gums, and causeth a good breath.

THe teeth being black and rustie, and full of filth, and the Gums putrified or corrupt, are the worst things that may be seen in man or woman, and are also very unwholsome; and the Remedie to make the teeth white, and to help the gumms, is thus: Make this water, and use it in this order as I will shew thee.

Take Sal Gemmae, Roch Allum, Brimstone of each two pound, Borax ℥. x. Pearl beat fine, Corall, each ℥. ii. Pure di­stilled Vinegar ℥. iiii. Put all the aforesaid matters in a Goord, with his head and receiver, and give it fire accord­ing to Art, and at the last there will come forth a white wa­ter like Milk, the which after it hath stood a while, will waxe clear. You shall understand, that this water is above all other waters in the world, to help Ulcers in the mouth, and to in­carnate the gums, and to make the teeth white, and causeth a good breath in those which are troubled with the aforesaid matters. For of this water I have made great quantitie, and it hath been carried into Spain, into Almain, into Poland, into Constantinople, and in divers other Countries, as though it had been a Divine thing, and not material.

For truly this experience doth cause the world to wonder at it, the use hereof I have written in this Book, and here­after I will write it again in some of my Books, where oc­casion shall serve to use it in cures.

CHAP. XXII. Of the hidden Secrets of Frankincense.

THe Pine is a tree, the which by nature is uncorruptible, and the gum that runs from it is of great vertue and strength, because it preserveth those things wherein it is put, and when [Page 110] his Elements are separated out of that Gum, the Physician may work strange things therewith, against most part of in­firmities that happen unto mans bodie, if he apply them where they are convenient: For the water being drunke help­eth winde in the stomack: Also it helpeth the white Skall, and all such like scabs, if ye wash them therewith morning and evening. It drieth up Ulcers, also it is of marvellous vertue against chilblains and kibed heels, and chapps, and such like, in the hands or feet that come through cold, being used thus. You shall first perfume the parts that are sore over the fume of hot water, so that they may sweat, then drie them and wash them with the aforesaid water, and annoint them with the Oil, and put on a pair of gloves or such like, and in very short time they shall be whole. The aire helpeth much in wounds in any part of the bodie, because it preserveth the flesh from putrifact­ion, and keepeth it from alteration, and taketh away the paine and healeth the sore: Also it preserveth the face if it be annoin­ted therewith. Moreover, it is marvellous in old diseases inward­ly, if ye give them thereof every morning ʒ i. with ℥ ss. of our Sirupo Vegetabile. The fire cureth sores and such like, and the earth remaineth in his state. Ye shall understand, that these are great secrets of importance, the which I have revealed of this Gumme, and happy shall he be that useth them in the time of need: And the order to make this Oile is thus.

Take as much Frankincense as thou wilt, and put it into a Retort of glass, with the fourth part of common Ashes, and set it to distill, and give it first a small fire untill the Oyle change colour, then presently change the Receiver, and augment the fire untill all the substance be come forth. Ye shall under­stand that this Oyle is best fresh, for when it is old, it will waxe thick, and cannot pierce so well.

CHAP. XXIII. Of the Oyle of Honie, and the order to make it.

THat which most men call Oyle of Honey, is not an Un­ctous Oyle like unto other Oyles, but rather a certain [Page 111] Element, the which is neither oyle nor water, although it be clear, and this serveth not much in Chirurgery, because it is not convenient in sores, but much rather it is a perfect re­medie in things appertaining to Physick, because it comfort­eth the Stomack, and fortifieth the vertue, and extinguisheth all sorts of Fevers. It helpeth the Collick, it dissolveth the Stone in the Reins, and provoketh Urine, and also maketh the hair yellow as gold, if ye wash it therewith, and the order to make it is thus.

Take pure Honey two pound, and put it into a Retort of glasse, that holdeth at the least fifteen or twentie pounds, and set it in a Furnace, and give it a fire of the second degree, and first there will come forth a clear white water, and when it changeth colour, change the receiver, and give it strong fire untill all the fumes be come forth, the which is the Oile, and that keep by it self as a precious Balm against malign Infirmities that are cured with Physick.

CHAP. XXIV. To make our great Cerot, the which is of marvellous vertue.

TAke Galbanum, Armoniacum, Oppoponax, ana ℥. ii. Olibanum, Verdigrease, ana ℥. i. Bdellium, Gum Arabi, Lapis ematites minerale, ana ℥. ii. Turpentine, Frankincense, ana ℥. iiii. Oleum Philosophorum of Turpentine and Waxe, ℥. iii. common Oyle four lb. new waxe ℥. vii. beat all those that are to be beat, and searce them, then dissolve the Gums in distilled Vinegar according to Art, then vapour away the Vinegar untill it come thick, then take thy Oyle and Waxe, and melt them together, then put in the rest, and stir them untill it be boyled, and to know when it is boyled, is this. First, in the beginning it will begin to rise marvellously, and then fall down; then let it boil untill it begin to fume or smoak, then strein it into a vessell of Copper, and presently put therein ℥. iiii. of Precipi­tate, and stir them well together untill it be cold, then make it in rowls, and keep it as a precious Jewell in Chirurge­rie, because it mundifieth, incarnateth, and healeth all [Page 112] sorts of Ulcers, better then any other Cerot that ever I could finde.

CHAP. XXV. A Magistrall Ʋnguent that healeth all manner of sores.

THis Unguent is most rare in the cure of Ulcers when they are already mundified, because it incarnateth, drieth, and siccatrizeth, and the order to make it is thus.

Take common Oyle one pound, Litarge ℥. ii. new Wax, ℥. iii. Turpentine, ℥. vi. boyl them as the aforesaid Cerot, and when it is boyled, put thereto ℥. iii. of the dead cope of Aqua for­tis, the which is made of Vitriol Romain, Roche Allom, and Salt-Peter, and stir them well together, and keep it to thy use. Ye shall understand, that the maker must be expert in the Art, least he overboil it, or boil it too little, for if it be not in order as it should be, it will not work his effect.

CHAP. XXVI. A Magistrall Cerot of our Invention against the white Scall.

THis Cerot is of great vertue, and of marvellous experience, to resolve the white Scall, because it is penetrative, mun­dificative, and resolutive, and causeth the hair to grow that is fallen away, to the great content of the Patient and ho­nour of the Physician, and it is made in this otder. Take Frankincense that is strained from his filth, what quantitie you will, and distill it in a Retort, and give it fire at the least fortie hours, then let it cool and break the glasse, and in the bottome thou shalt finde a black mase, the which make into powder, then for every pound of the said pow­der, put thereto one ounce of Waxe, and four ounces of the said oyle that ye distilled, and half an ounce of the heads of Bees, the which are easie to be had in Summer: Mix all the aforesaid things in a Vessell of Copper, and with a small fire make them in form of a liquid Unguent, and when thou wilt [Page 113] use it, shave the head, and wash it, and lay thereon this Cerot upon a fair cloth warm, and every two days change it, and so in short time thou shalt see strange effects of his vertue, as I have done divers and sundry times to my great honour. This serveth also against breaking of bones, dislocations, and for Scabs ulcerated, because it drieth, and comforteth, and resolveth all the evill qualities; giving you charge in the distilling, because the fire many times consumeth it so, that in the bottome there remaineth nothing that good is, and therefore beware in the making.

CHAP. XXVII. To make a divine and blessed Cerot against divers infirmi­ties.

ULcers are of divers sorts, and are caused of sundry causes, as of Choller, Bloud, Flegme, Melancholy, and for that cause the Medicines would be agreeable; neverthelesse, I will shew thee a Cerot of such a temperature, that it will serve to help any sore in any place of the body, of what quality soever it be, except it be Scirro, or Noli me tangere, the which are in a manner counted uncurable, of the common Practitioners: but not by me, for I have cured them, and the order to make it is thus.

Take oil of Frankincense one pound, oil of Sulphur ℥. i. Vitrioll rubified ℥. iii. Precipate ℥. i. fresh Butter ℥. iii. and as much Wax as will suffice to make it in form of a Cerot, the which will have all the aforesaid intentions: because the Precipitate doth mundifie the Ulcer; the oil of Frankincense taketh away the pain, and incarnateth; the oil of Sulphur cleanseth; the Vitrioll drieth; the Butter mundifieth; and the Wax consolidateth, in such sort, that any one may perceive his vertue.

CHAP. XXVIII. To make a miraculous Emplaister for Flegmon, or Erisi­pella.

THis Flegmon or inflammation, called Saint Anthonies fire, is a tumour caused of the alteration of the bloud, by rea­son of superfluous heat, and this most commonly cometh unto Cholerick and Sanguine bodies, that are full of flesh, and have much bloud: And the Erisipella is caused of a windy humidity, and of a hot humour, and to shew it, yee may see how that Flegmon is no other then bloud that runneth to the place offended: And when it cannot find way to resolve, it putrifieth and turneth into Sanius matter, so that by this yee may see that to be true which I have said. Also Erisipella is a wind hot and moist, for when it cometh to suppuration, then cometh forth nothing but wind and water, and this is the true proof by demonstration, and therefore seeing that these two infirmities are in a manner alike, or little differing: this Medicine shall be appropriate as well to the one as to the other, because it resolveth and cooleth, and the order to make it is thus.

Take fine Clay that hath no stones nor gravell in it, and searce it very fine, and put it in a pot, and for every pound thereof put thereto ℥. iii. of Oil of Frankincense, that cometh forth last in the distillation, and as much of our Quintessence as will serve to make it in form of a liquid Unguent, and this yee must mix without fire, and then lay it upon a cloth, and warm it over the fire a little, and lay it upon the Flegmon, or Erisipella, but first ere yee use this remedy unto those that have Flegmon, yee shall give them a dose of our Electuario Angelica, and in Erisipella give them a dose of our Aromatico, and so thou shalt help them perfectly, as I have proved divers times, and may be used although yee take no bloud; but if yee take bloud, let it be in augmentu, and not in statu, nor in declinatione, because it would so weaken Nature, that afterward it cannot defend it self to drive forth the humour peccant, that is cause of the disease.

CHAP. XXIX. To make a resolutive Plaister of great vertue.

THis Plaister is to resolve tumours and hardnesse, if it be layed thereon very hot, and when it is cold to lay on ano­ther: and this yee shall doe untill the hardnesse be resolved, and it is made in this order.

Take common Ashes that are well burnt and white, and finely searced one pound, Clay beat into fine powder half a pound, Carabe ℥. iii. mix all these in an earthen dish on a small fire, with Oil of Roses in form of a liquid Unguent, and that yee shall lay upon the place greived as hot as yee may suffer it, and change it morning and evening, and thou shalt see it work a marvellous effect. Moreover, when that Petecchi cometh forth of a diseased, let him be folded in the same remedy very hot, and in 24 houres he shall be helped, if he be first well purged, for this is a great secret that I have re­vealed. This word Petecchi is, as it were, certain spots like those which we call Gods Tokens, the which commonly come unto those that have the Pestilent Fever.

CHAP. XXX. To make a maturative Plaister of great vertue.

THis Maturative doth open an Imposthume without Instru­ment and pain, and the order to make it is thus

Take the yolks of Eggs ℥. ii. white Salt finely ground ℥. i. Snails with their Shells stamped ℥. ss Hens dung that is liquid, and red like Hony ℥. i. Mix all these well together without fire, and when you will bring an Imposthume to suppuration and break it, lay on this plaister morning and evening a little warm, and in short time it will draw forth the Imposthume, and break it, and heal it, without any other help. Keep this as a secret.

CHAP. XXXI. A composition of great vertue, against all Ʋlcers and Sores.

TAke Oil of Vitrioll that is perfect, as much as you will, and put it in a glass, with as much oyle of Tartar made by dissolution, and so let it stand ten daies. Then take ʒ. i. of that and ℥. i. of pure Aqua vitae, and mixe them together, and therewith wash the hollow Ulcers, and they will heal in short time. It helpeth any crude kinde of scab or sore that is caused of the evill qualitie of Nature.

CHAP. XXXII. A strange composition of great vertue.

THis Composition is divine in his operation, because it healeth many indispositions in our bodies, when it is applied rightly, and the order to make it is thus.

Take water of Carduus Sanctus one pound, Oyle of Hon­nie, one ounce, oyle of Sulphur, ʒ. ss. Mixe them together, and let it settle till it be cleer: for this helpeth Ulcers in the mouth, and maketh the teeth fair and white, if yee wash them therewith. It causeth a sweet breath, and preserveth the Gums, and maketh the hair and beard fair, if ye wash them therewith. And this it doth because the water of Carduus Sanctus pre­serveth where it is applyed: Also the oyle of Honie hath a ver­tue preservative and retentive of the hair, and the oyle of Sul­phur mundifieth, and clenseth, and incarnateth, so that by these means the said water hath these vertues aforesaid.

CHAP. XXXIII. To make an Ʋnguent of great Vertue against Ʋlcers.

THis Unguent hath a great vertue in healing all sores that are putrified and corrosive, except they be Cankers or Noli me tangere, the which are counted among the uncurable [Page 117] cures: But when they are other sores, this will heal them quickly, and the order to make it is thus.

Take a good quantity of Calex vivae, and put it into a great Tub, and cover it with water four fingers high, and stir it well together, then let it settle, and thereon will come a thin scum the which ye shall gather together with a Scummer, and keep it untill ye have sufficient quantitie, then take oyle of Linseed, oyle of Nuts, oyle of Almonds, and of the said scum that is gathered, of each one pound, then distill it in a Retort, untill all the substance be come forth, then separate the oyle from the water, and then make this composition.

Take of the said oyle distilled one pound, Tallow such as they make candles of, Hogs grease, new Wax, Mercurie preci­pitate of each two ounces, fine Aqua vitae iii. ounces, mix them all together in a Copper pan on a soft fire, untill the Aqua vi­tae be consumed, and that it remain a liquid Unguent, then take it forth, and keep it in a close vessell, that it take no ayre: and this ye shall apply cold unto Ulcers, upon a fine linnen cloth, for first it doth mundifie, and then incarnate, and last siccatrize, it helpeth sores, scabs, scrophule, mall de Formica Se­tole on the Nipples of womens breasts, Emeroids, pains in the privie members, and such like, for it is temperate.

CHAP. XXXIV. A Discourse upon sundry sorts of Ʋnguents, and their quali­ties.

THere are many sorts of Unguents that are found out, of which I beleeve that many Chirurgians are greatly abused of their operation, but for that which I doe finde, that some sorts of Unguents are occupied for one effect, and they work another; as for example, Ʋnguento Camphorato which many doe occupie to cool hot sores, in stead of cooling heat­eth them more then they were before, which cometh by means of the Camphire which is a hot substance, as I will prove by sufficient reason that it cannot be denied. For you shall un­derstand, that into Ʋnguento Camphorato, is put Camphire and [Page 116] [...] [Page 117] [...] [Page 118] oyle, both hot materials, as for experience: Take Cam­phire and lay it by the fire, or set it nigh a candle, and thou shalt perceive, that assoon as it feeleth the heat, it will flie into the fire and burn fiercely; and the like will the Oyle do; for if you wet a cloth therein and hold it over the fire, present­ly it will burn, which are manifest signs that they be both hot, becuse they are friends unto the fire; whereas if they were cold and moist, the fire would not burn them with such force. As for example, take water, earth, stones, and mettals that are cold and moist, and lay them on the fire, and you shall see that the flame of a candle shall not be able to kindle the fire with such ease as it doth with the Camphire and oyle. So that you may see that Camphire and Oyle are hot and friends unto the fire which is most hot, and earth, stones, and mettalls, are moist and cold, and are enemies unto the fire, and therefore I conclude, that Ʋnguento Camphorato is very hot, and cannot by any meanes cool hot Ulcers. Also Ʋn­guentum Apostolorum is a composition in which there is put Verdigriece, a materiall which is most enemie unto the sore, for laying it thereto causeth great pain, as you may under­stand of those that have proved it, and in my judgement this is no Unguent to be laid on a sore, because they cannot suffer it, neither is it possible to heal the sore with that Un­guent, for that it corrodeth the flesh and will not let it heal. Also Ʋnguento de minio is a mixture not very profitable for Ulcers, because it is too much drying; for applying it unto a sore that is not mundified, it drieth it in Superficie, so that if Na­ture send humours unto those parts, and they find no exha­lation or vent by reason of that drying, it will cause the ga­thering of abundance of humours, and be a means of greater mischief: But if the sore be well mundified and cleansed, you shall have little need of that Unguent, because Nature will doe it alone without any other help, so that this Unguent is of small profit to be used of any. But to the contrary, there are many sorts of Unguents which are most necessary to dresse sores, as Ʋnguento di Rasino, which by his Nature is friendly to the sore, because it mundifieth and healeth, help­ing Nature that it may work with greater speed. The Dia­chilone [Page 119] commune is also an Unguent very profitable to mundifie or purge sores, and likewise to siccatrize them. The Un­guent of Litarge is refriscative and drying, and healeth scabs, and cooleth the heat of the flesh alterated. Ʋnguento Rosato doth mittigate the pains of foul Scabs. And thus discoursing from time to time, there are many sorts of Unguents very hurt­full, and not to be used, and also there are many sorts that are wholesome and good, without which in a manner they can­not work. Neverthelesse, it were necessary to know how and where to apply them rightly.

CHAP. XXXV. Medicines appropriate against all kindes of Poysons, as well Ve­getables as Minerals.

THere are an infinite number of Poysons, and they are dif­fering in their operation, but yet they work in manner one effect, as you may see by experience in those that are poysoned, for after that they be dead, they are swollen and become black, and in their Stomack is abundance of aquosi­tie: And the cause is this, that if a poyson have power to kill or strangle a man or woman, of necessitie it must be cor­rosive, and being corrosive, it will work this effect, that is, assoon as it arriveth at the stomack, it beginneth to make al­teration and quickly congealeth the blood, and enflameth the parts round about it, it draweth unto it great quantitie of water; and it causeth the congelation of the blood on the one part, and the inflammation of the stomack on the other part, and the gathering of the water on the other part. And in a manner all poisons work one effect, and there are great num­ber of these Poisons, of which I would shew their qualities, but that I fear I should cause such as are ignorant to know them, and therefore I leave them. But I will write the order where­with thou shalt help all those poysons that are curable, with as much facilitie as is possible. Poysons, as I said before, do work three evill Effects, they inflame the stomack, congeal the blood, and draw unto them great quantity of water, which three [Page 120] things being in a man killeth him out of hand; and the ne­cessariest cure in that matter of poyson is this. First cause the poysoned person to vomit so much as he can, and as soon as he can, and that thou shalt doe with ℥. ss. of our Electuario Angelica, which provoketh vomit, and evacuateth the stomack of the poyson, and of the matter drawn by the poyson into the stomack, and it is excellent against all kind of poysons; that being done, annoint all his body with our Balsamo arti­ficiato, the which will keep the bloud liquid, and will not suffer it to congeal by any meanes: after that let him take every morning ʒ. iii, of our Pills against poyson, which are written in my discourse upon Chirurgery; and when he hath taken those Pills, let him drink thereon a little good wine: and after let him drink the decoction of Diptamo bianco, and dresse his meat with hearbs that are good against poyson, as there are a great number: And this doing, by the help of God thou shalt help all those that are curable, for it is a rationall Medicine and experimented, which worketh incredible ope­rations.

CHAP. XXXVI. A water that preserveth the Face and Teeth.

THis water is miraculous, for if yee wash the face therewith, and rub the teeth, it will make the face shining and bright, and the teeth like fine Ivory, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Mother of Pearl in powder one pound, the juyce of Lemmons pressed with their pills and all three pound, put them in a glasse, and let it stand fifteen dayes, then put thereto so much strong distilled Vineger as there was of the juyce, and distill it in a Retort of glasse, with a small fire, untill the spirits doe appear, then presently change thy Receiver, and keep it, wherewith thou shalt wash thy face and rub thy teeth: Note, that when yee will occupie that water, it were necessary that the face were washed so clean as is possible, and to rub the teeth with a clean cloth, for with this I have seen many goodly experiences in those matters.

CHAP. XXXVII. To Clarifie and take away spots out of the Face.

TAke Lac virginis two parts, pure Oil of Tartar one part, fine Aqua vitae six parts, mix them, and when thou goest to bed annoint thy face therewith, and in the morning wash thy face with the decoction of Bran, and dry it well, then annoint it with the Oil of Almonds, and so using this order, in short time thy face will be bright and clear without any spot. For this Composition is of marvellous vertue to pre­serve the flesh, and to defend it from all impediments of Na­ture, and preserveth the head from many infirmities.

CHAP. XXXVIII. The order to make a goodly Remedy, to cause the hair to grow.

THe beard and hair commonly doe fall through two causes, the one is, when the Patient hath a Pestilent Fever, that is, Mal di Mazzucco, for when they are cured, all their hair will fall away, and many times most of them doe change that sub­tile skin, called of the Doctors Epiderma, and this is one of the causes: The other cause is, when they accompany with un­clean women, and that they get those Carvoli on the Yeard, the which as soon as they are cured, there cometh an altera­tion in the throat, so that they cannot well eat their meat, then after that in short time the hair will begin to fall, and these are the two causes of falling of the hair. In that which commeth after Mal di Mazzucco, ye shall need nothing else but to annoint the head when yee goe to bed, with our Oleum Philosophorum a little warm, and that will cause the hair to grow, restore the sight and hearing, the which those commonly doe lose when they are sick, through their long sicknesse. But when the hair doth fall through the other cause, yee must use forcible Medicines to cause it to come again, and that thou shalt doe with this Cerot. Take Turpentine, Ship-pitch, Rosin of the Pine tree, and new Wax, and make thereof a [Page 122] Cerot, the which spread upon a cloth, and strew thereon Can­tharides in powder, then lay it upon the head, and there let it remain five dayes without moving it, and when yee take it away, take Magno liquore, and our Oleum Philosophorum, of each alike, and therewith annoint the head once a day very hot. And while yee use this Unction, take Sinaber ℥. i. Olibanum, Mirrh, and Colles, of each two scruples, and grinde them to­gether, and divide them in six parts, and every night when yee goe to bed, perfume the bed with one of these parts, the which thou shalt doe in this order: Take Coals in a Chafing-dish, and cast it therein by little and little, and then cover thy head with a cloth, and receive the fume, and then goe to bed with the said cloth about thy head, and this thou shalt doe six evenings, and continually use the Unction untill it be helped, the which will be in short time.

CHAP. XXXIX. To make our Sirrup of Bayes.

THis Sirrup being well made, is of marvellous vertue for those women that are troubled with pains of the Mother, and pains caused of wind and cold, because the Bayes of their nature are hot and drying, and resolveth the wind, and warm­eth the cold, and drieth the humidity, so that whosoever doth use this Sirrup oftentimes, shall be free from the stitch in the side, and gravell in the Reins, because it doth mundifie the Reins, and resolve the humour hanging, and therefore this would be used in Polonia, and Almaign with great profit, because those Countries are cold, and they feed on most meats which are contrary to those aforesaid infirmities, and the order to make it is thus. Take a branch of Bayes weighing one pound, and put it in a glasse with eight pound of white Wine, and two pound of purified Hony, and distill it in Bal­neo three hours, then take it from the fire, and keep that by it self, then take that which remained in the glasse, and distill it by a filter three or four times untill it be clear, then take two pound of Sugar, and clarifie it with the white of an Egge, [Page 123] and then mix it with that which yee distilled by a filter, and give it a little walme or two, but not too much, then when it is boyled, before it be cold, put therein the said water that yee distilled in Balneo, and aromatise it with six graines of Musk, and ℈. i. of Cloves, and another of Saffron, and ʒ. ss. of Cinamon, and ℥. iii. of Rosewater, and then keep it in a glasse close stopped, and it will preserve a long time: The dose of this Sirrup is from ℥. i. to ℥. ii. and no more. And therefore if any will sweat for any indisposition in the body, let them take four ounces as warm as they may suffer, and lay them down to sweat, and it will resolve great infirmi­ties.

CHAP. XL. The order to make a Sirrup of Cinnamon and Ginger.

THis Sirrup is exceeding hot, and preserveth a weak sto­mack through cold, resolveth the Cough, and the Catarre caused through want of naturall heat: but yee shall note, that if the indisposition were of a hot and dry cause, in any wise ye shall not use this. It causeth digestion, and provoketh venereous acts, and killeth many that oppresse themselves therewith, for they will doe more then Nature is able to carry, and so fall into a disease called Apoplexia, and die, or else live with great pain; and therefore I would wish those that have no great need thereof, not to use it for Lechery sake, for better it were to leave it in Vase spermatico, but as for those that have need thereof, it will revive them if they were in a manner dead, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Ginger, Cinnamon, of each one pound, beat them in powder, and infuse it in half a pound of Rosewater, and there let it remain four or five daies, and then put thereon ℥. iiii. of the water of a Herb called Mortella, in the Italian tongue, and six pound of the best white wine, and distill them altogether untill all the substance be come forth; then take as much white Honey as the matter purified weigheth, and while it is yet hot on the fire, put therein the said Water which [Page 124] you distilled, and six grains of Musk powdred with Sugar, and incorporate them well together, and keep it in a glasse close shut, and when ye will use this, ye shall take it in the morning warm, fasting thereon four or five hours, because it may pierce the better, and doe his operation; the quantitie that you shall take ordinary is ℥. i. but if it doe not work his operation well, augment the quantitie, and take somewhat more or lesse ac­cording to thy stomack, and the time shall be two or three weeks, or more or lesse, according as thou feelest thy self, for it is of so much vertue that it will not be credited, except it be of those that have seen the experience thereof, there­fore keep it as a thing of value.

CHAP. XLI. Our Sirrup of a Capon, that is made with Consumato.

THis Sirrup is a restorative of great vertue, never seen or heard of before, and is of such vertue that it is able to su­stain a sick person many dayes without taking any other meat, because it is of flesh and blood, for the flesh sustain­eth the flesh, and the blood sustaineth the blood, and the or­der to make it is thus.

Take a great fat Capon that is well-fleshed, and pull it while it is alive, and take forth onely the gutts and the belly, and when he is dead, stamp it in a Morter grossely, and put it in a distilling glasse with twentie pound of good white wine, and ℥. ss. of Salt, and four ounces of Sugar, and ℥. ss. of Cin­namon, then distill it in Balneo untill the two thirds be con­sumed, then keep that which is distilled, and that which re­mained in the glasse strain through a cloth, and presse out all the juyce of the flesh with a Presse, then passe all that through a filter, and then with Sugar make it in form of a Sirrup, but boil it not too much, then put therein that which ye distilled from the Capon, and aromatise it with Cinnamon half a dram, Saffron one scruple, Musk four grains, Rosewater ℥. ii. then keep it in a glasse close stopped, and this hath no dose, be­cause it is taken onely to sustain a weak nature; you may put [Page 125] it in broth, or in any other meats, or by it self, and alwaies it will work his operation, in strengthening those that are weak.

CHAP. XLII. A Magistrall Sirrup of Quinces, the which is Restorative.

THis Sirrup of Quinces is of great vertue, because it resto­reth strength, helpeth digestion, comforteth the Stomack, and maketh the heart merrie, as you may see by the Ingre­dients; it comforteth also the sight, and quickeneth the me­morie: And the order to make it is thus.

Take of the best Quinces you can find, and cut them in small peeces, with seed and all three pound, Cinnamon half an ounce, Cloves, Saffron, of each a scruple, Lignum Aloes, ℥ i. ss. Bengewine ℥. i. stamp all these and infuse them in seven pound of strong white wine, then distill it in Balneo, untill all the li­quor be come forth, and when it is in manner done, take it from the fire, and put it into an earthen vessell well glazed, and put therein that which ye distilled, and mix them well together, then strain it hard through a Canvas, and passe it by a filter, or a linnen cloth, and make it as clear as you can possible, then take that, and with refined Sugar, make a Sirrup according to Art, and when it is made, aromatise it with Musk, and Rose­water, and keep it in a glasse close stopped, that it take no air, giving your charge that it be not over-boyled. And this thou shalt give unto those that cannot digest their meat, because it warmeth the stomack, with a temperate heat, the which resolveth the cruditie of humours, that are in the stomack, and disposeth Nature to digestion, for because the Quinces by nature are hot, and helpeth it to digest, the Cloves and Saffron make the heart merrie, and the Lignum Aloes, pre­serveth from Corruption, in such sort, that all these being to­gether, worketh wonderfull effects in the bodie of many, the quantitie thereof is ℥. i. in the morning, and two hours after supper cold.

CHAP. XLIII. A Magistrall Sirrup of Lignum Sanctum.

THis Magistrall Sirrup is of such vertue in his operation, that it will help the Mal' Francese, if it be made accord­ing to the order, and taken as it should be: And the order to make it is thus.

Take Lignum Sanctum rasped ℥. vi. the Bark of the same ℥. iiii. and lay it to infuse in twelve pound of good white wine, with one pound of white honey, then distill it untill ye have received three pound, then take it from the fire, and keep the water by it self; then take that which remained in the glasse, and distill it by a filter untill it be clear, then put thereto the water that ye distilled away, and for every pound of that wa­ter put thereunto ℥. iii. of Julep simple, and mix them well together, and keep it in a Bottle of glasse well stopped, for this is marvellous in the cure where Sweatings is needfull: For if ye give five or sixe ounces of this, as hot as he may suffer it, and cover him in the bed, he shall sweat marvellously, the which sweating resolveth cold tumours, pains, and divers other in­dispositions, that are to be resolved by sweat. And as for the cure of the Pox, this is a most soveraign remedie, when there are tumours, or pains, or inflations. But when there are Ul­cers, Scabbs, or Inflammations, in that case you may not use it by any means, because it is very hot, and will cause greater inflammation. And therefore if any will use this Sirrup to cure pains, swellings, or inflammations, it were necessarie first to take our Aromatico, written in this Book, with divers other Medicines of our Invention, that being done, let him take seven or eight times our Sirrupo solutivo,, and then begin to take this Sirrup, and sweat thereon morning and evening: His meat shall be rost Mutton, or a Bird, Raisins, Dates, Almonds, and such like, but he must not eat too much. His bread shall be Bisket, and his drink good wine at meals, and if it doe hap­pen that he be bound in the body, yee shall give him every week once our Sirrupo Solutivo, and so continue with his sweating untill he be helped.

CHAP. XLIV. A Sirrup of Juniper Berries.

THis Sirrup of Juniper Berries is of great vertue, because it is one of those fruits that continueth green all the year: of the which hearbs I have written a discourse in my book called La Physica del Phioravante, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Juniper Berries when they begin to wax black four pound, and stamp them, and infuse them in twelve pound of strong white Wine six dayes, then distill it with two pound of white Hony, and ℥. i. of Cinnamon, untill yee have re­ceived two pound, then take it from the fire, and strain out the Fesses that remained with a presse, then strain it by a filter again, then with Sugar make a Sirrup in good form, and when it is boiled, put therein the said water distilled from the berries, and so without fire incorporate them well together, and keep it in a glasse close shut that it take no air: the dose is an ounce and a half to be taken warm. This is excellent for those that are troubled with wind, or coldnesse of the stomack, because it warmeth, drieth, and helpeth digestion, and therefore this would work miraculous effects in Almaign, because it is a cold Region, and that they eat many moist meats, the which Nature cannot well digest: It is also appro­priate against pains of the Mother, because it provoketh men­strua, and purgeth the Matrix, and helpeth digestion, and causeth sleep, with divers other vertues.

CHAP. XLV. To make a Sirrup of the Bran of Wheat.

THis Sirrup is of marvellous vertue against divers infir­mities, for by nature it is hot, and provoketh sweat, and urine, and serveth very much against the French diseases, if you can use it in his time and place, and it is made in this order.

Take Bran one pound, and infuse it in twelve pound of [Page 128] white Wine, and so let it remain two dayes, then boil it in a glasse with a Head and Receiver, untill the third part be con­sumed, the which yee shall reserve to mix with it afterward, then strein that in the glasse, and passe it by a filter, and when it is clear, put thereunto the aforesaid which yee reserved: Then take Hony and Sugar, of each alike, and therewith make a Sirrup according to art, and when it is made, aromatise it with a little Cinnamon, Cloves, Saffron, Lignum Aloes, and Musk, according to thy discretion, and for every pound of the said matter, yee shall put thereto half an ounce of our Vegitable Quintessence, and it shall be finished, the which keep close shut, for it is of such vertue, that it will not corrupt, the dose is from ℥. ii. to three, to be taken warm, and then lie down to sweat, for this will resolve all infirmities that may be resolved by sweat. It is very profitable for those that are troubled with any old indisposition, as the Cough, the Catarre, indisposition of the Stomack, and such like: Yee shall note, that this would not be used in the Summer, for because it is too hot for that time.

CHAP. XLVI. To make a Sirrup of Sarsa parilla, of our invention.

THe Sarsa parilla is a Root that cometh from the Indies, the which is hot and drying, of the which Physitians make Sirrups and Potions for divers infirmities, wherein it is need­full of drying by sweat: but untill this time they have all abu­sed themselves in the order, because all hot and dry things are spirituall, and so in making their decoction the spirits goe away in fume, and the decoction remaineth senza anima, and vertue, in respect: yee shall understand, that the Sarsa parilla is a root miraculous in his operation, because it warmeth the cold, and drieth the humidity, and resolveth tumours, and healeth sores, and helpeth paines, when it is made according to our order, and because it is a Medicine in so common use, I will shew thee the order to make this Sirrup, that shall have [Page 129] both anima, and vertue, in so much that the world shall won­der at it: and the order to make it is thus.

Take one pound of the best Sarsa parilla that yee can find, and cut it very small, and put it in a glasse with one pound and a half of Hony, and ℥. i. of Cinnamon, and ℥. ii. of Li­gnum Aloes, and put them in twelve pound of white Wine, and so let it stand four and twenty houres, and then distill it, untill yee have received three pound of water, giving you charge, that the Receiver be great, and lute not the mouth but stop it with Tow least it break, then take it from the fire, and let it wax cold, and when it is cold, pour forth that which is clear, and put it unto the water that yee distilled first, and keep it close, for it is a blessed Sirrup: this being done, put upon the Fesses twenty pound of white Wine, and one pound of fine Sugar, and let it boil half an hour, and then strein it, and when the Physitian will give it, he may give ℥. viii. at a time as hot as he may suffer it, and then lay him down to sweat as much as he can. And with his meat let him drink the last decocti­on, and thus the Physitian shall reap honour, and the Patient health, and therefore if any will have his intent, let him not break this our order in any respect.

CHAP. XLVII. To make a Potion of China as it ought to be.

THis China is a root like unto the root of Canna, the which is brought unto us out of India, from an Isle called China, from whence it took his name China, and there are of two sorts: the one is white and heavy, the other is great, and red, and light, and of this I have made no experience at all: But of the other I have had great experience, and by the help of God have resolved great and terrible diseases, and the order to condite them after our order is this.

Take ℥. vi. of China, and ℥. iii. of Lignum Aloes of the best that yee can finde, and ℥. iiii. of Pollipodie, and ℥. i. of Coloquintida, beat all these grossely, and put them into a di­stilling glasse, with twenty pound of good Wine, then give [Page 130] it fire untill ye have received three pound of water, then let it cool, and strain it, then put therein the water that yee distil­led first, and incorporate them well together, and of this give ℥. iiii. at a time warm, then cast away the Fesses, for they are unprofitable. But the Sirrup is of such vertue, that it resol­veth tumours, sores, pains, and all other indispositions caused of the Pox. It serveth also for Doglie Artetich, for pains of the Gout, and for many other indispositions caused of cru­ditie, and coldnesse of the humours, because it is of na­ture hot and drying, and his vertues are to drie: I have seen of this Sirrup great experience in divers and sundry causes.

CHAP. XLVIII. A Potion of Alchachengie, and wherefore it serveth.

THis Herb Alchachengie with his fruit is aperative, and most profitable for those that cannot make water, by reason of alteration of the pores that are altered through cold, for this is hot and drying, by the which means, it resolveth the alteration of the aforesaid cause, and causeth the Urine to passe with ease; It helpeth the digestion, and comforteth the stomack, when it is grieved through winde or cold: And the order to make it is thus.

Take that Herb, with Root, Leaves, fruit and all, and lay it to infuse in the water of Mallows, with the Herb Pelitorie, and there let them remain five or six dayes, then put there­unto course Sugar, and let it boil one hour and no more, and then strain it, and put thereunto a little Cinnamon, and then it is finished: and when you will occupie it against difficulty of Urine, give them thereof ℥. iiii. and keep them warm in bed, and they shall feel great ease.

CHAP. XLIX. A Pectorall Potion, of our new Invention.

THis Potion is appropriate against the indisposition of the Breast and Stomack, and is of a marvellous operation, be­cause [Page 131] it is aperative, softning the stomack, and mundifieth the breast, and maketh the heart merrie: And this is most soveraign for the Cough, Catarr, and all the other indispositions, that come unto the breast through cruditie, and viscositie of hu­mours, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Pomi Calimani, and Pomi Apiae, of each one pound, Quinces half a pound, common Honie, ℥. iiii. fine Sugar one pound, sweet white wine ten pound, water of Bugloss four pound, boil all these together in a Copper Vessell, that is well tinned within, untill the Apples doe begin to fall in pieces, then take it from the fire, and strain them through a strainer, with­out pressing of the Fesses, then put into that two drachms of Cinnamon, and then strain it by a filter four or five times, untill it be clear, then keep it in a vessell of glasse close stop­ped, that it take no aire. The quantity is ℥. iiii. as warm as ye may, take it in the morning, fasting at least five or six hours after it, and if it be possible sleep thereon in your bed, for it is a thing of great vertue, in resolving the indisposition of the breast and stomack.

CHAP. L. To make a Potion of Camedrios, and Iva Artetica, which dis­solveth all Fevers that come with cold.

THe Herb Iva Artetica, as I have shewed in another place, is of marvellous vertue, also the Camedrios is of great ver­tue, and is hot and dry by nature. The Iva is good against the accident of the Fever, and the Camedrios dissolveth the melancholie humour; and therefore when a decoction is made of these two Herbs, it will work a marvellous effect in the cure of the said Fever, because it provoketh sweat, and assubtiliateth the grossenesse of the humour, and extin­guisheth the accident of the Fever in such sort, that the Fever shall resolve with good successe, and the order to make that Potion is thus.

Take Camedrios, and Iva Artetica, of each one pound, and dry them in the shadow, Lignum Aloes ℥. i. the seed of Wal­wort [Page 132] ℥. iiii. common Honey ℥. vi. fine Sugar one pound, strong white wine xvii. pound: Mix all these together in a distilling glasse, and so let it stand three daies, then distill forth three pound, and let it cool, and strain it through a Searce, and put thereunto the water that ye distilled out be­fore, then passe it by a filter three or four times untill it bee clear, then keep it in a Glasse close shut that it take no aire, and it will last a long time without corruption, and when any will take it against the said Fever coming with cold, give him every morning fasting ℥. v. warm, and let him lie down to sweat as much as he may, and fast thereron at the least four hours, and take heed yee eat no things that are cold, and moist, for they will hinder the cure very much, and at night when he goeth to bed, give him ℥. iii. warm, and if it hap that in his sleep he sweat, dry him well with warm clothes, and thus doing, in short time he shall be delivered of that infirmitie, for this I have used divers and sundry times to my great honour, and profit of the Patient.

CHAP. LI. To make a Potion that is good against all Infirmities.

THis is a Magistrall Potion, the which helpeth against all Infirmities, by reason that it destroyeth all the evill qua­lities in our bodies, it comforteth Nature, helpeth digestion, provoketh Urine, and looseth the bodie, the which things are most comfortable to our bodies, and the order to make it is thus.

Take the seed of Quinces, ℥. x. the Pills of Citrons, ℥. vi. Balm, Nettles, of each, ℥. iiii. beat all these grossely, and infuse them in twelve pound of strong white wine, and there let it remain six daies, then distill it with ℥. vi. of Honey, and ℥. xv. of Sugar, untill ye have received two pound of water, then take it from the fire and let it cool, and strain it by a filter, and then put therein the first water, and eight grains of Musk, dissolved with a little Rosewater about ℥. ii. and then for eve­ry pound of the said matter, put thereunto ℈. i. of Oyle of [Page 133] Vitrioll, and incorporate them well together, then keep it in a glasse close stopped that it take no air, and of this yee shall take ℥. i. in the morning cold, and fast thereon; for who­soever doth use this in his health shall seldome be sick, but live in health. For in this composition there entereth the seed of Quinces, that resolve the evill quality of the Stomack, and make the heart merry: The Pomcitrone pills preserve and help digestion: The Balm purifieth the bloud, healeth the Liver, causeth good digestion, and comforteth the Heart: The Nettles warmeth, provoketh Urine, and mundifieth the Reins, and resolveth the malignity of the Sinews: The Wine comforteth Nature, strengtheneth the Head, and sustaineth the strength: The Musk is warm by Nature, and resolveth the windinesse, and purgeth the bloud: The Oil of Vitrioll heal­eth all the Scoriaciones of the Mouth, the Breast, and Stomack, and preserveth the body from all corruption: So by this yee may see of what importance this Composition is, through the vertue of the Simples that are therein: so to conclude, I say, that this is one of the best Compositions that can be made, because of his nature: It letteth alteration in our bodies, and helpeth against all diseases or infirmities, and prolongeth life.

CHAP. LII. An Infusion with Wine most precious against the Gout.

THe Gout is a putrified and rotten disease, as I have written of in divers places, and the cure thereof is hard, because it were needfull to help many inconveniences before yee come to the cure. Neverthelesse, it is a strange thing to see divers, that after they are cured they have no care to preserve them: so that look which way they got it, that way it will come again, but if they would use defensives and preservatives, they may remain well, and therefore I have devised this Wine, the which they shall continually drink: for as long as they use this Wine, the Gout shall never trouble them, and the order to make it is thus.

[Page 134]Take Vino negro that is sweet and pleasant, about twelve gallons, and put it in a vessell that is well seasoned, and in that Wine put fine Lignum Aloes in powder ℥. iii. Pollipodie of the Oak ℥. iiii. Sena of Levant ℥. ii. Musk dissolved in Rose­water ten grains, common Hony two pound, then let it repose untill it be clear, and then begin to drink thereof; for this Wine purgeth, the which if it purge too much, yee shall refrain it now and then, according as yee find your body: This doth not onely help the Gout, but all kinds of pains caused of cor­ruption of humours, because it drieth, resolveth, and preserveth, the which are convenient to preserve the body.

CHAP. LIII. Another artificiall Wine, against the stitch in the side, and gra­vell.

THe stitch in the side, and the gravell in the Reins, are some­what of kin together, because they are caused of one cause, that is, of vapours corrupt and rotten, and of grossenesse, and evill qualities of the humours, the which, one with the other, ingender that infirmity, which in some men is no other then an evill indisposition inwardly, the which is very hard to be helped, for if thou wilt resolve it, it were necessary, first to remove the evill quality, and then cure it, and after they are cured to preserve them, that the said indisposition return not again, and in so doing thy cure shall have good successe, and therefore I have made this Wine to preserve thee from that indisposition, and the order to make it is thus.

Take as it were a Hogshead or a Barrell of good white Wine, that containeth about eighteen gallons of Wine, in the which yee shall put Carduus Benedictus ℥. ii. Saxifrage ℥. vi. Walwort ℥. iiii. Pollipodie ℥. iiii. Cinnamon ℥. i. Spikenard half an ounce, Lignum Aloes ℥. ii. fine Sugar three pound, then let it repose three or four dayes, and then begin to drink it, for yee may use it with small wine, or water, or in what or­der yee will. And in the mean time that yee take this drink, yee shall not eat fat Pork, nor any other fat meat, nor Butter, [Page 135] Milk, Cheese, or Pie-crusts, or such like things, that are of grosse and hard digestion, because they will let the operation of this wine. For whosoever doth use this wine, shall never be troubled with those kinds of infirmities, because it doth losen the belly, mundifie, cleanse, and preserve from all evill quali­ties. I call to remembrance that in the City of Naples, where I dwelled six yeares, I caused divers and sundry persons to use this Wine, and they found such profit thereby, that it was to be wondered at, for in that City▪ there were many troubled with the said indisposition, in respect of Hogs flesh, fish, and such other moist things as they commonly eat in that City, and therefore whosoever useth this Wine shall not be troubled with the said infirmities.

CHAP. LIV. To make a Quintessence of marvellous vertue.

THe Quintessence is so called, because it is an essence taken from the Elements without corrupting the said Elements; and therefore it is called Quinta essentia: for it is an essence above the four Elements, the which hath a marvellous vertue in preserving, and conserving all things from putrifaction, and is of so much vertue, that drinking thereof every morn­ing half an ounce when they rise out of their bed, it preser­veth them for ever in health. It healeth wounds and all sores, washing them therewith. It preserveth all flesh, fish, and fruits, that is put therein, and the order to make it is thus.

Take good strong Wine fourteen pound, common Hony one pound, Anniseed, Coriander, Lignum Aloes, Calamus Aromaticus, of each ℥. iii. Rosewater ℥. iiii. Beat all the afore­said things grossely, and infuse them in the said Wine two daies, and then put them in a Goord of glasse, and distill it by Balneo, so long untill the water that cometh forth doe burn, and when it will not burn, distill no more, then keep that which is distilled in a glasse close stopped that it take no air, and so keep it untill thou have occasion to use it, for it is a most rare [Page 136] liquor, because, as I have said before, it resolveth all the in­dispotions that happen unto mans body. For of this Com­position the antient Doctours had small knowledge, nor of many things more written in this book. If any man desire to have this Quintessence more perfecter, let him take a tenth part of good Hony, with a little fine Cinnamon, and distill it again by Balneo, and the Flegm will remain all in the bot­tome of the vessell, and the Quintessence will be so fine, that the air will take it away, and therefore he that can make this well, shall work strange cures therewith, so that the world will wonder thereat:

CHAP. LV. To make Diatartaro, the which is marvellous in divers infir­mities.

THis Diatartaro is good against pain of the stomack, of the body, and for those that are slipticke of body, that cannot goe to stool, and such like matters, because it is of nature tem­perate and lenitive, and hath vertue to heat and dissolve the evill quality, and it is made in this order.

Take Pears of what sort yee will, and cut them in four peices, then boil them in water till they be soft, and that the water be almost consumed, then passe it through a strainer, and put thereunto as much white Hony purified as it weigheth, and thereof make an Electuary in good form, and when it is made, aromatise it with Musk, then for every pound of the said Electu­ary, put thereunto ℥. i. of perfect oil of Tartar, made by disso­lution after it is calcined white: But yee shall note, that the Oil must be put in when the Electuary is cold, and so mix it toge­ther, then keep it in a glazen vessell: The dose is from ℥. ss. to an ounce in the morning fasting, and eat no meat in four hours after: for this, as I have said, will cure the indisposition of the Stomack, pains of the Milt, pains of the Body that have continued long, pains of the Mother, and such like things that are caused of cold and moist humours.

CHAP. LVI. A Composition of great value to comfort the Stomack.

AMong all the compositions that the Apothecaries have, this is one of the best and most perfectest, because it com­forteth the stomack that is weak, and spoyled through a long and fastidious infirmitie, for it is of a temperate heat, and helpeth to digest, causeth sleep, and comforteth the breast, and the composition is this.

Take the best Honey that ye can get, and clarifie it with Rose­water and the white of an Egg, as ye would doe Sugar, and scum it very well, then take as much fine Sugar as yee have of Honey, and incorporate them together on a small fire, and when it is come to the thicknesse of an Electuarie or thereabout, for every pound of the said matter, yee shall put ℥. i. of our Quintessence Vegitable, and ℥. ii. of Oyle of Almonds new­ly made, and stir them well together being cold, then put thereto a little Musk and Cinnamon to give it a pleasant smell, then keep it close: The quantitie is ℥. i. more or lesse▪ ac­cording to the strength of the stomack; yee may temper it with good broth if ye will, and fast thereon four hours at the least, and thou shalt see strange effects of this composition.

CHAP. LVII. To make a stomachall Emplaister to cause digestion where it wanteth.

THere are many causes that hinder digestion, as through coldnesse of the Stomack, through heat, through moist­nesse or drynesse, or through superfluous choller, or flegm, or melancholy, of the which things the Physitian cannot certifie himself which it is, so by that meanes many proved divers Remedies for that indisposition, and cannot find the way to help it. And therefore I will shew thee a plaister that hath all these four principall intentions; that is, to help digestion, strengthen the stomack, make the heart merrie, which things [Page 139] are all necessarie to preserve a man within good temperature and health, and the Remedie is this.

Take these Hearbs gathered in their times and dried, that is, Sage, Rosemary, Wormwood, Balm, Saint Johns-wort, Net­tles, of each as much you will, beat them finely, and searce them: then take for every pound of that powder of Cinna­mon, ℥. i. half an ounce of Cloves, and as much Lignum Aloes, and ten grains of Musk dissolved in Rosewater; then take for every pound, of good Honie ℥. ii. and as much Vinegar, and make them into the form of a liquid Plaister, and when thou wilt occupie it, spread it upon a cloth warm, and lay it to the stomack, and in the mean while eat restorative meats, and drink small wine.

CHAP. LVIII. A rare Secret to help the Eyes.

THis is a great Secret for those that have lost the sight of their Eyes, and was never written of before of any man, but of me, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Swallows and stamp them feathers and all in a Mor­ter, then take for every pound of that, ℥. iiii. of bread, and four pound of white wine, and so let it stand six daies to in­fuse, then distill it by Balneo untill all the substance be come forth, then keep that water in a glasse close stopped, and set it in the Sun twentie dayes, and then use morning and even­ing to drop it in the eyes, and thou shalt see strange ope­rations of the same Experiment, for it taketh away the dim­nesse of the eye, quickneth the sight, and comforteth the brain, that it cannot be hurt by any means.

CHAP. LIX. To make a Liquor to comfort the Smelling, and to preserve the Head.

THe Smelling is one of the five Senses of our Bodie, of the which four-footed beasts have great use; for they will not [Page 138] receive any thing into the bodie before they have smelled unto it, and then if it be against their nature, they will not eat it, and therefore this smelling is that which preserveth the hearing, the seeing and the taste; for if the nose take an evill smell, all the other senses have part: For if yee smell to Onions or Scallions, the taste will be troubled, the eyes will weep, the eares will also be troubled: And to the contrary, when a man smelleth a good smell, it comforteth the eyes, the hearing, and taste, and for that cause I have made this liquor, to comfort the Smelling, for by that the whole bodie is comforted, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Lignum Aloes ℥. ii. Annise seed, ℥. iiii. Calamus Aro­maticus ℥. i. Calaminte dried, three ounces, common Honey two pound, strong white wine twelve pound, let all these be infused for four dayes, and then distill it in Balneo, and when yee distill it, put into the Receiver six grains of Musk dissolved in two ounces of Rosewater, and distill away but three pound, the which keep in a glasse close stopped, and when yee will comfort the smelling, wash the face and beard therewith, and thou shalt smell a savour of marvellous effect, the which comforteth Nature marvellously: It comforteth the Stomack, and helpeth a stinking breath: It helpeth the mouth being ulcerated, and those that have the Rupture in short time, if yee wash it twice a day therewith. It helpeth also women that are troubled with dissention of the Matrix, if ye wet a cloth therein and lay it upon the Mother, in short space it shall receive great health. Also it helpeth those that are troubled with the Meagrum, or pains in the Head coming of cold or winde, if ye wash the Head with the said Liquor, presently they shall feel ease, with divers other vertues, the which I will leave untill another time.

CHAP. LX. A Decoction of the Vine, and wherefore it serveth.

THis Decoction is a composition of our Invention, and may be made in the same order as ye doe with Lignum vitae, [Page 140] or Sarsaparilla, and hath no lesse vertue against contagious diseases, and hath so great vertue in drying and resolving, that it is to be wondred at, and may be used in all causes in stead of Sarsaparilla, or Lignum vitae, or China, and this I have found out by great travell and experience, and the order to make it is thus.

Take the Roots of the Vine, or the stalks, and cut them small, then take thereof two pound, and infuse them in strong Vi­negar untill they be covered, then put thereunto xii. pound of common water, and one pound of white Honey, and boil them untill the consumption of the third part, so that there remain eight pound, then strain it, and put thereunto [...] ss. of Julep sim­ple, then keep it in a glasse close shut to thy use, for it ser­veth against many diseases or infirmities, and for those that have lost their appetite, if they take thereof four ounces morning and evening warm, and fast thereon four or five houres, in short time they shall recover it again. It is also good for those that are troubled with the Collick: It also in­gendereth Milk in womens breasts; it ceaseth pains of the Matrix, and also the Cough, Catarr, and paines of the Reins, and such like, the which I will not speak of at this time. Also of the seed of the Grape I have made an oyle by Expression, as they make oyle of Linseed and other seed, the which is of so much vertue, that it helpeth in manner against all indi­spositions, and especially against Ulcers and Wounds by his proper qualitie, for unto this oyle yee can neither attribute heat, not drinesse, moistnesse nor cold, but onely a temperate thing, the which thou mayest know by his experience. If ye use to eat of this oyle, it mittigateth and healeth all the in­dispositions of the bodie, for it is of so much sustenance and vertue, that it preserveth the bodie in temperature: And these have I found out by experience.

CHAP. LXI. To make a composition of the Hearb Mercurie.

THis Hearb Mercurie is of so much vertue that the tongue cannot expresse it, and many Philosophers have assigned [Page 141] unto it Celestiall vertue, because it preserveth a man in a youthfull state a long time, and from infirmities: It ma­keth the heart merrie, the which it doth by his secret and hidden vertues, and the order to make the said compositi­on is thus.

Take the Juyce of this Hearb in May when it is with flour, and strain it through a filter untill it be clear, then take of that juyce i. pound, Julip simple half a pound, fine rectified Aqua vitae without flegm ℥. vi. Pure Oyle of Vitriol, ʒ. ii. fine Musk two Carrets; Mix these together in a glasse, and stop it very well, and set it in the Sun fortie daies together, and look that yee take it in every night: that time being ex­pired, you may use it when ye will, and the order to use it s thus. Ye shall take in the morning ℥. i. with two or three ounces of the broth of a Capon, or other flesh, and fast there­on four or five hours at the least, and thus using it two moneths together, it will be unpossible to have any infir­mitie a long time after, by the vertue of the said composi­tion. Among the rest I saw once a Gentleman that had the Palsie one and twentie moneths, the which by using of this composition the space of ten moneths was perfectly whole. Another Composition also I have made, the which is of marvellous vertue, and is in this order.

Take the Hearb Mercurie when it is floured, and accom­pany it with Wine and Honey, then distill it, and sepa­rate the Elements according to Art, and thou shalt have a most rare Medicine, wherewith thou mayest help many infirmities. But first I would counsell you, ere you use this, to prepare the bodie with taking once our Aromatico, the which cleanseth both the stomack and body, and thus doing thou shalt reap fame.

CHAP. LXII. A Medicine of Lappaciole Minor, the which is marvellous in curing any sort of Catarre.

THere are four kinds of these, according to the writing of Dioscorides, but that which the Author doth write of in this [Page 142] place, is that which Dioscorides calleth Xanthium, and in the Shops it is called Lappa Minor, and Lappa Inversa, and in the Italian Lappaciole Minore, and in English it is called the Ditch-Bur, and Louse-Bur. Take that hearb with the root and all, what quantity yee will, and distill thereof a water, the which keep unto thy use, and when yee will use it against the Catarre, take of that water four ounces, with white crude Hony half an ounce, mix them well together, and drink it in the morning warm as soon as yee rise, and fast thereon four or five hours, and use a reasonable diet in your meat and drink, and eat nothing that may offend the Catarre, and so using this reme­dy for a moneth together, thou shalt help any sort of Catarre perfectly, by vertue of that hearb. For this I have experimen­ted divers and sundry times in poor and simple Catarres. But [...] if they come of the Pox, or Hectick, in that case it may pleasure them much, but yet not cure them. Yee shall note, that it would be necessary for the Patient to take a dose of our Aromatico before he take the said Medicine, because our Aromatico disposeth the Catarre to solution, whereby it may be the sooner cured.

CHAP. LIII. Of Pollipodie, and his vertues.

THis hearb is well known to most men, and hath great ver­tue against old greifs, and opilations, and all indisposi­tions that come through distemperment of humours, because it evacuateth the body, cleanseth the head, and purgeth the bloud: and the order to make it is thus.

Take Pollipodie two ounces, Sene one ounce, Lignum Aloes half an ounce, mix these well together in a stone morter, then take white Wine as much as yee will, and for every pound of Wine put thereto ℥. i. of that mixture, and so let it stand four and twenty hours, and then drink it, for it will purge without any pain, those that have any indisposition of the stomack, weaknesse of the legs, and faintnesse of the body, and such like. For yee shall understand, the Pollipodie pur­geth [Page 143] Flegm, and the Sene purgeth Choller, as by the viscosity is known: The Lignum Aloes preserveth nature, so that by the ingredients yee may know the vertue of this compositi­on. Yee shall understand, that this root would be gathered when the Sunne is afarre off; and that the cold time of the year doth begin to draw on, for then they are of most force.

CHAP. LXIV. Of the Olive, and his vertues.

TAke common Oil, the which is made of the Olive, two pound, Frankincense one pound, Turpentine one pound, distill them together in a Retort two dayes long, then sepa­rate the oyle from the water, and keep each alone, then take forth the Fesses out of the Retort, the which is a miracle of Nature, because it serveth against all Infirmities, where it is applyed. It helpeth broaken bones wonderfully, and these secrets I have found out by experience. There is also drawn out of the wood a liquour by discention, the which is black of colour, and is of marvellous vertue against paines. A little of this Oil being mixed with Oil of Sulphur, helpeth all putrified and corrosive Ulcers that are caused of putrifaction of hu­mours. The Lye made of the Ashes of Olives, preserveth the beard and hair in their naturall colour, if yee wash the head often therewith. Of this Oil I have made a great discourse in my Chirurgery.

CHAP. LXV. Of Ciperous, and his vertues.

THis hearb being put into new Wine, when it worketh in the Hogshead, giveth it a pleasant savour, and whosoever useth to drink of that Wine, it will defend him from all interiour passions that are caused of ventosity, and helpeth those that are troubled with the Rupture, because it resolveth the wind, [Page 144] and hath a restrictive vertue. It purgeth the bloud mar­vellously, and causeth digestion, and of this I have seen the experience. Also I saw one, that in the moneths of April, May, and June, took the roots of Ciperous and beat them to powder, and made thereof a plaister, and laid it upon the Rupture, changing it every day once: and also he eat of the said roots, and so in short time he was helped; and that experiment I have seen divers times. Also if yee take those nodes or knots that are on the roots, and stamp them, and boil them with common Oil, Frankincense, and yellow Wax, untill it become black of colour, it will cure wounds mar­vellously, it mittigateth the pains in all old sores, it cureth all pains coming of humidity and wind: Moreover, if yee annoint the body with the said Oil, and drink the Wine wherein hath lien infused the said root, it will preserve it mar­vellously. And among all other things that I saw of this Ciperous; there was a Merchant called Nicolo Carbolo, the which was of the age of thirty yeares, and was troubled with a kind of scab like a Leper, and had carried it long, the which I caused to make this Oil, and he did not onely annoint him therewith, but also drunk thereof every morning ℥. ss. with wine, so that in short time he became so whole and sound, that it was to be wondered at.

CHAP. LXVI. Of Rew, and his vertues.

TAke Rew when it is seeded, but yet not dry, and stamp it in a Morter, and for every pound of Rew, put thereto ℥. vi. of Turpentine, and as much of the yolks of Eggs hard sod, and incorporate them well together; then put it in a glasse close stopped, and set it to putrifie in warm dung five and twenty dayes, then distill it by a Retort according unto art, untill all the substance be come forth, the which will be both Oil and water, the which yee shall separate. The wa­ter serveth against all pains of the belly that are caused of cold and moistnesse; the dose is ʒ. ss. in some warm broth, [Page 145] and may be taken at any time. Also giving it to any that hath a [...]ever coming with cold, it will help him in short time: yea, some have been cured at once or twice taking the same. Moreover, the Oil is most soveraign against cold greifs, as well inward as outward, it preserveth those greatly, that take every morning a drachm with sweet wine, and fast thereon four or five hours. Also for outward griefs it is most ex­cellent, if yee annoint them therewith cold, because it resol­veth and drieth all evill qualities of our bodies: besides these experiences, I have made an Oil of the seed of Rew by ex­pression, the which is of so much vertue, that if yee annoint the head therewith, it causeth a good memory unto those that have lost it, or are weak by reason of humidity, or cold.

CHAP. LXVII. Of Wormwood, and his vertues.

THis hearb Wormwood is of great vertue, if yee can use it well: for if any lean persons or evill coloured use the same, it will bring them to their perfect health and colour, and the order to make it is thus.

Take Wormwood and distill it in Balneo, then put there­unto Oil of Vitriol, as much as will suffice to make it tart, and thereof use every morning one spoonfull fasting, and in short time it will restore thee to perfecter health than ever thou wast before, and bring thy colour again.

CHAP. LXVIII. Of Gratia Dei, and his vertues and operation in divers infir­mities.

THis Gratia Dei is an hearb well known unto most men, and is like unto Germander, and bitter in taste, and it ought to be gathered in July and August, and must be dried in the shadow, hanging so that it may touch nothing, and [Page 146] then ℈ i. of this powder will provoke vomit, and ease Na­ture. It helpeth also putrified Ulcers, if ye make a decoction thereof with Lye, and then wet clothes therein, and lay them upon the sore; for as it causeth to vomit and evacuateth the stomack, so neither more nor lesse it causeth the Ulcer to vo­mit, or purge, and healeth it with great speed: It helpeth much those that are Phrenzie, by reason that it mundifieth the sto­mack and bodie from such putrifaction.

A most excellent composition of this Hearb. Take thereof in fine powder, ℥.i. Cinnamon, ʒ.i. Cloves, ℈. i. Wheat flower one pound, Zucche compost condit. ℥. iii. Oranges condited, one ounce, beat them altogether, and make thereof a past with Honey, and form it like a loaf, and set it in an Oven to bake, but take heed it doe not burn, and when thou wilt use it, give thereof one ounce, and it will purge gallantly, and is very delectable to be eaten. This Purgation is divine in many in­firmities, but above all other against Scrophule, the white Scall, and Scabs, because it evacuateth onely the superfluous humi­ditie, and drieth, and is appropriate for these infirmities: For ye shall note, that all Soluble Medicines doe not serve in one infirmitie, because one is Cholerick, the other Sanguine, one Flegmatick, and the other Melancholie, and for that cause it is necessary to find the proper Medicine for the infirmitie. The Rhabarb purgeth Choller: The Eleborus Melancholie; the Ebulus or Wallwort Flegm, and the Gratia dei the bloody, so that every one hath his propertie.

CHAP. LXIX. Of Wallwort and his Vertues and Operations.

VVAllwort is an Herb▪ well known, and groweth in a fat ground, and hath leaves, flouers, and seed like Elder, and is of such vertue that it is to be wondred at, for if it were brought unto us from farr Countries, it would be accounted above all other hearbs, but being so familiar among us, we make no account thereof. This Herb called Wallwort or Dainwort, by his propertie and nature provoketh vomit [Page 147] and dissolveth the bodie, if ye drinke the juyce thereof, or eat the Hearb green: The water distilled of this Root being drunke, and applied outwardly with wet clothes unto the Gout, it taketh away the pain. If ye give the juyce of this Hearb with Sirrup of Acetose to drink, it will help frantick Fevers. The pouder of his leaves hath great operation in all sorts of putrified Ulcers, because it taketh away the pain, mun­difieth, and incarnateth, with divers other vertues, the which if I should write them they would not be credited, and there­fore I leave it to the Experimentor.

CHAP. LXX. Of Millefolie or Yarrow, and his great vertue.

THis Hearb Millefolie, is well known unto most men; and of many is little esteemed, because it groweth so common­ly amongst us. This Hearb being green, is a miraculous and divine remedie, to help any sorts of fresh and bleeding wounds, if ye stamp a handfull thereof, and lay it thereupon the lips being close joyned together, within the space of four and twentie-houres it shall be perfectly whole. If yee drinke three ounces of the juyce of this Hearb with new Milk, morn­ing and evening, it will help Gonorrea in short time. It is al­so an excellent remedie for those that have their Liver and Lungs ulcerated, for this I have proved divers and sundry times in Goats, the which are troubled with a certain infir­mitie, the which is called Bissole of the Goat-keepers, for they are certain Imposthumes that doe ingender in the Liver and the Lungs, and causeth them to die. I then seeing that in the interiour parts of the Goats, made this experience, I took Millefolie made in powder, and gave it unto the Goats with Salt, and for the most part they were helped; and af­ter that I cured a number of men and women of that disease, for of that infirmity there die a great number in the world. And with the said order aforesaid, thou mayest save a number, but it must be mixed with Sal artificiato Leonardo. Those that are Ettici and Tesici die commonly through Imposthumes [Page 149] and Ulcers that are caused in the Liver, for of this I have seen above an hundred. For after they were dead, I have caused them to be opened to see the experience. You shall understand, that this Hearb Millefolie hath a great propertie to heal those Ul­cers. And therefore the Chirurgian that understandeth not Physick, can ill help those Ulcers inwardly, because he can­not apply his Unguents and Plaisters, as he doth outwardly. And those kind of Ulcers cannot be known, but of those which have seen them, and have seen the successe of their diseases, and therefore I may well discourse thereof, because of them have passed a great number through my hands, and I have seen them with mine eyes. So that I conclude, that all which I have said is two things, the one is, to see the thing in fact, the other, to have approved Medicines to help them. A most excellent composition of this Hearb, the which helpeth wounds in very short time.

Take this Hearb when it is floured, and readie to seed, and put thereunto Bdellium, Frankincense, and common oyle, and make thereof as it were Mustard, then distill it with a gen­tle fire, with great diligence, as ye distill our Oleum Benedi­ctum, and thou shalt have a rare Secret against all manner of wounds, so that it causeth the world to wonder at his ope­ration.

CHAP. LXXI. Of Gentian and his Experiments, approved by mee many times.

THis Hearb is well known, and his vertue is most in the Root, and is a miraculous and divine remedie for those that have pains within the bodie caused of winde, and also for those that have the Stitch in the side, if yee give the pow­der thereof in sweet white wine, for presently it taketh away the pain, because his nature is to dissolve winde, the which is cau­sed of oppilations of the Pores through abundance of humi­ditie, and the Gentian hath vertue to drie and dissolve wind, [Page 148] and so Nature doth evaporate the ventositie: And this is the reason why the Gentian doth that effect.

CHAP. LXXII. Of Imperatoria and his great experience that it doth against pains of the Mother.

THis Hearb is of great vertue in his operation, if his Root be made in powder, and given to eat with Honey unto a woman that is troubled with the Mother, either through cold or heat. For if they be grieved through cold, the Im­peratoria which is hot, doth dissolve it, and they shall be deli­vered. If it be through heat, the heat is alwaies windie, be­cause the heat is none other thing, then a humour retained in those parts, the which this hearb by his proper vertue and qualitie doth resolve. So that whether it be cold or hot, this vertuous hearb helpeth them with great speed, for this I have proved an infinite number of times. Moreover this hearb hath great vertue to comfort the stomack, and causeth digestion, and to preserve all the bodie, and for that cause the Ancients have called it Imperatoria.

CHAP. LXXIII. Of Cardo Sancto and his vertues particular, the which I have proved.

THere are many kind of hearbs, the which are called Cardi, but unto that which they call Cardo Sancto; they have ad­ded Sancto, because the people should know, that it is an hearb of great value in certain diseases, so that it is to bee wondred at for his operation. And that which I have seen, thereof will I write in this place, that is, if yee stamp this hearb when it is green, and lay it upon the wound, it will heal it miraculously, and with great speed. Also the juyce or powder of the said hearb being given to drink unto those that have worms, presently it helpeth them. This Herb being dried [Page 150] and infused in Aqua vitae, and given to drink to any that is grieved with any grievous pains, in short time he shall bee whole. This Hearb is also good for the sight of the eies: If ye make a past thereof with Bread and Honey, and distill it with white wine, it is most excellent. It hath also two great Vertues to preserve humane bodies, the which I have proved, the one is outwardly, and the other inwardly, and they are made in this order.

Take Carduus Benedictus when it beginneth to flour, and stamp it grosly, and infuse it in common oyle and Aqua vi­tae, with a little Frankincense, and there let them remain, un­till they be macerated, then boil them and strain it, then take thereof a third part, and put thereto a little Virgin waxe, and let it boil, untill it begin to fume, and turn to a black co­lour, then strain it, and keep it in a glasse close shut, that it take no aire, then if yee take one drachm of the oyle with sweet wine cold, it will resolve any infirmitie, and preserve them that use it in health; with the black liquor yee shall an­noint all the body when yee go to bed, cold, the which doth not onely resolve the evill qualitie, but preserveth a man in good state. It maintaineth the hair black, so that it shall not waxe white: It killeth worms in the bodie, with divers other things, that I will leave untill another time.

CHAP. LXXIV. Of sweet Marjoram, and of his Secrets the which I have proved.

MArjoram hath great and rare vertues, the which I have proved, because others might know them and use them, when occasion shall serve. And first I will write of the juyce, the which is of such strength and vertue, that one ounce thereof being mixt with one drachm of Oyl of bitter Almonds, and one scruple of Mastick in powder, being snuffed up at the nose, untill it come unto the mouth, it purgeth the head of all pains, dissolveth tumours, quickneth the sight, and cau­seth sleep, and helpeth the head of all infirmities: Also Mar­joram [Page 151] put into Vinegar, with Cloves and Cinnamon, and make thereof an Epithema, it dissolveth the evill disposition of the stomack, and quickeneth the appetite, and provoketh sleep, and being eaten in Sallets, it comforteth the Stomack marvellously, with divers other vertues, the which I have not seen.

CHAP. LXXV. Of the Hearb called Laciola, or Ophio Glossen, of some Ad­ders tongue, or Lancea Christi.

THis Hearb is of marvellous vertue, for if it be laid upon a wound, either green or drie, it healeth it marvellously, and with speed, and that it doth by his hidden and secret vertue. The decoction of this Hearb healeth wounds in­wardly, and also other offences, it helpeth the Rupture in young children, being new done, if yee lay it thereon, and bind it hard with a Trusse, these Vertues I have seen of this Hearb.

CHAP. LXXVI. Of Hypericon or Saint Johns-wort.

THere is an Oyle made of the Seed of this Hearb by ex­pression, the which being annointed upon a wound, it doth heal it with great speed. It is also excellent for those which have the Pitechie that is, a certain disease so called in the Italian tongue, it is also most excellent against all Poi­sons. This Hearb is also good against scabbs, if ye annoint them with the juyce, and drinke his decoction, because it quencheth and cooleth the superfluous heat. And this it doth by his proper qualitie, and hidden vertue.

CHAP. LXXVII. Of Nettles, and his vertue in many operations.

THis hearb is commonly known among us, and is of mar­vellous vertue, and his effects are uncredible. Neverthe­lesse, I will not let to shew one experiment of it, the which is marvellous, and is this: Take a Capon, and pull away all his feathers from his breast, and beat him with Nettles, and he will call in the young Chickens, and govern them like the Hen. Nettles being dried and made into powder, and given to eat unto a man, it will provoke venereous acts, being used to be eaten in meats, it purgeth the Matrix, it helpeth scabs, if you wash them with his decoction, and mittigateth all pains coming of cold, making a bath thereof; his decoction helpeth the tooth-ach, with many other vertues that I have not proved. But truly I beleeve, that if any would give him­self to seek experience in this hearb, he should see strange things. For I have alwayes seen that in these kind of hearbs, that naturally will not be touched, God and Nature hath gi­ven great vertue.

CHAP. LXXVIII. Of Hysop of the Mountain.

THis hearb hath great vertue, for if his decoction be given to drink unto those that have the flux of Urine, in short time it will help them: The like doth his decoction in wounds imposthumated, for if yee wash them therewith, it will mundifie, and restrain, and bring it presently to be whole. Also if yee make powder thereof, and lay it upon a fresh wound, it will help it presently, and that it doth by his great estranged vertue. It helpeth the Cough, being infufed in Wine and drunk.

CHAP. LXXIX. A great secret of a kind of Betonie.

THere is found in the field a certain kind of Betonie, the which is the length of an arm or more, and as big in the stalk as a Goose quill, and it is four square, and the leaf is much like unto the Oaken leafe, and his flour is much like the colour of a Violet, and his seed is black, and much lik unto the grains of Gunpowder, and this hearb in Lumbardie is called Betonica, and in the Realm of Naples it is called Centra galla, and of this hearb I have seen great vertues and experi­ence, and especially when it beginneth to flour untill it be seeded: for if yee distill it with sweet Wine, and receive thereof onely the fourth part, it will restore the sight unto those that are almost blind: It comforteth a weak stomack very much, if yee drink thereof every morning three or four drachms. The Fesses which remain in the glasse being mix­ed with Hony and a little Zedoaria, helpeth women that are troubled with the Mother, if they drink thereof every morn­ing ℥. viii. warm. This hearb being bruiesd with Wine and Salt, and laid upon a fresh wound every three dayes once, helpeth the same with speed: Also if yee put one of his seeds into the eyes, and there let it remain so long as yee may suffer it, it will clear the sight marvellously, for it hath been proved many times. It helpeth those kind of Scabs the which are most evill to be helped, being mixed in this order.

Take the juyce of this hearb, although it be somewhat drie and hard to get forth, and for every ounce of that juyce, put thereunto ℥. iiii. of the Oil of Frankincense that cometh forth last in the distillation, and boil them a little together untill it begin to fume, then take it from the fire and strain it through a cloth, and when yee goe to bed annoint all the scabs therewith cold, and thou shalt see a most strange cure, never written of before by any man, the which I have proved divers and sundry times, and is a secret to be used on noble personages, because it doth his effect without letting of bloud, and purging, most wonderfull to behold: So that it is to be [Page 154] accounted rather a divine Medicine then humane; for truly I have done more cures with this hearb then with any other that ever I used.

CHAP. LXXX. Of the effects of Wine, and what cometh thereof.

FIrst I will speak of Wine and his qualities. You shall un­derstand, that Wine is a liquour the which changeth into divers kinds differing from his own nature: And first it changeth into Vineger of it self without any artifice, the which can never be turned into Wine again. Also they se­parate from Wine Aqua vitae, the which being separated can­not be turned into Wine again. Also Wine maketh, by setling it self, a certain stone called Tartar, the which can ne­ver be turned into Wine again, nor yet into Vineger. And thus when the workman doth transmute or change it, it can­not be turned again into his first quality. Wine is very apt to corrupt, and to change into other kinds, but after that it changeth or transmuteth, it is uncorruptible: for when it is turned into Vineger, it is apt to conserve all things. Vege­table and Animall that is put therein, but not the Minerals, for by nature it is enemy unto them. There is also sepa­rated from Wine Aqua vitae, the which is conservatrix of all Medicines; for when it is circulated and made into a Quint­essence it becometh celestiall, as I have shewed in my other books, and therewith thou mayest help many infirmities, because it mittigateth all pains, and dissolveth in a manner all infirmities, and especially when it is compounded in this manner.

Take of that Quintessence four parts, Oil of Sulphur and Vitrioll of each one part, Julep of Violets sixty parts: Mix them all together, and it will be of such vertue, that if yee give ʒ. i. thereof to drink to one that lay at the point of death, it would recover him, because it breaketh choller, preserveth the stomack, causeth an appetite, and helpeth any sort of Fe­ver, and preserveth both men and women in lusty state, if they [Page 155] use it oftentimes; for these experiences I have seen divers times. Also of the Tartar yee may may make Oyle, the which is of marvellous vertue, both in Physick, Chirurgerie, and Alchimie. There is also drawn forth of Tartar, his spirit and oyle in this order, as Andernacus writeth, the which is most profitable against sundry infirmities, and the order to make it is thus.

Take white Tartar and beat it to powder four pound, and put it into a stone pot or glasse well luted, and set it in a fur­nace to distill with a great Receiver close luted, least all the fumes come forth or break the glasse, then give it first a small fire, and so increase it as though thou wouldest draw a strong water, and so continue it untill there come forth no more spirits, then let it wax cold, and take forth the liquor, and put it into an upright glasse with his head and receiver, and di­still away the water in Balneo, then take that oyle which is in the bottome, and distill it in Sand or Ashes, and there will come forth at the first a yellowish oyle, and so by little and little it will change colour, and become blacker and blacker, and thick like unto a Balme, or a Sirrup. You shall understand, that the first Liquor separated in Balneo, is cal­led Liquor fecularum vini, or Spiritus Tartari, the oyle which yee rectified in Sand, is called Oleum fecularum vini, sive Mumia fecularum vini the which is most effectuall and profitable in curing all running Ulcers that goeth creeping upon the flesh, and especially those that come Ex lue venerea, for this Mumia doth so cure those malign Ulcers, that their malice can hurt no more, but shall be quite extincted: Be­ing drunke with wine, it doth break and expell the Stone in the Reins and Bladder, it provoketh Urine and purgeth Ulcers. Furthermore, ʒ. i. of the liquor or spirit of Tartar, being drunke with water of Fumitorie or Hirundinariae or such like, as is most convenient for Pustulas gallicas ex anthemate erici­pelas, the Dropsie, Water betwixt the skin and the flesh, Fevers, Menstrua, and all obstructions of those parts; it will work all those effects more effectuall if it be taken with water of Tria­cle, the which is made as hereafter followeth. Also yee shall understand that this spirit of Tartar must be rectified four or [Page 156] five times from the calces of his Fesses in Balneo, to take away his stinking smell, and then it will be the purer and more effectuall, and this is the making of Aqua Theriacalis.

Take Triacle of Alexander that is perfect good▪ ℥. v. red Myrrh, ℥. ii. Saffron, ℥. ss. mix them together in a glasse, and pour thereon, ℥. x. of the spirit of Wine, and then set them close stopped to digest, then distill it according unto art; sometime they put into this water ℈. ii. of Camphire especi­ally when it is used in hot burning Fevers and Inflāmations, and and then it is called Aqua theriacalis camforata, this Compositi­on following being drunk, hath a singular piercing vertue. Take Spiritus calcanthi, ℥. i. Liquoris fecularum vini correcti, ℥. iii. Aqua Theriacalis ℥. v. give thereof ʒ. i. in strong wine or o­ther convenient liquor both for the aforesaid defects, and al­so to prevent and cure infinite other diseases.

CHAP. LXXXI. Of the qualitie of Vinegar, and his Secrets.

VInegar is made of wine, and of water. Whereas there is wine, they make it of wine, but in those Countries where there groweth no wine, they make it of beer and ale, in stead of wine, the which Vinegar is very strong. Neverthelesse, it hath not the vertue and qualitie of that which is made of wine, because his nature is to preserve those things which are put therein, as is said before. If yee doe distill Vinegar in Balneo untill it remain drie, and then burn those Fesses un­till they come white, and then lay them in a moist place, it will turn into Oyle, the which is of such vertue for mans bo­die, that it is not to be credited, for if yee give thereof a small quantitie to drink, it will dissolve the Gravel, and Stone in the Bladder. And therefore this is a worthy secret to be known, the which was never revealed before to any man: As for his o­ther vertues, they are known to all men. Distilled Vinegar be­ing mixed with a little oyle of Tartar and Aqua vitae, preserveth the face, and maketh it fair, but if it were not a sin to offend God, I could say such great and strange things of distilled [Page 157] Vinegar, that it would cause the world to wonder at it, but for troubling my conscience, I will hold my peace for this time, and leave this to be sufficient, which I have written al­ready.

CHAP. LXXXII. Of the Fesses of Wine, and of his Secrets that I have found out.

THat which is called Allum du Fesse, is the Fesses of Wine burnt, the which I have spoken of in other places, but here I will shew thee a great and rare Secret, never written before by any man, the which shall be to the honour of the Physiti­an, and this is the Secret.

Take the Fesses of Aqua fortis, made with Roch Allom, Sal Niter, and Vitriol two pound, Allum du Fesse two pound, mix them well together, and put them into a Furnace to cal­cine, untill it become to a hard stone: and when it is calcined, make it presently into powder, and set it four or five nights in the ayre, and it will turn moist, then take six pound of pure Aqua vitae without flegm, and put therein the same pow­der, and so let it remain eight daies, every day stirring it once, then pour of that part which is clear, and keep it as a preci­ous Jewell, then take the Fesses and calcine them again, as yee did at the first, and make them in powder again: And this powder mundifieth all filthie and stinking sores, and with this water thou mayest help them, if that the workman can apply it with reason. Also with this water may be done great cures in Physick, if it be given as it ought to be. Also of the said powder there may be made Pills and Potions, that worketh miracles in the world, as I have seen divers times.

CHAP. LXXXIII. Of Verjuyce made of Grapes, and his Secrets.

VErjuyce is the Juice of unripe Grapes, the which is kept to dresse and season meats, to give them a better taste, [Page 158] and it is of great vertue, and appropriate for many things. But when it shall be distilled with Hony, and Allum du Fesse in a Limbeck of glasse, it will be a miraculous remedie for Imposthumes that are very hot. It maketh women fair and shining, if they wash them therewith. But if this be mixed with oyle of Talk, it will restore the sight unto those that are almost blind. Also two drachms of distilled Verjuyce, with two drachms of the juyce of Betonie, and four ounces of Milk being used, will make a man very luxurious, and help a weak back. Also Verjuyce being distilled, will bring an appetite unto those that have lost it. And all these are with great reason, for yee shall understand that the Verjuyce without a­ny other Artifice, doth mundifie the stomack, and loose the bodie, and purifie the blood: The Honey is Cordiall, and is hot by nature, and dissolveth winde, the Alum du Fesse drieth, and destroyeth all the evill humours: The Talk is bright and shining, and his whitenesse doth penetrate very much: The Betonie comforteth the stomack, and is windie: The Milk is aperative and nutritive, and therefore consider well thereon, and thou shalt find it reason and experience that I have said.

CHAP. LXXXIV. Certain Secrets of Animals, and first of the Oxe.

THe fat of the Oxe is very appropriate to Unguents, to help all manner of sores, because it comforteth the place offen­ded, and mittigateth the pain; but when this grease or fat shall be distilled with Turpentine and Wax, it will work Mi­racles in divers operations, of the which I will not speak in this place. There is in the throat of divers old Oxen certain knots or kernels as a man may term them, the which are of the bigness of an Olive, some are bigger and some lesser, according to the age of the Oxe. Take of those kernells, and hang them up to drie in the shadow, and make thereof powder, and of that powder give every morning, ss. ℥. [Page 159] unto those that have the Dropsie, and in short time they shall be helped. Also the sinnews of an Oxe being dried, and made lint to make tents or stoppings, is most excellent, and will work great effects, and this is one of the Secrets, the which I never meant to reveal untill death. The blood of a young Bull that is not gelded, being drunken as it is warm, is most strong poison, there are also divers other things, the which I would write of this Beast but for tediousnesse sake.

CHAP. LXXXV. Of the Goat.

THe fat of the Male Goat before he is gelded is of much vertue, because it comforteth all members that are offended, as well inwardly as outwardly: If yee annoint any that hath the Flux with the said grease, it will doe him great pleasure. Also the dung of the Goat is most excellent to mollifie sinnews that are indurated in any place, and therefore this dung being put into Unguents appropriate, of force must work great Effects.

CHAP. LXXXVI. Of the Horse and his Vertues.

THe Dung of the Horse is of great vertue, for if a man were lame, and indurated through grosse and viscous humours, let him be buried in fresh warm Horse dung two hours, and in ten or twelve daies he shall be helped. The fat of the Horse is very hot and penetrative, and especially that in the neck, where the Main groweth. Also the fat being distil­led with the rosin of the Pine tree and Myrrh, is miraculous against shrunk sinnews.

CHAP. LXXXVII. Of the Dog and his Secrets.

THe Dog is an amiable Animall above all other unto man, for he understandeth in a manner what a man doth say; and from the Dog is taken many wholsome things for man, for of the skin they make Gloves, and such like, the which are wholsome for them that wear them. The fat of the Dog is very hot and piercing, and dissolveth all pains that come of cold. The dung of a Dog is profitable to dresse Leather with­all, also his blood mixed with Hogs grease, and the Ashes of a Vine, dissolveth all manner of swellings, that come in divers parts of the bodie.

CHAP. LXXXVIII. Of the Cat and his Vertues.

THe Cat is very hot, above all other animals, that apper­tain unto the house, and his fat is of such heat, that it is uncredible to be spoken of, and he is never in love, or goeth a catterwalling, but in the coldest weather. The Brain of the Cat is of such a heat, that if any doe eat thereof, it will make him mad; if yee annoint certain places of the house with the fat, it will cause the Mice to run away, fearing least the Cat were there, and that is by a hidden propertie. There ingen­dereth in the flesh of a dead Cat certain putrified Worms, the which afterward become a kinde of Flie, that are called Ta­phaeni, the which is a very great enemie to the Oxe, and all o­ther Cattell, for they will run away from them, for if they be bitten therewith, they will in a manner be mad.

CHAP. LXXXIX. Of the Hare and his Secrets.

THe blood of the Hare being dried in the Furnace, and made into powder, helpeth those much, which are troubled [Page 161] with the stone and gravell, giving it to drink with the juyce of Pelitory. The hair of the Hare serveth to stench bloud in wounds. The Testicles of the Hare dried in a Furnace, and made into powder, and being drunk, provoketh venereous acts. The Gaul of the Hare being distilled with Hony and Aqua vitae, is a miraculous remedy for the sight of the eyes, putting therein every night one drop when yee goe to bed. There is yet a great vertue in the Hare, that if I should reveale it, the world would wonder at it, and therefore I omit it unto the ingenious.

CHAP. XC. Of the Frog and his secrets.

THese Frogs are of great vertue in divers operations; for their fat helpeth the Leprosie if ye annoint them there­with, and is a most miraculous thing for those that are burnt, or scalded with water; for if yee annoint them therewith, it will help them quickly, and leave no scar. But if this fat be distilled with Mirrh, and Aqua vitae, and accompanied with Aloes, and the juyce of Brassica Marina, called Soldanella, and thereof made Pills, they will be of so much vertue, that one scruple or two of those Pills being given oftentimes unto one that hath the Dropsie, they shall be helped quickly, and hereof I have had great experience, to my great honour and profit of the Patient.

CHAP. XCI. A discourse upon certain stones, and their qualities in Physick and Chirurgery: and first of the Marble stone.

THere are a great number of stones that the Majesty of God hath created in the world, of the which I will make mention of some, as well Minerall as Artificiall, because the Physitian as well as the Chirurgian, may be served therof in their affairs, although it be hard to have knowledge of those [Page 162] things, because they are much differing one from another, and grow in divers parts of the world: yea, and although they be brought unto us, yet they are so unknown, that we cannot know the thousand part of their vertues and quali­ties. And to begin, I will write of the Marble, the which is a white stone, like unto Sugar when it is broken, and it is of great vertue in Chirurgery, for when it is brought into calkes, thereof may be made an Unguent of great vertue in this or­der. Take of that calkes, and lay it to steep in fair water, so that it may be covered four fingers, then stir it eight or ten times a day, and then let it wax clear and settle, then pour it off, and put on more, and doe as yee did before, and when the water is settled clear pour it off again, then take of that calkes what quantity you will, and with Oil of Roses make it into an Unguent, the which is marvellous for such as are troubled with heat, for it drieth, and cooleth, and setteth it in good disposi­tion, so that with ease it may be healed.

CHAP. XCII. A Discourse upon Lapis Ematites, and his vertues in Chirur­gery.

THis Lapis Ematites is a stone like unto the Mine of Iron, the which if it be ground into powder will be red like un­to Sinaper, and thereof thou shalt make an Unguent in this manner. Take Oil of Roses four ounces, Auxungia two ounces, new Wax half an ounce, Turpentine one ounce, Lapis Ematites in most fine powder three ounces, mix them well together in a Copper pan with a small fire, untill it begin to give certain fumes, or smell, and it will be black, then take it from the fire, and alwayes stir it untill it be cold; and then it will be hard like a Cerot, the which is miraculous in healing corrosive Ulcers. Also this stone being in fine powder, and made into a Lineament with Vineger, Oil of Roses, and a little Litarge, helpeth Scabs, and quencheth their heat, and cooleth the blood. Also two drachms of this powder being eaten with Sugar rosate, helpeth those which have inflamma­tions [Page 163] in their stomack with speed. This stone hath also divers other vertues, the which I will leave at this time.

CHAP. XCIII. Of the stone of Iron, which some call Loppa.

THese stones which the workmen take from the Forge, that are called Loppa diferro, are of great importance, if we may beleeve the Alchimists, because they say, that this stone is the beginning of their Stone, &c. Yee shall understand, that this stone is most necessary both in Physick and Chirur­gery, when it shall be well prepared as it ought to be: and his preparation is in this order. Take that masse of matter and stamp it, and searce it very fine, and then put it into a ves­sell that is apt to resist the fire, and set it in a glasse Furnace for twenty or thirty dayes, and then it will be a red masse, the which yee shall beat into an impalpable powder, the which if thou wilt use in Physick thou maist dissolve in Vinegar, and when it is dissolved keep it for inflammations of the Liver and Stomack, the which thou mayest give with any kind of Sirrup appropriate, for this is a miraculous Medicine against the flux of the body. Also if yee make an Unguent of the said pow­der with Oil of Wax, of Frankincense, and Eggs, it will work strange operations in Contusions and Dislocations of bones, laying it thereon very warm, because it resolveth all altera­tion, mittigateth the pain, and comforteth the place offended. Yee shall understand, that it was never made of none but of us, which ever seek new Medicines and goodly experiences, to pleasure the world with that Art.

CHAP. XCIV. Of Lapis Judaicus and his form, and wherefore it serveth in Phy­sick and Chirurgery.

THis Lapis Judaicus is a certain stone, the which is like unto the similitude of the Cuckows Egge, and is of a grayish co­lour [Page 164] and rough, and within it is another stone like unto a Nut, and this stone is of a great vertue in his operation; for if it be beaten into powder, and dissolved in distilled Vineger, and then mixed with Sirrup of Saxifrage, and given to drink to those that are troubled with gravell, it will cause them to avoid it in their Urine: and to break the stone, they shall mix the powder with Hony, and lay it on plaister-wise upon the Reines, and it will break the gravell with speed. More­over, this Stone hath two rare vertues, the which I will not write of in this place, but I would counsell those that carry them upon their bodies to have two, a Male and a Female, and look upon them every day once, for of this stone I have seen great experience.

CHAP. XCV. Of Lapis Lazuli and his operation.

CErtain wise men in the world that have made great con­sideration of this stone, say, that this is the stone of gold, because it is mixed with Azure, white and yellow, and also other colours; but I find that in many places of the world, they have the Mine of gold, and yet they find no Lapis La­zuli; and therefore it is a signe that it groweth in places where Nature doth produce it in that form. And for that which I have seen of Lapis Lazuli is, that if yee give it inward­ly it provoketh vomit, and helpeth the Quartain Ague: And I have proved to calcine it in the Furnace where they bake Bricks, and when it was calcined to dissolve it in Aqua vitae: the solution helpeth many infirmities, giving it inwardly, and especially maligne Fevers. Also being put in maligne sores, it bringeth them to so good a temperature, that it is miracu­lous, and not credited, except of those that see the experience. And at this time I am seeking to bring it to a certain perfecti­on, the which shall work miracles, and hitherto I have had good successe, for thereof I have seen great miracles that cau­seth the world to wonder: And yet of late I have found an Oil made of the same Stone, that provoketh sleep, and causeth [Page 165] quiet rest, and is marvellous for the sight of the eyes, annoint­ing the head, the eyes, and the stomack therewith when yee go to bed: For of this I have seen an infinite of experiments, and I swear by that I am, that with all the travell that I have had, I never found a better thing then this Oil; for if yee annoint the Gout therewith, presently it taketh away the pain, and inflammation, or alteration, but the reason thereof I know not, because as yet I had no leisure to consider there­of: But by the grace of God, at the next impression I will set forth some notes of their experience that I have seen in the Art.

CHAP. XCVI. Of the Flint-stones and their vertues.

THe flint is a stone, the which if it be stricken with Iron or Steel it will give fire, and his vertues are great both in Physick and Chirurgery, and also in divers other Arts. First in Physick it hath vertue to dissolve the gravell in the Reins and Bladder, if ye give thereof two drachms with unriped Wine, and this it doth by his proper quality and hidden ver­tue. In Chirurgery it hath great vertue, for being ground into most fine powder, and made into an ointment with Oil of Roses, and Wax, it mittigateth all inflammations, and ta­keth away the pain of the sore, because it cooleth and drieth Moreover, this stone is used of those that make Glasse, to make their composition with their Ashes and Maganese. There are yet a great number of vertues, the which I leave unto the Experimentour.

CHAP. XCVII. Of the white stone which some call Allum, Scaleola, or Gesso.

THis Allum, Scaleola, or Gesso is used much in Italy to make Lime of, I suppose it to be that which is called Muskovie Glasse, or Lapis Specularis; this is very necessary both in [Page 166] Physick and Chirurgerie, because it is by vertue attractive and drying, and helpeth much against burning Fevers, tempering it when it is burnt like flower with Vinegar, and when it is tempered, lay it presently upon the Reins, and lay it just the length and largenesse, and so let it remain three or four houres, because it draweth like Boxing Glasses, and so lea­veth the Reins cold and eased: and so by that effect it doth great pleasure in those kind of Fevers. It helpeth also in Ul­cers if yee make a paste thereof with common lye, and lay it thereon eight or ten houres, and then change it, for of this I have seen strange effects.

CHAP. XCVIII. Of the Stone called Lapis Amiante.

THis Stone called Amiante, as all they which have written thereof say, is a stone like unto Cycile, or Allum du plum, but not so white, of the which stone there is found great quantitie in Cyprus, and there they spin it like as it were Flaxe, and doe make thereof Napkins and such like, and when they are foul, in stead of washing them, they make a great fire, and lay them thereon, and so make them clean and white, for the experience thereof I have seen, and that which I have said, is in the Lapidarie of Dioscorides and Plinie, and Petro Andrea, Mathiolus Sanesie. And hereof I will shew thee a mar­vellous strange secret, the which I have proved, and is this. Take of the said stone and make it in powder, and mix it with crude Lead being in powder, as I have shewed in my Ca­prici Medicinale, with Tutia prepared, the composition there­of is this. Take of the stone ℥. iiii. Lead, ℥. xii. Tutia ℥. ii. Mix them and calcine them in the fire, and when they are calcined, beat them to powder, and lay them to steep in strong Vinegar in a glasse, and so let it stand a moneth stir­ring it every day once, and then at the moneths end let it boil on the fire a quarter of an hour, and then let it settle untill it come clear, then take of that Vinegar as much as yee will, and mix it with as much oyle of Roses, stirring it [Page 167] untill it come to a bodie, the which is a precious linament and rare, for if ye annoint the white scall or such like scabs on the heads of young children, it will heal them with great speed. Also for Scabs and Itch in the legs it is excellent, if ye annoint them therewith every night when you go to bed. This Stone ser­veth also when it is dissolved by it self in Aqua vitae and Sugar, for those women that are troubled with the whites; for if they drinke thereof every morning a little, it helpeth them quickly. I beleeve this Stone hath many other vertues which I know not.

CHAP. XCIX. Of the Saphire, and his vertues in Physick.

SAphires are certain stones, like unto Azures, small, and are transparent, the which if thou wilt use, it were necessary to be cunning in the knowledge of them, for otherwise yee may be deceived. And furthermore, above that which many Phi­losophers have written thereof, I have found two goodly ex­periences never known before, and are these. First to make the heart merrie, and to help the passions of the same, the which ye shall use thus.

Take thy Saphire, and stamp it very finely, and dissolve it in Vinegar, or with the juice of Limons, and when they are dis­solved, take thereof ʒ i. with as much of our Elixar vitae, and of Oyle of Honey ℈ i. and a little of the Julep of Violets, and give it to drink unto those that have the aforesaid infirmi­ties, and thou shalt see miracles of their operation. I hope ere it be long, to set forth a great and strange secret of these Stones.

CHAP. C. Of Red Corall.

REd Corall is a stone, the which most commonly doth grow upon baked stones or bricks, and to approve it to be so, there is a certain Island of Barbarie, the which is called Tobac­co, the which was sometimes inhabited, but sithence the Sea hath over-run a great part thereof, and so the stones of the houses, and the Bricks were scattered in the bottome of that Sea, and [Page 168] at this time the Genoes gathered a great quantitie of Red Co­rall, the fairest in all the world. I call to remembrance that in the yeer 1549. I being in Messina, a famous Citie in the Realm of Cicilia, I saw a Fisherman cast his Net in the gate hard by the tower called Salvatore; and he took up a branch of red Corall that was grown upon a Brick, and was of such greatnesse and beautie, as had not been seen in two hundred yeers before. So that by this I have proved, that the Corall doth grow upon Bricks, or baked stones, and these have great vertue in Physick and Chirurgerie, when they be dissolved in the juyce of Limons, or distilled Vinegar. For howsoever it be taken inwardly, it comforteth the sto­mack, and maketh the heart merrie, dissolveth the Fever, and not without great cause. For it is so good of nature, that our nature doth desire it. Corall being calcined and dissolved with Aqua vitae, or with our Quintessence of Wine, helpeth very much against Ulcers, because it taketh away the pain pre­sently, and mundifieth, and incarnateth, and cicatrizeth. Of this Corall ye may make Lozenges, or such like, the which are very Restorative.

CHAP. CI. A Discourse upon the Stone Salt.

THere is found a Salt in the Realm of Naples, in the Pro­vince of Calabria, in the state of the Prince of Besignano, in certain Mountains that are of the Mine of Salt: I doe verily beleeve that this Salt is a fifth Element, because Salt would be called no other then wisedome, as a man may say, taste. And to prove that which I have said, yee may see that the world cannot live without it. Moreover this Salt serveth much in Physick and Chirurgery, for they put it into Clisters, and lay it also upon wounds. But I have found a way to prepare this Salt sweet like Sugar, but yet Salt, and is of such a pleasant tast, that it comforteth them that use it, and this is called Sal conditum Leonardo, the which Salt is good against Worms, and comforteth the stomack, causeth an appetite, purgeth the Urine, with a number of [Page 169] other vertues. And the order to take it is thus. Yee shall take thereof half a spoonfull in the morning at one time, and also use it in stead of Salt to your meat, and season your meat therewith. Also if any have pains in any part of their bodie, annoint it with this Salt, and bind a cloth thereon, and it will be helped.

Hereafter followeth the Vertues of certain Mineralls, and mean Mineralls. And first of Vitrioll.

CHAP. CII. Certain Secrets of Vitriol.

IN Vitriol are many Secrets which untill this time have been hidden, by meanes of which there may be done many strange and great matters in divers operations, not onely in Physick and Chirurgery, but in many other things. Ye shall there­fore take Vitriol and put it in a pot; and make him sweat untill yee see him weep; the which sweat being taken from him, is a mortall enemie unto sharp Fevers, when it is drunk with sodden or distilled waters. Also if those that have the Etica or Tissick doe drinke it with Mel Rosarum, it will doe them great pleasure, it serveth also to make the hair of the head or beard black. Then if that by force of fire yee cause him to vomit a black liquor, it will be a thing very apt to dissolve any humour, the which in short time will dissolve any pain. For if ye put it into Gangrena, or other putrified Ul­cer, it doth mundifie it with great speed: It mortifieth Warts Chaps, Fistulaes, and any kind of those humours. If it be drunken with Wine or other liquor, it is good against Fevers of any qualitie. Then his Feces being reduced into water with Vinegar, and his Salt being taken out, it is of such vertue, that in a manner it will make men immortall. And above the aforesaid matters, in Alchymie it worketh strange things, for by the meanes thereof they may make the great Amalgam of Mercurie and Mars, wherewith may be done great mat­ters, and happie shall he be that goeth to work that way. For with Vitriol, Mercurie and Mars is made full glad the Master of the Art.

CHAP. CIII. Strange secrets of Roch Allum.

IN Allum are great vertues, and especially in Roch Allum; for the water being separated from the Feces, and accompa­nied with our Quintessence, worketh most strange cures, and especially in desperate diseases: And the Feces which cannot dissolve, when with fire they shall be brought to perfection, and accompanied with Mars, they shall be apt to heal any sort of Ulcer inwardly, and with speed take away the pain, and not without great reason: for the Roch Allum is Anima Terrae, a firm Element, and that which dissolveth and turneth all things into his nature. Mars also is Anima Terrae, and is that, in which is found all vertue and richnesse: But he that is not expert, let him not settle himself to this enterprise, least it fall not out right; for he that cannot prepare, calcine, dissolve, and con­geale, shall never doe any thing that is ought worth, therefore it were better to leave then meddle.

CHAP. CIV. Of Orpiment and his nature.

THis Orpiment is a stone, as it were, made of scales, and is of divers colours; there is white, and yellow, and red like bloud; neverthelesse, they are all of Sulphurous matter, the which burneth visibly like Sulphur, of the which I know no use, neither in Physick nor Chirurgery, although that some Chirurgians doe lay it upon sores to dry them, the which they doe for want of reason or knowledge: With this Orpiment, being mixed with Calx viva, and strong Lie, and so made into an Unguent, they use to take away hair: It serveth also for Painters to make a yellow colour like Gold, the which if it be burned, it changeth into another colour. This serveth for in­finite uses in Alchimie; for his sublimation being made with Sul niter, and Tartar, when it is white, and Amalgamed with Quick-silver and fine Silver, and given in projection upon Venus purged, it will make it very fair and white, and much [Page 171] like Lime. Orpiment is dissolved, by way of calcination with strong Vinegar, until such time as his substance be taken away; then let it settle and wax clear, and vapour away that clear part, and in the bottome yee shall find the whitenesse of Sul­phur, the which being fixed with sufficient order, it doth blanch all metals, and this is called the Quintessence of Sulphur Mi­nerall: This serveth for many other uses in Alchimie, the which I will leave until another time: But this which I have written is most true.

CHAP. CV. Of Cinaber Minerall, and wherefore it serveth.

THis Cinaber is of two kindes, Mineral and Artificial; the Mineral is a stone of the colour of Iron, the which being ground into powder it will be red like bloud, the which is of a great drying nature, by the reason that it containeth in it Sul­phur, it drieth maligne Sores, and being made in a Perfume, it helpeth the mouth being ulcerated, and being made into an Unguent, it cooleth greatly; also being dissolved in Vinegar, it mittigateth the pain in maligne Ulcers, and healeth them in short time; his sublimation being made with Salt and Tartar, blancheth Copper and Lattin like to Silver.

This stone serveth also to burnish Metal or Silver therewith. The artificial Cinaber is made of Sulphur and Mercury by way of sublimation, the which serveth for divers uses; as for the Painters, or to write with; also to make drying Unguents, and for fumes against the Pox, with divers other uses, the which I leave at this time.

CHAP. CVI. Of the secrets of Salt, and his royall vertue.

THere is in Salt a great vertue, and his secrets are of great force, for if Salt be dissolved in the mighty water of Vi­triol, together with Mars, and then caused to vomit with great heat, until it remain in a dry powder, and then circulate it with our Quintessence of Wine and Honey the space of a moneth, [Page 172] the which if the workman can doe, he shall make a miraculous Medicine, which by his vertue and hidden quality, will serve against divers great infirmities, because his nature is to pre­serve the body in his strength, and to discharge all evil humours that may offend Nature. But to speak of some particular thing, I say, that this glorious Medicine doth help the Fever Hectick when they are new begun, giving thereof a little quan­tity with water of Vervane, Agrimonie, and Betonie; with the water of Fennel and Selandine, it restoreth the sight unto those that are obscure; it helpeth also the flux of the body, with divers other things, the which I will not utter in this place.

CHAP. CVII. Of the secrets of common Salt, and his vertues.

THere are three sorts, or kinds, found of common Salt, the one is natural, the which is found in Mountaines, as in Naples in the Province of Calabria, where are great Moun­taines of it, and also in Spain in the Isle of Anvisa, and this is the Mineral Salt. The second kind is Artificial, as is made in Germany in their Cauldrons. The third kind is also natural of the Sea, which is made upon dry sands in pits, by force of the Sun; but the most sweet and savourest is that which is made with fire, because it is purified and clean: The Salt of the Mountain is of more vertue then all the rest in Physick; for when it shall be calcined forty dayes together in a Furnace, and then dissolved with our Quintessence of Honey, so that there remain no Feces, it will be of such vertue, that in manner it will revive the dead, if you give them thereof a spoonful. With this the antientest Doctors did marvellous things, and they called it the Salt of Wisdome, for he that knew well his vertues would marvel thereat. This Salt serveth also against the infirmities of Oxen.

CHAP. CVIII. Certain secrets of Salt-Peter.

SAlt-Peter is a certain kind of salt of Urine, the which is taken out of the earth by art, and is most wholsome against [Page 173] divers infirmities; for when it shall be calcined thirty dayes together in a Furnace, with as much Tartar, and then dissolved with our Quintessence, accompanied with the spirits of Cin­namon, Ginger, and Cloves, it will be a most wholsome Me­dicine, and will cause the Professors of the Art to be amazed at his operation, for it helpeth the Hectick, and Dropsie, and divers such like infirmities, the which I will not speak of in this place, fearing that they will not be credited: Neverthe­lesse, those that are disposed to travel on that matter shall find their desire, and reap great fame in the world.

CHAP. CIX. Certain secrets of Allum du Fece.

THis Allum is made with the Feces of Wine, in this manner. You shall understand, that in those Countries where they make Wine, they put it in vessels, and lay them towards the East, and then in certain space there settleth great quantity of Feces, the which being put into certain bags, and hanged up to dry, the humour runneth out, and the Fesses remain in a hard masse, the which afterward is dried and burned, and the ashes thereof is called Allum du Fece, in the which are found great secrets; for without this certain colours cannot be dyed: It maketh also womens hair yellow, and taketh away all spots or staines, and the like vertue it hath in our Physick, if that the workman were able to prepare it as it should be, for it will transmute one complexion into another.

CHAA. CX. A great secret of Gold.

GOld, which Alchimists do call Sol, is a metal of such impor­tance, that it is superiour of all the rest in vertue, weight, and prise, and of brightnesse and fairnesse, and is that, with the which may be made a Medicine, that in manner giveth life un­to the dead, when it is prepared with the fire, and accompa­nied with Mercury: Then with our two Quintessences it may be dissolved by and by, and by way of circulation it may be [Page 174] separated from all companie, and when it shall be dissolved, you may give it to help against any great infirmitie, if thou knowest how to apply it conveniently.

CHAP. CXI. A great Secret of Silver.

SIlver, which we call Luna, is a Metal very bright in white­nesse and next unto gold, for of it may be made marvellous things, especially in dangerous infirmities that are of impor­tance. For being prepared and reduced into his first matter, it may be accompanied with our Quintessence, and make there­of a drink that will be very profitable against the Leprosie, and this composition shall be given in the broth of a Chicken unto those that are Asmatick, for it will doe them great plea­sure, and cure all those that are troubled with the Leprosie. It maketh also womens faces shining and marvellous fair. But when it shall be further prepared, it will restore the sight unto those that are almost blinde through debilitie. Also if it be used in Alchymie, it will work strange effects.

CHAP. CXII. Certain Secrets of Saturn.

SAturn is that metal which we call Lead, in the which is found great secrets both in Physick and Chirurgery. For when it shall be brought into pouder without fire or other mixture, but onely grinding it in a brazen morter with the spittle of a man, untill it become into fine pouder, it comfort­eth much against all corrosive and malign Ulcers, because it cooleth and drieth miraculously, but when Saturn shall be calcined and dissolved in Vinegar, and his Salt taken forth, and then that Salt dissolved in our Quintessence, will help many infirmities, and especially those that are caused of hu­miditie, and caliditie, because it dryeth and cooleth by his Nature. Also an Unguent made of the calx of Lead, serveth against divers sorts of Sores. Also if the Workmaster were diligent, with Lead, Feretto of Spain, Vitriol, and Tutia, he [Page 175] might make a metal like unto Gold of the Ducket, of the which he might receive a great benefit.

CHAP. CXIII. Of the secrets of Copper.

VVHen Venus shall be well prepared, and with art of fire shall be well calcined, and done thereunto what is con­venient, it will be valiant in his operation. For of it is made an unguent, that mundifieth sores with great speed. Also there­with is made a water, that helpeth all kind of crude infirmi­ties in the eies: It helpeth Scabbes, and is of great profit a­gainst the white scall, warts on the privie parts, and sores in the secret parts. For it resolveth them very vell. Moreover if the workman be his crafts master, he may bring it into such an extream whitenesse, that it shall appear like Luna. Also if he can amalgam it with Mars and Mercury, and give him his cocture, he may draw forth a great quantity of Sol.

A great Secret of Copper, as concerning Chirurgerie.

Take Sal Niter lb. ii. Roch Allom half a pound, Sal Gem. four ounces, Ʋitriol Romane one pound, Soot of the Chimney three ounces, mix these together, and distill thereof a strong water according to art, that being done, put the water into a Retort, and for every pound of water, put thereto four ounces of Verdegriese finely cearsed, then set thereunto a Recei­ver, and give it fire according to art, untill all the fumes be come forth, then let it coole, and break the glasse, and take forth that which remained in the bottome, and beat it to pow­der, then put that into another Retort, and put thereon as much distilled Vinegar as the powder weighed, and distill it againe, untill there come no more fumes, then let it coole, and break the glasse, and take forth the matter, and grind it to pow­der, and keep it in a glasse that it take no aire. For this is most marvellous in ulcerated and putrified sores, because it mundi­fieth, cleanseth, and incarnateth, and with great speed bring­eth them to be whole with small paine, or none at all: If ye make an unguent thereof with oyl of Roses, Wax, and Frank­insence, it helpeth all manner of sores with speed.

CHAP. CXIV. Of the Secrets of Jupiter or Tin.

IƲpiter is a shining Metall, by the means of which all the other Metals become shining, and are preserved, and in this is found great vertue and experience, both in Physick and Chirurgerie, and also in Alchimie. For when it is well prepared, and reduced into a potable water, it will be a glo­rious Medicine for the solution of the Hectick, Tissick, and Dropsie. But if it be brought into a Quintessence, and accompanied with our Quintessence, and the Quintessence of Honey, it will be a precious Medicine to restore the sight of the eyes. Also if the Chirurgians could well prepare it, after it is calcined, and make thereof an Unguent with things appropriate, they might doe strange cures therewith. More­over if the Alchymists could reduce him to his perfection, it would be a Medicine of great price. For if they could joyn it with Venus purged and well prepared, it would be as white as Luna, and then he that had a Medicine appropriate, might bring it to a perfect bodie.

CHAP. CXV. Certain Secrets of Iron.

IRon, which the Alchymists doe call Mars is a Minerall, the which is appropriate against divers and sundry infirmities when it is well prepared and dissolved, the which is done in this manner.

Take Iron filed in pouder, and dissolve it in strong water, the which solution will be red like bloud, then vapour away that water untill it remain in a red stone that hath no moi­sture left in it, then break the glasse, and grinde it to fine pouder, and wash it with fair water, untill the water remain sweet, then dry it on a great fire, and grinde it again, then put it into a glasse with a long neck, and put thereon Vinegar distilled likewise, and set it in warm horse-dung thirtie or fourtie dayes, and the pouder shall be dissolved into clear [Page 177] clear water, of the colour of bloud. And when that thou seest it all dissolved into water, vapour away the Vinegar, and there will remain a stone blackish of colour, which take forth of the glasse, and grind it to pouder, then dissolve it in recti­fied Aqua vitae, and then shall be finished the solution of Iron Physically, the which thou maist give safely when need shall require, and chiefly against Fluxes of the body, against spitting of bloud, the Emeroids, Scabs, and also for the Le­prosie, and Tissick, and Hectick. And this is the true soluti­on of Iron devised by me, and I promise thee, that this is one of the greatest Secrets that may be found in the world: and his vertues are such and so many, that I cannot expresse them. And therefore I would wish all Physitians and Chi­rurgians, to follow this glorious enterprize worthy of praise, by the which meanes men may come to great perfection in Physick and Chirurgerie, if they can use it when time and place shall serve.

CHAP. CXVI. Of the Secrets of Mercurie.

QUicksilver is a liquid Minerall and Volatile, the which the Alchymists call Sulphur volatilis, and will accompa­nie with all other Mettals, but with small fire they may bee separated again, and will flie away in Fume, and for that cause the Philosophers call it Servus fugitivus, as a man would say, it can hold friendship with none, but so soon as he hath done his service he flyeth away, as it is seen by Goldsmiths that gild Plate. For when they have laid him on with the Gold, they put it to the fire, and he flyes a­way, and the like it should doe when any man doth occu­pie him in any sort of infirmitie, and the order to calcine it is thus.

Take a long pot of stone that is very well glazed, and that hath a neck of a foot and a half long, and that hath a very narrow mouth as is possible, and put therein two or three pound of Quick-silver, then set the same pot in a Sallet of Iron, and lute them close together, and set it upon a Furnace, and [Page] give them fire according to Art, until the Quick-silver remain calcined; giving you charge, that your head and receiver be very well luted, least you loose some part of the Quick-silver; and thus in eight dayes it shall be finished, the which shall be apt unto solution: Also this calcination serveth to divers and sundry Medicines: It mortifieth corrosive Ulcers without any pain; the solution is made in this order.

Take the said Calx, and put it into a glasse with a long neck, and put thereon distilled Vinegar, and set it in warm sand four and twenty houres, and then give it one walm, and when it hath boiled, pour out the Vinegar, and then if there remain any Feces in the bottome, put thereon fresh Vinegar, and doe as thou diddest before; and this thou shalt doe so often, till it be dissolved into water, and when all is dissolved, evaporate away the Vinegar, that there remain but little in the bottome; then put thereto water of Honey made by distillation accor­ding to our order; and so the solution of Mercury shall be finished, the which is miraculous in many infirmities: It serveth against the Cough, Catarhe, and for those that have their sto­macks putrified with the Pox, causing them to use it with other Sirrups or Potions: It helpeth those whose Milt is indurated; and also for those, that have any sort of Fistula in any part of the body: It is also good for divers other things, the which I will not write in this place, because I would have other men to exercise themselves in the practise thereof, whereby they may find out divers other secrets as I have done.

The vertue of this Balm.

IT preserveth all things from putrefaction that is put therein, or annointed therewith, as the natural Balm doth in all respects.

If any be touched with the Pestilence, so that the heart or brain be not yet infected, give them ʒ. ii. thereof to drink, and annoint his stomack with the same, and lay him down to sweat, and in once or twice using it, by the grace of God they shall be helped, for it will suffer no venome to remain within the body: Being taken in the aforesaid order, it helpeth those that have surfeited by any meanes.

Being annointed on the stomack morning and evening, it causeth an appetite, and consumeth cold humours: Also if yee drink thereof every morning ʒ. i. fasting, it will purge the head and stomack of all superfluous moisture, and sharpeneth the sight, if yee drop now and then one drop into the eye.

Being drunk as is aforesaid, it helpeth those that are troubled with the Rheum, Catarhe, and Cough, and Stitch of the side caused of winde.

Being put into the eare, it comforteth the sight and hearing marvellously, and all impediments in the head, and consumeth all evill humours by his proper quality and nature, so that if yee use it, yee shall wonder at the operation.

It helpeth all manner of Wounds, in what place of the body soever they be, if yee wash them therewith, and lay thereon a cloth wet in the same.

If yee wash the Sciatica therewith, and lay thereon a cloth wet in the same, it taketh away the pain presently.

It expelleth gravel in the Reins, being drunk with Parsly water.

It is good against the Fever quartain, if yee drink thereof ten or twelve dayes together every morning ʒ. i. or ii. after that the stomack hath been evacuated.

[Page]It resolveth aches and swellings coming of cold, if yee bath them therewith.

It helpeth the tooth-ach, if yee hold it in your mouth so long as yee may suffer it.

It helpeth those that are troubled with the Cramp, or that have their mouthes drawn awry by that meanes, if yee drink a small quantity, and hold the same in your mouth, and then an­noint the parts therewith.

FINIS.
A TREATISE OF CHIRUR …

A TREATISE OF CHIRURGERY: PUBLISHED Wih many EXCELLENT EXPERIMENTS AND SECRETS;

Found out by the Same Author.

LONDON, Printed by G. D. 1652.

How that our Physick and Chirurgerie is better then that, the which the Ancients have commonly used.

I Here is no doubt, but that our new Physick and Chirurgerie, is better then that, the which the An­cients have used, because it helpeth the sick with more ease and speed, and much more safer, and to shew the truth, the Ancients had never knowledge of our Dia Ar [...]matico, nor of Electuario Angelica, nor of our Pil­lole Aquilone, nor did not make our Sirrupo solutivo, nor yet our magno liquore, with a number of other Medicines found out by me, the which are written in the end of this Book, with the which I have done wonderfull cures, as thou mayest read in my Thesauro de la vita humana, and truly most nece­sary for all Professors of this Art, because therein thou shalt find so many goodly experiences, as it would cause the world to wonder thereat: But to return to our purpose, I say that the Ancients, which had not knowledge of our reme­dies, they wanted also knowledge of the true Physick and Chirurgerie, as by the experience thou mayest see; I say not this to speak evill of those wise and Ancient Doctors, that were Inventors thereof, but I say it to say the truth, and ma­ny shall be my testimony of this truth. Because in many coun­tries, where our works that are Imprinted are come, they be­gin to pactice after our order. And this order of curing, I repute it not to my Science, but a work that God would re­veal unto the world through my meanes, and to shew the truth, there hath been none, that hath found the Medicines for wounds with so much ease and brevitie, as I have done.

Who hath ever found the true Remedie for the Gout, for the Quartan, for Fluxes, and all sorts of Fevers, as I have done? Or what is he that ever brought the whole Art of Physick and Chirurgerie into eight small Volumes, as I have done? What is he that ever writ of the Pestilence, and of his qualitie, and remedies, and orders to be used in the same, as I have done? And if there be any that doth not credit me, let them make experience of all that I have said; and I pro­mise [Page 2] you, and swear as I am a true Knight, they shall finde more truth then I will write at this time, being as I have said, a Work given of God, for a universall benefit of all the World, and therefore I exhort every one of the Professors of Physick and Chirurgerie, to follow this our truth, because they are of so great experience, that it seemeth miraculous unto man, as I have seen many yeers ago, to my great ho­nour, and satisfaction of the people of the world, and thus doing and working, thou shalt come to know that our Phy­sick and Chirurgerie is better and wholesomer, then that which hath been used of the Ancients untill this present time.

Certain Remedies for all Captains and Souldiers that travell either by Water or Land.

THere are three Infirmities, that offend the Souldiers in the camp above all the rest, the which are these, Fevers, Wounds, and Fluxes of the body, the which thou maiest help in this Order following, with these Medicines, that is, our Quintessence of Wine, our Balsamo, Magno liquore, Quin­ta essentia solutiva, and Specie Imperiale, and the order to use them is thus. When any hath a Fever or a Flux, then present­ly, when the disease beginneth, let him blood in one of the two Veins under the tongue, cutting it overthwart, and this thou shalt doe in the evening, then the next morning, take a dose of our Imperiall powder mixt with wine, and this ye may do with­out any diet or straight order, that being done, give him three mornings together, half an ounce of our Quintessence solutive with Broth. But if it be a Flux, and that the Pati­ent is not cured, let him stand in a cold bath of salt-water of the Sea, three or four hours or more, and he shall be per­fectly helped.

Then as concerning wounds, as well cuts as thrusts, and as well gallings with arrows, as Harquebusse-shot, and other sorts, thou shalt cure them thus. The first thing that ye shall doe to them is to wash them very clean with Urine, and then dry them well, then put therein our Quintessence of Wine, and presently [Page 3] joyn the parts together, and sow or stitch them close, then put thereupon five or six drops of our Balsamo, and upon the wound lay a cloth wet in our Magno liquore, as hot as he may suffer it, and this yee shall doe the first day. Then the next day fol­low this Order: First put thereon our Quintessence, and a little of our Balsamo, and then our Magno liquore, very hot, and never change that Medicine, and thus doing the wound shall heal with great speed, and in a quarter of the time, that the common Chirurgians are able to doe it, by the grace of God.

A short discourse of the most excellent Doctor and Knight Leonardo Phioravante Bolognesse upon Chirurgery, with a declaration of many things necessary to be known. Never written before in this order; whereunto is added a number of notable secrets found out by the said Authour.

The Preface.

IT is to be understood, that when the Almighty Creator had made the world, he also created all manner of Beasts, as well on earth as in the water, with other Foules, after which, saith the holy Scripture, he created man after his own Image and similitude, and to him gave power over all things created, and with the same grace and reason, through the which he was apt to rule, and have knowledge of all through the Spirit of God, as to have knowledge of all things whereunto he gave his mind and understanding, as it is at this present to be seen among men in the world, that have knowledge of divers and sundry things, all necessary for those that will live in the world with honour: For some understand the Art of Husbandry, which was the first Art used in the world, for so much as without it we cannot well live, as it is plainly seen. There are others that have knowledge in keeping beasts of all kinds, apt or meet for mans body, as Goats, Kine, Hogs, Hens, Geese, Horses, Mules, and such like. There are others that have knowledge in Navigation, without the which also the world would be unperfect, as it is seen by experience. There be others that have knowledge in Cosmograhie, whereby they know divers parts of the world whether men may travell. There be others that have knowledge in the Art of Warres, whereby they may help to defend their Prince and Countries in executing of justice. There be others that understand Astrologie, by the which they know the course of Planets, and their effects: Others understand the Mathe­maticks, whereby they measure land and all other things: Others study Musick to accord voices together: And others understand Physick to help the diseased bodies of humane Creatures, and also Animals of divers and sundry infirmities. There be others that understand Chirurgery, to help all manner of sores that happen unto [Page 5] men: upon which Chirurgery we will write a breif discourse, and pleasant reason, and will leave apart the Science that is doubtfull, because there is no Science in the world wherewith a man may doe good, if therewith be no practise or experience, as a man may say. The which experience is master of all things, as it is plainly seen; and therefore we will give you to understand, which of those parts be best or most necessary in this Chirurgery, either to help those that are hurt, or the Science, or experience. And we will shew the meer truth without any dissimulation or fraud, as I have alwayes done in my Works which are printed, and at this present doe intend to doe, if Almighty God give me grace, and quicken my spirits or wits, in wri­ting that which shall be to his honour, and profit to the world.

What Chirurgery is.

CHirurgery is both Science and practise, and to say the truth, he that will know the composition of mans body, must of necessity have some Science, and be Anatomist, although the same Science be a thing to be learned by practise, for I have seen many times, those which were unlearned, to be expert in the Anatomy of mans body, and those were Painters and Draw­ers, the which was necessary for them to know to frame their figures accordingly: and therefore I take not that for Science, but practise: For Science is onely that wherewith the causes of every infirmity is found out, and is of small effect to our purpose, because Chirurgery helpeth not onely the cause, but also the effect after it is known, and therefore I may say, that Chirurgery is no other then a pure and meer practise, and that it is onely necessary for the Chirurgian to know how to stitch a Wound well, to mundifie an Ulcer, and to keep it from putrifaction, and keep it from alteration, so that there run no evill humours unto the place offended, and to know all kind of Unguents that are apt to heal all kind of Wounds and Ulcers, which thing must be known by practise, And likewise to make all manner of Unguents necessary for Chi­rurgery, and for that cause I conclude most truly, that our Chirurgery is onely practise or experience. And that which causeth me to beleeve it is, that I have alwayes seen the most part of Chirurgians, when they should have any case in Chi­rurgery, they knew not what Unguent would help the sore, but many times they prove this, and that, and so continue untill they have found one that is convenient for the sore, whereunto it is applyed, and therefore this is a certain signe, that they know not by Science their Medicine to help the sore, but with experience they search it. Therefore if it be so, [Page 7] it is a sign that I have said the truth, and so conclude, that Chirurgery is a practise to help sores on mens bodies, and also on beasts, when occasion shall serve.

What Wounds are.

VVOunds are those which in Latine are called Vulnus, and of the vulgar Vulnera, and they are of two kinds, that is, simple, and compound. The simple are those that are onely in the flesh, the compound are those where are cut Sinewes, Veins, Musckles, and Bones, and these are of divers and sundry kinds, And the difference that is among them is, by the variety of the place where they are wounded, and by the difference of the weapon wherewith they were hurt, for some goe right, some overthwart, some long, some broad, some are thrusts or stocate, that offend divers parts of the body. The simple are of small importance, because if yee keep them clean and close shut, nature will heal them without any kind of Medicine. But those, where Veins are cut, have need of some art or practise, with the which they may stop the bloud, and in any wise not to suffer the wound to remain open, but to sow it up very close, so that the Vein may heal. Also those where Sinews are hurt are of great importance, and would be healed with great speed, so that the Sinews may joyn with more ease. But those where Bones are hurt, are of greater importance, for if the Bone be separated from the other, of necessity it must be taken forth before the Wound be healed. So that by this means every one may know what Wounds are, and their kinds.

Of Ʋlcers, and what they are.

ULcers are of divers and sundry kinds, and are ingendered of many causes, as hereafter I will shew. But first I will write of those kind of Ulcers that are caused of Wounds. You shall understand, that Wounds, in what part of the body soever they be, being imposthumated, or cancrenated, they change their names, and are no more called Wounds, al­though [Page 8] the originall was a wound. For when it is cancrena­ted, it is called Ʋlcera corrosiva, because it goeth eating and creeping on the flesh. But when the wound is imposthuma­ted and full of matter, it is called, Ʋlcera putrida, that is pu­trified, and it is because it is filthy and stinketh. But when it is neither cancrenated, nor yet aposthumated, but that through some evill disposition the wound is closed, and that there cometh in it evill qualities without alteration, then it is called Ʋlcera sordida, because therein is evill qualitie, and it appeareth but a little, but it is evill to heal. There be other sorts of Ulcers also, the which are caused of divers and sun­dry kinds of tumours, and the most evill and mischievous are those that are of tumours caused of the Pox, for unto those there runneth abundance of evill humours that augment the Ulcer, and they be the worst sort, for they cannot be healed by themselves, except the body be well purged and evacuated of all the humours that are offensive. There is another kind of Ulcer the which cometh of an Imposthume, as well hot as cold, and those are more gentle and easie to be helpt, if yee know the Medicines that are apt to help and dissolve those kind of Ulcers.

These are the three kind of Ulcers that commonly happen unto men and women through divers causes, as it is said be­fore, so that these are the principall causes of those malign Ulcers.

Of Imposthumes, and their kinds.

IMposthumes are a certain kinde of Tumour that are cal­led after divers manners, because they come in divers places of the bodie, as those sorts of Imposthumes that come in the Groin, which in Venice are called Pannoche, in Rome, Tencone, in Naples, Dragonselly, in Spain, Incordi, and the Ancients called them Buboni, and some with other names. There are other that come in all parts of the body, and when they come they cause great pain, and then they ripen and break of them­selves for the most part, and these in Naples, are called Au­trax, and in Rome, Chicholini, in Venice, Ʋn-nasito, in Lumbar­die, Ʋn bungo, and in Spain, Ʋn nacido mui viliaco. There is [Page 9] another kind of Imposthume, that is ingendered of a contu­sion or bruise, and is properly called Apostumatio pro Amaca­tura. In the Head there grow certain kinds of sores that are called Talpae, or Topinare, the which are of small Importance, for they may be healed in short time, and these are seen in childrens heads, that are often troubled therewith, and sometimes in their throats, and for the most part about the eares.

Of Fistulaes, and their kinds.

ALl manner of Sores that doe not siccatrize perfectly, and have communication with the inward parts, are cal­led Fistulaes, and we term them in Italian Sofio, or Spiraculo, as yee may see by experience, and this is perillous, when a Fi­stula closeth, being in the body, and specially those Fistulaes that are in the Fundament, for Nature her self doth ingender it for ease. But these Fistulaes that come in divers parts of the body are troublesome, but not perillous: Also all such sores as tarry long before they be incarnated come to Fistu­laes, and many times it cometh through their being long curing, by tenting with their tents, which are the causes that Nature maketh a Callow, and leaveth the sore so hol­low, that it will never be filled with flesh, but so remain hollow, as it is seen easily by experience. There be other sorts of Fistulaes in form of a sore, and they be those sores that most commonly come on the leggs, the which doe purge a long time, and are also very hard to heal, because if yee heal one of them presently, there will rise another hard by it, and that is a kind of Fistula▪ There is another kind of Fi­stula that is caused of those sores that are upon the bone, the which by his continuance doe break and consume the skin and the bone, and these many times remain Fistulated, but who so taketh away the cause of the sore, nature it self will pre­vail mightily, and will heal it, as may be seen daily by ex­perience, in those that be so troubled. The Fistulaes that come in the eyes, are called Fistula Lachrymosa, and they have [Page 10] some communication with the inward parts, and are evill to be healed. Because first the cause must be taken away inwardly, and then nature will heal it by it self, as I have seen by expe­rience, so that these are the kinds of Fistulaes most known unto all men, and the causes of these Fistulaes are two, and for my part I am fully perswaded it is so. The First is of wounds evill healed, that remain Fistulated. The Second cause, I find to be of sores caused of the Pox, and to shew a truth, yee shall cure them of the Pox, and their Fistulaes will heal of themselves without any other help, as it is daily to be seen. There may be many other causes the which as yet I know not, but these two are a sufficient reason, and to be considered of the Professors of this Art, if they desire to come to any excellency; and therefore I will reason no more of the matter, because the Science, and my experience will reach no further.

Of all sorts of Scabs.

THere be divers kinds of Scabs, but I will onely treat of those in which I have had most experience, and will set them forth as plainly as I can, that every one thereby may have profit. The first kind of Scab is that which is caused of Ripletion of the body, by eating much meat of great nourish­ment, and then not to digest it, so in that cause nature, to ease it self, sendeth forth that humiditie, and when it joyneth to the skin, it ingrosseth and causeth an Imposthume, and pas­sing to the outward parts, it is alreadie corrupted, and so causeth the Pustulaes, as by experience may be seen, and this kinde is a viscous and fat humour with great humidity. There is another kind of Scab that is alwaies dry with rednesse, and is small, with great heat and Itching, and the same in my judge­ment is caused by much heat of the Liver; and adustion of blood, and may be healed easily. There is another kind of great scab that hath a great dry crust on them, and they grow big, and the same is of the French Pox being new taken. There is another kind like Serpigo, that goeth creeping, and [Page 11] hath a dry crast, and hath no matter under it; and the same is also of the French Poxe inveterated. There are also divers other kinds, the which I will leave at this time, because they are of small importance, and may be helped with those Medicines which are fit for the [...]inds aforesaid.

Of Formicola, and his Effects.

THose kind of Ulcers that are commonly called Mal di Formica, are so called, because they are a kind of ma­lign Ulcers and corrosive, that goeth creeping upon the flesh, and maketh many holes that are lifted up on the sides, and are red, and these for the most part are caused of the Pox, as may be seen by experience, and these sores are evill to be healed, because thereunto runneth abundance of humours, the which cannot be resolved but with inward Medicines, that is, with exquisite Purgations that purifie the blood, and that cutteth away the evill humours that run thereunto, and cause great alteration with burning. This kinde of sore cometh many times in the head, and when it cometh in that part, it is called Tigna, or the white scall, and to shew that this is the truth, yee may see that those Medicines which heal Formicola, doth also heal the white Scall, for this is a kind of the Pox, as by the Effects yee may plainly see; for if any should say the con­trary, I would answer him again, that this may well be, be­cause the same infirmitie may be taken in the mothers womb, or as soon as the child is borne, it may take it of the Nurse that giveth it suck, if shee be infected with that disease, so that I conclude it may be so. But there are a number of that kinde of disease, which I let passe, because I have seen no ex­perience of them.

A Discourse of Wounds, and other kindes of Inward Sores.

VVOunds that are within the body, as in the stomack, or belly, or Intestinals, in the bladder, reins, or guts; The Milt, Liver, Lungs, Heart or other Muskles or Arteries, as there be a number, I confesse to know nothing therein, and [Page 12] I will shew you the reason: You shall understand, that when a wound doth offend the Interior parts, the Physitian or Chrurgian, or great Anatomist whatsoever he be, cannot know all those parts offended in the body, for after the weapon is within the bodie, it may turn, and with the point hurt other parts afar off the wound, and offend divers particular parts one different from the other, and therefore I beseech you, ex­cellent Chirurgians, when such a case cometh, how doe you know or discern which parts are hurt? but to say the truth, I beleeve in that case they know all alike, but what should I say of the cure of such a wound, if the Chirurgian know not where it is, nor of what importance, but worketh by imagi­nation, and if that Nature doth prevail, and that the wound doth heal, it is by the good fortune of the Physitian, so that for wounds inwardly I, conclude no other at this time, but will leave it to those that know more then I, and hereafter I will discourse of Ulcers and Imposthumes inwardly, what they are, and how to cure them with our order: yee shall under­stand that there are a number of kinds of Ulcers and Impost­humes that may ingender inwardly, but it seemeth to me so hard to understand, that I can determine nothing that were true, and the cause is this, that we have seen an infinite of Physitians and Chirurgians that have visited one Impost­humated, or Ulcerated, and the Physitian could not know the place, and particular of that Imposthume or Ulcer, if that the Patient do not tell him and shew him, and cause him to feel with his hand, and this is most true, and therefore if one cannot resolve him of outward things, that he may see and feel with his hand, how can he resolve him when one of those acci­dents is within the bodie, where the Patient knows not himself, which is grieved? Truly, I would gladly know what judgement they would give of that matter, for because if there be any Im­posthume or Ulcer in any part of the bodie, the sick shall feel great offence and pain, neverthelesse he cannot tell where it is, nor what part is hurt, so that I conclude, if that the Patient know not, much lesse the Physitian knoweth, and of this I have made a large discourse in Caprici medicinale, for as I have said before, in this case I know nothing. Neverthelesse, when [Page 13] it shall come to his place, I will write a discourse of the order to cure the most part o [...] [...]liters, and Imposthumes, but touch­ing wounds, I will promise no more then I have said before. Also I will write excellent Remedies of great experience, with the which all wounds, so they be not mortall, may be helpt and healed, and also the reasons convenient in that matter.

An order to use in healing all manner of Diseases appertaining unto the Chirurgian.

VVOunds and all other sorts of sores, are of sundry and divers kinds, as is aforesaid, neverthelesse the order to helpe them is not much different one from the other, if we should say onely the truth without abuse. For yee shall un­derstand, that Nature is the master of all things created, and the Physitian and Chirurgian are helpers of that Nature, as the antient Professors of the Art have affirmed. Then seeing this is so, what need we to make such adoe, having Nature that worketh so gently, if it be not hindered by the Minister, and therefore if we will speak of Wounds, I say, that the Minister hath three operations to doe and no more, and the rest leave to Nature that worketh gently. The three operations that the Master hath to doe are these: To defend the Wound so that there runneth no humours to it, and that it putrfie not, and to keep it clean, and when the Minister hath done that, let Nature work that which she will work well, and if any de­sire to see if it will be so in effect, yee may see by a Dog, for if he hath a great wound upon his body, he healeth it without any Medicine, onely with diet, and keeping it clean with his tongue, and this is most true, that those which doe help Wounds by inchantment, doe nothing but keep the Wound clean, and cause the Patient to keep a diet, and so nature work­eth as well on a Man as on a Dog, therefore let none marvell of this authority of a Dog, although I approve the like of a Christian. But for so much as it would be good to help Na­ture, that it might work with more speedinesse, as Husband­men and Gardners doe, who because they would have Nature to work the better, and quicker in their ground, doe cast thereon divers sorts of dungs, &c. The which is done onely [Page 14] to help Nature to work the quicker, and to conclude, I say, that the Chirurgian should doe the same in helping of Wounds. But as for Ulcers of divers sorts, it were necessary to find out the cause, because they come of divers causes, for when the cause is found, it will be more easie to be helped, because Ul­cers cannot come but by great distemperance of Nature in our bodies, as by great heat or cold, or by repletions of the body. Therefore in this case it is necessary to purge the bo­dy: First, to ease Nature which is offended, and to extinguish the superfluous heat or cold that is in the bodie: That being done, the minister or helper of Nature hath three things to doe. The first is to mortifie or kill the sore, the second to mundifie, and the third to incarnate, and then Nature will cicatrize it, and these three operations are to be used in Ul­cers. Also Imposthumes are caused of divers accidents, in the which it is also necessary to seek out the cause, whereby to know what purgations are fit to purge the body of the superfluous humours, and then the Minister hath three things to doe in that case. First to bring it to maturation quickly, then when it is ripe and broke, to mundifie it well, and thirdly to incarnate it, and these are the three operations that are to be done in an Imposthume to help Nature to work well, and so following this order thy work shall prove well, and goe the right way, as hereafter I will shew in his place, the ope­rations to use in the effect, with the order to help them, and also to make thy Unguents, shewing their quality and vertue, and will prove by reason those things that are doubtfull, so that every one shall be satisfied in that matter.

Of Medicines to be used in all kind of Wounds outward, with ease and brevity.

HAving declared what outward Wounds are, it is also necessary to shew the order how to cure them, with as much speed and ease as it is possible, and therefore I will be­gin first with simple Wounds that are onely in the flesh, with­out offence of Veins, Sinews, or Bones, although these need no help, but onely to joyn the lips close together, and if [Page 15] need be, to stitch them close, and then let Nature work, the which in short time will heal them, but if thou by Art wilt help nature, thou shalt annoint them with oyle of frankincense once a day. But Wounds, where Veines are cut, have need of present help, and artificiall meanes, and sufficient remedies to help it, with as much speed as may be, so that the Veins cut may joyn again together, without any great offence of the Wound, and that is done in this order. The first thing is to joyn the parts close together, and stitch it well, not as the common Chirurgians doe, but as they doe use to stitch bags, and when it is stitched close, annoint it onely upon the Wound with our Magno l [...]quore, and lay thereon a cloth wet in the same Oil very warm, then take Hypericon with the seed, Mille­folie, Viticella, ana and make thereof a powder, the which thou shalt strew upon the Wound being drest, and round about it, for this Medicine doth assubtiliate the matter that runneth unto the Wound, and taketh it forth with great ease, and without pain of the Wound, for this is the most soveraign Medicine in that case, that Nature with Art may make, and hath been proved a thousand times by experience in divers places. But those Wounds where Bones and Sinews are hurt, have need of great artifice and cunning, because they be of importance; But when the Sinews be onely offended, it were necessary to stitch them presently, as I have said of those where Veins are cut, but not to dresse it with Magno liquore, but instead thereof to take our Ole [...]m Benedictum, and Oil of Frankincense, of each alike, for those Oils doe exceedingly comfort the Sinews that are cut, and when it happeneth that a Sinew hath a puncture, or is cut half way, in that case it were necessary to cut it overthwart, because it shall bring no Spas­mus to the Wound, but if so be then that the Bone be hurt, and that there be any part to come forth, it were necessary to leave the Wound open untill the Bone cometh forth, and then to incarnate it, and this thou shalt doe with our artifi­ciall Balm, for the same serveth for Wounds, and lay there­upon the Cerot of Gualtifredo di Medi, the which healeth it with speed, and so with these orders thou mayest help all the aforesaid sorts of Wounds, and the defensive to use in these [Page 16] Wounds is this. Rec. Aqua vitae made of pure wine, and that will burne all away, and put therein Hypericon, Millefollie, Viti­cella, Betonica, and then wet a cloath in that infusion and, lay it for a defensive round about the Wound, and so thou shalt have thine intent to the great satisfaction of the Patient. Wounds in the head are helped as those are where the Sinews are offended, there are also divers other sorts of Wounds which are helped with the Remedies by us formerly men­tioned.

To help Ʋlcers of all sorts.

SEeing that Ulcers are of divers and sundry kinds, it were necessary to know of what kind and qualitie they are, so that thou mayest help them in form and order convenient, and first I will write of the corrosive Ulceras of a wound cancre­nated, mal di Formicola, and other sorts of Ulcers that go creeping upon the flesh. The cure of these kinds of Ulcers is to apply quickly our Caustike to mortifie the evill, the which thou shalt doe thus, wet a little bumbaste in our Cau­stike, and therewith wash all the sore, and then leave it so open twentie four hours without binding it fast, and when twentie four houres are past, wash the sore with strong Vinegar and water, of each a like quantitie, with charge, that there remain none of the Caustike in the sore, then lay thereon butter washed, with a colewort leaf untill the asker or dead flesh fall away, then take our Cerot Magistrale, with a little Precipitate strewed thereon, and then annoint it with Magno liquore, and lay it upon the sore, for this Cerot helpeth all manner of corrosive Ulcers without any other help, and every Plaister will serve three or four dayes, taking them off every twentie four hours, and make them clean, and then lay them on again, and as for the filthy Ulcer that I have shewed of in his Chapter, ye shall dresse them onely with our Ʋnguento magno, the which without any other help will heal them quickly: But ye must every four dayes touch them with Aqua fortis drawn from Precipitate, the which water draweth forth the offensive matter, and leaveth it putrified [Page 17] and clean; and in all other sorts of Ulcers, our Balm artifici­all, our Magno liquore, Oyle of Waxe and Turpentine, the Black Cerot of Gualtifredo, di Medi, our Cerot Magistrale, with Precipitate, are able to help, be they never so evill.

The Order to be used in curing Imposthumes of divers sorts.

THere be many sundry kinds of Imposthumes that com­eth to mans bodie, that are caused of divers and sundry accidents, and therefore must be cured by divers orders, and with sundry Medicines according to his kind, because some Imposthumes are caused of a contusion or bruised flesh, some are certain griefs, that Nature would discharge her self of, and so sendeth forth that matter, some are caused of cold, others of melancholy humours, and others are caused of cor­ruption of the Pox, and these are the kindes of Impost­humes that commonly come, and hereafter I will shew the order to cure them one after another.

And first of those that are caused of a contusion, because it is bruised flesh, for every contusion must be putrified and brought to matter, therfore make a maturative, and bring it to suppuration, and when you know there is matter, pre­sently launce them, and dresse them with this Medicine as well within as without, the which without any other help will heal any great contusion. But you must make the Un­guent fresh every day, and with new Eggs, yee shall mix the yoalk of an Egg with our Magno liquore, and therewith dresse them. And as for those Imposthumes that come by in­disposition of Nature, are certain Sborine, a word so called in Italian, by the which Nature would prevail: it were neces­sary to let those have their cures according to Nature, untill they break of themselves, and when they are broken, dresse them within with this Unguent. ℞ Oyle of Roses, ℥. vi. Li­targe of Gold in fine powder, ℥. ii. Storax liquida, ℥. i. Turpentine two ounces, yellow Wax, ℥. iii. mix them and boyl them one the fire untill it be black, and if it be too hard, put thereto more oyle of Roses, and make it in form of an Unguent, and therewith dresse those kindes of Imposthumes, [Page 18] and lay thereon the Cerot Diapalma, and therewith will be wrought miracles. Also for those Imposthumes caused of cold, yee shall use hot Medicines and attractives: The Cerot of Oxicrocii is excellent in those kind of Imposthumes, our Balm artificiall, or the water, and such like things as are tem­perate by Nature. But those Imposthumes that have their Originall of the French Pox, are evill and malign, because their cause is malign and evill, and therefore their cure is with great purging, and to let the Imposthume ripe of himself, and when ye launce it, dresse it within with our Ʋnguento ma­gno, mixed thus, ℞. Ʋnguento magno ℥. ii. Magno liquore ℥ i. Precipitate, ℥. ss. mix them well together, and therewith dresse the Imposthume, the which will heal quickly and well, and lay thereon our Cerot Magistrale, with this charge, that in all the cures aforesaid yee purge the body well, so that the humours run not unto the place offended, and use defensives according to the kind of Imposthume, as oyle of Frankincense, of Turpentine of Wax, of Honey, Aqua vitae: all these are excellent defensives by themselves, annointing them round about the Imposthume.

The Order to cure all manner of Fistulaes.

FIstulaes, as I have said before, are of divers kinds, and caused of divers accidents, and so likewise they have need of di­vers Medicines, and first I will write of those Fistulaes that come of Wounds evill healed, and that have made a callow in that order that Nature cannot siccatrize, and so remain Fistu­lated, and the cure of these kind of Fistulaes is to put there­in a Rupture that doth cut and mortifie the callow, and cau­seth it to fall away, and then with incarnating Medicines, incar­nate them, and siccatize them, and this is the true cure of these Fistulaes. But those kind of Fistulaes that nature causeth to ease her self of some accident, commonly come in the lower parts about the fundament, and they be very perillous, and and not to be healed as they before were. But they must be with purging the body, stomack, and head, the which is to be done thus, First, purge them ten or twelve daies with our Ma­gistral [Page 19] Sirrup, then give them our Aromatico, and drink thereon a little white Wine, then purge the head with a perfume made of Myrrha and Cinaber, after these things be done yee shall rectifie the Liver with some decoction fit for that purpose, as of Lignum Sanctum, or Sarsa parilla, or such like that work effect, for this Medicine doth also help Fistula lachrymosa, that commonly come about the eyes or eares. There be other Fistulaes in form of a sore, which must be helpt with purging, and lay upon the sore our Cerot Magistrale with Precipitate, and annoint it with Magno liquore, for with this Cerot one­ly may all Fistulated sores be healed, for it doth mundifie and afterwards siccatrize it, there be also divers such like matters that are easily cured, if ye apply thereunto those Me­dicines that are appropriate.

To help all manner of Scabs.

THe kinds of Scabs be many, and caused of divers cau­ses, and their cures are also divers wayes. Those that are caused of repletion of the body, and of grosse blood, the which are caused by eating abundance of such meats as are of great nourishment, the which if thou wilt cure them, it were necessary to purge them with our Sirrupo Solutivo, ten or twelve daies, then give him or her one drachm of our Aro­matico in the morning fasting, and drinke thereon a cup of sweet Wine, then let him sweat three or four times, and after annoint him with our Ʋnguento magno two or three times, and it will heal him of those kind of scabs.

Now to cure that kind of seab that is red and small, and causeth great itching, you shall make a decoction of Hearbs, that cool the liver and purifie the blood, as Borage, Bu­glosse, Endive, Maiden-hair, Liver-wort, Harts-tongue, Agri­mony, Citrach, Succorie, and such like Hearbs, then purge with Alves, the juyce of Elder roots, Hiera pigra solutiva, and such like, as doth cool the Liver and Blood, and then annoint them with Ʋnguento di Lithargirio, and therewith you shall help all those kinds of seabs. There be also certain great scabs over all the body, the which are very thick, and those [Page 20] are a kind of the Pox, the which may be helpt with giving them our Pillole contra il mal Francese, the quantity is accord­ing to the discretion of the Physitian, and these Pills yee shall take three times every third day, and then annoint them with our Ʋnguento magno, and he shall be helped. There is another kind of scab that goeth creeping with a dry crust like unto Petigine, and those are the meer Pox inveterated, and and the order to cure them is thus, give them our Sirrup a­gainst the melancholie humour, because it purgeth the blood and cooleth the Liver, and dissolveth that viscous humour that ingendereth that crust, that being done, give them our Aromatico, and annoint them with our Magno liquore, and he shall be perfectly helped in short space. There are other kind of Scabs that come through great cold, and those are healed onely with annointing them with oyle of Frankin­cense three or four times.

To help Mal di Formica.

THose be certain Ulcers which go creeping in the upper part of the flesh, and have many orifices or mouthes, and these are caused of the Pox being inveterated, the which are cured in that order that the Poxe is, and that is this: First, purge the bodie with our Electuario Angelica, the which pur­geth away grosse and malign humours, and evacuateth the stomack of choler and flegm, this being done, cause the Patient to sweat, for that will assubtiliate the humours, and cause them to come forth, that being done, take our Cerot Ma­gistrale, and strew thereon Precipitate, and then annoint it with our Magno liquore, and lay it upon the sore, and there let it lye twentie four hours before ye change it, then make it clean, and lay it on again, for that Plaister may serve four daies, making it clean every 24. hours, and when the Plaister will draw no more matter, you shall use our Ʋnguento magno, the which will help it in short time. But if it doe happen that this Order doe not cure them, then it would be necessary for them to be annointed with the Unction for the Pox, and to annoint them so long till the mouth be sore, and when that [Page 21] sign doth appear, annoint them no more, for he will spit or vapour at the mouth for twelve or fifteen dayes, and as soon as he vapoureth make a Bath and wash him well, and wash the mouth with Wine, and without all doubt it shall help him God willing; now hereafter I will write of certain things which are used of common Chirurgians, with a brief discourse upon them.

Of the Tow which is laid upon Wounds by common Chirur­gians.

THe pleggits of Tow, which are laid upon Wounds when they are first stitched is made in this order. ℞. The white of an Egge, Salt, and Rosewater, and beat them toge­ther, and when the Wound is stitched then lay it thereon, because the bloud should stint, and the Wound remain shut, so that it may be helped with more ease. Now touching this, I will shew thee a reason why they use it in their first cure, yee shall understand, that every like desireth his like to succour him, or keep company with him, and therefore the Antients, our antient Professors of Art, willed the white of an Egge to be occupied in Wounds, because it is a substance of flesh like unto the other flesh; and to declare the truth, I will prove it by naturall reason, for yee shall understand, that the white of the Egge is that part which ingendereth the flesh, the skin, and the feathers of the Hen, and the yolk ingendereth onely the guts and other intrals of the Animall, then seeing the white is that which ingendereth the flesh onely, it is like unto flesh, as it is said before; then the Salt is a materiall which preserveth all things from putrifaction, as is seen by expe­rience daily, and for that consideration it was put in this Com­position to preserve the flesh, the Rosewater by nature is cold and dry, and by his coldnesse defendeth the inflammation, and by his drinesse is repercussive, and mittigateth, so that these are the reasons why the said Tow is laid upon Wounds, but I would to God that such things were used, as by their excel­lent operations would help and heal from the beginning to the latter ending and to leave of such trifling orders.

Of the digestive with the which they dresse wounds after the afore­said Tow.

AFter that the Tow is taken away from the Wound they dresse it with a Composition called digestive, because it digesteth the Wound, although this Medicine be somewhat scrupulous, and against Science, and the reason is this, yee shall understand, that when a man is wounded, the place be­fore was sound, and therefore being wounded, our true duty is to help the same Wound, and not to digest or rot it, as commonly all Chirurgians doe, for by rotting of it in that order it is perillous, and more dangerous to be cured, as is daily seen by experience, and this no man can deny. But now I will follow our Regiment in shewing what this di­gestive is, the which is made thus.

℞ The yolk of two Eggs, Turpentine washed ℥. i. Oil of Roses ℥. ss. mix them in an Unguent, and this is the di­gestive wherewith they dresse it untill the sore have made matter enough, and then they use to dresse it with Medicines much differing from the same; but I marvell much at the diversity of this matter, that this digestive being applyed to a putrified Ulcer worketh divers effects, for it healeth it divine­ly: and moreover, yee shall understand, that if it be applyed unto when they be incarnated, it will sicatrize them marvel­lously, for truly these are things worthy to be known, and he that understandeth the reason, I accompt him to be wise, for if this digestive be laid on fresh wounds it putrifieth and rot­teth them, again being laid on a filthy sore it doth mundifie and heal, and then if it be applyed on a Wound incarnated, it sicatrizeth and healeth it, for this I have done divers and sundry times, the which is to be wondred at.

Of the mundificative Ʋnguent wherewith they dresse the Wounds after they are digested to mundifie them.

VVHen Wounds are come to digestion, and that they purge, alwayes they change Unguents, and they [Page 23] apply Unguents that have vertue to mundifie the Wound and make it clean, so that it may the better incarnate, and that Unguent is called properly a mundificative, the which is made of Barly flower, and Hony, or Hony of Roses, and Oil of Ro­ses, and this is the mundificative they use eight or ten dayes together, for if the Wound were not well mundified, it would never incarnate well, so that this Unguent is most necessary in that operation, in respect of the ingredient.

Of their incarnative wherewith they dresse the Wound after it is mundified.

VVHen that the Wound is mundified, so that thereunto cometh small quantity of matter, then it is necessary to apply Unguents that incarnate, so that they may siccatrize with more ease, and this kind of incarnative is in the most use among the common Chirurgians, the which is made of Tur­pentine, Wax, and Frankincense, and a little Oil of Roses mixt on the fire, and this is their incarnative.

A rare secret, the which this Authour did send unto a speciall friend of his, being in the warres in Africa, the which helpeth all Wounds, either by cut, thrust, galling with Arrows, or har­quibush-shot, or otherwise.

THe first thing that yee shall doe is, to wash the Wound very clean with Urine, and then dry it very well, then put therein our Quintessence of Wine, and presently joyn the parts close together, and stitch or sow them well, but in any wise sow nothing but the skin, for otherwise it would cause great pain, then put thereon five or six drops of our Balsamo, and upon the Wound lay a cloth wet in our Magno liquore, as hot as he may suffer it, and this doe the first day, then the next day follow this order, first put thereon our Quintessence, and a little Balsamo, and then our Magno liquore very hot, and ne­ver change this Medicine untill it be whole.

Of those Ʋnguents that siccatrize Wounds.

THe Unguents that siccatrize Wounds after they are in­carnated be of divers kinds, although they work one effect in siccatrizing, or causing a skin. The digestion that is written of before, being applyed upon a Wound incarnated, doth siccatrize it with speed, the like doth Diachilon, and Ʋnguentum de Tutia. The Cerot called Gratia Dei, although these be sundry Compositions one differing from another, yet in effect they serve all to this siccatrization, as yee may see by experience, and this they doe, because they be tempe­rate and of good qualities, and so they help nature to work more quickly, and they are called helpers of nature. But these kind of Unguents that work by themselves, as Ʋnguento Apostolorum, the Caustick, Aegypciacum, the Rottery, and such like Unguents as work with violence, and suppresse na­ture, and doe that which nature cannot doe by it self without help, but all those Unguents that are not violent neither in heat or cold, are apt to siccatrize Wounds, and all sores, that are mundified and incarnated.

A Remedy to help a Wound with great speed, of our invention.

VVOunds of divers and sundry sorts are very perillous of life, but to help them quickly, because the Patient may take no harm, yee shall use this secret, wash the Wound with our water of Balm, and cleanse it well, and lay there­on clothes wet in Oil of Frankincense made by distillati­on, and therewith thou shalt heal any great Wound in short time, as I have proved divers and sundry times, in sundry causes.

An excellent secret to heal Wounds of Gun-shot, or Arrowes, with­out any danger.

IF thou wilt help the aforesaid Wounds, it were necessary first to joyn the parts close too, and wash it with our [Page 25] Aqua celestis, and lay thereon our Oleum Balsami, and therewith thou shalt save the lives of many wounded persons.

A Discourse upon old Wounds that are not yet healed, and their soveraign Remedy.

VVHen that Wounds are evill healed, and that they im­posthumate, and that the Arme, or Leg, or other parts where they were wounded, is indurated and full of pain, thou shalt use this secret of our invention, never known before of old nor new Writers, for it is of great vertue, and many times proved: first yee shall wash the Wound well, and make it clean round about, then wash the Wound with our Quint­essence, and make it to fume, because our Quintessence doth open the pores, and assubtiliateth the matter, and causeth the humour to come forth, that being done, annoint it all over with our Magno liquore, and thus doing, before three dayes end he shall feel great ease, and in short time it shall be helped, because this Medicine taketh away the hardnesse, and healeth the Wound, and comforteth the place offended.

To dissolve a Bruise in short time, when it is new done.

THese are called Contusions, unto the which nature sendeth quickly great quantity of humidity, and in that place it causeth Imposthumation: But if our Chirurgians would be diligent and quick, all Contusions might be helped with great ease in short time, and therefore if thou wilt work miracles in the cure, use this our meanes, and it will turn to thy great ho­nour, and the remedy is this.

℞. Liquid Vernish three pound, yellow Wax ℥. iv. com­mon Ashes ℥. vi. Aqua vitae rectified two pound. Put all the aforesaid matters in a Retort of glasse, and distill it with a gentle fire untill all the substance be come forth, the which will be Oil and water, the which yee shall separate, and keep them, and when occasion serveth, annoint the Bruise there­with, and lay thereon a cloth wet in the same, for this is a mi­raculous Medicine, experimented and proved by reason, for [Page 26] an experiment without reason is as a man without clothes, and therefore if thou wilt know great and rare secrets never writ­ten before, looke in my Spechio del scientia universali, and in my Thesauro del vita humana, and therein thou shalt find strange things proved by reason and experience, the which books God willing, I mean to set forth in the English tongue to the profit of my Country.

To help a Wound quickly that is in perill of any accident.

VVOunds in some parts of the body are very dangerous of life; and especially where Sinewes be cut or peirced, or Veines or Muscles hurt, or Bones broke, and by an infinite of other particulars, which being open or evill healed, the Pa­tient may be in danger of life, because the winde entereth in, and they cause pains and inflammation, and therefore to avoid all these aforesaid matters, so that the Wound shall have no detriment, use this remedy. First joyn the parts close to­gether, and put therein our Quintessence, and lay thereon a cloth wet in our Balm, and bind it fast that the air get not in, for it is very hurtfull; yee shall understand, that these are two of the excellentest Medicines that may be found, because our Quintessence doth assubtiliate the bloud, and taketh it forth, and taketh away the pain, and the Balm doth warm and comfort the place offended, and will not suffer any matter to run thereunto by any meanes, for this is most true, as I have proved divers and sundry times, and alwayes have had good successe.

To stop the flux of bloud in Wounds with great speed.

VVHen there is any great flux of blood in Wounds, by reason of some vein that is cut, and that the Chi­rurgians would stop it, it were necessary to stitch it well, but not as the common Chirurgians doe, with wide stitches, but stitch it very close and hard, and put therein our Quintessence, and upon the Wound strew the bloud of a man dried in powder, and lay upon the bloud a cloth wet in our Balm [Page 27] artificiall very warm, and upon that bind the Wound with li­gaments very streight, and every day twice wash it with our Quintessence, and round about annoint it with our Balm, and also cast thereon our secret powder for Wounds, and that doe morning and evening every day, without opening of the Wound, and in that time the Wound will remain well, and the veins will be in a manner healed so that they will not bleed, giving you charge, that the Wounded man keep no diet, be­cause the vertue being weak relaxeth the veins, and that causeth the flux of blood.

Another Remedy to stay the flux of bloud in a Wound.

VVHen there is a great flux of bloud in a Wound, the perfectest remedy is to stitch it very close, then take mans bloud being dried, and made into powder, and cast it upon the Wound, and bind it somewhat streight, and so let it remain four and twenty hours, and when yee unbind it, take heed that yee remove nothing, and cast on more dried bloud upon the Wound, annoint it round about with our Oleum Philosophorum de Turpentina & Cera, and bind it up again other four and twenty hours, and then bind it gently, and annoint the Wound with Oil of Frankincense, and so in short time it will be whole, giving thee great charge, that yee put in no tent or such like, and then thou shalt see mi­racles.

Of our Cerot Magno, that helpeth against all sorts of Sores and Wounds.

THis Cerot is of great vertue, and healeth all manner of Sores and Wounds, if it be spread on a cloth and laid thereon, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Galbanum ℥. i. Ammoniacum ℥. ii. Oppoponax ℥. ii. Ari­stolochia longa ℥. i. new Wax ℥. xviii. fine Mirrh, Olibanum, Verdiguieco, ana ℥. i. Bdellium ℥. ii. Gum of the Proin tree ℥. ii. Lapis h [...]matites ℥. ii. Turpentine, Frankincense, of each ℥. iiii. Oil of Wax ℥. iii. Beat all those that are to be beaten, [Page 28] and searce them finely, and keep every one by himself, then dissolve the Gums in distilled Vinegar, according to Art, and then vapour away the Vinegar again, and strain the gums through a cloth, then take the Wax with as much sweet oyle and melt them on the fire, and when they are melted, put thereunto ℥. ii. of Litarge of gold finely searced, and stir them continually untill it be boyled, the which ye shall know by this token. Put a feather therein, and if it be boyled e­nough, it will burn straightwaies, or else let it boil untill it burn it, then take it from the fire, and cool it a little, and then put in the gums and stir them well together, and set it on the fire again, and it will rise with a great noise, and therefore let it boyl untill it do fall down again, then take it from the fire, and put thereunto all the aforesaid powders, and stir it untill it be cold, and therewith thou shalt work marvellous cures, if it be made well, according to Art.

Of our Magistrall Ʋnguent that helpeth divers sorts of Sores.

THis Unguent is appropriate for many kind of sores, be­cause it comforteth the sore, and taketh away the pain, and draweth the matter from the lower parts or bottom of the sore, the which matter is cause of the pain: It keepeth also from accidents, giving you charge that it be made ar­tificially, for otherwise it will not be of so much vertue, and this is the Unguent.

℞. Litarge of Gold, four ounces, Oyle of Roses, two pound; boil them in a Copper pan so long, as if yee put a feather therein, it will burn it, then it is sod, then put thereto of new Wax, ℥. vi. Storax liquida, two ounces, common Honey, three ounces, then let it boil awhile untill they be well incorporated, then take it from the fire, and put thereto Olibanum, Myrrha, Mercurie Precipitate, Oyle of Wax, Oyle of Turpentine, Oyle of Frankincense, of each two ounces, mix them well till they be incorporated, then put thereto pure rectified Aqua vita, ℥. iiii. and mix them well, [Page 29] and then it is ended; and this is of my invention, where­with I have done very strange cures.

To make Oyle of Frankincense.

TAke a Retort of glasse well luted, and fill it half sull of Frankincense, and for every pound of Frankincense, put thereunto ℥. iii. of common Ashes finely searced, then distill it in sand, and the first that cometh forth will be water, the which will be clear, then increase the fire, and there will come forth an oyle of the colour of a Rubie, the which keep close in a glasse, the first water is of marvellous vertue in divers operations, but one miraculous experiment I will not leave to write of, because it is a thing very necessary, and it is this. For those that have chilblains, or kibes, or chops in the hands or feet that cometh through cold, yee shall first perfume the parts that are sore over the fume of hot water, so that they may sweat, then dry them and wash them with the aforesaid water, and put on a pair of gloves, and in short time they shall be whole, it helpeth also the white scall and scabs, and such like things. The Oyle serveth in many operations, and specially in all cold diseases; if they be inwardly, give thereof every morning one scruple to drinke, and if they be outward an­noint. Also it helpeth all manner of wounds be they never so great: If yee annoint them therewith, and keep them close from the ayre.

And in any wise use no tenting to keep them open, but wet a cloth therein, and lay it thereon, and in short space they will be healed, also it dissolveth a bruise in short space if yee annoint it often therewith, this oyle serveth also for Painters to make Varnish.

Of Oyle of Wax, and his Effect.

THis Oyle of Wax is marvellous excellent, for so much as it serveth for the most part against all diseases; which Oyle Raymond Lulli doth approve to be a more heavenly and divine Medicine then humane, and is most rare for wounds, but [Page 30] it is not good for common Chirurgians, because it helpeth a great wound in ten or twelve daies at the most, but as for small wounds, it healeth them in three or four daies, annoint­ing onely the wound therewith, and lay thereon clothes wet in the same. Also this oyle worketh miracles against divers diseases inwardly, if yee give thereof one drachm with white wine, and as for those whose hair and beard doe fall away, it is a rare thing and of great profit, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. A retort of glasse well luted, and put therein what quan­tity of Wax you will, so that it be not half full, and for every pound of Wax, put thereunto four ounces of the powder of Bricks, then set it in a furnace, and give it gentle fire untill all the substance be come forth, the which oyle will be con­gealed hard, the which is his perfection, for if you will distill it so many times that it congeal no more, it will be too hot and sharp, and not to be used within the body in any wise, but the first distillation you may use safely inwardly, and make Unctions for any kind of disease where need shall require, and alwaies it will be good, and doe no hurt in any wise in any disease, and therefore this Oyle ought to be had in great regard of all men.

To help the Tooth-ach, that is caused of rotten teeth, or that cometh of a descention of the Head.

THe teeth being rotten or corrupted alwayes causeth great pain, and many times it cometh of a descention from the head and such like humours, as Catarrs, Erisipella, but let it come of what cause it will, I will shew a remedie of great im­portance, and it is very short, yee shall take our Aqua reale, and hold it in your mouth a good while, and then spit it out again, and this yee shall doe for three dayes together every day once, then afterward it were necessary to wash your mouth in like manner with our Aqua balsami for the space of a moneth, and so the tooth-ach shall be taken away with ease, for this is our Secret, and may be used in all times of the year.

Against a stinking Breath.

THe Breath may stink through many causes, as by Ulcers in the mouth, or by corrupt and rotten teeth, and sometime it cometh of the stomack, and that is evill to be helpt, and therefore if thou wil [...] help these, thou must use divers Re­medies, and first to help those that have their mouthes ulce­rated, yee shall give them a quantity of our Pillele aquilone, and then let them wash their mouthes with our Aqua reale, and so the Ulcers shall be helpt, and the mouth shall not stinke. But when the stench cometh of rotten teeth, use the aforesaid remedie or Medicine that is written for the tooth-ach, the which will make the teeth as white as snow, and will ake no more, but when the stink cometh from the sto­mack, it were necessary to purge the body with our Sirrup Sclutivo, six or seven dayes, and then to take our Aromatico, that being done, take rectified Aqua vitae, and the water of Honey, and oyle of Turpentine, of each alike, mix them well together, and every morning drinke thereof ℥. ss. fasting, for the space of of a moneth or thereabout.

To help all such persons that have a great Cough in the Sto­mack.

THe Cough doth come of divers and sundry causes, but let it come of what cause it will, it alwaies offendeth the stomack and the head, for alwaies when the stomack is offen­ded, of necessitie the head is offended, because it hath com­munication with the Stomack, so that the Stomack [...] cause of the pains in the head, and therefore it is necessary to help the stomack first, and that thou shalt doe with our Pillole aquilo­ne, the which is written in this Book following, and if so bee you cannot take Pills, take our Aromatico, this being done, if there be no Fever, give him every morning, ℥. i. of our E­lectuarie Magistrale per la tosse, and every night annoint his stomack with Magno liquore, and also his head and nosthrils, but if it happen that the aforesaid things help it not, then [Page 30] [...] [Page 31] [...] [Page 32] take the bloud of the Liver-vein, and purge the body with our Sirrup against the melancholie humour, and so by the grace of God they shall remain healed.

To help those that cannot hold their water.

THis proceedeth of two causes principally, the first is, of superfluous heat of the body, through the which heat, na­ture doth assubtiliate too much that humid part, and conti­nually doth send it down into the Bladder. The second cause is, that the pores are too much relaxed or opened, by the which operation the Urine doth passe without retention, and these are the two causes why the Urine cannot stay, and this cometh commonly to young children, because they are very hot of complexion, and the order to help them, is this.

Give them our Pillole Aquilone three times, the quantitie is from ʒ. i. to one and a half; that being done, yee shall make them a decoction of Hysope of the mountain, and put therein Sugar, and this they shall use ten or twelve daies at the least, for this mundifieth the place offended, and disposeth it to solution. Then after this is done, yee shall give him for ten daies together half a drachm of Mastick, with a little Plan­tain water, for this is hot and restringeth the pores, and in­grosseth the Urine, and so the Patient shall remain whole of that infirmitie, by the vertue of the aforesaid three Medicines, and it is a very easie cure, and soveraign for that purpose. But sometime there happeneth a Flux of Urine somewhat like this, and it is not of the aforesaid causes, but of causes much different from them,, for this is in men and women of age, and thi [...] I find to be caused of the Pox that causeth the Flux, and they void certain threds which some call G [...]norea, and the remedie thereof is onely with great purging and sweating, and then to annoint them five or six nights with our Ʋrguento magno, and keep them warm in bed untill ye have en­ded to annoint him, and then go to the stow, and he shall be helpt of that infirmitie.

To help those that cannot make water.

THe Urine is staid through divers and sundry causes, and the principall are three, of the which one is the Stone that in­gendereth in the Bladder, for alwaies it hangeth down in the neck of the Bladder, and stoppeth the Meatus, or pores that the Urine cannot passe, the which grieveth the Patient mar­vellously. The other is caused of gravell, or grosse and vis­cous humours that cannot passe the pores, and so cause that retention of Urine with great pain. The third is caused of an obstruction or restriction of the pores or conduits, where the Urine doth passe, and so keepeth the Urine within with great pain, so that these bee the three chiefest causes of the retenti­on of Urine

The cure of the first cause which is the Stone, is to purge them well, and then to use our most soveraign Remedie that is written in this Book following, the which is of great ver­tue to break the Stone, as I have proved many times, but when this Medicine is not able to break it, then it is necessa­ry to cut it forth, and this is all concerning the first cause.

To help the second cause, it were necessary to use Purga­tions that purge the Reins well, and then to give them our Aromatico, and then to annoint the Reins six dayes every day once with Ʋnguento magno, and with this Medicine thou shalt help him perfectly.

To cure the third cause it were necessary to purge with aperative things, and then to annoint his Reins, and under the members and belly with our Balm artificiall, and give him to drinke the powder of Hoglice, or Centum pedes, that are found under stones, and by the grace of God he shall be perfectly whole.

To help those that have great burning of their Ʋrine.

THe burning of the Urine may come of divers and sun­dry causes, but I find four principall, of which one is the Stone in the Bladder being great or small. The second cause [Page 34] is a certain heat, the which corrupteth the place where it passeth and carrieth forth, as it were, certain long threds, the which causeth that burning. The third cause is a certain viscousnesse, the which holdeth to the bottome of the Uri­nall, and it will not well break, and this is called Gonorrea. The fourth cause is certain fluxes of Urine caused of some kind of the Pox, as yee may see by those that use company with evill women, and take harm, for presently this burning cometh, and therefore this sheweth me plainly, that it is the Pox that causeth the burning of Urine.

But if thou wilt help the aforesaid four causes, thou mayest doe it with ease having the true Art of a good Physitian, and the remedie of the first cause coming of the Stone, is to take it forth of the Bladder.

The second cause is to be helpt with purging with our Sirrupo Solutivo, and then after that, to use our oyle of Vi­triall compound, taking thereof every morning, ℥. i. and so they shall remain helped.

The third cause is helpt with taking every [...]en dayes a quan­titie of our Aromatico, and so with this onely Remedie they shall be helped.

The fourth cause is helped with Medicines appropriate for the Pox, and to annoint them with Ʋnguento magno.

To help those that have great pain of the Gout.

THe Gout is a corrupt and malign infirmitie, and proper­ly ingendered of corruption, as it is plainly seen in those that are troubled therewith, and to prove it to be true, Na­ture doth shew it well, because you may see how great the alteration is of that accident, and seeing that humour is cau­sed of a windie humour, and alteration of the bloud, as is seen by experience, I beleeve the same disposition hath his originall and beginning of the stomack, for so much as all those that are troubled with that disease, the first sign that appeareth unto them, is a great pain in the Stomack, three or four dayes or more before the grief cometh, and then the pain increaseth exceedingly, so that by the said sign, I judge [Page 35] this accident cannot proceed of other place then the sto­mack, and to affirm it better, yee shall understand, that those which are troubled therewith can find no better remedy then to evacuate the stomack from all corruption, and therefore if thou wilt help them of that accident, the first thing that yee shall doe is, to give them a quantity of our Aromatico in the morning fasting, and drink thereon a little white Wine, that being done, it would be necessary to make a fomentation with Nettles that be well boiled in water, and then to an­noint them with our Balsamo artificiato, and so for that time the Gout will be gone, and will remain away for a long time.

But if God permit me life, I will hereafter set forth the order to help the Gout that it shall never come again, with a certain order to be observed in the same, found out by this Authour, and hath been proved an infinite number of times in divers places, and on divers noble men, as yee may well un­derstand in his Thesauro della vita humana.

A remedy against the Pestilence, that preserveth those that use it.

THe Pestilence is a certain corrupt humour, which is the cause of the evill disposition of the air that is corrupted and poysoned, and it is so contagious, that in six and thirty hours it corrupteth the body, and causeth them to dye, and therefore if any will defend them from that infection, they may doe it by the help of God and the Physitian with these Medicines; the first thing is to confesse our selves unto Al­mighty God, and to pray heartily unto him, and then as con­cerning Physicall Medicines, three things are to be used, which may save the lives of many: The first thing is to evacuate the stomack, the second to sweat, the third unction. And touching the first, yee shall use every three dayes our Pillo [...]e Aquilone, for they evacuate the contagiousnesse, and will not let it corrupt the body. For the second, yee shall cable them to sweat by artificiall meanes, for that evacuateth a certain matter very apt to corrupt. And the third is, to annoint all [Page 36] the body with our Balm artificiall, for that preserveth the bo­dy, and defendeth it from the contagiousnesse, so that by these three meanes men and women may be preserved from that vio­lent death.

To help Pellaria, that is a disease which causeth the hair and beard to fall away,

THis Pellaria is a certain kind of fantasticall infirmity, of the which we by practise doe know the cause, which is by using company with women corrupted with the Pox, and by the same practise we see, that those whose hair doe fall away, doe fall into great infirmities of the Pox, although not all, yet the most part, and therefore if thou wilt help that accident, it were necessary to purge them with our Sirrupo Solutivo eight or ten dayes together, that being done, give them our Arc­matico, and then annoint the place where the hair is fallen away every evening with our Balm artificiall, so that with the use of these three Medicines the Patient shall remain per­fectly whole of that matter, because the Sirrup purgeth the whole body universally, and the Aromatico purgeth the sto­mack and the head, and the Balm comforteth and defendeth the place where the hair is fallen, so that it shall fall no more, for this I have proved an infinite of times. You shall under­stand, that there be two other kinds of Pellaria, the which will not be helped in the aforesaid order, for the one cometh of a great fear, and the other cometh because they have had Mal di Massuca, and their heads be corrupted by that meanes, and for these two I know no remedy, but to let nature have her course.

To help a Carnositie in the Yeard.

THe Carnositie that cometh in the Yeard hindereth the Urine so that it cannot passe, and groweth in the mouth of the bladder, and is a kind of matter ingendered in that place, the which is much like unto an Emerode that cometh in the neck of the intestine about the fundament, and because it is a [Page 37] grosse and ulcerated matter, the urine passeth with difficultie and great burning, the which is very painefull unto those that have it, but if thou wilt helpe that inconvenience, it were necessary to purge the body well, and to keep a diet, and to drink the Decoction of Hypericon made with Hony, and use to eat dry meats as much as is possible, and then make certain little wax Candles of Wax and Frankincense, and then make this Unguent.

℞. Red Lead ℥. i. white Hony ℥. i. Butter ℥. ii. white Wine as much as will suffice to incorporate them in a liquid form on a soft fire, and then take ten quills that hath bloud in them, out of the wing of a young Pigeon that is fat, and there­with stir the Unguent when it boileth, and when one quill is dried take another, and so change them untill the Wine be consumed, and then it is made, and when thou wilt occupie it, take one of the said Candles of wax, and upon the end put of this Unguent, and put it into the Yeard untill it touch the Carnositie, and this thou shalt use day by day, untill the Can­dell passe without any impediment, and then the Patient shall be helped, for this is most true, and I have proved it an infinite of times, to my great credit, and content of the Patient.

To help the white Scall.

THis disease being so odious is a corrupt humour, which is not onely in the head as many doe think, but it depend­eth of the inward parts, and hath communication with the head, and this humour is like unto the Fume, for continually it vapoureth up, and when it can ascend no more because it is hindered in the skin, then it settleth, and ingrosseth, and causeth the head to break forth in that grievous order as is seen. But I will shew a secret to help it, so that it shall never come again, and the order to make it is thus. You shall give them our Sirrupo Solutivo eight or ten dayes together, that being done, give them our Pillole Aquilone three times, the which pills must be taken every three dayes once, that being done, take Sinaber finely beaten ℥. ii. Olibanum, Mirrha, ana. ʒ. i. mix them together, and divide it into [...]ive parts, and make [Page 38] thereof five perfumes in five mornings, and cover their heads with a cloth, so that it touch not the head, then let the powder be cast on by little and little untill it be spent, upon a chafing­dish of coals, and so let them stand covered one hour with­out moving, and this doe every one of the times, that being done, annoint the head for the space of a moneth with Oil of Wax, and Turpentine, and they shall be helped, for this is a remedy that cannot fail, for I have proved it an infinite of times, in Palermo, in Mesina, in Naples, in Rome, and in Venice, and alwayes I have had good successe, to my great credit, and profit of the diseased person.

To help those Carvoli that come upon the Yeard, and their causes.

THose Carvoli that come upon the Yeard are of divers kinds, as by reason and experience thou mayest see, but the most part are taken by using the company of lewd and cor­rupt women infected with the Pox, and those are the worst kind, for they are the first originall of the Pox, and of those Carvoli come, Pannochi, or Botches, and certain great Scabs, Pellaria, Aches, and Tumours, and an infinite of other evill effects, and these are the first kind. There are another kind, which commonly come of their own accord by reason of heat, and those are easie to be helped, and are not perillous or painfull. There is another kind, the which is as though it were scorched or burnt, the which cometh through debility of the Yeard, and having company with women, and these are also of small importance.

The first kind are certain Ulcers that come upon the end, and some upon the proper substance of the Yeard, and some upon the skin, and the order to cure them is thus. Yee shall mortifie them within and without with our Caustick and when they are mortified yee shall dresse them with our Magno liquo­re, and they shall be whole quickly.

But yee shall well note, that many times after they are hea­led before fifteen dayes doe passe, there will come a certaine alteration in the throat, so that they can scarce swallow their [Page 39] meat, and this alteration many times endureth eight or ten daies, and then it resolveth by it self, and that is a certain sign of Pe [...]aria.

And therefore if thou wilt avoid that inconvenience that the hair fall not off, assoon as yee feel any of the afore­said griefs, then presently take a quantitie of our Electuario Angelica, and then take our Sirrupo Magistrale, four or five dayes, and annoint thy head ten or twelve daies with our Magno liquore, and so by these meanes the hair shall not fall. Because our Electuario Ang [...]lica, doth evacuate the stomack, and cleanseth the head, and drieth up the matter, the which is already alterated by that disease. Also our Sirrupo magi­strale, doth evacuate the body, and purifie the bloud, and s [...]aketh the fury of the disease. Our Magno liquore preserveth the hair from drying and falling.

There cometh many times, after those Carvoli are healed, certain Imposthumes in the groin, of the which we will speak in another Book particularly. The other kind of Carvoli that come upon the Yeard, are helped onely by washing them with some [...]ath, that is restrictive and comfortative. The other kind which are like scorching or burning, are helped by keeping them clean, and annointing them with a Liniment of Tutia camphorata.

And thus I make an end, giving to understand to those that practice, how that they may avoid that disease called Pel­laria, or falling of the hair or beard, for this is one of my Secrets, whereof I mean to write a great number, if God per­mit me.

A Discourse of those Sores that come of the Pox, and how to help them quickly.

THe Pox, as I have written of divers times, being a putri­fied and corrupt disease, the sores coming thereof of force must be of his nature, that is corrupt and stinking, therefore if thou wilt help them, and take away their pain quickly, thou shalt use three operations, the first is to give them our Pillole Aquilone, and then to wash the sore with oyle [Page 40] of Sulphur, and then lay thereon our Cerot magistrale, with Precipitate, and annoint it with Magno liquore, and therewith thou shalt help them quickly, because those Pills are appro­priate for that disease, and the oyle of Sulphur draweth forth the filth from the Center, and the Precipitate draweth forth the grosse matter, so that of force it must heal.

The cure of one that had the Pox in his head.

BEing in Naples, among all other that I cured, there came unto me a Spaniard called, Il Siegnior Diego di Menas, a man of the age of 36 years, of complexion cholerick adust, the which had the Pox, and in his forehead he had a certain tumour, the which had perished a great part of the skull, and was open, and he had been taken in hand of divers men, and none could doe him good: I seeing that took him in hand, and gave him our Sirrupo solutivo eight or nine daies together, after­ward I gave him our Aromatico, and then gave him the roots of Cina in decoction, and then perfumed him with Olibanum, Mastick, Myrrha, and Sinaber, and so by these meanes hee was helped of that infirmitie, but the bone remained bare, and I laid thereon our Cerot Magistrale, and so in short time, the bone did separate of his own accord, and one day I took it off altogether, it was so great, that it covered the fourth part of the head, then presently this Seignior Diego went abroad, shewing what was taken from his head, as divers can testifie.

The cure of a Wound in the Head, and in the Hand.

THere was a certain Gentleman called Gionan Jacobo Veni­ciane, the which had a great Wound one the head, and in one of his hands, the which being taken in hand of divers Chirurgians, was brought to a very evill case by reason of great alteration in the Wounds; and the Physitian that had him in hand, was one called Realdo Polumbo cremense, the which dressed his head with Wine and Oyle, and the hand with Turpentine and Oyle of Roses. Than I being in [Page 41] company told him, that it were good to change those Me­dicines, because in wounds of the head, those Medicines were not convenient, for the oyle being crude, putrifieth, and the Wine is repercussive▪ and will not suffer the Putrefaction to come forth that the oyle ingendereth, and for that reason the said Medicine would not be used.

And as for the Medicine for his hand, I say that the Tur­pentine is not convenient, for where there is offence of skin, veins, sinnews, and bones, Turpentine is not good, because it is hot and putrefactive, by means of the Oyle, and causeth inflammation, and therefore it ought not to be used.

Put if thou wilt help the head and hand both, yee shall use a kind of Medicine that comforteth the place offended, and that doth assubtiliate the matter, and incarnate, to the which the said Realdo answered and said my reason was good, if I could find Remedies that will doe that Effect, the which I sent for to my house, and used them in this order.

First, I did put our Quintessence into his wound in the head being cold, and then a little of our Balsamo cold, the which seemed strange to Realdo, and then I laid thereon our Ma­gno liquore, and upon the cloth I laid a little of our secret Powder, and the like I did to the hand, and so in fourteen dayes the wounds were whole, to the great marvell of a number.

A great Secret particular for the Flux, and Dissenteria.

THe Fluxes of the body are no other but a distemperance of Nature, and are of two kinds, the one is caused of an evill qualitie and distemperance of the Liver, and that is cal­led Flusso Epatico. The other is caused of great heat, Fever, and distemperament of Nature, and this is called Dissenteria, that is a distemperament of the guts, and both these sorts are hard to be helped of the ancient Doctors, as it is well seen by experience of those that practise, for they will help them with repression and restrictives, but that is not the way if wee shall beleeve Galen, the which writes, Fluxus Fluxum curat, the which is most true, for I have cured a thousand of the [Page 42] Flux with giving them our Aromatico, and three or four doses of our Si [...]o solutivo, therefore Galen saith true.

But the Dissenteria is cured with giving them our Electuario Angelica, and then every day after dinner stand in a bath of water of the Sea cold two hours at the least, and so in this order thou shalt help any crude kind of Dissenteria in short time, and with great ease, use this as a Secret.

The cure of one that was poysoned with Arsenick.

THere was a certain man poysoned with Arsenick given him in a messe of Rice-pottage in an evening at supper, and as soon as it was in his stomack, he began to groan, and sweat, and vomit, in such order as it was strange to see, and it happened that at the said time there was a learned man in the house, who seeing this man in that case, suspected him to be poysoned, and so sent for me, and when I came, the poor man was almost dead, then presently I called the wife of the house, and told her that her husband would die, and that she should have the Law for poysoning of him, but if that shee would tell him what poyson shee had given him, perhaps he might recover him again, with many words more: so to conclude shee told him, that shee had given him two grains of Arsenick in Rice-pottage, then presently I called for a cup of Sack, and caused him to drinke, and then he vo­mited and went to the stool, and then I annointed him with our oyle of Hypericon, and Scorpions, all the body over, and still caused him to drinke that he might evacuate that poison, but all his mouth and throat remained swollen, and he did spit great abundance, and I caused him to use that Unguent, and every morning gave him Triacle with Wine, and every three dayes, I gave him a quantitie of Pillule Aggregative, and last of all I caused him to use Aqua vitae compound, and so ere fortie daies he was perfectly whole, and rid of a terrible dis­ease, the which he had before he was poysoned.

The cure of an Ʋlcerated Leg.

THere was a certain man of the age of six and thirty years, of complexion cholerick and sanguine, the which had his left leg all ulcerated, in such order that the Physitians and Chirurgians of the Citie would have cut it off, but in any wise I would not consent thereunto, but took it in hand, and gave him first our Magistrall Sirrup in the morning eight or nine daies together, and in the mean time I washed the leg with Wine wherein was boyled Mallows, Consolida ma­jore, Carduus benedictus, and Honey, and then wet clothes therein, and laid them on twice a day, then I caused him to use a decoction of Lignum vitae, and the bark with Iva artetica, Carduus benedictus, Pollipodie, Ripontico, Wine and Sugar, and his common drink was wine and water boiled on the Fesses of the same, and this he used four and twentie daies, then I perfumed him with Cinaber three times, and ere three monthes were past, he was perfectly whole, for his disease came of the Pox, and those sores are commonly called Mal di for­mica.

The Cure of the Gout on a certain Gentleman.

IN the aforesaid year, in the moneth of August, I was called to visit a noble Gentleman called, Il seignior Don Christ of a­lo, della roca, a man of five and thirtie years, of complexion cholerick, and sanguine, the which was sore troubled with the Gout, and because it was in the beginning of August, our ancient Doctors have forbidden to take any soluble Medicine in that time, in respect of the Canicular dayes. Neverthelesse, I called Armellio, and Leonardo Testa, two excellent Physitians, the which gave their counsell to take no Medicine, neverthe­lesse I proved that the Gout was extream hot, and for that I ordained a cold Sirrup to mittigate the superfluous heat, the which was made of Liverwort, Harts-tongue, Dates, Raisins, Figs, Sugar, and Succorie water, and aromatised it with Musk and Rosewater, of the which he took every day four ounces, [Page 44] and for the alteration of the Gout, I washed it three or four times a day with our Aqua del Balsamo, because it pe­netrateth and openeth the pores, and assubtiliateth and dry-the humour offensive: also I ordained him bread of Barley, because it cooleth the bloud, and is of good digestion, and caused him to refrain from all fat Brothes, and his drink was temperate, and to this one of the Doctors did agree, but the other would not, neverthelesse the Gentleman was content with my advice, then I began to give him the afore­said decoction, with our Soluble Quintessence, and therewith he had every day two or three Stools, and I washed the Gout three or four times a day with our Aqua Balsami, and the first day he began to feel ease, and the second he felt more, so that in seven daies all his pains were taken away, and then I applyed thereunto our Secret of Secrets for that kind of disease, the which in three dayes delivered him; then I caused him to use certain Medicines to defend the Gout from coming again, and so he continued whole to his great satis­faction.

Of the causes of the Scyatica, and how yee may help it.

THe Sciatica is a disease so called, because it cometh in that place of the bodie called Sio, and is caused of an e­vill qualitie, and grosse humours that are staid in that place, because they cannot passe down, and this is seen by expe­rience daily, for where that pain is, there is alteration, and the cure thereof is with Glisters, Vomits, Purgations, and Un­ctions, because the Glister doth evacuate those places next unto it, and so easeth the humour, the vomit cleanseth the Stomack, the Purgations doe evacuate the body downwards, the Unctions dissolve the Winde, and so by these meanes thou mayest helpe the Sciatica, as I have done many times to my great honour, and satisfaction of the Patient.

A most excellent remedie to helpe the flux of the body, with a cer­taine discourse thereon.

IF thou wilt helpe the flux of the body, it were necessary to know first from whence it proceedeth, for he that knoweth not the cause, is lesse to be credited to cure the effect, and there­fore I will shew thee what the Flux is, and from whence it com­eth, and then I will shew the order to cure it, and also to make the Medicines.

The Flux of the body is caused of a superfluous heat con­ceived in the stomack, the which make a continuall solution inwardly, as yee may see by experience of those that are troubled therewith, for so long as the cause is not taken away, all their meat doth turn into that matter, the which if it be so, that is true which I doe say, that the Fluxes are a distempe­rance of the body, caused of hot and corrupt humours in the stomack, and therefore if thou wilt cure it, it were necessary to extinguish the heat, and to take away the corruption, the which thou shalt doe with the rednesse of Marte Militare written in this book following; for that is the most soveraign remedy that can be found But first yee shall take twelve grains of our Petra Philosophale, with ℥. ss. of Mel Rosar [...]m, and then take for four mornings together one scruple of the red­nesse of Marte, with ℥. ss. of Sugar Rosat, and therewith thou shalt work miracles.

A discourse as concerning Cornes in the feet or elsewhere, with their remedies.

THis callous matter is a certain hot humour, of the which Nature would discharge her self, and when that humour is driven forth of Nature, it goeth unto the lower parts into the end of the Toes, for in that extream part of the toes, that skin that is called Epiderma, is hard, and will not suffer it to passe or exalate, and there many times it ingendereth a tu­mour in the skin with great hardnesse, and many times that tumour doth increase and cause such pain, that it doth not [Page 46] onely hinder their going, but hindereth them from sleep in the night, and this kind of tumour is called commonly Callo, or Corns in English, and I thought it good to call them Creste, because they are alwayes growing, and are of great impor­tance among the Chirurgians, for an infinite number of per­sons are troubled therewith, and therefore I will shew thee our secret to help them quickly, and with great ease; which secret was never known before of any. First yee shall pare them with a sharp knife unto the bottome, and there yee shall find a certain thing like matter, but if yee find no matter, yee shall pare it untill the bloud doth appear, then touch it once with Oil of Sulphur, and then dresse it with our Bal­samo artificiato once a day untill it be whole. Keep this as a secret.

Of an Infirmity of Importance, that cometh upon the extremity of the toe upon the nail.

THere are many men that are troubled with a certain in­firmity under the nail of their great toe, the which seemeth as though that the nail grew in the flesh, which is not so, but the flesh groweth over the nail, and although this seemeth to be a thing of nothing, and that the Ancients have had small consideration thereof: Neverthelesse, it is an infirmity of great importance, and to be considered of, because many are troubled therewith, and especially men of authority, and espe­cially those that are troubled with the Gout. I call to re­membrance, that in the time that I was in Naples, I cured a great number, and especially those that were of great autho­rity, to my great honour and profit. The first thing that I did, I cut the nail on the part which was grieved and took it away, the which was done easily and with little pain, which thing being done, I touched it with our Caustick, and so let it remain three dayes together, and then I dressed it every day with our Magno liquore untill it was whole, which was in short time.

A discourse upon the Emeroids, with the order to cure them with most excellent Medicines of our invention.

THe Emeroids are a certain kind of evill tumour, caused of the bloud in the veins [...]merodiall, and these come alwayes in the extremity of the Intestinals about the Funda­ment, and some of them cause great pain, and some of them doe burn excessively, or doe scald; the which cometh through the quality of the good and evill humours, as yee may see by experience, how that some have such burning that they can­not rest in the night, the other have such pain that they can­not sit, the other are so scalded that they cannot abide it, yee shall understand, that this infirmity is more painfull in one complexion then in another, and the cure thereof is difficile Neverthelesse it may be cured, and the order is this.

First take our Aromatico, then take our Sirrupo Solutivo three or four dayes, then take our perfume three or four times on the Fundament, that being done, annoint the place with our Balm artificiall, for that drieth and taketh away the pain altogether, and so the Patient shall remain perfect whole.

There is also a great secret in the tooth of a Horse-fish, if it be worn on a mans finger, to take away the Emeroids, the which tooth I have known proved at the least seven or eight times, for I have a ring made thereof, and have used it.

A great secret to help those that are burst, or have the Ru­pture.

THis is a rare secret, never known before of any man, and especially for those that have not been burst long time, and that the Rupture hath not yet made a Callow, and the or­der to cure it is thus.

First yee shall give them our Aromatico every ten dayes once, and every morning fasting give them one ounce of [Page 48] fine Tartar beaten into powder, with water or wine to drink, and likewise in the evening, two hours before supper give him as much, and his bread shall be Bisket made of Rye, also he must wear a Trusse made fit for that purpose, and use this remedy.

℞. Rectified Aqua vitae without flegm ℥. xii. Rosin of the Pine tree that is dry, Olibanum, Mastick Sarcocolla, ana. ℥. ss. Mix them altogether, and with this water wash the Rupture every day twice, and then cast thereon presently the powder of a hearb called Bislingua and Balsamina, ana. and then wet a cloth in the said water, and lay it thereon, and bind the Trusse very hard, and keep thy house with as much ease as thou may­est, and strain not thy self in any wise, and thus within a hun­dered dayes thou shalt help any great Rupture, keeping the aforesaid order.

A rare secret and divine, to help those that are troubled with the Spleen.

THe Milt is alterated and becometh hard, by reason of a superfluous humidity, which it receiveth by the evill dispo­sition of the Liver and Lungs, and therefore if thou wilt help it, it were necessary to use Medicines abstersive and drying, and to give them our Aromatico once, and then to use this Electuary, the which is of marvellous vertue in that operation.

℞. Squamma ferri ℥. i. Scolopendria ℥. i. Spicknard, Lapis Lazuli, ana. ℈ ii. Cinnamon ℥. ss. beat them fine, and make thereof an Electuary with purified Hony according to art, and take thereof every morning a spoonfull, and as much at night two houres before supper, and annoint the place where the Milt lieth with our Balsamo artificiato, and so by the grace of God, and meanes of these Medicines, thou shalt be helped quickly.

A great secret to help the Spleen with great sppeed.

THe Milt, as is aforesaid, is grieved through abundance of humidity which it receiveth, and therefore thou must onely seek to dry that humidity, and for that purpose I will shew thee two great secrets wherewith thou shalt work mi­racles, and are of great reason and experience, The one is to be let bloud under the tongue in one of these two veines, that is on that side where the Milt lieth, that being done, yee shall take Mustard, and mix it with the Urine of a Boy, and say it between two clothes, and lay it on the sore place one night, and then if it be not well, use it still untill it be helped, for this I have proved an infinite of times.

The cure of a certain Spaniard called Carabasall di Cordonet, the which was troubled with the Pox.

THis Souldier, being of the age of two and thirty yeares, was mightily troubled with the Pox, with extream paines and sores, among the which, he had all his thigh so eaten away, as though he had been gnawn with Dogs, with most extream pain, and the way that I cured him was thus. I gave him twelve grains of our Petra Philosophale, with Sugar Rosate, the which caused him to vomit and to evacuate downward, of the which he found great case: that being done, I prepared him our de­coction of Lignum sanctum solutivum, the which is written of hereafter, with a certain drink made with Wine, and Lignum vitae, and this he used five and twenty dayes, and then I an­nointed him with our Ʋnguento magno, and in the space of forty dayes he was perfectly helped to the sight of all men.

The cure of the Stitch in the side with retention of Ʋrine.

THere was a certain Gentleman called, Marco di Chiuffunt of the age of six and thirty yeares, the which was trou­bled with a terrible stitch in the side, and had proved many [Page 50] Medicines, and none did him pleasure, the which, after I took him in hand, I gave him our Aromatico, and after that the pain slacked, than I caused him to annoint all those parts with the oyle of Nutmegs, and the oyle of Eggs mixt together, and so he remained quite whole, for in this order I have cured an infinite of persons to my great honour.

A cure of a certain Spaniard wounded in the head in Naples.

THere was a certain Spaniard called Zamora, of the age of four and thirtie years, of complexion cholerick and sanguine, the which was wounded in the left side of the head, with incision of the bone; also you shall understand, that in Naples the ayre is most evill for wounds in the head, by rea­son that it is so subtile, and for that cause the Doctors did fear the cure, neverthelesse I dressed him with our Magno li­quore, and Balsamo artificiato, keeping the wound as close as was possible, annointing it onely upon the wound, and so in fourteen daies he was perfectly whole, to the great wonder of a number of Chirurgians of that Citie.

The cure of a certain Gentleman that had Mal' di formica.

THere was a certain Gentleman Neopolitan, the which was called, Il Seignior Giovan Francisco Gaetavo, of the age of thirty eight years, the which was marvellously tormented with a sore arm, and a sore leg, called Mal' di formica, and he was of complexion cholerick and melancholie, and these sores went creeping upon the flesh, healing in one place and break­ing out in another, and in his arm he had nine sores, and in the leg fourteen, and this Gentleman had sought help the space of two yeares, and could find none, and had twice taken the Diet, and yet could find no help, the which Gentleman I took in hand, and the first thing that I gave him was this: ℥ i. of Hierapiera Galeni, with twenty grains of our Petra Philospha­le, the which provoked both vomit and seege divers times, that being done, I gave him our Sirrupo Solutivo 12. mornings toge­ther, that being done, I gave him a Medicine with our Petra Philosophale and Eleborus niger, the which caused him also to vo­mit [Page 51] and purge downwards, that being done, I caused him to make a Sirrup of Lignum Sanctum, and the Bark, Iva Arte­tica, and Carduus Benedictus, in the which I put seven pound of Wine, and one of Sugar, and then I caused him to make a drinke with water, and wine, and Honey, to drink continually, and that I caused him to use five and twentie dayes, and then I annointed him with our Ʋnguento magno five times without fire, the which Unguent caused him to spit abundance of fil­thy matter, and at the last it caused him for to spit blood, after the which I caused him to make a Bath the which is written in our Regiment of the Pestilence, called the Joyfull Jewell, and I [...]aid on the Sores our Cerot Magistrale, and thus within thirty eight dayes he was perfectly whole.

Certain Cures that this Authour did when he travelled into Africa.

IN the year 1550 he travelled into Africa, and there he was chosen by Il. S. Don Pietro di Toledo viceroi di Napoli, to be Physitian unto the camp under Don Gracia his son, and so in the year 1551. in the moneth of May he departed from Naples with all the army of the Emperour, Carolo quinto D' Austria, and so having a prosperous wind, arrived in Barba­rie by a certain old citie called Monasterio, and there gave an assiege, and took it without any remission or ransoming, and made slaves of all those that were left alive, and it re­mained utterly destroyed, but not without great mortality of our Christian Souldiers, and beside those that were kil­led, there was a great number wounded, the which were brought into the Gallies, and carried to the Isle of Sicilla, in a certain citie called Tarpano, the which say they, was buil­ded by a great Idolater called Tarpos, and there in the Ho­spitall those wounded persons were left, with certain Chirur­gians that were under my jurisdiction, and with certain Me­dicines of my invention, and so in short time the most part were helped, and then the Armie returned unto Naples a­gain, and refreshed them with new men and victuall. And then on the fifteenth of June, we set up sail and failed, and [Page 52] when we were in the midst of the gulf between Naples and Palermo, there happened a great mis-fortune, the which was thus.

In the Gallie of Si. Giordano Captain General of the Gallies Duke of Florence, it happened that he being at the table with divers Captains and Gentlemen, and as they were, at dinner, a certain Captain being grieved with another, multiplyed words, and took a loaf of bread, and threw it at his face, without any reverence or respect of the said Generall Sig. Gi­ordano. That being done, the said Generall rose from the ta­ble, and took him by the bosome, and gave him five stocadoes in the breast, the which pierced within the bodie, and there he fell for dead: that being done, the said Generall repented himself of his rashnesse, and presently sent for me being in the Gallie of Don Gracia to come and dresse him, and so my Generall caused me to doe with all diligence, and when I came, this poor Captain lay as though he had been dying, ne­verthelesse I dressed him with great diligence, and that Medi­cines which I used were these: First, I put into the wounds, of our Qiuntessence, and upon the wound I dressed it with our Balm artificiall, and gave him a vomit, the which caused him to cast great quantitie of bloud, and then every morning I gave him half an ounce of our Aqua Balsami, and thus within two days after we arrived at Palermo, the Captain was perfectly whole, to the great marvell of a number. After that we depar­ted from Palermo, and went to the Citie of Trapano, where the rest of the gallies were, and there continued four dayes, and then on Saint Johns even, we went to an Island called Fanig­nana, and there kept the feast of Saint John, and then we de­parted with all the army, and went on the side of Africa, and on Saint Peters day we landed in the Gardens of that Citie, and there began to offer battell, and there remaining about 24. or 25. dayes, the army began to be infected with a certain kind of flux, whereof a great number dyed every day. My Generall seeing that called me, and asked if it were possible to find some remedie for that flux, unto the which I answered willingly, and said, I would devise by the help of God some re­medie, because it was my dutie, to labour for the health of [Page 53] the Souldiers of the Emperour, the which thing I did in short time thorow the whole camp; as I will write hereafter in the next chapter.

The cure of the Flux, wherewith I helped the Armie of the Em­perour in Africa.

BEing as I have said before in the camp, where they were marvellously tormented with a Flux, and many died there­of, and could find no help, although they had Medicines. Than I which had the experience in hand, began to laugh to my self, and the remedie wherewith I helped them all, was this. First, I caused them to eat well, and then in the morning I gave them a vomit, and then every day after they had eaten, I caused them to go into the water of the Sea, and there to re­remain four or five houres, and so doing within four or five daies they were helped, for I swear as I am a Knight, that if I had not been there, the whole Armie had died of that Flux, for of fourteen or fifteen thousand that were there, there was not left two thousand but they were infected with that Flux, or distemperance of the Liver caused of superfluous heat, the which heat distempereth the Stomack, and causeth the continuall Flux; you shall understand that our vomit doth evacuate the stomack of the putrefied humour, and the salt-water cooleth the heat, and restraineth the Flux, so that by these meanes they were helped.

A goodly Remedy found out by me for Wound in the head.

VVOunds in the head were very perillous in that place, so that if a hundered were hurt in the head, it was not possible to recover ten, and that came through two things, the which were much contrary in that Region, for the day was so hot that it burned all things, and the night to the contrary so extream cold, that it was intolerable, and not to be credi­ted, and so by this distemperance, when the Craneum was unco­vered that the aire might touch it, presently they died with­out any help, then I seeing that, began to consider of the [Page 54] matter, desiring to find some mean to help them, and so stu­dying, it came in my memorie, that the air was cause of their death, as it was in truth. Then presently I commanded all those Chirurgians that were under my jurisdiction that they should not meddle with any wound in the head without my presence, the which thing was done, and as many as were wounded, the first thing that I did, in stead of cutting or launcing or discovering, according to the common order, I joyned the parts, and sowed them close, and dressed them upon the wound with our Quintessence, and with Balsamo, and Magno liquore, and so in short time the most part were hel­ped, and there died none so desperate as they did before, and therefore to my judgement, this was a good invention, and never used of any before, and this order of curing is ve­ry naturall, for Nature doth shew it in hearbs, plants and stones, how that they cannot stand dis-united, then much more our flesh cannot stand dis-united, without great torment of the Patient, for untill it be joyned together again, it is unpossi­ble to be helped, then seeing that is true, it is most naturall for the wound to be joyned together, and to use those Medicines, that where they be applyed, will not suffer the humour to come thereunto, nor putrifie the place that is hurt, and seeing it is so, as by experience is seen, we must beleeve this to be a natu­rall and most wholsome remedie, so that I affirm that the joyn­ing of the parts of the wound in the head, and other parts of the body is most soveraign, and of great satisfaction to the sick, for they never felt pain, nor have no Fever, nor other sort of accident, for of those I have cured a great number with good successe.

The cure of one that had his nose cut off, and set on again.

IN that time when I was in Africa, there happened a strange and that was thus.

A certain Gentleman a Spaniard that was called Il Seignior Andreas Gutiero, of the age of twentie nine yeares, upon a time walked in the field, and fell at words with a Souldier, and [Page 55] began to draw, the Souldier seeing that, struck him with the left hand, and cut of his nose, and there it fell down in the sand, then I happened to stand by and took it up, and pissed thereon to wash away the sand, and stitched it on again very close, and dressed it with our Balsamo artificiato, and bound [...]t up, and so let it remain eight dayes, thinking that it would have come to matter: neverthelesse, when I did unbind it. I found it fast conglutinated, and then I dressed it onely once more, and he was perfectly whole, so that all Naples did mar­vell the real, as is well known, for the said Sig. Andrea doth live yet, and can testifie the same.

The cure of an arme of S. Giordano Ursino.

AT the same time the said Sig. Giordano Ʋrsino, and Si. An­tamo Savello Romano, and Sig. Astor Baglione, with divers others, took their Horses and rid about two miles from the Camp, and there perceived certain Mores on horseback, the which did assault these Gentlemen, and one More with his Launce did thrust through the arme from the elbow through the shoulder, then the said Sig. Giordino returned to the Camp with great pain, and presently I was sent for, and when I had seen it, I put therein our Quintessence, and upon the Wound I said our Balsamo, and Magno liquere, and bound it streight, and so left it, and in five dayes it was whole and sound, and then went to the assault most valiantly, as many can testifie, because he was generall of Firenze.

A great chance that happened in the assault in Africa.

AT the same time there was a Gentleman Florentine, that was with the said Si. Giordano Ʋrsino, that was called Mille­matti, the which fought with his Sword and Target, and defended many shot of Calivers, and such like, at the last one peirced his Target, and struck him upon the breast, and bruised him marvellously, and yet broke no skin, and therewithall he fell to the ground for dead, and the carrier of dead men, or Becamort, as they call them, would have buried him in a [Page 56] Myne, I then being present, caused him to be brought into the Tent of Sig. Astor Baglione, and there I put our Quintessence in­to his mouth, and that caused the blood to liquifie and come forth at the mouth, and laid upon his stomack a plaister of Ashes and Oil as hot as he could abide, and that I changed morning and evening, and alwayes I gave him of our Quintes­sence to drink, so that in short time he was helped, and yet liveth in health: and this was one of the most strangest things that ever I saw, that a pellet of a Caliver could not break the flesh, and that came by certain words that the said Millematti did carry written upon his breast, as he perswaded me afterward, for he said, In verbis, & in herbis, & in lapidibus sunt virtutes, &c.

The cure of Wounds being poysoned, and of ther Sores.

VVHile that warres dured in Africa, many times the Chirstians were poysoned with venomous Arrows and such like, for the Moores commonly when they fight a­gainst the Christians, they stick the heads of their Arrows in a Squill, and poyson it with the juyce, and when those Arrow heads or other weapon goeth into the flesh of a man, it causeth so great burning, that it bringeth Spasmus, and so in short time they dye. And untill this time there hath been no other Medicine found, but to cut away all the flesh that the weapon hath touched, or else to cauterize it two or three times with a red hot Iron to extinguish the venome, but I, through the grace of God, have found the true and perfect way to help them quickly, and with great ease, and without detriment of the wounded, and the remedy is this; yee shall put our Quintessence into the Wound, and lay thereon our Magno liquore, the which are two Medicines that kill the poyson of the Squill, and therefore if any will prove this to be true, to see the experience, take a peice of a Squilla, and scratch it with thy nail, and then put thy finger into thy ear, or scratch any other place that yee may touch the flesh, and presently thou shalt feel a terrible burning, and to quench it, presently take of our Quintessence, and wash the place [Page 57] therewith, and presently the pain will cease, and therefore use this as a secret, for therewith I have cured a great num­ber.

A remedy found out by me against the poyson of a Fish.

VVHen that I caused so many sick of the Flux to goe into the sea, whereby they were helped, there was a certain kind of fish, that as soon as they touched the flesh of a man, presently it inflamed, and the poyson so increased, that in two or three dayes it caused corrosive Sores, the which caused many to dye, and many were stung with that fish which never could find help: I then seeing that desperate case, up­on a time visited a young man being a Romane, the which was hurt on the Codds and Yeard with such a Spasmus, that it was wonderfull to behold, and having a glasse full of my Quintessence in my hand, I opened the sore and washed it therewith, and presently the pain ceased, then afterward I dressed it with an Unguent made of the fat of the fish, and so therewith he and a great number more were helped in short time, and these are secrets of my invention.

Of the taking of Africa and his destruction

IN the year 1551. the eleventh of September about the nine­teenth hour the generall assault was given to the City of Africa, and in the space of two hours it was taken, and destroy­ed by the souldiers of Carolus Quintus Emperour, whereat was slain a great number of both parts, and there was such a number hurt, that it was to be wondered at, the which were healed with our Magno liquore, and Balsamo, and when the City was taken and all ended, the Gallies remained there all September, and the fourth of October every man went to serve at their ports appointed, and so we returned to Naples to passe the winter, but yet we remained but a while, for there was occasion to goe to Siena, the which rebelled against the Emperour, and so we went with Don Pietro da Toledo the which died after at Firenza, &c.

The cure of a great wound on the head.

IN this yeare 1551. in the moneth of November, there came unto my house a Spaniard, the which was called Giovan Ruiz di Zamora, the which had a great wound over the eare, on the left side that reached halfe over the head, with great fracture of the bone, the which I presently stitched with diligence, and put therein our Quintessence, and upon the wound I dressed it with Magno liquore, and Balsamo, and made a gentle ligature with a piece of silke, and sent him home to his lodging, and commanded him to come againe the next day about the said houre, and those that were about me, fell a laughing at my words, and said that he would die of that wound, because I let him goe forth in the ayr, to the which I answered that he might safely goe forth, and so the next day he came againe, and I took off the ligament, but not the cloth, and thereon I put of our Quintessence and Balme, and so in three dayes I touched it not, and then I took off the Ligament againe, and dressed it upon the cloath, and let it remaine untill the 8. day, and then I opened it, and took away the cloath, and found the wound so healed that yee could scarce perceive any scarre, and many said that it was impossible to be healed, for it would come to im­posthumation, neverthelesse it remained perfectly whole for five or six moneths that he remained in that Citie, in the which time I cured a great number in the same order that were woun­ded in the head, to the great wonder of those that dwelt in Naples, for they count all wounds in the head to be mortall, because the ayre is so pestilentiall-, for as soone as it toucheth the scull it corrupteth the wound.

But using our order thou mayest safely helpe them, so that the wound be not mortall, for by keeping it close shut it is pre­served.

A very strange thing that happened in the aforesaid year.

THere was a certaine young Marriner of the age of 26▪ years, the which was called, Francisco di Giovanni Raguseo, of the [Page 59] Isle of Mezo, the which being in fight fell downe, and the o­ther that fought with him out him over the side and backe a handfull long, in so much that a piece of the Milt was cut over­thwart, then he was carried to a Chyrurgian, and he stitched him up, then the next day I was called, and there I found the Wound not well stitched, the which I ripped up againe, and found the belly full of blood, and when I saw that, I caused divers to make water, and therewith I washed him, and with taking forth of the blood, there came a piece of the Milt that was cut, the which I washed, and gave it to a Marriner that stood by, and the Patron of the ship tooke it from him and carried it away, then I stitched him up againe and left a little hole or orifice beneath, where the matter might come forth, and dressed him with our Quintessence, with Balsamo, and Mag­no liquore, and in the space of 22. dayes he was whole perfectly.

The cure of a Fistula in the lower parts.

IN the yeare, 1552. in the moneth of March, I was brought unto a man of the age of fourtie years, of complexion cholerick and melancholly, the which had a Fistula in the lower parts, the which was of this Nature, that it had alterated the cods, the member, and all the parts thereabout, with ele­ven holes infistulated, at the which holes he made water with great burning, and intolerable paine, and which are accidents of a Fever in manner continuall, the which Patient had beene taken in hand of divers, and none could doe him pleasure. Then the first thing that I did, I gave him our Aromatico, that being done, I gave him xii. dayes together our Quintessentia solutivo, that being done, I gave him a quantity of our Ele­ctuario Angelica, and then he used one of my secrets, the which I will not write in this place, that being done I caused him to spit with one of my confections, written hereafter, and so by these meanes he was perfectly whole.

Of many that I cured in Naples.

IN that time that I remained in the famous Citie of Naples, untill the year 1555. in the Moneth of February, and then I thought it good to go to Rome, vvhere at this time I cured a number of persons, and have helped so many by the help of God, vvhich if I should record them, it vvould be sufficient to fill a great volume, for there came such a number to my door, that the people wondered thereat, and with four Medicines compounded by me, I helped in manner all of every disease, and the Medicines were these, one Pill made with our Pe­tra philosophale, Elbero negro, Olio di sulpho, Olio di melle, mixed with Marchpane, and made in Pils. The second Remedy was soluble Pils, made with Aloe hepatico, Colloquintida, Siena, and oyle of vitrioll made in pas [...]e with sugar, and common honey. The third Remedy was an unction, made with Sage, Rosemary, Wormewood, R [...]w, Mint, Nutmegs, Cloves, Cinamon, Ma­stick, Trankincense, Turpentine and wax with common oyle. The fourth Remedy was our Quintessence, and these four Re­medies, I gave unto those people to helpe their griefes: and I willed them that tooke these Medicines to eat well, and of good meats, and so alwayes they praysed these Medicines, the which was not without great reason, because the Pills first eva­cuate the stomack of all Impediments, and leaveth nature ea­sed, the second Pills evacuate the body of the corruption.

The unction comforteth the stomack, and helpeth digestion, and mitigateth the paine. The Quintessence comforteth the stomack, causeth good digestion, purifieth the bloud, and comforteth the head, so that by these aforesaid Reasons, ye may understand that these foure Remedies may helpe against all indispositions inwardly, and for cause of those Remedies those people honour me like a Prophet, and alwayes have had me in great Reverence, as long as I remayned among them.

A cure of Ulcera putrida which was in the arm.

IN the year aforesaid, and in the moneth of August, there came to my hand a certain Gentleman of the Embassa­dors of Portingall, that was called Il signior Jari, a man of the age of two and thirtie yeares, of complexion me­lancholie, the which had a putrified Ulcer about the left shoulder, that he had carried above three yeares, and was as big as a hand, and very deep, which could not be healed of the common Chirurgians, nor yet be eased of his pain, then I reasoning with this Gentleman, told him that the cause of that sore, was corrupt and putrified bloud, and by that meanes the Liver received evill qualities, and that if he would be helped, the cause must be removed, the which was hard to be done, because the bloud must be evacuated a little, and then the stomack must be evacuated of moist matter that of­fendeth it, and hindereth digestion of the meat, and will not suffer good bloud to ingender; then will it also be necessary to evacuate the body downwards, that the corruption send not up his vapours unto the upper parts of the body, and hinder the cure of the Ulcer, all this being done, it were ne­cessary to evacuate the humour between the skin and the flesh by sweat, so that all the parts of the body may remain purified, and so by these meanes the Ulcer may easily mundi­fie, incarnate, and siccatrize, and shall be a perfect cure: to the which thing the Gentleman was willing, for he had as willingly dyed as lived, and so in the name of God I took him in hand, and the first thing that I gave him was a vomit that purged the stomack, and took away great part of his pain: then I purged him with our Quinta essentia solutivo eight daies together, that being done, I made him a Fomentation that caused him to sweat well, and to spit abundance, then I caused him to be let bloud under the tongue, and then I annointed all the Ulcer with our Caustick, the which mortified all the filthi­nesse therein, and then I dressed it with Magno liquore, and our Cerot Magistrale, and so with these Remedies in short space the said Gentleman was cured, to the great marvell of [Page 62] the said Ambassadour, and all those that saw it: By reason of that cure came another of the same house unto me, called Il Seignor diego Iaimes, the which was troubled with a difficulty of Vrine, which did trouble him mightily, to whom I gave three times our Petra Philosophale, and once the juyce of Elder Barks, and he was helped: I cured another in the same house of a Fever with our Oyle of Honey, and with Balsamo: The Ambassadour likewise being troubled with the Gout, willed me to take him in hand, the which I did, and cured him, so that in three years after while I continued in Rome he never felt paine, and of these cures I helped an infi­nite in Spaine, as is well known to the Inhabitants thereof.

The cure of Ethesia in the beginning.

IN the yeare 1555. in the Moneth of March, there came to my hands a young man of Millayne, the which was a Pain­ter, of the age of five and twenty years, the which was fallen into a spice of Etisie, and did spit much bloud with a conti­nuall Fever, whom I cured in this order.

First, I let him bloud under the tongue on the right side, and after that I gave him a quantity of our Aromatico with Plan­taine water, because the bleeding taketh away the superfluous bloud of the breast, which nature sendeth forth by it selfe, and the Aromatico with Plantaine water is cold and dry, which are most necessary for that disease, for they evacuate the sto­mack, repercute and mitigateth the alteration, those things being done, I caused him to use our Quintessence solutive to evacuate the body in respect of the Putrefication already con­ceived within the intestinals, also I caused him to use the Quintessence of the Flower of Flowers, and I annointed his stomack with Magno liquore, and also he used our Electuarie of Althea, and so by these meanes he was helped perfectly.

The cure of a certaine man wounded in thirteen places.

IT happened that a certaine man called Alessandro Orefice, was wounded before my lodging in thirteen places, and there fell [Page 63] for dead, and then by a certaine friend was brought into my Lodging, and there I laid him upon a Table, and took off his clothes, and sowed all those wounds which were to be sowed or stitched, and dressed him with our Quintessence, and Balsa­mo, and Magno liquore, and our secret Powder, and so by those meanes in 15. dayes he was perfectly whole.

Of Remedies that helpe many diseases.

THere are divers and sundry diseases, and they be helped with divers and sundry Medicines; therefore I will make a note onely of those which are most used.

And first I will write of those Remedies that help the Fe­vers of all sorts, which are these, the Sirrup of Burrage, Bugloss, Endive, Cicory, Hops, Fumitorie, Rhabarb, Cassia, Scamony, Sine, Barly-water, Sirrup of Scytrones, and such like.

The Remedies that helpe the Pox are these, Aloes, Colo­quintida, Turbit, Hermodactils, Scamony, Precipitate, Oriola, Olivella, the Unction of Mercury, Lignum sanctum, Cina, Salsa perilla, the perfume of Sinaber, a stove of hearbs, our Ceroto Magistrale, and such like things. Those Remedies that helpe the Cough, are Enula Campana, Garlike, Sulphur, Ho­ney, Lapaciolle, the Oyle of Sulphur, and such liket: Those Remedies that help the Scabs, are the juyce of Aureola, Sulphur, Litarge, Aqua Reale, Roch Allome, those that are troubled with paines in the body, may use Genciane, Nutmegs, Dicta­mus albus, Euphorbio: those that are wounded shall use Turpen­tine, our Balsamo, Magno liquore, Aqua Balsami, Elixar vitae, Ceroto Magistrale, Oyle of Hipericon, of our invention, and such like. Those that provoke vrine, are the flours of Mallows, Alkekengi, Hogs life, Cantharides, and such like, and therefore I will not trouble you further, because I have written sufficiently in my other Books in sundry places, and hereafter I will write of divers; and sundry Medicines of our invention never found out before of any man.

Here beginneth the order to make divers and sundry Medicines of our invention never found out before by any man. And first to make our Petra Philosophale, that helpeth against all manner of diseases that happeneth unto man, or woman, or any other Animall terrestriall.

THere hath alwayes been a great questioning among the Philosophers, whether that one Medicine might help a­gainst all diseases or no. The which I affirm, and will approve with sufficient reason, that the Petra Philosophale made of our invention may help against all the infirmities that cometh unto mans body, and two onely reasons I will shew thee with brevity, the first of them is this, that all sorts of infir­mities have their Originall and beginning of the stomack, and to know the truth, yee may see manifestly, that if the body be never so little infirmed, the stomack is also greived: For yee may see how the Animals terrestriall never help themselves of other infirmity then of the stomack, and when they will help themselves, they eat hearbs, the which causeth them to vomit, and this doth signifie, that they have no other infir­mity then the aforesaid, so by the experience of the Animals I approve that the infirmity is caused of the stomack, and this is the first reason. The second is, that all the Medicines, wherein our Petra Philosophale is put, as soon as they are come into the stomack, it draweth unto it all the evill humours of the stomack, and also of the whole body, and mixeth with them, and so natrue sendeth them forth by vomit, or by seege, or both, and so the stomack shall be evacuated of that matter, and the body remain free from all impediments of infirmities, so that by this reason I affirm, that our Petra Philosophale may help against all sorts of infirmities, and to know the truth, I have proved it by experience in all manner of infirmities, and alwayes have found it to doe much good unto all men, and hurt none unto my knowledge, and the order to make this Petra Philosophale is thus.

℞. Sal niter, Roch Allum, Vitrioll Romain, of each two pound.

[Page 65]First, dry the Vitrioll in an earthen pan, and then beat it to powder, and mix it with the other matters, and put thereunto foure ounces of Sal gemma, then put it in a goord with his head, and a Receiver well luted, and distill it in a wind Fur­nace, so that yee may make fire with wood, and at the first make small fire, and so increase it according to Art, and al­wayes lay wet clothes an the head and Receiver, and that thou shalt doe, because the spirits of the water shall not flye away. Yee shall understand, that in the beginning of your di­stillation, the Receiver will wax red like bloud, and then turn white; and at the last, when yee give it strong fire, it will turn red again, and those are the pure spirits of the Aqua fortis, and then at the end, the Receiver will turne white againe, and then it is ended, then let it wax cold, and then keep it in a Glasse close shut to make our Petra Philosophale.

Then take Mercury, lib. 1. Quick-lyme, ℥. vj. Sope, ℥. iiij. Common ashes, ℥. iij.

Mix them together in a Morter of stone, and then put them into a Retort, and distill it with a strong fire untill all the Mer­cury be come forth into the Receiver, then take it forth, and keepe it in a Glasse, to make thy composition, the which is made thus.

℞. The water that thou madest first, and put it into a goord of Glasse being well luted, and then put in thy Mer­cury that thou diddest distill before. After that, take Steel in thinne Plates, j. ℥. Iron also in thinne Plates, ℥. ii. Fine Gold in leaves, the weight of two French Crownes, and put them altogether in the Glasse, and presently set on the head, for it will begin to boyle, and cause red fumes like bloud, the which thou shalt receive in a Receiver, and presently set thy Glasse in the Furnace, and give it fire untill all the water be come forth with the fume. Then let it coole, and keep that water close in a Glasse, then break the other Glasse that stood in the fire, and in the bottome thou shalt find our Petra Philo­sophale, the which thou shalt grind finely, and searce it into most fine powder, and then wash it well with Vinegar distilled, and dry it againe, and at the last wash it with Rose-water, and dry it very well, stirring it continually over the fire, then [Page 66] keep it as a precious Jewell close in a Glasse.

For the order to use it, I will write hereafter, in sundry pla­ces: Yee shall understand that the water which yee distil­led away from the stone, will serve for the same purpose again: But ye must take but halfe the quantity of the aforesaid mat­ters, and when ye have distilled it again from the stone, yee shall preserve it for an infinite number of purposes, as I will shew thee hereafter.

To make our Balme artificiall, with the order to use it, and wherefore it serveth.

THis Balsamum hath all the vertues of the natural Balme, although not in quality, yet in vertue, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Venice Turpentine, pound 1. Oyle of Bayes, that is perfect without mixture, ℥. iiij. Galbanum, ounces iij. Gum Arabie, ounc. iiij. Olibanum Mirrha elect, Gum Hederae, of each, ℥. iij. Lignum Aloes, Galingal, Cloves, Consolida minore, Ci­namon, Nutmegs, Zedoaria, Ginger, Diptamnum album, of each, ounce 1. Muske of Levant, Ambergriece of each one Drachme. Beat all those aforesaid things together, and put them into a Retort of Glasse well luted, and put thereto vj. pound of Re­ctified Aqua vitae without fleame, and so let it stand viiij. dayes, and then distill it by sand, and there will come forth a white water mixed with Oyle, and so keep thy fire small, untill there come forth a blackish Oyle, then change thy Receiver, and set thereto another, and increase thy fire untill all the spirits bee come forth, then separate the Oyle from the black water, and keep them by themselves and the like shall yee doe by the first water. The first vvater that is white, is called A­qua del Balsamo, and the Oyle separated from that is called Oleum del Balsamo. The second vvater that is black is called Mater Balsami, and the Oyle separated from that vvater, is called Balsamo artificiato, which would be kept as a precious Jewel.

The first Water is most excellent to clear and preserve the sight of the eyes, also if the face being washed therewith, it ma­keth [Page 67] it very faire, and preserveth it youthfully, it keepeth back age, it breaketh the gravell in the reines; and it provoketh Vrine, the which is stopped thorow carnosity; it helpeth all manner of Wounds, in what place of the body soever they be, if yee wash them with the said vvater, and wet therein clouts, and lay thereon, for his operation is so strange, that it seemeth rather divine then humane. It helpeth much against the Etisie, and against all sorts of of Catarres, and Cough. If ye wash a Sciatica therewith, and lay thereon a cloath wet in the same, it taketh away the paine presently.

The other water called the Mother of Balme, helpeth scalls in short time if ye wash them therewith; so doth it helpe the white scall, Lepra, and all sorts of Ulcers that are not corro­sive most miraculous to see, and without any trouble; it ser­veth also against a number of other infirmities, the which I will let passe at this time.

The Oyle of Balme, doth serve for an infinite number of things, and especially for Wounds in the head, where the bone and pannicle is hurt, putting it therein. It preserveth the face if yee annoint it therewith. It is most excellent against the Plurisie, giving thereof j. ʒ at a time with the water of Balm

The Balme artificiall is a most miraculous Liquor, if any have the stitch in the side, and take two drachms thereof, it presently will helpe him. It is also good against the Cough, and Cattare, coldnesse in the head and stomack, and for Wounds in the head. It is a most soveraign Remedy, if yee annoint all the head therewith once a day; because it pierceth into the brains, and also unto the stomack beneath. It re­solveth all tumours in all parts of the body with speed. It re­solveth a Quartaine in short time, if yee annoint all the body therewith, leaving no part.

And to be short, I know no disease neither hot nor yet cold, but that this Balsamum doth good unto, as well the hot disea­ses as the cold, because it cooleth the hot, and heateth the cold, and this it doth by his quality and hidden vertue, so that I have found in this precious Liquor such great vertues, that I am not able to declare them all; so that every one which is furnished with this precious Balme, may be kept from [Page 68] infirmities, and shall not need to seek the naturall Balm with so much expenses and danger of the life, as hath been many times seen.

To make our Aromatico, the which helpeth against all manner of infirmities, of what quality soever they be.

ARomatico Leonardo, is so called, because it was compoun­ded and made by his invention, and is a miraculous Me­dicine, that serveth against all manner of diseases of what quality soever they be, for it worketh this operation, that is, as soon as it joyneth to the stomack, it draweth to it all the evill humours of the body, and imbraceth them, and carrieth them forth of the body both by vomit and seege, and so leaveth nature unburthened, the which may prevail to his pleasure, because it hath no impediment, and by this reason I approve, that our Aromatico helpeth against all diseases, as is said before, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Fine white Sugar ℥. iv. pure Pearles, Musk, Saffron, Lignum Alloes, Cinnamon, ana. ℈. i. Petra Philosophale ʒ. iv. Mix them together, and make thereof Lozanges with Rose-water according to art, the which yee shall keep in a box of wood close shut, and the order to use it is thus, when the Physitian doth goe to visit any sick person, and that he will prepare him some Medicine to take inward, the best and most perfectest Medicine that he can ordain is our Aromatico, because it evacuateth the stomack by vomit, and the body downward, and his operation is such, that it doth in manner helpe any crude sort of infirmity, and the quantity is from one drachm to two drachms, and may be taken in broth, in wine, in water, or mix it with any pills, or potion, giving you charge, that when yee put it in any potion, that yee leave none in the bottome of the cup where yee drink it out, because the Petra Philosophale is heavy, and will remain in the bottome, for if that remain, it will not work at all, giving you also charge, that the said day that yee give this Medicine, that yee let the Patients drink as much crude water as they will, and give them [Page 69] little meat to eat that day, and this is the order to use this Me­dicine.

To make our Electuario Angelico, and the order to use it, and in what diseases.

ELectuario Angelico Romano, is so called, because it was com­pounded by me in the City of Rome, in the time of Pope Paulo quarto, and because this Composition worketh suddenly, I called it Angelico, and is most excellent against many diseases, it is good against all sorts of Fevers, giving it Perminorativo, and for the stitch in the side it is most rare, because it taketh away the viscosity in the stomack, and openeth the pores, and is good against the Gout, for if they take it every third day once, in ten dayes they shall be helped, it is also good against the Cough, Catarre, and for the Milt, and for those that have the Pox, or the running Gout, and such like influences, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Saffron, Lignum Aloes, Cinnamon, red Corrall, ana. ʒ. iii. Elleborus niger without preparation ℥. ii. Electuario de succo rosarum Mesue that is not too much boiled ℥. vi. Sugar Rosate ℥. viii. Musk of Levant ʒ. i. Petra Philosophale ℥. iii. our Quintessence of Wine ℥. ii. purified Hony as much as will suffice to make it in form of an Electuary, mix them on a small fire in an earthen pan, and when it is made, keep it in a vessell of glasse, for any other vessell will not be so good: This Electuary yee may mix with any soluble Medicine, but yee must take it fasting, the quantity is from two drachms to four drachms. Yee shall understand, that this in a manner reviveth the dead by his great vertue, as hath been seen many thousand times in Venice, and in Rome, most worthy of memory, and therefore if any Phisitian desire to get fame in the world, let them use our Electuario Angellico, which worketh miracles on the earth.

Of the vegetable stone of our invention, to transemute a body of one complexion into another, and to make him sound for ever.

THe way to make the vegetable stone is rare, and his ver­tues are infinite, and without comparison, and the cures that are done therewith are so miraculous, that the world will no [...] beleeve them, although it be the meer truth, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Tartar of white Wine that is thick and shining, Turpen­tine that is clear and pure: The hearb called Alloes, that hath leaves as long as an arme, and dented on both sides, and some call it Semper-vive, take of each of these one pound, and stamp them together, and put them into a Urinall with a Head and Receiver, and distill them in a Wine Furnace untill all the substance be come forth, then take the Fesses out of the glasse, and grind them with the said water, and then distill them as thou diddest before, and alwayes at the last give it a strong fire that the fesses may remain well burnt, then take out the fesses again, and grind them with the water as thou diddest first, and distill it again, and this thou shalt doe fifteen or twenty times, untill all that water be consumed, and the fesses remain white like salt, then lay that fesses on a smooth stone in a moist place, and it will turn into water, the which keep in a glasse close shut, and that is the water of the vegetable stone, which water is of so much vertue, that one scruple thereof being put into two ounces of Julip of Violets, and given to drink to any that is infirmed or evill complexionated, in lesse then four and twenty dayes he shall be helped of any grievous disease, and this must be taken in the morning fasting, when the stomack is empty, for then it worketh better his opera­tion.

This is also an excellent remedy against the wormes, giving it in the aforesaid manner, it mundifieth the Liver, and drieth the humidity of the Milt, it dissolveth the Cough, and Catarres, it provoketh Urine where it is let, with divers other vertues, the which I will let passe untill another time, for if I should [Page 71] write them all, they would not be credited, and therefore we Physitians should not rest to practise in all things that seemeth to us convenient, and I promise thee truly, that hee which shall occupie this thing, shall work miracles on the earth, and win great fame and honour. Yee shall understand, that this is the stone that the Philosophers have long sought to fix their Medicine Minerall, so that making the projection they joyn the Medicine with metalling bodies, and not to goe away in fume, because this stone resisteth all great fires without con­suming, and fixeth Sulphur and Orpiment, so that they shall abide the fire, and maketh them white: If yee make projecti­on therewith on Copper, or on Lattin, it will turn it into the whitenesse of pure silver, and that I have seen with my eyes, so that yee may see of what importance this vegitable stone is, the which worketh such goodly transmutations, as well in met­talling bodies as in humane bodies, and therefore it is to be accounted of, because it may save the life of many that use it in their Medicines.

Our soluble Sirrup, with the order to use it.

SOluble Sirrups made in decoction are very wholsome, and of great faculty, and especially in the crudity of hu­mours, and the reason is this: because it disperseth the matter, and evacuateth it with great ease, and without dan­ger or trouble of the Patient, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Sage, Rosemary, Wormwood, Cicory, Carduus sanctus, Nettles, Organy, of each a handfull, Figs, Raisins, Dates, sweet Almonds, Sal gem, ana ℥. iiii. Coloquintida, Aloes hepatica, Cin­namon, Mirabolani citrini, ana. ℥. ii. common Hony two pound.

Stamp them all grosly, and put them to infuse in eighteen pound of fair water, then boil it till half be consumed, then strain it, and distill it by a filter, and aromatise it with two ca­rets of Musk and a pint of Rosewater, and then it is made, which yee shall keep in a bottle of glasse close stopped, the quantity is from four ounces to six ounces.

[Page 72]In Winter you shall take it very warme. And in the Spring and Autumne, yee shall take it but warm. In Summer yee shall take it cold, for this purgeth the grosse humours of the body, and hurteth not the stomack, yee may use it in a Fever, four or five dayes together, and it will helpe it. In crudity of hu­mours, as the French Pox, Gouts, Catarres, Doglie, Arteti­ca, and such like matters, where there is no accident of Fe­ver, yee may take it ten or fifteen dayes together, and cannot hurt by any means, for it purgeth most excellently: it is given against the Cough, against Flux of the Vrine, and paines in the head, and Carnosity in the yeard, or the Hemeroids: And in summe it is good against all diseases caused of corrupt hu­mours; for it hath such vertue, that it draweth from all parts, and evacuateth the humours intestinal, for of this Sirrup I have had great experience, in such persons as were in manner banished, and had lost their taste, and presently using this, they came to good temperature; and I have used it an infinite number of times, in persons that were ulcerated, and full of sores, evill handled of Fortune, and of the infirmity, and finding no means to cure them as they should be, I gave them this Sirrup fourteen or fifteen dayes, and then they were cu­red, with a number of other things, the which would be too long to write; and therefore I would wish every one to use this, not onely in the aforesaid matters, but in all other di­seases.

Our Sirrupo Magistrale Leonardo, which serveth against an infinite number of diseases, and is a rare Medicine.

THis Sirrup is solutive, and very pleasant to use, and can­not hurt in any wise, which is seldome seene in other Me­dicines, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. The leaves of Sine, two ounces. Fumitory, Mayden-hair, Harts-tongue, Lyver-wort, Epitemum, Ellemo, Pollipodie of the Oke, the floures of Borrage, of Buglosse, Lycorice, of each three ounces. Colloquintida, Elleborus niger, Aloes hepatica, Mira­bolani Indi ana. ℥. j. Proynes 14. Sebestien. 12. Tamarise. ℥. 1. [Page 73] Stamp them grosly, and infuse them in ten pounds of Fumitory water, then boyle it untill the consumption of the third part, and then straine it, and in that which is strained put these things: Sirrup of Stacados, lb. i. Saffron, one scruple, Mel rosarum, six ounces: Rectified Aqua vitae, four ounces: Muske, ʒ. i. the Muslege of Marish Mallowes, four ounces, Benja­min, one ounce, Rose-water, three ounces And then it is made, which ye shall keep in a Glasse close stopt, and keep it in a temperate place, and this you must take warme, the quantity is from two ounces to foure ounces, and it is a most safe Me­dicine to be used without keeping of any dyet. It helpeth those much that have Pellaria, scabs, Hemeroids, and such like diseases, and may be given unto a woman with child, with­out any danger, when she shall have occasion to use any.

Our Sirrup against the Melancholly humour, and especially where there is ventosi [...]ie in the stomack.

IT were necessary for those that will make this Sirrup, to be expert in the Art, for it would be made with great diligence, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Water of Fumitorie, of Hops, of Wormwood, of Mayden-haire, of each five pound. Then with this water thou shalt make a decoction with these things that follow.

℞. Pollipodium of the Oak, one pound, Sine leaves, Epitimum, ana. four ounces Cordial flours, two handfuls. Mayden-haire, one handfull, Licoris, Raysins, Cinnamon, of each two ounces: The four Cole seeds two ounces. Make thereof a Decoction ac­cording to Art, and straine it, then take foure pound of that Decoction, and put thereto the juyce of Burrage, of Buglosse, of Hops, of each two ounces; Common Honey, vi. ounces. Then with white Sugar, make a Sirrup in good forme, and aroma­tise it with Muske and Amber, putting thereto one ounce of Plyris without Muske, and then it is made. The quantity is from three ounces to four ounces in the morning warme, and fast thereon at the least three or foure houres, for this pur­geth marvellously the melancholly humours, and all other grosse humours, and dissolveth wind, and comforteth the heart, &c.

Our Potion of Lignum Sanctum, which is miraculous to dissolve crude, and maligne humours, with the order to use it in the French Pox, and such like diseases.

BEcause the Pox is a disease contagious, putrefied, and cor­rupt, and worketh many evill effects, as I have written in my Caprici medicinale; therefore it were necessary to prepare most excellent and rare Remedies to dissolve the same, which Medicines are infinite.

But in this Chapter I will write one, that purgeth the crude and viscous humours downwards, and doth assubtiliate the grosse humours, and dryeth all sorts of subtill humours that offend Nature, and sendeth them forth by sweat, it dryeth the melancholly humour, and dissolveth choller, and is most wholesom for those that are troubled with that disease, because it dryeth much and dissolveth the disease, with many other good effects, as by experience thou mayest see, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. The barke of Lignum sanctum grosly beaten lb. 1. and lay it to steep in lb. xiiii. of faire water 24. hours, then boyle it untill foure pounds be consumed, then put thereto Pollipodie of the Oak, two ounces, Cicory one handfull, Aloe Epatike ʒ. iiii. and let them boyle for an houre: Then put thereunto the leaves of Syve, Epitemum, ana, ℥. j. Colo­quintida, ʒ. vj. Sugar, seven ounces, then let it boyle till halfe be boyled away; and that there remaine lb. vii. then straine it, and put it in a Glasse with 12. graines of Muske; and keep it very close stopt; and this is the Sirrup which yee shall take twise a day, that is morning and evening; then make this drinke following, which shall be the common drink at all times to your meat.

℞. One pound of Lignum sanctum, Raspead, and steep it in ten pounds of white Wine that is ripe; and let it boyle an houre, then put thereto lb. xv. of faire water, and let it boyle a little more; and then straine it, and keep it in a glasse bottle, for this is to be used all the day time; and the order [Page 75] to use these is thus. First, when any feeleth himselfe grieved with the Pox or any such like disease, he must keep his bed at the least twenty dayes, and use to take of the first Sirrup or Potion every morning a good draught, being as warme as hee may suffer it, then cover him well with clothes that he may sweat as much as he can; then take off the clothes by little and little, and dry him with warm clothes, and so let him repose for two hours, and then let him eat, and his meat must be dry, as Bisket, rost-meat, Raysins of the Sun, Almonds, and some­time a raw egge, and his drink at meals, and all the day be­side shal be the last made with Wine and Water, then at night give him of the first Sirrup as yee did in the morning, and cause him to sweat; and then dry him; and this order thou shalt use twenty dayes together not comming forth of thy Chamber, and by the grace of God thou shalt be helped of any such grievous infirmity; as I have seen the experience thereof an infinite of times, to my great honour; for it may be occupied in all complexions with safety, as by the ingredi­ents thou maist see.

A most marvellous water and rare, to cause a man to avoid the gravell in Vrine, and to mundifie the Reines.

THe gravell in the Reines of the back is caused, and engen­dered of great heat, and drynesse in those parts, as thou maist plainly see by those which are troubled therewith; for their Reines are so hot that they cannot abide any heavy gar­ment to lye thereon, and they alwayes make their water with great paine and burning: therefore if thou wilt helpe that in­firmity, it were necessary to refrigerate the Reines, and moi­sten it with good juyce, and take away that burning of the Vrine; and so in that order the Patient shall be helped; and this thou maist doe in short time, and with great ease with this Remedy.

℞ The seed of small Lemonds, the seed of Oranges, and one pound, Saxifrage, six pound, Balme, Scolopendria, Pellitory of the wall, Sparagus, Crisoni, Isop, Fenel-roots, Parsly roots, ana. ℥. vi. stamp them altogether, and make them in forme of a li­quid [Page 76] Unguent with the juyce of Lemons, then distill it in a common tin Stillitory being luted, untill the matter remain dry, then keep the water in a Glasse close stopt, and when yee will occupy this water, yee must first purge the body of the crude and viscous humours, and likewise evacuate the stomack of choller and flegm; that being done thou shalt take every mor­ning and evening ℥. vj. warme, and it would be necessary for those that take it, to use a dyet, and to refrain moist and cold meats, and use onely dry things, and so this water shall help those aforesaid griefs; as I have proved divers times.

To make the water of Lignum Sanctum, most wholsome against the Pox with a new order.

COmmonly they use to take the water of Lignum Sanctum, against the Pox; the which surely is most wholsome, but it must be taken in good order and form, and must be made with great discretion, and not as they use it now adayes; for they give it some three or foure times, and never the better, although the wood be sufficient enough to helpe them; and therefore I would wish every one that will use this water to take it in such order as it ought to be, the which I will shew thee hereafter.

℞. Lignum sanctum, Rasped small one pound, the bark being beaten ℥. iii. infuse them in twelve pound of fair water one night, and the next morning put therein one pound of Hony, the which is put in, because it is aperative and warm, and helpeth to provoke sweat, and causeth it to have a good tast, then boil it till half be consumed, then put thereto Carduus sanctus ℥. iiii. strong Wine three pound, then boil it untill a third part be consumed, and then it is made, then strain it, and take forth the Carduus sanctus, and put therein twenty pound of fair water, and one pound of Hony, and let it boil untill four pounds be consumed, and strain it, and keep it in a glasse bottle, for this is the common drink to drink all the day long, and the order to take it is thus: First before yee will take this water, it were necessary to take our Sirrupo Solutivo seven or eight dayes, after that take of our Electuario Angelica ℥. ss. [Page 77] that being done, in the name of God take this potion of Lignum sanctum in this order, take in the morning at the appearing of the day ℥. viii. very warm as yee may suffer, and presently lay clothes on him, and cause him to sweat two houres, and then dry him with warm clothes, and so let him remain two houres, and then give him to eat, and his meat shall be [...]isket, Raisins, Almonds, and sometimes a little rost meat, and no other: then in the evening, about the two and twentieth hour yee shall give him the said Sirrup as yee did in the morning, neither more nor lesse, and cause him to sweat, and about the four and twentieth hour give him onely Bisket and Raisins, and the other common drink that was made last, giving you warn­ing, that yee make this drink fresh every third day, because it shall not hurt the stomack, and every week once, yee [...] take a pill of Marte millitare, and that day thou shalt eat birds flesh, because of weakening, also yee shall take very great bee [...] to one thing, and that is this, if it happen, that at the begin­ning of this cure there cometh a Fever, or other accident unto the Patient, that in any wise yee leave not the cure, but fol­low the order, for that is a certain sign of health, for many times I have given this water, and unto some in the fourth or fifth day the Fever came, and tarried many times ten or twelve dayes, and then the Fever went away with the corrupt disease, and all for company, and so in short time they were cured, so that, as I have said before, when that sign appeareth, and is delivered, it is a certrin sign of health: Also I will advise thee of another thing, and that is this, if the Patient cannot sweat, yee shall annoint him all over with the Oil of Quin­ces, the which will cause him to sweat apace: For without sweat the cure will not be perfect, and this order thou shalt keep at the least forty dayes together within thy Chamber, so that there come no air in, for it will hinder the cure.

Our distillation for the Etesia, which is of marvellous vertue, and without comparison, with the order to use it.

HAving written sufficiently of the quality of the Fever Hectick and his cure, in my Caprici Medicinal [...], [...] I [Page 78] will write of nothing but the order to make this precio us Li­quor, with the order to use it, as well for that disease as for other such like, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. A young Hen that hath not yet laid Eggs, and pull her quick, and then take forth her guts onely, and stamp her in a stone Morter, and put thereto as much crumme of white bread as the flesh doth weigh, and stamp them together, and put thereto a handfull of fresh Scabious, and as many leaves of Gold as weigheth a French Crown, then put thereto as much water of Mortella as all the aforesaid matter doth weigh, and so leave it one night, and then distill it in a Urinall of glasse, with three pound of strong Wine in Balneo Mariae, untill the fesses remain dry, and then it is ended.

Then for every pound of this distillation, put thereunto ℥. i. of the water of Hony made according to our order, and keep it in a glasse unstopt, that the strong savour may goe away, and the order to use it in the Fever Hectick I have writ­ten in his Chapter, this serveth also for those inward cau­ses which are most troublesome, and for those that have a burning Fever. Also for women that have a Fever in their child-birth.

Our vegetable Sirrup, which is miraculous and divine.

THis Sirrup is one of my seven secrets, with which I have done many miracles many times, in divers operations on many infirmities, and have been so chary of it, that I meant never to set it forth in my life time, but yet I considering what great benefit it might be unto the world, I thought good to set it forth, that every one might be served according to his pleasure: and the like I will doe of many other secrets of great importance, which shall be dispersed among my books, and the order to make this Sirrup is thus.

℞. Lignum Aloes, Riopontico, Eupatorio, red Saunders, of each ℥. ii. Beat them, and make thereof a decoction in good form, and with lb. iv. of this decoction make a Sirrup, and put thereto these things following while it is hot, Saffron ℈. i. Ginger ʒ. i. Musk two Carets, the solution of our Petra [Page 79] Vegetable ℥. iii. Cloves, Nutmegs, of each ℈. i. and a halfe, then keep it in a glasse close shut, and this is our vegetable Sirrup which worketh miracles in divers infirmities, for by his nature it purifieth the Bloud, mundifieth the Liver, comforteth the Heart, preserveth the Stomack, provoketh Urine, dissolveth gravell in the Reines, it helpeth the Cough, and helpeth di­gestion, and quieteth all the humours in the sick person, with divers other vertues, which I will leave till another time. This may be taken with broth, with distilled waters, or with any Decoction, or Medicine fasting, the quantity is from one drachm to two drachms, and happy shall they be which shall use it.

An Electuary that helpeth the Cough with great speed, and ease.

THe Cough is caused of a catarrous humour, and coldnesse of the stomack, and therefore if yee will help it, it were ne­cessary to have a remedy that doth ripen the Catarre, and mollifie the stomack, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Enula campana, ℥. iiij, Marsh Mallowes. ℥ xij. Quinces ℥. xvj. But if yee cannot get Quinces, yee may take Mar­malade ready made, and boyle it in faire water with the said roots, untill they be dry, then stamp them in a Morter, and straine them thorow a strayner, then take for every pound of that matter two pound of white Honey, and boyle them toge­ther, but boyle them not too much, then take it from the fire, and put thereunto for every pound of the aforesaid matter, one scruple of Saffron, and one Drachm of Cinamon, and two ounces of Sulphur, and one scruple of Licoris, and then in­corporate them well together, and aromatise it with Muske and Rose-water, and this yee shall use morning and evening; for this is of so great vertue, that it is to be wondered at, be­cause the Mallowes doe mollifie, the Enula campana doth warm and causeth digestion, and comforteth the stomack; the Quinces are cordial and warm; the Sulphur is a great dryer, the which destroyeth the evill humours of the body; the Saffron comforteth the heart; the Cinamon is stomachall, the [Page 80] Licorice is mollificative, and digesteth the matter; so that of force this Electuary must help any kind of Cough, except it come of the Pox; for then it will doe small pleasure; as I have proved.

Electuario benedicto Leonardi, the which purgeth the body without any griefe, and is miraculous in his operation.

THis Electuario benedicto, is a compound of our invention many years agoe; and is so called, because of his marvel­lous operation, and the order to make it, is thus.

℞. Of a certain kind of fruit called of some, Spina merula, of other Spini cervini, with his berry they make a kind of sap green, take of these berries when they be ripe, and stamp them, and take thereof the juyce, and straine it by a filter, and for every pound of the aforesaid Juyce yee shall put there­in these things; Cinnamon, Safron, Cloves, Nutmegs, Gin­ger, ana. 1. Drachm Sena, Alloes, ana 3. Drachm mix them well together, and set it in the sunne till it be dryed like a paste, and then make it liquid again with these following.

℞. Rose-water, our Quintessence, ana ℥. ii. for a pound. Muske 2. carretes for a pound, Mirrha 1 Drachm for a pound. Incorporate all the aforesaid things together, and set it in the sunne untill it be thorow dry, and may be made in powder, of the which yee shall take what quantity yee will, and mix it with as much Honey purified, and that is our Electuario bene­dicto, the which purgeth the body without paine, and preser­veth the stomack, purgeth the head, and helpeth putrified Fevers, with divers other things the which I will not write at this time. Yee may keep this mixture 6. moneths after it is mixt with Honey: the dose is from halfe an ounce to a whole ounce. Yee may take them in Pills in broth, in an Electuarie, or in Wine, or how yee will, and alwayes they shall make his effect well.

An Electuarie against the evill disposition of the Liver and Stomack.

THe Liver is troubled with divers and sundry causes: but for the most part it is of heat: For the heat sheweth some outward sign, as is seen by experience; for their Face and Nose are red; they have heat in their Legs, chops in the palms of their hands and feet. It ingendereth Fluxes in the body, burning of Vrine, running of the Reins, and such like effects. And the order to cure them is thus.

℞. Citraca, Scolopendria, Epataca, Eupaterio, ana ℥. iij. beat them in fine powder, Lignum aloes three Drachms, Saf­fron ij. scruples, Cinamon, two Drachms, white crude Honey one pound and a halfe, mix them and incorporate them together without fire, then take thereof morning and evening ℥. j. at a time; but before yee begin to take this Electuary, yee shall take a quantity of our Electuario Angelica, and then in short time they shall be helped, as thou maist well see by the ingredients that goeth into this composition.

Our magistrall Electuary of Sulphur, the which serveth against divers sorts of infirmities.

AS the fire hath vertue to heat and dry materiall things, so hath the Sulphur vertue to warme, and to dry the humi­dity and coldnesse of our bodies; for I have occupied it di­vers and sundry times, and alwayes have seen divers and sundry good effects; but for the better commoditie, and more ease to use it, I have compounded this Electuary, the which thou maist use with ease and benefit unto a number, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Very fine Sulphur that is without earth, and make it in fine powder, one pound, Cinamon halfe an ounce. Saffron one scruple, Ginger ij. Drachms, Muske dissolved in Rose-water, ij. Carrets, white honey crude as much as will suffice to make it in an Eelectuary without fire, then keep it in a dry place: and this yee shall use in the morning fasting, and his quantity is [Page 82] from four Drachms to seven. This dryeth up scabs, provoketh Vrine, breaketh the stone in the reins, it helpeth the Cough, dryeth up the watering of the eyes, causeth a good appetite, with divers other things, the which I will leave to the experi­mentors.

Our Electuario of Consolida majore, that serveth for many di­seases inwardly.

THis Consolida majore is an hearb so called, because of his effect that it doth in healing of Wounds, and other pla­ces of the flesh separated; for if yee eat thereof, it will help the Rupture, and all sorts of Wounds penetrating, and Ulcers of the Lungs, it dryeth the Milt, and such like effects; but because thou maiest use it more commodious, I have com­pounded an Electuary, the which is excellent and rare, and is made thus.

℞. The root of Consolida majore, one pound, and boyle it in water untill it be consumed, then stamp them in a Morter, and passe them thorow a strayner, then put thereto as much white Honey as the matter weigheth and boyle them on a small fire untill it be come to the forme of an Electuary, and when it is boyled, put thereto these things.

℞. The shels of Pomgranads in fine powder, ℥. j. Lignum Aloes vj. Drachms, Mirra, Mastike, Sarcocolla, Sanguis dracho­nis, in graine, ana ij. Drachms. Cinamon, j. Drachm, Muske of Levant dissolved in Rose-water, one Carret, then incorpo­rate them well whiles it be warme: Yee shall note that the body must first be well purged ere yee take this Electuary, and yee must also keep a dyet that the Medicine may work the bet­ter; for this helpeth all the aforesaid diseases inwardly, as is said before: yee may use it implaister wise upon Wounds, and on broken bones, and use it inwardly, and so the Patient shall remaine helped. With this I have seen men of great age hel­ped, that were burst below, and wounded from one part to the other; and also broken bones and bruises, the which if I should write them, it would not be credited.

Our Imperiall Electuary for the Mother.

THis Electuary for the Mother, is by Nature temperate hot, and by his heat provoketh Menstrua, and comforteth the Matrix, and all other weak parts, of what causes soever they be; and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Cinamon, elect, ℥. j. Nutmegs, Maces, Cloves, Ginger, ana one Drachm, Cassiae lignae, six Drachms. Marmalade ℥. xij. Lignum aloes iiij. Drachms, red Sanders ij. Drachms, Aqua vitae well rectified ℥. iij. fine Muske two Carrets, purified Honey lb. ij. then make thereof an Electuary according to art, which is most excellent against the indisposition of the Mother: But first ere yee begin to take this Medicine, it were necessary to take a quantity of our Pillole Aquilone, and then to take this Electuary in the morning fasting thereon four or five houres, the quantity is from halfe to one ounce; also that time that yee eat this Electuary, yee shall eat no evill meats, as Hogs flesh, fryed meats, or baked meats, or such like as might hinder the operation of the Electuary: This Electuary yee shall use at the least fourty dayes together; and so thou shalt see marvellous effects thereof, as I have done a thousand times in Cicilia, in Naples, and in Rome; and also in Venice, and alwayes it fell out in one order, and yet the Regions are much different one from another, and the inhabitants are contrary of complexion; neverthelesse this Medicine wrought alwayes one effect in operation, as well in one place, as in another; and therefore I approve it to be a most blessed Medicine, and of great experience.

Pills against poyson, the which are of marvellous vertue.

THese Pills are of such experience against poyson, as is not to be beleeved, and the order to make them is thus.

℞. Imperatrice, Bistorta, Tormentilla, Valeriana, Dittamobian­co, Carlina, Ariostogia rotunda, Gencyana, Agarico electo, Sal gemma of each alike quantity, beat them in fine powder, then take the juyce of Carlike, and of Onions as much as will [Page 84] make it into a paste; also put into the juyce ʒ. i. of Saffron, then let the said paste being mixt dry in the shadow, and then beat it into powder again, and mix it with the aforesaid juyce in good forme, and keep it in a vessell of Lead untill thou hast need, and when thou wilt occupy it, take thereof ʒ. iiij. and make thereof Pills with Sirrup Acetoso in good form; which thou shalt give unto him that is poysoned; and in short time thou shalt see Miracles of that Medicine: for all the aforesaid simples in manner alone are sufficient to deliver one that were poysoned, but being mixed together it worketh greater effect.

Ʋnguento magno Leonardo.

THis Ʋnguento magno is so called by reason of his great ver­tue and operation; for it worketh so strange in some di­seases, that it in a manner reviveth the Patient, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Otnegra oviu, ℥. vj. Oximel squilliticum halfe an ounce, mix them together in an earthen dish untill the Otnegra oviu. be become like ashes, then it is deifitrom, then put thereon ℥. ij. of vinegar, and wash it well, untill it remain pure and cleare, then take Olibanum halfe an ounce, Cerusae, ℥. 1.

Beat them fine, and mix it in a stone Morter with as much Magno liquore, as will serve to incorporate them well, then put thereto the Otnegra oviu. and mix them very well together; that being done, put thereto Auxungia porcina, ℥ viij. And mix them all together, and then it is made, which keep in a vessell well glased; for it will keep a long time without cor­ruption, and is apt to help those that are lame, full of paines, sores and swellings, paines of the eyes, the stone in the reins, and such like matters, It helpeth all manner of French Pox, if yee annoint them therewith untill their Gums be sore, and then leave. But yee shall note that the body must first be well purged before yee annoint them. This Unguent cooleth all corrosive Ulcers, and helpeth them in short time, it helpeth all paines in the eyes, if yee put it therein, and taketh away all burning with speed; and to be short, it helpeth those diseases in most short time, so that it is to be wondred at.

Oil of Hypericon, which is most miraculous for Wounds and Bruises.

THis Oil of Hypericon compounded by us, is of great ver­tue in divers and sundry accidents, and especially in Wounds, for it helpeth them without any pain, although the Veins, Sinews, or Bones were hurt, or cut and that in very short time, it preserveth the Wound from corruption, and taketh away the pain, and incarnateth, and siccatrizeth, as by expe­rience thou mayest plainly see. It dissolveth Contusions, and is most marvellous against poyson.

It helpeth against any crude sort of venomous Fever, if yee annoint all the body therewith leaving no part, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. The floures, leaves, and seed of Saint Johns Wort, as many as yee will, and stamp them together, and put them in a glasse, with as much strong white Wine as will cover it well, then set it in the sun ten dayes together, then put thereto as much pure Sallet Oil as the Hearbs and the Wine doth weigh, then let it stand in the sun other ten dayes, giving you warning, that yee weigh your Oil before yee mix them, that being done, put thereunto for every pound of Oil ℥. ii. of Tur­pentine, and ʒ. i. of Saffron, of Nutmegs, Cloves, Mirrha electe, of each ℥. ss. Frankincense ℥. i. Viticella ℥. ii. for every pound.

Stamp them altogether, and put them into a great glasse, and set it to boil in Balneo Mariae, with a Head and Receiver close shut, and to know when it is boiled enough is, that there will ascend no more vapours into the Head, and that will be within four and twenty houres or thereabout; then take forth the glasse being yet hot, and strain it, and keep it in a glasse close shut as a precious Jewell; yee shall note, that this Oil must alwayes be occupied very warm, and in any wise tent no Wound, but wet clothes therein and lay it thereon, and thy cure shall prosper well, for this I have proved a thousand times in divers places.

To make our Oleum benedictum, which healeth Wounds di­vinely.

THis Oleum benedictum serveth chiefly for Wounds in all parts of the body, and especially for Wounds in the head, if there were fracture of bone, and offences of the Pannicle, and in other places where Sinewes are hurt, or Muskles, or Veins, or in any other noble place of the body, with this Oleum benedictum, and with our vegetable Quintessence thou mayest help them easily, and in short time, without any danger or detriment of the wounded person, as is said before, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. The whites of Eggs being hard sod in water ℥. xii. clear Turpentine ℥. xiv. pure Mirrh ℥. iii. Mix them, and put it in­to a Retort of glasse, and give it gentle fire at the first, and then increase it according to Art, untill all the substance be come forth of the Retort, which will be both Water and Oil, which separate, and keep the Oil by it self in a glasse as a pre­cious Jewell, for this worketh miracles in Wounds of what sort soever they be, moreover it causeth hair to grow on the head or beard which is fallen away, and that it doth in short time, by onely annointing the place therewith, also if any have a stitch in his side, and retention of Urine: let him take a Gli­ster, wherein he shall put a little of this Oil and he shall be helped, and this effect it doth, because it drieth mightily that alteration made in the secret parts of the Reines inwardly, where no locall medicine can be applyed.

A Magistrall Water, which preserveth the sight a long time, and mundifieth the eyes of all spots.

IF thou wilt make a water that shall have vertue to preserve the sight long, and to mundifie the eyes from all spots, that are therein, it were necessary, that therein were simples that are preservative and mundificative, as I will shew thee here­after.

℞. The best and strongest white Wine that thou canst [Page 87] find lb. xii. new Bread well risen lb. iv. Celandine, Fennell, Cipolla squilla, ana. ℥. iv. Cloves ℥. ss.

Stamp them, and then distill them altogether in a goord, in Balneo Mariae untill yee have received five pound, which keep by it self, for that is most excellent against pain in the eyes.

Also if any drink every morning for a moneth the quantity of one ounce, it will help him of any grievous infirmity. Also I never applyed this Water to any thing, but alwayes it did great pleasure.

To make Oyle of Vitriol compound, which preserveth nature in his strength.

THe order to make this Composition is thus.

℞. Fine Sugar lb. iv. Riopontico lb. i. Rhabarbaro ℥. i. the floures of Mercury lb. i.

Stamp them altogether, and make thereof a paste, that being done, take pure rectified Aqua vitae without flegm lb. iv. And put them altogether in a Retort of glasse close stopped, then set it in warm horse dung six dayes, then take it forth and distill it in Balneo Mariae, untill there will come forth no more substance, then take forth the fesses in the Retort, and put it in a canvas, and presse it forth very hard: Then take Buglosse water, Fumitory water, Scabious water, of each ℥. vi. and with the said waters wash well the fesses, and presse it forth again as hard as yee can; then cast them away, and distill that water by a filter untill it be clear, then mix it with the first that was distilled by Balneo, then take the best Oil of Vitrioll that yee can get, and for every pound of the said matter, put thereunto ℈. ss. of the said Oil of Vitrioll, and keep it in a glasse close shut. This Composition I have caused to be used in the summer time, and yet continually doe use it, where­of I have seen great experience; it procureth a good appe­tite unto those that have lost or spoiled it, it helpeth the Milt, it dissolveth the pains of the head and teeth, with many other vertues, which I will not write at this time, it preserveth old men in their strength and lustinesse, so that it hath been a [Page 86] thing to be wondered at, and the order to take it is thus. Yee shall take ℥. ss. in the morning fasting as it is, and fast thereon four houres at the least, and that day eat but little meat, but let it be of good nourishment, and whosoever followeth this order long, shall live in perfect health of body, as I have seen divers and sundry times.

Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina, & Cera.

THis Oil of Turpentine and Wax is a most precious Balm, and his vertues are infinite, because it is made of Simples in manner uncorruprible, and is most miraculous for those that are corrupted or stricken with the Pestilence, because it is most penetrative, and of nature drying, and comforteth all weak parts in mans body, of what infirmity soever they be, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. New yellow Wax ℥. xii. clear Turpentine ℥. xviii. Ben­jamime ℥. ii. fine rectified Aqua vitae ℥. xxx. common Ashes ℥. vi. Mix them, and put them into a Retort of glasse well luted, and then distill it in a wind Furnace, untill all the sub­stance be come forth, and in the Receiver thou shalt find three things, the first is the Water, the second Oil, the third flegm, which thou shalt separate one from another, and keep them close stopt in a glasse, which is most excellent in time of the Pestilence, as well for unction as for to help the sores, for if yee put it in a sore, or botch, that is broke, presently it taketh away the pain, and being mixed with other of our Medicines, as I have shewed in my Regiment of the Pestilence, it helpeth them with great speed. If any annoint all his body with this Oil twice a moneth, it will preserve him youthfull, and in health a long time, it preserveth also dead flesh or fish that is put therein from corruption, also if any be wounded in any part of the body, let him annoint it with this Oil four or five times and it shall be whole: Also if any cannot make water, give him ʒ. ii. of this Oil to drink, and presently he shall make water, it is also good against the stitch in the side, and Plurisie, and Worms, and the Cough, and Catarre, and against the pestilent Fever, and such like indisposition, if yee [Page 89] drink a little thereof, it hath a number of other vertues, which I will leave unto the Experimentours.

Our Magno liquore which is of great vertue.

THis is of my invention, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Sweet sallet Oyle xx. lb. white wine lb. ij. boyle them together untill the wine be consumed, then put it in a vessell of stone, and put thereunto these things following.

℞. The flours of Rosemary, lb. iii. Lignum alces, ℥. vj. Oli­banum, Bdellium, ana. ℥. x. then stop it very close, and bury it in the ground four foot deep, and this would be buried in the beginning of August, and there remain untill the moneth of March, then take it forth of the ground, and set it in the sun, and put thereto these matters following. Sage, Rosemary, Rew, Betony, Millifolly, Comfery roots, Tamaro, Viticella, ana, one handfull, Gallingall, Cloves, Nutmegs, Spikenard, Saffron, ℥. j. Sarcocolla, Sanguis Draconis in graine, Mastike, ℥. j. aloes epatike, Rasa di pino, ana, ℥. viij. yellow Wax, Aux­ungia, ana. ℥. xviij. Colophonie., lb. j. Hipericon with the seed and all, lb. ij. Muske, ʒ. j. Mix these all well together, and boyle them in Balneo untill the herbs become dry, and have no more substance, then it is boyled, then take it forth and straine it; and put thereunto for every pound ʒ. vj. of our Balme artificiall; and when the moneth of September commeth, put thereunto lb. ij. of the fruit of the herb called Balsamina, which is red, and then it is ended, which thou shalt keepe in a Glasse close shut; for the older it is, the better it is; and is of such vertue, that it helpeth the Etisie, and Hidropsie, if yee give them every morning iiij. Drachms, with ℥. j. of Sirrup of Roses warme the space of xl. dayes, as I have proved: And this is the true and perfect Unction that helpeth the Petocchie, a disease so called in the Italian: If any were wounded, and had cut veins, sinues, and bones, let him joyne the parts close together, and dresse it with this Oyle very hot upon the upper parts; and in short time it shall be whole, without any alte­ration; it helpeth also the white scall if yee annoint it there­with: It helpeth coldnesse in the head and Catarrs, if yee [Page 90] annoint it within the nostrils at night when yee goe to bed; if yee annoint the stomack therewith, it causeth perfect digestion of the meat, it provoketh Vrine where it is let thorow carno­sity or Gonorrea, or such like matter; it causeth hair to grow, it preserveth the beard black, and is good against worms; and all these experiments are true, and proved of me divers and sundry times in the aforesaid infirmities, and also in divers other which I leave untill another time: Yee shall note, that if yee annoint any all over that is grieved with the Pox with this Oyle, it will increase his paine; and so by that means yee may know whether he be infected or no.

Pillole Angelica, which evacuate the body without any Impe­diment, and are most profitable.

IT is most necessary that all kind of Pills should be well pre­pared, and artificially handled; because they shall make no alteration in the stomack of those that take them; and there­fore I will write a kind of Pills of our invention, and are called Pillole Angelica Leonardo, which may be used in any kind of infirmity, and may be given to a woman with child without danger, for they dissolve the body without trouble, they purge choller and flegme, and purge partibus along, and are good a­gainst all paines, they dry up Ulcers in all parts of the body, dissolve the Catarrous humour, and in a manner all Fevers, and the order to make them is thus, ℞. Coloquintida, ℥. iiij. and put it in j. pound of pure rectified Aqua vitae without flegm, and there let it remaine three dayes, then straine it hard into a cleane vessell, and put therein Aloes epatike, Mirrha, Elebo­rus niger, ana, ℥. i. Beat them in fine powder, and mix them like a paste, then set it in the sunne untill it be almost dryed: Then put thereto Saffron, Cinamon, yellow Sulphur, ana, ʒ. iiii. and mix them well together, and let them dry altogether, then make it into a paste with white crude Honey, and keep it in a vessell of Lead, for that is best, the quantity is from one Drachm to two Drachms, for these are Pillole preparate, that may be taken without keeping of dyet, and they doe purge all humours hanging in the body, and preserveth the body from [Page 91] putrefaction, as I have seen the experience thereof divers times.

Pillole Aquilone of our Invention.

THose Pills are above all other in operation, as the Eagle is above all other birds; and therefore I thought good to call them Pillole Aquilone, and the order to make them is thus.

℞. Conserve of Damaske Roses made with Honey three ounces, Lignum aloes ʒ. i. Oyle of Vitrioll twelve graines, Ci­namon elect. ℈. ii. Petra Philosophale of our invention halfe an ounce, Sugar-candy, two ounces.

Mix them and make thereof a paste with Sirrupo acetoso, and keep them in a Glasse. The vertue of these Pills I will not write at this time, but onely I say they help against all sorts of infirmities, and hurteth none in any wise; the quan­tity is from ʒ. i. to ʒ. ii. in the morning fasting, but yee may not guild them in any wise, but drink after them a cup of wa­ter or wine, to carry them downe, then sleep thereon, and that day eat little meat, and light of digestion.

Our Quintessentia solutiva, which is of marvellous operation in divers matters.

THis Quintessentia solutiva evacuateth the body with great ease and without any detriment, and it purgeth all parts of the body that are troubled with grosse and viscous humours, it resolveth swellings, and taketh away the paines; it preser­veth the sight, and killeth worms, and causeth a good appe­tite, with many other good qualities, which I will leave at this time and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Lignum Aloes, Cinamon, Turbit, Aloes hepatica, ana, one ounce, Colloquintida, two ounces, Cloves, Saffron of each ℈. iii. Musk of Levant ʒ. i. Julip of Violets, lb. i.

Mix all the aforesaid matters together in a Glasse, and put thereon two pound of our Quintessence, and so let it stand twelve dayes, and then straine it, and put it into a vessell of Glasse close shut; this may be taken with broth, wine, or with [Page 92] what Sirrup or Potion yee will; the quantity is from ʒ. ii. to ʒ. iiii. in the morning fasting without keeping of any dyet at ll, and it shall worke well without trouble at all.

Our Sirrup of Quintessence, which is of marvellous vertue.

THis Sirrup is of marvellous vertue, as is seen daily by ex­perience, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Of that pure rectified Aqua vitae, whereof we make our Quintessence ℥. xii. Oil of Sulphur, Oil of Vitrioll, of each ʒ. i. Oil of Tartar perfect ℥. ii. Julip of Roses lb. iv. Musk two carrets, Saffron ℈. i. Cinnamon ʒ. i. Mix them together, and keep them in a glasse, for his vertues are innumerable, and in manner reviveth those that are half dead. It helpeth the Fever in short time if yee use it. This Sirrup may be mixed with any kind of potion that is given to the sick, and may be given alone in broth, wine, or water, or in what sort yee will, the quantity is from ʒ. ii. to ʒ. iv. and herewith I have done miracles, as thou mayest read, in my Thesauro della vita humana.

Pillole Magistrale, which is good against divers infirmities.

THese Pills are of great vertue, and especially against all kind of paines coming of corrupt humours; for they purge the putrefied humours, and preserve the body from corrupti­on, and the order to make them is thus.

℞. Olibanum, Masticke, Mirrha, Sarcocolla, Aloes hepatica, Elleborus niger, Saffron, Turbit, Colloquintida, ana, q v.

Stamp them finely; and for every ounce of the aforesaid matters, put thereunto two Carrets of Muske, and then in­corporate it with Honey of Roses, and Aqua vitae of each alike; and this Paste thou maiest keep for six moneths in a vessell of Lead; the quantity is from two Dramchs to three Drachms in the morning fasting, and drink thereon a little Wine. These Pills are most excellent to take away the paines of the Gout, and to preserve a man from it; they are also good for those that have the French Pox, because they eva­cuate [Page 93] the grosse and viscous humours, and maintain the body in good temperature, and using them in those diseases, it pre­serveth the body in good temperature. They are also good for women that are troubled with pains of the Mother, and retention of their Termes, for these are aperative and pro­voke them, and purgeth the Matrix of all impediments con­tained therein, they serve against the Megrum, and all pains of the head, and also against all kind of putrified Fevers, as I have seen the experience thereof sundry times.

A compound Aqua vitae, which serveth against all cold dis­eases of the stomack.

THis Aqua vitae, aromatised with simples of Levant, is of most excellent vertue, as by the ingredient thou mayest perceive, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Nutmegs, Cloves, Gallingall, Cardamomum, Cubebes, Mace, Cinnamon, Ginger, Saffron, Olibanum, ana. ℥. i. Beat them finely, and put them in a goord of glasse, and put therein lb. vi. of pure rectified Aqua vitae, and so let it stand six dayes, then distill it by sand, and there will come forth a red water, which is most precious against all infirmities caused of cold, it mundifieth all sorts of Sores, and helpeth all Wounds with­out pain. It causeth a good memory, it helpeth the Cough, and maketh the heart merry, with divers other vertues, which I leave to the Experimentour.

A compound Oil against Poyson, which is of a marvellous vertue

IF thou wilt help those that are poysoned, it were necessary to have remedies of such vertue that are apt to the solution of the poyson, for the poyson worketh those three effects, as is said berore, in the Chapter of the effects of poyson, where­in it is written, how that it is necessary to keep the bloud liquid, so that it congeal not in the veines, and likewise to let or stay that water which cometh to the stomack, and to let that alte­ration, or inflammation as we may term it. And all these operations are necessary to be done with most excellent re­medies, [Page 94] in which there entereth part of poyson, for the Pro­verb saith, that one poyson killeth another, and that I will approve in this Chapter, and the order to make this Composi­tion is thus.

℞. The oldest Oil that thou canst find lb. i. Aloes hepatica, Rhabarbaro, Spico nardo, Mirrha, Tormentilla, Dictamnum album, Gentiana, Bistorta, Consolida majore, Rubia di titory, ana. half an ounce, Theriaca Methridata, ana, ʒ. iii. quick Scorpions to the number of sixty. First put the quick Scorpions into the oil, and let them boil in Balneo Mariae four hours then put there­unto the other matters, and let them boil altogether other four houres, then strain it, and keep it in a vessell of glasse close shut, for truly this is a divine Oil for that accident, in which yee see entereth Scorpions which are venomous, and yet his poyson is wholesome for those that are poysoned.

The like yee may see by those that are burnt with fire, for the best Medicine that they can find, is to burn that place again: Also yee may see, that when great quantity of bloud cometh forth of a Wound, the Chirurgian presently letteth him bloud in another place to turn the same. Seeing then that these are true, it is also true, that one poyson doth kill another poy­son. And by this reason I approve, that if yee extinguish the poyson, it were necessary to be done with his kind, never­thelesse it must be prepared so, that the matter be not alterated, and become hurtfull unto the poysoned person, and the order to use this Oil against poyson is thus.

When that a man is poysoned, presently annoint all his body with this Oil, and give him thereof to drink two drachms with white Wine Vinegar morning and evening, and God willing thou shalt help any poyson be it never so strong: If he be poysoned with Sublimate, or a Diamoud, this remedy will not be good, because they are not poysons, but are deadly Minerals, which by no meanes can be digested, ere their evill effect mitigated. Therefore when one is poysoned with Sublimate, his remedy is no otherwise, but to make him bathes of Vinegar, and let h [...]m drink Milk enough, and eat Butter, and drink Siero, for this is the true remedy; as for example, when that a sore is mortified with a rottery made of Subli­mate, [Page 95] or Arsenick, presently it causeth great alteration, for which there is no excellenter remedies then Vinegar, Butter, and Milk: Then seeing that these remedies are so profitable to be used outwardly, there is no doubt, but that they will doe the same effect inwardly: Also it would be necessary to cause them to vomit every day once at the least, to keep the stomack evacuated of that matter, so that it come not to choke the infected person, or infect the sinews, so that the par­ty remain not lame for a long time after, as is daily seen in di­vers places.

A marvellous Sope that helpeth those which cannot spit but with great pain.

THis Composition is called Saponea nostra, because it is made of Sope, but not of that Sope which is in the Apothecaries shops in Venice, but this is a confection, which being eat every morning a little quantity, it helpeth those that spit with pain, it openeth the stomack, and breaketh that evill matter con­tained therein, and casteth it forth at the mouth with the spit­tle, and so leaveth the Patient well disposed and merry, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. White Venice Sope, and beat it into powder ℥. i. pure Mastick ʒ. ii. Cinnamon, Licorice, ana. ʒ. i. fine Sugar as much as will suffice to make it in tables according to art, the which are most strange, neverthelesse marvell not thereat, for I will shew the reason, so that every one shall be satisfied.

Yee shall understand, that the first ingredient being the Sope, is made with the Lye of Soda and Calx, which things doe dry and mundifie all sorts of Ulcers sordid, and cooleth them: Also therein is Oil Olyfe, which is one of the most ex­cellentest liquours in the world, for this of it self is able to cut that matter from the stomack, and to mundifie it; then in this compound there is Mastick, which is most excellent for the stomack, and draweth down from the head, then the Licorice and Cinnamon are aperative, and comforteth the stomack, so that all these being mixed together, of force it must help against these infirmities of the breast, and the quantity thereof is from ʒ. ii, to ℥. ss.

To make the Quintessence of Hony.

THis Quintessence hath all the vertues of the Quintessence of Wine, and is made in this order, and is rather to be counted a divine remedy then humane.

℞. The purest Honey that yee can get, which is not mixt with any thing lb. ii. and put it into a goord of glasse with his Head and Receiver close luted, and give it first a gentle fire, untill there appear certain white fumes in the Head, which will turn into a red water by laying of clothes wet in cold wa­ter upon the Head and Receiver, then keep in thy fire accor­ding to art, untill all the substance be come forth, which thou shalt keep in a glasse close shut, and in short time it will turn into the colour of a Rubie, then distill it seven times in Bal­neo Mariae, and it will lose his red colour, and be of a very plea­sant smell, and remain in the colour of Gold, and this Quint­essence dissolveth Gold and maketh it potable, and also all manner of Jewels that is put therein; also if yee give two or three drachms to any that lie a dying, presently it will recover him again, as the Quintessence of Wine doth; if yee wash any Wound or Sore therewith it will heal it quickly; it is good against the Cough, Catarre, and paines of the Milt, and many other sorts of diseases which I will not write at this time, for few or none will beleeve his great operation or vertue. If yee distill it twenty times with fine Silver, it will restore the sight unto those that are almost blind. Moreover, I have given this six and forty dayes unto one that had the Palsie, and he was helped quickly.

It helpeth also the Falling sicknesse, and preserveth the bo­dy from putrefaction, so that by these meanes we may see, that it is a celestiall remedy given unto us by the Almighty God, and therefore I would wish some vertuous men to take a little pains in making of this precious liquour, and they shall see such wonders thereof, that the world will marvell thereat, as I have proved many times, to my great honour and profit of the Patient. For many times I have given it the sick that no man did see me, and presently they thought I had wrought [Page 97] by inchantment, by reason of his great vertue, and therefore all men that professe Physick and Chirurgery, ought to be pro­vided of this liquour, and such like for their commodity, and profit of the Patient.

To make our Elixar vitae, or Aqua Coelestis.

THis Elixar vitae is a Medicine of such vertue and strength, that it helpeth in manner against all diseases that cometh to mans body, for those that are hot, it cooleth, and those that are cold, it warmeth, and that it doth by his proper quality and vertue, for this I have proved a thousand times, and have used it against sundry diseases, and alwayes have had good successe, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Ginger, Zedoaria, Gallingal, long Pepper, round Pepper, Juniper berries, Citron pills, Orange pills, Sage, Basill, Rose­mary, Mint, Majorame, Bay berries, Penniroyall, Gentian, Calamint, the floures of Elders, red Roses and white, Spica nardi, Cubebe, Lignum aloes, Cardamomum, Cinnamon, Cala­mus Aromaticus, Germander, Staecados, Camepiteos, Meligette, Mace, Olibanum, Aloes hepatica, the seed of Mugwort, of each ʒ. ii. Figs, Raisins, Dates, Almonds, Grains of the Pine, ana. ℥. vi. pure white Honey lb. i. Musk of Levant ʒ. i. fine Su­gar lb. iv.

Mix them altogether, and infuse them in lb. v. of pure Aqua vitae without flegm, and so let it stand eight dayes, then distill it in Balneo Mariae untill the fesses remain dry, then take that and sercolate it in a Pellicane in horse-dung forty dayes, then take the glasse with the fesses, and distill it in sand untill all the substance be come forth, which will be red like bloud, and stinketh of the fire, and is thick, the which must be sercolated as the first, and this is the fiery part, which is of marvellous vertue, insomuch that it reviveth those that are at the point of death, and therefore I will write of some of his vertues which I have proved.

The first water distilled by Balneo, being taken every third day ʒ. i. preserveth the body in prosperous state, and defend­eth it from many sorts of diseases It helpeth all sorts of wounds [Page 98] if yee wash them therewith three or four times, and is most excellent against all impediments in the eyes, if yee put there­in one drop, and preserveth the sight a long time, so that yee shall not need to wear Spectacles. If a young woman doth wash her face therewith oftentimes, it preserveth her a long time in that state. If yee use to drink this Elixar, it pro­voketh venereous acts; and disposeth women to be deli­vered, with divers other vertues, which I leave to the Experi­mentour.

The last water, which is red, is excellent good against the pains of the Mother if it be drunk. It dissolveth also the Plu­risie, if yee give thereof ʒ. ii. and annoint the parts grieved therewith. It helpeth the pains of the Collick, and hardnesse of the Milt. It is also good against paines in the teeth, and stinking breath, and many such like things. It helpeth all man­ner of Fevers, and the reason is, because it drieth up all the evill humours that offendeth Nature, as well within as without, so by this reason it is apt to help all sort of diseases. If any were sick and could not speak, let him take ʒ. i. of this with ʒ. i. of the first, and presently he shall speak most miracu­lously, for this I have proved a thousand times, to my great honour and content of the Patient, and therefore I would wish all those that professe Physick, or Chirurgery, to be prepared with this liquour, and such like, for their own profit, and health of their Neighbour.

To make Aqua Reale vel Imperiale, which maketh the teeth white presently, incarnateth the gums, and causeth a good breath.

THe teeth being black, rusty, and full of filth, and the gums putrified or corrupt, are the worst things that may be seen in man or woman, and are also very unwholsome, and the remedy to make the teeth white, and to help the gums is thus. Make this water, and use it in the order as I will shew thee.

℞. Sal gemmae, Roch Allum, Brimstone, of each lb. ii. Borax ℥. x. Pearle beaten fine, Corrall, ana. ℥. ii. pure distilled Vi­negar. [Page 99] ℥. iv. Put all the aforesaid matters in a Goord, with his Head and Receiver, and give it fire according to art, and at the last there will come forth a white water like Milk, which after it hath stood a while will wax clear. Yee shall under­stand, that this water is above all other waters in the world to help Ulcers in the mouth, and to incarnate the gums, and to make the teeth white, and causeth a good breath in those which are troubled with the aforesaid matters. For of this water I have made great quantity, and it hath been carried in­to Spain, into Almainy, into Poland, into Constantinople, and into divers other Countries, as though it had been a divine thing, and not materiall.

For truly this experience doth cause the world to wonder at it, the use hereof I have written in this book, and hereafter I will write it again in some of my books, where occasion shall serve to use it in cures.

A kind of Pill most convenient for the eyes, and comforteth the stomack.

THose Pills which comfort the stomack, by force must help the sight, for when the stomack is filled with malign hu­mours, it distempereth those parts that are about it, and the fumes that ascend up to the head moisteneth Neruos opticos of the eyes, and by this cause the eyes are offended, therefore it were necessary for those Pills that help the eyes also to com­fort the stomack, which must be done by evacuating the mat­ter hanging by vomit, and the order to make these Pills is thus.

℞. Marchpane made with Sugar and Almonds ʒ. i. Petrae Philosophale ten grains, Elleborus niger six grains, Diagridii three grains. Mix them well in a Morter in form of a paste, and make thereof five Pills, and those thou shalt take in the morning fasting, for they are of so much force and strength, that they help not onely the eyes and stomack, but in manner all diseases, because they cleanse the stomack, and evacuate the body, which two things are most necessary in all diseases.

A discourse upon a Composition that preserveth a man or woman in health a long time.

IF thou wilt make a paste that shall have vertue to preserve whole bodies, and to help the sick, it were necessary to look out simples that have vertue to doe it, and when thou hast found out those drugs that have vertue to preserve, thou mayest put thy trust in them: which I discoursing by the way of reason, and conferring it by experience, have found out a number of drugs that are friends unto our nature, and pre­serveth it, of the which I will shew thee some that are of great importance, which may be proved by reason and experience, and are these.

℞. Aloes hepatica, Olibanum, Mirrha, ana. ℥. ii. Beat them into fine powder, and make them into a paste like a salve with rectified Aqua vitae, then dry it in the Sun, then beat it into powder again, and make it into a paste with our Oleo del Bal­samo, and then thou shalt have a past of most marvellous ver­tue, for if yee take thereof every morming ʒ. i. it will pre­serve him long in health, it is most excellent for those that be wounded, or have any sore upon them, because it keepeth the sore from putrefaction, as by the ingredient thou mayest perceive.

A marvellous Water, to be used of all Chirurgians in curing of their Patients.

IT is necessary for the Chirurgian in the cure of Wounds and Sores, to help the body as well inwardly as outwardly, to take away the evill qualities and corruption of the hu­mours, and to preserve it from putrefaction, and then the sore will heal with little help, and in short time, and that thou mayest doe with this Water, which is uncorruptible, and of great experience, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Of that Aqua vitae whereof we make our lb. x. and put therein these things following,Quintessence Cinnamon, Lignum aloes, red Saunders, Carduus benedictus, ana. ℥. iii [Page 101] Cloves, long Pepper, Calamus Aromaticus, Saffron, ana. ℥. ii. Almonds, Grains of the Pine, Dates, ana. ℥. iv. Melegette, ℥. i. fine Sugar lb. iv. Musk four carrets; let all these stand in a long necked glasse close stopped eight or nine dayes, and then distill it in Balneo untill yee have received lb. v. which keep close stopped in a glasse as a precious Jewell: then distill the rest in sand untill the fesses be dry, and that will be a red Wa­ter, and will stink somewhat of the fire or smoak, which also keep in a glasse, for in time it will loose his stinking smell, and be most pretious. The first Water is of such vertue, that it helpeth all putrified Ulcers if yee dresse them therewith. The second is also perfect, that if any man drink every morning ʒ. ii. it will so preserve him, that it were unpossible he should have any infirmity. For of this Water I have made great ex­perience in many kind of diseases, and especially in the Plurisie and Petecchie.

To make our Caustick.

ALthough I have written of this Caustick in my Regiment of the Pestilence, called now in English, a Joyfull Jewell, imprinted by William Wright, dwelling under Saint Mildreds Church. Neverthelesse, I thought good to write it in this place, because every one hath not both these books, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Arsenike cristaline, Sal armoniack, Sublimate, ana. boil them, being finely ground, in as much strong Vinegar as the matter weigheth, untill two third parts be consumed, and that there remain a third; then keep it in a glasse close shut unto thy use, as I will shew thee in divers places, when occasion shall serve.

To make Oil of Antimony.

REc. Antimony, and calcine it untill it will smoak no more, and that it be of a grayish colour, and alwayes as it clut­tereth stamp it again, then take as much common Ashes as the Antimony finely searsed, and put them into a Retort well luted, [Page 102] and give it fire according to art, till all the fumes or spirits be come forth; giving you charge, that your Receiver be very great least all break. This Oil is of marvellous vertue against Ulcers, if yee give thereof four grains with any Sirrup; it help­eth the Fever presently; it helpeth Fistulaes; and to be short, it is most wholsome in divers things. But it were ne­cessary for the Chirurgian to be expert in the use thereof, and to mix it according to his work. And therefore he that can­not use it well, were better to let it alone, because it is a peril­lous thing unto the unskilfull, and pretious unto those that know how to use it.

A precious Liquour above all other.

THis is the most precious water that may be made in the world, and his vertues are such, and so many, that they cause the world to marvell at them. The Mirrha and Aloes, with Vernish, and with as much of our Quintessence being mixed, which without Fire, Ashes, and Coals cannot be sepa­rated, and when the Air, the Water, and Earth are separated, each of them shall be apt to mitigate pains, dissolve humours, help wounds, dissolve pains within the body, and such like matters. This water I have used divers times, and caused the world to wonder at its operations, and so shall every one doe, that desireth to follow the right way, and that will be a child of Art. Thou shalt understand, that I would have writ­ten this plainer, but that I write it to those that have judgement both of the quantities and vertues; because Pearls are not for Swine.

A Secret of marvellous vertue.

REc. A new Brick forth of the Kill, and break it in small peices like a Nut, then lay them in the fire untill they be red hot, then take them forth, and quench them in sweet Sallet Oil, then take them forth again, and lay them in the fire untill they be red hot, then quench them again, and this yee shall doe at the least five times, and at the last time take them forth, [Page 103] and put them into a glasse, with Aloes, Frankincense, and Mirrha, and distill it according to art; then separate each liquour by himselfe, and therewith thou shalt work wonderfull cures, if thou knowest how to use it, and whereunto.

Our Secret of marvellous vertue in act and strength

THis Unguent is of marvellous vertue, and was never made by any before, neither Antients nor of our time, which Unguent helpeth putrified Ulcers in the legs, so that it is to be wondered at: for it worketh divers operations, it mortifieth the evill, mundifieth, incarnateth, and siccatrizeth, which things to the Professours of the Art seemeth hard: Neverthelesse it is true, as I have proved an infinite of times; and because the world should have it, I have written here the receipt.

℞. Of our Magno liquore, and Oil of Mastick, made at the Apothecaries, and put them into a vessell of Copper, with as much Litarge as yee shall think good, and so let it stand a good while on the fire, and put thereto of our Cerotte Magistrale, and incorporate them well together, and so of yellow it shall become black; then take it from the fire, and put therein Mercury precipitate, and stir them well untill it be cold, and herewith thou shalt work wonders. It would be necessary for him that will make this receipt, to consider well of the Ingre­dients of the Compositions, which are written in this book.

To rectifie and preserve the sight of those that are weak-sighted.

IF thou wilt rectifie and preserve the sight in those that are weak-sighted, of what cause soever it be; thou shalt make this water, and use it according to this receipt.

℞. Fenell seed, the flours of Rosemary, Rew, Celendine, Carduus benedictus, Staveseaker, Eufrage, of each a handfull, Cinnamon, Nutmegs, sweet Almonds, of each ℥. i.

Stamp all these grosly, and infuse them in thirty pound of pure white Wine, then let it stand four dayes, and then distill it in Balneo, untill yee have received four pound, which keep close by it self, and when thou wilt use it, put thereof one [Page 104] drop into the eye when yee goe to bed, and in the morning when yee rise; and thus using it, it will preserve the sight a long time.

Of Lac Virginis, and the order to make it

THis Lac Virginis is a solution of Saturne, and Sal gemma, which is a thing most necessary for the Chirurgian to use, and the order to make it is thus.

℞. Litarge of gold as much as yee think good, and beat it into fine powder, then put thereon strong distilled Vinegar, and so let it remain two or three dayes, stirring it every day, then boil it untill half be consumed, then let it repose two or three houres, and the Vinegar will be clear and of the colour of Gold, then pour it forth into a glasse, and keep it, then take Sal gemmae, and rain water, ana. and dissolve it on warm ashes, and when it is dissolved, keep it in a glasse, and when thou wilt make Lac Virginis, take of each of these solutions alike, and mix them together, and thou shalt see a strange thing. For as soon as they are mixed together, they will turn into a white Unguent like Ceruse, or white Lead, which serveth in divers causes according to the intention of the Chirurgian.

The solution of Litarge by himself, with as much Oil of Roses, being mixed together, maketh a delicate Unguent, and refriscative, which siccatrizeth Ulcers with great speed.

To calcine Tutia, and to bring it into a salt.

Thou shalt dissolve thy Tutia in this water following.

℞. Sal niter, Roch Allum, Vitrioll, Sinaber, ana. lb. i Beat them together, and distill them according to art; then take that water, and put therein thy Tutia, and let it dissolve upon the warm ashes, and when it is dissolved, vapour away the water untill it remain dry, the which take forth, and put it into an earthen pan unglazed, and calcine it with a strong fire, then dissolve it in distilled Vinegar, and when it is dis­solved, vapour away the Vinegar, and the salt will remain in the bottom, which serveth much for Tincture, and to make a [Page 105] Liniment for the eyes, the which is most precious and rare, for if ye mix a little thereof with Hogs grease and Camphire, and then put it into the eye, it helpeth them with such speed, that it is to be wondred at, and not without cause. For his nature is to give light, and to heal things imperfect. The Tu­tia mixt with Borax, and with our Varnish that we guild lea­ther with, and given in projection upon Venus melted, it cau­seth it to be in colour not much differing from Sol, of the which thou mayest make strange things, for he that knew the vertue and qualitie of Tutia, as well in Alchymie, as in infir­mities, was to be counted a wise man.

To Precipitate Mars, and to bring it into a red powder, called Crocus Martis, the which serveth for divers purposes.

REcipe, Sal niter refined, Roch Allum, Vitriol Romain, ana and thereof make a water according to Art, with all his spirits, and in that water dissolve thin plates of Iron or Steel, and when it is dissolved, vapour away the water, untill it re­main dry in a red powder, then take it forth, and calcine it in a Furnace of reverberation 24 houres. Then keep it to thy use, untill thou knowest more thereof, for it is wonderfull in his operation, as I will shew thee hereafter.

A Secret of Turpentine of Ciprus.

THe Turpentine of Ciprus is a kinde more finer then our Turpentine, and without comparison, and of more ver­tue then ours is, and this the Doctors say, doth dissolve pains and preserveth the body, if it bee taken inwardly, because they say, That Turpentine is an uncorruptible Gum, the which is most true. But in that Gum there is one part thick and grosse that hindereth his operation, and he that can separate this grosse part from the noble parts, shall doe great won­ders therewith: It is needfull then with the fire, and the means of our Quintessence, to make the separation of the Elements, the which are four, Water, Oyle, Liquor and Earth. The Wa­ter is profitable, the Oyle is perfect, the Liquor is noble, [Page 75] and the Earth that remaineth, is spoiled, and of no substance, and with those things thou mayest doe high and great cures, when they are applyed according as they ought to be, be­cause many good and profitable things, through the want of perfect application in time and place, many times doe hurt, and to shew the truth, I will shew thee an example of wine, the which is a precious liquor, the which being drunk in the morning is hurtfull to many, to eat meat betwixt meals is not good, and many such like things, that when they be not done with order doe hurt, and therefore it is necessary for those that will understand, that matter to be of a good intelligence, as well in making it, as in using or applying it to the sick.

FINIS.
THE EXCELLENCIE OF P …

THE EXCELLENCIE OF PHYSICK AND CHIRURGERIE, Collected out of approved Practises, and learn­ed Observations of many expert men in both Faculties.

LONDON, Printed by G. D. 1652.

To the Freindly Reader, as much health as he wisheth of Soul and Body.

MEN many times meddle in some matters, wherein they take more toile then thank for their labours; and he, which thinks in the night that he hath pleased all, shall find in the morning that he hath angered some. So many as know me wel, and whereto I was cheifly adicted within these eight or nine yeares, that is, unto the study and practise of the soul Physick, may now make a question of my medling so long with bodily Physick. But my twofold answer they may take with them for their satisfaction: First, that I keep still Depositum illud, which God hath committed unto me (and sealed the same by mine own spirituall birth, and other mens sanctification) till he that hath said, Goe, points the time, and gives the occasion of my further service in that weighty Function. Secondly, as when I conversed in that calling I was chargeable to none, so (not surceasing the same of mine own accord) I have since, by God his blessing of my labours here­in, as not greatly inriched my self, so not impoverished any: That wherein I have thus continued, seeing it concerneth learning, and an honest mans maintenance, cannot, or ought not to offend any that are well in their wits. These few secrets contained in this Collection, and Appendix thereto adjoyning (which I have reduced into method for his sake that gathered them here and there) cannot, or ought not to scandalize any, that have a sanctified cunning in Physick or Chirur­gery. I must needs tell thee, that I lean more to that safe, speedy, and pleasant kind of curation, with Medicines rightly prepared, then to the carelesse Composition, made by addition of other simples, clogged with more impurities then are in that simple which they labour to cor­rect. I dare also avouch, that any poor body may better commit his crasie body, to be healed or helped of any outward or inward malady, by the right prepared Medicines, for the value often Shillings (which he can hardly spare) then a wealthy man to their deceits (I would say receits) for ten Crownes, which he may well enough forbear: Many of the ignorant sort have counted the Chymicall or Paracel­sical Physick dangerous, and not without cause, for wofull experience [Page] hath brought it into that suspition. But (good Reader) hear me in that which Ile tell thee, and so take thine answer for this time: Some of the learned, and most of the ignorant, have in generall despised them, but by your leave, after they have heard a particular of the excellent successe attained by many of them; they have adventured upon those, without knowledge, experience, direction, and so have made many Patients to smart for it: Therefore I would not, that the fine fingered Phisitian should scorn to wear this Pearl, which is as fit for Sir John lack-Latine, for the Land-leaper, or cogging Quack­salver, as a Pipe for an Asse, or a Cage for a Cow. The Salts, Oyles, Waters, Extracts, Tinctures, Simples prepared, and Compositions of Simples conjoyned, mentioned in this book or not mentioned, I mean not to make sale of (as the Grocer or the Apothecary doth,) but I keep them in store, and mean to increase them for mine own use and my freinds, and for such as shall need them, as the learned counsell of Physick rules shall give occasion.

Farewell.

A Note of such prepared Simples and Compositions as are mentioned in this Book, with other things not mentioned therein, whereof there is particular use in Physick and Chirurgerie, and are to be sold in Amen Corner by W. J.

The Names of the severall kinds of Salts.

SAlts of Herbs, as of Wormwood, Mints, Carduus Bene­dictus, Cammomil, Raddish, S. Johns wort, Sea-holy, Cen­taurie, Rosemarie, Fennell, Time, Bean stalks, Black Helle­bore, Brionie, Sage, Majoram, Germander, Melilote, Cha­mepitis, Hysop, Feverfew, Gentian, Alisanders, Mugwort, Fumitorie, Origanum, Eufrasie or Eyebright, Tartar Chri­stalline, Pockwood, or Lignum vitae.

Salts of Trees, and fruticall Plants, as Ash, Juniper, Ivie, Broom, Vine.

Salts of Spices, and other things, as of Cloves, Ginger, Cin­namon, Nutmegs, Urine, Armoniack of Amber, Vinegar, Salt or Sugar of Saturne. Salt Nitre out of Ireland. Allum del Plume, Tartar six times calcined, Sal conditum, Lapilli Ʋrinae, Salt common calcined. A Caustick.

The Names of the divers kinds of Waters, as of Cinnamon, Cloves, Nutmegs, Frankincense, Turpentine, Wax, Honie, Aqua fortis, Aqua Regis, Aqua Spermatis Ranarum. Eggs, Harts horn, Amber, Vinegar distilled, Spirit of Wine, Fra­gariae, with spirit of Wine, Mans scull, Pockwood, Resinae pi­ni. Percepier, Roses, Aqua vitae of Roses Sweet water. Aqua vitae of Percepier. Aqua vitae of Juniper Berries. A­qua vitae of Turkie Balm, Aqua Benedicta, Walnuts, Annise­seed, Sal Gummae.

The severall kindes of Oyles drawn by Distillation, or other­wise prepared,

OYles of Herbs, as of Sweet Majoram, Sage, Time, Ori­ganum, Rosemary flowers, Hysop, Mints, Lavendar, Penniroyall, Camomill Flowers, Nenafar grossely prepared, [Page] Betonie and Cammomil grossely prepared. Roses by Di­stillation, Thorn apple, Wormwood.

Oyles of Seeds, as of Annise, Fennell, Dill, Carvi, or Ca­raway, Cummin, Mustard.

Oyles of Fruits, Berries, and Spices, as of Nuts, Figs, Sweet Almonds, Orange pils, Lemon pils, Bay berries, Juniper berries, Misselto of Apples, Nutmegs, Cinnamon, Ginger, Cloves, Maces, Pepper.

Oyles of Trees, or Woods, of Gums, Stones, and other things, as of Lignum vitae, Ash, Broom, Wax, Honey, Turpentine, Tar, Frankincense, Colophonie, Galbanum, Sagapenum, Ma­stick, Labdanum, Ammoniack, Amber, Jet, Benzoin, Storax liquid, Castoreum, Mans scull, Butter, Eggs, Tartar, Stink­ing oyle of Tartar, Vitriol, Sulphur, Petroleum de Lateribus, Dears suet, Sperma caeti, Worms.

The Severall kinds of Extracts, or Essences, as of Herbs, Roots, &c.

VVOrmwood, Cammomil, Sage, Celandine, Betonie, Agrimonie, Tansie, Horehound, Eufrasie, Marigold, Fumitorie, Henbane, Chamepitis, Tormentill, Philipendula, Black Hellebore, Aristolochie, Gentian, Angelica, Savine, Perwincle, Carduus Benedictus, Feverfew, Percepier, Rue, Pio­nie, Juniper, Broom flouers, Hermodactiles, Sena, Agarick, Cnicus or Bastard, Saffron, Rhubarb, Colocinthis, Soldanel­la, Laureola, Aloes, Polipodie, Bruscus, Centaurie, Enula cam­pana, Melissa or Balm, Ginger, Musk, Squilla, Sarcocolla, Cantharides, Spicknard, Zedoaria, Pepper, Orange Pills.

A Note of the divers kinds of Compositions, as followeth.

LAudanum anodinum, Panchimagogon, Amuletum Palmarii, Oleum benedictum, Oleum sive Mumia Tartari, Oleum Heracl. Kulandi, Mumia vitrioli, Creta vitrioli, Crocus Martis, Balsamum sulphuris, Flos Sulphuris, Oleum Camphorae, Essentia perlarum, Flores Antimonii, Mercurius Antimonii, Vitrum Antimonii, Tur­petum minerale Quercetani, Turpetum Diaph. Sulphur vitriola­lum, Mercurius sublimatus, Mercurius praecipitatus, Aqua The­riacalis, Calx testarum ovorum, Emplastrum Fodicationis, Gibsons [...]alm, Petra Philosophal nostra, Pillolae Aquilonae, Oleum Hyperi­conis compositum, Oleum Balsami, Aqua Balsami, Dia Aromatico, Electuario Angelica, Balsamum artificiale, Electuarium magi­strale, Aqua praeservans, Magno liquore, Cerotum magistrale, Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinth. & Cera, Ʋnguentum ex Ly­targirio, Aqua realis, Sirrupo del Ebulo composit. Unguent against contractions, Ʋnguento magno, Pillulae contra morbum Gallicum, Cordiale rosarum sine sulphure, Balsamus urinae descriptione Willi­chii, Our solutive liquor, Oil of Nicotion, Paracelsus his Vulne­rary oyle, Water for the eyes, Water for pin and web, Aqua Persicaeriae, Ʋnguento nigro, Unguent to cause hair to grow, Unguent to cleanse wounds, Unguent defensative, Unguent stomackal, Unguent against aches and bruises, Extract a­gainst all obstructions, Adeps ursi, Medulla Mumiae, Our com­position against the Strangury, Ischurie, or stone in the bladder, &c. Balsamum Tartari, Spirit of Honey, Spirit of Tartar, Tin­cture of Sulphur, Powder to mundifie Ulcers, Mater Balsami, A composition against burning and scalding, Vigoes balm, Aqua del petra Vegetab. Tinctures of Spices, Spiritus tartari cum colcothare rectificat. Another water for the eyes, Sirrupus spinae merulae, Cinnamon water, Unguent de Peto, Mans bloud dried, Craneum humanum calcined, Our composition against all Fe­vers, Our composition against the Wormes, Gum of the root and hearb Henbane.

A Table of all the principall matters contained in this COLLECTION.

In the Proem are contained these things.
  • THe Dutie of an expert Chirurgian p. 1.
  • The generall cure of Wounds ib.
  • Why wounds cannot heal quickly ib.
  • How to deal generally with wounds in the head 2
Of Wounds.
  • A grievous wound [...]n the head cured ib.
  • A dangerous wound cured in five daies 3
  • A Wound on the ear ibid.
  • Wounds in the head with the fracture of the scull ib.
  • Contusions in the head or elsewhere 5
  • Contusion quickly healed ibid.
  • Wounds in the head with the scull fra­ctured ibid.
  • To heal wounds speedily ib.
  • Wounds by shot or launce ib.
  • A singular remedie for the speedie hea­ling of wounds ibid.
  • Wounded eie with a splinter ib.
  • Puncture in the eie 6
  • Another cure done in like manner ib.
  • A squatted hand healed ibid.
  • A punctured arm healed ibid.
  • Five wounds in the breast healed 7
Of Sores, Ulcers, &c. and their Cure.
  • Sore mouths healed 8
  • Ulcer in the upper lip ibid.
  • Ulcer in the throat ibid.
  • Scald head healed ibid.
  • Another for the same 9
  • Ʋlcer on the thumb ibid.
  • Ulcerated leg ibid.
  • Two putrified Ʋlcers on the leg healed ibid.
  • Three Ulcers in the leg healed 10
  • Old rotten sores cured ibid.
  • Ulcers in most parts of the bodie and head 11
  • Scabs like the Leprosie 12
  • A child healed that had the French P [...] ibid.
  • A Canker cured ibid.
  • Pockie pustul [...]es with Serpigo healed 13
  • Tetters and ringwormes ibid.
  • Another 14
  • Terrors on womens breasts ibid.
  • Shingles healed ibid.
  • To break a plague sore ibid.
  • Scabs and Itch, &c. 15
  • Three deep Fistulaes in the breast cured ib.
  • Lichen or Impetigo cured 16
  • A great men taken away ibid.
The Second part of the Collection of the Cures of Internall Diseases.
  • OF grievous aches and pain in the bodie 17
  • Aches coming of the Pox cured ibid.
  • An excellent Ʋnguent to ease any pain ibid.
  • To ease the Gout 18
  • To cure Gouts and Aches coming of beat ibid.
  • The cure of the Scurvie ibid.
  • Tumors throughout the bodie cured 19
  • Swelling of the Gods 20
  • Another of the same ibid.
  • The Ischiatica cured ibid.
  • Against the cramp 21
  • Against contraction of sinnews ibid.
  • A wrie neck set straight 22
  • Another ibid.
  • Squinancie cured ibid
  • Alopecia cured ibid.
  • To purge the head 23
  • [Page]Pin and Web cured ibid.
  • An approved water for the eyes ibid.
  • Another ibid
  • To stay bleeding at the nose 24
  • Another for the same ibid.
  • Another ibid.
  • Another 25
  • Another ib.
  • Other wayes to doe the same ibid.
  • Spitting of bloud ibid.
  • Another ibid.
  • Lift up the Uvula 26
  • Cure of the Hicket ibid.
  • Another ibid.
  • The falling sicknesse cured ibid.
  • Another ibid.
  • Jaundies cured 27
  • Another ibid.
  • Another 28
  • Jaundies with obstraction of menstrues ibid.
  • Windinesse in the stomack ibid.
  • Cough of the lungs 29
  • Another with stitch in the side ibid.
  • Shortnesse of breath with a Cough ibid.
  • Another 30
  • To stay vomiting ibid.
  • Another ibid
  • Vomiting of bloud with a Flux of the bellie 31
  • Vomiting with a Fever ibid.
  • Plurifie cured 32
  • Plurifie with spitting of bloud ibid.
  • Plurifie with Inflammation of the tongue, &c ibid.
  • Plurifie in a woman 33
  • Another for the same ibid
  • Diaphoreticall decoction ibid.
  • Plurifie broken with a Potion ibid
  • Another 34
  • An inward Imposthume or bastard Plurifie ibid.
  • Pain in the side ibid
  • Pain and wind in the body 35
  • Expelling of wind ibid
  • Dropsie cured ibid.
  • Against Wormes in the stomack or else­where 36
  • A Quartain of long continuance ibid.
  • Against the Pestilence, Plurifie, and Quartain 37
  • Swelling of the Spleen ibid.
  • Frantick Fevers for want of sleep ibid.
  • Pestilent Fevers 38
  • Against poyson or the Pestilence, a Dia­phoreticall Potion ibid.
  • The signes of death in the Plague ibid.
  • Counsels, Preservatives, &c. against the Plague 39
  • An inveterate Gonorrhea in man or wo­man ibid.
  • Another 40
  • An Electuary against Gonorrhea ibid.
  • To stop the immoderate Flux menstruall ibid.
  • Another 41
  • To stop a Flux ibid.
  • Bloudy Flux cured ibid.
  • Cures of the Hemeroides 42
  • Ficus in ano ibid.
  • To provoke menstrues 43.
  • Another of the same ibid.
  • Suffocation of the Matrix ibid.
  • Another for the same 44
  • To provoke Ʋrine ibid.
  • To provoke Urine, and to heal other ob­structions ibid.
The first part of the Supplement or Appendix, &c.
  • Of pain in the head, and the cure 45
  • Of the Catarhe and Rheum in the head 46
  • The second course to cure the Catarhe 47
  • Contusion in the head 48
  • The healing of the white Scall 49
  • Pain in the eyes ibid.
  • An Unguent for sore eyes ibid.
  • To stay spitting of bloud ibid.
  • The description and cure of the Squinancie ibid.
  • The description and cure of Scrophulae 50
  • Another cure for the same 51
  • Another for the same ibid.
  • [Page]Another ibid
  • Of Panaricium and the cure 52
  • Ʋlcers in womens breasts ibid.
  • Of Astma, and the cure of it 53
  • To know a confirmed Dropsie ibid.
  • Against Wormes 54
  • Hardnesse of the Milt, and the cure ibid.
  • Another for the same ibid.
  • Of the Gonorrhea, and the cure ibid.
  • Of the Hemeroides and their cure 55
  • Of the divers sorts and effects of the He­meroides, and their cure 56
  • Suffocation of the Matrix, and the cure thereof. 57
  • Of the Rupture, and the cure in the be­ginning ibid.
  • Another 58
  • Of retention of Urine and the cure ibid.
  • Of the difficulty of Urine, and the cure thereof 59
  • Another for the same often proved 60
  • Of retention of Urine, with stitch in the side ibid.
  • Swelling of the legs and feet, and their cure ibid.
  • Of Chilblaines and their cure ibid.
  • Of Cornes in the feet, and to take them away 61
  • Of a greif under the nailes of the fingers and toes, and the cure 62
  • Of Erisipela, and the cure thereof ibid.
  • The cure of Warts 63
The second part of the Appendix, &c.
  • Of Danewort, and his vertues 63
  • Of Eleborus niger, and his vertues 64
  • Of Gratia Dei, and the vertue thereof ibid.
  • Of Rhubarb, and his use 65
  • Of Tithymale, and his vertues ibid.
  • Of Soldanella, and his vertues 66
  • Of Cyprus, and his vertues ibid.
  • Of Elder, and his vertues ibid
  • Of Tobacco, and his use ibid
  • Of sweet Majorame, and his vertues 67
  • Of Persicaria, and his use ibid.
  • Of Man, and the Medicines taken from him 68
  • Of an Hen, and the Physicall use thereof 69
  • Of Eeles, and their medicinall use ibid.
  • Of the Barbill, and her use in Medicines 70
  • Of Bees, and their medicinall use ibid.
  • Of Frogs, and their phisicall use ibid.
  • Of Centumpedes, Crickets, &c. and their use 71
  • Of Tacca mahacca, and the use thereof ibid.
  • Of the gun Caranna, and the use thereof 72
  • Of liquid Amber, and the use of it in Medicines ibid.
FINIS

The Proheme or Entrance into this Collecti­on, contained in the first four Chapters.

CHAP. I. What the duty of an expert Chirurgian is.

A Good and true Chirurgian is no other, then a Minister, and helper of nature; who hath three operations to perform in curing of wounds: The first is, that he joyn the separated parts close to­gether: The second, to preserve it from pain: The third, that he keep it from putrefaction; all the rest he may leave unto nature, which will work with good expedition: And this is a sure intention concerning the cure of Wounds; never keep the flesh open with tents or pledgets; neither weaken nature by letting of bloud, or by purging, nor yet by streight diet, to cause the pain to increase, but keep the wound alwayes clean, washing it with Aqua Balsami, and lay upon the wound clothes wet in Magno liquore: This is a good and an approved order, whereof whosoever will know more, let him look in Leonardo Phioravante his book of Rationall Se­crets, where he shall be satisfied more at large.

CHAP. II. The cure of all manner of Wounds in generall

ALl kind of wounds may be healed with these Medicines following (according to the method before mentioned) viz. with our Balsamo, with Aqua balsami, Balsamum artificiale, Quinta essentia vini Oleum refinae pini, Oleum Cerae & Terebinthi­nae, Magno liquore, Cerotum magistrale, Elixer vitae, Oleum hype­riconis compositum, our secret Powder, all which are set down in the forenamed book, and for the most part, are to be had for a reasonable consideration, at the house of W. I. in Amen Corner.

CHAP. III. The cause why Wounds cannot heal quickly.

THough there be many more, yet cheifly they may be re­duced unto two causes: The one is, an immoderate and extream diet, which weakeneth the stomack and body so much, [Page 2] that nature cannot prevail to conglutinate or soder the flesh together; and thus, through want of natural heat, the wound falleth to Imposthumation, Gangrena, Fistulaes, &c. and can hardly be cured. The second cause is, the keeping of them too much open, by reason of their tents or pledgets, so that they cannot joyn together again, but grow to Cancers and Fistu­laes, whereupon many times the Patient remaineth lame ever after, or else speedy death is the end thereof.

CHAP. IIII. Of Wounds in the head, how they must be dealt withall.

ALl wounds in the head must be close joyned and kept to­gether, the bloud must be crushed out, then wash it well with something that hath vertue to liquifie the bloud, as the Quintessence of Wine, or such like; then lay thereon lint wet in Oleum benedictum; this Medicine you shall change in four dayes, but every day once wash the wound round about with that Quintessence, and annoint it with the said Oil, and at the fourth dayes end dresse it again, and let it remain two dayes more, and after that for a day more, and the wound (by the help of God) shall be cured in twelve or fourteen dayes: Thus may you deal with all wounds, save those that are made in the belly; as for all other, either simple or compound wounds, you shall find their cure, methodically shewed, in the Rationall Secrets of Leonardo Phioravante published in English.

CHAP V. The healing of a greivous Wound on the side of the head.

THe wound was made on the side of the head, almost to du­ra mater, and it was healed in this manner: First there was put into the same the Quintessence aforesaid, then a little Bal­samo, then there was applyed a cloth which was wet in Magno liquore, made very hot, upon which cloth was laid our secret powder, covered with lint, and thus he was dressed once every day till he was whole. You must note, that whensoever the skull is hurt unto dura mater, there must be cast up at the nostrils our balsamo that the smell may pierce upward, and resolve the of­fence. Sometime also in stead of a Defensative, you may an­noint round about the wound, with the foresaid Balm, which preserveth from putrifaction and alteration.

CHAP. VI. A dangerous wound in the head, cured in five dayes.

IT was healed very quickly, by putting therein our Aqua cae­lestis and balsamo, and by applying unto the same very hot clothes wet in Magno liquore.

CHAP. VII. The cure of a wound on the eare to the skull.

A Sore wound was made on the eare, which was cut unto the skull of the head, and was healed in this manner; First, by annointing it with out Quintessence, which caused it to wax ve­ry hot, the space of two hours. After that there was put in our Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina & Cera, and so he dressed it every day once.

CHAP. VIII. How three wounds in the head, with fracture of the bone or scull were healed by I. P.

A Ceriain Miller in Buckinghamshire, called Peter Bull, be­ing sore wounded in the head, whereof one wound was in the midst of the head, with fracture of the skull, another with­in an inch of that six inches long, he had another wound over his eie brow two inches long. Besides the wounds in his head, he had also a great wound in the bow of his arm beside the elbow, so that a man might have laid his three fingers in it, divers of his fingers were also cut, and he lost two joynts. This man bled by the space of seven or eight hours before it was stinted; nor was he dressed untill the next day, but yet he was cured in this manner. First the hair was shaven away round about the wounds on his head, and the wounds were made clean, then was there dropped into the wound, Balsamum sul­phuris, made very warm, and a fine cloth wet therein was ap­plyed to the wounds, and round about the wounds there was a Defensative applyed, thus he was dressed once in 24 hours, and within the space of 3. weeks, he was perfectly helped, that he wore no plaister at all. Also you shall note that upon the wound next the cloth, there was laid cerotum magistrale, of Leon. Phioravante; Forget not, that this Balsom must alwayes be used warm, with a fine linnen cloth, or a peece of Cambrick, and not with any lint. This Balsam did cause the hair to grow [Page 4] so fast about the wounds, that it was fain to be shaven away ve­ry often.

CHAA. IX. Of contused wounds on the head, or other parts of the bodie

THe ancient Practitioners have esteemed contused wounds to be very dangerous. For they say contusions must first be brought to putrifaction, and turned into matter which opinion is not to be allowed, for the bruises are to be dissolved with­out maturation, which hath been a thousand times proved in the wars, after this manner to have been performed. ℞. Magno liquore, Oleum benedictum, ana, mix them, and being very hot, wet clothes therein, and lay thereon twice a day, and in three or four dayes they will be resolved. Also the oyle of Fran­kincense, or Oleum Philosophorum de Tereb. & Cera, will resolve any simple bruise in three or four houres, onely by continu­all annointing the place therewith, so fast as it drinketh in any. Provided, that the bruise be not above six or eight hours old, for if it be, then will your work be somewhat the longer before it be finished.

CHAP. X. A contused wound on the head healed by I. P.

A Young man of 28. yeers of age, that had a great contusion on the head with a staffe, was helped thereof in 9 daies, by applying thereunto Balsamum sulphuris before mentioned.

CHAP. XI. A wound in the head, with fracture of the skull, cured by I. P.

A Little boy with a fall from a horse, had a fracture in the skull, which was healed with Balsamum sulphuris, & Ce­rotum Magistrale Leonardo. The child did at his dressing, vo­mit very often, which argued the breaking of his scull, yet was he healed in seven dayes.

CHAP. XII. To heal wounds speedily.

FIrst wash them very well with our Aqua balsami, then joyn them very close together, and lay thereon a cloth wet in Oleo rosini pini, and (through Gods help) they shall be quickly healed.

CHAP. XIII. To heal Wounds, by shot, or launce.

HE that will cure Wounds that are made with shot, launce, Arrowes, &c. must first wash the Wound well with urine, and dry the Wound well, then let him put therein the Quintessence of Wine, and forthwith joyn the Wound close and hard together, then let him put immediately therein, five or six drops of our Balsamo artificiato, and lay a cloth upon the Wound wet in Magno liquore, which must be applyed so hot as he may suffer it; thus must he doe the first day. That being done, he must put thereon our Quintessence of Wine, and then a little Balsamo, after that some Magno liquore (as before was said) and so let him hold on unto the end of his cure.

CHAP. XIIII. A most singular and wonderfull remedy to heal Wounds quickly.

VVOunds must be helped with drying Medicines, (as was noted in the third Chapter) such Medicines, I say, as have vertue to preserve the part offended from putrefaction. This will be performed with our Aqua Balsami, and the Oil distilled from Vern [...]ce liquid; for these two are apt to heal all sorts of Wounds, if yee wash them with the water, and annoint them round about with the oil, for they doe not onely keep the Wounds from putrifying, but they help to siccatrize quickly, and in such manner, as it seemeth marvellous, not onely most profitable for the wounded Patient, but best for the good and honest Chirurgian, who abhorreth in his work to play the Tin­ker, which in stopping of one hole is wont to make three, but with as much safety and speed as Nature and Art will yeeld, to bring to passe all his honest intentions.

CHAP. XV. A wound in the eye with a splinter, healed by W. H.

A Splinter of wood leaped into the eye of a certain Maiden as she was chopping of sticks. The wound was so grievous, [Page 6] that the gelly of her eye came forth by the space of a moneth; all this while she could neither see, nor take any rest. By the blessing of God, within four dayes after she could thred a needle, and was recovered in this manner. First there was dropped into her eye Balsamum Sulphuris warm, and then a cloth wet therein was applyed thereunto, by which onely she was cured: the Maid dwelleth in Nottingham­shire.

CHAP. XVI. A prick in the eye with a knife, healed by W. H.

A Child of seven yeares of age had a puncture in the eye with a knife, which was cured by dropping therein Bal­samum Sulphuris warm, and laying a defensative round about it.

Another cure performed in like manner, by W. H.

ONe George Clarke, servant to the right worshipfull Mr Butler of Denham (then high Sheriffe of Bedford) was healed of a puncture in his eye with the aforesaid Medicine.

An hand flat squatted and contused, healed by W. H. CHAP. XVII.

AN old man, called Thomas Smith, of Carlton in North-hamptonshire, Husbandman, in lopping of a tree had his hand caught between two boughs, and was squatted in pei­ces; this contused hand was presently put close together, and annointed with Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina, & Cera, and through Gods goodnesse, was perfectly cured in eight dayes.

CHAP. XVIII. A wound or puncture through the arme. I. P.

A Young man, called Hudson, a Carpenter of Carlton in Northamptonshire, being thrust through the arme with a [Page 7] Pitch-forke, was thus cured. First there was injected Magno liquore (as hot as he could abide it) into the wound; then was there a linnen cloth wet in the same oyle applyed unto the wound, upon the which cloth was also laid a pledget of Cerotum magistrale; this wounded man was healed in five or six dayes.

CHAP. XIX. Five wounds in the breast.

A Certain man that had five stocadoes into the body was thus cured. First there was put into the wounds the Quintessence of Wine, then were the wounds dressed with Balsamo artificiato, which caused him to vomit, and to avoid much bruised bloud; after that he drunk every morning a little Aqua Balsami, and in short time by Gods help was per­fectly cured.

The manner to stay any flux of bloud, or vein, you shall find in the 17. Chapter of the second part of this Collection, and in the Secrets of Leonardo Phioravante, where he treateth of Wounds.

The Second Part of the first Division.

VErbum sapienti sat est, and a man may know by the halfe what the whole means; by these few experimented secrets, you may proceed unto the cure of any Wound, Contusion, or Puncture, in what part of the body soever they shall be. The things wherewith you are to work, as Balsamum Sulphuris, Oleum Philosophorum de Terebinthina & Cera, Cerottum ma­gistrale, &c. you may have of Mr. William Johnson dwelling in Amen Corner. Now let us proceed unto the experimen­ted secrets, concerning Ulcers and Sores, either simple or com­plicate with diseases, as they have been observed by those which have proved them.

CHAP. XX. The healing of sore mouthes.

THe Ulcers and Sores that have been in the mouthes of young and old, have been healed by the lotion or garga­risme made with Plantaine water, Hony-suckle water, and Barly water, mixed with Saccarum Saturni.

CHAP. XXI. An Ʋlcer in the upper lip.

A Certain Porter of London having an Ulcer on his upper lip, which was like a Cancer (some called it Noli me tan­gere) continually running, with filthy stinking sanies, was thus cured. First he was purged with Turpetum minerale, then was the sore dressed with this Medicine.

℞. Aloes lotae ℥. ss. Salis preparati ʒ. ii. Mellis ℥. iiii. Misce & utere.

CHAP. XXII. An Ʋlcer in the throat, ex morbo Gallico.

A Young woman that was much troubled in the throat with a greivous Ulcer, was thus cured. First she was pur­ged with Aromatico, and twice or thrice with our Quintessence solutive mixed with Sirrup of Roses, then was the sore touched with Aqua realis, two or three times with a little lint, and lastly she used this gargarisme.

℞. Mellis Rosarum ℥ ii. Diamorum ℥. ii. ss. Hony-suckle water, ana ℥. vi. Oleum Vitrioli as much as will suffice to make it tart; this hath been often proved in dangerous cases.

CHAP. XXIII. The healing of a scall'd head.

A Woman had all her head covered with a most silthy scab, which was dry above and moist underneath, very [Page 9] noysome to behold, who could neither be healed by purging, or locall Medicines that were used, till this Medicine was ap­plyed unto her. Once in a day Oleum ligni Guaiaci was apply­ed, and in short time the scall fell away, like a scull of an head, and there began hair to grow underneath it; this cure was per­formed in twelve dayes.

Another cure performed upon a scall head.

A Maiden of eighteen yeares of age, having an huge great scall upon her head, was cured (after she had taken one dose of Aromatico) by often washing the part affected with Mater Balsami Phioravante

CHAP XXIV. An Ʋlcer on the Thumb.

ONe had such a filthy and stinking Ulcer on the Thumb, that the Chirurgians would have cut off the whole Thumb. This party was afterward cured by the application of Fodicatio­num emplastri.

CHAP. XXV. An Ʋlcerated leg wonderfully swoln.

A Young boy that had an ulcerated leg wonderfully swoln, was thus cured. He received at two severall times Quint­essence solutive, with Sirrup of Roses; then were the sores washed with salt of Vitrioll dissolved in Plantaine water, a cloth being wet therein and applyed thereto morning and evening.

CHAP. XXVI. Two putrified Ʋlcers on the leg, healed by I. P.

FIrst this Patient was purged with Aromatico Leonardo once or twice, then his Ulcers were dressed with this Un [...]uent made of rubified Vitrioll, and a Cerot called the great Cerot: [Page 10] this was applyed unto the Ulcers, with a pledget of Lint, and was suffered to lye four and twent [...] hours, which mortified the sores; then was more of the same Unguent applyed, and with an Instrument the escare was loosed round about, and in three or foure dayes, the escare came away easily with a paire of Mullets: then he healed it up with Magno Liquore, and Sacca­rum plumbi, within a little while after.

CHAP XXVII. Three Ʋlcers in the legs healed by W. H.

A Certaine woman of Bedford, had three Ulcers in her leg, who had sought her cure at the hands of divers, the space of four years, but could find no helpe, yet she was afterward cured in this manner. First, shee took in the morning fasting Aromatico Leonardo, which evacuated her stomack and belly. Then was there applyed unto the sores Saccarum plumbi, three or foure dayes together, which caused every day a certaine thinne skinne to come upon the Ulcers, much like the filme of an egge, the same skin was taken away every day: with this Medicine following, it was dressed the fourth day, which cau­sed it to look faire and red the next dressing: and so in short time it was perfectly cured. To one spoonfull of Magno Li­quore was put as much Saccarum Saturni, as would lye upon a three-pence; and so it was incorporated warme: the sores were dressed therewith every day.

CHAP. XXVIII. The cure of old rotten sores by W. R.

A Certain old woman, did in this manner helpe divers old sores in the body. First she purged the Patients, and then she applyed this unguent to the sores. Take a pot of strong Ale, and set it to boyle over a gentle fire, till it wax thicke like a salve, and then use it. At the first this Medicine will smart, and be somewhat painefull to bear; neverthelesse it will cleanse and heale.

Note. Also a friend of mine told me, that the juyce of [Page 11] Marigold leaves, or the leaves boyled with milke to an Un­guent, will heal all Ulcers and Wounds.

CHAP XXIX. The healing of Ʋlcers in most parts of the body: but chiefly in the head by W. H.

A Certain man being full of Ulcers, coming of the Pox, in most parts of his body shewing themselves, but chiefly in the head, was cured in this manner. First, he was purged twise or thrice, with Panch [...]magogon, after that, hee kept his Chamber, (that had a good fire in it) and took six graines of Turpetum diaphoreticum, mixed with ʒ. i. of Amul [...]tum Palma­rij. Halfe an houre before he took a draught of fat broth, and kept his bed; and alwayes as he vomited, hee washed his mouth with a convenient Gargarisme, and sweat thereon one houre or two, and then was dryed with warme clothes: That done, he reposed a day or two, and took the aforesaid Tur­petum againe, in manner aforesaid: this he did three or foure times. In the mean while, he annointed his Ulcers with ole­um Guaiaci, which did both clense, and heale. Also divers times, hee used this Potion in the morning, which caused him to sweat. ℞. ℥. ii. of the water of Lignum vitae, made by di­stillation, and as much of the Sirrup of Fumitorie, and ℈. i. of the salt of Lignum vitae, mix them warme, and drink it fasting. Thus in very short time he was cured. This one thing must not be forgotten, that when there shall come any inflammation or sorenesse in the mouth, you doe use this Gargarisme fol­lowing. Take Plaintaine water, honey suckle water, ana, ℥. iiij. Barly water, ℥. vi. mel rosarum ℥. ii. ss. Diamor [...]m ℥. ii. Oleum vitrioli, as much as will make it tart: this will heale any sore in the mouth. Remember also, that if the Ulcers be very corrosive and foule, you shall touch them once or twise, with Oleum vitrioli, or Oleum tartari faetentis, whereby they will heal the sooner, this hath been often proved.

CHAP. XXX. The healing of scabs, like the Leprosie, by G. M.

A Young man (which was thought to be infected with a Le­prosie) had on his head, and most parts of his body, hard and dry scabs, but hee was cured in this manner. First, hee was purged with Aromatico Leonardo once or twise. Then every morning till he was cured, he took ℈ i. of the extract of Ca­mepiteos, either in a Pill, or in drinke as hee thought good. After that his sores were dressed with this Unguent. ℞. Succi sempervivi ℥. ii. Succi plantaginis, ℥. iiii. ss. Succi solani, ℥. iii. Sacchari Saturni, ℥. ii. ss. mix them, and stirre them well toge­ther over a gentle fire, till all the Saccharum be dissolved, and therewith dresse the sores twise a day.

CHAP. XXXI. The healing of a Child, that was full of Ʋlcers, coming of the Pox.

A Young child four yeares old that was grievously tormen­ted with the French disease, having extreme paine in the body, and being full of sores, was thus cured ℞. the distilled water of Lignum vitae, ℥ i, Salis ejusdem, ʒ. i. mix them, and thereof the Child dranke, with Sirrup of Fumitorie or Hops, morning and evening, and sometime the Child sweat thereon. Also the sores were annointed with this Unguent, ℞. Oleum guaiaci, ℥. ss. Balsamum Sulphuris, ʒ. ss. Saccarum plumbi, ʒ. ss. Oleum camphorae, five or six drops, the caput mortuum of Aqua fortis, ℈. i. Mix them well, and grind them on a stone with May butter, and therewith the sores were annointed morning and evening.

CHAP. XXXII. A Cancer cured by an old Empericke.

A Certaine Empericke did help many Cancers, in divers peo­ple (that were troubled with them) after this manner. Hee took certaine wormes called in Latine Centumpedes, in English sowes: they are such as lye under old timber, or between the [Page 13] barke and the tree. These he stamped, and strained with Ale, and gave the Patient to drinke thereof morning and evening. This Medicine caused many times a certain black bugge, or worme to come forth, which had many legs, and was quick; and after that the Cancer would heale quickly with any conveni­ent Medicine.

CHAP. XXXIII. The healing of pockie Pustulaes, with Serpigo by W.H.

A Certaine man having a number of sores all over his body' and a Serpigo in the palme of his hand, so grievous, that a man might have laid great strawes therein, was healed in this manner. First he was purged three times with six graines of Turpetum minerale Phadronis, mixed with halfe a Drachm of Amuletum Palmarij. That done, hee annointed all his sores twise ot thrise with Oleum Tartari faetentis; afterward with Ʋn­guentum ex Lithargirio Phioravante. Now touching his hands, which had the Serpigo, he held them morning and evening over a bath of oats, or some warme hearbs, that they might sweat; and then annointed them with Balsamum Sulphuris, and in short time they were helped. An Unguent made with Saccarum Sa­turni, and oyle of Roses, will doe the like effect.

CHAP. XXXIIII. A Tetter or Ring-worme, cured by W. K.

THere is a certaine Worme or Tetter, which many times cometh on the back of the hand or arme, and doth cor­rode like a Serpigo, but it is none; which (after the use of many other Medicines) hath been cured in this manner. The place was annointed five or six times a day, with the Sirrup of Sugar, that the Worm might come to the upper place or skin; then within three or foure dayes after, hee annointed the place with Oleum Tartari faetentis; and in short time he was cured, though his disease had continued three years, coming and go­ing. Some have killed the Worme with Oleum vitrioli.

CHAP. XXXV. A man cured that was full of Tetters.

THis was the manner of his cure. He took the rennet of a Calfe, and dranke it in milke three or foure times, and sweat thereupon; then he annointed the parts affected with Saccarum Saturni, mixed with oyle of Roses warme.

CHAP XXXVI. Totters in Womens breasts, oftentimes cured as followeth.

THey took five spoonfulls of Madder, and boyled it in ale, and then strained it clear, without pressing it at all, and drank thereof three or four mornings; then with the foresaid oyntmnet they used to annoint the parts grieved, and there­upon (with Gods help) were quickly healed.

CHAP. XXXVII. The healing of Shingles.

THey took for them Doves dung newly made, and barly meale, stamped them well, and mixed them with halfe a pint of Vinegar; they used it cold to the place grieved, and applyed vine leaves (to keep in the Liquor) round about it. Then they bound it up with clothes, and suffered it to lye three dayes, and then (if need were) refreshed it againe with a new Plaister, and at the most, with the use of three Applications, it was perfectly helped.

CHAP. XXXVIII. The breaking of a plague sore, by W. K.

HEe took of Elder leaves, as much as was sufficient, hee stamped them very well with dry figs, and put thereto auxungiae porcinae, and applyed it warme to the sore, three or foure times a day, and quickly brake it.

CHAP XXXIX. Scabs, and Itch, with small Pustulaes, taken quite away by I. H.

A Certain man greatly troubled with itch and pustulaes in his hands, proceeding of a dissolved salt in his body, could find no help till he used this course. He took Panchimagogon twice in three dayes; that done, he washed his hands with the salt of Vitrioll dissolved in Plantaine water, and shortly after they went quite away.

CHAP. XL. Three deep Fistulaes in the breast, cured by W. T.

THere was a certain man, called R. B. dwelling in London, which having three deep Fistulaes in his breast, had been long under the hands of unskilfull Chirurgians, consuming both himselfe and his substance; but afterward by Gods help, he using the course that W. T. prescribed, was cured very spee­dily. First he was purged every second or third day, for five or six times together with Turpetum minerale Phaedronis, re­ceiving thereof five or six grains in Amul. Palmarii; after­ward he was caused to sweat five or six times with this potion following.

℞. The distilled water of Lignum vitae ℥. ii. Salis ejusdem ℈. i. water of Carduus benedictus ℥. ii. which being mixed, he drunk it warm in the morning, and sweat thereon two houres. After he was purged, he dressed the Fistulaes two houres with this Unguent (untill they were mundified) upon tents of shoe-leather. When the Fistulaes were cleansed, he dressed them onely with Emplastrum Fodicationis (being made liquid to wrap up the tent with) till they were whole.

The mundificative Ointment was this.

℞. Oil of Wax, of S [...]ccinum, of Guaiacum, Oleum Hypericon, Compositum, ana. ʒ. ii. mix them without fire, and use it with the aforesaid tents. Also you shall note, that he drunk no other drink then this all the while. ℞. Lignum vitae, the bark, Sarsapa­rilla, ana. ℥. iv. the roots of Tormentill, Bistorta, Virga pastoris, Li­corice, [Page 16] corice, ana. ℥. ii, Juniper berries ℥. i. Mallow leaves, Sanicle, Alchimilla, Mugwort, Hypericon, Brunella, Comfery, ana. M. ii. Bring these into powder, and for every gallon of new tunned drink, adde thereto two or three ounces of this pow­der in a linnen cloth; let it stand till it be stale, and let him drink thereof.

CHAP. XLI. The cure of Lichen, or Impetigo, by M. K.

A Certain Maiden 17. yeares old, had all the flesh on her thumb and fore-finger eaten away with the aforesaid di­sease, which was cured by strewing thereon Saccarum Saturni, and applying thereto Cerottum magistrale Phioravante.

CHAP. XLII. A great Wen taken away, by W. H.

ONe that was troubled with a great Wen, had it taken a­way by washing it with strong lye made of oaken ashes. I have been since told of a certainty, that if yee rub the Wen often with the hand of a dead man, untill the Wen wax hot, it will consume away in short time after. Some rost an Egge hard, and cut it in the midst, and lay it thereon, and using this often the Wen will wear away.

The Second Part concerning the Cures of internall diseases.

Thus much breifly in these short Chapters is expressed and declared, concerning Wounds and Ʋlcers, wheresoever they be, or howso­ever they arise; by which examples, the learned Artist may un­dertake other things which are not here mentioned: But in any ease let him be advised by the wise Phisitian in his businesse, when there is any difficulty, and not run by and by to his receipt or [Page 17] experiment. It followeth now (in manner aforesaid) to set down the observed practises of those that have cured internall diseases, which have taken effect, and brought forth symptomes outwardly or inwardly.

CHAP. I. Of the cure of greivous Aches and pains, performed by W. H.

A Certain man was greatly afflicted with divers wofull Aches, and paines in his knees and shoulders, who was cured by receiving a dose of Aromatico, and by application of Emplastrum faetidum unto the greived parts.

CHAP. II. The healing of Aches coming of the Pox, by W. H.

ONe of a very dark and melancholy complexion, to whom some men in London had given the fume, and the unction three or four times; and yet left him possessed with most pitti­full Aches, and paine in his joynts; who for want of mainte­nance, was inforced to goe into the country where he was born, and was there pittied of an honest Gentleman, which cured him in this sort. First he purged him twice or thrice with Aromatico Leonardo, which done, he took, for four or five dayes together, ʒ. ss. of the extract of Hermodactiles with white Wine; then unto the articular parts that were greived, he applyed Em­plastrum faetidum, W. H. and thus in short time he was healed throughly.

CHAP. III. A notable experience of a Medicine that hath brought great ease to any great Ach, or pain, as of the Gout, or otherwise.

TAke one or two of the foremost sucking whelps of a Ma­stiff, or Bear-bitch, kill them, and take forth the guts, fill them with black Snails, rost them, and bast them with ℥. xii. of oil of Spike coloured with Saffron; reserve that which drop­peth from them, and mix it with as much oil of Wax, and there­with annoint any ach or greife.

CHAP. IIII. A particular way, whereby the pain of the Gout is soon eased or prevented, S. N.

TAke Minium, the yolk of an Egg, oil of Tartar, oil of Ro­ses, as much of each as you think sufficient, and with a little Saffron make it in form of a plaister, and lay it on cold. I knew another Gentleman greivously vexed with the Gout, who was in this sort soon eased. First when he supposed that the pain would come, he took a dose of Aromatico Leonardo, then the next day, unto those greived parts he applyed this plaister. Take a pickle herring and cut forth the bone, stamp it very small with a little bole Armoniacke, and Rosewater, and apply it cold to the greife, from place to place as it go­eth. Many men after they have been well purged, have had great ease by annointing the place three or four nights toge­ther with Aqua Balsami Phioravante, also Oleum Cerae is very profitable in that case.

CHAP V. The cure of Gouts, and all Aches coming of heat, by L. F.

FIrst the Patients were purged with Aromatico, then was this plaister applyed, which is attractive, resiccative, resolutive, as being intentions farre better fitting that purpose, then any other. Take the marrow of the bones of a Calfe newly killed, lb. i. Vitrioll in manner rubified, lb. i. ss. Cantharides, in fine pow­der, ℥. i. the ashes of the Vine, ℥. vi. mix them all on a small fire, untill they be incorporated, then with oyle of wax, make it in a liquid ointment, and spread it on a cloth, and lay it on cold; and when it waxeth dry chafe it till the pain be ceased; this hath eased many in a short time

CHAP. VI. The remedie against the Scorbute, or Scurvy, and the Gout, by W. T.

A Young man six and twenty yeares of age, mightily trou­bled with the Gout and Scurvy, was after this sort cured. [Page 19] First he was purged with Aromatico Leonardo, then he used the purging drink following every morning, that he might have each day three or four stooles, at night he took ℥. ii. of the distilled water of Lignum vitae with ℥. i. of the Sirrup of Cow­slips; also he used to eat these conserves following mixed together; ℞. Conserve of Cowslips ℥. iiii. of Sage, of Rose­mary floures, ana ℥. ii. of red Roses ℥. i. the quantity which he took at once, was as much as a Walnut; also he annointed the greived parts with this Unguent; ℞. Auxungiae humanae distilled ℥. ii. Oil of Turpentine ℥. ii. of Wax ℥. ss. mix them together; also in his usuall drink, which he drunk with his meat, was mixed Chamepiteos, Sage, Rosemary and Betony, this was the purging drink; ℞. the strong decoction of Lignum vitae, put therein of the leaves of Sena ℥. iv. Epithemum ℥. ii. Hermodactiles ℥. iv. Turbith ℥. i. Coloquintida ℥. ss. let them stand in warm sand four and twenty houres, and strain it, this he drunk in the morning fasting.

CHAP. VII. Tumours in all parts of the body, taken away by R. A.

THis was sent me by a freind of mine, who had seen the experience thereof divers times. First he purged the Pa­tients twice with Aromatico Leonardo, then he gave unto them ℥. ii. of Quintessence solutive, with ℥. i. of Sirrup of Roses, four or five mornings together, and after it they drank a little good broth made sweet with Sugar; that done, they drunk this water following: ℞. Hearb-grasse, Sothernwood, Mug­wort, Wormwood, ana. M. i. Juniper berries three or four handfull, cut the hearbs, and bruise the berries, and infuse them in a gallon of white Wine Vinegar four and twenty houres in a warme place; then distill it with a gentle fire; this done, take that distilled Vinegar, and infuse therein fresh hearbs and berries, and distill it again as before: Doe so the third time, and distill it as before. At the last infusion you shall put therein ℥. iiii. of good Mithridate or Triacle, and distill them together, and keep them close to your use. Thereof the Patients took at four a clock in the morning four ounces very [Page 20] warm, whereupon they layd them down and sweat two or three houres, alway wiping it away with warm clothes. Every sweating time they changed their shirts. When this medicine was ministred to a woman, she took but two ounces thereof. To a child he gave two ounces. In this sort he cured not one­ly Tumors, but Sores, Pustulaes, Fevers, Jaundies, &c.

CHAP. VIII. Swelling of the Coddes, mittigated and resolved by R. A.

A Certaine man riding on a trotting horse, had his stones swollen as big as ones fist, who was thus helped. First, he was purged once or twise with Panchimagogon, then this Cata­plasme was applied warm unto the part twise or thrise a day. ℞. the crums of Brown-bread, Bean-flower, ana. as mcuh as is sufficient, boyl them with new wort; when it is almost boyl­ed, put thereto a little Commin-seed, and a dish of fresh But­ter, and so applie it warm. I have seen the fat of an horse, to have cured the foresaid griefe.

Another for the same.

Take a pint of pure honey, as much bean-flower, and two spoonfuls of vinegar, of Commin-seed, ℥. ii. mix them well together, and spread it on a cloth, and warm it a little against the fire, and apply it.

CHAP. IX. The cure of a painfull Ischiatica, by I. H.

A Certaine man that was grievously troubled with the Ischi­atica, was healed in this manner. First, he was purged with Aromatico, then he took for five or six mornings together, two drachms of Quintessence solutive with Sirrup of Roses, and after the taking thereof, he drank a little sweet broth. That done, he drew a blister with Cantharides, and Oleum de te­rebinthina & cera; and in short time he was helped. Since which time I have known three or four persons helped in the same manner, by annointing the grieved parts with Aqua balsami Phioravante.

CHAP. X. An excellent remedie against the Cramp, proved often by R. G.

THey that were affected therewith, did upon the bare skin and places grieved, weare the root of common flagg. Also the skins of twenty silver Eeles, new flaied, and chopped small, boiled in two pound of May-Butter, and four handfuls of Rue, scumme it well, and annoint the place therewith, and this will work the same effect. A worshipfull Gentleman that had di­vers times proved the same, sent these notes unto me.

CHAP. XI. Contraction or shrinking of sinews, with Consumption of the party, helped by W. H.

A Man six and twenty years old, having a sore and grievous ulcerated leg, fell into the hands of inexpert Chirurgians, who with their Corrosives shrunk up his sinews, that he could neither go nor stand, but in short time after he was cured in this manner. He was once purged with Aromatico, then he took Quintessence solutive two or three dayes together in sirrup of Roses, and drank thereupon a little broth. Then did he use the Bath following divers times, and annointed him with the ointment against contraction of sinewes, described by Leo­nardo Phioravante. Another man having his hand shrunk to­gether upon the like occasion, was healed in the same order. This is the description of the Bath. Take two or three young whelps that cannot see, boil them in water with Mallowes, Hollihock, Mellilot, Wallwort, Cammomil. ana. one handfull: boil the Whelps till the flesh fall from the bones, this done, strain it, and use to bathe therewith very warm.

CHAP. XII. The cure of one whose neck was drawn awry, performed by W. T.

A Child had her neck drawn awry with a kind of Convul­sion, or Cramp, called Tetanus, and was thus cured. First she drank every morning and evening a little Aqua balsami Phioravante, then was her neck annointed with some of the said water mixed with Magno liquore Phioravante, and in ten dayes she was cured.

Another of the same, by W. T.

TAke Oleum de lateribus, ℥. i, Oleum Terebinthinae, ℥. ss. of Juniper Berries, ʒ. ii. of Cloves, ʒ. i. Nutmegs, Mace, ana. ʒ. ss. mixe them with Oleum Cerae, q.s. to make it in form of a liniment, and therewith annoint the parts.

CHAP. XIII. The Squinancy cured by I. P.

THis Medicine following did help one that was so swoln and grievously pained, that he could scarcely eat or drink. ℞. Olei Philosophorum de lateribus, ℥. ii. Olei lini ʒ. vi. Olei Cerae, ℥. i. mixe them warm, and annoint the place affected often­times in the day. Also one drachm of the tooth of a wild Boare, being drunk with ℥. iii. of oyle of Linseed, doth help it presently.

Also another man was forthwith cured thereof, which drank one spoonfull of Aqua balsami, and wetting a cloth therein, applied it to his throate.

CHAP. XIIII. The cure of Alopecia, by I. P.

MAgno liquore Phioravente, being annointed on the head, causeth the haires to grow againe abundantly which are [Page 23] fallen away, and to wax black. Balsamum sulphuris also doth the same.

CHAP. XV. A gargarisme to purge the head, by I. S.

TAke Spikenard, Alisander seed, ana. ℥. i. beat them into powder, and boile them in Vinegar till half be consumed, Then strain it, and put thereto lb. ss. of Mustard, and ℥. iii. of Rose water, boil it a little, keep it close to thy use, and when you will, you may take a spoonfull warm in the morning, and gargle therewith.

CHAP. XVI. The Pinne and Web, cured by M. R.

HE took an handfull of Centumpedes, or Sowes, stamped, and strained them with Ale, and gave the Patient to drink thereof three or four mornings, and willed the Patient to stop his nose and mouth, and to hang down his head, and therewith he was healed, as I was credibly certified.

CHAP. XVII. A water for sore eyes, prooved by M. E.

A Gentlewoman with this water hath cured a very great num­ber of sore eyes. She took an Egg hard sodden, cut it in the middst, and took forth the yolk, and put thereto as much white Copperice as a Nut: Then she closed it together, and wrapped it in red Fennell, and laid it to steep foure and twen­ty houres in Rose-water, then she strained it hard through a cloth, and dropped it into the eyes morning and evening; it was held for a great secret.

Another manner of way to heal the Pinne and Web in the eyes.

TAke nine of the Wormes called Centumpedes, or Sowes, stamp and strain them with the juice of Wood-bine, or Be­tony [Page 24] for three or four mornings together warm: which being drank will consume the Web in the eye.

CHAP. XVIII. The staying of the bleeding at the nose, done by M. R.

TAke burnt Lome, M. ii. sharp Vinegar, lb. ss. mix them well, and lay it between a linnen cloth: and bind it to the fore­head cold, and in short space it will stint.

Another for the same, I. H.

A Man of fifty yeares of age had a great flux of bloud at the nostrill, which had continued a long time, and could find no remedie till he used this order and medicine following. First his ring finger was bound hard with a thread, then was this cataplasme following applied to his forehead and temples.

Take burnt lome made in powder, M. vi. strong Vinegar, as much as will suffice to make it in form of a Cataplasme, to be applyed cold, thus in few hours the bloud stinted. Ne­verthelesse he took morning and evening the fume of Succi­num album at the mouth and nose, which stayed the flux, and comforted the vitall and animall spirits. His diet was cold and drying, his drink was water or red wine, wherein was put Crocus martis.

Another kind of curing the same per­formed by D. B.

ONe bleeding at the nose a day and a night, was thus help­ped. He made a tent of lint, and dipped it in Inke and put it into his nostrils, and laid a defensative over his eyes and nose, made with Sanguis Draconis, bole armoniack, and a little Vinegar.

Another way.

MAny have been cured by applying unto their cods a lin­en cloath wet in Vinegar.

Another.

SOme have had the bleeding stinted, by applying the hearb Peruinca unto the nose.

Other waies to do the same.

CArduus Benedictus bruised and put up into the nostrils, stin­teth the bleeding at nose. The same it performeth in a wound.

The hearb Geranium which hath a red stalk, being put into the nostrils or wound, doth the same: very often prooved.

In like manner, and to the same effect, worketh Crocus martis.

Also the bloud of a man dried worketh after the same order: both for the staying of bloud at the nose and in a wound.

CHAP. XIX. Spitting of bloud stayed by I. H.

A Certain woman spit bloud three or four dayes in great quantity, who was cured by drinking the decoction of mints in Vinegar.

Another for the same.

ALso five or six drops of Oleum Mastick, drunk in Cinna­mon-water, staieth the spitting of bloud.

CHAP. XX. The falling down of the Ʋvula, and the inflammation of the Al­monds, in such sort, that they could not swallow their meat, nor fetch their breath well, cured by W. T.

TAke white Amber grosly beaten ʒ. i. and with a Funnell take the fume thereof cast on a few coales, morning, noon, and night; then take ℥. i. of old leaven, and spread it plaister­wise on a cloth, strew thereon a little Commin-seed, and the powder of white Amber, and apply it half an hands breadth to the crown of the head the space of a whole day, then at night lay on another, and in short time it will take away the swelling, often proved.

CHAP. XXI. The cure of the Hicket, by W. B.

ONe that was divers times greivously troubled with the Hicket, was cured by applying a brown tost warm to his stomack; the tost was steeped in Triacle and Aqua vitae.

Another.

DIvers have been cured thereof, by taking four or five grains of Labdanum nostrum in Wine or Malmsey.

CHAP XXII. The falling Sicknesse cured by W. H.

A Certain woman being a Barbers wife in Bedfordshire, which was greived therewith every change of the Moon, was preserved by taking each day three drops of Oleum Heraclei, with the extract of Peoniae.

Another performed by I. H.

FIrst you shall purge them with the extract of Helleborus ni­ger; the dose whereof is from eight graines to twelve, being [Page 27] before well corrected, and then drunk in some convenient liquor or potion. That done, he gave them morning and evening of this composition: the which the longer that they use, the better it will be for them. ℞. Essentiae Peoniae, conserve of Rosemary flouers, of Betony, ana q. v. mixe them toge­gether in form of an electuary: then adde thereto for every ounce of that composition, of olenm cran ii humani ℈. i. and ℈. ss. of oile of Rosemary-flouers, and twelve graines of ole­um vitrioli. Hereof let them take ℥. ss. at a time, either by it self, or with some convenient liquor, broth, or potion. Also the nape of the neck must be annointed with Oleum castorei: when they do fall, you shall annoint their nostrils with oleum succinum, for that will in short time recover them againe. It will be also very expedient to use those things that comfort the brain and the heart.

CHAP. XXIII. The cure of the Jaundise by I. P.

A Young maiden much affected with them was in this sort cured. She was twice purged with Aromatico, and as of­ten mith Panchimagogon. This done, she felt her self very much eased, save onely in her yellow colour, which was thus also taken away. She took three or four mornings ℥. iii of the decoction of Goose dung, ℈. ii. of the extract of Centory: which she drank warm, and so was cured.

Another for the same by W. H.

A Woman that had the yellow Jaundise above two years together was thus cured. First she took ʒ. i. of Balsamum artificiale Leon. Phior, with a spoonfull of white wine in the morning: which caused her the next day to be as yellow as Saffron all her body over, yea, her haire of her head, and the nailes of her hands and feet very strange to behold. The third day she took the same againe, and in three times she was perfectly cured. This was at Carleton, five or six miles from Bedford. Certaine Practitioners have found a great secret in [Page 28] the salt called Lapilli urinae, or Paracelsus his Rebisola, against the Jaundies and all obstructions.

Another way by the same person W. H.

TAke Nucis Cupressi. Cassiae ligni, ana. ℥. i. extract Cen­taurii ℈. ii. mixe them and drink it in white wine warm, and they shall after the receipt hereof evacuate in their urine great store of yellowish choller, but by taking this medi­cine twise or thrise it will vade quite away, as hath been often proved. Remember that before you take this medicine (that it may work with better effect) you receive a dose or two of Aromatico Leonardo.

The cure of the Jaundies, with obstruction of the menstrues performed by W. H.

A Young Gentlewoman eighteen yeares old was greatly grieved with the Jaundise and suppression of her naturall sicknesse: but was in this sort cured.

℞. water of Madder roots, Sage, and Bettonie, ana. ℥. iiii. Spiritus Tartari, ℥. ii. Oleum vitrioli, ℈. ii. mixe them and drink thereof morning and evening two or three ounces warm. Also you shall note that she was purged once (before she took this drink) with Arom. Leonardo, and so was perfectly cured, and had her courses againe, which before she wanted seven moneths and more.

CHAP. XXIIII. The healing and cure of great windinesse in the stomack, by I. H.

A Certain Gentleman who was afflicted with a windinesse in the stomack, that many times with extream paine he fell into a sound. In this misery he continued three years and more, but in this manner he was helped. First he took Aromat. Leo. which evacuated upward and downward the gross and viscous cause of this wind. After that he had used this potion follow­ing [Page 29] forty dayes together. He took every morning and even­ing Spiritus Tartari, corrected with his Cristaline salt, half a spoonfull, Aqua preservans as much. This withdrew the cause, opened all obstructions in the body, so that in a moneth he remained perfectly cured.

CHAP. XXV. Cough of the lungs cured by W. T. after this manner.

REcipe Aquae Marrubii, ℥. vi. sirrup of Injubes, ℥. iii. mixe them, and make thereof a Julepe: whereof the patient took four spoonfuls, with ʒ. i. of Balsamum sulphuris, every four hours till he was well.

Another cured by W. T. which had also a sore stitch in the side.

FIrst he took Aromat. Leon. and then took this potion fol­lowing, for certaine dayes. ℞. Carduus Benedictus, Hype­ricon, Folefoot, a little Enula campana, make thereof a decocti­on with Ale, and he drank every morning ℈. i. of Balsamum sulphuris, and a spoonfull of Aqua Balsami Phioravante, morn­ing and evening till he was cured.

CHAP. XXVI. Shortnesse of breath with a Cough, remedied by M. R.

FIrst he was purged with Aromatico Leonardo, then he used this diet with hot and drying meats, rost or sodden; Enula campana, Hisop, and Liquorice, were infused in his wine. Al­so he used every morning to drink or eat in a rere Egg ℈ ss. of Balsamum sulphuris, and thereby was safely and quickly cured.

Another remedy for shortnesse of breath.

THe Wormes called Centumpedes or Sowes, are of great vertue, to discharge the Lungs that are stuffed with grosse flegm.

CHAP. XXVII. An approved remedy to stay vomiting, by M. R.

A Man of thirty yeares old was troubled a long time with sore vomiting, throwing up presently whatsoever he eat or drank, and was thus relieved ℞. Malmesey ℥. vi. Oleum Vitrioli six drops or more, mix them together, and take thereof every morning fasting ℥. i. or thereabout, and in short time it will stay the vomit.

To stay vomiting of bloud.

TAke five or six drops of Oil of Mastick, and drink it in Cinnamon water.

To stay vomiting another way.

A Pultus thus made, as followeth, and applied to the sto­mach staieth the vomiting. Take Rie-leaven, and mixe it with the juice of Mints, and a little Vinegar over the fire in form of a Pultus, when you do apply it to the stomack, strew thereon the powder of Cloues, and so oft as it cooleth, apply it warm. Also a Rie tost steeped in Vinegar, is profitable for the stomack.

The oyle of Wormwood (that cometh by distillation) being drank with convenient liquors, or potions, and the same compounded with other convenient things, and applyed to the stomack, doth work notable effects this way, and is good against many other maladies.

CHAP. XXVIII. Ʋomiting of bloud, with a cruell flux of the belly staid by M. R.

A Man fourty five years old that had congealed bloud in his body, did vomit abundance of bloud, and avoided down­ward a certain black matter like unto pitch. He had a great stitch in his side without a Fever, and alwaies when he vomited it was thought he would have died, this man was by Gods help thus cured. First he took this potion. Take the water of Nettle roots, ℥. viii. Oleum vitrioli, as much as will make it tart. He drank thereof cold, which presently mittigated both the fluxes. Then unto the stomack and throat, was applied this Pultus warm, both morning and evening, which wrought an excellent effect. ℞. the crums of Rie-bread, M. xii. Red wine or Aligant, strong Vinegar, ana, q. s. boyl them to the form of a Pultus. Then he took at the mouth and nose, the fume of Succinum, or Amber, which strengthened the vitall and ani­mall spirits. His side was annointed with this ointment, which took away the pricking and paine. ℞. Ʋnguent de Althea, ℥. iiii, Amigdalarum dulcium, ℥. i. mixe them, and therewith an­noint the side morning and evening. His diet was this, all his meat was boiled in Red wine, or Smiths water. His drink was the decoction of Nettle roots, or red Wine, wherein Steel hath been quenched diverse times.

Ʋomiting joyned with a Fever.

A Gentlewoman affected with these griefs was in this man­ner comforted. ℞. Aqua balsami, ʒ. i. Aqua preserv. ʒ. ii. Oleum piperis, six graines, mixe them well with a good spoon­full of the sirrup of Quinces, and so she drank it at the begin­ning of the heat.

CHAP XXIX. A great and sore Plurisie cured by M. R.

A Certain man of twenty four yeares old was vexed with a most grievous plurisie, with pricking, shooting, and a Cough, with a continual Fever, and inflammation of the tongue. First there was good store of bloud taken from the liver-vein on that side where the pain was. Then were these sirrups (that do decoct and purge) ministred unto him. ℞. Sirupi de liqnoritia, de Hysopo, acetosae ana. ℥. i. Oximellitis squillitici, aceti squillit ana. ʒ. iii. make thereof a loche, whereof in the morning he licked with a Licorice stick, which caused him to spit easily, and took away the heat or burning of the tongue, being used with this decoction. ℞. French Barly, ℥. iii. Carduus Benedictus, M. i. Roses, Violets, ana. P. i. Licorice scraped, ʒ. iii. Figs, iii. Rai­sin, ℥. i. ss. Sugar-Candie, ℥. ii. boile them in lb. xvi. of water, till two pound be wasted, and so drink it cold: Also his diet was light and thinne, as broth and drink, &c.

Plurisie, with spitting of bloud cured by M. R.

FIrst there was made this purging preparative. ℞. Senae, ʒ. vi. Carduus Benedictus. M. ss. Sugar, ℥. ss. Ginger, ℥. ss. lay them to infuse one night in warm whaie, made of Goates milk lb. i. ss. whhreof yee shall give morning and evening, ℥. iiil. warm: this purgeth gentlie, and causeth to spit easily. Then three daies after they must bleed well on the Liver-vein, and their drink at meales, was the decoction of Hysop, Violets, Lico­rice, and Raisins with Sugar.

Plurisie, with inflammation of the tongue, and costive­nesse of the body, M. R.

FIrst they were purged with Aromatico, and then used this gargarisme. ℞. Sempervivae, or Housleek, M. ii. boile them in a quart of water till a third be wasted. Then strain it, and put thereto ℥. ii. of Wine-vinegar, wherewith they gargari­sed [Page 33] warm oftentimes. Then they used Mel Rosarum, which took away the blacknesse of the tongue. Their diet was moist and cooling, as followeth. ℞. French Barly, ℥. ss. Figs, vii. Raisins, ℥. iiii. boil and strain them, and put thereto Oleum vitrioli, q. s. to make it tart, and so drink thereof.

Plurisie in a woman cured.

FIrst she was purged with Aromatico Leonardo, then unto her side there was applyed this unguent, seven or eight times a day, which took away her pain. ℞. Ʋnguenti de Althea, ℥. ii. Oil of sweet Almonds, ℥. ss. mixe them together: the next morning she was let bloud in the basilike veine, on that side where her pain was. Her diet was the same that was spoken of before. After meat she used a Lochsanum fit for the purpose, and so in short time she was cured.

Another woman cured of the same disease by M. R.

FIrst there was ministred unto her this potion. ℞. the water of Carduus Benedictus, lb. ss. Oleum vitrioli, q. s. to make it tart like a Pomegranate. The next day she was let bloud in manner aforesaid, about ℥. x. After she had bled, she took this potion following, five daies together, morning and evening, which caused her to sweat well, and thereupon she was quickly cured.

The diaphoricall decoction.

REcipe Cardni Benedicti, M. ii Liquorice scraped ℥. iii. Figs, v. Raisins ℥. ii. Sugar-Candie, ℥. i. ss. boil them in a suffici­ent quantity of water, and strain them to drink.

A plurisie broken with a potion.

FOr the breaking of his Aposteme, there was ministred unto him Aromatico Leonardo, with honied water. The next day the Basilick veine, on the Pluriticall side was opened. His [Page 34] drink at dinner and supper was this decoction. Take Hy­sope dried, M. i. Violets, P. ii. six Figs, Liquorice scraped, ℥. ss. Raisins, ℥. iiii. boyle them in nine pound of water, till one pound be wasted, then strain this pectorall decoction, and use it.

Another cured in this manner.

FIrst he took Aromatico Leonardo, and thereupon drank the water of Carduus Benedictus. The next day they let him bloud on the same side where the paine was. His diet was moist and cooling, and he drank Barly water mixed with sir­rup of Roses, and Oleum vitrioli, and shortly after was cured.

CHAP XXX. An inward Imposthume, or bastard plurisie cured by W. M.

A Man having an Imposthume in his side, which would have turned to the Plurisie, was thus cured. Take a good sweet Apple, and cut off the crown, take out the coare, and fill it with powder of Olibanum, bind on the crown againe, and rost it under the embers till it be soft. Then mixe with it three or four drops of Oleum vitrioli, and let the Patient eat it, and sweat thereon.

Also with the same medicine, at the same time, there was a boy helped, that had a Plague sore on his neck.

Paine in the side with the Cough, cured by W. T. after this manner.

REcipe Floris Sulphuris, ʒ. ii. the extract of Enula Campa­na, ʒ. i. Ireos and Liquorice, ana. ℥. i. Honey, q. s. to make it in form of an Electuary. Before it be made up, put thereto ℈. ss. of Oleum sulphuris, and use it morning and evening.

CHAP. XXXI. Paine and wind in the body, cured by I. H.

A Certaine woman twenty eight years of age, being often troubled with a griping paine and wind in her body, was presently eased by taking four or five graines of Laudanum nostrum in Malmesey, with two or three drops of oyle of Ani­seeds. After this manner diverse persons have been cured: Provided alwaies that the body be loose, else must it be moved either with some gentle Glister, or Suppositary.

The expelling of wind out of the body by L. F.

THis course following hath been divers times proved most effectuall against wind in the stomack, and other parts of the body. First let them take a dose of Aromatico Leon. Then let them take morning and evening half a drachme of this composition, three or four daies together, either in potion or pills.

℞. The essence of Gentian, ʒ. ii. the essence of Ginger, oile of Anniseed, Fenell seed, ana. ℈. ss. make thereof a masse, and keep it to your use.

CHAP. XXXII. The cure of the Dropsie performed by W. T.

A Man of three and forty yeares old troubled with the Dropsie, was in this manner cured. Take the roots of blew flouer-de-Luce sliced, and steeped in Vinegar three or four houres, and then dried, ℥. ss. the bark of Laurell roots so prepared as much, the leaves of Sena in powder, one spoonfull, Anniseed, and Ginger, ana. ʒ. i. mixe them, and take of that powder every morning, the weight of four pence, till it give you four stooles a day, continue herein so long as you shall think it good.

CHAP. XXXIII. The killing and expelling of Wormes in the Stomack, or else­where, by I. H.

AN infinite number of people both young and old, have been cured thereof, with this composition following. Take the seed of Carduus sanctus, Wormseed, Dittanie, Semen Canlium, cornu cervi usti, corallinae, vermium terrestrium, ana ʒ ss. mix them in fine pouder, and give thereof ʒ ss. either with honie, or sweet milk, in the morning and evening. Annoint also the stomack and belly downward with this Unguent following, and apply a little unto the navell with brown paper, and no doubt of it, within two or three dayes the Patient shall bee cured. For it doth not onely kill the wormes, but causeth them to come forth by seege, making the belly soluble, so that they shall have two or three stools in a day. The Caraplasm or Ʋnguent is this. ℞. Farinae lupinorum, Aloes, centauriae, myrr­hae, theriacae optimae, ana ℥ ss. beat them into fine pouder, and make thereof an Unguent, with the juyce of Peach leaves, and keep it to your use. Also two or three drops of Oleum vitri­oli, being drunke with water of Gramen, or such like for three or four dayes, killeth wormes. Also ʒ ii of Quinta essentia so­lutiva Phiorav. drunke with ℥ i. of Sirrup of Roses, killeth the Worms, and expelleth them by seege.

CHAP. XXXIV. A Quartane of long continuance, cured by L. F.

FIrst the Patient was purged, with 12. grains of La Petra Phi­losophale, Leon. Phiorav. mixed with ʒ ss. of good Mithri­date, the next day he took of this decoction warm, ℥. vi. and so continued 14 dayes morning and evening. ℞. Chamepiteos lb. i. white wine lb viii, white honey lb i. distill them with a gentle fire, till five pound be come forth. Then let it cool, and filter that which remained in the vessel, and mix it with that which was distilled afore, keep it in a glasse close stopped, and use it. Also the Reins of the back was annointed every [Page 37] night with Balsamum artific. Leon. Phior. and so he was well cured.

CHAP. XXXV. An approved Remedie against the Pestilence, Plurisie, and Quartane.

DIvers people have been cured of these foresaid diseases, by taking a dose of Turpetum Diaphoreticum, Paracelsi, either with Amuletum Palmarii, or with some excellent good Mithri­date in the morning fasting, and sweating thereupon. Some­time it is given with other potions or compositions, according to the disease.

CHAP. XXXVI. The swelling of the Spleen in a melancholie person, cured by W. T.

A Certain Melancholie man, was much grieved in his Milt, heart and head; but he was thus cured. First he was twice purged, with ℈ i. of Panchimagogon, and ℈ i. of the extract of Sena mixed with Sirrup of Roses, and two or three drops of oyle of Vitriol. That done, he took a quart of posset Ale, made of White wine and Burnet, and drank thereof morning, noon, and night a good draught, with half a spoonfull of A­qa Balsami Phiorav. Also now and then, he took morning and evening a tost of white bread, steeped in Aqua preser­vans, and within ten dayes after he purged again, and so re­mained in good health.

CHAP. XXXVII. Frantick Fevers, for want of sleep, often cured by I. P.

MAny that were so grievously vexed with a burning fever, that they could not sleep, and were in manner frantick, have taken five or six grains of Laudanum, with conserve of Succorie floures, and therewith were speedily delivered out of their extremities.

Pestilent Fevers, with great thirst cured by I. H.

FIrst they were purged once or twice with Aromatico Leo­nardo, then was the stomack comforted with some pecto­rall Potion. That being done, there was Barly water made with Raisins, Liquorice, and cool hearbs, if you may have them. Then strein it clean, and put therein as much Oleum vitrioli as will make it tart, like a Pomegranate. Drink thereof when you are drie, for it comforts nature, asswageth heat and thirst won­derfully, openeth all obstructions, and defendeth the bodie from putrified Fevers [...]f they be grieved with the head-ach, you shall cause them to be let bloud under the tongue, cutting those veins over-thwart, and they shall presently be cured.

CHAP. XXXVIII. Against Poison, or the Pestilence, a Diaphoreticall Potion, by W. T.

REcipe Myrrhae, croci, ana ℥ ii. Amuleti Palmarii ℥ i. Spiritus vini, lb i. Oleum piperis, Oleum gingiberis, ana ʒ i. mix them in a glasse, and give thereof ℥ ss. in old Sack at once against the Pestilence or Poison.

CHAP. XXXIX. Signs of death in the Plague, W. K.

TAke a quick Frog, and lay it with the bellie next the sore; if the partie will escape, the Frog will burst in a quarter of an houre. Then lay on another, and this you shall do till no more doe burst, for they draw forth the venome. I have been told, that a dried toad will in better sort do the same. If none of the Frogs doe burst, the partie will not escape, this hath been often proved.

CHAP. XL. Counsell, antidotes, and Preservatives against Infectious ayres, on the water, or land, by W. T.

YOu shall use to chew, or hold in your mouth, a little of Essentia Angelicae. Also it would be very profitable to drink three or four drops of the same fasting. Also Oleum Camphorae being drunk effecteth the same. In like manner, aqua balsami Phioravante, if it be drunk in the morning with Wine, or Allum, preserveth a man from all poison and pesti­lent ayres: and is a most singular remedie against surfets, or the Pestilence. Also, if you be in any infected ship, or house, it were necessary to wear a bag of Saffron under your arm­pits to defend the heart.

Also it were very necessary to drinke two or three drops of the essence of Saffron for the same purpose.

Amuletum Palmarii is also very excellent, being taken in the morning fasting.

Dissolved Pearl, eaten or drunk, defendeth the heart, puri­fieth the bloud, and reviveth the spirits above all other things. You may make it in Lozanges, or drink it in any cordiall, in what quantity you will.

CHAP. XLI. An Inveterate Gonorrhaea, either in man or woman, oftentimes cured, by W. T.

MAny have been cured of this, and such like infirmities with this composition following. Among the rest, one Gentleman in Buckinghamshire, who was vexed therewith a­bove seven yeares continually.

A Gentlewoman also was so grievously afflicted with flux. albo, that she waxed lame, and went with a staffe: these were both cured in 12 dayes. But one thing must be remembred, that if it come ex lue venerea, it were necessary, first to be purged, and then to use these Pills.

℞. Magisterii perlarum, ʒ i. Gum Tragacanth, ʒ ss. fine bole [Page 40] Armoniack, terra sigillata vera, ana. ʒ i. Laudanum nostrum, ℈ i. make an hard Mass with Turpentine, and take thereof, ʒ ss. when you go to bed, untill this quantity be spent. In the mean time also, you shall annoint the reins of the back with this Unguent.

℞. Ʋnguentum album camphoratum, ℥ ii. saccarum Saturni, ʒ. ii. misce, fiat unguentum.

Another for the same, W. T.

First, purge them with Aromatico Leonardo, once or twice, then let them take morning and evening, half a dram of the Pills following; and annoint the reins of the back, with the foresaid Unguent.

℞. Symphyti, crassuli, ana ʒ ii. Magisterii perlarum, dissol­ved Corall, ana. ʒ. i. Laudani nostri, ℈ i. nucis moschatae nume­ro ii., boli Armen, terrae sigillatae verae, sem. papav. albi, Traga­canth, ana ʒ ii. make them up in a masse with Turpentine, and use them in manner aforesaid.

An Electuarie against Gonorrhea, by W. T.

A Certain man, being troubled with a stinking Gonorrhea, was in this order cured. First he was purged with Aro­matico Leonardo; the next day he took a pill or two of Venice Turpentine, washed in plantain water; that done, he used to eat morning and evening the quantitie of an hazel nut of this Electuarie untill he was helped, which was not long after.

Take the kernels of hazell nuts blaunched, ℥ iiii. magisterii perlarum, laudani nostri, ana ℈ i. terrae sigillatae, boli veri, sanguinis draconis in grain, ana ℈ ii. Seminis Plantaginis, rasurae Eboris, ana ℈ i. nuces moschatae, 3. or 4. Cinamomi, ʒ i. Saccari, ℥ iii. mix them well together, and use it. Also in the mean time hee annointed the reins, with the foresaid Unguent.

CHAP. XLII. The immoderate Flux menstruall, suppressed, or stayed by W. T.

A Certain woman being grievously weakened with that dis­ease, and having great heat and pain in her bodie, was [Page 41] thus cured. Take the roots of Orpine, and Comfery, thinn sliced, Clary, q. v. boil them with a Chicken, and with that broth make Almond milk, and to every handfull of Almonds adde ℈. i. of Laudanum nostrum, Grind them well together, and drink thereof morning and evening. Also you shall an­noint the reines and grieved parts with the unguent mention­ed in the Chapter aforegoing.

Another aginst the same.

I Was informed that the powder of a Land-Frog bound about the womans neck, doth stay the foresaid Flux.

CHAP. XLIII. A Flux stopped by G. F.

DIssolve Bay-Salt in Malmesey, and therewith wash the soles of your feet, and in three or four daies it will stay the Flux. Diverse Souldiers in the Warres have been cured thereof by setting their Fundament in warm Horse dung. Al­so the powder of red-Roses drunk in red-wine is very profi­table for the stopping of the Flux.

Bloudie Flux of long continuance cured by W. T.

REcipe conserve of red Roses, Marmalade of Quinces, electuary of Sulphur of Leonardo Phioravante his de­scription, of each two ounces, Amuletum Palmarii, half an ounce, Essentiae croci, Laudanum nostrum, of each half a scruple, aquae preservantis half an ounce, oleum vitrioli, and Sulphuris, ana. ℈. ss. mixe them, and take thereof ʒ. i. morning and evening.

CHAP. XLIIII. The cure of the Emeroides or Piles, performed by I. H. and many others.

TAke Mullen, and frie it with Butter, and therewith annoint the part divers times.

The oyle of Eggs is a notable remedie to withdraw the said infirmitie.

Balsamum sulphuris annointed upon them, doth with great speed and good successe cure them: this also hath been often­times proved very excellent.

If they be annointed with Oleum Tartari faetentis, it drieth them up in short time. But first it were necessary to purge the body of the melancholick originall of that disease, both by vomite and seege.

Some use to take them away, by applying a caustick unto them.

The cure of Ficus in ano, ex lue venerea performed by I. P.

MAny have been sore troubled with Warts or Blathers in the fundament, which have in very short time been cured by annointing them with Balsamum Tartari faetentis. Among other men there was a strong lusty fellow, fifty years old, of complexion melancholie, which was beastly bewraied with the Pox, about whose fundament or Longanon, there re­mained twelve or fourteene growing, whereof some were so big as a little Figg, all of them did runne or yeeld a loathsome yellow sanies or matter. This man was cured with Balsamum Tartari faetentis, without any paine to him; and the warts were so dried, that they were pulled off with a paire of mullets: after which he remained whole. This man was hea­led in Bedfordshire.

CHAP XLV. The provoking of menstrues, by I. H.

BY this composition following many more, then it is here requisite to speak of, have had there menstrues provoked, and many other obstructions opened: especially if it be given with broths, liquors, or medicaments, appropriate ther­unto.

℞. Extractionem Cammomillae, Calendulae, Gentianae, Brionie, Chamepiteos, Peoniae, Centaurii, Juniperi, Genistae, Sabinae, Spic­nardi, Rutae, Melissae, Chelidoniae, Philipendulae, Matricariae, ana. ʒ. i. Essentiae Zedoariae, Croci, ana. ʒ. ss. Mirabolanorum, Casto­rei, ℥. ss. mixe them, and keep it close. The dose is from ℈. i. to ʒ. i. upon extreamity, either in pills or convenient electuaries. It must be ministred four or five daies before the new Moon, and as many after, with the infusion of Sena, or in sirrup of Roses, for the intent above named.

To provoke menstrues in melancholie people, W. H.

TAke of the extract of Helleborus niger, five graines, Panchi­magogon, fifteen graines, make it into three small pills and annoint the pills with Oleum annisi, and thereof take once or twise. After that take this composition following.

Take of the Essence of Gentian, Sabina, Angelica ana. ʒ. i. Essentia Croci, ℈. i. Castorei ℈. ss. mixe them, and make them up in form of pills, and take thereof each night when you goe to bed ℈ i. either in pills, or dissolved in some convenient liquor about the aforesaid time of the Moon. A very melancholie maiden was cured in this manner.

CHAP. XLVI. Suffocation and paines of the Matrix, with retention of menstrues cured by I. P.

REcipe extract. Brioniae ʒ. i. ss. the leaves of Sena, ℥. ss. Gin­ger, ℈. i. Cinnamon, ʒ. i. Sugar, ℥. i. lay them to infuse [Page 44] one night in a pint of warm whaie made of Goats milk. Then strain it and drink thereof three mornings warm, about the new Moon keeping a warm and drying diet, your wine must be infused with Rosemary floures.

Another that hath cured the rising of the Mother by R. C.

REcipe the Flours or Buds of a Walnut-tree in May, give the Patients as much thereof to drink as will lie on a Groat, and with two or three doses they shall be cured.

Also if you give ℈. i. of Oleum succinum album in wine, it will presently cure the same disease, a thing oftentimes proved with good successe.

CHAP. XLVII. To provoke Ʋrine, and to cause the Jaundise to flow, W. K.

THe powder of Earth-Wormes drunk with white Wine provoketh Urine, and cureth the Jaundise and Ter­tians.

Also gray Sope, ℥. ii. bay-Salt fine beaten, ℥. i. mixe them and therewith annoint the navell and belly.

Also Castle-Sope being drunk with warm wine provoketh Urine.

Also note if you shall apply quick earth-wormes upon a Whiteblow, called Panaricium (of some Panaricies) they will cure the same.

CHAP. XLVIII. To provoke Ʋrine, and to heal other obstructions, a most excellent and proved receit, by I. H. and many other.

THis composition of artificiall Salts breaketh, and (after a sort) consumeth all tartarous diseases, as hath been very often and truely experimented by divers and sundry persons: [Page 45] yea, it prevaileth much against the Gout, being taken with Potions, Electuaries, and Sirrups appropriate unto the parti­cular ministrations.

℞. The salt of Radish, of Eringus, Bean stalkes, Broom, Alizanders, Juniper, Ash, Anniseed, Fennell, Camomill, Worm­wood, Urine, Tartar Christalline, ana, mix them in a warm Morter, and keep it close, and in a dry place, for in the air and moisture it will quickly resolve. The dose hereof is from half a scruple to an whole scruple, and may be very safely admini­stred without perill to any age or sex upon good occasions, and at times convenient, after that the body is prepared for the same purpose.

The end of the second part of this Collection.

A Supplement, or Addition unto the former Collection.

This Appendix or Addition containeth both Philosophicall dis­courses, of the causes [...]nd cures of divers and sundry diseases: as also many pithie discourses, of the vertues and use of many Vegetables, Animals, &c. culled and translated out of the Phy­sicks and Chirurgery of Sir Leonardo Phioravante, and left to passe forth in print with this Collection.

CHAP. I. Of pain in the head.

THe pain in the head is an infirmity, whose cause untill this time hath not been sufficiently known, as by mine own experience shall prove unto you.

All, or the most part of Physitians in the world doe hold this position, that pain in the head is no other thing, then va­pours ar [...]sing from the stomack, and ascending unto the head, which doe offend membrana, whereupon ensueth pain. Here­in they speak some part of the truth; but (in my judgement) [Page 46] they are not yet come perfectly to know all the cause of this infirmity: for I see, that in the cures, which these Theoricks would perform, it falleth not out according to their expecta­tion and desire, for that they know not the whole, or the principall cause of the malady, therefore what certain Me­dicine can they find out to cure the infirmity? They may per­chance (as the blind man hits the Crow) help they know not what; which thing I speak not to back-bite or injury any of them, but to tell them, out of love that I bear to them and others, the whole and true cause of that, whereof heretofore they have been ignorant. The first cause is putrified bloud in Leonichi: The second is the vapours that ascend from the stomack and offend the head: The third is the humidity or moisture between the skin and the flesh: So that the causes are three, and the remedies as many to dissolve the Antecedent causes. I have now shewed thee the originall and root of the pain in the head, about which thou shalt never more need to beat thy head, or break thy brains, either in seeking the Aphorismes of Hyppocrates, the Commentary of Galen, or the Authority of Avicen, for in these four or few words I have said all. Now of the cure of this disease, as I have experi­mented the same an infinite sort of times in my life, which way soever the cause cometh, work thou after this manner, and thou shalt never sustain blame or discredit.

When the pain in the head is confirmed, and that thou canst find no help by common Theorick or Practick doe these things following. First let them bloud on Leonichie, cutting it over­thwart, and let the Patient spit as much as he can; then the next morning let them take our Aromatico fasting; the next day let the head be shaven, and lay thereon an attractive plai­ster, drawing out the humidity, whereof I have made mention in my Caprici medicinale; in the end, cause them to sneeze, and hereby all the pain in the head will cease.

CHAP. II. Of the Catarre, and rhume in the head.

THe Catarre is a moist vapour which assaulteth the head, and afterwards falleth down again into the stomack, where [Page 47] it ingrosseth and corrupteth. This moisture hath his be­ginning of the moisture of the Lungs, and untill such time as the Lungs be discharged thereof, the Catarre will continue in his force. This infirmity reigneth more in flegmatick and melancholy bodies, then in any of other constitutions: Such as are troubled with it are not long lived, because their Lungs consume by little and little, and thereupon they are troubled with the Ptisick, and consequently they perish if they be not quickly releived. I will now shew thee a rare secret to cure the same.

Take Pulmonaria, and Sena, that is fresh and new, infuse them in wine and water over a small or gentle fire, till the wine have drawn out the vertue; then strain it, and put there­unto our Quintessence, and keep it close in a glasse, let the Pa­tient drink thereof every morning ℥. iii. luke warm for twenty dayes together; let him eat good nourishing meats, for they agree well with this disease: If the Patient be not too farre spent, you shall see your cure performed in short time: In the mean while, if the Patient be weak, you shall give him new laid Eggs, and good white Wine: If the humidity be perceived not to be quite expelled and evacuated, then give him our Aromatico, afterward comfort him again with Restoratives and Cordials to make him strong, and no doubt, by the help of God he shall be cured. This method of curing this infirmity, differeth from the common course that Physitians take, which would cure it with diet, bleeding, and mollifying liniments, and causing them to spit, and such like, which are meanes rather to augment the Catarre, then to diminish the same.

The second course to cure the descension, that cometh from the head to the stomack.

USe these five things if you will cure this disease; 1. our Electuario Angelica. 2. Quintessence solutive. 3. our Pillulae pro descenso. 4. Ʋnguents for the stomack and head. 5. our Quintessence vegetable. The Electuary cleanseth the head and stomack; the Quintessence solutive evacuateth the body; the Pills take away the cause of the descension; the Unguents [Page 48] dry; and the vegetable Quintessence preserveth the body from all ill and noysome infirmities. The Electuary must be taken first in the morning; of the Quintessence solutive you must take a spoonfull in the morning in a little broth and sugar, keeping a reasonable good diet, and doe this four or six dayes; then take the Pills in the evening, and in the mean time annoint the head and stomack with Oleum Cerae, and drink every morn­ing a little of our Quintessence, which if you doe use continual­ly (by the blessing of God upon it) there is no doubt, but the body shall be free from many troublesome maladies.

There was a certain woman of the age of 58. yeares, who being greatly troubled with a Catarrhe, was cured by the use of our Aqua preservans morning and evening, and by annointing the stomack with Balsamo.

One that was affected with a Catarrhe, and a stitch in the side, was thus cured. He took our Aromatico twice; then he took every morning a spoonfull of our Quintessence solutive with the broth of a Capon, for seven or eight dayes toge­ther; and every night when he went to bed, he annointed his stomack with Oleum Incompostibile, and thereby was soon after cured.

A woman that had great pain in her head and stomack, and had her menstrues stopped, with losse of her appetite, was thus helped.

First she took two doses of our Pillulae Angelicae; that done, she took every morning a spoonfull of Quinta essentia solutiva, with broth and sugar, for five or six mornings together; after that she took every morning one spoonfull of our Aqua pre­servans, whereupon in short time after she was cured.

A Contusion in the head.

A Certain man had a great fall from an Horse, where­with he bruised his head most greivously, who was cu­red in four dayes, by annointing the place with Oleum bene­dictum nostrum.

The taking away or healing of the white Scall.

THis noisome malady is perfectly cured, by purging the Pa­tients with our Aromatico, and annointing the head with our Oleum Philosophorum.

Also the Artificiall Balsom of our description doth the like, and Oleum benedictum nostrum effecteth the same.

Pain in the eyes, with great dimnesse of sight.

A Certain man that had great pain in his eyes, and was al­most blind, recovered his sight by letting bloud under the tongue; the next day he took Aromatico once, after that he used our Quintessence solutive seven or eight dayes together, and every night he annointed his stomack with Oleum Cerae rectified; then was dropped into his eyes our Quintessence for the eyes, and thereof was he well cured.

An Ʋnguent for sore eyes

TAke Rosewater. Fennell, and Eufrage water, ana. put therein a small quantity of Verdigreace, and boil it a little on the fire; then let it settle till it be clear, and pour it off. With this water see that you wash Auxungia porcina seven or eight times, and of that put a little into the eye when yee goe to bed.

To cure or stay the spitting of bloud.

ONe that spit bloud was cured in ten dayes, by drinking the liquour of Honey morning and evening Another was healed by drinking the decoction of Mint in Vinegar: ano­ther by drinking of Crocus martis.

The description and cure of the Sqinancie.

THis disease is a windy moisture, and a suffocation of bloud, as you may see by experience, that such as are pos­sessed [Page 50] therewith, have a great alteration, or many changes of Fevers, with a swelling in the throat, and many times, if it be not quickly helped, it will choke them, and this is the cure there­of. You shall give them ʒ. i. of the powder of a wild Boares tooth, with ℥. iii. of oil of Linseed, and forthwith by the help of God they shall be greatly eased.

CHAP. III. The description, and manifold cures, of the disease called Scro­phulae, or forunculi, which some doe call waxing kernels, but rather the Kings Evill.

THe Scrophulae or waxing kernels (so called of some) which use to come in the throat, or other parts of the bodies of young children, doe arise and are caused of great quantity of melancholy humours, because that doth for the most part reign in persons that are weak of complexion; for you may easily see, that such as are vexed with that infirmity, are not very quick spirited. These Scrophulae are a long time ere they will come to suppuration; and before they break, and when they are broken, they cause excessive pain, and are hard to be cured: For all infirmities that come of melancholy, are trou­blesome to cure, or resolve, as you may see in the Quartain, and such like. But here I will shew thee a secret to cure these Scrophulae. First you must remove the cause, and then cure the effects, for otherwise it were impossible to cure them with outward Medicines. This melancholy is purged with our Sir­rup against melancholy, which you must use eight or ten dayes, the dose is about ℥. iv. cold; that done, give them our Aro­matico, which cleanseth the head and stomack, and purifieth the bloud. As touching locall Medicines to break it, you shall lay thereon our Caustick 24. houres, which mortifieth and dryeth, for it will draw forth a great deal of moisture; after this annoint it with our Magno liquore untill the escare be fallen out, and when it is mundified, apply thereon the Cerot of Gual­tifredo di Medi, and use no other Medicine, for it will incarnate, and siccatrize without scarre.

Another cure for Scrophulae.

A Certain young boy of 14. yeares, of complexion cholerick and melancholie, who had Scrophulae in his throat on both the sides, was cured thus. The first Medicine that he took was the Infusion of Rhubarb, with the Trochisches of Agarick, and acetum squilliticum, and water of Maidenhair mixed to­gether, which he used by the space of ten daies. Then was laid upon the Scrophulae, a plaister of Cerot magistrale with Cantharides, which drew forth the malignitie of the Ulcer, and great store of Sanies, being applied for 15 daies toge­ther. This done, I gave him the decoction of Salsaparilla, with a good diet for twentie dayes together. Then I applyed unto the sore a Cerot of Gualtifredo di Medi, which in a short time cured him, that had been vexed with them four yeares be­fore.

Another for the same.

ANother which was a maid of 13. years of age, was vexed with Scrophulae in her throat, which was also in this man­ner cured. First, gave her the extract of Elleborus niger, with mel Rosarum, which doth very effectually purge the melan­cholie humour. That done, I gave her our Sirrup against the melancholy humour, for eight or ten dayes together, and applyed unto the sores an Unguent of Litarge, boiled with the powder of Scrophularia, thus was shee in short time perfect­ly cured.

Another against Scrophulae.

REcipe Verdigrease, Pelitorie of Spain, Dock root, the Juice of Leeks, of the Hearb Scrophularis, ana, mix them, and lay on lint, and applie it unto the Scrophulae, but take some care thereof.

CHAP. IIII. Of Panaricium, or Panaricies, called the Whitblow.

THis grievous and intollerable maladie, (as those know well that have felt them) cometh on the end of the fin­ger, and is an infirmitie bred in the liver, whereof nature be­ing willing to discharge her self, sendeth it to the extream parts of the fingers, and most commonly it cometh to the fin­ger next the thumb, but seldome in the other. The reason or cause whereof is hidden, save that we may conjecture (as wee have said before) an accident in the Liver, which nature sen­deth forth unto those parts to ease her selfe. When it cometh to the end of the finger, that it can go no further, it causeth a sharp and excessive pain; and the accident coming unto that place, not having passage, is so hot, that in short time it putrifieth the sinews, muscles, and cartilages, and in the end rotteth both flesh and bone. The secret of this grief is not commonly known of the most Chirurgians, who with all their learning cannot devise to cure it as it ought to be cu­red. The most part of such as have that infirmitie lose their finger; but if thou wilt quickly help them, follow this me­thod.

First, let them bleed on the Liver vein, then let them be well purged. Afterward dresse the finger, with Oleum Sulphu­ris, which will cause some pain, neverthelesse (to have some ease) you must abide it. The next day dresse it with Magno liquore untill it be whole, which will be in short time, as I have often proved.

CHAP. V. Of grievous Ʋlcers in Womens Breasts.

FIrst they must be touched with Oleum Sulphuris, then make this Unguent. Take the yolks of Eggs, ℥ ii. Turpentine, Butter, Barlie flower, Honey of Roses, ana, ℥ ss. incorporate them all in a morter, and therewith dresse them, untill they be whole. But if they come of any kinde, or spice of the [Page 53] pox this unguent will be to very small purpose. But then shall you dresse them, with our Ʋnguento magno, which is appropri­ate unto the disease, and look that you purge them with our Aromatico.

CHAP VI. Of the disease called Astma, and the cure thereof.

THis disease which is called the Ptisick, is a certaine infirmity contained in the lungs, which doth harden and dry them in such manner, that such as are troubled therewith cannot fetch their breath. It proceedeth of adustion of the bloud, that can not runne into the veines: and so the lungs lacking sustenance worsteth that effect. This disease is cured four manner of waies. First, you shall let them bloud under the tongue, cut­ting those veines overthwart, and suck them as much as they can: for it evacuateth and openeth the opilation of the bloud, and easeth the lungs of all that evill matter which offendeth. Secondly, you shall give them a dose of Aromatico, which eva­cuateth the stomack of all evill qualities that offend the Lungs. The third is, to let them eat for a moneth together every morn­ing ℥. i of our Electuario de Althea. The fourth, to annoint the stomack every night with Magno liquore. But every ten daies you must take a dose of our Electuario Angelica, where­by thou shalt help them quickly. You must also keep a sober diet, refraining Fish, Porke, slimie things, spice, baked meats, cheese, and such like, which nourish grosely, and do infect the bloud.

CHAP. VII. To know the Dropsie confirmed in a man, the cure whereof is shew­ed in xxxii. Chapter of the second part of the Collection

THere are three signes or tokens of a confirmed Dropsie. First, look whether the tongue be white and cold: Then whether the yard be shrunk into the belly. And lastly if there do any veines appear on the belly. If you perceive these they are infallible declarations of a confirmed Dropsie.

CHAP. VIII. An excellent remedie against Wormes.

YOu shall give the Patient two drachms of our Ʋnguento magno to drink with Mel Rosarum, three mornings together annoint the nostrils therewith, and in three daies they will be expelled, were they never so many.

CHAP. IX. Of the hardnesse of the Milt, and the cure thereof.

THe Spleen or Milt is hardned by reason of superfluous hu­midity, that it taketh from the Liver and Lungs. There­fore if you will help this infirmity, it were necessary to use me­dicines abstersive and drying, which thou shalt do thus First give them our Aromatico, then let them use this Electuray, which is of mervellous vertue in that operation. Take Crocus martis, Scolopendria, ana. ℥. i. Spicknard, Lapis lazuli, ana. ℈. ii. Cinnamon, ℥. ss. mixe them, and make an Electuary thereof with purified hony, and take thereof every morning one spoonfull, and every night (two hours before supper) another spoonfull, and annoint the outward part where the grief is with our Balsamo Artificiato, and in short time the disease shall be cured.

Another remedy very effectuall for the former disease

LEt them bloud on the two veines under the tongue. That done mixe mustard-seed with the Urine of a Boy, and lay it between two clothes, and apply it to the part affected one night, and then (if thou feele not good ease) use it againe till the disease be gone. Also the decoction of Oak helpeth the swelling of the Milt.

CHAP. X. Of the Gonorrhaea or running of the reines, and the cure.

THis disease is a corruption caused of the superfluous use of women, that are infected therewith: for such men as have [Page 55] knowledge of them, they receive the said corruption, which afterwards cometh forth of the yard with great paine and difficulty in making water: and moreover in the night, when that part is erected, it causeth great torment: which for fifteen or twenty daies causeth extream paine. This is the beginning of the French-Pox, a fit sauce for that sweet sin of Letchery. It bringeth most commonly paine in the interior parts, or paine in the reines, arms, and legs: insomuch that in fine it cometh to that fowle disease. For such as have this Go­norrhaea, never suspecting or fearing the after-claps, suffer their disease to grow on further and further till their cure will very hardly or never be accomplished. Therefore I wish every man to seek help in time, least by letting it passe, in the end it turne to his destruction. The cure is as followeth.

First you shall give them our Aromatico once in white Wine; Then morning and evening for seven or eight daies use this potion following: annointing also the reines and those parts with our Aqua faetida being cold, and in short time they shall be healed.

℞. The whites of four or five new layd Eggs, of fine Sugar, ℥. ii. of Rose-water, ℥. iii. mixe them well, and drink it morn­ing and evening. This is a rare secret, and often proved, the drink must be drunk cold.

CHAP. XI. Of the Emeroids, and their cure.

THe Emeroides are an alteration in the Emeroidall veines, caused of a corrupt and putrified humor, whereof nature being willing to discharge her self, sendeth forth by those veines unto the extream or outward parts, where it cannot pass through, and causeth the alteration and inflammtion that is cal­ed the Emeroides. This corruption and putrifaction is caused of the evill quality of the Liver, which corrupteth the bloud, and is the cause of all this inconvenience. Commonly the originall and beginning thereof is caused of the Pox, a thing that must be considered of in the cure. Now for the cure, it were necessary to help the Liver, to purifie the bloud, to alter [Page 56] the Emeroides, and to discharge nature of that impediment. First, therefore give them our Electuario Angelica, the next day they shall take our Sirrupo solutivo, whereof they shall take five or six doses. Then let them annoint the Emeroids with our Caustick, once or twise, and they shall soone after bee cured.

Of the divers sorts and divers effects of the Emeroides, and their cure.

BY reason of this disease that cometh alwaies at the end of Intestino, or Longanon, some have marvelous paine about the fundament, some burn wonderfully, and others do scald: which commeth because of the good or bad qualities in some, more then in other some, as experience sheweth. For (as I said) some have such a burning, that they can take no rest, some have such paine as they cannot sit, some have it so scalding hot that it is intollerable. Though this infirmity is more hurt­full in one complexion then in another, and the cure hard, yet you shall cure them in this manner.

First, give them Aromatico, then purge the body five or six times with our Sirrupo solutivo. Then give him our fume at the lower parts, three or four times, and then annoint the parts with our Balsamo Artisiciato, for that will dry and take away the paine altogether, and the Patient shall be surely healed.

There are divers kinds of Emeroides, but two in principall. The one sort is in the fundament, and causeth great paine when they go to the stoole. The other sort commeth forth of the fundament and are not so painefull as the first. To cure those within the fundament, you shall give the Patient eight or ten daies together our Sirrupo magistrale warm, then let them take our Aromatico once, and use Glisters, wherein is put half an ounce of Aqua reale Phioravante at a time, and so thou shalt help them. The best way for those that are come forth, is to make incision, or to make a little hole in them, that the bloud which is putrified may come forth, and so by evacuation thou shalt help them. Also you shall understand that vomiting is very necessary in the cure of both sorts, because it openeth [Page 57] the veines. Also Oleum ovorum doth ease the paine of the Emeroides very greatly; so doth the oyle of Figs if you an­noint them therewith. The tooth of an horse-fish being worn in a ring on the finger, after the body is purged, taketh them away by a secret and hidden quality, a thing proved more then an hundered times.

CHAP. XII. Of the cure of such as were troubled with suffocation of the Matrix.

A Certaine woman affected therewith, having much paine and griefe in her stomack, was cured by taking a dose of our Electuario Angelica. Then she used our sirrup against paines of the Mother eight or ten daies, and annoted her sto­mack with Magno liquore every night.

A certaine young woman afflicted in manner aforesaid, wanted also her naturall sicknesse; and began to loose her naturall heat, so that nature could not digest, the superfluous matter in her body was thus helped. First, she took our Electu­ario angelica, and every night annointed her stomack, nostrils, and pulses with Magno liquore, and every morning drunk of o