The Fickle Northern Lass; OR, The Wronged Shepherds Resolution.

He thought himself the jolliest of the crew
Whilst that his love remained firm and true;
But she false Maid did prove to him d [...]sloyal,
And was not constant to abide the Tryal:
Which made him to resolve thus in his mind,
Never to trust n [...] more to women kind.
Tune of, There was in Lass in the North Country, &c.
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There was a Lass in the North Country,
and she had lovers two or three,
But she unkindly dealt by one,
who had to her great favour shown:
Which made him thus for to complain,
I never will see love again:
For since that she hath chang'd her mind,
Ile trust no more to women kind.
I gave her Ribbonds for to wear,
and now and then a pair of gloves,
But she unkindly dealt by me,
and gave them to her other loves;
But now in the Country will I hye,
And for to seek a new victory.
For since that she hath chang'd her mind,
Ile trust no more to women kind.
Sometimes she vow'd she did me love,
and I was apt for to believe,
But all her flattering words did prove,
no more then baits for to de [...]ieve:
As I do And it to my pain,
Therefore i'le never believe again,
for since that she hath chang'd her mind,
Ile trust no more to women kind.
As she was fair, had she been true,
I should a had no cause to sue:
But she was fickle in her mind,
subject to waver with the wind:
With each new face that she did see,
She presently in love would be.
And since that she hath chang'd her mind,
Ile trust no more to women kind.

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I Must confess that in my eye,
She was a Pearl, I valued high;
But what is beauty without grace,
Or one where vertue hath no place;
Her false alluring smiles no more,
Shall draw my senses out of door.
For since that she hath chang'd her mind,
Ile trust no more to women kind.
I gave her heart, I gave her hand,
And all I had at her command,
She could not ask what she would have,
But presently the same I gave;
Yet all my favours prov'd in vain,
For she would not require my pain;
Then since, &c.
When I did think her most secure,
Another did her mind allure;
And by some crafty wiles she went,
To undermine my sweet content;
So that I now repent the day,
That e're I cast my love away.
For since, &c.
But now my resolution's such,
To suffer for my loving much;
All womens company I'le shun,
For fear I further be undone;
And go where none hath power to know,
The subject of my grief and woe:
for since, &c.
And in some dark and dismal place,
There will I build my self a Cave.
And in some low and barren ground,
Where none but Shepherds can be found,
Ile find a place for to be wait,
By sorrows which doth me assail:
for since, &c.
Some shady desert I will chuse,
Which other mortals all refuse,
And on the Trees her name I'le carve,
That doth from me so ill deserve;
That future ages all may know,
What love to her I once did owe;
And since, &c.
The purling streams with me shall mourn,
And leaves relenting all shall turn,
The Wood-nimphs who my plaint do hear,
Shall new and then afford a tear;
All blaming her for cruelty,
That brought me to this misery.
And since, &c.
And when my time is drawing nigh,
I will prepare my self to dye;
The Robin Red breasts kind will be
Perhaps with leaves to cover me:
Then to the world I'le bid adieu,
And unto her that prov'd untrue.
For since that sshe did change her mind,
Young-men beware of women kind.

Printed for F. Coles, T. Vere, J. Wright, and Clarke.

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