CHOICE NEW SONGS Never before Printed. SET TO SEVERAL NEVV TUNES BY THE BEST Masters of MUSIC. Written by THO. D'URFEY, Gent.

LONDON, Printed by Iohn Playford, for Ioseph Hindmarsh (Bookseller to His ROYAL HIGHNESS) at the Black Bull in Cornhill, 1684.

DISSEMBLED LOVE: A Song set by Mr. Abel.

[...] WHen Damon does his Pas—sion show, dissembling I de­spise; [...] yet tho' a Frown sits on my Brow, I languish with my Eyes: [...] When e're he does his Tale begin, and I would seem most coy; my poor Heart [...] pants to let him in, al—tho' my Tongue de—ny, al—tho' my Tongue de—ny. [...]

II.
'Gainst Honour, the Tyrant of our Souls,
And Love, the greater Foe;
Some God that o're my Fate controuls,
Inspire me what to do:
For long if Love invade my Heart,
From Honour I must fly;
And if my Honour Love subvert,
'Twill soon my Life destroy.

A LEVET to the ARTILLERY: A Song made upon His Royal Highness's leading the Artillery-Company through the City; Set to an excellent Minuet of Monsieur Grabue's.

[...] ALL Loy—al Hearts, take off your Brimmers, bow down ye [...] Cuckolds, Whigs, and Trimmers; sneak in your Shops, and go crowch to your [...] Wives, keep in your No—ses, for fear of your Lives: Great York like God [...] Mars rides through the Ci—ty, and leads on the Brave, and the Witty; ye [...] [Page 3] [...] Rogues, truckle down; 'tis not your Branches can succour your Haunches, if 'tis not your Horns can se—cure from his Arms, if you [...]

once you are known.
chance to be known.
[...]

The HORSE-RACE; a Song made and sung to the King at Newmarket: Set to an excellent Scotch Tune, called, Cock up thy Beaver, in four Strains.

[...] TO Horse, brave Boys of New—mar—ket, to Horse, you'l [...] lose the Match by lon—ger de—lay—ing; the Gelding just now was led [Page 4] [...] o—ver the Course, I think the De—vil's in you for stay—ing: [...] Run, and en—dea—vour all to bub—ble the Sporters, Bets may re­co—ver [...] all lost at the Groom-Porters. Fol—low, fol—low, fol—low, [...] fol—low, come down to the Ditch, take the odds, and then you'l be [...] rich; for I'le have the brown Bay, if the blew Bonnet ride, and hold a [...] [Page 5] [...] thousand Pounds of his side Sir: Dragon would scow-er it, but Dragon grows [...] old; he can—not en—dure it, he cannot, he wonnot now run it, as [...] late—ly he could: Age, Age, does hinder the Speed Sir. Now, now, now they come [...] on, and see, see the Horse lead the way still; three lengths be—fore at the [...] turning the Lands, five hundred Pounds up—on the brown Bay still: Pox on the [...] [Page 6] [...] De—vil, I fear we have lost, for the Dog, the Blue Bonnet, has [...] run it, a Plague light up—on it, the wrong side the Post; Odszounds, was [...] e—ver such Fortune. [...]

To CYNTHIA; a Song set by Mr. King.

[...] EN—a—mour'd Angels leave the Sky, to hear the Music [...] of her Tongue; fond Cupids round a—bout her fly, to kiss her as she [...] [Page 7] [...] walks along: The Trees all bow their verdant Heads, like humble Lo—vers [...] when she talks; and blushing Flow'rs deck the Meads, as proud they may a­dorn [...] her Walks. [...]

II.
She has such Beauty as were fit
To bless the greatest Monarch's side;
A Mine of rich obliging Wit,
Without the least allay of Pride.
Tell me no more of Joys above,
With which immortal Souls are crown'd;
There is a Rapture in her Love,
Which zealous Bigots never found.

A SONG made to an excellent Tune of Mr. Peasable's.

[...] SUch a damn'd Fa—tigue Fools do make of wooing, [...] that the Plea—sure got is seldom worth the pains; Men of deep Intrigue [...] with e—ter—nal Cooing, by their mighty Passions shew their little Brains: [...] See a Fop there cringing, making ug—ly Fa—ces, hear him swear, [...] No Joy like Syl—via's soft Em—bra—ces; vow a thousand Gra—ces, [...] [Page 9] [...] crowns her as she pas—ses, dye by her Eyes, and all con-foun-ded Lies. [...]

II.
All the charming Nymphs Experience teach ye,
Blunt and honest Lovers ever prove the best;
Prating noisie Fops fain would over-reach ye,
And with gingling Nonsence hope to charm your Breast.
Shun the fulsom Tool when e're he comes before ye,
Pity 'tis a Fool should triumph o're ye:
He will ne're adore ye,
Tho' he may implore ye;
Vow and swear too,
There's not a word on't true.

The Law of Nature; a Song Pindaric-way to ASTREA, and sung to the King at Windsor: Made to an excellent new Tune of Mr. Akeroyd's.

[...] WHilst their Flocks were feeding near the foot of a [...] flowry Hill, Ce—la—don complaining of his Fate, thus to A—stre—a cry'd: [...] [Page 10] [...] Hear my gen—tle Plea—ding; Ah! cru-el Nymph! for—bear to kill a [...] Shepherd with Dis—dain and Hate, whom you have once en—joy'd! [...] There is a Sa—cred Pow'r in Love is beyond all Mor—tal Rules; [...] fol—low the Laws of Na—ture, for the Di—vine Cre—a—tor [...] did produce, and for Hu—man use did Beau—ty chuse, who de­ny [...] [Page 11] [...] themselves, are Fools. E—ve—ry Heart is pair'd a—bove, and In­gra—ti—tude's [...] a Sin to all the Saints so hateful, she that is [...] found in—grate—ful, may too late, in a wret—ched state, knock at [...] Heaven's Gate, but shall ne—ver en—ter in. [...]

II.
Had our first-made Father,
Lord of the whole Creation,
Done such a Crime as could have damn'd us all,
Trespassing on his Wife;
Iove no doubt had rather,
When he the ill design had known,
Have plac'd his Angel e're the Fall,
Guarding the Tree of Life.
[Page 12] But he that well knew Adam's Breast,
Whom Nature learnt to woo,
Never intended damning,
Nor had the Serpents shamming Edified;
For the Bone of his Side,
That was made his Bride,
Taught him what he was to do.
Nor was the Maker e're possest
With Rage that he did enjoy;
But the Reflection hated,
What he with pains created,
Should be thought
Such a cowardly Sot,
To be poorly caught
In such a sneaking Lye.

The WEDDING: A Dialogue between John and Jug, sung in the Cheats of Scapin by Mr. Reading and Mrs. Norris; Set by Mr. Farmer in two Parts.

Iohn.

[...] COme Iug, my Honey, let's to bed, it is no Sin, sin [...] we are wed; for when I am near thee, by desire, I burn like a—ny Coal of Fire. [...]

Iug.

[...] To quench thy Flames I'le soon a—gree, thou art the Sun, and I the Sea; all [...] [Page 13] [...] Night with—in my Arms shalt be, and rise each Morn' as fresh as he. [...]

CHORUS.

[...] COme on then, and couple to-ge-ther, come all, the Old and the Young, the Short and the [...] COme on then, and couple to-ge-ther, come all, the Old and the Young, the Short and the [...] Tall; The richer than Cressus, and poorer than Job, for 'tis Wedding and Bedding that [...] Tall; The richer than Cressus, and poorer than Job, for 'tis Wedding and Bedding that [...] Peoples the Globe. [...] Peoples the Globe.

II.

Iohn.
My Heart and all's at thy Command;
And tho' I've never a Foot of Land,
Yet six fat Ews, and one milch Cow,
I think, my Iug, is Wealth enow.
Iug.
A Wheel, six Platters, and a Spoon,
A Jacket edg'd with blue Galloon;
My Coat, my Smock is thine, and shall,
And something under best of all.
Chor.
Come on then, &c.

A Scotch SONG made to the Irish JIGG, and sung to the King at Whitehall.

[...] LAte—ly as thorough the fair E—den—bo—rough, to [...] view the gay Meadows as I was a gang—ing; Ioc—key and [...] Mog—gy were walking and tal—king of Love and Re—li—gion, thus [...] close—ly Ha—ran—guing. Ne—ver, says Mog—gy, come near me, false [...] Ioc—key, for thou art a Whig, and I vow to ab—hor thee; [...] [Page 15] [...] Ize be no Bride, nor will lig by my side, for no sneaking [...] Re—bel shall lift a Leg o're me. [...]

Iockey.
II.
Fairest and Dearest,
And to my Heart nearest,
To live with thy Frowns I no longer am able;
I am so loving,
And thou art so moving,
Each hair of thy Head ties me fast as a Cable:
Thou hast that in thee
Ize sure to win me,
To Iew, Turk, or Atheist, so much I adore thee;
Nothing I'd shun
That is under the Sun,
So I have the pleasure to lift a Leg o're thee.
Moggy.
III.
Plotters and Traytors,
And Associators,
In every degree [...]hou shalt swear to oppose 'em;
Swimmers and Trimmers,
The Nation's Redeemers,
And for thy Reward thou shalt sleep in my Bosom:
I had a Dad,
Was a Royal brave Lad,
And as true as the Sun to his Monarch before me;
Moggy he cry'd,
The same hour that he dy'd,
Let no sneaking Rebel e're lift a Leg or'e thee.
Iockey.
[Page 16]
IV.
Adieu then, ye Crue then,
Of Protestant Blue Men,
No Faction his Moggy from Iockey shall sever;
Thou shalt at Court
My Conversion report,
I am not the first Whig by his Wife brought in favour:
Ize never deal
For the dull Commonweal,
To fight for true Monarchy shall be my Glory;
Lull'd with thy Charms,
Then I'le dye in thy Arms,
When I have the pleasure to lift a Leg o're thee.

The ENJOYMENT, or No, no, chang'd to Ay, ay.

[...] WHen the Kine had gi—ven a Pale-full, and the Sheep came [...] bleating home; Doll that knew it would be healthful, went a wal—king [...] with young Tom: Hand in Hand Sir, o're the Land Sir, as they wander'd [...] [Page 17] [...] to and fro; Tom made jol—ly Love to Dol—ly, but was dash'd with [...] No, no, no; no, no, no; no, no, no. [...]

II.
Faith, says Tom, the Time's so fitting,
We shall never get the like;
You can never stir from knitting,
When I am digging in the Dyke:
Now we are gone too▪ and alone too,
No one by to see or know;
Prethee Dolly, shall I, shall I?
Still she answer'd, No, no, no;
No, no, no; no, no, no.
III.
Fye upon you Men, cries Dolly,
In what Snares you'd make us fall;
You get nothing but the Folly,
But I should get the Devil and all:
Tom with Sobs, and some dry Bobs,
Cry'd, You're a Fool to argue so;
Come, come, shall I? Prethee Dolly!
Still she answer'd, No, no, no, &c.
IV.
To the Tavern then he took her,
Wine to Love's a Friend confess'd;
By the Hand he often shook her,
And drunk Brimmers to the best:
She grew warm, and thought no harm,
'Till after a brisk Pint or two;
To what he said, the silly Jade
Could hardly get out, No, no, no, &c.
V.
She swore he was the prettiest Fellow
In the Country, or the Town;
And began to be so mellow,
On the Cowch she laid her down;
Tom to woo her then came to her,
Thinking this the time to try;
And something past, so kind at last,
The Note was chang'd to Ay, ay, ay;
Ay, ay, ay; ay, ay, ay.
VI.
Closely now were joyn'd their Faces,
Lovers, you know what I mean;
Nor could she hinder his Embraces,
Love was now too far got in:
Both now lying, panting, dying,
Calm succeeds the stormy Joy;
Tom would fain renew agen,
And Doll consents with Ay, ay, ay;
Ay, ay, ay; ay, ay, ay.

A SONG set by Mr. Thomas Farmer.

[...] HOW sweet is the Passion of Love! how gay is the Joy of the [...] Soul! how pleasing those Fa—vours do prove, whose Kindness does Fortune con­troul! [...] Her Eyes that with In—flu—ence shone, obtain'd such a So—ve—raign [...] Pow'r; they exhal'd out my Soul like the Sun, when it draws up the Dew from a Flow'r. [...]

II.
Let no Man believe he is wise,
By applauding the Musical Sphere;
But turn his Ear to her Voice,
And all that is Charming is there:
My Heart which no Face could command,
Within her sweet Bosom I lost;
And with every touch of her hand,
I was ready to give up the Ghost.

LOVE'S Complaint against HONOUR.

[...] HAp—py were the Ru—ral Swains, that lov'd with Freedom [...] all the day; that sung their Pas—sions on the Plains, and pass'd with joy their [...] Hours away: E're Ambition taught Mankind to know, Degrees of less or greater; [...] we a true Content did find, and found a thousand times the better. [...]

II.
What's the gawdy lofty Sky
The worse, for blessing Earth with Rain?
Or the dazling Deity,
For stooping to the lowly Main?
Ah then! why should I be blam'd,
For letting poor Amintor woo me?
Yet I dye with blushing Shame,
For Honour tells me he's below me.

Advice to a PAINTER; excellently Set by Monsieur Baptist.

[...] COme, curious Painter! let thy Art on Cynthia's lovely [...] Face be shown; come draw her Picture from my Heart, and if thou can'st, de­fend [...] thy own: But ah! 'tis much in vain to try, for thou art Man as [...] well as I. And none that's born of Mor—tal Race, can scape un­woun—ded [...] from our Eyes; nor view the Glo—ries of her Face, but [...] [Page 21] [...] with Despair or Plea—sure dies: Such was the Prophet's trembling Awe, when [...] he the Great Cre—a—tor saw; such was the Prophets trembling Awe, when [...] he the Great Cre—a—tor saw. [...]

III.
First in her Soul-commanding Face,
A Sacred Innocence display;
Then make her blush with such a Grace,
As when Aurora paints the Day:
And let it by thy Skill be shown
For others faults, and not her own.
IV.
Draw in her Smiles, all Joys that grow
In Heaven, and happy Lovers crown;
And in a corner of her Brow,
Damnation lurking in a Frown:
Then paint me dying at her Feet,
Thou hast done all that's Brave and Great.
FINIS.

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