MONASTICON ANGLICANU …

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM, OR, THE HISTORY Of the Ancient Abbies, and other Monasteries, Hospitals, Cathedral and Collegiate Churches, IN ENGLAND and WALES. WITH DIVERS French, Irish, and Scotch Monasteries Formerly relating to ENGLAND.

Collected, and Published in Latin, by Sir William Dugdale, Knt. late Garter King of Arms.

In Three Volums.

And now Epitomized in English, Page by Page.

With Sculptures of the several Religious Habits.

—Forsan & haec olim meminisse juvabit.
Virg. Aen. 1.

LICENSED, May the 25th, 1692.

R. MIDGLEY.

LONDON: Printed, for Sam. Keble at the Turks-Head in Fleet-street; Hen. Rhodes at the Star the Corner of Bride lane in Fleetstreet, MDCXCIII.

To the much Honoured WILLIAM BROMLEY, Esq One of the Knights of the Shire for the County of WARWICK.

SIR,

THAT which I here present you is Originally the Pro­duct of yovr own Country, since the Great Artist from whose elaborate and curious hand I Coppy this Peice in little, owed his Birth and Habitation to Warwickshire. I know not therefore to whom (in the number of my Friends) more properly to dedicate these Collections than to your self: for thus it is an act of Justice to restore to the proper County (in your Person who represent it) what came from thence at first.

Nothing deterr'd my Presumption in this more than to think I should expose the Imperfections of my Pen to so accurate and excellent a Judgment. A Judgment that has taught you the true use of Foreign Travails, by which you have brought home from the politest Nations of Europe, all their Virtues and Accomplishments, and left behind their Fopperies and Vice. It is this Judgment that has so signalized your Merit in the Eye of your Country, that she has justly fixt her choice on you for one of her Representatives in our Great Senate; and it is the same Judgment that you have since most worthily em­ploy'd in that High and Honourable Assembly, by assisting, and complying with the best Methods and Endeavours for the Publick Good: Or, to use the words of Horace,

—Quid expediat, communiter, aut melior pars,
Malis carere quaeritis laboribus.

Yours are the Publick Cares; that's your noble Province. While I, and those in my inferiour and unactive Station, can only wish Success to the Proceedings of such Good Patriots as your self; Our thoughts are best imploy'd with our own pri­vate Business, and inoffensive Studies.

[Page] Concerning this Book, Sir, it is a Subject that gives Posterity such a View of the decays of Time, and the Inconstancy of Fortune, as the like cannot, perhaps, be produced in the Histo­ry of any other Nation Since of all that stupendious number of Monastick Foundations in England and Wales, the continued Work of many Ages, by which the greatest Kings, Princes, and Noblemen of this Island were once thought to have eternized their names, and in those magnificent and costly Structures to have built themselves so many Monuments as lasting as the Earth they stood on, not one remains at this day; nay the very Ruines of many are become invisible. To this pur­pose (tho' on a different occasion) a modern French Poet hath well exprest himself in these Lines,

Aussi le temps a fait sur ces Masses hautaines
D'ilustres chastimens des Vanitez humaines.
Ces Tombaux sont tombez, and ces superbes Rois
Sous leur chute sont morts une seconde fois.

And yet their Memory still lives in our History and Records; so much more durable and lasting is Paper than Brass and Marble. For this we are heholding to the Labours of your Sir William Dugdale, a Person so highly meritorious in the study, and discovery, of our English Antiquities, that his Reputation can never die among the learned.

Warwickshire has certainly produced two of the most famous and deserving Writers, in their several ways, that England can boast of; a Dugdale, and a Shakespear, both Williams; a name that has been of eminent Grace to this County in many Instan­ces: nor will it ever cease to be so while you are living.

I might here enlarge in your just Encomium, but I fear to displease you even with truth, when it must be so very much to your Commendation. I know your Modesty as well as Merits, and I have ever observed that Praise is most uneasie to those who best deserve it. I will therefore only add that I am,

SIR,
Your very Humble and most Affectionate Servant, J. W.

TO THE READER.

SOmething may be said here, by way of Preface, of the Work it self, and of this Abridgment or Epitome of that Work. First for the Work it self, it will perhap [...] be thought by some that the Mona­sticon Anglican [...], or History of the Foundations and Endowments of the antrent Abbies, Priories, &c. once flourishing in England, and long since utterly supprest, is in these our days (in which their very Me­mory seems to some People, odious and ungrateful) more useless and in­significant than an Old Almanack. 'Tis true, the matter appears very obsolete and neglected, yet is the Monasticon Anglicanum so far from being useless, that it is in effect the most useful Evidenciary, and Repertory of Titles that is in print. Considering, 1. The vast Quantity of Lands which formerly belong'd to Religious Houses in this Kingdome. 2. The divers sorts of Liberties and Immunities which most of those Houses and their Possessions were endow'd with, as Courts of Pleas, Markets, Fairs, Commons, Free Pastures, Estovers, Exemptions from Tithes, Tolls, Taxes and Contributions, with other Franchises of various sorts and not easily reckon'd up. 3. That by the Statutes 27 H. 8. ch. 28. § 1. &. 31 H. 8. ch. 13. § 2. 3. it is expresly provided that the King and his Patentees shall have and hold the said Lands in as large and ample manner as the said Houses enjoy [...]d them, and § 21. of the last mentiond Statute, that such Lands as were before discharged of the Payment of Tithes shall so continue. By which Provisions such Persons as enjoy any [Page] of those Lands are intituled to many of the same Liberties and Franchises as were at first given with the said Lands to those Houses respectively, such Franchises being real and annext to the Estate. 4. All the Monasticon is a Transcript of antient Manuscripts coppyed by that laborious Antiqu [...]ry Mr. Roger Dodsworth, and that eminently learn'd Historian Sr. William Dugdale Knt. late Garter King of Armes, out of the very Original Grants, or Leiger Books, or Publick Records, or other Mu­niments formerly kept by the respective Monasteries, and (when they perused them) choicely preserved either in some of our most famous Li­braries, or in the Possession of those Gentlemen and Persons of honour, who since the Suppression enjoy the Lands to which those Deeds relate, or some part of them; whose names are cited in the Margin of the said Book. And such credit hath it received from the integrity of the Authors or Colle­ctors thereof, that (as I am credibly inform'd) it hath been admitted as a good Circumstantial Evidence in the Courts of Westminster when the Records therein transcribed could not upon diligent Search be otherwise recovered. Further, this Book is of use to enlighten and assi [...] the young Student of [...] Common Laws, it shewing in divers parts of it, the Commencemen [...] of [...]e­nures, the Nature and manner of Corrodies, Appropriations, Endowmen [...] of Vicarages, Reservation of Services upon Grants in Frankalmoine, or upon Tenures by Divine Service, the old Ways of tithing, Conveyancing, and something of Pleading. It is also useful in History, giving us a lively Idea of the manner of our Forefathers way of Living, their Zeal for Gods Publick Worship, as then profest, and the Simplicity of their Devotions; and of the great Charity to the Poor, and Hospitality and Beneficence to all Comers, maintain'd and exercised in the Monasteries. But these things have been thought faults, and therefore I will mention no more of that; but observe in the last place, that this Book is of great use in matters of Heraldry and Genealogies; there being few or none among the Great Families, and old Nobility, of England, who have not been Founders or Principal Benefactors to some Monastery or Religious House, and the Monks and Canons have for the most part taken spe­cial Care to record in the Leiger Book of their respective Houses [Page] the History of their Founder's and Patron's Family, setting down their several Matches, and Issue, and often-times the day of their Births and Deaths, with the most remarkable Circumstances of their Lives, and where buried; which seems also to be done at the time when every thing happen'd or soon after, and is therefore of greater Credit. In this Work we must note that the Author saies nothing of the four Orders of Fryers, viz. The Franciscans or Gray-Friers, the Dominicans or Black-Friers, the Carmelites or White-Friers, and the Augustine Friers; the Reason was, I suppose, because their Houses, generally speaking, were not endow'd with Lands and Revenues, but they sub­sisted for the most, part by daily and accidental Charities.

Thus much of the Book at large, now as to this Abridgment or Epitome, I have only this to say; It gives you a short view in English of the Prin­cipal, and (as I thought,) most material Passages of what is contain'd in Latin, and sometimes old French, in the three great and copious Tomes of the Monasticon Anglicanum: The Names of Persons and Places, [...]ing variously written according to the different Orthography of several Ages, and Writer, I have not thought convenient to alter the ancient way of spelling, but have transcribed them here in the same variety as I found 'em there: In the Margin I have exactly observed and markt out the Pages successively in order, that so the Reader may have a ready recourse to the Book at large for a fuller and more particular Information. And in my opinion this is the best use that can be made of any Abridg­ment; namely to serve as a larger and better sort of Table, which not only represents the substance of a voluminous Author in little, but refers and directs the Reader to the place where the Subjects is more expresly handled. On the whole, you have here a short Historical Account of the Foundation of all the Principal Churches and Religious Structures in Eng­land and Wales, as well those that were demolisht at the Suppression of the Monasteries, as those that are still in being (except Parish Churches.) And here we must note that of all those Cathedral Churches and Episcopal Seats, whose venerable Fabricks we behold at this day, some were former­ly Abbies, where the Prior and Convent of Monks were the Bishops Chap­ter; [Page] such were Canterbury, Rochester, Winchester, Ely, Nor­wich, Worcester, Durham, Carlile; (and in such Churches where there was a Bishop, the Superior of the Monks was always call'd a Prior, the Bishop being in effect the Abbot) others never were Abbies, but the Chapter did always consist of a Dean and Secular Canons (or Prebendaries) as at present; such were York, London, Lincoln, Salisbury, Exeter, Wells, Litchfield, Herefored, Chichester, and in Wales, St. Davids, Landaff, Bangor, and St. Asaph. Besides these, there were five new Bishopricks erected by King Henry VIII. in certain Ahbies, after their dissolution, viz. Peterborough, Oxford, Chester, Glocester, and Bristol, whose Churches were left standing, with some of their old Buildings for the Habitation of the Bishop, Dean and Chapter, &c. (for which see the Statutes, 31 H. 8. ch. 9. 34 H. 8. ch. 17.) West­minister-Abby was also made an Episcopal Seat, but that conti­nued so but a while. Some other Monastick Churches were made Parochial, and are still in being, as St. Albans, St. Mary Overies, Royston, &c. to conclude, I think I may, not unfitly, apply to my present undertaking the words used on the like occasion, in the Second Book of Maccabees, ch. 2. v. 23. All these things (I say) being declared by Iason of Cyrene in five Books, we will essay to abridge in one Volum. For considering the infinite number, and the difficulty which they find that desire to look into the Narra­tions of the Story, for the variety of the Matter, we have been careful that they that will read might have delight, and they that are desirous to commit to memory might have ease, and that all into whose hands it comes might have profit.—To stand upon every point, and to go over things at large, and to be curious in particulars, belongeth to the first Author of the Story. But to use Brevity, and avoid much labouring of the Work, is to be granted to him that will make an Abridgment. Here then will we begin the story: only adding thus much to that which hath been said, that it is a foolish thing to make a long Prologue and to be short in the Story it self.

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM, ABRIDGED.

VOL. I.

OF THE Benedictine Monks, CLUNIACS, CISTERSIANS, and CARTHUSIANS.

Of the first Institution of Monks.

THose who have writ of this Subject have produced for Examples of the Monastick Life,In the Proem. out of the Old Testa­ment, Samuel, Elias, and the Sons of the Prophets; and out of the New, St. Iohn the Baptist, and our Saviour Christ himself, who exhorted his disciples to leave all Secular concerns and follow him. After his Ascention the Apostles and Disciples lived in common; But after the Apostles were martyr'd, some Christians retain'd Property, others still endeavour'd to con­tinue the Apostolick Life, and live in Common: such were the Monks in Egypt; Anthony, Hilarion, Macarius, &c. After them St. Ierome, St. Augustin, till at last St. Benedict in the year 516. at Mount-Cassin, writ his Rule, which was approved by the whole Church.

Of the Rules of Monks, and other Religious Persons there have been several Authors, some of the Principle were, St. Basil, who writ his Rule for Monks, Anno Dom. 350. St. An­gustin Bishop of Hippo made a Rule for Canons Regular, Anno Dom. 400. St. Benedict, before-mention'd, about Anno 516. St. Bruno, for Carthusians, An. 1083. Robert an Abbot in Burgundy instituted the Cistercians, An. 1098. Norbert, the Premonstratenses An. 1120. In the same year began also the Hospitallers and Templers. St. Gilbert of Sempringham founded his Order, An. 1148. St. Dominick, An. 1198. St. Francis 1260. The Car­melites were settled and establisht by Pope Martin, An. Dom. 1279.

Kings of this Land who have become Monks.

Petroc, King of Wales; Constantine, King of Cornwall; Sebby, Offa, and Sigebert, Kings of the East-Saxons; Ethelred, and Kynred, Kings of Mercia; Coelwulph, and Edbricht, Kings of Northumber­land.

The Old Form of admitting a Brother into a Convent.
His first Petition, in the Colloquium.

Syr I besyche you and alle the Covent for the luffe of God, our Lady sanct Marye, sanct John of Baptist [...], and all the hoyle Cowr [...]e of Devyne, that ze wolde resave me, to lyve and dye here among yow in the state of a Monke, as prebenvarye and servant unto alle to the honour of God solace to the Company, prouffet to the place, and helth unto my Sawie.

His Answer unto the Examinacyon.

Syr I tryste thrugh the helpe of God and your good prayers to keep all thes things which ze have now heyr rehersede.

His Petition before the Profession.

Syr I have beyn heyr now this twell month nere hand, and lovyde be God, me lyks right well, both the order and the company; wherapon I besyche yow and all the company for the luffe of God, our Lady sanct Marye, sanct John of Baptisie and all the hoyle compa­ny of hevyne that ze will resave me unto my profession at my twell month day according to my petycion whyche I made when I was fyrst resaved heyr amongs you [...] &c.

Of the Benedictine Order have been four Emperors, twelve Empresses, six and forty Kings, one and fifty Queens, not to mention those of lesser Quality.

ERRATA.

PAge 6. l. 24. r. Lindisfarn. p. 37. l. ult. r. or an Oxe. p. 39. l. 30. r. for the. p. 69. l. 4. r. Inspeximus. p. 78 l. 12. r. or any. l. 20. r. be put in. p. 84. l. antepe [...]ul. r. Daptfer. p. 168. l. antepenul. r. of the same. p. 196. l. 14. r. HETHE in Kent. p. 210. l. 32. r. Earl. p. 220. l. 35. r. special. p. 231. l. 30. r. East Angles. p. 232. l. 3. r. Derham p. 262. l. 7. r. Marches. p. 267. l. 4. r. Patron of the. p. 294. l. 19. r. colours. p. 328. l. 25. r. Wyndesore.

Some other literal Mistakes and false Pointing, have happen'd, which the Reader may ea [...]y perceive and correct.

A BENEDICTINE MONK

Place this & ye following plates according to ye pages in ye mergin.

Vol. 1. P. 1.

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM, Abridg'd in English.
VOL. I.
Of the BENEDICTINE Order.

The Monastery at GLASTONBURY, in Somersetshire.

IN the 31th. year after our Saviour's Passion,Folio 1. twelve Dis­ciples of St. Philip the Apostle, among whom Ioseph of Arimathea was one, came to this place, and preacht the Christian Religion to King Arviragus. They obtained of that King the Ground where the Monastery afterwards stood, and twelve Hides of Land, and built there the first Church of the Kingdom, in a poor and homely manner. They lived here in a kind of heremitical life, and converted many Pagans to the Faith of Christ. After they were all dead, and here buried, the ho­ly men Phaganus and Diruvianus, having baptized King Lucius, obtained this place of that King, and for a great while they and their Successors re­mained here in a kind of Society consisting of twelve only, till the arri­val of St. Patrick, who taught them the monastical Life, and became him­self their first Abbot. Afterwards St. David Archbishop of Menevia (now called St. David's) added to the East-end of the Old Church a lesser Chap­pel in manner of a Chancel, and consecrated it in honour of the Virgin Mary.

This Church for its Antiquity was by the old English call'd Ealdechirche, and the Men of those days had no Oath more sacred and formidable than to swear by this Old Church. And it was reverenced like Rome it self, for as that became Famous for its multitude of Martyrs, so did this for its multitude of Confessors here buried.

The Isle in which this Church stood was by the Britions call'd Ynswyrtryn, i. e. the Isle of Glass, from the clear and cristaline stream of Water which 2 runs into the Marsh here. It has been also called Avallonia. By the Saxons it was named Glastynbury. This Isle with several other places adjoyning, were call'd the twelve Hides, and did enjoy from the beginning very great Priviledges. The Bounds of which twelve Hides may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 2, 3. These places there mentioned enjoyed all sorts 3 of Immunities from the first beginning of Christianty in this Land, con­firm'd to the Church of Glastonbury, by the British, English, and Norman Kings.

In this Church did rest and lie buried the twelve Disciples of the Apo­stle Philip, above▪ mentioned, whose chief was Ioseph of Arimathea, with [Page 2] his Son Iosephus. Here also lies St. Patrick the Apostle of Ireland, and two of his Disciples, St. Gildas the British Historaographer, St. David Archbishop of 4 Menevia, St. Dunstan Archbishop, St. Indractus with his seven Companions all Martyrs, St. Vrbanus, the Bones of Venerable Bede, with the [...] of a great number of other Saints, and holy Martyrs, and Confeffors.

To recite all the Reliques that were in this Church would be two large 5 for any Abridgement, I only mention those of most note. Several things relating to the Old Testament, as Moses's Rod, Manna, &c. things [...] to our Lord Iesus Christ, two small pieces of his Cradle, some of the Gold which the Wise-men of the East offer'd, some pieces of Bread of [...] Loaves with which Iesus fed five thousand men, some of [...] some pieces of his Cross, and of his Sepulchre, one [...] of [...] of Thorns, &c. Things relating to the Virgin M [...]ry. [...] one thread of her Garment, and some of her Hair, & [...] [...] tude of Reliques relating to St. Iohn Baptist, the [...] 6 and Virgins. On this account the Church of [...] verenced by Kings, Queens, Archbishops, Bishops, Dukes, [...] lity of both Sexes, and of all Orders and Degrees; and [...] think himself who could give any thing to the increase [...] or could here obtain a place of Sepulture. In this Isle. which was call'd 7 the Tomb of Saints, was interr'd Coel King of the Britons, Father of St. Helena, Mother of Constantine the Great; Caraducus Duke of Cornwall, [...]he renowned King Arthur and Guenevera his Queen, which King died at Gla­stonbury about Whitsontide in the Year of our Lord 542. King Kentwynus, King Edmund Son of Edward the Elder, King Edgar, King Edmund Ironside, with several Bishops and Dukes who were great Benefactors to this House, and many other Great men. In so great Reverence was the Church and Church-yard where these were interr'd, that our fore­fathers did not dare to use any idle discourse or to spit therein, without great necessity, enemies and naughty men were not suffer'd to be buried therein, neither did any bring any Hawk, Dog, or Horse upon the Ground, 9 for it they did, it was observed that they immediately died thereupon.

Bishops and famous Prelates that have gone from this House to govern other Churches, are as follows, viz. Birthwaldus, Abbot here, was made Archbishop of Canterbury; Athelmus Monk here, Bishop of Wells, and after that Archbishop of Canterbury; St. Dunstan, Monk and Abbot here, Bishop of Worcester, then of London, and lastly of Canterbury; Egelganus Monk here, Bishop of Chichester and Archbishop of Canterbury; Sigericus Monk here, Bishop of Wells and Archbishop of Canterbury; St. Elphegus a Martyr, Bishop of Winchester, and after that Archbishop of Canterbury; Elnothus, Monk here and Archbishop of Canterbury, in the time of King [...]

To these may be added Gaufridus a Bishop, and Monk here, ob, Anno Dom. 782. Ethelwinus, a Bishop, who died the same year; Wi [...]ertus, a Bishop, ob. Anno Dem. 800. Wigthagu Bishop, ob. Anno Dom. [...]36. Al­stanus, Bishop, ob. Anno Dom. 842. Tumbertus, Bishop, ob. 866. Daniel, 10 Bishop, ob. 956. Elfricus, Bishop, ob. 988. Also in the time of King Edgar, Sigegarus Bishop of Wells, Britelmus Bishop of Wells, [...], Sigefridus, St. Ethilwoldus, Wilsinus, Aelf [...]anus, Egelricus, Kenwaldus, [...], Livingus, Brithwius, Britwaldus, who died Anno Dom. 1055. All these, of [...] in this House became Bishops of divers places in England.

The Benefactors to this House were, first, Arviragus King of the Bri­ta [...]is, who, though a Pagan, gave to St. Ioseph and his Companio [...]os the [Page 3] Isle in which the Monastery was built, call'd by the Inhabitants Ynswyr­tryn, which, King Lucius did afterwards confirm to Phaganus and Diruvi­anus, and their Disciples. King Arthur gave many other adjoyning Lands. King Kenwalli, King Kentwinus, King Baldredus, Bishop Hedda, King Ked­walla, King Ina, gave other Lands. So did St. Wilfridus Archbishop of 10 York, and abundance of others of both Sexes, among the Principal of which were King Sigebert. King Offa, King Alfred or Alured, King Athel­stan, King Edmund, King Edwin, King Edgar, King Edmund Ironside, with several Queens. These and many other names, with the Lands by the several Benefactors given, may be read of in the Monasticon at large, p. 9, 10, 14. 15. &c.

St. Patrick, who was born in the year of our Lord 361. after his Con­version of Ireland to Christianity, became Abbot of this Place, and obtain­ed of Pope Celestine, twelve years Indulgence to all those who should with pious Devotion visit the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary here erected, and honour her with any part of their Goods.11

About the year of our Lord 505. Augustine the Monk was sent into En­gland by the holy Pope Gregory to preach the Faith to the English Saxons. 12 He converted Fthelbert the King of Kent and his People. A [...]terwards be­ing made Archibshop, he establisht his Metropolitan Seat at Canterbury, and there placed certain Monks living according to the Rule of St. Benedict; after this several Monasteries in England were erected under the same Rule, which obtained so great reputation that there were no Monks to be found in England but what were of this Order; and in those time the Rule of St. Benedict began to be first observed in the Monastery of Glastonbury, they living here before that, after the manner of the Monks of Egypt. 13

King Ina began his Reign over the West Saxons Anno 689. and gave much Land to this Monastery, he also built the greater Church at Glastonbury, in honour of our Saviour, and of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul. And by his Charter bearing date Anno Dom. 725. Granted to this Monastery many and great Priviledges and Immunities. King Ina dying in a Pilgri­mage to Rome, his Successor, Ethelardus, became also a bountiful Benefactor,14 as were several other succeeding Kings of the West Saxons, &c.

King Edmund granted to the Church of the holy Mother of God at Glastonbury, and to the venerable Dunstan Abbot there, the Liberty and 15 Power, Rights and Customs, and all Forfeitures in all their Lands, i. e. Burgbrice Hundred. Socna, Atb [...]s, Ordelus, Infangenetheofas, Homsecna, Frith­brice, Foresteall, Toll and Team, through the Kingdom of England, and that they should enjoy their Lands as free from all Claims as he enjoy'd his own, especially to the Town of Glastonbury it self, with many other Liberties &c and this was by his Charter dated Anno Dom. 944.

King Edgar, by his Charter dated at London Anno Dom. 971. granted to 16 the said Monastery the same and greater Liberties, among other things, that the said Monastery and some Parishes there mentioned subject and belong­ing to it, should be exempt from the ordinary Jurisdiction of the Bishop, except in some things, with a Salvo to the holy Church of Rome, and that of Canterbury: And gave and confirmed to this Church two hundred and fifteen Hides of Land given by several Benefactors.17

William the Conqueror at his first coming to the Crown, did very much mutilate the Possessions of this Church. He made one Turstinus a Norman Abbot here, in the year 1081. And in order to make some amends to the Monks, he confirm'd to them several Lands which they complained to have been unjustly taken from them.

[Page 4] 18 Herlewin, and Henry Brother of Theobald Earl of Blois, and Nephew of King Henry the I. were two Abbots of this Monastery, who through their industrious endeavours obtained much good to this House, and the Restoration of many Lands which had been taken from it.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 837.

[This Abby was valued before the Suppression at 3311 l. 7 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

The Cathedral Church of Canterbury.

IN the time of the blessed Gregory's Papacy, St. Augustine with several o­ther Monks were sent to convert the English People, who in the year of Grace 600. (or according to others 596.) coming into England, con­verted King Ethelbert and some thousands of his People, which King gave them a Mansion in his Capital City of Canterbury, then called Dorobernia, there to Preach and Baptize. Hereupon the blessed Augustine having re­ceived a Pall from Pope Gregory, built a Church there, and dedicated it to the honour of our Saviour Jesus Christ, he also did here institute the Metropolitan Seat of himself and Successors. And having rais'd here a Monastery of Monks, the People flow'd in to him from all parts, some for Baptism, and some to become Monks, devoting themselves and all they had to God's service.

The Principal Benefactors were King Ethelbert, who gave them his 19 Palace in Canterbury, which Pope Gregory decreed to be the Metropolitan Seat, and made it the first in Dignity, it having first received the Faith, Ethelbaldus Son of Ethelbert. King Cedwalla, King Offa, Edmundus King of 20 Kent Cenulphus King of Kent, Beornulphus King of Mercia, King Athelstan, 21 King Edmund, St. Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror, King 22 Henry the I. Henry the II. Richard the I. Edward the III. Edward Prince of Wales, his Son; Henry the IV. These and abundance of others of infe­riour condition gave and confirmed to this Church many Lands, Privi­ledges, and Immunities, the particulars of all which Lands, &c. may be seen in the Monasticon at large.

The Monastery of St. AUGUSTINES in Canterbury.

23 SAint Augustine being sent by Pope Gregory as aforesaid, arrived at the Isle of Thanet in Kent, in the year 596. with several Monks and Mi­nisters of God's Word about forty in number; they were kindly received by King Ethelbert, who received holy Baptism on Whitsonday Anno Dom. 597. After this Augustine went over to the Bishop of Arles in France, and being by him ordain'd a Bishop, he returned into England. At Canterbury he fixt his Metropolitan Seat as above-mentioned. A little without this City on the East-side had been an Idol Temple formerly made use of by King Ethelbert, before his Conversion, this Augustine cha [...]g'd into a Church; and dedicated in the name of St. Pancrace the Martyr. Afterwards in the year 605. Augustine obtain'd this Church, and the adjacent Ground of King Ethelbert, upon which place a new Church was built and dedicated to the honour of St. Peter and St. Paul; which Church was stored with Monks, endow'd with Revenues by that King, and appointed for the [Page 5] burial place, of himself and Successors, as also chosen for the burial of Augustine and his Successors, Archbishops of Canterbury.

King Ethelbert having built and endow'd this Monastery he placed there, by the Council of Archbishop Augustine, one Peter a Monk to be Abbot 24 of it.

The Archbishop Augustine granted several Priviledges to this Mona­stery, and denounced heavy Censures against any who should violate the 25 same in future times.

This Monastery was used for a burial place of the Archbishops, the Monks, and others of Canterbury, for many years; it being in those times not usual to bury within a City, till the Venerable Cuthbert came to be Archbishop, being the 11th. after Augustine, who being at Rome, ob­tain'd of the Pope the liberty of having burial places in England, with­in Cities.

On the East-side of Canterbury without the City and near this Mona­slery stood the Church of St. Martin, which Church was the Seat of a 26 Bishop, who always remain'd at home, or in the County, and in the ab­sence of the Archbishop used to act for him. The last Bishop of this Church was one Godwyn, who dying in the time of William the Conquer­or, when Lanfrank was Archbishop of Canterbury, he refused to subrogate any other Bishop in his place, but instead of a Bishop constituted an Arch­deacon there.

[Valued before the Suppression at 1413 l. 4 s, 11 d. ob. q. per Annum:

ROCHESTER, in Kent.

ANno Dom. 600. King Ethelbert founded the Church of St. Andrew the 27 Apostle at Rochester, and gave to it several Lands, as did also Eadbert King of Kent, Offa King of Mercia, and divers others; denouncing to the Vi­olators of their pious Donations, heavy Curses and Imprecations. All which Lands and Liberries King Henry the I. did confirm to the said Church, to Gundulf the Bishop there, and the Monks serving God in it. 29 Other principal Benefactors to this Church, and the Monks here, were King William the Conqueror, King William Rufus, Rodbert Son of King Henry, Robert Fitz Hamon, and William de Albeiney the King's Butler. Vid Vol. 2. p. 844. Vol. 3. p. 1.

[Valued before the Suppression at 486l. 11 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

WINCHESTER Cathedral Church.

ANno Dom. 608. Kinegilsus Son of Celric, King of the West Saxons, after 31 his Baptism and his peoples conversion to Christianty, designed to build this Church, and to it give all the Land lying about Winchester for the space of seven Leucas or Miles. But himself being prevented by death from periecting what he intended, his Son and Successor Kinwalcus per­form'd the Work, and confirm'd the Lands above-mentioned to the said Church.

Other principal Benefactors to this Church were King Ina; Ethelardus, King of the West Saxons; Egbert, King of all England, who lies buried here; 32 King Alured, who built a new Monastery within the Coemitery of the Epis­copal

[Page 6] Church. endow'd it with Possessions, and gave the Government of 33 it to St. Grimbaldus. (This King first instituted Hundreds and Tithings); Edward his Son and Successor, King Ethelstan his Son, King Edred his Bro­ther; King Edgar; Queen Emma Mother of Hardecanute, and Edward surna­med the Confessor; which Queen having perform'd her purgation of sup­posed 34 incontinency with Elwin Bishop of Winchester, according to the 35 Law Ordel, by going over nine red hot Plowshares, unhurt, gave to the Church of St. Swithin, here, nine Manors; so also did the said Bishop Elwin; all which gifts were confirm'd by King Edward the Confessor. 36 Anno Dom. 1079. Bishop Walkelinus began to new build the Church from the Foundation, towards which Work the King gave so much Wood, as could be cut down and carried away from his adjoyning Wood called Hanepinges, in three days and nights; upon which, such an innumerable Company of Carpenters assembled, that in the time limitted, they con­veyed away the whole Wood.

37

Anno Dom. 963. In the time of Bishop Ethelwold, the secular Clergy of this Church, living licentiously, were displaced, and Monks put in their room. Vide infra, p. 979.

[Valued at 1507 l. 17 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

DURHAM Monastery.

38 ANno Dom. 635. Eighty eight years from the first coming of the English into Britain, and thirty nine years from the coming of St. Augustine, pious King Oswald erected a Bishops Seat in the Island of Landisfarn, of which Agdanus became Bishop, and placed there the Monks that came along with him.

39 Of this See, Cuthbert was Consecrated Bishop, at York, on Easter-day Anno Dom. 685. To him Egfrid King of Northumberland gave Creec, with the Lands three Miles about it, and also Lugub [...]lia, now called Carlile, with the Lands fifteen Miles about it. Ob. Cuthbert 687.

Anno Dom. 729. Coelwolf King of Northumberland began his Reign; he was a great Benefactor to this Church, and became himself a Monk here.

40 All the Land lying between the two Rivers of Tyne and Tese, was for­merly given to St. Cuthbert, and was subject to the Government of the Bishop of St. Cuthbert's Church, till the Danes took away a great part of the Lands, which were however restored again by King Ethelstan.

41 In the year 1074. Aldwinus a Monk and two of his Companions led a Monastick Life at a place then called Girecum or Girne in Northumberland, from which three Monks, three Monasteries proceeded, namely one at Durham, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, and of St. Cuthbert, one at Lestingham, and one at a place then called Streneshalgh, all three within the Kingdom of the Northumbers.

43 William de Karilepho by his Deed dated Anno Dom 1082. declared the many and great Liberties granted by Pope Gregory the VII. and adds others to the Church of St. Cuthbert, with an Anathema to the Impugnors.

44 King William the Conqueror upon the precept of Pope Gregory the VII. and at the Petition of William Bishop of Durham, removed the Secular Canons out of the Church of D [...]ham, and placed Monks in their room, and confirmed all the Liberties and Priviledges granted to the said Church, and this by his Charter dated in the 18th. year of his Reign.

[Page 7] Thomas Archbishop of York set forthand declared the Diocess of the Bi­shop of Durham to be all the Land betwixt Tyne and Tese, Northumberland, Tevydale, Tynd [...], Carl [...]ol, Weredale, with the Church of Hertesham, and Lindis [...]rn.

Principal Benefactors to this Church were, King William the Conqueror, who gave great P [...]sessions to the Bishop and his Successors, to hold [...] 45 and quiet as he himself held them in his own hands.

Edgar Son of Mal [...]olm King of the Scots, he gave to the Church of Durham, the Mansion of Berwic, and Coldy [...]ghamschyr.

King Richard the I. he granted and confirm'd to the Bishop of [...] 46 and his Successors many great Priviledges, with the Domi [...] and [...] 47 of a Count Palatin, for ever, &c. Vid Vol. 2. p. 845.

[Valued at 1366 l. 10 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

MALMESBURY, in Wiltshire.

MAyldulp [...]us, by Nation a S [...]tchman, a Philosopher by Ernd [...]ion, and a Monk by Profession, was the first Founder of the Monstery 49 here.

Anno Dom. 635. King Berthwald, with the Consent and Confirmation of King Aethelred, gave to this Monastery for ever Summerford, lying upon 50 the [...] Thames.

Other Benefactors to this Monastery were Lutherius Bishop of Winchester, who by his deed dated Anno Dom. 680. gave to it for ever the Town of Malmesbury, King Athelred in the year 681, gave other Lands; so did King 51 Chedwalla Anno 682. in the year 1065. King Edward the Confessor con­firm'd all former Donations, and himself granted to this House great Li­berties and Priviledges; the like did King William the Conqueror in the 52 year 108 [...]. the same year Mauld his Queen became also a Benefactrice.53

Pope Innocent in the year 1248. granted to the Abbot and Monks of Malmesbury in the Diocess of Salisbury, a Confirmation of all their Lands and Revenues, which see in the Monasticon at large, together with several great 54 Immunities; and ordain'd that the Rule of St. Benedict should be for ever observed in this Monastery.

[Valued at 803 l. 17 s. 7 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

WESTMINSTERABBY, in Middlesex.

IN the days of King Lucius the first Christian King of Britain, who was baptized Anno Dom. 184. this place was first consecrated to God's ho­nour, 55 and especially appointed for the Royal Sepulture and a Repository of the Regalia. Thus it remained till, under Dioclesian's persec [...]tion, Christianity was expelled from hence, and the place turned to a [...] Temple of Apollo. Afterwards when the Saxons had conquered this King­dom and were in possession of it, the blessed Gregory in the year of Grace 604. sent Augustine the Monk together with Mellitus, Iustus, I aurentius, and others, to teach the Christian Religion in Britain. He arrived in Kent, as hath been already noted, and having converted and baptized Ethel­bert, King of that province, he afterward did the same to Sebert, King of the East-Saxons, King Ethelbert's Sister's Son; who upon his Conversion [Page 8] to Christianity, cast down the foresaid Temple of Apollo, and in the same place (then called Thorney Isle) built a Church in honour of St. Peter Prince of the Apostles.

56 In the same year the blessed Augustine, ordained two Bishops Mellitus 57 Bishop of London, and Iustus Bishop of Rochester. The History of this 58 Church says, that Mellitus going to consecrate it, he found the Work al­ready performed by St. Peter himself.

59 This Church being afterwards new built by St. Edward the King and Confessor, Pope Nicholas granted to it large immunities, appointing it to be for [...]ever a Seat of Benedictine Monks, the place of Consecration of our Kings, and Repository of the Regalia, and exempted it from the Bishops Jurisdiction, placing it under the sole and immediate Government of the King and his Successors.

60 The said King Edward the Confessor, by his Charter dated in the year 1066. reciting that at the Dedication of this new Church he had placed here certain Relicks, viz. Two pieces of our Lord's Cross, a piece of his Seamless Coat, with other Relicks of the blessed Virgin, and of the Apostles, &c. he renew'd and confirm'd the Lands and Priviledges formerly granted 61 to this Church by his Ancestors, granting others of his own; and giving to the praise of Almighty God, and for a perpetual Endowment to this Church, several Lands and Hereditaments, among others Roteland after the death of Queen Edgith, &c. With blessings denounced to those who shall in the future increase or improve these Gifts, but heavy Curses and Ana­themas against those of what degree or quality soever who shall infringe or diminish the same. Vid. Vol. 22. p. 847.

[Valued at 3471 l. 0 s. 2 d. q. per Annum.]

SHERBURN, in Dorsetshire.

62 FOunders and Benefactors to this Monastery were Kenewale, Edgar, Offa, Egbert, Sigebert, Ina, and several other Saxon Kings. In the year of our Lord 1122 Sherburn and Horton made both but one Abby; but afterwards about the year 1139. Roger Bishop of Salisbury changed the Priory of Sherburn into an Abby, that of Horton being destroy'd and annext to this.

See more of this Abby infra, p. 423.

[Valued at 682 l. 14 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

LESTINGHAM, in Yorkshire.

ANno Dom. 648. Edilwald Son of Oswald King of the Northumbers, gave to Cedde Bishop of the East Saxons (or Bishop of London) a piece of Ground on a high Mountain, called Lestingay, for the building of a Mona­stery. For the erecting of which Cedde prepared himself by fasting a whole Lent (except Sundays) eating nothing till the Evening, and then only a 63 little Bread, one Hen-Egg, and a little Milk mingled with Water. After this he built the Monastery, and instituted there the same Discipline as was used in that of Lindisfarn, where he himself had been educated. He govern'd his Diocess for many years after, but died in this Monastery, and was here buried.

PETERBOROUGH Abby, in Northamptonshire.

THIS Monastery was begun by Peada the first Christian King of Mercia, by and with the assistance of a great and eminent man called Saxulphus the first Abbot here. The place where it was built was in those old Times called Medeshamstede, but the Church being dedicated to St. Peter, it was afterwards called Peterborough. The Foundation was perfected and the Endowment compleated by Wulfer King of Mercia, and younger Brother of King Peada, who after his conversion to Christianity 64 by his Deed An. Do. 664. not only confirmed what had been already given by his Predecessors, but gave to this Monastery a very great quantity of Lands lying in the Country round about. King Edgar by his Charter dated A. D. 972. granted other Lands and many Priviledges. Pope Agatha 65 granted many Priviledges to this Monastery, which were confirmed in a Council of twenty five Bishops, assembled in a place called Estfeild 66 A. D. 680. These Grants, Liberties and Priviledges, were in succeeding 67 times confirm'd by King Edward the Elder, King Ethelred, King Cnut, 68 Edward the Confessor, and William the Conqueror.

The Monastery of St. Peter at Medeshamstede, being built A. D. 654. remained in Peace till the year 870. at which time the Pagan Danes coming down out of Yorkshire into Lincolnshire, Earl Algar, Morcar, a Lay-Brother of Crowland-Abby, call'd Tolius (who had been a famous Souldier before he entered into Religion) Hardingus of Reihalle, and under his Command all the men of Stamford, made head against them, and at first 69 conquered the Pagans; but they being soon after reinforced with greater power, they in a second Battel over-threw the Christians with grievous slaughter[?]; burnt down the Abby and Church of Croyland, and from thence marcht to Medeshamsted where they slew the Abbot and all the Monks to the number of eighty four, and utterly destroyed the Church and all other Buildings. From hence they march'd to Cambridge destroy­ing all the Country as they went.

70

In the year of Christ 970. St. Adelwold Bishop of Winchester began to re-edifie the Monastery of Medeshamstede, and call'd it the Borough of St. Peter, one hundred year after it was destroyed by the Danes.

The foregoing Particulars of this History have been curiously painted in the Windows of the Cloysters belonging to this Abby, with English Verses under each Picture explaining the Story: Which see in the Mona­sticon at large.

[Valued at 1721 l. 14 s. 0 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

WHITBY, (of Old call'd STRENSHALE,) in Yorkshire.

ANno Dom. 655. Penda the Pagan King of Mercia making War upon Oswy King of Northumberland, Oswy made a Vow to Almighty God that 71 if he overcame his Enemies, he would dedicate his Daughter to perpetual Virginity, and give twelve of his Manour-houses to be converted into Mo­nasteries. Hereupon he fought, and tho' much inferiour in number ob­tain'd a Signal Victory, and Penda was slain in the Battle. In[?] performance o [...] [...] Vow, he gave his Daughter named Ethelfleda, then scarce one year [...], and the Ground then called Streneshal for the building of a [Page 10] 72 Monastery. It was begun by Hilda, a Woman of great Religion; and was at first a Nunnery, but afterwards a House of Monks.

In the year 1067. William de Percy, who came into England with the Conquerour, and had obtained to himself and Heirs the Town of Whitby and all its Members, made a new Foundation of the Abby of Whitby, and gave all the said Town and Members to God, St. Peter, and St. Hilda of Whitby, and to the Monks there serving God, in perpetual Alms, with 73 divers other Lands; and made Reinfridus a Monk of Euesham, Prior of the 74 Monastery. This was after this place had been destroyed by the Danes above two hundred years.

Many were the Benefactors to this Abby, besides the Founder William de Percy, a particular of the Lands, Possessions, Forests, Churches, Tithes, and Liberties by them given, may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 74, 75. Vid. inf. p. 988.

[Valued at 437 l. 2 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

CHERTSEY, in Surrey.

75 THE Abby of Chertsey was founded in the Reign of King Egbert, in the year of our Lord 666. by Frithwaldus a petty King or Gover­nor 76 of the Province of Surrey, under Wulfar King of Mercia, and endow'd with large Possessions; all which were confirm'd by the said Wulfar King of Mercia.

The Limits of the Lands belonging to Chertsey-Abby may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 77.

78 Pope Alexander granted to this Abby many Priviledges; among other, that they should pay no Tithes of their Lands in their own hands, nor of the Beasts which they themselves kept.

[Valued at 659 l. 15 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

BERKING, in the County of Essex.

79 THE Nunnery at Berking, eight miles from London, was founded by Erkenwaldus Bishop of that City, for his Sister Ethelburge, who was the first Abbess of this Nunnery.

80 Hodelredus a Kinsman of Sebby King of the East Saxons gave to this House fair Revenues, which Guift was confirm'd by the said King Sebby.

The Ancient Profits and Expences of this Nunnery, as they were charg'd to the Account of the Celeress, may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 80, 81, 82, 83.

[Valued at 862 l. 12 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum.]

The Monastery of St. Mildred, in the Isle of Thanet, in Kent.

MIldred the Virgin, was the Daughter of Merwaldus Son of Penda 84 King of Mercia, and Domneva of the Family of the Kings of Kent. Which Domneva with her Husband's assistance built this Monastery for Nuns, and placed here seventy Virgins, of whom their Daughter Mildred was consecrated Abbess. This House was destroy'd by the Pagan Danes [Page]

A BENEDICTINE NUN

Vol. 1. P. 79

[Page] [Page 11] the year 1011. Afterwards in the time of King Cnut, it was annext by that King's Grant to St. Augustines Monastery, and the Body of St. Mildred translated from hence of St. Augustines at Canterbury, A. D. 1033. The 85 Lands belonging hereunto in the Isle of Thanet, were confirm'd to the said Monastery of St. Augustines by King Edward the Confessor.

FALKSTONE, in Kent.

EAnswida Daughter of Eadbaldus Son of Ethelbert King of Kent, built this Monastery in a remote Part from Commerce, situated seven Acers breadth from the Sea, which in process of time quite wore away the Land, and destroyed this House; but the Reliques of the holy Virgin the Foundress, who lived and died here; were removed to the Neighbour­ing Church of St. Peter.

See more of this House, infra, p. 560.

[Valued at 41 l. 15 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

LIMING, in Kent.

THE Monastery here was built by Ethelburge Daughter of King Ethel­bert, and Wife of Edwin King of Northumberland, after whole death she return'd into Kent, and founded this Nunnery, and lies here buried.

RACULFE, in Kent.

BIrthwald Archbishop of Canterbury was before his election to that See, 86 in the year 692. Abbot of Raculfe.

In the year 949. King Eadred King of all England, gave the Monastery of Raculfe and all the Lands belonging thereunto, to the Church of Canter­buy, Odo being then Archbishop and Metropolitan there. The Lands be­longing 87 to this House did amount to twenty five Carucates, and one Carucate assigned only to the Repairs of the Church.

ELY Abby, in Cambridgeshire.

ANno Dom. 627. The blessed Augustine, built a Church at Ely in a place called Cradindene, a mile distant from the present City, it was consecrated to the honour of the blessed Virgin, and stored with Ministers for God's service, but these were all expell'd by Penda King of Mercia, and the place turn'd into a Desert.

Afterwards in the year 673. Ethelreda the Virgin, built a Monastery in a more eminent place in Ely, for both Sexes, of which she her self be­came 87 the first Abbess. In the year 870. the Church of Ely was again 90 destroy'd and burnt by the Pagans.

In the year 970. Ethelwaldus Bishop of Winchester bought this Isle of 87 King Edgar, rebuilt the Church and placed Monks in it, under the Rule of 92 an Abbot; and in this state it remained till the year 1108. (9 H. 1.) 95 at which time Pope Paschal at the request of that King, changed the Abby 88 into a Bishoprick.

[Page 12] The foresaid Ethelred was Daughter of Anna King of the East-Angels, and was buried in Ely together with several other holy Women of her Relations and Blood.

90 The History of this Church says, that an Apparition appear'd to one of the Monks, and foretold to him the destruction of the Monastery, be­cause not one of both Sexes in this House, but himself, did use to pass the night in religious Exercises, but in Vanity and Sin. After which the 91 Danes destroyed it to the Ground, An. Dom. 870.

92 Benefactors to this House were the abovesaid Ethelwald Bishop of Win­chester, who bought the whole Isle of Ely, and gave it and other Lands and 93 rich Moveables to this Church, King Edgar and King Edward the Elder, granted and confirmed to it many Lands and Priviledges, approved and ratified by Pope Victor.

[Valued at 1084 l. 6 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.]

WIRMOUTH, and GYRWY, now called YARROW, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

96 IN the year 674. Egfrid King of the Northumbers gave a quantity of Ground lying at the mouth of the River Wyra, to the holy Abbot Benedict an Englishman, who had been five times at Rome, for the building a Monastery to St. Peter; and other Lands in a place then called Gyrwy, not far distant for another Monastery to the honour of St. Paul. Both which he indow'd, and filled with Monks.

97 Gyrwy, is four miles distant from New-Castle, of this House Venerable Bede, was heretofore a Monk, and educated under the above-mentioned Benedict.

[Valued at 25 l. 8 s. 4 d. per Annum.

ABBINGTON, in Barkshire.

AT such time as the wicked Hengist destroyed 460, of the Barons and Great men of this Land, by fraud and treachery, one of the Noble­men's Sons named Aben, made a shift to escape the slaughter, and concealed himself in a Wood on the South-side of Oxfordshire for a great while: but being at last taken notice of for his great sanctity, people built there for him a House and Chappel, which was afterwards from his name called Abendun. In the year 675. one Heane, a man of great Riches begun to build in the same place a Monastery (though after removed to some distance) and gave to it a part of his Inheritance. Sister of this Heane was Cissa, who built at a place called Helneston near the Thames a Monastery for Nuns, of which she became her self the Abbess. This Lady had obtained a small piece of one of the Nails of our Lord's passion, to which she caused some other Iron to be added, and made of that, a Cross, which she caused to be placed upon her breast after her death, and so buried. This Cross was in the time of Adelwold Abbot here (and afterwards Bishop of Winchester) found acciden­tally, in digging to make an Aqueduct, it was translated into the Mona­stery of Monks, and there preserved with great reverence; and call'd the black Cross.

[Page 13] The Monks here at their first Institution were but twelve and the Ab­bot; 98 they never went abroad without great necessity and with the Ab­bot's leave; they did eat no flesh, unless sick, &c.

The Town of Abbington was in old time called Seuekesham. It was a 99 Regal Seat, and a place of great concourse for religious Worship, as well before the times of Christianity, as since, (tam tempere Religonis fanaticoe, quam tempore religionis Christianoe, are the Words of the old Historian).

Benefactors to this House were Cedwalla King of the West-Saxons; King 100 Ina his Son An. Dom. 699. Kenulfus King of Mercia, An. Dom. 821. Edred 101 King of all England, An Dom. 955. Edgar King of all England An. Dom. 958. in the Reign of this King, the above-mentioned Adelwold was Abbot here, 102 who built the Church in honour of the holy Mother of God, and sent one of 104 his Monks beyond the Seas for the rule of St. Benedict, he settled here several good Orders, and gave great Riches and Ornaments to this Church; after this, he was by King Edgar chosen to be Bishop of Winchester, An. Dom. 963. 105 King Hen. I. was also a great Benefactor. And Pope Eugenius III. granted to this Abby great Priviledges by his Bull dated, An. Dom. 1146.107

[Valued at 1876 l. 10 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

GLOUCESTER Abby.

ANno Dom. 680 or 681. In the Reign of King Aethelred, one Osrich 108 a petty King, or Subregulus, first founded the Church of St. Peters in Gloucester, and placed his Sister Kineburga Abbess of the Monastery there. This M [...]nastery was built at the Expences of King Ethelred and his Wife Elfleda. Which being afterwards destroyed by the Danes, was in the year 1058. restored and consecrated by Aldredus then Bishop of Worcester, and afterward Archbishop of York.

The foresaid King Ethelred, in the the 30th. year of his Reign became 109 a Monk at Bardeney, and after that Abbot; and departed this life in the year 716.

The fore-mentioned Osrich, became King of the Northumbers after the death of Kenred, and died, An. Dom. 729.

The Nuns of this House were dispersed after the year 767. and Bene­dictine Monks were placed here, An. Dom. 1022. by Wolstan then Bishop of Worcester.

This Church was again new built from the Foundation by Serlo the first 110 Abbot after the Conquest, and consecrated in the year 1100. by Sampson Bishop of Worcester. Two years after which this Church together with 111 the whole City of Gloucester was burnt down.

Many were the Benefactors to this Church of all sorts and qualities, whose Names together with the Lands given, amounting in all to a great Revenue, may be seen at large in the Monasticon, from p. 111, to p. 120.

See more of this Church infra p, 993, and Vol. 3. p. 7.

[Valued at 1946 l. 5 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

WORCESTER Abby.

120 ANno Dom. 680. In the Reign of King Athelred in the Kingdom of Mer­cia, Worcester was first made a Bishops seat; and Boselus the first Bishop.

St. Oswald who was Bishop here in the year 871. or according to o­thers 959. introduced the first Monks, into this Church, in the room of the Clerks.

King Offa, King Edgar, and many others of the Saxons; were great Benefactors to this Church, as may be seen in the Monasticon, from p. 121, to p. 136. and from thence to p. 140. a Recapitulation of their Lands and Endowments.

[Valued at the Suppression at 1229 l. 12 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

BARDENEY Abby, in Lincolnshire.

142 WHEN the Body of St. Oswald was first buried at Bardeney, there were three hundred Monks in this Abby. It was first built by King Ethelred, and destroyed to the Ground by the Danes, and re-edified again by Gilbert de Gaunt Uncle to William the Conqueror; whose Son and Heir Walter de Gaunt did, in the year 1115, confirm to the Church and Monastery of St. Peter and St. Paul, and St. Oswald, at Bardeney, all those Lands and Possessions which his Father had given in pure and per­petual Alms to the same: And did also inlarge their Possessions of his own 143 Charity. All which was afterwards confirm'd by King Henry the first. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 847.

[Valued at 366 l. 6 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

EUESHAM Abby, in Worcestershire.

144 SAint Egwin, who was the third Bishop of Worcester founded this Mo­nastery. 145 Kenredus King of Mercia, and Offa Governour of the East Angles in the year 709, being both then at Rome, endow'd it with large Possessions. The Towns which St. Egwin obtain'd to his Monastery of 146 the said Kings were in all twenty two. There were belonging to this House sixty seven Monks, five Nuns, three poor People, three Clerks, who had all the same allowance as the Monks had; and besides these, sixty five Servants. The under Officers of this House as Prior, Sub-Prior, third 147 Prior, Precentor, Sacristan, Celarer, &c. were created by the Abbot with the advice and consent of the major part of the Covent, in Chapter. All which Officers had their several Rents arising from distinct and several 148 places appropriated to their several Offices.

149 In the year 1174. Waldemarus King of Danemark gave and confirm'd the Priory of Othenesia in that Kingdom as a Cell to this Abby of Euesham.

This Abby was first founded, as aforesaid, by St. Egwin in the year of grace 692. and dedicated to the honour of the glorious Virgin Mary. The Founder himself leaving his Bishoprick, became the first Abbot here. After whose death succeeded eighteen Abbots until the year 941. at which time the Monks here were dispersed, and secular Chanons substituted in [Page 15] their room. In the time of King Edgar, Anno Dom. 660, the Monks were again restored; but after his death expell'd again, in the year 977. This House and Estate was afterwards given to a potent man called Godwin, and successively it came into several hands, till at last in the year 1014. King Ethelred made Ailfwardus a Monk of Ramsey, Abbot of Euesham; he was also Bishop of London at the same time. From his time the Abby of Euesham flourisht under divers Abbots, whose names from the Norman Conquest till the year 1379. are as follows, 152 Egelwinus, Walterus, Robertus, Mauricius, Reginaldus, Willielmus de Andi­villa, Rogerus, Adam, Rogerus Norreys, Radulphus. Thomas de Marleberg, Richaadus le Cras, Thomas de Glovernia, Henricus, Willielmus de Wytechurch, Iohannes de Brokehampton, Willielmus de Chyriton, Willielmus de Boys, Iohannes de Ombresseye, Rogerus Zatten 1379. Vid Vol. 2. p. 851.

[Valued at 1183 l. 12 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

SHEPEY Monastery of Nuns, in Kent.

FOunded by Queen Sexburga, about the year of our Lord 710. William Archbishop of Canterbury, after the Conquest restored this 153 Monastery, it having lain a long time burnt down and destroyed by the Danes. King Henry the II. King Richard the I. King Henry the III. and others, were Benefactors to this Church of St. Sexburg, here, and to the Nuns serving God in the same; all whose Donations of Lands and Liber­ties were confirm'd in the 1st. year of King Henry the IV.

[Valued at 129 l. 7 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

SELSEY, in Sussex.

IN the year of our Lord 711. Wilfred Bishop of Hagulstad remaining five years in the Isle of Selsey to avoid persecution, built there a Monastery in honour of the blessed Mary, to which Ethelwold King of the South Saxons, gave Lands.

TUKESBURY, in Gloucestershire.

THIS Monastery was founded in the year 715. by two Dukes of great account in the Kingdom of Mercia named Oddo and Doddo, to 154 the honour of the glorious Virgin Mary.

Robert Fiz-Hamon in the year 1102. new built this Church and Mona­stery, 155 making it an Abby, and subjecting to it the Priory of Cranburne. His Daughter Mobilla was afterwards married to Robert base Son of King Henry I. who was created Earl of Gloucester; he built the Priory of St. Iames at Bristol, and annext it also to the House. From him descended 156 Gibbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, who was a great Benefactor to this House, and buried here; as were the rest of his descendants, 157 Earls of Gloucester, and the Dispencers who descended from one of the Heirs General. All these and more of their Blood, among whom Henry de 159 Beauchamp Duke of Warwick, were Benefactors to this Abby, their pious 160 gifts being all confirm'd and ratified by the King, 1462.

[Page 16] 163 The several parcells of Lands and Hereditaments given and confirm'd to this House by former Kings may be seen, p. 161, 162.

[Valued at 1598 l. 1 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

WINBURNE, in Dorsetshire.

SAint Quinburga, and St. Cuthburga, Sisters of Ina King of the West Sax­ons, built here a Monastery for Nuns, Anno Dom. 718.

CROYLAND, in Lincolnshire.

CRoyland is one of those small Islands which lie in the East Fens. Here St. Guthlac, at the age of twenty five years, became a Hermite, and in his life time delivered the Island from Devils and evil Spirits, and dying, was here buried.

164 Ethelbald King of Mercia, by his Charter dated in the year 716. gave to God, the blessed Mary and St. Batholomew, the whole Isle of Croyland, containing four Leucas, or miles in length, and three in breadth, for the erecting of a Monastery under the Rule of St. Benedict: and endow'd the said Monastery with large Possessions lying about the Place.

165 All which was confirm'd to them by Offa King of Mercia, in the year 166 793. and by Withlaf King of Mercia, in the year 833.

167 This Abby being afterwards burnt down and destroyed by the Pagan Danes, was re edified and restored to its former Possessions and Liberties, by King Eadred, who stiled himself King of Great Britain, in the year 948. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 853.

[Valued at 1803[?] l. 15 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

BEVERLEY, in Yorkshire.

169 SAint Iohn Archibishop of York was the first Dr. of Theology in Oxford. He converted the Parish-Church of St. Iohn in the Town of Beverly into a Monastery, building to it a new Quire; and made his Deacon 170 Bithunus the first Abbot here. Both which lie buried in this Church. One hundred years after this the Monastery of Beverley was destroyed by the Danes, and lay in Ruines three years, before it was repair'd. King Athelstan built here a Colledge of secular Chanons. And granted and confirm'd to this Church of St. Iohn of Beverley many great Priviledges and Liberties An. Dom. 938. King Edward the Confessor was a great Be­nefactor to this Church, and augmented the number of the Prebendaries. 171 William the Conqueror was also a Benefactor. Thomas the first Archbishop of York, erected a new Dignity in the Collegiate Church of Beverley, viz. a Prepositus or Provost, who has neither voice in the Chapter nor Stall in the Quire; of these, there is a List of thirty eight, Thomas Becket being the fifth in number. Vid. Vol. 3. part. 2 p. 3.

[Valued at 109 l. 8 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

RIPPON, in Yorkshire.

WIlfrid Archibishop of York founded a Monastery at Rippon, which was 172 afterwards burnt down, in the Devastation which King Adred made upon the Northumbers. But being in after-times re-edified, King Athalstan granted to this Church the Priviledge of Sanctuary, with the same Liberties which he had given before to the Church of Beverly; and 173 that the men of Rippon should be believed by their yea, and by their na.

St. FRIDISWADE, at Oxford.

FRidiswade the holy Virgin was Daughter of Didanus a petty King (Sub-regulus) of Oxford; her Father built a Church there in honour of St. Mary, and all Saints, and gave it for his Daughters Habitation, who with twelve other Nuns led there a religious Life. St. Fridiswade died on the 14th. of the Calends of November 735. and was buried in the said 174 Church. This Monastery and Church was afterwards burnt down, with the Danes in it, who had fled thither for Refuge; but King Ethelred did soon after rebuild it with additions, as appears by his Charter dated in the year 1004. In the year 1111. Roger Bishop of Salisbury, in lieu of Nuns, instituted in this Monastery a Prior and Cannons, to whom King Henry I. 175 gave a fair Estate in Lands and Tyths, which was confirm'd to them by Pope Adrian.

Benefactors to this Church of St. Fridiswade in Oxford, were Maud the Empress, Earl Simon, Ralpt Foliot, and others.

See more of this Monastery, infra, p. 983.

DEREHAM, in Norfolk.

WIthburga Daughter of Anna King of the East Angles, built a Mona­stery 176 for Nuns in this Town and was buried here. After the In­cursion of the Pagan Danes, the Nuns were all dispers'd, and the Church was made parochial. In the year 798, the Body of St. Withburga was found here, uncorrupted, near fifty five years after her death. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 853.

St. ALBANS-ABBY, in Hertfordshire.

SAint Alban was martyr'd in this place, then called Verolamium, in the time of Dioclesian's persecution. Ten years after that persecution ceas'd, the Christians built here a Church to his memory; which being destroy'd by the incursion of the barbarous People, Offa King of Mercia, about the year 793. repair'd the Church, built here a Monastery, stored it with 175 Monks, translated the Reliques of the Martyr into a rich Shrine, and ob­tain'd of Pope Adrian to have him canonized. And by his Charter dated in the above-mentioned year granted to the said Monastery several Lands and great Priviledges. In the year 1154. Nicholas Bishop of Alba (an English-born man near this Monastery) being chosen Pope by the name of Adrian IV. [Page 18] granted to the Abbot of this Abby, that as St. Alban was the first Martyr of England, so this Abbot should be the first of all the Abbots of Eng­land in order and dignity.

178 King Iohn by his Charter dated the 11th. of Iune in the first year of his Reign, granted to God, and the Church of St. Alban, and the Monks there, divers Lands and great Liberties.

179 Pope Honorius, by his Bull dated in the year 1218. confirm'd to this Church all Lands and Liberties granted to it by former Popes, Kings, and 180 others, granting also to the Abbot and his Successors Episcopal Rights, and the Espiscopal Habit, and that he and his Monks should be exempt 181 from the Jurisdiction of the Bishop; with other exemptions, &c. reserving as a Rent to the Apostolick See yearly, for these Liberties, the payment of one ounce of Gold.

In the Windows of the Cloysters of this Abby, were formerly painted abundance of Historical Passages out of the Bible, with Latin Verses under­neath each Story, explaining the same. In like manner were the Windows of the Library, and Presbytery painted, with the Pictures of famous men, with explanatory Verses, which Verses may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 182, 183, 184.

[Valued at 2102 l. 7 s. 1 d. ob. q. per Annum:

184 BATH, in Somersetshire.

KING Osric was the first Founder of this Monastery for Nuns, Anno. Dom. 676. Offa King of Mercia, placed here secular Cannons; and King Edgar introduced Monks instead of Cannons.

185 King William the Conqueror gave the City of Bath to God, St. Peter, and Iohn Bishop of Wells, for the augmentation of his Episcopal Seat. King Henry the I. confirm'd the same, and constituted and confirm'd the 186 Episcopal Seat of Somersetshire, which was formerly at Wells, to be at Bath, by Charter dated in the year 1111. and in the twelth year of his Reign. The said Iohn the Bishop, by his Deed dated 1106. appointed the Church of St. Peter here, to be the Head and Mother-Church of the whole Diocess, and restored the Lands which the King had given him in Bath, to the Monastery there, to which they did formerly belong; with an Anathema against the Violators of his said Gift and Restoration.

Oliver King Bishop of Bath, and Gibbs the last Prior here, built the pre­sent Church, p. 185.

[Valued at 617 l. 2 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

WELLS, in Somersetshire.

CYnewulf King of the West Saxons, in the year 766. gave to the Mo­nastery at Wells dedicated to St. Andrew the Apostle, several parcells of Land adjoyning.

187 King Edward the Confessor Anno 1065. gave and confirm'd to the Church and Bishop of Wells, the Lands and Liberties formerly to the said Church given, with additions.

WINCHCUMB, in Gloucestershire.

ANno Dom. 787. Offa King of Mercia, built here a Monastery for Nuns. Or as others say, it was built by Kenulphus King of Mercia A. D. 798.188 and the Church dedicated by Wilfridus Archbishop of Canterbury, and twelve other Bishops; at which dedication that King released at the Altar, the King of Kent, his Prisoner of War. This Monastery being almost utterly decay'd, in the time of King Edgar, was repaired by St. Oswald Archbi­shop of York, and Germanus made Abbot here. King Kenulius is said to 189 have placed here at the first Foundation no less then three hundred Monks. Of these three hundred Monks there might possibly be not above forty 190 who were Priests or Clerks, the rest might be Hermits, or as meer Lay-men get their living by Working, as in ancient Times Monks did use to do. The Mannors and Lands formerly belonging to this Monastery were eleven Towns with their Members, the names of which may be seen, p. 190. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 854.

[Valued at 759 l. 11 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

WILTON, in Wiltshire.

WVistan Earl of Wiltshire repaired an ancient Church here dedicated to St. Mary, and [...] therein a Colledge of Priests. After whose 191 death, his Widow Alburga converted the Foundation to a Nunnery of Virgins, Anno Dom 800. Afterwards King Alfred built at Wilton a new Monastery, and dedicated the Church to St. Mary and St. Bartholomew; here he placed twelve Nuns and an Abbess, and translated the other Nuns hither from St. Mary's, which made the number in all twenty six. Subsequent Benefactors were King Edward the Elder, King Athelstan, King Edgar, William the Conqueror, &c. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 857.

[Valued at 601 l. 1 s. 1 d. q. per Annum.]

AMBRESBURY, in Wiltshire.

THE Nunnery at Ambresbury was built by Queen Elfrida by way of expiation for the murder of King Edward the Younger, called St. Edward of which she had been guilty. In the Reign of Henry the II. Anno Dom 1177. the Nuns here were expell'd from this House and shut up in other religious Houses under stricter Custody, for their inconti­nency and notorious scandal. And other Nuns of Font-Everard intro­duced here, by the Authority of Pope Alexander, King Henry the II. and Richard Archbishop of Canterbury. Which King Henry the II. gave to the said Nunnery of Font Everard this Church as a Cell, with many other 192 Lands and great Liberties, all which were confirm'd by King Iohn in the first year of his Reign; with a Gift of 50 s. per Annum out of the Exchequer 193 for ever, in the fifth year of his Reign. Vid. 2. Vol p. 868.

[Valued at 495 l. 15 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

MIDLETON, in Dorsetshire.

194 KING Athelstan, having upon false accusations unjustly banisht his youngest Brother Edwyn, and put him to Sea in an old Vessel with­out either Sails or Oars, where he was drown'd; and being afterwards extream penitent, he built and endowed here a Church and Monastery 195 in honour of St. Mary and St. Sampson the Archbishop; and stored it with Black Monks, for the Soul of his said Brother Edwyn.

He also purchased from Rome and other places beyond the Seas several holy Reliques; and gave them to this Monastery as a piece of our Saviour's Cross; a Great Cross composed of Gold, Silver, and precious Stones; 196 the Arm and several Bones of St. Sampson the Archbishop, &c. King Athel­stan's Charter of Endowment bears date in the year 843. and was exem­plified and confirm'd by King Henry the II.

197 The same Founder built another Monastery on the same occasion, at a place called Michel, in Dorsetshire.

[Valued at 578 l. 13 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

POLESWORTH, in Warwickshire.

EGbert King of the West Saxons built here a Nunnery, and made his Daughter Edith the first Abbess there. King William the Conquer­or 198 gave this Estate to a Favourite of his called Sir Robert Marmyon, whose chief Seat was at the Neighbouring Castle of Tamworth, he expell'd the Nuns for a while, but not long after restored them again to their old Estate, and was reputed their Founder. The Nuns of Polesworth had a Cell at Olbury, which was given to their Monastery by Walter de Hastings, and 199 confirm'd to them by Roger Bishop of Chester (then the same Diocess with Coventry and Litchfield) and others.

[Valued at 87 l. 13 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

St. WERBURGS, at Chester.

THE holy Virgin Werburg was Daughter of Wulfer King of Mercia, and Ermenilda his Wife. She lived and died in a Monastery at 200 Chester, which had been built of old time for the Habitation of Nuns; but after the Conquest Hugh Earl of Chester placed Monks there.

The Monastery was built by King Edgar in the year 858. Hugh Earl of Chester having establisht Monks here, endow'd the Foundation with great Revenues, his Barons also giving very liberally to the same, whose Char­ter bears date Anno Dom. 1093. The Particulars given may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 201. 202.

See more of this House, p. 985.

[Valued at 1003 l. 5 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

ATHELING, in Somersetshire.202

KING Elfred being driven out of his Kingdom by the Danes, con­ceal'd himself for some time in this place, then compast about with Marishes and Water, that it was inaccessable but with a Boat. Upon his restoration he built here a Church and Monastery. His Charter of Endowment bears date Anno Dom. 878.203

About the same time that King Elfred founded this Monastery for Monks, he founded another for Nuns at Shaftesbury.

[Valued at 209 l. 0 s. 3 d. q. per Annum.]

PERSHORE, in Worcestershire.

THE Monastery here was built in the time of King Edgar by Duke Egelwardus; but the greatest part of its Estate was in after­time transferred by King Edward and King William to Westminster. Others say, it was founded about the year 604. by Oswald Nephew of King Athel­red.204 Oswald did at first place here secular Canons, which were after changed to Monks, then Canons restored, and then Monks once again in­troduced by King Edgar. Anno Dom. 1223. there happened a grievous fire here, and the Monks for some time having left the place, their Estate was usurpt by the Monks of Westminster. The Deeds, and Charters of Privi­ledges of this House being burnt, Witnesses were examined and made 205 several Depositions of the ancient Liberties and Customs used, and of right 206 belonging to this Monastery, which may be seen in the Monasticon at 207 large.

[Valued at 643 l. 4 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

HIDE, in Dampshire.208

THIS is otherwise called the new Monastery at Winchester, and was designed by King Elfred, but built after his death by his Son King Edward, who placed therein secular Canons under the Rule of a holy man call'd Grimbaldus. This new Monastery being at first built within the 209 City, close to the Cathedral Church, was on the account of several in­conveniencies in the Scituation, removed in the year 1121. to the place called Hide. Great was the Revenue given to this Monastery, and many the Benefactors besides the Founder, as King Athelstan, King Edmund, King Edred, King Edgar (who expell'd the Canons and placed Monks here) King Edmund Ironside, Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror,210 Henry 1. and Maud his Queen, &c.

But this House was not without its misfortunes, William the Conqueror at his first coming finding the Abbot and twelve of his Monks in arms against him, seiz'd upon their Estate and held it from them almost two years. And in the Reign of King Stephen, Henry then Bishop of Winchester committed such extortions upon the Monks here, that he got from them almost all their Church Plate, and was so oppressive that of forty Monks, there remain'd but ten in the House.

[Page 22] 211 King Edgars Diploma to this House was written in Letters of Gold, and dated Anno Dom. 966.

The Priviledges of this House were agreed and settled between William Bishop of Winchester and Gaufridus Abbot here, An. Dom. 1110.

[Valued at 865 l. 18 s. 0 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

212 WINCHESTER Monastery of Nuns.

ABout the year 903. Alswitha Wife of King Alfred, began the Foun­dation of a Nunnery at Winchester, which was after her death com­pleated by her Son King Edward the Elder.

[Valued at 179 l. 7 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

213 St. PETROCUS, at Bodmin, in Cornwall.

KING Athelstan was the first Founder of this Monastery for Monks; which after the Conquest, came into the Crown, but was purchased by Alganus, and stored with Canons regular.

St. GERMAINS, in Cornwall.

KING Athelstan founded a Monastery here, which at that time was the Seat of a Bishop, but was afterwards removed by King Edward the Confessor from hence to Exeter. Bartholonew Bishop of Exeter intro­duced into this Church by the King's Authority, Canons Regular, eight in number, and a Prior.

[Valued at 243 l. 8 s. per Annum.]

SHAFTESBURY, in Dorsetshire.

KING Elfred built this Town in the year 880. Elgiva Wife of Ed­mund, great Grand-child of the said Elfred, built here a Monastery for Nuns. King Edward the younger, commonly called St. Edward the Martyr, murder'd by his Mother-in-Laws procurement, was here interr'd, on which account this Church was afterwards call'd by his name.

214 Benefactors to this House were King Edmund, King Edred, A. D. 948. 215 and King Etheldred, 1001.

216 See more of this Monastery, p. 983.

[Valued at 1166 l. 8 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

217 TAVESTOCK, in Devonshire.

ORdgarus an Earl in these Parts, and Father of Elfrid Wife of King Edgar, built this Monastery in the year 961, for Monks. It was afterwards burnt down by the Danes. King Edelred, in the year 981. en­dow'd 218 it with Lands and Liberties; the like did King Henry the 1. all [Page 23] which was exemplified and confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the twenty second Year of his Reign.

See more of this Monastery, p. 995.

[Valued at 902 l. 5 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

RUMSEY, in Hampshire.219

KING Edward the Elder, built here a Monastery, in which his Grand­son King Edgar placed religious Nuns, under the Government of Merwina their Abbess, Anno Dom. 907.

King Edgar, King Henry III. and King Edward I. were Benefactors to this House, and confirm'd the Lands and Liberties to them given.

[Valued at 393 l. 10 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

HORTON, in Dorcetshire.220

ORgarus Earl of Devonshire (formerly mention'd) was the first Foun­der of this Monastery, who after his decease, which happen'd in the year 971. was here buried.

Roger Bishop of Shirburn, obtain'd of King Henry the I. that this House and the Possessions thereunto belonging should be transfer'd and annext to the Monastery of Shirburn, so that in after-times it was accounted only as a Cell of that House, tho'it had been before that reckon'd as an Abby of it self.

EXETER, in Devonshire.

THE Kingdom of the West Saxons having been destitute of a Bishop for full seven years before, Pope Formosus threatn'd to curse King Edward the Elder, in the year 905. unless he would restore Bishops ac­cording to the ancient Tradition. Hereupon that King calling a Synod, in which presided Plegmundus Archbishop of Canterbury, did by their ad­vice constitute several Bishops Seats, and set out their several Diocesses; and the Archbishop ordain'd seven Bishops in one day to seven Churches, among which Athelstan was made Bishop of Cornwall, and Eadulf of Crid­ington. 221 In the year 1046. King Edward the Confessor united these two Bishopricks, and soon after at the request of Pope Leo fixt the Seat of the Bishop in the Monastery of St. Mary and St. Peter at Exeter, the then Bi­shop Leofric being introduced into the Cathedral Church betwixt the King and Queen. Which Bishop finding the said Church much decay'd 222 and impoverisht in its Goods and Revenues became a great Benefactor, gi­ving 223 to it not only several Books and Church Ornaments, but divers Lands; and recover'd for the Monastery other Lands which had been formerly given, and since lost and taken from them.

King Athelstan, soon after his coming to the Crown of this Kingdom,225 erected the Monastery here to St. Mary and St. Peter, and endow'd it with twenty six Towns and Villages, and gave to it the third part of those many Relicks which he had caused to be collected beyond the Seas, viz. some pieces of our Lord's Cross, Sepulcher, Garment, Cradle, &c. with many [Page 24] 227 others, which may be seen at large, p. 225, 226. After him King Athelred, 228 King Cnut, King Edward the Confessor, King Iohn, and King Henry the ill. 229 became Benefactors: so also King Henry the I. who restored to this Mona­stery 230 several Churches which had been taken from it.

231 RAMSEY, in Huntingdonshire.

IN the year 969. Ailwinus Duke of the East Angels, at the instigation of Oswald Archbishop of York, founded the Monastery of Ramsey, which was consecrated by St. Dunstan Archbishop of Canterbury, and the said Oswald, in the year 974. and the Church dedicated to the blessed Mary and all holy Virgins, and to St. Benedict.

232 Ramsey is a small Island, situated among Fens and Marishes, in the East corner of Huntingdonshire, about two miles long, and near as broad. It was formerly very much abounding with Alders and other Trees that delight in moist Ground, from whence it might take its name Ramsey à ramis, quasi Insula Ramorum.

233 At the Foundation of this Church King Edgar gave to it five Hides of Land. St. Oswald also gave several Ornaments and Lands, and procured to it others.

234 Duke Ailwinus the Founder gave to this Abby the whole Isle in which it stood with the adjacent Marishes and Meers, and divers other Lands. All which, with other Lands from other Benefactors, King Edgar con­firm'd 235 to this Abby, granting also divers great Priviledges as a Sanctuary, &c. The like was done by King Edward the Confessor, with the addition 236 of several other Liberties and Priviledges. King Henry the I. King Henry 237 the II. King Richard, King Iohn, and King Edward the I. were also Royal 238 Benefactors.

Ailwinus the Founder gave many precious Ornaments besides two 239 hundred Hides of Land, and departed this Life on the 8th. of the Calends of May. His Epitaph was as follows,

240 Hic requiescit Ailwinus, inclyti regis Edgari cognatus, totius Angliae Aldermannus, & hujus sacri caenobii, miraculosè, fundato r.
ABBOTS OF RAMSE Y.
  • 1 AEdnothus, A. D. 970.
  • 2 Wufilus 1008.
  • 3 Withmannus 1016.
  • 4 Ethelstanus 1020.
  • 5 Alfwinus 1043.
  • 6 Aielsinus 1080.
  • 7 Herbertus made Bishop of Nor­wich 1087.
  • 8 Aldwinus 1091.
  • 9 Bernardus was Abbot for five years in the life of Aldwinus.
  • 10 Reginaldus 1114.
  • 11 Walterus 1133.
  • 12 Willielmns 1161.
  • 13 Robertus Trianel 1180.
  • 14 Eudo 1200.
  • 15 Robertus de Redinges 1202.
  • 16 Richardus 1214.
  • 17 Hugo Foliot 1216.
  • 18 Ranulfus 1231.
  • 19 Willielmus Acolt 1253.
  • 20 Hugo de Sulgrave 1254.
  • 21 Willielmus 1267.
  • 22 Iohannes 1285.
  • 23 Simon 1316.
  • 24 Robertus 1342.
  • [Page 25]25 Ricardus 1349.
  • 26 Edmundus 1382.
  • 27 Thomas Botterwick 1400.
  • 28 Iohannes Tychemarsh 1419.
  • 29 Iohannes Crowland 1434.
  • 30 Iohannes Stowe 1436.

The memorable Occurrances in the times of these several Abbots may be seen in the Monasticon, p. 241, 242. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 869.

[Valued at 1716 l. 12 s. 4. d. per Annum.]

THORNEY, in Cambridgeshire.

THIS Monastery was founded in the year 972. by St. Adelwold Bi­shop 243 of Winchester, in the Reign of King Edgar. In the year 1085. the Church was new built by Gunterius the then Abbot here, and dedicated by Hervey the first Bishop of Ely. In the year 973. King Ed­gar granted to this Abby several Lands and Priviledges.

Principal Benefactors to this House were Nigellus Bishop of Ely, William 245 Peverel, several of the Beauchamps, Henry de Merch, William de Albeneis,247 Brito Thurstan de Montfort, and Iohn de Stutavill, &c. The Lands and 249 Benefactions of whom, were recited and confirm'd to this Abby by the 250 Bull of Pope Alexander dated A. D. 1162.

ABBOTS of THORNEY.251
  • A. D.
  • 1085. Gunterius.
  • 1123. Robertus I.
  • 1151. Gilbertus.
  • 1154. Galterus.
  • 1158. Herbertus.
  • 1163. Walterus.
  • 1176. Solamon.
  • 1193. Robertus II.
  • 1198. Radulphus.
  • 1216. Robertus III.
  • 1231. Wido Wake.
  • 1237. Ricardus.
  • 1238. David.
  • 1244. Thomas Castre.
  • 1261. Willielmus Yakesley.
  • 1293. Odo de Whitlesey.
  • 1305. Willielmus Clopton.
  • 1322. Reginaldus de Water Newton.
  • 1347. Willielmus Haddon.
  • 1365. Iohannes Depyng.
  • 1396. Nicholaus Islep.
  • 1402. Thomas Charw.
  • 1425. Alanus Kirketon.
  • 1437. Iohannes Kirketon.
  • 1450. Iohannes Ramsey.

[Valued at 411 l. 12 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

CHATERIZ, in Cambridgeshire.

THE Mannor of Chateriz was given by King Edgar, to the Abbot of Ramsey. Ednodus Abbot of Ramsey built a Church and Monastery for Nuns at Chateriz, and endow'd it with necessaries; which Ednodus or Ednothus being Bishop of Dorchester was murdered by the Danes, 1016.

King Henry the I. gave and annext this Abby to the Church of Ely, and 252 Herveus the first Bishop there. Pope Innocent the IV. confirm'd the E­state and Priviledges of this Abby to the Abbess and Sisters here, about the year 1242. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 869.

[Valued at 97 l. 3 s. 4 d. q. per Annum.]

253 CERNE, in Dorsetshire.

SAint Augustine the Monk after he had converted Kent, travelled with his Companions over the rest of King Ethelbert's Dominions, which extended as far as the Northumbers, preaching the Gospel of Christ. And being in Dorsetshire; a great Company of people offer'd themselves to Baptism in a place where water was wanting, whereupon by miracle a 254 Fountain of Water burst out of the Ground, which was in the succeeding­times call'd St. Augustin's Fountain. Here Edwaldus Brother of St. Edmund the King and Martyr, led a Hermits life, and died with the reputation of great Sanctity; which occasion'd that Egelwaldus or Ethelwerdus built here a Monastery to the honour of St. Peter, which his Son Ethelmer Earl of Cornwall A. D. 987. endow'd with divers Lands.

[Valued at 515 l. 17 s. 10 d. q. per Annum.]

255 St. IVES, in Huntingtonshire.

IN the year 1001. the Body of St. Ivo being found in this Town then called Slepe, and translated from his Grave to a Shrine, the Town ever after took name from the Saint, and Ednothus Abbot of Ramsey, built here a Church. Pope Vrban confirm'd the Estate of this Monastery to the Prior and Monks of the same and to their Successors, granting them many great Priviledges, among others, that they should pay no Tithes of their Lands and Cattle which they should hold in their own proper hands.

256 It was found by Inquisition in the 36 H. 3. that the Parish Church of St. Ives dedicated to the honour of all Saints, is a Vicarage of the Presen­tation of the Abbot of Ramsey, that the Prior of St. Ives as Parson receives all Corn-Tithes, and of the Vicar for his portion 4 l. 13 s. 4 d. That the Vicar receives all small Tithes, obventions, Mortuaries (Testamenta) Plow­alms, Rates and other Customs, which see in the Book at large.

WARWELL, in Hampshire.

KING Edgar hearing extraordinary Commendations of the beauty of Elfrida Daughter of Odgar Duke of Devonshire, sent Earl Ethelwold, to discover if the young Lady's beauty was equal to report, the Earl finding it so, disparaged her to the King, and secretly married her himself. After a while the King perceiving himself to have been treacherously deceived, took occasion one day to take the Earl flew him. In expiation of which Deed Elfrida, 258 who was after her first Husband's death married to King Edgar, built here a Monastery for Nuns, in honour of the holy Cross. This Monastery was after wards endowed with Lands by King Ethelred Son of the said Edgar and Elfrid in the year 1002, as appears by Inspectimus 44. H. 3. Vid. 3. Vel. p. 9.

[Valued at 339 l. 8 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

EYNESHAM, in Oxfordshire.

THIS Monastery was situated near the River Thames, founded and 259 endowed by one Ethe [...]marus, a man of Quality under King Ethel­red, who confirmed the Lands given to it, and granted divers Liberties and Priviledges to the same, in the year of our Lord 1005.

To this House a Monastery at Stow near Lincoln, built and endow'd by 262 Godiva Wife of Leofrick Earl of Chester, was formerly annext as a Cell.263

In the year 1109. King Henry the I. repair'd this Monastery, at that 264 time decay'd, and confirm'd to it all its Lands and Liberties.265

[Valued at 441 l. 12 s. 2 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

BURTON, in Staffordshire.

WVlfricus Spot, an Officer in the Court of King Ethelred built this Abby and endow'd it with all his paterrnal Inheritance, amounting 266 to 700 l. and gave to that King three hundred Mancas of Gold to purchase his Confirmation of what he had done. The Names of the several Lands and Monnors given to this Abby may be seen, p. 268, 269.

King Ethelred granted to this Abby great Liberties in all their Lands, by 270 his Charter dated in the year 1006. And Pope Lucius the III. in the 271 year 1185. confirm'd to them all their Lands, granting also many great Priviledges to the said Abby, as that they should pay no Tithes of what they held in their own hands, &c.

The afore-mention'd Wulfricus Spot, the Founder of this Abby, was Earl of Mercia, and one of the Blood Royal. Upon the Foundation, (which was in the year 1004.) certain Monks were removed to this House from Winchester. Wulfricus was slain in a Battle against the Danes, A. D. 1010. and was buried in the Cloyster of this House.

A List of the Abbots of Burton upon Trent from the first Foundation to 272 the Dissolution.273
  • 1 Wulfgetus. ob. 1026.
  • 2 Britericus. ob. 1050.
  • 3 Leuricus. ob. 1085.
  • 4 Galfridus Malaterra expell'd 1094.
  • 5 Nigellus. ob. 1114.
  • 6 Galfridus resigned 1150. to
  • 7 Robertus deposed and expell'd 1159.
  • 8 Barnardus ob. 1175.
  • 9 Robert chosen again ob. 1177.
  • 10 Rogerus Malebraunch ob. 1182.
  • 11 Ricardus ob. 1188.
  • 12 Nicholaus ob. 1197.
  • 13 Willielmus Melburne ob. 1210.
  • 14 Rogerus Normannus ob. 1218.
  • 15 Nicholas de Wallingford ob. 1222.
  • 16 Richardus de Insula, removed to be Abbot of St. Edmunds 1229.
  • 17 Laurentius ob. 1240.
  • 18 Iohannes Stafford ob. 1280.
  • 19 Thomas Pakington ob. 1305.274
  • 20 Iohannes Pisoator alias Stapunhull. ob. 1316.275
  • 21 Willielmus de Bromley. ob. 1329.
  • 22 Robertus Longdone. ob, 1340.
  • 23 Robertus Brickhull. ob. 1348.
  • 24 Iohannes Ipstoke. ob. 1366.
  • 25 Thomas Southam. ob. 1400.
  • 26 Iohannes Sudburie resign'd 1424.
  • 27 Willielmus Mathew. ob. 1430.
  • 28 Robertus Ousby resign'd 1432.
  • 29 Radulphus Henley resign'd 1454.
  • 30 Willielmus Bronston. ob. 1472.
  • 31 Thomas Feylde. ob. 1473.
  • 32 Willielmus Heigh. ob. 1502.
  • 33 Willielmus Beyne ob. 1525.
  • 34 Iohannes Boston.
  • 35 Ricardus Edes, the last Abbet of Burton.

[Page 28] The remarkable Occurrences during the times of the said several Abbots may be seen in the Book at large. Vid Vol. 2. p. 869.

[Valued at 267 l. 14 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

276 ABBOTSBURY, in Dorsetshire.

ABout the year 1026. one Orcus a Great man in the Court of K. Canu [...]us, together with his Wise Tola, being both without hope or possibility of issue, built and edow'd the Monastery at Abbotsbury, and dedicated it 278 to St. Peter the Apostle. The said Orcus did also give a hall to a Guild or Fra­ternity in this Town, and by agreement between him and the Brethren, certain Orders were settled for the Rule and Governance of the said Fra­ternity, to the glory of God, and honour of St. Peter. King Edward the 279 Confessor, and King William the Conqueror ratified Orcus and his Wives Benefactions to the Monks here, and granted them certain Franchises. By in­quisition taken before the Escheator and Sheriff of this County, in the 280 53 Hen 3. The several Lands, Rents, and Liberties of this Abby were found and set forth; the Jury also found that the Abbot here held his E­state of the King in Capite by the service of one Knight's Fee only, and not, in Baronia, by the service of a Barony.

In the year 1505. Thomas Strangeways Esq founded a perpetual Chan­try in the Chappel of the Blessed Mary in the Church of this Abby, and endow'd it with Rents, for the maintenance of one Mass to be said in the 281 said Chappel daily for ever, for the Souls of his Ancestors and Friends, and for all the Faithful, subjecting it to the Visitation of the Bishop; and the Abbot did oblige himself to find a Monk (in case he should have above eight Monks, Priests, in the Monastery) to perform the Office: and this 282 under the penalty of 3 s. 4 d. to the Bishop of the Diocess, and 3 s. 4 d. to the Heirs of the said Strangeways, for every omission.

[Valued at 390 l. 19 s. 2 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

HULME, in Suffolk.

CAnutus the Danish King of England, returning from Rome, built two Monasteries to the honour of St. Benedict, one in Norwey, and the other this in England. Which last he founded in a fenny place then call'd 283 Couholm, where, in former-times, before the Danes came into Fngland, one Suneman a Hermite did inhabit, spending his time in devotion there for above fifty years. To the Abby here built, the said King canutus gave many Lands and Priviledges. All which King Edward the Confessor confirm'd, and granted others, Sacne, and Sokne, Toll, and Theam, &c. and 284 all other Liberties and free Customs which he himself enjoy'd in his own Demeans, and Lands belonging to the Crown.

St. EDMUNDS-BURY, in Suffolk.

SAint Edmund the last King of the East Angles, being overcome by Inguar, and Hubba Pagan Danes, was cruelly bound to a Tree, whipt,285 and then shot to death, suffering martyrdom for the Christian Religion, in the year of our Lord 870. and the 29th. of his Age. His Head and Body were thrown into a thick Wood by the Pagans, but being afterwards found out by miracle, he was buried at a Neighbouring place call'd by the Saxons Beodrichesworth (now St. Edmunsbury) where the Christians built a small Church. But afterwards King Canutus (who had erected at 286 Rome an English School, and assign'd for its maintenance a Sum of Money which was yearly sent from England, and call'd Romescot) by advice of his Bishops and Barons, changed the secular Clergy, belonging to this Church, to Monks, in the year 1020 and brought hither from the Abby of Hulme thirteen religious Benedictines, whose first Abbot here was one Wius. He also caused half the Books, Vestments, and Utinsils of that Ab­by to be removed hither. King Edmund the Elder in the year 942. gave Lands to this Church, and after him the foresaid King Conutus gave many Lands to this Monastery, and rebuilt it in a magnificent manner.

Controversies arising in the Reign of King William the Conqueror,288 between the Abbot and the Bishop of the Diocess, the Abbot went to Rome, and found such favour with Pope Alexander the II. that he granted to him and his Successors Episcopal Jurisdiction, and this special priviledge, viz. That so long as they kept a porphery Altar, which he then gave him, tho' the whole Kingdom should fall under Excommunication, yet the Divine Office should not cease in this Abby unless specially interdicted by name. His Bull bears date An. Dom. 107 [...]. In the year 1081. the Con­test between the Bishop and Abbot was examined before King William the Conqueror, and upon hearing both sides, that King did declare the 289 Church of St. Edmund, and the Town in which it Stands, to be exempt from the Bishops Jurisdiction.

The Steward or Seneschall's Office for the Liberty of St. Edmund, was a place of great honour, and the Family of Hastings held it in Fee. They enjoy'd several great Fees and Advantages by Custom, in case they exe­cuted the Office in their own Person, but if by Deputy or Lieutenant, then the said Deputy received half. All which particulars were found by in­quision in the 30th. year of Edward the I.

In the year 1010. the Body of St. Edmund was translated to London, this 291 Country being insested by the Danes; but after three years it was brought back again. In the year 1021. soon after King Canutus had introduced Monks here, Aldwinus Bishop of the East Angles, began to build a stately new Church, to which work and for the maintenance of the Fabrick, the Inhabitants of Norfolk and Suffolk did freely give yearly 4 d. out of every Carucate of Land in the Country. This Church was in the year 1032. dedicated in honour of Christ, the Blessed Mary, and St. Edmund.

King Edward the Confessor, King William the I. King Henry the I. King Steven, and King Richard, with many Bishops, and other Persons of Q [...]a­lity 292 of both Sexes gave Lands and great Revenues to this Abby.293

The Body of St. Edmund remain'd intire and uncorrupted, and was so 294 seen by many witnesses.

295 ABBOTS of St. EDMVNSBVRT.
  • [Page 30]296 1 Wius, Monk of Hulme, ob. 1044.
  • 2 Leoffranus, ob. 1065.
  • 3 Baldwinus, ob. 1097.
  • 4 Robert, Son of Hugh Earl of Chester depos'd 1102.
  • 5 Robert, Prior of Westminster, ob. 1107.
  • 6 Alboldus, ob. 1119.
  • 7 Anselmus, Nephew of Anselm Archbishop of Cant was 1138. chosen Bishop of London, but not received there, ob. 1148.
  • 8 Ordingus, ob. 1156.
  • 9 Hugh, Prior of Westminster, ob. 1180.
  • 10 Sampson, ob. 1211.
  • 11 Hugo, chosen Abbot 1213. con­secrated Bishop of Ely 1229. ob. 1254.
  • 12 Richard, Abbot of Burton, ob. 1233.
  • 13 Henry, ob. 1248.
  • 14 Edmund de Walpool, Doctor in the Decretals, ob. 1256.
  • 15 Simon, elected, 1257.
  • 16 Iohn de Norwold, ob. 1301.
  • 17 Thomas de Tottington, ob. 1312.
  • 18 Richard de Draugton, ob. 1337.
  • 19 William de Bernham. ob. 1361.
  • 20 Henry de Hunstanston died before Confirmation:
  • 21 Iohannes de Brinkele ob. 1379.
  • 22 Iohannes Tynmouth, created, 7 R. 2.
  • 33 Willielmus de Cratfeild, created 13 R. 2.
  • 24 Willielmus Exeter. 5 H. 6.
  • 25 Willielmus Curteys, 7 H. 6.
  • 26 Iohannes Boon, created Abbot 1457.
  • 27 Richardus Hengham 1475.
  • 28 Thomas Raclesden. 1478.
  • 29 Iohn Reeve, alias Melford, the last Abbot of Bury created 5 Hen. 8.

297 By Covenant made between the above-mentioned Iohn Norwood Abbot here on the one part, and the Prior and Convent of this Monastery on the other, the Mannors, Lands, and Revenues belonging to this Abby were divided and appropriated to the several Offices of the House, as such and such Lands and Revenues to the Abbot, such to the Celerarius, for 298 the diffraying of his Office, such to the Sacristan for the Charges in­cumbant on him, such to the Camerarius, such to the Almoner, such to the 299 Pitanciarius, such to the Infirmarius, such to the Hostillarius, and such to the Praecentor. But all Law-Suits concerning any the Lands or Estate of the Abby the Abbot was to manage at his own proper Charges. Also the Abbot was to entertain all secular Guests as well Horse-men as Foot­men, in case he was resident with his Family in Town, but the Convent was to entertain religious Persons, and in case the Abbot be absent, then the Convent to entertain also secular persons, if under thirteen Horse. This agreement between the Abbot and Convent was made in the year 1281. And exemplified by King Edward the I. in the same year, being the 9th. of his Reign.

300 The Names of the Sacristans of BVRT.
  • 301 1 Thurstan.
    • In the time of Abbot Baldwin.
  • 2 Tolimus.
  • 3 Godefridus.
  • 4 Radulphus.
  • 5 Harueus.
  • 6 Helias Widewell.
  • 7 Frodo.
  • 8 Willielmus Schuch.
  • 9 Willielmus Wardel.
  • 10 Hugo.
  • 11 Walterus de Banham.
  • 12 Willielmus de Disce.
  • [Page 31]13 Robertus de Granele, chosen Ab­bot of Thorney.
  • 14 Richardus de Insula, chosen Ab­bot of Burton, and at last Ab­bot here 1233.
  • 15 Dominus de Newport.
  • 16 Georgius, first Precentor, then Sacristan, than Prior here, re­puted a Saint.
  • 17 Nicholaus.
  • 18 Simon de Luyton, chosen Prior, and then Abbot here 1257.
  • 19 Richardus de Hornins [...]e.
  • 20 Richardus de Colecester.
  • 21 Simon de Kingston, first Celarer, and then Chamberlain.
  • 22 Willielmus de Luyton.
  • 23 Richardus le Brun.

Of the Buildings about the Church and Abby, perform'd, in the times of the Sacristans abovemen­tion'd, see the Book at large.

To the Cellarer of this House (whose Office was to make provision for 302 the diet of the whole Covent) did belong many Rights and Priviledges by ancient Custom. He kept the Court of the Lordship in the Town, from which he received divers annual Profits. His Officers were to be first served in the Market in buying provisions, if the Abbot were not in Town. Also the Cellerar and Abbots Officers were to have Herrings a half-penny in the hundred cheaper than any other people.

[Valued at 1659 l. 13 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

COVENTRY, in Warwickshire.

THIS Monastery was built by Leofricus Earl of Chester, and Godiva his Wife (a most pious Lady) and plentifully endow'd with Lands and Revenues. The Church was so richly adorn'd with Gold and Silver, and precious Stones, that the Walls seem'd too narrow to contain all the Treasure

The Founder Earl Leofrick died in the year 1057. and was buried at Co­ventry, as was also his Wife Godiva, in the Church-Porch of their own Foun­dation [...] In which Church was formerly kept an Arm of the Great St. Au­gustine [...] inclosed in Silver.

Robert de Limesey (who was made Bishop of Chester, A. D. 1088. and died 303 1116.) obtain'd of King Henry the I. The Monastery of Coventry, and consti­tuted it the Capital Cathedral of that Diocess. Whose Successor in that See, Hugh Bishop of Coventry, A. D. 1191. expell'd the Monks out of the Cathedral Church here, and placed in their room, secular Canons. But in the year 1198. Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, by order of Pope Ce­lestine, restored the Monks to the possession of their Church again.

It appears by Earl Leofrick's Charter of Foundation that he built this Church and Monastery to the honour of God and St. Mary his Mother, St. Peter the Apostle, St. Osburga the Virgin, and all Saints. And gave to the Maintenance of the Monks here serving God, twenty four Vil­lages, with the Moiety of the Town of Coventry in which it stands, with all Liberties and Customs which he himself enjoy'd in the said Estate, and that the Abbot of the said House should be subject to none but the King. All which grants King Edward the Confessor did confirm to Leof­winus 304 the first Abbot there and his Successors. Also Pope Alexander by his Bull directed to the said King Edward bearing date 1043. confirm'd all their Liberties and Exemptions, granting them full power to chose their [Page 32] own Abbots or Deans, without any Lett or Hindrance from the Aposto­lick Authority.

305 Leofwinus, the first Abbot of Coventry, being created Bishop of Chester, ordain'd with the Consent of the Monks, that his Successors, Superiors of that Monastery should be call'd Priors and not Abbots.

PEYKIRK, in Northamptonshire.

IN the year 1048. one Wulgatus then Abbot of a Monastery in this Town, lost his Abby and the Lands thereunto belonging, to the Ab­bot of Peterborough, who claim'd the same as parcel of his Estate. And this was by Judgment given in the Court of King Hard [...] Canute.

SPALDING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of Croyland, &c.

ANno Dom. 1052. Thoroldus de Bukenh [...]le Brother to Godiva Countess of Leicester having obtain'd six Monks from Wulgate Abbot of Croy­land, began the Priory of Spalding, assigning to it divers Lands, and an­next it as a Cell to Croyland.

In the year 1074. Tuo Taylboys Earl of Anjou (Andegavia) having mar­ried Lucia Great Grand daughter of the foresaid Godiva became Lord of Spalding and all Holland; and gave the Cell of Spalding to a Monk of St. Nicholas of Anjou. He also confirm'd the Estate which his Great Uncle Thorold had given to this House, and procured the like Confirma­tion 307 from the 2 Williams and Hen. 1st. Kings of England. In the year 1085. Yuo Taylboys, by License of King William the Conqueror, gave this Cell to the Abby of St. Nicholas of Anjou, with the Lands and Estate there­unto belonging. All which, with divers Liberties, was confirm'd to the 308 said Abby of St. Nicholas by King William the I. William the II. and Henry 309 the I. And also by King Iohn in the first year of his Reign.

See more, Vol. 2. p. 871.

[Valued at 767 l. 8 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

310 BATTEL Abby, in Sussex.

IN the year 1067. King William the Conqueror built this Abby in the same place where he fought and overcame Harold and his Army, that herein perpetual praise and thanks might he given to God for the said Victory and Prayers made for the Souls of those who were here slain. It was dedicated to St. Martin, and largely endow'd [...] with Lands and Priviledges.

312 In this Battle, it is said, that above ten thousand men lost their lives, on the conquering side; but what number of the conquered may be guest with astonishment.

314 King William design'd to have endow'd this Abby with Lands sufficient for the constant maintenance of sevenscore Monks, but death prevented. However he granted to it, to be free from the Bishops Jurisdiction, to have Sanctuary, to have Treasure troue, with many other Royal Liberties and Exemptions. He translated from an Abby in Normandy called Major Monaste­rium, several Monks, among whom one Gausbertus, who he appointed the first [Page 33] Abbot of Battail. And gave to this Abby the Mannor of Wi in Kent, 315 with other Mannors in Sussex, Surrey, Essex, Barkshire, Oxfordshire, and 317 Devonshire, with free Warren in all their Lands.

Yet King William gave this caution or restriction to the Abbot, that he 318 should not wast the Alms belonging to this Abby upon his secular kindred or others, but take care to bestow them upon poor People and Travellers, &c.

King William Rufus, and King Henry the I. were also Benefactors to this House.

[Valued at 880 l. 14 s. 7 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

BRECKNOCK, in Wales, a Cell to Battel Abby.319

BErnard de Newmarch was a Noble Norman in the Reign of King Henry the I. and was the first Conqueror of the Lands about Brecknock. He gave to Battel Abby his Church of St. Iohn the Evangelist in his Castle of 320 Brecknock. Roger Earl of Hereford. Grandson of the foresaid Bernard 321 gave divers Lands and Tithes to the Monks in the Church of St. Iohn of Brecknock, together with divers Liberties and Exemptions. All which 322 was afterwards confirm'd by Maihel de Hereford. and William de Braiose. Other Benefactors were Herbert Fitz Peter, Iohn Fitz Reginald, &c.323

[Valued at 112 l. 14 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

ARMETHWAYT, in Cumberland.324

KING William the Conqueror founded here a Monastery for black Nuns; and endow'd it with divers Lands, and such Priviledges as w [...]re granted to the Church of Westminster. This he granted in pure and perpetual Alms as freely As hert may it thynk or ygh may it se.

This Nunnery being seated so very near the Borders of Scotland, was so impoverisht by the Scots frequent Spoils and Inroads, that it was in a 325 manner reduced to nothing; whereupon King Edward the IV. did in the thirteenth year of his Reign, new grant, ratifie, and confirm their Lands and Estate unto the then Prioress and Nuns here.

[Valued at 18 l. 18 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

BEAULEIU (Bellus Locus) in Bedfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

THE Church of St. Mary in this place, of old call'd Moddry, was at first a Hermitage and built by a Hermite called Radulfus. It was afterwards given by Robert de Albeneio, with the consent of his Mother Secilia, to the Abby of St, Albans, and became a Cell of that House. Which 326 Robert endow'd it with divers Lands, all which he gave to God, and St. Alban, and to the Monks of Beauleiu, in Fee, to hold in free Alms.

WALLINGFORD, in Barkshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

327 THE Church here, dedicated to the holy Trinity, was made a Cell of St. Albans, in the time of Paul Abbot there. King Henry the VI. was a Benefactor to the Priory of Wallingford. Vid. Vol 3. p. 11.

BELVOIR or Beaver, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

RObertus de Toteneio Lord of the Castle of Belvoir, gave the Church of St. Mary, adjoyning to his said Castle, to the Abby of St. Albans to be a Cell of that House, endowing it with divers Lands and Tithes; ap­pointing it for the Burial-place of himself and Wife, in case they died in 328 England, and such it afterwards proved to be for his descendents.

329 The Lands hereunto given were confirm'd successively by the Heirs and Progeny of the said Robert, and lastly by Thomas Lord Ros, in the 8. Hen. 6.

[Valued at 104 l. 19 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

330 HATFEILD-PEVERELL, in, Hertfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans

WIlliam Peverell gave the Church of St. Mary at Hatfeild with his own Mansion-House there, for a Habitation of Monks, and en­dow'd the same with Lands; all which was afterwards annext to St. Al­bans, and became a Cell of that House.

[Valued at 60 l. 14 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

331 HERTFORD, a Cell of St. Albans.

RAdulfus de Limesey, having erected a Church at Hertford, he gave the same for a Cell to the Abby of St. Albans, and with it divers Lands in Hertford and elsewhere. The Abbot of St. Albans obliging himself to send thither six Monks of his House to serve God at Hertford, and in case the Revenue should be augmented then to send a greater number.

332 Hadwisia, Wife of the said Radulfus, Alan de Limesey their Son, Gerard his Son, and Iohn de Limesey his Son, were all Benefactors to this Church of St. Mary's at Hertford, and to the Monks of St. Albans serving God herein.

[Valued at 72 l. 14 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

333 TINEMOUTH, in Northumberland, a Cell of St. Albans.

334 RObert de Mulbray a Norman of noble extraction, to whom King Wil­liam the Conqueror gave the Earldom of Northumberland, endow'd the Church of St. Mary, adjoyning to his Castle of Tinemouth, and in which the Body of St. Oswin King and Martyr rested, with fair Revenues, 335 and gave it for a Cell to the Monks of St. Albans. David King of Scotland [Page 35] was a Benefactor to this House; so were King Henry the I. of England, King Henry the II. and King Iohn, who granted to God and the Church of St. Oswin in Tinmouth, and the Monks of St. Albans serving God here, many Lands, and great Liberties, which Liberties tho' seiz'd by King Edward 336 the III. yet were by him in the second year of his Reign regranted to them in as large a manner as ever, out of the special Devotion which he bore to the two glorious Martyrs St. Alban and St. Oswin.

[Valued at 397 l. 10 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum.]

WYMUNDHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell of St. Albans.337

ANno Dom. 1139. William de Albaneio Butler to King Henry the I. built the Church of St. Mary and Priory of Monks at this Town, endow'd the same with Revenues [...] and annext it as a Cell to St. Albans; yet so as they might choose a Prior among themselves and present him to their Founder, whom he was not to refuse without good Cause. And the 338 Monks here paid only a Mark of Silver yearly to the Abbot of St. Albans as an acknowledgment of subjection.

King Henry the I. confirm'd the Estate given to this House with the grant of many great Liberties. The like did also William Earl of Sussex, 339 Grandson of the foresaid William the Founder.

Afterwards in the 27th. of King Henry the VI. by Authority of Pope 340 Nicholas the V. and at the Petition of Sir Andrew Ogard Kt. then Patron of this Monastery, it was discharged from any dependency on the Abby of 341 St. Albans, and from paying the Mark per Annum, and made an Abby of it self, and Steven London then Prior, the first Abbot. All which was allow'd and confirm'd by the said King Henry the VI. who at the same 342 time pardon'd all penalties incurr'd by the Parties concern'd in procuring the Popes Bull, by reason of the Statute of Provisors, or any other Statute.

[Valued at 211 l. 16 s. 6 d. q. per Annum.]

BINHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell of St. Albans.343

PEter de Valoniis and Albreda his Wife gave the Church of St. Mary at Binham to the Abby of St. Albans, but to be subject only in such manner as St. Pancrace at Lewis is subject to St. Peter of Clugni, paying yearly to the Church of St. Alban a Mark of Silver and no more. Rog [...]r de Valoniis confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and the Monks of St. Albans ser­ving God at Binham, all the Lands which his Father Peter had given 344 them, and gave to them besides several other Lands and Tithes. The 345 like was done by others of that Family, and Iohn Bishop of Nor­wich. 346

St. MARY de PRATO, near St. Albans.347

THIS was a small Nunnery given, with certain Lands, by Garinus Abbot of St. Albans, for the maintenance of Leprous Nuns. Con­firm'd by King Iohn, in the fifth year of his Reign.

SOPEWELL, in Hertfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

ABout the year 1140. two religious Women led a solitary life in a small Habitation made of Boughs of Trees, near a Wood called Eiwoda, who being taken notice of for their austerities and pious Lives, Gaufridus the sixteenth Abbot of St. Albans, built there for them a Cell, gave them the Vail of Nuns, and constituted their way of living according to the Rule of St. Benedict. He also endow'd the House with Possessions and Rents, and assigned them a Coemitery, in which none were to be buried but the Virgins of the House, whose number was not to exceed thirteen.

348 Henry de Albaneio and Cecilia his Wife, and several of their Descen­dants, were great Benefactors to this Cell of St. Mary of Sopewell; and so was Richard de Tany.

349 Michael Abbot of St. Albans, made and publisht here in his Visitation, Anno Dom. 1338. certain good Rules and Orders to be observed by the Nuns of this House: among others, that the Door that goes into the Garden, and that of the Parlour, should not be open'd till the Bell sounds to the ninth hour, and that all the year they should be shut up at night when the Abby-Bell sounds the Cover [...]eu, &c.

[Valued at 40 l. 7 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

350 MERGATE, in Bedfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

IN the time of Gaufridus Abbot of St. Albans, one Roger a Monk of that Abby, became a Hermite in a Hermitage between St. Albans and Dunstable, where he lived in a most austere manner, with the reputation of great Sanctity; at the same time Christina a Virgin renouncing the World became an Anchoress at the same place, yet the said Roger never 351 saw her face, tho' they lived together four years. Roger died and was buried in the Abby-Church of St. Albans; but Christina surviving, be­came of so great note for her Sanctity, that the abovesaid Gaufridus, built here from the Foundation a Monastery for Nuns, and endow'd the same with Revenues, of which House Christina became the first Prioress. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 872.

352 St. NICHOLAS, Priory, at Exeter, a Cell of Battel-Abby.

THIS Church formerly dedicated to St. Olive King and Martyr, was by King William Rufus given to the Monks of Battel-Abby, for a Cell; and by them new dedicated to St. Nicholas. King William Rufus, King Henry the I. and King Iohn, conferr'd many Lands and Liberties upon this House.

[Valued at 147 l. 12 s. per Annum.]

MALLINGE, in Kent.

KING Edmund gave certain Lands in Mallinges to the Monastery of St. Andrew the Apostle, which afterwards was by Gundulfus Bishop 353 o [...] Rochester, converted to an Abby of Nuns here, dedicated to St. Mary; to which King Henry the I. and King Iohn, and Anselme Archbishop of Canterbury, were also Benefactors.

[Valued at 218 l. 4 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

TUTBURY, in Staffordshire.354

HEnry de Ferariis built the Church and Monastery, to the honour of the blessed Virgin, at his Castle of Tutbury, which by the Grant and Li­cente of King William Rufus, he endow'd with divers Lands and Tithes. Earl Robert de Ferariis the younger, Grandson of the Founder, was a great Benefactor, and so were many others whose names, with the parcells by them given, may be seen in the Monasticon at large.355

Iohn Duke of Lancaster, being Lord of the Honour and Castle of Tutbury, granted his Letters Pattents to the King of the Minstalls in Tutbury, im­powring him and his Successors, to arrest all Minstralls within the said Honour and Franchise who refuse to do their service of minstralsie on the Feast of the assumption of our Lady [...]early, and constrain them to it, according to Custom. Dated in the 4 Rich. 2.

There is also another Custom of the Place, that the Stage-players who come to Matins on the Feast of the Assumption, should have from the Prior of Tutbury a Bull in case they can catch him before he gets over the River there, or else the Prior is to give them 40 d. in mony. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 873.

EYE, in Suffolk.356

RObert Malet, to whom King William the Conqueror had given the honour of Eye, with the assent of that King, built a Monastery there, and to it gave the Church dedicated to St. Peter, in Eye, with a great quanity of Lands and Churches, with Liberties and Franchises, to hold as freely as King William gave them to him. In the year 1138. King Steven 357 confirm'd to the Monks here, all their Lands and Liberties, with a for­mal Curse to the Violators. The like Confirmation from William Earl of Boloign that King's eldest Son. This House was a Cell to the Abby 358 of Bernay in Normandy, so that neither the Prior nor any Monk could be placed here without the assent of the Abbot of Bernay; neither upon the death of the Prior here, could the Founder, or his Heirs or Successors, Pa­trons of this Priory, meddle with, or receive any profit from the Goods and Possessions of this House during the vacancy; but only, in sign of Dominion, he used to place a Porter at the Gate of the Priory, who du­ring the Vacation was maintain'd out of the Revenues of the House, and at the Instalment of the next Prior used to receive for his Fee the Sum of 5 s. for an Ox.

[Page 38] 359 In the 8th. year of King Richard the II. the Estate of this Priory being then seiz'd into the King's hands because of his Wars with France, the Prior and Covent complain'd that they were extreamly impoverished by Foreign Exactions, so that the Revenues of this House could hardly maintain the Prior and three or four Monks; that King therefore by his Letters Patents, at their Petition and Request, discharged them for ever of their Foreign Subjection to the Abby of Bernay, and made them a Prior and Covent of themselves independent, like other English Priories.

[Valued at 161 l. 2 s. 3 d. q. per Annum.]

HELENSTOW, in Berkshire.

JVdith Countess of Huntington, Wife of Earl Waltheof, built a Church and Monastery here for Nuns; and dedicated it to the holy Trinity, 360 St. Mary, and St. Helen. She and others endow'd it with divers Lands; all which were afterwards confirm'd to the Nuns here by King Henry the II. together with large Priviledges and Exemptions.

PENWORTHAM, in Lancashire, a Cell of Evesham.

WArinus Bussell, and Richard Bussell his Son, gave the Church at Penwortham, and with it divers Lands, to the Abby of Evesham, for a Cell of that Abby. All which was confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and to the Monks serving God in Penvercham, by Hugh Buissell, Grandson 361 of the foresaid Warinus, in pure and perpetual Alms. This was in the Reign of King William the Conqueror.

[Valued at 29 l. 18 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

KILBURN, in Middlesex, a Cell of Westm.

IN the Reign of King Henry the I. Herebertus Abbot of Westminster, Osbert de Clara, Prior, and the whole Convent of Westminster, gave a Hermitage at Kilburn to three Maids Emma, Gunilda, and Christina, for a Nunnery; and endow'd the same with Lands and Rents. Gilbert Bishop 362 of London gave the Jurisdiction of this Cell of Kilburn to the said Abbot and his Successors, exempting it from the Jurisdiction of the Bishop of London for ever. But new Contests arising about this House between the Bishop of London and Abbot of Westminster, they came to an Agree­ment in the year 1231. That the Bishop might visit the Nunnery to preach to them, and to hear their Confessions, but without exacting any 363 Procurations; and that the Government of the House placing, and displacing the Abbess and Nuns, should belong to the Abbot, as a Cell of his House, &c.

[Valued at 74 l. 7 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

HURLEY, in Barkshire, a Cell of Westminster.

GOdefridus de Magnavilla gave to God, and St. Peter, and to the Church of Westminster, and St. Mary of Hurley, the Town of Hurley, with 364 divers other Lands and Tithes, for the Maintenance of a Convent of Monks to serve God in the said Church for ever. All which was confirm'd to the Priors and Monks of Hurley by William Bishop of London. In the 365 year 1258. Godefridus Prior of Hurley and his Covent made an exchange, with Absolon Abbot of Walden, of some of their Revenues.

[Valued at 121 l. 18 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

MALVERNE, in Worcestershire, a Cell of Westminster.

IN the eighteenth year of William the Conqueror, one Aldwine a Her­mit and his Brethren began the Monastery here.

King William the Conqueror and others gave Lands and Revenues to 366 this House, but more especially King Henry the first who by his Charter 367 dated in the year 1127. granted and confirm'd to them many Lands and great Liberties and Immunities. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 876.

[Valued at 98 l. 10 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.]

AUCOT, in Warwickshire, a Cell of Malverne-magna.

WIlliam Burdet gave all his Land in Aucot to God and St. Mary of Malverne and to the Monks there, in the year 1159. From a­mong which Monks he was to have, by agreement betwixt him and Roger, Prior of that House, a certain number for the Institution of a Monastery here. The Prior of which House was to be constituted by the Prior of Malverne, by and with the advice of the Abbot of Westmin­ster.

[Valued at 28 l. 6 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

SUDBURY, in Suffolk, a Cell of Westminster.

KING Edward the III. in the thirty fifth year of his Reign, granted 368 his License to Richard Roke of Westminster, to settle certain Land in Sudbury and Holgate upon the Abbot and Convent of Westminster, or the relief of their poor Cell of St. Bartholomew near Sudbury.

St. NEOTS, in Huntingtonshire.

SAint Neot was Son of King Adulphus, and Brother of King Alured, who founded the University of Oxford. He was a Monk at Neotestoke, in Cornwall, and from thence his Body was translated to Anulphesbury, in Huntingtonshire, where Earl Elfrid converted his Palace into a Monastery of black Monks. Which being afterwards spoild and burnt down by the [Page 40] 369 Danes, was in the Reign of King Henry the I. An. Dom. 1113. re-edified by Rohesia Wife of Richard Son of Earl Gislibert; about which time it was given as a Cell to the Abby of Bec in Normandy. The foresaid Lady and divers others gave Lands and Revenues to the Monks of Bec serving God at St. Neots. It appears by the Bull of Pope Celestine, directed to the Bishop of Lincoln, that the Prior and Convent of St. Neots, being their House was situated on a famous and great Road, did use to bestow meat 370 and drink on all Travellers who desired it, and to this only use they did appropriate certain Rents and Pensions which they received yearly from the Churches of Eynesbury and Torney.

In the Reigns of Henry the IV. and Henry the V. This Monastery was discharg'd of its Foreign Subjection to the Abby of Bec, and made an English Priory. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 876.

[Valued at 241 l. 11 s. 4 d. q. per Annum.]

371 SELBY, in Yorkshire.

KING William the Conqueror founded the Abby here for Benedictine Monks, in honour of our Lord Iesus Christ, and his blessed Mother the Virgin Mary, and St. Germain the Bishop. Which King, and se­veral other persons, did endow it with large Possessions, in particular Guido de Raincourt gave to this Church of St. Germain in Selby his Town of Stamford in Northamptonshire. Thomas Archbishop of York, Gilbert 372 T [...]s [...]n chief Standard-bearer of England, Gaulerannus Earl of Mellent, Henry 373 de Lacy Earl of Lincoln and Constable of Chester, &c. gave other Lands 374 and great Liberties [...] All which King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Monks here. Also King Edward the III. did in the second year of his Reign, confirm to them all their Liberties and Exemptions, whereupon in the twenty second of that King, they were 375 excused from paying to the King, in any of their Lands purchased before the abovesaid second year, any a [...]d for knighting his eldest Son, &c.

[Vaued at 729 l. 12 s. 10 d. q. per Annum.]

SHREWSBURY, in Shropshire.

IN the year 1083. Roger Earl of Montgomery built here a Monastery in 376 honour of St. Peter. To this House he gave great Possessions, and after his Example other Barons and Knights of that County did the like. 377 After the death of the said Roger, Hugh his Son and Heir gave other Lands and great Liberties and Immunities, with a heavy Curse to the 378 Violaters. The like did King Henry the I. and King Steven, confirming their said Liberties in so large a manner that nothing could be added to 380 them. Other principal Benefactors were Matilda de Lungespe Daughter and 381 Heir of Walter de Clifford, Walchelinus Maminot, Willielmus Peverell, and 382 Richard Fitz-Allen Earl of Arundel, &c. All whose Guifts and Benefacti­ons were confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks of this House by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign.

[Valued at 132 l. 4 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

St. MARY's, at York.383

THE History of the Foundation of this Abby was writ by Stephen who had been Abbot of Whitby, and was after that made the first Abbot of this House. In which the most observable matters are as follows,

Alan Son of Eudo Earl of Brittain, having built a Church adjoyning to 385 the City of York in honour of St Olave, gave it to the foresaid Stephen and his Companions, with four Acres of Land, thereon to erect a Monastery. This was about the year 1088. in the Reign of King William the Conque­ror. Who dying, his Son and Successor King William Rufus, gave them Land whereon to build a larger Church, and gave to the Monastery, divers Lands, Liberties, and Exemptions. Also Earl Alan their first Founder gave them the adjoynig Suburbs lying without the City of York, to hold freely for ever. And gave the Advowson of this Abby to the King, that so he might be the Defendor and Patron of it for the future. Thomas Archbishop of York claim'd the four Acres of Land on which this Abby was built as belonging to him, and was a continual vexation to the Monks, till King William Rufus gave him the Church of St. Steven's in York, in exchange and full satisfaction.

When King William Rufus, seeing the Old Church to be too strait, laid 386 the Foundation of a new one, he changed the name of St. Olave, and gave it the name of St. Mary.

King Henry the II. granted to this Abby very great Liberties and 387 Franchises, the same as are enjoy'd by St. Peters of York, and St. Iohn of Beverley. And confirmed to them all their Lands and Revenues given them by their several Benefactors amounting to a very great number, some of the principal of whom were King William the I. and II. King 388 Henry the I. Alan Earl of Britaign, Odo Earl of Campania, Berengerius de 389 Todenei, Willielmus Peverel, Petrus de Ros, Robertus de Brus, Ivo Tallebois, 390 Walterus de Daincourt, and Conan Earl of Britaigne, &c.391

In the year 1343. William Archbishop of York in his Visitation, que­stioning by what Right and Title the Abbot and Covent here, did claim 392 and receive the Tithes, Portions, and Pensions, from several places there mention'd (amounting to a very great number) they produced the Bulls 393 of several Popes, and Grants of his Predecessors, Archbishops of York, whereupon they were by the said Archbishop allow'd, and their Title de­clared good and sufficient.

A List of some of the ABBOTS of St. Mary's at York.394
  • 1088 Stephanus Wittebiensis.
  • 1112 Richardus.
  • 1131 Godfridus.
  • 1132 Sauaricus.
  • 1161 Clemens.
  • 1184 Robertus de Harpham.
  • 1189 Robertus de Longo-Campo.
  • 1239 Willielmus Rondele.
  • 1244 Thomas de Warterhill.
  • 1258 Simon de Warwick.
  • 1296 Benedictus de Malton.
  • 1303 Iohannes de Gillyngs.
  • 1313 Alanus de Nesse.

Vid. Vol. 3. p. 9.

[Valued at 1550 l. 7 s. 0 d. q. per Annum]

395 St. BEES, or St. Beges, in Cumberland, a Cell of St. Mary's, at York.

SAint Bega was a vailed Nun, born in Ireland, she built a small Mona­stery in Caupland in the furthermost parts of England, not far from Carlile. This Monastery, together with several Lands and Tithes, was afterwards in the Reign of King Henry the I. given to the Abby of St. Mary's at York, by William Meschines, Son of Ranulph, Lord of Caupland, for a Cell to that Abby; which was to send hither a Prior, and at least 396 six Monks to be constantly here resident. To this House, also William Forz Earl of Albemarl was a Benefactor.

[Valued at 143 l. 17 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

397 WETHERHAL, in Cumberland; a Cell to St. Mary's at York.

AT the time of the Foundation of St. Mary's at York, Radulph Meschines Earl of Cumberland, gave the Cell of St. Constantine at Wedderhal, to the said Abby of St. Mary's; which guift was confirm'd by King William 398 the Conqueror in the last year of his Reign: (Or rather by King William Rufus in the first of his.)

Benefactors to this House were David King of Scotland and Earl 399 of Huntington, and his Son Henry Prince of Scotland, with divers o­thers.

Adelwald, (or Athelwulph, who was the first) Bishop of Carlile, con­firm'd to the Monks of St. Mary's at York the Churches, and Tithes to them given. in his Diocess. Providing however that the said Monks shall allot a sufficient proportion out of the same for the Priests in the several Churches, and that they should also pay the Synodals.

400 King William the Conqueror, upon his Conquest of this Kingdom, gave to Ralph de Meschines the County of Cumberland, to his Brother Hugh de Meschines, the County of Chester, and to a third Brother William de Mes­chines (who founded this House at Wetherhal) all the Land of Copland, lying between Duden and Darwent. Which Great men soon after sub­divided, and parcell'd out their respective Territories so given, to cer­tain Barons and Knights their Dependents, viz. Ralph de Melchines enfeofft Hubert de Vaux of the Barony of Gillesland, &c. William de Meschines Lord of Copland, enfeofft Waldeuus Son of Cospatrick of all his Land between Cocar and Derwent, &c. These chief Lords reserving from their Feoffees certain services, in like manner as they themselves held their Estates by some services of the King. (Yet were Lands often granted to the Monasteries, to hold free from all services whatsoever, except the Divine Service of Prayers for their Founders, &c.)

And note, That after this manner were Lands and Liberties first derived from the Crown, and Tenures raised in relation to them, since the Norman Conquest.

[Valued at 117 l. 11 s. 10 d. ob. q. per Annum.

St. MARTINS, at Richmund, a Cell to St. Mary's at York.401

WYmar, Sewer to the Earl of Richmund, gave the Chappel of St. Martins at Richmund, and with several Lands, to God and the blessed Mary at York.

Roaldus Grandson of Alan Constable of Richmund, and divers others were Benefactors, and gave Lands and Tithes to God, the Church of St. Mary at York, and Priory of St. Martins near Richmund, and to the Monks there.

In the year 1146. Pope Eugenius the III. confirmed the Cell of St. Martins.

Peter Capell, Rector of the Church of Richmund granted a Pension of 402 5 l. per Annum to the Monks of St. Mary's at York, and 20 l. of Wax to their Cell of St. Martins of Richmund, yearly.

The several Rents and Revenues of this House; where, and from whom they arise, may be seen in the Book at large, p. 402, 403.

[Valued at 43 l. 16 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

ROMBURGH, in Cambridgeshire, a Cell to St. Mary's at York.404

ALan (otherwise, as I suppose, called Steven) Earl of Britany and Rich­mond, gave the Cell of Romburgh to God, St. Mary, and the Monks of the Abby at York; which Gift was confirm'd to them by Everard Bi­shop of Norwich, and that the Abbot and Convent of St. Mary's at York, might place and displace the Prior and Monks at their pleasure. The like Confirmations were granted by Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, and Gaufridus Bishop of Ely.

SANTOFT and HENES, in Lincolnshire, Cells of St. Mary's at York.

ROger Moubray gave the Isle called Santoft, and large Possessions with it,405 for a Cell to the Church of St. Mary's at York, and to the Monks there. And William Earl of Waren gave Henes to the said Church.406

HEREFORD Priory, a Cell of St. Peter's at Gloucester.

IN the year 1101. Hugo de Lacy gave the Church of St. Peters at Here­ford, which his Father Walter had built from the Foundation, to the Monks of St. Peters at Gloucester, with all the Estate belonging to it, given by his said Father Wal [...]er de Lacy, and Confirm'd by King William the Conqueror.

In the Reign of King Edward the II. great Contests arising in this House between William de Irby who claim'd to be Prior under the Kings Patronage, and Thomas de Burg [...]ull who claim'd under another Title: the Estate of the Priory was so wasted and impoverisht betwixt them that there did not remain sufficient to discharge the Works of Piety, for which it was at first built, and the House running to utter ruin; that King there­fore, [Page 44] to prevent its final destruction, in the fifteenth year of his Reign, directed his Writ to the Sheriff of Hereford, commanding him to seize the said Priory with all its Possessions as well moveable as immoveable into his hand, and them safely to keep until further Order.

407 NORWICH, in Norfolk.

THE Church of the holy Trinity in Norwich was founded in the Reign of King William Rufus, An Dom. 1096. by Herbert Losenge, who had been Prior of Fischampe in Normandy, then Abbot of Ramsey, and then Bishop of the East-Angles, of which Diocess he fixt the Seat at Norwich, and built this Church for his Cathedral; erecting on the North-side of it his own Palace, and on the South-side a Monastery for Monks. 408 Certain Limits were appointed about this Church and Monastery, within which, Bishop Herbert obtain'd great Priviledges and Franchise from both Regal and Papal Authority. Notwithstanding which, great Contests arose between the Citizens and the Monks about their Liberties, which con­tinued for many years, and were never perfectly compos'd till the sixth 409 year of King Iohn. The said Bishop Herbert endow'd this Monastery, 410 so founded by him, with large Revenues, as appears by his Deed dated 411 An. Dom. 1101. King Henry the I. confirm'd his Gift, and also gave them 412 other Lands in the same year. King Henry the II. also made a large Confirmation of all their Lands and Liberties.

Vid. infra p. 1003. and Vol. 3. p. 5.

413 EWYAS Priory, in Herefordshire.

THIS Priory was founded and endow'd by Harald Lord of Ewyas, An. Dom. 1100. whose Gift was afterwards confirm'd by Robert his Son, who also gave other Lands; all which was also confirm'd by Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, and Iohn Bishop of Salsbury.

MIDLESBURG, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Whitby.

RObert de Brus and Agnes his Wife, and Adam de Brus their Son gave the Church of St. Hylda in Midlesburg, and with it divers Lands, in perpetual Alms to the Monks of St. Peter and St. Hilda at Whitby, for a Cell of that House, and that certain of those Monks might live and re­side here for God's service in the Church of Midlesburg William Malebiss was also a Benefactor to the Church of St. Hylda at Midlesburg and the Monks there.

HAKENES, in Yorkshire.414

IN the Reign of King William Rufus, the Monastery of Whitby being much infested not only by robbers from the Woods on the Land, but also by Pirates from the Sea, who carried from them almost all they had, Serlo de Percy then Prior of that House, and his Monks, applied them­selves to William de Percy, Brother of Serlo, and desired of him a place of Refuge at Hakenes; who readily granted them the Church of St. Mary in that Town, which had been built by St. Hildo the Abbess, with Li­cense to erect a Monastery there, and in it to remain till they could re­turn in peace to Whitby; which accordingly they did, and remain'd here for some time.

HORSHAM, in Norfolk.

RObert Fitz-Walter and Sibill his Wife, returning through France from Rome, where they had been in Pilgrimage, were set upon by Theives, robb'd, and kept in Prison. till by their Prayers to Almighty God, and to the holy Virgin St. Faith, they were miraculously deliver'd out of their Confinement. After which they visited in Devotion the Shrine of St. Faith at the Abby of Couches in France, where for the space of twelve days they remain'd, being kindly entertain'd by the Abbot and 415 Convent there. Vowing at their return into England to their own Man­nor, to built there a Monastery in the Worship of God and St. Faith. Which accordingly they did; endowing the same with Lands, and placing therein two Monks of the Abby of Couches, to which Abby they annext this House as a Cell. Their Deed of Foundation and Endowment, was made in the time of Henry the I. and Herbert Bishop of Norwich, who died 19. H. 1.

Pope Alexander, by his Bull dated in the year 1163. confirm'd to the Monks here all their Lands and Liberties.416

In the 14. Rich. 2. this Priory was discharged of its Foreign Sub­jection to the Abby of Couches, and made an English Priory of it self.

[Valued at 162 l. 16 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

RADINGFEILD, in Suffolk.417

THIS was a Priory of Nuns founded to the honour of God and St. Andrew, by Manasses Earl of Gisnensis, and Emme his Wi [...]es Daugh­ter and Heir of William de Arras, and endow'd by them with the Man­nor of Radingfeild, &c. late held by the said William de Arras; their Deed bears date 1120.

[Valued at 67 l. 0 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

READING, in Barkshire.

[...] of Nuns. But that having been [...] Henry the I. An. Dom. 1126. [Page 46] built here a most noble Abby for Monks, and dedicated it in honour of the Virgin Mary and St. Iohn Baptist, and endow'd it with great Posses­sions 418 and Franchises as may be seen in his Charter dated 1125. all which was confirm'd by King Hen. 2.

419 Hugh Abbot of Reading and his Covent, reciting by their Deed, that King Henry the I. had [...]rected that Abby for the maintenance of Monks there devoutely and religiously serving God, [...]for the receit of Strangers and Travellers, but chiefly Christ's poor People, they therefore did e­rect an Hospital without the Gate of the Abby there, to maintain twenty six poor People; and to the maintenance of Strangers passing that way they gave the profits of their Mill at Leominstre. Also Auc [...]erius Abbot of Reading, built near this Abby a House for Lepers, which was call'd St. Mary Magdalens, alloting for their sustenance sufficient of all things, as well 420 for Diet, as other matters. If any Brother of this House were guilty of Adultery, or of striking his Brother in Pride, Anger, or Hatred, he was to be expell'd the House; none were to go abroad without a Companion; what Charity happens to be given to any one, to be common to all; these and several others were the Rules observed in the Lepers House of St. Mary Magdalen.

[Valued at 1938 l. 14 s. 3 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

LEOMINSTER, in Herefordshire, a Cell to Reading.

421 HERE was formerly a Nunnery built by Merwald one of the Kings of Mercia; but that having been long destroy'd by the Danes, King Henry the I. when he built the Abby of Reading, gave them also Leo­minster, with all the Estate belonging to it, and those Monks made it a Cell of their Abby. It was confirm'd to them by Richard and Hugh Bi­shops of Hereford.

RINDELGROS, in Scotland, a Cell to Reading.

422 DAvid King of Scotland gave this Town to the Abbot and Covent of Reading, to have and enjoy as freely and quiety as any Abby in his Kingdom enjoy their Estates. With a Provision that if he or his Suc­cessors shall add to this Donation sufficient wherewith to maintain a Co­vent here, that then the said Abbot of Reading should send a Covent hither.

MAY, in Scotland, a Cell to Reading.

THIS Priory was founded by David King of Scotland, and endow'd with several Lands in Scotland, by the said David, and Malcolm and William successively Kings of Scotland.

SHIRBURN, in Dorsetshire.423

THE Bishops Seat which is now at Salisbury, did of old time, for many years, remain at Shirburn; but since that time Monks were placed here instead of secular Canons. The Abby-Church here, dedicated to our Lady, was in the time of Abbot Bradeford, set on fire, and a great part burnt, in a Dissention which happened between the Townesmen and the Monks; but the Townesmen were made to contribute to the Repa­ration.424 King Hen. 2. granted and confirm'd certain Lands to this Abby.

[Valued at 682 l. 14 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

CADWELLI, in the Diocess of St. David's, in Wales, a Cell to Shirburn.

THIS Priory of Cadwelli was given to the Church of St. Mary's of Shirburn [...] and to Thurstan Prior there and his Successors, by Roger Bishop of Salsbury. Maurice of London and others were Benefactors. Pope 425 Alexander, by his Bull dated 1163. confirm'd to the Abby of Shirburn all its Lands and Revenues, among others the Parish Church of St. Mary of Shirburn, which the Abbot of that Abby held as a Prebend of the Church of Salisbury, also the Church of St. Mary of Cadwelli with all the Chappels,426 and Tithes thereunto belonging, &c. all which Grants and Deeds were ratified, approved, and confirm'd, and also exemplified by David Bishop of St. David's, Anno Dom. 1303.

[Valued at 29 l. 10 s. per Annum.]

CARHOW, in Norfolk.

THIS was a Nunnery founded and endow'd by King Steven near the City of Norwich. King Iohn in the first year of his Reign granted to the Nuns here a Fair, to be held yearly at the Nativity of our Lady, with the like Liberties as the Monks enjoy in their Fair at Norwich. King 427 Henry the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirmed their Estate.

[Valued at 64 l. 16 s. 6 d. q. per Annum.]

GRENDALE, in Yorkshire.

AVicia Prioress of the Covent of Nuns in the Church of St. Mary of Grendale, granted in fee-farm to Ralf Prior, and to the Convent of Giseburn, certain Lands which had been to the said Nuns given by Eugeramus de Bovington; to hold at the yearly Rent of four Quarters of Wheat yearly, to be paid half at the Feast of St. Martins in Winter, and half at Whitsontide. Richard de Percy, then Patron of this Priory, granted the Advowson thereof to Richard Malebisse and his Heirs for ever, yeild­ing,428 in [...]eu of all Service, one pound of Incense yearly at the Feast of Pentecost; which by the same Deed he assigned to be paid to the said Priory.

CLERKENWELL, in Middlesex.

JOrdanus, Son of Radulfus, Son of Brian, gave to God, St. Mary, and all Saints, and to Robert the Chaplain, in Alms, fourteen Acres of Land lying near the Clerks-well (fons clericorum) freed and discharged from all Claims of the Hospitallers of St. Iohn or Ierusalem; this he gave to the said Robert, to the end that he might there build a religious House, such as he thought fit for God's service. Which being built and made a Nunnery, 429 Matilda de Ros, Daughter of Richard Canvilla, Girard de Canvill, Henry de Essex, and others were Benefactors; whose Gifts were confirm'd by Richard Bishop of London, An. Dom. 1194. and by the Heirs General of 430 the Founder, who also granted other Lands and Possessions lying round 431 the Nunnery. All which Lands and Possessions were confirm'd to the 432 Church of St. Mary de Fonte Clericorum adjoyning to London, and the 433 Nuns there by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 262 l. 19 s. per Annum.]

WROXHALL, in Warwickshire.

HVgh Lord of Wroxhall and Hatton, being taken Prisoner at the holy War (in Palestine) and detain'd in Cha [...]s there, was by miracle re­moved from thence and set down in his own Estate at Wroxhall; where­upon 434 he built a Nunnery here for Benedictine Nuns, in honour of God and St. Leonard, to whom he had made his Prayers when in distress; and made his two Daughters Nuns here.

The Names of the Prioresses,
  • 1 Ernborow.
  • 2 Helin.
  • 3 Sabin.
  • 4 Helin.
  • 5 Mawd.
  • 6 Emme.
  • 7 Mawd.
  • 8 Cece [...]ie.
  • 9 Ide.
  • 10 Amis Abtot.
  • 11 Annis.
  • 12 Sibill Abtot. 1284.

435 King Henry the II. and several others were Benefactors, all whose Gifts were confirm'd to this House in the first of King Edward the III.

[Valued at 72 l. 15 s, 6 d. per Annum.]

436 COLNE, in Essex, a Cell to Abington.

ALbericus de Veer, the Kings Chamberlain, gave and confirm'd to God and St. Mary, and to the Monks of Abington at Coln, serving God in 437 the Church of St. Andrew there, divers Land and Revenues. King Henry the I. in the year 1111. authorized and confirm'd the Subjection of this Church to that of Abington, and all the Estate given un­to 438 it by the said Albericus de Veer and others of his Family. Which Albericus, before his death, became a Monk in this House, and dying, was here buried; as were also his Sons. In the year 1311 a Compositi­on and Agreement was made between Richard Abbot of Abington, and Iohn de Campeden Prior of Colun, and their several Convents, containing that the Prior and Covent of Coln might choose and admit their own Monks [Page 49] from what parts they please, and that no Monks should be sent thither from the Convent of Abyndon; that the Convent of Coln might choose their own Prior, who was to be presented to, and allow'd by the Abbot 439 of Abyndon; sa [...]ing to the Abbot the right of visiting the said Priory of Coln. In consideration of which Liberty the Monks of Coln, did with the Consent of Robert de Veer Earl of Oxford their Patron, grant to the Ab­bot of Abyndon their Lordship of Kensington. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 877.

[Valued at 156 l. 12 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

CANEWELL, in Staffordshire.

GEva Daughter of Hugh Earl of Chester, and Wife of Ieoffrey Ridell, founded the Church in honour of St. Mary, and St. Giles, and All Saints in Canewell, for Monks; and, with the grant and allowance of her Heirs Ieoffrey Ridell, and Ralph Basset, endow'd it with divers Lands. The said 440 Ralph Basset was a Benefactor to this House, and so was Waleran Earl of 441 Warwick.

FARWELL, in Staffordshire.

ROger Bishop of Chester (whose Seat was since translated to Lichfield) gave the Church of St. Mary at Faurwelle to Nuns and devout Wo­men; this he did at the request of three Hermits inhabiting at Faurwelle; and endow'd the same with Lands, to hold as freely as he himself did from God and the King; all which King Henry the II. confirm'd to the said 442 Nuns, and also gave them of his own Charity divers other Lands and Liberties.

PINLEY, in Warwickshire.

R de Pila [...]dinton, gave this place to be a Nunnery, which was confirm'd to the Nuns here by Alured Bishop of Worcester, and by Simon and Iohn his Predecessors. Iohn Son of Ieoffrey de Langele gave to God and St. Mary of Pinley and the Nuns there, his Brother Robert de Lange­ly, his Homage, and Service, and Rent of 6 d. for the maintenance of our Ladies Lamp at Pinley (ad Lumen beatae Mariae de Pineleia)

[Valued at 23 l. 5 s. 11 d. per Annum]

STRATFORD Pr [...]ory.443

THE Nunnery here dedicated to St. Leonard, was founded and en­dowed by Christiana de Sumeri, and her Son; as seems by the Confirmation of King Steven. King Richard the I. did confirm other Lands to it, given by Galiena and her Son Bartholmew de Daumartin, Pa­trons of the House.

FRESTONE in Lincolnshire, a Cell of Croyland.

ALan de Creun, with Muriel his Wife, and Maurice his Son gave the Clearch of St. Iames of Frestone, with several Lands and Tithes, to 444 be a Cell to the Abby of Croyland. From which Creun, or Croune, descended the Family of Pedwardyn, who became Heirs of the Founder, the Male Line ceasing.

St. DOGMELS, in Pembrokshire, (Cella Caenobii Tyronensis.)

THese Monks were Benedictines of the same Order with those of St. Martins at Tours. The Priory here was founded by Martin de Turribus, a Norman who first Conquered the Country hereabouts call'd 445 Kames, or Kemish. Robert the Son of this Martin, endow'd it with Lands, confirm'd to it by King Henry the I.

[Valued at 87 l. 8 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

WALDEN Abby, in Essex.

THE Abby at Walden was founded in the year 1136. by Gaufridus 446 de Mandevilia Earl of Essex. He was Grandson of Ieoffrey who came into England with the Norman Conqueror, and was of most signal 447 note in his Army for his great Performances. From the noble Founder of this Abby (who died in the year 1144.) descended the illustrious Family of the Bohuns Earls of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton.

This Abby was dedicated to the honour of the blessed Mary, and St. 448 Iames the Apostle.

The Family of Bohuns were great Benefactors to this Abby, and most of them buried here.

This Abby was built on the West-side of the Town and adjoyning to the 449 High-way, which place was chosen as more proper for the relief of Tra­vellers, and for Hospitality.

451 After the death of the Founder, Rohesia his Widow built a Nunnery at Chinksand, to which she did all good Offices, and for the sake of that House, became very unkind to this of her Husbands Foundation.

452 William de Mandevilla second Son of the Founder, while Ieoffrey his elder Brother lived, led a military life in Flanders with Philip Earl of that Country, but upon his Brother's death without issue, he return'd into England, and inherited his Estate. Soon after which he made a Pilgrimage to Ierusalem and visited the holy Places, from whence being return'd into England, he visited this House, and was here received with great Ceremony, where he presented at the Altar several Relicks which be had purchased in 453 the holy Land, and became a great Benefactor to this House, giving them by his Testament the Moiety of his Lordship of Walden, &c. and died in Normandy without issue. After whose decease this Barony came by his 454 Heirs General to one Ieffrey Fitz-Peter, who disseiz'd the Monks of what 456 Earl William had given them, and kept the Estate from them a great while, 458 till after King Iohn's Coronation, being made Earl of Essex. he restored part of their Lands again, and confirm'd them to the Monks here. This [Page 51] Ieffrey Filius Petri was very vexatious to this Abby, the manner and par­ticulars may be seen in the Book at large. Yet did, Gaufridus de Manda­villa, 459 the first Founders Deed of Foundation contain a heavy Curse to any of his Successors or Tenants who should vex or disturb these Monks in any of their Possessions, or alienate or diminish the same. The Founders En­dowment was confirm'd by several of his Descendents; also by King Steven, 460 and King Henry the II. And King Edward the III. in the seventeeth year of 461 his Reign Licensed William de Bohun Earl of Northampton to give and an­next 462 the Priory of Bereden in Essex as a Cell to this Abby.463

[Valued at 372 l. 18 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

BROMFEILD, in Shropshire.464

ANno Dom. 1155. The Canons of Bromfeild, by the Authority of Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, gave their Church of Bromfeild to the Abby of St. Peters at Gloucester.

King Henry the II. confirm'd all the Estate belonging to the Church of St. Mary of Bromfeild, to the Prior and Monks there serving God, to hold of him and his Heirs in perpetual Alms. The like did King Henry the III.

BRETFORD, in Warwickshire.

GAufridus Camerarius de Clintona gave certain Lands in this Lordship to one Noemi a Nun, for the erecting a Cell of Nuns here.

Afterwards, at the request of the said Gaufridus de Clinton, the Nuns 465 here, being only two, viz. Sebure and Naeumi, gave their House and Estate here to the Canons of Killingworth.

TALLACH, in the Diocess of St. David's in Wales.

THE Abby here, dedicated to God, St. Mary and St. Iohn Baptist, was founded by Resus the younger Son of Resus the younger, of the Family of the Princes of South-wales, and by him, and others endow'd with many Lands, the particulars may be seen in the Monasticon at large, fol. 466, 467. all which was confirm'd to this House by King Edward the 467 II. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, and by King Edward the III. in the fifth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 136 l. 9 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

BLITHBURY Priory, in Staffordshire.468

HVgh Malvisin gave Blytheburgh to Monks and Nuns there dwelling, for the service of God and St. Giles, to hold in pare and perpetual Alms. Which Estate tho' for a while taken away by William Malvisin, Son of the Founder Hugh, yet it was soon restored again.

EDWARDSTON, in Suffolk, a Cell to Abbington.

HVbertus de Monte Canesi Lord of the Town of Edwardston in Suffolk gave the Church there, to the Monks of Abbendon, to be a Cell of 469 that House, and confirm'd his Gift in the fifteenth year of Henry the I. Which was also ratified by that King, An. Dom. 1115.

DEPING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Thorney.

BAldewinus Wac gave the Church of St. Iames in Deping with divers Lands belonging to it, to God, St. Mary, and the Church of Thorney, 470 which was confirm'd by his Son and Grandson: and also by Pope Inno­cent the III. in the first year of his Pontificate. (1198)

ALCESTER, in Warwickshire.

IN the year 1140. Radulfus Pincerna (or Boteler) founded this Monastery (then called from its Situation St. Mary's of the Isle) and made Robert a Monk of Worcester the first Abbot here. At which time it was agreed between the two Houses, viz. The Abby of Worcester, and this, that there should be a constant Love and Brotherhood betwixt them, and that upon 471 the death of the Abbot here, another should be chosen indifferently out of either House; the said Founder endow'd this Monastery with divers Lands ordaining that the Abbot should not spend any of the Revenues to enrich his secular kindred, but upon the Poor and Travellers. Robert Earl of Leicester (of whom this Estate was holden by the foresaid Founder) confirm'd the same to the Monks here, and granted to them divers Liber­ties. 472 The like did King Steven. King Henry the II. confirm'd to them 473 all their Lands by their several Benefactors given, and also granted them full power to choose their own Abbot from among themselves, in their Convent. King Edward the IV. in the fifth year of his Reign, seeing the Estate of this Monastery to run to decay, it being so far wasted that 474 it was not sufficient to maintain any Monks, but the Abbot only, granted this House and what Estate it had left, to the Abby of Evesham, to which he annext it for ever; so that from that time it became a Cell of that Abby.

[Valued at 65 l. 7 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

LINGEBROOK Priory, in Herefordshire.

IT seems by an Inquisition taken 24. Edw. 3. that Adam Esgar Clerk, was a Benefactor to the Monastery of Nuns here, and founded an Anniversary for William de Power.

[Valued at 22 l. 17 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

NUNKELLING, in Yorkshire.

AGnes de Archis gave the Church here and divers Lands to God, St. Mary, and St. Helen, and to the Nuns of Killing, in pure and [...]ree Alms. The Nuns Estate here was afterwards confirm'd by Richard de Sancto Quintino, and William de Fortibus Earl of Albemarle, and by 475 Aeliz de Sancto Quintino Daughter of the foresaid Agnes, who also gave other Lands; and lastly by the Archbishops of York.

[Valued at 35 l. 15 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

SANDWELL, in Staffordshire.

WIlliam Son of Guido de Offney founded a Hermitage in Bromwich, near the Well call'd Sandwell for a Habitation of Monks, and en­dow'd the same with divers Lands lying about the same. Which was con­firm'd to the said Monks by Gervais Paganellus Lord of the honour of Dudley, of which Barony the Lands were holden.

MONKETON, in Yorkshire.476

WIlliam de Arches and Iuetta his Wife founded a Nunnery here, of which their Daughter Matilda was a Nun, endowing the same with divers Lands. All which was confirm'd to the said Nunnery by Henry Murdac Archbishop of York. (He died 1153.)

[Valued at 75 l. 12 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

HALISTANE, in Northumberland.

RIchard Bishop of Durham, in the year 1311. united the Churches of Crossanet, and Harbottell, to the Church of Halistan and the Nun­nery there, and gave the Patronage of the same to Richard de Vmframvill Patron of the said Nunnery. King Henry the III. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Prioress and Nuns of Halystan, the Lands given to them by Alice de Alneto, and Roger Bertram.

[Valued at 11 l. 5 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

DUNSTER, in Somersetshire.

THE Monastery of Monks here, dedicated to the honour of St. George, 477 was founded and endow'd with sundry Lands and Revenues by the Ancestors of Iohn de Mooun Lord of Dunsterre, which Iohn did, in the fifteenth year of King Edward the III. ratifie and confirm to the Monks here all his Ancestors Donations.

[Valued at 37 l. 4 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

MARGAN Abby, in Wales.

THIS Abby was founded by Robert Earl of Gloucester in the year 1147. King Iohn in the sixth year of his Reign confirm'd to the 478 Church o [...] St. Mary's of Margan, and the Monks there, all the Lands and Estate given to them by the said Robert and several others.

[Vaued at 181 l. 7 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

BLACKBURGH, in Norfolk

ROger de Scales and Muriell his Wise gave to God, St. Mary, and St. Ca­therine, and to the Brethren serving them in this place, called Ship­lade, otherwise Blackbergh, divers Lands and Possessions. The same Roger by an other Deed gave the same Lands and others to the Sisters here serving God. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 879.

[Valued at 42 l. 6 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

479 HENWOOD, in Warwickshire.

KEtelbernus de Langedona, gave to God, and St. Margeret the Virgin, and to the Nuns at Eastwell (so was this Monastery then called by reason of its situation) part of his Demeans of Langedon in which Lord­ship this Nunnery stood, with divers other Lands and Liberties, to hold as freely as he himself held them of his chief Lord Hugh of Arden. Pope Innocent in the first year of his Pontificate incorporated, annext, and uni­ted to this Nunnery of Henwood divers Churches given to the same by King Rich. II. and King Henry the IV.

[Valued at 21 l. 2 s. 0 d. ob. per Annum]

480 St. RADEGUNDS, adjoyning to Cambridge.

KING Steven confirm'd to the Church and Nuns of St. Mary of Cam­bridge certain Lands which William a Monk and Goldsmith gave them; and also other Lands given them by Countess Constance Wife of his 481 Son Eustace. It was found by Inquisition taken at Cambridge, 3. Edw. I. that the Prioress and Nuns of St. Radegund at Cambridge hold a certain piece of Ground called Greencroft, containing ten Acres on which their Church and House is founded, which was given for that purpose by Mal­colme King of Scotland: and that Nigellus and Eustachius Bishops of Ely had been Benefactors to this Nunnery.

LANGLEY, in Leicestershire.

THE Nunnery of St. Mary's of Langly was founded by William Pan­tulphe and Burgia his Wife. from whom descended Robert de Tate­sale Patron of this Priory 5. H. 3. The Nuns here upon the death of their [Page 55] Prioress, had power to choose another without asking leave of their Pa­tron, who did use during the time of such Vacation to appoint a Boy (unum Garcionem) with a white Wand to keep the Gate of the Nunnery, for which he was to have his Diet there.

[Valued at 29 l. 7 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

SANDFORD, in Barkshire.

KING Edward the I. in the 2 [...]st year of his Reign granted to the Prior and Convent o [...] Sandelford, free Warren in their Demeans. Sa [...]herus de Sancto Andrea granted to God, and the Church of St. Nicholas 482 of Sandford, and to the Nuns there, a R [...]nt of Five Shillings per Annum in his Town of Littlemore. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 13.

SETON, in [...]umberland.

HEnry Duke of Lancaster, Earl of Derb, Lincoln and Leicester, being inform'd that the Revenues of th [...] Priory were so small that they could not maintain the Pri [...]ress and Nuns [...] gave and annext to this House, the Hospital of St. Leonard [...] in Lancaster, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. Which Hospital was first founded by King Iohn for a Master, a Chaplain, and nine poor People, three of which to be Lepers, and the rest sound.

[Valued at 12 l. 12 s. ob. per Annum.]

ANKERWIK, in Buckinghamshire.

GIlbert and Richard Muntfichet, Knights, founded a Nunnery here, and endow'd it with Lands. King Henry the III. in the one and fortieth year of his Reign confirm'd their Estate given by many Benefactors, whose 483 Names, and Parcels given are exprest in his Charter.

[Valued at 32 l. 0 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

WINTENEY, in Hampshire.

RIchard, Son of Richard de Hereard endow'd the Nunnery here built to God, the blessed Mary, St. Mary Magdalen, and All Saints, with divers Lands, which King Edward the I. confirm'd,

[Valued at 43 l. 3 s. per Annum.]

SNELLESHALL, in Buckinghamshire.

RAlph Martell, and others, gave to the Prior and Monks here serving God in the Church of St. Leonard, at Snelleshall, divers Lands, which were confirm'd to them by King Henry the III.

[Valued at 18 l. 1 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

484 BIRKENED, in Cheshire.

HAmo de Massie endow'd the Church of St. Mary and St. Iames here with Lands, and granted and confirm'd to the Prior and Monks, and their Successors, power and liberty to choose their own Prior upon any vacancy, from among themselves, according as Pope Alexander had granted to them.

[Valued at 90 l. 13 s. per Annum.]

MARRIGG, in Yorkshire.

TO the Nuns here serving God, Roger de Asco, Conan de Asch, and many others; among the rest Conan Duke of Britanny and Rich­mond were great Benefactors; giving divers Lands and Liberties, all 485 which were recited and confirm'd by the Charter of King Edward the III [...] in the twenty second year of his Reign.

[Valued at 48 l. 18 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

STYKESWOULD, in Lincolnshire.

486 IT appear'd by Inquisition taken in the Reign of King Edward the I. that the master and Nuns of Stikeswold held several Lands of the Gift o [...] Lucy Mother of Ranulf Earl of Chester, and others. And that they had been so held for the space of one hundred years.

[Valued at 114 l. 5 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum [...]

STODELY, in Oxfordshire.

BErnard de Sancto Walerico, and Thomas de Sancto Walerico his Son en­dow'd a Nunnery here, and gave power to the Nuns upon the va­cancy of the Prioress to choose another with the assent of the Patron or 487 his Steward. Thomas de S. Walerico lived in the time of King Iohn 1207. Richard King of the Romans, and Edmund Earl of Cornwall, and Godfrey de Craucumbe were Benefactors. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 13.

[Valued at 82 l. 4 s. 4 d. q. per Annum.]

KIRKLEY, in Yorkshire.

REinerus Flandrensis, gave divers Lands to the Nuns here, which were confirm'd to them by William Earl of Warren in pure and perpetual 488 Alms. They had also other Lands from other Benefactors, all which were confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the twentieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 19 l. 8 s. per Annum.]

STANFORD, in Lincolnshire.

WIlliam Abbot of Peterborough, in the Reign of King Henry the II. founded at Stanford a Priory of Nuns in honour of God and St. Michael, he built their Church, and placed there forty Nuns. Saving to himself and Successors, Abbots of Peterburgh, the placing of the Prio­ress, &c. reserving also a Rent of half a Mark yearly to be paid to the Church of Peterburgh.

William de Humet gave a Rent often Marks per Annum to the Cistercian Monks in Stanford, which was confirm'd to them by King Iohn in the sixteenth year of his Reign. Lucy Wife of the said William gave certain 489 Rents to the Nuns of St. Michaels at Stanford.

The Prioress and Nuns here did by their Act and Deed acknowledge and promise fidelity and obedience to the Abbot and Convent of Peter­borough; that the Prior or Curator of their Monastery might be placed and displaced by the said Abbot and Convent; that upon the death of the Prioress, no Election of another should be made without the Abbots Li­cense; and that the admitting of the Nuns into the said House should be wholly in the power of the said Abbot; also that the said Nunnery should pay a yearly Pention of a Mark of Silver to the said Abby of Peterburgh for the buying of Books. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 880.

[Valued at 65 l. 19 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

WYRTHORP, in Northamptonshire.

IN the 28th. of Edw. 3. Thomas de Holland and Ioan his Wife (the Kings Kinswoman) were Patrons of a Nunnery at Wyrthorp, at which time this House was so impoverished and decayed, by reason of the Pestilence, and other reasons, that there was here but one Nun remaining, whereupon, by the King's License the said House and Church of Wyrthorp, with all its Possessions, were by the Bishop for ever united and annext to the Nun­nery of St. Michaels by Stanford, and the Nun here remaining, was re­moved thither.

IVINGHO, in Buckinghamshire.490

KING Edward the I. in the eighth year of his Reign, gave divers Lands, to the Prioress and Nuns of St. Margaret of Ivingho, and their Successors, to hold of the King in free, pure, and perpetual Alms.

WABURN, in Norfolk.

THE Priory of Waburn was founded by Sir Ralph Meyngaryn Knight, from whom descended by the Mothers side Iohn de Veer Earl of Oxford.

[Valued at 24 l. 19 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

CAMPESS, or Campsey, in Suffolk.

TEobandus de Valoines gave his Land in Campess to his two Sisters Ioan and Agnes, for the Foundation of a Nunnery there to the ho­nour of God and the glorious Virgin Mary. Which was confirm'd by 491 King Iohn. Matilda de Lancaster, Countess of Vlster, did in the Reign of King Edw. III. by License of that King, found a Chantry of five Priests to officiate in this Church, which Chantry, was removed afterwards to a Town call'd Brusseyard in the Mannor of Rokhall; the Revenues and Scite where­of was afterwards, in the said King's Reign given to a Prioress and Nuns of St. Clares Order, which Nunnery was there erected (at Brusseyard) in 492 place of the said Chantry Priests or Chaplains.

[Valued at 182 l. 9 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

DENNEY Abby, in Cambridgeshire.

IN the last year of Nigellus Bishop of Ely, who died 1169. one Robert, Chamberlain to the Earl of Britony and Richmond, founded the Mo­nastery here as a Cell to Ely, becoming a Monk himself. In the year 1341. 493 Maria de Sancto Paulo, Countess of Pembroke, gave this Mannor of Denney to Sister Katherine de Bolwyk Abbess, and to the Nuns of St. Clare, or Minoresses, there serving God, in free, pure, and perpetual Alms. She 494 also annext and united the Advowson of the Abby of Minoresses at Water­beche 495 to this at Denney, and translated the Nuns of Waterbeche hither. All which she did by License of King Edward the III. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 883.

[Valued at 172 l. 8 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

496 SEWARDSLEY, in Northamponshire.

RObert de Pinkeny, and Simon de Pinkeny, gave certain Lands to the Nuns here, and William de Sancto Iohanne, was also a Bene­factor.

[Valued at 12 l. 6 s. 7 d. q. per Annum.]

LITTLE MAREIS, near Yedingham, in Yorkshire.

ROger de Clere, endow'd the Nunnery here with divers Lands. The Church of Yeddingham was dedicated in honour of the most blessed Virgin in the year 1241. on the seventeenth of the Kalends of September, at which time divers indulgences were granted. Richard de Breuse be­came 497 Patron of this House in right of Alice his Wife who was descended from the Founders. King Henry the III. in the 30th. year of his Reign confirm'd to the Nuns of Yeddingham all the Lands given by their several Benefactors.

498 There was delivered in this House, to the Prioress and Convent sixty and two Loaves daily; to nine Brethren twelve Loaves a piece, weekly; to Brother Iames fourteen Loaves, to three Priests, to four Chaplains, and [Page 59] other Officers accordingly, &c. among the rest of the Deliveries is set down.—Canibus in singulis Maneriis triginta novem panes de pane duriori— To the Dogs (Waiters or Attendants) in each Manor thirty nine Loaves of the coursest sort of Bread.

[Valued at 21 l. 16 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

NUNBURNHAM, in Yorkshire.

THE Ancestors of Roger de Merlay Lord of the Barony of Morpath were founders of the Nunnery of Brunham. And it was found by inquision 38. Hen. 3. that these Nuns held Lands here of the Fee of Thomas de Graystoc.

[Valued at 8 l. 1 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

LYTHOM, in Lancashire, a Cell to Durham.499

RIchardus filius Rogeri, or Richard Fitz-Rogers, gave his Land at Ly­thum with the Church there, to the Prior and Monks of Durham for the erecting and establishing at Lytham a Cell of their Order, which he endow'd with divers Lands. This was confirm'd by King Iohn in the second year of his Reign.

CHIRBURY, in Shropshire.500

THE Monks here having formerly inhabited at Snede, and removed from thence; King Edward the I. in the ninth year of his Reign, understanding this place not to be convenient for them removed them back again to Snede.

ARDEN, in Yorkshire.

PEter de Hotona founded and endowed an Abby of Nuns at Arden, and dedicated it to St. Andrew; which was confirm'd by Roger de Mow­bray Lord of the Fee: and by Elizabeth Heir of the said Peter in the tenth year of Edward the I. In the 6th. of Henry the IV. Ieoffrey Pigot, as Heir of Peter the first Founder, and Elizabeth abovesaid, was admitted by the Nuns here as Founder or Patron.

[Valued at 12 l. per Annum [...]]

DAVINTON, in Kent.501

KING Henry the II I. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Prioress of the Church of St. Mary Magdalene of Davyntone, and to the Nuns there serving God, divers Lands and Rents, given by seve­ral Benefactors.

502 FOSS, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the III. in the 21st. year of his Reign gave to the Prioress and Nuns of Foss without Torkesey, sixscore Acres of Land and seven Tosts in Torkesey to hold for ever at the yearly Rent of forty six Shillings.

[Valued at 7 l. 3 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

WALLING WELLS, in Nottinghamshire.

RAlph de Cheurolcurt, gave to God and St. Mary a place in his Park of Carletuna, for the building a place of Religion; and to it gave o­ther Lands and Liberties, in pure and perpetual Alms.

503 From this Founder, is descended by a Daughter, the Family of Furneux; the Male Line of which Family is now in Being in Darbyshire under the name of Rooper.

[Valued at 58 l. 9 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

St. CATHERINES Nunnery, without Exeter, in Devonshire.

KING Iohn in the second year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Church of St. Catherine without Exeter, and the Nuns there, the Lands given to them by William de Trascy, and Henry de Pomerya, with the grant of many Liberties.

FLAMSTED Priory, in Hartfordshire.

AGatha, Widow of William de Gatesden, endowed the Church of St. Giles 504 of Flamsted with certain Lands, which Gift was confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 30 l. 19 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

CRESSEWELL, in Herefordshire.

WAlter de Lascy gave to the Church of St. Mary at Cressewell, and to the Monks there of the Order call'd Grandimontenses, divers Lands and Revenues; confirm'd by King Henry the III. who also granted 505 to them divers Liberties. Other Benefactors gave them other Lands, all which was confirm'd to them by King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 17.

DARBY Priory, in Darbyshire.

KING Henry the III. granted to the Prioress and Nuns de Pratis at Derby, an Augmentation of one hundred Shillings per Annum, out of the Fee-farm of the Town of Nottingham. It was found upon an Ex­tent in the 15. E. 1. that the Scite of the Abby at Derby with a Garden 506 and Curtilage, was worth yearly 20 s. And that the said Abby held there, in Demean, four Carucates of Land, each Carucate containing sixty Acres of Land, (i. e. Arable Land,) &c.

LAMBLEY Nunnery, in Northumberland.

KING Iohn in the second year of his Reign, confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and St. Patrick, and to the Nuns at Lambeleya, the Scite of the Abby of Lambeleya Super Tinam, and the Lands which Adam de Tindale and Helewisa his Wife gave to the said House.

STEINFEILD Priory, in Lincolnshire.

THIS was a Priory of Benedictine Nuns, founded by Henry Son of Henry de Percy. The Patronage of this House came to Iocelin de Lovein by Agnes his Wife, one of the Daughters and Co-heirs of William de Percy. King Edward the I. in the one and twentieth year of his Reign, granted the Prioress and Nuns here, free Warren in their Demean Lands,507 the same not being within the bounds of his Forests.

[Valued at 98 l. 8 s. per Annum.]

MODBURY, in Devonshire.

THE Mannor of Modbury, and right of Patronage of the Priory there, being in Ida Widow of Sr. Iames Exton, Knight, by Virtue of a Fine in the 9. Edw. 2. the said Ida through the mediation of Friends re­leased all her title to Richard de Campo-Arnulphi.

CHESTER Nunnery.

THE Monastery of St. Mary here, was founded for Nuns, and en­dow'd by Ranulph Earl of Chester with Lands and Liberties.

[Valued at 66 l. 18 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

ROSSEDALE, in Yorkshire.

RObert de Stutevill founded and endow'd the Nunnery at Rossedale to God and St. Laurence, which was confirm'd by King Iohn. Sibilla de Valoniis, Adam de Neuton, &c. gave other Lands to the Prioress and 508 Nuns here, all which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the second 509 year of his Reign.

[Valued at 37 l. 12 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

510 PEMBROK Priory.

WAlter Marescallus, and William Marescallus both Earls of Pembrok, gave divers Lands and Endowments to the Priory of St. Nicholas at Pembroke.

St. CLEMENTS, adjoyning to York.

THurstan Archbishop of York gave to God and St. Clement, and the Nuns there, divers Lands to hold in pure and perpetual Alms; whose Letters of Endowment were confirm'd by the Dean and Chapter 511 of York. Other Benefactors gave other Lands, all which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign. Anno. Dom. 1192. Gaufridus Archbishop of York gave the Priory of St. Clements to the Abby of Godestave, but the Nuns here refused to submit to such Donation, and appeal'd to the Pope.

[Valued at 55 l. 11 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

512 CHESTHUNT, in Hertfordshire.

KING Henry the III. gave to the Prioress and Nuns here all the Lands and Tenements belonging to the Canons of Cathale, whom he caused to be removed.

[Valued at 14 l. 10 s. per Annum.]

FINCHALE, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FInchale is a solitary place not far from the City of Durham, where a certain Hermit named Godricus de Finchale, who in his youth had visited the holy Sepulcher, spent his old Age in Devotion, and here died with the reputation of great Sanctity. After the death of this Godficus, Ranulphus Bishop of Durham granted this Hermitage, and the Lands ad­joyning, 513 to Algarus the Prior, and the Monks of Durham. Hugh Bishop of Durham founded and endow'd the Priory of Finchale for such Monks of Durham as the Prior of Durham should from time to time send thither in the service of God and St. Iohn.

[Valued at 122 l. 15 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

The Priory of St. James at Bristol, a Cell of Tewkesbury.

WIlliam Earl of Gloucester gave to this House divers Lands and Tithes, and the Profits of the Fair at Bristol, in Whitsun-week, which with other Lands given by other Benefactors was confirm'd by King Henry the II. The same King gave the Monks here certain Liberties in his Forrest. Robert Earl of Gloucester was buried in this Church of St. Iames, at Bristol.

BUNGEY, in Suffolk.

ROger de Glanvill and Gundreda the Countess, his Wife, founded a Nun­nery in the Church of the holy Cross at Bungey. The En­dowments 514 whereof as well by the said Roger and his Wife as by a great 515 number of other Benefactors, were all confirm'd to the said Nuns and their Successors to hold in pure and perpetual Alms, by King Henry the II. in the ninteenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 62 l. 0 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

SYLLEY Isle, near Cornwall.516

THIS Isle was given of old by the Kings of England to the Abbot and Monks of Tauestock, who used to send two of their Monks hi­ther to perform the Divine Offices, till the Wars with France in the Reign of King Edward the III. And then that King gave License to the Abbot of Tauestock, in the ninteenth year of his Reign, to place here two secular Chaplains instead of Monks.

ROWNEY Priory, in Hertfordshire.

IN the 36. H. 6. Agnes Selby Prioress of this House and the Covent of Nuns here, in respect of the poverty of the place, did by their Deed seal'd with their Common-Seal, resign up their Church, House, and Lands, into the hands of their Patron Iohn Fray who designed to convert the same in a better manner. Which Iohn Fray was chief Baron of the Exchequer, and being thus possest of this Priory, he would not convert it 517 to any other use but to the service of God, and therefore obtain'd the King's License in the 37. H. 6. to found and endow here a Chantry for one Priest.

The first Founder of the Priory was Conan Duke of Britony and Rich­mond, who, with others, endow'd it with Possessions of the value of ten Marks per Annum.

[Valued at 13 l. 10 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

518 NUN-EATON, in Warwickshire.

THIS House was founded and endow'd by Robert Earl of Leicester Son of Robert de Mellento, in the Reign of King Henry the II. for Nuns of the same Order with those at Font-Ebraud.

519 Whose Gifts were confirm'd by his Son Robert, and by King Henry 520 the II.

The Prioress and Covent of Font-Ebrald granted to this House the immunity to receive and retain to their own proper use all such gifts as should be made unto them, without any exaction of the said Abbess and Covent of Font-Ebrald. Which immunity and several others were con­firm'd to them by Pope Alexander the III.

[Valued at 253 l. 14 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum.]

LUFFELD, in Northamptonshire, a Cell to Westminster.

THE Priory of Luffeild was founded by Robert Earl of Leicester, for the Souls of King William the I. and Queen Matilda, &c.

521 King Henry the I. his Daughter Maud the Empress, and King Edward the I. were Benefactors, and Pope Alexander the III. granted to Ralph Prior of St. Mary's at Luffeild, his Brethren, and their Successors, divers Priviledges by his Bull dated 1174.

522 Radulfus de Cahienes, Hugo de Sancto Martino, and others gave them di­vers 523 Churches and Tithes.

524 King Henry the III. in the fifty sixth year of his Reign, reciting the Priory of Luffeild to have been founded by his Predecessors Kings of England, granted to the Prior and Monks there free Chiminage in his Forrest of Whitlewood, for five years next ensuing.

WILBERFOSS, in Yorkshire.

THIS was a House of Nuns dedicated to St. Mary, founded by He­lias de Cotton, and endow'd by' Alan his Son with divers Lands.

King Henry the II. in the fourth year of his Reign, and King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign, confirm'd their Lands and Estate.

Vid. Vol. 3. p. 12.

[Valued at 21 l. 16 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

525 GODSTOW Priory of Nuns, in Oxfordshire.

THE Church here was built by their Prioress Editha, and in the year 1138. dedicated in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary and St. Iohn Baptist, by Alexander then Bishop of Lincoln, in presence of King Steven, and Maud the Queen, with abundance of Bishops, Earls, and Barons, and others of prime quality, who all gave to the said Church at that time some Rents and Endowments: Whereupon Albericus Bishop of Hostia the Pope's Legate in England released to every of the said Bene­factors [Page 65] one year of injoyn'd Penance, and granted moreover a Remis­sion 526 of forty days in every year to all those who should in Devotion visit the said Church on the day of St. Pris [...]a the Virgin, or on the Nativity of St. Iohn Baptist.

Their Lands and Revenues were confirm'd by King Steven, and by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.527

In the year 1191. Hugh Bishop of Lincoln visiting in this part of his 528 Diocess, and seeing in this Church a Tomb before the Altar with more than ordinary Ornaments, and being inform'd upon enquiry that it was the Tomb of Rosamond Concubine to King Henry the II. he caused her body to be removed out of the Church, and to be buried in the Church-yard to avoid the scandal of Religion, and to deter other Women from Whoredom.

About the time of the Suppression of this House, Rosamonds Tomb was open'd and her Bones found inclosed in Leather, and that in Lead. When it was opened a very sweet smell came out from it. The following In­scription was formerly read on a Cross near Godstow,

Qui meat hac oret, signum salutis adoret,
Vtque sibi detur veniam Rosamunda precetur.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 884.

[Valued at 274 l. 5 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

LILLECHIRCHE, in the County of ...;

KING Iohn gave to the Abby of St. Mary and St. Sulpice at Lille­church, and the Prioress and Nuns there the Mannor of Lillechurch in pure and perpetual Alms, and granted them a Fair to be there held yearly on the Feast of St. Michael, and two days after; all which was con­firm'd by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign, who also in the fiftieth year of his Reign released and pardon'd their Suit-ser­vice 529 to his Court at St. Martins le Grand, in London.

TYKEHEAD Priory, in Yorkshire.

KING Iohn in the fifth year of his Reign confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Mary of Tykeheved, and to the Nuns there serving God, the Lands and Possessions then given them by several Benefactors.

In the year 1264. the Prior and Canons of Ellerton, and the Nuns of Tykehead, exchanged certain Lands and Houses which had been the occa­sions 530 of former Suits and Controversies.

Sir Robert de Aske Kt. the Founder, gave to this House the Rent of 7 s. 4 d. per Annum, for the maintaining of a yearly Obit for himself and Elizabeth his Wife, conditionally that if the Obit were not diligently ob­serv'd, then the said Sum or Rent to be restored to his Heirs. Dated 1522.

[Valued at 20 l, 18 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

HUNTINGTON Priery of Nuns.

IN the time of Richard de Gravesend Bishop of Lincoln, Elena Walensis was elected Prioress of the Priory of St. Iames extra Hunted [...]n, the Lady Dervorgull de Galewidia, being then Patroness of the said Priory, and Richard de F [...]xton her Sen [...]schal, or Steward.

CLIVE, in Somersetshire.

WIlliam de Romare, who married Lucy Countess of Lincoln. founded the Abby of the blessed Virgin and St. Laurence, at Rewsby in Lincolnshire, 8. Steph.

William his youngest Son by the said Lucy, who married Phillip Daughter 531 of Hubert de Burgh Earl of Kent, founded the Abby of our blessed Lady of the Cliff, in Somersetshire, in the 9 Rich. 1. of which one Ralph was the first Abbot.

King Henry the III. confirm'd their Lands and Estate, and moreover, granted to the Abbot and Convent of Clive, the Mannor and Hundred of Bramton, in Devonshire, to be held of the King and his Heirs at the yearly Farm of 22 l. per Annum.

[Valued at 155 l. 9 s. 5 d. q. per Annum.]

HALIWEL Priory, in Middlesex.

KING Richard the I. in the sixth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Nuns of Haliwell the several Lands given to them by Galfredus Ca­merarius and others.

The same King in the first year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church of St. Iohn Baptist of Haliwell, and to the Nuns there serving God, the Ground on which the said Church stands cum pertin. viz. the Marish or Meadow in which the Fountain call'd Haliwell rises, with other Lands given by Richard late Bishop of London, Walter Precentor of St. Pauls, &c.

532 These Nuns held also certain Lands at Camerwell and Pecham given to them by several Benefactors.

KERSEY Priory, in Suffolk.

533 NEsta de Cokefeld, Widow of Thomas de Burgo, gave to God, and to the Church of St. Mary, and St. Anthony of Kersey, and to the Canons there, divers Lands, of which she and her second Husband past a fine in the 24. Hen. 3.

KINGTON Priory, in Wilishire.534

RObert Burnell Bishop of Bath and Wells founded this House to God and St. Mary, for Nuns, whose Deed of Foundation was exemplified by Inspectimus 19. F. I.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 887.

[Valued at 25 l. 9 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

BURNHAM, in Buckinghamshire.

ANno. Dom. 1266. Richard King of the Romans founded a Monastery here for Nuns, which he dedicated to God and St. Mary, and en­dow'd it with his Mannor and Advowson of Burnham and other Lands. Witnesses to whose Deed or Charter of Foundation, were his Brother 535 King Henry the III. and Prince Edward his eldest Son, with others.

[Valued at 51 l. 2 s. 4 d. q. per Annum.]

STOKE-CLARE Priory, in Suffolk

THIS House was founded in the year 1248. by Richard de Clare Earl of Glouce [...]ter, from whom descended the Mortimers Earls of March, 536 and the Royal House of [...]ork, as is set forth in a long Pedigree in Latin 537 and English Verse, in Dialogue between a Fryer and a Secular at the Tomb of Ioan of Acres Daughter of Edward the [...] and Wise of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester. This House being an al [...]en Priory and Cell to the Abby of Beekeherlewyn, in Normandy, King Richard the II. in the ninteenth 538 [...] of his Reign, made it Indigena, and gave it as a Cell to St. Peters at Westminster.

Pope Iohn, in the fifth year of his Pontisicate, translated this House from a Priory of Monks into a Colledge of a Dean and Secular Canons. This 539 was done at the Petition of Edwund Earl of March, Heir of the first Foun­ders, who by his Deed dated 7. Hen. 5. granted and confirm'd to the Dean and Canons here all the Lands and Priviledges belonging to the Priory. Vid. infra, 1004. Vol. 3. part 2. p. 164.

[Valued at 324 l. 4 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

GLOUCESTER-HALL, in the Suburbs of Oxford.540

THIS was founded and endow'd An. 1283. (11. E. 1.) for the main­tenance of thirteen Benedictine Monks of the Abby of Gloucester, by Iohn Giffard Lord of Brimesfeild. 19. E. 1. That King granted his License of Mortmain. 541

It appears by the Founders Deed of Foundation, that the House was built upon certain Ground purchased of the Knights of St. Iohn of Ierusa­lem, in a Lane commonly then called Stockwell street, that the Church here was dedicated to St. Iohn the Apostle, and St. Benedict the Abbot and Con­fessor, and that the House was erected for Benedictine Monks Causa studii.

MISSENDEN, in Buckinghamshire.

IT was found by Inquision taken at Aylesbury, 51. E. 3. that the Abby of Mussenden was [...]ounded in the year 1293. by William de Mussenden, who held the Mannor of Mussenden of the Earl of Gloucester by Knights service. In the Chapter-House and Church belonging to this Abby did 542 lie buried several of the Missendens descended from the Founder, whose names may be seen in the Book at large. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 18.

[Valued at 261 l. 14 s. 6 d. q. per Annum.]

The MINORESSES, at London.

KING Edward the I. in the one and twentieth year of his Reign granted his License of Mortmain to Edmund his Brother and his Wife, Blanch Queen of Nauarre, to build a House in [...]e Parish of St. Botulphs with­out Algate, for Nuns of the Order of Minoresses, there to remain in the service of God, the blessed Mary, and St. Francis.

[Vaued at 318 l. 8 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

543 WATERBECHAM, in Cambridgshire.

KING Edward the I. in the twenty second year of his Reign granted to Dionisia de Monte-Caniso, the Mannor of Waterbecke, to build a Rengious House there for Minoresses of the Order of St. Clare to be brought over from beyond the Seas. All which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign.

HOLAND, in Lancashire.

HERE being formerly a Collegiate Church or Chappel of St. Thomas the Martyr, served by Secular Chaplains, Walter Bishop of Coventry 544 and Litchfeild, in the year 1319. by consent of Robert de Holland the Patron, alter'd the Foundation into a Priory consisting of a Prior and twelve Benedictine Monks. Upon every Vacation or Death of the Prior, the Monks were to choose three of their House, one of which being ap­proved by the Patron, and presented to the Bishop, was to be by him con­stituted Prior. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 889.

[Valued at 53 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

546 Of certain Antient Monasteries in Wales.

MOrcant a King in Wales having treacherously kill'd his Uncle Frioc, af­ter he had in a most solemn manner sworn an inviolable peace with him before the holy Alter, was by Oudoceus Bishop of Landaff, in a Synod of his Clergy, which he had assembled for that purpose, enjoyn'd for the said per­jury and homicide, to perform Fastings, Prayers, and Alms Deeds; and be­ing on his sincere Repentance, received again in the Christian Communion, he granted and quit claim'd to the Abbies of Catoc, Ildut, and Docun, and to the Cathedral Church of Landaff, divers Liberties and Immunities.

Alien Priories, of Benedictines.

Viz. Such Monasteries here in England as did belong to certain 547 greater and elder Monasteries of the same Order beyond the Seas, and were subject to, and did depend on the same; and had the name of Cells.

DEREHURST, in Gloucestershire, a Cell to St. Denis in France.

HERE was an old Abby destroy'd by the Danes. But after the Nor­man Conquest, in the year 1069. King William the Conqueror endow'd here a new Priory and made it a Cell to St. Denis in France: or rather confirm'd what King Edward the Confessor had done before.548 King Henry the VI. in the twenty first year of his Reign made this Priory Indigena.

OTERY, in Devonshire, a Cell to St. Mary's at Roan.
549

THIS Priory was given to the Church of St. Mary at Roan by King Edward the Confessor in the year 1060. In the 8. Edw. 3. the Dean and Chapter of St. Mary's at Roan, by the King's License, granted their Mannor of Otery, and Advowson of the Church there, to Iohn de 550 Grandison Bishop of Exeter, who in the eleventh year of that King founded here a Colledge of Secular Canons.

LEVISHAM, in Kent, a Cell to St. Peter's at Gaunt, in Flanders.

KING Henry the I. in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks of St. Peters of Gant, the Mannor of Leve­sham and Greenwich, &c. with divers Liberties, formerly granted by King Edward and King William his Father.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 890.

551 St. MICHAELS of the MOUNT, in Cornwall, a Cell to St. Mi­chael, in Normandy.

RObert Earl of Morton gave St. Michaels Mount, in Cornwall, to God and the Monks of the Church of St. Michael de Periculo Maris, in Normandy, Anno Dom. 1085.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 902.

552 MERSEY, in Essex, a Cell to St. Owens at Roan.

IT was [...]ound by Inquisition 4. E. 3. that the Mannors of Mersey Fyngrin­ho and Peet, and half the hundred of Wenestr, in the County of Essex, were given to the Abby of St. Owens, in Normandy, by St. Edward the Confessor, and confirm'd by King William, and King Henry the II.

ANDEVER, in Hampshire, a Cell to St. Florence at Saumurs.

KING O William the Conqueror (or as the Words of the Deed are, Willielmus Rex qui armis Anglicam terram sibi subjugavit) gave to St. Florence, the Church of Andever, with divers Lands and Revenues to the 553 same Church belonging: Confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the eighth year of his Reign.

BLITH Priory, in Nottinghamshire, a Cell to St. Catherines at Rohan.

ANno Dom. 1088. Roger de Builly and Muriel his Wife founded and 554 endowed this House with Lands and great Liberties. All which was afterwards confirm'd to the Monks here by King Henry the II. and by Idonea de Veteri ponte Daughter and Heir of Iohn de Bullei, by her Deed dated 1232. King Iohn in the second year of his Reign gave the Chapel­ry of Blyth, and divers other Churches and Lands to St. Mary's at Rohan.

555 COVENHAM, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Karileph, in le Maine in France.

KING William the Conqueror Anno 1082. gave this Town situated 556 in that part of Lincolnshire, called Lyndsey to God and St. Karileph. 31. Edw. 1. A Writ of Quod Damnum was executed at Lincoln, in order to an alienation [...] of this Cell, from the Abbot and Covent of St. Karileph in the Diocess of Mans, to the Abbot and Covent of Kirkeslede here in England.

ABERGAVENNY, in Monmouthshire a Cell of St. Vincents in Maine.

557 THIS Priory was founded by Hamelinus who came into England 558 with the Conqueror, and died in the Reign of King William Rufus. William de Brewosa, and others of the founders Linage were Benefactors.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 904.

WOTTON-WAVEN, in Warwickshire.

RObert de Toenio gave this Estate to the Monks of St. Peter at Con­chis, in Normandy; on whom King Henry the I. conferred great 559 Priviledges.

FOLKESTON, in Kent, a Cell to the Abby of Lolley in Normandy.

NIgellus de Munevilla, An. 1095. gave this Church of Folkston to Ra­nulph 560 then Abbot of the Church of St. Mary de Lonleyo, and to the Monks there, in pure and perpetual A [...]s. Which, with divers other Lands and Revenues, was confirm'd to them by William de Abrincis Lord of Folkeston, who descended from the said Nigellus.

KIRKBY, in Warwickshire, a Cell of St. Nicholas in Anjou.562

ANno 1077. Gosfredus de Wirchia gave to God and the Monastery of St. Nicholas in Anjou, Lands in Kirkby with other Lands and Pos­sessions elsewhere; from whom descended Roger de Mulbraio, who gave to the Church of St. Nicholas of Kirkeby the Church of Newbold. After­wards 563 Thomas Earl of Nottingham having founded a House of Carthusians at Epworth in the Isle of Axholme, the Abbot of St. Nicholas at Anjou was prevailed with to assign his Estate in Monks-Kirkby, Newbold, &c. to the said House of Carthusians, which was confirm'd by King Henry the V. in the third year of his Reign.

The Priory of the Holy Trinity at York, a Cell toMarmonstier in Tourain. Majus-Monasterium in France.

RAdulphus Paganellus gave the Church of the holy Trinity at York to the Monks of St. Martin in the Majus-Monastery, with divers other 564 Possessions. It was found by Inquisition taken at York 34. Edw. 1. That the 565 Heirs of the Founder claim'd no right in the Temporals of this Priory upon the death of any Prior, but only to place a Porter to see that the Goods of the Priory be not stollen during the Vacation, and that the upon the arri­val of a new Prior from the Abbot of Majus-monasterium, he did use to enter upon the Possession of his Office, without fealty or other duty to the Patron.

HEDLAY, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Holy Trinity at York.

YPolitus de Bram gave to God and St. Mary of Hedlay and the Monks there certain Lands in Midelton. All which was confirm'd to the Prior and Convent of the Trinity at York, and to their Cell at Hedlay, by Peter de Midleton, in the year 1290.

566 LANCASTER, a Cell to St. Martins at Sees in France.

ROger Earl of Poictiers gave the Church of St. Mary at Lancaster with divers Lands and Revenues to the Monastery of St. Martin. All 567 which was confirm'd by Iohn Earl of Morton; and by King Richard the II.

568 An. 1246. Iohn Romanus Archdeacon of Richmond, appropriated the Church of Lancaster and Chappels thereunto belonging to this Priory, reserving twenty Marks per Annum for a Vicar presentative.

569 OTTERY, in Devonnshire, a Cell to the Abby of St. Michael pericul. mar. in Normandy.

THIS Priory was founded by King Iohn for four Monks and endow'd with Lands of 100 l. value per Annum. These Monks were to di­stribute to the Poor at their Gates, bread to the value of 16 s. every week.

570 LODRES, in Dorsetshire, a Cell to the Abby of St. Mary de Mon-Bur.

BEnedict de Redueriis gave this Mannor to the Monastery of St. Mary de Monte Burgo; confirm'd by King Henry the I.

571 APLEDERCOMB, in the Isie of Wight, a Cell to the Abby of Mont-Burg, in Normandy.

THIS Priory consisted only of a Prior and two Monks, who were removed by Command of King Edward the III. to a more Inland Habitation, first to the Abby of Hyde, and after that in the 13. E. 3. to Salisbury.

FRAMPTON, in Dorsetshire, a Cell to Caen, in Normandy.

THIS was given to St. Stephens at Caen, and the Monks there, by King William the Conqueror, and with divers other Lands and Liberties confirm'd to them by King Richard the II.

572 SWANESEY, in Cambridgeshire [...] a Cell to St. Sergius, in Angiers.

THE Church of Swanesey with all manner of Tithes there, and in the Vills thereunto belonging, were given by Alan Earl of Britain, to 573 the Abby of St. Sergius and St. Bachus at Angiers; who presented the Prior to this Priory, as often as the Office avoided.

BLAKENHAM, in Suffolk, a Cell to St. Mary at Bec.

THIS was given to the Abby abovesaid by Walter Giffard, and confirm'd by King William Rufus.

COGES, in Oxfordshire, a Cell of Fischamp.

MAnnasses Arsic gave this Estate with other Tithes and Revenues to the Church of Fiscampe, Anno 1103.

WESTWOOD, in Worcestershire, a Cell to Font-Ebraud.574

OSbert Fitz [...] Hugh, and Eustachia de Say his Mother erected here a Convent of Nuns of Font-Ebraud.

WELLS, in Norfolk, a Cell of the Abby at Caen, in Normandy.

KING Edward the III. in the forty seventh year of his Reign (being then in War with France) committed the Custody of the Priory of 575 Paunfeild and Wells to Hugh Fastolf, to hold at the yearly Rent of 40 l. per Annum to the King, and 10 l. per Annum to each Monk there, for his support.

This Priory being first given by William de Estois to the Abby of St. Steven at Caen, and after seized into the King's hands by Edward the III. it continued in the Crown till 9. Edw. 4. at which time that King desirous 576 to restore this Estate to its antient use, the Spiritualty, and out of the Devotion which he bore to St. Stephen, he conferr'd the whole Estate which did formerly belong to this Priory on the Dean and Canons of his free Chappel of St. Steven at Westminster.

PATRICKSBURN, in Kent, a Cell to Beau-Lieu, in Normandy.

IT was found by Inquisition taken at Canterbury the 6 Edw. 3. that this Mannor was given to the Priory of Beau-Lieu, in Normandy, by Io­hannes de Pratellis, and confirm'd by King Iohn.

STOKE-CURCY, in Devonshire, a Cell to Lonley, in France.577

HVgh de Novilla gave to God and the Monks at Stok-curcy, the Church of St. Andrew of Stoke-curcy, with other Revenues. William de Curcy, and Iohn de Novilla were also Benefactors.

[...]
[...]
SHIRBURN, in Hampshire, a Cell of St. Vigor Cerasius.

HEnry de Portu, or Port gave the West part of Shirburn with the Church 578 there, and divers other Revenues, to God and St. Vigor Cerasius, all 579 which was confirm'd to the Monks at Shirburn by his Descendents. King Edward the III. gave the Custody of the Hospital of St. Iulian, or Domus Dei, at Southamptonto Queens Colledge in Oxford; to which Hospital King Edward the IV. in the first year of his Reign gave the alien Priory of Shireburn, in Hampshire.

BURWELL, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Mary Silvae Majoris.

JOhn de Hay gave to God and the Monastery of St. Mary Silvae Majoris; 580 and to the Monks at Burwell, divers Possessions; from whom descended Gilbert de Vmframvill Earl of Angos, who lived at Burwell.

LANKYWAN, in Wales, a Cell to the Abby of Lyra.

EDmund, Son of King Henry the III. discharged this House from all Exactions and Troubles from his Heirs or their Bayliffs, in the Vaca­tion of a Prior.

SELE, in Sussex, a Cell of St. Florence at Saumurs.

581 WIlliam de Braiosa, by his Deed dated 1075. gave the Church of St. Peter at Sele, with other Churches and Revenues both in Eng­land and Normandy to the Abbot and Monks of St. Florence. This Priory of Sele was made Indigena, or Denison 19. R. 2.

OKEBURN, in Wiltshire, a Cell to Bec, in Normandy.

582 MAtilda de Wallengfort gave to the Church of St. Mary of Bec, both 583 the Okeburns, viz. the greater and the less. Richard Earl of Corn­wall by his Deed dated 1253. discharg'd the Abbot and Monks of Bec from all Exactions and Suit of Court in his honour of Walingford, except only that his Bayliff of Walingford should once a year keep a view of Frankpledge at Okeburn, and then be entertain'd for that day, with four Horses at most.

584 WILLESFORD, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Bec in Normandy.

BY Inquisition taken at Stranford, it was found that the Prior of the Order of Bec held in Willesford and Ancaster, Lands of the value 16 l. per Annum of the Gift of Hugh de Evermewe.

WEDEN-PINKNEY, in Northamponshire, a Cell to St. Lucian near Beauvoys in France.

GIles, Ralph, Gilbert, Henry, and Robert de Pinkeni, successively gave Lands and Revenues to the Abby of St. Lucian and the Monks at 585 St. Mary's of Weden. Anno Dom. 1392, The Abbot and Convent of St. Lucian convey'd their Priory of Weden, and all the Estate thereunto be­longing to the Abbot and Convent of Bitlesden and their Successors, in consideration of a Sum of Gold received, and the yearly pension of ten Marks to be paid to the Abbot and Convent of St. Lucian and their Suc­cessors in the Church of St. Mary at Calais, on the Feast of St. Iohn Baptist.

TYWARDREIT, in Cornwall, a Cell to Angiers in 586 France.

RObert de Cardinan gave divers Lands and Revenues in Cornwall, to the Church of St. Sergius and St. Bachus at Angiers, and to the Church of St. Andrew of Tywardrait, and to the Monks there; all which 587 was confirm'd by King Henry the III.

BIRSTALL, in Yorkshire, a Cell of St. Martins at Albamarle.

THIS was given among other Lands and Revenues to the Church and Monks of St. Martin without the Castle of Albamarle in Normandy, by Steven Earl of Albamarle 1115. Walter Archbishop of York 588 first settled the Monks of Albamarle here at Birstal, and granted to them divers Immunities. Charles the VI. King of France by his Deed dated 1395.589 setting forth that the Abbot and Convent of St. Martin had past over to his beloved Cousin the Duke of Lancaster their Priory of Birstal in England for the Sum of one thousand Livers, granted them his License to purchase Lands of the like value in France. The said Abbot and Convent of St. Martin by their Deed dated 18. Rich. 2. granted all their Lands, Tithes and Pensions here in England to the Abbot and Convent of Kirkstal (in Yorkshire.)

GOLDCLIVE, in Monmouthshire, a Cell to Bec in Normandy.

RObert de Candos gave this Church of St. Mary Magdalen of Goldclive 590 with divers other Lands, &c. to the Monks of St. Mary at Bec. All 591 which was confirm'd by King Iohn in the second year of his Reign. This Priory was afterwards united to the Abby of Teukesbury, which union, was ratified by Pope Eugenius, Anno Dom. 1402.

Vid. 2. Vol p. 904.

592 MINTING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of S t. Benedict Super Leyre.

THIS was given to that Monastery, by Ranulph Earl of Che­ster.

BOXGRAVE, in Sussex, a Cell of I'Essay in Normandy.

THIS Priory was founded in the Reign of King Henry the I. Wil­liam Earl of Arundell endow'd it with great Possessions, and gave and 593 confirm'd it to the Monks of the Holy Trinity at l'Essay The first [...]ounder 594 of this House, (dedicated to the blessed Mary and St. Blase) at Boxgrave, was Robert de Haya, who placed here three Monks of the Order of S [...] Bene­dict; Roger de Sancto Iohanne who married Cecily, his Daughter, doubled the number of Monks, whose Sons William and Robert de Sancto Iohanne, still encreas'd them to fifteen, conferring divers Revenues for their maintenance, out of which he reserved only an annual Pension of three M [...]ks to the 595 Abby of l'Essay. Thomas Abbot of the Holy Trinity at l'Esay, granted to the Prior of Boxgrave and his Successors, that they might constantly have fifteen Monks in their Priory, and that upon the decease of any, they might supply their number with whom they pleas'd to elect. King 596 Edward the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign discharged this Priory of all seizures as an alien Priory in time of War, and made it Denison.

LONG-BENINGTON, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Savigny in Normandy.

567 RAdul [...]us Filgeriarum gave Belintone to the Abby of Savigny. The Monks here held sour Carucates of Land each Carucate worth 4 l. per Annum.

GROMOND, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Abby of Gramont in France.

THIS was given to the said Abby by Ioan late Wife of Robert de Turneham, and confirm'd by King Iohn in the fifteenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 15.

MONKENLEN, in Herefordshire, a Cell to Conchis in Normandy.

598 WIlliam Bishop of Hereford did by his Episcopal Authority confirm and appropiate to the Abby of St. Peter at Conchis the Mannor and Church of Monekeslen, and other Revenues, given by Ralph de Tony Senior.

TOFT Priory in Norfolk, a Cell to Preaux.

THIS was given by Robert Earl of Mellent, and with divers other Lands confirm'd to the Abby of St. Peter at Preaux by King Henry 599 the II. and by King Edward the I. with great Liberties.

ALVERTON, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Majus Monasterium.

RIchard Malleverer gave the Church of St. Martin in Alverton to the 600 Monks of Majus Monasterium in Alverton. Confirm'd by King Henry the II.

MONMOUTH, a Cell to the Abby of St. Florence at Saumurs.

WIhenocus de Monemue built in his Castle of Monemue a Church to the honour of God, St. Mary, and St. Florence, and gave it in perpetual Alms to the Monks of St. Florence at Saumurs. Iohn de Mone­muta 601 gave to the Church of St. Mary of Monmouth, and to the Abby of Saumurs, the Hospital of St. Iohn at Monmouth.

HAGH, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to the Abby de Voto near Cherburg.602

KING Henry the II. gave and confirm'd to the Abby and Cannons of Cherburg in France, the Mannor and Church of Hagh with large Liberties, as they were formerly confirm'd by King Henry his Grandfather.

The particulars and values of their Estate was [...]ound by Inquisition 603 22. Edw. 3. Among other things, that they had certain Rents in Grantham, &c.

HINKLEY, Leicestershire, a Cell to Lyra in Normandy.

RObert Earl of Leicester gave to the Abby of Lyra, the Church of Hinkelai with divers Chappels and other Churches adjoyning, with 604 their Tithes. All which was confirm'd by King Henry the II.

HORSELEGH, in Essex, a Cell to St. Martin of Troarn.

THE Abby and Covent of St. Martins at Troarn in Normandy, granted the Churches of Horselegh and Whitenhirs [...], to the Prior and Con­vent of Bruton, in exchange for other Lands which the Priory of Bruton had in Normandy, from which time the Prior of Bruton placed a Prior in 605 Horselegh from among his own Canons, and presented secular Vicars to the said two Churches. This was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the forty fifth year of his Reign.

ABBERBURY, in Shropshire, a Cell to the Abby of Gramount.

FVlco Fitz-Warin [...]ounded and gave this Priory to the Monks of Gra­mount 606 with divers Lands, &c. confirm'd by King Henry the II. in the seventeenth of his Reign. And by Thomas Corbeth in the year 1262.

LEVENESTRE, in Sussex, a Cell to Almenesches.

THE Possessions of the Benedictine Nuns of St. Mary of Almenesches 607 as well in France as England were confirm'd to them by Pope Alex­ander, and their Lands in their own hands exempted from Tithes, by his Bull dated 1178.

BY the Stat. made at Carlile 35. E. 1. commonly called De aspor­tatis Religiosorum, it is anacted that no Foreign Abby, &c. shall im­pose any Tallage, Payment, or Assesment whatsoever, oo any of their Houses subject to them in England, under the Penalty of forfeiting their Estate here. In the Parliament held at Westminster 13. R. 2. it was or­dain'd that no alien of the French Nation should enjoy any Benefice in this Kingdom; notwithstanding several Frenchmen having purchased Let­ters of Denization, continued to enjoy Benifices, &c. whereby great Trea­sures were transported out of the Kingdom, the King's Council discovered 608 to his Enemies in France. &c. It was therefore enacted 1 H. 5. ch. 7. that the foresaid Ordinance be but in due execution against all, but such Priors Alien as are conventual, and such as have Induction and Institu­tion, provided that such be Catholicks, and that they give security not to discover, &c. It was finally enacted in the Parliament held at Leicester 2 H. 5. for the Inconveniencies above-mentioned, and also for that the English had their Possessions seiz'd in France, that all the Possessions of the Priors aliens (except Conventuals, &c.) be vested in the King's hands and his Heirs for ever, to the intent that Divine Services in the places afore­said may for the time to come be more duly perform'd by English peo­ple, than they have been by French.

A CLVNIAC MONK

Vol. 1 P. 611.

OF THE Cluniacenses or Monks of Clugny.

The first Institutor of this Order, or rather Reformation of 611 Monks, was Abbot Berno, to whom William then Duke of Aqui­tain, gave the place call'd Clugny or Cluny in Burgundy for their first Habitation, in the year of our Lord 890. This was a Reform of St. Bennet's Order.

WENLOCK, in Shropshire.

HERE was formerly a Nunnery in which Milburg Neice of Wilphere 613 King of Mercia, lived, and died Abbess, with the Reputation of great Sanctity. Which House being totally decayed, Roger Earl of Mongomery, built here a Monastery for the Monks of Cluny. The Church here was dedicated to St. Mildred. Isabel de Say Wife of William Fitz-Alan 614 was a Benefactress. And this Priory was made Indigena 18. R. 2.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 907.

[Vaued at 401 l. 0 s. 7 d. q. per Annum.]

DUDLEY, in Staffordshire, a Cell to Wenlock.

THE Church here was dedicated to St. Iames, which with other Churches and Lands, Pope Lucius did confer and appropriate to 615 this Priory in the year 1190. granting in the same Deed divers great Priviledges and Immunities to the Monastery.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 907.

LEWES, in Sussex.

THIS House was founded by William de Warren Earl of Surrey in the time of King William the Conqueror. Which Earl obtain'd from 616 the Abby of St. Peter in Burgundy four Cluniac Monks, to whom he gave the Church of St. Pancrace adjoyning to his Castle of Lewis, and endow'd them with divers Lands and Possessions, by the License, and Con­firmation of King William; with a Curse to the Violators of his Gift, and 617 a Blessing to the Defenders. Yet this Priory remain'd a Cell to the 618 Abby of Clugny in Burgundy till the forty seventh year of King E. 3. at which time that King made it indigena, and independant; so also the Priories of Castleacre, Prittlewell, Farleigh, Horton, and Stanesgate, which were all Cells belonging to the Priory of Lewis. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 908.

[Valued at 92 l. 4 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

619 PRITTLEWELL, in Essex, a Cell to Lewes.

RObert Fitz-Suene gave the Church of Prittlewell to the Priory of St. Pancrace at Lewes, to be a Cell of that House, and to be furnisht with Monks of the Rule of St. Bennet, and Order of Clugny from Lewes; ordaining by his Deed of Foundation that the Prior of Prittlewel should pay yearly to the Prior of Lewes one mark for an acknowledgment.

[Valued at 155 l. 11 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

WESTACRE, in Norfolk, a Cell to Lewes.

THIS House was granted and confirm'd by Rodulphus de Toneio Lord of the Soil, to Oliver, Priest of Acre, and Walter his Son, who became Canons regular here.

[Valued at 260 l. 13 s. 7 d. q. per Annum.]

620 FARLEY, in Wiltshire, a Cell to Lewes.

THIS Priory was founded Anno Dom. 1125. and dedicated to God and St. Mary Magdalen. It was endow'd by Humphrey de Bohun the King's Sewer, and Margery his Wife, with [...]Mannor of Farley and the Park there, and with divers other Lands and Revenues. All which was 621 confirm'd to them by King Henry the III. [...] in the eleventh year of his Reign.

[Valued at 153 l. 14 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

HORTON, in Kent, a Cell to Lewes.

622 THIS House was founded and endow'd by Robert de Ver Constable of England, and Adeliza his Wife, and subjected to the Priory of Lewes, to which they were to pay a Mark per Annum as an acknowledg­ment. In this House did inhabit thirteen, or at least eight Monks: who were to say three Masses dayly, viz. the High Mass, our Lady's Mass, and the third pro defunctis. Their Seal was kept by three Monks, viz. the Prior, Sub-prior, and another.

[Valued at 95 l. 12 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

623 STANESGATE, in Essex, a Cell to Lewes.

ANno Dom 1177. Alexander Prior of this House, and the Covent of the same, with the assent of the Covent of Lewis, granted the Tithes of their Fee at Clerkenwell, with their Land there, to the Nuns of St. Mary at Clerkenwell, they paying to the Prior of Stanesgate, a yearly Pension of ten shillings for the said Tithes and Lands.

CLIFFORD, in Herefordshire, a Cell to Lewes.

IT appeared by Inquisition 20. E. 3. that this Priory was founded by Simon Fitz-Richard Fitz [...]Ponce formerly Lord of Clifford and Ancestor o [...] the Countess of Lincoln, and that this House was not alien, or dependant on any other beyond Sea. It was subjected by the Founder to the Priory 624 of Lewes.

[Valued at 57 l. 7 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

CASTLE-ACRE, in Norfolk.

FOunded An. Dom. 1090. William de Warren Earl of Surrey, the first of that name, and his Son Earl William the II. were great Benefactors, and gave to God, and St. Mary, and to the holy Apostles Peter and Paul, 625 and to the Cluniac Monks of St. Pancrace (i. e. of the Priory of Lewes) ser [...]ing God at Achra, divers Lands and Revenues. Besides whom many other Benefactors gave other Mannors and Lands, Tithes and Churches, as may be seen in particular in the Book at large. p. 626, 627, 628, 629.

Herbert Bishop of Norwich constituted the Church and Monastery here,630 and placed therein Cluniac Monks, under the Rule of St. Benedict. Bishop Ebrard impropriated and confirm'd to them their several Churches, given to them by the Earls of Surrey and other Benefactors.

It was certified to King Edw. the I. in the thirty fourth year of his Reign that the [...]rior and Convent of Castle-acre were English, and not Aliens of the Subjects of the King of France, or his Adherers; and that no Rent or Pension was paid by them to any of his Dominion or Adherents, nor did they owe obedience to any such, except only, that when the Abbot of Clugny comes sometimes into England he uses to visit in the said Priory. Hereupon this House was allow'd to be Indigena and not Alienigena, and to be priviledged accordingly, 18. E. 2.

[Valued at 306 l. 11 s. 4 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

MENDHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell to Castle-acre.631

WIlliam Son of Roger de Huntingfeild gave to God, and St. Mary of Acre, and to the Monks there, the Isle of St. Mary of Mendham to be in the same manner subject to Castle-acre, as that House is to St. Pancrace, and that to the Church of Clugny.

The Prior of Castle-acre and Convent there did grant to Roger de Hunting­feild, 632 who was their great Benefactor, to maintain at least eight Monks at this Priory of Mendham, and not to depose the Prior here unless for one of these three causes, Disobedience, Incontinence, or Dilapidation of the House.

BROMHOLM, in Norfolk a Cell of Castle-acre.

THE Estate here, with divers other Lands, was given to the Monks of Acre, by William de Glanville, and confirm'd to them by Bar­tholmew his Son.

633 The Prior and Convent of Bromholm, held Lands in Fee- [...]arm of the Prior and Convent of Acre, at the Annual Rent of fourteen Marks, five [...]hillings and four pence payable at three terms by the year, viz. at the Feast of St. Michael 64 s. at the Purification 64 s. and at Penticost 64 s.

Controversie arising between the Priors of Lewes, and Acre, and the Prior of Bromholm, about placing the Prior of this House. The whole matter was referr'd by Pope Gregory the IX. to be heard and determin'd by the Prior 634 of Osolveston in Leicestershire, and the Dean of Rutland; who decreed among other things, that upon the death of the Prior of Bromholm, the Prior of Acre should nominate six Monks, three of Acre and three of Bromholm, out of which number, the Convent of Bromholm should choose one for their Prior, &c. This Decree was made in the Church of St. Mary near the 635 Bridge in Stanford, on Wednesday next before Palm-Sunday 1229.

Pope Celestin by his Bull dated in the fourth year of his Pontisicate, granted that this Priory should be free from any subjection to that of Acre.

King Henry the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign granted to the Prior and Monks of St. Andrew of Bromholm to have a Fair there yearly at 636 the Feast of the Exhaltation of the holy Cross, and a Market weekly on the Monday. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 909,

[Valued at 100 l. 5 s. 3 d. q. per Annum.]

REINHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell to Castle-acre.

WIlliam de Lisewis [...]ounded here a House for three Monks at least in a place then called Normannesberch, and endow'd it with Lands, in honour of the blessed Virgin and St. Iohn the Evangelist, all which Ieoffrey his Son gave and confirm'd to the Monks of Acre.

Roger Prior of Reinham, granted to Lena, a Nun and other Nuns there ser­ving 637 God, a certain Solitary Place or Hermitage near Winghale, parcel of the Possessions of this House, to be held by them at the yearly Rent of twelve pence. To which House of Nuns Riginald Fitz [...]Hamon gave other Lands with his Daughte [...] whom he made a religious Woman there.

638 SLEVESHOLM, in Norfolk, a Cell of Castle-acre.

FOunded by William Earl of Warren, and by him given to Monks of Castle-acre. Iohn Earl of Warren confirm'd his Great Grand-fathers Foundation Anno Dom. 1309. (3. E. 2.) and granted, that as often as the 639 Priory of this House should be void, the Prior of Castle-acre should have full power to confer the place on a Monk of that House, which new Prior being first presented to the said Iohn Earl of Warren or his Heirs, and having [...] his [...]ealty, should be admitted with effect.

BERMUNDSEY, in Surrey.

THIS Monastery of St. Saviours of Burmundsey was founded by Alwinus Child a Citizen of London, in the year 1082.

Many were the Benefactors to this House. King Henry the I. in the 640 year 1127. gave to the Monks here the Mannors of Bermundsey, Rederhith, and Delwich, the hide of Southwark, and other Lands. Walkelinus Mam­mynot gave them a Moiety of all Greenwich.

King Henry the II. in the year 1159. confirm'd to them the Donation 641 of divers Churches, as Camberwell, and others.

Anno 1213. the Prior of Burmundsey raised from the Foundation a new Building adjoyning to the Walls of his House, which was call'd the Ele­mosinary, or Hospitale conversorum & puerorum, in honour of St. Thomas the Martyr.

An [...] 1268. King Henry the III. granted to the Monks of Burmundsey a Market every Monday at their Mannor of Charleton in Kent, and a Fair to be held there at the Feast of the Holy Trinity yearly.

The Mannor of Bermundsey was ancient Demesn of the Crown, and all 642 the Lands and Tenements in this Mannor cum pertin. are impleadable in the Court of this Mannor by the King's writ of Right according to the Custom of the said Mannor, and not at the Common Law.

Within the Mannor of Burmundsey were comprised the several Towns of Bermondesey, Camberwell, Rederhith, the Hide of Southwark, Dilwich, Waddon, and Reyham, with their Appurtenants.

[Valued at 474 l. 14 s. 4 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

The Priory of St. James by Exeter, in Devonshire.

BAldwin Earl of Devonshire founded this Priory without the Walls at 643 Exeter for Cluniac Monks, and endowed it with Revenues. Con­firm'd by Richard Earl of Devonshire, Son of Baldwin, 1157. and by Ro­bert 644 Bishop of Exeter, Anno 1146. Also by Maud the Empress. Infra 645 p. 1025.

[Valued at 502 l. 12 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

LENTON, in Nottinghamshire.

WIlliam Peverel built this House for Cluniac Monks, and gave to the Abby of Clugny great Revenues for the Maintenance of certain Monks of their Order in this Priory, providing however that this House should be free and discharged from all exactions of that Abby, paying on­ly 646 one Mark per Annum as an acknowledgment. To this Priory of the 647 Holy Trinity at Lenton King Henry the II. was a Benefactor, so were also King Steven, and King Iohn, which last granted them the Tithes of his hunting (Decimam venationis nostrae) in the Counties of Nottingham and Derby. All whose Grants were confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the 648 tenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 30.

[Valued at 329 l. 15 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

PONTEFRACT, in Yorkshire.

THE first Founder of this House was Robert de Laceio, who built it in a place then called Kirkeby, in honour of St. Iohn the Apostle and Evangelist, subjecting it to the Church of Clugny from whence it was 649 furnisht with Monks, and gave them several Lands and Revenues; con­firm'd 650 by Hugo de la Val. Henry de Lascy Son of the said Robert, gave to these Monks the Custody of the Hospital of St. Nicholas in Pomfract, in 651 the year 1159. Pope Celestin confirm'd the Estate given to this Mona­stery, and granted them several Priviledges, among others, that in the time of a general Interdiction it may be lawful for the Monks here to cele­brate the Divine Offices, with a low Voice, their Church-Doors shut, and 652 without the [...]ound of any Bells. Adam Fitz-Swany gave divers Lands to the Monks of Pontfract, he also gave them for a Cell, the Priory of St. Mary Magdalen of Lunda, or Monk-Breton, which he had founded on his paternal Estate. After many Controversies between the Monks of Pont­fract and the Monks of Breton, it was at last agreed and determin'd by 653 Deed dated in the year 1269. that the Monks of Breton should pay a Pi­tance of 20 s. per Annum to the Covent of Pontfract, that the Monks of Breton should freely choose their own Prior, but that he should be created 655 or install'd by the Prior of [...] Pontfract, &c. To this House were several Per­sons of great Quality, Benefactors; whose names and parcels by them gi­ven may be seen in the Book at large. p. 656, 657, 658, 659.

[Valued at 337 l. 14 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

660 MONK-BRETON, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Pontfract.

THIS Priory was founded to the glory of God and honour of St. Mary Magdalen of Lunda, by Adam the Son of Suanus wh [...] en­dow'd it with the Town of Breton, &c. The then Prior of the Charity (being the Capital House of this Order beyond Seas) granted that the Monks of this House, might choose their own Prior, the Prior of Pontfract 663(if required) being present at the Election. Adam Fitz Swane the [...]oun­der gave this House as a Cell to the Priory of St Iohn at Pontfract [...] and ordered this House to pay to that Priory a Recognition of one Mark of Silver per Annum. Pope Vrban the III. confirm'd the Foundation 1186.

[Valued at 239 l. 3 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

THETFORD, in Norfolk.

664 FOunded Anno Dom. 1103. by Roger Bigot, whose Gifts and Endow­ments to this House were all confirm'd and ratified by his Son Wil­liam 666 Bigot Dapiser to the King; and also by King Henry the I. and King 668 Henry the II. This Priory was made Denison 50. E. 3.

[Valued at 312 l. 14 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.

MONTACUTE, in Somersetshire.

FIRST founded by William Earl of Moriton in Normandy, who en­dowed this Priory with three fair Lordships, viz. Montegue and two others. King Henry the I. gave and confirm'd to God and the blessed Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul of Montacute, and the Cluniac Monks there, divers Lands, with great Liberties and Exemptions. The like did King 669 Henry the II. and King Henry the III. in the four and thirtieth year of his 670 Reign. King Edward the III. in the fourteenth year of Reign, granted 671 the Advowson, and Custody of this Priory and four Cells thereunto be­longing, to William de Monte-acuto Earl of Salisbury, and Marshal of England, and to his Heirs. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 909.

[Valued at 456 l. 14 s. 7 d. q. per Annum.]

DAVENTREY, in Northamptonshire.672

THIS Priory was first founded at Preston by Hugh de Leycestre (call'd the Vicount) but that place being found inconvenient, they were by License of Simon de Seynliz the elder, Earl of Northampton, removed to Daventre, where he built a Monastery in honour of St. Augustine the Apo­stle of the English. King Henry the II. confirm'd their Liberties and Fran­chises 673 granted by King Henry the I. to St. Mary of Charity (i. e. the Capital House of this Order beyond Seas) and to St. Augustine of Daventrey and the Monks there. Many were the Benefactors to this House, as Matilda de Senliz, Richard de Foxton, whose Daughter Ann was married to Alan Basset 674 of Lufphenam (com Roteland) Steven de Welton, Henry de Braybrok (whose 675 Geneologies may be seen, Fo. 677. 678.)

St. ANDREWS, at Northampton.679

THIS Priory was founded in the eighteenth year of King William the Conqueror, by Simon de Seynliz, who came into England in the Army of that King. He married Maud Daughter and Co-heir of Waldel­fus Earl of Huntington, with whom he had the honour of Huntington, Alice the other Daughter was by him given to Ralph de Tonny with 100 l. per Annum in Land (centum Librarum terrae) out of the said honour. In the Reign of King Henry the I. the said Simon made a Voyage to the Holy Land, and died in his return at the Monastery of the blessed Mary of Charity (to which Monastery he had subjected this of St. Andrew.) After his death King Henry, having married Maud Sister of Alexander King of Scotland, gave Maud Earl Simons Widow to David Brother of Alexander, and with her the Custody of Earl Simons Son and Heir, Simon de St. Lyz, junior. Hugh Bishop of Lincoln confirm'd the Churches and Tithes given 681 to this Priory, among which were the Churches of Ryal and Exton in Rutland. King Henry the I. also confirm'd the Lands to them given, and granted them many Liberties and Franchises. This Priory was made De­nison 682 6 H. 4.

To the Hospital of St. David at Kingsthorp built upon the Lands of this Priory, for the Relief of Travellers and poor People, Walter Prior of this House with the assent of his Convent, gave two yard Land and a Messu­age, [Page 86] &c. in Thorp, constituting several Orders for the Government of the said Hospital, among others that there should be three rows of Beds placed in length before the Chappel, so as the Poor, and especially the sick Peo­ple, might most conveniently hear Mass, &c. subjecting the said Hospi­al 683 to the Prior of St. Andrews at Northampton, and the Abbot of Sullebi. This Deed bears date 1200. being the second of King Iohn.

(This Priory was valued at 263 l. 7 s. 1 d. q. per Annum.)

684 BAR NESTAPLE, in Devonshire.

THIS House was founded for Cluniac Monks, and dedicated to the honour of God, and our Lord Jesus Christ, and St. Mary, the holy Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul, and St. Mary Magdalen, by Ioel Son of Alured, who endow'd it with large Possessions, subjecting it to the Church of St. Martin de Campis, in which he himself became a Monk. Confirm'd by King Henry the I. and by Henry de Tracy, who descended 685 from the Founder, An. 1146. (11. Steph.)

[Valued at 123 l. 6 s. 7 d. per Annum]

TIKEFORD, in Buckinghamshire.

FVlcodius Paganellus was the first Founder of this Priory, who with other Benefactors, endowed it with divers Lands and Rents. All which together with a Court-Leet, King Henry the II. confirm'd to the 687 Monks here. King Edward the II. in the fifth year of his Reign, granted further to William de la Manerere then prior of this House, and his Suc­cessors, to have a Pillory and Tumbrel in their Lordship of Tikeford, for the punishment of Malefactors.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 910.

FEVERSHAM, in Kent

ANno 1148. King Steven founded the Abby here to the honour of of our Saviour, and endow'd it with divers Mannors, Lands, Li­berties, and free Customs to hold in perpetual Alms, discharged and quit of all secular Exactions. King Steven and Maud his Queen, and Eus [...]acius their Son were buried here. King Henry the II. confirm'd to the Cluniac Monks of Feversham, all their Lands and Franchises, granting to them a Fair yearly for eight days beginning at the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula. 688 The like confirmation was made by King Iohn in the sixteenth year of 689 his Reign; and by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign. Peter Abbot of Clugny granted to King Steven, Clarembaldus then Prior of Bermundesey with twelve Monks of that House, for the Composing an Abby at Feversham, and at the same time absolved the said Clarembaldus and his Monks from all Obedience and Subjection to the Church of Clugny, and that of the Charity: The like Emancipation or discharge of subjection was also granted by the then Prior of the Charity.

[Valued at 286 l. 12 s. 6 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

ARTHINGTON, in Yorkshire.690

THIS was a Priory of Nuns, built and endow'd by Peers of Arthington, and confirm'd by Pope Alexander; as is set forth in an award made in the twenty eighth year of the Reign of King Henry the VI. Alicia de Romeli was a Benefactress to this Nunnery 691 whose Gift was confirm'd by her Son William de Curcy the Kings Sewer, and by Warinus Fitz [...]Gerald the King's Chamberlain.

[Valued at 11 l. 8 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

Of the Cistercian Order.

Anno Dom. 1098. Robert Abbot of Molesme by License of Hugo 695 Archbishop of Lyons the Pope's Legate, first instituted this Order, in a Desert Place called Cistercium in the Dutchy of Burgundy, the Rule of St. Bennet, being not duly observed, in his old Monastery. In this Order therefore they betook 699 themselves to the strict observance of St. Bennet's Rule, and obtain'd great Priviledges from the Pope. To avoid Pride 700 and Superfluity, they were to retain no Crosses of Gold or Silver, but only of Wood; their Chalices were to be of Sil­ver and not of Gold, &c. The second Abbot of this Order was one Stephen an Englishman.

703 WAVERLEY, in Surrey.

THIS Abby was founded in the year of Christ 1128. by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester. The first Monks of this Order, being twelve and an Abbot, came to this House from a Foreign Abby call'd Elemosina. The said William Bishop of Winchester endow'd this House with divers Lands, and with Common in Farnham Woods, all which was by consent of the King, and the Convent of Winchester, and confirm'd by his Successors. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 912.

[Valued at 174 l. 8 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

704 FURNES, in Lancashire.

ANno Dom. 1127. being twenty nine years from the first Institution of the Cistercian Order (26. H. 1.) This House was founded by Steven Earl of Morton and Boloign, afterwards King of England.

The Names of the Abbots of FVRNES.
  • 1. Evanus de Albrincis.
  • 2. Eudo de Sourdeval.
  • 3. Michael de Lancastria.
  • 4. Petrus de Eboraco.
  • 5. Richardus de Bajocis.
  • 6. Iohannes de Cawnesfeild.
  • 705 7. Walterus de Millum.
  • 8. Ioslenus de Pennington.
  • 9. Conanus de Bardoule.
  • 10. Willielmns Niger.
  • 11. Giraldus Bristaldon.
  • 12. Michael de Dalton.
  • 13. Richardus de Sancto Quintino.
  • 14. Radulfus de Flet [...]ham.
  • 15. Iohannes de Newby.
  • 16. Stephanus de Alverston.
  • 17. Nicholaus de Meaux, who was after Bishop of Sodor.
  • 18. Robertus de Denton.
  • 19. Laurentius de Acclom
  • 20 Willielmus de Midleton.
  • 21. Hugo de Bron.
  • 22. Willielmus de Cockeram.
  • 23. Hugo Skiller.
  • 24. Iohannes de Cockeram.
  • 25. Alexander de Walton.
  • 26. Iohannes de Cockham.
  • 27. Iohannes de Bolton.
  • 28. Willielmus de Dalton. [Page]
    A CISTERCIAN MONK

    Vol. 1 P. 69 [...]

    [Page] [Page 89]
  • King Steven's double Relati­on to Maud the Empress.
  • Edgar Edling had two Sisters Margaret, and Christiana; who had issue as follows,
    Steven Earl of Morton, &c. was Son of Steven E. of Bloys and A­dela Daughter of K. William the Conqueror, and Sister of K. H. I. marriedChristianaMargaret Wife of Malcolm K. of Scots.
     Eustace E. of BolonMaryMatilda Wife of Hen. I. K. of Eng.
     MaudMaud, first married to the Emperior, then to Jeostery Earl of Anjou, by which last the had issue.
      Willam Earl of Warren and Bolon 
       Hen. the II. K. of Eng. Marry

William de Lancaster, the third of that Name was a great Bene [...]actor to 706 this Abby, as appears by his Deeds dated 1240. &c. Which William mar­ried Agnes de Brus and had issue 707

 Halewisa ux. Petri de Brus Alicia ux. Williel. de Lindesey. Sorota ax. Alani de Multon
Petrus de Brus jun. ob. s. h.Agnes ux. Walteri de Fawkunbergh.Lucia ux. Marmaduci de Thweng.Margareta ux, Dom. Rob. de Ros.Laderina ux. Johanis de Belew.

Pope Eugenius granted to Iohn Abbot of St. Mary's of Furnes, among 709 other Priviledges that they should not pay any Tithes for their Lands or Cattel held in their own hands and occupation. And (Anno Dom. 1305.) it was agreed between the Abbot of Furnes and the Prior of St. Mary of Lancaster (which last was intituled to the Tithes of their Grange of Bel­lomonte) that in case the Abbot of Furnes let the said Lands, then the Prior of Lancaster should receive Tithes of the Lands so let, but in case the Abbot and Covent of Furnes should occupy the same in their own hands, then the said Prior to receive only a Pension of two Marks per Annum.

[Valued at 805 l. 16 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

710 RUSSIN, in the Isle of Man, a Cell to Furnes.

711 THE Abby of Russin was founded in the year 1134. Olauus King of Man, a very devout Prince, gave the Land whereon this Abby stands to Yvo then Abbot of Furnes, for the erecting of this Monastery.

Certain Antient Synodals, and Ecclesiastical Constitutions for the Isle of Man, made by Simon Bishop of Sodor 1229.

712 Other Constitutions made in the Church of St. Bradan in Man 1291. under Mark Bishop of Sodor.

716 Other Additional Constitutions made in the Church of St. Michael the Archangel, by William Russel Bishop of Sodor, and the whole Clergy of Man 1350. All which see at large in the Monasti [...]on.

718 Thomas Lord Stanley, Earl of Darby, and K. of the Isle of Man by his Let­ters Patents dated at Lathum, 28. Mar 1505. confirm'd to [...]uan then Bishop of Sodor and his Successors, all the Lands, Revenues, Rig [...]s and Priviledges belonging to the Church in the Isle and Kingdom o [...] Man.

YNES, in Ireland, a Cell to Furnes.

THIS was first founded in the year 1126. by a King of Vlster named Magnellus Makenlefe, in a place call'd Erynach, but that [...] al­most destroyed in the Wars, it was translated by Iohn de Curcy [...] of Vlster, and new founded at Ynes, and at the same time he subjected [...]is Abby to Furnes, An. 1180.

719 NETHE, in Glamorganshire.

RIchard de Grainvilla gave to God and the Church of the holy Trinity at Savigny, Nethe and other Lands and Posse [...]ons, to the I [...] ­on that the Abbot and Convent of Savigny should institute here a Con­vent of Monks under an Abbot. King Iohn confirm'd the said Lands to the Church of the Holy Trinity at Nethe and the Monks there, in the ninth year of his Reign granting them also many Priviledges and Im­munities.

[Valued at 132 l. 7 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

720 BASINGWERK Abby, in Flintshire.

FOunded Anno 1131. by Ranulph Earl of Chester, confirm'd by King Henry the II. and by Lewellin Prince of North Wales The like 721 Confirmation to this Monastery, and the Monks here was made by David Prince of Northwales, Son of the foresaid Lewelin, who also gave them certain Lands and Revenues, in the year 1240.

[Valued at 150 l. 7 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

TINTERN, in Wales.

FOunded 1131. William, Mareschal of England, and Earl of Pembroke, in the seventh year of Henry the III. confirm'd to God, and the bles­sed Mary of Tyntern, and to the Abbot and Monks there, all the Lands and 722 Revenues given to them by his Ancestors; granting also to the said Ab­by great Liberties and Immunities: prohibiting all Men to vex or disturb 723 them or theirs, under the penalty of twenty Marks, besides the curse of 724 God. Their Estate was also confirm'd by Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk and Mareschal of England, Anno 1301. Walter Fitz Richard appears to be the 725 Founder of this House Anno 1131. Who dying without issue, his Bro­ther Gilbert Strongbowe became his Heir, and was the first Earl of Pembroke, from whom descended Isabel; she became the Wife of William Mareschall, who died 1219. and lies buried in the Temple at London: he left five Sons all successively Earls of Pembroke, but they all died without issue, Matilda the eldest of their Sisters and Co-heirs, was married to Hugh le Bigod Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, &c.

[Valued at 192 l. 1 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

RIEVALL, in Yorkshire.727

ANno 1132. Gualterus Especk a Great man in the Court of King Henry the I. founded this Monastery in a place called Blachomour near the River Rie, for the receipt of certain Monks of the Cistercian Order sent over by Bernard Abbot of Clarevallis, whose first Abbot was William.

This Walter Especk, having unhappily lost his Son and Heir who broke 728 his Neck by a fall from a Horse, built and endow'd with part of his Estate three Monasteries, viz Kirkham, Rievall, and Wardon. The rest of his Estate was divided between his three Sisters and Co-heirs, one of which married to Peter Lord Roos, the Descent of which Noble Family, the Reader may see set forth in the Book at large, with their several Matches and Issue, down to George Manners, Lord Roos, who died An. 1513.

Many were the Benefactors, and large the Possessions of this Monastery, exprest Fol. 729, 730, 731.

Pope Alexander the III. by his Bull dated 1140. granted to Aelredo Abbot of St. Mary's of Rievalle and his Brethren, and their Successors in 732 that Monastery, a Confirmation of all their Possessions, with divers Pri­viledges, in particular that they might celebrate the Divine Offices in the time of a general Interdict, &c.

[Valued at 278 l. 10 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

FOUNTAINS, in Yorkshire, a Cell of Clarevallis. Founded 1132.733

THE Rule and Discipline of St. Benedict being relaxt in the Abby of St. Mary's at York, and a great Dissention happening therein on that occasion between the Abbot and Prior, Turstin then Archbishop of York gave leave to thirteen of the Monks to retire from the said Abby.739 To these the said Archbishop appointed a Solitary, and then Desert place [Page 92] for their Habitation, at that time called Skeldale, since Fountains. Here for a time a great Elme was their only fence from the Weather, under which they slept, sed, and performed their Offices according to their Rule. Richard, who had been their Prior at York, being elected their first Abbot and confirm'd by the Archbishop Turstin aforesaid. They having past a Winter in this manner, sent to the holy Bernard Abbot of 741 Claravellis submitting themselves to his Rule and Direction. Abbot Bernard sends back with the Messengers one of his Monks named Galfridus who taught them the Cistercian Discipline. Hitherto they were in great want, being forced to dress for their Food the Leaves of the Trees and 742 Herbs of the Fields. Yet in their distress having in their poor House but two Loaves and a half, they gave one of them to a Poor man who de­manded an Alms for Christ his sake. Two years they labour'd under this grievous Poverty; after which God sent them many Benefactors; the first of which was Hugh Dean of York. Five years after the first Foundation of 743 the Monastery of Fountains, a certain Nobleman called Ranulph de Mer [...]ay built for them a new Monastery to which they sent some of their Monks under the Government of Abbot Robert formerly a Monk at Witheby. Be­sides 746 which, many Cells were founded and given to this House, a Wo­burne, 747 Kirkstall, Bitham, otherwise called Vallis dei, Lisa in Norway, &c.

252 Benefactors to this House were Alanus de Aldeburg; Roger de Mubrai 754 de Aldeburg, Swanus de Tornetun, de Bramlcia, Roger de Lact Constable of 757 Chester, Nigellus de Mubrai, Alice de Gant, &c. who gave to God and the 758 Church of St. Mary de Fontibus divers Mannors and Lands. All which were confirm'd to the Monks of the Cistercian Order here, and their Suc­cessors 759 for ever by King Richard the I.

[Valued at 998 l. 6 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

760 QUARRE (Quarrera) in the Isle of Wight, a Cell to Savigny. Fo [...]nded 1132.

RIchard Earl of Exeter, Son of Baldwin, confirm'd to God, the holy Virgin, and Gaufridus Abbot of Savigny, this House and divers Lands and Revenues thereunto belonging, first given by his Father. Bene­factors to this House were Henry Fitz-Empress, who writ himself Son of 761 the Duke of Normandy and Earl of Anjou, Engelgerius de Bohun; William de Vernun Earl of Devon, &c.

762 Controversie arising between the Abbot and Covent of Lyra, and this Church of Quarre about certain Tithes and Revenues in and about Caris­brok, and other Neighbouring Towns here in this Island, the Matter was agreed and settled by Deed dated in the year 1289.

[Valued at 134 l. 3 s. 11 d. per Annum]

764 CUMBERMERE, in Cheshire. Founded 1133.

HVgo Malbanc founded this Abby in the Honour of the blessed Virgin, and St. Michael, and endow'd it with very large Lands and Posses­sions; 765 among others, with the fourth part of the Town of Wiche, and the Tithes of the Salt and Boylries there. Yet by the same Deed he granted [Page 93] that Ralph Earl of Chester his chief Lord, should be accounted the Principal Founder and Defender of the said Church and Monks there. King Henry the III. in the sixteenth year of his Reign, confirm'd all their Possessions; and again in the fiftieth year of his Reign. In the year 1230. Ralph Earl 767 of Chester confirm'd their Estate given by Hugo Malbanc, and granted them several Liberties and Immunities. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 913.

[Valued at 225 l. 9 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

GEROUDON, in Leicestershire.768

THIS was founded Anno 1133. as Cell to Waverle. The Founder, Robert Earl of Leicester, endow'd this Monastery with all his Lands in Disseley, and with the Wood of Shepehed. Many were the Bene­factors who gave to this Church of St. Mary of Geroldon, and the Monks here large Possessions, viz. Margaret Countess of Wynton Sister of the said 769 Robert, Margaret de Ferrariis Countess of Derby, Roger de Quincy, Gilbert 770 de Coleville, William Son of Richard Wareyn, William Peverell, &c. All 771 whose Gifts were confirm'd to them by King Edward the III. in the four­teenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 159 l. 19 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

SWINESHEAD, in Lincolnshire. Founded An. Do. 1134.773

THIS was founded and endow'd by Robert Greslei; whose several Lands and Possessions were recited and confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Mary of Swynesheved and the Monks there, by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 167 l. 15 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

CALDER, in Cumberland. Founded An. Do. 1134.774

KING Henry the II. confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks here all the Lands and Possessions given by Ralph de Meschin their Founder, and other Benefactors.

[Valued at 50 l. 9 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

BILAND, in Yorkshire. Founded An. Do. 1134.775

THIS House was at first founded for certain Monks of Savigny, by 776 Roger de Mulbray; which Roger died in the Holy Land. Walter de Sciflings Parson of Kildale, Hugo de Wake, and others were Benefactors. In the ninth of Richard the II. Thomas Earl Mareschall and Earl of Not­tingham, 778 Lord Mowbray and Segrave, did by his Deed recite, ratifie, and confirm the Foundation of this Abby by his said Progenitor Roger de Mul­bray. Vid. infra, p. 1027.

[Valued at 238 l. 9 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

779 BILDWAS, in Shropshire. Founded An. 1135.

KING Steven in the third year of his Reign (An. Dom. 1139) gave and confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Ceadde, and to the Abbot and Monks here, their Estate in like manner as Roger Bishop of 780 Chester had given it, and further, granted them several Immunities. Walter 781 de Dunstanville, Robert Corbet, and others were Benefactors. Their Estate was confirm'd to them by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 914.

[Valued at 110 l. 19 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

782 St. Mary's near Dublin, in Ireland, a Cell to Bildwas. Founded 1139.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd to the white Monks of St. Mary's near Dublin, all their Lands and Possessions; and by another Deed 783 subjected the said Monks to the Abbot of Bildewas.

BITLESDEN, in Buckinghamshire. Founded An. 1147.

THE Lordship of Bitlesden escheating in the time of King Steven, from one Robert de Meperteshall, to the then Earl of Leicester, the said Earl granted it to his Steward Ernaldus de Bosco, who founded here an Abby, which the Earl also confirm'd; but after some time the abovesaid Robert de Meperteshal being about to commence a Suit in Law for this E­state, the Monks here in consideration of ten Marks obtain'd from the said Robert also a Charter of Confirmation. This House was first given 784 by the abovesaid Arnold de Bosco for a Cell to the Abby of Geroudon.

[Valued at 125 l. 4 s. 3 d. q. per Annum.]

WARDON, in Bedfordshire. Founded An. 1136.

THE first Founder of this House was Walter Espec, who endow'd it for Monks from the Abby of Rieval, which was confirm'd by King Steven Anno Dom. 1135. and by King Richard the I. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 389 l. 16 s. 6 d. q. per Annum.]

785 FORD, in Devonshire.

IN the year 1133. Richard Viscount or Sheriff of Devonshire, a near Kinsman of King William the Conqueror, and to whom that King had given the Castle of Exeter, and Honour and Barony of Okehampton in De­vonshire, gave his Land of Brightley, within the said Honour of Okehamp­ton, for the founding of an Abby, and obtained twelve Monks for the same from the Abby of Waverly. These Monks having remaine [...] [...] Brightley for five years, were at last forced through the [...] [Page 95] sterility of the place, to return back to Waverly: Which the Sister and Heiress of their Founder seeing, she gave them the Mannor of Thorncomb for their maintenance, and her house therein, then called Ford, for their more convenient habitation. From this Lady did descend Hawisia who was mar­ried 786 to Reginald de Courtnay, who was the Grandson of Lewis the Gross of France, from whom descend the noble Family of Courtnays, Patrons of this Abby, and great Benefactors. Whose descent and lineage is set forth in the 787 Book at large. One of which Family, namely the Lord Iohn Courtnay, was, through the divine Mercy, his great Faith, and his Hope in the Pray­ers of these Monks, miraculously delivered from a terrible Storm at Sea in the Night time, when all the Seamen despair'd of life. Hugh Courtnay the 789 second of that name, became Earl of Devonshire, and died 9 E. 3. I [...]seline de Pomerei, and others, were Benefactors to this Monastery; all whose 791 gifts are confirm'd by King Richard I. in the first year of his Reign.

[Valued at 374 l. 10 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

BUCKFAST in Devonshire.792

FOunded for Monks and endowed with Lands by Richard Banzan, to hold by the 30th. part of a Knight's Fee; and confirm'd by King Hen. II.

[Valued at 466 l. 11 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

MEAUX, in Yorkshire. Founded, Anno 1136.

MEaux was so called by its Inhabitants, who came into England with the Norman Conqueror, and named their new Seat according to the name of the City of Meaux in Normandy from whence they came. 793 The Founder of this Abby was William le Gross Earl of Albemarl, and Lord of Holderness, and in a manner of all Yorkshire; who having vow'd a Journy to Ierusalem and being by reason of his age, and unweildyness of his Body, not well able to perform such a Voyage, built this Monastery by way of commutation of his Vow. This he gave to God and the Blessed 794 Virgin Mary, introducing a Convent of Monks from the Monastery of Fountains, of whom one Adam was made the first Abbot; which Monks 795 at first got their living by the work of their hands and sweat of their brows; but were not long after plentifully endow'd with Lands and Reve­nues by the said Earl. This William le Gross was Grandson of Odo to whom 796 William the Conqueror gave his Sister in marriage, and the Isle of Holder­ness; the Archbishop of Roan gave him the County of Albemarl to hold of him by the Service of being his Standard Bearer in his Expeditions attend­ed with ten Knights. The Line of this William being not long after extinct,797 the County of Alb [...]marl, and Honour of Holderness escheated to the Crown for want of heirs. This Monastery was begun, and the Monks first en­tred there under their Abbot Adam, on the Calends of Ianuary 1150. Ri­chard de Otringham Rector of the Church of Schelford in the Diocess of Ely, 799 by his Deed dated, An. Dom. 1317. gave divers Lands to the Abbot and Convent here, for the maintenance of a perpetual Chantery of seven Monks of this House, at the Porch of their Abby Church. The number of the Monks in this Abby were 50. The Lands given to this Abby 800 were confirm'd to it by King Iohn, in the 6th. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 299 l. 6 s. 4 d. q. per Annum.]

NEW-MINSTER, near Morpeth, in Yorkshire.

THIS was founded and endow'd in the year 1138. by a certain Nobleman call'd Ranulf de Merley, it was furnisht with Monks from 801 the Abby of Fountains. Their Lands were confirm'd to them by King Henry the III. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 916.

802 TAME, in Oxfordshire. Founded 1138.

THIS House was founded and endow'd by Sir Robert Gait a K [...]t. and was furnisht with Cistercian Monks from Waverley. Their E­state was confirm'd to them by King Henry II. in the eleventh year of his Reign, and by King Edward the II. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 256 l. 13 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

803 BORDESLEY, in Worcestershire. Founded, An. 1138.

THis Abby was founded by Mawd the Empress for Cistercian Monks, in honour of the most blessed Virgin Mary (Regina Caelorum) so are the words of her Charter.) Endowing it with divers Lands and Reve­nues to hold free and quit of all Secular Service. Besides whom, many 804 other Benefactors conferr'd upon this Abby great Possessions, all which were confirm'd by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.

[Valued at 388 l. 9 s. 10 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

805 LOUTH-PARK in Lincolnshire. Founded, An. 1139.

THe Founder of this Monastery was Alexander Bishop of Lincoln, who procured Monks for it from the Abby of Fountains, but their first Settlement being at a place called Haverholm, which Seat not being con­venient for their Habitation, he removed them from thence to this Place, Besides the said Bishop they had divers other Benefactors, all whose do­nations were confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and the Monks de Parcho-Lude, by King Henry the III. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 147 l. 14 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

806 KIRKSTED, in Lincolnshire.

THIS House was founded in the year 1139. by Hugh de Bretone a Ba­ron of those times, and by him endow'd with divers Lands. Other 807 Benefactors were the Furnivalls, D' Aencurts, and D'arci's, &c. Richard de 808 Luvetot gave and annext to this House the Hermitage of St. Iohn in the Parish of Ecclesfeild, with the Land thereunto belonging. Conan Duke of Britain and Earl of Richmund gave to this Abby the Church of Gaiton with two Carucates and a half of Land, &c.

[Valued at 286 l. 2 r. 7 d. per Annum.]

KINGS WOOD, in Gloucestershire. Founded, An. 1139.811

THis House was founded by William de Berkeley for Cistercian Monks, and the Foundation confirm'd by Maud the Empress: but after­wards for many years it became a Grange depending on the Abby of Tet­tebiry, and a long contest was had about this Matter, till at last it was from 812 a Grange advanced to the name of the Abby of Kingeswode. The Lands and Endowments given to this Abby by the Founder, were confirm'd by 813 several of the Berkleys, his noble Descendants.814

[Valued at 244 l. 11 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

PIPWELL, in Northamptonshire.815

THis Monastry was first founded, An. Dom 1143. (and then called Sancta Maria de Divisis.) among thick Woods, which were in after times destroyed. In the year 1323 [...] the Monks here were dispersed thro' Poverty. Their first Founder was William Boutevileyn of Cottesbrook; 818 from whom descended one Robert Boutevileyn, who did many unkindnesses to these Monks. This was before their dispersion. Hugh Senlize and 819 Emma his Wife one of the Daughters and Heirs of the Lord of Braybroke, gave to the Monks of Pipwell divers Lands and Tenements in Braybroke, confirm'd by the Capital Lord of the Fee Simon de Foxton, and these seem to be the second Founders. King Henry III. granted to these Monks pa­sture on Benifield Laund for 250 Cattle.

[Valued at 286 l. 11 s. 8 d. q. per Annum.]

STONELEY, in Warwickshire.820

MAud the Empress first founded the Priory of Rademere in the Forest Kanoc, confirmed by King Steven. This Priory was afterwards advanced to an Abby of Cistercian Monks by Henry Fitz Empress then Duke of Normandy. In the year 1154 [...] which was thirteen years after 821 the Monks had remained at Rademore, the [...] foresaid Henry Fitz Empress [...] being now King of England, they changed their habitation of Radmore for Stanley, and the whole Lordship of the same, which was before that the Kings Demesn. The first stone of the Abby Church there was laid on the Ides of April, An. Dom. 1154. The said King Henry I. endow'd this House with divers other Lands and Revenues elsewhere.

[Valued at 151 l. 0 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

COGESHAL, in Essex.

THis Abby was founded by King Steven and Maud his Queen, in the year 1142. William de Humberstane, with the Kings License, gave the Mannor of Tyllingham-Hall for the finding of one Wax light to burn before the High Altar at the Abby Church here in the time of high Mass,822 [Page 98] daily. The Monks of this House were endowed with great Immunities

[Valued at 251 l. 2 s. per Annum.]

REVESBY, in Lincolnshire Founded An. 1142.

THe Founders of this House were William de Romara, Farl of Lincoln, and William his Son, who gave to the Abbot and Monks of Rievalle, Revesby, Thoresby, and other Lands in Lincolnshire for the building and 823 endowment of this House. This Abby was dedicated to St. Laurence. The Lands and Reuenues were confirm'd by Ralph Earl of Chester, and by King Richard I. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 287 l. 2 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

CUMHIRE, in Pembrokshire,

825 THis House was founded by Cadwathel ap Madok in the year 114 [...], for 826 Sixty White Monks. King Henry III, in the sixteenth year of his Reign confirm'd to these Monks all their Lands and Revenues.

[Valued at 24 l. 19 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

827 BOXLEY in Kent.

WIlliam de Ipre a great Commander in King Stevens Army founded this Abby of Boxley for White Monks in the year 1144. King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign confirm'd their Estate with Sac & Soc.

[Valued at 204 l. 4 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

SINNINGTHWAIT, in Yorkshire.

828 THis House was founded for Nuns, by Beriram Haget, and confirm'd by Roger de Mubrai his superiour Lord. Iessery Archbishop of York, took these Nuns and their Possessions into his protection, and denounced a malediction against those who should dare to wrong them, and a bles­sing to their Benefactors. Alice Widow of Adam de Stanely gave, with her self, nine Bovates of Land in Berewik (super Theseiam) which was after­wards changed with Ranulf Fitz Henry for other Lands in Lofthows.

[Valued at 60 l. 9 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

ESSEHOLT, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Sinningthwait.

POpe Alexander the third, by his Bull dated in the year 1172. con­firm'd to Christian Prioress of Sinningthwait, and the Nuns there [...] and their Successors, their House and Estate both at Sinningthayte, and at 829 Esseholt, with all Lands already given, or to be given to their said Houses. With Priviledge of Sanctuary.

[Valued at 13 l. 5 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

WOBURN, in Bedfordshire. Founded An. 1145.

THIS was founded and endowed by Hugh de Bolebock, by advice of Henry Abbot of Fountains, from whence a Convent of Monks was sent to this place. King Iohn in the second year of his Reign con­firmed the Estate of this House, so did also King Henry the II.

[Valued at 391 l. 18 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

MEREVAL, in Warwickshire. Founded An. 1148.830

THIS was founded by Robert Earl of Ferrariis, and by him en­dowed with all the Forest of Arden, with other Lands. All which was confirm'd By King Henry the II.

[Valued at 254 l. 1 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

HAMPOLE, in Yorkshire.

THIS House was founded for Nuns by Avicia de Tanai, and en­dowed by her with divers Lands of her Inheritance, all which were confirmed by Ralph de Till [...]er Grandson, by Roger Archbishop of York, and by William Fitz William, An. 1331.

[Valued at 63 l. 5 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

VALLE-DEI, alias Vaudey, in Lincolnshire.831

THE Abby here was founded by William Earl of Albemarl in the year 1147. It was at first called Biham, but afterwards Vallis-dei, and was planted with Monks from Fountains. The same Founder, e­rected also the Abby of Meaux of which supra. p. 792. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom Gilbertus de Gant, Roger de 833 Mulbray, &c. all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign. See the Genealogy of Gilbert de Gant Nephew of William the Conqueror, and the Noble Families descended 834 from him in the Book at large.

[Valued at 124 l. 5 s. 11 d. q. per Annum:

SWINE, in Yorkshire.

ERinburch de Burtona was the Foundress of this Abby, giving divers Lands of her Patrimony and Inheritance to God and the Church of St. Mary at Swine, and to the Brethren and Sisters there serving God. Pope Alexander exempted the Nuns here from paying Tithes for their Lands in their own Occupation. Vide infra, fol. 1026.

[Valued at 82 l. 3 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum]

835 BRURE, in Oxfordshire. Founded An. 1147.

KING Henry the III. Roger Earl of Warwick, and others, were Bene­factors to this Abby, all whose Gifts were confirm'd to the Cistercian Monks here, by King Iohn in the sixth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 134 l. 10 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

RUPE, alias Roche, in Yorkshire. Founded An. 1147.

836 RIchard de Bulli, and Richard Fitz Turgis, were joint Founders of this 837 Abby. Besides those of the Family of Bully, the Monks here were endow'd with Lands and Revenues by other Benefactors, among whom 839 Edmund de Lacy Constable of Chester, and William Earl Warren, &c. Pope Vrban the III. confirmed their Estate and Lands given and to be given, and exempted them from Tithes for their Lands in their own Tenure, and this was by his Bull dated 1186. Their first Abbot was Durandus, who governed twelve years 2. Dionisius 12. 3. Rogerus de Tikehill 8 4. [...]iugo de Waddeworth 5. 5 Osmundus 39. 6 Reginaldus 15. 7 Richardus 16. 8 Walter 14. 9 Alanus. 10 Iordanus. 11 Philippus.

[Valued at 224 l. 2 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

840 HOTON, in Yorkshire.

THIS House was founded for Nuns, and endow'd by Radulf de Nevil. With the Licenses of Adam de Brus, and Ernald de Percy.

BASEDALE, in Yorkshire.

JOhn de Ever by his Deed dated An. 1304. released to Ioan Prioress of Basedale, and to the Convent of the same, and their Successors, all homage and suit of Court for all their Lands holden of him in Kirkeby, Cliveland, and Ingelby. William de Percy and others were Benefactors to this Nunnery; all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King 841 Henry the III. in the twentieth year of his Reign. Robert de Longo Campo Abbot of St. Mary's at York and the Convent there, granted to these Nuns a Coemitery for themselves, but their Servants and Tenants to be buried at the Parish Church.

Guido de Bouincurt was the Founder of this Priory of Nuns.

(Valued at 20 l. 1 s. 4 d. per Annum.)

SALLEY, in Yorkshire.

THIS Abby was founded by William de Percy An Dom. 1147. Ma­tilda 842 de Percy Countess of Warwick, Daughter or the said William, was a great Benefactress to this Abby, and gave them the Church of Tad­caster, 843 and was accounted a second Founder; Agnes de Percy her Sister [Page 101] and Heiress, did add to her bounty. William Vavasor gave and confirm'd 845 all the Lands which his Father Malgarus Vavasor had given to this House, placing his Confirmation (una cum Corpore meo) together with his own body on the Altar of the blessed Mary de Sallay; providing thereby that in case he happens to die within the Kingdom of England, that his Body be 846 buried in this Abby. Iohn de Lacy Constable of Chester was among others a Benefactor to these Monks, An. 1223. William de Percy who founded this Abby, was Grandson to William de Percy who came into England with 847 the Conqueror. His Estate came to his two Daughters Matilda who was married to William Earl of Warwick, but died without issue, and Agnes married to Goseline Lovain, Brother to the Duke of Brabant, the issue of this Match kept the name of their Mothers Family, and are the Progeni­tors of the Earls of Northumberland. This Abby was wasted and part of it burnt down by the Scots in their Wars.

[Valued at 147 l. 3 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

RUFFORD, in Nottinghamshire. Founded 1148.848

THIS Abby was founded and endowed by Gilbert de Gaunt Earl of Lincoln. Many were the Benefactors, whose Gifts were confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks here, with the Grant of divers Priviledges in the Forest of Shirewood, by King Henry the III. in the thirty sixth year of his 849 Reign.

[Valued at 176 l. 11 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

SALTRE, in Huntingtonshire. Founded, An 1147.

SImon Earl of Northampton founded and endowed this Abby with all his 850 Land at Saltre, and with all the Marish Ground between that and Witlemare, and in Witlemare, &c. With very large Immunities and Fran­chises, such as his Ancestor Iudith Countess of Huntington (Neice of the Conqueror) had formerly obtain'd of her said Unkle for this Town and 851 Lordship of Saltre, as (inter alia) to be exempt from the County and Hundred Courts, to find neither Man nor Arms for the War, &c. The abovesaid Countess Iudith had a special Love for this place, and did very 853 much frequent it, and on that account did obtain from her said Unkle as great and large Priviledges as could then be granted for this Lordship. Which Priviledges, and also the Limits and Bounds of the Estate of this Abby, are particularly and at large set forth in the Monasticon. Contro­versie arising between the Abbot of Ramsey and the Abbot of Saltre, a­bout their Rights in Withlesmare and Vlbemare, the matter was determin'd by a final Concord before the Kings Justices at Huntedon, Anno 3. Rich. 854 the I.

[Valued at 141 l. 3 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

KIRKSTALL, in Yorkshire.

THIS Abby was first founded by Henry de Laceio in the year 1147. and first instituted with a Convent of Monks under their Abbot [Page 102] Alexander, from the Abby of Fountains. Their first Habitation was at 855 a Town call'd Bernolswick, but this place proving to these Monks very in­convenient on divers accounts, after they had been here somewhat above six years, they removed to a place called Kirkestall, in a Vally called Aierdale, which place was then only inhabited by some Hermits: This 856 last Seat they obtain'd of William Pictavensis who own'd the Soil, at the yearly Rent of five Marks. Their first Abbot Alexander govern'd the Monks here thirty five years, and after his death was succeeded by Ra­dulfus Hageth, and after him Abbot Lambert, to whom succeed Abbot 857 Helias, who at first was refused by the then Patron Roger de Lacy, but be­came afterwards much in his favour. King Iohn did some ill Offices to this Abby in taking from them some of their Lands. Robert de Lacy, who died Anno 1194. was accounted a second Founder of this Abby.

859 King William the Conqueror gave to Ilbertus de Lacy, who came into England in his Army, all Blackburnshire (in the County of York) with the Lordship and Honour of Pontfract, and other Lands. This Ilbertus built the Castle at Pontefract, and in it a Chappel for a Dean and Canons. Son of this Ilbertus was Robert Lacy who built the Monastery of Pontefract, who was the Father of Henry Lacy the Founder of this Abby of Kirkstall, this Henry married the Sister of William Vesci Rector of Berwick. Of 860 this Family was Roger Constable of Chester, who hearing that his Lord Ranulphus Earl of Chester was distrest in Wales, raised on the sudden a great Force among the Shoo-makers and Stage-players of Chester, and with them went and relieved his Lord from the Power of the Welch; where­upon the said Earl Ranulph granted to him and his Heirs the Dominion 861 and Patronage of the Shoo-makers and Players at Chester for ever. His Son and Heir Iohn de Lacy became the first Earl of Lincoln of this name, Anno Dom. 1221. and died 1240. From the Heirs General of this Fa­mily did descend Our Kings of the House of Lancaster.

[Valued at 329 l. 2 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

DORE, in Herefordshire.

862 RObert Earl of Ferrars founded this Monastery, and endowed it with Lands, to hold free and quit of all secular Service, by the Rent of three shillings yearly to be paid at the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula: and this was exprest to be given not only for the Health of the Souls of his 863 Ancestors and Heirs, but also (propace & stabilitate totius Angliae & Walliae) for the Peace and Stability of all England and Wales. King Iohn by his Deed dated in the seventeenth year of his Reign gave divers Lands to the Church of the blessed Mary at Dore and the Cistercian Monks there. Walter 864 de Clifford and others were Benefactors. All whose Gifts were confirm'd to 865 this House by King Henry the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 918.

[Valued at 101 l. 5 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

SIBETON, in Norfolk. Founded An. 1150.

866 THIS Abby was founded and endowed by William Son of Robert Fitz Walter. The Lands given to the Monks here were confirm'd [Page 103] by King Steven and King Henry the II. The said Robert Fitz-Walter was 867 the Founder of the House of St. Faith's at Horsham, and married Sibill Daughter of Radulfus de Cayneto, who came into England with the Con­queror; from whom descended the Families of Cressi and Vfford.

[Vid. Vol. 3. p. 32.

[Valued at 250 l. 15 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

STANLEIGH, in Wiltshire.

THIS Abby was first founded by Maud the Empress at Lokeswell in the year 1151. and three years afterwards translated to Stanlegh, by her Son King Henry the II. The Monks of this House came from Quarre 868 in the Isle of Wight. King Richard the II. confirm'd to them all their Lands, and took them into his protection.

[Valued at 177 l. 0 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

JERVAL, in Yorkshire.869

AKarius Fitz-Bardolf (a potent man in Yorkshire, in the time of King Steven) gave to Peter de Quinciaco, and certain other Monks of Savigny, a parcel of Land in Wandesleydale, for the erection of an Abby of their Order, which Abby was at first call'd Fors, and afterwards Iorvalle. 870 This Foundation was confirm'd by Alan Earl of Britan and Richmond, which Earl Alan, being present at the beginning of the Erection of the first Buildings, prevailed with several of his Knights to be assistant to the Work, and this was in the year 1145. Roger de Molbray gave also divers Lands to this House before his first Voyage to Ierusalem. The 871 abovesaid Peter inhabited this House at first with only two Companions labouring with their hands for their sustentation, but in a while they had of the said Earl of Richmond's Gift, five Plows, forty Cows, sixteen Horses, three hundred Sheep, &c. After this Serlo Abbot of Savigny (having a property in this House of Iorevalls by reason that the first Monks came from thence) granted the same to the Abby of Biland. Where­upon the foresaid Peter submitted himself and Companions being two Monks and one Lay-brother (conversus) to the Abbot of Biland. 872 Being fully possest of this House, Roger Abbot of Biland appointed 873 Iohn de Kinstan to be Abbot here, instituting him in these words, I con­firm thee Abbot and I commit to thee the care of Souls and the Government of the Abby of Joreval, with all its substance Persons and Possessions now had or to be had, as well in Temporals as Spirituals, in like manner as Serlo Abbot of Savigny gave the same to me. And then put into his hands the Rule of St. Benedict &c. An. 1150. Hereupon the said Abbot appointed to be of his Convent, the aforesaid Peter and his two Companions, with nine Monks of Biland, who removed from thence to Iorvall. After this the 874 abovesaid Earl Alan, and his Son Conan Duke of Britan encreased their Revenues, with the Gift of many other Lands. In the year 1156. the said Conan translated these Monks from Fors, the place being poor and 875 steril, to East-Witton [...] upon the River Ior, and this was by permission and approbation of the Abbot of Cisteaux and the general Convent of that Order. Alanus Earl of Britan, who was so great a Benefactor to this 877 [Page 104] Monastery, was Brother and Heir to Alanus Rufus, who was the Son of Eudo Earl of Britan, who came into England with King William the Conqueror, and had given him by the said King all Richmondshire. An. 1268, 878 Iohn Duke of Britan and Earl of Richmond, confirm'd the Donations of 879 his Ancestors. So also did King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 234 l. 18 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

881 GREENFEILD, in Lincolnshire.

RAdulf de Aby gave Lands here and elsewhere for the Foundation and Endowment of a Nunnery in Greenfeild; which was confirm'd by 882 Hugh Bishop of Lincoln, and Eudo de Greinesby, &c. Iohn Son and Heir of Adam de Welle gave to this House 10 l. per Annum for the finding of two sufficient Chaplains to celebrate for him, and his Ancestors, and all the faithful in our Ladies Chappel in the Priory Church here for ever, to the finding of which Margaret then Prioress of this House did oblige her Suc­cessors by her Deed dated Anno Dom, 1348.

[Valued at 63 l. 4 s. 1 d. per Annum]

CUMB, in Warwickshire.

RIchard de Camvilla gave Lands to the Abbot and Monks of Waver­ley, for the founding of this Abby of Cistercian Monks. Roger de 883 Moubray confirm'd the Estate so given, to the Monks of Cumb, quit of all secular service.

[Valued at 311 l. 15 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

STRATFORD-LANGTON, in Essex.

FOunded Anno. 1135. for Monks by William de Montefichet, endow'd with all the Lordship for Stradford in Westham, &c. All which Gifts were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 511 l. 16 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

884 FLEXLEY, in Gloucestershire.

THE Abby here was founded and endow'd by Roger Earl of Hereford, their Lands were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 112 l. 13 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

BLANCLAND, in Wales.

THIS was founded by Iohn de Toryton: The Lands given to these Monks were recited and confirm'd by King Iohn in the sixteenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 918.

[Valued at 135 l. 3 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

HOLMCOLTRUM, in Cumberland Founded An. 1150.885

KIng Henry II seems to have been the Founder of this Abby, King Ri­chard the I. in the first year of his Reign confirm'd their Lands, as [...] also K. Henry III. in the 39. year of his Reign. Iohn Gernoun and Mar­garet 886 his Wife, founded and endow'd a Chantry in this Abby Church for four Chaplains, Monks of this House, and two secular Chaplains. This Iohn than held two parts of the Mannor of Wyggeton, by Cornage. As was found by Inquisition, 6 E. 3. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 34.

[Valued at 427 l. 19 s. 3 d. ob. q. per Annum]

TARENT, in Dorsetshire.887

THis Abby was founded for Nuns of the Cistercian Order, by Richard Bishop of Durham. Iohn Queen of Scots gave to this House (cum corpore suo) with her Body, Lands in Stanton in Cambridgeshire to the va­lue of 20 l. per Annum. All the Estate belonging to this Monastery was 888 confirm'd by King Henry III. who was also himself a Benefactor.

[Valued at 215 l. 7 s. 9 d. per Annum]

TILTEY, alias Wudeham, in Essex.

FOunded Anno 1152. This was first given by Maurice Son of Ieffery 889 de Teretia to the Canons of the Church of St. Iohn Baptist of Wode­ham, and endow'd with several Lands, confirm'd by King Henry II. Af­ter wards King Richard the first confirm'd the same Estate to the Monks here settled of the Cistercian Order, in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 167. 2 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

DEULACRES, in Cheshire.890

ANno 1153. The Abby of Pulton in Cheshire was founded by Robert Pincerna, it was furnisht with Monks of the Cistercian Order from Cumbermere, and was therefore called a Daughter of that House. In the year 1214. the Convent was translated from Pulton to Deulacres by Ralph Earl of Chester. This Ralph afterwards coming from his Expedition in the Holy Land, was in a great Storm at Sea in the Night, confident of deliverance at Midnight, through the Suffrages of these Monks, then at their Nocturnal Devotions, accordingly the Storm did then begin to cease to the wonder of the Seamen. This Ralph and his Successors Earls of 891 Chester gave and confirm'd divers Lands and Possessions to this Abby.892

Vid. Vol. 2. pag 919.

CLUNOK-VAUR, in Wales.

THe Original of this Monastery was by S. Benow of whom mention is made in the Life of St. Winefrid. The White Monks here were of a [Page 106] newer Foundation. Guithin, Unkle to one of the Princes of Northwales gave the Village of Clunok to Benow. Vide Vol. 2. pag. 119.

893 STRATFLURE, in Cardiganshire.

FOunded and endowed with divers Lands by Reese Prince of South­wales. The Estate of this House, (called also Strata florida) was con­firm'd by King Henry II. and King Edward I.

[Valued at 118 l. 7 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

894 LEG [...]URN, in Lincolnshire.

THis Abby was founded for Nuns by Robert de Lekeburn, who was bu­ried in the Chapter house of this Nunnery; at whose Interment, his Son and Heir William, declared publickly his confirmation of his Fathers Donations and Endowments, adding of his own gift the yearly Rent of 895 two shillings in Franckalmoign. King Iohn in the first year of his Reign confirm'd the Estate of this House.

[Valued at 38 l. 8 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

STRATMARGEL, or Strata-Marcella, in Montgomeryshire.

FOunded An. 1170. by Madock ap Griffin; By his Deed dated An. 1222 he endowed it with divers Lands and Revenues.

[Valued at 64 l. 14 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

896 STANLAW, in Cheshire. Founded An. 1172.

THe first Founder of this House was Iohn Constable of Chester, who en­dowed 897 it with divers Lands and Liberties, his Deed bears date 1178. These Monks of Stanlaw were afterwards translated to the Church of Wha­ley, at which the Abbot and Convent of Salley in Torkshire were very much grieved, alledging among other things that they were nigher to their Ab­by 898 than the Constitutions of their Order do allow of, and that it was to their damage 27l, 10 s. But the differences were composed in the year 899 1305. by the Abbots of Ryvalle and Belland. The Church of Whaley was in being in the time when St. Augustine the Monk came into England. The Rectors of which Church were in after times called Deans and not Par­sons, and were married men, who also had the ordinary Jurisdiction of the 900 place committed to them by the Bishop. These Deans had an Estate of in­heritance in the Church of Whaly, and the Chappels, which went from Father to Son, and the Cure of the Churches was supplied by certain Priests, whom the Deans provided and presented to the Bishop for his License. The Names of these Deans may be seen in the Book at large. But after the Council of Lateran (1215.) it was no longer permitted that this Church should go as an inheritance. Not long after this the Church of Whaley was given by Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln, [Page 107] and Lord of Blagbornshire, to the Monks of Stanlaw, who enter'd upon this their new Seat in the year 1296. Dom. George de Norbury being then 901 their Abbot; which Translation was ratified by the Bull of Pope Nicholas the IV. The Deed of the said Henry, whereby he gave this Church of 902 Whally with all its Rights, Liberties and Appurtenants, bears date in the year 1283. In the thirty fourth year of Edward the III. Henry Duke of 903 Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Lincoln, and Leicester, gave divers Lands to the Abbot and Convent of Whalley, for the maintaining of a Recluse, or Anchorite, and his Successors, dwelling in a place within the Church-yard of the Parish-Church of Whalley, and for two Women their Servants; who shall be there continually praying for the said Duke his Ancestors and Heirs, viz to find them every Week throughout the year fifteen Loaves of the Convent Bread, each Loaf weighing fifty shillings sterling, and seven Loaves of the second sort, of the same weight; eight Gallons of the best Ale of the Convent, and three pence for their Companage; to de­liver them yearly at the Feast of all Saints ten Stock-fish, and ten great Ling fish, one bushel of Oats for their Potage, one bushel of Salt, two 904 Gallons of Oyl for their Lamps, one stone of Tallow for Candles, six Load of Turf, and one of Brushwood for Fuel, to keep their House in re­pair, and to find one of their Monks and a Clark to say Mass in the Chap­pel of the said Recluse, daily, &c.

The first Founder of this House, Iohn de Lacy, Constable of Chester and Lord of Halton married Alice Sister of William de Mandeville, and 905 died in the Holy Land. Of this Family was Henry de Lacy Founder of the Abby of Kirkstall (of whom before.)

NUNAPLETON, in Yorkshire.907

THIS Priory of Nuns was founded by Adeliza de Sancto-Quintino, and Robert her Son and Heir, dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Iohn the Apostle, and confirm'd by Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury. The 908 several Donations made by the Founders and other Benefactors to this 909 House were confirm'd by King Iohn, in the sixth year of his Reign. Among 910 the Injunctions prescribed to the Nuns of this House, An. 1489. These were some. That the Cloister Doors be shut up in Winter at Seven, and in Summer at Eight a Clock at night, and the Keys delivered to the Prioress. That the Prioress and all the Sisters lodge nightly in the Dorter, unless sick or diseased. That none of the Sisters use the Ale-house, nor the Water-side where course of Strangers daily resort. That none of the Si­sters have their service of Meat and Drink to the Chamber, but keep the Frater and the Hall, unless sick. That no Sister bring in any Man, reli­gious or secular, into their Chamber or any secret place day or night, &c. That the Prioress License no Sister to go Pilgrimage, or visit their Friends without great Cause, and then to have a Companion. That the Con­vent grant no Corodies or Liveries of Bread, or Ale, or other Victual, to any Person, without special License. That they take no Perhendinauncers or Sojourners, unless Children, or old Persons, &c.

[Valued at 73 l. 9 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

CODENHAM Priory, in ...

COdenham was given to God, St. Mary, and St. Iohn, by Eustachius de Merch, for Nuns of the Profession and Order of the Nuns of Apeltun.

911 BINEDON, in Dorsetshire.

FOunded An. 1172. by Roger de Novo Burgo and Matilda his Wife, endow'd with divers Lands by them and other Benefactors. All which was confirm'd to the Church of St. Mary of Bynedone and the 912 Monks there, by King Henry the III. in the eighteenth year of his Reign. Henry de Novo Burgo granted power to the Abbot and Monks to choose whom they pleased for their Patron, who thereupon chose King Henry the III. and Alianor the Queen for their Patrons, which King accordingly took to him the Patronage, Advowson, and Protection of this Abby in the fifty sixth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 147 l. 7 s. 9 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

CROXDEN, in Staffordshire.

BErtram de Verdun built an Abby for Monks at Chotes, Anno Dom. 1176. Anno 1179. The Convent removed from thence to Crokesden.

Abbots of this House.
  • 1. Thomas, ob. 1229.
  • 2. William de Choucomb.
  • 3. William de Esseburn, ob. 1237.
  • 4. Iohn de Tilton.
  • 5. Walter de London, ob. 1268.
  • 6. William de Howton, ob. 1278.
  • 7. Henry de Moysam.
  • 8. Iohn de Billesdon, ob. 1293.
  • 9. Richard de Twiford, ob. 1297.

A vacancy of above seven Months.

  • 10. William de Evera. Richard de Esseby restored 1320.
  • 11. Richard de Esseby, displaced, 1313.
  • 12. Thomas de Casterton.
  • 913 13. Richard de Schepesheved 1335.

The Founder of this House Bertram de Verdun died in the Holy Land, and was buried at Acon, but most of his descendants were buried in the Church of this Abby. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 40.

[Valued at 90 l. 5 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

914 KELDEHOLM, in Yorkshire.

THE Abby at Keldeholm was founded for Nuns by William de Stutevill, and endow'd by the same William and several others of that Family. Confirm'd by King Iohn in the second year of his Reign.

[Valued at 29 l. 6 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

916 PONT-ROBERT, or Roberts-Bridge, in Suffex.

FOunded for Monks by Robert de Sancto-Martino, in the Reign of King Henry the II. Anno Dom. 1176. Their Estate was confirm'd by King Edw. the III. in the tenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 920.

[Valued at 248 l. 10 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

WICKHAM, in Yorkshire.

THIS Nunnery was founded by Paganus de Wicham, whose Son 917 Theobald, Alan Buscell de Hoton, and the Prior of Bridlington, were Benefactors. King Iohn confirm'd their Estate in the 2 d. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 25 l. 17 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

918 ABERCONWAY, in Carmarthenshire. Founded An. 1185.

THIS Abby of Monks was founded by Lewelin Son of Gervasius, Prince of North Wales, and by him endow'd not only with large Possessions in Lands, but with great Immunities and Priviledges, as to be 920 quit from maintaining for their Founder any Men, Horses, Dogs, or Hawks, to have the Election of their Abbot free to themselves, to have and enjoy Wreck of the Sea in all their Lands, to be Tole free, &c. Whose Grant bears date An. 1198. King Edward the I. in the twelfth year of 921 his Reign, translated this Abby from Aberconway to a place called Maynan which he had built to the honour of God, St. Mary, and all Saints, endowing it with Lands and Franchises.

[Valued at 162 l. 15 s. per Annum.]

922 NUN-COTUN, in Lincolnshire.

INgeram de Muncels confirm'd the Gift of his Father Alan de Muncells of the Town of Cotun, and other Lands, to the Church of the blessed 923 Mary of Cotun and the Nuns there. Pope Alexander granted them divers 924 Priviledges, and Hugh Bishop of Lincoln settled the Constitutions of their House, ordering among other things, that the number of the Nuns should not exceed thirty, that no Nun after Profession should have property in any thing, that no Nun should be or speak with any Person, whether secular or religious, alone, without witness, &c.

[Valued at 46 l. 17 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

925 DUNKEWELL, in Devonshire.

FOunded An. 1201. By William Briwer. Their Lands were confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby, by King Hen. III. in the 11th. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 294 l. 18 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

BEAU-LEIU, in Hampshire.

KING Iohn being offended with the Cistercian Order in England, and the 926 Abbots of that Order coming to him to reconcile themselves, he caused them to be trod under his Horses Feet, for which Action being terrified in a Dream, he built and endowed the Abby of Beau-leiu in Newforest, for thirty Monks of that Order, An. 1204.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 921.

[Valued at 326 l. 13 s. 2 d. ob. q. per Annum.]

MENDHAM, in Buckinghamshire.

THIS was a Cell to Woburne, founded by Hugh de Bolebec, and con­firmed 927 by King Iohn in the second year of his Reign. The Con­vent of this Abby came hither from Woburne in the year 1204.

[Valued at 20 l. 6 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

GRACE-DIEU, in Wales.

THIS Abby was founded by Iohn of Monmouth An. 1229. or accord­ing to others 1233. King Edw. 3. in the thirty fifth year of his Reign granted to this Abby the Hermitage of St. Briavello in the Forest of Dene for the finding and maintaining of a Chantery of two of their Monks, to celebrate there for the Souls of his Ancestors.

928 HAYLES, in Gloucestershire.

ANon 1246. Richard Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans founded this Abby of Hayles for twenty Monks who came from Beau-lieu. An. 1251. the Abby-Church was dedicated, the King, and Queen, and thirteen Bishops, being present at the Solemnity.

[Valued at 357 l. 7 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

NEWENHAM, in Devonshire.

FOunded An. 1241. by Reginald de Moun, in his Mannor of Axemin­ster, 929 with which and other Lands it was endowed. Confirmed by King Edw. 3. This Reginald de Mohun was the Son of Reginald Lord of 930 Dunsterre, and Alice Daughter of William Bruer, by whom he inherited the Mannor of Axeminster. See in the Book at large the Progeny of the noble Family of Mohuns.

Abbots of this House.
  • [Page 111]Iohn Godard.931
  • Henry Sper sholt.932
  • Iohn de Ponte-Roberto.
  • Ieffrey de Blanchvil.
  • Hugh de Cokeswell.
  • Iohn de Northampton.
  • William de Cornubia.
  • Richard de Chichestre.
  • Richard de Piderton.
  • William le Fria.
  • Ralph de Shapewike.
  • Robert de Puplysuirie.
  • Iohn de Cokyswill.
  • Iohn de Geytingtone, ob. 1338.
  • Walter de Hous.

[Valued at 227 l. 7 s. 8 d. per Annum.

GRACE-DIEU, in Leicestershire.933

FOunded by Roesia de Verdun, for Nuns. Endow'd by her with her Mannor of Beleton, &c.

LETLEY, in Hampshire.

KING Henry the III. was-the Founder of this Abby of Letley, other­wise call'd Locum Sancti Edwardi, and endow'd it with Lands in the thirty fifth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 100 l. 12 s. 8 d: per Annum.]

REWLEY, in the Suburbs of Oxford.934

THIS was founded in the year 1281. for Cistercian Monks, by Richard Earl of Cornwall, and King of the Romans, who endow'd this Abby with divers Lands. They were found by Inquisition to be ex­empt from suit to the County and Hundred Courts.935

[Valued at 174 l. 3 s. ob. per Annum.]

DERNHALL, in Cheshire.936

KING Edward the I. founded and endow'd this Abby in performance of a Vow made in a great danger at Sea, his Deed of endowment bears date before he came to the Crown, in the four and fiftieth year of his Father's Reign. King Henry the III. granted his Letter of Request to all Religious Houses in England for the furnishing this House with Books. After King Edward came to the Crown in the seven and twentieth year of his Reign he translated these Monks to Vale-Royal, and granted them 937 many great Immunities and Franchises.938

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 921.

[The Abby of Vale-Royal was valued at 118 l. 7 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

939 BOCLAND, in Devonshire.

FOunded by Amicia Countess of Devon, for Cistercian Monks; endowed by her and her Daughter Isabella de Fortibus Countess of Albemarl and Devon, with many Lands and Liberties. Confirm'd by King Edward 940 the II. Anno 4.

[Valued at 241 l. 17 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.]

942 HILTON, in Staffordshire.

ANno. 1223. Henry de Audiddeley founded and endow'd this Abby with many Lands and Liberties to hold in pure and perpetual 943 Almes. King Richard the II. in the 19th year of his Reign, at the request of Elizabeth relict of Sir Nicholas de Audley, Licensed the Abbot and Con­vent of Blanchland in Normandy, to transfer to this House the Priory and Mannor of Cameryngham, which was thence forward united to this Abby.

[Valued at 75 l. 14 s. per Annum.]

The Abby of Grace, near the Tower at London.

KING Edward the III. founded this House in the Church-yard of the Holy Trinity near the Tower at London, and endow'd it with all the Messuages and Gardens lying on and about the Tower Hill, Anno Reg. 24. (1350.) Afterwards in the fiftieth year of his Reign he gave the 944 Mannor of Gravesend, and other Mannors in Kent to be settled upon this House. All which was after done and confirm'd by King Richard the II. Anno Regn. 22.

[Valued at 546 l. 10 s. per Annum.]

[Page] [Page]

A CARTHVSIAN MONK

Vol 1 P. 949

Of the Carthusians.

949 This Order was first founded, Anno Dom. 1080. By a certain learned man named Bruno, who professing Philosophy at Paris and hearing the dead Body of his Friend, who had the Esteem of a very good Man when living, cry out as they were about to bury him, Iusto dei judicio damnatus sum, he and six Companions forsook the World; and betook them­selves to a most austere Life in a Desert and Melancholy Place call'd Cartusia, in the Diocess of Grenoble in France. Their inward Habit is of Hair-Cloath; they never eat flesh; on Fridays fast with Bread and Water; never stir out of their Monasteries, except the Prior and Procurator; observe al­most continual silence; and suffer no Women to enter into any part of their Houses, no, not their Churches. See more of their Rules in the Monasticon at large.

WITHAM, in Somersetshire.959

KING Henry the II. founded this Monastery in the honour of the blessed Mary, St. Iohn Baptist, and all Saints, for the Order of Car­thusians, and endow'd it with divers Lands and Franchises. Imprecating 960 on the Violator of that his pious Donation, the wrath of Almighty God, and his own Curse, unless the Party make Condign Satisfaction; but to all such as augment his Gift, or favour the Peace of the House, he wisht the Peace and Reward of the Eternal Father for ever.

HENTON, in Wiltshire.

ELa Countess of Sali [...]bury, Widow of William Longespee Earl of Salisbury, founded this Monastery in her Park of Henton, for Carthusians, to the honour of God, the blessed Mary, St. Iohn Baptist, and all Saints; and en­dow'd it with Lands and Liberties.

King Henry the III. in the four and twentieth year of his Reign granted and confirm'd to this House the same Liberties and free Customs which his Grandfather King Henry the II. had formerly granted to the Carthusians of Witham, with other Exemptions.

The Carthusians in the Suburbs of London.

KING Edward the III. in the forty fifth year of his Reign granted 961 his License to Sir Walter Lord of Manny, to found this Monastery for [Page 114] Carthusian Monks in a certain place without the Bars of West-Smithlsied, called Newe-cherche-hawe, which House was to be called la Salutation mere dieu, and to endow the same with twenty Acres of Land there adjoyning.

Pope Vrban, reciting that in the time of a great Pestilence Sir Walter[?] Manny purchased this ground for a Church-yard to bury poor People in, and there intended to erect a Chappel and a Colledge of twelve Chaplains, by the License of Pope Clement the VI. but afterwards the said Sir Walter changing his intention, and erected here a Convent of Carthusians: the said Pope Vrban granted his Bull of License for uniting to the said House of Carthusians, Ecclesiastical Benefices to the value of 200 l. per Annum.

962 BEAUVAL, or Bella-valle, in Nottinghamshire.

IN the year 1343. Nicholas de Cantilupo Lord of Ilkeston, by[?] License of King Edward the III. founded this House in his Park of Gryseleve, in the County of Nottingham, for a Prior and twelve Carthusian Monks, to the glory of God, the blessed Virgin Mary, and all Saints, and endow'd it with Lands and Rents in Greseleye and Seleston.

963 This Nicholas de Cantilupo was lineally descended from Robert de Muskam, Seneschal or Steward to Gilbert de Gaunt that famous Souldier in the Army of William the Conqueror, from which Gilbert the said Robert de Musk [...]m enjoy'd the Lordship of Ilkeston, conferr'd upon him in the Reign of King Henry the I.

Elizabeth Widow of Brian Stapleton Knt. and William Ryther Knt. and Sibilla his Wife, by License of King Richard the II. founded in this Church a Chantry, for the maintenance of two Chaplains, Monks of this House, to celebrate dayly for the Soul of William de Aldeburgh, &c.

St. ANNE, adjoyning to Coventry.

THIS was first founded in the year 1381. by William Lord de la Zowche, and first supplied with three Monks from the Carthusians 964 at London, and with three others from Bellevalle. Besides the said Lord Sowche they had many other Benefactors, as Richard Luff Mayor of Coven­try, Iohn Holmeton of Sleford, Iohn Bokington Bishop of Lincoln, Thomas de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick, &c. who erected several parts of their Buildings. In the year 1385. King Richard the II. became the principal Founder, with his own hands laying the first Stone in the Foundation of their Church, protesting publickly to be the Founder and to finish the Buildings. 965 To this House were divers Churches appropriated and divers Lands given, among others the Mannor of Ediweston in the County of Rutland, by the Abbot and Convent of St. George de Bauquerville, in Normandy, with other Prior alians Lands, &c.

966 KINGSTON upon Hull, in Yorkshire.

MIchael de la Pole Knt. Lord of Wingfeild, by his Deed dated at King­ston upon Hull 1378. Founded and endowed this House without the Walls of Hull for a Prior and twelve Carthusians, Monks, in lieu of Minnoress [Page 115] Nuns of the Order of St. Clare, as his Father in his life time had once in­tended. The House was founded to the honour of God, and the glorious 967 Virgin Mary, and of St. Michael the Archangel, and all Angels, and holy Spi­rits, St. Thomas the Martyr, late Archbishop of Canterbury, and of all other Saints of God. And by assent of the Prior of the Great Carthusians in Savoy, the chief House of the Order, Walter de Kele was by the Founder made the first Prior of this House.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 930.

MOUNT-GRACE, in Yorkshire.968

THomas de Holland Duke of Surrey, Earl of Kent. and Lord Wake, sounded this House for Carthusians in his Mannor of Bordelby, near Cleaveland in Yorkshire, to the honour of God, the Virgin Mary, and St. Nicholas, willing the House to be called the House of Mount-Grace of Ingelby, and by assent of the Prior of the Grand Carthusians, made Robert Tredewy the first Prior of the same.

King Henry the VI. ratified and confirm'd this Foundation, in Parlia­ment, in the ninteenth year of his Reign.969

EPWORTH, in the Isle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire.

KING Richard the II. in the twentieth year of his Reign granted his License of Mortmain to Thomas Earl of Nottingham Marshal of Eng­land to found a Convent for Carthusian Monks on his Land at Epworth, in the lsle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire, and to name it the Visitation of the Mother of God, to the honour of God, the Virgin Mary, St. Iohn the Evangelist, and St. Edward the King and Confessor, and to endow the same with one hundred Acres of Land; Licensing also to the Abbot of St. Nicho­las in Angiers. of the Order of St. Benedict, to grant over to this House their Priory of Monks Kirkeby, in Warwickshire, &c. to be appropriated to 970 these Carthusians for ever, in pure and perpetual Alms.

Pope Bonisace the IX. in the eighth year of his Pontificate granted In­dulgence to such who should visit this Church of the Carthusians on the second of Iuly being the Feast of the Visitation of the blessed Mary, and con­tribute 971 to the Buildings here.

This was a plenary Indulgence, and of the same manner with that which was formerly granted to the Church of the Angels without the Walls of Assisium in Italy, of which you may read in the Monasticon at large, p. 971, 972, &c.

SHEEN Monastery, in Surrey.

ANno Dom. 1414. King Henry the V. founded three Monasteries near 973 his Royal Seat at Schene, one of Carthusians, one of Celestin Monks professing the Rule of St. Bennet, and one of Brigettines under the Rule of St. Augustin. The last was a Monastery of sixty Nuns, thirteen Priests, four Deacons, and eight Lay-Brothers; the Men and Women had two separate Convents, but one Church, in which the Nuns kept above in a kind of Gallery, and the men below.

[Page 116] King Henry the V. by his Charter of Foundation dated in the third year 974 of his Reign, appointed the House of Carthusians, which he founded at Shene, on the North-side of his Mannor there, to be call'd the House of Jesus of Bethleem at Shene; and to this House he gave the Lands of 975 several Priors alians here in England, belonging to Abbies in France, granting in the said Charter that if any of the Lands so given should in time to come be evicted or recovered from the Prior and Monks of this House or their Successors, that then they should receive the like value yearly out of the Profits of the Hanaper in the Chancery, and out of the Customs arising in the Ports of London, St. Botulphs, Southampton, Lenn, and Cicester. 976 He gave also several other Benefactions, as the Fishery at Shene, four Pipes of Gascon Wine yearly at the Purification of the blessed Mary for ever, with divers great Liberties and Exemptions from all manner of Taxes and Impositions, granting to the said Prior, and Monks, and their Suc­cessors Felons Goods, &c. and that they should have the return and exe­cution 977 of Writs in their Lands, with fines pro Licencia Concordandi, and all Amerciaments &c. Deodands, Treasure-trove, &c. Clerk of the Mercate, Wreck of the Sea, &c. Free Warren in all their Demesnes and Lands al­ready given or to be given, tho' within the Bounds of a Forest, Soc and Sac, Insangenthef, and Out fangenthef, and view of Frankpledge of all their Tenants and Residents, with a Pillory and Tumbrel, and that they may erect Gallows on their Lands for the execution of Malefactors, whom they should apprehend on their Lands according to the said Liberty of Infangenthef and Outfangenthef, and that they should have a Market weekly every Tuesday at their Town of Esthenreth in Berkshire, and two Fairs yearly, with other such like great Priviledges and Immunities.

Additions, relating to the Benedictine Order.979

WINCHESTER Cathedral Church. Supra p. 38.

SOme Remarks of the Founder and Royal Benefactors to the Church of Winchester, Kings and Saints buried there, out of Leyland. Pope In­nocent confirmed to this Church all their Possessions with the grant of di­vers 980 Priviledges, as not to pay any Tithes for their Lands or Cattle in 981 their own proper hands, to celebrate Divine Offices in the time of a general Interdict, with a low Voice, &c. King Edgar restored Monks in this 982 Church confirming their Possessions and Liberties with grievous Curses to the Violators. King Edward the Elder conferr'd on them certain Lands to hold free from any secular service except what related towards the building of Forts and Bridges.

SHAFTESBURY, in Dorsetshire. Supra 217.983

KING Iohn in the seventh year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church of St Mary, and St. Edward at Shaftesbury, and to the Nuns there, their Lands and Liberties, among which was the whole hundred of the Mannor of Bradford, &c.

St. FRIDISWIDE, in Oxford. Supra 174.

THE Possessions of this House were enjoy'd by secular Canons for many years, till in the year 1122. (22 H. 1.) they were again re­stored 984 to Regulars. Maud the Empress confirm'd to the Church of St. Fritheswithe and the Canons Regulars, divers Lands and Churches, and granted them a Fair. The like did King Iohn in his first year.985

St. WERBURG, at Chester. Supra 199.

ANno 1119. Richard Earl of Chester confirm'd the Possessions of this House given by many Benefactors, granting to the Abbot of this Monastery a Court of Pleas, and that the said Abbot should not be sued nor be forced to sue out of his own Court. Ralph de Meschines Earl of 986 Chester, and his Son of the same name, were great Benefactors to the Abbot and Convent of St. Werburg; so also were Richard de Rullos and Robert his Brother.987

WHITBY, in Yorkshire. Supra 75.988

WIlliam de Percy having built and endow'd in a Grove or Wood at Dunesle, a Hermitage in honour of St. Iames the Apostle, he [Page 118] gave it for ever into the Obedience and Subjection of the Church of St. Peter and St. Hylda of Whitby, so that they continually cellebrate the Divine Office there by some Priest of their House.

WULVERHAMTON, in Staffordshire.

IN this Town of Hampton, one Wulfruna, a religious Matron erected a Monastery to the honour of God, the ever blessed Virgin Mary (then term'd Stella maris & Domina gentium) and of all Saints, and endow'd the same with divers Lands, all which was ratified and establisht by Sigerich 991 Archbishop of Canterbury, in the year 996, by the Consent of King Ethelred. The Estate of this House was afterwards confirm'd by King Edward the 992 Confessor, King William the Conqueror, King Henry the II. and King Iohn, who gave Timber out of his Woods towards the buildings in this Abby.

993 GLOUCESTER, in Gloucestershire. Supra 108.

GLoucester became a Bishop's Seat in the year 189. soon after the Con­version of King Lucius. Eldadym in the year 489. and Dubricius in the year 522. were Bishops there. But the Seat was afterwards removed to Menevia, now call'd St. Davids. Wolpherus Son of Penda King of Mercia, according to Malmesbury, laid the first Fonndations of the Monastery here, after whose death Ethelred his Brother and Successor carried on the Work, committing it to the care of Osric, who for this purpose he made his Prorex or Lieutenant of this Province. This House was first a Nunnery 994 and continued such under three Abbesses successively. Afterwards Bernul­phus King of Mercia, placed here secular Canons, who, though Clerks and Preachers, were married-men, and differ'd not much in their Habit from secular Christians; thus it continued till in the year 1022. King Canutus displaced the Canons, and in their room put Regular Monks of St. Bene­dicts Order. This Monastery being afterwards burnt down, Aldredus Bi­shop of Worcester rebuilt it in the time of King Edward the Confessor, some­thing distant from the place where it first stood, and more to the outside of the Town. It was twice destroy'd by fire since the Conquest, viz. in the years 1214. and 1223. in the Reigns of Henry the III. and Edward the I. The Buildings in and about this Church were increased and beautified by 995 several Abbots of this Monastery, as Thomas Seabrook, Richard Haulaces; and Parker, who was the last Abbot here, and built the South Porch of this Church.

TAVISTOCK, in Devonshire Supra 219.

IN the time of King Edgar, Earl Otdulphus Son of Ordgarus begun this 996 House in a place appointed by Revelation; finisht and confirm'd in the 998 time of King Ethelred, An 981. Pope Celestine in the year 1193. granted 1001 to this Abby divers Priviledges and Exemptions. In the year 1304. The Prior of Plympton, of the Order or St. Augustin, did oblige himsel [...] and Suc­cessors to the Abbot of Tavestock and his Successors for the performance [Page 119] of divers Services and Offices in his Deed mentioned. King Henry the VIII.1003 in the fifth year of his Reign granted to Richard Banham then Abbot of Tavistock and his Successors to be Lords of Parliament, and to enjoy all Honours and Priviledges of such; and moreover in case they should at any time be absent from Parliament on the Affairs of their House he pardon'd such their absence, they paying for every whole Parliament that they shall be absent five Marks.

NORWICH. Supra 413.

HErbert Bishop of Norwich translated the Monks hither from Thetford. This Bishop besides the Church at Norwich, caused to be built the Churches at Elmham, Lyn, and Yarmouth, and died An. 1119.1004

STOKE-CLARE. Supra 535.

RIchard de Clare Earl of Hertford gave to this House the Hermitage of Standune, that Divine Service might be there celebrated for him and his. The Donations and Endowments given to this House were con­firm'd by Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury; and by Pope Alexander,1005 Anno Dom. 1174.1010

St. Mary de Pratis, at Northampton.1011

THIS was a Priory of Cluniac Nuns founded by Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Northampton, which Foundation, and all the Lands given thereunto as well by the said Earl Simon as others, was all at large recited and confirm'd by the Charter of King Edward the III. in the second year of his Reign. Which may be seen from p. 1011. to p. 1019.

[Valued at 119 l. 9 s. 7 d. q. per Annum.]

PILLA Priory, in Wales.1019

ADam de Rupe founded here a Priory for Benedictine Monks of Tiron, which Priory he endow'd with divers Lands and Liberties. Dedi­cated to God, St. Mary, and St. Budoco.

HENINGHAM, in Essex.1020

FOunded and endow'd for Benedictine Nuns, by Abericus de Ver, Earl of Oxon, and dedicated to God, St. Mary, St. Iames, and the holy Cross. Hugh de Ver Earl of Oxford founded without the Gates of the Castle of Hegham, an Hospital for poor and impotent People; which that it might 1021 not be to the prejudice of the Priory of the holy Cross at Hegham, nor to the Parish-Church there, was to be govern'd by certain Ordinances then made, among others, that the said Hospital should pay Tithes as well [Page 120] great as small to the Parish Church, and that the Chaplains of the said Hospital before they are admitted, should swear fealty to the Prioress of that Priory.

[Valued at 29 l. 12 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

LAPLEY, in Staffordshire, a Cell to St. Remigius, at Rhemes.1022

GIven by Algarus an Earl of England; the Appropriations belonging to this Priory were allow'd by Walter Bishop of Coventry and Litchfeild, 1023 Anno 1319. King Edward the I. in the twentieth year of his Reign, granted to the Abbot and Convent of St. Remigius at Rhemes, a Market in their Mannor of Aston in Staffordshire on the Tuesday, weekly, and a yearly Fair on the Eve and Day of St. Peter Ad vincula; with free Warren in their Demesnes of Lapley, Merston, and Aston.

TOTNES, in Devonshire.

JVhellus Son of Alured gave the Religious House here for a Cell to God and the holy Martyrs St. Sergius. and St. Bachus, and to the Abbot of that Monastery at Angiers in France That they should pray for the good Estate of King William the Conqueror while living, and after his death for his Soul, and for him the said Iuhellus and all his Relations.

1024 BARNSTAPLE Priory of St. Mary Magdalen, in the Diocess of Exeter.

THIS was founded for a Prior and six Monks; given by the said Iuhellus, and confirm'd by King William the Conqueror to the Cluniac Monks of the Abby of St. Martin de Campis at Paris. The Church of St. Peter at Barnstaple was apppropriated to this Priory by 1025 William Bishop of Exeter, by Deed dated, An. 1233. The same William Bishop of Exeter did also by his Deed recite and confirm the Lands and Priviledges given to this Priory by Ioel Son of Alured, before named.

The Priory of St. James without the Walls at Exeter, for a Prior and four Monks. Supra 643.

THIS Priory, with divers Lands and Priviledges, were given by Baldewin de Riveriis Earl of Exeter, to the foresaid Cluniac Monks 1026 of St. Martins Abby at Paris,

The Priory of St. Clare, in Wales.

FOR a Prior and three Monks. This was given with nine Houses at Lundon, by William Giffard Bishop of Winchster, to the foresaid Clunia [...] Monks of St. Martins Abby at Paris. Confirm'd by King Hen. the I.

SWINE Abby, in Yorkshire. Supra p. 834.

MAtilda Prioress of Swine, and the Convent of Nuns there, did cove­nant with Sir Alexander Hilton, Knight, who had given them nine Bovates of Land in Swine, that in case the said Sir Alexander should die in the year 1241. or in the second year after, that then three Bovates of 1027 the nine should return back to the Heirs of the said Sir Alexander; in case he die in the third year, then six of the said Bovates should return to the Heirs of the said Knight, but in case the said Sir Alexander should keep the said Nuns indempnified[?] for the said three years, then the Nuns to give back the said Land with the Deed of Feoffment after the expiration of the term of six years, &c.

BYLAND, in Yorkshire. Sup. 775.

THE History of the Foundation of this Abby was writ at large by Phillip the third Abbot of this House; and is in short as follows, In the Reign of King Henry the I. Anno Dom. 1134. After the Foundation of the Abby of Furnes, whose Monks came from Savigny in France, an Abbot and Convent of twelve Monks went from the Abby of Furnes, to Cald in Copland, then newly erected, the Abbots name was Geraldus; here they remained for about four years, till in the year 1137. being plunder'd and their House almost wholly destroy'd, they were forced to return back to Furnes, but being refused entrance there, and distrest for want of a 1028 Habitation, they were partly through the recommendation of Thurstan Archbishop of York, and partly out of pitty to their Condition, relieved by Gundrea relict of Nigellus de Albeney, and Roger de Molbray her Son; which Roger settled them for a time at a place call'd H [...]de, a Hermitage be­longing to one Robert de Alneto a Hermit; who upon their arrival resign'd the place to them, and became a Monk among them, this was in the year 113 [...] The said Roger gave these Monks for their maintenance the Tithe of all the Provision spent in his House, for the collecting of which they had a Lay-brother (Conversus) always remaining in his House, who collected the said Tithe, and sent it to the Monastery; but this being found, in time, inconvenient, was not long after chang'd into an Endowment of Land, An. 1140. After this Abbot, Geraldus seeing the Estate of his Mo­nastery encrease, and fearing that the Abbot of Furnes would claim it, by 1029 reason that he and his Convent came from thence at first, and had there­fore a kind of filial Relation, tho' they were since refused assistance from thence, when in distress, hereupon he made a Journey to Savigny, the Mo­ther House of Furnes, and obtain'd from the Abbot there in a general Chapter of the whole Order (An. 1142.) to be discharged of all subjection to Furnes, and to be immediately subject to Savigny. This Abbot Geral­dus dying in his return home, Roger then Master of the Novices, was un­animously chosen Abbot, and so confirm'd by the Archbishop of York, at the Presentation of Roger Molbray their Patron. After this the Abbot of Fur­nes placed another Abbot and Convent at Cald. An. 1143. Roger de Molbray gave to these Monks the Town and Church of Bellalanda, or Biland, with the Appurtenants, whether they afterward removed their Habitation. When Abbot Roger perceived the Inhabitants of Scalton (a Vill belonging to Biland) to suffer divers Inconveniencies in coming to the Mother 1030 [Page 122] [...].

THE Allen Priories, supprest in the second year of Henry the V. 1035 An. Dom. 1414. were in number one hundred and forty two, whose names see in the Book at large.

The Religious Houses supprest by Pope [...] the VII. and granted to 1037 Cardinal Wolsey by King Henry the VIII. in the seventeenth year of his Reign for the building of two Colledges, at Oxford and Ipswich, were in number one and twenty; and afterwards six more by another Bull of the same Pope, which were granted also to the said Cardinal for the same pur­pose, by King Henry the VIII. in the twentieth year of his Reign.

An exact Catalogue of the Religious Houses was made in the twenty 1038 sixth year of King Henry the VIII. [...]s (que) ad with the Annual Values of almost 1046 all of them, as well in Wales as England. Which Catalogue was [...] incerted into the Books of First Fruits and Tenths.

Out of which Catalogue I have set down the Valuation of the Annual Rents of each House, under the proper Head, in the foregoing [...] except some few not then valued.

Having said something in the beginning, of the Institution of the Mo­nastical 1047 Life, I shall here add what Opinion Men had of the Subversion of Monasteries, even among Protestants.

[Page 123] The Augustine Confession, says, That Monasteries were heretofore Schools of sacred Learning, advantagious to the Church, and that Pastors and Bishops came from thence. Calvin in his Institutions, says, Monastick Colledges were then as Seminaries of the Ecclesiastick Order; and gives a very great Encomium of their manner of Life and Piety, Charity to the Poor, and Humanity, out of St. Augustines Epistles.

Hyperius says, That Monasteries at their Institution were no other than Convents of Good men, and Students; Schools where the Elder did teach the younger Religion, where they did spend their time in writing, and disputing, and instituting those who afterwards arrived to eminent places in the Church, as to be Bishops or Priests, &c. William Perkins, says, That 1048 the Monasteries of the Ancients were for the most part Publick Schools, that is, Communities of Teachers and Learners.

The Preamble of the Stat. 27 H. 8. c. 28. (omitted in the printed Act,) for the Suppression of certain Religious Houses, (viz. under the value of 200 l. per Annum) hath these Words, Forasmuh as manifest sin is dayly used, and commonlycommitted in such little and small Abbies and Priories, &c. where the Congregation of such religious Persons is under the number of twelve persons, &c. Considering also that divers and great solemn Monasteries of this Realm, where­in, thanks be to God, Religiou is well kept and observed, be destitute of such full numbers of religious Persons as they might and may keep, &c. Therefore the said lesser Monasteries were dissolved, and their Lands given to the King.

Sir Edward Coke, in his 4th. Institut. p. 44. says, In the Reign of Henry 1049 the VIII. the Members of both Houses of Parliament were informed [...] on the King's behalf, That no King or Kingdom was safe but where the King had ability to live of his own, and to defend his Kingdom upon any sud­den Invasion or Insurrection, &c. It was therefore projected, that if the Par­liament would give unto him all the Abbies, Priories, Nunneries, &c. that for ever in time then to come, he would take order that the same should not be converted to private use, but first that his Exchequer for the Pur­poses aforesaid should be enriched. 2dly. The Kingdom strengthened by a continual maintenance of forty thousand well trained Souldiers with skillful Captains and Commanders. 3dly. for the Benefit and Ease of the Subject, who should never afterwards in any time to come, be charged with Subsidies, Fifteenths, Loans, or other common Aides. 4thly, Least the honour of the Realm should receive any diminution (there being nine and twenty Lords of Parliament among the Abbots and Priors, who held of the King per Baroniam) the King would create a number of Nobles. The said Monasteries and their Possessions were given to the King, his Heirs and Successors. Now observe the Catastrophe; not long after the disso­lution of the Monasteries, the said King demanded and had two Subsidies, and exacted divers Loans.

There were in the Reign of Henry the VIII. 645. Monasteries and Re­ligious Houses, forty of which being granted to Cardinal Wolsey for the Endowment of his two Colledges: Soon after, as the Pope had given these to the Cardinal, the King with the Parliaments assent took the rest. An. 1536. those under 200 l. per Annum, were granted, amounting to 376, and soon after the Remainder, being in all 605 Monasteries. Besides them, were given 96 Colledges, 110 Hospitals, and 2374 Chantries and free Chappells. The Revenue of all which, is wisht to have been bestow'd for the Advancement of the Church, Relief of the Poor, &c. rather than [Page 124] conferr'd with such a prodigal Dispensation on those who stood ready to 1050 devour what was sanctified. To this purpose one Henry Brinklow a Merchant of London, made a Complaint to the Parliament of the Abuse that follow'd in relation to Appropriations, which as he said were the best Benifices, and did amount to the third part of all the Parish Churches in England. Touching the Alms (says he) that they dealt, and the Hospitality that they kept, every man knoweth that many thousands were well received of them, and might have been better, if they had not so many Great mens Horses to feed, and had not been overcharged with such idle Gentle­men as were never out of the Abbies. But now that all the Abbies with their Lands and Impropriated Parsonages are in Temporal mens hands, where 20 l was given formerly to the poor yearly, in more than one hundred places in England, is not one meals meat given; where they had always one or other Vicar that either preached or hired some to preach, now there is no Vicar at all, but the Farmer is Vicar and Parson too.

1051 The Lord Herbert in his History of Hen. VIII. says, That the King was petition'd that some of the Houses, both for the Vertue of the Persons in them, and for the Benefit of the Country, (the Poor receiving thence great Relief, and the richer sort good Education for their Children) might be left for pious Uses; Bishop Latimer also moved that two or three might for those ends be left in every Shire. But Cromwell (by the King's per­mission) invaded all. However the King thought fit to have this Pro­ceeding confirm'd by Act of Parliament. But the Christian World (says my Lord Herbert) was astonisht at these doings. Beside the Houses and Lands taken away, there was much mony made of the present Stock of Cattle and Corn, of the Timber, Lead, Bells, &c. and chiefly of the Plate and Church Ornaments, which is not valued, but may be conjectured by that one Monastery of St. Edmunds Bury, whence was taken five thousand Marks of Gold and Silver, besides divers Stones of great Value.

The End of the First Volum.
MONASTICON ANGLICANU …

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM, ABRIDGED.

VOL. II.

OF THE Canons Regular Of St. AVGVSTIN, HOSPITALERS, TEMPLARS, GILBERTINES, PRAEMONSTRATENSES, and MATURINS, or TRINITARIANS

OF THE ORIGINAL OF CANONS.

OF the Author of this Institution there is great variety of Opinion.In the Proem. Some ascribe it to the Aportles, o­thers to Pope Urban the I. about the year of Christ 230. Others to St Augustine; Others to Pope Gelasius the I. about the year 495. &c. Canons were first in­troduced in England by one Berinus, An. Christi 636. The Ca­nonical Life being by little and little relaxt and fallen off, Ca­nonical Clerks were in the Council of Mentz, An. 813. reduced back to their first manner of living, viz. to live in Common, to have but one Table, one Purse, and one Dormitory. About An. 1083, it was enjoyn'd that no Canon should dare to become an Abbot or Monk under the penalty of Excommunication. In process of time Canons becoming loose and disorderly, ano­ther sort of Canone began to be taken notice of, who observing a stricter Discipline, were call'd Canons Regular, and the others Canons Secular. The Canons Habit is a white Tunick with a Linnen Go [...] under a black Cloak. St. Iames the Apostle and the first Bishop of Ierussaem, is said first to have assumed the Linnen Tunick, after the manner of the ancient Levitical Priests.

This Order had formerly in Europe four thousand five hundred and fifty five Monasteries, In Italy seven hundred. Popes of this Order there have been thirty six, Cardinals three hundred, Holy men and such who have been reckon'd in the Catologue of Saine seven thousand five hundred.

[Page 128] For the Canons of this Order were made three Rules.

The first Rule which St. Augustin made for his Brethren, who promised to live together in Common, consists of nine Chapters; and treats of the Community of Goods, Self-denial, &c.

The second Rule of St. Augustin appoints the manner and time of Praying, Singing, Reading, Working, Living, and Conversing, and con­sists of Five Chapters.

The third Rule of St. Augustin, treats more largely of those things which appertain to the Community of living among Clerks, and consists of Forty Five Chapters.

A CANNON REGVLAR OF St AVGVSTINE.

Vol. 2. p 1.

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM.
Vol. II.
Of the Order of St. AUGUSTIN.

DOVER, in Kent.

1 JVlius Caesar having Conquer'd Britain (now call'd Eng­land) forty seven years before the Birth of Christ, built a Tower at Dover where the Castle now stands. In the year of Grace 180, King Lucius then reigning in Britain, became a Christian under Pope Elutherius, and among other Pious Deeds built a Church in the Castle of Dover. An. 469, King Arthur repair'd the said Castle, and built the Hall there call'd Arthur's-hall. After this the Saxons came out of Germany, Conquer'd Britany, beat the Britons into Wales, who afterwards were call'd Welchmen, and the Saxons Englishmen, and being Pagans, demolis [...]t Churches, and supprest Christianity throughout the Land. An. 586. Pope Gregory sent St. Augustin the Monk with others in­to England, who converted to Christ the King then reigning in Kent, named Adelbert, whose Son and Successor Adelbold placed twenty four Secular Canons in the said Castle to serve in his Chappel there. An. 686, Withred King of Kent built the Church of St. Martin, in the Town of Dover, and removed the said Canons thither, from the Castle; here they remain'd 400 years after. He built also three other Churches for the use of the Parishoners, which were however Chappels subordinate to St. Martins. 2 But these Canons being very licentious by reason of their great Priviledges and Exemptions from the ordinary Jurisdiction. King Henry the I. in 1130. did give the said Church of St. Martin to the Archbishop of Canterbury and his Successors, and tho' William Corboil then Archbishop, built the New Minster, and design'd to have made it an Abby of Canons of St. Augustin, yet after his death Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, in the 4 Reign of Henry the II. put Monks of St. Bennet therein. The said King Henry the II. by his Charter subjecting the Government of this House to the Archbishop of Cantebury intirely, and that no other Order but that of St. Bennet should be herein. King Edward the III. in the thirtieth year of his Reign did unite and annex this House to the Priory of Christ-Church in Canterbury for ever, so that none for the future should be Prior here, but a Monk of Canterbury.

[Valued at the Suppression at 170 l. 14 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

5 BODMYN, in Cornwall.

KING Henry the III in the seven and fiftieth year of his Reign con­firm'd to the Prior and Canons of Bodmine, the Mannor of Newton, in the County of Devon, formerly given them by King Eadred, with Ex­emption from suit to the County of Devon and Hundred of Shefbury, &c.

[Valued at 270 l. o s. 11 d. per Annum.]

St. GERMAINS, in Cornwall.

IT was found by Inquisition in the thirtieth of Edw. the III. That King Canute endow'd this Church, and that here was then a Bishops Seat for Cornwall, which was after united to Cryditon, and in the Reign of Edward the Confessor, removed from thence to Exeter; and that soon after, Leo­fricus then Bishop of Exeter did remove from hence the Secular Canons, and did found here a Priory of Canons Regular, and that hereupon the Bishops of Exeter for the time being became Patrons of this Priory, and enjoy'd the Profits of the Vacations of the said Priory when they hap­pened.

[Valued at 243 l. 8 s. per Annum.]

6 PLIMTON, in Devonshire.

HERE was formerly a Colledge consisting of a Dean and four Pre­bendaries, founded by some of the Saxon Kings, which Canons or Prebendaries were displaced by Wil. Warwist Bishop of Exeter, because they 7 would not leave their Concubines, and a Priory of Canons Regul [...], erected here, which Priory was founded in the Mansion-house of the Rectory of the 8 said Church of Plimpton, and the said Foundation confirm'd by King Hen. 9 the I. who also granted and confirm'd to the Canons there, divers Lands, Liberties, and Immunities. Among other Benefactors to this Priory, King Edgar gave them divers Lands for the Maintenance of two Canons, ad divina ibidem celebranda, & pro peregrinis & aliis hospitandis.—After­wards 10 King Edward the I. granted to the said Canons, that for the future they might appoint and place in the Church of Landoho, where the said Revenue did arise, a Secular Vicar and Chaplain to celebrate there, and to perform the said Alms and Hospitality, nomine dictorum Prioris & Canonicorum.

[Valued at 912 l. 12 s. 8 d. ob. per Annum.]

11 WALTHAM, in Essex.

THIS Monastery was built to the praise of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the holy Cross, by Earl Harold (afterwards King) who en­dow'd the same with divers Lands and Goods. All which were con­firm'd, with the Grant of great Liberties, by King Edward the Confestor, An. Dom. 1062. Which Harold being slain in Battle, by William the Con­queror, [Page 131] was buried in this Abby-Church. An. Dom. 1177. The Secular 13 Canons here were removed and Canons Regular placed in their room, by King Henry the II. who confirm'd their Estate and Liberties, and ordain'd 14 that in the said Abby, no Kinsman of the Abbot should be made Steward or other Officer, nor any Officer to hold his place by Inheritance, but re­movable at the Will of the Abbot and Canons. The like Confirmation 15 was made by King Richard. 16

[Valued at 900 l. 4 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

PENTNEY, in Norfolk.19

FOunded to the honour of God, the glorious Virgin Mary, and the blessed Mary Magdalen, by Robert de Vauz, and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Churches. This Robert came into England with the Conqueror, from whom descended by an Heir General the Lords Roos 20 who became thereupon Patrons of this Priory.

[Valued at 170 l. 4 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

WALSINGHAM, in Norfolk.

GAlfridus de Favarches endowed a Chappel here, which his Mother had founded in honour of the perpetual Virgin Mary, with divers Re­venues; confirm'd by Robert Brucutt, and Roger Earl of Clare. The Chap­pel 21 here was first begun in the Reign of Edward the Confessor, but the Canons introduced in the time of William the Conqueror. Here was a 22 perpetual Chantry establisht for the Souls of Thomas de Felton, &c. in the Chappel of St. Ann in the Priory, consisting of four Chaplains. 8. R. 2.

[Valued at 391 l. 11 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

THREMHALE, in Essex.23

GIlbert de Montefixo, or Munfichet, who was a Roman by birth, and Kinsman to the Conqueror, came into England in his Army, and having attained large Possessions here, gave Land in Thremhale for the building a Religious House with some small Possessions; and returning to 24 Italy, the place of his Nativity, lest issue Richard de Munfichet who gave to God and the Church of St. Iames the Apostle at Thremhale, divers Lands and Priviledges; from this Richard are descended by an Heir General the Veres Earls of Oxford, who became Benefactors to this House.

[Valued at 60 l. 18 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

The Priory of Huntington.

EVstachius the Viscount, who also held the Barony of Lovetot, founded the Priory of St. Mary of Huntingdon, and endow'd it with divers 25 Lands, confirm'd by King Henry the I. In the Town of Huntingdon were in former time [...]i [...]teen Parish-Churches, tho' at present there remains but 26 [Page 132] four. David Bruce Earl of Huntingdon was buried in this Priory. Pope Eugenius confirm'd to the Canons here all their Lands and Priviledges, An. Dom. 1147. and so did King Henry the III. in the seven and thirtieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 187 l. 13 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

28 St. OSWALDS, near Gloucester.

FOunded by Ethelred Earl of Marches and Ethelfleda his Wife before the Conquest, for Prebendaries, who translated hither the Body of St. Oswald from Bardney. But soon after the Conquest, this Colledge being impropriated to the See of York that Archbishop changed the Prebendaries here to Canons Regular.

[Valued at 90 l. 10 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

BARNEWELL, near Cambridge.

IN the time of William the Conqueror lived one Picot, a Norman, a Per­son 29 of great Note, who was Viscount or Sheriff in this County, he had also a Barony here. Hugolin his Wife being much devoted to St. Giles, made a Vow in her sickness to erect a Monastery to that Saint, which Vow her Husband confirm'd; this was erected near the Castle in Cambridge, and six Canons Regular placed therein under the Rule of one Galfridus de Huntedon. But Picot and his Wife dying before their intended Charity was fully compleated, and Robert their Son being after their death accused of Treasonable Practices for which he fled the Kingdom, King Henry the I. seized upon his Barony, and gave it to a Paganus Peverelle, who finding this House fallen to decay, undertook to restore it, and increase the Canons to the number of thirty. To this end he obtained of the King a 30 peice of Ground lying without the Town of Cambridge, call'd Barnewell, of sweet and delicate Situation: here he built a very fair Church, and removed the said Canons hither with great Solemnity from the place of their first Foundation in Cambridge, Anno Dom. 1112. after they had con­tinued there just twenty years. From this Paganus Peverell the Patronage of this Priory descended by an Heir General to the Peches An. Dom. 1284. Gilbert Peche gave the Patronage of this Monastery to King Edward, for ever. The abovesaid Paganus Peverell was Standard-bearer to Robert Son 32 of William the Conqueror in the holy Land. The Particulars of their Revenue was found by Inquisition 3 E. 1. which see in the Book at large. The foresaid Gilbert Peche, by his Deed dated 1256. granted to the Canons of this House liberty to choose their own Prior, but that upon the death of the Prior, one or two of the Canons should come to him, if in England, and acquaint him therewith, and desire his leave (as Patron) to proceed to a new Election, that thereupon they should proceed, and 33 having made their Election, they should present the Person elected to him, and require his consent, that during the time of Vacation, he, his Heirs, or Successors, should not commit any Wast on the Goods of the said Mona­stery, nor have there more than one Servant with a Horse and a Boy.

[Valued at 256 l. 11 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

NOSTELL, in Yorkshire.

RObert de Laci founded the Church of St. Oswald at Nostell, and en­dow'd the same with divers Lands and Revenues, for Canons Re­gular, granting them free liberty to Elect their own Prior. King Henry 34 the I. recited and confirm'd the several Grants of their Benefactors; the like did King Henry the II. to this Priory, by the name of the Church of 36 the blessed Oswald the King and Martyr adjoyning to the Castle of Ponte­fract, in a place called Nastle. In the year 1231. the Prior and Convent here leased their Estate at Canonthorp to William de Runeys, Knt. for his 38 Life, at the Rent of 13 s. 4 d. per Annum, the said William causing Divine Service to be celebrated at the Chappel there three days in every Week, viz. Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday, with other Covenants.

[Valued at 492 l. 18 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

BREDON, in Leicestershire.39

RObert Earl of Nottingham gave to the Church and Canons of St. Oswald of Nostla, the Church of St. Mary, and St. Hardulf of Bredon with divers Lands and Revenues to the same appertaining. Whereupon this House became a Cell to that of Nostell immediately before treated of; yet by subsequent agreement between the Prior and Convent of Nostell, and 41 Walter, Advocate, or Patron of Bredon, the said Prior should upon a Va­cancy at Bredon, choose two of the Canons there, or in case there should not be two fit Persons there then two of his own House, of which two the said Walter should choose one, and then the said Prior and Walter joyntly to present the party so chosen to the Diocesan, to be Prior of Bredon. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 41.

[Valued at 24 l. 10 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

ANother Cell to Nostell was Woodkirk (or Wodechurche) in Yorkshire, en­dow'd for Canons by the Earls of Warren.

HYRST, in the Isle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire.42

THIS was a Cell belonging to Nostell, endow'd with Lands by Nigellus de Albani, and Roger de Moubray.

[Valued at 5 l. 10 s. 1 d. per Anunm.]

SCOKIRK, in Yorkshire.

Was another Cell to the foresaid Priory of Nostell. To which Gaufri­dus 43 Fitz-Pagan and others gave Lands and Tithes. William de Archis granted to the Canons here half the Tithe of his Bread made in his House for ever in pure and perpetual Alms.

[Valued at 8 l. per Annum.]

44 COLCHESTER, in Essex.

KING Henry the I. gave to the Church of St. Iulian, and St. Botolph of Colchester, and to the Canons there the Tithes of all his Demesnes in Hetfeld, with divers Lands in and about Colchester; confirming to them other Lands which they had of the Gift of Hugh Fitz-Stephen to hold in Serjeancy by the finding of one Horse of the price of five shillings, and one Sack and one Prick, at the King's charges when he makes War against 45 the Welch for forty days. Pope Paschall the II. by his Bull dated A D. 1116. granted to the Canons of this House, that as they were the first of this Order in England, so they should be the first in Dignity, and exempted them from all Secular or Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction other than that only of 46 the See of Rome, and finally that they should choose their own Superior, but present him when chosen to the Bishop of London to be Consecrated.

[Valued at 523 l. 17 s. per Annum.]

HAGHMON, in Shropshire.

47

THIS was founded in the year 1100. (1. H. 1.) by William Fitz-Allen. King Edward in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirmed to the Church of St. Iohn the Evangelist of Haghman, and to the Canons there, all their Lands and Revenues given by several Benefactors, among whom were some of the Welch Princes. Vide infra 933.

[Valued at 259 l. 13 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

49 St. JAMES at Northampton.

FOunded and endowed by William Peverell. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. With the grant of divers Liberties.

[Valued at 175 l. 8 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

50 WIRKSOP, in Nottinghamshire.

FOunded and endowed by William de Lovetot, 3 Hen. 1. and dedicated to God and St. Cuthbert: Which Estate was confirm'd and encreased by his Heirs. Pope Alexander the III. by his Bull dated An. Dom. 1161. 53 confirm'd the Estate of the Canons here, and granted them divers Privi­ledges, as to pay no Tithes for the Cattle and Lands in their own occu­pation; to present Priests from among their own Brethren to the Bishop to be instituted to the Parish Churches which they hold, who shall be answerable to the Bishop for the Cure of the People, and to the Priory for the Profit of the Livings; to have a Caemitary free for the burial of such as desire to be buried with them, saving the Rights and Dues of the Parish Churches from whence the dead are brought; and to celebrate 54 the Divine Offices, privately, in the time of a general Interdict. Their Lands and Liberties were also confirm'd by King Hen. II. Vid. infra 937.

[Valued at 239 l. 10 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

FELLEY, in Nottinghamshire.56

THIS was a Cell belonging to Wyrksop (alias Radeford) given to that House by Radulphus de Annesley and Reinold his Son, An Dom. 1152. (2. H. 2.) In the year 1343. William Archbishop of York appropriated 57 the Church of Adingburgh to this Priory of Felley for the encrease of four Canons more, there being but five before, so that for the future there should be nine, of which one to be Prior, reserving out of the Fruits and Profits of the said Church a sufficient subsistance for a perpetual Vicar,58 which Vicar was to be presented by the Prior and Canons of this Mona­stery.

[Valued at 40 l. 19 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

LANTHONY, in Wales (after Translated to Gloucester.)

HERE was of old time a small Chappel of St. David, in a very so­litary place, where a Knight called William, belonging to the Fa­mily 59 of Hugh de Lacy, forsaking the World, led an Heremitical Life; whose 60 eminent Fame for Holiness drew to him one Ernisius Chaplain to Queen Maud, Wife of King Henry the I. who became his associate in his Devo­tions and Austerity; this was An. Dom. 1103. under the Reign of King Henry the I. In the year 1108. they erected here a mean Church which was dedicated to St. Iohn Baptist, by the Bishop of thatLandaff. Diocess, and the Bishop of Hereford. Of these two Heremits Hugh de Lacy became a Pro­tector and Benefactor. After some time, these two, through the Advice 61 and Approbation of Anselme Archbishop of Canterbury were willing to en­crease their number and to alter their poor House from a Heremits Cell to be a Monastery, and they chose from all the Religious Orders then in being, that of the Canons Regular. A certain number of Canons were thereupon assembled from the Monasteries of Mereton, the holy Trinity at London, and Colchester, and establisht here at Lanthony, over whom the foresaid Ernisius was made Prior; the number of Canons being about that time forty, or more. And many their Benefactors besides Hugh de Lacy, who conferr'd[?] on them more Revenues than they were willing to receive. Walter the Constable, being the chief Officer in the King's Court, and one 62 of the Greatest Men of the Kingdom, took on him a Religious Habit, and spent the remainder of his days in this House. On the death of Ernisius, Robert de Retun was chosen Prior, but he being afterwards made Bishop of Hereford, Robert de Braci was chosen to succeed him. After the death 63 of Henry the I. the Canons of this House were much afflicted and disturb'd in their Possessions here, whereupon Milo Earl of Hereford, the Kings Constable (and Son of that Walter who became a Religious man among the Canons) gave them a piece of Ground without the Walls of Gloucester for a new Seat, here they built a new Church, which in the year 1136. was solemnly dedicated by the Bishops of Worcester and Hereford, in honour of the blessed Mary, yet still this House retain'd the name of Lanthony. After this Robert de Braci died and was buried in the new Monastery at Gloucester, to whom succeeded William de Wycumb. And now it was, that 64 by Papal Authority the Church of St. Mary at Gloucester was confirm'd as [Page 136] 65 a Cell to that of St. Iohn Baptist at Lanthony. However the Canons being better pleased with their new Habitation, which was much braver and richer than their old Seat in Wales, chose to inhabit at Gloucester, removing and spoiling what they had at Lanthony. They became also very licentious in their way of living. During this William their Prior falling into Troubles and Vexation as well with the Canons of his own House, as Roger Earl of Hereford[?] the Patron, was forced to resign his Office; to 66 whom succeeded Clement the Sub-prior. This man reform'd the Abuses that were in the Monastery, especially as to the Church Service. From the aforenamed Milo Earl of Hereford, descended by an Heir General the Noble 67 Family of Bohuns Earl of Northampton, Hereford, and Essex, who by reason 68 thereof were Patrons of this Monastery. The first Founder, Hugh de Lacy, came into England with the Conqueror, but died without issue, and his 69 Inheritance went to his two Sisters, from whom are descended divers Noble Families, of which Descents see the Book at large. King Iohn in 71 the first year of his Reign recited and confirm'd to the Canons of Lantho­ny the several Lands and Revenues given them by their Benefactors. The 72 like did King Edward the II. in his eighteenth year. King Edward the IV. in the one and twentieth year of his Reign gave the Priory of Lanthony and all the Lands, &c. belonging to the same, to Henry Deen, then Prior of the Priory of the blessed Mary of Lanthony at Gloucester, and to the Canons there to be consolidated and united thereunto for ever, providing that the Prior and Canons at Gloucester shall for the future maintain at Lanthony one Prior dative and removeable at will, with four Canons to celebrate 73 Masses and other Divine Offices there for ever, if not hindred by Rebels and Wars.

[Valued at 648 l. 19 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

CARLILE, in Cumberland.

KING Henry the I. gave the Churches of New-Castle upon Tyne, and Newbourne, to the Canons of St. Mary of Carlile. Besides that King, 74 the King of Scotland and many others were Benefactors, all whose Gifts were confirm'd by King Henry the II. And others given by King Edward the I. and II.

[Valued at 418 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

75 DUNMOW, in Essex.

THE Church here was built in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary by Iuga Baynard Lady of little Dunmow, whose Son and Heir Golfridus Baynard by the assent of Anselme Archbishop of Canterbury placed Canons herein, An. Dom. 1106. The Estate here and that at Castle Baynard, in London, being forfeited by William Baynard (An. 1111.) was given by King Henry to Robert Grandson of Gilbert Earl of Clare, whose issue be­came 76 Patrons of this House, till in the year 1216. Robert Fitz-Walter re­fusing to consent to King Iohn's unlawful love to his Daughter Matilda the Fair, that King seized upon his Estate and Barony, and his Castle of Baynard at London; and Matilda, who was then here at Dunmow, not ad­mitting [Page 137] the Kings Suit, was poison'd in a mess of Broth. These things occasioned the Barons Wars, which after a while were again composed, and Robert Fitz-Walter restored to his Barony and the Kings Favour as formerly, An. 1268. Iohn Prior of this Church was suspended, and the Conventual Church interdicted, because his tenth was unpaid the space of four days, but Appeal being made, the Suspension was denied, and disowned.

Priors of DUNMOW.
  • [...] ob. 1120.
  • [...] ob. 1163.
  • [...] ob. 1179.
  • [...] ob. 1208.
  • [...] ob. 1219.
  • Willielmus, ob. 1221.
  • Thomas, ob. 1238.
  • Iohannes Pateford, ob. 1245.
  • Hugo de Steveinheth, ob. 1246.
  • Edmundus, ob. 1247.
  • Galfridus, ob. 1248.
  • Iohannes de Codham, ob. 1270.
  • Hugo de Posslington Cessit, 1279.
  • Richardus de Wicham.
  • Stephanus de Noble, ob. 1312.
  • Robertus.

10 August 1502. The Bells in the Steeple at Dunmow were consecrated; 77 the first in honour of St. Michael; the second in honour of St. Iohn Evan­gelist; the third in honour of St. Iohn Baptist; the fourth in honour of the Assumption of the blessed Mary; the fifth in honour of the Holy Trinity and all Saints.78

Here was an ancient Custom continued till the dissolution of this Priory, that if any married man would come and take his Oath before the Prior and Convent, kneeling in the Church-yard upon two hard pointed Stones,79 That he never repented of his marriage, nor had any brawls or contention with his Wife within a year and a day, nor ever made any nuptial Transgression in that time, then he was to have delivered to him with great Solemnity, a Gammon or Flitch of Bacon. The Records of the House mention three People that have performed this, Steven Samuel of Essex, 7 E. 4. Richard Wright of Norfolk, 23 H. 6. and Thomas le Fuller of Essex, 2 H. 8.

[Valued at 150 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

The Priory of the Holy Trinity, in London.80

THIS Church was founded by Richard Beumeys Bishop of London; and as it seems, then called Christ-Church, who placed herein ma­ny Canons. Maud Wife of King Steven, David King of Scots, and many others gave Lands to this Priory. King Henry the I. gave to these Canons of the holy Trinity the Soke called Cnihtengild, and the Church of St. Bu­tulph, 81 with Soc and Sac, Tol and Theam, &c. King Henry the III. in the eleventh of his Reign recited and confirm'd the several Lands and Re­venues given to this Priory, in which Deed he mentions Queen Maud Wife of King Henry the I. to be the Foundress of this House.

TAUNTON, in Somersetshire.

83 IT was found by Inquisition, An. 10. E. 2. that this Monastery was founded by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester, on a piece of Ground on the North-side of the Town of Taunton, without the East-Gate. A­mong other of their Benefactors, was William de Monteacuto Earl of Salis­bury, who granted to the Canons here, the Mannor and Hundred of Dul­verton, cum pertin. to hold in Fee-farm, at the yearly Rent of 10 l. Which demise is dated in the Chapter of the Priory of Taunton, 11. E. 3.

[Valued at 286 l. 8 s. 10 d. per Annum]

84 HASTINGS, in Sussex.

THIS Priory was erected here, by one Sir Walter Bricet a Knight, and dedicated to the holy Trinity. But by reason of the Inunda­tion of the Sea the Canons were not able to remain here, whereupon Sir Iohn Pelham Knight, by License of King Henry the IV. founded for them another Church and Habitation at Warbilton, towards the Support of which the said King Henry the IV. in the fourteenth year of his Reign granted the Mannor of Withiam, then valued at 25 l. 5 s. 5 d. per Annum, for twenty years, which Estate was part of the Possessions of Morteyn an alien Priory, at that time [...]eized into the King's hands by reason of his Wars with France.

[Valued at 51 l. 9 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum]

St. MARY-OVERIE, in Southwark.

FOunded by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester, who here instituted 85 Secular Canons, divers of the Family of the Earls of Warren, and of the Moubrays were Benefactors to his Priory. King Steven gave the Ca­nons here (then Regulars) the tenth of his Farm of Southwark; Cicely 86 Countess of Hereford gave them her Lands at Ketebrok, confirm'd by King Iohn. Vid. infra, 940.

[Valued at 624 l: 6 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

BRISET, in Suffolk.

THIS Priory was sounded in time of Herbert Bishop of Norwich by Radulphus Fitz-Brian and Emme his Wife, to God, St. Mary, and the holy Confessor St. Leonard. Which Founders endow'd it with divers 87 Lands and Tithes, among which was the Tithes of Smithfield at London. From this Radulph Fitz-Bryan descended Almaricus Peche, who confirm'd 88 all his Ancestors Donations to this House. Walter Bishop of Norwich granted to this Almaric Peche to have a Chantery in his Chappel at Briset, but that the Chaplain at his first admittance should make Oath in presence of the Prior or his Procurator (inspectis sacrosanctis Evangeliis) that he would pay over all the Oblations which he should receive in the said Chappel, [Page 139] to the Mother Church; and that he should not admit any Parishoner of the Mother Church to any Sacrament unless in imminent peril of death; and in sign of subjection to the Mother Church, that the said Almaric and all his Family should repair thither to the Great Mass on five days yearly, viz. Christmass day, Easter-day, Whitsunday, the Assumption of the glorious Virgin, and St. Leonards-day.

CIRENCESTER, in Gloucestershire.89

KING Henry the I. founded this Priory, by the Consent and Autho­thority of Pope Innocent;(N. 2.) and by the Council and common Ap­plause of the Archbishops and Bishops, Princes and Barons of the King­dom, endowed it with divers Lands and Revenues, as well in the Town of Cirencester and County of Gloucester, as in Wiltshire, Somersetshire, Dor­setshire, Oxfordshire, and Northamptonshire, also with the Liberties of Soc and Sac, Toll and Theam, &c. Whose Royal Grant bears date A. D. 1133.90 King Iohn was also a Benefactor to this House.(N. 2.)

[Valued at 1051 l. 7 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

HEXHAM, or Hagustald in Northumberland.

THIS Town situate on the South Banks of Tine, was of old time magnificent and great, and made a Bishops Seat by the blessed Wilfrid in the year 674. and so it continued for above one hundred and 91 forty four years under the Government of twelve Bishops successive­ly,(N. 3.) viz. 1. Wilfridus, 2. Eata, 3. Tunbertus, 4. Iohn, 5. St. Acca, 6 Fred­bertus, 7. St. Alcmundus, 8. Tilbertus, 9. Ethelbertus, 10. Eadfredus, 11. Osbertus, 12. Tydferdus, after which it ceased to be govern'd by a Bi­shop of its own. The Bishop of Durham exercising Ecclesiastical Juris­diction here, till in the Reign of King Henry the 1. it was given to the See of Tork. In the year 1113. Thomas then Archbishop of Tork placed here Canons Regular. Iohn de Normanville, and Robert de Insula were Benefactors to the Canons here. It was found by Inquisition taken in 92 the four and twentieth year of E. 1. That Thomas the second, Archbishop of Tork, did found and endow this Priory, the Lands by him given and by many other Benefactors, were all found and set forth in particular; which see in the Book at large, p. 93. 91, &c.

[Valued at 122 l. 11 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

STODELY, in Warwickshire.

THese Canons were first establisht at Wicton by Peter de Stodley, and 89 by him afterwards removed from thence to Stodley,(O. 2) and by him endow'd with Lands, confirm'd by King Henry the II. and King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign. To this House William de Canti­lupo, William Comin, and others were Benefactors.

[Valued at 117 l. 1 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

90 LAUND, in Leicestershire.

THE Priory here was founded by Richard Basset and Matildis Ridel his Wife,(O. 2.) for Canons Regular, and dedicated to St. Iohn Baptist. It was endowed with the Town and Mannor of Lodington (within the Bounds of which it stands) as also that of Friseby, with the Tyths of seve­ral Churches, in the Neighbourhood, among others with the Church of 91 Warleg and Chappel of Belton, and the Church of Glaeston, in Rutland. Confirm'd by King Henry the 1. and King Henry the II.

[Valued at 399 l. 3 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

THURGARTON, in Nottinghamshire.

92 THE Priory of St. Peter at Thurgarton was founded and endow'd with divers Lands and Tithes by Radulphus de Ayncourt. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom several of the Family 94 of Vilers, all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Henry the II. 95 and by King Edward the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign.

Valued at 259 l. 9 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

DRAX, in Yorkshire.

96 THIS Priory dedicated to St. Nicholas, was founded and endowed with divers Lands and Liberties by William Paganell. By Inden­ture 97 dated An. 1383. The Prior and Convent of this House did oblige themselves, in consideration of twenty Marks received, to perform a yearly Obit on the day of the Epiphany, for the Soul of Gilbert de Oun­fravile late Husband of Maud Countess of Northumberland.

[Valued at 104 l. 14 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

98 MARTON, in Yorkshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Bertram de Bulemer, and confirmed by his Grandson Henry de Nevill. This Priory, as appears by the Char­ter of King Henry the II. was at first given to Canons and Nuns, but the Nuns were afterwards translated to a place called Molesbi.

[Valued at 151 l. 5 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

100 BETHKELERT, in Wales.

KING Edward the I. in the fourteenth year of his Reign confirm'd the Estate and Lands given to this House by Lewelin the Great, and others.

[Valued at 70 l. 3 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

BOLTON, in Yorkshire.

ANno 1120. William Meschines, and Cecilia his Wife Lady and Heiress of the honour of Skipton, founded and endow'd a Monastery of Canons at Emmesey. which House was dedicated in honour of the blessed Virgin and St. Cuthbert the Bishop. In the year 1151. these Canons were 101 translated from hence to Bolton, which Alice de Rumelli gave them in ex­change for other Lands of theirs. Which Alice being Heiress to their Founder,102 confirm'd all his Grants, and further granted them Free chace in her Chace of Craven [...] Their Lands given by their several Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the fifth year of his Reign. This Priory was in some sort subject to that of Huntingdon till discharged 104 of that subjection in the time of Pope Celestin the III. The Prior and Con­vent here granted to Iohn de Insula Lord of Rougemount to maintain a Chantery of fix Chaplains in the Church of Harewood, &c.

[Valued at 212 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

KIRKHAM, in Yorkshire.105

WAlter Espec and Adelina his Wife by the consent of King Henry the I. founded the Priory of Canons of the Holy Trinity at Kirkham, and endow'd the same with divers Lands and [...] Tithes; inter alia, with the Tithes of Venison, & ferarum silvestrium, which he and his posterity should take, and of all Foul taken in his Rivers. Likewise the said Walter granted them the tenth Penny, or Tith, of his Rents of his Lands in Northumberland. This Walter Espec was a man of a Giant-like stature,106 with a Voice like a Trumpet, of Noble Blood, but more noble in his Christian Piety; who having no Children of his own, tho' he had Ne­phews, gave the best of his Possessions to Christ, founding and endowing the Monastery of Kirkham for Canons Regular. In the year 1261. Wil­liam 107 de Roos Lord of Hamlak, among other things, granted to the Prior and Convent of Kirkham and their Successors, in lieu of the Tithes of his hunting, three good wild Beasts (tres seras competentes) also the Rent of 100 s. per Annum for other Tithes, for which consideration the said Canons did quit their claim of Free-chace in Hamelak.

[Valued at 269 l. 5 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

LAUNCESTON, in Cornwall.

THIS Priory did stand on the West South-West part of the Suburb of the Town, and was erected by William Warwist Bishop of Exeter, for which he supprest a Collegiate Church of St. Steven, having Prebendaries, and gave the best part of their Lands to the Priory, and took the Residue himself. King Iohn, and King Henry the III. confirm'd the Lands given 108 them by several Benefactors.

[Valued at 354 l. 0 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

St. DENNIS, near Southampton.

THIS Priory was founded by King Henry the I. endowed with Re­venues 109 by King Henry the II. King Seven, King Richard the I. Hum­phrey de Bohun, &c.

[Valued at 80 l. 11 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

110 LEDES, in Kent.

THIS Monastery was founded An. 1119. by Robert de Crepito Corde, in French Creveceur, Anglicè Creutor, for Canons Regular. Dedicated to St. Mary and St. Nicholas. Divers of the Name and Family of Creveceur 112 were Benefactors, granting to them divers Revenues and Liberties, and that the Canons here should have the Custody of their House and Goods in the time of Vacation, without any Impediment of them, the Patrons or their Heirs, and that upon the death of their Prior, they might freely proceed to the Election of another without leave-asking, however after Election, the new Prior must be presented to the Patron according to Custom. Confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the one and fortieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 362 l. 7 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

113 HASELBERGE, in Sommersetshire.

IN the Reign of King Henry the I. lived at Haselburge a certain Priest much famed for Sanctity and for the Spirit of Prophesie, called Wul­frieus. In his time William Fitz Gualter instituted Canons Regular here, and endow'd them with Possessions. But at his first undertaking this Foundation, Wulfricus told him, that Those whom he designed to introduce here would not prosper in this place. The said Wulfric died An. 1154.

114 KENILWORTH, in Warwickshire.

GAlfridus de Clinton, Chamberlain to King Henry the I. sounded this Church for Canons Regular, in honour of St. Mary, to whom he gave all his Lands at Kenilworth, (except what he had retain'd to his Castle, and for making a Park) with many other Lands and Liberties, all which he enjoyn'd his Heir to observe and not to violate on pain of his 115 Curse and God's Wrath. Gaufridus his Son confirm'd his Father's Gifts, and granted them Tithes of all manner of Provisions whatsoever that came 116 to his Castle of Killingworth. Henry his Son made the like Confirmation, 117 and granted still more [...] King Henry the I. recited and confirm'd all for­mer 118 Benefactions, and granted the Canons here great Liberties and Im­munities. The like Confirmation was made by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 538 l. 19 s. per Annum.]

STONE, in Staffordshire.119

WVlfer King of Mercia, was Son and Successor to Penda, a Pagan and 120 Persecutor; he after his Father's death became a Christian and married Ermenilda a Christian Lady, Daughter of Exbert King of Kent, by whom the had two Sons Wulfad, and Ruffin; and a Daughter named Werburg: which two Sons being baptized by St. Cedda then a Hermit, and 121 by him privately instructed and incouraged in Christianity, This did so 122 offend their Father Wulfer who had apostatized from the Faith of Christ,123 that finding them at Prayers at St. Cedd's Cell, he killed them both with his own hands, their Martyrdom happened on the 9th. Calend. August. This sad News being known to the Queen, she caused their Bodies to be 124 inclosed in a Stone Monument, and in process of time a Church to be erected in the place where they were martyr'd. Wulfer the King being horribly tormented in mind could find no ease till he repair'd to St. Cedd, who upon his repentance and contrition, absolved him and enjoyn'd him 125 for Pennance, to suppress Idolatry throughout his Kingdom of Mercia, and establish the Christian Religion. This King hereupon built many Churches and Monasteries, among others Peterborough Abby; and in the place where the Martyrs suffered, was erected a Colledge for Canons then called Stanes, now Stone. In after-times one of this House went to Rome as a Procurator from the rest, and obtain'd from the Pope a Cano­nization for St. Wulfad and St. Ruffin. In the time of the Normans Con­quest 126 one Robert Lord of Stafford, (from whom the Barons of Stafford did descend) was chief Lord of this Place; here did Inhabit at that time two Nuns and a Priest, who were all slain by one Enysan de Walton, af­ter which Murther, the abovesaid Robert by advice of Geffry de Clinton, did Establish here, Canons instead of Nuns. Nicholas de Stafford Son of Robert, gave this House as a Cell to Kenilworth. King Henry the II. con­firmed 128 all the Benefactions. The Church here was dedicated to St. Wulfad.

[Valued at 119 l. 14 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

BROKE, in Rutland, a Cell to Kenilworth.130

HVgh de Ferrariis granted to the Canons of Kenilworth the Land of Broch, with the Wood-ground and Essarts, and this was by the assent of Walchelin his Nephew, and William his Brother, all which was confirm'd to the said Canons by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 40 l. per Annum.]

LANERCOST, in Cumberland.

THIS House dedicated to God and St. Mary Magdalen, was founded and endowed with large Revenues by Robert de Vallibus Son of Hubert de Vallibus, he granted to the Canons here, inter alia, Pasture and feeding in his Forest of Walton, for thirty Cows, and twenty Sows; with all the Bark of his Timber-Trees in the Woods of his Barony, with all [Page 144] all the dry Wood lying any where in his Forest for the support of their 131 House. The Church here was dedicated by Bernard Bishop of Car­lile, An. 1169. King Richard the I. confirm'd the several Lands, &c. given 132 to the Canons of this Monastery. The abovesaid Herbert de Vallibus was the first Baron of Gillesland, which Barony went by a Daughter to the Name and Family of Multon, and in like manner from them to the Fami­ly of Dacres.

[Valued at 77 l. 7 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

DUNSTABLE, in Bedfordshire.

HEre was formerly a very Woody place just in the meeting of those two Royal Ways of Watling, and Ickneld, which made the Passage so unsafe and full of Thieves, that there was hardly any Travelling. King Henry the I. desirous to rectifie this, caused the Woods to be cut up, and a Royal Mansion to be built near the place which was called Kings­bury. He also caused Proclamation all over the Kingdom that who ever would come and inhabit in that place, should have Land for 12 d. an Acre per Annum, and enjoy the same Liberties and Freedoms as the City of London doth, or any other ancient Borough in the Kingdom, by this means 133 People flock'd hither and built the Town, which from Dunning a noted Robber, who used to rob here, was named Dunningstable. Besides the Li­berties abovementioned this Town had two Markets weekly, and a Fair at St. Peter ad Vincula for three days, and a Gallows for Felons. Within the Limits of this Borough that King erected a Church in honour of St. Peter, and built a Monastery for Canons Regular, to whom he gave the said Church, and all the Borough with its Markets, Fairs, and Liberties, re­taining only in his own hands the Capital Mansion. All which, with the Grants of other Matters, were afterwards confirm'd to them by King Hen. the II. and King Rich. the I. King Iohn did the like, and granted them also his House of Kingsbury, the said Canons had also a Court of Pleas there of their own. Some of the Tenants held in Capite of the Abbot, and some by Services to be done to the said Canons, but all were Free­men.

[Valued at 344 l. 13 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

134 SUTHWIKE, in Hantshire.

THIS Monastery was founded and endowed with divers Lands by King Henry the I. who granted them all sorts of Liberties, and Freedom from Tributes, Taxes, and Exactions, and that they should not be impleaded for any matter or thing unless in the presence of him or his Heirs.

[Valued at 257 l. 4 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

MERTON, in Surrey.135

FOunded by King Henry the I. An. 1121. and by him endowed with the Town of Merton belonging to his Crown, and large Liberties.

[Valued at 957 l. 19 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

OSENEY, near Oxford.136

RObert de Oilley (whose Uncle of the same name came into England with the Conquerour, and obtained from him the Baronies of Oxford, and St. Waleries) founded this Priory for black Canons among the Isles made by the River Isis near Oxford. It is said that his Wife Edith took occasion to incite her Husband to this Foundation, from the constant as­sembling and chattering of certain Magpies in that place whenever she walkt our thither for her recreation. The Church here dedicated to St. Mary was built, An. 1129. Which said Robert endowed the Canons 137 here with divers Tenements in Oxford, and several Lands and Churches in the Neighbouring Towns. Robert one of the natural Sons of King 139 Henry the I. having married a Daughter of the Founder, devoted him­self to these Canons alive, or dead; and gave them 10 l. of Land in his Mannor of Waneting. The like did Henry de Oily his Brother-in-Law out of his Mannor of Hocnorton. The other Lands granted by divers Bene­factors 140 to these Canons see in the Book at large.141

[Valued at 654 l. 10 s. 2 d. per Annum.]142

RONTON, in Staffordshire.143

THIS Priory was founded by Robert the Son of Noel, in a place then called St. Mary des Essarz, and was a Cell to Haghmon in Shrop­shire. Whose Foundation and Endowment was afterwards confirm'd by Thomas his Son, and by R. Archbishop of Canterbury. Vid. inf. 940.

[Valued at 90 l. 2 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

PYNHAM, near Arundell in Sussex.

ADeliza, second Wife, and Widow of King Henry the I. (afterwards married to William Earl of Arundel) gave a parcel of Land then called Pynham adjoyning to Arundell, for the maintenance of two Chap­lains. William Earl of Arundell gave the same Land and more, for the maintenance of Regular Canons, and building a Church to the honour of God and St. Bartlemew; he gave them also Common of Pasture in his Medow of Arundell for fourteen Cows, and two Bulls, &c. All which Gifts 144 were confirm'd by Ranulph Bishop of Chichester.

LILLESHULL, in Shropshire.

THE Church here, dedicated to St. Alcmund, is said to have been first founded by Adelfleda a Queen of Mercia, but afterwards much amplified, and endow'd with ten Prebends, by King Edgar. Afterwards 145 Richard Beumeys Dean of this Church, by assent of King Steven, and Authority of the Pope, gave this Church over to Canons Regular, coming from St. Peter's at Dorchester, which new Monastery was ded [...] ­cated 146 to St. Mary ever Virgin. Benefactors to this House were Alan la 147 Zouche, the Lady Hillaria de Trussebut, &c. King Henry the III. confirm'd their Estate. Vid. inf. 941.

[Valued at 229 l. 3 s. d. per Annum.]

GISEBURNE, in Yorkshire.

RObert de Brus, by the Council of Pope Calixtus the II. and Thurstin Achbishop of York, founded this Priory to the honour of God and 148 St. Mary, and endow'd it with divers Lands as well at Gyseburn as elsewhere, and with the Churches of Skelton, and Herte, &c. Robert de Brus was a noble Norman Knight, who came into England with the Conqueror, An. 1066. and obtain'd to himself the Castle of Skelton, the Lordships of Danby, Kendal, Anendule, Herte and Hertnesse, Karlton, and divers other Lands in the North. This Robert gave to his second Son, of his own name, Anandal in Scotland, and Herte and Hertnesse in England, and dying 149 An. 1141. lies buried at Gisburne Priory of his own Foundation, to whose Estate succeeded Adam de Bruse, from whom descended Peter de Bruse, who dying without issue, An. 1273. his inheritance became divided a­mong his four Sisters, viz. Agnes, married to the Lord Walter Fauconberg, who had for her purparty the Castle of Skelton, &c. Lucia married to the Lord Marmaduke de Tweng, who had with her Danby, &c. Margaret who 150 married the Lord Robert de Rose, and with her went Kendale, and lastly Laderina married to the Lord Iohn de Bellew, and had for her part Charle­ton, &c. From Robert the second Son of the first mention'd Robert de Brus, descended lineally Robert de Brus King of Scotland, who making 151 War against King Edward the I. that King seiz'd upon his Lands of Herte 152 and Hertnesse, as forfeited, and granted them to the Lord Clifford. These Bruses of the younger House gave divers Churches in Scotland to this Priory, confirm'd by William King of Scotland. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 46.

[Valued at 628 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

153 SCARTHE, near Wharlton, in Yorkshire.

THIS House founded and endowed by Steven de Manilio, was given as a Cell to Guisburne by Hugo de Rudby, Chaplain to the said Steven, and by him appointed Trustee for this purpose.

NUTLEY, in Buckinghamshire.154

THIS Abby, otherwise called, Sancta Maria de Parcho, was founded and endowed by Walter Gifford Earl of Buckingham, and Ermigar­dis his Wife. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. and by King Iohn with 155 the Addition of great Liberties and Immunities, who also granted to 156 William Marescal and his Heirs, the Gift of the Pastoral Staff of the Abby of Nuteley. To the Canons here was given the Church of all Saints at Bradley in the Diocess of Sarum; in which Parish was founded a Chappel for Leperous Women; which Chappel, before it could be dedi­cated by Iocelin then Bishop of Sarum, was publickly and solemnly de­clared by Oath not to be any ways prejudicial to the Mother Church in Tithes or Obventions, &c.

[Valued at 437 l. 6 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

BISSEMEDE, in Bedfordshire.157

HVgh de Bellocampo founded, and endow'd this Priory with divers Lands and Commons, &c. He granted the Canons here besides o­ther things, the Priviledge to have their Corn first ground at his Mills at Hetune, after that which should be found on. All which was confirm'd by Roger de Bellocampo. He granted also the Tithes of his Park of Ettune,158 (tam de bosco quam de essartis) as well of his Woods as arable Lands. Pope 159 Gregory granted to this House divers Priviledges, as not to pay Tithes of 160 their own Stock, to cellebrate privately in time of a general Interdict, &c.161 Here was formerly a Hermitage of great Veneration.

[Valued at 71 l. 13 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.]

BRIDLINGTON, in Yorkshire.

WAlter de Gant establisht Canons in the Church of St. Mary of Bridlinton, and gave them all his Estate in that Town, and con­firm'd to them all other Lands which his (homines) Tenants who held of him, had given them. Gilbert de Gant, his Son, Earl of Lincoln, confirm'd 162 all that his Father gave, &c. The like did King Henry the II. Gilbert de 163 Gant was born, baptized, and educated in this Priory, and therefore dis­posed 165 his Body to be buried here. The Archdeacon of Richmond did use in time of his Visitation to come to a Church belonging to these Canons with a train of ninety seven Horse, one and twenty Dogs, and three Hawks, and in an hours time all their Provision was utterly consumed, till at last this great Oppression was prohibited by the Bull of Pope Innocent the III. Ralph de Nevil granted to these Canons to take Stone out of his Quarry of Fivele, with a way over his Ground, for the use of their Monastery, for ever.

[Valued at 547 l. 6 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

166 St. BARTLEMEW, in Smithfield, London.

RAherus founded the Church here in honour of St. Bartholmew for Canons of St. Augustin's Rule, and himself became their Prior for 167 the space of two and twenty years. This man had been formerly when young, a noted Drole or Jester, and by such means had become accep­table and familar to the great Ones at Court, and to the King himself. But being inspired with God's grace, he saw the Follies of that Course of Life; and finding his Conscience burden'd with many sins, he undertook a Journey to Rome; while he remain'd there he fell sick, and in his sickness made a Vow upon his return to Health, and his Country, to build there an Hospital for the Relief and Solace of Poor People. After this being restored to his Health, he began his journey homeward. On the Way St. Bartholmew appeared to him in a Nocturnal Vision or Dream, and di­rected him to build a Church in Smithfield at London, and name it to him. 169 Being return'd to London, he ob [...]ain'd the King's License for this Foundati­on, without which it could not be effected, the Ground where the Building was appointed, being within the Kings Market-place. He began here­upon a double Work of Piety, the Hospital in performance of his Vow, and the Church according as directed, both not far distant; which last was founded, An. 1123. in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and me­mory of St. Bartholmew the Apostle. It is said that this very Foundation in this place, was foretold long before in a Vision, to King Edward the Confessor. Before Raberus began the Foundation of this Monastery, the Ground here was all overspread with Filth and Durt, and was the com­mon place of Execution of Malefactors. The Priory being built and Can­nons 170 assembled to inhabit it, Raherus became their Prior, who obtain'd for their maintenance sufficient from the Oblations of pious People, and from the King as large Liberties as any Church in England enjoy'd. 171 King Henry the III. confirm'd all the Lands and Churches given them by divers Benefactors, namely, the place call'd Smithfeld, the Church of St. Sepulcher de Ballio, London, cum pertinentiis suis infra Burgum & extra, the Church of St. Michael Bassingshagh, &c. and that the Hospital of St. Bartlemew in Smithfield should be in the Disposition and Subjection of the said Prior and Canons.

[Valued at 653 l. 15 s. per Annum.]

172 WARTRE, in Yorkshire.

FOunded An. 1132. by Galfridus Trusbut, and by him endow'd with the Church of Wartre, and eleven Bovates of Land in the Field of that Town. Confirm'd by Pope Innocent the II.

Priors and Abbots of this House.
  • 1. Ioseph, Prior.
  • 2. Radulphus, Prior.
  • 3. Richard, Abbot.
  • 4. Yuo, Abbot.
  • 5. Nicholas, Prior.
  • 6. Richard, Prior.
  • 7. Thomas, Prior.
  • 8. Radulphus.
  • 9. Iohn Lestyngham.
  • 10. Iohn de Dunelmia.
  • 11. Robert de Lunde.
  • 12. Iohn Queldreke, in his time the [Page 149] Hospital of St. Giles of Beverly was annext to this House, A. 1278.
  • 13. Iohn de Thorpe.
  • 14. Richard de Welwyk.
  • 15. Robert Balne.
  • 16. William Feryby.
  • 17. Henry Holme.
  • 18. Iohn Hemyngburgh.
  • 19. William Tynyngton, deposed by the Archbishop of York.
  • 20. Robert Takel.
  • 21. Thomas Ruland.173
  • 22. William Wartre.
  • 23. Robert Hedon.
  • 24. William York.
  • 25. William Spenser.

Several of the Trussebuts descendants of the Founder confirm'd the Pos­sessions of these Canons; and so did Robert de Ros Lord of Beuver, 174 An. 1279. being then Patron (Advocatus) of this Priory. Pope Innocent 175 granted to these Canons of St. Iames of Wartre divers Priviledges, in the Case of non-payment of Tithes for their own Goods and Stock, in the Case of a general Interdict, &c. 176

Valued at 221 l. 3 s. 10 d. per Annum.

TWYNEHAM, in Hantshire.177

IN the Reign of King Edward the Confessor, there were Secular Canons in Christ Church at Twyneham. Ranulph Flammard, a great Favourite under King William Rufus, and afterwards Bishop of Durham, was Dean of this Church. In the Reign of King Steven Canons Regular were first introduced here. The aforesaid Ranulphus, or Randulphus, new built the 178 Church of Twynham, which at that time bore the name of the Holy Tri­nity. Richard de Redvers endow'd it with Lands in the Isle of Wight and elsewhere. Which Richard de Redvers was by King Henry the I. made Earl of Devon, and had the Isle of Wight, and the Inheritance of this 179 Town of Twineham, given to him. From whom descend the Courtney's Earls of Devon. Baldwin de Redveriis confirm'd the Estate given by his 180 Father Richard to this Church, with the Grant of large Liberties; which Baldwin was the first who introduced Canons Regular into this Church, to whom his Son Richard de Redveriis junior, granted the free Election of their Prior, and confirm'd all their Possessions, An. 1161. Vid. Vol. 3.181 P. 45.

[Valued at 312 l. 7 s. per Annum.]

HERYNGHAM, in Sussex.

KING Edward the I. granted his License to William Paynel to grant certain Lands to the Prior and Canons of this House, for the finding of four Secular Chaplains to celebrate for his Soul, in their Church, Statuto de terris ad manum mortuam non ponend. edito, non obstante. After­wards, upon the Petition of Matilda Neice, and heir of the said William, 182 exhibited to King Edward the II. in Parliament, that King granted that instead of the four Secular Chaplains, the said Prior might for the future appoint four Regular Canons of his own House for that Office. King Edward the III. granted his License to appropriate the Hospital of St. An­thony at Coukham to this House.

St. OSITH at Chich, in Essex.

THE Priory of St. Osith the Virgin and Martyr at Chich, was foun­ded by Richard de Belmeis Bishop of London, who design'd to re­sign his Bishoprick and become a Canon Regular here himself, but was prevented by death. The second Prior of this House was Ralph after­wards 183 Archbishop of Canterbury. King Henry the II. confirm'd all the Pos­sessions given to this Priory by several Benefactors, with the grant of 184 ample Liberties, free Waren and a Market at Chiche. King Iohn granted the Patronage or Advowson of this Abby to William then Bishop of Lon­don and his Successors.

[Valued at 677 l. 1 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

IXWORTH, in Suffolk.

GIlbert Blundus who came into England with the Conqueror, founded this Priory of the blessed Mary of Ixworth near the Parish-Church of that Town.

[Valued at 280 l. 9 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

185 NORTON, in Cheshire.

THIS Priory of the blessed Mary of Norton was founded and endowed by William the Son of Nigellus Constable of Chester. Roger Constable of Chester confirm'd the Lands and Possessions given to these Canons in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, and Oxfordshire, who also granted them divers Priviledges, inter alia, to have two Deer, yearly, on the Feast of the Assumption, out of his Park of Halton. When William Bastard, to whom King Edward the Confessor had assigned the Inheritance of his King­dom 187 as his most worthy and nearest Kinsman, came into England, with him came Hugh to whom he gave the Earldom of Chester. With this Hugh came a Nobleman called Nigellus, to whom the said Earl gave the Barony of Halton and made him his Marshal, and Constable of Chester, and further conferr'd on him many and great Priviledges. such as shew'd a particular favour to him more than any other Baron of Cheshire [...] William Son of this Nigellus founded this Priory first at Runcorn. An [...] 1133. which was afterwards removed to Norton. From him [...] Roger Con­stable 188 of Chester abovementioned, to whom Ranulf Earl o [...] Chester, for a par­ticular Service done him in Wales, gave the Dominion of Shoo-makers and Stage-players to hold to him and his Heirs for ever. This Roger died A. 1211. and lies buried in the Monastery of Stanlowe. Of this Line descended the 189 Lacies Earls of Lincoln, and the Earls of Lancaster, Leicester, and Derby.

[Valued at 180 l. 7 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

NEWBURGH, in Yorkshire.190

FOunded by Roger de Molbray, and endowed with divers Lands and Churches; who also confirm'd what the Freemen of his Fee had given, or should give to the Canons here. In the time of King William the Conqueror Robert de Mowbray was Earl of Northumberland, who taking 192 part with other Great men, who rise against King William Rufus for having banish'd Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury, and destroy'd eighty Religious Houses to enlarge his Forrest, was taken by the King, beheaded, and his Estate seized; and afterwards given by King Henry the I. to Negellus de Albeney, whose Mother was a Mowbray; after which time the Albanies 193 took on them the name of Molbray. Son of that Nigellus was the first abovemention'd Roger de Molbray, who founded this Priory, An. 1145. he founded also the Abby of Bellaland, and many other Religious Houses to the number of thirty five. From whom descended Themas Mowbray who in the Reign of King Rich. II. was made Duke of Norfolk, Earl of Nottingham, Lord Marshal of England, &c. From whom descended two Co-heirs, the 194 eldest of which Ann, was married to the Lord Thomas Howard, who in the second year of King Edward the IV. was created Duke of Norfolk.

[Valued at 367 l. 8 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

HODE, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Newburgh.

HOde was at first demised to the Canons of Billalanda, by Robert de 195 Alneto, on condition that they should here found an Abby of their Canons. This was confirm'd by Roger de Mowbray. Adam Fossard gave Hode to the Canons of Newburgh with Lands lying about the same, which Canons did acknowledge the said Adam to be the Patron (Advocatus) of the said place, and of all belonging thereunto.

EGLESTON, in the Bishoprick of Durham.196

PHilip Bishop of Durham confirm'd to God, St. Mary, and St. Iohn Baptist, and to the Canons of Egleston, divers Lands which Gilbert de Ley held of him by the service of one Knights Fee, and had given them. An. 1273. the Abbot and Canons of this House covenanted with Iohn Duke of Britany, and Earl of Richmond, to find six Chaplains Canons of this House, to say six Masses daily in the Castle of Richmond, for ever, the said Canons to be constantly resident in the said Castle, in consideration whereof the said Earl of Richmond granted to the Abbot and Convent of Egleston divers Lands and Possessions, and a place apart in his said Castle for the Habitation of the said six Chaplains, &c.

DORCHESTER, in Oxfordshire.197

BEfore the Norman Conquest here was a Bishops Seat; Remigius tran­slated it to Lincoln. Alexander Bishop of Lincoln erected here an Abby of black Canons; the Body of which Church served for the Parish Church. After the Suppression the East-part of the Abby-Church [Page 152] was bought by a rich man of this Town for 140 l. and given to aug­ment the Parish Church.

[Valued at 219 l. 12 s. per Annum.]

198 THORNTON, upon Humber, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by William Grose Earl of Albemarl, Anno Dom. 1139. Canons Regular were introduced here from Kyrkham, under the Govern­ment of one Richard their Prior, who was afterwards made Abbot in the year 1148. by Pope Eugenius the III. Earl William the Founder died, An. 1180. having endow'd this Abby with many Lands and Revenues. 199 King Richard the I. confirm'd all the Possessions given to the Abby of St. Mary of Thornton and the Canons there, with the Grant of large Liberties and Immunities. Pope Celestine the III. granted them the Priviledge not to pay any Tithes of Cattle, &c. for their own use.

Abbots of this House were
  • 1. Richard.
  • 2. Philip, 1152.
  • 3. Thomas, 1175.
  • 4. Iohn Benton, 1184.
  • 5. Iordan de Villa, 1203.
  • 6. Richard de Villa, 1223.
  • 7. Ieffrey Holme, 1233.
  • 8. Robert, 1245.
  • 9. William Lyncoln, 1257.
  • 10. Walter Hoto [...]t, 1273.
  • 11. Thomas de Ponte, 1290.

The Advowson of this Abby, together with all the Lands, and Pos­sessions 201 of the Earl of Albemarl, did escheat to King Edward the I. Which being thus in the Crown, King Edward the III. in the sixth year of his Reign granted, by advice of the Prelates and Barons in Parliament, that the said Advowson should remain ever annext to the Crown; and that the said Abbot should not be oblig'd to attorn to any, in case any grant of the said Advowson should be made.

[Valued at 594 l. 17 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

BRUMMORE, in Wiltshire.

BAldwin de Riveris and Hugh his Unkle, were the Founders of this Monastery for Canons Regular, King Henry the II. confirm'd the Lands given them, and granted them feeding for one hundred Cattle; and one hundred Hogs in Newforest, and dead Wood for their fuel as much as necessary.

202 HAREWOLD, in Bedfordshire.

THIS was a Priory of Nuns of St. Augustin, founded by Sampson de Forte, Malcolm King of Scotland, as Earl of Huntington confirm'd certain Lands to this Church of St. Peter of Harewold, and to the Prior, 203 and Canons, and Sisters there serving God. The like did King William of Scotland. King Henry the IV. of England gave to the Prioress and Nuns of Harewold, one Messuage in Chakirstone of the yearly value of 2 s. with the Advowson of that Church.

BRINKEBURNE, in Northumberland

FOUNDED by William Bertram, Hawys his Wife, and Roger his Son, for Canons. Their Possessions were confirm'd by William Earl or Northumberland, Henry Earl of Northumberland Son to the King of Scot­land, 204 and by King Henry. III.

[Valued at 68 l. 19 s. 1 d.]

LEYE, in the Ile of Gersey, Diocesse of Exon.

THIS was at first a Priory of Canons, but afterwards in the Reign of King Edward. I. it was changed to a Nunnery of Canonesses; it was dedicated to St. Mary and St. Iohn Evangelist. 205

BRIWETON, in Somersetshire.

WIlliam de Moyne Earl of Somerset gave divers Lands, &c. to the Ca­nons Regular of this House, which was before the Conquest an Abby of Monks founded by Algarus Earl of Cornwal, but the said Moyne, 206 or Mohun, placed Canons here since the Conquest. Sauvaricus Bishop of Bath and Glaustonbury confirm'd to God and the Blessed Mary of Briweton, and the Canons Regular there, the Lands, &c. given by their Benefactors.

[Valued at 439 l. 6 s. 8 d.]

BRADENSTOKE, in Wiltshire.

FOunded and endowed by Patricius Earl of Salisbury and Walter his Father. William Bishop of Sarum appropriated divers Churches to 208 the proper use of these Canons, salvis Vicariis ordinandis & taxandis. King Henry. III. confirm'd all their Possessions.209

[Valued at 212 l. 19 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

NOCTON in Lincolnshire.211

THE Priory of Nocton Park was founded by Robert de Areci, Lord of Nocton. It was dedicated to St. Mary Magdelen. The Heir ge­neral of Norman de Arcy descended from the Founder, married to Iohn de Lymbury. The Possessions given by several Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Henry. III. in the 55th. year of his Reign.212

[Valued at 44 l. 3 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

WIGMORE in, Herefordshire.

OLiver de Merlymond cheif Seneschal of all the Lands of Hugh de Morti­mer, 313 in the time of King Steven, built the Church of Schobbedon, which Town his said Lord Hugh de Mortimer had given him in Consideration of [Page 154] 214 his Service. This Oliver being kindly entertain'd at St. Victors Abby at Paris in his return from a Pilgrimage, he was so highly pleased with their good life and Regular devotion, that he afterwards obtain'd from that Abby two of their Canons to come over and Institute a House of Re­ligion at his new built Church of Schobbedon, to which he annext divers Lands and profits. But after this a great dissention arising between the said Hugh de Mortimer and Oliver de Merlymond, in so much that the said Oliver departed from his Service and went to Miles Earl of Hereford, Mor­timer seized upon all his Estates, and took from the Canons all the Goods which Oliver had given them, whereby the said Canons were reduced to such extreamity that they were about to leave their House. But this 215 difference, being at last composed by the mediation of the Bishop of Here­ford, Mortimer not only restored them their Lands, &c. of which he had de­prived them, but gave them more, among other Benefactions, the Church of Wigmore, and advanced their Prior to the title of an Abbot. But soon af­ter he took from them again the Town of Schobbedon, and it was once more restored by mediation. After this these Canons removed their habitation 216 to a place call'd Eye, and from thence to Wigmore. After this they remov­ed once more into the Field of Beodune, where they built from the ground a Monastery and Church, which Church was dedicated to St. Iames by 217 Robert Folyoth then Bishop of Hereford, the aforesaid Sir Hugh de Mortimer, conferring thereon at the Dedication great Benefactions both in Lands, and Plate for the Altar. Which Sir Hugh died a Chanon of this House, being ve­ry antient. Whose Son and heir Sir Roger de Mortimer behaved himself so unkindly to the Canons of this House, that the Abbot and most of the Con­vent were forced, for some time to retire to Schobbedon, but the differ­rence was made up by the Interposition of King Henry. Isabell de Ferrers Widow of the said Sir Roger, built a House of Religion at Lechelade af­ter her Husbands decease, and endow'd it with Lands for the good of his Soul. The said Sir Roger tho' unkind at first, yet before his death 219 confirm'd all that his Father had given to these Canons, with other Lands given by himself.

220 Among those 260 most famous and valiant Knights that King William the Conqueror brought into England with him in his Army, was Ralph de Mortuomari one of the chief; which Ralph obtain'd to himself the Lordship of Wigmore, and other Possessions in the Marches of Wales.

This Ralph built the Castle of Wigmore, and left issue Hugh and Wil­liam, Hugh became the Founder of the Abby of Wigmore, as has been said, and endow'd it largely An. 1179. and dyed in this Monastery An. 222 1185. Grandson of this Hugh was Ralph de Mortuomari, who being sent over into Normandy by King Iohn in order to defend that Country a­gainst the King of France, who had invaded and Seized all Normandy (be­cause King Iohn refused thô several times summon'd, to do homage for the same) was by the said King of France taken Prisoner. During whose absence from these Parts the Welch invaded this Monastery of Wig­more, plundered the Canons of all their movables, and burnt all the Build­ings 223 except the Church. Son of which Ralph was Roger, who marryed Matilda daughter of William de Breuse Lord of Bregnoc, and was so faith­ful an adherent to King Henry III. against his rebellious Barons, that he was the chief means of defeating that formidable Commotion, and esta­blishing 224 the King in his Throne. Grandson of this Roger, was Roger Mor­timer who was created the first Earl of March, An. 1. Edward. III. Which [Page 155] Earl Roger was great grandfather of Edmund Mortimer who married Phi­lippa 226 only daughter and heir of Leonel Duke of Clarence, second Son of King Edward. III. Which Edmund having buried his said Wife went over into Ireland the Kings Lieutenant, and An. 1381. departed this life in that 227 Kingdome, being but twenty nine years of age. His body was brought over, and buried in this Abby Church of Wigmore, with his Countess, and most of his Ancestors. Which Edmund and Philippa had issue two Sons 228 Roger, and Edmund, and two Daughters Elizabeth and Philippa. Roger Mortimer was slain in Ireland, An. 1398. But left issue by his Wife Alianora 229 daughter and coheir of Thomas Holland Earl of Kent, two Sons Edmund and Roger, and two daughters Anne and Alianore. Anne was married to Ri­chard de Condsborough Earl of Cambridge. The two Sons, and the other daughter died all without issue.

[Valued at 267 l. 2 s. 10 d. ob per Annum.]

THORNHOLME, in Lincolnshire.230

IT was found upon Inquisition at the Assizes at Lincoln, 4 Iohn, that King Steven founded this Priory and placed Canons in it. That Henry. II gave the Mannour of Aplebi, in which the Priory is scituated, to William de Lungespe his Brother, who after gave the Manour to Iohn Maleherbe.

DERLEY, in Darbyshire.

Hvgh the Priest, intitled Dean of Derby, gave to Albinus, and his Ca­nons of St. Helens near Derby, the Land which he held at Little Derby, for the erecting of a Church and Habitation for him and the said Canons, with divers Lands of his Patrimony. Which Estate the said 231 Albin and his Successors, Abbots of this House, quietly enjoyed all the time of the life of the said Hugh, and of Henry his Son, which Son he be­gat in lawful marriage before he received holy Orders, and of two daughters and heiresses of the said Henry, who dying in the Reign of King Henry. III. that King supposing the said two daughters to dye with­out heirs, claim'd the Advowson of this Abby as an Escheat Vid. Vol. 3. P. 57.

[Valued at 258 l. 14 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

St. AUGUSTINS at Bristol, in Gloucestershire.232

ROBERT Fitz Harding a Burgesse of Bristol, to whom King Henry II. gave the Barony of Berkly, built this Abby, and gave to the Ca­nons Regular of this House, the Church of Berkly, with divers others. Whose Estate was confirm'd to them by King Henry. II. while he was yet Duke of Normandy and Earl of Anjou: also by Iohn Earl of Morton, &c. 233

[Valued at 670 l. 13 s. 11 d. ob per Annum.]

234 COKESFORD near Rudham, in Norfolk.

JOhn de Querceto (or Cheney) gave to God, and St. Mary, and the Canons of Rudham divers Lands, Churches, and Mills, & Duos homines scilicet G. & V. & terram illorum, two of his Tenants with the Land which they 235 held of him. Hervey Beleth gave them the Mannor of Rudham for the main­tenance of an Hospital, by him founded at Boycodeswade.

[Valued at 121 l. 18 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

BRUNNE, in Lincolnshire. (Bourn)

FOunded by Balwin Son of Gislebert, who endow'd it with divers Lands, Churches, and Tithes of sundry kinds, An. 1138. The 236 Wakes were principal Benefactors to this House, and became Patrons of the same, being Lords of the Mannor of Bourn, and descended from the 237 Founder, and as Patrons had the Custody of the Abby in time of Vaca­tion, &c. which was allowed by King Edward the II. who for that pur­pose granted his mandate to Matthew Broun Escheator for the Counties of Lincoln, Northampton, and Roteland, in the seventeenth year of his Reign, notwithstanding that some of the Possessions of this Abby were held of the King in Capite.

NEWENHAM, in Bedfordshire.

238 BEfore the Conquest, the Church of St. Paul in Bedford was a Colledge of Prebendaries or Secular Canons, till one of the Canons killing a Butcher, they were forced to remove their Habitation to a place call'd Newenham, a Mile distant from Bedford, and there they became Regular Canons. Roi [...]ia Wife of Paganus de Bellocampo, to whom King William 239 the Conqueror gave the Barony of Bedford, and Simon her Son, were the founders of their House at Newenham. Which Simon endow'd them with divers Lands and Possessions, among others the Church of St. Paul at Bedford with all its Possessions, and the Tithes of the Mill of the Castle 240 of Bedford, &c. These Canons had also large Liberties granted them on the River, for fishing, and for keeping Swans as many as they pleased; seeding 241 for thirty Hogs yearly quit of Paunage in the Wood of Kerdington, free 242 Pasture for twelve Oxen, in all the Grounds of the Patron where his own 243 Oxen fed, with Liberty to elect their own Prior, saving to the Patron the Custody of the outward Gate of the Monastery in time of Vacation, &c. All whose Lands and Liberties were confirm'd to them in 15 R. 2. by Tho­mas Earl Mareschal, and Earl of Nottingham, Lord Moubray and Segrave, then Patron of this Priory.

[Valued at 293 l. 5 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

St. RADEGUNDIS at Bradsole, in Kent.244

KING Henry the III. confirm'd the several Lands and Revenues given to this House by sundry Benefactors, among whom Henry de Weng­ham Dean of St. Martins in London. Vid. Vol. 3. P. 69.

[Valued at 98 l. 9 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

KIME, in Lincolnshire.245

THE first founder of this Priory was Sir Philip de Kyme Knt. the Canons of this House held Lands in Thorpe, and Billingey.

[Valued at 101 l. 0 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

BUTLEY, in Suffolk.

FOunded by Ranulph de Glanvilla, and by him endowed with divers Churches and Lands, in the year 1171. This Ranulph de Glanvill was 246 heretofore Chief Justice of England, and left only three Daughters, among whom he parted his Land before he made his Voyage to the Holy Land, to the eldest who married one William de Aubervil, he gave the intire Mannor of Benhall and the Advowson of the Monastery of the blessed Mary of Buttele, and to the other Sisters other parts of his Estate.

Vid. Vol. 3. P. 110.

[Valued at 318 l. 17 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

NEW [...]STED near Guildford, in Surrey.247

FOunded by Rualdus de Calua and Beatrix his Wife with the assent of William Malbanc their Heir, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, and St. Thomas the Martyr, in a place call'd Aldeburi in the Mannor of Sandes, for Canons Regular; whose Estate was confirm'd by King Henry the III. and King Edward the II.

BERLIZ, in Somersetshire.249

THE several Lands, Churches, and Tithes given to the Prior and Ca­nons of this House, dedicated to St. Nicholas, by Matilda de Say [...]d others, were confirm'd by King Henry the III. An. Regni 40. and by Edw. the III. An. 13.250

WOMBRIGGE, in Shropshire.252

FOunded by William Fitz-Alan. Dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Leonard. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom the Lords of Cherinton gave divers Lauds and Revenues in that 253 [Page 158] Town, &c. All the Possessions of these Canons, with divers Liberties to them granted by their severeal Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II. An. Reg. 12.

[Valued at 65 l. 7 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

257 CALDEWELL, in Bedfordshire.

SImon Basket an Alderman of Bedford was the first founder of this House, but the Advowson came afterwards to the Lords Latymer. Robert Son of William de Houton gave Lands to the Order of Fryers of the Holy Cross at Caldewell, confirm'd by King Hen. the III. An. Reg. 57.

[Valued at 109 l. 8 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

258 TONEBRIGGE, in Kent.

FOunded by Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford, for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with certain Rents, the feeding of one hundred and twenty Hogs yearly in his Forrest of Tonebrigge freely, and to have yearly one Buck at the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen.

ANGLESEYE, in Cambridgeshire.

Elizabeth de Burgo Sister and one of the Heirs of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, Patroness of this Priory, granted the Monks here liberty to choose their Prior, An. 1333. The same Elizabeth 259 granted a Rent of 20 l. per Annum to the Prior and Convent of this House, in consideration of which they obliged themselves to find two Chantry Priests, Seculars, to celebrate at the Altar of the holy Cross in their Church for ever, for the said Elizabeth her Ancestors and Heirs, and to allow to the said two Priests their Lodging and Diet, and to each 20 s. per Annum, or else twelve Marks yearly, which they shall think most con­venient; which Grant bears date 6. E. 3.

[Valued at 24 l. 19 s. per Annum.]

260 TRENTHAM, in Staffordshire.

RAlph Earl of Chester was the Founder, or rather Restorer, of this House; granting to the Canons here a yearly Rent of 100 s. per Annum. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. with the grant of large Li­berties and Immunities.

[Valued at 106 l. 3 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

WORMLEY, in Herefordshire.261

STeven de Ebroicis gave to this Church, dedicated to God, and St. Lea­nard, and to the Canons here, certain Mills, Lands, and Tithes in Lenhale, for the maintenance of there Chaplains. Confirm'd by Gilbert de Lacy in consideration of [...] by the said. Canons to him paid. And 263 by William Son of the said Steven, An. 1240. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 48.

[Valued at 83 l. 10 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

ROYSTON, in Cambridgeshire.264

FOunded and endow'd by Eustach de Mer [...]. King Richard the I. con­firm'd to this Monastery by the Name of the Monastery of St. Tho­mas the Martyr apud Crucem Rhosiae, and to the Canons here, all their Pos­sessions given by several Benefactors, and further granted a yearly Fair during all Whitsun-week, and a Market every Wednesday, with the same Liberties as were enjoy'd by the Canons at Dunstable, with very large Im­munities in his Grant specified, dated in the first year of his Reign.

ERDBURY, in Warwickshire.265

RAlph de Sadle was a principal Benefactor to the Canons of this House. An. 1232. Alexander then Bishop of Coventry and Litch­feild, order'd the following Settlement between the Prior of Erdbury, and the Vicar of Dercet, and their Successors, viz. that the Vicar should have all the Altarage of the said Church, and Tith-Corn of eight yards Land in Radewey, and of two yard Land in Derced in the Demeans of the said Prior, with a House, &c. That the Vicar of the said Church 266 should be a Priest and not of any lesser Order, and shall have an Associate constantly, and a Deacon, who together with him shall officiate in the said Church, the Vicar to bear all usual Charges except the Repairs of the Chancel, for which the Prior and he are to joyn proportionably. This Monastery being decay'd in its Revenues, King Henry the VI. An. 23. granted the Prior and Convent License to obtain and receive Lands and Tenements to the value of one hundred Marks without fine to the King.

[Valued at 94 l. 6 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

POGHELE, in Barkshire.

FOunded by Ralph de Chadelewurth, dedicated to God and St. Mar­garet, endow'd with divers Lands and Revenues by the said Ralph and others, all which was recited and confirm'd by King Henry the III.

267 ROUCESTRE, in Staffordshire.

RIchard Bacun founded and endowed this House for Canons Regular, with large Possessions and Liberties: All which were confirm'd to 268 the said Canons by Ranulph Earl of Chester, to hold in pure and perpetual 270 Alms. Confirm'd also by King Henry the III. in the thirtieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 100 l. 2 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

CUMBWELL, in Kent.

FOunded by Robert de Turneham, dedicated to God, and St. Mary Magdalen, endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions, all which were confirm'd by Steven de Turnham, Son of the said Robert, and by King Henry the III. An. Reg. II.

[Valued at 80 l. 17 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

271 WOSPRING, in Somersetshire.

THE several Lands, Rents, &c. given to this Church, dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Thomas the Martyr, by William de Courteney and others, were recited and confirm'd to the Prior and Canons here, by King Edw. the II. An. Reg. 18. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 47.

[Valued at 87 l. 2 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

272 MARLEBURGH, in Wiltshire.

KING Richard the II. An. Reg. 22. granted his Pardon to the Prior and Convent of St. Margaret near Marlbergh (which House was founded by his Progenitors) for having accepted divers Lands of Iohn Lovel Che­valer, without License first obtain'd; and further ratified and confirm'd the Possession of those Lands to the said Convent.

273 IVICHURCH, in Wiltshire.

KING Henry the III. granted to the Prior and Canons of this House certain Lands and Priviledge in his Forrest of Clarendon; King Edw. the III. granted more, also Pasture for forty Oxen and Cows in his Mea­dow of Clarendon, and 100 s. of Rent out of his Mannor of Clarendon. 274 King Hen. the II. founded this Monastery for four Canons.

[Valued at 122 l. 18 s. 6 d. ob. per Annum.]

BUCKENHAM, in Norfolk.

FOunded by William Earl of Chichester in honour of God, St. Mary, and St. Iames, and by him endowed with Churches, Lands, and Tithes. Confirm'd by King Edw. the II. An. Reg. 11.

[Valued at 108 l. 10 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

COLDE-NORTON, in Oxfordshire.275

KING Hen. III. An. Reg. 13. confirm'd to the Prior and Canons of this House, dedicated to St. Iohn the Evangelist, their several Lands and Possessions given by Reginald Earl of Bolon, and Ida his Wife, and divers other Benefactors. Vid. Vol. 3. p 55.

OSULVESTON, (Ouston) in Leicestershire.276

FOunded by Robert Grimbold in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ, St. Mary, St. Andrew the Apostle, and all Saints, for Canons; to whom he gave the Church and Town of Osolvestone, &c. in pure and perpetual Alms. Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirm'd the several Churches granted to this Monastery, and further, granted to these Canons to be for ever free and quit from the Payment of Sinodals, and all other Episcopal Customs ex­cept Peter pence, denouncing a Curse to such as shall infringe or violate his Grant. Robert Grimbold was a Judge under King Henry the II. whose Seal 278 did represent a Figure setting in Judgment, holding in one hand a pointed Sword, signifying Justice, and in the other a Sword with the point abated or broken off, representing Mercy. Among other Benefactors to this House was William de Ros Lord of Beaver, &c.

[Valued at 161 l. 14 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

THORKESEY, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the III. An. Reg 21. granted to the Prior and Canons of this House the Scite of their Monastery in Frankalmoine, and four hundred and ninety eight Acres of Land, and fifty Tosts in Torkesey to hold at the yearly Rent of 10 l. for ever. Beside which the Prioress and Con­vent of Fossa near Torkesey held one hundred and twenty Acres of Land and Meadow, and seven Tofts in Torkesey at the yearly Rent of 46 s.

Valued at 13 l. 1 s. 4 d. per Annum.

CHAUCUMBE, in Northamptonshire.279

FOunded and endow'd by Hugo de Chaucumb. Amabilia de Segrave Lady of Chaucumbe, and others of the Segraves were Benefactors; all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. An. Reg 2.

[Valued at 83 l. 18 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.] Y

280 REPINDON, in Darbyshire.

FOunded An. 1172. (18 H. 2) by Matilda Widow of Ranulph Earl of Chester, and dedicated to the holy Trinity. King Hen. the III. An. Reg 57. confirm'd to the Canons of the holy Trinity of Rependene, and of St Giles of Calc. all the Lands and Possessions given them by the said 282 Matilda and others; the like did King Edw. the II. An. Reg. 18.

[Valued at 118 l. 8 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

KAERMERDIN, in Wales.

KING Henry the II. gave and confirm'd to the Church of St. Iohn the Evangelist at Kayrmerdin, and the Canons there, the old City of Kayrmerdyn with its appurtenances, with the Church of St. Peter there, and the Chappel in the Castle.

[Valued at 164 l. 4 d. per Annum.]

WIKES, in Essex.

KING Henry the II. gave to God and the Nuns of St. Mary at Wikes, the Church of Wikes, with certain Land and seven Villains in that 283 Town. He also granted them two Grayhounds, and four other Dogs (Bracatos) for taking Hares in his Forrest of Essex; with divers other Li­berties and Immunities.

BISSETER, in Oxfordshire.

284 GIlbert Basset gave to the Canons of this House large Possessions, so did William Lungespeye, among other things Pasture for fifty Cattle at Erdintone, to feed among his own Cattle there; another Benefactor was Phil [...]p Basset Brother of Fulc Basset Bishop of London. All whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edw. the II. An. Reg. 9.

[Valued at 147 l. 2 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

285 HERTLAND, in Devonshire.

FOunded by Gaufridus Son of Oliver de Dynam; and the Canons Se­cular, changed to Canons Regular of St. Augustin by the Authority of Bartholomew Bishop of Exeter. All whose Possessions King Richard 286 the I. in the first year of his Reign, confirm'd with the Grant of great Immunities, and Liberties, namely to have a Court to hold plea of all things, but Life and Member, arising in their own Lands and Estate, &c.

[Valued at 306 l. 3 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

HELAGHE, in Yorkshire.287

FOunded by Bertramus Haget, in a place where formerly was a Her­mitage in some sort belonging to the Prior and Convent of Marton, who by their Deed, under their Convent Seal, did disclaim, resign, and quit all title to the same, An. 1203. The Lord Iordan de Sancta Maria marrying Alice an Heir General of the foresaid Bertram, became a second Founder of this Priory, who confirm'd their Estate, and so did Alice his Widow after his decease.288

Priors of Helaghe-Park.
  • 1218. William de Hamelecis.
  • 1233. Elias.289
  • 1257. Iohn Nocus.
  • 1260. Hamo de Eboraco.
  • 1264. Henry de Quetelay.
  • 1281. Adam de Blide.
  • 1300. William de Grimstone.
  • 1320. Robert de Sposford.
  • 1333. Steven Levington.
  • 1357. Richard.
  • 1358. Thomas de Yarum.
  • 1378. Steven Clarell, 45 years.
  • 1423. Iohn Birkyn.
  • 1429. Thomas York.
  • 1435. Richard Areton, translated to Gisburn.
  • 1437. Thomas Botson, translated to Bolton.
  • 1440. Thomas Collingham.
  • 1460. Christopher Lofthous, under an ill Character, for the Book says, furatus est bona hujus domus.
  • 1471. William Berwick.
  • 1475. William Brammam, Vicar of Helagh.290
  • 1480. William Ellington.
  • 1499. Peter Kendayl.

William de Percey Lord of Kildale gave to the Canons of St. Iohn the Evangelist of Helagh-Park, the Chappel of St. Hilda at Kildale with divers 291 Lands, for which the said Canons were to find two of their own House, or two Secular Priests, to celebrate the Divine Offices in the said Chap­pel for ever.

[Valued at 72 l. 10 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

CANONS-ASHBY, in Northamptonshire.

THe Pynkeneyes Lords of Wedone were great Benefactors to the Canons here, giving them divers Lands in Wedone and Weston, with Com­mon for 100 Sheep, 8 Oxen, 5 Cows, and 5 Mares in the Pasture of Wapham, and feeding for Sixscore Hogs in the Woods there.292

[Valued at 119 l. 4 d. per Annum.]

HAVERFORD, in Wales.293

RObert de Haverford gave to the Canons here divers Churches and Tithes in his Barony of Haverford, all which were confirm'd to them by King Edward. III. An. Reg. 5.

[Valued at 133 l. 11 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

294 WODHAM, in Essex.

THis place being formerly a Hermitage of St. Iohn Baptist, Maurice de Tiretia founded here a Priory of Canons, and gave them divers Lands, confirm'd by King Henry. II.

295 IPSWICH, in Suffolk.

KIng Iohn in the fifth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Canons of the Church of the holy Trinity at Gypewic, the several Lands, Chur­ches, and Possession, given them by many Benefactors, among the rest a Fair to last for three days at the Feast of the holy Cross in September.

296 FINSHEVED, in Northamptonshire.

FOunded and endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions by Ri­chard 297 Engaine, Lord of Blatherwick, in the Reign of King Iohn. Af­ter the year 1367 the Male Line of the said Founder failing, his estate be­came divided among three Sisters, married to the Families of Goldinton, Pabenham, and Bernake. Iohn Engayne gave divers Lands in Blatherwick 298 and Laxton, to the Canons of the blessed Mary of Finnisheved for the maintenance of two Chaplains in the Chappel at Finnisheved, and two other Chaplains in the Chappel of Blatherwick.

[Valued at 56 l. 10 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

KEINSHAM, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded by William Earl of Gloucester, at the desire of Robert his Son, then dying. Dedicated to God, the blessed Mary, and the Apostles 299 St. Peter and St. Paul. Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford confirm'd the several Lands, Possessions and Liberties, given to the Ca­nons of this House, and so did also King Edward II. An. Reg. 11.

KIRTMELE, in Lancashire.

300 WIlliam Marescallus founded and endow'd this Priory for Canons, providing that it should always remain a Priory independent of 301 any other House, yet it should never be made an Abby, and upon the death of the Prior, two Canons to be chosen and presented to him or his heirs, of which he or his heirs to elect one to be made Prior. Confirm'd by King Edward II. An. Reg. 17.

LESNES, in Kent.

FOunded by Richard Lucy Prefect of England, An. 1178. In the year 302 1179, the same Richard quitting his Office of Chief Justice, became [Page 165] himself a Canon Regular of this House, and soon after died and was here. buried. The Lands and Possessions given to these Canons by their foun­der, and others, were confirm'd to them by King Iohn, and King Edward. II.

BURSCOUGH, in Lancashire.303

FOunded and endow'd with large Possessions by Robert Lord of La­thom. King Edward I. granted to these Canons to have a mercate e­very Thursday, and a Fair for five days at the Feast of the Decollation of St. Iohn Baptist yearly, at their Mannour of Ormeskirk. Walter Lord of Scare­sbrek 304 and many others were Benefactors, all whose gifts were recited and 305 confirm'd by King Edward. II. An. Reg. 17.

[Valued at 80 l. 7 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

STEVERDALE, in Somersetshire.306

RIchard Lovel Chivaler, gave certain Lands of the value of 40 s. to the Prior and Convent here for the finding of one Chaplain to celebrate daily for the Souls of the said Richard and his Ancestors, in the Church of this Priory. This House was founded by the Ancestors of Richard de Sancto maure; and united to the Monastery of Taunton, 24. Henry. VIII.307

DODFORD, in Worcestershire.

FOunded and endow'd by King Henry I. But in process of time the Revenues of this House being so decay'd that there remain'd here but one Canon, it was united to the Abby of Hales Owen, An. 4. Edward IV.308

The Abby de PRATIS, near Leicester.

FOunded An. 1143. by Robert Earl of Melent and Leicester, and largely endow'd by him and others with Churches, Lands, Rents, Tithes, and Liberties, in and about Leicester and elsewhere with the grant 309 of two Bucks yearly, one at the Feast of the Assumption, and one at the Feast of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, &c. Margaret de Quincy granted to the 310 Canons here divers Possessions, among other things House-bote and hay­bote, and timber for repairs, out of her Forrest of Charnwood, as often as occasion requires; also one Buck yearly out of the said Forrest. Roger de Quincy granted them among other things the right Shoulder of every Deer taken in his Park of Acle, and free pasture for all their Cattle throughout the Forrest of Leicester. Their Possessions were confirm'd by King Steven, 311 and King Henry. II. Robert Earl of Mellent came into England with 312 the Conqueror who gave him the Earldom of Leicester, which City being destroy'd with the Castle there, he re-edified the Church of St, Mary in the said Castle, and placed in it twelve Secular Canons and a Dean, ap­propriating thereunto all the Churches in Leicester (except St. Margarets which is a Prebend of Lincoln) with divers Lands. Robert his Son and Heir having sounded the Abby de Pratis transferred all the Possessions [Page 166] and Prebends of the Church of St. Mary to his new built Abby. This last mentioned Robert (commonly call'd Bossu) took the Habit of a Canon Regular in this Abby, and died here, An. 1167. He also founded an Abby of Monks at Geroudon, and a Nunnery at Eaton, in, which his Countess Amicia became a Nun. After some time the Male Line of this Robert failing, the Estate became divided between two Sisters Co-heirs, Amicia married to Simon de Montefort, and Margaret married to Sayer de 315 Quincy. These Canons had also a Grant of one Load of Wood, daily, out of the Forrest of Leicester, ad focum domus infirmariae Canonicorum, for Fewel to serve in the Infirmary.

[Valued at 951 l. 14 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum.]

316 GRIMESBY, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the I. founded and endowed this Priory, granting to the Canons here among other things, the tenth Penny of all his Farmes in Leiseby, and Grymesby, and the Tith of all Fish in his Port of Honflet, in pure and perpetual Alms, with large Liberties and Immuni­ties. All which were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 9 l. 14 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

St. THOMAS the Martyr near Stafford.

FOunded by Richard Peche (Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, 1162.) who in his later days became a Canon Regular in this House, in which Habit he died and was buried; his Episcopal Habit being taken away by his Cosin G. Peche a Monk of Coventry. Robert de Ferrars Earl of Derby 317 gave to this Priory certain Lands together with his Body, after his decease, to be buried here.

[Valued at 141 l. 13 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

NEW-STEAD, in the Forrest of Sherwood, in Nottinghamshire.

FOunded by King Henry the II. for Canons Regular, to whom he gave the Town and Church of Paplewic and other Lands, with large Liber­ties. 318 Also two great Wastes called Kygell, and Ravenshede. King Iohn while Earl of Morton gave other Lands, all which he confirm'd after he was King, An. 6.

[Valued at 167 l. 16 s. 11 d. ob. per Annum.]

319 HICKLING, in Norfolk.

FOunded and endow'd by Theobaldus de Valeines. Confirm'd by King Iohn, An. Reg. 5.

[Valued at 100 l. 18 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

STONELEY, near Kimbolton, in Huntingtonshire.

THIS was a Prioy of seven Canons, founded by William Mandeville Earl of Essex To this House the Rectory of Kymolton was appro­priated. The Bigrames were Benefactors and lay here buried.

[Valued at 46 l. 0 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum]

MODBERLEY, in Cheshire.320

FOunded by Patricius de Modberley for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with several Lands and Commons of Pasture. He also granted the Canons free power, upon the decease of their Prior, to elect another according to their own pleasure.

SPINEY, in Cambridgeshire.

FIRST founded by Beatrice Malebisse one of the Co-heirs of the Lord­ship of Wikes, within the said Lordship, for three Canons Regular. Afterwards Maria de Basingburne, encreased the number to four, two of which were to come daily and officiate in the Church of Wykes. She 321 also gave a Messuage and other Lands for the Prior and Canons to main­tain therein seven Poor men, allowing to each daily a Loaf of a Farthing, and among all a measure of Ale of a Penny, to each three Ells of Linnen Cloath at two pence per Ell, and every two years a Woollen Garment price two shillings and six pence, &c. Also to make three distributions of Alms per Annum to three thousand poor People. But these Charges being found to extend to much more then the Revenue of the Lands by her given, Richard Aithilwald and Matilda his Wife Cousin and Heir of the Foundresses, did An. 6. H. 5. release the coming of the two Canons to the Church of Wykes, and changed the three distributions abovesaid, to the giving thirteen shillings and four pence yearly in Alms to the Poor of Wykes, &c. King Henry the VI. An 27. granted his License to the Prior and Convent of this House to give their Convent and all their Revenues to the Prior and Convent of Ely. 322

MOTESFONT, in Hantshire.

FOunded by William Briwer who endowed this Priory with divers Lands, and gave his Mannor of Merton for the maintenance of four poor men in Diet and Aparel, &c. Divers others were great Benefactors, among whom Peter de Rivallis Brother of the Founder then commonly call'd The Holy Man in the Wall: Alienora Wife of King Edward the I. gave divers Possessions for an Anniversary, and for daily Alms to seven poor Wi­dows, &c. Confirm'd by Margery de la Ferte or Feritate Daughter of William Briwer, and Co heir after the death of William her Brother; Wil­liam 324 Son of Reginald de Brus married Grace eldest Daughter and Co-heir [Page 168] 325 of this William Brewere, from whom descended four Daughters, married to the Earl of Hereford, Cantelow, Fitzherbert, and Mortemer. The Estate of these Canons was confirm'd by King Iohn, An. 6.

[Valued at 1 [...] 4 l. 3 s. 5 d. ob. per Annum.]

326 FRITHELSTOKE, in Devonshire.

IT was found by Inquisition 15 Iohn. That Robert Son of Robert de Bello Campo founded and endow'd the Priory of Canons here dedicated to God, the blessed Mary and St. George; saving to the Patrons the liber­ty of appointing one to guard the Gare of the said Priory in time of Va­cation, and take care that the Goods of the same be not wasted, the said Guardian to have nothing but his sustenence, and upon confirmation of a new Prior to retire.

[Valued at 127 l. 2 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

WROXTON, in Oxfordshire.

FOunded by Master Michael Belet in the time of Hugh Bishop of Lin­coln, and by him endowed with his Mannors of Wroxton, where it was founded, and Thorpe near Rowell in Northamptonshire. Confirm'd by King Hen. the III. with Liberties of Sac and Soc, &c.

[Valued at 78 l. 13 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

327 DE PRATO, between North-Creyke and Burnham, in Norfolk.

ANno 1206. Robert de Nerford founded a Church here, which Robert was principal Warden of Dover Castle under Hubert de Burgo then Chief Justice of England. He also built a Chappel to the honour of St. 328 Bartholomew with an Hospital for thirteen poor men, and four Chaplains and a Master. After the death of the said Founder, the said Master and his Brethren took the Habit of Canons Regular, and from that time were called Prior and Canons. The Chappel and new erected Priory was de­dicated, An. 1221. Alice Widow of the said Robert made several Orders for the Government of the said Hospital, among others that the Brethren 329 who should be admitted into the said Hospital should at their entry pro­mise Chastity, and Obedience to the Master, that none should have pro­perty, and that a Light should burn night and day in the Church. After that the said Alice confirm'd with Warranty all the Lands and Possessions given to this House, to the Canons for the same. She at last convey'd the Advowson and Patronage of this Priory of King Hen. the III. who made it an Abby, and confirm'd all their Possessions, An. Reg. 15.

ACORNBURY, in Herefordshire.330

THE Lady Margery de Lacy founded this Priory for Nuns, and en­dow'd it with the Forrest of Acornbury, as was found by Inquisition, An. 49. H. 3. which King in the fiftieth year of his Reign confirm'd their Estate. Catherine de Lacy Daughter of the Foundress gave certain Lands to 331 these Nuns for the finding of a Chaplain to celebrate daily in their Church for the Souls of her Ancestors, and in case the said service should not be duly performed, then the Bishop of Hereford to compel the Prioress and Nuns to the performance. Margaret Widow of Walter de Clifford gave her Heart to these Nuns, to be buried in their Church, and with her Heart, fifteen Marks sterling, in Alms; this was by Deed dated, 1260.332 Iohn de Breuse gave to the Nuns of Cornebery the Rents of ten (Burgagia) Borough houses in Tettebiri, which Gift was confirm'd by William his Son, 18 E. 1.

[Valued at 67 l. 13 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

BILSINGTON, in Kent.333

FOunded An. 1258. by Iohn Mansel Provost of Beverley, who endow'd it with certain Lands'n Bilsington, and granted that upon the death or the Prior, the Superior and Convent should have the Custody of their own House and all their Possessions, and might proceed to the Election of a new Prior without License first obtain'd from any one. Some of the Lands of this Priory being overflow'd by the Sea, King Edw. the III. granted 334 the Canons License to drain, and include the same with Walls according to the Law of the Marish. This was after a writ of ad quod dampnum first sued out and return'd.

[Valued at 81 l. 1 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

BRADLEY, in Leicesterstire.

FOunded by Robert Bundy, it had but two Canons. Of later time, the Lord Scrope had the Patronage.

[Valued at 20 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

MICHELHAM, in Sussex.

FOunded by Gilbert de Aquila in honour of the Holy Trinity, for Ca­nons, and endowed with divers Lands, free Pastures, and Priviledges in his Wood Grounds in Suffex. All which with other Lands given by many other Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II.335 An. Reg. 14.

[Valued at 160 l. 12 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

336 RATLINGCOPE, in Shropshire.

LEwelin Prince of North-Wales granted his Letters of Protection to the Canons of this House, to exempt them and theirs, from all Rapine and Depredation or any other molestation by the bordering Welch, and this was on the account of one Walter Corbet a Canon of this House, his Kinsman.

337 RAVENSTON, in Lincolnshire.

PEter Chaceport Keeper of the Kings Wardrobe, having bought certain Lands here with the Advowson of the Church, Hugh his Son and Heir surrender'd them into the hands of King Henry the III. who with them founded and endow'd a Priory of Canons, granting them to have the cu­stody of their own House in time of vacation, and not to be charg'd with 338 any Sustentation or Pension to any Clerk, Servant, &c. or keeping any of the Kings Horses.

GLANNAUCH, in Wales.

FOunded and endow'd by Lewellin Prince of North-Wales, An. 1221. After him several other Welch Princes confirm'd the Estate and Pos­sessions of the Canons of the Isle of Glannauch. So also did King Edw. the I. An. Reg. 23.

339 CHETWODE, in Buckinghamshire.

FOunded by Robert Grosteste Bishop of Lincoln. Here was formerly a Hermitage and Chappel of the holy Martyrs St. Steven and St. Lau­rence, founded by Sir Robert de Chetwode Knt. It was vulgarly called a Hermitage, not that it was the Habitation of a Hermit, but because it was 340 situated in a solitary Place. This Priory was given with all its Possessions to the Abby of Notteley, 1 E. 4.

341 LACOCK, in Wiltshire.

FOunded by Ela Widow of William Longaspata, for Nuns, among whom she her self took the Habit, An. 1236. and after became Abbess of this House. This William Longespee was Son of King Henry the II. and Earl of Rosmar and Salisbury in Right of Ela his Wife, descended from Wal­ter de Ewrons, to whom King William gave the said Earldom of Salisbury. 342 The said Countess Ela founded two Monasteries in one day, viz. 16 Cal. Maii, Anno. Dom. 1232 Namely Henton for Carthusians, and this of La­cock for Canonesses. The said Ela became Abbess here, An. 1240. resign'd An. 1257. died 1261. aged 74.

[Valued at 168 l. 9 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

SELEBURNE, in Hantshire.343

FOunded by Peter de Rupibus Bishop of Winchester, and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Churches, saving to the Vicars of the said Churches a Sufficient sustentation, the Presentation to the said Vicarages to belong to the Prior and Canons,

KIRKBY Beler, in Leicestershire.344

ANno 13 Edward I. Roger Beler of Kirkeby founded a House of one Custos and 12 Chaplains to Celebrate in the Chappel of St. Peter at Kirkby, and gave them the Advowson of the said Church, and the Man­nour of Buckminster. Vid inf. 246.

[Valued at 142 l. 10 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

ASHERUGGE, in Buckinghamshire.

EDmund Son of Richard King of the Romans and Earl of Cornwal, founded here a House for a Rector of Good men Brothers of the Church, in honour of the precious bloud of J [...]sus Christ; here were to be 20 Brethren, of which 13 at least to be Priests. For the maintenance of 345 these he gave divers Lands, Possessions, Liberties, and Priviledges, among other things to be free and quit of all Tolls, &c. and to be quit of Scutage as oft as it should happen; also to have the Custody of their own 346 House on the death of their Rector, and Liberty to chose another with­out presenting him to the Patron. Vid. infra.

[Valued at 416 l. 16 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

KIRKBY Belar.

AN. 1326. Roger Beler was slain in Leicester. After whose death, his Widow with the assent of his Son and heir translated the Chantry of secular Priests by him founded at Kirkly to the use of Canons Regular, of whom the first Prior came from the Abby of Olustone (Ouston).

The issue of Roger Belar the first Founder failing, the Bishop of Lincoln, became Patron.

More of ASHRU'G.

THe Lord Edmund Earl of Cornwal, who founded this House of Reli­gious Men call'd Bonos homines, or Bonhomes, was buryed in the Church here, wherein was carefully preserved a small parcel of our Lords Bloud, with the heart of Thomas de Cantilupo Bishop of Hereford the ho­ly Confessor, and other Reliques.

RIGATE, in Surrey

SEems to be founded by some of the Warens Earls of Surrey, Iohn de Waren Earl of Surrey released to the Canons of this House a Rent of 19 s. 4 d. one plow-share, four horse-shooes and nails, which the said Canons used to pay yearly to his Ancestors for certain Tenements in Rey­gate, 347 he also granted to these Canons 46 s. 11 d. per Annum. for the Cele­brateing one Mas [...]e daily in his Castle of Reygate, for ever.

[Valued at 68 l. 16 s. 8 d. per Annum.]

HALTEMPRISE, in Yorkshire.

THis Monastery was first founded and endow'd at Cottingham by Thomas Wake, Lord of Lydel, with License of King Edw. II. Pope Iohn XXII. granted to the said Thomas Wake Liberty to translate the said 348 Monastery from thence to Altemprise. The said Thomas Wake granted to the Canons, Regular of this House several Mannours and Lands with 349 Great Liberties of Leets, &c. and Commons of Pasture, &c. in pure and per­petual Alms, with general Warranty. Iohn de Meaux of Bewyke by his Deed dated An. 1361 (31 Edward III.) gave to the Prior and Con­vent of this House his Mannour of Willardby, &c. conditionally for fix Canons to celebrate for the Souls of him and his Ancestors, &c. Matins Masse, Vespers and Complin, &c. and in the case of non performance of the Conditions his heirs to re-enter.

[Valued at 100 l. 0 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

351 BADLESMERE, in Kent.

KIng Edward II. An. 13. granted his License to Bartholmew de Bad­lesmere to found and endow a House of Canons Regular in his Man­nour of Badlesmere, with a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

MAXSTOKE, in Warwickshire.

FOunded by William Clinton Earl of Huntington, in honour of the ho­ly Trinity, the Blessed Virgin, St. Michael, and all the Saints, for Ca­nons 352 Regular, viz. One Prior elective, and a Convent of twelve Canons. In whose deed of Foundation, dated An. 1336, he appointed several Or­dinances relating to their habit, the Election of the Prior, none to med­dle with the Custody of the [...] House in time of the Vacation but who the Superior and Convent shall appoint, Of the quality of such as are to be re­ceived for Canons, Of the Number of Canons to be encreased, as the Re­venue 353 increases, The Prior and Convent not to sell or grant any Cor­rodies or Pensions unlesse compelled by inevitable necessity, Of the Ac­compt, Of the founders Anniversary, Of the number of Masses, That at the end of every Office of our Lady the Priest who Officiate shall say the Angelic Salutation, in manner following, Ave Maria gracia plena Domi­nus'tecum, Benedicta tu in Mulieribus & benedictus fructus ventris tui Ihesus, [Page 173] Amen. Et benedicta sit venerabilis mater tua Anna, exqua tua Caro virginea & immaculata processit. Amen. With some other Orders; all which were 354 confirm'd by Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, An. 1337. King Edw. the III. granted his License to these Canons to exchange their Man­nor of Shustoke, for certain Lands in Maxstoke.

[Valued at 87 l. 12 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

BISHAM, in Barkshire.355

FOunded by William de Monteacuto Earl of Sarum and Lord of Man, and Dynbeghe, who by his Deed dated An. 1338. endow'd the Ca­nons here with divers Lands, Churches, and Rents, and granted that up­on the death of the Prior, neither he nor his Heirs should intermeddle with Custody of the House, or any of their Possessions. King Henry the V.356 An. 8. gave License to Matilda Widow of Iohn de Monteacuto Earl of Sarum, to remove the Bones of her said Husband buried in the Abby of Cirencester, to this Priory of Bustlesham and bury them here.

[Valued at 285 l. 11 s. ob. per Annum.]

FLANESFORD, in Herefordshire.

FOunded by Richard Talebot, in honour of God, St. Mary the Virgin, and St. Iohn Baptist, for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions, which Lands being held of the King in Capite, King Edw. the III. An. 20. granted his License for so doing.

[Valued at 14 l. 8 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

EDINDON, in Wiltshire.357

WIlliam de Edindon Bishop of Winchester being born in this Town, founded in the Parish-Church of Edindon a perpetual Chantry for Secular Chaplains, and endow'd the same with sufficient Revenues, but being afterwards minded to turn the same to a Priory of Brethren of St. Augustines Order called Boni homines (or Bonhomes) he laid the Founda­tion of a Monastery, An. 1352. which was dedicated in honour of St. Iames the Apostle, St. Catherine, and all Saints, by Robert Bishop of Sarum, An. 1361. William de Edyndon the Founder died, An. 1366.

[Valued at 442 l. 9 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

DERTFORD, in Kent.

FOunded by King Edward the III. for Nuns of St. Augustines Order, living under the Care of the Friers of the Order of Preachers, and and by him endow'd with Lands and Reven [...]es in Kent, and elsewhere,358 they enjoy'd also divers Houses and Rents in London, all which was con­firm'd to them to hold in Frankalmoine, by the Grant of the said King,359 dated in the six and fortieth year of his Reign. King Richard II. [Page 174] An. 8. granted to the Prioress land Convent of this House (Monasteri­um Sororum Praedicatissarum de Derford) the Mannor of Massingham in Nor­folk with its Fairs, Markets, and Liberties, &c. for the finding of one Chap­lain to celebrate in the Chappel of the Infirmary of this House, and for the Relief and Sustentation of the Sisters and Brethren in the said Infir­mary.

[Valued at 380 l. 9 s. ob. per Annum.]

360 SYON, in Middlesex.

FOunded by King Henry the V. An. Reg. 2. To the honour of the holy Trinity, the glorious Virgin Mary, the Apostles and Disciples of God, and all Saints, especially St. Briget, for sixty Nuns of which num­ber one to be Abbess, of the Order of St. Augustin, and for five and twenty Religious Men, of which number thirteen to be Priests, four Deacons, and eight Laymen, all to be under the Government of the Consessor. To live separately, viz. The Nuns in a part of the House by themselves, and the Consessor and Brothers in a part distinct, chastely both in mind and body, according to the Regular Institute of St. Bridget. This Religious 361 House was founded in his Mannor of Istelworth in the Parish of Twykenham, near the Thames, and called by the name of the Monastery of St. Saviour, and St. Briget of Syon, of the Order of St. Augustin: by which name or Title the said Abbess and Nuns were enabled to purchase Lands, to sue, and be sued. Matilda Newton was appointed the first Abbess, and Wil­liam Alnewyk the first Confessor. The said King Henry the V. endow'd this House with the Rent of one thousand Marks to be paid yearly out of the Exchequer, till he or his Heirs should settle Lands of that value.

[Valued at 1731 l. 8 s. 4 d. ob. per Annum.]

362 SOme other Houses are reckon'd of this Order, of which there remains little or nothing of note but only their Names, which are Flixton, in Suffolk; Hempton, in suffolk; Leyes, in Norfolk; Wodebrigge, in Essex; Vlve­scrofte, in Leicester shire; St. Iohn Baptist at Exeter; Canonleghe, in Devonshire; Shelbrede, in Sussex; Torpington, in Sussex; Merkeby, in Lincoln; Wes [...]wde, Kent; St. Iohn, Northampton.

Hospitals for the Infirme, Of St. AUGUSTINS Order.

It was Decreed in the Council of Lateran, An. Dom. 1179. That where a Number of Leperous People are gather'd to­gether 365 in Community they shall be permitted to enjoy to themselves a Church, Church [...] yard, and Priest of their own. But they must take care that this be no ways injurious or pre­judicial to the Rights of Parish-Churches. Yet shall not the Leprous or Lazer-houses be compelled to pay Tithes of the increase of their own proper Cattle.

St. LEONARD's Hospital, in York.367

ANno Dom. 800. King Egbert in a Parliament at Winchester, chang'd the name of his Kingdom of Britain, into that of England. A. 924. Athestan succeeding his Father King Edward the elder in this Kingdom, he substituted Ho [...]el, King of Wales, and Constantin, King of Scotland, saying, it was more glorious to make a King than to be one. Which Constantin (more Scot­torum perjurium non timens (they are the Authors words) soon after rebell'd against him, and wasted the Northern parts about Northumberland. Here­upon King Athelstan rais'd an Army and in his Journey towards Scotland made his Supplications to God for Victory, at Beverlay, York, and Dur­ham; after which he overcame Constantin; and imploring Almighty God to shew some token whereby the present and future Ages might know that the Scots ought to be subject to the Kings of England, he strook his Sword into a Rock of Stone near Dunbar Castle, and made therein a gash of an Ell deep, which remains (says my Author) to this day. This King returning out of Scotland Victorious, did divers works of Charity, in par­ticular, he gave to the Clergy or Ministers of the Church of St. Peter at York, call'd Colidei, for the better Relief of the Poor, and Maintenance 368 of Hospitallity, certain Revenues, and a piece of Ground for erection of an Hospital; which Hospital when built was call'd the Hospi­tal of St. Peter, until the Reign of King Steven, who built there a Church in honour of St. Leonard, after which it was called the Hospital of St. Leonard. King William Rusus, King Henry the I. King Hen. the II.369 and others were Benefactors to this Hospital. Walter de Langton Master 370 of this Hospital in the 22 E. 1. made certain Orders for Government of the Brothers and Sisters in the same, containing an exact direction how the Chaplains were to spend the day both in the Church and out of it, in their Religious Offices, &c. That the Lay Brothers should not go beyond the Door of the Nave of the Church unless in processions, that the Si­sters 371 have a convenient place appointed for them in the Church, that [Page 176] neither any of them, nor the Lay-Brothers, go out of the Bounds of the Hospital without leave, &c.

[Valued at 362 l. 11 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

CARMANS Spittle, in Yorkshire.

372 FOunded by one Acehorne in the time of King Athelstan, for one Alder­man and fourteen Brothers and Sisters, in the Town of Flixton. Designed for the Relief of Travellers that they might not be exposed to Wolves and other wild Beasts of the Woods; the said Founder endowing it with divers Possessions in Flixton, with common of Pasture for twenty four Cows and one Bull, &c. The Vicar of the Church of Folketon, in which Parish this Hospital was situate, was used yearly on the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, to cellebrate a Solemn Mass in the Chappel of this Hospital; the Assistants at which Mass enjoy'd several Indulgences. 373 King Henry the VI. An. 25. confirm'd the Possessions and Liberties of this Hospital naming it for the future Carmans Spitell.

St. GREGORY's Hospital, in Canterbury.

FOunded by Lansranc Archbishop of Canterbury without the North­Gate of the City. For infirm Men, and Women to live a part in separate Divisions of the House. The said Lanfranc built near this Hospi­tal a Church in honour of St. Gregory the Pope, placing Canons therein 374 who were to take care of the Souls of the said Poor, and were to receive their Provision daily from the Hospital, these Canons were endow'd with fair Revenues, which in the year 1384. were taxt or estimated in the whole at 133 l. 15 s. These Canons were at first Secular, as establisht, by 375 Lanfranc, but afterwards they were changed into Regulars by William Archbishop of Canterbury.

[Valued at 121 l. 15 s. 1 d. per Annum.]

BRACKLEY, in Northamptonshire.

RObert Earl of Mellent, who came into England with the Conqueror, founded this Hospital, where his Heart was kept intire, preserved with Salt. An. 6 Hen. 5. Matilda Widow of Iohn Lord Lovel granted her Mannor of Bagworth and Thornton in Leicestershire to certain Trustees and their Heirs, for them to grant to Thomas Coltone, and several others then Members of this Hospital, Pensions for Life; and by another Deed dated 8 H. 5. declared her Intention and Will to be to change this Ho­spital into a Priory of Friers, Preachers, consisting of twelve and a Prior, the Kings License being first obtain'd; after which the said Trustees to re­enseoff her or her Heirs with the said Mannor, or convey it to them back again. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 83.

St. JULIANS near St. Albans, in Hertfordshire.376

THe Church and House of St. Iulian near Eyewode was founded for Lazares; by Gaufridus Abbot of St. Albans with the advice and con­sent of his Convent, and endow'd with divers Tithes and parcells of Tithes in St. Albans, Bradewey, and elsewhere. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. For the Government of these Brethren several Orders were made, as that their Habit should be a Tunick, and Supertunick of plain Rus­sit,377 that they should be single, or if married to separate from their Wives, both parties being willing; that no Woman should enter into the 378 House except the common Laundress, or a Mother, or Sister, to visit their Relation when sick with License of the Custos, that every Brother at his admitance should make Oath to obey the Abbot of St. Albans and his Archdeacon, &c.

RIPPON, in Yorkshire.380

FOund by Inquisition, that it was founded by Thurstan Archbishop of York, for the Relief of Poor and Leprous People. Endow'd with Revenues given at first to certain Sisters who lived here, wherewith to find a Chaplain to celebrate in the said Hospital, and to relieve all such Leperous People, who, being born in Ripschire, should repair to this House, where they were to receive one Garment called Bak, and two pair of Shooes per Annum, and every day to each man one Loaf, half a Flagon of Ale, &c. Which said Sisters being dead, the Archbishop that then was gave the Hospital to the Possession and Government of a Master and certain Chaplains, but in time Leperous People decaying, in the 15 E. 3. there were neither Brothers nor Sisters in this Hospital, otherwise it remain'd as it ought. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 89.

St. GILES, in the S [...]burbs of London.381

QUeen Maud Wife of King Henry the I. built on the West side of London a House for the Relief of Leperous People, with an Oratory, and call'd it the Hospital of St. Giles. It was endowed with several Re­venues by the said Queen and others, all which were confirmed by her Grandson King Henry the II. Vid. ins. p. 400.

St. MARY of Bethelem without Bishopsgate, in the Suburbs of London.

SImon Fitz Mary Cittizen of London, having an extraordinary affection to the memory of the Incarnation and Nativity of our Saviour which was wrought in Betholem, gave all his Lands in the Parish of St. Butolph 382 without Bishopsgate, to a Church of St. Mary of Bethelem by him there erected, and for the instituting of a Priory of a Prior, Canons, Brethren and Sisters, to live according to the Rule and Order of the Church of [Page 178] St. Mary at Bethelem, all which were to wear the Sign of a Star on their outward Garment; this Priory was also for the reception of the Bishop of Bethelem, or any of the Canons or others belonging to that Church when they should come into England, to which Bishop as a sign of Subjection, this Priory was to pay a Mark yearly at the Feast of Easter in nature of a Rent. The Deed of Foundation and Endowment of this House by the said Simon Fitz Mary bears date, An. 1247.

383 St. MARY's Hospital without Bishopsgate, at London.

FOunded by Walter Brun Citizen of London, and Roisia his Wife, on a a parcel of Land given for that purpose by Walter Fitz Aldred Alder­man, and endowed with divers parcells of Land and Rents of Tenements in several Parishes in and about London.

A Composition was made between Iohn Witing Rector of the Church of St. Butolph without Bishopsgate, and Godefrey then Prior,385 and the Canons, and Brethren of this Hospital, about Parochial Rights; containing, that the said Prior should pay to the said Rector, in lieu of Tithes and Offerings for the territory and space of Ground belonging to his Priory, 10 s. yearly, at four quarterly Payments; in all other their Lands without the said Bounds Tithes to be paid; the said Prior and Canons to admit no Parishoner of the said Church to make oblation, or pay any Right that is due to the Parish Church, nor to be buried with them, un­less the Parish Church be first satisfied, and for the Performance hereof the said Prior made Oath before the Bishop of London, and so were all his Successors to do. The first Stone of this Hospital was laid by Walter Archdeacon of London, An. 1197.

[Valued at 478 l. 6 s. 6 d. per Annum.]

386 St. BARTLEMEWS Hospital in the Suburbs of London.

KING Henry the I. granted and confirm'd to the Prior and Canons of St. Bartholomews and to the Poor of the Hospital belonging to that Church, very great Liberties, (Et liberam esse sicut coronam meam) whose 387 Charter bears date An. 1133. (33 H. I.) This Hospital was founded for the receit of all poor infirm People, till such time as they should be cured of their Infirmities, and for the lying in of poor Women, and maintenance of their Children (in case the Mothers should die in Childbed in the Hospital) till the said Children be seven years old. On this Account King Edward the III. freed the Master, Brethren, and Sisters, of this House, from being taxt to the Publick Taxes of that time.

[Valued at 305 l. 6 s. 7 d. per Annum.]

388 St. INNOCENTS near Lincoln.

FOunded by King Henry the I. for ten Lepers and a Warden, with two Chaplains and a Clerk, and endowed with several Rents, &c. as appeared by Inquisition in the Reign of King Edward the III. at which [Page 179] time there was here, nine Brethren and Sisters, and but one of those a Leper, and he taken in not of Charity, but for 100 s. paid for his entrance; here were also seven Women taken in for money, contrary to the first 389 Institution. King Henry the VI. An. 35. granted this Hospital and all the Revenues thereunto belonging, after the death of the then Warden, to William Sutton Master of the Order of Burton, St. Lazarus, Warden of the Hospital of St. Giles of Lepers without London, and to the Brethren of the said Order and their Successors, for the finding and maintenance of three Lepers of the Kings Houshold Servants, if any such shall be, &c.

ILLEFORD, in Essex.390

THis Hospital was Founded by the Abbess and Convent of Barking for thirteen Leperous Brethren, two Chaplains, and a Clerk. For whose Regular Government Ralph de Baldock Bishop of London made Cer­tain Orders, viz. That the Lepers were to be chosen out of the Dem [...]asns of the Abby of Barking if any such there, That the Abbess present to one place, and the Master and Brothers to the next alternately, That no mar­ried Leper shall be admitted unless the Wife is minded to vow Chastity, That every Brother shall constantly frequent the Divine Offices at the Church unless hinder'd by Sickness, &c. That no Woman be admitted 391 to enter the said Hospital, unless the Abbess, near Relations to visit when Sick, or the Common Laundress, and that at open day, That no Leper shall go abroad without special License, That the Abbess shall ap­point the Master of the said Hospital, That every Leper shall at his recepti­on 392 make Oath to live chastly, to be obedient to the Abbess and Convent of Barking, to have nothing in propricty, &c. Which Orders bear date An. Dom. 1346.

[Valued at 16 l. 13 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

St. PETERS in the City of York.

KIng Henry. I. gave and confirm'd to the Hospital of St. Peter at York divers Lands by him, and Eustachius Fitz-Iohn, and others, granted toge­ther with divers Liberties, as Sac & Soc, Tol & Them, &c. and as a more especial Mark of his favour to this House took to himself the name of a Bro­ther and Warden of the same (Frater enim & Custos ejusdem Domus Deisum) The Like did King Henry III. and King Iohn. Their Possessions were 393 also confirm'd by King Henry II. and King Edward I. Other Benefactors 394 were William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarl, Several of the Percys, and 395 Moubrays, &c.

St. MARY MAGDALEN at Colchester, in Essex.396

FOunded by Eudo Seneschal of King Henry I. by that Kings Command. King Richard I. granted to the Lepers of this Hospital a fair two days yearly, viz. on the Vigil and day of St. Mary Magdalen.

St. JOHN, and St. Leonard, at Alesbury, in Buckinghamshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Robert Ilhale, Robert atte Hide, &c. for the maintenance of Leperous and other poor People of Aylesbury; Confirm'd by King Henry I. and King Henry II. These were two Hospitals. That of St. Iohn valued at 33 s. 4 d. per Annum, and that of St. Leonard at 20 s. per Annum. But it was found by Inquisition, 34 Edward III. that for eleven years before, they were both decay'd, and their Possessions come to the hands of Laymen.

397 BURTON Lazers, in Leicestershire.

FOunded for Leperous people by Roger de Moubray, and dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Lazerus of Ierusalem, and by him endow'd with divers Lands in Burton. Nigellus de Moubray granted to this House the Tith of all the Meat and Drink of his Family wherever he should in­habit, and charged his Heirs diligently to perform the same. William de 398 Burdet gave to Burton St. Lazarus, and the infirm Brethren of Ierusalem, the Hospital of Tilton, and the Church of Louseby, &c. Sir Iohn Digby 399 Knight, and Thurbert de Rochebi, &c. were also Benefactors. Confirm'd by King Henry II. and King Iohn. King Edward III. granted to the Master and Brethren of St. Lazarus of Ierusalem in England, Founded for Lepers, and Souldiers that fight against the Enemies of the Cross, to be free and quit of all Tenths, Tallages, and other Aids and Contributions granted or to be granted to the King and his Heirs.

[Valued at 265 l. 10 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

400 St. GILES, without London. Sup. p. 381.

KING Edward the III. An. 27. at the Request of the Master of the Order of Burton St. Lazarus in England, and in consideration of the Release of a yearly Rent of forty Marks formerly granted out of the Exchequer, to the said Master and Brethren of that Order, granted to the said Brethren and their Successors the Custody of the Hospital of St. Giles without London.

YARUM, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Alan de Wilton, who gave to this Hospital divers Lands 401 in Hooton to hold at the yearly Rent of two Marks, also other Lands in Mydilton, for the maintenance of three Chaplains in the said Hospital, and thirteen poor people. The same Alan did after wards grant this Hospi­tal and all its Appurtenances in pure and perpetual Alms, to the Canons of Helagh-Park. The like grant was made to the said Canons by Peter de 402 Brus, which Peter de Brus gave'divers Lands to the Brethren of this Hospi­tal, with free grinding in all his Mills, and free Pasture for all their pro­per Cattle, in his Land.

St. JAMES near Westminster.

THE Master of the Hospital of St. Iames near Westminster being sum­mon'd in a Quo Waranto, 22 E. 1. appear'd and pleaded, that King Henry the III. granted to the Leperous Women of St. Iames without London, near Westminster, their Lands then given, or to be given, to be held with Soc, and Sak, Thol and Them; and that King Edward the I. granted them a Fair yearly on the Vigil, day, and Morrow of St. Iames, and for four days following, & profert, &c. Ideo predictus Magister, quoad hoc sine die, &c.

TANREGGE, in Surrey.403

O Do Dammartin gave to God and the Hospital of St. Iames in his Vil­lage of Tanregge, and to three Priests there serving God, certain Lands, &c. for the maintenance of Infirm and poor People, and Travellers, he also gave them his Relicks, two Silver Cups for the making a Chalice, with all the Vestments, Books and other Furniture of his own Chappel.

[Valued at 78 l. 8 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

St. JOHN BAPTIST at Stamford, in Lincolnshire.

THIS Hospital dedicated to St. Iohn Baptist and St. Thomas the Mar­tyr, consisting of a Master and Brethren, was founded by one Syward; among other Benefactors were Richard de Humez and Bertran de Verdun who gave part of a Meadow lying near the Bridge towards the North, wherein to build a Church and make a Coemitery. Confirm'd by King Richard I. and by Pope Alexander. It was situated at the end of Stamford-Bridge, on the South-side; for the Reception of Travellers and poor people.404

SAUTINGEFELD, near Wytsande.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd divers Lands to this Hospital and to the Brethren here serving God.

SCARDEBURGH, in Yorkshire.

THE Hospitals of St. Nicholas, and St. Thomas the Martyr, were e­rected by certain Burgesses of Scardeburgh, and were both under the Inspection of the Bayliffs and Burgesses of that Town, &c. as was found by Inquisition, An. 26 Edw. the I.

405 St. GILES, without Shrewsbury.

KING Henry the II. granted to the Poor of this House a Rent of 30 s. out of his Farm of Shropshire. King Henry the III. granted them out of every Sack of Corn coming to Shrewsbury Market, a handful of both hands, and out of every Sack of Wheat a handful of one hand, also a Horse-load of dead Wood daily in his Wood call'd Linewood, for their firing.

ROMENALE, in Kent.

FIRST founded by Adam de Cherrings in honour of the blessed Mar­tyrs St. Steven, and St. Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury, and by him endow'd with Lands, Rents, and Possessions for the maintenance of cer­tain Lepers, and one Chaplain. But in process of time this Hospital be­coming decay'd and neglected, by reason, chiefly, that no Lepers could be found to inhabit here for many years, Iohn Franceys Patron of this Hospi­tal, An. 37. Edward the III. in order to revive and restore the same, made divers Orders, viz. That in lieu of the Lepers that used to be here, there should for the future be two Priests to celebrate for the Founders and 406 Benefactors, one of which to be Custos or Master, to be instituted and inducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and to be Resident, which two Priests shall celebrate daily in the Chappel of this Hospital, Matins, and the Canonical hours; that upon the death of the Custos, the Patron to present another to the Archbishop of Canterbury to be admitted Custos, within the space of two Months, or in default of the Patron, the Jurates of the Town of Romenale, or the major part of them, &c.

407 St. BARTHOLMEWS without Oxford.

THE following Orders were made in the Parliament at Lincoln, An. 9. Edward the II. That there should be fix infirm Brothers of this Hospital, and two found Brothers to labour about the Affairs of the House, each of which eight, to receive 9 d. a Week, that there should be a Priest to be the Master of the said Hospital to say Mass daily, and to administer the Sacraments to the Infirm, his Salary fix Marks per Annum. Queen Margaret Widow of Edward the I. was during her Life Patroness and Visitor, and after her death the King or his Chancellor. The said King Edward the II. An. 14. granted his License, the former Ordina­tion 408 non obstante, for the Master and Brothers of this Hospital to admit Iohn Serthe into the next void Place, the said Iohn having given eighteen Marks, to the Repairs of the Chappel, then ruinous.

MAIDEN-BRADLEY, in Wiltshire.

MAnserus Byset, a Baron, did first institute this House for Leperous Women, and appointed there certain Secular Priests, who he na­med Curators of the Women. Hubert Bishop of Salisbury translated those Priests into Canons Regular. The Church of Kiderminster was appropri­ated 409 to this House, by Roger Bishop of Worcester, after the death of Ro­bert then Parson. This Manserus, or Manasserus Byset was Dapiser, or Sew­er, to King Henry II. King Henry III. confirm'd the several Lands and Possessions given to the Leperous Sisters of Maiden-Brad [...]egh, and to the Prior and Brethren there.

[Valued at 180 l. 10 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

St. THOMAS of Acon, in London.411

KIng Edw. III. A. 14. confirm'd to the Master and Brethren of this Ho­spital divers Lands, Tenements, and Rents in London, and elsewhere. as Westhame, Stratford, Bromley, and Stepney, &c. Ieffrey Fitz Peter Earl of Essex granted to the Brethren of this Hospital of St. Thomas the Mar­tyr of Acon, the Custody of the Hospital of St. Iohn Evangelist at Ber­chamstede. 412

Anno 23. Heney the VI. Iohn Neel then Master, and his Brethren of this House, exhibited their Petition in Parliament, setting forth, that Thomas Son of Theobald de Helles, and Agnes his Wife, Sister of St. Thomas the Martyr Archbishop of Canterbury, gave to the Master and Brethren of this House then being, all the Land with the Appurtenances sometimes belonging to Gilbert Beckit Father of the said St. Thomas, in which Land the said Martyr was born, to make there a Church in Worship of God, the blessed Virgin, and the said Martyr, which Lands lye in the Parish of St. Mary of Colchirche in London, that the Endowment of the said Hospi­tal was enlarg'd by King Henry the III. An. 52. in which house have al­ways been, ever since, a Master and Brethren prosessing the Rule of St. Austin, and Priests and Clerks to the number of twelve or more, that of old time this House hath been dispoiled, and great part of their Evidences lost and destroyed, they pray therefore that his Majesty by the assent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and by the Authority of this present Par­liament would ordain, stablish and approve, that the Master and Brethren of the House or Hospital of St. Thomas the Martyr of Acres in the City of London, may by that name plead and be impleaded, purchase Lands, have 413 a Common Seal, and choose their own Master, presenting him to the Ordinary, and that they may not be charged with any Corrody or Pension, and that their present Lands and Possessions may be confirm'd to them; all which was granted as desired, by the King, with the advice and assent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in that Parliament, and by Authority of the same.

[Valued at 277 l. 3 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

St. JOHN BAPTIST at Lynn, in Norfolk.

FOunded by Vlfketel Son of the Nun of Sceringes, and by him endow'd with a parcel of Land in Linn, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. The Mayor and Burgesses of Linn did use to present and establish the Master and Warden of this Hospital, till the time of Iohn of Ely Bishop of Norwich.

[Valued at 7 l. 6 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

414 St. MARY MAGDALENS at Lenne.

THomas de Cant. and Robert Winchelsey Archbishops of Canterbury, in their Visitations, and Peter the Chaplain, the Founder, made several Orders for the Government of this Hospital; as, that any Brother being a detractor or vexatious to the rest to be punisht by the Prior and Brethren, and if incorrigible to be expell'd; founded with a Church and Coemitary for twelve Brothers and Sisters, some sound, and some infirm, with a Chaplain; to dwell in the House, the infirm not to come into the Chan­cel, Cellar, Kitchin, or Curtelage, nor to intermeddle with the Offices of the House, to have a Common Seal, &c. All the Brothers and Sisters to have equal Portions in the Revenues with the Prior, if any of the Infirm withdraws himself for one month, his Salary for a year to be forfeited, if for a year, he to be expell'd; a general Chapter to be held yearly the 415 next day after the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen, &c. Which Orders were ratified and confirm'd by William de Turbus Bishop of Norwich, Anno Dom. 1174.

KYNEWALDGRAVES, in Yorkshire.

ROger Archbishop of Tork, and other Archbishops of that See were Be­nefactors to the poor Sisters of this Hospital dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, all confirm'd by Thomas Archbishop of York, An. 1301. Which with many other Possessions by others given were all recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. An. 1.

417 St. MARGARETS, at Huntingdon.

SEems to be founded by Malcolm King of Scotland, who gave to the In­firm of this Hospital, Lands, and Rents, so did Isabel de Brus, Daugh­ter of Earl David; Robert de Brus, Son of the said Isabel, Lord of Anan­dale gave them divers Tenements in Cunyngtone, with view of Frank­pledge to be held there twice per Annum, viz. after Easter, and after Mi­chaelmass, with small Courts to be held there at their Will as ost as expe­dient. The like Grant by Bernard de Bruys, all which was confirm'd to the Master and Brethren of this House by King Edw. III. An. 12.

HORNECHIRCHE, in Essex.
418

THE Master and Confraters of the Hospital of Hornchurch were re­movable at the Will of the Master of the Hospital of St. Bernard de Monte in Savoy, to which Hospital this was only a Cell, having no Common Seal of their own, nor power to sue or be sued.

HERBALDOUNE, in Kent.

FOunded by King Henry II. who assigned to the Lepers of this Hos­pital a Rent of twenty marks per Annum out of his Revenue of Can­terbury, till such time as he assigns them other Provisions in Churches or Rents elsewhere.

[Valued at 109 l. 7 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

St. SEPULCHERS at Hedon in Yorkshire.

ALan Son of Oubernus gave a parcel of Land to God and the Lepers of St. Sepulchres at Hedon; Alexander de Thunestal and many others 419 were Benefactors to this Hospital, all whose Gifts were recited and con­firm'd by King Edw. the II. An. Reg. 19.

HAVERING, in Essex.420

KING Henry the II. gave the Church of Havering to the poor Bre­thren of the Church of St. Bernard de Monte Iovis. Confirm'd to them with other Lands by King Richard the I. and King Henry the III. An. 37.

ELLESHAM, in Lincolnshire.421

THIS Hospital, begun by Beatrix, and finisht and confirm'd by Walter de Amundevil, was by him conferr'd upon Canons Regular,422 to whom he gave divers Lands and Churches, for the maintenance of Ho­spitality and Sustentation of poor People. Confirm'd to the Canons by Iohn Son of William de Dyve, An. Dom. 1277. The abovesaid Walter 423 de Amundevile became a Canon here, and was here buried. The Hospi­tallers of Ierusalem having by fraud obtain'd this House from the then Patron, were by Letter from Pope Alexander, made to relinquish their Pretensions.

[Valued at 70 l. 0 s: 8 d. per Annum.]

St. MARY's at Dover, in Kent.

FOunded by Hubert de Burgo Earl of Kent. King Henry III. An. II. granted to the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital the Tith of all profitsarising from the Passage of the Port of Dover, to hold to them and their Successors in Frankalmoign. The same King, An. 13. granted them a yearly Rent of 10 l. at the feast of St. Michael to be paid out of the profits of his Port of Dover, beside the tith above mention'd. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 86.

424 CONYNGESHED, in Lancashire.

WIlliam de Lancaster gave to God and St. Mary and to the Brethren of this Hospital, all Conyngsheved, and divers other Lands, 425 Possessions, and Commons of Pasture, &c. He also gave the Canons of this House the Advowson of the House of Lepers of St. Leonard at Kirkeby in Kendale, &c. Divers other Benefactors gave Many Lands and parcels, all 427 which were recited and confirm'd by King Edward II. An. 12. Magnus King of Man and the Iles, by his deed dated An. Dom. 1256. granted to the Prior and Convent of this House that their Ships and Goods should be free from toll, and all other demands and Customs, throughout all his Dominions.

St. JOHN Baptist, at Coventry.

LAurence Prior of Coventry, and the Convent there granted the Scite 428 of this House, and the apurtenances, in perpetual Alms for the Receit of Poor and infirm people. And this was at the petition of Edmund Arch­deacon of Coventry. Confirm'd by Richard Archbishop of Canterbury, and by Bull of Pope Honorius III. dated, An. 1221. King Henry III. An. 45. granted to the Brethren and Sisters of this Hospital liberty and protection by themselves or Messengers to ask, gather, and receive Almes abroad, for Releif of their House, for the space of seven years. An. Dom. 1425, Ri­chard Crosby being then Prior of the Cathedral and Regular Church of the Blessed Mary of Coventry, and Thomas Everdon Master or Custos of this Hospital, Several Orders were made for the Government of this House, containing, That the Prior and Convent aforesaid shall be accounted 429 Founders of this Hospital, and Edmund formerly Archdeacon of Coventry Principal Benefactor, that the Master of the Hospital be Subject to the Pri­or, who is to have the placing, Creation, and reception of the said Mast­er and all the Brethren and Sisters, that the said Prior and his Successors may Visit in the said Hospital once a year, attended with eight persons on­ly, 430 the Master to make Oath of Fidelity to the Prior at his admission, the Brothers and Sisters a Promise in Writing sign'd and Seal'd, The Master to be in Priests Orders, the Habit of the Master and Brothers to be of Dark Colour sign'd with a black Crosse, and on their Mantles also a black Crosse; without which habit they ought not to appear abroad, The Master to hold Chapter every Fryday, or however once a week, The Di­vine Offices to be devoutly celebrated in the said Hospital at the usual hours Secundum usum sarum, The Lay Brothers and Sisters that are illerate to say

[Page]
A CANNON HOSPITALLER OF St IOHN BAPTIST AT COVENTRY

Vol.2 P. 428.

[Page] [Page 187] instead of Matins thirty Paters, and as many Aves, with the Creed, and for every of the other hours seven, But those Brothers that have learning, sufficient, to say the Office of the Blessed Virgin; The Sisters to be always intent and Solicitous about the Care and Service of the Infirm in the said Hospital, The Common Seal to be kept under three Keys, one to remain 431 with the Master, the other two with the Senior Brother and Sister, That the Master shall pay predial Tithes to the Prior, but not of Cattle nor Wood, That the said Hospital shall have a free Sepulture for those who choose to be buried with them, &c.

[Valued at 83 l. 3 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

BRUGWALTER in Somersetshire.432

FOunded by William Briewerr, for thirteen poor People, beside Religi­ous men, and Travailers. Several Churches being of the Ad­vowson of the Master and Brethren of this Hospital of St. Iohn Baptist at Brudgwalter, were appropriated hereunto by the Bishop of Bath and Wells 433 and the Bishop of Exeter, An. 1284. The Patronage of this Hospital coming to the hands of the Lord de la Zouche in Custody of King Henry VI. by reason of his Nonage, that King granted his License to the President and Brethren of this House to elect a New Master, on the death of the former.

[Valued at 120 l. 19 s. 1 d. ob. per Annum.]

BRUGENORTH, in Shropshire.

IT was found by Inquisition, 14 Edward IV. that Radulf le Strange Founded and endow'd this Hospital in honour of the blessed Trinity, the Virgin, and St. Iohn Baptist; From which Ralfle Strange did lineally descend Iohn Talbot, created first Earl Salisbury of that name. And it was then 434 further found that the name of Custos of this Hospital was in Process of time changed to that of Prior.

[Valued at 4 l. per Annum.]

St. JOHN'S in the City of Wells.

FIrst Founded by Hugh Bishop of Lincoln. Ioselin Bishop of Bath, and Sir Edmund Lyons were Benefactors. These were so bountiful to this Hospital, that at first this House had two hundred marks of annual Rents.

[Valued at 40 l. o s: 2 d. ob per Annum.]

STRODE, in Kent.

FOunded by Gilbert Bishop of Rochester, for the Receit of Poor, weak and infirm People, as well known, as Strangers, and Travellers, and for their releif with Bed, Meat, and Drink, till they either die or depart in health; The Master or Governour of which House by the name and title [Page 188] of Iconomus, he appointed to be a Regular, and to have with him at least two Priests to celebrate daily two Masses. The said Bishop endow'd this 435 Hospital with divers Churches and Tithes, &c. All which Revenues were 436 confirm'd by the Prior and Convent of Rochester, Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, and King Richard the first. Whose Several Deeds were all Re­cited and confirm'd by King Edward III. An. 6. by Inspeximus. The same 437 King Edward III. An. 16. granted his License to Mary of St. Paul Countess of Pembroke to grant her Mannour of Strode to any House of Religious Men or Women, already built, or to be built by her, with a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

[Valued at 52 l. 9 s. 10 d. ob. per Annum.]

SHIREBURNE, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FOunded and endow'd with Lands and Churches by Hugh de Puteaco (or Pudsey) who placed there Leperous People collected all over his Diocess, endowing it with Lands and Churches.

SUTTON, in Yorkshire.

JEffrey Fitz-Peter Earl of Essex gave certain Lands here to William de Wrotham Archdeacon of Tanton, for the erection of an Hospital in honour of the holy and individual Trinity, and the blessed Virgin, and of all Celestial Virtues, and all Saints, and for the maintenance of thirteen poor People and three Chaplains.

MERLEBERGE, in Wiltshire.

TO this Hospital dedicated to St. Iohn Baptist, and to the Brothers and Sisters here, King Iohn, An. 16. confirm'd divers Lands given by Henry de Kenet, Levenot Son of Levenot, and others.

[Valued at 6 l. 18 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

438 St. LAURENCE near Bristol, in Somersetshire.

KING Iohn, An. Reg. 9. and King Henry the III. An. 32. confirmed divers Lands to the Masters and Brethren of this Hospital of Lepers of St. Laurence in the Suburbs of Bristol.

BOCKLAND, in Somersetshire.

LOretta Countess of Leicester, Widow of Earl Robert, gave divers Lands to God and the blessed Mary, and St. Iohn Baptist, and to the blessed Poor of the Hospital-house of Ierusalem, for the Sustentation of the Sisters of Bocklaund, and for the finding of a Chaplain to celebrate daily in the Church at Bokland.

St. THOMAS, in Southwark.439

FOunded by Peter de Rupibus, and endowed with a Rent of 343 l. Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, An. 7. E. 1. exchanged with the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Thomas the Martyr in Southwark, the Church of Blechyngelegh for certain Lands in Surrey; which Church King Edward the II. gave them License to impropriate to their Hospital, and to hold it to them and their Successors, so impro­priated.

[Valued at 266 l. 17 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

DOMUS DEI, in Southampton.

GErvase de Hamton, Margaret de Redvariis, and many others gave divers Lands, &c. to this Hospital, all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. An. Reg. 6. The same King, An. 17.440 gave the Custody of this Hospital, then being of his Patronage, to the Prepositus and Scholars of Que [...]ns-hall in Oxford, and to their Successors for ever, which Hall was then newly founded and endow'd with Pos­sessions by Queen Philippa Wife of that King, He also granted to the 441 Custos, Scholars, Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital, to be freed for themselves and Lands from all Taxes and Tallages, &c. for ever. King Edward the IV. An. 1. granted to the Custos, Chaplain, and Brethren of this Hospital, and their Successors, the Alien Priory of Shirburne in the County of Southampton, with all its Lands, &c. Richard Duke of York the Father, and Richard Earl of Cambridge the Grandfather of that King, are in the said Grant alledged to be buried in this Hospital.

SANDONE, in Surrey.

TO the Master and Brethren of this Hospital dedicated to the Holy Ghost, William de Perci Son and Heir of Henry de Perci gave and 442 confirm'd divers Lands and Rents for the Maintenance of six Chaplains. The Heart of which William being buried here, the Prior and Brethren of this House oblig'd themselves to find a Lamp and Wax-Candle to burn for him in the Church of Standone at the time of Mass, for ever, An. 14. Henry 6. That King granted his License to the Cardinal Bishop of Winchester to annex and unite for ever this Hospital, being founded by his Predecessors, to that of St. Thomas in Southwark.

ROUNCEVAL, by Charing-Cross in the Suburbs of London.443

IT was found by Inquisition 7 R. 2. that William Marechall Earl of Pembroke gave to the Prior and Convent of the Hospital of the blessed Mary of Rouncyvall and his Successors for ever, one Messuage and certain Lands and Tenements in Charing, where the Chappel and Hospi­tal are situated. Confirm'd by King Henry.

St. JOHN's Hospital at Oxford.

KING Henry the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, erected a noble Inn, or Hospital, not far from the East gate, in Oxford, for the Reception and Relief of the Necessities of the Infirm and Travellers, 444 himself laying the first Stone. The same King gave the Master and Bre­thren of this Hospital his Mill at Edendon, and the Iews Garden in the Suburbs of Oxford without the said East-gate, and granted that as often as he came to Oxford they should receive of him Alms for one hundred poor People on the first day of his coming to Town. He also granted to this Hospital of St. Iohn Baptist at Oxford a parcel of his Wood of Shottoure, with the Pasture adjoyning, &c.

NEWSTEDE near Stamford, in Lincolnshire.

WIlliam de Albiniaco the III. gave to this Hospital, fonnded in honour of the blessed Mary ever Virgin, at the Bridge of Wass between 445 Stamford and Offington, and to the Brethren there, divers Lands, &c. With the Tith of all the Bread, Flesh, and Fish, spent in his Family, and free Pasture for one hundred sheep, &c. The Master of the said Hospital to be a Priest and a Canon Regular of some House, and to have with him some other Canons living according to the Rule of St. Augustin, and seven poor and infirm men to be maintain'd in the Hospital. The same Wil­liam, 446 the Founder of this House, by another Deed appointed the num­ber of the Brothers here to be as follows, two Priests, one Deacon, one Clerk, and thirteen infirm People. William Albiniaco the IV. confirm'd what his Father had given, and granted that upon death of the Prior, the Canons here might freely choose another and present him to the Patron, and in the mean time, the Canons to have the Custody of the House, and Liberties of the same. All which things were confirm'd by King 447 Edward the III. An Reg. II.

[Valued at 37 l. 6 s. per Annum.]

St. JOHN BAPTIST, at Nottingham.

ANno Dom. 1241. Walter de Gray Archbishop of Tork made the fol­lowing Order and Rule for the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital. That the Master or Custos provide two Chaplains or more to celebrate there for ever, that all the Brethren rise together to Matines, which are to be so early that they may be finisht by or before day-break, from the Feast of St. Michael to Easter; which done then shall follow Prime and Terce, then Mass, and after Mass, Sext and None; the Brothers shall mind their business in the House, and if not hindred with necessary Oc­casions, they shall hear Vespers and Complin; that they shall be all obedi­ent to the Custos, and none shall have any thing in property for seven days under pain of Excommunication; they shall be all cloathed and fed in common, eat no flesh but three days in the Week, Sunday, Tuesday, and 448 Thursday; lie in one Dormitory; they shall be chast and sober; their Habit of Russet and Black, &c.

[Page 191]Here was in this Town of Nottingham, another Hospital, founded by Iohn Plumtre, by License of King Richard the II. An. Reg. 16. for two Chaplains, one of which to be Master or Custos, and for thirteen old and poor Widows (senio confractis & paupertate depressis) which said Iohn endow'd the same with ten Messuages and two Tofts in Nottingham; and ordained that the Community of the Town of Nottingham, and the Prior of Lenton should present to the Chantry in the Chappel of this Hospital, and that the two Chantry Priests should receive for their stipends 100 [...]. to each yearly. Whose Orders bear date An. Dom. 1400.

St. JOHN BAPTIST at Ludlow, in Shropshire.449

FOunded by Peter Vndergod, near the Bridge at Ludlow, and by him endow'd with divers Lands, &c. for the maintenance of certain Reli­gious Brethren, and for the Sustenance of poor and infirm People. He also granted to the Brothers, that after his decease, they might freely choose one of themselves to be their Master or Custos: and so as often as occasion should be, and the Master and Brothers to admit the Poor, &c. which Lands, &c. so given as abovesaid were confirm'd by Walter de Lacy the Chief Lord of the Fee, and by King Henry the III. An. 5.

[Valued at 17 l. 3 s. 3 d. per Annum.]

The House of Converts, in the Suburbs of London.450

FOunded by King Henry the III. in a place then called Newstrete, and by him endow'd with seven hundred Marks for the Maintenance of Converts, and for the building their Church, &c. to be paid yearly out of the Exchequer, one Moiety at Easter and the other at Michaelmas, till other Provision shall be made, in Lands or Rents. And by another Charter dated 33 H. 3. that King gave to this House by him founded for Convert Iews, between the old and new Temple at London, certain Es­cheated Lands to hold to the Master and Brethren of the said House con­verted and to be converted from Judaism to the Catholick Faith.

LECHELADE, in Gloucestershire.451

FOunded by Richard Earl of Cornwa! Brother of King Henry III. and Senchia his Wife. Confirm'd by King Henry III. Which King An. 54. granted to the Brethren of this Hospital, dedicated to St. Iohn Baptist, the Hermitage of Lovebury in the Forrest of Whichewode, they providing one Chaplain to celebrate daily in the said Hermitage. King Edward the IV. An. 12. granted the Patronage or Advowson of this Hospital to his Mother Cecily Dutchess of York, with License to change it into a Chantry of three perpetual Chaplains to celebrate the Divine Offices daily at the Altar of our Lady in the Church of Lechlade, which three Chaplains to be a Body incorporate, able to purchase Lands &c. and to have a Common Seal. By the same Deed he granted Li­cense 452 to Iohn Twyn [...]ho to found another Chantry at the Altar of [Page 192] St. Blase in the same Church for one perpetual Chaplain, and that the other three Chaplains may grant to this Chantry Priest of St. Blase, a yearly Rent of ten Marks.

LEDBURY, in Herefordshire.

453 FOunded by Hugh Foliot Bishop of Hereford for the Reception of poor People and Travellers, and dedicated in honour of God and St. Katherine the Virgin; he endow'd it with several Churches, and Tenements, &c. all which with other Lands given by others, King Edw. the III. An. 2. confirm'd.

[Valued at 22. l. 5 s. per Annum.]

454 St. LEONARDS, at Leicester.

RObert the III. call'd for distinction Blancmains, Earl of Leicester, had issue, among others, William a Leper, who founded this Hospi­tal.

LANGRIGH, in ...

RIchard de Singelton, and Walter Nutun of Ribelcester gave to the Ma­ster and Brethren of this Hospital, dedicated to God and St. Saviour, Divers Lands in Ribelcester and elsewhere.

455 BILLESWIKE near Bristol, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded by Robert de Gurnay, and by him endow'd with the Mannor of Poulet, &c. for the Maintenance of a Master and three Chaplains, and for the refection of one hundred poor People daily, for ever, each of the said Poor to have a quantity of Bread of the weight of 45 s. with a sufficient quantity of Potage made of Oat-meal: the Bread to be made of an equal mixture of Bean-flower and Barly (de frumento fabarum, & ordeo.)

[Valued at 112 l. 9 s. 9 d. per Annum.]

GLANFORDBRIGGE, in Yorkshire.

456 FOunded by the Ancestors of Sir Ralph Paynel Knt. but the Abbot and Convent of Seleby had the power of placing one of their Brother­hood, in this Hospital, to have the Custody of the same, yet so that he should not convert the Goods of the Hospital to any other use but only to the Sustentation of the Poor and Needy.

St. BARTLEMEW's, in Gloucester.

IT was found by Inquisition 30 E. 3. That in the time of Hen. the II. one Nicholas Walred, a Chaplain, undertook the building of the West-Bridge here, to whom many Workmen resorting, one William Myparty a Burgess of Gloucester, erected a certain Habitation for the said Nicholas and the other Workmen, in which House for a long time after the said Nicholas and William did dwell together, with the Workmen and divers infirm People of both Sexes, having always a Priest for their Governor all living on Alms, till King Henry the III. An. 13. gave them the Church of St. Nicholas in this City, with other Lands, from which time the said House became an Hospital bearing the name of St. Bartlemew, the same King granted them Liberty also to choose a Prior, which accordingly they did. This Hospital consisted of a Master, and three Brothers, beside the Poor.

[Valued at 44 l. 7 s. 2 d. ob. per Annum.]

GRETHAM, in the Bishoprick of Durham.457

FOunded by Robert Bishop of Durham in honour of God, St. Mary, and St. Cuthbert, for a Master and Brethren, and for the Sustentation of the poor and needy People that should resort thither; who also en­dow'd it with the Mannor of Gretham, &c. He granted also that the Master and Brethren of this House should be free from all Tolls, Aids, and Tal­lages; and to all their Benefactors, being contrite and confess'd, he releas'd forty days Penance. Whose Deed, confirm'd by Hugh Prior of Durham and the Convent there, bears date An. Dom. 1262.

[Valued at 97 l. 6 s. 3 d. ob. per Annum.]

ESTBRIGGE, in Canterbury.458

THIS Hospital founded in honour of St. Nicholas, St. Catherine, and St. Thomas the Martyr, was compounded of several, united into one; the poor and infirm Brethren of which, William Cokyn Citizen of Canterbury made his Heirs of all his Lands, Possessions, and Chattles, which with divers other Gifts from other Men, King Edward the II. An. 7. recited and confirm'd to the Master and Brethren here, and their Successors.

[Valued at 23 l. 18 s. 9 d. ob. per Annum.]

BOLTON, in Northumberland.

FOunded and endow'd by Robert de Roos for three Brothers and Chap­lains, and thirteen Leperous Men, and certain Lay Brothers. Con­stituting 459 the Abbot of Rivall, and the Prior of Kyrkham joyntly to be the principal Wardens or Governors of this Hospital to whose Power, he com­mitted the placing the Master, or displacing him if occasion be.

BASINGSTOKE, in Southamptonshire.

FOunded by King Henry the III. ad sustentation ministorum Altaris Christi, For the support of those who serve at God's Altar.

460 St. KATHERINES near the Tower, at London.

FOunded by Queen Alianore Widow of King Henry II. For a Master and Brethren, and by her largely endow'd with Lands, Rents, and Tenements in East-Smithfield, Kent, and Hertfordshire. Reserving to her self and the succeeding Queens of England full Power to place the Master or Custos of the Hospital, for ever. Ordaining that out of the Revenues of this House should be maintain'd three Priests together with the said Master, to cele­brate daily in the said Hospital; that on the 16th of November on which day King Henry the II. died, a half-penny a peice should be distributed in Alms to one thousand poor People, and on every day in the year 12 d. to twenty four poor People, that upon the death of any Brother or Sister, ano­ther to be substituted by her, or the succeeding Queens of England, who are after her death, to be the Patronesses and Conservators of this House. Whose Deed of Foundation and Settlement, bears date An. Dom. 1273.

[Valued at 315 l. 14 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

461 St. JOHN BAPTIST, in Exeter.

FOunded by Gilbert and Iohn, Merchants of Exeter, here were five Priests, nine Boys, and twelve poor People.

St. PAUL at Norwich.

FOunded by Edward (or Eborard) the II. Bishop of Norwich. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 43.

St. GILES at Norwich.

FOunded by Walter Suffeld, alias Calthorpe, Bishop of Norwich, for a Master, three Priests, and twelve poor Women.

[Valued at 90 l. 12 s. per Annum.]

WELLE, in ...

FOunded by Ralph Neville for three Chaplains, and certain poor and infirm People, and by him endow'd with divers Lands which he held of the honour of Richmond, for which he had the License of King Edward the III. An. 16. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 89.

PONTFRACT, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by William le Tabourerc, for one Chaplain and eight poor People, and endow'd by him and others, with the License of King Edward the III. granted An. 8.

ELSING-SPITTEL, in London.462

WIlliam Elsyng Citizen of London founded here a Colledge consisting of one Warden and four Secular Priests, and an Hospital of poor People in the Parishes of St. Alphege, and St. Mary Aldermanbury, on which Colledge and Hospital he bestow'd certain Tenements and Rents in the said Parishes and elsewhere in London; and gave the Patronage of the same to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, who united to this House, and appropriated the Church of Aldermanbury, &c. The said Dean and Chapter to pla [...] the Warden and two of the Priests, and the said William Elsyng, the other two; the Custos to be in Priestly orders, and unbenificed elsewhere; 463 so also the four Priests. Other Rules and Orders were made for the Go­vernment of this House, as that the Custos or Warden shall at his admit­tance be sworn to the due Administration of his Office; that the Warden and Priests shall daily say Mattins, Masses, and the Hours, Vespers and 464 Complin in the Chappel of the Hospital, and visit the infirm People there; that within three days after the Nativity of the blessed Virgin yearly the four Priests and Warden be new cloathed, in like manner, the four Priests Apparel not exceeding 30 s. for each, and the Warden in a Garment of the same colour not exceeding 40 s. and that the Priests be allowed more for Linnen and Shooes, &c. 20 s. per Annum to each, and the Warden 40 s. to be paid yearly, eight days after Easter; that ninety eight blind and poor 465 People of both Sexes be received and lodged in this Hospital, and Poor, Blind, or paralitick Priests, if any such offer themselves, to be received before any others, &c. Which orders were seal'd by the said William El­syng,466 An. Dom. 1331. (5 E 3.) in the presence of Iohn de [...] Mayor of London, the two Sheriffs, and several Aldermen, &c. Not long after this, viz. An. 1340. Ralph Bishop of London changed the Warden and Secular Priests of this Hospital of St. Mary within Cripplegate, into a Prior and Canons Regular of St. Augustin, under the Patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Paul's, still; all other things concerning the said Hospital relating to the poor, &c. to remain as before; and this Com­mutation was upon the Petition of the Founder William Elsyng.

[Valued at 193 l. 15 s. 5 d. per Annum.]

BERKING-CHIRCHE, near the Tower at London.467

KING Edward the III. An. 44. granted his License to Robert Denton Chaplain, to found an Hospital in his House or Messuage within the Parish of Berking-Church, London, for the Habitation of poor Priests and other poor men and Women, who fall into Frensies and lose their Memo­ry; he also Licensed him to give and assign the same House and another Messuage in the Parish of St. Laurence Pountency (both which Messuages [Page 196] were held of him in Burgage) to certain Chaplains, &c. for the celebrating the Divine Offices, &c. But the intended Foundation here not taking effect, King Rich. the II. An. 2. at the Petition of the said Robert, granted him License to assign the Premisses, &c. to the Hospital of St. Katherine near the Tower.

468 St. MARY's in Leicester.

FOunded by Henry Duke of Lancaster near the Castle in Leicester, An. Dom. 1330. And by him endow'd with divers Lands, &c. Here was also of his Frection a Collegiate Church, in which he was buried An. 1361. The whole was to maintain a Dean and twelve Canons, and as many Vicars, one hundred poor People and ten able Women to serve them. Vid. Vol 3. part 2. p. 139.

[Valued at 23 l. 12 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

HEHTE, in Kent.

KING Edward the III. An. 16. granted his License to Hamon Bishop of Rochester for the founding of this Hospital for thirteen poor Peo­ple, with a non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

469 HOLBECHE, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the III. by Iohn de Kirktone for a Warden being a Chaplain, and fifteen poor People. Dedicated in honour of all Saints, and by the said Iohn endowed with divers Lands, held of the Abbot and Convent of Croyland.

St. NICHOLAS near York.

THis Hospital being of the Advowson or Patronage of the Kings of Eng­land, was An. 1303. Visited by William de Grenefeud at that time 470 Lord Chancellor, at which time he made certain Orders for the Govern­ment of this House, viz. that all the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital should at their Admittance profess due Obedience to the Master and War­den, and inviolaby observe perpetual Chastity, That both Brothers and Sisters should be present at Matins, Mass, and the other hours, unless hinder'd by Sickness, &c. and that they should say during the time of Di­vine Service, the Lord's Prayer and Angelick Salutation, with due devoti­on, iterating the same as often as the Lord shall inspire them; That the Brothers and Sisters should not live under the same Roof, &c. That what ever they have for their several uses shall after their death come to the House; That they shall have a Common Seal; that they shall not demise, or bind any of their Possessions, unknown to the Chancellor of England or his Successors; That for the future none shall be Master or Custos of this House but such only as will undertake the Government in his own person; [Page 197] If any transgress against their due obedience the Master or Custos shall for 471 the first Offence punish the Ofsenders by with-holding their Commons for some days, as the offence requires, which punishment shall for the second offence be doubled, for the third the party shall be expell'd &c.

[Valued at 29 l. 1 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

BOWES, in the Ile of Gerneseye.

FOunded with License of King Edward III. An. 35. by Peter of St. Pe­ters in Gernsey, in the Parish of Saintpierport in that Iland, for a Ma­ster or Custos, Brethren, and Sisters; and by him endow'd with twenty yardland, and the delivery of fourscore quarters of wheat yearly, arising out of certain Land in the said Parish; which Land was held in Capite of the King, by a Service call'd Chaumpert, viz. the payment of the eleventh Sheaf arising on the said Lands yearly.

WOLVERHAMPTON, in Staffordshire.472

FOunded, with License of King Richard II. An. 16. by Clement Lu­sone, and William Waterfall, for one Chaplain and six poor people.

The Holy Trinity in New Sarum.

KIng Richard II. An. 17. granted his License to Iohn Chaundeler to make an Hospital in honour of the holy Trinity of two messuages in a Street call'd Newestreet in New Sarum, for the Releif of poor weak and Infirm people, whereof the Mayor of the Said City for the time being to be Ma­ster, and to rule and govern the same, and to endow the same with a cer­tain Rent of 13 s. 4 d. King Henry IV. An. 1. granted License to the then Master to purchase Lands of 20 l. value per Annum.

KNOLS Alms house at Pontfract, in Yorkshire.473

FOunded by Sir Robert Knolls Knight Citizen of London, and Constance his Wife, in honour of the Holy Trinity, and blessed Virgin Mary, for certain Chaplains whereof one to be Master, two Clerks, and thirteen Poor people, such especially as by misfortune come to want, and two Servants to help the said Poor. The Master to have twenty marks for his fastenance, the two Clerks each ten marks, and the thirteen Poor a­mongst them 34 l. 4 s. 3 d. ob, per Annum. viz. 1 d. ob, a day to each. Which Deed of the Said Roberts Foundation bears date An. Dom. 1385,

[Valued at 182 l. 14 s. 4 d. per Annum.]

OKEHAM, in Rutland.

KIng Richard II. An. 22. granted his License to William Dalby of Extone to found this Hospital for two Chaplains, of which one to be Custos, and thirteen poor Men, and to endow the same with one Messuage and two acres of Land at Okeham, and to grant the Patronage of the same 474 to the Prior and Convent of St. Anne of the Order of Ca [...]husians at Co­ventry, with a further License to the said Prior and Convent to give a yearly Rent of 40 l. to be issuing out of some of their Possessions where ever they pleased to assign, to the Custos of the said Hospital and the said Poor men for their maintenance, for ever.

[Valued at 12 l. 12 s. 11 d. per Annum.]

DONYNGTON, in Barkshire.

KIng Richard II. An. 16. gave License to Richard Alberbury to found an Hospital in his Mannor of Donyngton, which he held of the King, as of his honour of Walingford, for certain poor people, or which one to be chief, by the name and Title of The Minister of God of the poor House of Donyngton, and to endow the same with divers Lands.

[Valued at 19 l. 3 s. 10 d. per Annum.]

THORNTONS Hospital in New Castle upon Tine, in Northumberland.

FOunded by Roger Thornton in honour of St. Catherine for one Chap­lain, 475 who is Custos, nine poor men, and four Poor Women, to be con­tinually resident, for which foundation King Henry IV. An. 1 [...] granted his License, and that they might have a Common Seal. Endow'd by the said Roger with yearly Rents of 10 l.

EWELME, in Oxfordshire.

KIng Henry VI. An. 15. granted his License to his Cous [...]n William de la Pole Earl of Suffolk, and Alice his Wife to found an Alms House in this Town, for two Chaplains and thirteen poor men, and that they should be a Body Corporate, and that he might endow the same with one 476 hundred Marks per Annum. This Hospital was Founded An. Dom. 1448. and call'd Gods House. The two Priests were one to instruct the Poor in Religious Dutyes, the other to be a Schoolmaster and teach the poor; both to have for Salery to l. the Minister 16 d. a week, the other twelve poor men, 13 d, a week.

[Valued at 20 l. per Annum.]

SHIREBURNE, in Dorsetshire.

FOunded, with License of King Henry the VI. An. [...]5. by Robert Nevyle Bishop of Sarum, Humfrey Stafford, Knt. Margaret Goghe, Iohn Faunt­leroy, and Iohn Baret, to the honour of God, St. Iohn Baptist, and St. Iohn Evangelist, for twenty Brethren, twelve poor and impotent men, and four poor and impotent Women, and for a perpetual Chaplain; and that the Brothers of this House might elect one among themselves to be their Master from year to year, and upon the death of any of their number the rest might elect others to succeed in their room, &c.

BOCKING, in Essex.477

KING Henry the IV. granted his License to Iohn Doreward to erect a perpetual Chantry of one Chaplain in the Parish-Church of Stane­wey in Essex, and to endow the same with a Mansion lying near the Church yard there, and with 7 l. of yearly Rent. Which Licensed Foun­dation not being effected in the Life of the said Iohn, King Henry the VI. did afterward grant License to Iohn Doreward Esq his Son, to found a certain House at Bocking to be called Maison Dieu, for seven poor Peo­ple, one of which to be call'd Praepositus Villae de Bokking, and to have the Government of the said poor, &c. and to endow the same, and a Chantry by him founded in the Parish Church of Bokking, with Lands and Rents.

TODINGTON, in Bedfordshire.478

KING Henry the VI. An. 21. granted his License that Iohn Broughton or his Feoffees might erect an Hospital in honour of St. Iohn Baptist in Todyngdone, for one Chaplain, and three poor Men, to be a perpetual Community and Body Corporate. Also that he might give to the Prio­ress and Nuns of St. Margaret at Dertford an Annual Rent of 8 l. and that the said Nuns might assign the said Rent, and also another Rent of 5 l. per Annum to be issuing out of their own Lands to this Hospital, which House 479 of Dertford was of the said Kings Patronage being founded by his Proge­nitors.

RICHMOND, in Yorkshire.

HERE being of old time a poor Hospital dedicated to St. Nicholas in which was only one Chaplain, of the Kings Patronage by rea­son or the honour of Richmond, and that Hospital being fallen to extream decay, William Ayscogh one of the Justices of the Common-Pleas, repair'd it, and added another Chantry Chaplain, in consideration whereof, and that he was become as a second Founder, King Henry the VI. An. 26. granted him the Patronage.

[Valued at 10 l. per Annum.]

DERTFORD, in Kent.

KING Henry the VI. An. 31. gave License to Iohn Bamburgh, William Rothele, Roger Ionet, and Thomas Boost, and to the Survivors of them to found an Alms-House in honour of the holy Trinity (to which the Parish Church there is dedicated) for the perpetual Vicar of that Church, and the Gardians of the Goods, and Chattles of the said Church, and for five poor decrepid Men; and that the said Vicar, and Gardians, and their Successors should be Master of the said House, and a Body Corporate, and have a 480 Common Seal. With License to give and assign Lands and Rents to the said Hospital of the value of 20 l. per Annum.

The Alms-house within the Precinct of St. Crosses at Winchester, in Hampshire.

FOunded by Henry, Cardinal, and Bishop of Winchester, half Brother of King Henry IV. who by License of King Henry the VI. An. 21. 481 granted to the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of the Holy Cross near Winchester, divers Mannors, and Lands, &c. to the yearly value of 500 l. Within which this Alms-house was erected for two Chaplains, five and thirty poor Men, and three Women, to be govern'd by the Master of that Hospital; but the Cardinal dying before this Foundation was perfectly compleated, King Henry the VI. An. 33. did incorporate 482 them under a Rector of their own, by the name of The New Alms-house of Noble Poverty, establisht near Winchester by Henry Cardinal of England, and Bishop of Winchester, Son of John late Duke of Lancaster of noble Me­mory; with grant of a Common Seal, and Power to purchase, &c.

[Valued at 84 l. 4 s. 2 d. per Annum.]

STOKFASTON (Stockerson) in Leicestershire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the IV. An. 5. by Iohn de Boyville Esq near the Town Church, for one Chaplain, and three poor men, who were a Body Corporate, and might retain Lands to the value of 10 l. per Annum.

483 HEITSBURY, in Wiltshire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the IV. An. 11. by Margaret Widow of Robert Lord Hungerford, Iohn Cheyne of Pynne Esq and Iohn Mervyn Esq for one Chaplain, twelve poor Men, and one poor Wo­man, of whom the Chaplain to be Custos or Warden. Which Hospital was made a Body Corporate, &c. and endow'd with divers Lands, and 484 had a grant of twenty Load of Wood for firing, out of the Wood of Southleghe in Wiltshire.

The Savoy, in the Suburbs of London.

KING Henry the VIII. An. 2. granted the place, or peice of Ground, called the Savoy, parcel of the Dutchy of Lancaster, and lying in the Parishes of St. Clements Danes without the Bars of the New Temple at Lon­don, and St. Mary of the Stronde in the County of Middlesex, to Richard Bishop of Winchester, Richard Bishop of London, Thomas Bishop of Dur­ham, Edmund Bishop of Sarum, William Bishop of Lincoln, Iohn Bishop of Rochester Thomas Earl of Arundel, Thomas Earl of Surrey, Charles Lord Herbert, Sir Iohn Fyneux Chief Justice of the Kings-Bench, Sir Robert Rede Chief Ju­stice of the Common Pleas, Iohn Young Master of the Roles, Sir Iohn Lovell, and Iohn Cutte, Excutors of King Henry the VII. for the founding and establishing of an Hospital. And by another Deed dated An. 4. he granted License to the said Executors to found such Hospital for five Se­cular Chaplains, one of which to be Master, to pray for the good Estate of him and Catherine his Consort, and for the Souls of King Henry the VII. and Elizabeth his Consort, and of Arthur Prince of Wales. Which Hospital was to be called The Hospital of Henry the VII. late 585 King of England, at the Savoy; to be a Body Corporate, to have a Com­mon Seal, and yearly Revenues, to the value of five hundred Marks per Annum, for maintenance of the said Chaplains, and for performance of such other Works of Mercy and Piety as by the said Executors shall be appointed and exprest. With a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

[Valued at 529 l. 5 s. 7 d. ob. per Annum.]

Of the Knights, Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem.

THE Patron of this Order of Knights was St. Iohn Baptist, from 489 whom they took their Denomination. The Hospital of St. Iohn 490 Baptist and the Poor at Ierusalem, is said to be first built in the time of Iulius Caesar Emperor of Rome, and Antiochus Prince of Antioch, with certain Treasure which one Melchiar, a Priest in the Temple, had taken out of the Sepulcher of David; here the Poor and Infirm were kindly re­ceived 491 and entertain'd from all parts of the World. The same Author delivers that when our Saviour Christ became incarnate and conversed on Earth, when he came to Ierusalem, he resorted frequently to this House, and that it was in this House that he appear'd to his Apostles after his Pas­sion 492 and Resurrection, the Doors being all shut. After his Ascension, St. Steven and others of his Disciples served the poor in this Hospital house ac­cording to our Lord's Precept. When the Christians were expell'd from Ierusalem, and the City was possest by the Saracens, one Conradus, or Gerardus, a devout Servant of God, lived here and served the Poor in like manner, who at such time as Ierusalem was besieg'd by Godfrey of Bullen, and the Christian Pilgrims, and a great Famine being in the Christian Camp, was accustomed to go upon the Walls and throw over Loaves, which he carried secretly about him for that purpose, as if he were eager in throw­ing Stones against the Besiegers. This Gerard was the first Master of this Hospital, which after the City was taken by the Christians was very much favour'd, and its Revenues augmented by the Kings of Ierusalem, &c. After the death of this Gerard, Frier Raymund de Puy became Master, who 493 establisht a Rule for the Hospitallers, confirm'd by Pope Innocent the II. and Pope Boniface. This Rule consists of nine and twenty Articles, among which it is ordain'd that every Brother or Frier, at his admission to the Service of the Poor here, is to profess these three things, Chas [...]ity, Obe­dience, 494 and to live without Property, that when the Friers go abroad they 495 shall not go alone, but two or three together, that if any be publickly guilty of Fornication, he shall be publickly whipt, and then expell'd the Society. The Infirm at their first Reception into the Hospital, shall be consest, and 496 communicate, and then carried to bed, and there served and attended as Lords and Masters of the House, That all the Brothers shall wear a Cross 467 on their upper Garments as a Badge of their Faith, &c.

Others give another account of the Original of the Hospitallers [...] affirm­ing that after the Turks of Arabia had over-run Syria and Egypt about the year 612. certain Italian Merchants of the City of Malfe, trading into these parts, and being favour'd by the Turks on the account of their Trade, they obtain'd from the Calife of Egypt a peice of Ground lying be­fore 498 the Temple of the Sepulcher, for their Habitation; here those M [...]r­chants built a Monastery and Church in honour of the blessed Virgin, placing therein an Abbot and Monks: After that they built another little [Page 203] Church in honour of St. Mary Magdalen, for the Reception of Women Pil­grims, and placed therein certain Nuns, and lastly considering the danger of those who came in Pilgrimage to the holy places, who were often robbed by the Turks, they built an Hospital or Domus Dei for the Reception of Men, whether Well or Sick, who arrived here in Pilgrimage, and ano­ther Church for them, dedicated to St Iohn Elemon, Patriarch of Alexan­dria. These three Houses subsisted only by Alms, collected for them, yearly, by the said Merchants of Malfy, till the Christians conquer'd Ieru­salem and expelled the Saracens: At which time lived in the Abby of Monks, the before-mention'd Girald to whom the Abbot committed the Reception and Relief of the Poor and Pilgrims in the foresaid Domus Dei or Hospital; and after such reduction of the City, the said Hospital flourisht daily more and more, procuring to it self great Revenues, and to 499 be discharged from its subjection not only to the Abbot, but Patriarch also. These and the like mighty Priviledges granted them by the Court of Rome, were the occasion of great Troubles and Disorders between the Hospitallers and the Patriarch of Ierusalem These Hospitallers on their admission were to make Oath upon the Missal, as follows, You promise 500 and vow to God, our L [...] and my Lord St. John Baptist, to live and die under the obedience of such Supe [...]ior, whoever he be, as God shall give you, you vow fur­ther and promise to live chastly until death, and also without property; we also make another promise, which no Religious Men besides us, make, for we promise to be Servants and Slaves of the In [...]irm our Masters. After the making this Vow, he who admits him says, And we promise you Bread and Water, and humble Cloathing, for nothing more you can require, and we make you a Partaker of all the good Works done in our Order, &c.

A List of such who have been Masters.501
  • 1. Girardus.
  • 2. Raymundus de Podio.
  • 3. Augier de B [...]llen.
  • 4. Ar [...]audns de Comps.
  • 5. Gilbertus Assailli.
  • 6. Castus.
  • 7. Iobertus.
  • 8. Gaufridus de Dinsono.
  • 9. Hermengandus Daps, in his time the Christians lost Ierusalem.
  • 10. Rogerius de Molins.
  • 11. Garnerius de Neapoli, he had been Prior of St. Iohn's at London. Vid. p. 550.
  • 12. Alfonsus de Portugalia, resigned.
  • 13. Gaufridus Rat
  • 14. Garinus de Monteacuto.
  • 15. Bertrandus de Gexi.
  • 16. Garinus.
  • 17. Bertrandus de Cons.502
  • 18. Petrus de Villa Brida.503
  • 19. Willielmus Castello Novo.
  • 20. Hugo Ryvell.
  • 21. Nicholaus de Lorgne.
  • 22. Odde.
  • 23. Guillelmus de Villareto.
  • 24. Fulco de Vilareto, in his time the Knights Hospitallers took the Island of Rhodes, and removed the Convent from Cyprus. He was deposed.
  • 25. Mauricius de Paygnaco.
  • 26. Elionnus de Villa Nova.
  • 27. Deodatus de Gosono.
  • 28. Petrus Cornelian.

505 The Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, in the Suburbs of London.

FOunded by Iordan Briset, a Baron, about the year 1100. on ten Acres of Land which he had in exchange from the Nuns of Clerken­well, which Nunnery he had founded not long before. The Church of this Hospital was dedicated in honour of St. Iohn Baptist by Heraclius Pa­triarch 506 of Ierusalem, An. Dmo. 1185. The foresaid Iordan endow'd this House with fourteen Acres of Land adjoyning upon the Clerks Well. Ro­bert de Fun gave to the Brethren of this House the Hermitage of Yevelie, with a Condition that the said Brothers should admit him into their Or­der, at such time as he pleased, whether in Health or Sickness. Many o­thers 507 were Benefactors, among the rest Robert de Vere Earl of Oxford gave to the Prior and Brothers of the Hospital of St. Iohn of Ierusalem in Eng­land 508 two Knights Fees, William Earl of Ferrars, Hugh de Bellocampo, Gil­bert 510 de Montefichet, &c. gave divers other Lands, and Churches, &c. re­cited 511 and confirm'd by King Iohn, An. 1. These Knights of St. Iohn claimed a Priviledge to bury the Bodies of such who had given Alms to their Fra­ternity, however they came to their death, whereupon it happen'd, An. 4. E. 1. that certain Fellons having been executed, some of the Ser­vants of these Knights went to the Gallows and took `em down to bury, one of which Fellons, Adam le Messer by name, being laid in the Grave came to life again, and fled to the Neighbouring Church for Sanctuary, where he remain'd till he abjured the Realm. Pope Clemens having in the Council of Vienna supprest the Order of Knights Templers, and given all their Lands and Possessions, moveable and immoveable to these Knights 512 Hospitallers of St. Iohn of Ierusalem, King Edw. the II. An. 7. granted his Letters of Mandamus all over England, for putting the same in execution, in this Kingdom. The like Grant was made by Act of Parliament, An. 17. 513 E. 2. However Hugh Spencer the younger by force seized and held from them 514 their Mannor of the New Temple, London, which upon his Attainder came to the hands of King Edward the III. who in the twelfth year of his Reign, did give, grant, and sell, in consideration of 100 l. part of the said Mannor of the New Temple then valued at 7 l. 5 s. 2 d together with the Church, Coemitary, and Cloyster, &c. to the Prior of St. Iohn's and his Successors.

Vid. Vol. 3. p. 108.

517 Of the Knights Templers in England.

ANno Dom. 1118. Certain Religious Knights, of whom the principal were Hugh de Paganis, and Godfrey de S. Audomaro, engaged them­selves to the Service of Christ, before the Patriarch of Ierusalem, and un­dertook to live after the Mannor of Canons Regular. King Baldwin granted them a Habitation in part of his Palace adjoyning to the Temple, and he and others gave them other Gifts whereon to subsist. Their chief proses­sion was to guard the Roads from Theives for the safety of Pilgrims. Their Habit was white with a red Cross. Their number did in a little time so increase, that they had in their Convent above three hundred Knights, besides others, and as their number so their Possessions 518 did swell to a vast and invidious value. An. Dom. 1240. the Church be­longing

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[Page] [Page 205] to these Knights at the Place call'd the New Temple in London was dedicated on Ascention day, the King and a great Concourse of Peers and great Persons being present, An. Dom. 1147. Conrad Emperor of Germany, and Lewis King of France, with great forces of French, English, Normans, and Britains, made an expedition against the Pagans in the Holy Land, but returned with Little or no success at that time; These Knights Tem­plers 519 having been very Treacherous to the Christians at the Seige of Da­mascus, which City had been taken by King Lewis but for them. An. Dom. 1307. (1 Edward 2.) These Knights were Imprison'd throughout all Christendome, for certain Enormities and Superstitions crept into their Order, and all their Estates real and personal Seized.

Of the New Temple at London.521

KIng Henry III. by a solemn and formal Deed of Grant dated the nine­teenth year of his Reign, gave his Body to be buried, when it shall please God to take him out of this Life, at the New Temple in London The like did Queen A [...]ianor. The said King Henry III. granted to the Ma­ster and Brothers of this House (Magistro & Fratribus militiae Temp'i Sa­lomonis Ierusalem) and to their Successors 8 l. yearly out of the Exchequer for the Maintenance of three Chaplains in the New Temple at London. King Henry the II. gave the said Knights the whole Water Course of Fleet with a place near Castle Bainard for the making a Mill, with a Messuage 522 upon the Fleet near the Bridge. He also granted the Church of St. Cle­ments Danes with all it appurtenances. Pope Innocent granted that none who should fly into the Houses of these Knights Templers for safety or Protection, should be disturb'd, nor their Goods taken, under Pain of Excommunication. One of these Priviledged Places belonging to these Knights was Parish=Gardyn, otherwise call'd Wideflete, in Suthwark (vide pag. 543) Concerning which divers Statutes and Orders were made by Iohn Duke of Bedford, Farmer of that place, An. 1320. Some of which were, That every person flying thither for safety should be examined for what Cause he flyes, whether for another mans Debt, or Felony, or Tres­pass; and then his name and the Cause to be registred, That he shall be sworn to be of good behaviour in the said Priviledged place, while he re­mains there, &c. If his flight be for Fellony he shall be kept under a Guard of six men of the Society, If any person strike another he shall pay 523 to the Lord 6 s. 8 d. if he draw bloud, 13 s. 4 d. If any one commit fel­lony after his reception he shall lose his Priviledged and be committed to the Prison of the Kings Bench. If any person take in a Whore or be con­vict of Fornication or Adultery within the Priviledged places, he shall forfeit to the Lord 6 s. 8 d and lose his Priviledge. Bernard de Ball [...]lio gave to these Knights 15 l. per Annum. of his Lands in England, arising at Hichen in Hartfordshire. This guift was made at Paris, in the Presence of the Apostolick Lord Eugenius, the King of France, Several Arch-Bishops and one hundred and thirty Knights of this Order. Confirm'd afterwards 524 by King Steven. An. Dom. 1185, an Inquisition was made by Frier Galfrid 525 Son of Steven, of all the Lands, Churches, Mills, Rents of Assize, &c. belonging to this Order in England; which Perticulars take up fifteen pa­ges, and being as I conceive, of no use in this Abridgment, I shall not take any further notice of them, but refer the Curious to the Book at large. An. Dom. 1434. Frier Iohn Stillingfleet compiled a Book of the names, [Page 206] 541 of all the Several Founders or Benefactors of the Hospital of St. Iohn of Ierusalem in England, and of all the Lands, Churches, Preceptories Mannors, Houses, Rents. &c. given as well to the said Hospital, as to the Knights Templers in England. He begins with the Lord Iordan Briset who in the Reign of King Hen. 1. Founded the House and Hospital of St. Iohn at 542 Clerkenwell, and since him reckons up some hundreds of other Benefactors, with the Lands, &c. by them given, among whom, I shall observe, Wil. Maun­deville Earl of Essex gave to the Brothers of this Hospital five Bucks to be received yearly between the Feasts of St, Iohn Baptist, and St. Michael, and five Does between St. Michael and Lent, for ever out of his Park of Enfelde. William Longeford Knt. William Coterell and others gave divers Tenements in the Parish of St. Dunstans West, with divers Rents in Fleet-street, the 543 Pasture call'd Fiketzfeld, the Mills of Wideflete, with the Garden called Parish-Garden, with many other Lands, Tenements, and Pastures in South­wark, Lambethe, and Newington, &c. The Lady Ioan Gray Widow of Sir Robert Gray Knt. gave them the Mannor of Hampton near Kingston with all the Appurtenances, An. 1212. with other Lands elsewhere. Sir Thomas 544 de Saunford Knt. gave them the Mannor of Saunford in oxfordshire. Roger de Moubray gave to the Templers many Lands, among the rest, he gave 545 them the Preceptory of Bal [...]alle, in Warwickshire. Maud Countess of Clare, Widow of William, and Mother of Richard Earls of Clare, gave divers 546 Lands. Hubert de Ria, gave the Templers divers Revenues in the same 547 year that Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury out of anger and ill will departed from the King at Northampton; So runs the Date of the Deed. Robert de Everyngham gave the Templers the Mannor of Ronstone, &c. and Gilbert de Gressy gave them, there, two Quarentenes or Furlongs of Heath (bruerae) and Pasture for five hundred Sheep, this Preceptory was call'd Temple 548 Bruer. Simon de Montefort Earl of Leicester gave the Templers large Pos­sessions 550 near Leicester. William de Erlegh had given Bucklande to be a Monastery of Canons, but they having misbehaved themselves and forfeited their Estate there, King Henry the II. about the year 1180. gave their House and Estate thereto belonging, to the Prior of St. Iohn of Ierusalem, for the Habitation of certain Sisters of that Order, conditioning that this 551 should be the only House in England for such Sisters. Robert de Ros and abundance of the greatest Lords of this Kingdom were Benefactors to these Knights. But above all they held themselves so far obliged to Roger de Moubray, that the Templers granted to the said Roger and his Heirs, that if at any time they should happen to find any Brother of the said Order put to publick Penance for any Fault or Offence against his Rule, yet the said Roger or his Heirs should have power to release him from his said Penance, without any contradicton. And the Hospitallers granted An. 1330. to Iohn Lord Moubray and his Heirs for ever, that in case he or they come at any time in devotion to any of their Convents beyond the Seas, to be as honourably received and served as any under the Degree of 552 their King. King Steven, King Henry the II. King Iohn, and King Henry the III. were great Benefactors to the Templers, the last of which granted them free Warren. Fairs and Markets, in many of their Mannors and 553 Towns. King Richard the I. had a special love for the Knights Hospital­lers by reason he had received from the Master and Brothers of the Hos­pital many benefits for himself and followers, when in the holy Land. King Richard the I. granted to the Templers, and also to the Hospitallers, Markets and Fairs in divers of their Towns. King Edward the II. granted

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[Page] [Page 207] all the Estate of the Templers to the Knights Hospitallers of St. Iohn, by Act of Parliament in the seventeenth year of his Reign. King Edw. the III. King Richard the II. and King Henry the IV. were also very kind to these Knights of St. Iohn, the last mention'd granted to these Knight, to receive from his Wood of Pederton three Load (six Horses to a Load) of underwood weekly, viz. of Thorne, Allez, Maple, and Hazel, for the use and profit of the Prioress and Sisters of Buckland, and their Successors for ever.

Ieffrey de Say granted to the Knights Templers (fratribus militiae Templi 555 Salomnis) his Mannor of West-Grenewiche, &c. A sine was past 19 H. 3. between Robert de Stanford Master of the Warfare of the Temple in