In Effigem Nicholai Culpeper Equitis
The shaddow of that Body heer you find
Which serves but as a case to hold his mind,
His Intellectuall part be pleas'd to looke
In lively described in the Booke

Pharmacopoeia Londinensis: OR THE London Dispensatory

Further adorned by the Studies and Collections of the Fellows, now living of the said COLLEDG.

Whereunto is added,

1. The Vertues, Qualities, and Properties of every Simple.

2. The Vertues and Use of the Compounds.

3. Cautions in giving all Medicines that are dangerous.

4. All the Medicines that were in the Old Latin Dispensatory, and are left out in the New Latin one, are printed in this fourth Impression in English with their Vertues.

5. A Key to Galen's Method of Physick, containing thirty three Chapters.

6. What is added to the Book by the Translator, is of a diffe­rent Letter from that which was made by the Colledg.

By Nich. Culpeper Gent. Student in Physick and Astrology; living in Spittle-fields neer London.

Scire potestates Herbarum, usumque medendi
Maluit, & mutas agitare (inglorius) artes.
Virgil.

LONDON:

Printed for Peter Cole, at the sign of the Printing-Press in Cornhil neer the Royal Exchange. 1653.

Pharmacopoeia Londinensis: OR THE London Dispensatory

Further adorned by the Studies and Collections of the Fellows, now living of the said COLLEDG.

Wherein you may find,

1. The Vertues, Qualities, and Properties of every Simple.

2. The Vertues and Use of the Compounds.

3. Cautions in giving all Medicines that are dangerous.

4. All the Medicines that were in the Old Latin Dispensatory, and are left out in the New Latin one, are printed in this fourth Impression in English with their Vertues.

5. A Key to Galen's Method of Physick, containing thirty three Chapters.

6. What is added to the Book by the Translator, is of a diffe­rent Letter from that which was made by the Colledg.

7. In this Impression the Latin name of every one of the Com­pounds is printed, and in what page of the New Folio Latin Book they are to be found.

By Nich. Culpeper Gent. Student in Physick and Astrology; living in Spittle-fields neer London.

Scire potestates Herbarum, usumque medendi
Maluit, & mutas agitare (inglorius) artes.
Virgil.

LONDON:

Printed for Peter Cole, at the sign of the Printing-Press in Cornhil neer the Royal Exchange. 1653.

TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL Edward Hall Esquire, Justice of the Peace for the County of Surry; Nich. Culpeper wisheth increase of Grace in this World, and a Crown of Glory in that to come.

Right Worshipful,

LET it not seem strange in so Solemn a Business, in which no less than the Preservation of Life, Health, and by consequence Wel-being of all the poor People in this Nation is concerned; in so weighty a business, contrary to all Presidents in this Nation, which is now Heart-sick of Ignorance, and cries out aloud for cure; in so Populous a City, and so full of Cri­ticks, before so many Ancient Physitians who might have done the Work better than I, had they not wanted will; neither could they have wan­ted that, had they not wanted real Love to this Nation: in such times (I say) in such a place, and before such People, for me whose years are few, whose Exercise in the Physical Sphere small, (my greatest Studies be­ing spent about Natural Phylosophy) whose Judgment slender to venture upon this so great a Work as to attempt to rectifie the Judgments of a whol Colledg, (which is indeed no less needful than great) may seem to some perhaps, great Arrogancy and Presumption, to others no smal in­solency and want of discretion: Notwithstanding, the Glory of God being my Aim, and the good of this languishing Nation my End (I do not call the Nation languishing in respect of Government, but in respect of Knowledg, as for the Government of this Nation, God knows what he hath to do, and I hope well) which I say languisheth so sorely under a Disease which now turned Epidemical and rages so extreamly that it sweeps away millions in a year, leaving many woful Widdows, and Fa­therless Children to the protection of those whose mercies are cruelty, and that is Ignorance in Physick, or want of Knowledg of what may do them good; the Cure of this Disease cannot be performed neither by Aurum potabile, nor the Phylosophers Stone, but by the real indeavors of a Pub­lick Spirit by the Fear of God, and Love to poor People, by laboring to discharge a good Conscience, by instructing People what belongs to their Health; this I as­sure you was the reason that moved me to adventure into the Stage of [Page] the World in this Nature, and not any sinister ends of my own whatsoe­ver, for it is not unknown to your Worship that I have incurred many E­nemies by my writing, though I do good, and but my duty; yet I shall ever chuse rather to satisfie the Godly minds of real Common-wealths­men, in revealing to them what belongs to the Preservation of their Lives, and the helping of their poor Neighbors, than either wrong my own Conscience, or rob the whol Nation of what I may and ought to re­veal to them: I confess I have chiefly been reviled of those to whom I have done good, who have received their greatest Knowledg of Physick by my Writings; I can pity them, but do not wonder a whit at it; it hath been so even in the dayes of old, when Christ and his Apostles lived upon Earth, they cast out Devils, they cured their Diseases, they made the Blind to see, and the Lame to go, for which of all these good Deeds were they persecuted? doubtless it was done by that Monster Envy wch rules in the children of Disobedience, who having joyned to himself Pride, and Self-interest labors to surpress whatsoever is well done; but as I have fellowship with Christ and his Apostles in their Sufferings, so I look to have fellowship with them in that Glory into which no Proud, nor Envious, nor Self-seeking man shall enter. I can freely (as I hitherto have done) yet continue doing them good, as being perswaded that by so doing, I am the more like unto God, who causeth the Sun to shine upon the good and the bad, and the Rain to fall upon the just and the unjust; following that Rule which is so often repeated in holy Writ, If thy Enemy hunger give him meat, if he be athirst give him drink, for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire upon his head, and the Lord shall reward thee.

Worthy Sir, This Child of mine coming out the fourth time into the World, and wanting Defence, as most Truths do, cried aloud for a Patron which made me so bold as to present it at your feet; rather I wil assure you, to take a Pattern of your Patience than any waies to make a purchase of my own praise, that so in despight of Cavaliers it may be called the God-child of a Peerless God-father. You must not expect large incomiums of praise from him whose words & actions you know alwaies to be so plain, nor an Epistle stuffed as full of Flattery as an Egg is full of meat, which I hate to give, and you to receive, and God hates it in whom­soever he finds it; it is sufficient to you, and infinite joy to me, that your Works declare to the World what you are, even in these times when rich Pluto is accounted a better Phylosopher than learned Plato, when Godliness is not accounted great Gain, as it was in better times than now are, but Gain is accounted great Godliness. I had Reasons enough to make me bold to dedicate it to you, as namely, That Ingenuity of your Spirit, your excellent Endeavors for the publick Good, that admirable Con­stancy which Honor it self could not choak; so that your Splendor (like other Justices in Office with you) has not gone out like a Candle, and left a stinking snuff behind, though it hath pleased God to place you in Authority in such an Age, that calleth Vertue Vice, and Vice Vertue, that calleth Good, Evil, and Evil, Good, that strike at the Devil, and hit Christ in his Saints: To whom rather (these things considered) should I dedicate these my weak Labors, than to your self, to whom God [Page] hath given the Knowledg to discern Vertue from Vice, to love the one and hate the other, according to that excellent Speech of Plato, Oh Know­ledg, how would men love thee if they did but know thee, for as Health is the Con­servation of the Body, so is Knowledg the Conservation of the Mind, which is too too much absconded (the more is the pity) from the eyes of this langui­shing Nation, and calls aloud for a Cure, for as Plato saith in another place, If Vertue could take upon her a bodily shape, she would be so beautiful as men would be in love with her; also if Vice could take upon her a Bodily shape, she would be such an ugly beast all men would loath and disdain her, for if Drunkards have so many Apish and beastly postures, what would Drunkenness it self have, which is the Author of them all, if that could appear in a visible form? This I know you are well versed in; the love of a Real Common-wealth may be read in you even through a pair of Spectacles glassed with an inch board: this was another argument moving me to dedicate this Book to you, which tends towards the furtherance of a Common-wealth, and the pulling down a Monopoly extreamly prejudicial, yet scarce discernable.

I must be brief, because it is brevity you delight in, therefore to use many words I account it needless; your kind acceptance of this Book, I shall account such a favor as is never to be forgotten: The God of Hea­ven and Earth which hath hitherto preserved your Body in so many dangers and difficulties which you have passed, and your Spirit pure in these back-sliding Times, still be your Guide, and preserve your Spirit, Soul, and Body untill the time of your Change shall come, and present you blameless at the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ, in whom God hath loved you, and washed you from your sins in his Blood.

So praies, Sir
Your Worships most humble Servant NICH. CULPEPER.

A Premonitory Epistle TO THE READER.

Courteous READER,

THose things which God did make first in the Beginning without means, He now preserveth by Means, and therefore He hath placed Nature in the World which by Motion acts in all things, according to the quality of the thing acted upon, as Fire acts upon Wood to make a fire to warm one by, or the like; therefore as the Cause of Diseases is to be under­stood to be Natural, so is their Cures also to be effected in a Natural way; and if you do but consider the whol Universe as one united Body, and Man an Epitomy of this Body, it will seem strange to none but Mad-men and Fools that the Stars should have influence upon the Body of Man, considering he being an Epitomy of the Creation, must needs have a Celestial World within himself; for to wind the strings a little higher, If there be a Trinity in the Deity (which is denied, but by none but Ranters) then must there be a Trinity also in all his Works, if there be a Unity in the God-head, there must needs be a Unity in all his Works, and a dependancy between them, and not that God made the Creation to hang together like Ropes of Sand, so God made but one world, and yet in this one World a Trinity, first Elementary, which is lowest; Secondly, Celestial, which is next above that; Thirdly, Intellectual, which is highest in degree, and happy, yea thrice happy is he that attains to it; if then Man be capable of the Intellectual World as having an Epitomy of that in himself, whereby he knows that there is a God, and that God made this World, and Governeth it now he hath made it, that there are Angels, and that he bath an immortal Spirit in himself which causeth him to hope and expect immortality; If he have an Epitomy of the Elementary World in himself, whereby he searcheth and seeks after the Vertues of Elementary Bodies, and the various mixtures of Natural things, their Causes, Effects, Times, Fashions, Events, and how they are produced by the Elements, must he not also by the same rule have an Epitomy of the Celestial World within himself, by which he searcheth out the Motion and Course of the Celestial Bodies, and what their influence is upon the Elements, and Elementary Bodies; he that denies this, let him also deny that the whol world was made for man, that so the world may see what he is; it is palpable to those that fear God, and are conversant either in his Word or in his Works, that every inferior world is Governed by its supe­rior, and receives influence from it. God Himself the only First-being, the Maker and Disposer of all things, Governs the Celestial World by the Intellectual, namely, the Angels; He governs the Elementary World, and all Elementary Bodies, by the Celestial World, namely, the Stars; and that's the reason the influence' of the Stars reacheth not to the Mind or Rational part of Man, because it is an Epitomy of the Intellectual world which is a superior to them: but because there is now some Dispute about it (I should have said Cavelling) by such as would fain have their own Knaveries hidden, and therfore they would fain have the Stars made to stop Bottles, or else for the Angels to play at bowls with when they had nothing else to do, but not rule the Elemen­tary world, no, by no means: We shall prove they rule over the Elementary world, first by Scripture, second­ly by Reason.

First, by Scripture: I beseech you read in the first place, Genesis 1. 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. verses, And God said, let there be lights in the Firmament of the Heaven, to divide the Day from the Night: and let them be for SIGNS, and for SEASONS, and for DAIES and YEARS. And let them be for Lights in the Firmament of the Heaven to give light upon Earth: and it was so. And God made two great Lights, the greater light to RULE the day, the lesser Light to RULE the night, He made the Stars also. And set them in the Firmament of the Heaven to give light upon Earth. And to RULE over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from darkness. To this place also answers that in the 136. Psalm, He made the Sun to RULE by day, and the Moon and Stars to RULE by night. In these Scriptures God saith He made them to Rule, He set them for Signs, therefore they must signifie something, He set them also for Sea­sons, for Daies, and for Years: the Scriptures are so cleer, they need no Exposition.

But let us see a little what Reason saith to the business: It is palbable and apparant that all Elementary Bodies never stand at a stay, but are ever either increasing or decreasing: It is as apparant that the Celestial Bodies are not changed, but remain the very same they were at the first Creation; and if so, the Elementary [Page] Bodies must needs be by Nature Passive, because they are subject to change, and the Celestial Bodies active be­cause they change not; as a Carpenter when he hews a Timber-log, the Timber-log must needs change form according as [...] hewed, but the Carpenter himself changeth not.

Secondly, Consider that all Time is measured out by Motion, and that the Original of all Motion is in the Heavens, for it is the motion of the Sun which causeth day and night, Summer, Winter, Spring, and Har­vest, from which Conversion of Times and Years all changes proceed, both Heat and Cold, Dryness and Moi­sture, by which four is caused Life and Death, Generation and Putrifaction, increase and decrease of Elemen­tary things, for the Elementary world is the womb of all Elementary Creatures, both Animals, Minerals, and Vegetables, it conceives them, and nourisheth and cherisheth them being conceived: this womb is alwaies full of useful Matter, fit for the forming, increasing, and conserving Bodies, whether Animal, Mineral, or Vegetable; the Sun gives a vital seed, and stirs up all to motion and action, quickens, and defends what it hath quickned; the Moon subministers moisture to preserve what the Sun hath Generated from the scorching heat which is caused by motion: both Sun and Moon make use of the other five Planets (even as the Heart and Brain make use of the Liver, Spleen, Gall, &c. in the Body of Man) for the effecting and varying things below, and tempering them diverse waies according to their several motions, else all the things generated in the Elementary World would be of one Nature and Quality, and then the world could not subsist; for Man having all qualities in him, cannot subsist without any one of them: He, and he only is a Physitian that knows which of these qualities offends, by which of the Celestial Bodies it is caused, and how safely and speedily to remedy it; all the the rest that practice Physick are but Mountebanks, for there is no question to be made, but that all Diseases have their original from super-aboundance or deficiency of Heat, Coldness, Dryness or Moi­sture; and that the Elements barely from themselves can cause this, is an opinion more fitting for a Hog-herd than a Phylosopher, for whatsoever is begotten must have a matter to be begotten of, as well as something to beget it, and this matter must be proper to receive form, for man cannot make a Timber-log of a Turf, nor a Book of an Egg-shel, therefore this Matter must naturally be affected to suffer whatsoever form the Author pleaseth to give it: the Author of every Generation must be altogether active, not subject to any adverse principles, that so he may not run out of one thing into another before he hath finished, and this is proper to the Sun, Moon, and Stars: this will be denied by none that have lived a Rational Man but one Summer and one Winter, and felt a difference of heat and coldness, driuess and moisture, caused by the neerness and remoat­ness of the Sun, and seen the difference of springing, increasing and decaying of things upon Earth in those times, for when we see the Load-stone draws Iron, it shews plainly that Nature hath given it efficacy so to do; so when we see these things done by the Heavens, we must needs think Nature hath given the Heavens power to do so, and seeing those Qualities, Heat, Coldness, Dryness, and Moisture, are contrary the one to the other, of necessity sometimes the one must yeeld, and sometimes the other, and thence comes the Procreation, Corruption, and Vicissitude of things below; and seeing all likes rejoyce in their likes, and disagree with their dislikes, there must needs be something in the Heavens agreeable to all this, therefore some part of the Heavens is said to be Hot, some Cold, some Dry, and some moist, not because they are so in themselves, but because they work such effects in Elementary Bodies, as is evident to the experience of them that search after it.

We have now shewed you what a Physitian ought to be in respect of Knowledg in the Celestial World: I shall only now show you in a word or two what knowledg he ought to have in the Elementary and Intellectual worlds, and that very briefly, and so conclude.

As in the Celestial world he ought very carefully to heed the oppositions and great conjunctions of the Pla­nets, the Eclipses of the Luminaries, the Quarterly ingresses of the Sun and the Crisis of Diseases, so in the Elementary world he ought to heed the Seasons of the Year, whether they be hotter, colder, dryer, moister than they should be; [...] ought to be very well skilled in Vegetables and Minerals and how the Earth brings them forth, what is the Office of the Central Sun, and what is the office of the Celestial Sun, what is the office of the Central Moon, and what the office of the Celestial Moon in the production of things here below, and how, and by what Mediums they perform it.

Lastly, In the Intellectual World, he ought to be very frequent, fearing God, and eschewing evil, for into his hands as the means, hath the eternal God of Heaven and Earth put the lives of those Christians whom, he loved so well that he redeemed them by the Blood of his only begotten Son: Let him be very studious in those great Books of God, the Book of the Scripture, and the Book of the Creatures, let the Glory of God, and the Good of the Creature be his whol Aim, neither let such a Monster as Covetousness have the least entertain­ment in his heart; let him be no respecter of Persons, but go as willingly to the Poor for nothing, as to the Rich for a reward, Knowing, That he that giveth to the Poor, lendeth to the Lord, and he shall be sure to have a good Pay-master. To conclude, In all his practices let him consider what he would have another do to him if he were in like case, and do the like to them: and to them that follow this Rule, Peace shall be upon them, as upon the Israel of God.

Ita dixit Nich. Culpeper.

Weights and Measures in the New DISPENSATORY.

  • Twenty Grains make a Scruple.
  • Three Scruples make a Drachm.
  • Eight Drachms make an Ounce.
  • Twelve Ounces make a Pound.

THe most usual Measures [amongst us] (quoth the Colledg) are these:

A Spoon which in Syrups holds half an ounce, in distilled Waters three drachms.

A Taster which holds an ounce and an half.

A Congie which (in their former Dispensatory held nine pound, now) holds but eight pound; viz. just a Gallon: To miss but one Pint in a Gallon is no­thing with a Colledg of Physitians, such Physitians as our times afford. The reason I suppose is, Because most Nations differ in the quantity of their Measures, and they quoted their Congius from one Nation be­fore, and from another now; for indeed their Di­spensatory is borrowed a great part of it from Arabia, part from Greece, some from France, some from Spain, and some from Italy, and now they vapor with it. Oh brave! should a man that borrowed his Cloathes from so many Broakers in Long-lane be proud of them?

Besides these, they have gotten another antick way of MENSURATION which they have not set down here, viz. By Handfuls and Pugils. An Handful is as much as you can gripe in one Hand; and a Pu­gil as much as you can take up with your Thumb and two Fingers; and how much that is who can tell? Intruth this way of Mensuration is as certain as the Weather-cock, and as various as mens Fingers are in length, and the things taken up in driness or form; for an Handsul of green Herbs will not be half an Handsul or not above when they are dry: and your mother-wit will teach you that you may take up more Hay in this manner than Bran, and more Bran than Sand. And thus much for their Weights, and also for their Measures: both rediculous and contradictive.

Weights and Measures in the Old Dispensatory.

TWenty Grains do make a Scruple. Three Scru­ples make a drachm (commonly called a dram) Right Drachms make an Ounce. Twelve Ounces make a Pound.

As for the Colledges Measures I know not well what English Names to give them. [...] holds in Syrups half an Ounce; in distilled Waters three Drachms. [...] holds an ounce and an half. Hemina (which also they call Cotyla) contains nine Ounces. Libra holds twelve Ounces. A Sextary contains eighteen Ounces. A Congie six Sextaties.

These Measures amongst the Romans contained not just the same quantities; for their Cyathus contained an ounce and an half, a drachm and a scruple. Their Sextary contained but fourteen ounces, three [...], and half a quarter; and among the Gracians not so much: It is called a [...] because it is the sixt part of a Congie. Neither did the Roman Hemina contain altogether seven ounces and an half. Their Libra I suppose to be that which Galen calls [...], viz. A Vessel to measure with; it was made of cleer Horn, and by certain lines drawn round it like rings, was divided into twelve equal parts, each part con­taining an ounce.

DIRECTIONS.

ALthough I did what I could throughout the whol Book to express my self in such a lan­guage as might be understood by all, and therefore avoided terms of Art as much as might be, (it being the task of the Colledg to write only to the Learned and the Nurslings of Apollo, but of my Self to do my Country good; which is the Center all my Lines tend to, and I destre should terminate in) Yet,

1. Some words must of necessity fall in, which need explanation.

2. It would be very tedious at the end of every Re­ceipt to repeat over and over again, the way of admi­nistration of the Receipt, or ordering your Bodies after it, or to instruct you in the mixture of Medicines, and indeed would do nothing else but stuff the Book full of [...].

To answer to both these is my task at this time.

To the first:

The words which need explaining, such as are ob­vious to my Eye are these that follow.

  • 1. To distil in Balneo Mariae, is the usual way of distilling in Water. It is no more than to [...] your Glass-Body which holds the matter to be distilled in a convenient vessel of Water, when the Water is cold (for fear of breaking) put a wisp of Straw, or the like under it, to keep it from the bottom, then make the Water boyl, that so the Spirit may be distilled forth; take not the Glass out till the Water be cold again, for fear of breaking: It is impossible for a man to learn how to do it, unless he saw it done.
  • 2. Manica Hippocrates, Hippocrates his Sleeve, is a piece of woolen cloath, new and white, sewed toge­ther in form of a Sugar-loaf. Its use is, to strain any Syrup or Decoction through, by powring it into it, and suffering it to run through without pressing or crushing it.
  • 3. Calcination, is a burning of a thing in a Cruci­ble or other such convenient vessel that will endure the fire: A Crucible is such a thing as your Gold-smiths melt Silver in, and your Founders their Mettals; you may place it in the midst of the fire, with coals a­bove, below, and on every side of it.
  • 4. Filtration, is straining of a liquid body through a brown [...]: Make up the Paper in form of a Fun­nel, the which having placed in a Funnel, and placed the Funnel, and the Paper in it in an empty Glass, powr in the Liquor you would filter, and let it run through at its leisure.
  • 5. Coagulation, is curdling or hardning: It is used in Physick for reducing a liquid body to hardness by the heat of the fire.
  • 6. Whereas you find Vital, Natural, and Animal Spirits often mentioned in the Vertues of Receipts, I shall explain what they be, and what their [...] is in the Body of Man.
  • The actions or operations of the Animal Vertues, are,
    • 1. Sensitive.
    • 2. Motive.
    The Sensitive is
    • 1. External.
    • 2. Internal.
    • The External Sences are
      • 1. Seeing.
      • 2. Hearing.
      • 3. Tasting.
      • 4. Smelling.
      • 5. Feeling.
    • The Internal Sences are
      • 1. Imagination to apprehend a thing.
      • 2. Judgment, to Judg of it.
      • 3. Memory, to remember it.
  • The seat of all these is in the Brain.

    The Vital Spirits proceedeth from the Heart, and causeth in Man Mirth, Joy, Hope, Trust, Humani­ty, Mildness, Courage, &c. and their opposites: Viz. Sadness, Fear, Care, Sorrow, Despair, Envy, Hatred, Stubbornness, Revenge, &c. by heat Natural or not Natural.

    The Natural Spirit nourisheth the Body [...] (as the Vital quickens it, and the Animal gives it Sence and Motion) Its office is to alter or [...] Food into Chyle, Chyle into Blood, Blood into Flesh, to Form, Engender, Nourish, and Increase the Body.

  • 7. Infusion, is to steep a gross body into one [...] Liquid.
  • 8. Decoction, is the Liquor in which any thing is boyled.

As for the manner of [...] or ordering the [...] any sweating, or purging Medicines, or Pills, or the like, the Table at the latter end of the Vertues of the Medicines will direct you to what Pages you may find them in, look but the word [Rules] there. As al­so in the next Page.

The different forms of making up Medicines, [...] [...] People, that so Medicines might be more delightfull, or at least less burdensom: in such a case, the Table of Vertues at the latter end will universally furnish you with the generality of both Simples and Compounds a­propriated to the Disease. You may make the mix­tures of them in what form you please; only for your better instruction at present, accept of these few Rules:

  • 1. Consider, That all Diseases are cured by their contraries, but all parts of the Body maintained by their likes: Then if heat be the cause of the Disease, give the cold Medicine apropriated to it, if Wind, see how many Medicines apropriated to that Disease ex­pel Wind, and use them.
  • [...] [...], for if your Brain be over heated, and you use such Medicines as cool the Heart or Liver, you may make mad work.
  • [Page]3. The distilled Water of any Herb you would take for a disease, is a sit mixture for the Syrup of the same Herb, or to make any [...] into a Drink, if you affect such liquid Medicines best: if you have not the distilled water, make use of the Decoction.
  • 4. Diseases that lie in parts of the Body remot from the Stomach and Bowels, it is in vain to think to car­ry away the cause at once, and therefore you had best do it by degrees; Pills, and such like Medicines which are hard in Body, are fittest for such a business, because they are longest before they digest.
  • 5. Use no strong Medicines, if weak will serve the turn; you had better take one too weak by half, than too strong in the least.
  • 6. Consider the Natural temper of the part of the Body afflicted, and maintain it in that, else you extin­guish Nature, as the Heart is hot, the Brain cold, or at least the coldest part of the Body.
  • 7. Observe this general Rule; That such Medicins as are hot in the first degree are most habitual to our Bodies, because they are just of the heat of our Blood.
  • 8. All opening Medicines, and such as provoke U­rine, or the Terms, or break the Stone, may most con­veniently be given in white wine, because white Wine os it self is of an opening Nature, and clenseth the Reins gallantly.
  • 9. Let all such Medicines as are taken to stop flu­xes or [...], be taken before meat, about an hour be­fore, more or less, that so they may strengthen the di­gestion and retentive faculty, before the Food come in­to the Stomach; But such as are subject to vomit up their meat, let them take such Medicines as stay vo­miting presently after meat, at the conclusion of their Meals, that so they may close up the mouth of the sto­mach; and that is the reason why usually men eat a [...] of [...] after meat, because by its sowrness and binding it closeth the mouth of the stomach, thereby staying belching and vomiting.
  • 10. In taking Purges be very carefull, and that you may be so, observe these Rules,
    • 1. Consider what the humor offending is, and let the Medicine be such as purgeth that humor, else will you weaken Nature, not the Disease.
    • 2. Take notice, if the humor you would purge out be thin, then gentle Medicines will serve the turn, but if it be tough and viscous, take such Medicines as are cutting and opening the night before you would take the Purge.
    • 3. In purging tough humors, sorbear as much as may be such Medicines as leave a binding quality be­hind them.
    • 4. Have a care of taking Purges when your Body is astringent; your best way, is first to open it by a Clyster.
    • 5. In taking opening Medicines, you may safely take them at night, eating but a light supper three or four hours before, and the next morning drinking a draught of warm Posset-drink, and you need not fear to go a­bout your business. In this manner you may take Le­nitive Electuary, Diacatholicon, Pulp of Cassia, and the like gentle Electuaries, as also all Pills that have neither Diagrydium nor Colocynthis in them. But all violent Purges require a due ordering of the Body, such ought to be taken in the morning after you are up, and not to sleep after them before they have done wor­king, at least before night; two hours after you have taken them, drink a draught of warm Posset-drink, or Broath, and six hours after eat a bit of Mutton, of­ten walking about the Chamber; let there be a good fire in the Chamber, and stir not out of the Chamber till the Purge have done working, or not till next day.

Lastly, Take sweating Medicines when you are in bed, covered warm, and in the time of your sweating drink Posset-drink as hot as you can drink it; if you sweat for a Feaver, boyl Sorrel and red Sage in your Posset-drink, sweat an hour or longer if your strength will permit, then (the chamber being kept very warm) shift your self all but your Head, about which (the Cap which you sweat in being still kept on) wrap a Napkin very hot, to repell the vapors back.

I confess these, or many of these Directions may be found in one place of the Book or other, and I delight as little to write tautology as another, but the Prin­ter desiring they should be put here, and I considering it might make for the publick good, inserted them; if notwithstanding any will be so mad to do them­selves a mischief, the fault is not mine.

The TRANSLATORS PREFACE to the Catalogue of SIMPLES.

BEfore I begin the Catalogue, I thought good to pre­mise a few words to the Reader.

1. Let him have a care he mistake not one thing for another; viz. Herbs for Roots, or either of them for Flowers: If he cast but his eye up to the top of the Page he shall there see which it is.

2. Let a due time be observed (cases of necessity excepted) in gathering all Simples; for which take these few Rules. The time to gather all roots is before the hearb run up to seed, for then they are softest, as you may see by Radishes, carrots, parsneps &c. the roots of which, you may perceive hard when they run up to seed and not because the sap is then in the root, as the vulgar hold; for if the sap rose and fell as they hold, then the root must grow in winter only, as the branches do in Summer, which experience will shew to be falce; for the root grows only in Summer, as the branches doe; you see what a wooden Docter Tradition is: Would not this make e­very one endevour to Study a reason for what he doeth? and see how our forefathers have been lead by the noses by Tradition. The truth is, it is the Sun is the author of life and growth to the wholl Creati­on, he was ordained of God for that end; when he comes on this side of the Equator, the trees spring, when he passeth to the south side of the Equator they loose their verdant color and growth also till the revolution of time bring his presence to revive them; but enough of this in this place.

Herbs are to be gathered when they are fullest of juyce which is, before thy run up to seed; and if you gather them in a hot sunshine day, they will not be so subject to putrifie: the best way to dry them, is in the Sun, according to Dr. REASON, though not according to [Page 2] Dr. TRADITION: Such Herbs as remaine green all the year, or are very full of juyce, it were a folly to dry at all, but gather them only for present use, as Housleek, Scurvy-grass &c.

Let Flowers be gathered when they are in their prime, in a sun­shine day, and dried in the sun. Let the Seeds be perfectly ripe be­fore they be gathered.

3. Let them be kept in a dry place; for any moisture, though it be but a moist air, corrupts them, which if perceived in time, the beams of the Sun will refresh the hearbs and flowers and do the Sun no harm.

4. Take notice, that only the Latin Names, were quoted by the Colledg, & are to beseen at the beginning of each Simple, in a diffe­rent Letter; the English Name, together with the Temperature, and Vertues, were added by the Translator for the publick good.

5. All the Latin Names to one Herb are not set down, most of which are superfluous, some ridiculons, some Idolatrous; as to attri­bute one Herb, to the Virgin Mary, another to St. Peter, and a third to St. Paul: Some blasphemous as to call one, the holy Ghost, another Allelujah, another, an Herb of the Trinity &c. So in the Compositions, To call an Oyntment, the Oynt­ment of the Apostles: to call one Plaister, Divine, another, Holy, a third, the grace of God. The Colledge might have been ashamed of it if they had ever come where shame grew: but,. 1. The Heathen they dedicated herbs and trees to their Gods. 2. the Pa­pists they must follow their patriarks and dedicate them to their Saints; Ours having not wit enough to find out a third, (for their wits were in print before they were born) they follow the Papists as their holy Fathers as in absconding their art so in their blasphemies, see how one sin ushers in another.

A CATALOGUE OF THE SIMPLES CONDUCING TO THE DISPENSATORY.

ROOTS.

ACANTHI, Brancae Ursinae. Of Bears-breech, or Brank-ursine; it is meanly hot and dry, it helps ach and numness of the joynts, and is of a binding quality, good for wounds and bro­ken bones. Dioscorides saith, they are profita­ble for Ruptures, or such as are bursten, or burnt with fire, a drachm of the Root in Pouder being taken in the morning fasting, in a Decoction made with the same Root and Water.

Acori, Veri, Perigrini vulgaris, &c. See Calamus Aromaticus. I shall not, nor dare not make a long Paraphrase about the sorts of it, one of which is Water-flag, or Flower-de-luce, which is hot and dry in the second degree, binds, strengthens, stops fluxes of the belly, and immo­derate flowing of the terms in women, a drachm being taken in red wine every morning.

Alljum. Garlick. It is hot and dry in the fourth degree, breeds naughty and corrupt blood, yet is an enemy to all Poysons, and such as are bitten by cold venemous beasts, viz. Adders, Toads, Spiders, &c. it provokes urin, and expels wind.

Alcannae. Of Privet. See the Leaves.

Althaeae. Of Marshmallows: are meanly hot, of a digesting softning nature, ease pains, help bloody fluxes, the stone and gravel; being bruised and well boyled in Milk, and the Milk drunk, is a gallant Remedy for the gripings of the belly, and the Bloody flux: If a Feaver accom­pany the Disease, boyl a handful of common Mallow leaves with a handful of these Roots.

Angelicae. Of Angelica; is hot and dry in the third degree, strengthens the heart excee­dingly, and is a singular remedy against pesti­lence and poyson, half a drachm taken in the morning fasting.

Anchusae. Of Alkanet; cold and dry, bin­ding, good for old Ulcers.

Anthorae. An outlandish root, the counter­poyson for Monkshood, it is an admirable re­medy for the wind-chollick, and resists poyson. They that would know more of it, let them reade Guainerius, and Solerius, both which li­ved neer the places where it plentifully grew.

Apii. Of Smallage. See the Barks.

Aristolochiae. Of Birthwort: of which are three sorts, long, round, and climing: All hot and dry in the third degree.

The long, being drunk in Wine, brings a­wayDioscori­des. both birth and after-birth, and whatsoever a careless Midwife hath left behind.Galen.

[Page 4]The round, being drunk with Wine, helps (besides the former) stuffings of the lungues, hardness of the spleen, ruptures, convulsions; both of them resist poyson.

I never read any use of the climing Birthwort. Artanitae, Cyclaminis, &c, Of Sowbread: hot and dry in the third degree, a most violent purge, dangerous; outwardly applied to the place, it profits much in the bitings of vene­mous beasts, also being hung about women in labor, it causeth speedy deliverance. See the Herb.

Arundinis, Vallatoriae, & Saccharinae. Of common Reeds and sugar Reeds. The Roots of common Reeds applied to the place draw out thorns, case sprains; the ashes of them mixed with Vinegar, take scurf, or dandrif off from the head, and prevent the falling off of the hair, they are hot and dry in the second degree, according to Galen.

I would not have the Reader build too much confidence upon the degrees of temperature (or more properly intemperature) neither of this, or any other Simple, because most of them are quo­ted by Outlandish Authors; and out of question the difference of the climate may somthing alter their temperature in degree.

I never read any vertue of the Root of Sugar Cane.

Ari, &c. Of Cuckow-pints, or Wake-Ro­bin, hot and dry in the third degree. I know no great good they do inwardly taken, unless to play the rogue withal, or make sport: outward­ly applied, they take off Scurf, Morphew, or Frec­kles from the face, and cleer the skin, and case the pains of the Gout.

Asclepiadis, vincetoxici. Of Swallow-wort, hot and dry, good against poyson, and gripings of the belly, as also against the bitings of mad­dogs, taken inwardly.

Asari. Of Asarabacca: the Roots are a safer purge than the Leaves and not so violent, I do not much fancy any of them both, ignorant people had better let them alone than be too bu­sie with what they have no skill in: they purge by vomit, stool, and urine, they are profitable for such as have Agues, Dropsies, stoppings of the Liver, or Spleen, green sickness.

Asparagi. Of Sparagus, or Sperage: they are temperate in quality, opening, they provoke urine, and cleanse the reins and bladder, being boyled in white wine, and the wine drunk.

Asphodeli, Hastae Regiae, foem. Of Kings spear, or foemale Asphodel. I know no physical use of the Roots, probably there is: for I do not be­leeve God created any thing of no use.

Asphodeli, Albuci, maris, of male Asphodel. Hot and and dry in the second degree. Inward­ly taken, they provoke vomit, urine, and the terms in women: outwardly used in Oyntments, they cause hair to grow, clense Ulcers, take a­way Morphew and Freckles from the face.

Bardanae &c. Of Bur, Clot-bur, or Bur­dock,Dioscori­des. temperately hot and dry. Helps such as spit blood and matter, bruised and mixed withApuleius. salt and applied to the place, helps the bitings of mad-dogs. It expels wind, easeth pains of the teeth, strengthens the back, helps the running of the reins, and the whites in women, being taken inwardly.

Behen. alb. rub. Of Valerian, white and red. Mesue, Serapio and other Arabians say they are hot and moist, in the latter end of the first, or beginning of the second degree, and comfort the heart, stir up lust. The Graecians held them to be dry in the second degree, that they stop fluxes, and provoke urine.

Bellidjs. Of Dacies. See the Leaves.

Betae, nigrae, albae, rubrae. Of Beets, black, white, and red; as for black Beets I have no­thing to say, I doubt they are as rare as black Swans. The red Beet root boyled and preserved in Vinegar, makes a fine cool, pleasing, clensing, digesting sawce. See the Leaves.

Bistortae &c. Of Bistort, or Snakeweed, cold and dry in the third degree, binding, the quan­tity of half a dram at a time taken inwardly, resist pestilence and poyson, helps ruptures, and brui­ses, staies fluxes, vomiting, and immoderate flowing of the terms in women, helps inflama­tions and soreness of the mouth, and fastens loose teeth, being bruised and boyled in white Wine and the mouth washed with it.

Borraginis. Of Borrage, hot and moist inDioscori­de. the first degree, cheers the heart, helps drooping spirits.

Brionae &c. Of Briony both white and black, they are both hot and dry, some say in the third degree, and some say, but in the first: they purge flegm and watry humors, but they trouble the stomach much, they are very good for dropsies; the white is most in use, and is admirable good for the fits of the Mother; both of them externally used, take away Freckles, Sun­burning and Morphew from the face, and clense filthy Ulcers: It is but a churlish purge, but being let alone, can do no harm.

Buglossi. Of Bugloss: Its vertues are the same with Borrage, and the Roots of either sel­dom used.

Bulbus Vomitorius. A vomiting Root: I ne­ver read of it elsewhere by this general name.

Calami Aromatici. Of Aromatical Reed, or sweet garden flag: It provokes Urine, streng­thens the lungues, helps bruises, resists poyson, &c. being taken inwardly in pouder, the quan­tity of half a drachm at a time. In beating of it be very speedy, for the strength will quickly fly out. You may mix it with Syrup of Violets, if your body be feaverish.

Capparum. Of Cappar Roots. Are hot and dry in the second degree, cutting and clensing; they provoke the Terms, help malignant Ulcers, case the Toothach, asswage Swellings, and help the Rickets. See Oyl of Cappers.

Cariophillatae &c. Of Avens, or Herb Ben­net. The Roots are dry, and somthing hot, of a cleansing quality, they keep garments from be­ing moth-eaten. See the Leaves.

Caulium. Of Coleworts. I know nothing [Page 5] the Roots are good for, but only to bear the the herbs and flowers.

Centaurij Majoris. Of Centaury the greater. The Roots help such as are bursten, such as spit blood, shrinking of sinews, shortness of wind, Coughs, Convulsions, Cramps: half a drachm in pouder being taken inwardly, either in Mus­chadel, or in a Decoction of the same Roots. They are either not at all, or very scarce in Eng­land, our Centaury is the smal Centaury.

Cepae. Of Onions. Are hot and dry (ac­cording to Galen) in the fourth degree: they cause driness, and are extreamly [...] for cho­lerick people, they breed but little nourishment, and that little is naught; they are bad meat, yet good Physick for flegmatick people, they are o­pening, and provoke Urine, and the terms, if cold be the cause obstructing; bruised and out­wardly applied, they cure the bitings of mad dods; rosted and applied, they help Boils, and Aposthumes; raw, they take the fire out of burnings; but ordinarily eaten, they cause head­ach, spoil the sight, dull the sences, and fill the body full of wind.

Chameleontis albi nigri &c. Of Chameleon white and black. Tragus calleth the Carline Thistle by the name of white Chameleon, the root whereof is hot in the second degree, and dry in the third; it provokes sweat, kils worms, resists pestilence and poyson, it is given with success in pestilential feavers, helps the tooth­ach, by being chewed in the mouth, opens the stoppings of the Liver and Spleen, it provokes urine, and brings down the terms: give but lit­tle of it at a time, by reason of its heat. As for the black Chemeleon, All Physicians hold it to have a kind of venemous quality, and unfit to be used inwardly, both Galen, Clusius, Nican­der, Dioscorides, and Aegineta. Outwardly in Oyntments, it is profitable for Scabs, Morphew, Tetters, &c. and all things that need clensing.

Chelidonij, majoris, minoris. Of Celondine, the greater and lesser: The greater is that which we usually call Celondine: The Root is mani­festly hot and dry, clensing and scouring, proper for such as have the yellow Jaundice, it opens obstructions of the Liver; being boyled in white Wine, and the Decoction drunk; and if chewed in the mouth it helps the tooth-ach.

[...] the lesser is that which usually we call Pilewort, which though Galen, and Dio­scorides teach to be hot in the fourth degree, and might happily be so in those Countries where they lived, yet with us it scarce exceeds the first degree, the Juyce of the root mixed with Honey and snuffed up into the nose, purgeth the Head, helps the Hemorrhoids or Piles being bathed with it, as also doth the root only carried about one, being made into an Oyntment helps theScro­phula. disease in the neck commonly called the Kings Evil.

China, wonderfully extenuateth and drieth, provoketh sweat, resisteth putrefaction, it streng­thens the Liver, helps the Dropsie and malig­nant Ulcers, Leprosie, Itch, and French-pocks, and is profitable in Diseases coming of fasting. It is commonly used in diet drinks for the pre­mises.

Cichoris. Of Succory; cools and dries in the second degree, strengthens the Liver and Veins, it opens obstructions, stoppings of the Liver and Spleen, being boyled in white Wine and the Decoction drunk.

Colchici. Of Meadow-Saffron. The Roots are held to be hurtful to the stomach, therefore I let them alone.

Consolidae, majoris, minoris. Consolida major, is that which we ordinarily call Comfry; it is of a cold quality, yet pretty temperate, of such a gluttenous quality that according to Dioscorides they will joyn meat together that is cut in sun­der, if they be boyled with it; it is excellent for all wounds, both internal and external, for spit­ting of blood, Ruptures or Burstness, pains in the back, it strengthens the Reins, it stops the Terms, and helpeth Hemorrholds. The way to use them is to boyl them in water and drink the Decoction.

Consolida minor, is that we call Self-heal, and the Latins Prunella. See the Herb.

Costi utriusque. Of Costus both sorts, being Roots coming from beyond Sea, hot and dry, break wind, being boyld in Oyl, it is held to help the Gout by anointing the grieved place with it.

Cucumeris agrestis. Of wild Cucumer Roots, or Cowcumber as the vulgar call them; they purge flegm, and that with such violence, that I would advise the Country man that knows not how to correct them, to let them alone.

Cinarae &c. Of Artichokes. The Root purgeth by Urin, whereby the rank savor of the body is much amended.

Cynoglossae &c. Of Houndstong. Cold and dry: being roasted and laid to the fundament, helps the Hemorrhoids, is also good against bur­nings and Scaldings.

Curcumae. Of Turmerick, hot, in the third degree, opens obstructions, is profitable against the yellow Jaundice, and cold distempers of the Liver and Spleen, half a drachm being taken at night going to bed in the pulp of a rosted Apple, and if you ad a little Saffron to it, it will be the better by far.

Cyperi utriusque, longi, rotundi. Of Cyperus grass, or English Galanga, both sorts, long and round; is of a warming nature, provokes urine, breaks the Stone, provokes the Terms; the A­shes of them (being burnt) is used for Ulcers in the mouth, Cankers, &c.

Dauci. Of Carrots. Are moderately hot and moist, breed but little nourishment, and it extream windy; I omit what vertues Galen writes of them, as being confident there was such a difference between them, that our Carrots will never answer those effects, or if any do, 'tis the wild kind.

Dentaria majoris &c. Of Tooth-wort, too­thed Violets, or Coral-wort; they are drying, binding, and strengthening; are good to ease [Page 6] pains in the sides and bowels; also being boy­led, the [...] is said to be good to wash green Wounds and Ulcers with.

Dictamni. Of Dittany: is hot and dry in the third degree, [...] travail in women, provokes the Terms. (See the Leaves.)

[...]. Of Doronicum, a supposed kind of Wolf-bane: I am of opinion that Serapio and [...] and other Arabian Physitians did not intend that Root we now use for Doronicum when they wrote so much against it, I shall ad­hear to the judgment of [...], which is verifi­ed by dayly experience; It is hot and dry in the third degree, strengthens the heart, is a soveraign cordial, and preservative against the Pestilence; It helps the Vertigo or swimming of the head, is admirable against the bitings of Venemous beasts, and such as have taken too much Opium, as also for Lethargies, the Juyce helps hot [...] in the eyes; a scruple of the Root in pouder is [...] to take at one time.

[...], Dracunculi. Diverse Authors at­tribute [...] to this name, it is most pro­bableMathio­lus. to me that they mean Dragons, the RootsDiosco­rides. of which cleanse mightily, and take away proud, or dead flesh, the very smell of them is hurtful for women with Child, outwardly in Oynt­ments, they take away Scurf, Morphew, and Sun­burning; I would not wish any unless very well read in Physick, to take them inwardly.

Ebuli. Of [...] Elder, Walwort, or Dane­wort; hot and dry in the third degree; the Roots are as gallant a purge for the [...] as any is under the Sun, which besides the Autho­rity of the Ancient, was often proved by the ne­ver dying Dr. Butler of Cambridg, as my self have it in a Manuscript of his. You may take a drachm or two drachms (if the Patient be strong) in white Wine at a tim.

Echij. Of Vipers Bugloss, or Wild Bugloss: I warrant you if Authors had not differed about this herb, the Colledg would have set down five or six names to have explained their meaning, as they usually do where they need not: I have set down the most usual name, and alwaies quote the vertues to what I set down: They say the root of this being carried in ones hand, no vene­mous beast will bite him, (and so they say of Dragons which I forgot before) so that you may walk without danger amongst Adders, Vipers, and Serpents; (but I beleeve you had best have a care you do not tread upon them): this root is cold and dry, good for such as are bitten by vene­mous beasts, either being boiled in Wine and drunk, or bruised and [...] to the place; being also boiled in Wine and drunk, it encreaseth milk in Nurses.

Ellebori, Veratri, albi, nigri. Of Helle­bore, white and black. The root of white Hel­lebore, or Sneezwort, being grated and [...] up the nose, causeth Sneezing, kills Rats, and Mice, being mixed with their meat: it is but a scurvy, churlish Medicine; being taken inwardly, and therefore better let alone than used; and yet Dr. Bright commends it for such as are mad through Melancholly. Others are of opinion such harsh Medicines are not convenient for so sullen an humor, and of that opinion am I my self: If you will use it, for sneezing, let your head and neck be wrapped hot for fear of car­ching cold.

Black Hellebore, Bears-foot, or Christmas flower; both this and the former are hot and dry in the third degree. This is nothing so vio­lent nor dangerous as the former, Both Galen, and Julius Alexandrinus, report the roots of this boiled in Vineger to be an admirable remedy against inveterate Scabs, Itch and Leprosie, the same helps the Tooth-ach, being held in the mouth, and dropped into the ears, help deafness coming of Melancholly, and noise in the ears; You must boyl them but very little, for the strength will soon fly out in vapor. corrected with a little Cionamon (in pouder) it purgeth Melancholly, resisteth Madness. Al­so Pliny, Absyrtus, and Columella, affirm that a piece of root put into a hole made in the ear of a beast troubled with the Cough, or that hath ta­ken any poyson, and drawn quite through next day about that time, helpeth them: out of que­stion it is a special thing to rowel Cattel with­all.

Enulae Campanae, Helenij. Of Elecampane. Is hot and dry in the third degree, wholsom for the stomach, resists poyson, helps old Coughs and shortness of breath, helps Ruptures and pro­vokes lust: in Oyntments, it is good against Scabs and Itch.

Endiviae &c. Of Endive. Garden Endive which is the root here specified, is held to be somewhat colder, though not so dry and clean­sing as that which is wild, it cools hot stomachs, hot livers, amends the blood corrupted by heat, and therefore must needs be good in Feavers; it cools the Reins, and therefore prevents the Stone, it opens obstructions and provokes Urine, you may bruise the root and boyl it in white wine, 'tis very harmless.

Eringij. Of Eringo, or Sea-holy: the roots are moderately hot, something drying and clen­sing, bruised and applied to the place, they help the Scrophula, or diseace in the throat called the Kings Evil, they break the Stone, encrease seed, stir up lust, provoke the Terms &c.

Esulae, majoris, minoris. Of Spurge the grea­ter and lesser; they are both (taken inwardly) too violent for a vulgar use; outwardly in Oyntments they clense the Skin, and take away sunburning.

Filicis &c. Fearn, of which are two grand di­stinctions, viz. male and foemale; I suppose they intend the male here, because they adjoyn some other names to it, which the Greeks attributed only to the male, the foemale is that which we in Sussex call Brakes; both of them are hot and dry, and exellent good for the Rickets in children, and diseases of the Spleen, but dangerous for women with child.

Filipendulae. Of Dropwort, The roots are hot and dry in the third degree, opening, clen­sing, yet somewhat binding, they provoke U­rine, case pains in the bladder, and are a good [Page 7] preservative against the Falling sickness.

Foeniculi. Of Fennl: The root is hot and dry, some say in the third degree, opening; it pro­vokes Urine, and the Terms, strengthens the Liver, and is good against the dropsie.

Fraxini. Of Ash-tree. I know no great ver­tues in Physick of the roots.

Galangae, majoris, minoris. Galanga com­monly called Galingal, the greater and lesser: They are hot and dry in the third [...] and the lesser are accounted the hotter, it strengthens the stomach exceedingly, and takes away the pains thereof coming of cold or wind, the smelMathiolus of it strengthens the brain, it releeves saint hearts, takes away windiness of the womb, heats the Reins, and provokes lust: you may take half a drachm at a time.

Gentianae, Of Gentian, called so fromGentius a Prince. his name that first found it out, some call it Felwort, and Baldmoney. It is hot, clenssng, and scour­ing, a notable counterpoyson, it opens obstru­ctions, helps the bitings of venemous beasts, and mad dogs, helps digestion, and clenseth the body of raw humors; our Chyrurgians use the root in form of a tent, to open the sore, they are also very profitable for Ruptures, or such as are burst,

[...]. Of Liquoris; the best that is grows in England: it is hot and moist in tem­perature, helps the roughness of the Wind­pipe, Hoarsness, diseases in the Kidnies, and Bladder, and ulcers in the Bladder, (which in my opinion is a very difficult thing to cure, al­though curable) it concocts raw humors in the stomach, helps difficulty of breathing, is pro­fitable for all salt humors; the root dried and beaten into pouder and the pouder put into the eye, is a special remedy for a Pin and a Web.

Graminis. Of Grass, such as in London they call Couch-Grass, and Squitch-grass, in Sussex Dog-Grass. It gallantly provokes Urine, and easeth the Kidnies [...] with Gravel, gri­pings of the belly, and difficulty of Urine. LetGalen. such as are troubled with these Diseases, drink [...]. a draught of white Wine, wherein these Roots (being bruised) have been boyled for their mor­nings draught; if they find ease, let them thank God, if not, let them blame me. Bruised and applied to the place, they speedily help green Wounds.

Hermodactyli. Of Hermodactils. They are hot and dry, purge flegm, especially from the joynts, therefore are good for Gouts, and other Diseases in the Joynts. Their vices are corre­cted with long Pepper, Ginger, Cinnamon, or Mastich: I would not have unskilful people too busie with Purges.

Hyacinthi. Of Jacinths: The Roots are dry in the first degree, and cold in the second; they stop loosness, bind the belly.

Iridis, vulgaris, & Florentinae, &c. Orris, or Flower-de-luce (after the French name) both that which grows with us, and that which comes from Florence. They are hot and dry in the third degree, resist poyson, help shortness of the breath, provoke the terms; the Root being green and bruised, takes away blackness and blewness of a stroke being applied thereto.

Imperitoriae &c. Of Masterwort. The Root is hot and dry in the third degree; mitigates the rigor of agues, helps Dropsies, provokes Sweat, breaks Carbuncles, and Plague-sores be­ing applied to them; it is very profitable being given inwardly in bruises.

Isatidis, Glasti. Of Woad. I know no great Physical vertue in the Root. See the Herb.

Labri Veneris, Dipsaci. Fullers-Thistle, Teazle. The Root being boyled in Wine till it be thick (quoth Discorides) helps by unction the clefts of the Fundament, as also takes away Warts and Wens. Galen saith, they are dry in the second degree: and I take it all Authors hold them to be cold and dry.

Lactucae. Of Lettice. I know no Physical vertue residing in the Roots.

Lauri. Of the Bay-tree. The Bark of the Root, drunk with Wine, provokes Urine, breaks the Stone, opens obstructions of the Liver andGalen. Spleen. But according to Dioscorides is naught for women with Child.

Lapathi acuti, Oxylapathi. Sorrel, according to Galen: but Sharp-pointed-Dock, according to Dioscorides: But which the Colledg intends, I know not. The Roots of Sorrel are held to be profitable against the Jaundice. Of Sharp­pointed Dock; clense, and helps Scabs, and Itch.

Levistici, Of Lovage. They are hot and dry, and exceeding good for any diseases coming of wind.

[...] albi. Of white [...]. The Root is somthing hot and dry, helps Burnings, softens the Womb, provokes the Terms; if boyled in Wine, is given with good success in rotten Fea­vers, Pestilences, and all Diseases that require suppuration: (it being outwardly applied) helps Ulcers in the head, and amends the ill colour of the face.

Malvae. Of Mallows. They are cool, and digesting, resist Poyson, and help Errosions, or gnawing of the bowels, or any other part; as al­so Ulcers in the Bladder. See Marsh-mallows.

Mandagorae. Of Mandrakes. A Root dan­gerous for its coldness, being cold in the fourth [...], the Root is scarcy, and dangerous for the vulgar to use; therefore I leave it to those that have skill.

Mechoachanae. Of Mechoacan. It is corre­cted with Cinnamon, is temperate, yet drying, purgeth flegm chiefly from the head and joynts, it is good for old diseases in the head, and may safely be given even to Feaverish bodies, because of its temperature, it is also profitable against Coughs and pains in the Reins; as also against the French-Pox: the strong may take a dram at a time.

Mei &c. Spignel. The Roots are hot and dry in the second or third degree, and send up unwholsom vapors to the head; and therefore seeing God hath alootted such plentiful Remedy [Page 8] for those maladies, this Root conduceth to the cure of: I pass it by with silence.

Mezerei &c. Of Spurge Olive, or Widdow­wail. See the Herb, if you think it worth the seeing.

Merorum Celci. Of the Mulberry-tree. The bark of the Root is bitter, hot and dry, opens stoppings of Liver and Spleen, purgeth the bel­ly, and kills worms, boyled in Vinegar, helps the tooth-ach.

Morsus Diaboli, Succisae &c. Devils-bit. See the Herb.

Nardi Spicae, Indicae, Celticae. Of Spiknard, Indian, and Celtique. Celtick Nard, according to Rondetitius wonderfully provokes Urine. They are both hot and dry, but I let the degree alone, till the Learned are agreed about it: The Indian also provokes Urine, and stops fluxes, helps windiness of the Stomach, resisteth the pe­stilence, helps gnawing pains of the Stomach, and dries up Rhewms that molest the head. The Celtick Spicknard performs the same offices though in a weaker measure.

Nenupharis, Nymphae. Of Water-Lillies. They are cold and dry, and stop lust: I never dived so deep to find any other vertue the Roots have.

Ononidis, Arrestae Bovis &c. Of Cammock, or Rest-Harrow: so called because it makes Oxen stand still when they are ploughing. The Roots are hot and dry in the third degree; it breaks the Stone, (viz. the bark of it) the Root it self, according to Pliny, helps the Falling­sickness, according to Mathiolus, helps Rup­tures; you may take half a dram at a time.

Ostrutij. Masterwort: given once before un­der the name of Imperitoria. But I have som­thing else to do than to write one thing twice as they did.

Pastinatae, Sativae, & silvestris. Garden and wild Parsnips. They are of a temperate quality, enclining something to heat: the Garden Par­snips provoke lust, and nourish as much and more too, than any Root ordinarily eaten; the Wild are more Physical, (and so are usually all Wild Plants, I could give reasons for it if I durst spend time and paper) being cutting, clensing, and opening; they resist the bitings of vene­mous beasts, ease pains and stitches in the sides, and are a soveraign Remedy against the Wind Chollick.

Pentaphyllis Of Cinkfoyl: Commonly cal­led Five-leaved, or Five-fingered grass; the Root is very drying, but very moderately hot: It is admirable against all Fluxes, and stops blood flowing from any part of the body, it helps infirmities of the Liver and Lungues, helps putrified ulcers of the mouth, the Root boyled in Vinegar is good against the Shingles, and ap­peaseth the rage of any fretting sores. You may sasely take a drachm at a time in any convenient Liquor.

Petacitae. Of butter-bur. The Roots are hot and dry in the second degree, they are exceeding good in violent and pestilential Feavers, they provoke the Terms, expel Poyson, and kill Worms.

Peucedani, foeniculi porcini. Of Sulphur­wort, Hog-fennel, or Hore-strange. It is very good applied to the navils of Children that stick out, Ruptures; held in the mouth, it is a present Remedy for the fits of the Mother; it being ta­taken inwardly, gives speedy deliverance to wo­men in travail, and brings away the after-birth.

Poeoniae, maris, foemellae. Of Peony, male, and foemale. They are meanly hot, but more drying, the male is more effectual in operation than the foemale (say Authors) and yet quoth Dr. Reason, why should not the male be best for men, and the foemale for women? The Root helps women not sufficiently purged after tra­vail, it provokes the Terms, and helps pains in the Belly, as also in the Reins and Bladder, Fal­ling-sickness, and Convulsions in children, be­ing either taken inwardly or hung about their necks. You may take half a drachm at a time, and less for children.

Phu, Valerinae, majoris, minoris. Valerian, or Setwal, greater and lesser. They are tempe­rately hot, the greater provoke Urine and the Terms, helps the Strangury, staies Rhewms in the Head, and takes away the pricking pains thereof. The lesser resists Poyson, asswageth the swelling of the Cods, coming either through wind or cold, helps cold taken after sweating or labor, Wind Chollick; outwardly it draws out thorns, and cures both Wounds and Ulcers.

Pimpinellae &c. Of Burnet. It doth this good, To bring forth a gallant Physical Herb.

Plantaginis. Of Plantane. The Root is somthing dryer than the Leaf, but not so cold, it opens stoppages of the Liver, helps the Jaun­dice and Ulcers of the Reins and Bladder. Dio­scorides affirmeth that one Root helpeth a Quo­tidian Ague, three a Tertain, and four a Quartan, which though our late writers hold to be fabu­lous, yet there may be a greater truth in it than they are aware of; yet I am as loth to make Su­perstition a foundation to build on as any of them, let Experience be Judg, and then we weigh not modern Jury Men. A little bit of the Root being eaten, instantly staies pains in the Head, even to admiration.

Polypodij. Of Polypodium, or Fearn of the Oak. It is a gallant, though gentle purger of Melancholly; Also in the opinion of Mesue (as famous a Physitian as ever I read for a Gal­lenist) it dries up superfluous Humors, takes a­way swellings from the hands, feet, knees, and joynts, stitches, and pains in the sides, infirmi­ties of the Spleen, Rickets: correct it with a few Annis seeds, or Fennel seeds, or a little Ginger, and then the stomach will not loath it. Your best way of taking it, is to bruise it well, and boyl it in white Wine till half be consumed, you may put in much, [...] little, according to strength of the Diseased, it works very safely. I can give no better reason why Polypodium of the Oak should be the best, unless because 'tis rarest, it draws either very little sap from the Oak, or [Page 9] none at all; or if it did, the reason were as far to seek. I am of opinion, that which grows on the ground is the best to evacuate Melancholly, but it is more Sympathetical.

Poligonati, sigilli Solomonis &c. Of Solo­mons Seal. Let it be no dishonor to Galen nor Dioscorides that English men have found out in late daies that these Roots may safely be given inwardly; Intruth they may be excused if the difference of the climates they and we lived, and now live in, be but considered, neither I hope will my Country men blame me for follo­wing only Dr. Experience in the vertues of this Root: stamped and boyled in Wine it speedily helps (being drunk I mean, for it will not do the deed by looking upon it) all broken bones, it is of an incredible vertue that way; as also being stamped and applyed to the place it soon heals all Wounds, and quickly takes away the black and blew marks of blows, being bruised and applied to the place, and for these, I am perswaded there is not a better Medicine under the Sun (or as Copernicus and Kipler will have it above the Sun.)

Porri. Of Leeks. They say they are hot and dry in the fourth degree, they breed but ill favo­red nourishment at the best, they spoil the eyes, heat the body, caus troublesom sleep, and are noi­som to the stomach, yet are they good for some­thing else (than only to stick in Welchmens hats) for the juyce of them dropped into the ears, takes away the noise of them, mixed with a little Viniger and snuffed up the nose, it staies the bleeding of it; they are better of the two boiled then raw, but both waies exceeding hurtfull for Ulcers in the bladder; and so are Onions and Garlick.

Prunellorum Silvestrium. Of Slo-bush, or Slo-tree. I think the Colledge set this amongst the roots only for fashion sake, and I did it be­cause they did.

Pyrethri Salivaris &c. Pelitory of Spain. It is hot and dry in the foutrh degree, chewed in the mouth, it draws away Rewm in the Tooth-ach; bruised and boiled in oyl, it provokes sweat by unction; inwardly taken, they say it helps Pal sies and other cold effects in the brain and nerves.

Rhapontici. Reupontick, or Reubarb of Pon­tus. It takes away windiness, and weakness of sto­mach, sighings, sobbings, spittings of blood, dis­eases of the Liver and Spleen, Rickets &c. if you take a dram at a time it will purge a little but bind much, and therefore fit for foul bodies that have fluxes.

Rhabarbari. Of Reubarb. It gently purgeth Choller from the stomach and liver, opens stop­pings, withstands the Dropsie, Hypocondriack Melancholly, a little boyling takes away the ver­tue of it, and therefore it is best given by infu­sion only; If your body be any thing strong you may take two drams of it at a time being slised thin and steeped all night in white Wine, in the morning strain it out and drink the white Wine; it purgeth but gently, it leaves a binding quality behind it, therefore dryed a little by the fire and beaten into pouder, it is usually given in Fluxes.

Rhaphani, Domesticae & sylvestris. Of Radi­shes, Garden and Wild. Garden Radishes pro­voke Urine, break the stone, and purge by urine exceedingly, yet breed very bad blood, are of­fensive to the stomach, and hard of digestion, hot and dry in quality. Wild, or Horse Radi­shes, such as grow in ditches, are hotter and dri­er than the former, and more effectual in the premises.

Rhodie Rad. Rose Root, called (I suppose) by that name because of its sweetness. Stamped and applied to the head it mitigates the pains thereof, being somewhat cool in quality.

Rhabarbari Monachorum. Patience, Monks­Reubarb, or BastardReubarb, It also purgeth, clenseth the blood, opens obstructions of the liver.

Rubiae tinctorum. Of Maddir. In this were Galen and Dioscorides quite beside the cushion, in saying this root was opening, and clensing, when clean contrary; it is both drying and binding, yet not without some opening quality, for it helps the Yellow Jaundice, and therefore opens the obstructions of the Liver and Gall; it is given with good success to such as have had bruises by falls, stops Loosness, the Hemor­rhoids, and the Terms in women.

Rusci. Of Knee-holly, or Butchers-broom, or Bruscus. They are meanly hot and dry, pro­voke urine, break the stone, and help such as cannot piss freely. Vse them like grass roots.

Sambuci. Of Elder. I know no wonders the root will do.

Sarsae-Parigliae, Of Sarsa-Parilla, or bind­weed; somewhat hot and dry, helpful against pains in the head, and joynts, they provoke sweat, and are used familiarly in drying Diet drinks.

Satyrij utriusque. Of Satyrion, each sort. They are hot and moist in temper, provoke lust, and encrease seed; each branch beareth two roots, both spongy, yet the one more solid than the o­ther, which is of most vertue, and indeed only to be used, for some say the most spongy root is quite contrary in operation to the other, as the one increaseth, the other decreaseth; yet if in your eye they contend for dignities, put them both in water, and the most solid which is for use will sink, the other swim.

Saxifragiae albae. Of white Saxifrage; in Sussex we call them Lady-smocks. The roots powerfully break the Stone, expel wind, provoke Urine, and cleanse the reins.

Sanguisorbae. A kind of Burnet.

Scabiosaer Of Scabious. The roots either boyled or beaten into pouder and so taken, helps such as are extreamly troubled with Scabs and Itch, are medicinal in the French-pocks, hard swellings, inward wounds, being of a drying, clensing, and healing faculty.

Scordij. Of Scordium, or Water Germander. See the Herb.

[Page 10] Scillae. Of Squils. See the Vineger, and Wine of Squils in the Compounds.

Scrophulariae &c. Of Figwort. The roots being of the same vertue with the [...], I refer you thither.

Scorzonerae. Of Vipers grass. The root cheers the heart, and strengthens the vital spirits, resists poyson, helps passions and tremblings of the heart, faintness, sadness, and melancholly, opens stoppings of the liver and spleen, provekes the terms, easeth women of the sits of the mo­ther, and helps swimmings in the head.

Seseleos. Of Seseli, or Hart-wort. The roots provoke mine, helps the falling sickness.

Sisari, secacul. Of Scirrets. They are hot and moist, of good nourishment, something windy, as all roots are; by reason of which, they provoke lust, they stir up apetitite, and provoke urine.

I hope I may without offence forbear mention­ing, Comfry, and black Briony, twice, though the Colledg did not.

Sonchi. Of Sowthistles. See the herb.

Spinae Albae, Bedeguar. I scarce know what name to give it, that will please the Colledg; Our English, both physitians and Apothecaries, call that ball of threed that grows upon the Bry­ars, Bedeguar; but the Arabians called our Ladies thistles, by that name; The roots of which are drying and binding, stops fluxes, blee­ding, takes away cold swellings, and case the pains of the teeth.

Spatulae soctidae. Stinking Gladon, A kind of Flower-de-luce-, called so for its unsavory smel: It is hot and dry in the third degree; outwardly they help the Kings Evil, soften hard swellings, draw out broken benes: Inwardly ta­ken, they help Convulsions, Ruptures, Bruises, Infirimities of the Lungues.

Tamarisci. Of Tamaris. See the berbs, and Barks.

Tanaceti. Of Tansie. The root eaten, is a singular remedy for the Gout: the rich may be­stow the cost to preserve it.

Thapsi &c. A venemous root, outlandish: therefore no more of it.

Tormentillae. Of Tormentil. A kind of Sinkfoil; dry in the third degree, but moderate­ly hot; exceeding good in pestilences, provokes sweat, staies vomiting, cheers the heart, expels poyson.

[...]. Of Tresoyl. See the Herb.

Tribuli Aquatici. OfWater Caltrops. The roots lie too far under water for me to reach to.

Trachellij. Of Throatwort: by some called Canterbury Bels: by some Coventry Bels. They help diseases and ulcers in the throat.

Trinitatis herbae. Hearts-ease, or Pansies. I know no great vertue they have.

Tunicis. I shall tell you the vertues when I know what it is.

Tripolij. The root purgeth flegm, expels poy­son.

Turbith. The root purgeth flegm, (being hot in the third degree) chiefly from the exterior parts of the body: it is corrected with Ginger, or Mastick. Let not the vulger be to busie with it.

Tubernum. Of Toad-stools. Whether these be roots or no, it matters not much: for my part I know but little need of them, either in food or Phyfick.

Victorialis. An Outlandish kind of Garlick. They say, being hung about the neck of Cattel that are blind suddenly, it helps them; and de­fends those that bear it, from evil spirits.

Swallow-wort, and Teazles were handled be­fore.

Ulmariae, Reginae prati &c. Meadsweet. Cold and dry, binding, stops fluxes, and the immo­derate flowing of the terms in women: you may take a drachm at a time.

Urticae Of Nettles. See the Leaves.

Zedoariae. Of Zedoary, or Setwal, This and Zurumbet, according to Rhazis, and Mesue, are all one; Avicenna thinks them different: I hold with Mesue; indeed they differ in form, for the one is long, the other round; they are both hot and dry in the second degree, expel wind, resist poyson, stop Fluxes, and the terms, stay vomiting, help the Chollick, end kill worms; you may take half a dram at a time.

Zingiberis. Of Ginger. Helps digestion, warms the stomach, cleers the sight, and is pro­fitable for old men, heats the joynts, and there­fore is profitable against the Gout, expels Wind; it is hot and dry in the third degree.

BARKS.

APis Rad. Of the Roots of Smallage. Take notice here, That the Barks both of this Root, as also of Parsly, Fennel &c. is all that of the root which is in use, neither can it properly be called Bark, for it is all the Root, the hard pith in the middle excepted, which is alwaies thrown away, when the roots are used. It is something hotter and drier than Parsly, and more medicinal; it opens stoppings, pro­vokes urin, helps digestion, expels wind, and warms a cold stomach: use them like Grass Roots.

Avellanarum. Of Hazel. The rind of the tree provokes Urine, breaks the Stone; the husks anp shels of the Nuts, dried and given in pouder, stay the immoderat flux of the terms in women.

Aurantiorum. Of Orrenges. Both these, and also Lemmons and Citrons, are of different qualities, the outward bark, viz. what looks red, is hot and dry, the white is cold and moist, the juyce colder than it, the seeds hot and dry; the outward bark is that which here I am to speak to, it is somewhat hotter than that either of Lemmons or Citrons, therefore it warms a cold stomach more, and expels wind better, but it strengthens not the heart so much.

Berber &c. Barberries. The rind of the tree according to Clusius, being steeped in Wine, and the Wine drunk, purgeth Choller, and is a singular remedy for the yellow Jaundice. Boil it in white Wine and drink it. See the Directi­ons at the beginning.

Cassia Lignea &c. It is something more oyly than Cinnamon, yet the vertues being not much different, I refer you thither.

Capparis Rad. Of Caper Roots. See the Roots.

Castanearum. Of Chestnuts. The bark of the Chestnut tree is dry and binding, and stops Fluxes.

Cinnamomum. Cinnamom, and Cassia Li­gnea. Are hot and dry in the second degree, strengthens the stomach, helps digestion, cau­seth a sweet breath, resists poyson, provokes u­rin, and the terms, causeth speedy delivety to women in travel, helps Coughs and Defluxions of humors upon the Lungs, Dropsies, and diffi­culty of Urin. In Ointments it takes away red pimples, and the like deformities from the face. There is scarce a better remedy for women in labor, than a drachm of Cinnamon newly bea­ten into pouder and taken in white Wine.

Citrij. Of Pome Citrons. The outward pill, which I suppose is that which is meant here: It strengthens the heart, resists poyson, amends a stinking breath, helps digestion, comforts a cold stomach.

Ebuli Rad. Of the Roots of Dwarf-Elder, or Walwort. See the Roots.

Enulae. Of Elecampane. See the Roots.

Esulae Rad. See the Roots.

Fabarum. Of Beans. Bean Cods (or Pods, as we in Sussex call them) being burned, the ashes are a sovereign remedy for aches in the joints, old [...], Gouts, and Sciaticaes.

Foenicull Rad. Of Fennel Roots. See the Roots, and remember the Observation given in Smallage at the beginning of the Barks.

Fraxini Rad. Of the Bark of Ash tree Roots. That the vertue lies only in the Bark of the Root, I suppose it to be only nicety: but the Bark of the tree, helps the Rickets, is moderately hot and dry, staies Vomitting; being burnt, the Ashes made into an ointment, helps Lepro­sie, and other deformity of the skin, easeth pains of the spleen. You may lay the Bark in steep in white Wine for the Rickets, and when it hath stood so two or three daies, let the diseased Child drink now and then a spoonful of it.

Granatorum. Of Pomegranates. The rind or pill, cools, and forcibly binds, staies Fluxes, and the Terms in women, helps digestion, strengthens weak stomachs, fastens the teeth, and are good for such whose gums wast. You may take a drachm of it at a time inwardly. Pome­granate flowers are of the same vertue.

Gatrujaci. See the Wood.

Juglandium Virid. Of green Walnuts. As for the outward green bark of Walnuts, I suppose the best time to take them is before the Walnuts be shelled at all, and then you may take Nuts and all (if they may properly be called Nuts at such a time) you shall find them exceeding com­fortable to the stomach, they resist poison, and are a most excellent preservative against the Plague, inferior to none; they are admirable for such as are troubled with Consumptions of the lungues; the rich may keep them preserved; they that cannot do as they would, must be [Page 12] content to do as they may. viz. dry them and so keep them.

Lauri. Of the Bay tree. See the Root.

Limonum. Of Lemmons. The outward pill is of the nature of Citron, but held not so ef­fectual; how ever let the poor Country man that cannot get the other, use this.

Mandragorae. Rad. Be pleased to look back to the Root.

Myrobalanorum. Of Myrobalans - See the Fruits.

Macis. Of Mace. It is hot in the third de­gree, strengthens the stomach and heart excee­dingly, and helps concoction.

Maceris &c. It is held to be the inner bark of Nutmeg-tree, helps fluxes and spitting of blood.

Petroselini Rad. Of Parsly Roots. opens ob­structions, provokes urine and the terms, warms a cold stomach, expells wind and breaks the stone, use them as Grass Roots, and take out the inner pith as you were taught in Smallage roots

Prunelli Silvestris. Of Sloe-tree. I know no use of it.

Pinearum putaminae. Pine-shucks, or husks. I suppose they mean of the cones that hold the seeds; both those and also the bark of the tree, stop fluxes, and help the lungues.

Querci. Of Oak-tree. Both the Bark of the Oak, and Acorn Cups are drying and cold, binding, stop fluxes and the terms, as also the running of the reins, have a care how you use them before due purging.

Rhaphani. Of Radishes. I could never see any bark they had.

Suberis. Of Cork. It is good for somethingPaulus. else besides to stop bottles; being dry and bin­ding, stancheth blood, helps fluxes, especially the ashes of it being burnt.

Sambuci &c. Of [...] Roots and Branches; purgeth water, helps the dropsie,

Cort. Medius Tamaricis. The middle Bark of Tamaris, easeth the Spleen, helps the Rickets, you may use them as Ash-tree Bark.

Tilliae. Of Line-tree. Boyled, the water helps burnings.

Thuris. Of Frankincense. I must plead Igno­ramus.

Ulmi. Of Elm. Moderately hot and clensing, very good for wounds, burns, and broken bones. viz. boyled in water and the greived place bathed with it.

WOODS and their CHIPS OR Scobs, properly signifies Saw-dust. RASPINGS.

A Gallochus, Lignum Aloes. Wood of Aloes; is moderately hot and dry: a good Cor­dial: a rich Perfume: a great strengthener to the stomach.

Aspalathus. Rose-wood. There are diverse Bushes called by the name of Aspalathus: But because the Colledge have set it down amongst the Wood, (I suppose they mean the Tree) It is moderately hot and dry, stops loosness, pro­vokes urin, and is excellent to clense filthy ul­cers.

Bresilium. Brassil. All the use I know of it is, to dye Cloath, and Leather, and make red Ink.

Buxus. Box. Many Physitians have written of it, but no physical vertue of it: I suppose the Colledg quoted it only as a word of course.

Cypressus. Cypress. The Wood laid amongst cloathes, secures them from moths. See the Leaves.

Ebenum. Ebeny. It is held by Dioscorides, to cleer the sight, being either boyled in Wine, or burnt the ashes.

Gaujacum, Lignum vitae. Dries, attenuates, causeth sweat, resisteth putrifaction, is admi­rable good for the French pocks, as also for Ul­cers, Scabs and Leprosie, it is used in diet drinks.

Juniperus. Juniper. The smoke of the Wood, drives away Serpents; the ashes of it made into ly, cures Itch, and Scabs.

Nephriticum. It is a light wood and comes from Hispaniola: being steeped in water, will soon turn it into a blew colour; it is hot and dry in the first degree, and so used as before, is an admirable remedy for the stone, as also for the obstructions of the liver and spleen.

Rhodium. Encreaseth Milk in Nurses.

Santalum, album, rubrum, citrinum. White, red, and yellow Sanders: They are all cold and dry in the second or third degree: The red stops defluxions from any part, and helps inflamati­ons; the white and yellow (of which the yel­low is best) cool the heat of Feaveas, streng­then the heart, and cause cheerfulness.

Sassafras. Is hot and dry in the second de­gree, it opens obstructions or stoppings, it strengthens the breast exceedingly, if it be weakened through cold, it breaks the stone, staies vomiting, provokes urin, and is very profitable in the French pòcks, used in diet drinks.

Tamaris. Is profitable for the Rickets, and Burnings.

Xylobalsamum. Wood of the Balsam tree. Is hot and dry in the second degree, according to Galen. I never read any great vertues of it.

HERBS AND THEIR LEAVES.

A Brotanum mas, foemina. Southernwood, male and foemale. Is hot and dry in the third degree, resists poyson, kils worms, pro­vokes lust; outwardly in plaisters, it dissolves cold swellings, and helps the bitings of vene­mous beasts, makes hair grow: take not above half a drachm at a time in pouder.

Absinthium &c. Wormwood. Its several sorts, are all hot and dry in the second or third degrees, the common Wormwood is thought to be hottest, they all help weakness of the stomach, clense Choller, kill Worms, open Stoppings, help Surfets, cleer the Sight, resist Poyson, clense the Blood, and secures cloaths from Moths.

Abugilissa &c. Alkanet. The Leaves are something drying and binding, but inferior in vertue to the Roots, to which I refer you.

Acetosa. Sorrel. Is moderately cold and dry, binding, cutteth tough humors, cools the brain, liver, and stomach, cools the blood in Feavers, and provokes apetite.

Acanthus. Bears-breech, or Branch ursine. Is temperate, something moist. See the root.

Adiantum, album, nigrum. Maiden hair, white and black. They are temperate, yet dry­ing, white Maiden hair is that we usually call Wall-rue; they both open obstructions, clense the breast and lungs of gross slimy humors, pro­voke urine, help ruptures and shortness of wind.

Adiantum Aureum, Politricum. Golden Maiden-hair; its temperature and vertues are the same with the former; helps the Spleen; burned, and Ly made with the Ashes, keeps the hair from falling off from the head.

Agrimonia. Agrimony. Galens Eupatorium: [...]. it is hot and dry in the first degree; binding, itPliny. amends the infirmities of the liver, helps such asDioscori­des. piss blood, helps inward wounds, opens obstru­ctions; outwardly applied it helps old sores,Serapio. ulcers &c. Inwardly it helps the Jaundice and the spleen: You may either take a drachm of this or that following at a time inwardly in white, or boyl the herb in white Wine and drink the decoction.

Ageratum. Mesue his Eupatorium. Maud­lein. Is hot and dry in the second degree, pro­vokes urine and the terms, dries the brain, opens stoppings, helps the green sickness, and profits such as have a cold, weak liver; outwardly ap­plied, it takes away the hardness of the matrix, and fills hollow ulcers with flesh.

Agnus Castus &c. Chast-tree. The Leaves are hot and dry in the third degree; expel wind, consume the seed, cause Chastity being only born about one, it dissolves swellings of the Cods being applied to them, Headach, Lethargy. Al­so Dioscorides saith a branch of it preserves a traveller from weariness.

Alleluja, Lujula &c. Wood Sorrel. It is of the temperature of other Sorrel, and held to be more cordial; cools the blood, helps ulcers in the mouth, hot defluctions upon the lungs, wounds, ulcers &c.

Alcea. Vervain-Mallow. The root helpsAetius. fluxes and burstness.Dioscori­des.

Allium. Garlick. Hot and dry in the fourth degree, troublesom to the stomach, it duls the sight, spoils a cleer skin, resists poyson, easeth the pains of the teeth, helps the bitings of mad dogs and venemous beasts, helps ulcers, leprosies, pro­vokes urine, is exceeding opening, and profi­table for dropsies.

Althaea &c. Marsh-Mallows. Are modera­tely hot and drier than other Mallows; they help degestion, and mitigate pain, ease the pains of the stone, and in the sides. Use them as you were taught in the roots whose vertues they have, and both together will do better.

Alsine. Chickweed. Is cold and moist with­outGalen. any binding, aswages swelling, and comforts the sinnews much, and therefore is good for such as are shrunk up, it dissolves Aposthumes, hard swellings and helps mangy hands and legs, out­wardly applied in a pultis.

Alchymilla. Ladies-Mantle: is hot and dry, some say in the second degree, some in the third: Outwardly it helps wounds, reduceth womens breasts that hang bagging: inwardly, helps brui­ses, and ruptures, staies vomiting, and the whites in women, and is very profitable for such women as are subject to miscarry through cold and moisture.

Alcanna. Privet; hath a binding quality, helps ulcers in the mouth, is good against bur­nings and scaldings, cherisheth the nerves or sinnews: boyl it in white Wine to wash your mouth, and in hogs grease for burnings and scaldings.

Amaracus, Majorana. Marjoram. Some say 'tis hot and dry in the second degree, some ad­vance it to the third. Sweet Marjoram, is an ex­cellent remedy for cold diseases in the brain, being only smelled to: helps such as are given to much sighing, easeth pains in the belly, provokes urine, being taken inwardly; You may take a drachm of it at a time in pouder. Outwardly in Oyls or Salves, it helpeth Sinnews that are shrunk, Limbs out of joint, all aches and [Page 14] swellings coming of a cold cause.

Angelica. Is hot and dry in the third degree, openeth, digesteth maketh thin, strengthens the heart, helps fluxes, and loathsomness of meat, it is an enemy to poyson and pestilence, provokes the term in women, and brings away the after­birth. You may take a drachm at a time in pou­der.

Anagallis, mas, foemina. Pimpernel, male and foemale. They are something hot and dry, and of such a drawing quality that they draw thorns and splinters out of the flesh, amend theGalen. sight, clense ulcers, help infirmities of the liver and reins.

Anethum. Dill, is hot and dry in the second degree. Dioscorides saith, it breeds milk in Nur­ses. But Galen he denies it: Howsoever, it staies vomiting, easeth hiccoughs aswageth swellings, provokes Urine, helps such as are troubled with the fits of the mother, and digests raw humors.

Apium. Smallage: So it is commonly used; but indeed all Parsly is called by the name of A­pium, of which this is one kind. It is somewhat hotter and drier than Parsly, and more efficaci­ous; it opens stoppings of the liver, and spleen, clenseth the blood, provokes the terms, helps a cold stomach to digest its meat, and is singular good against the yellow Jaundice. Both Smal­lage and Clevers may be well used in pottage in the morning instead of Herbs.

Aparine. Goose-grass, or Clevers; they areDiosco­rides. meanly hot and dry, clensing; helps the bitings of venemous beasts, keeps mens bodies from gro­wingPliny. too fat, helps the yellow jaundice, staiesGalen. bleeding, fluxes, and helps green wounds.Tragus.

Aspergula odorata. Woodroof: Cheers the heart, makes men merry, helps melancholy, and opens the stoppings of the liver.

Aquilegia. Columbines; help sore throats, are of a drying, binding quality.

Argentina. Silver-weed, or Wild Tansie: cold and dry all most in the third degree; stops Lasks, Fluxes, and the Terms, good against Ul­cers, the Stone, and inward Wounds, it stops the immoderate Flux of the Terms in women, if it be but worn in their shoos: easeth gripings in the belly, fastneth loose teeth; outwardly it takes away Freckles, Morphew, and Sunburning, it takes away Inflamations; and bound to the wrests stops the violence of the fits of an ague.

Artanita. Sow-bread: hot and dry in the third degree; it is so dangerous a purge that I dare not take it my self, therefore would I not advise others: outwardly in Oyntments it takes away Freckles, Sunburning, and the marks which the Smal Pocks leave behind them: dangerous for women with child, yea so dangerous, that both Dioscorides and Pliny say, it will make a woman miscarry if she do but stride over it.

Aristolochia, longa, rotunda. Birthwort long and round. See the Roots.

Artemisia. Mugwort; is hot and dry in the second degree; binding: an herb apropriated to the foemine sex, it brings down the terms, brings away both birth and after birth, easeth pains in the matrix. You may take a drachm at a time.

Asparagus. See the Roots.

Asarum &c. Asarabacca; hot and dry; pro­vokes vomiting, and urine, and are good for dropsies; they are corrected with Mace or Cin­namon.

A [...]riplex &c. Orach, or Arrach; it is cold in the first degree, and moist in the second, saith Galen, and makes the belly soluble. Dioscorides saith, they cure the yellow Jaundice. Lycus Neop saith, they help such as have taken Cantha­rides. Mathiolus saith, (I doubt he was mistaken.) it purgeth upwards. and downwards. Hypocrates saith, it cools hot aposthumes, and St. Anthonies fire. It is cer­tainly an admirable remedy for the fits of the mother and other infirmities of the matrix, and therefore the Latins call it Vulvaria.

Auricula muris, major. Mouse ear, hot and dry, of a binding quality, it is admirable to heal wounds, inward or outward, as also ruptures or burstness, Edg-tools quenched in the juyce of it, will cut Iron without turning the edg, as easy as they will lead, and lastly it helps the swelling of the Spleen, Coughs, and Consumptions of the lungues.

At [...]ractilis hirsuta. Wild Bastard-saffron, Distaff-thistle, or Spindle-thistle; is dry andGalen. moderately digesting, helpeth the biting of ve­nemousDiosco­rides. beasts. Mesue saith, it is hot in the first degree, and dry in the second, and cleanseth the breast and lungues of tough flegm: but if the Colledg do intend Carduus Bened. by this, we shall talk with that by and by.

Balsamita &c. Costmary, Alecost: See Maudlin, of which I take this to be one sort or kind.

Barba jovis, sedum majus. Housleek or Sen­green: cold in third degree, profitable against the Shingles and other hot creeping ulcers, in­flamations, St. Anthonies fire, frenzyes, it cools and takes away corns from the toes being bathed with the juyce of it, and a skin of the leaf laid over the place, stops fluxes, helps scalding and burning.

Bardana. Clot-bur, or Burdock, temperately dry and wasting, something cooling, it is held to be a good remedy against shrinking of the sin­news, they ease pains in the bladder, provoke u­rine. Also Mizaldus saith that a leaf applied to the top of the head of a woman draws the Ma­trix upwards, but applied to the soles of the feet draws it downwards, and is therefore an admi­rable remedy for suffocations, precipitations, and dislocations of the Matrix, if a wise man have but the using of it.

Beta, alba, nigra, rubra. Beets, white, black, and red, Black Beets I have, as yet, as little skill in as knowledg of. The white are something colder and moister than the red, both of them loosen the belly, but have little or no nourish­ment. Simeon Sethi tells a large story of several diseases they breed in the stomach. I scarce be­leeve him. This is certain, the white, provoke to stool, and are more clensing, open stoppings [Page 15] of the liver and spleen, help the vertigo or swim­ming in the head. The red stay fluxes, help the immoderate flowing of the terms in women, and are good in the yellow Jaundice.

Benedicta Carrophyllata. Avens: hot and dry, help the chollick and rawness of the stomach, stitches in the sides, help bruises, and take away clotted blood in any part of the body.

Betonica vulgaris. Common or wood Betony; hot and dry in the second degree, helps the fal­lingGalen. sickness, and all headaches coming of cold, clenseth the breast and lungs, opens stoppings of the Liver and Spleen, as the Rickets, &c. pro­cures appetite, helps sour belchings, provokes urine, breaks the stone, mitigates the pains of the reins and bladder, helps Cramps and Con­vulsions, resists Poyson, helps the Gout, such as piss blood, madness and headach, kills worms, help bruises, and clenseth women after their la­bor. You may take a drachm of it at a time in white Wine, or any other convenient liquor proper against the Disease you are afflicted with.

Betonica Pauli &c. Pauls Betony, or male Lluellin, to which ad Elatine or foemale Lluel­lin which comes afterwards; they are pretty tem­perate, stop defluxions of humors that fall from the head into the eyes, are profitable in wounds, helps filthy foul eating Cankers: Pena tells of one of her Country men, a Shentleman of Wales, who had her nose almost eaten off with the Pocks, yea it was so pitiful sore it had almost brought her to a Leprosie, & her was cured by on­ly taking her own country Herb Lluellin inward­ly, and applying the Herb outwardly to the place.

Betonica Coronaria &c. Is Clove Gilliflowers. See the Flowers.

Bellis. Daisies, are cold and moist in the se­cond degree, they ease all pains, and swellings coming of heat, in Clysters they loose the bel­ly, are profitable in Feavers, and inflamations of the stones, they take away bruises, and black­ness and blewness: they are admirable in wounds and inflamations of the lungues or blood.

Blitum. Blites. Some say they are cold and moist, others cold and dry, none mention any great vertues of them.

Borrago. Borrage: hot and moist, comforts the heart, cheers the spirits, drives away sadness and melancholly, they are rather laxative than binding; help swooning and heart-qualms, breed special good blood; help consumptions, madness, and such as are much weakned by sickness.

Bonus Henricus. Good Henry, or all good; hot and dry, clensing, and scouring, inwardly taken it loosens the belly, outwardly, it clenseth old sores and Ulcers.

Botrys. Oak of Jerusalem: hot and dry in the [...] degree, helps such as are short-winded, cuts and wasts gross and tough flegm, laid a­mongst cloaths they preserve them from moths, and give them a sweet smel.

Branca ursina. Bears-breech.

Brionia &c. Briony, white and black: both are hot and dry in the third degree, purge violently, yet are held to be wholsom Physick for such as have Dropsies, Vertigo, or swimming in the Head, Falling sickness &c. Certainly it is a scurvy, strong, troublesom purge, therefore ill to be tampered with by the unskilful; outward­ly in Oyntments, it takes away freckles, wrinkles, morphow, scars, spots, &c. from the face.

Bursa pastoris. Shepherds-purse; is manifest­ly cold and dry, though Lobel and Pena thought the contrary; it is binding and stops blood, the terms in women, spiting and pissing of blood, cools inflamations.

Buglossum. Bugloss. In Sussex (because they must be [...]) cal­led Lan­guedebeef: in plain English, Oxtongue Its vertues are the same with Borrage.

Bugula. Bugle, or middle Comfry; is tem­perate for heat, but very drying, excellent for falls or inward bruises, for it dissolves [...] blood, profitable for inward wounds, helps the Rickets and other stoppings of the Liver; out­wardly it is of wonderful force in curing wounds and ulcers, though festered, as also gangreens and Fistulaes, it helps broken bones, and dis­locations. Or Members out of joynt. To conclude, let my Country men esteem it as a Jewel. Inwardly you may take it in pouder a drachm at a time or drink the deco­ction of it in white Wine, being made into an oyntment with hogs grease, you shall find it ad­mirable in green wounds.

Buphthalmum &c. Ox eye. [...] saith they are commonly used for black Hellebore, to the vertues of which I refer you.

Buxus. Boxtree. The leaves are hot, dry, and binding, they are profitable against the bitings of mad dogs, both taken inwardly, boyled and ap­plied to the place, besides they are excellent to cure horses of the bots.

Calamintha, [...], Palustris. Mountain, and Water Calamint. For the Water Calamint; see Mints, than which it is accounted stronger. Mountain Calamint, is hot and dry in the third degree, provokes urine and the terms, hastens the birth in women, brings away the after-birth, helps cramps, convulsions, difficulty of breathing, kills worms, helps the leprosie; outwardly used, it helpsGalen. such as holds their necks on one side: half aDioscori­des. drachm is enough at one time.

Calendula &c. Marigolds. The Leaves areHpuleius. hot in the second degree, and something moist, loosen the belly, the juyce held in the mouth, helps the toothach, and takes away any inflamation, or hot swelling being bathed with it mixed with a little Vineger.

Callitricum. Maiden-hair. See Adianthum.

Caprisolium. Honysuckles: The Leaves are hot, and therfore naught for inflamations of the mouth and throat, for which the ignorant people often give them, and Galen was true in this, let modern Writers write their pleasure. If you chew but a leaf of it in your mouth, experience will tell you, that it is likelier to cause than to cure a sore throat, they provoke urine, and purge by urine, bring speedy delivery to women in travail, yet pro­cure barrenness, and hinder conception; outwardly they dry up soul ulcers, and clense the face from morphew, sunburning and freckles.

[Page 16] Carduncellus &c. Groundsel. Cold and moist according to Tragus, helps the Chollick, and pains or gripings in the belly, helps such as can­not make water, cleanseth the reins, purgeth Choller and sharp humors, the usual way of ta­king it is, to boyl it in water with [...] and [...]. so eat it, I hold it to be a wholsom and harmless purge. Outwardly it easeth womens breasts that are swollen and inflamed, (or as themselves say) have gotten an ague in their breasts, as also infla­mation of the joynts, nerves, or sinnews.

Carduus B. Mariae. Our Ladies Thistles. They are far more temperate than Carduus Bene­dictus, open obstructions of the liver, help the Jaundice and Dropsie, provoke Urine, break the Stone.

Carduus Benedictus. In plain English, Blessed Thistle; Though I confess it be better known byCamera­rius. the Latin name: it is hot and dry in the second degree, clensing and opening, helps swimmingArnoldus villanova­nus. and giddiness in the head, deasness, strengthens the memory, helps griping pains in the belly, kills worms, provokes sweat, expels poyson, helps inflamation of the liver, is very good in pesti­lences, and the French-pocks; outwardly applied, it ripens Plague-sores, and helps hot swellings, the bitings of mad-dogs, and venemous beasts, and foul filthy ulcers. Every one that can but make a Carduus posset knows how to use it.

Carlina. See the Roots, under the name of white Chameleon.

Corallina. A kind of Sea-Moss: cold, bin­ding, drying, good for hot gouts, inflamations; also they say it kills worms, and therefore by some is called Maw-wormseed.

Cassutha, cuscuta, potagralini. Dodder. See Epithimum.

Caryophyllata. Avens or Herb Bennet. Hot and dry, they help the Chollick, Rawness of the stomach, Stitches in the sides, Stoppings of the liver, and Bruises.

Cataputia minor. A kind of Spurge: See Ti­thymalus.

Cattaria, Nepeta. Nep, or Catmints. The vertues are the same with Calaminth.

Cauda Equina. Horse-tail; is of a binding drying quality, cures wounds, and is an admi­rable remedy for sinnews that are shrunk; yea, Galen saith it cures sinnews though they be cut in sunder: but Columbus holds that is incurable unless they be cut within the Muscle; well then we will take Galen in the charitablest sense. However this is certain, it is a sure remedy for bleeding at the nose, or by wound, stops the Terms in women, Fluxes, Ulcers in the Reins or Bladder, Coughs, Ulcers in the Lungues, Diffi­culty of breathing.

Caulis, Brassica [...], silvestris. Cole­worts, or Cabbages, Garden and Wild. They are drying and binding, help dimness of the sight, help the spleen, preserve from drunkenness, and help the evil effects of it, provoke the terms; they say, being laid on the top of the head, they draw the matrix upward, and therefore are good for the falling out of the womb. Chrysippus writes a whol treatise of them, and makes them a univer­sal medicine for every disease in every part of the body.

Centaurium, majus, minus. Centaury the greater and lesser. They say the greater will do wonders in curing wounds: see the Root. The lesser is that which is commonly in Sussex known by the name of Centaury, and indeed so throughout that part of the nation that I have travailed over; a present remedy for the yellow Jaundice, opens stoppings of the liver, gall, and spleen purgeth choller, helps the Gout, cleers the sight, purgeth the stomach, helps the dropsie and green-sickness. It is only the tops and flowers which are useful, of which you may take a drachm inwardly in pouder, or half a handful boiled in posset drink at a time.

Centinodium &c. Knotgrass; cold in the se­condBrass avo­lus. degree, helps spitting and pissing of blood,Camera­rius. stops the terms and all other fluxes of blood, vo­miting of blood, Gonorrhaea, or running of Reins, weakness of the back and joints, inflama­tions of the privities, and such as piss by drops, and it is an excellent remedy for hogs that will not eat their meat. Your only way is to boyl it, it is in its prime about the latter end of July or beginning of August: at which time being ga­thered it may be kept dry all the yeer.

Ceresolium vulgare & Myrrhis. Common and great Chervil: Take them both together and they are temperately hot and dry, provoke urine, they stir up lust and desire of copulation, com­fort the heart and are good for old people, help pleurisies and pricking in the sides.

Caepaea, Anagallis aquatica. Brooklime, hot and dry, but not so hot and dry as Water-cresses; Tragus saith they are hot and moist, but the man dreamed waking, they help mangy Horses: see Water-cresses.

Ceterach &c. Spleenwort; moderately hot, wasts and consumes the spleen, in so much that Vitruvius affirms he hath known hogs that have fed upon it, that have had (when they were kil­led) no spleens at all. It is excellent good for melahcholly people, helps the strangury, provo­kes urine, and breaks the stone in the bladder. Boyl it and drink the decoction; but because a little boyling will carry away the strength of it in vapours, let it boyl but very little, and let it stand close stopped till it be cold before you strain it out; this is the general rule for all Simples of this nature.

Chamaepitys. Ground-pine; hot in the second degree, and dry in the third, helps the Jaundice, Sciatica, stoppings of the liver, and spleen, pro­vokes the Terms, clenseth the entrails, dissolves congeled blood, resists poyson, cures wounds and ulcers. Strong bodies may take a dram, and weak bodies half a drachm of it in pouder at a time.

Chamaemelum, sativum, sylvestre. Garden and Wild Chamomel. Garden Chamomel is hot and dry in the first degree, and as gallant a medi­cine against the stone in the bladder as grows up­on the earth, you may take it inwardly, I mean the decoction of it, being boyled in white Wine, [Page 17] or inject the juyce of it into the bladder with a syringe. It expels wind, helps belchings, and potently provokes the terms;used in baths it helps pains in the sides, gripings and gnawings in the belly.

Chamaedris &c. Germander; hot and dry in the third degree; cuts and brings away tough humors, opens stoppings of the liver and spleen, helps coughs and shortness of breath, strangury and stopping of urine and provokes the terms; half a drachm is enough to take at a time.

Chelidonium utrumque. Celondine both sorts. Small Celondine is usually called Pilewort, it is something hotter and dryer than the former, but not in the fourth degree as Galen and Dioscori­des would have it; they say it helps the Hemor­rhoids or Piles, by only carrying it about one, (but if it wil not, bruise it and apply it to the grief) and from thence it took its [...]. Celon­dine the greater is hot and dry (they say in the third degree) any away used, either the juyce, or made into an Oyl or Ointment, is a great pre­server of the sight and as excellent an help for sore eyes as any is.

Cinara &c. Artichokes. They provoke lust, and purge by urine.

Cichorium. Succory, to which ad Endive which comes after. They are cold and dry in the second degree, clenfing and opening, they cool the heats of the liver, and are profitable in the yellow Jaundice, and burning Feavers, helps excoria­tions in the Yard, hot Stomachs; and out­wardly applied, help hot rewms in the eyes.

Cicuta. Hemlock; Cold in the fourth de­gree, poysonous; outwardly applied, it helps Priapismus, or continual standing of the Yard, the Shingles, St. Anthonies fire, or any eating Ulcers.

Clematis Daphnoides, Vinca provinca. Per­uinkle. Hot in the second degree, somthing dry and binding, stops Lasks, spitting of blood, and the Terms in women.

Consolida masor. Comfry. I do not con­ceave the Leaves to be so vertnous as the Roots,

Consolida media. Bugles, of which before.

Consolida minima. Daizes.

Consilida rubra. Golden Rod: hot and dry in the second degree; clenseth the Reins, pro­vokes Urin, brings away the Gravel; an admi­rable herb for wounded people to take inwardly, stops blood &c.

Consolida Regalis. Delphinium. Larks heels, resist poyson, help the bitings of venemous beasts.

Saracenica Solidago. Saracens Consound. Helps inward wounds, sore mouths, sore throats, wasting of the lungues, and liver.

Coronopus. Buchorn-Plantane, or Sea-Plan­tane: Cold and dry, helpeth the bitings of ve­nemousAegineta. beasts, either taken inwardly, or apply­ed to the wound; helps the Chollick, breaks the Stone.

Cotonaria. Hath got many English names. Cottonweed, Cudweed, Chaffweed, and Petty Cotton. Of a drying and binding nature; boy­led in Ly, it keeps the head from Nits and Lice; being laid among Cloaths, it keeps them safe from Moths, kils Worms, helps the bitings of venemous beasts; taken in a Tobacco-pipe, it helps Coughs of the lungues, and vehement head­aches.

Cruciata. Crossewort. (there is a kind of Gentian called also by this name, which I passe by) Is drying and binding, exceeding good for inward or outward wounds, either inwardly ta­ken, or outwardly applied; and an excellent re­medy for such as are bursten.

Crassula. Orpine. Very cool: Outwardly u­sed with Vineger, it cleers the Skin; inwardly taken, it helps gnawings of the stomach and bo­wels, ulcers in the lungues, bloody flux, and Quinsie in the throat: For which last disease, it is inferior to none: take not too much of it at a time, because of its coolnesse.

Crithamus, &c. Sampler. Hot and dry, helpsGalen. difficulty of urine, the yellow jaundice, provokes the terms, helps digestion, openeth stoppings of the liver and spleen.

Cucumis Asininus. Wild Cucummers. See E­laterium.

Cyanus major, minor. Blewbottle, great and small, A fine cooling herb, helps bruises, wounds, broken veins; the juyce dropped into the eye, helps the inflamations thereof.

Cygnoglossum. Hounds-tongue. Cold and dry; applied to the fundament, helps the He­morroids,Dioscori­des. healeth wounds, and ulcers, and is a present remedy against the bitings of Dogs, bur­nings and scaldings. Some say, if you put the herb under your foot, within your stocking, no Dog will bark at you.

Cypressus. Chamae cyparissus. Cypresse tree. The leaves are hot and binding, help Ruptures, and Polypus, or flesh growing on the Nose.

Chamaecyparissus. Is Lavender Cotton. Resists poyson, kils worms, and withal take notice how learnedly the Colledge could confound the Cy­press tree, and Lavender Cotton together; and if they say some Authors say Cypressus and Cha­maecyparissus are all one, and withal shew you where, then tell them I thought their brain was in their books not in their heads.

Distamnus Cretensis. Dictamny, or Dittany of Creet, hot and dry, brings away dead children, hastens womens travail, brings away the after­birth, the very smel of it drives away venemous beasts, so deadly, an enemy is it to poyson; it's an admirable remedy against wounds and Gun­shot, wounds made with poysoned weapons, it draws out splinters, broken bones &c. The dose from halfe a drachm to a drachm. They say, the Goats and Deers in Creet, being wounded withVirgil. Arrows, eat this herb, which makes the ArrowsAeniad. lib. 12. fall out of themselves: And from thence came the tale in Virgil * about Aeneas.

Dipsacus, sativ. sylv. Teazles, Garden and wild: the leaves bruised and applied to the tem­ples,Galen. alay the heat in feavers, qualifie the rago in frenzies; the juyce dropped into the ears, kill worms in them, (if there be any there to kill) [Page 18] dropped into the eyes, cleers the sight, helps red­ness and pimples in the face being anointed with it.

Ebulus. Dwarf-Elder, or Walwort: hot and dry in the third degree; wasts hard swellings, being applied in form of a pultis; the hair of the head being anointed with the juyce of it turns black; the leaves being applied to the place, help inflamations, burnings, scaldings, the bi­tings of mad-dogs; mingled with Buls suet is a present remedy for the gout; inwardly taken, is a singular purge for the dropsie and gout.Dr Butler.

Echium. Vipers-buglosse, Vipers-herb, Snake­buglosse, Wall-buglosse, Wild-buglosse; seve­ral Countries give it these several names: it is a singular remedy being eaten, for the biting of ve­nemous beasts; Continual eating of it makes the body invincible against the poyson of Serpents, Toads, Spiders &c. however it be administred; It comforts the heart, expels sadness, and melan­cholly: It grows abundantly about the Castle walls, at Lewis in Sussex. The rich may make the flowers into a conserve, and the herb into a syrup; the poor may keep it dry; both may keep it as a Jewel.

Empetron, Calcifraga, Herniaria &c. Rup­ture-wort, or Burst-wort; the English name tels you it is good against Ruptures, and so such as are bursten shall find it, if they please to make trial of it, either inwardly taken or outwardly ap­plied to the place, or both. Also the Latin names hold it forth to be good against the stone, which who so tries shall find true.

Enula Campana. Elicampane. Provokes U­rine: See the root.

Epithimum. Dodder of Time, to wch ad cōmon Dodder wch is usually that wch grows upon Flax: indeed every Dodder retains a vertue of that herb or plant it grows upon, as Dodder that grows up­on Broom, provokes urin forcibly, & loosens the [...]. belly, and is moister than that which grows uponMesue. Flax, that which grows upon Time, is hotterActua­rius. and dryer than that which grows upon Flax, even in the third degree, opens obstructions, helps in­firmitiesSerapio. of the spleen, purgeth melancholly, re­leevesAvicenna. drooping spirits, helps the rickets; that which grows on Flax, is excellent for agues in young children, strengthens weak stomachs, pur­geth choller, provokes urine, opens stoppings in the reins and bladder; that which grows upon Nettles, provokes urine exceedingly. The way of using it is to boyl it in white Wine, or other convenient decoction, and boyl it very little, remembring what was told you before in [...].

Eruca. Rocket, hot and dry in the third de­gree,Galen. being eaten alone, causeth headach by its heat, procureth lust.

Eupatorium. See [...].

Euphragia. Eybright: somthing hot and dry, the very sight of it refresheth the eyes; inwardly taken, it restores the sight, and makes old mens eyes young; a drachm of it taken in the mor­ning is worth a pair of Spectacles, it comforts and strengtheneth the memory, outwardly ap­plyed to the place it helps sore eyes.

Filix foemina.
Filicula, poly­podium.See the Roots.
Filipendula.

Malabathrum. Indian-leaf, hot and dry in the second degree, comforts the Stomach excee­dingly, helps digestion, provokes urine, helps in­flamations of the eyes, secures cloathes from moths.

Foeniculum. Fennel, Encreaseth milk in Nurses, provokes Urine, breaks the stone, easeth pains in the Reins, opens stoppings, breaks wind, provokes the terms, You may boyl it in white Wine.

Fragaria. Strawberry leaves, are cold, dry, and binding, a singular Remedy for inflamati­ons and wounds, hot diseases in the throat, they stop fluxes, and the terms, cool the heat of the stomach, and inflamations of the Liver. The best way is to boyl them in barley water.

Fraxinus &c. Ash-trees: the leaves are mo­derately hot and dry, cure the bitings of Adders, and Serpents, by a certain antipathy (they say) there is between them, they stop loosness, and stay vomittng, help the Rickets, open stoppages of the Liver and Spleen.

Fumaria. Fumitory: Cold and dry, it ope­neth and clenseth by Urine, helps such as are Itchy, and Scabbed, cleers the skin, opens stop­pings of the Liver and Spleen, helps Rickets, Hypochondriak Melancholly, madness, frenzies, Quartan Agues, loosneth the belly, gently pur­geth Melancholly, and addust choller: boyl it in white Wine, and take this one general rule, All things of a clensing or opening nature may be most commodiously boyled in white wine. Re­member but this and then I need not write one thing so often.

[...]. Goats-rue: Temperate in quality, resists Poyson, kills Worms, helps the Falling­sickness, resisteth the Pestilence. You may take a drachm of it at a time in pouder.

Galion. Ladies-bedstraw: dry and binding, stancheth blood: boyled in Oyl, the Oyl is good to anoint a weary Traveller; inwardly it provokes lust.

[...]. See the Root.

Genista. Broom: hot and dry in the second degree, clens and open the Stomach, break the Stone in the Reins and Bladder, help the green sickness. Let such as are troubled with heart­qualms or faintings, forbear it, for it weakens the Heart and Spirit Vital. See the Flowers.

Geranium. Cranebil, the divers sorts of it, one of which is that which is called Muscata, and in Sussex barbariously Muscovy; it is thought to be cool and dry, helps hot swellings, and by its smel amends a hot brain.

Geranium Columbinum. Doves-foot; helps the wind Chollick, pains in the belly, stone in the reins and bladder, and is singular good in ruptures, and inward wounds. I suppose these are the general vertues of them all.

Gramen. [...]; See the Root.

[Page 19] Gratiola. Hedg- Hysop, purgeth water and flegm, but works very churlishly. Gesner com­mends it in Dropsies.

Asphodelus foem. See the Root.

Hepatica, Lichen. Liverwort, cold and dry, excellent good for Inflamations of the Liver, or any other Inflamations, yellow Jaundice.

Hedera Arborea, [...]. Tree and Ground­Ivy. Tree-Ivy helps Ulcers, Burnings, Scal­dings, the bad effects of the Spleen; the Juyce snuffed up in the nose, purgeth the head, it is ad­mirable for surfets or headach, or any other ill effects coming of drunkenness, and therefore the Poets feigned Bacchus to have his head bound round with them. Your best way is to boyl them in the same liquor you got your surfet by drinking.

Ground-Ivy is that which usually is called Alehoof, hot and dry, the Juyce helps noise in the ears, fistulaes, gouts, stoppings of the Liver, it strengthens the Reins and stops the terms, helps the yellow Jaundice, and other diseases co­ming of stopping of the Liver, and is excellent for wounded people.

Herba Camphorata. Stinking Ground-pine, is of a drying faculty, and therefore stops deflu­xions either in the eyes, or upon the Lungues, the gout, cramps, palsies, aches, strengthens the Nerves.

Herba Moschata. Mentioned even now, me thinks the Colledg should not have forgotten themselves so soon: How can a man that forgets himself remember his patient?

Herba Paralysis, Primula veris. Primroses, or Cowslips, which you will. The Leaves help pains in the head and joynts; see the Flowers which are most in use.

Herba Paris. Herb True-love, or One-berry. Pena and [...], affirm it resists poyson. Ma­thiolus saith it takes away evil done by witch­craft, and affirms it by experience, as also long lingring sickness; however it is good for wounds, fals, bruises, apostumes, inflamations, ulcers in the privities. Herb True-love, is very cold in tem­perature. You may take half a dram of it at a time in pouder.

Herba Roberti. A kind of Cranebil.

Herba venti, Anemone. Wind-flower; the Juyce snuffed up the nose purgeth the head, it clenseth filthy Ulcers, encreaseth milk in Nur­ses, and outwardly by Oyntment helps Lepro­sies.

Herniaria. The same with Empetron.

Helxine. Pellitory of the wall. Cold, moist, clensing, helps the stone and gravel in the Kid­nies, difficulty of Urine, sore throats, pains in the ears the Juyce being dropped in them; out­wardly it helps the shingles and St. Anthonies fire.

Hippoglossum. Horstongue, Tongueblade or Double-tongue. The Roots help the strangury, provoke urine, case the hard labor of women, pro­voke the terms, the Herb helps ruptures and the fits of the mother, it is hot in the second degree, dry in the first, boyl it in white Wine.

Hippolapathum. Patience, or Monks Reu­barb: see the Roots.

Hipposelinum. Alexanders, or Alisanders. Provoke urin, expel the After-birth, help the strangury, expel wind.

Horminum, Clary; hot and dry in the third degree; helps weakness in the back, stops the running of the Reins, and the whites in women, provokes the Terms, and helps women that are barren through coldness, or moisture, or both, causeth fruitfulness, but is hurtful for the memo­ry. The usual way of taking it, is to fry it with Butter, or make a Tansie with it.

Hydropiper. Arsmart. Hot and dry, con­sumes all cold swellings, and blood congealed by bruises and stripes; applied to the place, it helps that aposthume in the joynts, commonly called a Felon: (but in Sussex, an Andicom) If you put a handful of it under the saddle upon a tired horses back, it will make him travel fresh and lu­stily; strewed in a chamber kils all the Fleas there; this is the hottest Arsmart, and is unfit to be given inwardly: there is a milder sort, cal­led Persicaria, which is of a cooler milder quali­ty, drying, excellent good for putrified ulcers, kill worms: I had almost forgot that the former is an admirable remedy for the Gout, being rosted between two Tiles and applied to the grieved place, and yet I had it from Dr Butler too.

Hysopus. Hysop. Helps Coughs, shortness of Breath, Wheezing, Distillations upon the Lungues; it is of a clensing quality: kils worms in the body, amends the whol colour of the bo­dy, helps the Dropsie and Spleen, sore Throats, and nois in the Ears. See Syrup of Hysop.

Hyoscyamus &c. Henbane. The white Hen­bane is held to be cold in the third degree, the black or common Henbane and the yellow, in the fourth: They stupifie the sences, and there­fore not to be takn inwardly; outwardly appli­ed, they help inflamations, hot gouts; applied to the temples, they provoke sleep.

Hypericon. St. Johns wort. It is as gallant a Wound-herb as any is, either given inwardly, or outwardly applied to the wound; it is hot and dry, opens stoppings, helpeth spitting and vomiting of blood, it clenseth the Reins, pro­vokes the Terms, helps congealed blood in the Stomach and Meseraick Veins, the Falling­sickness, Palsy, Cramps and Aches in the joynts; you may give it in pouder or any convenient de­coction.

Hypoglottis Laurus Alexandrina. Laurel of Alexandria, provokes urin and the terms, and is held to be a singular help to women in travail.

Hypoglossum, the same with Hippoglossum be­fore, only different names given by different Authors, the one deriving his name from the tongue of a horse, of which form the Leaf is; the other from the form of the little leaf, because small leaves like small tongues grow upon the greater, but whether the Colledg knew this [...] no, is some question.

Iberis Cardamantice. Sciatica-cresses. I sup­pose so called because they help the Sciatica, [Page 20] or Huckle bone-gout.

Ingunialis, Aster. Serwort, or Shartwort: be­ing bruised and applied they help swellings, bot­ches, and venerious buboes in the groyn, whence they took their name, as also inflamati­on and falling out of the fundament.

[...]. See the Roots.

Isatis, Glastum. Woad. Drying and bind­ing; the side being bathed with it, it easeth pains in the spleen, clenseth filthy corroding gnawing ulcers.

Iva Arthritica. The same with Camaepytis.

Juncus odoratus. The same with Schoenan­thus.

Labrum veneris. The same with Dipsacus.

[...]. Lettice. Cold and moist, cool the inflamation of the stomach commonly called heart-burning, provoke sleep, resist drunken­ness and take away the ill effects of it, cool the blood, quench thirst, breed milk, and are good for chollerick bodies, and such as have a frenzy, or are sienitique, or as the vulgar say frantick. They are far wholsommer eaten boyled than raw.

Lagobus, Herba Leporina. A kind of Trefoil growing in France and Spain. Let them that live there look after the vertues of it.

Lavendula. Lavender: hot and dry in the third degree; The temples and forehead bathed with the juyce of it, as also the smel of the herb helps swoonings, Catalepsis, Falling sickness, provided it be not accompanied with a Feaver. See the flowers.

Laurcola Laurel. The leaves purge upward and downward, they are good for rhewmatick people to chew in their mouths, for they draw forth much water.

Laurus Bay-tree: the leaves are hot and dry, resist drunkenness, they gently bind and help diseases in the bladder, help the stinging of Bees and Wasps, metigate the pain of the stomach, dry and heal, open obstructions of the liver and spleen, resist the pestelence.

Lappa minor. The lesser Burdock.

[...]. Mastick-tree, both the leaves and bark of it stop sluxes, (being hot and dry in the second degree) spitting and pissing of blood, and the falling out of the fundament.

Lens palustris. Duckmeat: cold and moist in the second degree, helps inflamations, hot swel­lings, and the falling out of the fundament, be­ing warmed and applied to the place.

Lepidium Piperites. Dittander, Pepper-wort, [...]. [...]. or [...]: a hot fiery sharp herb, admirable for the Gout being applied to the place, being [...]. only held in the hand it helps the toothach, and withal leaves a wan color in the hand that holds it.

Livisticum. Lovage: Clears the sight, takes away redness and freckles from the face.

Libanotis Coronaria. See Rosemary. Linaria. Toad-flax, or Wild-flax; hot and dry, clense the reins and bladder, provoke urin, open the stoppinps of the liver and spleen, and help diseases coming thereof: outwardly they take away yellowness and deformity of the skin.

Lillium convallium. Lilly of the Valley. See the flowers.

Lingua Cervina. Harts-tongue: drying and binding, stops blood, the terms and fluxes, opens stoppings of the Liver and Spleen, and diseases thence arising. The like quantity of Harts­tongue, Knotgrass and Comfry Roots being boyled in water, and a draught of the decoction drunk every morning, and the materials which have boyled applied to the place, is a notable re­medy for such as are burst.

Limonium. Sea-bugloss, or Marsh-bugloss, or as some will have it Sea-Lavender: the seeds being very drying and binding, stop fluxes and the terms, help the chollick and strangury.

Lotus urbana. Authors make some flutter a­bout this Herb, I conceive the best take it to be Trisolium Odoratum, Sweet Tresoyl, which is of a temperate nature, clenseth the eyes gent­ly of such things as hinder the sight, cureth green wounds, ruptures, or burstness, helps such as piss blood or are bruised, and secures garments from moths.

Lupulus. Hops. Opening, clensing, provoke urine; the young sprouts open stoppings of the Liver and Spleen, clense the blood, cleer the skin, help scabs and itch, help agues, purge chol­ler: they are usually boyled-and taken as they eat Sparagus, but if you would keep them, for they are excellent for these diseases, you may make them into a Conserve, (as you shall be taught hereafter) or into a Syrup.

Lychnitis Coronaria: or as others more pro­perly from the Greek write it, Lychnis. Rose Campion. I know no great physical vertue it hath.

Macis. See the Barks.

Magistrantia &c. Masterwort: Hot and dry in the third degree; it is singular good against poyson, pestilence, corrupt and unwholsom air, helps windiness in the stomach, causeth an ap­petite to ones victuals, very profitable in fals and bruises, congealed and clotted blood, the bitings of mad-dogs; the leaves chewed in the mouth, clense the brain of superfluous humors, thereby preventing Lethargies, and Apo­plexes.

Malva. Mallows. The best of Authors ac­count wild Mallows to be best, and hold them to be cold and moist in the first degree; they are profitable in the bitings of venemous beasts, the stinging of Bees and Wasps &c. Inwardly they resist poyson, provoke to stool; outward­ly they asswage hard swellings of the Privities or other places, in Clysters they help roughness and fretting of the Guts, Bladder, or Funda­ment; and so they do being boyled in water and the decoction drunk, as I have proved in this present Epidemical disease, the Bloody-flux.

Majorana. See Amaracus.

Mandragora. Mandrakes. Fit fot no vulgar use, but only to be used in cooling Oyntments.

Marrubium, album, nigrum, foetidum. Mar­rubium album, is common Horehound. Hot in the second degree, and dry in the third, openeth [Page 21] the Liver and Spleen, clenseth the breast and lungs, helps old Coughs, pains in the sides, Phtisicks, or ulceration of the lungues, it pro­vokes the Terms, easeth hard labor in Child­bearing, brings away the after-birth. See the Syrups.

Marrubium, nigrum, & foetidum. Black and stinking Horehound, I take to be all one. Hot and dry in the third degree; cure the bitings of mad-dogs, wast and consume hard knobs in the fundament and matrix, clense filthy Ulcers.

Unless by stinking Horehound the Colledg should mean that which Fuchsius cals Stachys, if they do, it is hot and dry but in the first degree, and a singular Remedy to keep wounds from in­flamation.

Marum. Herb Mastich. Hot and dry in the third degree, good against Cramps and Convul­sions.

Matricaria. Featherfew. Hot in the third degree, dry in the second; openeth, purgeth; a singular remedy for diseases incident to the Matrix, and other diseases incident to women, eases their travail, and infirmities coming after it; it helps the Vertigo or dissiness of the head, Melancholly, sad thoughts: you may boyl it ei­ther alone, or with other Herbs fit for the same purpose, with which this Treatise will fur­nish you: applied to the wrists, it helps the Ague.

Matrisylva. The same with Caprifolium.

Meliotus. Melilot. Inwardly taken, pro­vokes urine, breaks the Stone, clenseth the Reins and Bladder, cutteth and clenseth the Lungs of tough Flegm; the juyce dropped in­to the eyes, cleers the sight, into the ears, miti­gates pain and noise there; the head bathed with the juyce mixed with Vinegar, takes away the pains thereof: outwardly in Pultisses, it asswa­geth swellings in the privities, and else where.

Mellissa. Bawm. Hot and dry; outwardly mixed with salt and applied to the neck, help theGalen. Kings Evil, bitings of mad-dogs, venemous [...] beasts, and such as cannot hold their necks as they should do; inwardly it is an excellent re­medy for a cold and moist stomach, cheers the heart, refresheth the mind, takes away grief, sor­row, and care, instead of which it produceth joy and mirth. See the Syrup.

Mentha sativa. Garden Mints, Spear Mints. Are hot and dry in the third degree, provoke hunger, are wholsom for the stomach, stay vomiting, stop the terms, help sore heads in in children, strengthen the stomach, cause dige­stion;Pliny. outwardly applied, they help the bitingsGalen. of mad dogs: Yet they hinder conception, and are naught for wounded people, they say by rea­son of an antipathy between them and Iron.

Mentha aquatica. Water Mints. Ease pains of the belly, headach, and vomiting, gravel in the Kidnies and Stone.

Methastrum. Horse-mint. I know no dif­ference between them and Water Mints.

[...], mas, foemina. Mercury, male and foemale, They are both hot and dry in the second degree, clensing, digesting, they purge watry humors, and further conception. Theo­phrastus relates that if a woman use to eat either the male, or foemale Mercury, two or three daies after conception, she shall bring forth a child ei­ther male or foemale according to the sex of the herb she eats.

Mezereon. Spurg-Olive, or Widdow-wail. A dangerous purge, better let alone than medled with.

Millesolium. Yarrow. Meanly cold and binding, an healing Herb for wounds, stanchethGalen. bleeding; and some say the Juyce snuffed up the nose, causeth it to bleed, whence it was called, Nose-bleed; it stoppeth Lasks, and the Terms in women, helps the running of the reins, helps inflamations and excoriations of the Yard, as also inflamations of wounds.

Muscus. Moss. Is somthing cold and bin­ding, yet usually retains a smatch of the proper­ty of the tree it grows on, therefore that which grows upon Oaks is very dry and binding; Se­rapio saith that it being insused in Wine and the Wine drunk, it staies vomiting and fluxes, as al­so the whites in women.

Myrtus. Mirtle-tree. The Leaves are of a cold earthy quality, drying and binding, good for fluxes, spitting, vomiting, and pissing of blood, stop the Whites and Reds in women.

Nardus. See the Root.

Nasturtium, Aquaticum, Hortense. Water­cresses and Garden-cresses.

Garden-cresses are hot and dry in the fourthDioscorl­des. degree, good for the Scurvy, Sciatica, hard swel­lings, yet do they trouble the belly, ease pains of the Spleen, provoke lust.

Water-cresses are hot and dry, clense the blood, help the Scurvy, provoke urine and the terms, break the stone, help the green sickness, cause a fresh lively color.

Nasturtium Album, Thlaspi. Treacle-mustard. Hot and dry in the third degree, purgeth vio­lently, dangerous for women with child: Out­wardly it is applied with profit to the Gout.

Nicotiani. Tabacco. And in reciting the [...] vertues of this herb, I will follow Clustus, thatI know not what better name to give it, Old head­aches, continual head-a­ches: take which ye will. none should think I do it without an Author. It is hot and dry in the second degree, and of a clensing nature, the leaves warmed and applied to the head are excellent good, in * inveterate head-aches and Negrims, if the diseases come through cold or wind, change them often till the diseases be gone, help such whose necks be stiff, it easeth the faults of the breast, Asthmaes or hard flegm in tho lappets of the lungues, eas­eth the pains of the stomach and windiness there­of being heat hot by the fire and applied to it; easeth the pains of the spleen being moistened in vineger and applied hot to the side, they loosen the belly and This I know by experience even wher many o­ther medi­cines have sailed. kill worms being applied to it in like manner, they break the stone being applied in like manner to the region of the bladder, help the rickets, being applied to the belly and sides; applied to the navil they give present ease to the fits of the mother, they take away cold ach in [Page 22] the joints applied to them, boyled, the liquor absolutely and speedily cures scabs and itch, nei­ther is there any better salve in the world for wounds than may be made of it, for it clenseth, [...] out the filth though it lie in the bones, brings up the flesh from the bottom, and all this it [...] speedily, it cures wounds made with [...], and for this Clusius brings many [...] tedious here to relate; It is an [...] thing for Carbuncles, and Plague­sores, [...] to none; green wounds 'twill cure in a trico, Ulcers and Gangrenes very spee­dily, not only in men but also in beasts: there­fore the Indians dedicated it to their god. Ta­ken in a pipe it hath almost as many vertues, it easeth [...], takes away the sence of hunger and thirst, provokes to stool, he saith, the In­dians will travail four daies without either meat or drink by only chewing a little of this (made up like a Pill) in their mouths; It easeth the body of supersluous humors, opens stoppings. Mo­nardus also confirms this judgment, and indeed a man might fill a whol Volumn with the ver­tues of it. See the Oyntment of Tobacco

[...]. Money-wort, or Herb Two­pence; cold dry, binding, helps Fluxes, stops the Terms, helps ulcers in the lungues; out­wardly it is a special herb for wounds.

Nymphaea. See the Flowers.

[...]. Basil, hot and moist. Simeou Se­thi, saith the smel of Basil is good for the head, but Hollerius (and he no mean Physician nei­ther) saith the continual smell of it hurts the brain and breeds Scorpions there, and asfirms his own knowledg of it, and that's the reason (saith he) there is such an Antipathy between it and [...], which I am confident there is, the truth is, it will quickly putrifie and breed worms. Hollerius saith, they are venemous; and that's the reason the name Basilicon was given to it: The best use that I know of it, is, it gives spee­dy deliverance to women in travail. Let them not take above half a drachm of it at a time in pouder, and be sure also the birth be ripe, else it causeth abortion.

Oleae folia. Olive-leaves; they are hard to come by here.

Ononis. Rest-harrow. See the Roots.

Ophiogloslon. Adders-tongue: the leaves are ve­ry drying, being boiled in Oyl they make a dainty green Balsom for green wounds: taken inward­ly, they help inward wounds.

Origanum. Organy: a kind of wild Marjo­ram; hot and dry in the third degree; helps the bitings of venemous beasts, such as have ta­ken Opium, Hemlock, or Poppy; provokes urine, brings down the terms, helps old coughs; in oyntment it helps scabs and itch.

Oxylapathum. Sorrel. See Acetosa.

Papaver &c. Poppies; white, black, or er­ratick. I refer you to the Syrups of each

Parietaria. Given once before under the name of Helxine.

[...]. Parsnips. See the Roots.

Persicaria. See Hydropiper: this is the milder sort of Arsmart I described there: If ever you find it amongst the Compounds, take it under that notion.

Pentaphyllum. Cynkfoil: very drying, yet but meanly hot, if at all; helps ulcers in the mouth, roughness of the windpipe, (whence comes hoarsness and Couges &c.) helps fluxes, creeping ulcers and the yellow jaundice; they say one leaf cures a quotidian ague, three a ter­tian, and four a quartan: I know it will cure agues without this curiosity, if a wise man have the handling of it; otherwise a Cart load will not do it.

Petroselinum. Parsly. See smallage

Pes Columbinus. See Geranium.

Persicarum folia. Peach leaves: they are a gentle, yet a compleat purger of choller, and diseases coming from thence, fit for children be­cause of their gentleness. You may boyl them in whiteWine, a handful is enough at a time.

Pilosella. Mousear: once before, and that's often enough.

Pithyusa. A new name for Spurge, of the last Edition.

Plantago. Plantane. Cold and dry, an herb though common, yet let none despise it, for the decoction of it, prevails mightily against tor­menting pains and excoriations of the guts, bloody fluxes, it stops the terms, and spittingTragur. of blood, [...], or Consumptions of theDiosco­rides. lungues, the running of the reins, and the whites in women, pains in the head, and fren­zies: outwardly it cleers the sight, takes away inflamations, scabs, itch, the shingles, and all spreading sores, and is as wholsome an herb as can grow about a house.

Polium &c. Polley, or Pellamountain: allDioscori­des. the sorts are hot in the second degree, and dry in the third: helps dropsies, the yellow-jaundice, infirmities of the spleen, and provokes urine.

Polygonum. Knotgrass.

Polytricum. Maidenhair.

Portulaca Purslain: Cold and moist in the second or third degree; cools hot stomachs, and (I remember since I was a child that) it is admirable for one that hath his teeth on edge by eating sowr apples, it cools the blood, liver, and is good for hot diseases, or inflamations in any of these places, stops fluxes, and the terms, and helps all inward inflamations whatsoever.

Porrum. Leeks. See the Roots.

Primula Veris. See Cowslips, or the Flowers, which you will.

Prunella. Self-heal, Carpenters-Herb, and in Sussex Sicklewort. Moderately hot and dry, binding. See Bugle. So shall I not need to write one thing twice, the vertues being the same.

Pulegium. Penyroyal: hot and dry in the third degree; provokes urine, breaks the stone in the reins, (for I take it, the herb is chiefly apropriated to those parts) strengthens womens backs, provokes the terms, easeth their labour in Child-bed, brings away the afterbirth, staies vomiting, strengthens the brain, (yea the very [Page 23] smell of it) breaks wind, and helps the Verti­go.

Pulmonari, arborea, & Symphytum maculosum. Lunguewort. I confess I searching Authors for these, found out many sorts of Lungueworts, yet all agreed that both these were one and the same; and helps infirmities of the Lungues, as hoarceness, coughs, wheezing, shortness of breath &c. You may boyl it in Hysop water, or any other water that strengthens the Lungues.

Pulicaria. Fleabane; hot and dry in the third degree, helps the bitings of venemous beasts, wounds and swellings, the yellow Jaundice, the falling-sickness, and such as cannot piss; it be­ing burnt, the smoke of it kils all the Gnats and Fleas in the chamber, as also Serpents if they be there; it is dangerous for women with child.

Pyrus sylvestris. Wild Pear-tree. I know no vertue in the Leaves.

Pyrola. Wintergreen. Cold and dry, and very binding, stops fluxes, and the terms in women, and is admirable good in green wounds.

Quercus folia. Oak Leaves: are much of the nature of the former, stay the whites in wo­men. See the Bark.

Ranunculus. Hath got a sort of English names: Crowfoot, King-kob, Gold-cups, Gold-knobs, Butter-flowers &c. they are of a notable hot quality, unfit to be taken inwardly; If you bruise the Roots and apply them to a Plague-sore, they are notable things to draw the venom to them. Also Apuleius saith, that if they be hanged about the neck of one that is lu­natick in the wane of the Moon, the Moon be­ing in the first degree of Taurus, or Scorpio, it quickly rids him of his disease.

Raparum folia. If they do not mean Turnep­leaves, I know not what they mean, nor it may be themselves neither, the greatest part of them having as much knowledg in Simples, as a horse hath in Hebrew. Rapum is a Turnep, but surely Rapa is a word seldom used; If they do mean Turnep-leaves: when they are yong and tender, they are held to provoke urin.

Rosmarinum. Rosemary, hot and dry in the second degree, binding, stops fluxes help stuf­fingsScrapio. in the head, the yellow Jaundice, helps theDioscori­des. memory, expels wind: See the Flowers.

Rosa Solis. See the Water.

Rosa Alba, Rubra, Damascena. White, Red, and Damask Roses. I would some body would do so much as ask the Colledg wherefore they set the Leaves down.

Rumex. Dock: all the ordinary sort of Docks are of a cool and drying substance, and there­fore stops fluxes; and the Leaves are seldom u­sed in Physick.

Rubus Idaeus. Raspis, Rasberries, or Hind­berries: I know no great vertue in the Leaves.

Ruta. Rue, or Herb of grace; hot and dry in the third degree, consumes the seed, and is an enemy to generation, helps difficulty of brea­thing, and inflamations of the lungues, pains in the side, inflamations of the Yard and Matrix, is naught for women with child: An hundred such things are quoted by Dioscorides. This I am sure of, no Herb resisteth poyson more. And some think Mithridates, that renowned King of Pontus, fortified his body against poyson with no other medicine. It strengtheneth the heart exceedingly, and no Herb better than this in Pestilential times, take it what manner you wil or can.

Ruta Muraria. See Adianthum.

Sabina. Savin; hot and dry in the third de­gree, potently provokes the terms, expels both birth and after-birth, they (boyled in oyl and used in Oyntments) stay creeping ulcers, scour away spots, freckles, and sunburning from the face, the belly anointed with it kils worms in children.

Salvia. Sage: hot and dry in the second or third degree, binding, it staies abortion in such women as are subject to come before their times, it causeth fruitfulness, it is singular good for the brain, strengthens the sences and memory, helps spitting and vomiting of blood; outward­ly, heat hot with a little Vinegar and applied to the side, helps stitches, and pains in the sides.

Salix. Willow-leaves; are cold, dry, and bin­ding, stop spitting of blood and fluxes; the boughs stuck about a chamber, wonderfully cool the air, and refresh such as have feavers; the leaves applied to the head, help hot diseases there, and frenzies.

Sampsucum. Marjoram.

Sanicula. Sanicle: hot and dry in the second degree, clenseth wounds and ulcers.

Saponaria. Sope-wort, or Bruise-wort; vul­garly used in bruises and cut fingers, and is of notable use in the French-pocks.

Satureia. Savory. Summer-savory, is hot and dry in the third degree, Winter-savory is not so hot, both of them expel wind gallantly, and that (they say) is the reason why they are boyled with Pease and Beans, and other such windy things: 'tis a good fashion and pitty it should be left.

Saxifragia alba. White Saxifrage; breaks wind, helps the chollick and stone.

Scabiosa. Scabious; hot and dry in the se­cond degree, clenseth the breast and lungues, helps old rotten coughs, and difficulty of brea­thing, provokes urine and clenseth the bladder of filthy stuff, breaks Aposthumes, and cures Scabs and Itch. Boyl it in white wine.

Scariola. An Italian name for Succory.

Schoenanthus. Schaenanth, Squinanth, or Chamels-hay; hot and binding. Galen saith it causeth headach, beleeve him that list; Dio­scorides saith it digests and opens the passages of the veins: surely it is as great an expeller of wind as any is.

Scordium. Water-Germander; hot and dry, clenseth ulcers in the inward parts, it provokes urine and the terms, opens stoppings of the li­ver, spleen, reins, bladder, and matrix, it is a great counterpoyson, and easeth the breast op­pressed with flegm. See Diascordium.

[Page 24] Scrophularia. Figwort, so called of Scrophula, the Kings Evil, which it cures, they say by be­ing only hung about the neck if not, bruise it and apply it to the place, it helps the Piles or Hemorrhoids, and (they say) being hung about the neck preserves the body in health.

Sedum. And all his sorts. See Barba Jovis.

Senna. In this give me leave to stick close to Mesue, as an imparaleld Author: it heats in the second degree and dries in the first, clenseth, purgeth, and digesteth, it carries downwards both choller, flegm, and melancholly, it clenseth the brain, heart, Liver, Spleen, it cheers the sences, opens obstructions, takes away dulness of sight, preserves youth, helps deafness (if pur­ging will help it) helps melancholly and mad­ness, keeps back old age, resists resolution of the nerves, [...]. pains in the head, scabs, itch, falling­sickness, the windiness of it is corrected with a little Ginger. You may boyl half an ounce of it at a time, in Water or white Wine, but boyl it not too much; half an ounce is a moderate dose to be boyled for any reasonable body.

Scrpillum. Mother-of-Time, Wild Time; it is hot and dry in the third degree, it provokes the terms gallantly, as also helps the strangury [...]. or stoppage of urine, gripings in the belly, rup­tures,Galen. convulsions, inflamations of the Liver, Lethargy, and infirmities of the spleen: boyl it in white Wine.

Sigillum Solomonis. Solomons Seal. See the Root.

Smyrnium. Alexanders of Creet.

Solanum. Nightshade: very cold and dry, binding, it is somwhat dangerous given inward­ly, unless by a skilful hand; outwardly it helps the Shingles, St Anthonies fire, and other hot inflamations.

Soldanella. Bindweed, hot and dry in the se­cond degree, it opens obstructions of the Liver,Galen. and purgeth watry humors, and is therefore ve­ry profitable in dropsies, it is very hurtful to the stomach, and therefore if taken inwardly it had need be well corrected with Cinnamon, Ginger, or Annis-seeds &c. Yet the German Physitians affirm that it cures the dropsie being only brui­sed and applied to the navil and somthing lower, and then it needs not be taken inwardly at all.

Sonchus levis Asper. Sowthistles smooth and rough; they are of a cold watry, yet binding quality, good for frenzies, they encrease milk in Nurses, and cause the children which they nurse to have a good color, help gnawings of the stomach coming of a hot cause; outwardly they help inflamations, and hot swellings, cool the heat of the fundament and privities.

[...] Chirurgorum. Flixweed: drying with­out any manifest heat or coldness, it is usually found about old ruinous buildings, it is so cal­led because of its vertue in stopping fluxes [...] highly commends it, nay elevates it up to the skies for curing old wounds and fistulaes; which though our modern Chyrurgians despise, yet if it were in the hands of a wise man, such as Paracelsus was, it may do the wonders he saith it will.

Spinachia. Spinage. I never read any physical vertues of it.

Spina alba. See the Root.

Spica. See Nardus.

Staebe. Silver Knapweed: The vertues be the same with Scabious, and some think the Herbs too; though I am of another opinion.

Staechas. French Lavender, Cassidony, is a great counterpoyson, open obstructions of the Liver and Spleen, clenseth the matrix and blad­der, brings out corrupt humors, provokes urine. There is another Staechas mentioned here by the name of Amaranthus, in English, Golden flower, or Flower-gentle: the flowers of which expel worms; being boyled, the water kils Lice and Nits.

Succisa, Monsus Dioboli. Devils-bit: Hot and dry in the second degree: inwardly taken, it easeth the fits of the mother, and breaks wind, takes away swellings in the mouth, and slimy flegm that sticks to the jaws, neither is there a more present remedy in the world for those cold swellings in the neck, which the vulgar call, the Almonds of the ears, than this Herb bruised and applied to them.

Suchaha. And Egyptian Thorn. Very hard, if not impossible to come by here.

And here the Colledg make another racket a­bout the several sorts of Comfryes, which I pass by with silence, having spoken to them be­fore.

Tanacetum. Tansie: hot in the second de­gree, and dry in the third; the very smel of it staies abortion, or miscarriages in women; so it doth being bruised and applied to their navils, provokes urine, and easeth pains in making wa­ter; and is a special help against the Gout.

Taraxacon. Dandelyon, or to write better French, Dent-de-lyon, for in plain English it is called Lyons-tooth; it is a kind of Succory, and thither I refer you.

Tamariscus. Tamaris. It hath a dry clensing quality, and hath a notable vertue against theGalen. Rickets, and infirmities of the Spleen, provokesDioscori­des. the terms.

Telephium. A kind of Orpine.

Thlaspi. See Nasturtium.

Thymbra. A wild Savory.

Thymum. Tyme. Hot and dry in the third degree; helps coughs and shortness of breath, provokes the terms, brings away dead children and the after-birth, purgeth flegm, clenseth the breast and lungues, reins and matrix, helps the Sciatica, pains in the breast, expels wind in any part of the body, resisteth fearfulness and melan­cholly, continual pains in the head, and is pro­fitable for such as have the Falling-sickness to smell to.

Thymaelea. The Greek name for Spurge­Olive: Mezereon being the Arabick name.

Tithymalus, Esula &c. Spurge. Hot and dry in the fourth degree; a dogged purge, better let alone than taken inwardly; hair anointed with the juyce [Page 25] of it will fall off; it kills Fish, being mixed with any thing that they will eat: outwardly it clenseth ulcers, takes away freckles, sunburning and morphew from the face.

Tormentilla. See the Root.

Trinitatis herba. Pansies, or Hearts-ease: They are cold and moist both Herbs and Flowers, excel­lent against inflamatious of the breast or lungs, Con­vulsions, and Falling sickness, also they are held to be good for the French Pocks.

Trifolium. Trefoil: dry in the third degree, and cold. The ordinary Medow Trefoil, (for their word comprehends all sorts) clenseth the guts of slimy humors that stick to them, being used either in Drinks or Clysters; outwardly they take away infla­mations, Pliny saith the Leaves stand upright before a storm, which I have observed to be true oftener than once or twice, and that in a cleer day, 14. hours before the storm came.

Tussilago. Colts-foot: something cold and dry, and therefore good for inflamations, they are admi­rable good for Coughs, and Consumptions of the lungues, shortness of breath &c. It is often used and with good success taken in a Tobacco-pipe, being cut and mixed with a little oyl of Annis seeds. See the Syrup of Colts-foot.

Valeriana. Valerian, or Setwal See the Roots

Verbascum. Thapsus Barbatus. Mullin, or Hig­taper. It is something dry, and of a digesting, clen­sing quality, stops fluxes and the hemorroids, it cures hoarcness, the cough, and such as are broken winded; the Leaves worn in the shooes provokes the terms, (especially in such Virgins as never had them) but they must be worn next their feet: also they say, that the Herb being gathered when the Sun is in Virgo, and the Moon in Aries, in their mutual Antiscions, helps such of the falling-sickness as do but carry it about them: worn under the feet it helps such as are troub­led with the fits of the mother.

Verbena. Vervain; hot and dry, a great opener, clenser, and healer, it helps the yellow jaundice, de­fects in the reins and bladder, pains in the head, if it be but bruised and hung about the neck; all disea­ses in the secret parts of men and women; made into an ointment it is a sovereign remedy for old head­aches, called by the name of [...] as also fren­zies; it cleers the skin, and causeth a lovely co­lour.

Veronica: See Betonica Pauli.

Violarla. Violet Leaves: They are cool, ease pains in the head proceeding of heat, and frenzies, either inwardly taken, or outwardly applied, heat of the stomach, or inflamation of the lungues.

Vitis Vinifera. The Manuted Vine, Vines of different climates, have dif­ferent o­perations. I write of English Vines. The Leaves are binding and cool withal; the burnt ashes of the sticks of a Vine, scour the teeth and make them as white as snow; the Leaves stop bleeding, fluxes, heart-burnings, vomitings, as also the longing of wo­men with child.

Vincitoxicum. Swallow-wort. A pultis made with the Leaves helps sore breasts, and also soreness of the matrix.

Virga Pastoris. A third name for Teazles. (Thus you see the Colledg will be surer than the Miller who took his toll but twice.) See Dipsacus.

Virga Auria. See Consolida

Ulmaria. See the Root. Meadsweet.

Umbilious Veneris. Navel-wort; Cold, dry and binding, therefore helps all inflamations; they are very good for kib'd heels, being bathed with it, and a leaf laid over the sore.

Urtica: Nettles; an herb so well known, that you may find them by the feeling in the darkest night: they are something hot, not very hot; the juyce stops bleeding; they provoke lust exceedingly, help diffi­culty of breathing, pleurisies, inflamations of the lungues, that troublsome cough that women call the Chincough; they exceedingly break the stone, pro­voke urine, and help such as cannot hold their necks upright. Boyl them in white Wine.

Usnea. Mosse; once before.

FLOWERS.

BOrrage, and Bugloss flowers, strengthen the heart and brain, and are profitable in Feavers.

Chamomel flowers, heat and asswage swellings, in­flamations of the bowels, dissolve wind, are profit­able given in Clysters or drink, to such as are troub­led with the Chollick, or Stone.

Staechas, opens stoppings in the bowels, and streng­thens the whole body.

Saffron powerfully concocts, and sends out what­ever humor offends the body, drives back inflamati­ons, being applied outwardly, encreaseth lust, pro­vokes urine.

Clove-Gilliflowers, resist the pestilence, streng­then the heart, liver, and stomach, and provokes lust.

Schoenanth (which I think I touched slightly a­mongst the Herbs) provokes urine potently, provokes the terms, breaks wind, helps such as spit or vomit blood, easeth pains of the stomach, reins, and spleen, helps dropsies, convulsions, and inflamations of the womb.

Lavender-flowers, resist all cold afflictions of the brain, convulsions falling-sickness, they strengthen cold stomachs, and open obstructions of the liver, they provoke urine and the terms, bring forth the birth and afterbirth.

Hops, opens stoppings of the bowels, and for that cause Beer is better than Ale.

Bawm flowers, cheer the heart and vital spirits, strengthen the stomach.

Rosemary-flowers, strengthen the brain exceeding­ly and resist madness, cleer the sight.

Winter-Gilliflowers, or Wall-flowers (as some call them) help inflamation of the womb, provoke the terms, and help ulcers of the mouth.

Hony-suckles, provoke urine, ease the pains of the spleen, and such as can hardly fetch their breath.

Mallows, help Coughs.

Red Roses, cool, bind, strengthen both vital and animal vertue, restore such as are in consumptions, strengthen. There are so many Compositions of them which maks me the briefer in the Simples.

Violets, (to wit the blew ones, for I know little or no use of the white in physick) cool and moisten, pro­voke sleepe loosen the belly, resist feavers, help in­flamations, correct the heat of choller, ease pains in the head, help the roughness of the wind-pipe, disea­ses in the throat, inflamations in the breast and sides, pluresies, open stoppings of the liver, and help the yellow Jaundice.

Cichory, (or Succory as the vulgar calls it) cools and strengthens the liver: so doth Endive.

Water-lillies ease pains of the head coming of chol­ler and heat, provoke sleep, cool inflamations, and the heat in seavers.

Pomegranate-flowers, dry and bind, stop fluxes, and the terms in women.

Cowslips, strengthen the brain, sences, and me­mory, exceedingly, resist all diseases there, as con­vulsions, falling-sickness, palsies &c.

Centaury, purges choller and gross humors, helps the yellow Jaundice, opens obstructions of the liver, helps pains of the spleen, provokes the terms, brings out the birth and afterbirth.

Elder, flowers, help dropsies, clense the blood, cleer the skin, open stoppings of the liver and spleen, and diseases arising there from.

Bean-flowers, cleer the skin, stop humors flowing into the eyes.

Peach-tree flowers, purge choller gently.

Broom-flowers, purge water, and are good in drop­sies

The temperature of all these differ either very little or not at all from the Herbs. And now I think I have done full out as well as the Colledge, that named three times as many and gave the vertues of none.

The way of using the Flowers I did forbear, be­cause most of them may, and are usually, made into Conserves, of which you may take the quantity of a Nutmeg, in the morning; all of them may be kept dry a yeer, and Boyled with other herbs conducing to the cures they do.

FRUITS and their BUDS.

GReen Figs, are held to be of ill juyce, but the best is we are not much troubled with them in England; dry Figs helps coughs, clense the breast, and help infirmities of the lungues, shortness of wind, they loose the belly, purge the reins, help inflama­tions of the liver and spleen; outwardly they dissolve swellings; some say the continual eating of them makes men lousie.

Pine-Nuts, restore such as are in consumptions, amend the failings of the lungues, concoct flegm, and yet are naught for such as are troubled with the headach.

Dates, are binding, stop eating ulcers being ap­plied to them, they are very good for weak stomachs, for they soon digest, and breed good nourishment, they help infirmities of the reins, bladder, and womb.

Sebestens, cool choller, violent heat of the sto­mach, help roughness of the tongue and windpipe, cool the reins and bladder.

Raisons of the Sun, help infirmities of the breast and liver, restore Consumptions, gently clense and move to stool.

Walnuts, kill worms, resist the Pestilence, (I mean the green ones, not the dry.)

Capers, eaten before meals, provoke hunger.

Nutmegs, strengthen the brain, stomach, and li­ver, provoke urin, ease the pains of the spleen, stop loosness, ease pains of the head, and pains in the joynts, ad strength to the body, take away weakness coming of cold, and cause a sweet breath.

Cloves help digestion, stop loosness, provoke lust, and quicken the sight.

Pepper, binds, expels wind, helps the chollick, quic­kens digestion oppressed with cold, heats the sto­mach, (for al that old women say, 'tis cold in the stomach.)

Quinces, See the Compositions.

Pears are grateful to the stomach, drying, and therefore help fluxes.

All Plums that are sharp or sour, are binding, the sweet are loosning.

Cucumers, or (if you will) Cowcumbers, cool the stomach, and are good against ulcers in the blad­der.

Gaules, are exceeding binding, help ulcers in the mouth, wasting of the gums, easeth the pains of the teeth, helps the falling out of the womb and funda­ment, makes the hair black.

Pompions are a cold and moist fruit, of smal nou­rishment, they provoke urine, outwardly applied, the flesh of them help inflamations and burnings, be­ing applied to the forehead they help inflamations of the eyes.

Melones, called in London Musk-millions, have few other vertues.

Apricocks are very grateful to the stomach, and dry up the humors thereof, Peaches, are held to do the like,

Cubebs, are hot and dry in the third degree, they expel wind, and clense the stomach of tough, and viscus humors, they ease the pains of the spleen, and help cold diseases of the womb, they clense the head of slegm and strengthen the brain, they heat the sto­mach and provoke lust.

Bitter Almonds, are hot in the first degree and dry in the second, they clense and cut thick humors, clense the lungues; and eaten every morning they are held to preserve from drunkenness.

Bay-berries, heat, expel wind, mitigate pains are excellent for cold infirmities of the womb, and drop­sies.

Cherries, are of different qualities according to their different tast, the sweet are quickest of digestion, but the sour are most pleasing, to a hot stomach, and procure appetite to ones meat.

Medlers, are strengthening to the stomach, bind­ing, and the green are more binding than the rotten, and the dry than the green.

Olives, cool and bind.

English-Currance, cool the stomach, and are pro­fitable in acute feavers, they quench thirst, resist vo­miting, cool the heat of choller, provoke appetite, and are good for hot complexions.

Services, or (as we in Sussex call them) Checkers, are of the nature of Medlars, but something weaker in operation.

Barberries, quench thrist, cool the heat of chol­ler, resist the pestilence, stay vomiting and fluxes, stop the terms, kill worms, help spitting of blood, fasten the teeth, and strengthen the gums.

Strawberries, cool the stomach, liver, and blood, but are very hurtful for such as have agues.

Winter-Cherries, potently provoke urine, and break the stone.

Cassia-fistula, is temperate in quality, gently, purgeth choller and flegm, clarrifies the blood, resists feavers, clenseth the breast and lungues, it cools the reins, and thereby resisteth the breeding of the stone, it provokes urine, and therefore is exceeding good for the running of the reins in men, and the whites in women.

All the sorts of Myrobalans, purge the stomach, the Indian Myrobalans are held to purge melancholly most especially, the other slegm; yet take heed you use them not in stoppings of the bowels: they are cold and dry, they all strengthen the heart, brain, and sinnews, strengthens the stomach, releeve the sences, take away tremblings and heart-qualms. They are seldom used alone.

Prunes, are cooling and loosning.

Tamarinds, are cold and dry in the second degree, they purge choller, cool the blood, stay vomiting, help the yellow Jaundice, quench thrist, cool hot stomachs, and hot livers.

I omit the use of these also, as resting confident a child of three yeers old, if you should give it Rai­sons of the sun or Cherries, would not ask how it should take them.

SEEDS OR GRAINS.

COriander seed, hot and dry, expels wind, but is hurtful to the head, send up unwholsom vapors to the brain, dangerous for mad people; therefore let them be prepared as you shall be taught towards the latter end of the Book.

Fenugreek seeds, are of a softening discussing nature, they cease inflamations, be they internal or external, bruised and mixed with vineger they ease the pains of the Spleen; being applied to the sides, help hardness and swellings of the matrix; being boyled, the de­coction helps scabby heads.

Linseed hath the same vertues with Fenugreek.

Gromwel-seed, provokes urine, helps the chollich, breaks the stone, and expels wind. Boyl them in white Wine, but bruise them first.

Lupines, easeth the pains of the spleen, kils worms, and casts them out; outwardly, they clense filthy ul­cers, and Gangrenes, help scabs, itch, and inflama­tions.

Dill seed, encreaseth milk in Nurses, expels wind, staies vomitings, provokes urine; yet it duls the sight and is an enemy to generation.

Smallage seed, provokes urin and the terms, expels wind, resists poysons, and easeth inward pains, it opens stoppings in any part of the body, yet it is hurtful for such as have the falling sickness, and for women with child.

Rocket seed, provokes urine, stirs up lust, encreaseth seed, kills worms, easeth the pains of the spleen: use all these in like manner.

Basil seed: If we may beleeve Dioscorides and Cre­scentius, cheers the heart, and strengthens a moist stomach, drives away melancholly, and provokes urine,

Nettle seed, provokes lust, opens stoppages of the womb, helps inflamations of the sides and lungues, purgeth the breast: boyl them (being bruised) in White Wine also.

The seeds of Ammi, or Bishopsweed, heat and dry, help difficulty of urine, and the pains of the chollick, the bitings of venemous beasts, they provoke the terms, and purge the womb.

Annis seeds, heat and dry, ease pain, expel wind, cause a sweet breath, help the dropsie, resist poyson, breed milk, and stop the whites in women, provoke lust, and ease the headach

Cardamoms, heat, kill worms, clense the reins, and provoke urine.

Fennel seeds, break wind, provokes urine, and the terms, encreaseth milk in Nurses.

Commin seeds, heat, bind and dry, stop blood, expel wind, ease pain, help the bitings of venemous beasts: outwardly applied (viz in plaisters) they are of a discussing nature.

Carrot seeds, are windy, provoke lust exceedingly, and encrease seed, provoke urine and the terms, cause speedy delivery to women in travel, and bring away the after-birth. All these also may be boyled in White Wine.

Nigella seeds, boyled in oyl and the forehead anoin­ted with it, ease pains in the head, take away leprosie, itch, scurff, and hepls scald-heads: inwardly taken they expel worms, they provoke urine, and the terms, help difficulty of breathing: the smoke of them (be­ing burned) drives away Serpents and venemous beasts.

Stavesager, kills Lice in the head, I hold it not fitting to be given inwardly.

The seeds of water-cresses, heat, yet trouble the stomach and belly, ease the pains of the spleen, are very dangerous for women with child, yet they pro­voke lust; outwardly applied, they help leprosies scald­heads, and the falling off of hair, as also Carbuncles, and cold ulcers in the joynts.

Mustard seed, heats, extenuates, and draws moi­sture from the brain; the head being shaved and a­nointed with Mustard, is a good remedy for the le­thargy, it helps filthy ulcers, and hard swellings in the mouth, it helps old aches coming of cold.

French Barly, is cooling, nourishing, and breeds milk.

Sorrel seeds, potently resist poyson, helps fluxes, and such stomachs as loath their meat.

Succory seed, cools the heat of the blood, extin­guisheth lust, openeth stoppings of the liver and bo­wels, it allaies the heat of the body, and produceth a good colour, it strengthens the stomach, liver, and reins.

Poppy seeds, ease pain, provoke sleep. Your best way is to make an Emulsion of them with Barly-wa­ter.

Mallow seeds, ease pains in the bladder.

Cich-Pease, are windy, provoke lust, encrease milk in Nurses provoke the terms, outwardly, they help scabs, itch, and inflamations of the stones, ulcers &c.

White-Saxifrage seeds, provoke urine, expel wind, and break the stone. Boyl them in white Wine.

Rue seeds, help such as cannot hold their water.

Lettice seed, cool the blood, restrains lust.

Also Gourds, Citruls, Cucumers, Mellons, Pur­slain, and Endive Seeds, cool the blood, as also the stomach, spleen and reins, and allay the heat of fea­vers. Use them as you were taught to do Poppy seeds.

Wormseed, expels wind, kills worms.

Ash-tree Keyes, ease pains in the sides, help the dropsie, releeve men weary with labor, provoke lust, and make the body lean.

Peony seeds, help the Ephialtes, or the disease the vulgar call the Mare, as also the fits of the mother, and other such like infirmites, of the womb, stop the terms, and help Convulsions.

Broom seed, potently provoke urine, breaks the stone.

Citron seeds, strengthen the heart, cheer the vital spirit, resist pestilence and poyson.

TEARS, LIQUORS, AND ROZINS.

LAdanum, is of a heating molifying nature, it o­pens the mouth of the veins, staies the hair from falling off, helps pains in the ears, and hardness of the womb. It is used only outwardly in [...].

Asa foetida, is commonly used to allay the fits of the mother by smelling to it, they say, inwardly ta­ken, it provokes lust, and expels wind.

Benzoin, or Benjamin, makes a good perfume.

Sanguis Draconis, cools and binds exceedingly.

Aloes, purgeth choller and flegm, and with such deliberation that it is often given to withstand the violence of other purges, it preserves the sences and betters the apprehension, it strengthens the liver, and helps the yellow Jaundice. Yet it is naught for such as are troubled with the Hemorrhoids, or have agues. I do not like it taken raw. See Aloe Rosata, which is nothing but it washed with juyce of roses.

Manna, is temperatly hot, of a mighty dilative quality, windy, clenseth choller gently, also it clen­seth the throat and stomach. A child may take an ounce of it at a time melted in milk, and the dross strained out, it is good for them when they are scab­by.

Scamony, or Diagridium, call it by which name you please, is a desperate purge, hurtful to the body, by reason of its heat, windiness, corroding, or gnaw­ing, and violence of working, I would advise my country to let it alone 'twill gnaw their bodyes as fast as Doctors gnaw their purses.

Opopanex, is of a heating, molifying, digesting quality.

Gum Elemi, is exceeding good for fractures of the skul, as also in wounds, and therfore is put in plaisters for that end. See Arceus his Liniment.

Tragacanthum, commonly called Gum Traganth, and Gum Dragon, helps coughs, hoarsness, and di­stillations upon the lungues.

Bdellium, heats and softens, helps hard swellings, ruptures, pains in the sides, hardness of the sin­news.

Galbanum, hot, dry, discussing; applied to the womb, it hastens both birth and afterbirth, applied to the na­vel it staies the strangling of the womb, commonly called the fits of the mother, helps pains in the sides, and difficuty of breathing, being applied to it, and the smel of it helps the vertigo or dissiness, in the head.

Mirrh, heats, and dries, opens and softens the womb, provokes the birth and after birth; inwardly taken, it helps old coughs, and hoarsness, pains in the sides, kills worms and helps a stinking breath, helps the wastings of the gums, fastens the [...]; outwardly it helps wounds, and fills up ulcers with flesh. You may take half a drachm at a time.

Mastich, strengthens the stomach exceedingly, helps such as vomit or spit blood, it fastens the teeth and strengthens the gums, being chewed in the mouth.

Frankinsence and Olibanum, heat and bind, fill up old ulcers with flesh, stops bleediug, but is extream bad for mad people.

Turpentine purgeth, clenseth the Reins, helps the running of them.

Styrax calamitis, helps coughs and distillations up­on the lungues, hoarsness, want of voice, hardness of the womb, but it is bad for headaches.

Amoniacum, applied to the side, helps the hardness and pains of the spleen.

Camphire, easeth pains of the head coming of heat, takes away inflamations, and cools any place it is ap­plied to.

JUYCES.

THat all Juyces have the same vertues with the Herbs, or Fruits whereof they are made, I sup­pose few or none will deny; therefore I shall only name a few of them, and that briefly.

Sugar is held to be hot in the first degree, streng­thens the Lungues, takes away the roughness of the Throat, succours the Reins and Bladder.

The Juyce of Citrons cools the Blood, strengthens the Heart, mitigates the violent heat of Feavers.

The Juyce of Lemmons works the same effect, but not so powerfully (as Authors say,)

Juyce of Liquoris strengthens the Lungues, helps Coughs and Colds.

I am loth to trouble the Reader with Tautology, therefore I pass to

THINGS BRED OF PLANTS.

OF these, the Colledg names but few, and all of those few have been treated of before, only two excepted; the First of which is,

Agaricus. Agrick, It purgeth Flegm, Choller, and Melancholly, from the Brain, Nerves, Muscles, Marrow, (or more properly Brain) of the Back, it clenseth the Breast, Lungues, Liver, Stomach, Spleen, Reins, Womb, Joynts, it provokes Urine, and the Terms, kills Worms, helps pains in the Joynts, and causeth a good Colour: It is very seldom or never ta­ken alone. See Syrup of Roses with Agrick.

Lastly, Viscus Quircinus, or Misleto of the Oak, helps the Falling sickness, being either taken inward­ly, or hung about ones neck.

LIVING-CREATURES.

MIllepedes (so called from the multitude of their feet, though it cannot be supposed they have a thousand,) Sows, Hoglice, (in Sussex they call them Woodlice:) being bruised and mixed with Wine, they provoke urine, help the yellow Jaundice; out­wardly being boyled in oyl, help pains in the ears, a drop being put into them.

The flesh ofI take our Eng­lish Ad­der to be the true Viper, though happily not so vene­mous as they are in hotter Countries. Vipers being eaten, cleer the sight, help the vices of the nerves, resist poyson exceedingly, neither is there any better remedy under the Sun for their bitings than the head of the Viper that bit you, bruised and applied to the place, and the flesh eaten, you need not eat above a drachm at a time, and make it up as you shall be taught in Troches of Vipers. Neither any comparable to the stinging of Bees and Wasps &c. than the same that stung you, bruised and applied to the place.

Land Scorpions, cure their own stingings by the same means, the ashes of them (being burnt) potent­ly provokes urine and breaks the stone.

Earth-Worms, (the preparation of which you may find towards the latter end of the Book) are an ad­mirable remedy for cut nerves being applied to the place, they provoke urine, see the oyl of them, on­ly let me not forget one notable thing quoted by Mi­zaldus, which is, that the pouder of them put into an hollow tooth, makes it drop out.

Eels, being put into Wine or Beer, and suffered to die in it, he that drinks it will never endure that sort of liquor again.

Oysters, applied alive to a pestilential swelling, draw the venom to them.

Crab-fish, burnt to ashes, and a drachm of it taken every morning helps the bitings of mad-dogs, and all other venemous beasts.

Swallows, being eaten, cleer the sight, the ashes of them (being burnt) eaten, preserves from drunken­ness, helps sore throats being applied to them, and inflamations.

Grashoppers, being eaten, ease the chollick, and pains in the bladder.

Hedg-Sparrows, being kept in salt, or dryed, and eaten raw, are an admirable remedy for the stone.

Young Pidgeons being eaten, help pains in the reins, and the disease called Tenasmus.

PARTS OF LIVING CREATURES AND EXCREMENTS.

THE brain of Sparrows being eaten provoke lust exceedingly.

The brain of an Hare being rosted helps trem­bling, it makes children breed teeth easily, their gums being rubbed with it, it also helps scald heads and falling off of hair the head being anointed with it.

The head of a cole black Cat being burnt to ashes in a new pot, and some of the ashes blown into the eye every day, helps such as have a skin growing over their sight, if there happen any inflamation, moisten an Oak leaf in water and lay over the eye; Mizaldus saith (by this one only medicine) cured such as have been blind a whol yeer.

The head of a youngSome Countries call them Gleads, & others Puttocks. Kite, being burned to a­shes and the quantity of a drachm of it taken every morning, in a little water, is an admirable remedy for the Gout.

Crabs-eyes, breaks the stone, and open stoppings of the bowels.

The lungues of a Fox well dried (but not burned) is an admirable strengthner to the lungues: See the Lohoch of Fox lungues

The liver of a Duck, stops fluxes, and strengthens the liver exceedingly

The liver of a Frog, being dried and eaten, helps quartan agues, or as the vulgar call them third-day agues.

Cocks stones nourish mightily, and refresh and re­store such bodies as have been wasted by long sickness they are admirable good in Hectick feavers, and (Ga­lens supposed incurable) Marasmus, which is a con­sumption attending upon a Hectick feaver; they en­crease seed, and help such as are weak in the sports of Venus.

Castorium resists poyson, the bitings of venemous beasts, it provokes the terms, and brings forth both birth and after birth, it expels wind, easeth pains and aches, convulsions, sighings, lethargies, the smell of it allaies the fits of the mother; inwardly given, it helps tremblings, falling-sickness, and other such ill effects of the brain and nerves: A scruple is e­nough to take at a time, and indeed spirit of Casto­rium is better than Castorium raw, to which I refer you.

The yard of a stag, helps fluxes, the bitings of ve­nemous beasts, provokes urine, and stirs up lust ex­ceedingly.

A sheeps or Goats bladder being burnt, and the a­shes given inwardly, helps the Diabetes, or continu­al pissing.

Unicorns horn, resists poyson and the pestilence, provokes urine, restores lost strength, brings forth both birth and after-birth.

Ivory, or Elephants tooth, binds, stops the whites in women, it strengthens the heart and stomach, helps the yellow-Jaundice, and makes women fruit­full.

The vertues of Harts-horn, are the same with U­nicorns horn.

The bone that is found in the heart of a stag is as soveraign a Cordial, and as great a strengthner to the heart as any is, being beaten into pouder and taken inwardly, also it resists pestilences and poyson.

The scull of a man that was never buried, being beaten to pouder and given inwardly, the quantity of a drachm at a time, in Bettony water, helps palsies, and falling sickness.

That small Triangular bone in the Skul of a man, Called Os triquetrum, so absolutely cures the falling sickness that it will never come again (saith Paracel­sus.)

Those small bones which are found in the fore feet of a Hare being beaten into pouder and drunk in Wine, powerfully provoke urine.

A Ring made of an Elks Claw, being worn helps the cramp.

The fat of a man is exceeding good to anoint such limbs as fall away in flesh.

Goose grease and Capons grease are both softning, helps gnawing sores, stifness of the womb, and mi­tigate pain.

I am of opinion that the Suet of a Goat, mixed with a little Saffron is as excellent an oyntment for the Gout, especially the Gout in the knees as any is.

Bears grease staies the falling off of the hair.

Fox Grease helps pains in the ears.

Elks Claws or Hoofs are a Soveraign remedy for the falling sickness, though it be but worn in a Ring, much more being taken inwardly, but (saith Mizal­dus) it must be the Hoof of the right foot behind

Milk is an extream windy meat, therefore I am of the Opinion of Dioscorides, viz. that it is not pro­fitable in head-aches, yet this is for certain, that it is an admirable remedy for inward ulcers in any part of the body, or any corrosions or excoriations, pains in the reins and bladder, but it is very bad in disea­ses in the liver, spleen, the falling sickness, vertigo, or dissiness in the head, feavers, and head aches: Goats milk is held to be better than Cows for Hectick fea­vers, Phtisicks, and consumptions, and so is Asses also.

Whey, attenuateth and clenseth both choller and melancholly, wonderfully helps melancholly and mad­ness coming of it, it opens stoppings of the bowels, helps such as have the dropsie, and are troubled with [Page 32] the stoppings of the spleen, rickets, and hypocon­driack melancholly: for such diseases you may make up your Physick with Whey. Outwardly it denseth the skin of such deformities as come through choller or melancholly, as scabs, itch, morphew, leprosie &c.

Honey, is of a gallant clensing quallity, exceed­ing profitable in all inward ulcers, in what part of the body soever, it opens the veins, clenseth the reins and bladder: he that would have more of the vertues of it, let him read Butler his Book of Bees, a gal­lant experimental work. I know no vices belonging to it, but only it is soon converted into choller.

Wax, softens, heats, and meanly fills sores with flesh, it suffers not the milk to curdle in womens breasts; inwardly it is given (ten grains at a time) a­gainst bloody-fluxes.

Raw-Silk, heats and dries, cheers the heart, drives away sadness, comforts all the spirits, both Natural, Vital, and Animal.

As for Excrements, there the Colledg makes shit­tin work, and paddle in the turds like Jakes Farmers, I will let them alone for fear the more I stir them the more they stink.

BELONGING TO THE SEA.

SPerma Caeti, is well applied outwardly to eating Ulcers, the marks which the small pocks leave be­hind them, it cleers the sight, provokes sweat; in­wardly it troubles the stomach and belly, helps brui­ses, and stretching of the nerves, and therefore is good for women newly delivered.

Amber greese, heats and dryes, strengthens the brain and nerves exceedingly, if the infirmity of them come of cold, resists pestilence.

Sea-sand, a man that hath the dropsie, being set up to the middle in it, it draws out all the water.

Red Corral, is cold, dry and binding, stops the immoderate flowing of the terms, bloody-fluxes, the running of the reins, and the whites in women, helps such as spit and pisse blood, helps witchcraft being carried about one, it is an approved remedy for the falling sickness. Also if ten grains of red Corral be given to a Child in a little breast-milk so soon as it is born, before it take any other food, it will never have the falling sickness, nor convulsions. The com­mon dose is from ten grains to thirty.

Pearls, are a wonderfull strengthner to the heart, encrease milk in Nurses, and amend it being naught, they restore such as are in Consumptions, both they and the red Corral preserve the body in health, and resist feavers. The Dose is ten grains or fewer; more I suppose because it is dear, than because it would do harm.

Amber, (viz. yellow Amber) heats and dryes, therefore prevails against moist diseases of the head, it helps violent Coughs, helps Consumptions of the lungues, spitting of blood, the whites in women, it helps such women that are out of measure unwealdy in their going with child, it stops bleeding at the nose, helps difficulty of urine: You may take ten or twenty grains at a time

The Froath of the Sea, it is hot and dry, helps scabs, itch, and leprosie, scald heads &c. it clenseth the skin, helps difficulty of urine, makes the teeth white, being rubbed with it, the head being washed with it, it helps baldness, and trimly decks the head with hairs,

METTALS, MINERALS, AND STONES.

GOLD is temperate in quality, it wonderfully strengthens the heart and vital spirits; which one perceiving very wittily inserted those verses.

For Gold is Cordial; and that's the reason,
Your raking Misers live so long a season.

However this is certain, in Cordials, it refists me­lancholly, faintings, swoonings, feavers, falling- sick­ness, and all such like infirmities incident, either to the vital or animal spirit. What those be, see the di­rections at the beginning.

Alum, heats, binds, and purgeth, scours filthy ul­cers, and fastens loose teeth.

Brimstone, or flower of Brimstone, which is Brim­stone refined, and the better for Physical uses, helps coughs and rotten flegm; outwardly in oyntments it takes away leprosies, scabs, and itch, inwardly it helps the yellow Jaundice, as also worms in the belly espe­cially being mixed with a little Salt-peter, it helps lethargies being snuffed up in the nose, the truth is I shall speak more of this, and many other Simples (which I mention not here) when I come to the Chy­mical Oyls of them.

Litharge, both of Gold and Silver, binds and dries much, fils up ulcers with flesh, and heals them.

Lead, is of a cold dry earthly quality, of an hea­ling nature, applied to the place it helps any infla­mation, and dries up humors.

Pompbolix, cools, [...], and binds.

The ston, not the herb. Jacynth, strengthens the heart being either beaten into pouder and taken inwardly, or only worn in a Ring; Cardanus saith it encreaseth riches and wisdom.

Saphyre, resisteth Necromantick apparitions, and by a certain divine gift, it quickens the sences, helps such as are bitten by venemous beasts, ulcers in the guts, Galen, Dioscorides, Garcias, and Cardanus are my Authors

Emerald, called a Chast stone, because it resisteth lust, and will break (as Cardanus saith) if one hath it about him when he deflowrs a Virgin; moreover being worn in a Ring, it helps or at least mitigates the falling sickness, and vertigo, it strengthens theGarcius. memory, and stops the unruly passions of men, it takes away vain and foolish fears, as of Devils, Hob­goblins &c. it takes away folly, anger &c. and cau­seth good conditions; and if it do so being worn a­bout one, reason will tell him that being beaten into pouder and taken inwardly, it will do it much more.

Ruby (or Carbuncle, if there be such a stone) re­strainsCardanus lust, resists pestilence, takes away idle and foo­lish thoughts, makes men cheerful.

Granate, strengthens the heart, but hurts the brain,Cardanus causeth anger, takes away sleep.

Diamond, is reported to make him that bears it infortunate, It makes men undaunted (I suppose be­causeGracius it is a stone of the nature of Mars) it makesCardanus men more secure or fearless than careful, which it doth by over-powring the spirits; as the Sun though it be light it self, yet it darkens the sight in behold­ing its body.

Amethist, being worn, makes men sober and staied, keeps them from drunkenness, and too much sleep, it quickens the wit, is profitable in huntings, and fightings, and repels vapors from the head.

Bezoar, is a notable restorer of nature, a great cor­dial, no way hurtful nor dangerous, is admirable good in feavers, pestilences, and consumptions, viz. taken inwardly, for this stone is not used to be [...] as a Jewel; the pouder of it being put upon wounds made by venemous beasts, draws out the poyson.

Topas, (If Epiphanius spake truth) if you put it into boyling water, it doth so cool it that you may presently put your hands into it without harm, if so, then it cools inflamations of the body by touching of them.

Toadstone, being applied to the place helps the bi­tings of venemous beasts, and quickly draws all theLemnius poyson to it, it is known to be a true one by this, hold it neer to any Toad, and she will make proffer to take it away from you, if it be right, else not.

There is a stone of the bigness of a Bean found in the Gizzard of an old Cock, which makes him thatLemnius bears it, beloved, constant, and bold, valiant in fighting, beloved by women, potent in the sports of Venus.

Nephriticus lapis, help pains in the stomach, and is of great force in breaking and bringing away the stone & gravel; concerning the powerful operation of which I shall only quote you one story of many, out of Monardas, a Physitian of note. A certain noble man (quoth he) very well known to me, by only bearing this stone tyed to his arm, voided such a deal of gravel, that he feared the quantity would do him hurt, by avoiding so much of it, wherefore he laid it from him, and then he avoided no more gravel; but afterwards being again troubled with the stone, he ware it as before, and presently the pain eased, and he avoided gravel as before, and was never troubled with the pain of the stone so long as he ware it.Mathiolus

Jasper, being worn stops bleeding, easeth the la­bor of women, stops lust, resist feavers and drop­sies.

Aetites, or the stone with child, because being hol­low in the middle, it contains another little stone within it, it is found in an Eagles nest, and in manyDioscori­des. other places; this stone being bound to the left arm of women with child, staies their miscarriage or a­bortion,Pliny. but when the time of their labor comes, re­move it from their arm, and bind it to the inside of [Page 34] their thigh, and it brings sorth the child, and that (al­most) without any pain at all.

Young Swallows of the first brood, if you cut them up, between the time they were hatched, and the next full Moon, you shall find two stones in their ven­tricle, one reddish, the other blackish, these being hung about the neck in a piece of Stags leather, help the falling sickness, and feavers. The truth is, I have found the reddish one my self without any regard to the lunation, but never tried the vertues of it.

Lapis Lazuli, purgeth melancholly being taken in­wardly; outwardly worn as a Jewel, it makes men cheerful, fortunate, and rich.

And thus I end the Stones, the vertues of which if any think incredible, I answer, 1. I quoted the Au­thors where I had them, [...]. I know nothing to the contrary but why it may be as possible as the sound of a Trumpet is to incite a man to valor, or of a Fiddle to dauncing; and if I have added a few Simples which the Colledg left out, I hope my fault is not much, or at least wise, venial.

THus much for their old Dispensatory, which with them is now like an old Almanack out of date: Indeed had not the Printer desired it might not be (and withall promised me that he would do it in a smaller print that so the Book might not exceed the former price) I had left out what hi­therto hath bin written, having published in print such aThe English Physitian. trea­tise of Herbs and Plants as my Country men may readily make use of, for their own preservation of health or cure of diseases, such as grow neer them and are easily to be had; that so by the help of my book they may cure themselves, and never be be­holding to such Physitians as the iniquity of these times af­fords.

And thus I come to the thing they call their New Dispensatory, or as more properly it is, their old one new vamped; And first to their Cotalogue of simples.

A CATALOGUE OF SIMPLES IN THE NEW DISPENSATORY.

ROOTS, of

Colledg. SOrrell, Calamus Aromaticus, Water­flag, Privet, Garlick, Marsh-mallows, Aleanet, Angelica, Anthora, Smallage, Aron, Birth­wort long and round, Sowbread, Reeds, Asarabac­ca, Virginian, Snakeweed, Swallow-wort, Spara­gus, Asphodel male and foemale, Burdocks great and small, Behen, or Bazil, Valerian white and red, Da­zies, Beets, white red and black, Marsh-mallows, Bistort, Borrage, Briony white and black. Bugloss garden and wild, Calamus Aromaticus, our Ladies thistles, Avens, Coleworts, Centaury the less, O­nions, Chameleon white and black, Chelondine, Pile­wort, China, Succory, Artichokes, Virginian Snake­root, Comfry greater and lesser, Contra yerva, Costus, sweet and bitter, Turmerick, Wild Cucumers, Sow­bread, Hounds-tongue, Cyperus long and round, tooth­wort, White Dittany, Doronicum, Dragons, Woo­dy Nightshade, Vipers Bugloss, Smallage, Hellebore white and black, Endive, Alicampane, Eringo, Coltsfoot, Fearn male and foemale, Filipendula or Dropwort, Fennel, White Dittany, Galanga great and small, Gentian, Liquoris, Dog-grass, Hermoda­ctills, Swallow-wort, Jacinth, Henbane, Jallap, Ma­sterwort, Orris or flower-de-luce both English and Florentine, Sharp-poynted-dock, Burbock greater and less, lovage, Privet, White Lillies, Liquoris, Mallows, Mechoacan, Jallap, Spignel, Mercury, Devils Bit, Sweet Navew, Spicknard, Celtick, and Indian, Wa­ter lillies, Rest-harrow, Sharp-poynted-Dock, Peony male and foemale, Parsneps garden and Wild, Cink­foyl, Butter-Burre, Parsly, Hogs-Fennel, Valerian greater and lesser, Burnet, Land and water Plantane, Polypodium of the Oak, Solomons Seal, Leeks, Pelli­tory of Spain, Cinkfoyl, Turneps, Rhadishes garden and Wild, Rhapontick, Common Rhubarb, Mouks-rhu­barb, Rose-root, Maddir, Bruscus, Sopewort, Sarsa­parilla, Satiryon male and foemale, white Saxifrage, Squills, Figwort, Scorzonera English and Spanish, Virginian, Snakeweed, Solomons Seal, Cicers, Stin­king Gladon, Devills-bit, Dandelion, Thapsus, Tor­mentill, Turbith, Colts foot, Valcrian greater and lesser. Vervain, Swallow-wort, Nettles, Zedoary, long and round, Ginger.

Culpeper] These be the Roots the Colledge hath named, and but only named, and in this order as I have set them down. It seems the Coiledg hold a strange opinion, viz. That it would do an Eng­lish man a mischeife to konw what the herbs in is garden are good for, such admirable Common­wealths-men they are, so infinitly beneficiall to their Country; even in the suparlative degree.

For my own particular I aim solely at the benefit of my country in what I do, and shall impartially reveal to them what the Lord hath revealed to me in Phy­sick: I see my first labours were so well accepted, that I shall not now give over till I have given my coun­try that which is called the whol body of Physick, in their own mother tongue; I waigh the ill language of the Colledg no more than I do a straw under my foot; Wisdom will be justified of all her children: only I desire them not to grow to proud, but remem­ber who it was said, Pride goes before a fall, and a haughty mind before destruction.

In antient times when men lived more in health, simples were more in use by farr than now they are: now compounds take the cheif place, and men are farr more sickly then before; The reason I conceive to be the incongruity between the Colledges compounds and our bodies; It is palpably true that their re­ceipts were no children of their own brains, but bor­rowed [Page 36] some from Arabia, others from Greece, and some few from Italy: I know no reason why they ab­scorded the names of the Authors from whence they borrowed them, unless it were either to make the Ge­neration to come, beleeve they were their own: or else to put an exceeding difficulty to all, an [...] im­possibility upon most, to find the verttues of them, as not knowing in what Authors to search for them; The one of these shews the pride, the other the dishonesty of their hearts.

But to return to my purpose, my opinion is, that those herbs, roots, plants &c. which grow neer a man are farr better and more congruous to his nature than any out-landish rubbish whatsoever, and this I am able to give a reason of to any that shall demand it of me, therefore I am so capious in handling of them, you shall observe them ranked in this order.

1. The Temperature of the Roots, Herbs, Flowers &c. are of, viz. Hot, cold, dry, moist, together with the degree of each quality.

2. What part of the body each root, herb, flower, is apropriated to, viz. head, throat, breast, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, bowells, reins, bladder, [...], joynts, and in those which heat those places, and which cool them.

3. The property of each Simple as they, bind, open, mollify, harden, extinuate, discusse, draw out, sup­pure, clense, glutinate, break wind, breed seed, pro­voke the terms, stop the terms, resist poyson, abate swellings, ease pain.

This I intend shall be my generall method through­out the Simples, which having finished; I shall give you a paraphrase explaining these terms, which right­ly considered will give the key of Galens way of ad­ministring Physick.

The Temperature of the Roots.

Roots hot in the first degree.

Marshmallows, Bazil, Valerian, Spattling poppy, Burdocks, Borrage, Bugloss, Calamus Aroma­ticus, Avens, Pilewort, China, Self-heal, Liquoris, Dog-grass, White-Lillies Peony male and foemale, Wild parsneps, Parsly, Valerian great and small, Knee-holly, Satyrion, Scorzonera, Skirrets.

Hot in the second degree.

Water-flag, Reeds, Swallowwort, Asphodel male, Carline thistle, Cyperus long and round, Fennel, Lovage, Spignell, Mercury, Devils-bit, Butter-burr, Hogs-Fennel, Sarsa-parilla, Squills, Zedoary.

Hot in the third degree.

Angelica, Aron, Birthwort long and round, Sow­bread, Asarabacca, Briony, white and black, Sullen­dine, Virginian Snake-root, Hermerick, White [...], Doronicum, Hellebore white and black, A­licampane, Filipendula, Galanga greater and lesser, Masterwort, Orris, English and Florintine, Rest­harrow, Stinking Gladon, Turbith, Ginger.

Hot in the fourth degree.

Garlick, Onnions, Leeks, Pellitory of Spain.

Roots temperate in respect of heat are,

[...], Sparagus, Our Ladies thistles, Erin­go, Jalap, [...], Mechoacan, Garden-Parsnips, Sink-foyl, [...].

[...] cold in the first degree.

Sorrel, Beets white and red, Comfry the greater, Plantane, Rose root, Maddir.

Cold in the second degree.

Alcanet, Dazies, Succory, Hounds-tongue, En­dive, Jacinth.

Cold in the third degree,

Bistort and mandrakes, are cold in the third de­gree, and Henbane in the fourth.

Roots dry in the first degree

Bearsbreech, Burdocks, Red beets, Calamus Aro­maticus, Pilewort Self-heal, Endive, Eringo, Jacinth, Maddir, Knee-holly.

Dry in the second degree.

Waterflag, Marsh-mallows, Alkanet Smallage, Reeds, Sorrel, Swallow-wort, Asphodel male, Bazill, Vale­rian and Spatling-poppy, according to the opinion of the Greeks, Our Ladies thistles, Avens, Succory, Hounds-tongue, Cyperus long and round, Fennell, Lovage, Spignel, Mercury, Devills bitt, Butter-burt, Parsly, Plantane, Zedoary.

Dry in the third degree.

Angellica, Aron, Birthwort long and round, Sow­bread, Bistort, Asarabacca, Briony white and black, Carline thistle, China, Sullendine, Virginian, Snake­root, White Dittany, Doronicum, Hellebore white and black, Alicampane, Filipendula, Galanga greater and lesser, Master-wort, Orris English and Floren­tine, Rest-harrow, Peony, male and foemale, Sink­foyl, Hogs-Fennell, Sarsa-parilla, Stinking-Gladon, Tormentill, Ginger.

Dry in the fourth degree

Garlick, Onnions, Costus, Leeks, Pellitory of Spain.

Roots moist are,

Bazil Valerian, and Spattling-poppy, according to the Arabian Physitians, Daisies, white Beets, Bor­rage, Bugloss, Liquoris, Dog-grass, Mallows, Saty­rion, Scorzonera, Parsnips, Skirrets.

Roots are also apropriated to several parts of the bo­dy; and so they,

Heat the head,

Doronicum, Fennel, Jallap, Mechoacan, Spicknard, Celtick, and Indian, Peony male and foemale.

Neck and throat.

Pilewort, Devils-bit.

Breast and lungues.

Birthwort long and round, Elicampane, Liquoris, Orris English and florentine, Calamus Aromaticus, Sinkfoil, Squills.

Heart

Angellica, Borrage, Bugloss, Carline thistle, Doro­nicum, Butter bur, Scorzonera, Tormentil Zedoary, Bazil, Valerian white and red.

Stomach

Alicampane, Galanga greater and lesser, Spick­nard, Celtick, and Indian, Ginger, Fennel, Avens; Radishes.

Bowels

Valerian great and small, Zedoary, Ginger.

Liver

Smallage, Carline thistle, Sullendine, China, Turmerick, Fennel, Gentian, Dog-grass, Cinkfoyl, Parsly, Smallage, Sparagus, Rhubarb Rhapontick, Knee-holly.

Spleen

Smallage, Carline thistle, Fearn male and foemale, Parsly, Water-flag, Sparagus, round Birthwort, Fen­nel, Capers; Ash, Gentian.

Reins and bladder.

Marshmallows, Smallage, Sparagus, Burdock, Ba­zil, Valerian, spatling Poppy, Carline thistle, Chi­na, Cyperus long and round, Filipendula, Dog-grass, Spicknard, Celtick, and Indian, Parsly, Kneeholly, white Saxisrage.

Womb

Birthwort long and round, Galanga greater and les­ser, Peony male and foemale, hogs Fennel.

Fundament

Pilewort.

Joynts

Bears-breech, Hermodactils, Jallap, Mecoacan, Ginger, Costus.

Roots cool the Head

Rose Root.

Stomach

Sow thistles, Endive, Succory, Bistort.

Liver and spleen

Maddir, Endive, Cichory.

The properties of the Roots.

Although I confess the properties of the Simples may be found out, by the ensuing explanation of the terms and I suppose by that means they were found out at first, and although I hate a lazy Student from my heart, yet to encourage young Students in the art; I shall quote the cheifest of them, I desire all lovers of Physick to compare them with the explanation of these Rules, so shall they see how they agree, so may they be enabled to find out the properties of all Simples, (yea of such as are not mentioned in the learned Colledges Apish Dispensatory) to their own exceeding benefit in Physick.

Roots, Bind,

Cyperus, Bistort, Tormentil, Cinkfoyl, Bears breech, Waterflag, Alkanet, Toothwort, &c.

Discuss

Birthwort, Asphodel, Briony, Capers, &c.

Clense

Birthwort Aron, Sparagus, Grass, Asphodel, Sul­lendine, &c.

Open

Asarabacca, Garlick, Leeks, Onions, Rhapontick, Turmerick, Carline thistle, Succory, Endive, Fili­pendula, Fennel, Parsly, Bruscus, Sparagus, Smallage, Gentian &c.

Extenuate

Orris English and florentine, Capers, &c.

[...]

Garlick, Onions, [...] of Spain &c.

[...]

Mallows, Marshmallows, &c.

Suppure

Marshmallows, Briony, white Lillies, &c.

Glutinate

Comfry, Solomons seal, Gentian, Birthwort, Dai­sies, &c.

Expell Wind

Smallage, Parsly, Fennel, Waterflag, Garlick, Co­stus, Galanga, hogs Fennel, Zedoary, Spicknard Indian and Celticque, &c.

Breed seed

Waterflag, Eringo, Satyrion, Galanga, &c.

Provoke the terms

Birthwort, Asarabacca, Aron, Waterflag, white Dittany, Asphodel, Garlick, Centaury the less, Cy­perus long and round, Costus, Capers, Calamus, A­romaticus, Dittany of Creet, Carrots, Eringo, Fen­nel, Parsly, Smallage, Grass, Alicampane, Peony, Valerian, Kneeholly, &c.

Stop the terms

Comfry, Tormentil, Bistort, &c.

Provoke sweat

[Page 38]Carline thistle, China, Sarsa parilla, &c.

Resist poyson

Angellica, Garlick, long Birthwort, Smallage, Do­ronicum, Costus, Zedoary, Cyperus, Gentian, Car­line thistle, Bistort, Tormentil, Swallow-wort, Vi­pers, Bugloss, Alicampane &c.

Help burnings

Asphodel, Jacinth, white Lillies, &c.

Ease pains

Water-flag, Eringo, Orris, Rest-harrow, &c.

Of Roots, some purge,

Choller

Asatabacca, Rhubarb, Rhapontick, Fern, &c.

Melancholly

Hellebore, white and black, Polypodium.

Flegm and watry humors

Squils, Turbith, Hermodactils, Jallap, Mechoacan, wild Cucumers, Sowbread, male Asphodel, Briony white and black, Elder, Spurge, great and small.

How to use your bodies in, and after taking Purges; you shall be taught by and by: I quoted some of these properties, to teach you the way how to find the rest, which the explanation of these terms will give you ample instructions in: I quoted not al because I would fain have you studious; be dilligent, gentle Readers be dilligent, who knows but you may come to be Collegiates, or as good Phy­sitians as Collegiates, before you die.

The BARKS which the Colledg blot paper-with, are these that follow,

Colledg] [...] Nuts, Orrenges, Barberries, Birch-tree, Caper roots, Cassia Lig­nea, Chestnuts, Cinnamon, Citron Pills, Dwars-El­der, Spurge Roots, Alder, Ash, Pomegranates, [...], [...], green Walnuts, [...]; Bay, Lemmons, Mace, Pomegranates, Mandrake roots, Mezereon, Mulberry-tree roots, Sloe-tree roots, Pine­nuts, Fistick-nuts, Poplar tree, Oak, Elder, Sassasras, Cork, Tamaris, Line-tree, Frankinsence, Elm, Capt. Winters Cinnamon.

Culpeper] A. Of these, Captain Winters Cin­namon, being taken as ordinary Spice, or half a dram taken in the morning in any convenient Liquor, is an excellent remedy for the Scurvey, the pouder of it being snuffed up in the nose, clenseth the head of Rhewn gallantly.

The Bark of the black Alder-tree, purgeth choller and flegm, if you make a decoction with it: Agri­mony, Wormwood, Dodder, Hops, Endive, and Succory roots, Parsly, and Smallage Roots, or you may bruise a handful of each of them, and put them in a gallon of new [...], and let them work together, (put the Simples in a Boulter-bag) Half a pint, more or less, ac­cording to the age of him that drinks it. a draught being drunk every morning, helps the dropsie, Jaundice, evil disposition of the body, helps the rickets, strengthens the liver and Spleen, makes the digestion good, trou­bles not the stomach at all, causeth appetite, and helps such as are scabby and itchy.

The rest of the Barks that are worth the noting, and the vertues of them are to be found, in the former part of the book.

Barks are hot in the first degree.

Guajacum, Tamaris, Orrenges, Lemmons, Ci­trons.

In the Second

Cinnamon, Cassia Lignea, Captain Winters Cin­namon, Frankinsence, Capers.

In the Third

Mace.

Cold in the first

Oak, Pomegranates.

In the third

Mandrakes

According to Place, they Heat the Head

Captain Winters Cinnamon.

The Heart

Cinnamon, Cassia Lignea, Citron Pills, Walnuts, Lemmon Pills, Mace.

The Stomach

Orrenge Pills, Cassia Lignea, Cinnamon, Citron Pills, Lemmon Pills, Mace, Sassafras.

The Lungues

Cassia Lignea, Cinnamon, Walnuts.

The Liver

Barberry-tree, Bay-tree, Capt. Winters Cinnamon.

The Spleen

Caper Bark, Ash-tree Bark, Bay-tree.

The reins and Bladder

Bay-tree, Sassasras.

The Womb

Cassia Lignea, Cinnamon.

Cool the Stomach

Pomegranate Pills.

Purge choller

The Bark of Barberry-tree.

Purge Flegm and Water.

Elder, Dwarf-Elder, Spurge, Laurel.

To fill up another part of a Page, the Colledg quote a few WOODS, which are these;

Colledg] FIrr, Wood of Aloes, Rhodium, Brazil, Box, Willow, Cipress, Ebeny, Guajacum, Juniper, Lentisk, Nephriticum, Rhodium, Rosema­ry, Sanders, white, yellow, and red, Sassasras, Tama­ris.

Of these some are hot, As,

Wood of Aloes, Rhodium, Box, Ebeny, Guaja­cum, Nephriticum, Rosemary, Sassafras, [...].

Some cold, As

Cypress, Willow, Sanders, white, red, and yellow.

Rosemary is apropriated to the Head, Wood of A­loes to the Heart and Stomach, Rhodium to the Bo­wels and bladder, Nephriticum to the Liver, Spleen Reins, and Bladder, Sassafras to the breast, sto­mach and bladder, Tamaris to the Spleen, Sanders cools the heart and spirits in seavers.

For the particular vertues of each see that part of the book preceeding.

The HERBS which the Colledg spent so much pains and Study, barely to name, are,

The Colledg] SOuthernwood male and foe­male, Wormwood, Common, Roman, and such as beares, Wormseed, Sorrel, wood Sorrel, Maiden-hair common, white or wal Rue, black and golden, Maudlin, Agrimony, Vervain, Mallow, Ladies mantle, Chickweed, Marshmallows, and Pimpernel both male and foemale, water Pimper­nel, Dill, Angellica, Smallage, Goose-grass or cleavers, Columbines, wild Tansy, or silver weed, Mugwort, Asarabacca, Wood roofe, Arach, Distaffe thistle, Mou­sear, Cost-mary, or Alecost, Burdocks greater and les­ser, Brooklime, or water Pimpernal, Beets white, red, and black, Bettony of the wood and water, Daisies greater and lesser, Blite, Mercury, Borrage, Oak of Jerusalem, Cabbages, Soldanella, Briony white and black, Bugloss, Bugless, Sheaphards purse, Ox-eye, Box leaves, Calaminth of the Mountains, and Fens, ground Pine, Wood-bine, or Honey suckles, Lady­smocks, Marygolds, our Ladies thistles, Carduus, Benedictus, Avens, small Spurge, Horse tail, Cole­worts, Centaury the less, Knotgrass, Ceterach, Chey­vil, Germander, Chamomel, Chamepitys, foemale Southernwood, Chelondine, Pilewort, Chicory, Hem­lock, garden and Sea Scurvy-grass, Fleawort, Comfry great, middle, or Bugle, least or Daisies, Sarasens con­sound, Buck horn, Plantane, May weed, (or Marg­weed, as we in Sussex call it) Orpine, Sampeer, Crol­wort, Dodder, Blew bottle great and smal, Artichoaks, Houndstongue, Cypress leaves, Dandelion, Dittany of Creet, Fox leaves, Teazles garden and wild, [...] Elder, Vipers Bugloss, Lluellin, Smallage, Endiue, Alicampane, Horstail, Epithimum, Groundsel, Hedg­mustard, Spurge, Agrimony, Maudlin, Eye-bright, Orpine, Fennel, Sampeer, Filipendula, Indian leaf, Srawberry leaves, Ashtree leaves, [...], Goats rue, Ladies Bedstraw, Broom, Muscatu, Herb robert, Doves foot, Cotton-weed, Hedg-bysop, tree Ivy, ground Ivy, or Alehoose, Alicampane, Pellitory of the wall, Liver-wort, [...], Rupture-wort, Hawk­weed, Monks Rhubarb, Alexanders, Clary garden and wild, Henbane, St. [...], Horstongue, or double tongue, Hysop, Sciatica-cresses, small Sen­green, Sharewoot, Woad, Reeds, Schoenanth, Chame­pitys, Glasswort, Lettice, Lagobus, Archangel, Bur­dock great and small, Lavender, Laurel, Bay leaves English and Alexandrian, Duck meat, Dittander or Pepper wort, Lovage, Privet, Sea Bugloss, To ad-flax, Harts-tongue, sweet Trefoyl, Wood Sorrel, Hops, Willow herb, Marjoram, common and tree Mallows, Mandrakes, Horehound white and black, herb [...], Feather-few, Woodbine, Melilot, Bawm, garden and water Mints, Horse-mints, Mercury, Mezereon, Yarrw, Devils-bit, Mosse, sweet Chivil, Mirtle leaves, Garden and water Cresses, Nep, Tobacco, Money­wort, Water-lillies, Baxil, Olive leaves, Rest-harrow, Adders tongue, Origanum, Sharp-poynted-Dock, Poppy, white, black, and red, or Erratick, Pellitory of the wall, Cinkfoyl, Arsmart, spotted, and not spot­ted, Peach leaves, Throughwax, Parsly, Harts-tongue, Valerian, Mousear, Burnet, smal Spurge, Plantane, common and narrow leaved, Mountain and Cretick Poley, Knotgass, Golden Maiden-hair, Poplar leaves and Buds, Leeks, Purslain, Silverweed, or wild Tansy, Horehound white and black, Prim-roses, Self-heal, Field Pellitory, or Sneez-wort, Peny-royal, Fleabane, Lungue-wort, Winter-green, Oak Leaves and Buds, Cinkfoyl, Crowfoot, Rosa solis, Rasberry and Bramble Leaves and Buds, Docks, Common Rue, or Herb of Grace, Goats Rue, Wall Rue, or white Maiden-hair, Wild Rue, Savin, Ozier Leaves, [Page 40] Garden Sage, the greater and lesser, wild Sage, Elder leaves and buds, Marjoram, Burnet, [...], Sope­wort, Savory, white saxifrage, Scabious, Cichory, Schoenanth, Clary, Scordium, Figwort, Housleek or sengreen, the greater and lesser, Groundsel, Senna leaves and cods, Mother of Time, Solomons seal, Alexanders, Nightshade, Soldanella, Sowthistles, smooth and rough, Flixweed, Common spike, spinach, Hawthorn, Devils bit, Comfry, Tamaris leaves, Tan­sie, Dandelyon, Mullen or Higtaper, Time, Linetree Leaves, spurge, Tormentil, common and golden Tre­foyl, Woodsorrel, sweet Trefoyl, Coltsfoot, Valerian, Mullen, Vervain, Pauls Bettony, Lluellen, Violets, Pansies, Perewinkles, Swallow-wort, Golden rod, Vine leaves, Meadsweet, Elm-leaves, Navil-wort, Nettles, common and Roman, Arch-Angel, or dead Nettles, white and red.

Culpeper] A. These be the Herbs as the Colledg set them down to look upon; we will see if we can translate them in another form for the use and bene­fit of the body Man.

Herbs Temperate in respect of Heat, Are

Common Maiden-hair, Wal-rue, black and golden Maiden-hair, Wood-roof, Bugle, Goats Rue, Harts­tongue, sweet Trefoyl, Flixweed, Cinkfoyl, Trefoyl, Pauls Betony, Fluellin.

Intemperate, are hot in the first degree, as

Agrimony; Marshmallows; Goosgrass or Cleavers; Distaff thistle; Borrage; Bugloss; our Ladies thistles; Avens; Cetrach; Chervil; Camomel; Eyebright; Cowslips; Melilot; Bazil, Self-heal.

In the second degree

Common and Roman Wormwood; Maudlin; La­dies Mantle; Pimpernel, male and foemale; Dill; Smallage; Mugwort; Costmary; Betony; Oak of Je­rusalem; Marigolds; Cookow flowers; Carduus Bene­dictus; Centaury the less; Camepitys; Scurvy-grass; Indian leaf; Broom; Alehoof, Alexanders; Double­tongue, or tongue-blade; Arch-Angel, or dead Net­tles; Bay leaves; Marjoram; Horehound; Bawm; Mer­cury; Devils-bit; Tobacco; Parsly; Poley mountain; Rosemary; Sage; Sanicle; Scabious; Senna; Solda­nella; Tansy; Vervain; Peruinkle.

In the third degree

Southernwood, male and foemale; Brooklime; An­gellica; Briony, white and black; Calaminth; Ger­mander: Sullendine: Pilewort: Fleabane: Dwarf-Elder: Epithimum: Bank-cresses: Clary: Glasswort: Lavender: Lovage: Herb mastich: Feathersew: Mints: Water­cresses: Origanum: biting Arsmart, called in Latin, Hydropiper: (the Colledg confounds this with Per­sicaria, or mild Arsmart, which is cold) Sneezwort: Penyroyal: Rue: Savin Summer and Winter Savory: Mother of Time: Lavender: Spike: Time: Nettles.

In the fourth degree

Sciatica-cresses: stone crop. Dittander or Pepper­wort: Garden-cresses: Leeks: Crowfoot: Rosa solis: Spurge.

Herbs cold in the first Degree.

Sorrel, wood Sorrel, Arach, Burdock, Sheaphards purse, Pellitory of the wall, Hawk-weed, Mallows, Yarrow, mild Arsmart called Persicaria; if you be afraid of mistaking this for the other, break a leaf cross your tongue, that which is hot will make your tongue smart, so will not this, (and here by the way let me tell the Colledg one of their errors, and I will tell them but the truth, whereas they affirm, Persica­ria Maculata, or spotted Arsmart to be the Hydropi­per, 'tis no such matter in our Country, most of the wild Arsmart, though not all, hath blackish spots in the leaves, almost Semi circular, like a half Moon, but to proceed) Burnet, Coltsfoot, Violets.

Cold in the second Degree.

Chickweed, wild Tansy, or Silver-weed, Daisies, Knot-grass, Succory, Buckhorn, Plantane, Dandeli­on, Endive, Fumitory, Strawberry leaves, Lettice. Duckmeat, Plantane, Purslain, Willow leaves.

In the third Degree.

Sengreen or Housleek, Nightshade.

In the fourth Degree.

Hemlock, Henbane, Mandrakes, Poppies.

Herbs dry in the first Degree.

Agrimony, Marshmallows, Cleavers, Burdocks, Sheaphards purse, our Ladies thistles, Chervil, Chamomel, Eyebright, Cowslips, Hawkweed, Tongue blade, or double Tongue, Mclilot, mild Ars­mart, Self-heal, Senna, Flixweed, Coltsfoot, Peru­inkle.

Dry in the second Degree.

Common and Roman Wormwood, Sorrel, wood Sorrel, Maudlin, Ladies mantle, Pimpernel male and foemale, Dill, Smallage, wild Tansy or Silverweed, Mugwort, Distaffe thistle, Cost-mary, Bettony, Bugle, Cookow flowers, Carduus Benedictus, Avens, Centaury the less, Chicory commonly called Succo­ry, Scurvy-grass, Buckhorn, Plantane, Dandelion, Endive, Indian leafe, Strawberry leaves, Fumitory, Broom, Alehoofe, Alexanders, Archangel or dead Nettles white and red, Bay leaves, Marjoram, Fea­ther-few, Bawm, Mercury, Devils-bit, Tobacco, Parsly, Burnet, Plantane, Rosemary, Willow leaves, Sage, Sanicle, Scabious, Soldanella, Vervain.

Dry in the third Degree.

Southern wood male and foemale, Brooklime, An­gellica, Briony white and black, Calaminth, German­der, Chamepitys, Sullendine, Pilewort, Fleabane, Epithimum, Dwarff Elder, Bank cresses, Clary, Glas­wort, Lavender, Lovage, Horehound, herb Mastich, Mints, Water-cresses, Origanum, Cinkfoyl, hot Arsmart, Poley mountain, Sneezwort, Peny-royal, Rue, or herb of Grace, Savin winter and summer Sa­vory, mother of Time, Lavender, Spike, Tansy; Time; Trefoyl.

In the fourth Degree.

Garden cresses; wild Rue; Leeks; Onions; Crow­foot; Rosa solis; Garlick; Spurge.

Herbs moist in the first Degree.

[...]; Bugloss; Marigolds; Pellitory of the wall; Mallows; Bazil.

In the fourth Degree.

Chickweed; Arach; Daisies; Lettice; Duckmeat; Purslain; Sow thistles; Violets; Water-Lillies.

Herbs apropriated to certain parts of the bo­dy of man, and so they,

Heat the Head; as,

Maudlin; Costmary; Bettony; Carduus. Benedict­us; Sullendine; Scurvy grass; Eyebright; Goats [...]; Cowslips; Lavender; Laurel; Lovage; herb Mastich; Feather-few; Melilot; Sneezwort; Peny royal; Sen­na; mother of Time; Lavender; Spike; Time; Ver­vain, Rosemary.

Heat the Throat.

Archangel white and red; otherwise called dead Nettles; Devils-bit.

Heat the Breast.

Maidenhair; white, black, common and Golden; Distaffe thistle; Time; Betony; Calaminth; Cha­momel; Fennel; Iudian leafe; Bay leaves; Hysop; Bawm; Horehound; Oak of Jerusalem; Germander; Melilot; Origanum; Rue; Scabious; Peruinkles; Nettles.

Heat the Heart.

Southernwood male and foemale; Angellica; Wood­roofe, Bugloss; Carduus Benedictus; [...]; Goats Rue; Bay leaves; Bawm; Rue; Senna; Bazil; Rose­mary; Alicampane.

Heat the Stomach.

Wormwood common and Roman, Smallage, A­vens, Indian leafe, Broom, Schenanth, Bay leaves, Bawm, Mints, Parsly, Fennel, Time, mother of Time, Sage.

Heat the Liver.

Agrimony, Maudlin, Pimpernel male and foemale, Smallage, Costmary, or Alecost, our Ladies thistles, Centaury the less, Germander, Chamepiyts, Sullen­dine, Sampier, Fox gloves, Ashtree leaves, Bay leaves, Toad-flax, Hops, Hore-hound, Water-cresses, Parsly, Poley mountaine, Sage, Scordium, Senna, mother of Time, Soldanella, Asarabacca, Fennel, Hysop, Spicknard.

Heat the Bowels.

Chamomel, Alehoofe, Alexanders.

Heat the spleen.

All the four sorts of Maiden-hair, Agrimony smal­lage, Centaury the less, Cetrach, Germander, Cha­mepitys, Sampier, Fox-gloves, Epithimum, Ashtree, Bay leaves, Toad flax, Hops, Hore-hound, Parsly, Poley mountain, sage, scordium, senna mother of Time, Tomaris, Wormwood, Water-cresles, Harts­tongue.

Heat the Reins and Bladder.

Agrimony, Maudlin, Marshmallows, Pimpernel male and foemale, Brooklime, Costmary, Betony, Chervil, Germander, Chamomel, sampier, Broom, Rupture-wort; Clary, [...], Bay leaves, Toad­flax, Hops, Melilot, Water-cresses, Origanum, Pe­ny-royal; scordium, Vervain; mother of Time; Rocket, Spicknard, Saxifrage; Nettles.

Heat the Womb.

Maudlin Angellica; Mugwort, Costmary, Cala­minth, Fleabanc, May [...] or Marg-weed, Dittany of Creet, Schenanth; Archangel or dead Nettles, Melilot; Feather-few; Mints; Devils-bit, Origanum; Bazil; Peny-royal; Savin; Sage; Scordium; Tansy: Time: Vervain, Peruinkles: Nettles.

Heat the Joynts.

Cowslips: sciatica-cresses, hot Arsmart: Garden cresses: Costmary, Agrimony, Chamomel: Saiut Johns-wort, Melilot, Water-cresses, Rosemary, Rue, Sage, Stechas.

Herbs cooling the Head.

Wood sorrel, Teazles, Lettice, Plantane, Willow­leaves, sengreen, or Housleek, strawberry leaves, Vi­olet leaves, Fumitory, Water-Lillies.

Cool the Throat.

Orpine, strawberry leaves, Privet, Bramble leaves.

Breast.

Mulberry leaves Bramble leaves, Violet leaves, strawberry leaves, sorrel, Wood-sorrel, Poppies, Orpine, Money-wort, Plantane, Colts-foot.

Heart

Sorrel, Wood sorrel, Vipers, Bugloss, Lettice, Burnet, Violet leaves, strawberry leaves- Water­Lilles.

Stamach

Sorrel, Wood-sorrel, succory, Orpine, Dandelion, Endive, strawberry leaves Violet leaves, Hawkweed, Lettice, Purslain, sow thistles, Violet leaves.

Liver

Sorrel, Wood-sorrel, Dandelion, Endive, succory, strawberry leaves, Fumitory, Liver-wort, Lettice, Purslain, Nightshade, Water-Lillies.

Bowels

Fumitoty, Mallows, Buckhorn-Plantane, Orpine Plantane, Burnet.

Spleen

Fumitory, Endive, succory, Lettice.

Reins and Bladder

Knot-grass, Mallows, Yarrow, Money-wort; Plan­tane, Endive, succory; Lettice, Purslain, Water-lillies, Housleek, or sengreen.

The Womb

Wild Tansy, Arach, Burdocks, Willow herb, Mirtle Leaves, Money-wort, Purslain, sow thistles, Endive, succory, Lettice, Water-Lillies, sen­green.

The Joynts

Willow leaves, Vine leaves, Lettice, Henbane Nightshade, sengreen; or Housleek.

Herbs altering according to property, in ope­ration; some Bind; as;

Amomus; Agnus Castus; sheaphards purse; Cy­press; Horstail; Ivy; Bay leaves; Melilot: Bawm; Mirtles; sorrel; Plantane; Knot-grass; Comfry; Cinkfoyl; Fleawort; Purslain; Oak leaves, Willow leaves; sengreen; or Housleek; &c.

Open; as;

Garlick; Onions; Wormwood; Mallows; Marsh­mallows; Pellitory of the wall; Endive; succory &c.

Soften.

Mallows; Marshmallows; Beets; Pellitory of the wall; Violet leaves; strawberry leaves; Arach: Cy­press leaves: Bay leaves: Felawort: &c.

Harden

Purslain, Nightshade: Housleek, or sengreen: Duckmeat: and most other Herbs that are very cold.

Extenuate

Mugwort: Chamomel: Hysop. Penyroyal: Stoechas: Time: Mother of Time: Juniper &c.

Discuss

Southernwood, male and foemale, al the four sorts of Maiden-hair: Marshmallows: Dill: Mallows: Ar­rach: [Page 42] Beets: Chamomel: Mints: Melilot: Pellitory of the Wal: Chickweed: Rue: stoechas: Marjoram.

Draw

Pimpernel: Birthwort: Dittany: Leeks: Onions: Garlick: and also take this general Rule, as all cold things bind and harden, as is apparant by the frost binding and hardning water and mire; so all things very hot are drawing, as is cleer by the Sun who is the Original of heat, drawing up the dew.

Suppure

Mallaws, Marsh-mallows, white Lilly leaves &c.

Clense

Pimpernel: southernwood: sparagus: Cetrach: Ar­rach: Wormwood: Beets: Pellitory of the wal: Cha­mepitys: Doddar: Liverwort: Horehound: Willow leaves &c.

Glutinate

Marshmallows: Pimpernel: Centaury: Chamepi­tys: Mallows: Germander: Horstail: Agrimony: Maudlin: strawberry leaves: Woad: Chervil: Plan­tane: Cinkfoyl: Comfry: Bugle: self-heal: Wound­wort: Tormentill: Rupture-wort: Knotgrass: To­bacco

Expel wind

Wormwood; Garlick; Dill; Smallage; Chamomel; Epithimum; Fennel; Juniper, Marjoram; Origanum; Savory, both winter and summer; and that, I am of opinion, was the reason in ancient times, women al­waies boyled Savory with their beans and pease, viz. to expel the windiness of them; it was a good fashi­on, and therefore I would not have it left: however this shews that in ancient times, people were more studious in the nature of Simples, or at the least Phy­sitians were more honest, I mean more free in im­parting their knowledg for the benefit of the vulgar; at last Honesty began to leave the Earth, and then Ignorance quickly stepping up in the place of Know­ledg, people used them a while for custom sake, at last they were esteemed superstitious, and quite left off.

I care not greatly, now I am at it, if I quote one more of like nature (I am confident, were it my present scope, I could quote an hundred) and that is Tansy.

Tansie is excellent good to clense the stomach and bowels of tough viscous flegm, and humors that stick to them, which the flegmatick constitution of the Winter usually infects the body of man with, and oc­casions gouts and other diseases of like nature, and la­sting long; this was the original of that custom to eat Tansies in the Spring, which afterwards grew to be superstitious, and apropriated only to some cer­tain daies, as Palm-Sundaies &c. and so at last the evils of observing daies being known, and the ver­tues of the meat absconded, it is quite almost left off. For my part, if any think it superstitious to eat a Tansie in the Spring, I shall not burden their consci­ences, they may make the Herb into a Conserve with Sugar, or boyl it in Wine and drink the Decoction, or make the Juyce into a Syrup with Sugar, which they will. But to proceed.

Herbs breed seed

Clary, Rocket, and most Herbs that are hot and moist, and breed Wind.

Provokes the Terms

Southernwood, Garlick, al the sorts of Maidenhair, Mugwort, Wormwood, Bishopsweed, Cabbages, Bet­tony, Centaury, Chamomel, Calaminth, German­der, Dodder, Dittany, Fennel, St. Johns-wort, Mar­joram, Horehound, Bawm, Water-cresses, Origanum, Basil, Penyroyal, Poley-mountain, Parsly, smallage, Rue, Rosemary, Sage, Savin, Hartwort, Time, Mo­ther of Time, Scordium, Nettles.

Stop the Terms

Shepheards-purse, strawberries, Mirtles, Water­Lillies, Plantane, Housleek or sengreen, Comfry, Knotgrass.

Resist Poyson

Southernwood; Wormwood; Garlick; al sorts of Maiden-hair; smallage; Betony; Carduus Benedictus; Germander; Calaminth; Alexanders; Carline thistle; Agrimony; Fennel, Juniper; Horehound; Origanum; Penyroyal; Poley-mountain; Rue; scordium; Plan­tane.

Discuss swellings

Maiden-hair, Cleavers or Goosgrass, Mallows, Marshmallows, Docks, Bawm, Water-cresses, Cink­foyl, scordium &c.

Ease pain

Dil, Wormwood, Arrach, Chamomel, Calaminth, Chamepitys, Henbane, Hops, Hogs Fennel, Parsly, Rosemary, Rue, Marjoram, Mother of Time.

Herbs Purging

Choller

Groundsel, Hops, Peach Leaves, Wormwood, Cen­taury, Mallows, senns.

Melancholly

Ox-eye, Epithimum, Futhitory, senna, Dodder.

Flegm and Water

Briony, white and black: spurge: both work most violently and are not therefore fit for a vulgar use: Dwarf Elder: Hedg Hysop: Laurel Leaves: Mercury Mezereon also purgeth violently, and so doth [...]: Elder Leaves senna.

For the particular operations of these, as also how to order the body after purges, the quantity to be ta­ken at a time, you have been in part instructed al­ready, and shal be more fully hereafter.

The FLOWERS which the Colledg acquaints you with the Latin names of, only, are these.

Colledg] VV Ormwood, Agnus Castus: A­maranthus: Dill Rosemary, Columbines: Orrenges: Balaustins: or Pomegranate flowers: Betony: Borrage: Bugloss, Marigolds: Wood­bine: or Honey suckles: Clove gilliflowers: Centaury the less: [...]: winter-gilliflowers: or Walflo­wers: succory: Comfry the greater: saffron: Blewbottle great and small: (Cynosbatus, Tragus, and Dedonae­us hold our white thorn to be it: Cordus and Marcel­lus think it to be Bryars: and Lugdunensis takes for the sweet Bryar: but what our Colledg takes it for: I know not) Cytinus: (Dioscorides calleth the Flowers of the Manured Pomgranates: Cytinus: but Pliny calleth the Flowers of the wild kind by that name:) Fox gloves: Vipers Bugloss: Rocket, Eye-bright: Beans: Fumitory: Broom: Cowslips: St. Johns-wort: Hysop: Jasmine: or shrub Trefoyl, Archangel: or dead Nettles white and red: Lavender, Walflowers: or Winter-gilliflowers: Privet: Lillies: white: and of the vally: Hops: Comon and tree Mallows: Feather­few: Woodbine: or Honeysuckles: Melilot: Bawm, Walnuts: Water-Lillies: white and yellow: Origanum: Poppies: white: and red: or erratick: Poppies, or corn Roses: so called because they grow amongst Corn, Peony, Honey-suckles: or Woodbine: Peach-flowers: Prim-roses, self-heal: sloebush: Rosemary flowers: Roses: white, Damask: and red, sage: E lder: white saxifrage: scabious, siligo (I think they mean wheat by it: Authors are not agreed about it:) stoechas: Ta­maris: Tansy: Mullen, or Higtaper: Line-tree: Clove­Gilli-flowers, Colts-foot, Violets: Agnus: Castus: dead-Nettles white and red.

That these may be a little explained for the Publique good: be pleased to take notice that of these:

Some are hot in the first degree: as:

Borrage: Bugloss: Betony: Ox-eye: Melilot Chamo­mel: stoechas.

Hot in the second degree.

Amomus: saffron: Clove-gilli-flowers, Rocket: Bawm, spicknard, Hops: schenanth: Lavender: Jas­mine, Rosemary.

In the third degree.

Agnus: Castus: Epithimum: Winter-gilli-flowers: or Wal-flowers: Woodbine: or Honey-suckles.

Cold in the first degree.

Mallows: Roses: red: white: and Damask: Vio­lets.

In the second.

[...]: or wind-flower: Endive: succory: Water­Lillies: both white and yellow.

In the third.

Balaustins: or Pomegranate flowers.

In the Fourth.

Henbane-and all the sorts of Poppies: only where­as Authors say: field Poppies: which some call red: o­thers: erratick: and corn Roses, are the coldest of all the others: yet my opinion is: that they are not cold in the fourth degree.

Moist in the first degree.

Borrage: Bugloss: Mallows: succory, Endive.

In the second.

Water-Lillies: Violets.

Dry in the first degree.

Ox-eye: saffron: Chamomel: Melilot: Roses.

In the second.

Wind-flower: Amomus: Clove-gilli-flowers, Roc­ket: Lavender: Hops: Peony: Rosemary: spicknard.

In the third.

Woodbine, or Honey-suckles: Balaustines: Epi­thimum: Germander: Chamepitys.

The Temperature of any other flowers not here mentioned are of the same temperature with the herbs; you may gain skil by searching there for them, you can lose none.

For parts of the Body they are apropriated to, some heat

The Head, as

Rosemary flowers; selt-heal; Chamomel; Betony; Cowslips; Lavinder; Melilot; Peony; sage; stoechas.

The Breast

Betony: Bawm: seabious: schaenanth.

The Heart

Bawm: Rosemary-flowers: Borrage: Bugloss: sas­fron: spicknard.

The Stomach

Rosemary-flowers: spicknard: schaenanth.

The Liver

Centaury: schaenanth: Elder: Betony: Chamomel: spicknard.

The Spleen

Betony: Wal-flowers.

The Reins and Bladder

Betony: Marshmallows: Melilot: schaenanth: spicknard.

The Womb

Betony: squinanth or schaenanth: sage: Orris or Flower-de-luce.

The Joynts

Rosemary-flowers: Cowslips: Chamomel: Melilot.

Flowers as they are cooling, so they cool

The head

Violets, Roses, the three sorts of Poppies, and [Page 44] Water-Lillies.

The breast and heart.

Violets, red-Roses, Water-lillies.

The stomach.

Red-Roses, Violets.

The Liver and spleen.

Endive, and Succory.

Violets, Botrage, and Bugloss moisten the heart, Rosemary flowers, Bawm, and Betony, dry it.

According to property so they, Bind,

Balaustins, Saffron, succory, Endive, red-Roses Melilot, Bawm, Clove-gilliflowers, Agnus Ca­stus.

Discuss.

Dill, Chamomel; Marshmallows, Mallows, Meli­lot, stoechas, &c.

Clense.

Damask-roses, Elder flowers, Bean-flowers, &c.

Extenuate.

Orris: or Fower-de-luce: Chamomel: Melilot:, stoechas: &c.

Mollify.

Saffron: white Lillies: Mallows: Marshmallows: &c.

Suppure.

Saffron: white Lillies &c.

Glutinate:

Balaustins, Centaury, &c.

Provoke the terms.

Betony: Centaury: Chamomel: Schoenanth, Wal­flowers, Bawm: Peony: Rosemary, Sage.

Stop the terms.

Balaustins, or Pomegranate flowers, Water-Lil­lies.

Expell wind.

Dill: Chamomel: Schoenanth: Spicknard.

Help burnings.

White Lillies, Mallows, Marhmallows.

Resist poyson.

Betony: Centaury.

Ease pain.

Dill Chamomel. Centaury: Melilot: Rosemary.

Flowers purge Choller.

Peach flowers, Damask Roses, Violets.

Flegm.

Broom flowers, Elder flowers.

If you compare but the quallities of the Flowers, with the Herbs, and with the Explanation of these terms at the latter End, you may easily find the tem­perature, and property of the rest.

As for the vertues of the flowers, there were but few quoted before, and those very briefly; I think the reason was, because the Printer was afraid the book would be too big: I shall therefore give a supply here, to what was wanting there, and where I was too briefe there, I shall be more large here.

The Flowers of Ox-eye, being boyled into a pul­tis, with a little barly meal, take away swellings, and hardness of the flesh, being applied warm to the place.

Chamomel flowers heat, discuss, Loosen, and rari­fie, boyled in Clisters, they are excellent in the wind chollick, boyled in Wine, and the decoction drunk, purgeth the reins, breaks the stone, opens the pores, casts out chollerick humors, succors the heart, and ea­seth pains and aches, or stiffness coming by travai­ling.

The flowers of Rocket used outwardly, discuss, swellings, and dissolve hard tumors, you may boyl them into a pultis, or Cataplasme, as Scholers cal it, But inwardly taken, they send but unwholsom vapors up to the head.

Hops open obstruction of the bowels, Liver, and spleen, they clense the body of Choller and flegm, provoke urine. I wonder in my heart how that apish fashion of drinking Beer and Ale together for the stone, came up, and others affirm that the disease of the stone, was not in rerum naturam, before Beer was invented, a gross untruth: for Physitians have written of the stone, that lived a thousand years be­fore Beer was invented. I deny not but staleness of Beer, may cause sharpness of urine, otherwise Beer, if mild, is ten times better drink for such as are troubled with the stone, than Ale, as being more opening.

Jasmine flowers boyled in Oyl, and the greived place bathed with it, takes away cramps, and stiches in the sides: The plant is only preserved here in the gardens of some few, and because hard to come by, I pass it; If you desire more vertues of it, be pleased to search it in Dodonoeus.

The flowers of Woodbine, or Honey-suckles, be­ing dryed, and beaten into pouder, and a drachm, ta­ken in white Wine in the morning, helps the rickets, difficulty of breathing, provoke urine, and help such as cannot make water: I would have none make a common practice of taking it, for it clenseth the uri­tery vessels, so potently that it may cause pissing of blood.

The flowers of Mallows, being bruised, and boyl­ed in hony (two ounces of the flowers is sufficient for a pound of hony, and having first clarified the honey, before you put them in) then strained out, this ho­ney taken with a Liquoris stick, is an eccellent reme­dy both for Coughs, Astmaes, and cansumptions of the Lungues.

Certain FRUITS, mentioned by the Colledg, in this Order.

Colledg] WInter Cherries, Love-Apples, Al­monds, sweet and bitter, Ana­cardia, Orrenges, Hazel Nuts, the oyly Nut Ben, Barberries, Capers, Gumny Pepper, Figs, Carpobalsa­mum, Cloves, Cassia Fistula, Chestnuts, Cherries, black and red, Cicers, white black and red, Pome Citrons, Coculus Indi. [...], Currance, Cornels, or Cor­nelian Cherries, Cubebs, Cucumers, garden and wild, Guords,See the flowers. Cynobatus, Cypress Cones, Quinces, Dates, Dwarf Elder, Green Figs, Strawberries, common and Turky Galls, Acorns, Acorn cups, Pomegranates, Goos-berries, Ivy, Herb True-love, Walnuts, Jujubes, Juniper berries, Bay-berries, Lemmons, Orrenges, Citrons, Quinces, Pomegranates, Lemmons, Man­drakes, Peaches, Stramontum, Apples garden and wild, or Crabs and Apples, Musk Melones, Medlars, or open Arses, Mulberries, Myrobalans, Bellericks, Chebs, Emblicks, Citron and Indian, Mirtle berries, Water Nuts, Hazel Nuts, Chest-nuts, Cypress Nuts, Walnuts; Nutmegs, Fistick Nuts, Vomiting-Nuts, Olives pickled in brine, Heads of white and black Poppies, Pompions, Peaches, French or Kidney Beans, Pine Cones, white black and long Pepper, Fistick Nuts, Apples, and Crabs, Prunes French and Da­mask, Sloes, Pears, English Currance, Berries of pur­ging Thorn, Black-berries, Rasberries; Elder-berries, Sebestens, Services or Checkers, Hawthorn Berries, Pinenuts, Water nuts, Grapes, Goos-berries, Rai­sons, Currance.

Culpeper] That you may reap benefit by these, be pleased to consider, that they are, some of them

Temperate in respect of heat

Raisons of the Sun, Currance, Figs, Pinenuts, Dates, Sebestens.

Hot in the first degree

Sweet Almonds, Jujubes, Cypress nuts, green Ha­zel Nuts, green Walnuts.

Hot in the second degree

The [...] Ben, Capers, [...], dry Walnuts, dry Hazel Nuts, Fistick nuts.

In the third degree

Juniper Berries, Cloves, Carpobalsamum, Cubebs, Anacardium, bitter Almonds.

In the fourth degree

Pepper, white black and long, Guinny Pepper.

Cold in the first degree

The flesh of Citrons, Quinces, Pears, Prunes, &c.

In the second

Guords, Cucumers, Melons, (or, as they are called in London, Musk Melones, I suppose for the sweetness of their smell) Pompions, Orrenges, Lemmons, Ci­trons, Pomegranates, viz. the Juyce of them, Peaches, Prunes, Galls, Apples.

In the third

Mandrakes.

In the fourth

Stramonium.

Moist in the first degree

The flesh of Citrons, Lemmons, Orrenges, viz. the inner rind which is white, for the outer rind is hot.

In the second

Guords, Melones, Peaches, Prunes &c.

Dry in the first degree

Juniper berries.

In the second

The Nut Ben, Capers, Pears, Fistick nuts, Pine­nuts, Quinces, Nutmegs, Bay-berries.

In the third

Cloves, Galls, &c.

In the fourth

All the sorts of Pepper.

As apropriated to the body of man, so they heat the Head, as

Anacardia, Cubebs, Nutmegs.

The Breast

Bitter Almonds, Dates, Cubebs, Hazel Nuts, Pine­nuts, Figs, Raisons of the Sun Jujubes.

The Heart

Walnuts; Nutmegs; Juniper Berries.

The Stomach

Sweet Almonds; Cloves; Ben; Juniper berries; Nulmegs; Pinenuts Olives.

The Spleen

Capers.

The Reins and Bladder

Bitter Almonds; Juniper Berries; Cubebs; Pine­nuts; Raisons of the Sun.

The Womb

Walnuts; Nutmegs; Bay-berries; Juniper berries.

Cool the Breast

Sebestens; Prunes; Orrenges; Lemmons.

The Heart

Orrenges; Lemmons; Citrons; Pomegranates; Quinces; Pears.

The Stomach

Quinces; [...]; Cucumers; Guords; Musk Melones; Pompions; Cherries; Gooseberries; Cornelian Cher­ries; Lemmons; Apples; Medlars; Orrenges; Pears; English Currance; Cervices or Checkers.

The Liver

Those that cool the stomach, and Barberries.

The Reins and Womb

Those that cool the stomach, and Strawberries.

By their several Operations; some

Bind, as

The berries of Mirtles; Barbérriés, Chestnuts, Cor­nels or Cornelian Cherries; Quinces; Galls; Acorns; Acorn-cups; Medlars; Checkers, or Services; Pome­granates; Nutmegs; Olives; Pears; Peaches.

Discuss

Capers; al the sorts of Pepper.

Extenuate

Sweet and bitter Almonds; Bay-berries; Jnniper­berries.

Glutinate

Acorns; Acorn cups; Dates; Raisons of the Sun; Currance.

Expel Wind

Bayberries, Juniper berries, Nutmegs, al the sorts of Pepper.

Breed seed

Raisons of the Sun, sweet Almonds, Pinenuts, Figs &c.

Provoke Urine

Winter-cherries.

Provokes the Terms

Ivy Berries, Capers &c.

Stop the Terms

Barberries &c.

Resist poyson

Bay berries, Juniper berries, Walnuts, Citrons, commonly called Pome-citrons, al the sorts of Pepper.

Ease pain

Bay berries, Juniper berries, Ivy berries, Figs, Wal­nuis, Raisens, [...], all the sorts of Pepper.

Fruits Purging

Choller

Cassia Fistula: Citron Myrobalans: Prunes: Ta­marinds: Raisons.

Melancholly

Indian Myrobalans.

Flegm

Colocynthis and wild Cucumers purge it violently, and therefore are not rashly to be medled withal; I desire my book should be beneficial, not hurtful to the vulgar; but Myrobalans of all sorts, especially Chebs, Bellericks, and Emblicks purge flegm very gently, and without danger.

Of all these, besides what hath been formerly men­tioned in this Book (to which I refer you) give me leave to commend only one to you, as of special con­cernment, which is Juniper berries; They may be found all the Winter long plentifully growing on Warley Common in Essex neer Brent-wood, about fifteen miles from London.

Tragus saith, the Vertues of Juniper berries are so many, that they cannot be numbred; amangst which these are some: The Berries eaten (for they are plea­sant in tast) are exceeding good against the biting of Adders, they resist poyson, pestilence, or any infecti­ous disease, help the strangury, and dropsie. Mathio­lus affirms that a lye made with the ashes of Juniper and water, is as great a provoker of Urine as can be; The Berries expel wind exceedingly, heat the sto­mach, help the digestion, provoke the Terms, the Germans make an universal medicine of them; they help the cough, shortness of breath, weakness of the lungues, convulsions, cramps, they give easie delivery to women with child; five or six berries taken every morning preserves the body in health, helps the chollick and stone, rawness of the stomach, faintings, and heart-qualms, Madness and frenzies, they [...] then the eyes and help rhewms there, the yellow jaundice, falling sickness, gout, and palsey.

Take those berries that are ripe, which look black.

SEEDS barely mentioned by the Colledg are, of

Colledg] SOrrel: Agnus Castus: Marshmallows: Bishops weed true and common: Amo­mus: Dill: Angellica: Annis: Rose-seeds: Smallage: Columbines: Sparagus: Arach: Oates: Orrenges: Burdocks: Bazil: Barberries: Cotton: [...]: or Kneebolly: Hemp: Cardamoms greater and lesser: Carduus Benedictus: our Ladies thistles: Bastard Sas­fron: Caraway: Spurge greater and lesser: Coleworts: Onions: the Kernels of Cherry stones: Chervil: Succo­ry: Hemlock, Citrons: Citruls: Garden Scurvy-grass: Colocynthis, Coriander: Sampier: Cucumers garden and wild: Guords: Quinces: Cummin: Cynosbatos: Date-stones: Carrots English and Cretish: Dwarffe­Elder: Endive: Rocket: bedg Mustard: Orobus: Beans: Fennel: Fenugreek: Ashtree keyes: Fumitory: Broom, Grains of Paradice: Pomegranates, wild Rue: Alexanders: Barly: white Henbane: Saint Johns­wort: Hysop: Lettice. Sharp-pointed-Dock: Spurge: Laurel: Lentils: [...]: Lemons: Ash tree keyes: Linseed: or Flaxseed: Gromwel: Darnel: sweet Tre­foyl: Lupines, Master-wort: Marjoram: Mallows: [...]: Melones: Medlars, [...]: Gromwel: sweet Navew: Nigella: the Kernils of Cherries: A­pricocks: and Peaches, Bazil: Orobus: Rice: [...] Poppies white and black: Parsneps Garden and wild: through Wax: Parsly: English and [...]: Bur­net: Pease: Plantane: Peony: Leeks: Purslain: Flea­wort: Turneps: Radishes: Sumach: Spurge: Roses: Rue garden and wild: Wormseed: Saxifrage: Succory: sesami, Hart-wort: common and Cretish, Mustard­seed: Alexanders: Nightshade: staves-ager: Sumach: Treacle: Mustard, sweet Tresoyl: Wheat: both the fine flower and the brann: and that whichI think the Col­ledg have almost as much skill in making starch as I have. Starch is made of: Vetches or Tares: Violets: Nettles common and Roman: The stones of Grapes: Greek wheat: or spelt Wheat.

Culpeper] That you may receive a little more bene­fit by these, than the bare reading of them, which doth at the most but tel you what they are; the following Method may instruct you what they are good for.

Seeds are hot in the first degree.

Linseed, Foenugreek, Coriander, Rice, Gromwel, Lupines.

In the second.

Dill, Smallage, Orobus, Rochet, Bazil, Nettles.

In the third.

Bishops weed, Annis, Amomus, Caraway, Fen­nel, (and so I beleeve is Smallage too, let Aurhors say what they wil, for if the herb of Smallage be som­what hotter than Parsly, I know little reason why the seed should not be so hot) Cardamoms, Parsly, Cum­min, Carrots, Nigella, Navew, Hart-wort, Staves­ager.

In the fourth.

[...], Mustard-seed.

Cold in the first degree.

Barly, &c.

In the second.

Endive, Lettice, Purslain, Succory, Guords, [...], Melones, Citruls, Pompions, Sorrel, Night­shade.

In the third.

Henbame, Hemlock, Poppies white and black.

Moist in the first degree.

Mallows, &c.

Dry in in the first degree.

Beans, Fennel, Fenugreek, Barly, Wheat, &c.

In the second.

Orobus, Lentils, Rice, Poppies, Nightshade, and the like.

In the third.

Dill Smallages Bishops-weed, Annis, Caraway, Cummin, Coriander, Nigella, Gromwel, Parsly.

Apropriated to the body of Man, and so they

Heat the head.

Fennel, Marjoram, Peony, &c.

The Breast.

Nettles.

The heart.

Bazil, Rue, &c. Mustard seed, &c.

The stomach.

Annis, Bishops-weed, Amomus, Smallage, Cum­min, Cardamoms, Cubebs, grains of Paradice.

The Liver.

Annis, Fennel, Bishops-weed, Amomus, Smallage, Sparagus, Cummin, Caraway, Carrots.

The spleen.

Annis, Caraway, Water-cresses.

The Reins and Bladder.

Cicers: Rocket: Saxifrage: Nettles: Gromwel.

The Womb.

Peony: Rue.

The Joynts.

Water-crafses: Rue: Mustard-seed.

Cool the Head.

Lettice: Purslain: white Poppies.

The Breast,

White Poppies: Violets.

The Heart.

Orrenge: Lemon: Citron: and Sorrel seeds.

Lastly: the four greater and four lesser cold seeds, which you may find in the beginning of the Compo­sitions, as also the seeds of white and black Poppies, cool the Liver and spleen, reins, and bladder, womb: and Joynts.

According to operation some Seeds,

Bind, as

Rose seeds, Barborries, Sheaphards purse, Purslain, &c.

Discuss.

Dill, Carrots, Linseeds, Fenugreek, Nigella, &c.

Clense.

Beans, Orobus, Barly, Lupines, Nettles, &c.

Mollify.

Linseed, or Flax seed, Fenugreek seed, Mallows, Nigella.

Harden.

Purslain seed, &c.

Suppure.

Linseed, Fenugreek seed, Darnel, Barly husked, commonly called french Batly.

Glutinate.

Orobus, Lupines, Darnel, &c.

Expell wind.

Annis, Dill, Smallage, Caraway, Cummin, Car­rots, Fennel, Nigella, Parsly, Hartwort, Worm-seed.

Breed seed.

Rocket, Beans, Cicers, Ashtree keyes.

Provoke the terms.

Amomus, Sparagus, Annis, Fennel, Bishops-weed, Cicers, Carrots, Smallage, Parsly, Lovage, Hart­wort.

Break the stone.

Mallows, Marshmallows, Gromwel, &c.

Stop the terms.

Rose seeds, Cummin, Burdock, &c.

Resist poyson.

Bishops-weed, Annis, Smallage, Cardamoms, Or­renges, Lemons, Citrons, Fennel, &c.

Ease pain.

Dill, Amomus, Cardamoms, Cummin, Carrots, Orobus, Fenugreek, Linseed, Gromwel, Parsly, Panick.

Asswage swellings.

Linseed, Fenugreek seeds, Marshmallows, Mal­lows, Coriander, Barly, Lupines, Darnel, &c.

Then the Colledg tell you a tale that there are such things in rerum Natura, as these Gums, Rozins, Balsams, and Juyces made thick, viz.

Colledg] Juyces of Wormwood and Maudsin, A­cacia: Aloes: Lees of Oyl: Assa foetida: Balsam of Peru: and India: Bdellium Benzoin: Cam­phirt: Caranna: Colophonia: Juyce of Maudlin: Eu­phorbium: Lees of Wine, Lees of Oyl: Gums of Galba­num: Ammoniacum: Anime: Arabick: cherry trees: Coopal, Elemi: Juniper: Ivy: Plum-trees: Cambnge: Hypocystis: Labdanum: Lacca: liquid-Amber: [...]: Mastich: Mirrh: Olibanum: Opium: Opopanax: Pice­bitumen: Pitch of the Cedar: of Greece: Liquid and dry, Rozin of sirr tree, Larch tree, Pine tree: Pine­fruit: Mastich Venice and Cipress Turpentine: Sugar: white, red, and Christalline, or sugar-Candy white and red, Sagapen. Juniper, Gum, sanguis draconis: sarcocolla: scamony, styrax: liquid and Calamitis: Ta­cha Mahacca: Tartar, Frankinsence: Olibanum: [...]: [...]. Who would have thought our Col­ledg of Physitlans were turned Bird-catchers.

Culpeper.] That my Country may receive more benefit than ever the Colledg of Physitians in­tended them from these, I shall treat of them severally.

  • 1. Of the Juyces.
  • 2. Of the Gums and Rosins

Concrete Juyces, or Juyces made thick are either

Temperate, as

Juyce of Liquoris, white starch.

Hot in the first degree

Sugar

In the second

Labdanum.

In the the third

Benzoin, Assafoetida.

Cold in the first degree

Sanguis Draconis, Acacia.

In the third

Hypocistis

In the fourth

Opium, and yet some Authors think Opium is hot because of its bitter tast

Aloes and Manna purge Choller gently; and Sca­mony doth purge choller so violently, that it is no waies fit for a vulgar mans use, for it corrhodes the Bowels. Opopanax purgeth flegm very gently.

Considering I was very brief in the handling the Vertues of these in my former part, I shall supply here what was wanting there.

White starch gently levigates or makes smooth such parts as are rough, Syrup of Violets being made thick with it and so taken on the poynt of a knife, helps coughs, roughness of the throat, wheezings, excoria­tions of the bowels, that same very disease which so lately puzled the Learned Rabbies of our times, the Bloody-flux, or the plague in the guts (as their Wor­ships learnedly called it) I cut my finger the other [Page 49] day, and then had I got the plague in my finger by the same rule.

Juyce of Liquoris helps roughness of the [...] Arteria, which is in plain English called the Wind­pipe, the toughness of which causeth coughs and hoarceness, difficulty of breathing &c. It allaies the heat of the stomach and Liver, caleth pains, soreness and roughness of the reins and bladder, it quencheth thirst, and strengthens the stomach exceedingly: It may easily be carried about in ones pocket, and eat a little now and then.

Sugar clenseth and digesteth, takes away roughness of the tongue, it strengtheneth the reins anti bladder being weakned; being beaten into fine pouder and put into the eyes, it takes away films that grow over the sight.

Labdanum is in operation, thickning, heating and mollifying, it opens the passage of the veins, and keeps the hair from falling off, the use of it is [...] external; being mixed with Wine, Mirrh, and Oyl of Mirtles, and applied like a plaistet, it takes away filthy scars, and the deformity the small pocks leave behind them; being mixed with Oyl of Roses, and dropped into the ears, it helps pains there; being used as a pessary, it provokes the terms, and helps hardness or stiffness of the womb: It is sometimes used inwardly in such medicines as ease pains and help the cough; if you mix a little of it with old white Wine and drink it, it both provokes urine, and stops loosness or fluxes.

Dragons blood, cools, binds and repels

Acacia and Hyposistis do the like.

The juce of Maudlin; (or for want of it Costmary, which is the same in effect, and better known to the vulgar, some Countries call it Alecost) the juyce is made thick for the better keeping of it; first clarifie the juyce very wel, before you boyl it to its due thick­ness, which is something thicker than Honey.

It is apropriated to the Liver; and the quantity of adrachm taken every morning, helps the [...], or evil disposition of the body proceeding from cold­ness of the Liver; it helps the rickets, and worms in children, provokes urine, and gently (without pur­ging) disburdens the body of choller and [...]; it succours the lungues, opens obstructions and resists purifaction of blood.

The rest which are [...] and easie to be had may be found in what goes before; such as are hard to come by I pass by, as considering it would do the Reader little good to tell him a long tale of what things are in the East Indies or Arabla.

Gums are either temperate, as

Lacca, Elemi, Tragatanth &c.

Intemperate, and so are hot in the first degree, as

Bdellium, Gum of [...]

In the second

[...], Mirrh, [...], Frankinsence, Oliba­num, Pitch, [...], [...],

In the third

Ammoniacum.

In the [...]

Euphotbium.

Gum Arabick is cold.

Colophonia and Styrax soften.

Gum Arabick and Tragacanth, Sandarack or Ju­niper Gum, and [...] bind.

Gum of Cherry trees, breaks the stone.

Styrax provokes the terms.

Opopanax gently purgeth flegm.

Because I was brief in the vertues of these before, I shall supply here what was wanting there.

From the prickly Cedar when it is burned comes forth that which with us, is usually known by the name of Tar, and is excellent good for unction eithor, for scabs, itch, or manginess, either in men or [...]; as also against the leprosie, Tetters, Ring­worms, and Scald-heads.

All sorts of Rozins fill up hollow ulcers, and re­lieves the body ore, pressed with cold griefs.

The Rozin of pitch tree, is that which is common­ly called Burgony-pitch, and is something hotter and sharper than the former, being spread upon a cloath is excellent good against old aches coming of former bruises or dislocations.

Pitch mollifies hard Swellings, and brings boyls and sores to suppurstion, it breaks carbuncles, disperseth Aposthumes, clenseth ulcers of corruption and filleth them with flesh.

[...] heats and mollifies, and that very tempe­rately, being mixed with any convenient Oyntment or Plaister, it helps kernels in the neck and throat, Scrophula, or that disease which was wont to be cal­led the Kings evil, because people dream'd waking that the Kings of England could cure it by touching, which to me is as credible as the History of [...] and the Dragon.

Inwardly taken in any convenient Medicine, it pre­vokes urine and the terms, and breaks the stone; it helps coughs and the bitings of venemous beasts, it helps windiness of the Spleen, and [...] the sides thence coming; both outwardly applied to the place & inwardly taken, it helps ruptures or such as are burst, it softens the hardness of the womb, dties up the moi­sture thereof, and expels the dead child.

[...] Judaicum is a certain dry pitch which the dead Sea, or Lake of Sadom in [...] cast forth at certain times, the Inhabitants there about, pith their Ships with it. It is of excellent use to mollifie the hardness of swellings and discuss them, as also against Inflamations; the smoke of it burnt is excellent good for the fits of the mother, and the falling-sickness; Inwardly taken in Wine it provokes the terms, helps the bitings of venemous beasts, and dissolves congea­led blood in the body.

Ambergreese is hot and dry in the second degree; I will not dispute the case whether it be a Gum or not: It strengthens nature much which way soever it be taken; there are but few grains usually given of it at a time, I suppose rather for fear it should be too heavy for the purse than too hot for the body; mix­ed with a little Oyntment of Orrenge flowers, and the temples and forehead anointed with it, it easeth the pains of the head and strengthneth the brain ex­ceedingly; the same applied to the privities helps the fits of the mother, inwardly taken it strengthens the brain and memory, the heart and vital Spirit, warms cold stomachs, and is an exceeding: strengthener of nature to old people; adding vigor to decayed and worn-out spirits, it provokes lust, and [...] barren women fruitful, if coldness and [...] or weakness be the cause impediting.

[...] being smelled to, is [...] known to repress the fits of the mother; a little [...] into an aching tooth, presently easeth the pains; ten grains [Page 50] of it taken before dinner walking half an hour after it, provokes appetire, helps digestion, strengthens the stomach, and takes away loathing of meat, it pro­vokes lust exceedingly, and expels wind as much.

Borrax, or Borrace as some cal it, besides its vertues it hath to sodder Gold, Silver, and Copper &c. In­wardly given in smal quantities, it stops fluxes, and the running of the reins; being in fine pouder, and put into green wounds it cures them at ounce dres­sing.

Cambuge, which out of many names, which every Country bestows upon it, the Colledg are pleased to call Gutta Gamba: Authors are extreamly different, both about its being, what is is, whether a juyce or not; If a juyce, of what, and about its operation, whether it work violently or not: for my part I care not for medling with an unknown medicine my self, neither would I advise my Country men.

Caranna outwardly applied, is excellent for aches, and swellings in the nerves and joynts; If you lay it behind the ears, it draws back humors from the eyes, applied to the temples as they usually do Mastich, it helps the tooth-ach.

Gum Elemi Authors apropriate to fractures in the skull and head. See Arceus his Liniment.

Gum Lacca being well purified, and the quantity of half a drachm taken in any convenient liquor, strengthens the stomach and liver, opens obstructi­ons, helps the yellow jaundice and dropsie, provokes urine, breaks the stone in the reins and bladder.

Liquid Amber is not much unlike liquid Styrax; by unction it warms and comforts a cold and moist brain, it easeth all greifs coming of a cold cause; it mightily comforteth and strengtheneth a weak sto­mach, being anointed with it, and helps digestion ex­ceedingly, it dissolves swellings. It is hot in the third degree, and moist in the first.

I think it would do the Common-wealth no harm, if I should speak a word or two of Manna here, al­though it be no Gum; I confess Authors make some flutter about it, what it is, some holding it to be the juyce of a tree; I am confident it is the very same condensated that our honey-dews here are, only the Countryes whence it comes being far hotter it fulls in greater abundance: Let him that desires reasons for it, be pleased but to read Butler his book of Bees, a most excellent experimental work, where he shal find reason enough to satisfie any reasonable man. Chuse the dryest, and whitest, it is a very gentle purger of choller, quencheth thirst, provokes appetite, easeth the roughness of the throat, helps bitterness in the throat, and often proness to vomit; It is very good for such as are subject to be costive to put into their drinks in stead of Sugar, it hath no obnoxious quali­ty at al in it, but may be taken by a woman with child, without any danger, a child of a year old may take an ounce of it at a time, dissolved in milk, it wil melt like Sugar, neither wil it be known from it by the tast.

Mirrh is hot and dry in the second degree, excee ding dangerous for women with child; It is bitter, and yet al Authors hold it to be good for the rough­ness of the throat and wind-pipe; half a drachm of it taken at a time, helps rhewmatick distillations upon the Lungues, pains in the sides, it stops fluxes, pro­vokes the terms, brings away both birth and after­birth, softens the hardness of the womb: being taken two hours before the fit comes, it helps Agues, Malhi­plus saith he seldom used any other medicine for the quartan ague, than a drachm of Mirrh given in Muskadel, an hour before the fit usually came; if you make it up into pills with Treacle, and take one of them every morning fasting; it is a soveraign pre­servative against the pestilence, against the poyson of serpents and other venemous beasts, a singular reme­dy for a stinking breath, if it arise from putrifaction of the stomach, it fastens loose teeth, and staies the shedding off of the hair, outwardly used, it breeds flesh in deep wounds, and covers the naked bones with flesh.

Olibanum is hot in the second degree, and dry in the first: you may take a drachm of it at a time, it stops loosness and the running of the reins, it streng­thens the memory exceedingly, comforts the heart, expels sadness and melancholly, strengthens the heart, helps Coughs, Rhewms, and pleurisies; your best way (in my opinion to take it, is to mix it with conserves of Roses, and take it in the morning fa­sting.)

Tachamacha, is seldom taken inwardly, outward­ly spread upon leather, and applied to the navil, it staieth the fits of the Mother, applied to the side, it mitigates speedily, and in little time quite takes away the pain and windiness of the spleen; the truth is whatsoever ach or swelling proceeds of wind or cold raw humors, I know no better Plaister coming from Beyond Sea then this Gum; it strengthens the brain and memory exceedingly, and stops al such de­fluxions thence, as trouble the eyes, ears or teeth, it helps the gout and Sciatica.

Gum Coopal, and Gum Anime are very like one a­nother, both in body and operation, the former is hard to come by, the last not very easy, it stops de­fluxions from the head, if you persume your Cap with the smoke of it, it helps the headach and Me­grim, strengthens the brain, and therefore the Sin­news.

Gum Tragaganth, which the vulgar call Gum dra­gon, being mixed with pectoral Syrups (which you shall find noted in their propper places,) it helps coughs and hoarceness, salt and sharp distillations up­on the Lungues, being taken with a liquoris stick, being dissolved in sweet Wine, it helps (being drunk) gnawings in the bowels, sharpness and fret­ting of the urine, which causeth excoriations either in the reins or bladder, being dissolved in milk and the eyes washed with it, it takes away wheals and scabs that grow on the eye lids, it is excellent good to be put in pultisses to sodder wounds, especially if the nerves or sinnews be hurt.

Sagapen. dìssolved in juyce of Rue and taken, wonderfully breaks the stone in the bladder, expels the dead child and after-birth, cleers the sight, dissol­ved in Wine and drunk, it helps the cough, and distil­lations upon the Lungues, and the fits of the mo­ther, outwardly in Oyls or Oyntments, it mightily helps such members as are out of joynt or overstret­ched.

Galbanum is of the same operation, and also taken from the same plant, viz. Fennel, Giant.

Gum Arabick, thickneth and cooleth, and cor­recteth Chollerick sharp humors in the body, being dissolved in the white of an Egge well beaten, it helps burnings, and keeps the place from blistering.

Mastich staies fluxes, being taken inwardly any way: Three or four small grains of Mastich swal­lowed down whol at night going to bed, is an excel­lent remedy for pains in the stomach: Being beaten [Page] into pouder, and mixed with conserves of Roses, it strengthens the stomach, stops distillations upon the lungues, staies vomiting and causeth a sweet breath, being mixed with white Wine and the mouth washed with it, it clenseth the gums of corruption, and fasteneth loose teeth.

Frankinsence being used outwardly in the way of a Plaister, heats and binds, being applied to the tem­ples, stops the Rhewms that flows to the eyes, helps green wounds, and fills hollow ulcers with flesh, stops the bleeding of wounds, though the Arteries be cut, being made into an Oyntment with Vineger and Hogs-grease, helps the Itch, burnings, ulcers in the head, pains in the ears, inflamations in womens breasts, commonly called the Ague in the breast; be­ware of taking it inwardly, least it cause madness.

Turpentine is hot in the second degree, it heals softens, it discusseth and purgeth, clenseth the reins, provokes urine.

Styrax Calamitis is hot and dry in the second de­gree, it healeth, mollifieth, and concocteth; being taken inwardly helps the cough, and distillation of the Lungues, hoarceness and losse of voice, helps the hardness of the womb, and provokes the terms; if you take ten grains of it at a time made up in the form of a Pill.

Ammoniacum, hot and dry in the third degree, softens, draws, and heats; being dissolved in Vine­ger, strained and applied plaister-wise, it takes away bunckles and hardness in the flesh, it is one of the best remedies that I know for infirmities of the spleen, being applied to the left side; being made into an Oyntment with Oyl, it is excellent good to anoint the Limbs of such as are weary; a scruple of it being taken in the form of a Pill losens the belly, gives spee­dy delivery to women in travail, helps diseases in the spleen, the sciatica and all pains in the joynts, such as piss blood, and have any humor afflicting their Breast.

Camphire, it is held by al Authority to be cold and dry in the third degree, it is of very thin and subtil parts, insomuch that being beaten into very fine pou­der it will vanish away into the air, being beaten into pouder and mixed with Oyl, and the temples anoin­ted therewith, easeth head aches proceeding of heat, al inflamations whatsoever; the back being anointed with the same, cools the reins, and Seminal Vessels, stops the running of the reins and whites in women, the moderate use of Venery, the like it doth if it be drunk inwardly with Betony Water, take but a smal quantity of it at a time inwardly, it resists poyson and bitings by venemous beasts; outwardly applied as before and the eyes anointed with it, stops hot rhewms that flow thither.

Opopanax purgeth thick flegm from the most re­mote parts of the body, viz. the brain, joynts, hands and feet, the nerves and breast, and strengthens all these parts when they are weak, if the weakness proceed of cold as usually it doth; it helps weakness of the sight, old rotten coughs, and gouts of all sorts, drop­sies, and swellings of the spleen, it helps the strangury and difficulty of making Urine; provokes the terms, and helps all cold afflictions of the womb, have a care you give it not to any women with child. The dose is one drachm at most corrected with a little Mastich, dissolved in Vineger and outwardly applied helps the passions of the Spleen.

In the next place, the Colledg tells you a sowr tale concerning Liquid Juyces and Tears, which are to be kept for present use; Viz.

Colledg. VIneger, Juyce of Citrons, Juyce of sowr Grapes, Orrenges, barberries, Tares of a Birch-tree, Juyce of Chermes, Quinces, Pomegranates, Lemmons, Wood-sorrel, Oyl of unripe Olives, and ripe Olives both new and old, Juyce of red and Damask Roses, Wine, Tares of a Vine.

Culpeper] A The Vertues of most of these may be found in the Syrups, and are few of them used a­lone, unless it be Vineger to make sawce, and Wine to drink.

Then the Colledg tells you there are these things bred of PLANTS, and that every child knows; Viz.

Colledg. AGrick, Jews-ears, the Berries of Cer­mes, the Spungy substance of the Bry­ar, Moss, Viscus Quercinus, Oak Apples.

Culpeper] A. As the Colledg would have you know these, so would I know what the chiefest of them are good for.

Jews-ears boyled in Milk and drunk, helpeth sore Throats: it is the opinion of those that have studied Hermetick Phylosophy, That those things which re­semble any parts of mans body, strengthens those parts of the body they resemble, and help the diseases they are vulgarly incident to, which is an approved truth in this; for as they resemble the Bar of a man, so being boyled in white Wine, and the Wine drunk, and the Jews-ears applied to the Ear outwardly, will help deafness, inflamations, and other infirmities of the Ears.

[Page 52]Moss, is cold, dry, and binding, therefore good for fluxes of all sorts: if you desire to know more of it, I desire you would see my English Physitian.

Our Colledg must have none but Misleto of the Oak used, and what has any body to do to question them for so doing? let the [...] buy only such, and paysawce for it; it is nothing to me; but as for the poor Country man, I can tell him this, and I will tell him but the truth, and am able to prove it when I have done, That one sort of Misleto is as good as another; it helps the [...] sickness, and the convulsions being [...] gathered and used.

Oak Apples: [...] saith if Oak Apples be broken alonder about the time of their withering be­fore they have a hole through them, they contain in them one Living-creature or another, which [...] it be a Fly it signifies War, if a Spider, Pestilence, if a Magget, Murren of beasts, if a Worm, scarcity of Vi­ctuals, if an Ant, plenty of Corn for us; Ple bind no bodies faith to beleeve it, because I never tried it my self; this I say, they are [...] and binding: being boyled in milk and drunk, they stop fluxes and the terms; and being boyled in Vineger, and the body anoynted with the Vineger cures the Itch.

Then the Colledg acquaints you with more wonders, That there are certain Living-Creatures, called

Colledg. BEES, Woodlite, Silkworms, Stoads, Crabs of the River, little Puppy Dogs, Grashoppers, [...], Cathanel, Hedg-hogs, E­mets or Ants, Larks, Swallows, and their yong ones, Hors-leeches, Snails, Earth-worms, Dish-washers or Wagtails, House Sparrows, and Hedg Sparrows, Frogs, Scincus, Land Scorpions, Moles, or Mants, Tortoise of the woods, Tenches, Vipers and Foxes.

Culpeper] A. The part of this crew of Cattel and some others which they have not been pleased to learn may be made beneficial to your sick bodies, be pleased to understand, that

Bees being burnt to ashes, and a Ly made with the ashes, trimly decks a bald head being washed with it.

Snails with [...] on their backs, being first washed from the dirt, then the shels broken, and they boy­led in spring Water, but not [...] at all, for the [...] will sink of it self, and the water drunk for or­dinary drink is a most admirable remedy for a con­sumption, and here by the way I cannot but admire at the simplicity of most Physitians, who prescribe that the snails ought to be purged from their flime either with salt or bran before they be used, which if you do, you take away their vertue, for the reason why they cure a consumption is this, Man being made of the slime of the Earth, the [...] substance recovers him when he is wasted; if you please to eat the Snails when they are boyled you may, for they have a very pleasing tast, & it would be very cunning­ly done of you, if you did so, especially in these hard times, for then would you have meat, drink, and me­dicine all together. Besides this, being [...] and applied to the place they help the gout, draw thorns out of the flesh, and held to the Nose help the blee­ding thereof.

Frogs. It is a vulgar fashion of the Walloons to catch live Frogs and cut off their hinder Legs and fry them and eat them; whether they be good meat or no I know not, but I am sure 'tis a good medicine for the biting of Serpents: An Oyl made of it is ex­cellent good for the stifness of the Tendons, and the falling off of hair.

Before I come to the Compounds, lest any should think I go about to hide from them any thing that might do them good, I have here inserted the living Creatures, and Excrements, &c. in the order the Colledg left them, (for impose them they could not for want of Authority; Alack! alack! the King is dead, and the Colledg of Physitians want power to impose the Turds upon men.) The use of the Fats and Suets, you shel have if you please but to stay til I come to the Oyls and Oyntments; the other which you think not useful for Physick, will serve to laugh at, the reading of them may make you [...], though the smell of them might turn your stomach: My self cannot chuse but smile to think in what part of the Apothecaries Shop the Colledg would have them kept, they had need place them neer the Civit pot.

Therefore consider that the Colledg gave the Apothecaries a Catalogue of what Parts of Living Creatures and Excre­ments they must keep in their Shops. Viz.

Colledg. THE Fat, Grease, or Suet of a Duck, Goose, Ecl, Bare, Herron, Thymallos (if you know where to get it) Dog, Capon, [...], wild Cat, Stork, Coney, Horse, Hedg-hog, Hen, Man, Lyon, Hare, Pike or [...], (if they have any fat I am [...] 'tis worth twelve pence a grain) Wolf, Mouse of the Mountains, (if you can catch them) [...], [...], Serpent, Badger, [...] or [...], Bear, Fox, Vultur (if you can catch them) Album [...], a Dogs Turd, the [...] of a Hare and a Hog, East and West [...], Butter not [...] and salted, stone taken out of a mans Bladder, Vipers [Page 53] flesh, fresh Cheese, Castorium, white, yellow, and vir­gins wax, the Brain of Hares and Sparrows, Crabs claws, the Rennet of a Lamb, Kid, a Hare, and a Calf, and a Horse too (quoth the Colledg:) [They should have put in the Rennet of ah Ass to make a Medicine for their adle brains; the next time they alter their Dispensarory, let them go take council of the But­chers, and allow them a place in their Colledg-Gar­den in Amen-Corner as they have done their learned Alchymist; truly they would have knocked down such an Earor like an Ox, and told them no creatures had Rennets, but only such as sucked: to proceed.] The Heart of a Bullock, a Stag, a Hog, and a Weather; the Horn of an Elk, a Hart, a Rhinocerot, an Unicorn; the skull of a Man, killed by a violent death; a Cocks comb [to hang upon their learned heads] the Tooth of a Bore, an Elephant, and a Sea-horse, Ivory, or Ele­phants Tooth, the skin a Snake hath cast off, the gall of a Hawk, Bullock, a shee Goat, a Hare, a Kite, a Hog, a Bull, a Bear, the cases of Silk-worms, the Li­ver of a Wolf, an Otter, a Frog, Ising-glass, the guts of a Wolf, and a Fox, the milk of a shee Ass, a shee Goat, a Woman, an Ewe, a Heifer, East and West Bezoar, the stone in the head of a Carp, and a Pearch, if there be any stone in an Ox Gall, stone in the Blad­der of a Man, the Jaw of a Pike or Jack, Pearls, the marrow of the Leg of a Sheep, Ox, Goat, Stag, Calf, common and virgin Honey, Musk, Mummy, a Swal­lows nest, Crabs eyes, the Omentum or Call of a Lamb, Ram, Weather, Calf, the whites, yolks, and shells of Hens Egs, Emets Egs, bone of a Stags Heart, an Ox Leg, Ossepiae, the inner skin of a Hens Gizzard, the Wool of Hares, the feathers of Partridges, that which Bees make at the entrance of the Hive [to keep out cold if they make any thing at all, for I assure you I could never find any yet, and have been a diligent searcher after it] the pizzle of a Stag, of a Bull, Fox Lungues, fasting spittle, the blood of a Pidgeon, of a Cat, of a hee Goat, of a Hare, of a Partridg, of a Sow, of a Bull, of a Badger, of a Snail, [they might have been a little plainer; Testudo, which is their word, signifies any shell-fish, as also snails that have shels on their backs; any thing will serve to cheat the peo­ple with] Silk, Whey, the suet of a Bullock, of a Stag, of a hee Goat, of a Sheep, of a Heiser, Sperma [...], a Bullocks Spleen, the skin a Snake hath cast off, the Turds of a Goose, of a Dog, of a Goat, of Pidgeons, of a stone-horse, of a Hen, of Swallows, of Men, of Women, of Mice, of Peacocks, of a Hog, of a Heiser, the Ancle of a Hare, of a Sow, Cobwebs, Water shels, as Blatta Bizantia, Buccinae, Crabs, Cockles, Dentalis, Entalis, mother of Pearl, Mytuli purpurae, Os sepiae, Umbilicus, Marinus, the stones of a Horse, of a Cock, the hoof of an Elk, of an Ass, of a Bullock, of a Horse, of a Lyon, the piss of a Bore, of a shee Goats of a Man or Woman that is a Maid, and that is not a Maid, the Moss on a Mans skull, Zibeth.

Culpeper] A. The Liver of a Hedg-hog being dried and beaten into pouder and drunk with Wine, strengthens the Reins exceedingly, and helps the dropsie, convulsions, and the Falling-sickness, toge­ther with all fluxes of the Bowels.

The Liver being in like manner brought into pou­ders strengthens the Liver exceedingly, and helps the dropsie.

The Heart of a Frog being applied to the Region of the Heart in a burning Feaver, mitigates the fits to admiration.

The Heart of a Lark being bound to the Thigh of those that have the Chollick, helps them; it doth the like also, being eaten.

Then the Colledge tells you these things may be ta­ken from the SEA, As

Coll. AMber-greese, Sea water, Sea sand, Bitu­men, Amber, white and yellow, Jet, Ca­rallinae, Corral white and red, Fome of the Sea, Spunge stone, Pumice, Sea salt, Spunges, Amber.

METTALS, STONES, SALTS, and other MINERALS.

VErt-de-greese, scales of Brass, Aetitis, Alana Terra, Alabaster, Alectorious, Allum Scisile and Roch, Amethist, Amianth, Ampheliles, Antimony, Leaves and filings of Silver, Quick-silver, Lapis Ar­menius, native Arsenick, both white and red, artifieial Arsnick, white and realgar, Argilla, Asteria, Leaves and filings of Gold, Belemnites, Beril, Bole-armenick, Borax, Toads-stone, Lapis Calaminaris, Cadmia, Lime quick and quenched, Vitriol, white, blew, and green, Steel, Borax [...], Crysopus, Cinabaris, na­tive and artificial, whetstones, Chalk white and green, Cristal, Diphriges, the rust, dust, scales, and flakes of Iron, Granate, Morter, such as walls are daubed with, Hematites, Heliotropium, Jacinth, Hibernicus, Jas­per, Lapis Judaicus, Tiles, Lapis Lazuli, Lapis Lin­cis, [...], Litharge of Silver and Gold, Load­stone, Marchasite, or fire-stone, Marble, red Lead, na­tive and artificial; Myst, Naphtha, Lapis Nephriti­cus, Niter, Oaker, yellow and red, Onyx, Opalus, O­phytes, Osteocolla, Lead white and black, Plumbago, Pompholix, Marchasite realgar, Ruby, red Oaker, Sal Armoniack, Sal Gem, and Sal Niter, Saphir and Sardine, Selenites, Flints, Emerald, Smiris, Sori, Spodium, Peuter, Brimstone quick and common, Talch, Earth of Cimolia, Samos, Lemnos, Sylesia, Topas, A­lana Terra, Tutty, Vitriol, white, blew, and green.

When the ground of our institution required us, then one to one simple, and sometimes to repeat them in diverse places, it pleased us to note those that are iterated in a different Character, lest we should seem to make a needless repetition, or in­crease our Catalogue for vain glory sake.

Well said Colledg.

Culpeper] A. Also I repeated them twice or thrice when they did, & caused them to be set down in a dif­ferent Letter; also I hope it will make to my honor and not to my disgrace to imitate such a learned Col­ledg of Physicians.

Of some precious stones I spake before in the for­mer Edition; I shall here reduce them all into order, and treat of such as were casually there omitted: whe­ther they were mentioned by the Colledg or no it matters nothing to me.

Precious Stones alter by a way ma­nifest or hidden.

By a way manifest, they are

Hot in the first degree.

Hemetites, Pyrites, Lapis Asius, Thyites, Smyres, Lapis Schistus.

Precious Stones cold, are in the first degree.

Jacinth, Saphir, Emerald, Cristal, Lapis Samius, Lapis Phrygius.

In the second degree.

Ruby, Carbuncle, Granate, Sardony.

In the fourth degree.

Diamond.

In respect of property, they bind, as Lapis Asius, Nectius, Geodes, Pumice-stone.

Emollient, as

Alabaster, Jet, Lapis Thrasius.

Stupifie, as

Memphites, Jasper, Ophites.

Clense, as

Lapis Arabicus.

Glutinate, as

Galactites, Melites.

[...], as

Morochtus.

Break the stone, as

Lapis Lyncis, Lapis Judaicus, Lapis Sponge.

Retain the fruit in the Womb, as Aetites, Jasper.

Provoke the Terms.

Ostracites.

Stones altering by a hidden proper­ty (as they call it) Are

[...], Topas, Lapis Colubrinus, Toad-stone, Emerald, Alectorius, Calcidonius, Amethist, Saphit, Jasper, Lapis Nephriticus, Lapis Tibernum, Lapis Spongites, the Stone found in the Maw of a Swal­low, Load-stone, Lapis Vulturis, Merlucius, Corral, Lynturius, Jet, Aetites, the stones of Crabs, Amber, Cristal, &c.

The Load-stone purgeth gross humors.

Lapis Armenius, and Lapis Laxuli, purge Melan­cholly.

To speak a word or two of those which were then pretermitted.

A Water-Snake, a string being thrust through her tail, and she hung up, a Vessel full of Water being set underneath, into which she may put her Head; afterHollerius. certain hours, or dayes, she will vomit up a Stone, which being received in the vessel full of water will drink it all up, which being bound to the Navil of one that hath the Dropsie, drinks up all the water.

Lapis Calcidonius, being hung about the neck, helps those melancholly illusions, and melancholly fancies.

In the Indian Sea, are taken certain strong fighting Fish, called Tyburones; in the Heads of which, areNicholam [...]. found three or four Stones, sometimes more, very white, great and ponderous, insomuch, that sometimes they weigh two pound: The pouder of this Stone is very profitable for such as are troubled with the Stone and difficulty of Urine, breaks the stone in the Reins and Bladder.

Blood-stone is a kind of Jasper of diverse colors, [...]. with red spots in it like blood, stops the Terms and bleeding in any part of the Body.

Hemetites stops blood, the Eyes being often stro­ken with it, helps bloodshed; being beaten into pou­derDiosco­rides. and taken inwardly provokes urine and stops the Terms.

Pyrites, heats and clenseth, takes away dimness ofDiosco­rides. sight.

Lapis Asius binds, and moderately corrodes and elenseth filthy ulcers, and fills them up with flesh; be­ing mixed with Honey, and applied to the place, is an admirable remedy for the Gout.

Christal being beaten into very fine pouder, and a [...] drachm of it taken at a time helps the bloody-flux, stops the whites in women, and increaseth milk in Nurses.

Lapis Samius is cooling and binding, it is very comfortable to the stomach, but it dulls the Sences,Diosco­rides. helps Fluxes of the Eyes and Ulcers: Dioscorides held that it was little inferior to Lapis Aetites in all his vertues.

That which comes off from a Whetstone of Cy­press by whetting, helps baldness; being taken inward­ly with Vineger consumes the Spleen and helps the falling-sickness.

Geodetes binds and dries; being beaten into pou­der and mixed with water, and applied to the place, takes away inflamations of the Testicles.

Pumice-stone being beaten into pouder and theDiosco­rides. teeth rubbed with it, clenseth them.

Jet, it is of a softening and discussing nature, it resisteth the fits of the Mother.

Lapis Memphites: Dioscorides saith, that if it be beaten to pouder and made into an Oyntment, and the part of a man which is to be cut off anointed with it, it takes away the sence of it without any danger.

Lapis Ophites: some of these stones have white lines in them; these are an admirable remedy both for Head-ach and Lethargy; all of them being born about one help the Head-ach, and the biting of Ser­pents.

Lapis Arabicus being beaten into pouder and made into an Oyntment, helps the Hemorrhoids.

Ostrocites, a drachm of it taken in pouder pro­vokesDiosco­rides. the terms, being taken after that purgation causeth conception; also being made into an Oynt­ment helps inflamations of the breasts.

Lapis [...] is an admirable stone of the Moon; the Women in Germany wear them as [...] because they would be fruitful; they cure the falling-sickness, and being bound to trees make them fruitful.

Lapis Amianthus being born about one helps suchDiosco­rides. as are bewitched.

Myexis being born about one takes away pains in [...]. the reins and hinders the breeding of the stone.

Lapis Armenius purgeth Melancholly, and also causeth vomiting, I hold it not very [...] for our English bodies, and therefore I will speak no more of it.

[...]

An Explanation of certain Uncupations, comprehen­ding more things than one under one name.

The five opening Roots.

Smallage, Sparagus, Fennel, Parsly, Kneeholly.

The two epening Roots.

Fennel, Parsly.

The five emollient Herbs.

Marsh-mallows or Mallows, Beets, Mercury, Pelli­tory of the wall, Violet Leaves.

The five Capillary Herbs.

Maidenhair, Wall-rue, Cetrach, Harts-tongue, Po­litricum.

The four Cordial Flowers.

Borrage, Bugloss, Roses, Violets.

The four greater hot Seeds, Carminative, or breaking wind.

Annis, Caraway, Cummin, Fennel.

The four lesser hot Seeds.

Bishopsweed, Amomus, Smallage, Carrots.

The four greater cold Seeds.

Citrul, Cucumer, Guord, Melone.

The four lesser cold Seeds.

Succory, Endive, Lettice, Purslain.

Five fragments of precious Stones.

Granate, Jacinth, Saphire, Sardine, Emerald.

Culpeper] A. I was the more willing to quote these again, although they be almost the same in their former Dispensatory; 1. Because this is all the good the Learned Colledg hath done their Country, in this their refined Master-piece; namely, To tell them that such and such Roots are opening, such and such Flowers Cordial, or strengthening to the heart, such and such Seeds break wind, &c. and if any should be so bold as to object against a whol Colledg of learned Physitians, That they did the generality of the Common-wealth no good at all, because they wrote it in Latin, which is a Language understood but by few; it were easily answered, They did it in Latin to animate people to bring up their children to learning, which is a thing I wish from my heart were done; what the Colledg doth, I know not.

2. Because they have here left out some Oyntments, the use of which they would not have the Chyrurgi­ans know, (the most part of which are no Scholars, (the more is the pity) and that they know well e­nough) it were a brave trick if they could catch old birds with chaff.

KIND READERS,

THE Right VVorshipful, the Colledg of Physitians of London in their new Dispensatory, give you free leave to distill these common VVaters that follow, but they never intended you should know what they are good for.

SIMPLE DISTILLED WATERS.

Of Fresh Roots of

BRiony, Onions, Alicampane, Orris, or Flower-de­luce, Turneps.

Of Flowers and Buds of

Southernwood, both sorts of Wormwood, Wood-sor­rel, Ladies-Mantle, Marsh-mallows, Angelica, Pim­pernel with purple flowers, Smallage, Columbines, Sparagus, Mousear, Borrage, Shepheards-purse, Ca­laminth, wood-bine or Honey-suckles, Carduus Bene­dictus, our Ladies thistles, Knotgrass, Succory, Dra­gons, Coltsfoot, Fennel, Goats-rue, Grass, Hysop, Let­tice, Lovage, Toadflax; Hops; [...]; Mallows; Horehound; Feathersew; Bawm; Mints; Horsemints; Water-cresses; English Tobacco; white Poppies; Pelli­tory of the wall; Parsly; Plantane: [...]: Self-heal: Penyroyal: Oak Leaves: Sage: Scabious: Figwort or Throatwort: Housleek or [...]: the greater and les­ser: Mother of Time: Nightshade: Tansie: [...]: Valerian

Of Flowers of

Orrenges [if you can get them] Blew-bottle the greater: Beans: Water-lillies: Lavender: Nut-tree: Cowslips: Sloes: Rosemary: Roses, white [...] and red: Satyrion: Line-tree: Clove-gilliflowers: Violets.

Of Fruits of

Orrenges: black cherries: [...]: Quinces: Cucumers: Strawberries: Winter Cherries: Lemmons: Rasberries: unripe Walnuts: Apples.

Of parts of living creatures and their Excrements.

Lobsters: [...], [...] Snails:I know not which their word signifies, Cockles, Snails, Peruinkls, and al such shel-fish: As their former word wch I transla­ted Lob­sters, sig­nifies Crabs as well as Lobstars, & I could afford to think they intend ri­ver Crabs here, by 2 or 3 letters of a word, wch they ad at the latter end of it, it be­ing usual with Phy­sitians be­cause they cannot write true latin to a­breviate thir words by the middle, that so a man can neither tel what gen­der nor what case they are of. [...]: Bullocks dung made in May: Swallows: Earthworms: Mag­pies: spawm of Frogs.

SIMPLE WATERS DISTILLED being digested beforehand.

Of the fresh Roots of Nettles. Of the Leaves of

Agrimony: Wild Tansie, or Silverweed, Mugwort, Betony, Marigolds, Chamomel, Chamepitis, Sullon­dine, Pilewort, Scurvy — grass, Comfry the greater, Dan­delyon, Ashtree leaves, Eyebright, Fumitory; Alehoof or ground Ivy, Horstail, St. Johns wort, Yarrow, Moneywort, Restharrow, Solomons seal, Ros solis, Rue, Savin, Saxifrage, Hartstongue, Scordium, Ta­maris, Mullin, Vervain, Pauls Betony, Mead sweet, Nettles.

Of the Flowers of

Mayweed: Broom: Cowslips: Butter-bur: Peony: Elder.

Of the Berries of

Broom, Elder.

Culpeper] A. Then the Colledg gives you an Ad­monition concerning distilling these (such a one as it is) which being converted into your native language, is as followeth.

[Page 59] We give you warning that these common waters be better prepared for time to come, either in common stills, putting gaod store of Ashes underneath, the Roots and Herbs being dryer, &c. Or if they be full of Juyce, by I know whomthey may thank for this way of di­stillation. distilling the Juyce in aconvenient Bath, that so burning may be avoided, which hitherto hath seldom been: But let the other Herbs, Flowers, or Roots, be bruised, and by adding Tartar, common Salt, or Leven, be di­gested, then putting spring water to them: distill them in an Alembick with his refrigeratory, or Worm, till the change of the tast shew the vrtue to be drawn off, then let the Oyl (if any be) be seperated from the Water ac­cording [...].

Into the number of these Waters may be ascribed, The Teares of Vines, The Liquor of the birch tree, May dew.

Culpeper] A. That my Country may receive the be­nefit of these Waters: I shall first shew the Tempera­tures, secondly, the vertu es of the most usual & most easie to come by: If any should take exceptions that I mention not all (for itis imposible to write to please every body) I answer first I me ntion enough, se­condly; Who ever makes this objection, they shew extream ingratitude, for had I mentioned but only one; I had revealed more to them than ever the Col­ledg intended they should know, or con me thanks for doing, but the best is, I respect their love, and fear their hatred much at one.

The quallities and apropriati­on of the simple distilled Waters.

Simple distilled Waters either cool or heat; Such as cool, either cool the blood or Choller.

Waters cooling the blood.

Lettice, Purslain, Water-Lillies, Violets, Sorrel, Endive, Succory, Fumitory.

Waters cooling and repressing chollerick humors, or vapors in the head.

Nightshade, Lettice, Water-Lillies, Plantane, Pop­pies, viz. The flowers both of white, black, and red Poppies, black Cherries.

The breast and lungues

Violets, Poppies all three sorts, Colts-foot.

In the heart.

Sorrel, Quinces, Water-Lillies, Roses, Violets, green or unripe Walnuts.

In the stomach.

Quinces, Roses, Violets, Nightshade, Housleek, or Sengreen, Lettice, Purslain.

In the River.

Endivc, Succory, Nightshade, Purslain, Water Lil­lies.

In the Reins and bladder.

Endive, Succory, winter Cherries, Plantane, Wa­ter-Lillies, Strawberries, Housleek: or Sengreen, black Cherriea.

In the Womb.

Endive: Succory, Lettice, Water-Lillies, Purslain, Roses.

Simple Waters which are hot, concoct either flegm or Melancholly.

Waters concocting flegm in the Head are of:

Betony, Sage, Marjoram, Chamomel, Fennel, Ca­laminth, Rosemary flowers, Primroses, Eye-bright.

In the Breast and Lungues.

Maidenhair, Betony, Hysop, Hore-hound, Cardu­us Bnedictus, Scabious, Orris, or Flower-de-luces Bawm, Self-heal, &c.

In the heart.

Bawm, Rosemary.

In the stomach.

Wormwood, Mints, Fennel, Chervil, Time, mo­ther of Time, Marigolds.

In the Liver.

Wormwood: Centaury: Origanum; Marjoram: Maudlin: Costmary; Agrimony: Fennel.

In the Spleen.

Water-cresses: Wormwood: Calaminth.

In the reins and bladder.

Rocket: Nettles: [...]: Pellitory of the wall: Alicampane: Burnet.

In the Womb.

Mugwort: Calaminth: Peny-royal: Savin: mother of Time: Lovage.

Waters concocting Melancholly in the head: are of

Hops: Fumitory.

The Breast.

Bawm: Carduus Benedictus.

The Heart

Borrage: Bugloss: Bawm: Rosemary.

The Liver.

Endive, Cichory, Hops.

The Spleen,

Dodder: Harts-tongue: Tamaris: Time.

Having thus ended the apropriation, I shall speak breifly of the vertues of distilled Waters.

Lettice Wat er cools the blood when it is overhea­ted, for when it is not, it needs no cooling, it cools the head and Liver, staies hot vapors ascending to the head, and hi ndring sleep, it quencheth immoderate thirst, and breeds milk in nurses. Distill it in May.

Purslain Water cools the blood and Liver, quench­eth thirst, helps such as spit blood, have hot coughs or pestilences.

The distilled Water of water Lilly-Flowers, cools the blood and the bowels, and al internal parts of the body, helps such as have the yellow Jaundice, hot coughs or pleuresies, the headach coming of heat, feavers pestilential, and not pestilential, as also he­ctick feavers.

The Water of Violet flowers, cools the blood, the heart, Liver, and Lungnes overheated, and quencheth an insatiable desire of drinking; they are in their prime about the latter end of March, or begining of A­pril, according as the year fals out.

The Water of Sorrel cools ths blood, heart, Liver, and spleen; if Venis Treacle be given with it, it is pro­fitable in pestilential feavers; distil it in May.

Endive and Succory Water, are excellent against heat in the stomach; If you take an ounce of either (for their operation is the same) morning and even­ing four daies one after another, they cool the Li­ver, and clense the blood; they are in their prime in May.

Fumitory Water is usual with the City Dames, to [Page 60] wash their faces with, to take away morphew freckles, and Sunburning, inwardly taken it helps the yellow Jaundice, and Itch, clenseth the blood, provokes sweat, strengthens the stomach, and clenseth the body of adust humors, It is in its prime in May and June.

The Water of Nightshade helps pains in the head coming of heat; take heed you distill not the deadly Nightshade instead of the common, if you do, you may make mad work; let such as have not wit enough to know them asunder, have wit enough to let them both alone til they do.

The Water of white Poppies extinguisheth al heat [...] nature, helps headaches coming of heat, and too long standing in the Sun: Distil them in June or July.

Colts-foot Watar is excellent for burns to wash the place with it, inwardly taken it helps Phthisicks, and other diseases incident to the lungues; Distil them in May or June.

The Water of distilled Quinces strengthens the heart and stomach exceedingly, staies vomiting, and fluxes, and strengthens the retentive faculty in man.

Demask Rose-water, cools, comsorts, and streng­thens the heart; so doth red Rose-water, only with this difference, the one is binding, the other loosening, if your body be costive, use Damask Rose-water, be­cause it is loosening, if loose, use red, because it is binding.

White Rose-water is generally known to be excel­lent against hot rhewms, and inflamations in the eyes, and for this it is better than the former.

The Water of Red Poppy flowers, called by many Corn-roses, because they grow so freequently amongst corn, cool the blood, and spirits overheated by drin­king or labor, and is therefore excellent for surfets.

Green Walnuts gathered about the latter end of June, or beginning of July, and bruiled, and so stil­led, strengthens the heart, and resisteth the pestilence.

Plantane Water helps the headach, being dropped into the ear; it helps the toothach, helps the Phthi­sick, dropsie, and fluxes, and is an admirable remedy for [...] in the reins and bladder, to be used as com­mon drink: the herb is in its prime in May.

Strawberry Water cooleth, quencheth thirst, clari­fieth the blood, breaks the stone, helps al inward in­flamations, especially those in the reins, bladder, and passages of the urine, it strengthens the Liver, and helps the yellow Jaundice.

The distilled Water of Dog-grass, or couch-grass as some cal it, clenseth the [...] gallantly, and provokes urine, opens [...] of the Liver and spleen, and kils worms.

Black Cherry Water, provokes urine, helps the dropsie; It is usually given in diseases of the brain, as convulsions, falling sickness, palsey, and Apople­xy.

Betony is in its prime in May; the distilled Wa­ter thereof is very good for such as are pained in their heads, it prevails against the dropsie, and al sorts of feavers, it succors the Liver and spleen, and helps want of digestion, and evil disposition of the body thence arising, it hastens travail in women with child, and is excellent against the bitings of venemous beasts.

Distil Sage whilest the slowers be on it; the Wa­ter strengthens the brain, provokes the terms, helps nature much in al its actions

Marjoram is in its prime in June; the distilled Water, is excellent for such whose brains are too cold, it provokes urine, heats the womb, provokes the terms, strengthens the memory, and helps the judg­ment, causeth an able brain, and therefore I com­mend it to the Colledg of Physitians.

Distil Chamomel Water about the beginning of June: It easeth the chollick and pains in the belly, it breaks the stone in the reins and bladder, provokes the terms, expels the dead child, and takes away pains in the head.

Fennel water strengthens the heart and brain, di­lates the breast, helps the cough, provokes the terms, encreaseth milk in nurses, and if you wash your eyes with it, it cleers the sight.

Calaminth Water, hea ts and clenseth the womb, pro­vokes the terms, and easeth the pains of the head; distil it in May.

The Distilled water of Rosemary slowers, helps such as are troubled with the yellow Jaundice, Asth­ma; it clenseth the blood, helps concoction, streng­thens the brain and body exceedingly.

Waters of the flowers of Lillies of the valley, streng­thens the brain and all the sences.

The water [...] Cowslip flowers, helps the palsey, and thence they obtained the name [Paralysis] takes away pains in the head, the vertigo, and megrim, and are exceeding good for women with child.

The eyes being washed every morning with Eye­bright water, most strangely cleers and strengthens the sight.

Maidenhair distilled in May, the water clenseth both Liver and Lungues, clarifies the blood, and break the stone.

Hysop water clenseth the Lungues of flegm, helps Coughs, and Asthmaes; distill it in August.

The water of Hore-hound, helps the Cough, and straitness of the breast, it strengthens the breast, Lun­gues, and stomach, and Liver; distil it in June.

Carduus water succors the head, strengthens the memory, helps such as are troubled with vertigoes, and quartan agues, it provokes sweat, strengthens the heart, and is good in pestilences, and all other feavers of choller; it is in its prime in May and June.

Scabious water, helps pleuresies, and pains, and prickings in the sides, Apostthemes, Coughs, pesti­lence, and straitness of the breast.

Water of Flower-de-luce, is very profitable in drop­sies, an ounce being drnnk continually, morning and evening, as also pains and torments in the bowels.

Bawm water distilled in May, restores memory when it is lost, it quickens al the sences, strengthens the brain, heart, and stomach, causeth a merry mind, and a sweet breath.

The water of Comfry sodders broken bones, being drunk helps ruptures, outwardly it stops the bleeding of wounds, they being washed with it.

Wormwood water distilled cold, about the end of May, heats and strengthens the stomach, helps con­coction, staies vomiting, kills worms in the stomach, and bowels, it mitigates the pains in the teeth, and is profitably given in feavers of Choller.

Mint water strengthens the stomach, helps concocti­on and [...] vomiting; distil it in the latter end of May, or beginning of June, as the year is in forward­ness, or backwardness; observe that in all the rest.

Chervil water distilled about the end of May, helps ruptures, breaks the stone, dissolves congealed blood, strengthens the heart and stomach.

The water of Mother of Time strengthens the [Page 61] brain and stomach, gets a man a good stomach to his victuals, provokes urine, and the terms, heats the womb; it is in its prime about the end of June.

The water of Marigold flowers, is apropriated to most cold diseases of the head, Eyes, and stomach; they are in their vigor when the Sun is in the Li­on.

Distilled water of Centaury, comforts a cold sto­mach, helps in feavers of choller, which the Greeks [...] [...], and [...] it kills worms, and provokes appetite to victuals.

Maudlin and Costmary water distilled in May, or June, strengthens the Liver, helps the yellow [...], opens obstructions, and helps the dropsie.

Water-cresses distilled in March, the water clenseth the blood, and provokes [...] exceedingly, kils worms, outwardly mixed with Honey, it cleers the skin of morphew and Sunburning.

Distil Nettles when they are in flower, the water helps coughs, and pains in the bowels, provokes u­rine, and breaks the stone.

Saxifrage water provokes urine, expels wind, breaks the stone, clenseth the reins and bladder of gravel; di­stil them when they are in flower.

The water of Pellitory of the wal, opens obstru­ctions of the Liver and Spleen, by drinking an ounce of it every morning, it clenseth the reins and blad­der, and easeth the gripings of the howels coming of wind; distil it in the end of May, or beginning of June.

Sinkfoyl water breaks the stone, clenseth the reins, and is of excellent use in putrified feavers; distil it in May.

The water of Radishes, breaks the stone, clenseth the reins and bladder, provokes the terms, and helps the yellow Jaundice.

Alicampane water strengthens the stomach and Lungues, provokes urine, and clenseth the passages of it from gravel.

Distil Burnet in May or June; the water breaks the stone, clenseth the passages of urine, and is exceeding profitable in pestilential times.

Mugwort water distilled in May, is excelleut in coughs, and diseases proceeding from stoppage of the terms in women, it warms the stomach, and helps the dropsie.

Distil Peny-royal when the flowers are upon it; the water heats the womb gallantly, provokes the terms, expels the Afterbirh, cuts, and casts out thick and gross humors in the breast, easeth pains in the bo­wels, and consumes flegm.

The water of Lovage distilled in May, easeth pains in the head, and tures ulcers in the womb being washed with it, inwardly taken it expels wind, and breaks the stone.

The tops of Hops when they are young, being di­stilled; the water clenseth the blood of addust and melancholly humors, and therefore helps Scabs, Itch, and leprosie, and such like diseases thence proceeding, it open obstructions of the spleen, helps the rickets, and Hypocondriack melancholly.

The water of Borrage and Bugloss, distilled when their flowers are upon them, strengthen the heart and brain exceedingly, clense the blood, and takes away sadness, greife, and melancholly.

Doddar water clenseth the Liver and spleen, helps the yellow jaundice.

Tamaris water opens the obstructions, and helps the hardness of the spleen, and strengthens it.

English Tobacco distilled; the water is excellent good for such as have dropsies, to drink an ounce or too every morning, it helps ulcers in the mouth, strengthens the Lungues, and helps such as have Asth­maes.

The water of Dwarffe Elder hath the same effects.

Thus have you the vertues of enough of cold wa­ters, the use of which is for mixtures of other medi­cines, whose operation is the same, for they are very seldom given alone; if you delight most in liquid medicines, having regard to the disease, and part of the body afflicted by it, these will furnish you with, where withal to make them, so as will please your pal­lat best.

COMPOUNDS.

SPIRITS and COMPOND DISTILLED WATERS.

Culpeper] A. BEfore I begin these, I thought good to premise a few words: They are all of them hot in operation, and therefore not to be medled with by people of hot Constituti­ons, when they are in health for fear of Feavers, and adustion of blood; but for people of cold constitu­tions, as Melancholly and Flegmatick people. If they drink of them moderately now and then for re­creation, due consideration being had to the part of the body which is weakest, they may do them good; yet in diseases of melancholly, neither strong Waters nor Sack is to be drunk, for they make the [...] thin, and then up to the head it flies, where it fills the brain with foolish and fearful imagina­tions.

2. Let all yong people forbear them whilst they are in health, for their blood is usually hot enough without them.

3. Have regard to the season of the year, so shall you find them more beneficial in Summer than in in Winter, because in Summer the body is alwaies coldest within, and digestion weakest, and that is the reason why men and women eat less in Summer than they do in Winter.

Thus much for people in health, which drink strong waters for recreation.

As for the Medicinal use of them, it shall be shewed at the [...] end of every Receipt; only in general they are (due respect had to the humors afflicting, and part of the body afflicted) medicinal for disea­ses of cold, and flegm, chilliness of the spirits &c.

But that my Country men may not be mistaken in this, I shall give them some Symptoms of each Com­plexion, how a man may know when it exceeds its due [...].

Signs of Choller abounding.

Leaness of body, costiveness, hollow eyes, anger without a cause, a testy disposition, yellowness of the [...] bitterness in the [...] pains in the [...] the pulse [...] and stronger [...] ordinary; the [...] higher colourd, thinner and brighter; trou­blesom sleeps; much dreaming of fire; lightning; an­ger and fighting.

Signs of Blood abounding.

The Veins are bigger (or at least they seem so) and fuller than ordinary; the skin is red, and as it were swollen; pricking pains in the sides and about the temples; shortness of breath; headach; the pulse great and full; urine high coloured and thick; dreams of blood &c.

Signs of Melancholly abounding.

Fearfulness without a cause, fearful and [...] imaginations, the skin rough and [...], [...], want of sleep, frightful dreams, [...] in the throat, the pulse very weak, solitariness, thin [...] urine, often sighing &c.

Signs of Flegm abounding.

Sleepiness, dulness, slowness, heaviness, cowardli­ness, forgetfulness, much spitting, much [...] at the [...], little appetite to meat, and as bad [...], the skin whiter, colder and smoother than it was wont to be, the pulse flow and deep, the urine thick and low colored, dreams of rain, flouds, and water &c.

These things thus premised I come to the matter.

The first the Colledg presents you with, is

Spiritus et Aqua Absinthii minus Composita. Pag. 30. Or, Spirit and Water of Wormwood the lesser Composition.

The Colledg] Take of the Leaves of You may take what Worm­wood you pleas; what care they so they get money, they have their de­sire. dried Wormwood two pound; Annis seeds half a pound; steep them in six gallons of small Wines twenty four hours, then [...] them in an Allembick, [...] to e­very [...] of the [...] water two [...] Sugar.

Let the two first pound you draw out be called Spirit of Wormwood; those which follow, Wormwood Wa­ter the lesser Composition.

Culpeper] A. I like this distinction of the Col­ledges very well, because what is first stilled out is far stronger than the rest, and therefore very fitting to be kept by it self, you may take which you please, ac­cording as the temperature of your body, either to heat or cold, and the season of the yeer requires.

A. It hath the same vertues Wormwood hath, only fitter to be used by such whose bodies are chilled by age, and whose natural heat abateth. You may search the Herb for the vertues; it heateth the stomach and helpeth digestion.

The Colledg] After the same manner (only omit­ting the Annis seeds) is distilled Spirit and water of Angelica, both Herb and Root; [...], Mints, Sage &c. The Flowers of Rosemary Clary, Clove-gilli flowers &c. the seeds of Caraway &c. [...] berries, [...] pils, Lemmons, Citrons &c. [...], Nutmegs &c.

Culpeper] A. I would some body (that knows their conditions) would do but so much as ask the Colledg what the meaning of all these et caetera's is.

Spiritus et Aqua Absynthii magis composita. Pag. 30. Or, Spirit and Water of Wormwood the greater Composition.

The Colledg] Take of common and Roman Worm­wood, of each a pound; Sage, Mints, Bawm, of each two handfuls; the roots of Galanga, Ginger, Cala­mus Aromaticus, Alicampane, of each three drams; Liquor is an ounce, Raisons of the Sun stoned three oun­ces; Annis seeds and sweet Fennel seeds, of each three drachms, Cinnamon, Cloves, Nutmegs, of each two drachms; Cardamoms, Cubebs, of each one drachm: Let the things be cut that are to be cut, and the things bruised that are to be bruised; all of them infused in twenty four pints of Spanish Wines for twenty four hours, then distilled in an Allembick, ad­ding two ounces of white Sugar to every pint of distil­led water.

Let the first pint be called Spirit of Wormwood the greater composition.

Culpeper] A. In this Receipt they have only in their new Master-piece, left out According to Art, and I commend them, for sure it was advisedly done of them not to write of what they never had.

A. The Opinion of Authors, is, That it heats the stomach, and strengthens it and the lungues, ex­pels wind, and helps digestion in ancient people.

Spiritus et Aqua Angelicae magis composita. Page 31. Or, Spirit and Water of Angelica the greater Composition.

The Colledg] Take of theI bid thē say Leaves in my last Edition. Leaves of Angelica eight ounces, of [...] ounces, of Bawm and Sage, of each sour ounces; Angelica seeds six ounces; sweet Fennel seeds nine ounces: Let the Herbs being dried and the seeds be grosly bruised, to which ad of the Species called Aromaticum Rosatum, and of the Species called Diamoschu Dulce, of each an ounce and an [...]; infuse them two daies in thirty two pints of Spanish Wine; then distil them with a gentle fire (according to that art which we never had) and with every pound mix two ounces of Sugar dissol­ved in Rose water.

Let the three first pound be called by the name of Spi­rit, the rest by the name of Water.

Culpeper] A This Receipt was far different from that Angelica water which they prescribed in their last Dispensatory; I could at first imagine no reason worth the quoting, unless it were done to make it dearer, as who should say, seeing the common people cannot be kept from knowing the vertues of what we have so long monopolized into our own hands, through the iniquity of the times in abolishing King­ly Government, which was the only [...] we had to lean upon; yet will we to work again, and leave ne­ver a stone unturned that may uphold us in our pride and unconscionable domineering: and though we cannot write but it will be translated into such a lan­guage as will be in the reach [...] the [...] brain, yet will we wind the business so high, that it shall be out of the reach of his purse; this I thought to be the plain English of it: yet afterward I found, that their former Dispensatory had a water called Cordial Wa­ter, which here shouldered out, Angelica Water, and having got into its place, stole its name. Pray do but so much as tell what good it doth the vulgar for you to change the names of Medicines: I [...] a Rat, a new trick to cheat the world.

A. The chief end of composing this Medicine, was to strengthen the heart, and [...], and therefore is very wholsom in pestilential times, and for such as walk in stinking airs.

I shall now quote you their former Receipt in [...] former Dspensatory.

Angellica water the greater Composition.

The Colledg] Take of Take the Leaves. Angellica two pound, An­nis seeds half a pound, Coriander and [...] away seeds, of each four ounces, Zedoary bruised, three ounces, steep them twenty four hours in six gallons of [...] Wines, then draw out the Spirits, and sweeten it with Sugar.

Culpeper] A. It comforts the heart, cherisheth the vital Spirits, resisteth the pestilence, and al corrupt airs, which indeed are the natural causes of al Epidi­mical diseases; the sick may take a spoonful of it in any convenient cordial, and such as are in health, and have bodies either cold by nature, or cooled by age, may take as much either in the morning fasting, or a little before meat.

Spiritus Lavendulae compositus. [...]. Pag. 31. Or, [...] Spirit of Lavender. Matthias.

The Colledg] Take of Lavender flowers one gal­lon, to which pour three gallons of the best Spirit of Wine, let them stand together in the Sun six daies, then destil them with an [...] with his refrigera­tory.

Take of the flowers of Sage, Rosemary, and [...] of each one handful, the flowers of [...], [...], Lillies of the vally, Cowslips, of [...]; let the flowers being newly and seasonably gathered, being infused in one gallon of the best Spirit of Wine, and mingled with the aforegoing Spirit of [...] flowers, adding the leaves of Bawm, Feather-few, and Orrenge tree fresh gathered; the flowers of [...], and Orrenge tree, Bay berries, of each one ounce; af­ter [...], distil it again, after which add, Citron [...] the outward Bark, [...] seeds hus­ked, of each six drachms, Cinnamon, Nutmegs, Mace, Cardamoms, [...], yellow Sanders, of each half an [...], wood of Aloes one [...], the best [...], the stones being taken out, half a pound, digest thêm six weeks, then strain it, and filter it, and add to it, [Page 64] prepared Pearls two drachms, Emeralds prepared a scruple, Ambergreese, Musk, Saffron, of each half a scruple, red Roses dried, red Sanders, of each half an ounce, yellow Sanders, Citron pills dried, of each one drachm; let the Species being tied up in a rag, be hung into the aforegoing Spirit.

Culp] Although I could have easily been brought to beleeve, that the Colledg never intended the com­pany of Apothecaries any good, yet before I read this Receipt; I could not conceit they willingly intended to impose impossibilities upon them; I could wish the Apothecaries would desire to be certified by the Col­ledg.

A. 1. Whether the Gallon of Lavender flowers must be filled by heap, or by strike.

A. 2. Next, whether the flowers must be pressed down in the Measure, or not.

A. 3. How much must be drawn off in the first distillation.

A. 4. Where they should get Orrenge leaves and flowers fresh gathered.

A. 5. What they mean by Convenient Digestion.

A. 6. Where you shal find Borrage, Bugloss, and Cowslips [...] together, that so you may have them al fresh according to their prescript, the one flowring in the latter end of Aprill, and beginning of May, the other in the end of June, and beginning of July.

A. 7. If they can make a shift to make it (which is a task almost, if not altogether, as hard as to piss down Pauls, how, or which way the vertues of it wil countervail the one half of the charge and cost, to leave the pains and trouble out. [...] Dr. Ignoramus followed Matthias and never considered he lived in a different Climate.

Spiritus Castorii. Page 32. in the Latin Book. Or, Spirit of Castorium.

The Colledg] Take of fresh Castorium four oun­ces, Lavender flower an ounce, the tops of Sage, and Rosemary, of each half an ounce, Cinnamon six drams, Mace, Cloves, of each two drachms, Spirit of Wine rectified six pound.; digest them in a Phial filled only to the third part, close stopped with cork and bladder, in warm ashes for two daies, then distilled inA table at the lat­ter end shal in­struct you in al such crabbed words. Bal­neo Mariae, and the distilled water kept close stop­ped.

Culpeper] A. By reason of its heat it is no waies fit to be taken alone, but mixed with other conveni­ent medicines, apropriated to the diseases you would give it for; It resists poyson, and helps such as are bit­ten by venemous beasts, it causeth speedy deliver y to women in travail, and casteth out the after birth, it helps the fits of the mother, Lethargies, and Convul­sions; being mixed with white. Wine, and dropped into the ears, it helps deafness, if stopping be the cause of it: the dose to be given inwardly, is between one drachm, and half a drachm according to the age and strength of the patient.

Aqua Petasitidis composita. Page 32. in Latin Book. Or, Compound water of [...]-Burrs.

The Colledg] Take of the fresh roots of Butter Burr bruised, one pound and an half; the roots of Angelica, and Master-wort, of each half a pound; steep them in ten pints of strong Ale, then distil them, till the change of the tast gives testimony that the strength is drawn out.

Culpeper] A. This water is very effectual, being mixed with other convenient cordials, for such as have pestilential feavers; also a spoonful taken in the morning, may prove a good preservative in pestilen­tial times: it helps the fits of the mother, and such as are short winded, and being taken inwardly, dries up the moisture of such sores as are hard to be cured.

Aqua Raphani Composita. Page 33. in the Latin B. Compound water of Rhadishes.

The Colledg] Take of the leaves of hoth sorts of Scurvy-grass, of each six pound; having bruised them, press the [...] out of them, with which mix of the Juyce of Brooklime, and Water-cesses, of each one pound and an half, of the best white wine eight pound, twelve whole Lemmons, pills and all, fresh [...] roots four pound, the roots of wild Raddishes two pound; Capt. winters Cinnamon half a pound, Nut­megs four ounces; steep them altogether and then di­stil them.

Culpeper] A. In their former Dispensatory, when they had that Ingenuity left to confess where they had their medicines; I gave them a modest term, and said they borrowed them from such or such an Au­thor; but now all ingenuity hath left them, and no­thing but Self remains in them, and they abscond their Authors; I know not what to say, unless I should say they: stole them: whether this be their own or not I know not, 'tis something like them, a churlish medicine, to a churlish Colledg; I fancy it not, and so I leave it; I suppose they intended it for purgation of women in childbed, and 'tis as fit for it, as a Sow is for a Saddle.

Aqua Peoniae Composita. Page 33. in the Latin B. Or, Compound water of Peony.

The Colledg] Take of the flowers of Lillies of the vally, one pound; infuse them in four gallons of Spanish Wine, so long til the following flowers may be had fresh.

Take of the fore named flowers half a pound, Peony flowers four ounces; steep them together fourteen daies, then distil them in Balneo Mariae til they be dry, in the distilled liquor, infuse again male Peony roots, gatheredAnd that is they know not when: I, you wil be precise in your time, let it be in the hour and day of the Sun, he ri­sing in the lion, and the moon applying to his ⚹ or △. in due time, two ounces and an half, white Dittany, long Birthwort, of each half an ounce, the leaves of Misleto of the Oak, and Rue, of each two handfuls, Peony seeds husked ten drachms, Rue seeds three drachms and an half, Castorium two scruples, Cubebs, Mace, of each two drachms, [...] an ounce and an half, Squils prepared three drachms, Rosemary flowers six pugils, Arabian [...], Lavender, of each four pugils, the flowers of Betony, Clove-gilli-flowers, and Cowslips, of each eight pugils; then adding four pound of the Juyce of black cherries: Distil it in a glass stil, til it be dry.

Culpeper] A. It seems the Colledg was shrewdly put to it, to alter the name of this Receipt, from Langius his Antepileptical water, to Compound wa­ter of Peony, a new trick to cheat the world, and they have also altered some few things not worth the no­ting.

A. If the Authority of Erastus, or daily experience wil serve the turn, then was this Receipt chiefly com­piled against the Convulsion fits, but the derivation of the word notes it to be prevalent against the fal­ling [Page 65] sickness also, for [...] in Greek, signifies Falling sickness; and indeed Erastus and experi­ence pleads for this also: It is true, the Compositi­on of Erastus differs from this, and so doth another recited by Johannes Langius; but it seems our Phy­sitians (for some reasons best known to themselves) e­steemed this the best at this time, for their minds are mutable.

A. Well then, having now learned the vertues of the Water, a word or two of the Use will not be a­miss. Erastus was of opinion that both these disea­ses were caused by the Moon (and so am I of that o­pinion also, for I know some at this time that are con­stantly troubled with the falling sickness, only at the new and full Moons; I could give reasons for this judgment of Erastus but I am unwill ing to be tedi­ous.) Then saith he, if the disease come daily, let a spoonful to it be taken morning and evening, if weak­ly, then let it be taken only at the new and ful Moon, and at her quartiles to the Sun, if it begin to wear a­way, then only twice a month viz. at the new and full Moon wil suffice. It profits also in time of the fit, by rubbing their temples, nostrils, and jaws with it.

Aqua Bezoartica. 34. in the Latin Book. Or, Bezoar Water.

The Colledg] Take of the leaves of Sullendine roots and al, three handfuls and an half, Rue two handfuls, Scordium four handfuls, Dittany of creet, Carduus, of each one handful and an half, Zedoary, and Angellica roots, of each three drachms, Citrons, and Lemmon pills, of each six drachms, Clove-gilli­flowers one ounce and an half, red Roses, Centaury the less, of each two drachms, Cinnamon, Cloves of each three drachms, Venis Treacle three ounces, Mithri­date one ounce and an half, Camphire two scruples, Troches of vipers two ounces, Mace two drachms, wood of Aloes half an ounce, yellow Sanders one drachm and an half, Cardus seeds one ounce, Citron seeds six drachms; let them be cut, and infused in Spirit of Wine, and Malaga Wine, of each three pound and an half, Vineger of Clove-gilli-flowers, juyce of Lemmons, of each one pound, and distilled in a glass stil in Balneo Mariae; after it is half stilled off, the resi­due may be strained through a linnen cloath, and be reduced to the thickness of Honey, and called the Bezo­artick extract.

Culpeper] A. Extracts have the same vertues with the waters they are made from, only the different form is to please the quaint pallats of such whose fan­cy loaths any one particular form.

A. This Bezoar water strengtheneth the heart, Ar­teries and spirit vital: It provoketh sweat, and is ex­ceeding good in pestilential feavers, in health it with­stands melancholly and consumptions, and makes a merry blith cheerful creature. Of the extract you may take ten grains at a time or somewhat more if your body be not feaverish; half a spoonful of water is sufficient at a time and that mixed with other cor­dials or medicines apropriated to the disease that troubles you, which the Table at the latter end of the Book will direct you to. And take this for a general rule, when any thing is too hot to take it by it self, re­sort to the Table of diseases, which will amply fur­nish you with what to mix it, and especially the cold waters, the vertues of which you have amply in this third Edition: This is Langius Receipt, though the Colledg would have no body know it.

Aqua et Spiritus Lumbricorum Magistralis. P. 34. L. B. Or, Water and Spirit of Earth-worms.

The Colledg] Take of Earth-worms wel clensed, three pound, Snails with shels on their backs clensed, two Gallons; beat them in a mortar, and put them into a convenient vessel, adding stinging Nettles, roots and all, six handfuls, wild Angellica four handfuls, Brank ursine seven handfuls, Agrimony, Betony, of each three handfuls, Rue one handful, common Worm­wood two handfuls, Rosemary flowers six ounces, Dock roots ten ounces, the roots of Sorrel five ounces, Turmerick, the inner bark of Barberries, of each four ounces, Fenugreek seeds two ounces, Cloves three ounces, Harts-horn, Ivory in gross pouder, of each four ounces, Saffron three drachms, smal Spirit of Wine four gallons and an half; after twenty four hours infusion, distil them in an Alembick. Let the four first pounds be reserved for Spirit, the rest for water.

Culpeper] A. 'Tis a mess of Altogether; it may be they intended it for an Universal medicine.

Aqua Gentianae composita, Page 35. in the Latin B. Or, Gentian Water Compound.

The Colledg] Take of Gentian roots sliced, one pound and an half, the leaves and flowers of Centa [...] ­ry the less, of each four ounces; steep them eight da [...] in twelve pound of white Wine, then distil them in an Alembick.

Culpeper] A. It conduceth to preservation from ill air, and pestilential feavers, it opens obstructions of the Liver, and helps such as they say are Liver grown, it easeth pains in the stomach, helps digesti­on, and easeth such as have pains in their bones by ill lodging abroad in the cold, it provokes appetite, and is excellent good for the yellow jaundice, as also for prickings or stitches in the sides; it provokes the terms, and expells both birth and after-birth; it is naught for women with child: If there be no feaver, you may take a spoonful or taster full by it self, if there be, you may if you please mix it with some cooler medicine apropriated to the same use you would give it for.

Aqua Gilberti. Page 35. in the Latin Book. Or, Gilberts Water.

The Colledg] Take of Scabious, Burnet, Dragons, Bawm, Angellica, Pimpernel with purple flowers, Tormentil roots and all, of each two handfuls; let al of them being rightly gathered and prepared, be steeped in four gallons of Canary Wine, stil off three gallons in an Alembick, to which ad three ounces of each of the cordial flowers, Clove-gilli-flowers six ounces, Saf­fron half an ounce, Turmerick two ounces, Galanga, Bazil seeds, of each one drachm, Citron pills one ounce, the seeds of Citrons, and Cardus, Cloves, of each five drachms, Harts-horn four ounces; steep them twenty four hours, and then distil them in Bal­neo Mariae; to the stilled water add Pearls prepared, an ounce and an half, red Corral, Crabs eyes, white Amber, of each two drachms, Crabs claws six drams, Bezoar Ambergreese, of each two scruples, steep them six weeks in the Sun in a vessel well stopped, often sha­king it, then filter it (you may keep the p [...]uders for Sp. cord. temp.) by mixing twelve ounces of Sugar [Page 66] candy, with six ounces of red Rose water, and four ounces of Spirit of Cinnamon with it.

Culpeper A. I suppose this was invented for a cor­dial, to strengthen the heart, to releeve languishing nature, it is exceeding dear; I forbear the dose, they that have money enough to make it themselves, can­not want time to stady both the vertues and dose; I would have Gentlemen men to be studious.

A. Only one thing I would demand of the Col­ledg that makes their brags so much of minding their Countryes good, these same species which they ap­point to be left (after use in this medicine) for Spe­cies Cordiales Temperatae. Doth the vertue come out of them in this medicine or not? if not, why are they put in? if yes, then wil the Species cordiales Temperatae be like themselves, viz. good for nothing but to deceive people.

Aqua Cordialis [...]. Page 36. in Lat. B.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Borrage, Bug­loss, Bawm, Bistort, Tormentil, Scordium, Vervain, Sharp-pointed dock, Sorrel, Goats Rue, [...], blew Bottle great and smal, Roses, Marigolds, Lem­mons, Citrons, of each six ounces, Bnrnet: Sinksoyl, of each three ounces, white Wine Vineger one pound, Purslain seeds two ounces, Citron and Cardus seeds, of each half an ounce, Water Lilly flowers two ounces, the flowers of Borrage, Bugloss, Violets, [...], of each one ounce, Diatrion Santalon six [...]; let all of them being rightly prepared, be infused three daies, then distilled in a glass still; to the distilled Liquor add earth of Lemnos Siletia, aud Sa­mos, of each one ounce and an half, Pearls prepared with the juyce Citrons, three drachms, mix them, and keep them together.

Culpeper] A. No sooner had I translated their old Dispensatory (which should have been Authentick til dooms day in the afternoon had not I done it) to work go they and make another such a one as [...] and then the old one is thrown by like an old Alma­nack out of [...]; some final alterations they have made in some medicines (of which this is one) not worth speaking of, yet wil they serve to vapor with, look here quoth they here's such a thing altered, here is a grain and an half put in, where there was but a grain before, the other is dangerous and destructive to the Common-wealth, and so care not a straw for defaming their predecessors; nay some of their own handy works, so they may but uphold their own inte­rests and unconscionable domineering; thus they serve the poor people just as a Cat serves a Mouse; first play with them, and then eat them up.

A. It mightily cools the blood, and therefore pro­fitable in Feavers, and al diseases proceeding of heat of blood it provokes sleep. You may take half an ounce at a time, or two drachms if the party be weak.

Aqua Theriacalis. Page 36. in the Latin Book. Or, Treatle Water.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of green Walnuts, [...] pound; the juyce of [...] three pound, juyce of Carduus, Marigolds and Bawm, of each two pound, [...] Petasitis roots one pound and an half, the roots of [...] one pound, Angellica and Master-wort, of each half a pound, the leaves of Scordium four [...], old venis [...], [...], of each eight oun­ces, Canary Wine twelve pound, Vineger six pound, juyce of Lemons two pound; digest them two daies, either in horse-dung or in a bath, the vessel being close shut, then distil them in Sand: in the distillation you may make a theriacal extraction.

Culpeper] A. This water is exceeding good in [...] Feavers, especially pestilential, it expelleth venemous humors by sweat, it strengtheneth the heart and vi­tals, it is an admirable counterpoyson, special good for such as have the Plague, or are poysoned, or bitten by venemous beasts, and expelleth virulent humors from such as have the French Pocks. If you desire to know more vertues of it, see the vertues of Venis Treacle. The dose is from a spoonful to an ounce.

Aqua Brioniae Composita. Page 37. in the Lat. Book. Or, Briony water Compound.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Briony roots, four pound, the leaves of Rue, and Mugwort, af each two pound, dried Savin three handfuls, Feather-few, Nep, Peny-royal, of each two handfuls, Bazil, Ditta­ny of [...], of each one handful and an half, [...] pills four ounces, Mirrh two ounces, Castorium one ounce, [...] Wine twelve pounds; digest them four daies in a convenient vessel, then stil them in Balneo Mariae; about the middle of the distillation strain it out, and make an Hysterical extraction of the resi­due.

Culpeper] A. A spoonful of it taken easeth the [...] of the mother in women that have them; it potently expels the after-birth, and clears the body of what a mid-wife by heedlesness or accident hath left behind, it clenseth the womb exceedingly, and for that I fan­cy it much; take not above a taster full at a time, and that in the morning fasting, for it is of a purging quality, and let women with child forbear it. This was called Aqua Histerica in their former Edition; let any body unless it be an Ass be judge if the Col­ledges intentions in changing the names only of their medicines, the Ingredients being all the very [...]; If I could not have found out this, I had certainly been as great a fool as themselves.

Aqua [...]. Page 37. in the Latin Book. Or, Imperial Water.

The Colledg] Take of dried Citron, and [...] pills, Nutmegs, Cloves, [...], of each two oun­ces, the roots of Cyperus, Orris Florentine, Calamus, Aromaticus, of each one ounce, Zedoary, Galanga, Ginger, of each half an ounce; the tops of Laven­der, and Rosemary, of each two handfuls, the leaves of Bay, Marjoram, Bawm, [...], Sage, Time, of each one handful, the flowers of white and Damask Rose fresh, of each half a handful, Rose water four pound white Wine eight pound; let al of them being bruised, and insused twenty four hours, then distil them accor­ding to art.

Culpeper] A. You must distil it in a Bath, and not in sand: It seems the Colledg were but mean practioners in Alchymy, but in this, and many other Receipts, trusted to that monster called Tradition; therefore take this for a general Aphorism, All gross bodies stilled in sand, will stink egregiously. This so gravelled the Colledg that in their new Dispensatory they quite lest out the manner of distillation.

A. It comforts and strengtheneth the heart a gainst Faintings, and Swoonings, and it is held to be [Page 67] a preservative against Consumptions and Apoplexies. You may take half a spoonful at a time.

Aqua Mirabilis. Page 38. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cloves, Galanga, Cubebs, Mace, Cardamoms, Nutmegs, Ginger, of each one drachm; [...] of [...] half a pound; Spirit of wine one pound; white wine three pound; infuse them twenty four hours and draw off two pound with an Alembick.

Culpeper] A The Simples also of this regard the stomach, and therefore the water heats cold stomachs: besides Authors say, it preserveth from Apoplexies, and restoreth speech lost.

Aqua [...]. Page 38. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of Scordium, Scabious, Cardus, [...], of each two handfuls, Citron and Orrenge Pills, of each two ounces; the seeds of Citrons, Car­dus, Hartwort, Treacle Mustard, of each one ounce; the flowers of Marigolds, and Rosemary of each one handful: cut them and bruise them grosly, then insuse them in four pound of white Wine, and two pound of Cardus Water, in a glass stopped close, and set in the [...] or bath for a fortnight, often shaking it, then still it in Balneo Mariae. Let the two first pounds be kept by themselves for use, and the remainder of the di­stillation by it self: Lastly, mix an ounce of Julep of Alexandria, and a spoonful of Cinnamon water with each pound.

Culpeper] A. Aqua [...], signifies a Water for Treacle, so then if you put Diascordium to it, it is a water for Diascordium: well then, we will take it for a general water for all Physick.

Aqua Caponis. Page 38. in Lat. Book. Or, Capon Water.

The Colledg] Take a Capon the guts being pulled out, cut in pieces the fat being taken away, boyled in a Do so much som of you that know their qualities, as ask thē the mea­ning of this word, [sufficient quantity] I told thē of it be­fore, but they are too proud to learn. sufficient quantity of spring water, in a close vessel, take of this broath three pound, Borrage and Violet Water of each a pound and an half, white Wine one pound; red Rose Leaves two drachms and an half; the flowers of Borrage, Violets and Bugloss, of each one drachm; pieces of bread hot out of the Oven half a pound; Cinnamon bruised half an ounce; still it in a glass still according to art.

Culpeper] A. Divers Physitians have written se­veral Receipts of this water, as Gesner, Andr. è La­cuna, Med. Florent. and Coloniens. But the truth is, this Receipt (although our Physitians conceal it) was borrowed from the Augustan Physitians, and only be­cause they thought (as I suppose) a Capon must not be eaten without bread, they added the bread to it, the rest is verbatim from the Augustan Physitians.

A. The Simples are most of them apropriated to the heart, and in truth the the composition greatly nourishes and strengtheneth such as are in consump­tions, and restoreth strength lost, either by feavers or other sickness: It is a Soveraign remedy for He­ctick feavers, and Marasmos, which is nothing else but a consumption coming from them; let such as are subject to these diseases hold it for a Jewel.

Aqua Limacum [...]. P. 39. Or, Water of Snails.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Or Ale­hoos, Wch is al one. Ground-Ivy, Coltsfoot, Scabious, Lungwort, of each one pound and an half, the Juyce of Purstain, Plantane, Oak of Capadocia if you can get it. Am­brosia, Pauls Betony, of each a pound; Hogs blood, white Wine, of each four pound; Garden Snails, two pound; dried Tobacco Leaves, eight; pouder of Liquor is two ounces; of Alicampane, half an ounce; of Orris an ounce; Cotton seeds, an ounce and [...] half; the greater cold seeds, Annis seeds, of each six drachms, Saffron one drachm, the flowers of red Ro­ses, six pugils, of Violets and Borrage, of each four [...], [...] them three daies warm, and then distill them in a glass still in sand.

Culpeper] It purgeth the lungues of flegm, and helps consumptions there: If you should happen to live where no beetter nor readier Medicine can be gotten, you may use this.

Aqua Scordii Composita. Page 29. in the L. Book. Or, Compound Water of Scordium.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Goats-rue, Sorrel, Scordium, Citrons, of each one pound; Lon­don Treacle half a pound; steep it three daies and di­still it in sand.

Culpeper] A. A tasterful taken in the morning preserves from ill airs.

Aqua Mariae. Page 39. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Sugar candy a pound, Cana­ry Wine six ounces, Rose water sour ounces; boylit well into a Syrup, and ad to it Imperial Water two pound, Ambergreese, Musk, of each eighteen grains; Saffron fitfeen grains; yellow Sanders infused in Imperial water two drachms; make ae cleer water of it.

Culpeper] A. The difference between this and their former Aqua Mariae is this, Here they appoint Imperial Water, and before Aqua [...], which they very subtilly have left out here: any tooth good Barber, so we may hold up our honor and gains. Both Receipts are very costly, as far beyond the reach of a poor mans purse, as of his brains.

Aqua Papaveris Composita. Page 39. in L. Book. Or, Poppy Water Compound.

The Colledg] Take of red Poppies, four pound; sprinkle them with white Wine two pound; then di­still them in a common still: let the distilled Water be powred upon fresh flowers and repeated three times; to which distilled water ad twoMust they be pēny ones, or [...] ones? Nutmegs sliced; red Poppy flowers a pugil, Sugar two ounces; set it in the Sun to give it a pleasing sharpness; if the sharp­ness be more than you would have it, put some of the same water to it which was not set in the Sun; and then it will be a pretty water good for nothing.

Aqua Juglandium Composita. Page 40. in L. Book. Or, Walnut Water Compound.

The Colledg] Take of green Walnuts a pound and an half, Rhadish roots one pound, green Asarabacea six ounces, Rhadish seeds four ounces: let all of them being bruised be steeped in three pound of white Wine for three daies, then distilled in a leaden still till they be dry; And when you have done so, I pray ask the Colledg what it is good for, in truth I know not.

Some Waters kind country men, the Colledg have plaid the men and left out in their new Dispensatory, which were in their old one; and they are these.

Mathiolus, his Bezoar Water.

The Colledg] Take of Mathiolus his great Anti­elote, Syrup of Citron Pills, of each one pound; spi­rit of Wine distilled five times over, five pound: put all these in a glass that is much to big to hold them, stop it close that the spirit fly not out, then shake it toge­ther, that the Electuary may be well mingled with the Spirit, so let it stand a month, shaking it together twice a week (for the Electuary will settle to the bot­tom) The month being ended, powr off the cleer water into another glass to be kept for your use, stopping it very close with wax and Parchment, else the strength will easily fly away in vapors.

Culpeper] A. Mathiolus is very large in commen­dation of this Water, for (quoth he) four drachms (that is half an ounce) of this water being taken, ei­ther by it self, or in the like quantity of good Wine, or any other Cordial Water, so absolutely and spee­dily cureth the bitings of any venemous beasts what­soever, that although the danger of death be such, that the patient have lost his speech, sight, and almost all the rest of his sences, yet will he be rouzed up like a man out of his sleep, to the wonderful admiration of the beholders which he saith he hath proved aIf it want 900. of it, it maters not much, it is but a figur called an Hyperbole: wch is as much as to say in Eng­lish, an Eloquent Lye. thousand times. It draws away poyson from the heart, and cures such as have drunk poyson, it casts poyson out of the stomach by vomit, and helps such as have the pestilence.

A. For my own particular part, thus much I can testifie by experience in the commendations of it; I have known it given in acute, in peracute feavers with gallant success, and also in Consumptions, yea, in Hecticks, and in Galens supposedWhich had it bin so, my self had not been alive to have written this Book. incurabe Ma­rasmos, neither hath it missed the desired effects; and therefore out of question it strengtheneth the heart exceedingly, and the spirit vital. It helps in the fal­ling-sickness, apoplexies and convulsion.

A. And then your own genius will tell you, this is fittest for cold complexions, cold diseases, and such diseases as the heart is most afflicted in. It is too hot to be taken alone; and half a drachm is the most may be taken at a time.

Cinnamon Water.

The Colledg] Take of bruised Cinnamon a pound and an half, Spanish Wine twelve pints: Infuse the Cinnamon in the Wine twenty four hours, then distil them in an [...]; draw out three pints of strong Waters (and small as much as you think sufficient) sweeten it with Sugar sufficiently, and so keep it for your use.

Culpeper] A. The vertues are the same that Cin­namon it self hath, to which I refer you.

Mathiolus his Cinnamon Water.

The Colledg] Take of bruised Cinnamon a pound, put it into a glass still, powring upon it four pints of Rose water, a pint and an half of Spanish wine, stop the still body close, and place it in a warm bath twenty four hours; then put on the still-head, lute it well, and distill it according to art.

Culpeper] A. Mathiolus appoints Wine of Creet four pints, and that is all the alteration.

A. The Authors own Judgment is, That it strengthens the brain, heart, liver, stomach, lungues, spleen, and nerves, quickens the sight, resisteth poy­son, helpeth bitings by venemous beasts, causeth a sweet breath, bringeth down the terms in women, and hath vertue, attenuating, opening, digesting and strengthening.

A. The truth is, I beleeve it prevails in cold dis­eases, being orderly regulated in quantity, according to the nature of the disease, the age and strength of the patient, and the season of the year; have a care of taking too much of it in feavers.

Cinnamon Water made by Infusion.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon bruised, four ounces; Spirit of Wine, two pints; infuse them to­gether four daies, in a large glass close stopped with Cork and a Bladder, shaking the Glass twice a day.

Dissolve half a pound of white Sugar Candy, in a quart of Rose water; then mix both these liquors to­gether, then put into them four grains of Musk, and half a scruple of Ambergreese tied up in a linnen rag and hung to the top of the glass.

Culpeper] In my opinion this latter water is more prevalent for heart-qualms, and faintings than Ma­thiolus his, neither is it half so hot, therefore more safe.

Aqua Coelestis. Mathiolus.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon an ounce; Gin­ger half an ounce; white, red, and yellow Sanders, of each six drachms; Cloves, Galanga, Nutmegs, of each two drachms and an half; Mace, Cubebs, of each one drachm; both sorts of Cardamoms, Nigella seeds, of each three drachms; Zedoary, half an ounce; seeds of Annis, sweet fennel, wild Parsnips, Bazil, of each a drachm and an half; Roots of Angelica, Avens, Calamus Aromaticus, Liquoris, Valerian the less, the leaves of Clary, Time, Calaminth, Penyroyal, Mints, Mother of Time, Marjoram, of each two drachms; the flowers of red Roses, Sage, Rosemary, Betony, Stoechas, Bugloss, Borrage, of each one drachm and an half; Citron Pils three drachms: Let the things be bruised that are to be bruised, and infused fifteen daies in twelve pints of the best spirit of Wine [Page 69] in a glass body well stopped, and then let it be distilled in [...] Mariae according to art. Adding to the distilled Water, Pouders of Diambra, [...] dulce, Aromaticum Rosatum, Diamagariton frigidum, Di­athodon Abbatis, pouder of Electuary de gemmis, of each three drachms; yellow Sanders bruised two drachms; Musk, Ambergreese, of each a scruple tied up in a fine rag; cleer Julip of Roses a pound shake them well together, stopping the glass close with wax and Parchment till it grow cleer to be kept for your use.

Culpeper] A. It comforteth and [...] the heart, reviveth drooping spirite, prevaileth against the plague and all malignant feavers, preserveth the Sences; and restoreth such as are in Consumptions; It is of a hot nature. Let not the quantity taken at a time exceed half a drachm.

A. Only take this Caution, both concerning this and all other strong waters; They are not safely gi­ven by themselves in Feavers, (because by their hot quality they inflame the blood, and ad fuel to the fire) but mixed with other convenient Cordials, and con­sideration had to the strength, complexion, habit, age, and sex of the patient: for my own part, I aim sincerely at the publick good in writing of this, and therefore as I would not have Physitians domineer; so I would not have fools turn Physitians.

Bawm Water: The greater Composition.

The Colledg] Take of [...] a pound, Time, Pe­nyroyal, of each three drachms; Cinnamon, two drachms; Cardamoms the less one drachm: And they are the greater Carda­moms, as most of the Arabi­an Physiti­ans held. Grains of Paradice half an ounce: Sweet Fennel seeds an ounce; Nutmegs, Ginger, of each a drachm; Galan­ga, [...] drachms; [...] Aromaticus, Cyperus, of each one drachm and an half; Dictamni, half a drachm: Let all of them be bruised and infused in eight pints of Spanish Wine, and six pints of strong Ale, for twenty four hours together, and then distilled by an Alembick, draw out of the stronger water three pints.

Culpeper] A. The Simples seem chiefly apropria­ted to the stomach, and therefore must needs streng­then cold and weak stomachs, and help digestion: besides Authors say, It restoreth memory lost, quick­kens all the sences, keeps away gray hairs and baldness, strengtheneth the brain, makes the heart cheerful, and helps the lisping of the tongue, easeth the pains of the teeth, and causeth a sweet breath.

Rosa [...].

The Colledg] Take of Nutmegs, Annis seeds, Coriander seeds, of each one ounce; Galanga, Ginger, Cloves, of each half an ounce; red Rose Leaves, one bandful; Ros-solis six handfuls; Liquoris two oun­ces; Cardamoms, Zedoary, Grains of Paradice, Ca­lamus Aromaticus, of each one drachm; red Sanders, Cinnamon, of each an ounce and an half; of the best Aqua vitae, twelve pints: make an infusion of them for eight daies, [...] strain it and ad to the Liquor, one pound and an half of Sugar.

Culpeper] A, The Basis of this Medicine, seems to be the Herb Ros-solis, which is of a drying and binding quality, and apropriated to the Lungues, and therefore must needs be available for [...], or Consumptions of the Lungues, and because this herb provokes lust exceedingly, I suppose therefore the Rose leaves were added, which according toSchol. Salem. Authors resist lust.

Dr. Stephens Water.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon, Ginger, Galan­ga, Cloves, Nutmegs, Grains of Paradice, Seeds of Annis, Fennel, Caraway, of each one drachm; Herbs of Time, Mother of Time, Mints, Sage, Penyroyal, Pellitory of the Wall, Rosemary, flowers of red Roses, Chamomel, Origanum, Lavender, of each one hand­ful; infuse them twelve hours in twelve [...] of Gascoign Wine, then with an Alembick, draw three pints of strong Water from it.

Culpeper] A. Authors hold it profitable for wo­men in labor, that it provokes the terms, and brings away the after-birth.

Ordinary Aqua vitae.

The Colledg] Distil Ale and Lees of Wine in [...] Alembick (whose worm runs through cold Water) in­to small Wine, in ten Congies of which, [...] one pound of bruised Annis seeds, for twenty four hours, then still it again into strong water.

Aqua vitae Compound.

The Colledg] Is made of smal Wines, in six con­gies of which, infuse Annis seeds half a pound; seeds of Fennel, and Caraway, of each two ounces; Cloves, [...] and Ginger, of each one ounce, and then draw the strong Spirit from it.

Culpeper] A. This is excellent good in my opini­on for such as are troubled with wind.

Vsquebach.

The Colledg] Take of strong Aqua vitae twenty four pints, in which, for four daies infuse a pound of Liquoris, Raisons of the Sun half a pound; Cloves half an ounce; Mace, Ginger, of each two drachms, strain it and keep it for your use.

Culpeper] A. It strengthens the stomach, and helps indigestion coming of flegm and cold.

A. It is possible I may have overslipped some o­thers of their Alterations of Names; my time is short, and my understanding dull: and the truth is, their new model shews far more subtilty than ho­nesty.

TINCTURES.

Tinctura Croci. Page 41. in the Latin Book. Or, Tincture of Saffron.

Colledg. TAke two drachms of Saffron, eight ounces of Treacle Water, digest them six [...], then strain it.

Culpeper] A. See the Vertues of Treacle Water, and then know that this strengthens the heart some­thing more, and keeps melancholly vapors thence by drinking a spoonful of it every morning.

Tinctura [...]. Page 41. in the Latin Book. Or, Tincture of Castorium.

The Colledg] Take of Castorium in pouder half an ounce; Spirit of Castorium half a pound; digest them ten daies cold: strain it, and keep the Liquor for Tincture.

Culpeper] A. A learned invention! 'Tis some­thing more prevalent than the Spirit.

Tinctura Fragorum. Page 41. in the Latin Book. Or, Tincture of Strawberries.

The Colledg] Take of ripe Wood-Strawberries, two pound; put them in a Phiol, and put so much small Spirit of Wine to them, that it may oretop them the thickness of four fingers; stop the vessel close, and set it in the Sun two daies, then strain it and press it but gently; powr this Spirit to as many fresh Straw­berries, repeat this six times, at last keep the cleer Li­quor for your use.

Culpeper] A. A gallant fine thing for Gentlemen that have nothing else to do with their money, and it will have a lovely look to please their eyes.

Tinctura Scordii. Page 41. in the Latin Book. Or, Tincture of Scordium.

The Colledg] Take of the Leaves of Scordium ga­thered in a dry time, half a pound; digest them in six pound of small spirit of Wine, in a vessel well stop­ped for three dates, press them out gently, and repeat [...] infusion three times, and keep the clarified Liquor for use.

So is made Tincture of Sullondine, Rest-harrow, Ros-solis.

Culpeper] A. See the Herbs for the Vertues, and then take notice that these are better for cold sto­machs, old bodies.

Tictura Theriacalis Vulgo Aqua Theriatalis Lugd. per infus. Page 41. in Lat. Book. Or, Tincture of Treacle.

The Colledg] Take of Canary Wine often times di­stilled, Vineger in which half an ounce of Rue seeds have been boyled, two pound; choyce Treasle, the best Mithridate, of each half a pound; mix them and set them in the Sun, or heat of a Bath, digest them and keep the Water for use.

Tinctura Cinnamomi, vulgo, Aqua Clareta Cinnam. Page 42. in the Latin Book. Or, Tincture of Cinnamon.

The Colledg] Take of bruised Cinnamon two oun­ces; rectified Spirit of Wine two pound: infuse them four daies in a large glass stopped with Cork and Blad­der, shake it twice a day, then dissolve half a pound of Sugar candy by it self in two pound of Rose Water, mix both Liquors, into which hang a Nodule contai­ning, Amber greese half a scruple, Musk four grains.

Culpeper] A. This was before amongst the Wa­ters, only there is four ounces of Cinnamon ap­pointed, and here but two.

Tictura Viridis. Page 42. in the Latin Book. Or, A Green Tincture.

The Colledg] Take of Vert-de-greece, half an ounce; Auripigmentum six drachms; Allum three drachms; boyl them in a pound of white uine till half be consumed, adding after it is cold the Water of red Roses, and Nightshade, of each six ounces.

Culpeper] A. This was made to clense ulcers, but I fancy it not.

Aqua Aluminosa Magistralis. Page 42. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Plantane and red Rose wa­ter, of each a pound; roch Allum and sublimatum, of each two drachms: Let the Allum and Sublimatum being in pouder boyl in the waters, in a vessel with a narrow mouth till half be consumed; when it hath stood five daies, strain it.

Culpeper] A. Now they have left out the Quick­silver as I bid them, I like men will do as they are bid, yet I fancy it not. Follopius invented it, but you must tell no body.

PHYSICAL WINES.

Vinum Absynthites. Page 43. in the Latin Book. Or, Wormwood Wine.

Colledg] TAke a handful of dried Wormwood for every gallon of Wine; stop it in a vessel close, and so let it remain in steep: so is prepared Wine of Rosemary flowers, and Eye-bright.

Culpeper] A. It helps cold stomachs, breaks wind, helps the Wind Chollick, strengtheneth the stomach, kills worms, and helps the green sickness.

A. Rosemary flower-Wine is made after the same manner that Wormwood Wine is made.

A. It is good against al cold diseases of the head, consumeth flegm, strengtheneth the gums and teeth.

A. Eyebright Wine is made after the same man­ner.

A. It wonderfully cleers the sight being drunk, and revives the sight of ancient men: A cup of it in the morning is worth a pair of Spectacles.

A. All other Wines are prepared in the same man­ner, when the Physitian shall see it fit [quoth the Colledg] in their former, but here they left it out.

A. But what if there be never a Physitian worth a rush in 20. 30. 40. or 50. miles, (as some such places may be found in this Nation) must the poor Coun­try man lose his cure? truly this charity is according to vulgar Fervent cold: in such cases let them view the vertues of the Simple the Wine is made of, and then let them know the Wine of that Simple is far better and fitter for cold bodies and weak stomachs, than the Simple it self.

A. The best way of taking any of these Wines is, To drink a draught of them every morning. You may if you find your body old or cold, make Wine of any other herb, the vertues of which you desire, and make it and take it in the same manner: I have done, on­ly I would know of the Colledg whether their woo­den wits intend Sack or white Wine to be used in these.

Vinum Cerassorum Nigrorum. Page 43. in Latin B. Or, Wine of Black Cherries.

The Colledg] Take a gallon of the juyce of black Cherries, keep it in a vessel close stopped til it begin to work, then filter it, and an ounce of Sugar being added to every pound, let it pass through Hippocrates his sleeve, and keep it in a vessel close stopped for use

Culpeper] A. If ever I knew the like of the Col­ledg never trust me, here they go and appoint the Wine of black Cherries with never a drop of Wine in it, and the juyce will not keep without it, above a week or so, and so if you are minded to make it, you may by that time sing

Alack, alack now have I lost
My pains, my labor, and al my cost.

A. Or I know not, it may be they followed their Patriarks the Papists, as wel in this, as in their rea­sons, why Physick must not be printed in our mo­ther tongue; and they were minded to pop you off with the juyce, and drink al the wine themselves: Or to judge as modestly as can be judged, they were so mad because I had translated their former, that anger so besotted them in this, that they knew not what they wrote.

Impedit Ira animum ne possit cernere verum.

Unbridled anger takes away mens knowledge; And clouds the The truth (and so it did the Colledg.)

Vinum Helleboratum. Page 43. in the Latin B. Or, Wine Helleborated.

The Colledg] Take of white Hellebore out smal, four ounces, Spanish Wine two pound; steep it in the Sun in a Pbial close stopped, in the Dog daies or other hot weather.

Culpeper] A. And then it will make a dogged purge, as like the Colledg as a pomewater is like an apple.

Vinum Rubellum. Page 43. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Stibium in pouder one ounce, Cloves sliced two drachms, Claret Wine two pound, keep it in a Phial close shut.

Vinum Benedictum. Page 43. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Crocus Mettallorum in pou­der one ounce, Mace a drachm, Spanish Wine one pound and an half, steep it.

Vinum Antimoniale. Pege 43. in the Latin Book. Or, Antimonial Wine.

The Colledg] Take of Regulus of Antimony in pouder, four ounces, steep it in three pound of white Wine, in a glass well stopped, after the first shaking let the Regulus settle.

Culpeper] A. These three last mentioned are vo­mits, and vomits are fitting medicines for but a few, as I told you before, the mouth being ordained to take in nourishment not to cast out excrements, and to regulate a mans body in vomiting; and doses of of vomits requires, a deeper study in Physick, then I doubt the generality of people yet have; I omit it therefore at this time, not because I gruteh it my Country, but because I would not willingly have them do themselves a mischeife, I shal shortly teach, them in what diseases vomits may be used, and then and not til then the use of vomits.

Vinum Scilliticum. Page 44. in the Latin Book. Or, Wines of Squils.

The Colledg] Take of a white Squil of the moun­tains, gathered about the rising of the [...] starre, cut in thin peices, and dryed for a month, one pound, put it in a glass bottle, and pour to it eight pound of french Wine, and when it hath stood so four daies, take out the Squil.

Culpeper] A. I told told them before that Squils grew by the Sea side, and not upon mountains; but a man shall, as soon knock a Spunge into a milstone, as any wit into the head of a conceited fool; and then again it must be gathered at the rising of the dog-star; yes forsooth by al means: truly right worshipful against the time you are minded to play the anticks again, I will give you as much directi­ons in this business, as is needful to give men of your Rank and quallity. Therefore know, that the dogs are two constellations between the Equator and the South pole, consisting of divers Stars, two of which are most remarkable, and of the first magnitude, whereof that in the great dog is called Syejus: that in the [...], Procyon, each of these two Stars hath three risings, Acronical, Cosmical, and Heliacal, and as many settings. I dare pass my word it is not the Heliacal rising here meant; If it be, I hope so lear­ned a Colledg is not to seek of finding such a [...] out, Procyon riseth Acronically upon the fifteen or sixteen of January; Syejus upon the twenty six or twenty seven of the same month, Procyon riseth Cos­mically upon the ninteenth of July, and [...] upon the last day of the same month: the next time you write, pray lay your noddles together; to study out at which of these times the Squil must be gathered.

A. The vertues of this are the same with Vineger of Squils, only 'tis hotter.

PHYSICAL VINEGERS.

Acetum Distillatum. Page 45. in the Latin Book. Or, Distilled Vineger.

Colledg FIll a glass or stone Alembick with the best Vineger to the third part, separate the [...] with a gentle fire, then encrease the fire by degrees, and perform the work.

Acetum Rosatum. Page 45. in the Latin Book. Or, Rose Vineger.

The Colledg] Take of red Rose buds gathered in a dry time, the whites cut off, dried in the shaddow three or four daies, one pound, Vineger eight Sexta­ries; set them in the Sun fourty daies, then strain out the Roses, and repeat the infusion with fresh ones.

After the same manner is made Vineger of Elder­flowers, Rosemary flowers, and Clove-gilli-flo­wers.

Culpeper] A. For the vertues of al Vinegers take this one only observation, they carry the same ver­tues with the flowers whereof they are made, only as we said of Wines, that they were better for cold bo­dies than the bare Simples whereof they are made, so are Vinegers for hot bodies. Besides Vinegers are of­ten, nay most commonly used externally, viz. to bath the place, then look a mongst the Simples, and see what place of the body the Simple is apropriated to, and then you cannot chuse but know (if you have but a grain of understanding, more than a beast) both what Vineger to use, and to what place to apply [...].

Acetum Scilliticum. Page 45. in the Latin Book. Or, Vineger of Squils.

The Colledg] Take of that part of the Squil which is between the outward bark and the bottom, cut in thin slices, and placed thirty or fourty daies in the Sun or some remiss heat, then a pound of them (being cut smal with a knife made of Ivory or some white wood) being put in a vessel, and six pound of Vineger put to them; set the vessel being close stopped in the Sun thirty or fourty daies, afterwards strain it, and keep it for use.

Culpeper] A. A little of this medicine being taken in the morning fasting, and walking half an hour af­ter, preserves the body in health, to extream old age, (as Sanius tryed, who using no other medicine but this, lived in perfect health til an hundred and seven­teen years of age) it maketh the digestion good, a long wind, a cleer voice, an acute sight, a good co­lour, it suffers no offensiye thing to remain in the bo­dy, neither wind, flegm, choller, melancholly, dung nor urine, but brings them forth, it brings forth filth though it lie in the bones, it takes away salt and sour belchings, though a man be never so I would not have Galens judgment tried in this parti­ticular, it is far safer to take it upon his word. licentious in diet, he shal feel no harm; It hath cured such as have the Phtisick, that have been given over by al Physiti­ans: It cures such as have the Falling-sickness, gouts, and diseases and swellings of the Joynts; It takes a­way the hardness of the liver and spleen. We should never have done if we should reckon up the particular benefits of this medicine; Therefore we commend it, as a wholsom medicine for soundness of body, preservation of health, and vigor of mind: thus [...].

Acetum Theriacale Norimberg. Page 46. in Lat. B. Or, Treacle Vineger.

The Colledg] Take of the roots of Sullendine the greater, one ounce and an half, the roots of Angellica, Master-wort, Gentian, Bistort, Valerian, Burnet, white Dittany; Alicampane, Zedoary, of each one [Page 73] drachm, of Plantane the greater one drachm and an half, the leaves of Mousear, Sage, Scabious, Scordi­um, Dittany of Creet, Cardus, of each half a hand­ful, bark and seeds of Citrons, of each half a drachm, Bole Armenick one drachm, Saffron three drachms, Harts-born one drachm and an half; of these let the Saffron, Harts-horn, Dittany, and Bole, be tied up in a ragge, and steeped with the things before mentioned, in five pints of Vineger, for certain daies by a tempe­rate heat in a glass well stopped, strain it, and ad six drachms of the best Treacle to it, shake it together, and keep it for your use.

Acetum Theriacale. 46. in the Latin Book. Or, Treacle Vineger.

The Colledg] Add to `the description of Treacle water, Clove-gilli-flowers two ounces, Lavender flowers an ounce and an half, Rose, and Elder flower Vineger, of each four pound, digest it without boyling three daies, then strain it through Hippocrates his sleeve.

Culpeper] A. See Treacle water for the vertues, only this is a little more cool, a little more phantasti­cal.

DECOCTIONS.

Decoctum Commune pro Clystere. Page 47. in Lat B. Or, A common Decoction for a Cylster.

The Colledg] Take of Mallows, Violets, Pellito­ry, Beets, and Mercury, Chamomel flowers, of each one handful, sweet Fennel seeds half an ounce, Lin­seeds two drachms, boyl them in a sufficient quantiiy of common water to a pound.

Culpeper] A. This is the common Decoction for all Clysters, according to the quality of the hu­mor abounding, so you may ad what Simples, or Sy­rups, or Electuaries you please; only half a score Linseeds, and a handful of Chamomel flowers are ad­ded.

Decoctum Fpythimi. Page 47. in the Latin Book. Or, A Decoction of Epithimum.

The Colledg] Take of Myrobalans, Chebs, and Inds, of each half an ounce, [...], Raisons of the Sun stoned, Epithimum, Senna, of each one ounce, Fu­mitory half an ounce, Mandlin five drachms, Poli­podium six drachms, Turbith half an ounce, Whey made with Goats milk, or Heisers milk four pound, let them all boyl to two pound, the Epithimum ex­cepted, which boyl but a walm or two, then take it from the [...], and ad black Hellebore one drachm and an half, Agrick half a drachm, Sal. Gem. one drachm and an half, sleep them ten hours, then press it strong­ly out.

Culpeper] A. Here is half a drachm of black Hel­lebore added, and I like the Receipt never the better for that.

A. It purgeth melancholly gallantly, as also addust choller, it resisteth madness, and al diseases coming of melanchelly, and, therefore let melancholly people e­steem it as a jewel.

A. I cannot but commend it to such of my Countey men as abound with melancholly humors: Let them take a quarrer of a pint of this in the mor­ning, and keep by the fire side al day; imagine they take it at six of the Clock, then let them drink a draught of posset-drink at eight, and eat a bit of hot Mution at twelve, if their bodies be strong, (for people oppressed with Melancholly, usually go hard­ly to stool, by reason it is a retentive humor) Let them mix those Syrups (which I shal quote when I come to them) with it, and I dare hazard that small credit I have in Physick, that it shall in a few mor­nings fetch them out of their Melancholly dumps, which though they may seem pleasing, yet are no way profitable to the body of man, especially if the body be troubled also with [ill tumors] I know not what better word to give [Cacochynna.]

Decoctum Sennae Gereonis. Page 47. in the Lat. Book. Or, A Decoction of Senna.

The Colledg] Take of Senna two ounces, Polli­podium half an ounce, Ginger one drachm, Raisons of the Sun stoned two ounces, Se bestens, Prunes, of each twelve, the flowers of Borrage, Violets, Roses, and Rosemary, of each two drachms; boyl them in four pound of water till half be consumed.

Culpeper] A. It is a common Decoction for any purge, by adding other Simples or Compounds to it, according to the quality of the humor you would have purged, yet in its self, it chiefly purgeth melancholly. I shal quote it when I come at such Compounds as are fit to mix with it.

Decoctum Pectorale. Page 48. in the Latin Book. Or, A Poctoral Decoction.

The Colledg] Take of Raisons of the Sun stoned, an ounce, Seb oftens, Jujubes, of each fifteen, Dates six, Figs four, french Barly one ounce, Liquoris half an ounce, Maiden-hair, Hysop, Scabious, Colts-foot of each one handful, boyl them in three pound of wa­ter till two remain.

Culpeper A. The medicine is cheifly apropriated to the Lungues, and therefore causeth a cleer voice, a long wind, resisteeh coughs, hoarceness, Asthmaes [Page 74] &c. You may drink a quarter of a pint of it every morning, without keeping any diet, for it purgeth not. I shall quote some Syrups fitting to be mixed with it, when I come to the Syrups.

Decoctum Trumaticum. Page 48. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Agrimony, Mugwort, And why wild? I know no reason, nor a horse that hath a bigger head than I. The garden is best. wild Angelica, St. Johns wort, Mousear, of each two handfuls; Wormwood half a handful; Sou­thernwood, Betony, Bugloss, [...] the greater and lesser, roots and all, Avens, both sorts of Plantane, Sanicle, Tormentil with the roots, the buds of Ras­berries and Oak, of each a handful: all these being gathered in May or June and dilligently dried, let them be cut and put up in skins or papers against the time of use; then take of the fore named Herbs three handfuls, boyl them in four pound of Conduit water, and two pound of white Wine gently till half be con­sumed; strain it, and a pound of Honey being added to it, let it be scummed and kept for use.

Culpeper] A. [...] sight of a Medicine will do you good, this is as like to do it as any I know.

Some they have left out in their new Model, which are these that follow:

A Carminative Decoction.

Colledg] TAke of the You must bruise the seeds, else the Deco­ction wil be but lit­tle the [...] for them. seeds of Annis, Carrots, Fennel, Cummin, and Caraway, of each three drachms; Chamomel flowers half a handful; [...] of the Sun an ounce and an half: boyl them in two pints of water, till almost half [...] sumed.

Culpeper] A. It is commonly used in Clysters, to such whose bodies are molested or oppressed with wind, these seeds being added to the former Deco­ction.

A Decoction of Flowers and Fruits.

The Colledg] Take five Figs, fifteen Prunes, Ju­jubes, and [...], of each twenty, Tamarinds an ounce, the flowers of Roses, Violets, Borrage, Bug­loss, of each a drachm; Maidenhair, Hops, Endive, of each half an handful, Liquoris two drachms: be­ing cut and bruised, boyl them in three pints of spring Water to the consumption of the third part.

Culpeper] A. It strengthens the Lungues, and helps Obstruction.

Lac Virgineum.

The Colledg] Take of Allum four ounces, boyl it in a quart of spring Water, to the third part: Af­terwards,

Take of Beaten into very fine pou­der. Litharge half a pound, white Wine Vine­ger a pint and an half; boyl it to a pint, strain both the waters, then mix them together, and [...] them about till they are white.

Culpeper] A. It takes away Pimples, redness, frec­kles and sunburning, the face being washed with it.

A Drink for wounded men.

The Colledg] Take of Crabs of the River calcined, and beaten into very fine pouder, two drachms; the roots of round Birthwort, and of Comfry the greater, Self-heal, Bay-berries lightly bruised, of each one drachm; tie them all up in a linnen cloath, and boyl them in three pints of white Wine till the third part be consumed, adding about the middle of the De­coction, one pugil of The [...] not the fish. Perewinkles, then strain it for your use.

This Decoction must be prepared only for the present, when the Physitian appoints it, as also must almost all the rest of the Decoctions.

Culpeper] A. And therefore left my poor woun­ded Country man should perish for want of an Angel to fee [...] Too ma­ny Physi­tians in England being like Balaams Asse, they will not speak un­less they see an An­gel: yet I accuse not all. Physitian, or if he have it, before the Phy­sitian (which in some places is very remote) can come at him: I have taken the pains to write the Receipt in his own Mother tongue; he may get any friend to make it: He may drink half a pint of it in the morning; or if he please to boyl it in smal Ale instead of Wine; he would be well the sooner if he drunk no other drink.

SYRUPS. ALTERING SYRUPS.

Syrupus de Absinthio Symplex. Pag. 49. in Lat. Book. OR Syrup of Wormwood, Simple.

The Colledg. TAke of the clarified Juyce of common Wormwood, clarified Sugar, of each four pound; make it in­to a Syrup according to art.

After the same manner, are prepared simple Syrups of Betony, Borrage, Bugloss, Cardus, Chamomel, Suc­cory, Endive, Hedg-mustard, Strawberries, Fumito­ry, Ground-Ivy, St. Johns wort, Hops, Mercury, Mousear, Plantane, Apples, Purslain, Rasberries, Sage, Scabious, Scordium, Housleek, Coltsfoot, Pauls Be­tony, and other Juyces not sour.

Culpeper. A. See the Simples, and then you may easily know both their vertues and also that they are pleasanter and fitter for delicate stomachs when they are made into Syrups.

Syrupus de Absinthio Compositus. 49. in the Lat. B. OR Syrup of Wormwood, Compound.

The Colledg. Take of common Wormwood meanly dry, half a pound, red Roses two ounces, Indian Spicknard three drachms, old white Wine, Juyce of Quinces, of each two pound and an half; steep them a whol day in an earthen vessel, then boyl them gently, and strain it, and by adding two pound of Sugar boyl it into a Syrup according to art.

Culpeper. A. Mesue is followed verbatim in this; and the Re­ceipt is apropriated to cold and flegmatick stomachs, and in my opinion 'tis an admirable remedy for it, for it strengthens both stomach and liver, as also the instruments of concoction; a spoonful taken in the morning, is admirable for such as have a weak dige­stion, it provokes an appetite to ones victuals, it prevails against the yellow Jaundice, breaks wind, purgeth humors by urin. It was Roman Wormwood before, and so Mesue hath it, and our Colledg is as well able to correct Mesue as the Pigmies were to beat Hercules.

Syrupus Acetosus Symplex. Pag. 50. in the L. Book. OR Syrup of Vinegar Simple.

The Colledg. Take of cleer Water four pound, white Sugar five pound, boyl them in a glazed vessel over a gentle fire, scumming it till half the water be consumed, then by putting in two pound of Wine Vineger by degrees, per­fect the Syrup.

Culpeper. A. That is, Only melt the Sugar with the Vinegar over the fire, scum it, but boyl it not.

Syrupus Acetosus Simplicior. Pag. 50. in the L. Book. OR Syrup of Vineger more Simple.

The Colledg. Take of white Sugar five pound, white Wine Vine­gar two pound, by melting it in a bath, make it into a Syrup.

Culpeper. A. Of these two Syrups let every one use which he finds by experience to be best; the difference is but little, I hold the last to be the best of the two, and would give my reasons for it, but that I fear the Book will swell too big: They both of them cut flegm, as also tough, hard, viscous humors in the stomach; they cool the body, quench thirst, provoke urine, and pro­pare the stomach before the taking of a vomit. If you take it as a prepatative for a vomit, take half an ounce of it when you go to bed the night before you intend to vomit, it will make you to vomit the easier, but if for any of the foregoing occasins, take it with a Liquoris stick.

Syrupus Acetosus Compositus. Pag. 50. in the L. Book. OR Syrup of Vinegar Compound.

The Colledg. Take of the Roots of Smallage, Fennel, Endive, of each three ounces; the seeds of Annis, Smallage, Fen­nel, of each one ounce; of Endive half an ounce, cleer Water six pound; boyl it gently in an earthen vessel till half the Water be consumed, then strain and clarifie it, and with three pound of Sugar, and a pound and an half of white wine Vinegar, boyl it into a Syrup.

Culpeper. A. This in my opinion is a gallant Syrup for such whose bodies are stuffed either with flegm, or tough humors, for it opens obstructions or stoppings both of the stomach, liver, spleen, and reins; it cuts and brings away tough flegm and choller, and is there­fore a special remedy for such as have a [...] at their stomach. Mesue prescribes ten [...] of Water, and a quart of Vineger, let every one use which Dr Expe­rience tels him is best.

Syrupus de Agno Casto. Pag. 50. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Agnus Castus.

The Colledg. Take of the seeds of Rue, and Hemp, of each half a drachm; of Endive, Lettice, Purslain, Guords, Me­lones, of each two drachms; of Fleawort half an ounce, of Agnus Castus four ounces, the Flowers of Water-Lillies, the Leaves of Mints, of each half a handful; Decoction of seeds of Lentils, and Corian­der seeds, of each half an ounce, three pound of the De­coction, boyl them all over a gentle fire til two pound be consumed, ad to the residue being strained, two ounces Juyce of Lemmons, a pound and an half of white Sugar, make it into a Syrup according to art.,

A. A pretty Syrup and good for little.

Syrupus de Althaea. Pag. 51. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Marsh-Mallows.

The Colledg. Take of Roots of Marsh-Mallows two ounces, the Roots of Grass Sparagus, Liquoris, Raisons of the Sun stoned, of each half an ounce, the tops of Mallows, Marsh-Mallows, Pellitory of the Wall, Burnet, [...], Maiden-hair white and black, of each a hand­ful red [...] an ounce, of the What they are see at the end of the Simples, and before the Com­pounds in this Book. four greater and four lesser cold seeds, of each three drachms, boyl them in six pound of cleerr Water till four remain, which being strained, boyl into a Syrup with four pound of white Sugar.

Culpeper. A. It is a fine cooling, opening, slippery Syrup, and chiefly commendable for the chollick, stone, or gra­vel, in the kidnies or bladder.

A. I shall only give you a Caution or two concer­ning this Syrup, which for the forenamed effects, I hold to be excellent.

A. 1. Be sure you boyl it enough, for if you boyl it never so little too little, it will quickly be sour.

A. 2. For the Chollick (which is nothing else but an infirmity in the gut called Colon and thence it takes its name) you had best use it in Clysters, but for gra­vel or the stone, drink it in convenient Medicines, or by it self; If both of them afflict you use it both waies: I assure you this medicine will save those that are subject to such diseases, both mony and misery.

Syrupus de Ammoniaco. Pag. 51. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Ammoniacum.

The Colledg. Take of Maudlin and Cetrach, of each four hand­fuls; common Wormwood an ounce, the Roots of Suc­cory, Sparagus, bark of Caper Roots, of each two oun­ces, after due preparation sleep them twenty four hours in three ounces of white Wine, Rhadish and fumitory water, of each 2. pound, then boyl it away to one pound eight ounces, let it settle, in four ounces of which whilst it is warm, dissolve by it self Gum Ammoni­acum, first dissolved in white Wine Vinegar, two oun­ces, boyl the rest with a pound and an half of white Sugar into a Syrup, adding the mixtures of the Gum at the end.

Culpeper. A. It cools the Liver, and opens obstructions both of it and the Spleen, helps old Surfets and such-like diseases, as scabs, itch, leprosy, and what else proceed from the Liver overheated; you may take an ounce at a time.

Syrupus de Artemisia. Pag. 51. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Mugwort.

The Colledg. Take of Mugwort two handfuls, Penyroyal, Cala­minth, Origanum, Bawm, Arsmart, Dictani of Creet, Savin, Marsoram, Germander, St. Johns Wort, [...], Featherfew with the Flowers, Centaury the less, Rue, Bettony, Bugloss, of each a handful; the Roots of Fennel, Smallage, Parsly, Sparagus, Brus­cus, Saxifrage, Alicampane, Cyperus, Maddir, Orris, Peony, of each an ounce; Juniper Berries, the seeds of Lovage, Parsly, Smallage, Annis, Nigella, Carpobalsa­mum or Cubebs, Costus, Cassia Lignea, Cardamoms, Calamus Aromaticus, the Roots of Asarabacca, Pelli­tory of Spain, Valerian, of each half an ounce; being clensed, cut, and bruised, let them be infused twenty four hours in fourteen pound of cleer water, and boy­led till half be consumed, being taken off from the fire and rubbed between your hands, whilst it is warm, strain it, and with Honey and Sugar of each two pound, sharp Vineger four ounces, boyl it to a Syrup, and perfume it with Cinnamon and Spiknard, of each three drams.

Culpeper. A. It helps the passion of the matrix, and retains it in its place, it dissolves the coldness wind, and pains thereof, it strengthens the nerves, opens the pores, corrects the blood, it corrects and provokes the terms in women. You may take a handful of it at a time.

Syrupus de Betonica Compositus. Pag. 52. In L. Book. O R, Syrup of Betony Compound.

The Colledg. Take of Betony three handfuls, Marsoram a hand­ful and an half; Time, red Roses, of each a handful; Violets, Stoechas, Sage, of each half a handful; the seeds of Fennel, Annis, and Ammi, of each half an ouce; the roots of Peony, Polypodium, and Fennel, of each five drachms; boyl them in six pound of river water to three pound, strain it, and ad juyce of Betony two pound, Sugar three pound and an half, make it into a Syrup.

Culpeper. A. It helps diseases coming of cold, both in the head and stomach, as also such as come of wind, vertigoes, madness, it concocts melancholly, it pro­vokes the terms in women, and so doth the Simple Syrup more than the Compound. The Compositi­on was framed by the Augustan Physitians. Certain­ly our Physitians have but shallow brains, that they are fain to trot as far as Ausberg in Germany to steal Receipts.

Syrupus Byzantinus, Simple. Page 53. In the Latin Book.

The Colledg. Take of the Juyce of the Leaves of Endive and Smallage, of each two pound; of Hops and Bugless, of each one pound; boyl them together, and scum them, and to the clarified Liquor, ad four pound of white Sugar, to as much of the Juyces, and with a gentle fire boyl it to a Syrup.

Syrupus Byzantinus, Compound. Page 53. In the Latin Book.

The Colledg. Take of the Juyces so ordered as in the former, four pound, in which boylred Roses two ounces, Liquoris half an ounce, the seeds of Annis, Fennel, and Smal­lage, of each three drachms, Spicknard two drams, strain it, and to the three pound remaining, ad two pound of Vineger, four pound of Sugar, make it into a Syrup according to art.

Culpeper. A. They both of them (viz. both Simple and Compound) opens stoppings of the stomach, liver, and spleen, help the Rickets in children, cuts and brings away tough flegm, and helps the yellow Jaun­dice: Mesue saith the Compound Syrup is of more effect than the Simple for the same uses. You may take them with a Liquoris stick, or take a spoonful in the morning fasting.

Syrupus Botryos. Page 53. In the Latin Book. O R Syrup of Oak of Jerusalem.

The Colledg. Take of Oak of Jerusalem, Hedg-mustard, Nettles, of each two handfuls; Coltsfoot, an handful and an half, boyl them in a sufficient quantity of cleer Water till half be consumed; to two pound of the Decocti­on ad two pound of the Juyce of Turneps baked in an Oven in a close pot, and with three pound of white Sugar boyl it into a Syrup.

Culpeper. This Syrup was composed against Coughs, short­ness of breath, and other the like infirmities of the breast proceeding of cold, for (which if you can get it) you may take it with a Liquoris stick.

Syrupus Capillorum Veneris. Pag. 53. In L. Book. O R Syrup of Maidenhair.

The Colledg. Take of Liquoris two ounces, Maidenhair five oun­ces, steep them a natural day in four pound of warm water, then after a gentle boyling and strong straining, with a pound and an half of fine Sugar make it into a Syrup.

Culpeper. A. It opens stoppings of the stomach, strengthens the Lungues, and helps the infirmities of them. This may be taken also either with a Liquoris stick, or mixed with the pectoral Decoction like Syrup of Coltsfoot.

Syrupus Cardiacus, vel Julepum Cardiacum. Pag. 53. O R A Cordial Syrup.

The Colledg. Take of Rhenish Wine two pound, Rose water two ounces and an half, Cloves two seruples, Cinnamon half a drachm, Ginger two scruples, Sugar three ounces and an half, boyl it to the consistence of a Ju­lep, adding Amber-greese three grains, Musk one grain.

Culpeper. A. He that hath read thus far in this Book, and doth not know he must first boyl the Simples in the Wine, and then strain them out before he puts in the Sugar, is a man that in my opinion hath not [...] enongh to be taught to make up a Medicine; and the Colledg in their new Master-piece hath left it out.

A. If you would have this Julip keep long, you may put in more Sugar, and yet if close stopped, it will not easily corrupt because 'tis made up only of Wine; indeed the wisest way is to order the quantity of sugar according to theThat la­titude may be given safely in al Composi­tions. pallat of him that takes it.

A. It restoreth such as are in Consumptions; com­forts the heart, cherisheth the drooping spirits, and is of an opening quality, thereby carrying away those vapors which might otherwise anoy the brain and heart: You may take an ounce at a time, or two if you please.

Syrupus infusionis Floram Caryophillorum. Pag. 54. O R Syrup of Clove-gilliflowers.

The Colledg. Take a pound of Clove-gilliflowers the whites being cut off, infuse them a whol night in two pound of Wa­ter, then with four pound of sugar melted in it, make it into a Syrup without boyling.

Culpeper. A. In their former they added three pound of Wa­ter, if you would infuse them you must do it at several times.

A. The syrup is a fine temperate syrup, it streng­thens the heart, liver, and stomach, it refresheth the vital spirits, and is a good cordial in feavers; and u­sually mixed with other Cordials, you can hardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup.

Syrupus de Cinnamomo. Pag. 54. In the L. Book. O R, Syrup of Cinnamon.

The Colledg. Take of Cinnamon grosly bruised, four ounces; steep it in white Wine, and small Cinnamon water, of each half a pound three daies in a glass by a gentle heat; strain it and with a pound and an half of Sugar boyl it gently to a syrup.

Culpeper. A. This comes something neerer the Augustan Dispensatory than their former did; it is not altoge­ther the same, for then people would have said they did nothing, whereas now 'tis apparent they did something though to little purpose.

It refresheth the vital spirits exceedingly, and chee­reth both heart and stomach languishing through cold; it helps digestion exceedingly, and strengthens the whol body. You may take a spoonful at a time in a Cordial.

The Colledg. Thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups (but only with white Wine) of Annis seeds, sweet Fennel seeds, Cloves, Nutmegs, Ginger &c.

Syrupus Acetositatis Citriorum. Pag. 54. In L. Book. O R, Syrup of Juyce of Citrons.

The Colledg. Take of the Juyce of Citrons, strained without ex­pression and clensed a pound, sugar two pound, make it into a syrup like syrup of Clove-gilliflowers.

Culpeper. A. It prevails against all diseases proceeding from Choller, or heat of blood, feavers, both pestilential and not pestilential, it resisteth poyson, cools the [Page 104] blood, quencheth thirst, cureth the Vertigo, or dissi­ness in the head.

The Colledg. After the same manner is made syrup of Grapes, Or­renges, Barberries, Cherries, Quinces, Lemmons, Woodsorrel, Mulberries, Sorrel, English Currence, and o­ther sour Juyces.

Culpeper. A. If you look the Simples you may see the vertues of them, they all cool and comfort the heart and strengthen the stomach, syrup of Quinces staies vomi­ting, so doth also syrup of Grapes.

Syrupus Corticum Citriorum. Pag. 54. In the L. Book. O R, Syrup of Citron Pills.

The Colledg. Take of flesh yellow Citron Pills five ounces, the Berries of Chermes, or the Juyce of them brought over to us two drachms, spring water, four pound, steep them all night, boyl them till half be consumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pound and an half of sugar boyl it into a syrup, let half of it be without Musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of Musk tyed up in a rag.

Culpeper. A. It strengthens the stomach, resists poyson, strengthens the heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings; it strongthens the vital spirits, restores such as are in Consumpti­ons, and Hectick Feavers, and strengthens nature much. You may take a spoonful at a time.

Syrupus è Coralliis Simplex. Pag. 55. In the L. Book. O R, Syrup of Corral Simple.

The Colledg. Take of red Corral in very fine pouder four ounces, dissolve it in clarified Juyce of Barberries in the boat of a bath, a pound, in a glass well stopped with wax and Cork, a digestion being made three or four daies, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified Juyce and proceed as before; repeat this so osten till all the Corral be dissolved; lastly to one pound of this Juyce ad a pound and an half of sugar, and boyl it to a syrup gently.

Syrupus è Coralliis Compositus. Pag. 55. In L. Book. O R Syrup of Corral Compound.

The Colledg. Take of red Corral six ounces, in very fine pouder and levigated upon a marble, ad of clarified juyce of Lemmons, the flegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified [...] of Barberries, eight ounces; Sharp wine Vinegar and juyce of Wood-sorrel, of each six ounces; mix them together and put them in a glass stopped with Cork and Bladder, shaking it every day till it have digested eight daies in a bath or horsdung, then filter it, of which take a pound and an half; juyce of Quinces half a pound, Sugar of Roses twelve oun­ces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup of Clove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omit­ting the half drachm of Ambergrees and four grains of Musk till the Physitian command it.

Culpeper. A. Syrup of Corral both Simple and Compound, restore such as are in Consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially the last, and very Cordial, special good for Hectick feavers, it stops fluxes, the running of the reins, and the whites in women, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the Falling­sickness, it staies the terms in women: And indeed it had need be good for somthing, for it is exceeding costly. Half a spoonful in a morning is enough for the body, and it may be too much for the purse.

Syrupus Cydoniorum. Pag. 56. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Quinces.

The Colledg. Take of the Juyce of Quinces clarified six pound, boyl it over a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding red Wine three pound, white sugar four pound, boyl it into a syrup, to be perfumed with a drachm and an balf of Cinnamon, Cloves and Gin­ger of each two scruples.

Culpeper. A. It strengthens the heart and stomach, staies loosness and vomiting, releeves languishing nature, for loosness take a spoonful of it before meat, for vo­miting after meat; for both as also for the rest, in the morning.

Syrupus de Erysimo. Pag. 56. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Hedg-mustard.

The Colledg. Take of Hedgmustard fresh, six handfuls, the Roots of Alicampane, Coltsfoot, Liquoris, of each two oun­ces; Borrage, succory, Maiden-hair, of each a hand­ful and an half, the Cordial Flowers, Rosemary, and Be­tony, of each half a handful, Annis seeds half an ounce, Raisons of the Sun stoned two ounces, let all of them being prepared according to art be boyled in a sufficient quantity of barley Water and Hydromel, with six oun­ces of juyce of Hedgmustvrd to two pound and an half, the which with three pound of sugar boyl into a Syrup according to art.

Culpeper. A. It was invented against cold afflictions of the breast and Lungues, as Astmaes, hoarceness &c. you may take it either with a Liquoris stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three or four ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning.

Syrupus de Fumaria. Pag. 56. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Fumitory.

The Colledg. Take of Endive, common Wormwood, Hops, Dod­der, Hartstongue, of each a handful; Epithimum an ounce and an half; boyl them in four pound of Water till half be consumed; strain it, and ad the juyce of Fumitory a pound and an half; of Borrage, and Bug­loss of each half a pound, white Sugar four pound; make them into a Syrup according to art.

Culpeper. A. The Receipt is a pretty concocter of melan­cholly, and therefore a rational help for diseases ari­sing thence, both internal and external; It helps diseases of the skin, as Leprosies, Cancers, Warts, Corns, Itch, Tetters, Ringworms, Scabs, &c. and it is the better to be liked because of its gentleness, For in my experience, I could never find a violent Medicine do good, but ever harm in a For Me­lancholly is a sad sullen hu­mor, you had as good vex a nest of Wasps as Melancholly disease. It also strengthens the stomach and liver, [Page 105] opens obstructions, and is a soveraign remedy for Hypocondriack Melancholly. You may ad an ounce of this to the decoction of Epithimum before menti­oned, and order your body as you were taught there. It helps surfets exceedingly, clenseth, cooleth, and strengtheneth the liver, and causeth it to make good blood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh. I commend this Receipt to those whose bodies are sub­ject to scabs and Itch. If you please you may take two ounces by it self every morning.

Syrupus de Glycyrrhiza. Pag. 56. In the L. Book. O R Syrup of Liquoris.

The Colledg. Take of green Liquoris scraped and bruised two ounces, white Maidenhair an ounce, dryed Hysop half an ounce, steep these in four pound of hot water, after 24. hours boyl it till half be consumed, strain it and clarifie it, and with Honey, Peuids, and Sugar of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding be­fore it be perfectly boyled, red Rose-water six ounces.

Culpeper. A. It clenseth the breast and lungues, and helps continual Coughs and Pleuresies. You may take it with a Liquoris stick, or ad an ounce of it or more to the pectoral Decoction.

Syrupus Granatorum cum Aceto: vulgo, Oxysaccharum simplex. Page 57. in the Latin Book. O R Syrup of Pomegranates with Vineger.

The Colledg. Take of white Sugar a pound and an half, Juyce of Pomegranates eight ounces, white Wine Vineger four ounces, boyl it gently into a Syrup.

Culpeper. A. Look the Vertue of Pomegranates amongst the Simples.

Syrupus de Hyssopo. Page 57. in the Latin Book. O R Syrup of Hysop.

The Colledg. Take eight pound of spring Water, half an ounce of Barley, boyl it about half an hour, then ad the Roots of smallage, Parsly, Fennel, Liquoris, of each ten drams; Jujubes, Sebestens of each fifteen; Raisons of the sun stoned an ounce and an half; Figs, Dates, of each ten; the seeds of Mallows and Quinces, Gum Tragacanth tyed up in a rag, of each three drachms; Hysop meanly dried ten drachms, Maiden-hair six drachms; boyl them together, yet so, that the Roots may precead the Fruits, the Fruits the Seeds, and the Seeds the Herbs, about a quarter of an hour; at last, five pounds of Water being consumed, boyl the other three (being first strained and clarified) into a syrup with two pound and an half of Sugar.

Culpeper. A. You may thank Mesue for it, not the Col­ledg.

A. It mightily strengthens the By the breast I alwaies mean that which is lled [...]. breast and lungs, causeth long wind, cleer voice, is a good remedy a­gainst coughs. Use it like the syrup of Liquoris.

Syrupus Ivae arthriticae, sive Chamaepityos. Pag. 57. O R Syrup of Chamepitys.

The Colledg. Take of Chamepitys two handfuls; Sage, Rosema­ry, Poley mountain, Origanum, Calaminth, wild mints, Peniroyal, Hysop, Time, Rue, Garden and wild, Betony, Mother of Time, of each a handful; the roots of Acorus, Birthwort long and round, Briony, Dittany, Gentian, Hogs Fennel, Valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, sparagus, Fennel, Parsly Bruscus, of each an ounce; Pellitory of Spain an ounce and an half, stoechas, the seeds of Annis, Ammi, Car­raway, Fennel, Lovage, Hartwort, of each three drachms, Raisons of the sun two ounces; boyl them in ten pound of water to four, to which ad Honey and Sugar of each two pound, make it into a syrup to be persumed with sugar, Nutmegs, and Cubebs, of each three drachms.

Culpeper. A. I bid them mend this for shame last time, and the truth is, so they have; before it was a Hodg-podg that could not be made, and now 'tis a Hodg-podg only not worth the making.

Syrupus Jujubinus. Page 58. in the Latin Book. O R Syrup of Jujubes.

The Colledg. Take of Jujubes, Violets, five drachms; Maiden­hair, Liquoris, French Barley, of each an ounce; the seeds of Mallows five drachms; the seeds of white Poppies, Melones, Lettice, [seed of Quinces and Gum Tragacanth tyed up in a rag] of each three drachms; boyl them in six pound of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it and with two pound of sugar make it into a syrup.

Culpeper. A. Those that adore the Colledg as so many little God-a-mighties, let them ask them what part of the Violets must be put in, for they must operate as neer to their meanings as the men of Benjamin could throw a stone and not miss; others that do not, may be pleased to make use of the Flowers.

A. It is a fine cooling syrup, very available in Coughs, Hoarsness, and Pleuresies, Ulcers of the Lungues, and Bladder, as also in all inflamations whatsoever. You may take a spoonful of it once in three or four hours, or if you please take it with a Liquoris stick.

Syrupus de Meconio, sive, Diacodium. Page 58. Syrup of Meconium, or, Diacodium.

The Colledg. Take of white Poppy heads with their seeds, gathe­red a little after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three daies, eight ounces; black Poppy heads (so or­dered) six ounces, rain Water eight pound, steep them twenty four hours, then boyl and press them gently, boyl it to three pounds, and with twenty four ounces of sugar boyl it into a syrup according to art.

Syrupus de Meconio Compositus. Page 59. in L. Book. Syrup of Meconium Compound.

The Colledg. Take of white and black Poppy heads with their seeds fifty drachms; maindenhair fifteen drachms; Jujubes thirty; the seeds of Lettice fourty drachms; [Page 106] of Mallows and Quinces tied up in a rag a drachm and an half; Liquoris five drachms; Water eight pound; boyl it according to art, strain it, and to three pound of Decoction ad sugar and penids, of each a pound, make it into a syrup.

Culpeper. A. Meconium: The blush of which this Receipt carries in its frontispiece, is nothing else but the juyce of English Poppies boyled till it be thick: As I am of opinion that Opium is nothing else but the juyce ofFor such Opium as Authors talks of comes frō Utopia. Poppies growing in hotter Countries (and there­fore in all reason is colder in quality;) and therefore (I speak purely of Meconium and Opium, not of these syrups) though they be no edg-tools, yet 'tis ill jesting with them.

A. All these former syrups of Poppies provoke sleep, but in that, I desire they may be used with a great deal of caution and wariness, such as these are, are not fit to be given in the beginning of Feavers, nor to such whose bodies are costive; ever remember my former Motto, Fools are not fit to make Physiti­ans. Yet to such as are troubled with hot, sharp Rhewms, you may safely give them; and note this, the last, which is borrowed from Mesue is apropriated to the Lungues, whose own words (translation excep­ted) of it are these, It prevails against dry Coughs, Phtisicks, hot and sharp gnawing Rhewms, and pro­vokes sleep. It is an usual fashion for Nurses when they have heat their milk by exercise or strong liquor, (no marvel then if their children be froward) then run for syrup of Poppies to make their young ones sleep. I would fain have that fashion left, therefore I forbear the dose; let Nurses keep their own bodies [...], and their children will sleep well enough, never fear.

Syrupus [...]. Page 59. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Bawm.

The Colledg. Take of the Bark of Bugloss Roots an ounce; the [...] of white Dittany, sinksoyl, scorzonera, of each half an ounce; the Leaves of Bawm, scabious, De­vils-bit, the [...] of both sorts of Bugloss, and Rose­mary of each a handful; the seeds of sorrel, Citrons, Fennel, Cardus, Bazil, of each three drachms; boyl them in four pound of water till half be consumed, strain it, and ad three pound of white sugar; Juyce of Bawm, and Rose Water, of each half a pound, boyl them to a syrup, the which perfume with Cinnamon and yel­low sanders of each half an ounce.

Culpeper. A. The scorzonera Roots, and Bugloss Roots are added, and the Bettony Roots left out, and Fernelius his name buried in oblivion; that is all the Alterati­on: If the name of the wicked shall rot, 'tis more likely to happen upon themselves than Fernelius.

A. Alwaies tie perfumes up in a rag, and hang them into the syrup by a string when it boyls, and hang them by a string in the veslel (be it pot or glass) that you may keep the syrup in being boyled.

A. It is an excellent Cordial, and strengthens the heart, breast, and stomach, it resisteth Melancholly, revives the spirits, is given with good success in Fea­vers, it strengtheneth the memory, and relievs lan­gushing nature. You may take a spoonful of it at a time.

Syrupus de Mentha. Page 59. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Mints.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Quinces sweet and between sweet and sowr, the juyce of Pomegra­nates sweet, between sweet and sowr, and sowr, of each a pound and an half, dryed mints half a pound red Roses two ounces, let them lie in steep one day, then boyl it half away and with four pound of sugar boyl it into a syrup according to art, perfume it not unless the Physitian command.

Culpeper.] A. The syrup is in quality binding, yet it comforts the stomach much, helps digestion, staies vomiting, and is (in my opinion) as excellent a re­medy against sowr or offensive belchings, as any is in the Dispensatory: Take a spoonful of it after meat.

Syrupus de Mucilaginibus. Page 60. in the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Mussilages.

The Colledg.] Take of the seeds of Marsh-Mal­lows, Mallows, Quinces, of each an ounce; Gum Tragacanth, three drachms; let these infuse six hours in warm Decoction of Mallows, white Poppy seeds, and Winter-cherries; then press out the Mussilage to an ounce and an half; with which [...] and three ounces of the aforesaid Decoction, and two ounces of sugar, make a syrup according to art.

Culpeper.] A. A spoonful taken by it self, or in any convenient Liquor is excellent for any sharp corro­ding humors be they in what part of the body soever, Phtisicks, bloody Flux, stone in the Reins or Bladder, or Ulcers there, it is excellent good for such as have taken Purges that are to strong for their bodies, for by its slippery nature it helps corrosians, and by its cooling, helps inflamations.

Syrupus Myrtinus. Page 60. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Mirtles.

The Colledg.] Take of Mirtle berries two oun­ces and an half; Sanders white and red, sumach, Balaustines, Barberry stones, red Roses of each an ounce and an half; Medlars half a pound; bruise them in eight pound of water to four; strain it and ad juyce of Quinces and sour Pomegranates, of each six ounces; then with three pound of sugar boyl it in­to a Syrup.

Culpeper.] A. The syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, it helps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions of the internal parts, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stops immo­derate flux of the terms in women: A spoonful at a time is the dose.

Syrupus Florum Nymphaeae simplex. Page 60. Or, Syrup of Water-Lilly-flowers, simple.

The Colledg.] Take of the whitest of white Wa­ter-lilly-flowers, a pound; steep them in three pound of warm Water, six or seven hours; let them boyl a little and strain them out; put in the same waight of Flowers again the second and third time; when you have strained it the last time, ad its waight of sugar to it and boyl it to a syrup.

Syrupus Florum Nymphaeae compositus. Page 60. Syrup of Water-lilly-Flowers, compound.

The Colledg.] Take of white Water-lilly-Flowers [Page 107] half a pound; Violets two ounces, Lettice two hand­fuls; the seeds of Lettice, Purslain, and Guords, of each half an ounce; boyl them in four pound of cleer water till one be consumed; strain it, and ad half a pound of red Rose water; white sugar four pound, boyl it into a syrup according to art.

Culpeper.] A. They both are fine cooling syrups, they allay the heat of Choller, and provoke fleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases in either: you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach is empty.

Syrupus de Papavere Erratico, sive Rhubro. Page 61. Or, Syrup of Eratick Poppies.

The Colledg.] Take of the fresh Flowers of red Poppies two pound, steep them in four pound of warm spring Water; the next day strain it and boyl it into a syrup with its equal waight in Sugar.

Culpeper.] A. I know no danger in this syrup, so it be taken with moderation; and bread immoderate­ly taken, hurts; the syrup cools the blood, helps sur­fets, and may safely be given in Frenzies, Feavers, and hot Agues.

Syrupus de Pilosella. Page 61. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Mousear.

The Colledg.] Take of Mousear three handfuls, the Roots of Ladies mantle, an ounce and an half; the Roots of comsry the greater, Maddir, white Dit­tany, Tormentil, Bistort, of each an ounce; the Leaves of Wintergreen, Horstail, Ground-Ivy, Plantane, Ad­ders tongue, Strawberries, St. Johns Wort with the Flowers, Golden rod, Agrimony, Bettony, Burnet, Avens, Sinkfoyl the greater, red Coleworts, Balau­stines, red Roses of each a handful; boyl them gently in six pound of of Plantane Water to three, then strain it strongly and when it is setled, ad Gum Tragacanth, the seeds of Fleawort, Marsh-mallows, and Quinces, made into a Mussilage by themselves in strawberry and Bettony Water, of each three ounces; white sugar two pound, boyl it to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper.] A. Certainly they intended an univer­sal Medicine of this, and may prove as good as Chry­sippus his Coleworts. It is profitable for wounded people to take, for it is drying and healing, and therefore good for Ruptures.

Syrupus insusionis Florum Paeoniae. Page 62. Or, Syrup of the infusion of Peony Flowers.

The Colledg.] It is prepared just for all the world like syrup of Clove-gilliflowers.

Culpeper.] A. See syrup of Meconium for the ver­tues.

Syrupus de Paeonia Compositus. P. 62. in L. Book. Or, Syrup of Peony Compound.

The Colledg.] Take of the Roots of both sorts of Peony taken up at the full Moon, cut in slices and stee­ped in white Wine a whol day, of each an ounce and an half; Contra yerva half an ounce; Siler mountain six drachms; Elks Claws an ounce, Rosemary with the Flowers on, one handful; Bettony, Hysop, Origa­num, Chamepitys, Rue, of each three drachms; Wood of Aloes, Cloves, Cardamoms the less, of each two drachms; Ginger, Spicknard, of each a drachm; stoechas, Nutmegs, of each two drachms and an half; boyl them after one daies warm digestion, in a suffici­ent quantity of distilled Water of Peony Roots, to four pouud; in which being strained through Hippocrates his sleeves, put four pound and an half of white sugar and boyl it to a syrup.

Culpeper.] A. It is somewhat costly to buy, and as troublesom to make, a spoonful of it taken helps the Falling-sickness and Convulsions.

Syrupus de Pomis alterans. Page 62. in the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Apples.

The Colledg.] Take four pound of the juyce of sweet scented Apples, the juyce of Bugloss garden and wild, of Violet Leaves, Rose water, of each a pound; boyl them together and clarifie them, and with six pound of pure sugar, boyl it into a syrup according to Art.

Culpeper.] A. It is a fine cooling syrup for such whose hearts and stomachs are overpressed with heat, and may safely be given in feavers, for it rather loo­sens than binds; it breeds good blood, and is profi­table in Hectick feavers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, it quencheth thirst ad­mirably in Feavers, and staies Hiccoughs. You may take an ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need.

Syrupus de Prasio. Page 62. In the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Horehound.

The Colledg] Take of white Horehound fresh, two ounces; Liquoris, Polipodium of the Oak, Fennel, and smallage Roots of each half an ounce; white Maiden-hair, Origanum, Hysop, Calaminth, Time, savory, scabious, Coltsfoot of each six drachms; the seeds of Annis and Cotton, of each three drachms; Raisons of the sun stoned two ounces, fat Figs ten, boyl them in eight pound of Hydromel till half be con­sumed, boyl the Decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar of each two pound, and perfume it with an ounce of the Roots of Orris Florentine.

Culpeper.] A. It is apropriated to the breast and lungues, and is a fine clenser, to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helps Phtisicks and Coughs, and diseases subject to old men and cold natures. Take it with a Liquoris stick. Both this Receipt and the former, Fernelius was the Author of.

Syrupus de quin (que) Radicibus. Page 63. In L Book. Or, Syrup of the sive opening Roots.

The Colledg.] Take of the Roots of smallage, Fennel, Parsly, Bruscus, Sparagus, of each two oun­ces, spring Water six pound; boyl away the third part and make a syrup with the rest according to art; with three pound of sugar, adding eight ounces of white white Wine Vinegar towards the latter end.

Culpeper] It clenseth and openeth very well, is profitable against Obstructions, provokes Urine, clenseth the body of flegm, and is safely and profita­bly given in the beginning of Feavers. An ounce at a time upon an empty stomach is a good dose.

Syrupus Raphani. Page 63. In the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Rhadishes.

The Colledg] Take of Garden and wild Rhadish Roots, of each an ounce; the Roots of white Saxi­frage, Lovage, Bruscus, Eringo, Restharrow, Parsly, Fennel, of each half an ounce; the Leaves of Bettony, Burnet, Penyroyal, Nettles, Watercresses, Sampier, Maidenhair, of each a handful; Winter Cherries, Jujubes, of each ten; the seeds of Bazil, Bur, Parsly of Macedonia, Hartwort, Caraway, Car­rots, Gromwel, the Bark of the Root of Bay-tree, of each two drachms; Raisons of the sun stoned, Liquo­ris, of each six drachms; boyl them in twelve pound of water to eight; strain it, and with four pound of Sugar and two pound of Honey, make it into a syrup and perfume it with an ounce of Cinnamon, and half an ounce of Nutmegs.

Culpeper] A. A tedious long Medicine for the stone: I wonder why the Colledg affect such LONG Receipts, surely it will be LONG enough before they be wiser.

Syrupus Regius, aliàs Julapium Alexandrinum. P. 64 Or, Julep of Alexandria.

The Colledg] Boyl four pound of Rose water, and one pound of white sugar into a Julep.

Julep. of Roses is made with Damask Rose water, in the very same manner.

Culpeper] Two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer for them that have nothing else to do with their money.

Syrupus de Rosis siccis. Page 64. In the L. Book. Or, Syrup of dried Roses.

The Colledg] Make four pound of spring Water hot, in which infuse a pound of dried Roses by some at a time; press them out, and with two pound of su­gar boyl it into a syrup according to art.

Culpeper] A. If you boyl it, it will lose bothIn syrups made of Decocti­ons, the colour is not so material. co­lour and vertue, and then who but the Colledg would first cry out against such paltry stuff? I am weary with nothing this in every Receipt, therefore be pleased to accept of this one general Rule, It is not best to boyl any syrups made of Infusions, but by adding the double weight of Sugar (viz. two pound of sugar to each pint of infusion) melt it over a fire only.

A. Syrup of dried Roses, strengthens the heart, comforts the spirits, bindeth the body, helps fluxes and corrosions or gnawings of the guts, it strengthens the stomach, and staies vomiting. You may take an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes; after meat, if for vomiting.

Syrupus Scabiosae. Page 64. In the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Scabious.

The Colledg] Take of the Roots of Alicampane, and Polypodium of the Oak, of each two ounces; Rai­sons of the the sun stoned an ounce, sebestens twenty, Coltsfoot, Lungwort, savory, Calaminth, of each a handsul and an half; Liquoris, Spanish Tobacco, of each half an ounce; the seeds of Nettles and Cot­ton of each three drachms; boyl them all (the Roots being infused in white Wine the day before) in a suffi­cient quantity of Wine and Water to eight ounces; strain it, and adding four ounces of the Juyce of Scabious, and ten ounces of sugar boyl it to a syrup, ad­ding to it twenty drops of oyl of Sulphur.

Culpeper] A. It is a clensing syrup, apropriated to the breast and lungues; when you perceive them op­pressed by flegm, crudities, or stoppings, your reme­dy is to take now and then a spoonful of this syrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy or scabby.

Syrupus de Scolopendrio. Page 64. in the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Hartstongue.

The Colledg] Take of Hartstongue three handfuls, Polypodium of the Oak, the Roots of both sorts of Bugloss, bark of the roots of Capars & Tamaris of each two ounces, Hops, Doddar, Maiden-hair, Bawm of each two handfuls, boyl them in nine pound of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pound of white sugar make it into a syrup according to art.

Culpeper] A. It helps the stoppings of Melanchol­ly, opens obstructions of the Liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetick evils, and therefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the vulgar call the Rickets, or Liver-grown: A spoonful in a mor­ning is a precious Remedy for children troubled with that disease. Men that are troubled with the spleen, which is known by pain and hardnes in their left side, may take three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one Receipt worth the price of the whol Book.

Syrupus de Stoechade. Page 65. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Stoechas.

The Colledg] Take of Stoechas flowers four ounces, Rosemary flowers half an ounce, Time, Calaminth, Origanum of each an ounce and an half, Sage, Beto­ny of each half an ounce, the seeds of Rue, Pcony, and Fennel, of each three drachms, spring water ten pound, boyl it till half be consumed, and with Ho­ney and sugar of each two pound boyl it into a syrup, which perfume with Cinnamon, Ginger, and Calamus Aromaticus, of each two drachms tyed up in a rag.

Syrupus de Symphyto. Page 65. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Comfry.

The Colledg] Take of the Roots and Tops of Com­fry the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red Roses, Betony, Plantane Burnet, Knot-grass, scabious, Coltsfoot, of each two handfuls, press the Juyce out of them all being green and bruised, boyl it, scum it and strain it, ad its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup according to art.

Culpeper] A. The syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or pissings of blood, it unites broken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the terms in women: you cannot er in taking of it.

Syrupus Violarum. Page 65. in the Latin Book. Or, Syrup of Violets.

The Colledg] Take of Violet Flowers fresh and picked, a pound, cleer water made boyling hot two pound, shut them up close together in a new glazed pot, a whol day, then press them hard out, and in two pound of the Liquor dissolve four pound and three ounces of [Page 109] white Sugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boyling.

Syrup of the Juyce of Violets is made with its dou­ble waight of Sugar like the former.

Culpeper] A. This latter syrup is far more charga­ble than the former, and in all reason is better, al­though I never knew it used; they both of them cool and moisten, and that very gently, they correct the sharpness of choller, and give ease in hot vices of the breast, they quench thirst in acute fea­vers, and resist the heat of the disease, they comfort hot stomachs exceedingly, cool the liver and heart, and resist putrifaction, pestilence and poyson. It is so harmless a syrup you shall hurt your purse by it soo­ner than your body.

The Colledg] Julep of Violets is made of the wa­ter of Violet flowers and sugar like Julep of Roses.

Culpeper] A. It is cooling and pleasant for the Gentry when they are hot with walking, for few of them much trouble their study.

PURGING SYRUPS.

Syrupus de Cicborio cum Rhabarbaro. Page 67. Or, Syrup of Succory with Rhubarb.

The Colledg. TAke of whol Barley, the Roots of Smal­lage, Fennel and Sparagus of each two ounces, Succory, Dandelyon, Endive, smooth Sowthistles of each two handfuls, Lettice, Liver­wort, Fumitory, tops of Hops, of each one handful, Maiden-hair white and black, Cetrach, Liquoris, Winter Cherries, Dodder of each six drachms; to boyl these take sixteen pound of spring water, strain the liquor and boyl in it six pound of white Sugar, adding towards the end six ounces of Rhubarb, six drachms of Spicknard bound up in a thin and slack rag, the which crush often in boyling, and so make it into a sy­rup according to art.

Culpeper] A. This Receipt (without a name) was borrowed from Nicholaus Florentinus; the diffe­rence is only in the quantity of the Rhubarb, and Spike, besides the order inverted, whose own aproba­tion of it runs in these terms.

A. It clenseth the body of venemous humors, as Boyls, Carbuncles, and the like; it prevails against pestilential Feavers, it strengthens the heart and nu­tritive vertue, purgeth by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep.

A. But by my Authors leave, I never accounted purges to be proper Physick in Pestilential Feavers; this I beleeve, the syrup clenseth the liver well, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with Hypo­condriack Melancholly. The strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak one; or you may mix an ounce of it with the Decoction of Senna.

Syrupus de Epithymo. Page 67. in the Latin. Book. Or, Syrup of Epithimum.

The Colledg] Take of Epithimum twenty drams, Mirobalans, Citron, and Indian of each fifteen drams, Emblicks, Bellericks, Polypodium, Liquoris, Agrick, Time, Calaminth, Bugloss, Stoechas of each six drams, Dodder, Fumitory, of each ten drachms, red Roses, Annis seeds and sweet Fennel seeds of each two drachms and an half, Would I ould see them: tru­ly if ye would hav them, I doubt you [...] go to Arabia where Me­sue dwelt. sweet Prunes ten, Raisons of the sun stoned four ounces, Tamarinds two ounces and an half; after twenty four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boyl it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and with five pound of fine Sugar boyl it into a syrup according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is best to put in the Dodder, Stoe­chas and Agrick, towards the latter end of the De­coction.

A. This Receipt was Mesue's, only instead of five pound of Sugar, Mesue appoints four pound of Su­gar and two pound of Sapa (the making of which shall be shewed in its proper place) and truly in my opinion the Receipts of Mesue are generally the best in all the Dispensatory, because the Simples are so pertinent to the purpose intended, they are not made up of a mess of Hodgpodg as many others are: but to the purpose.

A. It purgeth Melancholly, and other humors, it strengtheneth the stomach and Liver, clenseth the body of addust choller and addust blood, as also of salt humors, and helps diseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosie &c. and the truth is, I like it the better for its gentleness, for I never fancied violent Medicines in Melancholly dis­eases. A mean man may take two ounces at a time, or ad one ounce to the Decoction of Epithimum.

Syrupus è Floribus Persicorum. Page 68. in L. Book. Or, Syrup of Peach-flowers.

The Colledg] Take of fresh Peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whol day in three pound of warm water, then boyl it a little and strain it out, repeat this infusi­on five times in the same [...], in three pound of which dissolve two pound and an half of Sugar [and boyl it into a syrup.

Culpeper] A. It is a gentle Purger of choller, and may be given even in feavers to draw away the sharp chollerick humors according to the opinion of An­dernacus, whose Receipt (all things considered) dif­fers little from this.

Syrupus de Pomis Purgans. Page 68. in the L. Book. Or, Syrup of Apples, purging.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of sweet smelling Apples two pound, the juyce of Borrage and Bugloss of each one pound and an half, Senna two ounces, Annis seeds half an ounce, Saffron one drachm; let [Page 110] the [...] be sleeped in the Juyce's twenty four hours, and after a walm or two strain it, and with two pound of white sugar boyl it to a syrup according to art, the Saffron being tyed up in a rag, and often cru­shed in the boyling.

Culpeper] A. Mesue appoints Senna Cods, and so do the Augustan Physitians, viz. the husk that holds the seeds; and the Colledg altered that, and added the Annis seeds, I suppose to correct the Sen­na, and in so doing they did well.

A. The syrup is a pretty cooling purge, and tends to rectifie the distempers of the blood, it purgeth choller and melancholly, and therefore must needs be effectual both in yellow and black Jaundice, madness, scurf, Leprosie, and scabs; It is very gentle, and for that I commend both the Receipt, and Mesue the Au­thor of it. The dose is from one ounce to three, ac­cording as the body is in age and strength. An ounce of it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out in scabs.

Syrupus de Pomis Magistralis. Page 68. in L. Book. Or, Syrup of Apples Magisterial.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce and Water of Ap­ples of each a pound and an [...], the Juyce and Water of Borrage and Bugloss of each nine ounces, Senna half a pound, Annis seeds, and sweet Fennel seeds of each three [...], Epithimum and why of Creet? there grew most Time upon Hi­mettus in Greece, & Hybla in Sycilia, & so by con­sequence most Epi­thimum. of Creet two ounces, Agrick, Rhubarb, of each half an ounce, Ginger, Mace of each four scruples, Cinnamon two scruples, Saffron half a drachm; Infuse the Rhubaib and Cinnamon apart by it self, in white Wine and Juyce of Apples, of each two ounces, let all the rest, the Saffron excepted, be sleeped in the Waters above mentioned, and the next day put in the Juyces, which being boyled, [...] and strained, then with four ounces of white Sugar boyl it into a syrup, crushing the Saffron in it being tyed up in a linnen rag, the infusion of the Rhubarb being added at the latter end.

Culpeper] A. Out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge addust Choller and Melancholly, and to re­sist madness. I know no better purge for such as are almost, or altogether distracted by Melancholly, than one ounce of this mixed with four ounces of the De­coction of Epithimum, ordering their bodies as they were taught.

Syrupus de Rhabarbaro. Page 69. in the Lat. Book. Or, Syrup of Rhubarb.

The Colledg] Take of the best Rhubarb and Senna of each two ounces and an half, Violet Flowers a handful, Cinnamon one drachm and an half, Gin­ger half a drachm, Betony, Succory and Bugloss Water of each one pound and an half; let them be mixed to­gether warm all night, and in the morning strained and boyled into a syrup with two pound of white su­gar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of Roses.

Culpeper] A. It clenseth choller and melancholly very gently, and therefore is fit for children, old peo­ple, and weak bodies. You may ad an ounce of it to the [...] of Epithimum or to the Decoction of Senna. It is a very pretty Receipt made by the Au­gustan Physitians.

Syrupus Rosaccus Solutivus. Page 69. in L. Book. Or, Syrup of Roses Sclutive.

The Colledg] Take of spring water boyling hot four pound, Damask Rose leaves fresh as many as the Water will contain, let them remain twelve hours in insusion, close stopped; then press them out and put in [...] Rose leaves, do so God re­joyceth in odd num­bers, quoth one of their Patriarks, I should have said a Poet. nine times, in the same li­quor, encreasing the quantity of the Roses as the Li­quor encreaseth, which will be almost by the third part every time; Take six parts of this Liquor and with four parts of white Sugar boyl it to a syrup ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. It loosneth the belly, and gently bringeth out choller and flegm, but leaves a binding quality behind it.

Syrupus e Succo Rosarum. Page 70. in the Lat. Book. Or, Syrup of the Juyce of Roses.

The Colledg] It is prepared without steeping, only with the Juyce of Damask Roses pressed out, and clarified, and an equal proportion of Sugar added to it.

Culpeper] A. This is like the other.

Syrupus Rosaccus Solutivus cum Agarico. Page 70. Or, Syrup of Roses Solutive with Agrick.

The Colledg] Take of Agrick cut thin an ounce, Ginger two drachms, Sal-Gem one drachm, Polypo­dium bruised two ounces, sprinkle them with white wine and steep them two dates over warm oshes, in a pound and an half of the infusion of Damask Roses prescribed before, and with one pound of sugar boyl it into a syrup according to Art.

Culpeper] A. You had better ad twice so much su­gar as is of the infusion, for fear the strength of the Agrick be lost in the boyling.

A. It purgeth flegm from the head, relieves the sences oppressed by it, it provokes the terms in wo­men, it purgeth the stomach and Liver, and provo­keth urin. Some hold it an universal purge for all parts of the body: a weak body may take an ounce at a time, and a strong, two ounces, guiding himself as he was taught in Decection of Epithimum.

Syrupus Rosaccus Solutivus cum Helleboro. Page 70. Or, Syrup of Roses Solutive with Hellebore.

The Colledg] Take of the bark of all the Myroba­lans of each four ounces, bruise them grosly and steep them twenty four hours in twelve pound of the infusi­on of Roses before spoken; Senna, Epithimum, Poly­podium of the Oak, of each four ounces; Cloves an ounce, Citron seeds, Liquoris of each four ounces, the Take the Roots themselves for if the Bark be to be had, it is very rare. bark of black Hellebore roots six drachms; let the fourth part of the Liquor gently exhale, strain it, and with five pound of Sugar and sixteen drachms of Rhu­barb tyed up in a [...] rag, make it into a syrup ac­cording to Art.

Culpeper] A. You must not boyl the black Helle­bore at all, or but very little, if you do you had as good put none in; me thinks the Colledg should have had either more wit or honesty, than to have left Receipts so woodenly penned to posterity, or it may be they wrote as they say only to the Learned, or in plain English for their own ends, or to satisfie their covetousness, that a man must needs run to them eve­ry time his finger akes.

A. The syrup rightly used, purgeth melancholly, resisleth madness. I wish the ignorant to let it alone, for fear it be too hard for them, and use them as coursly as the Colledg hath done.

Syrupus Rosaccus Solutivus cum Sena. Page 70. Or, Syrup of Roses Solutive with Senna.

The Colledg] Take of Senna six ounces; Caraway [Page 111] and sweet Fennel seeds of each three drachms, sprin­kle them with white Wine and infuse them two daies in three pound of the infusion of Roses aforesaid, then strain it, and with two pound of Sugar boyl it into a Syrup.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth the body of choller and melancholly, and expels the relicts a disease hath left behind it; the dose is from one ounce to two: you may take it in a Decoction of Senna, it leaves a bin­ding quality behind it.

Surupus de Spina Cervina. Page 71. Or, Syrup of Purging Thorn.

The Colledg] Take of the Berries of Purging Thorn, gathered in September, as many as you will, bruise them in a stone Mortar and press out the [...], let the fourth part of it evaporate away in a bath, then to two pound of it, ad sixteen ounces of [...] Sugar, boyl it into a Syrup, which perfume with [...], Cinnamon, Nutmegs, Annis seeds, in fine pouder of each three drachms.

Culpeper] A. Tragus and Pena commend it much against the Dropsie, I know nothing of it by experi­ence, and I am confident the Colledg when they writ it knew as little, and therefore I hold it modesty to let it alone, as an upstart Medicine appointed to try experiences upon poor mens bodies, and if it kill them, their friends by Law cannot question a Colle­giate.

SYRUPS MADE WITH VINEGER AND HONEY.

Mel Anthosatum. Page 72. in the Latin Book. Or, Honey of Rosemary Flowers.

TAke of fresh Rosemary Flowers a pound, clari­fied Honey three pound, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in the sun, and keep them for use.

Culpeper] A. It hath the same vertues with Rose­mary flowers, to which I refer you, only by reason of the Honey it may be somwhat clensing.

Mel Helleboratum. Page 72. in the Latin Book. Or, Honey Helleborated.

The Colledg] Take of white Hellebore Roots brui­sed a pound, cleer water fourteen pound, after three daies infusion, boyl it till half be consumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pound of Honey boyl it to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. What a monstrum horrendum, hor­rible terrible Receipt have we got here? A pound of white Hellebore boyled in fourteen pints of Water to seven; I would ask the Colledg (if they would not be angry, or if they be I cannot help it) whether the Hellebore will not lose its vertue in the twentieth part of this infusion and decoction (for it must be in­fused (forsooth) three daies to a minute;) if a man may make so bold as to tell them the truth, A Tay­lors Goose being boyled that time, would make a De­coction near as strong as the Hellebore, but this they will not beleeve; well then be it so, imagine the Hellebore still to retain its vigor after being so long tired out with a tedious boyling (for less boyling would boyl an Ox) what should this Medicine do? purge Melancholly say they, but from whom? from men or beasts? for the Medicine would be so strong the Devil would not take it unless it were powred down his throat with a horn. I will not say they in­tended to kill men cum privilegio, that's too gross; I charibly judg thus, They fearing their monopoly would not hold as being built upon a rotten foundati­on, intended when it failed to turn Horse-Doctors, and so provided this Receipt against a wet day, For,

A. Either the vertue of the Hellobore will fly away in such a martyrdom, or else it will remain in the Decoction.

A. If it evaporate away, then is the Medicine like themselves good for nothing.

A. If it remain in, it is enough to spoil the stron­gest man breathing.

A. 1. Because it is too strong.

A 2. Because it is not corrected in the least, and because they have not corrected that, therefore I take leave to correct them.

Mel Mercuriale. Page 72. in the Latin Book. Or, Honey of Mercury.

The Colledg] Boyl three pound of the Juyce of Mercury with two pound of Honey to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. It is used as an Emollient in Cly­sters.

Mel Mororum, vel Diamoron. Page 72. in L. Book. Or, Honey of Mulberries.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Mulberries and black berries, before they be ripe, gathered before the Sun be up, of each a pound and an half, Honey two pound boyl them to their due thickness.

Culpeper] A. It is [...] known to be good for sore mouths, as also to cool inflamations there.

Mel Nuceum, aliàs, [...] et Dianncum. P. 72. Or, Honey of Nuts.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of the outward bark of green [...], gathered in the dog daies two pound, boyl it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of Honey boyl it to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. It is a good preservative in peftilen­tial times, a spoonful being taken so soon as you are up.

Mel Passulatum. Page 72. in the Latin Book. Or, Honey of Raisons.

The Colledg] Take of Raisons of the Sun clensed from the stones two pound, steep them in six pound of warm water, the next day boyl it half away and press it strongly, and with two pound of Honey let the ex­pressed liquor boyl to its thickness.

Culpeper] A. It is a pretty pleasing Medicine for such as are in Consumptions, and are bound in body.

Mel Rosatum commune, sive Foliatum. Page 73. Or, Common Honey of Roles.

The Colledg] Take of red Roses not quite open two pound, Honey six pound, set them in the Sun ac­cording to art.

Mel Rosatum Colatum. Page 73. in the Latin Book. Or, Honey of Roles strained.

The Colledg] Take of the best clarified Honey ten pound, Juyce of frish red Roses one pound, set it handsomly over the fire, and when it begins to boyl, put in four pound of fresh red Roses, the whites being cut off; the Juyce being consumed by boyling and stir­ring, strain it, and keep it for use.

Culpeper] A. They are both used for diseases in the mouth.

Mel Rosatum Solutivum. Page 73. in L. Book. Or, Honey of Roses Solutive.

The Colledg] Take of the often Infusion of Da­mask Roses five pound, Honey rightly clarified four pound, boyl it to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. It is used as a laxative in Clysters, and some Chyrurgians use it to clense wounds.

The Colledg] After the same manner is prepared Honey of the Infusion of red Roses.

Mel Scilliticum. Page 73. In the Latin Book. Or, Honey of Squils.

The Colledg] Take one Squill full of Juyce, cut it in bits, and put it in a glass vessel, the mouth close stopped, and covered with a skin, set it in the Sun fourty daies, to wit, twenty before and after the ri­sing of the Dog Star, then open the vessel and take the Juyce which lies at the bottom, and preserve it with the best Honey.

Culpeper] A. A man never shews his folly so much as in medling with things he hath no skill in: Were it not folly in me to go teach a Smith how to make nails, or a Farmer how to mend his Land? And what then is it for our learned Colledg to write of Astronomy, which is a Science they have as much skill in as Banks his horse? I told them of it last Edi­tion, and now they have mended it as the Fletcher mended his Bolt, made two faults for one before; what should a Common-wealth do with such crea­tures that know nothing, and are too proud to learn. It belongs to their slaves, viz. the Company of the Apothecaries to ask them, 1. Which Dog Star they mean, 2. Which rising whether Acronical, Cosmi­cal, or Heliacal.

The Colledg] Honey of Violets is prepared like as Honey of Roses.

Oxymel Simple. Page 73. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the best Honey four pound, cleer water and white Wine Vineger of each two pound, boyl them in an earthen vessel, taking the scum off with a wooden Scummer, till it be come to the con­sistence of a Syrup.

Culpeper] A. Your best way is to boyl the Water and Honey first into a Syrup, and ad the Vineger af­terwards, and then boyl it again into a Syrup. Ob­serve, that the later it be before you ad the Vineger to any Syrup, the sowrer will it be: so may you please your self, and not offend the Colledg, for they give you latitude enough.

A. It cuts flegm, and it is a good preparative a­gainst a vomit.

Oxymel Compound. Page 73. in the L. Book.

The Colledg] Take of the Bark of the Root of Fennel, Smallage, Parsly, Bruscus, Sparagus, of each two ounces, the Seeds of Fennel, Smallage, Parsly, Annis, of each one ounce, steep them all (the Roots being first clensed and the Seeds bruised) in six pound of cleer water, and a pound and an half of wine Vi­neger, the next day boyl it to the consumption of the third part, boyl the rest being strained, with three pound of Honey into a liquid Syrup according to art.

Culpeper] A. First, having bruised the Roots and Seeds, boyl them in the water till half be, consumed, then strain it and ad the Honey, and when it is al­most boyled enough, add the Vineger; and with all my heart I will put it to Dr. Reason to judg which is the best way of making of it, the Colledges or mine.

Oxymel Helleboratum. Page 74. in the Latin Book. Or, Oximel Helleborated.

The Colledg] Take of Rue, Time, Dittany of Creet, Hysop, Penyroyal, Horebound, Cardus, the Roots of Celtick Spicknard without Leaves, the inner bark of Elders, of each a handful, mountain Cala­minth two pugils, the Seeds of Annis, Fennel, Bazil, Romane Nettles, Dill, of each two drachms, the Roots of Angelica, Marsh-Mallows, Aron, Squils prepared, Birthwort, long, round, and climing, Turbith, English Orris, Costus, Polypodium, Lemmon Pills, of each an ounce, the strings of black Hellobore, Spurge, Agrick, added at the end of the Decoction, of each two drams; the bark of white Hellebor half an ounce, let al of them being dried & bruised, be digested in a Glass, or glazed vessel close stopped, in the heat of the Sun, or of a Furnace; Posca, made of equal parts of Water and Vineger, eight pound, Sapa two ounces; three daies being expired, boyl it a little more than half a­way; strain it pressing it gently, and ad to the liquor a pound and an half of Honey-Roses, wherein two oun­ces of Citron Pills have been infused, boyl it to the thickness of Honey, and perfume it with Cloves, Saf­fron, Ginger, Galanga, Mace, of each a drachm.

Culpeper] A. It is such a mess of altogether, that a man scarce knows what to do with it; here are ma­ny Simples very Cordial, many provoke the terms, some purge gently, some violently, and some cause vomiting; being all put together I verily think the labor and cost if put in an equal ballance would out­weigh the benefit; but the Apothecaries must make it, the Colledg commands it.

Oxymel Julianizans. Page 75. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of the bark of Caper Roots, the Roots of Orris, Fennel, Parsly, Bruscus, Cichory, Spa­ragus, Cyperus, of each half an ounce, the Leaves of Harts-tongue, Schaenanth, Tamaris, of each half a handful, sweet Fennel Seed half an ounce, infuse them in three pound of Posca which is somthing sowr, afterwards boyl it till half be consumed, strain it, and with Honey and Sugar clarified, of each half a pound, boyl it to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. This Medicine is very opening, ve­ry good against Hypocondriack Melancholly, and as fit a Medicine as can be for that disease in children called the Rickets. Children are as humorsom as men (and they are humorsom enough Experience the best of all Doctors teacheth) some love sweet things, let them take Syrup of Harts-tongue; others cannot abide sweet things, to their natures this Syrup suits, being taken in the same manner.

The Colledg] Oximel of Squils simple is made of three pound of clarified Honey, Vineger of Squils two pound, boyl them according to art.

Culpeper] A. They say they borrowed this Re­ceipt of Nicholaus, but of what Nicholaus I know [Page 113] not, the self same Receipt is word for word in Mesue whose commendations of it is this, It cuts and di­vides humors that are tough and viscus, and therefore helps the stomach and bowels afflicted by such hu­mors, and helps sour belchings. If you take but a spoonful in the morning, an able body will think it enough.

A. View the Vineger of Squils, and then your rea­son will tell you this is as wholsom, and somwhat more toothsom.

Oxymel Scilliticum Compositum. Page 75. in L. Book. Or, Oximel of Squils Compound.

The Colledg.] Take of Origanum, dried Hysop, Time, Lovage, Cardamoms the less, Stoechas, of each five drachms, boyl them in three pound of Water to one; strain it, and with two pound of Honey, Honey of Raisons half a pound, Juyce of Briony five ounces, Vineger of Squils a pound and an half, boyl it and scum it according to art.

Culpeper.] A. Mesue saith this is good against the Falling-sickness, Megrim, Head-ach, Vertigo, or swimming in the head, and if these be occasioned by the stomach as many times they are; it helps the Lungues obstructed by humor, and is good for wo­men not well clensed after labor, it opens the passage of the womb. 'Tis too churlish a purge for a Coun­try man to meddle with: If the ignorant will be med­ling they will meet with their matches, and say I told them so.

A. Such Syrups as are in their rejected Dispensato­ry, and left out in this, (for they love to reject the best and chuse the worst, as though they were born for nothing else but to do mischief) are these that follow.

Culpeper. A. REader, before we begin, I thought good to advertise thee of these few things, which indeed I had inserted at the beginning of the Syrups had I not forgotten it.

A. 1. A Syrup is a Medicine of a liquid body, compounded of Decoction, Infusi­on, or Juyce, with Sugar or Honey, and brought by the heat of the fire, into the thickness of Honey.

A. 2. Because all Honey is not of a thickness, understand new Honey, which of all other is thinnest.

A. 3. The Reason why Decoctions, Infusions, and Juyces, are thus used, is, be­cause thereby,

  • 1. They will keep the longer.
  • 2. They will tast the better.

A. 4. In boyling Syrups have a great care of their just consistance, for if you boyl them too much they will candy, if too little, they will sour.

A. 5. All Simple Syrups have the vertues of the Simples they are made of, and are far more convenient for weak people, and queazy stomachs.

Syrup of Purslain. Mesue.

The Col­ledg. TAke of the seeds of Purslain grosly bruised, half a pound, of the Juyce of Endive boyled and clarified two pound, Sugar two pound, Vineger nine ounces; infuse the seeds in the juyce of Endive twenty four hours, afterwards, boyl it half away with a gentle fire, then strain it and boyl it with the Sugar to the consistence of a Syrup, adding the Vineger towards the latter end of the Decoction.

Culpeper.] A. It is a pretty cooling Syrup, fit for any hot diseases incident to the stomach, reins, blad­der, matrix, or liver, it thickens flegm, cools the blood and provokes sleep. You may take an ounce of it at a time when you have occasion.

Compound Syrup of Coltsfoot. Renodaeus.

The Colledg.] Take six handfuls of green Colts­foot, two handfuls of Maiden-hair, one handful of Hysop, and two ounces of Liquoris, boyl them in four pints, either of If I durst spend pa­per about it, I could easily prov spring wa­ter to be the best by far. rain or spring water, till the fourth part be consumed, then strain it and clarifie it, to which ad three pound of white Sugar, boyl it to the perfect consistence of a Syrup.

Culpeper.] A. The Composition is apropriated to the Lungues, and therefore helps the infirmities, weaknesses, or failings thereof, as want of voice, difficulty of breathing, coughs, hoarsness, cathars &c. The way of taking it is with a Liquoris stick, or if you please you may ad an ounce of it to the pectoral Decoction before mentioned.

Syrup of Poppies, the lesser Composition.

The Colledg] Take the heads of white Poppies and black, when both of them are green, of each six ounces; the seeds of Lettice, the Flowers of Violets, of each one ounce, boyl them in eight pints of Water, till the vertue is out of the heads, then strain them, and with four pound of Sugar boyl the Liquor to a syrup.

Syrup of Poppies, the greater Composition. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of the heads of both white and black Poppies, seeds and all, of each fifty drachms, Maiden-hair fifteen drachms, Liquoris five drachms, [Page 114] Jujubes thirty by number, Lettice seeds fourty drams; of the seeds of Mallows and Quinces (tied up in a thin linnen cloath) of each one drachm and an half, boyl these in eight pints of water till five pints be con­sumed; when you have strained out the three pints remaining, ad to them, Penides and white Sugar of each a pound, boyl them into a Syrup according to art.

Culpeper.] A. All these former Syrups of Poppies provoke sleep, but in that, I desire they may be used with a great deal of Caution and wariness, such as these are, are not fit to be given in the beginnings of Feavers, nor to such whole bodies are coslive; ever remember my former Motto, Fools are not fit to make Physitians. Yet to such as are troubled with hot, sharp Rhewms, you may safely give them; and note this, the last, which is borrowed from Mesue is apro­priated to the Lungues, whose own words (transla­tion excepted) of it are these, It prevails against dry Coughs, Phtisicks, hot and sharp gnawing Rhewms, and provokes sleep. It is an usual fashion for Nur­ses when thcy have heat their Milk by exercise or strong liquor, (no marvel then if their children be froward) then run for Syrup of Poppies to make their yong ones sleep. I would fain have that fashi­on left, therefore I forbear the dose; let Nurses keep their own bodies temperate, and their children will sleep well enough, never scar.

Syrup of Eupatorium (or Maudlin.) Mesue.

The Colledg. Take of the Roots of [...], [...], and Succory, os each two [...]; Liquoris, [...], Dodder, [...], Roses, os each six drachms; Maiden­hair, [...], or instead thereof the Roots of [...] Mariae, A kind of Thorn growing in Egypt and Ara­bia. [...], or [...] thereof the Roots of Avens, the flowers or roots of Bugloss, Annis seeds, sweet [...] seeds, Ageratum, or Maudlin, of each five drachms, [...], [...], of each three drachms, Spicknard, Indian Leaf, or instead of it put Roman Spike, of each two drachms: boyl them in eight pints of water till the third part be consumed; then strain the Decoction, and with four pound of Su­gar, clarified juyce of Smallage and Endive, of [...] half a pound, boyl it into a Syrup.

Culpeper.] A. 'Tis a strange clause, and the stran­ger because it comes from a Colledg of Physitians: that they should set Bedeguar, or instead thereof Car­duus Mariae: It is well known that the Bedeguar u­sed here with us, or rather that which the Physitians of our times use for Bedeguar, is a thing that grows upon wild Roses, but the Bedeguar of the Arabians wasIt is that we call our Ladies thistle, ha­ving white veins in the leaf, & used to be eaten in the spring­time. Carduus Mariae, and they knew well enough Mesue (whose Receipt this was) was an Arabian: truly this is just as if they should say, they would have ten shillings for a visit, or instead of that an angel; there being in deed and in truth as much difference between Bedeguar and Carduus Mariae, as between eightpence and two groats.

A. It amends infirmities of the Liver coming of cold, opens obstructions, helps the Dropsie and evil state of the body, it extenuates gross humors, streng­thens the Liver, provokes urine and is a present suc­cour for Hypocondriack Melancholly. You may take an ounce at a time in the morning: it opens, but purgeth not.

Honey of Emblicks. Augustanus.

The Colledg.] Take fifty Emblick Myrobalans, bruise them and boyl them in three pints of water till two be consumed; strain it, and with the like weight of Honey, boyl it into a Syrup.

Culpeper.] A. It is a fine gentle purger both of flegm and Melancholly, it strengthens the brain and nerves, and sences both internal and external, helps tremblings of the heart, staies vomiting, provokes ap­petite. You may take a spoonful at a time.

ROB OR SAPA AND JUYCES.

Culpeper. A. ROB is somthing an uncouth word, and happily formidable to the ignorant Coun­try-man in these thieving times; and therefore in the first place, I will explain the word.

A. 1. Rob or Sapa, is the Juyces of a Fruit, made thick by the heat either of the Sun or the Fire, that it is capable of being kept safe from putrifaction.

A. 2. Its use was first invented for Diseases in the mouth, (however or for whatsoever it is used now, it matters not.)

A. 3. It is usually made, in respect of body, som­thing thicker than new Honey.

A. 4. It may be kept about a year, little more or less.

Rob, sive Sapa, simplex. Page 76. in the L. Book. Or, Simple Rob, or Sapa.

The Colledg.] Take of Wine newly pressed from white and ripe Grapes, boyl it over a gentle fire to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. When ever you reade the word Rob, or Sapa throughout the Dispensatory, simply quoted in any medicine without any relation of what it should be made, this is that you ought to use.

Rob de Berberis. Page 76. in the Latin Book. Or, Reb of Barberries.

The Colledg.] Take of the Juyce of Barberries strained as much as you will, boyl it by it self (or else by adding half a pound of Sugar to each pound of Juyce) to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper.] A. It quencheth thirst, closeth the mouth of the stomach, thereby staying vomiting, and belching, it strengthens stomachs weakened by heat, and procures appetite. Of any of these Robs you may take a little on the point of a knife when you need.

Rob de Cerasis. Page 76. in the Latin Book. Or, Rob of Cherries.

The Colledg.] Take of the juyce of red Cherries somwhat sourish, as much as you will, and with half their weight in sugar boyl them like the former.

Culpeper.] A. See the vertues of Cherries, and there have you a neat trick to keep them all the year.

Rob de Cornis. Page 76. in the latin Book. Or, Rob of Cornels.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce os Cornels two pound, sugar a pound and an half, boyl it according to art.

Culpeper.] A. Of these Cornel trees are two sorts, male and foemale; the fruit of the male Cornel, or Cornelian Cherry is here to be used, for the foemale is that which is called Dogberry, in the North Country they call it Gatter-wood, and we in Sussex Dog-wood, I suppose because the Berries will make Dogs mad as some hold; also it is very unwholsom wood, specially for such as have been bitten by mad Dogs.

A. The fruit of male Cornel, binds exceedingly, and therefore good in fluxes, bloody fluxes, and the immoderate flowing of the terms in women.

Rob Cydoniorum. Page 76. in the Latin Book. Or, Rob of Quinces.

The Colledg] Take of the clarified juyce of Quinces, boyl it till two parts be consumed, and with its equal waight in Sugar boyl it into a Rob.

Miva vel Gelatina Eorundem. Page 76. in L. Book. Or, [...] of Quinces.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Quinces clarifi­ed twelve pound, boyl it half away, and ad to the re­mainder, old white wine five pound, consume the third part over a gentle fire, taking away the scum (as you ought) let the rest settle, and strain it and with three pound of sugar boyl it according to art.

Culpeper] A. Both are good for weak and indispo­sed stomachs.

The Colledg] Rob of sowr Plums is made as Rob of Quinces, the use of sugar is indifferent in them both.

Rob of English Currence is made in the same man­ner, let the juyce he clarified.

Culpeper] A. The vertues are the same with Rob of Barberries.

Rob Baccarum Sambuci. Page 77. in L. Book. Or, Rob of Elder Berries.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Elder Berries and make it thick with the help of a gentle fire, either by its self, or a quarter of its waight in sugar being added.

Culpeper] Both Rob of Elder Berries, and Dwarf­Elder are excellent for such whose bodies are incli­ning to Dropsies; neither let them neglect nor de­spise it, if they do 'tis not my fault: They may take the quantity of a Nutmeg each morning, 'twill gent­ly purge the watry humor.

The Colledg] In the same manner is made Rob of Dwars Elder, Junipers and Pauls Betony, only in the last, the Sugar and Juyce must be equal in waight.

Succus Glycyrrhizae simplex. Page 77. in Lat. Book. Or, Juyce of Liquoris simple.

The Colledg] Infuse Liquoris Roots clensed and gently bruised three daies in spring water, so much that it may oretop the Roots the breadth of three fin­gers, [Page 116] then boyl it a little and press it hard out, and boyl the Liquor with a gentle fire to its due thick­ness.

Culpeper] A. It is vulgarly known to be good a­gainst coughs, cold, &c. and a strengthener of the Lungues.

Succus Glycyrrhizae Compositus. P. 77. in L. Book. Or, Juyce of Liquoris Compound.

The Colledg] Take of the water of tender Oak leaves, of Scabious of each four pounds, English Liquo­ris scraped and bruised two pound, boyl them by de­grees till they be soft, then press out the Liquor strong­ly in a press, to which ad three pound of Juyce of Hy­sop, and dry it away in the Sun in a broad Earthen vessel.

Culpeper] A. The vertues are the same with the former, but that the Colledg loves to be troublesom.

Succus Pronorum sylvestrum. Page 78. in Lat. Book. Or, Juyce of Sloes, called Acacia.

The Colledg] Take of Sloes hardly ripe, press out the Juyce and make it thick in a bath.

Culpeper] A. It stops Fluxes, and procures appe­tite.

The Colledg] So are the juyces of Wormwood, Maudlin, and Fumitory made thick, to wit, the Herbs bruised while they be tender, and the juyce pressed out and after it is clarified, boyled over the fire to its just thickness.

LOHOCH, OR ECLEGMATA.

Culpeper. A. BEcause this word also is understood but by few, we will first explain what it is.

A. 1. The word Lohoch is an Arabick word, cal­led in Greek [...], in Latin, Linctus, and sig­nifies a thing to be lick'd up.

A. 2. It is in respect of Body, somthing thicker than a Syrup, and not so thick as an Electuary.

A. 3. Its use it was invented for, was against the roughness of the windpipe, diseases, and inflamations of the Lungues, difficulty of breathing, Colds, Coughs &c.

A. 4. Its manner of reception is with a Liquoris stick, bruised at end, to take up some and retain it in the mouth, till it melt of its own accord.

Lohoch de Farfara. Page 79. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Coltsfoot.

The Colledg] Take of Coltsfoot roots clensed eight ounces, Marsh-mallow roots four ounces clensed, boyl them in a sufficient quantity of water, and press the pulp out through a sive, dissolve this again in the De­coction, and let it boyl once or twice, then take it from the fire, and ad two pound of white sugar, Ho­ney of Raisons, sourteen ounces, juyce of Liquoris two drachms and an half, stir them stoutly with a wooden pestel, mean season sprinkle in saffron, and Cloves of each a scruple, cinnamon and Mace, of each two scruples, make them into a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. It was invented by an uncertain, or an unrevealed Author for the Cough, and they that cannot get a better nor a cheaper may freely use this, for the Colledg gives them leave if they appoint it, not else; those that have read the Augustan Physiti­ans may reade a cheaper there, and those that have not nor cannot, may know if they please, how they are led by the noses by a company of Colledg gulls.

Lohoch de Papavere. Page 79. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Poppies.

The Colledg] Take white Poppy seeds twenty four drachms, sweet Almonds blanched in Rose water, Pinenuts clensed, Gum Arabick and Tragacanth of each ten drachms, juyce of Liquoris an ounce, starch three drachms, the seeds of Lettice, Purslain, Quin­ces of each half an ounce, Saffron a drachm, Penids four ounces, Syrup of Meconium three pound, make it into a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. The right Worshipful, the Col­ledg of Physitians, having found a Medicine called by this name in the Augustane Dispensatory, did as well as they could to alter it a little, that so they might make fools beleev it was their own. It helps salt sharp and thin distillations upon the Lungues; it allaies the fury of such sharp humors which occasion both roughness of the throat, want of sleep, and feavers; It is excellent for such as are troubled with Pleuresies to take now and then a little of it.

Lohoch è Passulis. Page 80. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Raisons.

The Colledg] Take of male Peony Roots, Liquo­ris of each half an ounce, Hysop, [...], Hartstongue, or Cetrach of each half a handful, boyl them in spring water, and press them strongly, and by adding a pund [Page 117] of Raisons bruised, boyl it again, pressing it through a linnen cloath, then with a pound of white Sugar make it into a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. Although this Medicine be seldom in use with us in England, yet by report of forraign Physitians, it is very prevalent, both against coughs, consumptions of the Lungues, and other vices of the breast, and is usually given to children for such disea­ses, as also for the The dif­ference of which two diseases is not much. convulsions, and falling sickness, and indeed the simples testifie no less.

Lohoch è Pino. Page 80. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Pinenuts.

The Colledg] Take of Pinenuts, fifteen drachms, sweet Almonds, Hazel nuts gently rosted, Gum- Ara­bick, and Tragacanth, pouder and juyce of Liquoris, white starch, Maiden-hair, Orris Roots of each two drachms, the pulp of Dates seventeen drachms, bit­ter Almonds one drachm and an half, Honey of Rai­sons, white Sugar-Condy, fresh Butter, of each two ounces, Honey one pound and an half, dissolve the Gums in so much Decoction of Maiden-hair as is suf­ficient, let the rest be mixed over a gentle fire, and stir­red that so it may be made into a Lohoch.

Culpeper] A. Before, the Colledg followed the Augustan Physitians to a hair, and indeed who can blame them for following wiser men than themselves, now they have altered the quantities, of the simples, and if you ask them the reason why they did so, you shall have the same answer Balaam gave when he dis­puted with his Ass, ``Oh, that there were a sword in ``my hand that I might kill thee.

A. The Medicin is excellent for continual coughs, and difficulty of breathing, it succours such as are Asthma, is a diseas whē thick tough flegm stiks in the lap­pets of the Lungs. Asthmatick, for it cuts and attenuates tough hu­mors in the breast.

Lohoch de Portulaca. Page 80. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Purslain.

The Colledg] Take of the strained juyce of Pur­slam two pound, Troches of terra Lemnla two drams, Troches of Amber, Gum-Arabick, Dragons blood of each one drachm, Lapis Hematitis, the wool of a Hare tosted, of each two scruples, white Sugar one pound, mix them together, that so you may make a Lohoch of them.

Culpeper] A. The Medicine is so terribly binding that it is better let alone than taken, unless in inward bruises when men spit blood, then you may safely take a little of it; if you would know whence they stole it, it was from Ausberg: you shall shortly hear the Au­gustan Physitians come with Hu and Cry after the Colledg, and cry, STOP THEEVES!

Lohoch è Pulmone Vulpis. Page 81. in Lat. Book. Or, Lohoch of Fox Lungs.

The Colledg] Take of Fox Lungues rightly prepa­red, juyce of Liquoris, Maiden-hair, Annis seeds, sweet Fennel seeds, of each equal parts, Sugar dissol­ved in Coltsfoot and Scabious water and boyled into a Syrup, three times their waight; the rest being in fine pouder, let them be put to it and strongly stirred toge­ther, that it may be made into a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. Look what pains the Colledg hath taken in altering this Receipt, here is a little Scabi­ous water added and that's all: Why should they think themselves wiser than Mesue, when they are not (God knows) half so honest.

A. Mesue appoints sixteen ounces of Honey, and no Sugar nor uncertain quantity of any thing, and reason it self will tell you Honey is most densing.

A It clenseth and uniteth ulcers in the Lungs and breast, and is a present remedy in Phtisicks.

Lohoch sanum et Expertum. Page 81. in L. Book. Or, A sound and well Experienced Lohoch.

The Colledg] Take of dried Hysop and Calaminth of each half an ounce, Jujubes, Sebestens, the stones being taken out, fifteen, Raisons of the Sun stoned, Now they ap­pointed fat Figs as I bid them last time. fat Figs, Dates, of each two ounces, Linseed Fe­nugrick seed, of each five drachms, Maiden-hair one handful, Annis seeds, and sweet Fennel seeds, Orris Roots cut, Liquoris, Cinnamon, of each an ounce; boyl them all according to art in four pound of cleer water till half be consumed, and with two pound of [...] boyl it into a syrup, afterwards cut and bruise very smal Pinenuts five drachms, sweet Almonds blan­ched, Liquoris, Gum Tragacanth and Arabick, white Starch, of each three drachms, let these be put into the Syrup when it is off from the fire, and stir it about swiftly with a wooden Pestel till it look white.

Culpeper] A Only Mesue appoints one drachm less of Linseeds, and whereas they appoint white Su­gar, he appoints Penids, else the Receipt is verbatim.

A It succours the Breast, Lungs, Throat, and Or wind pipe. Trachaea Arteria oppressed by cold, it restores the voice lost by reason of cold, and attenuate thick and gross humors in the Breast and Lungs.

Lohoch Scilliticum. Page 81. in the Latin Book. Or, Lohoch of Squils.

The Colledg] Take three drachms of a Squill ba­ked in past, Orris Roots two drachms; Hysop, Hore­hound, of each one drachm, Saffron, Mirrh, of each half a drachm, Honey two ounces and an half, bruise the Squill, after it is baked, in a stone Mortar, and af­ter it hath boyled a walm or two with the Honey, put in the rest of the things in pouder, dilligently stirring it, and make it into a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. In their former Edition (if they be not ashamed to own it, as they need not for they cannot mend it) they quoted another Lohoch of Squills, and said it was Mesue's, but they were beside the cushion, it was this.

Eclegma of Squils. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Squils and Ho­ney, both of them clarified, of each two ponud, boyl them together according to art to the consistence of Honey.

A. And my Descant upon it was this,

A. How the name of Mesue came to be obtruded upon this Receipt I know not; this I am confident of, Galen was the Author of it, neither is it proba­ble the Colledg would have given the name of Ecleg­ma, but Lohoch, had it been the Receipt of an Ara­bian; neither can it be the Printers fault, for he va­pors at the latter end of the Book, that he hath made none, and he hath done it in English, that the vul­gar may understand THAT in the Book, though nothing else.

A. Ah ha, quoth they, have we got the rong Sow by the ear, and hath he found out our knavery? it cannot be holp, we will leave out that here, and steal one from Mesue to put instead of it, which is what they prescribed but now; and just as I was writing [Page 118] of this I heard my neighbors dogs howl, it may be it was because he was ashamed of their baseness, or else because if they had that trick, they had others worse.

A. For the vertues of it see Vineger of Squils, and Oximel of Squils, only this is more mild, and not so harsh to the throat, because it hath no Vineger in it, and therefore is far more fitting for Asthames, and such as are troubled with difficulty of breathing, it cuts and carries away humors from the breast, be they thick or thin, and wonderfully helps indigestion of victuals, and easeth pains in the breast; and for this I quote the Authority of Galen. Alwaies take this as a general Aphorism in Physick, Sour things we offensive to the Wind-pipe.

A. Lohochs left out in their new Moddel, because they must be doing.

Lohoch of Coleworts. Gordonius.

The Colledg] Take one pound of the Juyce of Coleworts, clarified, Saffron three drachms, clari­fied Honey and Sugar, of each half a pound, make of them a Lohoch according to art.

Culpeper] A. It helps hoarsness, and loss of voice, easeth surfets and Headach coming of drunkenness, and opens obstructions of the Liver and Spleen, and therefore is good for that disease in children which women call the Rickets.

PRESERVED ROOTS, STALKS, BARKS, FLOWERS, FRUITS, PULPS.

TAke of Eringo Roots as many as you will, clense them without and within, the If you would see the pith, you must put on your Spe­ctacles; surely the Colledg mistook a Tobacco­pipe for the pith. Pith being ta­ken out, steep them two daies in cleer water, shifting the water somtimes, then dry them with a cloth, then take their equal waight in white Sugar, and as much Rose water as will make it into a syrup, which being almost boyled, put in the Roots, and let them boyl till the moisture be consumed, and it be brought to the due body of a Syrup.

Not much unlike to this, are preserved the Roots of Acorus, Angelica, Borrage, Bugloss, Succory, Alicam­pane, Burnet, Satyrion, Sicers, Comfry the greater, Ginger, Zedoary.

Take of the Stalks of Artichokes not too ripe as ma­ny as you will, and (contrary to the Roots) take on­ly the pith of these, and preserve them with their e­qual waight in Sugar like the former.

So is prepared the Stalks of Angelica, Burs, Lettice &c. before they be too ripe.

Take of fresh Orrenge Pills as many as you will, take away the exteriour yellowness, and steep them in spring water three daies at the least, often renewing the wa­ter, then preserve them like the former.

In like manner are Lemmon and Citron Pills preser­ved.

Preserve the Flowers of But where must we hav them? Citrons, Orrenges, Bor­rage, Primroses, with Sugar according to art.

Take of Apricocks as many as you will, take away the outer skin and the Stones, and mix them with their like waight in Sugar, after four hours take them out, and boyl the Sugar without any other Liquor, then put them in again, and boyl them a little.

Other Fruits have the same manner of being preser­ved, or at least not much unlike to it, as whol Bar­berries, Cherries, Cornels, Citrons, Quinces, Peaches, common Apples, the five sorts of Myrobalans, Hazel Nuts, Walnuts, Nutmegs, Raisons of the Sun, Pep­per brought green from India, Plums Garden and wild, Pears, Grapes.

Pulps are also preserved, as of Barberries, Cassia Fistula, Citrons, I think they mean the fruit of Bryars, a choaky thing, just like the Colledg, and good for as little. Cynosbatus, Quinces, and Sloes, &c.

Take of Barberries as many as you will, boyl them in spring Water till they are tender, then having pulped them through a sive, that they are free from the stones, boyl it again in an Earthen vessel over a gentle fire of­ten stirring them for fear of burning, till the watry humor be consumed, then mix ten pound of Sugar with six pound of this Pulp, boyl it to its due thickness.

Broom Buds are also preserved, but with Brine and Vineger, and so are Olives and Capars.

Lastly, Amongst the Barks, Cinnamon, amongst the Flowers, Roses and Marigolds, amongst the Fruits, Almonds, Cloves, Pinenuts and Fistick Nuts, are said to be preserved but with this difference, they are encrusted with dry sugar, and are more called Consects than Preserves.

CONSERVES AND SUGARS.

The Colledg. CONSERVES of the Herbs of [...], Sorrel, Woodsorrel, the Flowers of [...], Borrage, Bugloss, Bettony, Marigolds, the tops of [...] the Flowers of Centaury the [...], [...] flo­wers, Germander, Succory, the Leaves of [...], the Flowers of [...] the greater, I know not what they mean by Citraria nor what by Cynos­batus, un­less they mean Bry­ar flowers which hav as much vertue in thé as the Colledg. [...]; Cynosbati, the roots of Spurge, Herbs and Flo­wers of Eyebright, the tops of [...], [...], the Flowers of Broom not quite open, Hysop, Laven­der, white Lillies, Lillies of the Valley, Marsoram, Mallows; the tops of Bawm, the Leaves of Mints, the Flowers of water Lillies, red Poppies, Peony, Peaches, Primroses, Roses, damask, red, Rosemary, the leaves of Rue, the flowers of Sage, Elder, Scabi­ous, the Leaves of Scordium, the flowers of Lime­tree, Coltsfoot, Violets; with all these are Conserves made with their trebble proportion of white Sugar, yet note, that all of them must not be [...], some of them must be cut, [...] and gently [...] some neither cut, beaten, nor boyled, and some admit but one of them, which every Artist in his Trade may find out by this Premonition and avoid errour.

Culpeper] A. What a half-faced order to make up Conserves do the Colledg here leave? Indeed it belongs to the Apothecaries Trade, Is it not suffi­cient for a gentle man to go to a Smith and bid him shoo his Horse, but he must go about to teach him how to make his shoos and nails? would he not by medling with what he hath no skill in, quickly shew what a Lubber he is? and what then can one say of the Colledg? Mutato nomine de te, fabula narra­tur.

SUGARS. Diacodium Solidum, sive Tabulatum. Page 86.

The Colledg] Take of white Poppy heads, meanly ripe and newly gathered, twenty, steep them in three pound of warm spring water, and the next day boyl them till the vertue is out, then strain out the Liquor, and with a sufficient quantity of good Sugar, boyl it according to art that you may make it into Lozenges.

Culpeper] A. This Receipt is transcribed verbatim from the Augustan Physitians, though the Colledg (through forgetfulness or something else) hide it, the vertues are the same with the common Diacodi­um, viz. to provoke sleep and help thin Rhewms in the head, coughs and roughness of the Throat, and may easily be carried about in ones pocket.

[...] Simplex, et Perlatum. P. 86. Or, [...] of Sugar, both Simple and [...].

The Colledg] The first is made by pouring the Su­gar out upon a Marble; after a sufficient boyling in half its [...] of Damask Rofe water) And the latter by adding to every pound of the former towards the latter end of the Decoction, Pearls prepared and bruised half an ounce, with eight or ten Leaves of Gold.

Culpeper] A. Here the Colledg have left out that blasphemous speech, which I cannot write without horror, nor an honest man read without trembling, viz. To call a little Rose-water and Sugar boyled to­gether, THE HAND OF CHRIST: The truth is, if they had left out the rest of the blas­phemies, I should have had some hopes they would in time turn honest, but I see to my grief they re­main: especially that abominable blasphemy in their Dedicatory Epistle to King James, which they ha­ving not [...] enough to alter, [...] let stand, or else it was because like Sodom, they would declare their sin and hide it not, but manifest to the world in the sight of the Sun, that they are not a Colledg of Christians, but of RANTERS, by calling KING JAMES their GOD; blush O Sun at such blasphemy. It may be they left it out because King Charls is dead, for worshiping old Jemmy for God, 'tis more than probable they worshiped his Son for Christ; and their Tubelary gods being apud Infe­ros, gives me some hopes they will follow them quick­ly, and so all the Tyrants will go together.

A. It is naturally cooling, apropriated to the heart, it restores lost strength, takes away burning feavers, and false imaginations, (I mean that with Pearls, for that without Pearls is rediculous) it hath the same vertues Pearls have.

Saccharum Tabellatum Compositum. Page 86. Or, Lozenges of Sugar Compound.

The Colledg] Take of choyce Rhubarb four scru­ples, Agrick Trochiscated, Corallina, burnt Harts­horn, Dittany of Creet, Wormseed and Sorrel seed, of each a scruple, [...], [...], [...], Saffron, of each half a scruple, white Sugar a pound, dissol­ved in four ounces of warmwood water, warmwood Wine an ounce, Cinnamon water a spoonful, with the forenamed poudersmake it into Lozenges according to art.

Culpeper] A. The title shews you the vertues of it: for my part I think in penning of it, they made a long Harvest of a little Corn.

Saccharum Penidium. Page 86. in Latin Book. Or, Sugar Penids.

The Colledg] Are prepared of Sugar dissolved in spring water by a gentle fire, and the whites of Egs dilligently beaten, and clarified once, and again whilst it is boyling, then slrain it and boyl it gently again, till it rise up in great bubbles, and being chewed it stick not to your teeth, then powr it upon a Marble, anointed with Oyl of Almonds, (let the bubbles first sink, after it is removed from the fire) bring back the outsides of it to the middle till it look like larch Rozin, then your hands being rubbed with white starch, you may draw it into threeds either short or long, thick or thin, and let it cool in what form you please.

Culpeper] A. I remember Country people were wont to take them for coughs, and they are some­times used in other Compositions.

Confectio de Thure. Page 87. in the Latin Book. Or, Confection of Frankinsence.

The Colledg] Take Coriander seeds prepared half an ounce, Nutmegs, white Frankinsence, of each three drachms; Liquoris, Mastich, of each two drachms; Cubebs, Harts-horn prepared of each one drachm, Conserves of red Roses an ounce, white Su­gar as much as is sufficient to make it into mean bits.

Culpeper] A. I cannot boast much neither of the rariety nor vertues of this Receipt.

Saccharum Rosatum. Page 87. in the Latin Book. Or, Sugar of Roses.

The Colledg] Take of red Rose Leaves the whites being cut off, and speedily dried in the Sun an ounce, white Sugar a pound, melt the Sugar in Rose water and juyce of Roses of each two ounces, which being consumed by degrees put in the Rose Leaves in Pouder, mix them, put it upon a Marble, and make it into Lo­zenges according to art.

Culpeper] A. As for the vertues of this, It streng­thens weak stomachs, weak hearts, and weak brains, restores such as are in consumptions, restores lost strength, staies fluxes, easeth pains in the head, ears, and eyes, helps spitting, vomiting, and pissing of blood; it is a fine commodity for a man in a Con­sumption to carry about with him, and eat now and then a bit. This they mended as I bid them, `tis a comfort they will do something as they are bid.

SPECIES OR POUDERS.

Aromaticum Caryophyllatum. Page 88. in the Latin Book.

Colledg. TAke of Cloves seven drachms, Mace, Zedoary, Galanga the less, yellow San­ders, Troches, Diarrhodon, Cinnamon, wood of Aloes Indian Spicknard, long Pepper, Cardamoms the less of each a drachm, red Roses four drachms, Gallia Moschata, Liquoris, of each two drachms, Indian leaf, Cubebs, of each two scruples, beat them all dilli­gently into pouder.

Culpeper] A. This pouder strengthens the heart and stomach, helps digestion, expelleth wind, staies vomiting, and clenseth the stomach of putrified hu­mors. This they have mended also, as I in my for­mer Edition shewed them.

Aromaticum Rosatum. Page 88. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of red Roses exungulated fif­teen drachms, Liquoris seven drachms, Wood of A­loes, yellow Sanders, of each three drachms, Cinna­mon five drachms, Cloves, Mace, of each two drams and an half, Gum-Arabick, and Tragacanth of each eight scruples, Nutmegs, Cardamoms the less, Ga­langa, of each one drachm, Indian Spicknard, two scruples, make it into pouder to be kept in a glass for use.

Culpeper] They have here only left out the Musk and Ambergreece, viz. Musk one scruple, Amber­greece two scruples, for fear the Receipt should be too good.

A. It strengthens the brain, heart, and stomach, and all such internal Members as help towards conco­ction, it helps digestion, consumes the watry excre­ments of the bowels, strengthens such as are pin'd a­way by reason of the violence of a disease, and re­stores such as are in a consumption.

Pulvis ex Chelis Cancrorum Compositus. Page 89. Or, Pouder of Crabs Claws Compound.

The Colledg] Take of Pearls prepared, Crabs eyes, red Corral, white Amber, Harts-horn, Oriental Bezoar, of each half an ounce, Pouder of the black tops of Crabs Claws, the waight of them all, beat them into pouder which may be made into Balls with gelly, and theskins which our vipers have cast off, warily dried and kept for use.

Culpeper] A. This is that pouder they ordinari­ly call Gnscoigns pouder, there are diverse Receipts of it, of which this is none of the worst, thought the manner of making it up be antick and exceeding dif­ficult if not impossible; but that it may be had to do a man good when Adders skins cannot be gotten you may make it up with gelly of Harts-horn, into which put a little Saffron: four, or five, or six grains is ex­cellent good in a feaver to be taken in any Cordial, for it cheers the heart and vital spirits exceedingly, and make them impregnable.

Species Cordiales Temperatae. Page 89. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of wood of Aloes, Spodium of each a drachm, Cinnamon, Cloves, bone of a Stags heart, the Roots of Angelica, Avens and Tormentil, of eath a drachm and an half, Pearls prepared six drachms, raw silk tosted, both sorts of Corral of each two drachms, Jacinth, Emerald, Saphir, of each half a drachm, Saffron a scruple, the leaves of Gold and Silver, of each How big must they be? ten make them into pouder ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. Musk and Ambergreece of each half a drachm, is here left out; it was not done for cheap­ness, for it will still be dear enough; but the world changeth so doth the Colledg, the world grows worse and worse so do the Colledg.

A. It is a great Cordial, a great strengthener both of the heart and brain.

Diacalaminthe Simple. Page 89. in the Latin Book.

The Colled] Take of mountain Calaminth, Peny­royal, Origanum, the seeds of Macedonian Parsly, common Parsly, and Hartwort, of each two drachms, the seeds of Smallage, the tops of Time of each half an ounce, the seeds of Lovage, black Pepper, of each an ounce, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. It heats and comforts cold bodies, cuts thick and gross flegm, provokes urin & the terms in women. I confess this differs somthing from Galen, but is better at leastwise for our bodies in my opinion than his. It expels wind exceedingly, you may take half a drachm of the pouder at a time. There is no­thing surer than that all their Pouders will keep bet­ter in Electuaries than they will in Pouders, and most part of them were quoted Electuaries by the Authors whence they had them; and into such a body, if you please you may make it with two pound and an half of white Sugar dissolved in Rose-water.

Diacalaminthe Compound. Page 89. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Diacalaminthe simple half an ounce, The Leaves of Horehound, Marjoram, Bawm, Mugwort, Savin dried, of each a drachm, Cyperus Roots, the seeds of Maddir and Rhue, Mace, Cinnamon, of each two scruples, beat them and mix them dilligently into a pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. This seems to be more apropriated to the foeminine gender than the former, viz. to bring down the terms in women, to bring away the [Page 122] birth and after-birth, to purge them after labor, yet is it dangerous for women with child.

Dianisum. Page 90. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Annis seeds two ounces and an half, Liquoris, Mastich, of each an ounce, the seeds of Caraway, Fennel, Galanga, Mace, Ginger, Cinnamon, [...] five drachms, the three sorts of Pepper, [...] Lignea, Mountain Calaminth, Pellitò­ry of Spain of each two drachms, Cardamoms the greater, Cloves, Cubebs, Indian Spicknard, Saffron, of each a drachm and an half, make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. Mesue appointed this to be made into an Electuary, it is chiefly apropriated to the sto­mach, and helps the cold infirmities thereof, raw flegm, wind, continual coughs, and other such disea­ses coming of cold. You may safely take a drachm of the Electuary at a time. You may make an Electua­ry of it with its trebble waight of clarified Honey.

Pulvis Radicum Ari Compositus. Page 90. Or, Pouder of Aron Roots Compound.

The Colledg] Take of Aron Roots two ounces, of common Water-slag and Burnet, of each one ounce, Crabs Eyes half an ounces Cinnamon three drachms, Salt of Wormwood, and Juniper of each one drachm, make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. And when you have done, tell me what 'tis good for.

Diaireos Simple. Page 90.

The Colledg] Take of Orris Roots half an ounce, Sugar Candy, Diatragacanthum frigidum, of each two drachms, make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. I do not mean the Diatragacanthum frigidum, for that is in pouder before. It comforts the breast, is good in colds, coughs, and hoarsness. You may mix it with any pectoral Syrups which are apropriated to the same diseases, and so take it with a Liquoris stick.

Dialacca. Page 90. in the Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of Gum-lacca prepared, Rhu­barb, Schaenanth, of each three drachms, Indian Spicknard, Mastick, the Juyce of Wormwood and A­grimony made thick, the seeds of Small age, Annis, Fennel, Ammi, Savin, Bitter Almonds, Mirrh, Costus or Zedoary, the Roots of Maddir Asarabacca, Birth­wort long and round, Gentian, Saffron, Cinnamon, dried Hysop, Cassia Lignea, Bdellium of each a dram and an half, black Pepper, Ginger, of each a drachm, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. If the Colledg were made to fast till they could beat this into pouder, they would make such poor — weak — Receipts in a little time.

A. According to Mesue you ought to dissolve the Mirrh and Bdellium in Wine, and together with the simples, beaten in fine pouder, make it into an Ele­ctuary with a sufficient quantity of clarified Honey. It strengthens the stomach and liver, opens obstructi­ons, helps dropsies, yellow jaundice, provokes urine, breaks the stone in the reins and bladder. Half a drachm is a moderate dose; if the patient be strong they may take a drachm in white Wine: let women with child forbear it.

Pulvis Cardiacus Magistralis. Page 91. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of East Bezoar, Bone of a Stags heart of each a drachm and an half, Magisteri­um of white and red Corral, white Amber, Magiste­rium of Pearl, Harts-horn, Ivory, [...], Earth of Germany, [...] and Lemnos, Elks Claw, [...] Roots of each a drachm, Wood of Aloes, [...] Pills, the Roots of Angelica and Zedoary, of each two scruples, Leaves of Gold twenty, Amber­greece one scruple, Musk six grains, mix them and make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. It is too deer for a vulgar purse, yet a mighty Cordial and great strengthner of the Heart and Vitals in Feavers.

[...]. Page 91. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the four greater cold seeds, the seeds of Purslain, white Poppies, Endive, Sorrel, Citrons, the three [...], Wood of Aloes Ginger, red Roses [...], the Flowers of [...], Bug­toss, Violets, the [...] of Mirtles, bone in a Stags heart, Ivory, [...] a [...], [...], of each one drachm, both sorts of Corral, of each half a drachm, Pearls, three drachms, Camphire six grains, make them into pouder according to art.

Observe that the four greater cold [...], and the Poppy seeds are not to be added before the pouder be required by the Physician for use. Do so by the other pouder in the Composition of which these pouders are used.

Culpeper.] A. Here may you see what a labarinth the Colledg have run themselves into through their [...], viz. because they would seem to be singular in Sayiing contrary to wiser Physitians, they run upon two dangerous Rocks in this one Receipt, 1. It is a costly Cordial, and not usually above one drachm of it (very seldom half so much) given at one time, and these Seeds excepted against in their cau­tion, and upon grounds just enough, are not the tenth part of the Composition, which (a drachm being prescribed) is but six grains, which six grains must be divided into five equal parts (a nice point) one part for each seed. 2. If this Rock were put off, yet then can you not beat them into pouder alone because they are so moist, and yet is not mended now; sure they are mad, and there is some hopes they will not live long. They have left out the Ambergreece six grains, and the Roman Doronicum, instead of which they put in the like quantity of Contra yerva.

A. As for the vertues of it, Authors hold it to be restorative in consumptions, to help such as are in hectick Feavers, to restore strength lost, to help Coughs, Asthmaes, and consumptions of the lungs, and restore such as have labored long under langui­shing or pining diseases.

Diambra. Page 92. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg.] Take of Cinnamon, Angelica Roots, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, Indian Leaf, Galanga, of each three drachms, Indian Spicknard, Cardamoms, greater and lesser of each one drachm, Ginger a dram and an half, Wood of Aloes, yellow Sanders, long Pepper, of each two drachms, Amber-greece a [...] and an half, Musk half a drachm, make them all in­to pouder according to art.

Culpeper.] A. Mesue apropriates this to the head, and saith, it heats and strengthens the brain, causeth mirth, helps concoction, cherisheth the Animal, Vi­tal, and Natural Spirit, it strengthens the heart and stomach, and resists all cold diseases, and is therefore special good for women and old men. Your best [Page 123] way is to make it into an Electuary, by mixing it with three times its waight of clarifyed Honey, and take the quantity of a Nutmeg of it every morning. Here also they have left out Doronicum, and put in Ange­lica Roots; sure they hate Doronicum as bad as they hate Honesty.

Diamoschu Dulce. Page 92. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Saffron, Galanga, Zedoary, Wood of Aloes, Mace of each two drachms, Pearls raw Silk tosted, white Amber, red Corral prepared, Gallia Moschata, Bazill, of each two drachms and an half, Ginger, Cubebs, long Pepper of each a dram and an half, Nutmegs, Indian Leaf or Cinnamon, Cloves, of each one drachm, Musk two scruples, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. It wonderfully helps cold afflictions of the brain, that come without a feaver, melancholly and its attendance, viz. sadness without a cause &c. Vertigo or dissiness in the head, Falling-sickness, Pal­sies, resolution of the nerves, Convulsions, Heart­qualms, afflictions of the Lungues, and difficulty of breathing. The dose of the pouder is half a drachm, or two seruples, or less, according to the age or strength of him or her that takes it. Mesue appoints it to be made into an Electuary with clarified Honey, and of the Electuary, two drachms is the dose; the time of taking it is, in the morning fasting.

Diamoschu Amarum. Page 92. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Is prepared by adding to the fore­named Wormwood, dried Roses of each three drams, Aloes half an ounce, Cinnamon two drachms and an half, Castorium and Lovage of each one drachm, make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. Besides the vertues of the former, it purgeth the stomach of putrified humors.

Species Dianthus. Page 93. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Rosemary flowers an ounce, red Roses, Violets, Liquoris, of each six drachms, Cloves, Indian Spicknard, Nutmegs, Galanga, Cinna­mon, Ginger, Zedoary, Mace, Wood of Aloes, Carda­moms the less, the seeds of Dill and Annis, of each four scruples, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. It strengthens the heart and helps the passions thereof, it causeth a joyful and cheerful mind, and strengthens such as have been weakned by long sickness, it strengthens cold stomachs, and helps digestion notably. The dose is half a drachm, you may make it into an Electuary with Honey, and take two drachms of that at a time.

Diapenidion. Page 93. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Penidies two ounces, Pine­nuts, sweet Almonds blanched, white Poppy seeds, of each three drachms and a scruple, [Cinnamon, Cloves, Ginger, (which three being omitted it is Diapenidion without Species] Juyce of Liquoris, Gum Traga­canth, and Arabick, white Starch, the four greater cold seeds [...], of each a drachm and an half, Cam­phire seven grains, make them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. It helps the vices of the breast, coughs, colds, hoarsness, and consumptions of the lungues, as also such as spit matter. You may mix it with any pectoral Syrup, and take it with a Liquo­ris stick, if you fancy the Pouder best; but if the E­lectuary, you may take a drachm of it upon a knifes point at any time when the cough comes.

Diarrhodon Abbatis. Page 93. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Sanders white and red, of each two drachms and an half; Gum Tragacanth, Arabick, Ivory, of each two scruples; [...] roots, Maslick, Indian Spicknard, Cardamoms, Li­quoris, Saffron, Wood of Aloes, Cloves, Gallia Mos­chata, Annis and sweet Fennel seeds, Cinnamon, Rhu­barb, Bazil Seeds, Barberry seeds, the seeds of Succo­ry, Purslain, the four greater cold Seeds clensed, white Poppy seeds, of each one scruple; Pearls, bone of a Stags heart of each half a scruple; red Roses exangu­lated, one ounce and three drachms; Camphire seven grains, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. It cools the violent heat of the heart and stomach, as also of the liver, lungues and Spleen, easeth pains in the body, and most infirmities coming to the body by reason of heat. The dose of the Pou­der is half a drachm, and two ounces of the Electua­ry, into which with Sugar dissolved in Rose-water you may make it; and can the Colledg justly say 'tis destructive to the Common-wealth?

Diaspoliticum. Page 94. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cummin seeds steeped in Vineger and dried, long Pepper, [...] leaves, of each an ounce, Niter half an ounce, make them into pou­der.

Culpeper] A. It is an admirable remedy for such whose meat is putrified in their stomcahs, it helps cold stomachs, cold belchings and windy. You may take half a drachm after meat, either in a spoonful of Muskadel, or in a Syrup of Mirtles or Quinces, or any Cordial Water whose effects is the same.

Species Diatragacanthi srigidi. Page 94. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Gum Tragacanth two ounces, Gum Arabick an ounce and two drachms, white starch half an ounce, Liquoris, the seeds of Me­lones and white Poppies, of each three drachms, the seeds of Citruls, Cucumers and Guords of each two drachms, Penids three ounces, Camphire half a scruple, make of them a Pouder according to art.

Also you may make an Electuary of them with a sus­ficient quantity of Syrup of Violets; but have a care of what was told you before, Of the seeds. (quoth the Colledg, Before, when all honesty was not fled from them to Heaven.)

A. If you please to put in the cold seeds (which the Reverend Colledg appoints to be left out, till the Pouder come to be used, and then 'tis impossible to put them in, as I shewed before, page 122.) and so make it up into an Electuary; then I can tell you what the vertues are: It helps the faults of the breast and Lungs coming of heat and driness, it helps Con­sumptions, Leanness, Inflamations of the sides, Pleu­resies &c. hot and dry Coughs, roughness of the Tongue and Jaws: but how to make ought of the Receipt as the Colledg have ordered it, belongs to a­nother Oepidibus and not to me. It is your best way to make the Electuary very moist, and take now and then a little of it with a Liquoris stick.

Diatrion [...]. Page 94. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the three sorts of Peppers of each six drachms and fifteen grains, Annis seeds [...], Ginger of each one drachm, beat them into [...].

Culpeper.] A. It heats the stomach and expels wind. Half a drachm in pouder, or two drachms in Electuary (for so Galen who was Author of it ap­points it to be made with clarified Honey, a suffici­ent quantity) if age and strength permit; if not, half so much, is a sufficient dose, to be taken before meat, if to heat the stomach and help digestion; af­ter meat, if to expel wind.

Diatrion Santalon. Page 94. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of all the sorts of Sanders, red Roses, of each three drachms, Rhubard, Ivory, Juyce of Liquoris, Purslain seeds of each two drams and fifteen grains, white Starch, Gum Arabick, Tra­gacanth, the seeds of Melones, Cucumers, Citruls, Guords, Endive, of each a drachm and an half; Cam­phire a scruple, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It is very profitable against the heat of the stomach and liver, besides it wonderfully helps such as have the yellow Jaundice, and consump­tions of the Lungues. You may safely take a drachm of the pouder, or two drachms of the Electuary in the morning fasting; for most of their pouder will keep better by half in Electuaries, and were so appointed by those from whence they stole them.

Pulvis Haly. Page 95. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of white Poppy seeds ten drachms; white Starch, Gum Arabick and [...], of each three drachms, the seeds of Purslain, Marsh-mallows, Mallows, of each five drachms, of Cucumers, [...], Guords, Citruls, Quinces, of each seven drachms, Ivory, Liquoris, of each three drachms; Penids, the waight of them all, make them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It is a gallant cool Pouder, sit for all hot imperfections of the breast and Lungues, as consumptions, pleuresies, &c.

A. Your best way is to make it into a soft Electu­ary with Syrup of Violets, and take it as Diatraga­canthum frigidum. They have only taken a little pains to less purpose to alter the quantities, else 'tis the same with their former.

Laetisicans. Page 95. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take the flowers of Clove-Bazil, or the seeds thereof, Saffron, Zedoary, Wood of Aloes, Cloves, Citron Pills, Galanga, Mace, Nutmegs, Sty­rax Calamitis of each two drachms and an half, Ivo­ry, Annis seeds, Time, Epithimum, of each one dram, bone of a Stags heart, Pearls, Camphire, of each half a drachm, [...] of Gold and Silver of each half a scruple, make it into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. It causeth a merry heart, a good co­lour, helps digestion, and keeps back old age. You may mix half a drachm of it to take at one time, or less if you please, in any Cordial Syrup, or cordial E­lectuary apropriated to the same uses.

Pulvis Bezoardicus Magistralis. P. 95. in L. Book. Or, A Bezoartick Pouder Magisterial.

The Colledg] Take of Saphire, Ruby, Jacinth, Granates, Emerald of each a drachm, Terra Lemnia, Bole-armenick, red Corral prepared, Pearls prepared of each two drachms, Zedoary, Unicorns horn, East and West Bezoar, Musk, Ambergreece, Camphire, Squinanth, Saffron, of each half a drachm, yellow Sanders, Wood of Aloes, Benjamin, of each two scru­ples, Magisterial Phylonium four scruples, bone of a [...] heart Citron Pills, Chermes, of each half a drachm, Chymical Oyl of Cinnamon and Nutmegs of each five drops, make of them a most subtil Pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. Surely the Colledg laid all their heads together to invent a Cordial that should be so dear no body should buy it, I am afraid to look upon it. 'Tis a great Cordial to revive the body, but it will bring the purse into consumption.

Species confectionis Liberantis. Page 96. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Tormentil Roots, the seeds of Sorrel, Endive, Coriander prepared, Citron, of each one drachm and an half, all the Sanders, white Dittany of each a drachm, Bole-armenick, Earth of Lemnos of each three drachms, Pearls, both sorts of Corral, white Amber, Ivory, Spodium, bone of a Stags heart, the roots of Scrpentary, Avens, Angelica, Car­damoms, [...], Mace, Wood of Aloes, Cassia Lignea, Saffron, Zedoary, of each half a drachm, Penids, raw Silk tosted, Emeralds, Jacinth, Granate, the flowers of Water-Lillies, Bugloss and red Roses, of each a scruple, Camphire seven grains, make them in­to pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. The Scrpentary Roots are added, and Musk and Ambergreece of each three grains, left out, because destructive to the Common-wealth.

A. It is exceeding good in pestilential Feavers, and preserveth from ill airs, and keepeth the humors in the body from corruption, it cools the heart and blood, and strengtheneth such as are oppressed by heat; to conclude, it is a gallant cool cordial though costly. It being out of the reach of a vulgar mans purse, I omit the dose, let the Gentry and Nobility study Physick themselves, so shall they know it, for had they wanted hearts to that study no more than they wanted time and means, it had been far better for this Common-wealth than now it is. If a Gentleman have no skill in Physick himself, Dr. Dunce if he have a Plush Cloak on will serve his turn.

Pulvis Saxonicus. Page 96. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the Roots of both sorts of Angelica, Swallow-wort, [...] Valerian, Polypo­dium of the Oak, Marsh-mallows, Nettles, of each half an ounce, the [...] of German Mezereon, two drachms; twenty grains of Herb [...]-love, the Leaves of the same, Roots and all, thirty six; the Roots being steeped in Vineger and [...], beat it all into pouder.

Culpeper] A. It seems to be as great an expeller of poyson, and as great a preservative against it, and the pestilence as one shall usually reade of. Widdow­wail left out by [...], Crato, and [...]: and out of question it makes the Receipt the worse, and not the [...]. [...] intend the flower of herb True­love, [Page 128] thereby distinguishing it from one leaf of the flower, or whether they mean the flower and branch, is very difficult if not impossible to judg; for their word [cum toto] comprehends all, both root, branch, leaf, and flower.

Pulvis Antilyssus. Page 97. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the Leaves of Rue, Ver­vain, Sage,. Plantane, Polypodium, common Worm­wood, Mints, Mugwort, Bawm, Bettony, St. Johns wort, Centaury the less, of each equal parts, let them all be gathered in their greatest strength, which is a­bout the full Moon in June, and dried speedily in a Warm Sun, and renewed yeerly, and not beaten to pouder till you have occasion to use them.

Culpeper] A. I see now the Colledg is not too old to learn how to dry Herbs, for before they ap­pointed them to be dried in the shadow; I would they would learn humility and honesty, and mind the common good, and consider what infinite num­ber of poor creatures perish daily (whom Christ hath [...] purchased to himself, and bought with the price of his blood) through their hiding the rules of Phy­sick from them, who else happily might be preserved if they knew but what the Herbs in their own Gar­dens were good for; with what face will they an­swer for this another day before God and the Lord Jesus Christ and the holy Angels? a few thoughts of this might put them upon such principles as might be a lengthning to their Tranquility; but why do I spend time about them, seeing there is little hopes they will be honester? for why did they change the name of this Receipt from a pouder against the bi­tings of Mad-dogs, to Pulvis Antilyssus? was it not because people should not know what it is good for, but if they be bitten, they may be mad and hang themselves for all them? I beleeve I have hit the nail at head the first blow. A drachm of the Pouder is sufficient to take every morning.

Rosatae Novellae. Page 97. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of red Roses, Liquoris, of each one ounce, one drachm, two scruples and an half; Cinnamon, They should hav added a quarter of a grain, and half a guarter. two drachms, two scruples, and two grains, Cloves, Indian Spicknard, Ginger, Galanga, Nutmegs, Zedoary, Styrax Calamitis, Cardamoms, Parsly seeds of each one scruple eight grains, beat them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. Excellently penned, even to half a grain.

A. It quencheth thirst, and staies vomiting, and the Author saith it helps hot and dry stomachs, as also heat and driness of the heart, liver, and lungues, (yet is the pouder it self hot) it strengthens the vital spirit, takes away heart-qualms, provokes sweat, and strengthens such as have labored long under Cronical diseases. You may take a drachm of the Electuary e­very morning, if with clarified Honey you please to make it into such a body.

Pulvis Thuraloes. Page 97. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Frankinsence a drachm, [...] half a drachm, beat them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. And when you have occasion to use it, mix so much of it with the white of an Beat the white of the Egg well first. Egg as will make it of the thickness of Honey, then dip the wool of a Hare in it, and apply it to the sore or part that bleedeth, binding it on.

A. In my opinion this is a pretty Medicine, and will stick on till the sore be throughly healed, and then will come off of it self. I remember when I was a child, we applied such a medicine, (only we left out the Aloes and Frankinsence, and used only Coneys wool and the white of an Egg) to kibed heels, and alwaies with good success. And why could they not here set down the yertues and way to use it as they did last time? Do they delight to have the curses of the Widdow and Fatherless, and the last groans of poor dying People ring in the ears of the Lord God Almighty against them, or did they think I was dead, they (and their Imps) having so often cursed me to the pit of Hell for doing my Country good? No, I would have them know that through the prayers of so many honest people, and so many that bless God for me, my life shall be lengthned to a longer date than their Charter, and when I die I shall have more weeping eyes accompanying me to the Grave than all they have friends in the whol Universe.

Pulvis Hermodactylorum compositus. Page 97. Or, Pouder of Hermodactils compound.

The Colledg] Take of mens bones burnt, Scammo­ny, Hermodactils, Turbith, Senna, Sugar, of each e­qual parts, beat them into pouder.

Culpeper] A. 'Tis a devilish purge like themselves good for nothing but to destroy men; your souls be­ing led to your graves by their directions like sheep to the slaughter, and know not whither you are going nor what hurts you, or if you do, are they questio­nable by law? Dear souls, avoid this Medicine, else the Colledg will have mens bones enough to burn, it may be they appointed it for that end: And oh Col­ledg, Colledg, may I not use the speech of Cicero to you? Iam vos non stultos ut semper, non improbos ut saepe, sed dementes et insae nos rebus addicam ne­cessariis, I cannot now accout you sools as alwaies, not wicked as sometimes, but mad men and lunatick, and prove it by good reasons; would you offer to ap­point such a violent purger without any thing to cor­rect it? God be merciful to your souls, for if you give such Physick you will kill more men by half than you cure, and men must give you an angel at least to kill them, when the hangman would do it at a chea­per rate.

Pulvis Senae Compositus major. Page 98. in L. Book. Or, Pouder of Scnna, the greater Composition.

The Colledg] Take of the seeds of Annis, [...], Fennel, Cummin, Spicknard, Cinnamon, Galan­ga, of each half an ounce; Liquoris, Gromwel, of each an ounce, Senna the waight of them all, beat it into Pouder.

Culpeper] A. That this Receipt is gallantly com­posed none can deny, and is an excellent purge for such bodies as are troubled with the wind chollick, or stoppage either of the guts or Kidneys; two drams taken in white Wine will work sufficiently with any ordinary body. Let weak men and children take less, keeping within doors, and warm. And why must the Colledg spit their venom in defacing the name of the deceased Dr. Ralf, Holland with a deleatur? why should all be accounted their own when nothing indeed is theirs but folly and baseness.

Pulvis [...] Compositus minor. Page 98. in L. Book. Or, Pouder of Senna, the lesser Composition.

The Colledg] Take of Senna two ounces, Cremor [Page 126] Tartar half an ounce, Mace two scruples and an half, Ginger, Cinnamon, of each a drachm and an half, Sal gem one drachm, beat it into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. This Pouder purgeth melancholly, and clense the head; Montagnanus was the Author of it, only the Colledg something altered the quan­tities of the Simples: the following pouder works somthing violently by reason of the Scammony that is in it, this is more gentle, and may be given with­out danger, even two drachms at a time to ordinary bodies. I would not have the unskilful meddle with the following. Neither is it fitting for weak bodies and children; such as are strong may take a drachm, or a drachm and an half, mixing it with white Wine; let them take it early in the morning after they are up, and not fleep after it for fear of danger; two hours after let them drink warm posset drink, and six hours after eat a bit of warm Mutton, let them walk about the chamber often, and not stir out of it that day.

Diasenae. Page 98. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Senna, Cremor Tartar, of each two ounces, Cloves, Cinnamon, Galanga, Ammi, of each two drachms; Diacrydium half an ounce, beat it into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. Out of question some body had for­merly cursed the Colledg for calling so violent a purge a HOLY POUDER, and therefore now they changed the name; yet this Use may safely be made of their Doctrine, ``Themselves being violent, ``count the violentest things the most holy.

Diaturbith with Rhubarb. Page 98. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Turbith, Hermodactils, of each an ounce, Rhubarb ten drachms, Diacrydium half an ounce, Sanders red and white, Violets, Gin­ger, of each a drachm and an half, Mastich, Annis [...], Cinnamon, Saffron of each half a drachm, make it into pouder.

Culpeper] A. This also purgeth flegm and choller. Once more let me desire such as are unskilful in the rules of Physick, not to meddle with purges of this nature (unless prescribed by a skilful Physitian) lest they do themselves more mischief in half an hour, than they can claw off again in half a year.

Culpeper] The Pouders they in their new Moddel have plaid the men and left out, are these:

The lesser Cordial Pouder. Fernelius.

The Colledg] Take of Harts-horn, Unicorns-horn, Pearls, Ivory, of each six grains: beat them into fine pouder; If you mean to keep it, you may encrease the quantity analogically.

The greater Cordial Pouder. Fern.

The Colledg] Take of the Roots of Tormentil, Dittany, Clove-gilliflowers, Scabious, the seeds of Tormentil, Coriander prepared, Citron, Carduus Benedi­ctus, Endive, Rue, of each one drachm; of the three sorts of White, red, and yellow Sanders, Been white and red, (or if you can­not got them, take the Roots of Avens and Tormen­til in their steads) Roman A kind of [...]. Doronicum, Cinnamon, Cardamoms, Saffron, the flowers of both sorts of viz. Bor­rage and Bugloss. Bugloss, red Roses, and Water-Lillies, Wood of A­loes, Mace, of each two scruples, Ivory, Spodium, Bone of a Stags heart, red Corral, Pearls, Emeral'd, Jacinth, Granate, of each one scruple, raw Silk Dried or rosted by the fire. tor­refied, Bole Armenick, Earth of Lemnos, of each half a drachm; Camphire, Amber-greese, Musk, of each [...] grains; beat them into pouder according to art, and with eight times their weight in white Sugar, dis­solved in Rose-water, you may make them into Lozen­ges, if you please.

Culpeper] A. Both this and the former Pouder, are apropriated to the heart, (as the titles shew) ther­fore they do strengthen that and the vital spirit, and relieve languishing nature. All these are Cordial Pouders, and seldom above half a drachm of them gi­ven at a time, I suppose more for the cost of them than any ill effects they would work, they are too high for a poor mans purse, the Rich may mix them with any cordial Syrup or Electuary which they find apropriated to the same use these are.

A Pouder for such as are bruised by a Fall. The Augustan Physitians.

The Colledg] Take of Terra sigillata, Dragons blood, so called; though it be nothing less, but only the gum of a tree. Sanguis Draconis, Mummy, of each two drachms; Sperma Ceti one drachm; Rhubarb half a drachm: beat them into Pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. You must beat the rest into pouder, and then ad the Sperma Ceti to them afterwards, for if you put the Sperma Ceti and the [...] all together, and go to beat them in that fashion, you may as soon beat the Mortar into pouder, as the Simples. Indeed your best way is to beat them severally, and then mix them all together, which being done, makes you a gallant medicine for the infirmity specified in the ti­tle, a drachm of it being taken in Muskadel, and sweating after it.

Species Electuarii Diacymini. Nicholaus.

The Colledg] Take of Cummin seeds, [...] a na­tural day in Vineger, one ounce and one scruple; Cia­namon, Cloves, of each two drachms and an half; Galanga, Savory, Calamith, of each one drachm and two scruples; Ginger, black Pepper, of each two drachms and five grains; the seeds of Lovage and Bishops weed. Ammi, of each one drachm and eighteen grains; long Pepper one drachm; Spicknard, Nutmegs, Carda­moms, of each two scruples and an half; beat them and keep them diligently in pouder for your use.

Culpeper.] A. It heats the stomach and bowels, expels wind exceedingly, helps the wind chollick, helps digestion hindred by cold or wind, is an admi­rable remedy for wind in the guts, and helps [...] agues. The pouder is very hot, half a drachm is e­nough to take at one time, and too much if the pati­ent be feaverish; you may take it in white Wine. It is in my opinion a fine composed Pouder.

Species Electuarii Diagalangae. Mesue.

The Colledg.] Take of Galanga, [...] of Aloes, of each six drachms; Cloves, [...], seeds of Lovage of each two drachms; Ginger, long and white Pep­per, Cinnamin, [...] Aromaticus, of each a dram and an half; Calaminth, and Mints dried, Carda­moms the [...], Indian Spicknard, the seeds of Smallage, Annis Fennel, Carraway, of each one dram, beat them into Pouder according to art. Also it may be made into an [...] with white Sugar dissolved [Page 127] in Malaga Wine, or twelve times the weight of it of clarified Honey.

Culpeper] A. I am afraid twelve times the weight of the weight of the simples is too much by half, if not by three parts: Honest Mesue appoints only a sufficient quantity, and quotes it only as an Electua­ry, which he saith prevails against wind, sowr bel­chings, and indigestion, gross humors and cold af­flictions of the stomach and liver. You may take half a drachm of the pouder at a time, or two of the Electuary in the morning fasting, or an hour before meat. It helps digestion exceedingly, expels wind, and heats a cold stomach.

Species Electuarii de Gemmis frigidi.

The Colledg] Take of Pearls prepared three drachms; Spodium, Ivory, both sorts of Corral, of each two drachms; the flowers of red Roses a dram and an half; Jacinth, Saphire, Emerald, Sardine, Granate, Sanders white red and yellow, the flowers of Borrage and Bugloss, the seeds of Sorrel and Bazil, both sorts of Been (for want of them, the Roots of A­vens and Tormentil) of each one drachm; Bone of a Stags heart half a drachm; Leaves of Gold and Sil­ver of each fifteen: make of them all a pouder accor­ding to art, and let it be diligently kept.

Species Electuarii Diamagariton Calidi. Avicenna.

The Colledg.] Take of Pearls and Pellitory of the Wall; of each one drachm; Ginger, Mastich, of each half an ounce; Doronicum, Zedoary, Smallage seeds, both sorts of Cardamoms, Nutmegs, Mace, of each two drachms; Been of both sorts (if they cannot be procured take the Roots of Avens and Tormentil) black and long Pepper of each three drachms; beat them into pouder and keep them for your use.

Culpeper] A. Avicenna prescribes this as an E­lectuary, and so are most of all the Colledges Pouders prescribed by those by whom they borrowed them, as I told you before, and they will keep longer and bet­ter in Electuaries than in Pouders; but people must be fantastical.

A. This (quoth Avicenna) is apropriated to wo­men, and in them to diseases incident to their ma­trix, but his reasons I know not; It is Cordial and heats the stomach.

Lithontribon Nicholaus, according to Fernelius.

The Colledg] Take of Spicknard, Ginger, Cinna­mon, black Pepper, Cardamoms, Cloves, Mace, of each half a drachm; Costus, Liquoris, Cyperus, Tra­ganth, Germander, of each two scruples; the seeds of Ammi. Bishops weed, Smallage, Sparagus, Bazil, Nettles, Citrons, Saxifrage, Burnet, Carraway, Carrots, Fennel, Bruscus, Parsly of Macedonia, Burs, Or Hart­wort. Seseli, Asarabacca, of each one drachm; Lapis spongiae, Lyncis, Cancri, Judaici, of each one drachm and an half Goats blood prepared an ounce and an half; beat them all into pouder according to art.

Culpeper] A. The truth is, the Colledg have alte­red this Receipt much, and I am perswaded have made it much better, Neque enim benefacta maligne, de­tractare meum est.

A. It heats the stomach, and helps want of digesti­on coming through cold, it easeth pain in the belly and loyns, the A [...] that cau­sethmen to vomit up their Ex­crements. Illiack passion, powerfully breaks the stone in the reins and bladder, it speedily helps the chollick, strangury, and disury. The dose is from a drachm to half a drachm, take it either in white Wine, or Decotion of [...] to the same purposes.

Pleres Arconticon. Nicholaus.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon, Cloves, Galan­ga, wood of Aloes, Indian Spicknard, Nutmegs, Gin­ger, Spodium, Schoenanthus, Cyperus, red Roses outof que­stion: yet it seems the Coledg either did not know, or did not care which [...], Violets of each one dcachm, Indian Leaf or Mace, Liquoris, Mastich, Styrax Calamitis, [...], [...], or Water-Mints, Bazil, Cardamoms, long and white Pepper, Mirtle berries, and Citron pills, of each half a drachm and six grains, [...], [...] white and red (or if they be [...] take the roots of Avens and Tormentil in their steads) red Corral, [...] Silk, of each eighteen grains, Musk six grains, Cam­phire four grains, beat them into pouder according to [...], and with ten times their weight in Sugar dissolved in Bawm water you may make them into an Electuary.

Culpeper.] A. It is exceedingly good for [...], me­lancholly, lumpish, pensive, grieving, vexing, pining, sighing, sobbing, fearful, careful spirits, it strengthens weak stomachs exceedingly, and helps such as are prone to faintings and swoonings, it strengthens such as are weakned by violence of sickness, it helps bad memories, quickens all the sences, strengthens the brain and Animal spirit, helps the falling-sickness, and succours such as are troubled with Asthmacs, or other cold afflictions of the lungs. It will keep best in an Electuary, of which you may take a drachm in the morning, or more, as age and strength requires.

A Preservative Pouder against the Pestilence. Montagnan.

The Colledg] Take of all the White, red, end yellow. Sanders, the seeds of Bazil, of each an ounce and an half; Bole Arme­nick, Cinnamon, of each an ounce; the Roots of Dit­tany, Gentian and Tormentil of each two drams and an half; the seeds of Citron and Sorrel, of each two drachms; Pearls, Saphire, bone of a Stags heart, of each one drachm: beat them into pouder according to art.

Culpeper.] A. The title tels you the vertue of it. Besides it cheers the vital spirit and strengthens the heart. You may take half a dram every morning ei­ther by it self, or mixed with any other convenient composition, whether Syrup or Electuary.

Diaturbith the greater, without Rhubarb.

The Colledg.] Take of the best Turbith an ounce; Diagridium, Ginger, of each half an ounce; Cinna­mon, Cloves, of each two drachms; Galanga, long Pepper, Mace, of each one drachm: beat them into Pouder, and with eight ounces and five drachms of white Sugar dissolved in Succory Water, it may be made into an Electuary.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth flegm, being rightly ad­ministred by a skilful hand. I fancy it not.

A Pouder for the worms.

The Colledg] Take of Wormseed four nunces; Senna one ounce; Coriander seed prepared, Harts horn, of each half a drachm; Rhubarb half an ounce; dried Rue two drachms: beat them into Pouder.

Culpeper] A. I like this Pouder very well, the quantity (or to write more Scholastically, the dose) must be regulated according to the age of the patient, even from ten grains to a dram, and the manner of taking it by their pallat: It is something purging.

ELECTUARIES.

Antidotus analeptica. Page 99. in the Latin Book.

Colledg] TAke of red Roses, Liquoris, of each two drachms and five grains; Gum Arabick and Tragacanth of each two drachms and two scruples; Sanders white and red of each four scruples, Juyce of Liquoris, white Starch, the seeds of white Poppies, Purslain, Lettice, and Endive of each three drachms, the four greater cold seeds hus­ked, the seeds of Quinces Mallows, Cotton, Violets, Pinenuts, fistick nuts, sweet Almonds, Pulp of Sebe­stens, of each two drachms, Cloves, Spodium, Cin­namon, of each one drachm, Saffron five grains, Pe­nids, half an ounce, being beaten, make them all into a soft Electuary with three times their weight in Syrup of Violets.

Culpeper] A. It restores Consumptions, and Hectick [...], strength lost, it nourisheth much, and restor es radical moisture, opens the pores, resists choller, takes away coughs, quencheth thirst, and re­sisteth feavers. For the quantity to be taken at a time, I hold it needless to trouble the Reader: you may take an ounce in a day by a drachm at a time, if you please; you shall sooner hurt your purse by it than your body.

Consectio Alkermes. Page 99. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Apples, Da­mask Rose-water, of each a pound and an half, in which infuse for twenty four hours, raw Silk four ounces, strain it strongly and ad syrup of the Berries of Chermes brought over to us two pound, Sugar one pound, boyl it to the thickness of Honey, then remo­ving it from the fire whilst it is warm, ad Ambergreese cut smai half an ounce, which being well mingled put in these things following in pouder, Cinnamon, Wood of Aloes of each six drachms, Pearls prepared two [...], Leaf-Gold a drachm, Musk a scruple, make it up according to art.

Culpeper] A. They have added the double quan­tity of Juyce of Chermes, whereby the Medicine is made both hotter and stronger, and if they had dou­bled the quantity of Sugar also, that so it need not have boyled away so much, they had done better; al­so they have subtracted from the quantity of Musk there being a drachm appointed before, but why they have done so, neither I, nor I think themselves know; and as little reason can be given why they should leave out the Lapis Lazuli, unless it be for an Apish opinion they hold, that Lapis Lazuli purgeth, where­as indeed, it strengthens the heart exceedingly against Melancholly vapors. Their former Composition contained of it (being first burnt in a Crucible, then often washed in Rose-water till it be clean) six drachms.

A. Questionless this is a great Cordial, and a migh­ty strengthner of the heart, and spirit vital, a restorer of such as are in consumptions, a resister of pestilen­ces and poyson, a great relief to languishing nature; it is given with good success in feavers, but give not too much of it at a time, lest it prove too hot for the body, and too heavy for the purse. You may mix ten grains of it with other convenient Cordials to children, twenty or thirty to men.

Electuarium è Sassaphras. Page 100. in L. Book. Or, Electuary of Sassafras.

The Colledg] Take of Sassafras two ounces; com­mon Water three pound, boyl it to the consumption of the third part, adding towards the end Cinnamon bruised half an [...], strain it and with two pound of white Sugar, boyl it to the thickness of a Syrup putting in, in pouder, Cinnamon, a drachm, Nutmegs half a scruple, Musk three grains, Ambergreese two and thirty grains, ten Leaves of Gold, Spirit of Vi­triol four drops, and so make it into an Electuary ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. It opens obstructions of the Liver and Spleen, helps cold Rhewms or defluxions from the head to the lungs, or teeth, or eyes; it is excellent in coughs, and other cold afflictions of the lungues and breast; it helps digestion, expels wind and the gravel of the kidneys, it provokes the terms, warms and dries up the moisture of the womb, which is ma­ny times the cause of barrenness, and is generally a helper of all diseases coming of cold, raw thin hu­mors: you may take half a drachm at a time in the morning.

Electuarium de Baccis Lauri. Page 100. Or, Electuary of Bay-berries.

The Colledg] Take of the Leaves of dried Rhue ten drachms, the seeds of Ammi, Cummin Lovage, O­riganum, Nigella, Carraway Carrots, Parsly, Bitter Almonds, Pepper black and long, wild Mints, Cala­mus Aromaticus, Bay-berries, Castorium of each two drachms, Sagapenum half an ounce, Opopanax three drachms, clarified Honey a pound and an half, the things to be beaten being beaten, and the Gums dissol­ved in uine, make it into an Electuary according to art

Culpeper] A. It is exceeding good either in the chollick, or iliack passion, or any other disease of the bowels coming of cold or wind, it generally easeth pains in the bowels. You may give a drachm in the morning fasting, or half an ounce in a Clyster, ac­cording as the disease is.

Diacapparis. Page 101. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Capars four [...], Agri­mony Roots, Nigella seeds, Squils, Asarabacca, Cen­taury, black Pepper, Smallage, Time of each an ounce, Honey three times their weight, make into an Electua­ry according to art.

Culpeper] A. They say it helps infirmities of the spleen, and indeed the name seems to promise so much; it may be good for cold bodies if they have strength of nature in them; me thinks 'tis but odly composed: the next looks more lovely in my eyes, which is —

Diacinnamomu. Page 101. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon fifteen drachms; Cassia Lignea, Alicampane roots, of each half an ounce; Galanga seven drachms, Cloves, Long Pepper, both sorts of Cardamoms, Ginger, Mace, Nutmegs, Wood of Aloes, of each three drachms, Saffron one drachm, Sugar five drachms, Musk two scruples, added accor­ding to the prescript of the Physitian, and by adding three pound eight ounces of clarified Honey, boyl it and make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Diacinnamomum, or in plain Eng­lish, a Composition of Cinnamon, heats the stomach, causeth digestion, provokes the terms in women, strengthens the stomach and other parts that distri­bute the nourishment of the body; a drachm of it ta­ken in the morning fasting is exceeding good for an­cient people and cold bodies, such as are subject to dropsies and diseases of flegm, or wind, for it comforts and strengthens nature much. If you take it to help digestion, take it an hour before meat, do so in all things of like quality.

Diacorallion. Page 101. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Corral white and red, Bole Armenick, Dragons blood, of each one drachm, Pearls half a drachm, Wood of Aloes, red Roses, Gum Tra­gacanth, Cinnamon of each two scruples, Sanders white and red of each one scruple, with four times its weight in Sugar dissolved in smal Cinnamon water, make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It comforts and strengthens the heart exceedingly, and restores such as are in con­sumptions, it is cooling, therefore good in Hectick feavers; very binding, and therefore stops fluxes; neither do I know a better Medicine in all the Dis­pensatory for such as have a consumption accompani­ed with a loosness. It stops the terms and whites in Women, if administred by one whose wits are not a woolgathering. Take but a drachm at a time every morning, because of its binding quality, except you have a loosness, for then may you take so much two or three times a day.

Diacorum. Page 101. In the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the roots of Cicers, Acorus, or Calamus Aromaticus, Pine-nuts, of each a pound and an half; let the Cicers roots being clensed, cut In water saith Me­sue, though the Col­ledg left it out. You might boil them in piss, and yet not swerve frō their Re­ceipt. boyled and pulped, be added to ten pound of clarified Honey, and boyled (stirring it) to its just thickness, then being removed from the fire ad the Acorus roots beaten, the Pine-nuts cut, and these following in pou­der; Take of black Pepper an ounce, Long Pepper Cloves, Ginger, Mace, of each half an ounce, Nut­megs, Galanga, Cardamoms of each three drachms, mix them with the Roots and Honey into an Electua­ry according to art.

Culpeper] A. The Electuary provokes lust, heats the brain, strengthens the nerves, quickens the sences, causeth an acute wit, easeth pains in the head, helps the falling-sickness and convulsions, coughs, cathars, and all diseases proceeding from coldness of the Brain. Half a drachm is enough to take at one time because of its heat.

Diacydonium Simple. Page 102. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the flesh of Quinces cut and boyled in fair water to a thickness eight pound, white Sugar six pound, boyl it to its just thickness.

Diacydonium with Species. Page 102. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the [...] of Quinces, Su­gar of each two pound, white [...] half a pound, added at the end of the Decoction, it being gent­ly boyled and the scum taken away, ad Ginger two ounces, white Pepper, ten drachms and two scruples, bruise them grosly, and boyl it again to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper.] A. Is not this then more a Syrup than an Electuary? Surely either the Colledg or I doted, when we set this among the Electuaries, and would not be beaten out of our follies.

Diacydonium Compound, Magisterial, Page 102. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of white Sugar six pound, spring water four pound, clarifie them well with the white of an Eg scumming them, then take of ripe Quinces clensed from the rind and seeds, and cut in four quarters eight pound, boyl them in the foregoing Syrup till they be tender, then strain the Syrup through a linnen cloath, vocata Anglice boulter, boyl them a­gain to a Gelly, adding four ounces of white Wine Vi­neger towards the end; remove it from the fire and whilst it is warm, put in these following Species in gross pouder, Ginger an ounce, white Pepper, Cin­namon, Nutmegs of each two drachms; keep it in di­verse bones.

Culpeper.] A. If a man void of partiality should compare this and the former Receipt together, [...] would find but little difference between them: only a little Cinnamon and Nutmegs added.

A. The vertues of all these three are, They com­fort the stomach, help digestion, stay vomiting, bel­ching &c. stop fluxes and the terms in women. They are all harmless, you may take the quantity of a Nut­meg of them at a time, before meat to help digestion and fluxes, after meat to stay vomiting, in the mor­ning for the rest.

Consectio de Hyacintho. Page 103. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Jacinth, red Corral, Bole Armenick, Earth of Lemnos of each half an ounce, the Berries of [...], the Roots of Tormentil and Dittany, the seeds of Citrons, Sorrel, and Purstain, Sassron, Mirrh, red Roses exungulated, all the sorts of Sanders, bone of a Stags heart, Harts-horn, Ivory prepared, of each four scruples, Saphire, Emerald, Topas, Pearls, raw Silk, Leaves of Gold and Silver of each two scruples, Camphire, Musk, Ambergreese of each five grains: with Syrup of Lemmons, make it into a Confection according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is a great Cordial and cool, ex­ceeding good in acute feavers, and Pestilences, [...] mightily strengtheneth and cherrisheth the heart. Never above half a drachm is given at a time, very seldom so much; not because of its offensiveness, I suppose its chargableness.

Antidotum Haemagogum. Page 103. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Lupines busked two drams, [Page 130] black Pepper five scruples, and six grains, Liquoris four scruples, long Birthwort, Mugwort, Cassia [...], Macedonian Parsly seed, Pellitory of Spain, Rhue seed, Spicknard, Mirrh, Penyroyal, of each two scru­ples fourteen grains, the seeds of Smallage, Savin, of each two scruples and thirteen grains, Centaury the greater, Cretish Carrots, Nigella, Carraway, An­nis, Cloves, Allum of each two scruples, Bay-leaves one scruple, one half scruple and three grains, Wood of Aloes a scruple and fourteen grains, Schaenanth one scruple and thirteen grains, Asarabacca, Calamus Aromaticus, Amomum, Centaury the less, the seed of Orrach, Peony, Fennel, of each one scruple and six grains, Cyperus, Alicampane, Ginger, Cappar roots, Cummin, Orobus of each one scruple: All of them be­ing beaten into very fine pouder, let them be made into an Electuary according to art, with four times their weight in Sugar, let it stand one month before you use it.

Culpeper] A. It provokes the terms, brings a­way both birth and after-birth, the dead child, pur­geth such as are not sufficiently purged after travail; it provokes urine, breaks the stone in the bladder, helps the strangury, disury, iskury, &c. helps indige­stion, the chollick, opens any stoppings in the body, it heats the stomach, purgeth the liver and spleen, consumes wind, staies vomiting; but let it not be ta­ken by women with child, nor such people as have the Hemorrhoids.

A. Nicholaus I take to be the Author of this fan­tastical Medicine, (though the Colledg give it a more general term) and the vertues also are quoted from him. The dose is from one dram to two drams.

Diasatyrion. Page 104. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Satyrion Roots three oun­tes, Dates, bitter Almonds, Indian nut, Pinenuts, Fistick Nuts, green Ginger, Eringo Roots preserved, of each one ounce; Ginger, Cloves, Galanga, Pepper long and black, of each three drachms, Ambergreese one scruple, Musk two scruples, Penids four ounces, Cinnamon, Saffron, of each half an ounce, Malaga Wine three ounces, Nutmegs, Mace, Grains of Para­dice, of each two drachms, Ash-tree Keys, the belly and loyns of Scinks, Borax, Benjamin, of each three drachms, Wood of Aloes, Cardamoms, of each two drachms, the seeds of Nettles and Onions, the roots of Avens of each a drachm and an half, with two pound and an half of Syrup of green Ginger make them into an Electuary according to Art.

Electuarium Diaspermaton. Page 104. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the four greater and lesser cold seeds, the seeds of Sparagus, Burnet, Bazil, Par­sly, Winter Cherries of each two drachms, Gromwel, Juyce of Liquoris, of each three drachms, Cinnamon, Mace, of each one drachm, with eight times their weight in white Sugar dissolved in Marsh-mallow water, make it into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. It breaks the stone, and provokes urine. Men may take half an ounce at a time, and children half so much, in Water of any Herbs or Roots &c. (or Decoction of them) that break the stone; which the last Catalogue in the Book (viz. the Catalogue of Diseases) will furnish you with. I delight to have men studious.

Micleta. Page 105. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the Barks of [...] the Miro­balans torrefied, of each two drachms and an half, the seeds of Water-cresses, Cummin, Annis, Fennel, Ammi, Caraway, of each a drachm and an half, bruise the seeds and sprinkle them with sharp white Wine Vi­neger, then beat them into pouder and add the Myro­balans and these things that follow, Spodium, Balau­stines, Sumach, Mastich, Gum Arabick of each one drachm and fifteen grains, mix them together, and with ten ounces of Syrup of Mirtles make them into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. It gently easeth the bowels of the wind Chollick, wringing of the guts, infirmities of the spleen, it stops fluxes, the Hemorrhoids, as also the terms in women.

A. A drachm or two of this taken in the morning had been a better remedy (I say amongst their Hodg­podg) than most they gave in the late Epidemical disease, the bloody flux.

Electuarium Pectorale. Page 105. in the Lat. Book. Or, A Pectoral Electuary.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Liquoris, sweet Almonds, Hazel Nuts of each half an ounce, Pine­nuts an ounce, Hysop, Maiden-hair, Orris, Netile seeds, round Birthwort of each a drachm and an half, black Pepper, the seeds of Water-cresses, the Roots of Alicampane, of each half a drachm, Honey fourteen ounces, make them into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. It strengthens the stomach and lungs, and helps the vices thereof. Take it with a Liquoris stick.

Theriaea Diatessaron. Page 105. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Gentian, Bay-berries, Mirrh, round Birthwort, of each two ounces, Honey two pound, make them into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. This is a gallant Electuary, like the Author, which was Mesue. It wonderfully helps cold infirmities of the brain, as convulsions, falling­sickness, dead palseys, shaking palseys &c. as also the stomach, as pains there, wind, want of digestion; as also stoppings of the Liver, dropsies; it resists the pestilence, and poysons, and helps the bitings of ve­nemous beasts. The dose is from half a drachm to two drachms, according to the age and strength of the patient, as also the strength of the diseases; you may take it either in the morning or when urgent oc­casion cals for it.

Diascordium. Page 106. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon, Cassia Lignea, of each half an ounce, Scordium one ounce, Dittany of Creet, Tormentil, Bistort, Galbanum, Gum Arabick of each half an ounce; Opium one drachm and an half; Sorrel seeds one drachm and an half; Gentian half an ounce, Bole-Armenick an ounce and an half, Earth of Lemnos, half an ounce; long Pepper, Gin­ger, of each two drachms; clarified Honey two pound and an half; Sugar of Roses one pound, Canary Wine ten ounces; make them into an Electuary ac­cording to Art.

Culpeper] A. It is a well composed Electuary, something apropriated to the nature of women, for it [Page 131] provokes the terms, hastens their labor, helps their usual sickness at the time of their lying in, I know nothing better; it stops fluxes, mightily strengthe­neth the heart and stomach; neither is so hot but it may safely be given to weak people; and besides pro­vokes sleep. It may safely be given to young children ten grains at a time; ancient people may take a dram or more: It is given as an excellent cordial in such feavers as are accompanied with want of sleep.

Mithridate. Page 106. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Mirrh, Saffron, Agrick, Ginger, Cinnamon, Spicknard, Frankinsence, Treacle Mustard seeds, of each ten drachms; the seeds of Hart-wort, Opobalsamum, or Oyl of Nutmegs by ex­pression, Schenanth, Stoechas, Costus, Galbanum, Tur­pentine, long Pepper, Castorium, Juyce of Hypocistis [...] Calamitis, Opopanax, Indian leaf, or for want of it, Mace, of each one ounce; Cassia Lignea, Poly mountain, white Pepper, Scordium, the seeds of Carrots of Creet, Carpobalsamum or Cubebs, Troch. Cypheos, Bdellium, of each seven drachms; Celtick Spicknard, Gum Arabick, Macedonian Parsly seed, O­pium, Cardamoms the less, Fennel seed, Gentian, red Rose Leaves, Dittany of Creet of each five drachms; Annis seeds, Asarabacca, Orris, Acorus, the greater Valerian, Sagapen. of each three drachms, Meum, A­cacia, the bellies of Scinks, the tops of St. Johns Wort, of each two drachms and an half; Malaga wine so much as is sufficient to dissolve the Juyces and Gums, clarified honey the trebble weight of all, the Wine excep­ted, make them into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper.] A. I have not time to search whether there be any difference between Damocrates and the Colledg. It was also corrected afterwards by Bar­tholomew Maranta. Also diverse Authors have spent more time about this and Venis Treacle (both of them being terrible messes of Altogether) in reducing them into Classes, than ever they did in saying their prayers. Also Andromacus hath another sort os Me­thridate. It may be it is that usually called with us [Venis Mithridate] but because the Electuary is ve­ry chargable to be made, and cannot be made but in great quantities, and only that here prescribed is to be gotten, or at least, easily to be gotten; I am willing to spare my pains in any further search.

A. It is good against poyson, and such as have done themselves wrong by taking filthy Medicines, it provokes sweat, it helps continual watrings of the stomach, ulcers in the body, consumptions, weakness of the limbs, rids the body of cold humors, and dis­eases coming of cold, it remedles cold infirmities of the brain, and stopping of the passage of the sences (viz. hearing, seeing, smelling, &c.) by cold, it ex­pels wind, helps the chollick, provokes [...] to ones victuals, it helps ulcers in the bladder if Galen say true, as also difficulty of Urine, it casts out the dead child, and helps such women as cannot con­ccive by reason of cold, it is an admirable remedy for melancholly and all diseases of the body coming through cold, it would fill a whol sheep of paper to reckon them all up particularly. You may take a scruple or half a drachm in the morning, and follow your business; two drachms will make you sweat, yea one dram if your body be weak, for then two drams may be dangerous because of its heat: how to order your self in sweating you were taught before, if you have forgot where, look the Table at latter end.

Phylonium Persicum. Page 107. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of white Pepper, the seeds of white Henbane of each two drachms, Opium Earth of Lemnos of each ten drachms, [...], Hematitis, Saf­fron of each five drachms, Castorium, Indian Spick­nard, Euphorbium prepared, Pellitary of Spain, Pearls, Amber, Zedoary, Alicampane, Troch. Ra­mach, of each a drachm, Camphire, a scruple, with their trebble waight in Honey-Roses make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. All the difference is, Mesue appoints Honey, whose commendations of it is this: It stops blood flowing from any part of the body, the immo­derate flowing of the terms in women, the hemor­rhoyds in men, spitting of blood, bloody fluxes, and is profitable for such women as are subject to miscar­ry: See the next Receipt.

A. Now they have made the quantity the same with Mesue, before I think they followed Wicker.

Phylonium Romanum. Page 107. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of white Pepper, White Hen­bane seeds of each five drachms, Opium two drachms and an halfe, Cassia Lignea a drachm and an halfe, the seeds of Smallage a drachm, Parsly of Macedonia, Fennel, Carrots of Creet of each two scruples and five grains, Saffron a scruple and an half, Indian Spick­nard, Pellitory of Spain, Zedoary, fisteen grains, Cinnamon a drachm and an halfe, Euphorbium prepa­red, Mirrh, Castorium, of each a drachm, with their trebble waight in clarified Honey, make it into an Electuary.

Culpeper] A. It is a most exquisite thing to ease vehement and deadly pains in what part of the body soever they be, whether internal or external: that vehemency of pain will bring a feaver, and a feaver, death, no man well in his wits will deny; therefore in such diseases which cause vehemency of pain, as Chollicks, the Stone, Strangury &c. this may be given (ordered by the discretion of an able brain, for it conduceth little to the cure) to mitigate the ex­tremity of pain, until convenient remedy may be had: (as men pump water out before they can stop the hole in a leaking vessel.) As for other vertues which Au­thors say this Electuary hath, I shall pass them by, resting confident that other remedies may be found out for them in this Book, as effectual, and less dan­gerous; and because the former Electuary is not much unlike to this in some particulars, take the same caution in that also. I would not have the vul­gar meddle with this, nor the former.

Phylonium Magistrale. Page 108. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Opium four ounces, Ben­jamin, Mirrh; Mummy of each halfe an ounce, Spirit of Wine as much as is sufficient to make it into an O­piate.

Culpeper] A I hold their Laudanum to be a bet­ter Midicine, for this (being exceeding dangerous) for an unskilful man to meddle withal, I let it alone, yet am not ignorant what good it might do to such whose wounds have brought them into a frenzy, if given by an able hand.

[...] de Ovo. Pag. 108 in the Latin Book. Or, Electuary of Eggs

The Colledg] Take a Hens Egge new laid and the white being taken out by a small hole, fill up the void place with Saffron, leaving the yolk in, then the hole being stopped, rost it in ashes till the shell begin to look black, take dilligent heed the Saffron burn not for then is the whole Medicine spoiled, then the mat­ter being taken out dry if so that it may be beaten into pouder, and ad to it as much Pouder of white Mu­stard Seed as it waighs. Then take the Roots of white Dittany, and Tormentil, of each two drachms, Mirrh, Harts horn, Petasitis roots of each one dram, the roots of Angellica and Burnet, Juniper berries, [...], Camphire of each halfe an ounce, mix them all together in a mortar, then ad Venis Treacle the waight of them all, stir them about with a pestle three hours together, putting in so much Syrup of Lem­mons, as is enough to make it into an Electuary ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. A drachm of it given at a time is as great a help in a pestilential feaver as a man shall usually reade of in a Galenist. It provokes sweat, and then you shall be taught how to use your self: if years do not permit, give not so much.

Theriaca Andromachi. Page 108. in Lat. Book. or, Venis Treacle.

The Colledg] Take of Troches of Squills fourty eight drachms, Troches of Vipers, long Pepper, O­pium of Thebes, Magma, Hedycroi dried of each twenty four drachms, Red Roses exungulated, Orris, Illirick, juyce of Liquoris, the seeds of sweet Navew, Scordium, Opobalsamum, Cinnamon, Agrick, of each twelve drachms, Mirrh, Costus, or Zedoary, Saffron, Cassia, Lignea, Indian Spicknard, Schenanth, Pepper, white and black, Olibanum, Dittany of Creet, Rha­pontick, Stoechas, Horehound, Macedonian Parsly seed, Calaminth, Cypress, Turpentine, the roots of Cinkfoyl and Ginger of each Six drachms, [...], mountain, Chamepitis, Celtick Spicknard, Amomus, Styrax Calamitis, the roots of Meum, the tops of Ger­mander, the roots of Rhapontick, Earth of Lemn os, Indian leafe, Chalcitis burnt or in stead thereof Ro­man Vitriol burnt, Gentian roots, Gum Arabick, the juyce of Hypocistis, Carpobalsamum or Nutmegs, or Cubebs, the seeds of Annis, Cardamoms, Fennel, Hart­wort, Acacia or in stead thereof the juyce of Sloes made thick, the seeds of Treacle Mustard, and Ammi, the tops of Saint Johns wort, Sagapen. ofof each four drams, Castorium, the roots of long Birth-wort, Bitumen, Judaicum, Carrot seed, Opopanax, Centaury the less, Galbanum of each two drachms, Canary Wine enough to dissolve what is to be dissolved, Honey the trebble waight of the dry Species, make them in­to an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is confessed many Physitians have commented upon this Receipt; as Bartholomaeus Maranta, Galen, Medici Romani, and Medici Bo­nonienses, cum multis aliis; but with little diffe­rence. The vertues of it are, It resists poyson and the bitings of venemous beasts, inveterate head­aches, vertigo, deafness, the falling sickness, a­stonishment, apoplexes, dulness of sight, want of voice, asthmaes, old and new coughs, such as spit or vomit blood, such as can hardly spit or breath, coldness of the stomach, wind, the chollick, and Illiach passion, the yellow jaundice, hardness of the spleen, stone in the reins and bladder, difficulty of urine, ulcers in the bladder, feavers dropsies, le­prosies; it provokes the terms, brings sorth both birth and afterbirth, helps pains in the joints, it helps not only the body, but also the mind, As vain fears, melancholly &c. and is a good remedy in pestilential feavers. Thus Galen. You may take half a drachm and go about your business, and it will do you good if you have occasion to go in ill airs, or in pestilential times; if you shall sweat upon it, as your best way is, if your body be not in health, then take one drachm, or between one and two, or less than one, according as age and strength is; if you cannot take this or any other sweating medicine by it self, mix it with a little Carduus or Dragons water, or Angelica water which in my opnion is the best of the three.

Theriaca Londinensis. Page 110. in Lat. Book. Or, London Treacle.

The Colledg] Take of Hartshorn two ounces, the seeds of Citrons, Sorrel, Peony, Bazil, of each an ounce, Scordium Corallina of each six drams, the roots of Angellica, Tormentil, Peony, the Leaves of Dittany, Bay berries, Juniper berries, of each half an ounce, The flowers of Rosemary, Marigolds, Clove Gilliflowers, the tops of Saint Johns wort, Nutmegs, Saffron of each three drachms, the Roots of Gentian, Zedoary, Ginger, Mace, Mirrh, the leaves of Scabious, Devilsbit, Cardus, of each two drachms, Cloves, Opium of each a drachm, Malaga Wine as much as is sufficient, with their trebble waight in Honey, mix them according to art.

Culpeper] A. The receipt is a pretty cordial, re­sists the pestilence, and is a good antidote in pesti­lential times, it resists poyson, strengthens cold sto­machs, helps digestion, and crudities, of the sto­mach. A man may safely take two drachms of it in a morning and let him fear no harm.

Diacrocuma. Page 110. in the Latin Book.

Colledg] Take of Saffron, Asarabacca roots, the seeds of Parsly, Carrots, Annis, Smallage, of each half an ounce, Rhubarb, the roots of Meum, Indian Spicknard of each six drachms, Cassia Lig­nea, Costus, Mirrh, Schenanth, Cubebs, Maddir roots, the juyces of Maudlin, and Wormwood made thick, Opobalsamum, or oyl of Nutmegs of each two drachms, Cinnamon, Calamus Aromaticuus, of each a drachm and an half, Scordium Cetrach, juyce of Liquoris of each two drachms and an half, Traga­canth a drachm with eight times their waight in white Sugar, dissolved in Endive water, and clari­fied, make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Mesue appoints clarified Honey. It is exceeding good against cold diseases of the sto­mach, liver, or spleen, corruption of humors, and putrifaction of meat in the stomach, il-savored co­lour of the body, dropsies, cold faults in the reins and bladder, provokes urine. Take a drachm in the morning.

PURGING ELECTUARIES.

[...] Laxativa. Page 111. in the. Latin Book.

Colledg. TAke of choyce Turbith ten drachms, Diacridium, bark of Spurge roots pre­pared, Hermodactils, Red-roses of each five drachms, Cloves, Spicknard, Ginger, Saffron, long Pepper, A­momus, or for want of it Calamus Aromaticus, Car­damoms the less, the seeds of Smallage, Parsly, Fen­nel, Sparagus, Bruscus, Saxifrage, Gromwel, Car­raway, Sal. gem. Galanga, Mace of each a drachm, with their trebble waight of clarified Honey, make them into an Electuary according to art. Also you may keep the Species by it self, in your shops.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth flegm, chiefly from the joynts, also it purgeth the reins and blad­der.

A. I willingly omit the quantity of these purges, because I would not have foolish women and dunces do themselves and others mischief. For it worketh too violently for their uses, and must be prudently ordered, if taken at all, for I fancy it not at all, but am of opinion it kills more men than cures.

Caryocostinum. Page 111. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cloves, Costus, or Zedoa­ry, Ginger, Cummin of each two drachms, Hermo­dactils, Diacridium, of each half an ounce, with their double waight of Honey clarified in white Wine, make them into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Authors say it purgeth hot Rewms, and takes away inflamations in wounds, I assure you the' Electuary works violently, and may safest be gi­ven in Clysters, and so you may give two or three drachms at a time, if the patient be strong. For taken orherwise it would kill a horse cum privilegio. I wonder theColledg is not a shamed to fret mens guts out with outlandish rubbish, and then they may safe­ly cry out they have the Plague in their guts, and they know not how to cure them.

Cassia Extracta pro Clysteribus. Pag. 111. in L. Book. Or, Cassia extracted for Clysters.

The Colledg] Take of the leaves of Violets, Mal­lows, Beets, Mercury, Pellitory of the wall Vio­let flowers of each a handful, boyl them in a [...] quantity of water, by the benefit of [...] let the Cassia be extracted, and the [...] washed; Then take of this Cassia so drawn, and boyl it to its con­sistance. [...] pound, Sugar a pound and an halfe, boyl them to the form of an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is no more than breaking the Canes of the Cassia, and pick out the pulp (casting away the seeds, boyl the pulp in a little of this de­coction, then press it through a pulping sieve, the title shews the use of it: or if you will take an ounce of it inwardly, you shall find it work with great gentleness. You may take it in white Wine, it is good for gentle bodies, for if your body be hard to work upon, perhaps it will not work at all; it pur­geth the reins gallantly and cooleth them, thereby preventing the stone and other diseases caused by their heat.

Electuarium [...] Magistrale Majus. P. 112. Or, The greater bitter Electuary.

The Colledg.] Take of Agrick, Turbith, Species, Hiera Simplex, Rhubarb of each one drachm, choise Aloes unwashed two drachms, Ginger, Christal of Tartar, of each two scruples, Orrus Flo­rentine, sweet Fennel seeds of each a [...], Syrup of Roses, Solutive as much as is sufficient to make [...] into an Electuary according to art.

Electuarium Amarum Minus. P. 112. in the L. B. Or, The lesser bitter Electuary.

The Colledg] Take of Epithimum half an ounce, the roots of Angelica three drachms, of Gentian [...], Acorus, of each two drachms, Cinnamon one drachm and an half, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, Saf­fron, of each one drachm, [...] six ounces, with Syrup of Fumitory, Scabious, and Sugar so much as is sufficient to make it into a soft Electuary.

Culpeper] A. Both these purge choller, the for­mer flegm, and this melancholly; the former works strongest, and this strengthens most, and is good for such whose brains are anoyed. You may take half an ounce of the former if your body be any thing strong in white Wine, if very strong an ounce, ordering your self as you were taught before, and the Table at later end will direct you to the place: a reasonable body may take an ounce of the latter, the weak less. I would not have the unskilful too busie with purges without advice of a Physitian.

Diacassia with Manna. Page 112. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Damask Prunes two [...] Vlolet-flowers a bandful and an half, [...] water a pound and an half, boyl it [...] to art till half be consumed, Strain [...] and dissolve in the decoction six [...] of Cassia newly drawn, Sugar of Violets [...] up of Violets of each four ounces, Pulp of Tama­rinds an ounce, Sugar Candy an ounce and an half, Manna two ounces, mix them, and make them into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It is a fine cool purge for such as are bound in the body, for it works gently and with­out trouble, it purgeth choller, and may safely be given in feavers coming of choller: but in such ca­ses, if the body be much bound, the best way is first to administer a Clyster, and then the next morning an ounce of this will cool the body and keep it in due temper. I wonder what they need have put in Sugar of Violets, and Syrup of Violets, why would not the double quantity of the Syrup have fetved the [Page 134] turn; I protest they will do any thing, to make their Rceipts dear and difficult, that so they may grow rich by a lazy life, and uphold themselves in their lawless domineering. A most unconscionable thing that men should prefer their own greatness before the the lives of poor men and women; the stones in the street, would cry out against them shortly, if I should hold my peace.

Cassia Extracta sine foliis [...], P. 113. in L. Book. Or, Cassia extracted with the leaves of Senna.

The Colledg] Take twelve Prunes, Violet flo­wers a handful, French Barly, the seeds of Annis, and bastard Saffron, Polyprdium of the Oak, of each five drachms, Maidenhair, Time, Epithinum, of each half a handful, Raisons of the sun stoned half an ounce, sweet Fennel seeds two drachms, the seeds of Purslain, and Mallows of each three drachms, Liquo­ris half an ounce, boyl them in a sufficient quantity of water, Strain them, & dissolve in the Decoction, Pulp of Cassia two pound, of Tamarinds an ounce, Cinna­mon three drachms, Sugar a pound, boyl it into the form of an Electuary.

Cassia Extract a cum Foliis Senae. P. 113. in L. Book. Or, Cassia extracted with the leaves of Senna.

The Colledg] Take of the former Receipt two pound, Senna in pouder two ounces, mix them accor­ding to art.

Culpeper.] A. This is also a fine cool purge, gentle, clensing the bowels of choller and melancholly with­out any griping, very fit for feaverish bodies, and yet the former is gentler than this. They both clense and cool the reins; a reasonable body may take an­ounce and an half of the former, and an ounce of the latter, in white Wine, if they keep the house, or their bodies be oppressed with melancholly, let them take half the quantity in four ounces of decoction of Epithium.

Diacarthamum. Page 113. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Ask thē whether you must put in the [...] seeds or not, [...] Colledg doth not bid them. Diatragacanthum Fri­gidum half an ounce, Pulp of preserved Quinces an ounce, the inside of the seeds of Bastard Saffron half an ounce, Ginger two drachms, Diagrydium beaten by it self three drachms, Turbith six drachms, Man­na two ounces, Honey Roses, Solutive, Sugar-can­dy of each one ounce, Hermodactils half an ounce, [...] ounces and an half, make of them a Liquid Electuary [...] to art.

Culpeper] A. I [...] what art it must be, wherewith a man should make up an [...] and have not wherewithal; I tell you truly, that to [...] up an Electuary of this without more moisture (for here is nor a quarter enough) is a task harder than al Hercules his twelve labors, abate me but his fetch­ing Cerberus out of Hell: For my part I shall trouble the Reader no further, but leave the Receipt to Ar­noldus and the Colledg for a pure piece of non-sence. Only let me admire at the pride and Headstrongness of the Colledg, that will not mend any error, though as apparant as the Sun is up, when he is upon the Meridian; but quos perdere [...] Jupiter dementis facit, those whom Jupiter will destroy, he first makes mad; so their Jupiter, or Juvans pater (as they often in their Dedicatory Epistle stile the King, and the only God they (poor fooles) wor­ship, unless like heathens they worship many gods) being now sent to take his supper apud inferos, hath left such a spirit of madness upon them, which is an absolute forerunner of their end.

Diaphoenicon. Page 113. in [...] Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the pulp of Dates boyled in Hydromel, Penids, of each half a pound, sweet Al­monds blanched three ounces and an half, to all of them being bruised and permixed, add clarified Ho­ney two pound, boyl them a little and then strew in Ginger, long Pepper, Mace, Cinnamon, Rue leaves, the seeds of Fennel and Carrots, of each two drams; Turbith four ounces, Diacridium an ounce and an half; make of them an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. I cannot beleeve this is so profita­ble in Feavers taken downwards as Authors say, for it is a very violent purge: Indeed I beleeve being mixed in Clysters, it may do good in Chollicks and infirmities of the bowels coming of Raw humors, and so you may give half an ounce at a time.

Diaprunum Lenitive. Page 114. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take one hundred Damask Prunes boyl them in water till they be soft, then pulp them, and in the Liquor they were boyled in, boyl gently one ounce us Violet flowers; strain it, and with two pound of Sugar boyl it into a Syrup; then ad half a pound of the aforesaid pulp, the pulp of Cassia and Tamarinds of each one ounce; then [...] with it these Pouders following, [...] white and red, Spodium, Rhubarb, of each three drachms, red Roses, Violets, the seeds of Purslain, Succory, Barberries, Gum Tra­gacanth, Liquoris, Cinnamon, of each two drachms; the four greater cold seeds of each one drachm; make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It may safely, and is with good suc­cess given in acute, burning, and all other feavers, for it cools much and loosens the body gently; it is good in agues, hectick feavers and Marasmos. You may take an ounce of it at a time, at night when you go to bed, three hours after a light supper, neither need you keep your chamber next day, unless the wea­ther be very cold, or your body very tender.

Diaprunum Solutive. Page 114. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Diaprunum Lenitive whilst it is warm, four pound; Scammony prepared two ounces and five drachms; mix them together and make them into an Electuary according to art.

Seeing the dose of Scammony is encreased according to the Author in this Medicine, you may use a less weight of [...] if you please.

Culpeper] A. [...] they left out now, and left their honesty withal. [...] therein the Col­ledg said true, for the Medicine according to this Receipt is too strong, violent, corroding, [...], fretting, and yet this is that which is commonly cal­led Duaprunes, which simple people take to give themselves a purge, being fitter to do them mischief (poor souls) than good, unless ordered with more discretion than they have; it may be they build up­on the vulgar proverb, That no carrion will kill a Crow. Let me intreat them to have a greater care of themselves, and not meddle with such desperate Me­dicines: [Page 135] Let them not object to me they often have taken it and felt no harm; they are not capable of knowing what harm it may do them a long time af­ter: let them remember the old proverb, The pit­cher never goes so often to the well, but it comes broke home at last.

Catholicon. Page 114. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the pulp of Cassia and Ta­marinds, the Leaves of Senna, of each two ounces; Polipodium, Violets, Rhubarb, of each one ounce; Annis seeds, Penids, Sugar Candy, Liquoris, the seeds of Guords, Citruls, Cucumers, Melones, of each two drachms, the things to be bruised being bruised, take of fresh Polypodium three ounces, sweet Fennel seeds six drachms, boyl them in four pound of water till the third part be consumed, strain it, and with two pound of Sugar boyl the Decoction to the thickness of a Syrup, then with the pulps and pouder make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is a fine cooling purge for any part of the body, and very gentle, it may be given (an ounce, or half an ounce at a time, according to the strength of the patient) in acute, in peracute dis­eases, for it gently looseneth the belly and adds strength, it helps infirmities of the liver and spleen, gouts of all sorts, quotidian, tertain, and quartan A­gues, as also headaches. It is usually given in Cly­sters. If you list to take it inwardly, you may take an ounce at night going to bed, in the morning drink a draught of hot posset drink and go about your business.

A. They have altered the quantities of some of the Simples that are harmless, for they do wonders as fast as Bell in the Apocripha eat Mutton.

Electuarium de Citro Solutivum. Pag. 115. in L. B. Or, Electuary of Citrons Solutive.

The Colledg] Take of Citron Pills preserved, Con­serves of the flowers of Violets and Bugloss, Diatraga­canthum frigidum, Diacrydium of each half an ounce; Turbith five drachms, Ginger half a drachm, Senna six drachms; sweet Fennel seeds one drachm; white Sugar dissolved in Rose water and boyled according to art ten ounces; make a sollid Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Here are some things very cordial, others purge violently, both put together, make a composition no way pleasing to me; therefore I account it a pretty Receipt, good for nothing.

Electuarium Elescoph. Page 115. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Diacrydium, Turbith, of each six drachms; Cloves, Cinnamon, Ginger, My­robalans, Emblicks, Nutmegs, Polypodium, of each two drachms and an half, Sugar six ounces, clarified Honey ten ounces, make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper.] A. Mesue appoints only clarified Ho­ney, one pound and four ounces, to make it up into an Electuary; and saith, it purgeth choller and flegm, and wind from all parts of the body; helps pains of the joynts and sides, the Chollick, it clenseth the reins and bladder: yet I advise you not to take too much of it at a time, for it works pretty violently, though well corrected by the pen of a Mesue: let half an ounce be the most, for such whose bodies are strong, alwaies remembring that you had better ten times take too little, than once too much. You may take it in white wine, and keep your self warm. If you would have my opinion of it, I do not like it.

Consectio Hamech. Page 115. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the bark of Citron Myroba­lans two ounces; Myrobalans, Chebs and blacks, Vi­olets, Colocynthis, Polypodium of the Oak, of each one ounce and an half; Wormwood, Time, of each half an ounce; the seeds of Annis and Fennel, the flowers of red Roses of each three drachms: Let all of them being bruised be infused one day in six pound of Whey, then boyled till half be consumed, rubbed with your hands and pressed out: to the Decoction add juyce of Fumitory, pulp of Prunes, and Raisons of the Sun, of each half a pound; White Sugar, clarified Honey, of each one pound; boyl it to the thickness of Honey, strewitg in towards the end, Agrick Trochiscated, Sen­na of each two ounces; Rhubarb one ounce and an half; Epithimum, one ounce; Diacrydium six drams; Cinnamon half an ounce; Ginger two drachms, the seeds of Fumitory and Annis, Spicknard, of each one drachm; make it into an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. The Receipt is chiefly apropriated as a purge for Melancholly and salt flegm, and dis­eases thence arising, as Scabs, Itch, Leprosies, Can­cers, infirmities of the skin, it purgeth addust hu­mors, and is good against madness, melancholly, forgetfulness, vertigo: It purgeth very violently, and is not safe given alone. I would advise the unskilful not to meddle with it inwardly: You may give half an ounce of it in Clysters, in melancholly diseases, which commonly have astringency a constant compa­nion with them.

A. They have now something mended it, as well as they could, they having no more skill in making up Medicines than a Cow hath in dauncing.

Electuarium Lenitivum. Pag. 116. in Lat. Book. Or, Lenitive Electuary.

The Colledg] Take of Raisons of the Sun stoned, Polypodium of the Oak, Senna, of each two ounces; Mercury one handful and an half; Jujubes, Sebe­stens of each twenty; Maiden-hair, Violets, French Barley, of each one handful; Damask Prunes stoned, Tamarinds, of each six drachms; Liquoris half an ounce: boyl them in ten pound of water till two parts of three be consumed; strain it, and dissolve in the Decoction, pulp of Cassia, Tamarinds, and fresh Prunes, Sugar of Violets, of each six ounces; Sugar two pound; at last ad Pouder of Senna Leaves, one ounce and an half; Annis seeds in pouder two drams to each pound of Electuary; and so bring it into the form of an Electuary according to Art.

Culpeper] A. It gently opens and mollifies the bowels, bringing forth choller, flegm, and melan­cholly, and that without trouble: It is cooling, and therefore is profitable in Pleuresies, and for wounded people: A man of reasonable strength may take an ounce of it going to bed, wch wil work next morning.

A. And intruth they have done well here to ad the Annis seeds to correct the Senna; Oh that they would but do so alwaies

Electuarium Passulatum. Page 117. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of fresh Polypodium roots, three ounces; fresh Marsh-Mallow roots, Senna, of each two ounces, Annis seeds two drachms, steep them all in a glazed Vessel in a sufficient quantity of spring water, boyl them according to art; strain it and with Pulp of Raisons of the Sun half a pound, white Sugar, Manna, of each four ounces; boyl it to the thickness of a Cydoniate, and renew it four times a yeer.

Culpeper] A. The Colledg are so mysterious in this Receipt, a man can hardly give directions how to make it, for they give only incertainties.

A. You had best, first boyl the Roots in three pints of water to a quart, then put in the Senna, and seeds, boyl it to a pint and an half, then strain it and ad the rest; the Manna will melt of it self as well as the Sugar, indeed you had best dissolve the Manna by it self in some of the Decoction, and so strain it because of its dross.

A. It gently purgeth both choller and melancholly, clenseth the reins and bladder, and therefore is good for the stone and gravel in the kidnies. I leave out the dose till the Colledg have learned wit enough to make the Receipt plainer.

Electuarium è succo Rosarum. Pag. 117. in L. Book. Or, Electuary of the Juyce of Roses.

The Colledg] Take of Sugar, the juyce of red Ro­ses clarified, of each a pound and four ounces; the three sorts of Sanders of each six drachms, Spodium three drachms, Diacydonium twelve drachms, Cam­phire a scruple: Let the Juyce be boyled with the Su­gar to its just thickness, then add the rest in Pouder and so make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth Choller, and is good in tertian Agues, and diseases of the joynts; it purgeth violently, therefore let it be warily given. I omit the dose, because it is not for a vulgar use. I would not willingly have my Country men do themselves a mischief; let the Gentry study Physick, then shall they know what belongs to it. A lazy Gentry makes blockheaded Physitians.

Hiera Picra Simple. Page 117. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon, Xylobalsamum, or wood of Aloes, the roots of Asarabacca, Spicknard, Mastich, Saffron, of each six drachms, Aloes not wa­shed twelve ounces and an half, clarified Honey four pound and three ounces, mix them into an Ele­ctuary according to art. Also you may keep the Spe­cies by it self in your shops.

Culpeper] A. It is an excellent remedy for vicious juyces which lie furring the tunicle of the stomach, and such idle fancies and symtomes which the brain suffers thereby, whereby some think they see, others that they hear strange things, especially when they are in bed, and between sleeping and waking; be­sides this, it very gently purgeth the belly, and helps such women as are not sufficiently purged after their travel.

A. Being thus made up into an Electuary, it will be so bitter a dog would not take it, and the Species kept by it self is not so sweet: your best way (in my opinion) to take it (for I fancy the Receipt very much, and have had experience of what I have writ­ten of it) is to put only so much Honey to it as will make it into Pills, of which you may take a scruple at night going to bed (if your body be not very weak) in the morning drink a draught of hot broath or pos­set drink; you need not fear to go about your busi­ness, for it will hardly work till next day in the af­ternoon, and then very gently. I have found the be­nefit of it, and from my own experience I commend it to my Country men.

Hiera with Agrick. Page 117. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Species Hiera, simple with­out Aloes, Agrick Trochisheated, of each half an ounce, Aloes not washed one ounce, clarified Honey six ounces, mix it, and make it into an Electuary ac­cording to art.

Culpeper.] A. Look but the vertues of Agrick and ad them to the vertues of the former Receipt, so is the business done without any further trouble.

Hiera Logadii Page 117. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Coloquintida, Polipodium, of each two drachms, Euphorbium, Poley mountain, the Seeds of Spurge, of each one drachm and an half, and six grains, Wormwood, Mirrh, of each one dram and twelve grains, Centaury the less, Agrick, gum Ammoniacum, Indian leafe or Mace, Spicknard, Squills prepared, Diacrydium of each one drachm, A­loes, Time, Germander, Cassia Lignea, [...] Hore­hound, of each one scruple and fourteen grains, Cin­namon, Opopanax, Castoreum, long Birthwort, the three sorts of Pepper, Sagapen. Saffron, Parsly of each two drachms, Hellibore black and white, of each six grains, clarified Honey a pound and and half, mix them, and make of them an Electuary according to art. Let the Species be kept dry in yo ur shops.

Culpeper] A. It takes away by the roots daily e­vils comming of mellancholly, falling sickness, ver­tigo, convulsions, megrim, leprosie, and many other infirmities; for my part I should be loth to take it inwardly unless upon desperate occasions, or in Cly­sters. It may well take away diseases by the roots, if it take away life and all.

Hiera Diacolocynthidos. Page 118. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Colocynthis, Agrick, Ger­mander, white Horebound, Stechas, of each ten drachms, Opopanax, Sagapen. Parsly seeds, round Birthwort roots, white [...] of each five drachms, Spicknard, Cinnamon, Mirrh, Indian leaf or Mace, Saffron of each four drachms, bruise the Gums in a mortar, sist the rest, and with three pound of clarified Which is indeed the triple weight. Honey, three onnces and five drachms, make it an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It helps the falling sickness, mad­ness, and the pain in the head called [...], pains in the breast and stomach whether they come by sickness or bruises, pains in the loins or backbone, hardness of womens breasts, putrifactions of meat in the stomach and sour belchings. It is but used seldom [...] therefore hard to be gotten.

Triphera the greater. Page 110. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Myrobalans, Chebs, Belle­ricks, [Page 137] Inds, and Emblicks, Nutmegs, of each five drachms, Watercress seeds, Asarabacca roots, Persi­an Origanum, or else Dittany of Creet, black Pepper, Olibanum, Ammi, Ginger, Tamaris, Indian Nard, Squinanth, Cyperus roots, of each half an ounce, filings of Steel prepared with Viniger twenty drams, let the Myrobalans be rosted a little with fresh butter, let the rest being poudered, be sprinkled with Oyl of sweet Almonds, then add Musk one drachm, and with their trebble waight in Honey, make it into an Electuary according to art.

C. A. It helps the immoderat flowing of the terms in women, and the Hemorrhoids in men, it helps weak­ness of the stomach and restores colour lost, It frees the body from crude humors, and strengthens the bladder, helps melancholly, and rectifies the di­stempors of the spleen. You may take a drachm in the morning, or two if your body be any thing strong, and by that you have read this, you cannot chuse but see a reason, why they set a binding Electuary a­mongst the Purges, as also why the name is changed, from Triphera the less, to Triphera the greater, viz. Because a great piece of ignorance to set it here, they are like to give Medicines to good purpose, when they know the operations no better.

Triphera Solutive. Page 119. in the Latin Book

The Colledg] Take of Diacrydium ten drachms, Turbith an ounce and an half, Cardamoms the less, Cloves, Cinnamon, Alias Macae Honey of each three drachms, yellow Sanders, Liquoris, sweet Fennel seeds of each half an ounce, Acorus Schenanth, of each a dram, Red­Roses, Citron pills preserved, of each three drachms, Violets two drachms, Penids four ounces, white Su­gar half a pound, Honey clarified in juyce of Apples one pound, make an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. The Diacrydium and [...], ate a couple of untoward purges, the rest are all Cordials, but what to make of them all together I know not, and as little reason do I know, why they should put Honey in twice, unless they mistook honey for Mace, they have a blessed turn in this world, 'tis lawful for them to mistake, but for no body else.

ELECTUARIES left out in their new Master-piece which is famous for its baseness.

Athanasia Mithridatis. Galen.

Colledg. TAke of Cinnamon, Cassia, Schoenanth, of each an ounce & an half; Saffron, Mirrh, of each one ounce; Costus, Meum. Spignel, Water­flag per­haps they mean. See the root in the Ca­talogue of Simples. Acorus, A­grick, Scordium, Carrots, Parsly, of each half an ounce, white Pepper, eleven grains; Honey, so much as is sufficient to make it into an Electuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. It prevails against poyson and the bitings of venemous beasts, and helps such whose meat putrifies in their stomach, staies vomiting of blood, helps old coughs, and cold diseases in the li­ver spleen, bladder, and matrix. The Colledg hath made some petty alterations in the quantities of the Simples, but not worth the speaking of. The dose is half a drachm.

Electuarium è Scoria ferri is properly those flaks that smiths beat off from Iron when it is [...] hot. scoria ferri. Rhasis.

The Colledg.] Take of the flakes if Iron infused in Viniger seven daies and dried, three drams, Indi­an Spicknard, Schoenanth, Cyperus, Ginger Pepper Bishops Weed, Frankinsence, of each half an ounce, Myrocalans, Indian, Bellericks, and Emblicks, Ho­ney boyled with the decoction of Emblicks sixteen ounces: mix them together and make of them an E­lectuary.

Culpeper] A. I wonder how the quantities of the Myrobalans escaped the great care, labor, pains, and the industry of the honorable Society the Authors of that Book, or the vigilancy of the vaporing Printer. Rhasis an Arabian Physitian, the Author of the Re­ceipt appoints a drachm of each: the medicine heats the spleen gently, purgeth melancholly, easeth pains in the stomach and spleen, and stre ngthens digesti­on. People that are strong may take half an ounce in the morning fasting, and weak people three drams. It is a good remedy for pains and hardness of the spleen.

Cónfectio Humain. Mesue.

The Colledg.] Take of Eyebright two ounces, Fennel seeds five drachms, Cloves, Cinnamon Cubebs, long Pepper, Mace, of each one drachm: beat them all into pouder, and with clarified Honey one pound, in which boyl juyce of Fennel one ounce, juyce of Ce­londine and Rue, of each half an ounce, and with the pouders make it up into an Electuary.

Culpeper.] A. It is chiefly apropriated to the brain and heart, quickens the sences, especially the sight, and resisteth the pestilence. You may take half a drachm if your body be hot, a drachm if cold, in the morning fasting.

Diaireos Salominis. Nich.

The Colledg] Take of Orris roots one ounce; Pe­nyroyal, Hysop, Liquoris, of each six drams; Tra­ganth, white Starch, bitter Almonds, Pine Nuts, Cinnamon, Ginger, Pepper, of each three drachms; fat Figs, the pulp of Raisons of the Sun, and Dates of each three drachms and an half; Styrax Calamitis two drachms and an half; Sugar dissolved in Hysop water, and clarified Honey, of each twice the weight of all the rest: make them into an Electuary accor­ding to art.

Culpeper] A. The Electuary is chiefly apropria­ted to the lungues, and helps cold infirmities of them, as asthmaes, coughs, difficulty of breathing &c. You may take it with a [...] stick, or on [Page 138] point of a Knife, a little of it at a time, and of­ten.

Diasatryon. Nich.

The Colledg] Take of the roots of Look the Roots in the Simples and there you shall find those directions you have need e­nough of. Satyrion fresh and sound, Garden Parsnips, Eringo, Pine Nuts, In­dian Nuts, or if Indian Nuts be wanting, take the double quantity of Pine Nuts, Fistich Nuts, of each one The Au­thor ap­points se­ven drams. ounce and an half; Cloves, Ginger, the seeds of Annis, Rockit, viz. The seeds with­in them. Ash Keys, of each five drachms; Cinnamon, the tayls and loins of Scincus, the seeds of I know not what English name to give it. Bulbus, Nettles, of each two drachms and an half; Musk seven grains; of the best Sugar dissolved in [...], three pounds: make it into an Electu­ary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Either the Colledg or the Printer, left out Cicer roots seven drachms, which I think are proper to the Receipt; they also added the loins of Scincus and the Nettle seeds, and in so doing they did well.

A. It helps weakness of the reins and bladder, and such as make water with difficulty, it provokes lust exceedingly, and speedily helps such as are im­potent in the acts of Venus. You may take two drachms or more at a time.

Mathiolus his great Antidote against Poysou and Pestilence.

The Colledg] Take of Rhubarb, Rhu-pontick, Va­lerian Roots, the Roots of Acorus or Calamus Aroma­ticus, Cyperus, Cinkfoyl, Tormentil, round Birthwort, male Peony, Alicampane, Costus, Illirick, Orris, white Chamelion, or Avens, of each three drachms, the roots of Galanga, Masterwort, white Dictamni, An­gelica, Yarrow, Filipendula or Dropwort, Zedoary, Ginger, of each two drachms; Rosemary, Gentian, Devils-bit, of each two drachms and an half, the seeds of Citrons, and Agnus Castus, the berries of Kermes, the seeds of Ash-tree, Sorrel, wild Parsneps, Navew, Nigella, Peony the male, Bazil,Irio. Hedg Mu­stard, Treacle Mustard, Fennel, Bishops-weed, of each two drachms; the berries of Bay, Juniper, and Ivy,I think they mean that by Smilex aspera. Sarsaparilla (or for want of it the double weight of Cubebs) Cubebs, of each one drachm and an half; the leaves of Scordium, Germander, Chamepi­tys, Centaury the less, Stoechas, Celtick Spicknard, Calaminth, Rue, Mints, Betony Vervain, Scabious, [...] Benedictus, Bawm, of each one drachm and an half, Dittany of Creet, three [...], Mar­joram, St. Johns wort, Schaenanth, Horchound, Goats Rue, Savin, Burnet, of each two drachms; Figs, Walnuts, Fistick nuts, of each three ounces; Emblick Myrobalans half an ounce, the flowers of Violets, Borrage, Bugloss, Roses, Lavender, Sage, Rosemary, of each four scruples, Saffron three drachms, Cas­sia Lignea ten drachms, Cloves, Nutmegs, Mace, of each two drachms and an half, black Pepper, long Pepper, all the three sorts of Sanders, wood of Aloes, of each one drachm and an half, Harts-horn half an ounce, unicorns-horn, or in its stead, Bezoar Stone one drachm, Bone in a Stags heart, Ivory, Stags pizzle, Castorium, of each four scruples, Earth of Lemnos three drachms; Opium one drachm and an half, Orient Pearls, Emerald, Jacinth, red Corral, of each one dram and an half, Camphire two drams, Gum Arabick, Mastich, Frankinsence, Styrax, [...], Sagapenum, Opopanax, Laserpitium or Mirrh, of each two drachms and an half, Musk, Amber­greese, of each one drachm, Oyl of Vitriol half [...] ounce,See the way to make these in their proper places. Species cordiales temperatae, Diamargeri­ton, Diamoscu, Diambra, Electuarii de Gemmis, Troches of Camphire, of Squils, of each two drams and an half, Troches of Vipers two ounces, the juyce of Sorrel, Sowthistles, Scordium,Ecchium Vipers Bug­loss, Borrage, Bawm, of each half a pound, Hypoci­stis two drachms, of the best Treacle and Mithridate of each six ounces, Old Wine three pound, of the best Sugar or choyceA wise man will take [...] Honey eight pound six ounces: These being all chosen and prepared with diligence and art, let them be made into an Electuary, just as Treacle or Methridate is.

Culpeper] A. The Title shews you the scope of the Author in compiling it, I beleeve it is excellent for those uses: I want time to examine what altera­tions the Colledg hath made in it, or whether any or none; for particular [...] (to avoid Tautolo­gy) I refer you to his Bezoar Water. The dose of this is from a scruple to four scruples, or a dram and an half; It provokes sweating abundantly, and in this or any other sweating Medicine, order your body thus: Take it in bed, and cover your self warm, in your sweating, drink poslet drink as hot as you can; if it be for a feaver, boyl Sorrel and red Sage in the posset drink, sweat an our or two if your strength wil bear it, then the chamber being kept very warm, shift your self all but your head, about which (your cap which you sweat in being kept on) wrap a hot napkin, which will be a means to repel the vapors back. This I for present hold the best method for sweating in feavers and pestilences, in which this Electuary is ve­ry good.

A. I am loth to leave out this Medicine, which if it were stretched out and cut in thongs would reach round the world.

Requies. Nicholaus.

The Colledg] Take of red Rose Leaves, the whites being cut off, blew Violets, of each three drachms: Opium of Thebes dissolved in Wine, the seeds of white Henbane, Poppies, white and black, the roots of Mandrakes, the seeds of Endive, Purslain, Garden Lettice, I take it to be Flea­wort, not Fleabane; the seeds look just like fleas. Psyllium, Spodium, Gum Traganth, of each two scruples, and five grains: [...], [...], Ginger, of each a drachm and an half: Sanders, [...], white, and red, of each a drachm and an half: Sugar three times their weight dissolved in Rose wa­ter: Mix them together, and make of them an Ele­ctuary according to art.

Culpeper] A. Requies, the title of this Prescript, signifies Rest: but I would not advise you to take too much of it inwardly, for fear instead of Rest it brings you to Madness, or at best to Folly: outwardly I confess being applied to the temples, as also to the insides of the wrests, it may mitigate the heat in fea­vers, and provoke the Rest; as also mitigate the vi­olent heat and reging in Frenzies. I like not the Re­ceipt taken inwardly.

Electuarium Reginae Coloniens.

The Colledg] Take of the seeds of Saxifrage and Gromwel, juyce of Liquoris, of each half an ounce: the seeds of Carraway, Annis, Smallage, Fennel, Par­sly of Macedonia, Broom, Carrots, Bruscus, Sparagus, Lovage, Cummin, Juniper, Rue, Siler Mountain, the [Page 139] seeds of Acorus, Penyroyal, Cinkfoyl, Bay-berries, of each two drachms: Indian Spicknard, Schaenanth, Amber, Valerian, Hogs Fennel, Lapis Lincis, of each a drachm and an half: Galanga, Ginger, Turbith, of each two drachms: Senna an ounce: Goats blood prepared, half an ounce: mix them together: first beat them into pouder, then make them into an Electu­ary according to art, with three times their weight in Sugar dissolved in white Wine.

Culpeper] A. It is an excellent remedy for the stone and wind chollick, a drachm of it being taken every morning; I assure such as are troubled with such diseases, I commend it to them as a Jewel.

PILLS.

Culpeper. A. PILLS in Greek are called, [...], in Latin, Pilulae; which signifies little Balls: because they are made up in such a form, that they may be the better swallowed down, by reason of the offensiveness of their tast.

A. They were first invented for the purging of the head (however Physitians have since ordered the bu­siness) because the matter there offending is not so soon taken away by any other Physick.

A. Such as have Scammony, otherwise called Dia­grydium in them, or Colocynthis, work strongly, and must be taken in the morning, and the body well re­gulated after them, keeping your chamber and a good fire. I shall instruct you in the dose as I come to them, Such as have neither Colocynthis, nor Dia­grydium, may best be taken in the evening; neither need you keep the house for them.

Pilulae de Agarico. Page 121. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Agrick.

The Colledg] Take of Agrick three drams: our own blew Orris roots, Mastich, Horehound, of each one drachm: Turbith five drachms, Species Hiera Picra half an ounce: Colocynthis, Sarcoc ol, of each two drachms: Mirrh, one drachm: Sapa as much as is sufficient to make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It was invented to clense the breast and lungues of flegm, it works pretty tithly, there­fore requires a good headpiece to direct it. Half a drachm at a time keeping your self warm cannot well do you harm, unless your body be very weak.

Pilulae Aggregativae. Page 121. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Citron Myrobalans, Rhu­barb, of each half an ounce, juyce of Agrimony and Wormwood made thick of each two drachms: Diagri­dium five drachms: Agrick, Colocynthis, Polypodium, of each two drachms: Turbith, Aloes, of each six drams: Mastich, red Roses, Sal. gem. Epithimum, Annis, Gin­ger, of each one drachm: with Syrup of Damask Ro­ses, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth the head of choller, flegm, and Melancholly and that stoutly; it is good against quotidian agues, and faults in the stomach and liver; yet because it is well corrected if you take but half a drachm at a time, ond keep your self warm, I sup­pose you may take it without danger.

Pilulae Aloephanginae. Page 121. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Cinnamon, Cloves, Carda­moms the less, Nutmegs, Mace, Calamus Aromaticus, Carpobalsamum, or Juniper Berries, Squinanth wood of Aloes, yellow Sanders, red Roses dried, Wormwood, of each half an ounce: Let the tincture be taken out of these being grosly bruised in spirit of Wine, the vessel being close stopped, in three pound of this tincture be­ing strained, dissolve Aloes one pound: which being dissolved add Mastich, Mirrh, of each half an ounce: Saffron two drachms: Balsam of Peru one drachm: the superfluous Liquor being consumed, either over hot ashes or a bath, bring it into a Mass of Pills.

Culpeper] A. This Receipt differs much from that which Mesue left to posterity: perhaps the Col­ledg followed Renodaeus more closly in it than they did Mesue: But some question whether Renodaeus: or the Colledge either can amend the Receipts of Mesue. The chief alterations are: Asarabacca roots, Indian Spicknard, of each one ounce, is totally left out; besides, all the Simples till you come to the Wormwood, are set down but half so much in quan­tity as Mesue prescribed them: Some other small alterations are also in most of the quantities. But I must return to my scope.

A. It clenseth both stomach and brain of gross and putrified humors, and sets the sences free when they are thereby troubled, it clenseth the brain of­fended by ill humors wind &c. helps vertigo, and head-aches, and strengthens the brain exceedingly, helps concoction, and strengthens the stomach. I have often made experience of it upon my [...] body, and alwaies with good success in such occasions, and therfore give me leave to commend it unto my Coun­try men, for a wholsom clensing Medicine, streng­thening, no waies violent: one drachm taken at night going to bed will work gently next day; if the party be weak you may give less, if strong, more. If you take but half a drachm you may go abroad the next day, but if you take a drachm, you may keep the house, there can be no harm in that.

Pilulae de Aloe Lota. Page 122. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of washed Aloes.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes washed with juyce of Red-Roses one ounce, Agrick three drachms, Mastich two drachms, `Diamoschu Dulce half a drachm, Syrup of Damask Roses, so much as is sufficient to make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth both brain, stomach, bo­wels and eyes of putrified humors, and also streng­thens them. Use these as the succeeding.

Aloe Rosata. Page 122. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg.] Take of Aloes in pouder, four ounces, juyce of Damask Roses clarified one pound, mix them and [...] them in the Sun, or in a bath, till the superfluous Liquor be drawn off, digest it, and evaporate it four times over, and keep the By Mass aiwaies understand the com­position brought into such a thickness, that you may easily with your fingers make it into pills. Mass.

Culpeper] A. It is a gallant gentle purger of chol­ler, frees the stomach from superfluous humors, o­pens stoppings, and other infirmities of the body proceeding from choller or flegm, as yellow Jaun­dice &c. and strengthens the body exceedingly. Take a scruple or half a drachm at night going to bed, you may walk abroad, for it will [...] work till next day in the after noon.

Pilulae Aurcae. Page 122. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes, Diacrydium, of each five drachms, Red-Roses, Smallage seeds, of each two drachms and an half; the seeds of Annis and Fennel, of each one drachm and an half, Mastich, Saffron, Troch. Alhandal of each one drachm, with a sufficient quantity of Honey roses, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. They are held to purge the head, to quicken the sences, especially the sight, and to expel wind from the bowels, but works something harshly. Half a drachm is the utmost dose, keep the fire take them in the morning and sleep after them, they will work before noon.

Pilulae Cochiae the greater. Page 122. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg.] Take of Species Hiera Picra ten drachms, Troch. Alhandal three drachms and an half, Diacrydium two drachms and an half, Turbith, Ste­chas, of each five drachms, with a sufficient quanti­ty of Syrup of Stechas, make it into a [...] according to art.

Culpeper] A. Gesner, and Math. de Grad. put in only two scruples and a half of Diagrydium, be­like because they would not have it work so violent­ly. But Mesue, Rhafis, and Nicholaus Myrepsus prescribe two drachms and an half, as here in the Dis­pensatory; only Mesue appoints it to be made up with syrup of Wormwood. 'Tis held to purge the head, but 'tis but a dogged purge at best, and must be given only to strong bodies, and but half a drachm at a time, and yet with great care.

Pilulae Cochiae the less. Page 123. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg.] Take of Aloes, Scammony, Colocyn­this, of each one ounce, with equall parts of Syrup of Wormwood and of purging thorn, make it into a Mass according to [...].

Pilulae de Cynoglosso. Page 123. in the Latin Book Or, Pills of Houndstongue.

The Colledg] Take of the roots of Houndstongue dried, white [...] seed, Opium prepared of each half an ounce, Mirrh six drachms, Olibanum five drachms, Saffron, Castoreum, Styrax Calamitis, of each one drachm and an half, with Syrup of Stoe­chas, make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. It staies hot rhumes that fall down upon the lungues, therefore is good in Phtisicks, also it mitigates pain: a scruple is enough to take at a time going to bed, and too much if your body be weak, have a care of opiates for fear they make you sleep your last.

Pilulae ex [...]. Page 123. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of two things.

The Colledg] Take of Colocynthis, and Scamony, of each one ounce, Oyl of Cloves as much as is suffi­cient to malax them well, then with a little Syrup of purging Thorn, make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. Surely the Colledg intend to go to Hell, and give Phisick to the Devils, they else would never invent such Pills as this and put Cochiae the less, without any corrigents at all, in truth 'tis pity but they should have the just reward of Perillus, viz. be forced to take them themselves, they being not only to strong, but also of a base gnawing na­ture, that so they may gnaw out their ill conditi­ons.

Pilulaede Eupatorio. Page 123. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Eupatorium.

The Colledg] Take of the juyce of Maudlin, and Wormwood made thick, Citron Myrobalans, of each three drachms, Rhubarh three drachms and an half, Mastich one drachm, Aloes five drachms, Saffron half a dram, Syrup of the juyce of Endive, as much as is sufficient to make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. Having compared this Receipt of Mesue with reason, I find it a gallant gentle purge, and strengthening, fitted for such bodies as are much weakened by diseases of choller. The author apro­priates it to such as have tertain agues, the yellow Jaundice, obstructions or stoppings of the liver; half a drachm taken at night going to bed, will work with an ordinary body, the next day by noon; the truth is, I was before sparing in relating the doses of most purging physicks because they are to be regu­lated according to the strength of the patient &c. Physick is not to be presumed upon by Dunces, lest they meet with their matches and overmatches too.

Pilulae Foetidae. Page 123. in the Latin Book. Or, Stinking Pills.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes, Colocynthis, Amo­niacum, Sagapen. Mirrh, Rue seeds, Epithymum, of each five drachms, Scammony three drachms, the roots of Turbith half an ounce, the roots of Spurge the less prepared, Hermodactils of each two drachms, Ginger one drachm and an half, Spicknard, Cinna­mon, Saffron, Castoreum, of each one drachm, Euphor­bium prepared two [...], dissolve the Gums in juyce of Leeks, and with Syrup made with the juyce of Leeks and Sugar, make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. They purge gross and raw flegm, and diseases thereof arising, Gouts of all sorts, pains [Page 141] in the backbone and other joynts; it is good against Leprosies, and other such like infirmities of the skin. I fancy not the receipt much. Both because of its violence and apish mixture.

Pilulae de Hermodactilis. Page 124 in the L. Book. Or, Pills of Hermodactils.

The Colledg] Take of Sagapen. fix drachms, O­popanax three drachms, melt them in warm juyce of Coleworts, so much as is sufficient, then strain it through a convenient ragg, afterwards boyl it to a mean thickness, then take of Hermodactils, Aloes, Ci­tron, Myrobalans, Turbith, Coloquintida, soft Bdel­lium, of each six drachms, Euphorbium prepared, the seeds of Rue and Smallage, Castorium, Sarcocol, of each three drachms, Saffron one drachm and an half, with Syrup of the juyce of Coleworts made with Honey, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. They are good against the Gout and other cold afflictions of the joynts. These are more moderare by half; than Pilulae Foetidae, and apropri­ated to the same diseases. You may take a drachm in the morning, if age and strength agree; if not, take less, and keep your body warm by the fire, now and then walking about the chamber.

Pilulae de Hiera cum Agarico. P. 124. in Lat. Book. Or, Pills of Hiera with Agrick.

The Colledg] Take of Species Hiera Picra, A­grick, of each half an ounce, Aloes one ounce, Honey roses so much as is sufficient to make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. Very many are the vertues Authors have been pleased to confer upon this Medicine, as making it universal, and applying it to all parts of the body, and almost all diseases in them; proceed they either of choller, flegm, or of melanceolly: nay they make it to resist poyson, and Epidemicall diseases, to help the [...], dropsie, and falling sick­ness; to provoke the terms, and ease the fits of the mother, to cure agues of all sorts, shortness of breath, and consumption of the lungues, vertigo, or dissiness in the head, to open obstructions of the liver and spleen, [...] cure the yellow Jaundice, and sharpness of urine: to strengthen the brain and memory, and what not; the truth is, it is as harmless a purge, as most is in their Dispensatory. You may safely take a scruple at night going to bed, having eat a light supper three hours before; and you may safely go a­bout your business the next day, for it will not work too hastily, but very gently; so you may continue ta­king it a week together, for it will not do wonders in once taking.

Pilulae Imperiales. Page 124. in the [...] Book. Or, Imperiall Pills.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes two ounces, Rhubarb one ounce and an half, Agrick Senna, of each one ounce Cinnamon three drachms, Ginger two drachms, Nut­megs, Cloves, Spicknard, Mastick, of each a dram, with Syrup of Violets, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It clenseth the body of mixt hu­mors, and strengthens the stomach exceedingly, as also the bowels, liver, and natural spirit; it is good for cold natures, and cheers the spirits. The dose is a scruple or half a drachm, taken at night; in the morning drink a draught of warm posset drink, and then you may go about your business:) both these and such like Pills as these, 'tis your best way to take them many nights together, for they are proper for such infirmities as cannot be carried away at once, observe th is rule in all such pills as are to be taken at night.

Pilulae de Lapide Lazuli. P. 124. in the Lat. Book. Or, Pills of Lapis Lazuli.

The Colledg] Take of Lapis Lazuli in pouder and well washed five drachms, Epithimum, Polypo­dium, Agrick, of each an onnce, Scammony, black Hel­lebore roots, Sal. gem. of each two drachms and an half, Cloves, Annis seeds of each half an ounce, Spe­cies Hiera Simple, fifteen drachms, with Syrup of the juyce of Fumitory, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It purgeth melancholly very violent­ly, we will not now dispute the story how, or in what cases violent purges are fit for melancholly, let it suf­fice that it is not fit for a vulgar use.

Pilulae Macri. Page 125. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes two ounces, Mastich half an ounce, dried Marjoram two drachms, Salt of Wormwood one drachm, make them all being in pou­der, into a Mass according to art with juyce of Cole­worts and Sugar, so much as is sufficient.

Culpeper] A. It is a gallant composed Pill, who ever was the Author of it, I have not time to search, it strengtheneth both stomach and brain, especially the nerves and muscles (what they are you shall be instructed in a table by it self, at the latter end of the Book, as also in all other hard words that puzzle your brains) and easeth them of such humors as afflict them, and hinder the motion of the body, they open obstructions of the liver and spleen, and takes away diseases thence coming. Your best way is to take them often going to bed, you may take a scruple, or half a drachm at a time; I commend it to such peo­ple as have had hurts or bruises, whereby the use of their limbs is impaired, and I desire them to take it often, because diseases in remote parts of the body cannot be taken away at a time; It will not hinder their following of their business at all, and therefore is the fitter for poor people.

Pilulae Mastichinae. Page 125. in the Latin Book. Or, Mastich Pills.

The Colledg.] Take of Mastich two ounces, A­loes four ounces, Agrick, Species Hiera simple, of each one ounte and an half, with Syrup of Wormwood, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. They purge very gently, but strengthen much, both head, brain, eyes, belly and reins. Both dose, and order is the same with the for­mer.

Pilulae Mechoacanae. Page 125. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Mechoacan.

The Colledg] Take of Mecoacan roots half an ounce, Turbith three drachms, the leaves of Spurge steeped in Viniger and dried, the seeds of Walwort, Agrick, [...], of each two [...], Spurge [Page 142] roots prepared, Mastich, of each one drachm and an half, Mace, Cinnamon, Sal. gem. of each two scruples, beat them into pouder, and with white Wine bring them into a Mass. When it is dry beat it into pouder, and with Syrup made with the juyce of Orris roots and Sugar, make it the second time into a Mass for Pills.

Culpeper] A. They purge flegm very violently. If the disease be desperate, you may take half a dram, (or a scruple if your body be weak keeping the house) else I would advise you to let them alone.

Pilulae de Opopanace. Page 125. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Opopanax.

The Colledg] Take of Opopanax, Sagapen. Bdel­sium, Amoniacum, Hermodactils, Coloquintida, of each five drachms, Saffron, Castorium, Mirrh, Gin­ger, white Pepper, Cassia Lignea, Citron, [...], of each one drachm, Scammony two drachms, Turbeth half an ounce, Aloes one ounce and an half, the Gums being dissolved in clarified juyce of Cole­worts, with Syrup of the juyce of Coleworts, make them into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It helps tremblings, palsies, gouts of all sorts, clenseth the joynts, and is helpful for such as are troubled with cold afflictions of the ner­ves. It works violently, take but half a drachm at a time and stir not abroad.

[...] Rudii. Page 126 in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Coloquintida six drachms, Agrick, Scammony, the roots of black Hellebore, and Tarbith, of each half an ounce, Aloes one ounce, Diar­rodon abbatis half an ounce, let all of them (the Diarrh. Abb-excepted) be grosly bruised, and insused eight daies in the best spirit of Wine in a vessel close stopped in the Sun, so that the Liquor may swim at top the breadth of six fingers: afterwards infuse the Diarrh. Abb. in the same [...] four daies in aqua vitae, then having strained and pressed them hard, mix them both together, Casting the dross away, and draw off the moisture in a glass Alembick, and let the thick matter remain in a Mass.

Culpeper] A. As this is the dearest, so in my o­pinion it is most excellent in operation of all the Pills in the Dispensatory, being of a quick searching nature, yet though many violent simples be in it, the terrene part is cast away, and only the tincture used, whereby it is apparent it cannot lie gnawing in the body so long; It clenseth both head and body of choller, flegm, and melancholly: it must not be ta­ken in any great quantity, half a drachm is sufficient for the strongest body; let the weaker take but a scruple, and the weakest less; keep your cham­ber: they work very speedily being of a penetra­ting nature.

Pilulae Ruffi. Page 126. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes two ounces, Mirrh one ounce, Saffron half an ounce, with Syrup of the Juyce of Lemmons, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. A scruple taken at night going to bed, is an excellent preservative in pestilential times; also they clense the body of such humors as are got­ten by surfets, they strengthen the heart, and weak stomachs, and work so easily that you need not fear following your business the next day.

Pilulae sine Quibus. Page 126. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills without which —

The Colledg] Take of washed Aloes, fourteen drachms: Scammony prepared six drachms: Agrick, Rhubarb, Senna, of each half an ounce: [...], red Roses exungulated, Violet flowers, Doddar, Ma­stich, of each a drachm: Salt of Wormwood, of each half a drachm: with Syrup of the Juyce of Fennel made with Honey, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth flegm, choller, and me­lancholly from the head, makes the sight and hearing good, and giveth ease to a burdened brain. Pilulae sine quibus esse nolo, is in English, Pills without which I will not be: But unless they worked more gently, I had rather let them alone than take them. I doubt they were mistaken, it should have been Pi­lulae sine quibus esse volo, not sine quibus esse nolo.

Pilulae Stomachicae. Page 126. in the Latin Book. Or, Stomach Pills.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes six drachms: Ma­stich, red Roses, of each two drachms: with Syrup of Wormwood, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper.] A. They clense and strengthen the sto­mach, they clense but gently, strengthen much, help digestion. Take them as the former.

Pilulae Stomachicae cum Gummi. Pag. 127. in L. B. Or, Stomach Pills with Gums.

The Colledg] Take of Aloes an ounce: Senna five drachms: Gum Ammoniacum dissolved in El­der-flower-Vineger, half an ounce: Mastich, Mirrh, of each a drachm and an half: Saffron, Salt of Worm­wood, of each half a drachm: with Syrup of Pur­ging Thorn, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. They work more strongly than the former did, and are apropriated to such whose sto­machs are weakned by surfets; let such take a drachm of them in the morning, and if they can sleep after them, let them. They may take them by four of the clock, and keep the house all day.

Pilulae è Styrace. Page 127. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Styrax.

The Colledg] Take of Styrax Calamitys, Oliba­num, Mirrh, Juyce of Liquoris, Opium, of each half an ounce: with Syrup of white Poppies, make it into a Mass according to art

Culpeper] A. They help such as are troubled with defluxion of Rhewm, Coughs, and provoke sleep to such as cannot sleep for coughing. Half a scruple is enough to take at a time, if the body be weak, if strong, they may make bold with a little more: I de­sire the ignorant to be very cautious in taking Opi­ates; I confess it was the urgent importunity of friends moved me to set down the Doses; they may do wise men very much good, and therefore I consen­ted: if people will be mad and do themselves mis­chief, I can but warn them of it, I can do no more.

Pilulae de Succino. Page 127. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of Amber

The Colledg] Take of white Amber, Mastich, of each two drachms: Aloes five drachms: Agrick, a drachm and an half: Long Birthwort, half a drachm: with Syrup of Wormwood make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. It amends the evil state of a wo­mans body, strengthens conception, and takes away what hinders it; it gently purgeth choller and flegm, and leaves a binding, strengthening quality behind it. Take them as Imperial Pills.

Pilulae ex Tribus. Pag. 127. in the Latin Book. Or, Pills of three things.

The Colledg] Take of Mastich two ounces: Aloes four ounces, Agrick, Hiera Simple of each an ounce and an half, Rhubarb two ounces, Cinnamon two drachms: wth Syrup of Succory, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper.] A. They gently purge choller, and help diseases thence arising, as itch, Scabs, wheals, &c. They strengthen the stomach and Liver, and open obstructions; as also help the yellow Jaundice. You may take a scruple or half a drachm at night go­ing to bed, according as your body is in strength; neither need you fear next day to go about your busi­ness.

Pilulae Turpeti Aureae. Page 127. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Turbith two ounces: Aloes an ounce and an half: Citron Myrobalans, ten drams: Red Roses, Mastich, of each six drachms: Saffron, three drachms: Beat them all into pouder, and with Syrup of Wormwood bring them into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. They purge choller and flegm, and that with as much gentleness as can be desired; also they strengthen the stomach and liver, and help dige­stion. Take a setuple or half a drachm, according as your body and the season of the yeer is, at night, you may follow your business next day.

Laudanum. Page 127. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Thebane Opium extracted in Spirit of Wine, one ounce: Saffron alike extracted, a drachm and an [...] Castorium one drachm: Let them be taken in tincture of half an ounce of Species Diambrae newly made in Spirit of Wine; add to them Amber greese, Musk of each six grains: Oyl of Nut­megs ten drops: Evaporate the moisture away in a bath, and leave the Mass.

Culpeper] A. It was invented (and a gallant in­vention it is) to mitigate violent pains, stop the sumes that trouble the brain in feavers (but beware of Opiates in the beginning of Feavers) to provoke sleep, take not above two grains of it at a time, going to bed; if that provoke not sleep, the next night you may make bold with three. Have a care how you be too busie with such medicines, lest you make a man sleep till dooms-day.

Nepenthes Opiatum. Page 128. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Tincture of Opium made first with distilled Vineger, then with Spirit of Wine, Saffron extracted in spirit of Wine, of each an ounce: Salt of Pearl and Corral, of each half an ounce: Tincture of Spec. Diambrae, seven drachms: Amber greese, one drachm: [...] them into the form of Pills by the gentle heat of a bath.

Culpeper] A. The Operation is like the former, only 'tis dearer, and not a whit better: This is for the Gentry that must pay dear for a thing, else 'tis not good.

The PILLS left out by the Colledg in their New piece of Wit, are these.

Pilulae Assaireth. Avicenna.

The Colledg] Take of Species Hiera Picra Galeni an ounce: Mastich, Citron Myrobalans, of each half an ounce: Aloes two ounces: the Syrup of Stoechas as much as is sufficient: Make of them a Mass ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth choller and [...], and strengtheneth the whol body exceedingly, being very precious for such whose bodies are weakened by sur­fers, or ill diet, to take half a drachm or a scruple at night going to bed.

Tills of Bdellium. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of Bdellium ten drachms: Myrobalans, Bellericks, Emblicks, and Blacks, of each five [...]: flakes of Iron, Leek seéds, of each three drachms:A kind of Sea shel to be had at the Apo [...]. Choncula Veneris burnt, Corral burnt, Amber, of each a drachm and an half: [...], half an ounce: Not in­fuse as the Colledg prescribe. Dissolve the Bdellium in juyce of Leeks, and with so much Syrup of juyce of Leeks as is sufficient, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. Both this and the former are seldom used, and therefore are hardly to be had. Those that please may easily make the former, this is more tedi­ous; but the Printer will have it put in to stop the mouth of Momus.

Pills of Rhubarb. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of choyce Rhubarb three [...]: Citron Myrobalans, Trochisci Diarhodon, of each three drachms and an half: Juyce of Liquoris, and Juyce of Wormwood, Mastich, of each one drachm; the seeds of Smallage and Fennel, of [...] half a dram: Species Hiera Picra Simp. Galeni, [...]: with juyce of Fennel And why not calri­fied? Can they give but a piece of a reason for it? I am decei­ved if Mc­sue apoint not Fennel water. not clarified, and Honey so much as [Page 144] is sufficient, make it into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth choller, opens obstructi­ons of the Liver, helps the yellow jaundice and dropsies in the beginning, strengtheneth the sto­mach and lungues. Take them as Pilulae Imperiales. They are never the worse because the Colledg left them out.

Pilulae Arabica. Nicholaus.

The Colledg] Take of the best Aloes, four ounces: Briony Roots, Myrobalans, Citrons, Chebs, Indian, Bellerick, and Emblick, Mastich, Diagrydium, Asa­rabacca, Roses, of each an ounce: Castorium, three drachms: Saffron, one dram: with Syrup of Worm-wood, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper.] A. It helps such women as are not suf­ficiently purged in their labor, helps to bring away what a careless Midwife hath left behind, purgeth the head, helps head-ach, megrim, vertigo, and pur­geth the stomach of vicious humors, besides Authors say it preserves the sight, and hearing, and preserves the mind in vigor, and causeth joyfulness, driving a­way melancholly; 'tis like it may, but have a care you take not too much of it, a scruple is enough to take at a time, or half a drachm if the body be strong, take it in the morning about four of the clock, and (if you can) sleep an hour or two after, keep your self warm by the fire, and order your self as after other purges. I pray be not too busie with it, and say I warned you of it.

Pilulae Arthriticae. Nicholaus.

The Colledg] Take of Hermodactils, Turbith, A­grick, of each half an ounce: Cassia Lignea, Indian Spicknard, Cloves, Xylobalsamum, or wood of Aloes, Carpobalsamum or Cubebs, Mace, Galanga, Ginger, Mastich, Assafoetida, the seeds of Annis, Fennel, Saxi­frage, Sparagus, Bruscus, Roses, Gromwel, Sal. gem. of each two drachms: Scammony, one ounce: of the best Aloes the weight of them all: Juyce of Chame­pitys made thick with Sugar so much as is sufficient, or Syrup of the Juyce of the same, so much as is suf­ficient to make it into a Mass.

Culpeper.] A. As I remember the Author ap­points but a drachm of Scammony, which is but the eighth part of an ounce, and then will the Receipt be pretty moderate, whereas now it is too too vio­lent. I know well enough it is the opinion of Do­ctors that Aloes retards the violent working of Scam­mony, I could never find it, and I am the worst in the world to pin my faith upon another mans sleeve, and I would as willingly trust my life in the hands of a wild bear as in the hands of that Monster called TRADITION: If but a drachm of Scam­mony be put in, then may a man safely (if not too much weakned) take a drachm of it at a time, about four in the morning, ordering your self as in the for­mer: but made up as the Colledg prescribes, I durst not take them my self, therefore will I not prescribe them to others. It helps the gout and other pains in the joynts, comforts and strengthens both brain and stomach, and consumes diseases whose original comes of flegm.

Pilulae Cochiae with Hellebore.

The Colledg] Take of the pouder of the Pills be­fore prescribed, the pouder of the bark of the roots of [...] Hellebore, one ounce: make it into a Mass with Syrup of Stoechas according to art.

Culpeper] A. The former purgeth the head of flegm, and therefore is fit for Lethargies: this of Melancholly, and is therefore fit for mad people, if Melancholly be the cause.

Pills of Fumitory. Avicenna.

The Colledg] Take of Myrobalans, Citrons; Chebs, and Indian, [...], of each five drachms: Aloes [...] drachms: Let all of them being bruised, be thrice moistened with juyce of Fumitory, and thrice suffered to dry, then brought into a Mass with Syrup of Fumitory.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth Melancholly from the li­ver and spleen, sharp, chollerick, and addust humors, salt flegm, and therefore helps [...] and itch. Take but half a drachm at a time in the morning, and keep by the fire. Be not too busie with it I beseech you.

Pilulae Indae. Mesue out of Haly.

The Colledg] Take of Indian Myrobalans, black Hellebore, Polypodium of the Oak, of each five drams: Epithimum, Stoechas, of each six drachms: Agrick, Lapis Lazuli often washed, Troches Alhandal, Sal. In­di, of each half an ounce: Juyce of Maudlin made thick, Indian Spicknard, of each two drachms: Cloves one drachm: Species hiera picra Simplex Ga­leni, [...] drachms: with Syrup of the Juyce of Smallage, make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It wonderfully prevails against affli­ctions coming of Melancholly, Cancers which are not ulcerated, Leprosie, Evils of the mind coming of melancholly, as sadness, fear, &c. quartan agues, jaundice, pains and infirmities of the spleen. I advise to take but half a drachm, or a scruple at a time, and take it often, for melancholly infirmities are not easi­ly removed upon a sudden, take it in the morning and keep the house.

Pilulae Lucis majores. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of Roses, Violets, Wormwood, Colocynthis, Turbith, Cubebs, Calamus Aromaticus, Nutmegs, Indian Spicknard, Epithimum, Carpobal­samum, or instead thereof, Cardamoms, Xylobalsa­mum, or wood of Aloes, the seeds of Seseli or Hart­wort, Rue, Annis, Fennel, and Smallage, Schaenan­thus, Mastich, Asarabacca roots, Cloves, [...], Cassia Lignea, Saffron, Mace, of each two drachms; Myrobalans, Citrons, Chebuls, Indian, Bellerick, and Emblick, Rhubarb, of each half an ounce: Agrick, Senna, of each five drachms: Aloes succotrina the weight of them all: with Syrup of the juyce of [...] make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It purgeth mixt humors from the head, and [...] it of such excrements as hinder the sight. You may take a drachm in the morning, keep your self warm and within doors, you shall find them strengthen the brain and visive vertue: If your body be weak take less.

Pills of Spurge. Fernelius.

The Colledg] Take of the Bark of the roots of Spurge the less, steeped twenty four hours in Vineger and juyce of Purslain, two drachms: Grains of A [...] of Spurge, three of the seeds of which some Au­thors (and they good ones too) say, will give a man a sufficient purge. Pal­ma Christi torrefied, by number fourty: Citron My­robalans, [Page 145] one drachm and an half: Germander, Cha­mepitys, Spicknard, Cinnamon of each two scruples; being beaten into fine pouder with an ounce of [...] Traganth dissolved in Rose water, and syrup of Roses so much as is sufficient, let it be made into a Mass.

Culpeper] A. I could say if I would, and prove it too, that the ounce of Gum Traganth so dissolved is enough to make six times so much into a Mass, but because the Receipt (in my eyes) seems more fitting for a horse than for a man, I leave it.

Pills of Euphorbium. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of Euphorbium, Colòcynthïs, Agrick, Bdellium, Sagapenum, of each two drachms: Aloes five drachms: with Syrup made of the juyce of Leeks, make it into a mass.

Culpeper] A. The Pills are exceeding good for dropsies, pains in the loins, and Gouts coming of a moist cause. Take not above half a drachm at a time and keep the house.

Pilulae Scribonii.

The Colledg] Take of Sagapenum, and Mirrh, of each two drachms: Opium, Cardamoms, Castorium, of each one drachm; white Pepper, half a drachm; Sapa so much as is sufficient to make it into a Mass according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is apropriated to such as have Phtisicks, and such as spit blood, but ought to be newly made, a scruple is sufficient taken going to bed. Galen was the Author of it.

A. I have now done with the Pills, only take no­tice that such as have Diagrydium (otherwise called Scammony) in them, work violently and are to be ta­ken early in the morning, with discretion and admi­nistred with due consideration; the other work more gently, so that you may take a scruple of them at night going to bed and follow your imployments next day without danger.

A. I put in these only to satisfie the desires of the curious, being confident that the Colledg quoted more by half than needed; and Apothecaries must have them all in a readiness because the Colledg ap­points them; for if a Master, bid his boy quench out the fire and make a new one, he must do it, be­cause he is commanded; Oh! that they would once be so wise to see their slavery.

TROCHES.

Culpeper. A. IF any cavil at this name, and think it hardly English; let them give a better and I shall be thankful: I know no other English name but will fall far below it.

A. They have gotten many Greek names, almost as many as a Welchman: [...], and [...]. The Latins, besides the Greek name, Trochisci and Pastilli, and Placentulae.

A. Although a man may make them into what form he pleaseth, yet they are usually made into little flat thin cakes, of a scruple or twenty grains in weight plus minus: some print Images (as of Serpents upon Troches of Vipers) upon them, some guild them with Leaf-Gold, some do neither.

A. They were first invented by the Ancients, that Pouders being brought into this form may be kept pure the longer; for the vertues of Pouders will soon exhale by intromission of air, which the thick body of troches resist; also such as are pectoral are the [...] carried in ones pocket.

A. Few of them are taken by themselves, but mix­ed with other Compositions.

Trochisci de Absinthio. Page 129. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of Wormwood.

The Colledg] Take of Red Roses, Wormwood leaves, Annis seeds, of each two drachms, Juyce of Maudlin made thick, The roots of [...], Rhu­barb, Spicknard, Smallage seeds, bitter Almonds, Ma­stich, Mace, of each one drachm, juyce of Succory so much as is sufficient to make it into Troches according to art

Culpeper] A. Before they used the term Absinthi­um Ponticum, which is a term they gave before both to Roman and common wormwood, as I then told them in the Margin, and they it seems either not kno­wing what Wormwood Mesue the Author of the Re­ceipt intended, or what pontick Wormwood, which before they pratled of was, now quite left out.

A. They strengthen the stomach exceedingly, o­pens obstructions or stoppings of the belly or bowels, strengthens digestion, open the passages of the liver, helps the yellow Jaundice, and consumes watry su­perfluities of the body. They are somewhat bitter and seldom taken alone; if your pallat affect bitter things, you may take a drachm of them in the mor­ning: They clense the body of choller, but purge not, or not to any purpose.

Agaricus Trochiscatus. Page 129. in the Lat. Book. Or, Agrick Trochiscated.

The Colledg] Take of Agrick sifted and poudered, three ounces, Steep it in a sufficient quantity of [...] Wine, in which two drachms of Ginger have been [...], and make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. See Troches of Agrick. This being indeed but the way to correct Agrick, and make it [...] [Page 146] fitter for use, and to perform those vertues Agrick hath, which you may find among the simples.

Trochisci Albi, Rhasis. Pag. 129, in the Latin Book. Or, White Troches.

The Colledg] Take of Ceruss washed in rosewater ten drachms, Sarcocol three drachms, white Starch two drachms, Gum Arabick, and Tragacanth, of each one drachm, Camphire half a drachm, either with Rosewater, or womens milk, make it into Troches ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. They are cool without Opium, but cooler with it, as also very drying, and are used in injections in ulcers in the yard, and the running of the reins &c. It seems now the Colledge, is very unwilling that you should know, that they use to con­tain half a drachm of Opium. If there be an infla­mation you may use them with Opium, if not, with­out, and the manner of using them is this, take a drachm of the Troches, which having beaten into pouder, mix with two ounces of plantane water, and with a Syringe inject it into the yard.

Trochisci Alexit [...] Page 129. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Zedoary roots, pouder of Crabs claws, of each one drachm and an half, the outward Citron pills preserved and dryed, Angelica seeds, of each one drachm, Bole Armenick half a drachm, with their trebble weight in Sugar make them into pouder, and with a sufficent quantity of Mussi­lage of Gum Tragacanth, made in [...] water di­stilled, make it into past, of which make [...]

Culpeper A. The Greeks call all medicines that expell poyson Alexiteria, so then Trochisci Alexite­rii, are nothing else but troches to expel poyson; this receipt is far different from what they prescribed be­fore under that name, It may be I shall find under a­nother name before I have done with the troches, they use to do such tricks sometimes, [...] I do not; you shall have it at latter end; mean season, this pre­serves the body from ill airs, and Epedemical disea­ses, as the pestilence, small pocks &c. And streng­thens the heart exceedingly, eating now and then a little, you may safely keep any troches in your poc­ket, for the dryer you keep them, the better they are.

[...] Alhandal. Page 130. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Coloquintida freed from the seeds, and cut Small, and rubbed with an ounce of [...] of Roses, then beaten into fine pouder ten ounces, Gum Arabick, Tragacanth, Bdellium, of each six drachms, [...] the Gums three or four daies in a suffi­cient quantity of Rosewater till they be melted, then with the afore said pulp, and part of the said Mussi­lage, let them be dried in the shadow, then beaten a­gain, and with the rest of the Mussilage, make it up a­gain, dry them and keep them for use.

Culpeper] A. They are too violent for a vulgar use.

Trochisci Aliptae Moschatae. P. 130. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of [...] bruised, three ounces, Styrax Calamit is one ounce and an half, Ben­jamin one ounce, wood of Aloes two drachms, Amber greese one drachm, Camphire half a drachm, Musk [...] a scruple, with a sufficient quantity of Rosewater, make it into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. It is singular good for such as are Asthmatick and can hardly fetch their breath, as also for yong children, whose throat is so narrow that they can hardly swallow down their milk, A very little taken at a time is enough for a mans body, and too much for a poor mans purse; for young children, give them four or five grains at a time in a little breast milk.

Trochisci Alk ckengi Page. 130. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of winter cherries.

The Colledg] Take of winter cherries three drachms, Gum Arabick, Tragacanth, Olibanum, dra­gons blood, Pine nuts, bitter Almonds, white Starch, juyce of Liquoris, Bole Armenick, white Poppy seeds, of each six drachms, the seeds of Meloues, Cucumers, Citrulls, Guords, of each three drachms and an half, the seeds of Smallage and white Henbane, Amber, earth of Lemnos, Opium, of each two drachms, with juyce of fresh winter Cherries, make them into Tro­ches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They [...] provokes urine, and break the stone. Mix them with other medicines of that nature, half a drachm at a time or a drachm if age permit.

Trochisci Bechici albi, vel, Rotulae Pectorales. 130. Or, Pectural [...]

The Colledg] Take of white Sugar one pound, white Sugar Candy, Penids of each four ounces, Or­ris Florentine one ounce, Liquoris six drachms, white Starch one ounce and an half, with a sufficient quan­tity of Mussilage, of Gum Tragacanth made in Rose­water, make them into small troches.

You may add four grains of Ambergreese, and three grains of Musk, to them if occasion serve.

Trochisci Bechici Nigri. Pag. 131. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of juyce of Liquoris, white Sugar of each one drachm, Gum Tragacanth, sweet Almonds blanched, of each six drachms, with a suffi­cient quantity of Mussilage, of Quinte seeds, made with Rosewater, make them into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. Both this and the former will melt in ones mouth, and in that manner to be used by such as are troubled with coughs, cold, hoarceness or want of voice, the former is most in use, but in my opinion the last is most effectual. You may take them any time when the cough troubles you, and this convenience you shall find in Troches more than in any other Physick, you may carry them any whether in your pocket in a paper, without spoyling, though you travel as far as the East Indies.

Trochisci de Barberis. Page 131. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of Barberries.

The Colledg] Take of juyce of Barberries, and Li­quoris made thick, Spodium, Purstain seeds, of each three drachms, Red-roses six drachms, Indian Spick­nard; Saffron, white Starch, Gum Tragcanth, of each a drachm, Citrull seeds elensed three drachms and an half, Camphire half a drachm, with Manna dissolved in juyce of Barberies, make them into Troches accor­ding to art.

Culpeper] A. They wonderfully cool the heat of the liver, reins, and bladder, breast and stomach, and stop loosness, cools the heat in feavers. They are very fit for bodies that are distempered with heat to carry about with them when they travail, they may take them at any time; I suppose their mothers wit will teach them that it is best to take them when the stomach is empty: I cannot write every thing, nei­ther if I did should I please every body; I had as leeve undertake (with the Sicilian Phylosopher) to teach an Ass to speak, as to teach a Dunce phy­sick.

Trochisci de Camphora. Page 131. in the Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Camphire.

The Colledg] Take of Camphire half a drachm: Saffron two drachms: white Starch three drachms: red Roses, Gum Arabick, and Tragacanth, Ivory, of each half an ounce: the seeds of Cucumers husked of Purslain, Liquor is of each an ounce, with Mussi­lage of the seeds of Fleawort, drawn in Rose water, make them into Troches.

Culpeper] A. It is [...] good in burning feavers, heat of blood and choller, together with hot distempers of the stomach and Liver, and extream thirst coming thereby, also it is good against the yel­low Jaundice, Phtisicks, and Hectick feavers. You may use these as the former. They have much alte­red this, for they must be doing, though to little pur­pose.

Trochisci de Capparibus. Pag. 132. in L. Book. Or, Troches of Cappers.

The Colledg] Take of the Bark of Cappar roots, the seeds of Agnus Castus, of each six drachms: Am­moniacum, half an ounce: the seeds of Water-cresses and Nigella, the Leaves of Calaminth and Rue, the roots of Acorus and long Birthwort, the juyce of Maud­lin made thick, bitter Almonds, of each two drachms: Harts-tongue, the roots of round Cyperus, Maddir, Gum Lac. of each one drachm: Being bruised let them be made into Troches according to art, with Am­moniacum dissolved in Vineger and boyled to the thickness of Honey.

Culpeper] A. They open stoppings of the liver and spleen, and help diseases thereof coming, as Ric­kets, Hypocondriack Melancholly &c. Men may take a drachm, children a scruple in the morning: you need not ask how children should take it, 'tis well if you can get them to take it any how.

Trochisci de Carabe. Page 132. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of Amber.

The Colledg] Take of Amber an ounce: Harts­born burnt, Gum Arabick burnt, red Corral burnt, Tragacanth, Acacia, Hypocistis, Balaustines, Mastich, Gum Lacca washed, black Poppy seeds rosted, of each two drachms and two scruples: Frankinsence, Saf­fron, Opium, of each two drachms: with a sufficient qantity of Mussilage of the seeds of Fleawort drawn in Plantane water, make them into Troches according to art.

Culpeper.] A. They were invented to stop fluxes of blood in any part of the body, the terms in women, the Hemorrholds or piles; they also help ulcers in the breast and lungues. The dose is from ten grains to a scruple.

Trochisci Cypheos for Methridate. Page 132. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Pulp of Raisons of the sun, [...], Turpentine, of each three ounces: Mirrh, Squinanth, of each an ounce and an half; Cinnamon, half an ounce: Calamus Aromaticus, nine drachms: the roots of round Cyperus, and Indian [...], Cassia Lignea, Juniper Berries, [...], Aspalathus or wood of Aloes, two drachms and an half: Saf­fron one drachm: clarified Honey as much as is suf­ficient: Canary Wine a little: Let the [...] and Bdellium be ground in a Mortar with the Wine, to the thickness of liquid Honey, then ad the [...], then the pulp of Raisons, then the Pouders; at last with the Honey let them all be made into Troches.

Culpeper] A. It is excellent good against inward ulcers in [...] part of the body soever they be. It is chiefly used [...] Compositions, as [...] and [...].

Trochisci de Eupatorio. Page 133. in the Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Maudlin.

The Colledg] Take of the Juyce of Mandlin made thick, Manna, of each an ounce: red Roses half an ounce: Spodium three drachms and an [...]: Spick­nard three drachms: Rhubarb, Asarabacca roots; Annis seeds, of each two drachms: Let the Nard, Annis seeds and Roses be beaten together; the Spodi­um, Asarabacca and Rbubarb by themselves; then mix the Manna and Juyce of Maudlin in a Mortar, add the pouders, and with new juyce make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. Obstructions, or stoppings, and swelling above nature, both of the liver and spleen, [...] cured by the inward taking of these Troches, and diseases thereof coming; as yellow and black jaun­dice, the beginning of dropsies &c. Take them as Troches of Wormwood.

Throches of Gallia Moschata. Page 133. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Wood of Aloes five drams: Ambergreece, three drachms: Musk, one drachm: with Muscilage of Gum Tragacanth made in Rose water make it into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They strengthen the brain and heart, and by consequence both vital and animal spirit, and cause a sweet breath. They are of an extream price, therefore I pass by the dose.

Trochisci Gordonli. Page 133. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of the four greater cold seeds busked, the seeds of white Poppies, Mallows, Cot­ton, Pierstain, Quinces, Mirtles, Gum [...] and Arabick, Fistick Nuts, Pine nuts, Sugar-candy, Penids, Liquoris, French [...] arley, [...] of Flea­wort seeds, sweet Almonds blanched, of [...] two drachms: Bole Armenick, Dragons blood, Spodium, red Roses, [...], of each half an ounce: with a suffi­cient quantity of Hydromel make it into Troches ac­cording to art.

Culpeper.] A. They are held to be very good in ulcers of the bladder, and all other inward ulcers whatsoever, and case feavers coming thereby, being of a fine cooling, slippery, heating nature. You may mix half a drachm of them with Syrup of Marsh­mallows, or any other Syrup, or Water apropriated to [Page 148] these uses: they ease the pains of the stomach much. They have left out the four lesser cold seeds of each two drachms, and altered some of the quantities of the rest, if you ask them a reason, they can scarce give you a wise one.

Trochisci Hedychroi Galen, for Treacle. Page 134. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Aspalatbus, or yellow San­ders, the leaves of Mastich, the roots of Asarabacca, of each two drachms, Rhupontick, Castus, Calamus Aromaticus, Wood of Aloes, Cinnamon, Squinancth, Opobalsamum or Oyl of Nutmegs by expression, of each three drachms: Cassia Lignea, Indian Leaf or Mace, Indian Spicknard, Mirrh, Saffron, of each six drachms: Amomus, or Cardamoms the [...], an ounce and an half: Mastich a drachm: Canary Wine as much as is sufficient: Let the Mirrh be dissolved in the Wine, then add the Mastich and Saffron well beaten, then the Opobalsamum, then the rest in pou­der, and with the Wine, make them up into Troches, and dry them gently.

Culpeper] A. They are very seldom or never used but in other compositions; yet naturally they heat cold stomachs, help digestion, strengthen the heart and brain.

Trochisci Hysterici. Page 134. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of Assafoetida, Galbanum, of each two drachms and an half: Mirrh, two drachms: Castorium a drachm and an half: the roots of Asarabacca and long Birthwort, the Leaves of Savin, Featherfew, Nep, of each a drachm: Dittany half a drachm: with either the juyce or decoction of Rue, make into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. These are applied to the foeminine gender; help fits of the mother, expel both birth and after-birth, clense women after labor, and expel the relicts of a careless Midwife. Search what other compositions are apropriated to the same purpose; you may find them in the Table at the latter end of the Book; and then you may ad half a drachm of this to them.

Trochisci de Ligno Aloes. Page 134. in Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Wood of Aloes.

The Colledg] Take of Wood of Aloes, red Roses, of each two drachms: Mastich, Cinnamon, Cloves, Indian Spicknard, Nutmegs, Parsnep seed, [...] the greater and [...], Cubebs, Gallia Moschata, [...], Mace, of each a [...] and an half: [...], [...], of each [...] a scruple: with [...] of [...] make it into Troches.

Culpeper.] A. It [...] the heart, stomach, and [...], takes away [...]-qualms, faintings, and [...] breath, and [...] the dropsie. The rich may take half a drachm in the morning.

[...]. Page 135. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of Mirrh.

The Colledg] Take of Mirrh three drachms: the [...] of Lupines five drams: Maddir roots, the leaves of Rue, wild Mints, [...] of Creet, Cummin seeds, Assa foetida, Sagapen. Opopanax, of each two drams; Dissolve the Gums in Wine, wherein Mugwort, hath been boyled, or else, Any tooth, good Bar­ber. [...], then add the rest, and with juyce of Mugwort, make it into tro­ches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They provoke the terms in women, and that with great ease to such as have them come down with pain. Take a drachm of them beaten into pouder, in a spoonful or two of syrup of Mugwort, or any other Composition tending to the same purpose, which the Table at latter end will direct you.

Sief de Plumbo. Page 135. in the Latin Book. Or, Sief of Lead.

The Colledg] Take of lead burnt and washed, Brass burnt, Antimony Tutty washed, Gum Arabick and Tragacanth, of each an ounce, Opium half a drachm, with Rosewater, make them being beaten and sifted into Troches.

Culpeper] A. It fils up and cures ulcers in the eyes. If you put it into them (say authors), but in my opinion 'tis but a scurvy medicine.

Trochisci Polyidae Androm. Pag. 135. in Lat. Book.

The Colledg] Take of Pomegranat flowers twelve drachms, Roch album three drachms, Erankinsence, Mirrh, of each half an ounce, Chalcanthum two drams, Buls gall six drachms, Aloes an ounce, with Austere Wine, or juyce of Nightshade or Plantane, make them into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They are very good they say, be­ing outwardly applied, both in green wounds and ul­cers. I fancy them not.

Trochisci de Rhabarbaro. Pag. 135. in Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Rhubarb.

The Colledg] Take of Rhubarb ten drachms, juyce of Maudlin made thick, bitter Almonds, of each half an ounce, red Roses three drachms; the roots of Asarabacca, Maddir, Indian Spicknard, the leaves of Wormwood, the seeds of Annis and Smallage, of each one drachm, with Wine in which Wormwood hath been boyled, make them into Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They gently clense the liver, help the yellow Jaundice and other diseases coming of choller and stoppage of the Liver. You may take a drachm of them every morning, or if you list not to take them alone, beat them into pouder, and mix them with white Wine.

Trochisci de Santalis. Page 136. in the Latin Book. Or, Troches of Sanders.

The Colledg] Take of the three Sanders, of each one ounce, the seeds of Cucumers, Guords, Citrulls, Purslain, Spodium, of each half an ounce, red Roses se­ven drachms, juyce of Barberies six drachms, Bole armenick half an ounce, Camphire one drachm, with Purslain water make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. The vertues are the same with Troches of Spodium, both of them harmless.

Trochisci de scilla ad Theriacam. P. 136. in L. Book. Or, Troches of Squills for Treacle.

The Colledg] Take a Squill gathered about the beginning of July, of a middle bigness, and the hard part to which the Small roots stick, wrap it up in past, and [...] it in an Oven, till the past be drie, and the [Page 149] Squill tender, which you may know by [...] it with a wooden sticks or a bodkin, then take it out and [...] it in a mortar, adding to every pound of the Squill, eight ounces of white Orobus, or red Citers in pou­der, then make it into Troches, of the weight of two drachms a peice (your hands being anoynted with Oyl of Roses;) dry them on the top of the hoùse, open­ing towards the Ask the Colledg whether the South part of the world be toward the shaddow, or the North: in­truth ei­ther the world is turned up­side down, or they or I, are be­side the cushion. South, in the shadow, often turn­ing them till they be well drie, then keep them in a peu­ter [...] glass vessell.

Troches of Spodium. Page 136. in the Latin Book.

The Colledg] Take of redRoses twelve drachms, Spodium ten drachms, Sorrel seed six crachms, the seeds of Purslain and Coriander, steeped in Vineger and dried, Pulp of Sumach, of each two drachms and an half, Maid wind up the Jack. white Starch rosted, Balaustines, Barber­ries, of each two drachms, Gum Arabick rosted one drachm and an half, with juyce of unripe grapes, make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. They are of a fine cooling, binding nature, excellent in feavers coming of choller, espe­cially if they be accompanied with a loosness, they al­so quench thirst. You may take half a drachm, either by themselves, or in any other convenient medi­cine.

Trochisci de terra Lemnia. Pag. 137. in Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Earth of Lemnos

The Colledg] Take of Earth of Lemnos, Bole Ar­menick, Acacia, Hyposistis, gum Arabick tosted, Dra­gons blood, white Starch, red Roses, Rose seeds, Lap. Hematitis, red Corral, Amber, Balaustins, Spodium, Purslain seeds a little tosted, Olibanum, Hartsborn burnt, Cypress Nuts, Saffron, of each two drachms, black Poppy seeds, Tragacanth, Pearls, of each one drachm and an half, Opium prepared one drachm, with Juyce of Plantane make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. Indeed in external applications, if any inflamation, or feaver be, I think it better with Opium than without, else better without than with it.

A. It was invented to stop blood in any part of the body, and for it, 'tis excellent: well then, for the bloody flux, take half a drachm of them inwardly (being beaten into pouder) in red Wine every mor­ning; for spitting of blood, use it in like manner in Plantane water; for pissing of blood, inject it into the bladder; for bleeding at the nose, either snuff it up, or anoint your forehead with it mixed with oyl; for the immoderate flowing of the terms, inject it up the womb with a syringe, but first mix it with Plan­tane water; for the hemorrhoids or wounds, apply it to the place bleeding.

Sief de Thure. Page 137. in the Latin Book. Or, Sief of Frankinsence.

The Colledg] Take of Frankinsence, Lap. [...], Pompholix, of each ten drachms Ciruss fourty drachms, Gum Arabick, Opium, of each six drachms, with sair water make it into Balls, dry them and keep them for use.

Culpeper] A. Sief is a general term which the A­rabians give to all medicines apropriated to the eyes, of which this is one, and a good one to dry up rewms there.

Trochisci è Violis Solutivi. P. 137. in Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Violets Solutive.

The Colledg] Take of Violet flowers meanly dry, six drachms, Turbith one ounce and an half, juyce of Liquoris, Scammony, Manna, of each two drachms, with Syrup of Violets make it into Troches.

Culpeper] A. They are not worth talking of, much less worth cost, the cost and labor of making.

Trochisci de Vipera ad Theriacam. P. 137. in L. B. Or, Troches of Vipers for Treacle.

The Colledg] Take of the flesh of Vipers, the skin, entrals, head, sat, and taill being taken away, boyled in water with dill, and a little Salt eight ounces, white bread twice baked, grated and sifted two ounces, make it into Troches, your hands being anoynted with Opobalsamum, or Oyl of Nutmegs by expression, dry them upon a sieve turned the bottom up­wards in an open place, often turning them till they are well dried, then put them in glass, or stone pot glazed, stopped close, they will keep a year, yet is it far better to make Treacle, not long after you have made them.

Culpeper.] A. They expel poyson, and are excel­lent good, by a certain Sympatheticall vertue, for such as are bitten by an Adder.

Trochisci de Agno Casto. Pag. 138. in Lat. Book. Or, Troches of Agnus Castus.

The Colledg] Take of the seeds of Agnus Castus, Lettice, redRose flowers, Balaustins, of each a dram, Ivory, white Amber, Bole Armenick washed in knot grass water, two drams; Plantane seeds four scruples, Sassafras two scruples, with Mussilage of quince seeds extracted in water of Water lilly flowers, let them be made into Troches.

Culpeper] A. Very pretty Troches, and good for little.

These Troches they have left out, and left to be spoy­led in the Apothecaries Shops: it is the wisest way to keep those poor, you would make slaves of.

Trochisci Alexiterii. Renodaeus.

Colledg TAke of the roots of Gentain, Tormentil, Orris Florentine, Zedoary, of each two drachms; Cinnamon, Cloves, Mace, of each half a dram; Angelica roots three drachms; Coriander seeds prepa­red, Roses, of each one drachm; dried Citron pills two drachms: beat them all into pouder, and with juyce of Liquoris softened in Hippocras, six ounces, make them into a soft Past, which you may from into either Troches or small rowls, which you please.

Culpeper] A. It preserves and strengthens the heart exceedingly, helps fainting and failings of the vital spirits, resists poyson and the pestilence; and is an excellent medicine for such to carry about them whose occasions are to travail in pestilential places and corrupt air, only taking a very small quantity now and then.

Troches of Annis seeds. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of Annis seeds, the juyce of Maudlin made thick, of each two drachms; the seeds of Dill, Spicknard, Mastich, Indian leaf or Mace, the leaves of Wormwood, Asarabacca, Smallage, bitter Almonds, of each half a drachm: Aloes two dtams; [...] of Wormwood so much as is sufficient to make it into Trocbes according to art.

Culpeper] A. They open obstructions of the li­ver, and that very gently, and therefore diseases com­ing thereof, help quartan agues. You can scarce do amiss in taking them if they please but your pallat.

Trochisci Diarhodon. Mesue

The Colledg] Take of the flowers of red Roses six drachms; Spicknard, wood of Aloes, of each two drachms, Liquoris three drachms; Spodium one drachm; Saffron half a drachm, Mastich two drachms, make them up into Troches with white Wine according to art.

Culpepeper A. They wonderfully ease feavers, co­ming of flegm, as quotidian feavers, agues, Epialos, &c. pains in the belly.

Trochisci de Lacca. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of Gum Lacca clensed, the juyce of Liquoris, [...], Wormwod, and Barber­ries all made thick, Rhubarb, long Birthwort, Costus, Asarabacca, Bitter Almonds, Maddir, Annis, Smal­bage, Schoenanth, of each one drachm: With the De­coction of Birth-wort, or Schoenanth, or the juyce of Maudlin, or Wormwood, make them into troaches ac­cording to art.

Culpeper] A. It helps stoppings of the liver and spleen, and feavers thence coming; it expels wind, purgeth by urine, and resists dropsies. The dose is between half a drachm and a drachm, according to the age and strength of the patient.

Pastilli Adronis. Galen.

The Colledg] Take of Pomegranate flowers ten drachms: Copper is twelve drachms: [...] Galls, Birthwort, Frankinsence, of each an ounce; Allum, Mirrh, of each half an ounce: it may be they mean white Copperis. Misy, two drachms: With eighteen ounces of austere Wine make it into [...] according to art.

Culpeper] A. This also is apropriated to wounds, ulcers, and fistulaes; it clears the ears, and repres­seth all excressences of flesh, clenseth the filth of the bones.

Trochisci Musae. Galen.

The Colledg. Take of Allum, Aloes, Copperis, Mirrh, of each six drachms: Crocomagma, Saffron, of each three drachms: Pomegranate flowers, half an ounce: Wine and Honey of each so much as is suf­ficient to make it up into troches according to art.

Culpeper. A. Their use is the same with the for­mer.

Crocomagma of Damocrates. Galen.

The Colledg. Take of Saffron, a hundred drams: red Roses, Mirrh, of each fifty drachms; white Starch, I think they mean Gum Ara­bick. Gum, of each thirty drachms; Wine so much as is sufficient to make it into troches.

Culpeper. A. It is very expulsive, heats and streng­thens the heart and stomach.

Trochisci Ramich. Mesue.

The Colledg. Take of the juyce of Sorrel, [...] ounces; red Rose Leaves, an ounce; [...] berries two ounces: boyl them a little together, and strain them: ad to the decoction, Galls well beaten, three ounces: boyl them again a little, then put in these following things in fine pouder: take of red Roses an ounce; yellow Sanders ten drachms; Gum Arabick an ounce and an half; Sumach, Spodium, of each an ounce; Mirtle berries four ounces: wood of Aloes, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, of each half an ounce; sour Grapes seven drachms: mix them all together, and let them dry upon a stone, and grind them again into pouder, and make them into smal troches with one drachm of Camphire, and so much Rose water as is sufficient, and perfume them with fifteen grains of Musk.

Culpeper. A. They strengthen the stomach, heart, and liver, as also the bowels, they help the chollick, and fluxes of blood, as also bleeding at the nose if [Page 151] you snuff but up the pouder of them; disburden the body of salt, fretting, chollerick humors. You may carry them about you and take them at your pleasure.

Troches of Roses. Mesue.

The Colledg] Take of red Roses, half an ounce: wood of Aloes two drachms: Mastich, a drachm and an half: Roman Wormwood, Cinnamon, Indian Spick­nard, Cassia Lignea, Schaenanth, of each one drachm: old Wine, and decoction of the five opening Roots, so much as is sufficient to make it into troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. They help pains in the stomach and ill digestion, the Illiack passion, Hectick feavers, and dropsies in the beginning, and cause a good colour. Use them like the former.

Trochisci Diacorrallion. Galen.

The Colledg] Take of Bole Armenick, red Cor­ral, of each an ounce: Balaustins, terra Lemnia, white Starch, of each half an ounce: Hypocystis, the seeds of Henbane, Opium, of each two drachms: juyce of Plantane so much as is sufficient to make them in­to troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. These also stop blood, help the bloody-flux, stop the terms, and are a great help to such whose stomachs loath their victuals. I fancy them not.

Trochisci Diaspermaton. Galeni.

The Colledg] Take of the seeds of Small age, and Bishops weed, of each an ounce; Annis and Fennel seeds, of each half an ounce: Opium, Cassia Lignea, of each two drachms: with rain Water, make it into troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. These also bind, case pain, help the pleuresie.

[...] Pastilli. Galen.

The Colledg] Take of white Starch Balaustins, earth of Samos, juyce of Hypocistis, If it be not Gum Arabick, I know not what it is. Gum, Saffron, Opium, of each two drachms: with juyce of Plan­tane, make them into troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. The Operation of this is like the former.

Troches of Agrick.

The Colledg] Take of choice Agrick three ounces; Sal. Gem. six drachms; Ginger two drachms; with Oxymel Simplex so much as is sufficient, make it in­to Troches according to art.

Culpeper] A. The vertues of both these are the same with Agrick, only it may be more safely given this way than the other; they clense the brain of flegm, and the stomach of tough thick, viscous hu­mois. The dose is one drachm at a time.

Of the Use of Oyls, &c.

BEfore I begin with their Oyls, Oyntments, and Plaisters, give me leave to swerve a little from the Colledges mode, they swerve ten times more from the truth: I would but give a few Rules for the Use of them, and I had as good do it here as any where: and to write but the truth, many City Chyrurgi­ans that I have talked with, are scarce able to give reason for what they do; 'tis to be feared, that those that live in the country far remote, are far less able: to do all these a curtesy, do I candidly deliver these Rules, and let me never be acconnted so basely bred, as to forget those kind Ladies and Gentlewomen that for Gods sake help their poor wounded neighbors, the great God reward them with a plentiful increase of estate in this world, and eternal Beatitude in that to come.

The cheifest of all these, Chyrurgicall Antidota­ries, I shall divide into these twelve Chapters, which shall be treated of in this order.

Of Medicines.
Anodine1
Repelling2
Attracting3
Resolving4
Emollient5
Suppuring6
Clensing7
Incarnative8
Scarrifying9
Glutinative10
Cathereticks11
Stanching blood.12

Chap. 1. Of ANODINES.

SUch Oyls, Oyntments, and Plaisters, as ease pain are called by Physitians (because you should not know what they mean) Anodines.

All pain is caused by heat, or driness, or both, for moisture seldom, unless heat be joyned with it cau­seth pain.

Anodines, also some divide into proper and impro­per, improper Anodines, (if a man may call them A­nodines) they call Narcoticks, for I assure you if crab­bed words would cure [...], our Physitians would come behind none in the world: the truth is, these words were borrowed from Galen, and are Greek words, and Galen writing in his mother tongue, they were understood well enough there; ours retain the same words, only to blind peoples eyes, that so they may not prie into the Mystery of their Monopoly, for then all the fat were in the fire. But to pro­ceed.

Proper Anodines are either temperately hot or temperately cold.

Hot Anodines are

Oyl of sweet Almonds, Linseed Oyl, Oyl of Eggs, Oyl of Saint Johns-wort, Hen-grease, Ducks grease, Goose grease, Chamomel, Melilot, Fenugreek seeds, Dill, Bay leaves and berries, Juniper berries, Rose­mary, Oyles and Ointments made of them; Oyle of Earth-worms Oyle of Elder, Wax, Turpentine, Oyntment of Marshmallows, Martiatum, Arregon, Resumptivum, Oxycroceum.

If any external part of your body be pained, these, or any of these made into fomentations, to both the part pained, or into pultifses, or Oyls, or Oyntments by adding Hogs grease, or Plaisters, by adding Wax, or Rozin, or both to the Oyntment; and applyiug it to the place, ease pain.

But if together with the pain there be an inflama­tion, then Anodines of a cooler nature are more con­venient, such be Oyl Omphacine, viz. Oyl of O­lives pressed from them before they be ripe, Poppies, Roses, Violets, Pellitory of the wall, Flea­wort: these, or any of these made into Pultisses, Oyls, Oyntments, or Plaisters, Oyntment of Roses, Unguantnm Album, Populeon, Refrigerans, Gale­ni, &c.

Improper Anodines, or Narcoticks which you please, are Medicines of another nature, and (you may thank the Colledge of Physitians, for training you up in such ignorance) scarce fit for a vulgar use, till they have learn'd more skill in Physick than yet they have; yet be pleased to consider, that in taking away pains, three things are to be considered; The cause, the pain, the part pained. To these are medicines apropriated, for some take away the cause, but these belong not to my present scope; others take away the pain, and meddle not with the cause, as those proper Anodines I mentioned before: and some take away neither cause nor pain, but only stupifie the sences, that so it cannot be felt: these are to be u­sed with abundance of skill and discretion, and never but in cases of necessity, when the pain is so vehement that Nature is not able to bear it, or a Feaver thereby threatned. Of this Nature, and for this use are Nar­coticks.

Of these some are Simple; As,

Mandrakes, Henbane, Poppies, Opium, Lettice, Sengreen, Nightshade, Camphire, Hemlock, &c.

Compound are, Oyls and Oyntments of these, Philonium Persicum, Philonium Romanum, Pilulae è Cynoglosso, or Pills of Houndstongue, Pilulae è Sty­race; and most Opiates you meet withal in the Dis­pensatory.

Chap. 2. Of Repelling Medicines.

BY Repelling, or Repulsive Medicines I mean, either,

  • 1. Such as by a cold quality put back the humor. Or,
  • 2. Such as by binding, strengthen the part affli­cted.
They are in quality;
  • 1. Hot and binding.
  • 2. Cold and binding.

They are devided into Simple, and Compound.

Simple Repercussives (which is another term they have)

areMild,binding.
Strong,
Hot and

Mild Repulsives are,

Roses, Endive, Lettice, Sorrel, Navel-wort, Pur­slain, Violets, Water-Lillies, cold water, Whey, Co­riander, Cinkfoyl, Trefoyl, Pellitory of the Wall, Apples, Pears, Whites of Eggs, Horstail, Woodbine.

Strong are,

Teazles, Shepheards purse, Plantane, Nightshade, Sengreen, or Housleeks, Melones, Guords, Citruls, Duckmeat, Fleawort, Mirtles, Quinces, Pomegranat rinds and flowers, Sanguis Draconis, Poppy, Opium, Bole Armenick, Ceruss, Terra Sigillata, Lead, burnt and not burnt, Cypress Nuts.

Hot and binding

Comfry the greater, Wormwood, Centaury, Horc­hound, [Page 153] Cardamoms, Cyperus grass, Calamus [...], the [...] of [...] and of [...].

Compounds are,

The Oyls and Oyntments of these, Refrigerans, Galen, Unguentum Album, Rhasis, Unguentum [...], [...], [...] de Siccativum rubrum, Unguentum Pectorale, [...].

Chap. 3. Of ATTRACTIVES.

ATTractives (called by the Greeks, [...]) are [...] to [...]; for the nature of Repelling, Repulsive, or Repercussive Medicines, is to drive from the Circumference to the Centre, but of Attractives to draw from the Centre to the Cir­cumference.

They are all hot in temper, and of thin parts.

Attractives draw by
  • 1. Natural Heat.
  • 2. Putrifaction.
  • 3. Hidden Property.
  • 4. Fuga [...].
1. Such as draw by Natural heat are,
  • 1. Simple.
  • 2. Compound.

Simple are,

Onions, Briony, Leeks, Garlick; and now you may know a reason why the cutting of Onions makes your eyes run a water; Birthwort, Spurge, Sou­thernwood, Nettles, [...], Gentian, Asphodel, Bdellium, [...], Euphorbium, Water-cresses, [...], [...], Carpobalsamum, Fran­kinsence, [...], [...], Rosemary flowers, Cab­bage; Aqua vitae, Sea water, Ammoniacum, Pitch, Bitumen, Calaminth, Dittany, Mustard, [...], Galbanum, Pellitory of Spain, Cantharides, Crow­foot, &c.

Compound are,

The Oyls and Oyntments made of these, Turpen­tine, Oyl of Bricks, Oyl of Foxes, Oyl of Bays, Oyl of Dill, Oyl of Rhue, Peter Oyl, Oyl of Ca­storium, Oyl of St Johns wort, Oyntment of Arregon Matiatum and Agrippa, Mithridate, and Venis Trea­cle applied outwardly, for [...], Diachylon mag­num, Diachylon cum Gummi, A Plaister of [...], both Simple and Compound, [...], with ma­ny others, which Reading and Dilligence (if they be gentlemen of your acquaintance) will help you to, and furnish you with.

Such as draw by Putrefaction are,

All Turds in general, especially Pidgeons and Goats dung, Leaven, Old Cheese, &c.

By hidden Property as they call it,

All [...] in general, Amber, Viscus Quercinus, or Mislero, Peony, the Load-stone; these they (poor fools, being utterly ignorant of the Sympathy and Antipathy of the Creation, and by consequence of the Magnetick Vertue of things, upon which the Foundation of Physick is built) call them Hidden Qualities, and so give Physick by rote, as a Parrot speaks. I could if I durst tell you of common [...] obvious to the eye of every one, that have a far greater Magnetick Vertue in them than the Load-stone; but I must be silent till men learn to be Honester: It is denyed me to write all I know.

By Fuga Vacui, or driving away Emptiness.

It is a most certain truth that nature abhors Vacu­um or Emptiness, neither is there such a thing in rerum Naturâ, let Baptista van Helmont speak his pleasure; And this way do Cupping glasses, and Horse Leaches draw; and thus may you draw with a horn.

Chap. 4. Of Resolving Medicines.

THese the Greeks call Diaphoretica, the Latins, Carminativa, and these are used externally as well as internally; for it is the external use of Me­dicines we are to speak of in this place.

Their Use is,
  • 1. To open the Pores.
  • 2. To make the Humor thin.
  • 3. To Evacuate them by Sweat, which is that they call, Insensible transpiration.
They are,
  • 1. Simple.
  • 2. Compound
The Simple are,
  • 1. Weak.
  • 2. Strong.

Weak are,

Savin, Marjoram, Rosemary, Origanum, Worm­wood, Melilot, Arrach, Spicknard, Chamomel, Dill, Annis, Cummin, Hysop, Fumitory, Elder, Dwarf El­der, Valerian, Southernwood, Wormwood, [...], Rozin, all sorts of Turds, Turpentine, old Cheese, Wine, strong-water.

Strong are,

Dittany, Leeks, Onions, Garlick, Vineger, Aqua vitae, [...] of Spain, all the hot seeds which you may find ranked in Battalia at the beginning of the Compounds, Cinnamon, Chervil, Nutmegs Pepper, Crowfoot.

Coupound are,

Oyls, Oyntments, and all Compositions of the former; Oyl of Euphorbium, Oyntment of Bays, Diachylon magnum, and cum Gummi, Emplastrum de Cymino, Oxicroceum, Emplastrum de Baccis lauri: Of Melilot, Oyutments of [...], Arregon, and Martiatum.

Chap. 5. Of Emollients.

TEe use of Emollients, is to soften hard places, and bring them to their pristine estate, of which we spake more at large in the Simples.

They are,
  • 1. Common.
  • 2. Propper.

Those are common, whose general operation is to soften hard swellings, and such parts and places of the body, as are hardened by Congralation.

They are Propper which are apropriated to pecu­liar humors, and belong to my scope at present; for I intend not a Treatise of Chyrurgery, but to givea Candle and a Lanthorn, to light you through the Oyls, Oyntments, and Plaisters; that you may see what a mist the Colledge being ballanced with igno­rance, and Sailing by the wind of Authority, hath hitherto wrapped you in, and compassed you round a­bout with: for take this for a general rule, and you (if you have any Ingenuity in you) must needs con­fess, Ignorance is encroaching, and seeks Authority to back it; But wisedom desires to be publick, and is alwaies justified of her children.

To proceed, consider that Emollients are more temperate than Attractives, but less temperate than Suppuratives; of which more in the next Chap­ter.

Also take notice that if the tumor be in any princi­pal part of the body, mix your Emollients with A­stringents.

Emollients are either Simple or Compound.

Simple are,

Almost, if not altogether, all Marrows, as of a Stagge, Dog, Horse, Caìfe, Bear, Man, Hog, Hen, Goose, Duck, Lion, Goat, &c. The Colledge in their Simples rattle you up enough of them, one after another, (I promised then to tell you what they were held to be good for, and now I am as good as my word; and although I am of opinion, that there is a far neerer and [...] way to cure diseases than they use, yet this book (if you have but wit enough to be a Physitian) this Book I say, if heedfully read and examined, will so furnish you with the vulgar rules, that you may be able to understand, that when God shall enable me to put it forth. A man shall never know any thing of the mysteries of his Creator, till he knows himself: and he shall never know himself, First, Till he hath the honesty freely to impart to others, what God hath freely revealed to him for the publick good; Secondly, Till he hath the Discretion to impart every thing in its due season. But to pro­ceed to Simple Emollents where I left) Gum Amo­niacum, Bdellium, Opopanax, Galbanum, Turpen­tine, Rozin, Colophonia, Pitch, the Emollient hearbs (you have them in rank and file, at the be­ginning of the Compounds) Linseed, Fennugreek seed, white Lilly roots, Astrach, Figs, Wheat and Barly Meal, Malt, Flower, &c.

Compounds are,

Oyls, Oyntments, and Plaisters, made of all or a­ny of these, Oyl of Lillies, Oyl of Chamomel, Oyl of Earth-worms, Oyl of Foxes, Oyntment of Marsh­mallows, Resumptivum Diachylon, cum muliis ali­is.

I shall give a notion or two, and then I have done with this, (you had had them before had I not for­gotten them, and now before I go any further let me advise those that intend to reap any benefit by my writings, to take a pen and ink, and note down what ever they find of consequence in them; for I know and they shall find by experience; that once writing of a thing, seates it better in the memory, then a hun­dred times reading of it.)

  • 1. The grease of all males is hotter, then the grease either of foemales, or Eunuchs, as for exampte; the grease of a Bull is hotter by far, than either the grease of a Cow or an Ox.
  • 2. The grease of wild Beasts, is hotter then that of such as are tame or demostical, as the grease of a wild Cat is hotter than that of a house Cat; judge ye the like of Fowles, the grease of a wild Duck, is hot­ter than that of a tame. A word is enough to the wise.

Chap. 6. Of Suppuratives.

THe Greeks call these Peptica. the Lattines Ma­turantia, we had some talk about them amongst the Simples.

Their office is by natural heat, to bring the blood and superfluous humors into matter, to help nature so to concoct a superfluous humor, that it may be fit to be cast out, to ripen it as the vulgar proverb is.

Emplasticks are af this nature, which we treated of by themselves in the Simples, and may well be re­duced to this head. For,

First, Some close the pores of the body, and so natu­ral heat being kept in is encreased, as the Sulphuri­ous Vapors being kept in the Cloud turn to real fire, and that is that we call Lightning; So that cortup­tion of the body being kept in together putrifies, and turns to matter.

Of this number (for before we told you what Em­plasticks were in general, now we tell you, what par­ticulars are Emplasticks, and a little Ingenuity will find out more, by [...] the qualities of these) of [Page 155] this number I say, are Mallows, Marshmallows, yolks of Eggs, Turpentine, Honey, Amoniacum, Galbanum, Labdanum, Frankinsence, Liquid Sty­rax.

2. As the former forced nature to do the work, so these help nature in it, the former did it per acci­dens, these per se, viz. they are friendly to nature, and conspire together with it to bring the Superflu­ous matter to form, yea to such a form as may be cast out, and the body afflicted may thereby be ca­sed.

Such Simples are,

Marshmallow roots, white Lilly roots (which is the best internal medicine of Gallen's Method, which I know for such an use, for you must note, that I chiefly speak of external medicines now) Wheat, and Barly, and malt Flower, [...] Fenu­greek seed, Brank Ursine, or Bears breech, Figs, Rai­sons, Currance, Dates &c.

As for Compounds, I shall not use any distinction between them, they that do one may happily do both together, there are besides Compounds made of these (let me not forget Oyl of Lillies, because I fancy it) Unguentum Basilicon) Diachylon simplex, Diachy­lon magnum, Diachylon cum Gummi, a Plaister of Mussilages, your own genius, if it be not dull, [...] you with more.

Chap. 7. Of Clensing Medicines.

CLensing medicines are such as by a drawing quality, have power to draw away parulentus excrements (which Chyrurgians call the Sanies of a wound) or mattery quality which ariseth in all wounds after putrifaction, (and then Chyrurgians call them ulcers) from the Centre of the ulcer, to the circumference, you have an [...], you would fain clense it, for you must make it clean before you can heal it, clensing medicines were ordained you for hat end.

Of these some are,
  • 1. Simples.
  • 2 Compounds.
Of Simples some are,
  • 1. Weak.
  • 2. Strong.

Weak Simples are,

Honey, Sugar, Salt Urine, especially your own U­rine, white Wine, these gently clense all wounds and [ulcers which is indeed nothing else but a wound putrified, 'tis neither better nor worse.]

Strong Simples are,

Wormwood, Agrymony, Betony, Smallage, Sou­thernwood, Mirrh, Aloes, Sarcocolla, Turpentine, bitter Almonds, Vert-de-greece, Bullocks gall, Ali­campane, Briony, the roots of Aron, or Cooko pin­tles, Gentìan, Hellebore, Allum, Whey, Birthwort, both long and round.

Compounds are.

Oyls and Oyntments of these, and what hath these in them doth more or less clense; Oximel, That Plaister which the Colledge like blasphemous wret­ches call Divine, that Oyntment of twelve ingredi­ents which they are not ashamedwithout blushing, to call an Oyntment of the Apostles, their consciences are so feared, Unguentum Egiptiacum &c.

Chap. 8. Of Incarnatives.

THe Greeks call Incarnatives Sarcotica.

Their office is to dry, and change the blood that comes to any part into flesh.

They must be hot, and but hot in the first degree; because they must be friendly to nature, else they can­not be helpful.

They must all be dry, yet so as there must not be a difference in their driness, for if the ulcer happen in a dry part of the body, the Sarcotick must be very dry, and therefore some of them are drying even to the fourth degree: but if the part of the body where they happen be moist, you must use Incarnatives, (or Sarcoticks which you please to call them by) that are less drying.

According to the degrees of Comparison I shall

divide them into,
  • Mean.
  • Stronger.
  • Strongest.

Mean are Olibanum, Colophonia, Mastick, Aloes, Barly Meal, malt Fl