AFter that I had accomplysshed and fynysshed dyuers hystoryes as wel of contemplacyon as of other hystoryal and worldly actes of grete conquerours & prynces / And also certeyn bookes of ensaumples and doctryne / Many noble and dyuers gentylmen of thys royame of Eng­lond camen and demaunded me many and oftymes / wherfore that I haue not do made & enprynte the noble hystorye of the saynt greal / and of the moost renomed crysten kyng / Fyrst and chyef of the thre best crysten and worthy / kyng Arthur / whyche ought moost to be remembred emonge vs englysshe men tofore al other crysten kynges / For it is notoyrly knowen thorugh the vnyuersal world / that there been ix worthy & the best that euer were / That is to wete thre paynyms / thre Iewes and thre crysten men / As for the paynyms they were tofore the Incarnacyon of Cryst / whiche were named / the fyrst Hector of Troye / of whome thystorye is comen bothe in balade and in prose / The second Alysaunder the grete / & the thyrd Iulyus Cezar Emperour of Rome of whome thystoryes ben wel kno and had / And as for the thre Iewes whyche also were tofore thyncarnacyon of our lord of whome the fyrst was Duc Io­sue whyche brought the chyldren of Israhel in to the londe of byheste / The second Dauyd kyng of Iherusalem / & the thyrd Iudas Machabeus of these thre the byble reherceth al theyr noble hystoryes & actes / And sythe the sayd Incarnacyon haue ben thre noble crysten men stalled and admytted thorugh the vnyuersal world in to the nombre of the ix beste & worthy / of whome was fyrst the noble Arthur / whos noble actes I purpose to wryte in thys present book here folowyng / The second was Charlemayn or Charles the grete / of whome thystorye is had in many places bothe in frensshe and englysshe / and the thyrd and last was Godefray of boloyn / of whos actes & lyf I made a book vnto thexcellent prynce and kyng of noble memorye kyng Edward the fourth / the sayd noble Ientylmen Instantly requyred me temprynte thystorye of the sayd noble kyng and conquerour kyng Arthur / and of his knyghtes wyth thystorye of the saynt greal / and of the deth and endyng of the sayd Arthur / Affermyng that I ouȝ rather tenprynte his actes and noble feates / than of godefroye of boloyne / or [Page] ony of the other eyght / consyderyng that he was a man borne wythin this royame and kyng and Emperour of the same / And that there ben in frensshe dyuers and many noble volu­mes of his actes / and also of his knyghtes / To whome I answerd / that dyuers men holde oppynyon / that there was no suche Arthur / and that alle suche bookes as been maad of hym / ben but fayned and fables / by cause that somme crony­cles make of hym no mencyon ne remembre hym noo thynge ne of his knyghtes / wherto they answerd / and one in specyal sayd / that in hym that shold say or thynke / that there was neuer suche a kyng callyd Arthur / myght wel be aretted grete folye and blyndenesse / For he sayd that there were many euydences of the contrarye / Fyrst ye may see his sepulture in the monasterye of Glastyngburye / And also in polycronycon in the v book the syxte chappytre / and in the seuenth book the xxiij chappytre / where his body was buryed and after founden and translated in to the sayd monasterye / ye shal se also in thystorye of bochas in his book de casu principum / parte of his noble actes / and also of his falle / Also galfrydus in his brutysshe book recounteth his lyf / and in dyuers places of Englond / many remembraunces ben yet of hym and shall remayne perpetuelly / and also of his knyghtes / Fyrst in the abbey of westmestre at saynt Edwardes shryne remayneth the prynte of his seal in reed waxe closed in beryll / In whych is wryton Patricius Arthurus / Britannie / Gallie / Germanie / dacie / Imperator / Item in the castel of douer ye may see Gau­wayns skulle / & Cradoks mantel. At wynchester the rounde table / in other places Launcelottes swerde and many other thynges / Thenne al these thynges consydered there can no man resonably gaynsaye but there was a kyng of thys lande na­med Arthur / For in al places crysten and hethen he is re­puted and taken for one of the ix worthy / And the fyrst of the thre Crysten men / And also he is more spoken of beyonde the see moo boookes made of his noble actes than there be in englond as wel in duche ytalyen spaynysshe and grekysshe as in frensshe / And yet of record remayne in wytnesse of hym in wales in the toune of Camelot the grete stones & meruayl­lous werkys of yron lyeng vnder the grounde & ryal vautes [Page] which dyuers now lyuyng hath seen / wherfor it is a meruayl why he is nomore renomed in his owne contreye / sauf onelye it accordeth to the word of god / whyche sayth that no man is accept for a prophete in his owne contreye / Thēne al these thynges forsayd aledged I coude not wel denye / but that there was suche a noble kyng named arthur / and reputed one of the ix worthy / & fyrst & chyef of the cristen men / & many noble volu­mes be made of hym & of his noble knyȝtes in frensshe which I haue seen & redde beyonde the see / which been not had in our maternal tongue / but in walsshe ben many & also in frensshe / & somme in englysshe but no wher nygh alle / wherfore suche as haue late ben drawen oute bryefly in to englysshe / I haue after the symple connyng that god hath sente to me / vnder the fauour and correctyon of al noble lordes and gentylmen en­prysed to enprynte a book of the noble hystoryes of the sayd kynge Arthur / and of certeyn of his knyghtes after a copye vnto me delyuerd / whyche copye Syr Thomas Malorye dyd take oute of certeyn bookes of frensshe and reduced it in to Englysshe / And I accordyng to my copye haue doon sette it in enprynte / to the entente that noble men may see and lerne the noble actes of chyualrye / the Ientyl and vertuous dedes that somme knyghtes vsed in tho dayes / by whyche they came to honour / and how they that were vycious were punysshed and ofte put to shame and rebuke / humbly bysechyng al noble lordes and ladyes wyth al other estates of what estate or degree they been of / that shal see and rede in this sayd book and werke / that they take the good and honest actes in their remembraunce / and to folowe the same / wherin they shalle fynde many Ioyous and playsaunt hystoryes / and noble & renomed actes of humanyte / gentylnesse and chyualryes / For herein may be seen noble chyualrye / Curtosye / Humanyte frendlynesse / hardynesse / loue / frendshyp / Cowardyse / Mur­dre / hate / vertue / and synne / Doo after the good and leue the euyl / and it shal brynge you to good fame and renom­mee / And for to passe the tyme thys boook shal be plesaunte to rede in / but for to gyue fayth and byleue that al is trewe that is conteyned herin / ye be at your lyberte / but al is wry­ton for our doctryne / and for to beware that we falle not to [Page] vyce no synne / but texcersyse and folowe vertu / by whyche we may come and atteyne to good fame and renomme in thys lyf / and after thys shorte and transytorye lyf to come vnto euerlastyng blysse in heuen / the whyche he graunte vs that reygneth in heuen the blessyd Trynyte Amen /

THenne to procede forth in thys sayd book / whyche I dyrecte vnto alle noble prynces / lordes and ladyes / gentylmen or gentylwymmen that desyre to rede or here redde of the noble and Ioyous hystorye of the grete conque­rour and excellent kyng. Kyng Arthur / somtyme kyng of thys noble royalme / thenne callyd brytaygn [...] / I wyllyam Caxton symple persone present thys book folowyng / whyche I haue enprysed tenprynte / And treateth of the noble actes / fe­ates of armes of chyualrye / prowesse / hardynesse / humanyte loue / curtosye / and veray gentylnesse / wyth many wonder­ful hystoryes and aduentures / And for to vnderstonde bryefly the contente of thys volume / I haue deuyded it in to xxj bookes / and euery book chapytred as here after shal by god­des grace folowe / The fyrst book shal treate how Vtherpen­dragon gate the noble conquerour kyng Arthur and contey­neth xxviij chappytres / The second book treateth of Balyn the noble knyght and conteyneth xix chapytres / The thyrd book treateth of the maryage of kyng Arthur to quene gue­neuer wyth other maters and conteyneth fyftene chappytres / The fourth book how Merlyn was assotted / and of warre maad to kyng Arthur / and conteyneth xxix chappytres / The fyfthe book treateth of the conqueste of Lucius themperour and conteyneth xij chappytres / The syxthe book treateth of Syr Launcelot and syr Lyonel and meruayllous aduentu­res and conteyneth xviij chapytres / The seuenth book treateth of a noble knyght called syr Gareth and named by syr kaye Beaumayns and conteyneth xxxvj chapytres / The eyght book treateth of the byrthe of Syr Trystram the noble knyght and of hys actes / and conteyneth xlj chapytres /

The ix book treateth of a knyght named by Syr kaye le cote male taylle and also of Syr Trystram and conteyneth xliiij [Page] chapytres / The x book treateth of syr Trystram & other mer­uayllous aduentures and conteyneth lxxxviij chappytres / The xj book treateth of syr Launcelot and syr Galahad and conteyneth xiiij chappytres / The xij book treateth of syr Launcelot and his madnesse and conteyneth xiiij chappytres / The xiij book treateth how galahad came fyrst to kyng Arthurs courte and the quest how the sangreall was begonne and conteyneth xx Chapytres / The xiiij book treateth of the queste of the sangreal & conteyneth x chapytres / The xv book treateth of syr launcelot & conteyneth vj chapytres / The xvj book trea­teth of Syr Bors & syr Lyonel his brother and conteyneth xvij chapytres / The xvij book treateth of the sangreal and conteyneth xxiij chapytres / The xviij book treateth of Syr Launcelot and the quene and conteyneth xxv chapytres / The xix book treateth of quene Gueneuer and Launcelot and conteyneth xiij chapytres / The xx book treateth of the pyetous deth of Arthur and conteyneth xxij chapytres / The xxj book treateth of his last departyng / and how syr Launcelot came to reuenge his dethe and conteyneth xiij chapytres / The somme is xxj bookes whyche conteyne the somme of v hondred & vij chapytres / as more playnly shal folowe herafter /

¶ The table or rubrysshe of the contente of chapytres shortly of the fyrst book of kyng Arthur /
Fyrst how vtherpendragon sente for the duke of cornewayl & Igrayne his wyf & of their departyng sodeynly ageyn ca primo How Vtherpendragon made warre on the duke of cornewayl and how by the moyane of Merlyn he laye by the duchesse & gate Arthur Capitulo
ij
Of the byrthe of kyng arthur and of his nouryture / & of the deth of kyng vtherpendragon / and how Arthur was chosen kyng and of wondres and meruaylles of a swerde taken out of a stone by the sayd Arthur capitulo
iij iiij & v
How kyng arthur pulled oute the swerde dyuers tymes
vj
How kyng arthur was crowned & how he made offycers
vij
How kyng Arthur helde in wales at a pentecost a grete feest and what kynges and lordes came to his feste
viij
Of the fyrst warre that kyng Arthur had and how he wanne the felde Capitulo
ix
How Merlyn counceylled kyng arthur to sende for kyng ban & kyng bors & of theyr counceyl taken for the warre
x
Of a grete tornoye made by kynge arthur & the ij kynges ban and bors and how they wente ouer the see Capitulo
xj
How xj kynges gadred a grete hoost ayenst kyng Arthur
xij
Of a dreme of the kyng wyth the hondred knyghtes
xiij
How the xj kynges wyth theyr hoost fought ayenst arthur & his hoost and many grete feates of the warre capitulo
xiiij
Yet of the same batayll Capitulo
xv
Yet more of the said batayl & how it was ended by merlyn
xvij
How Kyng Arthur kyng ban & kyng bors rescowed Kyng Leodegraunce and other Incydentes
xviij
How Kyng arthur rode to Garlyon and of his dreme / & how he sawe the quostyng beest capitulo
xix
How kyng Pellynore took arthurs hors & folowed the questyng beest and how Merlyn mette wyth Arthur
xx
How vlfyns apeched quene Igrayne Arthurs moder of trea­son / and how a knyght came and desyred to haue the deth of hys mayster reuengyd capitulo
xxj
How gryflet was made knyght & Iusted with a knyȝt
xxij
[Page]How xij knyghtes came from Rome & axed truage for thys londe of arthur / and how arthur faught wyth a Knyght
xxiij
How Merlyn saued Arthurs lyf & threwe an enchauntement vpon Kyng Pellynore and made hym to slepe
xxiiij
How Arthur by the meane of Merlyn gate Excalybur hys swerde of the lady of the lake Capitulo
xxv
How tydynges cam to arthur that kyng ryons had ouercome xj kynges & how he desyred arthus berde to purfyl his mantel Capitulo xxvij ¶How al the chyldren were sente fore / that were borne on may day. & how Mordred was saued
xxviij
¶The second book
Of a damoysel whyche came gyrde wyth a swerde for to fynde a man of suche vertue to drawe it oute of the scabard ca
primo
How balen arayed lyke a poure Knyght pulled out the swerde whyche afterward was cause of his deth capitulo
ij
How the lady of the lake demaunded the Knyȝtes heed that had wonne the swerde / or the maydens hede
iij
How merlyn tolde thaduenture of this damoysel capitulo
iiij
How balyn was pursyewed by syr Launceor Knyght of Ire­londe / and how he Iusted and slewe hym
v
How a damoysel whiche was loue to Launceor slewe hyr self for loue / and how balyn mette wyth his brother balan
vj
How a dwarfe repreuyd Balyn for the deth of Launceor / & how Kyng Marke of Cornewayl founde them and maad a tombe ouer them capitulo
vij
How Merlyn prophecyed that two the best Knyghtes of the world shold fyght there / whyche were Syr Launcelot and syr Trystram Capitulo
viij
How balyn and his broder by the counceyl of Merlyn toke Kyng ryons and brought hym to Kyng Arthur
ix
How Kyng arthur had a bataylle ayenst Nero and Kyng loth of orkeney / and how Kyng loth was deceyued by merlyn and how xij Kynges were slayne capitulo
x
Of the entyerement of xij Kynges / & of the prophecye of mer­lyn / how balyn shold gyue the dolorous stroke
xj
How a sorouful knyȝt cam tofore arthur & how balyn fet hym & how that Knyght was slayn by a Knyght Inuysyble
xij
How balyn & the damoysel mette wyth a Knyght whych was [Page] in lyke wyse slayn / & how the damoysel bledde for the custom of a castel Capitulo
xiij
Ho balyn mette wyth that knyght named garbon at a feest & there he slewe hym to haue his blood / to hele therwith the sone of his hoost Capitulo
xiiij
How Balyn fought wyth kyng Pelham / & how his swerde brake / and how he gate a spere wherewyth he smote the dolo­rous stroke capitulo
xv
How balyn was delyuerd by Merlyn / and sauyd a knyght that wold haue slayn hym self for loue capitulo
xvj
How that knyght slewe his loue & a knyght lyeng by hyr / & after how he slewe hym self wyth his owne swerde / & how ba­lyn rode to ward a castel where he lost his lyf Capitulo
xvij
How balyn mette wyth his brother balen & how eche of theym slowe other vnknowen tyl they were wounded to deth
xviij
How merlyn buryed hem bothe in one tōbe / & of balyns swerd capitulo
xix
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the thyrd book
How kyng arthur took a wyf and wedded gueneuer dough­ter to leodegran kyng of the londe of Camelerd wyth whome he had the rounde table Capitulo
primo
How the knyghtes of the rounde table were ordeyned & theyr syeges blessyd by the bysshop of caunterburye capitulo
ij
How a poure man rydyng vpon a lene mare / and desyred of kyng Arthur to make his sone knyght Capitulo
iij
How syr Tor was knowen for sone of kyng Pellynore / and how Gawayn was made knyght capitulo
iiij
How atte feste of the weddyng of kyng arthur to gueneuer a whyte herte came in to the halle & thyrty couple houndes / & how a brachet pynched the herte whiche was taken awaye
v
How syr Gawayn rode for to fetche ageyn the berte / & how ij brethern fought eche ageynst other for the herte Capitulo
vj
How the herte was chaced in to a castel and there slayn / and how Gauwayn slewe a lady Capitulo
vij
How iiij knyȝtes faught ayenst sir gawayn & gaheryse & how they were ouercom & her lyues saued atte request of iiij ladyes capitulo viij ¶How syr Tor rode after the knyght wyth the brachet & of his aduenture by the waye capitulo
ix
How syr Tor fonde the brachet wyth a lady / & how a knyght [Page] assaylled hym for the sayd brachet capitulo
x
How syr Tor ouercame the knyght / and how he losth ys heed at the requeste of a lady capitulo
xj
How kyng pellenore rode after the lady and the knyght that ladde her awaye / & how a lady desyred helpe of hym and how he faught wyth ij knyghtes for that lady of whome he slewe that one at the fyrst stroke capitulo
xij
How kyng Pellynore gate the lady & brought hyr to Camelot to the courte of kyng arthur capitulo
xiij
How on the waye he herde two knyghtes as he laye by nyght in a valeye & of other aduentures capitulo
xiiij
How whan he was comen to camelot he was sworne vpon a book to telle the trouthe of his queste capitulo
xv
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the fourth book
How merlyn was assotted & dooted on one of the ladyce of the lake / and how he was shytte in a roche vnder a stone and there deyed capitulo
primo
How v kynges came in to this londe to warre ayenst kyng Arthur / & what counceyl arthur had ayenst them capitulo
ij
How kyng arthur had adoo with them & ouerthrewe them & slewe the v kynges & made the remenaunte to flee
iij
How the batayl was fynysshed or he came / & how the kyng founded an abbay where the batayl was capitulo
iiij
How syr Tor was made knyght of the rounde table and how bagdemagus was dyspleased capitulo
v
How kyng Arthur / kyng Vryens & Syr Accolon of gaule chaced an hert & of theyr meruayllous aduenture
vj
How Arthur took vpon hym to fyght to be delyuerd oute of pryson / & also for to delyuer twenty knyghtes that were in pryson Capitulo
vij
How accollon fonde hym self by a welle / & he toke vpon hym to doo bataylle ayenst Arthur capitulo
viij
Of the bataylle bytwene kyng Arthur & Accolon
ix
How kyng arthurs swerde that he faught wyth brake / & how he recouerd of accolon his owne swerde excalibur and ouer­came his enemye Capitulo
x
How accolon confessyd the treason of Morgan le fay Kyng arthurs syster & how she wold haue doon slee hym ca
xj
[Page]How Arthur accorded the two brethern / and delyuerd the xx knyghtes / & how syr Accolons deyed capitulo
xij
How Morgan wold haue slayn syr vryens hyr husbond / & how syr Ewayn hir sone saued hym Capitulo
xiij
How quene Morgan le fay made grete sorowe for the deth of accolon / & how she stale awaye the scawbard fro arthur
xiiij
How Morgan le fay saued a knyght that shold haue be drowned / & how kyng Arthur retorned home ageyn capitulo
xv
How the damoysel of the lake saued Kynge Arthur from a mantel which shold haue brente hym capitulo
xvj
How syr Gawayn & syr Ewayn mette with xij fayr damoyselles / & how they compleyned on syr Marhaus ca
xvij
How syr Marhaws Iusted with syr Gawayn & syr Ewayn and ouerthrewe them bothe capitulo
xviij and xix
How syr Marhaus syr Gawayn & syr Ewayn mette the da­moyselles & eche of them toke one capitulo
xx
How a knyght & a dwarf stroof for a lady capitulo
xxj
How kyng Pelleas suffred hym self to be taken prysoner by cause he wold haue a syght of his lady / & how syr Gawayn promysed hym for to gete to hym the loue of his lady
xxij
How syr Gawayn came to the lady Ettard and laye by hyr & how syr Pelleas fonde them slepyng capitulo
xxiij
How syr Pelleas loued nomore ettard by the moyan of the damoysel of the lake whome he loued euer after ca
xxiiij
How syr marhaus rode with the damoysel and how he came to the duke of the south marchis Capitulo
xxv
How syr Marhaus faught wyth the duke and his vj sones and made them to yelde them capitulo
xxvj
How syr Ewayn rode wyth the damoysel of lx yere of age / & how he gate the prys at tornoyeng capitulo
xxvij
How syr Ewayn fauȝt with ij knyȝtes & ouercam hem
xxviij
How at the yeres ende alle thre knyghtes wyth theyr thre da­moyselles metten at the fontayne capitulo
xxix
¶Of the fyfthe book the chapytres folowen
How xij aged Ambassyato [...]s of rome came to kyng Arthur to demaunde truage for brytayne capitulo
primo
How the kynges and lordes promysed to kyng Arthur ayde and helpe ageynst the Romayns capitulo
ij
[Page]How kyng Arthur helde a parlement at yorke & how he ordeyned how the royame shold be gouerned in his abscence
iij
How kyng Arthur beyng shypped & lyeng in his caban had a meruayllous dreme / & of thexposycion therof capitulo
iiij
How a man of the contreye tolde to hym of a meruayllous geaunte / & how he faught & conquerd hym Capitulo
v
How kyng Arthur sente syr gawayn & other to lucius / & how they were assaylled & escaped wyth worshyp Capitulo
vj
How Lucius sente certeyn espyes in a busshement for to ue taken hys knyghtes beyng prysonners / and how they were letted capitulo
vij
How a senatour tolde to Lucius of their dyscomfyture / & also of the grete batayl betwene Arthur & Lucius capitulo
viij
How Arthur after he had achyeued the batayl ayenst the Ro­mayns entred in to almayn & so in to ytalye Capitulo
ix
Of a bataylle doon by Gauwayn ayenst a sarasyn / whiche af­ter was yelden & became crysten Capitulo
x
How the Sarasyns came oute of a wode for to rescowe theyr beestys / and of a grete bataylle Capitulo
xj
How syr Gauwayn retorned to kyng Arthur wyth his prysoners / And how the kyng wanne a Cyte / and how he was crowned emperour capitulo
xij
¶Here folowen the chappytres of the vj book
How syr Launcelot and syr Lyonel departed fro the courte for to seek auentures / and how syr Lyonel lefte hym slepyng and was taken Capitulo
primo
How syr Ector folowed for to seek syr Launcelot / & how he was taken by syr Turquyne Capitulo
ij
How iiij quenes fonde Launcelot slepyng / & how by enchauntement he was taken & ledde in to a castel capitulo
iij
How syr Lancelot was deliuerd by the meane of a damosel
iiij
How a knyght founde syr Launcelot lyeng in his lemmans bedde / & how syr Launcelot faught with the knyght ca
v
How sir Launcelot was receyued of kyng bagdemagus doughter / & he made his complaynte to hir fader Capitulo
vj
How syr Launcelot byhaued hym in a tournement / & how he mette wyth syr Turquyn ledyng syr Gaheris capitulo
vij
How syr Launcelot & sy Turquyn faught to gyders ca
viij
[Page]How s [...]r Turquyn was slayn / & how syr Launcelot bad syr gaheris delyuer al the prysoners capitulo
ix
How syr Launcelot rode with the damoysel & slewe a knyght that distressid al ladyes / & also a vylayn yt kept a bridge
x
How syr launcelot slewe ij geauntes & made a castel free
xj
How syr Launcelot rode dysguysed in Syr kayes harnoys / & how he smote doun a knyght Capitulo
xij
How syr Launcelot Iusted ayenst four knyȝtes of the rounde table and ouerthrewe theym capitulo
xiij
How syr Launcelot folowed a brachet in to a castel where he fonde a dede knyght & how he after was requyred of a damoysel to hele hir brother capitulo
xiiij
How sir Launcelot cam in to the chapel peryllous & gate there of a dede corps a pyece of the cloth & a swerde capitulo
xv
How syr Launcelot at the request of a lady recouerd a fawcon [...]y whiche he was deceyued capitulo
xvj
How syr Launcelot ouertoke a knyght which chased hys wyf to haue sleyn hyr / & how [...]e sayd to hym capitulo
xvij
How syr Launcelot came to kyng arthurs court / & how there were recounted al his noble feates & actes capitulo
xviij
¶Here folowen the chappytres of the seuenth boook
How beaumayns came to kyng arthurs courte & demaunded thre petycyons of kyng Arthur Capitulo
primo
How syr Launcelot & syr Gauwayn were wroth by cause syr kaye mocqued beaumayns / & of a damoysel whyche desyred a knyght to fyght for a lady Capitulo
ij
How beawmayns desyred the batayl / & how it was graunted to hym / & how he desyred to be made knyȝt of sir Launcelot
iij
How beaumayns departed & how he gate of syr Kaye a spere and a shelde / and how he Iusted and faughte wyth Syr Launcelot Capitulo
iiij
How beaumayns tolde to syr Launcelot his name / and how he was dubbed knyght of Syr Launcelot / and after ouertooke the damoysel Capitulo
v
How beaumayns fought & slewe ij knyghtes at a passage
vj
How beaumayns faught with the knyght of the blacke laundes / & faught with hym tyl he fyl doun & deyed capitulo
vij
How the brother of the knyght that was slayn mette wyth [Page] beaumayns / & fauȝt with beaumayns tyl he was yelden
viij
How the damoysel euer rebuked beaumayns / & wold not suffre hym to syt at hir table / but callyd hym kychyn boye
ix
How the iij brother callyd the rede knyght Iusted & faughte ayenst beaumayns / & how beaumayns ouercame hym ca
x
How syr beaumayns suffred grete rebukes of the damoysel / & he suffred it pacyently capitulo
xj
How beaumayns faughte wyth Syr Persaunt of ynde / and made hym to be yelden capitulo
xij
Of the godelye comynycacyon bytwene syr Persaunt & beau­mayns / & how he tolde hym that his name was syr gareth
xiij
How the lady that was bysyeged had worde fro hyr syster how she had brought a knyght to fyght for hyr / and what bataylles he had achyeued Capitulo
xiiij
How the damoysel & beaumayns came to the syege / & came to a Sys [...]amor tree / & there beaumayns blewe an horne / & thenne the knyȝt of the rede laundes cam to [...]yght wyth hym ca
xv
How the two knyghtes mette to gyders and of their talkyng and how they began theyr batayl Capitulo
xvj
How after longe fyghtyng beaumayns ouercame the knyght & wold haue slayn hym / but atte request of the [...]ordes he sa­ued his lyf & made hym to yelde hym to the lady capo.
xvij
How the knyȝt yelded hym / & how beaumayns made hym to goo vnto kyng arthurs court & to c [...]ye sir lancelot mercy
xviij
How Beaumayns came to the lady. & whan he came to the castel / the yates were closed ageynst hym / & of the wordes that the lady sayd to hym Capitulo
xix
How syr beaumayns rode after to rescowe his dwarfe / and came in to the castel where he was capitulo
xx
How syr gareth otherwyse callyd beaumayns cam to ye presence of his lady / & how they toke acqueyntance / & of their loue
xxj
How at nyght cam an armed knyght & faught with sir gareth & he sore hurt in the thyghe smote of the knyghtes heed ca
xxij
How the sayd knyght came ageyn the next nyght & was be­heded ageyn / & how at the foste of pentecost al the knyȝtes that syr gareth had ouercome cam & yelded hem to kyng arthur
xxiij
How kyng Arthur pardoned them / and demaunded of them where syr Gareth was Capitulo
xxiiij
[Page]How the quene of Orkeney came to this feste of pentecoste / & sir gawayn & his brethern cam to aske hir blessyng
xxv xxvj
How kyng Arthur sente for the lady Lyonas / & how she lete crye a tournoye at hir castel / where as came many knyghtes Capitulo
xxvij
How kyng Arthur wente to the tornoyment with his knyghtes / and how the lady receyued hym worshypfully / & how the knyghtes encountred Capitulo
xxviij
How the knyghtes bare them in the batayl capitulo
xxix
Yet of the sayd tornoyment capitulo
xxx
How syr Gareth was espyed by the herowdes / and how he escaped oute of the felde capitulo
xxxj
How syr Gareth came to a castel where he was wel lodged & he Iusted with a knyght & slewe hym Capitulo
xxxij
How syr Gareth fought wyth a knyght that helde within his castel xxx ladyes & how he slewe hym capitulo
xxxiij
How syr gowayn & syr Gareth fought eche ayenst other / and how they knewe eche other by the damoysel Lynet ca
xxxiiij
How syr Gareth knowleched that they loued eche other to kyng Arthur / & of thappoyntement of their weddyng
xxxv
Of the grete ryalte & what offycers were made at the feste of the weddyng & of the Iustes at the feest Capitulo
xxxvj
¶Here folowen the chappytres of the eyght book
How syr Trystram de Lyones was borne and how his moder deyed at his byrthe / wherfore she named hym Tristram
primo
How the stepmoder of syr Trystram had ordeyned poyson for to haue poysened syr Trystram Capitulo
ij
How Syr Trystram was sente in to Fraunce and had one to gouerne hym named Gouernayle / and how he lernyd to harpe / hawke and hunte capitulo
iij
How syr Marhaus came out of Irelonde for to aske trewage of Cornewayle or ellys he wold fyght therfore capitulo
iiij
How Trystram enterprysed the bataylle to fyght for the trew­age of Cornwayl / & how he was made knyght Capitulo
v
How Syr Trystram arryued in to the Ilond for to furnysshe the bataylle wyth syr Marhaus Capitulo
vj
hoow syr Tristram faught ayenst Syr Marhaus & a [...]hyeued his batayl / & how syr Marhaus fledde to his shyppe ca
vij
[Page]How Syr Marhaus after that he was arryued in Irelonde dyed of the stroke that syr Trystram had gyuen to hym / and how Trystram was hurte capitulo
viij
How syr Trystram was put to the kepyng of la bele ysoude fyrst for to le helyd of hys wounde Capitulo
ix
How syr Trystram wanne the degree at a tornoyment in Ire­londe / & there made palomydes to bere no harnoys in a yere
x
How the quene espyed that syr Tristram had slayn hir broder syr Marhaus by his swerde & in what Ieopardye he was
xj
How Syr Trystram departed fro the kyng & la bele Isoude out of Irelonde for to come in to cornewayl capitulo
xij
How syr Trystram and Kyng Marke hurted eche other for the lone of a knyghtes wyf capitulo
xiij
How syr Trystram laye wyth the lady. and how her husbond faught wyth syr Trystram Capitulo
xiiij
How syr bleoberis demaunded the fayrest lady in kyng marks court whom he toke awaye & how he was fouȝten with
xv
How syr Trystram faught wyth two knyghtes of the rounde table capitulo
xvj
How Syr tristcum faught with syr bleoberis for a lady / and how the lady was put to choyse to whome she wold goo
xvij
How the lady forsoke syr tristram & abode with Syr bleoberie and how she desyred to goo to hyr husbond ca
xviij
How kyng mark sent syr trystram for la bele Isoude toward Irelond & how by fortune he arryued in to englond
xix
How kyng Anguysshe of Irelonde was somoned to come to Kyng Arthurs courte for treason Capitulo
xx
How syr Trystram rescowed a chylde fro a knyght / and how gouernayle tolde [...]ym to Kyng Anguysshe ca
xxj
How syr trystram faught for syr anguysshe & ouercame hys aduersarye & how his aduersarye wold neuer yelde hym
xxij
How syr blamor desyred trystram to slee hym / & how syr tristram spared hym & how they took appoyntement
xxiij
How syr tristram demaunded la bele Isoude for kynge mark / & how syr trystram & Isoude dronken the loue drynke
xxiiij
How syr Tristram & Isoude were in pryson / & how he faughte for hir beaute / & smote of another ladyes hede capitulo
xxv
How syr Trystram faught wyth syr breunor / and atte laste [Page] smote of his hede Capitulo
xxvj
How syr galahad faught wyth syr Tristram / & how syr tristram yelded hym & promysed to felaushyp with lancelot
xxvij
How syr Launcelot met [...]e wi [...]h syr Carados [...]eryng awaye sir gawayn / & of the rescows of syr Gawayn Capitulo
xxviij
Of the weddyng of Kyng Marke to la bele Isoude / and of brangwayn hyr mayde and of Palamydes
xxix
How Palamydes demaunded quene Isoude / & how lambegus rode after to rescowe hyr / and of the scape of Isoude
xxx
How syr Trystram rode after Palamydes and how he fonde hym and faught wyth hym / and by the moyne of Isoude the batayl seced Capitulo
xxxj
How syr Trystram brought quene Isoude home / and of the debate of kyng Marke and Syr Trystram capitulo
xxxij
How syr Lamerok Iusted wyth xxx knyghtes / & syr Tris­tram atte requeste of kyng mark smote his hors doun
xxxiij
How syr Lamerok sente an horne to kyng Marke in despyte of syr Trystram / And how syr Trystram was dryuen in to a chapel capitulo
xxxiiij
How Syr tristram was holpen by his men / & of quene Isoude which was put in a lazarcote / & how tristrā was hurt
xxxv
How syr Trystram serued in warre the kyng howel of bry­tayn and slewe hys aduersarye in the felde
xxxvj
How syr Suppynabyles tolde syr Trystram how he was deffamed in the courte of kyng Arthur / & of syr lamerok
xxxvij
How syr Trystram and his wyf arryued in wales and how he mettr there wyth syr Lamerok Capitulo
xxxviij
How syr Trystram faught wyth Syr Nabon / and ouercame hym / and made syr Lamerok lord of the yle
xxxix
How syr Lamerok departed fro syr Trystram / & how he mette wyth syr frolle and after wyth syr Launcelot capitulo
xL
How syr Lamerok slewe syr frolle / and of the curtoyse fyghtyng wyth syr belleaunce hys brother Capitulo
xlj
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the ix book
How a yonge man came in to the courte of kyng arthur / and how syr Kaye called hym in scorne la cote male tayle
primo
How a damoysel came in to the courte & desyred a knyght to take on hym an enquest which la cote male tayle emprised
ij
[Page]How le cote male tayle ouerthrewe syr Dagonet the Kynges fole / and of the rebuke that he had of the damoysel ca
iij
How le cote male tayle fought ayenst an hondred knyghtes / & how he escaped by the meane of a lady Capitulo
iiij
How syr Launcelot cam to the courte and herde of la cote male tayle / and how he folowed after hym / and how la cote male tayle was prysoner Capitulo
v
How syr Launcelot faught wyth vj knyghtes / & after wyth syr bryan / and how he delyuerd the prysonners
vj
How syr Launcelot mette wyth the damoysel named maledy­saunt / and named hyr the damoysel bein pensaunt
vij
How le cote male tayle was taken prysoner / & after rescowed by syr launcelot / & how syr launcelot ouercam iiij brethern
viij
How Syr Launcelot maad le cote mayle lord of the castel of Pendragon & after was made knyght of the rounde table
ix
How la bele Isoude sente letters to syr Trystram by hir mayde brangwayn and of dyuers auentures of syr Trystram
x
How syr Tristram mette with syr lamerok de gales / and how they faught & after accorded neuer to fyght to gyders
xj
How syr palomydes folowed the questyng beest & smote doun syr Trystram and syr Lamerock wyth one spere Capitulo
xij
How syr lamerok mette wyth syr Molleagaunce / & faught to gydre for the beaulte of dame Gueneuer capitulo
xiiij
How Syr Kaye mette wyth Syr Trystram / and after of the shame spoken of the knyghtes of Cornewayl / and how they Iusted capitulo
xv
How Kyng Arthur was brought in to the forest peryllous / & how syr Trystram saued his lyf capitulo
xvj
How syr Trystram came to la bele Isoude / & how kehydyou [...] began to loue bele Isoude & of a letter that tristram fonde
xvij
How syr Tristram departed fro tyntagyl & how he sorowed & was so longe in a forest tyl he was out of his mynde
xviij
How syr Trystram sowsed dagonet in a welle / & how Pala­mydes sente a damoysel to seche Trystram / and how palamydes mette wyth Kyng Mark capitulo
xix
How it was noysed how syr Trystram was dede and how la bele Isoude wolde haue slayn hyr self capitulo
xx
How kyng Mark fonde syr Trystram naked and made hym [Page] to be borne home to tyntagyl and how he was there knowen by a brachet capitulo
xxj
How Kyng Marke by thauys of his counceyl bannysshed syr Trystram oute of Cornewayl the terme of x yere
xxij
How a damoysel souȝght helpe to helpe sir laūcelot ayenst xxx knyghtes / & how syr trystram faught with them ca
xxiij
How syr Trystram & syr Launcelot came to a lodgyng where they must Iuste wyth two knyghtes capitulo
xxiiij
How syr Trystram Iusted wyth syr Kaye and syr Sagramor le desyrous / and how syr Gawayn torned Syr Trystram fro Morgan le fay Capitulo
xxv
How syr Trystram and syr Gauwayn rode to haue foughten ayenst the xxx knyghtes / but they durst not come oute
xxvj
How damoysel brangwayn fonde trystram slepyng by a welle & how she delyuerd letters to hym fro bele Isoude [...]a
xxvij
How syr Trystram had a falle of syr Palomydes / and how Launcelot ouerthrewe two knyght [...]s capitulo
xxviij
How syr Launcelot Iusted with Palomydes and ouerthrewe hym / & after he was assaylled with xij knyghtes
xxix
How syr Trystram byhaued hym the fyrst day of the tourne­ment / and there he had the prys Capitulo
xxx
How syr Trystram retourned ayenst kyng arthurs partye by cause he sawe syr Palomydes on that partye capitulo
xxxj
How Syr Trystram fonde Palomydes by a welle / & broughte hym wyth hym to his lodgyng Capitulo
xxxij
How syr Trystram smote doun syr Palomydes / and how he Iusted wyth kyng Arthur and other feates
xxxiij
How syr Launcelot hurte syr Trystram / and how after syr Trystram smote doun syr Palomydes capitulo
xxxiiij
How the prys of the thyrd day was gyuen to Syr Launcelot and syr Launcelot gaf it to syr Trystram ca
xxxv
How Palomydes came to the castel where syr Trystram was And of the queste that syr Launcelot & x knyghtes made for syr Trystram Capitulo
xxxvj
How syr Trystram / syr Palomydes / and Syr dynadan were taken and put in pryson Capitulo
xxxvij
How Kyng marke was sory for the good renommee of syr Tristram / somme of arthurs knyghtes Iusted wyth knyghtes [Page] of Cornewayl Capitulo
xxxviij
Of the treason of kyng Marke / and how syr Gaheris smote hym doun / and Andred his cosyn capitulo
xxxix
How after that syr Trystram / syr Palomydes / and syr Dynadan had be longe in pryson they were delyuerd ca
xl
How syr Dynadan rescowed a lady fro syr breuse sauns pyte & how syr Trystram receyued a shelde of Morgan le fay
xlj
How syr Trystram took wyth hym the shelde / and also how he slewe the paramour of Morgan le fay capitulo
xlij
How Morgan le fay buryed hyr paramour / and how syr tristram preysed syr Launcelot and hys kynne ca
xliij
How syr Trystram at a tornoyment bare the shelde that Mor­gan le fay delyuerd to hym capitulo
xliiij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the tenth book
How syr Trystram Iusted and smote doun Kyng Arthur / bycause he tolde hym not the cause why he bare that shelde ca
j
How syr Trystram saued syr Palomydes lyf / & how they pro­mysed to fyght to gyder wythin fourtenyght capitulo
ij
How syr Trystram sought a stronge knyght that had smy­ton hym doun & many other knyghtes of the rounde table
ii [...]
How syr Trystram smote doun syr Sagramor le desyrous / & syr Dodynas le sauage capitulo
iiij
How syr Trystram mette at the perron wyth syr Launcolot / & how they faught to gyder vnkuowen Capitulo
v
How syr Launcelot brought syr Trystram to the courte / and of the Ioye that the kyng and other made for the comyng of syr Trystram Capitulo
vj
How for despyte of syr Trystram kyng Marke came wyth ij knyghtes in to englond [...]and how he s [...]ewe one of the knygh­tes Capitulo
vij
How the kyng came to a fontayne where he fonde syr Lame­rock complaynyng for the loue of Kyng lots wyf
viij
How kyng marke / syr Lamerok / and syr dynadan came to a castel / and how Kyng Mark [...] was knowen there capitulo
ix
How syr Berluses mette wyth Kyng marke / and how Syr dynadan toke his partye ca
x
¶How kyng marke mocked syr dynadan / & how they mette wyth vj knyȝtes of the ronnde table
xj
¶How the vj knyȝtes sente sir dagonet to Iuste with [Page] kyng marke & how Kyng marke refused hym ca
xij
How syr Palomydes by aduenture mette kyng Marke fleyng & how he ouerthrewe dagonet / and other knyghtes
xiij
How kyng marke & syr Dynadan herde syr palomydes ma­kyng grete sorowe & mornyng for la bele Isoude
xiiij
How the kyng had slayn syr amant wrongfully tofore kyng arthur / & syr launcelot fette kyng marke to kyng arthur
xv
How syr dynadan tolde syr palamydes of the batayl betwene Syr Launcelot and syr Trystram Capitulo
xvj
How syr Lamerok Iusted wyth dyuers knyghtes of the cas­tel / wherin was Morgan le fay capitulo
xvij
How syr Palamydes wold haue Iusted for syr Lamerock wyth the knyghtes of the castel Capitulo
xviij
How syr Lamerock Iusted wyth syr Palomydes and hurte hym greuously capitulo
xix
How it was tolde syr Launcelot that Dagonet chaced kyng marke / & how a knyght ouerthrewe hym & vj knyghtes
xx
How Kyng Arthur lete do crye a Iustes / & how syr Lamo­rak came in and ouerthrewe syr Gawayn & many other
xxj
How Kyng arthur made Kyng marke to be accorded with syr Trystram & how they departed toward Cornewayll
xxij
How syr Percyuale was made knyght of kyng arthur / and how a dombe mayde spack & brouȝt hym to the roūde table
xxiij
How syr Lamerock laye wyth kyng lots wyf / and how syr Gaheris slewe hir whiche was his owne mod [...]r ca
xxiiij
How syr agrauayn & syr Mordred mette wyth a knyght fle­yng / and how they bothe were ouerthrowen and of Syr Dynadan Capitulo
xxv
How Kyng Arthur / the quene & Launcelot receyued letters oute of Cornewayle / & of the ansuer ageyn ca
xxvj
How Syr Launcelot was wrothe wyth the letter that he re­ceyued from kyng Marke / and of Dynadan whiche made a laye of kyng Marke capitulo
xxvij
How Syr Trystram was hurte / and of a warre maad to Kynge Marke / And of Syr Trystram how he promysed to rescowe hym Capitulo
xxviij
How syr Trystram ouercame the batayl / & how Elyas desy­red a man to fyght body for body capitulo
xxix
[Page]How syr Elyas & syr Trystram faught to gyder for the tru­age / & how syr trystram slewe Elyas in the felde
xxx
How at a grete feste that kyng Marke made / an harper came and sange the lay that dynadan had made capitulo
xxxj
How kyng Marke slewe by treason his brother bowdyn for good seruyce that he had done to hym Capitulo
xxxij
How anglydes boudyns wyf escaped with hir yonge sone alisaunder le orphelyn & came to the castel of arondel
xxxiij
How anglydes gaf the blody doblet to alysaunder hir sone the same day that he was made knyȝt & the charge withal
xxxiiij
How it was tolde to kyng marke of Alysaunder. and how he wold haue slayn syr Sadok for sauyng of his lyf
xxxv
How syr Alysaunder wanne the pryce at a tournoyment and of Morgan le fay / And how he faught wyth Syr Maulgryn and slewe hym capitulo
xxxvj
How quene Morgan le fay had alysaunder in hyr castel / and how she heelyd his woundes capitulo
xxxvij
How Alysaunder was delyuerd fro the quene Morgan le fay by the moyane of a damoysel capitulo
xxxviij
How alysaunder mette wyth alys la beale pylgrym / and how he Iusted wyth two knyghtes / And after of hym and of Syr Mordred capitulo
xxxix
How sir galahalt dyd do crye a Iustes in surluse / & quene gueneuers knyȝtes shold Iuste ayenst all that wold come
xL
How syr Lancelot fought in the tournoyment / & how syr pa­lomydes dyd armes there for a damoysell Ca
xlj
How syr Galahault & syr Palomydes faught to gyder / and of syr dynadan and syr Galahault Capitulo
xlij
How syr archade appeled syr Palamydes of treason / & how syr palamydes slewe hym Capitulo
xliij
Of the thyrd day & how syr Palomydes Iusted wyth syr Lamerok and other thynges capitulo
xliiij
Of the iiij day & of many grete feates of armes ca
xlv
Of the v day & how syr Lamerok bybaued hym ca
xlvj
How palamydes fought wyth Corsabtyn for a lady / & how Palamydes slewe corsabryn
xlvij
Of the vj day & what was thenne doon ca
xlviij
Of the vij batayll / and how Syr Launcelot beyng desguysed [Page] lyke a mayde smote doun syr dynadan capitulo
xlix
How by treson syr Tristram was brought to a turnoyment for to haue be slayn / and how be was put in pryson
L
How Kyng Marke lete do counterfete letters from the pope & how syr percyual delyuerd syr Tristram oute of pryson
lj
How syr Trystram & la bele Isoude came in to englond / & how syr Launcelot brought them to Ioyous garde capitulo
lij
How by the counceyl of bele ysoude Trystram rode armed and how he mette wyth syr Palomydes capitulo
liij
Of syr Palomydes and how he mette wyth syr bleoberys & wyth syr Ector and of syr Percyuale Capitulo
liiij
How syr Trystram mette wyth syr dynadan & of their deuy­ses & what he sayd to syr Gauwayns brethern
lv
How syr Trystram smote doun syr agrauayn & syr gaheris & how syr Dynadan was sente fore by la bele Isoude
lvj
How syr Dynadan mette wyth syr Trystram / & wyth Iustyng wyth syr Palamydes syr Dynadan knewe hym
lvij
How they approched the castel Lonazep and of other deuyses of the deth of syr Lamerok Capitulo
lviij
How they came to humberbanke / & how they fonde a shyppe there wherin laye the body of Kyng Hermaunce
lix
How syr Trystram wyth his felawshyp came and were with an hoost whyche after faught wyth Syr Trystram and other maters capitulo
lx
How Palamydes wente for to fyght wyth two brethern for the deth of kyng Hermaunce Capitulo
lxj
The copye of the letter wryton for to reuenge the kynges deth and how syr palamydes faught for to haue the bataylle
lxij
Of the preparacyon of syr Palamydes & the ij brethern that shold fyght wyth hym Capitulo
lxiij
Of the batayl betwene syr Palamydes & the two brethern and how the two brethern were slayn capitulo
lxiiij
How syr Trystram and syr Palamydes mette Breuce sauns pyte and how Syr Tristram and la beale ysoude wente vnto Lonazep Capitulo
lxv
How syr Palamydes Iusted wyth syr Galyhodyn / & after wyth syr Gawayn & smote them doun
lxvj
How syr Trystram & his felaushyp cam vnto the tournement [Page] of lonezep and of dyuers Iustes and maters capitulo
lxvij
How syr Trystram and hys felaushyp Iusted & of the noble feates that they dyd in that tournoyeng
lxviij
How syr Trystram was vnhorsed & smyten doun by syr launc [...]lot / & after that syr Tristram smote doun kyng arthur
lxix
How syr Trystram chau [...]ged his harnoys & it was al reed and how he demenyd hym and how Syr Palamydes slewe Launcelottes hors Capitulo
lxx
How syr Launcelot sayd to syr Palamydes / & how the prys of that day was gyuen to syr Palamydes
lxxj
How syr dynadan prouoked syr Trystram to do wel
lxxij
How kyng Arthur & syr Launcelot came to see la bele ysoude & how Palamydes smote doun kyng arthur Capitulo
lxxiij
How the second day Palamydes forsoke syr Trystram / and wente to the contrarye partye ayenst hym capitulo
lxxiiij
How syr Trystram departed out of the felde / & awaked Sir Dynadan and chaunged his araye in to blacke ca
lxxv
How syr Palamydes chaunged his shelde & armour for to hurte sir tristram / & how syr launcelot dyd to sir tristram
lxxvj
How syr Trystram departed wyth la bele Isoude / & how Pa­lomydes folowed and excused hym capitulo
lxxvij
How kyng arthur and syr Launcelot came in to theyr pauelyons as they satte at souper / and of Palomydes
lxxviij
How syr Trystram and syr Palamydes dyd the nexte day and how kyng Arthur was vnhorsed capitulo
lxxix
How syr Trystram torned to kynge Arthurs syde / and how Syr Palomydes wolde not capitulo
lxxx
How syr bleoberis & syr Ector reported to quene Gueneuer of the beaute of la bele Isoude capitulo
lxxxj
How Palomydes complayned by a welle / & how Epynogris came and fonde hym / and of theyr bothe sorowes
lxxxij
How syr palomydes brouȝt to s [...]r epynogris his lady / & how sir palomydes & syr safer were assaylled ca
lxxxiij & lxxiiij
How syr Trystram made hym redy to rescowe Syr Palomydes but syr Launcelot rescowed hym or he came capitulo
lxxxv
How syr Trystram and syr Launcelot wyth palomydes came to Ioyous garde / of Palomydes and syr Trystram ca
lxxxvj
How there was a day sette bytwene syr Trystram and Syr [Page] palomydes for to fyght / & how sir trystram was hurte
lxxxvij
How syr palomydes kepte his day for to haue foughten / but syr Trystram myght not come / & other thynges ca
lxxxviij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xj book
How Syr Launcelot rode on his aduenture / & how he helpe a dolorous lady fro hyr payne / and how that he faught wyth a dragon capitulo
primo
How syr Launcelot came to Pelles / and of the sangreal / and how he begate galahad on Elayn kyng pelles douȝter
ij
How Syr Launcelot was dyspleasyd whan he knewe that he had layen by Elayn / & how she was desyuerd of galahad
iij
How syr bors came to dame Elayn & sawe galahad / & how he was fedde wyth the sangreal capitulo
iiij
How syr bors made syr pedyuer to yelde hym / & of meruayl­lous aduentures that he had & how he achyeued them ca
v
How syr bors departed / & how syr Launcelot was rebuked of the quene Gueneuer / and of his excuse capitulo
vj
How dame Elayn galahads moder came in grete estate to ca­melot / and how Launcelot byhaued hym there Capitulo
vij
How dame brysen by enchauntement brought syr Launcelo [...]te to Elayns bedde / & how quene gueneuer rebuked hym
viij
How dame Elayn was commaunded by quene Gueneuer to voyde the courte / & how syr Launcelot becam madde
ix
What sorowe quene gueneuer made for Syr Launcelot / & how he was sought by knyghtes of his kynne Capitulo
x
How a seruaunte of syr Aglouals was slayn / & what ven­geaunce syr aglouale & syr percyuale dyd therfore
xj
How syr percyuale departed secretelye fro his brother / & how he losed a knyght bounden with a chayne & other thynges
xij
How syr Percyuale mette wyth sir Ector / & how they faught longe and eche had almoost slayne other capitulo
xiij
How by myracle they were bothe made hole by the comyng of the holy vessel of Sangreal Capitulo
xiiij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xij book
How syr Launcelot in hys madnes took a swerde & faughte with a knyght and after lepte in to a bedde capitulo
primo
How syr Launcelot wa [...] caryed in an hors lytter / & after syr Launcelot rescowed syr blyaunte his hoost Capitulo
ij
[Page]How syr Launcelot faught ayenste a [...]ore & slewe hym / & how he was hurte / & brought to an hermytage capitulo
iij
How syr Launcelot was knowen by dame Elayn / and was borne in to a chambre & after helyd by the sangreal
iiij
How syr Launcelot after that he was hole & had his mynde he was ashamed / and how that Elayn desyred a castel for hym capitulo
v
How syr Launcelot came in to the Ioyous yle / & there he na­med hym self la chyualer malfet capitulo
vj
Of a grete tournoyeng in the Ioyous yle / and how syr Percyuale and Syr Ector came thyder and syr Percyuale fought wyth hym capitulo
vij
How eche of them knewe other / & of their curtosye / & how his brother Ector came to hym / and of theyr Ioye
viij
How syr bors & syr Lyonel came to kyng brandegore / & how syr bors toke his sone helyne le blank & of sir launcelot
ix
How syr Launcelot wyth syr Percyuale & syr ector came to the courte / and of the grete Ioye of hym capitulo
x
How la bele ysoude counceylled syr Trystram to goo vnto the courte to the grete feste of Pentecoste capitulo
xj
How syr Trystram departed vnarmed and mette with syr Palomydes / and how they smote eche other / and how Palo­mydes forbare hym capitulo
xij
How Syr Trystram gate hym harnoys of a Knyght whyche was hurte & how he ouerthrewe syr Palomoydes
xiij
How syr Trystram and syr Palamydes fought longe to gy­ders / and after accorded / and syr Trystram maad hym to be crystened Capitulo
xiiij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xiij book
How at the vygyle of the feste of Pentecoste entred in to the halle before Kyng Arthur a damoysel / and desyred syr launcelot for to come and dubbe a knyght / and how he wente wyth hyr Capitulo
primo
How the letters were founde wryton in the syege peryllous & of the meruayllous aduenture of the swerde in a stone
ij
How syr Gawayn assayed to drawe oute the swerde / & how [Page] an olde man brought in galahad capitulo
iij
How the olde man broght Galahad to the syege peryllous & sette hym therin / & how al the knyghtes meruaylled
iiij
How Kyng Arthur shewed the stone houyng on the water to Galahad and how he drewe oute the swerde
v
How kyng Arthur had al the knyghtes to gyder for to Iuste in the medowe besyde wynchester or they departed
vj
How the quene desyred to see Galahad / & after al the knyghtes were replenysshed wyth the holy sangreal / & how all they a [...]owed the enqueste of the same capitulo
vij
How grete sorowe was made of the kyng and ladyes for the departyng of the knyghtes / & how they departed
viij
How Galahad gate hym a shelde / and how they spedde that presumed to take doun the sayd shelde capitulo
ix
How Galahad departed with the shelde / and how Kyng [...]ne lake had receyued thys shelde of Ioseph of armathye
x
How Ioseph made a crosse on the whyte shelde with his blode & how galahad was by a monke brought to a tombe
xj
Of the meruayle that syr Galahad sawe & herde in the tombe and how he made melyas knyght Capitulo
xij
Of thaduenture that Melyas had / & how Galahad reuenged hym / and how melyas was caryed in to an abbey
xiij
How Galahad departed / & how he was commaunded to goo to the castel of maydens to destroye the wycked custome
xiiij
How syr Galahad faught wyth the knyghtes of the castel & destroyed the wycked custome capitulo
xv
How syr Gawayn came to thabbey for to folowe Galahad / & how he was shryuen to an heremyte Capitulo
xvj
How syr Galahad mette with syr Launcelot & with syr Percyuale / and smote hem doun and departed fro them
xvij
How syr Launcelot halfe slepyng and halfe wakyng sawe a seek man borne in a lytter / and how he was heled by the sangreal capitulo
xviij
How a voys spake to syr Launcelot / & how he fonde hi [...] hors & his helme borne awaye / & after wente a fote
xix
How syr Launcelot was shryuen & what sorowe he made / & of good ensauamples whyche were shewed to hym ca
xx
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xiiij book
[Page]How syr Percyuale came to a recluse and asked hyr coun­ceyl / & how she tolde hym that she was hys aunte ca
primo
How Merlyn lykened the rounde table to the world / and how the knyghtes that shold achyeue the sangreal shold be knowen Capitulo
ij
How syr Percyuale came in to a monasterye where he fonde Kyng Enelake whyche was an olde man capitulo
iij
How syr Percyuale sawe many men of armes beryng a dede knyght and how he fauggt ageynst them capitulo
iiij
How a yeman desyred hym to gete ageyn an hors / and how Syr Percyualles hakenay was slayn / and how he gate an hors capitulo
v
Of the grete daunger that syr Percyual was in by hys hors and how he sawe a serpent and a Lyon fyght
vj
Of the aduysyon that syr percyual sawe / and how hys aduy­syon was expowned / and of hys Lyon capitulo
vij
How syr Percyuale sawe a shyppe comyng to hym warde / & how the lady of the shyppe tolde hym of hir disherytaunce
viij
How syr Percyual promysed hir helpe & how be requyred hir of loue / and how he was saued fro the fende ca
ix
How Syr Percyual for penaunce roof hym self thorugh the thyghe / and how she was knowen for the deuyl
x
¶Here folowth the xv book whyche is of syr Launcelot
How Syr Launcelot came in to a chapel / where he fonde deed in a whyte sherte a man of relygyon / of on hondred wynter olde capitulo
primo
Of a dede man how men wold haue hewen hym / and it wolde not be / & how syr Launcelot toke the hayr of the dede man
ij
Of an aduysyon that syr Launcelot had / and how he tolde it to an heremyte / and desyred counceyll of hym capitulo
iij
How the heremyte expowned to syr Launcelot his aduysyon & tolde hym that syr Galahad was hys sone capitulo
iiij
How syr Launcelot Iusted wyth many knyghtes / & he was taken Capitulo
v
How syr Launcelot tolde hys aduysyon to a woman / & how she expowned it to hym capitulo
vj
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xvj book
How syr Gawayn was nyghe w [...]ry of the queste of sangreal & of his meruayllous dreme capitulo
primo
Of the aduysyon of syr Ector / and how he Iusted wyth syr Ewayn le auoultres hys sworne brother ca
ij
How syr Gawayn & syr Ector cam to an hermytage to be confessyd & how they tolde to the hermyte theyr aduysyons
iij
How the heremyte expowned theyr aduysyon Capitulo
iiij
Of the good counceyl that the heremyte gaf to them
v
How Syr Bors mette wyth an heremyte / and how he was confessyd to hym and of his penaunce enioyned to hym
vj
How syr bors was lodged wyth a lady and how he took on hym for to fyght ageynst a champyon for hyr lande
vij
Of a vysyon whyche Syr bors had that nyght / and how he faught and ouercame hys aduersarye capitulo
viij
How the lady was restored to hyr londes by the bataylle of syr Boors / and of his departyng / and how he mette syr Ly­onel taken and beten wyth thornes / and also a mayde which shold haue ben deuoured Capitulo
ix
How syr boors lefte to rescowe his brother. & rescowed the da­moysel / & how it was tolde hym that lyonel was dede
x
How syr boors tolde his dreme to a preest / whiche he had dre­med & of the counceyl that the preest gaf to hym
xj
How the deuyl in a womans lykenes wold haue had Syr bors to haue layen by hir / & how by goddes grace he escaped
xij
Of the holy comynycacyon of an abbot to Syr boors / and how the abbot counceylled hym capitulo
xiij
How syr boors mette wyth his brother syr Lyonel / and how syr Lyonel wolde haue slayn syr boors capitulo
xiiij
How syr Colgreuaunce fought ayenst syr Lyonel for to saue syr boors / and how the heremyte was slayn ca
xv
How syr Lyonel slewe Syr Colgreuaunce / and how after he wold haue slayn syr bors capitulo
xvj
How there came a voys whyche charged syr bors to touche not hym and of a cloude that came bytwene them capitulo
xvij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xvij bo [...]k
[Page]How syr Galahad faught at a turnement / and how he was knowen of syr gawayn & of syr ector de marr [...]s capitulo
j
How syr Galahad rode with a damoysel / & came to the shyp where as syr boors and syr Percyuale were in capitulo
ij
How syr Galahad entryd in to the shyp / & of a fayr bedde therin wyth other meruayllous thynges / & of a swerde
iij
Of the meruayles of the swerde & of the scaubard
iiij
How Kyng Pelles was smyton thorugh bothe thyes by cause he drewe the swerde / & other meruayllous hystoryes
v
How Salamon toke dauyds swerde by the counceyl of hys wyf / and of other maters meruayllous Capitulo
vj
A wonderful tale of kyng Salamon & his wyf
vij
How Galahad and hys felowes came to a castel / and how they were foughten wyth al / & how they slewe theyr aduer­saryes and other maters capitulo
viij
How the iij knyghtes wyth Percyuals syster came in to the waste forest / & of an herte & iiij Lyons and other thynges
ix
How they were desyred of a straūge custom / which they wolde not obeye / wherfore they faught & slewe many knyghtes
x
How Percyuals syster bledde a dysshe ful of blood for to hele a lady wherfore she dyed / and how that the body was put in a shyppe Capitulo
xj
How Galahad and percyuale fonde in a castel many tombes of maydens that had bledde to dethe capitulo
xij
How Syr Launcelot entred in to the shyppe where syr Percy­uales syster laye deed / and how he mette wyth Syr Galahad hys sone capitulo
xiij
How a knyght brought to syr Galahad an hors / & bad hym come from his fader syr Launcelot capitulo
xiiij
How Launcelot was tofore the dore of the chambre / wherin the holy sangreal was capitulo
xv
How syr Launcelot had layen xiiij dayes & as many nyghtes as a dede man & other dyuers maters capitulo
xvj
How syr Launcelot retorned toward logres and of other ad­uentures whyche he sawe in the waye capitulo
xvij
How Galahad came to Kyng Mordrayns / and of other maters and aduentures Capitulo
xviij
How syr Percyuale and syr boors mette wyth syr Galahad [Page] & how they came to the castel of carbonek & other maters
xix
How Galahad & his felowes were fedde of the holy sangreal & how our lord apperyd to them and other thynges
xx
How Galahad enoynted wyth the blood of the spere the maymed kyng and of other aduentures capitulo
xxj
How they were fedde wyth the sangreal whyle they were in pryson / and how Galahad was made kyng capitulo
xxij
Of the sorowe that Percyuale and boors made whan galahad was dede & of Percyuale how he dyed & other maters
xxiij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xviij book
Of the Ioye of Kyng Arthur and the quene had of thachy­euement of the sangreal / and how Launcelot fyl to hys olde loue ageyn capitulo
primo
How the quene comaunded syr Launcelot to auoyde the court and of the sorowe that Launcelot made capitulo
ij
How at a dyner that the quene made there was a knyght enpoysoned whyche syr Mador layed on the quene
iij
How syr Mador appeched the quene of treason / & there was no knyght wold fyght for hyr at the fyrst tyme
iiij
How the quene requyred syr Boors to fyght for hyr / & how he graunted vpon condycyon / and how he warned syr Launcelot therof capitulo
v
How at the day syr boors made hym redy for to fyght for the quene / & whan he shold fyȝt how another dyscharged hym
vj
How syr Launcelot fought ayenst syr mador for the quene / & how he ouercame syr Mador & dyscharged the quene
vij
How the trouthe was knowen by the mayden of the lake / and of dyuers other maters Capitulo
viij
How syr Launcelot rode to astolat / & receyued a sleue to bere vpon his helme at the requeste of a mayde capitulo
ix
How the tornoye began at wynchester and what Knyghtes were at the Iustes and other thynges capitulo
x
How sir Launcelot and syr Lauayn entred in the felde ayenst them of kyng Arthurs court / & how launcelot was hurte
xj
How syr Launcelot & syr Lauayn departed oute of the feldo and in what Ieopardye Launcelot was capitulo
xij
[Page]How Launcelot was brought to an hermyte for to be helyd of his wounde and of other maters capitulo
xiij
How syr Gawayn was lodged wyth the lord of astolat / & there had knowlege that hit was Syr Launcelot that bare the rede sleue Capitulo
xiiij
Of the sorowe that syr boors had for the hurte of Launcelot and of the angre that the quene had by cause Launcelot bare the sleue capitulo
xv
How Syr boors sought launcelot & fonde hym in the hermy­tage / & of the lamentacion bytwene them Capitulo
xvj
How syr Launcelot armed hym to assaye yf he myght bere ar­mes & how his woundes brest oute ageyn capitulo
xvij
How syr boors retorned & tolde tydynges of syr Launcelot / & of the tournoye and to whome the prys was gyuen
xviij
Of the grete lamentacyn of the fayr mayde of astolat whan Launcelot shold departe & how she dyed for his loue
xix
How the corps of the mayde of astolat arryued tofore kyng arthur and of the buryeng / and how syr Launcelot offryd the masse peny capitulo
xx
Of grete Iustes doon alle a crystemasse / and of a grete Ius­tes and tournoye ordeyned by Kyng Arthur / and of Syr Launcelot Capitulo
xxj
How Launcelot after that he was hurt of a gentylwoman came to an hermyte and of other maters capitulo
xxij
How syr Launcelot byhaued hym at the Iustes / and other men also Capitulo
xxiij
How Kyng arthur meruaylled moche of the Iustyng in the felde and how he rode & fonde syr Launcelot capitulo
xxiiij
How trewe loue is lykened to sommer Capitulo
xxv
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xix book
How quene gueneuer rode on mayeng with certeyn knyghtes of the rounde table and clad al in grene capitulo
primo
How syr Mellyagraunce toke the quene & al hyr knyghtes whyche were sore hurte in fyghtyng capitulo
ij
How syr Launcelot had word how the quene was taken / & how syr mellyagraunce layed a busshement for launcelot
iij
[Page]How syr Launcelots hors was slayn / & how how syr Launcelot rode in a carte for to rescowe the quene Capitulo
iiij
How syr Mellyagraunce requyred foryeuenes of the quene / & how she appeased syr Launcelot and other maters
v
How syr Launcelot came in the nyght to the quene and laye wyth hyr / and how syr Melyagraunce appeched the quene of treson capitulo
vj
How syr Launcelot answerd for the quene / and waged ba­taylle ayenst syr melyagraunce / and how syr Launcelot Was taken in a trappe Capitulo
vij
How syr Launcelot was delyuerd out of pryson by a lady & toke a whyt courser and came for to kepe hys day
viij
How syr Launcelot cam the same tyme that syr mellyagraūce abode hym in the felde and dressyd hym to bataylle
ix
How syr Vrre came in to arthurs courte for to be heled of his Woundes / & how kyng arthur wold begyn to handle hym
x
How Kyng arthur handled syr Vrre / and after hym many other knyghtes of the rounde table capitulo
xj
How syr Launcelot was comanded by arthur to handle hys woundes & anone he was al hool / & how they thanked god
xij
How there was a party made of an hondred knyghtes ayenst an hondred knyghtes / and of other maters capitulo
xiij
¶Here foloweth the book of the pyteous hystorye whyche is of the morte or deth of kyng Arthur / and the chapytres of the twenty book
How syr Agrauayn & syr mordred were besy vpon syr Ga­wayn for to dysclose the loue bytwene Syr Launcelot & quene Gueneuer Capitulo
primo
How syr Agrauayn d [...]sclosed theyr loue to kyng Arthur / & how Kyng Arthur gaf them lycence to take hym
ij
How syr Launcelot was espyed in the quenes chambre / and how Syr Agrauayn and Syr Mordred came wyth twelue knyghtes to slee hym Capitulo
iij
How syr Launcelot slewe syr colgreuance & armed hym in his harnoys & after slewe syr agrauayn & xij of his felawes
iiij
How Syr Launcelot came to syr bors & tolde hym how he had [Page] spedde & in what aduenture he had ben / & how he escaped
v
Of the counceyl and aduys whiche was taken by syr Laun­celot and by hys frendes for to saue the quene Capitulo
vj
How syr mordred rode hastely to the Kyng / to telle hym of thaffray & deth of syr agrauayn & the other knyghtes
vij
How syr Launcelot and hys kynnesmen rescowed the quene from the fyre and how he slewe many knyghtes
viij
Of the sorowe & lamentacyon for the dethe of hys neuewes & other good knyghtes / & also for the quene his wyf
ix
How Kyng Arthur at the requeste of syr Gawayn conclu­ded to make warre ayenst syr Launcelot / and layed syege to his castel called Ioyous garde capitulo
x
Of the comynycacyon bytwene kyng Arthur & syr Launcelot and how Kyng Arthur repreuyd hym capitulo
xj
How the cosyns & kynnesmen of syr Launcelot excyted hym to goo oute to batayl / and how they made them redy
xij
How syr Gawayn Iusted and smote doun syr Lyonel / and how syr Launcelot horsed kyng Arthur ca
xiij
How the Pope sent doun his bulles to make pees / & how syr Launcelot brought the quene to kyng Arthur
xiiij
Of the delyueraunce of the quene to the kyng by sir launcelot & what langage syr Gawayn had to syr Launcelot
xv
Of the comynycacyon bytwene syr Gawayn and syr Launce­lot wyth moche other langage capitulo
xvj
How syr Launcelot departed fro the kyng & fro Ioyous garde ouer see warde and what knyghtes wente wyth hym
xvij
How syr Launcelot passed ouer the see / & how he made grete lordes of the knyghtes that wente wyth hym capitulo
xviij
How kyng arthur & syr Gawayn made a grete hoost redy to goo ouer see to make warre on syr Launcelot capitulo
xix
What message syr Gawayn sente to syr Launcelot / & kynge Arthur layed syege to benwyck and other maters
xx
How syr launcelot & syr Gawayn dyd batayl togyder / and how syr Gawayn was ouerthrowen and hurte capitulo
xxj
Of the sorowe that kyng arthur made for the warre / & of an other batayl where also syr Gawayn had the werse
xxij
¶Here folowen the chapytres of the xxj book
[Page]How Syr Mordred presumed & toke on hym to be kyng of englond / & wold haue maryed the quene his faders wyf ca
j
How after that kyng arthur had tydynges / he retorned and came to douer where syr Mordred mette hym to lette his lan­dyng / and of the deth of Syr Gawayn Capitulo
ij
How after syr Gawayns ghoost apperyd to kynge arthur & warned hym that he shold not fyght that day capitulo
iij
How by mysaduenture of an adder the batayl began / where Mordred Was slayn and arthur hurte to the deth
iiij
How Kyng arthur comanded to caste his swerd excalybur in to the water / & how he was delyuerd to ladyes in a barge
v
How syr bedwere fonde hym on the morne deed in an hermy­tage / and how he abode there wyth the hermyte capitulo
vj
Of thoppynyon of semme men of the deth of kyng arthur / & how quene Gueneuer made hir a nonne in almesburye
vij
How whan syr Launcelot herde of the deth of kynge arthur & of syr Gawayn and other maters came in to englond
viij
How syr Launcelot departed to seche the quene Gueneuer and how he fonde hir at almesburye capitulo
ix
How Syr Launcelot came to thermytage where tharchebysshop of caunterburye was / & how he toke thabyte on hym
x
How syr Launcelot wente wyth his seuen felowes to amesburye / & fonde there quene Gueneuer deed / whom they brought to glastynburye capitulo
xj
How syr Launcelot began to sekene / & after dyed / whos body was borne to Ioyous garde for to be buryed capitulo
xij
How syr Ector fonde syr launcelot hys brother dede / and how Constantyn reygned next after Arthur / and of the ende of thys book capitulo
xiij
¶Explicit the table

¶Capitulum primum

HIt befel in the dayes of Vther pendragon when he was kynge of all Englond / and so regned that there was a myȝty duke in Cornewaill that helde warre ageynst hym long tyme / And the duke was called the duke of Tyntagil / and so by meanes kynge Vther send for this duk / chargyng hym to brynge his wyf with hym / for she was called a fair lady / and a passynge wyse / and her name was called Igrayne / So whan the duke and his wyf were comyn vnto the kynge by the meanes of grete lordes they were accorded bothe / the ky­nge lyked and loued this lady wel / and he made them grete chere oute of mesure / and desyred to haue lyen by her / But she was a passyng good woman / and wold not assente vnto the kynge / And thenne she told the duke her husband and said I suppose that we were sente for that I shold be dishonoured Wherfor husband I counceille yow that we departe from hens sodenly that we maye ryde all nyghte vnto oure owne castell / and in lyke wyse as she saide so they departed / that neyther the kynge nor none of his counceill were ware of their depar­tyng Also soone as kyng Vther knewe of theire departyng soo sodenly / he was wonderly wrothe / Thenne he called to hym his pryuy counceille / and told them of the sodeyne departyng of the duke and his wyf /

¶ Thenne they auysed the kynge to send for the duke and his wyf by a grete charge / And yf he Wille not come at yo­ur somōs / thenne may ye do your best / thenne haue ye cause to make myghty werre vpon hym / Soo that was done and the messagers hadde their ansuers / And that was thys shortly / that neyther he nor his wyf wold not come at hym / Thenne was the kyng wonderly wroth / And thenne the kyng sente hym playne word ageyne / and badde hym be redy and stuffe hym and garnysshe hym / for within xl dayes he wold fetche hym oute of the byggest castell that he hath /

¶ Whanne the duke hadde thys warnynge / anone he wente and furnysshed and garnysshed two stronge Castels of his of the whiche the one hyght Tyntagil / & the other castel hyȝt [Page] Terrabyl / So his wyf Dame Igrayne he putte in the castell of Tyntagil / And hym self he putte in the castel of Terrabyl the whiche had many yssues and posternes oute / Thenne in all haste came Vther with a grete hoost / and leyd a syege a­boute the castel of Terrabil / And ther he pyght many pauel­yons / and there was grete warre made on bothe partye & / and moche peple slayne / Thenne for pure angre and for grete lo­ue of fayr Igrayne the kyng Vther felle seke / So came to the kynge Vther Syre Vlfius a noble knyght / and asked the kynge why he was seke / I shall telle the said the kynge / I am seke for angre and for loue of fayre Igrayne that I may not be hool / wel my lord said Syre Vlfius / I shal seke Merlyn / and he shalle do yow remedy that youre herte shalbe ple­asyd / So vlfius departed / and by aduenture he mette Mer­lyn in a beggars aray / and ther Merlyn asked Vlfius who­me he soughte / and he said he had lytyl ado to telle hym / Well saide Merlyn / I knowe whome thou sekest / for thou sekest Merlyn / therfore seke no ferther / for I am he / and yf kynge Vther wille wel rewarde me / and be sworne vnto me to ful­fille my desyre that shall be his honour & profite more thā myn for I shalle cause hym to haue alle his desyre / Alle this wyll I vndertake said Vlfius that ther shalle be nothyng resona­ble / but thow shalt haue thy desyre / well said Merlyn / he shall haue his entente and desyre / And therfore saide Merlyn / ryde on your wey / for I wille not be long behynde

Capitulum Secundum

THenne Vlfius was glad and rode on more than a paas tyll that he came to kynge Vtherpendragon / and told hym he had met with Merlyn / where is he said the kyng sir said Vlfius he wille not dwelle long / ther with al Vlfius was ware where Merlyn stood at the porche of the pauelions dore / And thenne Merlyn was bounde to come to the kynge whan kyng Vther sawe hym he said he was welcome / syr sa­id Merlyn I knowe al your hert euery dele / so ye wil be sworn vnto me as ye be a true kynge enoynted to fulfille my desyre ye shal haue your desyre / thenne the kyng was sworne vpon the iiij euuāgelistes / Syre said Merlyn this is my desyre / the first nyȝt yt ye shal lye by Igrayne ye shal gete a child on her & [Page] whan that is borne that it shall be delyuerd to me for to nou­risshe there as I wille haue it / for it shal be your worship / & the childis auaille as mykel as the child is worth / I wylle wel said the kynge as thow wilt haue it / Now make you redy said Merlyn this nyght ye shalle lye with Igrayne in the castel of Tyntigayll / & ye shalle be lyke the duke her husband Vlfyus shal be lyke Syre Brastias / a knyghte of the dukes And I will be lyke a knyghte that hyghte Syr Iordanus a knyghte of the dukes / But wayte ye make not many questi­ons with her nor her men / but saye ye are diseased and soo hye yow to ledde / and ryse not on the morne tyll I come to yow / for the castel of Tyntygaill is but x myle hens / soo this was done as they deuysed / But the duke of Tyntigail aspyed hou the kyng rode fro the syege of tarabil / & therfor that nyghte he yssued oute of the castel at a posterne for to haue distressid the kynges hooste / And so thorowe his owne yssue the duke hym self was slayne or euer the kynge cam at the castel of Tynti­gail / so after the deth of the duke kyng Vther lay with Igra­yne more than thre houres after his deth / and begat on her that nygȝ arthur / & or day cam Merlyn cā to the kyng / & had hym make hym redy / & so he kist the lady Igrayne and departed in all hast / But whan the lady herd telle of the duke her husbād and by all record he was dede or euer kynge Vther came to her thenne she merueilled who that myghte be that laye with her in lykenes of her lord / so she mourned pryuely and held hir pees / Thenne alle the barons by one assent prayd the Kynge of accord betwixe the lady Igrayne and hym / the kynge gaf hem leue / for fayne wold he haue hen acoorded with her / Soo the kyng put alle the trust in Vlfyus to entrete bitwene them so by the entrete at the last the kyng & she met to gyder / Now wille we doo wel said Vlfyus / our kyng is a lusty knyghte and wyueles / & my lady Igrayne is a passynge fair lady / it were grete ioye vnto vs all and hit myghte please the kynge to make her his quene / vnto that they all well acoordd and meued it to the kynge / And anone lyke a lusty knyghte / he assentid therto with good wille / and so in alle haste they were maryed in a mornynge with grete myrthe and Ioye / And Kynge Lott of Lowthean and of Orkenay thenne [Page] wedded Margawse that was Gaweyns moder / And kynge Nentres of the land of Garlot wedded Elayne / Al this was done at the request of kynge Vther / And the thyrd syster morgan [...]efey was put to soole in a nonnery / And ther she lerned so moche that she was a grete Clerke of Nygromancye / And after she was wedded to kynge Vryens of the lond of Gore that was Syre Ewayns le blaunche maynys fader /

Capitulum tercium

THēne quene Igrayne waxid dayly gretter & gretter / so it befel after within half a yere as kyng Vther lay by his quene he asked hir by the seith she ouȝt to hym whos was the child within her body / thēne was she sore abasshed to yeue ansuer / Desmaye you not said the kyng but telle me the tro­uthe / and I shall loue you the better by the feythe of my body Syre saide she I shalle telle you the trouthe / the same nyghte yt my lord was dede the houre of his deth as his knyȝtes record ther came in to my castel of Tyntigaill a man lyke my lord in speche and in countenaunce / and two knyghtes with hym in lykenes of his two knyghtes barcias and Iordans / & soo I went vnto led with hym as I ouȝt to do with my lord / & the same nyght as I shal ansuer vnto god this child was begoten vpon me / that is trouthe saide the kynge as ye say / for it was I my self that cam in the lykenesse / & therfor desmay you not for I am fader to the child / & ther he told her alle the cause / how it was by Merlyns counceil / thenne the quene made gre­te ioye whan she knewe who was the fader of her child / Sone come merlyn vnto the kyng / & said syr ye must puruey yow / for the nourisshyng of your child / as thou wolt said the kyng be it / wel said Merlyn I knowe a lord of yours in this land that is a passyng true man & a feithful / & he shal haue the nourysshyng of your child / & his name is sir Ector / & he is a lord of fair lyuelode in many partyes in Englond & walys / & this lord sir ector lete hym be sent for / for to come & speke with you / & desyre hym your self as he loueth you that he will put his owne child to nourisshynge to another woman / and that his wyf nourisshe yours / And whan the child is borne lete it be delyuerd to me at yōder pryuy posterne vncrystned / So like [Page] as Merlyn deuysed it was done / And whan syre Ector was come / he made fyaūce to the kyng for to nourisshe the child ly­ke as the Kynge desyred / and there the kyng graunted syr ec­tor grete rewardys / Thenne when the lady was delyuerd the kynge commaunded ij knyghtes & ij ladyes to take the child bound in a cloth of gold / & that ye delyuer hym to what pou­re man ye mete at the posterne yate of the castel / So the child was delyuerd vnto Merlyn / and so he bare it forth vnto Syre Ector / and made an holy man to crysten hym / and named hym Arthur / and so sir Ectors wyf nourysshed hym with her owne pappe / Thenne within two yeres kyng Vther felle seke of a grete maladye / And in the meane whyle hys enemyes Vsurpped vpon hym / and dyd a grete bataylle vpon his men / and slewe many of his peple / Sir said Merlyn ye may not lye so as ye doo / for ye must to the feld though ye ryde on an hors lyttar / for ye shall neuer haue the better of your enemyes / but yf your persone be there / and thenne shall ye haue the vyctory So it was done as Merlyn had deuysed / and they caryed the kynge forth in an hors lyttar with a grete hooste towarde his enemyes / And at saynt Al [...]ons ther mette with the kynge a grete hoost of the north / And that day Syre Vlfyus and sir Bracias dyd grete dedes of armes / and kyng Vthers men o­uercome the northeryn bataylle and slewe many peple & putt the remenaunt to flight / And thenne the kyng retorned vnto london and made grete ioye of his vyctory / And thēne he fyll passynge sore seke / so that thre dayes & thre nyghtes he was specheles / wherfore alle the barons made grete sorow and asked Merlyn what counceill were best / There nys none other reme­dye said Merlyn but god wil haue his wille / But loke ye al Barons be bifore kynge Vther to morne / and god and I shalle make hym to speke / So on the morne alle the Barons with merlyn came to fore the kyng / thēne Merlyn said aloud vnto kyng Vther / Syre shall your sone Arthur be kyng after your dayes of this realme with all the appertenaunce / thenne Vtherpend [...]agon torned hym and said in herynge of them alle I gyue hym gods blissyng & myne / & byd hym pray for my soule / & righteuously & worshipfully that he clayme ye croune vpon forfeture of my blessyng / & therwith he yelde vp the ghost & [Page] thenne was he enterid as longed to a kyng / wherfor the que­ne fayre Igrayne made grete sorowe and alle the Barons / Thenne stood the reame in grete ieopardy long whyle / for euery lord that was myghty of men maade hym stronge / and ma­ny wende to haue ben kyng / Thenne Merlyn wente to the ar­chebisshop of Caunterbury / and counceilled hym for to sende for alle the lordes of the reame / and alle the gentilmen of ar­mes that they shold to london come by Cristmas vpon payne of cursynge / And for this cause yt Ihu that was borne on that nyghte that he wold of his grete mercy shewe some myracle / as he was come to be kynge of mankynde for to shewe somme myracle who shold be rightwys kynge of this reame / So the Archebisshop by the aduys of Merlyn send for alle the lordes and gentilmen of armes that they shold come by crystmasse euen vnto london / And many of hem made hem clene of her lyf that her prayer myghte be the more acceptable vnto god / Soo in the grettest chirch of london whether it were Powlis or not the Frensshe booke maketh no mencyon / alle the estates were longe or day in the chirche for to praye / And whan matyns & the first masse was done / there was sene in the chircheyard a­yēst the hyhe aulter a grete stone four square lyke vnto a marbel stone / And in myddes therof was lyke an Anuylde of stele a foot on hyghe / & theryn stack a fayre swerd naked by the poynt / and letters / there were wryten in gold aboute the swerd that saiden thus / who so pulleth oute this swerd of this stone and anuyld / is rightwys kynge borne of all En­lond / Thenne the peple merueilled & told it to the Archebisshop I commande said tharchebisshop that ye kepe yow within your chirche / and pray vnto god still that no man touche the suerd tyll the hyhe masse be all done / So whan all masses were done all the lordes wente to beholde the stone and the swerd / And whan they sawe the scripture / som assayed suche as wold haue ben kyng / But none myght stere the swerd nor meue hit He is not here said the Archebisshop that shall encheue the swerd but doubte not god will make hym knowen / But this is my counceill said the archebisshop / that we lete puruey x knyȝtes men of good fame / & they to kepe this swerd / so it was ordeydeyned / & thēne ther was made a crye / yt euery mā shold assay yt [Page] Wold for to wynne the swerd / And vpon newe yeersday the barons lete maake a Iustes and a tournement / that alle knyȝtes shat wold Iuste or tourneye / there myȝt playe / & all this was ordeyned for to kepe the lordes to gyders & the comyns / for the Archebisshop trusted / that god wold make hym knowe that shold wynne the swerd / So vpon newe yeresday whan the seruyce was done / the barons rode vnto the feld / some to Iuste / & som to torney / & so it happed that syre Ector that had grete lyuelode aboute london rode vnto the Iustes / & with hym rode syr kaynus his sone & yong Arthur that was hys nouris­shed broder / & syr kay was made knyȝt at al halowmas afore So as they rode to ye Iustes ward / sir kay had lost his suerd for he had lefte it at his faders lodgyng / & so he prayd yong Arthur for to ryde for his swerd / I wyll wel said Arthur / & ro­de fast after yt swerd / & whan he cam home / the lady & al were out to see the Ioustyng / thenne was Arthur wroth & saide to hym self / I will ryde to the chircheyard / & take the swerd with me that stycketh in the stone / for my broder sir kay shal not be without a swerd this day / so whan he cam to the chircheyard sir Arthur aliȝt & tayed his hors to the style / & so he wente to the tent / & found no knyȝtes there / for they were atte Iustyng & so he handled the swerd by the handels / and liȝtly & fiersly pulled it out of the stone / & took his hors & rode his way vntyll he came to his broder sir kay / & delyuerd hym the swerd / & as sone as sir kay saw the swerd he wist wel it was the swerd of the stone / & so he rode to his fader syr Ector / & said / sire / loo here is the swerd of the stone / wherfor I must be kyng of thys land / when syre Ector beheld the swerd / he retorned ageyne & cam to the chirche / & there they aliȝte al thre / & wente in to the chirche / And anon he made sir kay to swere vpon a book / how he came to that swerd / Syr said sir kay by my broder Arthur for he brought it to me / how gate ye this swerd said sir Ector to Arthur / sir I will telle you when I cam home for my bro­ders swerd / I fond no body at home to delyuer me his swerd And so I thought my broder syr kay shold not be swerdles & so I cam hyder egerly & pulled it out of the stone withoute ony payn / found ye ony knyȝtes about this swerd seid sir ector Nay said Arthur / Now said sir Ector to Arthur I vnderstāde [Page] ye must be kynge of this land / wherfore I / sayd Arthur and for what cause / Sire saide Ector / for god wille haue hit soo for ther shold neuer man haue drawen oute this swerde / but he that shal be rightwys kyng of this land / Now lete me see whether ye can putte the swerd ther as it was / and pulle hit oute ageyne / that is no maystry said Arthur / and soo he put it in the stone / therwith alle Sir Ector assayed to pulle oute the swerd and faylled

¶Capitulum sextum

NOw assay said Syre Ector vnto Syre kay / And a­non he pulled at the swerd with alle his myghte / but it wold not be / Now shal ye assay said Syre Ector to Arthur I wyll wel said Arthur and pulled it out easily / And [...]her with alle Syre Ector knelyd doune to the erthe and Syre Kay / Allas said Arthur myne own dere fader and broder why knole ye to me / Nay nay my lord Arthur / it is not so I was neuer your fader nor of your blood / but I wote wel ye are of an hyher blood than I wende ye were / And thenne Syre Ec­tor told hym all how he was bitaken hym for to nourisshe hym And by whoos commandement / and by Merlyns delyueraūce ¶Thenne Arthur made grete doole whan he vnderstood that Syre Ector was not his fader / Sir said Ector vnto Arthur woll ye be my good & gracious lord when ye are kyng / els were I to blame said arthur for ye are the man in the world that I am most be holdyng to / & my good lady & moder your wyf that as wel as her owne hath fostred me and kepte / And yf euer hit be goddes will that I be kynge as ye say / ye shall desyre of me what I may doo / and I shalle not faille yow / god forbede I shold faille yow / Sir said Sire Ector / I will aske no more of yow / but that ye wille make my sone your foster broder Syre Kay Seu [...]all of alle your landes / That shalle be done said Arthur / and more by the feith of my body that neuer man shalle haue that office but he whyle he and I ly [...]e / There with all they wente vnto the Archebisshop / and told hym how the swerd was encheued / and by whome / and on twelfth day alle the barons cam thyder / and to assay to take the swerd who that wold assay / But there afore hem alle ther myghte none take it out but Arthur / wherfor ther were many lordes wroth [Page] And saide it was grete shame vnto them all and the reame to be ouer gouernyd with a boye of no hyghe blood borne / and so they fell oute at that tyme that it was put of tyll Candel­mas / And thenne alle the barons shold mete there ageyne / but alwey the x knyghtes were ordeyned to watche the swerd day & nyȝt / & so they sette a pauelione ouer the stone & ye swerd & fyue alwayes watched / Soo at Candalmasse many moo grete lordes came thyder for to haue wonne the swerde / but there myghte none preuaille / And right as Arthur dyd at Crist­masse / he dyd at Candelmasse and pulled oute the swerde e­asely wherof the Barons were sore agreued and put it of in delay till the hyghe feste of Eester / And as Arthur sped a­fore / so dyd he at Eester / yet there were some of the grete lordes had indignacion that Arthur shold be kynge / and put it of in a delay tyll the feest of Pentecoste / Thenne the Archebisshop of Caunterbury by Merlyns prouydence lete purueye thenne of the best knyghtes that they myghte gete / And suche knygh­tes as Vtherpendragon loued best and moost trusted in his dayes / And suche knyghtes were put aboute Arthur as syr Bawdewyn of Bretayn / syre kaynes / syre Vlfyus / syre bar­sias / All these with many other were alweyes about Arthur day and nyghte till the feste of Pentecost

¶Capitulum sextimum

ANd at the feste of pentecost alle maner of men assayed to pulle at the swerde that wold assay / but none my­ghte preuaille but Arthur / and pulled it oute afore all the lordes and comyns that were there / wherfore alle the comyns cryed at ones we wille haue Arthur vnto our kyng we wille put hym nomore in delay / for we alle see that it is goddes wille that he shalle be our kynge / And who that hol­deth ageynst it we wille slee hym / And therwith all they knelyd at ones both ryche and poure / and cryed Arthur mercy by cause they had delayed hym so longe / and Arthur foryaf hem / and took the swerd bitwene both his handes / and offred it vpon the aulter where the Archebisshop was / and so was he made knyghte of the best man that was there / And so anon [Page] was the coronacyon made / And ther was he sworne vnto his lordes & the comyns for to be a true kyng to stand with true Iustyce fro thens forth the dayes of this lyf / Also thēne he made alle lordes that helde of the croune to come in / and to do ser­uyce as they oughte to doo / And many complayntes were made vnto sir Arthur of grete wronges that were done syn the dethe of kyng Vther / of many londes that were hereued lordes knyghtes / ladyes & gentilmen / wherfor kynge Arthur maade the londes to be yeuen ageyne vnto them that oughte hem / ¶whanne this was done that the kyng had stablisshed alle the countreyes aboute london / thenne he lete make Syr kay sencial of Englond / and sir Baudewyn of Bretayne was made Constable / and sir Vlfyus was made chamberlayn / And sire Brastias was maade wardeyn to wayte vpon the northe fro Trent forwardes for it was ye tyme yt most party the kynges enemyes / But within fewe yeres after Arthur wan alle the north scotland / and alle that were vnder their obeissannce / Also walys a parte of it helde ayenst Arthur / but he ouercam hem al as he dyd the remenaunt thurgh the noble prowesse of hym self and his knyghtes of the round table

¶Capitulum octauum

THenne the kyng remeued in to walys / and lete crye a grete feste that it shold be holdyn at Pentecost after the incoronacion of hym at the Cyte of Carlyon / vnto the fest come kyng Lott of Lowthean / and of Orkeney / with fyue C knyȝtes with hym / Also ther come to the feste kynge Vryens of gore with four C knyȝtes with hym ¶ Also ther come to that feeste kyng Nayntres of garloth with seuen C knyghtes with hym / Also ther came to the feest the kynge of Scotland with sixe honderd knyghtes with hym / and he was but a yong man / Also ther came to the feste a kyng that was called the kyng with the honderd knyghtes / but he and his men were passyng wel bisene at al poyntes Also ther cam the kyng of Cardos with fyue honderd knyghtes / And kyng Arthur was glad of their comynge / for he wende that al the kynges and knyghtes had come for grete loue / and to haue done hym worship at his feste / wherfor the kyng made grete io­ye / and sente the kynges and knyghtes grete presentes / But [Page] the kynges wold none receyue / but rebuked the messagers shamefully / and said they had no ioye to receyue no yeftes of a berdles boye that was come of lowe blood / and sente hym word / they wold none of his yeftes / But that they were co­me to gyue hym yeftes with hard swerdys betwixt the neck and the sholders / And therfore they came thyder / so they told to the messagers playnly / for it was grete shame to all them to see suche a boye to haue a rule of soo noble a reaume as this land was / with this ansuer the messagers departed & told to kyng Arthur this ansuer / wherfor by the aduys of his ba­rons he took hym to a strong towre with / v / C good men with hym / And all the kynges afore said in a maner leyd a syege tofore hym / but kyng Arthur was well vytailled / And with in xv dayes ther came Merlyn amonge hem in to the Cyte of Carlyon / thenne all the kynges were passyng gladde of Merlyn / and asked hym for what cause is that boye Arthur made your kynge / Syres said Merlyn / I shalle telle yow the cause for he is kynge Vtherpendragons sone borne in wedlok goten on Igrayne the dukes wyf of Tyntigail / thenne is he a bas­tard they said al / nay said Merlyn / After the deth of the du­ke more than thre houres was Arthur begoten / And xiij da­yes after kyng Vther wedded Igrayne / And therfor I preue hym he is no bastard / And who saith nay / he shal be kyng and ouercome alle his enemyes / And or he deye / he shalle be long kynge of all Englond / and haue vnder his obeyssaunce walys / yrland and Scotland / and moo reames than I will now reherce / Some of the kynges had merueyl of Merlyns wordes and demed well that it shold be as he said / And som of hem lough hym to scorne / as kyng Lot / and mo other cal­led hym a wytche / But thenne were they accorded with Merlyn that kynge Arthur shold come oute and speke with the kynges / and to come sauf and to goo sauf / suche suraunce ther was made / So Merlyn went vnto kynge Arthur / and told hym how he had done / and badde hym fere not but come oute boldly and speke with hem / and spare hem not / but ansuere them as their kynge and chyuetayn / for ye shal ouercome hem all whether they wille or nylle /

¶Capitulum ix

[Page]THenne kynge Arthur came oute of his tour / and had vnder his gowne a Iesseraunte of double maylle / and ther wente with hym the Archebisshop of Caunterbury / and syr Baudewyn of Bretayne and syr kay / and syre Brastias / these were the men of moost worship that were with hym / And whan they were mette / there was no mekenes but stoute wordes on bothe sydes / but alweyes kynge Arthur ansuerd them and said / he wold make them to bowe and he lyued wherfore they departed with wrath / and kynge Arthur badde kepe hem wel / and they bad the kynge kepe hym wel / Soo the kynge retornyd hym to the toure ageyne and armed hym and alle his knyȝtes / what will ye do said Merlyn to the kynges ye were better for to stynte / for ye shalle not here preuaille tho­ugh ye were x so many / be we wel auysed to be aferd of a dreme reder said kyng Lot / with that Merlyn vanysshed aweye / and came to Kynge Arthur / and bad hym set on hem fiersly / & in the mene whyle there were thre honderd good men of the best that were with the kynges / that wente streyghte vnto kynge Arthur / and that comforted hym gretely / Syr said Merlyn to Arthur / fyghte not with the swerde that ye had by myracle / til that ye see ye go vnto the wers / thenne drawe it out and do your best / So forth with alle kynge Arthur sette vpon hem in their lodgyng / And syre Bawdewyn syre Kay and syr Brastias slewe on the right hand & on the lyfte hand that it was merueylle / and alweyes Kynge Arthur on horsback leyd on with a swerd and dyd merueillous dedes of armes that ma­ny of the kynges had grete ioye of his dedes and hardynesse / Thenne Kynge Lot brake out on the bak syde / and the kyng with the honderd knyghtes and kyng Carados / and sette on Arthur fiersly behynde hym / with that Syre Arthur torned with his knyghtes / and smote behynd and before / and euer sir Arthur was in the formest prees tyl his hors was slayne vndernethe hym / And therwith kynge lot smote doune kyng Arthur / with that his four knyghtes receyued hym and set hym on horsback / thēne he drewe his swerd Excalibur / but it was so bryght in his enemyes eyen / that it gaf light lyke xxx torchys / And therwith he put hem on bak / and slewe moche peple And thenne the comyns of Carlyon aroos with clubbis and [Page] stauys and slewe many knyghtes / but alle the kynges helde them to gyders with her knyghtes that were lefte on lyue / and so fled and departed / And Merlyn come vnto Arthur / and counceilled hym to folowe hem no further

¶Ca / x

SO after the feste and iourneye kynge Arthur drewe hym vnto london / and soo by the counceil of Merlyn the kyng lete calle his barons to coūceil / for Merlyn had told the kynge that the sixe kynges that made warre vpon hym wold in al haste be awroke on hym & on his landys wherfor the kyng asked counceil at hem al / they coude no counceil gyue but said they were bygge ynough / ye saye wel said Arthur / I thanke you for your good courage / but wil ye al that loueth me speke with Merlyn ye knowe wel that he hath done moche for me / and he knoweth many thynges / & whan he is afore you / I wold that ye prayd hym hertely of his best auyse / Alle the barone sayd they wold pray hym and desyre hym / Soo Merlyn was sente for & fair desyred of al the ba­rons to gyue them best counceil / I shall say you said Merlyn I warne yow al / your enemyes are passyng strong for yow / and they are good men of armes as ben on lyue / & by thys tyme they haue goten to them four kynges mo / and a myghty duke / and onlesse that our kyng haue more chyualry with hym than he may make within ye boundys of his own reame and he fyghte with hem in batail / he shal be ouercome & slayn what were best to doo in this cause said al the barons / I shal telle you said Merlyn myne aduys / there ar two bretheren be­yond the see / & they be kynges bothe and merueillous good men of her handes / And that one hyghte Kynge Ban of Benwic And that other hyght Kyng Bors of gaule that is Fraunce And on these two Kynges warrith a myghty man of men the Kynge Claudas / and stryueth with hem for a castel / and grete werre is betwixt them / But this Claudas is so myghty of goodes wherof he geteth good Knyȝtes that he putteth these two kynges moost parte do the werse / wherfor this is my counceil that our kyng and souerayne lord sende vnto the kynges Ban and Bors by two trusty knyghtes with letters wel deuysed / that and they wil come and see kynge Arthur and his courte / & so helpe hym in his warrys that he wil be sworne [Page] vnto them to helpe them in their warrys ageynst kynge Clau­das / Now what saye ye vnto this counceill said Merlyn / thys is wel counceilled said the kynge & alle the Barons / right so in alle haste ther were ordeyned to goo two knyghtes on the message vnto the two kynges / Soo were there made letters in the plesaunt wyse accordyng vnto kyng Arthurs desyre / Vl­fyus and Brastias were made the messagers / & so rode forth wel horsed and wel armed / and as the gyse was that tyme & so passed the see & rode toward the cyte of Benwyck / and there besydes were viij knyghtes that aspyed them / And at a strayt passage they mette with Vlfyus & Brastias / & wold haue taken hem prysoners / so they prayd hem that they myght passe / for they were messagers vnto kyng Ban & Bors sent from kynge Arthur / therfor said the viij knyghtes ye shalle dye or be prysoners / for we ben knyghtes of kyng Claudas And therwith two of them dressid their sperys / and Vlfyus and Brastias dressid theire speres and ranne to gyder with grete raundon / And Claudas knyghtes brack their speres / and ther to hylde and bare the two knyghtes out of her sadels to the erthe / and so lefte hem lyeng and rode her wayes / And the other sixe knyghtes rode afore to a passage to mete wyth hem ageyne / and so Vlfyus & Brastias smote other two doun And so past on her wayes / And at the fourth passage there mette two for two / and bothe were leid vnto the erthe / so ther was none of the viij knyghtes but he was sore hurte or brysed And whan they come to Benwick it fortuned ther were both kynges Ban and Bors / And whan it was told the kynges that there were come messagers / there were sente vnto them ij knyghtes of worship / the one hyghte Lyonses lord of the co­untrey of payarne and Sir phariaunce a worshipful knyght Anone they asked from whens they came / and they said from kynge Arthur kyng of Englond / so they took them in theyre armes and made grete ioye eche of other / But anon as the ij kynges wist they were messagers of Arthurs / ther was ma­de no taryenge / but forthwith they spak with the knyghtes / & welcomed hem in the feythfullest wyse / & said / they were most welcome vnto them before alle the kynges lyuynge [...] / and ther with they kyst the letters & delyuerd hem / And whan Ban [Page] and Bors vnderstood the letters / thenne were they more welcome than they were before / And after the hast of the letters / they gaf hem this ansuer that they wold fulfille the desyre of kynge Arthurs wrytyng & Vlfyus & Brastias tary there as longe as they wold / they shold haue suche chere as myghte be made them in tho marchys / Thenne Vlfyus & Brastias told the kyng of the aduēture at their passages of the eyghte knyȝ­tes / Ha A said Ban and Bors they were my good frendes I wold I had wyst of hem they shold not haue escaped so So Vlfius & Brastias had good chere and grete yeftes as moche as they myghte bere awey / and hadde their ansuere by mouthe and by wrytynge that tho two Kynges wold come vnto Arthur in all the hast that they myȝte / So the two Kny­tes rode on a fore / and passed the see / and come to their lord and told hym how they had spedde / wherof Kynge Arthur was passyng gladde / At what tyme suppose ye / the ij Kynges wol be here / Syr said they afore all halowmasse / Thenne the kynge lete puruey for a grete feeste / and lete crye a grete Iustes / And by all halowmasse the two kynges were come ouer the see with thre honderd knyȝtes wel arayed both for the pees and for the werre / And kyng Arthur mette with hem x my­le oute of london / and ther was grete ioye as coude be thouȝt or made / And on al halowmasse at the grete feeste sate in the halle the thre kynges / and syre kay sencial serued in the halle And Syr lucas the bottelere that was duke Corneus sone / & sir gryflet that was the sone of Cardol / these iij knyȝtes had the rule of alle the seruyse that serued the kynges / And anon as they had wasshen & rysen / al knyȝtes that wold Iuste made hem redy / by than they were redy on horsbak there were vij C knyghtes / And Arthur Ban & Bors with the Archebis­shop of Caunterbury / and syre Ector kays fader they were in a place couerd with clothe of gold lyke an halle with ladyes and gentilwymmen for to behold who dyd best and theron to gyue Iugement

¶Capitulum xj

ANd kynge Arthur and the two Kynges lete departe the vij C knyghtes in two partyes And there were iij C knyghtes of the reame of Benwick and of gau­le torned on the other syde than they dressid her sheldes / and [Page] beganne to couche her speres many good knyghtes / So Gryf­let was the first that mette with a knyghte one ladynas and they mett so egerly that al men hadde wonder / And they soo faughte that her sheldes felle to pyeces / and hors and man felle to the erthe / And bothe the frensshe knyghte and the Englysshe knyghte lay so longe that alle men wend they had ben dede / whan lucas the botteler sawe Gryflet soo lye / he horsed hym ageyne anon / and they two dyd merueillous dedes of armes with many bachelers / Also syre kay came oute of an en­busshement with fyue knyghtes with hym / and they sixe smo­te other sixe doune / But syr kay dyd that day merueillous dedes of armes / that ther was none dyd so wel as he that day Thenne ther come ladynas & Grastian two knyghtes of fra­unce / and dyd passynge wel that all men preysed them / Thenne come there Syre placidas a good knyghte and mette with syr kay and smote hym doune hors and man / wherfore Syre gryflet was wrothe and mette with Syre placidas soo harde that hors and man felle to the erthe / But whan the / v / knyghtes wyst that syr kay had a falle they were wrothe out of wyt / And therwith eche of them / v / bare doune a knyghte / whanne kyng Arthur and the two kynges sawe hem begyn waxe wrothe on bothe partyes / they lepte on smale hakeneis / and lete crye that all men shold departe vnto their lodgynge And so they wente home and vnarmed them and so to euen songe and souper / And after the thre kynges wente in to a gardyn / and gaf the pryce vnto syre kay and to lucas the bot­telere / and vnto Syre Gryflet / And thenne they wente vnto connceil / and with hem gwenbaus the brother vnto syr Ban & Bors a wyse Clerk / and thyder wente Vlfyus and Bras­tias and Merlyn / And after they had ben in counceill / they wente vn to bedde / And on the morne they herde masse and to dyner / and so to their counceille and made many argumentis what were best to doo / At the last they were concluded / that Merlyn shold goo with a token of kyng Ban and that was a rynge vnto his men and kynge Bors and Gracian & pla­cidas sholde goo ageyne and kepe theire castels and her coun­treyes / as for kynge Ban of Benwick and kynge Bors of Gaules had ordeyned hem / and so passed the see and came to [Page] Benwyck / And whan the peple sawe kyng Bans rynge & gracian and placidas they were glad / and asked how the kynges ferd / and made grete ioye of their welfare and cordyng / and accordynge vnto the souerayne lordes desyre / the men of warre made hem redy in al hast possyble / soo that they were xv M on hors and foot / and they had grete plente of vytaylle with hem by Merlyns prouysyon / But gracian and placidas were lefte to furnysshe and garnysshe the castels for drede of kynge Claudas / ryght so Merlyn passed the see wel vytailled bothe by water and by land / And whan he came to the see / he sente home the foote men ageyne and took no mo with hym / but x M men on horsbak the moost parte men of armes and so shypped and passed the see in to Englond / and londed at Douer / and thorow the wytte of Merlyn he lad the hoost North­ward the pryuyest wey that coude be thoughte vnto the foreist of Bedegrayne / and there in a valey he lodged hem secretely / ¶Thenne rode Merlyn vnto Arthur and the two kynges & told hem how he had sped / wherof they had grete merueylle / that man on erthe myghte spede so soone / and goo and come So Merlyn told them x M were in the forest of Bedegrayne wel armed at al poyntes / thenne was there no more to saye / but to horsbak wente all the hoost as Arthur had afore pur­ueyed / So with xx M he passed by nyghte and day / but ther was made suche an ordenaūce afore by Merlyn that ther shold no man of werre ryde nor go in no countrey on this syde trent water / but yf he had a token from kynge Arthur / where tho­row the kynges enemyes durste not ryde as they dyd to fore to aspye

¶Capitulum xij

ANd soo within a lytel space the thre kynges came vnto the Castel of Bedegrayne / and fond there a pas­synge fayr felauship and wel be sene / wherof they had grete ioye / and vytaille they wanted none / This was the cause of the northeren hoost that they were rered for the despyte and rebuke the syx kynges had at Carlyon / And tho vj kynges by her meanes gate vnto hem fyue other kynges / And thus they beganne to gadre theyr peple ¶ And how they sware that for wele nor woo they shold not leue other / [Page] tyl they had destroyed Arthur / and thenne they made an oth The fyrst that beganne the othe was the duke of Candebenet / that he wold brynge with hym v M men of armes the which were redy on horsbak / Thenne sware kynge Brandegoris of stranggore that he wold brynge v M men of armes on hors­bak / Thenne sware kynge Claryuaus of Northumberland he wold brynge thre thousand men of armes / thenne sware the kyng of the C knyghtes that was a passynge good man and a yonge that he wold brynge four thousand men of armes on horsbak / thenne ther swore kynge Lott a passyng good knyȝt and syre Gawayns fader that he wold brynge v M men of armes on horsbak / Also ther swore kynge Vryence that was syr Vwayns fader of the lond of gore and he wold brynge vj M men of armes on horsbak / Also ther swore kyng Idres of Cornewalle that he wold brynge v M men of armes on horsbak / Also ther swore kyng cardelmans to brynge v M mē on horsbak / Also ther swore kyng Agwysaunce of Irelond to brynge v M men of armes on horsbak / Also ther swore kyng [...]entres to brynge v M men of armes on horsbak / Also there swore kynge Carados to brynge v M men of armes on horsbak / Soo her hool hoost was of clene men of armes on horsbak fyfty thousand and a foot x thousand of good mennes body­es / thenne were they soone redy and mounted vpon hors and sente forth their fore rydars / for these xj kynges in her wayes leyd a syege vnto the castel of Bedegrayne / and so they departed and drewe toward Arthur and lefte fewe to abyde at the syege for the castel of Bedegrayne was holden of kynge Ar­thur / and the men that were theryn were Arthurs

¶Capitulum xiij

SOo by Merlyns aduys ther were sente fore rydars to skumme the Countreye / & they mette with the fore ry­dars of the north / and made hem to telle whiche wey the hooste cam / and thenne they told it to Arthur / and by kyng Ban and Bors counceill they lete brenne and destroye alle the contrey afore them there they shold ryde / ¶ The kynge with the honderd knyghtes mette a wonder dreme two nyghtes a fore the bataille / that ther blewe a grete wynde & blewe doun her castels and her townes / and after that cam a water and bare hit [Page] all awey / Alle that herd of the sweuen said / it was a token of grete batayll / Thenne by counceill of Merlyn whan they wist whiche wey the xj kynges wold ryde and lodge that nyghte At mydnyght they sette vpon them as they were in theyr pauelyons / But the scoute watche by her hoost cryed lordes att armes for here be your enemyes at your hand

¶Capitulum xiiij

THenne kynge Arthur and kynge Ban and Kynge Bors with her good and trusty knyghtes set on hem so fyersly that he made them ouer throwe her pauelions on her hedys / but the xj kynges by manly prowesse of armes tooke a fayre champayne / but there was slayne that morowe tyde x M good mennys bodyes / And so they had afore hem a strong passage yet were they fyfty M of hardy men / Thenne it drewe toward day / now shalle ye doo by myne aduys said Merlyn vnto the thre kynges I wold that kynge Ban and kynge Bors with her felauship of x M men were put in a wood he­re besyde in an enbusshement and kepe them preuy / and that they be leid or the lyght of the daye come / and that they stere not tyll ye and your knyghtes haue foughte with hem longe And whanne hit is daye lyght dresse your bataille euen afore them and the passage that they maye see alle your hooste / For thenne wyl they be the more hardy when they see yow but a­boute xx M / and cause hem to be the gladder to suffre yow and youre hoost to come ouer the passage / All the thre kynges and the hoole barons sayde that Merlyn said passyngly wel / and it was done anone as Merlyn had deuysed / Soo on the mo [...]n whan eyther hoost sawe other / the hoost of the north was well comforted / Thenne to Vlfyus and Brastias were delyuerd thre thowsand men of armes / and they sette on them fyersly in the passage / and slewe on the ryght hand and on the lyft hand that it was wonder to telle /

¶Whanne that the enleuen kynges sawe that there was so fe­we a felauship dyd suche dedes of armes they were ashamed and sette on hem agayne fyersly / and ther was syr Vlfyus hors slayne vnder hym / but he dyd merueyllously well on foote / ¶But the Duke Eustace of Cambenet [Page] and Kynge Claryaunce of Northumberland / were alweye greuous on Vlfyus / thenne Brastias sawe his felawe ferd so with al / he smote the duke with a spere that hors & man fell doune / that sawe kyng Claryaunce and retorned vnto Bras­tias / and eyther smote other soo that hors & man wente to the erthe / and so they lay long astonyed / & their hors knees brast to the hard bone / Thenne cam Syr kay the sencyal with syxe felawes with hym / and dyd passyng wel / with that cam the xj kynges / and ther was Gryflot put to the erthe hors & man and lucas the bottelere hors and man by kynge Brandego­rys and kyng Idres & kyng Agwysaunce / thēne waxed the medle passynge hard on bothe partyes / whan syre kay sawe Gryflet on foote / he rode on kyng Nentres & smote hym doun and lad his hors vnto syr gryflet & horsed hym ageyne / Also syr kay with the same spere smote doun kyng Lott / & hurt hym passyng sore / that sawe the kyng with the C knyȝtes and ran vnto syr kay and smote hym doune and toke his hors / & gaf hym kyng Lott wherof he said gramercy / whan syr Gryf­let sawe syr kay & lucas the bottelere on foote / he took a sharp spere grete and square / and rode to pynel a good man of ar­mes / and smote hors and man doune / And thenne he tooke his hors / and gaf hym vnto syr kay / Thenne kynge Lot saw kyng Nentres on foote / he ranne vnto Melot de la roche / & smo­te hym doune hors and man & gaf kyng Nentres the hors & horsed hym ageyne / Also the kyng of the C knyȝtes sawe ky­nge Idres on foot thenne he ran vnto Gwymyart de bloy and smote hym doune hors and man & gaf kynge Idres the hors & horsed hym ageyne / & kyng Lot smote doun Claryaunce de la foreist saueage & gaf the hors vnto duke Eustace / And so whanne they had horsed the kynges ageyne they drewe hem al xj kynges to gyder and said they wold be reuenged of the dommage that they had taken that day / The meane whyle cam in syr Ector with an egyr countenaunce / and found Vlfyus and Brastias on foote in grete perylle of deth that were fow­le defoyled vnder horsfeet / Thenne Arthur as a lyon ranne vnto kynge Cradelment of North walys / and smote hym tho­rowe the lyfte syde that the hors and the kynge fylle doune / And thenne he tooke the hors by the rayne / and ladde hym [Page] vnto Vlfyus & said haue this hors myn old frend / for gre­te nede hast thow of hors / gramercy said Vlfyus / thenne syre Arthur dyd so merueillously in armes that all men had wondyr / whan the kynge with the C knyghtes sawe kyng Cradel­ment on foote / he ranne vnto syre Ector that was wel horsed syr kayes fader / and smote hors and man doune / and gaf the hors vnto the kynge / and horsed hym ageyne / and when kyng Arthur sawe the kyng ryde on syr Ectors hors he was wroth and with his swerd he smote the kynge on the helme / that a quarter of the helme and shelde fyll doune / and so the swerd carf doune vnto the hors neck / and so the kyng & the hors fyll doune to the gronnd / Thenne syr kay cam vnto syr Morgano­re sencial with the kyng of the C knyghtes & smote hym doun hors and man / and lad the hors vnto his fader syre Ector / thenne syr Ector ranne vnto a knyght hyghte lardans / & smote hors & man doune / & lad the hors vnto syr Brastias that grete nede had of an hors and was gretely defoyled / whan Brastias beheld lucas the botteler that lay lyke a dede man vnder the horse feet / and euer syr Gry flet dyd merueillously for to rescowe hym / and there were alweyes xiiij knyghtes on syr lucas / & thenne Brastias smote one of hem on the helme / that it wente to the treth / & he rode to another and smote hym that the arme flewe in to the feld / Thēne he wente to the third and smote hym on the sholder that sholder and arme flewe in the feld / And whan Gryflet sawe rescowes / he smote a kny­ght on the tempils that hede & helme wente to the erthel / and gryflet took the hors of that knyght & lad hym vnto syr lu­cas / & bad hym mounte vpon the hors & reuenge his hurtes / For Brastias had slayne a knyghte to fore & horsed gryf­let /

¶Capitulum xv

THenne lucas sawe kyng Agwysaunce that late hadde slayne Morys de la roche / and lucas ran to hym with a short spere that was grete / that he gaf hym suche a falle that the hors felle doun to the erthe / Also lucas found there on fo­te bloyas de la flaundres and syr Gwynas ij hardy knyȝtes & in that woodenes that lucas was in / he slewe ij bachelers & horsed hem ageyn / thēne waxid the batail possyng hard on both partyes / but arthur was glad yt his knyȝtes were horsed ayene [Page] & thēne they foughte to gyders that the noyse and sowne rang by the water & the wood / wherfor kyng Ban and kyng bors made them redy and dressyd theyr sheldes and harneys / and they were so couragyous that many Knyghtes shoke & beuerd for egrenes / All this whyle lucas and Gwynas & bryaunte & Bellyas of Flaundrys helde strong medle ayenst vj kyn­ges / that was Kynge Lott / kynge Nentres / kyng Brandegorys / Kyng Idres / kyng Vryens & kyng Agwysaunce / Soo with the helpe of syre kay & of syr gryflet / they helde these vj kynges hard that vnnethe they had ony power to defend them But whan syr Arthur sawe the batail wold not be endyd by no maner / he ferd wood as a lyon / & stered his hors here & there on the right hand & on the lyft hand▪ that he stynte not tyl he had slayne xx knyȝtes / Also he wounded kyng Lot so­re on the sholder and made hym to leue that ground / for syre kay & gryflet dyd with kyng Arthur there grete dedes of ar­mes / Thenne Vlfyus and Brastias & sir Ector encountred ageynst the duke Eustace & kyng Cradelment & kyng Cradelmāt and kynge Claryaunce of Northumberland & kyng Carados & ageynst the kyng with the C knyȝtes / So these knyȝtes encountred with these kynges that they made them to auoyde the grounde / thēne Kyng Lott made grete dool for his dommagis & his felawes / & said vnto the x kynges but yf ye wil do as I deuyse we shalle be slayn & destroyed / lete me haue the kynge with the C Knyȝtes & kyng Agwysaunce & kyng I­dres and the duke of Canbene [...] / & we v Kynges wol haue xv M men of armes with vs & we wille go on parte / wyle ye vj Kynges holde the medle with xij M / & we see that ye haue fouȝten with hem long thēne will we come on fyersly / & ellys shall we neuer matche hem said kynge Lot but by this meane So they departed as they here deuysed / & vj kynges made her party strong ageynst Arthur and made grete warre longe / In the meane whyle brake the enbusshement of Kynge Ban and kynge bo [...]s and Lyonses and Pharyaunce had the ad­uant garde / and they two knyghtes mette with kyng Idres and his felauship / and there began a grete medele of brekyng of speres and smytynge of swerdys with sleynge of men and horses / And kynge Idres was nere at discomforture

[Page]That sawe Agwysannce the kynge and put lyonses and pharyaunce in poynte of dethe / for the duke of Canbenek came on with all with a grete felauship / soo these two knyghtes were in grete daunger of their lyues that they were fayn to retorne but alweyes they rescowed hem self and their felauship mer­ueillously / Whan kynge Bors sawe tho knyghtes put on bak it greued hym sore / thēne he cam on so fast that his felauship semed as blak as Inde / whan kyng Lot had aspyed kynge bors / he knewe hym wel / thenne he said O Ihesu defende vs frō deth & horryble maymes / for I see wel we ben in grete perylle of dethe / for I see yonder a kynge one of the most worshipful lest men & one of the best knyȝtes of the world ben enclyned vnto his felauship / what is he said the kynge with the C knyȝtes / it is said kyng Lot kyng bors of gaul [...] / I merueile how they come in to this countreye without wetynge of vs all It was by Merlyns auyse said the knyghte / As for hym sa­yd kynge Carados / I wylle encountre with kynge bors / and ye wil rescowe me whan myster is / go on said they al / we wil do all that we may / thenne kyng Carados & his hoost rode on a softe pace tyl that they come as nyghe kynge Bors as a bowe draughte / thenne eyther bataill lete their hors renne as fast as they myghte / And Bleoberys that was godson vnto kynge Bors he bare his chyef standard / that was a passynge good knyghte / Now shall we see said kyng Bors hou these northe­ren bretons can bere the armes / & kyng Bors encountred with a knyght / and smote hym thorow out with a spere that he fel dede vnto the erthe / and after drewe his swerd & dyd mer­ueillous dedes of armes that all partyes had grete wōder therof / & his knyȝtes failled not but dyd their part / & kyng Ca­rados was smyten to the erthe / With that came the kyng with the C knyȝtes & rescued kyng Carados myȝtely by force of armes / for he was a passyng good knyght of a kynge / & but a yong man

¶Capitulum xvj

BY than come in to the feld kynge Ban as fyers as a lyon with bandys of grene / & therupon gold / Ha a said kyng Lot we must be discomfyte / for yonder I see the moste valyaunt knyght of the world / and the man of the most re­noume / for suche ij bretheren as is kyng Ban & kyng bors ar [Page] not lyuynge / wherfore we must nedes voyde or deye / And but yf we auoyde manly and wysely / ther is but dethe / whanne kynge Ban came in to the bataill / he cam in so fiersly / that the strokes redounded ageyne fro the woode and the water / wher­for kynge Lott wepte for pyte and doole that he sawe so ma­ny good knyȝtes take theyr ende / But thorowe the grete for­ce of kyng Ban they made both the Northeren bataylles that were departed / hurtled to gyders for grete drede / and the thre kynges & their knyghtes slewe on euer that it was pyte on to behold that multitude of the people that fledde / But kynge Lott and Kynge of the honderd knyȝtes & kynge Morgano­re gadred the peple to gyders passyng knyghtly / and dyd gre­te prowesse of armes / and helde the bataill all that daye lyke hard / ¶Whanne the kynge of the honderd knyghtes beheld the grete damage that kynge Ban dyd / he threst vnto hym wyth his hors and smote hym on hyhe vpon the helme a grete stroke and stonyed hym sore / Thenne kynge Ban was wroth with hym / and folowed on hym fyersly / the other sawe that / and cast vp his sheld & spored his hors forward / But the stro­ke of kynge Ban felle doune and carfe a cantel of the sheld / and the swerd s [...]ode doune by the haulerk behynde his back / & cut thorow the trappere of stele / and the hors euen in two pye­ces that the swerd felte the erthe / Thenne the kynge of the C knyghtes voyded the hors lyghtly and with his swerd he broched the hors of kyng Ban thorow and thorow / with that kynge Ban voyded lyghtly from the deede hors / and thenne kynge Ban smote at the other so egrely / and smote hym on the helme that he felle to the erth / Also in that yre he feld kyng Morganore and there was grete slaughter of good knyghtes and moche peple / by than come in to the prees kynge Arthur / and fond Kynge Ban stondynge among dede men and dede hors fyghtynge on foote as a wood lyon / that ther came no­ne nyghe hym as fer as he myght reche with his swerd / but he caughte a greuous buffet wherof Kynge Arthur had grete pyte / And Arthur was so blody that by his shelde ther myght no man knowe hym / for all was blood and braynes on his swerd / And as Arthur loked by hym he sawe a knyght that was passyngly wel horsed / and therwith syre Arthur ranne [Page] to hym / and smote hym on the helme that his swerd wente vnto his teeth / and the knyght sanke doune to the erthe dede / & anon Arthur tooke the hors by the rayne and ladde hym vnto kynge Ban & said fair broder / haue this hors / for ye haue grete myster therof & me repenteth sore of your grete dammage Hit shall be soone reuengid said Kynge Ban / for I truste in god myn eure is not suche but some of them may sore repente thys / I wol wel said Arthur / for I see your dedes full actual Neuertheles I myghte not come at yow at that tyme / But whanne Kynge Ban was mounted on horsbak / thenne there beganne newe bataill the whyche was sore and hard / and passyng grete slaughter / And so thurgh grete force Kynge Ar­thur / Kynge Ban and Kynge Bors made her knyghtes a li­tel to withdrawe them / But alwey the xj Kynges with her chyualrye neuer torned bak / and so withdrewe hem to a lytil woode / and so ouer a lytyl ryuer / & therethey rested hem / for on the nyghte they myghte haue no rest on the feld / And thē ­ne the xj kynges and knyghtes put hem on a hepe all to gy­ders as men adrad and out of all comforte / but ther was no man myghte passe them / they helde hem so hard to gyders bothe behynde and before that kynge Arthur had merueille of their dedes of armes and was passynge wrothe / A syr Arthur sa­id kynge Ban and kynge Bors blame hem noughte / For they doo as good men ouȝt to doo / For by my feith said kyng Ban / they are the best fyghtyng men and knyghtes of moost prowesse that euer I sawe or herd speke of / And tho xj kynges are men of grete worship / And yf they were longyng vnto yow / there were no kynge vnder the heuen hadde suche xj knyghtes and of suche worship / I may not loue hem said Arthur / they wold destroye me / that wote we wel said kynge Ban and Kynge Bors / for they are your mortal enemyes / and that hath ben preued afore hand / And this day they haue done theire parte / and that is grete pyte of theire wilfulnes Thenne alle the xj kynges drewe hem to gyder / And thenne said kynge Lott / lordes ye must other wayes than ye do / or els the grete losse is behynde / ye may see what peple we haue lost / and what good men we lese / by cause we waytte alweyes on these foote men / and euer in sauynge of one of the foote men [Page] we lese x horsmen for hym / therfore this is myne aduys / lete vs put our foote men from v [...] / for it is nere nyghte / For the noble Arthur wille not [...]ry on the foote men / for they maye saue hem self / the woode is nerehand / And whan we horsmen be to gyders / loke eueryche of yow kynges lete make suche or­dinaunce that none breke vpon payne of dethe / And who that seeth ony man dresse hym to flee / lightly that he be slayne / for it is better that we slee a coward than thorow a coward alle we to be slayne / How saye ye said kynge Lott / ansuere me all ye kynges / it is wel said quod kynge Nentres / so said the ky­nge of the honderd knyghtes / the same saide the kynge Cara­dos and kyng Vryence / so dyd kynge Idres and kyng brandegorys / and so dyd kyng Cradulmas and the d [...]ke of Cā ­debenet / the same said kyng Claryaunce & kyng Agwysaunce and sware they wold neuer faille other neyther for lyf nor for dethe / And who so that fledde but did as they dyd shold be slayne / Thenne they amended their harneys and ryghted theire sheldes and tooke newe sperys and sette hem on theire thyes and stode stille as hit had ben a plompe of wood /

¶Capitulum xvij

WHanne Syre Arthur and kynge ban and bors by­helde them and all her knyghtes they preysed hem mo­che for their noble chere of chyualrye for the hardyest fyghters that euer they herd or sawe / with that there dressyd hem a xl noble knyghtes and saide vnto the thre kynges / they wold breke their bataille / these were her names Lyonses / pharyaunce Vlfyus / brastias / Ector / kaynes / lucas the bottelere / Gryflett la fyse de dieu / mariet de la roche / Gwynas de bloy / briāt de la foreyst saueage / bellaus / Moryans of the castel maydyn [...] / flā nedreus of the castel of ladyes / Annecians that was kynge bors godsone a noble knyght / ladynas de la rouse / Emerause Caulas / Gracyens le casteleyn / one bloyse de la caase / and syre Colgreueaunce de gorre / all these knyȝtes rode on a fore with sperys on their thyes / and spored their horses myghtely as the horses myȝte renne / And the xj kynges with parte of her knyȝtes russched with their horses as fast as they myȝte with their spe [...]es / & ther they dyd on both partyes merueillous dedes of armes / soo came in to the thycke of the prees Arthur ban & [Page] bors & slewe doune right on both handes that her horses went in bloood vp to the fytlokys / But euer the xj Kynges and their hooste was euer in the vysage of Arthur / wherfore Ban and Bors had grete merueille consyderyng the grete slauȝter that there was / but at the last they were dryuen abak ouer a lytil ryuer / with that came Merlyn on a grete black hors / and said vnto arthur thow hast neuer done / hast thou not do ne ynough / of thre score thousand this day hast thow lefte on lyue but xv M / and it is tyme to saye ho for god is wrothe with the that thow wolt neuer haue done / for yonder xj kyn­ges at this tyme will not be ouerthrowen / but and thow tary on them ony lenger / thy fortune wille torne and they shall encreace / And therfor withdrawe yow vnto your lodgyng and reste yon as soone as ye may and rewarde your good knyȝtes with gold and with syluer / for they haue wel deserued hi [...] / there may no rychesse be to dere for them / for of so fewe men as ye haue ther were neuer men dyd more of prowesse than they haue done to day / for ye haue matched this day with the beste fyghters of the world / that is trouthe said kyng Ban and bors / Also said Merlyn / withdrawe yow where ye lyst / For this thre yere I dar vndertake they shalle not dere yow / And by than ye shalle here newe tydynges / And thenne Merlyn said vnto arthur / these xj kynges haue more on hand than they are ware of / for the Sarasyns ar londed in their countreyes mo than xl M that brenne and [...]lee / and haue leid syege att the castel wandesborow and make grete destruction / therfore drede yow not this thre yere / ¶Also syre al the goodes that ben goten at this bataill lete it be serched / And whanne ye haue it in your handys lete it be gyuen frely vnto these two kynges Ban and Bors that they may rewarde theyr knyghtes with all / And that shalle cause straungers to be of better wyll to do yow seruyse at nede / Also ye be able to reward youre owne knyghtes of your owne goodes whan someuer it lyketh you It is wel said qd Arthur And as thow hast deuysed so shal it be done / whanne it was delyuerd to Ban & Bors they gaf the goodes as frely to their knyȝtes as frely as it was yeuen to them / Thenne Merlyn took his leue of Arthur and of the ij kynges for to go and see his mayster Bleyse that dwelde [Page] in Northumberland / and so he departed and cam to his maister that was passyng glad of his comynge / & there he tolde / how Arthur and the two kynges had sped at the grete bata­yll / and how it was ended / and told the names of euery ky­ng and knyght of worship that was there / And soo Bleyse wrote the bataill word by word as Merlyn told hym how it began / & by whome / & in lyke wyse how it was endyd / And who had the werre / All the batails that were done in arthurs dayes / merlyn dyd his maister Bleyse do wryte / Also he did do wryte all the batails that euery worthy knyght dyd of arthurs Courte / After this Merlyn departed from his mayster and came to kynge Arthur that was in the castel of Bede­grayne / that was one of the castels that stondyn in the forest of Sherewood / And Merlyn was so disguysed that kynge Arthur knewe hym not for he was al be furred in black she­pe skynnes and a grete payre of bootes / and a bowe and a­rowes in a russet gowne / and broughte wild gyse in his hād and it was on the morne after candelmas day / but kyng Arthur knewe hym not / Syre said Merlyn vnto the kynge / wil ye gyue me a yefte / wherfor said kyng Arthur shold I gyue the a yefte chorle / Sir said Merlyn ye were better to gyue me a yefte that is not in your hand than to lese grete rychesse / for here in the same place there the grete bataill was is grete treso­ur hyd in the erthe / who told the so chor [...]e said Arthur / Mer­lyn told me so said he / thenne Vlfyus and Brastias knew hym wel ynough and smyled / Syre said these two knyghtes It is Merlyn that so speketh vnto yow / thenne kyng arthur was gretely abass [...]ed and had merueyll of Merlyn / & so had kynge Ban and kynge Bors / and soo they had grete dys­port at hym / Soo in the meane whyle there cam a damoysel that was an erlys doughter his name was Sanam / and her name was Lyonors a passynge fair damoysel / and so she cam thyder for to dohomage as other lordes dyd after the grete bataill / And kyng Arthur sette his loue gretely vpon her and so dyd she vpon hym / and the kyng had adoo with her / and gat on her a child / his name was Borre that was after a good knyghte and of the table round / thenne ther cam word that the kyng Ryence of Northen walys maade grete werre on [Page] kynge Lodegreance of camylyard / for the whiche thyng arthur was wroth for he loued hym wel and hated kyng Ryence / for he was alwey ageynst hym / So by ordenaunce of the thre kynges that were sente home vnto Benwyck / alle they wold de­parte for drede of kynge Claudas and pharyaunce and An­temes and Grasians and lyonses / payarne with the leders of tho that shold kepe the kynges landys

¶Capitulum xviij

ANd thenne kynge Arthur and kynge Ban & kyng Bors departed with her felauship a xx M and came within vj dayes in to the countrey of Cmyliarde and there rescowed kynge Lodegreaunce and s [...]ewe ther moche people of kynge Ryence vnto the nombre of x M men and put hym to flyghte / And thenne had these thre kynges grete [...]here of ky­ng Lodegreaunce / that thanked them of their grete goodnesse that they wold reuenge hym of his enemyes / and there hadde Arthur the fyrst syght of gweneuer the kynges doughter of Camylyard / and euer after he loued her / After they were weddyd as it telleth in the booke / Soo breuely to make an ende / they took theyr leue to goo in to theyre owne Countreyes for kynge Claudas dyd grete destruction on their landes / Thenne said Arthur I wille goo with yow / Nay said the kynges ye shalle not at this tyme / for ye haue moche to doo yet in these landes / therfore we wille departe / and with the grete goodes that we haue goten in these landes by youre yeftes we shalle wage good knyghtes & withstande the kynge Claudas ma­lyce / for by the grace of god and we haue nede we wille sen­de to yow for youre socour / And yf ye haue nede sende for vs / and we wille not tary by the feythe of our bodyes / Hit shalle not saide Merlyn nede that these two kynges come ageyne in the wey of werre / But I knowe wel kynge Arthur maye not be longe from yow / for within a yere or two ye shalle haue grete nede / And thenne shalle he reuenge yow on youre ene­myes as ye haue done on his / For these xj kynges shal deye all in a day by the grete myghte and prowesse of armes of ij valyaunt knyghtes as it telleth after / her names ben Balyn le Saueage and Balan his broder that ben merueillous go­od knyghtes as ben ony lyuyng / ¶Now torne we to the xj [Page] kynges that retorned vnto a cyte that hyghte Sorhaute / the whiche cyte was within kynge Vryens / and ther they refres­shed hem as wel as they myght / and made leches serche theyr woundys and sorowed gretely for the dethe of her peple / with that ther came a messager and told how ther was comen in to their landes people that were lau [...]es as wel as sarasyns a xl M / and haue brent & slayne al the peple that they may come by withoute mercy / and haue leyd syege on the castel of wā ­disborow / Allas sayd the xj kynges here is sorow vpon sorou And yf we had not warryd ageynst Arthur as we haue done / he wold soone reuenge vs / as for kyng Lodegryaunce he loueth Arthur better than vs / And as for kyng Ryence / he hath ynough to doo with Lodegreans / for he hath leyd syege vnto hym / Soo they consentyd to gyder to kepe alle the marches of Cornewayle / of walys and of the northe / soo fyrst they putte kynge Idres in the Cyte of Nauntys in Brytayne with iiij thowsand men of armes / to watche bothe the water and the land / Also they put in the cyte of wyndesan kynge Nauntres of garlott with four thousand knyghtes to watche both on water and on lond / Also they had of other men of werre moo than eyght thousand for to fortyfye alle the fortresses in the marches of Cornewaylle / Also they put moo knyȝtes in alle the marches of walys and scotland with many good men of armes / and soo they kepte hem to gyders the space of thre yere And euer alyed hem with myghty kynges and dukes and lordes / And to them felle kynge Ryence of North walys / the whiche was a myghty man of men & New that was a mygh­ty man of men / And all this whyle they furnysshed hem and garnysshed hem of good men of armes and vytaille and of alle maner of abylement that pretendith to the werre to auen­ge hem for the bataille of Bedegrayne / as it telleth in the book of auentures folowynge

Capitulum xix

tHēne after the departyng of kyng Ban and of kyng Bors kynge Arthur rode vnto Carlyon / And thyder cam to hym kyng Lots wyf of Orkeney in maner of a messa­ge / but she was sente thyder to aspye the Courte of kynge Ar­thur / and she cam rychely bisene with her four sones / gawayn [Page] Gaherys / Agrauaynes / and Gareth with many other knyghtes and ladyes / for she was a possynge fayr lady / wherfore the kynge cast grete loue vnto her / and desyred to lye by her / so they were agreed / and he begate vpon her Mordred / and she was his syster on the moder syde Igrayne / So ther she rested her a moneth and at the last departed / Thenne the kyng dre­med a merueillous dreme wherof he was sore adrad / But al this tyme kyng Arthur knewe not that kyng Lots wyf was his syster / Thus was the dreme of Arthur / hym thought ther was come in to this land Gryffons and Serpentes / And hym thoughte they brente and slough alle the peple in the lād And thenne hym thoughte / he faughte with hem / and they dyd hym passynge grete harme / and wounded hym ful sore / but at the last he slewe hem / whanne the kynge awaked / he was pas­synge heuy of his dreme / and so to put it oute of thoughtes / he made hym redy with many knyghtes to ryde on huntynge / As soone as he was in the forest / the kynge sawe a grete hert afore hym / this herte wille I chace said kynge Arthur / And so he spored the hors / and rode after longe / And so by fyne for­ce ofte he was lyke to haue smyten the herte / where as the ky­nge had chaced the herte soo long that his hors had loste hys brethe and fylle doune dede / Thenne a yoman fette the kynge another hors / So the kyng sawe the herte enbusshed and his hors dede / he sette hym doune by a fontayne and there he fell in grete thoughtes / And as he satte so hym thoughte he herd a noyse of houndes to the somme of xxx / And with that the ky­nge sawe comyng toward hym the straungest best that euer he sawe or herd of / so the best wente to the welle and drank / and the noyse was in the bestes bely lyke vnto the questyng of xxx coupyl houndes / but alle the whyle the beest dranke there was no noyse in the bestes bely / and therwith the best departed with a grete noyse / wherof the kyng had grete merueyll / And so he was in a grete thoughte / and therwith he fell on slepe / Ryght so ther came a knyght a foote vnto Arthur / and sayd knyght full of thought and slepy / telle me yf thow sawest a straunge best passe this waye / Suche one sawe I said kynge Arthur / that is past two myle / what wold ye with the best said arthur Syre I haue folowed that best long tyme / and kyld myne [Page] hors / so wold god I had another to folowe my quest / ryȝte so came one with the kynges hors / and whan the knyght sa­we the hors / he prayd the kyng to yeue hym the hors / for I haue folowed this quest this xij moneth / and other I shal encheue hym or blede of the best blood of my body / Pellinore that tyme kynge folowed the questynge best / and after his deth sir Palamydes folowed hit

¶Capitulum xx

SYr knyghte said the kynge leue that quest / and suffre me to haue hit / and I wyll folowe it another xij mo­neth / A foole said the knyghte vnto Arthur / it is in veyne thy desyre / for it shalle neuer ben encheued but by me / or my next kyn / there with he sterte vnto the kynges hors and mounted in to the sadel / and said gramercy this hors is myn owne / wel said the kynge thow mayst take myn hors by force but and I myȝte preue the whether thow were better on horsbak or I / wel said the knyght seke me here whan thow wolt and here nygh this wel thow shalt fynde me / and soo passyd on his weye / thenne the kyng sat in a study and bad his men fetche his hors as faste as euer they myghte / Ryght soo came by hym Merlyn lyke a child of xiiij yere of age and salewed the kyng / and asked hym why he was so pensyf / I may wel be pensyf sayd the kynge / for I haue sene the merueyllest syȝt that euer I sawe / that knowe I wel said Merlyn as wel as thy self and of all thy thoughtes / but thow art but a foole to take thought / for it wylle not amend the / Also I knowe what thow arte / and who was thy fader / and of whome thow were begoten / kynge Vtherpendragon was thy fader / and begat the on Igrayne / that is fals said kyng Arthur / how sholdest thou knowe it / for thow arte not so old of yeres to knowe my fa­der / yes sayd Merlyn I knowe it better than ye or ony man lyuynge / I wille not bileue the said Arthur and was wroth with the child / Soo departed Merlyn and came ageyne in the lykenes of an old man of iiij score yere of age / wherof the kynge was ryght glad / for he semed to be ryghte wyse Thenne saide the old man why are ye so sad / I maye wel be heuy said Arthur for many thynges / Also here was a chyld and told me many thynges that me semeth / he shold not knowe / for he was not of age to knowe my fader / yes said the old [Page] man / the child told yow trouthe / and more wold he haue tolde yow and ye wolde haue suffred hym / But ye haue do­ne a thynge late that god is displeasyd with yow / for ye haue layne by your syster / and on her ye haue goten a chyld / that shalle destroye yow and all the knyghtes of your realme what are ye said Arthur that telle me these tydynges / I am Merlyn / and I was he in the childes lykenes / A sayd kyng Arthur ye are a merueillous man / but I merueylle moche / of thy wordes that I mote dye in bataille / Merueylle not sa­id Merlyn / for it is gods wyll youre body to be punysshed for your fowle dedes / but I may wel be sory said Merlyn / for I shalle dye a shameful deth to be put in the erthe quyck / and ye shall dye a worshipful deth / And as they talked this / cam one with the kynges hors / and so the kyng mounted on his hors and Merlyn on another and so rode vnto Carlyon / & anone the kynge asked Ector and Vlfyus how he was bigoten / & they told hym Vtherpendragon was his fader & quene Igra­yn his moder / thenne he sayd to Merlyn I wylle that my moder be sente for that I may speke with her / And yf she saye so her self / thēne wylle I byleue hit / In all hast the quene was sente for / and she cam & broughte with her Morgan le fay her doughter that was as fayre a lady as ony myghte be / & the kynge welcomed Igrayne in the best maner /

¶Capitulum xxj

RYght soo cam Vlfyus & saide openly that the kynge and all myȝt here that were fe­sted that day / ye are the falsest lady of the world and the most traitresse vnto the kynges person / Beware saide Ar­thur what thow saist / thow spekest a grete word / I am wel ware said Vlfyus what I speke / & here is my gloue to preue hit vpon ony man that will seye the contrary / that this quene I­grayne is causar af your grete domage / & of your grete werre For and she wold haue vtterd it in the lyf of kyng Vtherpē ­dragon of the byrthe of yow / and how ye were begoten ye had neuer had the mortal werrys that ye haue had for the moost party of your barons of your realme knewe neuer whos sone ye were / nor of whome ye were begoten / & she that bare yow of her body shold haue made it knowen openly in excusyng of her worship & yours / & in lyke wyse to alle the reame / wherfor I [Page] preue her fals to god and to yow and to al your realme and who wyll saye the contrary I wyll preue it on his body Thenne spak Igrayne and sayd I am a woman and I may not fyghte / but rather than I shold be dishonoured / ther wold some good man take my quarel / / More she sayd / Merlyn knoweth wel and ye syr Vlfyus how kynge Vther cam to me in the Castel of Tyntagaill in the lykenes of my lord that was dede thre houres to fore / and therby gat a child that nyght vpon me / And after the viij day kynge Vther wedded me / and by his commaundement whan the child was borne it was de­lyuerd vnto Merlyn and nourysshed by hym / and so I sawe the child neuer after / nor wote not what is his name / for I knewe hym neuer yet / And there Vlfyus saide to the quene Merlyn is more to blame than ye / wel I wote said the quene I bare a child by my lord kyng Vther / but I wote not Where he is become / thenne Merlyn toke the kynge by the hand sa­yeng / this is your moder / and therwith syr Ector bare wytnes how he nourysshed hym by Vthers commaundement / And ther with kynge Arthur toke his moder quene Igrayne in his armes and kyst her / and eyther wepte vpon other / And thenne the kyng lete make a feest that lasted eyght dayes / Thenne on a day ther come in the courte a squyer on hors back ledynge a knyght before hym wounded to the dethe / and told hym how ther was a knyght in the forest had rered vp a pauelione by a well and hath slayne my mayster a good knyght / his na­me was mylis / wherfor I byseche yow that my mayster maye be buryed / and that somme knyȝt maye reuenge my maysters deth / thenne the noyse was grete of that knyghtes dethe in the Court / and euery man said his aduys / thenne came Gryflett that was but a squyer / and he was but yonge of the age of the kyng Arthur / soo he besoughte the kyng for alle his seruyse that he had done hym to gyue hym the ordre of knyghthode

¶Capitulum xxij

THou arte full yong and tendyr of age sayd Arthur for to take so hyghe an ordre on the / Sir said gryflet I byseche yow make me knyȝt / Syr said Merlyn it were gre­te pyte to lese Gryflet / for he wille be a passynge good man / whanne he is of age / abydynge with yow the terme [Page] me of his lyf / And yf he auenture his body with yonder kny­ght at the fontayne it is in grete peryll yf euer he come agey­ne / for he is one of the best knyghtes of the world / and the strē gyst man of armes / wel said Arthur / so at the desyre of gryflet the kynge made hym knyght / Now said Arthur vnto syre Gryflet / Sythen I haue made yow knyghte thow must yeue me a gyfte / what ye will said Gryflet / thou shalt promyse me by the feythe of thy body whan thou hast Iusted with the kny­ght at the fontayne / whether it falle ye be on foote or on hors­bak / that ryght so ye shal come ageyne vnto me withoute ma­kynge ony more debate / I wyll promyse yow said Gryflet as yow desyre / Thenne toke Gryflet his hors in grete haste / & dressyd his sheld and toke a spere in his hand / and so he rode a grete wallop tyll he cam to the fontayne / and ther by he sawe a ryche pauelion / and ther by vnder a clothe stode a fayr hors wel sadeled and brydeled / and on a tree a shelde of dyuerse colours and a grete spere / Thenne Gryflet smote on the sheld with the bott of his spere that the shylde felle doune to the gro­und / with that the knyght cam oute of the pauelione / & sayd fair knyght why smote ye doune my sheld / for I wil Iuste with yow said gryflet / it is better ye doo not sayd the knyghte for ye are but yong and late made knyght / and your myghte is nothyng to myn / as for that saide Gryflet I wylle Iuste with yow / that is me loth said the knyght / but sythen I muste nedes I wille dresse me therto / of whens be ye sayd the knyȝte syre I am of Arthurs courte / So the two knyghtes ranne to gyder that gryflets spere al to sheuered / and ther with all he smote Gryflet thorowe the sheld & the lyfte syde / and brake the spere that the troncheon stack in his body / that hors and knyghte fylle doune

¶Capitulum xxiij

THan the knyght sawe hym lye soo on the ground / he alyght and was passynge heuy / for he wende he had slayne hym / and thenne he vnlaced his helme and gate hym wynde / and so with the troncheon he set hym on his hors and gate hym wynde / and so bytoke hym to god / and seid he had a myghty hert and yf he myght lyue he wold preue a passynge good knyȝt / & so syr Gryflet rode to the court where grete doole [Page] was made for hym / But thorowe good leches he was heled / and saued / Ryght so cam in to the Courte xij knyȝtes & were aged men / and they cam from themperour of Rome / & they as­ked of Arthur truage for this realme / other els themperour wold destroye hym & his land / wel said kyng Arthur ye are messagers / therfor ye may say what ye wil other els ye shold dye therfore / But this is myn ansuer I owe themperour noo truage nor none will I hold hym / but on a fayr felde I shall yeue hym my truage that shal be with a sharp spere / or els with a sharp swerd / & that shall not be long by my faders sou­le Vtherpendragon / & therwith the messagers departed passyngly wroth / & kyng arthur as wroth / for in euyl tyme cam they thenne / for the kyng was passyngly wroth for the hurte of sir Gryflet / & soo he commaunded a pryuy man of his chambre / that or hit be day his best hors and armour with all that lon­geth vnto his persone be withoute the cyte or to morowe daye Ryght so or to morow day he met With his man and his hors and so mounted vp and dressid his sheld / & toke his spere and had his chamberlayne tary there tyll he came ageyne / And so Arthur wode a softe paas tyll it was day / & thenne was he ware of thre chorles chacynge Merlyn / and wold ha­ue slayne hym / thenne the kyng rode vnto them / and had them flee chorles / thenne were they a ferd whan they sawe a knyght and fled / O Merlyn said Arthur / here haddest thou be slayne for all thy craftes had I not byn / Nay said Merlyn not soo / for I coude saue my self and I wold / and thou arte more nere thy deth than I am for thow gost to the deth ward & god be not thy frend / So as they wente thus talkyng / they came to the fontayne / and the ryche pauelione there by hit / thenne kyng Arthur was ware where sat a knyght armed in a cha­yer / Syr knyght said Arthur / for what cause abydest thow here that ther maye no knyght ryde this wey but yf he Iuste wyth the said the kynge / I rede the leue that custome said Arthur This customme saide the knyght haue I vsed and wille vse magre who saith nay / & who is greued with my custome / lete hym amende hit that wol / I wil amende it said Arthur / I shal defende the said the knyȝt / anon he toke his hors & dressid his shylde & toke a spere & they met so hard either in others sheldes [Page] that al to sheuered their sperys / ther with anone Arthur pul­led oute his swerd / nay not so said the knyght / it is fayrer sayd the knyȝt that we tweyne renne more to gyders with sharp sperys / I wille wel said Arthur and I had ony mo sperys I haue ynow said the knyȝt / so ther cam a squyer and brouȝt ij good sperys / and Arthur chose one & he another / so they spored their horses & cam to gyders with al the myghtes / that eyther brak her speres to her handes / thenne Arthur sette hand on his swerd / nay seid the knyght / ye shal do better / ye are a pas­synge good Iuster as euer I mette with al / & ones for the loue of the hyghe ordre of knyȝthode lete vs Iuste ones ageyn / I assente me said Arthur / anone there were brought two grete spe­rys / and euery knyght gat a spere / and therwith they ranne to gyders that Arthurs spere al to sheuered / But the other knyghte hyt hym so hard in myddes of the shelde / that horse & man felle to the erthe / and ther with Arthur was egre & pul­led oute his swerd / and said I will assay the syr knyghte on foote / for I haue lost the honour on horsbak / I will be on horsbak said the knyght / thenne was Arthur wrothe and dressid his sheld toward hym with his swerd drawen / whan the knyght sawe that / he a lyghte / for hym thought no worship to haue a knyght at suche auaille he to be on horsbak and he on foot and so he alyght & dressid his sheld vnto Arthur & ther begā a strong bataille with many grete strokes / & soo hewe with her swerdes that the cantels flewe in the feldes / and moche blood they bledde bothe / that al the place there as they faught was ouer bledde with blood / and thus they fought long and rested hem / and thenne they wente to the batayl ageyne / and so hurt led to gyders lyke two rammes that eyther felle to the erthe So at the last they smote to gyders that both her swerdys met euen to gyders / But the swerd of the knyght smote kyng ar­thurs swerd in two pyeces / wherfor he was heuy / thenne said the knyghte vnto Arthur / thow arte in my daunger Whether me lyst to saue the or slee the / and but thou yelde the as ouer come and recreaunt / thow shalt deye / as for deth said kyng ar­thur welcome be it whan it cometh / But to yelde me vnto the as recreaunt I had leuer deye than to be soo shamed / And ther with al the kynge lepte vnto Pellinore & tooke hym by [Page] the myddel and threwe hym doune and raced of his helme / whan the knyght felt that / he was adrad / for he was a pas­synge bygge man of myghte / and anone he broughte Arthur vnder hym / and reaced of his helme and wold haue smyten of his hede /

¶Capitulum xxiiij

THer with all came Merlyn and sayd knyghte / hold thy hand / For and thow slee that knyghte thow put test this r [...]ame in the grettest dammage that euer was reame / For this knyght is a man of more worship than thou wotest of / Why / who is he said the knyghte / it is kyng Arthur Thenne wold he haue slayn hym for drede of his wrathe / and heue vp his swerd / and therwith Merlyn cast an enchauntement to the knyghte that he felle to the erthe in a grete slepe / Thenne Merlyn tooke vp kyng Arthur and rode forth on the knyȝtes hors / Allas said Arthur what hast thou done merlyn hast thow slayne this good knyghte by thy craftes / there ly­ueth not soo worshipful a knyghte as he was / I had leuer than the stynte of my land a yere that he were on lyue / care ye not sayd Merlyn / for he is holer than ye / for he is but on slepe and will awake within thre houres / I told you said Merlyn what a knyghte he was / Here had ye be slayn had I not ben Also ther lyueth not a bygger knyght than he is one / and he shal here after do yow ryght gaod seruyse & his name is Pel­linore / and he shal haue two sones that shal be passyng good men sauf one / they shalle haue no felawe of prowesse and of good lyuynge / and her names shal be Persyual of walys / & Lamerak of walis / & he shal telle yow the name of your own sone bygoten of your syster that shal be the destruction of alle this royame

¶Capitulum xxv

RYghte so the kyng and he departed & wente vn tyl an ermyte that was a good man and a grete leche / Soo the heremyte serched all his woundys & gaf hym good salues so the kyng was there thre dayes & thenne were his woundes wel amendyd that he myght ryde and goo / & so departed / & as they rode Arthur said I haue no swerd / no force said Merlyn here by is a swerd that shalle be yours and I may / Soo they rode tyl they came to a lake the whiche was a fayr water / and brood / And in the myddes of the lake Arthur was ware of [Page] an arme clothed in whyte samyte / that held a fayr swerd in that hand / loo said Merlyn yonder is that swerd that I spak of / with that they sawe a damoisel goyng vpon the lake / what damoysel is that said Arthur / that is the lady of the lake said Merlyn / And within that lake is a roche / and theryn is as fayr a place as ony on erthe and rychely besene / and this da­moysell wylle come to yow anone / and thenne speke ye fayre to her that she will gyue yow that swerd / Anone with all ca­me the damoysel vnto Arthur / and salewed hym / and he her ageyne / Damoysel said Arthur / what swerd is that / that yon­der the arme holdeth aboue the water / I wold it were myne / for I haue no swerd / Syr Arthur kynge said the damoysell / that swerd is myn / And yf ye will gyue me a yefte whan I aske it yow / ye shal haue it by my feyth said Arthur / I will yeue yow what yefte ye will aske / wel said the damoisel go ye in to yonder large / & rowe your self to the swerd / and take it / and scaubart with yow / & I will aske my yefte whan I see my tyme / So syr Arthur & merlyn alyght & tayed the­ir horses to two trees / & so they went in to the ship / & whanne they came to the swerd that the hand held / syre Arthur toke it vp by the handels / & toke it with hym / & the arme & the hād went vnder the water / & so come vnto the lond & rode forth / & thēne syr Arthur sawe a ryche pauelion / what sygnyfyeth yō der pauelion / yt is ye knyȝtes pauelion seid merlyn yt ye fouȝt with last / syr Pellinore / but he is out / he is not there / he hath a doo with a knyght of yours that hyght Egglame / & they ha­ue fouȝten to gyder / but at the last Egglame fledde and els he had ben dede / & he hath chaced hym euen to Carlyon / and we shal mete with hym anon in the hygh wey / that is wel sayd / said Arthur / now haue I a swerd / now wille I wage bata­ill with hym & be auenged on hym / sir ye shal not so said Merlyn / for the knyght is wery of fyghtyng & chacyng so that ye shal haue no worship to haue a do with hym / Also he will not be lyȝtly matched of one knyȝt lyuyng / & therfor it is my co­unceil / lete hym passe / for he shal do you good seruyse in shorte tyme & his sones after his dayes / Also ye shal see that day in short space ye shal be riȝt glad to yeue him your sister to wedde whan I see hym I wil doo as ye aduyse me sayd Arthur [Page] Thenne syre Arthur loked on the swerd / and lyked it pas­synge wel / whether lyketh yow [...]etter sayd Merlyn the suerd or the scaubard / Me lyketh better the swerd sayd Arthur / ye are more vnwyse sayd Merlyn / for the scaubard is worth x of the swerdys / for whyles ye haue the scaubard vpon yow / ye shalle neuer lefe no blood / be ye neuer so sore wounded therfor kepe wel the scaubard alweyes with yow / so they rode vnto Carlyon / and by the wey they met with syr Pellinore / but Merlyn had done suche a crafte / that pellinore sawe not Ar­thur / and he past by withoute ony wordes / I merueylle sayd Arthur that the knyght wold not speke / syr said Merlyn / be sawe yow not / for and he had sene yow ye had not lyghtly departed / Soo they come vnto Carlyon / wherof his knygh­tes were passynge glad / And whanne they herd of his auen­tures / they merueilled that he wold ieoparde his persone soo al one / But alle men of worship said it was mery to be vnder suche a chyuetayne that wolde put his persone in auenture as other poure knyghtes dyd /

¶Capitulum xxvij

THis meane whyle came a messager from kynge Ry­ons of Northwalys / And kynge he was of all Ire­land and of many Iles / And this was his message gre­tynge wel kynge Arthur in this manere wyse sayenge / that kynge Ryons had discomfyte and ouercome xj kynges / and eueryche of hem did hym homage / and that was this / they gaf hym their berdys clene flayne of / as moche as ther was / wher for the messager came for kyng Arthurs berd / For kyng Ryons had purfyled a mantel with kynges berdes / and there lacked one place of the mantel / wherfor he sente for his berd or els he wold entre in to his landes / and brenne and slee / & neuer leue tyl he haue the hede and the berd / wel sayd Arthur thow hast said thy message / the whiche is the most vylaynous and lewdest message that euer man herd sente vnto a kynge / Also thow mayst see / my berd is ful yong yet to make a purfyl of hit / But telle thow thy kynge this / I owe hym none homage / ne none of myn elders / but or it be longe to / he shall do me homage on bothe his kneys / or els he shall lese his hede by the feith of my body / for this is the most shamefullest message [Page] that euer I herd speke of / I haue aspyed / thy kyng met ne­uer yet with worshipful man / but telle hym / I wyll haue his hede withoute he doo me homage / thenne the messager departed ¶Now is there ony here said Arthur that knoweth kyng Ryons / thenne ansuerd a knyght that hyght Naram / Syre I knowe the kynge wel / he is a passyng good man of his body / as f [...]we ben lyuynge / and a passyng prowde man / and sir doubte ye not / he wille make warre on yow with a myghty puyssa­unce / wel said Arthur I shall ordeyne for hym in short tyme

¶Capitulum xxviij

THēne kyng arthur lete sende for al the childrē born on may day begotē of lordes & born of ladyes / for Merlyn told kynge Arthur that he that shold destroye hym / shold be borne in may day / wherfor he sent for hem all vpon payn of deth and so ther were founde many lordes sones / and all were sente vnto the kynge / and soo was Mordred sente by kyng Lotts wyf / and all were put in a ship to the see / and some were iiij wekes old and some lasse / And so by fortune the shyp drofe vnto a castel and was al to ryuen and destroyed the most part sauf that Mordred was cast vp and a good man fonde hym / and nourysshed hym tyl he was xiiij yere olde / & thenne he brought hym to the Court / as it reherceth afterward toward the ende of the deth of Arthur / So many lordes and barons of this reame were displeasyd / for her children were so lost / and many put the wyte on Merlyn more than on Arthur / so what for drede and for loue they helde their pees / But whanne the messager came to kynge Ryons / thenne was he woode oute of mesure and purueyed hym for a grete hoost as it rehercyth af­ter in the book of Balyn [...]e sa [...]age that foloweth next after / how by aduenture Balyn gat the swerd

¶Explicit liber primus

¶Incipit liber secundus

AFter the dethe of Vtherpendragon regned Ar­thur his sone / the whiche had grete werre in his dayes for to gete al Englond in to his hand / For there were many kynges within the real­me of Englond and in walys / Scotland and Cornewaille / Soo it befelle on a tyme / whanne kyng Arthur [Page] was at London ther came a knyght and tolde the kynge ty­dynges how that the kynge Ryons of Northwalys had rered a grete nombre of peple / and were entryd in to the land and brente and slewe the kynges true liege peple / yf this be true said Arthur / it were grete shame vnto myn estate / but that he were myghtely withstand / it is trouthe sayd the knyghte / for I sawe the hoost my self / wel saide the kynge / lete make a crye / that all the lordes knyghtes and gentylmen of armes shold drawe vnto a castel called Camelot in tho dayes / and ther the kynge wold lete make a counceil general and a grete Iustes So whan the kynge was come thyder with all his baronage and lodged as they semed best / ther was come a damoisel the whiche was sente on message from the grete lady lylle of aue­lyon / And whan she came bifore kynge Arthur / she told from whome she came / and how she was sent on message vnto hym for these causes Thenne she lete her mantel falle that was ry­chely furred / And thenne was she gyrd with a noble swerd wherof the kynge had merueill / and said Damoysel for what cause are ye gyrd with that swerd / it bisemeth yow not / Now shall I telle yow said the damoysel / This swerd that I am gyrd with al doth me grete sorowe and comberaunce / for I may not be delyuerd of this swerd / but by a knyghte / but he must be a passyng good man of his handes and of his dedes and withoute vylonye or trecherye and withoute treason / And yf I may fynde suche a knyghte that hath alle these vertues / he may drawe onte this swerd oute of the shethe / for I haue ben at kyng Ryons / it was told me ther were passyng good knyghtes / and he and alle his knyghtes haue assayed it and none can spede / This is a grete merueill said Arthur / yf this be sothe / I wille my self assaye to drawe oute the swerd / not presumynge vpon my self that I am the best knyghte / but that I will begynne to drawe at your swerd in gyuyng example to alle the Barons that they shall assay euerychone after other whan I haue assayed it / Thenne Arthur toke the swerd by the shethe and by the gyrdel and pulled at it egrely / but the swerd wold not oute / ¶Sire seid the damoysell ye ne­de not to pulle half so hard / for he that shall pulle it out shal do it with lytel myghte / ye say wel said Arthur / Now assaye [Page] ye al my barons / but beware ye be not defoyled with shame trechery ne gyle / thenne it wille not auaylle sayd the damoysell / for he must be a clene knyght withoute vylony and of a gentil strene of fader syde and moder syde / Moost of all the barons of the round table that were there at that tyme assayed alle by rewe / but ther myght none spede / wherfor the damoysel made grete sorow oute of mesure and sayd Allas I wende in this Courte had ben the best knyghtes withoute trechery or treson / By my feythe sayth Arthur here are good knyghtes as I de­me as ony ben in the world / but theyr grace is not to helpe yow / wherfor I am displeasyd

¶Capitulum ij

THenne felle hit soo that tyme / ther was a poure kny­ght with kynge Arthur / that had byn prysoner with hym half a yere & more for sleynge of a knyghte / the whiche was cosyn vnto kynge Arthur / the name of this kny­ght was called Balen / and by good meanes of the barons he was delyuerd oute of pryson / for he was a good man na­med of his body / and he was borne in northumberland / and soo he wente pryuely in to the Courte / and sawe this aduen­ture / wherof hit reysed his herte / and wolde assaye it as other knyghtes dyd / but for he was poure and pourely arayed he put hym not ferre in prees / But in his herte he was fully assured to doo as wel yf his grace happed hym as ony knyght that there was / And as the damoysel toke her leue of Arthur and of alle the barons so departyng / this knyght Balen called vnto her and sayd Damoysel I praye yow of your cur­tosy / suffre me as wel to assay as these lordes though that I be so po [...]rely clothed / in my herte me semeth I am fully assu­red as somme of these other / And me semeth in my herte to spede ryght wel / The damoysel beheld the poure knyght / and sawe he was a lykely man / but for his poure arrayment she thoughte he shold be of no worship withoute vylonye or tre­chery / And thēne she sayd vnto the knyght / sir it nedeth not to put me to more payn or labour / for it semeth not yow to spede there as other haue failled / A fayr Damoysel said Balen worthynes and good tatches and good dedes are not only in arrayment / but manhood and worship is hyd within mans persone and many a worshipful knyghte is not knowen vnto [Page] alle people / and therfore worship and hardynesse is not in arayment / By god sayd the damoysel ye say sothe / therfor ye shal assaye to do what ye may / Thenne Balen took the swerd by the gyrdel and shethe / and drewe it out easyly / and when he loked on the swerd hit pleasyd hym moche / thenne had the kynge and alle the barons grete merueille that Balen hadde done that auenture / many knyghtes had grete despyte of Balen / Certes said the damoysel / this is a passynge good knyght and the best that euer I found and moost of worship with­oute treson / trechery or vylony / and many merueylles shalle he do / Now gentyl and curtois knyght yeue me the swerd ayene nay said Balen / for this swerd wylle I kepe but it be taken from me with force / wel saide the damoysel ye are not wyse to kepe the swerd from me / for ye shalle slee with the swerd the best frende that ye haue and the man that ye moste loue in the world / and the swerd shalle be your destruction / I shal take the aduenture sayd Balen that god wille ordeyne me / but the swerd ye shalle not haue at this tyme by the feythe of my bo­dy / ye shalle repente hit within short tyme sayd the damoysel / For I wold haue the swerd more for your auaylle than for myne / for I am passyng heuy for your sake / For ye wil not byleue that swerd shal be youre destruction / and that is grete pyte / with that the damoysel departed makynge grete sorowe / Anone after Balen sente for his hors and armour / and soo wold departe fro the Courte and toke his leue of kynge Ar­thur / nay sayd the kynge I suppose ye wyll not departe so liȝ­tely fro this felauship / I suppose ye are displeased that I ha­ue shewed yow vnkyndenes / Blame me the lasse / for I was mys senformed ageynst yow / but I wende ye had not ben suche a knyght as ye are of worship and prowesse / and yf ye wyll abyde in this courte among my felauship / I shalle so auaun­ce yow as ye shalle be pleased / god thanke your hyhenes said Balen / your bounte and hyhenes may no man preyse half to the valewe / but at this tyme I must nedes departe / bysechyng yow alwey of your good grace / Truly said the kynge I am ryght wrothe for your departyng / I pray yow faire knyghte / that ye tary not long / and ye shal be ryght welcome to me / & to my barons / and I shalle amende all mysse that I haue [Page] done ageynst yow / god thanke your grete lordship said Ba­len / and therwith made hym redy to departe / Thenne the moost party of the knyghtes of the round table sayd that Balen did not this auenture al only by myghte but by wytchecraft

¶Capitulum Tercium

THe meane whyle that this knyght was makyng hym redy to departe / there came in to the Court a lady that hyght the lady of the lake / And she came on horsbak rychely bysene / and salewed kynge Arthur / and there asked hym a yefte that he promysed her whan she gaf hym the swerd / that is sothe said Arthur / a gyfte I promysed yow / but I haue forgoten the name of my swerd that ye gaue me / The name of it said the lady is Excalibur that is as moche to say as cut stele / ye saye wel saide the kynge / Aske what ye wil and ye shall haue it / and hit lye in my power to yeue hit / wel sayd the lady / I aske the heede of the knyghte that hath wonne the swerd / or els the damoysels heede that broughte hit / I take no force though I haue bothe their hedes / for he slewe my broder a good knyȝte and a true / and that gentilwoman was causar of my faders deth / Truly said kynge Arthur I maye not graunte neyther of her hedes with my worship / therfor aske what ye wille els / and I shall fulfille your desyre / I wil aske none other thyng said the lady / whan Balyn was redy to departe he sawe the lady of the lake that by her menes had slayne Balyns moder and he had soughte her thre yeres / and whan it was told hym that she asked his hede of kynge Ar­thur he went to her streyte and said euyl be you foūde / ye wold haue my hede / and therfore ye shall lese yours / and with hys swerd lyghtly he smote of hir hede before kynge Arthur / al­las for shame sayd Arthur why haue ye done so / ye haue sha­med me and al my Courte / for this was a lady that I was be holden to / and hyther she came vnder my sauf conduyte / I shalle neuer foryeue you that trespas / Sir said Balen me for thynketh of your displeasyr / for this same lady was the vn­truest lady lyuynge / and by enchauntement and sorssery she hath ben the destroyer of many good knyghtes / and she was causer that my moder was brente thorow her falshede and tre­chery / what cause soo euer ye had said Arthur ye shold haue [Page] forborne her in my presence / therfor thynke not the contrary ye shalle repente it / for suche another despyte had I neuer in my Courte / therfor withdrawe yow oute of my Courte in al hast that ye may / Thenne Balen toke vp the heed of the lady and bare it with hym to his hostry / and there he met with his squyer that was sory he had displeasyd kyng Arthur / and so they rode forth oute of the town / Now said Balen we must depar­te / take thow this hede and bere it to my frendys / and telle hem how I haue sped / and telle my frendys in Northumberland that my most foo is deed / Also telle hem how I am oute of pryson / and what auēture befelle me at the getyng of this swerd Allas said the squyar ye are gretely to blame for to displease kyng Arthur / as for that said Balen I wylle hyhe me in al the hast that I may to mete with kynge Ryons and destroye hym eyther els to dye therfor / and yf it may happe me to wyn­ne hym / thenne wille kynge Arthur be my good and gracious lord / where shall I mete with yow saide the squyer / in kynge Arthurs Court said Balen / so his squyer and he departed at that tyme / thenne kynge Arthur and alle the Court made grete doole and had shame of the deth of the lady of the lake thenne the kyng buryed her rychely

¶Cpitulum iiij

AT that tyme ther was a knyghte / the whiche was the kynges sone of Irelond and his name was Launce­or / the whiche was an orgulous knyȝt / and counted hym self one of the best of the Courte / and he had grete despyte at Ba­len for the encheuynge of the swerd that ony shold be acoun­ted more hardy or more of prowesse / and he asked kynge Arthur yf he wold gyue hym leue to ryde after Balen and to reuenge the despyte that he had done / Doo your best said Arthur I am right wroth said Balen I wold he were quyte of the despyte that he hath done to me and to my Courte / Thenne this Launceor wente to his hostry to make hym redy / In the meane whyle cam Merlyn vnto the Court of kyng Arthur and there was told hym the aduenture of the swerd and the deth of the lady of the lake / Now shall I saye yow said Merlyn / this same damoysel that here standeth that broughte the swerde vnto your Court / I shalle telle yow the cause of her comynge / she was the falsest damoysel that lyueth / say not so said they / She [Page] hath a broder a passynge good knyght of prowesse and a ful true man / and this damoysel loued another knyght that helde her to peramour / and this good knyght her broder mett with the knyght that held her to peramour and slewe hym by force of his handes / whan this fals damoysel vnderstood thys / she wente to the lady lyle of Auelione / and besought her of help / to be auengyd on her owne broder

¶Capitulum quintum

ANd so this lady lyle of Auelion toke her this swerd that she broughte with her / and told there shold noo man pulle it oute of the shethe but yf he be one of the best knyghtes of this reame / and he shold be hard and ful of prowesse / and with that swerd he shold slee her broder / this was the cause that the damoysel came in to this Courte / I knowe it as wel as ye / wolde god she had nat comen in to thys Courte / but she came neuer in felauship of worship to do go­od but alweyes grete harme / and that knyght that hath encheued the suerd shal be destroyed by that suerd / for the whiche wil be grete dommage / for ther lyueth not a knyȝt of more prowesse than he is / and he shalle do vnto yow my lord Arthur grete honour and kyndenesse / and it is grete pyte he shall not endure but a whyle / for of his strengthe and hardynesse I knowe not his matche lyuynge / Soo the knyght of Irelonde armed hym at al poyntes / and dressid his shelde on his sholder and mounted vpon horsback and toke his spere in his hand / and rode after a grete paas as moche as his hors myght goo / and within a lytel space on a montayne he had a syghte of Ba­lyn / and with a lowde voys he cryed abyde knyght / for ye shal abyde whether ye will or nyll / and the sheld that is to fore you shalle not helpe / whan Balyn herd the noyse / he tourned his hors fyersly / and saide faire knyghte what wille ye with me / wille ye Iuste with me / ye said the Iryss [...]e knyghte / therfor co­me I after yow / parauenture said Balyn it had ben better to haue hold yow at home / for many a man weneth to putte his enemy to a rebuke / and ofte it falleth to hym self / of what co­urte be ye sente fro said Balyn / I am come fro the Courte of kynge Arthur sayd the knyghte of Irlond / that come hy­der for to reuenge the despyte ye dyd this day to kyng arthur [Page] and to his courte / wel said Balyn / I see wel I must haue adoo with yow that me forthynketh for to greue kyng arthur or ony of his courte / and your quarel is ful symple said Balyn vnto me / for the lady that is dede / dyd me grete domma­ge & els wold I haue ben lothe as ony knyghte that lyueth for to slee a lady / Make yow redy sayd the knyght launceor / and dresse yow vnto me / for that one shalle abyde in the feld thenne they toke their speres / and cam to gyders as moche as their horses myght dryue / and the Irysshe knyght smote Ba­lyn on the sheld that alle wente sheuers of his spere / & Ba­lyn hyt hym thorugh the sheld / and the hauberk perysshed / & so percyd thurgh his body and the hors croppe / and anon tor­ned his hors fyersly and drewe oute his swerd and wyste not that he had slayn hym / and thenne he sawe hym lye as a dede corps

¶Capitulum vj

THenne he loked by hym and was ware of a damoysel that came ryde ful fast as the hors myghte ryde on a fayr palfroy / and whan she aspyed that launceor was slayne / she made sorowe oute of mesure and sayd O Balyn two bodyes thou hast slayne and one herte and two hertes in one body / and two soules thow hast lost / And therwith she toke the swerd from her loue that lay ded and fylle to the ground in a swowne / And whan she aroos she made grete dole out of mesure / the whiche sorowe greued Balyn passyngly sore / and he wente vnto her for to haue taken the swerd oute of her hād but she helde it so fast / he myghte not take it oute of her hand onles he shold haue hurte her / and sodenly she sette the pomell to the ground / and rofe her self thorow the body / whan balyn aspyed her dedes he was passynge heuy in his herte and asha­med that so fair a damoysell had destroyed her self for the loue of his deth / Allas said Balyn me repēteth sore the deth of this knyght for the loue of this damoysel / for ther was moche true loue betwixe them bothe / and for sorowe myght not lenger be­hold hym but torned his hors and loked toward a grete forest and ther he was ware by the armes of his broder Balan / and whan they were mette they putte of her helmes and kyssed to gyders and wepte for ioye and pyte / Thenne Balan sayd / I [Page] lytel wende to haue met with yow at this sodayne auenture / I am ryght glad of your delyueraunce and of youre dolorous prysonement / for a mā told me in the / castel of four stones that ye were delyuerd / & that man had sene you in the court of ky­nge Arthur / & therfor I cam hyder in to this countrey / for he­re I supposed to fynde you / anon the knyȝt balyn told his bro­der of his aduenture of the swerd & of the deth of the lady of the lake / & how kyng arthur was displeasyd with hym wher­for he sente this knyȝt after me that lyeth here dede / & the dethe of this damoysel greueth me sore / so doth it me said Balan / but ye must take the aduenture that god wil ordeyne yow / Tru­ly said Balyn I am ryght heuy that my lord Arthur is dis­pleasyd with me / for he is the moost worshipful knyght that regneth now on erthe / & his loue will I gete or els I wil put my lyf in auenture / for the kyng Ryons lyeth at a syege atte castel Tarabil & thyder will we drawe in all hast to preue our worship & prowesse vpon hym / I wil wel said Balan that we do & we wil helpe eche other as bretheren ouȝt to do /

¶Ca vij

NOw go we hens said balyn & wel be we met / the me­ne whyle as they talked ther cam a dwarf from the cyte of camelot on horsbak as moche as he myght & foūd the dede bodyes / wherfor he made grete dole & pulled out his here for sorou & saide which of you knyȝtes haue done this dede / where by askest thou it said balan / for I wold wete it said the dwarfe / it was I said balyn that slewe this knyght in my de­fendaūt for hyder he cam to chaace me & other I must sle [...] hym or he me / & this damoysel slewe her self for his loue whiche repenteth me / & for her sake I shal owe al wymmen the better lo­ue / Allas said the dwarf thow hast done grete dommage vnto thy self / for this knyght that is here dede was one of the most [...]alyaunts men that lyued / and trust wel balyn the kynne of this knyght wille chace yow thorowe the world tyl they haue slayne yow / As for that sayd Balyn I fere not gretely / but I am ryght heuy that I haue displeasyd my lord kyng ar­thur for the deth of this knyght / Soo as they talked to gy­ders there came a kynge of Cornewaille rydynge / the whi [...]he hyghte kynge Mark / ¶And whanne he sawe these two bodyes dede and vnderstood hou they were dede by the ij knyghtes [Page] and so leyd hym on on hors lyttar / with that Merlyn was vanysshed and came to kyng Arthur afore hand & told hym how his most enemy was taken and discomfyted / by whome said kynge Arthur / by two knyghtes said Merlyn that wold please your lordship / and to morowe ye shalle knowe what knyghtes they are / Anone after cam the knyght with the two swerdes and balan his broder / and brought with hem kynge Ryons of Northwalys and there delyuerd hym to the porters and charged hem with hym / & soo they two retorned ageyne in the daunyng of the day / kynge Arthur cam thenne to kyng Ryons and said Syr kynge ye are welcome / by what auen­ture come ye hyder / syr said kyng Ryons I cam hyther by an hard auenture / who wanne yow said kyng Arthur / syre said the kyng the knyght with the two swerdes & his broder whi­che are two merueillous knyghtes of prowesse / I knowe hem not sayd arthur but moche I am beholden to them / A said merlyn I shal telle yow it is balen that encheued the swerd & his broder balan a good knyght / ther lyueth not a better of pro­wesse & of worthynesse / and it shal be the grettest dole of hym that euer I knewe of knyght / for he shalle not long endure / Allas saide kynge Arthur that is grete pyte for I am moche beholdyng vnto hym / & I haue yll deserued it vnto hym for his kyndenes / nay said Merlyn he shal do moche more for yow / and that shal ye knowe in hast / but syr are ye purueyed said Merlyn for to morne the hooste of New kynge Ryons broder wille sette on yow or none with a grete hoost and therfor make yow redy for I wyl departe from yow

¶Capitulum x

THenne kyng Arthur made redy his hoost in x batails and New was redy in the felde afore the castel Ta­rabil with a grete hoost / & he had x batails with many mo peple than Arthur had / Thenne New had the vaward with the moost party of his peple / & merlyn cam to kyng lot of the yle of Orkeney / and helde hym with a tale of prophecye til New and his peple were destroyed / & ther syr kay the sencyal dyd passyngly wel that the dayes of his lyf the worship went ne­uer frō hym & sir heruys de reuel did merueillous dedes with [Page] with kynge Arthur / and kynge Arthur slewe that daye xx knyghtes & maymed xl / At that tyme cam in the knyȝte with the two swerdys and his broder Balan / But they two did so merueillously that the kynge and alle the knyghtes mer­ueilled of them / and alle they that behelde them said they we­re sente from heuen as aungels or deuyls from helle / & kynge Arthur said hym self they were the best knyghtes that euer he sawe / for they gaf suche strokes that all men had wōder of hem In the meane whyle came one to kynge Lott and told hym / whyle he taryed there new was destroyed and slayne with al his peple / Allas sayd kynge Lot I am ashamed / for by my defaute ther is many a worshipful man slayne / for and we had ben to gyders there hadde ben none hooste vnder the heuen that had ben abel for to haue matched with vs / This fayter with his prophecye hath mocked me / Al that dyd Merlyn for he knewe wel that and kyng Lot had ben with his body there at the fyrst bataille / kynge Arthur had be slayne / and alle his peple destroyed / & wel Merlyn knewe the one of the kynges shold be dede that day / & loth was Merlyn that ony of them both sholde be slayne / But of the tweyne / he had leuer kyng Lotte had be slayne than kynge Arthur / Now what is best to doo sayd kyng Lot of Orkeney whether is me better to treate with kynge Arthur or to fyghte / for the gretter party of oure pe­ple are slayne / and destroyed / Syr said a knyght set on arthur for they are wery and forfoughten and we be fresshe / As for me sayd kyng Lot I wolde euery knyght wolde do his parte as I wold doo myn / And thenne they auaunced baners and smoten to gyders and al to sheuered their speres / and arthurs knyghtes with the helpe of the knyght with two swerdes & his broder balan put kyng lot & his hoost to the werre / But alweyes kyng Lot helde hym in the formest frunte & dyd merueillous dedes of armes / for alle his hooste was borne vp by his handes for he abode al knyghtes / allas he myght not endure the whiche was grete pyte that so worthy a knyyt as he was one shold be ouermatched that of late tyme afore hadde ben a knyght of kyng Arthurs & wedded the sister of kyng arthur & for kyng Arthur lay by kyng lots wyf the whiche was ar­thurs syster & gat on her Mordred / therfor kyng lot held ayēst [Page] Arthur / So ther was a knyght that was called the knyghte with the straunge beeste / and at that tyme his ryght name was called Pellinore / the whiche was a good man of pro­wesse / and he smote a myghty stroke att kynge Lot as he fo­ught with all his enemyes / and he fayled of his stroke / and smote the hors neck that he fylle to the grounde with kyng lot And therwith anon Pellinore smote hym a grete stroke tho­row the helme & hede vnto the browes & thenne alle the hooste of Orkeney fled for the deth of kynge Lott / and there were slayn many moders sones / But kynge Pellinore bare the wy­tte of the deth of kynge Lot / wherfore syr Gawayne reuenged the deth of his fader the x yere after he was made knyght and slewe kynge Pellinore with his owne handes / Also there we­re slayne at that bataille xij kynges on the syde of kyng Lot with New / and alle were buryed in the chirche of saynt Steuyns in Camelot / and the remenaunt of knyghtes and of o­ther were buryed in a grete roche

¶Capitulum xj

SO at the enterement cam kynge Lots wyf Morgause with her foure sones Gawayne / Agrauayne / Gaherys and Gareth / Also ther came thyder kyng Vryens syr Ewayns fader and Morgan le fay his wyf that was kyng Arthurs syster / Alle these cam to the enterement / but of alle these xij kynges kyng Arthur lete make the tombe of kynge Lot passyng rychely / and made his tombe by his owne / and thenne Arthur lete make xij ymages of laton and couper / & ouer gylt hit with gold in the sygne of xij kynges / & echon of hem helde a tapyr of wax that brent day and nyȝt / & kyng Arthur was made in sygne of a fygure standynge aboue hem with a swerd drawen in his hand / & alle the xij fygures had countenaunce lyke vnto men that were ouercome / All this made Merlyn by his subtyl craf [...]e and ther he told the kyng whā I am dede / these tapers shalle brenne no lenger / and soone af­ter the aduentures of the Sangrayll shalle come among yow and be encheued / Also he told Arthur how Balyn the wor­shipful knyght shal gyue the dolourous stroke / wherof shalle falle grete vengeaunce / O where is Balen & Balan & Pelli­nore saide kynge Arthur / as for Pellinore sayd Merlyn / he wyl mete with yow soone / ¶And as for Balyn [Page] he wille not be longe from yow / but the other broder wil departe ye shalle see hym no more / By my feyth said Arthur they are two merueyllous knyghtes / and namely Balyn passeth of prowesse of ony knyghte that euer I found / for moche be holden am I vnto hym / wold god he wold abyde with me / Syr sayd Merlyn loke ye kepe wel the scaubard of Excali­bur / for ye shalle lese no blood whyle ye haue the scauberd vpon yow though ye haue as many woundes vpon yow as ye may haue / Soo after for grete trust Arthur betoke the scau­berd to Morgan le fay his syster / and she loued another knyght better than her husband kynge Vryens or kynge Arthur And she wold haue had Arthur her broder slayne / And therfor she lete make another scauberd lyke it by enchauntement and gaf the scauberd Excalibur to her loue / and the knyghtes name was called Accolon that after had nere slayne kyng arthur / After this Merlyn told vnto kynge Arthur of the pro­phecye / that there shold be a grete batail besyde Salysbury and Mordred his owne sone sholde be ageynste hym / Also he tolde hym that Basdemegus was his cosyn and germayn vnto ky­nge Vryence

¶Capitulum xij

WYthm a daye or two kynge Arthur was somwhat se­ke / and he lete pytche his pauelione in a medowe / & there he leyd hym doune on a paylet to slepe / but he myght haue no rest / Ryght so he herd a grete noyse of an hors and therwith the kynge loked oute at the porche of the pauelione / and sawe a knyght comynge euen by hym makyng grete dole Abyde fair syr said Arthur / & telle me wherfor thow makest this sorowe / ye maye lytel amend me said the knyghte and soo passed forthe to the castel of Melyot / A none after ther cam balen / and whan he sawe kynge Arthur / he alyght of his hors / and cam to the kynge on foote / and salewed hym / by my hede saide Arthur ye be welcome / Sire ryght now cam rydynge this way a knyght makynge grete moorne / for what cause I can not telle / wlerfor I wold desyre of yow of your curtosye and of your gentylnesse to fetche ageyne that knyght / eyther by force or els by his good wil / I wil do more for your lordship than that said balyn / and so he rode more than a paas and found the knyght with a damoysel in a forest & said sir knyȝt [Page] ye must come with me vnto kynge Arthur for to telle hym of your sorow / that wille I not / sayd the knyghte / for hit wylle scathe me gretely / and do yow none auaylle / syr sayd Balyn I pray yow make yow redy for ye must goo with me / or els I must fyghte with yow and brynge yow by force / and that were me both to doo / wylle ye be my Waraunt said the knyght and I goo with yow / ye saide Balyn or els I wylle deye therfore / And so he made hym redy to go with Balyn / and lefte the damoysel stylle / And as they were euen afore kynge Arthurs pauelione / there came one inuysybel and smote thys knyghte that wente with Balyn thorow oute the body wyth a spere / Allas sayd the knyght I am slayne vnder youre cō ­duyt with a knyght called Garlon / therfor take my hors that is better than yours and ryde to the damoysel and folowe the quest that I Was in / as she wylle lede yow and reuenge my deth whan ye may / That shalle I doo sayd Balyn / and that I make a vowe vnto knygthode / and so he departed from thys knyghte with grete sorowe / Soo kyng Arthur lete berye thys knyght rychely / and made a mensyon on his tombe / how there was slayne Herlews le berbeus / and by whome the trechery was done the knyght garlon / But euer the damoysel bare the truncheon of the spere with her that syr Harlews was slayn with al

¶Capitulum xiij

SO Balyn and the damoysel rode in to a forest / & ther met with a knyght that had ben on huntynge / and that knyght asked Balyn for what cause he made so grete so­rowe / me lyst not to telle yow saide Balyn / Now saide the knyghte and I were armed as ye be I wolde fyghte wyth yow / that shold lytel nede sayd Balyn / I am not aferd to telle yow / and told hym alle the cause how it was A sayd the knyght is this al / Here I ensure yow by the feithe of my bo­dy neuer to departe from yow whyle my lyf lasteth / & soo they wente to the hostry and armed hem / and so rode forth with balyn / And as they came by an heremytage euen by a Chyrcheyerd / ther cam the knyghte garlon inuysybel and smote thys knyghte Peryn de mountebeliard thurgh the body with a spe­re / Allas saide the knyghte I am slayne by this traytoure [Page] knyghte that rydeth Inuysyble / Allas said balyn it is not the fyrst despyte he hath done me / and there the heremyte and Ba­lyn beryed the knyght vnder a ryche stone and a tombe royal And on the morne they fond letters of gold / wryten / how syr Gaweyn shalle reuenge his faders deth kynge Lot / on the kynge Pellinore / Anone after this balyn and the damoysel rode tyl they came to a castel and there balyn alyghte / and he and the damoysel wende to goo in to the castel / and anone as balyn came within the castels yate the portroolys fylle doune at his bak / and there felle many men about the damoysel / and wold haue slayne her / whan balyn sawe that / he was sore a­greued / for he myghte not helpe the damoysel / and thenne he wente vp in to the toure and lepte ouer the wallys in to the dyche / and hurte hym not / and anone he pulled oute his suerd and wold haue fouȝten with hem / and they all sayd nay they wold not fyghte with hym / for they dyd no thyng but thold custome of the castel / and told hym how her lady was seke / & had layne many yeres / and she myghte not be hole but yf she had a dysshe of syluer ful of blood of a clene mayde & a kyn­ges doughter / and therfore the custome of this castel is / there shalle no damoysel passe this way but she shal blede of her blo­od in a syluer dysshe ful / wel said balyn she shal blede as moche as she may blede / but I wille not lese the lyf of her why­les my lyf lasteth / & soo balyn made her to blede by her good will / but her blood halpe not the lady / and so he & she rested there al nyght / & had there ryght good chere / and on the morn they passed on their wayes / And as it telleth after in the sangraylle that syre Percyualis syster halpe that lady with her blood wherof she was dede

¶Capitulum xiiij

THenne they rode thre or foure dayes and neuer mette with aduenture / and by happe they were lodged with a gentyll man that was a ryche man and well at ease / And as they sat at her souper balyn herd ouer complayne greuous­ly by hym in a chayer / what is this noyse said balen / forsothe said his hoost I wylle telle yow / I was but late att a Iust­ynge / and there I Iusted with a knyghte that is broder vnto kynge Pellam / and twyes smote I hym doune / & thenne [Page] he promysed to quyte me on my best frynde / and so he woun­ded my sone that can not be hole tyll I haue of that knyghtes blood / and he rydeth alwey Inuysyble / but I knowe not his name / A sayd Balyn / I knowe that knyght / his name is Garlon / he hath slayne two knyghtes of myn in the same ma­ner / therfor I had leuer mete with that knyght than alle the gold in this realme / for the despyte he hath done me / wel said his ooste I shalle telle yow kynge Pellam of lystyneyse hath made do crye in all this countrey a grete feest that shal be with in these xx dayes / & no knyght may come ther but yf he bryn­ge his wyf wyth hym / or his peramour / & that knyȝte youre e­nemy and myn ye shalle see that daye / Thenne I behote yow sayd Balyn parte of his blood to hele youre sone with alle / we wille be forward to morne sayd his oost / So on the morne they rode all thre toward Pellam / and they had xv dayes Io­urney or they cam thyder / and that same day began the greete feeste / and soo they alyght and stabled theyr horses / & went in to the Castel / but balyns oost myght not be lete in by cause he had no lady / thenne Balyn was wel receyued & brought vnto a chamber and vnarmed hym / and there were brought hym robes to his pleasyr / and wold haue had Balen leue his swerd behynde hym Nay sayd Balen that doo I not for it is the customme of my Countrey a knyghte alweyes to ke­pe his wepen with hym and that customme wylle I kepe / or els I wyll departe as I cam / thenne they gaf hym leue to were his swerd / and so he wente vnto the castel / and was sette amonge knyghtes of worship and his lady afore hym / Soo­ne balyn asked a knyght / is ther not a knyghte in this court whos name is Garlon / yonder he goth sayd a knyght / he with the blak face / he is the merueyllest knyȝt that is now lyuyng for he destroyeth many good knyghtes / for he goth Inuysyble A wel said Balen is that he / thēne balyn auysed hym long yf I slee hym here I shall not scape / And yf I leue hym now perauentur I shalle neuer mete with hym ageyne at suche a steuen / and moche harme he wille doo and he lyue / Ther with this Garlon aspyed that this Balen behelde hym / and then­ne he came and smote Balyn on the face with the bak of his hand / and sayd knyȝt why beholdest thow me so for shame [Page] therfor ete thy mete and doo that thow cam for / Thow sayst so­the said Balyn / this is not the fyrst despyte that thow hast done me / and therfor I will doo that I cam for and rose vp fyersly and claue his hede to the sholders / gyue me the truncheon sayd Balyn to his lady where with he slewe your knyghte / anone she gaf it hym / for alwey she bare the troncheon with her And therwith Balyn smote hym thurgh the body / and sayd openly with that truncheon thow hast slayn a good knyghte / and now it stycketh in thy body / And thenne Balyn called vnto hym his hoost / sayenge / now may ye fetche blood ynough to hele your sone with all /

Capitulum xv

ANone all the knyghtes aroos from the tabyl for to set on Balyn / and kynge Pellam hym self aroos vp fyersly / & sayd knyȝt hast thow slayn my broder / thow shalt dye therfor or thou departe / wel said balen do it your self yis sayde kyng pellā / ther shall no mā haue ado with the / but my self for the loue of my broder / Thenne kyng Pellam cauȝt in his hand a grym wepen and smote egrely at balyn / but ba­lyn put his swerd betwixe his hede and the stroke / and ther­with his swerd brest in sonder / And whan balyn was wepenles he ranne in to a chamber for to seke somme wepen / and soo fro chamber to chamber / and no wepen he coude fynde / and al­weyes kynge Pellam after hym / And at the last he entryd in to a chambyr that was merueillously wel dyȝte and ryche­ly / and a bedde arayed with clothe of gold the rychest that myghte be thought / and one lyenge theryn / and therby stode a table of clene gold with four pelours of syluer / that bare vp the table / and vpon the table stood a merueillous spere straungely wrought / And whan balyn sawe that spere / he gat it in his hand and torned hym to kyng Pellam / and smote hym passyngly sore With that spere that kynge Pellam felle doune in a swoune / and therwith the castel roofe and wallys brake and fylle to the erthe / and balyn felle doune so that he myghte not stere foote nor hand / And so the moost party of the castel that was falle doune thorugh that dolorous stroke laye vpon Pellam and balyn thre dayes

¶Capitulum xvj

[Page]THenne Merlyn cam thyder and toke vp Balyn and gat hym a good hors for his was dede / and bad hym ryde oute of that countrey / I wold haue my damoysel sayd balyn / Loo sayd Merlyn where she lyeth dede & kynge Pellam lay so many yeres sore wounded / and myght neuer be hole tyl Galahad the haute prynce heled hym in the quest of the Sangraille / for in that place was part of the blood of our lord Ihesu cryst that Ioseph of Armathe broughte in to this lond / and ther hym self lay in that ryche bed / And that was the same spere that Longeus smote oure lorde to the herte / and kynge Pellam was nyghe of Ioseph kynne / and that was the moost worshipful man that lyued in tho dayes / and gre­te pyte it was of his hurte / for thorow that stroke torned to grete dole tray and tene / Thenne departed Balyn from Mer­lyn and sayd in this world we mete neuer nomore / Soo he rode forth thorowe the fayr countreyes and Cytees & fond the peple dede slayne on euery syde / and alle that were on ly­ue cryed O balyn thow hast caused grete dommage in these cō trayes for the dolorous stroke thow gauest vnto kynge Pellā thre contreyes are destroyed / and doubte not but the vengeaun­ce wil falle on the at the last / whanne Balyn was past tho contrayes he was passyng fayne / so he rode eyȝt dayes or he met with auenture / And at the last he came in to a fayr forest in a valey and was ware of a Toure / And there besyde he sawe a grete hors of werre tayed to a treee / and ther besyde satte a fayr knyght on the ground and made grete mornynge and he was a lykely man and a wel made / Balyn sayd God saue yow why be ye so heuy / telle me and I wylle amende it and I may to my power / Syr knyghte said he ageyne thow doest me grete gryef / for I was in mery thoughtes and now thou puttest me to more payne / Balyn wente a lytel from hym / & loked on his hors / thenne herd Balyn hym saye thus / a fair lady why haue ye broken my promyse / for thow promysest me to mete me here by none / and I maye curse the that euer ye gaf me this swerd / for with this swerd I slee my self / and pulled it oute / and therwith Balyn sterte vnto hym & took hym by the hand / lete goo my hand sayd the knyght or els I shal slee the / that shal not nede said balyn / for I shal promyse [Page] yow my helpe to gete yow your lady / and ye wille telle me where she is / what is your name sayd the knyght / myn name is Balyn le saueage / A syr I knowe yow wel ynough ye are the knyght with the two swerdys and the man of moost prowesse of your handes lyuyng / what is your name sayd balen / my name is garnysshe of the mount a poure mans sone / But by my prowesse and hardynesse a duke hath maade me knyght / and gaf me landes / his name is duke Hermel / and his doughter is she that I loue and she me as I demed / houfer is she hens sayd Balyn / but vj myle said the knyghte Now ryde we hens sayde these two knyghtes / so they rode mo­re than a paas tyll that they cam to a fayr castel wel wallyd and dyched / I wylle in to the castel sayd Balen / and loke yf she be ther / Soo he wente in and serched fro chamber to chā bir / and fond her bedde but she was not there / Thenne Balen loked in to a fayr litil gardyn / and vnder a laurel tre he sawe her lye vpon a quylt of grene samyte and a knyght in her ar­mes fast halsynge eyther other and vnder their hedes grasse & herbes / whan Balen sawe her lye so with the fowlest knyghte that euer he sawe and she a fair lady / thenne Balyn wente thurgh alle the chambers ageyne and told the knyghte how he fond her as she had slepte fast / and so brought hym in the place there she lay fast slepynge

¶Capitulum xvij

ANd whan Garnyssh beheld hir so lyeng for pure sorou his mouth and nose brast oute on bledynge and with his swerd he smote of bothe their hedes / and thenne he maade sorowe oute of mesure and sayd O Balyn / Moche sorow hast thow brought vnto me / for haddest thow not shewed me that [...]yght I shold haue passed my sorow / forsoth said balyn I did it to this entent that it sholde better thy courage / and that ye myght see and knowe her falshede / and to cause yow to leue loue of suche a lady / god knoweth I dyd none other but as I wold ye dyd to me / Allas said garnysshe now is my sorou doubel that I may not endure / Now haue I slayne that I moost loued in al my lyf / and therwith sodenly he roofe hym self on his own swerd vnto the hyltys / when balen sawe that [Page] he dressid hym thens ward / lest folke wold say he had slayne them / and so he rode forth / and within thre dayes he cam by a crosse / & theron were letters of gold wrytē that said / it is not for no knyght alone to ryde toward this Castel / thēne sawe he an old hore gentylman comyng toward hym that sayd Ba­lyn le Saueage thow passyst thy bandes to come this waye / therfor torne ageyne and it will auaille the / and he vanysshed awey anone / and soo he herd an horne blowe as it had ben the dethe of a best / That blast said Balyn is blowen for me / For I am the pryse and yet am I not dede / anone with al he sa­we an honderd ladyes and many knyghtes that welcommed hym with fayr semblaunt and made hym passyng good chere / vnto his syght and ledde hym in to the castel / and ther was daunsynge and mynstralsye and alle maner of Ioye / Then­ne the chyef lady of the castel said / knyghte with the two suerdys ye must haue adoo and Iuste with a knyght hereby that kepeth an Iland / for ther may no man passe this way but he must Iuste or he passe / that is an vnhappy customme said Ba­lyn that a knyght may not passe this wey / but yf he Iuste / ye shalle not haue adoo but with one knyghte sayd the lady / wel sayd Balyn syn I shalle therto I am redy but traueillynge men are ofte wery and their horses to / but though my hors be wery / my hert is not wery / I wold be fayne ther my deth shold be / Syr said a knyght to Balyn / me thynketh your sheld is not good / I wille leue yew a [...]yggar / therof I pray yow / and so he tooke the sheld that was vnknowen and lefte his owne and so rode vnto the Iland / and put hym and his hors in a grete boote / and whan he came on the other syde / he met with a damoysel / and she said / O knyght balyn why haue ye lefte your owne sheld / allas ye haue put your self in grete daunger / for by your sheld ye shold haue ben knowen / it is grete pyte of yow as euer was of knyght / for of thy prowesse & hardynes thou hast no felawe lyuynge / Me repenteth said ba­lyn that euer I cam within this Countrey / but I maye not torne now ageyne for shame and what auenture shalle falle to me be it lyf or dethe I wille take the aduenture that shalle come to me & / thenne he loked on his armour / & vnderstood he was wel armed / and therwith blessid hym and mounted [Page] vpon his hors

¶Capitulum xviij

THenne afore hym he sawe come rydynge oute of a castel a knyght and his hors trapped all reed and hym self in the same colour / whan this knyghte in the reed beheld Balyn hym thought it shold be his broder Balen by cause of his two swerdys / but by cause he knewe not his sheld he demed it was not he / And so they auentryd theyr speres & came merueillously fast to gyders / and they smote other in the sheldes / but theire speres and theire cours were soo bygge that it bare doune hors & man that they lay bothe in a swoun But balyn was brysed sore with the falle of his hors / for he was wery of trauaille / And Balan was the fyrst that rose on foote and drewe his swerd and wente toward Balyn / and he aroos and wente ageynst hym / But balan smote ba­lyn fyrste / and he put vp his shelde and smote hym thorow the shelde and tamyd his helme / thenne Balyn smote hym ageyne with that vnhappy swerd and wel nyghe had fellyd his broder Balan / and so they fought ther to gyders tyl the­yr brethes faylled / thenne Balyn loked vp to the castel and sawe the Towres stand ful of ladyes / Soo they went vnto bataille ageyne and wounded eueryche other dolefully / and thenne they brethed oftymes / and so wente vnto bataille that alle the place there as they fought was blood reed / And att that tyme ther was none of them bothe but they hadde eyther smyten other seuen grete woundes so that the best of them myȝt haue ben the dethe of the myghtyest gyaunt in this world / Thenne they wente to batail ageyn so merueillously that dou­bte it was to here of that bataille for the grete blood shedynge And their hawberkes vnnailled that naked they were on e­uery syde / Atte last balan the yonger broder withdrewe hym a lytel & leid hym doune / Thenne said balyn le Saueage what knyghte arte thow / for or now I found neuer no knyȝt that matched me / my name is said he balan broder vnto the good knyght balyn / Allas sayd balyn that euer I shold see this day / and therwith he felle backward in a swoune / Thenne ba­lan yede on al four feet and handes and put of the helme of his broder and myght not knowe hym by the vysage / it was so ful hewen and bledde / but whan he awoke he sayd O balan [Page] my broder thow hast slayne me and I the / wherfore alle the wyde world shalle speke of vs bothe / ¶Allas sayd Balan that euer I sawe this day that thorow myshap I myght not knowe yow / for I aspyed wel your two swerdys / but by cause ye had another shild I demed ye had ben another knyȝt Allas saide Balyn all that maade an vnhappy knyght in the castel / for he caused me to leue myn owne shelde to our bothes destruction / and yf I myȝt lyue I wold destroye that cas­tel for ylle customes / that were wel done said Balan / For I had neuer grace to departe fro hem syn that I cam hyther / for here it happed me to slee a knyght that kepte this Iland / & syn myght I neuer departe / and nomore shold ye broder & ye myght haue slayne me as ye haue and escaped your self with the lyf / Ryght so cam the lady of the Toure with iiij knygh­tes and vj ladyes and vj yomen vnto them and there she herd how they made her mone eyther to other and sayd we came bothe oute of one tombe that is to say one moders bely / And so shalle we lye bothe in one pytte / So Balan prayd the lady of her gentylnesse for his true seruyse / that she wold burye them bothe in that same place there the bataille was done / and she graunted hem with wepynge it shold be done rychely in the best maner / Now wille ye sende for a preest that we may receyue our sacrament and receyue the blessid body of our lord Ihesu cryst / ye said the lady it shalle be done / and so she sente for a preest and gaf hem her ryghtes / Now sayd balen whan we are buryed in one tombe and the mensyon made ouer vs / how ij bretheren slewe eche other / there wille neuer good knyght nor good man see our tombe but they wille pray for our soules / & so alle the ladyes and gentylwymen wepte for pyte / Thenne anone Balan dyed but Balyn dyed not tyl the mydnyghte after / and so were they buryed bothe / and the lady lete make a mensyon of Balan how he was ther slayne by his broders handes / but she knewe not balyns name /

¶Capitulum xix

IN the morne cam Merlyn and lete w [...]yte balyns name on the tombe with letters of gold / that here lyeth balyn le Saueage that was the knyȝt with the two swerdes [Page] and he that smote the dolorous stroke / Also Merlyn lete ma­ke there a bedde / that ther shold neuer man lye therin / but he wente oute of his wytte / yet Launcelot de lake fordyd that bed thorow his noblesse / and anone after Balyn was dede / merlyn toke his swerd / and toke of the pomel and set on an other pomel / so merlyn bad a knyght that stode afore hym han­deld that swerd / and he assayed / and he myght not handle hit Thenne Merlyn lough / why laugh ye said the knyghte / this is the cause said Merlyn / ther shalle neuer man handle this suerd but the best knyght of the world / and that shalle be syr Launcelot or els Galahad his sone / and Launcelot with this suerd shalle slee the man that in the world he loued best that shalle be syr Gawayne / Alle this he lete wryte in the pomel of the swerd / Thenne Merlyn lete make a brydge of yron & of stele in to that Iland / and it was but half a foote brode / & there shalle neuer man passe that brydge nor haue hardynes to goo ouer / but yf he were a passyng good man and a good kny­ght withoute trechery or vylonye / Also the scaubard of Ba­lyns swerd Merlyn lefte it on this syde the Iland that galahad shold fynde it / Also merlyn lete make by his subtyly­te that Balyns swerd was put in a marbel stone standyng vp ryght as grete as a mylle stone / and the stone houed al­weyes aboue the water and dyd many yeres / and so by aduē ture it swam doun the streme to the Cyte of Camelot that is in englysshe wynchestre / & that same day galahad the haute pryn­ce came with kyng Arthur / and soo galahad broughte wyth hym the scaubard and encheued the swerde / that was there in the marbel stone / houynge vpon the water / And on whytson­day he encheued the swerd as it is reherced in the book of Sācgrayll / Soone after this was done Merlyn came to kyng Ar­thur and told hym of the dolorous stroke that Balyn gaf to kyng Pellam / and how Balyn and Balan foughte to gy­ders the merueillous batail that euer was herd of / and how they were buryed bothe in one Tombe / Allas said kyng Ar­thur / this is the grettest pyte that ouer I herd telle of two knyȝtes / for in the world I knowe not suche two knyghtes /

¶Thus endeth the tale of Balyn and of Balan two bre­theren born in northūberlād good kniȝtes /

¶Sequitur iij liber

¶Capitulum primum

IN the begynnynge of Arthur after he was cho­sen kyng by aduēture and by grace for the most party of the barons knewe not that he was V­ther pendragons sone / But as Merlyn made it openly knowen / But yet many kynges & lordes helde grete werre ayenst hym for that cause / But wel Arthur ouercame hem alle / for the mooste party the dayes of his lyf he was ruled moche by the counceil of Merlyn / Soo it fell on a tyme kyng Arthur sayd vnto Merlyn / my barons wille lete me haue no rest but nedes I muste take a wyf / and I wylle none take / but by thy counceill and by thyne aduys / it is wel done said Merlyn / that ye take a wyf / for a man of your bounte and noblesse shold not be without a wyf / Now is ther ony that ye loue more than another / ye said kyng Arthur / I loue gweneuer the kynges doughter Lodegrean of the land of Camelerd / the whiche holdeth in his hows the table round that ye told he had of my fader Vther / And this damoysel is the mo­ost [...]alyaunt and fayrest lady that I knowe lyuynge or yet that euer I coude fynde / Syre sayd Merlyn as of her beaute and fayrenes she is one of the fayrest on lyue / But and ye loued her not so wel as ye doo / I shold fynde yow a damoy­sel of beaute and of goodenesse that shold lyke yow & ple­se yow and your herte were not sette / But there as a mans herte is set / he wylle be lothe to retorne / that is trouth said kyng Arthur / but Merlyn warned the kynge couertly that gwene­uer was not holsome for hym to take to wyf / for he warned hym that launcelot shold loue her and she hym ageyne / and so he torned his tale to the auentures of Sancgreal / Thenne merlyn desyred of the kynge for to haue men with hym that shold enquere of gweneuer / and so the kyng graunted hym / & Merlyn wente forth vnto kyng Lodegrean of Camyllerd / & told hym of the desyre of the kyng that he wold haue vnto his wyf Gweneuer his doughter / that is to me sayd kyng Lodegreans the best tydynges that euer I herd that so worthy a kyng of prowesse and noblesse wille wedde my doughter / And os for my landes I wylle gyue hym wys [...] I it myght please hym / [Page] but he hath londes ynowe / hym nedeth none / but I shalle sende hym a gyfte shalle please hym moche more / for I shalle gyue hym the table round / the whiche Vtherpendragon gaue me / & whan it is ful complete / ther is an C knyghtes & fyfty / And as for on C good knyghtes I haue my self / but I fawte / l / for so many haue ben slayne in my dayes / and so Ladegreans delyuerd his doughter Gweneuer vnto Merlyn / and the table round with the C knyghtes / and so they rode fresshly with grete royalte / what by water and what by land / tyl that they came nyghe vnto london

¶Capitulum Secundum

WHanne kyng Arthur herd of the comyng of gwene­uer and the C knyghtes with the table round / thenne kynge Arthur maade grete Ioye for her comyng / and that ryche presente / and said openly this fair lady is passyng welcome vnto me / for I haue loued her longe / And therfore ther is nothyng so lyef to me / And these knyghtes with the round table pleasen me more than ryght grete rychesse / And in alle hast the kynge lete ordeyne for the maryage and the Co­ronacyon in the moost honorable wyse that coude be deuysed Now Merlyn said kyng Arthur / goo thow and aspye me in al this land l knyghtes whiche ben of most prowesse & wor­ship / within short tyme merlyn had founde suche knyȝtes that shold fulfylle xx & viij knyghtes but no mo he conde fynde Thenne the Bisshop of Caunterbury was fette and he blessid the syeges with grete Royalte and deuocyon / and there sette the viij and xx knyghtes in her syeges / and whan this was done / Merlyn said fayr syrs ye must al aryse and come to ky­ng Arthur for to doo hym homage / he will haue the better wil to mayntene yow / and so they arose and dyd their homage / & when they were gone / merlyn fond in euery syeges letters of gold that told the knyghtes names that had sytten therin / But two syeges were voyde / And so anone cam yong gawayn & asked the kyng a yefte Aske said the kyng / & I shal graunte it yow / syr I aske that ye will make me knyȝt / that same day ye shall wedde faire Gweneuer / I will do it with a good wil said kyng arthur & do vnto yow all the worship that I may / for I must by reson ye ar myn neuew my susters sone /

¶Ca iij

[Page]FOrth with alle ther cam a poure man in to the Courte and broughte with hym a fayre yonge man of xviij yere of age rydynge vpon a lene mare / and the poure man asked all men that he met / where shall I fynde kyng arthur / yonder he is sayd the knyghtes / wylt thow ony thynge with hym ye sayd the poure man / therfor I cam hyder / anone as he came before the kyng he salewed hym and sayd O kyng Arthur the floure of all knyghtes and kynges I byseche Ihesu saue the / Syr it was told me that at this tyme of your maryage ye wolde yeue any man the yefte that he wold aske / oute excepte that were vnresonable / that is trouth said the ky­nge suche cryes I lete make / and that will I holde so it apay­re not my realme nor myne estate / ye say wel and graciously said the poure man / Syre I aske no thyng els but that ye wil make my sone here a knyghte / it is a grete thynge thow askest of me said the kyng / what is thy name said the kyng to the po­ure man / syr my name is Aryes the Cowherd / whether cometh this of the or of thy sone said the kyng / Nay syre said Aryes / this desyre cometh of my sone and not of me / For I shal telle yow I haue xiij sones / & alle they will falle to what laboure I put them & wille be ryght glad to doo labour / but this child wylle not laboure for me for ony thyng that my wyf or I may doo / but alweyes he wille be shetynge or castynge dartes / and glad for to see batailles and to behold knyghtes / And alweyes day and nyghte he desyreth of me to be made a knyȝt what is thy name sayd the kynge vnto the yonge man / Syre my name is Tor / the kyng beheld hym fast / and sawe he was passyngly wel vysaged and passyngly wel made of his yeres wel said kyng Arthur vnto Aryes the Cowherd fetche al thy sones afore me that I may see them / and so the poure man did and al were shapen moche lyke the poure man / But Tor was not lyke none of hem al in shap ne in contenaunce / for he was moche more than ony of hem / Now said kyng Arthur vnto the Cowherd / where is the swerd he shalle be maade knyght with al / it is here sayd Tor / take it oute of the shethe sayd the ky­nge / and requyre me to make yow a knyght

Thenne Tor alyght of his mare and pulled oute his swerd knelynge and requyrynge the kynge / that he wold maake [Page] hym knyght / & that he myghte be a knyght of the table round As for a knyȝt I will make yow / & therwith smote hym in the neck with the swerd sayēg be ye a good knyȝt / & so I pray to god so ye may be / & yf ye be of prowesse and of worthy­nesse ye shalle be a knyght of the table round / Now Merlyn sayd Arthur say whether this Tor shall be a good knyghte / or no / ye syre he ought to be a good knyght / for he is comen of as good a man as ony is on lyue / and of kynges blood / how so syr sayd the kynge / I shalle telle yow sayd Merlyn / This poure man Aryes the cowhe [...]d is not his fader / he is nothyng syb to hym / for kynge Pellinore is his fader / I suppose nay said the Cowherd / fetche thy wyf afore me said merlyn / and she shalle not say nay / anon the wyf was fet which was a fair houswyf / and there she ansuerd Merlyn ful womanly / and there she told the kynge and Merlyn that whan she was a maide & went to mylke kyen / ther met with her a sterne kny­ght / & half by force he had my maidenhede / & at that tyme he bigat my sone Tor / & he toke awey from me my greyhound that I had that tyme with me / & saide that he wold kepe the greyhound for my loue / A said the Cowherd I wende not thys / but I may bileue it wel / for he had neuer no tatches of me / sir said Tor vnto Merlyn dishonoure not my moder / syr said mer­lyn it is more for your worship than hurte / for your fader is a good man & a kyng / & he may ryght wel auaunce you and your moder / for ye were begoten or euer she was wedded / that is trouth said the wyf / hit is the lasse gryef vnto me sayd the Cowherd

¶Capitulum Quartum

SO on the morne kyng Pellinore cam to the Court of kynge Arthur / whiche had grete ioye of hym and told hym of Tor / how he was his sone / and how he hadde made hym knyght at the request of the Cowherd / Whan Pel­linore beheld Tor / he pleasyd hym moche / so the kyng made ga­wayne knyght / but Tor was the fyrst he made at the feest / what is the cause said kyng Arthur that there ben two places voyde in the syeges / Syre said Merlyn / ther shalle no man syt in tho places / but they that shall be of moost wor̄ship / But in the sege perillous there shall no man sytte therin but one / and yf ther be ony so hardy to doo it he shall be destroyed / & he that [Page] shalle sytte there shalle haue no felawe / And therwith Mer­lyn tooke kynge Pellinore by the hand / and in the one hand next the two seges and the sege peryllous he said in open audyence this is your place and best ye are worthy to sytte there in of ony that is here / there at sat syr gauayne in grete enuy & told Gaherys his broder / yonder knyghte is put to grete wor­ship / the whiche greueth me sore / for he slewe our fader kynge Lot / therfor I wille slee hym said Gauayne with a swerd / that was sente me that is passyng trenchaunt / ye shall not soo said Gaherys at this tyme / For at this tyme I am but a squyer / and whan I am made knyght / I wol be auengyd on hym and therfor broder it is best ye suffre tyl another tyme that we may haue hym oute of the Courte / for & we dyd so / we shold trouble this hyhe feest / I wyl wel said gauayn as ye wylle /

¶Capitulum quintum

THenne was the hyghe feeste made redy / and the kynge was wedded att Camelott vnto Dame Gweneuer in the chirche of saynt steuyns with grete solempnyte / And as e­uery man was set after his degree / Merlyn wente to alle the knyghtes of the round table / and bad hem sytte styll that no­ne of hem remeue / for ye shalle see a straunge and a merueil­lous aduenture / Ryght so as they sat ther came rennyng in a whyte hert in to the halle and a whyte brachet next hym and xxx couple of black rennyng houndes cam after with a greete crye / and the hert went aboute the table round as he went by other boordes / the whyte brachet boot hym by the buttok & pulled oute a pees / where thurgh the herte lepte a grete lepe / and ouerthrewe a knyght that sat at the boord syde / and therwith the knyȝt aroos & toke vp the brachet / & so went forth oute of the halle & toke his hors & rode his wey with the brachet / right so anone cam in a lady on a whyte palfrey & cryed aloude to kyng Arthur / Syre suffre me not to haue this despyte for the brachet was myn that the knyght lad aweye / I maye not doo therwith said the kynge ¶With this there came a knyght rydynge al armed on a grete hors / and tooke the lady awey with hym with force / and euer she cryed and made grete dole / whanne she was gone the kynge was glad for she [Page] made suche a noyse / Nay said merlyn / ye may not leue this aduētures so lyghtely / For these aduentures must be brought a­gayne or els it wold be disworship to yow and to your feest I wyll said the kynge that al̄ be done by your aduys / Then­ne saide merlyn lete calle syr gauayne / for he must brynge a­geyne the whyte herte / Also syr ye must lete calle Syre Tor / for he must brynge ageyne the brachet / and the knyght or els slee hym / Also lete calle kynge Pellinore for he must brynge ageyne the lady and the knyght or els slee hym / and these thre knyghtes shalle doo merueillous auētures or they come ageyn Thenne were they called al thre as it reherceth afore / and eueryche of hem toke his charge / and armed them surely / But sir gauayne had the fyrst request / and therfore we wille begynne at hym /

¶Capitulum vj

SYre gauayne roode more than a paas and gaheryse his broder that roode with hym in stede of a squyer to doo hym seruyse / Soo as they rode they sawe two knyȝtes fyghte on horsbak passyng sore / so syr gauayn & his broder ro­de betwixe them / and asked them for what cause they foughte so / the one knyght ansuerd and sayd / we fyghte for a symple mater / for we two be two bretheren born & hegoten of one man & of one woman / allas said sir gauayn why do ye so / syr said the eldar / ther cam a whyte hert this way this day & many hoū des chaced hym / & a whyte brachet was alwey next hym / and we vnderstood it was auenture made for the hyhe feest of ky­nge Arthur / and therfore I wold haue gone after to haue wonne me worship / and here my yonger broder said he wolde go after the herte / for he was better knyght than I / And for this cause we felle at debate / & so we thouȝt to preue whiche of vs bothe was better knyȝt / This is a symple cause said sir ga­uayn / vncouth mē ye shold debate with al & no broder with broder / therfor but yf ye wil do by my coūceil I wil haue ado with yow / that is ye shal yelde you vnto me / & that ye go vnto kyng Arthur and yelde yow vnto his grace / sir knyȝt said the ij bretheren we are forfoughten & moche blood haue we loste thorow our wilfulnesse / And therfore we wolde be loth to haue adoo with yow / thenne do as I will haue yow said sir gauayne / [Page] we wille agree to fulfylle your wylle / But by whom shalle we saye that we be thyder sente / ye maye say / by the knyȝt that foloweth the quest of the herte that was whyte / Now what is your name sayd gauayne / Sorlouse of the forest said the eldar & my name is sayde the yonger Bryan of the forest and soo they departed and wente to the kynges Court / and Syr ga­uayne on his quest / and as gauayne folowed the herte by the crye of the houndes euen afore hym ther was a grete Ryuer / and the hert swamme ouer / and as syr gauayne wold folo­we after / ther stode a knyght ouer the other syde and sayd / Syre knyghte come not ouer after this herte / but yf thou wilt Iuste with me / I wille not faille as for that said sir gauayn to folowe the quest that I am in / and soo maade his hors to swymme ouer the water / and anone they gat theire speres / and ranne to gyder ful hard / but syre gauayne smote hym of his hors / and thenne he torned his hors & had hym yelde hym / Nay sayd the knyght not so though thow haue the bet­ter of me on horsbak / I pray the valyaunt knyght alyghte a foote and matche we to gyders with swerdes / what is youre name said sir gauayne / Alardyn of the Ilys said the other / thenne eyther dressid her sheldes and smote to gyders / but sir gauayne smote hym so hard thorow the helme that it went to the braynes and the knyght felle doune dede / A said Gaheryse that was a myghty stroke of a yonge knyght /

¶Capitulum Septimum

THēne Gauayne and Gaheryse rode more than a paas after the whyte herte / and lete slyppe at the herte thre couple of greyhoundes / and so they chace the herte in to a cas­tel / and in the chyef place of the castel they slewe the hert / syr gauayne and gaheryse folowed after / Ryght soo there came a knyght oute of a chamber with a swerd drawe in his hand and slewe two of the greyhoundes euen in the syghte of syre gauayne / and the remenaunte he chaced hem with his swerd oute of the castel / And whan he cam ageyne he sayd / O my whyte herte / me repenteth that thow art dede / for my souerayne lady gaf the to me / and euyll haue I kepte the / and thy deth [Page] shalle be dere bought and I lyue / and anone he wente in to his chamber and armed hym / and came oute fyersly / & there mette he with syr gauayne / why haue ye slayne my houndes said syr gauayn / for they dyd but their kynde / and leuer I had ye had wroken your angre vpon me than vpon a dom best thow saist trouth said the knyght I haue auengyd me on thy houndes and so I wille on the or thow goo / Thenne syr Ga­uayne alyght a soote and dressid his shelde and stroke to gyders myghtely / and clafe their sheldes and stoned their helmes and brak their hawberkes that the blood ranne doune to their feet / Atte last syr gauayne smote the knyght so hard that he felle to the erthe / and thenne he cryed mercy / and yelded hym and besought hym as he was a knyghte and gentylman / to saue his lyf / thow shalt dye said sir gauayne for sleyng of my houndes / I wille make amendys said the knyght vnto my power / Syr gauayne wold no mercy haue but vnlacyd his helme to haue stryken of his hede / Ryght soo came his lady oute of a chamber and felle ouer hym / and soo he smote of her hede by mysauenture / Allas saide Gaheryse that is fowle and sha­mefully done / that shame shal neuer from yow / Also ye shold gyue mercy vnto them that aske mercy / for a knyȝt without mercy is withoute worship / Syr gauayne was so stonyed of the deth of this fair lady / that he wiste not what he dyd / and said vnto the knyght aryse I wille gyue the mercy / nay nay said the knyght / I take no force of mercy now / for thou hast slayne my loue and my lady that I loued best of alle erthe­ly thynge / Me sore repenteth it said syr gauayn / for I thoughte to stryke vnto the / But now thow shalt goo vnto kyng Ar­thur and telle hym of thyne aduentures and how thow arte o­uercome by the knyghte that wente in the queste of the whyte herte / I take no force said the knyȝt whether I lyue or I dye but so for drede of deth he swore to goo vnto kynge Arthur / & he made hym to bere one greyhound before hym on his hors and another behynde hym / what is your name said sir gauayn or we departe / my name is said the knyght Ablamor of the marise / soo he departed toward Camelot

¶Capitulum Octauum

[Page]ANd syr gauayne went in to the castel and made hym redy to lye there al nyght / and wold haue vnarmed hym / what wylle ye doo sayd gaheryse / wylle ye vn­arme yow in this Countrey / ye may thynke ye haue many e­nemyes here / they had not sooner sayd that word but ther cā four knyghtes wel armed and assaylled syr gauayne hard and said vnto hym thou newe made knyght thow hast shamed thy knyghthode / for a knyght withoute mercy is dishonoured Also thow hast slayne a fayr lady to thy grete shame to the worldes ende / and doubte thow not thow shalt haue grete ne­de of mercy or thow departe from vs / And therwith one of hem smote syr gauayne a grete stroke that nygh he felle to the erthe / and gaheryse smote hym ageyne sore / and soo they were on the one syde and on the other / that syr gauayne and gahe­ryse were in ieopardy of their lyues / and one with a bowe an archer smote syr gauayne thurȝ the arme that it greued hym wonderly sore / And as they shold haue ben slayne / there cam four fair ladyes / and besought the knyghtes of grace for syre gauayne / and goodely atte request of the ladyes they gaf syr gauayne and gaheryse their lyues / & made hem to yelde them as prysoners / thenne gauayne and gaheryse made grete dole / Allas sayd syre gauayne myn arme greueth me sore / I am lyke to be maymed and so made his complaynt pytously / er­ly on the morow ther cam to syr gauayne one of the four la­dyes / that had herd alle his complaynte and said syr knyȝte what chere / not good said he it is your owne defaulte sayd the lady / for ye haue doone a passynge fowle dede in the sleynge of the lady / the whiche will be grete vylany vnto yow / But be ye not of kynge Arthurs kyn saide the lady / yes truly sayd syr gauayne / what is your name saide the lady / ye must telle it me or ye passe / my name is gauayne the kyng Lott of Orkeney sone / and my moder is kynge Arthurs syster / A thenne are ye neuewe vnto kyng Arthur sayd the lady / and I shalle so speke for yow that ye shall haue conduyte to go to kynge Arthur for his loue / and soo she departed / and told the foure knyghtes how theire prysoner was kynge Arthurs neuewe / and his name is syr gauayne kyng Lots sone of Orkeney / and they gaf hym the hertes hede by cause it was in [Page] his quest / ¶Thenne anone they delyuerd syr Gauayne vnder this promyse that he shold bere the dede lady with hym in this maner / The hede of her was hanged aboute his neck and the hole body of hyr lay before hym on his hors mane / Ryght soo rode he forth vnto Camelot / And anone as he was come merlyn desyred of kyng Arthur yt Syre Gauayne shold be sworne to telle of alle his auentures / and how he slewe the lady / and how he wold gyue no mercy vnto the knyght / where thurgh the lady was slayne / Thenne the kynge and the quene were gretely displeasyd with syr gauayn for the sleynge of the lady / And ther by ordenaunce of the quene ther was set a quest of ladyes on syr gauayn / and they Iuged hym for euer whyle he lyued to be with all ladyes & to fyȝte for her quarels / & that euer he shold be curteys / & neuer to refuse mercy to hym / that asketh mercy / Thus was gauayne sworne vpon the four euuangelystes that he shold neuer be ageynst lady ne gentil woman / but yf he fought for a lady / and his aduersary fouȝt for another / And thus endeth the auenture of syr gauayn that he dyd at the maryage of kyng Arthur Amen

¶Capitulum ix

THan Syre Tor was redy he mounted vpon his horsbak / and rode after the knyght with the brachet / so as he rode he mette with a dwarf sodenly / that smote hys hors on the hede with a staf / that he wente backward his spere lengthe / why dost thou so said syre Tor / for thou shalt not pas­se this way / but yf thow Iuste with yonder knyghtes of the pauelions / Thenne was Tor ware where two pauelions were / & grete sperys stood oute / and two sheldes henge on trees by the pauelions / I may not tary said syr Tor / for I am in a quest that I must nedes folowe / thou shalt not passe said the dwarf and therwith alle he blewe his horne / thenne ther cam one armed on horsbak / and dressyd his shelde / and cam fast toward Tor / and he dressid hym ageynst hym / and so ranne to gyders that Tor bare hym from his hors / and anone the knyght yeld hym to his mercy / But syr I haue a felawe in yonder pauelione that wille haue adoo with yow anone / he shall be welcome said syr Tor / Thenne was he ware of another knyght comyng with grete raundon / and eche of them dressid to other / that [Page] merueille it was to see / but the knyght smote syre Tor a gre­te stroke in myddes of the shelde that his spere all to sheuered And syr Tor smote hym thurgh the sheld by lowe of the sheld that it wente thorow the coost of the knyȝt / but the stroke sle­we hym not / And therwith syr Tor alyght & smote hym on the helme a grete stroke / and therwith the knyght yelded hym and besought hym of mercy / I wille wel said syr Tor / But thou and thy felawe must goo vnto kynge Arthur / and yelde yow prysoners vn to hym / by whome shall we say are we thy­der sente / ye shall say by the knyght that wente in the quest of the knyght that wente with the brachet / Now what be your ij names said syr Tor / my name is sayd the one Sire Felot of Langduk / & my name is said the other Sir Petypase of wynchylse / Now go ye forth saide syre Tor and god spede yow & me / Thenne cam the dwarf and saide vnto syr Tor / I praye yow gyue me a yefte / I wylle wel said syr Tor / aske / I as­ke nomore saide the dwarf / but that ye wille suffre me to doo yow seruyse / for I will serue no more rec [...]eaunt knyghtes / Take an hors said syr Tor and ryde on with me / I wote ye ryde after the knyght with the whyte braclet / and I shalle brynge yow there he is said the dwerf / And soo they rode tho­row oute a forest / and at the last they were ware of two pauelions euen by a pryory with two sheldes / And the one shylde was enewed with whyte / and the other shelde was reed

¶Capitulum x

THer with syr Tor alyghte and toke the dwarf his glayue / and soo he cam to the whyte pauelione / and sawe thre damoysels lye in it / and one paylet slepyng / & so he wente to the other pauelione / and found a lady lyeng slepyng ther in / But ther was the whyte brachet that bayed at her fast / and therwith the lady yede oute of the pauelione & all her damoysels / But anone as syr Tor aspyed the whyte brachet / he took her by force and took her to the dwerf / what / wille ye so sayd the lady take my brachet from me / ye sayd syr Tor / this bra­chet haue I sought from kynge Arthurs Courte hyder / well said the lady / knyght ye shalle not go fer with her / but that ye shalle be mette and greued / I shall abyde what auenture that [Page] cometh by the grace of god / and so mounted vpon his hors / and passed on his way towarde Camelot / but it was so nere nyght he myȝt not passe but lytel ferther / knowe ye ony lod­gyng said Tor I knowe none said the dwarf / but here besy­des is an hermytage / and there ye muste take lodgynge as ye fynde / And within a whyle they cam to the heremytage & took lodgyng / and was there gras otys and breed for their horses soone it was sped / and full hard was their souper but there they rested hem al nyght tyl on the morne / and herd a masse deuoutely / and tooke their leue of the heremyte / and syre Tor prayed the heremyte to pray for hym / he sayd he wold and be­tooke hym to god / And soo mounted vpon horsbak and rode towardes Camelot a long whyle / with that they herd a knyȝte calle lowde that came after hem / and he sayd knyghte abyde / & yelde my brachet that thow took from my lady / Syr Tor retorned ageyne / and behelde hym how he was a semely knyghte and wel horsed and wel armed at al poyntes / thenne Syre Tor dressyd his shelde and took his spere in his handes and the other cam fyersly vpon hym / and smote bothe hors & man to the erthe / anone they aroos lyghtely and drewe her swerdes as egrely as lyons and put their sheldes afore them and smote thorow the sheldes that the cantels felle of bothe partyes / Also they tamyd their helmes that the hote blood ranne oute / and the thyck maylles of their hawberkes they carfe and rofe in sonder that the hote blood ranne to the erthe / and both they had many woundes and were passyng wery / But syr Tor aspyed that the other knyght faynted / and thenne he sewed fast vpon hym and doubled his strokes and garte hym go to the erthe on the one syde / thenne Syre Tor bad hym yelde hym / that wille I not said Abilleus whyle my lyf lasteth and the soule is within my body onles that thou wilt yeue me the brachet / that wylle I not doo sayd syre Tor / for it was my quest to brynge ageyne thy brachet / the or bothe /

¶Capitulum xj

WYth that cam a damoysel rydynge on a palfrey as fast as she myȝt dryue and cryed with a lowde voys vnto Syre Tor / what wille ye with me sayd syr Tor / I byseche the [Page] said the damoysel for kynge Arthurs loue / gyue me a yefte / I requyre the gentyl knyght as thow arte a gentilman / Now said Tor Aske a yefte and I wille gyue it yow / gramercy said the damoy [...]el / Now I aske the hede of the fals knyght Abelleus / for he is the mooste outragyous knyght that lyueth & the grettest murtherer / I am both seid syr Tor of that gyfte I haue gyuen yow / lete hym make amendys in that he hath tre­spaced vnto yow / now said the damoysel he may not / for he sle­we myn owne broder afore myn owne eyen that was a better knyght than he / and he hadde had grace / and I kneled half an houre afore hym in the myre for to saue my broders lyf that had done hym no dammage but fought with hym by auentu­re of armes / and so for al that I coude do / he stroke of his hede wherfore I requyre the as thow arte a true knyght to gyue me my yefte or els I shal shame the in al the Court of kyng Arthur / for he is the falsest knyght lyuynge and a grete des­troyer of good knyghtes / Thenne whan Abelleus herd this / he was more aferd / and yelded hym and asked mercy / I maye not now saide syr Tor / but yf I shold be founde fals of my promesse / for whyle I wold haue taken you to mercy / ye wold none aske but yf ye had the brachet ageyn that was my quest And therwith he tooke of his helme / and he aroos and fled / and syr Tor after hym and smote of his hede quyte / ¶Now syr said the damoysel / it is nere nyght / I pray yow come & lod­ge with me here at my place / it is here fast by / I will Wel said syr Tor / for his hors and he had ferd euyll syn they departed from Camelot / and soo he rode with her and had passyng go­od there with her / and she hadde a passyng fair old knyght to her husband that made hym passynge good chere and wel ea­syd bothe his hors and he / and on the morne he herd his masse and brake his fast and tooke his leue of the knyghte and of the lady that besought hym to telle hym his name / Truly he sa­id my name is syr Tor that was late made knyght / and this was the fyrst queste of armes that euer I dyd to brynge a­geyn that this knyght Abelleus toke awey fro kyng arthurs courte / O fayr knyght said the lady and her husband / and ye come here in oure marches / come and see oure poure lodgynge / and it shalle be alweyes at your commaundement / Soo syre [Page] Tor departed and came to Camelot on the thyrdde day by no­one / and the kyng & the quene & alle the Courte was passyng fayne of his comyng and made grete ioye that he was come ageyne / for he wente from the Court with lytel socour / but as kyng Pellinore his fader gaf hym an old courser / and kyng Arthur gaf hym armour and a swerd / and els had he none other socour / but rode so forthe hym self alone / And thenne the kyng and the quene by merlyns aduys made hym to swere to telle of his auentures / and soo he told and made pryeues of his dedes as it is afore reher [...]ed / wherfor the kyng and the quene made grete ioye / nay nay saide Merlyn these ben but Iapes to that he shalle doo / for he shalle preue a noble knyght of prowesse as good as ony is lyuyng and gentyl and curteis & of good tatches and passyng true of his promesse / and neuer shalle outrage where thorow Merlyns wordes kynge Arthur gaf hym an erldome of bondes that felle vnto hym / and here endeth the quest of Syr Tor kynge Pellenors sone

¶Capitulum xij

THenne kynge Pellinore armed hym and mounted vpon his hors and rode more than a paas after the lady that the knyȝt ladde awey / And as he rode in a forest he sawe in a valey a damoysel sitte by a welle and a wounded knyght in her armes / and Pellenore salewed her / And whan she was ware of hym she cryed ouer lowde / helpe me knyghte for crystes sake kynge Pellinore & he wold not tarye he was so eger in his quest / and euer she cryed an C tymes after help Whanne she sawe he wold not abyde / she prayd vnto god to sende hym as moche nede of help as she had / and that he myȝt fele it or he dyed / Soo as the book telleth the knyght there dyed that there was wounded / wherfor the lady for pure sorowe slewe her self with his swerd / As kynge Pellinore rode in that valey he met with a poure man a labourer / Sawest thow not saide Pellinore a knyghte rydynge and ledynge aweye a lady / ye said the man / I sawe that knyght and the lady that made grete dole / And yonder bynethe in a valey ther shal ye see two pauelions and one of the knyȝtes of the pauelions [Page] chalengyd that lady of that knyght and sayd she was his cosyn nere / wherfor he shold lede her no ferther / And soo they waged bataill in that quarel / the one saide he wold haue her by force / and the other said he wold haue the rule of her by cause he was her kynnesman and wold lede her to her kyn / for this quarel he lefte them fyghtynge / And yf ye wille ryde a paas ye shalle fynde them fyghtyng / and the lady was beleft with the two squyers in the pauelions / god thanke the sayd kynge Pellenore / Thenne he rode a wallop tyll he had a syght of the two pauelions and the two knyghtes fyghtyng / anon he rode vnto the pauelions / and sawe the lady that was his quest / and sayd fayre lady ye must goo with me vnto the co­urt of kynge Arthur / Syr knyght said the two squyers that were with her yonder are two knyghtes that fyghte for thys lady / goo thyder and departe them / and be agreed with hem / & thenne may ye haue her at your pleasyr / ye say wel sayd kyng Pellenore / And anone he rode betwixt them and departed hem and asked hem the causes why that they fought / Sir knyght said the one / I shalle telle yow / this lady is my kynneswoman nygh myn auntes doughter / And whan I herd her complayne that she was with hym maulgre her hede / I waged ba­taille to fyghte with hym / Syre knyght sayd the other whoos name was Hontzlake of wentland / and this lady I gat by my prowesse of armes this day at Arthurs courte / that is vntruly said / said kynge Pellenore / for ye cam in sodenly ther as we were at the hyghe feest and tooke awey this lady or ony man myght make hym redy and therfore hit was my quest to brynge her ageyne and yow bothe / or els the one of vs to abyde in the felde / therfor the lady shalle goo with me / or I wille dye for it / for I haue promysed hit kynge Arthur / And ther for fyghte ye no more / for none of yow shalle haue no parte of her at this tyme / And yf ye lyst to fyȝte for her / fyȝte with me / and I wille defende her / wel said the knyghtes make you redy / and we shalle assaille yow with al our power / And as kynge Pellenore wold haue put his hors fro them fyr Hontzlake roofe his hors thorow with a swerd and said / Now art thow on foote as wel as we are / whan kynge Pellinore aspyed that his hors was slayne / lyȝtely he lepte from his hors / [Page] and pulled oute his swerd / and put his sheld afore hym / and sayde knyghte kepe wel thy heede / for thow shalt haue a buffet for the sleyng of my hors / So kyng Pellenore gaf hym suche a stroke vpon the helme that he clafe the hede doune to the chynne that he fylle to the erthe dede

¶Capitulum xiij

ANd thenne he torned hym to the other knyȝte that was sore wounded / but whan he sawe the others buffet / he wold not fyghte / but kneled doune and sayd take my cosyn the lady with yow at youre request / and I requyre yow as ye be a true knyghte / put her to no shame nor vylony / what sayd kynge Pellenore wylle ye not fyghte for her / no syr sayd the knyghte I wylle not fyghte with suche a knyȝte of prowesse as ye be / wel said Pellenore / ye say wel / I pro­myse yow she shall haue no vylony by me as I am true kny­ght / but now me lacketh an hors said Mellinore / but I wylle haue hontzlakes hors / ye shalle not nede sayd the knyght / for I shalle gyue yow suche an hors as shalle please yow / so that ye wille lodge with me / for it is nere nyghte / I wille wel sa­yd kynge Pellenore abyde with yow al nyghte / and there he hadde with hym ryght good chere / and faryd of the best with passynge good wyne and had mery rest that nyghte / And on the morne he herd a masse and dyned / And thenne was bro­ughte hym a fayre bay courser / and kynge Pellenors sadel sette vpon hym / Now what shalle I calle yow said the knyȝt in as moche as ye haue my cosyn at your desyre of your quest Syr I shalle telle yow my name is kyng Pellenore of the I­lys and knyghte of the table round / Now I am glad said the knyght that suche a noble man shalle haue the rule of my cosyn / Now what is your name said Pellenore / I pray yow telle me / Syr my name is syr Meliot of Logurs / and this lady my cosyn hyght Nymue / and the knyghte that was in the other pauelione is my sworne broder a passynge good knyȝte and his name is Bryan of the Ilys / and he is ful loth to do wronge and ful lothe to fyghte with ony man / but yf he be so­re souȝt on / so that for shame he may not leue it / It is merueil [Page] said Pellinore that he wille not haue adoo with me / syr he wil not haue adoo with no man but yf it be at his request / Bryn­ge hym to the Courte said Pellenore one of these dayes / Syr we wylle come to gyders / and ye shalle be welcome said Pel­linore to the Courte of kynge Arthur / and gretely allowed for your comynge and so he departed with the lady / & brouȝt her to Camelot / Soo as they rode in a valey it was ful of sto­nes / and there the ladyes hors stumbled and threwe her doun that her arme was sore brysed and nere she swouned for pa­yne / Allas syr sayd the lady myn arme is oute of lythe wher thorow I must nedes reste me / ye shall wel said kyng Pelli­nore / and so he alyȝt vnder a fayr tree where was fayr grasse and he put his hors therto / and so leyd hym vnder the tree / and slepte tyl it was nyghe nyght / And whan he awoke / he wold haue ryden / Sir said the lady it is so derke that ye may as wel ryde backward as forward / soo they abode styll & made there their lodgyng / Thenne syr Pellenore put of his armour thēne a lytel afore mydnyȝt they herd the trottynge of an hors be ye styll said kyng Pellenore / for we shalle here of somme a­uenture

¶Capitulum xiiij

ANd ther with he armed hym / so ryght euen afore hym ther met two knyghtes / the one cam froward Came­lot / and the other from the northe / and eyther salewed other / what tydynges at Camelot sayd the one / by my hede saide the other ther haue I ben & aspyed the courte of kynge Arthur And ther is suche a felauship they may neuer be broken / and wel nyghe al the world holdeth with Arthur / for there is the flour of chyualrye / Now for this cause I am rydyng in to the north to telle our chyuetayns of the felauship that is withholden with kyng Arthur / as for that said the other knyght I ha­ue brought a remedy with me that is the grettest poyson that euer ye herd speke of & to Camelot wyll I with it / for we haue a frend ryght nyghe kyng Arthur and wel cherysshed that shal poysone kynge Arthur / for so he hath promysed oure chyuetayns & receyued grete yeftes for to do it / Beware said the other knyght of Merlyn / for he knoweth alle thynges by the deuyls crafte / therfore wille I not lete it said the knyghte / & so they departed in sonder / Anone after Pellenore maade hym [Page] redy and his lady and rode toward Camelot / And as they cam by the wel there as the wounded knyght was and the lady / there he fond the knyghte and the lady eten with lyons or wylde beestes al sauf the hede / wherfor he made grete sorowe and wepte passynge sore and said Allas her lyf myghte I haue saued / but I was so fyers in my quest therfore I wold not abyde / wherfore make ye suche doole said the lady / I wote not said Pellinore / but my herte morneth sore of the deth of her for she was a passyng fayr lady and a yonge / Now wylle ye doo by myne aduys said the lady / take this knyghte and lete hym be buryed in an heremytage / and thenne take the ladyes hede and bere it with yow vnto Arthur / Soo kyng Pellinore took this dede knyght on his sholders / and broughte hym to the heremytage and charged the heremyte with the corps / that seruyse shold be done for the soule / and take his harneys for your payne / it shalle be done said the heremyte as I wille ansuer vnto god

¶Capitulum xv

ANd ther with they departed and cam there as the he­de of the lady lay with a fair yelow here that greued kyng Pellinore passyngly sore whan he loked on hit / for mo­che he cast his herte on the vysage / And soo by none they came to Camelot / and the kynge and the quene were passyng fayn of his comynge to the Courte / And there he was made to swere vpon the four euuangelystes to telle the trouth of his quest from the one to the other / A syr Pellinore sayd quene Gwe­neuer ye were gretely to blame that ye saued not this ladyes lyf / Madame said Pellinore ye were gretely to blame and ye wold not saue your owne lyf & ye myȝt / but sauf your plea­sir I was so furyous in my quest that I wold not abyde / & that repenteth me & shal the dayes of my lyf / Truly saide Merlyn ye ouȝt sore to repente it / for that lady was your own douȝter begoten on the lady of the rule / & that knyght that was dede was her loue / and shold haue wedded her / and he was a ry­ght good knyght of a yonge man and wold haue preued a good man / & to this court was he comyng & his name was sir Myles of the laūdys / & a knyȝt cam behynde hym / & slewe him with a spere & his name is Lorayne le saueage a fals knyȝt & a coward / & she for grete sorow & dole slewe her self with [Page] his swerd / and her name was Eleyne / And by cause ye wold not abyde and helpe her / ye shalle see youre best frende faylle yow whan ye be in the grettest distresse that euer ye were / or shalle be / And that penaūce god hath ordeyned yow for that dede / that he that ye shalle most truste to of ony man alyue / he shalle leue yow ther ye shalle be slayne / Me forthynketh said kynge Pellinore that this shalle me betyde but god may for­doo wel desteny / Thus whan the quest was done of the why­te herte / the whiche folowed syr gawayne and the quest of the brachet folowed of syr Tor Pellenors sone / & the quest of the lady that the knyghte tooke aweye / the whiche kyng Pellinre at that tyme folowed / Thenne the kyng stablysshed all his knyghtes and gaf them that were of londes not ryche / he gaf them londes / and charged hem neuer to doo outragyousyte nor mordre / and alweyes to flee treason / Also by no meane to be cruel / but to gyue mercy vnto hym that asketh mercy vpon payn of forfeture of their worship and lordship of kyng Arthur for euermore / and alweyes to doo ladyes / damoysels / and gen­tylwymmen socour vpon payne of dethe / Also that no man take noo batails in a wrongful quarel for noo lawe ne for noo worldes goodes / Vnto this were all the knyghtes sworne of the table round both old and yong / And euery yere were they sworne at the hyghe feest of Pentecost

¶Explicit the weddynge of kynge Arthur

¶Sequitur quartus liber

¶Capitulū Primū

SOo after these questys of Syr Gawyne / Syre Tor / and kynge Pellinore / It felle so that Merlyn felle in a dottage on the damoisel that kyng Pellinore broughte to Courte / and she was o­ne of the damoysels of the lake that hyȝte Ny­neue / But Merlyn wold lete haue her no rest but alweyes he wold be with her / And euer she maade Merlyn good chere tyl she had lerned of hym al maner thynge that she desyred and he was assoted vpon her that he myghte not be from her / Soo on a tyme he told kynge Arthur that he sholde not dure longe but for al his craftes he shold be put in the erthe quyck and [Page] so he told the kynge many thynges that shold befalle / but allewayes he warned the kynge to kepe wel his swerd and the scaubard / for he told hym how the swerd and the scaubard shold be stolen by a woman from hym that he most trusted / Also he told kynge Arthur that he shold mysse hym / yet had ye leuer than al your landes to haue me ageyne / A sayd the kynge / syn ye knowe of your aduenture puruey for hit / and put awey by your craftes that mysauenture / Nay said Merlyn it wylle not be / soo he departed from the kynge / And within a whyle the damoysel of the lake departed / and Merlyn wente with her euermore where some euer she wente / And oftymes merlyn wold haue had her pryuely awey by his subtyle craftes / thenne she made hym to swere that he shold neuer do none enchauntement vpon her yf he wold haue his wylle / And so he sware / so she and Merlyn wente ouer the s [...]e vnto the land of Benwyck there as kynge Ban was kynge that had gre­te warre ageynst kynge Claudas / and there Merlyn spake with kynge Bans wyf a fair lady and a good / and her name was Elayne / and there he sawe yonge Launcelot / there the quene made grete sorowe for the mortal werre yt kyng claudas made on her lord and on her landes / Take none heuynesse said Merlyn / for this same child within this xx yere shall reuenge yow on kynge Claudas that all Crystendom shalle speke of it And this same child shalle be the moost / man of worship of the world / and his fyrst name is galahad / that knowe I wel said Merlyn / And syn ye haue confermed hym Launce­lot / that is trouthe said the quene / his fyrst name was Galahad / O Merlyn said the quene shalle I lyue to see my sone suche a man of prowesse / ye lady on my parel ye shal̄ see hit / and lyue many wynters after / And soo soone after the lady and Merlyn departed / and by the waye Merlyn shewed her many wondres / and cam in to Cornewaille / And alweyes Merlyn lay aboute the lady to haue her maydenhode / and she was euer passynge wery of hym / and fayne wold haue ben delyuerd of hym / for she was aferd of hym by cause he was a deuyls sone / and she coude not beskyfte hym by no meane / ¶And soo on a tyme it happed that Merlyn shewed to her in a roche where as was a greete wonder / and wroughte by [Page] enchauntement that wente vnder a grete stone / So by her subtyle wyrchynge she maade Merlyn to goo vnder that stone to [...]ete her wete of the merueilles there / but she wroughte so ther for hym that he cam neuer oute for alle the crafte he coude doo / And so she departed and lefte Merlyn /

¶Capitulum Secundum

ANd as kynge Arthur rode to Camelot / and helde ther a grete feest with myrthe and Ioye / so soone after he retorned vnto Cardoylle / and there cam vnto Arthur newe ty­dynges that the kynge of Denmarke and the kynge of Ireland that was his broder and the kynge of the vale and the kynge of Soleyse / and the kynge of the yle of Longtaynse al these fyue kynges with a grete hoost were entrid in to the lād of kynge Arthur and brente and slewe clene afore hem / both Cytees and castels that it was pyte to here / ¶Allas sayd Arthur yet had I neuer reste one monethe syn I was crowned kyng of this land / Now shalle I neuer reste tyl I mete with tho kynges in a fayre feld / that I make myn auowe for my true lyege peple shalle not be destroyed in my defaul­te / goo with me who wille and abyde who that wylle / thenne the kynge lete wryte vnto kynge Pellenore and prayd hym in alle haste to make hym redy with suche peple as he myght lyȝ­tlyest rere and hye hym after in al hast / All the Barons were pryuely wrothe / that the kynge wold departe so sodenly but the kynge by no meane wold abyde / but made wrytynge vnto them that were not there / and bad them hye after hym su­che as were not at that tyme in the Courte / Thenne the kynge came to quene gweneuer and sayd lady make yow redy / for ye shall goo with me / for I may not longe mysse yow / ye shal cause me to be the more hardy / what auenture so befalle me / I wille not wete my lady to be in no ieopardy / Sire said she I am at your commaundement / and shalle be redy what tyme so ye be redy / So on the morne the kynge and the quene departed with suche felauship as they hadde / and came in to the Northe in to a forest besyde humber and there lodged hem

¶Whanne the word & tydynge came vnto the fyue kynges [Page] aboue sayd that Arthur was besyde humber in a foreste there was a knyght broder vnto one of the fyue kynges that gafe hem this counceille / ye knowe wel that syre Arthur hath the floure of Chyualrye of the world with hym as it is preued by the grete bataille he dyd with the xj kynges / And therfor hye vnto hym nyghte and daye tyl that we be nyghe hym / for the lenger he taryeth the bygger he is / and we euer the waiker And he is so couragyous of hym self that he is come to the fel­de with lytel peple / And therfore lete vs set vpon hym or day and we shalle slee doune of his knyghtes ther shal none esca­pe

¶Capitulum Tercium

UNto this counceille these fyue kynges assented / and so they passed forth with her hoost thorow Northwalis and came vpon Arthur by nyghte and sett vpon his hoost as the kynge and his knyghtes were in their pauelions kynge Arthur was vnarmed / and had leid hym to rest with hys quene Gweneuer / Sir said syr kaynus it is not good we be vnarmed / we shalle haue no nede said syre Gawayne and Syr Gryflet that laye in a lytel pauelione by the kynge / with that they herd a grete noyse and many cryed treson tre­son / Allas said kynge Arthur we ben bitrayed / Vnto armes felawes thenne he cryed / so they were armed anone at al po­yntes / Thenne cam ther a wounded knyghte vnto the kynge & saide syr saue your self and my lady the quene for our hooste is destroyed and moche peple of ours slayne / Soo anone the kynge and the quene and the thre knyghtes took her horses & rode toward humber to passe ouer it / and the water was so ro­ugh that they were aferd to passe ouer / Now may ye chese [...]ayd kynge Arthur whether ye wille abyde and take the aduentur on this syde / for and ye be taken / they wille slee yow / It were me leuer sayd the quene to dye in the water than to falle in your enemyes handes & there be slayne / And as they stode soo talkyng / syr kaynus sawe the fyue kynges comynge on hors­bak by hem self alone with her speres in her handes euen toward hem / loo said syr kaynus yonder be the fyue kynges / lete vs go to them and matche hem / that were foly sayd sire gawayne / for we are but thre and they ben fyue that is trouthe said syre Gryflet / No force said syr kay I wille vndertake for two of [Page] them / and thenne may ye thre vndertake for the other thre / and ther with al syr kay lete his hors renne as fast as he myghte and strake one of them thorow the shelde / and the body a fa­dom that the kynge felle to the erthe stark dede / That sawe syr Gawayne and ranne vnto another kyng so hard that he smote hym thurgh the body / And ther with all kyng Arthur ran to another / and smote hym thurgh the body With a spere that he fylle to the erthe dede / Thenne syr Gryflet ranne vnto the iiij kyng and gaf hym suche a falle that his neck brake / Anone syr kay ranne vnto the fyfthe kynge and smote hym so hard on the helme that the stroke clafe the helme and the hede to the erthe / that was wel stryken sayd kynge Arthur / and wor­shipfully hast thow hold thy promesse / therfor I shal honou­re the / whyle that I lyue / and ther with all they set the que­ne in a barge in to humber / but alweyes quene gweneuer pra­ysed syr kay for his dedes / and sayd what lady that ye loue / and she loue yow not ageyne she were gretely to blame / and amonge ladyes said the Quene I shalle bere youre noble fa­me / for ye spak a grete word and fulfylled it worshipfully and therwith the quene departed / Thenne the kyng and the thre knyghtes rode in to the forest / for there they supposed to he­re of them that were escaped / and there he fond the most party of his peple / and told hem all how the fyue kynges Were dede / and therfor lete vs hold vs to gyders tyll it be day / and whan their hoost haue a spyed that their chyuetayns be slayn they wille make suche dole that they shalle not mowe helpe hem self / and ryght so as the kynge said / so it was / for whan they fonde the fyue kynges dede / they made suche dole that they fell fro their horses / Ther with all cam kyng Arthur but with a fewe peple and slewe on the lyfte hand and on the ryght hand that wel nyhe ther escaped no man / but alle were slayne to the nombre of xxx M / And whan the bataille was all ended the kynge kneled doune and thanked god mekely / and thenne he sente for the quene and soone she was come / and she maade grete Ioye of the ouercomynge of that bataille

¶Capitulum iiij

[Page]THere with alle came one to kynge Arthur / and told hym that kyng Pellinore was within thre myle with a grete hoost / and he said / go vnto hym and lete hym vnderstande how we haue spedde / Soo within a whyle kynge Pellinore cam with a grete hoost / and salewed the peple and the kyng / and ther was grete ioye made on euery syde / Then­ne the kyng lete serche how moche people of his party ther was slayne / And ther were founde but lytel past two honderd men slayne and viij knyȝtes of the table round in their pauelions Thenne the kynge lete rere and deuyse in the same place there as the batail was done a faire abbeye and endowed it wyth grete lyue [...]ode and lete it calle the Abbey of la beale aduentu­re / but whanne somme of them cam in to their Countreyes ther of the fyue kynges were kynges and told hem how they were slayne / ther was made grete dole / And alle kynge Arthurs enemyes as the kynge of Northwales and the kynges of the North wyste of the bataille they were passynge heuy / and soo the kynge retorned vnto Camelot in hast / And whan he was come to Camelot / he called kynge Pellinore vnto hym & sayd ye vnderstand wel that we haue loste viij knyghtes of the best of the table round / and by your aduys we wille chese viij ageyne of the best we may fynde in this Courte / Syr said Pellinore / I shal counceille yow after my conceyte the best / there are in your Courte ful noble knyghtes bothe of old & yonge And therfor by myn aduys ye shal chese half of the old and half of the yonge / whiche be the old said kyng Arthur / Syre said kynge Pellinore me semeth that kynge Vryence that hath wedded your syster Morgan le fay and the kynge of the lake and syr Heruyse d [...] reuel a noble knyght / and syr galagars the iiij / this is wel deuysed said kyng Arthur and right soo shal it be / Now whiche are the four yong knyȝtes said Arthur Syre saide Pellinore the fyrst is syr Gawayne your neuewe that is as good a knyght of his tyme / as ony is in this lād And the second as me semeth best is syre Gryflet le fyse the d [...]ne that is a good knyght and ful desyrous in armes / and who may see hym lyue he shal preue a good knyghte / And the thyrd as me semeth is wel to be one of the knyghtes of the round table syr kay the senescha for many tymes he hath done [Page] ful worshipfully / And now at your last bataille he dyd full honourably for to vndertake to slee two kynges / By my hede said Arthur he is best worthy to be a knyght of the round ta­ble of ony that ye haue reherced / and he had done no more prowesse in his lyf dayes

¶Capitulum Quintum

NOw said kynge Pellenore I shalle putte to yow two knyghtes / and ye shalle chese whiche is moost worthy / that is Syr Bagdemagus and syr Tor my sone / But by cause Syre Tor is my sone I may not prayse hym / but els and he were not my sone / I durst saye that of his a­ge ther is not in this land a better knyghte than he is nor of better condycions and lothe to doo ony wronge / and loth to ta­ke ony wronge / By my hede said Arthur he is a passyng go­od knyght / as ony ye spak of this day that wote I wel sa­id the kyng / for I haue sene hym preued but he seyth lytyll and he doth moche more / for I knowe none in al this courte & he were as wel borne on his moder syde as he is on your syde that is lyke hym of prowesse and of myghte / And therfor I wille haue hym at this tyme and leue syr Bagdemagus tyll another tyme / Soo whan they were so chosen by the assente of alle the barons / Soo were there founden in her syeges euery knyghtes names that here are reherced / and so were they set in their syeges / wherof syr Bagdemagus was wonderly wrothe that syr Tor was auaunced afore hym / and therfore sodenly he departed from the Courte and toke his squyer with hym / & rode longe in a forest tyll they came to a crosse and there alyȝt and sayd his prayers deuoutely / The meane whyle his squyer founde wryten vpon the crosse that Bagdemagus shold ne­uer retorne vnto the Courte ageyne / tyll he had wonne a knyȝ­tes body of the round table body for body / lo syr said his squyer / here I fynde wrytyng of yow / therfor I rede yow retorne ageyne to the Courte / that shalle I neuer said Bagdemagus tyl men speke of me grete worship / and that I be worthy to be a knyghte of the round table / and soo he rode forthe / And ther by the way he founde a braūche of an holy herbe that was the sygne of the Sancgraill / and no knyght founde suche to­kens but he were a good lyuer / So as sir Bagdemagus rode [Page] to see many aduentures / it happed hym to come to the roche / ther as the lady of the lake had put Merlyn vnder the stone / and there he herde hym make grete dole / wherof fyre Bagdemagus wold haue holpen hym and wente vnto the grete stone / and he was so heuy that an C men myght not lyfte hyt vp / whan Merlyn wyste he was there he had leue his labour / for al was in vayne / for he myght neuer be holpen but by her that put hym ther / and so Bagdemagus departed and dyd many auentu­res and preued after a full good knyght / and came ageyne to the Courte and was made knyght of the round table / So on the morne ther felle newe tydynges and other auentures

¶Capitulum Sextum

THenne it befelle that Arthur and many of his knyghtes rode on huntynge in to a grete forest / and it hap­ped kyng Arthur / kynge Vryens and syr Accolon of gaulle folowed a grete herte for they thre were wel horsed / and soo they chaced so fast that within a whyle they thre were thenne x myle from her felauship / And at the last they chaced so sore that they slewe theyr horses vndernethe them / thenne were they al thre on foote / and euer they sawe the herte afore them pas­synge wery and enbusshed / What wille we doo said kyng ar­thur We are hard bestad / lete vs goo on foote said kyng Vryens tyl we may mete with some lodgynge / Thenne were they ware of the herte that lay on a grete water banke / and a bra­chet bytynge on his throte and mo other houndes cam after / Thenne kynge Arthur blewe the pryse and dyghte the herte / Thenne the kynge loked aboute the world / and sawe afore hym in a grete water a lytel ship al apparailled with sylke doune to the water / and the shyp cam ryghte vnto hem and lā ded on the sandes / Thenne Arthur wente to the banke & loked in / and sawe none erthely creature therin / Sirs said the kyng come thens / and lete vs see what is in this ship / Soo they Wente in al thre and founde hit rychely behanged with clothe of sylke / By thenne it was derke nyghte / and there sodenly were aboute them an C torches sette vpon alle the sydes of the shyp bordes and it gaf grete lyghte / And ther with all there [Page] cam out twelue fayr damoysels and salewed kynge Arthur on her knees and called hym by his name / and sayd he was ryght welcome / and suche chere as they had he shold haue of the best / the kynge thanked hem fayre / There with all they lad the kyng and his two felawes in to a fair chambre / and ther was a clothe leyd rychely bysene of al that longed vnto a tabel / and there were they serued of al wynes and metes that they coude thynke / of that the kynge had grete merueille / for he ferd neuer better in his lyf as for one souper / And so when they had souped at her leyser / kyng Arthur was ledde vnto a chamber / a rycher besene chamber sawe he neuer none / and soo was kynge Vryens serued / and ledde in to suche another chā byr / and syr Accolon was ledde in to the thyrd chamber pas­synge rychely and wel bysene / and so were they layde in the­ire beddes easyly / And anone they felle on slepe / and slepte merueillously sore all the nyght / And on the morowe kynge Vryens was in Camelott abed in his wyues armes Morgan le fay / And whan he awoke / he had grete merueylle / how he cam there / for on the euen afore he was two dayes Iourney frō Camelot / And whan kyng Arthur awoke he found hym self in a derke pryson herynge aboute hym many complayntes of woful knyghtes

¶Capitulum Septimum

WHat are ye that soo complayne said kynge Arthur / we ben here xx knyghtes prysoners sayd they / & some of vs haue layne here seuen yere and somme more and somme lasse / for what cause sayd Arthur / we shalle telle yow said the knyghtes / this lord of this castel his name is syr Damas / & he is the falsest knyght that lyueth / and ful of treason / and a very coward as ony lyueth / and he hath a yonger broder a good knyghte of prowesse / his name is syr Ontzlake / and this traytour Damas the elder broder wylle gyue hym noo parte of his lyuelode / But as syre Ontzlake kepeth thorow prowesse of his handes / and so he kepeth from hym a ful fair maner and a ryche and therin syre Ontzlake dwelleth wor­shipfully / and is wel biloued of al peple / & this syre Damas our maister is as euyll beloued for he is without mercy / and [Page] he is acoward / and grete werre hath ben betwyxe them bothe / but Ontzlake hath euer the better / and euer he profereth syre Damas to fyghte for the lyuelode body for body / but he wylle not do [...] / other els to fynde a knyghte to fyghte for hym / Vnto that syr Damas hath graunted to fynde a knyghte / but he is so euyll byloued and hated / that there nys neuer a knyghte wylle fyghte for hym / And whan Damas sawe this that ther was neuer a knyght / wold fyghte for hym / he hath daily layn a wayte with many knyghtes with hym / and taken alle the knyghtes in this countrey to see and aspye her auentures / he hath taken hem by force and broughte hem to his pryson / and so he tooke vs seueratly as we rode on oure auentures / & many good knyȝtes haue dyed in this pryson for hongre to the nombre of xviij knyghtes / And yf ony of vs alle that here is or hath ben wold haue foughten with his broder Ontzlake / he wold haue delyuerd vs / but for by cause this Damas is so fals and so ful of treason we wold neuer fyghte for hym to dye for it / And we be soo lene for hongre that vnnethe we may stande on oure feete / god delyuer yow for his mercy sa­yd Arthur / Anone there with alle ther cam a damoysel vnto Arthur / and asked hym what chere / I can not say sayd he / sir sayd she and ye wylle fyghte for my lord ye shall be delyuerd oute of pryson / and els ye escape neuer the lyf / Now sayd Arthur that is hard / yet had I leuer to fyghte with a kny­ght than to dye in pryson / with this said Arthur I may be delyuerd and alle these prysoners I wylle doo the batail / yes said the damoysel / I am redy sayd Arthur and I had hors and armour / ye shall lacke none said the damoysel / Me semeth damoysel I shold haue sene yow in the Courte of Arthur / Nay said the damoysel I cam neuer there / I am the lordes do­ughter of this castel / yet was she fals for she was one of the damoysels of Morgan le fay / Anone she wente vnto syr Damas and told hym how he wold doo bataille for hym / and so he sente for Arthur / And whan he cam he was wel coloured and wel made of his lymmes / that al knyȝtes that sawe hym said it were pyte that suche a knyghte shold dye in pryson / soo syr Damas and he were agreed that he shold fyghte for hym vpon this couenaūt that all other knyghtes shold be delyuerd [Page] And vnto that was syr Damas sworne vnto Arthur / and also to doo the bataille to the vttermost / And with that all the xx knyghtes were brought oute of the derke pryson in to the halle and delyuerd / and so they all abode to see the bataille

¶Capitulum Octauum

NOw torne we vnto Accolon of Gaulle that whanne he awoke / he found hym self by a depe welle syde within half a foote in grete perylle of dethe / And there cam oute of that fontayne a pype of syluer / and oute of that pype ranne water all on hyhe in a stone of marbel / whan Syre Accolon sawe this / he blessyd hym and sayd Ihesu saue my lorde kyng Arthur and kynge Vryens / for these damoysels in this ship haue bitrayed vs / they were deuyls and noo wymmen / And yf I may escape this misauenture / I shalle destroye all where I may fynde these fals damoysels that vsen enchaūtementys / ¶Ryght with that ther cam a dwarf with a grete mouthe & a flat nose and salewed syre Accolon and said how he came from Quene Morgan le fay / and she greteth yow wel / and byddeth yow be of strong herte / for ye shal fyȝte to morne with a knyghte at the houre of pryme / And therfore she hath sente yow here Excalibur Arthurs swerd and the scaubard / and she byddeth yow as ye loue her that ye doo the batail to the vttermest without ony mercy lyke as ye had promysed her whā ye spake to gyder in pryuete / And what damoysel that bryn­geth her the knyghtes hede whiche ye shal fyghte with al / she wille make her a quene / Now I vnderstand yow wel sayd Accolon / I shalle holde that I haue promysed her now I haue the swerd / whan sawe ye my lady Quene Morgan le fay Ryghte late sayd the dwarf / thenne Accolon tooke hym in his armes / and said recommaunde me vnto my lady Quene / and telle her all shal be done that I haue promysed her / and els I wille dye for hit / Now I suppose said Accolon she hath made alle these craftes and enchauntement for this bataille / ye may wel bileue it said the dwarf / Ryȝt so there cam a kny­ghte and a lady with syxe squyers / and salewed Accolon / and prayd hym for to aryse and come and reste hym at his [Page] maner / and so Accolon mounted vpon a voyde hors / & wente with the knyghte vnto a fayre maner by a pryory / and there he had passynge good chere / Thenne sir Damas sente vnto his broder syr Ontzelake / and badde make hym redy by to morne at the houre of pryme / and to be in the felde to fyghte wyth a good knyght / for he had founden a good knyght that was redy to doo bataill at all poyntes / whan this word cam vnto sir Ontzelake / he was passyng heuy / for he was wounded a ly­tel to fore thorow bothe his thyes with a spere / and made grete dole / But as he was wounded he wold haue taken the bataille on hand / Soo it happed at that tyme by the meanes of Morg [...]n le fay Accolon was with syr Ontzelake lodged / and whan he herd of that bataille and how Ontzelake was woū ­ded / he sayd that he wold fyghte for hym by cause Morgan le fey had sente hym Excalibur and the shethe for to fyȝte with the knyght on the morne / This was the cause syr Accolon to­ke the bataille on hand / thenne syre Ontzelake was passynge glad / and thāked syr Accolon with alle his herte that he wold do so moche for hym / & ther with al syr Ontzelake sente word vnto his broder syre Damas / that he had a knyȝte yt for hym shold be redy in the felde by the houre of pryme / Soo on the morne syr Arthur was armed and wel horsed / and asked syr Damas whan shalle we to the felde / syr said syr Damas ye shalle here masse / and so Arthur herd a masse / And whan masse was done / there cam a squyer on a grete hors & asked syr Damas yf his knyght were redy / for oure knyght is re­dy in the felde / Thenne syre Arthur mounted vpon horsbak / & there were alle the knyghtes and comyns of that countrey / & so by alle aduyses ther were chosen xij good men of the coun­trey for to wayte vpon the two knyghtes / And ryght as Arthur was on horsbak / ther cam a damoisel from Morgan le fey and broughte vnto syr Arthur a swerd lyke vnto Excalibur / and the scaubard / and sayd vnto Arthur Morgan le fey sen­deth here your swerd for grete loue / and he thanked her / & wen­de it had ben so / but she was fals / for the swerd and the scaubard was counterfeet & brutyll and fals

¶Capitulum ix

[Page] ANd thenne they dressyd hem on bothe partyes of the felde / & lete their horses renne so fast that eyther smote other in the myddes of the shelde / with their speres hede / that bothe hors and man wente to the erthe / And thenne they sterte vp bothe / and pulled oute their swerdys / the mea­ne whyle that they were thus at the bataille cam the damoysel of the lake in to the felde / that put Merlyn vnder the stone / & she cam thydder for loue of kynge Arthur / for she knewe how Morgan le fay had soo ordeyned / that kynge Arthur shold haue ben slayne that daye / and therfor she cam to saue his lyf And so they went egrely to the bataille / and gaf many grete strokes / but alweyes Arthurs swerd bote not lyke Accolon swerd / But for the most party euery stroke that Accolon gaf he wounded sore Arthur / that it was merueylle he stode / And alweyes his blood fylle from hym fast / whan Arthur beheld the ground so sore bebledde he was desmayed / and thenne he demed treason that his swerd was chaunged / for his swerd boote not styl as it was wonte to do / therfor he dredde hym sore to be dede / for euer hym semed that the swerd in Accolons hand was Excalibur / for at euery stroke that Accolon stroke he drewe blood on Arthur / Now knyghte said Accolon vnto Arthur kepe the wel from me / but Arthur ansuerd not age­yne / and gaf hym suche a buffet on the helme that he made hym to stoupe nygh fallynge doune to the erthe / Thenne syr Acoo­lon withdrewe hym a lytel / and cam on with Excalibur on hyghe / and smote syr Arthur suche a buffet that he felle nyhe to the erthe / Thenne were they wroth bothe / and gaf eche other many sore strokes / but alweyes syr Arthur lost so moche blo­od that it was merueille he stode on his feet / but he was soo ful of knyghthode that knyghtly he endured the payne / And syr Accolon lost not a dele of blood / therfor he waxt passynge lyghte / and syr Arthur was passynge feble / and wende veryly to haue dyed / but for al that he made countenaunce as tho­ugh he myghte endure / and helde Accolon as shorte as he my­ght / But Accolon was so bolde by cause of Excalibur that he waxed passynge hardy / But alle men that beheld hym sayd they sawe neuer knyghte fyghte so wel as Arthur dyd consyderyng the blood that he bled / Soo was all the peple sory for [Page] hym / but the two bretheren wold not accorde / thenne alweyes they fought to gyders as fyers knyghtes / and syre Arthur withdrewe hym a lytel for to reste hym / and syre Accolon called hym to bataille and said it is no tyme for me to suffre the to reste / And therwith he cam fyersly vpon Arthur / and syre Arthur was wrothe for the blood that he had lost / and smote Accolon on hyhe vpon the helme soo myȝtely that he made hym nyhe to falle to the erthe / And therwith Arthurs swerd brast at the crosse and felle in the grasse amonge the blood and the pomel and the sure handels he helde in his handes / when syr arthur sawe that / he was in grete fere to dye / but alweyes he helde vp his shelde and lost no ground nor bated no chere /

¶Capitulum x

THenne syre Accolon beganne with wordes of treason and sayd knyghte thow arte ouercome / and mayste not endure and also thow arte wepenles / and thow hast loste moche of thy blood / and I am ful bothe to slee the / therfor yelde the to me as recreaunt / Nay saide syre Arthur I maye not so / for I haue promysed to doo the bataille to the vttermest by the feythe of my body whyle me lasteth the lyf / and therfor I had leuer to dye with honour than to lyue with shame / And yf it were possyble for me to dye an C tymes I had leuer to dye so ofte / than yelde me to the / for though I lacke wepen / I shalle lacke no worship / And yf thow slee me wepenles that shalle be thy shame / wel sayd Accolon as for the shame I wyl not spare / Now kepe the from me for thow arte but a dede mā And therwith Accolon gaf hym suche a stroke that he felle n [...] ­ghe to the erthe / and wolde haue had Arthur to haue cryed hym mercy / But syre Arthur pressed vnto Accolon with his sheld / and gaf hym with the pomel in his hand suche a buf­fet that he went thre strydes abak / whan the damoisel of the lake beheld arthur / how ful of prowesse his body was & the fals treson that was wrouȝt for hym to haue had hym slayn she had grete pyte that so good a knyȝt & suche a mā of worship shold so be destroyed / And at the next stroke syr Accolon stroke hym suche a stroke that by the damoysels enchauntement the swerd Excalibur felle oute of Accolons hande to the erthe / And therwith alle Syre Arthur lyghtely lepte to hit / and gate hit [Page] in his hand / and forthwith al he knewe that it was his suerd Excalibur / & sayd thow hast ben from me al to long / & moche dommage hast thow done me / & ther with he aspyed the scau­bard hangynge by his syde / and sodenly he sterte to hym and pulled the scaubard from hym and threwe hit fro hym as fer as he myghte throwe hit / O knyghte saide Arthur this daye hast thow done me grete dommage with this swerd / Now are ye come vnto your dethe / for I shalle not waraunt yow but ye shalle as wel be rewarded with this swerde or euer we de­parte as thow hast rewarded me / for moche payne haue ye made me to endure / and moche blood haue I lost / And therwith syr Arthur russhed on hym with alle his myghte and pulled hym to the erthe / and thēne russhed of his helme / and gaf hym suche a buffet on the hede that the blood cam oute at his eres / his nose & his mouthe / Now wylle I slee the said Arthur / Slee me ye may wel said Accolon and it please yow / for ye ar the best knyghte that euer I fonde / and I see wel that god is with yow / But for I promysed to doo this batail said Acoo­lon to the vttermest and neuer to be recreaunt whyle I lyued therfore shal I neuer yelde me with my mouthe / but god doo with my body what he wyll / ¶Thenne syr Arthur remembrid hym and thoughte he shold haue sene this knyghte / Now telle me said Arthur or I wylle slee the / of what coūtrey art thou and of what courte / Syre knyghte sayd syr Accolon I am of the courte of kynge Arthur / & my name is Accolon of gaulle Thenne was Arthur more desmayed than he was before hand For thenne he remembryd hym of his syster Morgan le fay / and of the enchauntement of the ship / O syre knyght sayd he I pray yow telle me who gaf yow this swerd and by whom ye had it /

¶Capitulum xj

THenne syre Accolon bethouȝte hym and said wo worth this swerd / for by hit haue I geten my dethe / it may wel be / said the kynge / Now syre said Accolon I wil telle yow this swerd hath ben in my kepynge the moost party of this twelue moneth / And Morgan le fay kynge Vryens wyf sente it me yester daye by a dwerf to this entente that I shold slee kynge Arthur her broder / For ye shall vnderstand [Page] entente to slee kyng Arthur her broder / for ye shal vnderstand kynge Arthur is the man in the world that she moost hateth by cause he is moost of worship and of prowesse of ony of her blood / Also she loueth me oute of mesure as paramour / and I her ageyne / And yf she myghte brynge aboute to slee Arthur by her craftes / she wold slee her husband kynge Vryens ly­ghtely / And thenne hadde she me deuysed to be kyng in this land / and soo to regne / and she to be my quene / but that is now done saide Accolon / for I am sure of my dethe wel sayd syre Arthur / I fele by yow ye wold haue ben kynge in this land / It had ben grete dommage to haue destroyed your lord sayd Arthur / it is trouth said Accolon / but now I haue told yow trouthe / wherfore I praye yow telle me of whens ye are and of what courte / O Accolon sayd kynge Arthur now I lete the wete / that I am kynge Arthur to whome thow haste done grete dommage / whanne Accolon herd that / he cryed on lowde fayre swete lord haue mercy on me / for I knewe not yow / O syr Accolon sayd kynge Arthur mercy shalt thow haue / by cause I fele by thy wordes at this tyme / thow kno­west not my persone / But I vnderstand wel by thy wordes that thow hast agreed to the dethe of my persone / and therfore thow arte a traytour / but I wyte the the lasse / for my syster Morgan le fay by her fals craftes made the to agree and con­sente to her fals lustes / but I shalle be sore auengyd vpon her and I lyue that alle Crystendome shalle speke of it / god knoweth / I haue honoured her and worshipped her more than alle my kynne / and more haue I trusted her than myn owne wyf and alle my kynne after /

¶Thenne syr Arthur called the kepars of the felde and said Syrs cometh hyder / for here are we two knyghtes that haue foughten vnto a grete dommage vnto vs both / and lyke echone of vs to haue slayne other / yf it had happed soo / And hadde ony of vs knowen other / here had ben no bataille / nor stroke stryken ¶ Thenne al a lowde cryed Accolon vnto alle the knyghtes and men that were thēne there gadred to gyder / and sayd to them in this manere / O lordes this noble knyghte that I haue foughten with all / the whiche me sore repenteth is the mooste man of prowesse of manhode and of [Page] worship in the world / for it is hym self kynge Arthur our al ther liege lord & with myshap and with mysauēture haue I done this bataill with the kyng and lord that I am holden with all

¶Capitulum xij

THenne alle the peple felle doune on her knees and cryed kynge Arthur mercy / mercy shalle ye haue sayd Arthur / here maye ye see what auentures befallen oftyme of erraunte knyghtes how that I haue foughten with a knyght of myn owne vnto my grete dommage and his bothe /

But syrs by cause I am sore hurte and he bothe / and I had grete nede of a lytel rest / ye shalle vnderstande the oppynyon betwixe yow two bretheren as to the syre Damas / for whom I haue ben champyon and wonne the feld of this knyghte / yet wylle I Iuge by cause ye syre Damas are called an org [...] lous knyghte and full of vylony and not worthe of prowesse of youre dedes / therfor I wylle that ye gyue vnto your bro­der alle the hole manoir with the appertenaūce vnder thys for­me / that sir Ontzelake hold the manoir of yow / and yerely to gyue yow a palfrey to ryde vpon / for that wylle become yow better to ryde on than vpon a courser / Also I charge the syre Damas vpon payne of deth / that thow neuer destresse no knyȝtes erraunte that ryde on their aduenture / And also that thow restore these xx knyghtes that thow hast longe kepte prysoners of all their harneis that they be content for / and yf ony of hem come to my court and complayne of the / by my hede thou shalt dye therfore / Also syre Ontzelake as to yow by cause ye are named a good knyghte and ful of prowesse and true and gentyl in all youre dedes this shalle be youre charge I wylle gyue yow that in al goodely haste ye come vnto me and my courte and ye shalle be a knyghte of myne / and yf your dedes be there after I shall so proferre yow by the grace of god that ye shalle in shorte tyme be in ease for to lyue as worshipfully as your broder syre Damas / God thanke your largenesse of your goodenes & of your bounte / I shall be from hens forward at all tymes at your commaundement / For syr said syr Ontzelake as god wold as I was hurte but late with an aduen­tures knyght thurgh both my thyes that greued me sore / & els [Page] had I done this bataille with yow / god wold sayd Arthur it had ben so / for thenne had not I ben hurte as I am / I shalle telle yow the cause why / for I had not ben hurte as I am hadde not ben myne owne swerd / that was stolen from me by treason / And this bataille was ordeyned afore hand to haue slayne me / and so it was brouȝte to the purpos by fals treason and by fals enchauntement / Allas said syr Ontzela­ke that is greete pyte that euer soo noble a man as ye are of your dedes and prowesse / that ony man or woman myȝt fyn­de in their hertes to worche ony treason ageynst yow / I shalle reward them said Arthur in short tyme by the grace of god Now telle me said Arthur how f [...]r am I from Camelot / syr ye are two dayes iourney ther fro / I wold fayn be at some place of worship said syr Arthur that I myghte reste me / Syre said syr Ontzelake / here by is a ryche abbey of your elders foū dacyon of Nonnes but thre myle hens / So the kynge took his leue of alle the peple / and mounted vpon horsbak / and sir Accolon with hym / And whan they were come to the Abbaye / he lete fetche leche [...] and serche his woundes and Accolons bothe / but syr Accolon dyed within four dayes / for he had bled soo moche blood that he myghte not lyue / but kyng Arthur was wel recouerd / Soo whan Accolon was dede / he lete sende hym on an horsbere with syxe knyghtes vnto Camelot / and said / be­re hym to my syster Morgan le fay / and say that I sende her hym to a presente / and telle her I haue my swerd Excalibur and the scaubard / soo they departed with the body

¶Capitulum xiij

THe meane whyle Morgan le fay hadde wend kynge Arthur had ben dede / soo on a day she aspyed kynge Vryens lay in his bedde slepynge / thenne she called vnto her a mayden of her counceyll / & said go fetche me my lordes swerd for I sawe neuer better tyme to slee hym than now /

¶O Madame sayd the damoysel / and ye slee my lord ye can neuer escape / Care not yow said Morgan le fay / for now I see my tyme in the whiche it is best to doo hit / And therfor hye the fast and fetche me the suerd / Thēne the damoisel departed [Page] fonde syre Vwayne slepynge vpon a bedde in another chamber soo she wente vnto [...]ire Vwayne and awaked hym / and badde hym aryse and wayte on my lady youre moder / for she wille slee the kynge your fader slepynge in his bedde / for I goo to fetche his swerd / wel said syr Vwayne go on your waye / and lete me dele / Anone the damoysel brought Morgan the swerd with quakynge handes / and lyghtely took the swerd / & pul­led it out / and wente boldely vnto the beddes syde / and awayted how and where she myght sle hym best / And as she lyfte vp the swerd to smyte / sir Vwayne lepte vnto his moder and caughte her by the hand and sayd A fende what wilt thow do And thow were not my moder with this swerd I shold smyte of thy hede / A sayd syr Vwayn men saith that Merlyn was begoten of a deuylle / but I may saye an erthely deuylle bare me / O fayre sone Vwayne haue mercy vpon me / I was tempted with a deuylle / wherfore I crye the mercy / I wylle neuer more doo soo and saue my worship and discouer me not / On this couenaunt said syr Vwayne I wille forgyue it yow / soo ye wille neuer be aboute to doo suche dedes / Nay sone said she / & that I make yow assuraunce /

¶Capitulum xiiij

THenne came tydynges vnto Morgan le fay that Ac­colon was dede / and his body brought vnto the chirche And how kynge Arthur had his swerd ageyne / But whanne Quene Morgan wyste that Accolon was dede / she was soo sorouful that nere hir herte to brast / But by cause she wold not it were knowen / oute ward she kepte her counte­ce naun / & maade no semblaunt of sorowe / But wel she wyste and she abode tyll her broder Arthur cam thyder / there shold no gold goo for her lyf

¶Thenne she wente vnto Quene Gweneuer / and asked her leue to ryde in to the countreye / ye maye abyde sayde Quene Gweneuer tyll youre brother the kynge come home / I maye not sayde Morgan le fay / for I haue suche hasty tydynges / that I maye not tary / wel saide Gueneuer ye maye departe [Page] whanne ye wille / Soo erly on the morne or hit was daye she tooke her hors and rode alle that daye and mooste parte of the nyghte / And on the morn by none she cam to the same Abbay of Nonnes / where as lay kyng arthur / & she knowyng he was there she asked where he was / And they ansuerd how he had leyd hym in his bed to slepe / for he had had but lytel reste these thre nyghtes / Wel said she I charge yow that none of yow awake hym tyl I doo / and thenne she alyghte of her hors / & thoughte for to stele awey Excalibur his swerd / and soo she wente streyghte vnto his chamber / And noo man durste dys­obeye her commaundement / and there she fond Arthur a slepe in his bedde and Excalibur in his ryght hand naked / Whan she sawe that she was passynge heuy that she myghte not [...] ­me by the swerd withoute she had awaked hym / and thenne she wyst wel she had ben dede / Thenne she tooke the scaubard and wente her wey on horsbak / whan the kynge awoke and myssed his scaubard / he was wrothe / and he asked who had ben there / and they said his syster quene Morgan had ben ther and had put the scaubard vnder her mantel and was gone / Allas sayd Arthur falsly ye haue watched me / Syre sayd they alle we durste not disobeye your systers commaundement A said the kynge lete fetche the best hors maye be founde / And byd syre Ontzlake arme hym in al hast / and take another go­od hors and ryde with me / Soo anone the kynge and Ontzelake were wel armed / and rode after this lady / and soo they cam by a crosse and found a Cowherd / and they asked the poure man yf ther cam ony lady late rydynge that way / Syre said this poure man / ryght late cam a lady rydynge with a xl horses / and to yonder forest she rode / Thenne they spored theire horses / and folowed fast / And within a whyle Arthur had a syghte of Morgan le fay / thenne he chaced as fast as he my­ghte / whanne she aspyed hym folowynge her / she rode a gretter paas thorowe the forest tyl she cam to a playne / And whanne she sawe she myghte not escape she rode vnto a lake ther by / & sayd what soo euer come of me / my broder shall not haue this scaubard / And thenne she lete throwe the scauberd in the de­pest of the water soo it sanke / for it was heuy of gold and precious stones ¶ Thenne she rode in to a valeye [Page] where many grete stones were / And whan she sawe she muste be ouertake she shope her self hors and man by enchauntemēt vnto a grete marbyl stone / Anone with al cam Syr Arthur / and syr Ontzelake where as the kynge myght knowe his syster and her men / and one knyght from another / A sayd the kynge here may ye see the vengeaunce of god / and now am I sory that this mysauenture is befalle / & thenne he loked for the scaubard / but it wold not be founde / so he retorned to the Ab­beye there he came fro / So whan Arthur was gone / she torned alle in to the lykenesse as she and they were before / and sa­yd syrs now may we goo where we wylle /

¶Capitulum xv

THenne said Morgan sawe ye Arthur my broder / ye said her knyghtes ryght wel / and that ye shold haue founde and we myghte haue stered from one stede / for by his armyuestal contenaunce he wold haue caused vs to haue fled I byleue yow said Morgan / Anone after as she rode she met a knyght ledyng another knyȝt on his hors before hym boun­de hand and foote blyndefeld to haue drouned hym in a fon­tayne / whan she sawe this knyȝt so boūde / she asked hym what wylle ye doo with that knyght / lady said he I wylle drowne hym / for what cause she asked / for I fonde hym with my wyf and she shalle haue the same dethe anone / that were pyte sayd Morgan le fay / Now what saye ye knyȝt is it trouthe yt he sa­ith of yow she said to the knyght that shold be drowned / nay truly madame he seith not ryght on me / Of whens be ye sayd Morgan le fay and of what countre / I am of the Courte of kynge Arthur / and my name is Manassen cosyn vnto Acoo­lon of gaulle / ye say wel said she / and for the loue of hym ye shalle be delyuerd / and ye shalle haue your aduersary in the same was ye be in / So Manessen was losed & the other kny­ght bounde / And anone Manessen vnarmed hym and armed hym self in his harneis / and soo mounted on horsbak / and the knyght afore hym and soo threwe hym in to the fontayne and drowned hym / And thenne he rode vnto Morgan ageyne / & asked yf she wold ony thyng vnto kynge Arthur / Telle hym that I rescued the / not for the loue of hym but for the loue of Acoolon / and telle hym I fere hym not whyle I can make me [Page] and them that ben with me in lykenes of stones / And lete hym wete I can doo moche more whan I see my tyme / And so she departed in to the countrey of Gorre / and there was she rychely receyued / and maade her castels and townes passynge stronge / for alweyes she drad moche kynge Arthur / Whanne the kynge had wel rested hym at the Abbey he rode vnto Ca­melot / and fonde his quene and his barons ryght glad of his comynge / And whan they herd of his straunge auentures as is afore reherced / they alle hadde merueille of the falshede of Morgan le fay / many knyghtes wysshed her brent / thenne cam Manessen to courte and told the kyng of his auenture / well said the kynge she is a kynde syster / I shalle soo be auengid on her and I lyue / that alle Crystendome shalle speke of hit / So on the morne ther cam a damoisel from Morgan to the ky­nge and she brought with her the rychest mantel that euer was sene in that Courte / for it was sette as ful of precious stones as one myght stand by another / and there were the rychest stones that euer the kynge sawe / And the damoysel saide youre syster sendeth yow this mantel / and desyreth that ye shold ta­ke this gyfte of her / And in what thyng she hath offended you she wille amende it at youre owne pleasyr / whan the kyng beheld this mantel it pleasyd hym moche / but he said but lytel

¶Capitulum xvj

WYth that came the damoysel of the lake vnto the kyng and said syr I must speke with yow in pryuyte / say on said the kynge what ye wille / Syr sayd the damoysel put not on yow this mantel tyl ye haue sene more / and in no wyse lete it not come on yow nor on no knyghte of yours tyl ye commaunde the brynger therof to put it vpon her / wel said ky­nge Arthur / It shalle be done as ye counceille me / And thenne he said vnto the damoysel that cam fro his sister / damoisel this mantel that ye haue brought me I wille see it vpon yow / syr she said / it wille not biseme me to were a kynges garment / by my hede said Arthur / ye shalle were it or it come on my bak or ony mans that here is / and so the kyng made it to be putt vpon her / And forth with al she felle doune dede / and neuer more [Page] spake word after and brente to coles / Thenne was the kyng wonderly wrothe more than he was to fore hand / and sayd vnto kynge Vryens my syster your wyf is alwey aboute to bytraye me / and wel I wote outher ye or my neuewe youre sone is of counceille with her to haue me destroyed / But as for yow said the kyng to kynge Vryens I deme not gretely that ye be of her counceill / For Acoolon confessyd to me by his own mouth that she wold haue destroyed yow as wel as me ther for I hold yow excused / But as for your sone Syr Vwa­yn I hold hym suspect / therfore I charge yow put hym oute of my courte / So syr Vwayne was discharged / And whanne Syr Gawayne wyst that he made hym redy to go with hym / & said who so bannyssheth my cosyn germayn / shal bannysshe me Soo they two departed / and rode in to a grete forest / and soo they came to an Abbay of Monkes / and ther were wel lodged But whanne the kynge wyst that syr Gawayne was depar­ted from the Courte / ther was made grete sorowe amonge alle the estat [...]s / Now sayd Gaherys Gawayns broder we haue lost two good knyghtes for the loue of one / So on the morne they herd their masses in the abbay / and so they rode forth tyl that they came to a grete forest / thenne was syr Gawayne ware in a valey by a turret xij fayre damoysels / and two knyghtes armed on grete horses / and the damoysels wente to and fro by a tree / And thenne was syr Gawayne ware how there henge a whyte shelde on that tree / And euer as the damoysels cam by it / they spytte vpon it / and some threwe myre vpon the sheld /

¶Capitulum xvij

THenne syr Gawayne and syr Vwayne wente and salewed them / and asked why they dyd that despyte to the shelde / Syrs saiden the damoysels / we shalle telle yow / There is a knyght in this coūtrey that oweth this whyte sheld and he is a passyng good man of his handes / but he hateth al ladyes and gentylwymmen / and therfor we doo alle this des­pyte to the shelde / I shal say yow said syr gawayne / hit byse­meth euylle a good knyghte to despyse all ladyes and gentilwymmen / And parauentur though he hate yow he hath somme [Page] And parauenture he loueth in somme other places ladyes and gentylwymmen / and to be loued ageyne / and he be suche a mā of prowesse as ye speke of / Now what is his name / syr sayd they / his name is Marhaus the kynges sone of Irelond / I knowe hym wel sayd syre Vwayne / he is a passynge good knyght as ony is on lyne / for I sawe hym ones preued at a Iustes where many knyghtes were gadered / and that tyme ther myghte no man withstande hym / A sayd syr Gawayne Damoysels me thynketh ye are to blame / for hit is to suppose / he that henge that sheld ther / he wille not be longe ther fro / & thenne may tho knyghtes matche hym on horsbak / and that is more your worship than thus / For I wille abyde no len­ger to see a knyghtes sheld dishonoured / And therwith syre Vwayne and Gawayne departed a lytel fro them / And thenne were they ware where syre Marhaus cam rydynge on a grete hors streyghte toward them / And whanne the xij damoy­sels sawe syr Marhaus they fled in to the turret as they we­re wylde so that somme of them felle by the wey / Thenne the one of the knyghtes of the Toure dressid his shelde and said on hyghe syr Marhaus defende the / and soo they ranne to gy­ders that the knyȝt brake his spere on Marhaus / & Marhaus smote hym so hard that he brake his neck and the hors back / That sawe the other knyght of the turret and dressyd hym to­ward Marhaus / and they mette so egrely to gyders that the knyhht of the Turret was soone smyten doune hors and man stark dede /

¶Capitulum xviij

ANd thenne syre Marhaus rode vnto his shelde / and sa­we how it was defowled / and sayd of this despyte I am a parte auengyd / But for her loue that gaf me this why­te shelde I shalle were the / and hange myn where thow was and soo he hanged it aboute his neck / Thenne he rode streyght vnto syr Gawayn and to syr Vwayne / and asked them what they dyd there / They ansuerd hym that they cam from kynge Arthurs courte for to see auentures / wel sayd syre Marhaus here am I redy an auentures knyghte that wille fulfylle ony [Page] aduenture that ye wylle desyre / And soo departed fro them / to fetche his raunge / lete hym goo seid syr Vwayn vnto syre Gawayne / for he is a passynge good knyghte as ony is ly­uynge / I wold not by my wille that ony of vs were matched with hym / Nay said sir Gawayne not so / it were shame to vs were he not assayed were he neuer soo good a knyghte / wel said syr Vwayne I wylle assaye hym afore yow / for I am more weyker than ye / And yf he smyte me doune / thenne may ye reuenge me / soo these two knyghtes cam to gyders with grete raundon that syr Vwayne smote syr Marhaus that his spere braste in pyeces on the shelde / and Syre Marhaus smote hym so sore that hors and man he bare to the erthe / and hurte syre Vwayne on the lyfte syde / Thenne syr Marhaus torned his hors and rode toward Gawayne with his spere / and when syr Gawayne sawe that / he dressid his sheld / and they auen­tryd their speres / and they cam to gyders with alle the myȝte of their horses / that eyther knyght smote other so hard in myddes of theyr sheldes / but syr Gawayns spere brak / but sir marhaus spere helde / And therwith syre Gawayne and his hors russhed doune to the erthe / And lyghtly syr Gawayne rose on his feet / and pulled out his swerd / and dressyd hym toward syr Marhaus on foote / and syr marhaus sawe that / and pul­led oute his swerd / and beganne to come to syr Gawayne on horsbak / Syre knyght said syr gawayn alyȝte on foote or els I wylle slee thy hors / gramercy sayd syr Marhaus of youre gentylnes ye teche me curtosye / for hit is not for one knyȝt to be on foote / and the other on horsbak / & therwith syr Mar­haus sette his spere ageyne a tree and alyghte and tayed his hors to a tree / and dressid his shelde / and eyther cam vnto o­ther egerly / and smote to gyders with her swerdes that her sheldes flewe in cantels / and they brysed their helmes and their hauberkes and wounded eyther other / but Syre gawayne fro it passed ix of the clok waxed euer stronger and stronger / for thenne hit cam to the houre of noone & thryes his myghte was encreaced / Alle this aspyed syr Marhaus and had grete wonder how his myghte encreaced / and so they wounded other passynge sore / And thenne whan it was past noone / and whan it drewe toward euensonge syre gawayns strengthe febled & [Page] waxt passynge faynte that vnnethes he myght dure ony len­ger / and syr Marhaus was thenne bygger and bygger / syre knyght said syr Marhaus / I haue wel felt that ye are a passynge good knyghte and a merueyllous man of myghte as euer I felt ony / whyle hit lasteth / And oure quarels are not grete / and therfor it were pyte to doo yow hurte / for I fele ye are passynge feble / A said syr Gawayn gentyl knyghte ye say the word that I shold say / And therwith they took of theire helmes / and eyther kyssed other / and there they swore to gyders eyther to loue other as bretheren / And syr Marhaus prayd syr gawayn to lodge with hym that nyghte / And so they toke theyr horses / and rode toward syr Marhaus hous / And as they rode by the wey / syr knyghte said syr gawayne I ha­ue merueylle that so valyaunt a man as ye be loue no ladyes ne damoysels / Syre sayd syr marhaus they name me wrong­fully tho that gyue me that name / but wel I wote it ben the damoyseles of the Turret that so name me and other suche as they be / Now shalle I telle yow for what cause I hate them / For they be sorceresses and enchaunters many of them / & be a knyȝt neuer so good of his body and ful of prowesse as man may be / they wille make hym a sta [...]k coward to haue the let­ter of hym / and this is the pryncipal cause that I hate them & to al good ladyes and gentyl wymmen I owe my ser­uyse as a knyght ouȝte to do / As the book reherceth in frensshe ther were many knyghtes that ouermatched syr gawayne for alle the thryes myghte that he had / Syr Launcelot de lake / syr Trystrams / syr Bors de ganys / syr Percyuale / syr Pellias & syr Marhaus / these sixe knyȝtes had the better of sir gawayn Thenne within a lytel whyle they cam to syr Marhaus place / whiche was in a lytel pryory / and there they alyghte and ladyes and damoysels vnarmed them / and hastely loked to the­yr hurtes / for they were all thre hurte / and so they had all thre good lodgynge with syr Marhaus and good [...]here / for whan he wyst that they were kynge Arthurs syster sones / he maade them al the chere that lay in his power / and so they sciourned there a vij nyghte / and were wel easyd of their woundes and at the last departed / Now said syre Marhaus we wylle not departe soo lyȝtely / for I wylle brynge you thorow the forest [Page] And rode daye by day wel a seuen dayes or they fond ony a­uenture / At the last they cam in to a grete forest that was named the countreye and foreste of Arroy and the countrey of straunge auentures / In this countrey sayd syr Marhaus cam neuer knyghte syn it was crystened / but he fonde straunge auentures / and soo they rode / and cam in to a depe valey ful of stones / and ther by they sawe a fayr streme of water / abo­ue ther by was the hede of the streme a fayr fontayne / & thre damoysels syttynge therby / And thenne they rode to them / and eyther salewed other / and the eldest had a garland of gold aboute her hede / and she was thre score wynter of age / or more and her here was whyte vnder the garland / The second da­moysel was of thyrtty wynter of age with a serkelet of gold aboute her hede / The thyrd damoysel was but xv yere of age / and a garland of floures aboute her hede / when these knygh­tes had soo beholde them / they asked hem the cause why they sat at that fontayne / we be here sayd the damoysels for thys cause / yf we may see ony erraunt knyghtes to teche hem vnto straunge auentures / and ye be thre knyghtes that seken auentures and we be thre damoysels / and therfore eche one of yow must chese one of vs / And whan ye haue done soo / we wylle lede yow vnto thre hyhe wayes / and there eche of yow shal chese a wey and his damoysel with hym / And this day twelu [...] monethe ye must mete here ageyn / and god sende yow your lyues / and there to ye must plyȝte your trouthe / this is wel sa­id sayd syr Marhaus

¶Capitulum xx

NOw shalle eueryche of vs chese a damoysel / I shalle telle yow sayd syre Vwayne I am the yongest and moost weykest of yow bothe / therfor I wyl haue the eldest da­moysel / for she hath sene moche and can best helpe me whan I haue nede / for I haue moost nede of helpe of yow bothe / Now said syr Marhaus I wyll haue the damoysel of thyrtty wyn­ter age for she falleth best to me / wel sayd syre gawayne / I thanke yow for ye haue lefte me the yongest and the fayrest / and she is moost leuest to me / Thenne euery damoysel took her [Page] knyght by the raynes of his brydel / and broughte him to the thre wayes / and there was their othe made to mete at the fontayne that day twelue moneth and they were lyuynge / and s [...]o they [...]yst and departed / and eueryche knyghte selte his lady behynd hym / and syr Vwayne took the wey that lay west And syr Marhaus took the wey that lay southe / and syr ga­wayne took the weye that laye northe / Now wylle we begyn­ne at syr gawayne that helde that wey tyll that he cam vnto a fayre manoir where dwellyd an old knyghte & a good hous­holder / and there syr Gawayn asked the knyght yf he knewe ony auentures in that countrey / I shalle shewe yow somme to morne sayd the old knyghte / and that merueyllous / Soo on the morne they rode in to the forest of aduentures tyl they cam to a launde / and ther by they fond a crosse / and as they sto­de and houed / ther cam by them the fayrest knyght and the semelyest man that euer they sawe / makynge the grettest dole that euer man made / And thenne he was ware of syr gawayn and salewed hym and praid god to sende hym moche worship / As to that said syr gawayn gramercy / Also I praye to god that he send yow honour and worship / A said the kny­ghte I may laye that on syde / for sorowe and shame cometh to me after worship /

¶Capitulum xxj

ANd ther with he passed vnto the one syde of the laun­de / And on the other syde sawe syr Gawayne x knyȝtes that houed styll and make [...]em redy with her sheldes and speres ageynst that one knyght that cam by syr gawayn / Thenne this one knyght auentryd a grete spere / and one of the x knyghtes encountred with hym / but this woful knyght smote hym so hard that he felle ouer his hors taylle / So this same dolorous knyȝt serued hem al / that at the lest way he smote doune hors and man / and alle he dyd with one spere / and soo whan they were all x on fote / they wente to that one kny­ght / and he stode stone styll / and suffred hem to pulle hym dou­ne of his hors / and bound hym hande and foote / and tayed hym vnder the hors bely / and so ledde hym with hem / O Ihesu [Page] sayd syr gawayne this is a dooleful syghte / to see the yonder knyghte so to be entreted / and it semeth by the knyght that he suffr [...]th hem to bynde hym soo / for he maketh no resystence / Noo said his hoost that is trouthe / for and he wold they al were to weyke soo to doo hym / Syr said the damoysel vnto syr Gawayn / me semeth hit were youre worship to helpe that dolorous knyghte / for me thynketh he is one of the best knyghtes that euer I sawe / I wold doo for hym sayd syre gawayn but hit semeth he wylle haue no helpe / thenne sayd the damoysel me thynketh ye haue no luste to helpe hym / Thus as they talked they sawe a knyȝte on the other syde of the launde al armed [...]auf the hede / And on the other syde ther cam a dwerf on hors bak all armed sauf the hede with a grete mouthe / and a shorte nose / And whan the dwerf came nyghe he said where is the lady shold mete vs here / and ther with all she came forth out of the wood / And thenne they began to stryue for the lady / For the knyghte sayd he wold haue her / & the dwerf said he wold haue her / wylle we doo wel sayd the dwerf / yonder is a kny­ght at the crosse / lete vs put it bothe vpon hym / and as he de­meth so shalle it be / I wylle wel said the knyght / and so they wente all thre vnto syre gawayn and told hym wherfor they strofe / wel syrs said he wylle ye put the mater in my hand / ye they sayd both / Now damoysel sayd syr gawayn ye shal stande betwixe them both / and whether ye lyst better to go to / he shal haue yow / And whan she was sette bitwene them both she left the knyghte and wente to the dwerf / and the dwerf took her and wente his waye syngynge / and the knyghte wente hys wey with grete mornyng / Thenne came ther two knyghtes all armed and cryed on hyghe Syre gawayn / knyghte of kynge Arthurs make the redy in al hast and Iuste with me / soo they ranne to gyders that eyther felle doune / and thenne on foote they drewe their swerdes and dyd ful actually / the mene whyle the other knyghte wente to the damoysel / and asked her / why she abode with that knyghte / and yf ye wold abyde with me / I wylle be your feythful knyghte and with yow wylle I be said the damoysel / for with syr Gawayn I may not fynde in myn herte to be with hym / For now here was one knyȝt scomfyte x knyghtes / And at the laste he was cowardly led [Page] awey / and therfore lete vs two goo whylest they fyghte / and syre Gawayn fought with that other knyght longe / but at the last they accorded both / And thenne the knyght prayd syr ga­wayn to lodge with hym that nyghte / Soo as syre Gawayn wente with this knyghte he asked hym what knyghte is he in this countrey that smote doune the ten knyghtes / for whan he had done so manfully he suffred hem to bynde hym hand and foote / and soo ledde hym awey / A sayd the knyghte that is the best knyght I trowe in the world / and the moost man of prowesse / and he bath be serued soo as he was ēne more than x tymes / and his name hyghte syr Pelleas / and he loueth a grete lady in this countrey and her name is Ettard / and so when he loued her there was cryed in this countrey a greete Iustes thre dayes / And alle the knyghtes of this countrey were there and gentylwymmen / And who that preued hym the best kny­ght shold haue a passyng good swerd and a Serklet of gold and the serklet the knyght shold gyue hit to the fayrest lady that was at the Iustes / And this knyghte syre Pelleas was the best knyghte that was there / and there were fyue honderd knyghtes / but there was neuer man that euer syre Pelleas met with al / but he stroke hym doune or els from his hors / And euery day of thre dayes he strake doune twenty knygh­tes / therfore they gaf hym the pryse / & forthe with all he wente there as the lady Ettard was / and gaf her the serklet / & said openly / she was the fayrest lady that there was / & that wold he preue vpon ony knyghte that wold say nay /

¶Ca xxij

ANd soo he chose her for his souerayne lady / & neuer to loue other but her / but she was so proude that she had scorne ef hym and sayd that she wold neuer loue hym thouȝ he wold dye for her / wherfor al ladyes and gentylwym­men hadde scorne of her that she was so proude / for there were fayrer than she / & there was none that was ther but & sir Pelleas wold haue proferd hem loue they wold haue loued hym for his noble prowesse / & so this knyȝt promysed the lady et­tard to folowe her in to this coūtrey / & nener to leue her tyl she loued hym / & thus he is here the moost party nyghe her and lodged by a pryory / and euery weke she sendeth knyghtes to fyȝte with hym / And whan he hath put hem to the wers than wylle [Page] he suffre hem wylfully to take hym prysoner by cause he wold haue a syghte of this lady / And alweyes she doth hym grete despyte / for some tyme she maketh her knyghtes to taye hym to his hors taylle and some to bynd hym vnder the hors bely Thus in the moost shamefullest wyse that she can thynke he is broughte to her / And alle she doth hyt for to cause hym to leue this countreye and to leue his louynge / But all this can not make hym to leue / for and he wold haue foughte on foote he myghte haue had the better of the ten knyghtes as wel on foote as on horsbak / Allas sayd syr gawayn it is grete pyte of hym / And after this nyghte I wylle seke hym to morowe in this forest to doo hym alle the helpe I can / So on the mor­ne syr gawayne tooke his leue of his hoost syre Carados and rode in to the forest / And at the last he mette with syr Pelle­as makyng grete moone oute of mesure / so eche of hem salewed other / and asked hym why he made suche sorowe / And as it is aboue reherced / syre Pelleas told syre Gawayne / but alwe­yes I suffre her knyghtes to fare soo with me as ye sawe yesterdaye in truste at the last to wynne her loue / for she knoweth wel alle her knyghtes shold not lyghtely wynne me / and me lyste to fyghte with them to the vttermest / Wherfore and I loued her not so sore I hadde leuer dye an honderd tymes / and I myght dye soo ofte rather than I wold suffre that despyte / but I truste she wylle haue pyte vpon me at the laste / for loue causeth many a good knyght to suffre to haue his en­tent / but allas I am vnfortunate / And ther with he maade soo grete dole & sorowe that vnnethe he myghte holde hym on hors­back ¶ Now sayd syre gawayne leue your mor­nynge and I shalle promyse yow by the feythe of my body to doo alle that lyeth in my power to gete yow the loue of yo­ur lady / and ther to I wylle plyte yow my trouthe / A sayd syr Pelleas of what Courte are ye telle me I praye yow my good frend / And thenne syr gawayne sayd I am of the co­urte of kynge Arthur / and his susters sone / and kynge Lott of Orkeney was my fader / and my name is syre Gawayne / And thenne he sayd my name is Syre Pelleas borne in the Iles / and of many Iles I am lord / and neuer haue I lo­ued lady nor damoysel tyl now in an vnhappy tyme / and syr [Page] knyghte syn ye are soo nyghe cosyn vnto kynge Arthur and a kynges sone / therfor bytraye me not but helpe me / for I may neuer come by her but by somme good knyghte / for she is in a stronge castel here fast by within this four myle / and ouer all this countrey she is lady of / And so I may neuer come to her presence / but as I suffre her knyghtes to take me / and but yf I dyd so that I myghte haue a syghte of her I had ben dede long or this tyme / and yet fayre word had I neuer of her / but whā I am brought to fore her she rebuketh me in the fowlest ma­ner / And thenne they take my hors and harneis and putten me oute of the yates / and she wylle not suffre me to ete nor drynke / and alweyes I offre me to be her prysoner / but that she wylle not suffre me / for I wold desyre no more what paynes so euer I had / soo that I myȝte haue a syghte of her day­ly / wel sayd syr gawayne / Al this shalle I amende and ye wylle do as I shal deuyse / I wylle haue your hors and yo­ur armour / and so wylle I ryde vnto her castel and [...]elle her that I haue slayne yow / and soo shal I come withynne her to cause her to cherysshe me / And thenne shalle I doo my true parte that ye shalle not faylle to haue the loue of her

¶Capitulum xxiij

ANd there with syr Gawayne plyghte his trouthe vnto syr Pelleas to be true and feythful vnto hym / soo eche one plyghte their trouthe to other / and soo they chaunged horses and harneis / and sire Gawayn departed / and came to the castel where as stoode the pauelions of this lady withoute the yate / And as soone as Ettard had aspyed syr Gawayn she fledde in toward the castel / syre Gawayn spak on hyghe / and badde her abyde / for he was not syre Pelleas / I am ano­ther knyghte that haue slayne syr Pelleas / doo of youre hel­me said the lady Ettard that I maye see your vysage / And soo whan she sawe that it was not syr Pelleas / she made hym alyghte / and ledde hym vnto her castel / and asked hym feyth fully / whether he had slayne syr Pelleas / and he sayd her ye / and told her his name was syre gawayn of the courte of ky­nge Arthur and his syster sone / Truly sayd she that is grete pyte for he was a passynge good knyghte of his body / but [Page] of al men on lyue I hated hym moost / for I coude neuer be quyte of hym / And for ye haue slayne hym / I shalle be your woman and to doo ony thynge that myghte please yow / Soo she made syr Gawayne good chere / Thenne syr gawayn sayd that he loued a lady / and by no meane she wold loue hym / She is to blame sayd Ettard and she wylle not loue yow / for ye that be soo wel borne a man and suche a man of pro­wesse / there is no lady in the world to good for yow / wylle ye sayd syre Gawayne promyse me to doo alle that ye maye by the feythe of youre body to gete me the loue of my lady / ye syre sayd she / and that I promyse yow by the feythe of my body / Now sayd syre Gawayne it is your self that I loue so wel / therfore I praye yow hold your promyse / I maye not chese sayd the lady Ettard / but yf I shold be forsworne / and soo she graunted hym to fulfylle alle his desyre /

¶Soo it was thenne in the moneth of May that she and syre Gawayn wente oute of the castel and souped in a pauelione / and there was made a bedde / and there syre gawayne and the lady Ettard wente to bedde to gyders / and in another pauel­ione she layd her damoysels / and in the thyrd pauelione she leyd parte of her knyghtes for thenne she had no drede of syr Pelleas / And there syre gawayn lay with her in that pauel­ione two dayes and two nyghtes / And on the thyrd day in the mornyng erly syr Pelleas armed hym / for he hadde neuer slepte syn syr Gawayn departed from hym / for syr Gawayne had promysed hym by the feythe of hys body to come to hym vnto his pauelione by that pryory within the space of a daye and a nyghte ¶Thenne syre Pelleas moun­ted vpon horsbak / and cam to the pauelions that stode without the castel / and fonde in the fyrst pauelione thre knyghtes in thre beddes / and thre squyers lyggynge at theire feet / thenne wente he to the seconde pauelione & fond four gentyl wymmen lyenge in four beddes / & thenne he yede to the thyrd pauelion & fond syr gawayn lyggyng in bedde with his lady Ettard & eyther clyppyng other in armes / and whan he sawe that his herte wel nyghe brast for sorou / & said Allas that euer a knyȝt shold be founde so fals / and thēne he took his hors & myȝt not abyde no lenger for pure sorowe / And whanne he hadde ryden [Page] nyghe half a myle he torned ageyne and thoughte to slee hem bothe / And whanne he sawe hem bothe soo lye slepynge faste / vnnethe he myght holde hym on horsbak for sorowe / and sayd thus to hym self / though this knyght be neuer soo fals I wyl neuer slee hym slepynge / For I wylle neuer destroye the hy­gh ordre of knygthode / and therwith he departed ageyne And or he hadde ryden half a myle he retorned ageyne / and thoughte thenne to slee hem bothe / makynge the grettest sorou that euer man made / And whanne he came to the pauelions / he tayed his hors vnto a tree / and pulled oute his swerd naked in his hand / and wente to them there as they lay / and yet he thought it were shame to slee them slepynge / and layd the naked swerd ouerthwart bothe their throtes / and soo to­oke his hors and rode his waye

And whanne syre Pelleas came to his pauelions he told his knyghtes and his squyers how he had sped / and sayd thus to them for your true and good seruyse ye haue done me I shall gyue yow alle my goodes / for I wylle goo vnto my bedde and neuer aryse vntyl I am dede / And whan that I am dede / I charge yow that ye take the herte oute of my body and bere it her betwyxe two syluer dysshes / and telle her how I sawe her lye with the fals knyght Syr Gawayne / Ryght soo syr Pelleas vnarmed hym self and wente vnto his bedde makynge merueyllous dole and sorowe /

¶Thenne syre Gawayne and Ettard awoke of her slepe / & fonde the naked swerd ouerthwart theire throtes / thenne she knewe wel it was syr Pelleas swerd / Allas sayd she to sir Gawayne ye haue bitrayed me and syr Pelleas bothe / for ye told me ye had slayne hym / and now I knowe wel it is not soo he is on lyue / And yf syre Pelleas had ben as vncurteis to yow as ye haue ben to hym ye hadde ben a dede knyghte / but ye haue deceyued me and bytrayd me falsly / that al ladyes and damoysels may beware by yow and me / And ther with syr gawayn made hym redy / and wente in to the forest / Soo it happed thenne that the damoysel of the lake Nymue mette with a knyghte of syr Pelleas that wente on his foote in the forest makyng grete dole / and she asked hym the cause And soo the woful knyghte told her how his mayster and [Page] lorde was bitrayed thurgh a knyghte and a lady / and how he wyll neuer aryse oute of his bed tyl he be dede / Brynge me to hym sayd she anone / and I wyl waraunt his lyf he shal not dye for loue / and she that hath caused hym so to loue / she shalle be in as euyl plyte as he is or it be long to / for it is no Ioy of suche a prowde lady that wylle haue no mercy of suche a valyaunt knyght / anone that knyȝte broughte her vnto hym And whan she sawe hym lye in his bedde / she thoughte she sawe neuer so lykely a knyght / and ther with she threwe an enchauntement vpon hym / and he felle on slepe / And ther why­le she rode vnto the lady Ettard / and charged no man to a­wake hym tyl she came ageyne / Soo within two houres she broughte the lady Ettard thydder / and both ladyes fonde hym on slepe / loo sayd the damoysel of the lake ye oughte to be ashamed for to murdre suche a knyght / And therwith she threwe suche an enchauntement vpon her that she loued hym sore / that wel nyghe she was oute of her mynde / O lord Ihesu saide the lady Ettard / how is it befallen vnto me / that I loue now hym that I haue moost hated of ony man alyue / that is the ryght wys Iugement of god sayd the damoysel / And thenne anone syr Pelleas awaked and loked vpon Ettard / And whan he sawe her / he knewe her / & thēne he hated her more than ony wo­man alyue / and said awey traitresse come neuer in my syȝt And whan she herd hym say so / she wepte and made grete so­rou oute of mesure

¶Capitulum xxiiij

SYre knyhht Pelleas sayd the damoysel of the lake / ta­ke your hors / and come forthe with me oute of this co­untrey / and ye shal loue a lady that shal loue yow / I wylle wel said syr Pelleas / for this lady Ettard hath done me grete despyte and shame / and there he told her the begynnynge and endynge / And how he had purposed neuer to haue arysen tyll that he hadde ben dede / And now suche grace god hath sente me / that I hate her as moche as euer I loued her thanked be our lord Ihesus / Thanke me sayde the damoysel of the lake [Page] anone syre Pellas armed hym and tooke his hors and com­maunded his men to brynge after his pauelions and his stuffe where the damoysel of the lake wold assigne / soo the lady Ettard dyed for sorowe / and the damoysel of the lake re­ioysed syr Pellas and loued to gyders durynge their lyf da­yes /

¶Capitulum xxv

NOw torne we vnto syr Marhaus that rode with the damoysel of xxx wynter of age southard / and soo they cam in to a depe forest / and by fortune they were nyȝ­ted / and rode longe in a depe way / and at the last they came vnto a courtelage / and there they asked herborow / but the mā of the courtelage wold not lodge them for no treatyce that they coude treate / but thus moche the good man sayd / and ye will take the aduenture of youre lodgyng / I shal brynge you there ye shalle be lodged / what auenture is that that I shal haue / for my lodgynge sayd syr Marhaus / ye shalle wete whan ye come there sayd the good man / syr what auenture so it be bryng me thyder I pray the sayd syr Marhaus / for I am wery / my damoysel and my hors / So the good man wente and opened the gate / and within an houre he broughte hym vnto a fayre castel / and thenne the poure man called the porter / and anon he was lete in to the castel / & soo he told the lord how he brouȝt hym a knyght erraunt and a damoysel that wold be lodged with hym / lete hym in said the lord / it may happen he shalle repente that they toke their lodgyng here / So syr Marhaus was lete in with torche lyghte / and there was a goodely syghte of yonge men that welcomed hym / And thenne his hors was ledde in to the stable / and he and the damoysel were broughte in to the halle / and there stode a myghty duke and many go­odely men about hym / thēne this lord asked hym what he hy­ghte / and fro whens he cam / and with whome he dwelt / syre he said I am a knyghte of kynge Arthurs and knyght of the table round / and my name is syre Marhaus / and borne I am in Irland / And thenne sayd the duke to hym / that me sore repenteth / the cause is this / for I loue not thy lord / nor [Page] none of thy felawes of the table round / And therfor ease thy self this nyghte as wel as thow mayst / for as to morne I & my sixe sonnes shal matche with yow / Is ther no remedy but that I must haue a doo with yow and your vj sones at ones sayd syr Marhaus / No sayd the duke for this cause I maade myn auowe / for syr gawayne slewe my seuen sonnes in a re­counter / therfore I made myn auowe / there shold neuer knyȝt of kynge Arthurs court lodge with me or come there as I my­ght haue adoo with hym / but that I wold haue a reuengyng of my sonnes dethe / what is your name said syr Marhaus I requyre yow telle me and it please yow / wete thow wel I am the duke of south marchys / A sayd sir Marhaus I haue herd saye that ye haue ben longe tyme a grete foo vnto my lord ar­thur and to his knyghtes / that shalle ye fele to morne said the duke / Shalle I haue adoo with yow sayd syr Marhaus / ye sayd the duke / therof shalt thow not chese / and therfore take yow to your chambre and ye shalle haue all that to yow lon­geth / So syr Marhaus departed and was led to a chamber / and his damoysel was led vnto her chamber / And on the morn the duke sente vnto syre Marhaus and bad make hym redy / And so syr Marhaus arose and armed hym / and thenne ther was a masse songe afore hym and brake his fast / and so moū ted on horsback in the courte of the castel there they shold doo the batail / So ther was the duke al redy on horsbak clene armed and his syxe sonnes by hym / and eueryche had a spere in his hand / and soo they encountred where as the duke and his two sones brak theyr speres vpon hym / but sir Marhaus helde vp his spere and touched none of them /

¶Capitulum xxvj

THenne cam the foure sones by couple / and two of them brake their speres / and soo dyd the other two / And alle this whyle syre marhaus touched hem not / Thenne sir marhaus▪ ranne to the duke / and smote hym with his spere that hors and man felle to the erthe / And so he serued his sones / And thenne syr Marhaus alyghte doune and bad the duke [Page] yelde hym or els he wold slee hym / And thenne some of his sones recouerd / and wold haue set vpon syr Marhaus / then­ne syr Marhaus sayd to the duke seace thy sones or els I will doo the vttermest to yow all / Thenne the duke sawe he myghte not escape the deth he cryed to his sones and charged them to yelde them to syr Marhaus / And they kneled al doune / and put the pomels of theire swerdes to the knyght / and soo he re­ceyued them / And thenne they halp vp their fader / and soo by their comynal assente promysed to syr Marhaus neuer to be foes vnto kynge Arthur / and therupon at whytsontyde after to come he and his sones and putte them in the kynges grace Thenne syr Marhaus departed and within two dayes his damoysel brought hym where as was a grete tornement that the lady de Vawse had cryed / And who that dyd best shold haue a ryche serklet of gold worthe a thousand besauntes / And there syr Marhaus dyd so nobly that he was renomed / & had somtyme doune fourty knyghtes / and soo the serklet of gold was rewarded hym / Thenne he departed fro thens with grete worship / And soo within seuen nyghtes his damoysel brought hym to an erles place / his name was the erle Fergus / that after was syre Trystrams knyghte / and this Erle was but a yonge man / and late come in to his landes / and there was a gyant fast by hym that hyȝte Taulurd / and he had another broder in Cornewaille that hyghte Taulas that syr Trystram slewe whanne he was oute of his mynde / So this Erle maade his complaynte vnto syre Marhaus that there was a gyaunt by hym that destroyed al his londes / & how he durst nowhere ryde nor goo for hym / Syr sayd the knyghte whether vseth he to fyghte on horsbak or on foote / nay sayd the erle there maye no hors here hym / wel said syr marhaus thenne wille I fygh­te with hym on foote / Soo on the morne syr Marhaus prayd the erle that one of his men myghte brynge hym where as the gyaūt was / and so he was / for he sawe hym sytte vnder a tree of hoolly / and many clubbes of yron and gysarms about hym Soo thys knyghte dressid hym to the gyant putiyng his sheld afore hym / and the gyant toke an Iron clubbe in his hande / & at the fyrste stroke he clafe syre Marhaus shelde in ij pyeces / And there he was in grete peryl / for the gyant was a Wyly [Page] fyghter / but atte last syr Marhaus smote of his ryght arme aboue the elbowe / thēne the gyant fledde and the knyght after hym / and soo he drofe hym in to a water / but the gyant was soo hyghe that he myghte not wade after hym / And thenne sir Marhaus made the erle Fergus man to fetche hym stones / & with tho stones the knyghte gaf the gyaunt many sore knoc­kes / tyl at the last he made hym falle doune in to the water / & so was he there dede / thēne syr Marhaus wēte vnto the gyants castel / and there he delyuerd xxiiij ladyes and twelue knyȝtes oute of the gyants pryson / and there he had grete rychesse withoute nombre / soo that the dayes of his lyf he was neuer poure man / thenne he retorned to the erle Fergus / the whiche thanked hym gretely / and wold haue gyuen hym half his lā des but he wold none take / Soo syr Marhaus dwellyd with the erle nyghe half a yere / for he was sore brysed with the gy­aunt / and at the laste he took his leue / And as he rode by the way / he mette with syr gawayne and syr Vwayne / and so by aduenture he mette with foure knyghtes of Arthurs courte / the fyrst was syr Sagramore desyrus / syr Ozanna / syr Do­dynas le saueage / and syre felot of lystynoyse / and there syr Marhaus with one spere smote doune these foure knyghtes / and hurte them sore / Soo he departed to mete at his day afore sel [...]e

¶Capitulum xxvij

NOw tourne we vnto syr Vwayne that rode westwarde with his damoysel of thre score wynter of age / and she broughte hym there as was a turnement nyghe the marche of walys / and at that tornement syre Vwayne smote doune xxx knyghtes / therfore was gyuen hym the pryse / and that was a gerfaukon / and a whyte stede trapped with clothe of gold / Soo thenne syr Vwayn dyd many straunge auentures by the meanes of the old damoysel / and so she broughte hym to a lady that was called the lady of the roche / the which was moche curtois / So there were in the countrey two knyȝtes that were bretheren / and they were called two peryllous knygh­tes / the one knyghte hyght syre Edward of the reed castel / & [Page] the other syr Hue of the reed castel / And these two bretheren had disheryted the lady of the roche of a Baronry of landes by their extorsion / And as this knyȝt was lodged with this lady she made her compleynt to hym of these two knyghtes / Madame sayd syr Vwayne / they are to blame / for they doo a­geynst the hyghe ordre of knygthode & the othe that they ma­de / And yf hit lyke yow I wille speke with hem by cause I am a knyghte of kynge Arthurs / and I wylle entrete them with fayrenesse / And yf they wylle not I shalle doo bataille with them and in the deffense of youre ryghte / gramercy sayd the lady / and there as I maye not acquyte yow / god shalle / Soo on the morne the two knyghtes were sente for / that they shold come thyder to speke with the lady of the roche / and we­te ye wel they fayled not / for they cam with an C hors / But whan this lady sawe them in this maner soo bygge / she wold not suffre syr Vwayne to goo oute to them vpon no surete ne for no fayr langage / but she made hym speke with them ouer a toure / but fynally these two bretheren wold not be entreated and ansuerd that they wold kepe that they had / wel said syr Vwayne / thenne wylle I fyghte with one of yow / and pre­ue that ye doo this lady wronge / that wille we not said they For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one knyȝt at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bata­ille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght

¶Capitulum xxviij

SO was there sykernesse made on both partyes that no treason shold be wrought on neyther partye / soo thenne the knyghtes departed and made hem redy / and that nyghte syr Vwayn had grete chere / And on the morne he arose erly and herd masse and brake his fast / and soo he rode vnto the playn withoute the gates where houed the two bretheren a­bydynge hym / Soo they rode to gyders passynge sore that syre Edward and syr Hue brake their speres vpon syr Vwayne [Page] And syr Vwayne smote syre Edward that he felle ouer his hors and yet his spere brast not / And thenne he spored his hors and came vpon syr Hue and ouerthrewe hym / but they soone recouerd and dressid their sheldes and drewe their suerdes and bad syre Vwayne alyghte and doo his bataill to the vttermest / Thenne syr Vwayn deuoyded his hors sodenly / & put his shelde afore hym and drewe his swerde / and soo they dressyd to gyders and eyther gaf other suche strokes / & there these two bretheren wounded syr Vwayne passyng greuously that the lady of the roche wende he shold haue dyed / And thus they fought to gyders fyue houres as men raged oute of reason / And at the laste syr Vwayne smote syr Edward vpon the helme suche a stroke that his swerd kerued vnto his canel bone / and thenne syr Hue abated his courage / but syr Vwa­yn pressed fast to haue slayne hym / That sawe syr Hue he kneled doune and yelde hym to syr Vwayne and he of his gentilnesse receyued his swerd and took hym by the hand & went in to the castel to gyders / thenne the lady of the roche was pas­syng glad and the other broder made grete sorowe for his broders dethe / thenne the lady was restored of al her landes / and syr Hue was commaunded to be at the Courte of kynge Ar­thur at the next feest of penthecost / So sir Vwayn dwelt with the lady nyghe half a yere / for it was longe or he myghte be hole of his grete hurtes / and soo whan it drewe nygh the terme day that syr gawayn syr Marhaus and syre Vwayne shold mete at the crosse way / thenne euery knyght drewe hym thy­der to holde his promyse that they had made / & syr Marhaus and syr Vwayne broughte their damoysels with them / but sir Gawayn had lost his damoysel as it is afore reherced

¶Capitulum xxix

RYght soo at the twelue monethes ende they mette alle thre knyghtes at the fontayne and their damoisels but the damoysel that syr gawayn had coude saye but lytel wor­ship of hym / soo they departed from the damoysels and roode [Page] thurgh a grete forest / and there they mette with a messager that cam fro kynge Arthur that had soughte them wel nyhe a xij moneth thorou oute al Englond / walys and Scotland / and charged yf euer he myght fynde syre Gawayn and syre Vwayn to brynge hem to the courte ageyne / And thenne we­re they al gladde / and soo prayd they syre Marhaus to ryde with hem to the kynges courte / And soo within twelue dayes they cam to Camelot / and the kynge was passyng glad of the­ir comynge and soo was alle the Courte / thenne the kyng made hem to swere vpon a book to telle hym alle theire aduentures that had befalle hem that twelue monethe and soo they dyd / And there was sir Marhaus wel knowen / for ther were kny­ghtes that he had matched afore tyme / and he was named o­ne of the best knyghtes lyuyng / Ageyne the feest of pentecost cam the damoysel of the lake and broughte with hir syr Pelleas / and at that hyhe feest there was grete Iustynge of knygh­tes / and of al knyghtes that were at that Iustes / syr Pelleas had the pryse / and syr Marhaus was named the next / but syr Pelleas was soo stronge / there myght but fewe knyghtes sytte hym a buffet with a spere / And at that next feest sir pel­leas and syr marhaus were made knyghtes of the table roūd For there were two seges voyde / for two knyghtes were slayn that twelue moneth / and grete ioye had kynge Arthur of sire Pelleas and of sire Marhaus / but Pelleas loued neuer after sire Gawayne but as he spared hym for the loue of kyng ar­thur / But oftymes at Iustes and turnementes sire Pelleas quyte sire Gawayn / for so it reherceth in the book of Frensshe / Soo sire Trystram many dayes after faughte with sire Mar­haus in an yland / and there they dyd a grete bataylle / but at the last sire Trystram slewe hym / soo sire Trystram was woū ­ded that vnnethe he myght recouer and lay at a nonnery halfe a yere / and sire Pelleas was a worshipful knyghte / & was o­ne of the four that encheued the sancgreal / and the damoysel of the lake made by her meanes that neuer he had adoo with sire launcelot de lake / for where sire launcelot was at ony Iustes / or ony tornement / she wold not suffre hym be there that daye / but yf it were on the syde of sire launcelot /

[Page]¶Explicit liber quartus

¶Incipit liber quintus

WHanne kyng Arthur had after longe werre re­sted / and helde a Ryal feeste and table rounde with his alyes of kynges / prynces / and noble knyghtes all of the round table / there cam in to his halle he syttynge in his throne Ryal xij aū ­cyen men / berynge eche of them a braunche of Olyue in token that they cam as Embassatours and messager [...] fro the Emperour Lucyus / whiche was called at that tyme / Dictatour or procutour of the publyke wele of Rome / whiche sayde messa­gers after their entryng & comyng in to the presence of kynge Arthur dyd to hym theyr obeyssaūce in makyng to hym reue­rence said to hym in this wyse / The hyghe & myghty Emperour Lucyus sendeth to the kyng of Bretayne gretyng / cōmaūdyng the to knouleche hym for thy lord / and to sende hym the trua­ge due of this Royamme vnto thempyre / whiche thy fader and other to fore thy precessours haue paid as is of record / And thou as rebelle not knowynge hym as thy souerayne withhol­dest and reteynest contrary to the statutes and decrees maade by the noble and worthy Iulius Cezar conquerour of this Royame / and fyrst Emperour of Rome / And yf thou refuse his demaunde and commaundement / knowe thou for certayne that he shal make stronge werre ageynst the / thy Royames & londes / and shall chastyse the and thy subgettys / that it shal be ensample perpetuel vnto alle kynges and prynces / for to denye their truage vnto that noble empyre whiche domyneth vpon the vnyuersal world / Thenne whan they had shewed theffecte of their message / the kyng commaunded them to withdrawe them And said he shold take auyce of counceylle and gyue to them an ansuere / Thenne somme of the yonge knyghtes heryng this their message wold haue ronne on them to haue slayne them sayenge that it was a rebuke to alle the knyghtes there beyng present to suffre them to saye so to the kynge / And anone the [Page] kynge commaunded that none of them vpon payne of dethe to myssaye them ne doo them ony harme / and commaūded a kny­ghte to brynge them to their lodgynge / and see that they haue alle that is necessary and requysyte for them / with the best chere / and that noo deyntee be spared / For the Romayns ben grete lordes / and though theyr message please me not ne my court yet I must remembre myn honour / ¶After this the kyng le­te calle alle his lordes and knyghtes of the round table to counceyl vpon this mater / and desyred them to saye theire ad­uys / thenne syr Cador of Cornewaile spacke fyrste and sayd Syre this message lyketh me wel / for we haue many dayes rested vs and haue ben ydle / and now I hope ye shalle make sharp warre on the Romayns where I doubte not we shal gete honour / I byleue wel sayd Arthur that this mater pleaseth the wel / but these ansuers may not be ansuerd / for the dema­unde greueth me sore / For truly I wyl neuer paye truage to Rome / wherfore I pray yow to counceylle me / I haue vnder­stande that Bellinus and Brenius kynges of Bretayne haue had thempyre in their handes many dayes / And also Con­stantyn the sone of Heleyne / whiche is an open euydence that we owe noo trybute to Rome / But of ryght we that ben des­cended of them haue ryght to clayme the tytle of thempyre /

¶Capitulum Secundum

THenne ansuerd kynge Anguysshe of Scotland / Syr ye oughte of ryght to be aboue al other kynges / for vnto yow is none lyke ne pareylle in Crystendome / of knyȝt­hode ne of dygnyte / & I counceylle you neuer to obeye the Ro­mayns / for whan they regned on vs / they destressyd oure el­ders / and putte this land to grete extorcions & taylles / wherfore I make here myn auowe to auenge me on them / and for to strengthe youre quarel I shal furnysshe xy M good men of warre and wage them on my costes / whiche shal awayte on yow with my self whan it shal please yow / and the kyng of lytel Bretayne graunted hym to the same xxx M / wherfor kynge Arthur thanked them / And thenne euery man [Page] agreed to make warre / and to ayde after their power / that is to wete the lord of westwalis promysed to brynge xxx M men And syr Vwayne / syre Ider his sone with their cosyns pro­mysed to brynge xxx M / thenne syre launcelot with alle other promysed in lyke wyse euery man a grete multytude / ¶And whan kynge Arthur vnderstood theire courages and good wylles / he thanked them hertely / and after lete calle thembas­satours to here theire ansuere / And in presence of alle his lor­des and knyghtes he sayd to them in thys wyse / I wylle that ye retorne vnto your lord and procurour of the comyn wele for the Romayns / and saye ye to hym Of his demaunde and commaundement I sette nothyng / And that I knowe of no truage ne trybute that I owe to hym / ne to none erthely prynce / Crysten ne hethen / but I pretende to haue and occupye the so­ueraynte of thempyre / wherin I am entytled by the ryght of my predecessours somtyme kynges of this lond / and saye to hym that I am delybered and fully concluded to goo wyth myn armye with strengthe and power vnto Rome by the grace of god to take possession in thempyre / and subdue them that ben rebelle / wherfore I commaunde hym and alle them of Rome that incontynent they make to me their homage & to knouleche me for their Emperour and gouernour vpon payne that shalle ensiewe / And thenne he commaunded his tresorer to gyue to them grete and large yeftes / and to paye alle theyr dispencys / and assygned syre Cador to conueye them oute of the land / and soo they took theire leue and departed / and tooke theyr shyppynge at Sandwyche / and passed forthe by flaun­drys / Almayn / the montayns / and all ytalye vntyl they cam vnto Lucius / And after the reuerence made / they made relacy­on of their ansuer lyke as ye to fore haue herd / whan themperour Lucyus had wel vnderstonde theyre credence / he was sore meued as he had ben al araged / & sayd / I had supposed that Arthur wold haue obeyed to my commaundement / and haue serued yow hym self / as hym wel bysemed or ony other kyng to doo / O syre sayd one of the senatours late be suche vayn wordes / for we late yow wete that I and my felawes were ful sore aferd to beholde his countenaunce / I fere me ye haue made a rodde for your self / for he entendeth to be lord of this empyre [Page] whiche sore is to be doubted yf he come / for he is al another mā than ye wene / and holdeth the most noble courte of the world alle other kynges ne prynces maye not compare vnto his no­ble mayntene / On newe yeres daye we sawe hym in his estate whiche was the ryallest that euer we sawe / for he was serued at his table with ix kynges / and the noblest felauship of other prynces lordes and knyghtes that ben in the world / and euery knyghte approued and lyke a lord and holdeth table roūd And in his persone the moost manly man that lyueth / and is lyke to conquere alle the world / for vnto his courage it is to lytel / wherfore I aduyse yow to kepe wel youre marches and straytes in the montayns / For certaynly he is a lord to be do­ubted / Wel sayd Lucius bifore Eester I suppose to passe the moūtayns and soo forth in to fraunce / and there byreue hym his londes with Ianeweyes and other myghty warryours of Tuskane and lombardye / And I shall sende for them all that ben subgettys and alyed to thēpyre of Rome to come to myn ayde / and forthwith sente old wyse knyghtes vnto these coun­trayes folowynge / fyrste to ambage and arrage / to Alysaun­drye / to ynde. to hermonye / where as the ryuer of Eufrates ren­neth in to Asye / to Auffryke / and Europe the large / to erta­yne and Elamye to Arabye / Egypte and to damaske / to da­myete and Cayer / to Capadoce / to tarce / Turkye / pounce / and pampoylle / to Surrye and gallacye / And alle these were sub­gette to Rome and many moo / as Grece / Cypres / Macydone / Calabre / Cateland / portyngale with many thousandes of spaynardys / Thus alle these kynges / dukes / and admyrals assembled aboute Rome with xvj kynges attones with grete mul­tytude of peple / whan themperour vnderstood their comyng / he made redy his Romayns / and alle the peple bytwene hym & Flaunders ¶ Also he hadde goten wyth hym fyfty Geaunts whiche had ben engendred of fendys And they were ordeyned to garde his persone / and to breke the frounte of the bataylle of kynge Arthur /

And thus departed fro Rome and came doune the montayns for to destroye the londes that Arthur had conquerd and cam vnto Coleyne / and byseged a Castel there by / and wanne it soone and stuffed hit with two honderd sarasyns or Infydeles [Page] and after destroyed many fayr countrees / whiche Arthur had wonne of kyng Claudas / And thus Lucius cam with alle his hoost whiche were disperplyd lx myle in brede / and com­maunded them to mete with hym in Burgoyne / for he purposed to destroye the Royame of lytyl Bretayne /

¶Capitulo tercio

NOw leue we of Lucius the emperour and speke we of kynge Arthur / that commaunded alle them of his re­tenue to be redy atte vtas of hyllary for to holde a parlement at yorke / And at that parlement was concluded to areste alle the nauye of the lond and to be redy within xv dayes at sand wyche / and there he shewed to his armye how he purposed to conquere thempyre whiche he ought to haue of ryght / And the­re he ordeyned two gouernours of this Royame that is to say Syre Bawdewyn of Bretayne for to counceille to the best and syr Constantyn sone to syre Cador of Cornewaylle / whiche after the dethe of Arthur was kyng of this Royamme / And in the presence of alle his lordes he resyned the rule of the roya­me and Gweneuer his quene to them / wherfore syre launcelot was wrothe / for he lefte syre Trystram with kynge marke for the loue of beal Isoulde / Thenne the quene Gweneuer made grete sorowe for the departynge of her lord and other / and swou­ned in suche wyse that the ladyes bare her in to her chambre Thus the kyng with his grete armye departed leuyng the quene and Royamme in the gouernaunce of syre Bawduyn and Constantyn / And whan he was on his hors / he sayd with an hyhe voys yf I dye in this iourney I wyl that syre Constantyn be myn heyer and kyng crowned of this royame as next of my blood / And after departed and entred in to the see atte Sandwyche with alle his armye with a greete multitude of shyppes / galeyes / Cogges / and dromoundes / sayllynge on the see /

¶Capitulum iiij

ANd as the kyng laye in his caban in the shyp / he fyll in a slomerynge and dremed a merueyllous dreme / hym semed that a dredeful dragon dyd drowne moche of his peple / and he cam fleynge oute of the west / and his hede was enameled with asure / and his sholders shone as gold / his bely lyke maylles of a merueyllous hewe / his taylle ful of tatters / his feet ful of fyne sable / & his clawes lyke fyne gold And an hydous flamme of fyre flewe oute of his mouthe / lyke as the londe and water had flammed all of fyre / After hym semed there came oute of thoryent / a grymly bore al blak in a clowde / and his pawes as bygge as a post / he was rug­ged lokynge roughly / he was the foulest beest that euer man sawe / he rored and romed soo hydously that it were merueill to here / Thenne the dredeful dragon auaunced hym and cam in the wynde lyke a fawcon gyuynge grete strokes on the bore / and the bore hytte hym ageyne with his grysly tuskes / that his brest was al blody / and that the hote blood made alle the see reed of his blood /

Thenne the dragon flewe awey al on an heyȝte / and came doune with suche a swough and smote the bore on the rydge whi­che was x foote large fro the hede to the taylle / and smote the bore all to powdre bothe flesshe and bonys / that it flytteryd al abrode on the see / And therwith the kynge awoke anone / and was sore abasshed of this dreme / And sente anone for a wyse philosopher / commaundynge to telle hym the sygnyfycacion of his dreme / Syre sayd the philosopher / the dragon that thow dremedest of / betokeneth thyn owne persone that sayllest here / & the colours of his wynges ben thy Royames that thow haste wonne / And his taylle whiche is al to tatterd sygnefyeth the noble knyghtes of the round table ¶And the bore that the dragon slough comyng fro the clowdes / betokeneth some tyraunt that tormenteth the peple / or els thow arte lyke to fyghte with somme Geaunt thy self / beynge horryble and abhomynable Whoos pere ye sawe neuer in your dayes / wherfore [Page] of this dredeful dreme doubte the no thynge / but as a Con­querour come forth thy self / Thenne after this soone they had syghte of londe and saylled tyl they arryued atte Barflete in Flaundres / and whanne they were there he fond many of his grete lordes redy / as they had ben commaunded to awa­yte vpon hym

¶ Capitulum v

THenne came to hym an husbond man of the countrey / and told hym how there was in the countre of Con­stantyn besyde Bretayne a grete gyaunt whiche hadde slayne murthered and deuoured moche peple of the countreye and had ben susteyned seuen yere with the children of the co­myns of that land / in soo moche that alle the children ben alle slayne and destroyed / and now late he hath taken the duchesse of Bretayne as she rode with her meyne / and hath ledde her to his lodgynge whiche is in a montayne for to rauysshe and lye by her to her lyues ende / and many people folowed her moo than v C / but alle they myghte not rescowe her / but they lefte her shrykyng and cryenge lamentably / wherfore I sup­pose that he hath slayn her in fulfyllynge his fowle lust of le­chery / She was wyf vnto thy Cosyn syre Howel / whome we calle ful nyhe of thy blood / Now as thow a ryghtful kynge haue pyte on this lady / and reuenge vs al as thow arte a noble conquerour / ¶Alas sayd kynge Arthur / this is a grete meschyef / I had leuer than the best Royame that I haue / that I hadde ben a forlonge way to fore hym for to haue resco­wed that lady / ¶Now felawe sayd kynge Arthur canst thou brynge me there as thys gyaunt haunteth / ye syre sayd the good man / [...]oo yonder where as thow seest tho two grete fyres / there shalt thou fynde hym / and more tresour than I suppose is in al Fraunce / whanne the kynge hadde vnderstanden this pyteous caas / he retorned in to his tente / ¶Thenne he callyd to hym syre kaye and syre Bedewere / & commaunded them secretely to make redy hors and harneis for hym self and them tweyne / For after euensonge he wold ryde on pylgremage with them two only vnto saynt Mychels [Page] mounte / And thenne anone he maad hym redy / and armed hym at alle poyntes / and tooke his hors and his sheld / And soo they thre departed thens and rode forthe as faste as euer they myȝt tyl that they cam to the forlond of that mount And there they alyghted / and the kynge commaunded them to tarye there / for he wold hym self goo vp in to that mounte And soo he ascended vp in to that hylle tyl he came to a grete fyre / and there he fonde a careful wydowe wryngynge her handes and makyng grete sorowe syttynge by a graue newe ma­de / And thenne kynge Arthur falewed her / and demaunded of her wherfore she made suche lamentacion / to whome she an­suerd and sayd Syre knyghte speke softe / for yonder is a deuyll yf he here the speke / he wylle come and destroye the / I hold the vnhappy what dost thow here in this mountayne / For yf ye were suche fyfty as ye be / ye were not able to ma­ke resystence ageynst this deuyl / here lyeth a duchesse deede the whiche was the fayrest of alle the world wyf to syre Howel / du [...] of Bretayne / he hath murthred her in forcynge her / and hath slytte her vnto the nauyl / ¶Dame sayd the kynge / I come fro the noble Conqueroure kynge Arthur for to treate with that tyraunt for his lyege peple / Fy on suche treatys sa­yd she / he setteth not by the kynge ne by no man els / But and yf thou haue broughte Arthurs wyf dame Gweneuer / he shalle be gladder than thow haddest gyuen to hym half fra­unce / Beware approche hym not to nygh / for he hath vaynquysshed xv kynges / and hath maade hym a cote ful of precious stones enbrowdred with theyre [...]erdes / whiche they sente hym to haue his loue for sauacion of theyr peple at this laste Cry­stemasse / And yf thow wylt / speke with hym at yonder grete fyre at souper / wel sayd Arthur I wyll accomplysshe my message for al your ferdful wordes / and wente forth by the creast of that hylle / and sawe where he satte atte souper gnawynge on a lymme of a man / bekynge his brode lymmes by the fyre and brecheles / and thre fayr damoysels tornynge thre broches wheron were broched twelue yonge children late borne lyke yonge byrdes ¶Whanne kynge Arthur beheld that pyteous syȝte / he had grete compassion on them so that his hert [Page] bledde for sorowe / and hayled hym sayeng in this wyse he that alle the world weldeth gyue the shorte lyf & shameful dethe / And the deuyl haue thy soule / why hast thow murthred the­se yonge Innocent children / and murthred this duchesse / Therfore aryse and dresse the thow gloton / For this day shall thou dye of my hand / Thenne the gloton anone starte vp and tooke a grete clubbe in his hand / and smote at the kynge that his coronal fylle to the erthe / and the kynge hytte hym ageyn that he carf his bely and cutte of his genytours / that his guttes & his entraylles fylle doune to the ground / thenne the gyaunt threwe awey his clubbe / and caught the kynge in his armes that he crusshyd his rybbes / Thenne the thre maydens knelyd doune and callyd to Cryst for helpe and comforte of Arthur And thenne Arthur weltred and wrong / that he was other whyle vnder and another tyme aboue / And so weltryng and walowynge they rolled doune the hylle / tyl they came to the see marke / and euer as they soo weltred / Arthur smote hym with his daggar / and it fortuned they came to the place / whe­re as the two knyghtes were and kepte Arthurs hors / then­ne when they sawe the kynge fast in the gyaunts armes / they came and losed hym / And thenne the kynge commaunded syr kaye to smyte of the gyaunts hede / and to sette it vpon a trun­cheon of a spere / and bere it to syre howel / and telle hym that his enemy was slayne / and after late this hede be bounden to a barby [...]an that alle the peple may see and behold hit / and go ye two vp to the montayn / and fetche me my sheld / my suerd and the clubbe of yron / And as for the tresour take ye it / for ye shalle fynde there good oute of nombre / So I haue the kertyl and the clubbe I desyre no more / This was the fyerst gy­aunt that euer I mette with / sauf one in the mount of Arabe / whiche I ouercame / but this was gretter and fyerser / Thenne the knyghtes fette the clubbe and the kyrtyl / and some of the tresour they took to them self / and retorned ageyne to the host And anone this was knowen thurgh alle the countrey / wherfor the peple came and thanked the kynge / And he sayd a­geyne yeue the thanke to god / and departe the goodes among yow / And after that kynge Arthur sayd and commaunded his Cosyn howel that he shold ordeyne for a chirche to be bylded [Page] on the same hylle in the worship of saynte Mychel / ¶And on the morne the kynge remeuyd with his grete bataylle / and came in to Champayne and in a valeye / and there they pyght their tentys / and the kynge beynge set at his dyner / ther cam in two messagers / of whome that one was Marchal of fraūce and sayd to the kyng that themperour was entryd in to fra­unce / and had destroyed a grete parte and was in Burgoyn and had destroyed and made grete slaughter of peple & brente townes and borowes / wherfor yf thou come not hastely / they must yelde vp their bodyes and goodes /

¶Capitulum sextum

THenne the kynge dyd doo calle syre Gawayn [...] / syre Borce / syr Lyonel and syre Bedewere / and comma­unded them to goo strayte to syre Lucius / and saye ye to hym that hastely he remeue oute of my land / And yf he wil not / bydde hym make hym redy to bataylle and not distresse the poure peple / Thenne anone these noble knyghtes dressyd them to horsbak / And whanne they came to the grene wood / they sawe many pauelions sette in a medowe of sylke of dyuerse co­lours besyde a ryuer / And themperours pauelione was in the myddle with an egle displayed aboue / To the whiche tente our knyghtes rode toward / and ordeyned syr Gawayn and syre Bors to doo the message / And lefte in a busshement syre Lyonel / and syre Bedwere / And thenne syre Gawayn and syr Borce dyd their message / and commaunded Lucius in Arthurs name to auoyde his lond / or shortly to adresse hym to bataylle / To whome Lucius ansuerde and sayd ye shalle retorne to your lord and saye ye to hym that I shall subdue hym and alle his londes / Thenne syre Gawayn was wrothe and sayde I hadde leuer than alle Fraunce fyghte ageynste the / and soo hadde I saide syr Borce leuer than alle Bretayne or bur­goyne ¶Thenne a knyght named syre Gaynus nyghe cosyn to the Emperour sayde / loo how these Bretons ben ful of pryde and boost / and they bragge as though they bare vp alle the worlde / Thenne syre Gawayne was sore greued [Page] with these wordes / and pulled oute his swerd and smote of his hede / And therwith torned theyr horses and rode ouer waters and thurgh woodes tyl they came to theyre busshement / where as syr Lyonel and syr Bedeuer were houyng / The ro­mayns folowed fast after on horsbak and on foote ouer a chā payn vnto a wood / thenne syre Boors torned his hors / and sawe a knyghte come fast on / whome he smote thurgh the bo­dy with a spere that he fylle dede doune to the erthe / thenne cam Callyburne one of the str [...]ngest of pauye and smote doun many of Arthurs knyghtes / And whan syr Bors sawe hym do soo moche harme he adressyd toward hym & smote hym thurȝ the brest that he fylle doune dede to the erthe / Thenne syr Fel­denak thought to reuenge the dethe of gaynus vpon syre Ga­wayn / but syre gawayn was ware therof and smote hym on the hede / whiche stroke stynted not tyl it came to his breste / And thenne he retorned and came to his felawes in the bus­shement / And there was a recountre / for the busshement brake on the Romayns / and slewe and hewe doune the Romayns and forced the Romayns to flee and retorne / whome the no­ble knyghtes chaced vnto theyr tentes / Thenne the Romayns gadred more peple / and also foote men cam on / and ther was a newe bataille and soo moche peple that syr Bors and syr Berel were taken / but whan syre gawayn sawe that / he tooke with hym syre Idrus the good knyght and sayd he wold neuer see kynge Arthur but yf be rescued them / and pulled out galatyn his good swerd / and folowed them that ledde tho ij knyghtes awaye / and he smote hym that lad syre Bors / and took syr Bors fro hym and delyuerd hym to his felawes / And syre Idrus in lyke wyse rescowed syr Berel / thenne beganne the bataill to be grete that oure knyȝtes were in grete Ieopardy / wherfore syre Gawayn sente to kyng Arthur for socour and that he hye hym for I am sore wounded / and that oure prysoners may paye good oute of nombre / And the messager came to the kyng and told hym his message / And anon the kynge dyd doo assemble his armye / but anone or he departed the prysoners were comen / and syre gawayn and his fe­lawes gate the felde and put the Romayns to flyght / and after retorned and came with their felauship in suche wyse / that [Page] no man of worship was loste of them / sauf that syr Gawayn was sore hurte / Thenne the kynge dyd do ransake his woun­des and comforted hym / And thus was the begynnynge of the fyrst iourney of the brytons and Romayns / and ther we­re slayne of the Romayns moo than ten thousand / and grete ioye and myrthe was made that nyghte in the hoost of kynge Arthur / And on the morne he sente alle the prysoners in to parys vnder the garde of syre launcelot with many knyghtes & of syr Cador

¶Capitulum vij

NOw torne we to the Emperour of Rome whiche aspyed that these prysoners shold be sente to Parys / and anone he sente to leye in a busshement certayne knyghtes and prynces with syxty thousand men for to rescowe his knygh­tes and lordes that were prysoners / And so on the morne as Launcelot and syre Cador chyuetayns and gouernours of all them that conueyed the prysoners as they sholde passe thurgh a wode syr Laūcelot sente certayne knyghtes tespye yf ony were in the woodes to lette them / And whanne the said knyghtes cam in to the wood / anone they aspyed and sawe the grete en busshement / and retorned and told syr Laūcelot that ther lay in a wayte for them thre score thousand Romayns / And then­ne syr Launcelot with suche knyghtes as he hadde and men of warre to the nombre of x M put them in araye and met wyth them and foughte with them manly / and slewe and dreten­chid many of the Romayns / and slewe many knyghtes & ad­myrals of the party of the Romayns and sarasyns / ther was slayne the kynge of lylye and thre grete lordes Aladuke / he­rawde and heryngdale / but syr Launcelot fought soo nobly that no man myght endure a stroke of his hande / but where he came he shewed his prowesse and myght / for he slewe doune ryght on euery syde / And the Romayns and sarasyns fledde from hym as the sheep fro the wulf or fro the lyon / and putt them alle that abode alyue to flyght / And so longe they fouȝte that tydynges came to kynge Arthur / And anone he graythed hym and came to the bataille / and sawe his knyghtes how they had [Page] vaynquysshed the bataylle / he enbraced them knyght by knyȝte in his armes and said ye be worthy to welde all your honour and worship / there was neuer kynge sauf my self that had so noble knyghtes / Syre sayd Cador there was none of vs failled other / but of the prowesse and manhode of syre Launcelot were more than wonder to telle / and also of his cosyns whi­che dyd that daye many noble feates of werre / And also syre Cador tolde who of his knyghtes were slayne / as syr beriel & other syr Morys and syr Maurel two good knyghtes / then­ne the kynge wepte and dryed his eyen with a keuerchyef / & sayd your courage had nere hand destroyed yow / For though ye had retorned ageyne / ye had lost no worship / For I calle hit foly / knyghtes to abyde whan they be ouermatched / Nay sayd Launcelot and the other / For ones shamed maye neuer be recouerd

¶Capitul [...]m viij

NOw leue we kynge Arthur and his noble knyghtes whiche had wonne the felde / and had brought theyre prysoners to parys / and speke we of a senatour whiche esca­ped fro the bataille / and came to Lucius themperour & sayd to hym / Syre emperour I aduyse the for to withdrawe the / what dost thow here / thow shalt wynne noo thynge in these marches but grete strokes oute of al mesure / For this day one of Ar­thurs knyghtes was worth in the batayll an honderd of ours Fy on the sayd Lucius thow spekest cowardly / for thy wor­des greue me more than alle the losse that I had this day / and anone he sende forth a kynge whiche hyghte syr leomye with a grete armye / and badde hym hye hym fast to fore / and he wold folowe hastely after / kynge Arthur was warned pryuely / & sente his peple to Sessoyne / and toke vp the townes & castels fro the Romayns / Thenne the kyng commaunded syr Cador to take the rereward / & to take with hym certayne knyghtes of the round table / and syre Launcelot / syre Bors / syr kay / syre Marrok with syre Marhaus shalle awayte on our persone / Thus the kynge Arthur disperplyd his hoost in dyuerse partyes / to thende that his enemyes shold not escape / whanne the [Page] Emperour was entryd in to the vale of Sessoyne / he myghte see where kynge Arthur was enbatailled and his baner dys­played / and he was bysette round aboute with his enemyes / that nedes he must fyghte or yelde hym / for he myght not flee / But sayd openly vnto the Romayns / syrs I admoneste you that this day ye fyghte and acquyte yow as men / and remembre how Rome domyneth and is chyef and hede ouer alle the erthe and vnyuersal world / and suffre not these bretons thys day to abyde ageynste vs / & ther with he dyd commaunde hys trōpettes to blowe the blody sownes in suche wyse that the gro­und trembled and dyndled / Thenne the bataile approuched and shoue and showted on bothe sydes and grete strokes were smyten on bothe sydes / many men ouerthrowen / hurte / & slayn and grete valyaunces / prowesses and appertyces of werre we­re that day shewed / whiche were ouer long to recounte the no­ble feates of euery man / For they shold conteyne an hole vo­lume / But in especyal kynge Arthur rode in the bataille ex­hortynge his knyghtes to doo wel / and hym self dyd as no­bly with his handes as was possyble a man to doo / he drewe oute Excalibur his swerd / and awayted euer where as the ro­mayns were thyckest and moost greued his peple / and anone he adressyd hym on that parte and hewe and slewe doune ryȝt and rescued his peple / and he slewe a grete gyaunt named ga­lapas / whiche was a man of an huge quantyte and heyghte he shorted hym and smote of bothe his legges by the knees / sayenge Now arte thow better of a syse to dele with / than thou were / and after smote of his hede / there syre gawayn foughte nobly and slewe thre admyrales in that bataill / And so dyd alle the knyghtes of the round table / Thus the bataill bitwe­ne kynge Arthur and Lucius themperour endured longe / Lucius had on his syde many sarasyns / whiche were slayn / and thus the bataille was grete / and oftsydes that one party was at a fordele and anone at an afterdele / whiche endured so longe tyl at the last kyng Arthur aspyed / where Lucius themperour fought / and dyd wonder with his owne handes / And anon he rode to hym / And eyther smote other fyersly / and atte last Lucyus smote Arthur thwart the vysage / and gaf hym a large wound / And whanne kyng Arthur felte hym self hurte / anon [Page] he smote hym ageyne with Excalibur that it clefte his hede fro the somette of his hede / and stynted not tyl it cam to his breste And thenne themperour fylle doune dede / and there ended his lyf / And whan it was knowen that themperour was slayne anone alle the Romayns with all their hoost put them to fly­ght / and kynge Arthur with alle his knyghtes folowed the chaas / and slewe doune ryght alle them that they myghte at­teyne / And thus was the vyctory gyuen to kynge Arthur & the tryumphe / and there were slayne on the party of Lucius moo than an honderd thousand / And after kyng Arthur dyd doo ransake the dede bodyes / and dyd doo burye them that were slayne of his retenue euery man accordynge to the state & de­gree that he was of / And them that were hurte he lete the sur­gyens doo serche their hurtes and woundes / and commaun­ded to spare no salues ne medecynes tyl they were hole / Thenne the kyng rode strayte to the place where themperour lucius lay dede / and with hym he fond slayne the Sowdan of Surrey / the kynge of Egypte and of Ethyope / whiche we­re two noble kynges with xvij other kynges of dyuerse regy­ons / and also syxty senatours of Rome al noble men / whome the kynge dyd do bawme and gomme with many good gom­mes aromatyk / and after dyd do cere them in syxty fold of cered clothe of Sendale / and leyd them in chestys of leed / by ca­use they shold not chauffe ne sauoure / and vpon alle these bo­dyes their sheldes with theire armes and baners were sette / to thende they shold be knowen of what countrey they were / and after he fonde thre Senatours whiche were on lyue to whome he sayd / for to saue your lyues I wylle that ye take these dede bodyes / and carye them with yow vnto grete Rome / and pre­sente them to the potestate on my behalue shewynge hym my letters / and telle them that I in my persone shal hastely be atte Rome / And I suppose the Romayns shalle beware how they shal demaunde ony trybute of me / And I commaunde yow to saye whan ye shal come to Rome to the potestate and all the counceylle and Senate / that I sende to them these dede bodyes for the trybute that they haue demaunded / And yf they be not content with these / I shal paye more at my comynge / for other trybute owe I none / ne none other wylle I paye / And me [Page] thynketh this suffyseth for Bretayne / Irlond and al Alma­yne with germanye / And ferthermore I charge yow to saye to them / that I commaunde them vpon payne of theyre hedes neuer to demaunde trybute ne taxe of me ne of my londes Thenne with this charge and commaundement the thre Sena­tours afore sayd departed with alle the sayd dede bodyes le­ynge the body of Lucius in a carre couerd with tharmes of the Empyre al alone / And after alwey two bodyes of kynges in a charyot / and thenne the bodyes of the Senatours after them and soo wente toward Rome / and shewed theyr legacyon & message to the potestate and Senate / recountyng the bataylle done in Fraunce / and how the feld was lost and moche peo­ple & Innumerable slayne / wherfore they aduysed them in no wyse to meue no more warre ageynste that noble conqueroure Arthur / For his myght and prowesse is most to be doubted seen the noble kynges and grete multytude of knyghtes of the round table / to whome none erthely prynce may compare /

¶Capitulo nono

NOw torne we vnto kynge Arthur and his noble kny­ghtes whiche after the grete bataylle acheued ageynste the Romayns / entryd in to Lorayne braban and Flaundres and sythen retorned in to hault Almayn / and so ouer the mō tayns in to lombardye / and after in to Tuskane / wherin was a Cyte / whiche in no wyse wold yelde them self ne obeye / wher fore kynge Arthur biseged it / and lay longe aboute hit / and gaf many assaultes to the Cyte / And they within deffended them valyauntly / Thenne on a tyme the kynge called syr flo­rence a knyght / and sayd to hym they lacked vytaylle / and not ferre from hens ben grete forestes and woodes / wherin ben many of myn enemyes with moche bestyayl / I wyl that thou make the redy and goo thyder in foreyeng / and take with the syr Gawayn my neuew / Syre wysshard / syre Clegys / Syre Cleremond and the Captayn of Cardef with other / & brynge with yow alle the beestes that ye there can gete / And anone these knyghtes made them redy / and rode ouer holtys & hyllys thurgh forestes and woodes / tyl they cam in to a fayr medow [Page] ful of fayre floures and grasse / And there they rested them & theyr horses alle that nyghte / And in the spryngynge of the day in the next morne / syre Gawayn took his hors and stale away from his felauship to seke some aduentures / And anon he was ware of a man armed walkynge his hors easyly by a wodes syde / and his sheld laced to his sholdre syttynge on a stronge courser withoute ony man sauyng a page berynge a myghty spere. The knyght bare in his sheld thre gryffons of gold in sable charbuncle the chyef of syluer / whan syre Ga­wayn aspyed this gay knyght / he fewtryd his spere and rode strayt to hym / and demaūded of hym from whens that he was that other ansuerd and sayd he was of Tuscane / and dema­unded of syre gawayn / what profryst thow proude knyghte the so boldly / here getest thou no praye / thou mayst proue whā thou wylt / for thou shalt be my prysoner or thou departe /

¶Thenne sayd gawayn / thou auauntest the gretely and spe­kest proude wordes / I coūceylle the for alle thy boost that thou make the redy / and take thy gere to the / to fore gretter grame falle to the

¶Capitulum x

THenne they took theyr speres and ranne eche at other with alle the myghte they had / and smote eche other thurgh their sheldes in to theyr sholders / wherfore anone they pulled oute their swerdes / and smote grete strokes that the syre sprange oute of their helmes / Thenne syre gawayne was al abasshed and with galatyn his good swerd he smote thurgh shelde and thycke hauberke made of thyck maylles and al to russhed and brake the precious stones / and made hym a large wounde / that men myghte see bothe lyuer and long / Thenne groned that knyght / and adressyd hym to syre Gawayn / & with an awke stroke gaf hym a grete wound and kytte a vayne / whiche greued gawayn sore / and he bledde sore / ¶Thenne the knyghte sayd to syre Gawayn / bynde thy wounde or thy blee chaunge / for thou bybledest al thy hors and thy fayre armes / For alle the Barbours of Bretayne shal not conne staunche thy blood / For who someuer is hurte with this blade he shalle [Page] neuer be staunched of bledynge / Thenne ansuerd gawayn hit greueth me but lytyl / thy grete wordes shalle not feare me ne lasse my courage / but thow shalt suffre tene and sorow or we departe / but telle me in hast who maye staunche my bledynge / That may I doo sayd the knyght yf I wylle / And so wyll I yf thou wylt socoure and ayde me that I maye be crystned and byleue on god / And therof I requyre the of thy man­hode / and it shalle be grete meryte for thy soule / I graunte sa­id Gawayne so god helpe me tacomplysshe alle thy desyre / But fyrst telle me what thou soughtest here thus allone / and of what londe and legeaunce thou arte of / Syre he sayd my name is Pryamus / and a grete prynce is my fader / and he hath ben rebelle vnto Rome and ouer ryden many of theyr londes / My fader is lyneally descended of Alysaunder and of hector by ryght lygne / And duke Iosue and Machabeus were of oure lygnage / I am ryght enherytour of Alysaunder and auffryke and alle the oute yles / yet wyl I byleue on thy lord that thow byleuest on / And for thy laboure I shalle yeue the tresour ynough / I was soo elate and hauteyn in my hert that I thought no man my pere ne to me semblable / I was sente in to this werre with seuen score knyghtes / and now I haue encountred with the whiche hast gyuen to me of fyghtyng my fylle / wherfore syr knyghte I pray the to telle me what thow arte / I am no knyght sayd gawayn / I haue ben brought vp in the garderobe with the noble kynge Arthur many yeres for to take hede to his armour and his other araye / and to poyn­te his paltockes that longen to hym self / At yole last he made me yoman and gaf to me hors and harneys and an honderd pound in money / And yf fortune be my frend / I doubte not / but to be wel auaunced and holpen by my lyege lord / A sa­yd Pryamus / yf his knauys be so kene and fyers / his knyȝ­tes ben passynge good / Now for the kynges loue of heuen whether thou be a knaue or a knyghte telle thou me thy name / By god sayd syre Gawayn / Now wyl I saye the sothe / my name is syre gawayn and knowen I am in his courte and in his chambre / and one of the knyghtes of the round table / he dubbed me a duke with his owne hand / Therfore grutche not yf this grace is to me fortuned / hit is the goodnesse of god [Page] that lente to me my strengthe / Now am I letter pleasyd sayd Pryamus than thou haddest gyuen to me al the prouynce and parys the ryche / I had leuer to haue ben torn with wylde hor­ses / than ony varlet had wonne suche loos / or ony page or pry­ker shold haue had prys on me / But now syre knyghte I warne the / that here by is a duke of Lorayne with his armye and the noblest men of Dolphyne and lordes of lombardye / with the garneson of godard / and sarasyns of Southland y nombred lx M of good men of armes / wherfore but yf we hye vs hens / it wylle harme vs bothe / for we ben sore hurte / ne­uer lyke to recouer / but take hede to my page that he no horne blowe / For yf he doo ther ben houynge here fast by an C knyȝtes awaytynge on my persone / and yf they take the / ther shall no raunson of gold ne syluer acquyte the / Thenne syre gawayne rode ouer a water for to saue hym / And the knyghte folo­wed hym / and soo rode forthe tyl they came to his felawes / whiche were in the medowe / where they had ben al the nyghte Anone as syre wychard was ware of syre gawayn and sawe that he was hurte / he ranne to hym soroufully wepynge / and demaunded of hym who had soo hurte hym / and gawayn told how he had foughten with that man / and eche of them hadde hurte other / and how he had salues to hele them / but I can telle yow other tydynges / that soone we shal haue adoo with many enemyes / Thenne syre pryamus and syre gawayn alygh­ted / and lete theire horses grase in the medowe and vnarmed them / And thenne the blood ranne fresshly fro theyre woun­des / And pryamus toke fro his page a vyolle ful of the four waters that came oute of paradys / and with certayne baume enoynted theyr woundes / and wesshe them with that water / & within an houre after / they were both as hole as euer they were / And thenne with a trompet were they alle assembled to co­unceylle / And there pryamus told vnto them / what lordes and knyghtes had sworne to rescowe hym / and that without faill they shold be assailed with many thousandes / wherfor he coun­ceilled them to withdrawe them / Thenne syre gawayn sayd it were grete shame to them to auoyde withoute ony strokes / [...] wherfore I aduyse to take oure armes and to make vs redy to mete with these sarasyns and mysbyleuyng men / and wyth [Page] the helpe of god we shal ouerthrowe them and haue a fayre day on them / And syre Florens shall abyde styll in thys felde to kepe the stale as a noble knyghte / and we shal not forsake yonder felawes / Now sayd Pryamus seasse your wordes / for I warne yow ye shal fynde in yonder woodes many peryllo­us knyghtes / they wylle put forthe beestes to calle yow on / they be out of nombre / and ye are not past vij C whiche ben o­uer fewe to fyght with soo many / Neuertheles sayd syr gawayn we shal ones encountre them / and see what they can do and the beste shalle haue the vyctory

¶Capitulo xj

THenne syre Florence callyd to hym syre florydas with an honderd knyghtes and droofe forth the herde of bestes / Thenne folowed hym vij honderd men of armes / and syr Feraunt of spayne on a fayr stede came spryngynge oute of the woodes / and came to syre Florence and axyd hym why he fledde / Thenne syre Florence teok his spere / and rode ageynste hym / and smote hym in the forhede and brake his necke bone / Thenne all thother were meued / and thought to auenge the dethe of syr Feraunt / and smote in emonge them / and there was grete fyghte and many slayne and leyd doune to gro­unde / and syr Florence with his C knyghtes alwey kepte the stale and foughte manly / ¶Thenne whan Pryamus the good knyght perceyued the grede fyght / he wente to syre Ga­wayn / and badde hym that he shold goo and socoure his fe­lauship / whiche were sore bystad with their enemyes / Syr greue yow not sayd syre Gawayn / For theyr gree shall be theirs I shall not ones meue my hors to them ward / but yf I see mo than ther ben / For they ben stronge ynough to matche them / & with that he sawe an erle called syre Ethelwold and the duk of duchemen cam lepyng out of a wood with many thousādes & pryamus knyȝtes / & cam strayte vn to the bataylle / thēne sir gawayn comforted his knyghtes / and bad them not to be a­basshed / for al shal be ours / thēne they began to wallope & mette with their enemyes / ther were mē slayn & ouerthrowen on euery [Page] syde / Thenne threstyd in amonge them the knyghtes of the ta­ble round / and smote doune to the erthe alle them that wyth­stode them / in soo moche that they made them to recuyelle & flee / By god sayd syre Gawayn this gladeth my herte / for now ben they lasse in nombre by xx M / Thenne entryd in to the bataylle Iubaunce a geaunt / and fought and slewe doune ryght and distressyd many of our knyghtes / emonge whome was slayne syre Gherard a knyght of walys / Thenne oure knygh­tes toke herte to them / and slewe many sarasyns / And thenne came in syr Priamus with his penon / and rode with the kn­yghtes of the round table / and fought so manfully that ma­ny of their enemyes lost theyr lyues / And ther syr Pryamus slewe the Marquys of Moyses land and syre gawayn with his felawes so quytte hem that they had the feld / but in that stoure was syr Chestelayne a chyld and ward of syre Ga­wayne slayne / wherfore was moche sorou made / and his deth wes soone auengyd / Thus was the bataille ended and ma­ny lordes of lombardye and sarasyns left dede in the feld / ¶Thenne syre florence and syre Gawayne herberowed surely theyr peple / and token grete plente of bestyal of gold & syluer and grete tresour and rychesse and retorned vnto kyng Ar­thur whiche lay styl at the syege / And whanne they came to the kynge / they presented theyr prysoners and recounted the­yre aduentures / and how they had vaynquysshed theyre ene­myes

¶Capitulum xij

NOw thanked be god sayd the noble kynge Arthur / But what maner man is he that standeth by hym self hym semed no prysoner / Syre sayd Gawayne this is a good man of armes / he hath matched me / but he is yolden vnto god and to me for to bycome Crysten. had not he haue be we shold neuer haue rotorned / wherfore I pray yow that he may be bap­tysed / sor ther lyueth not a nobler man ne better knyght of his handes / thenne the kyng lete hym anon be crystned / and dyd doo calle hym his fyrste name Pryamus / and made hym a du­ke and knyghte of the table round ¶And thenne anon the kynge lete do crye assaulte to the cyte / and there was re­rynge of laddres brekyng of wallys and the dyche fylled / [Page] that men with lytel payne myȝt entre in to the cyte / thēne cam out a duchesse / & Clarysyn the countesse with many ladyes & damoysels / and knelyng bifore kynge Arthur requyred hym for the loue of god to receyue the cyte / & not to take it by assa­ulte for thenne shold many gyltles be slayne / thēne the kyng aualyd his vyser with a meke & noble coūtenaūce / & said ma­dame ther shal none of my subgettys mysdoo you ne your ma­ydens / ne to none that to yow longen / but the duke shal abyde my Iugement / thenne anone the kyng commaunded to leue the assault / & anon the dukes oldest sone brought out the keyes / & knelyng delyuerd them to the kyng / & bysouȝt hym of grace / & the kyng seased the toun by assent of his lordes / & toke the duc & sent hym to douer there for to abyde prysoner terme of his lyf & assigned certayn rentes for the dower of the duchesse & for her children / Thenne he made lordes to rule tho londes & lawes as a lord ought to do in his owne countrey / & after he took his iourney toward Rome / & sent sir Florys & syr florydas to fore with v C men of armes / & they cam to the cyte of vrbyne & leid there a busshement there as them semed most best for them / & rode to fore the toune / where anon yssued out moche peple & scarmusshed with the fore rydars / thēne brake out the busshement & wan the brydge & after the toun / & set vpon the wallis the kynges baner / thēne cam the kynge vpon an hille & sawe the Cyte & his baner on the wallys / by whiche he knewe that the Cyte was wonne / & anone he sente & commaunded that none of his lyege men shold defoule ne lygge by no lady / wyf / ne maide / & whan he cam in to the cyte / he passid to the castel / and comforted them that were in sorou / & ordeyned ther a captayn a knyȝt of his own coūtrey / & whan they of Melane herd that thylk cyte was wōne / they sent to kyng Arthur grete sōmes of money / & besouȝt hym as their lord to haue pyte of them / promysyng to be his subgettys for euer / & yelde to hym homage & fealte for the lādes of plesaūce & pauye / petersaynt & the port of tremble / & to gyue hym yerly a melyon of gold al his lyf tyme / thēne he rydeth in to Tuskane & wynneth tounes & castels & wasted al in his way that to hym wil not obeye / & so to spolute & viterbe & fro thens he rode in to the vale of vycecoūte emong the vynes And fro thens he sente to the senatours to wete / whether they [Page] wold knowe hym for theyr lord / But soone after on a sater day came vnto kynge Arthur alle the senatours that were left on lyue / and the noblest Cardynals that then ne dwellyd in Rome / And prayd hym of pees / and profered hym ful large And byfought hym as gouernour to gyue lycence for vj we­kes for to assemble alle the Romayns / And thenne to crowne hym Emperour with creme as it bylongeth to so hyhe astate / I assente sayd the kynge lyke as ye haue deuysed / and at cry­stemas there to be crowned / and to holde my round table with my knyghtes as me lyketh / And thenne the senatours maade redy for his Intronysacyon / And at the day appoynted as the Romaunce telleth he came in to Rome / and was crouned emperour by the popes hand with all the ryalte that coude be made / And sudgerned there a tyme / and establysshed all his lon­des from Rome in to Fraunce / and gaf londes and royammes vnto his seruauntes and knyghtes to eueryche after his desert in suche wyse that none complayned ryche ne poure / & he gafe to syre Pryamus the duchye of Lorayne / and he thanked hym and sayd he wold serue hym the dayes of his lyf / and after made dukes and erles / and made euery man ryche / Thenne after this alle his knyghtes and lordes assembled them afore hym / and sayd blessyd be god your warre is fynysshed and your conquest acheued / in soo moche that we knowe none soo grete ne myghty that dar make warre ageynst yow / wherfore we byseche you to retorne homeward / and gyue vs lycence to goo home to oure wyues / fro whome we haue ben longe / and to reste vs / for your Iourney is fynysshed with honour & worship / Thenne sayd the kyng / ye saye trouthe / and for to temp­te god it is no wysedome / And therfore make you redy and retorne we in to Englond / Thenne there was trussyng of har­neis and bagage and grete caryage / And after lycence gyuen he retorned and commaunded that noo man in payne of dethe shold not robbe ne take vytaylle / ne other thynge by the way but that he shold paye therfore / And thus he came ouer the see and londed at sandwyche / ageynste whome Quene Gweneuer his wyf came and mette hym / and he was nobly receyued of alle his comyns in euery cyte and burgh / and grete yeftes presented to hym at his home comyng to welcome hym with /

[Page]¶ Thus endeth the fyfthe booke of the conqueste that kynge Arthur hadde ageynste Lucius the Emperoure of Rome / and here foloweth the syxth book whiche is of syr Launcelot du lake

¶Capitulum primum

SOone after that kyng Arthur was come / fro rome in to Englond / thenne alle the knyghtes of the table round resorted vnto the kyng / & made many Iustes & turnementes / & some there were that were but knyȝtes whiche encreaced so in armes and worship that they passed alle their felawes in pro­wesse and noble dedes / and that was wel preued on many / But in especyal it was preued on syre launcelot du lake / for in al turnementys and Iustes and dedes of armes both for lyf and deth he passed al other knyȝtes / and at no tyme he was neuer ouercome / but yf it were by treson or enchauntement / so syr Launcelot encreaced soo merueyllously in worship / and in honour / therfor is he the fyrst knyȝt that the frensshe book ma­keth mencyon of after kynge Arthur came fro rome / wherfore quene gweneuer had hym in grete fauour aboue al other kny­ghtes▪ and in certayne he loued the quene ageyne aboue al o­ther ladyes damoysels of his lyf / And for her he dyd many dedes of armes and saued her from the fyer thorou his noble chyualry / Thus syre launcelot rested hym longe with play & game / And thenne he thought hym self to preue hym self in straunge auentures / thenne he badde his neuewe syre Lyonel for to make hym redy / for we two wylle seke aduentures / So they mounted on their horses armed at al ryghtes / and rode in to a depe forest & soo in to a depe playne / ¶ And thenne the weder was hote about noone / and syre launcelot had grete lust to slepe / Thenne syr lyonel aspyed a grete Appyl tree that stode by an hedge / & said broder yonder is a fayre shadowe / there maye we reste vs on oure horses / hit is wel saide faire broder said syr launcelot / for this vij [...] yere I was not so slepy as I am now / and so they there alyghted & tayed their horses vnto son­dry trees / and so syr launcelot layd hym doune vnder an appyl tree / and his helme he layd vnder his hede / And Syre [Page] lyonel waked whyle he slepte / Soo syre launcelot was a sle­pe passynge fast / And in the mene whyle there came thre kny­ghtes rydynge as faste fleynge as euer they myghte ryde And there folowed hem thre but one knyghte / And whanne syr lyonel sawe hym / hym thought he sawe neuer soo grete a knyghte nor soo wel farynge a man neyther soo wel appara­ [...]lled vnto al ryghtes / Soo within a whyle this strong knyȝt had ouertaken one of these knyghtes / and there he smote hym to the cold erth that he lay styll / And than he rode vnto the se­cond knyght / and smote hym soo that man and hors felle do­une / And thenne streyghte to the thyrdde knyghte he rode and smote hym behynde his hors are a spere length / And thenne he alyghte doune and arayned his hors on the brydel & bonde alle the thre knyghtes fast with the raynes of their owne brydels / Whan syr lyonel sawe hym doo thus / he thought to assay hym / & made hym redy & stylly / and pryuely he took his hors & thoughte not for to awake syr launcelot / And whan he was mounted vpon his hors / he ouertoke this strong knyght / & bad hym torne / and the other smote syr lyonel so hard that hors & man he bare to the erthe / & so he alyght doun & bound hym fast and threwe hym ouerthwart his owne hors / and soo he serued hem al foure / & rode with hem awey to his owne castel / And whan he came there he garte vnarme them & bete hem with thornys al naked / & after put hem in a depe pryson where were ma­ny mo knyghtes that made grete doloure

¶Capitulum secundum /

WHan syre Ector de marys wyst that syre laūcelot was past out of the court to seke aduentures he was wroth with hym self / & made hym redy to seke syre laūcelot / & as he had ryden long in a grete forest he mette with a man was ly­ke a foster / Fayre felaw said syre Ector knowest thou in thys countrey ony aduentures that ben here nyghe hand / Syr sayd the foster / this countrey knowe I wel. and here by within thys myle / is a stronge manoir and wel dyked / & by that manoir on the lyfte hand there is a faire fourde for horses to drynke of / and ouer that fourde there groweth a fayr tree / and the ronhangen many fayre sheldes that welded somtyme good knyghtes / & atte hoole of the tree hangeth a bacyn of coper & lat [...]en / [Page] and stryke vpon that bacyn with the but of thy spere thryes / And soone after thou shalt here newe tydynges / And ellys hast thou the fayrest grace that many a yere had euer knyght that passed thorou this forest / gramercy sayd syre Ector / and departed / and came to the tree and sawe many fayre sheldes / And amonge them he sawe his broders sheld syr Lyonel and many moo that he knewe that were his felawes of the round table / the whiche greued his herte / and promysed to reuenge his broder / Thenne a none syr Ector bete on the bacyn as he were wood / and thenne he gaf his hors drynke at the fourde / & ther came a knyghte behynd hym / and bad hym come oute of the water and make hym redy / and syre Ector anone torned hym shortly and in fewter cast his spere and smote the other knyghte a grete buffet that his hors torned twyes aboute / This was wel done said the strong knyȝt / & knyȝtly thou hast stryken me / And therwith he russhed his hors on syre Ector / and cleyȝte hym vnder his ryght arme & bare hym clene out of the sadel / and rode with hym awey in to his owne halle / & threwe hym doune in myddes of the floore / the name of thys knyghte was syre Turquyne / than he said vnto syre Ector for thou hast done this day more vnto me than ony knyghte dyd these xij yeres / Now wille I graunte the thy lyf so thou wilt be sworn to be my prysoner all thy lyf dayes / Nay said sir Ector / that wylle I neuer promyse the / but that I will do myne auauntage / That me repenteth sayd syre Turquyne / and thenne he garte to vnarme hym and bete hym with thornys all na­ked / and sythen putte hym doune in a depe dungeon where he knewe many of his felawes / But whan syre Ector sawe syr lyonel thenne made he grete sorowe / Allas broder sayd syr Ector / where is my broder syre Launcelot / Fayre broder I lefte hym on slepe whan that I from hym yode vnder an appel tree and what is become of hym I can not telle yow / Allas said the knyghtes / but syre launcelot helpe vs we may neuer be delyuerd / for we knowe now noo knyght that is able to matche oure mayster Turquyn

¶Capitulum tercium

[Page]NOw leue we these knyghtes prysoners and speke we of syre Launcelott du lake that lyeth vnder the Ap­pyl Tree slepynge / euen aboute the noone there come by hym foure quenes of grete estate / And for the hete shold not nyhe hem there rode foure knyghtes aboute hem / and bare a clothe of grene sylke on foure sperys betwixe them and the sonne / And the quenes rode on foure whyte mules

¶Thus as they rode they herde by them a grete hors grymly neye / thenne were they ware of a slepynge knyghte that laye alle armed vnder an appyl tree / anone as these quenes loked on his face / they knewe it was syre launcelot / Thenne they by­ganne for to stryue for that knyghte / euerychone sayd they wold baue hym to her loue / ¶We shalle not stryue sayd Morgan he fay that was kynge Arthurs syster / I shalle putte an enchauntement vpon hym / that he shalle not awake in syxe owres / And thenne I wylle lede hym awey vnto my castel / And whanne he is surely within my hold / I shalle take the enchauntement from hym / And thenne lete hym chese whyche of vs he wylle haue vnto peramour / ¶Soo thys enchaunte­ment Was caste vpon syre Launcelott / And thenne they leyd hym vpon his shelde / and bare hym soo an horsback betwixt two knyghtes / and brought hym vnto the castel charyot / and there they leyd hym in a chambyr cold / and att nyghte they sente vnto hym a fayre damoysel with his souper redy dyght By that the enchauntement was past / And whan she came she sale wed hym / and asked hym what there / I can not saye fayre damoysel said syre Launcelot / for I wote not how I cam in to this castel / but it be by an enchauntement / Syre sayd she ye must make good chere / And yf ye be suche a knyȝte as it is sayd ye ben / I shalle telle you more to morne by pryme of the daye / Gramercy fayre damoysel sayd syre Launcelot of youre good wyl I requyre yow / And soo she departed / And there he laye alle that nyght withoute comforte of ony body

And on the morne erly came these foure quenes passyng­ly wel bysene / Alle they byddyng hym good morne / and he them ageyne / ¶Syre knyghte the foure quenes sayd thow must vnderstande thou arte our prysoner / and we here knowe the wel that thou arte syre Launcelot du laake / kynge Bans [Page] sone / And by cause we vnderstande your worthynes that thou arte the noblest knyght lyuyng / And as we knowe wel ther can no la [...]y haue thy loue but one / and that is quene Gweneuer / and now thow shalt lose her for euer and she the / and therfore the behoueth now to chese one of vs four / I am the quene Morgan le fay quene of the land of Gorre / and here is the quene of Northgalys and the quene of Eestland / and the quene of the oute yles / ¶Now chese one of v [...] whiche thou wylt haue to thy peramour / for thou mayst not chese or ele in thys pryson to dye / This is an hard caaas sayd syre Launcelot that eyther I muste dye or els chese one of yow / yet had I leuer to dye in this pryson with worship than to haue one of you to my peramour maugre my hede / And therfore ye be ansuerd I wylle none of yow for ye be fals enchauntresses / And as for my lady dame Gwenener / were I at my lyberte as I was / I wolde preue hit on you or on yours / that she is the truest lady vnto her lord lyuyng / Wel sayd the quenes / is this yo­ur ansuer that ye wylle reffuse vs / ye on my lyf sayd syr laū celot / reffused ye ben of me / Soo they departed and lefte hym there alone that made grete sorowe

¶Capitulum quartum

RYght so at the noone came the damoysel vnto hym with his dyner / and asked hym what chere / truly fayre da­moysel sayd syre Launcelot in my lyf dayes neuer so ylle / sir she sayd that me repentest / but and ye wylle be reulyd by me / I shal help you out of this distresse / and ye shal haue no shame nor vylony soo that ye hold me a promyse / fayre damoysel I wil graunte yow / and sore I am of these quenes sorceresses aferd / for they haue destroyed many a good knyght / syre sayd she that is sothe and for the renome and bounte that they here of you / they wold haue your loue / and sir they sayne / your name is syre Launcelot du laake the floure of knyghtes / & they be passynge wrothe with yow that ye haue reffused hem / But syre and ye wold promyse me to helpe my fader on tewsdaye next comynge / that hath made a turnement betwixe hym and [Page] the kynge of Northgalys / for the last tewesdaye past my fader lost the felde thorugh thre knyghtes of Arthurs courte / And ye wyll be there on tewesday next comyng / and helpe my fader to morne or pryme by the grace of god I shalle delyuer yow clene / Fayre mayden sayd syr launcelot telle me what is your faders name / and thenne shal I gyue you an ansuer / Syre knyghte she sayd / my fader is kyng Bagdemagus that was foule rebuked at the last turnement / I knowe your fader wel said syre launcelot for a noble kyng and a good knyghte / And by the feythe of my body ye shalle haue my body redy to doo your fader and you seruyse at that day / Syre she sayd gra mercy / and to morne awayte ye be redy by tymes and I shal [...]e she that shal delyuer you / and take you your armoure and your hors shelde and spere / And here by within this x myle is an Abbey of whyte monkes / there I praye you that ye me a­byde / and thyder shal I brynge my fader vnto you / alle thys shal be done saide syre Launcelot as I am true knyghte / and soo she departed and came on the morne erly / and found hym redy / thenne she brought hym oute of twelue lockes & brouȝt hym vnto his armour / & whan he was clene armed / she brou­ght hym vntyl his owne hors / and lyghtely he sadeled hym and toke a grete spere in his hand / and soo rode forth / and sa­yd fayre damoysel I shal not faile you by the grace of god / And soo he rode in to a grete forest all that day / and neuer co­ude fynde no hyghe waye / and soo the nyght felle on hym / and thenne was he ware in a slade of a pauelione of reed sendel / By my feythe sayd syre launcelot in that pauelione wil I bod­ge alle this nyghte / and soo there he alyghte doune and tayed his hors to the pauelione / and there he vnarmed hym / and there he fond a bedde / and layd hym theryn / and felle on slepe sadly

¶Capitulum v

THenne within an houre there came the knyghte to who­me the pauelione ought / And he wende that his lemā had layne in that bedde / and soo he laid hym doune besyde syr Launcelot / and toke hym in his armes and beganne to kysse [Page] hym / And whanne syre launcelot felte a rough berd kyssyng hym / he starte oute of the bedde lyghtely / and the other knyȝt after hym / and eyther of hem gate their swerdes in theire han­des / and oute at the pauelione dore wente the knyghte of the pauelione / and syre launcelot folowed hym / and ther by a lytel slake syr launcelot wounded hym sore nyghe vnto the deth And thenne he yelded hym vnto syre launcelot / and so he graū ted hym so that he wold telle hym why he came in to the bedde Syre sayd the knyght the pauelione is myn owne / and there thys nyght I had assygned my lady to haue slepte with me And now I am lykely to dye of this wounde / that me repen­teth sayd Launcelot of youre hurte / but I was adrad of tre­son / for I was late begyled / and therfore come on your way in to your pauelione and take your rest / And as I suppose I shalle staunche your blood / and soo they wente bothe in to the pauelione / And anone syre launcelot staunched his blood / There with al came the knyghtes lady / that was a passynge fayre lady / And whanne she aspyed that her lord Belleus was sore Wounded she cryed oute on syre launcelot / and made grete dole oute of mesure / Pees my lady and my loue said Belleus / for this knyght is a goood man and a knyght ad­uenturous / and there he told her all the cause how he was woū ded / And whan that I yolde me vnto hym / he lefte me goode­ly and hath staunched my blood / Syre sayd the lady I re­quyre the telle me what knyght ye be / and what is youre na­me / Fayr lady he sayd / my name is syre launcelot du lake / soo me thought euer by your speche sayd the lady / for I haue se­ne yow ofte or this / and I knowe you better than ye wene / ¶ But now and ye wold promyse me of your curtosy for the harmes that ye haue done to me and to my lord Belleus that whanne he cometh vnto Arthurs courte for to cause hym to be made knyghte of the roūd table / for he is a passyng good man of armes and a myghty lord of landes of many oute yles / ¶Fayre lady said syre launcelot lete hym come vnto the cou­rte the next hyhe feest / and loke that ye come with hym / and I shal doo my power / and ye preue you doughty of your handes that ye shalle haue your desyre ¶So thus within a whyle as they thus talked the nyghte passed / and the daye shone / and [Page] thenne syre launcelot armed hym / and took his hors / and they taught hym to the Abbaye and thyder he rode within the spa­ce of two owrys

¶Capitulum sextum /

ANd soone as syre launcelott came withyn the Abbeye yarde / the doughter of kynge Bagdemagus herd a grete to hors goo on the pauyment / And she thenne aroos and yede vnto a wyndowe / and there she sawe syr launcelot / and anone she made men fast to take his hors from hym / & lete lede hym in to a stabyl / and hym self was ledde in to a fayre chamber / and vnarmed hym / and the lady sente hym a longe goune / & anone she came her self / And thēne she made launcelot passyng good chere / and she sayd he was the knyȝt in the world was moost welcome to her / Thenne in al haste she sente for her fader Bagdemagus that was within xij myle of that Abbay / and afore euen he came with a fayre felauship of knyghtes wyth hym / And whanne the kynge was alyghte of his hors he yo­de streyte vnto syr launcelots chamber / and there he fond hys doughter / and thenne the kyng enbraced syr Launcelot in hys armes and eyther made other good chere / Anone syre launce­lot made his complaynt vnto the kynge how he was bytrayed And how his broder syre lyonel was departed from hym / he nyst not where / and how his doughter had delyuerd hym out of pryson / therfor whyle I lyue I shal doo her seruyse and al her kynred / Thenne am I sure of youre helpe sayd the kynge on tewesday next comynge / ye syr sayd syr launcelot / I shalle not faylle yow / for soo I haue promysed my lady your do­ughter / But syre what knyghtes be they of my lord Arthurs that were with the kynge of Northgalys / and the kyng sayd it was syre madore de laporte / and syr Mordred and syr ga­halaytyne that al fur fared my knyghtes / for ageynst hem thre I nor my knyghtes myghte bere no strengthe / Syre sayde syre launcelot as I here say that the turnement shal be here within this thre myle of this abbay / ye shal sende vnto me thre knyghtes of yours suche as ye trust and loke that the thre knyghtes haue al whyte sheldes & I also & no paynture on the sheldes / & and we four will come out of a lytel wood in myddes of both [Page] partyes / and we shalle falle in the frounte of oure enemyes & greue hem that we may / And thus shal I not be knowen what knyght I am / Soo they took their rest that nyght / and thys was on the sonday / and soo the kyng departed / and sente vnto syre launcelot thre knyghtes with the four whyte sheldes And on the tewesday they lodged hem in a lytyl leued wood besyde there the turnement shold be / And there were scaffoldis and holes that lordes and ladyes myghte beholde and to gy­ue the pryse / Thenne came in to the feld the kyng of Northga­lys with eyght score helmes / And thenne the thre knyghtes of Arthurs stode by them self / ¶Thenne cam in to the feld kyng Bagdemagus with four score of helmys / and thenne they fe­wtryd their sperys / and cam to gyders with a grete dasshe / & there were slayn of knyghtes at the first recountre xij of kyng Bagdemagus parte / and syx of the kyng of Northgalys party / and kyng Bagdemagus party was ferre sette a back /

¶Capitulum septimum

WYth that came syr Launcelot du lake and he threste in with his spere in the thyckest of the prees / and there he smote doune with one spere fyue knyghtes / and of foure of hem he brake their backes / And in that throng he smote doune the kynge of Northgalys / and brake his thye in that falle / Alle thys doyng of syre Launcelot sawe the thre knyghtes of Arthurs / Yonder is a shrewde gest sayd syre Madore de la port therfore haue here ones at hym / soo they encountred / and syre Launcelot bare hym doune hors and man / soo that his sholder wente oute of lyth / Now befalleth it to me to Iuste sayd Mordred / for syr Mador hath asore falle / Syre Launcelot was ware of hym / and gate a grete spere in his hand / and mette hym and syr Mordred brake a spere vpon hym / and syre launce­lot gaf hym suche a buffet that the arsson of his sadel brake / & soo he flewe ouer his hors taylle that his helme butte in to the erthe a foote and more that nyhe his neck was broken / & there he lay longe in a swoune / ¶Thenne came in syr Gahalantyne with a grete spere / and Launcelot ageyyst hym with al theyre strength that they myȝt dryue that both her speres to brast euen [Page] to their handes / and thenne they flang out with their swerdes and gaf many a grym stroke / Thenne was syr launcelot wroth oute of mesure / and thēne he smote syr galahantyne on the helme that his nose braste oute on blood and eerys and mouthe bothe / and ther with his hede henge lowe / And therwith his hors ranne awey with hym / and he felle doune to the erthe / Anone there with al syre launcelot gate a greete spere in hys hand / And or euer that grete spere brake / he bare doune to the erthe xvj knyghtes some hors and man / and some the man & not the hors / & ther was none but that he hyt surely he bare no­ne armes that day / And thenne he gate another grete spere & smote doune twelue knyghtes / and the moost party of hem neuer throfe after / and thēne the knyȝtes of the kyng of northgalys wold Iuste nomore / And there the gr [...]e was gyuen to kynge Bagdemagus / So eyther party departed vnto his ow­ne place / and syr launcelot rode forth with kynge Bagdemagus vnto his castel / and there he had passynge good chere both with the kyng and with his doughter / and they profred hym grete yeftes / And on the morne he took his leue / and told the kynge that he wold goo and seke his broder syre Lyonel that wente from hym whan that he slepte / so he toke his hors / and betaught hem alle to god / And there he sayd vnto the kynges doughter yf ye haue nede ony tyme of my seruyse I praye you lete me haue knouleche / and I shal not faylle you as I am true knyght / and so syr launcelot departed / and by aduenture he came in to the same forest / there he was take slepyng / And in the myddes of an hyhe way he mette a damoysel rydyng on a whyte palfroy / and there eyther salewed other / Fayre damoysel said syre launcelot knowe ye in thi [...] countray ony aduen­tures / syre knyghte sayd that damoysel / here are aduentures nere hand / and thou durst preue hem / why shold I not pre­ue aduentures said syre launcelot for that cause come I hyder / wel sayd she thou semest wel to be a good knyght / And yf thou dare mete with a good knyght / I shal brynge the where is the best knyght / and the myghtyest that euer thou fond / so thou wylt telle me what is thy name / and what knyght thou arte / damoysel as for to telle the my name I take no grete for­ce / Truly my name is syre laūcelot du lake / syre thou bysemyst [Page] wel / here ben aduentures by that fallen for the / for here by du­elleth a knyght that wylle not be ouermatched for no man I knowe but ye ouermatche hym / & his name is syre Turquyne And as I vnderstand he hath in his pryson of Arthurs co­urte good knyghtes thre score and foure / that he hath wonne with his owne handes / But whan ye haue done that Iourney ye shal promyse me as ye are a true knyght for to go with me and to helpe me / and other damoysels that are distressid day­ly with a fals knyghte / All your entente damoysel and desyre I wylle fulfylle / soo ye wyl brynge me vnto this knyghte How fayre knyght come on your waye / and soo she broughte hym vnto the fourde and the tre where henge the bacyn / So sir launcelot lete his hors drynke / and sythen he bete on the bacyn with the butte of his spere so hard with al his myȝt tyl the bottom felle oute / and longe he dyd soo but he sawe noo thynge Thenne he rode endlong the gates of that manoyre nyghe half an houre / And thenne was he ware of a grete knyȝt that dro­ [...]e an hors afore hym / and ouerthwarte the hors there lay an armed knyght bounden / And euer as they came nere and ne­re / syre launcelot thouȝt he shold knowe hym / Thenne sir laun­celot was ware that hit was syre gaherys Gawayns broder a knyghte of the table round / Now fayre damoysel sayd sir la­uncelot / I see yonder cometh a knyght fast bounden that is a felawe of myne / and broder he is vnto syr gawayne / And att the fyrst begynnyng I promyse yow by the leue of god to re­scowe that knyght / But yf his mayster sytte better in the sa­del I shal delyuer alle the prysoners that he hath oute of daunger / for I am sure he hath two bretheren of myne prysoners with hym / By that tyme that eyther had sene other / they grypped theyr speres vnto them / Now fayre knyghte sayd syr la­uncelot / put that wounded knyghte of the hors / and lete hym reste a whyle / and lete vs two preue oure strengthes / For as it is enformed me thou doest and hast done grete despyte and shame vnto knyghtes of the round table / and therfor now de­fende the / And thow be of the table round sayd Turquyne I defye the and alle thy felauship / that is ouermoche sayd / sa­yd syre launcelot

¶Capitulum viij

ANd thēne they put theyr speres in the restys / & cam to gyders with her horses as fast as they myght renne / And eyther smote other in myddes of theyre sheldes that bothe theyre horse backes braste vnder them / and the knyghtes were bothe astonyed / and as soone as they myghte auoyde theyre horses / they took theire sheldes afore them / and drewe oute her swerdes / and came to gyder egerly / and eyther gaf other ma­ny stronge strokes / for there myght neyder sheldes nor harneis hold theyr strokes / And soo within a whyle they hadde bothe grymly woundes / and bledde passynge greuously / Thus they ferd two houres or mo trasyng and rasyng eyther other where they myght hytte ony bare place / Thenne at the last they were bretheles bothe / and stode lenyng on theyre swerdes / Now fe­lawe sayd syr Turquyne hold thy hand a whyle / and telle me what I shal aske the Say on thenne Turquyne sayd thou arte the byggest man that euer I mette with al / and the beste brethed / and lyke on knyȝt that I hate aboue al other kny­ghtes / so be hit that thou be not he I wyl lyghtly accorde with the / & for thy loue I wil delyuer al the prysoners that I haue that is thre score and foure / soo thou wylt telle me thy name / And thou and I we wyl be felawes to gyders and neuer to fayle the whyle that I lyue / it is wel sayd / sayd syr launce­lot / but sythen hit is soo that I may haue thy frendship what knyght is he that thou soo hatest aboue al other / Feythfully sayd syr Turquyne his name is syre launcelot du lake / for he slewe my broder syr Caradus at the dolorous toure that was one of the best knyghtes on lyue / And therfore hym I excepte of al knyghtes / for may I ones mete with hym / the one of vs shal make an ende of other I make myn auowe / And for sir launcelots sake I haue slayne an C good knyghtes / and as many I haue maymed al vtterly that they myght neuer af­ter helpe them self / and many haue dyed in pryson / and yet haue I thre score and foure / and al shal be delyuerd so thou wilt telle me thy name / so be it that thou be not syre launcelot / ¶Now see I wel sayd syre launcelot that suche a man I my­ghte be I myght haue peas / and suche a man I myghte be / [Page] that ther shold be warre mortal betwyxte vs and now syre knyghte at thy request I wyl that thou wete and knowe that I am Launcelot du lake kynge Bans sone of Benwyck / & very knyghte of the table round / And now I defye the and doe thy best / A sayd Turquyne / launcelot / thou arte vnto me moost welcome that euer was knyghte / for we shalle neuer departe tyl the one of ve be dede / Thenne they hurtled to gyders as two wilde bulles rosshynge and lasshyng with their sheldes and swerdes that somtyme they felle bothe ouer theyr no­ses / Thus they foughte stylle two houres and more / and ne­uer wolde haue reste / and syre Turquyn gaf syre laūcelot many woundes / that alle the ground there as they foughte was al bespechled with blood

¶Capitulum ix

THenne at the last syr Turquyn waxed faynte / and gaf somwhat a bak / and bare his shelde lowe for werynesse / That aspyed syre Launcelot / and lepte vpon hym fyersly and gate hym by the Bauowre of his helmet / and plucked hym doune on his knees / And anone he racyd of his helme / and smote his neck in sondyr / And whanne syre laūcelot had done this / he yode vnto the damoysel and sayd / damoysel I am redy to goo with yow where ye wylle haue me / but I haue no hors / Fayre syre sayd she / taste this wounded knyghtes hors and sende hym in to this manoyr and commaunde hym to de­lyuer alle the prysoners / Soo syr launcelot wente vnto Gaheryes and praid hym not to be agreued for to leue hym his hors Nay fayr lord said gaheryes I wyll that ye take my hors atte your owne commaundement / for ye haue bothe saued me and my hors / & this day I saye ye are the best knyghte in the worlde For ye haue slayne this daye in my syghte the myȝtest man & the best knyghte excepte yow that euer I sawe / & fore syre said Gaheryes I pray you telle me your name / Syre my na­me is syr launcelot du lake that ou [...]te to helpe you of ryghte for kyng arthurs sake / & in especial for my lord sir gawayn [...] sake your owne dere broder / & whan that ye come within yon­der manoyr / I am sure ye shal fynde ther many knyȝtes of the round table / for I haue sene many of their sheldes that I knowe [Page] on yonder tree / there is k [...]yes shelde / and sir braundeles sheld / and syr Marhaus sheld and syre Galyndes shelde and syre Bryan de lystnoyse sheld and syr Alydukes sheld with many mo that I am not now auysed of / and also my two bretheren sheldes syre Ector de marys and syr Lyonel / wherfore I pray yow grete them al from me / and say that I bydde them taste suche stuffe there as they fynd / and that in ony wyfe my bretheren goo vnto the courte and abyde me there tyl that I come / for by the feest of pentecost I cast me to be there / for as at this tyme I must ryde with this damoysel for to saue my promyse / and soo he departed from Gaheryse / & Gaheryse yede in to the manore / and ther he fond a yoman porter kepyng ther many keyes / Anone with al syre gaheryse threwe the porter vnto the ground / and toke the keyes from hym / and hastely he opened the pryson dore / and there he lete oute all the prysoners / and euery man losed other of their boundes / And whan they sawe syre Gaheryse / alle they thanked hym / for they wend that he was wounded / Not soo sayd Gaheryse / hit was launcelot that slewe hym worshipfully with his owne handes / I sawe it with myn owne eyen / and he greteth you al wel / and pra­yeth you to haste you to the courte / And as vnto syr Lyonel and Ector de marys he prayeth yow to abyde hym at the court That shalle we not doo says his bretheren / we wyll fynde hym and we may lyue / So shal I sayd syr kay fynde hym or I come at the courte as I am true knyghte / Thenne alle tho kn­yghtes sought the hous there as the armour was / and thenne they armed hem / and euery knyght fonde his owne hors / & al thet euer longed vnto hym / And whan this was done ther [...] a softer with foure horses lade with fatte veneson / Anone syr kay sayd / here is good mete for vs for one meale / for we had not many a day no good repast / And soo that veneson was rosted baken and soden / and so after souper somme abode there al that nyghte / But syre Lyonel and Ector de marys and syre kay rode after syre launcelot to fynde hym yf they myghte

¶Capitulum Decimum

[Page]NOw torne we vnto syre launcelot that rode with the damoysel in a fayre hyghe waye / syr sayd the damoysel / here by this way haunteth a knyght that destressyd al ladyes and gentylwymmen / And at the leest he robbeth them or lyeth by them / what said sir launcelot is he a theef & a kny­ght & a rauyssher of wymmen / he doth shame vnto the ordre of knyghthode / and contrary vnto his othe / hit is pyte that he ly­ueth / But fayr damoysel ye shal ryde on afore your self / and I wylle kepe my self in couerte / And yf that he trouble yow or distresse yow / I shalle be your rescowe and lerne hym to be ruled as a knyghte / Soo the mayde rode on by the way a soft ambelynge paas / And within a whyle cam oute that knyght on horsbak oute of the woode / and his page with hym / & the­re he put the damoysel from her hors / and thenne she cryed / With that came launcelot as fast as he myghte tyl he came to that knyght / sayenge / O thou fals knyght and traytour vnto knyghthode / who dyd lerne the to dystresse ladyes and gentyl wymmen / whanne the knyghte sawe syre launcelot thus rebu­kynge hym / he ansuerd not / but drewe his swerd and rode vnto syre launcelot / and syre laūcelot threwe his spere fro hym / and drewe oute his swerd / and stroke hym suche a buffet on the helmet that he clafe his hede and neck vnto the throte Now hast thou thy payement that long thou hast deserued / that is trouthe sayd the damoysel / For lyke as syr Turquyne watched to destroye knyghtes / soo dyde this knyght attende to des­troye and dystresse ladyes damoysels and gentywymmen / & his name was syre Perys de foreyst saueage / Now damoysel sayde syre launcelot wylle ye ony more seruyse of me / Nay syre she sayd at this tyme / but almyghty Ihesu preserue you whe­re someuer ye ryde or goo / for the curteyst knyghte thou arte and mekest vnto all ladyes and gentylwymmen that now lyueth / But one thyng syre knyghte me thynketh ye lacke / ye that are a knyghte wyueles that ye wyl not loue some may­den or gentylwoman / for I coude neuer here say that euer ye loued ony of no maner degree and that is grete pyte / but hit is noysed that ye loue quene Gueneuer / and that she hath ordeyned by enchauntement that ye shal neuer loue none other / but her / ne none other damoysel ne lady shall reioyse you / wherfor [Page] many in this land of hyghe estate and lowe make grete so­rowe / ¶Fayre damoysel sayd syr launcelot I maye not war­ne peple to speke of me what it pleaseth hem / But for to be a wedded man / I thynke hit not / for thenne I must couche with her / and leue armes and turnementys / batayls / and aduentures / And as for to say for to take my plesaunce with peramo­urs that wylle I refuse in pryncypal for drede of god / For knyghtes that ben auenturous or lecherous shal not be happy ne fortunate vnto the wereys / for outher they shalle be ouerco­me with a symplyer knyghte than they be hem self / Outher els they shal by vnhap and her cursydnes slee better men than they ben hem self / And soo who that vseth peramours shalle be vnhappy / and all thyng is vnhappy that is aboute hem / And soo syre Launcelot and she departed / And thenne he rode in a depe forest two dayes and more / and had strayte lodgynge / Soo on the thyrdde day he rode ouer a longe brydge / and there starte vpon hym sodenly a passynge foule chorle / and he smote his hors on the nose that he torned aboute / & asked hym why he rode ouer that brydge withoute his lycence / why shold I not ryde this way sayd syr launcelot / I may not ryde besyde / thou shalt not chese sayd the chorle and lasshyd at hym with a grete clubbe shod with yron / Thenne syre laūcelot drewe his suerd and put the stroke abak / and clafe his hede vnto the pappys / At the ende of the brydge was a fayre village / & al the people men and wymmen cryed on syre launcelot / and sayd Awers dede dydest thou neuer for thy self / for thou hast slayn the chyef porter of oure castel / syr laūcelot lete them say what they wold And streyghte he wente in to the castel / And whanne he cam in to the castel he alyghte / and tryed his hors to a rynge on the walle / And there he sawe a fayre grene courte / and thyder he dressyd hym / For there hym thought was a fayre place to fyghte in / Soo he loked aboute / and sawe moche peple in do­res and wyndowes that sayd fayr knyghte thou arte vnhap­py

¶Capitulum xj

[...]

¶Capitulum xij

ANone with al cam there vpon hym two grete gyaunts wel armed al sauf the hedes with two horryble club­bes in theyr handes / Syre Launcelot put his sheld afore hym and put the stroke aweye of the one gyaunt / and with his swerd he clafe his hede a sondre / whan his felaw sawe that / he ran awey as he were wood / for fere of the horryble strokes / & laūcelot after hym with al his myȝt & smote hym on the sholder / and clafe hym to the nauel / Thenne syre launcelot went in to the halle / and there came afore hym thre score ladyes and damoysels / and all kneled vnto hym / and thanked god & hym of their delyueraunce. For syre sayd they / the mooste party of vs haue ben here this seuen yere their prysoners / and we haue worched al maner of sylke werkes for oure mete / and we are al grete gentylwymmen borne / and blessyd be the tyme knyȝte that euer thou be borne / For thou hast done the moost worship that euer dyd knyght in this world / that wyl we bere recorde and we al pray you to telle vs your name / that we maye telle our frendes who delyuerd vs oute of pryson / Fayre damoysel he sayd / my name is syre launcelot du lake / A syre sayde they al / wel mayst thou be he / for els saue your self / as we demed / there myghte neuer knyght haue the better of these two gya­unts / for many fayre knyghtes haue assayed hit / and here ha­ue ended / and many tymes haue we wysshed after yow / and these two gyaunts dredde neuer knyghte but you / Now maye ye saye sayd syr launcelot vnto youre frendes how & who hath delyuerd you / and grete them al from me / and yf that I come in ony of your marches / shewe me suche chere as ye haue cause and what tresour that there in this castel is I gyue it you for a reward for your greuaunce / And the lorde that is owner of this castel I wold he receyued it as is ryght / Fayre syre saide they / the name of this castel is Tyntygayl / & a duke oughte it somtyme that had wedded fair Igrayn / & after wedded her Vtherpendragon / & gate on her Arthur / wel saide sir launcelot I vnderstande to whome this castel longeth / and soo he departed from them / and bytaughte hem vnto god ¶And thenne he mounted vpon his hors & rode in to many straunge & wyld [Page] countreyes and thorou many waters and valeyes and euyl was he lodged / And at the laste by fortune hym happend a­geynst a nyghte to come to a fayr courtelage / & therin he fond an old gentylwoman that lodged hym with good wyl / and there he had good chere for hym and his hors / And whan ty­me was his oost brought hym in to a fayre garet ouer the gate to his bedde / There syre Launcelot vnarmed hym & sette hys harneys by hym / and wente to bed / & anone he felle on slepe / So soone after ther cam one on horsback / & knocked at the gate in grete haste / and whan syr launcelot herd this / he arose vp and loked oute at the wyndowe / & sawe by the mone lyghte thre knyghtes cam rydyng after that one man / and al thre lasshed on hym at ones with swerdes / & that one knyȝt tourned on hem knyȝtly ageyne / and deffended hym / Truly saide syre launcelot yonder one knyȝte shal I helpe / for it were shame for me to see thre knyȝtes on one / And yf he be slayne I am partener of his deth / & ther with he took his harneis / and went out at a wyndowe by a shete doune to the four knyȝtes / & thenne syr launcelot sayd on hyghe / torne you knyghtes vnto me and leue your fyghtyng with that knyght / And thenne they alle thre lefte syr kay / and torned vnto syr launcelot / and there be­ganne grete bataylle / for they alyghte al thre / and strake ma­ny grete strokes at syr launcelot / and assaylled hym on eue­ry syde / Thenne syre kay dressid hym for to haue holpen syre Launcelot / nay syre sayd he I wylle none of your helpe / ther­for as ye wylle haue my helpe / lete me alone with hem / Syre kay for the pleasyre of the knyghte suffred hym for to doo hys wylle / and soo stode on syde / And thenne anon within vj strokes / syre launcelot had stryken hem to the erthe

And thenne they al thre cryed syre knyghte we yelde vs vnto you as man of myght makeles / As to that said syr laū celot I will not take youre yeldyng vnto me / But so that ye wylle yelde you vnto syr kay the Seneschal on that couena­unt I wyl saue your lyues and els not / ¶ Fayre knyghte sayd they that were we lothe to doo / For as for syr kay / we chaced hym hyder / and had ouercome hym had not ye ben / therfor to yelde vs vnto hym it were no reson / wel as to that said laūcelot / auyse you wel / for ye may chese whether ye wyll [Page] dye or lyue / for and ye be yolden it shal be vnto syr kay / ¶Fayre knyght thenne they sayd in sauynge of oure lyues we wylle doo as thou commaundys vs / Thenne shal ye sayd syre launcelot on whytsonday nexte comyng go vnto the courte of kynge Arthur / and there shal ye yelde you vnto quene Gueneuer / and put you al thre in her grace and mercy / and saye that sir kay sente you thyder to be her prysoners / Syre they said it shalle be done by the feythe of oure bodyes / and we ben ly­uynge / and there they swore euery knyghte vpon his swerd / And so sir launcelot suffred hem soo to departe / And thenne sir launcelot knocked at the yate with the pomel of his swerd / and with that came his oost / and in they entred sir kay and he Syre sayd his hoost I wende ye had ben in youre bedde / so I was / sayd sire launcelot / But I arose and lepte oute atte my wyndowe for to helpe an old felawe of myne / And so whanne they came nyghe the lyghte / sir kay knewe wel / that it was sir launcelot / and ther with he kneled doune and thanked hym of al his kyndenesse that he had holpen hym twyes from the deth Syre he sayd I haue no thynge done but that me ought for to doo / and ye are welcome / and here shal ye repose yow and ta­ke your rest / Soo whan sir kay was vnarmed / he asked after mete / soo there was mete fette hym / and he ete strongly / And whan he hadde souped they went to theyr beddes and were lodged to gyders in one bedde / On the morne sir launcelot arose erly / and lefte syre kay slepynge / and sir launcelot toke sire ka­yes armour and his shelde and armed hym / and so he wente to the stable / and toke his hors and toke his leue of his oost / and soo he departed / Thenne soone after arose syr kay and myssed sir launcelot / And thenne he aspyed that he had hie armoure and his hors / Now by my seythe I knowe wel that he wylle greue some of the courte of kynge Arthur. For on hym knyghtes wylle be bolde / and deme that it is I / and that wyll begyle them / And by cause of his armoure and shelde I am sure I shal ryde in pees / And thenne soone after departed sir kay & thanked his hoost

¶Capitulum xij

[Page]NOw torne we vnto syre launcelot that had ryden long in a grete forest / and at the last he came in to a lowe co­untray ful of fayre Ryuers and medowes / And a [...] fore hym he sawe a longe brydge / and thre pauelions stode ther on of sylke and sendel of dyuers hewe / And withoute the pauelions henge thre whyte sheldes on truncheons of sperys / & grete longe sperys stode vpryght by the pauelions / and at euery pauelions dore stode thre fresshe squyers / and soo syre laun­celot passed by them and spake no worde / whan he was paste the thre knyghtes sayden hym that hit was the proud kay / he weneth no knyght soo good as he / and the contrary is ofty­me preued / By my feythe sayd one of the knyghtes / his na­me was syre gaunter / I wylle ryde after hym / & assaye hym / for alle his pryde / and ye may beholde how that I spede / Soo this knyght syre Gaunter armed hym / and henge his shelde vpon his sholder / and mounted vpon a grete hors / and gate his spere in his hand / and wallopt after syre launcelot / and whanne he came nyghe hym / he cryed Abyde thou proude kny­ght syr kay / for thou shalt not passe quyte / Soo syr launcelot torned hym / and eyther feutryd their speres / and came to gyders with alle theyr myghtes / and syre Gaunters spere brake but syre launcelot smote hym doune hors and man / and whan syr gaunter was at the erthe / his bretheren sayd echone to o­ther yonder knyght is not syre kay / for he is byggar than he / I dare laye my heede sayd syre Gylmere yonder knyghte hath slayne syr kay and hath taken his hors and his harneis / whether it be soo or no sayd syr Raynold the thyrd broder / lete vs now goo mounte vpon oure horses and res [...]owe oure broder sir Gaunter vpon payne of dethe / we alle shal haue werke ynouȝ to matche that knyght / for euer me semeth by his persone it is syre Launcelot / or syr Trystram / or syr Pelleas the good kny­ght / Thenne anon they toke theyr horses and ouertook syr la­uncelot / and syre gylmere put forth his spere / and ranne to sir launcelot / and syre launcelot smote hym doune that he lay in a swoune / Syre knyght sayd syr Raynold thou arte a strong man / and as I suppose thou hast slayne my two bretheren / for the whiche rasyth my herte sore ageynst the / And yf I my­ght with my worship I wold not haue a doo with yow but [Page] nedes I must take parte as they doo / And therfor knyghte he sayd / kepe thy self / And soo they hurtled to gyders with alle theyr myghtes / and al to sheuered bothe theyre speres / And thenne they drewe her swerdes and lasshyd to gyder egerly / Anone there with aroos syre Gaūter / and came vnto his broder syre gylmere / and bad hym aryse and helpe we oure bro­der syr Raynold that yonder merueyllously matched yonder good knyght / There with alle they lepte on theyr horses & hurtled vnto syre launcelot / ¶ And whanne he sawe them come / he smote a sore stroke vnto syr Raynold that he felle of his hors to the ground / And thenne he stroke to the other two brethe­ren / and at two strokes he strake them doune to the erthe / with that sir Raynold beganne to starte vp with his heede al blody / and came streyte vnto syre launcelot / Now late be sayd sir launcelot / I was not ferre from the whan thou were maade knyght sir Raynold / and also I knowe thou arte a good knyght / and lothe I were to slee the / Gramercy sayd syr raynold as for your goodnes / And I dare saye as for me and my bretheren we wyl not be lothe to yelde vs vnto yow / with that we knewe youre name / for wel we knowe ye are not sire kay / As for that be it as it be maye / for ye shal yelde yow vnto dame gweneuer / and loke that ye be with her on whytsonday and yelde you vnto her as prysoners / and saye that syre kay sente yow vnto her / thenne they swore hit shold be done / and so passed forthe sire launcelot / nd echone of the bretheren halpe other as wel as they myght

¶Capitulum xiij

SOo sir launcelot rode in to a depe forest / and ther by in a slade / he sawe four knyghtes houyng vnder an oke / and they were of Arthurs courte / one was sir Sagramour le desyrus and Ector de marys / and sir Gawayn and sir Vwa­yne / Anone as these four knyghtes had aspyed sir Launcelot they wend by his armes it hadde ben sir kay / Now by my fe­ythe sayd sir Sagramour / I wylle preue sir kayes myghte / & gate his spere in his hand / and came toward sir launcelot Ther with sir launcelot was ware and knewe hym wel / and [Page] feutryd his spere ageynst hym / and smote syre Sagramore so sore that hors and man felle bothe to the erthe / Lo my felaus sayd he yonder ye may see what a buffet he hath / that knyȝt is moche bygger than euer was syre kay / Now shal ye see what I may doo to hym / Soo syr Ector gate his spere in his hand and wallopte toward syre Laūcelot / and syre Launcelot smo­te hym thorou the shelde & sholder that man and hors went to the erthe / and euer his spere held / By my feythe sayd sir V­wayne yonder is a strong knyghte / and I am sure he hath sla­yne syr kay / And I see by his grete strengthe it wyll be hard to matche hym / And there with al syre Vwayne gate his spere in his hand / and rode toward syre Launcelot / and syr launcelot knewe hym wel / and soo he mette hym on the playne / & gafe hym suche a buffette that he was astonyed / that longe he wyst not where he was / Now see I wel sayd syre gawayne I must encoūtre with that knyȝt / Thenne he dressid he his sheld and gate a good spere in his hand / and syre launcelot kne­we hym wel / and thenne they lete renne theyr horses with all theyr myghtes / and eyther knyght smote other in myddes of the shelde / But syre gawayns spere to brast / and syre launcelot charged so sore vpon hym that his hors reuersed vp so doune And moche sorowe had syre gawayn to auoyde his hors / and so syre launcelot passed on a paas and smyled and said god gyue hym ioye that this spere made / for there came neuer a better in my hand / Thenne the four knyghtes wente echone to o­ther and comforted eche other / what saye ye by this gest sayd syre Gawayne / that one spere hath feld vs al foure / we com­maunde hym vnto the deuyl they sayd al / for he is a man of grete myght / ye may wel saye it / sayd syre gawayne / that he is a man of myght / for I dare lay my hede it is syre Launcelot I knowe it by his rydyng / Lete hym goo sayd syre Gawayn for whan we come to the courte than shal we wete / and then­ne had they moche sorowe to gete theyr horses ageyne

¶Capitulum xiiij

NOw leue we there & speke of syr Launcelot that rode a grete whyle in a depe forest where he saw a black brachet [Page] sekyng in maner as it had ben in the feaute of an hurt dere / And ther with he rode after the brachet and he sawe lye on the ground a large feaute of blood / And thenne syre launcelot rode after / And euer the Brachet loked behynd her / and soo she wente thorou a grete mareyse / and euer syre launcelot folowed / And thenne was he ware of an old manoyr / and thy­der ranne the brachet / and soo ouer the brydge / Soo syre launcelot rode ouer that brydge that was old and feble / and whan he cam in myddes of a grete halle ther he sawe lye a dede kny­ght that was a semely man / and that brachet lycked his wo­undes / and there with al came oute a lady wepyng & wryn­gyng her handes / And thenne she sayd / O knyghte to moche sorowe hast thou broughte me / Why saye ye soo sayd syr launcelot / I dyd neuer this knyghte no harme / for hyther by feaute of blood this Brachet broughte me / And therfor fayre la­dy be not displeased with me / for I am ful sore agreued of your greuaunce / Truly syre she sayd I trowe hit be not ye that hath slayne my husband / for he that dyd that dede is sore wo­unded / & he is neuer lyckly to recouer / that shal I ensure hym / What was your husbandes name sayd syre laūcelot / Syr sayd she / his name was called syre Gylbert the bastard one of the best knyghtes of the world / and he that hath slayne hym I knowe not his name / Now god sende you better comforte sa­yd syre launcelot / and soo he departed and wente in to the forest ageyne / and there he met with a damoysel / the whiche knewe hym wel / and she sayd on loude wel be ye fond my lord And now I requyre the on thy knyghthode helpe my brother that is sore wounded / and neuer stynteth bledyng / for this day he fought with syre gylbert the bastard & slewe hym in playn bataylle / and there was my broder sore wounded / and there is a lady a sorceresse that duelleth in a castel here besyde / and this day she told me / my broders woundes shold neuer be hole tyl I coude fynde a knyght wold goo in to the chappel peryllous / & ther he shold fynde a swerd and a blody clothe that the woun­ded knyght was lapped in / and a pyece of that clothe & swerd shold hele my broders woundes so that his woundes were serched with the swerde and the clothe / This is a merueyllous thynge sayd syre launcelot / but what is your broders name / [Page] Syre she sayd / his name was syre Melyot de logurs / that me repenteth said syre launcelott / for he is a felawe of the table round / and to his helpe I wylle doo my power / Thenne syre sayd she / folowe euen this hyhe waye / and it wyl brynge you vnto the chappel peryllous / And here I shalle abyde tyl god send you here ageyne / and but you spede I knowe no knyȝte lyuynge that may encheue that aduenture

¶Capitulum xv

RYyght soo syr Launcelot departed / And whan he cam vnto the chappel peryllous / he alyghte doune / and te­yed his hors vnto a lytyl gate / and as soone as he was with in the chirche yard / he sawe on the frount of the chappel many fayre ryche sheldes torned vp so doune / and many of the shel­des syre launcelot had sene knyghtes bere byfore hand / wyth that he sawe by hym there stande a xxx greete knyghtes more by a yarde than ony man that euer he had sene / and all tho greued and gnasted at syre launcelot / And whan he sawe theyr countenaunce he dred hym sore / and soo putte his shelde afore hym / and toke his swerd redy in his hand redy vnto bataylle / and they were al armed in black harneis redy with her sheldes and her swerdes drawen / And whan syr Launcelot wold haue gone thorou oute them / they scateryd on euery sy­de of hym / and gaf hym the way / and ther with he waxed al bold / and entred in to the chappel / and thenne he sawe no ly­ght / but a dymme lamp brennynge / and thenne was he ware of a corps hylled with a clothe of sylke / Thenne syre Launce­lot stouped doune / and cutte a pyece awey of that clothe / and thenne it ferd vnder hym as the erthe had quaked a lytel / there with al he feryd / And thenne he sawe a fayre swerd lye by the dede knyghte / and that he gate in his hand and hyed hym oute of the chapel / Anone as euer he was in the chappel yarde / alle the knyghtes spak to hym with a grymly wys / and sayd knyghte syr launcelot leye that swerd from the or ellys thou shalt dye / whether that I lyue or dye sayd syr launcelot with noo grete word gete ye hit ageyne / therfor fyghte for it and ye lyst / Thenne ryght soo he passed thorou out them / and [Page] by yonde the chappel yarde ther mette hym a fayre damoysel & sayd syr launcelot leue that swerd behynde the / or thou wil dye for it / I leue it not sayd syr launcelot for no treatys / No sayd she and thou dydest loue that swerd / quene gwene­uer shold thou neuer see / thenne were I a foole and I wold leue this swerd sayd launcelot / Now gentyl knyghte sayde the damoysel / I requyre the to kysse me but ones / Nay sayd syr launcelot that god me forbede / wel syr sayd she / and thou haddest kyssed me / thy lyf dayes had ben done / but now allas she said I haue loste al my labour / for I ordeyned this chap­pel for thy sake / and for syre gawayne / And ones I had syr Gawayne within me / and at that tyme he foughte with that knyghte that lyeth there dede in yonder chappel syre Gylbert the bastard. and at that tyme he smote the lyfte hand of of sir Gylbert the bastard / And syre Launcelot now I telle the / I haue loued the this seuen yere / but there may no woman ha­ue thy loue but quene Gweneuer / But syth [...]n I maye not reioyce the to haue thy body on lyue I had kepte no more ioye in this world / but to haue thy body dede / Thenne wold I ha­ue baumed hit and serued hit / and soo haue kepte it my lyfe dayes / and dayly I shold haue clypped the / and kyssed the in despyte of Quene Gweneuer / ye saye wel sayd syr launcelot Ihesu preserue me from your subtyle craftes / And ther with al he took his hors and soo departed from her / And as the book sayth whan syr launcelo [...] was departed she took suche sorou that she dyed within a fourten nyghte / and her name was Hella­wes the sorceresse lady of the castel Nygramous / Anone syre launcelot mette with the damoysel syre Melyotis syster / And whan she sawe hym she clapped her handes / and wepte for ioye And thenne they rode vnto a castel there by where lay syr Me­lyot / And anone as syre launcelot sawe hym / he knewe hym / but he was passynge pale as the erthe for bledyng / whan syre Melyot sawe syre launcelot he kneled vpon his knees and cryed on hyghe / O lord syr launcelot helpe me / Anone syre launcelot lepte vnto hym and touched his woundes with syr Gyl­bertes swerde / And thenne he wyped his woundes with a part of the blody clothe that sir gylbert was wrapped in / and anon on holer man in his lyf was he neuer / And thenne ther was [Page] grete ioye bytwene hem / and they made syr launcelot all the chere that they myghte / and soo on the morne syre launcelot toke his leue / and hadde syre Melyot hye hym to the courte of my lord Arthur / for it draweth nyhe to the feest of pentecoste / and there by the grace of god ye shal fynde me / and therwith they departed /

¶Capitulum xvj

ANd soo syre Launcelot rode thorou many straunge co­untreyes ouer marys and valeyes tyl by fortune he came to a fayre castel / and as he paste beyonde the castel / hym thought he herde two bellys rynge. And thenne was he ware of a Faucon came fleynge ouer his hede toward an hyghe elme / and longe lunys aboute her feet / and she flewe vnto the elme to take her perche / the lunys ouer cast aboute a bough / And whanne she wold haue taken her flyghte / she henge by the leg­ges fast / and syre launcelot sawe how he henge / and byheld the fayre faucon perygot / & he was sory for her / The meane why­le came a lady oute of the castel and cryed on hyghe O launcelot launcelot as thou arte floure of alle knyghtes helpe me to gete my hauke / for and my hauke be lost / my lord wyl des­troye me / for I kepte the hauke and she slypped from me / and yf my lord my husband wete hit / he is soo hasty that he wyll slee me / what is your lordes name sayd sir Launcelot / sir she said his name is sire Phelot a knyghte that longeth vnto the kynge of Northgalys / wel fayre lady syn that ye knowe my name and requyre me of knygthode to helpe yow I wylle doo what I may to gete your hauke / and yet god knoweth I am an ylle clymber and the tree is passynge hyghe / and fewe bo­wes to helpe me with alle / And ther with sir launcelot alyȝte and teyed his hors to the same tree / and prayd the lady to vnarme hym / And soo whan he was vnarmed / he put of alle his clothes vnto his sherte and breche / and with myghte & force he clamme vp to the faucon / and teyed the lunys to a grete rotten boyshe / and threwe the hauke doune and it with alle / Anone the lady gate the hauke in her hand / and there with al came oute syre phelot oute of the greuys sodenly / that was her [Page] husband al armed / and with his naked swerd in his hand and sayd O knyghte launcelot now haue I fond the as I wold and stode at the bole of the tree to slee hym / A lady sayd syre Launcelot why haue ye bytrayed me / She hath done sayd syre Phelot but as I commaunded her / and therfor ther nys none other boote but thyne houre is come that thou muste dye / That were shame vnto the sayd syr launcelot thou an armed knyghte to slee a naked man by treason / thou getest no­ne other grace sayd syre phelot and therfor helpe thy self and thou canst / Truly sayde syre launcelot that shal be thy shame / but syn thou wylt doo none other / take myn harneys with the and hange my swerde vpon a bough that I maye gete hit / & thenne doo thy best to slee me and thou canst / Nay nay said sir Phelot / for I knowe the better than thou wenest / therfor thow getest no wepen and I may kepe you ther fro / Allas said sir launcelot that euer a knyghte shold dye wepenles / And ther with he wayted aboue hym and vnder hym / and ouer his he­de he sawe a rownsepyk a bygge bough leueles / and ther with he brake it of by the body / And thenne he came lower & away­ted how his owne hors stode / and sodenly he lepte on the fer­ther syde of the hors froward the knyghte / And thenne sir phelot lasshed at hym egerly wenynge to haue slayne hym / But syr Launcelot putte aweye the stroke with the rounsepyk / and ther with he smote hym on the one syde of the hede that he felle doune in a swoune to the ground / Soo thenne syre launcelot took his swerd oute of his hand and stroke his neck fro the body / Thenne cryed the lady / Allas why hast thou slayne my husband / I am not causer sayd syre launcelot / for with fals­hede ye wold haue had slayne me with treson / and now it is fallen on you bothe / And thenne she souned as though she wold dye / And ther with al syre launcelot gate al his armo­ur as wel as he myght / and put hit vpon hym for drede of more resorte / for he dredde that the knyȝtes castel was soo nygh And soo as soone as he myght he took his hors and departed and thanked god that he had escaped that aduenture

¶Capitulum xvij

[Page]SOo syre launcelot rode many wylde wayes thorou out mareys and many wylde wayes / And as he rode in a valey he sawe a knyght chacynge a lady with a naked swerd to haue slayn her / And by fortune as this knyȝte shold haue slayne thys lady she cryed on syr Launcelot and prayd hym to rescowe her / Whan syre launcelot sawe that me­schyef / he took his hors and rode bytwene them / sayeng knyȝtely for shame / why wolt thou slee this lady / thou dost shame vnto the and alle knyghtes / what haste thou to doo betwyx me & my wyf / sayd the knyght / I wylle slee her maugre thy hede / that shalle ye not sayd syr launcelot / for rather we two wylle haue adoo to gyders / Syre Launcelot sayd the knyght thow doest not thy part / for this lady hath bytrayed me / hit is not so sayd the lady / truly he sayth wronge on me / And for by ca­use I loue and cherysshe my cosyn germayne / he is Ialous betwixe hym and me / And as I shalle ansuer to god three was neuer synne betwyxe vs / But sir sayd the lady as thou arte called the worshipfullest knyghte of the world I requyre the of true knyȝthode kepe me and saue me / For what som euer ye saye he wyl slee me / for he is withoute mercy / haue ye no doubte sayd launcelot it shal not lye in his power / Syr sa­yd the knyghte in your syghte I wyl be ruled as ye wylle haue me / And soo sir launcelot rode on the one syde and she on the other / he had not ryden but a whyle / but the knyghte badde sir Launcelot torne hym and loke behynde hym / and sayde syre yonder come men of armes after vs rydynge / And soo sir la­uncelot torned hym and thoughte no treason / and there wyth was the knyghte and the lady on one syde / & sodenly he swapped of his ladyes hede / And whan syr Launcelot hadde aspy­ed hym what he had done / he sayd and called hym traytour thou hast shamed me for euer / and sodenly sir launcelot alyȝte of his hors and pulled oute h [...]s swerd to slee hym / and there with al he felle flat to the erthe / and gryped sir launcelot by the thyes and cryed mercy / Fy on the sayd sir launcelot thow shameful knyght thou mayst haue no mercy / and therfor ary­se and fyghte with me / nay sayde the knyghte I wyl neuer aryse tyl ye graunte me mercy / Now wyl I profer the fayr said launcelot I wyl vnarme me vnto my sherte / and I wylle [Page] haue nothyng vpon me / but my sherte and my swerd and my hand / And yf thou canst slee me / quyte be thou for euer / nay sir said Pedyuere that wille I neuer / wel said sir Launcelott take this lady and the hede / and bere it vpon the / and here shalt thou swere vpon my swerd to bere it alweyes vpon thy back and neuer to reste tyl thou come to quene Gueneuer / Syre sayd he that Wylle I doo by the feithe of my body / Now said la­uncelot telle me what is your name / sir my name is Pedyue­re / In a shameful houre were thou borne said launcelot / Soo Pedyuere departed with the dede lady and the hede / and fond the quene with kynge Arthur at wynchestre / and there he told alle the trouthe / Syre knyȝt said the quene this is an horryble dede and a shameful / and a grete rebuke vnto sire launcelott But not withstondynge his worship is not knowen in many dyuerse countreyes / but this shalle I gyue you in penaunce make ye as good skyfte as ye can ye shal bere this lady with you on horsbak vnto the pope of Rome / and of hym receyue your penaunce for your foule dedes / and ye shalle neuer reste one nyghte there as ye doo another / and ye goo to ony bedde the dede body shal lye with you / this othe / there he made and soo departed / And as it telleth in the frensshe book / whan he cam to Rome / the pope badde hym goo ageyne vnto quene Gueneuer and in Rome was his lady beryed by the popes commaunde­ment / And after this sir Pedyuere felle to grete goodnesse / & was an holy man and an heremyte

¶Capitulum xviij

NOw torne we vnto sir launcelot du lake that came home two dayes afore the feest of Pentecost / and the ky­ng and alle the courte were passynge fayne of his comynge / And whanne sire Gawayne / sir Vwayne / sire Sagramore / sir Ector de marys sawe sire Launcelot in Kayes armour / thenne they wist wel it was he that smote hem doune al with one spere / Thenne there was laughyng and smylyng amonge them / and euer now and now came alle the Knyghtes home that sir Turquyn hadde prysoners and they alle honoured and wor­shipped syre launcelot / ¶ Whanne sire Gaheryes herd them [Page] speke / he said / I sawe alle the bataille from the begynnyng to the endynge / and there he told kyng Arthur alle how it was and how syre Turquyn was the strongest knyghte that euer he sawe excepte syre launcelot / there were many knyghtes bare hym record nyghe thre score / Thenne sire kay told the kynge / how syr launcelot had rescowed hym whan he shold haue ben slayne / and how he made the knyghtes yelde hem to me / and not to hym / And there they were al thre / and bare record / and by Ihesu said syr kay by cause syr launcelot took my harneis and lefte me his / I rode in good pees / and no man wold haue adoo with me / ¶Anone there with alle ther came the thre knyghtes that fought with syre launcelot at the longe brydge And there they yelded hem vnto syr kay / and sir kay forsoke hem and said he foughte neuer with hem / but I shall ease yo­ur herte said sir kay / yonder is syr launcelot that ouercam you whan they wyst that / they were glad / And thenne syr Mely­ot de logrys came home / and told the kynge how syr launcelot had saued hym fro the dethe / and all his dedes were knowen how foure quenes sorceresses had hym in pryson / and how he was delyuerd by kynge Bagdemagus doughter / Also there were told alle the grete dedes of armes that syr launcelot dyd betwixe the two kynges / that is for to saye the kynge of north galys and kynge Bagdemagus Alle the trouthe syr Gaha­lantyne dyd telle / and syre Mador de la porte and syre Mor­dred / for they were at that same turnement / ¶Thenne cam in the lady that knewe syr launcelot whan that he wounded syr Bellyus at the pauelione / And there atte request of syr laū celot syr Bellyus was made knyghte of the round table / And soo at that tyme sir launcelot had the grettest name of ony knyghte of the world / and most he was honoured of hyhe and lowe

¶Explicit the noble tale of syr Launcelot du lake whiche is the vj book

¶Here foloweth the tale of syr Gareth of Orkeney that was called Beaumayns by syr kay / and is the seuenth book

¶Capitulum primum

WHan Arthur held his round table moost ple­nour / it fortuned that he commaunded that the hyhe feest of Pentecost shold be holden at a cyte and a Castel the whiche in tho dayes was called kynke kenadonne vpon the sondes that marched nyghe walys / ¶Soo euer the kyng hadde a custom that at the feest of Pentecost in especyal afore other feestes in the yere he wold not goo that daye to mete vntyl he had herd or sene of a grete merueylle / And for that custome alle ma­ner of straunge aduentures came before. Arthur as at that fe­est before alle other feestes / And soo sire Gawayne a lytyl to fore none of the daye of Pentecost aspyed att a wyndowe thre men vpon horsbak and a dwarf on foote / and soo the thre men alighte and the dwarf kepte their horses / and one of the thre men was hyher than the other tweyne by a foote and an half Thenne sir Gawayne wente vnto the kynge and sayd / sire go to your mete / for here at the hande comen straunge aduentures So Arthur wente vnto his mete with many other kynges / And there were all the knyghtes of the round table only tho that were prysoners or slayn at a recountre / thenne at the hy­he feest euermore they shold be fulfilled the hole nombre of an C and fyfty / for thenne was the round table fully complisshed Ryght soo cam in to the halle two men wel bisene and ryche­ly / and vpon their sholders there lened the goodlyest yong man & the fairest that euer they al sawe / & he was large and long and brode in the sholders & wel vysaged / and the fayrest and the largest handed that euer man sawe / but he ferd as though he myght not goo nor bere hym self / but yf he lened vpon their sholders / Anon as Arthur sawe hym there was made pees & rome / & ryght so they yede with hym vnto the hyghe deyse with out sayeng of ony wordes / Thenne this moche yong man pul­led hym a bak and easily stretched vp streyghte / sayeng kynge Arthur god you blisse and al your fair felauship / and in especial the felauship of the table rounde / And for thys cause I am come hyder to praye you and requyre you to gyue me thre yeftes / and they shalle not be vnresonably asked / but that ye may worshipfully and honorably graunte hem me / and to you [Page] no grete hurte nor losse / And the fyrst done and gyfte I wil aske now / and the other two yeftes I wylle aske this daye twelue moneth / where someuer ye hold your hyghe feest / Now aske sayd Arthur / and ye shalle haue your askyng

¶Now syre this is my petycyon for thys feest / that ye wylle gyue me mete and drynke suffycyauntly for this twelue moneth / and at that day I wylle aske myn other two yeftes

¶My fayr sone sayd Arthur aske better I counceille the for this is but a symple askynge / for my herte geueth me to the gretely that thou arte come of men of worshyp / and gretely my consayte fayleth me / but thou shalt preue a man of ryghte grete worship / Syre he sayd / ther of be as it be may I haue asked that I wylle aske / wel sayd the kynge ye shal haue me­te & drynke ynouȝ / I neuer deffended yt none / nother my frende ne my foo / But what is thy name I wold wete / I can not telle you sayd he / that is merueylle sayd the kynge / that thou knowest not thy name / and thou arte the goodlyest yong man one that euer I sawe / Thenne the kyng betook hym to sir kay the steward / and charged hym that he shold gyue hym of al maner of metes and drynkes of the best / and also that be hadde al maner of fyndynge as though he were a lordes so­ne / that shal lytel nede sayd syr kay to doo suche cost vpon hym For I dare vndertake he is a vylayne borne / and neuer will make man / for and he had come of gentylmen he wold haue axed of you hors and armour / but suche as he is so he asketh And sythen he hath no name / I shall yeue hym a name that shal be Beaumayns that is fayre handes / and in to the kechen I shalle brynge hym / and there he shal haue fatte broweys euery day yt he shall be as fatte by the twelue monethes ende as a porke hog / ryght soo the two men departed and belefte hym to syr kay / that scorned hym and mocked hym

¶Ca ij

THere at was sir Gawayn wroth / & in especyal sir la­uncelot bad sir kay leue his mockyng / for I dare laye my hede he shall preue a man of grete worship / lete be / said sir kay / it may not be by no reason / for as he is / so he hath asked / Beware said syre Launcelot / so ye gafe the good knyȝt Brewnor syre Dynadamys broder a name / and ye called hym la cote male tayle / and that tourned you to anger afterward [Page] / As for that sayd syr kay this shall neuer preue none suche / For syr Brewnor desyred euer worship and thys desy­reth breed & drynke / & brothe vpon payne of my lyf he was fostred vp in some abbay / and how someuer it was they fayled mete and drynke / and soo hyther he is come for his sus­tenaunce ¶And soo syre kay badde gete hym a place and sytte doune to mete / soo Beaumayns wente to the halle dore / and sette hym doune amonge boyes and laddys / & there he ete sadly / And thenne syre launcelot after mete badde hym come to his chamber / And there he shold haue mete and drynke ynough / And soo dyd syre Gawayne / but he reffused hem al / he wold doo none other / but as syr kay commaunded hym for no profer / But as touchynge syre Gawayn he hadde reson to profer hym lodgyng mete and drynke / for that profer came of his blood / for he was nere kynne to hym than he wyst But that as syre launcelot dyd was of his grete gentylnes and curtosye ¶Soo thus he was putte in to the kechyn and laye nyghtly as the boyes of the kechen dyd / And soo he endured alle that twelue moneth / and neuer dis­pleasyd man nor chylde / but alweyes he was meke & mylde / But euer whanne that he sawe ony Iustynge of knyghtes / that wold he see and he myght / And euer syre launcelot wold gyue hym gold to spende and clothes / and soo dyd syre Ga­wayne / and where there were ony maystryes done / there atte wold he be / and there myghte none cast barre nor stone to hym by two yerdys / Thenne wold syre kay saye how lyketh yow my boye of the kechyn / soo it past on tyl the feest of Whytson­tyde / And at that tyme the kynge helde hit att Carlyon in the moost royallest wyse that myghte be / lyke as he dyd yerly / But the Kynge wold no mete ete vpon the whyysonday vntyl he herd some aduentures / Thenne cam ther a squyer to the Kyng / and said / syre ye maye goo to your mete / for here cometh a damoysel with somme straunge aduentures / thenne was the Kynge gladde and sette hym doune / ¶Ryghte soo ther came a damoysel in to the halle and salewed the Kynge and prayd hym of socour / for whome sayd the Kynge what is the aduenture / ¶Syre she sayd I haue a lady of grete worship and renomme / and she is byseged with a tyraunte so that she may [Page] not oute of her castel / And by cause here are callyd the no­blest knyghtes of the world / I come to you to praye you of socour / What heteth your lady and where dwelleth she / & who is he / & what is his name that hath byseged her / syre kyng she saide / as for my ladyes name that shall not ye knowe for me as at this tyme / but I lete you wete she is a lady of grete worship and of grete landes / And as for the tyraunt that bysyegeth her and destroyeth her landes he is called the rede knyght of the reed laundes / I knowe hym not sayd the kynge / Syre said syre Gawayne / I knowe hym wel for he is one of the perilloust knyghtes of the world / men saye that he hath seuen mennys strengthe / and from hym I escaped ones ful hard / with my lyf / Fayre damoysel sayd the kynge there ben knyȝ­tes here wolde doo her power for to rescowe your lady / but by cause ye wylle not telle her name nor where she dwelleth / ther­for none of my knyghtes that here be now shal goo with yow by my wylle / thenne must I speke further sayd the damoysel

¶Capitulum iij

WYth these wordes came before the kynge Beaumayns whyle the damoysel was ther / & thus he said syr Kyng god thanke you I haue ben this xij monethe in your kechyn and haue hadde my ful sustenaūce and now I will aske my two yeftes that ben behynde / Aske vpon my peryl said the ky­nge / Syre this shal be my two gyftes / fyrst that ye wil gra­unte me to haue this aduenture of the damoysel / for hit belon­geth vnto me / thou shalt haue hit sayd the kyng I graunte it the / thenne syr this is the other yeft / that ye shal bydde Launcelot du lake to make me knyȝt for of hym I wil be made kny­ght and els of none / And whanne I am paste I praye yow lete hym ryde after me and make me Knyght / whan I requyre hym / Al this shal be done sayd the Kynge / Fy on the sayde the damoysel / shalle I haue none but one that is your kechyn page / thenne was she wrothe and toke her hors and departed / And with that there cam one to Beaumayns and told hym his hors and armour was come for hym / and there was the dwarf come with all thyng that hym neded in the rychest maner / ther at al the court had moche merueill fro whens cam al ye [Page] gere / Soo whanne he was armed there was none but fewe soo goodely a man as he was / and ryght soo as he came in to the halle and took his leue of kyng Arthur & sir Gawayn & syr launcelot / and prayed that he wolde hyhe after hym / and soo departed and rode after the damoysel

¶Capitulum iiij

BVt there wente many after to behold how wel he was horsed and trapped in clothe of gold / but he had neyther shelde nor spere / Thenne syr kay sayd al open in the halle I wylle ryde after my boye in the kechyn to wete / whether he wylle knowe me for his better / Said syr launcelot and sir gawayn yet abyde at home / So syr kay made hym redy and took his hors and his spere and rode after hym / And ryghte as Beumayns ouertook the damoysel / ryghte soo cam syre kay & sayd Beumayns what syre knowe ye not me / Thenne he tor­ned his hors / and knewe hit was sir kay / that had done hym alle the despyte as ye haue herde afore / ye sayd beumayns I knowe yow for an vngentyl knyghte of the courte / and ther­fore beware of me / There with syre kay putte his spere in the reyste / and ranne streyghte vpon hym / and beaumayns cam as fast vpon hym with his swerd in his hand / and soo he putte awey his spere with his swerd and with a foyne thrested hym thorou the syde / that syr kay felle doune as he had ben dede / & he alyght doune and took sir kayes shelde and his spere / and starte vpon his owne hors and rode his waye / Al that sawe syr launcelot and soo dyd the damoysel / And thenne he badde his dwarf starte vpon sir kayes hors / and soo he dyd / by that syre Launcelot was come / thenne he profered sir laūcelot to Iuste / and eyther made hem redy / and they came to gyder soo fyersly that eyther bare doune other to the erthe / and sore were they brysed / Thenne sir launcelot arose and halpe hym fro his hors And thenne beaumayns threwe his sheld from hym / and pro­fered to fyghte with sir launcelot on foote / and soo they rasshed to gyders lyke borys tracynge / rasynge and foynynge to the [Page] mountenaunce of an houre / and syre launcelot felte hym soo bygge that he merueylled of his strengthe / for he fought more lyker a gyaunt than a knyght / and that his fyghtynge was [...]urable and passynge perillous / For syr launcelot had so moche adoo with hym that he dred hym self to be shamed / and sa­yd Beumayns fyghte not so sore / youre quarel and myn is not soo grete but we may leue of / Truly that is trouthe sayd Beumayns / but it doth me good to fele your myght / and yet my lord I shewed not the vtteraunce

¶Capitulum quintum

IN goddes name sayd syr launcelot / for I promyse you by the feythe of my body I had as moche to doo as I myght to saue my self fro you vnshamed / and therfore haue ye no doubte of none erthely knyghte / Hope ye so that I maye ony whyle stand a proued knyght sayd Beaumayns / ye sayd Launcelot / doo as ye haue done / and I shal be your wara­unt / Thenne I praye you sayd Beaumayns yeue me the or­dre of knyghthode / thenne must ye telle me your name seyd la­uncelot / and of what kynne ye be borne / Syr soo that ye wylle not discouer me I shal sayd Beaumayns / nay sayd syre laū celot / and that I promyse yow by the feithe of my body / vn tyl hit be openly knowen / Thenne syr he sayd my name is Gareth and broder vnto syr Gawayn of fader and moder / A syr said Launcelot I am more gladder of you than I was / For euer me thouȝte ye shold be of a grete blood / and that ye cam not to the courte neyther for mete ne for drynke / And thenne sire Launcelot gaf hym thordre of knyȝthode / and thenne sire Ga­reth prayd hym for to departe and lete hym goo / Soo syre la­uncelot departed from hym and came to syre kay and maade hym to be born home vpon his shelde / and so he was helyd hard with the lyf / and al men scorned syr kay / and in especyal sir Gawayne and syre launcelot sayd it was not his parte to re­buke no yonge man / for ful lytel knewe he of what byrth he is comen / and for what cause he came to this courte / and soo we leue syr kay and torne we vnto Beaumayns / whanne he had ouertaken the damoysel / anone she sayd what dost thow here / thou stynkest al of the kechyn / thy clothes ben bawdy of [Page] the greece and talowe that thou gaynest in kyng Arthurs ke­chyn / wonest thou sayd she that I alowe the for yonder knyȝt that thou kyllest / Nay truly / for thou slowest hym vnhappely and cowardly / therfor torne ageyn bawdy kechyn page / I knowe the wel / for syre kay named the Beaumayns / what arte thou but a luske and a torner of broches and a ladyl wessher Damoysel sayd Beaumayns saye to me what ye wylle / I wylle not goo from you what someuer ye say / for I haue vn­dertake to kynge Arthur for to acheue your aduenture / and so shal I fynysshe it to the ende / eyther I shal dye therfore / Fy on the kechyn knaue wolt thou fynysshe myn aduenture / thou shalt anone be met with al / that thou woldest not for alle the brothe that euer thou soupest ones loke hym in the face / I shal assaye sayd Beaumayns / Soo thus as they rode in the wo­ode / ther came a man fleynge al that euer he myghte / whether wolt thou sayd Beaumayns / O lord he said / helpe me / for he­re by in a slade are syxe theues that haue taken my lord and bounde hym / soo I am aferd lest they wyl slee hym / Brynge me thyder said Beaumayns / and soo they rode to gyders vntyl they came there as was the knyghte bounden / and thenne he rode vnto hem / and strake one vnto the dethe / and thenne another / and at the thyrd stroke he slewe the thyrdde theef / and thenne the other thre fledde / And he rode after hem / and he o­uertook hem / and thenne tho thre theues tourned ageyne and assayled Beaumayns hard / but at the last he slewe them / & retorned and vnbounde the knyghte / And the knyght thanked hym / and prayd hym to ryde with hym to his castel there a lytel besyde / and he shold worshipfully rewarde hym for his go­od dedes / Syr sayd Beaumayns I wille no reward haue / I was this day made knyghte of noble syr launcelot / & ther­for I wylle no reward haue / but god rewarde me / And also I must folowe this damoysel / And whan he came nyghe her she bad hym ryde fro her / for thou smellyst al of the kechyn / wenest thou that I haue Ioye of the / for al this dede that thou hast done nys but myshappen the / But thou shalt see a syghte shal make the torne ageyne and that lyghtly / Thenne the sa­me knyght whiche was rescowed of the theues rode after that damoysel and prayed her to lodge with hym alle that nyghte And by cause it was nere nyght / the damoysel rode with hym [Page] to his castel / and there they had grete chere / and at souper the knyght sat syr Beumayns afore the damoisel / Fy fy said she syr knyghte ye are vncurtoys to sette a kechyn page afore me hym bysemeth better to stycke a swyne than to sytte afore a damoysel of hyhe parage / thenne the knyght was ashamed atte her wordes / and took hym vp / and sette hym at asyde bord / and sette hym self afore hym / and soo al that nyght they had good chere and mery reste /

¶Capitulum sextum

ANd on the morn the damoisel & he took their leue & thanked the knyght / and soo departed / and rode on her way / vntyl they came to a grete forest / And there was a grete ryuer and but one passage / and ther were redy two knyghtes on the ferther syde to lette them the passage / what saist thou sayd the damoysel / wylt thou matche yonder knyghtes or torne ageyne / Nay sayd syr Beaumayns I wyl not torne ageyn and they were syxe mo / And ther with al he rasshyd in to the water / and in myddes of the water eyther brake their speres vpon other to their handes / and thenne they drewe their swer­des / and smote egerly at other / And at the last syr Beaumayns smote the other vpon the helme that his hede stonyed / and there with alle he felle doune in the water / and there was he drowned / And thēne he sporyd his hors vpon the londe / whe­re the other knyghte felle vpon hym / and brake his spere / and soo they drewe theyr swerdes / and foughte longe to gyders At the laste syre Beaumayns clafe his helme and his heede doune to the sholders / and soo he rode vnto the damoysel & bad her ryde forth on her way / Allas she sayd that euer a kechen page shold haue that fortune to destroye suche two douȝty kn­yghtes / thou wenest thou hast done doughtely that is not soo / For the fyrste knyghte his hors stumbled / and there he was drouned in the water / and neuer it was by thy force / nor by thy myght / And the last knyghte by myshap thou camyst be­hynde hym and myshappely thou slewe hym / Damoysel sayd Beaumayns ye maye saye what ye wyl / but with whom someuer I haue a doo with al I truste to god to serue hym or he [Page] departe / And therfor I recke not what ye say soo that I may wynne youre lady / Fy fy foule kechen knaue thou shalt foe knyghtes that shal abate thy boost / Fayre damoysel gyue me goodly langage / and thenne my care is past / for what knyghtes someuer they be / I care not ne I doubte hem not / Also sa­yd she I saye it for thyne auayle / yet mayst thou torne ageyne with thy worship / for and thou folowe me / thou arte but sla­yne / for I see alle that euer thou dost is but by mysauenture / and not by prowesse of thy handes / wel damoysel ye may say what ye wylle / but where someuer ye goo I wylle folowe you Soo this Beaumayns rode with that lady tyl euensong tyme and euer she chyde hym and wold not reste / And they cam to a black launde / and there was a black hauthorne / & theron henge a blak baner / and on the other syde there henge a black shelde / and by hit stode a black spere grete and longe / and a grete black hors couerd with sylke / and a black stone fast by

¶Capitulum septimum

THer sat knyghte al armed in black harneis / and his name was ye knyȝt of the blak laūde / thēne ye damoysel whanne she sawe that knyghte she badde hym flee doun that valey for his hors was not sadeled / Gramercy sayd Be­aumayns / for alweyes ye wold haue me a coward / with that the black knyghte / whanne she came nyghe hym spak / & sayd damoysel haue ye broughte this knyghte of kynge Arthur to be your champyon / Nay fayr knyghte sayd she / this is but a kechyn knane that was fedde in kynge Arthurs kechyn for almesse / Why cometh he sayd the knyghte in suche aray / hit is shame that he bereth you company / syr I can not be delyuerd of hym sayd she / for with me he rydeth maugre myn hede / god wold that ye shold put hym from me / outher to slee hym and ye may / for he is an vnhappy knaue / and vnhappely he hath done this day / thorou myshappe I sawe hym slee two knyghtes at the passage of the water / and other dedes he dyde besorne ry­ght merueyllous and thorou vnhappynes / that merueylled me sayd the black knyghte that ony man that is of worshyp wylle haue adoo with hym / they knowe hym not sayd the da­moysel / And for by cause he rydeth with me / they wene that he [Page] be some man of worship borne / that may be / sayd the blak kn­yghte / how be it as ye say that he be no man of worshyp he is a ful lykely persone / and ful lyke to be a stronge man / but thus moche shal I graunte you sayd the black knyghte / I shal putte hym doune vpon one foote / and his hors and hys harueys be shal leue with me / for it were shame to me to doo hym ony more harme / whanne syre Beaumayns herd hym saye thus / he sayd syre knyghte thou art ful large of my hors and my harneys / I lete the wete it coste the noughte / & whe­ther hit lyketh the or not this launde wylle I passe maulgre thyn hede / And hors ne harneys getest thou none of my / but yf thou wynne hem with thy handes / and therfor lete see what thou canst doo / Sayst thou that sayd the black knyghte / now yelde thy lady fro the / for it besemeth neuer a kechyn page to ryde with suche a lady / Thou lyest sayd Beaumayns I am a gentyl man borne and of more hyghe lygnage than thou / & that wyl I preue on thy body / Thenne in grete wrathe they departed with theyr horses / and came to gyders as hit had ben the thonder / and the black knyghtes spere brake / and Beau­mayns threste hym thorou bothe his sydes / and there with his spere brak / and the truncheon lefte stylle in his syde / But neuertheles the black knyght drewe his suerd / and smote ma­ny eger strokes and of grete myghte / and hurte Beaumayns ful sore / But at the laste the black knyghte within an houre and an half he felle doune of his hors in swonne / and there he dyed / And thenne Beaumayns sawe hym soo wel horsed and armed / thenne he alyghte doune and armed hym in his armour / and soo took his hors and rode after the damoysel / Whanne she sawe hym come nyghe / she sayd awey kechyn knaue oute of the wynde / for the smelle of thy baudy clothes gre­ueth me / Allas she sayd that euer suche a knaue shold by myshap slee soo good a knyghte as thou hast done / but alle thys is thyn vnhappynes / But here by is one shal paye the alle thy payement / and therfore yet I counceylle the / flee / it may hap­pen me sayd Beaumayns to be beten or slayne / but I warne you fayre damoysel I wyll not flee awey / nor leue your company for al that ye can say / for euer ye say that they wil kylle me or bete me / but how someuer hit happeneth I escape / and [Page] they lye on the groūd / And therfore it were as good for you to hold you styll thus al day rebukynge me / for aweye wille I not tyl I see the vttermest of this Iourneye / or els I wylle be slayne / outher truly beten / therfore ryde on your waye / For folowe you I wille what someuer happen

¶Capitulum octauum

THus as they rode to gyders they sawe a knyght come dryuend by them al in grene bothe his hors & his har­neis / And Whanne he came nyghe the damoysel he as­ked her / is that my broder the black Knyȝte that ye haue bro­ught with yow / Nay nay she sayd this vnhappy kechen knaue hath slayne your broder thorou vnhappynesse / Allas sayd the grene knyghte that is grete pyte that soo noble a knyghte as he was shold soo vnhappely be slayne / and namely of a knaues hand as ye say that he is / a traytour sayd the grene kny­ghte thou shalt dye for sleynge of my broder / he was a ful noble knyghte and his name was syr Pereard / I defye the sa­id Beaumayns / for I lete the wete I slewe hym knyghtely and not shamefully / There with al the grene knyghte rode vnto an horne that was grene / and hit [...]enge vpon a thorne / and there he blewe thre dedely motys / and there came two damoysels and armed hym lyghtely / And thenne he took a grete hors / and a grene shelde and a grene spere / And thenne they ranne to gyders with al their myghtes and brake their speres vnto their handes / And thenne they drewe their swerdes / and gaf many sadde strokes / and either of them wounded other ful yll And at the last at an ouerthwart Beaumayns with his ho­rs strake the grene knyghtes hors vpon the syde that he felle to the erthe / And thenne the grene knyghte auoyded his hors lightly / and dressid hym vpon foote / That sawe Beaumayns And there with al he alighte and they rasshed to gyders ly­ke two myghty kempys a longe whyle / and sore they bledde bothe / with that cam the damoysel / and said my lord the gre­ne knyghte / why for shame stande ye soo longe fyghtyng with the kechyn knaue / Allas it is shame that euer ye were made knyghte to see suche a ladde to matche suche a knyghte / as the [Page] wede ouer grewe the corne / There with the grene knyght was ashamed / and there with al he gaf a grete stroke of myghte & clafe his shelde thorou / Whan Beaumayns sawe his shelde clo [...]ien a sonder / he was a lytel ashamed of that stroke and of her langage / And thenne he gaf hym suche a buffet vpon the hel­me that he felle on his knees / And soo sodenly Beaumayns pulled hym vpon the ground grouelynge / And thenne the grene knyghte cryed hym mercy / and yelded hym vnto syre Beaumayns / and prayd hym to slee hym not / Al is in vayn said Beaumayns for thou shalt dye but yf this damoysel that came with me praye me to saue thy lyf / and ther with al he vnlaced his helme lyke as he wold slee hym / Fy vpon the false kechen page / I wyll neuer pray the to saue his lyf / for I will neuer be soo moche in thy daunger / Thenne shalle he deye sayde Beaumayns / Not soo hardy thou bawdy knaue sayd the da­moysel / that thou slee hym / Allas sayd the grene knyghte suffre me not to dye for a fayre word may saue me / Fayr knyȝt said the grene knyghte saue my lyf / & I wyl foryeue the / the dethe of my broder / and for euer to become thy man / and xxx knyghtes that hold of me for euer shal doo you seruyse / In the deuyls name sayd the damoysel that suche a bawdy kechen knaue shold haue the and thyrtty knyghtes seruyse / Syr kn­yght said Beaumayns alle this auaylleth the not / but yf my damoysel speke with me for thy lyf / And therwith al he ma­de a semblaunt to slee hym / lete be sayd the damoysel thou baudy knaue / slee hym not / for and thou do / thou shalt repente it Damoysel said Beaumayns your charge is to me a pleasyr and at your commaundement his lyf shal be saued / & els not Thenne he said sir Knyghte with the grene armes I releace the quyte at this damoysels request / for I wylle not make her wrothe / I wille fulfylle al that she chargeth me / And thenne the grene knyghte kneled doune / and dyd hym homage with his swerd / thenne said the damoisel me repenteth grene knyghte of your dommage / and of youre broders dethe the black knyghte / for of your helpe I had grete myster / For I drede me sore to passe this forest / Nay drede you not sayd the grene knyghte / for ye shal lodge with me this nyghte / and to morne I shalle helpe you thorou this forest / Soo they tooke theyre [Page] horses and rode to his manoyr whiche was fast there besyde

¶Capitulum ix

ANd euer she rebuked Beaumayns and wold not suffre hym to sytte at her table / but as the grene knyghte took hym and sat hym at a syde table / Merueylle me thynketh said the grene knyght to the damoysel why ye rebuke this no­ble knyghte as ye do [...] / for I warne you damoysel he is a full noble knyght / and I knowe no knyght is abel to matche hym therfor ye doo grete wrong to rebuke hym / for he shall do yow ryght good seruyse / for what someuer he maketh hym self / ye shalle preue at the ende that he is come of a noble blood and of kynges lygnage / Fy fy said the damoisel it is shame for you to saye of hym suche worship / Truly said the grene knyȝt it were shame for me to sey of hym ony disworship / for he hath preued hym self a better knyght than I am / yet haue I mett with many knyghtes in my dayes / and neuer or this tyme haue I fond no knyght his matche / and so that nyghte they ye­de vnto rest / and al that nyght the grene knyght commaunded thyrtty knyghtes pryuely to watche Beaumayns for to kepe hym from al treason / And soo on the morne they al arose and herd their masse and brake theyr fast / and thenne they tooke their horses / and rode on theire waye / and the grene knyghte conueyed hem thorou the forest / and there the grene Knyghte said my lord Beaumayns I & these thyrtty knyghtes shall be alweye at your somons both erly and late at your callyng and whether that euer ye wille sende vs / it is wel said / sayd Beaumayns / whanne that I calle vpon you / ye must yelde you vnto kynge Arthur and all your knyghtes / yf that ye so commaunde vs / we shal ben redy at all tymes said the grene knyght / Fy fy vpon the in the deuyls name saide the damoysel that ony good knyghtes shold be obedyent vnto a kechyn knaue / Soo thenne departed the grene Knyghte and the damoy­sel / And thenne she said vnto Beaumayns why folowest thou me thou kechyn boye / caste away thy shelde and thy spere / and flee aweye / yet I counceille the by tymes or thou shalt say ry­ght soone Allas for were thou as wyȝte as euer was wade [Page] or Laūcelot / Trystram / or the good knyghte syr lamaryk thou shalt not passe a paas here that is called the paas perillous / Damoysel said Beaumayns who is aferd lete hym flee / for it were shame to torne ageyne sythen I haue ryden soo longe with yow / wel said the damoysel ye shal sone whether ye wyll or not

¶Capitulum x

SOo within a whyle they sawe a toure as whyte as o­ny snowe wel matchecold al aboute / and doubel dy­ked / And ouer the toure gate there henge a fyfty sheldes of dyuerse colours / and vnder that toure there was a fayr medow And therin were many knyghtes and squyers to behold scaffoldes and pauelions / for there vpon the morn shold be a grete turnement / and the lord of the toure was in his castel and loked out at a wyndowe / and sawe a damoysel / a dwarf and a knyȝt armed at al poyntes / So god me helpe said the lord with ye knyȝt wyll I Iuste / for I see that he is a kniȝt arraūt & soo he armed hym and horsed hym hastely / And whanne he was on horsbak with his shelde and his spere / it was al re­de bothe his hors and his harneis / and alle that to hym lon­geth / And whanne that he came nyghe hym he wende it hadde ben his broder the black knyghte / And thenne he cryed a loude broder what doo ye in these marches / nay nay sayd the damoy­sel / it is not he / this is but a kechyn knaue that was brought vp for almesse in kynge Arthurs courte / Neuertheles sayd the reed knyghte I wylle speke with hym or he departe / A sa­yd the damoysel this knaue hath kylled thy broder / and syre kay named hym Beaumayns / and this hors and this har­neis was thy broders the black knyghte / Also I sawe thy broder the grene knyghte ouercome of his handes / Now maye ye be reuenged vpon hym / for I may neuer be quyte of hym ¶With this eyther knyghtes departed in sondre / and they cam to gyder with alle their myght / and eyther of their horses fell to the erthe / and they auoyded their horses / and put their sheldes afore them and drewe their swerdes / and either gaf other sadde strokes / now here / now there / rasyng / tracyng / foynynge and hurlynge lyke two bores the space of two houres / And thenne she cryed on hyhe to the rede knyghte / Allas thou noble [Page] reed knyghte / thynke what worship hath folowed the / lete neuer a kechyn knaue endure the soo longe as he doth / Thenne the reed knyght waxed wrothe and doubled his strokes and hurte Beaumayns wonderly sore that the blood ranne doune to the ground that it was wonder to see that stronge bataille / Yet at the last syre Beaumayns strake hym to the erthe / and as he wold haue slayne the reed knyghte he cryed mercy sa­yeng Noble knyghte slee me not / and I shall yelde me to the with fyfty knyghtes with me that be at my commaundement And I forgyue the al the despyte that thou hast done to me / and the dethe of my broder the black knyghte / All this auailleth not said Beaumayns / but yf my damoysel praye me to saue thy lyf / And therwith he maade semblaunt to stryke of his hede / Lete be thou Beaumayns slee hym not / for he is a noble knyghte / and not soo hardy vpon thyne hede but thou saue hym / Thenne Beaumayns badde the reed knyghte stand vp and thanke the damoysel now of thy lyf / ¶ Thenne the reed knyght praid hym to see his castel / and to be there al nyghte Soo the damoysel thenne graunted hym / and there they had mery chere / But alweyes the damoysel spak many foule wordes vnto Beaumayns wherof the reed knyght had grete merueylle / and alle that nyghte the reed knyghte maade thre score knyghtes to watche Beaumayns that he shold haue no shame nor vylony / And vpon the morne they herd masse and dyned / and the reed knyghte came before Beaumayns with his thre score knyghtes / and there he profered hym his homa­ge and feaute at al tymes he and his knyghtes to doo hym seruyse / I thanke you said Beaumayns / but this ye shalle graunte me / whanne I calle vpon you to come afore my lord kynge Arthur and yelde you vnto hym to be his knyghtes / Syr said the reed knyghte I wille be redy and my felauship at your somons / So syr Beaumayns departed and the damoysel and ouer she rode chydynge hym in the fowlest manere /

¶Capitulum xj

DAmoysel said Beaumayns ye are vncurteis so to re­buke me / as ye doo / for me semeth I haue done you good seruyse / and euer ye threate me I shal be betyn with knyghtes that we mete / but euer for al your boost they lye in the dust or in the myre / and therfor I pray you rebuke me no more / And whan ye see me beten or yolden as recreaūt thenne may ye bydde me goo from you shamefully / but fyrste I lete you wete I wylle not departe from you / for I were werse than a foole and I wold departe from you all the whyle that I wynne worship / wel said she / ryght soone ther shall mete a knyght shal paye the alle thy wages / for he is the most man of worship of the world excepte kyng Arthur / I will wel said Beaumayns / the more he is of worship / the more shalle be my worship to haue adoo with hym / Thenne anone they were ware / where was afore them a Cyte ryche and fayre And betwixe them and the Cyte a myle and an half there was a fayre medowe that semed newe mowen / and therin were many pauelions fayre to beholde / Lo said the damoysel yon­der is a lord that oweth yonder cyte / and his custome is whan the weder is fayr to lye in this medowe to Iuste and torneye / And euer there ben aboute hym fyue honderd knyghtes & gentilmen of armes / and there ben alle maner of games that ony gentylman can deuyse / That goodly lord saide Beaumayns wold I fayne see / thou shalt see hym tyme ynough saide the damoysel / and soo as she rode nere she aspyed the pauelione / where he was / Loo sayd she seest thou yonder pauelione that is al of the coloure of Inde and al maner of thynge that there is aboute men and wymmen / and horses trapped / sheldes and speres were all of the colour of Inde and his name is sir persant of Inde the moost lordlyest knyghte that euer thou lokest on / Hit may wel be said Beaumayns / but be he neuer so sto­ute a knyghte in this felde / I shalle abyde tyl that I see hym vnder his shelde / A foole said she thou were better flee by ty­mes / why sayd Beaumayns and he be suche a knyghte as ye make hym he wylle not sette vpon me with alle his men / or with his / v / C knyghtes / For and ther come no more but one [Page] at ones / I shall hym not fayle whylest my lyf lasteth / Fy fy said the damoysel that euer suche a stynkynge knaue shold blowe suche a boost / Damoysel he said ye ar to blame soo to re­buke me / For I had leuer do fyue batails / than so to be rebu­ked / lete hym come and thenne lete hym doo his werst / Syre she said I merueylle what thou arte and of what kyn thou arte come / boldly thou spekest / and boldly thou hast done / that haue I sene / therfore I praye the saue thy self and thou ma­yst / for thy hors and thou haue had grete traueylle / And I drede we dwelle ouer longe from the sege / For hit is but hens seuen myle / and alle perillous passages we ar past saue al only this passage / and here I drede me sore lest ye shalle ketche some hurte / therfore I wold ye were hens that ye were not brysed nor hurte with this stronge knyghte / But I lete you wete this syr Persant of ynde is no thyng of myȝte nor strength vnto the knyghte that leid the syege aboute my lady / As for that said syre Beaumayns be it as it be may / For sythen I am come soo nyghe this knyght I wille preue his myghte or I departe from hym / and els I shalle be shamed / and I now withdrawe me from hym / And therfore damoysel haue ye no doubte by the grace of god I shall so dele with this kny­ghte that within two houres after none I shalle delyuer hym And thenne shal we come to the syege by day lyghte / O Ihe­su merueille haue I said the damoysel what maner a man ye be / for hit may neuer ben otherwyse but that ye be comen of a noble blood / for soo foule ne shamefully dyd neuer woman rule a knyghte as I haue done you / and euer curtoisly ye ha­ue suffred me / and that cam neuer but of a gentyl blood / ¶Damoysel sayd Beaumayns a knyght may lytel do that may not suffre a damoisel / for what someuer ye said vnto me / I took none hede to your wordes / for the more ye sayd the more ye angryd me / and my wrathe I wrekyd vpon them that I had a doo with al / And therfor alle the myssayenge that ye myssayed me / fordered me in my bataill & caused me to thyn­ke to shewe & preue my self at the ende what I was / for pera­uentur thouȝ I had mete in kyng Arthurs kechyn / yet I myȝt haue had mete ynouȝ in other places / but alle that I dyd it for to preue & assaye my frendes / and that shalle be knowen [Page] another day / and whether that I be a gentylman borne or no­ne / I lete you wete fayre damoysel I haue done you gentilmans seruyfe / and parauentur better / seruyse yet wille I do or I departe from you / Allas she said fayr Beaumayns for­gyue me alle that I haue myssaid or done ageynst the / wyth alle my herte said he I forgyue it yow / for ye dyde no thyng but as ye shold doo / for al your euyl wordes pleasyd me / & damoysel saide Beaumayns syn hit lyketh you to saye thus fayre vnto me / wete ye wel it gladeth my herte gretely / and now me semeth ther is no knyght lyuynge but I am able y­nough for hym

¶Capitulum Duodecimum

WYth this sir Persant of ynde had aspyed them as they houed in the felde / and knyȝtly he sente to them whe­ther he came in werre or in pees / say to thy lord said beauma­yns I take no force / but whether as hym lyst hym self / Soo the messager went ageyne vnto fyr Persaunt / and told hym alle his ansuer / wel thenne will I haue adoo with hym to the vtteraunce / and soo he purueyed hym and rode ageynst hym / And Beaumayns sawe hym and made hym redy / & ther they mette with all that euer theyr horses myght renne / and braste their speres eyther in thre pyeces / & their horses rassed so to gyders that bothe their horses felle dede to the / erthe & lyȝtly they auoyded their horses / and put their sheldes afore them / & dre­we their swerdes / and gaf many grete strokes that somtyme they hurtled to gyder that they felle grouelyng on the ground Thus they fought two houres and more that their sheldes & theyr hauberkes were al for [...]ewen / & in many stedys they we­re wounded / So at the last syr Beaumayns smote hym tho­rou the cost of the body / & thenne he retrayed hym here & there & knyghtly mayntened his batail long tyme / And at the last though hym lothe were Beaumayns smote sir Persant aboue vpon the helme that he felle grouelyng to the erthe / & thenne he lepte vpon hym ouerthwart and vnlaced his helme to ha­ue slayne hym / Thenne syr Persant yelded hym & asked hym mercy / with that cam ye damoisel & praid to saue his lyf / I wil wel / for it were pyte this noble knyȝt shold dye / gramercy sayd Persaunt gentyl knyȝt & damoysel / For certeynly now I [Page] wote wel it was ye that slewe my broder the black knyghte / at the black thorne / he was a ful noble knyȝte / his name was syr Perard / Also I am sure that ye are he that wanne myn other brother the grene knyght / his name was syre Pertolepe Also ye wanne my broder the reed knyght syr Perrymones / And now syn ye haue wonne these / this shal I do for to ple­ase you ye shal haue homage & feaute of me / & an C knyghtes to be alweyes at your commaundement to go & ryde where ye wil commaunde vs / & so they wente vnto sir Persauntes pauelione & dranke the wyne / & ete spyeces / & afterward sire Per­saunte made hym to reste vpon a bedde vntyl souper tyme / and after souper to bedde ageyne / whan Beaumayns was abedde syr Persaunt had a lady a faire douȝter of xviij yere of age and there he called her vnto hym / & charged her & commaunded her vpon his blessynge to go vnto the knyghtes bedde / and lye doun by his syde / & make hym no straunge chere / but good chere / and take hym in thyne armes & kysse hym / & loke that this be done I charge you as ye wil haue my loue & my good wil So syr Persants doughter dyd as her fader bad her / and soo she wente vnto syr Beaumayns bed / & pryuely she dispoylled her / & leid her doune by hym / & thenne he awoke & sawe her & asked her what she was / syre she said I am sir Persants douȝter that by the commaundement of my fader am come hyder / Be ye a mayde or a wyf said he / sir she said I am a clene maiden / God defende sayd he that I shold defoyle you to doo syre Persaunt suche a shame / therfore fayre damoysel aryse oute of this bedde or els I wille / Syre she said I cam not to you by myn owne wille but as I was commaunded / Allas said syr Beaumayns I were a shameful knyghte and I wolde do your fader ony disworship / and so he kyst her and soo she de­parted and came vnto syr Persant her fader / and told hym alle how she had spedde / Truly saide syre Persaunt what someuer he be / he is comen of a noble blood / and soo we leue hem there tyl on the morne

¶Capitulum xiij

[Page] ANd soo on the morne the damoy [...]el & sir Beaumayns herd masse & brake their fast / and soo took their leue Fair damoysel said Persant whether ward ar ye way ledyng this knyghte / syr she said this knyghte is goyng to the sege / that besyegeth my syster in the castel Dangerus / A a sayd persaunt that is the knyghte of the reed launde / the whiche is the moost peryllous knyghte that I knowe now lyuyng / and a man that is withouten mercy / and men sayen that he hath seuen mens strength / god saue you said he to Beaumayns from ye knyghte / for he doth grete wrong to that lady / and that is gre­te pyte / for she is one of the fairest ladyes of the world / & me semeth that your damoysel is her suster / is not your name Ly­net said he / ye sir said she / and my lady my systers name is dame Lyonesse / Now shal I telle you said syr Persaunt / thys [...]rd knyghte of the reed laund hath layne long at the syege wel nyghe this two yeres / and many tymes he myghte haue had her and he had wold / but he prolongeth the tyme to thys entent / for to haue sir laūcelot du lake to doo bataill with hym or sir Trystram or syr Lamerak de galys / or syre Gawayne / & this is his taryenge soo longe at the syege / Now my lord syre Persaunt of ynde saide the damoysel Lynet I requyre you that ye wille make this gentilman knyghte or euer he fyghte with the reed knyghte / I will with all my herte said syr Persaunt and it please hym to take the ordre of knyghthode of so sym­ple a man as I am / Sire said Beaumayns I thanke you for your good wil / for I am better sped / for certaynly the noble knyght sir Launcelot made me knyght / A said sir Persant of a more renomed knyghte myghte ye not be made knyghte / For of alle knyghtes he maye be called chyef of knyghthode / & so all the world saith that betwix [...] thre knyghtes is departed clerly knygthode / that is laūcelot du lake / syr Trystram de ly­ones and sir Lamerak de galis / these bere now the renommee / there ben many other knyghtes as sir Palamydes the sarasyn and sir Sasere his broder / Also sir Bleoberys and sire Bla­more de ganys his broder / Also syr Bors de Ganys & syr Ector de marys & sir Percyuale de galis / these & many mo ben noble kniȝtes / but ther be none yt passe ye iij aboue said / therfor god [Page] spede you wel said syr Persant / for and ye may matche the re­de knyghte ye shalle be called the fourth of the world / sir said Beaumayns I wold fayne be of good fame / and of knyghthode / And I lete you wete I cam of good men / for I dare say my fader was a noble man / and soo that ye wil kepe hit in close [...] and this damoysel / I wyl telle you of what kyn I am we wille not discouer you said they both tyl ye commaunde vs by the feythe we owe vnto god / ¶Truly thenne saide he / my name is Gareth of Orkeney and kynge Lot was my fader / & my moder is kynge Arthurs syster / her name is Dame Mor­gawse / and sir Gawayne is my broder / and sir Agrauayne & sir Gaheryes / and I am the yongest of hem alle / And yet wote not kyng Arthur nor sir Gawayn what I am

¶Capitulum xiiij

SOo the book saith / that the lady that was biseged had word of her systers comynge by the dwerf and a kn­yghte with her / and how he had passed al the perillous passa­ges / what manere a man is he said the lady / he is a noble kn­yght truly madame said the dwerf and but a yong man / but he is as lykely a man as euer ye sawe ony / what is he sayd the damoysel / and of what kynne is he comen / and of whome was he made knyghte / Madame said the dwerf he is the kyn­ges sone of Orkeney / but his name I wille not telle you as at this tyme / but wete ye wel of syre launcelot was he maade knyght / for of none other wolde he be maade knyghte / and sire kay named hym Beaumayns / how escaped he said the lady from the bretheren of Persaunt / ¶Madame he said as a noble knyghte shold / Fyrste he slewe two bretheren att a passage of a water / A saide she they were good knyghtes but they were murtherers / the one hyght Gherard de breusse / & the other kn­yght hyght sir Arnolde le Brewse / thenne madame he recoun­tred with the black knyght / and slewe hym in playne batail & so he toke his hors & his armour & fouȝt with the grene kn­yght & wanne hym in playn bataill / & in lyke wyse he serued the reed knyȝt / and aftir in the same wyse he serued the blewe knyȝt & wan hym in playn batail / thēne said the lady he hath ouercome sir Persaūt of Inde / one of the noblest knyȝtes of the world / & ye dwerf said he hath wōne al the iiij bretherē & slayn [Page] the blak knyght / and yet he dyd more tofore he ouerthrewe sir kay and lefte hym nyghe dede vpon the ground / Also he dyd a grete batayll with syre launcelot / and there they departed on euen handes / And thenne syre launcelot made hym knyghte / Dwerf sayd the lady I am gladde of these tydynges / therfor go thou in an hermytage of myn here by / and there shalt thow bere with the of my wyn in two flagans of siluer / they ar of two galons / and also two cast of brede with fatte veneson bake and deynte foules / and a cop of gold here I delyuer the / that is ryche and precyous and bere all this to myn hermytage / and put it in the hermytes handes / And sythen go thow vnto my syster and grete her wel / and commaūde me vnto that gentyl knyghte / and praye hym to ete and to drynke and make hym stronge / and say ye hym I thanke hym of his curto­sye and goodenes that he wold take vpon hym suche labour for me that neuer dyd hym bounte nor curtosye / ¶Also pray hym that he be of good herte & courage / for he shalle mete with a ful noble knyghte / but he is neyther of bounte / curtosye / nor gentylnes / for he attendyth vnto nothynge but to murther / & that is the cause I can not prayse hym nor loue hym / So this dwerf departed / and came to syre Persant where he fond the damoysel lynet and syr Beaumayns / and there he tolde hem alle as ye haue herd / and thenne they took theyr leue / but syr Persant took an ambelyng hacney and conueyed hem on the­yr wayes / And thenne belefte hem to god / and soo within a lytil whyle they came to that heremytage / and there they dra­nke the wyne / and ete the veneson and the foules baken / And so whan they had repasted hem wel / the dwerf retorned ageyn with his vessel vn to the castel ageyne / and there mette with hym the reed knyght of the reed laundes / and asked hym from whens that he came / and where he had ben / Syr sa­yd the dwerf I haue ben with my ladyes syster of this castel and she hath ben at kynge Arthurs courte / and broughte a knyghte with her / thenne I accompte her trauaille but loste / For though she had broughte with her syre launcelot / sir Trystram / syr Lamerak or syr gawayne / I wold thynke my selfe good ynough for them all / it may well be said the dwerf / but this knyghte hath passed alle the peryllous passages & slayn [Page] the klack knyghte and other two mo / and wonne the grene knyght / the reed knyghte and the bl [...]we knyghte / thenne is he one of these four that I haue afore reherced / He is none of tho said the dwerf / but he is a kynges sone / what is his name sayd the reed knyght of the reed laund / that wille I not telle you feyd the dwerf / but sire kay vpon scorne named hym Beaumayns / I care not said the knyght What knyghte soo euer he be / for I shal soone delyuer hym / And yf I euer matche hym he shalle haue a shameful dethe as many other haue had that were pyte sayd the dwerf / And it is merueill that ye make suche shameful warre vpon noble knyghtes

¶Capitulum xv

NO [...] leue we the knyghte and the dwerf / and speke we of Beaumayns that al nyȝt lay in the hermytage / & vpon the morne he and the damoysel lynet herd theire masse / and brake their fast / And thenne they toke theyr horses / and rode thorou oute a fair forest / and thenne they came to a play­ne and sawe where were many pauelions and tentys / and a fayr castel / and there was moche smoke and grete noyse / and whanne they came nere the sege / syr Beaumayns aspyed vpon grete trees as he rode / how there henge ful goodly armed knyghtes by the neck and theire sheldes aboute theire neckys with their swerdes / and gylt spores vpon their heles / and soo there henge nyghe a fourty knyghtes shamefully with ful ry­che armes / Thenne sir Beaumayns abated his countenaunce & sayd what meneth this / Fayre syre said the damoysel abate not your chere for all this syghte / for ye must courage your self or els ye ben al shente / for all these knyghtes came hyder to this sege to rescowe my syster Dame lyones / and whanne the reede knyghte of the reed laund hadde ouercome hem / he putte them to this shameful dethe withoute mercy and pyte / And in the same wyse he wyll serue you / but yf ye quyte you the better Now Ihesu deffende me said Beaumayns from suche a vylaynous dethe and shenship of armes / For rather than I sholde so be faren with all / I wolde rather be slayn manly in playn [Page] bataille / Soo were ye better said the damoysel / for trust not in hym is no curtosye but alle goth to the deth or shameful mur­ther / and that is pyte / for he is a ful lykely / man / wel made of body / and a ful noble knyghte of prowesse and a lorde of grete laundes and possessions / Truly said Beaumayns / he may wel be a good knyghte / but he vseth shameful customs and it is merueylle that he endureth so longe that none of the noble knyghtes of my lord Arthurs haue not delt with hym And thenne they rode to the dykes and sawe them double dy­ked with ful warly wallis / and there were lodged many grete lordes nyghe the wallys / and there was grete noyse of mynstralsy / and the see betyd vpon the one syde of the walles where were many shippes and maryners noyse with hale & how And also there was fast by a Sykamore tree / and ther henge an horne the grettest that euer they sawe of an Olyfantes bo­ne / and this knyght of the reed laund had hanged it vp ther that yf ther came ony arraunt knyghte / he muste blowe that horne / and thenne wylle he make hym redy & come to hym to doo bataille / But syr I pray you said the damoysel Lynet blowe ye not the horne tyl it be hyghe none / for now it is aboute pryme / & now encreaced his myghte / that as men say he hath seuen mens strengthe / A fy for shame fair damoisel say ye ne­uer soo more to me / For and he were as good a knyghte as euer was I shalle neuer fayle hym in his moost myghte / for outher I wille wynne worship worshipfully or dye knyghtely in the felde / and ther with he spored his hors streyghte to the Sykamore tree / and blewe soo the horne egerly that alle the sege and the castel range therof / And thenne there lepte oute knyghtes oute of their tentys and pauelions / and they within the castel loked ouer the wallis and oute att wyndo­wes / Thenne the reed knyghte of the reed laūdes armed hym hastely / and two barons sette on his spores vpon his heles / and alle was blood reed his armour spere and shelde / And an Erle bucled his helme vpon his hede / and thenne they bro­ughte hym a rede [...]pere and a rede stede / and soo he rode in to a lytyl vale vnder the castel / that al that were in the castel and at the sege myghte behold the bataill

¶Capitulum xvj

SYre sayd the damoysel Lynet vnto syr Beaumayns loke ye be gladde and lyght / for yonder is your dedely enemy / and at yonder wyndowe is my lady my syster dame Lyones / where sayd Beaumayns / yonder said the damoysel & poynted with her fynger / that is trouthe sayd Beaumayns / She besemeth a ferre the fayrest lady that euer I loked vpon and truly he said I aske no better quarel than now for to do bataylle / for truly she shalle be my lady / and for her I wylle fyghte / And euer he loked vp to the wyndowe with gladde countenaunce / And the lady Lyones made curtosy to hym do­une do the erthe with holdynge vp bothe their handes / Wyth that the reed knyghte of the reed laundes callid to syr Be­aumayns / leue syr knyghte thy lokynge / and behold me I coū ceille the / for I warne the wel she is my lady / and for her I haue done many stronge batails / Yf thou haue so done said Beaumayns / me semeth it was but waste labour / for she loueth none of thy felauship / and thou to loue that loueth not the / is but grete foly / For and I vnderstode that she were not glad of my comynge / I wold be auysed or I dyd bataille for her / But I vnderstande by the syegyng of this castel she may for­bere thy felauship / And therfor wete thou wel thou rede kny­ghte of the reed laundes / I loue her / and wille rescowe her or els to dye / Saist thou that said the reed knyghte / me semeth / thou oughte of reson to beware by yonder knyghtes that thow sawest hange vpon yonder trees / Fy for shame said Beauma­yns that euer thou sholdest saye or do so euyl / for in that thou shamest thy self and knyghthode / and thou mayst be sure ther wylle no lady loue the that knoweth thy wycked custommes And now thou wenest that the syghte of these hanged knyghtes shold fere me / Nay truly not so / that shameful syght cau­seth me to haue courage and hardynes ageynste the more than I wold haue had ageynst the / and thou were a wel ruled knyght / make the redy said the reed knyghte of the reed laū ­des / and talke no lenger with me / Thenne syre Beaumayns badde the damoysel goo from hym / and thenne they putte their speres in their reystes and came to gyders with alle their myȝt [Page] that they had bothe / and eyther smote other in myddes of their sheldes that the paytrellys / sursenglys / and crowpers b [...]aste / and felle to the erthe bothe / and the reynys of their brydels in their handes / and soo they laye a grete whyle sore stonyed that al that were in the castel and in the sege wende their neckes had ben broken / and thenne many a straunger and other sayd the straunge knyȝt was a bygge man / and a noble Iuster / for or now we sawe neuer noo knyghte matche the reed knyghte of the reed laundes / thus they sayd bothe within the castel and withoute / thenne lyghtly they auoyded theyr hor­ses and put their sheldes afore them / and drewe their swerdes and ranne to gyders lyke two fyers lyons / and eyther gafe other suche buffets vpon their helmes that they relyd bacward bothe two strydys / and thenne they recouerd bothe and hewe grete pyeces of theire harneis and theire sheldes / that a grete parte felle in to the feldes

¶Capitulum xvij

ANd thenne thus they foughte tyl it was past none / and neuer wold stynte tyl att the laste they lacked wynde bothe / and thēne they stode wagyng and scateryng pontyng / blowynge and bledynge that al that behelde them for the moost party wepte for pyte / Soo whan they had restyd them a whyle / they yede to bataille ageyne / tracyng racyng foynyng as two bores / And at some tyme they toke their renne as hit had ben two rammys & hurtled to gyders that somtyme they felle grouelyng to the erthe / And at somtyme they were so a­mased that eyther took others swerd in stede of his owne / Thus they endured tyl euensong tyme / that there was none that beheld them myghte knowe whether was lyke to wynne the bataill / and their armour was so fer hewen that men myȝt see their naked sydes / and in other places / they were naked / but euer the naked places they dyd defende / and the rede kn­yghte was a wyly knyght of werre / and his wyly fyghtyng taughte syr Beaumayns to be wyse / but he aboughte hit fulle sore or he dyd aspye his fyghtynge / And thus by assente of them bothe they graunted eyther other to rest / and so they sette [Page] hem doune vpon two molle hylles there besydes the fyghtynge place / and eyther of hem vnlaced his helme / and toke the cold wynde / for either of their pages was fast by them to come wh [...] they called to vnlace their harneis and to sette hem on ageyn at their commaundement / And thenne whan syr Beaumayns helme was of / he loked vp to the wyndowe / and there he sawe the faire lady Dame Lyones / and she made hym suche counte­naunce that his herte waxed lyghte and Ioly / and ther with he bad the reed knyghte of the reed laundes make hym redy and lete vs doo the bataille to the vtteraunce / I will wel sa­id the / knyghte / and thenne they laced vp their helmes / and their pages auoyded / & they stepte to gyders & foughte fresshely / but the reed knyghte of the reed laundes awayted hym / & at an ouerthwart smote hym within the hand / that his sw­erd felle oute of his hand / and yet he gaf hym another buf­fet vpon the helme that he felle grouelynge to the erthe / & the reed knyghte felle ouer hym / for to holde hym doune / Thenne cryed the maiden Lynet on hyghe / O syr Beaumayns where is thy courage become / Allas my lady my syster beholdeth the and she sobbeth and wepeth / that maketh myn her te heuy / when syr Beaumayns herd her saye soo / he abrayed vp with a gre­te myght and gate hym vpon his feet / and lyghtely he lepte to his swerd and gryped hit in his hand and doubled hys paas vnto the reed knyghte and there they foughte a newe bataille to gyder / But sir Beaumayns thenne doubled his stro­kes / and smote soo thyck that he smote the swerd oute of his hand / and thenne he smote hym vpon the helme that he felle to the erthe / and sir Beaumayns felle vpon hym / and vnlaced his helme to haue slayne hym / and thenne he yelded hym and asked mercy / and said with a lowde vois O noble knyghte I yelde me to thy mercy / Thenne syr Beaumayns bethoughte hym vpon the knyghtes that he had made to be hanged shame fully / and thenne he said I may not with my worship saue thy lyf / for the shameful dethes that thou hast caused many ful good knyghtes to dye / Syre saide the reed knyghte of the reed laundes hold your hand and ye shalle knowe the causes why I put hem to so shameful a dethe / saye on said sir Beaumayns / Syre I loued ones a lady a faire damoisel / and she [Page] had her broder slayne / and she said hit was syr launcelot du lake / or els syr gawayn / and she praide me as that I loued her hertely that I wold make her a promyse by the feith of my knyghthode for to laboure dayly in armes vnto I mette wyth one of them / and alle that I myghte ouercome I shold putte them vnto a vylaynous dethe / and this is the cause that I ha­ue putte alle these knyghtes to dethe / and soo I ensured her to do alle the vylony vnto kynge Arthurs knyghtes / and that I shold toke vengeaūce vpon alle these knyghtes and syr now I wille the telle that euery daye my strengthe encreaceth tylle none / and al this tyme haue I seuen mens strengthe

¶Capitulum xviij

THenne came ther many Erles and Barons and no­ble knyghtes and praid that knyghte to saue his lyf and take hym to your prysoner / And all they felle vpon the­ir knees and prayd hym of mercy / and that he wolde saue his lyf / and syr they all sayd it were fairer of hym to take homage and feaute / and lete hym holde his landes of you than for to slee hym / by his deth ye shal haue none auauntage and his mysdedes that ben done maye not ben vndone / And ther­for he shal make amendys to al partyes & we al wil become your men and doo you homage and feaute / Fayre lordes said Beaumayns / wete you wel I am ful lothe to slee this knyȝt neuertheles he hath done passyng ylle and shamefully / But in soo moche al that he dyd was at a ladyes request I blame hym the lesse / and so for your sake I wil releace hym that he shal haue his lyf vpon this couenaunt / that he goo within the castel / and yelde hym there to the lady / And yf she wil forgy­ue and quyte hym / I wil wel / with this he make her amen­dys of al the trespas he hath done ageynst her and her landes / ¶And also whanne that is done that ye goo vnto the courte of kyng Arthur / and there that ye aske syr Launcelot mercy / & syr Gawayn for the euyl wil ye haue had ageynst them / sire said the reed knyght of the reed laundes / al this wil I do as ye commaunde / and syker assuraunce and borowes ye shal haue / And soo thenne whan the assuraunce was made / he made [Page] his homage and feaute / and alle tho erles and barons wyth hym / And thenne the mayden Lynet came to syre Beauma­yns / and vnarmed hym and serched his woundes / and styn­ted his blood / and in lyke wyse she dyd to the rede knyghte of the reed laundes / and there they soiourned ten dayes in their tentes / and the reed knyghte made his lordes and serua­untes to doo alle the pleasyre that they myghte vnto syre Beaumayns / And soo within a whyle the reed knyghte of the reed laundes yede vnto the castel / and putte hym in her grace And soo she receyued hym vpon suffysaunt seurte / so alle her hurtes were wel restored of al that she coude complayne / and thenne he departed vnto the Courte of kynge Arthur / and there openly the reed knyghte of the reed laundes putte hym in the mercy of syre Launcelot and syr Gawayne / and there he told openly how he was ouercome and by whome / and also he told alle the batails from the begynnynge vnto the en­dynge / Ihesu mercy sayd kynge Arthur and sire Gawayne we merueylle moche of what blood he is come / for he is a no­ble knyghte / Haue ye no merueille saide sire Launcelot / for ye shal ryght wel wete that he is comen of a ful noble blood / and as for his myghte and hardynes ther ben but fewe now lyuynge that is so myghty as he is / and so noble of prowesse It semeth by yow said kynge Arthur that ye knowe his name / and fro whens he is come / and of what blood he is / I suppose I doo so said Launcelot / or els I wold not haue yeuen hym thordre of knyȝthode / but he gaf me suche charge at that tyme that I shold neuer discouer hym vntyl he requyred me or els it be knowen openly by some other

¶Capitulum xix

NOw torne we vnto syr Beaumayns that desyred of Lynet that he myght see her syster his lady / Syre she said I wold fayne ye sawe her / Thenne syr Beaumayns alarmed hym and toke his hors and his spere and rode streyȝt vnto the castel / And whanne he cam to the gate he fond there many men armed and pulled vp the drawe brydge / & drewe [Page] the porte cloose / ¶Thenne merueilled he why they wold not suffre hym to entre / And thenne he loked vp to the wyndow And there he sawe the fair Lyones that said on hyghe go thy way / syr Beaumayns / for as yet thou shalt not haue holy my loue vnto the tyme that thou be callyd one of the nombre of the worthy knyghtes / And therfor goo laboure in worship this twelue monethe / and thenne thou shalt here newe tydynges / Allas faire lady said Beaumayns I haue not deserued that ye shold shewe me this straungenes / and I had wend that I shold haue ryght good chere with you and vnto my power I haue deserued thanke / and wel I am sure I haue boughte your loue with parte of the best blood within my body Fayre curteis knyghte said Dame Lyones / be not displeasyd nor ouer hasty / for wete you wel / your grete trauaill nor go­od loue shal not be lost / for I consydre your grete trauail & labour / your bounte and your goodenes as me oughte to doo / And therfore goo on your wey / and loke that ye be of good comforte for all shal be for your worship / and for the best / & perde a twelue moneth wille soone be done / and trust me fair knyghte I shal be true to you and neuer te bitraye you / but to my dethe I shalle loue you / and none other / And ther with alle she torned her from the wyndowe / and syr Beaumayns rode awey ward from the castel makyng grete dole / and soo he rode here and there & wyste not ne where he rode tyl hit was derke nyghte / And thenne it happend hym to come to a poure mans hous and there he was herborowed all that nyghte / But syr Braumayns hadde no rest but walowed and wry­thed for the loue of the lady of the castel / And soo vpon the morowe he took his hors and rode vn tyl vnderne / and thēne he came to a brode water / and there by was a grete lodge / and there he alyghte to slepe and leid his hede vpon the shelde / and bitoke his hors to the dwarf / and commaunded hym to watche al nyghte / Now torne we to the lady of the same castel / that thoughte moche vpon Beaumayns / and thenne she called vnto her syr Gryngamore her broder / and praid hym in al maner as he loued her hertely that he wold ryde after syr Beaumayns / and euer haue ye wayte vpon hym tyl ye may fynde hym slepynge / for I am sure in his heuynes he wil alyȝt doun [Page] in some place / and leye hym doune to slepe / And therfor ha­ue ye your wayte vpon hym / and in the preuyest manere ye can take his dwerf / and go ye your waye with hym as faste as euer ye maye or syr Beaumayns awake / For my syster Lynet telleth me that he can telle of what kynreed he is come / and what is his ryghte name / And the meane whyle I and my syster wille ryde vnto youre castel to awayte whanne ye brynge with you the dwerf / And thenne whan ye haue bro­ughte hym vnto youre Castel / I wylle haue hym in examy­nacion my self / vnto the tyme that I knowe what is his ry­ghte name / and of what kynred he is come / shalle I neuer be mery at my herte ¶Syster said syre Grynga­more alle thys shalle be done after your entente / And soo he rode alle the other daye and the nyghte tylle that he fond syre Beaumayns lyenge by a water and his hede vpon his shelde for to slepe / ¶ And thenne whanne he sawe syre Beau­mayns fast on slepe / he cam stylly stalkyng behynde the dwerf and plucked hym fast vnder his arme / and soo he rode aweye with hym as faste as euer he myght vnto his owne castel And this syre Gryngamors armes were alle black and that to hym longeth / But euer as he rode with the dwerf toward his castel / he cryed vnto his lord / and prayd hym of helpe / And there with awoke syre Beaumayns / and vp he lepte lyghtly / & sawe where the Gryngamor rode his waye with the dwerf / and soo syr Gryngamor rode oute of his syghte /

¶Capitulum xx

THenne syre Beaumayns putte on his helme anone / and buckeled his shelde / and tooke his hors / and ro­de after hym alle that euer he myghte ryde thorou ma­rys and feldes and grete dales / that many tymes his hors and he plonged ouer the hede in depe myres / for he knewe not the wey / but took the gaynest waye in that woodenes that many tymes he was lyke to perysshe / And at the laste hym happend to come to a fayre grene waye And there he mette with a poure man of the countreye whom he salewed & asked hym / [Page] whether he mette not with a knyghte vpon a black hors & all black harneis a lytel dwerf syttynge behynde hym with heuy chere / Syre saide this poure man here by me came syre Gryn­gamor the knyght with suche a dwerf mornyng as ye saye / & therfore I rede you not folowe hym / For he is one of the pe­rylloust knyghtes of the world / and his castel is here nyhe hand but two myle / therfor we aduyse you ryde not after syr Gryngamor but yf ye owe hym good wille / Soo leue we syre Beaumayns rydynge toward the castel and speke we of sir Gryngamor and the dwerf / Anone as the dwerf was come to the castel / dame Lyones and dame Lynet her syster asked the dwerf where was his maister borne / and of what lygnage he was come / And but yf thou telle me said dame Lyones thou shalt neuer escape this castel / but euer here to be prysoner As for that said the dwerf I fere not gretely to telle his name and of what kynne he is come / wete ye wel he is a kyn­ges sone / and his moder is syster to kyng Arthur / and he is broder to the good knyghte of syre Gawayne / and his name is syre Gareth of Orkeney / and now I haue told you his ry­ght name / I praye you fayre lady lete me goo to my lord a­geyne / for he wille neuer oute of this countrey vn [...]yl that he haue me ageyne / And yf he be angry / he wil doo moche harme or that he be stynte / and worche you wrake in this countray As for that thretyng sayd syr Gryngamore be it as it be may we wille goo to dyner / and soo they wasshed and wente to mete / and made hem mery and wel at ease / by cause the lady Lyones of the castel was there / they made grete Ioye

¶Truly Madame sayd Lynet vnto her syster wel maye he be a kynges sone / for he hath many good tatches on hym / for he is curteis and mylde and the moost sufferynge man that euer I mette with al / For I dar saye ther was neuer gentylwo­man reulyd man in soo foule a manere / as I haue rebuked hym / And at all tymes he gafe me goodely and meke ansuers ageyne ¶And as they sate thus talky­nge / ther came sire Gareth in at the gate with an angry countenaunce and his swerd drawen in his hand / and cryed aloude that alle the castel myȝt here hit sayeng thou traitour syre [Page] Gryngamor delyuer me my dwerf ageyn / or by the feith that I owe to the ordre of knygthode I shal doo the al the harme that I can / Thenne syr Gryngamor loked oute at a wyndow and said syr gareth of Orkeney leue thy bostyng wordes / for thou getest not thy dwerf ageyne / Thou coward knyghte sayd syr Gareth brynge hym with the / and come and doo bataylle with me / and wynne hym and take hym / So wille I do sa­id syr Gryngamor and me lyst / but for al thy grete wordes thou getest hym not / A fayr broder said dame Lyones I wold he had his dwerf ageyne / for I wold he were not wroth / for now he hath told me al my desyre I kepe nomore of the dwerf And also broder he hath done moche for me / and delyuerd me from the reed knyghte of the reed laundes / and therfor bro­der I owe hym my seruyse afore al knyghtes lyuynge / And wete ye wel that I loue hym before al other / and ful fayne I wold speke with hym / But in no wyse I wold that he wist what I were / but that I were another straunge lady / wel said syr Gryngamor sythen I knowe now your wille / I wylle obeye now vnto hym / And ryght ther with al he wente doun vnto syr Gareth / and said syr I crye you mercy / and al that I haue mysdone I wille amend hit at your wille / And therfore I pray you that ye wold alyghte / and take suche chere as I can make you in this castel / Shal I haue my dwerfe saide syre Gareth / ye syr / and alle the pleasaunce that I can make you / for as soone as your dwerf told me what ye were and of what blood ye ar come / and what noble dedes ye haue done in these marches / thenne I repentyd of my dedes / And thenne syre Gareth alyghte / and ther came his dwerf & took his hors / O my felawe said syr gareth / I haue had ma­ny aduentures for thy sake / And soo syre Gryngamor tooke hym by the hand / and ledde hym in to the halle where his own wyf was

¶Capitulum xxij

[Page] ANd thenne came forth Dame Lyones arayed lyke a pryncesse / and there she made hym passyng good chere and he her ageyne / and they had goodely langage & louely countenaunce to gyder / And syre Gareth thought ma­ny tymes Ihesu wold that the lady of the castel perillous were so fayre as she was / there were al maner of games & pla­yes of dauncyng and syngynge / And euer the more syre Gareth bihelde that lady / the more he loued her / and so he brenned in loue that he was past hym self in his reason / and forth to­ward nyghte they yede vnto souper / and syre Gareth myghte not ete for his loue was soo hote, that he wist not where he was Alle these lokes aspyed syr Gryngamor / and thenne at after souper he callid his syster Dame Lyones vnto a chamber / and sayd / fair syster I haue wel aspyed your coūtenaūce betwixe you and this knyght / And I wil syster that ye wete he is a ful noble knyȝt / & yf ye can make hym to abyde here I wil do hym all the pleasyr yt I can / for & ye were better than ye ar ye were wel bywaryd vpon hym / Fayr breder said Dame lyones I vnderstande wel that the knyghte is good & come he is of a noble hous / Notwithstandyng I wille assaye hym better how be it I am moost beholdyng to hym of ony erthely mā for he hath had grete labour for my loue / and passid many a daungerous passage / Ryght soo syr Gryngamor wente vnto syr Gareth and said syre make ye good chere / for ye shal haue none other cause / for this lady my syster is yours at al tymes her worship saued / for wete ye wel she loueth you as wel as ye doo her and better / yf better may be / And I wist that sa­id syr Gareth / ther lyued not a gladder man than I wold be Vpon my worship said syr Gryngamor trust vnto my promyse And as long as it lyketh you ye shal soiourne with me and this lady shal be with vs dayly and nyghtly to make yow alle the chere that she can / I wille wel said syre Gareth / For I haue promysed to be nyghe this countrey this twelue mo­neth / And wel I am sure kynge Arthur and other noble knyghtes wille fynde me where that I am within this twelfe moneth / For I shal be soughte and founden yf that I be on lyue ¶ And thenne the noble knyghte syre Gareth wente vnto the dame Lyones whiche he thēne moche loued / & kyst her [Page] many tymes / and eyther made grete Ioye of other / And there she promysed hym her loue certaynly to loue hym and none o­ther the dayes of hyr lyf / Thenne this lady dame Lyones by the assente of her broder told syr Gareth alle the trouth what she was / And how she was the same lady that he dyd batail for / and how she was lady of the castel peryllous / and [...]here she told hym how she caused her broder to take awey his dwerf

¶Capitulum xxij

FOr this cause to knowe the certaynte what was your name / and of what kynne ye were come / And thenne she lete fetche tofore hym Lynet the damoysel that had ryden with hym many wylsome wayes / Thenne was syre Ga­reth more gladder than he was to fore / And thēne they trouth plyte eche other to loue / and neuer to faylle whyles their ly­fe lasteth / And soo they brente bothe in loue that they were accorded to abate their lustes secretely / And there Dame Lyones counceylled syr Gareth to slepe in none other place but in the halle / And there she promysed hym to come to his bedde a ly­tel afore mydnyght / This councell was not soo pryuely kepte but it was vnderstande / for they were but yonge bothe and tendyr of age / and had not vsed none suche craftes to forne / Wherfor the damoysel Lynet was a lytel displeasyd / and she thoughte her syster Dame Lyones was a lytel ouer hasty / that she myghte not abyde the tyme of her maryage / And for sauyng their worship / she thoughte to abate their hote lustes / ¶ And so she lete ordeyne by her subtyl craftes that they had not their ententes neyther with other as in her delytes / vntyl they were maryed / And soo it past on / At after souper was made clene auoydaunce / that euery lord and lady shold / goo vnto his rest / But syr Gareth said playnly he wold goo noo ferther than the halle / for in suche places he said was conuenyent for an arraunt knyȝt to take his rest in / and so there were or­deyned grete couches / & theron fether [...] beddes / & there leyde hym doune to slepe / & within a whyle cam dame Lyones wrapped in a mantel furred with Ermyne & leid her doun besydes syr gareth / And there with alle he beganne to kysse her / And thenne he loked afore hym and there he apperceyued and sawe co­me an armed knyght with many lyghtes aboute hym / and [Page] sawe come an armed knyȝt with many lyghtes about hym / & this knyghte had a longe Gysarme in his hand / and maade grym countenaunce to smyte hym / Whanne syre Gareth sawe hym come in that wyse / he lepte oute of his bedde and gate in his hand his swerd and lepte strayte toward that knyght / And whanne the knyght sawe syr Gareth come so fyersly vpon hym / he smote hym with a foyne theron the thycke of the thyȝ that the wound was a shaftmon brode and had cutte a two many vaynes and senewes / And there with al syr Ga­reth smote hym vpon the helme suche a buffet that he felle gro­uelyng / and thenne he lepte ouer hym and vnlaced his hel­me and smote of his hede fro the body / And thenne he bledde so fast that he myghte not stande / but soo he leid hym doun vpon his bedde / and there he swouned and laye as he had ben dede Thenne dame Lyones cryed alowde / that her broder syr Gryn­gamor herd / and came doune / And whan he sawe syr [...] Gareth soo shamefully wounded / he was sore displeasyd and sayd I am shamed that this noble knyghte is thus honoured / Syr sayd syr Gryngamore hou may this be / that ye be here / and thys noble knyghte wounded / Broder she said I can not telle yow For it was not done by me nor by myn assente / For he is my lord and I am his / and he must be myn husband / therfore my broder I wille that ye wete I shame me not to be with hym / nor to doo hym alle the pleasyr that I can / Syster said syre Gryngamore / and I will that ye wete it and syr Gareth both that it was neuer done by me nor by my assente that this vn­happy dede was done / And there they staunched his bledynge as wel as they myght / and grete sorou made sir Gryngamor and Dame Lyones / And forthe with al came Dame Lynet and toke vp the hede in the syghte of hem alle / and enoynted it with an oynement there as it was smyten of / and in the same wyse she dyd to the other parte there as the hede stak / And thenne she sette it to gyders / and it stak as fast as euer it did And the knyghte arose lyghtely vp / and the damoysel Lynet put hym in her chambre / Alle this sawe sir Gryngamor and dame Lyones / and soo dyd sir Gareth / and wel he espyed that it was the damoysel Lynet that rode with hym thorou the pe­ryllous passages / A wel damoysel said syre Gareth I wende [Page] wold not haue done as ye haue done / My lord Gareth said Lynet / alle that I haue done I will auowe / and alle that I haue done shal be for youre honoure and worship / and to vs alle / And soo within a whyle syr Gareth was nyghe hole / & waxid lyghte and Iocound / and sange / daunced and ga­med / and he and dame Lyones were soo hote in brennynge loue that they made their couenaunte at the tenth nyghte after that she shold come to his bedde / And by cause he was woūded afore / he laid his armour / and his swerd nyghe his beddes syde

¶Capitulum xxiij

RYght as she promysed she came / and she was not soo soone in his bedde / but she aspyed an armed knyghte comyng toward the bedde / there with alle she warned syr Ga­reth / and lyghtly thorou the good helpe of Dame Lyones he was armed / and they hurtled to gyders with grete Ire & ma­lyce al aboute the halle / and there was grete lyght as it had ben the nombre of xx torches bothe before and behynd / soo that syr Gareth strayned hym / soo that his old wounde braste a­geyne on bledyng / but he was hote and couragyous and to­ke no kepe / but with his grete force he stroke doune that kny­ghte / and voyded his helme / and strake of his hede / Thenne he hewe the hede in an honderd pyeces / And whan he had done so he took vp alle tho pyeces and threwe hem oute at a wyndow in to the dyches of the castel / and by this done / he was so faynt that vnnethes he myght stande for bledyng / And by thenne he was al most vnarmed / he felle in a dedely swoune in the [...]lo­re / And thenne dame Lyones cryed soo that syr Gryngamor herd / And whan he cam and fond syr Gareth in that plyte he made grete sorou / & there he awaked sir Gareth / and gaf hym a drynke that releued hym wonderly wel / but the sorou that Dame Lyones made there maye no tonge telle / for she soo fa­ryd with her self as she wold haue dyed / ¶Ryghte soo cam this damoysel Lynet before hem al / and she had fette alle the gobbets of the hede that syr Gareth had throwen out at a wyndowe / and there she enoynted hem as she had done to fore / & set them to gyder ageyn / wel damoisel Lynet said syre Gareth / [Page] I haue not deserued alle this despyte that ye doo vnto me / sir knyghte she said / I haue no thynge do / but I will auowe / And al that I haue done shalle be to your worship and to vs al / And thenne was syre Gareth staūched of his bledyng But the le [...]s said / that ther was no man that bare the lyf / sholde bele hym thorou oute of his wounde / but yf they he [...]ed hym that caused that stroke by enchauntement / So leue we syr Gareth there with syr Gryngamore and his systers / and tor­ne we vnto kynge Arthur that at the nexte feest of Pentecost helde his feest / and there cam the grene knyȝt with fyfty kny­ghtes / and yelded hem all vnto kynge Arthur / And so there came the reed knyghte his broder / and yelded hym to kyng Arthur and thre s [...]ore knyghtes with hym / Also there came the blewe knyghte to broder to them with an honderd knyghtes / & yelded hem vnto kynge Arthur / and the grene knyghtes na­me was Partolype / and the reed knyghtes name was Pe­rymones / and the blewe knyghtes name was syr Persant of Inde / these thre bretheren told kynge Arthur how they were ouercome by a knyghte that a damoysel had with her / and called hym Beaumayns / Ihesu sayd the kyng I mer­ueylle what knyghte he is / and of what lygnage he is come / He was with me a twelue monethe / and pourely and sha­mefully he was [...]ostred / and syre kay in scorne named hym Beaumayns / Soo ryghte as the kyng stode soo talkyng with these thre bretheren / there come syr Launcelot du lake and told the kynge that there was come a goodly lord with vj C kn­ghtes with hym / thenne the kynge wente oute of Carlyon / for there was the feest / and there came to hym this lord / and [...]alewed the kynge in a goodly manere / What wylle ye sayd kyng Arthur / and what is youre erand / Syr he said my name is the reed knyghte of the reed laundes / but my name is syr Ironsyde / and syre wete ye wel / here I am sente to yow / of a knyght that is called Beaumayns / for he wanne me in playne bataille hande for hand / and soo dyd neuer no kny­ght but he that euer had the better of me this xxx wynter / the whiche commaunded to yelde me to yow at youre wylle / ye are welcom said the kyng / for ye haue ben long a grete foo to me and my Courte / and now I truste to god I shalle [Page] soo entreate you that ye shal be my frend / Syre / bothe I and these fyue honderd knyghtes shal alweyes be at your somons to doo you seruyse as maye lye in oure powers / Ihesu mercy said kyng Arthur I am moche beholdynge vnto that knyght / that hath put soo his body in deuoyre to worshippe me & my Courte / And as to the Ironsyde that art called the reed kn­yghte of the reed laundes thou arte called a peryllous knyȝt And yf thou wylt holde of me I shal worshippe the [...] make the knyghte of the table round / but thenne thou must be no more a murtherer / Syre as to that I haue promysed vnto syre Beaumayns neuer more to vse suche custommes / for all the shameful customes that I vsed I dyd at the request of a lady that I loued / and therfor I must goo vnto syr Laun­celot and vnto syre Gawayne / and aske them foryeuenes of the euyll wylle I had vnto them / for alle that I put to deth was al only for the loue of syr Launcelot and of syr Gawa­yne / They ben here now said the kynge afore the / now maye ye saye to them what ye wylle / And thenne he kneled doune vnto syre Launcelot and to syre Gawayne and prayd them of foryeuenes of his enemytee that euer he had ageynste them /

¶Capitulum xxiiij

THenne goodely they said al at ones / god foryeue you and we do / and praye you that ye will telle vs where we may fynde syr Beaumayns / Fayre lordes said syr Iron­syde I can not telle you / for it is ful [...]ard to fynde hym / for suche yong knyghtes as he is one / whanne they be in their aduentures ben neuer abydynge in no place / ¶But to saye the worship that the reed knyghte of the reed laundes and syr persaunt and his broder said of Beaumayns / it was merueil to here / Wel my fayre lordes said kynge Arthur / wete yow wel / I shalle do you honour for the loue of syr Beaumayns / and as soone as euer I mete with hym I shalle make you al vpon one day knyghtes of the table round / And as to the syre Persaunt [...]o Inde thou hast ben euer called a ful noble kny­ghte / and soo haue euer ben thy thre bretheren called / But I merueil said the kyng that I here not of the black knyȝt your [Page] broder / he was a ful noble knyghte / Syr sayd Pertolype the grene knyȝt syr Beaumayns slewe hym in a recoūtre with his spere / his name was syr Perard / that was grete pyte sayd the kynge and soo said many knyghtes / For these four bretheren were ful wel knowen in the courte of kynge Arthur for noble knyghtes / for long tyme they had holden werre ageynst the knyghtes of the round table / Thenne sayd Pertolepe the grene knyghte to the kynge atte a passage of the water of mortay [...]e there encountred syr Beaumayns with two bretheren that euer for [...]he moost party kepte that passage / and they were two dedely knyghtes / and there he slewe the eldest broder in the water / and smote hym vpon the heede suche a buffet that he felle doune in the water / and there he was drouned / & his name was sir Garard le brewse / and after he slewe the other broder vpon the lond / his name was syr Arnold le brewse /

¶Capitulum xxvj

SOo thenne the kyng and they wente to mete / and we­re serued in the best manere / And as they satte at the mete / ther came in the quene of Orkeney with ladyes & knyȝtes a grete nombre / And thenne syr Gawayn / syr Agraua­yn and Gaherys arose / and wente to her / and salewed her vpon their knees / and asked her blyssyng / For in xv yere they had not sene her / Thenne she spak on hyghe to her broder kynge Arthur / where haue ye done my yong sone syr Gareth / he was here amongst you a twelue moneth / & ye made a kechyn kna­ue of hym / the whiche is shame to you all / Allas where haue ye done my dere sone that was my Ioye and blysse / O dere moder said syr Gawayn I knewe hym not / Nor I said the ky­nge that now me repenteth / but thanked be god he is preued a worshipful knyghte as ony is now lyuyng of his yeres / & I shal neuer be glad tyl I may fynde hym / A broder sayd the quene vnto kyng Arthur and vnto syr Gawayne and to alle her sones / ye dyd your self grete shame whan ye amongst you kepte my sone in the kechyn and fedde hym lyke a poure hog / Fayr sister said kyng Arthur ye shall ryghte wel wete / I knewe hym not / nor nomore dyd syre Gawayn / nor his [Page] bretheren / but sythen hit is s [...]o said the kyng that he is thus gone from vs alle / we must shape a remedy to fynde hym / Also syster me semeth ye myght haue done me to wete of his comy­nge / And thenne and I had not done wel to hym / ye myȝt haue blamed me / For whan he cam to this courte he came [...]e­nyng vpon two mens sholders as though he myght not haue gone / And thenne he asked me thre yeftes / and one he asked the same day / that was that I wold gyue hym mete ynough that twelue moneth / and the other two yeftes he asked that day a twelue moneth / and that was that he myghte haue thaduenture of the damoysel Lynet / and the thyrd was that syre Launcelot shold make hym knyght whan he desyred hym / And soo I graunted hym alle his desyre / and many in this Courte merueilled that he desyred his sustenaunce for a twelf monethe / And there by we demed / many of vs that he was not come of a noble hous / Syre said the Quene of Orkeney vnto kynge Arthur her broder / wete ye wel that I sente hym vnto you ryghte wel armed and horsed and worshipfully bysene of his body / and gold and syluer plente to spende / it may be said the kynge / but therof [...]awe we none / sauf that sa­me daye as he departed from vs / knyghtes told me that ther came a dwerf hyder sodenly and broughte hym armour and a good hors ful wel and rychely by [...]ene / and there at we al had merueille / fro whens that rychesse came / that we demed al that he was come of men of worship / Broder said the Quene alle that ye saye I byleue / for euer sythen he was growen / he was merueillously wytted / and euer he was feythful & true of his promesse / But I merueille said she that syre kay dyd mocke hym and scorne hym / and gaf hym that name Beau­mayns / yet syr kay said the quene named hym more ryghte­uously than he wende / For I dare saye and he be on lyue / he is as fair an handed man and wel disposed as ony is lyu­ynge / Syre said Arthurle te this langage be stylle / and by the grace of god he shal be founde / and he be within these seuen royames / and lete alle this passe and [...]e mery / for he is proued to be a man of worship / and that is my Ioye

¶Capitulum xxvij

[Page]THenne said syr Gawayne and his bretheren vnto arthur / syre and ye wyl gyue vs leue we wille go and seke oure brother / Nay said syr Launcelot that shalle ye not nede / and so said syr Bawdewyn of Bretayne / for as by oure aduys the kynge shal sende vnto dame Lyones a messager / and praye her that she wille come to the courte in alle the hast that she may / and doubte ye not she wille come / And th [...]ne she may gyue you best coūceille where ye shal fynde hym This is wel said of you said the kyng / Soo thenne goodely letters were made / and the messager sente forth that nyghte & day he wente tyl he [...]am vnto the castel perillous / And thenne the lady dame Lyones was sente fore there as she was wyth syr Gryngamor her broder and syre Gareth / and whan she vnderstode this message / she badde hym ryde on his way vnto ky­nge Arthur / and she wold come after in al goodely hast ¶Thenne whan she came to syr Gryngamor and to sir Ga­reth she told hem al how kyng Arthur had sente for her / that is by cause of me said syr Gareth / Now auyse me said dame Lyones what shalle I saye and in what manere I shal rule me / My lady and my loue said sir Gareth I pray you in no wyse be ye aknowen where I am / but wel I wote my moder is there and alle my bretheren / and they wille take vpon hem to seke me / I wote wel that they doo / But this madame I wold ye sayd and aduysed the kynge whan he questyoned with you of me / Thenne maye ye say / this is your aduys that and hit lyke his good grace / ye wille doo make a crye ayenst the feest of thassumpcion of our lady that what knyghte there preueth hym best he shal welde you and all your land / And yf soo be that he be a wedded man that his wyf shall the degre and a coronal of gold besette with stones of vertue to the valewe of a thousand pound and a whyte Iarfaucon / Soo dame Lyones departed / and came to kynge Arthur whe­re she was nobly receyued / and there she was sore questyoned of the kyng and of the quene of Orkeney / And she ansuerde where syr Gareth was she coude not telle / But thus moche she said vnto Arthur / syre I wille lete crye a turnement that shalle done before my castel at the Assumpcion of oure lady / and the crye shal be this that you my lorde Arthur shalt be there / & [Page] your knyghtes / and I will puruey that my knyghtes shalle be ageynst yours / And thennne I am sure ye shall here of syr Gareth / this is wel aduysed said kynge Arthur / and soo she departed / And the kynge and she maade grete prouysyon to that turnement / whan dame Lyones was come to the yle of Auylyon that was the same yle ther as her broder syr Gryngamor dwelte / thenne she told hem al how she had done / and what promyse she had made to kynge Arthur / Allas said syr Gareth / I haue ben soo wounded with vnhappynes sythen I cam in to this castel that I shal not be abyl to doo at that turnement lyke a knyghte / for I was neuer thorouly hole syn I was hurte / Be ye of good chere said the damoysel Lynet / for I vndertak [...] within these xv dayes to make you hole and as lusty as euer ye were / And thenne she leid an oynement & a salue to hym as it pleasyd to her that he was neuer so fressh nor soo lusty / Thenne said the damoysel Lynet / send you vnto syr Persaunt of ynde / and assomone hym and his knyghtes to be here with you as they haue promysed / Also that ye send vnto syr Ironsyde that is the reed knyghte of the reed laun­des / and charge hym that he be redy with you with his hole somme of knyghtes / and thenne shalle ye be abyl to matche with kynge Arthur and his knyghtes / Soo this was done & alle knyghtes were sente for vnto the castel peryllous / & then­ne the reed knyght ansuerd and said vnto dame Lyones and to syre Gareth / Madame & my lord syr Gareth ye shal vnder­stande that I haue ben at the court of kynge Arthur and sire Persaunt of Inde and his bretheren / and there we haue done oure homage as ye commaunded vs / Also syr Ironsyde sayd I haue taken vpon me with syre Persaunt of Inde and his bretheren to hold party ageynst my lord sir Launcelot and the knyghtes of that courte / And this haue I done for the loue of my lady Dame Lyones and you my lord sir Gareth / ye haue wel done said syr Gareth / But wete you wel ye shal be ful sore matched with the moost noble knyghtes of the world / ther for we must purueye vs of goode knyghtes where we may gete them / That is wel said / said sir Persaunt and worshipfully And soo the crye was made in England / walis and scotland Ireland / Cornewaille / & in alle the oute Iles and in bretayn [Page] and in many countreyes that at the feest of our lady the as­sumpcion next comyng men shold come to the castel peryllous besyde the yle of Auylyon / And there al the knyghtes that ther came shold haue the choyse whether them lyst to be on the one party with the knyghtes of the castel or on the other par­ty with kynge Arthur / And two monethes was to the daye that the turnement shold be / & so ther cam many good knyȝ­tes that were at her large and helde hem for the moost party ageynst kynge Arthur and his knyghtes of the round table / cam in the syde of them of the castel / For syr Epynogrus was the fyrst / and he was the kynges sone of Northumberland / & syr Palamydes the sarasyn was another / and syr Safere his broder / and syre Segwarydes his broder / but they were cryst­ned / and syre Malegryne another / and syr Bryan des les Ilelys a noble knyghte / and syr Grummore gummursum a good knyghte of Scotland / and syr Carados of the dolorous toure a noble knyghte and syr Turquyn his broder / and syr Arnold and syre Gauter two bretheren good knyghtes of Cornewaile / there cam syr Trystram de lyones / and with hym syr Dynadas the seneschal / and sir Saduk / / but this syr Tristram was not at that tyme knyght of the table round / but he was one of the best knyghtes of the world / And soo all these noble knyghtes accompanyed hem with the lady of the castel and with the reed knyghte of the reed laundes / but as for sir Gareth he wold not take vpon hym more but as other meane knyghtes

¶Capitulum xxviij

ANd thenne ther cam with kynge Arthur sir Gawayn Agrauayne / Gaherys his bretheren / And thenne his neuewes syr Vwayn le blaunche maynys / and syr Aglouale syr Tor / sir Percyuale de galys / and syre Lamorrak de galis Thenne came sir Launcelot du lake with his bretheren neuews and cosyns as sir Lyonel / sir Ector de marys / syr bors de ganys and sir Galyhodyn / syre Galihud and many moo of syre Launcelots blood and syre Dynadan / sir la coote male tayle / his broder a good knyghte / and sir Sagramore a good knyȝt [Page] And al the most party of the round table / Also ther cam with kynge Arthur these knyghtes the kynge of Ireland / kynge Agwysaunce / and the kyng of Scotland kyng Carados and kynge Vryens of the londe of gore and kyng Bagdemagus and his sone syr Melyaganus and syr Galahault the noble prynce / Alle these kynges prynces and Erles Barons and other noble knyghtes / as syre Braundyles / syre Vwayne les auowtres / and syre kay / syr Bedeuere / syr Melyot de logrys syr Petypase of wynkelsee / syr Godelake / alle these came with kynge Arthur and moo that can not ben reherced /

¶Now leue we of these kynges and knyghtes / and lete vs speke of the grete araye that was made within the castel and aboute the castel for bothe partyes / the lady Dame Lyones ordeyned grete aray vpon her party for her noble knyghtes for al maner of lodgyng and vytaille that cam by land & by water that ther lacked no thynge for her party nor for the other but there was plente to be had for gold and syluer for ky­nge Arthur and his knyghtes / And thenne ther cam the her­begeours from kynge Arthur for to herberowe hym & his ky­nges / dukes Erles Barons and knyghtes / And thenne syr Gareth prayd dame Lyones and the reed knyghte of the reed laundes / and syr Persant and his broder / and syre Grynga­mor that in no wyse ther shold none of them telle not his name and make no more of hym than of the leest knyghte that there was / for he said I wille not be knowen of neyther more ne lesse / neyther at the begynnynge neyther at the endynge ¶Thenne Dame Lyones said vnto syr Gareth / syre I wylle leue you a rynge / but I wold pray you as ye loue me hertely lete me haue it ageyne whanne the turnement is done / ¶For that rynge encreaceth my beaute moche more than it is of hym self / And the vertu of my rynge is that / that is grene it will torne to reed / and that is reed it wil torne in lykenes to grene / And that is blewe it wil torne to lykenes of whyte / and that is whyte it wil torne in lykenes to blewe / and so it wil doo of al manere of colours / Also who that bereth my rynge / shalle lese no blood / and for grete loue I wil gyue you thys rynge / Gramercy said syr Gareth myn own lady / for this ry­nge is passynge mete for me / for hit wille torne al manere of [Page] lykenes that I am in / and that shalle cause me that I shall not be knowen / Thenne syr Gryngamor gaf syr Gareth a bay courser that was a passyng good hors / Also he gafe hym go­od armoure and sure and a noble swerd that somtyme syre Gryngamors fader wanne vpon an hethen Tyraunt / And soo thus euery knyghte made hym redy to that turnement & kyng Arthur was comen two dayes to fore thassumpcion of our lady / And there was al maner of Royalte of al mynstralsye / that myghte be founde / Also there cam quene Gweneuer and the quene of Orkeney syr Gareths moder / And vpon the as­sumpcion day whanne masse and matyns were done there we­re herowdes with trompettes commaunded to blowe to the feld And soo there came oute syr Epynogrus the kynges sone of Northumberland from the castel / and there encountred with hym syre Sagramor le desyrus / and eyther of hem brake their speres to their handes / And thenne came in syre Palamydes oute of the Castel / and there encountred with hym Gawayne and eyther of hem smote other so hard that bothe the good kn­yghtes and their horses felle to the erthe / And thenne knygh­tes of eyther party rescowed their knyghtes / And thenne cam in syr Safere and syre Segwarydes bretheren to syre Pala­mydes / and there encountred syr Agrauayne with syr Safere and syr Gaherys encountred with syre Segwarydes / So syr Safere smote doune Agrauayne syr Gawayns broder / and sir Segwarydes syr Saferys broder And syr Malgryne a knyȝt of the Castel encountred with syr Vwayne le blaunche may­nys / And there syre Vwayne gaf syr Malgryn a falle / that he had almost broke his neck

¶Capitulum xxix

THenne syr Bryan de les yles and Grummore grummorssum knyghtes of the Castel with syre Ag [...]ouale and syre Tor smote doun syr Gromere Gromorson to the erth Thenne cam in syr Carados of the dolorous toure & syr Tur­quyne knyghtes of the Castel / and there encoūtred with hem syr Percyuale de galys & syr Launcelot de galys / that were two bretheren / And there encountred syr Percyuale with syre [Page] Caradus / and eyther brake their speres vnto their handes / [...] thenne syr Turquyn with syre Lamerak / and eyther of hem smote doune others hors and alle to the erthe / and eyther partyes rescowed other / and horsed them ageyn / And syr Arnold and syr Gautere knyghtes of the castel encountred with syre Braundyles and syr kay / and these four knyghtes encoun­tred myghtely / and brake their speres to their handes / Then­ne came in syr Trystram / syre Saduk / and syre Dynas kny­ghtes of the castel / and there encountred syr Trystram wyth syr Bedyuere / and there syr Bedyuere was smyten to the er­the bothe hors and man / And syr Saduk encountred with sir Petypase / and there syr Saduk was ouerthrowen / And there Vwayne les auoutres smote doune syr Dynas the seneschal / Thenne came in syr Persaunt of Inde a knyght of the castel And there encountred with hym syr Launcelot du lake / and there he smote syr Persaunts hors and man to the erthe / then­ne came syr Pertylope from the castel / and there encountred with hym syr Lyonel / and there syr Pertylope the grene kn­yght smote doune syr Lyonel broder to syr Laūcelot / All this was marked by noble heroudes / who bare hym best / and theire names / And thenne came in to the fold syre Perymones the grene knyght syr Persaunts broder that was a knyght of the Castel / and he encountred with syr Ector de marys / and ey­ther smote other so hard / that bothe their horses and they felle to the erthe / And thenne came in the reed knyght of the reed laundes and syr Gareth from the castel / and there encountred with hem syr Bors de ganys and syr Bleoberys / and there the reed knyghte and syr Bors smote other so hard that her speres brast and their horses felle grouelynge to the erthe Thenne syr Blamor brake his spere vpon syr Gareth / but of that stroke syr Blamor felle to the erthe / whan syr Galyhon­dyn sawe that / he had sir gareth kepe hym / & sire gareth smote hym to the erthe / thenne sire Galyhud gate a spere to auenge his broder / & in the same wyse sir gareth serued hym / & sir Dynadan & his broder la cote male tayle / & sir Sagramor desirus & sir Dodynas le saueage / All these he bare doun with one spere / Whan kyng Aguysaūce of Irland sawe syr Gareth fare so he merueiled what he myȝt be y one tyme semed grene & another [Page] tyme at his ageyne comyng he semed blewe / And thus at e­uery cours that he ro [...]e to and fro he chaunged his colour so that ther myghte neyther kynge nor knyghte haue redy cong­uyssaunce of hym / Thenne syr Anguyssaunce the kyng of Ir­land encountred with syr Gareth / and there syr Gareth smo­te hym from his hors sadyl and all / And thenne came kyng Caradus of Scotland and syr Gareth smote hym doun hors and man / And in the same wyse he serued kyng Vryens of the land of Gore / And thenne came in syr Bawdemagus / and syr Gareth smote hym doune hors and man to the erthe And Bawdemagus sone Melyganus brake a spere vpon sir Gareth myghtely and knyghtely / And thenne syr Galahaut the noble prynce cryed on hyghe knyghte with the many colo­urs wel hast thou Iusted / Now make the redy that I maye Iuste with the / Syre Gareth herd hym / and he gat a grete spere / and soo they encountred to gyder / and there the prynce brake his spere / But syr Gareth smote hym vpon the lyfte syde of the helme / that he relyd here and there / and he had falle do­une had not his men recouerd hym / Soo god me help sayd kynge Arthur that fame knyght with the many colours is a good knyghte / wherfor the kynge called vnto hym syr Launcelot and praid hym to encountre with that knyghte / Syr sa­id Launcelot I may wel fynde in my herte for to forbere hym as at this tyme / for he hath hadde trauail ynough this day / & whan a good knyghte doth soo wel vpon somme day / it is no good knyghtes parte to lette hym of his worship / And na­mely whan he seeth a Knyght hath done soo grete labour / for peraduenture said syr Launcelot his quarel is here this day / & perauentur he is best byloued with this lady of al that ben he­re / for I see wel / he payneth hym & enforceth hym to do grete dedes / & therfor said syr launcelot as for me this day he shall haue the honour / though it lay in my power to put hym fro it / I wold not

¶Capitulum xxx

THenne whanne this was done / there was drawynge of swerdes / And thenne there began a sore turnement [Page] And there dyd syr Lamerak merueyllous dedes of armes / & betwixe syr Lamerak and syre Ironsyde that was the reed knyghte of the reed laūdes there was strong batail / & betwix syre Palamides & Bleoberys there was a strong batail / & sir Gawayne and syr Trystram mette / and there syr Gawayne had the werse / for he pulled syre Gawayne from his hors / And there he was long vpon foote and defouled / Thenne cam in syr Launcelot and he smote syr Turquyne / and he hym / & thenne came syr Caradus his broder / and bothe at ones they assaylled hym / & he as the moost noblest knyght of the world worshipfully foughte with hem bothe / that al men wondred of the noblesse of syr launcelot / And thenne came in syr Gareth and knewe that it was sir launcelot that fought with tho two peryllous knyghtes / And thenne syr Gareth came with his good hors and hurtled hem in sonder / & no stroke wold he sm­yte to syr Launcelot / that aspyed sir launcelot & demed it shold be the good knyghte syre Gareth / & thenne syr Gareth rode he­re and there / & smote on the ryght hand & on the lyfte hand that alle the folke myghte wel aspye where that he rode / and by fortune he mette with his broder syr Gawayn / and there he put syr Gawayne to the werse / for he put of his helme / and so he serued fyue or syxe knyghtes of the rounde table that alle men said / he put hym in the most payne / and best he dyd his de­uoyr / For whan syr Trystram beheld hym how he fyrst Ius­ted and after foughte so wel with a swerd / Thenne he rode vnto syr Ironsyde and to syre Persaunt of ynde and asked hem by their feythe / what maner a knyghte is yonder knyght that semeth in soo many dyuerse colours / Truly me semeth sa­yd Trystram that he putteth hym self in grete payne for he neuer ceaseth / Wote ye not what he is sayd syr Ironsyde / No said syr Trystram / thenne shal ye knowe that this is he that lo­ueth the lady of the castel and she hym ageyne / and this is he that wannne me whan I byseged the lady of this castel / and this he that wanne syr Persaunt of ynde / and his thre brethe­ren / what is his name sayd syr Trystram and of what blood is he come / he was called in the courte of kyng Arthur Be­aumayns / but his ryȝt name is sir Gareth of Orkeney broder to sir Gawayn / by my hede said sir Tristram he is a good kniȝt [Page] knyght and a bygge man of armes / & yf he be yong he shalle preite a ful noble knyghte / he is but a child they all saide & of syr Launcelot he was made knyȝt / therfor is he mykel the bet­ter said Trystram / And thenne syr Trystram / syr Iron [...]yde / syr Persaunt and his broder rode to gyders for to helpe sir gareth / & thenne there were gyuen many strong strokes / And thenne syr Gareth rode oute on the one syde to amende his helme / & thenne said his dwerf take me your ryng that ye lese it not whyle that ye drynke / And so whan he had dronken he gat on his helme / & egerly took his hors & rode in to the felde & lefte his rynge with his dwerf / and the dwerf was gladde the ry­ng was from hym / for thenne he wist wel he shold be knowen And thenne whan syr Gareth was in the felde all folkes sa­we hym wel / & playnly that he was in yelowe colours / & the­re he rassyd of helmes & pulled doun knyȝtes that kynge Ar­thur had merueylle what knyȝt he was / for the kyng sawe by his here that it was the same knyght

¶Capitulum xxxj

BVt by fore he was in so many colours and now he is but in one colour that is yelowe / Now goo said kyng Arthur vnto dyuerse heroudes and ryde aboute hym & aspye what maner knyght he is / for I haue speryd of many knyghtes this day that ben vpon his party / and all saye they knowe hym not / And so an heroude rode nyhe Gareth as he coude / and there he sawe wryten aboute his helme in golde / This helme is syr gareth of Orkeney / Thenne the heroude cryed as he were wood / & many heroudes with hym / This is syre gareth of Orkeney in the yelowe armes that by all kynges and knyghtes of Arthurs beheld hym & awayted / & thenne they pre­ssyd al to beholde hym / & euer the heroudes cryed this is syre gareth of Orkeney kyng Lots sone / and whan syr gareth as­pyed that he was discoueryd / thenne he doubled his strokes / & smote doune syr Sagramore & his broder sir gawayn / O bro­der saide sir gawayn I wende ye wolde not haue stryken me / so whan he herd hym say so he thrang here & there / & so with grete payne he gat out of the prees / and there he mette with his dwerf / O boye said syr gareth thou hast begyled me foule this day that thou kepte my rynge / Gyue it me anone ageyn that [Page] I may hyde my body with al / and soo he tooke it hym / And thenne they all wist not where he was become / and syr gawa­yn had in maner aspyed where syr Gareth rode / and thenne he rode after with alle his myghte / that aspyed syr Gareth and rode lyghtely in to the forest that syr Gawayn wist not where he was become / And whan syr Gareth wyst that syr Gawa­yn was past / he asked the dwerf of best counceil / Syr said the dwerf / me semeth it were best now that ye are escaped fro spy­eng that ye send my lady dame lyones her rynge / It is wel aduysed said syr Gareth / now haue it here and here it to her / And saye that I recommaunde me vnto her good grace / and saye her I will come whan I maye / and I pray her to be true and feythful to me as I wil be to her / Syr said the dwerf it shal be done as ye commaunde / and soo he rode his waye and dyd his eraund vnto the lady / Thenne she said where is my knyghte syr Gareth / Madame said the dwerf he bad me saye / that he wold not be long from you / ¶ And soo lyghtely the dwerf cam ageyne vnto syr Gareth that wold ful fayne ha­ue had a lodgyng / for he had nede to be reposed / And thenne felle there a thonder and a rayne as heuen and erthe shold goo to gyder / And syr Gareth was not a lytyl wery / for of al that day he had but lytel rest neyther his hors nor he / So this syr Gareth rode soo longe in that forest vntyl the nyghte came And euer it lyghtned and thondred as it had ben woode At the last by fortune he came to a Castel / and there he herd the waytes vpon the wallys

¶Capitulum xxxij /

THenne syr Gareth rode vnto the barbycan of the castel / and praid the porter fayr to lete hym in to the castel / The porter ansuerd vngoodely ageyne / and saide thow getest no lodgyng here / Fayr syr say not soo for I am a knyȝte of kynge Arthurs / & pray the lord or the lady of this castel to gyue me herberow for the loue of kynge Arthur / Thenne the porter wente vnto the duchesse / and told her how ther was a knyghte of kyng Arthurs wold haue herberowe / lete hym in said the duchesse / for I wille see that knyghte / And for kyng Arthurs sake he shalle not be herberoules /

¶Thenne she yode vp in to a toure ouer the gate with greete torche lyght / whan sir Gareth sawe that torche lyghte he cryed [Page] on [...] thou be lord or lady gyaunt or champyon I toke no force so that I may haue herberowe this nyghte / & yf hit so he that I must nedes fyghte / spare me not to morne when I haue restyd me for bothe I and myn hors ben wery / Syr knyghte said the lady thou spekest knyghtly and boldly / but wete thou wel the lord of this castel loueth not kyng Arthur / nor none of his court / for my lord hath euer ben ageynst hym and therfor thou were better not to come within this castel / For and thou come in this nyghte / thou must come in vnder suche fourme that where someuer thou mete my lord by styȝ or by strete / thou must yelde the to hym as prysoner / Madame said syre Gareth what is your lord and what is his name / syr my lordes name is the duke de la rouse / wel madame said syr Gareth I shal promyse yow in what place I mete your lord I shalle yelde me vnto hym and to his good grace with that I vnderstande he wille do me no harme / And yf I vnderstand that [...]e wille I wil I releace my self and I can with my spere and my swerd / ye say wel said the duchesse / and thenne she lete the drawe brydge doune / and soo he rode in to the halle / and the [...]e he alyghte / and his hors was ledde in to a stable / & in the halle he vnarmed hym / & saide madame I will not oute of this holle this nyghte / And whan it is daye lyght / lete see / who wil haue adoo with me / he shal fynde me redy / Thenne was he sette vnto souper / and had many good dysshes / then­ne syr Gareth lyst wel to ete / and knyghtely he ete his mete / and egerly / there was many a fair lady by hym / & some said they neuer sawe a goodlyer man nor so wel of etynge / then­ne they made hym passyng good chere / & shortly whan he had souped his ledde was made there so he rested hym al nyghte / And on the morne [...]e herd masse & brake his fast & toke his leue at the duchesse / & at them al / & thanked her goodely of her lodgyng & of his good chere / & thenne she asked gym his na­me / Madame he saide truly my name is Gareth of Orkeney / & some men calle me Be [...]umayns / thēne knewe she wel it was the same knyȝt that fouȝt for dame lyones / so sir gareth depar­ted & rode vp in to a montayne / & ther mette hym a knyghte / his name was syr Bendelayne and sayd to syr Gareth thou shalt not passe this way / for outher thou shalt Iuste with me or [Page] els be my prysoner / Thenme wille I Iuste said syr Gareth / And soo they lete their horses renne / and there syr Gareth smote hym thorou oute the body / and syr Bendalyne rode forth to his castel there besyde and there dyed / So syr gareth wold haue rested hym / and he cam rydynge to Bendalaynis castel / Thenne his knyghtes and seruauntes aspyed that it was he that had slayne their lord / Thenne they armed xx good men and cam oute and assailled syr gareth / and soo he had no spere but his swerd / and put his shelde afore hym / and there they brake their speres vpon hym / and they assailled hem passyng­ly sore / But euer syr gareth deffended hym as a knyght

¶Capitulum xxxiij

SOo whan they sawe that they myghte not ouercome hym / they rode from hym / and took their counceylle to slee his hors / and soo they cam in vpon syr gareth / and with speres they slewe his hors / and thenne they assailled hym hard But whan he was on foote / there was none that he caughte but he gaf him suche a buffet that he dyd neuer recouer / So he slewe hem by one and one tyl they were but foure / and there they fledde / and sire gareth took a good hors that was one of theirs and rode his waye / Thenne he rode a grete paas til that he came to a castel and there he herd moche mornynge of lady­es and gentylwymmen / so ther cam by hym a page / what noy­se is this said syr gareth that I here within this castel / Syre knyghte said the page here ben within this castel thyrtty lady­es and alle they be wydowes / For here is a knyght that wayteth dayly vpon this castel / and his name is the broun kn­yght withoute pyte / and he is the parylloust knyght that now lyueth / And therfor sir said the page I rede you flee / Nay said sir gareth I wille not flee though thou be aferd of hym / And thenne the page sawe where came the broune knyghte / loo said the page yonder he cometh / lete me dele with hym said syre gareth / And whan eyther of other had a syghte they lete the­yr horses renne / and the broune knyghte brake his spere and sir gareth smote hym thorou oute the body that he ouerthrewe hym to the ground stark dede / So sir gareth rode in to the castel & praid the ladyes yt he myȝt repose hym / allas said the ladyes ye may not be lodged here / make hym good chere said the page [Page] for this knyghte hath slayne your enemy / thenne they al ma­de hym good chere as laye in their power / But wete ye wel they maade hym good chere for they myghte none otherwyse doo for they were but poure / And so on the morne he wente to masse / and there he sawe the thyrtty ladyes knele / and lay grouelyng vpon dyuerse tombes makynge grete dole and sorowe / Thenne syr Gareth wyst wel that in the tombes lay theire lordes / Fayre ladyes said syr Gareth ye must at the next feeste of Pentecost be at the court of kynge Arthur / and saye that I syr Gareth sente you thyder / we shal doo this said the ladyes Soo he departed / and by fortune he came to a mountayne / & there he found a goodely knyght that badde hym abyde syr kn­yghte and Iuste with me / what are ye said syr Gareth / My name is said he the duke de la rowse / A syr ye ar the same kn­yghte that I lodged ones in your Castel / And there I ma­de promyse vnto your lady that I shold yelde me vnto yow A said the duke arte thou that proud knyghte that proferest to fyghte with my knyghtes / therfore make the redy for I wil haue adoo with you / Soo they lete their horses renne / and ther syr Gareth smote the duke doune from his hors / But the du­ke lyghtly auoyded his hors / and dressid his shelde and drewe his swerd / and bad syr Gareth alyghte and fyghte with hym / Soo he dyd alyghte / and they dyd grete batail to gy­ders more than an houre / and eyther hurte other ful sore / Att the last sir Gareth gat the duke to the erthe / and wold haue slayn hym / and thenne he yelded hym to hym / Thenne must ye goo said sir Gareth vnto syr Arthur my lord at the next feest and saye that I sir Gareth of Orkeney sente you vnto hym / hit shal be done said the duke / and I wil doo to yow homage and f [...]aute with an C knyȝtes with me / and alle the dayes of my lyf to doo you seruyse wh [...]re ye wille commaunde me /

¶Capitulum xxiiij

SOo the duke departed / and sir Gareth stode there alone and there he sawe an armed knyght comyng toward hym / Thenne syre Gareth toke the dukes shelde / and [Page] mounted vpon horsbak / and soo withoute bydyng they [...] to gyder as it had ben the thonder / And there that knyȝt hu [...]t syr Gareth vnder the syde with his spere / And thenne they a­lyghte / and drewe their swerdes / and gafe grete strokes that the blood trayled to the ground / And soo they foughte two houres / At the last ther came the damoysel Lynet that somme men calle the damoysel saueage / and she came rydynge vpon an ambelynge meule / and there she cryed al on hyghe / syr Gawayne syr Gawayne leue thy fyghtynge with thy broder syre Gareth / And whan he herd her saye soo he threwe aweye hys shelde and his swerd / and ranne to syre Gareth / and tooke hym in his armes / and sythen kneled doune and asked hym mercy / what are ye said syr Gareth that ryght now were soo stronge and soo myghty / and now so sodenly yelde you to me O Gareth I am your broder syr Gawayn that for youre sake haue had grete sorou and labour / Thenne syr Gareth vnlaced his helme / and knelyd doune to hym / and asked hym mercy / thenne they rose both and enbraced eyther other in their armes and wepte a grete whyle or they myghte speke / and eyther of hem gaf other the pryce of the bataille / And there were many kynde wordes bitwene hem / Allas my faire broder said sir ga­wayn perde I owe of ryghte to worshippe you / and ye were not my broder / for ye haue worshipped kyng Arthur and all his courte / for ye haue sente me mo worshipful knyghtes this twelue moneth than syxe the best of the round table haue do­ne excepte sir Launcelot / Thenne cam the damoysel saueage that was the lady Lynet that rode with sir gareth soo longe / and there she dyd staunche sir garethe woundes / and sir gawayns Now what wille ye doo said the damoysel saueage / me semeth that it were wel do yt Arthur had wetyng of you both for your horses are soo brysed that they may not bere / Now faire da­moysel said syr Gawayne / I praye you ryde vnto my lord myn vnkel kynge Arthur / and telle hym what aduenture is to me betyd here / and I suppose he wille not tary long / Thenne she tooke her meule and lyghtly she came to kynge Arthur / that was but two myle thens / And whan she had told hym ty [...]ynges the kynge bad gete hym a palfroy / ¶And whan he was vpon his bak he badde the lordes and ladyes come after who [Page] that wold / and there was sadelyng and brydelyng of quenes horses and prynces horses / & wel was hym that soonest myght be redy / Soo whan the kynge came there as they were he sawe syr Gawayn and syr Gareth sytte vpon a lytel hylle syde / & thenne the kynge auoyded his hors / And whanne he cam ny­ghe syre Gareth / he wold haue spoken but he myghte not / and therwith he sanke doune in a swoune for gladnesse / and soo they starte vnto theyr vnkyl / and requyred hym of his good grace to be of good comforte / wete ye wel the kyng made gre­te ioye and many a pyteous complaynte he made to syr Ga­reth / And euer he wepte as he had ben a chyld / with that cam his moder the quene of Orkeney dame Morgause / And whan she sawe syr Gareth redely in the vysage she myghte not wepe but sodenly felle doun in a swoune / and lay there a grete whyle lyke as she had ben dede / And thenne syr Gareth recomfor­ted his moder in suche wyse that she recouerd and made good chere / Thenne the kynge commaunded that al maner of knyghtes that were vnder his obeissaunce shold make their lodgyng ryght there for the loue of his neuewes / And soo it was do­ne and al manere of purueaunce purueyd that ther lacked nothyng that myghte be goten of tame nor wylde for gold or syluer / And thenne by the meanes of the damoysel Saueage syr Gawayne and syr Gareth were heled of their woundes / and there they soiourned eyght dayes / Thenne said kyng Arthur vnto the damoysel saueage I merueylle that your syster Dame Lyones cometh not here to me / and in especyal that she cometh not to vysyte her knyghte my neuewe syre Gareth that hath had soo moche trauaille for her loue / My lord said the damoysel Lynet ye must of your good grace hold her excused / For she knoweth not that my lord syr Gareth is here / Go thē ne for her said kynge Arthur that we may be apoynted what is best to done accordyng to the plesyr of my neuewe / Syr sa­id the damoysel that shal be done / and soo she rode vnto her syster / And as lyghtely as she myght made her redy & she cam on the morne with her broder syr Gryngamor / and with her xl knyȝtes / And so whan she was come she had alle the che­re that myghte be done bothe of the kynge and of many other kynges and quenes

¶Capitulum xxxv

ANd [...]monge alle th [...]se ladyes she was named she fayrest and [...] / Thenne whanne syr Gawayn sawe her / there was many a goodely loke and goodely wordes that alle man of worship had ioye to beholde them / Thenne cam ky­nge Arthur and many other kynges and dame Gweneuer & the quene of Orbeney / And there the kyng asked his neuew syr Gareth whether he wold haue that lady as peramour or to haue her to his wyf / My lord wete yow wel that I loue her aboue al ladyes lyuynge / Now fayre lady said kyng Arthur what say ye / Moost noble kynge said dame Lyones wete yow wel that my lord syr Gareth is to me more leuer to haue and welde as my husband than ony kyng or prynce that is [...] / and yf I maye not haue hym I promyse yow I wylle neuer haue none / For my lord Arthur sayd dame Ly­ones we [...]e ye wel he is my fyrst loue and he shal be the laste / And yf ye wil suffre hym to haue his wyl and free choyse I da [...] saye [...]e wylle haue me / That is trouthe said syr Gareth / And I haue not you and weld not you as my wyf / there shal neuer lady ne gentylwoman reioyce me / What neuewe said the kynge is the wynde in that dore / for wete ye wel I wold not for the stynte of my croune to be causar to withdra­we your hertes / And wete ye wel ye con not loue so wel but I shal rather encreace hit than dystresse hit / And also ye shal haue my loue and my lordship in the vttermest wyse that may lye in my power / And in the same wyse said sir Gareths moder / thenne there was made a prouysyon for the day of mary­ge / and by the kynges aduyse it was prouyded that it shold be at Mychelmas folowyng at kynkenadon by the see syde / for ther is a plentyful countrey / And soo it was cryed in al the places thurgh the wyamme / And thenne syr Gareth sent his somones to alle these knyghtes and ladyes that he had won­nen in batail to fore that they shold be at his day of maryage at kynkenadon by the sandys / And thenne dame Lyones and the damoysel Lynet with syr Gryngamor rode to theire castel / and a goodely and a ryche rynge she gaf to syr Gareth / and he gaf her another / And kyng Arthur gaf her a ryche bee of [Page] gold / and soo she departed / and kyng Arthur and his felauship rode toward Kynkenadon / and syr Gareth broughte his lady on the way / & so cam to the kyng ageyne and rode with hym / Lord the grete chere that syr launcelot made of sir Gareth and he of hym / for there was neuer no knyght that syr gareth [...]oued so wel as he dyd syr Launcelot / and euer for the most party he wold be in syr launcelots company / for after syr Ga­reth had aspyed sir Gawayns condycions he withdrewe hym self fro his broder syr Gawayns felauship / for he was vengeable / and where he hated he wold be auengyd with murther and that hated syr gareth

¶Capitulum xxxvj

SOo hit drewe faste to Mychelmas / and thyder came dame Lyones the lady of the castel peryllous and her syster dame Lynet with syre gryngamor her broder with hem / For he had the conduyte of these ladyes / And there they were lodged at the deuyse of kyng Arthur / And vpon mychelmas day the Bisshop of Caunterbury made the weddyng betwixe syr gareth and the lady Lyones with grete solempnyte / and kyng Arthur made gaherys to wedde the damoysel saueage / that was dame Lynet / and kyng Arthur made syr Agraua­yne to wedde dame Lyones nees a fayr lady / her name was dame Laurel / And so whan this solemnacion was done / thenne came in the grene knyghte syr Pertylope with thyrtty kn­yghtes / and there he dyd homage and feaute to syr gareth and these knyghtes to hold of hym for euermore / Also sir Pertilo­pe said I pray you that at this feest I maye be your cham­berlayne / with a good wil said syr gareth / syth it lyketh you to take soo symple on offyce / Thenne come in the reed knyghte with thre score knyghtes With hym / and dyde to syr Gareth homage and feaute / and alle th [...] knyghtes to hold of hym for euermore / And thenne this syr Perymonyes praide sir gareth to graunte hym to be his chyef botteler at that hyghe feest I wil wel saide sir gareth that ye haue this offyce and it we­re better / Thenne came in syr Persant of Inde with an C kn­yghtes with hym / and there he dyd homage and feaute / and [Page] al his knyghtes shold doo hym seruyse / and hold their lon­des of hym for euer / and there he prayd syr Gareth to make hym his Sewar chyef at the feest / I will wel said syr Ga­reth that ye haue it & it were better / Thenne cam the dukde larowse with an C knyghtes with hym / and there he dyd ho­mage and feaute to syr Gareth / and soo to hold theire londes of hym for euer / And he requyred syr Gareth that he myght serue hym of the wyn that day at that feest / I wil wel sayd syr Gareth and it were better / Thenne came in the reed knyȝte of the reed laundes that was syr Ironsyde / and he broughte with hym thre honderd knyghtes / and there he dyd homage & feaute / and al these knyghtes to hold their landes of hym for euer / And thenne he asked syr Gareth to be his keruer / I will wel said syr Gareth and it please you / Thenne came in to the courte thyrtty ladyes / and alle they semed wydowes / and tho thyrtty ladyes broughte with hem many fayre gentylwy­mmen / And alle they kneled doune at ones vnto kyng arthur and vnto syr Gareth / and there al th [...] ladyes told the kyng how syr Gareth delyuerd hem from the dolorous [...]oure / and slewe the broune knyght withoute pyte / And therfore we and oure heyres for euermore wille doo homage vnto syr Gareth of Orkeney / So thenne the kynges and quenes / prynces & erlys Barons and many bold knyghtes wente vnto mete / & well maye ye wete there were al maner of mete plentyuously / alle manere rules and games with al manere of mynstralsy that was vsed in tho dayes / ¶Also ther was gr [...]te Iustes thre da­yes / But the kynge wold not suffre syre Gareth to Iuste by cause of his newe bryde / for as the frensshe book sayth that da­me Lyones desyred of the kynge that none that were wedded shold Iuste at that feest / Soo the fyrst day there Iusted sir lamerak de galys / for he ouerthrewe thyrtty knyghtes / & did passyng merueillously dedes of armes / and thenne kyng Arthur made syr Persaunt and his two bretheren knyghtes of the ro­und table to their lyues ende / and gaf hem grete londes / Also the second daye there Iusted Trystram best / and he ouerthrew fourty knyghtes / and dyd there merueillous dedes of armes And there kynge Arthur made Ironsyde that was the reed knyghte of the reed laundes a knyghte of the table round to [Page] his lyues ende / and gaf hym grete landes / The thyrd day there Iusted syr launcelot du lake / and he ouerthrewe fyfty knyghtes and dyd many merueyllous dedes of armes that all men wondred on hym / And there kynge Arthur made the duke de la rouse a knyghte of the round table to his lyues ende / and gaf hym grete landes to spende / But whan this Iustes were done / syr Lamerak and syr Trystram departed sodenly / & wold not be knowm / for the whiche kyng Arthur and all the court were sore displeasyd / And soo they helde the courte fourty da­yes with grete solempnyte / And this syr Gareth was a no­ble knyghte and a wel rulyd and fayr langaged

¶Thus endeth this tale of syr Gareth of Orkeney that wedded dame Lyones of the castel peryllous / And also syr Gahe­rys wedded her syster dame Lynet / that was called the damoysel saueage / And syr Agrauayne wedded dame Laurel a fa­yr lady and grete and myghty landes with grete rychesse gaf with them kyng Arthur that ryally they myght lyue tyl their lyues ende

Here foloweth the viij book the which is the first book of sir Tristram de Lyones / & who was his fader & his moder / & hou he was borne and fosteryd / And how he was made knyghte

¶Capitulum primum

HIt was a kyng that hyghte Melyodas / and he was lord and kynge of the countre of Lyonas And this Melyodas was a lykely knyght as ony was that tyme lyuynge / And by fortune he wedded kynge Markys syster of Cornewaille / And she was called Elyzabeth that was callyd bothe good and fair And at that tyme kynge Arthur regned / and he was hol [...] kynge of Englond / walys and Scotland & of many other royammes how be it there were many kynges that were lordes of many countreyes / but alle they held their landes of kyng Arthur / for in walys were two kynges / and in the north were many kynges / And in Cornewail and in the west were two kynges / ¶Also in Irland were two or thre kynges and al were vnder the obeissaunce of kyng Arthur / So was the kynge of Fraunce and the kyng of Bretayn and all the lordshippes vnto Rome / So whan this kyng Melyodas hadde ben with his wyf / within a whyle she waxid grete with child and she was a ful meke lady / and wel she loued her lord / & he her ageyne / soo there was grete ioye betwixe them / Thenne ther was a lady in that countrey that had loued kynge Me­lyodas longe / And by no meane she neuer coude gete his loue therfore she lete ordeyne vpon a day as kynge Melyodas rode on huntynge / for he was a grete chacer / and there by an en­chauntement she made hym chace an herte by hym self alone / til that he came to an old Castel / and there anone he was taken prysoner by the lady that hym loued / Whanne Elyzabeth kyng Melyodas myst her lord / and she was nyghe oute of her wytte and also as grete with child as she was she took a gentylwoman with her / and ranne in to the forest to seke her lord / And whanne she was ferre in the forest she myghte no ferther for she byganne to trauaille fast of her child / And she had many grymly throwes / her gentylwoman halp her alle that she myghte / And soo by myracle of oure lady of heuen she was delyuerd with grete paynes / But she had taken suche cold for the defaute of helpe that depe draughtes of deth toke her / that nedes she must dye and departe oute of this world / ther was [Page] none other boote / And whanne this quene Elyzabeth sawe that ther was none other bote / thenne she made grete dole / and said vnto her gentylwoman / whan ye see my lord kyng Me­lyodas recommaunde me vnto hym / and telle hym what pay­nes I endure here for gis loue / and how I must dye here for his sake for defaute of good helpe / and lete hym wete that I am ful sory to departe out of this world fro hym / therfor pray hym to be frende to my soule / Now lete me see my lytel child / for whome I haue had alle this sorowe / And whanne she sawe hym she said thus / A my lytel sone thou hast murthered thy moder / and therfore I suppose thou that arte a murtherer soo yong / thou arte ful lykely to be a manly man in thyn age / And by cause I shal dye of the byrthe of the / I charge the gentylwoman / that thou pray my lord kynge Melyodas tha whan he is crystned lete calle hym Trystram that is as moch to saye / as a sorouful byrthe / And ther with this quene gafe vp the ghoost and dyed / Thenne the gentylwoman leyd her vnder an vmbre of a grete tree / and thenne she lapped the ch­yld as wel as she myght for cold / Ryghte soo ther came the Barons folowynge after the quene / ¶And whan they sawe that she was dede / and vnderstood none other but the kynge was destroyed /

¶Capitulum secundum

THenne certayne of them wold haue slayne the child / by cause they wold haue ben lordes of the countrey of Lyonas / But thenne thorou the faire speche of the gentylwo­man / and by the meanes that she made / the moost party of the Barons wold not assente ther to / And thenne they lete cary home the dede quene / and moche dole was made for her / Thenne this meane whyle Merlyn delyuerd kynge Melyodas out of pryson on the morne after his quene was dede / And so when the kynge was come home / the moost party of the barons ma­de grete ioye / But the sorou that the kyng made for his quene that myghte no tong telle

Soo thenne the kynge lete entere her rychely / and after he le­te crystene his child as his wyf had commaunded afore her [Page] deth / And thenne he lete calle hym Trystram the sorouful bo­rne child / ¶Thenne the kynge Melyodas endured seuen ye­res withoute a wyf / And alle this tyme Trystram was nourysshed wel / ¶Thenne hit befell [...] that kynge Melyodas wedded kynge Howles doughter of Bretayne / and anone she hadde children of kynge Melyodas / thenne was she heuy and wrothe / that her children shold not reioyce the Countrey of Lyones / wherfor this quene ordeyned for to poysone yong Tristram / So she lete poyson be put in a pyece of syluer in the chamber where as Trystram and her children were to gyders / Vnto that entente that whanne Trystram were thursty he sho­ld drynke that drynke / And so hit felle vpon a daye the que­nes sone as he was in that chamber / aspyed the pyece with poyson / and he wende hit hadde ben good drynke / and by ca­use the child was thursty he tooke the pyece with poyson and dranke frely / and there with al sodenly the child brast & was dede / whanne the quene Melyodas wyst of the dethe of her sone wete ye wel that she was heuy / But yet the kyng vndersto­de no thynge of her treason / ¶Not withstandynge the quene wold not leue this / but efte she lete ordeyne more poyson / and putte hit in a pyece / And by fortune kyng Melyodas her husband fond the pyece with wyn where was the poyson / and he that was moche thursty took the pyece for to drynke ther oute And as he wold haue dronken therof / the Quene aspyed hym / and thenne she ranne vnto hym / and pulled the pyece from hym sodenly ¶The kyng merueilled why she dyd soo / and remembryd hym how her sone was sodenly slayne with poyson / And thenne he took her by the hand and sayd / thou fals traitresse thou shalte telle me what manere of drynke this is / or els I shalle slee the / And ther with he pulled oute his swerd / and sware a grete othe that be shold slee her / but yf she told hym trouthe / A mercy my lord sayd she / and I shalle telle you alle / And thenne she told hym why she wold haue slayne Trystram / by cause her chyldren shold reioyce his land / wel said kyng Melyodas / and therfor shal ye haue the lawe / And soo she was dampned by the assente of the Barons to be brent / and thenne was ther made a grete fyre / & ryght as she was at the fyre to take her execucion / yong [Page] Trystram knelyd afore kynge Melyodas / and besought hym to gyue hym a bone / I wylle wel said the kynge ageyne / ¶Thenne saide yonge Trystram gyue me the lyf of thy que­ne my stepmoder / That is vnryghtfully asked said kyng Melyodas / for thou oughte of ryght to hate her / for she wold ha­ue slayne the with that poyson and she myghte haue hadde her wille / And for thy sake moost is my cause that she sholde dye Syr saide Trystram as for that I byseche you of your mercy that ye wille forgyue hither / And as for my parte god forgyue it her and I doo / and soo moche it lyked your hyhenes to graunte me my bone / for goddes loue I requyre you hold yo­ur promyse / Sythen hit is soo said the kynge I wille that ye haue her lyf / thenne said the kynge I gyue her to you / and go ye to the fyre and take her / and doo with her what ye wylle / Soo syre Trystram wente to the fyre / and by the commaundement of the kyng delyuerd her from the dethe / But after that kynge Melyodas wold neuer haue adoo with her as at bedde and borde / But by the good meanes of yong Trystram he made the kynge and her accorded / But thenne the kynge wold not suffre yonge Trystram to abyde no lenger in his courte

¶Capitulum iij

ANd thenne he lete ordeyne a gentylman that was wel lerned and taughte / his name was gouernayle / and thenne he sente yonge Trystram with Gouernayle in to Fraunce to lerne the langage / and nurture / and dedes of armes / And there was Trystram more than seuen yeres / ¶ And thenne whanne he wel couthe speke the langage and hadde lerned alle that he myght lerne in that countreyes / thenne he came home to his fader kynge Melyodas ageyne / and so Trystram lerned to be an harper passynge alle other that there was none suche called in no countrey / and soo in harpynge & on Instrumentys of musyke he applyed hym in his yongthe for to lerne / And after as he growed in myght and strengthe he laboured euer in huntynge and in haukynge soo that neuer [Page] gentylman more that euer we herd rede of / ¶And as the book sayth / he beganne good mesures of blowyng of beestes of venery and beestes of chace / and alle manere of vermayns / and alle these termes we haue yet of haukyng and huntyng And therfore the book of venery / of haukynge and hunty­nge is called the book of syr Trystram / Wherfor as me semeth alle gentylmen that beren old armes oughte of ryght to ho­noure syre Trystram for the goodly termes that gentilmen haue and vse / and shalle to the daye of dome / that there by in a maner alle men of worship maye disseuer a gentylman fro a yoman / and from a yoman a vylayne / For he that gentyl is wylle drawe hym vnto gentil tatches / and to folowe the cus­tommes of noble gentylmen ¶Thus syr Trystram endured in Cornewaile vntyl he was bygge / and stronge / of the age of xviij yeres / And thenne the kynge Melyodas had grete ioye of syr Trystram / and soo had the quene his wyfe / For euer after in her lyf by cause syre Trystram saued her from the fyre she dyd neuer hate hym more after / but loued hym euer after / and gaf Trystram many grete yeftes for euery estate loued hym / where that he wente

¶Capitulum quartum

THenne it befelle that kynge Anguysshe of Irland / sente vnto kynge Marke of Cornewaile for his tru­age that Cornewaile had payed many wynters / And alle that tyme kynge Marke was behynde of the truage for s [...] uen yeres / And kyng Marke and his Barons gaf vnto the messager of Irland these wordes and ansuere that they wo­ld none paye / and bad the messagyer goo vnto his Kynge Anguysshe / and telle hym we wille paye hym no truage / but telle youre lord / and he wille alweyes haue truage of vs of Cornewaile / bydde hym sende a trusty knyghte of his land / that wille fyghte for his ryght / and we shalle fynde another for to defende oure ryght / with this ansuer the messagers de­parted in to Irland / ¶And whanne kynge Anguysh vn­derstood the ansuere of the messagers / he was wonderly wroth [Page] And thenne he callyd vnto hym syr Marhaus the good kn­yght that was nobly preued / and a knyghte of the table ro­und / And this Marhaus was broder vnto the quene of Ir­land / ¶Thenne the kynge sayd thus / Fayre broder sir Marhaus I praye yow goo in to Cornewaile for my sake and do bataille for our truage that of ryght we oughte to haue / and what someuer ye spende ye shalle haue suffyciently more than ye shal nede / Syre saide Marhaus wete ye wel that I shalle not be bothe to doo bataille in the ryght of you and your land with the best knyght of the table rounde / for I knowe them for the moost party what ben theire dedes / and for to auaunce my dedes and to encreace my worship I wylle ryght gladly goo vnto this iourneye for oure ryghte.

¶Soo in alle haste there was made purueaunce for syr marhaus / and he hadde al thynge that to hym neded / and soo he de­parted out of Irland / and arryued vp in Cornewaile euen fast by the castel of Tyntagil / And whan kynge Marke vn­derstood that he was there arryued to fyghte for Irland / ¶Thenne made kynge marke grete sorou whan he vnderstood that the good and noble knyghte sire Marhaus was come / For they knewe no knyght that durste haue adoo with hym / For at that tyme syre Marhaus was called one of the famo­sest and renoumed knyghtes of the world

And thus syre Marhaus abode in the see / and euery daye he sente vnto kynge Marke for to paye the truage that was behynde of seuen yere / outher els to fynde a knyght to fyghte with hym for the truage / This maner of message syre Mar­haus sente dayly vnto kynge Marke / ¶Thenne they of Cornewayle lete make cryes in euery place that what knyght wold fyghte for to saue the truage of Cornewaile he sholde be rewarded soo that he sholde fare the better the terme of hys [...]yf / ¶Thenne some of the Barons sayde to kynge Marke / and counceiled hym to sende to the courte of Kynge Arthur for to se [...]e [...]yre Launcelot du lake that was that ty­me named for the merueilloust Knyght of alle the worlde / ¶Thenne there were somme other Barons that counceylled the Kynge not to doo soo & said that it was laboure in vayn / [Page] by cause syr Marhaus was a knyght of the round table / ther for ony of hem will be loth to haue adoo with other / but yf hit were ony knyght at his owne request wold fyghte dysguysed and vnknowen / Soo the kynge and alle his barons assented that it was no bote to seke ony knyght of the round table / ¶ This meane whyle came the langage and the noyse vnto kynge Meliodas hou that sire Marhaus abode bataille faste by Tyntagil / And how kyng Marke couthe fynde no maner kn­yghte to fyghte for hym / Whan yong Trystram herd of thys / he was wrothe and sore ashamed that ther durst no knyghte in Cornewaile haue adoo with syr Marhaus of Irland /

¶Capitulum quintum

THere with al Trystram wente vnto his fader Kynge Meliodas and asked hym counceil what was best to doo for to recouer Cornewaile from truage / For as me semeth said sir Tristram it were shame that syr Marhaus the quenes broder of Irland shold goo aweye onles that he were foughten with alle ¶As for that said kyng Meliodas Wete you Wel sone Tristram that syre Marhaus is called one of the best knyghtes of the World and knyghte of the table round / And therfore I knowe no knyghte in this countre that is able to matche with hym / ¶ Allas saide syre Tristram that I am not made knyght / And yf sir Marhaus shold thus departe in to Irland / god lete me neuer haue wor­ship and I were made knyght I shold matche hym / And syr said Trystram I pray you gyue me leue to ryde to kynge Mark / and soo ye be not displeasyd / of kynge Mark [...] wille I be made Knyght / I wille wel saide kyng Meliodas that ye be ruled as your courage wille rule you

¶Thenne sir Trystram thanked his fader moche / And thenne he made hym redy to ryde in to Cornewaile / ¶In the meane whyle there came a messager with letters of loue fro kynge Faramon of Fraunces doughter vnto syre Trystram that were ful pyteous letters & in them were wryten many compla­yntes of loue / but syre Tristram had no Ioye of her letters nor [Page] [...]gard vnto her / Also she sente hym a lytel brachet that was [...]assynge fayre / But whan the kynges doughter vnderstood that sy [...] Trystram wold not loue her / as the book sayth / she dyed for sorou / ¶ And thenne the same squyer that broughte the letter and the brachet came ageyne vnto syr Trystram / as after ye shalle here in the tale ¶Soo this yonge syre Trystram rode vnto his eme kynge Marke of Cornewa­yle / ¶And whanne he came there / he herd say that ther wold ne knyghte fyghte with syre Marhaus / Thenne yede sir Tris­tram vnto his eme and sayd / syre yf ye wylle gyue me thor­dre of knyghthode / I wille doo bataille with syr Marhaus / what are ye said the kynge and from whens be ye comen / Sir said Trystram I come fro kynge Melyodas that wedded yo­ur syster and a gentylman wete ye wel I am

¶Kynge Marke behelde sir Trystram and sawe that he was but a yonge man of age / but he was passyngly wel maade and bygge / ¶Faire syre said the kynge what is youre name and where were ye borne / Syre sayd he ageyne / my name is Trystram / and in the countreye of Lyones was I borne / Ye saye wel said the kynge / and yf ye wille doo this batayll I shalle make yow knyghte / Therfore I come to you sayd syre Trystram and for none other cause

¶But thenne kynge Marke made hym knyghte / And there with al anone as he had made hym knyght he sente a messa­ge [...] vnto syre Marhaus with letters that said / that he hadde fonde a yonge knyghte redy for to take the bataile to the vtter mest / hit may wel be said syre Marhaus / ¶But telle kynge Marke I wille not fyghte with no knyghte but he be of bl­ood royal / that is to saye outher kynges sone outher quenes sone borne of a prynce or pryncesse /

¶whanne Kynge Marke vnderstood that / he sente for syre Trystram de lyones and tolde hym what was the ansuer of syr Marhaus / ¶Thenne sayd syre Trystram sythen that he seyth s [...]o / lete hym wete that I am comen of fader syde and moder syde of as noble blood as he is / ¶For syre now shalle ye knowe that I am kynge Melyodas sone borne of youre own syster dame Elyzabeth that dyed in the forest in the byrthe of me / O Ihesu said kynge Mark ye are welcome faire neuewe [Page] to me / ¶Thenne in alle the haste the kynge lete horse syr Tristram and arme hym in the best maner that myghte be had or goten for gold or syluer / ¶And thenne kynge Marke sente vnto sir Marhaus / and dyd hym to wete that a letter born mā than he was hym self shold fyghte with hym / and his name is sir Trystram de lyonas goten of kynge Melyodas / and bo­rne of kynge Markes syster / Thenne was sir Marhaus glad and blythe that he shold fyghte with suche a gentylman / and soo by the assente of kynge Mark and of syr Marhaus they lete ordeyne that they shold fyghte within an Iland nyghe syr Marhaus shyppes / and soo was syr Trystram putte in to a vessel bothe his hors and he and all that to hym longed bo­the for his body and for his hors / Syre Trystram lacked nothynge / And whan kynge Marke and his Barons of Cor­newaile beheld how yonge syr Trystram departed with suche a caryage to fyghte for the ryghte of Cornewaile / there was neyther man ne woman of worship but they wepte to see and vnderstande soo yonge a knyght to Ieoparde hym self for their ryghte /

¶Capitulum sextum

SOo to shorten this tale whan / syr Trystram was arry­ued within the Iland / he loked to the ferther syde / & there he sawe at an anker syxe shippes nyghe to the land / and vnder the shadowe of the shippes vpon the land / there houed the noble knyghte syr Marhaus of Irland / Thenne syr Trystram commaunded his seruaunt gouernail to brynge his hors to the land and dresse his harneis at al manere of ryghtes / And thenne whan he had soo done / he mounted vpon his hors And whan he was in his sadel wel apparailled / & his shelde dressid vpon his sholder / Trystram asked Gouernayle where is this knyghte that I shal haue adoo with alle / Syre sayd Gouernaile / see ye hym not / I wende ye had sene hym yonder he houeth vnder the vmbre of his shippes on horsbak with his spere in his hand and his sheld vpon his sholder / That is trouthe sayd the noble knyght syre Trystram now I see hym wel ynouȝ Thenne he commaunded his seruaunt Gouernayle [Page] to goo to his vessaile ageyne / and commaunde me vnto myne eme kynge Marke / and praye hym / yf that I be slayn in this bataille for to entere my body as hym semed best / & as for me lete hym wete I will neuer yelde me for cowardyse / and yf I be slayne and flee not / thenne they haue lost no truage for me And yf soo be that I flee or yelde me as recreaūt / bydde myn eme neuer berye me in Crysten beryels / And vpon thy lyf sa­id syr Trystram to Gouernayle / come thou not nyghe this I­land tyl that thou see me ouercomen or slayne / or els that I wynne yonder knyght / soo eyther departed from other sore we pynge

¶Capitulum septimum

ANd thenne syr Marhaus auysed syr Trystram and sa­id thus / yonge knyght syr Trystram what dost thou here / me sore repenteth of thy courage / for wete thou wel I haue ben assayed / and the best knyghtes of this land haue ben as­sayed of my hand / And also I haue matched with the best kn­yghtes of the world / and therfor by my counceille retorne a­geyne vnto thy vessaile / And faire knyght and wel preued knyght said syre Trystram thou shalt wel wete I maye not forsake the in this quarel / for I am for thy sake made knyght And thou shalt wel wete that I am a kynges sone born and goten vpon a quene / and suche promyse I haue made att my neuews request and myn owne sekyng that I shalle fyghte with the vnto the vttermest / and delyuer Cornewaile from the old truage / And also wete thou wel syr Marhaus / that this is the grettest cause that thou couragest me to haue adoo with the / For thou art called one of the moost renoumed kn­yght [...]s of the world / and by cause of that noyse and fame / that thou hast / thou gyuest me courage to haue adoo with the / for neuer yet was I preued with good knyghte / And sy­then I toke the ordre of knyghthode this day / I am wel plea­syd that I maye haue adoo with so good a knyght as thou arte / And now wete thou wel syr Marhaus that I caste me to gete worship on thy body / And yf that I be not preued / I trust to god that I shal be worshipfully preued vpon thy body / and to delyuer the countrey of Cornewaile for euer fro al [Page] maner of truage from Irland for euer / whanne syr Marhau [...] had herde hym saye what he wold / he saide thenne thus ageyn Fair Knyght sy [...]hen it is soo that thou castest to wynne worship of me / I lete the wete / worship may thou none lese by me yf thou mayst stande me thre strokes / for I lete the wete / for my noble dedes preued and sene / Kyng Arthur made me kny­ghte of the table round / Thenne they beganne to feutre theyre speres / and they mette soo fyersly to gyders / that they smote eyther other doune / bothe hors and all / But sir Marhaus smote syr Trystram a grete wounde in the syde with his spere / & thenne they auoyded their horses / and pulled oute their swer­des / and threwe their sheldes afore them / And thenne they las­shed to gyders as men that were wyld and couragyous / And whan they hadde stryken soo to gyder longe / thenne they lefte her strokes / and foyned at their brethes and vysours / & when they sawe that that myght not preuaile them / thēne they hurt led to gyders lyke rammes to bere eyther other doun / thus they fought stylle more than half a day / and eyder were wounded passyng sore / that the blood ranne doune fresshly fro them vpon the ground / By thenne syr Trystram waxed more fressher / than syr Marhaus and better wynded and bygger / and with a myghty stroke he smote syr Marhaus vpon the helme suche a buffet that hit went thorou his helme / and thorou the coyfe of stele and thorou the brayn pan / and the swerd stak soo fast in the helme and in his brayn pan that sir Trystram pulled thry­es at his swerd or euer he myght pulle it out from his hede / & there Marhaus felle doun on his knees the edge of Tristrams swerd left in his brayne pan / And sodenly syr Marhaus rose grouelynge / and threwe his swerd and his shelde from hym / and soo ranne to his shippes and fledde his waye / and sir tristram hadde euer his shelde and his swerd / And whan sir Tris­tram sawe sir Marhaus withdrawe hym / he said A sir knyght of the roūd table why withdrawest thou the / thou dost thy selfe and thy kyn grete shame / for I am but a yong Knyghte / or now I was neuer preued / and rather than I shold withdra­we me from the / I had rather be hewen in C pyeces / Syr marhaus ansuerd no worde but yede his way sore gronynge / well sir knyght said sir Tristram I promy [...]e the thy suerd and thy [Page] sheld shal be myn / and thy sheld shalle I were in al places where I ryde on myn aduentures and in the syghte of kyng Arthur and alle the round table

¶Capitulum viij

ANon sir Marhaus and his felauship departed in to Ir­land / And as soone as he came to the kynge his bro­der / be lete serche his woundes / ¶ And whan his hede was serched / a pyece of syre Trystrams swerd was founden therin / and myghte neuer be had oute of his hede for no surgeons / and soo he dyed of syr Trystrams swerd / and that py­ece of the swerd the quene his syster kepte hit for euer wyth her / for she thoughte to be reuengyd and she myghte / ¶Now torne we ageyne vnto syr Trystram that was sore wounded / and ful sore bled that he myȝt not within a lytel whyle when he had take cold vnnethe stere hym of his lymmes / And thē ne he sette hym doune softely vpon a lytel hylle / and bledde fast / Thenne anone came Gouernaile his man with his vessel And the kynge and his barons came with procession ageynst hym / And whan he was come vnto the land / Kynge Marke toke hym in his armes / and the kynge and sir Dynas the senescal ladde syr Tristram in to the castel of Tyntygail / And thenne was he serched in the best maner / and leid in his bedde / And whan kynge Marke sawe his woundes / he wepte hertely and soo dyd alle his lordes / So god me help said kyng Mark I wolde not for alle my landes that my neuewe dyed / Soo syr Trystram laye there a moneth and more / and euer he was lyke to deye of that stroke that sir Marhaus smote hym fyrst with the spere / For as the Frensshe book saith / the speres hede was enuenymed that syr Trystram myghte not be hole / Thenne was kynge Mark and alle his barons passynge heuy / For they demed none other / but that syr Trystram shold not reco­uer / Thenne the kynge lete sende after alle manere of leches & surgens bothe vnto men and wymmen / and there was none / that wold behote hym the lyf / Thenne came there a lady that was a ryght wyse lady / & she said playnly vnto kyng mark and to sir Trystram and to alle his barons that he shold neuer [Page] be hole / but yf sire Trystram wente in the same countrey that the venym came fro / and in that countrey shold he be ho [...]pe [...] or els neuer / Thus said the lady vnto the Kynge / whan ky­nge Marke vnderstood that / he lete purueye for syr Trystram a faire vessel / wel vytailled / and therin was put syr Trys­tram and gouernail with hym / and sir Tristram toke his harp with hym / and soo he was putte in to the see to sayle in to Ir­land / and soo by good fortune he arryued vp in Irland e­uen fast by a castel where the Kynge and the quene was / and at his arryuayl he sat and harped in his bedde a mery lay suche one herd they neuer none in Irland afore that tyme / ¶And whan it was told the Kyng and the quene of suche a Knyght that was suche an harper / anone the Kyng sente for hym / and lete serche his woundes / and thenne asked hym his name / thenne he ansuerd I am of the countrey of Lyonas / & my name is Tramtryst that thus was wounded in a bataille as I fought for a ladyes ryght / So god me help said kyng Anguysshe ye shal haue al the helpe in this land that ye may haue here / But I lete you wete in Cornewaile I had a gre­te losse / as euer hadde kynge / for there I lost the best knyghte of the world / his name was Marhaus a ful noble knyghte and Knyght of the table round / and there he told syr Trystrā wherefore syr Marhaus was slayne / Syr Trystram made sem blaunt as he had ben sory / and better knewe he how hit was than the kynge

¶Capitulum ix

THenne the kynge for grete fauoure maade Tramtryst to be put in his doughters ward and kepyng by cau­se she was a noble surgeon / And whan she had serched hym / she fond in the bottome of his wound that therin was poyson / and soo she heled hym within a whyle / and therfore Tramtrist cast grete loue to la beals Isoud / for she was at that tyme the fairest mayde and lady of the worlde / And there Tramtryst lerned her to harpe / and she beganne to haue a grete fantasye vnto hym / And at that tyme sir Palamydes the sarasyn Was in that countrey and Wel cherysshed With the kynge and the [Page] quene / And euery day syr Palamydes drewe vnto la beale Isoud / and profered her many yeftes / for he loued her passy­ngly wel / Al that Aspyed Tramtryst / and ful wel knewe he syr Palamydes for a noble knyght and a myghty man / And wete ye wel syr Tramtryst had grete despyte at syr pa­lomydes / for la beale Isoud told Tramtryst that Palamydes was in wylle to be crystened for her sake / Thus was ther grete enuy betwixe Tramtryst and syr Palamydes / Thenne hit befelle that kynge Anguysshe lete crye a grete Iustes and a grete turnement for a lady that was called the lady of the la­undes / and she was nyghe cosyn vnto the kynge / And what man wanne her / thre dayes after he shold wedde her and ha­ue alle her landes / This crye Was made in England / walys Scotland and also in Fraunce and in Bretayne / It befelle vpon a day la beale Isoud came vnto syr Tramtryst and told hym of this turnement / he ansuerd and sayd fayr lady I am but a feble knyghte / and but late I had ben dede / had not your good ladyship ben / Now fayre lady what wold ye I shold doo in this matere / wel ye wote my lady that I maye not Iuste / A Tramtryst said la beale Isoud why wille ye not haue ado at that turnement / wel I wote syr Palamydes shall be there / and to doo what he maye / And therfore Tram­tryst I pray you for to be there / for els syr Palamydes is ly­ke to wynne the degree / Madame said Tramtrist as for that / it may be soo / for he is a proued knyght / and I am but a yong knyght and late made / and the fyrst batail that I dyd it myshapped me to be sore wounded as ye see / But and I wyst ye wold be my better lady / at that turnement I will be so that ye wille kepe my counceille and lete no creature haue knouleche that I shalle Iuste but your self / and suche as ye wil to kepe your counceil / my poure persone shall I Ieoparde there for your sake that perauentur sir Palamydes shal kno­we whan that I come / Therto said la beale Isoud do your best & as I can said la beale Isoud I shal purueye hors and ar­mour for you at my deuyse / as ye will soo be hit said syr Trā trist I wille be at your cōmaundement / So at the day of Ius­tes / ther cam sir Palamydes with a black sheld / & he ouerthrew many knyghtes that alle the peple had merueylle of hym / [Page] For he putte to the werse syr Gawayne / Gaherys / Agrauayn Bagdemagus / kay / Dodyus le saueage / Sagramo [...] le desy­rus / Gumret le petyte / and Gryflet le fyse de dieu / Alle these the fyrste daye syr Palamydes strake doune to the erthe / And thenne alle maner of knyghtes were adred of sir Palamydes and many called hym the knyght with the black sheld [...] / Soo that day syre Palamydes had grete worshyp / ¶Thenne cam kynge Anguysshe vnto Tramtryst / and asked hym why he wold not Iuste / Syr he said I was but late hurte / and as yet I dare not auenture me / ¶Thenne came there the same squyer that was sente from the kynges doughter of Fraunce / vnto syr Trystram / And whanne he had aspyed syre Iristrā he felle flat to his feete / Alle that aspyed la Bele Isoud / what curtosye the squyer made vnto syr Trystram / And ther­with al sodenly syr Trystram ranne vnto his squyer whos name was Hebes le renoumes / and praid hym hertely in noo wyse to telle his name / Syr said Hebes I wille not discouer your name / but yf ye commaunde me

¶Capitulum x

THenne syr Trystram asked hym what he dyd in those countreyes / syr he sayd / I came hyder with syr Gawayn for to be made knyght / And yf it please you of your han­des that I may be made knyghte / Awaite vpon me as to morn secretely / and in the feld I shal make you a knyght / Thenne had la beale Isoud grete suspecyon vnto Tramtryst that he was somme man of worship proued / and ther with she comforted her self / and cast more loue vnto hym than she had do­ne tofore ¶And soo on the morne syr Palamydes maade hym redy to come in to the feld as he dyd the fyrst day / And there he smote doune the kynge with the C knyghtes and the kynge of Scottes / ¶Thenne had la beale Isoud ordeyned and wel arayed syr Trystram in whyte hors and harneis / And ryght soo she lete putte hym oute at a preuy posterne / & soo he came in to the feld as it had ben a bryght angel / And anone syr Palamydes aspyed hym / and ther with he feutrid a spere vnto syr Tramtrist / and he ageyne vnto hym / And [Page] there syr Trystram smote doune syr Palamydes vnto the erth And thenne there was a grete noyse of peple / some sayd / syre Palamydes hadde a falle / some said the knyght with the blak shelde had a falle / And wete you wel la beale Isoud was passynge gladde / And thenne sire Gawayne and his felawes ix had merueille what knyghte it myght be that had smyten doune syr Palamydes / Thenne wold there none Iuste with Tramtryst / but alle that there were forsoke hym / moost & lest / Thenne syr Trystram made Hebes a knyght / and caused hym to put hym self forthe / and dyd ryght wel that day / So af­ter syr Hebes held hym with syr Trystram / And whan syre Palamydes had receyued this falle / wete ye wel that he was sore ashamed / And as pryuely as he myght / he Withdrewe hym oute of the feld / Alle that aspyed syre Trystram / and lyghtly he rode after syre Palamydes and ouertoke hym / and badde hym torne / for better he wold assaye hym / or euer he departed Thenne syr Palamydes torned hym and eyther lasshed at other with their swerdes / But at the fyrste stroke syre Trystram smote doune Palamydes / and gaf hym suche a stroke vpon the hede that he felle to the erthe / Soo thenne Tris­tram badde yelde hym / and doo his commaundement or els he wold slee hym / whan syre Palamydes beheld his countena­unce / he dredde his buffets soo / that he graunted al his as kyn­ges / Wel said / said sir Tristram / this shalle be your charge / Fyrst vpon payne of your lyf that ye forsake my lady la be­ale Isoud / and in no maner wyse that ye drawe not to her / Also this twelue moneth and a day / that ye bere none armo­ur nor none harneis of werre / ¶Now promyse me this or here shalt thou dye / Allas saide Palamydes for euer I am asha­med / ¶Thenne he sware as syr Trystram hadde commaunded hym / Thenne for despyte and anger / syre Palamydes cutte of his harneis / and threwe them aweye / And soo syr Trystram torned ageyne to the Castel where was la beale Isoud / and by the weye he mette with a damoysel that asked after syre launcelot that wanne the dolorous gard Worshipfully / & this damoysel asked sire Tristram What he Was / For it Was tolde her that it Was he that smote doune syr Palamydes / by Whom the x knyghtes of kynge Arthurs Were smyten doune / [Page] Thenne the damoysel prayd syr Trystram to telle her what h [...] was / And whether that he were syr Launcelot du lake / for she demyd that there was no knyght in the world myghte do su­che dedes of armes / but yf it were Launcelot / Fayre damoysel sayd syr Trystram wete ye wel that I am not syr launcelot for I was neuer of suche prowesse / but in god is al that he maye make me as good a knyght as the good knyght sir laū celot / Now gentyl knyght said she / put vp thy vysure / & whan she beheld his vysage / she thouȝt she sawe neuer a better mās vysage / nor a better farynge knyght / And thenne whan the damoysel knewe certaynly that he was not syre launcelot / thenne she took her leue and departed from hym / And then­ne syre Trystram rode pryuely vnto the posterne where kepte hym la beale Isoud / and there she made hym good chere and thanked god of his good spede / Soo anone within a whyle the kynge and the quene vnderstood that hit was Tramtryst that smote doune syre Palamydes / thenne was he moche ma­de of more than he was before

¶Capitulum xj

THus was sir Tramtryst longe there wel cherysshed / with the kynge and the quene / and namely with labeale Isoud / So vpon a daye / the quene and la beale Isoud made a bayne for syre Tramtryst / And whan he was in his bayne / the quene and Isoud her doughter romed vp & doune in the chamber / and there whyles Gouernail and He­bes attendyd vpon Tramtryst / & the quene beheld his swerd there as it laye vpon his bedde / And thēne by vnhap the que­ne drewe oute his swerd / and beheld it a longe whyle / and bothe they thoughte it a passynge fayre swerd / but within a foote and an half of the poynte there was a grete pyece there of oute broken of the edge / And whan the quene aspyed that gap in the swerd / she remembryd her of a pyece of a swerd / that was foūde in the brayne pan of syre Marhaus the good knyght that was her broder / Allas thenne said she vnto her doughter la beale Isoud / this is the same traytour knyghte that slewe my broder thyn eme / Whanne Isoud herd her saye [Page] soo / she was passynge sore abasshed / for passyng wel she loued Tramtryst / and ful wel she knewe the cruelnes of her moder the quene / Anon there with alle the quene went▪ vnto her ow­ne chamber / and soughte her cofre / and there she toke oute the pyece of the swerd that was pulled out of syr Marhaus hede after that he was dede / / And thenne she ranne with that pyece of yron to the swerd that laye vpon the bedde / And whanne she putte that pyece of stele and yron vnto the swerd / hit was as mete as it myghte be / whan it was newe broken / And thē ­ne the quene gryped that swerd in her hand fyersly / & with alle her myghte she ranne streyghte vpon Tramtryst where he sat in his bayne / And there she hadde ryued hym thorou hadde not syr Hebes goten her in his armes / and pulled the suerd from her / and els she hadde threst hym thorou / Thenne whanne she was lettyd of her euyl wylle / she ranne to the kynge Anguyssh her husband and sayde on her knees / O my lord here haue ye in your hous that traitour knyght that slewe my broder and your seruaunt that noble knyght syr Marhaus / who is that said kynge Anguysshe and where is he / Syr she said hit is syr Tramtryst the same knyght that my doughter helyd Allas said the kynge therfore am I ryght heuy / for he is a ful noble knyght as euer I sawe in felde / ¶But I charge you said the kyng to the quene that ye haue not ado with that knyght / but lete me dele with hym / Thenne the kynge went in to the chambre vnto syr Tramtryst / and thenne was he gone vnto his chambre / and the kynge fond hym al redy armed to mounte vpon his hors / whanne the kynge sawe hym al redy armed to goo vnto horsbak / the kynge said nay Tramtryst hit wille not auaile to compare the ageynst me / But thus moche I shalle doo for my worship and for thy loue in soo moch as thou arte within my courte / hit were no worship for me to slee the / Therfore vpon this condycyon I wille gyue the leue for to departe from this courte in saufte / so thou wilt telle me who was thy fader / and what is thy name / and yf thou slewe syr Marhaus my broder

¶Capitulum xij

[Page]SYr said Trystram now I shalle telle you alle the tro­uthe / my faders name is sir Melyodas kynge of Lyo­nas / & my moder hyȝt Elyzabeth that was sister vnto kynge Marke of Cornewaile / & my moder dyed of me in the foreste / And by cause therof she commaunded or she dyed that whan I were crystened / they shold crystene me Trystram / & by cause I wold not be knowen in this countrey I turned my name and lete me calle Tramtryst / & for the truage of Cornewayle I fought for myn emes sake / & for the ryght of Cor­newaile that ye had posseded many yeres / And wete ye well said Trystram vnto the kynge I dyd the bataille for the loue of myn vnkel kynge Marke / and for the loue of the countreye of Cornewaile / and for to encreace myn honoure / For that sa­me day that I fought with sir Marhaus I was made knyȝt And neuer or than dyd I no bataile with no knyght / & frome he went alyue & lefte his sheld & his suerd behynde / so god me helpe said the kyng I may not say but ye dyd as a kny­ght shold / & it was your part to doo for your quarel / & to encreace your worship as a knyght shold / how be it I may not mayntene you in this countrey with my worship onles that I shold displease my barons & my wyf / & her kyn / Syr said Tr­ystram I thanke you of your good lordship that I haue had with you here / and the grete goodenes my lady your doughter hath shewed me / & therfor said sir Tristram it may so happen that ye shalle wynne more by my lyf than by my dethe / for in the partyes of Englond it may happen I may doo you scruyse at some season that ye shal be glad that euer ye shewed me your good lordship / ¶With more I promyse you as I am true knyȝt that in all places I shal be my lady your douȝters ser­uaunt / & knyȝt in ryght & in wrong / & I shal neuer fayle her to doo as moche as a knyght maye doo

¶Also I byseche your good grace that I may take my leue at my lady your doughter and at alle the Barons and kny­ghtes / I wille wel said the kynge / ¶Thenne sire Tristram wente vnto la beale Isoud / and tooke his leue of her / And thenne he tolde her all what he was and how he had chaunged his name by cause he wold not be knowen / & hou a lady told hym he yt shold neuer be hole tyl he cam in to this coūtrey where [Page] the poyson was made / where thorou I was nere my dethe had not your ladyship ben / O gentyl knyght said la beale Isoud ful wo am I of thy departynge / for I sawe neuer man that I oughte soo good wille to / and there with all she wepte hertely / Madame said sire Trystram ye shalle vnderstande that my name is sir Trystram de lyones goten of kyng Melyodas and borne of his quene / And I promyse you feythfully that I shal be alle the dayes of my lyf your knyghte / Gramercy said La beale Isoud / and I promyse you there ageynste that I shalle not be maryed this seuen yeres but by your assent / and to whome that ye wille I shalle be maryed to / hym wylle I haue / and he wille haue me yf ye wil consente / And thenne syre Trystram gaf her a rynge and she gaf hym another / and ther with he departed fro her / leuynge her / makynge grete dole and lamentacion / and he streyghte wente vnto the Courte a­monge alle the Barons / and there he took his leue at moost and leest / and openly he said amonge them all / Faire lordes now it is soo that I muste departe / Yf there be ony man here that I haue offended vnto / or that ony man be with me gre­ued / lete complayne hym here afore me or that euer I depart and I shal amende it vnto my power / And yf there be ony that wil profer me wronge or say of me wrong / or shame be­hynde my bak / saye hit now or neuer / and here is my body to make it good body ageynst body / And alle they stood stylle / ther was not one that wold saye one word / yet were there some knyghtes that were of the quenes blood and of sire Mar­baus blood / but they wold not medle with hym /

¶Capitulum xiij

SOo sir Tristram departed and toke the see / & with good wynde he arryued vp at Tyntagyl in Cornewaile / & whan kyng Mark was hole in his prosperite ther cam tydynges that sir Tristram was arryued and hole of his wo­undes / therof was kynge marke passyng glad / & soo were alle the barons / & whan he sawe his tyme he rode vnto his fader ky­ng melyodas / & there he had al the chere that the kyng & the quene coude make hym / And thenne largely Kyng Melyo­das and his quene departed of their landes and goodes to sire Trystram / ¶Thenne by the lycence of Kyng [Page] Melyodas his fader he retorned ageyne vnto the court of ky­nge Mark / and there he lyued in grete ioye long tyme / vntyl at the laste there befelle a Ialousye and an vnkyndenes betw­yxe kynge Marke and sir Tristram / for they loued bothe one lady / And she was an erles wyf that hyght syre Segwary­des / And this lady loued syre Trystram passyngly wel / And he loued her ageyne for she was a passynge fayr lady / And that aspyed sir Tristram wel / ¶ Thenne kynge Mark vnderstood that and was Ialous / for kyng Marke loued her passyngly wel / Soo it felle vpon a day / this lady sent a dw­erf vnto sir Tristram and badde hym as he loued her / that he wold be with her the nyȝt nexte folowynge / Also she charged you that ye come not to her but yf ye be wel armed / for her lo­rd was called a good knyghte ¶Syre Trystram answerd to the dwerf / recommaunde me vnto my lady / and telle her I wille not fayle but I wille be with her the terme that she hath sette me / and with this ansuer the dwerf departed / And kynge Marke aspyed that the dwerfe was with syre Trystram vpon message from Segwarydes wyf / thenne kyng Marke sent for the dwerfe / And whanne he was comen / he maade the dwerf by force to telle hym alle why and wherfore that he came on message from sire Tristram

¶Now said kynge Marke goo where thou wolt / and vpon payne of dethe that thou saye no word that thou spakest with me / soo the dwerf departed from the kynge / ¶And that same nyghte that the steuen was sette betwixt Segwarydes wyfe & syr Trystram kynge Marke armed hym / and made hym redy and took two knyghtes of his counceylle with hym / and soo he rode afore for to abyde by the waye / for to awayte vpon sir Trystram / ¶And as sire Trystram came rydynge vpon hys waye with his spere in his hand / kynge Marke came hurt­lynge vpon hym with his two knyghtes sodenly / And alle thre smote hym with theyre speres / and kynge Marke hurte syre Trystram on the brest ryght sore / And thenne syre Tris­tram feutryd his spere / and smote his vnkel kynge Marke soo sore that he rasshyd hym to the erthe / and brysed hym that he laye stylle in a swoune / and longe hit was or euer [Page] he myghte welde hym self / And thenne he ranne to the one kn­yght / and ef [...]e to the other / and smote hem to the cold erthe / that they laye stylle / And ther with alle sir Tristram rode fo­rthe sore wounded to the lady / and fonde her abydynge hym at a posterne

¶Capitulum xiiij

ANd there she welcomed hym fayre / and eyther halsed other in armes / and soo she lete putte vp his hors in the best wyse / and thenne she vnarmed hym / And soo they soup [...]d lyghtely and wente to bedde with grete ioye and plesaunce / and soo in his ragyng he took no kepe of his grene wound that kynge Marke had gyuen hym / And soo syr Tristram bebled both the ouer shete and the nether & pelowes / and hede shete / and within a whyle ther came one afore that war­ned her that her lord was nere hand within a bowe draughte Soo she made sir Trystram to aryse / and soo he armed hym / and tooke his hors and so departed / By thenne was come segwarydes her lord / and whan he fond her bedde troubled & bro­ken and wente nere and beheld it by candel lyghte / thenne he sawe that there had layne a wounded knyght / A fals tra­itresse thenne he said / why hast thou bitrayed me / and there with alle he swange oute a swerd and said / but yf thou telle me who hath ben here / here thou shalt dye / A my lord mercy sa­yd the lady / and helde vp her handes / sayeng / slee me not / and I shall telle you alle who hath ben here / Telle anone said seg­warydes to me alle the trouthe / Anone for drede she saide here was sir Trystram with me / and by the way as he came to me ward / he was sore wounded / A fals traitresse said segwarides where is he become / sir she said he is armed and departed on ho­ [...]e bak not yet hens half a myle / ye saye wel said segwarydes thenne he armed hym lyghtly / and gate his hors and rode after syre Tristram that rode streyght waye vnto Tyntagyl / And within a whyle he ouertoke sire Tristram / And thenne he [...]adde hym torne fals traitour knyghte / and syr Tristram anon torned hym ageynst hym / And there with al segwarides smote syr Trystram with a spere that it alle to braste / ¶And [Page] thenne he swange oute his swerd / and smote fast at syr Tristram / Syre knyght said syre Trystram I counceyle you that ye smyte no more how be it for the wronges that I haue do­ne you / I wille forbere you as longe as I maye / ¶Nay sayd Segwarides that shalle not be / for outher thou shalt dye or I / Thenne syre Tristram drewe oute his swerd and hurtled his hors vnto hym fyersly / and thorou the waste of the body he smote syre Segwarides that he felle to the erthe in a swoune / And soo sire Tristram departed and lefte hym there And soo he rode vnto Tyntagil and tooke his lodgynge secre­tely for he wold not be knowen that he was hurte

¶Also sir Segwarides men rode after theyr maister / whome they fond lyenge in the feld sore wounded / and brouȝt hym home on his shelde / and there he lay longe or that he were ho­le / but at the laste he recouerd ¶ Also kynge Marke wold not be aknowen of that sir Tristram and he hadde mette that nyght / And as for syre Trystram he knewe not that ky­nge Marke had mette with hym / And soo the kynges astaū ­ce came to sir Tristram to comforte hym as he laye seke in his bedde / But as longe as kynge Marke lyued / he loued neuer sire Trystram after that / though there was fayre speche / loue was there none / And thus it past many wekes and dayes / & alle was forgyuen and forgoten / For sire Segwarydes durste not haue ado with sir Tristram by cause of his noble prowesse And also by cause he was neuewe vnto kynge Marke / ther­fore he lete it ouer slyp / for he that hath a pryuy hurte is loth to haue a shame outward

¶Capitulum xv /

THenne hit befelle vpon a daye that the good knyghte Bleoberys de ganys broder to Blamore de ganys / & nyghe cosyn vnto the good knyght sir launcelot du lake / This Bleoberys came vnto the courte of kynge Marke / & there he asked of kynge Marke a bone to gyue hym what yeft that he wold aske in his courte

¶Whanne the kyng herd hym aske soo / he merueilled of hys [Page] askynge / but by cause he Was a knyghte of the round table / & of a grete renomme / kynge Marke graunted hym his hole as­kynge / thenne saide sire Bleoberys I Wille haue the fayrest lady in your Courte that me lyst to chese / I maye not say nay sayd ky