AN ABSTRACT OF THE DVTIES COM­MANDED, AND SINNES forbidden in the Law of God.

BY THE RIGHT REVEREND FATHER IN GOD, GEORGE DOVVNAME, Doctor of Diuinity, and Lord Bishop of DERRY.

PSALM. 119. 96.

I haue seene an end of all perfection: but thy Com­mandement is exceeding broad.

AT LONDON, Imprinted by FELIX KYNGSTON. 1620.

TO THE TRVE LOVER OF VERTVE AND RELIGI­on, Mistris MARGARET HARE, widow, the late deare and louing wife of IOHN HARE Esquire, of the Inner Temple, and chiefe Clerke of his Maiesties Court of Wards and Liueries.

THe Reuerend Author of this Booke, hauing now full twen­ty yeeres since, in his publike exercises finished a very large Treatise vpon the Decalogue, or ten Commandements of Almighty God, was then pleased at my ear­nest entreaty, and for my priuate vse, to collect and gather out of that large Treatise, the summe and heads of what was therein more largely handled, which I purposed still, accor­ding to his first intent, to haue kept by me for my priuate vse: but since, hauing been often im­portuned by many learned and religious Mini­sters [Page] for the loane thereof, whereto I had almost yeelded, had I not considered the wrong and iniurie which thereby might redound to the Author, if the same should happen to be printed, either by some vnperfect copy, or vnder the name of some other, especially, if euer the Au­thor should be pleased to publish those his larger volumes. And therefore for satisfaction of the request of my friends, I endeuoured to gaine the Authors consent to the publishing heereof; which hauing obtained, I have now put the same in print for the publike and generall good, and doe dedicate the same vnto you, not onely to be a helpe to you in your priuate meditations in the Law of God, but also as a testimony of my thankfulnesse for your many fauours both to me and mine. The Almighty God make it profi­table for the end intended: to whose blessed protection I commend you, and will euer rest

Yours in all Christian duty to bee commanded, BASILL NICOLL.

THE PREFACE, CONTAINING RVLES OF direction, for the expounding of the Commandements.

WHereas the holy Ghost testifi­eth, that the Law of God,Psal. 19. 7. (though propounded in ten words) is so perfect, that no­thing may be added to it, and so large, that nothing may bee compared therewith:Ps. 119. 96. It must therefore bee confes­sed, that the sence of the Commandements is so to be inlarged, as that they may be vn­derstood to bee the perfect Pandects (as it were) of Christians; forbidding all vices which the Lord condemneth in his Word; and commanding all morall duties which he requireth at our hands.

And for as much as there are two prin­cipall vses of the Law; the one, to shew vs our manifold sinnes, and the punishments due for them, that being humbled in our [Page] selues, we might seeke to Christ: the other, that it might be a perfect rule, whereby to frame our liues and conuersation; that be­ing redeemed by Christ, wee may also bee renewed according to the image of God, in true righteousnesse and holinesse: there­fore it is very expedient, that the speciall duties commanded, and vices forbidden in euery Commandement, should particular­ly be laid forth. That in respect of the for­mer vse, we might see those manifold both duties which wee haue omitted, and also vices which wee haue committed hereto­fore: and in respect of the latter, that wee might distinctly see and vnderstand those particular duties which the Lord enioy­neth vs to obserue, and those particular vi­ces which he chargeth vs to shunne for the time to come.

And for our direction in this behalfe, we are to expound euery Commandement ac­cording to these fiue rules:

1. Where any duty is commanded, there the contrary vice is forbidden; and where any vice is forbidden, there the con­trary duty is commanded.

[Page]Euery Commandement therefore containeth two parts; the

  • Affirmatiue, cō ­manding the duty.
  • Negatiue, for­bidding y vice.

Whence ariseth a di­stinction of sins, that they are either sins of

  • Omission.
  • Commission.

2. Vnder one particular vice mentioned in the Commandement, all of the same kind are forbidden; and vnder one particu­lar commanded, all of the same kind are commanded. For the Law of God is spiri­tuall,Rom. 7. 14 and therefore requireth not onely outward obedience in word and deed, but also inward in the mind and heart. Neither doth it onely forbid the outward sinnes committed in word and deed, but also all the secret corruptions of the mind and heart. And thus our Sauiour hath taught vs to expound the Law of God, Math. 5. 21, 22, 27, 28. and 1. Epist. Ioh. 3. 15.

Againe, the Law of God is perfect, re­quiring perfect obedience both inward and outward, not onely in respect of the parts, but also of the degrees. Wherefore, where any duty is commanded, there the highest [Page] degree of it is commanded, as appeareth by the summe of the Law, Math. 22. 37, 38. and where any vice is forbidden, there the least degree of it is forbidden, and beareth the name of that grosse sinne which is spe­cified, that we might learne to esteeme no sinne small.1. Sam. 15. 23. For vnaduised anger is mur­ther; and looking vpon a woman to lust after her, is forbidden vnder the name of adultery, as our Sauiour teacheth, Math. 5. 22, 28.

3. Where any duty is commanded, there the meanes which tend thereto are enioyned; and where any vice is forbidden, there the meanes, prouocations and allure­ments tending thereto are also forbidden. For such as is the end, such are the subor­dinate meanes that in their owne nature doe tend thereto. This teacheth, that good intentions and desires will not serue, when we are carelesse of the meanes.

Now there are three meanes which are common to all duties, and therefore in all the Precepts are commanded; and the neg­lect of them, or the vse of the contrary for­bidden: viz. 1. Prayer: for of our selues wee cannot so much as thinke a good thought, 2. Cor. 3. 5. Psal. 119. 33, 34, 35, 36.

[Page] 2. Diligent hearing of the Word, Rom. 10. 14, 17.

3. Good company, Prou. 13. 20. Hee that toucheth pitch, shall be defiled, Ecclus. 13. 1. A little leauen sowreth the whole lumpe, 1. Cor. 5. 6. Therefore Dauid bid­deth the wicked depart from him, that hee might keepe the Commandements of his God, Psal. 119. 115. and else-where profes­seth, that he auoided their company, Psalm. 26. 4, 5.

4. Where any duty is commanded, or vice forbidden, there also the signes are commanded, or forbidden. For first, as touching vertues and duties; the graces of God are not to bee smothered, as it were candles vnder a bushell, but they must be manifested to the glory of God, to the good example of others; and for a testimo­ny to our selues that wee are endued with them, wee must bee carefull of honest things, not onely before God, but also be­fore men, 2. Cor. 8. 21.

And as touching vices, we are taught to abstaine from all shew of euill, 1. Thes. 5. 22. Haughty lookes, strange apparell, are con­demned as signes of pride: haunting of sus­pected places,Pro. 6. 17. Zeph. 1. 8. as signes of incōtinency, &c.

[Page] 5. Duties to be procured, and vices to be auoided, not in our selues onely, but also in others. First therefore in all the Precepts is commanded the communion of Saints to be exercised among the faithfull, in an earnest desire shewne,Mat. 18. 15. to win our neigh­bour vnto Christ, and in a tender care ta­ken, for the furthering of the saluation one of another, by the duties of edification.

As namely,Heb. 3. 13. 1. In respect of duties, by stirring vp one another,1. Thes. 5. 11, 14. Heb. 10. 24. by

  • Instructing the igno­rant.
    Dan. 12. 3.
  • Admonitiō,
    Rom. 15. 14.
    or putting our brother in mind of his duty.
  • Exhortation vnto his duty.
  • Encouraging him in well-doing.
  • Comforting those which are weake.
  • Good
    • Counsell.
    • Example. Math. 5. 16. 1. Pet. 2. 12. Heb. 12. 13

[Page]2. In respect of things for­bidden, to

  • Reclame the Erroneous. Iam. 5. 19, 20.
  • Reprooue the offendour. Leu. 19. 17. Eph. 5. 11.
  • Disswade from vice.

Secondly, in all the Precepts wee are forbidden to haue any fellowship with the vnfruitfull workes of darknesse, Eph. 5. 11. or to be accessary to the offences of others, 1. Tim. 5. 22.

[Page]Men may be accessary to the offences of o­thers, diuers wayes: whereof some are

  • Common, and those either
    • Going before the offence committed, as
      • Prouoca­tion, by
        • Incensing, Gal. 5. 26. Eph. 6. 4. Iob 2. 9. 1. King. 21. 25, 7.
        • Alluring. Pro. 1. 10. [...]7. 18, 21. and here­to corrupt and infecting speeches are referred. 1. Cor. 15. 33.
      • Euill counsell: 2. Sam. 13. 5. [...]16. 21. 2. Chr. 22. 3, 4.
      • Consent and appro­bation, Rom. 1. 32 whether it bee
        • Ouert and expressed, and that either in
          • Word. Act. 8. 1. [...] 26. 10.
          • Deed. Act. 7. 58. so recei­uers, of theft; bawds, of adultery; partners of the gaine. Pro. 1. 14. Psal. 50. 18.
        • Couert, as by silence, or dissembling the fault of our brother, when hee ought to be admonished: for as by ill speech thou bringest thy brother into sinne, so by ill silence thou lea­uest him in sinne, or sufferest sinne to rest vpon him, Leuit. 19. 17. Qui tacet, consentire videtur.
      • Euill ex­ample, oc­casioning another to fall: this is called a scandall, Ro. 14. 13. and it is either a scandall
        • In it selfe as that which is euill in it selfe, and is therefore an offence gi­uen, though it be not taken: as any sinne committed in the sight or no­tice of another.
        • By accident, when the thing, which in it selfe is indifferent, is so vsed, as that the weake brother is offended thereby: that is, when he is by thine example animated to do that, which in his owne conscience he doth cō ­demne. Ro. 14. 20, 22. 1. Cor. 8. 9, 10.
    • Accompanying, or following after the offence, as ye
      • Excusing
      • Defending
      • Cōmending
      of it. Esa. 5. 20. Prou. 24. 24.
  • Peculiar to Superi­ours, as to
    • Command that which is euill & vnlawful, either
      • Publikely, by wicked laws & edicts. Esa. 10. 1. Dan. 3. 4, 5. 6
      • Priuately. 1. Sam. 22. 18. 19. 2. Sā. 12. 9. & 2. Sā. 11. 15, 17
    • Winke at euiil, which by their authority they might redresse. Ro. 13. 4. Mar. 15. 15. 2. Kin. 12. 3

[Page]The Law is diuided into two Tables, the

  • One, commanding the loue of God, or the duties of Piety towards God. Mat. 22. 37, 38.
  • Other, cōmanding the loue of our neigh­bour, or the duties of charity and righ­teousnesse towards our neighbour, Mat. 22. 39.

The Commande­ments of the first Table, prescribing the worship of God, or Piety, teach

  • Who is to bee worshipped: viz. that Iehouah alone is to bee had and worshipped as God. Praec. 1.
  • How, both in
    • His solemne worship: viz. by such means, and after such a manner as he hath prescribed. Praec. 2
    • The whole course of our liues, viz. by sanctifying & glo­rifying his name. Praec. 3.
  • When especially God is to bee wor­shipped, viz. on the Sabbath, which is to be sanctified, and con­secrated to the worship and ser­uice of God. Praec. 4.

The first Commandement.

The Summe of the first Commandement.

Math. 4. 10.

Thou shalt haue Iehouah alone for thy God.

The Affirmatiue part,

Containing two branches.

  • 1. That we should haue Iehouah to our God.
  • 2. That we should haue him alone.

The speciall duties.

We are to haue God both

  • Inwardly in our
    • Minds, by
      • Knowing
      • Beleeuing
      • Remēbring
      him.
    • Hearts, by adhering vnto him.
  • Outwardly, and in the whole man, by ho­nouring him.

In our minds.The duties of the mi [...]de.

1. The true Knowledge Knowledge of God. Ioh. 17. 3.

Where we are to consider the

  • Obiect: the truth which God hath reuealed concerning himselfe. Deut. 29. 29. Ioh. 5. 39. 1. Tim. 2. 4.
  • Quantity or measure, 1. Cor. 14. 20. Col. 3. 16. which must bee proportionable to our
    • Calling, more being required in those who are guides of others.
    • Meanes. Luk. 12. 48.
    • Time which God hath vouchsafed vs. Heb. 5. 12.
  • Quality, that it bee an effectuall▪ powerfull, and spirituall knowledge. 1. Ioh. 2. 3, 4.

The Negatiue part.

Forbidding,

  • 1. The not hauing of God, which is Atheisme.
  • 2. The hauing of a false god, which is Idolatry.
  • 3. The hauing of more gods than one, which is Po­lytheisme.

The Opposite vices. Opposite to know­ledge, in regard of the

  • Obiect, both in the
    • Excesse: curiosity, to bee w [...]e aboue that which is written. 1. Cor. 4. 6.
    • Desect,
      • Ignorance 1. Cor. 15. 34. Hos. 4. 1, 6. either when men
        • Cannot, through their naturall corrupti [...]n. 1. Cor. 2. 14. Rom. 3. 11. and this is na­rurall blindnesse.
        • Will not, which is af­fected ignorance. 2. Pet. 3. 5.
        • Care not to know God. which is [...]e­lesse ignorance. Pro. 1. 22. Ioh 3. 19.
      • The fruit of ignorance, which is, errours concerning God. Math. 22. 29.
  • Quantity, a small measure of knowledge. Heb. 5. 12. Esa. 28. 9, 10. Ier. 4. 22▪
  • Quality, a literall or speculatiue knowledge, seuered frō obedience. 1. Ioh. 2. 4. 1. Cor. 13. 2. Luk. 12. 47.

[Page] 2. Faith, Faith. whereby we giue credit to the Word of God. 1. Ioh. 5. 10.

Faith, in respect of the obiect, is either

  • Generall, whereby wee giue assent to the whole Word of God. And this, in regard of the
    • Quantity, ought to be a ful per­swasion, in re­spect both of
      • Vnderstan­ding. Col. 2. 2
      • Assent. Luk. 1. 1.
  • Quality, must bee a liuely, effe­ctuall and working Faith. Iam. 2. 18. Gal. 5. 6.
  • Speciall, giuing cre­dit to the
    • Threatnings of the Law to our humiliation. 2. Chron. 34. 19, 21, 27, Io [...]. 3. 5.
    • Promises of the Gospell to our iustification. Ioh. 3. 16.

3. Remembrance Remem­brance. of God. Eccl. 12. 1. Esa. 62. 6.

It contai­neth two duties:

  • Memory, laying vp (as it were) into the trea­sure of our hearts, those things which wee learne concerning God and his Word. Prou. 2. 1. [...] 4. 21. Deut. 6. 6. [...] 11. 18. Luk. 8. 15.
  • Recordation, recording or recalling to mind that which was committed to memory. Psal. 78. 34, 35. Psal. 22. 27.

And this ought to bee

  • Effectuall, working obedience. Psal. 119. 55. Esa. 64. 5.
  • Entyre, and not partiall: as, to remem­ber his mercy, and not to forget his iustice, &c.

[Page]Opposed to Faith

  • Generall, in the
    • Excesse, vaine credulity, hauing no ground in the Word of God.
    • Defect, in respect of the
      • Parts, viz.
        • Vnderstanding, such especially is the implicite faith of Pa­pists.
        • Assent,
          • With-held from the truth, doubting. Rom. 4. 20. Math. 21. 21.
          • Giuen to the contrary, fals­hood. 2. Kin. 7. 2. 2. Th. 2. 11, 12. which are two degrees of infidelity.
      • Quantity, [...], a small measure of faith. Act. 26. 28.
      • Quality, the idle and dead faith. Iam. 2. 14, 17, 26.
  • Speciall, viz.
    • Legall, infidelity working carnall securi­ty. Deut. 29. 19.
    • Euangelicall, as the
      • Counterfeit faith of hy­pocrites. Luk. 8. 13. Ioh. 2. 23, 24.
      • Infidelity of vnbeleeuers Ioh. 3. [...].

Opp.

  • Forgetful­nesse, in not
    • Laying vp, but suffering the Word of God to slip from vs. Heb. 2. 1. Deut. 6. 12.
    • Recalling, when iust occasion is offe­red. Iob 8. 13. Deut. 8. 11, 14, 19. Psal. 44. 20. & Psal. 50. 22.
  • Remēbrance, either
    • Vneffectuall, seuered from obedi­ence in men sinning against con­science.
    • Partiall, as cal­ling to minde either Gods
      • Mercy alone, vnto Presumption.
      • Iustice alone, to Desperation.

[Page] In our hearts we are to adhere vnto the Lord,The duties of the mind and set our hearts vpon him alone. Deut. 13. 4. Act. 11. 23. 1. Cor. 7. 35. Ioh. 23. 8.

This is to be done by setting our affections vpon God, chiefly by

  • Trusting in
  • Louing
  • Fearing

him aboue althings and frō these three some others arise.

1. Trust or assiance, Affi [...]ce in God. in God. Pro. 3. 5. Psal. 32. 10. [...]34. 8.

Which we are to haue, whe­ther wee

  • Haue meanes, for wee are not to trust in them, but in the vse of them to de­pend vpon God. Psa. 44. 5, 6, 7. [...]60. 11.
  • Want meanes. Iob 13. 15.

Wee are to trust in God, who is able to prouide for vs, both

  • Without meanes, Genes. 22. 14. Euen in the Mount will God prouide.
  • aboue means. 2. Chr. 20. 12. [...]14. 11. 1. Sam. 14. 6.

[Page]Opp. Remo­uing our harts from God, Ier. 17. 5. either by

  • Not setting our hearts vpon God▪ the fault of
    • Hypocrites. Esa. 29. 13
    • Profane persons. Ierem. 12. 2.
  • Setting our hearts vpon other things, the fault of worldlings. Psal. 62. 10. Phil. 3. 19. who are therefore called Adul­terers. Iam. 4. 4.

Oppos. as

  • Extremes, in the
    • Excesse: tempting of God, Math. 4. 6.
    • Defect, diffi­dence, Luk. 12. 29. and the fruits therof, viz.
      • Carking care. Mat. 6. 25, 31. Luk. 21. 34.
      • Vse of vnlawful means. Prou. 30. 9.
  • Disorder, whē our affiance is reposed in o­ther things, whether
    • Vnreasonable, as our
      • Instruments and meanes. Psa. 20. 7. [...]44. 6. Hab. 1. 16.
      • Wealth and riches. Iob 31. 24. 1. Tim. 6. 17. Psal. 52. 7.
      • Place, either for the
        • Strength. Ier. 48. 7. [...]49. 16.
        • Holinesse. Ier. 7. 4.
    • Reasonable, as
      • Men, Ier. 17. 5. though
        • Skilfull. 2. Chr. 16. 12.
        • Mighty, Psalm. 146. 2.
        • Many. Hos. 10. 13. Esa. 31. 1, 3
      • Diuels, as in
        • Witches and wi­zards. Deu. 18. 10, 11. Leuit. 20. 27.
        • Those that seeke to them. Leuit. 20. 6. 1. Chro. 10. 13.

[Page] To Affiance we are to ioyne Hope: Hope. for he that trusteth to Gods goodnesse for the present, will also expect go [...]d things from him for the time to come. Psal. 37. 7. Psal. 146. 5. Heb. 6. 19.

Her [...] 2. things are to be considered, the

  • Obiect, both the
    • Person, in whom, viz. God alone: who there­fore is called our Hope. Psal. 46. 2 [...]62. 9. Ioel 3. 16. Col. 1. 27. 1. Tim. 1. 1.
    • Things, viz. good things to come, ac­cording to Gods pro­mise, both in
      • This life, as
        • Assistance in time of need. Psalm. 46. 1. [...]62. 1, 2, 5, 6, 7.
        • Exhibition of all good things. Psalm. 104. 27, 28.
      • World to come, eternall life. Tit. 1. 2. 1. Thes. 5. 8. which, be­cause it is the chiefe obiect of our hope, is also called our hope. Col. 1. 5. Tit. 2. 13.
  • Manner how wee are to hope, with
    • Patience. Rom. 8. 25. 1. Thes. 1. 3. Hab. 2. 3.
    • Assurance and comfort. Rom. 12. 12. Heb. 3. 6. [...]6. 11. 1. Pet. 1. 13.

[Page]Opp. as

  • Extremes, in the
    • Excesse: Presumption, as the hope of the hypo­crite and impenitent sinner: for true hope is ioyned with repentance. 1. Ioh. 3. 3. and ne­uer maketh ashamed. Rom. 5. 5. but this doth. Iob 8. 13. Prou. 11. 7.
    • Defect,
      • Absence of hope, as in the ignorant. Eph. 2. 12. 1. Thes. 4. 13.
      • Despera­tion, or casting off of hope, as in
        • Epicures, who as they haue cast off all sorrow, Eph. 3. 19 so also all hope. 1. Cor. 15. 32. Esa. 22. 13. Ier. 18. 12.
        • Mē ouer­whelmed with sor­row. 2. Cor. 2. 7. arising from the sence of their
          • Affliction. Gen. 4. 13. 2. Cor. 7. 10. who therfore som times make away themselues.
          • Sinnes, and is either
            • Tēporary and cura­ble, as in the Elect.
            • Finall and incurable. Mat. 27. 5 Act. 1. 18.
  • Disorder or [...] of hope, being placed in
    • Our selues, or in our owne merits.
    • Any other thing besides God, from which (as the Author) wee ex­pect good things, ei­ther in
      • This life, ac­cording to that which was said in the disorder of affiance.
      • The world to come.

[Page] 2. Loue Loue. of God. Psal. 31. 23. 1. Ioh. 4. 19. Math. 22. 37.

Where consider the

  • Measure both
    • Simply: for hee is to bee loued without measure, as hee is good without measure, and hath loued vs without mea­sure. Ephes. 3. 19. Ioh. 3. 16. but because wee cannot at­taine to that; yet let vs loue him with all our heart. Deut. 6. 5. or at the least, with an vpright heart.
    • By comparison: for as hee is in­finitely good aboue al things, so he ought to be loued aboue all things. Luk. 14. 26. Math. 10. 37.
  • Manner: for as hee is absolutely good, yea goodnesse and charity it selfe; so hee is to be loued absolutely and for himselfe; but all other things in him, and for him. As for example: we are to loue our
    • Friends, in the Lord.
    • Foes, for the Lord.

Vnto the loue of God, arising from the perswasion of Gods loue towards vs, wee are to ad­ioyne partly as fruits, partly as companions thereof:

  • Zeale of Gods glory.
  • Reioycing in God.
  • Thankfulnes towards God.
  • Obedience towards God.
  • Patience towards God.

[Page]Oppos. as

  • Extremes, in the defect, (for in the excesse we cannot of­fend)
    • Want of the loue of G [...]d, when wee doe not loue him, either
      • With all our hearts.
      • Aboue all things.
    • Hatred of God, which is partly
      • Natural. Rom. 8. 7
      • Encreased by sin. Rom. 1. 30.
  • Disorder, when we lo [...]e any things as much, or more than God, Mat. 10 37. 1. Sam. 2. 29. 1. Kin. 11. 3. heereof there are two principall sorts, viz. the loue of
    • Our selues; I meane not the naturall loue of our selues, whereby we seeke our preservation (which as it is sub [...]rdinate to the loue of God, is lawfull) nor the spirituall loue of our [...]elues, whereby wee seeke our saluation; but the carnall loue of our selues, 2. Tim. 3. 12. Rom. 1 [...]. 14. Gal. 6. 8.
    • The world, & of those things that are therein, 1. Ioh. 2. 15, 16. as the loue of
      • Pleasure, wch is voluptu­ousnesse. 2. Tim. 3. 4. Philip 3. 19. 2. Pet. 2. 10, 12.
      • Riches, wch is couetous­nesse. Col. 3. 5. Eph. 5. 3.
      • Honour and glory, which is ambition, and vai [...]e­glory. Gal. 5. 26.

[Page] Zeale Zeale. of Gods glory. 1. King. 19. 10. Apo [...] 3. 19.

Here we are to consider,

  • Wherein this zeale must shewit selfe.
  • How it ought to be qualified.

It must shew it selfe in re­gard of the

  • Meanes of Gods glo­ry: and in this re­spect it cōtaineth 2. duties: viz. a
    • Feruent desire and forward care, y the means of ad­uancing Gods glory, may bee vsed both by
      • Thēselues, Tit 2. 14 [...] 3. 8. Rom. 12. 11. Act. 18. 25.
      • Others. 2. Cor. 11. 2. Col. 4. 13. Hebr. 10. 24.
    • Willing and cheerfull vsing of the meanes, and doing of the things whereby God may be glorified. 1. Chron. 28. 9. 1. Ioh. 5. 3. Ioh. 4. 34. Psalm. 122. 1. Esa. 58. 13. Act. 17. 11. 2 Cor. 9. 7.
  • Impediments of Gods glory, in respect wher­of it is a compound affection of feruent loue and desire of promoting Gods glory, and a vehement indignation conceiued a­gainst the obstacles therof. 1. King. 19. 10. Ioh. 2. 17. Numb. 25. 11. 2. Pet. 2. 7. Psalm. 119. 136.

This zeale ought to be

  • Pure,
    • Proceeding from a sincere affection not mixed with
      • Malice and emula­tion.
      • Hypocrisie.
    • Guided by knowledge, assuring the par­ty of the goodnesse of the cause. Gal. 4. 18.
  • Discreet, & therefore both
    • Moderate, not exceeding the
      • Proportion of the cause.
      • Bounds of a mans calling.
    • Seasonable. Prou. 25. 11.

[Page]Oppos.

  • Want of zeale, whereof are two degrees:
    • Lukewarmnesse. Apoc. 3. 15, 16. when men are neither hot nor cold, &c.
    • Coldnesse and (as it were) deadnesse in Religion. Zeph. 1. 12.
  • Corrupt zeale, be­ing either
    • Mixed with corrupt af­fections to which it is pretended (and therefore not sincere but counterfait) as with
      • Maliciousnes, which is bit­ter zeale. Ia. 3. 14.
      • Couetousnes, Ioh. 12. 5, 6.
      • Ambition and vaine-glory, &c. 2. King. 10. 16, 29.
    • Not guided by
      • Knowledge, which is a blind zeale. Rom. 10. 2. Phil. 3. 6. Ioh. 16. 2. the which, the more feruent, the more surious it is. Act. 26. 11 [...]22. 23.
      • Discretiō, which is a preposte­rouszeale, being ei­ther
        • Immoderate exceeding (as in schis­maticks) the
          • Propor­tion of ye cause.
          • Com­passe of a mans calling.
        • Vnseasonable. Ioh. 18. 10. Luk. 9. 54.

[Page]Delighting and reioycingRejoycing in God. in

  • God. Psalm. 37. 4. [...]104. 34. Phil. 3. 1, 3. Rom. 5. 11. his Word is sweet vnto them. Psal. 19. 10.
  • Him alone. 1. Cor. 1. 31. 2 Cor. 10. 17. Gal. 6. 14. in Christ crucified▪

And this we are to d [...]e at all times, Phil. 4. 4. both in the time of

  • Prosperity. Ier. 9. 23, 24.
  • Aduersity. 1. Sam. 30. 6. 1. Thes. 1. 6. Rom. 5. 3, 5.

Thankeful­nesse Thankful­nesse. to

  • God in all estates, Eph. 5. 20. both in time of
    • Prosperity. Psalm. 116. 12, 13.
    • Aduersity. Iob 1. 21. Lam. 3. 22.
  • Him alone as the Author of all good things. Iam. 1. 17.

This thankfulnesse is to bee testified by glo­rifying him both in

  • Word, giuing thanks. 1. Thes. 5. 18. Luk. 2. 20. Psal. 50. 23.
  • Dee [...], by doing those things which are acceptable vnto him. Psal. 16. 2. Ioh. 15. 8.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not delighting or reioycing in God, nor in his Word: a signe that men haue not tasted how good the Lord is. 1. Pet. 2. 3.
  • Delighting and reioycing in other things more than in the Lord: for what men loue, that they delight in: as worldly men in the fru­ition of worldly desires.
    • Voluptuous mē in their pleasures, which are their delights: some in sinfull pleasures, who glory in their shame. Phil. 3. 19.
    • Couetous men in their riches, Luk. 12. 19.
    • Ambitious men in their honour and glory. Deut. 4. 27.

Oppos.

  • Vnthank­fulnesse to God. 2. Tim. 3. 2. in not
    • Acknowledging him the Author of those good things which wee haue. 1. Cor. 4. 7.
    • Praising him, and giuing him thankes. Luk. 17. 17, 18.
    • Bringing forth the fruits of obedience to his glory. Esa. 5. 4.
  • To ascribe the thankes which are due vnto God, either to
    • Fortune.
    • Idols. Hos. 2. 5, 8. Ier. 44. 17, 18. our owne worthines, 1. Cor. 4. 7.
    • Other creatures, which are but the instruments of God to our good.

[Page] Obedience. Obedience. 1. Ioh. 5. 3. Ioh. 14. 1 [...].

Here consider

  • To whom simple and absolute obediēce is to be performed:
    • To God, in submitting our selues
    • to his reuea­led will: whereto we are to con­forme our
      • Hearts: which is inward o­bedience. Ps. 40. 7, 8.
      • Liues. Math. 6 10.
    • Him alone: no creature is to be obeyed, but in the Lord. Eph. 5. 21. Act. 4. 19. [...] 5. 29.
  • What man­ner of obe­dience is re­quired: viz. an obedi­ence
    • Totall, in re­spect of the
      • Doer: with all our might Deut. 6. 5.
      • Things: all that is commanded. Gal. 3. 10 Iam. 2. 11.
      • Time: alwayes. Deut. 5. 29. [...] 11. 1. 2. Kin. 17. 37.
    • Or entire at the least, that is, both
      • Sincere. Rom. 6. 17. 2. Chr. 25. 2.
      • Voluntary. 1. Chr. 28. 9.

Patience. Patience. 1. Cor. 13. 7. Rom. 12. 12. Phil. 1. 29. Iam. 1. 12.

Where we are to consider the

  • Obiect, that is, the crosse: which is that measure of affliction which God layeth on his children: and those are
    • Chastisements. 1. Cor. 11. 32. Apoc. 3. 19. Heb. 12. 6. Psa. 94. 12, 13.
    • Tryals. Deut. 8. 2. 16. Iam. 1. 3.
  • Manner: for the crosse (Luk 9 23.) is to bee borne
    • Humbly and meekly, Iob 1. 20, 21. Esa. 53. 7. Mic. 7. 9.
    • Com [...]ortably and cheer­fully. Col. 1. 11. 1. Pet. 4. 13.
    • Constantly. Iam. 1. 4.

[Page]Opp. In regard of the

  • Obiect,
    • Disobedi­ence to God, by
      • Omission:
      • Cōmission:
      and ei­ther by
      • Negligēce.
      • Contempt.
    • Obedience to
      • Man, more than to God. 1. Sam. 22. 18.
      • The flesh, and the diuell. Rom. 6. 16.
  • Manner, not
    • With all our heart, but perfunctorily, negligently, and for fashion sake.
    • Totall, but partiall, and (as it were) by halues.
    • Continuall and perpetuall, but
      • Temporary.
      • By fits.
    • Sincere, but hypocriticall.
    • Voluntary, but forced by seruile feare, and therefore not constant, but coun­terfeit.

Oppos.

  • The disorder: to suffer much for the loue of the world, but to suffer little or nothing for the loue of God.
  • The ex­tremes, in the
    • Excesse,
      • Rashnesse, in running into trouble and danger. Ec­clus. 3. 27.
      • Foole-hardinesse, in not a­uoiding it, when lawfully they may.
      • Senslesnesse. Ier. 5. 3.
    • Impatiēce, either
      • Murmuring & repining. Gen. 4. 15, 16. Psalm. 39. 10. Lam. 3. 26.
      • Fainting, and being ouer­come with too much griefe. 2. Cor. 4. 16.
      • Seeking an issue by vn­lawfull meanes.

[Page] FeareFeare of God: the awefull and son-like feare, concur­ring with the true loue of God, and faith in Christ. Psalm. 111. 10. Eccles. 12. 13. Prou. 28. 14. Psalm. 112. 1. [...] 128. 1. 4.

The obiect of feare, is the anger of God conceiued a­gainst sinne. Psalm. 90. 11. Esa. 64. 5.

And thus wee are to feare the displeasure of God, in re­gard of the time

  • Past, because wee haue sinned, and by sinne prouoked the Lord to wrath. This terrour or feare in the godly and elect, causeth them to meet the Lord, (Amos 4. 12.) and by repen­tance to preuent his iudgement. 2. Chron. 34. 19, 27. Act. 2. 37. [...] 16. 29, 30.
  • To come, that wee may not sin. Prou. 8. 13. [...] 14. 27. Iob 28 28. fearing
    • Chiefly the anger and dis­pleasure of God it selfe. 1. Pet. 1. 17. 2. Cor. 7. 1. Act. 9. 31. Luk. 1. 74. 2. Tim. 1. 7.
    • Secondarily, the effects of his anger, which are his iudgements and chastise­ments. Psalm. 119. 120. Hab. 3. 16. Deut. 5. 29.

[Page]Opp. as the

  • Disorder, which is preposte­rous feare of
    • God, in re­gard of the time
      • Past, which is the horrour of the wicked, auerting them from him, as from a seuere or cruell Iudge. Gen. 3. 10. Heb. 10. 29. Iam. 2. 19. Mat. 8. 29.
      • To come, when men feare not the displeasure of God it selfe, but onely the effect of it, which is punishment: this is ser­uile feare. 1. Ioh. 4. 18. Rom. 4. 15.
    • Other things more than of God. Luk. 12. 4, 5. 1. Pet. 3. 14. Esa. 51. I2, I3. Apoc. 21. 8.
  • Extremes, in the
    • Excesse: fearfulnes 2. Tim. 1. 7 working either
      • Superstition, or scrupulous care to serue God accor­ding to mens inuentions. Esa. 29. 13. Act. 17. 22.
      • Despaire, Esa. 12. 2. [...] 43. 1, 5. or astonishment. Exod. 20. 20. Luk. 5. 9.
    • Defect: Carnall security, when men (destitute of true faith and repen­tance) doe notwithstanding promise to themselues impunity. Prou. 28. 14. Psal. 36. 1, 2. Esa. 28. 15. Rom. 3. 18. Gen. 20. 11.

[Page] HumilityHumility. to be added to the former, as another duty of the soule, which we owe to God, Mic. 6. 8. and as a meanes and signe of all the former. Mat. 11. 29. 1. Pet. 5. 5. Math. 18. 1, 4.

Where consider the

  • Nature of humility, which is to humble a man, and (as it were) to make him euen with the ground, stripping himselfe of all praise, and renouncing all conceit of his owne worthinesse, that all praise may wholly be ascribed to God. Psa. 115. 1. Dan. 9. 7, 8, 9. 1. Chr. 29. 14. Gen. 32. 10. 1. Cor. 15. 10.
  • Cause of it, the ac­know­ledge­ment of
    • Our owne vile­nesse and vn­worthinesse, in respect of our
      • Mould, wee being but dust and ashes. Gen. 18. 27. Ecclus. 10. 12.
      • Miserable estate in our selues, in regard of
        • Our sinne. Luk. 18. 13 [...]15. 19.
        • Punishmēt due to vs for the same, Ga. 3. 10.
    • Mercy and bounty of God so vndeserued­ly vouchsafed vnto vs. Genes. 32. 10. Lam. 3. 22. 1. Cor. 4. 7.

Outwardly and in the whole man, we are to haue God by honouring him.Honouring of God. Mal. 1. 6. 1. Cor. 6. 20.

We are to honour God with the honor of the

  • Signe, which is religious adoration, and is to be performed to the Lord alone. Math. 4. 10. Esa. 45. 23.
  • Deed, which [...]
    • [...] worship or seruice, [...] [...], &c. Deu. 6. 13. [...]10. 20.
    • [...]

[Page]Opp.

  • Counterfeit humility. Mat. 6. 16. Esa. 58. 5.
  • Pride, Pro. 16. 5. in
    • Assuming to our selues that praise which is due to God. Dan. 4. 27. Act. 12. 22, 23.
    • Not acknow­ledging either
      • Our owne vnworthi­nes, but arrogating to our selues, such, or so great good things as wee haue not. Gal. 6. 3. Luk. [...] 8. 9, 11. Pro. 30. 12.
      • Bounty of God to­wards vs, but ascri­bing ye good things wee haue, to our selues. 1. Cor. 4. 7.

Opp.

  • Not honouring of God, which is profanenesse and contempt of God. Mal. 3. 14. Iob 21. 14, 15.
  • Not honouring him alone, which is idolatry, whe­ther it bee with the ho­nour of the
    • Signe. Psalm. 44. 20. Act. 10 25, 26. Apo. 19. 10.
    • Deed. Deut. 13. 13. [...] 17. 3. Exod. 22. 20.

The second Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding vs to worship God by such meanes, & af­ter such a manner as he hath prescribed in his W [...]rd, and is agreeable to his nature. Deut. 12. 30, 31, 32. that is to say, in Spirit and in truth. Ioh. 4. 23, 24.

His Nature is spirituall, his Word is truth; and therefore hee is to bee worshipped in

  • Spirit, that is,
    • By spirituall meanes.
    • After a spirituall manner.
  • Truth, that is,
    • By true meanes,
    • After a true man­ner.
    that is, such as is pre­scribed in the Word.

The speciall duties concerne the

  • Parts, and sorts of Gods worship.
  • Circumstances and ceremonies.

The Parts. The worship of God is partly

  • Inward, of the soule; which the Lord chiefly respecteth.
  • Outward, with which the inward is e­uer to be ioyned.

Heere therefore is commanded vprightnesseVprightnes. in Gods worship. Luk. 1. 75. Ioh. 4. 23, 24. Psalm. 119. 7. 1. Thes. 2. 4. Act. 10. 33. Luk. 8. 15.

The common affections.The worsh. of God is

  • Priuate.
  • Publike, in which are required
    • Inwardly, vnanimi­ty.
      Vnanimity.
      Act. 1. 14. [...]2. 1. [...]8. 6. Mat. 18. 19.
    • Outwardly, vnifor­mity.
      Vniformity
      Psal. 34. 3.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding all will-worship and super­stition, whereby men worship God according to their owne inuentions. Col. 2. 8, 23. Num. 15. 39. whether it bee in regard of the

  • Meanes. Leuit. 10. 1, 2. Ioh. 22. 10. 2. Kin. 16. 10.
  • Manner. Esa. 1. 11, 12, 13. [...] 66. 3.

But here especially are forbidden (as the gros­sest sinnes against this commandement, vnder which the Lord would forbid the rest)

  • Making Images to our selues, vnder which he forbiddeth all meanes deuised by our selues. 1. Ioh. 5. vlt. Deut. 27. 15.
  • Worshipping him by Images, whereby all counterfeit and corrupt worship is forbid­den. Deut. 4. 12, 15. Exod. 32. 1, 4. 5. Psal. 97. 7.

Opp. Hypocrisie in the worship of God. Esa. 29. 13. Mic. 6, 7. 8. Psal. 17. 1. Ezech. 33. 31.

Opp.

  • Schisme and diuision. 1. Cor. 11. 18.
  • Confusion. 1. Cor. 11. 21.

[Page] The sorts. The worship of God is either

  • Inuocation of the name of God.
  • Ministery and hearing of the Word.
  • Administration and receiuing of the Sa­craments.

1. Of Inuocation:Inuocation. and that it is to bee vsed. 1. Thes. 5. 17. Luk. 21. 36. Iam. 4. 2. Dan. 6. 10.

The things generally required in Inuocation, are partly

  • Essentiall.
  • Accidentall.

Essentiall, as

  • 1. To whom.
  • 2. In whose name.
  • 3. How, or in what manner.
  • 4. By whose helpe.
  • 5. For what things.

1. To whom; namely, to God, and to him alone, which is prescribed in the first Cōmandement. Ps. 50. 15. [...] 65. 3. Luk. 11. 2. And of him wee are to conceiue as hee hath reuealed himselfe in his Word.

2. In whose name, viz. in the name of Christ. Eph. 3. 12▪ Ioh. 16. 24. Dan. 9. 17.

And in his name alone, as being the onely Mediator, as of Redemption, Act. 4. 12. so also of Intercession. 1. Tim. 2. 5.

3. The manner, according to the will of God reuealed in his Word. 1. Ioh. 5. 14. Rom. 8. 27. viz.

Before we call vpon God, wee are to prepare our selues by meditation. Psal. 108. 1. Eccl. 4. 17. [...] 5. 1.

In the action it selfe there are duties required,

  • Generally in the soule.
  • Specially in the
    • Mind.
    • Heart.

[Page] Opp. Neglect of Prayer. Psal. 14. 1, 4. Iob 21. 15.

Opp.

  • Prayer to Saints or Angels. Esa. 63. 16. Act. 10. 26. Apoc. 19. 10. Ier. 2. 13.
  • Misconceiuing of God, (and so worshipping they know not what. Ioh. 4. 22.) in respect of the
    • Nature. As the Anthropomor­phites, and ignorant persons, who conceiue God vnder the shape of a man.
    • Persons. For the true God is the Father, the Son, and the holy Ghost. He there­fore who denyeth any one Person, doth not wor­ship the true God: as the
      • Iewes. 1. Ioh. 2. 23.
      • Turks.

Opp. Not to pray in the name of Christ alone, but in the name and mediation of Saints and Angels.

Opp. To pray amisse. Iam. 4. 3.

Opp. To be rash in speaking to God. Eccl. 5. 1. Ecclus. 18. 22.

[Page] In the soule generally it is required, that our prayer be [...] speech of the soule, and not of the mouth onely, a liftin [...] vp of our hearts, Psal. 25. 1. and a powring forth of the soule, Psal. 62. 8. a praying in spirit, Ephes. 6. 18. and in truth. Psal. 145. 18.

and therefore with the

  • Attention of the minde.
  • Intent and desire of the heart.

In the mind is required, that we pray with

  • Vnderstanding. Psal. 47. 8. Col. 3. 16.
  • Faith, that is, with Perswasion that wee and our prayers are accepted of God in Christ. 1. Ioh. 5. 14. Ephes. 3. 12.

In the heart it is requi­red that we pray with

  • Humility, in respect of our owne vnworthinesse. Gen. 18. 27. Luk. 18. 13. Gen. 32. 10.
  • Reuerence towards the Maiesty of God. Eccl. 5. 1.

4. By whose helpe, viz. by the helpe of the holy Ghost, who is the Spirit of supplication, and helpeth our infirmi­ties. Rom. 8. 26, 27. Zach. 12. 10. Ephes. 2. 18.

5. For what things, viz. good things onely, Math. 7. 11. which may concerne

  • Gods glory.
  • The good of
    • The Church.
    • Our brethrē.
    • Our selues.

The things Accidental, are the cir­cumstan­ces of

  • Persons, in respect wher­of Prayer is either
    • Priuate. Mat. 6. 5, 6.
    • Publike. Math. 18. 20.
  • Place: for we may pray in all places, both
    • Openly. 1. Tim. 2. 8.
    • Secretly.
  • Time, for wee are to pray alwayes. 1. Thes. 5. 17, 18. Ephes. 6. 18. that is, both
    • Ordinarily, at set times. Psal. 55. 17. Dan. 6. 10.
    • Extraordinarily, as occasion is offe­red. Col. 3. 17.

[Page] Opp. Not to pray from the heart, but with the mouth onely: a lip-labour. Hos. 7. 14.

To pray with

  • Wandring thoughts.
  • Fained lips, the desire and intent of the heart, not agreeing with the words of the mouth. Psal. 17. 1. Psal. 78. 36.

Opp. To pray without

  • Knowledge. Mat. 20. 22.
  • Faith. Rom. 10. 14.

Opp. To pray

  • With a conceit of our owne worthi­nesse. Luk. 18. 9, 11.
  • With lesse reuerence than if wee spake to a mortall man.

Opp. To pray for euill and vnlawfull things: for that is to make God the author of euill.

[Page] The things specially required, are such as concerne the seuerall kinds of Inuocation, viz.

  • Prayer:
  • Thankesgiuing:

which in vse are to be ioyned. Col. 4. 2. Phil. 4. 6.

In Prayer, three things are required;

  • Sence of our want. Psal. 63. 2. Iam. 1. 5. Ioh. 7. 37.
  • Feruency of desire, to haue our want supplied. Iam. 5. 16. Lam. 2. 17. Rom. 8. 26. [...] 15. 30.
  • Speciall faith in the promises made to our prayer; that is, that our particular requests shall be gran­ted vnto vs. Mat. 21. 22. Mark. 11. 24. Iam. 1. 6.

The things specially re­quired in thankesgi­uing, be­long to the

  • Action it selfe, wherein are required
    • Thankefulnesse. Colos. 3. 16. Psal. 9. 1. [...] 111. 1.
    • Cheerfulnesse. Philip. 1. 4. Psal. 9. 2. [...] 100. 1. [...] 81. 1.
  • Obiect: for wee are to giue thankes for all things, and in all estates. 1. Thes. 5. 18. Eph. 5. 20.

2. Of the Ministery of the Word; where we are to con­sider the duty of the

  • Minister, in reading and preaching the Word of God.
  • People, in hearing the Word.

[Page] Opp. To neglect the duty of prayer. Iam. 4. 2.

Opp. to pray

  • Without feeling, as
    • Secure persons, that feele no want. Apoc. 3. 17, 18.
    • Proud persons, that thinke thē ­selues full. Luk. 18. 9. [...] 1. 55.
  • Coldly.
  • Without faith. Iam. [...]. 6, 7.

Opp. To neglect the duty of thankesgiuing. Luk. 17. 17.

To giue thanks without

  • Thankfulnesse, and therefore in hypocrisie.
  • Cheerfulnesse, and so with­out sence of Gods bounty towards vs.

Not to be thankfull in all estates.

[Page]As touching preach­ing,Preaching. consider the

  • Person.
  • Obiect.
  • Parts.
  • Manner.

The Person ought to bee a Minister, Heb. 5. 4. Rom. 10. 15. called by

  • God, and therfore indu [...]d with
    • Sufficiency of gifts. 1. Tim. 3. 2. Mat. 13. 52. Mal. 2. 7.
    • Willingnesse to imploy them. Esa. 6. 8. Rom. 1. 15.
  • The Church.

The Obiect is the Word of God. Deut. 18. 18, 20. as the onely meanes of this part of Gods worship. 1. Thes. 2. 13. 1. Pet. 4. 11. 2. Cor. 2. 17. Ioh. 7. 16. 1. Pet. 4. 11.

The parts of preaching:

  • Explication of the Scripture, by the Scripture, accor­ding to the analogi [...] of faith. Neh. 8. 9. Rom. 12. 6.
  • Orthotomy, or right diuiding of the Word, 2. Tim. 2. 15. which is partly
    • The right diduction or collection of doctrines and obseruations out of the text.
    • Applicatiō of them to the vse of ye hearers, by the way of
      • Doctrine.
      • Confutatiō
      • Exhortatiō
      • Reproofe.
      • Consolatiō
      Luk. 12. 42. 2. Tim. 3. 16.

[Page] Opp. Intruders into the ministery, not called Ier. 14. 14, 15.

Nor furnished with gifts. Esa. 56. 10. Mal. 2. 9. Hos. 4. 6. Or not willing to imploy them. Mat. 5. 15.

Opp. Teaching other doctrine than is contained in the Word. 1. Tim. 1. 3. [...] 6. 3. as

  • Errours.
  • Fables and inuenti­ons of men. 1. Tim. 1. 4. [...] 4. 7.

Making merchandize of Gods Word, or mingling it with the doctrines and inuentions of men. 2. Cor. 2. 17. Ier. 23. 28.

[Page]The man­ner of preach­ing, viz. In

  • Demonstration of the Spirit. 1. Cor. 2. 4. Mic. 3. 8. that is, of spirituall graces, both of the
    • Mi [...]istery.
    • Person.
  • Simplicity. 1. Cor. 1. 17, 21. [...] 2. 4, 5.
  • Sincerity. 2. Cor. 4. 2. [...] 2. 17.
  • Integrity. 2. Cor. 2. 17. [...] 4. 2. 2. Tim. 2. 15. 1. Thes. 2. 4. Gal. 1. 10.
  • Fidelity, without respect of persons. Deut. 33. 9. 1. Cor. 4. 2. Ier. 23. 28.
  • Iudgement and discretion. Mich. 3. 8. Mat. 24, 45. Grauity. Tit. 2. 7.
  • Authority and power. Mat. 7. 29. Mic. 3. 8. Tit. 2. 15.
  • Courage and freedome of speech. I [...]r. 1. 8, 17. Ezech. 3. 8, 9. Ephes. 6. 19, 20.
  • Zeale of
    • Gods glory. Ioh. 7. 18. Mal. 2. 2.
    • The saluatiō of the People. 2. Cor. 11. 2. Gal. 4. 19. 2. Cor. 2. 15.

[Page] The duties which concerne the hearing of the Word. Luk. 8. 18.

And these are to be performed, both

  • Before we hear. Pre­paration. Exod. 19. Eccl. 4. 17. looking to our feet, that is, af­fectious▪ this pre­paration consist­eth in
    • Remouing the impedi­ments, as it were the putting off our sho [...]es. Exo. 3. 5. as
      • Carnall security, which maketh men come to the hearing of the Word, without any desire or care to pro­fit: this maketh hearers like the high way. Luk. 8. 13.
      • Impenitency, which causeth men to come without purpose of amend­ment: but rather with purpose to goe on in sin, whatsoeuer the Mi­nister shall say to the contrary. We must purge the vessell of our hart, before it will bee fit to receiue the pure liquor of Gods Word. 1. Pet. 2. 1, 2. and we must plough vp the fallow ground of our hearts, before the seed of Gods Word be cast into it. Ier. 4. 4. Iam. 1. 21.
      • Worldly cares, which cause men to receiue the seed as it were among thorns. Luk. 8. 14. Ier. 4. 4▪ Eze. 33. 31
      • Excesse in diet, surfetting and drun­kennesse. Luk. 21. 34.
      • Conceit of our owne knowledge▪ that wee may heare with meeknesse. Iam. 1. 21. Psal. 25. 9. Prou. 26. 12.
      • Preiudicate opinions, that wee may heare with docility. Luk. 18. 34.
      • Hypocrisie, which maketh men like the stony ground. Luk. 8. 13.
      • Curiosity, that wee may come to learne, rather than to iudge & cen­sure. Act. 17. 20. 21.
      • Hatred of the Ministers person, or mislike. 1. King. 22. 7, 8.
      • Itching of y eares, & affectiō to heare such as delight the eares, and please their fancies. 2. Tim. 4. 3. Mica. 2. 11.
      • Schismatical affectiō to hear some Mi­nisters, & in comparison of them, to contemne others. 1. Cor. 1. 11. 12 [...] 3. 4▪
    • Vsing helps See A.
  • While we heare. B.
  • After wee haue heard. C.

[Page]A. The helps which we are to vse, are

  • Meditation,
    • Whither we goe, to wit, to the place of Gods pre­sence, to appeare before him.
    • To what end, to
      • Performe an holy and vpright seruice vnto God.
      • Vse religiously the meanes of our sal­uation.
    • What our wants be, in regard of
      • Knowledge:
      • Faith:
      • Obedience, &c.
    • How necessary, profitable and effectuall the Word of God is, for relieuing our wants:
    that wee may come with hun­gring and thirst­ing desires to the hearing of the Word. 1. Pet. 2. 2.
  • Prayer for
    • The Minister, that God would assist him, and direct him by his Spirit, &c. Ephes. 6. 9. Col. 4. 3.
    • Our selues, that the Lord would illuminate our mindes, open our hearts, strengthen our memories, subdue our affections, transforme our liues into the obedience of his truth, &c. Psalm. 119.

[Page]B. Duties while we heare:

  • 1. To set our selues in Gods presence, and to behaue our selues as before him. Act. 10. 33.
  • 2. To acknowledge the Minister to be the Embassador of God, 2. Cor. 5 20, and to heare the Word preached, as the Word of God. 1. Thes. 2. 13. Deut. 3 2. 3. Ionas 3. 5.
  • 3. To heare with
    • Reuerence and feare. Esa. 66. 2.
    • Silence. Men are silent to heare but their Superi­our speake. Iob 29. 9.
    • Readinesse and desire to heare. Act. 17. 11.
    • Attention. Act. 8. 6. Luk. 4. 20. [...] 19. 48. [...] 8. 8.
    • Faith. Heb. 4. 2. Act. 13. 48.
    • Alacrity, and not with wearinesse.
    • Constancy, not departing before the end.
    • Meeknesse and submissi­on, Iam. 1. 21. accom­modating our selues to euery part or passage of the Sermon: as whē the Minister
      • Teacheth, with teach­ablenesse to learne.
      • Confuteth, to lay aside our errour, that wee may be found in the faith. Tit. 1. 13.
      • Exhorteth or reproo­ueth, &c. to receiue y words of exhortation. Heb. 13. 22. Prou. 15. 31, 32. Not as Act. 5. 33. [...] 7. 54 [...] 22. 22, 23.
    And not
    • With wandring minds. Ezech. 33. 31.
    • Reading, or being otherwise occu­pied.
    • Sleeping. Act. 20. 9.
  • 4. To receiue it into a good and honest heart, with desire to re­taine it, and with purpose to practise it. Luk 8. 15.
  • 5. To lay it vp in the treasure of our hearts. Luk. 2. 19. 51. Prou. 4. 21. and to heare for afterwards Esa. 42. 23. Not to let it slip from vs. Heb. 2. 1.

[Page]C. Duties af­ter wee haue heard. To

  • Meditate of that which we haue heard, and as it were to chew the cud. Act. 17. 10, 11. Psalm. 1. 2.
  • Conferre with others, especially such as are committed to our charge. Deut. 6. 7.
  • Call it to mind as occasion shall bee offered, and not to bee hearers of forgetfulnesse. Iam. 1. 25.
  • Endeuour to practise it. Luk. 8. 15. [...] 6. 48. [...] 11. 28. Iam. 1. 22.

3. The administration and vse of the Sacraments.

Wherein we are to follow the dire­ction of Gods Word, viz. that wee vse

  • Those Sacraments, and no other, which the Lord hath instituted in his Word.
  • Them after that manner which God hath prescribed in his Word.

The Sacraments of the New Testa­ment (for the Old appertaine not to vs) are onely two, viz.

  • Baptisme.
  • The Lords Supper

In the right vse of Baptisme, there are duties required in the

  • Party bap­tizing: in whom it is required, that he
    • Be a lawfull Minister.
    • Doe administer it according to Christs institu­tion: where consider
      • What, viz. the
        • Element, which is water only.
        • Sacramental word.
      • To whom, viz. to those who are within the coue­nant, whether
        • Growne persons.
        • Infants.
  • Party baptized, viz. faith and repentance,
    • Truly professed, by him that is of yeeres.
    • Promised in behalfe of the Infant, and performed when he comes to yeeres.
  • People,
    • To be present to receiue the party baptized, into the congregation.
    • To ioyne in prayer for the party baptized.

[Page]Otherwise we

  • Build vpon the sand. Luk. 6. 49.
  • Aggrauate our sinne, and encrease our punishment. Ioh. 15. 22.

To these the Papists adde fiue other.

The Papists permit priuate persons, yea Midwiues, to baptize.

The Papists adde Oyle, Salt, and Spittle, &c.

The Papists suppresse it in an vnknowne language.

Opp. To breake the Vow of Baptisme.

Opp. To depart.

[Page]1. Cor. 11. 23. In the right vse of the Lords Supper, there are duties required in

  • The Minister, that he admi­nister it accor­ding to Christs institution: where con­sider
    • What hee is to administer, viz.
      • The elements, both
        • Bread.
        • Wine.
      • The Sacramentall Word.
    • How, with such Sacramentall rites and acti­ons as were ordained by Christ.
    • To whom, to the faith­full in profession at the least: And not to
      • Profane persons.
      • Heretikes, or excō ­municat persons,
      • Such as cānot pre­pare themselues.
    • To what end, that it might be a
      • Sacrifice of praise to God.
      • Memoriall of Christs death.
      • Meanes to confirme the faith of the receiuer, &c.
  • The faithfull among the people, viz. to
    • Receiue the Communion when it is administred.
    • Receiue it worthily. Whereun­to are du­ties re­quired
      • Before, viz. due prepa­ration, consist­ing in
        • A triall of our selues, how wee stand to­wards
          • God, in regard of our
            • Know­ledge.
            • Faith.
            • Repen­tance.
          • Neighbours, in regard of bro­therly loue.
        • Prayer,
          • Confessing our sins, and wants.
          • Desiring Gods bles­sing vpon his owne ordinance.
      • At the Com­muniō some thing is to be
        • Considered: the sacramentall v­nion of the signe, and the thing signified.
        • Done, viz. the bread & the wine are to bee recei­ued with
          • Faith.
          • Thanksgiuing, & shewing [...]orth the death of Christ.
      • After­wards, to
        • Be thankfull to God.
        • Labour to feele the fruit and benefit of the Sacrament.
        • Performe y repētance, wch in the time of our preparatiō we either purposed or promised.

[Page] The Papists with hold the Cup from the people.

The Papists powre water into their wine.

They mutter the words as a charme ouer the bread.

They vse diuers gesticulations, partly

  • Ridiculous.
  • Idolatrous, as
    • Eleuation.
    • Adoration.
    • Carrying about.
    the Bread.

The Popish Priests distribute nothing to others, but are the onely receiuers in their priuate Masses.

The Papists consecrate their Eucharist, that it may bee

  • Adored and carried about in pompe, and not to be recei­ued.
  • A sacrifice propitiatory for the quicke and the dead.
  • An Idoll which they worship in stead of Christ.

[Page] And these were the parts of Gods worship.

Now follow the

  • Ad [...]uncts of Gods worship, as the
    • Circumstances.
    • Ceremonies.
  • Meanes thereof.

Concerning the circumstances belonging to Gods worship, and the ceremonies therein to bee vsed, we are to follow the gene­rall rules of Gods word, namely, that all things be done

  • To edification. 1. Cor. 14. 26.
  • Decently. 1. Cor. 11. 13 1. Cor. 14. 40.
  • According to order. 1. Cor.14.40.

The meanes of Gods wor­ship, especi­ally of

  • Prayer, Fasting▪ see my Treatise therof.
  • The Mini­stery of the Word and Sacramēts, as the
    • Preparation and education of Ministers in schooles of learning. 1. Sam. 10. 5. [...] 19. 20. 2. King. 4. 38.
    • Preseruation and suffici­ent maintenance. Deut. 12. 19. 1. Tim. 5. 17. Gal. 6. 6, 7.

The third Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part, Commanding vs to sanctifie the name of God. Math. 6. 9. Psal. 29. 2.

The Negatiue part, Forbidding to take the name of God in vaine; that is, to profane it, or pollute it.

The speciall duties of sanctifying Gods name, are the vsage of Gods name holily,

  • according to the se­uerall ac­ceptation of Gods name, which signifieth either
    • 1. God himselfe, and his attributes, which are himselfe. Ioel 2. 32. Deut. 28. 58. Exod. 33. 19. and 34. 5, 6, 7.
    • That wherby hee is named, that is,
      • 2. Renowmed: his name of renowme, or glory. Exod. 9. 16. Psalm. 8. 1.
      • Knowne, as
        • 3. His titles: as Iehouah, Iah, Lord, God, &c. Exod. 3. 15. Exod. 6. 3.
        • Meanes wherby hee is known, which are ei­ther
          • Peculiar to his Church, as the
            • 4. Word of God. Act. 9. 15 [...] 21. 13.
            • 5. Religiō of God, prescri­bed in his Word. Mic. 4. 5. 1. King. 5 3, 5.
          • 6. Common to all, as the workes of God, for God is knowne by his workes, as men are by their names. Rom. 1. 19, 20. Exod. 34. 7. Psa. 58. 11, 12. Ro. 1. 21.
  • After an especiall manner, according to any almost of the former acceptati­ons, and that is, by swearing.

[Page] 1. As the name of God signifieth▪ God himselfe, and his attributes.

Thus wee are to san­ctifie the name of God, in our

  • Hearts, 1▪ Pet. 3. 14, 15. by
    • Thinking and conceiuing of God and his attributes, holily and reuerently.
    • Acknowledging, beleeuing, and remembring effectually God and his attributes.
  • Mouthes, by
    • Confessing, and professing God and his attributes. Rom. 10. 10. 1. Pet. 3. 15.
    • Speaking holily and reuerently of God and his attributes.
  • Liues, by a conuersation answerable to the effectuall knowledge of God and his attri­butes. Deut. 28. 58.

2. As the Name of God signifieth his glory.

Thus wee are to san­ctifie the name of God, by glorifying him in our

  • Hearts, by a true
    • Desire of Gods glory.
    • Purpose and intent thereof. Mal. 2. 2.
  • Mouthes, by ma­king the glory of God, both the
    • Matter of our speech: for by gi­uing praise and thankes to God, we glorifie him. Psalm. 50. 23.
    • End of our speech, by vttering
      • Necessary truth. Iosh. 7. 19. Col. 4. 6.
      • Sauoury speeches.
  • Liues, by
    • Doing all things to the glory of God. 1. Cor. 10. 31.
    • Bringing forth the fruits of good workes: for thereby we
      • Glorifie God our selues. Ioh. 15. 8.
      • Cause others to glorifie him. Math. 5. 12.

[Page] The speciall vices.

To entertaine base, vnreuerent and vngodly thoughts, concerning God and his attributes. Psalm. 50. 21. this is to blaspheme God in our hearts. Iob. 1. 5. Psalm. 14. 1. [...] 10. 11.

Not to know God, &c. effectually. Rom. 2. 4, 5.

Not to confesse God and his attributes before men. Math. 10. 33.

To speake of God, or his attributes

  • Vnreuerently.
  • Vnholily.

Psalm. 78. 19, 20. Exod. 5. 2.

Not to sanctifie God in our liues. Numb. 20. 12. Tit. 1. 16.

Pride, and vaine-glory. Gen. 11. 4.

Neglect of Gods glory. Rom. 1. 21.

To suppresse the praises of God, and to be vnthankfull to him. Luk. 17. 17.

To blaspheme the name of God. Leuit. 24. 11.

Opp. Truth

  • Dissembled, or suppressed. Ioh. 9. 21. [...] 12. 42, 43.
  • Denyed. Mark. 14. 68.
  • Oppugned. Act. 26. 11. 1. Tim 1. 13.

Speech,

  • Idle. Math. 12. 36.
  • Vnsauoury. Col. 4. 6.

By our sinnes, to

  • Dishonour God. Rom. 2. 23.
  • Cause his name to be blasphemed. Rom. 2. 24. 2. Sam. 12. 14. Tit. 2. 5.

[Page] 3. As the Name of God signifieth his titles, which we vse by taking them

  • Vp in our mouthes and writings.
  • Vpon vs, when we are called af­ter Gods name, and his name is called vpon in vs. Genes. 4. 26. Esa. 43. 6, 7. Act. 11. 26.

We sanctifie the Name of God in our speech and writings, when it is mentioned

  • In a matter serious.
  • After a reuerent man­ner.
  • To a good end.

And here­unto is referred Blessing of

  • God. Rom. 9. 5. [...] 1. 25. 2. Cor. 11. 31. Iam. 3. 9.
  • Mē, which
    • Generally is required of all. Mat. 5. 44. Rom. 12. 14. and hereto salutation is referred. Genes. 47. 7, 10. Iam. 6. 12. Rom. 16. 16. Mat. 5. 47.
    • After a peculiar manner is to bee performed by Supe­riours. Heb. 7. 7. as by
      • Parents. Gen. 27. 27. [...] 49.
      • Ministers. Nu. 6. 23, 24, 25.
      • Magistrates. 2. Sam. 6. 18. 1. Kin. 8. 55.

We sanctifie the Name of God and of Christ our Saui­our, which we take vpon vs, professing our selues Chri­stians, and the children of God, when wee walke worthy our calling. Ephes. 4. 1. Tit. 2. 10. 2. Tim. 2. 19. Eph. 5. 3.

[Page] Neuer to make mention of God, which is a signe that he is not in mens thoughts.

To men­tion it a­misse, as

  • In a matter light and ridiculous, as in sport.
  • After a manner
    • Vnreuerent and carelesse.
    • Superstitious.
  • To a wicked end, as to
    • Charmes and Exorcismes. Act. 19. 13.
    • Wicked sentences, which be­gin, In nomine Dei. Amen.
    • Erroneous doctrines. Ierem. 23. 25.

Opp. Cursing. Rom. 12. 14.

Salutation,

  • Neglected in due time and place.
  • Abused to
    • Hypocrisie, where it is not sincere and from the heart.
    • Malicious purposes. 2. Sam. 20. 9. Mat. 26. 49.

Name of Christ, as it is taken vpon men, pro­faned, Gen. 6. 2. which is a fault either

  • Common to all wicked persons which call themselues Chri­stians.
  • Peculiar to the Iesuites, who vn­der the name of Iesus, serue Antichrist.

[Page] 4. As the Name of God doth signifie his Word.

This (to omit the holy and pure vse of it, in the preaching & hearing thereof, of which we spake in ye 2. Com.) we are to sanctifie in our

  • Hearts, by a holy
    • Meditation therof.
    • Desire, study and care to know and practise it.
    Psal. 119.
  • Words and writings, by applying it to those vses for which it is profitable. 2. Tim. 3. 16. to our selues, or o­thers, for the
    • Information of the iudgement, by do­ctrine and confu­tation.
    • Reforming of the life and affections, by admonition, ex­hortatiō, reproofe, consolation.
  • Deeds, by obeying it from our hearts. Rom. 6. 17. Luk. 11. 28. Ioh. 13. 17.

5. As the Name of God signifieth his religion.

This are we to sanctifie by a con­uersation answerable to the Religion which we professe, Tit, 2. 11, 12. 13. Ephes. 4. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. [...] 5. 8, 10, 11. This being the right way, Esa. 30. 21. Act. 9. 2. wee are to walke in it, Mic. 4. 5. and that

  • Vprightly, in re­spect of God. Psal. 119. 1. Gal. 2. 14. Gen. 17. 1.
  • Inoffēsiuely, in re­spect of men. 1. Cor. 10. 32. Heb. 12. 13. Phil. 1. 10. Act. 24. 14, 15, 16.

[Page]The Word of God is profaned in the

  • Heart, when wee haue neither desire to know it, nor care to keepe it.
  • Words & writings, when it is abused to vses either
    • Vaine and vnprofitable, as when it is read in an vnknowne language, or so sung, that it cannot bee vnderstood. Psalm. 47. 7.
    • Euill, in respect of
      • Iudgement, as for the
        • Confutation of the truth.
        • Confirmation of er­rours.
      • Manners, as to
        • Impenitency. Psa. 50. 16, 17.
        • Scoffes and iests.
        • Charmes and in­chantments. Deut. 18. 11, 12.
  • Deeds, when we doe not obserue it to doe it, Leuit. 22. 31, 32. either through
    • Neglect. Malac. 1. 12. Amos 2. 7. Prou. 30. 9.
    • Contempt, which is a kind of blasphemy. Num. 15. 30, 31.

Thus y name of God is takē in vaine, when our cōuersatiō is not agree­able to our profession: as whē mē walke in respect of

  • God, in hypo­crisie, 2. Tim. 3 5. pretending the profession of religion to their
    • Worldly respects. Phil. 3. 18, 19.
    • Wicked respects. Mat. 23. 14. 1. King. 21. 9. 2. Sam. 15. 8. Math. 2. 8.
  • Mē, offensiue­ly: and thus the name of God is profa­ [...]d by the
    • Dissolute and wicked life of carnall-gospel­lers. Rom. 2. 24.
    • Offences of the godly, 2. Sam. 12. 14. and those y would seeme forward professors.

[Page]6. As the Name of God signifieth his workes, both of

  • Creation, in respect whereof hee is called the Creator.
  • Administration, in regard whereof hee is called the Gouernour and Iudge of the world.

The workes of Creation or crea­tures, we are to sanctifie by a

  • Holy me­ditation and men­tioning of them, to
    • Gods glo­ry, that we
      • In them may acknow­ledge the wisedome, power and goodnesse of God. Rom. 1. 19, 20. Psalm. 19. 1.
      • Knowing him by his workes, may glorifie him as God. Rom. 1. 21.
      • Acknowledging in thē the workmanship of God, may speake ho­nourably thereof. Psa. 139. 14. Gen. 1. 3 1.
    • Our good, that what the Scripture hath taught vs in thē to
      • Imitate, wee may follow. Math. 6. 26, 28. Prou. 6. 6.
      • Auoide, wee may shun. Psalm. 32. 9. Ierem. 5. 8. 2. Pet. 2. 22.
  • Pure vse, sanctified by
    • The Word.
    • Prayer.
    1. Tim. 4. 5

[Page]Opp.

  • In respect of Gods glory,
    • Not to acknowledge God by his crea­tures.
    • Knowing him by them, not to glorifie him as God.
    • To depraue or deride (like Mo [...]us) the workes of God.
  • In regard of our good, to imitate that in them, which the Scriptures teach vs to shun.

Opp. To the vse sanctified by

  • the Word, is the vse
    • Without, or besides the Word, being
      • Scrupulous. Rom. 14. 23.
      • Superstitious,
        • Ascribing sanctifica­tion to them, as, to holy-water, salt, candles, bells.
        • Abusing them to di­uination. Deut 18. 10. Esa. 47. 13. Ier. 10. 2.
    • Contrary to the Word, abusing them as instruments vnto sinne, as our bo­dies to fornication, our meate and drinke, to surfetting and drunken­nesse.
  • Prayer, the profane vse, without
    • Crauing Gods blessing in the vse.
    • Returning thanks to God the giuer of them.

[Page]The workes of administration, (which in a generall sence are called the iudgements of God) are exercised in

  • Determining doubts, which by men cannot sufficiently be decided, viz. Lots, Prou 16. 33. as in
    • Deciding contro­uersies. Pro. 18. 18.
    • Elections. 1. Sam. 10. 21, 24. Act. 1. 23.
    • Diuiding inheri­tances. Numb. 26. 55.
    • Finding out a se­cret offe [...]dor. Iosh. 7. 14.
    Lots are purely vsed, when we
    • Call vpon God for his di­rection, re­ferring our selues to his iudgement. Act. 1. 24.
    • Rest well plea­sed in the sentence of God.
  • Assigning
    • Rewards and bles­sings, hereof we are to haue a pure vse, whether bestowed vpon
      • Our selues: that is, to bee thankfull for them, and to testifie our thākfulnes, by
        • Words, in
          • Giuing thankes. Psal. 124. 6. [...] 86. 12, 13.
          • Declaring Gods benefits. Ps. 66. 16. 71. 8, 18.
        • Deed, by
          • Referring thē to Gods glory, & the good of our brethren. Luk. 19. 13.
          • Being mooued to re­pentance thereby. Rom. 2. 4.
      • Others: viz. to
        • Reioyce with them. 1. Cor. 12. 26
        • Praise God for them. Psal. 35. 27. Gal. 1. 23.
    • Punishments & crosses, wch more specially are called iudg­ments: wherof also wee are to haue a pure vse, whether laid on
      • Our selues, to
        • Bee humbled vnder the hand of God. Iob 1.
        • Patiently & thankfully to beare them Iob 1.
        • To learne obedience by that we suffer. Heb. 5. 8.
      • Others, to
        • Be terrified (by their example) frō sinne. Iosh. 22. 20. 1. Cor. 10. 6. Rom. 11. 20, 21.
        • Condole with y faithful. Ro. 12. 15
        • Magnifie the iustice of God in pu­nishing the wicked Psal. 58. 11, 12. Iudg. 5. 31.

[Page]Lots abused, in

  • Casting of fortunes.
  • The game called Lottery.
  • Those games of Dice and Cards, &c. which wholly consist in chance: for in toyes and sports wee are not to ap­peale to the immediate iudgement of God. Prou. 16. 33.

Not to be thankfull to God for his benefits.

Not to testifie our thankfulnesse: but rather to

  • Assume the praise to our selues.
  • Abuse Gods blessings to
    • His dishonour.
    • Harme of others.
    • Impenitency.

To enuie the graces of God in others.

Not to be humbled vnder the hand of God. Ier. 5. 3. Esa. 22. 12, 13.

To be impatient, and to murmure.

To be incorrigible. Esa. 1. 5. Ier. 2. 30.

Not to be warned by the iudgements of God vpon o­thers. Dan. 5. 22. but rather to be pleased with our selues, that we are not so afflicted. Luk. 13. 1, 2, 3.

To reioyce at the afflictions of others. Iob 31. 29.

Of Othes.

1. In generall.

The Na [...]e of God is to be sanctified by a lawfull Oth.

Where consider two things: First, that we are to sweare vpon iust occasion. Deut. 6. 13. Psal. 63. 11. Esa. 45. 23.

Secondly, that we sweare lawfully.

Duties required in a lawfull Oth, respect the

  • Object: for we are to sweare by the Lord alone, Esa. 65. 16. Ierem. 12. 6. Either
    • Directly.
    • Indirectly, the inuocation and at­testatiō referred to God, though something else be named.
  • Maner, for we are to sweare▪ Ier 4. 2. in
    • Truth, Rom. 9. 1. that is,
      • To that which is true.
      • Truly, Exanimi sententia. 2. Chr. 15. 15.
    • Righteousnesse, promising by Oth lawfull things onely.
    • Iudgement,
      • Discerning the necessity of our Oth, in respect of the
        • Person
          • Imposing it.
          • Not beleeuing a necessa­ry truth, without it.
        • Thing, which cannot otherwise be proued.
        • End, for
          • Gods glory.
          • The good of
            • Our selues.
            • Others.
      • Duly weighing the conditions & circumstances. Gen. 24. 5. Iosh. 2. 17, 18, 19.
  • End, for we are so to sweare, that
    • God may haue glory by the manifestation, or con­firmation of a necessary (but hidden) truth, which otherwise could not bee demonstrated▪ Iosh. 7. 19.
    • Our neighbour may be satisfied, controuersies may be ended. Heb. 6. 16.
    • Our owne innocency cleered, Exod. 22. 11. and ou [...] duty discharged. 1. King. 8. 31.

[Page] To refuse altogether to sweare, with the Anabaptists.

To sweare vnlawfully.

To sweare by any thing be­sides God, Ier. 5. 7. Zeph. 1. 5. vsing Othes

  • Ridiculous: as By Lakin, &c.
  • Pharisaicall, by creatures, as Light, Fire, &c.
  • Popish, as by
    • Saints: Mary, Iohn, &c.
    • Idols, as
      • Masse.
      • Rood.
    Amos 8. 14.
  • Heathenish, by the gods of the Gentiles, 1. King. 19. 2. Mebercle, Medius Fidius, &c.
  • Blasphemous, as by all the parts and mem­bers of Christ.

Opp. to sweare

  • To that which is false. Leuit. 19. 12.
  • Falsly, with a mind to dece [...]ue Ps. 24. 4.

To sweare to an vnlawfull thing, which either

  • Is apparantly vnlawfull at the ti [...]e of the Oth. 1 Sam. 25. 21, 3 [...]. [...] 28. 10.
  • Afterwards proueth to bee vnlawfull. Mark. 6. 23, 25.

Opp. To sweare

  • Without necessity, as they vse to doe, who sweare ordinarily and com­monly: this is to p [...]ll [...]te the Name of God, and to make that common, which he hath sanctified and extol­led aboue all things. Math. 5. 37. Iam. 5. 12. Ecclus. 23. 8.
  • Rashly and vnaduisedly. Leuit. 5. 4. 1. Sam. 14 39, 44. as those which sweare in heat and choler.

To sweare to

  • No end, vainly, & through a foolish custome, without regard of Gods glory, or good of their brethren, or discharge of their duty.
  • An ill end, as
    • For a brauery, that they may glory in their shame, and garnish their speech with the pollution of Gods Name.
    • To falsifie the truth, and to win cre­dit to a falshood.

[Page] 2. In speciall.

There are two distinction of Othes.

1. An Oth is either

  • Assertory, wherein some truth, is auouched, and that, if it bee
    • Certaine & knowne, sim­ply that it is so.
    • Supposed, according to our opinion, that wee thinke so.
  • Promissory, wherby we truly promise some lawfull thing which is in our power, cal­ling vpon God not onely as our witnesse and Iudge, but also as our surety, that we will performe it. Heere foure things are required:
    • 1. That the thing be lawfull.
    • 2. That it is, and will be in our power.
    • 3. That wee haue a true and vnfained purpose to per­forme it.
    • 4. That wee doe in­deed performe it, Num. 30. 2. though to our owne hin­derance. Psal. 15. 4.

2. An Oth is either

  • Publike.
  • Priuate.

[Page]Opp. To auouch that to bee

  • True, which we know to be false.
  • Certaine, which we know not to bee true.

Opp. To promise by Oth y which

  • 1. Is not lawfull, which is to sinne with an high hand, and with a desperate resolution to doe ill.
  • 2. Is not in our po­wer, wch either
    • Appeareth so at the first; and so cannot be promised by Oth, without extreme profanesse.
    • Proueth so afterwards; & ther­fore cannot be promised sim­ply, without great rashnesse.
  • 3. We doe not meane to performe: which is to sweare deceitfully. Psalm. 24. 4.
  • 4. Which wee doe not performe, being a thing lawfull, and in our owne power; and this properly is called Periurie.

But if it be

  • Impossible, our Oth doth not bind vs.
  • Vnlawfull, wee are bound to breake it: otherwise we adde sinne to a sinne.

[Page]In publike Othes cō ­sider the duty of him that

  • Imposeth it, viz. that he so impose it, as that the Oth may bee taken in
    • Truth.
    • Iudgement.
    • Righteousnes.
  • Deposeth: that the consideratiō of the publike pla [...]e for seat of iudge­ment, make him y more reuerent­ly and circumspectly performe the generall duties, both in Othes
    • Asser­tory.
    • Promissory.

A priuate Oth may be taken onely vpon necessity. Mat. 5. 37. for what is redundant, aboue yea or nay, in our ordi­nary talke or communication, is of euill: and consequent­ly priuate Othes must be rare and in season.

To Promissory Othes we are to referre Vowes, which are promissory Othes, made to God voluntarily concer­ning the performance of some certaine thing which may be acceptable to God, either for the confirmation of our faith in prayer, or for the strengthening of our resolution in the performāce of some good thing which we purpose.

Duties required in Vowes, belong either to the

  • Making
  • Performing

of them. Psal. 76. 11. Esa. 19. 21.

Those which belong to the making of a vow, concerne the

  • Obiect, which is God alone, Psal. 76. 11.
  • Manner. A.
  • End. B.

[Page]Opp. To impose an Oth,

  • When it is not necessary.
  • Vpon men of no credit, who make no conscience of an Oth.
  • In matters of no moment.
  • Tumultuously and in haste.
  • Iniuriously, especially in a capitall cause, to make the party accuse himselfe.
  • Against his conscience, when hee knoweth that it
    • Is false.
    • Will not bee perfor­med.

Opp. To depose in an Oth

  • Assertory, con­trary to con­science, for
    • Malice.
    • Fauour.
    • Hire.
    1. King 21. 13. Mark. 14. 56.
  • Promissory, contrary to a mans purpose: as when being chosen to publike places, or admitted into societies, men take Othes, onely because it is the custome and man­ner that they should sweare, not because they meane to keepe their Oth.

To sweare in our communication,

  • Without necessity,
  • Rashly.
  • Profanely. Ier. 23. 10.
  • Ordinarily and commonly.

The Pa­pists vow to Saints, both

  • Themselues: as to Augustine, Francis, Domi­nick, &c. as the Nazarites were wont to vow themselues to God. Numb. 6.
  • Other things; as Oblations, and Pilgrimages, &c.

[Page]A. Manner, for it must be made in

  • Truth, and therfore must be
    • Sincere. 2. Chron. 15. 15.
    • Voluntary. Deut. 23. 23.
  • Righte­ousnesse, both in re­spect of the
    • Person vowing, that either hee
      • Be his owne man.
      • Haue the consent of his go­uernour. Numb. 30.
    • Thing vowed, that it be lawfull & accepta­ble to God: as
      • Things good and comman­ded: of such, Vowes are made.
        • Absolutely, wch are renewings of our Vow in Baptisme.
        • With restraint of circumstan­ces: as to giue so much almes weekly; or to pray so oft dai­ly, &c.
      • The vse, or forbearance of things indifferent, as wee haue found the same profitable or hurtfull to vs.
  • Iudgement, so as the party cleerly discerne it to be a thing, 1. lawfull and acceptable vnto God: 2. in our power, ei­ther naturally, or by the assistance of Gods grace promi­sed to vs: 3. profitable.

B. End of the

  • Vow, which is, to confirme our
    • Faith in prayer. 1. Sam. 1. 11.
    • Resolution in good things.
  • Thing vowed, which must be referred to the
    • Glory of God, as Vowes Eucharisticall, sacrifices of praise, gifts to be bestowed to godly vses. Ps. 66. 13, 14. [...] 61. 8. [...] 132. 2, 5. Leuit 27. 16. Gen. 28. 20, 21.
    • Good of our brethren: as Vowes of charity and mercy towards the poore.
    • Our pro­fit: as the Vowes of
      • Sobriety, of fasting and abstinence.
      • Repen­tance, as of
        • Hūbling our soules. Nu. 30. 14
        • Amen­ding our liues, in
          • Forsaking our sins with the occasi­ons thereof.
          • Stirring vp our selues to the per­formance of our duties.

[Page]Opp. Vowes

  • Hypocriticall: when men doe not truly purpose to performe them: such as hypocrites make in the time of aduersity, to deceiue God. Psal. 78. 36.
  • Forced: as of some young persons, which against their will are thrust into Monasteries, and made to vow single life.

The Vowes of children entring into a Monastery, a­gainst the will of their parents, are held firme among Pa­pists: as Mat. 15. 5, 6.

Opp. To vow things either

  • Simply euill.
  • Euill to vs.

Such are Monasticall Vowes.

Opp. To vow that which ei­ther is not, or wee know it not to be

  • Lawfull and acceptable to God. Deut. 23. 18. as the Vow of voluntary pouerty.
  • In our owne power: as the Vow of single life, in them that haue not the gift of con­tinency.
  • Profitable, as going on Pilgrimages, &c.

Vowes therefore indefinitely conceiued, (as that of Iephthe, Iudg. 11. 31.) are vnlawfull, because we know not whether they will be lawfull, in our power, or profitable.

Opp. To vow with the Pa­pists, such things as serue nei­ther for the

  • Glory of God, but
    • To superstitious and idolatrous ends.
    • For their owne glory, with opini­on of merit.
  • Profit of their neighbour, but contrary thereto, as the Vow of
    • Monastical obe­dience, making them renounce all duty to pa­rents, & seruice to their coun­trey.
    • Voluntary po­uerty, making them drones, &c.
  • Good of themselues, as y Vow of continency, from whence all the vncleannesse & incon­tinency of the Popish Clergy proceedeth.

[Page]As touching the performance of Vowes, the Scripture requireth that we should performe them, or else we commit a sinne, as bad, or worse than Periury, Num. 30. 3. & that without

  • Delay. Eccles. 5. 3, 4. Deut. 23. 21.
  • Diminution. Num. 30 3. Deut. 23. 23.

Prouided alwayes, that the thing vowed bee

  • Lawfull.
  • In our po­wer.

Otherwise wee haue sinned in vowing, but wee are not bound to the performance.

No hing doth bind the conscience, which is against the Word of God.

Vowes are of 2. sorts: some

  • Common to all Christians, as the Vow in Baptisme, whereby we consecrated our selues to God, and is more carefully to be performed.
  • Proper to seuerall men, and it is ei­ther a
    • Renewing of the common Vow, which is needfull to bee done, when men come to yeeres of discretion.
    • New Vow, concerning
      • Certaine things comman­ded, with limitation of circumstances.
      • Things indifferent, to bee vsed or refused, as wee haue found them by experience to bee pro­fitable or hurtfull for vs.

[Page] Not to performe lawfull Vowes, being in our power.

To vse delay, which argueth vnwillingnesse.

To performe it by the halues, which argueth doubling, as in Ananias and Saphyra. Act. 5.

To thinke our selues bound to performe vnlawfull or vnpossible Vowes. Iudg. 11. 35, 39.

To pretend we cannot performe the Vow of Baptisme, and such like lawfull Vowes, when we will not.

Not to performe the Vow of Baptisme, or those wher­by it is renewed:

Or any other lawfull or profitable Vow, which is in our power to performe, if we will.

The fourth Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding vs to remember the Sabbath to sanctifie it. Esa. 56. 2.

Whence two things are to bee considered:

  • 1. That we must sanctifie the Sabbath.
  • 2. That we must be mindfull and carefull of it to sanctifie it.

To the sanctification of the Sabbath two things are required: viz.

  • Rest, which is signified in the word Sabbath.
  • The sanctifying of that rest.

The rest which is re­quired, is partly

  • Outward, from bodily labours, and worldly businesse. Vers. 9. 10.
  • Inward, from the seruile workes of sinne.

Of the outward Rest, 3. things to be considered:

  • 1. Why it is required, viz. as a remedy against distraction.
  • 2. From what workes: viz. workes of our owne, and seruile workes, as
    • Buying and selling. Neh. 13. 15.
    • Carrying of burthens. Ierem. 17. 22.
    • Iourneys. Exod. 16. 29. &c.
  • 3. How farre forth works are forbidden: viz.
    • As they are meanes of distraction, and hindrances of the entire sanctification of the Sabbath.
    • Not as they are referred either to the meanes, or workes of sancti­fication. To the
      • Meanes, as the
        • Labours of the Ministers, in and about their ministe­ry. Math. 12. 5.
        • Trauell of the people to the places of Gods worship. 2. King 4. 23.
      • Workes, as the duties of mercy and charity: as to heale the sicke; to helpe a woman in trauell, &c. Math. 12. 7, 12. Hos. 6. 6.
    • Nor as they are workes of necessity. Mat. 12. 1. to 19. Of necessity I say,
      • Present, so as they could not haue been done before, nor may be done afterwards.
      • Sanctified, not contracted, through our owne negligence.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding the profanation of the Sabbath.

Opp. The

  • Extremes, in
    • Excesse: a Iewish and superstitious ob­seruation of the outward rest, prefer­ring it before either the meanes, or workes of sanctification. Mat. 12. 1, 2. Mark. 3. 2. Luk. 13. 14. Ioh. 9. 14, 16. 1. Mac. 2. 38.
    • Defect: the neglect of the outward rest, following of bodily labours and worldly businesse. Exod. 34. 21. [...] 31. 13, 14.
  • Abuse of rest, to
    • Idlenesse: when rest is not vsed as a meanes, but men rest in it as the end; which is worse than bodily labour. Sabbathum Asino [...]um.
    • Vanity, in profane sports and pastimes, which more distract, and more hinder our workes than honest labours. Esa. 58. 13. Sabbathum Tituli. Exod. 32. 6, 18, 19.
    • Sinne, as to gluttony, drunkennesse, whoredome, &c. Sabbathum Satanae.

[Page]By necessity therefore are excused, the necessary

  • Labour in prouision of food.
  • Tending of cattel. Mat. 12. 11 Labours of Mariners, being before the Sabbath on y sea.
  • Fight for defence of our Countrey. 1. Mac. 2. 41.
  • Labours of seruants, and sub­iects, enioyned by their ma­sters, and Magistrates, &c.
Mark. 2. 27.

The Sabbath was made for man.

The inward and spirituall rest from sinne. For as wee are to rest from sinne euery day (that in this life wee may begin our eternall Sabbath, Heb. 4. 9. 10.) so especially on the Sabbath. Esa. 56. 2. [...] 58. 13.

These workes are chiefly forbidden, as being especially

  • Seruile workes, whereby men serue the diuell.
  • Our owne workes.

Now followeth the sanctification of the Rest, by

  • Vsing the meanes
  • Doing the workes

of sanctifica­tion.

The Sabbath is to be sanctified, both

  • Publikely.
  • Priuately.

The publike sanctification consisteth in

  • Vsing the meanes of sanctifica­tion in the worship of God. Wherewe are to con­sider the duty of y
    • Ministers, who are to be the chiefe actors in the publike sanctification of the Sabbath: their duty is to
      • Call vpō God in behalfe of the people.
      • Reade and preach the Word.
      • Administer the Sacra­ments at conuenient times, and as occasion is offered.
    • People,
      • To vouchsafe their presence in the assembly, Leuit. 19. 30. 67. [...] 23. 2.
        • Cōming duly.
        • Staying to the end.
      • Being present, to behaue them­selues religiously and vprightly (as hath been shewed in the second Commandement) in
        • Hearing the Word.
        • Calling on ye name of God.
        • The vse of y Sacramēts.
  • Doing the workes of sanctification: as namely, in collections for the poore. 1. Cor. 16. 2.

[Page] Opp. Not to rest from sinne, which maketh the obser­uation of the outward rest, odious vnto God. Esa 1. 13, 14, 15. Amos 5. 21.

Opp. In the

  • Ministers,
    • Carelesse Non-residency
    • Idlenesse.
  • People,
    • Absence, vpon no iust cause, through
      • Negligence. Mat. 22. 5. Luk. 14. 18, 19, 20.
      • Contempt and obstinacy, as in Recusants, whether
        • Hereticks, as Pa­pists, &c.
        • Schismaticks, as Brownists. Heb. 10. 25.
    • Departure without any necessary cause.
    • Irreligious and hypocriticall behauiour in the worship of God.

[Page] The Sabbath is also to be sanctified priuately.

The priuate sanctification con­sisteth in duties, which either

  • haue reference to the publike sanctification, and those either
    • Going before, as preparation by
      • Meditation.
      • Prayer.
    • Follow­ing, as
      • Meditation of the Word heard.
      • Application of it to our vse.
      • Conference with others, if wee be not alone, &c.
  • Seuerally are required, as
    • Meanes of sanctifica­tion, as
      • Reading.
      • Meditation of Gods
        • Word.
        • Workes of
          • Creation.
          • Redēption by Christ.
        • Inuocati­on by
          • Prayer.
          • Thankes-giuing, and singing of Psalms. Ps. 92. 1
        • Godly conference.
    • Works of sanctifica­tion: as y workes of mercy.
      • Outward: as Almes [...]giuing, visiting the sicke, &c.
      • Inward & spirituall▪ as to
        • Teach the ignorant.
        • Reclaime the erroneous.
        • Admonish the backward.
        • Exhort & stir vp one another.
        • Rebuke the offendour.
        • Comfort the distressed.
        • Giue counsell to them which need it, or seeke it.
        • Reconcile them which bee at variance, &c.

[Page]To neglect the priuate sanctification of the Sabbath, mis-spending the time in

  • Worldly [...].
  • Idlenesse.
  • Vanity.
  • Sinne, &c.

[Page] 2. We are to remember, or (as Deut. 5. 12.) to obserue the Sabbath that we may sanctifie it.

Where are duties required, both

  • Before: so to cast our businesse before-hand, and so to dispose of our affaires and iour­neyes, &c. that on the Sabbath we shall not need to bee distracted with bodily la­bours, or worldly businesse.
  • On the Sabbath, studi­ously to obserue it, that is, both
    • Seriously & sound­ly, as the words import.
    • Willingly and with delight. Esa. 58. 13.

To the weekly Sab­bath, wee are to adde all other Sabbaths, lawfully ordained by the Church; all wch are to be consecrated as Sabbaths to the Lord, whether they be

  • Ordinary and Anni­uersary, such as
    • were the feast of
      • Purim. Hest. 3. 7. [...] 9. 21.
      • The Dedicati­on. 1. Macca. 4. 59. Ioh. 10. 22.
    • Are the feasts of Christs Natiuity, Resurrection, As­cension, & Pen­tecost.
  • Extraordi­nary, wch are Sab­baths of
    • [...]oy and thankes-gi­uing. Neh. 8. 9, 10.
    • Humiliation. Ioel 1. 14. [...] 2. 15. 2. Chr. 20. 3.

[Page] Opp. To bee mindfull of the Sabbath to profane it: as those who hauing any extraordinary businesse, will not bestow any part of the weeke vpon it, but will reserue it for the Sabbath; and make bold with God to borrow part of his day, &c.

To obserue the Sabbath for fashion sake, keeping the outward Rest onely, putting on gay clothes, and doing nothing.

To bee weary of the Sabbath, and to wish it were gone. Amos 8. 5.

The not obseruing of Sabbaths lawfully ordained by the Church, either through

  • Neglect.
  • Contempt.

The mis-spending of them, (which fault is common, especially in the Feast of Christs Natiuity) to vanity and sinne.

the summe of the second Table.

Thou shalt loue thy neighbour as thy selfe. Leuit. 19. 18. Mat. 22. 39. Rom. 13. 8, 9.

In which words we are to consider the

  • Duty, which is loue. 1. Cor. 13. 1. Ioh. 4. 20, 21 3. 14. and this loue must bee
    • Vnfained. Ro. 12. 9. 2. Cor. 6. 6. 1. Ioh. 3. 18.
    • Feruēt. 1. Pet. 4. 8.
    1. Pet. 1. 22.
  • Obiect, thy neighbour, whereby is meant, euery one that is neere vnto v [...] not onely in friendship, as the Pharises imagined, Math. 5. 43. or in place and dwelling, as the word is commonly vsed: but also in nature, as euery man is, being made of the same blood, Act. 17. 26. the same flesh, Esa. 58. 7. after the same image of God, Gen. 9. 6. Howbeit of this loue there are degrees, Gal. 6. 10. 1. Tim. 5. 8. Gen. 2. 24.
  • Manner, as thy selfe, Mat. 7. 12 that is, as thou oughtest to loue thy selfe, in regard both of the loue
    • Naturall, whereby thou des [...]est thine own good and safety, as the pre­seruation of thy
      • Life, and health.
      • Wiues chastity.
      • Goods.
      • Good name, &c.
    • Spirituall, whereby thou desirest and seekest the saluation of thy soule, and the meanes thereof.

The division of the second Table.

The com­mande­ments of the second Table, cō ­cerne such duties and vices, as are either

  • Peculiar to some sorts of men; as of
    • Superiours to inferiours.
    • Inferiours to superiours.
    as in the 5. Com­mandement.
  • Cōmon to all: & they forbid such sins against the neigh­bour, as either
    • Haue the consent of the will to doe them; and they are com­mitted a­gainst the
      • Person, as in the sixth Com­mandement.
      • Adiuncts of the Per­son, whe­ther
        • Inward, as Cha­stity in the se­uenth Cōman­dement.
        • Outward, as
          • Goods, in the 8. Commā ­dement.
          • Good name, in the ninth.
    • Goe before the consent of the will, as con­cupiscence: in the tenth Commande­ment.

The fifth Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding the duties of superiours and inferiours.

Which are either

  • Generall to all
    • Superiours.
    • Inferiours.
  • Peculiar to some.

The ge­nerall du­ties of all superi­ours.

  • 1. To shew themselues worthy of honour: that as they would bee honoured as Pa­rents, so they should behaue themselues as Parents.
  • 2. To carry themselues moderately and mo­destly towards their inferiours. Deut. 17. 20.
  • 3. To shew grauity answerable to their dig­nity. Iob 29. 8.
  • 4. To goe before their inferiours according to knowledge, in the example of good life. 1. Pet. 3. 7. Psal. 101 2.

The gene­ral dutie of all infe­riours, is, to honour their supe­riours: & this ho­nour is partly

  • Inward: viz. a reuerent estimation of them, according to their superiority.
  • Outward, of the
    • Signe, ac­cording to the man­ner of the countrey, as to
      • Rise vp to them. Iob 29. 8.
      • Goe to meet them Gen. 18. 2.
      • Bow the knee, and put off the hat. Gen. 18. 2.
      • Stand before them. Iob 29. 8. Gen. 18. 8.
      • Giue them the precedence. 1. King. 2. 19.
      • Be silent when they speak. Iob 29▪ 9, 10.
      • Vse words of reuerence. 1. Pet. 3. 6. Gen. 31. 35. 42. 10. 1. Sam. 1. 15.
    • Deed to minister vnto them as iust oc­casion is offered. Genes. 18. 4, 5. &c. Mat. 8▪ 9.

The Negatiue part.

Forbidding the offences of

  • Superiours.
  • Inferiours.

Opp. To

  • Shew themselues vnworthy of honour.
  • Carry themselues
    • Insolently towards their inferi­ours.
    • Lightly, before thē.
    • Dissolutely, before thē.

Opp. To

  • Despise superiours.
  • Behaue our selues towards them
    • Vnreuerently.
    • Vndutifully.

[Page] Speciall duties.

Superiours are such as haue any preemi­nence a­boue vs, whether it be in

  • Excellen­cy onely, and that in respect of gifts they haue
    • Receiued, as all our betters, whether in gifts
      • Inward, as of the minde.
      • Outward, as
        • Age, as the Ancient, Pro. 16. 31.
        • Degree, by rea­son of
          • Birth, as No­blemen and Gentlemen.
          • Wealth.
    • Bestowed on vs, as our Benefactors.
  • Authority also, as our Gouernours.

Of Superiours, in gifts receiued of God, as our betters: (which sig­nification in our modesty is to be extended to those who are our su­periours, or equals in any gifts, though (perhaps) inferiours in o­thers, Phil. 2. 3. Rom. 12. 10.) And first, of superiours in the gifts of the minde: as learning, Arts, wisedome, vertue, &c. their duty is

  • In humility to acknowledge their gifts to bee committed vnto them as talents, whereof they are to giue a strait ac­count.
  • Willingly to expose them to the
    • Glory of God. Ma [...]. 25.
    • Good of others 1. Cor. 12. 7.

The duties of inferiours to­ward their su­periours, in the gifts of the mind, viz. to

  • Acknowledge ingenuously the gifts of God where they are, and in that degree wherein they are, to praise God for them, &c.
  • Reuerence the party in whom they are.
  • Seeke vnto him to be profited thereby, as our need shall require.

[Page]Opp. To

  • Be lifted vp in heart aboue others, forget­ting our account.
    • Abuse
    • Bury
    the gifts of God.

Opp. To

  • Deny, extenuate or depraue the good gifts of God in others. Mark. 6. 3.
  • Disdaine to make vse of them, lest they should seeme to acknowledge their owne want, or the excellency of the other.

[Page]The duties of the An­cient, or su­periour in age, viz.

  • To be sober and graue. Tit. 2. 2.
  • By their wisedome and experience to aduise and instruct the younger. Tit. 2. 4.
  • To bee patternes and precedents of good things to the younger sort. Prou. 16. 31.

The duties of the yon­ger sort to wards the Ancient: to

  • Reuerence them as Fathers. 1. Tim. 5. 1. Leuit. 19. 32. Iob 32. 4, 6, 7.
  • Ascribe experience and wisedome to their yeeres. Iob 12. 12 32. 7. to hearken to their counsell.
  • Imitate their good example.

The duties of the

  • Wealthy, to vse their riches as instruments of boun­ty and liberality, for the
    • Publike vse of the
      • Church.
      • Cōmon­wealth.
    • Priuate good of others.
  • Noble, to vse their nobility and gentry as instruments of magnanimity and munificence, & their power as a refuge and protection of the innocent and helplesse.

The duties of those y be inferiour to them in outward e­state, to

  • Esteeme of them as their superiours, in re­spect of that high or better estate where­in God hath placed them.
  • Reuerence them as they are, or may bee the instruments of God for the good of o­thers, either in priuate, or publicke. 1. Sam. 25. 8.

[Page]Opp.

  • To be light or lewdly giuen.
  • To be
    • Counsellers
    • Precedents
    of euill.

Opp. To

  • Despise the aged. Esa. 3. 5.
  • Contemne their counsell. 1. King. 12. 8.
  • Neglect their good example.

Opp. To abuse their

  • Wealth, to niggardlinesse.
  • Power, to oppression, &c.

Opp. To

  • Disdaine the wealthy, as vnworthy of their wealth.
  • Presume against the honourable. Esa. 5. 3.

[Page]Superiors, as benefa­ctors, Act. 20. 35. Iob 29. 16. their duty in respect of the

  • Act of gi­uing, to doe it
    • Cheerfully, 2. Cor. 9. 7.
    • Freely, Luk. 6. 33, 34, 35.
    • Quickly, Prou. 3. 28.
    • Discreetly and with choyce, that Christ may take it as done to him. Mat. 25. 40.
  • Gift bestowed, holily to dissemble it, rather then to cast it in the parties teeth, follow­ing therein the Lord. Iam. 1. 5.

Duties to­wards the benefa­ctors, both

  • Inward: thankful­nesse, in
    • Acknowledging him the instru­ment of God for our good.
    • Esteeming as highly of the be­nefit after it is receiued, as be­fore.
    • Making the best of the benefit, in respect of the gift it selfe, and of the mind of the giuer.
  • Outward: testificati­on of our thankful­nesse in
    • Word by thankesgiuing. Rom. 16. 4.
    • Deed, by
      • Requitall, if wee be able.
      • Prayer to God for them. 2. Tim. 1. 16.

[Page]Opp. To

  • Bestow a benefit
    • Grudgingly and with ill will. 2. Cor. 9. 7.
    • Seeking his owne profit therin.
    • With delay: qui serò dat, diun [...] ­luit: he that is long in giuing, was long vnwilling.
    • Without choyce, so as hee may seeme rather to cast away a benefit, than rightly to be­stow it.
  • Exprobrate the benefit bestowed.

Opp. Vn­thankful­nesse, in

  • Not acknowledging the benefit.
  • Esteeming lightly of it, after it is receiued.
  • Extenuating or deprauing it.
  • Forgetting it.
  • Not recompensing it either with
    • The like, when we are able.
    • Prayer.
  • Requiting ill for good. Pro. 17. 13.

[Page] Of superiours in authority: who are not onely preferred before vs as our betters; but also set ouer vs as our Gouernours, in that society wherein we liue.

The duties of Gouernours in generall: to

  • Gouerne their infe­riours in the Lord,
    • Containing them in the duties of Piety and Iustice. 1. Tim. 2. 2.
    • Seeking not them­selues, but the
      • Glory of God. Rom. 13. 4, 6. 2. Chr [...]n. 19. 6.
      • Good of the inferiours. Rom. 13. 4.
  • Correct offendors, according to y quali­ty of their offence: wherein they are to vse
    • Discretiō to discerne of
      • The cause.
      • The disposition of the offendour.
      • Their owne af­fection, y they doe not pro­ceed to correc­tion, through
        • Choler and ha­stines:
        • Hatred of the person:
        but in iudge­ment, seeking y good of the
        • Party, if hee be corrigible.
        • Society y the
          • Euil may be taken away
          • Iudgmēt of God may be preuen­ted.
          • Rest may feare.
    • Moderation, that nei­ther they bee too
      • Remisse and indulgent.
      • Seuere or cruell.

The generall duties of infe­riours towards their gouer­nours, besides reuerēce, are, to

  • Be in awe of them. Leuit. 19. 3. Eph. 5. 33 6. 5.
  • Obey them, though euill, but not vnto euill. Eph. 6. 1, 2. Col. 3. 22, 23, 24. 1. Pet. 2. 13, 18.
  • Submit themselues to their corrections. Gen. 16. 6, 9. 1. Pet. 2. 19, 20.
  • Testifie their loue and thankfulnesse to them by their seruice, or goods, as their necessity shall re­quire. Math. 15. 4, 5.

[Page]Opp.

  • Contempt of Gouernours, and the fruit there­of, which is mocking. Prou. 30. 17. Iude, vers. 8.
  • Disobedience to their lawfull commande­ments. Rom. 13. 2.
  • Refusing of correction, and resisting of their power. Prou. 15. 10, 32.
  • To be wanting to them in their need. Math. 15. 6.

[Page] Speciall duties:

Gouernours are distin­guished according to the societies wherein they gouern, viz. in the

  • Family.
  • Schooles and Vniuersities.
  • Church.
  • Common­wealth.

Heere ther­fore are cō ­manded, duties

  • Oeconomi­call.
  • Scholasticall & Acade­micall.
  • Ecclesiasti­call.
  • Politicall.

Oeconomicall:

Duties of superiours and inferiours in the family: of whom there are three combinations, viz. the

  • Husband and wife.
  • Parents and children.
  • Masters and seruants.

The mutuall duties of man & wife, are either

  • Common to them both, as coniugall
    • Loue, whereby (they being vnited into one flesh) doe loue one another aboue all others. Gen. 2. 24. Ephes. 5. 27, 28, 29. and one anothers kindred, as their owne.
    • Communication of their
      • Bodies, by
        • Mutuall beneuolence, per­formed by the one to the other. 1. Cor. 7. 2, 3, 4, 5. Prou. 5. 18, 19.
        • Coniugall fidelity, either of them keeping themselues proper to the other. Mal. 2. 15. Prou. 2. 17.
      • Goods, labours, endeuours, and mutuall helpe, for the mutu­all good and comfort one of another. Gen. 2. 18.
    Both which re­quire cohabitation and dwelling toge­ther. 1. Pet. 3. 7. 1. Cor. 7. 10.
  • A. See Peculiar.

[Page]Opp.

  • Want of loue, discord and dissension.
  • Mutuall beneuolence denyed, the one refusing the others bed.
  • The bond of marriage broken by adultery.
  • Goods and helpes not communicated.
  • Separation of the one from the other, without iust and necessary cause.

[Page]A. Peculiar to either as the duties of the

  • Husband, to behaue himselfe as a head to the bo­dy, 1. Cor. 11. 3. Eph. 5. 23. in
    • Guiding, directing, instructing his wife according to knowledge. 1. Pet. 3. 7. 1. Cor. 14. 35.
    • Protecting her according to his power. Ruth 3. 9.
    • Cherishing her as the more tender part of himselfe. Ephes. 5. 23. 25, 33.
    • Prouiding things needfull, according to his ability; and communicating his goods to her, &c.
    • Gouerning her by an amiable gouern­ment, and giuing honour to her as the weaker vessell. 1. Pet. 3. 7. Gen. 26. 8.
  • Wife, to
    • Acknowledge her husband, to be her head and Lord: to reuerence him, and to feare him. 1. Pet. 3. 6. Ephes. 5. 33. Gen. 20. 16. 24. 65.
    • Bee subiect and obedient vnto him, as to the Lord. Col. 3. 18. 1. Pet. 3. 16. Eph. 5. 22, 24. 1. Cor. 14. 34.
    • Be amiable and gracious, seeking in all lawfull things, to please him. 1. Pet 3. 4.
    • Cherish her husband as the better part of her selfe. Tit. 2. 4.
    • Bee his assistant and helper, in gouerning the house, and performing the duties of a good huswife. Prou. 31. 10, 11, 12, &c. 1. Tim. 5. 14.
    • Be good house-keepers. Tit. 2. 5.

[Page]Opp.

  • To be his wiues vnderling, contrary to the order of nature, and ordinance of God. Genes. 3. 16. 1. Cor. 11. 3, 7, 8, 9. Ephes. 5. 23. 1. Tim. 2. 12, 13, 14.
  • To betray his wiues chastity.
  • To hate, or to strike her, which is his owne flesh. Ephes. 5. 29.
  • To deny things needful vnto her, being in his power.
  • To be too
    • Vxorious, fondly doting vpon his wife. 1. King. 11. 4.
    • Imperious and rigorous towards her. Col. 3. 19.

Opp.

  • Not to reuerence her husband as her head. 2. Sam. 6. 16, 20.
  • To vsurpe dominion ouer him. 1. Tim. 2. 12.
  • To be of an vnquiet and prouoking spirit. Prou. 21. 9, 19.
  • Not to cherish her husband.
  • Not to be an helper, but a crosse to her husband Pro. 12. 4.
  • To play the ill hous­wife, either
    • Idle at home.
    • Gadding abroad. Prou. 7. 11. 12.

[Page]Hitherto of the mutuall duties of man and wife: now follow their duties towards their family, in respect wherof they are gouernors; either as

  • Parents, ouer their children.
  • Master and Mi­stresse ouer their seruants.

The du­ties of the hous-hol­ders, to­wards those of their hous­hold in ge­nerall, are to

  • Rule them in y Lord, keeping them in godly obe­dience, 1. Tim. 3. 4. by dome­sticall
    • Instruction, both by
      • Doctrine, respecting
        • Priuate Catechizing. Deu. 6. 6, 7. 2. Tim. 3. 15. Gen. 18. 19.
        • The publike ministery, wch they must
          • Cause them to fre­quent. Exod. 20. 10.
          • Teach thē to vse a­right, by
            • Preparing them.
            • Examin­ing thē.
      • Example, going before them in exer­cises of religion, and in the practice of Christian duties. Iob 1. 5. Iosh. 24. 15.
    • Discipline, v­sing correctiō towards thē, either
      • verbal, as moderate threat­nings and reproofes.
      • Reall, as stripes, &c.
  • Prouide necessaries for them: as food, raiment, rest, and recreation. 1. Tim. 5. 8. Prou. 31. 15, 21. Gen. 30. 30.

Duties of Parents towards their children, viz. fatherly & motherly

  • Loue of them, which is cal­led Storgè. Psa. 103. 13. 2. Sa. 18. 33.
  • Care for thē.

And both in respect of their life

  • Naturall, as to
    • Nourish and bring them vp. 1. Tim. 5. 10.
    • Traine them vp to some honest calling whereto they are apt by inclina­tion, and by gifts.
    • Direct thē in matters of moment, & namely, in cōtracting mariage, Gē. 24. 1, 2. 1. Cor. 7. 36, 37.
    • Prouide and lay vp for thē, as God shall giue meanes. 2. Cor. 12. 14.
  • A. Spiri­tuall.

[Page]Opp.

  • To be without naturall affection. Rom 1. 31. 2. Tim. 3. 3.
  • To traine them vp in idlenesse or vanity.
  • To neglect their children, neither pro­uiding for them by
    • Education in some honest [...] ­ling.
    • Laying vp for them.

[Page]A. In respect of their life spiri­tuall: viz.

  • 1. As they bring them into the couenant of of Grace, so to procure vnto them the Sa­crament of the Couenant. Genes. 17. 23. Exod. 4. 25, 26. Luk. 1. 59, 60.
  • 2. To bring them vp in the feare of God. Eph. 6. 4.
    • Instructing them care­fully, Deut. 11. 19. Prou. 22. 6.
    • Chastising them mode­rately, Prou. 19. 18. 13. 24. 22. 15. 23. 13, 14.
  • 3. To pray for them, and to blesse them.

Duties of Children towards their parents.

viz. to

  • Be answerable to them in loue.
  • Reuerence them highly, though their estate bee meane. Gen. 31. 35. Math. 21. 30. Mal. 1. 6.
  • Stand in awe of them. Leuit. 19. 3.
  • Obey them in the Lord. Ephes. 6. 1. Col. 3. 20. Prou. 23. 22. Luk. 2. 51.
  • Shew themselues thankfull to their parents, by help­ing them with their
    • Goods. Mat. 15. 4, 5, 6, 1. Tim. 5. 4. Gen. 47. 12.
    • Seruice. Luk. 15. 29.
  • Submit thēselues to their parents
    • Instruction. Pro. 1. 8. 22. 19. 4. 4.
    • Correctiō Heb. 12. 7, 9. Heb. 5. 8.
  • Be content to be ruled & directed by their parents in matters of importance, as of marriage. Gē. 28. 1, 2, 7.
  • Preserue their parents goods.
  • Loue and reuerence those which be neere and deare to their parents, for their sakes.

Hitherto are to be referred the duties (Hest. 2. 7, 20) of

  • Tutors & guardians, towards their pupils: whose parents as they succeed in gouern­ment, so they must succeed them in fatherly loue and care.
  • Pupils, who are to behaue themselues to their guardi­ans, as dutifull children to their parents.

[Page]Opp.

  • To take care for the bodies of their children, but not for their soules. Ecclus. 16. 1, 2, 3.
  • Vsing no instruction.
  • In chastising, either too
    • Remisse and indulgent. Pro. 29. 15. 1. King. 1. 6.
    • Cruell. Colos. 3. 21. Ephes. 6. 4.
  • Not praying for them.

Opp.

  • Not to loue, but to
    • Hate thy parents.
    • Reuile or curse them. Leuit. 20. 9. Prou. 20. 20.
    • Strike them. Exod. 21. 15.
  • To bee ashamed of thy parents, because of their meannesse.
  • To contemne and despise them. Deut. 27. 17. Pro. 15. 20. 30. 17.
  • To scorne and deride them. Gen 9. 22, 24.
  • To be disobedient towards them. Deut. 21. 18. Rom. 1. 30. 2. Tim. 3. 2. 1. Sam. 2. 25.
  • To be vnkind and vn­thankfull towards them, in not
    • Relieuing their want with our store.
    • Helping them with our ser­uice.
  • To refuse or despise
    • Instruction.
    • Correction.
    Pro. 5. 12, 13 15. 5 10. 32.
  • To marry against thy parents good will, thou being vnder their gouernment. Gen. 26. 34.
  • To diminish thy parents goods, and to mis spend them. Prou. 28. 24. Deut. 21. 20.
  • To be vnkind or without naturall affection towards thy kindred.

[Page]Duties of Ma­sters towards their seruants, besides the ge­ [...]erall, which heere are to be applied: for they are to vse towards their seruants, 1. Pet. [...]. 18.

  • Equity and moderatiō, Colos. 4. 1. Iob 31. 13. in their
    • Comman­dements, which must be
      • Lawfull.
      • Possible to them. Genes. 24. 8.
      • Profitable. 1. Chron. 11. 17.
      • Proportionable to their ability.
      • On the Sabbath, neces­sary.
    • Gouern­ment, v­sing thē as
      • Childrē, thou sustaining the place of a father to them. 2. King. 5. 13.
      • Brethren in Christ. Phi­lem. 16.
      • Fellow-seruants of our Master in heauen. Eph. 6. 9. Col. 4. 1.
  • Bounty, to bee good to them, they deseruing not ill, both
    • Whiles they remaine, to suffer them to thriue vnder vs. Deut, 25. 4.
    • At their departure with our liking▪ to prefer them, or reward them as we may. Deut. 15. 13, 14. Pro. 17. 2.
    • After they are honestly departed, to esteeme them as our poore friends.

[Page]Opp. To be

  • Peruerse. 1. Pet. 2. 18. Gen. 16. 6.
    • Commanding things
      • Vnlawfull.
      • Vnprofitable.
      • Aboue their power.
      • On the Sabbath, vn­necessary.
    • Tyrannizing ouer them. Exod. 5. 7, 16. Ephes. 6. 9.
  • Too remisse or indulgent towards them, suffering them to liue in idlenesse, not correcting them. Prou. 29. 19, 21.
  • Hard towards them. Deut. 24. 14, 15.

[Page]Duties of seruants, partly

  • Common, as to
    • Loue their masters: from which loue will arise a
      • Tender care of their masters
        • Credit.
        • Welfare.
      • Loue to their masters children.
    • Reuerence and honour them. 1. Tim. 6. 1. 2. King. 5. 13.
    • Feare them. Mal. 1. 6.
    • Submit them­selues to their
      • Commandements, and to obey them. E­phes. 6. 5. Col. 3. 22, 23.
      • Corrections. 1. Pet. 2. 1 [...]. Gen. 16. 9.
  • More peculiar to them, as to be
    • Diligent. Col. 3. 22, 23. Ephes. 6. 5. Genes. 31. 40.
    • Faithfull and true. Tit. 2. 10.
    • Secret.
    • Thrifty for their masters profit.
    • Carefull to please their masters in all law­full things. Tit. 2. 9.

Duties Scholasticall and Academicall.

The common duties (not to mention the particular) of

  • Superiours and gouernours in Schooles and Vniuer­sities, that as they are called Fathers, so they should behaue themselues as fathers to their in­feriours. 2. King. 2. 12. Hence it is, [...]hat Salomon in his writings, calleth the party whom he instruct­eth, his Sonne.
  • Inferiours, that as they are termed sonnes, so they should demeane themselues as dutifull chil­dren. 2. King. 2. 3. Amos 7. 14. Phil. 2. 22.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not to loue their masters, nor to care for their cre­dit or welfare.
  • To despise them. 1. Tim. 6. 2.
  • Not to stand in awe of them.
  • To be disobedient.
  • To answere againe. Tit. 2. 9.
  • To be idle and slothfull. Math. 25. 26.
  • To be vnfaithfull and vntrue. 2. Sam. 16. 3.
  • To divulge his masters secrets.
  • To waste his masters goods. Luk. 16. 1.
  • Not to care for displeasing their masters.

[Page]Ecclesiasticall, betwixt the

  • Ministers, who are Fathers. Iudg. 17. 10, 18, 19. 2. King. 13. 14. 1. Cor. 4. 15.
  • People, who are the children. Gal. 4. 19. Philem. 10.

The duties of Mini­sters, re­spect their

  • Ministery,
  • Life,

in both which they are to go before the people. Deu. 33. [...]. Act. 20. 28. 1. Tim. 4. 1 [...]. Tit. 2. 7, 8.

As touching the ministery: he is to preach the Word in season, and out of season, 2. Tim. 4. 2. and thereto hee is bound by a double bond of necessity, in respect of

  • Himselfe. 1. Cor. 9. 16. Ezech. 34. 2, 10. Zac. 11. 17. Math. 25. 26, 28, 30.
  • People. Luk. 10. 42. Prou. 29. 18. Rom. 1. 16. 17. 1. Cor. 1. 21.

As touching his life, hee ought to be an example to his flock, Tit. 2. 7. 1. Tim. 4. 12. 1. Thes. 2. 10. being in

  • General, blamelesse. 1. Tim. 3. 2. Tit. 1. 6.
  • Particular, towards
    • God, godly. 1. Tim. 4. 7, 12. [...] 6. 11.
    • Neighbour,
      • Iust. Psalm. 132. 9.
      • Charitable. 1. Tim. 3. 2, &c. 6. 11.
      • Meeke. 1. Tim. 3. 2, &c. 6. 11.
      • Courteous. 1. Tim. 3. 2, &c. 6. 11.
      • Liberall. 1. Tim. 3. 2, &c. 6. 11.
    • Himselfe,
      • Sober.
      • Temperate.
      • Chaste, and modest.
      2. Tim. 2. 22.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not to feede the people, ei­ther because he is
    • Vnable. Esa. 56. 10.
    • Vnwilling, through
      • Idlenesse, Zac. 11. 17.
      • Couetousnesse, as Non-residents, not prouiding for their cures.
  • To bee blame-worthy, being in respect of
    • God, irreligious and profane.
    • Neighbour,
      • Vniust. 1. Tim. 3. 3.
      • Vncharitable. 1. Tim. 3. 3.
      • Hasty and vn­quiet. 1. Tim. 3. 3.
      • Vncourteous. Couetous. Esa. 36. 11. Mic. 3. 11.
    • Himselfe,
      • Intemperate.
      • Incontinent.

[Page]Duties of the people to­wards their Ministers, viz. to1. Tim. 3. 3.

  • Loue them dearly. 1. Thes. 5. 13. Galat. 4. 15.
  • Reuerence them highly. Philip. 2. 29. 2. Cor. 7. 19. Gal. 4. 14. 1. Tim. 5. 17.
  • Submit our selues to their ministery, and to obey them. Heb. 13. 17.
  • Allow them liberal maintenance. 1. Tim. 5. 17, 18. Prou. 3. 9. Galat. 6. 6, 7. 1. Cor. 9. 7, 8, 9, 11, 13.

Politicall duties are either

  • Common to all, as they are members of the Common-weale,
  • Peculiar to
    • Superiours.
    • Inferiours.

The common duty, the loue of our countrey: whose common good is to be perferred before all particular du­ties, which we owe either to others, or to our selues. All therefore must labour to bee good Common-wealths­men. 2. Sam. 24. 17. Nehem. 1. 4. 2. 3. Ier. 9. 1. Psalm. 122. 6, 7, 8.

Superiours in the Cōmon­weale, are

  • The Soueraigne Prince.
  • All other Magi­strates.

1. Pet. 2. 13, 14. all which, are fathers of their coūtrey, & so are to behaue thēselues. Gen. 45. 8. Iudg. 5. 7.

[Page]Opp. To

  • Hate the Ministers for their worke sake. 1. King. 22. 8.
  • Contemne and despise them. Luk. 10. 16.
  • Mocke, or otherwise abuse them. 2. Chron. 36. 16. 2. King. 2. 23, 24. 1. King. 13. 4. Psal. 105 15.
  • Resist or disobey their ministery. Hos. 4. 4. Deut. 17. 12. Act. 5. 39.
  • De [...]y them sufficient maintenance, which is a mocking of God. Gal. 6. 6, 7.
  • Withdraw from them that which by Law is appoin­ted to them: which is sacriledge, and spoyling of God. Mal. 3. 8, 9.

Opp. To be

  • Vnprofitable members in the Common­weale.
  • Hurtfull and pernicious, as Traytors, and other malefactors.

[Page]The Soueraigne Princes

  • Duty, is the good and com­mendable ex­ercise of his soueraigne po­wer, which cō ­sisteth espe­cially in
    • Making good lawes, and seeing them executed.
    • Creating the Magi­strates of State, & containing them in their duty.
    • Exempting frō death such as they may lawfully pardon, being by the rigor of the Law con­demned to dea [...]h.
    • The high and last Appeales.
    • Waging warres, and concluding peace.
    In all wch respects his go­uernment must be
    • Godly, seeking the glory of God.
    • Iust, seek­ing the good of the Com­mon­weale.
  • Vertues:
    • Piety, and the true feare of God. Deut. 17. 19.
    • Iustice. Prou. 29. 4.
    • Clemency. Prou. 20. 28.
    • Bounty and liberality. Deut. 17. 17. Prou. 28. 16.
    • Wisedome and learning. Psalm. 2. 10.
    • Fortitude and courage.
    • Temperance and sobriety. Prou. 30. 4, 5. Eccl. 10. 13, 14.
    • Chastity. Deut. 17. 17. Prou. 31. 3.
    • Modesty and humility. Deut. 17. 20. Psalm. 131. 1.

Of Magistrates.

Their

  • Duty, the conscionable exe­cution of their office to the
    • Glory of God.
    • Honour of the Soueraigne.
    • Good of the Common-wealth.
  • Vertues, Exod. 18. 21. Deut. 1. 13. for they ought to be
    • Men of courage.
    • Fearing God.
    • Faithfull and true.
    • Haters of rewards, and free from couetousnesse. Deut 16. 19 [...] 23. 8.
    • Wise and pru [...]ent.
    • Vnpartiall and iust, without respect of persons. Deut. 16. 18, 19, 20.

[Page] Opp. To seeke themselues.

  • Dastards and fearfull. Ioh. 19. 12, 13.
  • Irreligious.
  • Vnfaithfull and vnture.
  • Couetous, giuen to
    • Bribery. Act. 24. 26. Prou. 29. 4.
    • Extortion.
  • Vndiscreet.
  • Vniust, respecters of persons. Prou. 28. 2 [...].

[Page] Duties of the Subiects towards their Soueraigne Prince.

1. A speciall loue of them, from whence ariseth a

  • Speciall care of their safety, esteem­ing highly of them. 2. Sam. 18. 3. 21. 17. Lam. 4. 20.
  • Desire to pray for thē. 1. Tim. 2. 1, 2 Psal. 61. 6, 7.

2. To honour and reuerence them as the supreme Go­uernours vnder Christ. 1. Pet. 2. 17. Prou. 24. 21.

3. To be obedient and subiect to them, and that for conscience sake. 1. Pet. 2. 13. Rom. 13. 1, 5.

4. To be seruiceable vnto them, with our bodies and goods. Rom. 13. 6, 7. Mat. 17. 27. 22. 21.

Duties of the people towards the Magi­stra [...]e, being the cō ­mon duties of inferi­ours towards their Gouernours. viz.

  • Reuerence.
  • Subiection to their lawfull
    • Comman­dements.
    • Punish­ments.
    1. Pet. 2. 13, 14.
  • Thankfulnesse, allowing such sti­pends or fees as are due for their maintenance, &c.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not to loue the Prince.
  • Not to care for his safety.
  • To seeke to vndermine his safety, by secret and tre­che [...]ous conspiracies. 1. Sam. 24. 6. 26. 9. 2. Sam. 1. 14.
  • To resist him by open rebellion.
  • To speake ill of the Prince, or to curse him. Exod. 22. 28. 2. Sam. 16. 7. 1. King. 2. 8, 9. Eccl. 10. 20.
  • To despise or contemne him. 1. Sam. 10. 26, 27. 2. Pet. 2. 10.
  • To disobey their lawfull commandements. Iosh. 1. 18
  • To deny them seruice by our bodies or goods, when iust occasion is offered. 1. King. 12. 18.

The sixth Commandement.

The negatiue part, for­bidding all those sinnes which are referred to the person of

  • Thy neighbour, and those either
    • Inward.
    • Outward.
  • Thy selfe.

The inward sinnes are called the murther of the heart. Math. 5. 22. 1. Ioh. 3. 15. And to this head diuers particu­lars are to be referred.

And those are either as

  • Roots and fountaines from whence the rest doe spring and flow; as namely,
    • Vniust a [...] ­ger.
    • Hatred.
  • Fruits and streames proceeding from thence.

Anger is vniust, either when it

  • is conceiued vpon no iust cause, but is ras [...] and vnaduised, Math. 5. 22. the habite whereof is ir acundia or hastinesse. Tit. 1. 7. Prou. 14. 29. Prou. 12. 16.
  • Exceedeth, either in
    • Greatnesse, being immoderate, as it were a short madnesse. Eccl. 7. 10. Prou. 29. 22. 27. 3.
    • Continuance, being inuete­rate, and turning into rancor and malice. Ephes. 4. 26, 27.

[Page] The Affirmatiue part, commanding those duties which [...]uery man oweth to his owne, or his neighbours person.

The du­tie oppo­sed, is [...]ither

  • [...]ust anger. Ephes. 4. 26. Mark. 3. 5.
  • Remedy of vniust anger, (E­phes. 4. 1, 2, 3. Col. 3. 12, 13, 14) viz.
    • Long-suffering and mildnesse. 1. Cor. 13. 4. Prou. 14. 29.
    • Goodnes, Rom. 12. 21. in be­ing
      • Slow to anger. Iam. 1. 19.
      • Ready to forgiue. Ephes. 4. 32.

[Page] Hatred of our neighbours person. Leuit. 19. 17. 1. Ioh. 3. 15. 2. 9, 10, 11.

Hatred is either

  • Priuatiue, as being an absence of loue; which is an vniust mislike four neighbour; not so much for any cause in him, as for want of loue in our selues. 1. Ioh. 3. 4.
  • Positiue, wherof be 5. degrees: viz. when thou ha­test ano­ther for
    • Euill receiued. Math. 5. 43, 44.
    • Euill s [...]spected: but charity is not suspi­tious. 1. Cor. 13. 5, 7.
    • No cause without thy selfe that hatest. Psal. 35. 19. 69. 5. Ioh. 15. 25.
    • Euill done vnto him, as the obiect of thine vniustice. 2. Sam. 13 15.
    • His vertue and righteousnesse sake Psal. 38. 19, 20. Math. 10. 22. 1. Ioh. 3. 12.

And these were the roots.

The inward fruit of anger, is the desire or purpose of priuate reuenge Leuit. 19. 18. Rom. 12. 19. Prou. 20. 22. 24. 29. 1. Thes. 5. 15.

The inward fruites of hatred, are either more

  • Generall, as being carried to­wards all sorts: viz. Inhuma­nity or churlishnesse. 1. Sam. 25. 3, 10, 11, 17. [...]
  • Speciall.

[Page]The duty opposed,

  • Loue of our neigh­bours person.
  • Hatred of his sinne.

Leuit. 19. 17, 1 [...].

The duties opposed,

  • 1. To passe by an offence. Prou. 19. 11. Psal. 38. 13, 14 Prou. 10. 12.
  • 2. Freely to forgiue it. Col. 3. 13. Math. 6. 12, 14. Luk. 17. 3, 4. Math. 18. 21, &c.
  • 3. To forget it. Leuit. 19. 8.
  • 4. To requite good for euil to them that haue wronged vs, Mat. 5. 44. in
    • Helping them. Prou. 25. 21, 22.
    • Praying for them. Psalm. 35. 13. Act. 7. 60.

The duty opposed: Humanity, or [...], Courtesie. 1. Pet. 3. 8. Gen. 23. 4, 6. 24. 19. Act. 27. 3.

[Page] The more speciall are distinguished according to the difference of the Persons against whom they are referred.

As first, against those wch are in

  • Prosperity, & it is
    • Enuy against superiors Pom­peys enuy. Gen. 4. 5. 37. 4. 8. Act. 7. 9. Mat. 27. 18.
    • Emulation against equalls. Iam. 3. 14, 16. Caesars enuy. Mat. 20. 12, 15. Dan. 6. 4.
    • Disda [...]ne against inferiours. Luk. 15. 28, 29. Haman [...] enuy. Hest. 5. 13.
    Pro. 27. 4 14. 30.
  • Aduersity, as
    • Contempt. Mat. 18. 10. Prou. 18. 3. 14. 21. 17. 5. Esa. 58. 7.
    • Hard-heartednesse or want of compas­sion. Luk. 10. 31, 32. 1. Ioh. 3. 17. Amos 6. 6. Prou. 21. 13.
    • Reioycing at the euill of another, [...] Prou. 24. 17, 18. [...] 17. 5. Io [...] 31. 29. Psalm. 35. 19, 21, 25.

Secondly, the fruits of Hatred are such as are carried against

  • Freinds, fained friendship, being worse than open hostility, Prou. 25. 19. such as is y friendship of
    • Flatterers and parasites. Psal. 55. 12, 13. Pro. 27. 6 [...] 19. 4.
    • Trecherous per­sons 2. Sam. 20. 9. Luk. 22. 4. 8.
  • Foes, as
    • Enmity, and that either
      • Open hostility. Gal. 5. 20.
      • Secret grudge. Prou. 26. 24, 25, 26.
    • Implacablenesse, Rom. 1. [...]1. 2. Tim. [...]. 3.

[Page]Duty op­posed, to

  • Wish others those good things, which either we haue, or they want. Numb. 11. 29. Act. 26. 29.
  • Congratulate the wel-fare of others, and to reioyce with them that reioyce. Rom. 12. 15. 1. Cor. 12. 26.

Duties opposed, 1. Pet. 3. 8.

  • Pitty. Luk. 7. 13. [...] 10. 33. Col. 3. 12. Ephes. 4. 32. Math. 9. 36. [...] 14. 14. [...]15. 32.
  • Compassion. Rom. 12. 15. 1. Cor. 12. 26. Heb. 13. 3. which is especially to be shewed in publike euils. Esa. 24. 16. Ezech. 9. 4.
  • Mercy. Luk. 6. 36. Math. 5. 7. Iam. 2. 13.

Duty opposed, Prou. 18. 24. True friendship, which must bee

  • Christian, in the Lord. Deut. 13. 6.
  • Sincere. 1. Sam. 1 [...]. 2. 20. [...].
  • Constant. Prou. 17. 17.

Duties opposed,

  • Christian charity, wherby we loue our enemies for the Lords sake. Luk. 6. 35.
  • Placablenesse, and desire of reconci­liation. Ephes. 4. 27. Math. 23. 24. 25, 26.

[Page] Heereunto wee are to referre dissoluing friendship be­twixt others, and setting friends at variance. Prou. 6. 16, 19.

Thirdly, against those wch are vnder our po­wer: as

  • Cruelty against those that are vnder our (Rom 1. 31. Prou. 12. 10. [...]11. 17. lam. 2. 13.)
    • Authority, by rigorous pu­nishing. Deut. 25. 2, 3. 1. Sam. 22. 18, 19.
    • Might, by violent offering or reuenging iniuries. Gen. 6. 11. Iona. 3. 8. Mat. 2. 16.
  • Indulgence. Prou. 13. 24.

4. Against

  • Neighbours and those which dwell in the same society, Prou. 10. 12. Galat. 5. 20.
    • Discord. Iam. 3 16.
    • Contenti­ousnesse. Iam. 3 16.
  • Strangers, inhospitality. 3. Ioh. 10. Math. 25. 42.

And this was the murther of the heart: the outward signes wherof are also cōdemned, in ye

  • Countenance. Gen. 4. 6.
  • Eyes. 1. Sam. 18. 9. Mat. 20. 15.
  • Gesture. Math. 27. 39. Psal. 37. 12. [...] 59. 7, 15. Act. 7. 54.
  • Voice
    • Lowd speak­ing. Ephes. 4. 31.
    • Interiection of Anger, &c. as Tush, Ra­ka, &c. Mat. 5. 22.

[Page]Duty opp.

  • Friendship preserued in others. Prou. 17. 9.
  • Friendship restored, by pacification or peace-maki [...]g. Math. 5. 9.

Duties opp.

  • Clemency,
  • Seuerity,

in both seeking the parties good, Iude vers. 22, 23.

Duties opp.

  • Concord. Psal. 34. 14. 1. Pet. 3. 11.
  • Peaceablenesse, Tit. 3. 2 in
    • Resisting the beginnings of contention. Pro. 17. 14 Ecclus. 28. 10, 11.
    • Taking away the occasi­ons.
    • Depar [...]ing from his own right, to redeeme peace. Gen. 13. 8, 9, 10. Math. 17. 26.

Duty opp. [Hospitality. Rom. 12. 13. 1. Pet. 4. 9. Heb. 13. 2 Gen. 18. 3. Math. 25. 35.

Duties opp. [The signes of loue and good will: as cour­teous and milde behauiour.

[Page]The outward Murther is either in

  • Word.
  • Deed.

The for­mer, wch is the mur­ther of the tongue, is either

  • Mutuall, when the offence is committed on both sides: as in brawling and scolding. Prou. 17. 19. 1. Pet. 3. 9.
  • Seuerall, when of­fence is commit­ted on the one part, and that either in
    • Presence, and before a mans face, as
      • Reuiling or railing, 1. Cor. 6. 10. Mat. 5. 22. whereto referre in
        • Superiors, vn­christiā me­nacing. Eph. 6. 9. Act. 9. 1.
        • Inferiors, murmuring Phi. 2. 14. Numb. 16. 41.
      • Scoffing and scorning. 2. Chron. 36. 16. Deu. 21. 9. Galat. 4. 29. Prou. 3. 34.
      • Cursing Rom. 12. 14. Iam. 3. 9.
    • Absence, or behind a mans backe, as
      • Tale-bearing. Rom. 1. 30. Leu. 19. 16.
      • Slandering. E­zech. 22. 9.
      To wch sin he is accessary, who willingly receiueth ill reports. Prou. 25. 23.

The Murther which is in deed, is either of the

  • Body,
  • Soule:

and in both, a man may offend by

  • Omission.
  • Cōmission.

The bodily Murther by omission, is, not to defend or preserue the life and person of our neighbour, when we may and ought, Math. 27. 24. Prou. 24. 11, 12. Hereto is referred all negligence, whereby our neighbours life may bee hazarded: as the not couering of a well. Exod. 21. 33. Deut. 22. 8. Exod. 21. 29.

The bodily Murther which is by commis­sion, standeth in three degrees:

  • Fighting in time of Peace. Tit. 3. 2. Math. 26. 52.
  • Hurting or wounding the body of our neigh­bour. Exod. 21. 24, 25. Leuit. 24. 19.
  • Taking away of his life. Gen 9. 6. Apoc. 22. 15. Numb. 35. 33.

[Page]Duty opp. Is a peaceable tongue, which speaketh

  • No euill. Psalm. 34. 12, 13.
  • Good. Pro. 12. 1 [...]. 1 [...].

Duty opp. The preseruation and defence of our neigh­bours life and person. Psalm. 82. 4. Iob 29. 12. 1. King. 18. 1.

Duty oppos.

  • Abstinence from doing euill:
    • A Peaceable hand. Tit. 1. 7. [...] 3. 2.
    • Innocency. Psal. 26. 6.
  • Doing good, or be­neficence, Heb. 13. 16. which is a fruite either of
    • Mercy and humanity, which is to be extended towards all. Gal. 6. 10. [...] 5. 22.
    • Brotherly loue towards those which be of the houshold of faith, and is the communion of Saints in outward things. Rom. 12. 13.

[Page]But not euery one that taketh away another mans life, is guilty of murther: for those are to bee excepted, to whom the Lord

  • Giueth the sword, as to
    • Magistrates against malefactors. Gen. 9. 6. Leuit. 24. 14. Deut. 13. 5. Ex [...]d. 22. 18, 19, 20.
    • Souldiers in lawfull battel. 1. Sam. 25. 28. Heb. 11. 33, 34. Deut. 20. 13.
    • Priuate men, in case of present neces­sity, for their owne lawfull de­fence. Exod. 2. 22.
  • Offereth another▪ as it were to bee slaine, as those who are said to kill another, by meere chance. Exod. 21. 13. Deut. 19. 4, 5, 6, 10.

[Page]Murther, which is the taking away of a mans life, is to bee distinguished according to the variety of the

  • Manner whereby it is com­mitted: for a man may com­mit Mur­ther, ei­ther as
    • Principall, and that diuersly:
      • First, either
        • Directly, as by force and vio­lence. Num. 35. 16, 17, &c. 2. Sam. 3. 27. [...] 20. 10.
        • Indirect­ly, as by
          • Poyson.
          • Witch­craft.
          Gal. 5. 20. A­pocal. 21. 8.
      • Secondly, either
        • Of his own accord, and that either
          • Of malice prepensed. Gen. 4. 8. Act. 23. 14.
          • Vpon some passion or perturbatiō of mind, as
            • Of blinde zeale. Ioh. 16. 2.
            • In heat & choler.
            • In drunkē ­nesse.
        • At y moti­on of ano­ther, by whō he is Comman­ded, Counsel­led, Hired, to kill 2. Sam. 13. 28. 1. Kin. 21. 19. Mark. 6. 24. Ezech. 22. 12.
    • Accessary, and that diuers waies, whereof some are
      • Peculiar to Supe riours, as by
        • Commandement. 2. Sam. 12. 9.
        • Vniust sentence. 1. King. 21. 11. Mat. 26. 66.
        • Not punishing murther. Num. 35. 33. Ex. 21. 14.
      • Common to all sorts: as by
        • Consent. Act. 8. 1. 2. Sam. 3. 30.
        • Counsell. Mark. 6. 24.
        • H [...]ring. Mat. 26. 15.
        • False testimony. Deut. 19. 19.
        • Trechery. Mat. 26. 48. 49.
  • Person y is mur­thered, for it is
    • 1. Of a
      • Stranger, who is no kinsman.
      • Kins-man, and then it is called Paricide.
    • 2. Of a person
      • Priuate.
      • Publike.
    • 3. Of an
      • Offendor or wicked person.
      • Innocent.

[Page]Soule-mur­ther, either in respect of the life

  • Naturall, which is the vniust vexing and grieuing of a mans soule. Genes. 27. 46. Exod. 1. 14. Prou 10. 1. 1. Sam. 1. 6, 7.
  • Spirituall, Gal. 2. 20 and is ei­ther by
    • Omission, when men (especi­ally gouernours) neglect the saluation of others. Genes. 4. 9.
    • Commission, as when a man is a scandall to a­nother, or a cause of his sinne, as by
      • Prouocation, 1. King. 21 7, 25.
      • Counsell. 2. Sam. 16. 21. Math. 16. 23.
      • Euill exam­ple. Rom. 14. 15.

So much of Murther against the neighbour.

[Page] Duty opp. Cheering and comforting others. Gen. 45. 27. Prou. 17. 22.

Duty opp.

  • Not to hinder the saluation of others, but to bee in­offensiue. 1. Cor. 10. 32. 1. Ioh 2. 10.
  • to further the salua­tion of our neighbor, winning him vnto Christ, or edifying him, 1. Cor 9. 19, 22. by
    • The du­ties of the Commu­nion of Saints in spirituall things, Rom. 1. 11. 12. 1. Thes sal. 5. 11, 14 Iam. 5. 19. viz. by
      • Mutuall obseruation. Heb. 10. 24.
      • The fruits thereof, toward the
        • Ignorant, instruction. Dan. 12. 3.
        • Erroneous, reclaiming of him, that he may bee sound in the faith.
        • Somewhat backward, Hebr. 3. 12, 13.
          • Admoni­tion.
          • Exhorta­tion.
        • Offendours, reproofe. Leuit. 19. 17. Gal. 6. 1.
        • Comfortlesse, consola­tion. 1. Thes. 5. 14.
    • A godly example. Math. 5. 16. 1. Pet. 2. 12. [...] 3. 1.

[Page]Selfe-murther in respect of the

  • Body, and life naturall, by
    • Omission, as by neg­lecting the
      • Preserua­tion of the health, in respect of thy
        • Diet,
        • Sleepe,
        • Labour,
        • Recreations,
        • Passions of the minde.
        not obseruing a moderation, but running into ex­tremes.
      • Rec [...]y of health, refusing the helpe of Physicke when it is needfull.
    • Ecclus. 38. 9, 10, 12.
    • Commis­sion, as when men
      • Thrust themselues into danger; or being in danger, will not vse such lawful meanes as God hath vouchsafed them. Ecclus. 3. 27. Math 4. 6.
      • Contriue their own death, either
        • Indirectly, by committing some capitall crime. Numb. 16. 38.
        • Directly, by being their owne butchers. 1. Sam. 31. 4. Act. 1. 18.
  • Soule, and life spirituall, by
    • Omission, by neglect­ing the saluatiō of the soule, and the meanes thereof, and seeking the world, and desires therof, Phil. 3. 19.
      • First in order, and posting off re­pentance from time to time, to the extreme hazard of the soule.
      • First in degree, that is, chiefly, re­posing their happinesse there­in, and subordinating their Re­ligion to worldly respects, and so in time of triall fall away, with the losse of their soules.
    • Commission, in
      • Making no conscience of sin, especially in sinning against conscience. Prou. 19. 16.
      • Persisting in sinne without repentance.

[Page]Duty opp. Care to

  • Preserue health, Mar. 6. 31. by
    • Temperance and sobriety in diet.
    • Moderate sleepe and labour.
    • Honest and mode­rate recreations of
      • Body.
      • Minde.
    • Cheerfulnesse, auoiding worldly griefe. Prou. 17. 22.
  • Recouer health by the Christian vse of Physicke.

Duty opp. Care to preserue

  • Safety in
    • Auoiding dangers.
    • Repelling grosse iniuries.
  • Life.

Duty opp. To labour aboue all things for the salua­tion of our soules this care must shew it selfe in

  • Seeking the meanes & degrees of saluatiō; as vocation, iustifica­tion, sanctification, Mat. 6. 33. Ioh. 6. 27.
    • First in order, with­out delay.
    • First in degree, that is, chiefly reposing our felicity there­in; and in respect thereof to con­temne all worldly desires, as vaine & hurtfull. Eccl. 2. 11 Phil. 3. 8.
  • Auoiding sin, which is the bane of the soule, either by not
    • Committing sinne, though we mightgaine the whole world thereby. Mar. 8. 36.
    • Remaining in sin, but forth­with, both
      • Repenting. Pro. 28. 13.
      • Crauing pardon.

The seuenth Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding the preseruation of chastity, together with the

  • Mea [...]es
  • Signes.
  • Duty of pro [...]uring it in others.

Chastity is partlyThe parts of Chastity.

  • Inward, in the soule.
  • Outward, of the body.

Inward Chastity is the purity of the soule, from all

  • Motions
  • Passions

of lust, or vnlawfull cō ­cupiscence of the flesh. 2. Tim. 2. 22. 1. Pet. 2. 11.

For there is a lawfull concupiscence, whereby men or women desire the propagation of mankind by generati­on, according to the ordinance of God, being neither

  • Immoderate.
  • Vnseasonable.

Gen. 1. 28. [...] 9. 1. Heb. 13. 4. 1. Cor. 7. 2, 3, 5.

The outward Chastity is, when we possesse our ves­sels, that is, our bodies, in holinesse and honour. 1. Thes. 4. 4. Such is the Chastity of the

  • Eyes, containing them from beholding vanities, and the obiects of lust. Psalm. 119. 37. Iob 31. 1. Ecclus. 9. 8, 9.
  • Eares, shutting them against all vncleane talke.
  • Tongue, restraining it from all bawdy and filthy speak­ing.
  • Fact, abstaining from all vn­cleannesse, and wanton or vnchast pleasures.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding all vncleannesse, together with the

  • Meanes.
  • Signes.
  • Being accessary vnto the vnclean­nesse of others.

Opp. Vncleannesse

  • Inward.
  • Outward.

The inward vncleannesse, is the concupiscence of the flesh, 1. Ioh. 2. 16. or euill concupiscence, Colos. 3. 5. being the Adultery of the heart, Math. 5. 28. and it is either a

  • Fore passion, going before the consent of the will, such as are the first moti­ons of lust, which are more expresly and directly forbidden in the tenth Commandement. Iam. 1. 14, 15.
  • Passion of lust, 1. Thes. 4. 5. ioyned with the consent of the will: and this is either more
    • Sudden & mo­mētany. Mat 5. 28.
    • Inueterate, which is the burning of lust or le­chery 1. Cor. 7. 9. Hos. 7. 4.

Opp. Out­ward vn­cleannes, whereby the body, or any part thereof is polluted: as the A­dultery of the

  • Eyes, suffered to goe a whoring after ye obiects of lust. From hence all actuall vncleannes com­monly ariseth Gen. 6. 2. [...]34. 2. 2. Sam. 11. 2. Mat. 5. 28. Prou. 23. 33. This is either
    • Actiue, when men or women hauing eyes full of adulte­ry, seeke with their wanton lookes to entangle others with lust. 2. Pet. 2. 14. Pro. 6. 25. Gen. 39. 7.
    • Passiue, when by beholding others, themselues are en­tangled. Mat. 5. 28. Sam. 11. 2.
  • Eares laid open to vncleane communication, and com­mitting adultery with the vncleane tongue.
  • Tongue, in rotten and filthy speaking, wherby the mind of the hearer may bee defiled. Eph. 4. 29. [...] 5. 4, 6. 1. Cor. 15. 33. Colos. 3. 8.
  • Fact, be­ing com­mitted either a­gainst
    • Sobriety, without a partner, such as are all acts of lust and vncleannes commit­ted by thy selfe alone,
      • Waking. 1. Cor. 6. 9.
      • Sleeping. Deu. 23. 10 See A.
    • Honesty with a partner.

[Page] [Page]A. The acts of vncleannesse committed against honesty, are distinguished according to the

  • Manner, that it is commit­ted either
    • With the consent of the partner.
    • Without the consent of the party, who is forced and rauished, Rape. And this is a sin against both the seuenth Comma de [...]ent, as an act of brutish vnclea [...]esse; and against the sixth, as a sinne of violence against the person: and so punished with death. Deut. 22. 25, 26. Gen. 34. 2. 2. Sam. 13. 14.
  • Differ̄ece of the per­sons with whom it is cōmitted: in respect of whom it is (Rom. 1. 26, 27.) said to be either
    • According to the na­turall vse, viz. of the male with ye female, being nor neere of kinne; and is commit­ted be­tweene persons
      • Being both single. as Fornication, which if it bee committed with
        • one ordinarily, she is called a Concubine.
        • diuers, be is cal­led a whore [...]monger.
      • Married, & that either
        • Vnder pretence of marriage, as when neman hath [...] w [...]ues; [...] hus­bands. which is Polygamy. Mala. 2. 15. I euit. 18. 1 [...]. 1. Cor. 7. 2. Deut. 17. 17.
        • Without pretence of mariage, which is more properly called adultery, Leu. 20. 10. Heb. 13. 4 Ezec. 22. 11. and is
          • Simple A­dultery, whē the one party onely is married.
          • Double a­dultery, whē both are mar­ried per­sons.
    • Against ye naturall vse, being a mōstrous mixture of those wch bee of
      • The same
        • Blood, or neere of kindred, which is called Incest. Leuit. 18. 6, 7. 1. Cor. 5. 1. Amos 2. 7.
        • Sexe, which is called Buggery, or Sodomy Ro. 1. 26, 27. Leu. 18. 22. Gen. 18. & 19.
      • Diuers kinds, as Mankind with
        • Beasts. Leuit. 18. 23. [...] 20. 15, 16.
        • Vnclean spi­rits, wch are
          • Incubi,
          • Succubi.

[Page] The sorts.

Chastity is either of

  • Single life, which is the gift of continency, or the pure ab [...]ti­nence from marriage.
  • Wedlock, consisting partly in
    • Coniugall fidelity.
    • The moderate and modest vse of the marriage bed.
    • Pure abstinence vpon iust occa­sion, as in the time of
      • Absence of one from the other.
      • Fasting and prayer. 1. Cor. 7. 5.
      • The womans separation, or monethly sicknesse. See Ezec. 18. 6. Leuit. 18. 19. [...] 20. 18.

The meanes of chastity are either

  • Common, as
    • Prayer, it being the gift of God. Math. 19. 11. 1. Cor. 7. 7.
    • Company, with such as be sober and chaste. *
  • Speciall, which are to be vsed, either as
    • Preseruatiues: viz
      • Sobriety, modera­ting the delights of the
        • Taste: as temperance in diet.
        • Sight, abstaining from the view of
          • Vanities.
          • Obiects of lust.
      • Diligence and painfulnesse in our calling, or some honest labour.
      • Vigilancy. 1. Pet. 4. 7. 1. Thes. 5. 6.
      • Modesty in the
        • Eyes & countenance, that is, shamefastnes. 1. tim. 5. 6.
        • Speech.
        • Gesture and gate.
        • Attire. Tit. 2. 3. 1. Tim. 2. 9, 10.
    • The lawfull remedy: viz. the holy state of marri­age; into which men are bound to enter, when they finde the former meanes not sufficient for the preseruation of chastity in single life; that those who cannot liue chastly in single life; may liue chastly in wedlocke. 1. Cor. 7. 2, 9. Heb. 13. 4.

[Page] Opp. Incontinency in single life, whiles men choose to burne, ra­ther than to marry. 1. Cor. 7. 9.

Opp. The

  • Breach of wedlocke, by being vnfaithfull one to the other.
  • Vsing of the mar­riage bed
    • Immoderately, as a meanes, rather than a remedy of lust.
    • Immodestly, forget­ting the rules of
      • Shamefastnesse.
      • Honesty.
    • Vnseasonably, at forbidden times.

* Opp. Company with persons

  • Vnchast and vncleane. 1. Cor. 5. 6, 9, 11.
  • Wanton and effeminate. Ephes. 5. 7.
  • Drunkards and belly-gods. Prou. 23. 20.

Opp.

  • Intempe­rance in diet;
    • Drunkennes, or much drinking of wine and strong drinks. 1. Pet. 4. 3. Prou. 23. 33. Gen. 19. 32, 33.
    • Gluttony. Ezech. 16. 49.
  • Vnchast eyes
    • Beholding
      • Persons beautifull or wanton.
      • Pictures obscence.
      • Bawdy enterludes and playes.
    • Reading vnchast bookes.

Opp.

  • Idlenesse.
  • Slothfulnesse.

Ezech. 16. 49. 2. Sam. 11. 2.

Opp. Immodest

  • Countenance. Impudency, the harlots fore-head. Prou. 7. 13. Ier. 3. 3.
  • Speech. 1. Tim. 5. 13. Prou. 7. 11.
  • Gesture and gate, as
    • Proud, Esa. 3. 16, 17.
    • Wanton behauiour: whereto referre wan­ton dancing. 2. Pet. 2. 7. 2. Cor. 12. 21.
  • Attire. Prou. 7. 10. Zeph. 1. 8.

Opp.

  • Marriage in them that haue not the gift of continency, vnneces­sarily delayed; especially after marriage promised.
  • Vow, or resolute purpose to liue single, whether wee haue the gift of continency, or not.
  • Vnlawfull diuorces. Math. 19. 9.

[Page]The signes are

    • Sobriety. Ecclus. 19. 27, 28.
    • Modesty & shamefastnes.
    • Keeping of sober and chast company.
    wch being also meanes, are in a double respect required in this com­mandement.
  • Auoiding all iust suspicions and shewes of euill. Pro. 5. 8.

The duty of procu­ring or preseruing chastity in others, belongeth

  • Commonly to all, as occasion serueth. Genes. 39. 9. 2. Sam. 13. 13.
  • Especially to
    • Parents, who are to
      • Protect their childrens cha­stity. Deut. 22. 19, 21.
      • Prouide them the remedy of marriage in due sea­son. Gen. 24. 4.
    • Magistrats, who are by
      • Good lawes to prouide for the preseruation of chastity.
      • Seuere punishments to represse vncleannesse.

[Page]Opp.

  • Wantonnesse.
  • Immodesty and impudency.
  • Haunting vnchaste company.
  • Frequenting suspected places, especially at suspicious times. Prou. 7. 8, 9. Iob 31. 9. [...] 24. 15.

Opp. To be acces­sary to the vnclean­nesse of o­thers, Psa. 50. 18. this offence is cōmitted

  • Priuately, by
    • Bawds, and such as are the diuels instru­ments to bring naughty-packs toge­ther.
    • Those, which any way consent, coun­sell or allure to vncleannesse. 2. Sam. 13. 5. [...] 16. 21.
    • Them, who prostitute them whose cha­stity they ought to protect: as hus­bands their wiues, or parents their daughters. Leuit. 19. 29.
    • Parents, who for no iust cause deny mar­riage to their children.
  • Publikely by Magi­strates and gouernors, who ei­ther
    • Permit this sinne, by impo­sing
      • No punishment, es­pecially those who tolerate stewes. Deut. 23. 17.
      • Light or ridiculous punishments.
    • Forbid the remedy, which is marriage. 1. Tim. 4. 3.

The eighth Commandement.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding those duties which concerne our owne▪ or our neighbours goods, and outward estate.

These duties are either more

  • Generall.
  • Speciall.

The gene­rall duties stand in 3. degrees:

  • 1. To abstaine from doing any iniury or wrong to our neighbour, in respect of his goods or estate. 1. Cor. 6. 7, 8. or if wee haue, to make him amends. Exod. 22. 5.
  • 2 To preserue as much as we may, our owne and our neighbours goods, Ioh. 6. 12. Deut. 22. 1, 2, 3, 4. Exod 23. 4, 5.
  • 3. To be helpfull to others, as our ability af­fordeth, and their necessity requireth. Ephes. 4. 28.

The spe­ciall du­ties con­cerne the

  • Iust ( [...]) possession of our goods, and that containeth 2. branches; Iust
    • getting or obtaining of our goods. Mar. 8. 36. Prou. 16. 8.
    • Keeping or retai­ning of them.
  • Lawfull ( [...]) vse of our goods.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding those vices that concerne our owne, or our neighbours goods and outward estate.

Opp. To be

  • Hurtfull to our neighbour, in hindring or impairing his estate, Mark. 10. 19.
  • Wanting to our neighbour or our selues, in not
    • Preseruing his, or our owne goods.
    • Imploying our goods as wee ought, to
      • Our own good.
      • The benefit of others.

Opp.

  • Vniust possession, either by
    • Vniust getting. Prou. 13. 11. Hab. 2. 9. Ier. 17. 11.
    • Vniust detaining.
    all forbiddē vn­der the name of theft.
  • Vnlawfull vse of goods.

[Page]Vnto iust getting there are 4. vertues, or inward duties re­quired, whereby we shall bee fitly disposed f [...]r ye keep­ing of this Comman­dement, viz.

  • 1. [...], Heb. 13. 5. the not setting of our hearts vpon riches. Psal. 62. 10. Math. 6. 33.
  • 2. Contentednesse with that condition which God in his most wise, iust, and Fa­therly prouidence doth allot vnto vs. Heb. 13. 5. 1. Tim. 6. 6, 7, 8. Phil. 4. 11, 12.
  • 3. A moderate desire of such things as are conuenient & necessary for vs, Math. 6. 11. Prou. 30. 8. both for
    • Our owne maintenance, according to ye necessity of
      • Nature. 1. Tim. 6. 8.
      • Person. 1. Tim. 5. 8.
      • State, as we are ei­ther pri­uate or publike persons, &c.
    • Reliefe of others, Pro. 5. 15, 16. Act. 20. 35.
      • Priuately. Eph. 4. 28.
      • Publikely, in
        • Church.
        • Commō ­weale.
  • 4. A moderate care, to prouide those things which are conuenient and necessary for vs. Gen. 30. 30. 1. Tim. 5. 8. 2. Cor. 12. 13, 14. Prou. 31. 13. &c. Mat. 6. 11. that which wee [...]ay for, we must bee carefull to ob­taine by the vse of lawfull meanes.

[Page] 1. Opp. [...], loue of money, Col. 3. 3. 1. Tim. 6. 10. the roote of all the sinnes forbidden in this Com­mandement, which is also called the lust of the eyes. 1. Ioh. 2. 16.

2. Opp. Discontentednesse, disposing men to couet and seeke more than is needfull, though they haue not lawfull meanes: to which vice they make them­selues subiect, who haue not learned to liue within their compasse.

3. Opp.

  • Affectation of Pouerty, as in begging Friers, &c. Pro. 30. 8. Ephes. 4. 28. Act. 20. 35.
  • Couetousnesse and ambition, wherunto, be­sides the loue of money, and preferment, concurre
    • A resolution to be rich, and great in this world, whether God giue good meanes or not. 1. Tim. 6. 9.
    • Hasting to be rich. Prou. 28. 20, 22. 20. 21.
    • An insatiable desire still to haue more. Eccl. 4. 8. Prou. 27. 20.

4. Opp.

  • Improuidence and carelesnesse. Prou. 10. 5. 1. Tim. 5. 8.
  • Immoderate and carking care. Math. 6. 25, &c. Phil. 4. 6.

[Page]The sorts of iust getting,

  • Without contract, as of things
    • Gottē by our selues,
    • Receiued from o­thers.
  • By contract.

Goods are gotten & procured lawfully by our selues, and our owne meanes, either

  • Extraordinarily, by the law of
    • Nature: as those things wch haue no owner, either be­cause they
      • Are cōmon by the law of nature.
      • Were neuer in the possessiō of any.
      • Are cast off willingly, & abandoned by their owners.
      These by right ap­pertaine to the first
      • Getter.
      • Finder.
    • Nations: as those things which are gotten from the enemie by lawfull warre.
  • Ordinarily, by ye sweat of our browes in a lawfull calling. Ephes. 4. 28. where two things are required. viz.
    • A lawfull cal­ling.
    • Diligence ther­in.

Lawfull calling are either

  • Publike, and those either
    • Supreme or soueraigne; as of the Prince.
    • Subordi­nate, and those
      • Ecclesiasticall, as of Ministers and law­full gouernours in the Church.
      • Ciuill, and those seruing for
        • Peace.
        • Warre.
  • Priuate, as
    • Husbandry. Eccl. [...]. 8.
    • Arts
      • Liberall, whether
        • Professions, as of
          • Diuinity.
          • Law.
          • Physicke.
        • Preparatiues vnto Professions, as the seuen liberall Arts.
      • Illiberall, as trades seruing either for the
        • Making of things needfull, as Handicrafts, &c.
        • Communicating of thē, either by
          • Whole­sale.
          • Retaile.

[Page]Opp. In­ordinate walking, 2. Thes. 3. 6, 7, 11. opposed to the

  • Lawfull calling, viz
    • No cal­ling, as
      • Common beggers & rogues. Deut. 15. 4. 2. Thes. 3. 10.
      • Superfluous Gentlemen, who hauing nothing to main­taine them, refuse to liue in any calling, Luk. 16. 3.
    • Bad cal­ling, as those wch maintaine thēselues by
      • Vnlawfull professi­ons, as
        • Harlots and Bawds.
        • Witches and Wizards, Iugglers, Stage-play­ers, &c.
      • Gaming, as
        • Gamesters.
        • Keepers of gaming hou­ses, &c.
  • Diligent walking in our calling, viz. idlenes, 2. Thes. 3. 11, 12. Math. 25. 30. Pro. 18. 9.

[Page]There is also a lawfull acqui­sition or get­ting of things wee receiue from others, who either

  • Were the true owners thereof, as that which wee haue receiued by
    • Free gift, whereunto lega­cies are to be referred.
    • Succession & inheritance. Numb. 27. 8, 9.
  • Were supposed to haue been the true owners: as by prescription in things which may bee prescribed, hauing been without interruption enioyed, the whole time appointed by lawes.

[Page] The sorts of vniust getting, viz by

  • Fraud, which is pro­perly called theft.
  • Force, which is rob­bery.

Leuit. 19. 13. 1. Thes. 4. 6. Luk. 3. 14. 1. Cor. 6. 10.

Theft is to be distin­guished according to the dif­ference of the

  • Manner, that it is
    • Manifest, when the theefe is taken with the man­ner: that is, either
      • In the act of stealing.
      • With ye thing stolne.
    • Not manifest.
  • Persons which doe steale, for it is either
    • Domesti­cal, as the theft of the
      • Wife.
      • Children. Prou. 28. 24. Deut. 21. 20.
      • Seruants. Tit. 2. 10. Math. 24. 49.
    • Committed by other which bee not of the same family.
  • Obiects, which are stolne: for it is either of
    • Persons, by
      • Surrepti­on, to be
        • Sold, 1. Tim. 1. 10. Deut. 24. 7. Exod. 21. 16.
        • Mangled, as beggers steale children.
        • Married, as wooers some­times do young maids, against the will of the parents or gouernours.
      • Prodition or trechery. Mat. 26. 15.
      • Supposition of changelings. 1. King. 3. 20.
    • Things whereof there bee diuers distincti­ons. See A.

[Page]A. Things: whereof there be diuers di­stinctions, that it is

  • 1. Of things
    • Ciuill, and those either
      • Priuate.
      • Common or publike, and that is Pe­culatus, robbing of the Common­wealth.
    • Sacred, & that is sa­criledge: as Rom. 2. 22. of
      • Gifts, or vowed to bee giuen to God. Iosh. 7. 21. [...]6. 22. Act. 5. 2, 3. Prou. 20. 25. Dan. 5. 2, 23.
      • Tenths, and other Church-duties. Mal. 3. 8.
      • Church-liuings, Leuit. 27. 21. Neh. 13. 8.
        • Mangled by corrupt Pa­trons.
        • Alienated by appropria­tions.
        • Deuoured, by the Ha [...] ­pies of Princes Courts.
  • 2. Of
    • Immoueables, as remouing of land-markes. Deut. 19. 14. Prou. 22. 28. Hos. 5. 10. Deut. 27. 17.
    • Moueables, whether
      • Liuing, as
        • Plants, and their fruits, Deut. 23. 24, 25.
        • Fowles.
        • Fishes.
        • Beasts, Exod. 22. 1. and if of many toge­ther, it is Abigeatus. Iob. 15, 17.
      • Without life, as
        • Money, by Cutpurses, &c. Stuffe and apparell, for stealing whereof, those which conuey themselues into houses, are cal­led Directarij.
        • Writings and instruments
          • Embezeled and stolne.
          • Depraued & cor­rupted, or falsi­fied.

[Page]Robbery or Rapine is distin­guished by the end: for thereby is intended, either the

  • Neighbours harme, which is spoyling; as in those who are called
    • Incendiarij, who maliciously set on fire their neighbours houses, or corne.
    • Venefici, who spoyle mens goods or cattell, by
      • Poyson.
      • Charmes, In­chantments, Witchcraft.
  • Robbers owne pro­fit or gain: & is com­mitted either
    • Vnder pretence of authority by great theeues, and is cal­led Oppression: and that is by
      • Vsurpation, without colour of Law. Gen. 21. 25. Iudg. 18. 25. 27.
      • Extortion, vnder co­lour of Law. Psalm. 94. 20. Luk. 19. 8.
    • Without any such pretence of autho­rity, whe­ther in time of
      • Warre, as the Pillage of soul­diers, towards them that are not enemies. Deut. 2. 5, 6. Luk. 3. 14.
      • Peace, whether by
        • Land, as
          • Robbing by the high way. Luk. 10. 30.
          • Burglary, or breaking in­to houses. Exod. 22. 2, 3.
        • Sea, as Pyracy.

To these sorts of theeues and rob­bers, we are to ad­ioyne those that be accessary to their sinne, either

  • Before­hand, by
    • Consent. Psal. 50. 18.
    • Counsell or prouocatiō. 1. Kin. 21.
  • At the time, by helping and assisting them.
  • After, by
    • receiuing the
      • Theeues.
      • Things stolne.
    • Partaking with them in the gaine. Pro. 29. 24. [...]1. 14.

[Page]Now followeth the acquisition or getting, which is by Contract, which is the consent between parties, concer­ning the alienation or permutation of things vpon condi­tion, and that con­dition is either

  • Presently performed,
  • For the time to come, as­sured by obliga [...]ōs
    • Verball, wether by
      • Word of mouth.
      • Writing, a [...]
        • Bills.
        • Bonds.
    • Reall, as by
      • Pawnes.
      • Mortgage.
    • Personall, as by
      • Sureties.
      • Hostages.

In contracts we are to behaue our selues vprightly, without dissimula­tion or guile, as in the sight of God, Psalm. 15. 2, 4. obseruing in our

  • Words, truth. Zac. 8. 16.
  • Promises, faithful­nesse.
  • Deeds, iustice.

Contracts are con­cerning

  • Alienation of things for
    • A time:
    • Euer:
    and both of them either
    • Free.
    • For re­cōpēce
  • Committing to trust.

The free aliena­tion for a time, is either of the

  • Vse onely, which is commodation or lending to vse, the property retained.
  • Property also, which is mutuation or lending to spend; and hath place in things which are spent in the vse.

In things lent to vse, the duty of ye borrower is to

  • Vse the same to that end for which it was lent, and not to abuse it.
  • Restore y same particular
    • Safe and entire, or to make it good.
    • At the time appoin­ted.

[Page]Opp. To

  • Deale deceitfully. Ezech. 22. 12. 1. Thes. 4. 6. the highest degree wherof is coozenage.
  • Vse
    • Lying. Prou. 21. 6.
    • Vnfaithfulnesse in promises.
    • Vniustice and inequality.

Opp.

  • To abuse the thing borrowed, or to vse it further than the lender would like of.
  • To impaire it, and not to make, or not to bee willing to make amends.
  • Not to restore it at all, or not at the time appointed, detaining it against the lenders good will.

[Page]In things lent to be spent, the duty of the

  • Lender, is to intend and seeke the borrowers good, and not his owne gaine.
  • Surety, if there bee any, to giue his word for those that bee thrifty and honest, and to make good his word.
  • Borrower towards the
    • Surety, to saue him harmelesse.
    • Creditor, to restore the principall,
      • In the full value.
      • At ye time appointed.

The free alienation which is perpetuall, is Donation, and is heere considered as it is made, with

  • Condition, and not absolutely.
  • Limitation of certaine
    • Duties,
    • seruices,
    which the receiuer is bound to performe.

The alienation which is for recompence, is a commuta­tion, wherein equality is to bee obserued betwixt the things committed.

In these contracts out

  • Do vt des:
  • Do vt facias, vel contra,

that is, there is a commu­tation ei­ther of

  • things them­selues, or their vse,
  • Mens labour and industry,

for an e­quall re­compēce.

[Page]Opp. In the

  • Lender, to lend for gaine, which is Vsury: to which sin, are accessary
    • Brokers for Vsurers.
    • Borrowers without ne­cessity, vpon Vsurie.
  • Surety,
    • To giue his word for persons
      • Vnthrifty.
      • Dishonest.
    • Not to performe couenants.
  • Borrower, not to repay the principall at the time appointed: wherein they especially offend, who are voluntary Banquerupts.

Opp. Inequality in illiberall contracts.

[Page]The com­mutation of the things thēselues, is either of

  • Ware for ware, which is Bartery,
  • Money for money, which is Exchange.
  • Ware for money, which is Selling: wherein is required as touch­ing the
    • Person, that he be the right ow­ner, or authorized by him.
    • Thing, y it be saleable, in respect of the
      • Sub­stance.
      • Vse.
    • Price, that is be iust and equall.
    • Manner of selling, that it bee without fraud or deceit.
  • Money for ware, which is buying.

[Page]Opp. In regard of the

  • Person, when a man selleth that which he hath no right to sell.
  • Thing, which is not sale­able, ei­ther be­cause it is not
    • Valuable by money: as those who sell
      • The graces of God, as miraculous heal­ing, 2. King. 5. 20. Pardon of sinne.
      • Iustice, by Bribery.
      • Vntruthes, as
        • False witnesses.
        • Lawyers, who be Pa­trons of bad causes.
      • Liberality and time, as Vsurers doe.
    • Money-worth, be­ing in respect of the
      • Substance, counterfeit, or corrupt. Amos 8. 6.
      • Vse, vnprofitable, or hurtfull.
  • Price, being vnequall: in which respect they chiefly offend, e­uen as publike theeues, whose practice is, to raise the prices of things, as
    • Regraters.
    • Forestallers.
    • Ingrosers.
    • Dardanarij, Hucksters, and whorders vp of commo­dities, to cause a dearth. Prou. 11. 26.
  • Manner, when mē vse de­ceitfull
    • Words,
      • Flattering the buyer.
      • Praising the ware vnworthily, and con­cealing or extenuating the faults ther­of, not lessening the price.
    • Deeds, in respect of the
      • Kind, giuing one for another.
      • Quality, that the ware may seeme better than it is, as
        • Comparing it with that which is naught.
        • Vsing false lights.
        • Setting a false glosse on it.
      • Quantity, by
        • Vsing false
          • Waights and measures. Prou. 11. 1.
          • Weighing and measuring, whereto referre too much stretching of cloth.
        • Mixture, of that which is worse, they sell the lesse quantity of the better: as wa­ter with wine, wooll, or meale, &c.

[Page]In buying, regard is to be had of the

  • Person, of whom thou buyest, that hee haue right to sell.
  • Thing, that it bee a thing which is valuable by money, and may bee lawfully bought with money.
  • Price, that thou giue, and if thou hast know­ledge, that thou offer an equall price: and if he sell for need, to giue rather more, than lesse than the worth.
  • Manner, that it bee void of all deceit and wrong.

[Page]Opp. In regard of the

  • Person, to buy of him that hath no right to sell: as to buy stolne goods.
  • Thing, to buy that, which ei­ther
    • Cannot be valued by money, as
      • The graces of God: which properly is Symonie. Act. 8. 18, 19.
      • Remission of sin: as those which buy Pardons.
      • Holy orders, &c.
    • Ought not to be bought or sold for money, as
      • Presentations vnto Benefices, which also are cal­led Symony.
      • Vniustice, of a Iudge corrupted by thee.
      • False testimony of a witnesse suborned or hired by thee.
  • Price, to
    • Offer much lesse than thou knowest the thing to bee worth.
    • Take aduantage of the sellers need, and for that cause to giue the lesse. Amos 8. 6.
  • Manner, vsing de­ceit, in
    • Words, vnworthily dispraising the ware. Prou. 20. 14.
    • Deeds, as de­ceiuing ye seller with the mo­ney which is paid, in re­gard of the
      • Substance, or quality, being coun­terfeit.
      • Quan­tity, that is,
        • Waight Heere offend chiefly
          • Counter­feiters.
          • Clippers of coyne.
        • Number, as to deceiue in the tale, to giue 9. pence, for 12. pence, or 7. shil­lings 6. pence, for 10. shil­lings, &c.

[Page]To the former contracts we are to refer oppignoration, which is a con­tract partly of

  • Lending and borrowing vpon a pawne.
  • Buying and selling, if the condition be not obserued.

The duty of the giuer of the Pawne is, not to deceiue the taker, in the worth thereof.

The duty of the lender vpon a pawne is, to prouide onely for his indemnity: as if hee haue to deale with a needy brother, either to

  • Take
    • None of him.
    • Such onely as hee may well spare. Ex. 22. 26. Deut. 24. 6, 10, 11, 12, 13.
  • Restore it presently.

The contract which concerneth the alienation of the vse for hire, hath two parts:

  • Location or letting to hire.
  • Conduction or taking to hire.

The duty of him that let­teth to hire, is to

  • Let that onely which hath a fruitfull vse, which may be seuered from the property, which he reserueth to himselfe.
  • Require an hire proportionable to that vse, the impairing, hazard, and charge also be­ing considered.
  • Let that which is fit for the vse to which it is let.
  • Beare the hazard, if it miscarry without the hirers default. Exod. 22. 15.

The duty of the hi­rer, is to

  • Vse the thing hired, onely to that end for which it was let.
  • Restore it at the time appointed.
  • Restore it entire, of if it hath miscarried through his default, to make it good. Exod. 22. 12.

[Page]Opp. In the

  • Borrower, to lay a pawne of lesse value than the summe which is borrowed, with purpose to for­feit the same.
  • Lender,
    • To seeke gaine, by
      • Taking the fruitfull vse of the thing in respect of the loane; which is a spice of Vsury: Antichresis.
      • The forfeiture, prouiding not onely for his indemnity.
    • To take a pawne of a needy brother, which hee cannot well spare, and not to restore it pre­sently. Ezech. 18. 7, 12. [...]33. 15.

Opp.

  • To let that which hath no fruitfull vse, but is spent in the vse; which is vsury vnder pretence of let­ting.
  • To require an vnreasonable hire, and to take aduan­tage of the hire [...]s necessity.
  • To let that which is vnfit for the vse to which it is let.
  • To exact a recompence aboue couenant, for some harme which hath happened to the thing let, without the hirers fault.

Opp.

  • To abuse that which is hired, to other purpose.
  • Not to restore it.
  • Not to make it good, hauing by his default impaired or spoyled it.

[Page] Contracts, wherein is a commutation of mens skill, in­dustry and labour for an equall stipend or reward, may be referred to the Contract of Location and conduction.

The duty of him that hireth another mans labour, is to

  • Allow him an equll stipend. 1. Tim. 5. 18.
  • Giue it him, if he be poore, with­out delay. Leuit. 19. 13. Deut. 24. 14, 15.

The duty of him that is hired, is to

  • Require a stipend proportionable.
  • Imploy his labour and skill faithfully, and diligently. Gen. 31. 6, 39, 40.

To this head are to be referred the fees and duties of Lawyers, Physicians▪ Chirurgians, Schoole-masters, and of all Artificers and Trades-men, who imploy their labour or skill for recompence.

Now follow those contracts wherein are committed to trust either

  • Things.
  • Persons.

Things, as goods cō ­mitted to

  • Depositaries, (to whom se­questers are to bee referred) whose duty is to
    • Keepe them safe.
    • Restore them to the owner, demanding them.
    • Make them good, if by his default they be impaired or lost. Exo. 22. 10, 11, 12.
  • Feoffees of trust, Executors, who are faithfully to dis­charge that trust reposed in them.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not to allow an equall stipend to men for then labour.
  • To detaine the poore mans hire. Iam. 5. 4.

Opp.

  • To require an vnreasonable allowance.
  • To deale
    • Negligently.
    • Vnfaithfully.

Opp.

  • To vse the things committed to their trust, (by which vse they are impaired) or to turne them to their owne profit.
  • Not to restore them, especially committed to their trust in a tumultuous time: as in feare of fire.
  • Not to make them good, hauing impaired or spoyled them.

Opp. In Feoffees and Executors, to deale vnfaithfully.

[Page]Persons committed to trust, are Pupils, or Orphans, committed to Tutors and Guardians.

Whose duty is,

  • 1. To remember, that they are set ouer Orphans, not for their owne, but for the Orphans good.
  • 2. As they succeed the naturall parents in authority, so they ought to succeed them in fatherly affection. Hest. 2 7.

The other branch of iust pos­session, is iust keeping: which containeth two things, the

  • Preseruing and retaining of our owne goods.
  • Restoring of that which is other mens.

Wee are bound to preserue our goods, as being Talents committed to vs of God, and not to

  • Neglect them, or to ex­pose thē (as it were) to pilserers and stea­lers.
  • Suffer them to be spoy­led or lost. Ioh. 6. 12.

which are the oppo­site vices.

Quest. Whether for retaining our goods, and main­taining our right, it be lawfull to goe to Law?

Answ. It may be lawfull (though most men offend in going to law,) if these cautions bee obserued, viz. that

  • 1. The cause be iust, weigh­ty and necessary.
  • 2. Charity be not broken.
  • 3. It be vsed as the last re­fuge.

Restitution of other mens goods, which either

  • Haue been vnlawfully got­ten.
  • Cannot lawfully bee retai­ned.

[Page]Opp.

  • Not to seeke the Orphans, but their owne profit.
  • To make a prey of them, and to vse them not as chil­dren, but rather as slaues which are bought and sold.

Opp. To go to law,

  • For causes
    • Trifling.
    • Vniust.
  • In stomake and malice.
  • Not as the last remedy, but as present meanes to molest our neighbour.

Opp. To persist in the wrong, by not restoring.

Opp. To detaine them against the owners will.

[Page]Concerning restitution of things vnlaw­fully gotten, these 5. poynts are to be con­sidered, viz.

  • 1. That restitution is to be made. Leuit. 6. 4. 5. Num. 5. 6, 7, 8. 1. Sam. 12. 4. Luk. 19. 8. Mat. 27. 3. Ezech. 33. 14, 15.
  • 2. Who is to make restitution: viz. eue­ry one that hath vniustly got, whether by force or by fraud, or by any vniust meanes whatsoeuer.
  • 3. To whom? viz. to the party damni­fied, Leuit. 6. 5. or if hee be dead, to those who are next of kinne, Numb. 5. 7, 8. or for want of them, let him giue it to good vses.
  • 4. How much? the full value at the least, Leuit. 6. 5. Numb. 5. 7. Luk. 19. 8. or if hee be not able, yet so much as hee can. Exod. 22. 3.
  • 5. When? so soone as hee seeketh for­giuenesse at the hands of God. Num. 5. 6, 7, 8. Leuit. 6. 2. &c. Mal. 5. 23, 24.

[Page]Restitution also is to bee made of such things, as hauing come lawfully to our hands, cannot lawful­ly be detained against the owners good will, we be­ing able to restore them: and these are things which either wee haue

  • Found, which we must esteem as committed to our trust, by the Lord, that wee may restore them to the true owner, if hee can possibly bee knowne. Exod. 23. 4. Deut. 22. 2, 3.
  • Receiued by con­tract, as things
    • Ali [...]nated for a time; as things le [...]t, let, or l [...]d to paw [...]e. Psal. 37. 21. Ezech. 18. 12.
    • Committed to our trust. Leu. 6. 2, 4.

Now followeth the right vse of our goods towards

  • Our selues, which is the fruition of them.
  • Others, which is the free commu­nication of thē.

Prou. 5. 15, 16.

[Page] We are to enioy and to vse to our comfort, the good gifts of God. Eccl. 5. 17, 18. and heere­to belong 2. vertues

  • Parsimony in the honest sauing and sparing of things, that they be not idly and vnpro­fitably wasted or spent. Prou. 27. 23, 24, 25, 26, 27.
  • Frugality, in the sober and moderate spen­ding of our goods, according to our calling and ability, to profitable and needfull vses. Sit condus fortior promo.

To the free communication of goods to the good of o­thers, Prou. 21. 21. two ver­tues are required:

  • Liberality, that wee com­municate them willing­ly, and cheerfully.
  • Iustice, that we giue of our owne, without doing wrong to others.

Free com­munica­tion of goods, is either for

  • A time, by lending. Psal. 112. 5. Deut. 15. 7, 8. Luk. 6. 35.
  • Euer, by giuing, to vses
    • Publike, both
      • Ciuill. 2. Sam. 17. 27, 28, 29.
      • Ecclesiasticall. Pro. 3. 9. Ex. 36. 5, 6. 1. Chr. 29. 9
    • Priuate, as Almes-giuing, and relieuing the necessities of our brethren. Hebr. 13. 16. Luk. 21. 4. [...] 12. 33. Math. 25. 35.

[Page]Opp.

  • Niggardlinesse, which keepeth men not onely from communicating of goods, but also from enioying them. Eccl. 6. 2. [...] 4. 8. Ecclus. 14. 3, 4, 5, 6. and is a double theft.
  • Wasting and mis­spending, to vses
    • Vnnecessary aboue our power.
    • Dishonest.

Opp.

  • Couetousnesse.
  • Hard-heartednesse. 1. Ioh. 3. 17. Prou. 21. 13. Luk. 16. 23, 24.

The ninth Commandement.

Thou shalt not vtter a false (or vaine, Deut. 5. 20.) testimony concerning thy neighbour.

The Affirmatiue part,

Commanding, that our speech concerning our neighbour, or our selues, should bee both True, Charitable, and tendring his, and our own credit & good Name. 1. Cor. 13. 6. Ephes. 4. 15.

Heere therefore is commanded the preseruation of

  • Truth amongst men.
  • The fame and good name of men, both
    • Our owne.
    • Of others.

Of Truth, we are to consider 3. things:

  • 1. What it is: viz. a con­formity both of our
    • Speech with our mind. Psal. 15. 2.
    • Minde with the things thēselues.
  • 2. That in all our speech it is religiously to bee obserued. Prou. 12. 19. Ephes. 4, 25. Zach. 8. 16.
  • 3. The manner how it is to be professed, viz.
    • Freely. Dan. 3. 16, 17, 18. Act. 4. 8, 10, 13.
    • Simply with discre­tion. Mat. 10. 16.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding all speech

  • False and vaine.
  • Vncharitable, especially such as tendeth to the diffamation of our neighbour.

Opp. All fals­hood in speech Leuit. 19. 11. Col. 3. 9. Eph. 4. 25. Prou. 6. 17. [...] 12. 22. [...] 19. 5, 9. Psal. 5. 6. Apoc. 21. 8 whether wee speake

  • That wch is false:
  • Falsly, with a minde to deceiue:

Whether in

  • Iest, as the e­sting lye wch is false in mea­ning, as well as in words, Hos. 7. 3. being
    • Neither figura­tiue.
    • Nor y true mea­ning discoue­red by gesture, countenance, pronunciation, &c.
  • Earnest, whether to
    • Helpe, as the Offi­ciouslye.
    • Hurt as the Pernici­ouslye.

Opp. To

  • Freedome in the
    • Excesse, vndiscreet and vnseasonable profession of the truth, to the vnnecessary hurt or danger of our selues, or others.
    • Defect, when through [...]eare, or any sinister respect, the truth is
      • Denied. Mat. 26. 70, 72, 74.
      • Betrayed. 2. Tim. 4. 16.
  • Simplicity, a doubling and deceitfull tongue. Psal. 55. 22. Psalm. 12. 2. [...] 109. 2. Zeph. 3. 13. Ier. 9. 8, 9.

[Page]The meanes of truth, that it may

  • Bee amongst men, that is, that it bee
    • Knowne, are
      • Loue of the truth. Pro. 23. 23.
      • Docility or teachablenesse. Act. 17. 11.
    • Preserued and maintained: constancy and sted­fastnesse in the truth. Ephes. 4. 14.
  • Profitably be, are
    • Profitable speech, tending to
      • Gods glory. Ephes. 5. 4.
      • Our neigh­bours good,
        • Spirituall, viz. to edificati­on. Ephes. 4. 29.
        • Tempo­rall, as to his
          • Honest delight, vrbanity.
          • Profit. 1. Tim. 5. 23.
          Col. 4. 6.
    • And the meanes of enter­taining profitable speech, together with the reme­dy of the contrary: the
      • Meanes of entertaining profi­table speech, is Affability. Ioh. 4. 7, 10.
      • Remedy against vnprofitable speech, is Taciturnity. Pro. 10. 19. [...] 17. 28. Iam. 1. 19.

Of the preseruation of the fame and good name

  • Of our neigh­bour,
  • Our owne,

whereof great regard is to be had. Eccl. 7. 3. Pro. 22. 1.

To the preseruation of our neighbours good name, is required, both an

  • Inward disposition to tender it.
  • Outward profession of the truth con­cerning our neighbour, ioyned with charity.

The inward disposition is a true care of our neighbours credit, with the fruits thereof.

The care of our neighbours credit, whereby wee tender his good name, is a necessary fruit of Charity.

[Page] Opp. Loue of vntruth. Apoc. 21. 8.

Opp.

  • Voluntary or affected ignorance.
  • Vaine credulity

Opp.

  • Vnconstancy in the truth, and vnstayednesse. Ephes. 4. 14. 2. Pet. 3. 16.
  • Pertinacy in errour.

Opp. Speech vnprofita­ble, being either

  • Vaine. Psalm. 12. 2. [...] 144. 8. Deut. 5. 20. Prou. 30. 8. Tit. 3. 9. Math. 12. 36.
  • Hurtfull, tending to
    • Gods dishonour.
    • The neigh­bours hurt
      • Spirituall, rotten or infecting speech. Ephes. 4. 29. 1. Cor. 15. 33.
      • Tempo­rall, opposed to his
        • Honest delight,
          • Scurrility. Ephes. 5. 4.
          • Taunting and dis­gracing.
        • Profit.

Opp. To

  • Affability,
    • Counterfait courtesie. 2. Sam. 15. 5.
    • Morosity. 1. Sam. 25. 17.
  • Taciturnity,
    • Much talking. Prou. 10. 19. Psal. 140. 11.
    • Profitable truth smothered by silence.

Opp.

  • Neglect of our neighbours good name.
  • Desire to impaire it.

[Page]The fruits of this care are referred either to the

  • Fame it selfe, & that either
    • Good: to bee glad to heare well of our neighbours. Rom. 1. 8. Col. 1. 3, 4.
    • Bad: to be sorry for it.
  • Meanes, as
    • Hearing.
    • Iudging.
    • Reporting.

The duty in respect of

  • Hearing,
    • Not willingly to heare rumours and reports tending to the infamy of our neighbour. Psalm. 15. 3. Pro. 25. 23. but to repell tale-bearers.
    • Willingly to heare the commendations of others.
  • Iudging: to iudge charita­bly, the fruits whereof bee
    • Not to bee suspitious, but to represse vniust suspitions. 1. Cor. 13. 5.
    • To beleeue or determine nothing rashly a­gainst our neighbour.
    • To interpret
      • Good things well.
      • Doubtfull things; in the better part.
  • Reporting, to report no ill of thy neighbor, vnlesse it be in charity as namely, when it is
    • Profitable for the
      • Party of whom thou speakest, that he may be reclaimed. 1. Cor. 1. 11.
      • Party to whom th [...] speakest for preuentiō of
        • Danger inten­ded. Act. 23. 16. Ier. 40. 14
        • Infection like to ensue by his company.
    • Necessary for thy selfe: as when silence will make thee guilty of his fault. Ecclus. 19. 8.

[Page]Opp. To be

  • Sorry for the good report of our neighbour: a fruit of enuie. Math. 21. 15.
  • Glad at their infamy, or ill reports.

Opp. In respect of

  • Hearing,
    • Willingly to heare the ill reports of our neighbours, and to giue entertainment to tale-bearers. Exod. 23. 1. 1. Sam. 24. 10. Prou. 17. 4.
    • Vnwillingly to heare the commendations of others.
  • Iudging:
    • Vniust suspitions, which is the false witnesse of the heart, forbidden in this Commandement. 1. Tim. 6. 4. 2. Sam. 10. 3. 4.
    • Rashly to giue credit to ill rumours. Gen. 39. 19. 2. Sam. 16. 3. 4.
    • To iudge hardly of other mēs
      • Sayings and doings: interpreting good things ill, and doubtfull things into the worse part. 1. Sam. 1. 13. Act. 2. 13. Luk. 7. 39.
      • Persons according to
        • Their
          • Outward condition, which thou seest distressed. Ioh. 9. 2. Act. 28. 4. so Iobs friends.
          • Inward disposition, which thou surmisest. 1. Sam. 17. 28. Rom. 14. 4. 1. Cor. 4. 5.
        • Thine owne disposition, measu­ring others by thy selfe.
  • Reporting, to blaze abroad the secret faults of others; especially such as are sinnes of infirmity, Prou. 10. 18.

[Page] Thus much of the inward disposition: now followeth the outward profession:

for euery testimony concerning thy neigh­bour, must bee both

  • True.
  • Charitable.

Testimo­nies are either

  • Publike, and those either
    • Forensia, in place of iudgement, as the testimony of the
      • Iudge.
      • Notary.
      • Parties wch go to Law.
      • Lawyers and Aduocates.
      • Witnesses.
    • Or otherwise out of the place of iudgement.
  • Priuate.

The testimo­ny of y Iudge, is the sentence which he pro­nounceth, whereto is required

  • Before hand, a full triall and examina­tion of the cause. Deut. 13. 14. [...] 17. 4. [...] 19. 18. Gen. 18. 21.
  • In the deliuery thereof, that he iudge ac­cording to
    • Truth. Exod. 18. 21.
    • Iustice. Leuit. 19. 15. Deut. 1. 16. [...] 16. 20.
    • Equity.

Iudges must also take heed, that they bee not accessary to the false witnesse of others, by

  • Admitting needlesse suits.
  • Protracting of suits.
  • Rash imposing of Othes.

[Page]Opp. Te­stimonies

  • False, being either
    • Simply false. 1. King. 21. 13.
    • In shew of words true, but false in sence. Math. 26. 60, 61. with Ioh. 2. 19.
  • Vncharitable and malicious. 1. Sam. 22. 9.

Opp. Iudgement either

  • Rash, whē it is pro­nounced:
    • 1. The cause not well vnderstood by the Iudge. Prou. 18. 13.
    • 2. The party not heard to speake in his owne defence. Act. 25. 15, 16.
    • 3. One side onely being heard. 2. Sam. 16. 4. Prou. 18. 17.
    • 4. Vpon the witnesse of one alone, in a capitall cause. Deut. 17. 6.
  • Peruerse, wherein the wicked is absolued, and the righteous condemned, Prou. 17. 15. which cōmonly happeneth, because the Iudge is either a
    • Taker of Bribes. Deut. 16. 18, 19. Exod. 23. 8. 2. Chro. 19. 6. Esa. 5. 23.
    • Accepter of per­sons. Pro. 24. 23, 24. [...] 28. 2 [...] Le­uit. 19. 15. Deut. 1. 16, 17.

[Page]The duty of the Nota­ry, to deale truly in

  • Writing,
  • Preseruing,
  • Reciting

Records.

The du­ties of par­ties going to Law, are

  • Common to both, as
    • 1. To goe to Law onely vpon a iust and necessary cause, at least, in their perswasion.
    • 2. To deale truly in their suite.
  • Peculiar to either, in crimi­nall cau­ses, viz. to the
    • Plaintiffe, to accuse only in charity, for y good either of the
      • Party.
      • Cōmon­weale.
    • Defendant,
      • Not to deny a crime truly ob­iected. Iosh. 7. 19.
      • Nor to accuse him selfe vnnecessa­rily. Math. 26. 62, 63.

The duties of Lawyers and Aduocates. viz. to

  • Entertaine no cause which they know to be euil.
  • Maintaine the cause, which with good conscience they vndertake,
    • Truly.
    • Faithfully.

The dutie of the Witnesse,

  • To giue testimony, when hee is required thereto vpon iust occasion; yea vnre­quired, when hee seeth the innocent oppressed. Prou. 24. 11.
  • To testifie the truth
    • Onely.
    • Wholly.
    Prou. 14. 25.

[Page] Opp. To deale falsly in any of those respects.

Opp. Their faults are▪

  • Common to both,
    • To goe to Law for stomake, and in desire of contention.
    • To deale vn­truly, by
      • Forging, or suggesting false instruments, or proofes.
      • Suborning false witnesses.
  • Peculiar to the
    • Plaintiffe, in crimi­nal causes,
      • Calumniari, to ac­cuse of a crime
        • Vntrue. Deut. 19. 16. Hest. 3. 8.
        • Vnce [...]taine, which he can­not prooue. Act. 25. 7.
        • Praeuaricari, In shew to ac­cuse, but not indeed.
        • Tergiuersari, To goe backe from a iust accusation.
        Both which are [...]ffences against the Cōmonweale,
      • To be ready, vpon euery occasion, to accuse, which is to play the Sycophant; as contra­riwise, to refuse to accuse, vpon any (though iust and waighty) cause, is a fault. Leu. 5. 1.
    • Defen­dant, to
      • Deny the fault vntruly. Iob 31. 33.
      • Appeale without iust cause.
      • Not to submit himselfe to the sentence lawfully giuen. Rom. 13. 2.

Opp. To

  • Vndertake such causes as they suppose to bee euill. Prou. 21. 6.
  • Vse
    • False calumniations against the aduerse pa [...] ­ty. Act. 24. 5.
    • Vnfaithfull dealing towards their Cli­ent, either by
      • Animating him to g [...]e on in a bad cause.
      • Betraying a good cause.

Opp.

  • Not to giue testimony to the tru [...]h.
  • To beare false witnesse: the maine sin forbidden in this Cōman­dement. Pro. 6. 18. [...] 25. 18. [...] 19. 5, 9 [...] 21. 28. Deut. 19. 16, 19. and he is a false witnesse, who testifieth for truth, that which
    • Hee knoweth not to be [...] true.
    • He knoweth to be false.

[Page] Publike testimonies out of Iudgement.

And they are either

  • Open.
  • Secret.

Open, as in

  • Publike
    • Speeches, as in the ministery of the Word, wherin nothing but truth is to be vttered.
    • Writings.
  • Elections, wherein testimony is giuen of the excellen­cy of him, that is chosen, aboue others.

The Publike testimonies which be secret, are commonly faulty, ei­ther because they be vntrue, or at least, vncharitable: as in making, or spreading

  • Famous and diffamatory Libels.
  • Publike rumours. Exod. 23. 1.

Priuate testimonies, or priuate profession of the truth concer­ning our neighbour, ioyned with charity: and it is either of his

  • Vertues, which (as iust occasion is offered) wee are to acknowledge and commend, both in his presence, and absence.
  • Vices, which in his
    • Presence, wee are to tell him of, and not suffer sin to rest vpon him. Leu. 19. 17. Pro. 27. 5. Psalm. 141. 5.
    • Absence, wee are not to mention, but vpon necessity.

The duties which euery man is bound by this Commandement to performe to himselfe, are two; a

  • Care of his good Name.
  • True testimony of himselfe.

[Page]Opp.

  • Errours and vntruthes broched and published in
    • Publike speeches, especially in the ministery of the Word. Zac. 13. 3.
    • Writings and bookes printed.
  • False testimonie in elections, when the more vnworthy are pre­ferred.

Opp.

  • Flattery, wherein men of­fend in respect of the
    • Obiect, praising mens vices. Prou. 28. 4. [...] 24. 24.
    • Manner, commen­ding others
      • Fainedly. Prou. 27. 4.
      • Aboue measure. Act. 12. 22.
    • End, seeking
      • Their owne profit, as Parasites vse to doe.
      • The parties ruine, whom they doe flatter. Prou. 29. 5. Ier. 9. 8. Math. 22. 16.
  • Euill and cursed speaking.

Euill and cursed speaking is heere forbidden, as it tendeth to the im­pairing of our neighbours credit and good name.

And it is vsed, either in his

  • Presence, by
    • Reuiling, or contumelious speak­ing. 1. Cor. 6. 10.
    • Deriding and scorning. 1. Sa. 31. 4. Ioh. 19. 3. Mat. 27. 42. Gal. 4. 29.
  • Absence, by
    • Whispering, or tale-bearing. Pro. 16. 28. [...] 26. 20, 22. Ecclus. 5. 16, 17.
    • Slandering and back biting. Leuit. 19. 16. Iam. 4. 11. Ezech. 22. 9. Rom. 1. 30.

[Page]Our care in procu­ring, and preseruing a good Name, cō ­sis [...]eth in

  • Vsing the meanes, whereby a good Name (though not sought for therein) is gotten, Phil. 4. 8. as to
    • Glorifie God. 1. Sam. 2. 30.
    • Seeke his kingdome and righteousnes. Mat 6. 33
    • Walke vprightly. Psalm. 112. 6. Prou. 10. 7. and to be such as he would seeme to be.
    • Keepe a good conscience.
  • Auoiding the meanes of
    • Vain-gl [...]ry, as
      • Seeking to please men, more than God.
      • Hypocrisie.
      • Seeking commendation by vani­ties and vices.
      • Louing of flatterers.
      • Vsuall censuring of others. Math. 7. 1, 2.
      • Attempting matters aboue their ability and gifts. Psalm. 131. 1. Luk. 14. 29▪ 30.
      All which, end in in­famy and shame.
    • Infamy, arising from
      • our selues, as sinnes, Eccl. 10 1. both
        • Open, and not onely the sinnes themselues, but also all appea­rances thereof. 1. Thes. 5. 22. Rom. 12. 17.
        • Secret. 2. Sam. 12. 12. because God will bring them to light.
      • Others as oppr [...]brious speeches and slanders, against which we ought (especially if we be publ [...]ke persons) de [...]end and maintaine our good na [...]e 1. King. 2. 8, 9.

The true testimony of our selues, is cō [...]ning

  • Good, if it be
    • True, vp [...]n iust occasion to confesse it, verè & v [...]recundè, truly and modestly, to Gods glory. 1. Cor. 15. 10.
    • False, with modesty and humility to deny it.
  • Euill, if it be
    • True, we are to con­fesse it to
      • God. Prou. 28. 13. 1. Ioh. 1. 9.
      • Man, when the confession is necessary, in respect of
        • Gods glory. Iosh. 7. 19. Iona. 1. 10.
        • Neighbours good. Psal. 51.
        • Our own good. Iam. 5. 15.
    • False, constantly to deny it.

[Page]Opp. To

  • Neglect these meanes of a good Name.
  • Vsing the meanes of
    • Vain-glory.
    • Infamy.

Opp.

  • [...], in denying good things, and speaking more basely and meanly of thy selfe, than thine owne opinion is of thy selfe, and that either to
    • Auoid boasting, which is the modest lye: which is not to affirme lesse than is true, but to deny the truth.
    • Draw commendation from others, which is a double of­fence, being both
      • Arrogan­cy.
      • Counter­feit mo­desty.
  • Boasting, wherein mē offend, in respect of the
    • Obiect, boasting of that
      • Which is not good, but rather euill. Psal. 52. 1. Phil. 3. 19. Gen. 4. 23, 24.
      • Good, which they haue not, either
        • Not at all.
        • Not in that measure which they assume to themselues. Math. 26. 33, 35.
    • End, for their owne
      • Glory, Pro. 27. 2. and that ioyned either with the
        • Dishonor of God. 1. Cor. 4. 7. Esa. 10. 15.
        • Disgrace of o­thers. Luk. 18. 10.
      • Gaine. Act. 8. 9.

Opp. To

  • Deny that euill which is true. Gen. 18. 15.
  • Affirme that euill of our selues, which is false, to
    • Gratifie others.
    • Picke thanks. 2. Sam. 1. 10. with 1. Sam. 31. 4, 5.

The tenth Commandement.

The Negatiue part,

Forbidding in

  • Generall, all euill concupiscence going before the consent of the will, and pur­pose of the hart. Rom. 7. 7. [...] 13. 9. Col. 3. 5. 1. Pet. 4. 2. 2. Pet. 3. 3. Rom. 1. 24. Gal. 5. 16, 17. 1. Pet. 2. 11. Tit. 2. 12. Ioh. 8. 44.
  • Particular, the concupiscence of the eyes.

Euill concupiscence is either

  • Originall.
  • Actuall.

Originall concupiscence is originall sinne, which is heere forbidden, as it is referred against the neighbour: it is also called habituall, being the euill inclination and pronenesse of our nature to lust against our neighbour, contrary to the Law of God. Rom. 8. 6, 7. [...] 7. 8, 23. Gal. [...]. 17.

Actuall concupiscences, are ill motions in our mindes and hearts against our neighbour, Gen. 6. 5. being both

  • Foolish.
  • Hurtfull.

1. Tim. 6. 9. 1. Pet. 2. 11.

These euill moti­ons are either, euil

  • Phantasies and thoughts of the minde.
  • Affections and perturbations of the heart.

Those are euill phantasies and thoughts, which encline or stirre men vp to euill, and are repugnant to charity, 1. Cor. 13. [...]. These are sinnes, and heere forbidden. Pro. 24. 9. Zach. 8. 17. Deut. 15. 9. Esa. 55. 7. Act. 8. 22. Prou. 15. 26. Gen. 6. 5. [...] 8. 21.

The Affirmatiue part,

Requiring in vs a pure heart towards our neighbour. 1. Tim. 1. 5.

The purenesse of our heart consisteth in

  • Originall righteousnesse, and fect loue of our neighbour.
  • Spirituall concupiscence.

Originall righteous­nesse, is both a

  • Cleannesse from all vnrighteous­nesse, and euill concupiscence a­gainst our neighbour.
  • Disposition and pronenesse to all the duties of charity.

This righteousnesse, as the Lord planted it in our na­ture, so doth he require it in his Law; though wee haue lost it, and cannot fully attaine to it; and that to this end, that we seeing our vnrighteousnesse, and misery in our selues, might be forced to seeke vnto Christ, that both we might bee clothed with his righteousnesse, and also might by his Spirit be renewed according to his image, in holinesse and righteousnesse. Luk. 1. 74, 75. Ephes. 4. 23, 24.

Spirituall concupis­cence containeth the

  • Good motions of the Spirit.
  • Lusting of the Spirit against the flesh.

[Page]Euill thoughts, either

  • Are cast into mens minds by the diuell, which be called his suggestions.
  • Arise from the habituall concupiscence.

And both of them whiles we be either

  • Slee­ping.
  • Awaking.

The diuell casteth his suggestions in­to mens mindes, either

  • Immediately by himselfe. 1. Chron. 21. 1. Ioh. 13. 2. Luk. 9. 46, 47.
  • Mediately, vsing others for his in­struments. Gen. 3. 1. Iob 2. 9. Mat. 16. 23.

The suggestions of Satan, though alwayes sinfull in him, yet they are not sinnes vnto vs, vnlesse wee admit them, and giue entertainment to them: For it is not a sin to be tempted, (for Christ also was tempted) but to yeeld to the tentation. If therefore we admit them, we are defi­led by them but if wee presently repell and extinguish them, they infect vs not.

Euill thoughts arise also from our owne habituall and originall concupiscence. Luk. 24. 38. Mat. 15. 19. Gen. 6. 5.

They arise from the ha­bituall concupiscence, it being moued or stirred vp by some obiect, either

  • Apprehended by the sence.
  • Framed by the phantasie or imagination.
  • Represented to the minde, by the remembrance.

Euill thoughts happen vnto vs,

  • Awaking.
  • Sleeping, as in dreams.

[Page]The good motions, are righteous & charitable

  • Cogitations concerning our neighbour.
  • Affections towards him.

The lusting and combate of the Spirit, against the flesh. Gal. 5. 17. whereby we must crucifie the flesh, with the lusts thereof. Gal. 5. 24.

The meanes to attaine to this purenesse of the heart, are, to

  • 1. Walke with God, seeking to approue our hearts to him, who tryeth the hearts.
  • 2. Ob­serue our
    • Hearts, Prou. 4. 23. that
      • No euil concu­piscence doe a­rise in vs, or en­ter into vs.
      • If any do arise, or be admitted, that we forth­with extin­guish it.
    • Senses.

That euill concupis­cences doe not arise in vs, or ente [...] into vs, a twofold care is needfull,

  • Whiles wee wake, to keepe our mindes occupied about lawfull things, and not suffer them to be idle, or to wander about va­nities, or vnlawfull things.
  • When wee are to sleepe, to com­mend our soules into the hands of God, to bee kept safe from tentations, and pure from con­cupiscences.

We are also to obserue our sences, (but especially our sight) by the ministery whereof, the obiects of concu­piscence are represented to the mind. Gen. 3. 6. Iosh. 7. 21. Iob 31. 1. Psalm. 119. 37.

To these meanes we are to adde two more

  • The spirituall armour of God, which is mighty to cast downe imaginations, and to subdue euil thoughts. 2. Cor. 10. 5. Ephes. 6.
  • Feruent & faithfull prayer. Mat. 6. 13.

[Page] Those that arise from our owne corruption, if they be sudden and momentany, they are the least degree of sinne, but yet sinnes, arising from a corrupt fountaine, and arguing want of charity.

As touching dreames, those are culpable, which as they are the fruits of originall concupiscence, so also haue voluntary causes: as,

  • Wanton and vncleane dreames, following vpon
    • Intemperancy in diet.
    • Wanton & vncleane thoughts.
  • Malicious dreames, proceeding from hatred of our neigh­bour, and such like.

Now follow the affections and perturbations of the minde, going before the purpose of the heart, or consent to practise.

T [...] degrees of them.

And these are either

  • [...], fore-passions, or (as some speake) vnformed concupiscences, and acts of sensuality, going before the act of reason, or consent of the will.
  • These be the first motions of concupiscence, whereby the
    • Mind is withdrawne.
    • Heart is affected with a sudden delight, as it were a bait. Iam. 1. 14, 15.
  • [...], 1. Thes. 4. 5. Passions, which are of some called, For­med concupiscences, and are acts of rea­son, as being delibe­rate desires of the heart, & hauing the consent of the will▪ either to
    • Take further delight onely in entertaining the fore-said ill motions, and rouling them in our minds, though we consent not to the practice of them. These, with all the former, are directly and expresly forbid­den in this tenth Comman­dement.
    • Put them in practice, which are forbidden in the former Com­mandements; as the murther, adultery, theft, false testimo­nies of the heart.

[Page] The sorts.

The affections of the heart, are either

  • [...], wherein is auersation from that which seemeth euill, as an­ger, feare, &c.
  • [...], wherein is a liking or de­siring of that which seemeth good, as loue, &c.

Vnto [...], we are in this place to referre as branches of this Commandement, sudden anger, and the first mo­tions of mislike, hatred, enuie, reioycing at other mens e­uils, &c.

[...], which more pro­perly is called concupis­cence, is distinguished by the obiects, 1. Ioh. 2. 15. for it is either of

  • Pleasure, which is the lust of the flesh.
  • Profit, which is the lust of the eyes.
  • Honour, which is the pride of life.

The particular concupiscence which by name is forbidden in this Commandement, is the concupiscence of the eyes, vn­der which, as being the most pernicious, 1. Tim. 6. 9, 10. the Lord forbiddeth all sins of the same kind, that is, all euill mo­tions and concupiscences going before the consent of the will, or purpose of the heart.

Affirm. Remedies against the concupiscence of the eyes.

  • 1. To mortifie selfe­loue. 1. Cor. 10. 24.
  • 2. To pull out the eyes of enuie.
  • 3. To arme our selues with contentednes. Phil. 4. 11.

[Page]This concupis­cence is distin­guished accor­ding to the va­riety of the ob­iects, wch be­ing the persons or goods be­longing to o­ther men, wee are not to co­uet, as our neighbours

  • House. Esa. 5. 8.
  • Field. Deut. 5. 21. 1. King. 21.
  • Wife.
  • Man-seruant.
  • Maid-seruant.
  • Cattell, as Oxe, or Asse. 1. Sam. 12. 3.
  • Money, apparell, stuffe. Act. 20. 33. Or any thing that is his.

In all the Comman­dements, adde to the

  • Affirmatiue part, and to all the duties therein re­quired, the duty of
    • Vsing the meanes.
    • Shewing forth the signes.
    • Procuring y same in others.
  • Negatiue part, and to all the vices therein forbidden, the fault of
    • Neglecting the goodmean [...].
    • Vsing the bad meanes and allurements to euill.
    • Shewing forth the signes of euill.
    • Being accessary to the faults of others.

Deo Gratias.

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