A SVMMARIE ANSWERE TO AL THE MATERIAL POINTS IN ANY OF Master DAREL his bookes.

MORE ESPECIALLIE TO THAT ONE BOOKE OF HIS, INTITVLED, the Doctrine of the Possession and Dispos­session of Demoniaks out of the word of God.

By

  • IOHN DEACON.
  • IOHN WALKER.

Preachers.

And the Sorcerers or Charmers of Aegypt: they did in like manner with their in­chauntments. For they cast downe euery man his rod, and they were turned in­to Serpents: but Aarons rod deuoured their rods, and so Pharaohs heart was hardened.

Exdo. 7.11.12.13.

Si de veritate scandalum sumitur: vtilius permittitur nasci scandalum, quàm veritas relinquatur.

Aug. de libro arbitrio.

Talis est conditio falsitatis vel erroris, vt etiam nullo sibi adsistente consenescat: talis autem è diuerso, veritatis status, vt etiam multis impugnantibus, suscitetur & crescat.

Chrys. de laudibus Pauli. lib. 3.
Eugubinus de perenni Philosoph. lib. 3.
[...].
Heu Tripodes lugete, perit praesagus Apollo.
Aye me alas Tripodes, perisheth presager Apollo.

Propugnaculum vitae patientia.

LONDINI Impensis Geor. Bishop. 1601.

TO THE REVEREND FATHERS, THE LEARNED PREACHERS AND GODLIE BRE­thren in this our English Church: I. D. and I. W. doe hartily wish the abundance of Reuelation in Iesus Christ, with an holy discerning spirit; that they may be the better inabled thereby, to discerne aright of the things that differ, and to hold fast for euer the infallible truth, for the glorie of God▪ the Churches good, and their owne euerla­sting comfort in Iesus Christ. So be it.

REuerend Fathers and Brethren, 1. Cor. 14.29. [...] 31.32.33. beloued and longed for in the Lord: The blessed Apostle put­ting downe some certaine pre­cepts or Canons concerning the sacred Schooles of prophesie, obser­ueth (in effect) this following order. First, hee permitteth the Prophets to speake by two or by three, appointing the o­ther Prophets to determine vprightlie of that which they speake: and then next, hee decreeth, that if any thing be reuealed to another which sitteth by, the former should be silent a time, and the other man speake, be­cause all (being thereunto called) may prophesie one by one, that all may learne, and all may haue comfort. Howbeit, least any the Prophets should happily pre­sume (vpon this his permission) to speake at their pleasure, the Apostle forthwith (for auoyding disor­dered confusion) subiecteth the spirits of the Prophets to [Page] which more is (if wee found them able to mannage their matters) to giue them the hand of fellowship con­cerning their doubtfull cause. Or if happily (vpon bet­ter deliberation) they yeelded the question to vs: wee protested further, to conceale their secret being, vntill some good course might forthwith be taken for in­forming authoritie as well of their present conformi­tie, as also for procuring their speedie deliuerance from the Ecclesiasticall censures, so farre foorth as possiblie might be effected.

Sixtly, beholding the holie Religion of Christ verie shrewdly scandalized, by reason of such falsely preten­ded miracles: we knew (in our conscience) we might doe nothing at all against the truth, 2. Cor. 13.8. but for the truth, and therefore not possiblie conceale those truthes which the Lord hath discouered vnto vs.

Seuenthly, our holy established Religion being ve­rie scornefully derided with Papists and Atheists, as a Religion that needeth now at length to be presentlie supported by superfluous miracles: we verely perswa­ded our selues, that no good Christian heart could possiblie forbeare his best endeuour to stay their in­temperate courses.

Eightly, Master Darel and his fellowes very con­fidently persisting in the vnhappie support of those their newly broached opinions, hath mightily moued our hearts,Iude. 22.23. to haue (at the least) a compassion of some, by putting a difference, and othersome again to saue with feare, by pulling them violently forth of the fire.

Ninthly, their deceitful and coloured kind of pro­ceeding, in that they not onely pretend an holie cause, but which more is, doe varnish the same with holy pre­tences, with faire words and flattering speeches, Rom. 16.18. to intangle (if possiblie they may) the very hearts of the simple: hath [Page] made vs the more carefully to discouer vnto all the world, what lurking poyson lieth shrowded vnder those glorious pretences.

Lastlie, who would not both speake and write whatsoeuer they conscionablie knowe concerning these causes, if hee but respect (as in conscience hee ought) that shamefull reproch which Master Darell and his fauourits (like disordered persons) doe verie iniuriouslie impose vpon the whole land,D. Doctrine pag. 88. vpon Magi­tracie, Ministery and people in these following words. Wee doubt not (say they) but that other nations and kingdomes about vs, will both giue credit to this matter of fact, so soone as they shall heare thereof, and see how the same hath been witnessed vpon the oathes of many: and will also receiue the Doctrine of possession and dispossession, which we so much haue gaine-saide. Blush then oh England, and be thou ashamed of this thy incredulitie, which is such as the like thereof hath not bin read nor heard of before: for others haue yet acknowledged the worke which hath been done in them, but thou hast not gone so farre, but rather de­nied the same. Loe, these (in effect) be the maine oc­casions themselues, which moued vs especially to la­bour these matters.

Now next,The maine ends which the au­thors propoun­ded in writing. Psal. 122.6.7. the principall ends which we propound to our selues in publishing our labours, are these that follow. Namely, we haue (first) done it, to testifie our hearts desire for the timely accomplishment of Ieru­salems peace.

Secondly, to make knowne to the world, our pro­uident care for the speedie preuenting of euery such future disordered courses,Tit. 1.10.11. as happily might preiudice the whole, or any part of Gods truth, as heretofore the Brownists and Hackets haue too inconsideratlie effe­cted, by their vnruly and headie conceits.

[Page] Eccles. 12.9. 1. Cor. 13.9.12. Phil. 3.13.14.Thirdly, to insinuate vnto al the world, our arnest endeuours to know the truth: and to be better infor­med, if happily we erre in these matters.

2. Tim. 2.25.Fourthly, to lay open our Christian care for the timely informing of such as are contrarie minded.

Psa. 119.113.128. Psal. 119.163.Fiftly, to discouer our vndoubted detestation of all false waies in any, how deare soeuer vnto vs.

Sixtly, to vnfold the preposterous giddines of such humorous spirits, Tit. 1.11. 2. Tim. 4.3. 3. Ioh. 10. as dare (in this our doting age) so dan­gerouslie pester the Church with strange and vnwon­ted opinions: very fitly consorting with their fauourits natures.

Lastly, wee haue more especially published our la­bours, to stand in steede of some prouident watch­word for yong students in Diuinitie, and newly conuer­ted Christians; that in any wise they beware how they doe either broach abroad, 1. Tim. 3.6. Ephe. 4.14. 1. Ioh. 2.14. 2. Ioh. 4.1.2. or receiue any such phanta­sticall conceits of priuate persons, as are not primarily exa­mined according to the infallible rules of the word, neither yet authentically approued by publike authori­tie. Loe, these (in effect) were the maine occasions and ends, for the now publishing of our labours in print.

The premisses therefore considered, and the argu­ments on both sides rightly respected: we beseech you reuerend Fathers and Brethren to consider diligentlie whether of vs both haue caused diuisions and offences, Rom. 16.17.18. contrarie to the infallible Doctrines which you haue learned from Christ, and auoyd them. For they that are such, serue not the Lord Iesus Christ, but their owne bellies: and with faire speech and flattering, deceiue the hearts of the simple. Iudg. 19 30. Consider therefore we humbly be­seech you, consult and giue sentence, either with vs, or a­gainst, as the Lord shall direct your hearts. If wee be thought to haue the truth on our sides; we doubt not but that you will fight together with vs, Phil. 1.27. in one and the [Page] selfesame faith of the Gospell. On the other side, if we be found to haue faulted either in matter or manner, wee beseech you confute vs and spare not: and the blessing of God doe light on your hearts for your labour that way. Neither shall our priuiledged bookes be any stop­page at all to so good a purpose: for if you be vnwil­ling to deale that way because of authoritie, your pri­uate conuictions shall suffice, to procure from vs a pub­like retractation of whatsoeuer shall bee soundly ad­iudged amisse.Augustine. For howsoeuer we may happily erre, we purpose (by Gods grace) to bee no Heretikes. Referring therefore our selues and our labours to your ap­proued considerations: we humblie betake you all in our hartiest prayers, to the holy directions of the onely wise God, Rom. 16.2 [...] who iudgeth accor­ding to trueth. Amen.

Your louing brethren assuredly in the Lord, and the Lord his vnworthiest on earth,
  • IOHN DEACON.
  • IOHN WALKER.

TO THE CHRISTIAN AND WELL AFFECTED REA­DERS, WHO EXPECT THE COM­ming of the Lorde Iesus to their immortalitie: I.D. and I.W. doe wish the necessarie graces of the spirit, with a sauing knowledge in Iesus Christ: So be it.

GOod Christian Reader, when we dulie considered Maister Darel and his complices their lately dis­persed pamphlets, concerning their new-found trade of Diuillitie, as also their vndutifull manner of imprinting and publishing the same to the world: we could not but call to remembrance a most pestilent practise, which Cardi­nall Benno reporteth of Hildebrand. Benno Cardinal. in vita Alex­andri. 2. Who (hauing killed Alexander the second, for that he refused to sit at his speciall appointment in the Apostolike Sea, without the good Em­perours licence) was (by the ayde of his souldiours) forth­with enthronized into the Popedome himselfe: not ha­uing therein the consent either of Cleargie or people. The which his prowd vsurpation, when Abbas Cassi­nensis was come to redresse, Hildebrand that insolent V­surper very scornefullie sayth vnto him thus, Frater, nimium tardasti, Brother, you haue beene somewhat too slowe: to whome Cassinensis very boldly replyed saying, & tu Hildebrande nimium festinasti, and thou O Hil­debrand, thou hast beene ouer-hastie by much, both in kil­ling [Page] thy good predecessour, & in procuring the Popedome by such prowd vsurpation.

Euen thus (surely) it falles forth with vs at this present, concerning especiallie the matters controuerted betweene our selues and those our Antagonists. For they, not only giuing the Canuisado of late to her Maiesties high Commissi­on, but hauing withall (by the venemous infection of their viperous pennes) verie vncharitablie endeuoured to wound S. H. vnto death, for that (by meanes of the sayd S. H. his dutifull discouerie of those their vndutifull dea­lings) they might not be permitted to vsurp (in our English Church) a new Apostolicall power at their pleasures, without any her Maiesties authenticall licence. Maister Darel the principall agent (partly by the inherent pride of his insolent spirit, and partly by the prowde support of many his vnder-hand fauorits) is very prowdlie enthro­nized into a new Popedome forsooth. And by priuiledge thereof he hath very peremptorily imprinted and publi­shed sundrie seditious pamphlets, hauing thereunto nei­ther warrant from God, nor dispensation from Prince, nor testimonie of sound conscience, no nor so much as the holie approbation of any good christian subiect.

Notwithstanding all this, he hath for a season (though feare and shame enforceth him now to pluck in his head) very prowdlie ietted from countrie to countrie like a pettie new Pope among his owne Cardinals; yea and that also in his pontificalities, portrayed and contriued after the new-found popelike cut. The which their vnbridled insolencie, when we indeuoured to encounter, by publishing (as we verily beleeue) the infallible truth of these intricate matters in a treatise at large, and had signified so much to themselues by word and by letters in an only desire of doing them good, they labored by letters and otherwaies to inter­cept our said enterprise a time at the least. And in the meane time (by printing and publishing the trifling toyes of [Page] that their new found trifling trade) they haue sought to forestall our former good purpose, and laboured to calme our carefull endeuours for doing them good. Yea, and by these their preuenting practises, they do (in effect) but disdainefullie say vnto vs, with Pope Hildebrand their prowd copartner, Deere brethren, you haue bin some­what too slow in publishing those your dialogicall Discourses concerning Spirits and Diuels. Howbeit, we (by these our subsequent labours and second encoun­ters) may with Cassinensis very conscionablie replie vpon them thus: and you, oh counterfeit Exorcistes, you haue bin ouer-hastie by much, not only in killing your good predecessour by your poysoned penne, but also in broa­ching a fond triall abroade, without any triall of truth: in designing a Doctrine, so opposite to the Doctrine of Christ: and in discouering a Detection, to detect your great follie, and shame to the world.

The truth of the premisses (good christian Reader) may be made more apparantlie euident, if thou wilt proui­dently examine, first, the pamphlets themselues: and then next, the spirit it selfe which may be supposed to endight the same.

The pamphlets themselues (notwithstanding any their outward florishing shewes) they are inwardlie faultie (we verily thinke) both in matter and manner.

That they are ouermuch faultie in matter, is more then may be denyed, being euery of them fraught full of vnsound, and absurd positions, as shall be shewed hereafter in a short Catalogue prefixed before this booke.

Moreouer, that they be likewise faultie in their manner or forme, may easily appeare vnto such as are not vtterlie ignorant of methode: or, do any thing know what belongs to an orderlie manner of writing.

For first, their manner of writing, it seemes to be some­thing Schismaticall, and very shrewdlie to sauour of a Ser­pentine [Page] subtiltie, 2. Cor. 11.3.4. because (whatsoeuer their pamphlets pretend) they proceede not by a plaine course of teaching, but do rather incedere tortuosè, goe wrigginglie to worke, and walke this way and that way, like to the hunted Hare, which knoweth not whereon to resolue for a certaine.

Besides that, their manner of writing, it is also verie enigmaticall, obscure, and cloudie: their sentences or pe­riods they are (in effect) no better then riddles, and for the most part so vncertaine, so variable, so flitting, and so chan­ging, as none but themselues may possiblie spell, or spie forth their meaning.

Briefely, the very frame itselfe of their whole proceeding resembleth fitlie a paire of tarriours, or tyring yrons, and serueth to no other purpose at all, but to hold men occupied all the day long about a new nothing to hang on their sleeues. Or they may well be compared to an intricate La­byrinth, or maskaring maze, from whence (when a man is once entred into them) he wots not which waies to winde himselfe forth, as may plainely appeare vnto such as careful­lie consider the same, and this in effect for the Pamphlets themselues.

The spirit which may be supposed to indite those pamphlets, Deut. 13.1.2.3▪ Matth. 7.15.16▪ 1. Ioh. 4.1.3. should make wise men beware how they doe rashlie entertaine them for truths, before they haue soundly tried the same with the touchstone of truth. This sacred triall being dulie obserued herein, it may greatly be feared, that the spirit inditing those pamphlets, Iam. 3.17. will hardly be found to sauour of that wisedome which is from aboue, which is pure, peaceable, gentle, easie to be intreated, full of mercie and good fruites, without grudging, without hypocrisie: Iam. 3.15. but rather to tast of that wisedome which descendeth not from aboue, but is earthlie, sen­suall, and diuellish. 1. Cor. 2.11. And howsoeuer no man knoweth the secrets of man, saue only the spirit of man which is in him, and therefore may iudge nothing too rashly of [Page] man, 1. Cor. 4.5. Heb. 4.12.13. before the time: yet when the Lord himselfe is come, and hath lightned things which were hid in darknes, and made manifest the counsels of the hart to all mens eyes, then, I see no reason at all, but that (by the out-goings of the spirit) a man may as easily discerne the nature of the spirit it selfe, Matth. 7.16.17 as iudge of a tree by the fruites. And therefore, when we behold men caried head­long with selfe conceits, vaunting very prowdlie with the Anabaptists, and saying, Quod volumus, sanctum est: quod nolumus, id iniquum & iniustum. Whatso­euer we will or affect, that same is holie; whatsoeuer we nil, or affect not, that same is vniust & vnholie. Briefly, when we do heare M. Darel and his vnderhand fauorits (in sundrie places of their published pamphlets) to cry out and confesse, that all the learned men in the land are of a contrarie iudgement to them, and yet notwithstan­ding, do prowdlie oppose themselues to all the learned men in the land,1. Cor. 14.36. as though the word of truth came out only from them, or came only vnto themselues: what should set them agog in such a glorious vaunt, but only a prowd and insolent spirit?

Iude. 9.10. 3. Ioh. 10.Againe, when we heare how these vnrulie spirits doe nothing else in effect but rayle vpon men, reuile their per­sons, yea, and euen vtterlie disable the iudgements of such and so reuerend personages, as they themselues (in compa­rison of true learning in deede, of sound knowledge, and of all good gifts and graces of the spirit) are vtterlie vn­worthie to be named the seauenth day after the meanest of those, whom they so deepely disable: what may we imagine should hale them headlong an end in such a disgracing course, but only some phrentike, some furious, or some carnall spirit? sith the holie spirit of truth hath told vs for truth, 1. Cor. 3.3. that where there is nothing but enuying, but strife and diuisions, there the men themselues are yet carnall, and walke but as men.

[Page]Againe, when as their published pamphlets are peste­red full of apparant contradictions, the one very cruellie giuing a countercheck, and cutting the throate of the other, as hereafter appeareth:1. King. 22.22. Ioh. 8.44. how may we iustlie imagine that any other then an erronious and a lying spirit should be the primarie inditor thereof:Ioh. 14.17. seeing the holie spirit of God, is the spirit of truth, euermore but one and the same, and leadeth men alwayes into all soundnes of truth and Religion.

Againe, when as they do nothing in effect, but accuse and sclaunder throughout their seuerall pamphlets they care not whome:Reuel. 12.10. what drawes them thereto, but a diuellish satanicall spirit? sith the Diuell (you know) hath euer­more beene the accuser of our brethren.

If they haplie imagine, that those whom they accuse or slaunder, are but beasts and no brethren at all: we an­swere, that is much more then they are able to know, and we hold them no competent Iudges, concerning such cases especially as the Lord hath purposely reserued to his proper Consistorie, Deut. 29.29. and appropriated wholly to his owne iudge­ment seate.

Neither shall it suffice to say, that (howsoeuer they be thought to accuse, or to slaunder) they speake but the truth of euery of them: because, if that were so indeede, yet they do it vntrulie, in as much as they do it only to reproch, and to slaunder the persons of men, and not to reforme their supposed disorders. For, neither do they proceede therein by a iudiciall course, Exod. 20.16. neither yet are they iudici­allie called to testifie against them: and so, not only they breake the ninth commaundement, but (which more is) they do very daungerouslie scandalize the minds of so many in the land, as (being but ignorant before of those their falslie supposed crimes) are now (by their clamorous accusations) vncharitablie drawne into an hard conceit against their persons. D. Doctrine, pag. 86. Whether this be not a diuellish Satanicall [Page] spirit, let M. Darel himselfe determine: who doth very confidently affirme, that so many as are giuen to cursing and lying, to speake euill of persons which are in au­thoritie, to rayling, reuiling, sclaundering, hatred, and such like, they are vndoubtedlie the childrē of the Diuel, who himselfe was a liar, Ioh. 8.44. and a murderer from the be­ginning.

Briefly, when we behold them throughout their whole pamphlets, not only to impugne her Maiesties high Com­mission concerning ecclesiasticall persons and causes, but (which more is) by toong, by penne, by practize, and such other apparant shewes of vndutifull subiects, to resist her highnesse authoritie, and (which is worst of all) euen then to accomplish euerie of these, when they were by God forbidden, by her highnesse restrayned, by due order of lawe conuented, conuicted, apprehended, impriso­ned, by the sentence of Iustice definitiuely condemned for grosse malefactors, adiudged to prison; and so conse­quentlie by God himselfe, by her excellent Maiestie, by course of lawe, by all good conscience, and by the appro­ued practise of all holie Martyrs, enioined eftsoones to a dutifull silence: whence come these vnrulie procee­dings I pray you, but from such a rebellious spirit, as nei­ther for feare, Rom. 13.5. nor for conscience can be made to subiect it selfe to Gods sacred ordinance, but prowdlie resisteth the same,Rom. 13.2.3.4. and so procureth the sword of Iustice to be vn­sheathed against themselues, and to take vengeance on them, as vnrulie and turbulent spirits?

Thus then, the truth of the premisses, is verie apparant you see, as well by the seuerall pamphlets, as by the spirit it selfe, which may well be supposed to be the indighter thereof. And therefore we would to God (good christian Readers) you could suffer vs a little in our foolishnes: 2. Cor. 11.1.2.3.4. and in very deede you do suffer vs. For, we are iealous ouer you with a godlie iealousie, because we labour [Page] to prepare you for one husband, and to present you as a pure virgin to Christ. Howbeit, we feare, least as the Serpent beguiled Euah through his subtiltie, so your minds should be corrupt from the simplicitie that is in Christ. For, if these men do preach another Iesus then him whom others haue preached before, or, if you receiue another spirit then that which you haue receiued; either yet an other Gospell then that which was taught you be­fore: you might well haue admired their persons, approued their practises, and so desirouslie haue entertained their factious pamphlets. Notwithstanding, when there are no such matters at all as you haplie imagine, why haue they so stronglie bewitched your minds, Gal. 3.1. that you should not obey the truth, to whom Iesus Christ hath bin de­scribed in your sight, and among you crucified? They do ring in your eares, and would beare you in hand, that they only but display that authenticall power of the Lord, which others doe darken: as though all other saue onely themselues did daylie obscure the glorious scepter of Christ; and herein also (by the preposterous approbation of their vnderhand fauourets) they haue gotten a popular applause. But wherein will they not very fitlie resemble Sulpitius, Plutarch. in Silla. a man fearefully confect in all kind of mischiefe? who hauing (by the voyce of the vulgar sort) very peremp­torilie passed a Decree, that no Senatour should borow a­boue two hundred Crownes at the most, was found at his death to owe thirtie thousand himselfe. So surely, these men do seeme with the vulgar sort to dislike that any should dar­ken the glorious power of the Lord: whereas they them selues do obscure it the most of all others. For (how­soeuer they wholie pretend to vphold the kingdome of Christ) what do they else by those their iollie pretences, but couer themselues (as we say) with a wet sack? For, it will euidentlie appeare by the following discourses, that none haue more dangerouslie trampled downe the dig­nitie [Page] of Christ then themselues: and yet (as if the Crow had engendred the Swanne) these men forsooth, they will seeme now to build vp the dignitie they destroyed before.

Perhaps thou wilt say or surmize at the least, that we our selues (by omitting, and taking what part of their pamph­lets might make most for our owne purpose) haue therein euen purposely maymed their writings, and foyled the very force of their cause. Our answer is this, we haue care­fullie quoted the page it selfe, from whence we do drawe our seuerall collections: and therefore, let the learned determine, whether we haue any where abstracted their pamphlets besides their purposed scope, or haue other­wise pretermitted any thing materiall, which might but (in shew) either mannage or further their cause: and God forbid, but that we should very willinglie acknowledge and redresse the offred wrong. In deede, we haue purposelie pre­termitted many impertinent vagaries, extrauagant speeches, idle excursions, needles dilatations, friuo­lous amplifications, and humorous illustrations, which (like vnto vglie botches, and swelling tumours) do fil­thilie disfigure the bodie it selfe, and are nothing mate­riall, but meerely superfluous, because the very ground­worke it selfe whereon they seeme to be builded, is ouer­sandie or weake to support such a combersome frame: very confidentlie concluding withall, that for vs to an­swere their nothing, with something, would be (in the iudgement of the learned) a labour worth nothing. For, what do they (by such their clamorous outcryes) but deale with their ignorant Readers, as the foolish huntsman deales with his hounds, who by his crying so, ho, before the game it selfe be on foote, or, first found at the least: do but set the vnskilfull hounds at an idle gaze. Our An­tagonists in deede, they do keepe a clamorous coyle against the impugnings of any their pestilent practises, and tels i [...] [Page] in the eares of all the world, that (do the aduersaries what they are able) their wisedome forsooth,Math. 11.19. it must and shall be iustified of all her children: as though they thought it but an easie matter to breake an Eele with their knee, or to build vp the roofe without a foundation. Howbeit, they haue herein verie earnestlie solicited sundrie of our honorable Iudges and Magistrates, and presumed to prescribe them their seuerall courses, concerning anie their iudiciall proceedings against their persons: for­getting belike that they who take in hand to limit autho­ritie, are like vnto such as seeke to stay the course of the Sunne. They should rather acknowledge with Plutarch, that it is vnfitting for him who falleth, to lift vp: who knoweth nothing, to teach: who is disordered, to order: who is vnrulie, to rule: or, who cannot him­selfe obey, to commaund obedience to others. It had beene much better for them to haue trulie learned their dutie to God and their Prince, before they had so prowdly presumed to pester the Church with such vndutifull and disordered Pamphlets. Howbeit, because they haue publisht abroade such perilous points without any respect of Princes authoritie, or due regard of the Churches peace: it shall not be amisse to tell to their faces, that they haue therefore iustlie deserued the selfesame recompence, which Alexander Seuerus gaue to his friend Vetronius Turmius: namely, vt fumo pereant, qui fumum ven­dunt, that they perish with smoake, who sell forth smoake. For what other thing else do they set forth to sale, but such fuming smoke, as is readie to breake forth into dange­rous firie flames?

Beware therefore good christian Reader, that thou in­crease not the fire alreadie kindled, by blowing a popu­lar applause into the wide open eares of any those tur­bulent spirits. Be not too credulous or rash in intertayning their Bookes as the approued oracles of Apollo Pythius [Page] at Delphos. Seneca. 1. Thes. 5.21.22.23.24. Know this for a certaine, that euerie light beliefe is none other thing else but a foolish docu­ment. Therefore, try all things, and keepe that which is good: abstayne from all appearance of euill.

Now the verie God of peace sanctifie you through­out; and we pray God that your whole spirit, and soule and bodie may be kept blameles vnto the com­ming of our Lord Iesus Christ. Faithfull is he which calleth you, who also will do it: Amen.

Rom. 15.30.31.And now brethren, wee beseech you for our Lord Iesus Christs sake, and for the loue of the spirit, that you would striue together with vs, by prayers to God for vs: that we may be deliuered from them which are disobedient in Iudea, Isa. 9.6. Rom. 15.33. and, that our ser­uice which we haue to do at Ierusalem may be acceptable among the Saints of God. Thus the God of peace be with you all, Amen.

Your louing brethren assuredly in the Lord, and the Lord his vnworthiest on earth,
  • IOHN DEACON.
  • IOHN WALKER.

A summarie suruey of Master Darel his absurd and vnsound positions.

  • 1 POssessions are only to be iudged by the Scrip­tures. Doctrine pag. 5.
  • 2 It is impossible for Satan (being with­out man) to haue the whole rule and disposition of the body. Doct. pag. 2.
  • 3 The Demoniakes, in their fits are depriued of all their senses externall, and internall. Doctrine. pag. 10.
  • 4 A direction left to the Church, to discerne of posses­sions for euer. Doct. pag. 19.
  • 5 A medicine left for the curing of possessions. Doct. p.
  • 6 Satan is sooner cast forth being essentiallie within a man: then when he but vexeth him, by some outward ope­ration. Doct. 26.
  • 7 Satan (by his operation) caused something to be felt, and to appeare in some visible forme or shape. Doct. pag. 37.
  • 1 Satan repossessing a man, may (notwithstanding that in Luke 11. of taking 7. other worse then himselfe, and dwel­ling there) be cured by fasting and prayer. Doct. pag. 37.
  • 9 One place of Scripture may haue two senses, the one Spirituall, the other Literall. Doct. pag. 39.
  • 10 Fasting, a more effectuall exercise then Prayer. Doct. 43.
  • 11 Difference concerning the nature of Diuels. Doct. 49.
  • 12 The Apostles Faith (being a miraculous Faith) could not possibly faile: for it was giuen without meanes, and hath no meanes ordained for the encrease thereof. Doct. 47.
  • 13 The Apostles could not possibly erre in doctrine, or iudgement: much lesse could their Faith faile about a Mi­racle, sith they were shortly after to receiue the holy Ghost. Doctrine pag. 49.
  • 14 Prayer and fasting an ordinance of Christ, though no [Page] such ordinance may be proued by Scripture. Doct. pag. 54.
  • 15 Many, yea infinite things are decreed in the secret and eternall counsell of God, and knowen to be so of men: which are not set downe in his reuealed will, and yet are the ordinances of God, and so to be taken. Doctr. 54. Detect. 42.
  • 16 The meanes which God himselfe hath appointed to some certaine end: doth not alwaies prosper thereunto, as the word preached, meates, husbandrie, &c. Doctr. 58.
  • 17 That is no miracle, which is effected by any one meanes, ordeined to that end. Doctr. pag. 60.
  • 18 The outward thinges or actions which sometimes were vsed in working of miracles were not vsed as meanes, but as signes: when, and according as the Apostles percei­ued them profitable for man. pag. 61.
  • 19 If any heretofore haue vsed Prayer in working of mi­racles, they haue not vsed it as a meanes leading thereto: but vsed the same as a signe or document. pag. 63.
  • 20 Prayer and fasting is the onely meanes to remoue any iudgement from vs. Doctrine pag. 66.
  • 21 Gods prouidence denied, in saying that Satan can enter into a man at his pleasure: so the partie but giue his consent. pag. 80.
  • 22 To entreat Christ to cast out a Diuell, is mirandum: but not miraculum. Apolog. pag. 33. Detection. pag. 8.
  • 23 Reprobates may now cast out Diuels, Doctr. pag. 106.
  • 24 Where the proper signe of a thing is: there is also for certaine, the thing signified. Detection pag. 50.
  • 25 Physicke, and such like peculiar ordinances, are not mentioned at all in the Scriptures. Doctrine pag. 54.
  • 26 Diuels doe earnestly desire, to be essentially inherent in the possessed mans body. Doctrine pag. 2.
  • 27 Master Darell auoucheth a Vbiquitie in Diuels: name­ly, that at one instant, they are without, and within a man. Detection pag. 103.110.

Behold gentle Reader, we haue here giuen thee an inck­ling (as it were by the way) concerning the supposed sound­nesse of Master Darell his subsequent Doctrine, of the es­sentiall possessions and dispossessions of Spirits and Diuels: his published Pamphlets being euery of them vniuersally peste­red [Page] with these, and sundry other absurd and vnsound Posi­tions, as will plainely appeare in their orderly examinations. Now then, as by hauing the iust length of the one arme of a man, thou maist very neerely ghesse at the iust length also of the other: so surely (hauing felt by these few a shrewd sauour of palpable absurdities) thou maist very shrewdlie imagine what the whole Discourse is likely to be, the same being builded (as thou seest) vpon such fickle and sandie foundations, as are vtterly vnable to support the vnwealdie frame of so tottring a worke.

Moreouer, in that very many of these his Positions are di­rectly opposite to the infallible truth of the sacred Scrip­tures: it doth minister vnto thee a notable watchword, and exact at thy hands a circumspect consideration, concerning the entertainement of any thing contained in his Bookes. For doe tell me I pray thee, whether it be any waies possi­ble, that such palpable vntruthes should possibly proceede from that Spirit of truth,Ioh. 16.13. which leadeth the seruants of God into all soundnesse of truth? The Lord giue thee an vnder­standing Hart to know,Phil. 1.10. and a discerning Spirit to deter­mine rightly of the things that differ, and to hold fast what­soeuer is good to thy owne euerlasting comfort in Iesus Christ. So be it.

A briefe Catalogue of Master Darel his apparant contradictions.

  • 1 IN his doctrine, pag. 29. he saith to be possessed of a diuell, is as ordinary a disease as blindnes, deafnes, and such like: but ibidem pag. 67. hee makes both it and the cure an extraordinarie worke, calling for an extraordi­narie vse. And ibidem pag. 79. a disease supernaturall, and medi­cine supernaturall. And ibidem. pag. 103. a rare and extraordi­narie worke of God. And ibidem pag. 105. the casting out of the diuell at Nottingham, is made the same with Christes miracu­lous worke, and aboue some other miraculous actions. Also dete­ction pag. 41. supernaturall meanes, supernaturall disease. And pag. 58. prayer is as ordinarie a meanes as other medicines. And pag. 59. prayer and fasting an ordinarie meanes.
  • 2 In his detection pag. 54. signes of dispossession not necessary: but pag. 57, as also doctrine, pag. 36. they are absolutelie neces­sarie for sundrie reasons: and a direction left in the word for dis­cerning the same signes.
  • 3 In his doctrine pag. 39. no eiection of Satan in the papacie: yet pag. 70. a true deliuerance in the papacie graunted, and that by their humiliation.
  • 4 In pag. 39. he auoucheth a voluntarie departure of diuels: but pag. 77. the diuell (he saith) must be inticed out.
  • 5 In his doctrine pag. 12.41.81. he saith the Demoniakes receiue no hurt at all by anie their torments, and pag. 13. he ren­dreth a reason why: but pag. 36. hee saith Darling was so sore hurt, as for thirteene weekes after he was lame, and had no vse of his legges.
  • 6 In his doctrine, pag. 40. hee saith that diuels are now cast forth by Christ his owne absolute authoritie, and pag. 41. by his absolute & supreame authoritie: but in pag. 55. he saith that this supernaturall disease is cured by the supernaturall medicine ap­plied thereto, as a natural medicine is applied to a natural disease.
  • [Page] 7 In his doctrine pag. 41. hee maketh fasting and prayer a warranted ordinance for the expelling of diuels by the wordes of Christ, in Matth. 17.21. and in Mar. 9.29. but in his detecti­on, pag. 41. wee read not (saith he) of the first ordayning of anie such meanes.
  • 8 In examining the words of Math. 17.21. and Mar. 9.29. he saith the same words were spoken to the Apostles and Disci­ples, as appeareth in his doctrine, pag. 41.42.50. but pag. 43.44.45.46.47.48.49. he flatlie opposeth himselfe to that exposi­tion: and inuents many reasons why that speech of Christ should not be appropriated to them of that age: but all this in his detecti­on, pag. 43. hee doth plainely confute in this sort. Christ speakes not (saith he) of the future but of the present time, saying thus: this kind (goeth) not out, but this kind (shall) goe out, &c.
  • 9 In his doctrine, pag. 42. hee maketh sole prayer the onely meanes that euer was or shal be for casting out diuels: but pag. 43 he makes fasting the more effectuall meanes, and in pag. 79. the more soueraigne meanes.
  • 10 In his doctrine, pag, 43, he saith, that by prayer alone, and betimes in the day, euen straight after dinner, and without any fa­sting at all, were sundrie Diuels cast out from K. Wright: but in his detection, pag. 46. he makes it a difficult matter to driue out a diuell by prayer alone, or by prayer and fasting together.
  • 11 In laying downe the scope of the text, Matth. 17.21. hee noteth two impediments why the Apostles could not driue forth the diuell; namelie their incredulitie, and the nature of the spi­rit: but pag. 46. he saith that the Apostles then (by vertue of their miraculous faith) could doe any thing, and therefore cast out a diuell of any kind whatsoeuer, which he further confirmeth, pag. 47.
  • 12 In his doctrine, pag. 47. hee saith that the Disciples by vertue of their so large a Commission, could cast out a diuell of anie kinde: but pag. 50. in the second part of that his diui­sion, hee saith that the childe was possest with one of the worst kind of spirits, and that thence it came that the Disciples could not cast them out.
  • 13 In his doctrine, pag. 54. hee saith, that prayer and fasting being vsed aright, will certainely prosper, eyther to the remouing or sanctifying of the iudgement: but pag. 59. hee saith there is no assurance to preuaile.
  • [Page] 14 In his doctrine, pag. 52. he maketh Abrahams prayer the sole meanes of conception, and procreation of children: but pag. 60. another meanes is found, and the same also appointed of God for that purpose, or els the conception by sole prayer alone, would proue a miracle.
  • 15 In his doctrine, pag. 60. and 73. hee saith that miracles are vndoubtedlie ceased: but pag. 63. he saith there is no determi­nation of miracles in the word.
  • 16 In his doctrine, pag. 59. he saith it is plaine, that prayer, or prayer with fasting may be an ordinarie meanes appointed of God to driue out diuels, and yet (being vsed) not prosper to that selfe same end: but page the same, he saith that if any should af­firme that prayer and fasting are not of that efficacie, to cure any Demoniake without exception, it were an impious affirmation.
  • 17 In his doctrine, pag. 69. hee saith. In as much as our Church hath this power to cast out a diuel, it conuinceth the pa­pists, touching the power they onlie bragge of for casting out di­uels: but pag. 74. he saith, the papists haue no more cause to brag of that power, then the Rogue hath to boast of the hole in his eare.
  • 18 In his doctrine, pag. 63. he saith, there is no determinati­on of miracles in the word: but pag. 74.75. that it is now the sole and vndoubted badge of Antichrist to worke miracles.
  • 19 In his doctrine, pag. 74.75. he saith that the Papists may worke true miracles: but pag. 76. he saith that spirits are neuer cast forth by papists, but of themselues goe willinglie out: which if it be so, then there is no miracle wrought.
  • 20 In his doctrine, (in manie places) he saith that God hath left but one ordinarie meanes for expelling diuels, which is prayer and fasting: but pag. 79. he makes two distinct meanes; the first is the supernaturall medecine of prayer alone: the se­cond he calles another of the same kind, but yet more soueraigne, namely fasting and prayer.
  • 21 In his Doctrine, pag. 11. and in his Detection, pag. 100. and pag. 107. he labours to proue that the parties in deed, were truely possest, and dispossest, and that vndoubtedly Satan did vex them. But in his Doctrine page 81: he saith, that Satan is so cunning, as he can cause things to be in appearance, which are not at all.
  • 22 In his Doctrine, pag. 5.16.25. and 29. he saith, that pos­sessions are onely to be iudged by the Scriptures, and that there­in, [Page] there is a direction left by the Lord, for the discerning of them. But in his Detection, pag. 34. he saith that Christ did not ordaine any such meanes, for then we should haue it in the Scriptures; and such an ordinance there, I dare be hold to say we haue none.
  • 23 In his Detection, pag. 163. he saith, fier hath power to burne: but in the same pag. that fier hath no power to burne.
  • 24 In his Doctrine pag. 2. he saith, that it suteth altogether with Satans nature, to be filthy and wicked in speech: but in his Detection pag. 175. he saith, that it suteth as well with his nature, to vse good and holy speeches.
  • 25 In his Doctrine, pag. 89. he saith, that the Lord (in these daies) doth send Diuels into men for these speciall endes, Name­ly, first,
    Luk. 16.3 [...]
    to confound Atheists: secondly to reforme some. But (in the same page) he alleageth such a Scripture as sheweth euidently that no such thing can be possiblie effected: which causeth him to say, there is little hope, that any of the aforesaid ends should there­by be effected. Yet (opposing himselfe to the word) he vseth many ydle speeches about that matter, and brabbles much for the ac­complishment of those ends thereby.
  • 26 In his Doctrine, pag. 37. he saith, the Spirits were seene and felt of the parties in some visible formes or shapes. But pag. 9.9. he saith, they could not possibly be seene, or felt, being inuisible creatures: onely they were beheld in their operations and effectes.
  • 27 In his Doctrine (in many places) he makes it a most neces­sary work which was done vpon those his pretended Demoniakes. But pag. 102. he saith it was such a worke, as neither any part of truth needeth nor yet man, in regard of his weakenesse: but in the words following, he would pinne many necessary vses vpon it, name­ly, confirmation of the strong, perswasion of the weake, &c.
  • 28 In his Detection, pag. 102. he doubts not, but Sommers may be recouered. But in his Narration of the Lancashire De­moniakes, pag. 13. he giues a definitiue sentence, that he, and two others, shall neuer be cured, quoting for proofe, Luke 11.26.
  • 29 In his Doctrine, pag. 60. he saith. It is no miracle that is done by meanes. But pag. 63. he saith, that God can, and often doth bring most mightie thinges to passe, by small, and weake meanes.
  • 30 In in his doctrine, pag. 10. The Demoniakes in their fits, are depriued of all their senses externall and internall: but pag. 11. they seeme onlie to be so, and therefore are sayde to be so.
  • [Page] 31 In his doctrine, pag. 47. hee saith that the Apostles faith failed not: but pag. 48. hee saith their faith fayled at this time when Christ spake to them, and in this very worke.
  • 32 In his doctrine, pag. 38. he saith that these words (going out and entring in) are neuer vsed in the spirituall sense: but (in the same place) hee saith they are often and vsuallie taken in the literall sense: howbeit in his Detection, pag. 58. hee saith those words are onely but Metaphors.
  • 33 In his doctrine, pag. 50. he saith that the Disciples could not driue forth the diuell from the child by that their miraculous faith: but pag. 47. and in his Detection, pag. 24. he saith they could, and that one eiected so is much more admirable, then that which is done by prayer.
  • 34 In his doctrine, pag. 59. hee saith, that neyther the whole Church, nor any member thereof (in vsing the meanes) can haue assurance to preuaile: but (in the same page) hee saith, the assu­rance is or may be great in such a case.
  • 35 In his doctrine, pag. 66. hee maketh fasting and prayer the onelie ordinarie meanes to cast out diuels: but (in the same page) he saith, that Satan was so cast out of Darling and the rest, as Christ himselfe did cast him out, namelie by the finger of God: which manner of working he aduiseth to distinguish from all other manner of casting out diuels, as appeareth pa. 55.
  • 36 In his detection, pag. 49. he saith, that faith temporarie, and historicall, are of sufficient force to cast out diuels: but in his doctrine, pag. 93. where he expresseth what he meanes by fasting, he requireth such fruits of faith to be ioyned with fasting, as can­not possiblie proceed from these his two former kinds of faith.
  • 37 In his doctrine (euerie where) hee saith that prayer is the Churches ordinarie meanes to driue out diuels: but in his dete­ction, pag. 6. he saith, to intreat Christ to cast out a diuell is mi­randum.
  • 38 In his doctrine, pag. 45. hee saith that Peter and Paule, they needed not to haue prayed before their working of miracles, their faith being strong: but pag. 45. hee saith they did so pray, ei­ther to encrease their faith or to some other good end.
  • 39 In his doctrine, pag. 46. he concludes directlie against his owne Analysing and expounding of that scripture, which was put downe, pag. 42. Also he sets Matth. 17 21. and Luk. 9.1. toge­ther fast by the eares. Againe, he alleadgeth Act. 19.12. Luk. 9.1. [Page] and Matth. 10.1. directlie crossing his owne exposition, concerning Math. 17.21.
  • 40 In his Doctrine, pag. 30. he calles all men to the Law and to the testimonie. But pag. 54. and in his Detection, pag. 42. he standes for the defence of secret, and vnreuealed ordinances.
  • 41 In his Doctrine (euery where) and in his Detection, pag. 23. he saith that those are no miracles which are done by the ordi­narie meanes of fasting and prayer. But in his Detection. pag. 49. he alleadgeth Math. 7.22. to proue that there were others be­sides the Apostles, who cast out Diuels: which place of Mathew telleth vs expresly, tha [...] the men spoken of there, did work miracles.
  • 42 In his 1. Narration, pag. 10. and in his Doctrine, pag. 6. he saith, there is no determination for the ceasing of miracles in al the Scriptures: but in his Doctrine, pag. 63. & 73. he saith that the gift of working miracles continued in the Church but a time. And in his Detection, pag. 23. and 25. he saith, that before Ter­tullian, Cyprian, and those Fathers times, the working of mi­racles was vndoubtedly ceased.
  • 43 In his Doctrine, pag. 42. he calleth fasting and prayer a secret ordinance. But pag. 44. he makes it an expresse ordinance and a meanes expreslie and by name spoken of by Christ.
  • 44 In his Doctrine, pag. 42. he putteth downe two impedi­ments why the Apostle could not cast forth the Diuell from the Child. But pag. 44. he saith, that, that text can no further be vnderstood of the Apostles, then onely to signifie vnto them, the nature of that spirit: whence partlie it came to passe, that they could not cast him out.
  • 45 In his doctrine, pag. 44. he saith that Stapleton doth not appropriate the text in Mat. 17.21. to the Apostles of Christ: but pag. 45. he saith, that Thyreus and Stapleton both doe vn­derstand that text of the Apostles themselues, who (notwithstan­ding their miraculous faith) should also haue prayed.
  • 46 In his doctrine, pag. 42.49.50. he so vnderstandeth these words of Christ (this kind goeth not forth) as if they should containe in them an exception of the particular, from out of the generall: but pag. 46. hee saith that hee taketh that sense to be very vnsound, and contrarie to the meaning of Christ.
  • 47 In his doctrine, pag. 49. hee distinguisheth diuels by their sundrie sorts, degrees, or orders: but pag. 51. hee distinguisheth them by their only naturall qualities: as malice, crueltie, &c.
  • [Page] 48 In his doctrine, pag. 59. he saith God is at libertie, and not tied to meanes: but pag. 61. he tieth him fast to meanes; tel­ling vs that if God hath appointed a thing to come to passe by this or that meanes, then the meanes must be vsed, or els that thing will neuer come to passe.
  • 49 In his doctrine pag. 2. hee saith, it is absurd to affirme that the diuell (being without a man) can dispose of the whole or ante part of mans bodie: but detection, pag. 110. he saith that the di­uell (in all probability) did vse Sommers his tongue; notwithstan­ding hee was essentiallie and sensiblie playing boe peepe vnder the couerled.
  • 50 In his detection, pag. 111. he saith he would be ashamed to auouch, that the diuell would neuer giue Sommers ouer, vntill he had repossessed him: but in his doctrine, pag. 102. hee confidently affirmeth, that though Sommers should (in deed) be dispossest by the appoynted meanes: yet would the diuel labour very earnest­lie to reenter, and neuer giue ouer till he had repossessed him, which also (he saith) he hath.

These and sundrie such other apparant contradictions so v­niuersallie scattered in euerie of M. Darel his pamphlets: they may giue the sound hearted Readers some precedent tast of that subsequent soundnes, which they are likely to find throughout the whole building.Math. 7.26.27 For euen as when the [...]oundation it selfe is sandie and sliding, the whole frame that is founded theron, must necessa­rilie become but a reeling and tottering Tower, and lie hourelie subiect to a desperate downefall: so surely when the ground­sels, the studs, the raysing peeces, the iouystes, the tracings, and all the rest of the timber belonging thereto, are at such an ap­parant oddes in euerie of their Geometricall proportions, the workemanship whatsoeuer (when it is brought to the best) it will seeme but a bungerlie hotch potch, and the whole frame it selfe can neuer be firme, howsoeuer M Darel or any his Fauorits may o­ther waies hugge the same in their armes as the Ape doth her brood, till she hath vtterlie beref [...] them all of their liues.

The consideration hereof may make the considerate Readers to conceiue thus of the matter and say. If these mens seuerall writings be apparantlie found at such deadlie debate in them­selues: how is it possible they should continue or hold any confor­mable concord with the approued writings of others.

Moreouer, it may please the good Reader to remember withal, [Page] that such absurd positions and so many apparant contradicti­ons, they cannot possiblie proceed from that spirit of truth, Iohn 16.13. which leadeth into all soundnes of truth and religion: and that there­fore they haue in them no force at all to fight for the Lord, Iob. 13.9. who needeth not the lies of mortall men.

Brieflie, this we our selues doe certainely know, & all men (more especiallie the iudiciall sort) they plainely perceiue, that howsoe­uer those their pretended essentiall possessions and dispossessions of diuels may haplie accord with the truth of the Scriptures: yet these their published Pamphlets, they will neuer be able to make good the supposed truths which themselues doe pretend: and that therefore they must of necessitie be forced to begin a new ground, or to giue ouer their cause. The Lord by his spirit direct vs only vnto that which tends to the glory of his great name, the present good of his Church, and our owne euerlasting comforts in Ie­sus Christ. So be it: euen so Lord Iesu. Amen.

The seuerall Arguments handled at large in the subsequent Dialogues, concerning our second encounter.

The first Dialogue. Pag. 1.
The Argument.

1 WHether Master Darel his second encounter (contayning an hotch-potch of things confusedly shuffled together) hath found a better suc­cesse, concerning the pretended essentiall possession of Spirits and Diuels; then any the precedent particulars propounded at large in our former Dialogues.

The second Dialogue. Pag. 81.
The Argument.

2 WHether this fresh encounter (contayning an hotch-potch of matters confusedlie shuffled together) hath found a better successe, cōcer­ning the pretended dispossession of Diuels by prayer and fasting, then any of the precedent particulars pro­pounded at large in those our former discourses.

The third Dialogue. Pag. 197.
The Argument.

3 THe holie and right vses, which the Church and Children of God are to make of this Do­ctrine, concerning the finall determination of possessions and disposessions of spirits and diuels.

A SVMMARIE ANSWERE TO ALL THE MATERIALL POINTS in any of Master DAREL his bookes.
The first Dialogue.

THE ARGVMENT.

Whether Master Darel his second encounter (containing an hotch-potch of things confusedly shuffled together) hath found a better successe, concerning the pretended es­sentiall possession of Spirits and Diuels: then any the precedent particulars, propounded at large in our former Dialogues?

The speakers names.
  • PHILOLOGVS.
  • LYCANTHROPVS.
  • PNEVMATOMACHVS.
  • PHYSIOLOGVS.
  • ORTHODOXVS.
  • EXORCISTES.
Orthodoxus.

EXorcistes? Hauing very lately receiued your late-spread factious Pamphlets, as also your Champion-like challenge, concerning your old inueterate opinions, about the essentiall possessions of Spirits, and Diuels: I vnder­stand by Master Physiologus, and the rest of our companie, that (according to your owne appointment for time and place) you are now come purposely ouer vnto vs, to mannage your challenge. Surely (howsoeuer your maine forces may happely be feeble) there is no want (I per­ceiue) [Page 2] of a valorous minde. Vt desint vires, tamen est lau­danda voluntas. Well sir, you are welcome vnto vs. And therefore, what say you man? Doe you feele your selfe no lesse readie, than willing: to aduenture the com­bate afresh?

Exorcistes.

Yea sir, I am very willing, and readie at all assaies: and, doe purpose, very valiantlie to hold out the encounter, or lie fast by the heeles. But what say you first to those my three late published treatises: which you so scornefully brand with the odious title of factious Pamphlets?

Orthodoxus.

Or euer I come to open my mouth concerning any your owne matters, I must first of all, be very importunate vpon the rest of our companie, that they would (in no wise) inter­rupt our talke, for protracting the time: but onely attend with silence, and become indiff [...]rent Iudges, concerning the scope of our conference. Vnles happilie, it may please Master Physiologus (for better ease vnto me, and more delight to your selues) to enterlace now and then, some such Philoso­phicall points, as may (in any sort) tend to the further mani­festation of the maine purpose in hand.

Lycanthropus.

We like very well of, and doe willinglie submit to your motion: proceede therefore in your matters, as the Lord (in mercie) shall direct your minds.

Orthodoxus.

Content. Come on therefore Exorcistes: what say you now, to the essentiall possession of Spirits and Diuels?

Exorcistes.

Sir, be you sure, you must finde me no Changeling, con­cerning that so weightie a matter. But first shew me (I be­seech you) how you may possiblie make good the intole­rable disgrace which you haue primarilie imposed vpon those my fruitefull labours: which it pleaseth your own selfe, to terme but factious Pamphlets.

Orthodoxus.

Why man? It hath been euer my ordinarie manner of dealing (you know) to call a spade, a spade: and therefore, you must pardon my plainenes herein. Howbeit, be patient I pray you: we will neuer fall forth for naming the Childe. [Page 3] And therefore (pretermitting the terme of factious Pamph­lets) those your three last published treatises (sith forsooth, you will needes haue them intituled so) they are, either such as concerne onely but matters of fact: or, such as concerne matters of fact and Doctrine together. Your treatises, concer­ning onely but matters of fact, namely, your Triall, and De­tection: I doe purpose, at no hand to intermeddle withall. Both, because you your owne selfe haue purposely singled forth from the rest, your proper Antagonists, whom you proudely intitle, the two English Inquisitours, Samuel Hars­net (I meane) and his Master, whom also (in the very heate of your pride) you haue (by a Hysteron Proteron) preposte­rouslie put downe in your Pamphlet: and, for that I also my selfe, haue no authenticall Commission to enquire after, much lesse, to determine such factious proceedings. For which speci­all respects, I doe purposely put ouer the trying forth of your Triall, as also, the orderly deciding of that your Detection: to such Ecclesiasticall Commissioners, as her excellent Maiestie hath authenticallie subordinate vnder her Highnes, for the orderlie finding forth of all those vnorderlie, and grosse ma­lefactors, which doe indirectlie withstand, or impugne the same.

Exorcistes.

Well; what say you then to the other of my treatises?

Orthodoxus.

You shall vnderstand anon, my censure concerning the same. In the meane time, howsoeuer (for the former conside­rations) I doe vtterlie refuse to meddle with those two fore­named Pamphlets, being meerelie but matters of fact: yet must I bicker with you a blowe or two, concerning the seue­rall Epistles prefixed to both.See Darels trial, in the Epist [...] to Sir Iohn Popham, pag. 4. sect. 1. Item. pag. 6. For, besides that they are (in some places) absurd and senseles: doe labour thoroughout, vpon a pitifull begging of the cause of Possession, and Disposses­sion: are branded with Grosthead his corrections, by matching (in your Apocryphall text) that your pretended miracle, with the true miracles of Christ, but yet making the same (in your marginall note) no miracle at all: besides (I say) that they all keepe onely a circular motion: are full fraught with idle excursions: with rouing phantasies: with extrauagant speeches: are thirteene times pestered with an idle traducing [Page 4] tautologie: are stored with fearefull disloyall titles, and termes of disgrace: with vaunting challenges: virulent raylings: and bitter exclamations: I must necessarilie admonish you Rea­ders of some particulars in either of both: and therewithall, must aduise them, to beware they doe not, either too rashlie approue of your spirit, or, too inconsideratelie affect your Cabalisticall conceits. See Darels Tri­all in the Epi­stle. Ibidem. pag. 7. For first, in one of the Epistles, you ap­parantly discouer to all the world, your grosse, and intole­rable pride, by indighting, arraigning, adiudging, and condem­ning of Passhur and the Prelates (as it please you to terme them) of the vnpardonable sinne against the holy Ghost. Labouring the Lord Chiefe Iustice withall, not onely to re­couer himselfe with speede, from that forenamed fearefull sinne, whereunto (it seemes by the purport of your speech) you doe greatlie feare he is fearefullie falling: but also, to practise a fresh, such a platforme of Iustice, as your selfe doth more deliberatelie portrature to him, for those his iudiciall proceedings more especiallie concerning your speciall mat­ters. Namely, that he doe forthwith reuerse the precedent iudgement which passed against you: and admit you a new plea, to proceede in a fresh, and the same (at your pleasure) to prosecute eftsoones before the iudgement seate. Which mo­tion of yours being freely admitted, and the same once made but a meere matter of course: tell me, what one definitiue sen­tence against malefactors, must at any time stand currantly sound, without the speedie reuersing of some at the least. For if offendors may once haue free passage to such a procee­ding: they can very subtlelie suggest, and are cunning e­nough to pretend many colourable pretences, and probable presumptions for the timely annihilating, See Darels De­tection, in the Epistle. pag. 1. Item, Detection, pag. 204. Item in the same Epistle pag. 2. Item pag. 3. and for making a plaine nullitie in any definitiue sentence against themselues whatsoeuer. Againe, in the very title it selfe, as also, in the E­pistle before your detection, you doe to too dangerouslie de­tect, a very vndutifull and disloyall heart to her Maiestie, by branding her Maiesties iudiciall proceedings against you, with the treacherous title of a sinfull, shamefull, lying, and ridi­culous discourse: terming the dealers against you, no better then English Inquisitours: such as bewitch her Maiesties peo­ple with their crooked conueiances: Item pag. 7. Instruments of Satan: Impudent and shameles discoursers: the publishers of shameles [Page 5] and malitious inuectiues: A base kind credit, that [...] not otherwise gotten: tha [...] discrediting [...]hers. Item. pag. 8 yea, such, and so mightie aduersa­ries, as you must necessarilie cracke and diminish their credits, yea, take all credit quite from them, by detecting their filthi­nesse, especiallie, the Discoursers: that so (by making his name to rot, and to stinke) you may gaine among men, the more credit to your sillie poore languishing cause. With these and infinite other like vnchristian courses, vndutifull termes, and inhumane proceedings, are those your two Epistles pestered full: what say you Exorcistes vnto them?

Exorcistes.

I am so farre off from forethinking the same: as I could heartilie wish, they were doubled and trebled vpon their pates.

Orthodoxus.

Fie, fie for shame: these your vndutifull and disloyall reui­lings of men endowed with her Maiesties lawfull authoritie, doe euen make the very eares of all men to tingle.1. Sam. 3.1 [...] Surelie, howsoeuer we our selues (in our former conferences) were in very great hope of your happie conuersion: yet now (the na­turall corruption of your proude and intemperate spirit, so deepelie discouers it selfe) all good men, stand greatlie in doubt of doing you good, by any their holy endeuours. But tell me I beseech you, what spirit you are of? Tell me from whence you receiued so large a Commission, as that you dare (by vertue thereof) thus insolentlie inthronize your selfe into the sacred throne of the eternall God: for the ar­raigning, adiudging, and condemning of consciences? What pri­uiledge haue you thus proudely to pull downe from the seate of iustice, such approued Magistrates as her Maiestie hath authenticallie placed therein: and then so proudely skippe vp into their places your selfe, by countermaunding, anni­hilating, and reuersing definitiue sentences, yea and (which more is) by aduising, disposing, and determining (at your pleasure) quite contrarie courses, for iudiciall proceedings? Where is your warrant, so vnreuerently to rayle vpon, reuile, and speake euill of any in authoritie? We know very well, who hath giuen vs straightly in charge,Exod. 22.28. Act. 23.3. not to curse or reuile the rulers of the people: but we vnderstand not as yet, where, or from whence your selfe should possiblie procure such a plenarie power, Plenariam po­testatem. to countermaund or controll that former [Page 6] charge of the Lord. You take much more vpon you herein, then euer did Iehoshuah the high Priest, Zach. 3.1.2. Iude 8.9. or Michael the Arch­angeli, when they stroue with the Diuel: for, they durst neuer giue rayling sentence to him, but onely said thus, The Lord re­proue thee O Satan, euen the Lord that hath chosen Ierusalem, reproue and rebuke thee. Whereas your selfe (in most disloyall and vndutifull manner) doe offer a most dispitefull disgrace to publike gouernment: and, doe very seditiouslie depraue and speake euill of persons in publike authoritie, as though your tongue were your owne,See D. Doctrine among the vse, pag. 86. he cal­leth such as raile vpon men in authorit [...]e, the diuels children. to prate what pleaseth your selfe. But tell me good Exorcistes, doe these the outragious outgoings of your vnrulie affections: proceede from the spirit of God, or the Diuell?

Exorcistes.

I reuerence the authoritie it selfe; and doe only oppose my speech to shameles, and graceles men in authoritie.

Orthodoxus.

Rom. 14.4.Whatsoeuer you imagine the men to be, the best is, they doe stand, or fall to their Lord: and therefore there is no cause they should greatly feare the boysterous thumps of any your Cannon-like thunder cracks, all the while the greatest matter of your charge, 1. King. 18.20. 2. Chro. 32.10. Isa. 36.4. is but winde and paper. For it is an vndoubted truth I assure you, that as these Rabshakeian reuilings, and raylings against the persons of men, doe bewray to the world the badnes of your cause, and primarilie proceede from the very circumference it selfe of your circular conceits: so are they all equallie and proportionably directed to one and the selfe same period, viz. ad vertiginem cerebri, I meane, to the giddi-braines disease▪ or the turne-about sicknes. Iude 10. But be it the men were fully so bad as you beare vs in hand: we hope you will neuer hold them to be halfe so bad as the Diuell: and yet the Diuell, receiuing (notwithstanding his badnes) a Com­mission from God to afflict the Church; Iehoshuah and Mi­chael, they durst not (as we told you before) giue rayling sen­tence against the Diuell: Iude 3. for feare of being found thereby, to rayle against God himselfe, whose Executioner or hang-man he was. You are wise enough to make the application your selfe.Psal. 35.13. Act. 7.60. Luk. 23.34. Luk. 23.40. Besides al this, we haue the exāple of Dauid, of Stephen, of our Sauiour himselfe, of all the holy Martyrs of God, yea, and of the saued theefe on the Crosse, who all prayed for their [Page 7] persecutors pursuing their deaths: but we haue no one presi­dent of any that euer reuiled or railed on the persons of men, saue onely that of cursed Shimei, 2. Sam. 16. [...] Isa. 37.23. Luk. 23.39▪ of rayling Rabshakeh, and of the damned theefe on the Crosse, whose number (we hope) you will neuer encrease, by seconding such their vnchristian courses your selfe.Eccles. 10. For, if he who curseth the Ruler, but only in the secret and hidden thought of his heart, standeth daily in feare least the foules of heauen doe carrie the sound, and that which hath wings discouer the matter: surely, you that eftsoones doe so outragiouslie ring forth your virulent reuilings, and ray­ling termes against persons in publike authoritie, how should not you stand dailie in dread of a much more desperate downe-fall? Howbeit, that we may the better beate backe the very vttermost ebbe of those raging waues wherewith you foame forth at vnwares, Iude 13. your filthie shame, and the more for­ciblie cause them recoyle to the infectious Channell it selfe,Matth. 15.1 [...] Luk. 6.45. of that your imbred corruption, from whence they first floa­ted amaine with so furious a streame: it shall not be amisse to admonish your Reader of two cunning sleights of Legerde­maine, practised by your selfe throughout your Pamphlets. The first is this, namely; whatsoeuer is materiall in Master Harsnets Discouerie; and maketh directly against, either the matter it selfe, or the manner of your practise: that you doe closelie, and slielie ouerslip, not heauing thereat with the waight of one finger.

Exorcistes.

Put downe but one instance, if possiblie you are able: of any such cunning omission of matters materiall.

Orthodoxus.

I will.S. Harsnet his Discouerie in the Epistle▪ pag. 8.9. First therefore, whereas M. Harsnet (in that his Epistle before the Discouerie) hath apparantly discouered, and dashed to nothing, your fond and ridiculous distinction of mirandum, and miraculum, by the onely quoting of some certaine places of Scripture, wherein wonders and miracles are flatly confounded, as termes proceeding from one and the selfe same roote, and, wherein also those two words them­selues (or some other equiualent with them) are indifferent­ly vsed the one for the other: this Distinction of yours (being the very Atlas it selfe, that supportes the whole frame of those your Cabalisticall conceits concerning the pretended [Page 8] possessions and dispossessions of Diuels) is a matter (you see) very great and materiall: and therefore by consequence, it craueth your whole cunning and skill in confirming the same. Howbeit, this new found Distinction of yours (for any thing hitherto heard) it finds at your hands, a succour­les shelter: neither are those his quotations any otherwaies answered, then by laying your hand on your mouth. A­gaine,See S. Harsnets Discouerie, li. 1. cap. 5. pag. 28. and 29. A point very materiall, vnanswered. wheresoeuer Master Harsnet (in any one place tho­roughout his Discouerie) laieth downe directly against you, an accusation concerning Sommers his counterfeiting, and then mannageth his said accusation, first, by the testimonie of Sommers himselfe, then next, by your owne answere vnto it, and lastly, by the seuerall Depositions of seuerall Deponents: the which (as all wise men auouch) is a very orderlie, direct, and materiall proceeding, and therefore (for clearing your cause) it behooues you to shew your cunningest skil against such a course, and your vttermost force to weaken the same. Howbeit, such his materiall proceedings, is (for the most part, by whole Chapters together) pretermitted with silence: vn­les now and then, you catch at some odde quippes, or termes of disgrace (for feare of being thought to say nothing at all) and those you doe hotelie and fiercely pursue. Dealing therein, not vnlike to the daintie-fed Dog, who hauing eft­soones the proffer of a good morsell of meate, lets fall the same: and very eagerly skippeth at, and followeth a flie. And by this your cunning manner of dealing, you would make your sillie poore Readers beleeue, that (in any materiall point) you haue directlie Detected Master Harsnets Discouerie: whereas (in the opinion of all the learned) you haue rather indirectlie Discouered a very dangerous Detection of some supposed fraudulent dealing. And this in effect, for your first cunning sleight.

Exorcistes.

Well sir, and what is the other?

Orthodoxus.

Your other cunning sleight to couer your Legerdemaine, is this. Namely, when any materiall poynt, is (by M. Harsnet) propounded from Sommers his mouth,See D. Detecti­on. Epistle to the Reader. p 4. ra [...]. 4. that may any way portend your teaching to counterfeit: then Sommers for­sooth, he must be an infamous and notorious Liar, a forsworne, a [Page 9] counterfeit, & a blasphemous wretch. Howbeit, when Sommers vttereth any one word, that may seeme (in the least appea­rance) to vphold your idle conceits, or, that may any waies be thought to support your Iesuiticall supposes, or supposed bare signes of essentiall possession, and dispossession of Diuels: then, any your conceits (how phantasticall, or absurde so­euer) they must needes be esteemed for currant conclusions: and why? Because forsooth, K. Wright, T. Darling, M. Cooper, and W. Sommers doe say it. As if these your sillie poore Pro­ctors, were all of them equall with Pythagoras iudgement. Or, as though any their incredible predictions, must priui­ledge your palpable asseuerations. Or (which more is) as though wee must needes bee perswaded by your copartners mouthes: that, you your selfe is no theefe. Whether you haue ignorantly, or purposely practized these sleights of leger­demaine, I dare not certainly say, because I know not herein your hearts corruption: but let the indifferent and diligent Reader obserue you throughout, by conferring your writings one with the other, and then tell me where (in any these points) I misreport your proceedings. In the meane time, this may summarily suffice as a caueat, or watch-word for plaine hearted Readers; to beware how they doe either af­fect, or approue of (hand ouer head) those your two stragling Pamphlets, which onely concerne but matters of fact: and thus much in effect, for those vagrant and rouing rapsodies.

Exorcistes.

Be it so as you say: but what is your iudgement concer­ning the third?

Orthodoxus.

Your third Pamphlet, is a notable compound of sundrie de­uices confusedly shuffled together: for it containeth both matter of fact, and matter of doctrine. The first part which concerneth only but matter of fact, is solemnely intituled: A true Narration of the straunge and grieuous vexation by the Diuell, of the seauen persons in Lancashire, and W. Sommers of Nottingham. This your true Narration (if any vpon your bare report will receiue it for trueth) lieth very free (I sup­pose) from either the incounter, or challenge of any as yet: and therefore very free for such as take pleasure in trifling toyes, to vndertake any trifling incounter therewith. Howbeit, [Page 10] for that, the infallible truth as well, of the Narration it selfe, as of any the supposed straunge actions, or passions reported therein (how confidently soeuer you report them for true) doth wholy depend vpon that certaine truth, which must certainly confirme vnto vs, the certaine continuance of es­sentiall possessions, and dispossessions in these daies of the Gos­pell: you must haue vs excused, though wee hold all those your lately reported actions, or passions of the parties posses­sed, in perpetuall suspence, vnlesse, the certaine continuance of those your pretended essentiall possessions, be first vnan­swerablie propounded, and prooued vnto vs. And, in the meane time, you must giue vs good leaue, to esteeme of this your new-coyned Narration no better, then of a pretie con­triued conceit to passe away winter nights, when friends (be­ing merily met) sit sporting themselues by the fire side: and thus much in effect, for ye first part of that friuolous Pamph­let, which onely concerneth meere fictions, I should say mat­ters of fact.

Exorcistes.

And, what say you to the other part?

Orthodoxus.

The other part of that Pamphlet, respecting matters of fact, and matters of Doctrine, confusedly iumbled and blended together, is intituled: The Doctrine of the Possession, and Dis­possession of Demoniakes, out of the word of God. Wherein wee haue summarily to obserue, first, the Preface put downe in the very forefront of the Pamphlet: and then next, the Do­ctrine it selfe, with the prosecution thereof.

The Preface containeth first, the maine purpose of that friuolous Pamphlet: and then next, a three-fold Distribution of that selfesame purpose.

The maine purpose you pretend, for publishing that fri­uolous Pamphlet, is, the glorie of God: and the edification of the Christian Reader.

Surely, (how friuolous soeuer the Pamphlet be deemed) the pretended maine purpose for publishing the same, is a ve­ry honourable, and a glorious purpose no doubt. Howbeit, be­cause the most counterfeit Coyne, resembleth eftsoones the most glittering shew, and, the most horrible Strumpet, the ho­nestest face: yea, and for that also we haue it very strictly gi­uen [Page 11] vs in charge, 1. Iohn 4.1. first, to search out and examine your Spirit, or euer we doe ouer rashly giue credit to any your holie pretences. It shal not be amisse, before hand very euenly to peize with the holie waights of the Sanctuarie, whatsoeuer payment you proffer in liew of such purpose: and then after, approoue, or disprooue of your holie pretences accordingly. And this in effect for the maine purpose, prefixed in the very forefront of that friuolous Pamphlet. The three-fold Distribution of that selfesame purpose, is this that followeth in order.

1. First, you would proue, that the eight persons you speake of: were euery of them possessed by Satan.

2. Secondly, that they were all of them vndoubtedly dispossessed by your fasting, and prayer.

3. Lastly, you lay downe the holie and right vses, which (you say) we must make of this wonderfull worke.

This (wee suppose) is the three-fold Distribution of that your former pretended maine purpose: whereof we like won­drous well, especially, if you shall shew your selfe no lesse sufficiently able to prosecute, then you haue orderly disposed of that your pretended maine purpose. And (to ease you something herein) this we must tell you before, that if you can soundly informe our iudgements concerning the infal­lible truth of those the two former points: we will not greatly sticke to yeeld you the latter. See D. doctrine among the vse [...] especallie in p [...] 88. Albeit, the same be shrewdly intermingled with some such disloyal assertions, such strange conceits, and such needlesse toyes, as are not in our powers to reforme, and we wholy disclaime.

Moreouer, whatsoeuer odde Question concerning these matters, hath been controuerted, or handled before, in anie one of our former Conferences, that wee will not now disputs of afresh: but only referre you to the Dialogue, wherein the same is determined.

Briefly, your needles Dilatations, your superfluous appli­cations, your often excursions, your idle repetitions, your wan­dring Vagaries, your roauing Discourses, and extrauagant speeches (more befitting a Rhetoricall Declamer, then a Lo­gicall Disputer) all those we will passe by, with a purposed si­lence for mispending the time.

Neither will we tye our selues strictly to your course of speech, but will briefly abstract from the whole, your propo­sitions, [Page 12] and proofes, with whatsoeuer els is materiall: and onlie endeuour to answere the same. And this in effect for the whole preface, put downe in the verie forefront of your fri­uolous Pamphlet.

The Doctrine it selfe, with the prosecution thereof comes next to our consideration. The Doctrine it selfe, is a Doctrine concerning the essentiall possession and dispossession of Demo­niakes, out of the word of God. Whether this be an high, or ra­ther a deepe point of diuinitie, will appeare in the handling thereof.

The prosecution of this deepe point of Doctrine, is perfor­med according to the threefold distribution aforesaid. Thus haue we brieflie and summarilie broken vp the whole body of this your Doctrinal discourse: with the due order obserued therein. Goe to now Exorcistes, proceed according to this order and spare not: what say you man to the first point of al, I meane, the essentiall possession of those your pretended De­moniakes.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine. p. 1.I doe confidentlie auouch to the world, that those eight persons we speak of, they were in deed essentiallie possessed with vncleane spirits: and did not counterfeit a possession, as is af­firmed by some.

Orthodoxus.

You say they were in deed essentiallie possessed: I pray you forget not your wordes. Howbeit (or euer we come to dis­pute the verie point of that Question) this I must tell you for truth, that you cannot possiblie name anie one place throughout the whole Bible, wherein the words possession, or possessed, are properlie vsed to this your pretended purpose, as wee haue shewed sufficientlie in our second Dialogue: and then, how should you possiblie proue your supposed essenti­all possessions of those your pretended Demoniakes, out of the word?

Exorcistes.

O yes sir, euerie where throughout the Geneuah translati­on: those words are ordinarilie obserued.

Orthodoxus.

A proper Disputer you shew your selfe. I insist vpon the Originall, and you vrge the Geneuah translation: which yet [Page 13] (being dulie conferred one place with another,Matth. 15.22. [...]. Erasmus hath, à Daemonio agi­tatur. Beza, he hath, à daemonio vexatur. Castalio, he hath, est fu­riata. Montanus, hath daemoni­zatur. See D. Doctrine pag. 89. Item, pag. 99.) will be found directlie against you. For first concerning the Origi­nall, the word which the Euangelist vseth therein, is, Daemoni­zomênos: that is, one Diuellished, or one afflicted, tormented, or vext with a Diuell. And so hath your Geneuah translation, in the fifteenth of Matthew, the twentie two verse. Yea, and herein also you your owne selfe very fullie accordeth in the verie Title of that your forenamed Narration: terming that your supposed Possession in your eight pretēded Demoniakes, to be nothing els but a grieuous vexation by the Diuell. Yea, and (which more is) euen in the verie title of this your trea­tise of doctrine: you doe call them, onelie Demoniakes, as also in sundrie places throughout that booke. By all which it is to too apparant, that, either you finallie distrust the finding of that word possession throughout the whole Bible, and so speake of possession at a blind aduenture: or that els, you do (with the Geneuah translator) account the words (possession, and vexation by Diuels) to be indifferentlie taken for one, and the selfesame matter, and so your supposed essentiall pos­session falles flat to the ground. Howbeit, if we should verie fauourablie affoord you the word possession, which by great hand (you see) will neuer be gained: yet, then also you are as far from the point of your purpose, as euer before. For how proue you those your eight pretended Demoniakes, to be in such sort possessed: as you beare vs in hand they were?

Exorcistes.

I proue it directlie, from the verie cause of their actions, or passions thus. Supernaturall effects, doe argue some supernatu­rall cause. Those actions, or passions which they endured, were supernaturall effects: therefore, those actions, or passions, they argue some supernaturall cause.

Orthodoxus.

Your Assumption is vtterlie vntrue.See D. Doctrine, pag. 1. For those their sup­posed actions or passions, they were not supernaturall, whatso­euer you seeme to report: and (which more is) meere natu­rall causes haue had, and may haue more wonderfull effects, then any of those your eight pretended Demoniakes, their actions or passions being soundly reported: as in our seuenth Dialogue is shewed at large. Neither may you (in such vn­certaine causes and courses of nature) so certainelie conclude [Page 14] from the effect, to the cause, as you seeme at this present. Both because but one and the selfesame cause, may bring forth sundrie effects: and for that also, euen one and the selfesame effect, doth eftsoones proceed from seuerall causes. Touching the first, we haue a liuelie experiment from the Sunne it selfe: whose heate beeing euer but one and the same, doth cause quite contrarie effects. For it softeneth wax, and hardeneth clay: it draweth a verie fragrant sauour from flowers, and a foule noysome stinke from the dung-hill. Now next for the other, I meane, that one and the selfesame effect, may fitlie proceed from seuerall causes: we may see it apparant, by an extraordinarie heat in our bodies. Which extraordinary heat (being but one, and the same) may be an vndoubted effect, either of fire, or of aboundance of clothes, or of excessiue drinking of wine, or of some violent exercise. The like expe­riments doe daily appeare from the sundrie humours of our naturall bodies, and from the variable operations of nature a­rising thence. Yea and (which more is) those your supposed supernaturall effects (namelie rending, foaming, crying aloude, leauing for dead, and so forth) they may, and doe eftsoones a­rise from sundrie meere naturall diseases: I meane from me­lancholie, from mania, from lunacie, from phrensie, from the Epilepsie, from the mother, from conuulsions, from crampes, and such like. And therefore (from these so vncertaine effects) you cannot certainely conclude such certaine essentiall posses­sion of Diuels: as appeareth at large, in sundrie our former Dialogues.

Exorcistes.

See D. Do­ctrine, pag. 1.2.But sir, the actions, or passions of those eight Demoniakes, they were vndoubtedly supernaturall effects, and must neces­sarilie proceed from some supernaturall cause: namelie, ei­ther from God, or good Angels, or from Satan at least. From God or good Angels they could not possiblie proceed, being toyes and fooleries, so farre vnbeseeming their sacred natures: and therefore no doubt from the Diuell, to whose filthie dis­position they are so correspondent and suting.

Orthodoxus.

They were not supernaturall effects, as we told you before: and your selfe shall neuer be able to proue them such. Be­sides that, your supposed impossibilitie, for either God or [Page 15] good Angels to effect any such phantasticall, vaine, and filthie effects, so much vnbeseeming their natures, is to too grosse and absurde: sith the iudgments of God (whatsoeuer in shew, howsoeuer, or by whomsoeuer effected) are holie and good, and for that the Lord also, in the orderlie executions, or ef­fects of his iudgments is not preciselie tyed to this, or that, sup­posed seemelie manner of effecting the same. In like manner, your inference, concerning the suting of such vnseemelie ef­fects, to the verie nature of the vncleane spirit it selfe, & that your inforced conclusion of essentiall possessions pretended from thence: is much more absurde then the other before. For if those vaine and vnseemelie effects, Math. 8.29. Mar. 5.7. Luke 8.28. Acts 16.17. See D. Apolog. pag. 15. S. Harsnet h [...] discouerie pag▪ 223. See D. Detection. pag. 165. page, 175. so fitlie suting (you say) to the nature of the vncleane spirit, must necessarily con­clude an vndoubted essentiall possession of some vncleane spi­rit effecting the same: then those holie, and those seemely ef­fects (namelie, the confessing of Christ, and of the way of salua­tion, as also, Sommers his sound exposition of the Creed for a long time together) all of them so fitlie consorting with the nature of an holie spirit, they must necessarilie conclude an vndoub­ted essentiall possession of some holie spirit effecting the same. But the first (say you) is vndoubtedlie true: and therefore also the latter. Notwithstanding be it supposed, that those vaine and vnseemelie effects (which your selfe so vainely pretend) were effected (in deed) by some vncleane spirit, as you seeme to inferre: yet, that concludeth no essentiall, or in­herent possession in anie of your eight pretended Demoniakes. Because, not onelie those, but farre greater effects may be wrought by the diuell, though himselfe be not essentiallie in the partie possessed: and therefore, proue soundlie their essentiall inherencie in the parties possessed, or hold your peace.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, the Scriptures in euerie place, they speake of the Diuell his entring in, and going out of the partie possessed.

Orthodoxus.

Wheresoeuer the Scriptures so speak of the possession of di­uels, they speake it only by Metaphore: as hath beene suffici­entlie declared in our second Dialogue. And this I say fur­ther, that you cannot possiblie alleadge throughout the whole Scriptures, any one text, wherein either Angels or Spi­rits, or Diuels are otherwise spoken of then only by meta­phor: [Page 16] the which places being interpreted literallie, would pester the Church with many absurd and inconuenient opinions.

Iob 1.7. & 2.2As for example, the diuell, he is said in Iob to compasse the earth. What? must we therefore conceiue, that the diuell (in deed) hath his legges and feete like a man: wherewith (as it were a Malt-milne horse) hee doth compasse the world by a circular motion? So should we discouer to the world, our cir­cular follie.

Matth. 12.43. Luk. 11.24.Againe, he is said to walke through drie places, seeking his rest. Must we therefore imagine, that the diuell in deed doth trudge vp and downe the mountainous countries, like to a ro­ging vagobond: hauing no habitation wherein to hide his head?

1. Pet. 5.8.Againe, he is said to goe continuallie about like a roaring Lyon: seeking whom to deuour. Must wee therefore beleeue that the diuell in deed, runneth hither and thither; as a bel­lowing Bull, that seeketh for pasture? So should wee make it apparant, that we ourselues, runne wilde in our wits. And as in these few examples: so in all other besides, you may see the absurdities of such expositions. Now then, if in expounding these, and all other Metaphoricall speeches concerning spirits and diuels, you must necessarily let passe the bare literal sense, or otherwaies fall flat into a thousand absurd and inconue­nient opinions: why should you sticke so fast to the letter in this one place alone, concerning the entring in, and going out of the diuell, from the partie possessed? Which being spoken by Metaphor as well as the rest, may (with no lesse absurdities) be made to vndergoe the literall sense, then any of the rest whatsoeuer.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 38.39.I doe therefore sticke so fast to the bare letter, especiallie in this, aboue all the rest: because these words of entring in, and of going out, are neuer vsed in the spirituall sense, but of­ten, yea vsuallie in the other.

Orthodoxus.

The best is, that which you so boldlie auouch, is but one Doctors opinion: yea and (which more is) such a Doctor be­sides, as is not yet of that credit, that men may say, autos epha, Doctor Exorcistes hath spoken it. [...]. ipse dixit. Howbeit, because (in this [Page 17] point especially) you sticke so fast to the bare letter alone, & that also, of a verie set purpose (I feare) to pull in (as it were by the eares) your sensles opinion of essentiall possessions: I pray you make knowne vnto vs your meaning, concerning this your supposed essential possession of diuels. My meaning is this, doe tell vs plainely, whether wee must vnderstand the same of a diuell, essentiallie inherent in the partie possessed: or, of the partie himselfe, essentiallie inherent within the diuell?

Exorcistes.

A verie absurd, and sensles demaund: for who (by the essen­tiall possession of diuels) did euer vnderstand the partie him­selfe. essentiallie inherent within the diuell: but, rather the con­trarie?

Orthodoxus.

The demaund is not so absurd, or so senslesse as your selfe suppose: but, verie pertinent to the timelie encounting with that your absurd and sensles opinion of essentiall possessions, which you endeauour (with tooth and naile) to canonize for currant, by the onely bare literall sense of the diuell his entring in, and going out. To the end therefore you may the sooner conceiue the reason of this my demaund; I pray you (sith you relie so sore vpon the bare letter it selfe) let me heare in what sort you interpret this text of Scripture. Videl. There was in the Synagogue a man, Mark. 1.23. and 5.2. [...]. en pneumati acathartoo. The bare literall sense of that place, I verilie beleeue is this: a man, in spiritu impuro, that is, in an vncleane spirit: and so the vulgar, and Montanus interpret the same. Now then (if I should vrge you hardlie with the bare literall sense) who doth not plain­ly perceiue, how that I might (from the bare letter of this text) as boldlie conclude the partie possessed, to be essentiallie inherent within the diuell, as your selfe (by any other like text) may conclude the contrarie.

Exorcistes.

Not so.Erasmus, in Mark. 1.23. Marloratus, [...] Mark. 1 23. For (howsoeuer your selfe do insist vpon the bare letter it selfe) Erasmus, and Marlorate, they interpret that place in this sort. There was in the Synagogue, a man, obnoxius spiritui immundo, that is, subiect to an vncleane spirit.

Orthodoxus.

That interpretation of theirs, doth rather explane the true sense of the place: then expresse the proprietie of the verie [Page 18] wordes themselues, put downe in that place. And so, if that interpretation be simplie taken: then (howsoeuer the same doth truely deliuer the true natural sense of the place it selfe) your pretended bare literall sense, falles flat to the ground.

Exorcistes.

Tremellius, in Mark. [...].23. Theod. Beza, in Mark. 1.23.Well, be it so as you say: but, what thinke you of Tremel­lius and Beza, who ioyntly expound it thus. There was in the Synagogue, a man, in quo erat spiritus impurus: in whom was an vncleane spirit. This interpretation of theirs, not only ac­cords with the maine purpose of the holie ghost in that place: but (which mor [...] is) it makes verie directlie, for the essenti­all possession of diuels.

Orthodoxus.

Tremellius, and Beza, they (in deed) do interpret the place as you say: therein, respecting rather the very matter it selfe, then the bare meaning of words expressing that matter. So then, not onelie Erasmus and Montanus, but Tremellius also and Beza, they all (the two last especiallie) doe flatlie for­sake the bare letter in expounding that place: which direct­ly ouerthroweth that your presumptuous and singular con­ceit, concerning the continuall taking of these words (en­tring in, and going out) but onlie in the literall, and neuer in the spirituall sense. Besides that, your Geneuah translator, hee tyes himselfe, neyther to the strict letter, with Erasmus and Montanus, neyther yet to the exposition of Tremellius and Be­za: but simplie sets downe such a sense of the place, as the propriety of our English tongue, doth most aptly affoord, say­ing thus.See the Gene­uah translation, in Mark. 1.23. There was in the Synagogue, a man that had an vn­cleane spirit. The which, as it doth plainely expresse the very true purpose of the holie Ghost in that place: so doth it digresse verie little or nothing at all, from the naturall proprietie of the bare letter it selfe. Although notwithstanding, the same hath nothing in shew, that may make for your sensles opi­nion of essentiall possessions: but rather the contrarie, as may plainely appeare.

Exorcistes.

Yea, but Tremellius and Beza, expounding it purposelie thus (in whom was an vncleane spirit) it cannot be, but that by the words in whom they did vndoubtedly vnderstand an es­sentiall inherency of Satā, in the very body of the party possessed.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 19]

If that which you say, were their meaning in deed: yet then also, euen by this their said meaning they doe flatly o­uerthrow your idle assertion, concerning the onlie bare lite­rall sense of entring in, and going out. Sith, howsoeuer they (in expounding that place) doe principallie respect the onelie true naturall sense and scope of the Scripture: yet the bare li­terall sense is vndoubtedly this: namely, a man in an vncleane spirit. The which (you see) is flat opposite to that your sup­posed essentiall inherencie of a diuell in the partie possessed: and, (by the onlie bare letter it selfe) it rather implieth the con­trarie: namelie, that the possessed himselfe, is essentially inhe­rent within the diuell. Notwithstanding all this, howsoeuer Tremellius and Beza for the former respects doe expound it thus, a man, in whom was an vncleane spirit: they vnderstand not thereby, any essentiall possession, but, onlie an effectuall o­peration of Satan, Theod. litz Marc. 1. [...] in so manie especially, as are slauishlie sub­iected vnto him. And so, Maister Beza (by a verie apt re­semblance) interprets his meaning thus. Like as saith hee, when wee see one sicke of a feuer, wee commonly say in our vulgar tongue, the man is now in a feuer, though wee meane nothing els thereby, but that he is held with a feuer, because to be in a feuer in our vulgar tongue, Vt, in febre c▪ est febre ten [...] sic, in spiritu esse, est spiritu teneri. is nothing els with the Latines, but to be held with a feuer: so surelie, to be in a spirit with the Grecians, is nothing els with the Latines, but to be held of a spirit, that is, to be slauishly subiected vnto the ef­fectuall working power of a spirit. That this was the onely mea­ning of Beza, it appeareth plainely in Marke; where hee doth thus expound himselfe,Theod. Beza. Mark. 5.2. Ideo dici quemquam in spiritu, quod, eum spiritus quasi inclusum, tenet, ac deuinctum, that is: Therefore may any man be said to be in a spirit: because the spirit doth hold him inclosed, and fast bound as it were, by his effectuall power. So then, Maister Beza (you see) hee speaketh nothing at all for your idle supposed essentiall possession, but rather the contrarie: vnderstanding by that which we call the possession of diuels, none other thing els, but an effectual wo [...]king power of Satan, in such as he doth actuallie afflict, or torment.

Exorcistes.

Yea, but the Euangelist Luke (reporting that selfesame hi­story) puts it down in these proper termes. namely. There was [Page 20] in the Synagogue, Luk. 4.33. a man that had a spirit of an vncleane diuell: which must needes be vnderstood of essentiall possessions. For, how could that man possiblie haue a spirit of an vncleane di­uell: vnlesse the said Spirit were essentiallie in him? And so the vulgar accordinglie, verie fitlie, and significantly expounds that place.

Orthodoxus.

The vulgar I confesse, it doth truely expresse the true sense of the place: but, obserues not the proprietie of wordes put downe in that place. Howbeit, the originall (in deed) is thus. There was in the Synagogue, Luk. 4.33. [...]. id est, habens spiritum Demonij impuri. a man, [...]. i. habens spiritum daemonii impuri, that is, hauing a spirit of an vncleane diuell. And so, the Syriack, Erasmus, Montanus, and the Geneuah translates the same. The which translation of theirs, is vndoubtedly tolerable: especiallie, if, by the word [...], that is, a spirit, you vnderstand not the simple essence, but, the onely impulsion, motion, or inspiration of the spirit. Ac­cording to which sense, the word spirit is vsuallie obserued; both in the olde and new Testament. For, first in the old it is said of Daniel, Dan. 4.5.6. and 5.11.12. that he had the spirit of the holy Gods: that is, a diuine, and holy inspiration of God. Againe, in the new Testa­ment, the Ambassadours of Antichrist, they are said to be the spirits of diuels: Reuel. 16.24. that is, men of most diuelish spirits. And, e­uen so (in that place which you quote from the Euangelist Luke) where it is said,Luk. 4.33. There was in the Synagogue, a man, ha­uing the spirit of an vncleane diuell: the meaning is, a diuelished vncleane spirit, and so, the sense of that place is currant and sound: otherwise, if by these words (the spirit of an vncleane diuell) you doe essentiallie vnderstand the very spirit it selfe, according to the onely bare purport of the letter: who seeth not then, how groslie you distinguish a spirit and a diuell; ma­king them, two distinct, or seuerall essences, the one begetting the other,Theod. Beza, in Luc. 4.33. Est hebraea ge­ [...]inatio. which is monstrous absurd. Howbeit, to interpret that place, both according to the true naturall sense thereof, and as neer to the very letter it selfe as may be: I would take the words of that text, to be onely but an hebraicall iterating, or doubling of one, and the selfesame matter, to make it more notoriouslie, and expreslie apparant. And this hebraisme (I assure you) is very ordinarie, and vsuall throughout the old Testament. As, first in the Psalmes, where Dauid saith [Page 21] thus.Psalm. 40.2. [...]. i. é luto coeni; pr [...] luto coenoso. Dan. 12 2. [...]. i. in terra pulue­ris: pro puluer terrestri. Habens Daemo­niacum spiri­tum impurum. The Lord brought me out of the horrible pit, out of (mit­tith hauen) the clay of mire, that is, the mirie clay, or the most deepe mire. Againe, in Daniel, where it is said, and many of them that sleepe, admath-gnaphar: in the earth of dust, that is, in the dustie earth, shall awake. And euen so, in this place of Luke where it is said, there was a man which had a spirit of an vncleane Diuell, that is, a spirit, very diuelishlie addicted to all manner of vncleannes. Not vnderstanding by the word spirit in that place, the simple essence: but the motion, inspiration, or instigation of the spirit, as the Geneuah Bible very aptly ex­pounds it in the marginall note. By all the premisses then, it is very apparantly euident, that those words of the entring in, and going out of the diuell, are spoken onely but metaphori­callie: or that else (because you so stricktlie restraine those words to the onely bare literall sense) we may also (by vr­ging the bare letter vpon you) as boldlie conclude the posses­sed man, to be essentiallie inherent within the diuell, as the diuell himselfe, to be essentiallie inherent within the possessed man, both which to affirme, were monstrous absurd. So then, from any thing hetherto heard; you cannot possiblie con­clude the essentiall possession of diuels. Both, because no such thing is apparant in all the Scriptures: and for that also, those your pretended effects of such a possession, they may very well be wrought by the diuell, though he be neuer essen­tiallie within the possessed, as in our seuenth Dialogue hath been shewed at large.

Exorcistes.

The diuell (I confesse) may mightelie torment and vexe a man,See D. Doctrin. pag. 2. being but onely without him: howbeit, he cannot pos­siblie dispose, either of the whole, or any part of mans bodie, vnles he be essentiallie in him.

Orthodoxus.

This is to too absurd.2. Tim. 2.26. For, if the wicked are held captiues by Satan, at his owne will and pleasure: is it impossible (thinke you) that he at his pleasure (so farre forth I meane, as his Commission extends) should dispose of the whole, or any part of their bodies, by an onely effectuall operation, without any essentiall inherencie in them? Matth. 4.5.8. The diuell (by the permission of God) in those his sundrie transportings of Christ, did after a sort, dispose of the bodie of Christ: although yet, not essenti­allie [Page 22] inherent in the bodie of Christ.Ierem. 20.14. Iob. 3.1.2. 2. Sam. 16.7. 2. Chro. 32.17. Iohn. 13.2. Acts. 5.3. Rom. 6.16.19. The diuell hee disposed the tongues of Ieremie, Iob, Shimei, and Rabshakeh to cursing and rayling: though neuer essentiallie, in any of their tongues. The diuell, he put into the hart of Iudas to betray his maister: yet, not essentiallie in Iudas his hart. The diuell, he filled Ananias his hart with a lie: and yet not essentiallie in Ananias his hart. The vnregenerate, they giue ouer the members of their bodies, as in­struments of vnrighteousnes to sinne: yea, euen according to the disposing of Satan himselfe, Eph. 2.2. who worketh effectuallie in euerie of them: although yet, he be neuer essentially in any one of their members. Briefly, all those the aforesaid actions, or passions pre­tended to be done in deed, by those your supposed Demoni­akes (namelie wallowing, foaming, rending, tearing, crying, gna­shing of teeth, leauing for dead, and so forth) they are not (as the simplest man liuing may see) so supernaturall strange, or impossible: but, that the like, and euerie way, as strange things are eftsoones effected by meere naturall causes, and diseases (as our seauenth Dialogue declareth) and that also, without any operation of the diuell essentiallie in them.

Exorcistes.

See D. Do­ctrine, pag. 2. Mat. 12.43.44. Luk. 11.24.25.If the diuell may fullie effect as much in a man being onlie but without him, as if he were essentiallie within him: why doth hee then so earnestly desire to be essentiallie inherent in anie mans body?

Orthodoxus.

Its a verie phantasticall, or an idle conceit, to dreame that the diuell hath such a desire: I meane, to be essentiallie inherent in any mans bodie, Luk 22.32. [...]. Det. 5.8. notwithstanding his inexorable desire to doe the most mischiefe he may. I make no question, but that the diuell desired fullie as much against Iob, as he did euer a­gainst any, either since, or before: yea, and this I hold fur­ther, that the Lord (intending purposelie, to portraiture in the person of Iob, Iam. 5.11. an absolute patterne of perfect patience) gaue the diuell as much power ouer Iob, as ouer anie besides. And yet,Iob. 1.11. & 2.5 Iob. 1.12. & 2.6. neither did the diuel so much as desire, nor the Lord once permit him any such essentiall possession in the body of Iob, as your selfe (in these your pretended Demoniakes) would beare vs in hand.1. King. 22.21.22. Againe, the diuell, hee desired to become a lying spirit in the mouth of Ahab his Prophets; yet, hee neuer desired to be essentiallie inherent in any of their tongues. 2 Chron. 18.20.21. Nei­ther [Page 23] will those your quotations from Matthew and Luke: en­force so fond an assertion as you seeme to auouch. For, that desire of Satans reentrie expressed there, being but an allego­ricall demonstration of the Iewes accursed condition, who wilfullie reiect the exhibited graces of God in Iesus Christ: (as appeares by the application therof) it may at no hand be possiblie tentered to these your pretended essentiall possessi­ons. Matth. 12.4. Both, because our Sauiour intended no such matter at all, in anie of those places: and for that the essentiall possessi­ons of diuels, is only a deuise, and dreame of your owne. But, be it supposed the same were purposelie spoken of Satans possession in men: yet, the same being a Metaphor (as we shew­ed before) it onelie implyeth the diuell his earnest desire of an e [...]ectuall reoperation, but no one desire of any essentiall re­possession, because he neuer had anie such possession at all.

Exorcistes.

If the diuell had not been essentiallie inherent in the parties dispossessed by Christ,See D. Doctrin [...] pag 2. to procure in them such supenaturall effects: how could those selfesame effects of their possessions then, be any certaine true signes of their essentiall possessions now? which (that they are) were to too absurd to denie.

Orthodoxus.

Whatsoeuer you would haue vs fondlie imagine concer­ning those your supposed true signes of essentiall possession: See D. Detecti­on. pag. 34. &. M. Darel doth confidentlie auouch, that Christ neuer ordai­ned any such meanes, whereby we may certainelie discerne of those your supposed essentiall possessions. For, then we should haue it vndoubtedlie recorded in some part of the Scrip­tures: but, such an ordinance there, hee dare boldlie auouch there is none. Moreouer, what one of those your supposed supernaturall effects are you able to name, which the diuell cannot possiblie accomplish: but, by such a supposed essen­tiall inherencie in the possessed mans bodie? Againe, those selfe­same effects which the Scriptures entreate of, they are onelie recorded as meere matters of fact: but, no established perpe­tuall meanes, to discerne soundlie of all future essentiall posses­sions. Brieflie, be it supposed, that those selfesame effects, were then, and are now at this present, the vndoubted true signes of Satans possession: yet were they at no time, the certaine true signes of any such his supposed essentiall inherencie in the [Page 24] possessed mans bodie, as you would beare vs in hand.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 2.If those vexations, or torments, were not the vndoubted ef­fects of some diuell essentiallie inherent in the bodies of men at the least: then surelie, the common people of the Iewes (being able none otherwaies els to iudge of Demoniakes, but by those their vexations or torments) they had no certaine true meanes to discerne of essentiall possessions, which were to too absurd to imagine.

Orthodoxus.

How absurde so euer such an assertion may happilie seeme in your senselesse eyes, it is too much presumption for your selfe to auouch as you doe, at a blinde aduen­ture: that, the Iewes (by anie supposed effects of prece­dent possessions) had then, any certaine established meanes to discerne soundlie of their present Demoniakes. For first, if there were in Israell no such Demoniakes at all, before the comming of Christ: there needed no such supposed meanes, to discerne the essentiall possession of diuels. I will not certainelie auouch (although it might perhaps bee probablie disputed) that, till a little before the com­ming of Christ, there were no such possessions at all in Is­raell.

Exorcistes.

No such possessions at all in Israell? What say you then to King Saul, of whom the storie reporteth, that hee was vext with an euill spirit: 1. Sam. 16.14. was not he (I pray you) essentiallie possest of a diuell?

Orthodoxus.

King Saul (I confesse) he might haue some extraordinarie iudgement vpon him, and yet, neither essentiallie, nor actually possessed of Satan: in such sort especiallie, as we vnderstand of possessions, and as they were supernaturallie apparant in the dayes of Christ.

Exorcistes.

1. Sam. 16.14.O yes sir, the verie text it selfe, it telleth vs plainelie, that he was vexed with an euill spirit, which is the very phrase that the Euangelist obserueth in the new Testament, saying thus: haue mercie on mee, Matth. 15.22. for my daughter is pitifully vexed with a diuell.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 25]

Saul might be straunglie vexed, though not essentiallie pos­sessed with either spirit or diuell. For howsoeuer the word (vexed) be the very phrase in deed, which our English transla­tor obserueth in the old and new Testament: yet doth not that selfesame phrase expresse to the full, the naturall proprietie of the originall word, put downe either in the old or new testa­ment, as may plainely appeare to such as indifferently exa­mine the same. For first, in the new testament, the word which the Euangelist obserueth there, [...]. Matth. 15.22. Tremel. ibidem Pagnin. ibidem Beza, ibidem. Erasm. ibidem. Vulgar. ibidem. Castell. ibidem. Montan. ibid. Daimonizetai: the which Tremellius translates thus; pessime agitur, is grieuously tormen­ted: Pagnine and Beza thus, malè vexatur, is pitifullie vexed: Erasmus thus, miserè agitatur, is miserablie disquieted: the vulgar thus, malè vexatur, is mischieuouslie troubled: Castellio thus, est furiata, is become starke mad: and Montanus thus, Daemonizatur, is shrewdlie diuellished. The which last, doth more naturallie discouer the proper sense of the word: al­though yet, no one of them all doe vnderstand the same (you see) of essentiall possessions, but onlie, of the actuall vexations extraordinarilie inflicted by Satan. And, as not in the new: so, neyther in the old testament, doth our English word (vex­ed) so fitlie expresse the naturall proprietie of the originall word there as were to be wished.1. Sam. 16.14. [...]. id est. Affectus est passionibus, seu perturbationi­bus: Exterritus est vehementer: Exagitatus est, vt Auenarius: 1. Sam. 16.14. Montan. ibid. Vatab. ibidem. [...]. Vulgar. ibidem. Pagnin. ibidem. Munster, ibid. Tremel. ibidem. Septuagint. [...]. For the word it selfe (in the Hebrew text is bagnath: that is to say, hee is so affected with passions and perturbations of the minde or body, and so vehement­lie dismaied and disquieted with a furious madnes, or feare: as he is in a manner, become abominable, and most vile among men. That this is the true sense of the word, may plainely be ga­thered, not onlie from the verie proprietie of the word it selfe, but also by conference of seuerall translators. For first, Mon­tanus, and Vatablus, they translate it thus. Spiritus malus à Ie­houah, vubignathattu: id est terruit eum, that is, an euill Spirit from the Lord, did fearefullie fright him: the vulgar thus, exa­gitabat eum, moued him: Pagnine thus, turbauit eum, disturbed him, Munsterus thus, stupefecit eum, astonished him: Tremellius thus, perturbabat eum, disordered him, and so forth. By all which it is verie apparant, that the originall word importeth no essentiall possessions, but onely some mentall passions: and that therefore it was, that the Grecians from this word ba­gnath, doe draw the words petho, and pathenomai, that is, to [Page 26] endure the affections of minde or body. [...]. Also, the wordes, pathe, pathos, pathema, that is, passion, affection, or perturbation of minde. Because, passion (in deed) is nothing els but a perturba­tion of minde, vnnaturallie opposing it selfe to reason: such as is feare, anger, a vehement furie, or some other inordinate commoti­on of the minds affections, not subiecting it selfe to the orderly rule of reason. By all which it is very apparant, that those strange vexations, which our English translatour reporteth of Saul [...] they were only but mentall passions, and no essentiall possessions of either spirit or diuell.

Exorcistes.

Howsoeuer you may mince the originall wordes, I can­not be perswaded, but that Saul was essentiallie possessed of Satan.

Orthodoxus.

That may not possiblie be. Both because (the word bag­nath, importing only but mental passions) the possession then, it must necessarilie be inherent in the possessed mans minde, which were to too absurde to imagine: and for that also, the word bagnath it selfe, may at no hand endure such a violent sense, as may plainely appeare by the orderlie conference of this one, with some other places of Scripture, where the selfesame word is also in vse. As for example, Iob, intending purposelie to stay the rash and intemperate iudgement of those his three friends,Iob. 13.11. [...] Septuagint. [...]. terrebit vos. by recalling their minds to some timelie con­sideration of God his vnspeakable maiesty, he telleth them thus, excellentia eius, an non tebagneth, id est, terrebit vos? which we may not thus translate at any hand, the excellencie of Iehouah, shall it not be essentiallie inherent in euerie of you, for that were to too absurde: but rather thus, the excellencie of Iehouah, shall it not mightily amaze your mindes: that is, shall not the timely consideration of his incomprehensible Maie­stie, be able to breed such an astonishment or feare in euerie of your hearts, as may make you forthwith to desist from those your rash and presumptuous iudgements, which more especiallie concerne my present condition?Psalm. 18.4. [...] Septuagint. [...] 2. Sam. 22.5. [...]. So likewise the Prophet Dauid, declaring what griefes he endured, before he was fullie established king, saith thus in effect. The sorrowes of death compassed mee about, & torrentes nequitiae (iebagna­thuni) id est, terrebant me, and the floudes of wickednes astoni­shed, [Page 29] or made me afraide: Iob. 33.7. Hest. 7.6. 1. Chro. 21.30 Dan. 8.17. And not thus; the floudes of wickednes did essentiallie enter into my mind, for, that were to too absurd. The like vse of the word bagnath you may see in sundry pla­ces besides. By this then, it is apparantly euident, that see­ing this word bagnath, in no one text, els may possiblie im­port any such essentiall inherencie in eyther bodie or minde (as your selfe doth imagine) but signifieth only, some mentall a­stonishments, perturbations, or passions: you may not (without manifest violence to the originall word) vnderstand this one place of Saul, of any essentiall possessions by either spirit or di­uell, whatsoeuer your English phrase imports for the same.

Exorcistes.

Well sir, whether you translate it a vexing or an astoni­shing, the text telleth vs plainely, that those vexations, or a­stonishments of Saul, they were vndoubtedly effected by an euill spirit of the Lord: and must therefore, be necessarilie vn­derstoode of some one diuell or other,1. Sam. 16.14 essentiallie inherent within him.

Orthodoxus.

That followeth not. For albeit we should graunt by the way, those selfe same astonishments or frights of Saul, to be some immediate worke of the diuell, which will neuer be pro­ued: yet must those the aforesaid astonishments, be onely vn­derstoode of some actuall operation, and not of any essentiall possession, as may plainely appeare by the opposition of spirits put downe in the text. For consider I beseech you, the text, it telleth vs plainelie,1. Sam. 16.14. that the spirit of the Lord departed from Saul: and an euill spirit of the Lord astonished him. From the which opposition of spirits, I reason thus. The euill spirit of the Lord, it so astonished Saul, as the good spirit of the Lord possest him before. But the good spirit, it onely possessed him effectiuelie, Pet. Mart. in 1. Sam. 16.14. not essentiallie: therefore, the euill spirit, it a­stonished him onely effectiuelie, not essentiallie. Thus then you see, that the very opposition of spirits put downe in the text, it striketh starke dead, your idle conceits of essentiall possessions. Howbeit, as by the good spirit of the Lord we are onely to vnderstand the good graces and gifts of the spirit, which were wrought before in the heart of Saul; namely, a principall spi­rite, a spirit of prophesie, and such other good gifts: so like­wise, by the euill spirit of the Lord, we must vnderstand the [Page 28] bad disposition and qualities of Saul his corrupted spirit, which being then made destitute of the graces of God, and euen vt­terlie left to it selfe: did follow the sway of it owne inclina­tion, which made him forthwith astonished, fearefull, furious, yea, vtterly disordered in his iudgement or reason. And there­fore, this affliction (you see) it must onely be vnderstoode of some mentall passions, and not of any essentiall possessions.

Exorcistes.

I cannot beleeue for all this, but that Saul was essentiallie possest of a diuell.

Orthodoxus.

Why man the verie effects themselues which followed his said astonishment, doe flatlie conclude the contrarie. For, neither was he blind, nor deafe, nor dumbe, nor lame, nor sens­les, nor endued with supernatural knowledge or strength, which (you say,) are the vndoubted true signes of essentiall possessi­ons. Neyther was he at any time hurtful vnto him selfe, or dan­gerous to any one of his Courtiours: but onlie malcontented, amazed, astonished, and euen mad in his minde, so oft as he but onlie remembred the glorie of Dauid among the daughters of Israell: 1. Sam. 18.8, 9, 10. And therefore, there was in him, no essentiall pos­session of spirit, or diuell: but some temporarie disordered per­turbations or passions of minde, his iudgement or reason being vtterly distempered, by a finall depriuation of the graces of God.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir, his certaine dispossession doth plainely argue an vndoubted essentiall possession of some spirit or diuell at the least.1. Sam. 16.23. For the text telleth vs, that when Dauid but plaied before Saul with his harpe: Saul was forthwith refreshed and eased, for the euill spirit departed from him.

Orthodoxus.

Why man, the manner of this his deliuerance, it doth ar­gue the contrarie of that which you say. For tell me I pray you, hath the sound of an harpe any force at all to expell a diuell essentiallie inherent in any mans bodie? This we hold for a certaine, that no created meanes may effectiuely extend it selfe to the powerfull effecting of any such supernaturall acti­ons, as doe any way concerne the essentiall dispossessing of spi­rits, and diuels, the which point (in our eight Dialogue) is [Page 29] handled at large. And therefore the melodious sound of Da­uids harpe, it might onelie asswage (for the present) those me­lancholike passions which mightily swaied in Saul his minde: but it could not possiblie haue cured the essentiall possession of spirits or diuels, if any such, had bin extant in Saul. Other­wise, it would consequentlie follow, that men might fiddle forth spirits and diuels from parties possessed, and so there should be a necessarie vse of pipers and fidlers for the timelie dispossessing of these your pretended Demoniakes. As for Saul (howsoeuer his bad humour was eased a time) it is verie ap­parant hee was neuer perfectly cured thereof to the day of his death: and therefore not essentiallie possessed. Thus then, you may see it apparantly euident, both by the proprietie of the originall word: by the plaine opposition of spirits put downe in the text: by the effects themselues which followed of Sauls astonishment: and by the manner of curing that selfe­same maladie, that Saul was neuer essentiallie possest with ei­ther spirit or diuell, and so consequentlie, that (till a little be­fore the comming of Christ) there were no possessions at all in Israell. Yea, and thus much also, that generall admiration of all the people,Matth. 9.33. Mark. 1.27. and 2.13. Luke 4.36. which concerned especiallie those selfe same primarie dispossessions performed by Christ, may seeme to im­port; saying thus: the like was neuer seene in Israell.

Exorcistes.

That is, the like manner of curing: not the like matter of essentiall possessing.

Orthodoxus.

If there had beene the like matter of essentiall possessing be­fore the comming of Christ, but, not the like manner of cu­ring the same: then, tell vs (I pray you) what manner of cu­ring they had in those dayes, I meane, by what meanes they were cured before the comming of Christ. I hope you will not say they were cured by physicall meanes. Neyther may you for shame, auouch their cure to be wrought by that your supposed new ordinance of prayer and fasting; because, such an ordinance (before the comming of Christ) was neuer establisht, D. Detection▪ pag. 34. and so much also, you doe else where affirme your owne selfe. If therefore the manner of curing your supposed possessions then, was neyther by physicall meanes, nor by praier and fasting: it followeth necessarilie, that their said cure, it [Page 30] was then also effected by some supernaturall, and miraculous meanes. Now then, if the cure of those your supposed possessi­ons before the comming of Christ, were euerie of them su­pernaturall, strange and miraculous, how can it be possiblie true which the Euangelist reporteth here, saying thus, the like was neuer seene in Israell? sith, the miraculous expelling of spirits and diuels, Matth. 9.33. Luke 4.36. had beene in euerie age of the world, euen equallie admirable, straunge and most meruellous? Againe, sith Christ is in deed,Gen. 3.15. that promised seed of the woman, who (in his owne proper person) was actuallie to breake the Serpents head: it is meruellous probable, that the eternall father (euen in his foreseeing wisdome) had purposelie determined (from before all eternities) that the primarie, and first actuall en­countring with Satan his actuall possossion, should be primarily and actuallie accomplished by Christ himselfe, in his owne person first; and that therefore, this temporarie iudgement of Satan his actuall possession, was neuer actuallie inflicted vpon anie, before the comming of Christ. Besides that, if there had beene possessions and dispossessions from the beginning of the world,D. Doctrine, pag. 27. as your selfe doth else where auouch: the same then (no doubt) being so fearefull a iudgement, would haue beene eftsoones foretold and threatned the Iewes, by some of the Prophets at least, for an especiall part of the counsell of God, as well as many other speciall iudgements of lesse moment by much:Act. 20.27. and so, euen those their propheticall predictions and denuntiations of that so fearefull a iudgement (being so neces­sarie for the Church of God) it would no doubt, haue beene as carefullie registred for the succeeding ages to the end of the world, as any other like iudgement of God whatsoeuer. Moreouer, if there had beene such a miraculous dispossessing of diuels, any long time before the comming of Christ, then surelie, the same vndoubtedlie (being such admirable mat­ters of fact) they would in some one booke or other through­out the old testament, haue beene most carefullie recorded for all posterities: sith, many other miracles (of lesse importance by much) are so precisely put downe in euerie place: name­lie the miraculous deliuerance of Israell: the straung wonders in Egypt: Exod. 14.29. Exod. 7. and 8. and 9.10. Exod. 14.28, 29 Exod. 16. and 17 Exod. 19. & 20 Iosh. 10.11.12. Iudg. 14. & 15. & 16. 1. Sam. 5. & 17. 1. King. 17. & 18 2. King. 5. & 6 & 7. & 8. & 1 [...] in the red sea: in the wildernes: in mount Sinah, and els where: the wonders recorded in the bookes of Ioshuah, Iudges, Samuell, of the Kings, the Chronicles, and other histori­call [Page 31] bookes, wherein all such admirable matters of fact, are purposelie put downe and recorded. All which precedent mi­raculous actions, being in some of those bookes at the least, so exactlie registred by the spirit of God: it is not to be doubt­ed, but that the miraculous dispossessing of diuels (if any such then) would haue beene likewise most carefullie recorded, as matters, eyther actuallie, or typicallie performed. But, no such authenticall record is any where extant in all the Canonicall scriptures: and therefore, it is verie probable, there was then no such miraculous dispossessing of diuels before the comming of Christ.

Exorcistes.

Howsoeuer, such a miraculous manner of curing then, be not actuallie recorded, it is likelie the same was typicallie sha­dowed forth in the brazen Serpent. Numb. 21, 8, 9. Because that Serpent was a liuelie figure of Christ himselfe: who was actuallie to cure the deadlie sting of that infernall Serpent the diuell.

Orthodoxus.

Be it so as you say. Yet, that brazen Serpent, it onelie prefi­gured the effectuall curing of the serpentine sting of sinne, and not the power of Christ his actuall expelling of diuels from out of the bodies of men: vnlesse happily you imagine, that, as all the Elect were effectuallie wounded with the serpentine sting of sinne: so were they also essentiallie possessed with diuels inhe­rently dwelling within their bodies. Besides that, the brazen ser­pent was onlie a shadow of that whereof Christ was the bodie: and therefore by that reason, there could be onelie a bare shadow, but no essentiall possessions, or dispossessions before the comming of Christ. Furthermore, if there had (in deed) bin essentiall possessions before the comming of Christ: what then could Christ himselfe haue done more at his comming, then manie others had effected before him? Besides that, if there had beene such miraculous dispossessions before, then surelie, though Christ at his comming, had also (for the declaration of his deitie) dispossessed ten thousand Demoniakes moe then he did: yet, this one exception had bin verie forcible against him from time to time: namelie, that many others before him had performed as much in effect. And therefore no rea­son, that (for such a miraculous dispossessing of diuels) they should esteeme him to be rather the Messiah, then any of the [Page 32] rest. Moreouer, if there had beene any such miraculous dis­possessings before, then had not that beene true which our Sa­uiour speakes of himselfe,Iohn 15.24. saying thus: If I had not done works among them which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now haue they seene and hated, not onely mee, but also my father. Brieflie, if there had beene such dispossessions before the com­ming of Christ: how then should our Sauiour himselfe (by such his powerfull expelling of diuels) haue beene so particu­larlie reputed for that sonne of Dauid, Matth. 12.23. and 15.25. Psalm. 91.13. who especiallie was to walke vpon the Lion and Adder, and triumphantlie to tread the young Lion, and Dragon vnder his feet?

Exorcistes.

Whatsoeuer you say, I will neuer be perswaded, but that there were dispossessions before the comming of Christ.

Orthodoxus.

Well, be it supposed there were such miraculous disposses­sings in Israell, before the comming of Christ: yet is it to too absurde, to auouch that those extraordinarie effects which apparantlie brake forth in former Demoniakes, are purpose­lie recorded for infallible ordinarie meanes, or signes, to dis­cerne soundlie and truelie of all the succeeding Demoniakes. Both,See D. Detection, pag. 110. pag. 138. pag. 99. pag. 162. because wee are no where foretold by the Lord (your selfe also, els where auouching the contrarie) that diuels should preciselie obserue but one, and the selfesame methode, or order, in tormenting the parties possessed: and, for that also there was then no such vrgent necessitie of any such meanes, or signes to demonstrate Demoniakes. Detection. p. 54. For first, respecting our Sauiour himselfe, all such demonstratiue signes had bin meere­lie superfluous: because he verie well knew the parties posses­sed without the weake help of any such sensible, or humane experiments. As also, the people they very well might, and did also vndoubtedly know the parties possessed: partlie, from the often reuelations of the parties themselues, partlie, from the deliberate determinations of sundrie their approued Phisiti­ons, who duelie examining the order and manner of the pos­sessed mans fits, could certainely tell them, that the same must necessarily proceed from some supernaturall cause. Part­lie also from the outrage of Satan more at the presence of Christ,See Darels De­tection, pag. 113 then euer before: acknowledging him withall, to be the sonne of the liuing God. And, partlie also from the common [Page 33] peoples proper experience: who hauing throughly experimen­ted all physicall helpes,Mar. 5.25. Mar. 9.18. Luk. 8.42. and finding such ordinarie or naturall meanes ineffectual for working the cure, were driuen to con­clude of some other efficient, then the common course of na­ture could possiblie affoord. Neither did the parties, who brought the Demoniakes to Christ, purposelie relate those fearefull vexations, as the onelie infallible meanes whereby they truely discerned the party his vndoubted possession, Mat. 17.14.16. Mar. 9.17. Luk. 9.38.40. Mat. 15.22. which you very fondly imagine: but, they reported them rather as forcible motions, to incline and stirre vp our Sauiours heart vnto some timelie compassionable care for their timely dis­possession, as plainely appeareth. Besides this, the inference you bring from that Cananitish woman whom you quote in your margine: doth rather maime, then mannage your cause in question. For, she was none of the common people of the Iewes, but a Christian proselyte: verie truely instructed concerning a sauing knowledge in Christ,Mat. 15.22. as may plainely appeare by her holy confession. And therefore, there is no doubt but that selfesame Spirit which had instructed her soule so soundlie before, concerning the vndoubted true meanes for her daughters deliuerance: had also foreshewed her as soundly be­fore, the verie true nature of her daughters maladie, from the which she was then to be miraculouslie deliuered by Christ. Moreouer, if the common people of the Iewes could not pos­siblie discerne of the parties possessed, but, by some such sensi­ble effects or signes, as they had sensiblie experimented in their precedent Demoniakes: Mat. 9.32.12.22. Luk. 11.14. then, how were those other Demoni­akes discerned, of whō no such sensible signes at al are recorded in Scripture? Brieflie, your pretended obiection concerning the Iewes, doth not concludentlie auouch, that eyther the Iewes themselues did vndoubtedly hold an essentiall possession in those their Demoniakes: or, that otherwaies it was need­lesse for them to seeke vnto Christ for his help, all the while the diuell did but outwardlie afflict the partie possessed. No, no, the manner of their speech importeth rather the contrarie of that which your selfe doe affirme: namely, that they (hold­ing onlie but an outward vexation by Satan, in those their Demoniakes) did verie earnestly importune our Sauiour Christ for their speedie deliuerance. So then, that your idle conceit concerning some certaine true meanes or signes, for [Page 34] the Iewes to discerne their Demoniakes by:See D. Detecti­on. pag. 99. pag. 100. page. 138. page. 162. D. Detection. page. 54. is meerely ridi­culous. Both, because those your supposed meanes or signes, are onely recorded as meere matters of fact: and for that al­so, no certaine rules to discerne of possessions may certainly be concluded, from such vncertaine effects. Sith, as straunge and as admirable matters as any you name: may, and doe eft­soones also proceed from the onlie operations and corrupti­ons of nature, as our seauenth Dialogue declareth.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, page. 3.Not so, for these actions or passions I speake of: they are vndoub­tedly such as surmount the whole faculty, skil & power of nature.

Physiologus.

Giue me leaue (M. Orthodoxus) to argue this point. Come on Exorcistes, rehearse some few of the straungest of those your supposed actions or passions: which so highly surmoun­ted the whole facultie, skill and power of nature.

Exorcistes.

See D. Detecti­on. page. 100. page. 136.With verie good will. First therefore, the youngman (ha­uing pinnes thrust verie deepe into his legges, and other parts of his bodie) he was without sense or feeling thereof: a thing vtterlie impossible to nature.

Physiologus.

Hee himselfe hath eftsoones deposed, and confessed since then, that he hath felt the pinnes, and plucked them forth: although (for the present) he whollie dissembled the paine, as if he had beene altogether in a sensles condition. Howbeit, because in this and those other his deposed reports which di­rectly doe crosse your idle conceit, you vsuallie giue him the lie: let vs therefore, the more stricktly examine this your sensles opinion, concerning his supposed sensles condition. Ga­lene very flatlie auoucheth, [...]alen. Contra Aristotel. that sense is not the alteration or chaung which is made in the organon, or instrument of sense: but, the knowledge rather of that selfesame alteration. As for example, if (while I am attentiue to any thing) one passeth before me, though the very image of that partie be truelie receiued into the Christalline humour of mine eye, as it were in a glasse: yet for all that, I doe not see the said partie so pas­sing before me. Because, eyther the visuall spirit with the fa­cultie thereof, is kept backe in the spring & originall fountaine of sight: or, for that the soule doth not send forth the com­mon [Page 35] sense into the eie (it being els where imployed) without which there can be no sense, and so by consequence, eyther little or no paine at all. Againe, if I be earnestly busied, or attentiuely occupied about any matter, although (at that in­stant) some one being neere vnto me, should speake or crie out aloud, yet should not I discerne what is spoken or cryed: because, the common sense is imployed & hindred els where. As for example, Archimedes, he was so earnestly busied about, and so attentiuelie bent vpon his Geometricall lines during the siege of Syracuse: as (when the Cittie it selfe was subdued) he did neyther thinke, nor know that the same had beene ta­ken before. Againe, some hauing receiued many dangerous gunshots in warres, yet (being wholie taken vp with resoluti­on and purpose to fight) they felt (for the present) no paine at all: which pearcing of shot, was tenne thousand times more torment, then the youngman his pricking with pinnes. Now then, if constancie and resolution in any set purpose: as also, if a strong imagination may forciblie detaine the spirit ani­mal in her originall fountaine: brieflie, if the soule doth not send forth her common sense into any part or member affected, without the faculty of which common sense there must needs be in that part or member, either little or no feeling at al, and so by consequence, either little or no paine perceiued for ye pre­sent: shal we therfore imagine it straung, & highly surmoun­ting the whole facultie and power of nature, that your preten­ded poore patient at Nottingham (being especially so resolute vpon that his pretended purpose) should endure (with very little or no paine) the pricking with pinnes, and so to dissemble the same for the present, as if he had bin altogether in a sensles condition? Yea, and (which more is) must we vndoubtedly con­clude, that he was therefore possest with a diuell, because he felt not the pricking with pins? Nay, let vs rather conclude, that he was not possest, because he felt not the pricking. For there is no likelihood, and it is a thing vnreasonable, yea, to too absurd, to imagine that the diuell should quite take away the feeling of paine, from those whome he actuallie possesseth with a purposed minde no vexe and torment: no, he would rather augment and increase the feeling of paine, See D. Doctri [...] page. 89. pag [...] 106. that their torment might be so much more intolerable to them. And therefore, this is no action or passion surmounting the power of nature: [Page 36] or worth the recitall to proue your idle conceit.

Exorcistes.

See D. 1. Nar­ [...]at. pag. 19.Besides this senceleslnes of bodie: hee foamed at the mouth like an Horse or a Boare, for a great space together.

Physiologus.

If foaming at mouth be a supernaturall action: then the par­ties affected with the Epilepsie or falling sickenes, these can and doe also effect supernaturall actions. Moreouer, if foa­ming at mouth doth vndoubtedlie demonstrate a diuell in the partie that foameth: then may we likewise conclude, that euerie such scould as foames at the mouth; yea, euerie Horse and Boare, which foames at the mouth, hath vndoubtedlie some daungerous diuell in their bellie. But, who euer before now hath heard any speech of the diuell his white foame? For surelie, if a roaping white foame be some supernaturall action or passion, surmounting the whole facultie and power of nature it selfe▪ the same then must needs be the foame of some dan­gerous diuell demonstrated so plainely vnto vs, by such su­pernaturall occurrents. Notwithstanding, what wight (being well in his wittes) would not deeme it a verie ridiculous toy, to heare that a man (by his foaming and spattle) may truelie be discernde to be essentiallie possest with a diuell? Fie, fie Exorcistes, that you should so impudently dare to abuse your poore ignorant Reader. Are these the supernaturall acti­ons or passions: from whence you so confidently conclude your essentiall possessions of spirits and diuels?

Exorcistes.

See D. 1. Nar­ra [...]. pag. 12.Nay sir, besides these▪ he and the rest, they had euery of them some certaine violent motions & stirrings: and that also without any alteration at al, either in their pulse, their breathing or colour.

Physiologus.

Those their supposed strange motions or stirrings, they were (it should seeme) at no time so violent, but that the poore sillie persons then present could easelie stay them: which argueth no such supernaturall action, as must necessa­rilie be effected by som [...] diuell essentiallie inherent within them. Notwithstanding, be it freelie confessed, that those their imagined motions or stirrings were (in very deed) so sodaine, and so violent as you beare vs in hand, yea, and that also without any change or alteration in pulse, in breathing or [Page 37] colour: yet, this concludeth no supernaturall action or passion. Onely,Galen. it signifieth that the blood of those parties was earthie and thicke, and so it could not (on the sodaine) be so easilie kindled: which causeth not onely the pulse of such persons to be seldome or rare, but euen their colour it selfe to receiue no sudden alteration or change. Againe, who doth not eft­soones beholde sundrie Melancholike persons, not onely ma­ny daies and moneths, but also many yeeres to runne vp and downe like mad-men, crying very strangely, and howling like Dogges: without any alteration or change at all in pulse, in breathing or colour? Moreouer, very vse and custome hel­peth much in these matters: yea, and that also, without any alteration or change of pulse, of breathing or colour. Your pa­tient at Nottingham, he was (by profession) a tumbler long before: and therefore, the daily and accustomed vse of those his supposed violent motions or stirrings, could procure in his bodie the lesse alteration or change. Briefly, how many things else may we daily behold in the variable causes and courses of nature more admirable,Baptista Porta, in magic. natu­rali. Leuin. Lemnius de occult. natu­rae miraculis. Mizaldus, & Fracastorius, in lib. Sympathiae, & Antipathiae. more strange and incre­dible, than these are by much, the which notwithstanding, are neuer attributed to Diuels, but to the hidden secrets of nature it selfe: as we haue generally declared in our seauenth Dialogue at large, and may more particularlie appeare in the seueral authors set down in the margine. By all which it is very apprant: that this, and the rest are but slender weake reasons, to conclude so waightie a cause.

Exorcistes.

Well,See D. 1. Nar­ration, pag. 17. but what say you to this? Hee was sometimes stretched forth in length, to such an extraordinarie stature, as he seemed to exceed in height the tallest man in the towne: which thing could neuer be wrought by any naturall facul­tie, or power of nature.

Physiologus.

Howsoeuer the partie reporting had simplie deposed this point, may not your selfe (hauing sense) be monstrouslie a­shamed to penne downe such palpable, such impudent, and grosse impossibilities, as neyther man, nor diuell are able to ac­complish but by an vtter destruction of nature. Notwith­standing, be it supposed, that some such vnwonted extention had then beene effected, as you beare vs in hand: yet, thus [Page 38] then we answere the same. The partie intending to reach at the coard, being something aboue his ordinarie height, hee might therein haue some extraordinarie assistance from na­ture herselfe: who endeuouring such an extention, could not recall her said purpose before shee had come to her vtter­most limites. For, whatsoeuer is moued in recta linea, in the right line: Arist. lib. 8. de Physic. it must necessarilie come to arest or euer it can take a con­trarie motion. As for example, a ball being directlie throwen against a wall: before it reboundeth backe, it resteth it selfe against the wall. Againe, an arterie after the dilatation there­of, before it may possiblie make a contraction, it resteth it selfe. So surelie, all the arteries in Sommers his bodie, extract­ing themselues towardes the height of the coard aforesaide: they must needs rayse vp themselues to their vttermost ex­tention, or euer nature it selfe could cause them (by a naturall contraction) to returne to their former accustomed course: in all which time, that partie (beholding the boy at a blush) might imagine him to be of a supernaturall stature. And thus you may see some naturall reason, for the youngman his ex­tending himselfe to such extraordinarie height: if (in deede) the same had beene so as the partie doth simplie report it to be.See D. 1. Nar­rat. pag. 16. the 6. Deponent. Howbeit, because this supposed supernatural sight is only reported by a silly poore woman, perhaps in a maze whē she saw the same: men may be too credulous concerning those her reports. For, she not seeing such sight till the afternoone, it may be some vapours arising then vp in her braine,Hyperius in Method. [...]heo­log. lib. 2. p. 311 [...]. did breed certaine accidents, like to suffusions or cloudes; yea, and the same also in such an vnwonted sort, as the poore woman might vndoubtedly imagine,Galenu [...] libr. de Symptomatū differentijs. that she beheld the youngman from out of his ordinarie place, or stature: which (with pro­per resemblances) may be liuely demonstrated, especially by the arte optike at large, and therefore the same no such ad­mirable matter as you beare vs in hand.

Exorcistes.

Well sir, besides all this, he was eftsoones of such superna­turall strength: See D. 1. Nar­rat. pag. 14.17. as he could hardlie be ruled.

Physiologus.

How then came it to passe that some few men or women were able (by their owne naturall power) to subdue his saide supernaturall strength at their pleasure?See D. 1. Nar­rat. pag 14.17. You shall hardlie [Page 39] perswade mee, that the meere naturall power of a thousand men, may possiblie subdue the supernaturall strength of a spi­rit or diuell. Math. 8.28. Mark. 5.3. Luke 8.29. Howbeit, if this your supposed Demoniake had (in deede) beene fast tyed in chaynes of iron, as were the Demoniakes put downe in the Gospell, and could also as easi­lie haue knapt them in sunder: you might then more boldlie haue reported, and wee would the sooner haue beleeued, that the youngman (as you say) had beene (in deed) of an ex­traordinarie supernaturall strength, beyond the facultie and power of nature. In the meane time, you may not be angrie, though we esteeme these trothles tales as trifling toyes: be­ing altogether insufficient to proue any such, eyther actions or passions, as doe wholie surmount the facultie, skill, and power of nature.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, besides the precedent supernaturall actions, the youngman, See D. 1. Nar­rat. pag. 17.18. he was of a supernaturall knowledge: foretelling my comming vnto him, and telling of many things done, the actours themselues being absent.

Physiologus.

This is not so supernaturall as you make men beleeue. For he might be ashsted in those his supposed predictions, and de­clarations of actions els where effected:D. Detection. pag. 93. by watch-wordes, by signes, by the insinuations, and speeches of others; by his owne obseruations, collections, and probable coniectures: yea, and perhappes, by some cunning confederacies with Exorcistes himselfe. Now then all these, and other like helps hee eft­soones enioying as hath beene deposed by diuers: no mer­ueile at all though those his cosining predictions, and decla­rations of actions, to simple and plaine meaning people, did seeme verie admirable, straunge and miraculous. Although yet with the circumspect and prouident beholders, there was in them no straungnes at all: but such as might easilie be ef­fected by the meanest of wit, with the help of a cunning confederate. Bankes and hi [...] blacke Horse confederate. For, if Bankes (by his continuall prastise) had brought his blacke Horse to such exquisite knowledge, as that (by the onely sight of his maisters eye, by his words, and many other experimented obseruations and rules) he could, and did eftsoones effect such admirable matters, as many of the beholders did imagine him to be rather a black diuell, then [Page 40] an Horse: why should we wonder at all, that two cunning companions confederate together before, should conclude such a course betweene themselues, as the one (by the help of the other) should prognosticate such straunge and incredi­ble euents, as that the sillie poore hearers would rather deeme him some supernaturall Cole-prophet, then any natu­rall cosining companion. So then this argueth no such super­naturall knowledge, as you would make vs beleeue. Howbeit, if hee had spoken eyther Hebrew or Greeke, neuer hauing learned those languages before: that had beene in deed a ve­ry certaine argument of some supernaturall knowledge, and might very probably haue concluded some possession by Sa­tan.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, hee spake Latine I assure you: saying thus. Ego sum Deus. Ego sum Rex. See D. 1. Narra­tion, page. 19. Yea, and (which more is) he spake (for a good space together) with an hallow voice in his bel­lie, his mouth neuer closed, but stretched wide open.

Physiologus.

It should seeme he was onelie possest with some poore pe­tie diuell, See H. Discoue­rie, p. 253.254. Ibid. pag. 215. that had no more Latine in store. Howbeit, if the diuels memorie had failed him, the best is, the boy himselfe, he had learned that Latine at schoole, many yeares or euer the diuell and he grew acquainted.See S. Harsnets Discouerie, lib. pag. 227. As for speaking with an hol­low voice in his bellie, whatsoeuer it pleaseth your selfe to put downe with your penne: very manie notwithstanding haue iudiciallie deposed, that he spake as distinctlie, and as orderlie as other men doe. But, be it supposed he spake in such sort as you say:Iul. Scaliger cō ­tra Cardan. Ex­ercitat. 258. Hippocrates in Epidem. lib. 5. sent. 58. Iohan. Gorreus in definitionib. medicinal. Faetius, in aeco­nomia▪ Hippocratrin. Aug. de Ciuit. Dei lib. 24. cap. 23. doth that argue necessarily some diuel in his bellie? So, euerie paltrie ventriloquist must become a Demoniake. Hippocrates maketh mention of the wife of one Polemarchus, who spake in her bellie. Iohn Gorreus, hee saith, that such as speake in their bellie, in Hipocrates, they are called [...], that is, persons which speake in their bellie; their mouth and their lippes being closed. Faetius, he writeth, that the great A­drian Turnebus affirmed in his reading chaire: that hee had seene a Rogue, who (without eyther opening his mouth or stirring of his lippes) did with his bellie alone make such a sound, and vttered such a sensible voice, as both pleased the hearers, and gainde to himselfe great store of money by the [Page 41] practise thereof. If therefore these be the supernaturall acti­ons whereupon you so greatlie relie, for the vndoubted con­firmation of those your supposed essentiall possessions: I am sorie for intercepting M. Orthodoxus his course. Both, be­cause these things are to too course and ridiculous, to con­clude such a cause: and for that also, they were not in such sort effected, as they are by your selfe in your published Pamphlet reported.

Exorcistes.

Howsoeuer you would gladlie discredit the truth of the Historie, See D. Doctri [...] pag. 3. the same could not possiblie be false: it hauing the vndoubted truth thereof so carefullie reported with euerie circumstance, and the same also most soundlie deposed vnto, by diuers Deponents.

Orthodoxus.

Why man, the very matters themselues, they were no­thing so straunge as the Historie reports them to be. For, how admirable soeuer they seemed at first in the behol­ders eyes: yet, the Deponents themselues (deposing with some better deliberation, their supposed straungnes a fresh) they haue since then more aduisedlie reformed their oathes, H. Discouerie. pag. 207.20 [...] 209.210. &c. Item. lib. 4. pa [...] 256.257. and deposed the contrarie. Namelie, that now (by their bet­ter enlightned iudgements) they doe plainely perceiue all those the former supposed supernaturall actions or passions: to be but meere counterfeit toyes, and plaine cosoning practises. And therefore, whatsoeuer your selfe may happily imagine concerning the supposed infallible truth of that Historie, so carefullie reporting those seuerall points, with the seuerall circumstances appertaining thereto: yet, the very best that wise men may thinke of that Historie is this. Namely, that the writer thereof, reported those matters as then only they seemed to be; but not as they were indeed and in truth. Be­sides that, other Histories are therefore credited, because they report nothing in nature impossible: or if happilie they doe, yet then they plainely demonstrate how the same was effected. Moreouer, whereas you tell vs, that the truth of the Historie hath beene deposed vnto: See D. Detect▪ pag. 156. and pag. 168. our answere is this, so hath the supposed truth thereof, bin truely deposed against, howsoeuer you your selfe (in your accustomed charitie) doe charge the Deponents themselues with open penurie. And [Page 42] therefore (notwithstanding that your exceeding great care for the truth of the historie) the matters reported therein, they may be vntrue.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 4.But sir? the Magistrates, they haue not hetherto puni­shed the reporters themselues, for seducers and reporters of lies: and therefore, why should not the published historie be re­ported for truth?

Orthodoxus.

As though (because some sillie poore persons reporting those matters as they verily supposed the same to be) the Magistrate therefore, he must with no lesse seueritie, censure such flying reports, then if it had beene (in deed and in truth) for a meere matter of fact: or els, those matters themselues (so flyinglie reported abroad) they must necessarilie be intertai­ned for infallible truths: or as though, because the Magi­strate, either in mercie will not, or, in some negligence doth not seuerelie punish the reporters of lies: therefore, those their reported lies escaping vnpunished, must (hand ouer head) be esteemed infallible truths. Or, as though, because the due punishment for such seducing and lying reporters be prolonged a time: therefore (in the meane time) the historie it selfe (affoording such false and lying reports) must neces­sarilie be reputed an authenticall historie, notwithstanding the principall parties, and the Deponents also themselues haue iudiciallie deposed the contrarie. Neither doth the principall partie reporte any impossibilitie of himselfe, as you would haue vs fondly imagine: because, it is vndoubtedly possible, and we make no question at all, but that he did counterfeite. And so (notwithstanding those your thirtie Deponents in store) that which the historie reports concerning those your supposed supernaturall actions, or passions, it might be vt­terly false.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 5.Yea, but I am sufficiently able (notwithstanding the Par­tie his impudent denials) to proue (by the apparant signes put downe in the Scriptures) that he was vndoubtedly pos­sessed of Satan.

Orthodoxus.

When you haue substantially proued vnto vs, first, that [Page 43] those your pretended signes put down in the Scriptures, were purposelie recorded by the spirit of God, for certaine, and in­fallible perpetuall meanes to discerne truly of essentiall pos­sessions, and then next, that those falslie imagined signes in your counterfeit patients, were euery of them, as vndoubted effects of such a possession as were any of the other recorded in Scripture, of an actuall possession: then you say something vn­to vs. Howbeit, this your exceeding great labour to proue your supposed essentiall possessions from Scripture, by the par­ticular effects of parties actuallie possessed in Scripture: it might (we verely suppose) vntill then, haue been very well spared. Both, because those pretended Scripture signes were neuer put downe as any certaine demonstratiue rules, to discerne of your supposed essentiall possessions, which we haue proued be­fore: and, for that also we doe freely acknowledge an actuall possession in the daies of Christ, howsoeuer we doe flatly de­ny an essentiall inherencie of Diuels in the possessed mans bodie, or mind, as in our third and sixt Dialogue is plainely decla­red. Moreouer, be it supposed, that those selfesame effects of Demoniakes recorded in Scripture, were (in deed and in truth) the vndoubted true meanes to discerne truly of actuall possessions then: yet doth it not necessarie follow, that they are now also the vndoubted true signes of an essentiall posses­sion in Sommers. H. Discouerie, pag. 177. and pag. 294. and pag. 297. Both, because Sommers himselfe hath no lesse freelie confessed, then iudiciallie deposed his counterfeite carriage in all things: and for that also, the possession of Diuels whatsoeuer, is ceassed long since, as in our seuenth, and tenth Dialogues hath been sufficiently shewed.

Exorcistes.

If this be all you are able to say, concerning the infal­lible signes set downe in the Scriptures: your answere is weake.

Orthodoxus.

The answere alreadie auouched, might be fully sufficien [...] to stay the violent streames of these your outragious courses. Notwithstanding all this, least happily (by our voluntarie silence to these your supposed signes expressed in Scripture) you might, either falslie flatter your selfe, or fondly imagine, that we are forced to silence, because, now you doe in very deede, Aiacis clypeo tympanizare: encounter our forces [Page 44] with such a dangerous two edged sword as killeth downe right:See D. Doctrine, pag. 5. let vs therefore consider the matter so much the more exactlie, & see whether the Lord (by those your pretended Scripture signes) hath pronounced a definitiue sentence flat on your side, or not. And herein, we will first examine those the supposed signes thēselues: &, then next your orderlie ap­plying of those selfesame signes, to that your pretended pur­pose. Your supposed signes of possession are of two sorts; name­ly, either written or experimented, or rather (if you will haue it so) they are, either canonicall or apocryphall signes. Your written, D. Doctrine, pag. 6. or rather (if you will) your canonicall signes, they are those which your selfe would forciblie straine from the sa­cred Scriptures. Forciblie I say, both because there are no such matters establisht in Scripture, for infallible signes of fu­ture possessions, as we shewed before: and for that also, if some such could be soundly produced from Scripture; yet these your published signes, they keepe no such certaintie in them­selues, as may certainely conclude any certaine established meanes, for the certaine discerning of essentiall possessions to the end of the world. No surely, these your published signes, they doe ebbe and flowe with the Moone; hauing sometimes their redundancie, and sometimes their diminution, as best pleaseth your humour, to make them proportionable with this your pretended purpose in hand.See D. 1. Nar­rat. at the latter end of the trea­tise. For first, in yt your pri­mary imprinted Narration (the Moone being then in the ful) it was so full Sea with those your supposed signes of essentiall possession in Sommers, as they flowed iust to three and twentie in number. Then next, in your printed Apologie (the tyde being fallen,See D. Apolo­gie, pag. 9. it should seeme, to some lower ebbe) they did forthwith forgoe at that ebbe, full fiue of their former rate, and, onely became but eighteene olde ledgers, as may very plainely appeare.See D. Doctrine, pag 6. to 17. And yet now in this your Doctrine of possessions (wherein all things must needs be esteemed, as the vndoubted true Oracles of Apollo Pythius at Delphos) they doe sodainely flowe to a fuller Sea then euer before; being now newly amounted to nineteene in number. Whereunto also,See D. Doctrine, pag. 16. if we adde (as needeslie we must) those your owne seuen experimented or apocryphall signes of possession: then doe they arise fully to sixe and twentie in the whole. Surely, if there doe shortly fall into your hands another fresh Demo­niake, [Page 45] affoording some new coined signes of essential possessions: it is not to be doubted, but that (in your next new coyned Pamphlet) we shall haue iust one and thirtie signes of such a possession, and then (I beleeue) the game will be hit. Howbeit, in the meane season, such palpable vncertainties (especially in the very principles and rules themselues) doe plainelie Prognosticate (to so many as are not purposelie blind) that this your new found Cabalisticall craft, concerning the deepe and mysticall arte of Diuillitie: is nothing else in effect, but a meere Cabalisticall cogging conceit, or rather a verie nimble and craftie conueyance of Legerdemaine. And there­fore, those your supposed Scripture signes (continued from the sixt to the seuenteenth page) they might (I assure you, for any thing hitherto heard) very well haue been spared: were it not, that your selfe (in setting them downe) did purpose­ly intend to set forth to the world your circular follie. Who (rather then it should be supposed you did want your pro­per Antagonist, to incounter with these your supposed signes of your pretended essentiall possessions) would euen purposely crosse your owne selfe, to make some sport with your selfe. For,See D. Doctrine page. 5. first (in the first page) you make Scripture signes the one­ly assured meanes, to discerne truely of essentiall possessions: and then next (in the sixteene and seuenteene pages) you doe to too presumptuouslie put downe your owne experi­mented, See D. Doctrine page. 16. & 17 or rather your apocryphall signes, to be euery way as vndoubted demonstrations of such an essentiall possession, as any of the other expressed before. The which presumption of yours, your very friend (I meane M. Darel himselfe) hath censured thus.See D. Doctrine, pag. 22. Oh monstrous impietie! is not the Lord Ie­sus (trow we) very highly beholding to this presumptuous Exor­cist, that dareth euen in his very Doctrine of possessions and dis­possessions, thus presumptuouslie place the signes which Christ Ie­sus hath giuen in his holy word of one possessed, among those his owne apocryphall signes, which are but vncertaine and doubtfull? If happily you be offended with the peremptorie Censurer of this your presumptuous practise: you must (for any thing I know) be fame to pull your selfe by the nose. And this in effect, for your pretended signes of essentiall possession.

Exorcistes.

Verie wel:See D. Doctrin [...], pag. 6. &c. and what say you next for my applying of those [Page 46] selfesame signe [...], to my speciall purpose.

Orthodoxus.

This (in effect) is that which I say to the same: namely, that your presumptuous applying of these particular signes set downe in the Scriptures, See D. Doctrine from page 6. to page 17. to those your particular preten­ded patients, frō the sixt to the seuenteenth page (as before) is an intolerable trifling with truth: deseruing rather a iudi­ciall censurer, then any logicall confuter. Neyther (when you haue done what you can) will this your filthie prophanation of Scripture (in any possibilitie) be made to support the ri­diculous and idle frame of your palpable fooleries, from a most fearefull downefall before you beware: they are so diuersly opposite among themselues, and the one so cruellie cutteth in sunder the throat of another. For, behold (I beseech you) what vnreconciliable garboyles, your owne penne hath rash­ly procured among those your pretended true signes of your essentiall possessions? First, those your phantasticall Demoniakes, they haue sometimes a supernaturall strength, See D. Doctrine, pag. 14. & 16. See D. Detecti­on pag. 100. See D. Doctrine, pag. 17. See D. Doctrine, pag. 9. and knowledge: yet sometimes againe, they only but seeme to haue so. Some­times they hurt, but hurt not at all: for though Satan can hurt, yet he hurts not forsooth: although yet, wee haue sometimes seene the contrarie; for, Darling was so sore hurt, that he was lame for thirteene weekes together. Againe, sometimes they seeme to be sensles, but are not sensles: to see, but see not at all: to heare, when they heare not: to speake, when they speake not: to strike with their hands, See D. Detecti­on. pag. 129. when they strike not: to walke with their feet, when they walke not at al. Yea, and (which I beleeue is a wonder of wonders) fire is sometimes no fire: See D. Detecti­on, pag. 163. I meane it will sometimes burne, but yet not burne at all, if wee dare credit your penne, in reporting these parabables, or rather these pal­trie phantasticall fooleries. For what is this els in effect (I be­seech you) but euen most impudently also to auouch vnto vs, that those your pretended patients, they seemed some­times to foame, but foamed not: to cry out aloud, but cried not at all: to wallow, but wallowed not: to swell, but swelled not: to be left for dead, but were nothing lesse, and so forth? For surelie, where the causes themselues are onely in a seeming shew; there the effects can neuer be trulie in a shewing substance. But good Exorcistes, neuer go about (by any your bewitch­ing perswasions) to make vs beleeue any of these your caba­sticall [Page 47] conceits or phantasticall effects, in those your phantasti­call patients: vnles you will freely permit vs withall to con­clude, that those the pretended effects of all those your sup­posed essentiall possessions, they were onely but phantasticall ef­fects: and so consequently, but phantasticall signes: but phan­tasticall possessions and dispossessions: brieflie, but the phantasti­call deuises, of a phantasticall Exorcist: intending (by those his phantasticall fooleries) to replenish the world with phanta­sticall fooles. For, would you not (in good sooth) imagine vs all to be out of our wits: if you could make vs beleeue, that the maister diuell himselfe with all his adherents, were able to make a thing essentiallie existing in nature, eyther to be, or not to be, whē it pleaseth himselfe: or, that he can cause (at his pleasure) the same thing, so existing in nature, to receiue anie other proportion, qualitie, shape or forme, then that which was primarilie appointed for it, and, euen naturallie infused into it by the first creation of God? As in our fourth and fift Dialogues we haue handled at large. Well, notwithstanding all this, we must be forced to account al these the precedent phantasticall fooleries, for infallible truthes: if (forsooth) wee dare credit your bare report, concerning such admirable matters. And surelie, there is some reason we should harken vnto them at leasure: you your selfe especiallie hauing here shewed your selfe the most admirable mirabilist, among all the mirabilistes vnder the heauens. Here is (I trow) not only mirandum and miraculum both, but (which more is) mirabi­liter mirificissimum: I meane, a very world of wonderles wonders. Howbeit, these your pretended signes of essentiall possessions, with their phantasticall or fond application to those your sup­posed Demoniakes, being (in verie deed) meere matters of fact, and so, beyond the compasse of our Commission, wee leaue them therefore to M. Harsnet, See D. Doctrine pag. 19.20. and Thyreus the Iesuit, with whom you are hotely disputing these points: and will be I perceiue (so grosse is your impudencie) vntill publike au­thoritie doe eyther determine the contrarie, or appoint you and vs, to debate your question afresh, concerning the essen­tiall possession of diuels. Wherein, when you haue substantial­lie prooned: first, that our Sauiour Christ hath vndoubtedly establisht those selfesame supposed signes of actuall possessions recorded in Scripture, See. D. Doctrine pag. 18. to be for euer, the vndoubted true [Page 48] meanes, to discerne soundlie of essentiall possessions to the end of the world. And then next, that the pretie phantasticall ef­fects (pretended from those your phantasticall patients) were vndoubtedlie, euen one and the same with the other: that they proceeded apparantlie from one & the selfesame cause: and were also, essentiallie effected after one and the selfe­same manner, without eyther cosenage or crafty conueiance: then conclude (as you doe) from the effect to the cause, and spare not. In the meane time, you must giue vs good leaue, to doubt of their truth as we haue hitherto done; and must doe (I beleeue) for any thing you are able to alleadge to the contrarie. The rather, because the Euangelist (we doubt not) doth put downe all those which you call Scripture signes, as onely meere matters of fact, in the parties possessed then: and not as infallible meanes to discerne soundly of your essentiall possessions now, as we shewed before.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir, the Euangelist doth not barely report them, as meere matters of fact: See D Doctrine, pag. 19. but, puts them downe also, as rules of doctrine and directions for the Church, to discerne truelie of essentiall possessions now.

Orthodoxus.

How are you certaine hereof?

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag 19. [...]. Ipse d [...]x [...]t.Why sir? I conceiue it so: therefore, no doubt it is so.

Orthodoxus.

Oh irrefragable argument! autos epha, ipse dixit: M. Exor­cistes himselfe hath spoken it: therefore, all the wisedome in the world will neuer be able to impugne the impregnable truth thereof. Howbeit sir, I for my owne part, conceiue it not so: therfore the same is not so. How now Exorcistes, here is Pythagoras against Pythagoras: who I beseech you, shall be vmpier betweene them?

Exorcistes.

Surely, the very words of the text. Wherein our Sauiour sayth not,Mar. 9.21. how long hath thy sonne beene possessed: but rather, how long hath thy sonne been thus handled? See D. Doctrine pag. 19. Making (you may plainelie perceiue) such his manner of handling: an infallible signe to discerne sonndlie of all future essentiall possessions.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 49]

You labour,Maledicta gl [...]ssa, quae cor­rumpit textum. to proue your idle conceit, from a plaine text of Scripture: but accursed be that glosse, which corrupteth the text. For the question which Christ propoundeth there to the father of the child, Mark. 9.21. [...]. respecteth onlie the first time of that ac­cident, and not the manner or forme of his handling: as very plainely appeareth in the wordes of the text, saying thus, how long time is it? [...]agni [...], ex q [...] ei hoc accu [...]t. Bez [...]. quod ho [...] [...] ie. M [...]ntanus, vt hoc factum est▪ ous touto gegonen auto: that is, since this thing befell thy sonne; or since this thing happened to him: or, since this came to passe: or since this vexation first seased vpon him? Thus you see the verie words of the text, and the purest translators doe simplie referre that demaund of Christ to the verie time it selfe, not to the manner of that accident: and therefore (were it not that you would gladlie draw in your essentiall possession, as it were by the eares) all wise men would wōder you should so corruptly abuse the plaine text. How­beit, this is not all, for (besides this your purposed corrupting of Scripture) you doe also verie presumptuouslie adde to the text the wicked inuention of your own idle braine, by foy­sting these words (in him, or a diuell in him) into the very text it selfe: and so you enforce the holy Scriptures to speake what you please, saying thus. How long is it since thy sonne hath had essentiallie a diuell within him? And this no doubt, of a very set purpose, to vnderproppe your senceles opinion of essentiall possessions: there being no words in the text, im­porting such matter, or tending that way. For Matthew re­porting that storie saith onely thus:Math. 17.15▪ Luke. 9.36. Mark 9.27. He is lunatike, or sore vexed. Luke saith, a spirit taketh him. Marke saith, He hath a dombe spirite: Loe, this is all that the Euangelists write of that matter. How therfore are you able (from al, or any one of these places) to conclude a Diuell essentiallie inherent in the bodie of the Child? Nay rather, why should we not boldlie conclude the quite contrarie? Namely, that the Diuell did onely but actuallie vexe and torment him: and therefore, from hence (you see) there ariseth no rule of Doctrine or di­rection, to discerne truly of essentiall possessions.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, there is a medicine left for the curing of essentiall possessions: See D. Doctrin [...] pag. 19. therefore there is a meanes giuen to discerne sound­ly of such a possession. Otherwaies, what vse of a medicine: [Page 50] where there is no meanes at all to discerne of the maladie?

Orthodoxus.

Perceiuing the plaine text of Scripture to be directlie a­gainst you: now you compasse your matter about with a quite contrarie course. Labouring with tooth and nayle, to proue ignotum per ignotius;Ignotum, per Ig­notius. a matter vncertaine, by a thing more vncertaine: and so, in seeking to lay out your matter apparantly, you make it more obscure then it was at the first. For, if there be no medicine left for the cure: then (to vse your owne reason) there is no meanes to discerne the disease. Whether there be now such a medicine as your selfe doe ima­gine: will hereafter appeare,See D. Doctrine, from pag. 20. to pag. 25. when we come to entreate of that point. In the meane time (leauing Thyreus and your selfe to dispute the infallible signes of possession) we expect better reasons at your hands, for the proofe of your supposed essentiall possessions: or require at the least, your present sub­mission.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 25.Why sir? those eight Demoniakes we speake of, they were vndoubtedly dispossessed by prayer and fasting: therefore es­sentiallie possessed of Sathan.

Orthodoxus.

They were not essentiallie possessed of Satan: therefore not dispossessed at all by prayer and fasting. Howbeit, least you should thinke I doe now but put edge vnto edge: goe to, be it supposed they were so dispossest as you say: that onely pro­ueth they were possessed, not that they were essentiallie possessed of Satan. For possessed they might be: though the Diuell not essentiallie inherent in any one of their bodies, which is the poynt we dispute of.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, page. 26.Their speedie deliuerance doth argue an essentiall possession: for had they been onely but outwardlie afflicted of Satan, they had not been so presently deliuered as they vndoubtedlie were.

Orthodoxus.

Nay rather, if they had (in deed) been essentiallie possest, as you say; the Diuell would haue been the longer in driuing out: for possession (we commonly say) is fully as good as eleuen points in Lawe. Perceiue you not therefore how absurdlie [Page 51] you reason, when you affirme it more easie to deliuer a man essentiallie possessed of Satan: than to deliuer a man not possessed at all? For very certaine it is, that if one and the selfesame working power for the dispossessing of Diuels, doth (with equall expedition) both outwardly and inwardly concur in that spe­ciall busines, it will bring forth euen one and the selfesame effect: and therefore, why should not that worke whatsoeuer (whether outward or inward) be then forthwith accompli­shed with like speedie deliuerance?

Exorcistes.

Because prayer and fasting being vsed herein,See D. Doctrine, pag. 26. this disease, it hath a more particular, a more absolute, and a more certaine promise of speedie deliuerance: then any other torment of bodie or minde inflicted by Satan.

Orthodoxus.

You doe either most stranglie forget your selfe, or very rashly auouch you care not what. For, hath not euery spe­ciall torment else inflicted by Satan as particular, as absolute, and as certaine a promise as this your pretended possession; that particular promise especially being implicatiuely consi­dered in that selfe same generall promise, Eph. 4.27. Iam. 4.7. 1. Pet. 5.8. which the Lord hath vndoubtedly giuen to ech faithfull resistance of Satan? Now then, if generally all, then more specially euery particular tor­ment inflicted by Satan (the same being faithfully resisted) shall vndoubtedly receiue grace from aboue, for a like spee­die deliuerance: so farre foorth especially as seemeth good to the Lord. Notwithstanding, it may be (and very likely it is) you will answere vs thus. All the externall torments inflicted by Satan, they haue onely a promise conditionally, namely, if the same seemeth good to the Lord: howbeit the essentiall pos­session of diuels being an internall torment, it hath a promise more absolutely, I meane (in plaine English) whether God will or not. This you auouch in effect throughout all your pam­phlets, in sundry places: therefore proue this assertion sound­ly, by either Scripture or reason, and the conquest (I assure you) is your owne. Notwithstanding (howsoeuer Exorcistes surmiseth the contrary) we doe confidently auouch, that all externall torments whatsoeuer, inflicted by Satan, they haue so much more certaine promise of speedy deliuerance then these your supposed essentiall possessions: by how much that their [Page 52] said promise of speedy deliuerance, is more apparantly and more certainely auouched to them, then is any to these your pretended essentiall possessions of Satan. See D. Doctrine, pag 26. For, howsoeuer you may possibly beare vs in hand there was some gratious pro­mise of speedy deliuerance graunted freely vnto it in tenebris, I meane in some secret corner: very certaine we ar [...] (what­soeuer you prate) that, there is no apparant precept or pro­mise concerning such matters, throughout the whole Scrip­tures, as shall more plainely be proued, when we come to that point. See D. Doctrine, pag. 26. And therefore, that sillie poore instance, where­with you endeuour to proue a more speedy deliuerance from those your pretended essentiall possessions (that selfesame in­stance arising especially from those your particular actions, now iustly called in question) it concludes not your cause, howsoeuer therein you doe but triflingly collude [...]ith [...]our ignorant Reader; no, no, it is onely a pitifull begging of that you should proue. Petitio princi­pij. For, we flatly auouch, that those your eight pretended Demoniakes, they were not so possessed at all: and therefore,See D. Doctrine, pag 26. not dispossessed by your prayer and fa [...]ting. Briefly, when you are able as substantially to demonstrate the vndoub­ted certaintie of your essentiall possessions, Ioh. 20. & 21. as Christ hath vn­answerably established the infallible truth of his glorious re­surrection: we will then (by the grace of our God) endeuour our selues to become therein also,Ioh. 20.27. See D. Doctrine, pag. 26. not faithlesse, but faithfull Thomasses. In the meane time, you must be content, though we also accord, and iumpe iustly with those your other An­tagonistes, who doe purpos [...]ly reiect your phantasticall opi­nion of essentiall possessions. Moreouer, we doe here aduertise your selfe withall, to wonder no more, that the learned-men of our land should be of a diuers iudgement to yours: vntill you haue exactly considered, and fully answered our former Di­alogues. Againe, we would wish you to forbeare from those your insolent vaunts, concerning your hauing of Scriptures and Fathers f [...]lly on your side: vntill you haue suffici [...]ntly answered the seuerall Scriptures and Fathers let downe in our sixt Dialogue at large. Briefly, we would haue you sur­cease [...]rom that your shamelesse pretending of common ex­perience: vntill you haue flatly confuted whatsoeuer our se­uenth Dialogue setteth downe to the contrarie.See D. Doctrine, pag. 26▪ Yea, and all these the former forbearings we would haue you so much the [Page 53] rather to performe: by how much we see it is nothing re­pugnant to the nature and will of God, to denie your supposed essentiall possessions, especially now in these daies of the Gospell.

Exorcistes.

Oh yes sir,See D. Doctrine, pag. 27. the Lord he hath threatned wonderfull iudge­ments both written and vnwritten: therefore, he hath also threatned the essentiall possession of spirits and diuels.

Orthodoxus.

Or euer I answere the very point of your argument, I must necessarily censure a little, as wel your inconsiderate quoting: as also your vnconscionable abusing and prophaning of Scriptures. For first, in Deuteronomie, we must in any case accompt your essentiall possession of diuels, Deut. 28.62. some vnwritten won­derfull iudgement: Reuel. 22.18. howbeit, in the Reuelation forsooth, you will haue vs esteeme of the same, as of some written iudge­ment of God. And thus, betweene written and vnwritten you keepe such a coyle: as men must neuer be quiet, before the supposed essentiall pessession of diuels be deemed, if not a writ­ten, yet some vnwritten iudgement of God at the least. But goe to, propound your owne argument.

Exorcistes.

I propound it thus. All wonderfull iudgements (whether vnwritten or written) are vndoubtedly threatned to disobe­dientSee D. Doctrine page. 27. persons. But, the essentiall possession of diuels is some won­derfull iudgement of God vnwritten or written: therefore, the essentiall possession of diuels is vndoubtedly threatned to dis­obedient persons.

Orthodoxus.

I doe first answere your proposition thus. All such wonder­full iudgements as the Lord in his eternall counsell hath decreed for iudgements: those (whether vnwritten or written) are vndoubtedly threatned to disobedient persons. Then next I denie your Assumption, namely, that the essentiall possession of diuels is any such wonderfull iudgement, as the Lord (in his eternall counsell) hath decreed for a iudgement; neither will you euer be able to proue the same. But goe to, admitte (by the way) your argument were currant in euery point, which will neuer be proued: what then? how doth this conclude your supposed essentiall possessions now, in these daies of the Gospell?

Exorcistes.
[Page 54]

Oh yes sir, if you admitte the premisses, I doubt not to proue that Consequent, by a necessarie prosyllogisme, in this following order.See D. Doctrine, pag. 27. Whatsoeuer wonderfull iudgements (vnwrit­ten or written) are perpetually threatned to the disobedient persons, those iudgements, they are also perpetuallie inflicted vpon the disobedient persons. But, essentiall possessions (being some wonderfull iudgement vnwritten or written) are perpetu­ally threatned to the disobedient persons: therefore essentiall possessions, they also are perpetually inflicted vpon the disobe­dient persons.

Orthodoxus.

The proposition of this your necessarie prosyllogisme, it hal­teth downe right: and will neuer be made to goe currantly an end with all the cunning you haue. For then, all the won­derfull iudgements of God whatsoeuer (whether vnwritten or written) being perpetually threatned against, must also be per­petually inflicted vpon the disobedient persons: Ioh. 9.2.3. Psal. 130.3. and so (by con­sequence) there should be no saluation for any in Christ.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, the essentiall possession of diuels, it is onely but a corporall iudgement: and inflicted vpon men in this present life.

Orthodoxus.

Then is the same also but a conditionall and temporarie iudgement: and may not be auouched perpetuall. For, where the condition of the iudgement it selfe is not perpetuall: there also the perpetuitie of the iudgement falles flat to the ground.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 27.Though the essentiall possession of diuels, be (in deede) but a temporarie iudgement: the Lord notwithstanding, he may now (in these daies of the Gospell) inflict the same vpon some, if so it seemeth him good.

Orthodoxus.

And, he may cease to inflict the same vpon any for euer, if so it seemeth him good: which is euery way as likely and as probable, as that which you say your selfe. Howbeit, be­cause this is not to answere in deede, but rather to hacke sword with sword: we will therefore, more exactly examine the ve­ry point of your argument, which I take to be this, namely, [Page 55] the Lord he may now inflict the essentiall possession of diuels vpon some, See D. Doctrine, pag. 28. in these daies of the Gospell. What then? therefore he doth now also inflict the same vpon some? that followeth faire and farre off. Although yet, this in very deed is your vnan­swerable argument throughout your whole pamphlets almost, as all men may plainely perceiue that shall exactly consi­der the same. Wherein (like a superexcellent Logitian) you doe but blindly reason, A posse, ad esse▪ non valet con­sequentia. from a bare may-bee, to the being of a thing in deed; which concludeth as iustly as Germans lippes, that stoode seuen miles distant asunder. Howbeit, if you will haue it (in any case) accompted an irrefragable reason: then, what say you to another of mine, being cast in one and the selfe same mould with yours, thus. The skie may now fall, and so shall we haue great store of Larkes: therefore, the skie is now falne, and we haue great store of Larkes. If your selfe were forciblie constrained to feed vpon the onely most ad­mirable fruite of such a phantasticall sequell, till you haue ful­ly confirmed your cause in hand: it is to be greatly feared, that the very faintnesse of body would force you to desist from your labors, before you had finisht your businesse.

Exorcistes.

Not so.See D. Doctrine, pag. 28. For, there is as great cause the Lord should inflict this iudgement now: as at any time heretofore.

Orthodoxus.

It is vtterly vntrue.See D. Doctrine, pag. 31. For, the manifestation of Christ his Dei­tie, and the confirmation of his glorious Gospell were the maine causes of possession in Christ his time: those causes being cea­sed long since, how should the effect it selfe be still continu­ed? So then, the maine ends of possessions being long since de­termined: who seeth not lesse cause of inflicting that tempo­rarie iudgement, especially now in these daies of the Gospell? But, be it supposed there were now as great causes of such a wonderfull iudgement as euer before, what then? Seeing the same (as you lately confessed) is onely but a conditionall or temporarie iudgement, and therefore, to be then and there in­flicted, when and where it seemeth good to the Lord: from whence haue your selfe receiued this large Commission, that you dare thus proudly presume to limitte forth the Lord his times and his seasons, for the seasonable inflicting of this your supposed most wonderfull iudgement? The onely wise [Page 56] God, he standes in no neede of your counsell and direction: concerning the timely inflicting of this one, or any other of his temporarie iudgements. Isa. 40.13.14. VVis. 9.13.14. Rom. 11 34.35. 1. Cor. 2.16. See D. Doctrine, pag. 30. Rom. 12.3. Deut. 29.29. 1 Cor. 4.6. For, who euer taught him how to dispose of any his iudiciall proceedings with the sonnes of A­dam? So then, we conclude this point with Master Darrell, and say thus vnto you. You take too much vpon you (good bro­ther) in thus presuming to vnderstand aboue that which is writ­ten, and meete for your selfe to vnderstand: and doe not vnder­stand according to sobrietie. Know you not (good brother) that the things reuealed belong onely to vs, and our children? Why then dare your selfe thus insolently vndertake to limitte the Lord his times, and his turnes: for the timely inflicting of his tempo­rarie iudgments; and to auouch your own apocryphall conceipts, as vnanswerable reasons of those your pretended essentiall possessi­ons, which the Lord hath no where reuealed vnto you, but in truth the contrarie, as appeareth plainely, euen in all our prece­dent Dialogues.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine page 28.Howsoeuer your selfe do restraine the essentiall possession of diuels, to the only manifestation of Christ his Deitie & confir­mation of his glorious gospel: verie certaine it is, yt the aforesaid essentiall possession was euermore a iudgment, inflicted also vp­on the vngodly for sinne. But sinnes of euery kinde are now as rife in the world, as in any age since the beginning: and therefore the Lord, hee may now as iustlie inflict that punish­ment vpon sinners, as heretofore he hath done.

Orthodoxus.

I make none other restraint of that temporarie iudgement, then the sacred Scriptures doe make thereof: as in our sixt, seauenth, and tenth Dialogues appeareth. Notwithstanding be it confessed, that sinnes of euerie kind are as rife in this our age, as euer before: yet, who made you of counsell with the Lord, that you dare so peremptorilie, and so precisely put downe the supposed essentiall possession of diuels (it being but temporarie) as a wonderfull iudgement of God, inflicted especi­allie vpon men for their sins? Seeing it is certaine, that euen those natural infirmities themselues,Iohn. 9.3. which doe now remaine in the world, are not alwaies inflicted vpon men for their sinnes: yea, and sith it is also vndoubtedly true (if we speake properlie, and according to the depth of Diuinitie) that the [Page 57] afflictions which the Lord layeth ordinarilie vpon the E­lect in this life,Rom. 8.1. Robert Ponte. proposition 2. pag. 29. cannot properly be called the punishments for sinne. And therefore it must necessarilie follow, that ey­ther the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, it was not especiallie and purposelie inflicted vpon men for their sinnes, but only for the two former respects: or if so, that then only the repro­bate sort were fearefullie subiected to that speciall iudgement. And so (by consequence) Tho. Darling, he was not then possessed at all: because the whole world, and you also your selfe doe ioyntlie hold him an elected child of God. Moreouer, if some naturall infirmities were purposelie inflicted on men not for sinne as you say,Matt. 8.16.17, Ioh. 9.2.3. See D. Doctrine pag. 31. but for the onlie manifestation of the glorie of God, without any regard of the partie his sinnes: then why not much more a supernaturall maladie, I meane the actual possessi­on of diuels? It being especiallie but a temporarie iudgement of God; tending more especiallie to the glorie of God: yea, and (which more is) the admirable curing also thereof, appropri­ated more especiallie and onlie to Christ himselfe,Matth. 12.23. & 15.22. Gen. 3.15. Psalm. 91.13, Matth. 4.6. as to that onlie sonne of Dauid, who was actuallie to bruse the Serpents head, and triumphantlie to suppresse the Lion and Dragon. Be­sides all this, if the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, was a won­derfull iudgement inflicted vpon men for their sinne: it is ve­rie likely then,Matth. 9.2. Mar. 2.5. Luk. 5.20. Iohn. 5.14. that our Sauiour Christ in curing the same (as in the rest of many other his miraculous cures) would also haue put the possessed especiallie in mind of their sinnes, and of sinning no more. Howbeit, hee neuer gaue those men whome he deliuered from Satans possession any such watchword at all, concerning eyther their sinnes, or their sinning no more: and therefore it is verie probable, that that temporarie iudgement was neuer purposelie inflicted for sinne, but onelie for those the aforesaid respects. Neyther can those your quoted Scrip­tures, in any possibilitie, conclude your former assertion con­cerning the inflicting of actual possessions vpon men for their sinnes: those selfesame Scriptures hauing onelie a relation to some naturall infirmities, Ioh 9.2.3▪ Matth. 9.2. Iohn. 5.14. and not to this your supposed su­pernaturall maladie, I meane your essentiall possession of diuels. Furthermore, if possessions whatsoeuer be inflicted especiallie vpon men for their sinnes: it is verie likelie the same (being so extraordinarie a iudgement) would haue beene more espe­ciallie inflicted vpon extraordinarie sinners: but that we may [Page 58] plainely perceiue to be otherwaies. For not onelie the same was eftsoones inflicted vpon sillie poore persons, vpon young children and infants: See D. Detecti­on. page. 93. See S.H. Disco­uerie. pag. 114. but (which more is) that your pretended patient, he did (you say) vndergoe that wonderfull iudgement, not so much for any sinne of his owne, as for the sinnes of Not­tingham, and the Countrie about: and therefore it appeares by the premisses, that euen the actuall possession it selfe, was not alwaies inflicted vpon men for their sinnes. Now then, if not for sinne, as hath beene declared, then for the two former re­spects. But these two respects are long since determined: and therefore the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, was long since also concluded and ended. Brieflie be it supposed, that the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, was euermore a wonderfull iudgement inflicted especiallie vpon men for their sins, and that there be now as great sins in the world as euer before: yet your ordinarie conclusion (a posse, ad esse) inforced from thence, namelie, that therefore men (may be) as well possessed now, as at anie time heretofore, if so it seemes good to the Lord, doth not necessarilie follow thereof. For this (may be possessed now) doth not certainely conclude any certaine possession now; vnles you can first very certainely demonstrate vnto vs, that euen now also (as well as in Christs time) it seemeth good to the Lord, to inflict vpon men the selfe same wonderfull iudgement. Because, howsoeuer it be vndoubtedly true, that the Lord (if it seemeth him good) may do all things whatsoeuer: yet this also is as vndoubtedly true,Psal. 135.6. namely, that whatsoeuer the Lord willeth, that onely doth he in heauen and in earth. Which will of the Lord, when you (by the witnes of his owne mouth) are able to auouch direct­lie vnto vs, as an vndoubted confirmation of this your sin­gular conceite, concerning the essentiall possession of Diuels: we will then very willingly giue ouer the field, and yeeld you the conquest. In the meane time, if we also should argue a­gainst you thus. The Lord God, he hath (besides the possession of Diuels) ten thousand strange iudgements in store, to inflict vpon men for their sinnes: therefore (purposely pretermit­ting this temporarie iudgement of actual possession) he may feare­fullie inflict any other iudgement vpon obstinate sinners. If I say, we should argue on this sort (a posse, ad esse) would you not forthwith conclude great childishnes in vs? And yet this [Page 59] sophisme of ours (from a bare may be, to the being of a thing in deede) it hath so much more probabilitie of truth then hath yours: by how much the actuall possession of Diuels was only but a temporarie iudgement, and long since determined by our Sauour Christ, as in our seuenth, eight, ninth, and tenth Dialogues very plainely appeareth.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir,See D. Doctrine, pag. 28. I haue the consent of all Churches: the testimonie of Fathers, of trauellers, of Papists, yea and the very vaunts which the Iesuites make of their Exorcistes calling: to proue the continuance of essentiall possessions now in these daies of the Gospell.

Orthodoxus.

Your consent of all Churches (for any thing hetherto heard) is onely a consent, consisting wholy in silence. Moreo­uer (whatsoeuer may be the testimonie of Fathers herein) your writers themselues, they are onely brought in as dumbe shewes on the stage, and so they depart againe without spea­king at all: vnles happilie their generall silence must argue their particular consents to your purpose in hand. Other­waies, it may be supposed, that the great multitude of Fa­thers (whom you haue so mightely mustered on rankes in your margine) they would haue been made to parle, and to fight in your quarell as well as Wyerus: had they not taken the pette at your manner of marching, or been suddenly depri­ued of speech. As for Wyerus his rouing report concerning the seuentie possessed at Rome in one night, with the thirtie also at Amsterdam, it smels of the rotte, and argueth some Legerde­maine among the Exorcistes there at the least. Both because the parties themselues (being but Children) were the lesse able to espie and withstand the intoxicated potions, and be­witched inchantments of those cousening paltrie Priests: and for that those their pretended possessions befell them so on the sudden, as if the possession of Diuels, were onely an infectious or catching disease. Besides that, Wyerus he is one whose au­thenticall credit, your owne selfe hath else where disabled in matters more likelie then this: and therefore the lesse rea­son we should credit his rouing reports in these matters, espe­ciallie so strange and incredible. Now next concerning those your trauellers, that must tell vs their terrible tidings [Page 60] of your essentiall possessions in places else where, you know the accustomed Prouerbe: namely, that such as haue been at Rome may lie by authoritie. In consideration whereof, we deeme it much better for vs to entertaine (at our pleasures) those the Romish reports of your trauellers: then to trauerse the trueth of their trothlesse tales, by trauelling our selues to Rome for the due triall thereof. In like manner, the testimonie of your Papistes is of little importance concerning these speciall points. Both, because when the same shall be brought to the highest degree, it is but the bare testimonie of some cogging Copartners in the selfesame like cosoning practises: and for that also the reporter thereof is onely Thyreus, D. Detection, pag. 42. a man, whom your owne selfe doth deeplie discredit throughout your whole Pamphlet, yea and M. Darrel he saith: to conuince by such, is to beate the ayre, and not to dispute. Brieflie, your Exorcists calling, their pretended power and proud vaunts, for the powerfull expelling of Diuels (euery of those suting so fitly with Exorcistes him selfe and his seuerall practises) are all very fitly and fully confuted by D. Fulke, vpon seuerall occasions, and in sundry places throughout our sixt, ninth, and tenth Dialogues. The which reuerend and learned Doc­tor, did therefore not purposely bend his penne against the non-being of actuall possessions now in these daies of the Gospell: because (in his time) the being thereof was neuer so confident­ly braued out, before now, nor so impudently auouched from pretended examples of particular persons, as it is now by your selfe.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 29.But, why seemes it incredible there should be essentiall possessions: in these daies of the Gospell?

Orthodoxus.

Because, the working of miracles being ceased long since: the possession of Diuels whatsoeuer (being alwaies miraculous) did euen then also determine therewith, as in our sixt, ninth, and tenth Dialogues appeareth.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 29.It seemes then, by the purport of your speech, that to be possest with a diuell, is a miracle: and not any disease which was sometimes miraculously cured. For why? the ceasing of mi­racles putteth only an ende vnto miracles, and not to any [Page 61] the diseases them selues which were sometimes miraculouslie cured by Christ: otherwise, we should haue none sicke (now in these daies) of any naturall disease whatsoeuer. Howbeit, as all other naturall diseases (notwithstanding any their mi­raculous curing in the daies of Christ) are yet still continued amongst vs now, and are cured also by meere naturall medi­cines: so surely there may be essentiall possessions now, as a su­pernaturall maladie remayning with men, although no such miraculous curing of possessions now, as were heretofore effec­ted by Christ, and his owne Disciples.

Orthodoxus.

Howsoeuer you catch at any thing spoken, it appeareth rather (by the verie purporte of your answere) that you doe purposelie cauill, and but wrangle at words as being vtterlie vnable to incounter directlie with the matter it selfe, exprest in those words: and so (for default of an aduersarie) you but sportinglie fight with a phantasied shadow. For who e­uer auouched the only possession of diuels to be simplie a mira­cle? and not rather some such supernaturall matter, as was on­ly, and at all times miraculouslie cured? Which selfesame su­pernaturall or miraculous manner of curing, being ceassed long since: that supernaturall manner of vexing by Satan, must ne­cessarilie determine therewith. Otherwise the Church should still vndergoe some supernaturall maladie: for which there is now no supernaturall medicine remayning, which once to imagine, were to too absurde. Howbeit, that wee may the more strick [...]ly examine your confused answere by the seue­rall members: I pray you propound the seuerall points impli­ed therein, in a more seuerall order.

Exorcistes.

Content:See D. Doctrine, pag. 29. this then I say first. All naturall diseases what­soeuer (notwithstanding their former miraculous manner of curing) are yet still continued with men: therefore that super­naturall disease, I meane the essentiall possession of diuels (not­withstanding the former miraculous manner of curing) it also is yet still continued with men.

Orthodoxus.

I answere you thus. Naturall diseases they are yet stil con­tinued with men, as infirmities naturallie arising from the cor­ruptions of nature: supernaturall diseases, I meane the possession [Page 56] of diuels whatsoeuer, they euer did, and doe onely proceede from some supernaturall cause, namely, from that eternal God, who alone is the creator, the orderer, the disposer, the director and reformer of nature, as in our sixt Dialogue we haue plain­ly declared. Now then, howsoeuer wee may certainely con­clude the continuance of meere naturall diseases, so long es­speciallie as the corruptions of nature it selfe doe remaine: yet can we not certainely conclude from thence, any deter­mined continuance of supernaturall diseases, vnlesse also we can certainelie set downe a predetermined perseuerance thereof, from the perpetuall determination of that supernatural and pri­marie efficient, who (hauing in his owne hidden counsell decreed it so) will also accordinglie execute and effect the same vpon some at the least. Howbeit, such secret decrees are vnknowne to men: & therfore such supernatural diseases may neuer (by any mā liuing) be auouched for certaine. But goe on I pray in expounding the other part of your answere.

Exorcistes.

I propound it thus. Naturall diseases (notwithstanding their former miraculous maner of curing) are now stil to be cu­red of vs,See D. Doctrine, pag. 29. by meere naturall medicines: therefore supernaturall diseases, I meane the essentiall possessions of diuels (notwith­standing anie their former miraculous manner of curing) they also are now still to be cured by some supernaturall medicine, namelie, by prayer and fasting.

Orthodoxus.

I answere you thus. The curing of naturall diseases by meere naturall medicines;Exod. 15.25. 2. King. 20.7. Pro 27.9. 1. Tim. 5.23. Eccl. 38.1.4.12 is a flat institution and ordinance of the only wise God: and therefore the same is to be conscio­nablie and carefullie obserued of all men. Howbeit, the su­pernaturall remedie for supernaturall diseases, it was then, and now also, the only supernaturall vertue and power of the om­nipotent God: the which supernatural power of his was so far­forth, and so long time dispensed to some certaine particu­lar persons, as those supernaturall diseases continued in vse. And therefore vnlesse you be able to proue directlie vnto vs the perpetuall continuance of such supernaturall mala­dies; it is in vaine to pretend the perpetuitie and dispensation of any such supposed supernaturall medicine. Although not­withstanding, if you were sufficiently able to confirme the [Page 57] continuance of actuall possessions, euē now in these daies of the Gospell: yet surely, that your pretended ordinarie remedie of prayer and fasting for the curing thereof, will not possiblie be made to serue for your purpose, as our ninth Dialogue doth tell you, & shall be declared more at large, when we come to handle that point. For if the possession of diuels whatsoe­uer, be (as your selfe doth confesse) a disease no lesse superna­turall now, then were those primarie possessions in the dayes of Christ: wee doe verilie suppose, that the curing of possessions now, must needes be as supernaturall and as miraculous, as were any the miraculous curings of actuall possession in the dayes of Christ, whatsoeuer you prate to the contrarie. For (be the times what they will) this is vndoubtedly true, that supernaturall maladies whatsoeuer, they cannot possiblie be cured but by the only supernaturall medicine, I meane the im­mediate vertue & power of the Lord. And so by consequence, the curing of possessions now whatsoeuer: it must (notwith­standing any your pretended ordinarie meanes of prayer and fasting) be fullie as miraculous now, as euer before.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 29.30.Not so, for the miracle then was only the admirable curing of essential possessions, by the immediate power of a commaunding word: the extraordinarie vse of which selfesame commaund­ing power, is long since determined together, with the mira­culous manner of curing it selfe. Howbeit, the ordinarie curing of possessions now, it is only by the mediate power of an intrea­ting word▪ and therefore such ordinarie manner of curing possessions now, is no more miraculous then is the ordinarie hea­ling of blindnes, deafnes, dumbnes, & other like naturall diseases by meere naturall medicines. Among which said natural dis­eases, the essential possession of diuels is iointly recorded in scrip­ture; as a ioynt ordinary disease of like perpetuall continuance.

Orthodoxus.

The miraculous curing of possessions in Christs time, was at no hand effected by an onely bare commaunding word, prolated and vttered abroad in the ayre with a vanishing sound, for so there should, euen in onely bare syllables and words, be ne­cessarily included some magicall force: but the said miracu­lous curing then, was primarily and efficiently accomplished by some supernaturall power concurring also therewith, and [Page 64] inabling that selfesame commaunding word, to the admirable effecting of such a miraculous worke. In like manner, nei­ther is that your pretended ordinarie curing of possessions now whatsoeuer, effected by an onely bare entreating word, pro­lated and vented abroad in the ayre with a vanishing sound as before; for so, some magicall inchauntment should lie se­cretly lurking in the only bare syllables and words pronoun­ced, which were monstrous absurd to imagine: but this your pretended ordinarie curing of possessions now, it must also be primarilie, and efficientlie accomplished by some supernaturall power concurring also therewith, and inabling that selfe­same intreating word, to the admirable effecting of such a mi­raculous worke. For notwithstanding those your different termes of commaunding and intreating; that supereminent power which effecteth the businesse, is euer but one and the same. And therefore, howsoeuer the actuall possession of diuels be ioyntlie recorded with those naturall diseases, which are onlie to be cured by meere natural medicines: yet neyther are they a ioynt ordinarie disease, Iob. 1.6. & 2.1. nor of like perpetuall continuance; no more than Satan himselfe may therefore be [...]aid to be of like holinesse with other the sonnes of God, because he is ioynt­ly recorded among the sonnes of God: and therefore notwith­standing the ioynt recording of this one, with those naturall diseases which are now to be cured by onely meere naturall meanes: that supernaturall curing of the precedent and subse­quent possessions whatsoeuer, it was then, and is now (if anie such be) euen equallie and proportionablie most admirable, straunge and miraculous. Moreouer, if the pretended possession of diuels whatsoeuer, must therefore be now deemed but a meere naturall maladie, and only because it is ioyntlie recorded among those other diseases of men which are meerely natu­rall, a thing to too absurde and senceles: then surely (be­sides that you do therein directly crosse your former speech, where you make it a supernaturall maladie) the curing of pos­sessions now whatsoeuer,D. Doctrine, pag. 29. must needes be as meerely naturall, as the ordinarie curing of all other the naturall diseases recor­ded therewith. And so by consequence your prayers and fa­stings they are now but meere naturall medicines, no lesse na­turally effectual for the ordinarie curing of people possessed with diuels; then anie other physicall receits whatsoeuer, for the or­dinarie [Page 65] curing of meere naturall diseases, which were meerelie absurde to imagine, but most palpable grosse to auouch. O­therwaies, if the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, be (as your self doth els where affirme) a supernaturall disease, D. Doctrine, pag. 79. D. Detection. pag. 41. and the reme­die also thereof, namely, praier and fasting, a supernaturall re­medie: then surely the curing of such possessions (whensoeuer, and by whomsoeuer effected) it also must needs be superna­turall, straunge and miraculous, for a like cause argueth a like effect. And so by consequence, the working of miracles must still be continued in the Churches of Christ: an opinion di­rectlie opposite to the approued iudgements of all men. For all doe vniformely auouch, and very confidently conclude in one, that the working of miracles was only but a temporary priuiledge particularly bestowed on some, and that also, for those two former respects: namely, the declaration of Christs deitie, and confirmation of his glorious Gospell, as in our sixt, ninth and tenth Dialogues, hath beene shewed at large.

Exorcistes.

Howsoeuer principallie for those two former respectes,See D. Doctrine, pag. 31. there were in the dayes of Christ an essentiall possession of Di­uels, and other diseases: yet were there some other cause or causes besides, especiallie the outragious sinnes of people, the which also our Sauiour Christ (in curing the parties possessed) doth eftsoones admonish them of,Math. 9.2. Mark. 2.5. Luk. 5.20. Ioh. 5.14. as wee shewed before. Howbeit, the selfesame sinnes doe now remaine among men, in these dayes of the Gospell: and therefore also the selfesame essentiall possessions.

Orthodoxus.

That there were essentiall possessions eyther then or now, we haue euer denied: and your selfe shal neuer be able to proue the same, before you haue fullie disproued the seuerall rea­sons put downe in our second, third, fourth and fift Dialogues concerning those speciall points. Notwithstanding all this, if (by the way) the same should be graunted, which (by sway of argument) would neuer be gayned: yet were there no se­quele at all in your argument. For (besides that the same is your old accustomed suresbie, a posse ad esse) you doe reason absurdlie and fondlie in reasoning thus. The like sinnes doe still remaine among men in these dayes of the Gospell: there­fore also, the like essentiall possessions. Surelie you shall neuer [Page 66] be able to make vs beleeue that this consequent is currant: vnlesse you can soundlie perswade vs before hand, that the vnmatchable God hath (by some matchable couenant) conclu­ded couertlie with Exorcistes himselfe, to make the executi­on of any his wonderfull iudgements inflicted on sinners, e­uerie way proportionable and suteable to Exorcistes his phantasticall and itching conceit. For wee haue shewed be­fore, that the Lord did not purposelie inflict that extraordi­narie iudgement vpon men for their sinnes: and your quoted Scriptures they proue no such matter, as wee told you also before. If notwithstanding all this, you wil needs haue your sequele canonized currant; then how answere you this? The like sinnes do remaine among men now a dayes,Luk. 17.27. which were heretofore found in the dayes of Noah: therefore, there is now also the like ineuitable floud of water, that then drowned the world.

Exorcistes.

Gen. 9.14, 15.That followeth not. For the Lord God (by a perpetuall co­uenant) hath put a finall end to the like floud of water for euer: and sealed that selfesame couenant with a perpetuall signe.

Orthodoxus.

Ioh. 12.31.Euen so hath our Sauiour Christ (by a solemne perpetu­all promise as it were) put a finall end to the actuall possession of diuels: and sealed vp that selfesame promise by a perpetuall signe, Math. 12.39.40 I meane his death and resurrection, as in our sixt and seauenth Dialogues appeareth. But goe to then, how answere you this?Isa. 1.10. & 3.9 Ezech. 16.49. Luk. 17.29. 1. King. 2.23.24 The selfe same sins remaine at this day, which were erst to be seene in Sodome and Gomorrah: therefore also the selfesame iudgement of Brimstone, and fire from heauen. Or this, there is one and the selfesame deriding of the Prophets and seruants of God, which was in the dayes of Elisha: therefore there is one,2. King. 17.25. and the selfesame deuouring with Beares. Or this, there is the selfesame prophanenes now, which was erst in Sa­maria: therfore the like feareful destruction by Lyons. 2. King. 5.27. Or this, There are as bribing companions now in these dayes, as euer was Gehazi himselfe: therefore there is now the like leprous vengeance on them, that was erst on Gehazi himselfe. Goe to now Exorcistes, what say you to these and the like ex­ceptions against that your precedent inuincible argu­ment?

Exorcistes.
[Page 67]

These were euery of them, extraordinarie iudgements.

Orthodoxus.

And what one liuing man but your selfe alone, was euer so impudent as once to auouch: that the possession of diuels whatsoeuer, is an ordinarie iudgement of God?

Exorcistes.

Well sir,See D. Doctrine. pag. 31. how extraordinarie iudgements soeuer, the Lord God notwithstanding (if it seemeth him good) hee may euen now (in these dayes of the Gospell) inflict any one of them all vpon Sinners.

Orthodoxus.

Oh sir, recall home your wits I beseech you. I haue told you ofttimes before, and must now tell you againe, that the question is not what God may doe: but what hee now doth in these dayes of the Gospell. We verie confidently affirme that the Lord now in these dayes of the Gospell, doth not afflict any person, by an actuall possession of diuels, because the two onlie ends of that wonderfull iudgement, are long since de­termined: your answere thereunto is euermore but one and the same, namelie the Lord may doe it, a sillie poore answere God knowes. And thus in all your disputations (when wee once come to the verie period or point of the question) you are euen forciblie constrained to continue (as before) your cir­cular motion: from a bare may be, to the being of things.

Exorcistes.

In deed sir,See D. Doctrine, pag. 31. if it were certainely true, that men heretofore had bin only possest for those two former respects: I would then (without further contradiction) ioyne fullie with you in this speciall point. Howbeit, very certaine it is that they were also possest for outragious sinnes. Now such sinnes are still remayning with men: therefore also such essentiall possessions.

Orthodoxus.

Had possessions bin onlie for those two former respects: you would then (you confesse) haue freely consented vnto vs. Howbeit they were also (you say) for sinne. Now surely (if words could carrie the matter away) you would make a no­table Captaine to keepe an hold; for sure they were to be wel laden with words. Neyther will you euer giue out, before your braines be beaten about your eares: but still forsooth [Page 68] they were possessed for sinne. Howbeit this Cuckoe-like melodie hath beene so oft in your mouth: that it beginneth now to wax very stale for want of varietie. Notwithstanding all this, we need not be curious for answere herein; if wee please to accept of your curteous offer concerning your ioyning with vs in this point.D. Doctrine, pag. 30.31. For that the possession of diuels was gene­rallie for those two former respects: your owne selfe haue con­fessed before. That the same also was purposelie inflicted for sinne, the impregnable proofe thereof, doth as yet haerere in calamo, cleaue fast to your quill: and we haue sufficiently de­clared the contrarie a little before.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 32.Yes sir, there were essentiall possessions of Diuels, before the comming of Christ. But such possessions could not possiblie be then for the declaration of Christ his Deitie, it being not then manifested to the world in the flesh: and therefore those possessions must necessarilie be then inflicted vpon men for their sinnes.

Orthodoxus.

There were neuer essentiall possessions of Diuels, either be­fore, or after the comming of Christ, as in our second, third, and fourth Dialogue appeareth. Yea, and this we further a­uouch for the purpose in hand, that there were no actuall pos­sessions at all (for any long time especallie) before the com­ming of Christ, as we haue sufficiently shewed before, and your quotations of Scripture conclude not your cause: especi­allie that in the Acts. Math. 12.27. Act. 19.13. Vnlesse happily you would haue vs imagine that the presumptuous practise of the seauen sonnes of Sheua, and this your preposterous attempt did euery of them proceed from one and the selfesame ground, and tended ioyntly to one and the selfesame purpose. Both because they were neuer authenticallie furnisht with a powerfull authori­tie from Christ, to mannage throughlie their preposterous pre­tences: and for that also they felt then, and your selfe feele now (in a fearefull experience) euen but one and the selfe­same effect. Act. 19.16. Namelie, their adiured Demoniake outragiously running on them, and rending their carkasses: your coniured patient verie fiercelie returning on you in discouering his cosinage, to the cracking of your credit for euer, as touch­ing your exquisite skill in the Cabalisticall craft: inso [Page 69] much as they, & you also your selfe were driuen out a dores all naked and wounded. Touching the peoples discerning of possessions whatsoeuer, by any the supposed signes thereof, we haue answered fullie before: and doe here very confidently conclude, that this your pretended possession in Sommers (if the same was no cosinage at all concerning your selfe) it was vndoubtedly a meere illusion of Satan at least.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir,D. Doctrine, pag. 32. that (I assure you) is vtterly impossible. Because then not only our eyes, but the rest of our senses (our tasting only excepted) they were all deceiued. For very certaine it is, that my selfe with some hundred and fiftie besides at the least: we saw, we heard, we smelt, and we handled very strange and impossible accidents, I assure you.

Orthodoxus.

Your assurance herein, is not worth one rush. For if those your pretended admirable accidents, were (indeede and in truth) so straunge and impossible as you beare vs in hand: how then could your selfe, or any one of those hundred and fiftie eyther see, or heare, or smell, or handle them at all? Sith it is certainely sure that your corporall senses: they could not possiblie comprehend any such supernaturall, strannge or impossible matters. Besides all this, it is not impossible that the rest of your senses (as well as your eyes) might all be delu­ded by meanes of some deceiueable notions, at that instant a­rising from some deceiueable obiects, apprehended forthwith in the imaginatiue facultie, and disordering the iudgement: as in our second,D. Doctrine. pag. 24. D. Detection, pag. 110.138. fourth and fift Dialogues is largely decla­red. Brieflie you your owne selfe, doe else where very confi­dentlie auouch for infallible truth, that diuels (in very deed) will vndoubtedly seeme to doe some things in an outward shew: when as (in truth) they effect no such matters at all. And there­fore trust not (I aduise you) your naturall senses too farre, in discerning of diuels themselues, or of any their supernatu­rall actions: least (in the end) you be inforced with open shame to acknowledge your naturall follie. The rest is fullie answered before. And therefore to conclude this point; I be­seech you beware, lest (while with such a setled pertinacie you be drawen to denie the possibilitie of Satans illusions in those your pretended essentiall possessions) you doe not both [Page 70] purposelie delude your poore ignorant Reader, 2. Thes. 2.11.2 and prepo­sterouslie procure (at vnwares) such strong and such feare­full illusions vpon your owne soule, as may make you to beleeue er­ronious lies, and to repose your whole felicitie and pleasure in all vnrighteousnes: Loe Exorcistes, this is the worst I wish you, and this is the best I can doe for you. And thus much in effect for a summarie answere, concerning the supposed es­sentiall possession of those your eight pretended Demoniakes, set downe at large in your second Narration.

Lycanthropus.

Surely sir, this may suffice any reasonable man not parti­allie wedde to his proper conceit.

Pneumatomachus.

A reasonable man say you? Let him be reasonable or vn­reasonable: hee shall neuer be able with any sound or sub­stantiall reason to answere the same.

Phylologus.

Very true as you say: but what saith Exorcistes vnto it.

Exorcistes.

I say they were all essentiallie possessed of Satan: and your selues haue not hitherto proued the contrarie.

Phisiologus.

You say they were all essentiallie possessed, and we haue not hitherto proued the contrarie: a proper Disputer no doubt. You must take libertie to pester the Church with your idle affirmatiue positions: and then put vs (against all order of learning) to proue the negatiue part, or els forsooth (because your mastership saith it) your Cabalistical conceits must needs be canonized currant. No, no Exorcistes, you are not yet come to that credit in the schooles of the Prophets, that what­soeuer your selfe shall but barelie report, the same (without all peraduenture) must be deemed an authentical oracle. And therefore affoord vs some sounder arguments to proue the essentiall possessions of spirits and diuels: or presently giue ouer the conference.

Exorcistes.

How slenderlie soeuer you recken of those my precedent reasons: I haue such an apparant confirmation of that which I hold concerning these matters, as your selfe shall neuer be able to contradict. Namely, a very straunge and [Page 71] vnwonted experiment, from a poore Boy at Northwich in Cheshire; euen now (at this present) essentiallie possessed of Satan.

Orthodoxus.

Yea, but how are you certaine the Boy is (in deed and in truth) essentially possessed of Satan?

Exorcistes.

Why sir, I my selfe haue beene there sith he was so posses­sed, to take a circumspect view of his fearefull fits: and doe plainely perceiue (by his supernaturall actions and passions) that he is (in verie deed) essentiallie possessed of some spirit or di­uell at the least.

Orthodoxus.

So were you with him also (as some doe crediblie auouch) immediatlie before he fel into these his supposed fittes: and might therfore (for any thing known to the cōtrary) be con­federate with himselfe or some others, concerning those his cosoning courses. But be it supposed you neuer saw him be­fore, and then tell vs how you dare so confidently conclude from those his supposed actions, an essentiall possession of some spirit or diuell: sith diuels (you know) are such spirituall and inuisible substances, as may not possiblie be discerned by a­ny corporall sense.

Exorcistes.

Why sir? his supernaturall actions do plainely demonstrate the same to all the world.

Orthodoxus.

Rehearse some few of those his supposed supernaturall actions I pray you.

Exorcistes.

I will. First he continuallie waggeth his head without anie intermission at all.

Orthodoxus.

So doth the palsie sicke patient, as we may see by daylie ex­perience: and (which more is) whereas the palsie-sicke hath no intermission at all: that your pretended Demoniake, hee onelie waggeth the head in the day time and when people are present, howbeit in the night time he sleepes very qui­etlie as his owne mother reporteth. And therefore if an on­ly bare wagging of the head doth necessarilie argue an essen­tiall [Page 72] possession: then euery palsie sicke patient that waggeth the head, hee also is essentiallie possessed of Satan. Howbeit sir? we also our selues haue seene this your supposed Demoniake as well as your selfe: but could not perceiue in him any such supernaturall actions or passions, as you boldlie report vpon your bare credit.

Besides that, if the onlie bare wagging of the head must ne­cessarilie conclude a supernaturall action: then euery little childe that playeth wag-wanton, it also effecteth some su­pernaturall action. Moreouer this one and the rest of those your pretended Demoniakes, they were and are commonlie ouertaken with those their supposed supernaturall fits, when they are layd on their bedde, and closelie vnder a couerlid: by which meanes they may the more easilie wagge their heads, or worke any their pretended actions, and so likewise the sooner deceiue the sillie beholders. Who being wholie ta­ken vp before with a deepe impression of some supposed es­sentiall possession: were thereby so fearefullie forestalled in iudgement, as they could not prouidently behold nor adui­sedlie consider the manner of the Demoniakes working. And therefore this wagging of the head, it is no such supernaturall action, as may vndoubtedlie conclude an essentiall possession.

Exorcistes.

But sir? besides this extraordinary wagging of the head, he is also of a supernaturall strength.

Orthodoxus.

No such supernaturall strength was apparant to vs, being present with him (I assure you) in the very extremitie, or middest of those his pretended fits. For the one of vs did ea­sily hold his head, his shoulders, and all the other parts of his bodie from mouing at all, yea, and this also euen in de­spight of the boy himselfe, or of any supposed Diuell inherent within him: and therefore this supernaturall strength, is ra­ther supposed and suggested by your selfe and your fauou­rites, then any waies soundly prooued, or but probablie de­monstrated to vs.

Exorcistes.

Besides all this, hee was vndoubtedly of a supernaturall knowledge: for if two or three had suddenly come into the parlour where he lay, with seuerall bookes of sundrie matters [Page 73] hid close in their hats: hee could tell which of them had the holie Bible of God in his hat, and at him he would catch and snatch, letting all the prophane bookes passe quietly by him without any such stirre at all.

Orthodoxus.

So could Bankes his blacke horse very sensiblie demon­strate what money some had in his purse, with sundrie other trickes more admirable then this by much: and yet not possessed at all with a Diuell.

So a blind man (but casting his staffe at all aduenture) may happely at some time to kill a Crow: and yet neither indued with supernaturall knowledge, nor possest with a Diuell in the doing thereof.

So likewise, a blindfolded lubber playing at blindman buzz, may happely (by skuffling vp and downe in the house) to light vpon one and the selfe same person for two or three times together: and yet not assisted therein at all with any supernaturall knowledge, or led thereunto by any the extraor­dinarie directions of either Spirit or Diuell.

Briefly, so likewise a little yong child playing at handie dan­die, may happely (for three or foure times together) to make choise of that hand wherein the pin or the point is placed: and all this (I hope) without any supernaturall knowledge at all. And therefore it is very absurd that your selfe (from any such action as stands only vpon hap and hap hazard) should so confidently conclude a supernaturall knowledge, and so (by consequence) an essentiall possession of either Spirit or Diuell.

Besides that, how confidently soeuer you report this point of chusing the Bible before any other booke else: there bee some of good credit, and such also as fauour your cause (so farre forth especially as they perceiue not as yet the contra­rie truth) who doe confidently report that in deede and in truth, this your supposed Demoniake did so much as you say for once or twice: but that at some other times againe hee had failed grosly therein: and therefore this tricke of hap-hazard, is no such certaine signe, as may vndoubtedly con­clude an essentiall possession, in that your pretended poore patient.

I told you a little before (if you haue not forgotten) that (whensoeuer you hapned afresh vpon some other such new-found [Page 74] Demoniake) we then should haue some other new signes of this your supposed essentiall possession to make your game hit: Supra, in pag. 44.45. and now I perceiue it is growing very fast towards such a pretended period. For behold, wee haue here now (in this your newly pretended Demoniake) two other essentiall signes forsooth of an essentiall possession: namely, the wagging of the head: and the playing at handie dandie. Alas Exorcistes, though your conscience trembleth not, yet me thinkes your very face should blush for shame, in reporting these trifling toyes for true and infallible tokens of an essentiall possession of some one Diuell or other, inherently couching within the very bodie of this your new-found Demoniake.

Exorcistes.

But sir, besides all this the boy (I assure you) he is (for the whole time of his fearefull fits) so senselesse in euery part, as he neither seeth, nor heareth, nor speaketh, nor feeleth: and therefore essentially possest with a Diuell.

Orthodoxus.

How know you for certaine, that hee is (in deede and in truth) so senselesse, as you beare vs in hand? You are able (I confesse) to know when your selfe neither seeth, nor heareth, nor speaketh, nor feeleth: but that you should (in like man­ner) discerne as soundly of any such defect of sense in ano­ther, it is much more (I beleeue) than you are able to de­monstrate truely vnto vs. For be it supposed, that (for the whole time of those his pretended fits) there is in him no vse of his senses in any outward appearance to men: doth it follow necessarilie, that therefore there is within him also no true habite of sense at all? that is more (I beleeue) then you may truly auouch. Sith a man in a traunce may seeme (in all outward appearance) as though he were vtterly depriued of sense: when yet still he retaineth soundly an habite of sense, though (for a season) he wanteth the vse and practise thereof.

Exorcistes.

Sir, the very instance you giue, doth cleerely illustrate the infallible truth of that which I tell you. For euen as a man in a trance may seeme (in all outward appearance) as if he were sensles: so doth this poore boy (I assure you) in euery of those his fearefull fits: and therefore he is essentially possest with a Diuell.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 75]

That followeth fayre and farre off: yea and (by as good reason) you may likewise very boldlie conclude, that the man in a traunce is also possest with a spirit or Diuell: because (in all outward appearance) he seemeth no lesse sensles then this your pretended Demoniake. But (by the way) be it here graunted freely vnto you, that an vndoubted true sense­lesnesse doth argue (in deed) an essentiall possession: yet are you not able to demonstrate truely vnto vs, that the boy at Northwich, is (in those his pretended fittes) vndoubted­lie and truly so senslesse as you beare vs in hand, but that (howsoeuer it seemed in outward appearance) he both sawe and heard, and spake, and felt, as may very probablie be ga­thered thus.

First, that he sensiblie heard it is very apparant, in as much as my selfe but wishing (in his presence) a sight of his vrine, and being told by his parents, that the vrine which he first made in the morning was newly cast forth, but yet (said they) if you stay any time, you may happilie haue some from him afresh before it bee long: within a while after, such meanes was made by the boy (notwithstanding he was then in the extremitie of his fit) as I had forthwith his vrine (for­sooth) in no lesse orderly a manner, then if he had been in his perfect estate, which argueth plainely, that either his mother she had an extraordinarie reuelation concerning the fit time for affoording his vrine vnto her: or that the boy himselfe (hauing heard before my motion concerning that matter) did make such meanes as (notwithstanding that his said fit) his mother very orderly receiued his vrine without any spil­ling at all in the bed, and therefore this concludeth no sense­lesse condition, but rather the contrarie.

Againe, that he sensiblie sawe at that present, we proue it thus: because (besides the often casting of his eyes vpon vs at sundrie times) when his sister also came to his bed side in a foule or sluttish coate, and was therefore rebuked sharpelie of her mother: the boy (both seeing his sisters sluttishnes, and hearing his mothers rebukes) hee laughed heartilie thereat. And thereupon, the mother being tolde by the one of vs there, that the boy (it should seeme) he was not so sensllesse as they would beare vs in hand, her answer was this: name­ly, [Page 76] that the shrewd boy, he would oftentimes laugh in his fittes at many such knaueries: which argueth in him no such sensles condition as your selfe would pretend.

Againe, the Boy being kept (for tenne dayes together) in the Lord Bishop of Chester his pallace, and secretlie watched by some of his seruants, to spie forth his counterfeit carriage if any such were: he told his mother so much when hee was returned home (as she confesseth her selfe) and how the Bi­shops men stood peeping at him through the chinkes of the dore to spie forth his practises. But mother (saith he) I saw them full well, and was also as craftie as they: which argueth no sensles condition at all.

Againe, that he also (at that present) very sensiblie felt, may thus be prooued. Namely, for that the one of vs holding him fast perforce (as we told you before) he not onlie endeuou­red to preuent our sayd purpose, but when hee perceiued himselfe to be conquered in despite of his teeth, he forthwith roared and cryed out: which argueth plainely that he sensiblie heard, and saw and felt; yea, and that he might also be made to speake (as appeares by his crying) if he were well coniured a while with a three corded whippe. And therefore for any thing hitherto heard, this your new-found Demoniake, hee was not so sensles, as your selfe would senselesly beare vs in hand.

Exorcistes.

But sir, hee spake many wonderfull things in euery of his traunces, yea such and so straunge (I assure you) as could not possiblie be vttered forth by one of his yeares, without some supernaturall direction of eyther spirit or diuell at the least.

Orthodoxus.

We heard not any such speeches at all at our being there with him.

Exorcistes.

Very true as you say. Howbeit at sundrie other times hee vttered many: al which were penned downe from his mouth by sundrie persons, and some of them also verie graue and godlie Preachers, as may plainely be seene in many sheetes of paper, wherein they are all very carefullie recorded.

Orthodoxus.

Might not those graue and godly Preachers haue beene [Page 75] better imployed in some more profitable studie for the glorie of God, and the good of his Church: but that they must bee wholie taken vp many houres and dayes together about such trifling toyes, and become forsooth the publike notaries to a paltrie boy, or rather (if you please) to some sup­posed diuell inherently and essentiallie in him? Wee knowe not what account they themselues should possiblie make of so fruitlesse a course: howbeit, wee thinke (for our owne parts) that they might haue beene better imployed by much.

Exorcistes.

What your selfe doe happily imagine thereof, it makes no great matter. Surely (for mine owne part) I am fullie per­swaded that the Lord hath purposelie raysed vp, and appointed this Boy to lay open the truth of these mysticall matters, which hi­therto haue beene hidden from many.

Orthodoxus.

Fie, fie Exorcistes, doe you not tremble to vtter such an vngodlie and blasphemous conceit of your owne? Howsoeuer I haue hitherto spared your person, and purposely couered your wants with the mantell of loue: Pro. 10.12. 1. Pe [...] 4.8. yet surely I should feare­fullie sinne against my inlightned conscience, and very grie­uouslie offend my gratious God, if (as heretofore) I should still forbeare to reproue very sharpelie your grosse and pal­pable wickednesse.

You are fullie perswaded (you saie) that the Lord hath purposelie raysed vp, and appointed this boy to lay open the truth of these mysticall matters, which hitherto haue bin hid­den from manie. I pray you consider well what you say: and (out of your better thoughts) doe tell mee I beseech you, where, and from whome we are now to expect the reuelati­on of truths whatsoeuer? Know you not who it is that the father (in these last dayes) hath finallie appointed to reueale, and to speake all truthes to his Church? Heb. 1.1. What man? will you then forsake the fountaine of liuing waters for the reuelation of truthes;Ierem. 2.12. and runne to such filthie puddles of your owne deui­sing, as are able to hold no water at all? Isa. 8.28. Will you leaue the law, and the testimonies, and trot after a blind and a trothlesse lad for the reuelation of these hidden truthes? will you with­draw your selfe from that holy oyntment, 1. Ioh. 2.27. Ioh. 14. [...] whose onelie office it is [Page 78] to lead into all truth whatsoeuer: and hunt after a supposed wicked spirit in a graceles and sensles boy? Will you returne from the author of truth;Rom. 3.4. 2. Pet. 1.21. Ioh. 8.44. 1. Tim. 4.2. 2. Cor. 11.15. to the author of lyes? from the ho­ly ministrie of God; to an extraordinarie ministerie of the diuel and his diuellish instrument? In the name of God doe present­lie humble your soule at the fearefull remembrance of this your horrible and fearefull condition. Pray earnestlie to God, that (if it be possible) this blasphemous thought of your heart may be forgiuen you when the time of refreshing commeth. Act. 8.21. What great blasphemie is this against our Lord Iesus the Churches sole Pro­phet? Reuel. 19.10. For the onlie testimonie of Iesus, is that spirit of Prophecie, whereupon wee must soundly relie for the reuelation of all truthes whatsoeuer. What intollerable iniurie is this to the office of his holy spirit: Ioh. 14.26. who alone must bring to our remembrance whatsoeuer the Lord Iesus hath spoken before? What a fearefull checke giueth this blasphemous speech of yours, to the or­dinarie ministerie of Christ, so singularly graced, and so nota­blie qualified with sundrie giftes from aboue, Eph. 4.11.12. for the mani­festation of all truthes whatsoeuer, to the end of the world? Yea (besides these your sundrie and intolerable blasphemies) what a deadlie blow haue you giuen your owne selfe, and your fellow-laborers: as though that might be made knowen to the world by the ministerie of diuels: which could not, nor can­not possiblie be found forth by the Lord Iesus his ordinance. A very dangerous conceit, and flat opposite (I assure you) to our Sauiour himselfe;Luk. 16.29.31 who saith, they haue Moses & the Pro­phets, let them heare them. That wee should therefore expect reue [...]ations of truthes from any other meanes els, was neuer taught from heauen, but from hell: yea, euen out of the lying mouth of that damned rich glutton: who (reiecting the reue­lations of the word) did say vnto Abraham, Luk. 16.30. that if one should arise from the dead, they would vndoubtedly beleeue and be saued. Behold here the infernall author of that your vile and feare­full conceit: and be forthwith ashamed of such a tutor. The Lord open your eyes, and instruct you better, that so you may be enabled hereafter to deuide the word more truelie; and to shew your selfe a more sound and substantiall teacher of truth. 2. Tim. 2.15. For consider (I beseech you) how harshlie this blas­phemous speech of yours would sound in the verie eares of your prophanest hearers: namelie, if you should say thus vnto [Page 79] them. Good people be not troubled I pray you, with any your owne ignorance concerning these hidden truthes which wee intimate to you, and which are now in question among vs. For be you well as­sured, that this truth which hitherto hath bin hidden from manie, it shall now (notwithstanding) very shortly be manifested vnto you by such a corrupt boy, or rather (if you will) by some diuell in the boy at the least. Were not this pockie good stuffe (think you) to pester your Pulpit withall? And yet this (in effect) is e­uen the very same which you affoord vnto vs, frō that your former most filthie conceit. Pro. 9.7.8.9▪ Hauing thus (in some sort) dis­charged my conscience by giuing you admonition in time: doe you now produce better arguments to proue your supposed essentiall possessions of spirits and diuels, or els doe forthwith giue ouer the field for shame.

Exorcistes.

Why sir, I dispossest them all by prayer and fasting: there­fore they were all essentiallie possessed.

Physiologus.

What man? are you quite spent vp, concerning the pre­tended essentiall possessions of those your eight Demoniakes: that you are now (like a steale-counter) thus couertly creep­ing vnto their supposed dispossessions by prayer and fasting? Surely sir, if (while we be but in dealing spare blowes the one with the other) you begin (like a cowardlie crauen) so soone to set vp the heckle: it is to be feared, you will neuer hold out when once we come to the deadly fight.

Exorcistes.

Yes, yes, I warrant you feare it not. For neither is my cause so crasie, that I neede to feare your encounter: nor my courage so cowardly, as that I will euer fight crauen, be the bickering neuer so sharpe.

Phyfiologus.

Well said Exorcistes, when the cause it selfe becomes de­sperate: then well fare a valourous heart: howbeit, it were much better (in my simple conceite) to yeeld vp the field by a faire and a friendly perswasion, then (in a foole-hardie or humorous course) to continue a desperate fight, till you re­ceiue a deadly foyle.

Lycanthropus.

Surely Exorcistes, howsoeuer you braue it in words, it [Page 78] were better the controuersie were brought to an issue: be­cause the faster you runne, the further you range, and the more fiercelie you fight, the more feeble you growe: yea, all men may plainely perceiue, that (howsoeuer you prate) you will neuer preuaile.

Exorcistes.

Tush man, feare you not that.

Philologus.

Nay, feare that feare will, we feare not at all.

Exorcistes.

Neither yet I, I assure you.

Orthodoxus.

Well then Exorcistes, hauing said what possiblie you can concerning your first distribution, I meane the supposed es­sentiall possessions of those your eight pretended Demoniakes: let vs now (for one houre or two) goe take the fresh aire, and then reuiue our skirmish afresh, concerning your second di­stribution, I meane your dispossessing of those eight, by your prayer and fasting.

Exorcistes.

I doe willingly yeeld to your motion.

The end of the first Dialogue.

The second Dialogue.

THE ARGVMENT.

Whether this fresh encounter (containing an hotch-potch of matters confusedly shuffled together) hath found a better successe, concerning the pretended Dispossession of Diuels by prayer and fasting: then any the precedent particulars, propounded at large in those our former Dis­courses?

The speakers names.
  • PHILOLOGVS.
  • LYCANTHROPVS.
  • PNEVMATOMACHVS.
  • PHYSIOLOGVS.
  • ORTHODOXVS.
  • EXORCISTES.
Orthodoxus.

THis pleasant fresh ayre (I assure you) hath well re­freshed our feeble spirits: and therefore, that we protract no further time, doe tell vs directly Ex­orcistes ▪ what you say now to your falslie pretended Dispos­session of Diuels by Prayer and Fasting?

Exorcistes.

Sir, hauing sufficiently proued, that the eight persons we speake of,Doctrine, pag. 34. were euery of them essentiallie possest by the Diuell, yea, and this also, with such vnanswerable and inuincible arguments, as may fully perswade an indifferent Reader, there needes no further labour herein. Nnotwithstanding, be­cause that which makes for the proofe of their Dispossession tendeth directlie to the further confirmation of that their said essentiall possession, I am therefore readie with the like inuincible reasons to deale in that poynt if you please.

Orthodoxus.

It pleaseth vs passing well: and the sounder you deale, the better we like it, and the sooner we shall make an ende. As for your sufficient prouing of that which you falslie pre­tend: let the indifferent Reader determine. In the meane time, because you brag beyond measure of your vnanswe­rable, [Page 82] and inuincible arguments to mannage your matters withall; we will therefore the more exactly examine them seuerally, to make present triall of that their pretended force. And whereas you seeke to shelter all those your falslie pre­tended Patients, Doctrine, pag. 34.35.36. vnder an holie couerture of the parties dis­possessed in Scripture, and by such a deuice would seeme to soare aloft in the clowdes, before you be feathered fleg, to flie at so loftie a pitch: this therefore wee must tell you, or euer we enter the combat, that the holie Scriptures themselues wil not yeeld their holie protection, to so paltrie a cause. And therefore that which we haue hitherto spoken against your falslie pretended essentiall possessions, may fullie suffice to an­swere the whole, because where there was no true possession, there can be no dispossession in truth: yet, because the finall o­uerthrow of these your pretended dispossessions, doth more fully destroy your falslie supposed essentiall possessions, we are also here readie to encounter your vttermost force. Preter­mitting therefore all those your falslie pretended signes of dispossession from sacred Scripture, Doctrine, pag. 34.35.36. as also your intolerable prophanation thereof by your fond applications: doe presentlie proceede in propounding vnto vs your arguments.

Exorcistes.

Doctrine, pag. 37.I will. First, there were in euery of our Demoniakes those selfesame signes or notes of dispossession, precedent and subse­quent, which wee reade of in the Scripture Demoniakes: and therefore there was in euery of them the selfesame disposses­sion no doubt.

Orthodoxus.

If there were no doubt in the matter at al: it were vndoub­tedly a meere madnes for any to impugne the same. How­beit, thus we answer your argument. There were not in those your pretended Demoniakes, the selfesame signes or notes pre­cedent and subsequent: therefore not the selfesame vndoubted dispossessions. That there were not the selfesame signes or notes, I proue it thus. First, those signes or notes in the Scripture Demo­niakes, they were vndoubted effects of their dispossessions: H. Discouerie, pag. 177. and cap. 5. pag. 294. and pag. 297. Doctrine, pag. 37. the signes or notes in those your pretended Demoniakes, they were in truth but counterfeit cousonages, as themselues haue freely confessed vpon their oathes. Furthermore, those signes or ef­fects which wee finde in the Scripture Demoniakes, they were [Page 83] sensibly performed to the view of the beholders eye: the other in those your pretended Demoniakes, they were not so by your owne confession. Againe, howsoeuer those signes or notes in Scripture Demoniakes, were the vndoubted effects of dispossessions then, and so to be taken, because they are recor­ded for such by the blessed Euangelist, who could not erre in so recording the same: those your falsely pretended signes, they are but the vnruly reports of your lying pen, directed therein by a deceitfull heart: yea, they bee such signes (Master Darell affirmeth) as men may be deeply deceiued in discerning thereof. Doctrine. pag. 18. Detection, pag. 54. Besides that, those selfesame effects in the Scripture Demoniakes then, they cannot so concludently proue dispos­sessions now: because the like effects doe eftsoones also arise from meere naturall causes, and corporall diseases, as our sea­uenth Dialogue declareth at large. And therefore if those selfesame effects then, must necessarily bee made the vndoub­ted true signes of dispossessions now: then, wheresoeuer is the like rending and tearing, crying aloude, and leauing for dead, there is also the like essential dispossession of Diuels, which were to too absurd to imagine.Detection, pag. 54. Briefly, your good friend Master Darell, he doth confidently conclude a dispossession of Diuels, where no such signes are apparant: and therefore those your pretended signes precedent and subsequent, they doe not ne­cessarily conclude an essentiall dispossession of Diuels.

Exorcistes.

Oh yes sir,Doctrine, pag. 36.37. for besides those Scripture signes, I haue (in my proper experience) eftsoones obserued in the dispossession of some certaine Demoniakes, a very sensible seeing, or feeling of some thing going out of their bodies like to a Mouse, 2. Narration, pag. 13. an Vrchin, a Toade, a Bull, a foule blacke man, a Dog, and such like: and therefore there is vndoubtedly an essentiall dispossession of Di­uels.

Orthodoxus.

What man? are you wearie alreadie of those your Cano­nicall notes of dispossessions, that you are fled so soone to those your owne experimented apocryphall signes or effects? Surely it should seeme your force is but weake. Notwithstanding, howsoeuer you say you haue eftsoones obserued such things in your owne experience: very certaine it is, that not your owne selfe, but those your counterfeite Patients rather (if [Page 84] any at all) they alone experimented some such supposed sensible seeings, and feelings of some thing going out of their bo­dies: and therefore it is very vntrue to say that you your owne selfe obserued the same in your proper experience. Be­sides that,Doctrine, pag. 36.37. Master Darell (your good friend) doth flatlie af­firme, that the Spirits themselues, they neither were, nor conti­nued with those his pretended Demoniakes, in any such sensible bodies, as you say here you haue eftsoones obserued in sun­drie of them: and therefore impossible there should be any such sensible seeing or feeling of substances proceeding foorth from them,Doctrine, pag. 37. as you beare vs in hand. For howsoeuer you seeme to qualifie your former speech from the Spirit his sup­posed operation in the present procuring of some such sensible mat­ters in shew, at the very instant of their seuerall dispossessions: that is ouer childish a conceit, to perswade any reasonable man, hauing especially his eyes in his head. Eccles. 2.14. For the Spirits, they could not by any their supposed operations whatsoeuer, pro­cure such sensible things, as might be sensiblie seene, or palpablie felt of any whosoeuer: as in our second, third, fourth, and fift Dialogues is shewed at large.

Exorcistes.

Doctrine, pag. 37.Yea, but besides all this, I haue (by my proper experience) obserued eftsoones in sundrie Demoniakes, a vomiting imme­diatly before the egresse of the Spirit, prognosticating plain­lie vnto vs, his imminent essentiall dispossession: and therefore there is vndoubtedly an essentiall dispossession of Diuels.

Orthodoxus.

If this your new-coyned Prognostication, had (indeede) been printed with priuiledge, wee might (by the warrant thereof) not onely bee perswaded of the very trueth of that which you prate: but withall, we might (by vertue thereof) very boldly auouch, that euery Gormandizing belli-god, and surfetting Swil-boule (so oft as they happen to spue) are es­sentially dispossest, of one Diuell at the least. Yea, and so much more likely than the other you speake of, by how much those your pretended Demoniakes spitting vp but a little quan­tity of choler or phlegme (as your selfe do report) and that also with very great labour:D. 2. Narration, pag. 13. these drunken Epicures, they doe spue forth the Spirits by whole pottles at once, and that with a trice. Besides that, if vomiting (forsooth) be an vndoubted [Page 85] true signe of essentiall dispossessions: it is very probable that men may mightily further the essential dispossessing of diuels, by pro­curing the possessed to vomite forthwith. Brieflie the scriptures, they make no mention at all of these your apocryphall signes of essentiall dispossessions: Doctrine. pag 37. and therefore they are no certaine signes of any such matter, but must (saith good M. Darel) be regarded of all men accordingly.Darell▪ in the report of Tho­mas Darling, pag. 153. S. Harsnette [...] discouerie, in pag. 279.280. Namely, they must (in deed and in truth) be deemed no better then the dreaming dotages of some phantasticall or idle braine: howsoeuer you your selfe (being destitute of true scripture signes to [...] port your purpose in hand) doe make them the vndoubted true signes of Thomas Darling his dispossession. And therefore pro­pound better arguments then these: or put an end to your pratling discourse for shame.

Exorcistes.

Why sir,Doctrine. pag. 37. we vsed prayer and fasting in such proper termes, and to such speciall end, I meane to their essentiall dispossessions, and the same was forthwith effectuall; for the Lord, he vn­doubtedly heard vs, and wee saw the very worke it selfe ac­complished according to our owne desires: therefore there is now, vndoubtedly an essentiall dispossession of diuels.

Orthodoxus.

If you so stricktly tyed your selfe to some set and appoin­ted termes for such purpose as you pretend, it seemes then (by the purporte of your speech) that you rather coniured the diuell from those your Demoniakes, then entreated the Lord to cast them out: and then how can you from thence so con­fidently conclude that your prayer and fasting was effectu­allie heard of the Lord? For this question may iustlie arise from your speech: Namely, whether the powerfull efficacie of those your charming tearmes, had simplie and onelie their relation to God alone: or to God and the diuell together? If sim­plie, and onlie to God alone, then you doe therein directlie affirme, that God respected rather the forme, then the faith; rather the termes then the truth of your prayer. And therein withall, you doe implicatiuely put downe the principall cause why the rest of the Preachers (notwithstanding their often attempts by feruent prayer) could not possiblie expell William Sommer his combersome diuell as well as your selfe: namely for that they wanted euerie of them, those terrible [Page 86] termes which would haue striken it dead.D. Narration pag. 1. D. Apologie, in pag. 31.32. Notwithstanding this crosseth Master Darel very shrewdlie ouer the thumbes, who telleth vs plainely that the dispossession of Satan is so or­dinarie and so easie a matter, as it may be effected of any, how simplie soeuer: whereas that which your selfe here reporteth, implieth a quite contrarie tale, and concludes it impossible for any to accomplish the worke, but such as are first made throughlie acquainted with the proper tearmes of that trade. Againe, if the powerfull efficacie of those your charming tearmes had their relation to God and the diuell together: then how dare you so confidently auouch, that those your sayd prayers (vttered forth in such set and appointed termes) were heard of God: sith (it may be) the diuell himselfe (being feare­fullie frighted with those terrible tearmes) was voluntarilie fledde beyond the vtmost borders of Egypt, Tob. 8.3. or euer the Lord once opened his mouth concerning such his present depar­ture from those your pretended Demoniakes. Besides all this, those your charming termes, they are (it should seeme) of a wonderfull working power: in that not onelie they are able (by your owne saying) to driue out the most combersome di­uell with a trice: but (which more is) to accomplish (in all likelihood) an vndoubted regeneration euen in the Demoni­akes themselues,D. Doctrine, pag. 37. as a man may collect by your speech. For you desired (you say) that the diuell might so be driuen forth from euery of them, as their bodies might forthwith become temples of the holy Ghost to dwel in: and euen at the very instant you saw the worke visiblie accomplished, according to your owne desires. This being so as you say, no wonder at all, though the Inhabitants of Nottingham were so desirous to entertain your person and preaching: the very termes of your prayers being so effectuall as you beare vs in hand. But tell vs (I beseech you) from what special grounds you are so certainely assured, that the meanes which you vsed in those your supposed dispossessions, D. Doctrine, pag. 59. Darrels Apolog. pag. 32. Dar. Doctrine, pag. 18. were so effectuall then: sith M. Darel himselfe doth flatlie affirme, that both prayer alone, or prayer and fasting together: they are not alwaies effectuall to that selfesame worke. Yea, and (which more is) how could your selfe be so certaine thereof, seeing Satan (as you say) is so cunning, that he can cause many things to be in appearance which are not so indeed & in truth: & can also pretend a departure, when as yet he lieth secretly lurking within [Page 87] the Demoniakes bodies? Brieflie, how are you sure the worke it selfe was forthwith effected in such sort as you say, I meane,D. Doctrine. pag. 37. that you visiblie saw the diuell driuen forth of those your Demoniakes, & their bodies effectuallie made temples (at the ve­ry instant) for the holy Ghost to dwell in: sith as well the essentiall dispossession of diuels, as also that admirable worke of regene­ration, are eyther of them spirituall matters, and may not pos­siblie be discerned with corporall sense? And therefore we see not how the worke was forthwith accomplished according to your owne desires: vnles happilie your owne desires (being then onely to haue the beholders deluded) came so to passe, as you sawe (therein) your hearts desire in such sort effected. This reason therefore (howsoeuer it may serue in some sort to discouer your dissimulation) it concludes no essentiell dis­possession of Diuels.

Exorcistes.

But sir,D. Doctrine. pag. 37. there was then and after, an earnest desire of Satan his repossession in euery of those our Demoniakes: and there­fore there must necessarilie be performed in euery of them, an vndoubted essentiall dispossession before.

Orthodoxus.

Doe tell vs (I beseech you) how you became (on the sud­daine) so familiarlie acquainted with the Diuell his earnest desire of a repossession?

Exorcistes.

Euen by the consonancie of the sacred Scriptures: Matth. 12.43. Luk. 11.24. and the seuerall reports of the parties themselues.

Orthodoxus.

Those Scriptures (being meerely metaphoricall) how should they certainely conclude any such earnest desire of Satan his repossession: vnles you could first assuredly demonstrate vnto vs, both his essentiall possession and dispossession before, in those your pretended Demoniakes. As for the seuerall reports of the parties themselues; that (we verilie thinke) should yeeld vn­to you no such certaine assurance. Sith they haue voluntari­ly deposed before authoritie, H. Discouerie pag. 177. & pa [...] 294. and pag. 297. and we also our selues (hauing di­ligentlie enquired into the matter it selfe) doe plainely per­ceiue in our owne experience, that the parties themselues, they had (for the present) no purpose at all, to relate the vndoub­ted truth of things as they were done in deed: but reported [Page 88] them rather according to the predeterminate purpose of your proper desires, as wee told you before. Moreouer it may be, that those your pretended Demoniakes, they were then (when they reported those matters) in some one of their fal­slie pretended fittes, and were not (in deed) possessed or dispos­sessed at all, but they and the diuell dissembled the worke in hande: and if so, then the parties themselues (what­soeuer they seeme to report) they are not to be belee­ued in any those intricate matters. For first, if they but dissembled the thinges they reported, there is no reason at all, that men should giue credit to any such false dissem­blers, as make no conscience of any such cosoning courses. Againe, if they did not dissemble, but were (in deed) posses­sed of Satan, D. Doctrine, pag. 10.11. D. Detection. pag. 97.98. yet you doe tell vs your selfe, that all the while they are in their fits, they be altogether senselesse, not knowing what they either say, or doe: and then (by Master Darell his vnchangeable rules) they are not to be credited whatsoeuer they seeme to report. And so by consequence, these their dis­sembling reports concerning Satan his earnest desire of repos­session: they are none other then the bare reports of a lying diuell, or senselesse Demoniake at least, and no better to be esteemed of vs, then meerely phantasticall and senselesse re­ports. Besides all this, those your pretended Demoniakes, they reported no more concerning these admirable matters, then either that alone which they were taught before to prattle like parrats, or then that which they (being grossely deluded by the diuell him selfe, or his diuellish dissembling ympes) did verely imagine to be vndoubtedly euen so as they supposed the same: and therefore they onely reported the idle imagi­nation of their own idle braine. D. Doctrine, pag. 81. D. Doctrine, pag. 10.11. For, Master Darell doth tell vs directly, that the Demoniakes them selues, they neither saw ▪ nor heard, nor felt, nor perceiued any such matters. In like manner, that your confident auouching of the bare literall sense (of entring in, and of going out) is to too absurd, as we shewed before. For, neither will such a sense be made to agree with the maine purpose of Christ: and Master Darell himselfe more simplie,D. Detection, pag. 58. Math. 12.45. & more plainely expoundeth those Scriptures m [...]aphorically; accordingly also as Christ himselfe applies the same to the Iewes. And therefore, these your collections from thence, as they are to too absurd and senselesse: so doe they [Page 89] argue apparantly, the beggerlinesse of this your cause, and mightily bewray your vnspeakeable pouertie in supporting the same. Who perceiuing your selfe destitute of direct and plaine Scriptures, to proue your phantasticall fooleries: doe vnconscionablie seeke to vnderprop the same, by those your phantasticall conceites, which you haue violently inforced from the onely bare literall sense of such metaphoricall termes, as the holy Ghost hath peculiarly put downe in a quite con­trarie sense or purpose, to that which your selfe would falsely pretend, as may plainly appeare, by conferring faithfully the one with the other,Math. 12 43. Luc. 1 [...].24. Eph. 2.12. from point to point. For first, how can you soundly collect the essentiall possession of diuels: from the Iewes their onely accursed condition, as they are without Christ in the world? Or, how can you imagine any essentiall dispossession of diuels: from the Iewes their present desisting from sinne? Or, how may you fitly inferre an essentiall repos­session of diuels: Act. 13.46. Pro. 26.11. 2. Pet. 2, 22. from the Iewes their reiecting the profered graces of God in Christ, and their returning afresh to their for­mer vomite? Or (to be briefe) how can you soundly con­clude the reentring of seuen distinct seuerall diuels: from the Iewes their seuenfold more accursed condition then euer before? Math. 12.45. Luc. 11.26. Heb. 6.4. and 10.26. 2. Pet. 2.20.2 [...] Surely Exorcistes, such vnsauorie collections, they doe rather proceede from the senselesse profunditie of some new found senselesse Diuillitie, then from the depth of sacred Diuinitie: yea, and (which more is) these your absurd and senselesse collections, they are vndoubtedly such, as (being also obser­ued literallie in other like metaphors) might teach melan­cholike persons to cut off their owne hands: Math. 5.29. Math. 5.30. Pro. 23.2. Eccles. 2.14. to put out their owne eies: to cut their owne throates: yea, and that also, the eie of a foole is sette in his heele, because a wise-mans eie is placed aloft in his head. Yea, and this I say further, they would make wise men to wonder in what part of your bodie your owne eie was fixed: when you first squibbed foorth these your squinting [...]ollections. For, your dealings herein is not vnlike to the fetches of a wylie fox: S. D. Triall▪ pag. 83. who, when he looketh a man very full in the face, will then most couertly squint aside with his eies, to espie an escape on the one side or other. Howbeit, these your squinting collections, they are ouer much squea­mish to settle vs soundly in an vndoubted assurance of tha [...] your pretended essentiall dispossessions.

Exorcistes.
[Page 90]

D. Doctrine▪ pag. 39.Why sir? those our Demoniakes, they haue euer since re­mained well in their bodies, and haue been free (for these two yeeres or more) from those their former extraordinarie vexa­tions whatsoeuer: and therfore, essentiallie dispossessed of Satan.

Orthodoxus.

They were neuer essentially possessed by Satan, but did coun­terfeite their fittes, as them selues haue confessed; being eue­rie way free from all such supposed extraordinary vexations both then and before: and so by consequence, they were not essentiallie dispossessed at all. And howsoeuer you fondly beare vs in hand, that those voluntarie confessions of theirs concerning their counterfeytings, are vndoubted demonstra­tions of Satan his repossession in euery of them, very certaine it is, that the parties them selues, they knew their owne estates farre better then you could by much: and therefore (deposing the contrarie to that you auouch) they are to be beleeued before your selfe. Yea, euen Thomas Darling him selfe (of whome you threape so much kindnesse) he plainely confesseth (as Master Darell doth graunt) that he also (for his part) did but counterfeite whatsoeuer he did: D. his tryall pag. 22. D. Detection, pag. 179.180. and therefore ei­ther he was not essentiallie possessed at all: or else (by your own reason) he is as vndoubtedly repossest as any of the rest whom you so confidently charge that way. Howbeit, we doe reso­lutely assure our selues, that those your pretended demoni­akes, they were neither possessed, dispossessed, nor repossessed at all.D. Doctrine. pag. 39.40. For, very certaine it is, that the casting out of diuels is a miraculous worke: but the working of miracles, it was onely in Christ and his Apostles daies, and is ceassed long since, and therefore also the casting out of Diuels, it is ceased long since.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 40.The casting out of diuels in the daies of Christ, was effec­ted either by an absolute or committed authoritie. The one was in Christ alone, the other in the twelue Apostles, and seauenty Disciples: both which manner of expelling diuels are ceased long since as you say. Onely, now there remaineth prayer, or prayer and fasting: by which we entreate Christ to cast them out now, by his owne absolute authoritie, and therefore the casting out of diuels by these meanes, is no miracle at all.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 91]

If Christs absolute authoritie for the driuing out of Diuels be ceased long since: doe tell vs I beseech you, how Christ (notwithstanding any your earnest entreaties by fasting and prayer) may now possiblie driue forth Diuels by that his said absolute authoritie, which (you say) is ceased long since? For in that you auouch the worke of dispossessing Demoniakes now to be also effected by the absolute authoritie of Christ: you must necessarilie make, that his said absolute authoritie, either the onely efficient, or an instrument at least, in euery such powerfull expelling of spirits and Diuels. If you make Christ his absolute authoritie the onely efficient cause for the powerfull expelling of Diuels in these dayes of the Gospell: then surely (howsoeuer you may vrge your pretended ordi­narie meanes of prayer and fasting, for the intreatie of Christ) the authoritie or power that expels the Diuell, is either but one and the same, and so by consequence the casting out of Diuels, euen now in these latter daies of the Gospell, it must needes be as miraculous as euer before. On the other side, if the driuing out of Diuels be now wrought by the absolute authoritie of Christ, but instrumentallie at the becke and ap­pointment of your prayer and fasting: then your said speech, it implieth thus much at the least. Namely, that either the bare exercise of your prayer and fasting, is able efficiently to accomplish that worke, ex opere operato, by the onely bare worke being barely done: or that, in the very words of your prayer at least, there is couertly contained some certaine magicall force, for the timely effecting thereof. Thus then, as your reason is very ridiculous: so surely your fond allusion from the Queene, and Lord Chancellor is to too absurd.D. Doctrine, pag. 40. For first, you propound a case which neuer shall be: and there­fore, the same can neuer illustrate your purpose in hand. Be­sides that, you do (by the Lord Chancellors death) too highly derogate from her Maiesties absolute authoritie: in making those matters whatsoeuer, which her highnes (being there­unto entreated by some of her subiectes) shall by her absolute authoritie effect in her owne proper person: to be lesse admi­rable by many degrees, then those which were wrought be­fore, by the Lord Chancellor his committed power. Howbeit, to the end we may liuely illustrate the matter it selfe: let vs [Page 92] admitte the case to be thus; The Queenes Maiestie (next and immediatly vnder God) doth gouerne this kingdome by her absolute authoritie. This absolute authoritie, she hath (in part) dispensed to some certaine persons, subordinate vnder her, for the orderly execution of iustice and mercie among the rest of her subiectes: ratifying, and approuing what­soeuer those persons shall correspondently conclude ac­cording to the tenour of her Maiesties pleasure, expres­sed at large in her Lawes. Yea, and approouing the same to be as authenticall, as if she (by her absolute authoritie) had effected the same in her owne proper person. And (which more is) vpon the primarie establishment of her said absolute authoritie, she appointeth (as a temporarie of­ficer) the L. Keeper of her great seale, to confirme and establish (from time to time as occasion requireth) all those the for­mer constitutions of mercie or iustice, by annexing the broade seale of England vnto them: ratifying and approuing (as be­fore) whatsoeuer he accomplisheth accordingly. This Lord Keeper being (as you heard) but a temporarie officer) he dieth; whereupon her Maiestie intendeth that his said temporarie office shall fullie determine for euer: and (reseruing that ex­traordinarie power to her selfe) she neuer purposeth to set to her said seale, as before, but will now haue her said subiects very dutifully to accept of her future graunts and decrees, in no lesse assurance of her former experimented faithfulnes, then if they were extraordinarily sealed vp (as in former times) with tenne thousand authenticall seales. The case being thus, the question is this: Whether her subiects (seeing her Maie­sties pleasure to the contrarie) may warrantablie supplicate now, for her Highnesse said temporarie seale to any her future graunts or decrees: or (if any shall rashly attempt such a course) whether the same doth not argue in him, an vnduti­full presumption, or hopelesse distrust at the least, and so by con­sequence, doth highly offend her Maiestie. There is no man of common sense, that may iustly denie the same. Now then, the application is this: Christ Iesus hauing absolute authoritie from God the Father, to gouerne his Church, committeth part of his said authoritie to Apostles, Prophets, Euangelists, pastors and teachers: commaunding them (by his Word and Sacra­ments) to witnes his good will towards his Church to the end of [Page 93] the world. Giuing to some peculiar persons among the rest, a temporarie grace or power, to seale vp (for a season) his said Word and Sacraments, with extraordinarie and miraculous actions. These extraordinarie actions he doth after determine for euer, and will now haue all men to receiue his said Word and Sacraments, as the authenticall truths of his former ex­perimented faithfulnes towards his said Church, without a­ny farther superfluous seales, to the end of the world: and (re­seruing that extraordinarie power to himselfe) neuer purpo­seth to set to his said extraordinarie seale, as in former times, but will now haue his said Church very faithfully to enter­taine the timely reuelation of his future promises, in as full an assurance of that his former experimented faithfulnes towards her, and euery member, as if this said faithfulnes were extraordinarily sealed vp with ten thousand such tempo­rarie seales. Now then, the case being so as you see, the que­stion is this: Whether (the purpose of Christ standing so as wee say) it be not an intolerable presumption, or filthie di­strust at the least, for any whomsoeuer, to supplicate Christ for that extraordinarie fauour afresh, which he hath finally and fully determined: and so (by consequence) whether it bee not now a presumptuous sinne for any (how holie soeuer in shew) to vndertake, or attempt such a rash and vnwarran­ted course? I verely beleeue it is sinne: and that your selfe dare neuer denie the same. Notwithstanding, admit by the way, that any presumptuous person (so supplicating our Sauiour in such doubtfull vncertainties) should (for the bewitching of himselfe, 2. Thes. 2.9.10.11. Deut. 13.1.2.3. Matt. 24.23.24▪ Luk. 17.23. and the triall of others) obtaine (in some secret iudge­ment) his hearts desire: the question is, whether that extraor­dinarie seale so set to (in iudgement) by Christ his absolute au­thoritie, bee not as glorious, yea much more glorious, and more admirable now, then that which was put to before, by some such special persons as were thereunto enabled by Christ for a time: and whether that power which effecteth such worke (either then or now) bee not euermore one and the same, of equall authoritie and like admiration? I hope you haue not the face to withstand the infallible truth thereof. And therefore, in auouching so confidently, that this your new-found ordinance, for the powerfull expelling of Diuels by prayer and fasting, is now establisht and continued for e­uer, [Page 94] euen by the apparant proclamation of our Sauiour him­selfe, when no such proclamation is any where recorded throughout the Canonicall Scriptures: you doe therein verie blasphemously belie our Sauiour Christ, and make it apparant­ly euident, that your idle head, it was fraught too full of phan­tasticall and idle proclamations forsooth: when you thus pro­claimed (in print) all these your idle and phantasticall conceits to the world.

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 41.Not so sir: for howsoeuer the same be not apparantly ex­prest in the Word, our Sauiour Christ, hee hath secretly ordai­ned and established prayer and fasting, as a perpetuall secret ordi­nance, for the essentiall dispossessing of Spirits and Diuels to the end of the world: and therefore there are, and shall be such dispossessing of Diuels to the end of the world.

Orthodoxus.

If this your pretended new-found ordinance be not appa­rantly exprest in the Word: how know you the same to bee a secret ordinance perpetually established by Christ? Againe, if prayer and fasting be (as you say) but a secret ordinance: from whence haue you your speciall warrant to bee tampering therewith,Deut. 29.29. sith the secret things belong only to God?

Exorcistes.

See D. Doctrine, pag. 41. Matth. 17.21. Mark 9.29.It seemeth to vs such a secret ordinance, from out of those Scriptures, recorded by Matthew and Marke: therefore it is such an ordinance.

Orthodoxus.

If the same bee recorded by Matthew and Marke, it is then no secret, but a reuealed ordinance of Christ: and so (by consequence) it belongeth to vs and our children. Deut. 29.29. Howbeit, the same seemeth to vs no such secret ordinance from out of those Scriptures recorded by Matthew and Marke (Master Darell also very flatly affirming,D. Detection, pag. 41. that wee reade not of the first or­daining of any such meanes) and therefore the same is no such secret ordinance of Christ, as you beare vs in hand from those Scriptures. But goe to, put downe the very words themselues, from whence you would seeme to collect the secret institu­tion of such a secret ordinance, as your selfe doe imagine.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 41.I will. Our Sauiour Christ saith thus: This kind can by no [Page 95] other meanes come foorth, Matth. 17.21. Mark. 9.29. but by prayer and fasting. Wherein prayer and fasting seemeth vnto vs, to bee some secret ordi­nance of Christ, for the powerfull expelling of Spirits and Diuels.

Orthodoxus.

This seeming of yours was fully answered before by Ma­ster Darel his mouth:D. Detection, pag. 41. where he flatly affirmeth, that we reade not in Scripture, of the first ordaining of any such meanes. But proceede (I beseech you) in examining that Scripture.

Exorcistes.

Let Master Darell affirme what he please: that which I say, is very apparant, both by the coherence and purpose of the text it selfe.

Orthodoxus.

Let passe the coherence, and speake of the purpose alone.

Exorcistes.

Christs purpose (in that text) was,D. Doctrine, pag. 41. to put downe such an or­dinarie meanes for the powerfull expelling of Diuels to the end of the world: as may plainly appeare by the prosecution of that purpose it selfe, which is also expressed vnto vs, partly by a question, and partly by an answere thereto.

Orthodoxus.

Very well. But who (I beseech you) propounded the que­stion?

Exorcistes.

That did the Disciples of Christ.

Orthodoxus.

What was the maine reason of propounding the question?

Exorcistes.

Their not expelling of that Diuell from the child. D. Doctrine, pag. 41.

Orthodoxus.

To whom was the question propounded?

Exorcistes.

Euen to our Sauiour himselfe.

Orthodoxus.

What was the answere of Christ to their question?

Exorcistes.

That they could not cast out the Spirit, D. Doctrin [...] ▪ pag. 41. because of their vn­beliefe: and that this kinde goeth not forth but by prayer and fasting.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 96]

To whome was this answere propely giuen?

Exorcistes.

Euen to the Disciples themselues: who propounded the question.

Orthodoxus.

What doth Christ his answere implie?

Exorcistes.

Two speciall impediments to that present busines. Namelie first,D. Doctrine, pag. 42. the weakenes of the Disciples faith: then next the kinde of spirit wherewith they were then to encounter. As if Christ should thus haue answered. Your owne faith was too weake: and that kinde of diuell was too combersome for you to encoun­ter withall.

Orthodoxus.

Will you sticke fast to this sense, which you presentlie make of that scripture?

Exorcistes.

Make you no doubt thereof: whatsoeuer shall be written or said to the contrarie.

Orthodoxus.

Well then (pretermitting a time, the first impediment I meane, the weakenes of the Disciples faith: for that so vnweal­die a worke) doe tell vs, how you are certainely sure that Christ put downe your other pretended impediment, namelie, the kind of spirit: sith there is no such distinguished let laid forth in that speciall text?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine▪ pag. 42.Though the same be not expreslie put downe in the text: yet the words of our Sauiour Christ, doe secretlie implie so much: because the spirit (it should seeme) was one of that kind, which (in the ordinarie meanes that euer were, or shall be in the Church) could not be expelled by sole prayer, with­out fasting annexed vnto it.

Orthodoxus.

If sole prayer alone be able to driue out a diuel, then is it altogether a superfluous course, to haue fasting annexed thereto:Frustra fit per plura, quod fieri potest per pa [...] ­ [...]io [...]. because many thinges together are needles, where the worke may be throughly effected by one onely meanes. As also if prayer alone, be vnable to accomplish that worke vnlesse the [Page 97] exercise of fasting be ioyned therewith: then by what other meanes I pray you, were Katherine Wrights seauen diuels dri­uen out of her bodie: for at her dispossessing you only but prai­ed without fasting at all?

Exorcistes.

Those seauen diuels in Katherine Wright: were none of them all of that worst kinde of diuels.

Orthodoxus.

I am iust of your minde for that. Notwithstanding, how knew you so fitlie what kind they were of: before you had gi­uen the first onset vpon them? Surelie your hap was wonder­full good, in that you (dealing with seauen at a clap) should not meet with one combersome diuell among them all: seeing the Apostles of Christ (being to deale but with one diuel alone) were so hardly beset. Howbeit, referring the farther discourse of these your phantasticall toyes, to place more conuenient: doe tell mee Exorcistes, how (from that Scripture) you may possiblie conclude a perpetuall established ordinance for the ca­sting out of diuels to the end of the world: sith that verie text was speciallie and purposelie spoken to the Apostles themselues, as you told vs euen now.

Exorcistes.

Why sir?D. Doctrine, pag. 42.43. from these words (this kind goeth not forth but by praier and fasting) we may as confidently conclude, that Christ would haue prayer and fasting to be practised as a perpetuall ordinance for the powerfull expelling of diuels: as the Phisition (by telling men that the pleurisie can no other waies be cu­red but by onlie Phlebotomie) would haue Phlebotomie vsed for the only curing of Pleurisies.

Orthodoxus.

If you haue no deeper an insight into this your new-found trade of diuillitie, then you shew skill in the curing of pleurisies: there were no great regard to be giuen vnto this your pretended ordinance, for the expelling of diuels by pray­er and fasting. Auicen. lib. 3. tractat. 4. cap. 1. Phil. Barrowgh. de methodo cu­randi. lib. 2. cap. 8. For what learned Phisition hath euer affirmed, that a pleurisie cannot otherwaies be possiblie cured, but by the onlie vse of Phlebotomie? Seeing (if the bodie of the patient abound not with euill humours) it shall suffice (in the begin­ning of the inflammation) to mittigate & discusse the paine, with foments and medicines that do moderatlie heat: with an [...] [Page 100] of Christ must haue their speciall and onelie relation to the ages succeeding: then the ages succeeding, they should haue (by your saying) a farre greater power for the expelling of diuels then euer had any the Apostles of Christ. Because (by your Doctrine) the ages succeeding, they are successiuelie ena­bled to cope with those combersome diuels: against whome the Apostles themselues could not possiblie preuaile with al their po [...]er. Furthermore, if Christ in those words did but bare­ly establish a perpetuall ordinary meanes for expelling of diuels in the ages succeeding: then surely the Apostles of Christ, they haue hitherto concealed some necessarie parts of the counsell of God from the ages succeeding: Act. 20.26.27. for that no one of them all (in any their canonicall writings) haue so much as mentioned that selfe same ordinance, or giuen any directions at all concer­ning the same. Brieflie, whereas you confidentlie auouch that Christ (in those his words) did then vndoubtedlie esta­blish prayer and fasting, as a perpetuall ordinarie meanes for the powerfull expelling of diuels to the end of the world: you doe therein directlie oppose your owne selfe to good Master Darel your friend.D. Doctrine. For he telleth vs confidently, that this ordinance of prayer and fasting for the dispossessing of di­uels, it was so farre off from being then first establisht by Christ, as that it had been euer an ordinance thereunto in the Church continuallie, euen from Adam himselfe. And this (saith he) may plainely appeare by the wordes of our Saui­our himselfe: who saith not thus, this kind shal not go forth, as speaking in the future or following time, as of that which should afterwards bee put in vse: but hee rather saith thus, this kind (goeth) not forth, as meaning purposelie of the present and former seasons, or of that which had beene pra­ctised long before the dayes of our Sauiour himselfe: and therefore the same was no ordinance, then presently establisht by Christ.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 43. Matth. 12.27. Act. 19.13.Why sir, there were sundrie others besides Christ him­selfe and his own Apostles, that were commonlie conuersant in casting out diuels: as may plainely appeare by the scrip­tures. But Christ gaue vnto them no such speciall power for ca­sting out spirits, as he gaue his Disciples: and therefore they did it eyther by prayer alone, or by prayer and fasting, accor­ding [Page 101] to the kind of spirit possessing the partie.

Orthodoxus.

That is not so:D. Detection, pag. 43. for M. Darel doth plainely auouch, that euen those others also (besides our Sauiour and his own Apo­stles) they accomplished those selfe-same extraordinarie actions, and that also by the selfesame finger of God: and ther­fore by no such supposed ordinarie meanes as your selfe doe imagine. Againe, you your owne selfe doe likewise affirme, that this ordinance of prayer and fasting, it was not then an established ordinance; and Christ he telleth vs further, that those other (whatsoeuer they were) they also eiected spirits and diuels by the onlie miraculous faith, Matth. 7.22. as appeareth in the seauenth of Matthew: and therefore they did not the same by any ordinarie meanes, as you verie fondlie would beare vs in hand. Brieflie, if those other besides the Disciples then, and the rest whatsoeuer in these dayes of the Gospell now, may none other waies driue out diuels but by this your new-found ordinarie meanes, namelie, by prayer alone, or by prayer and fasting together, according to the kind of spirit possessing the parties: then it is necessarilie required, that men should first be throughlie acquainted with the kind of spirit posses­sing the partie, or euer they vndertake to accomplish so waightie a worke.

Exorcistes.

That is not requisite: neyther in deed can be.D. Doctrine, pag. 43.

Orthodoxus.

Then may no certainely know; eyther how or when to deale in so doubtfull a businesse.

Exorcistes.

Yes,D. Doctrine, pag. 43. let him first of all deale in the ordinarie and perpetuall meanes which is left to the Church, namelie, by prayer alone, for some two, three, or more houres together: and then if in that time (the meanes so obserued) he preuaile not at all, let him ioyne fasting thereunto: and that certainely (if God will) shall forthwith accomplish the worke.

Orthodoxus.

Very true as you say, Prayer and fasting together (if God will) shall be sure to preuaile: and euen so likewise should prayer alone, if God saw it good. Howbeit, it should seeme by the manner of your speech, that the powerfull effect of this [Page 102] new-found ordinance doth wholy consist vpon doubtfull vn­certainties: and therefore doe tell vs directly from whence you receiue your apocryphall canons or rules: and from what vnwritten veritie, you haue drawne these your vnwritten di­rections in practise? Is it not Exorcistes, an intolerable pride of heart, that you should dare thus impudently to institute in the name of Christ any of these your vnwritten ordinances, and apocryphall Canons concerning the same: without either warrant or word from the mouth of Christ? Againe, how shall you be able (in the day of your fearefull account) to iu­stifie your blasphemous taking of the Lords holie name in vaine, Exod. 20. by so vainly abusing the holie ordinance of prayer, for three or foure houres together, for no other purpose at all, but only to proue an idle experiment, concerning the vncer­taine effect of this your newlie conceited ordinance? Know you not man,Matth. 7.7. Mark. 11.24. Luk. 11.9. Ioh. 14.13. and 16.23. Iam. 1.6. that wee are to pray onely in faith without any doubting, and that faith it selfe must needes haue a ground from the written word? And therfore how should not those your idle prayers (for three or foure houres together) be tur­ned to sinne: they hauing especially no one word for their warrant? Moreouer, who tels you that fasting (annexed forthwith to those your experimentall prayers) will vndoub­tedly make them marueilous effectuall: seeing the most glorious Ceremonies of all (not proceeding frō a faith groun­ded fast on the word) are but holie abominations, yea, and sith fasting it selfe (when it is at the highest of all) is but a bodilie exercise, which (the Apostle telleth vs) doth profit but little? Besides all this,1. Tim. 4.8. if prayer alone be the only ordinarie meanes that euer was, or shall be in the Church, for the ordinarie expelling of Spirits and Diuels, as you told vs a little before: how then can you warrant that your superfluous addita­ment of fasting to be annexed therewith? Briefly, these your apocryphall Canons concerning the exercise of prayer alone, for some three or foure houres, and then next of fasting an­nexed vnto it; do directly crosse your owne practise with Som­mers: for you proceeded in prayer and fasting together, with­out making an experiment first, by prayer alone.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 43.Very true. Howbeit, that was done so, because we would make sure worke at the first: and driue out any Diuell from [Page 103] him (how combersome soeuer) without any further adoe in the matter.

Orthodoxus.

But in the meane time, what became of your appointed rules? and how was this your prescribed order obserued there­in? Nay, who seeth not the same to be a very phantasticall and friuolous order? For what needes an experiment first by prayer alone: sith prayer and fasting together wil strike it dead? Well sir, howsoeuer you prescribe rules to your pupils, I per­ceiue you will be your selfe an irregular person: yea, and that you can (at your pleasure) expell any Diuell, how dangerous or deadly soeuer. Howbeit, it is wonderfull, you tooke not that selfesame preuailing course with K. Wright, and her sea­uen Diuels: for (among seauen) you might peraduenture haue fallen vpon one of those combersome Spirits, which would not be remoued but by prayer and fasting together: and yet notwithstanding, you onely but prayed at her deliue­rance.

Exorcistes.

Indeede she was dispossessed by prayer alone, Dar. Doctrine. pag. 43. vpon the ve­ry day of her appointed deliuerance, by my only prayer, without fasting ioyned therewith, or so much as entended either by her selfe, or any other in her behalfe, or so much as aduised thereto.

Orthodoxus.

Surely it should seeme you haue a very rare gift for dri­uing forth Diuels: in that sometimes without either prayer or fasting at all (hauing onely but a purpose thereto) you can so easilie accomplish the worke. For, vpon the very day of K. Wrights second deliuerance (when you neither prayed nor fasted) it seemes you could driue out those seauen at a clap, if it be true that others report, S. Harsnettes discouerie, pag. 302. and pag. 307. and your selfe depose. For first, your selfe hauing well dined before with Master Beresford at Cutthorpe, and then after dinner, going two or three miles vnto the appointed place: you had fully dispatched them all by noone, or shortly after. Howbeit, I am something too blame for intermedling so farre with the secret mysteries of this new-found trade: for notwithstanding the premisses, and those your precedent Canons concerning the same, there may bee couched some hidden conceit vnder those your change­able [Page] [...] Spirit had time long enough for his further conti­nuance: yet K. Wrights seauen Diuels, they had continued in her their appointed terme to the full: and then (Master Darell affirmeth) they will goe out of their owne accord,D. Detection. pag. 102. without any such meanes at all. Thus then it is vncertaine (you see) whether that their speedie departure from out of her bellie, was voluntarie of themselues, or constrained rather by the ineuitable force of your fasting and prayer: neither do we perceiue how we may be soundly resolued herein, but by old Midlecubs mouth. For if their speedie departure was vo­luntarilie performed by their owne accord: then what need (I beseech you) of that your new-found ordinance of prayer and fasting, especially where such curteous Diuels must bee encountred with? Surely none at all. Nay rather, much needles labour might well haue bin spared, and such cause­lesse sturres needed neuer haue been raised all the countrey ouer, about a new nothing. On the other side, if their speedie departure was not voluntarie (as before) but that they were (by the very force of your prayers) compeld to bee packing, without longer delay: then tell vs I pray you, how your rule was obserued concerning the vse of fasting therewith? Now surely this new-found trade of Diuillitie, it was first founded (it seemes) vpon a tottering pillar, or fickle foundation: and that is the reason why you haue made your chaungeable Ca­nons so suteable and correspondent thereto.

Exorcistes.

Doctrine. pag. 43.Howsoeuer it pleaseth your selfe, very disdainfullie to [Page 105] terme it a new-found trade: very certaine I am, that our Sa­uiour Christ, he hath (in those Scriptures) established prayer and fasting, as a perpetuall ordinarie meanes for the power­full expelling of Diuels.

Orthodoxus.

Not so.Doctrine. pag. 44. Those Scriptures haue only a reference to the Dis­ciples of Christ concerning that action in hand: as wee shew­ed, and your selfe confessed before. For by them alone the question was moued: to them alone the answere was giuen: and of them alone must the same be vnderstood.

Exorcistes.

To appropriate that speech of Christ, Doctrine, pag. 44. and to restraine it precisely to the persons of the Disciples alone, as meerely and peculiarly appertaining to them: is much more then the text it selfe either in expresse words, or by necessarie conse­quence, may possibly beare.

Orthodoxus.

Oh,D. Doctrine, pag. 42. then I perceiue you are a Kingstroppe man concerning your word: who will say, and vnsay with a breath. For, did not your owne selfe so appropriate this scripture a little before, when you gaue the sense of the place: protesting withall, you would sticke fast to that sense for euer?

Exorcistes.

Yea,D. Doctrine, pag. 44. but I haue (vpon better deliberation) considered since, that there is no scripture besides, to helpe in this case: and therefore that former sense is more then any man may for certaintie auouch. Yea, it is such a sense I assure you, as we our selues may by as good warrant denie, as others may dare to affirme.

Physiologus.

Master Orthodoxus, this man (by his variable answeres) doth make me remember a merrie old iest of an Hermite. Who (comming in a cold winters night to a Farmers house, and blowing his fingers) was demanded of the Farmer, what he meant by blowing his fingers: I doe it (quoth the Her­mite) to warme them with all. This Hermite being foorth­with set downe to his supper with a good messe of warme pottage before him; he blew his said pottage: The Farmer beholding the man, said thus vnto him. Thou didst blow thy fingers euen now, to warme them withall: but I pray thee, for [Page 106] what purpose dost thou now blow thy pottage? I blow my pottage (saith he) to coole them thereby. Yea (quoth the Far­mer) can there come out of thy mouth, both heate and colde at a clap? I perceiue then by these pranckes, thou art but a dissembling fellow, or some counterfeite Frier; and there­fore, be packing (I pray thee) from out of my house: for I like not those fobbing companions, which can so cunningly blow both hotte and cold with a breath.

Exorcistes? Howsoeuer this tale befitteth your person: the allusion (you see) resembleth your practise in euery point. For you told vs euen now,D. Doctrine. pag. 42. very confidently, that Christ did ap­propriate this text, to his Disciples demand: and now, with one and the selfe same breath, you doe beare vs in hand, that such a sense is much more then may be auouched for truth, it hauing none other scripture besides, to mannage the same. Surely,Reuel. 3.16. as the Lord (for his owne part) protesteth to vomite such lukewarme Laodiceans out of his mouth, as are neither hotte nor colde: so shall it not be amisse for the wise Farmers of England, to beware how they harbour those doublefaced Ia­nusses, which know how to blow both hotte and colde with a breath. Besides that, this your new found ordinance (hauing neither expresse scripture to establish it, nor any text else to support the supposed truth thereof) it must needs be a pitifull ordinance: yea, and (which more is) an ordinance flat opposite (both in nature and qualitie) to all ordinances else whatsoeuer. And therefore, it shall not be amisse for your ignorant Reader, to haue a more watchfull respect to the maine point it selfe: being thus matched, with such a cog­ing companion, as knowes how to alter his shape with atrice.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 44.Howsoeuer you catch hold of any thing said by my selfe to the contrary, that scripture, it cannot be vnderstood of Christs Apostles, or of any others endewed with like mira­culous giftes: neither may it any further be meant of, or di­rected to them, then thereby to signifie to them, that it was one of the worst kinde of Spirites wherewith the childe was possessed, whence partly it came to passe, they had not cast him out.

Physiologus.

Philologus? doe you marke Exorcistes his speech?

Philologus.
[Page 107]

I marke it well. For he saith, that Scripture had no further relation to the Apostles them selues: then onely to set forth vnto them, with what kinde of spirit the childe was possessed.

Physiologus.

You obserue him aright. But, goe to now: fast or loose, for a shilling?

Philologus.

It is fast for a shilling.

Physiologus.

Nay, loose for a shilling: as will plainely appeare by the triall thereof. For first, if this Scripture hath an apt reference vnto the Apostles themselues, so farre foorth especially as concernes the necessary demonstration of that kinde of spirit wherewith the child was possessed: then so farre forth also, that portion of scripture was (by Exorcistes owne mouth) ap­propriated to the Apostles them selues. As also, if that kinde of diuell was but partly a cause, why the Disciples could not driue him out from the childe, as Exorcistes affirmeth euen now: then their weaknesse of faith, was partly the other im­pediment to that speciall worke,D. Doctrine, pag. 44. as Exorcistes also auou­ched before, when he put downe the sense of that Scripture. Making onely but two impediments to that selfe same busi­nesse: namely, the weakenesse of the Apostles faith, and the kinde of spirit wherewith the childe was possessed. Both which impediments (he saith) are necessarily implyed in that porti­on of Scripture: whereupon it must necessarily follow, that the very Scripture it selfe is peculiarly appropriated to the Apostles of Christ, the which thing here he doth flatly deny. Thus then yourselfe may plainely perceiue, that (by trust­ing the Aegyptians tongue too farre, without any farther regard to the sleight of his fingers) your shilling is flatly my owne.

Philologus.

I may not deny it. Howbeit, this being the first pennie that euer I lost at fast or loose: it shall make me beware how I relie too fast vpon the leger-demaines of such iuggling mates; for feare of loosing the purse and all.

Orthodoxus.

Physiologus? You your selfe (I perceiue) and Philologus are [Page 108] pleasantly disposed: in that you can so pleasantly sport your selues with Exorcistes his slippes. Howbeit, forbeare I beseech you, and let the poore man proceede in putting downe his reasons: why this portion of Scripture (howsoeuer the same was taken before) may not now be vnderstood of the Apostles, and seuentie Disciples?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine. pag. 44.My reason why that Scripture may not now be vnder­stood of them: is chieflie this. Christ speaketh (in that place) expresly, and by name, of an ordinarie meanes to cast out diuels: and therefore (by consequence) he speaketh onely to such ordinarie men, as by that selfe same meanes, either had or should cast them out, and not to any the Apostles of Christ, who dealt in those cases by no appointed ordinarie meanes, but without meanes by that onely power or gift, which they receiued immediatly for the working of miracles.

Orthodoxus.

Either your wits are bewitched; or else you are purpose­ly bent to blindfold your poore ignorant Reader, that so you may the more boldly giue him the bobbe. D. Doctrine. For, fasting and prayer (spoken of in that text) it seemed to your selfe a little before, to be there but a secret ordinance of Christ, for the expelling of spirits and diuels: and doth Christ now, ex­preslie, and by name entreate there also, of an apparant or­dinarie meanes for casting out diuels? Surely, it seemes you would shew your selfe an exquisite Artist, in deuising this new found trade of Diuillitie: were you but furnished throughly with the necessarie supplie of a lyars memorie. Howbeit, our Sauiour Christ, he doth (in that portion of Scripture) neither expreslie, nor secretly establish any such supposed ordinarie meanes, for the ordinarie expelling of di­uels by any whomsoeuer: but speakes (by the way) of pray­er and fasting, as of the ordinarie helpes to that selfe same miraculous faith, whereby his Disciples should haue driuen that diuell from the child. Neither doe we say, or so much as imagine, that the Apostles at any time expelled spirits or di­uels by any your supposed ordinarie meanes alone: and it is absurd for your selues to auouch, that they vsed no meanes at all. For, they vsed that their miraculous faith, which appre­hended the immediate power of Christ in their miraculous [Page 109] expelling of diuels: the which their said faith (being but weake at that present) should haue beene stirred vp and confirmed by fasting and prayer.

Exorcistes.

This iumpeth very patte with trayterous Stapleton, D. Doctrine. and Thyreus the Iesuite: who ioyntly affirme, that there are some kinde of spirites, which the Apostles (with all their power) could not possiblie expell but by prayer and fasting.

Orthodoxus.

And tell me in good earnest,D. Doctrine, pag. 49. whether Exorcistes our di­uel-driuer doth [...]ot also auouch the same. Howbeit, let Stapleton, Thyreus and Exorcistes affirme what they will, we hold no such Iesuiticall fooleries: and the difference be­tweene them and our selues, is apparantly euident, if your selfe had but eies to behold the same. For, whereas they and yourselfe (by foysting in a combersome kinde of diuels, vn­wealdie for the Apostles them selues through any their mi­raculous faith to ouersway) doe goe very fondly about to establish a new found ordinance, for the orderly exorcizing of spirits and diuels, vnder an holy pretence of prayer and fasting, as an ordinary meanes appointed by Christ to that selfe same busines: we (neuer dreaming of any such doting distinction of diuels) doe flatly denie such an ordinance to be any where establisht by Christ, and with all, we very confi­dently auouch, that all diuels whatsoeuer, were euer driuen foorth by the onely immediate power of the Lord, apprehen­ded wholie by a miraculous faith. Which said faith (being at any time growen sluggish or weake) must necessarily be stirred vp by fasting and prayer: euen as also the extraordi­narie propheticall spirit of Elisha was excited,2. King. 3.1 [...]. or quickned by the melodious harmonie of a musicall harp. And therefore (by the selfe same reason) you may as boldly conclude a new found ordinance for prophesiyng by the meanes of an harpe; because such a meanes was once practised, to awaken Elisha his propheticall spirit: as conclude an established ordinance for driuing forth diuels by fasting and prayer, because Christ (at one time) did tell his Disciples that such a meanes should haue been vsed by them, for the timely stirring vp of their miraculous faith, in that their intended businesse. In which holy exercise of prayer and fasting, the Disciples themselues [Page 110] being somewhat too negligent all the while that Christ was absent from them in the mount: their said faith was there­fore vnable to accomplish that selfe same miraculous work.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 45.If this exposition were true, then should there be some such kind of diuels, as the Apostles of Christ (by all the faith they eyther had or could haue) were vnable (without further supplie) to subdue: which seemes very straunge vnto mee, and such a sense, as I neyther can nor dare beleeue, neyther yet receiue for infallible truth.

Orthodoxus.

Why man, Stapelton, Thyreus, and you your own selfe doe flatlie affirme such a sense of the place. Eyther you are to too forgetfull what you affirme: or els you are groslie impudent in auouching the thing you dare not beleeue, nor receiue for infallible truth. But what might be the reason of such your sodaine Apostasie concerning this point?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 45.Surelie sir, euen this and none other. First, when I but re­member those wonderfull workes which the Apostles them­selues did eftsoones effect, and consider withall that abso­lute power of Christ, whereby they effected the same: I per­ceiue not how any infernall power could euer be able, to resist or hold out against that diuine and absolute power of Christ.

Orthodoxus.

It appeares by your speech, that eyther you haue had your later cogitations concerning these matters: or that els you haue filthilie forgot what you said but a little before, and (or euer it be long) will be forced eftsoones to auouch it a fresh. Howbeit, this (in the meane time) wee doe flatlie confesse for an answere, and Master Darel also auoucheth as much:D. Doctrine, pag. 46.47. namelie, that all the infernall powers of hell shall neuer be able to withstand that absolute power of Christ, which must necessarily driue them from the possessed. Although not­withstanding it followeth not, but that the diuell might then be able enough to withstand the Apostles miraculous faith, Caluin. in Matth. 17.20. in the timely apprehending of that selfesame absolute power of Christ. And this also by their own carelesnes in stirring vp their said faith by earnest prayer to God: for which their said carelesnesse, they were then so sharpelie rebuked of [Page 111] Christ, and for confirmation of which faith, from thence­forth they eftsoones practised such feruent prayer, Act. 9.40. and 28.8. about the powerful accomplishment of many their miraculous actions.

Exorcistes.

They sometimes prayed I confesse at their working of mi­racles: D. Doctrine, pag. 45. howbeit, they needed not so to haue done their faith being strong.

Orthodoxus,

Verie true. But (their faith being weake) there was great cause they should doe it: yea, and euen then also our Saui­our Christ very sharpely rebukes them for not doing the same.D. Doctrine, pag. 45. And (which more is) you your owne selfe doe af­firme that at other times also, they did earnestlie pray for the encrease of their faith: which faith of theirs being then but weake,D. Doctrine, pag. 46. M. Darel hee tels you, that was the cause why they could not driue forth the diuell.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir, the very words of our Sauiour himselfe, are so di­rectly against this interpretation: as wee may by no meanes admit of the same.Matth. 17.20. For he tels his Disciples, that nothing should be impossible to their miraculous faith: and therefore not the casting out of any diuell, how combersome or crabbed soe­uer. Vnlesse happilie you will make these wordes of Christ, (this kind goeth not forth but by fasting and prayer) a particular exception from out of that generall power of the Apostles mira­culous faith: whereunto nothing should be impossible, saue only the expelling of diuels of that kinde, which is vtterly vn­sound, and flat opposite to the meaning of Christ himselfe.

Orthodoxus.

Yea, but M. Darel he tels you a quite contrarie tale. For hee very confidentlie affirmeth, that the scope and pur­pose of Christ was, to make knowen to his owne Disciples, that the spirit possessing that child,D. Doctrine, pag. 42. was one of the worst kind of spirits: for as much as it was one that would not be remoo­ued, without the strong and chiefe of those meanes which were ordinarie and perpetual, and that thence partly it was, that the Disciples themselues did not cast him forth. And for this cause M. Darel doth tell vs,D. Doctrine. pag. 49. that our Sauiour Christ from out of those words (this kind goeth not out) noteth a cer­taine distinct sort, order, or degree of diuels, some way differing [Page 112] and distinguished from others: with one of which number, hee implieth that the child was possessed, whereby it came, that they themselues had not cast him out.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 46.Howsoeuer it pleaseth you to make your selfe sport with Master Darel his speeches, M. Darel (vpon better deliberati­on) now telleth you plainely, that so oft as hee considers the authoritie and power which Christ gaue his Disciples ouer al vn­cleane spirits, and their mightie preuailing therewith: as also when he remembers, that this selfesame receiued power of theirs,Luk. 9.1. was not bounded or limited to this or that kind of di­uel, but stretched it selfe ouer all euill spirits whatsoeuer; so that if he were but a diuell, they had power to expell him: so oft (I say) as M. Darel considers and remembers these mat­ters, hee dare boldlie conclude, that no diuell (how comber­some or cruell soeuer) was able to withstand the Apostles mi­raculous faith.

Orthodoxus.

Iam. 1.8. Ephes. 4.14.If M. Darel be fraught with such variable and flitting considerations: no maruell at all, though the poore man be carried hither and thither, with such variable and chaungeable opinions, as are like to the chaungeable taffeta resembling all colours. Howbeit, such wauering weathercockes should make wise men beware, how they credit any his vncertaine oracles concerning this new-found diuillitie, howsoeuer the beake stands full in the winde. More especiallie then it behooues them to haue their eyes in their head, when Master Darel concludes so directlie against the plaine wordes of Christ: Eccles. 2.14. D. Doctrine, pag. 47. Matth. 17.20. who tels his Disciples, that the very cause why they could not cast forth that spirit, was their vnbeleefe and weakenesse of faith, which they should haue stirred vp by fasting and prayer.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 47.Sir, by your patience, you are quite from the purpose of Christ: For he speakes there of the miraculous faith, as ap­peares by the text it selfe: which tels vs of such a faith no doubt as (being effectuallie had) is able to remoue moun­taines out of their places. Matth. 17.20.

Orthodoxus.

And we also vnderstand it of such a faith: but what then?

Exorcistes.
[Page 113]

Doe you aske me,D. Doctrine, pag. 47. what then? Why sir, that kinde of faith it was giuen without meanes to certaine men. And as the Lord appointed no meanes for the begetting of that selfe­same miraculous faith: so neyther hath hee ordained anie meanes at all for the encrease thereof.

Orthodoxus.

A mad man might happily imagine that Exorcistes (by this his immediate miraculous faith) had striken the Popingay dead: beholding him especially so crowslie to set vp the crest. But sir, how are you sure the miraculous faith was gi­uen the Apostles without any meanes? or that the Lord hath appointed no meanes at all, for the begetting thereof? Very certaine it is, that the miraculous faith (how extraordinarie soeuer) is giuen vnto men by the inspiration of God: and ther­fore the spirit it selfe is a meanes whereby the Lord begetteth that selfesame miraculous faith, in some certaine speciall per­sons, foreordained by the foreknowledge of God to that spe­ciall busines.1. Cor. 12.9. For to some (saith the Apostle) is giuen faith by the same spirit: whereby you may plainly perceiue, that euen the miraculous faith it selfe hath also a meanes, for the timely begetting thereof.

Exorcistes.

These are but starting holes, whereby to slip foorth when you feele your selfe hardly beset. For sir, I speake only of an ordinarie, and not of any extraordinary meanes for the beget­ting of faith: D. Doctrine, pag. 47. and (which more is) I would gladly know where the Lord hath sanctified any ordinarie meanes, for the begetting or encrease of that, which he giues without such meanes?

Orthodoxus.

And these are but quick-sands wherewith you doe grauell your deepe skill of Diuillitie, so oft as you plunge your selfe in the same. Howbeit, thus much (for aduantage) you con­fesse by the way: namely, that euen the miraculous faith it selfe is extraordinarily begotten in men by the spirit of God. But tell me (I pray you) doth the Lord inspire the miraculous faith into the mindes of some, by his onely immediate spirit? or hath he appointed no ordinarie meanes at all, whereby his said spirit may engraue, or beget that selfesame faith in their [Page 114] hearts? It is one thing to haue the bare matter of that faith it selfe: and another, to haue withall the admirable manner of executing the same. And therfore me thinks you might learne to distinguish betweene the bare habite of that faith, and the admirable execution thereof. Touching the onely bare habite of such a miraculous faith, I see not as yet to the contrary, but that we may boldly auouch the spirit alone, to be the imme­diate: Ioh. 17.21. Heb. 11.6. Rom. 10.17. and the word it selfe the mediate cause which begetteth both the iustifying, the historicall, and also the miraculous faith it selfe. For as all faith whatsoeuer doth come by hearing the word: so surely the miraculous faith it selfe (being none other thing else,Matth. 17.20. Musculus ibid. Pet. Martyr. loc. com. Class. 1. cap. 8. sect. 14. but an vndoubted perswasion, by which we firmely be­leeue that there is nothing impossible to God) it also must neces­sarily fetch the ground-worke of such a perswasion from the infallible word of God: for what els but the word it selfe may certainly assure vs, that there is nothing impossible to God? By this then you may also very plainly perceiue an apparant begetting of the miraculous faith (respecting especially the bare habite thereof) by an ordinarie meanes, I meane by the word of God. Caluin. in Matth. 17.20. Musculus ibid. Pet. Martyr. in 1. Cor. 12.9. And as this the miraculous faith doth vndoub­tedly gather her first begetting from the word it selfe, respe­cting especially the onely bare habite thereof: so surely the minde it selfe (being in that selfe same habite of faith) extraor­dinarily raised vp by some speciall motion from the spirit of God, vnto the timely execution of that selfesame faith (begot­ten (as before) by the word and spirit of God) it doth extraor­dinarily vndertake the powerfull effecting of some such ad­mirable matters as seemeth best to the Lord, for the present good of his Church. And this vndoubtedly is that extraordi­narie execution of the miraculous faith, whereof the Apostle purposely speaketh,1. Cor. 12.9. saying thus: To one is giuen faith by the same spirit: that is, an extraordinarie execution of that the miraculous faith, for the edification of the Church of God. And according to this selfesame begetting of the miraculous faith, by the ordinarie meanes of the word, the Apostle else­where (hauing spoken of many miraculous operations a little before) aduiseth the Corinthians to desire to follow after,1. Cor. 12.31. and 14.1. and very earnestly to labour for the best spirituall gifts: which neither hee would haue aduised them to, neither yet could they possiblie haue attained vnto them, if so bee there had [Page 115] been no ordinarie meanes by the word, by prophesie, by confe­rence, by meditation, or prayer at least to beget them withall.

Exorcistes.

Well sir, be it there are some such both extraordinarie and ordinarie meanes, for the timely begetting of this the miracu­lous faith: D. Doctrine, pag. 47. yet can you not prooue, and I would gladly bee made to perceiue where the Lord hath sanctified any ordi­narie meanes, for the timely encrease and confirmation of that which he bestowes vpon men, without such a meanes?

Orthodoxus.

Would you gladly bee made to perceiue this mysticall point? Iam. 1.18.19. 1. Pet. 1.22. 1. Pet. 2.2. Brentius. in Luc. 17.5. Why man, is not all faith whatsoeuer, to receiue her further encrease and growth from those selfesame meanes, whereby she was first begotten in the minde of man? If there­fore the miraculous faith hath her first begetting, extraordina­rilie from the spirit, and ordinarilie from the word of the Lord, as hath bin declared: who doubteth then, but that by those selfesame meanes also she is stirred vp, encreased, and confir­med from time to time? Otherwaies, what thinke you of Ti­mothie his extraordinarie gifts and graces of the spirit: 1. Tim. 1.18. Iohannes Caluin. ibidem & in 1. Tim. 4.14. Cruciger, in 1. Tim. 4.13.14 who be­ing called after an extraordinarie manner to the office of an E­uangelist, was (notwithstanding his said extraordinary calling) very earnestly aduised by Paul, to stirre vp those his said ex­traordinarie gifts, by the ordinarie vse of the word. Yea, and (according to this sacred counsell of Paul) the Disciples them­selues did pray vnto Christ for the encrease of their faith. Luk. 17.5.

Exorcistes.

You purposely peruert the scope of that Scripture. D. Doctrine, pag. 46. For the Apostles pray there for the onely encrease of their iustifying faith, as appeareth very plainly by the essentiall fruites there­of:Luk. 17.1, 2, 3, 4, 5. which (being put downe by Christ in the verses precedent) occasioned the Disciples to pray as they did.

Orthodoxus.

Not only they prayed for the timely encrease of their iusti­fying faith (as you say) but of their whole faith whatsoeuer. Howbeit, more especially for the timely encrease of their miraculous faith, as appeareth plainly by the answer of Christ: who (approuing their zeale in crauing so earnestly the en­crease thereof) commends them more especially for that, and tels them withall,Luk. 17.6. that if they had but so much of that faith as [Page 116] is a graine of mustard-seede, and should say to this Mulberie tree, plucke vp thy selfe by the rootes, and goe plant thy selfe in the Sea, it should forthwith obey their commaund. Neither in that place only, but elsewhere also the Disciples they doe (by their ear­nest prayers) very earnestly entreate the Lord, Act. 4.29.30. to grant vnto them all boldnes to speake his word, and to stretch forth his hand, that healing, and signes, and wonders might be done by the name of his holie sonne Iesus. D. Doctrine, pag. 45. Yea, and (which more is) Master Da­rell himselfe doth confesse, that both Peter and Paul verie earnestly entreated the Lord by their prayers, to make their miraculous faith very powerfull in restoring Tabitha to life, Act. 9.40. Act. 28. [...]. and in recouering the father of Publius from his dangerous and dead­ly feauer. By al which it is very apparant, that as the Apostles miraculous faith was begotten by meanes: so surely they vsed an ordinarie meanes for the encrease thereof.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 45.They did so I confesse: howbeit, there was no necessitie at all in doing the same, for these following reasons. Namely, first their said miraculous faith, it was of it selfe so strong, as it needed no helpe of any such ordinarie meanes for the en­crease thereof.

Orthodoxus.

Your reason it is to too absurd. For in saying the Apostles faith was so strong of it selfe, as it needed no manner of en­crease:D. Doctrine, pag. 46. besides, that you directly doe crosse your owne selfe elsewhere, you doe therein also first condemne the Disciples themselues, for putting vp a needles and superfluous prayer to God, so oft as they prayed for the encrease of that, which needed (you say) no encrease at all. Againe, you doe therein very plainly giue the Apostle the lie: who doth elsewhere a­uouch, that (so long as hee and the rest of Gods children re­maine in this mortall life) they but know only in part, 1. Cor. 13.9.10. yea, and that so they must doe, till this their imperfection be vtterly abo­lished, by the comming of that which is perfect. And therefore this your first reason, concerning the Apostles perfection of faith, is to too absurd, very false, and vnreasonable. Besides that, there is small reason wee should credit your bare affir­mation concerning that their supposed fulnes of faith, we ha­uing especially the authenticall iudgement of one so farre sur­mounting your selfe in the depth of Diuillitie, I meane your [Page 117] friend Master [...]: who telleth vs confidently,D. Doctrine. pag. 45. that doubt­les the Disciples they [...], in an especiall regard of them­sel [...], I [...], to stirre vp and encrease their faith: and therefore this first reason of yours is vnworthie (by Master Darell his iudgement) to receiue any answere.

Exorcistes.

Whatsoeuer Master Darell auoucheth concerning the A­postles prayers, D. Doctrine, pag. 48. for the timely encrease of that their miracu­lous faith, very certaine I am, they did more therein then God inioyned them to doe, in regard of any their extraordi­narie gifts and graces: and therefore their said prayers (if they only respected but the timely encrease of any their ordinarie graces) make nothing against me.

Orthodoxus.

How came you so throughly acquainted with those the se­cret counsels of God, that you are certaine the Disciples (in praying for the timely encrease of their extraordinarie gra­ces) did more therein, then God himselfe inioyned them to doe?

Exorcistes.

I am (I assure you) very certaine thereof:D. Doctrine, pag. 48. and so much the rather, for that they had no reuealed word from the Lord to warrant the same.

Orthodoxus.

They had (besides their ordinarie approued practises) the vndoubted re [...]lation [...] and motions of Gods spirit therein; as may very [...]bablie appeare by the extraordinarie blessing and effect which the Lord (at that instant) bestowed vpon their holie endeuours concerning Tabitha, Act. 9.40. Act. 28.8. and the father of Publius. Howbeit (because you so confidently auouch, that the Disciples did more therein, then they were inioyned by God) doe tell me (I beseech you) whether they sinned or not, in doing the same?

Exorcistes.

Nay surely, howsoeuer they prayed they sinned not there­in, as may plainly appeare by the good successe of their prayers: for (whereas God heareth not sinners) he heard them effectual­lie, and granted vnto them the request of their lips.

Orthodoxus.

It is not alwaies safe to reason from the successe of our [Page 118] prayers either one way or other; because the Lord he might heare them in iudgement: and so the Disciples (notwithstan­ding any the successe of their prayers) they might fearefully offend in crauing an encrease of that, which needed (you say) no encrease at all. Besides that, they hauing (as you further affirme) no reuealed word to warrant their prayer, the same could not possiblie be put vp in faith: Dar. Doctrine, pag. 48. Rom. 14.23. and being not made or put vp in faith, it must needs be sinne; for whatsoeuer is not of faith, is sinne, and so (by consequence) the Apostles (if they prayed in such sort as you say) they sinned no doubt. Briefely, the Apostles and all others, they are not onely to forbeare from the doing of what which God hath forbidden,Deut. 4.2. and 12.32. Iosh. 1.7. Pro. 30.5.6. Reuel. 22.18. but (which more is) they are strictly enioyned withall, to doe onely that which the Lord commaunds them to doe: if therefore the Apostles then prayed to God (hauing thereunto no warrant at all from his word) they did more therein, then they were commaunded of God, and so they sinned in do­ing the same.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 48.I am sure (whatsoeuer you say to the contrary) that the Apostles (in praying for the timely encrease of any their ex­traordinarie graces) they did more therein, then they needed to haue done: neither yet did they sin at al in doing the same.

Orthodoxus.

If they did more then they needed to haue done, and yet sinned not at al in doing the same: it seemes by your speech that the Apostles prayer, it was then some [...] of super­errogation at least; and so, therein not onely they iumped iustly with our Papists now, whom we generally condemne for such an insolent and proud conceite, but (which more is) they dealt directly therein, against the holy institution of their master Christ. Who wils them else where, that (when they haue done whatsoeuer they were able) they should notwith­standing, Luk. 17.10. acknowledge themselues but vnprofitable seruants: and so (by consequence) if (in praying as before) the Disciples did more then they needed to haue done; then surely (how­soeuer the pride of mans nature might superarrogate some thing vnto it selfe) it appeareth by Christs mouth, that they were but arrogant sinners, if that which your selfe doth auouch, be counted for currant. Howbeit, your friend ma­ster [Page 119] Darel [...] (analyzing and expounding the text) doth tell vs directly,D. Doctrine. pag. 59. that this Scripture containeth first, a commaunde­ments to fast and pray: and then next, a promised blessing in doing the same. By which it is very apparant (whatsoeuer you pra [...]e to the contrary) that the Apostles (in so praying) they did no more then they needed: but that rather, which was imposed vpon them, by a speciall commaundement from their master Christ. Yea, and that also according to the meaning of Christ himselfe:Matth. 17.20. D. Doctrine, pag. 47. who hauing told his Disciples before that the very weakenes of their faith was one speciall impediment to the speedy dispatch of that speciall busines: then teacheth them further,Matth. 17.2 [...]. Mark. 9.29. that they should haue quicke­ned their said faith by feruent and earnest prayer to God.

Exorcistes.

Whatsoeuer you tell me concerning master Darels expo­sition: D. Doctrine, pag. 48. this text may (at no hand) be peculiarly appropriated to the Apostles themselues, for many respects.

Orthodoxus.

What is one, to begin with?

Exorcistes.

Why this?D. Doctrine, pag. 48. If that Scripture hath speciall relation to the Apostles themselues, as you seeme to auouch: then surely, (howsoeuer they had faild in their enterprise) they might notwithstanding haue made this one defence, or excuse for themselues: namely, that they had no spare time for those speciall exercises, since they first saw the childe. The which so fit a defence or excuse, they would neuer haue omitted: be­ing especially so sharply reproued of their master before.

Orthodoxus.

That Scripture, it may not be appropriated to the Apostles (you say) for many respects: making their pretended excuse (from a supposed want of time, in the timely dispatch of those speciall exercises) the principall respect thereof. Surely, a worthy respect; and the same very respectiuely put downe no doubt, for many respects.

For, First you were throughly acquainted (it seemes) with all the spare time the Apostles then had at that present.

Secondly, it is very likely you knew how much of that time they must necessarily haue bestowed to the full: in the effec­tuall discharge of that duetie.

[Page 120]Thirdly, you were also very certaine no doubt, that if they but wanted one minute of that your appointed time: then surely (how succinctly, or how feruently soeuer they should put vp their prayers to God) their labours therein had been vtterly lost.

Lastly, you were made priuie (it seemes) to the Apostles purpose then, in not praying at all: who, perceiuing some want of time for the timely performance of those speciall exerci­ses, would not therefore vndertake them at all, for losing their labors, but tooke (as it seemes) their said want of time for a backesette, or a profered aduantage in their pro­per defence, if haplie they should faile (as they did) in the powerfull dispatch of that enterprise.

Now surely, the Disciples of Christ are highly beholding vnto you for this their proper defence; whereof they them­selues (it should seeme) were vtterly ignorant. Howbeit, had the Disciples dreamed in deed of such a sillie defence: yet surely, that dreaming defence, it had beene directly a­gainst the whole course of the historie, as may very plainely appeare by the seuerall circumstances concerning the same.

Matth. 17.1.For, first the possessed childe was presented vnto them, at the very selfe same time their master Christ was gone vp to the mount: being in the mount, he was forthwith transfigured, in the presence of Peter, Iames and Iohn.

Verse 2.In the time of his transfiguration: he talked a time with Moses, and Elijah.

Verse 6.After his transfiguration, he comforted the three Disciples: who were greatly amazed at that which they saw and heard.

Verse 7.Hauing comforted and reuiued their troubled Spirites: he wils them very carefully to conceale the vision it selfe, till after his death.

Verse 9.After this speciall charge, he reformed their error concer­ning Elijah his comming.

Verse 11.These things thus dispatched in order: he forthwith de­scended from out of the mount. Being so descended, he saw the people thronged together:Mark. 9.14. Verse 16. Verse 17. Verse 18. and the Pharisees very hotly disputing with his other Disciples, about their not dispossessing of the child as it seemes.

These circumstances duely considered, it is apparantly euident, that the Disciples they had time enough to haue [Page 121] prayed: and therefore, that your imagined want of time, it could be no colourable excuse, to colour their carelesse negligence in awakening their faith by feruent praier to God. Moreouer, in saying the Apostles would neuer haue omit­ted that profered excuse, from the want of time to those spi­rituall exercises: therein you derogate much from the Disci­ples their conscionable dealings in such sacred matters. For, what other thing else doth your speech import, but that ei­ther there was in the Disciples themselues, such absolute per­fection of foreseeing knowledge, as they neither would, nor possiblie could haue ouerseene, or pretermitted whatsoeuer might make for their proper defence: or that the Disciples at least (if especially they had been men of your humour and quicke conceite) they would (vpon euery occasion) haue beene forward enough, in making their present apologies, how preposterous, absurd, or vnsound soeuer.

Brieflie, howsoeuer you dreame, that the Disciples would haue made their excuse from that your imagined want of time to such spirituall exercises: it seemeth rather (their con­science being fully conuinced before, from the due conside­ration of the precedent circumstances concerning the suffi­ciencie of time for such businesse) that they (in all good con­science) did plead themselues guiltie of carelesse negligence, in not vsing the meanes of feruent prayer for the timely stir­ring vp of their faith. And therefore, they (by their purpo­sed silence) doe secretly consent to Christs reprehension, as a reprehension very iustly imposed vpon them for their former negligence: so farre off are they from falsely excusing them­selues, by any falsely pretended want of time. By all the pre­misses then, it is very apparant, that this your first reason hin­dreth nothing at all; but that the former speech of our Sa­uiour Christ may peculiarly, and onely be appropriated vn­to the Apostles themselues.

Exorcistes.

If,D. Doctrine, pag. 4 [...]. by the purport and drift of this text, we must necessa­rily be made to vnderstand, that the Disciples themselues (in their present weakenesse of faith for that present businesse) should in deede haue fasted and prayed: then surely our Sa­uiour Christ, he had not (in those words) directly answered vnto the very point it selfe of the Apostles former demaund, [Page 122] nor rendred any reason at all, why they had not cast foorth the spirit, they not hauing sufficient time to fast and to pray, as was shewed before.

Orthodoxus.

And we haue sufficiently shewed before: that they had time sufficient for the timely performance thereof. Howbeit, doe tell vs plainely, in which words our Sauiour Christ had not answered directly to the Disciples demaund; nor rende­red a sufficient reason for their not doing the present worke?

Exorcistes

D. Doctrine. pag. 48.In these words: namely, this kinde goeth not forth, but by prayer and fasting. For the Disciples demaunding why they could not driue forth that diuell, Mark. 9.29. and Christ telling them the reason was, because they had not solemnely prayed and fasted before: they might iustly haue answered, that they had no spare time for the orderly vndergoing of such solemne, and sacred exercises.

Orthodoxus.

By forging a reason of the nullitie of that worke, from whose words of Christ, it is to be feared (Exorcistes) you doe purposelie fight and struggle against the very light of your conscience: and therefore (that it should seeme) was the onlie cause why your selfe (insisting vpon your falselie supposed answere and reason of Christ) doe euen purposelie and (per­haps with a setled pertinacie) very vnconscionably conceale the wordes themselues, from whence you would seeme to collect your falselie supposed inference. For howsoeuer it may not be doubted of anie, but that our Sauiour Christ did directlie answere the point of his Disciples demaund, and very concludentlie yeeld them the reason of their not doing the deed: yet is it denied of all, that Christ did eyther of both in those selfesame words which your selfe doth alleadge. But he hauing in the words before, put downe their weakenesse of faith for the principall or maine impediment to that purposed businesse,D. Doctrine, pag. 46. D. Doctrine, pag. 41.42. as your owne selfe affirmed a little before: in those following words whereupon you fondlie insist, hee teacheth them how they should haue quickned their faith: namelie, by feruent and earnest prayer to God. And so this scripture (you see) notwithstanding any thing hitherto heard, may well be appropriated to the Apostles themselues.

Exorcistes.
[Page 123]

If that scripture must (in any wise) be meant of the Apo­stles themselues,D. Doctrine, pag. 48. then surelie so oft as their miraculous faith was vnable (of it selfe) to encounter with a combersome spi­rit: they must (for their further preuailing therein) haue ne­cessarilie consumed a whole day together in prayer and fa­sting: for fasting, Leuit. 23.32. it required a whole day, I meane from eeuen to [...]euen.

Orthodoxus

Exorcistes? you deale too triflinglie with your ignorant Reader: & do purposelie endeuour to dazell his eyes by your sundrie trickes of legerdemaine. For first (in vrging so strickt­ly the ceremonie of time for fasting and prayer) all the world may plainelie perceiue, that therein you doe but Iudaizare; and labour to entangle mens consciences a fresh, Gal. 5.1. with the heauie yoke of that Iewish bondage, from which they were freed by theyr libertie and freedome in Christ. And therefore by such need­lesse obseruation of dayes, Gal. 4 10.11. of monthes and of yeares, you may happilie enthrall the poore ignorant soules afresh, and bring their spirituall fathers in feare of bestowing their labours among them in vaine.

Moreouer, if fasting doth necessarilie require a whole day from eeuen to eeuen; or otherwise, the holie ordinance of God concerning that exercise, is apparantly violated and feare­fullie broken: then surelie the strickt and full obseruation thereof in the powerfull expelling of diuels may haue manie absurdities following the same. For be it supposed the diuell should be driuen from the partie possessed before noone at the furthest (as were those seuen from K. Wright, D. Doctrine, pag. 43. if we may bold­lie credit your own report) who seeth not then, but that the one of these two absurdities must follow thereof at the least. Namelie, that eyther men must necessarilie transgresse that holy ordinance of prayer and fasting, by giuing ouer the so­lemne continuance thereof, before the set and appointed time be fullie accomplished, because the diuell is departed before: or must els very triftlinglie continue in calling vpon Christ for his absolute power to cast forth the spirit, notwith­standing he be cleerelie expelled before, and onelie because the set time for the fast is not fullie expired, which were fond and ridiculous.

[Page 124]Besides that, you your owne selfe obserued no such set or appointed times for fasting and prayer in any one your preten­ded dispossessions. For in some of them, you rather f [...]asted then fasted: and therefore how can you (in conscience) commend the said exercise of fasting to any of your pupils, vnlesse it be purposelie and onelie done to make good the old verse, which saith. Qui satur est, pleno laudat ieiunia ventre, that is,

Who so crammeth himselfe till his stomacke doth staunch:
He fasting commends with a pampered paunch.

Againe, in that your pretended dispossessing of Sommers and the rest, you spent not a whole day in prayer and fasting from eeuen to eeuen: but beginning about nine of the clocke in the morning, you had finisht your worke betweene three and foure at the farthest. So that (howsoeuer you would bind the Disciples teeth and hands to the good behauiour for a whole day together, from eeuen to eeuen) it seemes you your selfe must haue your owne teeth and tongue at libertie, so soone and so oft as it pleaseth your selfe.

Brieflie, whereas your selfe (by vrging so stricktly the Leui­ticall fasts) would haue the Disciples of Christ, euen necessari­lie taken vp with those exercises of fasting and prayer for a whole day together: your old friend M. Darel, it seemes he af­foords them more fauour,D. Doctrine, pag. 82. in not tying them so stricktly to any set time for the same. For he tels vs directlie, that the di­uell (how combersome soeuer) hee hath in the partie possessed his determined time appointed of God: longer then the which he cannot continue one minute of an houre, but must necessa­rilie depart at that time, though no meanes for dispossession were vsed at all. And therefore sith (for any thing we know to the contrarie) the Lord may determine the spirits depar­ture before the one halfe of the day be spent in those exerci­ses: it were but a vaine and vncertaine course to appoint a whole day for fasting and prayer, from eeuen to eeuen. So then, by this you see, it is very apparant, that (notwithstanding anie your supposed want of time for the worke) this speech of Christ, it may very well be appropriated to the Apostles them selues.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 48.Nay that I flatlie denie. For the Apostles (being filled with the holy Ghost at the feast of pentecost) they were neuer after [Page 125] so farre emptied thereof, but that (in attempting any miracu­lous worke whatsoeuer) they were throughlie able to accom­plish the same, without any such vse of fasting and prayer: and therefore it is very vnlikelie that our Sauiour Christ (for fortie dayes space and no longer) would euer establish such an ordinance of fasting and prayer for them to obserue in anie their dispossessions whatsoeuer.

Orthodoxus.

This then (by the way) you confesse at vnwares, that (be­fore the Apostles were filled with the holie Ghost at the feast of pentecost) their faith was but weake, and needed fasting and prayer to support the same. But this accident befell the Apostles before the said feast: and therefore (by your owne speech) they needed fasting and prayer (at that present) to stir vp and quicken their faith.

Besides that,D. Doctrine, pag. 47.48. your old friend M. Darel, he tels vs directly that the Apostles in deed by the power they receiued from Christ, were able to driue out any diuell whatsoeuer, and (as occasion was offered) they did so vndoubtedlie from time to time, if their faith fayled them not: which (saith he) at that present it did, and euen in this very worke: and therefore this speech of Christ (concerning fasting and prayer) it was peculiarly appropriated to them.

Brieflie, our Sauiour Christ he tels his Disciples directlie, that their vnbeleefe and weakenes of faith, was the maine im­pediment to that speciall busines:D. Doctrine▪ pag 42.44.46.47. and therefore (howsoeuer your selfe affirmeth (els where) that their faith was so strong as it needed no meanes to stirre vp the same) Christ telleth them plainely, they should haue vnderpropped their sayd faith by the holy exercise of feruent prayer to God.

Exorcistes.

Verie true,D. Doctrine, pag 48.49▪ before they were filled with the holy Ghost, there was some need to haue stirred vp their weake faith by fasting and prayer: but after the feast of pentecost there was no need of any such helps. For euen as after they receiued the fulnes of the spirit, their faith neuer failed in doctrine and iudg­ment: so neyther in the working of miracles.

Orthodoxus.

A man may perceiue by your manner of writing, that you meane to turne ere you burne: yea, and when you haue [Page 126] turned your selfe besides all manner of turnings; that then you will not sticke to returne a fresh to your former tur­nings: and so begin there to turne as fast, as euer you turned before. For what an odde iest is this to affirme but euen now, that (before the Apostles were filde with the spirit) their faith was so strong, as it needed no meanes to stirre vp the same: and euen then also (with the turning of an hand) to turne the Catte in the panne, and to say (on your credit) that be­fore the feast of pentecost there was some neede to quicken their faith, by fasting and prayer. May not those your young pupils be pestilent proude, who (in this new-found trade of diuillitie) are got vnder the trustie tuition of such a turne-about tutor, Ephes 4.14. Iam. 1.8. as turnes like the weathercocke with euery blast of Do­ctrine? Howbeit, you seeke to shelter your weather shaken opinion with this slender shift:D. Doctrine, pag. 48.49. namely, that howsoeuer the Apostles faith might be weake before they were filde with the spirit (and thereupon they needed prayer and fasting to stir vp and strengthen the same) yet after the fulnes of spirit, as their faith neuer failed in doctrine or iudgement: so neyther in the working of miracles. This seemeth an irrefragable rea­son no doubt: and such a one I beleeue, as may not possiblie be shaken.

Well, bee it supposed that after the Apostles receiued the holie Ghost, their faith fayled sometimes in Doctrine or iudgement: then it is very probable their said faith, it might also fayle at sometime in the working of miracles. That the Apostles at sometimes fayled in the first, it is verie apparant. For,Gal. 2.14. Reuel. 19.10. and 22.8. [...] 1.2. D. Reinolds, in 2. conclusione pag. 695. Amand. [...]olan. Syllog. thes. pag. 381. Peter hee went not rightly to the truth of the Gospell. Iohn would haue worshipped the angell once or twice. The Apostles and brethren who were at Iudaea; they thought that the word of God was not to be preached vnto the Gentiles. All these were errors in doctrine and iudgement. And therefore the Apostles faith (fayling directlie in these) it might fayle much more in the working of miracles. Howbeit, because you seeme so confi­dent in this one assertion: doe shew vs the reason why the A­postles faith (so soone as they were filled with the holy Ghost) could not possiblie fayle in doctrine or iudgement?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, 48.49.My reason is this. The holy Ghost is called the spirit of truth: This spirit, being promised to them, was afterwards in miracu­lous [Page 127] maner bestowed vpon them: they therefore receyuing the fulnes of this spirit, their faith from thenceforth could not pos­siblie faile in Doctrine or iudgement, and therefore much lesse in the working of miracles.

Orthodoxus.

I answere.Ioh. 14.17. Ioh. 14.16. and 15.26. and 16.13. Act. 2.1.2.3. The holie Ghost is iustly called the spirit of truth. This spirit of truth was faithfullie promised vnto the Apostles: and, at the feast of Pentecost, very miraculouslie bestowed vpon them. Hitherto, we accord (you see) in euery point. Howbeit, your inference inforced from hence is not proued, but pitifullie begged: for we denie, that either all or any one of the Apostles receyued the fulnes of this spirit.

Exorcistes.

Then you denie the truth of the sacred Scriptures. For, doth not the Euangelist Luke verie flatlie affirme, that they were all filled with the holie Ghost, Act. 2.4. and spake with new toongs, as the spirit gaue them vtterance?

Orthodoxus.

He denyes not the truth of the sacred scriptures: who onlie denyes but your erronious collections, vntrulie gathered from the sacred scriptures. For, it is one thing to be filled with; and ano­ther thing to receyue the fulnes of the spirit. It is an axiome, not onely warrantable by learned Philosophers, and commonlie knowen to the simplest on earth, but approued of all by com­mon experience: that, whatsoeuer thing is receyued of another, the same thing is receyued only according to the capacitie of that which receyueth the same. We do willinglie acknowledge, that the holie Ghost hath replenished only our sauiour Christ with the vnmeasurable aboundance of his graces, and that Christ only hath receyued the fulnes of the spirit: because, that vnto him the father giueth not the spirit by measure. Ioh. 3.34. Notwithstanding, the Apostles and all other the elect, they do only apprehend the graces of the spirit in their proper measure: according to which measure, Ioh. 1.6. they haue receyued not the fulnes it selfe, but, of the ful­nes of Christ his spirit, euen grace, for grace. By all which it is very apparant, that euen the blessed Apostles and other the elect in Christ, they receyue the graces of the spirit only, according to the simple capacitie of humane frailtie: and, not according to the maiestie and fulnes of the spirit it selfe, so as their faith could not faile in any respect. For, howsoeuer they were trulie renued [Page 128] and enlightned with the holy Ghost: yet were they not (in this present life) so absolutely enligtned renued or clensed from all peruersnes of hart, or blindnes of mind, as that they could ney­ther swarue in doing their dutie, nor be deceiued at all in their iudgement. Not, that the measure of the spirit which they recey­ued, was (of it selfe) insufficient to preserue them absolutely from either of both: but, for that it pleased the father in such sort to dispence his spiritual graces to men in this life, as the ve­rie best might perceiue their owne imperfections, and there­withall, be driuen to acknowledge, that the fulnes of perfection consisteth only in Christ. For, who will denye, there is water enough in the mayne Ocean sea, to quench the raging flames whatsoeuer which wast a whole towne: howbeit, this we must needes acknowledge withall,2. Cor. 4.7. that a simple earthen vessell can­not possiblie contayne enough of that water to asswage the fier alone,Act. 14.15. that burneth one house. The blessed Apostles, they ac­knowledge themselues to be men, yea men, who (being natu­rallie begotten in the image and likenes of Adam their father) must naturallie flame and burne as the Prophet reporteth.Gen. 5.3. Psal. 57.4. And therefore,Ioh. 3.5. albeit they were certainely borne anew of water and the spirit: yet, the water of the spirit, it doth not so thoroughlie extinguish in them all sparks and ouersights whatsoeuer, as that their faith could not faile in any respect. For then, what needed their corruptible bodies to put incorruption vpon them, 1. Cor. 15 53. Phil. 1.23. or them­selues desire to be dissolued and to be with Christ? Howbeit, this we certainely know, that (during this life) there remayneth e­uen in the best of all, a dayly strife betweene the spirit and the flesh: Rom. 7.22.23. Gal▪ 5.17. yea, and that the remnants of flesh do sticke very fast not only in their harts, but also in their minds. And for these selfe­same respects, the very Apostles themselues do freely acknow­ledge, that now (namely while they liue in this life) they knowe only but in part: 1. Cor. 12.11. 2. Cor. 12.9. that the power of God is perfited in weakenes: and that therefore they do all cry out with the Prophet and say, heale thou vs O Lord, Ierem 17.14. Phil. 3.10. and we shall be healed: yea, and euen Paule, he acknowledgeth of himselfe, that he is not yet perfit, although he be laboring earnestly towards the marke. Iam. 3.2. And Iames sayth gene­rally concerning the faithfull, that in many things they all offend. Briefly,Ioh. 13.16. Psal. 51.7. our sauiour affirmeth flatly, that he which is washed the whitest of all, hath neede notwithstanding to wash his feete. By all which its very apparant, that the Apostles themselues, they were [Page 129] not so absolutely filled with the graces of the spirit, but that their faith notwithstanding it might and did faile at one time or o­ther, in some point of doctrine or iudgement, and therefore much more in the working of miracles.

Exorcistes.

If it be certainely true, that their faith (at any time) fayled in doctrine or iudgement: Ioh. 16.13. how then is the promise of Christ to be credited concerning the holie Ghost, for he told his Disciples, that the same should leade them into all truth?

Orthodoxus.

That the Apostles faith in some things, and at sometime might faile, it is vndoubtedly true▪ and, the promise also of Christ cōcerning the holie Ghost his direction, is as vndoubted a truth. For the holie Ghost (no doubt) did leade them into all truth, yea, I say further, into all holines of soule and bodie: howbeit, he led them into all truth, in such sort as Paule protesteth vnto the Ephesians, Act. 20.27. that he shewed them all the counsell of God. Now, he shewed them all the counsell of God, not absolutely and simplie, but so much thereof and so farforth also, as was profitable for them: Act. 20.21. otherwayes, if he had absolutely shewed them the whole counsell of God whatsoeuer, he must necessarily then haue shew­ed them also the secret things of God, Deut. 29.29. which only belong to the Lord alone, and concerned neither them, nor their children. And therefore whereas our sauiour promised such a comforter vnto his disciples, Ioh. 16.13. as should leade them into all truth: the meaning is, that he should leade them into nothing else but the truth of God, and into all that truth whatsoeuer, which concerned their owne, and his Churches saluation. For, more then this our Sa­uiour neuer promised to them: and, more then this, they were not to expect at their maisters hands. So then, howsoeuer the particle (al) may seeme to haue reference vnto whatsoeuer the Apostles should speake or do: yet Christ, he restraines the holie Ghost his directions to those only truths which he (by his owne mouth) had taught them before, as appeareth by the very ten [...]ur of that promise it selfe,Ioh. 14.26. which sayth. But the Comfortor which is the holie Ghost, whom the father will send in my name, hee shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance which I haue told or taught you before. Giuing them thereby to vnderstand, that whensoeuer they spake or did that, which was not according to the reuealed truth he had taught: them: that [Page 130] saying or doing of theirs was more then he had told them be­fore, and more then they were led vnto by the spirit of truth. By all the premisses then, it is very apparant that the holie Ghost (in those daies) enlightened the Apostles mindes, and now also (at this present) doth sanctifie the hearts of all the elect, so farre foorth as is expedient for their owne and the Churches saluation. But it was then, and is now expedient for them and for vs to erre in some things, 1. Tim. 1.15, 16.17. that wee may giue all glorie to God alone: that so (seeing our owne frailtie and weakenes) we might not be high minded, R [...]m. 11.20. Gal. 6.1.2. but feare: that there­by wee may be taught, very willingly to beare one anothers burthen: that we might learne to worke forth our owne salua­tion with feare and trembling: Phil. 2.12. 2. Cor. 12.9. Mark. 9.22. Luk 7.47. Luk. 7.5. Luk. 11.4. 1. Cor. 9.24. and 16.13. Ephes. 4.14. Heb. 12.1.2. Ioh. 14.26. that we may be made to vnder­stand with Paul, that the grace of God is sufficient for vs: that we may sharpen our trust in him: stirre vp our loue towards him: pray more feruently vnto him, to increase our faith, and to for­giue vs our sinnes: briefly, that wee may runne forth the whole race of our life, with greater stedfastnes and constancie. Now then the case being thus, wee may boldly conclude, that the Apostles themselues and all the elect in Christ, they are led in all truth and holines by the certain direction of the holy Ghost: howbeit, this wee haue to consider withall, that they are so led vnto this saluation, as they are not absolutely free from euery sparke and wrinkle, either of manners or doctrine, but that at some time, and in some speciall points they might and did erre, as hath been declared.

Exorcistes.

How then could the efficacie of Christ his intercession, con­cerning their soundnes of faith, be certaine vnto them: who (hauing related the insatiable desire of Satan to sift them,Luk. 22.31.32. as men winnow wheate) told them forthwith, that he had prayed their faith should not faile. By which we may learne, that (if the inter­cession of Christ be any thing gratious with God his father) the Apostles faith could not possibly faile in doctrine or iudgement.

Orthodoxus.

D. Bilson, in his true defence part. 2. pag. 380Nay rather by this we may learne, that you grossie abuse both the prouidence of God and that promise of Christ: and all to support your idle fansies. For Christ did not promise that Pe­ters iudgement should neuer faile: but that (in the following temptation which was forthwith to fall vpon Peter) his faith [Page 131] should not finally perish. I haue prayed for thee (saith Christ) that thy faith shall not faile: Chrysostom. i [...] Iohannem. ho­mil. 72. Item, in Matth▪ homil. 83. Beda in Lucam. cap. 22.32, that is (saith Chrysostome) that thou fi­nally perish not. For Christ did not say, I haue prayed that thou mightest not denie me; but that thy faith should not (wholie) faile: for by the fauour and care of Christ it came to passe, that Peters faith was not vtterly extinguished. Hereunto accor­deth Beda, saying: Our Sauiour prayed for Peter, not that hee should not be tempted; but that his faith should not faile: that is, that after Peter was fallen by denying his master, he might rise againe by repentance to his former state. Now then, if you rightly frame your argument from the premisses, you may plainly behold the absurditie of your owne illation, thus: I haue prayed for thee (saith Christ) that thy faith should not vt­terly vanish away, though thou shalt thrice denie me, and most shamefully forsake and forsweare me: therefore nei­ther Peter himselfe, nor the rest of the Apostles could possibly erre in matters of doctrine or iudgement. This you see is your argument: and now I aske you, not what boy, but what Bed­lem would thus dispute?

Exorcistes.

Peter denied not the faith: but the person of Christ.

Orthodoxus.

And hee that denieth the person of Christ, denieth not a part, but the whole faith of Christ. It is a sorer and more dan­gerous fall to denie the Lord himselfe, then to bee deceiued only in an opinion of faith, and this also according to the ve­rie confession of Peter himselfe. For thus he placeth them both in his second Epistle:2. Pet. 2. There shall bee false teachers amongst you, which shall priuilie bring in damnable sects, yea denying the Lord that hath bought them. And our Sauiour, in his (admoni­tion to the seauen Churches of Asia) sheweth the Church of Per­gamos, that he which denieth his name, Reul. 2.12, 13. denieth his faith. Thou holdest fast my name (saith he) and hast not denied my faith: wherefore, not to hold fast the name of Christ, is flatly to denie the faith of Christ. And how can you doubt of the trueth of this, since the missing of any point of faith is onely but heresie: whereas the denying of Christs name (which fearefull offence Peter fell into) is flat Apostasie, farre worse then the former by much? See then (I beseech you) how lewdly you peruert the words of our Sauiour. For where Peter is only forewarned [Page 132] of his fall: you would make Christs words a warrant vnto him that he shall neuer fall. And where the Lord promised Peter re­pentance, you turne the text, as if he were finally freed from all future offences.

Exorcistes.

Not so, I confesse Peter offended, but not in the faith.

Orthodoxus.

Could Peter denie his master Christ, and not denie his faith and hope in Christ? or can there be greater infidelitie, then flatly to denie the sonne of God? And yet Peter not onely de­nied him thrice, but with an oath, and a curse hee ratified his former deniall.

Exorcistes.

Peter only denied that he knew Christ.

Orthodoxus.

And he that knoweth not Christ, what faith or hope hath he in Christ? Ambrose yeelding a reason why Peter (after his fall) did not speake, Ambrosius, serm. 46. but weepe, saith thus: Peter doth not now vse speech by the which he had lied: by the which he had sinned: by the which he had lost his faith. I [...]em, serm. 47. And againe, Peter became more faithfull after he had bewailed the losse of his faith. By all the premisses then, it is very apparant, that (notwithstanding the prayer of Christ) the Apostles faith, it might and did faile at some time, in doctrine and iudgement: and therefore much more in the working of miracles.

Exorcistes.

This (in my opinion) is a dangerous point. For if it be fully concluded, that the Apostles (at some time) both might and did also erre in their iudgement concerning some points of doctrine: then how may wee be certaine, which of their wri­tings must be held for infallible truths?

Orthodoxus.

Surely, euen all those their writings whatsoeuer, which the holie Ghost did leade them into: those are the onely infallible truths of the spirit of truth. But such only are all those which their master Christ had taught them before:Reuel. 19.10. for the testimonie of Iesus is the spirit of prophesie, and none other truths then those which Iesus before had testified to them,Ioh. 13.19. were they led into by the spirit of truth. Those their testimonies therefore (what, or how many soeuer) they are to be esteemed as au­thenticall, [Page 133] and infallible truths. Al other their testimonies which only but slipped from humane infirmities (how glorious soe­uer in shew) as they are not the testimonie of Iesus, and there­fore not the spirit of prophesie: so are they (in euery place of the Bible) all tainted and branded for errors or vntruths, by the spirit of truth, as wee shewed before. For howsoeuer the Apostles themselues were subiect to errors: Amand. Pola [...]. Syllog. Thes. [...] Eccles. pag. 381 Ioh. 10.27.2 [...] Ioh. 14.26. yet could they not possiblie erre, so long as they onely but heard the voyce of Christ their Master and Shepheard, and but followed the on­ly directions of the spirit of truth.

Againe, howsoeuer some one of them, at some time, and in some speciall point, both might and did erre, as hath been de­clared: yet al their whole Colledge or companie, it did not nor could not possiblie erre. But euermore the light of truth was cleerely conserued in some of their mindes, to discouer the clowdes of darknes which shadowed the rest, and to pro­pagate the light of the truth to all posteritie:Math. 5.14. Eph. 2.20. Gal. 2 9. 2. Tim. 3.15. in which onely respect they are purposely called the lights of the world, the foundations and pillars of truth.

Besides that, the Apostles they did neuer vniuersallie erre, I meane, their faith neuer failed in all the parts of Christian do­ctrine: howsoeuer some of them, at some one time or other, might happily swarue in some certaine point.

Moreouer,1. Cor. 3.10.12. 1. Cor. 3.11. Eph. 4.20. they did neuer decline from the foundation it selfe: because then they could not haue been the true Church of Christ, which must necessarily bee builded vpon Christ the head corner stone, and therefore they euermore held the foun­dation fast.

Briefly, the Apostles faith, it neuer finally failed: for how­soeuer they at some times stragled aside through humane frailtie, yet were they in time recalled from their errors, as may plainly appeare.Luk. 24.48.49 50.51.52.53. For not only they all returned to Christ, so soone as he was risen from death: but (which more is) they first acknowledged themselues, and then taught soundly to o­thers the state of Christs kingdome. And Peter being reprooued of Paul did willingly yeeld vnto him: and Iohn staied him­selfe vpon the Angels admonition, Gal. 2.11.14. Reuel. 19.10. & 22.8.9. Act. 11.18. from offering worship vnto him: and the Apostles with the brethren (being taught the truth) reioyced greatly, that God had granted the Gentiles al­so repentance to life and saluation. Yea, and in this their sound [Page 134] conuersion, is fully performed that which was promised be­fore by Christ: Matth. 16.18. when he said vnto Peter, vpon that his wor­thie confession of faith: Thou art Peter, and vpon this rocke will I build my Church, and the gates of hell shall neuer preuaile against the same Marke the words, [...]. Therefore he calles them, [...]. 2. Cor. 10.4. the gates of hel, they shal not preuaile against the Church: yt is, they shall not be of a preuai­ling strength, for so much the word importeth. They shall then be of strength against the Church; but they shal not preuaile by their strength, no, albeit their said strength bee as strong as holds, as the Apostle elsewhere doth purposely call them: yet are they not preuailing holds. For the elect and chosen of God may take a fall at some time: but fall finally away they can ne­uer. Perhaps at some time they build straw or stubble: 1. Cor. 3.12. yet they build on the foundation, and the foundation is Christ. The sheepe of Christ may eftsoones goe astray in the wildernes, Luk. 15.4. but perish they cannot: because none shall euer be able to plucke them forth of the true shepheards hands. Ioh. 10.28.29. Luk. 15.12. The prodigall sonne may happily at sometime goe away from his fathers house: but he shall be made to returne againe, and be no lesse fauourablie entertained of his father, then hee was before. The faith of Peter himselfe did euen swoune, Luk. 22.31.3 [...]. as we say: but finally it failed him not. He was turned away from the Lord, whom hee also denied: Matth. 26.56.70. Matth. 26.75. Psal. 129.1.2. but hee returned againe to the Lord with the bitter teares of repentance. Briefly, the faithfull, they are oft times very shrewdly pressed with many and mightie enemies: how­beit, they are neuer suppressed. It is certaine therefore, that the elect and chosen,Rom. 8.15.16. albeit they be made the children of God by adoption: yet are they subiect to errors and slips. Howbeit, on the other side, they are subiect so, as they are freed from the guilt of error by Christ, and accepted as holie in the sight of God: Cant. 1.4. because they are holie in part. I am blacke, O ye daugh­ters of Ierusalem (saith the Spouse) yet am I comely as the tents of Kedar, yet as the hangings of Salomon. Yea further, the bride­grome (he saith) she is faire, Cant. 1.14. and 4.1.7. Cant. 1.7. nay (which more is) that she is the fairest, but yet, the fairest of women: not simply the fairest, but in comparison of women, but in respect of earthly creatures. To teach the Church thereby (least happily she grow proude of her borrowed beautie) that so long as she liueth in this taber­nacle of the bodie, Ezech. 16.14. Bernardus, in Cant. serm. 38. she goeth on towards, but is not yet come to the perfection of fairenes: and therefore that she is not faire altoge­ther, [Page 135] though she be therefore commended for her fairenesse, be­cause she walketh after the spirit, Rom. 8.1. not after the flesh. So then (to conclude this point) sith it is apparantly euident by all the pre­misses, that the Apostles faith, it might and did sometimes faile in doctrine or iudgement, yea, euen since that very time they were filled with the spirit: therefore it is likewise apparantly euident, that their said faith, it might much more faile in the working of miracles.

Exorcistes.

Their faith neuer failed in the working of miracles;D. Doctrine, pag. 49. since that time especially, they were filled with the spirit.

Orthodoxus.

Then was it needles for them to haue prayed for the timely increase and confirmation thereof,Act. 4.29.30▪ Act. 9.40. and 28.8. which they vndoubtedly did, as we haue proued, and your selfe confessed before. And, whereas you would strengthen your cause from the Apostles fulnes of faith: if you rightlie consider the matter that doth rather confound, then confirme the same. For, by arguing, that the Apostles faith could not possiblie faile, from the time they were filled with the spirit: you do implicatiuelie conclude, that it might and did also faile before, which is the very point you denie. And thus (hauing lost your selfe in a thicket of thornes) the faster you runne, the further you raunge: and the fouler you bescratch your face with the briers. D. Doctrine, pag 48.49. Briefely, whereas you seeme to inferre, that fasting and prayer, it had beene but a needles or­dinance for the Apostles of Christ, especiallie after they were filled with the spirit: and, that therefore it is very vnlikely, that our sauiour (for that short time only wherein the Apostles faith was subiect to failing) would haue instituted the same, as an ordinance only for them to obserue. Our answere is, that you do ouerproudly or peruersely controll the wisedome of Christ: and it may please you to consider withall, that the time be­tweene Christ his transfiguration and Pentecost, was not so short, as you haplie (by your inconsiderate accompt of bare fortie dayes) would beare vs in hand: for, if you runne ouer your reckonings afresh, you shall finde the interim, I meane the distance betweene them, to be full tenne weekes at the least. In all which time the Apostles of Christ (though at seuerall times they had fasted and prayed a whole day together) they might notwithstanding haue kept a combersome coyle in ca­sting [Page 136] out Diuels, especiallie if they had happened vpon many such tractable patients as was Katherine Wright: who (hauing seuen or eight diuels (you say) within her at once) had them all driuen forth in lesse space then an hower. And therefore (for any thing hitherto heard) I cannot perceiue, but that those words of Christ, namely, this kind goeth not forth but by fasting and praier they may, and are to be peculiarly appropriated vnto the Di­sciples themselues.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 49.Nay sir, that interpretation is so farre opposite to the words of Christ, as we dare (by no meanes) admitte of the same. For Christ (in the dispossession hee speaketh of heere) requireth a meanes for the expelling of Diuels, as without which meanes the same could not possiblie be brought to passe: and then tel­leth vs what that meanes is, namely fasting and prayer. Whereas this your obiected interpretation implieth, that this kind of spi­rit, it might be cast forth, without this said meanes of fasting and prayer: if so be the Apostles faith had beene strong enough.

Orthodoxus.

Very true as you say: and what one inconuenience I pray you, in holding so? We (for our owne partes) perceyue no such opposition betweene our sayd interpretation, and the words of Christ, as you falsely would beare vs in hand. Nay rather, you your owne selfe do shrewdlie ouerthwart, not only our sa­uiour, but also euen your greatest acquaintance, M. Darel I meane. For first, you make prayer and fasting an ordinarie esta­blished meanes for the perpetuall expelling of Diuels, whereas our sauiour sayth plainely, that the Apostles miraculous faith, was the onely powerfull meanes which should haue effected the same.

Againe, you do heere very flatly auouch, that this was such a daungerous kind of Diuel, as could not possiblie haue beene cast forth at all by the Apostles faith, had the same beene neuer so strong, without fasting and prayer annexed thereto: Whereas your good friend M. Darel doth firmely hold,D. Doctrine. pag. 46, 47. that the Apostles faith was so strong, as if he were a Diuel (of what kind soeuer) they could, and were able to haue cast him out.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 49,Very true, if he had beene any diuell, of the one sort of di­uels. For you must note, that Christ (in saying, this kinde go­eth [Page 137] not out) obserueth therein a distinct sort, degree or order of diuels, some way differing and distinguished from others: with one of which number he implyeth that the childe was possessed, whereby partly it came, that they had not cast the diuell forth.

Orthodoxus.

How know you, that Christ noteth therein: such a di­stinct order of diuels differing from others?

Exorcistes.

First,D. Doctrine▪ pag. 49. the same doth fitly accord with the very letter of the text: which telleth vs directly, that this kinde of diuels goeth not forth, but by fasting and prayer.

Orthodoxus.

You doe falsely belie the text it selfe. For the words of the text, they are not thus (this kinde of diuels, but this kinde) and no more. Wherein, Christ onely distinguisheth diuels from all other creatures: but seuereth not spirits by any distinct, or seuerall orders among themselues. As if some man (inten­ding to set forth a shrewe to the full) should say in this sort: the best of this kind is shrewish enough. Who seeth not plaine­ly, that the man (by this speech) doth onely distinguish wo­men from men by their sexe or kinde: but seuereth not shrewes by seuerall degrees among themselues? So surely, our Saui­our Christ in saying (this kinde goeth not forth) intendeth to set downe no seuerall orders of diuels among themselues, but speaketh onely of diuels in generall ▪ as if he should say thus, this kind, that is, these diuels, they goe not out, but by prayer and fasting. Notwithstanding, if you will haue vs approue of this your new-coyned distinction, doe tell vs I pray you, from whence you first learned the same: I meane where find you these your distinguished diuels, into such their seue­rall orders among themselues? For tell me I beseech you, are not all the holy Angels (how glorious soeuer) of one and the selfe same kinde? Againe, are not all men (how different so­euer in the doing of mischiefe) of one and the selfe same kind? I beleeue you dare neuer deny it. And onely are spirits or diuels distinguished into their seuerall kinds? Aug. in Psalm▪ 104.4. Hitherto I haue been (I assure you) of this opinion, that all diuels whatsoeuer, they are onely spirites by nature, and Angels by office: and that the distinction of Angels, is onely of good and euill An­gels. [Page 138] As for those your supposed sundry kindes of diuels, di­stinct into some seuerall orders among themselues, that my­sticall point of Diuillitie, I neuer heard of I assure you, before this present: neither yet of any further distinction of diuels, then only that of the diuell and his Angels.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 49.Sir, I distinguish not diuels in an especiall respect of any their essentiall being, for therein they are all of one and the selfe same nature or kinde: but my meaning is, that there is a distinct sort or order of diuels, seuered by sundrie degrees a­mong themselues. For howsoeuer, when we distinguish the whole state of this kingdome of England (by the Queene and her subiects) we do make therein, but one only superiour, and all the other inferiours: yet, who seeth not withall, but that the inferiours themselues, they are distinguished also by sun­drie sorts or degrees, namely, by Dukes, Earles, Lords, Iudges, Iustices, Knights, Gentlemen, Y [...]omen, and so forth. So surely, howsoeuer when we distinguish the whole kingdome of darke­nesse, by the diuell and his Angels, we therein make but one a Prince, and the other his subiectes: yet who sees not with all that the diuell his Angels, they are also distinguished them­selues by sundry sorts or degrees. Matth. 17.21. Mark. 9.29. Matth. 12.45. And so much, not onely the former places of Matthew and Marke doe plainely im­port: but our Sauiour else where, he makes it apparant by telling vs,D. Doctrine, pag. 51. that the vncleane spirit (being gone out of a man) is said to returne with seuen other spirits farre worse then him selfe. By which it is very apparant, that among vn­cleane spirits, some goe beyond others in malice and cruelty towards men, in subtiltie and iniquitie: and these are called (by our Sauiour Christ) the worst kinde of spirits, as distin­guished from others, which are lesse cruell and wicked.

Physiologus.

Now surely M. Orthodoxus, this fellow hee hath a verie deepe reach, or rather an odde kind of conceit concerning the hidden meaning of this mysticall trade of diuillitie: out of al doubt he surpasseth old doting Dionysius by many degrees.Dionysius in cae­lest. Hierarch. pag. 2. pag. 7.8. For howsoeuer that good Seraphicall Doctor hath to too prouidently penned the celestiall hierarchie of Angels, he did not so much as once dreame of anie infernall hierarchie of di­uels all the dayes of his life: no surelie, that mysticall matter [Page 139] surmounted (by manie degrees) the shallow reach of his stin­ted conceit. Seeing therefore that good old father hath left the same in suspence, and that no one writer euer since durst hitherto vndertake so vnwealdie a worke: it shall not be a­misse for your selfe Exorcistes (being especiallie a man (as it seemes) of such singular profunditie concerning such points) to giue the timelie aduenture vpon some admirable supplie of Dionysius his want, and to set forth to the world the infer­nall hierarchie of spirits and diuels. For by such meanes the simplest on earth may be brought in continuance of time, to an exquisite skill in that your new-found facultie, and be made to vnderstand with a trice, the seuerall sorts of infer­nall spirits: which vndoubtedlie would be a labour excee­ding profitable for people on earth, and very pernitious to the diuels in hell. In the meane time propound vnto vs (I pray you) some one or two of your soundest arguments, to proue directlie vnto vs some further distinction of infernall spirits, Matth. 25.41. Ephe. 2.3. then only that of the diuell & his Angels. This one di­stinction howsoeuer we acknowledge for currant, as hauing it warrant from the reuealed word: yet surelie, wee haue hi­therto esteemed all further inquisitions into those the suppo­sed seueral orders of diuels, to be meerely but friuolous. How­beit your selfe (it may be) haue latelie receiued these latelie reuealed oracles, from old Middlecubs mouth: and therefore I pray you, discouer your reasons to mannage this matter.

Exorcistes.

Why sir,Hyperius, in me­thod. theolog. lib. 2. pag. 273. there are seuerall degrees or sundry sorts of orders a­mong mē on earth: & therfore also among ye infernal diuels of hel.

Orthodoxus.

That followeth not. For this difference of order among men heere on earth, ariseth in an especiall regard, eyther of mens ages or callings: which maketh our sinne eyther more or lesse, according to the qualitie of the persons themselues, a­gainst whom we offend in those respects.

For first concerning their age, whereas all men naturallie descend from Adam, and (being (by reason of that their des­cent) eyther elder or younger then others, according to the course of times or seasons) are therefore to be reuerenced themselues,Exod. 20.12. Leuit. 19.32. Rom. 12.10. and to yeeld reuerence also to others, in an onlie regard of their age or condition, accordinglie as the Lord [Page 140] hath appointed:Basilinus, in Psal. 44. homil. 11. the case is not so with spirits and diuels. For neyther issued they all out of one, as all men by propagation were procreated first from Adam, but they were all ioyntlie and forthwith created together, not hauing among them an infant, a young or an old one: but they are all of equall antiqui­tie, and so no difference among them, in any regard of their nature or age. Neyther yet doe they come to perfection by lit­tle and little, or grow vp by nutriment and ordinarie exer­cise: but doe continuallie retaine in themselues that selfe­same estate of subsistence, which they euer enioyed from their first creation, without any such naturall supplies, or seruiceable additaments by nature or naturall meanes, as might make them any waies (in dutie) beholding one to another, and there­fore no difference among diuels at all in any regard of their nature or age.

Againe, that there is no difference among them at all, in consideration of any their different degrees of calling, it is verie apparant to so manie, as are not purposelie blind. For howsoeuer among men, Hyperius, in method. theolog. lib. 2. pag. 273. there are superiours and inferiours, magistrates, and ministers, some to rule, and some to be ru­led, and all this especiallie (respecting their naturall infir­mities) for auoyding disorder and confusion among them­selues, in this their warfayring state: there are no such seue­rall orders among spirits and diuels in hell. Ioh. 8.44. 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude. 6. Both because they (being (by their fall) depriued from all manner of dignitie) are now destinated and tumbled headlong into such a con­fused state as hath in it no order at all:Math. 8.12. & 25.30. and for that also, con­fusion it selfe is much more befitting their accursed conditi­on and kingdome of darkenes, then any such seemely order of gouernment, as the Lord (in mercie) hath establisht among men here on earth. Besides that, the seuerall degrees and orders among men vpon earth, they are an vndoubted ordinance of the eternall God: decreed from all eternitie, for this speciall purpose. Namely, that therein (the liuely image of Gods sacred iustice and mercie being shadowed forth vnto men vpon earth) that his said ordinance, it might more inuiolablie be executed and obeyed of all in this warfayring world: ac­cording to his owne vnchaungeable purpose, and speciall appointment. For this, all men are made to acknowledge by the very instinct and light of nature, namelie, that where­soeuer [Page 141] is found a maioritie,Vbi maiorita [...], ibi mandandi auctoritas: vbi minoritas, ibi obediendi ne­cessitas. therein is also implied a commaun­ding authoritie: and where there is only but a bare minoritie, there is onlie an obeying necessitie. Howbeit the Lord, he hath instituted no such ordinances at all, among spirits or diuels in hell. Because then, as here vpon earth: so likewise in hel there must be Iudges and Iustices, Parliaments, Termes, Assises, sessi­ons, and Courts for the orderlie conuenting and conuicting of grosse malefactors among them, and for the fearefull tor­menting of daylie disordered diuels, which were to too ab­surde to imagine. Both because the Lord himselfe (hauing al­readie endighted, arraigned and adiudged the diuell and his Angels to endlesse damnation) reserues them in chaynes vnder darkenes to the great and notable day: 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude 6. and for that also he hath now no further vse of the seruice of diuels in any such his iu­diciall courses with men, then an earthlie iudge hath vse of the hang-mans help, to execute the sentence of death vpon such malefactors, as he himselfe hath before condemned to death. And therefore vnlesse you be able directly to proue, that hang-men are distinguished also into seuerall orders among themselues; this your imagined reason (from the seuerall de­grees and orders among men vpon earth) hath in it no shew at all to maintaine any difference of order among spirits and diuels in hell.

Exorcistes.

But sir? there are distinct or seuerall orders among the An­gels in heauen: therefore also among spirits and diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

Master Orthodoxus, doe take your ease for a time, and let me alone with this argument. Come on Exorcistes, I hartely thanke you for this irrefragable reason: this I trow is a tou­cher. Surely howsoeuer Dionysius himselfe be departed long since: his dottage I perceiue must neuer decay, so long as Ex­orcistes is liuing. Now faire fall a sure friend at a pinch. But goe to man, doe tell vs I beseech you; how many distinct or­ders of spirits and diuels are establisht in hell?

Exorcistes.

That is much more then any may possiblie know:D. Doctrine, pag 43. or yet needes to enquire of.

Physiologus.

Why man, seeing you doe shew your selfe no lesse pre­sumptuous [Page 142] now, in vrging a distinction of diuels in hell, then was Dionysius before you in putting downe a difference of Angels in heauen: why may you not as boldlie determine this point from Dionysius his mouth by an argument of pro­portion thus? There are nine seuerall orders of angels in heauen: therefore nine seuerall orders of diuels in hell.

Exorcistes.

What inconuenience could follow thereof: if happilie I reasoned so?

Physiologus.

Nay, none at all I assure you, if in so saying you happilie be able to proue what you say: but that must be done (I sup­pose) at our latter Lammas.

Exorcistes.

Not so sir: the proofe (I assure you) is pregnant enough, if we but marke what we read in the scriptures concerning this point.Isa. 6.2. Psal. 80.1. Ezech. 10.1. Col. 1.16. Ephes. 1.21. and 6.12. Ephes. 3.20. Col. 3.10. Ephes. 6 12. 1. Thes. 4.16. Matth. 25.31. Dionysius, in caelest▪ hierarch. cap. 2. pag. 7.8. For therein is mention made of Seraphims, Cheru­bims, Thrones, Dominations, Vertues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels and Angels: all which (you may see) are di­stinct or seuerall names. But those nine seuerall names are gi­uen vnto Angels in regard of their nine seuerall orders in hea­uen: therefore there are also nine seueral orders of diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

Dionysius in deed, from those nine seuerall names, doth conclude (as you say) nine seuerall orders of angels: yea, and (which more is) hee doth afterwards verie quaintlie distin­guish those nine seuerall orders into a threefold ternarie of Angels, as may plainely appeare in his booke, if any were so surprised with palpable follie, as he could be brought to be­leeue the same.M. Dearings Reading, 6. in Heb. 1.14. pag. 104. Howbeit, there is no sound order of reaso­ning from that which your selfe or Dionysius doth dreame. Because, if from an onlie bare distinction of names, wee may boldly conclude a distinction of orders: then surelie, Dionysius and your selfe haue missed the marke by many degrees. For besides those the aforesaid nine seuerall names, Psal. 104.4. Heb. 1.7. Iob. 1.6. and 2.1. the Apostle (from out of the Prophet) alleageth two other names more: namelie, spirits and flaming fire: and in Iob, the Angels are called the sonnes of God. So then in this account (because there be twelue seuerall names) there must necessarilie be made twelue seuerall orders of Angels: which giueth to [Page 143] your selfe and Dionysius directly the lie.

Exorcistes.

Not so, for those three last you speake of your selfe, name­ly spirits, flaming fire, and the sonnes of God: they are names common to all Angels whatsoeuer.

Physiologus.

So is (I am sure) the name of Angels, Psal. 103.20. Matth. 25.30. Hy [...]erius, in method. theolog. lib. 2. pag. 288. as Dionysius also con­fesseth: which yet notwithstanding, he and you both doe preciselie put downe for one particular order of Angels. And therefore, if the communitie of name confoundeth the particularitie of order, then are there but eight orders of An­gels: other waies, if the varietie of names must make also a varietie of orders, then are you necessarily enforced to con­fesse twelue seueral orders of Angels at least. Howbeit, we haue to consider with Augustine, Augustinus, in Psalm 104.4. Hyperius, in method. theolog. lib. 2. pag. 273. that by the name (Angell) is not meant the nature, but the office of Angels. Doest thou enquire (saith hee) the name of this Angelicall nature? it is a spirit. Wouldest thou know the office? it is an Angell. Behold the selfesame distinction (saith he) in the nature of man. If thou as­kest the name of mans nature: it is man. If thou askest the name of his office, it is Preacher. The name of his nature, is man: the name of his office, is Souldier. Hereunto also apper­taineth the speech of Rabbi Shelomoh, Rabbi Shelo­moh. who saith, that the names of Angels are secret, yea so secret, as the Angels them­selues doe not know them: they hauing (indeede) no proper names, but onely some certaine sir-names (saith hee) imposed vpon them, from those speciall respects whereunto they are purposely sent, according to that in the Hebrues, which saith:Heb. 1.14. Are not his Angels all ministring spirits, sent forth to mi­nister for their sakes, who shall be heires of saluation? And ac­cording to the matter of their seuerall ministeries, they haue (for the present) their seuerall names bestowed vpon them, in an especiall regard of our slender and shallow capacities. Isa. 6.6. [...] ex [...] id est, combuere. Tob. 3 17. [...] ex [...] id est. [...]eder [...]. Dan. 8 16. Luk. 1.26. For so the Spirit that was sent to Isaiah (because hee purged the Prophets mouth with a fierie coale) he was fitly called Se­raphim, of Saraph: which signifies properly to burne. So the Angel who cured Tobiah, is called Raphael, that is, the medi­cine of God, of Rapha, which properly signifies to cure or to heale. So the Angel who was sent to Daniel, and the Virgin Mary (because he reuealed matters impossible for any but a [Page 144] supernaturall power to effect) he was correspondently called Gabriel: [...] ex [...], id est, praeualere. Iudg. 13.18. [...] ex [...]. Admirabil [...] esse. that is, the fortitude or strength of God, of the radicall word Gabar, which signifies properly to preuaile. So in like manner, the Angell who was sent to Manoah (because hee miraculouslie brought fire from heauen, that consumed the sacrifice) he was fitly called pele, of pala: which signifieth pro­perly to be secret, or wonderfull. By all these and the rest, wee may boldly conclude, that the seuerall names which are gi­uen to Angels, doe rather set foorth their seuerall temporarie imployments: then establish among them any distinct or seue­rall orders. For if wee examine the matters aright, wee may plainly perceiue,Hyperius, in method. theolog. lib. 2. pag. 273. that all the names attributed to them in the sacred Scriptures, they haue relatiō either to their nature or office, but not to any your supposed different orders at all.

Lycanthropus.

What names (I pray you) respect only their nature?

Physiologus.

That doe these three: namely, Spirits, Seraphims, and Che­rubims. Spirits, Gen. 3.24. [...] ex [...], id est, auis. because they are of a spirituall essence: Sera­phims, in regard of their fierie disposition or working, as wee told you before: and Cherubims, of Cherub, which properlie signifies a bird: and this also in consideration of their agilitie or swiftnes for performing the busines imposed vpon them. These names (you may see) they set foorth no seuerall orders: but doe only lay open the admirable nature of Angels.

Pneumatomachus.

And what names doe properly import their office?

Physiologus.

The names which properly import their office, are especial­ly two:M. Dearing, in Heb. Lecture. 7. pag. 104. namely, Angels and Archangels, that is, messengers, and principall messengers. And howsoeuer these two seuerall names (the one signifying simplie a messenger, the other a principall messenger) may seeme at a blush to import a seue­rall order of Angels: yet is it not so. Besides that, if (indeede) it were so as it seemes, yet doth it not conclude your purpose in hand: but commeth short of Dionysius, and your owne account, by seauen supposed seuerall orders at least. Howbeit, this I say for an answere, that wheresoeuer the name Arch­angell is mentioned, it signifieth our Sauiour Christ, and no creature at all. Or if happily the name Archangell bee any [Page 145] where attributed to any creature in heauen: Tremellius, in Daniel. 10.13. nota. 28. yet then hee that in one worke is called simplie an Angell, in another worke of greater glorie in our eyes, may there be called an Archangell. Euen as we see a Messenger, sent from the Prince of a message to some of his subiects, is simplie called an Am­bassadour: whereas notwithstanding the same person, being imployed by his Prince to some forraine Potentate, is more honorablie termed a Lord Ambassadour. All the other names attributed to Angels, namely, Thrones, Dominations, Vertues, Powers, or Principalities, they are but borrowed from matters of state concerning humane policies, and but metaphoricallie transferred to Angels, in an especiall regard of some speciall actions, as we said before of Gabriel, Raphael, and Pel [...]: but do signifie vnto vs no distinct or seuerall orders of Angels.

Exorcistes.

If those seuerall names do signifie no seuerall orders of An­gels, why then were they bestowed vpon them?

Physiologus.

They were so bestowed vpon them,Hyperius. in method. theolog▪ lib. 2. pag. 288 partly to expresse what superexcellent dignitie they were destinated vnto: partly to declare vnto vs what great and admirable matters the almightie hath wrought by meanes of their ministerie: and partly in regard of our naturall weakenes, who could not otherwise be made to conceiue of their nature or actions. For these and such other respects, best knowne to his wisedome, hath the Lord bestowed those metaphoricall titles, of Thrones, Dominations, Powers, and Principalities vpon Spirits or An­gels: but in no wise to distinguish any different superioritie, or seuerall orders among themselues, or no further at least, then onely to difference Michael and his Angels, Reuel. 12.7. I meane Christ and his heauenly host, as was shewed before.

Exorcistes.

But sir, they are called Thrones, Principalities and Powers in the plurall number, which importeth not simplie one singu­ler superiour, but many superiours possessing seuerall superiori­ties, degrees and orders among themselues in heauen: and therefore (by consequence) there are seuerall superiorities a­mong Spirits and Diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

The Angels respectiuely referred to Christ, are all of equall [Page 146] condition,Tremellius, in Daniel. 10.13. nota. 29. Matth. 25.31. and generally set forth by the only name of An­gels, without any other swelling words of superioritie: as Mi­chael and his Angels, Christ and his Angels. Howbeit, when Angels are spoken of comparatiuely in an onlie respect of hu­mane Princes, then are they purposely put downe by the titles of Thrones, Dominations, Principalities, or Powers: to ex­presse their glorious dignitie in comparison of earthly crea­tures, and to teach vs withall, that they haue a superioritie and chiefdome ouer the kingdomes of the world committed vnto them, from that almightie Iehouah who is Lord and King ouer al. Ephes. 3.10. For which only respect they are called Principa­lities or Powers in the heauens. Notwithstanding, be it suppo­sed yt those seuerall names implied some seuerall orders of An­gels: yet can they conclude no certaine number of any such seuerall orders. Ephes. 1.21. Because the Apostle (hauing elsewhere ex­preslie put downe those seuerall names) contents not him­selfe therein,Ephes. 1.21. but goeth on further thus: and euery name that is named, not onely in this world, but also in that that is to come, leauing the names (you see) indefinitely, and your supposed seuerall orders of Angels in perpetuall suspence. And therfore Dionysius and your selfe doe but triflingly deale with your Readers;Theod. Beza, in Ephes. 1.21. both in presuming to put downe a certaintie of that, which the holie Ghost so vncertainly expresseth, and in nominating also such seuerall orders of Angels there, where the holie spirit of God did purpose no such speciall matter at all: but laboured onely (by that excessiue manner of spea­king) to lift vp our Sauiour Christ farre aboue the excellen­cie of all created powers in heauen, in earth or in hell. Again, be it supposed indeed, that the Apostle (by those seueral names) did purposely put downe some seuerall orders of Angels in heauen: yet your inference enforced from thence, namely, that therefore there are likewise some distinct or seuerall or­ders among Spirits and Diuels in hell, is to too absurd. For howsoeuer the Lord might haue singular vse for the seuerall orders among Angels in heauen till the comming of Christ; there can be no further vse of any such seuerall orders of Di­uels in hell, then onely that of the hangmans vse, as hath been declared. Yea and (which more is) whatsoeuer further pre­heminence of order they ioyntly enioyed before their fall; the same now is so vtterly lost by the comming of Christ, as [Page 147] they are destinated for euer to vtter confusion. According to that of the Apostle, who telleth vs directly, that Christ hath spoyled principalities and powers, and made openlie a shew of them all, and triumphed ouer them in his crosse: Celos. 2.15. 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude 6. and not onely this, but also hath chained them vp vnder darknes vnto the great and notable day. So farre off is it therefore (you see) that there should be now any further distinction of orders in hell, then only of the Diuell and his Angels: as that they are ra­ther euen vtterly spoyled of all princely preheminence and power whatsoeuer.

Exorcistes.

That is not so. For the Apostle else where (speaking pur­posely of the power of diuels) doth call them principalities, Ephes. 6.12. powers, worldly gouernors, princes of darknesse, spirituall wicked­nesses, and so forth. But all these are seuerall names of order: therefore there are seuerall orders of diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

The Apostle in deed, he calles them so as you say: but con­cludes from thence, no further distinction of orders among them, then onely that of the diuell and his Angels, as we told you before. Making therein the diuell an onely superiour, and all other infernall spirits, his inferiours: but yet all of them equall inferiours. I proue it thus, The diuell alone he is called [...], I meane a prince, Ephes. 2.2. as hauing all other infernall spirits sub­iected vnto him: the rest, they are al equally called together, [...], that is,Ephes. 2.2. and 6.12. a power, or rather powers in the plurall number, as it were all very equally combined in one and the selfe­same power. And this also according to the accustomed course of the Scriptures themselues: which (whensoeuer they entreate of the hierarchie of infernall spirits) doe onely but mention the diuell and his Angels. Matth. 25.30. Ioh. 12.31. and 14.30. and 16.11. 2. Tim 2.26. Heb. 2.14. Luk. 4 6. 2. Cor. 4.4. Isa. 27.1. 1. Pet. 5.8. Reuel. 12.3. The diuell, as a prince a­lone: the Angels, as his onely subordinate powers. Yea, and (which more is) euen Satan himselfe (in an onely regard of his superioritie ouer the rest of the diuels) is called the God of this world: the great Leuiathan: the ramping, and roring Lyon: the great redde dragon and so foorth. Howbeit, no one such note of difference else, is any where put downe in the sa­cred scriptures, to distinguish the rest of infernall spirits, the one from the other: but they are all equally intituled by the name of Angels.

[Page 148]That is vntrue. For the rest of infernall spirits, they also are called principalities in the plurall number. Ephes. 6.12. We wrestle (saith Paul) [...], against principalities. But princi­palities belong to moe then to one alone: and therefore, there are seuerall orders of diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

V [...]ry true as you say, all diuels whatsoeuer are called prin­cipalities: not princes. For Satan alone is elswhere called their prince. Ephes. 2.2. Matth. 9.34. Mark. 3.22. Luk. 11.15. We walke (saith the Apostle) in trespasses and sinnes, [...], according to the prince of the ayre. Putting downe Satan (you see) as an onely prince: the rest, but hold­ing their principalitie in him alone. Which noteth no diffe­rence among the rest of infernall spirits: but makes them all equall in that one and selfesame principalitie, whereof Satan alone is the prince.

Exorcistes.

Yea, but all other infernall spirits whatsoeuer, they also are called powers in the plurall number. We wrestle (saith Paule) [...], against powers. Ephes. 6.12. But the name powers im­plieth a distinction of order: therefore there are distinct orders of diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

True, they are called powers (as you say) in the plurall number: howbeit, else where they are intituled, onely a power, in the singuler number. For we walke (saith the Apo­stle) [...],Ephes. 2.2. according to the Prince of the airie power. That is, according to the pleasure of that Prince: who hath a preheminence ouer the airie power. By which it is apparantly euident, that howsoeuer the other in­fernall spirits are also intituled powers: yet, that their said power whatsoeuer, it consisteth onely in Satan their Prince. And therefore, the word powers in the plurall number, doth rather make all the rest of infernall spirits or equall dignitie vnder Satan their prince; then distinguish them into any seue­rall orders among themselues.

Exorcistes.

Not so. For the words principalities and powers, as they are words of preheminence: so haue they relation to some other besides themselues, ouer whom they are to exercise their [Page 149] said principalitie or power.

Physiologus.

Very true as you say; they are words of preheminence, and haue also a relation to some other besides themselues. Howbeit, they haue no relation from any one diuell to ano­ther among themselues: but onely vnto men in the world, ouer whom (by the iust iudgement of God) they haue their preheminence. Ioh. 14.30. 2. Cor. 4.4. And therefore howsoeuer (in regard of them­selues) they are equally called but Angels: yet in compari­son of men, they may truely be said to be principalities and powers, as we confessed before concerning good Angels. Not­withstanding, howsoeuer (in comparison of men) they are called principalities and powers: yet, in comparison of Satan their prince, they doe all ioyntly make but one principalitie or power, whereof Satan alone retaineth the chiefedome. And therefore he is properly said to be a prince, Zanchius, in Ephes. 2.2. pag. 83. not of powers as of many, but a prince of the airie power; as of one onely pow­er, all ioyntly combined together in Satan himselfe. Neither is this change of numbers (the putting downe I meane of a singular word for a plurall) so strange as haply you take it: but very frequent and ordinarie in the sacred Scriptures. Of many examples hereof, consider onely this one for the pre­sent. Behold (saith Iohn) the Lambe of God which taketh away, [...], the sinne of the world, in the singular num­ber: meaning by sinne, Ioh. 1.29. all sinnes of the world whatsoeuer. Euen so Satan is said to be a prince of the airie power, mea­ning by the airie power, all the powers of the aire whatsoeuer: because, what powers soeuer the infernall spirits doe ioyntly execute, that power is onely in Satan himselfe, and not pecu­liar to any of the rest.

Exorcistes.

If by the change of numbers, the holy Ghost entendeth no seuerall orders of diuels, but simply and onely respecteth the speciall power of Satan himselfe: why then (I beseech you) is that selfe same simple power of Satan expressed sometimes sin­gularly, sometimes plurally, and not alwaies alike?

Physiologus.

The holy Ghost doth purposely obserue such a course, in an especiall consideration of our drowsie and secure condi­tion: who (notwithstanding we doe dayly heare of the in­exorable [Page 150] malice of Satan against vs) haue very great need to be awakened by the most terrible meanes that may be.Matth. 26.41. Ephes. 5.14. Zanchius, in Ephes. 2.2. pag. 89. And therefore the simple and vnited power of infernall spi­rits, is sometimes purposely put downe in the singuler num­ber: to teach vs therein, that howsoeuer the feendes of hell be many and infinite, their power notwithstanding is sim­ply but one and the same, is vndertaken of all with one onely consent, yea, and that they doe all ioyntly combine themselues together in one, against euery of vs: for one and the selfesame ende, I meane, to effect our finall destruction. And that therefore we had the more need to be sober and watch: 1. Pet. 5.8. yea, and so much the rather to giue ouer our selues to fasting and prayer, Omnis autem vis vnita, for­tior est seipsa disgregata. Eccles. 4.12. Matth. 12.25. by how much we know, that euery vnited power is more forcible, then that which is disioyned in it selfe. Againe, the power of infernall spirits is sometimes expressed in the plurall number, to teach vs the rather, how terrible it ought to be vnto euery of vs: not onely in consideration of the common hatred of diuels against vs all, but more especially in regard of their mighty seuerall powers: they being many and mightie among themselues, and euery waies readie at hand to assault vs in body & soule. In consideration where­of, the holy Ghost doth couertly teach vs how needfull it is for euery of vs to take to him selfe the whole armour of God: because,Ephes. 6.12.13. we wrestle not against flesh & bloud, but against pincipa­lities, against powers, against worldly gouernours, the princes (I meane) of the darkenes of this world, yea, & against spirituall wic­nesses in the aire, that is, quite ouer our heads, and thereby the more able, and more ready to hurt vs vnwares. By al the pre­misses then, you may plainely perceiue, that howsoeuer our Sauiour doth say (this kind goeth not forth) he meaneth not by the words (this kind) to distinguish any seuerall orders of diuels in hell: neither yet, to teach vs any such needeles matters.

Exorcistes.

Whatsoeuer you say to the contrarie, very certaine I am, that there be distinct and seuerall orders: not only of Angels in heauen; but also of diuels in hell.

Physiologus.

Further distinctions then those we graunted before, name­ly, that of Michael and his Angels, and of the diuell and his [Page 151] Angels: very certaine I am you shall neuer be able to proue in heauen or in hell. For first by auouching seuerall orders of angels in heauen, you doe therein directly oppose your selfe, not only vnto that definition which the Apostle maketh of Angels in the Epistle to the Hebrewes: but (which more is) euen vnto his maine purpose in that selfesame place.Heb. 1.14. For first he defineth all Angels (howsoeuer called in scripture) to be none other but ministring spirits: that is, to be all of one and the selfesame condition in nature and office.

Secondly his maine purpose,M. Deaering, in his 6 Reading Heb. 1.14. p. 95. in so speaking of Angels there, is to aduance Christ Iesus farre aboue all principalities or powers whatsoeuer: & therefore if any Archangell, Throne, Domination, power, or any other name els that is named, were any greater then an angel: surely all that disputation of the Apostle were nothing worth. For how could it conclude the excellency of Christ aboue all creatures, because he is grea­ter then Angels: if Cherubim, Seruphim, or any Archangell were also greater in dignitie then Angels? And therefore that the Apostles reason may (as it is) be strong and vnanswerable, we must confesse all blessed spirits (whatsoeuer they be) to be all but this, namely, ministring spirits for all the Elect.

Moreouer, by auouching for certaine, some seuerall orders also among spirits or diuels in hell: you doe therein bewray your intolerable pride to all the world.Gen. 1.1. &c. For if Moses (know­ing by inspiration the originall of the world how it was) had it not yet reuealed vnto him, what to write of angels or diuels: Act. 7.56. 2. Cor. 12.24. if Stephen who saw the heauens open, yet saw not these supposed seuerall orders of angels or diuels: if Paul, who was ta­ken vp into the third heauen, saw notwithstanding so little concerning such seuerall orders of angels or diuels, that whoso­euer will auouch so curiouslie thereof,Col. 2.18. he saith, they be puft vp with a fleshlie minde, to speake of thinges which they neuer saw: brieflie,Reuel. 1.10.19. if Iohn in all his reuelations had no such knowledge reuealed concerning the seuerall orders of spirits or diuels: who then is Exorcistes, or what is his parentage, that hee dare so proudlie determine such certeintie of things vncertaine, or that we should once beleeue him in that, wherein I am cer­taine he beleeues not himselfe? For this we hold an infallible truth, Hyperius, in method, theolog. lib. 2. pag. 301. that the seuerall names which are giuen to angels or spi­rits, they were purposelie giuen them for our better vnder­standing [Page 152] of the vnspeakeable power of God in their seuerall ministeries: and not to haue vs so precisely determine of anie their seuerall orders. And this is most cleere in Paule himselfe, who when hee had reckoned vp principalities, thrones, domi­nions and powers, Eph. 1.21. hee addeth: and euery name that is named in this world, or in the world to come. A cleare sentence of his own modestie, in confessing an holy ignorance concerning the se­uerall orders of angels or diuels: Aug. in Enchir. ad Laurenti­um▪ cap. 29. Item, ad Orosi­um, contra Pris­cil. & Orige­nistas. and such as should moue vs in all holie sobrietie, to say with Augustine.

The difference of these seuerall degrees I confesse I know not: if any man will say that hee knoweth it, let him speake: but let him proue what he speaketh. Seeing therefore Exorcistes you doe vaunt it so brauely, of your certaine knowledge concerning the seuerall orders of spirits and diuels, doe proue directlie vn­to vs, that of infernall spirits some are greater or lesse then other in princely preheminence: or els doe now plainely confesse that Christ by these words (this kinde) doth but generallie vnder­stand all Diuels whatsoeuer.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 51.Oh then I perceiue you haue hitherto wholie mistaken my meaning. For Christ in saying (this kinde) doth not pre­ciselie distinguish spirits or diuels into seuerall officers, making some higher, and some lower in princely preheminence among themselues: but teacheth vs rather, that among the sundrie sorts of vncleane spirits, some goe beyond others in malice and crueltie towards men, in subtiltie and iniquitie. And that therefore these are called (by our Sauiour Christ) the worst kind of spirits: whereby they are distinguished and doe differ from others, which are lesse cruell and wicked.

Physiologus.

Oh then I also perceiue, that (howsoeuer your knowledge may be infinitely profound in comparison of others) your hap in disputing these parabables is to too ouerthwart at this present. For the further you wade in the bottomles gulph of this new-found diuillitie, the deeper you diue your selfe ouer head and eares in all grosse and senseles absurdities. Before, you did only distinguish diuels into their seuerall sorts or orders: D. Doctrine. pag. 49. D. Doctrine, pag. 50.51. but (finding no fast footehold in those wandring vagaries) you would now difference them only in regard of their naturall qualities. Ma­king of infernall spirits, some cruell, some kind, some good, some [Page 153] bad, some meeke, and some very malitious in comparison of o­thers. Thereby insinuating closely vnto vs, that some Diuels are but yet in declining, and not come to the full period of their fearefull Apostacie or falling from God. I euer did thinke till now, that all Diuels whatsoeuer, they had been equallie maliti­ous, equallie enuious, equallie cruell, equallie ramping, and roaring like Lions, equallie compassing the world to worke our destruction: and that therefore, they are all purposely, and all iointly sayde to bee [...] that is,Ephes. 6.12. Zanchius, in Ephes. 6.12. pag. 499. spirituall wickednesses aboue in the aire. Marke I beseech you the Apostle, he calleth them spirituall wickednesses in the plurall number, to signifie vnto vs, that euery Diuell seuerally hath complete in that his spirituall nature,H. Discoueri▪ lib. 5. cap. 7. pag. 380. the fulnes of spiritual wickednes. How­beit, your mind (it should seeme) was musing vpon the gentle departure of Midlecub and his courteous companions: and that was some cause why you put downe at vnwares such palpable, grosse,H. Discouerie lib. 4. cap. 2. pag. 227. and ridiculous fooleries. For surely, had you only but thought vpon Sommers his knauish diuell (for so it pleaseth your selfe to accompt him) you would neuer haue dreamed of any such kinde or courteous Diuels, H. Discoueri▪ of M. Brosie▪ pag. 28. as you tell vs of here. Notwith­standing (sith you are now anatomizing the nature of Diuels) do shew vs I pray you, among whether of those your two con­trary [...]anckes of infernall spirits, we may boldly raunge Diuell Ascalon the Iester of Hell? It may be, you will haue him to make vp a full consort among those your musicall Lancashire spirits, D. 2. Narration pa. 3. & 5. & [...] who were giuen (for the most part) to singing and daun­cing, to gibing and iesting, and so keepe a seemely decorum in those your seuerall orders of Diuels. H. Discouerie lib. 5. cap. 7. pag. 380. As for Roofye, your old ac­quaintance, we see not as yet how we may possiblie make of him either flesh or fish: for, he hath only (you say) the appella­tiue name of all Diuels whatsoeuer: and by reason thereof, he may boldly partake with the Diuels of euery kinde, whether cruell or courteous. But fie, fie Exorcistes, are you not euen groslie ashamed, thus triflingly to delude your poore ignorant Readers, in making them beleeue the Crowe is white, I meane, in bearing them thus boldlie in hand that all Diuels whatsoe­uer, are euen such as your selfe do deuise them to be? Yea, and this also without due regard of God, of Religion, of reason, of common sense, and all honest humanitie. I haue the more care­fullie and more earnestlie labored this point, because (vnder [Page 154] the cunning pretence thereof) you do cunninglie go about to establish your new-found ordinance of fasting and prayer in the powerfull expelling of Diuels. For, vnlesse you be able (by one meanes or other) to finde vs forth some such combersome kind of Diuels, as the Apostles of Christ (by all their miraculous faith) were vnable to expell without fasting and prayer annex­ed therewith: that speech of Christ concerning prayer and fa­sting (you did plainely perceiue,D. Doctrine, pag. 52. and do elsewhere confesse) it must needs haue a peculiar relation to the Apostles themselues. This you cannot but see, and in consideration hereof, you doe purposely keepe this combersome coyle about the distinction of Diuels. Howbeit, the very matter of your charge being but gunpowder and pisse, the vntimely discharge of your bellowing Cannon hath procured more stinke to your cause, then stirre to your aduersarie. For, in laboring to build your new-found Ordi­nance, vpon this so sandie and fraile a foundation, the fall (you see plainely) is so much the sorer, and your losse groweth grea­ter by many degrees. Notwithstanding, be it supposed that Christ (in those words) doth put downe (in deede) some such seuerall orders of Diuels as haplie you dreame of, yet then are you neuer the neerer your purpose. For, let maister Orthodoxus now heare, how you may possiblie conclude from thence any such an established ordinance for the perpetuall expelling of Spirits and Diuels, as you would beare vs in hand?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 50.Why sir? that very text it selfe doth intimate these foure things vnto vs. First, that there are two kinds of Diuels, the one lesse, the other more mightie, cruell, subtile and more wicked. Secondly, that the former kind are more easily cast out of man; the other, with greater difficultie. Thirdly, that the Child was possest with one of the second kinde. Fourthly, that thence partly it was, that the Disciples had not driuen him forth frō the childe.

Physiologus.

Here we may see skill with a witnes. The vnlearned no doubt (wanting arte to analyze the scriptures) may here learne the trade to bebutcher a text at the least, yea, and how to quarter it forth both for the seller his best aduantage, and according to the compasse of the buyer his purse. Notwithstanding, whether any of those your foure intimations are intimated trulie vnto vs from the true naturall scope of that text: let the skilfull Artists [Page 155] determine betweene vs. As for those your two kinds of Diuels, you haue sufficiently heard before. Your other three intimati­ons, wee leaue them to such sillie poore senseles soules, as de­sire (by their fond intertainement) to intimate their owne and your follie to all the world. In the meane time, let maister Or­thodoxus now heare how either all, or any one of those your sillie intimations, may soundly intimate your supposed perpetual ordinance of prayer and fasting?

Exorcistes.

They intimate the same very fitlie vnto vs.D. Doctrine, pag. 50. For sith there be (in deede) such seuerall sorts of Diuels as hath beene declared, and that thence also it was, why the Disciples could not driue forth the Diuell from that child, our sauiour Christ was neces­sarily constrained to establish such an ordinance, as should effe­ctuallie do it for euer.

Orthodoxus.

But if there be no such seuerall orders of Diuels as we haue fullie declared before, then (by your owne reason) there needs no establishment of any such supposed perpetuall ordinance. Besides that,D. Doctrine [...] pag. 47. maister Darel, he tels vs directly, that the Disciples faith was fullie sufficient to effect it before, if he were but a Diuell: and was their said faith vnable to deale with that Diuel? That Diuell (it should seeme) was not the Diuell himselfe, but rather the Diuell his Dame: and therefore it was, that the Dis­ciples could not possiblie preuaile: for one shee Diuell (as some oldwiues affirme) is farre worse to encounter withal, then foure and twentie hee Diuels besides. Howbeit, perceiue you not Exorcistes how dangerouslie you derogate from the foreseeing wisedome of Iesus Christ: who hauing giuen his Disciples an ex­traordinarie faith which could not preuaile with euery kind of Diuell, was now (as you say) enforced vpon better deliberation, to establish such a powerfull ordinance, as should be able for e­uer to strike it dead? Briefely, if these your foure intimations (pretended perforce from that portion of scripture, with that your newfound ordinance of fasting and prayer enforced from thence) be currant in euery condition:D. Doctrine, pag. 52. maister Darell doth tell you it must necessarily follow, that then the Apostles them­selues should haue fasted and prayed, because either it must then haue been, that there was a kind of Spirit, which (for all the power the Apostles receyued) could not possiblie be expelled [Page 156] by them except (besides their said miraculous power) they had vsed the meanes of prayer and fasting, which is directly against the scripture as we haue heard before: or, that the Apostles weake faith should (at the least) haue beene helped by prayer and fasting, that so they might haue expelled the spirit, all which (sayth he) could not possiblie be.

Exorcistes.

Let maister Darel prate what he please,D. Doctrine, pag. 52. the interpretation I gaue is sound and good, and therefore it ought to be receiued.

Orthodoxus.

He is a wise man no doubt, who certainely knowes what interpretation you giue: because (whatsoeuer you pretend) you hold nothing for certaine. Howbeit, if you meane that inter­pretation of yours, which properly respecteth those your foure intimations reported euen now: then surely there is small sound­nes therein, and therefore no reason your said interpretation should be receyued for currant, but very great reason to ac­compt maister Darel and your selfe a couple of pratling com­panions.

Exorcistes.

Howsoeuer you imagine the contrarie,D. Doctrine, pag. 52. I see not what should hinder any from receyuing my said interpretation: sith the very occasion, coherence, text, and letter of that scripture make all and euery of them for it: and for that also the same is nothing against the analogie of faith.

Orthodoxus.

How fitlie the occasion, coherence, and text it selfe doe tend to the timely support of that your supposed interpretation, hath bin fullie shewed before. What concord it hath with the anologie of faith, is further then may be perceiued as yet: and much more then M. Darel himselfe dare freely acknow­ledge.D. Doctrine, pag. 44. For he tels vs els where, that there is no scripture be­sides, to help in this case: and then how should it possiblie accord with the analogie of faith?

Exorcistes.

Dar. Doctrine, pag. 52.Why sir, what impietie or what great absurditie is it to hold, that prayer and fasting is an ordinary meanes establisht by Christ for the powerful expelling of diuels? Or what dan­ger may possiblie befall the Church of God, by imbracing the same for a truth, it being so indeed? And this is all the euill [Page 157] fruit you can gather from that my former exposition.

Orthodoxus.

You demaunde what impietie, absurditie, or daunger doe follow your said exposition: I am content to giue you some inckling thereof.

First, it is impietie to auouch any thing for truth, which is not a truth: Rom. 1.18. or to father a lie vpon Christ, and so to hold the truth in vnrighteousnes. It is impietie to put vpon the pure Spouse of Christ, 2. Thes. 2. [...].10. the besmearing brand of that antichristian strumpet; to whome alone is giuen power to worke lying signes and wonders in all deceiueablenesse of vnrighteousnesse: and so make her (saith M. Darel) to boast or bragge that she hath in her eare the marke of a Rogue, D. Doctrine, pag. 74. or that shee is burnt in the hand like a theefe. For as these (saith he) are the infallible markes of rogues and theeues: so surely, the miraculous expelling of diuels by papists and others in these dayes of the Gospell, it is the vndoubted true ensigne, badge or cognizance of antichrist. It is impietie to affirme that fasting and prayer (ex opere opera­to) may possiblie effect such a worke: and so to iumpe with trayterous Stapleton and with Thyreus the Iesuite. It is im­pietie to prophane the holy exercise of prayer and fasting, by such preposterous practises: without any warrant at al from the word.Theod. Beza, in 1. Cor. 7.5. Moses Pella­cher. in Matth. 17.21. It is impietie to draw prayer and fasting from their peculiar and proper appointed ends, namely, from being but proppes and helpes for the onlie support of our feeble faith in the promises of God: and to make them the only sole meanes for the powerfull expelling of diuels without any faith at al. Yea,D. Doctrine, pag. 106. and euen such a meanes forsooth, as may (saith M. Da­rel) enable a reprobate to effect such a worke. Loe, these are the seuerall impieties which doe necessarilie succeede your sensles exposition: and yet you aske what impieties would fol­low thereof.

Now next for absurdities. It is to too absurde to auouch that fasting is more effectuall and more powerfull for the expelling of spirits and diuels; then is prayer it selfe. It is ab­surde to make sole prayer, but a practicall meanes to proue experiments by.Theod. Beza, [...] 1. Cor. 7.5. It is absurd to make fasting the subsequent of prayer: whereas it should (indeed) be a precedent exercise, or rather an ordinarie preparation thereunto. It is absurde to establish a trade without a tuition: or to prescribe a medicine [Page 158] where there is no maladie at all. Loe, these and such other ab­surdities doe necessarilie succeed your sensles exposition of Math. 17. vers. 21. and yet you enquire what absurdities may possiblie succeed the same.

Now next shall be handled succinctlie the daungers also thereof: which are both manie, and those also most mightie. For first it cannot but be fearefullie dangerous, that the Church should be brought to imbrace for infallible truth; that which cannot possiblie be proued a truth. Againe, it is vndoubtedly dangerous for the Church, by this meanes to consort her selfe with her enimy, especially in such grosse and erronious opinions. To practise prayer and fasting, as a perpe­tual ordinance establisht by Christ for the powerful expelling of diuels: hauing no one warrant in the word for the same. To be made carelesse of the true spirituall armour against Sa­tan in deed: by buzzing secretlie into her eares, that which is not her armour appointed by God. Ephes. 6.12. Loe, these are some of those palpable impieties, absurdities, and dangers which must necessarilie succeed your said exposition: and yet you are not ashamed to enquire what impieties, absurdities, or daungers may possiblie follow thereof.

These and such like, they are the supposed good fruites which grow vp, and may possiblie be gathered from your former most fruitles exposition, concerning that portion of scripture. As for the euill fruits you enquire after, therein you are sufficiently able to resolue your selfe. For what fruit may you haue of that whereof you are now so filthilie ashamed, Rom. 6.21. that you dare not shew forth your face as in former times?

Exorcistes.

Sir, I would you knew it, I am nothing ashamed of that infallible truth which I teach.

Orthodoxus.

If you blush not for very shame at so grosse an exposition: the lesse is your glorie, and the greater your confusion no doubt. For who (but an impudent person) would not be highlie ashamed of the ignorance of his owne soule? Pro. 23.23. Howbeit, if (in very deed) you be not ashamed thereof from your heart: why then doe you thus hide your head in a corner?Tertul. in Apologetic. Truth (you know) she seeketh no corners: neyther feareth she more in her heart, then to be hid from the eyes of the world.

Exorcistes.
[Page 159]

I forsake not the truth it selfe be you sure: I onely but flee those fierie trials which so fiercely doe follow the truth. Nei­ther take I this course,Matth. 10.2 [...]. without the warrant of Christ: who wils me (when I am persecuted in one Citie) to flie into another.

Orthodoxus.

Alas poore pitiful cause, what hard hap hadst thou to put thy selfe vnder the protection of so cowardly a Patrone, as on­ly but braues it in words: without either beating once back, or bearing off the blowes, which daily befall thy vntimelie birth! Howbeit, you doe blasphemouslie belie our Sauiour Christ, in saying that hee should approue of your cowardlie flight from citie to citie. For the flight which Christ warran­teth there, is yt wherin only your person (not your profession) is hotlie pursued by persecuting Tyrants. You are not pursued with any purposed hurt to your person: but onely with a prouident respect to those your preposterous practises, which your selfe (hauing preposterously set first on foote) doe now (by this your cowardly cariage) euen purposely betray in the open field.

Besides that, howsoeuer your flight might bee warranted lawfull before the challenged combat, yet being once pur­posely billed forth for the battell, and your owne selfe vn­dertaking the graund-Captaine his charge in this singular skirmish; you haue from hence-foorth no more warrant to flee the very forefront of the field, then hath the apprehended offender to breake out of prison.

Notwithstanding, let vs set these things aside for the pre­sent, and doe shew foorth vnto vs (I pray you) how (from that portion of Scripture) you may possibly conclude the timely establishment of that your supposed ordinance of prayer and fasting.

Exorcistes.

Why sir,D. Doctrine pag. 52. he knoweth nothing at all in the holie things, who vnderstandeth not this: namely, first if any bee now possest, and by prayer preuaile not; then prayer and fasting to­gether must forthwith be vsed. Secondly, that prayer and fa­sting (being so vsed) will certainly prosper: either to the present remouing, or to the powerfull sanctifying of the said iudgement at least.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 160]

If that man, who vnderstands not the profunditie of these new-found mysteries, knoweth nothing at all in holie things: then surely I for mine owne part must freely confesse, that hitherto I haue knowne nothing at all concerning that my­sticall way. Yea and (which more is) this your pretended great knowledge therein, it is (I verely beleeue) but a pre­sumptuous knowledge, hauing in it no soundnes of knowledge at all. For who euer taught you as yet, or from what spirituall fountaine can you possiblie conuey such a profunditie of sa­cred knowledge, D. Doctrine, pag. 43. as may warrant vs to vndertake, first an ex­perimentall practise of prayer alone: and then next (if this course preuaile not at all) to vse prayer and fasting together, for a more speedie dispatch of the busines? What may wee imagine hath taught you these different and variable practi­ses: but only a certaine secret feare of being taken tardie at vnwares, in those your different and variable courses, concer­ning the supposed expelling of Spirits and Diuels?

Notwithstanding, let it be graunted to bee so as you say, how proues this the matter in question: namely, that prayer and fasting is an ordinance establisht by Christ, for the perpetuall expelling of Diuels?

Moreouer, whereas you confidently auouch, that this your new-found ordinance (being rightly obserued of those your pretended Demoniakes) it will vndoubtedly prosper, either to the remouing or sanctifying of the iudgement at least: doe tell vs (I pray you) how it comes to passe, that this your said ordinance should now (at this present) enioy but a doubtfull prosperitie, the prosperitie thereof being (in Sommers and some of the rest) so certaine before, D. Doctrine, pag. 43. Quantum mu­ta [...]us ab illo? as you pur­posely vsed the same to make sure worke at the first? Here is a strange metamorphosis, and mightie alteration: yea, a sud­den exchange from that in former times.

But how doe you certainly know, that prayer and fasting (being so vsed) will certainly prosper, either to the remouing or sanctifying of the iudgement at least?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 52. Gen. 20.17. I proue it from former experience thus. The same prospe­red so farre forth by the practise of Abraham, as it opened the wombes of all the women in Abimelech his house.

[Page 161]Againe,Iudg. 20.28 it so prospered by the Israelites practise, as that thereby they conquered and killed the Beniamites. And there­fore the same so obserued of vs, will likewise prosper in this speciall busines.

Orthodoxus.

Examples may serue very fitly, to illustrate a point of do­ctrine proued before: but they suffice not of themselues to proue any matter in question.

Besides that, you doe grossely forget your selfe, and ouer­rashly auouch you care not what.Gen. 20.17. Iudg. 20.35 For, did Abrahams prayer get Abimelechs women with child: or the Israelites fasting con­quer the Beniamites? I was euer perswaded till now, that the act of generation had effected the one: and the men of warre had accomplisht the other.

Exorcistes.

Very true. Howbeit, by prayer and fasting those selfesame meanes were sanctified, for the powerfull effecting of those speciall workes.

Orthodoxus.

Then their prayer and fasting were not the meanes it selfe which effected those works: but onely a spirituall exercise, to sanctifie the meanes themselues which were to effect the same. And so by consequence, prayer and fasting, they are not the sole meanes that driues foorth a diuell: but they are rather a spirituall exercise, to sanctifie and strengthen the meanes in deed that must doe it, namely the miraculous faith. Which said faith being then ouer sluggish and weake in the Apo­stles themselues: should necessarily haue been stirred vp, and supported thereby.

So then those words of Christ, they implie no established ordinance for the perpetuall expelling of diuels: but doe on­ly import a speciall meanes for the timely confirmation of the Apostles faith. And therefore, this which you hitherto speake will neuer endure the hammering, for that which you purpose.

Exorcistes.

Why sir,D. Doctrine, pag. 53. I vsed that selfe same meanes to Katherine Wright, to Tho. Darling, to W. Sommers, to the seuen in Lancashire, and preuailed thereby: why therefore may I not now as safely say, that prayer and fasting was the sole and only meanes [Page 162] of expelling Satan in euery of these: as the Physition, apply­ing a naturall medicine for the cure of a naturall maladie, (that same medicine hauing prospered also in the timely re­couery of sundry diseased parties before) may boldly auouch, that that his said medicine was the onely meanes of curing those parties diseased? 1. Cor. 9.2. If Paul did iustly make the Corinthi­ans conuersion, the vndoubted true seale of his Apostleship: why may not my selfe with like boldnesse, propound my seuerall dispossessions, as a full confirmation of this establi­shed ordinance?

Orthodoxus.

The Phisition who cureth naturall diseases, he cures them not (I hope) by sole prayer and fasting, but by meere naturall medicines; as by the naturall remedies appointed of God for that purpose. Although yet, I denie not, but that earnest prayer before, is a warranted spirituall exercise to sanctifie the medicine it selfe; and to make it (by the good blessing of God) become much more effectuall in working the cure. Howbeit possession of diuels, the same (I am certaine) is no naturall maladie: neither yet are prayer and fasting any natu­rall medicine to cure the same. And therefore, euen as prayer it selfe cannot possibly cure, but serueth onely to sanctifie that naturall medicine, which must helpe the naturall malady: so surely, prayer of it selfe cannot possibly dispossesse any man of the diuell, but is onely a spirituall exercise, to stir vp and to strengthen that spirituall meanes which must doe it in deed, I meane, the miraculous faith. And so by conse­quence, sole prayer and fasting alone, they are no ordinarie meanes establisht by Christ for the perpetuall expelling of spirits and diuels.

1. Cor. 9.2.Besides that, howsoeuer the Apostle Paul might iustly challenge the Corinthians as his peculiar seale, and call them the proper defence of his Apostleship, because they themselues (by meanes of his powerfull preaching) were soundly con­uerted vnto the faith, and the authoritie of his Apostleship more authenticallie sealed vp and confirmed: yet, the falsely pretended cures of those your supposed patients (being in very deed but counterfeite seales) they cannot possibly seale vp your Exorcists calling; nor be any other in effect, but counterfeite confirmations of your falsely pretended new or­dinance, [Page 163] and so by consequence, they proue you to be but a counterfeite Exorcist. For we haue euer denied, and your selfe haue not hitherto proued any such certaine ordinance establisht by Christ.

Exorcistes.

Well,D. Doctrine, pag. 54. be it admitted, that neither those words of Christ, nor any one Scripture else doe purposely institute praier and fasting an established ordinance, for the perpetuall expelling of di­uels: yet notwithstanding, the same may well be, and is also in deed, a meanes ordeined by God himselfe to that same end.

Orthodoxus.

Are you fled on the sodaine, from this your newe found established ordinance of prayer and fasting, for the powerfull expelling of spirits and diuels; and doe now make them but onely a meanes thereunto ordeined of God? I perceiue you are to too afraid to tarrie ouer long in a squatte: the follow­ing crie of the Hounds is so hotte in your eares. But goe to, how are you certainly sure, that praier and fasting is a meanes ordeined by God himselfe: to that selfe same ende?

Exorcistes.

I am not simplie fled from the ordinance it selfe;D. Doctrine, pag. 54. but here­in doe make it more apparantly euident, that albeit prayer and fasting be not reuealed, yet are they vndoubtedly a se­cret ordinance of God at the least, to that selfe same end. For euen as this, or that medicine, applyed by the Phisition or Chirurgian, to this or that maladie, and healing the same in sundrie Patients, may (by experience) be knowne to be a me­dicine secretly ordeined of God to such an end, though no such particular medicine be thereunto expreslie mentioned in sa­cred Scripture: so surely, prayer and fasting being rightly vsed, and preuailing with many from time to time in the powerfull expelling of diuels; who seeth not now but that the said exercise of prayer and fasting, is a certaine secret meanes ordeined of God to that selfe same end, though there were (in the Canonicall Scriptures) no one mention at all of any such ordinance?

Orthodoxus.

You flee (I perceiue) from one starting hole to another, as a man almost spent, or in much feare at the least of being ferretted forth. For here now (as before in possessions) you are driuen to [Page 164] your popish distinction of written and vnwritten ordinances. And thus (by laboring very egerly to shunne the sands of suspition concerning a supposed confederacie with Sommers his couso­ning courses) you run your selfe desperatly vpon the dangerous rocks of discredit, cōcerning your iumping with Papists in their popish opinions. For, (by this your blind distinction of ordinan­ces vnwritten and written) you do very plainely demonstrate your selfe to be a chicken of father Bellarmines hatching, who (elsewhere no lesse fondly then your selfe here very foolishly) distinguisheth the word of God, into verbum scriptum and ver­bum non scriptum, Bellarm. de scriptu [...]. lib. 4. cap. 2. into the word written & the word vnwritten. By which your cunning sleights of legerdemaine, you do very cunningly endeuour to foist in (vnderhand) whatsoeuer grosse fooleries or fond conceits your owne priuate phantasies shall fondly affect. And therefore it shall not be greatly amisse, if you ioyntly together receiue your answeres, first, from the written word it selfe, and then next from your holie fathers decrees, vn­der whose trayterous ensigne you ioyntly skirmish in this so spe­ciall a combate.

First therefore (from the written word it selfe) we will finally squash your fond distinction thus.Isa. 8.20. If the Prophet Isaiah redu­ceth the aduersaries of truth whatsoeuer to the lawe and the te­stimonie, telling them farther, that if they speake not according to this word, it is because there is in them no sacred truth: then surely, father Bellarmine and your selfe (labouring thus lewdlie to foyst in such your vnwritten fooleries, as are not according to the law and the testimonie reuealed at large in the written word) you do plainely declare, that you are now necessarily driuen to these indirect dealings, because there is in you no truth at all.

Againe, if Christ commaundeth his aduersaries to search the scriptures, Ioh. 5.39. Act. 17.11. because in them they thinke to haue eternall life, tel­ling them withall, that they are those which testifie truly of him: then no doubt, he doth purposely restraine them all from en­quiring after any vnwritten verities, because such do neither testifie of him, nor may possiblie affoord any sound euidence at all to eternall life.

[...]. Tim. 3.15.16.17.Againe, if the holie scriptures (the word written I meane) are (of themselues) sufficiently able not only to make men wise to saluation, but (which more is) were purposely giuen of God, as the only profitable directions and rules for teaching, impro­uing, [Page 165] correcting and instructing in righteousnes, to make the man of God very absolute to euery good worke. If the written word I say, be fully sufficient to worke these effects; then surely those your supposed vnwritten ordinances are meerely superflu­ous.D. Willet. in Tetrastylon Papismi. part. 3. pag. 146. For, what may more be required from the written word concerning the Churches good in this present life, then to make the good Minister an absolute man of God, and the christian hearer a saued creature? But both these effects (sayth the blessed Apostle) are sufficiently attayned vnto by the written word: and therefore that vnwritten word which father Bellarmine and you so fondly dreame after, is meerely superfluous, and doth no­thing else (in effect) but defile the flesh, and deceiue your owne soules.

Now next we will likewise lay open your dottages concer­ning this your supposed vnwritten word, from your holie father his authenticall Canons thus.Decret. p. 1. distinct. 8. c. 9. Si solus Christus audiendus est, non debemus attendere quid aliquis ante nos faciendum putauerit: sed quid (qui ante omnes est) Christus prior fecerit. That is: If Christ only be to be heard, we are not to respect what any one else hath or shall thinke meete to be done; but what Christ (who was before all) hath first done himselfe. Now then, if Christ a­lone must be heard, whose voyce is onely knowen in the scrip­tures, I meane in the written word: then surely your vnwritten word, and whatsoeuer ordinance else is not apparantly extant in scripture, nor may (by necessary consequence) be soundly col­lected from thence, the same is meerely superfluous. So then, this your exorbitant distinction of written and vnwritten ordi­nances, it may not possiblie be made to support the importable burden of that your supposed established ordinance of prayer and fasting, for the perpetuall expelling of Spirits and Diuels: but it falles flat (you see) to the ground.

Besides that we haue euer denyed, and your selfe shall ne­uer be able to proue, that sole prayer and fasting is either a writ­ten, or vnwritten ordinance, forthe powerfull expelling of Spi­rits and Diuels. And (which more is) this your owne argument of comparison, it cutteth asunder the very throate of this your phantasticall opinion, as may plainely appeare by conferring each part of your comparison more fully together.

For, seeing you insist so much vpon naturall infirmities, and (by proportion thereof) would proue vnto vs the supernatu­rall [Page 166] possession of Spirits and Diuels: this you know (in experi­ence) that euery naturall cure is either ordinarie or extraordi­narie. An ordinarie cure is that which in an ordinarie course, and by ordinarie meanes procureth an ordinarie effect in the partie diseased. Now in an ordinarie cure there must necessarily con­curre these following matters.

Namely, first, an ordinarie naturall medicine to effect the in­tended cure: as for example, eie-bright to cleere the dimnes of sight.

Secondly, a secret operation of nature must necessarily con­curre with the medicine it selfe, to make it naturallie forcible for effecting the cure: otherwayes the medicine it selfe is vtterly vn­fruitfull.

Thirdly, there must be a ministeriall hand for the orderlie ap­prehending, and applying of that the aforesaid medicine.

Fourthly, there is also required in the Phisition himselfe the theorie, or knowledge of natures operation, to direct him aright in that selfesame busines.

Fiftly, there must be also an ordinarie meanes to imprint such a theorie, or knowledge in the Phisitions brest.

Lastly, the habite of this theorie or skill is that only, which imboldeneth and warranteth the Phisition himselfe in such an orderly practise.

Thus then you see that the Phisition his only knowledge con­cerning the secret operation of nature, is that which imboldneth and guideth the hand it selfe, in an orderlie apprehending and applying of that selfesame medicine to such an effected cure. And the cure in such sort effected, it is without doubt an ordi­narie cure, as hauing all things ordinarily concurring together in an ordinarie course of nature. Howbeit, if the Phisition should effect the said cure by sole prayer and fasting alone, without any such naturall medicine, or by a quite contrary meanes: namely, if he (together with prayer and fasting) should worke the sayd cure by the only applying of a plaister of clay, Ioh. 9.6. which naturallie hath in it selfe no naturall disposition at all for the orderlie ef­fecting of any such worke, and wherein nature her selfe neither hath, nor naturally can haue any such secret operation at all: then surely the cure it selfe (in such sort effected) it is vndoubtedlie supernaturall, extraordinarie, and meerely miraculous. By the premisses then you may plainely perceiue, what things (in a [Page 167] naturall disease) must necessarily concurre, for the timely effec­ting of the ordinarie cure thereof: and therefore do tell me plainely, whether you make the possession of Diuels a disease or not?

Exorcistes.

Yes sir,D. Doctrine, pag. 29. it is a disease as ordinarie as other diseases in men.

Orthodoxus.

But whether is it a naturall: or supernaturall disease?

Exorcistes.

It is a supernaturall disease no doubt.D. Doctrine, pag. 79.

Orthodoxus.

And is not the cure thereof eyther ordinarie: or extraordi­narie at least?

Exorcistes.

The cure thereof in Christ and his Disciples dayes,D. Doctrine, pag 29.55. was ex­traordinary no doubt: but now in these dayes of the Gospell, it is altogether ordinarie.

Orthodoxus.

If an ordinarie cure (as you say) then must you be able to demonstrate vnto me, the necessarie concurrencie of all the precedent matters, and so you say something vnto vs. My meaning is this, you must demonstrate vnto me: first an or­dinarie medicine for that selfesame cure. Secondly, a secret o­peration of some other effectual power concurring therewith. Thirdly, a ministeriall hand to apprehend and applie that selfesame medicine. Fourthlie, a theorie or skill to direct the sayd hand. Fiftlie, a meanes to imprint that selfesame theorie in the phisitions breast. Lastlie, an habite of that selfesame skill to imbolden and warrant the practise thereof: and then the cure in such sort effected, is vndoubtedlie ordinarie.

Exorcistes.

Why sir?D. Doctrine, pag. 55. prayer & fasting is a medicine ordained by Christ to effect that ordinarie cure.

Orthodoxus.

Haue prayer and fasting any such energetical force in them­selues, as doth naturallie and directlie tend to the timely ef­fecting of that selfesame cure: or doe they rather (ex opere o­perato) effect the said worke?

Exorcistes.

Neither of both. Although yet sole prayer & fasting do ef­fect [Page 168] the said worke, as wee see in experience: notwithstan­ding my selfe be vtterlie vnable to expresse the manner how it effecteth the same.

Orthodoxus.

I doe verilie beleeue you in this. Howbeit, if sole prayer and fasting be able of it selfe to effect such a worke, without any the other precedent matters concurring therewith: then surely that selfesame cure (as we told you before in na­turall diseases) it must needes be extraordinarie, and so (by consequence) a miraculous cure no doubt.D. Doctrine, pag. 63.73. D. Detection, pag. 23.25. D. Doctrine, pag. 79. D. Detection, pag. 41. Notwithstanding all this, the working of miracles (you say) it was ceased long since: and therefore also the miraculous expelling of spirits and diuels.

Besides that, you your owne selfe doe terme the possession of diuels a supernaturall disease. But supernaturall diseases doe necessarilie craue a supernaturall manner of cure; for nothing in an orderly course of nature, may possiblie cure a supernatu­rall infirmitie: and therefore that selfesame pretended cure of yours concerning Sommers (if euer the same was truely effe­cted) it must needes be as extraordinarie now, as euer were a­ny before: and so by consequence as miraculous now, as euer were any before, whatsoeuer you prate to the contrary, as in our tenth Dialogue is plainely declared.

Exorcistes.

Sir, I prate not at all, but doe aduisedlie report that infal­lible truth,D. Doctrine. pag. 55. whereof we haue the examples, the practise, and counsell of fathers: who generallie auouch the holie exercise of prayer and fasting, for the perpetuall expelling of spirits and diuels.

Orthodoxus.

Your Fathers forsooth (being euery of them mute before, concerning the essentiall possession of diuels) are here mustered afresh in one & the selfesame ranck, to support your idle cō ­ceit of an ordinarie dispossessing of diuels by prayer & fasting.

And herein (howsoeuer you wrest open their mouthes, to make them speake what you please) they speake nothing at all to your purpose in hand: my meaning is, they doe not concludently proue that Christ hath purposelie established prayer and fasting, as an ordinary and perpetuall meanes for the powerfull expelling of diuels.

[Page 169]For first, howsoeuer you begin with Origen, Origen. in Matth. 17 21. he rather insi­nuateth simplie the supposed efficacie of fasting and prayer in those your pretended admirable actions, then purposelie put downe the practise thereof, as a perpetuall ordinance pe­culiarlie and purposelie establisht by Christ, for the power­full expelling of spirits and diuels.

Tertullian, Tertul. Apol. ad Scapulam. cap. 3. he speaketh of many pretended deliuerances from some supposed extraordinarie afflictions of Satan: but sheweth not the manner how they were freed from thence.

Neyther had Cyprian (in those his pathetical perswasions) any purpose at all,Cyprian. ad Demetrian. tract. 1. pa. 328. to put downe the pretended establish­ment of that your conceited new ordinance, for the powerful expelling of spirits and diuels: as may plainely appeare by that authenticall censure, Iacobus Pame­lius in Cypria­num edit. vlt. pag. 254. which Iacobus Pamelius hath set downe vpon that selfesame place of Cyprian, which your selfe doth alleadge. Telling vs confidently that the Exorcists office was not then of any vse in the Church: and giueth this reason withall. Nam, munus illud cum miraculorum dono con­iunctum temporarium fuit. For that office or function (being conioyned with the gift of miracles) it was onelie a tempo­rarie office. Yea, and (in an vtter detestation of this your deluding conceit concerning the perpetuitie thereof from those your preposterous practises) a little after he saith: that the crafts and iuggling sleights of counterfeit Exorcists and con­iuring Priests, Chrys. tom. 5. de incompreh. dei natura. hom. 4. Kemnitius de sacramento or­dinis. Phil. Melanch. lib. epistolarum. Beza homil. 26. in histor. pass. edit. 2. pag 656. Vogel. in the­sauro theologi­co. pag. 986. Danaeus quaest. 38. in Marcum. Cassani [...]. si [...] loc. com. li. 1. pag. [...]7 they are (long since) apparantly euident: yea euen to the very eyes of the blind. By that then which is hitherto spoken concerning your mustered Fathers, you may easilie iudge the very iust length of all the others footings, concer­ning especiallie their hoped releefe towardes this your lan­guishing ordinance. For whatsoeuer they may seeme (in your sillie conceit) to set downe concerning some supposed supplie for your falslie pretended ordinance, very certaine it is, they doe not nor durst not auouch the pretended esta­blishment of that selfesame supposed ordinance by Christ his authoritie, as you very fondly imagine.

And as you are not herein assisted by any their determi­nate or resolute iudgements: so neyther haue you their own examples or practise to any such purpose: but onely their bare reports concerning the apocryphall practise of some o­thers conuersing among them.

[Page 170]Neyther doe they once open their mouthes concerning any such established ordinance: only Origen (as we yeelded vnto you before) he speakes of prayer and fasting by way of aduise, all the rest (if they speake anie thing) they speake onlie of prayer alone, as of that which they deeme a notable exercise or fruit of faith.

Neyther doe any one of them all in any their published workes, write eyther of sole prayer alone, or of prayer and fa­sting together, as of a perpetuall ordinance establisht by Christ to any such purpose: onely they giue their aduise for the exercise of prayer alone, if any such supposed occurrent should at any time befall the people of God.

Besides that, these your produced Fathers (not prouing be­fore your priuate opinion concerning essentiall possessions) their now propounded speeches to proue your pretended dispossessions by prayer and fasting (as by a perpetuall ordi­nance established purposely by Christ himselfe to such speci­all purpose) are meerely vaine and superfluous.

Exorcistes.

The Fathers (you say) they onely but giue their aduise concerning such workes: would the Fathers presume to ad­uise vnto that (thinke you) whereof they had no warrant at all in the word?

Orthodoxus.

Yea, why not, they hauing especially the selfesame adui­sing course so authentically warranted to them, by good Ma­ster Darels example: D. Doctrine. pag. 64. who (without any warrant at all from the word, as he saith) presumes to giue the selfesame aduice concerning the cure of parties bewitched.

Howbeit, if either those fathers, or you your selfe were pos­siblie able to proue prayer and fasting such a perpetuall ordi­nance establisht by Christ, as you falsely pretend: then sure­ly (albeit they gaue no such aduice at all) the same supposed ordinance (being at any time orderly vsed) should bee euer effectuall.Numb. 23.19. Rom. 9.19. Iam. 1.17. For who may bee able to alter the certaine ap­pointment of God: or possibly withstand his absolute will, concerning the purposed efficacie of any his established or­dinances? D. Doctrine, pag. 59. Otherwise (saith good Master Darell) the Lord should haue instituted something in vaine, a medicine for the curing of that selfesame disease which neuer can bee: or if [Page 171] happily it so fell forth that any were sick thereof, yet should not the medicine it selfe be of that powerfull efficacie, which is by your selfe pretended.

Exorcistes.

That followeth not:D. Doctrine, pag. 58. because the meanes which God him­selfe hath appointed to some certaine end, doe not alwaies prosper thereunto.

Orthodoxus.

It may follow very fitly,D. Doctrine, pag. 59. for any thing hitherto heard: yea, and it is impious, and to too absurd (saith good Master Da­rell) for any to affirme the contrarie. Besides that, the meanes which God himselfe appointeth to some certaine end, it shall and doth euermore prosper to that selfesame end, whereunto it is appointed of God: though we perceiue not the manner how, nor yet know the period of time when the same is effe­ctuall.

Exorcistes

But we see it eftsoones to be otherwise in preaching, D. Doctrine, pag. 58▪ in fee­ding, and plowing, which the Lord hath appointed for the con­uersion of sinners, for the sustentation of nature, and for the en­crease of fruites: all which (notwithstanding the Lord his ap­pointment) are eftsoones ineffectuall.

Orthodoxus.

You prate herein you know not, or care not what at the least. For if the Lord hath certainly appointed preaching, fee­ding, and plowing for those the forenamed end [...] they shall vn­doubtedly accomplish those ends, notwithstanding any sup­posed occurrent whatsoeuer. As for example, the Lord hath appointed the preaching of the Gospell to be either a sauour of life vnto life, 2. Cor. 2.16. Isa. 5.10. Isa. 6.9.10.11 or a sauour of death vnto death: and therefore the said preaching of the Gospell it shall certainly prosper, and haue it vndoubted effect concerning life, or death at the least.

For first,Act. 13.48. it shall be euermore effectuall concerning the worke of saluation in all the elect enioying the same: howsoe­uer your selfe imagine the contrarie.Rom. 10.16. Gal. 4.19. Ioh. 3.8. Act. 1.7. Rom. 10.20. and 11.33. First, because so many as are certainly ordained to life, shall thereby bee conuerted, and brought in time to a sauing faith.

Secondly, the very period of time concerning their said con­uersion, is vtterly vnknowne to all, yea euen to the conuerted [Page 172] himselfe: who knoweth no more the certaine time of his spirituall regeneration, then the naturall man knoweth the cer­taine season of his naturall conception; though they haue both in time an experimentall knowledge that they were certainlie begotten in time.

Ephes. 3.16. 1. Pet. 2.2.Thirdly, their said conuersion is continually encreasing and growing thereby; though wee cannot possibly discerne the manner of that selfesame encrease, no more then wee may possibly discerne the growing of grasse, albeit we should daily stand staring and gazing vpon it.

Act. 2.36.37. Rom. 7.21. [...]2.23.Fourthly, euen then also when we imagine their said con­uersion to prosper the least, or is resisted the most; it doth eftsoones prosper the best.

Lastly, the said preaching of the Gospell, it shall be (from time to time) as effectuall in euery respect,2. Cor. 4.4. 1. Pet. 2.8. Luk. 4.18. Act. 26.16, 17, 18. for the elects con­uersion, as for the reprobates certaine conuiction: but the same is euermore an effectuall meanes which maketh the wicked to stumble, and therefore effectuall to raise vp the elect in Ie­sus Christ.

Now next for the vsage of meates and drinkes, they (in like manner) are euermore effectuall either to nourish, or to annoy the bodies of men at the least: which are the two certaine ends, whereunto they are certainly appointed of God. Psalm. 105.40. and 107.9. 1▪ King. 19.8. Psal. 78.30.31. and 105.16. and 106.16. For as men at sometimes doe feed very moderatly, and are much refreshed thereby, because the Lord so appointed the same: so surely at sometimes againe, euen when they are eating, and while the meate is still in their mouthes, the wrath of God falleth very fear­fully vpon them.

Lastly, for plowing and sowing, very certaine it is the same shall euermore effectually prosper, in procuring abundance or barrennes vpon the ground at the least: which are the two certaine ends whereunto they are certainly appointed of God. For howsoeuer we may (by the secret operation of God) beholde in Isaack his tillage the blessing of abundance: Gen. 26.12. Psal. 107.34. yet sometimes againe, the Lord maketh the fruitfullest land to be­come very barren, because of the wickednesse of such as dwell therein.

Thus then you may plainly perceiue, that both preaching, and feeding, and plowing they are neuer in vaine, but doe ef­fectually worke to that certaine end, whereto they are certain­lie [Page 173] appointed of God: and therefore praying and fasting, if they bee certainly appointed by God for the powerfull ex­pelling of Diuels, they shall certainly prosper to that selfe­same end, and be alwaies effectuall thereunto. Howbeit, be­cause you so confidently impugne the truth of these points, let vs heare your reason why the same should not be alwaies effectuall.

Exorcistes.

The reason is,D. Doctrine. pag. 59. because the Lord is euer at libertie, and not tyed to any one meanes at all, he may blesse or keepe backe (if hee please) the blessing which himselfe hath appointed: and then the meanes or second cause it selfe will neuer pre­uaile.

Orthodoxus.

That is vntrue. For if the Lord hath appointed the meanes it selfe to a certaine end, he is not then at libertie, but hath ne­cessarily bound himselfe to that selfesame meanes, so farre forth especially, as concernes that certaine end whereunto he hath certainly appointed the same: yea, and he must also (in equi­tie) euen make the said meanes to be very effectuall. So as if at any time the meanes it selfe be vtterly ineffectuall, we may certainly conclude, that the Lord had not certainly appoin­ted the same to that certaine end.

The which point Master Darell perceiued full well,D. Doctrine. pag. 61. as ap­peares by his speech, saying thus: When the Lord appoints a thing to come to passe by such or such meanes, the same meanes must be vsed: otherwaies that thing shall neuer be. So then, if prayer and fasting be (as you say) an ordinarie meanes very certainly and purposely appointed of God for the powerfull expelling of Diuels, the said meanes (being vsed accordingly) must needes bee effectuall from time to time: and (being so made effectuall) the worke it selfe is vndoub­tedly miraculous.

Exorcistes.

Nay sir,D. Doctrine, pag 59. you are greatly deceiued. For to cast out a Diuell by a commanding word (as did Christ and his owne Disciples) is a miracle I confesse, yea of miracles the greatest: but to do it by an only entreating word, or rather to entreate Christ to doe it by his owne absolute authoritie, that is no miracle at all.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 174]

Very true as you say, the entreating word it selfe is no mi­racle. Howbeit, the question is, whether that worke so extra­ordinarily effected by Christ his absolute authority, at the on­ly entreatie of some one or a few, be not in very deede a mi­raculous worke?

Exorcistes.

It is not I assure you, and that also for these following reasons: first, because there is no assurance to preuaile in this case.

Orthodoxus.

Your assurance is as certaine to trust vnto, as the holding of a wet Eele by the taile: D. Doctrine, pag. 59. yea, and Master Darell himselfe doth flatly affirme, that this reason of yours is a very ab­surd and an impious reason. Besides that, in saying there is no assurance to preuaile in this case; you doe therein directlie conclude, that the same is [...]o ordinance established by Christ. Because euery of his ordinances (how weake or how waue­ring soeuer they seeme in the eyes of the world) they are sure and certaine, D. Doctrine, pag. 25. according to his absolute decree and most cer­taine appointment.

Besides this, in saying that (albeit prayer and fasting bee vsed accordingly) we haue yet no assurance at all to preuaile in this case, you doe nothing therein but giue good Master Darell the lie;D. Doctrine, pag. 26. who telleth vs plainlie, that howsoeuer the Lord hath appointed vs to fast and pray when we are in any other affliction of bodie or minde, neither shall our said la­bour be vndertaken in vaine: yet hath he no where so cer­tainly promised, that our said prayer and fasting shall so effe­ctually prosper to the deliuering of vs from such an affliction, as in this very case of possession he hath promised in particular and by speciall words, saying thus: This kinde goeth not foorth but by prayer and fasting. Therein secretly promising, that prayer and fasting being vsed accordingly, the euill Spirits they doe, and shall goe forth.

Moreouer, if you haue no assurance at al to preuaile in this case, why did you then so presumptuously vndertake to pray for a spirituall blessing vpon those your Demoniakes, D. Doctrine, pag. 26. namely, that their bodies might forthwith be made temples for the ho­lie Ghost to dwell in: sith all spirituall graces whatsoeuer, must [Page 175] euermore be prayed for earnestly, and with an vndoubted assurance? Yea, and how could you euen now so confident­ly auouch, that the worke it selfe was vndoubtedly effected before your eyes, sith the effects themselues are not possiblie comprehended by corporall sense, and there is no assurance (you say) to preuaile in this case.

Brieflie, if there be no assurance at all to preuaile in this case, then those your former directions or rules (concerning especiallie an experimentall prayer for three or foure howers together, and that your effectuall addition of fasting, with your warranted assurance of preuailing against any Diuell how headstrong soeuer) they are (for ought I perceiue) but vncerteine directions: yea, and then also you haue therein procured your yoong practitioners else where, very groslie to prophane the holy exercise of prayer and fasting, by their taking of the same (for some three or foure seuerall times) in vaine, about the dispossessing of your newly pretended De­moniak [...], they hauing (as your selfe here affirme) no assurance at all to preuaile in that case. And therefore (for any thing I see) their onely refuge is this, to say (in excuse of that their said enterprise) aliquando fallit regula: or to make (for their proper defence) that selfesame answere, which the Schole­men doe make for their Master thus. Hic non tenet Magister, here our Master hath missed the Cushion.

By all the premisses then you may plainly perceiue, that (notwithstanding the supposed force of this your first rea­son) the worke it selfe (being truly effected in such sort as you say) it was vndoubtedly a miraculous worke.

Exorcistes.

If the worke was in deed a miraculous worke, Dar. Doctrine. pag. 59.60. then surely Tertullian, Cyprian, Chrysostome and others, so oft as they ex­pelled the Diuels by prayer and fasting, they also wrought miracles. But either that is vtterly false: or, you doe other­waies conclude, that the working of miracles was also in vse at those times, a thing directly opposite to the iudgement of all men.

Orthodoxus.

Tertullian, Cyprian, Chrysostome and others, so oft as they expelled Diuels by sole prayer and fasting alone: so oft no doubt, they effected true miracles. Howbeit, no such power­full [Page 176] expelling of Spirits and Diuels hath been hitherto pro­ued in any one of them all: and therefore (notwithstanding any thing you prate to the contrary) the working of miracles might be ceased long time before their daies.

Otherwaies, if it be vndoubtedlie true, that Spirits and Diuels, either then or now are, and may be expelled by sole prayer and fasting: then surely, the worke it selfe (notwith­standing the force of your second reason) is vndoubtedly a miraculous worke, as in our ninth and tenth Dialogues verie plainely appeareth.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 60.Why sir, that can be no miracle which is wrought by meanes thereunto appointed of God: because then (as Da­naeus affirmeth) the number of miracles would grow to be in­finite.

Orthodoxus.

Admitte the case to be euen so as Danaeus (by your speech) reportes it to be: and doe tell vs withall whether Danaeus in the place you pretend, or in any other of his writings deni­eth the driuing out of Diuels, by sole prayer and fasting, to be a miraculous worke: and then you shall haue our answere vnto it. In the meane time (howsoeuer you for your credit, pretend the contrarie with glosing termes) declare now at length very conscionably and plainely vnto vs, whether you accompt not the conuersion and calling of Isaiah the Pro­phet a very miraculous worke: Isa. 6.7 8. As for the conuersion of sinners, the conception of children, the sustentation of nature, the ferti­litie of fields, and such other like instaunces produced by you to illustrate this point: they make nothing at all to your purpose in hand. For howsoeuer the conuersion of sinners, the conception of children, the sustentation of nature, and fruitfulnes of fields, are euery of them ordinarily accom­plished by their peculiar and proper meanes appointed of God:Isa. 51.18. 1. Cor. 4.15. 2. Pet. 2.2. Philem. 10. Gal. 4.19. Gen. 2.28. Deut. 8.3. Matth. 4.4. Gen. 2.15. namelie, by powerfull preaching, by the naturall co­pulation of man and woman, by corporall sustenance, by ploughing, by sowing, and so forth: yet, doe tell vs I pray you, whether prayer it selfe bee not also appointed of God, as an ordinarie fruite of faith, for the sanctifying of all those the aforesaid ordinarie meanes, to their sette and appointed ends?

Exorcistes.
[Page 177]

Who (being well in his wits) will euer denie the same?

Orthodoxus.

Well then, be it supposed that all those the aforesaid ope­rations, namely, the conuersion of sinners, the conception of children, the sustentation of nature, and the fruitfulnesse of fields; should euery of them be forthwith effected by sole prayer alone, without any ordinary vse of any the forenamed meanes: were not euery of those the aforesaid operations (not­withstanding any your said praiers) to be euery of them ac­compted miraculous actions?

Exorcistes.

Yes no doubt,D. Doctrine, pag. 61. euery of those the forenamed operations (being so effected by sole prayer alone) they were then to be repu [...]ed miraculous actions.

Orthodoxus.

But, how comes it to passe (I pray you) that such naturall operations, so effected by sole prayer alone, should forthwith be deemed miraculous actions: and the supernatural expelling of Satan by sole praier alone, should be no miracle in any respect?

Exorcistes.

The reason is,D. Doctrine, pag. 61. because prayer alone is the onely spirituall meanes, ordeined by God to that supernaturall worke: where­as those other naturall operations doe euery of them enioy (by the singular appointment of God) their sundrie peculiar meanes besides.

Orthodoxus.

Howsoeuer you would seeme to insinuate vnto vs, that sole prayer is an ordinarie and peculiar meanes appointed by God, for the powerfull expelling of Diuels: very certaine I am, you shall neuer be able to proue sole prayer and fasting a purposed ordinance of Christ, to any such speciall worke.

Besides that, if you were able in deed, to proue it so: yet then also, euen those your pretended speciall meanes, they could not possiblie of themselues expell either Spirite or DiuellD. Doctrine, pag. 59. But that supernaturall worke, it must (as good Master Darell affirmeth) be necessarilie effected, by the onely abso­lute authoritie and power of Iesus Christ.

Exorcistes.

Very true,D. Doctrine, pag. 59. Christ being earnestly intreated by sole prayer [Page 178] alone: doth (of his owne absolute authoritie) cast forth the Diuell.

Orthodoxus.

Then is it not the force of your prayer: but the absolute au­thoritie and power of Christ, that expelleth the Diuell. A thing very well knowen to Master Darell himselfe;D. Doctrine, pag. 66. and therefore he telleth vs confidently, that the seuen in Lanca­shire, W. Sommers, and the other two, I meane, Th. Darling, and K. Wright, D. Doctrine. pag. 55. Exod. 8.19. Luk. 11.20. were in deed essentiallie possessed of Satan: and being so, were vndoubtedly dispossessed by the finger of God, which said finger of God was euermore a miraculous manner of expelling Spirits and Diuels. Notwithstanding all this, how could your selfe apprehend, and applie that absolute au­thoritie and power of Christ; without the meanes and helpe of a miraculous faith?

Exorcistes.

D. Detection, pag. 49.In deed I must and doe freely confesse, that faith also (in that selfesame admirable action) is necessarily required for the powerfull apprehending and applying of that absolute authoritie of Iesus Christ.

Orthodoxus.

Then not any force of your prayer entreating, but the pow­er of your faith apprehending and applying the absolute au­thoritie of Christ, was the meanes alone that effected the worke: and so your pretended false meanes of sole prayer and fasting falles flat in the dust. But goe to, sith faith (as you say now) is required in that action; what manner of faith doe you meane? The miraculous faith is ceased you know: and the iustifying faith it may not possiblie be, as in our ninth Dialogue is plainely declared. And therfore it must (by your owne speech) be the historicall faith, or no faith at all.

Exorcistes.

D. Detection, pag. 49.Very true as you say. For howsoeuer the iustifying faith be (in deed) the best, and were to be wished in this speciall case: yet notwithstanding the faith temporarie, or the historicall faith may fullie suffice for the expelling of Satan after this manner, or by this ordinary meanes. Which standeth not so much in the faith of the person vsed therein, as in the mercie of God apprehended thereby: man vsing the meanes which the Lord (to that end) hath ordained.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 179]

This answere of yours is fearefullie fraught with manie irreligious and absurde assertions. For first you therein verie groslie bewray an vnspeakeable Pride: presuming to con­troll the abolute wisedome of the onlie wise God. Rom. 16.27. Who ha­uing instituted the onlie miraculous faith for the powerfull expelling of diuels: you your selfe doe proudly oppose your idle conceit to his said absolute wisdome, auouching very pre­sumptuouslie the iustifying faith farre better, and much more to be wished in this speciall case.

Secondly, you doe in the following speech very fondlie dallie with your former assertion. For if the temporarie, or the historicall faith may fullie suffice to the powerfull expelling of Satan, the supposed ordinarie meanes being vsed therwith: how should the iustifying faith be farre better, and much more to be wished in this speciall case?

Besides that, it is very absurd to auouch that the only histori­call faith may fullie suffice for doing the deed; because then one diuell may possiblie driue forth another: Iam. 2.19. for they haue the historicall faith, as fullie as the best of you all. And so by consequence, you therein doe giue a very daungerous blow to Christ his argument, Matth. 12.26. drawen from the absurditie of such an assertion: telling vs plainely it is to too absurde to imagine a dispossessing of one diuell, by the help of another: because, if Satan be deuided against Satan, his kingdome it cannot possiblie endure.

Moreouer, whereas your selfe so confidentlie auouch, that the expelling of diuels by such your falsly pretended meanes, doth not stand so much in the faith of the person for that action imployed, as in the mercies of God apprehended there­by: you doe directly crosse M. Darel himselfe,D. Doctrine, pag. 106. who telleth vs confidentlie, that this worke may well be effected by any one reprobate. But this also we suppose is vtterlie vntrue. For if the timely accomplishment of that speciall worke, consistes (as you say your selfe) in the only apprehension of the mercies of God: then surely no reprobate may possiblie driue forth a diuell. Rom. 14.23. Heb. 11.6. Because a reprobate (being vtterly destitute of the true sauing faith) he cannot possiblie please the Lord, nor any wayes apprehend his said mercies in Iesus Christ.

Yea,Matth. 7.22. and (which more is) your owne quoted scriptures doe [Page 180] plainely declare,Matth. 7.22. that reprobates (if at any time they cast forth diuels) they accomplish that worke by the miraculous faith; as by an extraordinarie meanes appointed of God, to that speciall busines. And therefore (notwithstanding anie of these your supposed reasons) it is very apparant, that (if diuels at any time be driuen out of men) the worke it selfe is a miraculous action: yea, albeit the same (as you say) should be effected in deed by the onlie meanes of your prayer. Euen as many other things els haue beene brought to passe by the prayers of sundrie persons: and yet notwithstanding the actions themselues, they were vndoubted true miracles, as in our ninth and tenth Dialogues appeareth at large.

Besides all this, euen the very instances themselues which you produce for your purpose: they all import so much as I say.1. King. 2.8. 2. King. 6.10. Mark 7.33. Ioh. 9.6.7. Namely the deuiding of Iorden by Eluah his cloake: the curing of Naamans leprosie, by washing seauen times in Ior­den: the opening of the dumbe mans eares, by the touch of Christs finger, and the loosing of his tongue by his spattle: his curing of the blind by a playster of clay, and by washing in Silo­am: with sundry such other besides, as in our tenth Dialogue doth plainely appeare.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 61.These outward things or actions which were sometimes practised by the Prophets, Apostles, and others in the wor­king of miracles, they were not vsed as meanes, but as signes: when, and accordingly as the actors themselues perceiued them profitable for the people present.

Orthodoxus.

Why man, what more profit might grow to the people of God: by vsing them rather as signes, then as meanes of those their miraculous actions?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 61.They vsed them rather as signes, then as meanes, happilie to trie the beholders faith the better thereby, or imprint the worke wrought the more in the beholders mindes, and parties cured; or for some other speciall purpose, best knowen to the Lord.

Orthodoxus.

Your Diuinitie (it should seeme) is but sillie Diuinitie, standing (for the most part) vpon sillie and doubtfull grounds: [Page 181] namelie, eyther vpon hap and hap hazard, or vpon some o­ther fickle foundation you wot not well what. And yet not­withstanding, you do no lesse impudentlie auouch the same for an infallible truth, then if you meant to out-face the whole world with the sway of your words. But good Exor­cistes, doe tell vs directly, how any mans faith may the better be tried, or the action it selfe more deepely imprinted in the beholders breasts; by making those accidentall matters to be rather the signes, thē the meanes of such miraculous actions.

Moreouer, in auouching those matters to be rather the signes, then the meanes of such miraculous actions: you doe therein directly conclude, that euery of those admirable acti­ons, whereof those outward matters are onely but signes, and no meanes, D. Doctrine, pag. 61. were vndoubtedly true miracles. Because (saith good Master Darel) whatsoeuer is brought to passe without meanes, that same is a miracle: as we haue handled at large in Oth, and mopeth, in semeion & teras, throughout our tenth Dialogue. But what might be the maine reason it selfe, which makes you so carefull in auoyding the word meanes: and so egerlie to take vp the word signes concerning this point?

Exorcistes.

I purposelie do it,D. Doctrine, pag. 61. to proue all those the aforesaid strange actions no miracles at all, how wonderfull soeuer in shew. For whatsoeuer is brought to passe by meanes, is no miracle: be­cause of the same meanes.

Orthodoxus.

If for this onlie respect you denie those outward matters to be meanes, and onlie auouch them to be but bare signes of the action effected: then surely, you therein doe make those selfesame actions (whereof such outward matters are onelie but signes) to be much more miraculous, then if these outward matters themselues had beene some meanes at the least to accomplish the action. And so by consequence, the dispossessing of those your Demoniakes, it was an action very miraculous: as hauing no meanes at all to effect the same.

Exorcistes.

Yes sir,D. Doctrine, pag. 55. they had prayer and fasting: as the onelie appoin­ted meanes to that special worke.

Orthodoxus.

Yea, but you flatlie denie those outward matters whatso­euer, [Page 182] to be thereunto any meanes at all: and do auouch them to be but the onlie bare signes of such actions effected.

Exorcistes.

I denied those other matters, which were mentioned be­fore in the Propheticall and Apostolicall operations, to be anie meanes at all: and did make them but the onelie bare signes of those their miraculous actions. Howbeit, I euer haue held, and doe confidently auouch, that prayer and fasting is a pe­culiar meanes appointed by God; for the perpetuall expel­ling of spirits and diuels.

Orthodoxus.

This your pretended ordinance of prayer and fasting, ha­uing hitherto beene often denied, and neuer yet by your selfe confirmed for truth: it is to little, or no purpose to in­sist (as you doe) vpon one and the selfesame point. Besides that,Ioh. 11.41. Act. 9.40. D. Doctrine, pag. 63. your selfe hauing spoken elsewhere of the prayers of Christ, of Peter and others in the working of miracles; you make their said prayers to be onely but signes and no meanes of their miracles.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 63.Very true as you say. For they expelled Diuels by a com­maunding power, not by any intreating word: and therefore, if at any time they prayed at their working of miracles, they vsed not those their said prayers as any appointed meanes leading to the action intended, but rather, in regard of the people present. To teach them thereby, that whensoeuer they effected miraculous actions, they wrought not those works by any godlinesse or power of their owne: Act. 3.12. Act. 3.16. 1. Pet. 1.21. but by the on­ly immediate power of him whom they called vpon.

Orthodoxus.

Well, be it so as you say. But declare plainely vnto vs I pray you, your owne purpose in praying also at the dispossession of those your pretended Demoniakes. Was it to perswade the people, that your selfe expelled those diuels by any your owne godlines, or power of your prayers: and not rather, to teach them, that the diuels (so expelled) were vndoubtedly driuen forth by the onely power of him, vpon whom you did call by your feruent prayers?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 63.We purposely praid (I must needs confesse) to teach the [Page 183] beholders: that the worke was effected, by the onely power of him, to whom we put vp our prayers.

Orthodoxus.

Herein then you confesse at vnwares, that your said pray­er and fasting was no meanes at all for those your pretended dispossessings of Satan, but only a bare signe of the absolute power of Christ which draue forth the diuell: and so (by conse­quence) you doe fully conclude, that your expelling of Di­uels by prayer and fasting (if any such were) was also a mira­culous worke.

Exorcistes.

I denie such a driuing out of diuels, D. Doctrine, pag. 60. to be any miracle at all: and doe very confidently auouch, that prayer and fa­sting (in such sort obserued) is a supernaturall medicine, for the timely curing of supernaturall diseases.

Orthodoxus.

If prayer and fasting be (as you say) a supernaturall me­dicine for supernaturall diseases: why then are not parties be­witched, deliuered (in like manner) from those their torments, by the onely meanes of prayer and fasting?

Exorcistes.

Had we the like Scriptures for the extraordinarie curing of parties bewitched, D. Doctrine, pag. 64, by prayer & fasting, as we haue for the admi­rable dispossessing of parties possessed: we would not then doubt, but that the one might therby be helped as well as the other.

Orthodoxus.

But, tell vs in good earnest, haue you not as full warrant from Scripture, for the curing of parties bewitched, by prayer and fasting: as you haue for the timely dispossessing of those your pretended Demoniakes?

Exorcistes.

No in very deed,D. Doctrine, pag. 64. we haue not in Scripture the like war­rant for one, which we haue for the other.

Orthodoxus.

By what warrant then, did you vndertake the pretended dispossession of Kath. Wright, of Th. Darling, of W. Sommers, and of those seuen also in Lancashire: if you had no Scripture to warrant the vndertaking of any such course?

Exorcistes.

Yes sir, we had Scripture to warrant whatsoeuer we en­terprised [Page 184] concerning those seuerall persons. For they being all essentially possessed by Satan, D. Doctrine, pag. 37.55. we vsed prayer and fasting in their timely dispossessing: and this also according to the established ordinance of Christ himselfe.

Orthodoxus.

For this your often pretended ordinance establisht by Christ, you haue sufficiently heard before: and therefore it were meerely superfluous to enter thereon afresh, especially your selfe propounding no fresh arguments to mannage the same. But good Exorcistes, tell vs here without halting, whe­ther you doe verelie hold, that those tenne persons aforesaid, were all of them essentiallie possessed of Satan.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 66.I make no doubt thereof: and it were meere madnesse for any to call that in question, it being so apparantly and so crediblie auouched.

Orthodoxus.

Well then, we will (for the present) forbeare to call it in question afresh: for feare of being reputed by your selfe, to bee more then madde. But come on, shew vs directly, by what meanes the Diuell did essentiallie enter into euery of them. Goe to man, neuer pawse at the matter, but tell the truth and shame the Diuell.

Exorcistes.

What skils it how the Diuell entred into them: sith it is apparantly euident, they were all essentiallie possessed?

Orthodoxus.

It skilled not greatly: were we not all desirous to heare the truth hereof from your owne mouth. Howbeit, because either your memorie failes you herein, or for that else, you are vtterly vnwilling that any should know the mysteries of this your new found trade: S. Harsnettes discouerie, in pag. 304.310. D. Apologie, pag. 29. D. Detection, pag. 81. D. 1. Narration, pag. 1. D. 2. Narration, pag. 17. let Master Darell be deemed in­different betweene vs both, to discouer these matters. For he telleth vs plainely, that Margaret Roper bewitched Ka­therine Wright: that Alice Goodridge sent her Spirite called Minnie, to torment Thomas Darling in all the parts of his body: that William Sommers was strongely possessed by a Witch in Worcestershire, who sent her spirit (called Lucie) into him, by giuing him a peece of bread and butter, and all this for a hat, and a hat band: and that Edmund Hartlay (a supposed [Page 185] Coniurer) by kissing the seuen in Lancashire, did breath the Diuell into euery of them. These are Master Darels re­ports concerning the essentiall possessions of those tenne seue­rall persons: tell vs therefore what you say to these his re­ports, and whether you hold them for truthes?

Exorcistes.

Yea, I doe hold them all for infallible truthes.

Orthodoxus.

It seemeth then that (these tenne persons being only bewit­ched, and not essentiallie possessed) you had not the like scripture for the curing of them, as (it seemes) you haue for parties posses­sed. And so by consequence, you your selfe obseruing in their seuerall cures the selfesame ordinance, which Christ (you say) hath onely establisht for parties possessed: you delt altogether therein without warrant from scripture.

Exorcistes.

Not so, for there is (you must note) an apparant difference betweene essentiall possessing, and an actuall bewitching: and therefore howsoeuer those tenne persons were all vexed of Sa­than, by the only meanes of foure seuerall Witches; yet was the Diuell essentiallie inherent in euery of their bodies: and so they (being euery of them essentiallie possessed) were also effectuallie dispossessed by prayer and fasting. Whereas all other actuall be­witchings of Sathan, they are only but externall vexations by spirits and diuels: and therefore the parties bewitched not being essentiallie possessed, we haue not the like scripture for them which we haue for the other.

Orthodoxus.

A man (no doubt) may highly commend your dexteritie in finding a present shift, when you are hardly beset. For, how­soeuer you were here (on the sodaine) depriued of a lyars me­morie, you are not destitute (I perceiue) of a womans wit, you haue your answeres so readie to help at a pinch. But go to, do tell vs I pray you, whether essentiall possessings, and actuall bewit­chings be not both of them supernaturall diseases?

Exorcistes.

Yes,D. Doctrine▪ pag. 64. I confesse they are both of them supernaturall diseases, and inflicted also by Sathan himselfe.

Orthodoxus.

Then surely, that supernaturall medicine which accompli­sheth [Page 186] the cure of the one, it must also effectuallie worke the cure of the other. D. Detection, pag. 41. But prayer and fasting (you say) is a supernaturall medicine to cure supernaturall vexations in parties possessed: and therefore also a supernaturall medicine, to cure supernaturall vexations in parties bewitched.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 64.It is euen so I confesse: neither is there any other way or meanes for the curing of such, but only prayer and fasting, vn­lesse haplie they will go to the Diuell for help, as many haue done, and yet do.

Orthodoxus.

Your answeres (I perceiue) they growe very giddie, for prayer and fasting was but euen now no way or meanes appro­ued by scripture to cure the supernaturall vexations of parties bewitched: and now the same is become on the sodaine, the only way or meanes thereto, vnlesse haplie men will go to the Diuell for help. Well then, for as much as you make them now (by your new edition) the only way or meanes to cure the su­pernaturall vexations also of parties bewitched: why do you not practise that selfesame meanes, and make apparantly euident those selfesame effects of sole prayer and fasting in parties bewit­ched, which you falsely pretend in parties possessed?

Besides that your speech it is to too absurd concerning the peoples going to the Diuell for help: for, neither haue the bewit­ched parties any power of themselues to go (at their owne plea­sures) to the Diuell for such a supposed help, without some se­cret purpose of God, and so you make the Lord some secret pa­trone to such sinister practises: neyther yet (if haplie they at­tempt such a course) can one Diuell possiblie driue forth ano­thee, if Christ his argument be any thing currant,Matth. 12.26. as we told you before.

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 65.Why sir, your owne speech importeth, that parties bewit­ched can haue no help at all but from God: and therefore let them fast and pray, and neuer giue ouer, till they haue receiued some comfortable answere from God.

Orthodoxus.

But seeing they haue no warrant thereto from the scrip­tures, as you confessed before: how should they possiblie (by their said prayer and fasting) conceiue either hope of ease, or ex­pect [Page 187] any fauourable answere from God? Rom. 14.23. For, whatsoeuer is not done of faith, is sinne: and nothing may be said to be done of faith, which hath not it warranted ground from the scripture. Notwithstanding, be it supposed that the parties bewitched, should (in such an vnwarranted course) present their feruent and often prayers to God in vaine: what then were best to be done in this case?

Exorcistes.

Then let them ioyne fasting therewith. D. Doctrine, pag. 65. For, seeing none for a temporall iudgement haue more cause to be humbled then they, and that fasting is a meanes to humble our harts: who should more fast (I beseech you) then such? and so seeke (by prayer and fasting) to remoue that heauie hand of God which lieth pressing vpon them, and which cannot otherwise be pos­siblie remoued, but to their further hurt.

Orthodoxus.

Your answeres are fallen at deadlie debate among them­selues. For, before you had no scripture to warrant their curing of parties bewitched by prayer and fasting: and now, you make prayer and fasting the only cure, except they will run to the Di­uell for help, and so procure more hurt to themselues. Prayer and fasting, they are made I perceiue (ex opere operato) your only salue for all manner of sores. But how dare you thus boldlie aduenture to giue these variable aduises, without any warrant from scripture? You haue hitherto very falsely pretended an established ordinance from Christ, for the curing of parties pos­sessed, by prayer and fasting: and now here againe, you do no lesse prowdlie presume of your selfe to institute another new ordinance, for the curing of parties bewitched, by prayer and fa­sting, without any warrant from scripture, as your selfe confes­sed before. Whither will not the height of your pride procure your vnrulie penne?

Briefely in saying there is (for parties bewitched) no ordinarie help prescribed in all the scriptures, and yet notwithstanding dare thus boldlie auouch an established ordinance from Christ for parties possessed: you do therein make the parties bewitched to lye vnder an heauier iudgement of God, then do any the par­ties possessed. And so by consequence to be in a much more fearefull cōdition: as hauing no meanes at all for their cure, but only a deuise of your owne, without any warrant frō scripture.

Exorcistes.
[Page 188]

D. Doctrine, pag. 65. Iudg. 20.26. 1. Sam. 7.6. &c. 2. Chro. 20.3. Ezra. 8.23. Ester. 3.13. Ionah. 3.4 5. Neh. 1.4. Act. 12.6.7.Though we haue not like speciall scriptures for parties bewit­ched, as we haue for parties possessed; yet haue we great store of generall scriptures, which teach vs to remoue all iudgements whatsoeuer by prayer and fasting: and so by consequence they teach the timely remouing also of this one speciall iudgement, by that selfesame speciall practise. And therefore, if (in such or­derly practise of prayer and fasting) the parties bewitched ob­taine not their purpose: yet shall not their labours therein be be­stowed in vaine, but they shall haue great comfort in doing their dutie; yea, they shall haue their afflictions sanctified vnto them, and made a meanes of much good to their soules.

Orthodoxus.

Isa. 22.12. Ioel. 1.13.14. and 2.1.You haue generall scriptures to call vnto humiliation: but no scriptures generall or speciall, which teach men, that sole prayer and fasting haue any power of themselues (ex opere operato) to remoue supernaturall iudgements of God. And therefore the parties whatsoeuer, which practise prayer and fasting to any such purpose: they can haue no comfort at all by the vnwar­rantable practise of that which they do not certeinly know, is a dutie enioyned them by God. But this knowledge they cannot certeinly haue without some warrant from scripture, howsoeuer your selfe do prowdlie presume to prescribe them such manner of practise. Neither can you certeinly say, that the parties shall be sure (by such an vnwarranted practise) either to haue their purpose obtayned, or their afflictions sanctified vnto thē at least, and made a meanes of much good to their soules: because you are not (as we verily suppose) so deepely engaged in such secret counsels of God, as that you are able to know certeinely the one or the other.Deut. 29.29. Much lesse may you so certeinly auouch, that their bewitched condition shall be made a meanes of much good to their soules: vnlesse you could certeinely say, that the parties themselues are within the secret election of God. Howbeit, what might be that great good (I beseech you) which their said affliction shall procure to their soules?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine. pag. 65.It is this. Namely, though they themselues in their out­ward man (I meane in their bodies) be marueilously afflicted still: yet in their inner man they shall be renued daily more and more.

Orthodoxus.
[Page 189]

Then is it not good to be freed at all from those their su­pernaturall afflictions: because the more their bodies be pressed therewith, the more shall their soules be bettered in the work of their spirituall renouation. But where haue you warrant from Scripture, that the supernaturall vexations inflicted on parties bewitched, should so effectually worke to the renew­ing of their soules? Are you not ashamed thus rouingly to raunge with your penne, about a pretended new ordinance for the powerfull expelling of Diuels by sole prayer and fasting: which (albeit you should runne your selfe out of breath) you will neuer be able to proue?

Exorcistes.

Suppose I am herein also deceiued,D. Doctrine, pag. 65. and that there is no such ordinance of Christ, as I affirme, and that prayer and fa­sting is no medicine appointed by God, and left to his Church for the timely curing of such as are possessed of Satan: 1. Pet. 5.9. yet see­ing wee are streightly commaunded to resist the Diuell (not only in tempting, but also in possessing) and haue a promise, that (wee so resisting) the Diuell vndoubtedly will or shall flee from vs: who seeth not that there was good and iust cause to take vp this holie exercise of prayer and fasting, and suffi­cient in Scripture to warrant the same?

Orthodoxus.

Suppose your supposals were as vndoubtedly true, as you verily suppose, and make no question but they be: haue you not then made a proper peece of work, in broching thus bu­sily so dangerous a garboyle, about Goates wooll or moone-shine in water? Notwithstanding, whether wee suppose your sup­posals to be true or false, such an ordinance forsooth, it seemes you will haue it to be by hooke or by crooke: otherwise you will make S. Peter his generall exhortation to cracke, by buil­ding vpon it perforce, a resistance of Satan, not only in temp­ting; but also in possessing. As though all Christians whatsoe­uer, which are continually tempted, are also essentially possessed of Satan. Amand. Pola­nus, in Syllog. Thess. de verbo Dei Didast. pag. 124. But deale plainly (Exorcistes) and tell vs euen in the integritie of your conscience, and before the presence of the al-seeing God: whether you verely thinke the holie Ghost (in that portion of scripture) had any respect at all to those your supposed essentiall possessions of Diuels? If yea, wee [Page 190] pray you then demonstrate the same more apparantly to our dull vnderstanding: if no, then how should that portion of scripture giue any such warrant to the vnorderly practise of that your pretended new ordinance of prayer and fasting?

Exorcistes.

D. Doctrine, pag. 66.Well, be it further granted, not onely that prayer and fa­sting is no such meanes, as I affirme it to be, but also that none of the forenamed persons were essentially possessed: yet there is notwithstanding sufficient to iustifie the aduice I gaue, and the worke of our hands. Because it is apparantly euident they were all vexed by Satan; if not essentially within them, yet by some externall operation of his: or at least were otherwise afflicted. If not so, that yet the hand or iudgement of God was one way or other vpon them.

Orthodoxus.

Your disputing about these intricate points, is not vtterlie vnlike to the countrey yong Gallant his dauncing a galliard: who comming on open stage hand in hand with his mate, at the first beginning of all they shake hands and sunder them­selues, neuer ioyning their hands together againe before the daunce be quite done. But the gallant in the meane time hee keepes a flouncing and frisking about; as though he would teach the whole world a new tricke in dauncing. So surely you play the yong gallant in this your idle discourse. For in the ve­rie title of your booke you come hand in hand with some straunge and grieuous vexation by Satan, and then (shaking hands at the first with that your assertion) you neuer ioyne hands with the same, before the full period of this your rouing discourse: but keepe (in the meane time) a vengeable coyle about the essentiall possessions and dispossessions of Diuels by fa­sting and prayer, as by a perpetuall ordinance, purposely esta­blisht by Christ for that selfesame purpose. But now (being growne very wearie with your violent fiskings and figgings about those your idle vagaries) you begin to ioyne hands a­fresh with that your former assertion: which only concerneth Satan his grieuous vexations.

Howbeit, you are fallen giddie (it seemes) by reason of your too often tripping and turning about, or otherwise so fearefully possest with the turne-about sicknes, as you wot not well what you say: but onely imagine that those your pre­tended [Page 191] Demoniakes were all vexed by Satan, if not essentiallie within them, yet by some externall operation of his, or at least were otherwaies afflicted. If not so, that yet the hand or iudge­ment of God was one way or other vpon them; but by what way or meanes you know not your selfe. And yet forsooth (as if all your idle conceits were certaine Oracles from Apollo Py­thius at Delphos) you dare proudly presume to iustifie there­by the aduice you gaue, and the worke of your hands con­cerning the same. An aduice you know not wherein, and a worke you wot not well whereabouts, as it seemes by your words: and therefore how could you (in such doubtfull vn­certainties) either pray in faith, or expect any blessing in hope? Notwithstanding, what was the aduice you gaue? and wherein (I pray you) consisted the worke of your hands?

Exorcistes.

The aduice which I gaue,D.Doctrine, pag. 66. Iudg. 20.26. 1. Sam. 7.6. 2. Chro. 20 3. Ezra 8.3. Ester. 3.13. Ionah. 3.4.5. Neh. 1 4. Act. 12.6.7. and the worke which wee pra­ctised was prayer and fasting, being thereunto secretly sum­moned by the Lord himselfe: who (so oft as he inflicteth any iudgement vpon vs) doth put vs in minde of girding in sack­cloth, as appeares in sundrie places of Scripture.

Orthodoxus.

Yea, but how could you possiblie conceiue any certaine forme of prayer, or faithfully put vp any feruent petition to God; not knowing certainly before with what kinde of iudgement the parties themselues were presently afflicted? Put case they were not afflicted at all, or molested only but with some me­lancholike passion: how then could you vse words in your prayer concerning the speedie remouing of Satan his suppo­sed essentiall possession, hee hauing in the partie distressed no such possession at all?

Againe, suppose the parties were vexed with some kind of sicknes vnknowne to your selfe, and you put vp petitions to God concerning only some other disease: how could you vse your proper termes to expresse the desire of your heart, or put vp your praiers in faith to God, Matth. 7.7. Mark. 11.24. Ioh. 14.13. and 16.23. Iam. 1.6. for the speedie remoouing of a iudgement you wot not what? Is it not more then audacious impudencie, thus presumptuouslie to determine a certaine course, in any such doubtfull vncertainties? As for your quo­ted scriptures, they only doe testifie the peoples humiliation by prayer and fasting; so oft as any straunge iudgement of God [Page 192] was fearefully inflicted vpon them: but proue not essentiall possessions, and dispossessions of Diuels by prayer and fasting, as by a speciall ordinance perpetuallie establisht by Christ for that selfesame purpose. And therefore they conclude not the cause you pretend: but rather the contrarie. Neither doe a­ny of those scriptures import the thing it selfe, for the which you produce them: my meaning is, they doe no waies de­monstrate vnto vs, that any one of those iudgements of God were at any time remooued by sole prayer and fasting alone, without the ordinarie assistance of some other ordinarie meanes annexed thereto. Or if any the said iudgements of God were forthwith remoued by sole prayer alone, without a­ny ordinarie meanes besides: then surely the said worke it was vndoubtedly a miraculous action.

As for example, in Iudges, the people of Israel (intending a iust reuenge vpon the Beniamites for their so shamefull dis­order) they prayed and fasted before: Iudg. 20.26.35. howbeit, the Israelites sword and speare was the ordinarie meanes whereby the Lord ouerthrew the Beniamites.

So, in Samuel againe (being to wage warre with the Phili­stims) they prayed and fasted for their happie deliuerance:1. Sam. 7.6.10.11. but yet the sudden thunder of God was the matter that daunted the Philistims hearts, and the Israelites weapons the only or­dinarie meanes that made so bloudie a massacre among the whole armie.

2. Chro. 20.3.22So in the Chronicles, the Israelites (being to warre with the Ammonites) they prepared themselues to the battell by prayer and fasting: howbeit, the slaughter of the Ammonites, it was effected by meanes of the intestine dissentions among them­selues.

So in Ester, the Iewes (being proscribed and destinated to a fearefull destruction) they prayed and fasted for their hoped deliuerance:Ester. 4.3.16. notwithstanding the personall presence and prudent perswasions of Ester, were the ordinarie meanes which pacified Ahashuerosh his anger against them.

So in Ionah, the Niniuites (being threatned with present destruction) they prayed and fasted: Ionah. 3.5.10. howbeit, their faithfull conuersion (whereof their said prayer and fasting were onely but frui [...]es) was the ordinarie meanes that turned away their threatned destruction.

[Page 193]So likewise Nehemiah, Nehem. 1.4. and 2.18.20. Moses Pellache [...] ibidem. hee prayed and fasted to testifie his faith towards God, his loue to his people, and sorrow for that their present condition: howbeit the industrie and diligent labour of skilfull artificers, was the ordinarie meanes that erected their Ci­tie.

So in the Acts, the people they prayed and fasted for Peters deliuerance: Act. 12.5.7. but yet Peter was extraordinarilie and miracu­louslie deliuered by the Angels meanes. By all the premisses you see it apparantly euident,M.Dent his [...]athwa [...]e to heauen. pa. 248. that sole prayer [...]lone is not the onlie meanes; but that rather which fau [...]tinieth some other ordi­nary meanes, for the timelie remouing of any the iudgements of God.

Neyther can you possiblie propound any one instance from out of the scriptur [...]s, wher [...]in [...]le pra [...]r and fasting a­lone (without some other [...] meanes concurring therewith) did euer effect an [...]e worke whatsoeuer: but the same was euermore reputed a miraculous action. And ther­fore do you plainly auouch, that (in euery of those your pre­tended dispossessions by sole praier & fasting) you wrought true miracles: or els now at the length giue ouer your grosse errors for shame. Yea, and this so much the rather, by how much you may plainelie perceiue, that the faster you runne the further you roane from the marke, and the more you seeke to confirme, the more you confound your owne cause. Being now brought (you may see) to such issue, as you know not what to make of the matter it selfe which you labour to mannage. Neyther yet can certainelie tell vs whether it was an inward possession, or an outward vexation. Or whether it was neyther of both, but some other straunge iudgement of God: or whether it was the hand of God some one way or other vp­on them, but what way you know not. And yet notwith­standing, you dare proudlie determine these intricate mat­ters: as if they were certainelie reuealed vnto you by an An­gell from heauen.

Exorcistes.

Whatsoeuer you say to the contrarie, the parties we speak of, they were euery of them essentiallie possessed of Satan, and dispossessed also by meanes of our prayer and fasting: yea, and these things we hold very confidentlie without any doub­ting at all. Neyther will wee be otherwaies perswaded: [Page 194] though an Angell from heauen should come and tell vs the con­trarie. M. More a­uouched so much in a con­ference be­tweene the au­thors and him. Gal. 4.18.

Orthodoxus.

It is very commendable to be confident in a good and com­mendable cause, both when you are present and absent. As for your present purpose in hand, it were much better to ac­knowledge the ignorance of your soule, and freelie to confesse that you hold a lie in your right hand: Eccles. 4.25. Isa. 44.20. then with such setled pertinacie to persist (as you do) in your peeuish opinions, and thus blasphemouslie to prophane the Apostles speech concer­ning the infallible testimonie of an Angell from heauen. For hereby you giue all good men a iust occasion,Gal. 18.9. not onely to suspect very shrewdlie the sinceritie of your spirit: but also (af­ter twise or thrise admonition) to shew themselues very carefull in fleeing from your person, Tit. 3.10.11. as from a man that sinneth, and persi­steth in sinning, you know very well how.

In the meane time whatsoeuer you haue hitherto sayde for your purpose, it moues not our mindes the breadth of one haire, but maketh vs more confident concerning the goodnes of our owne cause. And so wee meane still to con­tinue vntill your selfe (vpon further conference, and sounder deliberation with your secret fauorites) shall be found able to say more for the matter then hitherto you haue done.

D. Doctrine, pag. 67. M. Darel his owne conclusion retorted vpon himselfe.And therefore now to conclude for the present, and to inferre something of the premisses, and so to proceed to some speciall vses concerning the same. If it be vndoubtedlie true, that men now (in these last dayes) are not essentiallie possessed with diuels, nor dispossessed, and that sole prayer and fasting, they are no speciall meanes appointed purposelie by the Lord him­selfe for their perpetuall dispossessing: but that also, the seauen in Lancashire, and William Sommers with the other two, namelie, Darling and K. Wright were not (in deed) essentially possessed, and being not so, were not dispossessed at all by your pretended ordinarie meanes of prayer and fasting: then let the good Christian Reader iudge, whether those men doe not very groslie erre in the generall, who so confidentlie hold that men (now a dayes) both may be, and are also essentiallie possessed: and those also, who (affirming fullie so much) doe yet further very flatlie auouch, that (euen in these dayes of the Gospell) men possiblie may be, and are also essentially dis­possessed [Page 195] by sole prayer and fasting, as by a speciall ordinaunce established purposelie by our Sauiour Christ to that speciall purpose. And whether those men likewise, be not as faultie in the particular, who cannot (with any patience) endure, that the pretended possession and dispossession of those the fore­named persons (how absurd soeuer) should be impugned by any. Yea, and rather then any sound opposition of truth, to those their palpable vntruthes should gaine a publike pas­sage: they will (by all manner of meanes, directlie or indi­rectlie) contend for a most vaine and friuolous matter: namelie, that the said Sommers, Darling, and K. Wright were no counterfeits. Notwithstanding howsoeuer some in the world (for any thing that may possiblie be sayde to the con­trary) will neuer be brought to acknowledge the infallible truth which we teach, nor disclaime those palpable vntruthes, which your selfe so vndutifully haue broched abrode to the world, and thereupon be moued to giue the Lord that glorie and praise, which is iustlie due to his Maiestie for these his latelie reuealed counsels, concerning these intricate questions: and endeuour withall to make their right vse of euery point (a thing rather to be wished then hoped for) yet wisedome (no doubt) she shall and will be iustified freelie of all her children. Matth. 11.19. And thus much in effect for your two first distributions: namelie, the essentiall possessions and dispossessions of spirits and diuels: which may serue to giue wise men a watchword, till we heare your further determination concerning the same.

Exorcistes.

Well, but what say you now to my third distribution: I meane, the seuerall vses which we are to make of the same.

Orthodoxus.

We will say no more concerning those matters, then that which we haue spokē before: namelie, that in manie of those your supposed vses, there are some thinges to too vnsound and absurd, as in some part of our answeres hath beene part­ly obserued. Notwithstanding were they euerie of them so sound and so currant as you would haue vs imagine: yet could they not gaine at our hands any entertainement or an­swere, before the two precedent points be more substantiallie proued vnto vs. For what one sauorie vse may any man pos­siblie draw from matters vnsauorie: or rather (which more [Page 196] is) from matters not now existing in nature?

Physiologus.

Verie true as you say. And therefore Exorcistes eyther you must presentlie forsake your cause: or more sufficientlie confirme the same, then you haue hitherto done. Otherwise the whole world will forthwith condemne you for a verie per [...]erse and contentious person: very wilfullie bent to your idle conceits without eyther sway of reason, or shew of sense.

Exorcistes.

Well sir, sith you so careleslie reiect those holie and pro­fitable vses, which are drawen from this my Doctrine concer­ning essentiall possessions and dispossessions of diuels: I pray you what one good vse may be made of that which you hold to the contrarie.

Orthodoxus.

I doe no further reiect your said vses then their proper vnsoundnes, and want of sound matter to be grounded vp­on, doth necessarily require at my hands. Howbeit, because you shall not imagine, that we haue broached such opposite points to yours, as cannot possiblie afoorde any profitable vse to the Church or people of God: we are therefore not vnwil­ling to put downe some few vses of many, to make knowen to the world what true vses in deed may soundly be drawen from the soundnesse of our Doctrine. Which being by vs very faithfully propounded, are now authentically priuileged by publike authoritie. Howbeit, because we are almost all weary of this wearisome businesse: let vs walke forth to refresh our selues, for one hower or two: and then proceed in our purpose.

Physiologus.

We all approue of your motion.

The end of the second Dialogue.

The third Dialogue.

THE ARGVMENT.

The holy and right vses, which the Church and children of God are to make of this Doctrine, concerning the finall determination of possessions and dispossessi­ons of Spirits and Diuels.

The speakers names.
  • PHILOLOGVS.
  • LYCANTHROPVS.
  • PNEVMATOMACHVS.
  • PHYSIOLOGVS.
  • ORTHODOXVS.
  • EXORCISTES.

COme on Exorcistes, you doe earnestly expect (I am sure) what holy vses we may possibly make of these our former discoursed opinions: so opposite to yours in euery point.

Exorcistes.

I doe so indeed: neither need you to wonder thereat. For if you so carelesly reiect those seuerall vses which I made before, and onely because there is no matter (as you say) to ground them from: what ground haue your selfe to build a­ny vses vpon; denying so flatly the essentiall possession, and dispossession of Diuels?

Orthodoxus.

Why man, we will draw our vses from the finall determi­nation of possessions and dispossessions: but seeing you are in such expectation thereof, we will no longer protract the time.

Lycanthropus.

Nay sir, we also our selues are all held in as earnest expec­tation thereof, as is Exorcistes, I am sure: and therefore I pray you proceede in your purpose.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherein also you haue to vnder­stand, that the vses whatsoeuer which we entend to put downe from any the precedent points, they are summarilie such as haue a speciall relation, either to the Lord himselfe; or to some other besides.

Pneumatomachus.
[Page 198]

A very excellent order. I pray you therefore proceede in putting downe, first, those seuerall vses which haue a more speciall relation to the Lord himselfe.

Orthodoxus.

The 1. vse. Rom. 3.4. Tit. 1.2. Heb. 6.17.18.Content. First therefore, these our precedent discourses, they offer vnto vs in generall a very holy meditation, concer­ning the vndoubted faithfulnesse and truth of our eternall God. Who (promising foure thousand yeeres fully before to send such a blessed seede of the woman, Gen. 3.15. 1. Pet. 1.19.20. Act. 2.23. as should actually bruse the Serpents head) hath in his owne determined time, very faithfully fulfilled the same by sending his owne Sonne into the world, to accomplish his said eternall decree concer­ning the timely subduing of Satan his kingdome of darke­nesse. This therefore, may serue very fitly to confirme our faith and hope, in the faithfull assurance of all the rest of his promises as yet vnperformed: how impossible soeuer they seeme in our weake apprehension. More especially, it may fully assure our soules of the faithfull performance of that one infallible promise of God, which concerneth the vtter subuersion of Satan his whole kingdome of darkenes, and of the quite treading downe of himselfe, very shortly vnder our feete. Rom. 16.20. Because, whatsoeuer is alreadie fulfilled in part; the same is a very sure pawne to our soules of fulfilling the whole, in that conuenient season which the Lord hath ap­pointed. Let vs therefore (in an holy meditation of this so faithfully performed a promise) be more readie to raise vp our drouping soules with an holy consideration,Heb. 6.11.12. and full as­surance of all the rest of Gods promises. Yea, and whensoe­uer any doubtings (by the suggestions of Satan) shall at any time hereafter arise in our harts, and seeke to surprise our faith and hope concerning the vndoubted certainetie of any one promise of our gratious God: Psal. 42.5.11. and 43.5. let vs forthwith begin to checke our fainting soules, & very earnestly to meditate thus with our selues and say. My Soule be not faithlesse (I pray thee) but faithfull in those the assured promises of God, which chiefely concerne the finall and full subuersion of Satan. For what though he be dayly assaulting, Eph. 6.11.12. 1. Pet. 5.8. Luk. 22. [...]31. suggesting, and temp­ting? what though he seeke dayly to fanne and to winnowe thee, as men winnow wheate? what though he rageth howrely [Page 199] like a cruell red Dragon: Reuel. 12.7. 1. Pet. 5.8. 2. Sam. 12.7.8 Luk. 22.57. and goeth continuallie about like a ramping and roaring Lion to deuoure thee? yea, admit he doth eft soones trip vp thy heeles at vnwares, and giue thee a fearefull fall? yet shall he neuer finallie preuaile against thee; thou canst not finallie lye still in the dust of death;Luk. 22.32. Ioh. 17.20.21. Psalm. 19.13. thy faith cannot finallie faile. No no, thou hast a sure promise from God to go conque­ringlie vpon the Lion and Adder: and to trample the yong Dragon vnder thy foote: yea, the Lord God, he hath promised very shortly to tread Sathan downe vnder thy feete. Rom. 16.20. And what one cause hast thou (I pray thee) to distrust the truth of this promise, Heb. 12.1. thou hauing especiallie such a sure earnest pennie there­of, in the faithfull performance of other his faithfull promises? Heb. 12.12.13. 2. Pet. 3.9. Gen. 3.1 [...]. Let not any supposed lingring delay procure in thee a langui­shing hope. Consider the Lord his experimented faithfulnes con­cerning that promised seed which was actuallie to bruse the ser­pents head. That promise being solemnely pronounced vpon Adam his fall, was foure thousand yeares after very faithfullie fulfilled in Christ: and therefore this his latter giuen promise cō ­cerning the treading downe of Sathan vnder thy feete, it shall in his certaine appointed time be certainely performed vnto thee. For as all times with the Lord are presentlie present,2. Pet. 3.8. Mal. 3.6. Iam. 1.17. and there­fore, no forgetfulnes may possiblie lodge with his maiestie: so is there with him no shadow of change, and therefore he will vn­doubtedly performe whatsoeuer he hath certainely promised.

Lycanthropus.

This (I assure you) is a most comfortable vse for Christian consciences: I pray you proceede in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

I will. [...]he. 2. vse. This doctrine againe as it franklie affordeth an holie meditation cōcerning the faithfulnes and truth of God: so doth it no lesse freelie offer vnto vs a very deepe and sacred conside­ration concerning the omnisufficiencie of our all-sufficient Crea­tor, Gen. 17.1. and of the exceeding mightie power of his ouer-ruling arme ouer euerie of his creatures of what nature or kind soeuer. Yea euen ouer those the intellectuall spirits, Reuel. 12.10. 1. Pet. [...].8. Reuel. 12.3. 2. Cor. 11.3. Reuel. 12▪9. Ioh. 12.31. 2. Cor. 4.4. who for their inue­terate malice, are called accusing aduersaries: for their insatiable crueltie are termed ramping and roaring Lions: for their inexo­rable rage, are intituled the red firie Dragons: for their vnder­mining subtiltie, are said to be Serpents: and for their Lordlie dominion are accompted the Princes, and gods of this world. [Page 200] These titles howsoeuer they seeme terrible vnto vs, yet are the Spirits themselues no better then hangmen to the heauenlie ma­iestie o [...] the mightie Iehouah, but vile vassals to accomplish his vnchangeable decrees, and the slauish executioners of his ineui­table iudgements. Yea, and howsoeuer they make an out-facing brauado in any their outragious attempts against the sonnes of mortall mē, as though they would forthwith surprize the whole world, 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude 6. Reuel. 20.2. Tob. 8.3. not vnlike to the chayned Monkie which keepeth a skip­ping and leaping, as though she would presentlie ouerleape the vtmost borders of Egypt: yet can they extend their furie no fur­ther then the length of their chaine will giue them leaue, be­cause their whole malice, power, and policie are perpetuallie li­mited within those their appointed bounds, which they can­not possiblie passe. And therefore the serious consideration of this the ouer-ruling hand and power of the Lord, may notablie serue to support those often feares, which do ordinarilie arise from the often feeling of our fraile and feeble condition con­cerning our powerfull resisting of any the forcible assaults of Satan. Let vs therefore in euerie of these daunting feares, en­deuour to strengthen our weake knees, Heb. 12.12.13. and to support our feeble hands which hang so dro [...]pingly downe, by meditating daylie vpon the almightie power of our conquering Iehouah. Yea, let vs tell our distrustfull soules, there is little cause to be frighted herein,Exod. 8.19. Luk. 11.20. Psal 107.16. and 116.16. 2. Cor. 12.7. they hauing such an etsbang elohim, I meane, so powerfull a finger of the almightie God, as is sufficientlie able to knap in sunder the yron barres of Sathan, and to beate backe the vtter­most force of his buffeting blowes from all his beloued in Christ, who hauing promised that his power alone shall be a sufficient protection for euery of them,2. Cor. 12.7. and purposed to make perfit the same by those their manifold weakenesses, will haue them thus exercised a season for the further manifestation of his watchfull prouidence ouer them; for their greater triumph, in the day of their glorious coronation;2. Timoth. 4.8. 1. Pet. 5.4. 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude 6. yea, and for the sorer confusion of Sa­than himselfe in the generall iudgement.

Philologus.

A worthie meditation no doubt: and such as is able to sup­port the feeblest soule on earth.

Orthodoxus.

The 3. vse.Againe, this doctrine of ours concerning the finall deter­mination of Satan his power of actuall possession, by the pro­mised [Page 201] seed of the woman, who hath actually brused his head: it ministreth fitly vnto vs a verie fruitfull meditation of that vnspeakeable maiestie and power of Iesus Christ, which respe­cteth especially his triumphant conquering, or rather his actuall vanquishing, subduing, and spoyling of Satans tyran­nicall dominion and power: more especiallie his actuall affli­cting, tormenting and vexing of mens bodies and mindes, as in former times.Reuel. 6.2. Matth. 4.3.5.6▪ Gen. 3.15. Iob. 40.20. For this our conquering Iesus hee hath en­countred with Satan hand to hand, he hath actuallie brused the Serpents head: he hath brought vnder that proud Leuia­than: he hath put an ouerruling hooke into the nosthrils of that outragious Behemoth: Iob. 4.10. he hath so put to flight the fierie fierce Dragon,Reuel. 12.8. Psalm. 88.18. Ephes. 4.8. Io [...]. 12.31. Reuel. 12.9. Gal. 5.1. Ephes. 2.13.14. Col. 2.13 14. as he hath now no more place in heauen: he hath led captiuitie captiue, and euen actuallie cast foorth that prince which deceiueth the whole world with all his Angels. Yea and (which more is) he hath not onely freed vs finallie from the burthen of legall Ceremonies; from the extreame malediction and curse of the morall law; from the strength of sinne; and from the power and sting of Death: but hath so effectuallie destroyed, and so finally determined the said ac­tuall dominion of the Diuell concerning our bodies, by the ve­rie death of his bodie: Col. 2.15. as he hath euen vtterly spoyled Principa­lities and Powers themselues, and made a shew of them o­penly, and triumphed ouer them all in his crosse; yea hee hath euen destroyed through death, Heb. 2.14. Luk. 11.22. him that had power of death, that is, the Diuell, and so diuided his spoyles, as he shall neuer be able any more to recouer his former possession, neither yet be of power any more actually to molest, either our owne, or the bodies of any appertaining vnto vs. So as if wee can from henceforth but heedfully and warely watch his inte­stine windings and turnings,Matth 26.41. Mark. 14.38. Luk. 22.40. 1 Pet. 5.8. Ephes 4 27. and bee correspondently fur­nished with the spirituall armour of God, for the timely with­standing of that his power of spirituall obsession, which who­lie consisteth in those his spirituall assaultings, suggestings and temptings, wherewith he endeuours continually from time to time (like a ramping and roring lion) to deuoure vs afresh: he will not only very cowardly flee from vs, Iam. 4 7. but (which more is) wee may also with boldnes, and in all holy assurance in­sult vpon him, and his proud vsurping power, saying thus. Death, Hosh. 13.14. 1. Cor. 15.55. where is now thy power? sinne, where is now thy sting? yea [Page 202] Satan, Heb. 2.14. where is now thy actuall dominion ouer our bodies? Be­hold Satan, we all see and know now in experience, that the mightie Iehouah our God and most mercifull father, hath fi­nally freed vs from thy tyrannicall dominion and power of darknes:Col. 1.13. Math. 3.17. 2. Pet. 1.17. Col. 1.14. and hath translated vs into the kingdome of his deare sonne our Lord and Sauiour, in whom wee haue the redemption through his bloud. And therefore (Satan) the ioyfull remem­brance of this our happie deliuerance, may make vs the more freelie to reioyce in those our former sufferings vnder thy actuall power; because we haue therein fulfilled but the rest of the afflictions of Christ in our flesh. Col. 1.24. Who suffering still in vs and with vs, will (at his owne appointed time) triumph ouer thee also in euery of vs his members, as he hath actually done in his owne proper person: for hee is gloriously mounted vpon his white horse, Reuel. 6.2. hauing a bow and crowne in his hand, and is gone forth conquering, that he might ouercome. And thus in effect for those holie vses, which respectiuely haue their speciall re­lation to God himselfe.

Lycanthropus.

Very well: and what are those other vses (I pray you) which respect some other besides?

Orthodoxus.

The vses respecting some others, are those which more espe­ciallie respect the creatures themselues: namely, they are such as haue a more speciall relation to Satan, or men.

Pneumatomachus.

A very plaine order of teaching: and therefore (I pray you) proceed first to the vnfolding of those which haue a spe­ciall relation to Satan.

Orthodoxus.

The 4. vse.With very good will. First therefore this Doctrine of ours (so substantially deciphering foorth to the world the finall determination of Satan his actuall dominion, and the glorious triumph of Christ concerning the same) it doth very liuely demonstrate vnto vs at large, the miserable estate, and capti­uated condition of that cursed catife the Diuell. Ioh. 12.31. 2. Cor. 4.4. Eph. 2.2.3. & 6.12. 2. Tim. 2.26. Who hauing hitherto very proudly tyrannized ouer the whole ofspring of Adam, and euen actually tormented their bodies and minds at his pleasure, so farre forth especially as concernes his com­mission from God; was (at the very first onset of Christ in such [Page 203] actuall encounter) so fearefully frighted with his glorious presence and power, as hee roared forth and cried fearefully, saying: Iesus thou sonne of the liuing God, what haue I to do with thee? Math. 8.29. Mar. 5.7. Luk 8.28. art thou come hither to torment me before the time? Yea and which more is (the worke it selfe being once actually ef­fected, according to the predeterminate purpose and pro­mise of God) hee is now not onely very powerfully pulled downe a pegge lower by Christ himselfe, who (hauing actual­lie brused his head) did behold him like lightning fall downe from heauen, Luk. 10.18 that is, he beheld him very suddenly, very terri­blie, and vnrecouerablie tumbled downe from his tyrannicall dominion: but also euen actually expelled from his actuall pos­session in man, and so determinatelie driuen and exiled from al future hope of recouering the saine afresh,Matth. 12.43 Luk. 11.24. as he walketh now through desarts and stonie drie places (like a forlorne and com­fortlesse catife) seeking rest euery houre, but findeth none, nor, is neuer in hope to finde any againe, as in former times. But is now reserued in chaines vnder darknes vnto the great and no­table day: 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude. 6. Iam. 2.19. Apoc. 20.1.2.3 waiting euery houre (in trembling and feare) when that mighty Angel, who hath the key and a great chaine in his hand, should gloriously descend from heauen, should bind him hand and foote, and tumble him headlong into that bottomlesse pit, which (from the beginning) was prepared for him and his Angels. Isa. 30.33. Matth. 25.41. And therefore now is saluation in heauen, and strength, and the kingdome of our God, and the power of his Christ. For the accuser of our brethren is (actually) cast downe, Apoc. 12.10.11.12. who accused them before our God day and night. But they ouercame him by the bloud of the lambe, and by the word of his testimonie: and ther­fore reioyce you heauens, and you that dwell in them.

Exorcistes.

This vse (concerning the finall determination of Satan his actuall possession) maketh men carelesse, and lulleth them very shrewdly asleepe in all carnall securitie.

Orthodoxus.

Nothing lesse I assure you. Nay rather this doctrine of ours concerning the finall determination of Satan his power of actuall possession, The 5. vse. is so farre off from making vs carelesse con­cerning Satan his spirituall assaults: as it rather kindleth our care by many degrees. Yea, it doth more consideratelie put vs in mind of Satan his inexorable and outragious malice to­wards [Page 204] men: in the mischieuous practise of that his power of obsession. Who (perceiuing himselfe so vnrecouerablie, and so determinately driuen from his actuall domineering ouer the bodies of men) doth stirre vp and kindle his said wrath to the vttermost in the speedie execution of that his said power of obsession: Apoc. 12.12. yea, and this so much the rather, by how much he knowes very well that hee hath but a short time to worke. 1. King. 22.22. 2. Chro. 18.21. This makes him verie earnestlie to entreate the Lord that he may become a lying spirit in the mouth of false Pro­phets. Luk. 22.31. This holds him in continuall desire to sift and winnow the soules of Gods seruants, as men winnow wheate. This makes him to dart his sundrie suggestions into the mindes of the wicked.Luk 22.3. Ioh. 13.2.27. Act. 5.3. 1. Cor. 12.7. This causeth him to replenish the heartes of hy­pocriticall Professours with all vntruth and lies. This maketh him by his owne messenger (I meane the rebellious prickes of the flesh) vnmeasurablie to buffet the deare saints & seruants of God.Apoc. 12.4. This maketh the great red Dragon to draw with his taile, a third part of the starres of heauen, and to cast them downe on the earth.Apoc. 12.15. This enforceth the furious Serpent to cast forth after the Church, euen flouds of water from out of his mouth: that the said Church might be carried away of the floud. Yea the consideration of Satan his shortnes of time to worke, 1. Pet. 5.8. Iob. 1.7. and 2.2. is that which causeth him continuallie to trudge all a­bout, seeking whom he may possible deuoure. And for this purpose he snatcheth continuallie at euery occasion, as well without, 2. Cor. 4.4. as within vs: labouring especiallie to blindfold the mindes of men at the hearing of the word, or while men sleepe to play the enuious man at the least,Matth. 13.25.39. Ephes. 4.17.18. 2. Tim. 2.26. Ephes. 4.19. by mingling tares with their wheate, that so (corrupting their iudgements) hee might captiuate their minds at his pleasure, and cause them to commit all manner of vncleannes, yea euen with greedinesse. This therefore (you see) should make vs so much the more watchfull ouer our wayes, our words and our thoughts: by how much wee know the disease in the entrals to be much more daungerous then those without; and an intestine warre more deadlie then are the enimie his outward assaults. I meane those inward temptations and suggestions of Satan (arising vpon our naturall concupiscences, Iam, 3.15. and 4 4.5. 1. Ioh. [...].16. inordinate desires, and carnall lusts) will much more endaunger our slumbring soules, then any his externall operations concerning our bodies: vnlesse [Page 205] they be the more watchfully looked vnto,Ephes. 6.11. 1. Pet. 5.9. Apoc. 2.4. and the more wa­rilie resisted with the spirituall armour of God. For by them he wil make vs (in continuance of time) to forsake and fall from our first loue and zeale of religion. Ephes. 5.14. Ephes. 4.19. By them hee will bring vs into a secure and sensles condition. By them he will breed a be­nummednes ouer our soules: so as (being once without feeling) he may draw vs to all manner of vncleannes. Yea by the cu­stome of them,1 Tim. 4.1. he wil so seare vp mens consciences, as not on­lie they shall speake lies through hypocrisie, 2. Tim. 3.8. and become repro­bates concerning the faith: but so carrie themselues in their whole conuersation,Matth. 24.12. 2. Pet. 2 7. as iniquitie shall haue the vpper hand, and the loue of many become key-cold.

Lycanthropus.

Surelie it is euen so as you say, and therefore the Lord make vs more circumspect in euery condition: but I pray you proceed.

Orthodoxus.

Moreouer,The 6. vse. this Doctrine of ours (laying forth so directly vnto vs, the finall determination of Satan his power of actu­all possession, and the continuance of his power of obsession) it teacheth vs plainely the full compasse and measure of the diuell his commission; wherein his spirituall power more especially consisteth; how farre it extendeth it selfe, what he can possi­blie doe, Ephes. 6.1 [...]. 1. Pet. 5.9. Ephes. 4.27. Iam. 4.7. and wherein he is most able to hurt vs: to the ende we may become wise in furnishing our selues with spirituall weapons, and be made more couragious in resisting his vt­termost force. Yea surely, the fruitfull consideration hereof, should deliuer and free vs quite, from those many vnneces­sarie and wonted feares ▪ wherewith (in former times) we haue been fearefully taken vp, and tormented by reason of our grosse ignorance concerning this counsell of God, and for not knowing rightly what powerfull restraint the Lord hath layd vpon Satan his actuall power of possession. 2. Pet. 2.4. Iude 6. Reuel 20.2. Whereby, it comes eftsoones to passe, that (being in company with a supposed Demoniake, and mightily dismayed with a causelesse fea [...] of Satan his essentiall inherencie in the bodies of men) we dare neither open our eies, our eares, nor our mouthes, for feare of his leaping essentially into our selues:Ioh. 13.2. Act. 5. [...]. Ephes. 6.12. forgetting (in the meane time) these inward suggestions, and spirituall tempta­tions wherewith he doth howerly assault and circum [...]ent [Page 206] our slumbring soules. This therefore may fully suffice to re­forme our iudgements concerning these points: that (being now no more ignorant hereafter, of Satan his enterprises) we be not circumuented by him at vnwares, but may surely keepe watch & ward: may stand fast in the faith; may quite vs like men: and be ready to encounter with all his assaults.

Pneumatomachus.

The Lord enlighten our harts with this sacred knowledge, and sanctifie the same to our soules: but proceede in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

The 7. vse.Moreouer, in that this Doctrine of ours, concerning the finall accomplishment of Satan his power of actuall possession, is so mightely impugned by some, and hath such hard inter­tainement in the minds of men: it offreth vnto vs a very fruitfull consideration of Satan his deepe policie, cunning, and sleight, concerning especially such points of faith, as doe plainely discouer his craftie practises and wylie proceedings against our soules.2. Cor. 2.11. 2. Cor. 4.4. Ephes. 2.2. 2. Tim. 2.26. As for example, we may (euen by these matters in question) very apparantly perceiue his circumuen­ting purpose, in withholding of men from keeping due watch and ward against his power of obsession: by setting them so earnestly at an idle gaze concerning that his preten­ded power of actuall possession, which Christ (he knowes very well) hath long since determined, and concerning which there is now no danger at all.Ephes. 4.18. 2. Tim. 2.26. That by this his cunning de­uise he might hold mens minds, from all holy meditations con­cerning their continuall wrestlings with Principalities, Ephes. 6.12. with Powers, with worldly gouernours of the darkenesse of this world, yea, and with spirituall wickednesses, in the high places them­selues: while he surprise their slumbring soules at vnwares,Matth. 13.25. and 25.5. Ephes. 5.14. with his spirituall assaults and [...]irie temptations. And there­fore, whensoeuer we behold hereafter an extraordinarie or vnwonted course vndertaken by any, for the speciall sup­porting of this idle conceit: let vs then vndoubtedly assure our selues, that euen Satan himselfe is a principall partie, and hath very cunningly his hand in the packe,Gen. 3.1. 1. Kin 22.21.22 2. Cor. 11.3.13.14. Reuel. 12.9. Ephes. 4.17.18. by being a lying spirit in the practisers mouthes, of very purpose, to circumuent and deceiue vnstable soules. That thus holding their cogitati­ons captiuated, by a causelesse conceite of a matter which is [Page 207] not at all: he might the more cunningly suggest his intestine poysons and spirituall temptations; yea,Ioh. 13.2. Act. 5.3. Ephes. 6.12. and the more couertly miscarrie mens mindes in a corrupt conuersation, without any due regard of the glory of God, or the good of their Soules.

Philologus.

The truth of this point, is apparantly euident to all in their proper experience: but proceede I beseech you.

Orthodoxus.

Furthermore,The 8. vse. inasmuch as this Doctrine of ours (concerning the finall accomplishment of Sathan his power of actuall posses­sion) is so mightily maligned, and so preposterouslie impugned by some certaine persons professing the holie religion of God, it doth very liuely demonstrate to all the world the vnsuspected subtilties and wilie proceedings of that old Serpent the Diuell.Gen. 3.1. Who (at his first beginning of mischiefes) hauing purposely imployed the externall ministerie of the subtilest beast, in the speedie subuersion of Adam and all his posteritie, and percei­uing there was euer since (by the predeterminate purpose of God) such a perpetuall enmitie betweene them and their seede, Gen. 3.15. as he became vtterly without hope of vsing that selfesame meanes (as before) in any his mischieuous purposes against the persons and bodies of men, doth practise now a quite contrarie course, and the same also more dangerous then the other by many de­grees. Namely, he endeuoureth eftsoones (for the speedier and more effectuall corrupting of euery such sacred ordinance of God, as concernes especially the seruice of Saints) to stirre vp in the Church not cruell persecutors, Act. 20.30. but some certaine professors of the selfesame societie. Men I meane, not only reputed precise in the world: but such (for the most part) as will not sticke for­sooth (in the pritching heate of their holie pride) to say (with skornefull disdaine) to all others besides themselues,Isa. 65.5. Stand a­part, and come not neere vnto me, for I am holi [...]r then thou: not­withstanding they be (for the most part) the smoking wrath of Iehouah, and a fire that burneth all the day.

These men for their outward shewes of sinceritie, being (a­mong many others) in the least suspition of all concerning any sinister practises, and so (in very deede) the fittest instruments for the timely accomplishment of Sathan his pestilent purpo­ses: therefore hee doth cunningly seduce their soules by one meanes or other, and so makes them eftsoones very fearefullie [Page 208] to fall into, and boldlie to broach some odde phantasticall con­ceipt of their owne proper braine, to the fearefull infecting of many poore soules before they beware.

In this cunning course he began to worke first by our grand­mother Euah, Gen. 3.5.6. who (being her selfe before very groslie bewit­ched by his wilie perswasions and holie pretences, and fobbed vp with a fond conceite of being like vnto God in the knowledge of good and euill) became forthwith a very fit instrument to se­duce and deceiue her owne husband, and so brought him and all his into a miserable experience (indeede) not of good, but of euill.

Gen. 3.7. Gen. 34.14.15. Exod. 32.2.5. 1. King 22▪ 11. Ierem. 28.11. Act. 15 1. &c. 1. Cor. 1.11. and 3.3. Gal. 2.11.12.13 Euseb. eccl. hist. lib. 4. cap. 6. & lib. 5. cap. 24.25 26. & lib. 8. Ruffin. lib. 1. c. 1 Zozom. li. 6. c. 4. Basil. Mag. ad fratres in oc­cident. epist. 61. & 69. Act. 20.30 1. Ioh. 2.19. Gen. 25.22. 2. Tim. 2.17.And this Connie-catching course the Diuell hath successiuely continued from age to age vnto this present time, as the sacred scriptures themselues, and the ecclesiasticall histories do plainely record, if any desire to peruse the same.

Neither doth this cunning conueyance of these his inueterate mischiefes stay here, or take vp themselues from any further proceeding, but (euen also in this last age of the world) he go­eth still forwards with his legerdemaines, and iuggling sleights, procuring among our owne selues some certaine persons to spring vp from time to time, and to vtter many peruerse and pe­stilent points, of very purpose to draw disciples after them. That euen as Iacob and Esau (being brethren by nature) contended together in one and the selfesame wombe, to the deadlie griefe of Rebecca their mother: so surely the Diuell (by these cunning de­uises) endeuoureth daylie to stirre vp among brethren by out­ward profession such an intestine strife in the true Church of Christ, and to hatch vp in the same such a secret viperous broode, as should (like the fretting Gangrena) deuoure and eate through the very bowels thereof before the danger it selfe be espied.

A most lamentable experience concerning the infallible truth of that which we teach we may haue from the Anabap­tists in Europe: from the Donatists in Affricke: from the Iesu­ites in Germanie, in Fraunce, and elsewhere: from the Fami­lists, and Barrowists in England: from the fearefull seduction of Hacket, of Coppinger, of Arthington; yea, and euen now (at this present) from the seducing Exorcists of euery condition. Euery of these (howsoeuer they otherwaies pretend the good of the Church, and the credit of christian Religion) haue bred a more dangerous scandal, and giuen a more deadlie wound to the [Page 209] happie proceeding of our holie Religion in deede, then if they had bin the professed and open aduersaries to the holie profes­sion thereof.

The dutifull consideration of these dangerous occurrents (a­rising especially from Sathan his subtile proceedings) should help to engraue in our hearts a deeper impression of that the Apostle his heauenly admonition: 1. Ioh. 4.1. concerning the due triall of Spirits before, we do rashly beleeue their roauing reports. Yea, and the same doth further demonstrate to all the world, that (howsoeuer the phantasticall crew may haplie impute a great follie vnto vs for these our painefull proceedings) yet notwith­standing (the premisses dulie considered) the wise will confesse that we haue very iust cause to cry out with the blessed Apostle and say,2. Cor. 11.1.2.3 Would to God you could suffer alittle our foolishnes: yea, and (indeede) do you suffer vs. Because we are iealous ouer you all with a godlie iealousie: endeuouring to prepare you for one husband, and to present you a pure virgin to Christ. Howbeit, we stand greatly in feare, least, as the Serpent beguiled Euah through her subtiltie, so your minds should be corrupt from the simplicitie that is in Christ.

Physiologus.

This vse (I assure you) is worthie of consideration: but proceed in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Moreouer,The 9. vse. in that the holy exercise of prayer and fasting is so stoutlie pretended to be a sole and onlie ordinary meane establisht by Christ, for the powerfull expelling of diuels without the help of any other besides: and that (the saide meanes so obserued) the spirits they shall and will vndoub­lie depart from the partie possessed.

This serueth very fitlie to discouer vnto vs, another of Sa­tan his cunning deuises. Who when hee cannot otherwaies wrest from out of our handes religious exercises, and other such sacred matters of God: namelie, the word, Sacraments, in­uocation, prayer, & calling vpon God, with the rest of that kind: will then very carefullie bestirre his stumps, not onelie verie mischieuously to mislead mens minds and iudgements (concer­ning those matters themselues) by bearing them earnestly in hand, that there is essentiallie inherent in euerie of them, such an vnspeakeable operation, vertue or power, as of it [Page 210] selfe is able (ex opere operato) to effect many maruels: but he will labour withall (if possiblie he may) to miscarie euen the holiest & wisest men in their ordinarie practise of any the a­forenamed exercises and matters of God. So as (euen in the ve­rie vse of the forenamed matters) hee will cause them verie gros [...]ie to sinne: in hauing (without any warrant at all from the word) an idle conceit, that euen those very things them­selues (by some essentiall inherent vertue they wot not well what) are able forthwith verie fullie to effect, whatsoeuer their phantasticall conceit shall fondlie affect or desire.

And hereof it is, that the superstitious sort are so superstiti­ouslie caried away with an idle perswasion, that the fiue first verses of S. Iohns Gospell (being written in virgin parchment, and fastened priuilie about the patients necke) is not only a sin­gular medicine for the falling sickenes, but a notable preserua­tiue also against the power of infernall spirits. This makes them beleeue that the sixteenth verse of the fiftieth Psalme, being (by the Exorcist himselfe very solemnely pronounced ouer an hollow kney, hauing in it the names of the parties suspe­cted) will vndoubtedlie discouer the suspected theefe. This beares them in hand, that the diuell may (by no meanes) en­dure to haue the sixt petition of the Lords prayer pronounced within his hearing:D. 2. Narration, in the historie of W. Sommers, pag. 16. and that therefore it was why Sommers (for his heart) could not possiblie pronounce the same. Yea, this perswades them forsooth, that some texts of Scripture do onlie but serue to discouer the diuell;D. Detection, pag. 100. and some others againe, to driue him very forciblie forth from the parties possessed.

And that therefore it is, that the Exorcists both can and doe also (as they say themselues) so fitlie frame the very words of their mouthes, D. 2. Narration, in the historie of W. Sommers, pag. 17.18. as best may serue to their present intended purpose: yea, and that in the dispossessing of Sommers, and at the onlie hearing of these words (namelie, the spirit he cryed aloud, and rent him sore, and came out from the childe, and left him for dead) the diuell hee not only rored exceedinglie,D. 1. Narration, fol. 8. pag. 2. D. 2. Narration, in the historie of W. Sommers, pag. 20. but (which more is) euen Sommers also himselfe, hee was forth­with enforced perforce, very liuely to act those selfesame se­uerall matters, as they were then presentlie pronounced by Master Darel himselfe. As if forsooth there had been secretlie inclosed within the very frame of the Exorcists words: such a magicall force or enchauntment, as tended directlie (by the [Page 211] onlie pronountiation thereof) to the powerfull afflicting, and fearefull tormenting of diuels.

Hence also it is, that the grosse headed papists doe so grosse­lie imagine a magicall force, in hoc est corpus meum: for the pre­sent transubstantiating of bread and wine, into the very natu­rall Body and Blood of Christ.

Hence it is, that their Idolatrous masse is made a sacrifice propitiatorie for quicke and dead: and that therefore they haue their seuerall masses for seuerall matters.

That the daily rehearsal of their Ladies Psalter: doth pur­chase to themselues the remission of sinnes.

That the continuall saying of S. Bridgets Beades, com­monlie called their fifteene Ooes: will (for fifteene dayes be­fore) very directlie demonstrate vnto them, the very day and hower of their death.

That the only pattring ouer of fiue pater nosters, with fif­teene auies, and three creedes: is a penance satisfactorie for all their former faults.

Brieflie from hence also it is, that the Exorcists of euerie condition doe make sole prayer and fasting (ex opere operato) their onlie effectuall meanes for the powerfull expelling of diuels: D. Doctrine. yea, and that M. Darel also himselfe, doth so confi­dentlie auouch the same to be the only meanes, for the spee­die remouing of anie iudgement of God whatsoeuer. And that the holie exercise of prayer and fasting is made an ordina­ry medicine for euerie maladie: and the onelie salue for euerie sore. Whereby it commeth to passe that the most men (neg­lecting all other meanes els for their good) doe grieuouslie sinne in tempting the Lord: and (which more is) doe super­stitiouslie prophane the holie exercise of prayer and fasting.

And (which is to be respected the most of all) they doe thereby very strongly confirme the wisards of the world in their wicked opinions, concerning the supposed force of those their filthie sorceries and magicall inchauntments: bearing the the world in hand, that (by the onlie meanes of their filthie charmes, their frame of words, their superstitious inuocations, and other their vnlawfull orisons) they are able (without any more adoe) to amend whatsoeuer is amisse in man or beast.

And hereof it is, that the ignorant sort (beholding a man affected but onlie with melancholie) are so stronglie concei­ted: [Page 212] that it is no phisicall meanes, but only the good words and prayers of learned men that must restore them againe to their perfect health.

Lycanthropus.

The truth of this vse, I my selfe haue proued long since in my proper experience: but proceede I beseech you.

Orthodoxus.

The 10. vse.Againe, this Doctrine of ours (so notablie discouering the prophanation of prayer and fasting, by Exorcists, by Diuel­driuers by Sorcerers, and such like superstitious persons) it doth notablie lay open the inueterate malice of Satan, against any the publike meetings of the people of God. Who when (by the Magistrates speciall appointment) they haue iust occasion to assemble together at their sacred meetings, to make knowne, and to further thereby their humiliation and hartie repentance, in an hoped assurance of their reconciliation with God, by an holy obseruation of the publike exercises appoin­ted thereto, are very sure to be dangerously assaulted therin, by the circumuenting sleights of the Diuell. Who will verie earnestly endeuour to deface and obscure the forenamed exercises, by stirring vp such persons for the performance thereof, as know not how to vndergo them aright, or which else doe but grossely abuse them to vnnecessarie and vainlie conceited purposes, yea euen vnto such as they were neuer or­dained for.D. Doctrine. Namely, to driue foorth Diuels, ex opere operato: and to be the sole and onely meanes (without any other be­sides) for the timely remouing of any the heauie iudgements of God, of what kind soeuer.

Yea, and this their pretended effectuall power for the powerfull expelling of Diuels, they ascribe not (forsooth) to the more materiall part of that the appointed worship of God (namely to their feruent prayers) which were more tolerable by many degrees:D. Doctrine. but they impute it rather to the very mea­nest among all the rest, I meane to their abstinence from meates and drinkes, which is but a bodily exercise, and such also as pro­fits very little or nothing at all. Notwithstanding, these sillie poore soules, or rather these strongly seduced sots, they speake and esteeme of such superstitious fastings, as of a superexcel­lent and the most powerfull meanes of all other, to worke ma­ny wonders withall. Yea, and so this be (in euery point) [Page 213] performed according to the iust compasse of their idle con­ceit, Isa. 58.3. though the parties themselues haue only but a bare histo­ricall faith, law. 2.19. which the very Diuels are endued withall: yet their said exercises they are vndoubtedly of force (as themselues very fondly imagine) not onely to remoue any temporarie iudgement, how heauie soeuer, but also to obtaine any tempo­rall blessing at the hands of God.

And whereunto tends this paltrie stuffe (I beseech you) but onely to bring the holie things of our God into publike reproch among the irreligious Atheists and godlesse crew; who (when they shall see them practised but only as cloakes to co­uer mens paltrie pretences, and to nousle vp the world in their hypocriticall practises) will presently grow into scorning thereof. Yea, and (which more is) seeing these cunning sedu­cers do so stoutely beare men in hand, that euen those verie outward worshippings (albeit they proceede but from a bare historicall faith) will worke such straunge and wonderfull things: what a dangerous blow doe they offer vnto all the sound reprehensions of the Prophets, Apostles, and all other the ser­uants of God, who vsed euermore very sharply to checke the people of God, for their onely relying on, and for resting themselus too much vpon those their externall exercises, when (in the meane time) they neglected a true sauing faith, with all other the vnfained fruits of repentance.

Moreouer, this their idle conceit concerning the falsely supposed efficacie of sole prayer and fasting for the powerfull expelling of Diuels, what doth it else (I beseech you) but ioy the very hearts, and open the cauilling mouthes of all those our Iusticiaries and cunning Recusants, who remembring very well that (in all our former preachings and writings) we haue hitherto very mightily impugned, and flatly denied them the expected merits of those their voluntarie worships, and of all other their owne workes of what nature soeuer: shall yet now (notwithstanding) behold vs to chalenge the same to our selues, yea euen vnto the very meanest of al our exercises; and those also not performed by the holie directions of a sanctified knowledge, but by the onely sudden fier-flash of a bare historicall faith, without any warrant at al from the spirit of God. And thus much for the present concerning those [Page 214] seuerall vses, which haue a more speciall relation to Satan himselfe.

Philologus.

Very well: and what are those other (I pray you) which more respectiuely apper [...]aine vnto men?

Orthodoxus.

They are summarilie such as respect mens seuerall caria­ges, concerning those intricate and vnwonted occurrents, which in these our former discourses are handled at large. And these vses also they doe either generally appertaine to al: or they are more particularly befitting some speciall persons.

Pneumatomachus.

Which doe generally appertaine to all?

Orthodoxus.

They are all those which do indefinitely belong to euerie condition of people, without any respect of their persons. And these vses also they are such as doe generally concerne either the seuerall points propounded at large: or the parties what­soeuer perusing those points.

Lycanthropus.

We approue of your order. Begin therefore (we pray you) with the orderly declaration of such speciall vses, as haue speciall relation to any the seuerall points propounded.

Orthodoxus.

Content. First therefore in that we haue shewed at large, how the vnsearchable power of God (concerning especially the promised seede) was not onely (in his eternall counsell) ve­ry certainely established before all beginnings of time: but (which more is) the same also was correspondentlie promi­sed, and performed in time, according to the predeterminate purpose of the eternall God. Surely the deliberate and serious consideration hereof, doth minister vnto vs a singular me­ditation, or rather a notable document concerning the stabi­litie, and perpetuitie of any the sacred mysteries propoun­ded vnto vs at large, in the sacred Scriptures.

Wherein (for the better confirmation of our faith in any other the eternall Decrees of God, propounded vnto vs in his vnchangeable word) we haue deepely to consider and marke, what an immutable Coherence, methode or order, the [Page 215] Lord hath obserued from time to time:1. Pet. 1.10.11.1 [...] not onely in causing to be, but also in bringing to passe (yea, euen in the fittest sea­sons of all) his owne vnchangeable purposes, his hidden De­crees and Counsels, his admirable operations, and wonderfull actions, how impossible soeuer in nature; yea, though neuer so absurd or obscure in humane reason. As for example, the Lord hauing (in his eternall Counsell) purposed before all times the manifestation of his glory by the work of his hands, Psalm. 19.3. Prou. 16.4. did (in his owne appointed time) correspondently accom­plish the same,Gen. 3.3. 2. Cor. 4.6. Gen. 1.1. Wisd. 11.14. Gen. 1.2. Wisd. 11.17. by bringing light out of darkenesse, by cau­sing something of nothing, and by producing of order, from out of palpable confusion: and all this, by the methodicall and orderly creation of things in heauen and in earth. The which worke of creation (being in his owne eternall purpose before all times) was in time (you see) very effectually performed.

So likewise,Rom. 8. [...]0. Ephes. 1.9.10. the Lord hauing purposed (from before all eternities) to call out from the kingdome of confusion and darkenesse, such [...] selected people (for the further manisfestati­on of his glory on earth) as should in a more special manner professe his holy religion: this said purpose (being in his eter­nall Counsell determined before all times) was in due time accomplished,Gen. 12.1. Act. 7.3. Gen. 1 [...]. [...]. Rom. 4.28. Gen. 12.2.3. and 17 4.5. and 22.18. by calling forth Abraham from his owne Coun­trey and kindred, and by raysing (from out of his withered Loynes) such an vnspeakable seede, as should surmount in number the Starres of heauen, promising them certainely the appointed Sauiour, and performing the said promise to them in due time.

Againe,Gen. 15.13. Act. 7.6. the Lord hauing eternally decreed, not onely to deliuer his said Church from the firie furnace of Aegypt, but also to plant the same in the promised Canaan: this his said purpose (being before all beginning of time) was correspon­dently accomplished foure hundred yeeres after:Gen. 15.13.16. Exod. 12.40. Act. 7.6. Gal. 3.17. in that he caused the said Land to cast out the Amorites, and planted therein his owne inheritance.

So likewise the Lord hauing (from before all eternities) de­termined with himselfe, to deliuer the children of Israell from that Aegyptian bondage, by the mediation and ministerie of Moses; hee obserued the selfesame order also therein. For this his saide purpose being in himselfe from before all beginnings of time: was correspondentlie accomplished [Page 216] at his owne appointed time. [...]. 15.14.16. Act. 7.35. Exod. 2.11. Act. 7.23. And therefore (accordingly as he had promised before vnto Abraham) he sent Moses his ser­uant to accomplish the worke. Both by putting into his minde (when he was fortie yeeres old) to visite his brethren: and by confirming him also in that honorable calling fortie yeeres after;Exod. 3.1.2. Act. 7.30. partly, by an admirable order of appearing vnto him, and partly also by a miraculous manner of working by him.

Thus then (you see) their said deliuerance (being deter­mined with God before all times) it was accordingly promi­sed and performed in time.

And as before the Law written from the very first creation, the Lord obserued this method & order in the orderly mani­festation of any his vnchangeable ordinances: so surely, both at,Mal. 3.6. Iam. 1.17. and after the giuing of the Law, there was in him no shadow of chaunge concerning that selfesame vnchaungeable course.

For First, (hauing determined with himselfe (before all beginnings of time) to establish the Morall Law, as a perpe­tuall rule of perfect obedience) not onely he did (in very fitte time) make promise thereof to his people:Gen. 15.16. Act 7.7. Exod. 12.40. Act. 7.38. Gal. 3.17. but (which more is) after the full expiration of foure hundred and thirtie yeeres: (I meane, at the very appointed season it selfe) he did corre­spondently accomplish the same.

Neither hath the Lord obserued such an orderly methode of working onely before, Mal. 3.6. Iam. 1.17. and at the giuing of the Law: but euer since then, he hath beene altogether one and the same in the orderly accomplishment of al his actions, as may plainly ap­peare in his orderly establishing and subuerting of the seue­rall Monarkes, how mightie soeuer: in the seauentie yeeres captiuitie of Israell his people: in the birth and death of his onely Sonne: in the vniuersall establishment of his glorious Gospell: in Ierusalems finall destruction: in reiecting his owne people the Iewes, and in bringing the Gentiles into their roomes. And as in all these the precedent operations and actions: so likewise in the powerfull dispossessing of Satan, and in the finall determination of that his tyrannicall power of actuall possession, the Lord hath carefully obserued (not onely in purposing, but also in promising and performing) the selfesame order ac­cordingly. For as the Lord before all beginnings of time, did purposely determine such a temporary iudgement, as a peculiar demonstration of the Deitie of his onely Sonne, and [Page 217] promised withall, the admirable conquering of the selfesame iudgement in that promised seede, which was actually to bruse the Serpents head: so hath his said Sonne correspondently ac­complisht the same,Heb. 2.14. by his death and resurrection, destroying through death, him that had power ouer death, that is to say, the Diuell. Col. 2.15. Yea, he hath spoyled Principalities and Powers, made such a shew of them openly, and so triumphed ouer them all in his Crosse: as we may boldly assure our selues of the finall ac­complishment of that which our Sauiour affirmeth saying. Now is the iudgement of this world, now is the Prince of this world cast out, that is, his power of actuall possession is fully and finally determined. According to that his authenticall message (else wher [...]) vnto Herode saying:Luk. 13.3 [...] Behold, I cast out Diuels to day and tomorrow, and the third day I shall be perfected, or the third day, I will make an end of that businesse.

The prem [...]sses therefore considered, there is no more rea­son to doubt of the finall determination of this one, then of any other the eternall Decrees of God whatsoeuer.

For, seeing the Lord not onely purposed the finall determi­nation of Satan his power of actuall possession from before all beginnings of time,Gen. 3.15. but also very solemnely promised, and most powerfully effected the same in that promised seede which was actually to bruise the Serpents heade: who seeth not euen one and the selfesame methode, and order herein obser­ued, as in all other the forenamed purposes and determina­tions of our eternall God.

And therefore, there is no more reason to denye the finall de­termination of this one, then of any other the like purposed opera­tions of God: vnlesse we doe purposely entend to bring present confusion vpon the orderly actions of that only wise agent, Dan. 5.25.26. &c. Wisd. 11.17. who accomplisheth and ordereth all things in measure, in number, and waight.

Physiologus.

Very true as you say. And therefore let those men beware, who so constantly auouch the continuance of actuall possession now in these later dayes of the world. But proceede in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Againe, this doctrine of ours (deciphering so plainely vnto vs all those the deceiuable notions whatsoeuer, which more pe­culiarlie appertaine to this new-found trade of Diuillitie, with [Page 218] the seuerall points thereof) it ministreth vnto vs a notable me­ditation, or rather a watchfull consideration concerning the very proper foundation of all those the common receiued opinions, fantasies, dreames or idle conceites, which runne all the world ouer, about the Diuels their essential assuming and transforming of bodies: their pretended apparitions in this or that essentiall forme: their absolute power for creating of substances: their essentiall possessions; their supernaturall operations, with sundrie other such idle conceites.

These their strange imaginations concerning Spirits and Di­uels (if we rightlie consider the same) they arise not from any the infallible truths of the Lord, reuealed vnto vs in the sacred scriptures; for then we might and ought boldly to imbrace them for truths, how absurd soeuer in humane reason: but they do rather proceede from the only imagination of mans idle braine. Who hauing their cogitations darkened through the ignorance that is naturallie in them,Rom. 1.21. Ephes. 4.18. cannot possiblie be made to discerne aright of any such intricate matters.

Ephes. 2.2.Yea, and they spring partly also from the corrupt customes of the world.Isa. 29.13.14. &c. Matth. 15.5.6. For men receiuing such vntruthes from hand to hand (as it were an inueterate lie by an auncient tradition) do careleslie transferre the same from themselues to their owne posteritie, and the ages to come.

And thus forsooth, an old doating custome hauing careleslie begotten many grosse and erroneous opinions concerning Spi­rits and Diuels, the world (at this present) is so vniuersally be­sotted bewitched, Isa. 44.20. &c. and possessed with these palpable fooleries, as they had rather to hold a manifest lye in their very right hand, then be brought from their former most fond conceites, and corrupt customes, 2. Tim. 2.25.26 2. Tim. 3.5. to an vndoubted knowledge of the truth it selfe.

For howsoeuer they may haplie pretend herein the holie Re­ligion and feare of the Lord, they feare him not in deede and in truth,2. King. 17.33.34. but do serue him only after the manner of former nations: yea, euen vnto this day they deale in these points, according to the old accustomed manner, and not after the ordinances, cu­stomes, lawes, and commaundements which the Lord commaun­ded the children of Iacob. Isa. 8.20. They runne not (for a true vnderstan­ding of these mysticall matters) to the lawe and the testimonie, neither speake they at all according to this truth: Rom. 1.21.22. Ephes. 2.2. but euery man speaketh herein according to the blind imagination of his owne [Page 219] [...]oolish heart, and after the corrupt customes of the world itselfe, because there is in them no light of truth concerning these mat­ters. And thus much in effect for those speciall vses which haue a more speciall relation to any the seuerall points propounded.

Lycanthropus.

Very well. Proceede now (I pray you) vnto those other vses which more specially concerne the parties themselues, perusing those seuerall points.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherin especially we haue to consider, that seeing the matters we handle at large concerning these se­uerall points, are euery of them (as you haue heard) the infallible truthes of the Lord, and the same also most soundly confirmed by the very sway of sound reason, by the testimonie of fathers, and by the vndoubted auctoritie of the sacred Scriptures, not­withstanding (any thing hitherto written or said to the contra­rie) this Doctrine therefore of ours it ministreth a most christian admodition to all (especially the fauourits of this new-found diuillitie) to beware how they do ouer-rashlie iudge or con­demne any (how contemptible soeuer in their ouer-weening conceits) for Atheists, reuolters, formalists and irreligious per­sons, who either oppose themselues against, or (at least) do not fauour such phantasticall fooleries and fond conceites, as are lately broached abroade concerning these matters in question. Let men therefore beware how they doe ouer-rashly iudge, or condemne their brethren for these things, least haplie they be thought to oppose themselues not only against euident reason, Act. 5.35.39. and 7.51. 2. Tim. 3.8. and the approued testimonie of auncient Fathers, but also a­gainst the infallible truths of the sacred scriptures.

Besides that, let them further consider, that they cannot so rashlie speake euill of,Iam. 4 11.12. and condemne their brethren in these points: but necessarilie they must speake euill of the law, and condemne the law, Rom. 14 4.13. and so make themselues no obseruers, but iudges ouer the law, forgetting that there is but one law-gi­uer and iudge, who alone is able to saue and destroy. Yea, and so much the rather should wise men be willinglie admo­nished to beware of euerie such rash and inconsiderate cen­suring of others:Matth. 15.18.19 1. Cor. 4.4.5. by how much they may easilie perceiue not onlie their corrupt inclination very prone thereto, but also the seuerall effects thereof to be very filthie and dangerous.

[Page 220]That their corrupt inclination is very prone to such an vn­christian course, it is not to bee doubted for these following reasons.

Ioh. 8.44. Iam. 3.15. [...]6.First, Satan himselfe (being carried an end with an inue­terate rage against humane societies) hee endeuoureth no­thing more earnestlie, then to make diuisions in the Church of Christ, Iob. 1.9.10. and 2.4.5. Reuel. 12.10. and to cause among Christians such an vnchristian censuring of one another: that (by such their inconsiderate courses) he might make them more conformable to his own cursed nature, in accusing and condemning their brethren.

Secondlie, the corruption of their owne heart (which natu­rallie lusteth after euill things) doth naturallie affect the godles gracing of themselues,Iam 4.1. by their vngodlie disgracing of others.

1. Cor. 1.10. Phil. 2.2.3.4.Thirdlie, a proud and vaine-glorious conceit concerning their proper supposed excellencie, in comparison of all other besides themselues: doth easilie draw them vnto such an vn­christian course.

Lastlie, their inueterate malice and enuie against other mens gifts, Num. 11 28.29 Mark. 9.38. Luk. 9.49. 2. Cor. 10.11.12. 3. Ioh. 10. doth breed in them an inexorable disdaine, that any other but their own twinckling starres, should so much as peepe forth at all, within the circumference of their proudlie vsurped element.

Neyther onlie the pronenes of this their corrupt inclination, but (which more is) the filthie and most daungerous effects which will vndoubtedlie follow thereof, should forciblie disswade their mindes from such an vncharitable censuring of others.

Matth. 7.4.5. Rom. 2.2. 2. Tim. 3.5. Iam. 1.26.27.For first, pretending an holie zeale of religion, and yet de­termining to too rashlie of others for but opposing themselues to any their preposterous & idle conceits: what other thing els doe they effect thereby, but an apparant discouerie of their owne cloaked hypocrisie?

Rom. 14 4.10. Ephes. 4.31.Besides that, they doe thereby also, very vncharitably pro­uoke their poore brethren to anger against their persons: and so procure them to sinne.

Thirdlie, they doe (by those their inconsiderate courses) ve­ry apparantlie discouer to all the world, that they are (in ef­fect) no better then beastlie incarnate diuels: Iob. 1.9. and 2.5. Reuel. 12.10. thus rashlie to accuse and condemne their poore brethren, for but onelie opposing themselues to anie their sensles opinions.

[Page 221]Lastlie,Leuit. 24.20. Deut. 19 19. Matth. 5.38. by those their vncharitable censurings of others, they doe (in the iust iudgement of God) very iustlie procure to themselues the law of like. For what one good thing can they possiblie purchase thereby to themselues: or what o­ther euent doth follow thereof,Matth. 7.1.2. Luk. 6.37.38. Rom. 2.1.2.3. but a very iust occasion for others, to render and repay them their measure running ouer, pressed downe, and shaken together?

The premisses therefore duelie examined, and considerat­lie wayed with the euen ballance of an holy discretion: wee doubt not but that this admonition of ours being giuen to the wise, Prou. 9.9. will make them more wise, and verie warilie to consi­der how they inconsiderately rush vpon any those vnchari­table censurings of others, 1. Cor. 4.5. Heb. 4.13. or iudge rashlie of any man before the time: vntill the Lord come who will lighten things that are hid in darkenes, and make manifest the counsels of euery mans heart, that so euery one may haue his due praise, or dispraise from God.

In the meane time therefore this one vse of ours may fit­lie serue as a watchword for wise men, to make them beware how they doe eyther approue or disproue of any the publi­shed labours of other, in an onlie regard of the author him­selfe:1. Cor. 3.3.4. which argueth in euery of them very grosse and car­nall affections.

Yea, and it may in like manner very fully suffice to make them much more considerate how they doe entertaine (hand ouer head) the faith of our Lord Iesus Christ with respect of per­sons: Iam. 2.1. which is vndoubtedlie a very preposterous kind of pro­fession.

Brieflie, it aduiseth better and worse to take diligent heede, that (in their prouing of spirits, and trying of all things) they doe onlie hold that which is good, 1. Ioh. 4.1. 1. Thes. 5.21.2 [...] and very conscionablie abstaine from all appearance of euill.

Lycanthropus.

Surely sir (if a word be enough for a wise man) this one vse may fullie suffice to admonish so many, as are not ouer wilfullie wed to the vnrulie sway of their corrupt inclination: but proceed in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Again, in that the resplendent beames of this plaine truth which wee teach so liuely, and so notably laieth open to all the world the palpable and foggie clowdes of that their new-found [Page 222] trade of Diuillitie, which hitherto haue so dangerously dazeled the iudgements of men, together with all and euery the appurtenances appertaining thereto: who seeth not now how fitly and how forcibly the same admonisheth al men of eue­rie condition,Act. 8.9. Gal. 3.1. to cease forthwith, and to take vp themselues in time, from being any further bewitched (as in former seasons) with such babling fooleries, as are broached abroad in those their vndutifull Pamphlets, and from being caried about any more,Eph. 4.14. Iam. 1.6. like children, by any those vaine & windie blasts, which (like to vntimely births) are so vainly vented foorth from their proud and insolent puffes. Namely, the Diuels their sup­posed absolute power to worke what they lust:Psal. 12.3.4. Psal. 144.8 Pro. 3.8. their preten­ded essentiall possessions: their imagined assumings and trans­formings of what bodies they please at their pleasure: their falsely conceited facultie for the creating of substances: their dreamed dispossessions, by an established ordinarie meanes of prayer and fasting, as by themselues is fondly imagined, with sundrie such other supposals besides.

Isa. 9.15. & 28. [...]5.All these their vnwritten verities, or rather their vnwar­ranted trifling toyes, as they haue bin hitherto receiued (hand ouer head) among the irreligious and prophane of the world, with no l [...]sse admiration forsooth, then if they had been the Alcoranean Oracles of Mahomet himselfe: so are they (a­las) at this present, to too readily entertained with many (of no small accompt in the Church) as the infallible truths of the eternall God. Isa. 5.20. Howbeit, the same (being once equallie waied and wisely examined, according to the very touch­stone of truth: they will (notwithstanding any the supposed sway of their bookes) appeare to be no better in effect than old wiues fables; then the Legerdemaines of cunning Imposters; and the cousoning sleights of some Popish priests, as hath beene proued at large.

The premisses therefore considered, let the authors or fa­uourers of those published Pamphlets, endeuour what they possiblie may, to support and vphold those fondly conceited fooleries, in their former account with the people of God: they will (notwithstanding) very shortly vanish away like snow in the Sunne, & be deemed no better in effect, then Hobgob­lings, Bugboies, Night-sprites, or Fairies, to make the yoong chil­dren afraid with their supposed shadowes, while the aged ones in [Page 223] Christ doe take their comfortable rest, in an assured confi­dence, concerning the ouerruling power and prouidence of Ie­houah himselfe. And thus much in effect for those seuerall vses which doe generally appertaine to all men.

Pneumatomachus.

They are all singular vses no doubt. But proceede now (I beseech you) to the putting downe also of such as are more particularly befitting some speciall persons.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherein we haue first to consider, that the seuerall vses more particularly befitting some speciall persons, they are summarily of two sorts. Namely, either such only as concerne the affectors of that new-found Diuillitie: or else such also as respect the mislikers thereof.

Lycanthropus.

What are those vses (I pray you) which more speciallie concerne the affectors thereof?

Orthodoxus.

They are summarily such as doe purposely tend to the timely informing, either of the authors themselues, or of any their fauourits.

Philologus.

Declare first (I pray you) those seuerall vses, which more particularly respect the authors themselues.

Orthodoxus.

Content. Wherein wee haue first to consider, that for so much as all those the former conceits, which Exorcistes hath broached abroad, concerning these matters in question, are euery of them vndoubtedly such, as (notwithstanding any his glorious pretences) doe not onely not bring any one be­nefit to the Church in generall, or to any the particular mem­bers thereof: but doe rather tend couertly to the timely sup­port of his owne priuate purposes, without hauing relation to publike good; nay rather to the vntimely procuring of many publike and priuate mischiefes. The consideration hereof may serue to discouer those secret plots and vnder-hand practises, which our miracle-mongers (of what condition soeuer) doe mutually obserue among themselues with one harmonicall consent and course.

For they all (in the very first progresse of any their plotted [Page 224] proceedings) doe primarily propound to themselues such pur­posed proiects, as they (notwithstanding any their outward iollie pretences) doe cunningly prosecute, and eftsoones ac­complish, by the secret meanes of many their vnder-hand practises, and iuggling sleights of legerdemaine: yea and this also with such a slie and nimble conueiance, as a man would hardly imagine, that not any other but May-butter it selfe could possiblie melt in their mouthes.

1. Tim. 6.5. Iud. 16.For these cunning practitioners, as they haue euermore had an insatiable thirst to the filthie pleasures and pelfe of the world, as to the onely true obiects of their hearts desire, and the very purposed proiects which they principally propound to themselues in any their vnder-hand practises, though they falsely make shew of a quite contrarie end, in all outward ap­pearance: so haue they their sundrie deuices to further their said enterprise, and to accomplish effectually that their pri­marie pretended purpose, wherein also they are resolutelie bent, notwithstanding any crossing occurrents; although yet with as little suspition as they possiblie may.

And therefore in the very first progresse of those their pro­ceedings, they solemnely pretend the glorie of God, the gra­cing of sundrie his sacred ordinances, and the singular great good of his Church. Namely, either an approbation of the real presence of Christ in their Masse, or a confirmation of publike fasts in those their solemne meetings: or a perpetuall esta­blishment of the worship of Saints, of Purgatorie, of Masses, of Trentals, of Dirges, of praying for the dead, of plodding on Pil­grimage, with tenne thousand such other deuices.

Howbeit (notwithstanding these wonderfull sturres) if wee more prouidently respect the full period of those their proceedings, wee may plainly perceiue that their primarie propounded pleasures and profits (which they hourely expect as an ordinarie interest, 1. Tim. 3.3. and 6.5. Tit. 1.7. Iude 16. 1. Pet. 5.2. successiuely arising from such colou­red courses) they are that quickening spirit which only affoor­deth life and motion to those their entended actions: yea, and that onely preexisting efficient which giues an essentiall forme to all their purposes,Iob. 15.31. Psalm. 7.14. Isa. 59.4. and without which their vnder-hand practises would become an vntimely birth, would quickly va­nish away of themselues, and forthwith come vnto nothing.

Neither only these their lewd plots and practises are appa­rantly [Page 225] laid open: but the fearefull effects also of such coun­terfeit pranckes, they are (by the consideration hereof) verie plainly discouered. For who seeth not how opposite the same is to the eternall purpose of God concerning the actual brusing of the Serpents head: how derogatorious to the supereminent dignitie and power of Christ, Gen. 3.15. Ioh. 12.31. for the finall determination of Sa­tan his power of possession: how iniurious vnto the certaine e­stablished truth of the Gospell, Mar. 16.20. Heb. 2.4. Psal. 122.6. Gal. 5 4. in that it reuiueth the miracu­lous confirmation thereof afresh: how hurtfull to the Church of Christ, by breeding therein such vnnecessarie and fruitlesse garboyles: how grieuous to the godly, in procuring such an horrible prophanation of prayer and fasting, Exod. 20.7. Matth. 6.7. vnder an holie pre­tence of doing great good to the Church: how scandalous to the weake, in making them doubt whether the Gospell bee yet fully confirmed by miracles: Mar. 16.20. Heb. 2.4. how offensiue to Athei [...]s, in cau­sing them to skorne the holie things of God, so odly prophaned: how gratefull an enterprise to Antichrist, Isa. 52.5. Ezech 36.20. Rom. 2.24 Matth. 24.24 2. Thes. 2.9 Psal. 4.2. Ioh. 15.31. Psal. 7.14. Isa. 59.4. in that it puts vpon the true spouse of Christ the proper badge of his whorish strum­pet: how dangerous to all men, by drawing them thereby into many idle conceits, and needlesse troubles: and lastly, how ac­ceptable a seruice it is to the Diuell and his Angels, in that it erecteth and holdeth vp their kingdome afresh, by bearing the world in hand, that Spirits and Diuels haue such an essentiall inherencie in the bodies of men, as cannot bee helped without fasting and prayer, when there is no such matter at all; but only the bare imaginations of idle braines, and the deluding deuices of such cunning Impostors, as accompt worldly gaine the greatest godlinesse, and thereunto also doe hourely applie all their purposed plots and predetermined practises, as expe­rience in euery age of the world hath made it apparantly e­uident.

Lycanthropus.

This vse (I assure you) it serueth for singular purposes: but proceede in the rest I beseech you.

Orthodoxus.

Moreouer, it being (by these our precedent discourses) ap­parantly made knowen to all the world, that the very Au­thours themselues of any such vnderhand practises, haue (in euery age) been fearefully disgraced by the all seeing God: sharply censured by godly Superiours: greatly disliked of all [Page 226] the Religious: perpetually impugned by the most iudiciall sort: miserably scorned among the secure and godlesse Atheists: yea, and euen generally condemned of one and other: this should sufficiently enforme the late spronge plotters, and dayly deuisers of euery such new found senselesse Diuillitie, concerning the vndoubted vanitie of euery such vaine in­uention: yea, and it should make them withall to be mightily amazed, Act. 20.41. & 13.10.11. 2. Tim. 3.8.9.13 and to tremble exceedingly at the vnsearchable iudgements of God, concerning such subtill Impostors, as seeke to seduce the world by any their vnder-hand shifts. Who, notwithstanding they be neuer so outwardly holy in those their plotted pretences: yet, when they shall once but dare to enterprise the vnorderly mannaging of any such slie and cunning conueyances without an authenticall warrant from the word of the Lord: Exod. 8.19. Act. 8.11.12. and 13.10.11. 2. Tim. 3.9. they doe thereby not onely procure the mightie Iehouah to bring their Legerdemaines to light, but (which more is) they doe also (to any one of sounde iudgement) so euidently bewray their palpable follie, and so apparantly lay open their owne weakenesse, concerning the necessary support of their languishing cause, as euen the very best affected towards their proceedings (being especiallie iudiciall persons, & such also as are not too much ouercome, and too preposterouslie carried with partiall conceites) may easily be ledde, to thinke that the very Authors themselues doe but struggle against their enlightened iudgements; not vnlike vnto those, who (making shipwracke of conscience) haue fearefully forsaken their former synceritie, and soundnesse of faith. And this in effect, for those seuerall vses, which more particularly respect the Authours themselues.

Pneumatomachus.

Very well. But proceede now (I pray you) to those other vses, which more specially concerne their vnderhand fa­uourits.

Orthodoxus.

With all my hart. Wherein we haue first to consider, that seeing (howsoeuer the cunning Impostors of euery age haue, like Iannes and Iambres, euen openly encountered with the sound ministerie of Moses) their deceiueable signes and ly­ing wonders could neuer possiblie stand against the ineuita­ble force of the word, but (like to the AEgyptian sorcerers [Page 227] roddes) haue been euermore deuoured by Aaron his rodde: this therefore may fitly serue to admonish to the full, our vnder­hand fauourits of euery such newfound Diuillitie, that (now at length) they beware how they doe hereafter receiue the holy word of the Lord, Iam. 2.1. in an onely respect of persons, which is the ordinarie vsage of carnall professors. Least, as Simon Magus, along time bewitched the giddie braines of Sam [...]ria [...]ith his seducing sorceries: 1. Cor. 3.4. Act. 8.9.10. so their mindes alas, should (by some ser­pentine subtiltie) be drawen at vnwares from that holy simpli­citie which is in Christ. 2. Cor. 11.3

Yea, and this should admonish them further, that in these and all other like intricate causes, they receiue not (hand ouer head) whatsoeuer is disorderly printed or vnderhand broached by those, whom they partially fauour with a per­sonall respect: but that they would rather haue speedie re­course to the Law and the testimonies, and search there (with the good men of Berrea) whether they doe proportionably speake or write according to the infallible truth thereof,Isa. 8.20. Act. 17.11. which they will vndoubtedly doe if there be in them any true light at all. Because (being otherwise, either too partiall towards those whom they fondly affect, or too preiudicate at least to­wards such, as soundly impugne their proceedings) they should shew themselues to haue no loue of the truth, for the only truths sake: and therefore no maruell though they be purposelie subiected to strong illusions, 2. Thes. 2.10.11.12. and euen desperately giuen ouer to entertaine vntruthes, falshoods, and lies, to their further per­uerting, and the fearefull hazarding of their hoped saluation.

Philologus.

The Lord graunt, that this vse may become no lesse pro­fitable, then we see it expedient for euery condition of people: but proceede in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Moreouer, sith the fearefull inconueniences ensuing such Legerdemaines, are diuersly dangerous concerning the glorie of God, and the good estate of his Church here on earth: this therefore should throughly aduise the vnderhand fauourits of any such newfound Diuillitie, to beware how (either by company, conference, continuance, or any their vnderhand maintenance) they doe couertly vphold such cunning Impo­stors in any their counterfeite courses more especially con­cerning [Page 228] those idle conceites which haue so vndutifully, and so disordredly been broached abroad by their Bookes. Least they be otherwise very iustly adiudged to iustle against the glory of God: to vndermine the supereminent dignitie of Iesus Christ: to enlarge that temporarie power of the Diuell, which Christ hath long since restrained for euer: to weaken the cer­taintie of faith, respecting especially those particular promises, which the Almightie hath made concerning our full deliue­rance in Iesus Christ: yea and (which more is) to countenance a confused disorder, against her Maiesties established Lawes and orders. And this in effect, for those seuerall vses which onely concerne the inconsiderate affectors of this newfound Di­uillitie.

Lycanthropus.

Proceed now I beseech you to some such seuerall vses, as may more especiallie respect the mislikers thereof.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherein also wee haue to consider that al those the following vses, they are here to be put downe in a double respect. Namelie in an especiall respect of pub­like or priuate persons.

Lycanthropus.

A very plaine order: and therefore I pray you proceede first to the timelie vnfolding of those sundrie vses, which more especiallie concerne the publike persons.

Orthodoxus.

Content. Wherein especiallie you haue to consider, that the seuerall vses respecting publike persons, they are such as haue a more speciall relation to their publike places and callings. And these publike persons are also twofold, namely, eyther the ciuill magistrates, or the ecclesiasticall ministers.

Philologus.

Vnfold those vses first I beseech you, which more especi­allie concerne the ciuill magistrates.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherein we haue first to consider, that seeing so many and such daungerous mischiefes doe day­lie proceed from the vnderhand practises and legerdemaines of cunning impostors, as in our seuerall discourses hath beene handled at large: this therefore may fitlie serue for the fur­ther [Page 229] enlightning of all in authoritie: concerning especiallie their orderlie esteemings and iudgings about any the like oc­currents, which may haplie hereafter be brought into their open consistories, or before any their iudiciall thrones.

And this moreouer may giue them accordingly some fur­ther inckling,2. Tim. 2.5▪ how to proceed against the persons of any (how holie soeuer in shew) that shall once but dare to maintaine such idle conceits to the high dishonour of God, and the daylie incumbrance of Christes Church.

Yea, and (which more is) we doubt not at all but that these poore labours of ours (how loathsome soeuer in the eyes of the scornefull) they daylie doe, and will vndoubtedlie take so much more deepe impression in the honourable hearts of all holie superiours: by how much they may now plainely per­ceiue in experience, that (partly for want of looking into with the soundest iudgement, and partlie also for not proceeding a­gainst such grosse malefactors, with some sharper censure ac­cordinglie) such straunge and vnwonted occurrents doe eft­soones become very intricate, obscure and doubtfull, and procure withall manie perillous and incurable conceits a­mong the simpler sort.

Pneumatomachus.

A very excellent vse: but proceed in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Againe, in that the outragious flames of this wild-fire, which at the very first beginning of all so vniuersallie and so feare­fullie ouerspread it selfe, are now so quietlie calmed by the cooling streames of iustice, so forciblie suppressing the same: this tendeth very notablie (you see) to the singular commen­dation of those our superiours, who so timely tooke notice of, so seriouslie enquired into, so iudiciallie proceeded against, and with such holie perseuerance persisted constantlie in the ne­cessarie restraint, and timelie stoppage of all those outragious courses, which the busie headed broachers of such idle conceits, were so vndutifullie entred into, by the onlie instigation of their owne itching humour, without eyther due regard to the glorie of God, or any respect of the Churches good. Yea, and (which more is) the magistrates singular care is so much the more highlie commended, by how much an vrgent necessi­tie (in this erronious and reeling age of the world) required [Page 230] the same at their hands. Wherein euery odde companion doth boldlie take libertie to fansie whatsoeuer him liketh; penneth and printeth whatsoeuer he pleaseth; and broacheth and buy­eth whatsoeuer his itching humour affecteth: though neuer so opposite to our holy established religion, neuer so contrarie to her Maiesties lawfull proceedings, neuer so absurd and vnsound in it selfe, or neuer so daungerously entendeth the Churches hurt: Iudg. 17.6. yea, & al this, as though there were no king at all in Israel,

Besides all this, the magistrates their deserued commenda­tion (concerning the timelie supprssing of these vntimelie oc­currents) doth breake forth (like the Sunne in his strength) more especiallie in this, that they also (respecting especiallie that speciall charge which Christ Iesus by an holie adiurati­on imposeth vpon them thus:Cant. 2.15. Take to vs the foxes, the little foxes which destroy the vines; for our vines haue small grapes, haue (notwithstanding all humane frailties) continued an inuincible courage against so manie strong meanes which were hourely vsed vnto them, in the onely behalfe of the parties offending: yea, and that also by the often importunities of sun­drie solicitours of very good worth and place. Who euerie of them (from out of their approued loue to good men, & good causes no doubt) were so earnest that way, as it is to be won­dred that the Magistrates christian courage was not vtterlie quailed,Exod. 18.21. or something calmed at least. Which would vn­doubtedlie haue come to passe: had they not (with a single eye) respected their duties enioyned them in the word, the sundrie examples of sundrie good gouernours before them, and their singular care for the Churches peace. And this in effect, for those seueral vses, which more especially concerne the ci­uill magistrates.

Lycanthropus.

Declare now some such other vses I pray you, as may haue a more speciall relation to the ecclesiasticall ministers.

Orthodoxus.

With very good will. Wherein we haue first to consider, that seeing there haue beene and shall be to the end of the world, some such cunning seducers and cogging companions, as not onlie will cry out,Matth. 24.24. loe here is Christ, loe there is Christ, but shall moreouer be able to effect manie lying signes and won­ders in all deceiueablenes of vnrighteousnes, 2. Thes. 2.9.10. among such espe­ciallie [Page 231] as receiue not the loue of the truth: this therefore verie fitlie giueth the checke to those the pillars of truth in this se­cure and selfeliking age.Gal. 2.2. Who partlie for feare of foregoing their good reputation among the preciser sort, as they common­lie call them, partlie in an onely doubt of vndergoing some dis­pleasure with the higher powers, and partlie for feare of en­daungering their proper estate in the smallest degree, can at no hand be drawen eyther by penne, or by preaching, or by pub­like conference to confirme that infallible truth, which (in their hearts) they affirme concerning these vnwonted occurents. Yea, and (which more is) howsoeuer they pretend to be im­plicatiuely infolded within that absolute number of wise­doms seauen pillars;Pro. 9.1. yet may they at no hand be procured to support this necessarie building of wisedome, so farre forth espe­ciallie as their proper titles import: but are otherwaies wil­ling enough that some other besides themselues should beare the whole burden, and very well contented that any (so he haue but a seeming shew, though no shewing substance at all) should passe smoothlie away with his errour, to the intolera­ble preiudice of the truth it selfe; the irrecouerable poysoning of manie poore people; and the fearefull hazarding of their owne proper soules.

Pneumatomachus.

A vse worthie of obseruation: but proceed in the rest.

Orthodoxus.

Moreouer, in that so many grosse and palpable absurdities do not only arise from this new-found Diuillitie (as hath bin declared at large) but which more is, do couertlie trudge vp and downe from hand to hand, and are too careleslie entertained a­mong the simpler sort, as necessarie, fruitfull, and most currant conceits, to the intolerable scandalizing of manie, the high dishonor of God, the vndoubted preiudice of that supereminent power of Iesus Christ ouer Spirits and Diuels, to the palpable ob­scuring of such speciall promises as more especially concerne those speciall points, to the fearefull prophanation of prayer and fasting, to the dredful endaungering of the poore people of God, to the needles confirmations of popish adiurations, Exorcizings, and coniurings of Spirits and Diuels, to the dayly propagation of atheisme, epicurisme, and irreligious opinions among the propha­ner sort. This therefore may something make knowne to the [Page 232] true Ministers of Christ, how necessarily it appertaines to euery of them in their seuerall stations, 1. Tim. 4.24. 2 Tim 2.15.16 Tit. 1.13. Phil. 1.27. Tit. 1.9. to stirre vp the gifts that are gratiously bestowed vpon them, to take the Lords part in these holie truths, to fight together in one faith of the Gospell, to teach holesome doctrine, and to stop the mouthes of all the gainesayers how holie soeuer in any their outward pretences. Yea, and albeit they haue heretofore too inconsiderately affected the persons of some in an only conceit of their inherent holines, yet when­soeuer they shall hereafter perceiue any to arise among them­selues,Act. 20.30. which purposely speake peruerse things to draw disciples after them; that then (laying aside all carnall respects) they be forthwith taken vp with an holie consideration of their owne proper places, their callings, their titles, the condition of the times, the gadding affections of people, this itching age of the world,2. Pet. 5.2. the approching day of the Lord, their conscionable care towards God, to his Church, to their owne soules, and more es­pecially to that people of the Lord which peculiarly dependeth vpon them. And that also (in an only respect of these the prece­dent cōsiderations) they do forthwith make apparantly known to all the world their proper abilitie, their valour, and courage in defending the truth, and in conuincing the aduersaries there­of, of what cōdition soeuer. That by such a conscionable course they may truly declare themselues to be men sanctified and pre­pared for the seruice of the Lord, yea and such also as can do nothing against the truth, [...]. Cor. 13.18. but for the truth: notwithstanding any the sinister perswasions of men, or the carnall respects of this bewitching world. And this in effect [...]r those seuerall vses which more especially concerne the publike mislikers of this new-found Diuillitie.

Lycanthropus.

Very well. Proceede now (I beseech you) to the timely vn­folding of some such speciall vses, as haue a more speciall relati­on to the priuate mislikers.

Orthodoxus.

With all my hart. Wherein we haue first to consider, that seeing the [...]ound truth of this doctrine we teach,Gen. 3.4. 2. Cor. 11.3. Matth. 24.24. 1. Tim. 6.5. Rom. 1.18. hath (in euery age of the world) bin so mightily vndermined by Sathan him­selfe, and so dangerously darkened by such seducing compani­ons, as (accompting glorie or gaine the greatest godlines) do endeuour to withhold the veritie it selfe in vnrighteousnes, and [Page 233] to turne the manifest truth of God into a mysticall lye. Rom. 8.25. This therefore, it tendeth very notably (you see) to the timely com­mendation and comfort of all such sound harted Christians, as (notwithstanding these encountring occurrents) are not lightly carried about with euery vaine blast of deceiueable doctrines,Eph. 4.24. Iam. 1.8. from the sinceritie and soundnes of that sacred faith, which they firmely hold in Iesus Christ:1. Cor. 16.1 [...] but do rather very circumspectlie watch, most couragiouslie stand fast in the faith, to too vali­antly quite themselues like valorous souldiers; are vnconque­rablie strong against principalities and powers,