AN EXPLICATION OF THE ARTICLE κατῇλθεν ἐισ ἁιδου, of our Lordes soules going from his body to Paradise; touched by the Greek generally ἁιδου, The vvorld of Soules; termed Hel by the old Saxon, & by all our translations: vvith a defense of the Q. of Englands religion: To, & against the Archb. of Can­terbury: vvho is blamed for turning the Q auctority against her ovvne faith.

Sundry Epistles are prefixed & affixed. by H. Br.

The second edition, vvherein the Typographicall falts of the former are amended.

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Iames, 2, 1.
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1605.

TO THE MIGHTY PRINCE ELISA­BETH BY THE GRACE OF GOD QVEENE of England, France & Ireland, defendour of the faith, &c.

YOVR M. gaue intelligence vnto a gentleman of Middelburgh, of a prelates disgracing of my poore self: vvhich thing caused him some sadnes; & my self more. He demaunded of your highnes no censure touching me: but thinking that he lerned more substance of divinity in a short conference, thē in 64. yeres afore (as it pleased him to say,) procured me before I vvas vvare a great stipend to professe yf I vvould: & also vvrote to knovv vvhether you vvould employ me in England or like that els­vvhere others should: & knevv that it vvas against all Christianity & the peace of life, to censure any that seeke no prefermēt: vvher­by yf they requited like greefe, much disgrace vvould be spred, vvhere amity should beare the svvay. In his grief he replyed vpon the prelate: as vpon one not knovving the seasoning of his tongue in honesty: &, by hinderance of the best paynes for mans good, bent vnto the ruine of the Kingdome. Your M. best kno­vveth his vvhole hart, by his Letters. The Letter of the prelates tongue vvhetted too sharp, he gaue me: to reply for my self, as I thought meetest. The party I knevv by the speach: & shevved him the very syllabes: I think your M. looketh that I should avvnsvver: & not suffer you to be led amysse by him. Therfore I vvil first shevv vvhat man I hold most assured to be the repor­ter: next, vvhat I avvnsvver to his particular speach: By these ar­guments I gathered that the Archb. of Cant. vvas the man. By a man of his, the very same speach vvas uttered among some that spake in great thankfulnes for my paynes; & vvas counted to be [Page] il affected vnto the knovvledge of salvation: & he & his family alone are avvonder to the Lerned; noted the only that could not afford me good vvordes; vvhose penne & tongue (as they say) hath caused the vvhole nation, to be better spoken of. Your M. may remember vvhat he sayd of the litle book that drevv all the Scripture vnto Christ. & shevved the vse of every parcell, from the begining to the End: & called thither all kindes of Fastern & vvestern opening stil vvhere they erred, euen by them selves: carying half a skore of seuerall most hard & needful studies thither, & examining all auctours not only in their ovvne tongues but by theyr ovvne veyne & course of study. The praelat sayd to your highnes that it conteyned but the curious quirkes of an yong head. vvhere as yf he had studyed 31. y▪ ever since he vvas Doctor, hovv in one speach to shevv him self extremely voyd of all grounds of Lerning, & of all conscience for the truth: and of all care vvhose eares to infect vvith Atheism, the Tempter could hardly cary him [...] into partes more iniurions to all holy vvriters, & to men, for the marrow of theyr vvisdom: vvhich hold the dignity, though a yonge head vvith old study call them to build in England, far from theyr ovvne countrey: to our glory, & theyrs.

This old spech might sone tell, yf any prelate misused your M. eares extremely, vvho the party should be. for hardly vvil one nation bring tvvo of his mind and hart: confident to condemne vvhat he knovveth by his bare Latin studies no more thē a babe: & extremely bent to hinder the good of his ovvne religion. The same prelate vvrote vnto the sta [...]ioners to hinder a commentary of myne vpon Daniel: & caused many of them to blaspheme the trueth. Vnto vvhom I shevved by D. Saravia that he vsed more auctority thē your M. had to lend him. The good of your ovvne Kingdome might not be hindered by any auctority. Yf he could tell me vvhere I missed I vvould thank him: othervvise, yf he hindered, the vvork should be printed elsvvhere, & him self bla­med [Page] for hindering your comon good. By D. Sarauia he [...] me his ansvver: that it vvas better the trueth of Daniel vvere hid, then antiquity should be disgraced for missing as in my Epistle. VVhether I be to lerne mild vvriting of him, his vvorkes peste­red vvith disgraces compared vvith my Epistle to the LL. vvil shevv sufficienly. This Spirit, & that, uttered to your M. vvill argue one & the same soule: that I may vvel knovv vvhat prelate your M. meaned. Daniel cometh forth by the prelates better aduise, & auctorising: & my paynes is dedicated to the LL. of your M. most honorable privy cousel, to be regarded according to the sage honour of your M. governement. They all saving he sent me seueral vvord of special favour: & some of them be­leued that I had made the Bible as clear as any other book: & sayd that vvhat soeuer I vvould it should be done for me: vvher­upon I vvrote a request by a M. of that faculty, that theyr Lord­shippes vvold move your M. ether to recompense my longe paynes after great old promises, or, to giue me leaue to goe to the King of Scotland. Thence I had sure promesse of greate re­compense vpon bare copies not dedications of my paynes: & sin­gular helpe offred to put forth the Bible in such playnnesse, that a vvhol nation might soō understand it: & see the glory & certē ­ty of it. Thither I returned avvnsvver: that I vvold no lōgerserve your M. if I vvere not recompensed by fiue monethes end, by the begining of Lent. The LL. sent me by D. Cesar this ansvver: that they thought my studies not inferiour for iudgemēt in Di­vinity to any in England: & they bade me tell D. Cesar vvhat I vvould haue, that he might moue your M. & they further ad­vertise your highnes. I returned my mind: that your M. should be my chooser: & that I vvold like best of that vvhich you appointed for me. Thus a mā vvould haue thought that a cōclusiō frō their LL. should not find cōtradictiō from any vvhose voyce, faith, & honour must be in the message sent from thē to me by D. Cesar. Yet they vvere persuaded that the Archb. vvould neuer suffer [Page] your M, to see the clear certenty of Divinity, bicause you vvould so litle regard his bare Latin studies. This theyr mynd vvas she­vved me: And vvheras they meant to haue moved your M. to bestovv on me the charge of London (vvich he meant for D. Bā ­croft) & this vvas noysed by the clarks of the counsel; it vvas more talked that the Archb. vvould vvork him self any disgrace to hinder my being so nere occasion to open the Bible to your self: thus it pleased them to say, & think: In so much that a Bacheler of Divinity of Ripon, vvho knevv the Lords purpose for me: & his, against me; & my resolution vpon his next iniury to leave your governement, vvent to Lambeth for good vvil to aduise him better: But he could not haue fit talk vvith him; by reason that he vvas moved by some other, to some heate, and afore he could goe again to him, he brak out as it vvas expected. This shevveth most certenly vvho the prelate should be. For as this dealing is stranger then lightly should befala man of natural rea­son, though all honesty vvere set asyde: So the same man should be the likest to embreath into your M. the speach so deadly con­demned by the Gentleman vvhom you made Iudge of that vvhich you bad S. Iohn St. vvrite vnto him. That your M. may better mark the strange contemt of trueth in the Archb. & his boldenes in other matters, as that, vvhich the spech mentioned, vvas censured: I must briefly tell against vvhat dealings he brake out openly.

As I vvayted, vpon the LL. leasure, to move your M. for me, in sad vvether of vvinter, I vvas vehemently requested by Lerned & Zealous Christians to assemble the People, by my preaching, to pray for better vvether. VVhich vve & others prayed for, & ob­teyned: & many marked the meanes, & the event. In those sermons I chose Scriptures to open, vvhich Latin oryet Greek studies never opened; being so very familiar to all Hebrevves, that none of the Apostles age & nation vvold stagger in them. S. Stephens oration Act. 7. is of this tenour: speaking in the pro­phetes [Page] skill vsual in repetitiōs, flovving vvith matter vvhich ma­keth England, & al vniversities blame the text, or brede vnsavery expositions: & that vvhere the speach is fullest of heauenly vvis­dome. Him I expounded to the hearers confort: that they might better like of your governement, for that in your dayes Scripture vvas more cleared then 1500. yeres afore. And those poinctes I had printed afore to your M. & found great thankes then, from Zurick, the French, Dutch, Denmark, Scotland, & others. And yf it please your highnes to try your Archb. lerning, I dare assure you that all his latin studies vvill never expound S. Stephē: to tell vpō vvhat lavv of Moses he vvas called into iudgement: by vvhat re­lation to Scripture the miracle of his face vvas to be like an An­gels: hovv he frameth calling of Abraham from VR. hovv Ia­cobs family can have 75. soules, & but 70. in Moses: hovv the Speach of the burial in Abrahams purchase can be true: by vvhat ground he affirmeth that the Patriarches bones vvere caryed out of Egypt, & buryed in Sychem: & hovv our enemies graunt this true▪ Likevvise for Moses age of 40. yeres in Pharoes court: vvhat vvarant he had: vvhat authours allovvable to all Ievves vve haue for that: Hovv Rempham can stand in Amos, a propre name: vvhere the text is Chiun: & Babylon for Damascus, by the like vvarrant: & to vvhat poinct of his accusation his oration belon­geth: & vvhy he endeth in Solomons temple: & vvho but he sayd that VR vvas in Mesopotamia: or vvho but Philo the Greek sayd thad Abraham vvas called after his fathers death. A Doctor that fayleth in any of these poincts vvill disgrace the first Martyrs Apologie: And amonst his defenders in Latin & Greek stu­dies it is almost all disgraced. Strangers thank your M. for clearing S. St. by my pen.

And herein your M. may satisfy your self; vvhether your high preferred Archb. vvith his accusations vnlavvful, though they vvere true; or the defendour of your faith, on his ovvn charges, by shevving the agreement of all the Bible; in vvrit, vncorrupt: [Page] in meaning, sure, by enemies graunt, deserveth better acceptation for ground of study, far from phantasies. Although my trauel in this kind might have moved the Archb. to favour my paynes so much as the temporal Lords did for clearing Daniel by hea­then for story: for his chief Question, by Nathan the Prophet 2. Sam. 7. Which none of his Latines or yet Greeks, I trovv, haue done: for his tvvo tongues, by plain reasons, but neuer marked, as I iudge, by any, saving one levv: although my dili­gence might haue stirred his Love, it stirred only his enuy: and dayly it vvas noysed hovv he meant to defeate the LL. purpose: so that tvvo gentlemen conferred touching his course: & the one sayd: Shall I tell the Bishop that he taketh an vnhonorable course. The other avvnsvvered: No. The Bishop vvill but mock. This vvil not be strange to the Archb. for I vvrot it vnto him self: that he might consyder vvhat a goodly thrid he had spun that hauing receaued 50000. poundes of the Church is counted but a skopher in the greatest matters. For my self, he knovveth that I afforded him good language: & labored to countenance him: but still ready yf he vvold neuerend his iniu­ries to call him to accompt for all at once. After I had ex­pounded S. Stephen as plain to Ievves, vnexplicable vvithout them: I toke a text: 1. Pet. 3. Speaking to Ievves, hovv the Spirit of Christ preached in the dayes of Noah: to them vvhich are novv Spirites in Prison: vvhich very phrases they them selves haue: yet of vs the Greek is badly translated: & the divinity vvorse expoūded: Saving of Maximus Monachus & his auctours, & M. Beza: vvith Zegedin, & his folovvers But none vvithout Ievves auctority can satisfie the doubting, vvho vvill be taught hovv the phrase vvas vsual.

This text vvas comonly cited to proue that our L. descended to Gehenna by such vvho think that Hell in the Crede signifieth the state of the damned. I handled both: That S. Peter had no such meaning: nor the Greek Crede. This meaning I made of [Page] the Greek Credet: that synce Greeke vvas first spoken vntil the Crede vvas to be penned: as vve must iudg by that vvhich vve haue in record: [...] is nothing els but to goe from this vvorld: vvithout distinction of Ioy or torment, leauing that to further consyderation: & [...] in all the old testament, the vvorld of Soules: and Hell in our translations, of force the same; & so in our Crede, & so taken by K. Ed. & by your M. that vniustly they that leaue our Church quarel herein, as though vve denyed our L. to goe presently to heaven. My opinion herein I printed to the Lerned nobility, & inferior gentry: VVho, some of them vvrote to Basil that no humane paynes vvold ouermatch a ful treatise in the same tenour. Against this the Archb. brake out to open rage: vvith his bare commentary Latin, the plague of Divinity: & not vvorth one yeres study of tvventy, that the Bible vvil require. First, he gaue out vvord that I should be stayed from preaching. Many vvere sad. but I vvas glad. For I knevv that God called our long difference for Diuinity into the open iudgement of the vvorld, & in this matter he had sayd to one M. Samford attendant vpon a noble earle, vpon occasion of translating the Ps. 16. That he vvold burne in this opinion that Christ descended to Gehenna. And to ioyne in some spe­cial article vvith him, I chose this text, knovving hovv the [...] that to descend to hel vvas, true of a soule gone vp to heauen, vvold catch the bare Latinist. But I slayed in the realme till he vvold break out into some open action: that he could not aftervvardes deny his proceding. He bare the high commissioners in hand, as D. Cesar & D. Levvyn, that he Sent for me to ansvver for my Doctrine: & yf he had by request, I vvold gladly: yf he had vsed commaundement for the article knovven; it had bene Atheisme, to turne your auctority against your oth, & fayth. He vvas bound to knovv your religion con­firmed by act of Parlement. But hovv far his messenger differed in his caryage from all civility & lavv, I am ashamed to print: [Page] the LL. haue read it, & requested me to lay the blame vpon his man: but others sayd that the high shirif must ansvver for the vndershirfs faultes. Here vpon I resolved to leaue the realme: & shevved the LL. his monstrous dealing: hovv the bare La­tinist vvould be teaching me in Greek & Ebrevv general poinctes: & I shevved hovv a D. his frend lamented that he could not beat into his head the bare Conceit of my studies, & many other extreme vnlerned partes, some printed against him, as denying the Greek style, all from the LXX, in all the nevv Testament. And I sent vnto him self a copy: & further matter hovv his vnlernednes brought your M. auctority vnto manifest Atheisme & most senseles, against your ovvne good. Then he yelded: vvith great promises, yf I vvould but acknovvledge them that vvold be my frendes. Also he sayd that he sent for me but to ansvver D. Andrevves for the descent to Hell. He might haue requested me, & I vvould haue satisfied him: But to betray your M. auctority to be a slave to Heresy: that vvould not be good, nor semely for me. As he sent me this vvord: I vvrote from Leyden in Holland that I vvould defende myne opinion in Cambridge: yf he vvould hazard his fame vpon any that should reply. At that he raged vvith termes that the messenger lothed to report: Lest I should pay his vnlernednes vvith as good. Therupon I vvrote an Epistle to the Lerned nobility shevving hovv through all the Bible (vvherin one errour stayneth al) he suffred bad notes: to bring errours a thousand at once: To make all the Credite of Moses & the Prophetes no­thing vvorth: & there in I ansvver his heat: VVherin he vvill burn in this opinion that Christ descended to Gehenna. Novv my L. treasorer S. VVilliam Cecil asked him vvhat further matter he had to hinder theyr purpose. Then this he invented: that I vvrote vntruly that he determined betvvixt D. R. and my controversy, to your M. For that, I printed him a ful avvnsvver. Then came that nevv speach, vttered to your M. vvhich I am [Page] sure came from him. And this much for, vvho the party should be. Novv for ansvver. Though his speach might be held a back biting: yet I vvill suppose that he dealt better to mean but our open contention: for the descent to hel. VVherof I haue vvrit­ten here, vnto him self, a ful treatise. And vvheras he ought to proue that the Greek Crede is of his mynd by the General tenour of the tongue: and that all the Bibles ages beleued that Christ should goe to Gehenna, & that your M. is of his mynd: I resist, that neuer any Greek, heathen or Ievv toke [...] in his sense: but all vniforme in myne: that all the Bible vtterly refuseth that his sense: & all Ievves & Gentiles vvould take myne in one meaning, profitable for faith & past all colour of vvrangling: as Articles of religion ought to be plain: & that K. Ed. the 6. the rare noble prince your M. brother, once the only hope of our nation, so vnderstood the Article: and that your M. oth is to defend that meaning. To your M. to the most noble King of Scotland, vvhose M. offred me myne ovvne desire for divinity, to the Archb. his ovvne hart, to all Lerned nobles, & other Christianes I commend the trueth: to be tendered as yee look to finde the fauour of God: & to God him self I commend his ovvne cause: & the passage of his sonne from hence vvhether he vvent for the redemption of our soules: that his holy vvisdome may shine in this vvord of Sal­vation, from the holy directly, [...].

Your M. most carefull defendour of your faith. HVGH BROVGHTON.

AN EXPLICATION OF THE CREDE, FOR THE ARTICLE, [...] How that speach hath ben vsed, of east & west synce tongues were, vnto Plutarchs age beyond the Apostles, vniform in one tenour, for leaving this world: in speach of soules departing: & not more in the wicked which went to torment knowen, or in the vncerten, whither they went, then in the Godly, which went presently to loy: with a decla­ration how K. Ed. 6. so held it: whose religion in the same sense the Q. swearing to the Gospel, meant to defend: To the most reuerend Ihon whitgift D. in divinity, Archb. of Canterbury, & Metropolitan of England.

YOVR Graces zeal, hovv you vvill burn in this opinion, that Christ descended to Gehenna, & your vsage of the Q. auctority to haue your conceit accepted, hath caused ex­ceding great harm in the Church of Englād, & is like to cause more vnlesse God giue you grace to acknovvledg openly hovv dange­rously you vvere deceaved. You gaue great advantage to the families that refuse your assemblies to make theyr cause seem good: and so far that some aduentured theyr Eternal state, vpon theyr cause. For thus they reasoned. They vvho hold that Christs soule vvent to Hel, Gehenna Hel, make the Gospel to tell a Lye. Where, it is certen, he vvent to heaven: But the Church of England (say they) doth that: Therfore, belying the Gospel it ought to be refused. Novv such as dealt vvith them from you denyed the proposition: vvhich religion of trueth vvould not haue denyed: and graunted the assumption: as betraying the Q. religion. For Hell in our Diuinity & transla­tions of the old testament signifieth but [...] Sheol, that vvhich requireth all to come to it: and [...], Haiden, the vvorld [Page] vnseen. Generally, Hell is that vvorld vvhich haleth all hence: vvhether Ioy of Paradise; or Torment of Gehenna, be theyr lot there. Your defenders amazed at the term hell: & not knovving the religion of the realm, missed, as I sayd, to Deny the true proposition, and to graunt the slaunder, in the assumtion: Ther­upon the adversary familie, thinking that one as your G. should not be ignorant vvhat religion the Q. hath svvorn to defend, vvas hardened in theyr condemnation of the trueth: & some, holding on to theyr death & shortening of theyr dayes, ven­tured theyr Eternal state on this; that in the issue, ioyned vpō in disputing, they held the trueth, & that yovv vvere deceaued. So the Q. subiectes by your vvant of divinity came to theyr death, by holding that vvhich the Q. hath svvorn to defend. And many fearing to be of theyr mynd herein, bring an heresy into the Crede & think in deed that Christ descended to Gehenna. That is bred in them by your zeal set on flame for Gehenna. Also your self in speach to a D. that told me, blasphemed one as being of theyr family (vvhom they held, theyr deadliest enemy) for that in this syllogism he vvould. graunt theyr proposition. Y ou might better haue ioyned your self for agreeing in the assumtion, to slaunder the Q & all the religion of the realm. Your eyes haue seen by the same D. yf letters in cariage perished not: hovv the Lerned gentry cen­sure, that yf the party blasphemed by you vvould handle to the full of his knovvledge that for the descent of Christ into [...] it vvold be as vvell accepted as any thing that mans peynes euer studied. Yet you to hinder all his recompense demaunded in print (as the Q gouvernement should be thought hono­rable, & promised most honorably) take occasion of exception, vvher better desert then the former & of more dayly use, vvas exhihited to the good of the Church: & being in this giddi­nes of gouvernement, you held on beyond all loyalty & Chri­stianity to force the party greued, approved over the vvorld, & by the furthest enemies as the likest to procure the comon [Page] good of Christendom, him you compel to shevv his mon­strous recompense by you: after vvord vvas sent him by a M. of request that the Lords thought him second to no scholer. The time vvas vvhen you could send him vvord that by your faith he deserved as good a place, as you your self had, & made him likevvise a match in lerning vvith the best. Gehenna mar­red al that good (vvhich I hope to banish from your Crede) In M. Barovves case & Grenevvoods. The terme HEL, being [...] Haides in Greek, & [...] Sheol in Ebrevv, Inferi in old Latines, must be expounded as the orginal [...] in the Crede, & vvheras our old translations vse HEL for [...] sheol still through the prophets, vvhere properly the losse of this vvorld only is meant: (vvhen further sense cometh, the argument caryeth it, not the vvords force) HEL must be taken (as in old Saxon vvhen they knevv no Gehenna) for the state after this life: vvhether the party is haled. Novv 64. times [...] coming in the holy tongue, Hell as often in our old translations & never directly for Gehenna, but as by the argument, & so it may be heaven, in speach of the Godly, nether should HEL in the Crede mean any thing els but the vvorld to come: the vvorld of Soules. We may not be so simple as not to knovv our ovvne language. Likevvise HEL cometh nyne times vpō [...] in the nevv Testament. But neuer in all those places doth it signifie Gehenna. As tvvelue times Gehenna is in the Greek: & ther HEL is in your graces meaning. But 73. times in a general meaning of separation from this vvorld, & such lot, as in the matter folovveth, cometh it in both testaments. VVherfore the comon vse of the term should make the Crede not strange to vs. This I delivered as a most constant trueth: and shevved that our L. vvas to sacrifice him self for sin here in this vvorld: vvher vve might see it: & beleue it: and that vvhen he had povvred out his soule to death, a Sinoffring, ther vvas no further suffring: but all suffering vvas fulfilled: and that our Lord vvent presently through [Page] the veyl of kis flesh to Paradise; to heaven, to his hingdom, as the thief beleued: and his ovvn tongue taught: & as he com­mended his soul to the hand of God. Novv a narration in brief for the prophane vvorld, must speak of al this but generally: HE DESCENDED INTO THE VVORLD OE SOVLES. [...] Descendit ad Inferos: HE Descended to HEL. The force of the Greek maketh the matter plain; [...] as [...], Vnseen. The vvorld vnseen to vs that be here. Plato bringeth it pleasanter of [...] to Delight. Holding all true happines to be [...]: In that vvorld, into vvhich our L in the Crede is sayd to haue gone: [...] shaal the Ebrevv cometh to the same effect: TO REQVIRE: as requiring all, simply, to come thither. So the tongues of both testamen [...]es haue a sure mark in the tërm, that none should be deceaved: vvho had any vvhit aboue bare Latin studies. Seing the story of our Lord [...] is the glory, the crovvn, the pearl of all story, and his soules story in the passion the chief in al the Gospell, and such as must be dayly cited ouer all the earth in the Abridgement of our belief, & vvas penned in the Crede so sure for speach that no Ievv nor Gentil, from Babels breeding of tongues, till the Cred vvas penned, can be found to differ from one comon meaning; it vvas a pitifull thing that Sectaries should pick quarels vvith the Q. vvher all the vvit of men or Angels could not find fault: & vvhere the Q. meant no further them the blamers knevv to be true: That Christ his immortal Humane soul left the body fully, & all this vvorld, & vvent (as all the holy are sayd to haue gone) into Sheol, the vvorld of Soules It vvould make a mans hart to bleed that in so plain a case, men should not be told that theyr mynd diffred not from the Q. hovv they vvere senseles vvho blamed that vvhich they allovved, The four Evangelistes, the Man, the Lion, the Oxe, the Egle, all full of Eies, and penning four times the redemtion for the vvorthines of the matter, these all four vvill condemn vs [Page 5] for beasts, blind, skurfy, larne, & vnclean, vvho vvould over­reach them all, to bring from Satans spirit a iourny to Satans Lodging, vvhich should vtterly disanul all the Holy Bible. The Bible, vvhence true religion cometh, & vvher the place is of all divinity. VVhence, from plain rules four times told, & told in the passion story, all that toucheth our Lord for death & till the resurrection, must be fetched. All that Moses and the prophets spake, the old charet, on vvhom Christ sate, that all, all the Evangelists touch: omitting nothing: and he that cannot find a going dovvn to Gehenna for Christ in the passiō story, & vvould find it from the prophetes or the Epistles, he hath litle considered in vvhat place every article should be most fitly taught. Some places troble some, in the Epistles S. Paul vvriteth: Say not in thy hart vvho shal ascend to heauen, to bring Christ dovvn, or vvho shal descend into the deep: to bring vp Christ from the dead: There the term Deep may troble some: bicause it is strange. He meaneth by the DEEP but the graue: forced to that vvord from Moses text alluded vnto. vvhere he hath: vvho shall goe beyond the sea? For sea & for the graue his [...] Elegantly serueth. Again S. Paul saith that Christ descended [...] David gaue him his phrase vvho in the 70. sayth in thanks for preservation from death: [...], Ps. 86. 13. For the coniunction that the soul hath vvith the body, to make one person, the terms propre to the body, are spoken of the soul: or of the vvhole person, as in Eph. 4. The Ps. 88. often cleareth the speach vvith other terms of equal force. My life is come nere Sheol, [...]. Sheol, Hell, nere death. Again: Thou hast set me in the pit [...] In darknes: & [...] by S. Pauls term, [...], by the 70. Again vvilt thou doe vvonders for the dead: Shal [...] the dead rise vp & prayse thee. And [...] here must be expounded. DEAD by the Hebrevv, & not as Galen [Page 6] vseth the term: and so HEL in the Crede, not as from Papists: but from our ovvn translations, vvher the matter telleth vvhat the term must mean. So I expounded S. Peter 1. 1. Ep-3. that his Godhead & Eternal Spirit made alive his Humanity: ioy­ning the soul to his body: vvhich spirit preached, at the begining, to the first spoken too for that by God: to them vvho by Iobs phrase, are novv but spirits, theyr bodies eaten by the vvaters, & (by sure rules from Es. 42.) are in prison. The sum of my exposition is in print. And yf your G. cannot see that I cleared Peter more then any before, it is because you neuer knevv the vse of Ebrevves, according to vvhose meaning the Apostles speak plainly: vvhere ignorance bredeth curiosity to troble all religion & all the vvorld, vnder pretence of deep study in the fathers: vvher the cause must be opened by an­cienter then the primitive Church, for any Turk or Ievv. Here also serued that comon saieng from Epiphanius: that all the fathers vvere in [...] & that Christ vvent to them: novv they be in heauen: VVhen the resurrection brought a nevv vvorld: and a nevv phrase for theyr place: Yet they nothing altered, theyr place but be yet in [...], in paradise, in heauen, in ioy. And an Ebrevv Child vvold soon conceave vvhat Epiphanius autourmeant. After 300. yeres vvhen the term [...] vvas left as par­ticular to the vvicked, & Christs case knovven: many Credes vvisely & lernedly left out the article: vvhich conteyned but absolute death, in a soul immortal: & vvithout the phrase, the matter vvas graunted. So Eusebius in his apologie medleth not vvith it: as conteyning no matter litigious among Chri­stians: so the Nicene Crede & Athanasius left it out. This vvas the sum of my speach: In this sense I handled the article. For the saluation of your G. desperately bent to burn for Gehenna for Ever. Your G. hath in print my mynd in the Epistle to the Lerned nobility. I requested your G. as you knovv, vvhen you ceazed vpon that Epistle, in 400. copies, to [Page 7] chose out 400. vvhom you vvould, (yf you mistrusted my choise) to iudge vvhether the Q. and the nobility vvith Doctors & all sortes vvere not vvel aduised vvhen they meāt to haue mended the breaches of the temple: & might, vvith small change, haue made former paynes, that in the Geneva, glorious for euer. And yf you mistrusted not your opinion, both here, & for the Bible, you could not mislike my petition. Ther your G. may see further my opinion. In further opening of this cause, that you may better see your fault, after I haue touched the Q iudgement (against vvhich you turned her auctority) a fuller declaration of the cause shalbe afforded. Novv for the Q. iudgement, & the vvhole realms. Let vs consyder vvhether I accused you iustly of tur­ning the Q. auctority against her oth: vvhen you vsed the high commissions gravity to greue me: So that the LL. vvere ashamed, & desyred me not to record it: and yet I did not tell the fourth part of those vnhonorable partes vvhich might iustly place you lovver vvher you should offend lesse. Thus I reason. Edvv. the sixt and his subiects held that Christ' his soule neuer vvent to Gehenna: The Q. & her subiectes set vp religion in the same sense: as all the first parlement vvil shevv: Therfore the Q & all her good subiects mean to die in this fayth that Christ vvent presently hence to Paradise. For K. Ed. Peter Martyr his chief, & Martin Bucer, Duo fulmina belli Scipiadae, as good divines as the vvorld savv these thousād yeres, vvho held the sterne of religion in the realm, they shevv the kings mynd. They vvere his tongue, and his hart. I mentioned your errour, somvvhat phantastical, among the Lerned of Basil: vvherupon they sought out Bucers mynd and P. M. and shevved Bucers Cathechism: and preached openly vpon the article in my mind: from both those rarely Lerned fathers, vvhō God so honored that theyr bones should not rot in the apo­statical Land that so soon shrank from Paradise to descend to Gehenna. Your tutor D. Pern might somvvhat deceaue you: [Page 8] But you should haue tryed the tongues your self. In this Q. time M. Anthony Cevalerius in Cambridge scholes spake afore the vvhole vniversity: that Sheol [...] neuer signified Gehenna: being 64. times vsed. D. P. heard him. And I heard of one that left the vniversity a litle before, vvho held this your mynd in ansvvearing for his degree: But vvas generally misliked. And beside him I neuer heard of any myne elder but all graunted that our L. Soule vvent presently to heauen: saying your G. into vvhose head by reason of your bare Latin studies for Infernus, the manifold poincts of this question cannot so soon be beatē. The [...] that to descend to Hell in the Crede is to go vp to heaven, maketh you so amazed, that you rage & take against all the realm. But I plainly accuse you. The realm knovveth the Q. oth. Novv let vs search the Scripture fully: both for this phrase, & the vvord Sheol [...] & [...]: & for the Prophets maner of speach for the vvorld to come. In the Scripture the lavv is to be loked vnto first: & therein the patriarchs tongue. Iacob sayeth vvhen he thought that Ioseph had ben dead: [...]. I vvil descend vnto my sonne mourning, into HEL. This one place might geue your grace sufficient vvarning that the heathen maner of speath VVhich the Patriarchs vvere to vse, taketh descending to Hel, for all Leauing of this vvorld, though a man goeth vnto the ioyes of God. You shall haue an other place, of the same Patriarch, speaking vnto his sonnes all, saving Ioseph. [...]. You shall cause my old age to descend vvith sorovv into HEL. There your G. hath it the secnd time. You may see a third place spoken amonge all the Patriarchs by Iudah vnto Ioseph for Beniamin, of Iacob: in the former vvords in in Gen. 44. 31. They be in substance the very same syllables. Thus thricevve haue the same: that in the mouth of three vvitnesses the matter may be setled to stand. And the auctorities [Page 9] be the strongest: These be tvvelve precious stones that make the right of iudgement on Aharons brest: VVhose speach for the vvorld of Soules vvhile you folovv: you folovv tvvelve sure foundations to build a Ierusalem from heauen. The Abridger of the tvvelue Apostles doctrin to make gates & vvindovves as clear as pearl, vvould be sure to take theyr phrase in theyr meaning: and as they vvould nothing troble the heathē but vse theyr speach as theyr streates: so the holy congregatiō that penned the Crede vvold as much tender the vveaknes of the vvorld. The later Ievves in Ezekiel 28. be the very same Ievvels that the Patriarchs vvere. Nine of the tvvelue he nameth: the very same stones: VVhere the 70. supply the other three: lest the heathens should maruel vvhy he vvent so far & stayed: & the revelation hath ten the Greek termes of Ex. 28. The [...] or Chalcedon cometh for Iudas Ievvel to illustrat a speciall scripture: Es. 54. VVhere the Apostles Ierusalem full of light is sent dovvne from heauen: vvith vvindovves of Chal­cedon: & gates of pearl. Also the Sardonyx is a nevv name geven to zabulon: as by S. Iohn. and Moses may surely be gathered: though one vvold think Beniamins onyx should haue the sardonyx. But his Ebreu jaspe calleth Iaspis from Zabulon. For Beniamin must be the first foundation: vvhen Ieroboam made Ioseph lose dignity So Chrysoprase is nevv made for Nepthali. Seing then the Apostles the reapers of that vvich others sovved, treade most carefully in theyr steppes, even for the very syllables of the Greke vvordes: and that for stones names: vve may be sure theyr disciples by theyr spirite vvold be as careful for phrases in the height of religion: for vvhich men be the stones of the Sanctuary: and the Garden of Eden: nolesse then Israel, vvhen King Hyram vvas amōgest them in the building of the temple. The knovv­ledge vvhether the soule commended in the last breath to the hand of God, departeth from the myrie clay that is a precious [Page 10] poinct: and a speach of it sure among Christians for an hea­venly meaning, and nothing offensive nor envious in heathē eares, must be held as a treasure deeply hid in a field, neuer to deare: Such is both Iacobs speach and the Speach of the Crede, the first & last vsed fully in the same sense: that, vvhen Ioseph vvas sold by Iudah for sicles: & thought of Iacob to be rent of vvicked beasts: & that of Christ, sould by Iudah sot mo sikles: & rent in hand & foot by vvicked dogs. Yf your G. vvold take leasure to think but vpon this much: you vvould never more think of Gehennaes HEL: to burn in defense, that Christ cōmending his soule vnto the father, had presently that lodging: but that his descēding to Hell vvas in our later lāguage, (later then Iacob: at the first vse 1600. yeres) going vp into heavens ioyes vnto the Kingdom of Heauen. Next Genesis, Iob is the most ancient: VVho both lived before Moses, &, as may be gessed, about tvventy yeare after him: Liuing 140. yeares after his affliction: afflicted vvhen Satan most bragged of General conquest. VVhich vvhen it vvas, God vvould most punish Israel. But Israel vvas most punished vvhen Moses vvas born a redresser. VVherfore Satans triumph & Iobs Patience then seem to haue shevved them selves. So Iob shalbe found to liue afore & after Moses. He for his father Abraham & mother Ketura fastened in the house of God: & more then his cosyns Eliphas Isakides, & Bildad, though of Ketura: This Iob disputing vvith four Prophets: & being nere the Leaving of this vvorld vvherby the vvorld to come should fitly fall into spech, should be the fittest to shevv the signification of Sheol: specially vvhen God him self cometh moderator of the question & vseth the like term. Iob speaketh of all men thus: That vvhen vve descend to sheol, vve come not euer vp hither: & our place knovveth vs no more. And he vvished that God vvould lay him vp in Sheol: till his change (in the resurrection) should come: and he loked that [Page 11] Sheol should be his house: & that all his hopes should de­scend vvith the Beer, [...] into Sheol. He that vvould ouerreach Iobs style should need vvisdome: as high as the heauens, deeper then Sheol, longer then the earth, broader then the sea: & should need his vvisdom: before vvhom Sheol is naked. And in speach of the vvicked: that as heat maketh a riddance of snovv: So doth Sheol of synnets: He meaneth by his open speach, but theyr riddance hence: as vvhen he commendeth theyr outvvard prosperity: for childrē many, & lusty; & for deliting pleasures, hovv they spend theyr dayes in prosperity: and go dovvn to Sheol in a mo­ment: And thus Iob speaketh, to four Prophets of Terahes diverse families in Arabia. And vvher God moderateth & mentioneth the vvorld to come, he sayth: Haue the gates of death ben revealed to thee? or canst thou see the gates of the shadovv? That vvhich Iob vvould haue termed Sheol, the Lord termeth death. And thus by Iobs book the controversy is decided: in Iobs tongue for Sheol a lodging to him self and to all men. Novv ther vvas neuer any book vvritten, since the pen became the tongue of a vvriter, of a more curious style then Iob: in verse of many sorts: & vse of vvords more nyce then any Greek or Latin vvriteth: & for Grammer hath more trickes & difficulty then all the Bible beside: arabizing much: but fuller of Ebrevve depth in language. God savv it needful to honour vvith a style of al ornaments the particular cause of Iob, lest it should be despised or thought a fayned matter, And therfore gaue that book a more curious style then any other part of the Bible hath: & such depth of skill in the tongue as no Rabbin could be thought euer to haue such in the holy tongue. In such a style [...] vvould be consydered in in his exact propriety: vsed in such a company of the best lerned princes for so many (all hauing the [Page 12] holy Ghost) that ever vvere in the vvorld: The prince of princes coming moderatour of the disputatiō So again the book of Iob alone might fully satisfie your G. that you should chose a better theme for your martyrdom then to burn for Gehenna from [...] or [...]: the Hell of our old translations, vvhich by [...] & nere consequent, is often that vvhich vve novv call Heaven. After Iob let vs se vvher to descend to Hell is vsed, next in time. In Num. 15. the rebellious companies descended aliue to Sheol, or Hel: they & all theyr Houses & substance descended to Sheol. Ther the matter telleth, that Gehenna cannot be meant, but a destruction from this vvorld: as in Deut. 32. vvher Moses prophecyeth of the nations destruction & Ieremy tvvice citeth his spech: Hovv an anger kindled burneth vnto Sheol. The next place of descending to Sheol is in Speach of Anna Samuels mother, hovv she greued long & greatly vvas avveary of her life, & at deaths dore: and sayth of the Lord: that he causeth to descend vnto sheol, & yet bringeth vp again. The next descending to sheol is in Davids tongue, in Psal. 55. vvishing Gods enemies a destruction hence. Let them descend to sheol alive. The phrase shevveth that he looked vnto Korah & his company, of vvhom, that they all perished for euer, none vvill soon determin. And that theyr bodies then vvent to Gehenna: that none vvil say. In Davids tongue for tvvo more the cause is clear: in speach to Salomon for Ioab: & in the same terms for Semei. Thou shalt not suffre his old age to descend to Sheol in peace: And, thou shalt cause his old age to descend to Sheol or Hell vvith blood. But nether Ioab nor Semei died out of Gods covenant: nether could Salomon send to Eternal destruction: nether vvished David that to his sisters sonns nor yet to Semei. And these be all the places for 3000. yeares: vvhere descending to Hell is vsed: none signifiyng Gehenna, directly: but oftener by consequent that vvich novv [Page 13] vve call Heaven. And that is most evident in Holy Ezekias: in a speach much like: I shall go into the gates of Hell: & so forth as I haue printed in myne Epistle vvhich you haue. Ther Ezekias hath other Speaches vvhich make this phrase voyd of all doubt. So in Ezekiel of a mighty kingdom, vvher all vvere given to death: vnto the lovvest earth; vnto the sonns of Adam vvhich descend vnto the pit often cometh the speach of descending to Sheol, for open destruction by the K. of Baby­lon In Apryes dayes: vvher Eternal destruction vvas dayly on Prophane Egypt: & Ezekiel telling of descent to Sheol once, tvvice, thrice four times could not Prophecy any nevves: but that vvhich they had since the nation vvas. And so again one Chapter of Ezekiel, vvold haue resolued your G. yf you read it, ether in Ebrevv or in Greek, and made you clean of an other mynde. In the Babylonian, soone after the Egyp­tian fall the like speaches haue theyr euent. He vvas the day star: & exalted vnto Heauen: but he vvas caused to descend, & his pride vvas caused to descend to Sheol, vvher, as heauen signified not the propre heauen, as novv vve speak: nether doth Hel meane the propre HEL, as novv vve speak. And these I trovv be all the places vvhere the Credes phrase: [...], cometh in the Scripture, saving for Caper­naum Matt. 11. nothing to our Question: vvhere Gehenna is neuer in the direct meaning. So that all Scripture refuseth to vvarrant you. And yf you search Scheol alone, thinking to defend a nevv made phrase it vvil help you nothing. In these senses it vvil come: for the lovvest place or case in this life: in Amos: yf they dig Sheol, thence my hand shall take them: as yf they goe vp into Heauen, thence I vvill cause them to descend. In the same tenour of speach David afore spake: Ps. 139, But that Hyperbole cannot be applyed hither. Like vnto that is the vvhales belly: a Sheol to Ionas: or the graue. But in ful privation hence it vvil signify Death. & in [Page 14] the bodies case the graue, and corruption by the povver of death. In the soule the state of separation from the body: or the vvorld vnseene hence. Dauid doth often take it for death: as in Ps. 18. & 2 Sa. 22. the snares of Sheol, death com­passed me about. There the matter telleth vvhat must be sig­nified: euen sorovves neare death. For full death, For all the good it cometh it in Psal. 89. vvhat man liueth that shall not see death; vvho can deliuer his soule from the Hand of Sheol, or HEL; as generally cometh it in Osee: Chap. 13. I vvill re­deeme them from Sheol: I vvill deliuer them from death. That S. Paul expoundeth to be meant of the resurrection of the faithfull bodies; deliuered from corruption. And more often by much doth Dauid vse the term for the Godly then for the vvicked. So the term alone vvill help nothing. That in Ps. 16. vvhence our contention began: thou vvilt not leaue my soule to Sheol; hath but this sense playne and comon: the vvorld of Soules separated from the body. So generally the Ievves a­greed in that sense: that they held in S. Peters time, and in the Talmud still: that Dauid died not: thincking that Da­uid spake of himself. S. Peter graunteth that spoken of one vvhose soule left not the body to see corruption; as Dauids did by all graunts; and shevveth hovv Dauid spake of Christ his resurrection. So 3000 turned to him. Yf he had vvres­ted the text to Gehenna: he had differed from their mea­ning touching the vvord. As death in the vvicked is Eter­nall death: so euery term of their destruction, is Eternall destruction. So Sheol may be by a consequent. But neuer in speach of the Godly: nor in the vvordes force. The sea­uenty translaters considering vvhat term in Greek vvas fittest to expresse Sheol the Ebrevv, they considered deeply that [...] vvas generally takē of Greeks, for all mens comō case after this Life. And for Sheol, vvher they trāslate it, they set [...] the Greek term▪ comōly. Novv & thē [...] Death. & for the Ebrevv [Page 15] term of death they have more then once: [...]. Dealing most suerly in the term as all Heathen vvould soone conceave their meaning. So about 60 times your G. vvilbe found ig­norant of theyr mind: & oftener of the Ebrevv: of all those textes: of all the matter depending theretvpon: and of all the Septuagintaes iudgment for Greek vvriters betvvixt Homer & Menander, vvho seemed to learne of them principles of Gods vnity: and better manners then he himself practised. Of theyr age he vvas: and then vvere infinite mo Grecians such as Clemens nameth, vvho perished afore our tyme: but endured beyond the birth of the Creed: vvher the Pen­ner vvould Look to the Septuaginta. So, as Esay raiseth vp an infinite company from Sheol to meet the Chaldean, in Like sort the Septuagint vvill raise against you:

Millia quot magnis nunquam venere Mycenis.

Let vs novv come to the nevv Testament. There vve shall see that Gehenna is vsed for your HEL: for that vvhich you vvould dravv the King of glory into: & Hades for the com­mon death, and state after. VVhen the Gates of Hades shall not hinder the building of the Church, vpon the ROCK vvhose vvork is perfect, Deut. 32. vvhom Peter acknovv­ledged to be the sonne of God: there that must be meant vvhich the prince of Darknes the old bloudy serpent vvith Seuen heads and ten horns vsed to hinder the buylding. But death by Roman Emperours vvas the instrument of his hin­derance. Therfore death so farr as they could send it is meant by the Gates of Hades. And so vvould any of Ezechi­as kingdom or Achilles souldiers vnderstand the speach. A­chilles shall speak anon in the Greeks army. Ezechias shall not dy vvhile Esays 38. Liueth: though he is novv in Ha­des: vvith all the Patriarchs: Abraham, and Lazarus, vvith Lazarus Marthas brother. That [...] in 1 Cor. 15. you knovv is the Holy bodyes Lodging. as [Page 16] that Apocal. 1. it. vvhich Iohn feared: that of ordinary death: & so the Ethiopian putteth death for it: & Sheol, for, Death. So vvhen the black horse brought famyn: the pale Death brought [...] In plenty: But Hel of Eternal sorovv vvas no nevves for the Romane emperours: therfore not it, but hastened death in abundance is there signified, as comonly in the old Testament in speach of the vvicked. Peter and Paul both citing the 16. Psalm: & to no further death then that vvhich all must feel, tvvo such vvitnesses should setle the matter against the best renovvmed D. vvho though he vvere exalted to Heauen: He should be brought to Hell, in striving vvith such tvvo champions. And thus all the nevv Testa­ment vvith all that folovv the Lamb on mount Sion 144. thousand vvil tel that theyr harpes be tuned as the Prophets: & none of them vse Hell for a Lodging, after our L: triumph against Satan here, & telleth that having performed all that vvas of combat, he gaue vp his spirit vnto the father: vvher Satan should never greve it, nor giue it a lodging. And thus for the phrase through the Scripture: your G. hath as many adversaries as ever had any man: The sonnes of Eber to every mothers sonne: as by records vve may vvell iudge of the vnrecorded seing all recorded be vniform. Novv yf your G. think good Let vs examin the vvhole tenour of Moses speach for the vvorld to come: hovv he hath no term for heaven nor Hell: as you term Hell. Yet maketh the cause more plain, then terms vvould in mans speach. In Leviticus cap. 26. vvhere he telleth vvhat recompence shalbe for Keping the Lavv: & vvhat punishment for breaking of it: there life Eternal & heauen: ther death Eternal, & Hell of late language vvere to be named, yf at all, in the Lavv. But ther silence is for that tenour: therfore it vvas to be, equally, at it is, in all the rest of the Lavv. There, for keping the Lavv store of fruicts: peace and victories, encrease of Children vvith all plenty is [Page 17] the revvard. Lastly cometh the sound revvard: That Gods tabernacle shalbe amongst his people: and his soule vvil not Loth them but he vvilbe theyr God: & they shalbe his people, Here is life euerlasting, in that they, being surely in the fa­vour of God, are for euer in the favour of God. On the contrary side: for breach of the Lavv: open punishments vpon punishments: and Lothing from God is propounded: such as they felt from Chuzans dayes vnto Bel-esh-zars death, still as they fell to idolatry. And this is the tenour of Moses. So for the Gospel: He shevveth that Adam, & all his, shall dy: & that the redemer shalbe pereed in his footstep, by the Serpent: & shall bruse to povvder the Serpents head. VVher vve see that he shovvs hovv matter opened here shall fully cary a victory, vvhen the percing of the foot is gone so far as it could greue. The term [...] is repeated Ps. 89. svvetly loking back to Gen. 3. & forevvard vnto Mat. 27. that vve should not look as Papists do: for alteration after the first passage hence. By this doctrin the Ievves concluded sound­ly that all vvho died holding the covenant, still they dvvelt in Gods tabernacle: and vvho so dyed in contempt or igno­rance of it (as all vvho despised to Go into the Arck) all they perished for euer: & became Spirits in ptison. Novv the Pro­phets vvho shevv that the lavv is performed in Christ they turn all these phrases vnto the Gospell as Amos in his con­clusion: & as David Ps. 67. vsing the high priests blessings vvordes: cited in Paules salutations, & as Ieremy, often tel­ling of God being our God, cited syllably in the Apocalyps. Novv as the performance is in this vvorld, & vve must be victors in Gods full favour here, that death should be but a passage vnto Life, so Christ vvas to performe absolute obedi­ence through all his infinite suffrings in his vnspeakeable feare, sorovv & panges, being amongst vs, vvher Satan reigneth: vvhere vve might iudge, & beleue. And so the Ps. 22. declareth [Page 18] his sorovves: and triumph, at his departure from vs. God prouiding in the best ordre for vs: that the vvork of our redemtion should not haue the last act in Gehennaes dark­nes: such as could never haue bene penned to Adams sōnes. Here I may record a vvofull matter of a Learned E­brevv: vvho coming vvithin a step of Christianity fell back to Gehenna through your opinion. And also I may vse a li­tle digression to call you to better attention: and regard of your cariage. Isaak Ben Arama is that Ievv. One of their best Learned, of all that commented vpon Moses: and vvho condemned all his ovvne side, that since Ierusalem vvas de­stroyed, they are void of all comfort in their meaning of the Prophets vvhile they look for a third temple: vvheras God presently despised both tabernacle and temple to shevv that he vvould rest onely in Christ: as S. Stephen vvitnessed. This Learned Ebrevv seing in Leuiticus 26. the continuall curses for breaking the Lavv: and the stories plaine through all their ages till they lost their kingdom and found slavery in Babylon: and no comfort touching those times but re­pentance there, to come home, as Daniel shevved: and then a promise of Christ: Ben Arama seeing this, cannot tell vvhat to say for his ovvne side. Then he cometh to vs. And saith that Christians from that text accept the jus­tice of Iesus. As both the Prophets afore the captiuitie Da­vid, Hosee, Ioel, Amos and Ieremy, and after, Daniel plainly, ioyne Christ his saluation vnto Leuiticus in that place. This being layd dovvne of him; then, from your store he bringeth a matter that ouerthrovveth all the good, thus: But, saith he, the Christians say that their Iesus vvēt to Gehēna and fetched thence all the fathers: and that none vvent to Heaven before his death. But that cannot stand vvith trueth, that the Prophets Abraham Isaak and Iacob and Moses should not be vvith God. Thus Isaak Ben A­rama, [Page 19] through your Gehenna found Gehenna for him­self. VVheras in trueth the fathers vvere in Inferis, in Hades, in Sheol, and are yet, by the old Latin, Greek & Ebrevv: and by nevv Ebrevv in paradise: vvhether at the first they vvent from this vvorld: as I touched, afore. The cursed vvorld that sought Diuinity from bare Latin, and mistaken Greek, not knovving hovv Sheol, [...] and Infe­ri is heauen to the faithfull, brought a Cancre vpon all our faith, and such roots of bitternes▪ that the comonaltie is in­fected, and the moistened is accompanied vvith the dry. Novv my L. vvhat gain can your G. have in deceaving all the realm to bring an heresie Papisticall into the Creed? Every syn findeth iust recompense: and to thrust into faith an he­resy that is a great syn: vvherfore all that you deceave must feel the hand of GOD. VVe haue bene plagued enough alreadie, in that, after more payments for defense of the Gospell, then have bene gathered in five hundred yeres (as my L. treasorer vvas told) yet at the spittle as I shevved your G. tvvelve in a cōpany said that vve vver never in such pitiful days for vncertainty in religion. I dare charg you that if you had Lerning & favour of the trueth that had ben comon ouer England vvhich is famous in Constantinople, that the Q▪ scholers for clearing the Bible more then it hath ben this thousand yeres, might be no small Hope for benefiting all Christendom: & vve should haue bene farr from such Lamentations. One learned man in your place might sone make the Bible as clear as any other book. Though your bare Latin studies vnable vvhiles you live to go through the first chapter of the nevv Testa mēt, vvould but deride such a cōfidence. You that could look vpō the little book of Scripture concēt, & see in the preface No­ahs families frō heathē & say that the vvriter troubled his head vvith questions trifling & vnprofitable, shevv that you come x x yeares studie too short to iudge of that paynes: to knovv hovv & to vvhat infinite vse the heathē vver brought vvitnesses [Page 20] through all the Bible. Let me aduise your G. to ioyn vvith the trueth: to pity your ovvne soul first, & aftervvards others deceaved by you: and be not of theyr number vvhich had rather (as D. Deny vvas knovven to say) go to Gehenna and dravv the People after them, then be knovven hovv vnlerned they are. I dare tell you that you knovv not one letter of that study vvhich D. Abraham Ruben the Ievv vvould re­quire: not one letter, to tell vvhether the Characters novv, vvere afore Ezra: in vvhich poinct yf you missed you maymed all the cause. And ful many an hundreth thousand opposi­tion vvhich you knovv not must be vevved in mynd for doing him good. Oh that a lerned man vvere in your place: to keep this Ievv from Gehenna. & by him ful many a thou­sand. He is thought by the Ievves of Prage to be one of the lernedst Ebrevves in the vvorld. A copy of his Epistle printed vvas sent frō Basil thither by a Ievv: and they think that he is su­rely turned by some things of myne. But of this I am sure that yf I should handle the Descent to Sheol in your meaning, or vvith M. Lively teach that the Ebrevv text is corrupt, I should hinder more then build. VVherfore I must first dravv you from your Gehenna: & shevv M. Livelies vnsetlednes before I can do any thing aright for this Ievv. But my digression may not be too long. & of M. L. at better leasure. Novv I vvill returne to shevv more largely that vvhich I touched from Le­viticus: & to resume the vvhole question hovv in all times men looked vnto salvation. Let vs then consyder the Bible throvgh quite, for the redemtion & the vvorld to come: hovv the Prophets spake of it. VVe see that Adam vvas made a king on earth: that he lost al by his carelesse dealing: that Christ by his infinite feare & heedtaking destroyeth all Satans vvorks. This much Moses shevveth in a sort not hid. Hereupon cometh by consequent, a resurrection to Adam: & a nevv vvorld vvher hee should have a nevv paradise. But this [Page 21] vvorld is by Adams trespas subiect to vanity: that the vvhole masse trauelleth looking for liberty vvith the sonnes of God. And for christ no afflictiōs at touched but such as he might feel, vvhile he could feele the sores of brusing his foots sole [...] It signifieth the vvhole [...]. Adam knevv that Satans seed vvould as vvell perce his hāds: repressing all his steps & vvorks: and that Christ must be buried & laid in the dust: & that all the victory for the vvorld to come, must be vvrought in this vvorld: that here the prince of this vvorld should leese all that he vvan: & in this vvorld the kingdome of heauen should bear open cō ­fession. Here Adam might see that Christ his vnspeakeable fear, had sad heauines according: heavynes that Adams sonnes so de­spized the king of glory: heavines to see that they vvould pe­rish for ever: heauines that in this vvorld they vvould haue his blood for ever vpon them: heauynes in highest measure that, (as Es. 53. telleth) God casted on him the sin of vs all: that the soules case not the bodies, and thought, & accompt, & feeling for soules caused such sorovves as Ps. 22. being most pathetical, could not vtter: vvith Ps. 55. & the 69. in the highest terms of sorovves that euer could be vttered. Nor Esay the most elo­quent oratour in Ch. 49. vvhere Christ sadly lamenteth hovv, to many his labour vvas in vain, & he should be the despised of all soules: & the abhorred of nations: & in Ch. 50. though he had the onely tongue to season speach & silence, he must give his back to the vvhippers: his cheekes to the buffeters: his face to the spite of spitters: & seing that in all this they vvould not consider, but lye in Eternall sorovv: He that loued man, and euery man more then all the vvomen in the vvorld loued their ovvne children, must needs haue infinit pangs for their destruc­tion. All these Prophecies conteyned not more then Adam might see: nor other many: & speciall, Esayes Ch. 53. An A­bridgement of S. Matthevv: But Adam had not one vvord of going to Gehenna: but your holding of that vvill proue [Page 22] that you neuer examined vpon vvhat speaches Adam held a iudgement for bliss & curse, to the children of God the blisse, & to the Serpents brood the curse in the vvorld to come. Thus I trovv, your opinion tha Christ vvas to go to Gehenna, vvil be out of Adams Diuinity: and be found to flovv from the Ser­pent the father of Lies & the murtherer. Adam knevv the Eter­nal loue of God: begōn here: & cōtinued for euer: & knevv suf­frings in this vvorld tokēs of blessings for the vvorld to come: but for suffrings to the soule alone out of this vvorld, to vvin iustice & victory against Satā, that Iarreth frō all Adās Diuinity: vvhich must fall vvith in vvords told in Gen. 3. vpon vvhich ground all further diuinity story is built: as Adam knevv that particular ages should haue more seuerall remembrances but all to his sum of faith: So all Sacrifices, Noahs, Abrahams, Mosehs, signified a iustice vvrought in this vvorld: and none could signifie a Gehennean Lodging. Nether Abel crying af­ter his death, nor Isaak in a similitude receaued from death: nor the Scapegoat or birds loosed, nor any thing in all Sacrifices euer could signifie a going to Gehenna: seing it standeth vpon, not a phrase or any one term: but a generall rule: That all are dead in Adam; and yf they hold not life by Christ, they abide still dead in their sinnes: slaues of the serpent: partakers vvith him of infinit vvo from God. Where Moses saith; I kil and I make aliue: In that one place Abenczra vvould haue the resurrection in open phrase to be taught. Diuinity vvill suffer it: But a Sa­ducy vvould not so take it: for the vvords may be taken thus: I keep aliue some, vvhen I kil others their equals in vigour. The tabernacle of this vvorld, & of the Angels vvorld: and the high Sacrificers blessing these conteyned a dvvelling vvith God vnli­mited: & therfore Eternal: and life in Gods redemtion vvas vvithout limitation: as, Death, in his anger. But for Hell, a place of Deuils: that Mosehs Grammer vvil neuer afford you. As neuer Heauen in propre term, for soules; though by conse­quent [Page 23] the Godly naming themselves pilgrims here, import they looked for a citie vvherof God vvas the Builder. So a bet­ter case is collected, by consequent of matter, not by direct term of Heauen. It vvilbe thought strange that your G. a D. & [...] should be ignorant of these groundes for Diuinity. Novv let vs behold the Prophets, the Historique, & the other, the commenters vpon Lavv & story. For Iosua, Iudges, Samu­el, & the Kings, Abigaels speach to Dauid, that his soule should be in the band of the Liuing, & Eliahs taking vp: the one for phrase, the other for action are holden the plainest for Heauen. Yet some turn Abigaels vvords to a safety in Life, through great Dangers: VVhere Saul & his should shorten their dayes. And it is sure that she spake in that sense: that she looked for him to become king: & vvould not be teaching a Prophet assurance of Eternal Life: as bringing ovvles to Athens. The Ievves of true religion appearing thrice a year afore the face of God, knevv that vvhen this tabernacle vvas dissolued, they should haue a dvvelling in the heauens: But so spake that the vvrangling hea­thē should not stumble at their paths. In 2. Sam. 7. The king­dom of Christ altogether taught of Life Eternal: though the Speach to this day is taken of Ievves for pompe here. When the Ievves open Policy vvas dissolued then Daniel in most plentiful sort openeth the Spirituality of Christ his kingdom: hovv his Enemies vvere cast into fire burning vvithout Limitation, that is for euer: And vvhen he shevveth that Antiochus Epiphanes shall beeeaue the Ievves of Earthly comfort, then most fitly he comforteth them in the better resurrectiō, such as resisted him: & so S. Paul to the Ebrevves mentioneth those affaires: as Da­niel stood most carefully vpon the story of Antiochus: to let all vnderstād the last affliction of Gods people, before the coming of Christ. But Daniel hath no term for soules distinction gon hence: & he shevveth that Christ being killed, [...] Not letting death season vpon him but riseth, so doth bring in Eternal ius­tice. [Page 24] Your Gehenna came neuer in his mind. The Angel sent from Heauen spake vvhat he penned: & the Angel knevv that God ordeined a more certain course, for ease and clearnes of Sal­uation, then to ty soules to beleeue a iourny of a soule, to vvork merit in Darknes among spirits, vvhich iourny no pen could c­uer tell, nor hart conceaue vvhen it vvere told, vvhat he should do ther: or hovv he could suffer there: or hovv the body should vvin by the soules pain vvithout the body. And thus vve see hovv through the Prophets they vvere taught of redemtion. And in the nevv death & resurrection very often seen. But no going to Gehenna. Yf I vvrote but thus much the cause vvere fully concluded against your G. Yet for all plenty of store, I vvil ioyn vvriters not [...] but allovved for so much as I bring & much more by the Eternall spirit: and therfore may go vnder the former Title, of Serching the scriptures and the holy doctrine, for heauen: The Rabbins inuenting of nevv phrases for to expound the generalty of Sheol & the prophane Greeks for [...] their Hell. Thus the cause vvilbe so handled that fu­ther kindes of studie can not be required. For all the nevv Testa­ment is either from the old, or from the Rabbines, or from the prophane Greeks. And vvhen it is made vp from the old Te­stamēt, either vvhē the Apostles translate of them selues, as they do ful often, by prophane Greeks Language, or cite the Septua­ginta, vvhich borovved their vvords from Heathē, in both kindes the heathen must be looked vnto. So much is void of controuersie, that so far Greeks must be regarded. The Septua­gint is of so great auctority that for the main poinct of Saluatiō [...], to end Moses Lavves, that is cited vvhich is far of in Ebrevv: & this could haue no auctority but as from [...], holden Prophets scholers. And so for [...] they must be thought the best for the vse of the term. As for [...] frō Ps 110. (vvhich Greek stile the holy Ghost for that Ps allovveth at the least in tvventie parcels) Ecclesiastical disci­pline [Page 25] is cleared exceedingly. But of the 70. I haue little novv to say saving for inducement to moue the vnlearned & vnstayed to think better of Rabbins for many things, and of prophane Greeks. The very Septuagint vvere of the ancient Rabbins, & others of holy faith as Symeon the iust. Luk. 2. and others of great Learning: as Gamaliel, and the Chaldy paraphrastes. None but the senseles vvill despise such. For the Rabbins the most Learned Ebrevv Doctors, this much is famous; that a­gainst Sadduces, that denied the resurrection, and relyed in pre­tense vpon Moses vvords, they from Moses matter & assurāce of Doctrin invented very profitably these terms. The vvorld to come: [...]: The day of iudgement [...] Gehinnom, [...], the valley of Hinnō. The iudgemēt of Geenna [...] all these vsuall in Zohar. The second death. Onkelos Deut. 33. Ap. 20. The Garden of Paradise. [...]. The tree of Life: [...]. And a feast in the vvorld to come, in the Chal­dy of Iob. And in the Lavv & Prophets [...] Sheol contey­neth all these states being vnfolded. And because the Sadduces admitted but the Lavv; as the Doctors comō places also reduced all vnto the Lavv: The godly Doctors termed all the holy books the Lavv: Saned. fol. 92. And so the the term Lavv is vsed in S. Iohn. 10. & Rom. 3. And for the comfort of the Godly, that they dy not, but pas from death to Life, they called dying a deliuerance or setting free. as in Zeror vpon Ex. 17. Iosuah [...] at the time of his deliuerance hence, &c. Phil. So S. Paul spaketh [...]. And so [...]. The Syria (que) hath the Rabbi (que) term [...] very Lernedly. And all this vvas bred for distinctiō of matter about Sheol: because the Prophets comonly vsed comon terms of the vvorld; that the vvicked, as all be at the first, should not be tro­bled aboue their reach. Novv he that thinketh that Sheol sig­nifieth Gehenna more then Heauen, vvilbe ignorant of all this, [Page 26] & in a vvorld or Cimmerian darknes, or Aegyptian palpable myrknes. [...] in the 70. and Infernus or Hell, for it vvill as vvell catch a D. in Babish infācy for Diuinity. And this much for the Ebrevv Doctors fom vvhom the Apostles haue full ma­ny an hundreth [...] or membre of speah plain by conference vvith them, othervvise vnexplicable. Novv let vs consider the heathen Greeks, as the heathen lend the Apostles theyr vvords to teach them Life: and as the prouidence of God vvas vvonderfull gratious in giuing to Macedonians 300. yere raign ouer 72. kingdoms in the North, & in all the South; that from the vvest, Greek should go over all the vvorld by the Apostles tymes. And before great Alexander God gaue Grecians such svveetnes & vvhitenes and vvittines of speach, that to this day, they beare svvay over the vvorld: &. vvere still specially studied at the first over the vvest. Such as knovv not their vse for the tabernacle of the nevv Testament, vvill build in quirks of La­tin distinctions, being as silk vvorms thred vnlavvfull, as from vnclean vvorms. The vniuersall concent of a tongue spred o­uer many nations, & the Chiefest and most ancient next the E­brevv, ancient vvith the Eldest bred at Babel, & largest in vse, such consent and concent vvilbe holden of force vnuincible: a­gainst vvhich yf the Creed had ben penned for [...] the peruer­ting of an vsuall term had more hindered then any difficulty in the Mysterie of redemtion shake avvay the careles & contemtu­ous. As to speak in a language othervvise then any that euer v­sed the language for an hourely matter, that must needs argue the full extremity of all badnes and brainles folly. Amongst Greeks for [...] as for all Greek popular Maeonides that best knevv the old Greek of all countreys of Cittim, & Elisa, & hath bene follovved vnto the Apostles age, and of them for [...] (as I counted) & for [...] doubtles [...], & in­finitely, this old poet is vvorthiest to come first. And in him old Nestor 90 y. old, vvho vvould, setting curiosity aside, speak [Page 27] in simple antiquity. From his mouth flovveth an oration svvee­ter then hony for this matter, for he hath the very phrase of our Greek Creed: [...]. Thus he speaketh before the nobles of Graecia for the comon passage of the vvorld, in souldiers slain: Iliad. Eta:

[...]
[...].
Warre shed their blood: But their soules be gone down to Hell.

Old Nestor speaketh as Iacob, Iob, Anna, Dauid, Ezekias, the comon terms of death. And yf the Church of Pylos had vsed his phrase in any other meaning, yong mē & mayds, old men and Babes, vvould continually haue stumbled to more danger then vvant of Battlements to the rooff of an house, & vvant of couering to a vvell vvould haue caused in Iudea. And he that commaunded plain matters of comon discretion vnder then requireth greater Heed-taking for soules, that no Pachadh, [...]or Pachath as Esay and Ieremy speak: no grin nor spring be [...]ayd in soules vvay: nor any thing spokē in corners of speach vvher the simple vvould trip and be entrapped. I commend not our doubtful vsage of Hell: but seing a thing don cannot be vndon, I shevv that the trap must be looked vnto. Your G. vvho say the Q. vvill not haue the translation amended, as though the Realm had giuen her auctoritie for Atheisme, your G. must ansvvear, vvho your self being entrapped vvill burn to Entrap others, you must ansvver for the cōtinuance of the stum­bling block. And but that you hould back from the learned nobility 400 Epistles, as though your bare Latin vvere compa­rable to all their Lerning, or your care for the Realm compara­ble to theirs, so many nobles had removed the blocks much avvay by this time: & they all vvith all their attendants vvould haue persvvaded or suaded at the least not to sindge any more for Love of Gehenna to be a Lodging after a soule is com­mended to the faithfull Creator, then Ananias, Azarias & Mi­sael, [Page 28] lost of their hayr for the Idol of Chaldy religion, against vvhich not for vvhich they gave their bodies to the fier. And thus yf you vvill try Lerning by Antiquity Old Nestor vvill tell in vvhat Sense Argiui vvould vnderstand the Creed euen at the first sight: & befool the penner yf by any other sense he laid a snare vnder terms of a knovven & solenne meaning. Novv that one svvallovv make not a summer: you shall haue more not svvallovvs, but soules svvallovved of death in this phrase. Andromache Hectors vvife & S. Paules cuntrey—vvoman of Cilicia, she speaking of her seauen brethren kild in one day by Achilles saith:

[...].

As Tarsus spake Greek so did the rest of Cilicia, or at the least Fomer knovving all their maners of tongues vvould bring for a Q. the chief Dialect: & yf S. Paul had sent thither [...] in any other sense, the vniuersity of Tarsus (great Lernd thence arose) vvould haue said: Athens had not so great occasion to say that for the resurrection you brought strange things into their eares: as vve have for your article of Going to Liuels Lodging: vve speak [...] of all that dy. Are you appointed to teach vs nevv Greek; and to build a nevv Babylon. Our mindes may admit nevv Lavves; but not nevv Languages. To this absurditie your G. should bring the Holy Apostle; vvho yet knevv tongues better then all Corinth, & Greek, excellent vvell of a Child. And he that knevv hovv milk is for Babes, vvould neuer giue an article of plain vvords for a meaning neuer heard, and vnpossible to be proued: and neuer disputed in Scripture. Novv for Tro as or Tiras, Hector to his vvife speaketh of the phrase more fully, vvhen she desired him not to hazard his Life:

[...]
[...]
[...]

[Page 29]Here Tiras nation speak, that all once come to the vvorld, must be sent or go to Hel in the Creed term. And Maeonides him self, he spake in the same sort of Hectors soule: vvhen Achilles killeth him:

[...].
His soule fleeing out of the body went to Hell.

And this cometh in Homers ovvne phrase: vvherin he cōteyneth the maner of the Dialect of Smyrna, Rhodos, Colophon, Salamis, Chios, Argos, Athenae, vvhich all Chalenge him to be their countreyman. Novv the Revelation had made Smyrna astonished, yf [...] had ben in any other senses then Homer and their countreymen spake: as the placing of [...] later, shevveth also that [...] conteyneth not a more greuous state, but the later terme expoundeth the former: and in your G. Greek Smyrna had ben at the vvittes end. But in Homers Lan­guage and the Apocalyps style they vvould assure them selves of a fixed sense, for a soules leaving of this Life, and having a con­tinuance in the other vvorld: even as Orpheus hath it:

[...].

And Archilles in Phthia speakes in the same tenour, a patron of playnness, vvho hated a man Like the Gates of Hell, vvho vvould have one thing ready on his tongue, and an other closed in his brest: thus he speaketh, as for S. Mathevv and Ezekias. I did glance at the matter before. Thus Tethys sonn uttereth his plain hart:

[...]
[...]

In comparing Homer vvith the Bible, vve may see that to be most true vvhich the Talmud and Talmudists cite infinitely, thus: [...] The Lavv speaketh according to the tongue of the sonnes of Adam. Novv if the penner of the Creed had gone from the maner of all the Bible and of Adams sonnes, it hath ben a cursed vvork. And thus Homer telleth vs [Page 30] of a great part of he vvorld: vvhat they vvould say ought to be meant by [...] yf the teachers meant plainly: as they must do yf they came from God. VVe may here a litle digresse to other nations, and the ground of Divinity, & after come fresh againe to Homer, & his folovvers. The Aethiopians meaning I shevved from their translation that they put Death for [...] & Sheol for death. And so did the 70. in Es. 28. So all the South about the Apostles age (of such great antiquity they hold their translation, and part to be the APOstles ovvne vvork) all the South, all of the old vvilbe against you. As for the Syriaque they take Sheol stil as the Ebrevv, & in their tongue our L. spake, & it is the tongue only vvhich the nevv Testament calleth Ebrevv. Though Academiques call the Prophets tongue by that term. So our Lords example, vsing Syriaque as the vvorld then did vse it, shevveth that his Apostles vvould vse Greek as the vvorld then did vse it. As vve see not onely for vvords but also for matter that they never give any Lavv for maners but agreable to the Heathens native light planted in their harts at their coming to the vvorld: kindling that vvhich corruption had quenched; & so their terms for vertues and vices they take them from Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Demosthenes & such, & not a litle from Homer. And for faith, S. Paul telleth tou­ching his difference from his nation that it stood then onely in this, that Christ vvas to suffre: and being the first that riseth frō the dead, should shevv light vnto the vvorld. This he maketh his difference from the nation. All other poincts of Divinity and the Ecclesiasticall Discipline terms, I dare vndertake to shevv from Maymony & the tvvo Talmudes: even the phrase of Loosing & Binding, in the making of a D. absolute by the Sane­drin, vvith Imposition of Hands. So the term [...] is their ordinary for the Bishops of every congregati­on, infinitely vsed. As the term [...] in S. Paul is iust as in the 70. in Moses, the Kings, the Prophets and Nehemias, aud [Page 31] in Ester in some editions: vvhence your G. should have fetched the signification of it. And as our L. repressing the sonnes of Zebedy, deeming that his kingdome should be vvordly, telleth the difference, that Kings of the vvorld commaund vvith abso­lute authority: dealing in plain matters knovven to the natural man for comon profit: but they his scholers to teach divinity should be servants: dealing in matters beyond comon affecti­on or the natural mans reach, & hardly taught vvithout infinite service and patience: vvherin as Moses and Paul compare them­selves to nurses cherishing the children, so all Divines must be servants carying by Doctrine vnto Christ, and not by Cerberus Iaylourship make themselves slaves of Satan, Pharaohs over Israel: and not the Horses and Charets, in Eliahs sense; so also the Ebrevves have the same very phrase of service, in all that gover­ned in Divinity; and namely of Moses: hovv he spent 40. yeares in Pharaohs court: 40. yeares in sheepheardy; & vvas a servant to Israel 40. yeares: Shemoth Rabba, In like sorte D. Kimchi vp­on 1 Chron. 24. shevveth that David might not appoint one of the Sacrificers above an other: not so much as to appoint vvho should be first; but committed the Lots to God. And the high Sacrificer had no auctority over others by his place: not so much as to be of the Sanedrin for his office, vnlesse further ler­ning did commend him. And as S. Peter commaundeth [...] so ther is an expressed Lavv for the [...], the Seniors in these vvordes, in Maymony Tom. 4. Haleca Sanedrin Per. 15 fol. 247. of the later editiō & Lesser vol. [...]

So yf your Grace vvould knovv vvhat [...] signified and vvith conscience have handled the matter, you might best have knovven yf you had framed your study at the first to the [Page 32] Ebrevves maner: to have knovven Moses languages, and the Hebrevv Doctors calling of him to comon places: and hovv all the nevv Testament is framed to those comon places: & vvilbe never othervvise so clearly vnderstood as by that course: being bent to allovv the former good & to dash the traditiōs Popelike of the Pharisees. The Greek tongue vvould have told you, even in the first Chapter of Genesis in Adam before his fall, that [...] signified not a tyranny but a most Lavvfull & synles government: and again, the Ps. 110. the [...] vvherof are cited aboue 20. times of the holy Ghost in the nevv Testament, vseth [...] of Christ. The Greek tongue vvould have kept you aright for [...] and [...] 20. Mat. 25. that they are all one vvith [...] and [...] Luk 22. 25. in the greatest benefactours and enrichers of the kingdomes called for theyr desert [...], of the Peo­ple, rejoycing in theyr government: and the Rule or Canon that Sanedrin or [...] might not [...] (as S. Paul 1. Tim. 2. translateth [...] from Ester) this vvould have kept you from perverting the tongue, and marring all Divinity & disci­pline. You feign that our L. condemned heathen Rulers. Mark vvhither you rush. So the Zebedeans should have no re­presment: but all might hold the Iudaisme of Rambam Tom. 1. fol. 50. that Messias Kingdom shalbe pompous in Israel: So our L. might by Heathen Lavves have bene blamed fully: vvhich God forbid. So the Iudaisme that Israel might obey no King but of Israel, had bene confirmed by the Gospel, against Rom. 13. So all Kinges should need a Pope to overrule them: So our L. should have made a Lavv against comon experience: vvhich hath Gods auctority. See then hovv you run: missing of the ground: not knovving the Greek tongue by vvhich the nevv Testament must be expounded: (as all Ievves vvill graunt & require for the vvords) & for matter may in no case bring any nevv article: but as Paul hath [...] from [...] [Page 33] Dan. 9. most exactly translated, in his article of difference ha­ving the exact propriety on his side: so still articles of the Creed must haue such exact playnes that all vvicked may knovv vvhat they mean no lesse then the godly: and all godly children seaven yeares old, may clearly take them in the right meaning. Your G. is blamed in print, as I vvrot vnto you, in this case vvhich I vvill shevv briefly. A certen learned man, better learned then yourself, as it seemeth by his overreaching of you, vvas greatly grieved, that you played the Rex in taunting of him, and yet not the Rex properly: fatherly mildnes should be in a King, and all modesty: you vvere to sharp vvith him vvithout reason in checks as he thought from your ovvne auctority. Thē he told you that you ought not [...], then you re­plyed that [...] signified a tyrannical government: thē he rejoyned that of Christ it vvas spoken in the Ps. 110. and he hoped that you held him to be no Tyrant. Your Rebutter vvas [...], thus. And do you allovv the 70. Greek? Good my L. dare you dissalovv that Psalme for Greek, vvhose very syllables the holy Ghost citeth to the Ebrevves to dravv all unto Christ, & in the Gospell in parcels & times above 20. at the least? Be­sides my L. many an hundreth thousand times doeth the A­postles style expresse Ebrevv in the 70. peculiar maner: that you can hardly find five vvords together vvherof four be not in the 70. And yf the 70. Greek be not [...], vvhence vvill you expound the nevv Testament. Thus your Grace befooled the very rock of our salvation, and vvere accused to the Lords for vvorking the Eternal shame of our nation. Yf the Papists charge vs that the Chiefest preferred scholer in England knovv­eth not one line of the Nevv Testament, nor one vvord from vvhat auctority to vvarrant a translation, vve may be thought the most brutish & senseles of any nation vnder the cope of Heaven. And dare you burn for [...], that Gehen­na is meant by it: not knovving the Sepuuagint: and lesse Hea­then [Page 34] Greek? It is no marvayl that you accused my studies to the Q. of [...], seing you have no fansy to any Greek in the vvorld: that for Greek or Ebrevv can not speak to one vvord of either Testament, by former Greeks, & auctours authentical to Ievves, vvhat may constantly be affirmed These four vvords [...] my Lord vvhēce vvould you expoūd them. The general Greek by Peculiarity of matter maketh [...] a propre tenour of meaning, so that general Greek must be knovven, and yf in Heathen sense it can not stand, then the 70. and imitation of the Ebrevv phrase must be conside­red. And the Grace of a vvitty vvriter handling matters of diverse kindes, standeth, (in plain matrers) in Equivocation of a term serving all his purposes. So in [...] vvhether Generation, or Kindred, or story ought to be meant, the matter vvill tell. Neyther the house of Salomon nor the house of Abiud belongeth to the generation of Christ. Neither vvas that S. Mathevves purpose but he shevveth frō vvhat old pro­messe from God to Abraham to give him Canaan David vvas a King there, and Salomons House: and the Enheritance came to Christ; vvhom Herod therin feared: and therefore sought to kill him. And to that end he shevved the roll of the kindred, not of the Generation of Iesus Christ. The speach serveth most vvittily also as a proposition to all the Gos­pel, as [...] Gen. 25. [...] signifieth story. VVithout the 70. these four first vvords could never be vnderstood. So your G. vvould make our nation a vvonder of the vvorld, despising the 70. vvhose skil for applying heathen Greek first to Ebrevv true divinity all the vvorld admired: & the holy Ghost through the nevv Testament continually celebrateth: that vve have a three­fold thred, the nevv Testament, the 70. & the heathen. And he that cannot handle all these three is not fit to be [...]. And here I appeal vnto al the realm hovv fit you vver to repressmine Epistle for translating the Bible; vvho your self knovv not so [Page 35] much as one vvord of the Greek Testament, frō vvhat auctours it hath certenty & lesse in the old. But I vvill novv leave both Testaments, & regress to the Creed, penned for the simple Hea­then in the very phrase vvherin they nourished the immortality of soules in mention of death, that men should not be thought to dy as horses: but to have an other vvorld: hovv [...] the Creeds phrase vvas infinitely in speach among Hea­then in the Septuagintaes sense, & the rulers of divinity: & [...] signifieth but the vvorld of the dead, vvher immortal soules cō ­tinued. In Homers Odysseâ in Lambda vve have a vvhole book for the vvorld of Soules vntormēted, but continuing togeather. In the fable the substance of trueth must be imbraced, that Iape­tionidae rightly taught the soules immortality in an other vvorld called [...], & termed death, to the Soule immortal: a De­scending to [...] Hell. Thus of Tiresias Vlisses vvho vvent thither speaketh;

[...]
His soule went into a Chamber within Hell.

And the mother of Laertiades geveth him a general rule that vvhen bodies dy, then [...]

[...].

And of Oedipus mother he sayth, hovv vvhen she died [...]

So Agamemnon complayneth that Clytemnestra [...]

[...], vvould not so much as shut his eyes vvhen he vvent to Hell, to the vvorld of soules. In the same sorte Aeacides spirit asketh Vlissen hovv he durst come to the vvorld of soules, to Hel.

[...]
[...]

This distichon standeth as a Dictionary for Hades, vvhat place it is, against vvhich yf the [...] had gone, it hath bene a skoph [Page 36] to Hellas, and had hindered all the proceeding of the Gospell. But the Creed vvas penned vvith all circumspection: that vvhen some Arian objected basenes that Christ vvent to [...] Gregory Nazianzen ansvveared that thence he brought soules to the body: but they vver just soules: therfore by him [...] is the comon lodg­ment of all soules, vnjust and just. And so Eustathius Bishop of Thessalonice expoundeth [...] to be the Lot of all that dy, admitting Homers phrase; on vvhom he commenteth hovv all Greeks after him speak in his kind. And this much for Homer: of others the rarer may be cited: the comon are in all Hands. Anacreon hath not much, yet he hath in comon ra [...]e:

[...].
[...].

Simonides the vvittiest despising lifes shortnes and vanity telleth among other sundry vanityes vvhat riddance vvar maketh, [...]. And as in Melanippide God is [...], the Bishop of the immortall soule: so Ibycus of the soule saith [...]. [...]. For Love of pain­ful vertue Achilles and Aiax vvent to Hell. Litle of Sappho and Ibycus, as of the Last cited, came to our age: a fevv Lines: yet both make [...] theyr end: both vvorst and least fearing punish­ment. Tragiques are infinit in this: and Euripides beginneth here: defining [...], in his very first vvords:

[...]
[...].

And Lycophron that of purpose studied for hard Langage, yet here in he could fayn non, but must take for the vvorld to come, the comon: and in one Tragedy ten times runneth on Hades hovv [...]. For Athenaeans comōly, their Epigram of 4000 slain vvil serve, for Isaeus, Aesch. Dem. &c. [...], They made Hel their common game. By Hip­pocrat. Cous [...]. And for the Septuagintaes age [Page 37] Menander telleth hovv Greek vvent then: vvho thus speaketh of the dead to comfort one mourning.

[...]. And for [...] in one sense Plutarch fitly ioyneth Aeschylus vvith an o­ther. Aeschylus sayth:

[...],
[...].
Men are not well aduised that hate death:
which is the best medicine of all euels.

In Plutarch one ansvveareth:

[...].
[...].
[...].

that is,

O Death D of Physi (que) come.
For Hell is the onely hauen of the earth.
Having Haiden my helper I feare not shadowes.

For further auctors extant in Plutarchs time all of one mynd, Plutarch comforting his frend vpon a Godly sōnes death, that he vvas in Hell, & therfore in good case, and citing Pindarus, Plato, & others many, and as to one of hys mynd, for the term Hades he may be as an vvhole Library. And for plain sayings that they meant ioyes of high degree to be in death Pythagoraes Golden verses conclude that:

[...]
[...].

And the same vvas their General opinion, and not propre to the Samian Philosopher our old Cantabrigiā. Sophocles vvho sayth in [...]

[...].
He is better at case that is in Hell, then sick past help.

The same elsvvher telleth that they be [...] that are dead. And so spake Latins. Scipio vvent by Tully, as all, to Inferos: Yet had his place in Heauen. Leonidas in Herodotus harting [Page 38] 300. against Xerxes Army, told that they should sup [...] a­pud Inferos, by Tully. The argument aymed at a better case. Novv hovv did the heathen term the place of Torment? For that, Plutarch citeth Plato: & He, Homer. [...] is the Iayl. Homer is vvonderfull herein: & teacheth that our old fa­ther Iapetus very carefully deliuered to his posterity the true re­ligion, of the creation and of Angels fall & [...] Sin de­ceauing Man. And it is no Lesse marueyl that the Holy Ghost by S. Peter calleth Homers vvords from the fable vnto Iaphets trueth. Thus Iuppiter threateneth his Angels disobeying, to cast ech into [...], by the comment ry & prose term, Black Tartarus,

[...].
[...].
[...],
[...].
I will the disobedient into black Tartarus cast
where ther is a black Dungeon vnder the earth.
wher be steel gates: and a floor of Brasse.

As far beneath [...] Hades as heauen is from the earth.

So the Prison is Tartarus: The rest of all escaping prison is [...]. Moreouer [...] the Chain that can hold all nature fast, is in Homer, in the same speach. VVhen S. Peter telleth hovv God condemned the Angels [...], he ta­keth all the vvords from Homer and his prose commentary, cal­ling the fable to an old trueth. And seing the highest so co­meth dovvn to the capacity of Greeks dravving them euen by their fables phrases vnto the trueth: vve may be sure he vvould neuer thrust into the Creed, a speach against their vniuersal iudgement. None may say that the H. Gh. knevv not Ho­mers phrase: and reason telleth that profitably his place is tou­ched, and nothing falleth out by chaunce. Therfore S. Peter vvas directed by Gods vvisdome to temper his style to the Hea­then [Page 39] capacities euen in their fable: as, [...], in Plutarch: Fables touch the trueth. So for [...] Syn: she is [...]:

Sin, the Eldest Daughter of the Spirit, maketh all men sin.

And in this speach Agamemnon confessing his sin to Achilles, sayth that not he but sin vvrought Achilles iniury. In Ly­dia the Poët lerned Ebrevvish Greek: and much matter har­ping vpō trueth. The heathen vvould soon beleue that it pas­seth mans capacity to knovv vvher soules be tormented: but that God keepeth them in Chaynes of Darknes by his povver, their ovvn speach vvould soon make them vnderstand that. The Rabbins from the creation-story speaches before all orna­ments came to be made, vvhen yet Darknes vvas vpon the deep, call the Place of Torment [...]. The graue is also called by that, once in Paul. But in speach of the damned & of soules, it signifieth the place of torment. As in Zohar. Gen. 1. v. 2. the Ievves so spake, the Deuels vsed the same term Luc. 8. 31. vvho desired the Lord that he vvould not commaund them to go into the pit, [...] by the Syria (que) folovving the Rabbi (que) term. And in Papistry dravving to the Lake burning vvith fier and Brimston, as Dauid Ps. 11. closly noted from Gen. 19. Eternal destruction, the KEYS of [...] is a speach allovved by God from the comon maner. VVher this Abyssos or deep Pit lyeth, (that they Lie in a deep dark fiery dungeon, and yet are sene of the holy) vvisdome forbiddeth to serch. The Ievves from Esays last verse, place it in the High, in Cether Malcuth, Page 11. vvith astonishment at Gods counsell, that ioy & Torment should be so near in Place. The phrases of Abrahams bosom & the Epicures flames are in the same te­nour: Luk. 16. And so in Ap. 14. All that haue the mark of the beast that pretendeth the hornes & auctority of Christ they shalbe tormented in fier & Brimston before the Holy Angels & the Lamb. Novv vvhosoeuer vvill burn in defence of this posi­tion. [Page 40] The humane soule of Christ vvent to Gehenna, he ther­in hath the mark of Papistry: therefore, yf he burn for Gehenna he shall burn in Gehenna, and before the throne of the Lamb for euer & euer. VVhere torment shalbe, I determin not, nor your G. I trovv. And that is no part of our difference. But I novv dispute onely of the speach. Your G. seeth hovv God speaketh, as Greeks & Ebrevv schoolmen, that no [...] could euer haue taken place: yf none might deale vvith ruling for Diuinity but such as had spent their age in the tongues of both testaments: vvhose paynes vvhen bare Latin can persuade Princes & counsellers that they be but fansies, & curious quirks, it is no marueyle yf such turn auctority against the fayth vnder­taken to be defended. And novv I vvill make an End. I haue shevved hovv for your G. good, that you should not burn for Gehenna, lest you burn in Gehenna, I handled this cause: be­ing certefied that your tongue, vvhich could say, (as you knovv hovv I accused you to the LL.) that yf I vvere so highly prefer­red as you all the Kings of Christendom could not rule me, this tongue vvould embreath matter into the Q. eares that the LL. promess to stay me from going to the King of Scotland should be no better then yf it had bene vvritten in the vvater. This I did knovv full vvell: & vvas nothing amazed at your most mō ­strous iniuries. Such good experience I had of your G. I defen­ded your opinion for the certenty of Daniels 490. yeres, the comon opinions vvhich you dayly allovv in your Bibles. The matter vvas most needfull to be taught euery Child. And your auctority vvas a defendour of the trueth, though your Lerning savv nothing vvhat you defended. D. R. & I chose you vmpier: I shevved you arguments vvhervpon a Child vvovld determin aright. M. Mulcaster, the best Lerned in the vvorld in his ovvn conceit, reasonably in Heathen Greeks in deed, he instructed you, & returneth after IX. monethsa full discours of your de­termination: And most high speaches in commendation of my [Page 41] poor self. Tvvo good scholers moe from your g. told that you had determined. Yet you could condemn your self, the Q. and all the realm to vvork the hinderance of my employment. M. Kuph skophing me, you the Q. and him self yf he be of any re­ligion, the Merchant told certen Merchāts hovv your G. vvrote to D. R. that you vvould tell my narrand to the Q. that you vvere not of my mynd: and that I die bely you. All this vvas told me, my L. yet to do you good, & to keep your G. frō To­pheth, (Es. 30. vvhich speach spoken of vvicked perishing deuo­tels for euer, the Rabbins Lernedly turn to Eternal flames name, though outvvard destruction vvas only then in the prophets argument) to keep your G. from Topherh, from Gehenna, frō the Keyes [...], to do you good after M. Kuph playd the koph vvith you and the Q. to condemn the allovved religion true, 40. y. currant novv, in the Geneua Bible, & thēce dravvē to your Bible vvhich the Q. vseth in her Chappell, I vnder­took in London the opening of the Q. religion for our L. his soule going dovvn to Hell, by heathen phrase to the vvorld of soules; by Hebrevv schooles to paradise; by their distinct speach, vp to Heauen; Nostri sic rure loquuntur. Yet you in speach to the old L. Treasorer made this a bar, to hinder the high coū ­sel of the realm to cause any one farthing of recompense for clearing Daniel for both his tongues, & for Heathen comm en­ting on him vvhom they neuer savv, to make the hardest book in the vvorld as clear as any in the vvorld. VVord vvas sent me to be myne ovvn choser: I Leaue the choise to the Q. she by your grace choseth me neuer a peny: and aduentureth her E­ternal state on this that she vvho gaue ful many an hundred thousand pounds for court seruice that required no great art, ought not to giue one farthing to him that shevved in fevv sheets the vvhole frame of Scripture, vvith heathen and tvvelue the hardest kind of studies: & again particulerly opened Dani­el, shevved, for his tongues east Dialects the hardest and for [Page 42] his Prophecies heathen plainly recording most propre euents of his vvords. VVhen I pleaded vvith my old L. treasorer, vvhy the LL. vvould stay me from going to the King of Scotland & not perform promises at home: he sent ansvvear, that he vvas sory: and said that your G. hindered: for that I vvrote that you had determined, as I taught, that the time vvhen Christs should die & end Mosehs policy vvas certain in Daniel in vvords past re­ply, That is because I defended the Q. religion, and vvords sold to the People in copies infinite & dayly open in the Church, the most reuerend father the Archb. of Canterbury for defending the Q M & his G. hindereth all the Temporall Lords to pro­cure any farthing recompense to one to vvhom they sent vvord, that they held him inferior in Diuinity to none, vpon expounding Daniel to their contentment. And vvho vvould euer beleue that an Archb. should euer be caught in such dea­lings knovven ouer an vvhole kingdom: that you cannot de­ny one vvhit of all this. M. Liuely novv confuteth me: As one Ieninges of Vlissing a bad Linguist bragged: VVhom I am sure your self vvill condemne of extreem badnes for a Doeg: & a slanderer most impudent. To spare him I vvill vvrite vvhat I blame in his dealings, that you may reproue him openly: that I need not to vvork him Eternal disgrace. And for M. Liuely, determin novv vvhether he confuteth the Q. and you, or me. By the G. of God he shall find my pen the tongue of a svvift vvriter, yf he medle vvith me in any mayn poinct vvher the Q. and yee most RR. FF. be disseu oured from my opinion. But no vvit vvill suffre me any more to defend your G. vvho are cō ­victed past all denial, to turn against your self to do me mischief. Yet, though such dealings vvere foretold, after M. Samford told me that you told him you vvould burn in this opinion that Christ descended to Gehenna, I endeuored to saue our Archb. from dravving the Realm after him to [...] though I knevv hovv: [Page 43] ‘Inuitum qui seruat idem facit occidenti. Yet’ [...] ‘The best counsel is stil to defend the Church.’ Novv your G. turneth the Q. auctority against her ovvn oth: in the most sauage sort that ever I heard of. VVhat man of co­mon modesty vvould stir against a scholer bidden to chose his ovvn preferment, before his full ansvver, vvhen he demaun­ded either Leaue to leaue the Q. or employment? Leaue vvas denyed. Employment vvas promised. VVhen of a Di lē ­ma a Trilemma is made, the maker vseth not reason. I am sure you neuer read of such monstrous dealings. And in all this vvhen I charged your G. in a priuate Letter that you manyfold­ly turned the Q. auctority to Atheism: and Left it vnto your choise vvhit her you vvould rest or stir: you sent me vvord that you vvould do any thing for me, yf I vvould but acknovvledge those that vvould be my frends. And vvill you rush to Gehē ­na because I vvill not rely vpon you? & vvill you vse the Q. au­tority to Atheism to force me to rely vpon you? B. Elmer told you that some thought your Title and reuenues might be vsed to singular good vse for the Church: vvithout auctority of am­bition to be relyed vpon. I could haue Liued next you all my life: & neuer begin iniury: yeelding honour in reuerence, that you could haue no cause to complain. The meanest should neuer haue said, that in stead of Learning I pressed him vvith auctority: for a square cap to a roūd head: or for not vvearing vvhite Linen afore God and his Angels vvher black cloth by custom is more sage▪ nor for not crossing in Baptism most hea­uenly in plainnest sort. D. Abraham Rubens case telleth that the Church needeth great reuenues: as novv to put forth in E­brevv an Abridgement of all the Bible: vvhich thing the B. of London might haue done, but for you, bent I cannot tell hovv. VVho but you vvould haue resisted the LL. promise vpon a poinct of no sense: that I sought not to you? I sought to none [Page 44] of them all. All saving you shevved them selues singular ho­norably affected. Yet your G. durst resist the decree of the Sanedrin, as not knovving Deut 17. And you resist in the strangest sort that ever I heard: sending one to counter­fait his name, as to catch a Iesuit, then to rush into other mens houses: then a Constable and a Pursiuant; and to offer forty marks to tell vvher I vvas: and all this to come to keep your cold Empedoclean G. from Leaping into bur­ning Aetna. Hovv did you vse Rich Codder Mastres Hiddes man: to make the Q. autority as a dotage? You cite him before the high commissioners: and vvhen he ap­peareth you haue nothing to say to him. Then at your hall fier he saith: My Lords G. should be ashamed to mis­vse M. Br. thus: he is better Learned then he. Thus it pleased the poor servingman to speak: He heard a D. in my Lady of VVarvvicks chamber report D. R. Censure thus. Ther is so much in N. as can be in a man. That made him so speak. I report not this as glad that men so speak of me. For as none of your house can affoard me a good vvord, & your self exceed against me euen to the Q. in badnes of Lā ­guage, geving them a patron and M. Hutton your Can. Ta [...] man vvondred vvhat one vvilliā: And: meant to haue my commentations vpon Daniel, seing they conteyned no­thing but Rabbinical Toyes: as your gracious tongue & others make me not shrink: so neither doth the con­trary stir any desire to deale any further in Diuinity vvher you reign. But by vvhat diuinity did your G. put R. Codder to his oth to tell vvher I vvas? Will you haue the Q. to be a dog in her gouernemēt? Cā she svvear any for any but in some offense? Are you all together sold into syn? is it an offense to clear an article by 20. yeares study, more then you haue ta­ken, in vvriters currant among all men? Ys the enforcing of an vnlavvfull oth a small matter vvith your G? To him [Page 45] vvhose most holy and sacred name you so prophanely con­temned, vvho seeth hovv in your vvhole course you are bent to oppresse the light, vvhose knovvledg I ho­ped to haue made flovven over the nation, I commend the ending of our strife: & as he dallyeth not so I assure my self that the vvorld shal see you or me pay the price of misvsing the Maiesty of the vvhole Kingdom.

Finis.

TO ALL THE LEARNED nobility of England.

This contention (R. H.) vvhich I haue with the Metropolitan tou­cheth all the realm: as the Creed is vsed in all houses: wherin I la­bour to shew the right meaning of our Lords soule passing hence. As my paynes, all that I haue bestovved in England hath bene recompensed with extremity of badnes, by the Archb. his causing: so I looke that this paynes shall find no better interteynement. Only frō your honours & the plain harted I looke for ap­probation. I beleeue that I haue handled the matter more clearly then any who before me wrote of it. All may well here consider a questi­on in Aggei, whether holy flesh yf it touch vn­clean sanctifieth it, or polluteth it self: & whe­ther one heresy in the Creed be tolerable for the goodnes of the rest, or rather corrupteth the dignity of the whole: as one dead fly marreth an whole box of precious oinctment. How far the Metropolitans dealing hath bene from Learning, [Page 47] faith and comon humanity that will ap­pear in my Epistle to him self: & to what pas he hath brought the Q. honour▪ and how he be­gan this coyle to defeat my recompense for co­mentations vpon Daniel, that wilbe made kno­wen by some of your honours to the rest, with­out my declaration. I seek no further revenge but this that I may have the Q. quiet Leaue to forsake her kingdom: to take a course among strangers for passage of my yeares few & sorow­full that are to come: which I hope shalbe more to myne own comfort, then those which I haue spent vnder the Q. of whome I had great pro­mises tvventy yeares together: to hinder me from vsing other kingdoms benefit: But the strangest recompense (when I was bid be myne own chooser, & referred the choise again to her highnes) that euer hath bene heard of. I will make no pleading: but refer all to him whom she tooke to witnes as she Looked to be saued, that she would bestow all the commodityes of Diuinity to best desert. She relied vpon the Me­tropolitan: but regardeth not how God will regard such a post. How I accuse him you may [Page 48] read: & more for hindering the good of the Bi­ble according to the tenour shevved to your Honours. Therin he may soon win a victory: Seing the matter is of so great difficulty that it requi­reth as great study as any hath vndertaken this 1000 yeres for the text of both testamēts, & be­sides the help of all the Learned of a Kingdom: all being directed to grounds manifest; Here a Metropolitā may soon hinder: but I am affrayd while the nation beareth soules to be saued the like offer wil not be again. His G. wil not fīd ma­ny in the world that sēsibly defēd [...] of the Ebrew text. VVhile some of his aduaunced teach that the text is corrupted, the Pope is sure of the other part of the Dilemma: That the Church not the word must rule. A sensible rea­son of 848 Margent readings had bene worth thākes: how they note exactnes not corruptiōs. So the shewing how this: Adam Liued 230. & begot Seth: VVherin Moses omitted 100. y. this note being admitted, disanulleth all Moses au­tority 36. seuerall hūdreths. And any one mar­reth all: this also had bene worth thanks. His G. neuer read two that yelded a plain reason whēce [Page 49] that difference frō the Ebrevv sprang: VVhēce Graecia, Aethiopia, Arabia, Moscouia vtterly de spise the Ebrew text: and some Papists too. Al­so our Bishops missing for 600000, yeres 215. make Moses Mother 257. yeres old at the Least when she bare him: and infinitely corrupt all the Bible. This should be amended and not concealed. These amendements and other full rare poincts deserued some thankes. But I cō ­mēd thē to your honours care. My poore good will was ready: to haue wrought so much that the Bibles in English should haue ben the glory of all Diuinity of the west. Now I deem I shall neuer deal that way: but for some small parcel: as time fleeth and cannot be reuoked. Your ho­nours and the whole nation I commend to God: not minding euer to medle wher strēg­thening of the present religion is an haynous Crime, and saving from Gehenna, is persecu­ted as an haeresy. As your honours vvil be sory that this hath fallen out: so in the next Par­lement ye may take order: that no Bishop shall haue auctority but for receauing of his reue­nues: vnles he can read and translate both Tes­taments. [Page 50] How great hinderance his G. hath wrought it would make any hart sick to be­think: & it is better to be buryed then to be told. Least further harm proceed from such: I wish preuētion for the nations good: though I look for Litle to my self.

Your honours most willing to haue bene employed for the Churches good: HVGH BROVGHTON.

Errata, in some Copies.

In the preface.

Page 2. a. line 20 read. speach. Ibidē line 23 read first. pag. 3. a line 2 read this. Ibid. line 4. read. vvhich. so els where. page 4. a. line 13 read. a calling.

In the treatise,

Page 2. line 1. read haleth. page 4 line 1 read his. and kingdom. Ibid. line 25 read. then. page 5. line 23 and 29 read [...] Ibid. line 30. read [...] page 8 line 26. read [...] page 9 line 29 read. [...]. Ibid. L. 33 after (Clay) adde that is here, & from this earthly tabernacle, page 10. line 18 read a going. page 11 line 2 read Bear. Ibid. line 16 read shadovv of death? page 12. line 8 read 16. page 14 line 32 read [...] page 15 line 33. after (as) adde that Apoc. 20, the comon to all dead, page 17 line 11 read redemer. page 20 line 2 after (trueth) adde, to abā ­don your errors. Ibid. line 10 read proposition. Ibid. line 19 after (Iew) adde and that ansvvere vvas returned. Ibid. line 21 af­ter (meaning) adde or Daniels 490 yeres in M Livelies meaning. page 21 line 4 read. [...] page 24 line 10 read is seen. Ibid. line 18 read further. page 25 line 28 read philip. 1. page 26 line 1. read of Cim-▪ ibid. line 2 read [...] ibid. line 5 read speach ibid. line 31 read contend. page 29 line 12 read later, shevveth Ibid. line 29 read [...] page 32 line 33 read [...] page 33 line 8 read his page 35 line 15 read to [...] ibid. line 31 read [...] Page 37 line 6 read [...] Ibid. line 11 read [...] Ibid. line 16 read having [...] page 38 line 11 read commentary page 39. line 2. read [...] page 40 line 7. read [...] page 43 line 22 read life.

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