CANTVS.THE FIRST SET …

CANTVS.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fîue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne. 1619.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather emboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proceeding from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation. On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, I present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, and rest, great Marquesse

Happie to be the Seruant of your commands, THOMAS VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer;
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Thom, a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam, VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII

I.

[...] COme forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, Come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

II.

[...] SIng on Sis╌ter and well met, Loue╌ly Ma╌bell and faire Bett, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Younglings must haue a beginning, Vertues they are hard of winning, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) But we will spare for no paynes, If we win contents or gaines, Fa la la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Which if wee at╌taine vnto, We shall doe that few can doe. Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

III.

[...] AH sweet, whose beauty passeth all my telling, To thee my loue, to (repeat) all other are excelling, all (repeat) Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) By thee I liue and haue mine onely pleasure, Thou art my life, thou (repeat) and eke my whole hearts treasure, and (repeat) Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Let not vnkinde╌nesse then e╌clipse my gladnes, But let swee [...] smiles expell the clouds of sadnes, Fa la la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) For if my loue sweet looks and liking reapeth, O happy I my hart for ioy it leapeth. Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

IIII.

[...] MOther I will haue a Husband, And I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, In spight of her, of her that will haue none, Iohn a Dun should haue had me long ere this, Iohn (repeat) He said I had good lips to kisse, to kisse, to (repeat) to kisse, Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her that will haue none, For I haue heard tis trim, tis trim, for (repeat) for (repeat) when folkes doe loue, By good Sir Iohn I sweare now I will proue, now (repeat) by (repeat) now (repeat) For Mother I will sure haue one, haue one (repeat) In spight of her that will haue none, To the Towne therefore will I gad to (repeat) To get me a husband good or bad, to (repeat) Mother I wil haue a Husband, and I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue [Page] [...]one, haue one, In spight of her that will▪ in spight of her that will haue none.

V.

[...] FAir'st are the words that couer deep'st de╌ceit, As next sweet honey lyes the poyson'd sting, The crookt, the crooked hooke, The (repeat) is hid, the (repeat) is hid in pleasant'st baire, Which vnforeseene, which (repeat) which vnfore╌seene, which (repeat) too late repentance bring, too (repeat) too (repeat) Synons sweet speech, sweet speech, the out╌side of vntruth, of (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) procur'd the Troyans ruth. Synons sweet speech, the out side of vntruth, vntruth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) procur'd the Troyans ruth.

VI.

[...] CRuell Madame, my heart you haue bereft me, And to my selfe no part haue you left me, For yours all wholy loue hath fast in╌fest me, Wherefore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, My wofull heart both night and day bewaileth, My death drawes on, and my poore life it faileth, I sue for mercy where no teares auaileth, where no teares, no teares auaileth. Wherefore thus plaine I must for euer, for (repeat) Yet if your eyes did see how you torment me, yet (repeat) Yet if your eyes did see, yet (repeat) Alas, (repeat) alas, (repeat) (repeat) a╌las poore man it would the more content me, But now in absence, ah, ah doe I lament me, I doe la╌ment me, Wherfore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, Wherefore thus plaine I must for e╌uer.

VII.

[...] NEuer did any more delight to see his ene╌my, Neuer (repeat) more (repeat) Foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) Neuer did any more delight to see his ene╌my, Then I, more foole finding no remedy, finding (repeat) finding (repeat) 'It was because I lou'd her in my heart, Although a╌las she lou'd to make it smart, although (repeat) although (repeat) although (repeat) to make it smart. What shall I say then, but bid her a-due, Because vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) be (repeat) because vnkind to him that is most true? Because vnkinde, What shall I say then but bid her adue, Because vnkind, be (repeat) be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true, because vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true?

VIII. The first part.

[...] LOcke vp faire lids the treasures of my heart, Pre╌serue those beames, pre. (repeat) pre. (repeat) this ages onely light, To her sweet sence, sweet sence, sweet Sleepe, some ease impart, some ease im╌part, Her sence too weake to beare, to beare the spirits might, And while (O sleepe) thou closest vp her sight, thou (repeat) Where loue doth forge his fairest dart, O harbour all her parts in easefull plight, O (repeat) her parts in easefull plight, Let no strange dreame make her faire body start. faire (repeat) make her faire body start.

IX. The second part.

[...] ANd yet O dreame, O (repeat) if thou wilt not de╌part from this rare subiect, from (repeat) sub╌iect of thy common right, But wilt thy selfe in such a seate delight, But (repeat) then take my shape, then (repeat) then (repeat) then (repeat) and play a louers part, then (repeat) Kisse her from me, and say vnto her sprit, vnto (repeat) Till her eyes shine, till (repeat) till (repeat) I liue in darkest night, I (repeat) night, till her eyes shine, eyes shine, I liue in darkest night.

X.

[...] O Merry, merry world when euery louer with his mate, Might walke from meade to meade, And cheerefully relate, and (repeat) Sowre pleasures, and sweet griefes, and (repeat) following, following a wanton state, and sweet griefes, and sweet sweet griefes following a wanton state, Those dayes knew no suspect, those (repeat) each one might freely prate, each (repeat) each (repeat) each one might freely prate, And daunce and sing, & sing and play with his consoci╌ate, Then louers vsde like Turtles, then (repeat) like turtles to kisse full louingly, O honey dayes, oh (repeat) and customes of antiqui╌tie, But the world now is so full, but (repeat) but (repeat) now is so full, of so fond Ielousie, of (repeat) That we count charitie, that (repeat) that (repeat) wanton in╌iquitie, that (repeat) wanton in╌iquitie.

XI.

[...] SWeet theefe, (repeat) when me of heart you reft, You did a murther and a theft, And could you oft more cru╌ell doe, and could you oft, you oft more cruell doe, Then rob a man, then rob a man and kill him too? Wherefore of loue I craue this meede, To bring you where you did the deede, That there you may for him disgracing, Suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) of my imbra╌cing.

XII.

[...] SWeet, sweet, sweet Suffolke Owle, sweet, sweet (repeat) so trimly dight, With feathers, like a Lady bright, sweet (repeat) so (repeat) Thou sing'st alone, sitting, by night, Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te whoo, te whoo, te whit, te whoo te whit, te whit, te whit te whoo, Thy note that forth so freely roules, With shrill command the Mouse controules, with (repeat) And sings a dirge for dying soules, And sings a dirge, and (repeat) for dying soules, for (repeat) for (repeat) soules, soules, soules, Te whit, (repeat) te whoo▪ te whit te whoo te (repeat) te whit, (repeat) te whoo, (repeat) te whit te whoo, te (repeat)

XIII. The first part.

[...] THou art not faire for all thy red and white, For all those rosie ornaments in, for (repeat) For all those rosie, all those rosie ornaments in thee, Thou art not sweet, thou (repeat) though made of meere de╌light, Nor faire, nor sweet, nor (repeat) vn╌lesse thou pittie me, vnlesse (repeat) I will not sooth thy fancies, I (repeat) thou shalt proue, That beautie is no beautie without loue▪ that (repeat) that (repeat) is no beautie without loue. That beautie is no beau╌tie without loue▪ that (repeat) that beautie is no beautie without loue.

XIIII. The second part.

[...] YEt loue not me, nor seeke not to allure, Yet (repeat) yet (repeat) Yet loue not me, nor seeke not to allure, nor (repeat) My thoughts with beautie my (repeat) were it more di╌uine, Thy smiles and kisses, thy (repeat) thy smiles and kisses I cannot endure, Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Ile (repeat) Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in de╌spight, Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace (repeat)

XV.

[...] MIra▪ mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) (repeat) mira, (repeat) mira ca╌no, mi╌ra cano, (repeat) mi╌ra ca╌no, cano, Sol occubuit, Sol occubuit, oc╌cu╌buit, Sol (repeat) Sol occubu╌it, Sol (repeat) oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Nox nulla nox nulla, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est, Nox (repeat) nox (repeat) secu╌ta est, Sol occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol oc cubu╌it, occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol occubuit oc╌cubuit, Nox nulla secuta est. Nox Nox (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est, secuta est.

XVI. An Elegie, on the death of his right worshipfull Master, Sir Thomas Beaumont Knight, of St [...]oughton in Leicestershire.

[...] WEepe, weepe mine eyes (repeat) salt teares, due ho╌nour giue, With sighs deplore my griefe and mour╌ning state, Since he is dead by whom I still doe liue: Beaumont is dead, (repeat) O cursed cruell fate, a╌las, (repeat) O cursed cru╌ell fate, Beaumont farewell, the earth doth sweet╌ly sleepe, To hold thy Corps, though heau'n thy foule doth keepe. (repeat) though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. Beaumont farewell, the earth doth sweet╌ly sleepe, To hold thy corps though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. (repeat) thy soule doth keepe. though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. though heau'n thy soule doth keep. doth keepe.

Here endeth the songs of fiue parts.

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush, (repeat) my rude present, blushing yet say this, That he that sent thee, ment a better thing, that (repeat) he ment a better thing, Best mea╌ners oft, best (repeat) of their best purpose misse, Best runners, runners, runners, sometime faile to hit the Ring, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supplie in minde, Tell my sweet Mistresse, sweet (repeat) saint of woman╌kinde, my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supply in minde, what wants in shew, what (repeat) what (repeat) what (repeat) in shew, he, he doth supply in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird, sweet bird, sweet (repeat) dainty sweet bird, who art incaged there, dainty sweet bird, sweet bird, dainty (repeat) dainty (repeat) who art inca╌ged there, A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? A╌las, how (repeat) Both prisners (both) sing, both prisners, both sing, both sing, and both singing thus, Striue to please her, striue (repeat) striue (repeat) to please her who hath imprisned vs, im╌prisned vs, Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st, singing, thou, (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou liu'st singing, but I singing dye. Onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st, thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine' Is (repeat) is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no bet╌ter guerdon gaine? Adue, thy lookes are coy, thy fancie strange, O stay, my heart relents, and will not change, my (repeat) But rather dye, then from my Saint once swarue, then (repeat) My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue, my loue she doth deserue, My life she gaue, my (repeat) she gaue, my loue she doth deserue, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MEl╌po me╌ne, (repeat) bewaile thy sisters losse, In tragicke dumps their dolours deepe display, Curse cruell death, that so their blisse did crosse, And Musicks peerelesse patron tooke a╌way, Though they doe sleepe, Though they doe sleepe, dead, Prince Henry's dead, Prince (repeat) Prince (repeat) Prince (repeat) Farewell, (repeat) (repeat) farewell the Muses king. Farewell, (repeat) farewell, farewell, (repeat) fare╌well the Muses king.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatall Sis╌ters held the bloudy knife, A peerelesse Prince on earth did remaine, Too soone sad death en╌sued his blissefull life, And now he with the King of kings doth raigne, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy, he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, such ioy such ioy he hath to heare, to heare the heauenly quire, the (repeat) Such ioy, such ioy, he hath, to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards: And Nimphs, (repeat) that trooping, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with (repeat) Why sit you dead and drooping? dead and drooping, Vp, vp for shame, vp, vp for shame, and leaue this heauy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues renowned, be╌yond all humane ho╌nour, base earth scor╌ning, O╌ri╌an now a Saint in heau'n, O╌ri╌an (repeat) O╌ri╌an now in heau'n is crowned, Both bonfires and bell-ringers, both (repeat) belring╌ers, both bonfires and belring╌ers, she left vs, and good singers, good sing╌ers, sing╌ers, [Page] [...] sing╌ers, she left vs, and good singers, Sing then yee Shepheards and Nimphs of Di╌a╌na, and (repeat) Farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, faire O╌ri╌an, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, faire (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire (repeat) farewell faire (repeat) farewell faire (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na.

FINIS.
ALTVS.THE FIRST SET: …

ALTVS.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fiue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne, 1619.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather emboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proce [...]ing from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, [...] present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, [...], great Marquesse

[...] be the Seruant [...] your commands, [...] VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer▪
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Tho [...], a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam, VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII
FINIS.

Of 5. Voc.

I.

[...] COme forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, Come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

II.

[...] SIng on Sister and well met, Louely Mabell and faire Bett, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Younglings must haue a beginning, Vertues they are hard of winning, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) But we will spare for no paynes, If we win con╌tents or gaines, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Which if wee attaine vnto, We shall doe that few can doe, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

III.

[...] AH sweet, whose beauty passeth all my telling, To thee my loue, to (repeat) all others are all (repeat) excelling, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) By thee I liue, and haue mine onely pleasure, Thou art my life, thou (repeat) and eke my whole hearts, eke my whole hearts, my whole hearts treasure, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Let not vnkindenesse then eclipse my gladnes, But let sweet smiles ex╌pell the clouds of sadnes, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) For if my loue sweet looks and liking reapeth, O hap╌py I my heart for ioy it leapeth▪ Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

IIII.

[...] MOther I will haue a Husband, And I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, In spight of her that wil haue none, Iohn a Dun shuld a [...] me long ere this, Iohn (repeat) He said I had good lips to kisse, to kisse, to kisse, (repeat) Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her that will haue none, For I haue heard tis trim, for (repeat) for (repeat) when folkes doe loue, By good Sir Iohn I sweare now I will proue, by good Sir Iohn now I wil proue, by good Sir Iohn I sweare now I will proue, For Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, (repeat) (repeat) In spight of her that will haue none, To the Towne therefore wil I gad, will (repeat) will (repeat) wil I gad, (repeat) To get me a husband good or bad, to get me a husband good or bad, Mother I will haue a Husband, and I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, I one, In spight of her, in spight of her that will haue none.

V.

[...] FAir'st are the words that couer deep'st deceit, As next sweet honey, sweet honey, as (repeat) as (repeat) lye the poyson'd stings, The crook't, the crooked hooke, the (repeat) is hid, the (repeat) is hid, is hid in pleasant'st baite, Which vn╌fore╌seene, foreseene, which vnfore╌seene, which (repeat) too late repentance brings, repentance brings, too (repeat) Synons sweet speech, Sy╌nons sweet speech the outside of vntruth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) thicke (repeat) pro╌cur'd the Troyans ruth. Synons sweet speech, Sy nons (repeat) the outside of vntruth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) thicke (repeat) with Art, procur'd the Troyans ruth.

VI.

[...] CRuell Madame, my heart you haue bereft me, And to my selfe no part haue you left me, For yours all wholy loue hath fast in╌feft me, Where╌fore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, for e╌uer, My wofull heart both night and day bewaileth, My death drawes on, and my poore life it faileth, I sue for mercy where no teares, a╌uai╌leth, where (repeat) Wherefore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, for e╌uer, yet, Yet if your eyes did see how you tor╌ment me, yet (repeat) yet (repeat) yet (repeat) A╌las, (repeat) alas, (repeat) (repeat) alas, (repeat) poore man, it would the more content me, But now in absence, ah, doe I lament me, ah, doe I lament me, wherfore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, for e╌uer, Wherfore thus plaine I must for euer.

VII.

[...] NEuer did a╌ny more delight to see his enemy, (no) Neuer (repeat) then I more Foole, finding no remedy, finding no remedy, (no) Neuer did a╌ny more delight to see his enemy, (no) Neuer did (repeat) Then I more foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) finding (repeat) It was because I lou'd, I lou'd her in my heart, Although alas she made it smart, although alas she lou'd to make it smart, al╌though a╌las she made it smart. What shall I say then, but bid, but bid her adue, Because vn╌kinde, be (repeat) because vn╌kinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true? What shall I say then, but bid, but bid her adue, Be╌cause vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true? because vn╌kinde, vnkind, be╌cause vnkind, be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true?

VIII. The first part.

[...] LOcke vp: The treasures of my heart, of (repeat) Preserue those beames, pre. (repeat) this ages onely light, To her, to her sweet sence, sweet Sleepe, sweet Sleepe, some ease, some ease impart, Her sence too weake her sence too weake to beare, the spirits might, And while (O sleepe) thou closest vp her sight, thou (repeat) Where loue doth forge, his fairest dart, O harbour all her parts in easefull plight, O (repeat) in easefull plight, O (repeat) Let no strange dreame no (repeat) make her faire body start, make her faire body start.

IX. The second part.

[...] ANd yet O dreame, and (repeat) if thou wilt not de╌part from this rare subiect, from (repeat) sub╌iect, of thy common right, of (repeat) But wilt thy selfe in such a feate de╌light, But (repeat) then take my shape, and play a louers part, then (repeat) Kisse her from me, and say vnto her sprit, Till her eyes shine, till (repeat) till (repeat) I liue in dar╌kest night, I (repeat) I (repeat) I liue in darkest night, till her eyes shine, till (repeat) till (repeat) till (repeat) till her eyes shine, I liue in darkest night.

X.

[...] O Merry, world: And cheerefully relate, re╌late, Sowre pleasures, sowre pleasurs, and sweet griefes, sowre (repeat) and sweet griefes, following, following a wanton state, sowre pleasures, sowre pleasures and sweet griefes, sowre (repeat) and sweet griefes, following, following a wanton state, Those dayes, those dayes knew no suspect, those (repeat) each one might freely prate, each (repeat) each one might freely prate, And daunce and sing, and sing, and play with his conso╌ci╌ate, Then lo╌uers vsde like Turtles, like turtles, to kisse full louingly, O honey dayes, O O honey daies, & customes of antiqui╌tie. But the world now is full, but the world now is full of so fond Ielousie, of (repeat) of so fond Ielousie, That we count charitie, that (repeat) that (repeat) wanton iniquitie, that (repeat) that (repeat) that (repeat) [Page] [...]wanton in╌iquitie, that (repeat) wanton (repeat)

XI.

[...] SWeet theefe, when me of heart you reft, You did a murther and a theft, And could you ought more cruell doe, more (repeat) and (repeat) more (repeat) Then rob a man, then (repeat) and kill him too? Wherefore of loue I craue this meede, wherefore (repeat) I craue this meede, To bring you where you did the deede, That there you may for him disgracing, Suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer in chaines, in chaines of my imbracing.

XII.

[...] SWeet, sweet Suffolke Owle, sweet, (repeat) sweet (repeat) sweet Suffolke Owle, so trimly dight, With feathers, like a Lady bright, sweet (repeat) so (repeat) Thou sitting by night, sitting by night, Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te whit, te whit te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) Thy notes that forth so freely roules, thy (repeat) roules, roules, With shrill command the Mouse controules, with (repeat) And sings a dirge for dying soules, And (repeat) for dying, for dying soules, for (repeat) for (repeat) soules, soules, soules, Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te whoo. te (repeat) te (repeat) te whoo▪ te whit, te whoo.

XIII. The first part.

[...] THou art not faire for all, for all thy red and white. For all thy rosie ornaments in thee, for (repeat) for (repeat) Thou art not sweet, not sweet, thou (repeat) thou art not sweet, though made of meere delight, Nor faire, nor faire, nor sweet, nor (repeat) vnlesse thou pittie me, vnlesse (repeat) thou pittie me, I will not sooth thy fancies, thou shalt proue, That beautie is no beautie without loue. That beautie is, that beautie is no beautie without loue, that (repeat) that (repeat) that (repeat) that beautie is no beautie without loue▪ no (repeat)

XIIII. The second part.

[...] YEt loue not me, nor seeke not to al╌lure, nor (repeat) Yet loue not me, nor seeke not to al╌lure, Yet (repeat) nor seeke not to allure My thoughts with beautie, my (repeat) my (repeat) were it more diuine, Thy smiles and kisses, and kisses I can╌not endure, Ile not be wrapt vp, not (repeat) in those armes of thine, Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Ile (repeat) Ile (repeat) Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight, Imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight. Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, and loue me in de╌spight.

XV.

[...] MIra mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) (repeat) mira, mira ca╌no, mi╌ra cano, (repeat) (repeat) mira cano, mi╌ra ca no, mira ca╌no, Sol oc╌cubuit, Sol oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol (repeat) oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occu╌buit, occubuit, Nox nulla, (repeat) nox nulla, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est, Nox (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est, secuta est, Sol oc╌cu╌buit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol (repeat) oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol (repeat) Nox nulla, Nox nulla secuta est. Nox (repeat) Nox nul╌la secuta est. Nox (repeat) se╌cu╌ta est.

XVI. An Elegie, on the death of his right worshipfull Master, Sir Thomas Beaumont Knight, of Stoughton in Leicestershire.

[...] WEepe, weepe mine eyes.

Here endeth the songs of fiue parts.

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush (repeat) my rude pre╌sent, Blushing yet say this, That he that sent thee, ment a better thing, that (repeat) that (repeat) a bet╌ter thing, Best mea╌ners oft, best (repeat) of their best purpose misse, Best runners some time faile, best runners some time faile to hit the Ring▪ Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, he doth supplie in minde, tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, my sweet Mis╌tresse, my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew he doth supply in minde, what (repeat) what (repeat) what (repeat) what wants in shew what (repeat) he doth supply in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird, sweet bird▪ dainty (repeat) who art incaged there, sweet bird, dainty sweet bird, dainty (repeat) who art, who art incaged there, A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? A╌las, (repeat) how like thine and my fortunes are? alas (repeat) Both prisners (both) sing, both prisners, both sing, both sing, both sing, both sing, and both singing thus, Striue to please her, striue (repeat) (repeat) striue (repeat) who hath imprisned vs, who (repeat) Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye. Onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st, singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I sing╌ing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine? Is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no better guerdon gaine? Adue, thy lookes are coy, thy (repeat) thy (repeat) thy fancie, strange, O stay, my heart relents, and will not change, not change, my heart re╌lents, and will not change, and will not change, But ra╌ther dye, but (repeat) but (repeat) but rather dye, then from my Saint, my Saint once swarue, then (repeat) My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue she doth, my loue she doth de╌serue, My life she gaue, she gaue, my (repeat) my (repeat) my life she gaue, my loue she doth, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MElpomene.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatall Sisters. No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, the (repeat) Such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, the (repeat) Such ioy he hath, such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards and Nimphs, and (repeat) Shepheards and Nimphs that trooping, (repeat) (repeat) trooping were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with hey and whooping, Why sit you dead and drooping, why sit you dead and drooping? Vp, vp for shame, vp (repeat) and leaue this heauy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues renowned, be╌yond all humane honour, Base earth scorning, O╌rian now a Saint in heau'n, in heau'n, O╌ri╌an (repeat) O╌ri╌an, (repeat) is crowned, Both bon-fires and bell-ring╌rs, bell-ring╌ers, Sing then yee Shepheards and Nimphs of Di╌a╌na, and (repeat) Farewell [Page] [...] faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌an, farewell, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, fare╌well, faire (repeat) faire O╌ri╌a╌na, fare╌well faire O╌ri╌ana, farewell, faire- (repeat) farewell, faire (repeat) farewell, faire (repeat) fare╌well faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farevwell, faire O╌ri╌an, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, faire (repeat) farewell, faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, faire O╌ri╌a╌na.

FINIS.
TENOR.THE FIRST SET: …

TENOR.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fiue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne. 1620.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather emboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proceeding from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation. On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, I present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, and rest, great Marquesse

Happie to be the Seruant of your commands, THOMAS VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer;
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Thom, a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam▪ VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII
FINIS.

Of 5. Voc.

I.

[...] COme forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, Come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keepe thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

II.

[...] SIng on Sister and well met, Louely Mabell and faire Bett, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Younglings must haue a beginning, Vertues they are hard of winning, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) But wee will spare for no paynes, If we win contents or gaines, Fa la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Which if wee at╌taine vnto, We shall doe that few can doe. Fa la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

III.

[...] AH sweet, whose beauty passeth all my telling, To thee my loue, to (repeat) my loue, all o╌thers are all (repeat) excelling, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) By thee I liue, and haue mine one╌ly pleasure, Thou art my life, thou (repeat) my life and eke my whole harts, eke (repeat) treasure, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Let not vnkindenes then e╌clipse my gladnes, But let sweet smiles expell the clouds of sadnes, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) For if my loue sweet looks and li╌king reapeth, O happy I, my heart for ioy it leapeth. Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

IIII.

[...] MOther I will haue a Husband, And I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her, of her that will haue none, Iohn a Dun should haue had me long ere this, He said I had good lips to kisse, to kisse, (repeat) Mother I will sure haue one, For I haue heard tis trim, tis trim, for (repeat) when folks doe loue, By good Sir Iohn now I will proue, now (repeat) I by good Sir Iohn I sweare I will proue, For Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, (repeat) (repeat) In spight of her that wil haue none, To the Towne therefore will I gad, wil I gad, will (repeat) will (repeat) will (repeat) will I gad, will (repeat) To get me a husband good or bad, to (repeat) Mother I will haue a Husband, and I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, In spight of her, that will, in spight of her that will haue none.

V.

[...] FAir'st are the words that couer deep'st de╌ceit, As next sweet honey, as next sweet ho╌ney, lye the poys╌ned stings, the (repeat) The crook't, the crooked hooke, the (repeat) is hid, the (repeat) is hid, the hooke is hid in pleasant'st baite, the crook't, the crooked hooke is hid, the (repeat) the (repeat) is hid in pleasant'st baite, Which vnfore╌seene, which (repeat) which (repeat) which (repeat) too late repen╌tance brings, too (repeat) Synons sweet speech, Sy╌nons (repeat) the outside of vntruth, vn╌truth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) with Art, pro╌cur'd▪ pro╌cur'd the Troyans ruth. Synons sweet speech, Sy nons (repeat) the outside of vn╌truth, vntruth, the (repeat) thicke laid (repeat) with Art, thicke (repeat) thicke (repeat) with Art, procur'd the Troyans ruth.

VI.

[...] CRuell Madame, my heart you haue bereft me, And to my selfe no part haue you left me, For yours all wholy loue hath fast in╌fest me, Wherefore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, My wofull heart both night and day bewaileth, My death drawes on, and my poore life it fai╌leth, I sue for mercy where no teares, auaileth, where no teares, no teares auaileth. Wherfore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, I must for e╌uer, Yet if your eyes did see, yet if your eyes did see how you torment me, yet (repeat) did (repeat) Alas, (repeat) alas, (repeat) (repeat) alas, poore man, it would the more content me, But now in absence, ah, doe I lament me, ah, doe I lament me, wherfore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, wherfore thus plaine I must, thus plaine I must for e╌uer.

VII.

[...] NEuer did any more delight to see his enemy, Neuer (repeat) then I more Foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) neuer (repeat) Neuer (repeat) Then I more foole, find╌ing no remedy, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) It was because I lou'd, I lou'd her in my heart, Although a╌las she lou'd to make it smart, although (repeat) What shall I say then, but bid, but bid her adue, Because vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true? because vnkinde to him that is most true? What shall I say then, but bid, but bid her a-due, Because vnkinde, be╌cause vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) vnkinde, be╌cause vnkind, because vn╌kinde to him that is most true?

VIII. The first part.

[...] LOcke vp: The treasures of my heart, my heart, Preserue those beames, pre. (repeat) this ages onely light, To her, to her sweet sence, sweet Sleepe, sweet Sleepe, some ease, some ease some ease im╌part, Her sence too weake to beare, the spirits might, And while (O sleepe) thou closest vp her sight, thou closest vp, thou closest vp her sight, Where loue, where loue doth forge, his fairest dart, O harbour all her parts in easefull plight, all (repeat) O harbour all her parts in easefull plight, Let no strange dreame make her faire body start, faire (repeat) make (repeat)

IX. The second part.

[...] ANd yet O dreame, if thou wilt not depart from this rare sub╌iect, from this rare sub╌iect, sub╌iect, from thy common right, But wilt thy selfe in such a seate de╌light, But (repeat) then take my shape, then (repeat) and play a louers part, Kisse her from me, kisse (repeat) and say vnto her sprit, Till her eyes shine, till (repeat) till (repeat) I liue in darkest night, I (repeat) I liue in darkest night, I (repeat) night, till her eyes shine, till her eyes shine, eyes shine, I liue in darkest night.

X.

[...] O Merry: Might walke from mead to mead, And cheerefully relate▪ and (repeat) Sowre pleasures and sweet griefes, sowre (repeat) sowre (repeat) following, following a wanton state, sowre pleasures, and sweet griefes, sowre (repeat) sowre (repeat) following, following a wanton state, Those dayes knew no su╌spect, those (repeat) knew (repeat) each one might freely prate, each (repeat) each (repeat) And daunce and sing, and sing, and play with his con╌soci╌ate, Then lo╌uers vsde like Turtles, then (repeat) like turtles, to kisse full louingly, O hony hony dayes, O (repeat) O (repeat) and customes of an╌tiquitie, But the world, but (repeat) the world now is full, but (repeat) but the world now is full of so fond Ielousie, of (repeat) of (repeat) That we count charitie, that (repeat) that we count chari╌tie, wanton in╌iquitie, that (repeat) wanton in╌iquitie▪

XI.

[...] SWeet theefe, (repeat) when me of heart you reft, You did a murther and a theft, And could you ought more cru╌ell doe, and (repeat) and (repeat) more cruell doe, Then rob a man, and kill him too? then (repeat) and kill him too? Wherefore of loue I craue this meede, I (repeat) To bring you where you did the deede, That there you may for him disgracing, Suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) in chaines of my imbra╌cing.

XII.

[...] SWeet, sweet Suffolke Owle, sweet, (repeat) sweet (repeat) sweet (repeat) so trimly dight, With feathers, like a Lady bright, sweet (repeat) Thou sitting by night, (repeat) Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te whit, te whoo, te whoo, te (repeat) te whit, te whoo, te whit te whoo, Thy note that forth so freely roules, With shrill command the Mouse controules, And sings a dirge for dying soules, And sings a dirge and (repeat) for dy╌ing, soules, for (repeat) for (repeat) for (repeat) soules, (repeat) soules, Te whit, (repeat) te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te whoo▪ te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat)

XIII. The first part.

[...] THou art not faire for all, thy red and white, not (repeat) For all those rosie ornaments in thee, for (repeat) those (repeat) Thou art not sweet, thou (repeat) thou art not sweet, though made of meere delight, Nor faire, nor sweet, nor (repeat) vnlesse thou pittie mee, vn╌lesse thou pittie mee, I will not sooth thy fancies▪ I (repeat) thy fancies, thou shalt proue, That beautie is no beautie without loue. It is, no beautie without loue, that (repeat) that (repeat) it is no beautie without loue, that beautie is no beau╌tie, no beautie without loue.

XIIII. The second part.

[...] YEt loue not me, nor seeke not to al╌lure, nor (repeat) Yet loue not me, nor seeke not to al╌lure, Yet (repeat) nor seeke not to al╌lure not seeke not to allure, My thoughts with beautie, my (repeat) my (repeat) were it more diuine, Thy smiles and kisses, thy smiles and kisses I cannot endure, Ile not be wrapt vp, in those armes of thine, Ile (repeat) Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Im╌brace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue n e in despight. Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, & kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight.

XV.

[...] MIra, mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) mira ca╌no, mira (repeat) cano, mira cano, mi╌ra cano, mi╌ra cano, mi╌ra cano, mira ca╌no, Sol occubuit, Sol, Sol occubuit, Sol occubuit, Sol, Sol (repeat) occubuit, oc╌cubuit, Sol occu╌buit, occubuit, Sol Sol occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol occubuit, Nox nulla, Nox nulla Nox nulla, Nox, nox nulla, (repeat) (repeat) Nox, nox nulla secuta est, Nox (repeat) Nox (repeat) Nox nulla, Nox nulla secuta est, Sol occu╌buit, Sol (repeat) Sol oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) occubuit, oc╌cubuit, Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol Sol occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Nox nul╌la, secuta est. Nox nul╌la, Nox nul╌la secuta est. Nox (repeat) Nox (repeat) Nox nulla se╌cu╌ta est.

XVI. An Elegie, on the death of his right worshipfull Master, Sir Thomas Beaumont Knight, of Stoughton in Leicestershire.

[...] WEepe, weepe mine eyes.

Here endeth the songs of fiue parts.

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush (repeat) my rude pre╌sent, Blushing yet say this, say this, That he that sent thee, that (repeat) that (repeat) ment a better thing, he ment a bet╌ter thing, Best mea╌ners oft, best (repeat) of their best purpose misse, Best runners, runners, runners some time faile to hit the Ring, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew he doth supply in minde, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, he doth sup╌ply in minde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) in what (repeat) what (repeat) what wants in shew he doth supply, in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird, dainty sweet bird, dainty sweet bird, dainty (repeat) who art incaged there, A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? Both prisners (both) s [...]ng, both prisners, both sing, both (repeat) both (repeat) and both singing thus, Striue to please her, striue (repeat) striue (repeat) who hath imprisned vs, Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou liu'st singing, but I singing dye. Onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st, thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine? Is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no better guerdon gaine? Adue, O stay, my heart relents, and will not change, my (repeat) my heart relents, my heart relents, And will not change, But rather dye, but (repeat) but rather dye, then from my Saint once swarue, then (repeat) My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue she doth deserue, My life she gaue, my, (repeat) she gaue, my life she gaue, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MElpomene.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatal Sisters. Such ioy, such ioy, he hath to heare, to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, such (repeat) such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare, to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, the (repeat) such ioy, such ioy he hath, such (repeat) to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards and Nimphs, and (repeat) Shepheards and Nimphs that trooping, (repeat) (repeat) trooping were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with hey and whooping, Why sit you, why sit you, why sit you dead and drooping? Vp, vp for shame, vp (repeat) and leaue this heauy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues renowned be╌yond all humane honour, be╌yond all humane honour, Base earth scor╌ning, O╌rian now a Saint in heau'n, a (repeat) O╌ri╌an (repeat) a Saint in heau'n is crowned, Both bon-fires and bell-ring╌ers, both (repeat) bell-ringers, Sing then yee Shepheards and Nimphs [Page] [...] of Di╌a╌na, and (repeat) Farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, (repeat) faire O╌r╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌r╌an, farewell faire O╌ri╌ana, farewell faire Ori╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌an, farewell, faire (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, (repeat) (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na.

FINIS.
BASSVS.THE FIRST SET …

BASSVS.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fiue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne. 1619.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather emboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proceeding from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation. On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, I present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, and rest, great Marquesse

Happie to be the Seruant of your commands, THOMAS VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer;
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Thom, a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam, VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII
FINIS.

Of 5. Voc.

I.

[...] COme forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa fa la la la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, Come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa fa la la la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keepe thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, (repeat) Fa (repeat)

II.

[...] SIng on Sister and well met, Louely Mabell and faire Bett, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Younglings must haue a beginning, Vertues they are hard of winning, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) But wee will spare for no paynes, If we win contents or gaines, Fa la (repeat) Fa (repeat) Which if wee attaine vnto, We shall doe that few can doe. Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat)

III.

[...] AH sweet, whose beauty passeth all my telling, To thee my loue, to (repeat) all others are excelling, Fa la, (repeat) Fa la, (repeat) By thee I liue, and haue mine onely pleasure, Thou art my life, thou (repeat) and eke my whole harts treasure, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Let not vnkindenes then eclipse my gladnes, But let sweet smiles expell the clouds of sadnes, Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) For if my loue sweet smiles and liking reapeth, O happy I, my heart for ioy it leapeth. Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat)

IIII.

[...] MOther I will haue a Husband, And I will haue him out of hand, Mother I wil sure haue one, In spight of her, of her that wil haue none, Iohn a Dun shuld a had me long ere this, He said I had good lips to kisse, to kisse, to kisse, Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her that will haue none, For I haue heard tis trim when folkes doe loue, By good Sir Iohn I sweare now I will proue, now (repeat) by (repeat) now (repeat) For Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, (repeat) (repeat) In spight of her that will haue none. To the Towne therefore will I gad, will I gad, will (repeat) will I gad, will (repeat) To get me a husband good or bad, to (repeat) Mother I will haue a Husband, and I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her that will haue none.

V.

[...] FAir'st are the words that couer deep'st deceit, As next sweet honey, as (repeat) lye the poysned stings, The crook't, the crooked hooke, the crooked hooke is hid the (repeat) the hooke is hid in pleasant'st baite, Which vn╌foreseene, which (repeat) which (repeat) too late repentance brings, re. (repeat) Synous sweet speech, sweet speech the outside of vntruth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, pro╌cur'd the Troyans ruth. the (repeat) Synous sweet speech, sweet speech, the outside of vntruth, the (repeat) thicke laid with Art, procur'd the Troyans ruth. pro╌cur'd the Troyans ruth.

VI.

[...] CRuell Madame: Wherefore thus plaine I must for euer, My wofull heart bewaileth, My death drawes on, and my poore life, poore life it faileth, I sue for mercy where no teares, no teares auaileth, where (repeat) Wherefore thus plaine I must for euer, Yet if your eyes did see how you torment mee, yet (repeat) yet (repeat) A╌las (repeat) alas, alas, alas poore man, it would the more content mee, But now in absence, ah, doe I lament me, ah (repeat) wherefore thus plaine I must for euer, thus plaine I must for e╌uer.

VII.

[...] NEuer did any more delight to see his enemy, more Foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) Neuer did any more delight to see his enemy, more foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) finding no remedy, It was because I lou'd her in my heart, Al╌though alas she lou'd to make it smart, she (repeat) although (repeat) bid her adue, Because vnkinde, be (repeat) be╌cause vnkinde to him that is most true? bid her a-due, Because vnkinde vnkinde, be (repeat) because vnkinde to him that is most true?

VIII. The first part.

[...] LOcke vp: The treasures of my heart, Preserue those beames, preserue (repeat) preserue (repeat) this ages onely light, To her, sweet sence, to (repeat) sweet Sleepe, some ease, some ease impart, Her sence too weake to beare, the spirits might, And while (O sleepe) thou closest vp her sight, Where loue doth forge, doth forge his fairest dart, O harbour all her parts in ease — O (repeat) full plight, Let no strange dreame, let no strange dreame make her faire body start, make (repeat)

IX. The second part.

[...] ANd yet: O dreame, if thou wilt not depart from this rare subiect, from (repeat) of thy common right, But wilt thy selfe in such a seate delight, But (repeat) then take my shape, then (repeat) then (repeat) and play a louers part, Kisse her from me, and say vnto her sprit, Till her eyes, till (repeat) (doe) shine, I liue in darkest night, I (repeat) I (repeat) till her eyes shine I liue in darkest night.

X.

[...] O Merry world: Might walke from mead to mead, And cheerefully relate, Sowre pleasurs and sweet griefes, sweet griefes, following a wanton state, sowre (repeat) sweet griefes, following a wanton state, Those dayes knew no suspect, those (repeat) each one might freely prate, each (repeat) each (repeat) each (repeat) And daunce and sing, and sing, and play with his con╌so╌ci╌ate, Then lo╌uers vsde like Turtles, to kisse full louingly, O hony dayes, and customes of antiqui╌tie, But the world now is full, but (repeat) but (repeat) of so fond Ielou╌sie, of (repeat) That we count charitie, that (repeat) that (repeat) wanton in╌iquitie, that we count chari╌tie, wanton in╌iquitie.

XI.

[...] SWeet theefe, (repeat) when me of heart you reft, You did a murther and a theft, And could you ought more cru╌ell doe, and (repeat) cruell doe, Then rob a man, then (repeat) and kill him too? Wherefore of loue I craue this meede, To bring you where you did this deede, That there you may for him disgracing, Suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) of my imbracing.

XII.

[...] SWeet, sweet Suffolke Owle, sweet, (repeat) sweet (repeat) sweet (repeat) so trimly dight, With feathers, like a lady bright, sweet (repeat) Thou sitting by night, (repeat) Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) Thy note that forth so freely roules, With shrill command the Mouse controules, with (repeat) And sings a dirge for dying soules, And (repeat) for (repeat) for (repeat) for (repeat) soules, (repeat) soules, Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te te whit, te whoo. te (repeat) te (repeat) te whoo, te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te whoo.

XIII. The first part.

[...] THou art not faire for all thy red and white, For all those rosie ornaments in thee, for (repeat) Thou art not sweet, thou (repeat) though made of meere delight, Nor faire, nor sweet, nor sweet, vnlesse thou pittie mee, I will not sooth thy fancies, thou shalt proue, That beautie is no beautie without loue. that (repeat) that (repeat) that beautie is no beautie without loue.

XIIII. The second part.

[...] YEt loue not me, nor seeke not to al╌lure, Yet (repeat) Yet (repeat) nor seeke not to allure My thoughts with beautie, my (repeat) were it more diuine, Thy smiles and kisses, thy (repeat) I cannot en╌dure, Ile not be wrapt vp, not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight, Imbrace (repeat) Imbrace and kisse, and loue me in de╌spight, imbrace (repeat) Imbrace (repeat)

XV.

[...] MIra, mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, mira. (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) cano, mira cano, (repeat) cano, mira cano, mi╌ra cano, (repeat) cano, Sol occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol oc╌cubuit, Sol, (repeat) occubuit, Nox nulla, Nox nulla, Nox nulla secuta est, Nox nulla se╌cu╌ta est, Sol oc╌cu. buit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occu╌buit, Sol (repeat) occubu╌it, Sol (repeat) Sol occubu╌it, occubuit, Nox nulla secu╌ta est. Nox (repeat)

XVI. An Elegie, on the death of his right worshipfull Master, Sir Thomas Beaumont Knight, of Stoughton in Leicestershire.

[...] WEepe, weepe mine eyes.

Here endeth the songs of fiue parts.

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush (repeat) my rude present, Blushing yet say this, That he that sent thee, that (repeat) ment a better thing, Best meaners oft best (repeat) of their best pur╌pose misse, Best runners some time faile, best runners some time faile to hit the Ring, Tell my sweet Mistresse saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew he doth supply in minde. Tell my sweet Mistresse saint of woman╌kinde, my sweet Mistrisse, my sweet saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, he doth supply in minde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) what (repeat) he doth supply, he doth supply in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird: A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are, A╌las (repeat) my fortunes are, Both prisoners (both) both sing, both (repeat) And both singing thus striue to please her, striue (repeat) striue (repeat) who hath im╌prisoned vs, Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st singing, but I singing dye, onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st singing, but I singing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine, Is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no better guerdon gaine, Adue, O stay, my heart re╌lents, my (repeat) my (repeat) And will not change, my heart relents and will not change, my (repeat) But rather dye, but (repeat) then from my Saint once swarue, My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue she doth deserue, My life she gaue, my, my life she gaue, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MElpomene.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatal Sisters. desire, Such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy the heauenly quire, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, desire, Such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy the heauenly quire, to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards: That trooping, (repeat) (repeat) trooping were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with hey and whooping, Why sit you dead and drooping? Vp, vp for shame and leaue this heauy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues renowned be╌yond all humane honour, Base earth, base earth scorning, O╌rian now a Saint in heau'n, in heau'n is crowned, Both bon-fires and bell-ringers, Sing then yee Shepheards and Nimphrs of Di╌a╌na, and Nimphs of Di a╌na, Farewell, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ria╌na, farewell▪ [Page] [...]faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, [...] (repeat) farewell (repeat) farewell, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, [...]faire O╌ri╌a╌na.

FINIS.
QVINTVS.THE FIRST SE …

QVINTVS.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fîue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne. 1620.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather [...]mboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proceeding from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation. On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, I present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, and rest, great Marquesse

Happie to be the Seruant of your commands, THOMAS VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer;
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Thom, a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam, VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII

Of 5. Voc.

I.

[...] COme forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come forth sweet Nimphe and play thee, Come (repeat) Thy true loue here doth stay thee, Da-li-da makes me sing, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Come lull thee in mine armes, Ile keep thee safe from harmes, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

II.

[...] SIng on Sis╌ter and well met, Loue╌ly Ma╌bell and faire Bett, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Younglings must haue a beginning, Vertues they are hard of winning, Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) But we will spare for no paynes, If we win contents or gaines, Fa la la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Which if wee at╌taine vnto, We shall doe that few can doe. Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

III.

[...] AH sweet, whose beauty passeth all my telling, To thee my loue, to (repeat) all others are excelling, all (repeat) Fa la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) By thee I liue, and haue mine onely pleasure, Thou art my life, thou (repeat) and eke my whole hearts treasure, and (repeat) Fa la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Let not vnkinde╌nesse then e╌clipse my gladnes, But let sweet smiles expell the clouds of sadnes, Fa la la, (repeat) Fa (repeat) For if my loue sweet looks and li╌king reapeth, O happy I my hart for ioy it leapeth. Fa la la la, Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat) Fa (repeat)

IIII.

[...] MOther I will haue a Husband, And I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, In spight of her, of her that will haue none, Iohn a Dun should haue had me long ere this, Iohn (repeat) He said I had good lips to kisse, to kisse, to kisse, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mother I will sure haue one, In spight of her that will haue none, For I haue heard tis trim, tis trim, for (repeat) when folkes doe loue, By good Sir Iohn I sweare now I will proue, by (repeat) now (repeat) For Mother I will sure haue one, haue one, haue one, In spight of her that will haue none, To the Towne therefore will I gad to (repeat) wil I gad, will (repeat) To get me a husband good or bad, to (repeat) Mother I will haue a Husband, and I will haue him out of hand, Mother I will sure haue [Page] [...]one, haue one, In spight of her, in spight of her that will, that will haue none.

V.

[...] FAir'st are the words that couer deep'st de╌ceit, As next sweet ho╌ney, as (repeat) lye the poyson'd stings, The crooked hooke, The (repeat) is hid the (repeat) the (repeat) is hid in pleasant'st baite, Which vnforeseene, which (repeat) too late repentance brings repentance brings, too (repeat) too Synons sweet speech, the out╌side of vntruth, vntruth, the (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, with Art pro╌cur'd the Troy╌ans ruth. Synons sweet speech, sweet speech, the out side of vntruth, of (repeat) Thicke laid with Art, thicke (repeat) thicke (repeat) procur'd the Troyans ruth.

VI.

[...] CRuell Madame, my heart you haue bereft me, And to my selfe no part haue you left me, For yours all wholy loue hath fast infest me, Wherefore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, My wofull heart both night and day bewaileth, My death drawes on, and my poore life it faileth, I sue for mercy where no teares, no tears a╌uaileth, where (repeat) Wherefore thus plaine I must for euer, for (repeat) Yet if your eyes did see how you torment me, yet (repeat) did see, how you torment me, did see how you torment me, Alas, (repeat) alas, (repeat) a╌las poore man, it would the more content me, But now in absence, ah, doe I lament, lament me, ah, ah doe I lament me, Wherfore thus plaine I must for e╌uer, Wherefore (repeat)

VII.

[...] NEuer did any more delight to see his ene╌my, Then I, more foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) Neuer did any more delight to see his ene╌my, Neuer (repeat) more Foole, finding no remedy, finding (repeat) finding (repeat) It was because I lou'd her in my heart, Although alas she lou'd to make it smart, although (repeat) although (repeat) to make it smart, oh she did loue to make it smart. What shall I say then, but bid her adue, Be╌cause vnkinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) be (repeat) to him that is most true? because vnkinde, vnkind to him that is most true? What shall I say then, but bid her a-due, Because vnkind, be (repeat) be (repeat) be (repeat) because vnkinde to him that is most true? because vn╌kinde, be (repeat) be (repeat) be╌cause vnkinde, vnkinde, to him that is most true?

VIII. The first part.

[...] LOcke vp: The treasures of my heart, Preserue those beames, preserue (repeat) those beames, this ages onely light, To her sweet sence, to (repeat) sweet, sweet Sleepe, some ease, some ease im╌part, Her sence too weake to beare, the spirits might, And while (O sleepe) thou closest vp her sight, thou (repeat) Where loue doth forge, doth forge his fairest dart, O harbour all her parts in easefull plight, her (repeat) O harbour all her parts, O harbour all in easefull plight, Let no strange dreame make her faire body, faire bo╌dy start. make (repeat)

IX. The second part.

[...] ANd yet (O dreame,) if thou wilt not de╌part from this rare subiect, from this rare sub╌iect, sub╌iect of thy common right, But wilt thy selfe in such a feate delight, But (repeat) then take my shape, then (repeat) then (repeat) then (repeat) and play a louers part, Kisse her from me, and say vnto her sprit, and (repeat) Till her eyes shine, till (repeat) till (repeat) I liue in darkest night, I (repeat) I (repeat) night, till her eyes shine, I liue in darkest night.

X.

[...] O Merry, merry world when euery louer with his mate, Might walke from meade to meade, And cheerefully relate, and (repeat) Sowre pleasures, and sweet griefes, and sweet, sweet griefes, following, a wanton state, and sweet griefes, and sweet sweet griefes following, following a wanton state, Those dayes knew no suspect, those dayes knew no sus╌pect, each one might freely prate, each (repeat) each (repeat) each (repeat) And daunce and sing, and sing and play with his consoci╌ate, Then lo╌uers vsde like Turtles, like tur╌tles, to kisse full louingly, O honey dayes, oh (repeat) & customes of antiqui tie, But the world now is full, but (repeat) the (repeat) of so fond Ielousie, of (repeat) That we count charitie, that (repeat) that we count chari╌tie, wanton in╌iquitie, that (repeat)

XI.

[...] SWeet theefe, (repeat) when me of heart you reft, You did a murther and a theft, And could you ought more cru╌ell doe, and could you ought more cru╌ell doe, Then rob a man, and kill him too? Wherefore of loue I craue this meede, wherefore (repeat) To bring you where you did the deede, That there you may for him disgracing, Suffer in chaines, in chaines suffer (repeat) suffer in chaines, suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) suffer (repeat) of my imbra╌cing.

XII.

[...] SWeet, sweet Suffolke Owle, (repeat) (repeat) sweet, (repeat) sweet (repeat) so trimly dight, With feathers, like a Lady bright, sweet (repeat) Thou, thou sing'st alone, sitting, by night, Te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te (repeat) te whoo, te whit, te whoo, te (repeat) Thy notes that forth so freely roules, With shrill command the Mouse controules, with (repeat) And sings a dirge for dying soules, And sings a dirge, and (repeat) for dying soules, for (repeat) for (repeat) soules, soules, soules, Te whit, (repeat) te whoo, te whit te whoo te whit, te whit, te whoo. te whit, te (repeat) te whoo. te (repeat) te whit te whoo. te whit, te whoo.

XIII. The first part.

[...] THou art not faire for all thy red and white, For all those rosie, rosie ornaments in thee, for (repeat) Thou art not sweet, thou (repeat) though made of meere de╌light, Nor faire, nor sweet, nor (repeat) vnlesse thou pittie me, vnlesse (repeat) I will not sooth thy fancies, I (repeat) thou shalt proue, That beautie is no beautie without loue. that (repeat) that beautie is no beautie without loue. That beautie is, that beautie is no beautie without loue. that (repeat)

XIIII. The second part.

[...] YEt loue not me, nor seeke not to allure, nor seeke not to al╌lure, Yet (repeat) Yet loue not me, nor seeke not to allure, My thoughts with beautie my (repeat) were it more diuine, Thy smiles and kisses, thy smiles and kisses I cannot endure, Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Ile not be wrapt vp in those armes of thine, Ile (repeat) Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, Now shew it if thou be a woman right, Imbrace and kisse, and kisse, and loue me in despight, im╌brace (repeat) and kisse, and loue me in despight, imbrace and kisse, and loue me in despight▪

XV.

[...] MIra▪ mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, mira, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) Mira, (repeat) mira, (repeat) mira cano, mi╌ra cano, (repeat) mi╌ra ca╌no, ca no, Sol occubuit, Sol occubuit, oc╌cu╌buit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol occu╌buit, Sol oc╌cubuit, occu╌buit, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol occubuit, occu╌buit, Nox nulla, (repeat) (repeat) Nox, nox nulla, (repeat) (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est, Nox (repeat) Nox (repeat) Sol occubuit, Sol (repeat) Sol oc╌cubuit, occubu╌it, Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) Sol (repeat) occubuit, Sol occubuit Sol (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est. Nox (repeat) Nox nulla secu╌ta est, Nox (repeat) Nox nulla secuta est.

XVI. An Elegie, on the death of his right worshipfull Master, Sir Thomas Beaumont Knight, of Stoughton in Leicestershire.

[...] WEepe, weepe mine eyes (repeat) salt teares, due ho╌nour giue, With sighs deplore my griefe, (repeat) and mour╌ning state, Since he is dead by whom I still▪ doe liue: Beau╌mont is dead, (repeat) O cursed cruell fate, a╌las, (repeat) O cursed cruell fate, Beaumont farewell, the earth doth sweetly, doth sweet╌ly sleepe, To hold thy Corps, though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. (repeat) though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. Beaumont farewell, the earth doth sweetly, doth sweet╌ly sleepe, To hold thy corps though heau'n thy soule doth keepe. (repeat) (repeat) though heau'n thy soule doth keepe.

Here endeth the songs of fiue parts.

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush (repeat) my rude present, That he that sent thee, that (repeat) ment a better thing, that (repeat) a bet╌ter thing, Best mea╌ners oft, best (repeat) of their best purpose misse, Best runners, runners, runners, sometime faile to hit the Ring, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supplie in minde, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supply in minde▪ what wants in shew, what (repeat) what (repeat) what (repeat) what wants in shew, he doth supply in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird, sweet bird, dainty (repeat) sweet bird, who art incaged there, sweet bird, dainty sweet bird, dainty (repeat) sweet bird, who art inca╌ged there, A╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? A╌las, a╌las how like thine and my fortunes are? Both prisners (both) sing, both prisners, both sing, and both sing╌ing thus, Striue to please her, striue (repeat) to please her who hath imprisned vs, Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st, singing, thou, (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I sing╌ing dye. Onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine? Is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no better guerdon gaine? Adue, thy lookes are coy, thy (repeat) thy (repeat) thy fancie strange, O stay, my heart relents, and will not change, my heart relents, relents, my heart re╌lents and will not change, But rather dye, then from my Saint once swarue, then from my saint once swarue, My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue she doth, my loue she doth deserue, My life, she gaue, my (repeat) my (repeat) my loue she doth deserue, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MEl╌po╌me╌ne (repeat) bewaile thy sisters losse, In tragicke dumps their dolours deepe display, Curse cruell death that so their blisse did crosse, And Musicks peerelesse patron tooke a╌way, Though they doe sleepe, Though they doe sleepe, yet thou alone mayst sing, Prince Henry's dead, dead, Prince Henry's dead, Prince (repeat) Prince Henry's dead, Prince (repeat) Farewell, farewell, farewell the Muses king. Farewell, (repeat) farewell, farewell (repeat) fare╌well the Mu╌ses king.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatall Sis╌ters held the bloudy knife, A peerelesse Prince on earth he did re╌maine, too soone sad death en╌sued his blissefull life, And now he with the King of kings doth raigne, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare, to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy, such ioy, he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earth╌ly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, the (repeat) Such ioy such ioy he hath, to heare, to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards: And Nimphs, Shepheards and Nimphs, that trooping, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with (repeat) Why sit you dead, dead and drooping? Vp, vp for shame, vp, vp for shame, and leaue this heauy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues reno wned, be╌yond all humane honour, Base earth, scor╌ning, O╌ri╌an now a Saint in heau'n, O╌ri╌an (repeat) O╌ri╌an now is crowned, Both bonfires and bell-ringers, both (repeat) bell-ringers, both (repeat) she left vs and good singers, good sing╌ers, sing╌ers, [Page] [...]sing- ers, she left vs and good singers, Sing then yee Shepheards and [...]Nimphs of Di-a- na, and (repeat) Farewell faire O-ri-a-na, fare- [...]well, (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, [...]farewell faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, (repeat) farewell faire [...] O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell, (repeat) [...]farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na.

FINIS.
SEXTVS.THE FIRST SET …

SEXTVS.

THE FIRST SET: BEEING SONGS of diuers Ayres and Natures, of Fîue and Sixe parts: Apt for Vyols and Voyces.

NEWLY COMPOSED by Thomas Vautor, Batcheler of MVSICKE.

LONDON: Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes and Iohn Browne. 1620.

Cum Priuilegio.

TO THE RIGHT HONOrable George, Marquesse of Buckingham, Viscount Villiers, Barron of Whaddon, Master of his Maie­sties Horse, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber, and one of his most honourable Priuie COVNCELL.

Right Honourable:

SO infinite is Loue in operation, and so forcible are the faculties of the Soule, as beside mute respects of dutie and seruice, they will neuer rest without reall remonstrance of actuall fruites, which I (my right noble Lord) hauing beene an indiuiduall ap­pendant of your no lesse noble Mothers house and name, and a religious obseruant of your owne heroique and hopefull vertues, from your Cradle, do humbly present as a tribute of my deuotion, to your fauourable entertainment and protection, these few Songs, whereof some were composed in your tender yeares, and in your most worthy Fathers house, (from whom, and your most honourable Mother, for many yeares I receiued part of my meanes and liuelyhoode) which hath the rather emboldened mee, with many other more neere re­spects, to intreat your Honour to let them passe vnder your gracious fauour, as the most noble and truest fauourite of this our too much vnrespected quality. This is but a small testimony to paralell the proportion of my minde in this kinde, or any other seruice which my faculty and fortune are any way able to affoord: But knowing your honoura­ble disposition to accept the meanest seruice proceeding from so loyall and faithfull a heart, I make no doubt of your Lordships acceptation. On which hope relying, with all humility crauing pardon for my bold presumption, I present them, and will euer pray to God for your health, honour, and happinesse, and rest, great Marquesse

Happie to be the Seruant of your commands, THOMAS VAVTOR.

In commendation of the Authour.

THy pleasant notes with sweet concents ygilt,
Thy Wit, thy Art, and faithfull zeale discouer;
Great pittie 'twere such numbers should be spilt,
Or Enuy should in darknesse Vertue smother:
But thou hast chose, good Thom, a Patron fit,
That will defend thee, and safe-conduct it.
Calophysus.

THE TABLE.

Songs of fiue Voyces.
  • COme forth sweet Nymphe. I
  • Sing on Sister. II
  • Ah sweet, whose beautie. III
  • Mother I will haue a husband. IV
  • Fairest are the words. V
  • Cruell Madam. VI
  • Neuer did any. VII
  • Locke vp faire lids. 1. part. VIII
  • And yet O dreame. 2. part. IX
  • O merry world. X
  • Sweet thiefe. XI
  • Sweet Suffolke Owle. XII
  • Thou art not faire. 1. part. XIII
  • Yet loue not me. 2. part. XIV
  • Mira cano. XV
  • Weepe, weepe, mine eyes. XVI
Songs of sixe Voyces.
  • Blush my rude present. XVII
  • Dainty sweet bird. XVIII
  • Vnkinde. XIX
  • Melpomene. 1. part. XX
  • Whilst fatall Sisters. 2. part. XXI
  • Shepheards and Nymphs. XXII

Of 6. Voc.

XVII.

[...] BLush (repeat) my rude present, That he that sent thee, that (repeat) ment a better thing, that (repeat) bet╌ter thing, Best meaners oft, best (repeat) best mea╌ners oft, of their best purpose misse, Best runners, runners, runners, sometime faile to hit the Ring, Tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supplie in minde, tell my sweet Mistresse, saint of woman╌kinde, my (repeat) sweet (repeat) What wants in shew, what (repeat) he doth supply in minde, what wants in shew, what (repeat) in shew, what (repeat) what (repeat) what (repeat) he doth supply in minde.

XVIII.

[...] DAinty sweet bird, sweet bird, dainty sweet bird, sweet bird, A╌las how like thine and my for╌tunes are? my (repeat) A╌las, how like thine and my fortunes are? thine and my for╌tunes are? Both prisners (both) sing, both sing, both prisners, both sing, and both sing╌ing, and both singing thus, Striue to please her, striue (repeat) striue (repeat) who hath imprisned vs, who (repeat) Onely in this we differ, thou and I, Thou liu'st, thou liu'st singing, thou, thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye. Onely in this we differ, thou and I, thou (repeat) thou liu'st, thou liu'st singing, thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) thou (repeat) but I singing dye.

XIX.

[...] VNkinde, is this the meede of louers paine? Is (repeat) Doth loyall faith no better guerdon gaine? Adue, O stay, my heart relents, my (repeat) my (repeat) and will not change, my heart relents, and will not change, not change, my heart re╌lents and will not change, But ra╌ther ra╌ther dye, but (repeat) then from my Saint once swarue, then (repeat) My life she gaue, my (repeat) my loue, my loue she doth deserue, My life, my life she gaue, my life she gaue, my loue she doth deserue.

XX. The first part.

[...] MElpomene.

XXI. The second part.

[...] WHil'st fatall Sisters. Such ioy, he hath such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, Such ioy, such ioy, such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, such (repeat) such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, No earthly Musicke doth he more desire, Such ioy, he hath such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire, such ioy, such ioy such ioy he hath to heare the heauenly quire. the (repeat) Such ioy such ioy he hath, such (repeat) to heare the heauenly quire.

XXII.

[...] SHepheards and Nimphs, and (repeat) that trooping, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) were woont to fetch home May with hey and whooping, with (repeat) Why sit you dead and drooping? why sit you dead and drooping? Vp, vp for shame, and leaue this hea╌uy mourning, For O╌ri╌an is not dead, but liues renowned, beyond Base earth, base earth scor╌ning, O╌ri╌an now a Saint in heau'n, O╌ri╌an now a Saint, O╌ri╌an, (repeat) in heau'n, in heau'n is crowned, Both bonfires and bellringers, both (repeat) both bonfires and bell-ring╌ers, bell (repeat) she left vs and good sing╌ers, she (repeat) Sing then yee Shepheards [Page] [...] and Nimphs of Di╌a╌na, and (repeat) Farewell faire O╌ri╌an, farewell faire O╌ri╌an, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌╌na, fare╌well faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, fare╌well, faire (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌na, farewell faire O╌ri╌a╌an, faire (repeat) farewell faire O╌ri╌an, faire O╌ri╌a╌na, fare╌well faire O╌ri╌a╌na, faire (repeat)

FINIS.

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