Friendly Counsaile. OR,

Here's an answer to all Demanders
The which Ile declare to all By-standers,
Thereby to teach them how to know
A perfect Friend from a flattering Foe.

To the tune of I could fancy pretty Nancy.

[figure]
IT was my chance not long time since,
To be where was much conference:
And amongst their questions all,
One did me to answer call,
Thus demanding how to know
A faithfull friend from a flattering foe.
Being much amaz [...]ed in my minde,
How this Theame might be defind;
Yet I answer'd thus againe,
That I would resolue them plaine,
In what kinde they well might know
A faithfull friend from a flattering foe.
If that thou haue a friend, be kinde,
Here in true loue thou so [...]ne may finde,
Hee'l not leaue thée in dis [...]resse,
But will helpe thée more or lesse:
Hereby you may plainely know
A faithfull, &c.
On the contrary, marke my words,
Flattering tongues are worse than swords,
They'l speake you fair while you them féed,
But quite forsake thée in thy néed:
These are perfect signes to know
A faithfull, &c.
If thou want meanes and haue a friend,
Hée'le something giue and something lend,
He will not sée thée for to perish,
But will thée relieue end cherish:
Hereby you may finde and know
A faithfull, &c.
The Flatterer whilst thou hast thinke,
Will proffer meate and giue thée drinke,
But for it thou shalt dearely pay,
For he will bring thée to decay:
Then I advise thee how to know
A faithfull, &c.
Thy friend will grieue to sée thée lacke,
Hée'ls speake thée faire behind thy backe,
In words and déeds hée'l still agrée,
Hée'l grieue to see thy misery:
Hereby you may plainely know
A faithfull, &c.
Thy foe indéed is nothing so,
For hée'l reioyce still at thy woe,
And if thou once grow poore and bare,
Then for thée he no more will care:
Thus thou plainely here maist know
A faithfull, &c.
Thy friend will wish thée kéep thy meanes,
And not to waste it on lewd Queenes,
Hée'l bid thée for to haue a care
Cards, Dice and Whores, are dangerous ware:
Hereby you may plainely know
A faithfull, &c.
The other he will thée intice
To drunkennesse, Cards, Whores & Dice,
Hée'l aduise thée for to roare,
To spend thy meanes and so be poore:
Thus thou here maist plainely know
A faithfull, &c.

The Second Part. To the same tune,

[figure]
THy [...]riend such lewdnesse soon wil check,
And tell thée thou art like to lacke,
Hée'l bi [...] thee alwaies haue a care
Of that which thou dost little feare,
And that is, pouerty will grow,
Which thy true friend would not haue so.
The false and fained Flatterer
Will séeke to trap thée in his snare,
His words most swéet shall still appeare
To get thy money, wine and béere:
These are certaine signes to know
A faithfull friend from a flattering foe.
If that thy friend be true indéed,
Hée'l not forsake thée in thy néed,
Hee'l take thy part in weale and woe,
Thy flattering friend will not doe so:
These are certaine signes to know
A faithfull, &c.
Now some perchance may this obiect,
And say they are of the true Sect,
But such Ile neuer trust till I
Their inward thoughts doe proue and try,
Then I certaine am to know
A faithfull, &c.
If that you want, then néeds of force,
For your reliefe you'l take some course,
Need stands behind and bids you goe,
The kindnesse of mens hearts to know,
And where once you have try'd it so,
You'l know your friend, &c.
Thy friend will wondrous sorry be
To see thee fall to misery,
And to his power hee'l giue reliefe
To ease thy dolour, woe and griefe:
These are certaine signes to know
A faithfull, &c.
Your faire tongu'd fawning hypocrite
Will say that you were void of wit,
To spend your meanes so foolishly,
And lacke so long before you dye.
These are certaine signes to know
A faithfull, &c.
Then this aduice take then of me,
Before need comes goe thou and see.
Try whilst thou hast of thine owne,
And see where fauour may be showne:
Then thou soone shalt finde and know
A faithfull, &c.
And looke where thou didst fauour finde,
There be not wauering like the winde,
If that thy friend proue iust and true,
Then doe not change him for a new:
Thus to all men I doe show
The difference twix a friend and foe.
For my part I may plainely say,
That friends are apt for to decay,
In wealth a man shall haue great store,
But very few if once growne poore:
This I write for men to know
A faithfull, &c.
When I had meanes then I had friends,
But now I want, their friendship ends,
Now but few will take my part,
Nor helpe release me of my smart:
This I have writ for men to know
A faithfull, &c.
Thus to conclude and end my Song,
Let me aduise both old and young,
If thou doe wish for many friends,
Then haue a care and get some meanes
Then you need not care to know
A faithfull friend from a flattering foe.
C. R.
FINIS.

LONDON, Printed for Richard Harper in Smithfield.

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