MELISMATA. MVSICALL PHANSIES. FITTING THE COVRT, CITIE, and COVNTREY HVMOVRS.

To 3, 4, and 5. Voyces.

To all delightfull, except to the Spitefull,
To none offensiue, except to the Pensiue.

THOV SHALT LABOR FOR PEACE PLEN­TIE

LONDON, Printed by William Stansby for Thomas Adams. 1611.

TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVLL THE true fauorers of Musicke, and all vertue Mr. Thomas Rauenscroft, and Mr. William Rauenscroft Esquires.

RIght Worshipfull, I haue beene so much obliged to the courteous regard you haue alwaies had of mee, that if I should not owe vnto you my best endeauors; I should much contrary your kindnesses, and deseruedly incurre the shame of ingratitude: Let it therefore stand with your good likings, that by these harmelesse Musicall Phansies, I may shew vnto the world, and hereby confesse, how much I am bound vnto [Page] you; and when it shall further seeme good to your Worships to command me, I will not haue ability or life that shall not be at your seruice.

Your Worships affectio­nate kinseman, T. R.

TO THE NOBLEST OF THE COVRT, LIBE­RALLEST OF THE COVN­TREY, and freest of the CITIE.

YOv may well per­ceiue by the much va­riety herein composed, that my desire is to giue contentment in this kinde of Musicke to the skilfull, and most iudicious of all sortes. And being little or much beholding to some of each rancke, I studie and striue to please you in your owne elements. Now if my paines proue your pleasures, you shall still keepe mee in paines to please you. And so I rest yours.

TR.B.M.

❧ A TABLE OF ALL The Songs contained in this BOOKE.

COVRT VARIETIES.

1. CAnst thou Loue.
4. Voc.
2. Now flowres.
4. Voc.
3. Haste, haste, post haste.
5. Voc.
4. Will yee loue me.
5. Voc.
5. Long haue I beene perplext.
3. Voc.
6. Heigh ho, away the Mare.
4. Voc.

CITIE ROVNDS.

7. BRoomes for old shooes.
4. Voc.
8. I pray good Mother.
3. Voc.
9. My mistris will not be cōtent.
4. Voc.
10. I lay with an old man.
4. Voc.

CITIE CONCEITS.

11. WHere are you faire Maides.
5. Voc.
12. My master is so wise.
4. Voc.
13. Maides to bed.
4. Voc.
14. Oyes, Oyes.
4. Voc.

COVNTRY ROVNDS.

15. HE that will an Ale-house keepe.
3. Voc.
16. And seest thou my Cow.
3. Voc.
17. Kit and Tom chida.
4. Voc.
18. Dery ding, ding, dasson.
3. Voc.
19. As I went by the way.
5. Voc.

COVNTRY PASTIMES.

20. THere were three Rauens.
4. Voc.
21. It was the Frogge in the well.
4. Voc.
22. I haue house and land in Kent.
4. Voc.
23. Remember O thou man.
4. Voc.
FINIS.

¶The Courtiers good Morrow to his MISTRIS.
1.

4. Voc.

Medius.

[...] CAnst thou loue, and lie alone? Loue is so, loue is so dis- [...]graced: pleasure is best, wherein is rest in a heart embraced. Rise, rise, [...]rise, day light doe not burne out, Bels doe ring and Birdes doe sing, [...]onely I that mourne out. .ij.

Morning starre doth now appeare,
Wind is husht, and skies cleare:
Come come away, come come away,
Canst thou loue and burne out day?
Rise, rise, rise, rise,
Day-light doe not burne out,
Bels doe ring,
Birds doe sing,
Onely I that mourne out.

TREBLE.

[...] [...]Rise, rise, rise, day light doe not burne out, Bels do ring, [...]and Birds doe sing, onely I that mourne out.

TENOR.

[...] [...]Rise, rise, day light do not burne out, Bels do ring, and Birds [...]doe sing, one - ly I that mourne out.

BASSVS.

[...]Rise, rise, rise, day [...]light doe not burne out, Bels doe ring, and Birds doe sing, onely [...]I that mourne out.

¶ The Crowning of BELPHEBE.
2.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

[...] NOw flowres your odours breath, and all. .ij. the ayre [...]perfume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with, and with, no stormes [...]consume, hayle, hayle, and wel-come, wel-come her, Thou glorie, [...].ij. Thou glorie of our greene, receiue this flowrie [...]Spheare, .ij. and bee and bee the Shepheards Queene, and

TREBLE.

[...]NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ij. the ayre per- [...]fume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with no stormes no stormes [...]consume. [Page] [...] [...]and

MEDIVS.

[...]NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ii. the ayre per- [...]fume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with, and with, no stormes con- [...]sume. [...]and

BASSVS.

[...]NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ii. the ayre perfume, [...]grow in his honor'd wreath, and with no stormes consume, [...] [...]and

Tenor.

[...].ij. kneele, O kneele, and doe her homage now, O [...]now, that cals our hearts like fate, Now rise, .ij. .ij. your humble [...]bosomes bow, O bow, and leade her, .ij. and leade, and leade [...]her to her state.

TREBLE.

[...]be, .ii. the shepheards Queene. [...] [...] [...]

MEDIVS.

[...]be, .ii. the shepheards Queene. [...] [...] [...] [...]

BASSVS.

[...]be, and be the shepheards Queene. [...] [...]

¶Mercuries Song, the messengers of the GODS.
3.

5. Voc.

Medius.

[...] HAste, haste, post haste, make haste and [...]away; the tide tarieth no man, it makes no delay. Trudge, trudge [...]for thy life; for vertue must flie: these iourneyes are rise with thee, [...]with the poore Mercurie.

BASSVS.

[...] [...]

TREBLE.

[...]HAste, haste. [...] [...]

QVINTVS.

[...]HAste, haste. [...]

TENOR.

[...]HAste, Haste. [...]

¶ The Courtiers Courtship to his Mistris.
4.

5. Voc.

Quintus.

[...] WIll yee loue me Lady sweete, you are young and loue is [...]meete, out alas, out alas, alas, who then will sport thee, wanton yet in the spring, [...]Loue is a pretie thing, Loue is a pretie thing, Kisse sweete, as louers doe proue, [...]kind to them that woe.

BASSVS.

[...] [...] [...]

¶ The Mistris to the Courtier.

5. VOC.

MEDIVS.

[...]FIe away, fie away, fie, fie, fie, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, not I, [...]Ile liue a maide till I be fortie, Fie away, fie away, fie, fie, fie, no, no, [...]no, not I, no, .ij. no, no, no, no, not I.

TREBLE.

[...] [...] [...]

TENOR.

[...] [...] [...]

¶ A Song of Pages, Cashiered from their Masters.
5.

3. Voc.

Treble.

[...] LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I lothed, now may [...]we sing, hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the [...]heart to depart, that I must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will [...]I giue while I liue, .ij. for ioye, for ioye, that I leaue him, for .ij. gone may [...]hee be downe. trole we the Boles, lets in pretie soules, to carrouse [...]with the wenches, to .ij. with the wenches. .ij. with the wenches.

MEDIVS.

[...]LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I loathed, now may we [...]sing: hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the heart to [...]depart, that we must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will I giue [Page] [...]while I liue for ioye that I leaue him, for .ij. downe, neere more that [...]we see downe, trole we the boles, lets in pretie soules to carrouse with the [...]wenches, to carrouse, to .ij. with the wenches, to carrouse with the wenches.

BASSVS.

[...]LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I loathed, now may we [...]sing, hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the heart [...]to depart that I must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will I giue, [...]while I liue for ioye, for ioye, that I leaue him, for ioye, downe, .ij. [...]nor againe to come at vs, trole we the Boles, lets in prety souls to car- [...]rouse with the wenches, to .ij. to .ij. to .ij. with the wenches, to carrouse with [...]the wenches.

¶ Seruants out of Seruice, are going to the Citie to looke for new.
6

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] HEigh ho, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, aside all care, [...]if any man be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, a lustie crew, that are [...]enforced to crie, anew Master, anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master, a [...]new, Hay now, .ij. weele take small paines, and yet [...]will thriue, hay now.

BASSVS.

[...]HEigh hoe, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, if any man be [...]desposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, that are enforced to crie, [...]anew Master, anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master anew, Hey now [...]weele cut their throates that [...]

MEDIVS.

[...]HEigh hoe, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, .ij. let aside all [...]care, if any man be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, Loe, .ij. that [...]are enforced to trie, anew Master anew, .ij. .ij. Master, anew Master [...]anew. We neither minde to begge nor starue. [...]

TENOR.

[...]HEigh hoe away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, .ij. if any man [...]be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, a lustie crew, that are enfor- [...]ced to crie, anew Master anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master anew. [...]We will haue more then we [...]deserue.

❧CITIE ROVNDS.

[...] BRoomes for old Shooes, Pouchrings, Bootes and Buskings, will [...]yee buy a - ny new Broome? New Oysters, new Oysters, New new Cockels, [...]Cockels nye, Fresh Herrings: Will yee buy any straw? Hay yee any Kitchin-stuffe [...]Maides? Pippins fine, Cherrie ripe, ripe, ripe, Cherrie ripe, ripe, ripe. Hay any [...]Wood to cleaue? Giue eare to the clocke, beware your locke, your fire and your [...]light, and God giue you good night, one a Clocke.

8.

3. VOC.

[...] I Pray you good Mother, giue me leaue to play with little Iohn, [...]to make his Bed, and combe his head, and come againe anon, or else beate me as [...]you thinke good, for I loue Iohn alone.

9.

3. VOC.

[...] MY Mistris will not be content, to take a Iest, a Iest, a Iest, as Chaucer [...]meant, but following stil the womans fashion, allowes it, allowes it, for the new [...]translation, for with the word she would not dispence, and yet, and yet, and yet, [...]and yet I know the loues the sence.

10.

4. VOC

[...] I Lay with an old man all the night, I turned to him and he to me, [...]hee could not doe so well as hee might, but hee would faine, but it would [...]not bee.

❧CITIE CONCEITES. ¶The Painters Song of London.
11.

5. Voc.

Medius.

[...] WHere are you faire maides, that haue neede of our trades? [...]Ile sell you a rare confection: will yee haue your faces spread, either with white [...]or red? will yee buy any, will yee buy any faire complection?

BASSVS.

[...]WHere are you. [...]

2.
My drugges are no dregges,
For I haue whites of Egges,
Made in a rare confection.
Red Leather and Surflet water,
Scarlet colour or Staues-aker,
Will yee buy any faire complection?

TREBLE.

[...]WHere are you. [...] [...]

QVINTVS.

[...]WHere are you. [...] [...]

TENOR.

[...]WHere are you. [...] [...]

¶ The Scriueners seruants Song of Holborne.
12.

4. Voc.

Medius.

[...] MY master is so wise, so wise, that hee's proceeded wittall, my [...]Mistris is a foole, a foole, and yet tis the most get-all. Let the Vsurer cram him in [...]interest that excell, their pits, their pits enough to damme him before he goes [...]to hell. In Holborne some: In Fleetestreete some: where eare he come, there [...]some, there some, Where eare, .ij. where, .ij. theirs some, theirs some.

TREBLE.

[...]MY Master is so wise. [...] [...] [Page] [...]

TENOR.

[...]MY Master is so wise. [...] [...] [...]

BASSVS.

[...]MY Master is so wise. [...] [...] [...]

¶ A Belmans Song.
13.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

[...] MAides to bed, and couer coale, let the Mouse .ij. [...]Out of her hole: Crickets, Crickets in the Chimney sing, whil'st the little Bell, [...]the little Bell doth ring. If fast asleepe, who can tell when the Clapper, Clapper [...]hits the Bell.

TREBLE.

[...] [...] [...]

MEDIVS.

[...] [...]

BASSVS.

[...] [...]

¶ The Cryers Song of Cheape-side.
14.

4. Voc.

Medius.

[...] O Yes, O yes, O yes, If any one at fifteene, hath taken vp and found [...]a pretie, pretie thing, .ij. That hath, that hath her maiden head vnbound. [...]If any gallant haue with Cater-tray, play'd the wise Aker, and made all away, [...]let him come to the Crier, let .ij. There will bee laide a thousand [...]pound to tenne, that none, that none, .ij. (of these) will ere bee had a-

TREBLE.

[...] [...] [...] [Page] [...]

TENOR.

[...] [...] [...] [...]

BASSVS.

[...] [...] [...] [...]

[Page] [...]gaine. O yes, O yes, if note or line, or word be here let fall, that giues, .ij. [...]that giues to any man the taste of Gall, Let him come to the Cryer, Let .ij. [...]I will lay my lips to a fat shrouing Hen, that none, .ij. of these, of these will be had [...]againe, for this I say and likewise I protest, no arrowes here at shot at any brest, but [...]all are well come, are .ij. to my musicke feast: But all are wel-come, .ij. [...]But .ij. to my musicke feast, wel-come, .ij. vnto my musicke feast.

TREBLE.

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...]But all are wel-come, are .ij. to my musicke feast, .ij.

TENOR.

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...]But all are wel-come, [...]are .ij. but al are .ij. vnto my musick feast, .ij. vnto .ij. my musick feast.

BASSVS.

[...] [...] [...] [...]But all are wel-come, are .ij. are wel-come, but .ij [...]

COVNTRY ROVNDS.

15.

3. VOC.

[...] HE that will an Ale-house keepe, must haue three things in store, [...]a Chamber and a feather Bed, a Chimney and a hey no-ny no-ny, hay no-ny [...]no-ny, hey nony no, hey nony no, hey nony no.

16.

3. VOC.

[...] ANd seest thou my Cow to day Fowler, and seest .ij. [...]the Bels ring into Mattens, the Bels .ij. Bim bome, bim bome, [...]a bome, bome, bim bome, bim bome, a bome bome.

17.

4. VOC

[...] KIt and Tom chid a, Tom and Kit chid, Kit chid Tom, Tom chid [...]Kit, Kit and Tom chid a.

18.

3. VOC.

[...] DErrie ding, ding, ding Dasson, I am Iohn Cheston, we weeddon [...]we wodden, we weedon, we wodden, Bim bom, bim bom, bim bom, bim bom.

19.

5. VOC.

[...] AS I went by the way, holom, trolum, there met I by the way, ha- [...]zom, gazom, and I had my little companion: I would a catcht, hazom, gazom, [...]and hunge him vpon holum trolum.

22.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] THere were three Rauens sat on a tree, Downe a downe, hay down, hay [...]downe. There were three Rauens sat on a tree, with a downe, There were three [...]Rauens sat on a tree, they were as blacke as they might be, with a downe derrie, [...]derrie, derrie, downe, downe.

The one of them said to his mate,
down adowne hey downe,
2
The one of them said to his mate,
with adowne:
The one of them said to his mate
Where shall we our breakefast take?
with adowne dery downe.
Downe in yonder greene field,
downe adowne hey downe,
Downe in yonder greene field,
with adowne.
Downe in yonder greene field
There lies a Knight slain vnder his shield,
with a downe.
His hounds they lie downe at his feete,
downe adowne hey downe.
4
His hounds they lie downe at his feete,
with adowne.
His hounds they lie downe at his feete
So well they can their Master keepe,
with adowne.
His Haukes they flie so eagerly
downe adowne.
5
His Haukes they flie so eagerly
with adowne.
His Haukes they flie so eagerly,
There's no fowle dare him come nie.
with a downe.
Downe there comes a fallow Doe,
downe adowne.
6
Downe there comes a fallow Doe
with a downe.
Downe there comes a fallow Doe,
As great with yong as she might goe.
with adowne.
She lift vp his bloudy hed,
downe adowne.
7
She lift vp his bloudy hed,

MEDIVS.

[...]Downe a downe, hay downe, with a downe [...]with a downe, hey derrie derrie, downe, downe, downe.

TENOR.

[...]Downe hey downe, hey downe, hey downe. with a [...]downe, with a downe derrie, derrie downe a downe.

BASSVS.

[...]Downe hey downe, hey downe, with a downe, [...]with hey downe downe, derrie downe downe.

with a downe.
She lift vp his bloudy hed,
And kist his wounds that were so red
with a downe.
8
She got him vp vpon her backe,
downe adowne.
She got him vp vpon her backe,
with adowne.
She got him vp vpon her backe,
And carried him to earthen lake,
with adowne downe.
9
She buried him before the prime,
downe adowne.
She buried him before the prime,
with adowne.
She buried him before the prime,
She was dead her selfe ere euen-song time
with adowne.
10
God send euery gentleman
downe adowne.
God send euery gentleman
with adowne.
God send euery gentleman
Such haukes, such hounds, and such a Le­man,
with adowne.

¶ The Marriage of the Frogge and the MOVSE.
21.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] IT was the Frogge in the well, Humble-dum, humble-dum. And [...]the merrie Mouse in the Mill, tweedle, tweedle twino.

2
The Frogge would a woing ride,
humble dum humble dum
Sword and buckler by his side,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
3
When he was vpon his high horse set,
humble dum, humble dum
His boots they shone as blacke as iet,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
4
When she came to the merry mill pin,
humble dum, humble dum
Lady Mouse beene you within?
tweedle, tweedle twino.
5
Then came out the dusty Mouse,
humble dum, humble dum
I am Lady of this house,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
6
Hast thou any minde of me?
humble dum, humble dum
I haue e'ne great minde of thee,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
7
Who shall this marriage make?
humble dum, humble dum,
Our Lord which is the rat,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
8
What shall we haue to our supper?
humble dum, humble dum,
Three beanes in a pound of butter,
tweedle tweedle twino.
9
When supper they were at,
humble dum, humble dum
The Frog, the Mouse, and euen the Rat,
tweedle, tweedle twino:
10
Then came in gib our cat,
humble dum, humble dum,
And catcht the mouse euen by the backe,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
11
Then did they separate,
humble dum, humble dum,
And the frog leapt on the floore so flat,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
12
Then came in Dicke our Drake,
humble dum, humble dum,
And drew the frogge euen to the lake,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
13
The Rat run vp the wall,
humble dum, humble dum.
A goodly company, the diuell goe with all,
tweedle, tweedle twino.

MEDIVS.

[...]Humble-dum, humble-dum, tweedle, tweedle [...]twino.

TENOR.

[...]Humble-dum, humble-dum, tweedle, [...]tweedle, twino.

BASSVS.

[...]Humble-dum, humble-dum. tweedle, [...]tweedle twino.

¶ A wooing Song of a Yeoman of KENTS Sonne.
22.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

[...] I Haue house and land in Kent, and if you'l loue me, loue me now: [...]two pence halfe-peny is my rent, I cannot come euery day to woo.

Ich am my vathers eldest zonne,
my mother eke doth loue me well,
For ich can brauely clout my shoone,
and ich full well can ring a bell.
Chorus. For he can brauely clout his shoone,
and he full wel can ring a bell.
My vather he gaue me a hogge,
my mouther she gaue me a zow,
I haue a God-vather dwels there by,
and he on me bestowed a plow.
Chor. He has a God-vather dwels there by,
and he on him bestowed a plow.
One time I gaue thee a paper of pins
anoder time a taudry lace:
And if thou wilt not grant me loue,
in truth ich die beuore thy vace.
Cho. And if thou wilt not grant his loue
in truth hee'le die beuore thy vace.
Ich haue beene twise our Whitson Lord,
ich haue had Ladies many vare,
And eke thou hast my heart in hold,
and in my minde zeemes passing rare.
Cho. And eke thou hast his hart in hold,
and in his mind seemes passing rare.
Ich will put on my best white sloppe,
and ich will weare my yellow hose,
And on my head a good gray hat,
and in't ich sticke a louely rose.
Chor. And on his head a good gray hat,
and in't hee'le sticke a louely rose.
Wherefore cease off, make no delay,
and if you'le loue me, loue me now,
Or els ich zeeke zome oder where,
for I cannot come euery day to woo.
Cho. Or els hee'le zeek zome oder where,
for he cannot come euery day to woo.

TREBLE.

[...] [...]Two pence halfe-peny is his rent, he cannot come euery day to woo.

MEDIVS.

[...]Two pence halfe- [...]is his rent, he cannot come euery day to woo.

BASSVS.

[...]Two pence halfe-penie is his rent, [...]he cannot come euery day to woo.

¶ A Christmas Carroll.
23.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] REmember O thou man, O thou man. .ij. Remember O thou [...]man thy time is spent, remember O thou man, how thou art dead and gone, and [...]I did what I can, therefore repent.

Remember Adams fall
O thou man, O thou man,
2
Remember Adams fall
From heauen to hell:
Remember Adams fall
How we were condemned all
In hell perpetuall
there for to dwell.
Remember Gods goodnesse
O thou man, O thou man,
3
Remember Gods goodnesse
And his promise made.
Remember Gods goodnesse,
How he sent his sonne doubtlesse
Our sinnes for to redresse,
be not affraid.
4
The Angels all did sing,
O thou man, O thou man.
The Angels all did sing
Vpon the Shepheards hill.
The Angels all did singe
Praises to our heauenly King,
And peace to man liuing
with a good will.
5
The shepheards amazed was,
O thou man, O thou man.
The shepheards amazed was
To heare the Angels sing,
The shepheards amazed was
How it should come to passe
That Christ our Messias
should be our King.
6
To Bethlem did they goe,
O thou man, O thou man,
To Bethlem did they go
The shepheards three,
To Bethlem did they goe
To see where it were so or no,
Whether Christ were borne or no
to set man free.
7
As the Angels before did say,
O thou man, O thou man,

MEDIVS.

[...]O thou man, O thou man. [...]therefore repent.

TENOR.

[...]O thou man, O thou man, [...]therefore repent.

BASSVS.

[...]O thou man, O thou man, [...]therefore repent.

As the Angels before did say,
So it came to passe,
As the Angels before did say,
They found a babe whereas it lay
In a manger wrapt in hay,
so poore he was.
8
In Bethlem he was borne,
O thou man, O thou man,
In Bethlem he was borne,
For mankind sake,
In Bethlem he was borne
For vs that were forlorne,
And therefore tooke no scorne
our flesh to take.
9
Giue thanks to God alway,
O thou man, O thou man,
Giue thanks to God alway
With heart most ioyfully,
Giue thankes to God alway,
For this our happy day,
Let all men sing and say
holy, holy.
FINIS.

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