A BRIEFE DISCOVRSE O …

A BRIEFE DISCOVRSE Of the true (but neglected) vse of Cha­ract'ring the Degrees, by their Per­fection, Imperfection, and Diminution in Measurable Musicke, against the Common Practise and Custome of these Times.

Examples whereof are exprest in the Harmony of 4. Voyces, Concerning the Pleasure of 5. vsuall Recreations.

  • 1 Hunting,
  • 2 Hawking,
  • 3 Dauncing,
  • 4 Drinking,
  • 5 Enamouring.

By Thomas Rauenscroft, Bachelor of Musicke.

LONDON Printed by Edw: Allde for Tho. Adams 1614.

Cum priuilegio Regali.

To the Right Worshipfull, most worthy Graue Senators, Guardians, of Gresham Col­ledge in London.

  • Sr. Stephen Soames. Aldermen
  • Sr. Iohn Garret. Aldermen
  • Sr. Thomas Lowe. Aldermen
  • Sr. William Crauen. Aldermen
  • Mr. Cornelius Fish. Chamberlaine▪
  • Sr. Tho: Bennet Aldermen Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Mr. Tho: Ben­net Sheriffe. Aldermen Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Sr. Baptist Hocks Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Mr. William Quarles Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Mr. Edward Ber [...]es Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Mr. Iohn Gardiner Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • Mr. William Ferrers Of the Mercers Compa­ny.
  • And the 2. Wardens Of the Mercers Compa­ny.

And to the Right Worshipfull Sir Iohn Swi [...]erton and Sir Thomas Hayes Knights and Aldermen, most True and honourable affectors of Musicke.

AS I doe account it a great por­tion of happines to haue re­ceiu'd first Instructions, Ex­ercise, and Encouragement of my Studies in this Auncient and most Famous City: So am I thereby bound, and doe (willingly) endeuour my best pa [...]t and power, both to testifie and augment the Life and Honour of this Liberall Science which I [Page] pro [...]esse, to the benefit of all Students therein, and the contentment of all Affectors thereof in this my natiue Country, and especially in this the Metro­polis thereof, which gaue first life and breaching to my poore Endeauours. And herein I must, and doe acknowledge it as a singular helpe and benefit, that I haue receiu'd diuers Instructions, Resolutions, and Confirmations of sundry Points, and Praecepts in our Art, from the Musicke Readers of that most famous Colledge, founded and erected by the euer praise­worthie, and iustly renown'd Senator Sr. Thomas Gresham; who bearing his neuer dying Name, as a Praesident and Patterne to his Co-Citizens, to shew them the right way to aeternize their names to fu­ture posteritie, by being kinde Nursing Fathers to good Literature, Reu [...]ed the liberall Arts and Scien­ces, especially the Mathematickes, which were some­what neglected euen in the Vniuersities; and en­dowed them with such Maintenance and exhibi­tion, that (their worldly wants being more then meanly supply'd) they haue and doe continually striue with highest Art and Industry, so to explaine them to the world by way of Lecture, and other­wise, that much good from thence redoundeth to many desirous of those Knowledges, and more and more will, as time and occasion shall serue. What fruits my selfe in particular haue receiu'd [Page] by that one particular Lecture of Musicke (where­of I was an vnworthie Auditor) I dutifully acknowledge to haue proceeded from that Col­ledge; and doe heere Commende and Dedicate them to your Worshipps, Who are Visitors and Guardians of that most famous Foundation, from whence I haue receiu'd such benefit in these my studies. For as I haue beene encouraged by your Noblenes to trauaile in these Studies, so by Dutie they belong to You, from whome they had their Animation. May it therefore please your Worships to accept this my Discourse of Musicke with some Harmonicall Ex­amples thereof, as a Simple Sacrifice, in part of that deuotion and seruice which I owe, vpon promise and full intendment by your wonted goodnes and asistance, to search for Richer and riper Disco­ueries in this Musicall Continent. So wishing the long Continuance of your carefull Loue, and lo­uing Care to al good Learning, especially to Musicke, the earthly Solace of Mans Soule, I euer Remaine

The Honourer, and sincere Affector of your Approued good Mindes Thomas Rauenscroft.

Apologie.

PLutarch in his Booke of Musicke saith, that Pherecrates the Comicall Poet presented Musicke in forme and habite of a Woman, her body pitteously scourged and mangled; Iustice demaunding the reason, she in her complaint made answere, that Me­lanipides, Cynesias, Phrynis, and Timotheus had through certaine vncertaine Opinions and Changes, wrought her so much woe.

If Pherecrates had now liued, well and truely might he haue haue presented herTerent. Pannis annis (que) obsitam, with scarce Ligatures left to preserue the compacture of her Body, so much is she wrong'd, dila­c [...]rated, dismembred, and disioynted in these our daies; she scarcely hath Forme or Habite left, but e'ne as a Sceleton, retaines onely a shape, or shadowe, of what she was in her former purity.

Now may she sit complayning, O woe is me, that was ordain'd for the welfare of all vertue in Man; O woe is me, that to whome I brought so much goodnesse, by him I should be vilified, and so ill intreated; O woe is me, that for whome, and for whose best good I ordain'd Lawes and Praecepts, by him, and onely him, I should be thus abus'd, my Lawes violated, my Precepts reiected, and my selfe made a laughing stocke; O woe is me, that e're I was, or did so much good for him that sets so light by me.

And (if euer) this braine-sicke Age wherein we liue, may best testifie her misery; for neither Her selfe, nor her Lawes are regarded euen of her Children, but most led by their stragling passions runne after their owne rebellious Imaginations; which doth breed a mi­sery of miseries vnto Her, great griefe and sorrow to her true borne Children, and to all, a base wretched Estimation, aswell amongst those who know her Eminencie, as those who neuer knew Her, nor any other vertue.

And if we shall finde (as certainely finde we shall) in one mem­ber of Her, in one little part of her Praecepts, so many erroneous and repugnant Absurdities committed, what should we meete with, if we did search into her whole Body? surely such a contumelious In­surrection, that either for Ignorance or shame in so much wronging Her, we must stand obstinate, and set Her at defiance, or with peace­able vnderstanding submit ourselues to Her Censure, checking our [Page] Emperour they esteeme Learning and all Vertue to be the Bane and plague of a Common wealth: And yet (forsooth) these Archida­muses will seeme to countenance and entertaine Musi [...]ks Professors; But alas it is vpon Colour and Praetext, to make shew vnto the world that there is in them a Musicall Genius, and a religious disposition; they make this their vertue, to shadow such inhumane desires, for the better accomplishing of their priuate ends. And when their humours are to be besotted with the Soule-rauishing pleasure and content of melodious Harmony, they seeke ei­ther by dissembling Commendations, or grosse Flattery, or the like, (by any ordinary capacity quickly conceiued) to grieue and discon­tent those outwardly, who affoord them delight, and contentment inwardly.

What pollicies are vs'd in the Entertaining of these Professors, in the Retaining of them, and in their small Salaries and Pittances (which they terme Competencies) I forbeare at this time to disclose; But let such Golden Sheepe, who are better Clad then Taught, & wan­ting an ingenuous & generous disposition, are willing to prostitute themselues to Da [...]nee after euery mans Pipe, or to Fiddle at euery mans Whistl▪ be as they deserue; I could wish & aduice al Students of our Art, or any other noble Science and Speculatiue Facultie what­soeuer, to account of Such as they account of Them, and to stand firme for the honour and estimation of Learning.

But to our former discourse▪ Most men respect Parasites most, who soothingly seede, and flatter them in their naturall affections, but reiect and despise those [...] who dis [...]ouer the [...] [...]. Let Common Practise and her Complices censure [...]e as they please, building vpon a good foundation I am prepar'd; For 'tis neither Vaine-glory, nor Ambition that I ayme a [...], but onely the Honour of our Art, to vindicate Her from these Solaecismes, and Barbarismes, wherewith she is now pestred. I loue and reuerence the vnderstan­ding Artist and naturall Affector, as life; but d [...]rest the self-concei­ted pertinacious A [...]rist, and pol [...]tic [...] Fauourite [...]s death; & both shall be knowne by their affecting, or censuring of me.

It is an easie matter (saith one) to finde fault; & an ordinary mat­ter (say I) 'tis to commit a fault, and there is no reason but faults (especially great ones as these are) should be corrected.

Gla: D [...]d: lib. 3. cap. 8. Franchinus obserued these errors in the Common Practise, and reiected them.

[Page] Glar: Dod: lib. 3. cap. 11. Glare [...]us likewise sought to re [...]onne them.

Morley An­ [...]ota: [...] Tri­pla-proportion. Morley acknowledged them for errors; but was loath to break the Common Practise, or receiued Custome; yet if any would change, he would be the first that should follow.

The Ice is broken, and the Foot-path found; and I hope to finde many Morleyes aliue, though He (who did shine as the [...] in the Fir [...]ament of our Art, and did first giue light to our vnderstanding with his Praecepts) be long since come to the Close and Period of his Time; But his posterity, as Starres, receiuing light and benefit from his Labours, will (I hope) according to his desire and wishes, en­tertaine and embrace such [...], as he himselfe acknowledg'd to be true.

In this little Treatise I haue not obseru'd onely the Writings of Authors (because I found them various and differing among them­selues; Some obseru'd the custome of the Common Practise: Others not onely the Practise, but the Reason of each particular Pracept: A third, well vnderstanding neither The [...]ry nor Practise, drew ou [...] cer­taine Rules from both the former, and according to their owne Ima­genations deliuer'd absurd Opinions) but I haue search't the very Ori­ginall of our Art, and Etimologis of each proper [...], how, & wher­to [...] thing is appropriated; I haue compar'd the Practise with the The [...]ry, Nature with our Art, and it with other Arts, and I finde it a Subordinate Mathematicke, extracted from the Quintessence of A­rithmetick in the Rules and Praecepts.

So that then (Courteous Reader) if thou find'st Reason and Au­thority for my Assertions, neither misconstrue me, nor condemne me without better Reason, Proofe, and Authority, then heere I alleadge▪ And although diuers may produce Authors (and happily the selfe same which I alleadge) yet shal they finde that those Authors them­selues acknowledge to haue receiu'd them from the Common Pract­ise, and not from the Fundamentall Reasons of the Gr [...]unds and Rules of our Art; But till then, if thou accept and entertaine them, my desires and labours haue their accomplish'd & wish'd for, rewards.

If any obiect, that those former Harmonie [...] by mee published in my Infancy are contrary [...] obiecti [...]ns▪ I answere, I did then as a Childe; I did fo [...] Reasons; and those Workes for the mo [...] were not [...] by My selfe, but by diuers and sundry [...], which [...] the lesse compil'd together, in regard of the generall delight men tooke in them; [Page] And although very many of them were Defectius in their Comp­sition when they came to my hands: yet according to my know­ledge then, I corrected them and commended them to the world, and had the Printer and Presse-Corrector discharg'd their office with care, they had appear'd without any defect in their Cliff [...], Notes, and Duties, though most part of their Measures in the Pr [...]lat [...] and Di­minutions (following the Common Practise▪) a [...]e falsely Character'd; the which, by this fourth and last worke of Ioni [...] Harmonies, may be corrected.

The Forraine Artist saith, that an Englishman is an excellent [...] ­tator, but a very bad Inuentor; and indeed it should so appeare▪ [...]or we obseruing such Inuentions which they ensample to vs, as M [...]ri­galls, Pastorals, Neopol [...]anes, Ballads, and diuers other▪light▪ Har­monies, doe bend our courses onely to surpasse the tuning of such Strings; Among whome if diuers excellent Composers haue excee­ded their Ensamples, why should not we▪ (seeing our Ar [...] is as copi­ous, and ample▪ our Clymate not exceeding moist, and our A [...]tis [...] (as they confesse) farre surpasse them in the accuratenes thereof, which is vpon the P [...]ine song, and multiplicity of Parts, wherein they doe admire vs▪) finde some Inuention to set them on worke▪ Su [...]l [...] the fault is in our slothfull Natures, either not aiming at the [...] Perfection▪ or not making Vse of those knowledges for [...] which they would direct vs vnto.

Wherefore let vs for the honour of our Art, of our S [...]l [...]es and Countrye▪ (especially those whome she maintaines) endeauour▪ to bring Her vnto that Life, Reputation, Estimation and honour, which [...]he formerly did sustaine; so shall wee acknowledge our selues her True-borne Children, and knowe Her selfe to be a vertuous Mother and Nurse, and the World will esteeme Her according to her Desire, and reward vs according to our Deserts, and all receiue Comfort and Contentment, according to that power, which she affoordeth.

In Approbation of this Worke.

IN former Age, among [...] rare,
Regard was had of Measures then in vs [...]
And Characters; ordain'd by speciall care,
Least after Cōmers should the same abuse,
But forasmuch as those Compose [...] ▪Sage
Occasion had not to apply each thing
Vnto the [...]ers Humours which this Age
Hath stud [...]ed▪out▪ and to the world doth▪bring:
I well approue this Authors Diligence,
Who by his Labour Characters hath found▪
To shew what h [...]retofore by negligence
Hath beene omitted, and for certaine ground
To make that plaine, that wanting was before
In Measures, Times, Prolations well obseru'd.
Wherein his Commendat [...] is the more,
His Songs, and Skill high Praise hath well deserr'd.
NATHANIELL G [...]LES Bachelar of Mu [...]e▪ Maister of the Children of his [...] Chappels, of Household, and Windsor.

O [...] this Ensuing Discourse.

MArkes [...] L [...]nd [...] [...] t [...]es
None durst [...] ▪ somuch the common good
Preuail'd with all men; ▪twas the w [...]rst of crimes.
The like in Musicke may be vnderstood▪
For That the treasure of the Soule is next
To the rich Store-house of Diuinity:
Both comfort Soules that are with [...]r [...] p [...]plex▪
and set the Spirit Both from passions free.
[Page]The Markes that limit Musicke heere are taught,
So fixt of ould, which none by right can change,
Though Vse much alteration hath wrought,
To Mosickes Fathers that would now seeme strange.
The best embrace, which herein you may finde,
An [...] Author praise for his good Worke, and Minde.
THO: CAMPION.

IOHN DOWLAND Bachelar of Musicke, and Lu­tenist to the Kings Sacred Maiestie, in com­mendation of this Worke.

FIgurate Musicke doth in each Degres▪
Require it Notes, of seuerall Quantity▪
By Perfect, or Imperfect Measure chang'd:
And that of More, or Lesse, whose Marke [...] were rang'd
By Number, Circle, and [...] but v [...]ious vse
Of vnskild Composers did induce
Confusion, which made [...]dd [...] and obscure,
What first Inuention fram'd most cleere, and pure.
Those, (worthy RAVENSCROFT) arerestrain'd by Thee
[...] [...]t Forme: and that approu'd by Me.

In the most iust praise of Musicke, this praise­worthy Worke, and my deare, vertu­ous, and right [...]pert friend, the most iudicious Author.

THe ten-fold Orbes of Heauen are said to moue
By Musicke; for they make Harmonious din:
And all the Powres subordinate aboue
Spend Time, nay, spend Aeternity therein.
[Page]If Musicke then, moue all that All doth moue;
That's not compriz'd in ALL that spights her State:
If not in ALL, it's nought; which who doth loue
is worse then nought, to loue what Heau'n doth hate:
For, NOVGHT is nothing; sith it was not made
By that great WORD, without which made was nought:
Then, if that nought but NOVGHT doe her inuade,
Like God, her goodnesse is surmounting THOVGHT!
But no man is so ill that hath no good;
So, no man in the Abstract can be nought:
Then 'tis no man that hates sweete Musickes moode,
But Some-thing worse then all that can be thought.
A Beast? O no: A Monster? neither. Then
Is it a Deuill? Nothing lesse: for, these
Haue Beings with an Angell, or a Man;
But that exists not, that sweete Notes displease.
FORMES, Essence giue to Man, Beast, Fish, & Fowle;
Then Men WERE not, had they no Soule (their Forme)
But Musickes haters haue no Forme, nor Soule;
So, they (like Sinne) exist but to enorme,
For, had they Soules produc'd in Harmony,
Or rather Are it selfe (some Wise auouch)
They would be rauishe with her Suauity,
And turn'd Coelestiall with her Heauenly Touch!
But, let them goe as more than mortall Sinne
'Gainst Wisedomes Spirit, not to be forgiuen:
While thou dost wooe the Soules, which thou dost winne
With thy sweet Notes (deere Friend) to mind but Heau'n.
Thy Nature, Manners, and thy Notes doe make
A Three-fold-Cord, to drawe all hearts it gaines:
Thy Musickes Cordes hold Eares and Eyes awake
(Yet lullaby in pleasure) with their Straines.
So, then this latter Musicke (though alone)
'Twixt Fame and Thee doth make an Vnison,
Through which consent, though Deaths clouds thee o'rerun
Thy glory still shall shine, and cloud the Sun.
Io: Dauies. Heref:

In Approbation of this ensuing Discourse, and the Author therof my deare friend, Maister THO­MAS RAVENSCROFT.

ARts are much alt'red from their Pristine State,
Humors and Fancies so praedominate.
Ould Ar [...]sts though they were Plaine, ye [...] were Sure,
Their Praecepts and their Principles were Pure:
But now a dayes We scarce retaine the Grounds,
W'are so Extrauagant beyond our Bounds.
Among the Rest, Musicke (that noble Art)
In this s [...]d Elegie must beare a Part;
Whose Purity was such in times of yore,
(When The [...]ry the Practise went before)
That then She was had in as great Esteeme
As now of Her the Vulgar basely Deeme.
Errors in Figures, Characters, and Note
Doe Now cause many Teach, and Learne by ro [...].
This my deare Friend doth se [...]ke beere to a [...]d;
Wherein he trauail'd farre, great paines did spend
To right his Mother; he seekes to reduce
Her to her auntient Grounds, and former Vse▪
To beate downe Common Practise, that doth rang [...]
Among the Commons, and her Praecepts change.
Heere shall you finde of Measures diuers sorts,
For Church, for Madrigalls, for sundry Sports;
Heere shall you finde true Iudgement, store of reading▪
All for the Ould true Rules of Musicke pleading.
Numbers of 3. among the Meane respected
Are hence exil'd, and (worthily) reiected,
As being crept in by Custome, and Vse
Among the Vulgars, which the Wise refuse.
Much might be said more of this little Booke:
But let the Reader iudge that on't shall looke.
[Page]This of the Author onely I will say,
That in One poynt to no man he giues way▪
Composing of a Song vnto some Ditty
He is so Iudicious and so Witty,
That wa [...]ghing first the Nature of each Word
He findes fit Notes, that thereunto accord,
Making both Sound and Sence well to agree;
Witnesse his sundry Songs of Harmonie.
What shall I say more? this Worke I approoue,
And for his Skill, and Paines the Author loue.
MARTIN P [...]ER [...]ON Bachel [...]r of Musicks.

To him that reades.

COncord and Discord still haue beene at od [...]
Since the first howre the Heathens made them Gods.
In euery Profession, Trade, or Art
They draw their swords, and each Wit takes a par [...].
There's neither Starre that ma [...]es, nor Hearbe that grow [...]s,
But they Dispute vpon't with Words, or Blowes.
▪Mongst which Musitians, hanging vp their Harpes
Doe growe to fall Flat out, for Flats and Sharpes,
And by their Discord make that Art vneuen,
Whose Concord should expresse that Peace in Heauen:
But heere is One, whose Doue-like Pen of Peace
Striues to out-flie such Strife, and make it cease;
And Discord brings with Concord to agree,
That from their Strife he raises Harmonie.
He that for Loue doth This, and not for Gaine,
Must needes haue Praise, the proper due for Paine.
WILLIAM▪ AVSTIN.
[...]
[...]

To my deare Friend Maister THOMAS RAVENSCROFT, vpon this Worke.

I Prophesie (deare Friend) that thou which giu'st
The Dead deserued Bayes, shalt while thou liu'st
Neuer want Garlands of that Sacred Tree
To Crowne thee in Aeternall memorie:
Thou that hast made the dying Coales to Glowe
Of ould Ed. Piers his name; which now shall growe
('Gainst all that enuious or malicious bee)
In high Opinion 'mongst Posteritie;
Nor shall they touch Worth without Reuerence,
In whome once dwelt such perfect Excellence
In Heaun'ly Musicke; I may call it so,
If ould Pythagoras said truely, who
Affirm'd that the Sphaeres Caelestiall
Are in their Motion truly Musicall:
And Man, in whome is found a humane Minde,
(Then Whome, (Angells except) who e're could finde
A Nobler Creature) some affirme consisteth
Onely of Harmony, wherein existeth
The Soule of Musicke; and yet (but for Thee)
This Man had dy'd to all mens memorie;
Whose Name (now cleans'd from rust) this Worke of thine
(While there are Times or Men) I doe deuine
Shall keepe Aliue; nor shall thy owne Name die,
But by this Worke liue to Aeternitie:
And from it men hereafter shall pull out
Scourges, to lash the base Mechanicke Rout
Of Mercenary Minstrels, who haue made
(To their owne scorne) this Noble Art, a Trade.
THO: PIERS.

[...].

NIbona (prisca licèt) non consuêtudo ferenda;
Dirue, quod rectum ius negat esse suum.
Sit speciosa licèt tua, si sit adultera forma,
Vera magis grata est, altera fucus erit.
Iste Notas pariter (que) Nothas dat (perlege Lecter)
Quêis miserè est rudibus Musicae laesa Liber,
Est dignus quem saepe legas facilis (que) paratu est:
Multus in Authorem sit tuus ergo fauor.
T. H.

De ingenuo Iuvene T. R. (annos 22. nato) Musicae Studiosissimo, huius Libelluli Authore.

RAra auis Arte Senex Iuvenis; Sed rarior est, si
Aetate est juvenis, Moribus ille Senex.
Rara auis est Author; (poené est pars
Rauens ­croft.
Nominis vna)
Nam (que) annis juvenis, Moribus, Arte Senex.
Ad anno [...] 14. Creatus est Bacc [...]aureus facultati [...] Mu­sicae in Acâdem▪ Cantabrig.
Non vidit tria Lustra Puer, quin Arte probatus,
Vitâ laudatus, Sumpsit in Arte Gradum.
Quale fuit studium, Liber hic testabitur; in quo
Vim, Vitam Numeris reddidit ille Nouam.
Quám bené castigat, malé quos induxerat Vsus
Errores, Priscas hîc renouando Notas?
Arte Senex, Virtute Senex, aetate Adolescens
I bone, Rar [...] auis es; Scribe bonis anibus.
R. LL. Theo-muso-philus.
FINIS.

THE PREFACE.

MUsicke in ancient times, was held in as great Estimation, Reue­rence, and Honour, by the Best vnderstandings and Noblest Bloods, as any Sci­ence Liberall whatsoeuer. The Graue Philosophers re­puted it an Inuention of the Gods, which they had bestowed on Men, to make them better conditi­oned, then bare Nature affoorded: And the Wise Grecians therefore educated their children in it, that by meanes of it, they might temper their mindes, and fully settle therein, the Vertues of Modestie and Honesty: and, (in a word) all of worth euer held it, a very Direct and Necessary course, for the best Institution of Life, and Correction of ill manners.

The Causes then of that Disrepute, and ouer lowe Estimation, which Musicke in these dayes, (for the most part) sustaines, and whether they proceed from Corruptions of Nature, or Art, or both, as long since I began to meruaile at, so had I now vttered some obseruations thereabout, had not counsaile, and discretion perswaded me a while for a fur­ther exact suruay.

I had then (amidst other things) vnfolded on the one side, both the Naturall, and also the Politick Affector and [Page] Entert [...]yner of our Art, and on the other side, the strange imbecillity of our Professors, a great part of them Profest Gene­rall M [...]sters, able (they will vndertake) fully to teach both precepts and Practise of our Art, in one poore yeare, (or lesse if you will:) and yet (spoken it shall be without offence) the most of them, not well vnderstanding the very Nature of a Sound, or the Difference of P. operties, the Distinction of Tones, the Diuision of Numbers and Measures, the inaequalitie of Proportions, nay, scarse Defining the nature of that In­strument, Maisters whereof they professe themselues to be.

I had likewise poynted at some other abuses, commit­ted and suffered by Musicks Professors, as well in Ecclesiasticke as Common Seruice, whereby the one, findes his Due Right empay [...]ed; & the other, his Estimation; and both, their Abilities.

As for those common kinde Practitioners, (truly ycleped Minstrells, though our City makes Musitians of them) who making account forsooth to doe the Art Honour, now in these daies of the ill opinion, and small credit it beares, haue (fairely) brought it downe from a cheife Liberall Sci­ence, to the basest almost of Mechanick Functions: I make no question, but in good time it may returne vpon their owne necks, and their Desert be rewarded, as Statute in that case hath already (most worthily) prouided.

Besides, I suppose I should hardly haue omitted the Beleefe (whereof I finde some Aery or Instrumentall Com­posers and Practitioners to be) concerning certaine Vices, which their Ignorance is perswaded, our Art receiues helpe by, how disagreeing soeuer, both to Nature and [...]eason, which is the soule of all Arts.

And then for amends of all, I should at last, haue affoor­ded somewhat in the generall precepts, both of Plaine, and Measurable Musick, in the many Diuersities, which the Nature of Compositions giue vs, from the very originall of them, to [Page] that excellencie, wherein the Art is now to be found, and in divers other particulars tending to the same effect.

But now in the meane time, let the Affector shew his Disposition, and the Professor his Art, to both whome I pro­mise, that when e're I proceed in it, I will be free and im­partiall, as Rule and Reason onely giues me, laying my Obseruations, and so desiring (if it may be) the restitution of our Science, to Due, and ancient Honour.

And till then (if at all they loue the Art) they shall well accept of my good will, and (with me) take in good worth, these various Sprightfull, Delightfull Harmonies, which now I bring them. Their Composure I dare warrant, 'tis not onely of Ayre, made for some small tickling of the out­ward Sence alone, but a great deale more solide, and sweetly vnited to Number, Measures, and Nature of the Ditty. The earnest affections which a man hath, in the vse of such Recreations as they are made for, are so fully exprest in them, for Tact, Prolation, and Diminution, that not onely the Ignorant Eare must needs be plea­sed with them, for their Variety of sweet Stray [...]es, and the Humorous Fantastick eare satisfied, in the Iocundity of their many Changes, but also the Iudicious hearer will finde that in them, which passes the Outward sence, & strikes a rare de­light of Passion vpon the Mind it selfe, that attends them.

I will take so much Iudgement vpon me, as to affirme, I finde a great part of them so, though (without any tryall) the very Naming of those two Worthies in their Art, and Times, (and especially in these kinds) who first Composed that part I now speake of, is warrant inough for such a Beleefe of them Maister Edward Pearce the first, sometimes Mai­ster of the Children of Saint Paules in London, and there my Maister, a man of singular eminency in his Profession, both in the Educating of Children for the ordering of the Voyce so, as the Quality might afterward credit him and pre­ferre [Page] them: And also in those his Compositions to the Lute, whereof, the world enioyes many, (as from the Maister of that Instrument) together with his skilfull In­structions for other Instruments too, as his fruits can beare him witnesse.

The second I name, as partner in this worke, is Maister Iohn Bennet, a Gentleman admirable for all kindes of Com­posures, either in Art, or Ayre, Simple or Mixt, of what Nature soeuer. I can easily beleeue he had som what more then Art, euen some Naturall instinct or Better Inspiration, by which, in all his workes, the very life of that Passion, which the Ditty sounded, is so truely exprest, as if he had measured it alone by his owne Soule, and inuented no o­ther Harmony, then his owne sensible feeling in that Affecti­on did affoord him.

As for this little worke, and the Diuersities therein, they appertayne all, to the common Recreations that men take, and therein vtter that Passion which men discouer in the vse of th [...]se Recreations: As are

  • 1 Hunting
  • 2 Hawking
  • 3 Dauncing
  • 4 Drinking
  • 5 Enamoring:

All which are here as liuely Characteriz'd, as euer were any of the kind yet among vs, withall Measure, and Rule to Art appertayning.

1. 2.

HHunting & Hawking haue the first place, as the most gene­r [...]us and worthy kindes of Recreations. In the performance of both which, such are the Times, Numbers, and Measures, obseruable, not in Man alone that vses the Pastime, but euen in the Creatures also, that either make the Game, or pursue it, [Page] as being duely Composed, beget an excellent Harmony, and require the Singers skill to vtter them, as if he were then abroad at the performing of them.

3.

THe next we present is Dauncing, but that with some difference from the common Exercise now a daies of it, in our Maskes and Reuells: As not grounded on the Dauncing of Measures, and accordingly bound to some particular Rules and Numbers, proper to the Nature of that Daunce one­ly, which then is afoot: But fashioned like those Antique Daunces, which the Poets would haue vs beleeue, the Fayries, and the Satyres, and those other R [...]rall Natures frequented, and hauing in them, much more variety and change then any other Composition, and withall so expressing our imper­fect Moods and Measures, for their Tact, Prolation, and Di­minution, that in singing, cunningly and Sprightfully to re­semble them, must needs giue the performance high com­mendation, and the Hearer the most pleasing delight that may be.

4.

DRinking is our fourth Recreation. For so 'tis become (at least, if not the first) by the vse & Delight that men now take in it, and so, for their sakes, I am content now to terme it. And among all the rest, for theirs Especially, that in the Aery part of our Faculty, for want of Skill and Reason in that which they performe, set their Strength and Spirits to search it out of the other Elements, chiefely out of those two, that the Ayre is enuironed with, Fire and Water, well compos'd and Brew'd together, wherein they are resolued to grow exceeding skilfull, or else it shal cost their Braines a fiering, and their Bowells a drowning. The Earth indeed they looke least after, t'is base that they account, and for Mechanick Spirits to runne so lowe, The Note they sing [...]

The Definitions and Diuisions of Moode, Time, & Prolation in Measurable Musick.

MEnsurabilis Musice is defined to be a Harmony of diuers sortes of Sounds, exprest by certaine Characters or Figures called Notes, discribd on Lines & Spaces, different in Name, Essence, Forme, Quan­tity, and Quality, which are sung by a Mea­sure of Time; or as [...]o: Dunsta­ble Mensura­bilis, Musicae cap. 1. Io: Dunstable, Io: Nucius musica Poeti­ca cap. 1. the man whome Ioan. Nucius in his Poeticall Musicke (and diuers others) affirme to be the first that inuented Composition) saith, it hath his be­ginning at an Vnite, and increaseth vpward by two and by three infinitely, and from the highest decreaseth in like manner downe againe to an Vnite.

Measure in this Science is a Quantity of the length and short­nes of Time, either by Naturall sounds pronounced by Voice, or by Artificiall, vpon Instruments.

Of this Musick, Franchinus de Coloniâ was the first Inuentor; and to guide our knowledge the better, obseruing the same course that Guid [...] Ar [...]tinus did, (who instituted the forme of Plaine, or Simple Musick) He made Scales or Tables, in the which all things pertaining to the diuision of Perfect and Imperfect Measures are contained, and by the which we may by degree attaine to the perfection of this Knowledge.

The Scales or Tables (by him instituted) of diuers are vul­garly termed Moodes, by some of better vnderstanding, Measures; and consist of Notes, Pauses, Degrees, Signes, Per­fection, and Imperfection.

Of Notes.

A Note is a Signe, or Character repraesenting either a Natu­rall, or Artificiall Sound: and it is two fold;

  • 1. Simple
  • 2. Compound.

Simple Notes (Like Nowne Substantiues) require none other to be ioyned with them, to shew their signes, or significations; of which there are 8. Glareanus Dodecachod. lib. 3. cap. 4. the first fiue are cal'd Essentiall the last 3. Colaterall. 1. Large, 2. Long. 3. Breue 4. Semibreue. 5. Minime. 6. Crotchet. 7. Quauer. 8. Semiquauer.

Compound Notes (Like Nowne Adiectiues) cannot stand by themselues, but require another to be ioyned with them to shew their signes and significations; & arise from the 4. first simple Notes. Larg, Long, Breue, & Semibreue; which being fitly conioyn'd one with another, we terme Ligatures; of which, those that are with 10: Dunst. Mus. cap. 12. plikes or strokes in Qua­drate formes are called Rectes, [...] [...]hose that are by crooked ones 10: Dunst. Mus. cap. 12. Obliques, [...] either ascending or descending; in the Charactering of which, that at the beginning, that in the Middle, and that at the latter end must spe­cially be obserued.

For ensamples, I refer all to those forraine Authors, that haue at large discourst of the particular praeceps of this part of Musicke: but domestically to The: Mor: lib. 1. fol. 9. 10. 11. Master Tho: Mor­ley who will satissye any curious obseruer.

These Ligatures were inuented for two respects: 1. for the Ditties sake 2. (without Ditty) for breuity of Pricking. But in regard the Notes now in vse are not of so long a quantity, as when the Perfect Moodes were vsed, the most part of the Notes Ligatur'd, & Ligatures themselues are layd aside, except the Breue & Semibreue, which yet are retayned for the causes afore mentioned.

[Page 3]The 4 last simple notes, Minime, Crotchet, Quauer & Semi­quauer are therfore not Ligable, because they are not Measu­red; for the 10: Dunst. Mens. Mus. cap. 16. Minime is the first Note that Measureth (being in it selfe indiuisible) and the Semibreue the first note Measured; and therefore the first Note ligable; And for the other 3. Crotchet, Quauer, and Semiquauer, they are neither aug­mented nor diminished, but keepe one continuall quantitie,

The first 4. simple Notes Ibidem. cap 3. Franchinus Inuented; & although part of their formes were not in the originall as now they are charactered, yet their Measures were all one: hee was al­so the first that deuided the Largs into 3. Longs, and the Long into 3. Breues, and the Breue into 3. Semibreues. (further then which in those dayes the Measure tended not) so all of them into 2. likewise; and thereby he was the first that In­uented Perfection, and Imperfection.

The Minime Ibidem. cap 6. Ph. Vitriaco (the Flowre of Musitians of all the world in his time) inuented, obseruing the same forme that Franchinus did, deuiding the Semibreue into 3. Minimes, and into 2. at the least, and term'd it Prolation; but as for the Minime, not counting otherwise of it, then as of an Vnite, or a Poynt in Geometry, he reckoned it no Time, but the beginning of Time, and the very beginning of Measurable Musicke; and so in these dayes further then the Minime the Measure tends not, it being the first and shortest Note that any Measure can begin on; as contrarywise the Large is the last and longest Note, that the voyee of man with one Breath can deliuer.

And as for our Crotchets, Quauers, & Semiquauers, I yet finde not the Inuention of them; and therefore I suppose no great heede was taken of the Inuentor, yet they were accepted vpon sufferance; yet so, as that we now differ from the auntient in the naming of them, Ibidem. cap. 6. for that which wee terme our Quauer they term'd a Crotchet, & that which [Page 4] we terme a Crotchet, they term'd a Semi-Minime, the halfe of our Minime, as the Semibreue is the halfe of the Breue. And these Simple and Compound Notes are they, which wee com­monly call the Inward signes of Measurable Musicke.

Of Pauses, or Rests.

PAuses, or Rests are silent Characters, or an Artificiall o­mission of the voyce, repraesenting the quantity of the Inward notes, or Signes, as they are Measured by the outward Signes, which were Inuented for 3. causes. 1. For Closes, 2. for Fuges, 3. for avoyding of Discords, and disallowances.

Examples of Inward signes and rests. [...]

Large, Longe, Breue, Semi-breue, Minime, Crotchet, [...] Quauer, Semi-quauer.

Of Degrees.

DEgrees were inuented to expresse the value of the afore­said principall Notes, by a Perfect and Imperfect Measure. Perfect Measure is when all goe by 3.

Imperfect Measure when all go by 2. & Degrees are three-fold:

  • 1. Moode
  • 2. Time
  • 3. Prolation.

[Page 5] Glareanus Dodecach [...]d. lib. 3. cap. 5. As all other things haue a Moode (saith Glarean) so hath Musicke; and Modus signifieth a manner of something to be repraesented; and heere are all Notes of a Square Quadrat forme, and thereby are appropriated Largs and Longs, measured by the least of this forme, the Breues.

Tempus signifieth a Time, Plutarch. which is ordained by order, hauing a iust Measure, set Limits & Bonds; and here is afigure or Note of a Glarean lib. 3. cap. 1. Sebald: Heyd: lib. 2. cap. 1. Rhombus or Circular forme, which we terme the Semi-breue; but the reason why the Time is appropriated to the Breue is in regard of the Perfect Measure of the Breue by this Circular Note, though in the forme it is applyed to the Semi-breue.

Prolation signifieth an extending or putting foorth; and it is of the Degrees from the first measuring Note to the last measured, through the Perfect and Imperfect figures; vnto which terme Prolation is applyed, a Note of a Circular body, but with a Stroke, as a head ioyned to that Body, which is term'd the Minime; (which Sebald. Heyd: lib. 2. cap. 2. Gla. lib. 3. cap. 5. Minime measuring the Semi-breue) thereby comes it, that the Tearme Prolation is appropriated to the Semi-breue, as being the first Note measured by the Prolationate, or extending Note.

And all three of these Degrees, are 2. fold, Io: Dunsta­ble Mensura­bilis Musicae. cap. 16. Maior & Minor:

  • The Greater Moode perfect is, when a Large containes 3. Longs.
  • The Lesse Moode perfect is, when a Long containes 3. Breues.
  • The Greater Mood Imperfect is, when a Larg containes 2. Longs.
  • The Lesse Moode Imperfect is, when a Long containes 2. Breues.
  • Time perfect is, when a Breue containes 3. Semi-breues.
  • Time Imperfect is, when a Breue containes 2. Semi-breues.
  • Prolation perfect is, when a Semi-breue containes 3. Minimes.
  • Prolation Imperfect is, when a Semi-breue containes 2. Minimes

Of Outward Signes.

TO these Degrees there were added certaine Outward Signes, the better to distinguish the Perfection and Imperfection of Moode, Time, and Prolation.

To the Glarean D [...]d [...]ach [...]rd. lib. 3. cap. 6. Moode expressing the perfection of it is attri­buted a Ternary number: thus 3.

To the Sebaldus Heydon. lib. 2. cap. 1. O [...]nith [...]parchus lib. 2. cap. 4. 5. Imperfection the Binary exprest thus 2 M [...]rley. lib. 1. folio. 4. or the Ternary omitted.

But in the first Age of the Inuention of this Art, it was exprest by Rests or Pauses of their Notes, and in regard of the little vse of the Moodes, and the Practicall occasion of such Rests for Closes, and comming in of Fuges, they were layd aside, and these numbers aforesaid accepted.

The perfection of Time Glare. Dode. lib. 3. cap. 6. (as growing out of Circular moti­on) is exprest by a Round Circle, thus 𝇈.

The Imperfection of it by a Semicircle thus 𝇋 Ibidem. lib. 3. cap. 8. As for those that would haue the Number signifie the Time, and the Circle the Moode, Franchinus, Glareanus, and diuers aunci­ent Theoriks Iustly reprehend them.

To Prolation, for the expressing of the perfection therof is atributed a Poynt or prick, signifying the indiuisibility of the Measure which is placed in the midst of the Cicrcle thus 𝇇 or the Semicircle thus 𝇊 as by it presence it causeth Perfection; so by the absence thereof it causeth Imperfection; But those slender Artists, which would haue the Ternary number sig­nifie the Perfect Prolation, and the Binary the Imperfect, (and so onely appropriated) the aforesaid Authors condemne, as most ignorant of these Measures.

Furthermore these aforesaid Degrees are deuided into 4. Tables, by some term'd Moodes, by others 4. Prolations, (but wrong by both for of Moodes and Prolations, there are but 2. the Great & the Lesse) but by the best vnderstādings,

[Page 7]4. manner of Figures, are approued to distingush the Perfection and Imperfection of these Degrees, by which all Song in this kinde is measured.

Examples of the 4. Figures.
  • 1 Perfect of the more Prolation.
  • 2 Perfect of the Lesse Prolation.
  • 3 Imperfect of the more Prolation.
  • 4 Imperfect of the Lesse. Prolation.

1 PErfect of the more Prolation in his proper forme, is, when there is Perfect Moode, Perfect Time, and Perfect Prolation, and is thus Charactered.

Example.
𝆶Large𝆷𝆷𝆷𝆸𝆸𝆸𝆹𝆹𝆹톹텥톹텥톹텥톺텥톺텥톼텮톼텮톼텯톼텯
Longs3Breues.3Semb3Min3crot2qua.2semiq2
Breues9Sembr.9Min.9Crot.6qua4semq   
Semibreues27Min.27Crot.18qua.12sēiq8    
Minimes81Crotch54Qua.36Sēiq24      
Crotchets162Qua.108Semi.72        
Quauers324Semi.216          
Semiquauers648            

This Table, and the rest following expresse all perfection, and imperfection, and the quantity of the Diuisible and Indiuisible Notes, how many goeth to a Large, [Page 8] Before the former example this Character of the Perfect of the Mere Prolation should be plac'd thus. 𝇇3.

PErfect of the lesse Prolation or the lesse extenuation in the lesse Perfect Moode in his proper forme (accor­ding to those, whose ensamples ought to be the same with their reasons) in my opinion should be thus Charactered 𝇈2.3 but with diuers it is thus 𝇈, thus 𝇈2, and thus 𝇈3; according to which differences, wee finde great Maisters in their workes (especially in their ensamples) much ranging, although the most of them confesse thisSebal: Hey: lib. 2. cap. 1. Glarea Dode. lib. 3. cap. 5. Iohn Dunst. cap. 10. Ornith [...]: lib. 2 cap. 4. Morley lib. 1. fol. 13. Perfect of the lesse Prolation to be the lesse Moode Perfect: Time perfect, and the great Moode, (which is 3. Longs to the Large) and perfect Prolation (which is 3. Mimmes to the Semi-breue) to bee Im­perfect, and that Perfection is by 3. and Imperfection by 2. Why? either the omitting of the Numbers, and the Binary Number signifying Imperfection, or the single Ternary, al­though in the Perfect of the more Prolation, the single Terna­ry noteth the Perfection of both moodes, Ornith [...]. lib. 2. cap. 5. and wheresoeuer the Greater is there is the Lesse, but not contrarily; by which reason it makes good the aforesaid Charactering, and allowes vs for the signifying of the greater Moode Imperfect the Binary Number, for the Lesse Moode perfect the Ternary, for the Time perfect the Round Circle, and for Prolation Im­perfect, the absence of the Point or pricke, Example. 𝇈2.3.

[Page 9]

Example of the Perfect of the Lesse Prolation in the Measure and diuision of the Notes. 𝇈2.3
𝆶Large.𝆷𝆷𝆸𝆸𝆸𝆹𝆹𝆹톹텥톹텥톺텥톺텥톼텮톼텮톼텯톼텯
Long2Bruees3semib3Min.2Crot.2qua2Sem2
Breues6Semib.9Min.4Crot.4quau.4Se.4  
Semibreues18Min.18Crot.12quau.4semiq4    
Minimes36Crotch36quau.24semiq16      
Crotchets72quauer46Semi.48        
Quauers144Semiq.144          
Semiquauers288            

THese 2. Perfect Moodes in these dayes are of little of no vse, and therefore I haue little to say to them concer­ning their Diminutions; only I finde that the Auncients ex­prest them by Stroks drawn through their Circles: In the Perfect of the More for the great Diminution thus,Glarean Dode. lib. 3. cap. 11. (timeperf-prolatperf-str) for the Lesse thusSebal: Hey­don lib. 2. cap. 6. L [...]ssi [...] Se­nior. lib. 2. cap. 6. Morley lib. 1. fol 25. (timeperf-prolatimperf-x) In the Perfect of the Lesse for the great thusIbidem. (timeperf-prolatimperf-str) for the Lesse Ibidem. (timeperf-prolatimperf-x) but these for the most part are out of vse, only we finde in diuers Church & Madrigall Compositions, the Perfect of the Lesse in his great Diminution expressing Ses­qui-altera Proportion thus Charactered Glare: Do­de, lib. 3. cap. 11. (timeperf-prolatimperf-str)3/2 & by diuers ex­amples for Triple proportion thusSebald. Heyd. lib. 2. cap. 6. 𝇈3/1. but because these 2. Imperfect Moodes following are now only in vse, I will somewhat speake of the absurdities committed in the Cha­ractering of their Measures, especially for the Prolations & Diminutions; whereby wee may discouer what things are necessarie and Art-Like, & reiect those Vn-Art-Like Formes which by Ignoranee are creptin.

IMperfect of the More Prolation (which is the extenuation of the perfect prolation through the Imperfect Moodes and [Page 10] Time) in the proper forme of it is, when wee haue Imper­fect Moodes, Imperfect Time, and Perfect prolation, all Notes Measured by 2. (saue the Semi-breue which is by 3. and by all approued Theorickes thus Character'd. 𝇊

Exampleof the Imperfect of the More Prolation. 𝇊
𝆶Larg𝆷𝆷𝆸𝆸𝆹𝆹톹텥톹텥톹텥톺텥톺텥톼텮톼텮톼텯톼텯
Longs2Breues2Sem [...]2Min3crot2qua.2semiq2
Breues4Semibr4M [...]n.6Crot.6qua4semq4  
Semibreues8Min.12Crot.12qua.12sēiq8    
Minimes24Crotch24Qua.24Sēiq24      
Crotchets48Qua.48Semi.48        
Quauers96Semi.96          
Semiquauers192            

BVt now Practise hath so infected this Measure, especially in the Prolation and Dimin [...]tion of it, that when a Perfect Artist comes to sing a song of such Practicall Charactering, (supposing it to bee Character'd according to the iust Per­fection and Imperfection of the Degrees) hee shall bee (almost) as far to seeke for the Measure intended, as were they that Compos'd it to seeke for the true Charactering of that Measure, they would haue exprest. For that I may giue instance herein, I finde it by them thus exampl'd 𝇊3 or thus 𝇊3, the which indeed I must confesse is the Imperfect Time, and the More Prolation; But then I demannd to what end t [...]nds that Ternary Number? Hereto they will answere (especially those who in conceyt are Masters) that it is to signifie a Triple Proportion, by which the Song before which it is set, [Page 11] must be sung; and that is (say they)3. to one. True; but then aske them what three to one? and they will tell you, 3. Mi­nimes to one Semi-breue; O most Vnproportionate Customable Compositors, whose Art serues them not so much as to di­stinguish Prolation from Proportion! For Prolation is, when 3. Minimes goe to one Semi-breue, and Triple Proportion is, when 3. Semi-breues to one Semi-breue, as being a Proportion of the Greater Inaquality, and (as wee terme it) Multiplicis generis, that is when a Greater Number is compar'd with a Lesser, and containeth the Lesser many Times as 3/1 6/2 9/3 &c. It is euident then, that this single Ternary Number cannot stand for a Triple Proportion, seeing it wants a Lesser Number to bee compar'd with all; and beside that, were there a Number adioyn'd, yet the signe of the Imperfect Time, the Perfect Prolation, Ornitho. lib. 2. cap. 8. (and Number cannot work vpon Prolation so long as the Circle retaines the Poynt,) the Charactering of the Note in white, the breaking of the Measur'd Notes, and the Measure of a Lesser Quantity and Quality to the Tact, would all resolue vs, 'tis no Triple Proportion.

Others then being beaten from that opinion, and yet not doubting but to hit the marke, make answer; Some, that the Number is there set to signifie, that 3. Minimes went to a Semi-Breue, in their idle conceites neuer remem­bring that the Poynt in the Semi-Circle signifies that suffici­ently: Some, that it is to signifie the Moode, not regarding that the Measure it selfe confutes them, in as much as this Ternary Number signifieth Perfection, and the Moodes in this Measure are Imperfect. And lastly, Some (rather then faile) will haue it signifie Time, quite forgetting (as good Authors obserue) that 'tis the Circle which signifies it, which being broken in this Measure, makes it therefore Imperfect.

May I not then wel conclude, that seeing this Number sig­nifieth neither Proportion, nor Prolation, nor Imperfect moods, [Page 12] nor Time, 'tis but an Intruder, and by right must be wholy left out in the Measure of the Perfect Prolation? which being graunted, I will say no more of it, as making account that it is a thing generally knowne.

The vse of this Perfect Prolation is, in Seruice Diuine for I [...]bilees and Thankesgiuings, and otherwise for Galliards in R [...]ellings.

But in this Measure, I obserue another great error com­mitted by them, which expresse the Sesqui-altera-Proportion with 3. White Semi-breues, belike not vnderstanding, that herein a White Semi-breue contaynes [...]. Minimes, if it be not Imperfected by a Lesse Note going before, or following; Yet will they (forsooth) haue 3. of these White Semi-breues goe to the Tyme of 2. Tacts or Strokes; whereas, in all nature of Proportions, it (contrariwise) ought to bee exprest with 3. Semi-breues Denigrated, and so signifying Diminution; which then containe the quantity that they ayme at, of two Strokes in this Perfect Prolation,

Example.
  • Error [...]
  • Truth [...]

VNto this perfect Prolation, there pertaines a 2. folde Diminution▪ the Greater and the Lesser; signified by In­ternall, and Externall Signes.

[...] ▪ Magir [...] de Art▪ Musica. Internall by the Denigrating or blacking of the Inward or simple White Notes without the Externall Signe, Diminishe the Tact, as much as the Externall Signe it selfe of the Great Diminution: Examples of which wee [Page 13] finde Diuers, in Church Songs, Madrigalls, and such like as thus:

[...]
[...]

And diuers others there are bothin the Perfect and Im­perfect Measures, all pertayning to the Great Diminution.

The Externall Signes are those which are set, at the be­ginning of Songs, and are the Characters of the Degrees, for the Diminishing of the White and Blacke Notes, by Dash and Retort, in the Great and Lesse Motion of the Tact.

The Great Diminution and the Externall Signe to signifie it in White, is by a retort of the Semi-Circle with the Cha­racter of Prolation thus

Example.
  • [...] Perfect Prolation
  • [...] Great Diminution.

Otherwise ioyning the Externall and the Internall Signes together, 'tis thus signified,

[...]

Whereas the cōmon practise (in Composition for Church S [...]ngs, Mad [...]igalls, Pastoralls, Ballads, &c.) charactereth this Diminution with denigrated Notes, and the Outward signe by the Ternary Number thus:

[...]

THey seeme to drawe their Reasons (as some Masters haue affirm'd) from the 3. swift feete in Poetry, Tro­chaeus, Iambus and Tribrachius, in regard of the Notes that are Diminished.

But then why it should bee apply'd more to this Dimi­nution then to the Perfect Prolation I see no Reason at all; by cause howe're the Tact of this Diminution be of a swif­ter Motion, yet the Measures are all one in the diuiding of the Semi-breue, according to those feete. As 1. Trochaeus, which is one long and the other short, a Semi-breue and a Minime. 2. for Iambus, which by way of Retort to the former is one short and the other long, a Minime and a Semi-breue. 3. for Tribrachius, which is three short, the Semi-breue diui­ded into 3. Minimes; which diuision (say they) pertaines only to the Diminution and not to the Perfect Prolation; How beit many meane Practitioners are able to contrary that, and they who aright vnderstand Poetry, and Musicke▪ shall be Iudges, who knowe the Measure to bee all one, and the differences of the Motion to bee according to each Rule, or according to the discretion of them that Sing, or Reade them.

But the matter here we chiefly stand vpon is, that the Ter­nary Number ought vtterly to be reiected, as hauing no manner of interest either in the Perfect Prolation, or the Diminutions therof: The Perfect Prolation we spake of before; and now for the Diminution thus I say, that if by their Tro­chaick reason they will bring this Ternary Number in, to sig­nifie [Page 15] this Diminution, they may as well, yea they must ne­cessarily, to euery diuision of the Semi-breue, (which may bee as diuers, as is the Composers Inuention) set a seuerall Character to signifie it, and their applications of it to the feete, by which it is Measured: But what a confusion would that be to the Performer, (besides the euidence of their ridi­culous ignorance) to charge each Diuision with a particu­lar Character, when only the Externall and Internall Signes set at the beginning of Harmonyes are thereto sufficient? And if it bee vnnecessary to Charactere all, I see as little reason that they should Charactere any one: Or if yet they needs▪ will, that one be Charactered, then let them show me, why the Measure of these other feete, which belong to the Diuision of the Imperfect Prolation and the Diminuti­ons therof, (as Spondaeus, Pyrrychius, Anapaestus, Bacchius, Anti­b [...]chius, &c.) should not aswell be Character'd by them, as these that belong to the diuision of the Perfect Prolation, and the Diminutions of it. For if they hold that a thing needlesse and superfluous to be done in a case so common and obui­ous: the consequence will be altogether as good against this their Poeticall, phantasticall Charactring with the Ter­nary Number.

But see how one errorbegets another; It is that which I haue obserued as a most grosse Absurditie in the pricking of the Internall Signes of this Diminution, and yet is to be found among those, whome our Vulgar Practitioners ac­count approued Masters, & in that opinion haue followed their Vn-art-like Example; which is, the setting of it with a White Minime and a Crotchet, and the Tact charactered with the aforesaid Ternary Number; as thus

[...]

Their Apologie (vpon exception taken) prooued [Page 16] like their ensample, both fond, and sencelesse; to witt, that they might Character the Sounds in what forme it pleased them, and needed not to be bound to follow the Lawes and Rules of Art, which they found were herein who­ly against them.

THe Lesser Diminution, (which is vulgarly call'dMorley lib. 1. fol. 15. Diminu­tion of Diminution, or the Double Diminution of the Per­fect Prolation) is the swiftest Motion that any Tune it Composed of vnder this Measure, as Country Daunces, Bran's [...]s, Volt [...]s, Courant [...]s, & such like: And it like wise we find character'd, to signifie the Tact of it, with the Ternary Number, which is yet of all the rest the greatest Absurdity: For herein there are sixe Notes Measured to one Tact, (whereas afore but 3.) and Their Ternary Number is made to signifie no lesse then Perfect Prolation, Great Diminution, & Lesse Diminution, and all vpon the bare and groundlesse warrant of Common Practise, which say they, hath so receiu'd it, & therefore they vse it.

But what a confusion will this be when they haue a Song or Tune composed of all these Tacts, (as diuers there are in vse for Maskes and Reuells) and shall finde but onely one Character to expresse all Motions? how can that worke be perform'd in his proper nature, except the Composer shall either Demonstrate by a Canon what his meaning is, or himselfe personally be there to explaine his Forme inten­ded? Therefore the Authors of our Art, foreseeing the Diuersities (ànd there by the Absurdityes) which heerein would be inuented concerning the Diminutions of the Tact, agreed vpon certaine Rules and Characters together, to Demonstrate euery particular Motion by, of what kinde of Diuision soeuer the▪ Tact was. But now in regard that those Canons and Proportionate Rules are out of vse, I see no reason why wee should vse their Characters, but rather be led by that Rule, where of now in these dayes our prac­tise [Page 17] consists, which is the Circular Rule, and by which this lesser Diminution of the Perfect Prolation (the Internall Notes being Denigrated) is thus Charactered.

[...]

As for any motion of Tact swister then this Lesser Dimi­nution if there should bee need thereof, it should be either thus Charactered (timeimperf-prolatperf-str) or by the former Retorted thus (timeimperf-prolatperf-rev-str) Wherein the Stroke drawne through the Semi-circle and the Prick in it, doe signifie a Coniunction of both Prolations by a double Diminution of the Perfect and Imperfect Measures of the Tact. And thus much shall suffise for the banishing of the Ternery Number, and the placing in steed thereof the true Character of the perfect P [...]olation, with the Diminutio [...] of it by the Circular Rule.

THe Imperfect of the Lesse Prolation; in the proper forme of it is, when there is Imperfection of all Notes Measurable, from the Larg to the Minime; and is thus Truely Character'd 𝇋 and vnder it are composed, as Diuine Ser [...] [...]es for the Church, so also [...]ets, [...]igals, Pa [...]i [...]s, and such like for other vses.

Example of the Imperfect of the Lesse Prolation. 𝇋
𝆶Large.𝆷𝆷𝆸𝆸𝆹𝆹톹텥톹텥톺텥톺텥톼텮톼텮톼텯톼텯
Longs2Breues2Se [...]b2Min2crot2qua.2semiq2
Breues4Semibr4Min.4Crot.4qua4semq▪4  
Semib [...]ues8Min.8Crot.8qua.8sēiq8    
Mini [...]16Crot [...]16Qua.16Sēiq16      
Cr [...]che [...]s32Qua.32Semi.32        
Quauers64Semi.64          
Semiquaner [...]1 [...]8            

NOw as before I did in the former, so in this Measure al­so haue I obserued diuers absurdityes committed, by not distinguishing the Lesse Prolation from his Diminutions.

For vnto this Time and Prolation there pertaines a 2. folde Diminution (by Glarean▪ Dode lib. 3. cap 10. Preder [...]chus Berhusu [...]s cap 12. Ornitho: lib. 2 cap 8. some termed Sem [...]-dity) the Greater, and the Lesser.

The Greater Diminution is rightly thus Charactered Sebald: Heyd: lib. 2. cap. 6. Preder: Ber­husius cap. 12. 𝇍 or (by Retort of the aforesayd Imperfect Circle) thus 𝇌 though diuers there be, that from the Proportionate Rule (for­sooth) will haue it thus 𝇋2. but for as much as in this Measure there is vs'd no Denig ation, and all Proportions are out of vse saue Sesqui-altera, I haue sayd sufficiently for confutation thereof, before.

Vnder this Dimination are compos'd Almayns, Free Mens Songs, Ayres and such like, and (accordingly) among our Minstrells, 'tis knowne by the name of Almayne Tune, and is as a Duple to the Lesse Prolation; that is, a Motion as swift againe as the Lesse Prolation is of in his owne Naturall Tact.

The Lesse Diminution we finde to bee thus Character'd Morley lib. 1. fol. 15. [...], or with Retort of the Great Diminution thus Sebald. Heyd: lib 2. cap. 6. Nic [...]o [...]a [...] [...]e­flerij lib. 2. cap. 4. [...]; and this is the swiftest Motion that vnder this Measure is Compos'd; and such are all those Compositions which are vnder it, as Iiggs, and the like.

But neerein now the Ignorance of our times is such, not knowing the differences of this Imperfect Prolation [...] the Diminutions therof, that they commonly Charactere the Church Songs, and Mottets, with the Greater Diminution thus 𝇍 according whereunto if those Songs should be sung, it would not only alter the nature of those Harmonies, but also make them seeme rather some Danncing or Reuelling Measure, then a religious Note to be vsed in Gods Seruice▪

'Tis then the Lesse Prolation (thus 𝇋) wherewith all such [Page 19] Diuine Compositions (especially those which are with Fuges) ought to bee Character'd, and that is the slowest and gra­uest Measure now in vse.

And so againe for those Madrigalls, Pastor all [...], Rauens, and such like, which are Character'd with this Great [...], should they be sung according to the Tac [...] thereof, they would make such a confusion, that the Performers would surely bee taken for mad-men, and the Songs themselues would seeme no better then common has to the hearers.

Wherefore it concernes the Composer to vnderstand the differences of these Tacts, and according to the nature of the Composition discreetly to Charactere them, that both Him selfe, and his Wo [...]kes may haue their due commen­dation.

And thus much briefly for the true Charactering of the 4. Figures or Measures, concerning the Perfection, Imper­fection, and Diminutions of Moode Time, and Prolation. Onely thus much more of Diminution it selfe. I [...]ust craue leaue to adde, namely, the Description and [...] of it, that it is a certaine Glerean. Dod: lib. 3. cap. 8. Decreasing of the Quality and not of the Quantity) of the Notes and Rests, by Internall and External Signes: or Io: Magirut cap. 12. when the Element is abated in the Grea­ter, or Lesser of the Nature of it; and it was inuented to ha­sten the Tact, for a reuiuing of the Eare, when it is dul'd and wearied with a slow Motion; Ornitb [...]: lib. 2. cap. 8. Not that the Number or value of the Notes is thereby Diminished, but only that the Tact for the Motion of it is hastened, both in the Perfect and [...] difers.

And this by the Ancients was obserued 3. wayes.

  • 1 By a Canon.
  • 2 By Proportionate Numbers.
  • 3 By Retort of the Semi-Circle and a Dash.

1 Now the Canon being cleane out of vse, we haue no­thing at this time to speake thereof: and the like also for

[Page 20] Proportionate Numbers; in regard common practise hath disused all proportions saue Sesqui-altera we haue little to say of them.

As for the Ternary and Binary Number [...] which should be brought in by way of this Proportionate Deminuti­on, expressed by Glar [...]nus withthese examples (as from the common practise in thosedayes) 𝇊3 𝇊3 𝇋3 𝇋3 and thus with a Ternary Number alone 3; He and diuers other auncient Theorists affirme (inregard of the Di­minutions of the Degrees) that they are nothing but fancies of the ignorant Vulgar Practitioners; for saith he (speaking of the Diminution of the Degrees, and ther­byGlar [...]a [...], Dod: lib. 3, cap. 11. of the Circular Rule) what needs there to expresse the Diminutions of the Degrees, any more, then onely the Re [...]t and the Dash, and so reiect all the rest, that the common Canters should not be confounded in these rules, him­selfe and diuers others giuing these examples 𝇇. (timeperf-prolatimperf-x). (timeperf-prolatperf-str). (timeperf-prolatimperf-x). 𝇊. (timeimperf-prolatperf-rev) (timeimperf-prolatperf-str) (timeimperf-prolatperf-rev-str) or thus (timeimperf-prolatperf-str). 𝇋. 𝇌 or thus 𝇍. 𝇎 or thus (timeimperf-prolatimperf-x): to which as very resonable and onely necessary, for the practise of these Times (all others being contrary) I subscribe.

Of Tact.

Tact, Touch or Time, is, a certaine S [...]bald: Heyd. lib. 2. cap. 5▪ M [...]t [...] of the hand (whereby the q [...]tity of Notes and Rests are di­rected) by an equall Measure, according to the propertiesMorley [...] [...] fol. 9. Nichola Li­ [...]q. cap. 10. of the Signes of the Degrees. The Auncients obserued three

  • 1 The Greater.
  • 2 The Lesse,
  • 3 The Proportionate.

[Page 21]But these our dayes obserue but two, and those deriued from the former obseruations.

The first is the Perfect Diuision of the Semi-bre [...]e which is by 3. the which we call Minime Time, & as some say, from the Proportionate Rule.

The second is the Imperfect Di [...]ision of the Semi-breue which is by 2. the which we terme the Semi-breue Time, and as some say, from the Diminished Breue.

All which Tact or Time according to the discretion of the Singer (and according to the Measure) may be sung swif­ter, or slower.

BEsides all these, vnto these foure foresaid Figures or Measures, there appertaine diuers o [...]her [...]les; As Augmentation, Sin [...]opation, Imperfection, the Bricks of Perfecti­on, Addition, Diuision, Alteration, & such like; [...] which serue to distinguish the Diuision, Alteration, and A [...]g [...] ­tion of Perfect and Imperfect Notes; but because we h [...] lit­tle or no vse of the most of them, saue the Pricke of Additi­on, Morley A­nota, fol. 5. ((2) which some terme that of Perfection, others of Aug­mentation, making little difference betweene them) at this time I'le speake of it [...]nely, and not of the re [...].

A Prick is a Signe of an [...] Q [...]tity placed either before, after, on the vpper, [...]ther ends, or sides of a Note, and there seruing for the aforesaid distinctions.

This Pricke of Addition placed on the right side of a Note, (thus 𝆸.𝆹.톹텥.톺텥) in Perfect Time, & Perfect Prolation if a Minime or a Lesse Note follow, causeth the sameto be Perfect; and in Imperfect Time it maketh the said Note, if a Breue or Semi-breue, to be Perfect, but as for Lesse Notes, being Indiui­sible, it doth Augment the same to be halfe so long againe, as the Quantity of it affoorded.

ANd last of all, as necessary to all Harmonies, portaine certaine Signes for diuers vses, as Repetitions, thus Cha­ract [...]red. (repeat) ij :)(:

C [...]ed [...]nces thus 𝆸 (vocal join) 𝆸 (vocal join)

Concordances, do [...] thus 𝆸𝄐 as Pauses 𝆸𝄐fermatab;

[...], [...] h [...] two Notes are ioyn'd together both for the better ordering of Discords; and the applying of the [...] [...]; all which th [...]s worke [...] Index or Director thus (direct)

And these Signes, let me entreate all those which would performe these Harmonies in their proper Nature, strictly to obserue; which if they will doe, with the Distinctions of the [...] and [...] they [...] doe the Autho [...] [...] righ [...], and no doubt gi [...]e themse [...]ies & the hearers good contentment. [...] [...]able as they are True and Necessary, it will giue me muchincouragement to proceed further in a [...] [...]erall [...] by [...] shalt [...] me [...] [...]o bestow my [...]Spa [...] [...] such a [...] [...]

FINIS.

Errata in the Harmonies.

3. for Peiree read Peirs.

4. Treble. at ware baunt for [...] thus [...]

5. Tenor. at heylo. the Cliffe for this [...] thus [...]

7. Basis. at humble Siluans for [...] thus [...]

9. Tenor. at the second line the Cliffe for [...] thus [...]

13. Basis. for the Cliffe thus [...] thus [...]

Errata in the Discourse.

In diuers of the bookes, in the Rule of the Perfect of the Lesse his Character is thus, folio 8. 𝇇23 𝇇 𝇇2 𝇇3, but should be thus 𝇈32 𝇈 𝇈2 𝇈3 folio 13. in the fourth Example of Internall Signes. for [...] thus [...] folio 17. for Direction 'Tis, read Now. folio. 20. line 7. for the Characters of the Imperfect of the Lesse 𝇋3𝇋3. thus 𝇋3𝇋2.

Hunting, & Hawking,

A Hunts vp.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

Cho. [...] [...]

THe hunt is vp, (repeat) sing merrily wee, [...] the hunt is vp, sing merrily wee, the hunt [...] is vp, The Birds they sing, the Deare. [...] they fling, hey nony nony nony no, the Hounds they crye, the Hunters they slye, Cho . [...]. [...] hey tro lilo, tro lo lilo, hey tro lo lilo lili lo. The hunt is vp, vt supra.

The Woods resounds
To heere the Hounds,
hey, nony nony-no [...]
2
The [...] report
This [...]
[...]
Then hye apace
Vnto the chase
hey nony, nony nony-no
3
[...]
[...]
[...]

MEDIVS.

Cho: [...]

THe hunt is vp, the [...]unt is vp, sing merrily wee the hunt is vp, sing [...] merrily wee the hunt is vp. Hey downe Cho▪ [...] The Hunt is vp, [...]t supra.

TREBLE.

Cho: [...]

THe Hunt is vp, the Hunt is vp, sing mer [...] [...]ee, the Hunt is vp, [...] sing merrily wee, the Hunt is vp: hey downe [...] Cho [...] the Hunt, &c.

BASIS.

Cho: [...]

THe Hunt is vp, the Hunt is vp, sing merrily wee, the Hunt is vp, [...] verse [...] [...]

For Hunting.
The Hunting of the Hare.

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] HEy trola, trola, hey trola, trola, there, there boyes there (repeat) hoicka, hoick, (repeat) whoope (repeat) Crie there they goe, crie, there they goe, they goe, they are at a fault: Boy winde the Hor ne, Ho rne, Boy, winde the Ho rne,

TENOR.

[...] HEy trola, trola, hey trola, trola, there, there boyes there, (repeat) boyes there: hoicka hoick, whoop: (repeat) crye there they goe, crye there they goe, they goe, they goe, they are at a fault:

MEDIVS.

[...] HEy trola, trola, hey trola trola, there, there boyes there, (repeat) hoicka hoick, (repeat) whoop (repeat) crye there they goe, crye there they goe, they are at a fault: ☞ Boy, winde the ho rne, ho rne, Boy winde the ho rne,

BASIS.

[...] HEy trola, trola, hey trola, trola, there, there boyes there, there boyes there, hoicka hoick, whoop, (repeat) crye there they goe, crye there they goe, (repeat) they are at a fault: Boy

TREBLE.

[...]

Ho rne▪ Ho rne: Sing tiue, tiue, tiue, (repeat) Now in full crie,

[...]

with yeeble yable, gibble gabble, hey, with (repeat) with gibble gabble

[...]

hey, with (repeat) hey with hey, the Hounds doe knocke it lusti ly,

[...]

with open mouth and Iustie crye.

TENOR.

[...] [...]

Ho rne, Ho rne, sing tiue, tiue, tiue, sing (repeat) now in full crye,

[...]

with yeeble yabble, geeble gabble, hey: with yeeble yabble, yeeble yabble,

[...]

gibb [...]e gabble hey: with (repeat) yeeble yabble▪ gibble gabble, hey: The

[...]

[...]

MEDIVS.

[...]

ho rne, ho rne, sing tiue, tiue, tiue (repeat) now in full crye,

[...]

with yeeble yabble, gibble gabble, hey: (repeat) with hey: with yeeble

[...]

yabble, gibble gabble, yeeble yabble, gibble gabble, hey: the Hounds doe knocke

[...]

it lusti ly with open mouth and lustie crye.

BASIS.

[...]

Ho rne, Ho rne, sing tiue, tiue, tiue: sing now in full crye,

[...]

with yeeble yable, gibble gabble hey▪ with: (repeat) with yeeble yable,

[...]

gibble gabble, yeeble yabble, gibble gabble, hey: The Hounds doe knocke

[...]

[...]

A Hawkes-vp, for a Hunts vp.

4. VOC.

MEDIVS.

verse [...]

AWake, awake, the day doth break, our Spanyels couple [...] them: our Hawkes shall flye lowe, meane, or high, [...]Cho. and trusse it, (repeat) and trusse it (repeat) if they can, hey troly lolly ly lo ly ly lo, [...] hey troly ly (repeat) (repeat) hey (repeat) and trusse it, [...] and trusse it, and trusse it if they can, you can, and trusse it if they can.

Then rise, arise,
for Phoebus dies
(in golde) the dawne of day,
And Coveyes lye,
in Feilds hard by,
then Sing we care away.

Chor: Hey trolly, lolly, then sing wee care away.

TENOR.

verse [...]

AWake, awake, [...]Cho▪ [Page] [...]lolly lo hey, (repeat) (repeat) (repeat) hey troly loly lo, and trusse it, [...] and trusse it, and trusse it if you can you can, and trusse it if you can.

TREBLE.

[...]

AWake Cho [...] hey troly lo [...] ly ly lo ly ly lo hey (repeat) hey hey (repeat) [...] and trusse it, (repeat) and trusse it if you can you can, and trusse it if you can.

BASIS

[...]

Awake, Cho [...] hey troly lo ly lo ly lo, hey troly lo ly lo (repeat) hey tro lo ly [...] [...]

[Page]

[figure]

Hawking for the Partridge.

4. VOC

MEDIVS.

[...]

SIth Sickles & the sheering Sythe, hath shorne the Feilds [...] of late, now shall our Hawkes & we be blythe, Dame Partridge [...] ware your pate: our murdring Kites, in all their flights, wil sild or neuer neuer neuer▪ [...] [...]eld or neuer misse, To trusse you euer euer euer euer, & make your bale our blisse▪ [...] ☞ whur ret Duty, whur ret Beauty ret, whur ret Loue, whur ret, hey dogs hey (repeat)

TENOR.

[...]

SIth Sickles [...] [...] [...]

TREBLE.

[...]

SIth Sickles, [...] [...] whur ret, [...] whur ret, Quando ret, whur ret, Nimble ret, hey dogs hey (repeat) dogs hey,

BASIS.

[...]

S [...]th Sickles [...] [...] whur ret, whur ret, Trauell ret, whur ret, Trouer ret, hey dogs hey (repeat) [...] [...]

Of the Hearse and Ducke.

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] Dye fearfull Duckes, and climbe no more so high, (repeat) (repeat) The Nyas Hauke will kisse the Azure Skie. But when our Soare Haukes flye, & stiffe windes blowe: then long to late we Faulkners crye hey lo, hey lo, hey lo. (repeat) hey lo, hey lo. But when &c.

TENOR.

[...] Dye fearfull Duckes (repeat) and climbe no more so high, and (repeat) The Nyas Hauke will kisse the Azure Skie, But when out Soare Haukes flye and swift windes blowe, then long to late we Falk [...]s crye hey [...]o hey [...] (repeat) heylo (repeat) hey (repeat)

MEDIVS.

[...] Dye fearfull Duckes & climbe no more so high, no (repeat) & (repeat) The Nyase Hauke will kisse the Azure Skye, But when our Soare Haukes flye and stiffe windes blowe, then long to late we Faulkners crye, hey lo hey lo (repeat) hey lo (repeat) hey lo (repeat) hey lo (repeat) lo But when our Soare &c.

BASIS.

[...] Dye fearefull Duckes, and climbe no more so high (repeat) no more so high so high. The Nyase Hauke will kisse the Azure Skye, But when our Soare Haukes flye, & stiffe windes blowe, [...]

Dauncing.

The Fayries Daunce.

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] DAre you haunt our hallowed greene, none but Fayries heere are seene, downe and sleepe, wake and weepe: pinch him ▪ blacke; and pineh him blew, that seekes to steale a louer true. When you come to ¶ hear vs sing, or to tread our Fayris ring, pinch him blacke & pinch him blew, ▪O

TENOR.

[...] DAre you haunt our hallowed greene, none but Fayries here are seene: Downe and sleepe, wake and weepe, pinch him blacke, and pinch him blew, that seekes to steale a Louer true [...] when you come to neare vs sing,

MEDIVS.

[...] DAre you haunt our hallowed greene, none but Fayries here are seene: Downe and sleepe, wake and weepe, pinch him blacke and pinch him blew, that seekes to steale a Louer true. When you come to heare vs sing, ☞ or to tread our Faytie ring, pinch him blacke and pinch him blew. O

BASIS.

[...] DAre you haunt our hallowed greene, none but Fayries here are▪ seene, Downe and sleepe, wake and weepe, pinch him blacke and pinch him blew, that seekes to steale a Louer true. When yee come to heare vs sing,

TREBLE.

[...]thus our nayles shall handle you, thus our nayles shall hanndle you.

TENOR.

[...]thus our nayles shall handle you, thus our nayles shall handle you.

7 The Satyres Daunce.

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...] ROund a round a round a (repeat) keep your ring to the glorious Sunne, we sing Hoe! hoe! he that weares the flaming rayes, and the Imperiall Crowne ¶ of Bayes, him with him, with him, with shoutes and songs we pra [...]e, we praise,

TENOR.

[...] ROund a round a round a (repeat) keep your ring to the glorious Sunne we sing Hoe! hoe! he that weares the flaming rayes, and the Imperiall Crowne ¶ of Bayes, him with him, with him, with shoutes and songs, we praise, we praise,

MEDIVS.

[...]thus our nayles shall handle you, thus our nayles shall handle you.

BASIS.

[...]thus our nayles shall handle you, thus our nayles shall handle you.

MEDI [...]

[...] ROund a round a round a (repeat) keepe your ring, to the glorious Sunne we sing. Hoe!, hoe! he that weares the flaming rayes, & the Imperiall Crowne ☞ of Bayes, him with him, with him, with shoutes and songs, we praise, we [...]

BASIS.

[...] ROund a round a round a, (repeat) keep your [...]ing to the glorious Sunne we sing. Hoe! hoe! he that weares the flaming [...]ay [...], & the Impe [...]all Crowne (repeat) of Bayes, him with him, with him, with shoutes and songs, we praise, we praise,

The Urchins Daunce.

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...]

lightly (repeat) as the little, little bee, two by two, (repeat) and

[...]

three by three, (repeat) (repeat) and about goe wee, (repeat) and about, about

[...]

about, about, and about, about goe we, and about, about goe we. (vocal join)

TENOR.

[...]

lightly▪ (repeat) (repeat) as the little, little Bee, two by two, and three by

[...]

three, (repeat) (repeat) and about goe we, (repeat) and about, about,

[...]

about, about, and about, about goe we, and about, about goe we. (vocal join)

MEDIVS.

[...]

lightly, (repeat) as the little little Bee, two by two and three by three,

[...]

(repeat) and about goe we, (repeat) and about about about about & about

[...]

about goe we, and about about goe we.

BASIS.

[...]

lightly▪ (repeat) as the little little Bee, two by two (repeat) and three by three,

[...]

(repeat) (repeat) (repeat) And about goe we, (repeat) and about about about about

[...]

and about about goe we, and about about goe we. (vocal join)

The Elues Daunce.

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] ROund about (repeat) in a faire ring a, thus we daunce (repeat) and thus we sing a, trip and trip and goe, too and fro and fro, too and fro, too and fro, ouer this greene a▪ all about, in and out, (repeat) all about, in and out ouer this greene a. all about, &c.

TENOR.

[...] ROund about (repeat) in a faire ring a, Thus we daunce, (repeat) and thus we sing a, trip and trip and goe, too and fro and fro, ouer this greene a, All about, in and out, (repeat) all about, in and out, ouer this greene a. all about, &c.

MEDIVS.

[...] ROund about: (repeat) in a faire ring a, Thus we daunce, (repeat) and thus we sing a, trip and trip and goe, too and fro and fro, too and fro and fro, over this greene a, All about, in and out, (repeat) all about in and out, ouer this greene a. all about, &c.

BASIS.

[...] ROund about (repeat) in a faire ring a, Thus we daunce, (repeat) and thus we sing a, Trip and trip and goe, too and fro and fro, too and fro & fro, [...] fro ouer this green a, All about, in and out (repeat) all about in and out, ouer this greene a. all about, &c.

Drinking.

Of Drinking

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] TRudge away quickly & fill the black Bole, deuoutly as long as wee bide, now welcome good fellowes, both strangers and all, let madnes & mirth set sadnes verse aside. Of all reckonings I loue good cheere, with honest folkes in company: and when drinke comes my part for to beare, for still me thinks one tooth is drye.

Loue is a pastime for a King,
if one be seene in Phisnomie:
2
But I loue well this pot to wring,
for still me thinkes one tooth is drie.
Masters this is all my desire,
3
I would no drinke should passe vs by:
Let vs now sing and mend the fier,
for still me thinkes one tooth is drie.

TENOR.

[...] TRudge away quickly & fill the black Bole, devoutly as long as we bide, now welcome good fellowes both strangers & all, let madnes & mirth set sadnes vers. aside. for still me thinks one tooth is drye.

MEDIVS.

[...] TRudge away quickly and [...]ill the black Bole, deuo [...]ly as long as we bide, now welcome good fellows both strangers and all, let madnes and mirth set sadnes aside. for still me thinks one looth is drye.

4
Mr. Butler giue vs a taste,
of your best drinke so gently:
A Iugge or twaine, and make no waste,
for still me thinkes one tooth is drie.
5
Mr. Butler of this take part,
ye loue good drinke as well as I:
And drinke to mee with all your hart,
for still mee thinks one tooth is drie.

[...] Cho [...] T [...]dge away quickly, &c. now welcome good fellowes, &c.

BASIS

[...] TRudge away quickly and fill the blacke Bole, deuoutly as long [...] we bide, now welcome good fellowes both strangers and all, let madnes & mirth set sadnes aside. for still mee thinkes one tooth is drie.

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...] TOsse the pot tosse the pot, let vs be merry, and drinke till our cheeks be as red as a Cherry. We take no thought we haue no care, for still we spend, and neuer spare, till of all money our pursse is bare, we euer tosse the pot.

Chorus.

Tosse the pot, tosse the pot, let vs be merry,
And drink till our cheeks be as red as a Chery
2
We drinke Carouse with hart most free▪
A harty draught I drinke to thee:
Then fill the pot againe to me,
and euer tosse the pot,

Cho: Tosse the pot &c.

3
And when our mony is all spent,
Then sell our goods, and spend our rent,
Or drinke it vp with one consent,
and euer tosse the pot.

Cho: Tosse the pot &c.

TENOR.

[...] TOsse the pot tosse the pot let vs be merry, & drink till our cheekes be as red as a Cherry.

MEDIVS.

[...] TOsse the pot tosse the pot let vs be merry, & drink till our cheekes be as red as a Cherry.

Cho: Tosse the pot, &c.

4
When all is gone we haue no more,
Then let vs set it on the score,
Or chalke it vp behinde the dore,
and euer tosse the pot.

Cho: Tosse the pot, &c.

5
And when our credit is all lost▪
Then may we goe and kisse the post,
And eat Browne bread in steed of rost,
and euer tosse the pot.

Cho. Tosse the pot, &c.

6
Let vs conclude as we began,
And tosse the pot from man to man,
And drinke as much now as we can,
and euer tosse the pot.

Cho:

Tosse the pot tosse the pot let vs be merry,
And drinke till our cheekes be as red as a Cherry.

BASIS.

Cho.

[...] TOsse the pot tosse the pot, let vs be merry, and drinke till our cheekes be as red as a Cherry.

Ale and Tobacco.

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...] TObacco fumes away all nastie rheumes, but health awayi [...]neuer lightly frets, And nappy nappy Ale makes mirth, makes mirth (as Aprill raine ¶ doth Earth) Spring like the pleasant spring, where ere it soaking wets.

Chorus. But in that spring, &c.

One cleares the braine, the other glads the har [...],
which they retaine, by nature and by [...]rt:
The first by nature cleares, by Arte makes giddy will,
the last by nature cheares, by Art makes heady [...].

Chorus. So we whose braines, &c.

TENOR.

[...] TObacco fumes &c. ¶

MEDIVS.

[...] TObacca fumes &c. Chorus. So we whose Braines els lowe, swells high with Crotchet rules, feede on these two as far, as heddy giddy fooles▪

BASIS.

[...] TObacco fumes, &c.

TREBLE.

[...] ¶ But in that spring of mirth of mirth, such madnes (repeat) hye doth growe, as fills a foole by birth, a foole a foole by birth, with crotchets, (repeat) with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco (repeat) with (repeat) Tobacco (repeat) Ale with Ale and Tobacco.

Chorus

So we, whose Braynes els lowe swell hye with crotchet rules,
Feed on these two, as fat as headdy giddy fooles.

TENOR.

Chorus [...] ¶ But in that spring of mirth of mirth, such madnes madnes, (repeat) hye doth [...] growe as filles a foole by birth, a foole a foole by birth, with crotchets, with (repeat) [...] (repeat) with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco (repeat) with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco [...] (repeat) with Ale with Ale, & Tobacco.

MEDIVS.

[...] ☜ But in that spring of mirth of mirth, such madnes madnes (repeat) hye doth growe, as filles a foole by birth a foole a foole by birth, with crotchets (repeat) with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco, Tobacco, with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco, Tobacco, with Ale with Ale and Tobacco.

BASIS.

[...] ✚ But in that spring of mirth of mirth such madnes madnes (repeat) hye doth growe, as filles a foole by birth by birth with crotchets crotchets, (repeat) Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco, (repeat) with Ale and Tobacco, Tobacco, Tobacco, with Ale and Tobacco.

Enamoring.

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...] WHat seekes thou foole, what seeks thou foole in this place? thou foole, thou foole, gay cloaths and a purse of gould, foole foole, foole foole, whom [...] [...] [...]h [...]n s [...]ts to scho [...]le▪ foole foole, [...] [...]om a woman [...]s to scho [...]le▪ [...]hom &c▪

TENOR.

[...] WHat seeks, thou foole, thou foole the bable of a foole, what seeks thou foole, what seeks thou foole in this place. foole foole (repeat) whom a womā sets to schoole, foole foole, foole foole, whom a woman sets to schoole, whom a woman sets to schoole.

MEDIVS.

[...] WHat seekes, &c. thou foole a womans stouborne will, what seekes thou foole, what seekes thou foole in this place, thou foole [...] foole foole, foole foole whom a woman sets to schoole, foole foole, foole foole, whom [...] wh [...] [...] woman sets to schoole.

BASIS.

[...] WHat seekes, &c. foole foole, whom a woman sets to schoole, foole foole, whome a woman sets to schoole, whom a woman sets to schoole.

[Page]

[figure]

The Seruant of his Mistris.

4 VOC

MEDIVS.

[...] MY Mistres is as faire as fine, milk-white fingers, Cherry nose, like twinckling day-starres lookes her eyne, lightning all thinges where she goes, Faire as Phoebe though not so fickle: smooth [...] glasse though not so brickle.

My heart is like a Ball of Snowe,
melting at her luke-warme fight:
Her fiery Lips like Night-worms glowe
shining cleere as Candle-light.
Neat she is, no Fe [...]ther lighter:
Bright she is, no Dazie whiter.

TREBLE.

[...] MY Mistris is &c.

TENOR.

[...] MY Mistris is as faire as fine, &c.

BASIS.

[...] MY Mistris is &c.

The Mistris of her Seruant

4. VOC

TREBLE.

[...] LOue for such a cherry lip, would be glad to pawne his▪ Arrowes, Venus heere to take a sip, would sell her Doues and teeme of Sparrowes, out [...]hee shall not so, hey no no ny no ny no, none out I thi [...] [...]ust [...], bey nony nony nony, [...]y, hey (repeat) nony no.

Did Ioue see this wanton eye,
Ganimed should wayte no longer:
Phebe he [...] o [...] hight to [...]e,
would [...]ange her [...]ce, and lo [...]k [...] much y [...]ng [...].
but shee shall not see,
hey no ny, no ny no.
none but I this [...]p must owe,
hey no ny, no ny no.

TENOR.

[...] LOue for such a cherry lip, &c.

MEDIVS.

[...] LOue for such a chery lip, &c.

BASIS.

[...] LOue for such a chery lip, &c.

Their Mariage Zolemnized.

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] LEaue of Hymen, and let vs borrow to bid the Sunne good morrow, good morrow (repeat) good morrow. See the Sunne cannot refraine, but doth rise and giue againe, that which you of Hymen borrow, and with smiling bidst good morrow, good morrow to the Sunne, and to our Brides good-night to your sweet Beauties, sweet Beauties touch your side.

MEDIVS.

[...] LEaue of Hymen and let vs Borrow to bid the Sunne good morrow to (repeat) morrow good morrow (repeat) good morrow.

TENOR.

[...] LEaue off Hymen and let vs borrow, to bid the Sunne good morrow (repeat) good morrow (repeat) good morrow.

BASIS▪

[...] LEaue off Hymen and let vs borrow, to bid the Sunne good Morrow, good Morrow, good Morrow, good Morrow.

Hodge Trillindle to his Zweet hort Malkyn.
Vurst bart.

4. VOC.

DENOR.

[...] COame Malkyn, hurle thine oyz at Hodge Trillindle, And zet a zide thy Distaue thy Distaue and thy Zpindle, a little little tyny let a ma brast my minde, to thee which I haue vnw [...]d as ghurst as ghinde, yet loaue ma (Zweet, Zweet, Zweet,) a little tyny vit, and woe a little little We delocke wooll gommit, a little little tyny We delocke wooll gommit, y vaith wooll wee, wooll wee, that wee wooll y vaith lo. Zegund bart vollow [...].

DREBLE.

[...] COame Malkyn, &c.

DREBLE.

[...] Zegund bart vollowes.

MEDVZ.

[...] COame Malkyn, &c. Zegund bart vollowes.

BAZIS.

[...] COame Malkyn, &c. Zegund bart vollowes.

Malkinz anzwer to Hodge Trillindle.
Zecund bart.

4. VOC.

DRELE.

[...] YO tell yo tell ma zo: but Roger I cha vound your words but wynde: thon not for vorty bound, wooll I beeleaue you vurther thon Ich zee your words and deeds loyke Betans and Bacoan gree: But if yol loaue me long a little little vit, Thon wedlocke Ich a little (repeat) wool gomit, A little little tyny wedlocke wool gommit y vayth wooll I, thot ich wooll (repeat) thot Ich wooll [...] vayth lo.

MEDVZ.

[...] YO tell yo tell ma zo; &c.

MEDIVS.

[...] [...] Dthurd bart vollowes

DENOR.

[...] YO tell yo tell ma zo, &c. Dthurd bart vollowes.

BAZIS.

[...] YO tell yo tell ma zo, &c. Dthurd bart vollowes.

Their Goncluzion.

4. VOC.

Mal [...] ▪ DREBLE.

[...] TCh con but zweare, &c. Thon Roger zweare yo wooll be virmer thon yo weare: zo Roger zweare an oape hold Hodge O hold, oie to wyd yo gape, O hold, O hold, [...]howlt byte I zweare my wozen. [...] good [...] no more, Ich ¶ Cho wooll bee thoyne and God a bee vore, Ich (repeat) be thoyne, & God a beevore.

MEDVZ.

[...] TCh con but zweare, &c. ☞ Cho

DENOR.

[...] TCh con but zweare (ond thot I chill) vnbonably to loaue atha ztill, thot wool I lo. By thease ten Boans by Ia- by Ia- whay thou beleaue ma whon Ich zweare, ¶ Cho zo do thou▪

BAZIS.

[...] TCh con &c. Cho:

DREBLE.

[...] ¶ Thon geat wee Growdes ond Boagbipes ond (repeat) ond Boagbipes, Harbes ond Dabors (repeat) to leead vs on to eand ower loaues to eand ower loaues great labors, to eand ower loaues great labors

MEDVZ.

[...] ☞ Thon geat wee Growds ond Boagbipes, Boagbipes ond (repeat) ond Boagbipes, Harbs ond Dabors (repeat) to l [...]ead vs on to eand ower loaues, to eand ower loaues great labors to (repeat)

DENOR. 4 VOC

[...] ¶ Thon geat we [...] Growds ond Boagbipes ond Boagbipes (repeat) ond Boagbipes Harbs and Dabors (repeat) to leead vs on to eand ower loaues, to eand ower loaues great labors.

BAZIS. 4. VOC.

[...] ✚ Thon geat wee growds, ond [...]oagbips and Boagbipes (repeat) Harbs and Dabors, Harbs and Dabors, to leead vs one to eand ower lo [...]nes to eand our loaues, great labors to eand ower loaues great labors.

Their Wedlocke.

4. VOC.

DREBLE.

[...] A Borgens a borgens, che hard long a goe bee merry merry (repeat) ond a vig vor woe▪ O tis faliant [...]port▪ then let this Burden zweet ly ¶ zung be ztill, A▪ Borgen [...] a Borgen bee't good be it ill, A

DENOR.

[...] A ▪ Borgens a borgen, [...]ha hord long a goe, be merry merry (repeat) ond a vig [...]or woe▪ ¶

MEDVZ.

[...] A Borgens a Borgen cha hord long agoe be merry merry (repeat) ond a vig vor woe Zing gleare zing zweet and zure, ower Zong zhall bee but zhort▪ Muzicke foice, ond d [...]zing ☞

BAZIS.

[...] A Borgens a Borgen, cha hord long agoe, bee merry merry (repeat) and a vig vor woe, ✚

DREBLE.

[...] ¶ A Borgens a Borgen, vor weale or vor woe. So euer led dis blea­sing Borden goe, So (repeat) bleasing Burden goe.

DENOR.

[...] ¶ Borgens a borgen vor weale or vor woe, zo euer led dis bleasing borden goe, soeuer let so (repeat) so euer led dis bleasing burdon goe.

FINJS.

MEDVZ.

[...] ☞ Borgens a Borgen vor wealeor vor woe, zo euer led dis blea sing burden goe, so euer led (repeat) dis blea fing burdon goe.

BAZIS

[...] ✚ Borgens a Borgen vor weale or vor woe, so euer led dis bleasing burdon goe, so euer led, so euer led dis▪bleasing bordon goe.

FINIS.

A TABLE OF ALL THE Harmonies Contained in this Booke.

4. VOC.
HVNTING.
1 A Hunts vp. Iohn Bennet.
2 A Hunting Song. Edward Peirs.
HAVVKING.
3 A Hawks vp for a Hunts vp Th. Ra. B. Mu.
4 For the P [...]r [...]ridge. Th. Ra. B. Mu.
5 For the Hearne & Duck. Io Bennet.
DAVNCING.
6 Fayries Daunce. Tho: Ravenscroft. Bach. of Musicke.
7 Satyres Daunce. Tho: Ravenscroft. Bach. of Musicke.
8 V [...]chins Daunce.
9 El [...]s Daunce. Iohn Bennet.
DRINKING.
10 Of Beere. Tho: Ravens­croft. Bach. of Musicke.
11 Of Ale. Tho: Ravens­croft. Bach. of Musicke.
12 Of Ale and Tobacco. Tho: Ravens­croft. Bach. of Musicke.
ENAMORING.
  • 13 Three Fooles. Iohn Bennet.
  • 14 The Seruant of his Mistris. Iohn Bennet.
  • 15 The Mistris of her Seruant. Edward Peirs.
  • 16 Their Mariage solemnized.——Thomas Ravens­croft Bach. of Musicke.
  • 17 Hodge Trilli [...]dle to his sweet h [...]rt Molkyn. Thomas Ravens­croft Bach. of Musicke.
  • 18 Molkyns answer to Hodge Trillindle. Thomas Ravens­croft Bach. of Musicke.
  • 19 Their Gonglusion.———Thomas Ravens­croft Bach. of Musicke.
  • 20 Their Wedlocke.———Thomas Ravens­croft Bach. of Musicke.
FINIS.

Pammelia. MVSICKS Miscellanie. OR, MIXED VARIETIE OF Pleasant Roundelayes, and delightfull Catches, of 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Parts in one.

None so ordinarie as musicall, none so musical, as not to all▪ very pleasing and acceptable.

LONDON Printed by William Barley, for R. B. and H. W. and are to be sold at the Spread Eagle at the great North doore of Paules. 16 [...] ▪ Cum Priualegio.

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...]

TO THE VVELL DIS­POSED TO READE, AND to the merry disposed to Sing.

AMongst other liberall Arts, Musicke for her part, hath alwayes beene as liberall, in bestowing her melodious gifts, as any one whatsoeuer, and that in such rare manner, for diuersitie: and ample mea­sure, for multiplicity, as more cannot be expected, except it were more then it is respected: yet in this kind onely, it may seeme somewhat niggardly and vnkind, in neuer (as yet) publikely communicating, but alwayes priuately retaining, and as it were, enuying to all, this more familiar mirth and iocund melodie. But it may bee Musicke hath hitherto beene defectiue in this vaine, because this vaine indeed, hath hitherto been defectiue in Musicke: and therefore, that fault being now mended, this kind of Musicke also is now commended to all mens kind acceptation. This did I willingly vndertake, and haue easily effected, that all might equally pertake of that which is so generally affected. Catches so generally affected (I take it) quia non superant cap­tum, because they are so consonant to all ordinarie musicall ca­pacity▪ [...] [Page] being such indeed, as all such whose loue of Musicke ex­ceedes their skill, cannot but commend, such also, as all such, whose skill in Musicke, exceedes their loue of such sleight and light fanci­es, cannot either contemne or condemne. Good Art in all, for the more musicall▪ good mirth and melodie for the more Iouiall, sweet harmonie, mixed with much varietie, and both with great facilitie. Harmony to please, varietie to delight, facilitie to inuite thee. Some toyes yet musicall, without absurdity, Some very musicall, yet pleasing without difficulty, light, but not without musickes delight, Musickes pleasantnes, but not without easines, what seemes old, is at least renewed, Art hauing reformed what pleasing tunes iniurious time and ignorance had deformed. The onely intent is to giue generall content, composed by Art to make thee disposed to mirth. Accept there­fore kindly, what is done willingly, and publi­shed onely, to please good Company

[...] [...] [...] [...]

Rounds or Catches of three Uoices.
Cannons in the vnison.

3 Uoc.

1

[...] HEy hoe, to the greene wood now let vs goe, sing heaue and hoe, and there shall we find both bucke and Doe, sing heaue and hoe, the Hart the Hinde, and the little prety Roae sing heaue and hoe, Hey hoe, vt supra.

2

[...] O My fearefull dreames neuer forget shall [...], neuer forget— [...] shall I, me thought I heard a maiden child condemnd to die, whose name was Iesus, whose .ii. O my fearefull. vt supra.

3

[...] IOlly shepheard and vpon a hill as he sate, so lowd he blew his little horne, and kept right well his gate: Earely in a morning, late in an Euening, and euer biew this little boy, so merily piping: Tere liter lo .ii. terli terlo, terli ter liter lo .ii. rer liter lo terli. Ioly sheꝑheard, vt supra.

4

[...] ALL in to seruice let vs ring, merily together, ding dong ding dong Bell. Allinto vt supra.

[...] [...]

5

[...] NEw Oysters, new Oysters, new Oysters new, haue you any wood to cleaue .ii. haue you any wood to cleaue, what kitchin stuffe haue you maides .ii. what kitching sluffe haue you maides? New Oysters, vt supra.

6

[...] OKen leaues in the merry wood so wilde, when will you grow green a, fayrest maid and thou be with child, lullaby maist thou sing a, lulla lullaby lulla lulla lullaby lullaby maist thou sing a Oken leaues vt supra.

[...]

7

[...] NO [...] God bee with old Simeon, for the made Cannes for many a one, and a good old man was he, And Iinkin was his Iorneyman, and hee could tipple of euery can, and thus he said to me, to whome drinke you sir knaue, to you, then hey ho Iolly linkin, I spie a knaue in drin­king, come trole the bole to me. Now God vtsupra.

8

[...] WEll fare the Nightingale, faire fall the Thrush cocke too, but foule faire the filthie bird that singeth Cuckow. Wel vtsupra.

[...]

9

[...] FOllow me quickly, Iacke is a pretty boy, round about, standing stout, singing ale in abole, fala sol, la my dirry come dandy. Follow vtspura

10

[...] NOw kisse the cup cosen with curtesie, and drinke your part with a heart willingly, then so shall we all agree merily. Now vtsupra.

11

[...] NEw oysters, ii, new walefleet oysters, at a groat a pecke .ii. each oyster worth two pence, fetch vs bread and wine that we may eate, let vs loose no time with such good meat, a banquet for a prince. New

[...]

12

[...] ALL in to seruice, the belles toles, Al into seruice now [...]ing they all in to seruice, Ding dong dong bell, ding dong bell. Al in to vt supra.

Cannon three parts in one, in the fift and ninth.

3 Voc.

13

[...] HEy downe a downe, behold and see, what song is this or how may this bee, three parts in one: Sing all after mee with hey downe downe a downe downea trole the berry drinke and be mery. Hey downe. vt supra.

[...]

14.

[...] MIserere nostri Domine, secundum Misericordiam tuam. Miserere vt supra.⟨⟩

15

[...] PIetas omnium virtutem parens & fundamentum parens & fundamentum. Pietas. vt supra.

16

[...] INtende voci Oratio▪ nis mea rexmeus & De╌us meus quoniam .ii. ad te orabe. Intende vt supra.

[...] [...]

17

[...] HAec est vita aterna vt cognoscant te solum Deum verum, & quem misisti Iesum Christum & quem misisti Iesum Christum Amen. Haec est vt supra.

18

[...] MIserere nostri Domine viuennum & mortuo. rum. Miserere vt supra.

19

[...] O Prayse the Lord ye that feare him, magnifie him all yee seed of Iacob. and prayse him all yee seed of Israell. O prayse vt supra.

[...] [...]

20

[...] THe Nightingale, the mery Nightingale, she sweetly sits and sings, and sings: The prety nimble▪ Doe doth trip it to and fro, the st [...]nd horse kickes and flinges and [...]lings, the Cuckow he doth flie from tree to tree: And merily through the woods cuckow, cuckow rings. The vt supra.

21

[...] THe old dogge, the iolly olde dogge as he lay in his dennea Huffa, trolilo as he lay in his dennea. the third, trolilo, as he lay in his dennea. The vt supra.

[...]

22

[...] IOan come kisse me now, once againe for my loue, gentle loue come kisse me now. one come tsupra.

23

[...] MY Dame has in her hutch at home, a little dog, hey dog hey. third▪ with a clog. My

24

[...] GOE no more to Brainford, vnlesse you loue a Punke, for that wicked sinnefull towne hath made me drunk [...], come follow me. Go vt supra

[...] [...]

25

[...] DAme lend me a loafe .ii. from saturday to saturday And longer if you longer may, Dame lend me a loafe. Dame vt supra.

26

[...] I Am a thirst, what should I say, alasse I haue no money to pay, fill the pot Butler, fill, fill, for I will drinke with a good will. I vt supra

27

[...] THere lies a pudding in the fire, and my parte lies there­in a: whome should I call in, O thy good fellowes and minea. Third Call in, call in, O thy good fellows and minea. Ther ut supra

[...]

28

[...] HEy downe a downe downe a be hold and see, good hostesse this is the fill the pot for mee, and yet it is the first of three▪ Take and fill this best ale belieue me, if ye will drinke more, then call me, pot yet once againe, we will for this time thus remaine, when this is spent fill pot againe. Hey downe vt supra.

29

[...] WHat hap had I to marry a shrow for she hath giuen me many: a blow, and how to please her alacke I doe not know. What vt supra.

2
From morne to euen her tongue neere lies,
Sometime she braules, sometime she cries,
Yet I can scarse keepe her tallants from my eyes.
3
If I goe abroad, and late come in,
Sir knaue (saith she) where haue you beene,
And doe I well or ill, she claps me on the skin,

Rounds or Catches of foure Uoices.
Cannons in the vnison.

4 Uoc.

30

[...] HEy downe downe .il, hey d. d. d. a d. d. d. down . [...]. heaue and ho, Rumbelo, follow me my sweet heart follow me where I goe Shall I goe walke the woods so wild, wandering here and there as I was once full sore be guild, what remedy though alas for loue I die with woe, Oft haue I ridden vpon my gray nag, and with his cut tayle he plaid the wag, and down he fell vpon his cragge, [...]a la re la, la ri dan dino. Hey vt supra.

31

[...] VT, re, me, fa, sol, la, la, sol, fa, me, re, vt. Hey downe downe .ii. hey down .ii. down a. My heart of gold as true as steele as I me leant vnto the bowres, but if my Lady loue me well, Lord so Robin lowres, heaue and hoe Rumbelo, hey trolo troly lo, hey troly trolly hey .ii. .ii. My Ladies gone to Canterbury, S. Thomas be her boote. Shee met with Kate of Malmsbury, why weepst thou maple roote: O sleepst thou or wakst thou Ieffery, Cooke, the rost it burnes, turne round about about, .ii. [Page] [...] .ii. O Frier how fares thy bandelow bandelow Frier, [...] how fares thy Sandelow, Sandelow. Vt vt supra

32

Canon in vnisono.

[...] MIserere-mes Deus secun╌dum magnum misericordi╌ans tuam, Mise. .ii. Mise- vt supra,

33

[...] COnditor Kirie omnium qui vi [...]nt, Kirie Leison. Con. vt supra

[...] [...]

34

[...] IN te Domine speraui non confunder in aeternum In te Domine speràui, non confunder in aternum. In te vt supra.

35

[...] EXaudi Domine gra╌ti╌o╌nem meam. Exaudi vt supra.

36

[...] ORa & labara .ii. Ora vt supra. ⟨ ⟩

37

[...] QUicquid peticritis patrem in nomine meo, dal it vobi [...] Quic- vt supra.

38.

[...] CAnta╌te do mine Canticum no╌uum Canti╌cum nouum no nouum. Can- vt supra.

39

[...] MAne nobiscum .ii. .ii. Christi quontam ad vesperascit & di╌es inclinatus est. Mane vt supra.

[...] [...]

46

[...] ATtend my people and giue eare, of ferly thing [...] I shall thee te [...]l See that my words in mind thou beare, and to my precepts listen well. At­ vt supra

I am thy soueraigne Lord and God,
which haue thee brought from carefull thrall:
And eke reclaimde from Pharaohs rod,
make thee no Gods on them to call.
Nor fashioned forme of any thing,
in heauen or earth to worshippe it:
For I thy God by reuenging,
with grieuous plagues this sinne will smite.

47

[...] O Lord in thee is all my trust, giue eare vnto my wofull crie, re­fuse me not that am vniust, but bowing downe thy heauenly eye. O Lord vt supra.

2
Behold how I doe still lament
my sinnes wherein I doe offend,
O Lord for them shall I be shent,
sith thee to please I do entend.
3
No, no not so, thy will is bent,
to deale with sinners in thine ire:
But when in heart they shall repent,
thou grantst with speed their iust desire:

48

[...] O Lord turne not away thy face from him that lieth prostrate, lamenting sore his sinnefull life before thy mercies gate, which gate thou openest wide to those that doe lament their sinne, Shut not that gate against me Lord, but let me enter in. O Lord vt supra.

2
And call me not to mine accounts
how I haue liued here:
For then I know right well O Lord,
how vile I shall appeare.
I need not to confesse my life
I am sure thou canst tell,
What I haue beene, and what I am,
I know thou knowest it well.

49

[...] ADieu seul soit honneur honneur et gloire honneur et gloire adieu seul s [...]it, honneur et glorie adieu seul soit honneur et gloire. Adieu vt supr

50

[...] CElebrous sans cesse de diu ces boutes celebrous sans cesse de dieu ces boutes. Cele- vt supra.

51

[...] SAuct escriture to propa se, si tu veni a complerla loy, damer to [...] dieusour toute chose et ton Prochain antant que toy. Sanct. vt supra,

52

[...] DOnec aboire alle bon companion alleluia alleluia. Donec vt supra. ⟨ ⟩

53

[...] AS I mee walked in a May Morning, I heard a birde sing Cuckow. As vt supra.

2
Shee nodded vp and downe,
and swore all by her crowne,
Shee had friends in the towne,
Cuckow.
3
All you that married be,
learne this song of me,
So shall we not agree,
Cuckow.
4
All young men in this throng,
to marry that thinke it long,
Come learne of me this song,
Cuckow.

54

[...] THe white Henne shee cackles and layes in the puddles, Sing hey cocke without a combe, cocke a [...]. The vt supra.

[...]

55

[...]

THe winde blowes out of the west, thou gentle Mariner a, looke [...] to the looffe wel, beware the lee still, for deadly rockes doe now a­peare [...] a, looke to thy tacke; let bowling goe slacke, so shal wee scape them [...] and goe cleare, Tarra tan tarra stir well thy course sirra, the wind waxeth [...] large, the sheetes doe thou year, goe fill the canne, giue vs some beare. [...] Ile drinke thee Ile brinks thee my mates, what cheare? The vt supra.

[...] [...]

56

[...]

IAcke boy, ho boy newes, the cat is in the well, let vs ring [...] now for her knell, ding dong ding dong bell, Iacke vt supra.

57

[...]

BLow thy horne thou iolly hunter, thy hornes for to reuiue a, (repeat) [...] shew thy selfe a good huntsman whilst that thou art aliue a, that men may [...] say and sing with thee, thou hast a merry life a, in pleasure all the day, [...] and Venus mate to wife a. Blow vt supr [...]a.

[...]

58

[...] BAnbery Ale where where where, at the Blacke Smithes house, I would I were there. Banbery vt supra.

59

[...] A Miller, a miller, a miller would I be, to learne his craft as well as he, by art to steale, by cunning to lie, to get a poling pe [...]y thereby. A vt supra.

60

[...] [...]Irch and greene holly, birch and greene holly, if thou beest beaten boy, thanke thine owne folly. Birch vt supra▪

[...]

61

[...] THe Larke Linit and Nightingale to sing some say are best, yet merily sings little Robin, prety Robin with the red breast. The vt supra

62

[...] T. [...]. trole. ii. trole the bole to me, and I will trole the same again to thee, beginne now hold in now, for we must merry be as you see, be lusty so must we, Oh it is a braue thing for to passe away the spring with mirth and ioy to sing, Tan tan tan tara tant tant, all a flant braue boyes, what ioy is this to see, when friends so well agree. Trole vt supra.

[...]

36

[...] NOw Robin lend to me thy bow, Sweet Robin lend to me thy bow, for I must now a hunting with my Lady goe, with my sweet Lady goe. Now vt supra.

2 And whether will thy Lady goe,
Sweet Wilkin tell it vnto me:
And thou shalt haue my hawke, my hound, and eke my bow
to wait on thy Lady.
3 My Lady will to Vppingham,
to Vppingham forsooth will [...]hee,
And I my selfe appointed for to be the man,
to wait on my Lady.
4 Adiew good Wilkin all be shrewde,
thy hunting nothing pleaseth mee,
But yet beware thy babling hounds stray not abroad,
for angring of thy Lady.
5 My hounds shall be led in the line,
so well I can assure it thee:
Vnlesse by view of straine some persue I may find,
to please my sweete Lady.
6 With that the Lady shee came in,
and wild them all for to agree:
For honest hunting neuer was accounted sinne,
nor neuer shall for me.

64

[...] FArewell mine owne sweet heart farewell whome I loue best since I must from my loue depart, adew my ioy and rest. fare. vt supra.

65

[...] FAy mi, fare la mi, beginne my sonne and follow mee fing flat fa, me, so shall weewell agree, hey tro lo ly lo ly lo, hold fast good son with hey tro lily lo trode ly, O sing this once again Iustily. Fa vt supra.

66

[...] MVsing .ii. musing mine owne selfe all alone, I heard a maid . [...] ▪ I heard a maid making great mone with sobs and sighes, & many a grieuous moane, for that for that for that her maidenhead was gone. Mu▪ vt supra.

67

[...] TO Por [...]smouth .ii. it is a gallant towne, and there wee will haue a quart of wine with a nutmeg browne, diddle downe. The gal­lant shippe, the Mermaid, the Lion hanging stout, did make vs to spend there our sixeteen pence all out. The vt supra

68

[...] COme drinke to mee, and I will drinke to thee to thee, and then shall we full well agree. I haue loued the iolly tankerd full seuen winters and more, I loude it so long till that I went vpon the score, he that loues not the tankerd is no honest man .ii. and he is no right souldier that loues not the can: tappe the canikin, to [...]e the Canikin, trole the [...]ani­kin turne the canikin, hold good sonne and fill vs a fresh can, that wee may quaffe it round about from man to man. Come vt supra.

69

[...] LEts haue a peale for Iohn Cookes soule, for he was an honest man with belles all in an order, the cruse with the blacke bole, the tankard likewise with the can, and I my owne selfe will ring the treble bell, and drinke to you euery one▪ [...] now my mates, ring merily and well till all this good ale is gon. Lets vt supra.

70

[...] SIng we this roundelay merily my mate, ill may he thriue that doth vs hate, Sing we this roundelay merily each one, take care who will for ile take none. Sing vt supra.

[...] VT re mi fa mi re vt, hey derry derry sing and be merry, quand [...] veni quando coeli, whip little Dauids bome. bome. Vt vt supra. The fourth must sing the Fahurthen. Bome bome. .ii. Bome. Bome vt supra.

72

[...] L [...]dy come down and see the Cat sits in the Plumtree. Lady vt supra

73

[...] LOue, loue sweet loue for euermore farewell to thee, for fortune hath deceiued me .iii. Fortune my foe, most contrary hath wrought me this misery, but yet my loue, my sweet loue farewell to thee, farewell to thee. Loue vt supra.

A Round of three Country dances in one.

Basse or Ground.
74▪

[...] SIng after fellows, as you heare me, a toy that seldome is seene a: three country dances in one to be a prety conceit as I weene a.

Tenor.

[...] RObin Hood Robin Hood said little Iohn, come dance be­fore the Queene a. In a redde Petticote and a greene iacket, a white hose and a greene a. vt supra.

Cantus.

[...] NNow foote it as I do, Tom boy Tom, now foot it as I doe Swithen a, And Hicke thou must tricke it all alone, till Robin come leaping in betweene a. vt supra.

Medius.

[...] THe crampe is in my purse full sore, no money will bide there in a, and if I had some salue therefore, O lightly then would I sing a, hey hoe the Crampe a, hey hoe the Crampe a, hey hoe the crampe a the crampe a. The vt supra.

Rounds or Catches of fiue Uoices.
Canon in the vnison▪

5. Uoc.

75

[...] COme follow memerily my mates, lets all agree . [...]. and make no faults. Take heed of time, tune and eare, time, tune and eare, And then without all doubt, wee need not feare to sing this catch throughout: Malkin was a country maid, a country maid tricke and trim, tricke and trim as she might be, she would needes to the Court shee said to sell milke and firmenty, hey hoe, haue with you now [Page] [...] to Westminster, but before you come there, because the way is farresome [...] prety talke lets heare. Adew you dainty da [...]es, goe whether you will for [...] me▪ you are the very same I tooke you for to be Come vt supra.

76

[...] WHite wine and suger is good drinke for mee, for so said Parson Brat, but Gough saide nay to that, for hee loued Malmesie. white wine vt supra. ⟨ ⟩

77

[...] LIbera me Domine a per sequentibus me quia comfor­tati snnt [...]u▪ [...] per [...] me Libera vt supra.

78

[...] VNiuersa transeunt .ii. .ii. .ii. transeunt, Vniuersa vt supra.

79

[...] Vias tuas Domine. demonstra mihi, & semitas tuas edoce me, edoce me Uias vt supra.

80

[...] FIdes est a╌ni╌ma vi╌ta si╌cut anima est vita corporis. Fides vt supra.

81

[...] SI non pa╌uisti oec [...]╌disti Si vt supra.

82

[...] VEr╌hum Domini manet in aeternum in aeter╌num verbum vt supra.

83

[...] SIng you new after me, and as I sing sing yee, so shall we well agree, fiue parts in vnity, ding dong, ding dong, ding dong, ding dong bell. Sing vt supra.

84

[...] IInkin the iester was wont to make glee with Iaruis the Iugler till angry was he, then Wilkin the Wiseman did wisely foresee, that Iugler and Iester should gently agree, hey down, d. d. down derie d. d. d. d. down, d. Iinkin vt supra.

85

[...] HEy ho no body at home, meate nor drinke nor money haue I none, fill the pot Eadie. Hey vt supra.

86

[...] VT, re, mi, fa, sol, la, la, fa, fa, mi, re vt. Hey down ad. a dising you three after me and follow me my lads ii. my lads and we will merry be fa, la, la, la, la, .ii. fa, la, .ii. fa, la, .ii, la. la well song before hold fast .ii. .ii. hold fast betime, take heed .ii. you misse not nor breake the time, nor .ii. for if thou misse the Basse a note theres nere a man .ii. can sing a iot. Vt vt supra.

87

[...] LEt Lobcocke leaue his wife at home with lustie. ii. Iinkin that clownish Groome, with tighee, with two alone, with ta ha farewell my kind moame, yet must we looke kindly when Lobcocke comes home. Let vt supra.

88

[...] VT, re, mi, fa, sol, la, la, sol, fa. mi, re, vt. Hey downe, down, down, down, sing you now after me, la, mi, sol, re, fa, so shall [...] [Page] [...] we well agree, take heede to yourtime, and rest as you find, the round [...] and the square must be tende in their kind: O well sung my Lads I say, [...] we are as good by night as by day. la, mi, sol, re, fa, let vs be merry, heare [...] so long time as you may, for time truely passeth away, hey ho, hey ho, [...] hey ho, hey ho, hey ho. Vt vt supra.

[...] [...]

89

[...] KEepe well your ray my lads, and shew your selues like men, this day our foes shall feele our forces once againe, now let the trumpet sound .ii. their deadly blast, tantarra, tantarra, tantarra tan, stand to it first and last, with tautara ra .ii. see hey, they flie full fast. Keepe vt supra.

90

[...] HOw should I sing wel and not be weary, and ii. Since we lacke money to make vs merry, to make vs merry, since we lacke money to make vs merry, since we lacke money to make vs merry. how vt supra.

[...]

Rounds or Catches of sixe Uoices.
Canon in the vnison.

6 Voc.

91

[...] IOy in the gates of Ierusalem, peace bee in Sion. Ioy vt supra.

92

[...] LAndate nomen Domini, landate serui Dominum qui statis in d [...] domini. Landate vt supra.

93

[...] DOmine Fils Del vi╌vimiserere nostri, qui tollis. qui tolles peccata mund [...] Domine vt supra.

[...] [...]

94

[...] BEnedic Domine nobis his donis tuis quae de tua largitate sumus sump╌turi. Benedic vtsupra.

95

[...] NOw thanked bee the great God Pan, which thus pre­serues my loued life, and thanked be I that keepe a man who ended hath this bloudy strife, for if my man must prayses haue, what then must I that keepe the knaue. Now vtsupra.

A Round or Catch for se­uen Voices.
Canon in the vnison.

7. Voc.

96

[...] LAaudate nomen Domini super omnes Gentes. Laudate. vtsupra.

Rounds or Catches of Eight Voices.

97

[...] IEts hane a peale for Iohn Cookes soule for hee was a very very honest man, an honest man. Lets vtsupra.

[...]

98

[...] DElicta quis intelligu, ab occultis [...]ei [...] munda me. Delicta vt supr [...].

A Round or Catch for Nine voices.

99

[...] HEy ho [...] what shall I say, Sir Iohn hath carried my wife away, they were gone ere I wist, she will come when she list, hey trolly trolly [...]olly, come againe ho, hey

[...]

A Round or Catch for ten or eleuen voices.
Canon in the vnison.

10. or 11. Voc.

100

[...] SIng we now merily our purses be empty hey ho, let them take care that list to spare for I will not doe so, who can sing so merry a note, as he that cannot change a groat, hey ho [...] trolly lolly loc, trolly lolly lo. Sing vt supra.

[...] [...] [...]

A Table of all the Songes contained in this Booke.

Songs of three voices.
  • HEy hoe to the green. 1
  • O my fearefull dreames. 2
  • Iolly shepheard. 3
  • All into seruice. 4
  • New Oysters. 5
  • Oken leaues. 6
  • Now God be with. 7
  • Well fare the Nightingale. 8
  • Follow me quickly. 9
  • Now kisse the cup. 10
  • New Oysters new. 11
  • All in to seruice. 12
  • Hey downe a downe. 13
  • Miserere nostri. 14
  • Pietas omnium. 15
  • Intende voci Orationis. 16
  • Haec est vita aeterna. 17
  • Miserere nostri. 18
  • O prayse the Lord, 19
  • The Nightingale. 20
  • The olde dogge. 21
  • Ioan come kisse me now. 22
  • My Dame has in her huch. 23
  • Goe no more to Brainford 24
  • Dame lend me a loafe. 25
  • I am a thirst. 26
  • There lies a pudding. 27
  • Hey downe a downe. 28
  • What happe had I. 29
Songs of foure voices.
  • Hey downe downe. 30
  • Vt, re, me, fa, sol. 31
  • [...]M s [...]rere mei Deus. 32
  • Conditor Kirie omnium. 33
  • In te Do [...]n [...] speraui. 34
  • Exaudi Domine. 35
  • Ora & labora. 36
  • Quicquid pe [...]ieritis. 37
  • Cantate Domine canticum. 38
  • Mane nobiscum. 39
  • Emitte lucem tuam. 40
  • Fides est anima vitae sicut. 41
  • Descendet Christus de coelo. 42
  • Ascendit Christus in calum. 43
  • Adiuua nos Deus. 44
  • O Lord of whom I do depend. 45
  • Attend my people. 46
  • O Lord in thee is all my trust. 47
  • O Lord turne not away. 48
  • Adieu senl foit houneur. 49
  • Celebrous sans cesse de. 50
  • Sanct escriture te 51
  • Donec aboire. 52
  • As I me walked in a May. 53
  • The white Henne she cackles. 54
  • The wind blowes out. 55
  • Iacke boy, ho boy. 56
  • Blow thy horne thou iolly. 57
  • Banbery Ale. 58
  • [Page]A miller, a miller, a miller. 59
  • Birch and greene holly. 60
  • The Larke Linit. 61
  • Trole trole the bole. 62
  • Now Robin lend. 63
  • Farewell mine owne. 64
  • Fa, mi, fa, re, la, mi. 65
  • Musing mine owne selfe. 66
  • To Portsmouth. 67
  • Come drinke to me. 68
  • Lets haue a Peale▪ 69
  • Sing we this roundelay. 70
  • Vt, re, mi, fa, mi, re, vt. 71
  • Lady come downe. 72
  • Loue sweet loue. 73
  • Sing after fellowes. 74
Songs of fiue voices.
  • Come follow me merily. 75
  • White wine and suger. 76
  • Libera me Domine. 77
  • vniuersa transeunt. 78
  • Vias tuas Domine demonstra. 79
  • Fides est anima. 80
  • Si non pauisti occidisti. 81
  • Verbum Domini manet. 82
  • Sing you after me. 83
  • Iinkin the Iester. 84
  • Hey ho no body. 85
  • Vt, re, mi, fa, sol, la, 86
  • Let Lobcocke. 87
  • Vt, re, mi, fa, sol. 88
  • Keepe well your ray. 89
  • How should I sing well, 90
Songs of sixe voices.
  • Ioy in the gates of Ierusalem. 91
  • Laudate nomen Domini. 92
  • Domine Fili Dei.▪ 93
  • Benedic Domine nobis. 94
  • Now thanked be the. 95
A Song of seuen voices.
  • Laudate nomen Domini. 96
Songs of eight voices.
  • Lets haue a peale. 97
  • Delicta quis intelligit. 98
A Song of nine voices.
  • Hey hoe what shall I say. 99
A Song of ten voices.
  • Sing we now merily. 100
FINIS.

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...]

Deuteromelia: OR The Second part of Musicks melodie, or melodius Musicke. OF Pleasant Roundelaies; K. H. mirth, or Freemens Songs. AND such delightfull Catches.

Qui canere potest canat. Catch, that catch can.

Vt Mel Os, sic Cor melos afficit, & reficit.

LONDON: Printed for Thomas Adams, dwelling in Paules Church-yard at the signe of the white Lion. 1609.

Mirth and Musicke to the Cunning-catcher, Derth and Physicke to the Cony-catcher.

SEcundae cogitationes are euer (they say) meliores; and why may not then secundae Cantiones be as well dulciores? I presume they are so, and that makes me resume this vaine, with hope that I shall not consume in vaine my labour herein.

For first, the kinde acceptation of the former Impression is as a new invitation to this latter Edition, though not of the same things, yet of things of the same condition; full of the same de­lectation, made to please, as the other were; to please I say, and that with as much ease, as the other; made truely Musicall with Art by my correction, and yet plaine, and capable with ease, by my direction.

Againe, Bonum quò communius eò melius, we know; and I know no reason, why incundum, quò communius, should not be as well iucundius: Now then the nature of these (call them as you will) in regard of their facilitie and so their capabilitie is more commu­nicable, then any other kinde of Musicke▪ and in this respect more [Page] commendable; and will be I am sure more acceptable, because the things which many heretofore haue priuately ioyed in, may now by this meanes, publikely be inioyed.

Neither, can he, that is the most able Musition say, but that of these most men, almost all men are capable, that are not altogether immusicall: Neither can He, that is most spitefull say, but they are very delighfull, I, and some way gainfull too; (yet more paine­full to me, I am sure, then gainefull.) But, though there bee but little to bee gotten by them, yet pittie were it, such Mirth should be forgotten of vs; And therefore to make an end, I say no more but—Siquid nouisti dulcius istis.

Candidus imperti; si non, hijs vtere mecum, either commend me, or come and mend me, and so I end me, as resolute as thou art dissolute.

Thine T. R.

A Table of all the Songs contai­ned in this Booke.

Freemens Songs to 3. Voices.
  • AS it fell on a holy day. I
  • The flye she sat. II
  • We be Souldiers three. III
  • By Lands-dale hey ho. IIII
  • By Lands-dale, another way. V
  • We be three poor Mariners. VI
  • Of all the birds. VII
Rounds or Catches to 3. Voices.
  • LOrd heare the poore. VIII
  • Browning Madam. IX
  • Hold thy peace. X
  • Glad am I. XI
  • Margery serue well. XII
  • Three blinde mice. XIII
  • The great bels of Oesney. XIIII
  • Ma [...]lt's come downe. XV
Freemens Songs to 4. Voices.
  • MArtin said to his man. XVI
  • Giue vs once a drink. XVII
  • Who liueth so merry. XVIII
  • By a bancke as I lay. XIX
  • To morrow the Fox. XX
  • Willy I prethee go to bed. XXI
  • Yonder comes a. XXII.
Rounds or Catches to 4. Voices.
  • VT Re Mi Fa Sol La. XXIII
  • O my Loue. XXIIII
  • Go to Ione Glouer. XXV
  • The maide she went. XXVI
  • ICVBAK. XXVII
  • Sing with thy mouth. XXVIII
  • By hils and dales. XXIX
  • The Pigion. XXX
  • Hey downe a downe. XXXI
FINIS.

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...]

[...] [...] [...] [...] [...] [...]

Freemens Songs of 3. Voices.

1

[...] AS it fell on a holyday, ij. holyday, and vpon an holy tide a, ij. tide a: Iohn Dory bought him an ambling Nag, ij. ambling Nag to Paris for to ride a. (repeat) [...]ide a. And when:

2
And when Iohn Dory to [...], (repeat)
a little before the gate a: (repeat)
Iohn Dory was fitted, the porter was witted, (repeat)
to let him in thereat a: (repeat)
3
The first man that Iohn Dory did meet, (repeat)
was good King Iohn [...] a: (repeat)
Iohn Dory could well [...], (repeat)
but fell downe in a trance a. (repeat)
4
A pardon a pardon my Liege & my king, (repeat)
for my merie men and [...]. (repeat)
And all the Churles in merie England▪ (repeat)
Ile bring them all bound to thee a. (repeat)
5
And Nicholl was then a Cornish [...] (repeat)
a little beside Bohyde a: (repeat)
And he mande forth a good blacke Barke, (repeat)
with fiftie good oares on a side a. (repeat)
6
[...] top, (repeat)
and looke what thou canst spie a: (repeat)
Who, ho; who, ho; a goodly ship I do see, (repeat)
I trow it be Iohn Dory. (repeat)
7
They hoist their Sailes both top and top, (repeat)
the meisseine and a [...] was tride a: (repeat)
And [...]Spand [...] [...]is [...]ot, (repeat)
what [...]et [...]ould be tide a▪ (repeat)
8
The roring Cannons then were plide, (repeat)
and [...] the [...] a: (repeat)
The [...] they cride, (repeat)
to courage both all and some a▪ (repeat)
9
The [...] hooks [...]ere brought at length, (repeat)
the browne bill and the sword a: (repeat)
Iohn Dory at length, for all his strength, (repeat)
was clapt fast vnder board a. (repeat)

2

[...]

THe Flye she sat in Shamblerow, (repeat) [...]

And shambled with, (repeat) her heeles I trow.

And then came in sir Cranion,
with legs so long and many a one.
2
And said Ioue speede Dame Flye, Dame Flye,
marry you be welcome good Sir quoth she:
The Master humble Bee hath sent me to thee,
to wit and if you will his true loue be.
3
But shee said nay, that may not be,
for I must haue the Butterflye:
For and a greater Lord there may not be.
But at the last consent did shee.
4
And there was bid to this wedding,
all Flyes in the field and Wormes creeping:
The Snaile she came crawling all ouer the plaine,
with all her ioly trinckets at her traine.
5
Tenne Bees there came all clad in Gold.
and all the rest did them behold:
But the Thonbud refused this sight to see.
and to a Cow-plat away flyes shee.
6
But where now shall this wedding be?
for and hey nonny no in an old lue tree:
And where now shall we bake our bread?
for and hey nony no in an old horse head.
7
And where now shall wee brew our Ale?
but euen within one Walnut shale:
And also where shall we our dinner make,
but euen vpon a galde Horse backe.
8
For there wee shall haue good companie,
with humbling and bumbling and much melody:
When ended was this wedding day
the Bee hee tooke his flye away.,
9
And laid her downe vpon the Marsh,
betweene one Marigold and one long grasse▪
And there they begot good master G [...]at,
and made him the heire of all, that's flat.

4

TREBLE.

[...]

BY Lands-dale hey ho, by mery Lands- dale, there [...] dwelt a iolly Miller, and a very good old man was hee, was he, hey, ho: [...] he had, he had, and a sonne a▪ he had, he had and a sonne.

TENOR.

[...]

BY Lands-dale hey ho, by mery Lands-dale hey ho, was he, [...] hey ho, he had, he had and a sonne a. (repeat)

BASSVS.

[...]

BY Lands-dale hey ho, by mery Lands- dale, hey ho, (repeat) [...] there dwelt a iolly miller, and a very good old man was he, hey ho, he [...] had, he had and a sonne a, he had, (repeat) he had, he had:

2
He had, he had and a sonne a, (repeat)
men called him Renold,
and mickle of his might was he, was he, hey ho.
3
And from his father a wode a, (repeat)
his fortune for to seeke,
from mery Landsdale wode he, wode he, hey ho.
4
His father would him seeke a, (repeat)
and found him fast a sleepe.
among the leaues greene was he, was he, hey ho.
5
He tooke, he tooke him vp a, (repeat)
all by the lilly white hand,
and set him on his feet, and bad him stand, hey ho.
6
He gaue to him a benbow, (repeat)
made all of a trusty tree,
and Arrowes in his hand and bad him let them flee.
7
And shootè was that that a did a, (repeat)
some say he shot a mile,
but halfe a mile and more was it was it, hey ho.
8
And at the halfe miles end, (repeat)
there stood an armed man,
this childe he shot him through, and through, and through, hey hoy.
9
His beard was all on a white a, (repeat)
as white as Whale is bone,
his eyes they were as cleare, as Christall stone, hey ho▪
10
And there of him they made (repeat)
good yeoman Robin hood,
[...]

5

TREBLE.

Another way

[...] BY Landsdale, &c.

TENOR.

[...] BY Landsdale, &c.

BASSVS.

[...] BY Landsdale hey ho, by mery Lands-dale hey ho, (repeat) there dwelt a iolly Miller, and a good old man was he, was he, hey ho: he had, he had and a sonne a. (repeat)

2
He had, he had and a sonne a, (repeat)
men called him Renold,
and mickle of his might was he, was he, hey ho.
3
And from his father a wode a, (repeat)
his fortune for to seeke,
from mery Landsdale wode he, wode he, hey ho.
4
His father would him seeke a, (repeat)
and found him fast a sleepe.
among the leaues greene was he, was he, hey ho.
5
He tooke, he tooke him vp a, (repeat)
all by the lilly white hand,
and set him on his feet, and bad him stand, hey ho.
6
He gaue to him a benbow, (repeat)
made all of a trusty tree,
and Arrowes in his hand and bad him let them flee.
7
And shoote was that that a did a, (repeat)
some say he shot a mile,
but halfe a mile and more was it was it, hey ho.
8
And at the halfe miles end, (repeat)
there stood an armed man,
this childe he shot him through, and through, and through, hey hoy.
9
His beard was all on a white a, (repeat)
as white as Whale is bone,
his eyes they were as cleare, as Christall stone, hey ho▪
10
And there of him they made (repeat)
good yeoman Robin hood,
Scarlet, and little Iohn, and little Iohn, hey ho.

7

TREBLE.

[...] OF all the birds that e╌uer I see, the Owle is the fayrest For all the day long she sits in a tree, and when the night comes in her de▪gree, Te whow, sir knaue to thou, this song is well sung, away flies she, I make you a vow, and he is a knaue that drinketh now. Nose, nose, nose, nose, and who gaue thee that iolly red▪nese? Nutmegs and cloues, and that gaue thee thy iolly red nose. Nose, nose:

TENOR.

[...] OF all the birds that e-uer I see, the Owle is the fayrest For all the day long she sits in a tree, and when the night comes in her de╌gree, Te whit, to whom drinks thou. this song is a╌way flies she, [Page] [...] well sung, I make you a vow, and he is a knaue that drinketh now, Nose, [...] nose, nose, nose, and who gaue mee this iolly red nose? Sinamont, & Ginger, [...] Nutmegs and Cloues, and that gaue me my iolly red nose. Nose, nose:

BASSVS.

[...] OF all the Birds that euer I see, the Owle is the fay╌rest For all the day long she sits in a tree, and when the night comes in her degree. Te whit te whow, (repeat) this song is away flies she. well song I make you a vow, and hee is a knaue that drincketh now. Nose, Nose, Nose, nose, and who gaue thee that iolly red Nose? Nutmegs and cloues, and that gaue thee thy iolly red Nose. Nose,

Here endeth the Freemens Songs.

Rounds or Catches of 3. Voices.

8

[...] LOrd heare the poore that cry, the which doe liue in paine and miserie, Sonne of God shew some pittie.

9

[...] BRowning Madame, browning Madame, so merrily wee sing browning Madame, The fayrest flower in garden greene, is in my loues breast full comely seene, And with all others compare she can, therefore now let vs sing Browning Madame.

10

[...] HOlde thy peace, and I pree thee hold thy peace thou knaue, thouthird. knaue: holdsecond. thy peace thou knaue.

11

[...] GLad am I, glad am I, my mother is gone to Henly, shut the doore and spare not, doe thy worst I care not. If I dye vpon the same, bury, bury, bury me a gods name.

12

[...] MArgerie serue well the blacke Sow all in a mistie Morning, Come to thy dinner Sow come, come, come, or else thou shalt haue neuer a crumme.

13

[...] THree blinde Mice, three blinde Mice, Dame Iulian, Dame Iulian, the Miller and his merry olde Wife, shee scrapte her tripe li [...]ke thou the knife.

14

[...] THe great bels of Oesney they ring, they jing, they ring, they jing, the Tenor of them goeth mer▪ rily.

15

[...] MAult's come downe, mault's come downe from an old Ang [...]ll to a French crown, There's neuer a maide in all this towne, but well she knowes that mault's come downe, The greatest drunkards in this towne, are ver [...] glad that mault's come downe.

Here endeth the three parts.

Freemens Songs of▪ 4. Voices.

16

MEDIVS.

[...] MArtin: Fie man, fie, who's the foole now? Thou hast well drunken man, who's the foole now?

TENOR.

[...] MArtin: Fie man, fie, who's the foole now? Thou hast wel drunken man, who's the foole now?

BASSVS.

[...] MArtin: Fie man, fie, who's the foole now? Thou hast well drunken man, who's the foole now?

TREBLE.

The singing part.

[...] MArtin said to his man fie man, fie, O Martin said to his man who's the foole now? Martin said to his man fill thou the cup and I the can, thou hast well drunken man, who's the foole now.

2
I see a sheepe shering corne,
Fie man, fie:
I see a sheepe shearing corne,
Who's the foole now?
I see a sheepe shearing corne,
And a coucko [...]d blow his horne,
Thou hast well drunken man,
Who's the foole now?
3
I see a man in the Moone,
Fie man, fie:
I see a man in the Moone,
Who's the foole now?
I see a man in the Moone,
Clowting of Saint Peters shoone,
Thou hast well, &c.
4
I see a hare chase a hound,
Fie man, fie:
I see a hare chase a hound▪
who's the foole now?
I see a hare chase a hound,
Twenty mile aboue the ground,
Thou hast well drunken man,
Who's the foole now?
5
I see a goose ring a hog,
Fie man, fie:
I see a goose ring a hog,
Who's the foole now?
I see a goose ring a hog,
And a snayle that did bit [...] ▪a dog▪
Thou-hast well, &c.
6
I see a mouse catch the cat,
Fie man, fie:
I see a mouse catch the cat,
Who's the foole now?
I see a mouse catch the cat,
And the cheese to eate the rat,
Thou hast well drunken man,
Who's the foole now?

17

TREBLE

[...] GIue vs once a drinke, for and the black bole, sing gentle Butler bal╌la moy. for and the black bole, sing gentle Butler balla moy. For:

MEDIVS.

[...] GIue vs once a drinke for and the black bole, sing gentle Butler balla moy: For and the black bole, sing gentle Butler bal╌la moy For:

TENOR.

[...] GIue vs once a drinke for and the black bole, sing gentle Butler bal­la moy: For and the black bole, sing gentle Butler balla moy For:

BASSVS.

Chorus. GIue [...] vs once a drinke for and the black bole, sing gentle [...] butler balla moy, for & the black bole, sing gentle butler balla moy Verse. Giue vs once a [...] drinke for and the pint pot, sing gentle Butler balla moy, the pint pot. For and the

Giue vs once a drincke for and the quart pot,
sing gentle Butler balla moy:
The quart pot, the pint pot,
for and the black bole. &c.
Giue vs once a drinck for and the pottle pot,
sing gentle Butler balla moy:
The pottle pot, the quart pot, the pint pot,
for and the blacke bole, &c.
Giue vs once a drincke for and the gallon pot,
sing gentle Butler balla moy:
The gallon pot, the pottle pot, the quart pot, the pint pot,
for and the blacke bole, &c.
Giue vs once a drinke for and the verkin,
sing gentle Butler balla moy:
The verkin, the gallon pot, the pottle pot, the quart pot, the pint pot,
for and the blacke bole, &c.
Giue vs: kilderkin, &c. Giue vs: barrell, &c. Giue vs: hogshead, &c.
Giue vs: Pipe, &c. Giue vs: Butt, &c. Giue vs: the Tunne, &c.

18

MEDIVS.

[...] WHo liueth so merry, &c. AndChorus. euer she singeth as I can guesse, will you buy a╌ny sand, any sand Mistres?

TENOR.

[...] WHo liueth? AndChorus. euer she singeth as I can guesse, will ye buy any sand, any sand Mi╌stresse?

BASSVS

[...] WHo liueth? AndChorus. euer she singeth as I can guesse, will ye buy any sand, any sand Mistresse?

TREBLE.

The singing part.

Uerse. [...] WHo liueth so merry in all this land, as doth the poore [...] widdow that selleth the sand? Andchorus. euer shee singeth as I can guesse, [...] will you buy any sand, any sand Mistris?

Ver. 2 The Broom-man maketh his liuing most sweet,
with carrying of broomes from street to street:
Cho. Who would desire a pleasanter thing,
then all the day long to doe nothing but sing
Ver. 3 The Chimney-sweeper all the long day,
he singeth and sweepeth the soote away:
Ch. Yet when he comes home although he beweary,
with his sweet wife he maketh full merry.
Ver. 4 The Cobbler he sits cobling till noone,
and cobbleth his shooes till they be done?
Cho. Yet doth he not feare, and so doth say,
for he knows his worke will soone decay.
Ver. 5 The Marchant man doth saile on the seas,
and lye on the ship-board with little ease:
Cho. Alwayes in doubt the rocke is neare,
how can he be merry and make good cheare?
Ver. 6 The Husband-man all day goeth to plow,
and when he comes home he scrueth his sow:
Cho. He moyleth and toyleth all the long yeare,
how can he be merry and make good cheare?
Ve. 7 The Seruingman waiteth frō street to street,
with blowing his nailes and beating his feet:
Cho. And serueth for forty shillings a yeare,
that tis impossible to make good cheare.
8 Who liueth so merry and maketh such sport,
as those that be of thy poorest sort?
Cho. The poorest sort wheresoeuer they be,
they gather together by one, two, and three.
Bis. 9 And euery man will spend his penny,
what makes such a shot among a great many?
FINIS.

19

TREBLE.

[...] BY a banke as I lay, lay, lay, lay, lay, Musing on a thing that was past and gone hey ho, In the merry month of May, O some what before the day, Me thought I heard at the last, the last, the last. O the:

MEDIVS.

[...] BY a bancke as I lay, (repeat) lay, Musing on a thing that was past and gone hey ho, In the merry month of May, O some what before the day, Me thought I heard at the last, the last, the last. O the:

TENOR.

[...] BY a banck as I lay, lay, lay, lay, lay, musing on a thing that was past and gone, hey ho, In the merry month of May, O some what before the day, Me thought I heard at the last, the last, the last. O the:

BASSVS.

BY a bancke as I lay, lay, lay, lay, lay, lay, musing on a thing that [...] was past and gone, hey ho, In the merry month of May, O some what before [...] the day, Me thought I heard at the last, the last, the last. O the:

2
O the gentle Nightingale, (repeat)
the Lady and mistres of all Musicke,
She sits downe euer in the dale,
singing with her notes small,
Quauering them wonderfull thicke. (repeat)
O for Ioy my spirits were quicke,
to heare the sweet Bird how merely she
And said good Lord defend, (could sing,
England with thy most holy hand,
And saue Noble Iames our King.

21

TREBLE.

Sing softly.

[...] WIlly, hey trolly: Chorus. hey trolly, (repeat) lo ly ly, lolyly (repeat) hey ho tro lo lo ly ly ly lo.

Sing softly. MEDIVS.

[...] WIlly: hey ho, tro lo ly lo ly lo, (repeat) Chorus. hey ho troly (repeat) lolyly, lolyly (repeat) hey ho trololylolylylo.

Sing softly. BASSVS.

[...] Chorus. WIlly: hey trolly lo, hey trolly (repeat) trolly ly, lo ly ly lo, hey. (repeat)

TENOR.

The singing part.

[...] WIlly prethe goe to bed, for thou wilt haue a drowsie head, Tomorrow we must a hunting, and betimes be stirring, With a hey trolly loly, loly, loly, &c. hey ho tro lo lo lo ly ly lo.

2
It is like to be fayre weather,
couple vp all thy hounds together:
Couple Iolly with little Iolly,
couple Trole with old Trolly.
With a hey tro ly lo lo ly,
tro ly lo ly lo.
3
Couple Finch with black Trole,
couple Chaunter with Iumbole:
Let beauty goe at liberty,
for she doth know her duty.
With a hey, &c.
4
Let Merry goe loose it makes no matter,
for Cleanly sometimes she will clatter,
And yet I am sure she will not stray,
but keepe with vs still, all the day.
With a hey, &c.
5
With O masters and wot you where,
this other day I start a Hare?
On what call hill vpon the knole,
[...]nd there she started before Trole.
With a hey, &c.
6
And downe she went the common dale,
with all the hounds at her taile:
With yeaffe a yaffe, yeaffe a yaffe,
hey Trol, hey Chaunter, hey Iumbole,
With a hey, &c.
7
See how Chooper chopps it in,
and so doth Gallant now begin:
Looke how Trol begins to tattle,
tarry a while yee shall heare him prattle.
With a hey, &c.
8
For Beauty begins to wag her tayle,
of Cleanlies helpe we shall not faile:
And Chaunter opens very well:
but Merry she doth beare the bell.
With a hey, &c.
9
Goe prick the path, and downe the laune,
she vseth still her old traine:
She is gone to what call wood,
Where we are like to doe no good.
With hey tro ly lo ly lo,
tro ly lo &c.

MELISMATA. MVSICALL PHANSIES.

FITTING THE COVRT, CITIE, and COVNTREY HVMOVRS.

To 3, 4, and 5. Voyces.

To all delightfull, except to the Spitefull,
To none offensiue, except to the Pensiue.

THOV SHALT LABOR FOR PEACE PLEN­TIE

LONDON, Printed by William Stansby for Thomas Adams. 1611.

TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVLL THE true fauorers of Musicke, and all vertue Mr. Thomas Rauenscroft, and Mr. William Rauenscroft Esquires.

RIght Worshipfull, I haue beene so much obliged to the courteous regard you haue alwaies had of mee, that if I should not owe vnto you my best endeauors; I should much contrary your kindnesses, and deseruedly incurre the shame of ingratitude▪ Let it therefore stand with your good likings, that by these harmelesse Musicall Phansies, I may shew vnto the world, and hereby confesse, how much I am bound vnto [Page] you; and when it shall further seeme good to your Worships to command me, I will not haue ability or life that shall not be at your seruice.

Your Worships affectio­nate kinseman, T. R.

TO THE NOBLEST OF THE COVRT, LIBE­RALLEST OF THE COVN­TREY, and freest of the CITIE.

YOv may well per­ceiue by the much va­riety herein composed, that my desire is to giue contentment in this kinde of Musicke to the skilfull, and most iudicious of all sortes And being little or much beholding to some of each rancke, I studie and striue to please you in your owne elements. Now if my paines proue your pleasures, you shall still keepe mee in paines to please you. And so I rest yours.

TR. B. M.

❧ A TABLE OF ALL The Songs contained in this BOOKE.

COVRT VARIETIES.
  • 1. CAust thou Loue. 4. Voc.
  • 2. Now flowres. 4. Voc.
  • 3. Haste, haste, post haste. 5. Voc.
  • 4. Will yee loue me. 5. Voc.
  • 5. Long haue I beene perplext. 3. Voc.
  • 6. Heigh ho, away the Mare. 4. Voc.
CITIE ROVNDS.
  • 7. BRoomes for old shooes. 4. Voc.
  • 8. I pray good Mother. 3. Voc.
  • 9. My mistris will not be cōtent. 4. Voc.
  • 10. I lay with an old man. 4. Voc.
CITIE CONCEITS.
  • 11. WHere are you faire Maides. 5. Voc.
  • 12. My master is sowise. 4. Voc.
  • 13. Maides to bed. 4. Voc.
  • 14. Oyes, Oyes. 4. Voc.
COVNTRY ROVNDS.
  • 15. HE that will an Ale-house keepe. 3. Voc.
  • 16. And seest thou my Cow. 3. Voc.
  • 17. Kit and Tom chida. 4. Voc.
  • 18. Dery ding, ding, dasson. 3. Voc.
  • 19. As I went by the way. 5. Voc.
COVNTRY PASTIMES.
  • 20. THere were three Rauens. 4. Voc.
  • 21. It was the Frogge in the well. 4. Voc.
  • 22. I haue house and land in Kent. 4. Voc.
  • 23. Remember O thou man. 4. Voc.
FINIS.

COVRT VARIETIES.

¶ The Courtiers good Morrow to his MISTRIS.
1.

4. Voc.

Medius.

[...] CAnst thou loue, and lie alone? Loue is so, loue is so dis­graced: pleasure is best, wherein is rest in a heart embraced. Rise, rise, rise, day light doe not burne out, Bels doe ring and Birdes doe sing, onely I that mourne out. .ij.

Morning starre doth now appeare,
Wind is husht, and skies cleare:
Come come away, come come away,
Canst thou loue and burne out day?
Rise, rise, rise, rise,
Day-light doe not burne out,
Bels doe ring,
Birds doe sing,
Onely I that mourne out.

TREBLE.

[...] Rise, rise, rise, day light doe not burne out, Bels do ring, and Birds doe sing, onely I that mourne out.

TENOR.

[...] Rise, rise, day light do nor burne out, Bels do ring, and Birds doe sing, one╌ly I that mourne out.

BASSVS.

[...] Rise, rise, rise, day light doe not burne out, Bels doe ring, and Birds doe sing, onely I that mourne out.

¶ The Crowning of BELPHEBE.
2.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

[...] NOw flowres your odours breath, and all. .ij. the ayre perfume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with, and with, no stormes consume, hayle, hayle, and wel╌come, wel╌come her, Thou glorie, .ij. Thou glorie of our greene, receiue this flowrie Spheare, .ij. and bee and bee the Shepheards Queene, and

TREBLE.

[...] NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ij. the ayre per­fume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with no stormes no stormes consume.

[Page] [...] [...] and

MEDIVS.

[...] NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ii. the ayre per­fume, grow in this honor'd wreath, and with, and with, no stormes con­sume. and

BASSVS.

[...] NOw flowres your odours breath, and all, .ii. the ayre perfume, grow in his honor'd wreath, and with no stormes consume, and

Tenor.

[...]

.ij. kneele, O kneele, and doe her homage now, O

[...]

now, that cals our hearts like fate, Now rise, .ij. .ij. your humble

[...]

bosomes bow, O bow, and leade her, .ij. and leade, and leade

[...]

her to her state.

TREBLE.

[...]

be, .ii. the shepheards Queene.

[...]

[...]

[...]

MEDIVS.

[...]

be, .ii. the shepheards Queene.

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

BASSVS.

[...]

be, and be the shepheards Queene.

[...]

[...]

¶ Mercuries Song, the messengers of the GODS.
3.

5. Voc.

Medius.

[...] HAste, haste, post haste, make haste and

[...]

away; the tide tarieth no man, it makes no delay. Trudge, trudge

[...]

for thy life; for vertue must flie: these iourneyes are rife with thee,

[...]

with the poore Mercurie.

BASSVS.

[...]

[...]

TREBLE.

H [...]

Aste, haste.

[...]

[...]

QVINTVS.

H [...]

Aste, haste.

[...]

TENOR.

H [...]

Aste, Haste.

[...]

¶ The Courtiers Courtship to his Mistris.
4.

5. Voc.

Quintus.

[...] WIll yee loue me Lady sweete, you are young and loue is

[...]

meete, out alas, out alas, alas, who then will sport thee, wanton yet in the spring,

[...]

Loue is a pretie thing, Loue is a pretie thing, Kisse sweete, is loue is doe proue,

[...]

kind to them that woe.

BASSVS.

[...]

[...]

[...]

¶ The Mistris to the Courtier.

5. VOC.

MEDIVS.

[...]

FIe away, fie away, fie, fie, fie, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, not I,

[...]

Ile liue a maide till I be fortie, Fie away, fie away, fie, fie, fie, no, no,

[...]

no, not I, no, .ij. no, no, no, no, not I.

TREBLE.

[...]

[...]

[...]

TENOR.

[...]

[...]

[...]

¶ A Song of Pages, Cashiered from their Masters.
5.

3. Voc.

Treble.

[...] LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I lothed, now may

[...]

we sing, hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the

[...]

heart to depart, that I must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will

[...]

I giue while I liue, .ij. for ioye, for ioye, that I leaue him, for .ij. gone may

[...]

hee be downe. trole we the Boles, lets in pretie soules, to carrouse

[...]

with the wenches, to .ij. with the wenches. .ij. with the wenches.

MEDIVS.

[...]

LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I loathed, now may we

[...]

sing: hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the heart to

[...]

depart, that we must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will I giue

[Page] [...]

while I liue for ioye that I leaue him, for .ij. downe, neere more that

[...]

we see downe, trole we the boles, lets in pretie soules to carrouse with the

[...]

wenches, to carrouse, to .ij. with the wenches, to carrouse with the wenches.

BASSVS.

[...]

LOng haue we bin perplext and vext, with a life that I loathed, now may we

[...]

sing, hay ding, a ding, a ding, and leaue to lament any longer, glad to the heart

[...]

to depart that I must bid adew to my master, thankes to the heauens will I giue,

[...]

while I liue for ioye, for ioye, that I leaue him, for ioye, downe, .ij.

[...]

nor againe to come at vs, trole we the Boles, lets in prety souls to car­

[...]

rouse with the wenches, to .ij. to .ij. to .ij. with the wenches, to carrouse with

[...]

the wenches.

¶ Seruants out of Seruice are going to the Citie to looke for new.
6

4. VOC.

TREBLE.

[...] HEigh ho, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, aside all care,

[...]

if any man be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, a lustie crew, that are

[...]

enforced to crie, anew Master, anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master, a

[...]

new, Hay now, .ij. weele take small paines, and yet

[...]

will thriue, hay now.

BASSVS.

[...]

HEigh hoe, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, if any man be

[...]

desposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, that are enforced to crie,

[...]

anew Master, anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master anew, Hey now

[...]

weele cut their throates that

[...]

are aliue.

MEDIVS.

[...]

HEigh hoe, away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, .ij. let aside ail

[...]

care, if any man be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, Loe, .ij. that

[...]

are enforced to trie, anew Master anew, .ij. .ij. Master, anew Master

[...]

anew. We neither minde to begge nor starue.

[...]

TENOR.

[...]

HEigh hoe away the Mare, let vs set aside all care, .ij. if any man

[...]

be disposed to trie, Loe here comes a lustie crew, a lustie crew, that are enfor­

[...]

ced to crie, anew Master anew, .ij. .ij. anew Master anew.

[...]

We will haue more then we

[...]

deserue.

❧ CITIE ROVNDS.

[...] BRoomes for old Shooes, Pouchrings, Bootes and Buskings, will

[...]

yee buy a - ny new Broome? New Oysters, new Oysters, New new Cockels,

[...]

Cockels nye, Fresh Herrings: Will yee buy any straw? Hay yee any Kitchin-stuffe

[...]

Maides? Pippins fiue, Cherrie ripe, ripe, ripe, Cherrie ripe, ripe, ripe. Hay any

[...]

Wood to cleaue? Giue eare to the clocke, beware your locke, your fire and your

[...]

light, and God giue you good [...] a Clocke.

8.

3. VOC.

[...] I Pray you good Mother, giue me leaue to play with little Iohn,

[...]

to make his Bed, and combe his head, and come againe anon, or else beate me as

[...]

you thinke good, for I loue Iohn alone.

9.

3. VOC.

[...] MY Mistris will not be content, to take a Iest, a Iest, a Iest, as Chaucer.

[...]

meant, but following stil the womans fashion; allowes it, allowes it, for the new

[...]

translation, for with the word she would not dispence, and yet, and yet, and yet,

[...]

and yet I know the loues the fence.

10.

4. VOC

[...] I Lay with an old man all the night, I turned to him and he to me,

[...]

hee could not doe so well as hee might, but hee would faine, but it would

[...]

not bee.

❧ CITIE CONCEITES.

¶ The Painters Song of London.
11.

5. Voc.

Medius.

[...] WHere are you faire maides, that haue neede of our trades?

[...]

Ile sell you a rare confection: will yee haue your faces spread, either with white

[...]

or red? will yee buy any, will yee buy any faire complection?

BASSVS.

[...]

VVHere are you.

[...]

2.
My drugges are no dregges,
For I haue whites of Egges,
Made in a rare confection.
Red Leather and S [...]rflet water,
Scarlet colour or Sta [...]s-aker,
Will yee buy any faire complection?

TREBLE.

[...]

VVHere are you.

[...]

[...]

QVINTVS.

[...]

VVHere are you.

[...]

[...]

TENOR.

[...]

VVHere are you.

[...]

[...]

¶ The Scriueners seruants Song of Holborne.
12.

4. Voc.

Medius.

[...] MY master is so wise, so wise, that hee's proceeded wittall, my

[...]

Mistris is a foole, a foole, and yet tis the most get-all. Let the Vsurer cram him in

[...]

interest that excell, their pits, their pits enough to damme him before he goes

[...]

to hell. In Holborne some: In Fleetestreete some: where care he come, there

[...]

some, there some, Where eare, .ij. where, .ij. theirs some, theirs some.

TREBLE.

M [...]

Y Master is so wise.

[...]

[...]

[Page] [...]

TENOR.

M [...]

Y Master is so wise.

[...]

[...]

[...]

BASSVS.

M [...]

Y Master is so wise.

[...]

[...]

[...]

¶ A Belmans Song.
13.

4. Voc.

Tenor.

[...] MAides to bed, and couer coale, let the Mouse .ij.

[...]

Out of her hole: Crickets, Crickets in the Chimney sing, whil'st the little Bell,

[...]

the little Bell doth ring. If fast asleepe, who can tell when the Clapper, Clapper

[...]

hits the Bell.

TREBLE.

[...]

[...]

[...]

MEDIVS.

[...]

[...]

BASSVS.

[...]

[...]

[...] [Page] [...]

gaine. O yes, O yes, if note or line, or word be here let fall, that giues, .ij.

[...]

that giues to any man the taste of Gall, Let him come to the Cryer, [...]et .ij.

[...]

I will lay my lips to a fat shrouing Hen, that none, .ij. of these, of these will be had

[...]

againe, for this I say and likewise I protest, no arrowes here at shot at any brest, but

[...]

all are well come, are .ij. to my musicke feast: But all are wel-come, .ij.

[...]

But .ij. to my musicke feast, wel-come, .ij. vnto my musicke feast.

TREBLE.

4. VOC.

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

But all are [...]l▪come, are .ij. to my musicke feast, .ij.

TENOR.

7. VOC.

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

But all are wel-come,

[...]

are .ij. but al are .ij. vnto my musick feast, .ij. vnto .ij. my musick feast.

BASSVS.

4. VOC.

[...]

[...]

[...]

[...]

But all are wel-come, are .ij. are wel-come, but .ij▪

[...]

[...]

COVNTRY ROVNDS.

15.

3. VOC.

[...] HE that will an Ale-house keepe, must haue three things in store,

[...]

a Chamber and a feather Bed, a Chimney and a hey no-ny no-ny, hay no-ny

[...]

no-ny, hey nony no, hey nony no, hey nony no.

16.

3. VOC.

[...] ANd seest thou my Cow to day Fowler, and seest .ij.

[...]

the Bels ring into Mattens, the Bels .ij. Bim bome, bim bome,

[...]

a bome, bome, bim bome, bim bome, a bome bome.

17.

4. VOC▪

[...] KIt and Tom chid a, Tom and Kit chid, Kit chid Tom, Tom chid

[...]

Kit, Kit and Tom chid a.

18.

3 VOC.

[...] DErrie ding, ding, ding Dasson, I am Iohn Cheston, we weeddon

[...]

we wodden, we weedon, we wodden, Bim bom, bim bom, bim bom, bim bom.

19.

5. VOC.

[...] AS I went by the way, holom, trolum, there met I by the way, ha­

[...]

zom▪ gazom, and I had my little companion: I would a catcht, hazom, gazom,

[...]

and hunge him vpon holum trolum.

22.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] THere were three Rauens sat on a tree, Downe a downe, hay down, hay downe. There were three Rauens sat on a tree, with a downe. There were three Rauens sat on a tree, they were as blacke as they might be, with a downe derrie, derrie, derrie, downe, downe.

The one of them said to his mate,
down adowne hey downe,
2
The one of them said to his mate,
with adowne:
The one of them said to his mate
Where shall we our breakefast take?
with adowne dery downe.
Downe in yonder greene field,
downe adowne hey downe,
3
Downe in yonder greene field,
with adowne.
Downe in yonder greene field
There lies a Knight slain vnder his shield,
with a downe.
His hounds they lie downe at his feete,
downe adowne hey downe.
4
His hounds they lie downe at his feete,
with adowne.
His hounds they lie downe at his feete
So well they can their Master keepe,
with adowne.
His Haukes they flie so eagerly
downe adowne.
5
His Haukes they flie so eagerly
with adowne.
His Haukes they flie so eagerly,
There's no fowle dare him come nie.
with a downe.
Downe there comes a fallow Doe,
downe adowne.
6
Downe there comes a fallow Doe
with a downe.
Downe there comes a fallow Doe.
As great with yong as she might goe.
with adowne.
She lift vp his bloudy hed,
downe adowne.

7 She lift vp his bloudy hed,

MEDIVS.

[...] Downe a downe, hay downe, with a downe with a downe, hey derrie derrie, downe, downe, downe.

TENOR.

[...] Downe hey downe, hey downe, hey downe. with a downe, with a downe derrie, derrie downe a downe.

BASSVS.

[...] Downe hey downe, hey downe, with a downe, with hey downe downe, derrie downe downe.

with a downe.
She lift vp his bloudy hed,
And kist his wounds that were so red
with a downe.
8
She got him vp vpon her backe,
downe adowne.
She got him vp vpon her backe,
with adowne.
She got him vp vpon her backe,
And carried him to earthen lake,
with adowne downe.
9
She buried him before the prim [...]
downe adowne.
She buried him before the prime,
with adowne.
She buried him before the prime,
She was dead her selfe ere euen-song time
with adowne.
10
God send euery gentleman
downe adowne.
God send euery gentleman
with adowne.
God send euery gentleman
Such haukes, such hounds, and
with adowne.

¶ The Marriage of the Frogge and the MOVSE.
21.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] IT was the Frogge in the well, Humble-dum, humble-dum. And the merrie Mouse in the Mill, tweedle, tweedle twino.

2
The Frogge▪would a woing ride,
humble dum humble dum
Sword and buckler by his side,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
3
When he was vpon his high horse set,
humble dum, humble dum
His boots they shone as blacke as iet▪
tweedle, tweedle twino.
4
When she came to the merry mill pin,
humble dum, humble dum
Lady Mouse beene you within?
tweedle, tweedle twino.
5
Then came out the dusty Mouse,
humble dum, humble dum
I am Lady of this house,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
6
Ha [...]t thou any minde of me?
humble dum, humble dum
I haue [...] ne great minde of thee,
tweedle▪ tweedle twino.
7
Who shall this marriage make?
humble dum, humble dum,
Our Lord which is the rat,
tweedle▪ tweedle twino.
8
What shall we haue to our supper?
humble dum, humble dum,
Three beanes in a pound of butter,
tweedle tweedle twino.
9
When supper they were at,
humble dum, humble dum
The Frog, the Mouse, and euen the Rat,
tweedle, tweedle twino:
10
Then came in gib our cat,
humble dum, humble dum,
And catcht the mouse euen by the backe,
tweedle, tweedle twino,
11
Then did they separate,
humble dum, humble dum,
And the frog leapt on the floore so flat,
tweedle, tweedle twino.
12
Then came in Dicke our Drake,
humble dum, humble dum,
And drew the frogge euen to the [...],
tweedle, tweedle twino.
13
The Rat run vp the w [...]ll,
humble dum, humble dum.
A goodly company, the di [...]ell goe with all
tweedle, tweedle twino.

MEDIVS.

[...] Humble-dum, humble-dum, tweedle, tweedle twino.

TENOR.

7. VOC.

[...] Humble-dum, humble-dum, tweedle, tweedle, twino.

BASSVS.

[...] Humble-dum, humble-dum, tweedle, tweedle twino.

[...]
[...]

¶ A Christmas Carroll.
23.

4. Voc.

Treble.

[...] REmember O thou man, O thou man. .ij. Remember O thou man thy time is spent, remember O thou man, how thou art dead and gone, and I did what I can, therefore repent.

Remember Adams fall
O thou man, O thou man,
2
Remember Adams fall
From heauen to hell:
Remember Adams fall
How we were condemned all
In hell perpetuall
there for to dwell.
Remember Gods goodnesse
O thou man, O thou man,
3
Remember Gods goodnesse
And his promise made.
Remember Gods goodnesse,
How he sent his sonne doubtlesse
Our sinnes for to redresse,
be not affraid.
4
The Angele all did sing,
O thou man, O thou man.
The Angels all did sing
Vpon the Shepheards hill.
The Angels all did singe
Praises to our heauenly King,
And peace to man liuing
with a good will.
5
The shepheards amazed was,
O thou man, O thou man.
The shepheards amazed was
To heare the Angels sing,
The shepheards amazed was
How it should come to passe
That Christ our Messias
should be our King.
6
To Bethlem did they goe,
O thou man, O thou man,
To Bethlem did they go
The shepheards three,
To Bethlem did they goe
To see where it were so [...],
Whether Christ were borne or n [...]
to set man free.
7
As the Angels before did say,
O thou man, O thou man,

MEDIVS.

[...] O thou man, O thou man. therefore repent.

TENOR.

[...] O thou man, O thou man, therefore repent.

[...].

[...] [...]hou man, [...]pent.

[...]s the Angels before did say,
So it came to passe,
As the Angels before did say,
They found a babe where [...] it [...]ay
[...] anger wrapt in hay,
[...] was.
[...]
In Bethlem he was borne,
O thou man, O thou man,
[...] Bethlem he was borne,
[...] [...] sake,
In Bethlem he was borne
For vs that were for lorne,
And therefore tooke no scorne
our flesh to take.
9
Giue thanks to God alway,
O thou man, O thou man,
Giue thanks to God alway
With heart most ioyfully,
Giue thankes to God alway,
For this our happy day,
Let all men sing and say
holy, holy.
FINIS.

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