MADRIGALES AND AYRES.

Of two, three, foure and fiue Voy­ces, with the continued Base, with TOCCATOS, SINFONIAS and RITTORNELLOS to them. After the manner of Con­sort Musique.

To be performed with the Harpese­chord, Lutes, Theorbos, Base Violl, two VIOLINS, or two VIOLS.

PUBLISHED By WALTER PORTER, one of the Gentlemen of his MAIESTIES ROYALL Chappell.

LONDON, Printed by William Stansby. 1632.

Cum Priuilegio.

TENOR

TO THE RIGHT HO­NORABLE IOHN LORD DIGBY of Sherburne, Earle of BRISTOW.

My singular good Lord:

REtreats from the World are settings forward for Heauen, And since it is now so rare a fashion, to haue many Associates: in such extrauagancies; me thinks their diuine Solitudes (or Desolations) should be pleased with presentment of diuine Consorts. God himselfe is entitled to Musique, it being euen his owne spirits most sweet inspiration. For which cause I haue employed my best endeuours to serue your Honor in your sweet Solitari­nesse (as Sir Philip Sydney cals the fruition of his owne) with my best abili­tie; As well to expresse my true gratitude, for all your rare goodnesse in my attendance in Spaine; here and euery where, wherein your right Noble Fa­mily hath bound me with most strong deseruings; As any hope in my vnwor­thinesse to please you worthily. In regard your good Lordship hath heretofore beene feasted with the Choice Musiques of Christendome; whose Accents still sounding in your eares, must with all power of desert keepe out the desertlesse assaults, or Assayes of Entrie made by mine owne deficiencies. But because men many times (in curious feare to seeme partiall in sentence of their owne labours) are as many times scarce indifferent and equall; If any worth all in these my solicitous watches could obtaine lest passe to your Honors delight. I should be more glad to be now so deceiued; then euer I was sure of good speed in my most happie and successefull Ambitions.

And so rest euer your good Lordships,
Walter Porter▪
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To the Practitioner.

GEntle Practitioner, I haue boldly aduentred to publish these Madrigals and Ayres; thou mayst blame my presumption, yet thou canst not, if there be any goodnesse in thee, blame my intention and end, which is no other, but by this meanes to be free from burying that poore talent which God hath giuen me; and by this little, to ac­knowledge his great goodnesse, and my will, if I had greater abilitie: and to expresse in some meane manner my thankfulnesse vnto my Noble and worthy Friends, which, if they like any of them, I shall acknowledge my selfe well satisfied for all my labour and charge; if they come to any of your hands, before you censure (which I know you will, and they that vnderstand least most sharply) let me intreate you to play and sing them true, according to my meaning, or heare them done so; not in steed of singing, to howle or bawle them, and scrape in steed o playing, and performe them falsly and say they are naught; In so doing if they were nere so good, you'd spoyle them; for I must tell you, a Composer, when he hath set a Song with all the art he can, hath done but halfe the worke, the other halfe is the well performing or ex­pressing that in singing or playing which he hath done in composing, howsoeuer I now must be content, yet thus I could wish it; I haue exprest in the part of the Harpsechord, the maior and minor sixses, by Flats and Sharpes, the figures I haue put ouer the head of euery Note as neere as I could, I haue made the singing Base also a thorow Base, in which you are not to sing but where there are words or this signe (repeat) of Repetition; in the Songs which are set forth with Diuision, where you find many Notes in a place after this manner [...] in rule or space, they are set to expresse the Trillo: I have made vse of these Ita­lian words, because they shall not mistake, and sing them, if they were expressed in English, being mixed amongst the other wordes, Tace which is, that the Voyces or Instruments, are to be silent, or hold their peace, till such or such things be performed, also the word forte, which is strong or loud, I haue set before most of the Songs, Toccatos, Sinfonias, and Rittornellos, which besides the delight and varietie they beget, they are good for the respiration of the Voyce, for which end they are vsed; Thus much I thought good to certifie thee; what shall be wanting as through Bases, for the other Instruments, which is to be vsed to make vp the body of Musicke, according as I haue set downe, thou must take a little paines to write out, as I haue taken a great deale to make them, and to haue them printed, and when thou hast done, let a little Charitie be in a part of thy censure, And I shall striue, if this haue but indifferent acceptation, to doe something for thee more vsefull, till which time and euer,

I rest thine in all loue,
Walter Porter.

I.

Of 5. Voyces.

Cho:

[...] O Let your Songs be of him and prayse him, And prayse him, and let your talking bee of all (repeat) his wondrous Vers. workes, of all his wondrous workes, be of all (repeat) workes. Remember the marueilous workes that hee hath done, his wonders and Iudgements of his mouth, And forget not all his benefits, And (repeat) which forgiueth all thy sinnes, Cho: And healeth all thy In╌fir╌mi╌ties, And gathereth thee (repeat) and gathereth thee out of the land, And (repeat) land, from the East and from the West, from the North and from the South, and from the South, And saueth thy life, And (repeat) from destruction, And crowneth thee with mercie and louing kind­nesse, And (repeat) with mercie and louing kindnesse▪

I.

Of 5. Voyces.

Vers.

[...] O Prayse O prayse the Lord, Yee that excell in strength, yee that fulfill yee (repeat) his Commandements, vn╌to the voyce of his word, And hearken vnto the voyce the voyce of his word,

Cho: [...] O speake good of the Lord, O (repeat) O (repeat) of the Lord, All yee workes of his, In all pla╌ces of his Dominions, In (repeat) Dominions, prayse thou the Lord, whilst I liue will I prayse the Lord, O my Soule whilst I (repeat) whilst I liue will I prayse the Lord.

II.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] HEther we come in╌to this world of woe, And feeling to what end wee come, wee crie, And (repeat) And (repeat) wee come wee crye, I'th morning of our age like flowers wee blow, like flowers wee blow wee blow, And like Gods figures seeme too good too good to die, But let afflictions touch vs and like clay, wee fall to what vvee are vvee are, vvee (repeat) vvee (repeat) vve (repeat) to vvhat vvee are vvee fall to vvhat vvee are and end the day.

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III.

Of 4. Voyces.

Tace: Rittornello:

[...] HEe that loues a Rosie cheeke or a Corrall lip admires, or from starre like eyes doth seeke doth seeke, fewell to mainetaine his fires.

Cho: Tace:

As old Time: Once Sung and once Playde.

Tace: Ritornell: And so all ouer as afore.

But a smoth and stedfast mind,
Gentle thoughts and calme desires:
Hearts with equall loue combind,
Kindlesse neuer dying fires.

Cho: Where these are not. Tacet:

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IIII.

Of 4. Voyces.

[...] SLeepe all my Ioyes, And onely sorrow wake, let mirth to mourning pleasure yeelde to plaint, whilst I consume in sigh╌thing for her sake, whose losse to mind my heauie Soule makes faint, her loue my life, (repeat) her lacke my ling╌gring death, yee all my hopes are vanisht, as her breath.

Cho: [...] Al╌though shees dead, yet this from death (repeat) shee said, I al╌wayes al╌wayes liu'd and dyed a perfect maide.

V.

Of 3. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] SItting once rapt with delight, In my say╌rest mystresse sight, I tooke plasure to compare her eyes whitnesse to the ayre, I tooke pleasure to com­pare her eyes whitnes to the ayre, That which compast in the ball, I did pu╌rest water. pu╌rest water call, And the prettie prettie inward round, I stil'd earth but O I found while some part I did desire for to liken vn╌to fire, for to liken vnto fire, ere I knew from whence it came I my selfe grew all a flame, I my selfe grew all a flame.

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VI.

Of 4. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia.

[...] LOoke on me: If by so happie meanes I dye, my fortune it aduances, aduances. It will reuiue mee being dead, reuiue me being dead, It will reuiue mee being dead, reuiue mee being dead, and I againe shall loue you, Thinke mee but faire but faire and I am faire, Thinke (repeat) Though all the world denie it.

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VII.

Of 2. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] TEll mee you starres that our af╌fec╌tions moue why made you mee, why (repeat) that cruell one that cruell cruell one to loue, why burnes my heart, why (repeat) her scorned sacrifice whose brest, is hard as Christall, cold as Ice, God of desire if all thy vo╌ta╌ries thou thus re╌pay, succession will growe wise, No sighes for insence, Thy rytes will bee despis'd, Thy (repeat) thy Al╌ter Brooke O, o, Or giue her my flame to melt that Snow which yet vn╌thaw'd does on her bosome growe, or make mee Ice, and with her Christall chaynes binde vp all loue, binde vp all loue with in my froten vaines, Binde (repeat) fro╌zen vaines.

VIII.

Of 5. Voyces.

[...] OLd Poets that in Cu╌pids hands put weapons first, A Chaine, But now hec finds in Celias either brow, In both her eyes in all her parts two bowes, Ten thousand fetters flames and darts, The graces and the carelesse snares, that in her looser looser beautie lyes, Sweet smiles and sweeter ayres that flye, like lightning from her lippes, And then, Tell me how many wayes loue murders murders men, Tell me how many wayes loue murders men.

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IX.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] THus sung Orphius to his strings when hee was almost slaine, whilst the winds soft murmuring, Answerd all his woes againe a╌gaine, Answerd all his woes againe, Answerd all his woes a╌gaine his woes a╌gaine, Ah deare Euridice Ah, Ah deare Euridice, the Eccoing winds reply'd, The Eccoing winds re╌plyed the Eccoing winds reply'd, Ah, Ah deare Euridice, Ah deare Euri╌dice, Ah deare Euridice the Eccoing winds reply'd.

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X.

Of 3. Voyces.

Tace Toccato:

[...] ENd now my life, with dayly paines afflicted, afflicted with (repeat) since that, for all that I haue wept and grie╌╌ued, for all that I haue wept & grieued my teares are not requited, and trustie faith not any whit belee╌ued, vniust rewards and scornes of her to borrow, vn╌iust rewards and scornes of her to borrow, onely that shee would credit shee would credir and beleeue mee.

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XI.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace: Farewell once my delight, &c.

[...] ILe plaine no more to Loue, no more to thee, but cease to mourne, where none will pittie mee will pit╌tie mee.

Tace: And though I hate, &c.

Cho:

And since my Loue and me you disauow,
As if to Loue you were to iniure you.

Tace: Ile mildly Temporise. &c.

Cho:

Nor farther seeke this onely shall suffice mee,
My Loue deseru'd you though you did denie mee.

Tace: Farewell, Farewell. &c.

Cho:

Be you belou'd of all and lastly shine,
As faire in Heauens eye as you are in mine.
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XII.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] COme Louers all to mee, Come (repeat) and cease your mour­ning, cease your mourning, Loue h'has no shafts to shoote no shafts to shoote, loue (repeat) to shoote no more brands burning, Loue (repeat) burning, Hee meanes my paines shall you from paines de╌liuer, For in my brest, For in my brest h'has empt'd (repeat) all his quiuer, Had he not beene a child, bin (repeat) had (repeat) hee would haue knowne, h'has lost a thousand (repeat) seruants, h'has (repeat) thousand seruants, h'has lost a thousand thousand seruants to kill one.

XIII.

Of 3. Voyces.

Tace: Rittornello:

[...] FRom vs, replyd the lips proceed those blisses, which louers reepe by kind words and sweete kisses, Then weept the eyes, Then (repeat) And from there springs did power of liquid oriental Pearle a shower, where at the lips mou'd with de­light and pleasure, Through a sweete smile (repeat) vnlockt their pearely treasure and bad loue Iudge loue Iudge, whether did adde more grace, weeping or smiling, Pearles to Caelias face.

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XIIII.

Of 4. Voyces.

[...] TEll mee where the beautie lyes, In my Mistresse or in my eyes Beautie doth from like╌ing grow, Bee shee fayrer whiter then Venus Doues or Leda's Swanes, Seene of all of none respected, Then let my Mistresse that I loue her, thinke her faire, (repeat) cause I approue her, Then let my Mistresse that I loue her thinke her faire, (repeat) cause I approue her▪ Ouer againe BEautie doth from like╌ing grow, Bee shee fayrer whiter then Uenus Doues or Ledais Swaines, Seene of all of none respected, Then let my Mystresse that I Loue her, Thinke her faire (repeat) faire cause I approue her.

XV.

Of 3. Voyces.

Tace: Toccato:

[...] LOue in thy youth faire maide bee wise, Olde Time will make thee colder, and though each morning new a╌rise, yet we each day grow older, Thou as heauen art faire and young, Thine eyes like Twine starres shining, but ere ano╌ther day be sprung, but (repeat) all these will bee declining, Then winter comes with all his feares, and all thy sweetes shall borrow, Too late then wilt thou shower thy teares, And I too late shall sorrow.

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XVI.

Of 5. Voyces.

First Part.

Tace: Sinfonia.

[...] HAyle Cloris hayle: Faire goddesse of the Spring, Faire (repeat) youth of the yeare, Of thee still will wee sing, youth of (repeat) Of thee still will wee sing, Hayle fayrest of Ioues seede, Hayle fayrest of Ioues seede only of thee of thee, onely of thee, That art earths Musicke shall our Musicke be, shall (repeat) be, That (repeat) ▪ be That art earths Musicke shall our Musicke bee, That (repeat) bee.

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XVII.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] TThe Ecco: He Birds the wandring winds that throwe through the ayre, The (repeat) The (repeat) The (repeat) dring winds that throw through the ayre, Lifes soueraigne balsome as they blow, Lifes (repeat) shall with the lawds, shall (repeat) and zeale and zeale begetting layes, breath'd by vs hourely in thy prayse, in thy prayse feast the ayre, breath'd (repeat) breath'd (repeat) feast the ayre, And teach the hils the hils, And (repeat) rockes and woods to sing, faire goddesse of the Spring, faire goddesse of the Spring.

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XVIII.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace Toccato:

[...] YOung Thirsis lay in Phillis lap, and gazing on, and gazing on her eye, steem'd life too meane for such good hap, (repeat) to meane for such good hap, and faine the Boye would dye, So did these happie happie Lo╌uers dye Louers dye, So (repeat) happie Lo╌uers dye, That both to life Immediately, return'd to dye againe, (repeat) to dye a╌gaine.

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XIX.

Of 3. Voyces.

Tace: Rittornello:

[...] THy face & eyes: And for their sakes most men (repeat) affect thee, Then outward Repetition with the Violines. beautie, for which I affect thee I affect thee. Thy mind is fayrer then thy face or eyes, And that same beautious out╌side which thou hast, is but a curious Casket curious Casket in which lyes, The treasures of a minde, Tace: Repetition:—Tace: So keepe them still:—Vertuous and chaste, Vertuous and chaste. For when through age thy beautie shal decay, But worth will last vntill, last vntill Tace: Repetition:—Tace: But hee that shall:—thy dying day dying day. And thinke thee fayre and know thy vertues too, And much admire thee, As I sweare Tace: Repetition:—I doe as I sweare I doe.

XX.

Of 2. Voyces.

Tace: Toccato:

[...] TEll me Amintas Cloris cryes, Tel (repeat) As shee was sitting by him, As (repeat) Tell mee Amint as Cloris cryed, As she was sitting by him, If there bee such a thing as loue, how happe how (repeat) wee cannot spie him, be╌cause to fee, Two mortals two (repeat) is forbidden, But in thine eyes, But in thine eyes euen there hee lyes, And in (repeat) my bo╌some hidden, Eu'n there hee lyes but in thine, eyes euen there he lyes, And in, And in my bosome hidden, And in, And in my bosome hidden.

XXI.

Of 4. Voyces.

Tace: Sinfonia:

[...] DEath there is no neede of thee, Death (repeat) no need of thee of thee, Death (repeat) (repeat) of thee, Death (repeat) Loue alone, Are enough without thy Dart, with (repeat) are (repeat) Are enough without thy Dart, to tyre vpon an honest heart an honest heart, For loue no pryse but loue regards, And with it selfe it selfe rewards, And oft in seeking it is found, Glo╌rie that liues, glorie that liues, when wee are vnder vnder ground, glorie that liues when wee are vnder vnder ground.

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XXII. An Elogie on the Right Honourable Lady, the Lady ARRABELLA STEWARD.

Of 5. Voyces.

Tace:

First Part.

[...] WAke sorrow wake sith shee is falne a sleepe a sleepe, sith (repeat) sith (repeat) sith (repeat) falne a sleepe, who was Entombd, who was Entombd in life, Entombd in life, who was Entombd was Entombd in life, Eyes weepe out sight, eyes (repeat) eyes (repeat) out sight, Or see but still to weepe, Who now is dead, Aye me aye me shees dead, Then mind we still her name, Then (repeat) Then (repeat) Then minde we still her name with hearts with hearts of Lead.

Second Part.

[...] FArewell (repeat) deare widdow wife, Farewell in Death, that fardst so ill in life, that fardst so ill in life so ill in life. Sole parragon, Thy vault stil keepes stil keeps our thoughts, Thy Chest our hearts our hearts, Thy vault (repeat) still keepes our thoughts, thy Chest out hearts▪

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The Table of the Songs contained in this Booke.

  • 1 O Prayse the Lord, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 2 Hether we come, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 3 He that loues, Of 4. two Trebles, Alto and Tenor.
  • 4 Sleepe all my my Ioyes, Of 4. Treble, Alto, Tenor and Base.
  • 5 Sitting once, Of 3. Treble, Tenor and Base.
  • 6 Looke on me euer, Of 4. Treble, Alto, Tenor and Base.
  • 7 Tell me you Startes, Of 2. Treble and Tenor.
  • 8 Old Poets, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 9 Thus sing Orpheus, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 10 End now my life, Of 3. Alto, Tenor and Base.
  • 11 Farewell, Foure parts, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 12 Come Louers all, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 13 In Celias face, Of 3. Treble, Tenar and Base.
  • 14 Tell me where, Of 4. Treble, Alto, Tenor, and Base.
  • 15 Loue in thy youth, Of 3. Alto Tenor and Base.
  • 16 Hayle Clores hayle, First part, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 17 Th' Ecco, Second part, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 18 Young Thirsis lay, Of 5. Voyces.
  • 19 Thy face and Eyes, Of 3. Alto, Tenor, and Base.
  • 20 Tell me A Mintas, Of 2. Alto and Tenor.
  • 21 Death, there is no need, Of 4. Treble, Alto, Tenor, and Base.
  • 22 Wake Sorrow, wake, first and Second Part, Of 5. Voyces.
FINIS.

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