[...] THE FIRST BOOKE OF Songs or Ayres of 4. parts: vvith Tableture for the Lute or Orpherian, with the Violl de Gamba.

Newly composed by Francis Pilkington, Batcheler of Musick, and Lutenist: and one of the Cathedrall Church of Christ, in the Citie of Chester.

LONDON: Printed by T Este, dwelling in Aldersgate-streete, and are ther to be sould. 1605.

To the Right honourable VVilliam Earle of Darby, Lord Stanly, Lord Strange, of Knocking and of the Isle of Man, and Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter. Francis Pilkington wisheth health, with increase of Honour in this life, and Eternitie heereafter.

ARistoxenus (thrice noble Lord) held that the Soule of man was Musicke: But that the being thereof was framed of Bumbees, as the Pithagorians affirme: But for that it is the subiect and obiect of all harmonicall concents: Intimating heereby the dignitie and high renowne of that Art, which des­cended from so noble a stemme, seeketh by all meanes possible to nobilitate the same, and that man to bee vnfit for the society and commerce of men, that ho­noureth not so worthy a Jewell for the life of man. Which opinion verely is worthy Aristoxenus, that is to say, a noble Philosopher, yet how litle squaring with the time, experience a perfect Mistresse of truth hath a long time taught. For who regardeth the melodius charmes of Orpheus, or enchanting melodie of Arion? surely but a few, Quos aequus ama­uit Iupiter dijs geniti, aut ardeus euexit ad aethera virtus. Of which rancke seeing your Lordship hath giuen vndoubted testimonies of your honour to bee one: Musitions should commit an vndiscreet part of in­gratitude not to acknowledge so great a fauour. For mine owne part (who am meanest of many which professe this diuine skill, though not meanest in good will & humble affection to your Honor) I must confesse my selfe many waies obliged to your Lordships familie, not onely, for that my Fa­ther and Brother receiued many graces of your Honours noble Father, whom they followed, but that my self had the like of your most honorable Brother, euen from the first notice he chanced to take of mee. And ther­fore (most honourable Lord) I haue heere presented this oblation, how­soeuer meane, a token of mine affectionate good will Loue, yea onely deuoted to your Lordship, which if it may gaine your gracious acceptati­on, will feare neither Zoilus nor Momus his reprehension.

Your Honours in all dutie

THE TABLE.

  • NOw peep, boe peep, thrise happie blest mine eies. I
  • My choise is made, and I desire no change. II
  • Can shee disdaine, can I persist to Loue. III
  • Alas faire face, why doth that smoothed brow. IIII
  • Whether so fast, see how the kindly flowers perfumes the Aire. V
  • Rest sweet Nimphes let goulden sleepe, charme your Star brighter eies. VI
  • Aye mee, shee frownes, my mistresse is offended. VII
  • Now let her change and spare not, since she proues false I care not. VIII
  • Vnderneth a Cypris shade, the Queene of Loue sate mourning. IX
  • Sound wofull plaints in hills and woods. X
  • You that pine in long desire. XI
  • Looke Mistresse mine, within this hollow brest. XII
  • Clime O hart, clime to thy rest. XIII
  • Thanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light. XIIII
  • I Sigh as sure to weare the fruit, of the willow tree. XV
  • Down a down, thus Phillis sung, by Fancie once opressed. XVI
  • Diaphenia like the Dafdowndillie, white as the Sunne, faire as the Lillie XVII
  • Beautie sate bathing by a spring, where fairest shades did hide her. XVIII
  • Musick deare solace, to my thoughts neglected. XIX
  • With fragrant flowers we strew the way. XX
  • Come, come all you that draw heauens purest breath. XXI
  • A Pauin for the Lute and Base Violl. XXII
¶FINIS.

I. CANTO.

[...] NOw peep, boe peep, thrise happie blest mine eies, For I haue found faire [...] Phillis, for I haue found faire Phillis where she lies, Vpon her [...] bed, with armes vnspred, all fast a sleepe, Vnmaskt her face, thrise happie grace, fare-well, [...] fare-well my Sheepe, Looke to your selues, new charge I must ap- proue, Phillis doth [...] sleepe, Phillis doth sleepe, And I must guard my Loue. Looke. [...]

2
Now peep boe peep, mine eyes to see your blisse,
Phillis closd eyes atrackts you, hers to kisse:
Oh may I now performe my vow, loues ioy t'impart,
Assay the while, how to be-guile, farewell faint hart.
Taken she is, new ioyes I must approue,
Phillis doth sleep, and I will kisse my Loue.
3
Now peep, boe peep, be not too bould my hand,
Wake not thy Phillis, feare shee doe with-stand:
Shee stirs alas, alas, alas I faint in spright,
Shee opes her eie, vnhappie I, farewell delight.
Awakt shee is, new woes I must approue,
Phillis awakes, and I must leaue my Loue.

I. ALTO.

[...] NOw peep, boe peep, thrise happie blest mine eies, For I haue found faire Phillis, for I haue [...] found faire Phillis where shee lies, vp-on her bed, vpon her bed, vpon her bed with armes vnspred, All [...] fast a sleepe, vnmas'kt her face, thrise happie grace, Farewell, farewell my sheepe, Looke to your selues, [...] looke to your selues, new charge I must ap-proue, Phillis doth sleepe, Phillis doth sleepe and I must [...] guard my Loue. Looke to your &c.

I. BASSO.

[...] NOw peep, boe peep, thrise happie blest [...] mine eies, For I haue found faire Phillis, for I haue [...] found faire Phillis where shee lies, Vpon her bed with [...] armes vnspred, all fast a sleepe, Vnmas'kt her face, thrise [...] happie grace, Farewell, farewell my sheepe, Looke to your [...] selues, new charge I must approue, Phillis doth sleepe, Phillis [...] doth sleepe, and I must guard my Loue. Looke to &c.

I. TENORE.

[...] NOw peep, boe peep, thrise happie blest mine eies, For I haue found my Phillis, for I haue [...] found my Phillis where shee lies, Vpon her bed with armes vnspred, vpon her bed with armes vnspred, with [...] armes vnspred, all fast a sleepe, vnmas'kt her face, thrise happie grace, Farewell, farewell my sheepe, Looke [...] to your selues, looke to your selues, new charge I must ap-proue, Phillis doth sleepe, Phillis doth sleepe, and [...] I must guard my Loue. Looke to your &c.

II. CANTO.

[...] MY choice is made and I de- sire no change, My wan- The de- serts wilde wherin my wits did range, Are now [...] dring thoughts in li- mits now are bound: Let him that list sooth hu- mors that made ea- sie walks and plea- sant ground: Let passions stil pos- sesse the i- [...] be vaine, Till va- ni- tie all meane ex -ceeds, dle braine, And care con- sume whom fol- ly feeds. I rest resolu'd no [...] fancies fits can mee e- strange, My choice is made, and I [...] de-sire no more to change. [...]

2
Change they their choice, to whose delicious sence,
The strangest obiects are of most esteeme:
Inconstant likeing may find excellence,
In things which (being not good) yet best doe seeme.
Let gallant blouds still crowne their sports with ioy,
Whom honor, wealth, and pleasure fils:
Let sweet contentment neuer find annoy,
While Fortune frames things to their wills.
This stirs not mee, I am the same, I was before.
My choice is made, and I desire to change no more.
3
Be my choice blamde, or be I thought vnwise,
To hold my choice, by others not approued,
I say, that to my selfe I fall or rise,
By feare, or force I cannot be remoued.
Let friends in pittie doubt of my successe,
Their pittie gets no thanks at all:
Let foes be glad to see my hopes grow lesse,
I scorne the worst that wish they shall:
Still stand I firme, my hart is set, and shall remaine,
My choice is made, and neuer will I change againe.

II. ALTO.

[...]
MY choice is made, and I de- sire no change, my wandring thoughts in li- mits now are bound.
The de- serts wilde, wherin my wits did range, are now made ea- sie walks and plea-sant ground.
[...]
Let him that list sooth humors that be vaine, till va- ni- tie, till va- ni- tie all meane ex-ceedes.
Let passions still pos- sesse the I- dle braine, and care consume, and care consume, whom fol- lie feedes.
[...]
I rest resolu'd, no fancies fits can mee estrange, my choice is made, and I desire no more to change.

II. BASSO.

[...] MY choice is made, and I de- sire no change, my mandring The de- serts wilde, wherin my wits did range, are now made [...] thoughts in li- mits now are bound. ea- sie walks and plea- sant gound. [...] Let him that list sooth humors that be Let passions still pos-sesse the I- dle [...] vaine, till va- ni- tie, all mene exceede. braine, and care con-sume whom fo- lie feeds. [...] I rest resolu'd, no fancies sits [...] can mee estrange, my choice is made, and I desire no more to change.

II. TENORE.

[...]
MY choice is made, and I de-sire no change, my wandring thoughts in li- mits now are bound.
The de- serts wilde, wherin my wits did range, are now made ea- sie walks and plea-sant ground.
[...]
Let him that list sooth humors that be vaine, till va- ni- tie, till va- ni- tie all meane ex-ceedes.
Let passions still pos- sesse the I- dle braine, and care consume, and care consume, fol- lie feedes.
[...]
I rest resolu'd, no fancies fits can mee estrange, my choice is made, and I desire no more to change.

III. CANTO.

[...] CAn she disdaine can I per-sist to loue, can she be cruell, I subiected [...] still. Time will my truth, com- passi-on hers a- proue, re- lease the [...] thrald, and con- quer fro- ward will. I loue not lust, [...] Oh, oh therfore let her daigne, to equal my de- sires, to ij. my de- [...] sires with like a- gaine. I loue not, &c. [...]

Am I not pleasing in her prouder eies,
Oh that she knew Loues power as well as I,
Wittie she is, but Loues more wittie wise,
She breathes on earth, he Raignes in heauen on high.
I loue not lust, oh therefore let her daigne,
To equall my desires with like againe.
Loue scornes the abiect earth his sacred fires,
Vnites diuided mindes disseuers none,
Contempt springs out of fleshly base desires,
Setting debate twixt loue and vnion.
I loue not lust, oh therefore let her daigne,
To equall my desires, with like againe.

III. ALTO.

[...] CAn shee disdaine, can I persist to loue, Can shee be cruell I subiected still. Time [...] will my truth compassion hers a proue, release the thrald, and conquer fro- ward will. I [...] loue not lust, I loue not lust. Oh therefore let her daigne, to equall my desires, to ij. [...] with like a gaine. I loue not &c.

III. BASSO.

[...] CAn shee disdaine, Can I persist to loue, can shee bee cruell [...] I subiected still. Time will my truth compassion hers a- proue, [...] release the thrald and conquer froward will. I loue not lust, Oh [...] therefore let her daigne, oh ij. To equall my desires, [...] to ij. with like againe. I loue not &c.

III. TENORE.

[...] CAn shee disdaine, can I persist to loue, can shee be cruell I subiected still. Time will in truth [...] compassion hers approue, release the thrald and conquer fro- ward will. I loue not lust Oh therefore [...] let her daigne, Oh ij. to equall my desires, to equall my desires with like a gaine. I loue not &c.

IIII. CANTO.

[...] ALas faire face why doth that smoo- All in them selues con- firme a scorn- [...] thed brow: those speaking eies ros'd lips, and blush-ing beautie. full vow: to spoile my hopes of loue, my loue of du-tie. The time [...] hath bin, when I was bet- [...] ter grast: I now the same, and yet [...] that time is past. [...]

Is it because that thou art onely faire,
Oh no such gracefull lookes banish disdaine,
How then, to feede my passions with dispaire,
Feede on sweet loue, so I be loued againe.
Well may thy publike scorne, and outward pride,
Inward affections, and best likings hide.
Breath but a gentle aire, and I shall liue,
Smyle in a clowde, so shall my hopes renue,
One kind regard, and second seing giue,
One rising Morne, and my blacke woes subdue.
If not, yet looke vpon the friendly Sunne,
That by his beames, my beames to thine may runne.

IIII. ALTO.

[...] ALas faire face, why doth that smothed brow. Those speak-ing All in them selues, confirme a scornefull vow. To spoyle my [...] eies, rosd lips, and blush- ing beautie. The time hath bene, when I was better hopes of loue, my loue of du- tie. [...] grast, I now the same, and yet that tyme is past. The tyme hath: &c.

IIII. BASSO.

[...] ALas faire face, why doth that smoothed brow. Those speak-ing All in them selues confirme a scornefull vow. to spoile my [...] eies, ros'd lips and blushing beautie. hopes of loue, my loue of deutie. The time hath bin, when I was better [...] grast, I now the same, and yet the time is past. The time hath &c.

IIII. TENORE.

[...] ALas faire face, why doth that smothed brow. Those speak- ing All in them selues, confirme a scornfull vow. To spoile my [...] eies, rosd lips, and blush- ing beautie. The time hath bene, when I was better grast, hopes of loue, my loue of du- tie. [...] I now the same, and yet that time is past. The time hath, &c.

V. CANTO.

[...] WHether so fast, see how the kindly kindly flowres, perfumes the aire, and [...] all to make thee stay, The climing woodbind clipping al these bowrs, clips thee like- wise, clips ij. [...] wise, for feare passe a- way, Fortune our friend, our foe will not gainesay. Stay, stay but a while, stay ij. [...] stay ij. Phoe- be no teltale is, no teltale is, She [...] her En- di- mi- on, Ile my Phoebe kisse my Phoebe kisse. Stay, stay, &c. [...]

Feare not, the ground seekes but to kisse thy feete
Harke, harke how Philomela sweetly sings,
Whilst water wanton fishes as they meete,
Strike crochet time amid'st these christall springs,
And Zephirus mongst the leaues sweet murmure rings,
Stay but a while, Phoebe no teltale is,
She her Endimion, Ile my Phoebe kisse.
See how the Helitrope hearbe of the Sunne
Though he himselfe long since be gon to bed,
Is not of force thine eies bright beames to shun,
But with their warmth his gouldy leaues vnspred,
And on my knee inuites thee rest thy head.
Stay but a while, Phoebe to teltale is,
She her Endimion, Ile my Phoebe kisse,

V. ALTO.

[...] WHe- ther so fast, see how the kindly, kindly flowers perfume the aire, and all to make thee stay. [...] The clymbing Woodbind clipping all these bowers, clips thee likewise, clips. ij. for feare thou pas away. [...] Fortune our friend, our foe will not gain- say. Stay, stay but a while, ij. ij. Phoebe no tel- [...] tale is, no: ij. no: ij. She her Endimion, Ile my Phoebe kisse. my Phoebe kisse. Stay, stay, &c.

V. BASSO.

[...] WHe- ther so fast, see how the kindly flowers perfumes the ayre, & [...] all to make thee stay: the climing wodbind clipping all these bowers, clips [...] thee likewise, clips: ij. for feare thou passe away. Fortune our friend, our [...] foe wil not gaine say. Stay, stay but a while, stay: ij stay: ij. Phoebe [...] no teltale is, no: ij. She her Endimion, Ile my Phoebe kisse. Ile my [...] Phoebe kisse my Phoebe kisse. Stay, stay: &c.

V. TENORE.

[...] WHether so fast, see how the kind- ly flowers perfumes the ayre, and all to make thee stay, [...] The clipping woodbind, clipping all these bowers, clips thee likewise, clips ij. for feare thou passe away. [...] Fortune our friend, our foe will not gane say. Stay, stay but a while, stay ij. stay ij. stay ij. [...] Phoe-be no tel-tale is, no ij. no ij. She her Endimi- on Ile my Phoebe kisse, my Phoebe kisse. Say stay &c

VI. CANTO.

[...] REst sweet Nimphs let goulden sleepe, charme your star brighter eies, Whiles my [...] Lute the watch doth keep with pleasing simpa- thies, Lulla lulla- by, Lulla Lulla-by, sleepe sweetly, [...] sleep sweetly, let nothing affright ye, in calme con- tent- ments lie. Lulla, &c. [...]

Dreame faire virgins of delight,
And best Elizian groues:
Whiles the wandring shades of night,
Resemble your true loues:
Lulla lullaby, Lulla lullaby
[...]ur kisses your blisses send them by your wishes,
[...]hough they be not nigh.
Thus deare damzells I do giue
Good night and so am gone:
With your hartes desires long liue
still ioy, and neuer mone.
Lulla lullaby, Lulla lullaby
Hath pleasd you and easd you, & sweet slumber sezd you,
And now to bed I hie.

VI. ALTO.

[...] REst sweet Nymphes, let goulden sleepe charme your star brigh-ter eyes, whiles my Lute the [...] watch doth keepe with pleasant simpathies, Lulla lul-la- by, lul-la-by, lul-laby, sleepe sweetly, sleepe [...] sweet- ly, let nothing affright yee, in calme content- ments lye. Lulla &c.

VI. BASSO.

[...] REst sweet Nymphes, let goulden sleepe charme your star brighter eyes, [...] whiles my Lute the watch doth keepe, with pleasing Simpathies. Lulla lul-laby, [...] lul-la- by, sleepe sweetly, sleepe sweetly, let nothing affright ye, in [...] calme contentments lye. Lul-la &c.

VI. TENORE.

[...] REst sweet Nimphes let goulden sleepe, charme your star brighter eyes, whiles my Lute the [...] watch dothe keepe, with pleasing sim-pathies, Lulla lul- laby, lul- laby, lul-laby, sleepe sweetly, sleepe [...] sweetly, let nothing affright ye, in calme contentments lye. Lulla &c. [Page] [...] [Page] [...]

VII. CANTO.

[...] AYE mee, she frownes, my Mistresse is of- fen -ded, Oh pardon [...] deare, my misse shall be a- mended: My fault from loue proceeded, It merits grace [...] the rather, If I no dan- ger dreaded, it was to win your fauour. Then cleere those [...] clouds, then smile on mee, And let vs bee good friends. Come [...] walke, come talke, come kisse, come see, how soone our quarrell ends. Then cleere, &c. [...]

Why low'rs my loue, and blots so sweet a beautie,
Oh be apeasd with vowes, with faith and duetie:
Giue ouer to be cruell, sith kindnesse seemes you better,
You haue but changd a Juell, and loue is not your detter.
Then welcome mirth, and banish mone, shew pittie on your louer,
Come play, come sport, the thing thats gon no sorrow can recouer.
Still are you angry, and is there no relenting?
Oh wiegh my woes, be mou'd with my lamenting:
Alas my hart is grieued, myne inward soule doth sorrow,
Vnles I be releeud, I dye before to morrow.
The coast is cleard, her countnance cheard, I am againe in grace,
Then farewell feare, then come my deare, lets dallieand embrace.

VII ALTO.

[...] AYe mee, shee frownes, my Mistres is offended, Oh pardon deere, my misse shall be a-men-ded: [...] my fault from loue proceeded, it merits grace the rather: if I no dan-ger dreaded, it was to win [...] thy fauour. Then cleere those Clowds, then smile on mee, and let vs bee good friends: [...] come walke, come talke, come kisse, come see how soone our quarrell ends. Then &c.

VII. BASSO.

[...] AY mee, she frownes, my Mistres is offended, Oh [...] pardon deare, my misse shalbe amended: my fault from loue pro- [...] ceeded, it merits grace the rather, if I no danger dreaded, it [...] was to win thy fauour. Then cleare those clouds, then simile on [...] mee, and let vs bee good friends: come walke, come talke, come [...] kisse, come see, how soone our quarel ends. Then.

VII. TENOR.

[...] AYe mee, she frownes, my Mistres is offended, Oh pardon deare, my misse shalbe amended my [...] fault from loue proceeded, it merits grace the rather, if I no danger dreaded, it was to win thy fauour. [...] Then cleare those Clouds, then smile on mee, & let vs bee good friends: come walke, come talke, [...] come kisse, come see, how soone our quarell ends. Then. &c.

VIII. CANTO.

[...] NOw let her change and spare not, since she proues false I care not, Fained [...] loue so bewitched my de- light, That still I doated on her sight, But she is gon, but ij. [...] but ij. New desires imbra-cing, And my deserts dis- gracing. But she is &c. [...]

When did I erre in blindnesse,
Or vex her with vnkindnesse,
If my care did attend her alone,
Why is she thus vntimely gone?
True loue abides till the day of dying,
False loue is euer flying.
Then false fare-well for euer,
Once false proue faithfull neuer,
He that now so triumphes in thy loue,
Shall soone my present fortunes proue.
Were I as faire as diuine Adonis,
Loue is not had where none is.

VIII. ALTO.

[...] NOw let her change and spare not, since shee proues falce I care not: fayned loue [...] so bee-witched my delight, that still I doated on her sight. But shee is gon, But: ij. [...] But: ij. new desires imbracing, and my deserts disgracing. But &c.

VIII. BASSO.

[...] NOw let her change & spare not, since she proues false I care not: [...] fayned loue so bee witched my delight, that still I doated on her sight. But she is gon, [...] but: ij. ij. ij. new desires imbracing, and my deserts [...] disgracing. But: &c.

VIII. TENORE.

[...] NOw let her change & spare not, since she proues false I care not: fained loue so bewitched [...] my delight that still I doated on her sight. But she is gon, but: ij. ij. ij. new desires [...] imbracing, and my deserts disgracing. But: &c.

IX. CANTO.

[...] VN- der- neath a Cypris shade, the Queene of Loue sat [...] mourning, Casting downe the Rosie wreaths, Her heauenly brow a- dor- [...] ning: Quenching fiery sighes with teares, But yet [...] her hart, but yet her hart, her hart still bur- ning. Quenching fi-rie [...] sighes with teares, but yet her hart, but yet her hart, her [...] hart still bur- ning. [...]

2
For within the shady mourne, the cause of her complaining,
Mirrhas Sonne the leavy bowres did haunt, her loue disdaining,
Counting all her true desires, in his fond thoughts but faining.
3
Why is youth with beauty graft, vnfeeleing Iudge of vnkindnesse,
Spotting loue with the foule report, of crueltie and blindnesse,
Forceing to vnkind complaints, the Queene of all diuinenesse.
4
Stint thy teares faire Seaborne Queene, & greife in vaine lamented,
When desire hath burnt his hart, that thee hath discontented,
Then to late the scorne of youth, by age shall be repented.

IX. ALTO.

[...] VNderneth a Cypris shade, the Queene of Loue sate mour- ning, casting downe the Ro- sie [...] wreathes, her heauenly brow a-dorning, quenching fi'rie sighes with teares, quenching: ij. but [...] yet her hart still burning, but yet her hart, but ij. still bur- ning. quenching fi' -rie sighes with teares, [...] quenching ij, but yet her hart still burning. but yet her hart, but yet her hart still bur- ning.

IX. BASSO.

[...] VNderneth a: The Queene of Loue sate mourning, casting [...] down the Rosie wreathes her heauenly brow adoring: quenching si'rie [...] sighes, fi'rie sighes with teares, quench: ij. but yet her [...] hart, but yet her hart, her hart still burning. quenching si'rie sighes, [...] si'rie sighes with teares, quench: ij but yet her [...] hart, but yet her hart, her hart still burning.

IX. TENORE.

[...] VNderneth a Cypris shade, the Queene of Loue sate mourning, casting downe the Rosy wreathes, her [...] heauenly brow ado- ring: quenching fi'rie, fi'rie fi'rie sighes with teares, quench: ij. but yet her hart, [...] yet her hart still burning. but: ij. but: ij. quenching fi'rie, fi'rie sighes with teares, [...] quench: ij. but yet her hart, yet her hart still burning. but: ij. but: ij.

For his vnfortunate friend William Harwood. X. CANTO.

[...] SOund wo- full plaints in hils and woods, Fly my cries, to the skies, Melt [...] mine eies, and hart lan- guish, Not for the want of friends, or goods, make I [...] moane, though alone, thus I groane, by soules an- guish. Time, friends, chance, goods, might againe [...] re-couer, Black woes, sad griefes, ore my life doe houer, Since my losse is with dispaire, No [...] blest Star to me shine faire, All my mirth turne to mourning, Hart lament, for hope is [...] gon: is gon, Musick leaue, Ile learne to moane, Sorrowes the sads a- dor- ning. Since my, &c. [...]

Aye mee my daies of blisse are done,
Sorrowing must I sing, nothing can relieue mee:
Eclipsed is my glorious Sunne,
And mischance doth aduance horrors lance, still to greiue mee.
Poore hart, ill happ hath all ioy bereft thee:
Gon's the sole good, which the Fates had left mee.
Whose estate is like to mine? Fortune doth my weale repine,
Enuying my one pleasure,
Patience must mee assure, other plaster can not cure.
Therefore in this my treasure.

For his vnfortunate friend William Harwood. X. ALTO.

[...] SOund wofull plaints in hills & woods, flie my cries to the Skies, flie: ij. melt mine eies, & hart [...] languish, not for the want of friends, or goods, of: ij. make I moane, though a-lone thus I grone, by souls an- [...] guish: time, friēds, chāce, goods might again recouer, black woes, sad griefs ore my life doe houer, since my [...] losse is with dispaire, no blest Star to mee shine faire, all my mirth turne to mourning, hart lament, lament, hart la- [...] ment, for hope is gone, Musick leaue, lle leaue to moane, sorrowes the sads ador- ning. Since my: &c.

For his vnfortunate friend William Harwood. X. BASSO.

[...] SOund woefull plaints in hills and woods, flie my cries to [...] the skies, flie ij. melt mine eies & hart languish, not for the [...] want of friends, not for ii. or goods make I moane, though a- [...] lone, thus I groan, by soules; an- guish: time, frinds, chance goods might [...] a gaine re-couer, black woes, sad griefes, ore my life doe houer, [...] since my losse is with disparie, no blest Star to mee shine faire, all my [...] mirth turn to mourning, hart la- ment for hope is gon, Musick leaue [...] Ile learne to moane, sorrowes the sads adorning. since my &c.

For his vnfortunate friend William Harwood. X. TENORE.

[...] SOund woefull plaints in hills and woods, flie my cries to the skies. flie ij. melt mine eies and [...] hart languish, not for the want of frinds or goods, of ij. make I moane, though a-lone, thus I grone, by souls an- [...] guish, time, friends, chance goods might a- gaine reco-uer, black woes, sad griefes, ore my life, ore [...] my life do houer, since my losse is with dispaire, no blest Star, to mee shine faire, all my merth turne to mourning. [...] hart la: ij. hart ij. hart ij. for hope is gon, Musick leaue I learne to moane, sorrows the sads ador- ning since:

XI. CANTO.

[...] YOu that pine in long de- sire, helpe to cry. Come Loue, come Loue, [...] quench this bur- ning fire, Least through thy wound I die. Least through thy wound I [...] die. Least through thy wound I die. Come loue, &c.

2
Hope that tyres with vaine delay,
euer cryes
Come loue, come loue, howers and yeares decay,
In time loues treasure lyes.
3
All the day, and all the night
still I call
Come loue, come loue, but my deare delight,
yealds no releefe at all.
4
Her vnkindnesse scornes my moane,
that still shrykes
Come loue, come loue, beauty pent alone
dyes in her owne dislikes.

XI. ALTO.

[...] YOu that pine in long desire, helpe to cry. come Loue, come Loue, quench this burning [...] fire, burning fire, least through thy wound I die. least through thy wound I die, least through thy wound, [...] least through thy wound I die. come loue, &c.

XI. BASSO.

[...] YOu that pine in long desire, helpe to cry, come Loue, come [...] Loue quench this burning fire, least through thy wound I die. I die, least [...] through thy wound I die. least ij. die. come Loue &c.

XI. TENORE.

[...] YOu that pine in long desire, helpe to crie, come Loue, quench this bur-ning fire, least [...] through thy wound I die. least through thy wound I die, least through thy wound I die. least [...] through thy wound I die. come Loue &c.

XII. CANTO.

[...] LOoke Mistresse mine within this hol- low brest, See heere in- closd a [...] tombe of tender skin, wherin fast lockt is framd a Phe-nix nest, That saue your [...] selfe, is no passage in. Witnesse the woūd that through your dart doth bleed, And [...] craues your cure, and ij. and ij. since you haue done the deed. Witnesse, &c. [...]

Wherefore most rare and Phenix rarely fine,
Behould once more the harmes I do possesse:
Regard the hart that through your fault doth pine,
Attending rest yet findeth no redresse.
For end, waue wings and set your nest on fire,
Or pittie mee, and grant my sweet desire.

XII. ALTO.

[...] LOoke Mistresse mine, within this hollow brest, see heere inclos'd, a tombe of tender skin, wherein [...] fast lockt is fram'd a Phenix nest, that, saue your selfe, there is no passage in there is no passage in. Wit- [...] nesse the wound, that through your dart doth bleed, and craues your care, and craues your care, since [...] haue done the deed. Witnesse the &c.

XII. BASSO.

[...] LOoke mistres mine within this hollow brest, see heere in-closd a tombe [...] of tender skin, wherein fast lockt is framd a Phenix nest, that, saue your selfe, there is, [...] there is no passage in. Witnesse the wound that through your dart doth bleede, & [...] craues your cure, &: ij. &: ij. &: ij. since you haue done the deed witnesse.

XII. TENORE.

[...] LOoke mistres mine within this hollow brest, see heere inclosd a tombe of tender skin, within fast lockt is [...] framd a Phe-nix nest, that, saue your selfe, there is no passage in, there is no passage in. Witnesse the wound [...] that through your dart doth bleed, and craues your cure, & ij. &: ij. since you haue done the dead.

To his louing friend M. Holder, M. of Arts. XIII. CANTO.

[...] CLime O hart, clime to thy rest, Climing yet take heed [...] of falling, Climers oft euen at their best, catch loue, downe falth, hart appa-ling. Climers, &c. [...]

2
Mounting yet if she do call,
And desire to know thy arrant:
Feare not stay, and tell her all,
Falling shee will be thy warrant.
3
Rise, oh rise, but rising tell,
When her beautie brauely wins thee,
T'sore vp where that she doth dwell,
Downe againe thy basenesse brings thee.
4
If she aske what makes thee loue her,
Say her vertue, not her face:
For though beauty doth approue her,
Mildnesse giues her greater grace.
5
Rise then rise if she bid rise,
Rising say thou risest for her:
Fall if she do thee dispise,
Falling still do thou adore her.
6
If thy plaint do pittie gaine,
Loue and liue to her honor:
If thy seruice she disdaine,
Dying yet complaine not on her.

To his louing friend M. Holder M. of Arts. XIII. ALTO.

[...] CLime O hart, clime to thy rest, Clim-ing yet take [...] heede of sal- ling, Climars oft euen at their best, catch Loue, downe falt'h [...] hart ap-palling. Climars &c.

XIII. BASSO.

[...] CLyme O hart, clyme to thy rest, clyming yet take [...] heed of fal- ling, clymers oft euen at their best, catch loue, [...] downe falth hart appalling. clymars: &c.

To his louing friend M. Holder M. of Arts. XIII. TENORE.

[...] CLime O hart, clime to thy rest, Clim-ing yet take heede [...] of falling, Climars oft euen at their best, catch Loue, downe falt'h hart [...] ap-pal-ling. Clymars &c.

XIIII. CANTO.

[...] THanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light, My Loue and I be- traid thou [...] set vs free, And Zephirus as ma-ny vn- to thee, Whose blasts con- ceald, the pleasures of the night, [...] Re- solue to her thou gaue, content to mee. But be those bowers still fild with Ser- pents hisses, [...] That sought by treason, that ij. to be- tray our kis- ses. to betray our [...] kisses. But be those, &c. [...]

And thou false Arbor with thy bed of Rose,
Wherin, wheron toucht equall with loues fyer,
We reapt of eyther other loues desire,
Wither the twining plants that thee enclose.
Oh be thy bowers still fild with serpents hisses,
That sought by treason, to betray our kisses.
Torne be the frame, for thou didst thankles hide,
A trayterous spy, her brother, and my foe,
Who sought by death, our ioyes to vnder goe,
And by that death, our passions to deuide,
Leauing to our great vows, eternall woe.
Oh be thy bowers still fild with serpents hisses,
That sought by treason, to betray our kisses.

XIIII. ALTO.

[...] THanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light, My Loue and I betraid thou set vs free, And Ze-phirus as [...] many vn-to thee, whose blasts conceald, the pleasures of the night, Resolue to her thou gaue, content to [...] mee. But be those bowers still fild with Serpents hisses, That sought by treason, that ij. to [...] betray our kisses. to be- tray our kisses. But be those &c.

XIIII. BASSO.

[...] THanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light, My Loue [...] and I betrayd thou set vs free, And Zephirus as many vnto thee, Whose [...] blasts conceald, the pleasures of the night, Resolue to her thou gaue, [...] content to mee. But be those bowers still fild with Serpēts hisses, [...] That sought by treason, that: ij. to be- tray our kisses. [...] to betray our kisses. But be those, &c.

XIIII. TENORE.

[...] THanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light, My Loue & I betraid thou set vs free, And Zephirus as many [...] vnto thee, Whose blasts conceald, the pleasures of the night, Resolue to her thou gaue, content to mee. But [...] be those bowers still fild with Serpents hisses, That sought by treason, That: ij. to betray our kisses. [...] to betray our kisses. But those: &c.

XV. CANTO.

[...] I Sigh as sure to weare the fruit of the Wil- low [...] tree, I sigh as sure to lose my sute, for it may not bee. [...] I sigh as one that loues in vaine, I sigh as one that liues [...] in paine, very sorie, ij. ij. very weary of my [...] mi- se- rie. I &c.

2
I hate my thoughts which like the Flie, flutter in the flame,
I hate my teares which drop, and dry, quench and fri [...] the same:
I hate the hart which frozen burnes, I hate the hart which chosen turnes,
Too and from mee, making of mee nothing but a game.
3
My thoughts are fuell to desire, which my hart doth moue,
My teares are oyle to feed the fire, smart whereof I proue:
She laughes at sighes that come from mee, I sigh at laughes in her so free,
Who doth glory, in the storie of my sorie loue.
4
Her louely lookes, and louelesse mind doe not well agree,
Her quick conceipt, and iudgement blind, as ill suted bee:
Her forward wit, and froward hart, that like to knit, this glad to part,
Makes so prettie, and so wittie, not to pittie mee.
5
The more I seeke, the lesse I find what to trust vnto,
The more I hold, the lesse I bind, she doth still vndoe:
I weaue the web of idle loue, which endles will, and frutles proue,
If the pleasure for the measure of my treasure goe.

XV. ALTO.

[...] I Sigh as sure to weare the fruit of the willow tree, I sigh as sure to lose my sute, my sute, for [...] it will not bee, for it will not bee, I sigh as one that loues in vaine, that loues in vaine, I sigh as one that [...] liues in paine, very sory, ve: ij. ij. very weary of my misery. I sigh as &c.

XV. BASSO.

[...] I Sigh as sure to weare the fruit, of the willow tree, I sigh as sure, [...] I sigh as sure to loose my sute, for it will not bee. I sigh as one that loues in vaine, [...] loues in vaine, I sigh as one that liues in paine, ve-ry so-ry ve-ry ij. [...] ve-ry so-ry, ve-ry weary of my mi-se-rie. I sigh &

XV. TENORE

[...] I Sigh as sure to weare the fruit, the fruit of the willow tree, I sigh as sure to loose my sute, for it [...] will not bee, for it will not be. I sigh as one that loues in vaine, I sigh as one that liues in paine: [...] very so-ry, very: ij. very sory very wery of my mi- se- ry. I sigh &c.

Chorus. XVI. CANTO.

[...] DOwn a down, ij. Thus Phillis sung, by Fan- cie once op-pres- sed, Who so by foolish Loue are [...] stong, Are worthe-ly distres- sed, and so sing I, and ij. with a down, ij. ij. [...] with a down a down a down.

[...] 1 Verse. WHen Loue was first be- got, and [...] by the mothers will, Did fall to humane, lot, his solace to ful- fill, Deuoid of all de- ceit, a [...] chast and ho-ly fire, Did quicken mans con- ceit, and womens brest in- spire. The Gods that saw the [...] good, that mortals did ap- proue, With kinde and holy moode, began to talke of loue. [...] Chorus. Downe a downe.

2
But during this accord, a wonder strange to heare
Whilst loue in deed and word, most faihfull did appeare:
False semblance came in place, by selocie attended,
And with a double face, both loue and fancie blended,
Which made the gods forsake, and men from fancie flie,
And maidens scorne a mate, forsooth and so will I.

Chorus. Downe a downe. &c.

Chorus. XVI. ALTO.

[...] DOwne a &c. [...] And so sing I, and ij. with a downe, with ij. with a downe downe with a ij. a downe a downe. [...] verses. When Loue: &c.

Chorus. Downe a &c.

Chorus. XVI. BASSO.

[...] DOwne a: &c. [...] & so sing I with a downe, ij. [...] ij. with a downe a downe a downe. [...] Verses. When Loue: &c. [...] Chorus. Downe a: &c.

Chorus. XVI. TENORE.

[...] DOwne a &c. [...] And so sing I, with a downe, ij. with a downe a, with a downe a downe a downe downe. [...] Verses. When Loue:&c. [...] Chorus. Downe a:&c.

XVII. CANTO.

[...] DI-a-phe-ni-a like the Dafdown- dillie, White as the Sunne, faire as the [...] Lillie, Heigh ho, heigh ho, how I doe loue thee: I doe loue thee as my Lambs, Are be-lo- ued of [...] their dumbs, How blest were I if thou wouldst proue mee. I doe: &c. [...]

2
Diaphenia like the spreading Roses,
That in thy sweetes, all sweetes incloses,
Faire sweete how I doe loue thee?
I doe loue thee as each flower,
Loues the Sunnes life giuing power,
For dead, thy breath to life might moue mee.
3
Diaphenia like to all things blessed,
When all thy praises are expressed,
Deare ioy, how I doe loue thee?
As the birds doe loue the spring,
Or the Bees their carefull king,
Then in requite, sweete virgin loue mee.

XVII. ALTO.

[...] D I- a- phe-nia like the Dafdown- dil-lie, white as the Sunne, faire as the Lillie, Heigh ho, [...] heigh ho, how I doe loue thee, I doe loue thee as my Lambs, are beloued of their dambs; how blest were I if [...] thou wouldst proue mee. I doe; &c.

XVII. BASSO.

[...] D I-a-phe-ni-a like the Dafdown- dillie, white as the Sunne faire [...] as the Lillie, Heigh ho, high ho, how I doe loue thee, I doe loue thee as my Lambs, [...] are beloued of their dambs, how blest were I if thou wouldst proue mee. I doe &c.

XVII. TENORE.

[...] D I-aphe-ni-a like the daf- down- dillie, white as the Sunne, faire as the Lillie, Heigh ho, [...] heigh ho, how I doe loue thee: I doe loue thee as my Lambes, are beloued of their dambs, how blest [...] were I if thou wouldst proue mee. I doe loue &c.

XVIII. CANTO.

[...] BEautie sat bathing by a spring, Where fairest shades did hide her: The [...] winds blew calme, the birds did sing, The coole streames ranne be- side her. [...] My wanton thoughts entic'd mine eie, To see what was for- bidden: But better memory said fie, So [...] vaine de- sire was chidden. Hey no- ny, hey no- [...] ny, hey ij. hey nony no nony nony. Hey, &c.

Into a slumber then I fell,
When fond imagination,
Seemed to see, but could not tell,
Her feature, or her fashion.
But euen as Babes in dreames doe smile,
And sometime fall a-weeping:
So I a-wakt as wise this while,
As when I feel a sleeping.
Hey nonnie, nonnie, &c.

XVIII ALTO.

[...] BEau-tie sate bathing by a spring, wher fairest shades did hide her: The winds blew calme, the [...] Birds did sing, The coole streames ranne beeside her. My wanton thoughts entic'd mine eie, mine [...] eye, To see what was forbidden: But better memory said fie, so vaine desire was chidden. Hey nony [...] nonie, hey: ij. hey, ij. nonie, nonie, hey: ij. Hey nonie, &c.

XVIII. BASSO.

[...] BEautie sat bathing by a spring, Where fairest shades [...] did hide her: The windes blew calme, the Birds did sing, The coole [...] streames ranne beside her, bee-side her. My wanton thoughts en- [...] tic'd mine eye, To see what was forbidden: But better memory said [...] fie, So vaine desire was chidden. Hey nonie nonie, hey: ij. [...] nonie, hey ij. hey: ij. hey: ij. hey [...] no- nie. Hey nonnie. &c.

XVIII. TENORE.

[...] BEautie sat bathing by a spring, Where fairest shades did hide her: The winds blew calme, the [...] birds did sing, The coole streames ranne beside her, beside her. My wanton thoughts entic'd, entic'd [...] mine eie, To see what was forbidden: But better me-mory said fie, So vaine desire was chidden. Hey [...] nony, ij. hey ij. hey ij. nony. Hey &c.

XIX. CANTO.

[...] MVsick deare sollace, to my thoughts neg- lected, Musick time sporter, [...] Musick time sporter, to my most res- pec- ted, Sound on, sound on, thy gol- den [...] harmony is such, That whilst she doth vouchsafe her E-bon Lute to tuch. By descant [...] numbers I doe nimbly clime, from Loues se- cluse, Vnto his Courts, vn-to his Courts wher I in [...] fresh attire, at- tire my Muse. By descant, &c. [...]

2
I doe compare her fingers swift resounding,
Vnto the heauens Sphaericall rebounding:
Harke, harke, she sings no forst, but breathing sound I heare,
And such the concord Diapasons shee doth reare,
As when th' immortall god of nature from his seate aboue,
First formd words all, & fairely it combind, combind by loue.
3
Diuine Appollo bee not thou offended,
That by her better skill thy skils amended,
Schollers doe oft more lore, then maisters theirs attaine,
Though thine the groūd, all parts in one though she contain,
Yet maist thou triumph that thou hast a Scholler onely one,
That can her Lute to thine, and to thy voice, her voice attone.

XIX. ALTO.

[...] MVsicke deere selace to my thoughts neg-lected, Musicke time sporter ij. to my most [...] res-pected, Sound on, sound on, thy golden harmony is such, That whilst shee doth vouchsafe her [...] Ebon Lute to tuch, By descant numbers I doe nim-bly clime, from loues secluse, vnto his Courts, vn­to [...] his Courts, where I in fresh attire at- tire my Muse. By descant numbers &c.

XIX. BASSO.

[...] MV-sick deere sollace, to my thoughts neglected, Musick [...] time sporter, Musick time sporter, to my most respected, [...] Sound on, sound on thy goulden harmony is such, That whilst [...] shee doth, shee doth vouchsafe hre Ebon Lute to tuch. By descant [...] numbers I doe nimbly clime, from Loues secluse, Vnto his courts vn­to [...] his Courts, where I in fresh attire, at- tire my [...] Muse. By descant &c.

XIX. TENORE.

[...] MVsick deare solace to my thoughts neglected, Musick time sporter, Musick time sporter, to my [...] most respected: Sound on, sound on, thy golden harmony is such, That whilst she doth, she doth vouch- [...] safe her Ebon Lute to tuch. By descant numbers I doe nimbly clime, from Loues secluse, vnto [...] his Courts, vnto his Courts, where I in fresh attire at- tire my Muse. By descant, &c.

XX. CANTO.

[...] WIth fragrant flowers we strew the way, And make this our chiefe [...] ho- ly day, For though this Clime were blest of yore, Yet was it [...] ne-uer proud before: O gracious King, O ij. O ij. O ij: [...] of second Troy, Ac- cept of our vn- fai- ned ioy. O, &c [...]

2
Now th'Aire is sweeter then sweet Balme,
And Satires daunce about the Palme:
Now earth with verdure newly dight,
Giues perfect signes of her delight.
O gracious King of second Troy,
Accept of our vnfained ioy.
Now Birds record new harmonie,
And trees doe whistle melodie:
Now euery thing that Nature breeds
Doth clad it selfe in pleasant weeds.
O gracious King of second Troy,
Accept of our vnfained ioy.

XX. ALTO.

[...] WIth fragrant flowers we strew the way, And make this our chiefe ho-ly day, [...] For though this Clime were blest of yore, Yet was it ne-uer proud before: O gra- cious King, [...] O ij. O ij. O ij. O ij. of second Troy, Accept of our vnfai-ned ioy. O, &c

XX. BASSO.

[...] WIth fragrant flowers we strew the way, And make this our chiefe [...] holy day, For though this Clime were blest of yore, yet was it ne- uer proud be- [...] fore: O gratious King, O ij. O ij. O ij. O ij. [...] of second Troy, Ac-cept of our vnfained ioy. O gratious &c.

XX. TENORE.

[...] WIth fragrant flowers we strew the way, And make this our chiefe ho-ly day, For [...] though this Clime were blest of yore, Yet was it neuer proud before: O gratious King, O ij. [...] O ij. O ij. O ij. of second Troy, Accept of our vn-fained ioy. O gratious &c.

An Elegie in remembrance of his Worshipfull friend Thomas Leighton Esquier. XXI. CANTO.

[...] COme come all you that draw heauens pu- rest breath, Come [...] An- gell brested sonnes of har- mo- nie. Let vs candole in tragicke E- li- [...] gie, Con- dole with me our deerest Leightons death, Leighton in whose deere losse death belmish- eth [...] Iones beau-tie and the soule of true de- light, Leighton heauens fauorite and the [...] Muses Iewell, Muses and heauens onely heere- in too cruell, Leighton to hea- uen, Leighton [...] to heauen, hath tane too time- ly flight. Leighton to, &c. [...]

Come then sith Seas of teares, sith sighes and grones,
Sith mournefull plaints, lowd cries, and deepe laments,
Haue all in vaine deplord these drerements,
And fate in-explorable scornes our mones,
Let vs in accents graue, and saddest tones,
Offer vp Musicks dolefull sacrifice:
Let these accords which notes distinguist frame,
Serue for memoriall to sweet Leightons name,
In whose sad death Musicks delight now dies.

An Eiegie, in remembrance of his Worshipfull friend, Thomas Leighton Esquire. XXI. ALTO.

[...] [...] COme come all you that draw, Heauens pu- rest breath, Come Angell brested sonnes, come ij. [...] of har- mo- ny, Let vs condole in tragicke E- li- gie, con-dole with mee our deerest Leightons death, [...] Leighton in whose deere losse death blemisheth, Iones beautie and the soule, the soule of true delight, Leighton [...] heauens fauoret and the Muses Iew-ell, Muses and heauens onely here-in too cru-ell, Leighton to heauen, to [...] heauen, Leighton to heauen, hath tane too timely flight. Leighton &c.

An Elegie &c. XXI. BASSO.

[...] COme come all you that draw heauens purest [...] breath, Come Angell brested sonnes of harmony, Let vs con- [...] dole. tragick Eligie, Condole with mee our deerest Leightons [...] death Leighton in whose deere losse death ble- misheth Iones [...] beawtie and the soule of true de-light, Leighton heauens [...] fauorite and the Mu-ses Iewell, Muses and heauens onely [...] herein too cruell, Leighton to heauen, Leigh: ij. to heauen [...] hath tane too timely flight. Leighton to heauen, &c.

An Elegie, in remembrance of his Worshipfull friend, Thomas Leighton Esquier. XXI. TENORE.

[...] COme come all you that draw heauens purest breath, Come Angell brested sonnes, come ij. [...] of harmo-ny, Let vs condole in tragick Eligie, Condole with mee our dearest Leightons death, Leighton [...] in whose deere losse death blemisheth Iones beautie, and the soule of true delight, Leighton heauens fauorite and [...] the Muses Iewell, Muses and heauens only heerein too cruell, Leighton to heauen, to ij to heauen [...] hath tane too timely flight. Leighton, &c.

XXII. BASSO.

[...] A Pauin. 2 [...]

A Pauin for the Lute and Base Violl. XXII.

[...]

FINIS.

[Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page] [...] [Page]

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.