The Vale Mans Table.

¶Herein is taught euen for the ca­pacity of the meanest, howe to draine Moores, & al other wet grounds or bogges, and lay them dry for euer. Howe to measure without an instrument any roufe grounde, woode, or water, that you cannot come into. Also here is annexed the compasse and the scale, with part of the vse of the sayde com­passe, and the computation of yeares from VVilliam the Conqueror.

TO THE READER.

WHereas diuers ignoraunt in A­rethmaticke and Geomatrie, thinke it a hard thing to describe that smal worke of mine, intituled the Terrar, which I set foorth the last yeare, 1582. And the rules thereof so hard, that they cannot be learned without tedious trauel. Truely (gentle Reader) were it not for the ob­scure words of Art, they were most pleasant & easie. And for proofe thereof if thou canst but reade: I haue appointed one whome you may hear off, at the signe of the Lamb near Clemēts Inne, who shall teach thee so much Arethma­ticke, and Geomitry in one day, hauing a good capasity, as shall describe the sayde Terrar, the Map of a Country, or any such like worke, with the vse of the scale. And also he will teach thee any thing mentioned in it, to be taught with as much expedition as thou wouldest wishe. Con­demn me not before thou hast tried me, & then report as thou findest me. I know some that would haue none cunning but them selues, who would make mountaynes of their mould hilles. Such will smoothly laugh me to scorne. But I trust the modest minded by proofe will be wit­nesses of my truth. And as touching the rest of the twentye and fiue deuises which I offer to teach in the sayd Terrar, I promise thee, there is not one amongst them all, but is as easie to be learned as any of the workes herein described VVherefore let not wordes of Art dismay thee, nor those that would haue all men ignorant but them selues discourage thee: but lay hold on slip pery time, which once mispent may no way be reuolked. And consider with the Ant, that som­mer haruest, wil prouide both foode and fyer for winter cold. And thus fare well in Christ. From Paines End, the 16. of Nouember. 1583.

VVhereas the sayd Terrar was solde for two shillinges six pence, contrary to the Aucthours minde, from hence foorth they shall be sold by retaile for sixe pence a peece, you maye haue them at my Printers.

How to [...] [...]auel of any [...]at, is de [...] in the making of ponds vpon high & dry groūds by me already published in print. VVhich skill is needefull for them that will drayne bogs and weate groundes, for the better finding of the most conuenient currant, to conuay the water away. It is learned with twice reading ouer of tenne lines.

The compasse.

[compass rose]

Note that this figure is set in moste Maps, to describe the windes, viz. The North south, East, and VVest quarters with their parts. The North point marked with the flower Deluse, commonly standing with the face, or vpper part of the Mappe. So by this compasse to any worke an­nexed, you may know how it lieth, remembring that the point marked with the flower Deluce standeth North. Then tourning your face with that point you shall looke into the North. So is your back South, your right hand East, and your left hand, VVest.

THE cankred Carle in fertil soyle,
which doth much ground possesse,
And suffereth not the Plough-mans toile,
his lande to take and dresse.
Nor yet himselfe conuert the same,
vnto his Countries vse,
Deserueth well the shamefull name,
of common-weales abuse.
And to a Dog I him compare,
that in the Manger lies;
Which labouring Stead from prouen share
by barking he denies.
Yet will not eate of that himselfe,
whereof poore Stead is glad.
Such members vile in common wealth,
were better lost then had.

To draine wet grounds.

First draw a straite ditch, one foote deepe, and foure inches broad, in the most conuenient place of your ground. Then draw from your straite ditch two pearch a sunder, slope drayners as this figure doth represent. Dig them one foot deepe at the least, and one foote broad in the bottome, and not aboue two in­ches broade at the top, so will the top close vp againe, and the bottome will be hol­low, wherin the water will soake into the straite ditch: which ditch, you must fill with stones, or great grauell, and so must you fill fiue foote of the endes of the sloape drai­ners next to the straite diche, and if stones be plentie to fill the drainers throughout vvith stones is best. VVhere you fil them with stones, you may couer them with thick turff, and make it playn, so shal you lose no ground The charges for 10. Acres, is but 26. shil. 8. pence, besides carriages, vvhich charges, the earth that you cast out of the ditch and drayners, being wel spred, wil counteruail for the manuring of the ground.

[figure]

To draine Bogs.

In the firme ground within two yardes of the bog, draw a ditch from the highest part a long by the bogs side, as the currant goeth and continue your ditch vntill it commeth out at naught, as here is debscribed. Make your ditch as narrow as you can, dig it one foote lower then the spring which feedeth the bog. Then fill your ditch two foot thicke with stones, and vpon the stones, throw in the earth, and couer the top with turffe which you digged out of the ditch, so shall you spoyle no ground, and the water, which was the cause of the Bogge, wil alter his course and runne in the ditch among the stones, and in short time the Bogge will sinke, and prooue firme, and very fruiteful ground.

[figure]

How to measure a wood, and not to come into it.

Drawe adioyning to the water or wood whereof you would, knovv the contents either a square, a long square or a triangle, such as you may most cōueniently include your desired piece into. Then measure the vvhole plat, and from the contents therof: deduct the ouerplus, as for example in this long square herafter described. The vvhol contents is 60. Acres, vvherof you must deduct 3. acres for the long square at the East end, 5 Acres for the right triangle on the Southvvest part, and 14. for the blunt tri­angle on the North side. So testeth for the contentes of the vvood 38. Acres.

[figure]

The perfect vse of the scale may be learned by him that can not reade, hauing a good capacity, in the space of 3. houres▪ yet by it are most straunge vvorkes done, vvhich to the ignorant seeme vnpossible. It is necessary that it be taught by demon­strations for a little shewing in this cause is a great deale better then much reading.

The Scale.

 20 60 100

A Computation of yeares, from William the Conquerour. Wherein you may finde the year of our Lord, the Dominicall letter, the leape yeare, the names of the Kings successiuely, vvhat day they began, hovv long they did raigne, vvith the daies of their deathes. The dates of Recordes, or euidence, and of vvhat continuance they be: as for example.

I haue a lease for 99. yeares, from Michaelmas, in the 10. yeare of King Henrie the 7. The question is, howe many yeares are to come in the saide lease at Michaelmas 1583. First seeke King Henrie the 7. and then the tenth yeare of his raigne, which you shall finde in the yeare of our Lorde 1494. The which number substract out of 1583. So shall you finde 89. yeares past, and tenne yeares to come. If you cannot substract, then tel from 1494, vntill you come vnto 1583. And you shall finde as is aforesaid, and thus for all others.

  • Anno Domini.
  • The dominicall Letter.
  • The names of the kings, & the moneth they begonne.
  • The yeares of the Kinges.

Will. Conquerer.

1066AOctober. 14.1
1067G2
1068F3
1069DE4
1070C5
1071B6
1072AG7
1073F8
1074E9
1075D10
1076CB11
1077A12
1078G13
1079F14
1080ED15
1081C16
1082B17
1083A18
1084GF19
1085E20
1086D21

He raigned 20. yeres 11 months, 22. days. and died the 9. of Sept. 1087.

William Rufus.

1087CSeptember. 9.1
1088BA2
1089G3
1090F4
1091E5
1092DC6
1093B7
1094A8
1095G9
1096FE10
1097D11
1098C12
1099B13

He ra [...]gned 12. yeares 11 moneths 18. dayes and died the 1. of Au­gust. 1100.

King Henry 1.

1100AGAugust. 1.1
1101F2
1102E3
1103D4
1104CB5
1105A6
1106G7
1107F8
1108ED9
1109C10
1110B11
1111A12
1112GF13
1113E14
1114D15
1115C16
1116BA17
1117G18
1118F19
1119E20
1120D [...]21
1121B22
1 [...]22A23
1123G24
1124F [...]25
1125D26
1126C27
1127B28
1128A [...]29
1129F30
1130E31
1131D32
1132CF33
1133A34
1134G35
1135F36

He raigned 35. yeres, 4. months 11. days, & dyed the 2. of Sep­tember. 1135.

King Stephen.

1136FDDecember. 2.1
1137C2
1138B3
1139A4
1140GF5
1141E6
1142D7
1143C8
1144BA9
1145G10
1146F11
1147E12
1148DC13
1149B14
1150A15
1151G16
1152FE17
1153D18
  19

He raigned 18. yeres, 11. moneths 18 daies and died the 25. day of October 1154

King Henry. 2.

1154COctober. 25.1
1155B2
1156AG3
1157F4
1158E5
1159D6
1160CE7
1161A8
1162G9
1163F10
1164ED11
1165C12
1166B13
1167A14
1168GF15
1169E16
1170D17
1171C18
1172BA19
1173G20
1174F21
1175E22
1176DC23
1177B24
1178A25
1179G26
1180FE27
1181D28
1182C29
1183B30
1184AG31
1185E32
1186E33
1187D34
1188CB35

He raigned 24 yeres, 9 monethes 2. dayes and died the 6. of Iu­lie. 1189.

Kin. Richard 1.

1189AIuly. 6.1
1190G2
1191F3
1192ED4
1193C5
1194B6
1195A7
1196GF8
1197E9
1198D10

He raigned 9. yeares, 9. monethes 22 dayes and died the 6. of A­pril 1199.

King Iohn.

1199CApril. 6.1
1200BA2
1201G3
1202F4
1203E5
1204DC6
1205B7
1206A8
1207G9
1208FE10
1209D11
1210C12
1211B13
1212AG14
1213F15
1214E16
1215D17
1216CB18

He raigned 17. yeres & 7. moneths. and d [...]ed the 19. of October 1216.

King Henry. 3.

1217AOctober. 19.1
1218G2
1219F3
1220ED4
1221C5
1222B6
1223A7
1224GF8
1225E9
1226D10
1227C11
1228BA12
1229G13
1230F14
1231E15
1232DC16
1233B17
1234A18
1235G19
1236FE20
1237D21
1238C22
1239B23
1240AG24
1241F25
1242E26
1243D27
1244CB28
1245A29
1246G30
1247F31
1248ED32
1249C33
1250B34
1251A35
1252GF36
1253E37
1254D38
1155C39
2256BA40
1257G41
1258F42
1259E43
1260DC44
1261B45
1262A46
1263G47
1264FE48
1265D49
1266C50
1267B51
1268AG52
1269F53
1270E54
1271D55
1272CB56
  57

He raigned 56. yeres one moneth, & died the 16. of Nouember 1273.

King Edward. 1

1273ANouember. 16.1
1274G2
1275F3
1276ED4
1277C5
1278B6
1279A7
1280GF8
1281E9
1282D10
1283C11
1284BA12
1285G13
1286F14
1287E15
1288DC16
1289B17
1290A18
1291G19
1292FE20
1293D21
1294C22
1295B23
1296AG24
1297F25
1298E26
1299D27
1300CB28
1301A29
1302G30
1303F31
1304ED32
1305C33
1306B34
  35

He raigned 34 yeares 8. moneths 9 dayes, and deposed the 7. of Iuly 1307.

King Edward. 2

1307AIuly. 7.1
1308GF2
1309E3
1310D4
1311C5
1312BA6
1313G7
1314F8
1315E9
1316DC10
1317B11
1318A12
1319G13
1320FE14
1321D15
1322C16
1323 17
1324AG18
1325F19
1326E20
  21

He raigned 19. yeres 7. moneths 6. dayes and died the 25. of Ianuary 1326.

King Edward. 3

1327DIanuary. 25.1
1328CB2
1329A3
1330G4
1331F5
1332ED6
1333C7
1334B8
1335A9
1336GF10
1337E11
1338D12
1339C13
1340BA14
1341G15
1342F16
1343E17
1344DC18
1345B19
1346A20
1347G21
1348FE22
1349D23
1350C24
1351B25
1352AG26
1353F27
1354E28
1355D29
1356CB30
1357A31
1358G32
1359F33
1360ED34
1361C35
1362B36
1363A37
1364GF38
1365E39
1366D40
1367C41
1368 [...]A42
1369G43
1370F44
1371E45
1372DC46
1373B47
1374A48
1375G49
1376FE50
  51

He raigned 50 yeres 5. moneths 7. dayes and deposed the 21 of Iune. 1377.

Kin Richard. 2

1377DIune. 21.1
1378C3
1379B3
1380AG4
1381F5
1382E6
1383D7
1384CB8
1385A9
1386G10
1387F11
1388FD12
1389C13
1390B14
1391A15
1392GF16
1393E17
1394D18
1395C19
13 [...]6BA20
1397G21
1398F22
1399E23

He raigned 22 yeres 14. weekes 2 dayes and died t [...]e 29, of September 1399.

King Henry. 4.

1400DCSeptember. 29.1
1401B2
1402A3
1403G4
1404FE5
1405D6
1406C7
1407B8
1408AG9
1409F10
1410E11
1411D12
1412CB13
  14

He raignd 13. yeres 6 moneths 4. dais, and died the 20. of March. 1412.

King Henry. 5.

1413AMarch. 20.1
1414G2
1415F3
1416ED4
1417C5
1418B6
1419A7
1420GF8
1421E9
  10

He raigned 9. yeres 5. moneths 24. daies and deposed the 13 of August. 1422.

King Henry. 6.

1422DAugust. 31.1
1423C2
1424BA3
1425G4
1426F5
1427E6
1428DC7
1429B8
1430A9
1431G10
1432FE11
1434D12
1435C13
1436B14
1437AG15
1438F16
1439E17
1440D18
1441CB19
1442A20
1443G21
1444E22
1445ED23
1446C24
1447B25
1448A26
1449GF27
1450E28
1451D29
1452C30
1453BA31
1454G32
1455F33
1456E34
1457DC35
1458B36
1459A37
1460G38
1461FE39

He raignd 38. yeres 6. moneths 16. daies and died the 2. of March. 1460.

Kin. Edward. 4

1461DMarch. 4.1
1462C2
1463B3
1464AG4
1465F5
1466E6
1467D7
1468CE8
1469A9
1470G10
1471F11
1472ED12
1473C13
1474B14
1475A15
1476GF16
1477E17
1478D18
1479C16
1480BA20
1481G21
1482F22
  23

He raignd 22. yeres 5. weekes, one day, and died the 9. of April. 1483.

Kin Edward. 5

1483EApril 91

He raigned but 10. weekes, and 4. dais

Kin. Richard. 3

1484DCIune. 121
1485B2
  3

He raigned 2. yeres 2. monethes 5. daies and died the 22. of August. 1485.

King Henry. 7

1486AAugust. 22.1
1487G2
1488FE3
1489D4
1490C5
1491B6
1492AG7
1493F8
1494E9
1495D10
1496CB11
1497A12
1498G13
1499F14
1500ED15
1501C16
1502B17
1503A18
1504GF19
1505B20
1506D21
1507C23 22
1508BA24

He raignd 23. yeres 8. moneths 19. dais and died the 22. of April. 1509.

King Henry. 8.

1509GApril. 22.1
1510F2
1511E3
1512DC4
1513B5
1514A6
1515G7
1516FE8
1517D9
1518C10
1519B11
1520AG12
1521F13
1522E14
1523D15
1524CB16
1525A17
1526G18
1527F19
1528ED20
1529C21
1530B22
1531A23
1532GF24
1533E25
1534D26
1535C27
1536BA28
1537G29
1538F30
1539E31
1540DC32
1541B33
1542A34
1543G35
1544FE36
1545D37
1546C38

He raignd 37. yeres 10 monethes 1 day and died the 28. of Ianuary 1546.

Kin. Edward. 6.

1547BIanuary 28.1
1548AG2
1549F3
1550E4
1551D5
1552CB6
  7

He raignd 6. yeares 5. moneths, 19. dais and died the 6. of Iuly. 1553.

Queene Mary

1553AIuly. 6.1
1554G2

King Philip.

1555FIuly. 251.3
1556ED2.4.
1557C3.5.
1558B4.6.

She raigned 5. yeres 5. moneths 22. daies and died the 17. of Nouember. 1558.

Q. Elizabeth.

1559ANouember. 17.1
1560GF2
1561E3
1562D4
1563C5
1564BA6
1565G7
1566F8
1567E9
1568DC10
1569B11
1570A12
1571G13
1572FE14
1573D15
1574C16
1575B17
1576AG18
1577F19
1578E20
1579D21
1580CB22
1581A23
1582G24
1583F25
1584ED26
1585C27
1586B28
1587A29
1588GF30
1589E31
1590D32
1591C33
1592BA34
1593G35
1594F36
1595E37
1596DC38
1597B39
1598A40
1599G41
1600FF42
1601D43
1602C44
1603B45
1604AG46
1605F47
1606E48
1607D49
1608CB50
1609A51
1610G52
1611F53
1612ED54
1613C55
1614B56
1615A57
1616GF58
1617E59
1618D60
1619C61
1620BA62
1621G63
1622F64
1623E65
1624DC66
1625B67
1626A68
1627G69
1628FE70
1629D71
1630C72
1631B73
1632AG74
1633F75
1634E76
1635D77
1636CE78
1637A79
1638G80
1639F81
1640ED82
1641C83
1642B84
1643A85
1644GF86
1645E87
1646D88
1647C89
1648BA90
1649G91
1650F92
1651E93
1652C94
1653B95
1654AB96
1655G97
  98

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