CANTVS. Primꝰ. The f …

CANTVS. Primꝰ. The first set OF ENGLISH Madrigalls, to 4. 5. & 6. voyces.

Made and newly published by George Kirbye.

LONDON Printed by Thomas Este dwelling in aldersgate street. 1597.

To the vertuous, and very worthy Gentlewo­men, Mistris Anne: and Mistris Frauncis Iermin, daughters to the right worshipfull, Syr Robert Iermin Knight, (his very good Maister) G. K. wisheth in this life, increase of all vertues, and in the life to come, the full fruition of all happinesse.

IT were a thing very vnnecessary (thrise worthy & vertuous gentlewomen) for mee (although I were able) to speake any thing in commendation & praise of Musicke, considering (besides that many learned men haue learnedly written in commendation there­of) the examples of times past, and our owne expe­rience euery day, doth giue sufficient testimonie both of the pleasure and proffit that it bringeth to a di­stressed & melancholy mind. Also I think it conuenient not to answere (other­wise then with silence) to those (more sencelesse then brute beastes) that with open mouthes doe in-veigh, & speake all the euill they can against that excellent knowledge. But it standeth mee in hand, rather to craue pardon, for this my boldnes, in putting to the veiw of so many learned Musitions, (which this age & Realme affordeth) these first fruites of my poore knowledge in Musicke, yet I hope, that as they themselues had small entrances, beefore they came to their perfection, so they will fauourably, accept of these beginnings, looking for better hereafter: And in hope of their better likings, I haue made choise of you to patronise these my labours, as well for the Haereditarie vertues of your godly parentes alreadie dwelling in you, as also for the delight, knowledge, and practise which you haue in Musicke, in the which few or none (that I know) can excell you. Vouch safe therefore (worthy Mistrisses) to vndertake the tuition of that, which by right & equitie, you may challenge for your owne, being no straungers, but home bredd, & which for your delight & cōtentments were first by me compiled: & as you seemed to like them, being mine, so I doe not doubt but you will more fauour them, now beeing your owne. Then I (your deuoted seruant) shall think my paines heerein very well rewarded, & be better encouraged to employ my time hereafter in your fur­ther seruice.

Yours in all duetie, George Kirbye.

THE TABLE

Songs to 4. voyces.
  • LOE heere my heart I leaue. I
  • Alas what hope of speeding. II
  • What can I doe my dearest. III
  • Woe am I my hart dies. IIII
  • Farewell my loue. V
  • Sleep now my Muse. VI
Songs to 5. voyces.
  • Ah sweet alas when first I saw. VII
  • Mourne now my soule. VIII
  • Sound out my voyce. 1. part. IX
  • Shee that my plaints. 2. part. X
  • What shall I part thus vnrewarded. XI
  • Sorrow consumes mee. 1. part. XII
  • Oh heauens. 2. part. XIII
  • Why should I loue. XIIII
  • Sweet loue, sweet loue. XV
  • That Muse which soung, XVI
  • See what a maze of error. XVII
  • If pittie reigne with beautie. XVIII
Songs to 6. voyces.
  • Ah cruell hatefull fortune. XIX
  • I loue alas, yet am I not beloued. XX
  • Must I part my sweet iewell. XXI
  • Vp then, Melpomene. 1. part. XXII
  • Why waile wee thus. 2. part. XXIII
  • Sleep now my Muse. XXIIII
FINIS.

I.

[...] LOE heere my hart I leaue with hir remayning (repeat) [...]Loe heere my hart I leaue with hir remayning, that neuer [...]yet did deigne to doe mee pleasure, and when I seeke to moue hir with complay­ning, [...]complayning (repeat) she skornes my sighes and [...]teares alas past measure, (repeat) sweet loue, oh turne hir [...]hart at last & ioy mee, at last & ioy mee, & ioy mee, or els hir deep disdaine (repeat) [...]will soone destroy mee, sweet loue, oh turne hir hart at last & ioy mee, and [...]ioy mee, or els hir deep disdaine (repeat) will soone destroy mee.

II.

[...] ALas: What hope of speeding, where hope beguild, lies bleeding, [...]what hope &c. shee bad come when shee spyde mee, [...]and when I came shee flyde mee, (repeat) thus [...]when I was beeguiled, (repeat) shee at my sighing smi­led, [...]shee at my sighing, (repeat) smy­led, [...]But if you take such pleasure, of hope and ioy my treasure, by de­ceipt [...]to beereaue mee, (repeat) loue me & so deceiue mee. But if you [...]take such pleasure, of hope & ioy my treasure, by deceipt to bereaue me, (repeat) [...]loue me & so deceiue mee.

III.

[...] WHat can I doe my dearest, of the sweet help depriued, ij. [...]of those thy faire eies, by which I still haue li- ued, what can I doe my dearest, of the sweet [...]help, de- pri- ued, what can I doe my dearest, of the sweet help depriued, of those thy faire [...]eies, by which I still haue liued, I still haue liu- ed. by which I still haue liued, I still haue [...]liued, How can my soule endure, thus charg'd with sad-nesse, Exile, from thy deare sight, [...]ij. so full of glad- nesse▪ of gladnesse. [...]How can my soule endure, thus charg'd with sadnesse, Exile, from thy deare sight, [...]ij. so full of glad- nesse, so full of [...]glad- nesse, glad- nesse, so full of glad- nesse▪

IIII.

[...] WOE am I my hart dies, woe am I, woe am I my hart dies, [...]as yt which on thy will relies, since thē I die, (repeat) onely in hope to please [...]thee, since then I dye. onely in hope to please thee, No griefe of death though [...]cru- ell, shall disease mee, no griefe of death though cru- [...]ell, shal disease mee, yet shall I bee tormen- ted, (repeat) cruell, to [...]see thee pleas'd & conten- ted, (repeat) yet shall I [...]bee tormented tormented, yet shall I be tormented, tormented, cruell to see thee [...]pleas'd & conten- ted, cruell, to see thee pleas'd, cruell, to see thee [...]pleas'd & conten- ted.

V.

[...] FArewell my loue, I part contented, (repeat) [...]since tis ordeyn'd y I must leaue thee, that I must [...]leaue thee, since tis ordeyn'd that I must leaue thee, that I: Oh might I [...]stay, although tormented, Oh might I stay, although tormented, the paine next [...]death, would little greeue mee, the paine wold little greeue mee, the paine next [...]death would little greeue mee, No greater torment can be proued, then thus to [...]part, then thus to part from my beelou-ed. then thus to part from my beloued, [...]No greater torment can bee proued, then thus to part, then thus to part from [...]my beeloued, then thus to part, then thus to part from my beeloued.

VI.

[...] SLeepe now my Muse, and henceforth take thy rest, [...] (repeat) sleepe now my muse, & henceforth [...]take thy rest, which all to long thy selfe in vaine had wasted, Let it suffice, [...] (repeat) I still must liue opprest, and of my paines, (repeat) [...]the fruit must nere be tasted, and of my paines, (repeat) the fruit must nere bee [...]tasted, must nere bee ta- sted, Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) Fate cannot [...]bee withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake & do no good. Then sleepe my Muse, [...] (repeat) Fate cannot bee withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake and [...]dooe no good. it's better sleepe, then wake and dooe no good.

Heere endeth the songs of foure parts.

VII.

[...] AH sweet a- las when first I saw those eyes, those [...]eies, Ah sweet a- las when first I saw those eyes, [...]those eyes, (repeat) those eyes so rich with cristall ma- iestie, their [...]wounding beawty, gan to tyrannize, (repeat) And made mine eies bleed [...]teares full piteously, and made mine eies bleed teares full piteous-ly, I [...]felt the wound, yet feard I not the deede, I felt &c yet feard &c. Till [...]ah, I found my teares did in- ward bleed, did inward bleed. Till ah, I found my [...]teares my teares did in- ward bleed, did inward bleed.

VIII.

[...] MOurne now my soule with anguish, with anguish [...]of my paines, crost are my ioies (repeat) [...]which hope did e-uer giue, crost are my ioyes my ioyes my ioyes [...]which hope did euer giue, Dry are mine eyes, (repeat) with shedding [...]teares in vaine (repeat) in vaine, Dead is my hart dead is my hart, which [...]neuer more can liue, hard are my tormentes my tormentes (repeat) liueing [...]thus in griefe, Harder yet hir hart that yeeldeth no reliefe, harder yet hir hart, that [...]yeeldeth no reliefe, harder yet hir hart that yeeldeth no reliefe.

IX.

[...] SOund out my voice, with pleasant tunes recording, with [...]plea-sant tunes recording, Sound out my voice, with pleasant [...]tunes recording, The new delight, that loue to me inspireth, the new delight [...]that loue to mee in-spi- reth, that loue to mee inspireth, Pleas'd & con­ten [...]with that my minde de-sireth, pleas'd & content with yt my minde de-si­reth, [...]my minde de-sireth, thanked bee loue, so heauenly ioies affording thanked be [...]loue, so heauenly ioys affording, so heauenly ioies affor- ding, so heauenly [...]ioyes affor-ding. (repeat)

X.

[...] SHee that my plaints with rigour long reiec­ted, [...]shee that my plaints, with rigour long reiec­ted, [...]Binding my hart, binding my hart, with those hir golden tres­ses, [...] (repeat) with those hir golden tresses, In recompence, [...]in recompence, (repeat) [...]of all my long distres- ses, (repeat) said with a sigh, thy [...]loue hath mee infec- ted, thy loue [...]hath mee infected, thy loue &c. thy loue hath mee [...]infec- ted, (repeat)

XI.

[...] WHat shall I part thus vn-re-garded, thus vn-re-garded, [...]from you whom death could not dis-seuer, (repeat) [...]whom death could not dis-se- uer, Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly rewarded, [...]is faithfull seruice thus cruel- ly rewar- ded, why then vaine hope, [...]adew, adew for e-uer, why then vaine hope, adew adew for euer, Is [...]faithfull seruice thus cruelly rewar-ded, rewar-ded, why then vaine hope, adew, [...]adew for euer, why then vaine hope adew, (repeat) adew for e-uer.

XII.

[...] SOrrow consumes mee, sorrow consumes mee & in [...]stead of rest, (repeat) with foulded armes I [...]sadly sit and weep, & if I winck it is (but) for feare to see, & if I winck it is [...](but) for feare to see, the fearefull dreames effectes (repeat) that [...]trouble mee.

XIII

[...] O heauens what shall I doe? what shall I doe? [...]O heauens what shall I doe, Alas, alas must I, must [...]I my selfe be murdrer of my selfe, must I, be murdrer of my selfe, must I my [...]selfe be forst to ope the way, wherat my soule in wounds may sally forth, [...]may sal- ly forth, hard is my hap, hard is my hap, & thus in griefe I [...]dye.

XIIII.

[...] WHy should I loue, (repeat) since she doth proue vngratefull, [...]why should I loue, (repeat) since she doth proue vngratefull, since for re­ward [...]I reap, since for re- ward I reap naught but disdaine, I reap &c. [...]loue thus to be requited, it is hatefull, & reason would I should not [...]loue in vaine, I should not loue in vaine, yet all in vaine, yet all in vaine when [...]all is out of season, for loue, for loue, hath no so-ci-e-tie with reason, yet [...]all in vaine, (repeat) when all is out of season, for loue, for [...]loue hath no so-ci-e-tie with reason.

XV.

[...] SWeet loue, sweet loue, O cease thy fly- ing, [...]sweet loue, sweet loue, ô cease thy fly- ing, and [...]pitty mee, now dy- ing, to ease my hart distressed, to ease my hart [...]distres-sed, with hast make thy retur- ning, & quench my restlesse bur­ning, [...]and quench my restlesse burn- ning, That I by you redressed, may [...]bee re- uiu-ed, may bee reuiued, and honor you as blessed, may bee reuiu'd and [...]honor you, may bee reuiu'd & honor you as blessed. That I by you redres­sed, [...]may be reuiued, may bee reuiu'd, and honor you as blessed, may bee re­uiued, [...]may bee reuiu'd and honor you as bles- ed.

XVI.

[...] THat Muse which soung the beauty of thy [...]face, that Muse which soung, that Muse which [...]soung, the beauty of thy face, In sweet well tuned songes, and harmo­ny [...]y plesed, in sweet well tuned songs, and harmony y pleased, if still I bee disea­sed, [...]can carroll of thy wrongs, and blaze these faults, that will thy worth [...]disgrace, yet if thou doost re-pent thee, (repeat) I will forgiue, (repeat) [...]that mends shall well content mee. yet if thou doost repent thee, (repeat) [...]I will for-giue, (repeat) that mends shall well content mee. I [...]will forgiue, that mends shall well content mee.

XVII.

[...] SEe what a maze of error (repeat) and [...]laborinth of terror, (repeat) of ter- ror, my [...]loue hath traced, my loue hath tra- ced, my loue hath trast, [...]hath traced, wretched I, whom loue paineth, whom loue paineth, and [...]true faith onely gaineth, hope vt- terly disgraced, disgraced, & by disdaine, & [...]by disdaine de-faced. (repeat) & by disdaine, & by disdaine defaced, [...]& by disdaine defa- ced.

XVIII.

[...] IF pittie raigne with beautie, (repeat) then [...]may I be assu- red, (repeat) that what my [...]harme procured, will yeeld mee help of duety, If pittie raigne with beautie, if [...]pittie raigne with beau-tie, then may I be assu- red, (repeat) [...]that what my harme procured, (repeat) will yeeld mee help, of [...]duety, for wrongfull she was neuer, (repeat) then why should I (repeat) [...]still in dispaire perse -uer. for wrongfull shee was neuer, then why should [...]I, still in dispaire perseuer.

Heere endeth the songs of fiue parts.

XIX

[...] AH cruell hatefull fortune, (repeat) [...]now must I death importune, since that I am of all my hope [...]depri-ued, nor but for sor- row, had my soule sur- uiued, (repeat) [...]one- ly this hope doth rest for my contentment, that fortune tyr'd will [...]yeeld mee some amendment, (repeat) that fortune tyr'd will [...]yeeld mee some amendment, one- ly this hope doth rest for my contentment; [...]that fortune tir'd will yeeld me some amendment, that fortune tyr'd will yeeld me [...]some amendment.

XX

[...] I Loue alas, yet am I not beloued, (repeat) [...]I loue alas, yet am I not be- loued, (repeat) [...]my sutes are all reiected, (repeat) & all my lookes suspected, [...]Ex-pe-rience now too late hath proued, now too late hath proued, that t'was in [...]vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in vaine, &c▪ that erst I loued, Ex­pe-ri-ence [...]now to late hath proued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, (repeat) [...]that t'was in vaine that erst I lo-ued.

XXI.

[...] MVst I part, O my Iuell, haplesse, hap- lesse, [...]must I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, haplesse, from my faire [...]sunne, whose beames mee nourish, whose beames mee nourish, A-las, who now com­forteth, [...]A-las, or doth mee cherish, pained with grief so cruell, Oh, if it so must [...]needs bee, oh if it so must needs be, my wicked fortune, how can she further harme mee, [...]how can &c. Oh, if it so must needs bee, my wicked fortune, how [...]can shee further harme mee, how can &c. further harme mee.

XXII.

[...] VP then, Melpomene, the mournfulst Muse of nine, [...]such cause of mourning, of mourning, (repeat) [...]neuer hadst afore▪ Vp griesly gostes, & vp my ru- full▪ rime, Matter of [...]mirth now shalt thou haue no more, (repeat) for dead shee it▪ [...]that mirth thee made of yore, Dydo my deare a-las is dead, (repeat) [...]Dydo my deare, [...] l [...] a-las is dead, (repeat) [...]Dead & lyeth wrapt in dead, (repeat) O heauy hearse, Let [...]streaming tears be pou- red out in store, let streaming tears bee pou­red [...]out in store, O carefull verse, ô carefull verse.

XXIII.

[...] WHY waile wee thus, why weary we the gods with plaints, (repeat) [...]why weary wee the gods with plaints, As if some [...]e-uell were to hir bee- tight, shee raignes a goddesse, now emong the saints, [...]that whilome was the saint of shepperds hight, (repeat) [...]of shepperds light, and is enstalled now in heauens light, (repeat) [...]I see thee blessed soule I see, walke in E- li- zi-an fields [...]E-li-zi-an feilds so free, O happy hearse, (repeat) might I once come [...]to thee, (ô that I might) ô that I might, O ioy- full verse. O ioy­full [...]verse, O ioy- full verse.

XXIIII.

[...] SLeep now my Muse, and henceforth take thy rest, [...] (repeat) sleepe now my Muse, & henceforth [...]take thy rest, which all to long, (repeat) thy selfe in vaine had wasted, [...]had wa-sted, Let it suffice, (repeat) Let it suffice, I still must [...]liue op- prest, and of my paines, the fruit must nere bee ta- sted, and of my [...]paines, (repeat) the fruit must nere bee ta- sted, (repeat) Then [...]sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot bee withstood, It's bet-ter sleepe, then wake [...]and doe no good. Then sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot bee withstood, (repeat) [...]it's better sleep, (repeat) then wake & doe no good. & doe &c.

FINIS.
CANTVS. Secundꝰ. The …

CANTVS. Secundꝰ. The first set OF ENGLISH Madrigalls, to 4. 5. & 6. voyces.

Made and newly published by George Kirbye.

LONDON Printed by Thomas Este dwelling in aldersgate street. 1597.

To the vertuous, and very worthy Gentlewo­men, Mistris Anne: and Mistris Frauneis Iermin, daughters to the right worshipfull, Syr Robert Iermin Knight, (his very good Maister) G. K. wisheth in this life, increase of all vertues, and in the life to come, the full fruition of all happinesse.

IT were a thing very vnnecessary (thrise worthy & vertuous gentlewomen) for mee (although I were able) to speake any thing in commendation & praise of Musicke, considering (besides that many learned men haue learnedly written in commendation there­of) the examples of times past, and our owne expe­rience euery day, doth giue sufficient testimonie both of the pleasure and proffit that it bringeth to a di­stressed & melancholy mind. Also I think it conuenient not to answere (other­wise then with silence) to those (more sencelesse then brute beastes) that with open mouthes doe in-veigh, & speake all the euill they can against that excellent knowledge. But it standeth mee in hand, rather to craue pardon, for this my boldnes, in putting to the veiw of so many learned Musitions, (which this age & Realme affordeth) these first fruites of my poore knowledge in Musicke, yet I hope, that as they themselues had small entrances, beefore they came to their perfection, so they will fauour ably, accept of these beginnings, looking for better hereafter: And in hope of their better likings, I haue made choise of you to patronise these my labours, as well for the Haereditarie vertues of your godly parentes alreadie dwelling in you, as also for the delight, knowledge, and practise which you haue in Musicke, in the which few or none (that I know) can excell you. Vouchsafe therefore (worthy Mistrisses) to vndertake the tuition of that, which by right & equitie, you may challenge for your owne, being no straungers, but home bredd, & which for▪ you delight & cōtentments were first by me compiled: & as you seemed to like them, being mine, so I doe not doubt but you will more fauour them, now beeing your owne. Then I (your deuoted servant) shall think my paines heerein very well rewarded, & be better encouraged to employ my time hereafter in your fur­ther seruice.

Yours in all duetie, George Kirbye.

THE TABLE

Songs to 4. voyces.
  • LOE heere my heart I leaue. I
  • Alas what hope of speeding. II
  • What can I doe my dearest. III
  • Woe am I my hart dies. IIII
  • Farewell my loue. V
  • Sleep now my Muse. VI
Songs to 5. voyces.
  • Ah sweet alas when first I saw. VII
  • Mourne now my soule. VIII
  • Sound out my voyce. 1. part. IX
  • Shee that my plaints. 2. part. X
  • What shall I part thus vnrewarded. XI
  • Sorrow consumes mee. 1. part. XII
  • Oh heauens. 2. part. XIII
  • Why should I loue. XIIII
  • Sweet loue, sweet loue. XV
  • That Muse which soung, XVI
  • See what a maze of error. XVII
  • If pittie reigne with beautie. XVIII
Songs to 6. voyces.
  • Ah cruell hatefull fortune. XIX
  • I loue alas, yet am I not beloued. XX
  • Must I part my sweet iewell. XXI
  • Vp then, Melpomene. 1. part. XXII
  • Why waile wee thus. 2. part. XXIII
  • Sleep now my Muse. XXIIII
FINIS.

I.

[...] LOe heere my hart I leaue with hir remay- ning, I [...]leaue with hir remayning, Loe here my hart I leaue with hir [...]remayning, that neuer yet did deigne to do me pleasure, and when I seeke to [...]moue hir with complayning, complayning, she skornes my sighes and teares alas past [...]measure, alas past measure, shee skornes my sighes & teares alas past measure, sweet [...]Loue, oh turne hir hart at last & ioy mee & ioy mee, or els hir deepe disdaine [...] (repeat) will soone destroy mee. sweet Loue, oh turne hir hart at last & [...]ioy mee, at last & ioy mee, and Ioy mee, or els hir deep disdaine (repeat) will [...]soone destroy mee.

II.

[...] ALas what hope of speeding, wher hope beguild, lies bleeding, [...]alas what hope &c. shee bad come when shee spyde mee, and [...]when I came she flyde mee, (repeat) thus when I [...]was beeguiled, beeguiled (repeat) shee at my sighing smy­led, [...]she at my sighing, shee at my sighing smy­led, [...]But if you take such pleasure, of hope and ioy my treasure, by de­ceipt [...]to bereue me, (repeat) bereue me, loue me & so deceiue me. But [...]if you take such plesure, of hope & ioy my tresure, by deceipt to bereaue me, (repeat) [...]bereaue mee, loue me & so deceiue mee.

III.

[...] WHat can I doe my dearest, of the sweet help depri- ued, of the sweet [...]help depri- ued, of those thy faire eies, by which I still haue li- ued, I still haue li­ued, [...]my dear-est of the sweet help depriued, what can I doe my dearest, of the sweet help, de­priued, [...]of those thy faire eies, by which I still haue li- ued, by which I still haue [...]li- ued, How can my soule endure, ij. thus charg'd with sad- nesse, Ex­ile, [...]from thy deare sight, ij. so full of glad­nesse. [...]How can my soule endure, how can my soule endure, thus charg'd with sad­nesse, [...]Exile, from thy deare sight, ij. so full of [...]glad- nesse, so full of glad- nesse, so full of glad- nesse.

IIII.

[...] WOE am I my heart dies, (repeat) my hart dies, as [...]that which on thy will re- lies, since then I die, (repeat) onely in hope to [...]please thee, since then I dye, onely in hope, in hope to please thee, No griefe of [...]death though cru- ell, shall disease mee, No griefe of death though cru­ell [...]shall disease mee, yet shall I bee tormented, tormented yet shall I bee tormen­ted, [...]tormented, cruell, to see thee pleas'd & conten- ted. yet shall I [...]bee tormen- ted, yet shall I bee tormented, cruell, to see thee pleas'd [...]and conten- ted, (repeat) cruell, to see thee pleas'd [...]and con-ten- ted, cruell, to see thee pleas'd and contented.

V.

[...] FArewell, farewell my loue, I part contented, (repeat) [...]since tis ordein'd that I must leaue thee, that I must [...]leaue thee, since tis ordeyn'd that I, that I must leaue thee, Oh might I stay, [...]although tormented, Oh might I stay, although tormen- ted, the [...]paine next death, would little greeue mee, the paine would little greeue mee, [...]the paine next death, the paine wold little greeue mee, No greater torment can bee [...]proued, then thus to part then thus to part from my bee-lou- ed. (repeat) [...]No greater torment can bee proued, then thus to part, [...]then thus to part from my beelou- ed. (repeat)

VI.

[...] SLeepe now my Muse, and henceforth take thy [...]rest, and henceforth take thy rest, which all to long thy [...]selfe in vaine had wasted, Let it suffice, (repeat) I still must liue opprest, [...]and of my paines, (repeat) the fruit must nere be tasted, and of my paines, [...] (repeat) the fruit must nere bee ta- sted, Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) [...]Fate cannot be withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake & do no [...]good. Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) Fate cannot bee withstood, it's better [...]sleepe, then wake and dooe no good. it's bet-ter sleepe, (repeat) then [...]wake and dooe no good.

Heere endeth the songs of foure parts.

VII.

[...] AH sweet a- las when first I saw those eyes, when [...]first I saw those eies, those eyes so rich with cristall maie­stie, [...] (repeat) their wounding beawty, their wounding beau­tie, [...]gan to tyrannize, (repeat) & made mine eies bleed teares full piteously, [...]I felt the wound, yet feard I not the deed, (repeat) Till ah, I [...]found my teares did inward bleed, my teares did inward bleed. (repeat) Till [...]ah, I found my teares did in- ward bleed, my teares did inward bleed.

VIII.

[...] MOurne now my soule with anguish of my paine, with [...]anguish of my paine, crost are my ioies (repeat) [...]which hope did e- uer giue, crost are my ioies my ioyes which [...]hope did e- uer giue, Dry are mine eyes, (repeat) with shedding teares in [...]vaine, with shedding teares with shedding teares in vaine, Dead is my hart, [...]which neuer more can liue, (repeat) hard are my torments (repeat) [...]hard are my torments, liueing thus in griefe, Harder yet hir hart, that yeeldeth [...]no reliefe, harder yet hir hart, that yeeldeth no reliefe.

IX.

[...] SOund out &c. With plea-sant tunes re-cording, Sound out [...]my voice, with plesant tunes recording, The new [...]delight, that loue to mee in-spy- reth, the new delight that loue to [...]mee in-spireth, that loue to mee inspireth, that loue to me, to me inspy- reth, [...]Pleas'd & content with that my minde de- sireth, pleas'd & content [...]with that my minde de-si- reth, thanked be loue, so heauenly ioies affor­ding, [...] (repeat) so heauenly ioys affording, (repeat) [...]so heauenly ioies affor- ding, (repeat)

X.

[...] SHee that my plaints with rigour long re- iec­ted, [...]shee that my plaints, with rigour long reiected, [...]reiected, Binding my hart, binding my hart, (repeat) with those hir [...]golden tresses, (repeat) with those hir golden tres- ses, In recom­pence, [...]in recompence, in recompence, (repeat) in [...]recompence, of all my long dis- tres- ses, of all &c. said with [...]a sigh, thy loue hath mee infec- ted, thy loue hath [...]mee in- fec- ed, thy loue hath mee in- fec- ted, [...]infected.

XI.

[...] WHat shall I part thus vn-re-garded, (repeat) [...]from you whom death could not dis- seuer, (repeat) [...]disseuer, Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly re- warded, rewar- ded, [...]why then vaine hope adew, adew for e- uer, why then vaine hope adew, (repeat) [...]adew for e- uer, Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly re- warded, is faithfull seruice [...]thus cruelly re- war-ded, why then vaine hope, adew, adew for e­uer, [...]why then vaine hope adew, adew for e- uer.

XII.

[...] SOrrow consumes mee, consumes mee, and in [...]stead of rest, (repeat) with foulded armes (repeat) [...]I sad- ly sit & weep, & if I winck it is (but) for feare, it is [...](but) for feare to see, the fearefull dreames effectes (repeat) that [...]trou- ble mee.

XIII

[...] O Heauens? Alas, a- las a- las must I, must I my selfe be [...]murdrer of my selfe, be murdrer of my selfe, must I, my [...]selfe be forst to ope the way, must I my selfe be forst to ope the way wherat my [...]soule in wounds may sal- ly forth, in wounds may sally forth wherat my soule in [...]wounds may sal- ly forth, hard is my hap, (repeat) & thus in [...]griefe I dye.

XIIII.

[...] WHy should I loue, (repeat) since she doth proue vn­gratefull, [...]why should I loue, (repeat) since she doth [...]proue vngratefull, since for re- ward I reap naught but disdaine, since for re­ward [...]I reap disdaine, I reap naught but disdaine, it is hatefull, (repeat) [...]& reason would I should not loue in vaine, I should not loue in vaine, yet all in [...]vaine when all is out of season, for loue, for loue, hath no so-ci-e-tie [...]with reason. yet all in vaine, yet all in vaine, when all is out of sea-son, for loue, [...]for loue, hath no so-ci- e-tie with rea- son.

XV.

[...] SWeet loue, sweet loue, O cease thy fly- ing, [...]and pit-ty mee, now dy- ing, to ease my hart distressed, [...] (repeat) with hast make thy re- tur- ning, & quench my [...]restlesse burning, and quench my restlesse burnning, (repeat) [...]That I by you redres- sed, may bee re-ui-ued, may bee reuiu'd, and [...]honor you as blessed, may bee re- ui-ued, may bee reuiu'd and honor you as [...]bles- sed. That I by you redressed, may be re- uiued, may bee reuiu'd, & [...]honor you as blessed, may bee reuiu'd, and honor you, may bee reuiu'd and [...]honor you as blessed.

XVI.

[...] THat Muse which soung, that Muse which [...]soung, the beauty of thy face, In sweet well tuned [...]songes, and harmony that pleased, and harmony that plea-sed, if still I bee disea­sed, [...]can carroll of thy wrongs, (repeat) & blaze these faults, that [...]will thy worth dis- grace, yet if thou doost repent thee, (repeat) I [...]will forgiue, (repeat) that mends shall well content mee. yet if thou doost re­pent [...]thee, (repeat) I will forgiue, (repeat) that mends shall well con­tent [...]mee. I will forgiue, (repeat) that mends shall well content mee.

XVII.

[...] SEe what a maze of error (repeat) and [...]laborinth of ter- ror, (repeat) my loue hath [...]tra- ced, my loue hath tra- ced, wretched [...]I, (repeat) whom loue paineth, (repeat) and true faith onely gaineth, [...]hope vt- terly disgraced, and true faith onely gaineth, hope vtterly disgra­ced, [...]hope vtterly disgraced, & by disdaine, & by disdaine defaced. [...]& by disdaine, defa- ced & by disdaine, & by disdaine de- faced, & by dis­daine [...]defaced.

XVIII.

[...] IF pittie raigne with beautie, (repeat) [...]then may I be assured, that what my harme procured, [...] (repeat) will yeeld mee help of duety, If pittie reigne with beautie, [...]then may I be assured, (repeat) that what my harme procured, (repeat) [...]will yeeld mee help, of duety, of due- ty, For wrongfull [...]she was neuer, (repeat) then why should I still in dispaire perse-uer, for [...]wrongfull shee was neuer, then why should I, still in dispaire perseuer.

Heere endeth the songs of fiue parts.

XIX

[...] AH cruell hatefull fortune, (repeat) now must [...]I death importune, now must I &c. since that [...]I am of all my hope depri- ued, nor but for sorrow, had my soule suruiued, [...]had my soule surui- ued, one- ly this hope doth rest for my contentment, that [...]fortune tyr'd will yeeld mee some amendment, (repeat) some a­mend- [...]ment, one- ly this hope doth rest for my contentment, (repeat) [...]that fortune tir'd will yeeld me some amendment. (repeat) [...]will yeeld mee some amendment.

XX

[...] I Loue alas, yet am I not belo- ued, beloued, I loue [...]a- las, yet am I not beloued, (repeat) my [...]sutes are all re-iected, & all my lookes suspected, Ex-pe-rience now too late hath [...]proued, that t'was in vaine that erst I loued, that t'was &c. that erst &c. [...]that t'was in vaine I loued, Ex-pe-rience now to late hath proued, now too late hath [...]proued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, (repeat) [...]that erst I lo-ued.

XXI.

[...] MVst I part, O my Iuell, haplesse, haplesse, must I part, [...]ô my Iuell, haplesse, from my faire sunne, whose [...]beames mee nourish, whose beames me nourish, A-las, a-las, who now comfor­teth, [...]or doth mee cherish, pained with griese so cruell, Oh, if it so must needs [...]bee, (repeat) my wicked fortune, how can she further harme mee. how [...]can shee further harme mee, Oh, if it so must needs bee, my wicked fortune, how [...]can shee further harme mee- how can shee further harme mee.

XXII.

[...] VP then, Mel-po-me-ne, the mournfulst Muse of [...]nine, such cause of mourning, of mourning, such cause of [...]mourning, neuer hadst afore, Vp griesly gostes, & vp my ru- ful rime, Matter of [...]mirth now shalt thou haue no more, (repeat) for dead shee [...]is, that mirth thee made of yore, Dy-do my deare a- las is dead, (repeat) [...]Dydo my deare, a-las, is dead, Dead & lyeth wrapt in [...]lead, (repeat) and lyeth wrapt in lead, O heauy hearse, (repeat) [...]Let streaming tears bee pou- red out in store, (repeat) [...]O carefull verse, ô carefull verse.

XXIII.

[...] WHY waile wee thus, why weary wee the gods with plaints, [...] (repeat) as if some e-uell were to hir beetight, shee reignes a [...]goddesse, now emong the saints, that whilome was the saint of shepperds light, [...] (repeat) of shepperds light, and is enstalled now in [...]heauens hight, (repeat) I see thee blessed soule [...]I see, walke in E- li- zi-an fields so free, E- li- zi- an fields so free, [...]O happy hearse, (repeat) O hap- py hearse, might I once [...]come to thee, (ô that I might) O ioy- full verse. (repeat) [...]O ioy- full verse. O ioyfull verse.

XXIIII.

[...] SLeep now my Muse, and henceforth take thy rest, [...]and henceforth take thy rest, and henceforth take [...]thy rest, which all to long, (repeat) thy selfe in vaine had wasted, had wasted, [...]Let it suffice, (repeat) I still must liue opprest, (repeat) and [...]of my paines, the fruit must nere bee tasted, and of my paines, (repeat) [...]the fruit must nere bee ta- sted, Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) Fate [...]cannot be withstood, (repeat) it's better sleep, (repeat) Then [...]sleep my Muse, Fate cannot be withstood, It's better sleep, then wake & [...]doe no good. doe no good, then wake and dooe no good.

FINIS.
TENOR. The first set …

TENOR. The first set OF ENGLISH Madrigalls, to 4. 5. & 6. voyces.

Made and newly published by George Kirbye.

LONDON Printed by Thomas Este dwelling in aldersgate street. 1597.

To the vertuous, and very worthy Gentlewo­men, Mistris Anne: and Mistris Frauncis Iermin, daughters to the right worshipfull, Syr Robert Iermin Knight, (his very good Maister) G. K. wisheth in this life, increase of all vertues, and in the life to come, the full fruition of all happinesse.

IT were a thing very vnnecessary (thrise worthy & vertuous gentlewomen) for mee (although I were able) to speake any thing in commendation & praise of Musicke, considering (besides that many learned men haue learnedly written in commendation there­of) the examples of times past, and our owne expe­rience euery day, doth giue sufficient testimonie both of the pleasure and proffit that it bringeth to a di­stressed & melancholy mind. Also I think it conuenient not to answere (other­wise then with silence) to those (more sencelesse then brute beastes) that with open mouthes docin-veigh, & speake all the euill they can against that excellent knowledge. But it standeth mee in hand, rather to craue pardon, for this my boldnes, in putting to the veiw of so many learned Musitions, (which this age & Realme affordeth) these first fruites of my poore knowledge in Musicke, yet I hope, that as they themselues had small entrances, beefore they came to their perfection, so they will fauourably, accept of these beginnings, looking for better hereafter: And in hope of their better likings, I haue made choise of you to patronise these my labours, as well for the Haereditarie vertues of your godly parentes alreadie dwelling in you, as also for the delight, knowledge, and practise which you haue in Musicke, in the which few or none (that I know) can excell you. Vouchsafe therefore (worthy Mistrisses) to vndertake the tuition of that, which by right & equitie, you may challenge for your owne, being no straungers, but home bredd, & which for your delight & cōtentments were first by me compiled: & as you seemed to like them, being mine, so I doe not doubt but you will more fauour them, now beeing your owne. Then I (your deuoted seruant) shall think my paines heerein very well rewarded, & be better encouraged to employ my time hereafter in your fur­ther seruice.

Yours in all duetie, George Kirbye.

THE TABLE

Songs to 4. voyces.
  • LOE heere my heart I leaue. I
  • Alas what hope of speeding. II
  • What can I doe my dearest. III
  • Woe am I my hart dies. IIII
  • Farewell my loue. V
  • Sleep now my Muse. VI
Songs to 5. voyces.
  • Ah sweet alas when first I saw. VII
  • Mourne now my soule. VIII
  • Sound out my voyce. 1. part. IX
  • Shee that my plaints. 2. part. X
  • What shall I part thus vnrewarded. XI
  • Sorrow consumes mee▪ 1. part. XII
  • Oh heauens. 2. part. XIII
  • Why should I loue. XIIII
  • Sweet loue, sweet loue. XV
  • That Muse which soung, XVI
  • See what a maze of error. XVII
  • If pittie reigne with beautie. XVIII
Songs to 6. voyces.
  • Ah cruell hatefull fortune. XIX
  • I loue alas, yet am I not beloued. XX
  • Must I part my sweet iewell. XXI
  • Vp then, Melpomene. 1. part. XXII
  • Why waile wee thus. 2. part. XXIII
  • Sleep now my Muse. XXIIII
FINIS.

I.

[...] LOe heere my hart I leaue with hir remainīg, with hir I leue remaining, re­maining, [...]Loe heere my hart I leaue, with hir I leaue re- mai- ning, that neuer yet did [...]deigne to doe mee pleasure, and when I seeke to moue hir with complayning, & whē I [...]seeke to moue hir with complaining, (repeat) she skorns my sighes & teares, past mea­sure, [...]shee skornes my sighs & teares a-las past measure, (repeat) sweet loue, oh [...]turne hir hart at last and ioy mee, at last & ioy mee, (repeat) or else hir deep dis­daine, [...]will soone destroy mee. (repeat) sweet loue, oh turne hir [...]hart at last and ioy mee, at last and ioy mee, (repeat) or else hir deepe dis­dayne, [...]will soone destroy mee. or else hir deepe disdaine, will soone destroy mee.

II.

[...] ALas: What hope of speeding, where hope beguild, lies bleeding, A­las, [...]what hope of speeding, wher hope beguild lies bleeding, shee bad come when shee [...]spyde mee, (repeat) and when I came, shee flyde mee, (repeat) [...]thus when I was beeguiled, (repeat) shee [...]at my sighing, shee at my sighing smiled, shee at my sighing, (repeat) [...]smy- led, But if you take such pleasure, of hope and [...]ioy my treasure, by deceipt to beereaue mee, (repeat) to beereaue mee, [...]loue me & so deceiue mee. But if you take such pleasure, of hope & ioy my trea­sure, [...]by deceipt to bereaue me, (repeat) to bereaue me, loue me & so deceiue mee.

III.

[...] WHat can I doe my dearest, of the sweet help depriued, ij. [...]of those thy faire eies, by which I stil, I still haue liued, what can I doe my dearest, of the sweet [...]help, ij. depriued, what can I do my dearest, of the sweet help depriu'd depri- ued, [...]of those thy faire eies, by which I still haue li- ued, I still haue li- ued, ij. [...]How can my soul endure, my soul endure, thou charg'd with sad- nes, [...]Exile, frō thy deare sight, ij. so full of glad- nes, of glad­nesse [...]ij. How can my soule endure, my soule endure thus charg'd with [...]sad- nesse, Exile, frō thy deare sight, ij. so full of glad- nesse, of [...]glad- nes. ij. so full of glad- nesse.

IIII.

[...] WOe am I my hart dies, (repeat) my hart dies, as yt which [...]on thy will relyes, since then I dye, (repeat) since then I die, onely in [...]hope to please thee, since then I die, (repeat) onely in hope to please [...]thee, No grief of death though cruell shal disease mee, No griefe of death though [...]cru- ell shall dis- ease mee, yet shall I bee tormēted, tormen-ted, yet [...]shall I bee tormented, (repeat) cruell, to see thee pleas'd and conten­ted, [...]yet shall I bee tormented, tormented, (repeat) tor­mented, [...]cruell, to see thee pleas'd and conten- ted, cruell, to [...]see thee pleas'd, thee pleas'd and contented. and contented.

V.

[...] FArewell my loue, I part con-tented, (repeat) [...]since tis ordain'd yt I must leaue thee, yt I must leaue [...]thee, (repeat) since tis ordain'd that I must leaue thee, (repeat) Oh might I [...]stay, although tormented, (repeat) the paine next death, the [...]paine next death, would little greeue mee, (repeat) the paine next death, [...] (repeat) would little greeue mee, No greater torment can bee prooued, then [...]thus to part, then thus to part frō my beeloued. (repeat) No greater [...]torment can bee prooued, then thus to part, (repeat) from my beeloued, then [...]thus to part, (repeat) from my beelou- ed.

VI.

[...] SLeepe now my Muse, and henceforth take thy rest, [...] (repeat) which all to long thy self in vain had [...]wasted, Let it suffice, let it suffice, (repeat) I still must liue op- prest, and [...]of my paines, the fruit must nere bee tasted, and of my paines, the fruit must [...]nere bee tasted, (repeat) Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) then [...]sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot bee withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake and [...]dooe no good. Then sleepe my Muse, then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) Fate [...]cannot bee withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake and dooe no good. it's better [...]sleepe, (repeat) then wake and dooe no good.

Heere endeth the songs of foure parts.

VII.

[...] AH sweet a- las when first I saw those eyes, (repeat) [...]a- las when first I saw those eyes, (repeat) those [...]eyes so rich, those eyes so rich with cristall maie- stie, there wounding beawtye, (repeat) [...]gan to ty- rannize, And made mine eies bleed teares full piteously, [...]full piteously, (repeat) I felt the wound, yet feard I not the deede, yet [...]feard I not the deede, Till, ah, I found my teares did in- ward bleed. Till, [...]ah, I found my teares, dyd inward bleed.

VIII.

[...] MOurne now my soule, with an- guish of my paine, [...]Crost are my ioyes, my ioyes, Crost are my [...]ioyes which hope dyd euer giue, which hope dyd euer giue, Dry are myne eyes, [...]with shedding teares in vaine▪ (repeat) [...]with shedding teares in vayne, Dead is my hart, which neuer more can liue, can liue, [...]hard are my torments, my torments, (repeat) liuing thus in griefe, harder [...]yet hir heart, that yeeldeth no re- liefe. (repeat) harder yet [...]hir heart, (repeat) that yeeldeth no reliefe.

IX.

[...] SOund out my voice, with pleasaunt tunes, with pleasant [...]tunes recor- ding, Sound out my voice, with pleasant [...]tunes recording, The new delight that loue to mee inspireth, (repeat) [...]that loue to mee inspireth, Pleas'd and contented with [...]that my minde de-si- reth, my minde desireth, with that my minde desireth, thank­ed [...]bee loue, so heauenly ioyes affording, thanked be loue, so heauenly ioyes affor­ding. [...]so heauenly ioies affor- ding, (repeat) so heauenly ioyes affor­ding. [...] (repeat)

X.

[...] SHee that my plaints with rigour long re-iec-ted, [...]with rigour long reiected, she that my plaints with rigour [...]long reiected, binding my hart, binding my hart, binding my hart, with those hir [...]golden tresses, (repeat) In recompence, in recompence, in [...]recompence (repeat) of all my long distresses, (repeat) my [...]long distresses, said with a sigh, thy loue hath mee infected, [...]said with a (sweet) sigh thy loue hath mee infec- ted, thy loue &c. thy [...]loue hath mee infected, infected, thy loue hath mee in­fected. [...]

XI.

[...] WHat shall I part thus vn- regarded, (repeat) [...]from you whom death could not disseuer, (repeat) [...]whom death could not, whom death could not disseuer. Is faith- full [...]seruice thus cruelly rewarded, thus cruelly rewarded▪ is faithfull seruice thus cruelly re­warded, [...]why then vaine hope, adew, (repeat) adew for euer, adew (repeat) a­dew [...]for euer, Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly rewarded, thus cruelly &c. is [...]faithfull seruice thus cruelly rewarded, why then vaine hope, adew (repeat) adew [...]for euer, adew (repeat) adew for euer.

[...].

[...] SOrrow consumes mee, (repeat) consumes mee [...]and in stead of rest, in stead of rest, with foulded armes [...] (repeat) I sadly sit and weep, & if I winck it is (but) for feare, it is (but) for [...]feare to see, & if I winck it is (but) for feare to see, the fearefull dreames effectes [...]that trouble mee that trooble mee.

[...]

[...] OH heauens what shall I doe? what shall I doe? A­las▪ [...] Alas a-las must I, must I my selfe be murdrer of my [...]selfe, must I, be murdrer of my selfe, must I my selfe (alas) be forst to ope the [...]way, must I my selfe be forst to ope the way whereat my soule in wounds may [...]sal- ly forth, may sally forth, whereat my soule, whereat my soule may sally [...]forth, hard is my hap (repeat) hard is my hap, & thus in griefe I dye.

XIIII.

[...] VVHy should I loue, since she doth proue vngrate­full, [...] why should I loue, since she doth proue vngrate­full, [...] since for reward I reap dis-daine since for reward I reap naught but [...]disdaine reap naught but disdaine, loue thus to be requited, (repeat) it is [...]hatefull, & reason would I should not loue in vaine, not loue in vaine, yet all in [...]vaine (repeat) for loue, (repeat) for loue hath no so-ci- e-tie with reason, [...]yet all in vaine (repeat) for loue, (repeat) for loue hath no so-ci- e-tie with [...]reason.

XV.

[...] SWeet loue, sweet loue, O cease thy fly- ing, [...]sweet loue, and pitty mee now dy- ing, to [...]ease my hart distressed, with hast make thy re-tur- ning & quench my restlesse [...]burnning, & quench my restlesse burn- ning, that I by you re-dressed, [...]may bee re- uiued, and honor you as blessed, may bee re- uiued, may bee re­uiu'd [...] & honor you, may bee reuiu'd & honor you as blessed. That I by you redres­sed, [...] may be re- uiued, and honor you as blessed, may bee re- uiued, may be re­uiu'd [...] and honor you, may bee reuiu'd and honor you as blessed.

XVI.

[...] THat Muse which soung the beauty of thy face, [...]that Muse which soung, that Muse which soung, [...]which soung the beauty of thy face, In sweet well tu-ned songes, and [...]harmony that pleased, and harmo- ny that pleased, if still I bee diseased, can [...]carroll of thy wrongs, and blaze these faults, that will thy worth disgrace, that [...]will thy worth disgrace, yet if thou doost repent thee, I will forgiue, (repeat) [...]that mends shall well content mee, yet if thou doost repent thee, I [...]will for giue, (repeat) that mends shall well content mee. I will for­giue, [...]that mends shall well content mee▪

XVII.

[...] SEe what a maze of error (repeat) and [...]laborinth of terror, (repeat) my loue hath tra­ced, [...]my loue hath traced, (repeat) wretched I, [...]wretched I whom loue paineth, (repeat) & true faith onely gaineth [...]hope vtterly disgraced, (repeat) & by disdaine, & by disdaine de­faced. [...] (repeat) & by disdaine, & by disdaine defaced.

XVIII.

[...] IF pittie raigne with beautie, then may I be as­sured, [...] that what my harme procu- red, (repeat) [...]will yeeld mee help of duety, If pittie raigne with beautie, (repeat) [...]then may I be as-sured, (repeat) that [...]what my harme procu- red, (repeat) will yeeld mee help, of [...]duety, of due- ty; for wrongfull she was neuer, then why should I (repeat) [...]still in dispaire perseruer. for wrongfull she was neuer, then why should I, still [...]in dispaire perseuer.

Heere endeth the songs of fiue parts.

XIX

[...] AH cruell hatefull fortune, (repeat) now [...]must I death importune, now must, &c. Nor but [...]for sorrow, had my soule sur- uiued, (repeat) my soule suruiued, [...]onely this hope doth rest for my contentment, that fortune tyr'd will yeeld mee [...]some amendment, that fortune tyr'd, that fortune tyr'd will yeeld mee some a­mendment, [...]onely this hope doth rest for my contentment; that fortune tir'd, [...]that fortune tyr'd will yeeld mee some amendment, will yeeld mee some amend­ment. [...]

XX

[...] I Loue alas, yet am I not beloued, (repeat) [...]I loue alas, yet am I not beloued, my sutes are all reiected, [...]reiected, reiected, & all my lookes suspec- ted, Ex- perience now too [...]late hath proued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I [...]loued, that erst I loued, Ex- pe- rience now to late hath proued, that t'was in [...]vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in vaine [...]that erst I loued.

XXI.

[...] MVst I part: Haplesse, must I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, [...]must I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, from my faire sun, whose [...]beames mee nourish, whose beames mee nourish, A-las, who now cō-forteth, A-las, [...] (repeat) or doth me cherish, pained with grief so cruell, Oh, oh if it [...]so must needs bee, my wicked fortune, how can shee further harme mee, (repeat) [...]Oh, if it so must needs bee, my wicked fortune, how can shee further [...]harme mee, how can shee further harme mee.

XXII.

[...] VP then, Melpomene, the mournfulst Muse of nine, [...]such cause of mourning, (repeat) neuer hadst a­fore, [...]Vp griefly gostes, & vp my rufullrime, Matter of mirth now shalt thou [...]haue no more, (repeat) for dead shee is, that mirth thee [...]made of yore, of yore, Dydo my deare a- las is dead, Dydo my deare, a- las [...]is dead, a-las is dead, Dead & lyeth wrupt in lead, & lyeth wrapt in lead, O [...]heauy hearse, (repeat) Let streaming tears be poured out in store, let streaming [...]tears bee pou- red out in store, let streaming teares be pou- red out in [...]store, O carefull verse, ô carefull verse.

XXIII.

[...] WHY wayle we thus, why weary we the gods with plaints, [...]why waile wee thus, why weary wee the gods with [...]plaints, as if some e-uell were to hir betight, shee raignes a goddesse, now e­mong [...]y saints, that whilome was the saint of shepperds light, y whilom was y saīt of [...]shepperds light, that whilome was y saint of shepperds light, and is enstalled [...]now in heauens light, I see thee blessed soule I see, (repeat) [...]walke in E- li- zi-an feilds so free, so free, O happy hearse, (repeat) [...]might I once come to thee, (ô that I might) (repeat) O ioy­full [...]verse. (repeat) O ioy- full verse.

XXIIII.

[...] SLeep now my Muse, and henceforth take thy [...]rest, & henceforth take thy rest, & henceforth take thy [...]rest, which all to long thy selfe in vaine had wasted, thy selfe in vaine had wasted, [...]Let it suffice I still must liue opprest, Let it suffice, I still must liue op­prest, [...]and of my paines, (repeat) the fruit must nere bee tasted, [...]must nere bee tasted, Then sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot bee withstood, It's [...]bet-ter sleepe, then wake & doe no good. Then sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot [...]bee withstood, it's bet-ter sleepe, then wake & doe no good. then wake & [...]dooe no good.

FINIS.
BASSVS. The first se …

BASSVS. The first set OF ENGLISH Madrigalls, to 4. 5. & 6. voyces.

Made and newly published by George Kirbye.

LONDON Printed by Thomas Este dwelling in aldersgate sheet. 1597.

To the vertuous, and very worthy Gentlewo­men, Mistris Anne: and Mistris Frauncis Iermin, daughters to the right worshipfull, Syr Robert Iermin Knight, (his very good Maister) G. K. wisheth in this life, increase of all vertues, and in the life to come, the full fruition of all happinesse.

IT were a thing very vnnecessary (thrise worthy & vertuous gentlewomen) for mee (although I were able) to speake any thing in commendation & praise of Musicke, considering (besides that many learned men haue learnedly written in commendation there­of) the examples of times past, and our owne expe­rience euery day, doth giue sufficient testimonie both of the pleasure and proffit that it bringeth to a di­stressed & melancholy mind. Also I think it conuenient not to answere (other­wise then with silence) to those (more sencelesse then brute beastes) that with open mouthes doc in-veigh, & speake all the euill they can against that excellent knowledge. But it standeth mee in hand, rather to craue pardon, for this my boldnes, in putting to the veiw of so many learned Musitions, (which this age & Realme affordeth) these first fruites of my poore knowledge in Musicke, yet I hope, that as they themselues had small entrances, beefore they came to their perfection, so they will fauourably, accept of these beginnings, looking for better hereafter: And in hope of their better likings, I haue made choise of you to patronise these my labours, as well for the Haereditarie vertues of your godly parentes alreadie dwelling in you, as also for the delight, knowledge, and practise which you haue in Musicke, in the which few or none (that I know) can excell you. Vouch safe therefore (worthy Mistrisses) to vndertake the tuition of that, which by right & equitie, you may challenge for your owne, being no straungers, but home bredd, & which for your delight & cōtentments were first by me compiled: & as you seemed to like them, being mine, so I doe not doubt but you will more fauour them, now beeing your owne. Then I (your deuoted seruant) shall think my paines heerein very well rewarded, & be better encouraged to employ my time hereafter in your fur­ther seruice.

Yours in all duetie, George Kirbye.

THE TABLE

Songs to 4. voyces.
  • LOE heere my heart I leaue. I
  • Alas what hope of speeding. II
  • What can I doe my dearest. III
  • Woe am I my hart dies. IIII
  • Farewell my loue. V
  • Sleep now my Muse. VI
Songs to 5. voyces.
  • Ah sweet alas when first I saw. VII
  • Mourne now my soule. VIII
  • Sound out my voyce. 1. part. IX
  • Shee that my plaints. 2. part. X
  • What shall I part thus vnrewarded. XI
  • Sorrow consumes mee. 1. part. XII
  • Oh heauens. 2. part. XIII
  • Why should I loue. XIIII
  • Sweet loue, sweet loue. XV
  • That Muse which soung, XVI
  • See what a maze of error. XVII
  • If pittie reigne with beautie. XVIII
Songs to 6. voyces.
  • Ah cruell hatefull fortune. XIX
  • I loue alas, yet am I not beloued. XX
  • Must I part my sweet iewell. XXI
  • Vp then, Melpomene. 1. part. XXII
  • Why waile wee thus. 2. part. XXIII
  • Sleep now my Muse. XXIIII
FINIS.

I.

[...] LOe heere my hart I leaue with hir remay- ning, [...] (repeat) that neuer yet did deigne to [...]doe mee pleasure, and when I seeke to moue hir with complay-ning, and when &c. [...]she skornes my sighes and teares alas past measure, (repeat) [...]sweet Loue, oh turne hir hart at last & ioy mee, at last & ioy [...]mee, or els hir deepe disdaine will soone destroy mee. sweet Loue, oh turne hir hart [...]at last & ioy mee, at last & ioy mee, or els hir deep disdaine will soone destroy mee.

II.

[...] ALas what hope of speeding, wher hope be­guild, [...]lies bleeding, shee bad come when shee spyde mee, [...]when shee spide mee, and when I came shee flyde mee, thus when I [...]was beeguiled, shee at my sighing, she at my sighing, shee at my sighing smyled, [...]But if you take such pleasure, of hope and ioy my treasure, by deceipt to bee­reaue [...]mee, loue me & so deceiue mee. But if you take such pleasure, of hope and [...]ioy my treasure, by deceipt to bereaue me, loue me & so deceiue mee.

III.

[...] WHat can I dooe my dearest, of the sweet [...]help depriued, (repeat) of those thy [...]fayre eyes, by which I still, I still haue liued, by which I still, I still haue [...]liued, How can my soule endure, thus charg'd with sadnesse, Exile, from [...]thy deere sight, so full of glad- nesse, (repeat) [...]How can my soule endure, thus charg'd with sadnesse, Exile, from thy deere sight, [...]so full of glad- nesse. so full of glad- nesse.

IIII.

[...] WOE am I my heart dies, as that which on thy [...]will relies, since then I die, (repeat) onely in hope to [...]please thee, since then I dye, onely in hope to please thee, No griefe of [...]death though cruell, shall disease mee, yet shall I bee tormented, (repeat) [...]cru-ell, to see thee pleas'd and contented. yet shall I bee tormented, [...] (repeat) cru-ell to see thee pleas'd and contented, cruell, to [...]see thee pleas'd and contented.

V.

[...] FArewell my loue, I part contented, (repeat) [...]since tis ordein'd yt I must leaue thee, (repeat) [...]Oh might I stay, although tormented, the paine next [...]death, the paine next death would little greeue mee, the paine next death would [...]little greeue mee, No greater torment can bee proued, then thus to part, then [...]thus to part from my beeloued. No greater torment can bee proued, then thus to [...]part, then thus to part from my beeloued.

VI.

[...] SLeepe now my Muse, and henceforth take thy rest, sleepe [...]now my muse, & henceforth take thy rest, which all to long [...]thy selfe in vaine had wasted, Let it suffice, (repeat) I still must liue op­prest, [...]and of my paines, (repeat) the fruit must nere be tasted, and of my [...]paines, the fruit must nere bee tasted, Then sleepe my Muse, (repeat) Fate [...]cannot be withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake & do no good. Then sleepe my [...]Muse, (repeat) Fate cannot bee withstood, it's better sleepe, then wake and [...]dooe no good. it's bet-ter sleepe, then wake and dooe no good.

Heere endeth the songs of foure parts.

VII.

[...] AH sweet a- las when first I saw those eyes, those [...]eies, (repeat) those eyes so rich with cristall maiestie, with [...]christall maiestie, their wounding beawty, gan to tyrannize, gan to tirannize, And [...]made mine eies bleed teares full piteously, I felt the wound, yet feard I not the deed, [...] (repeat) Till ah, I found my teares did inward bleed, Till ah, I [...]found my teares did inward bleed.

VIII.

[...] MOurne now my soule with anguish of my paine, [...]crost are my ioies (repeat) which hope did [...]euer giue, Dry are mine eyes, with shedding teares in vaine with shedding teares [...]in vaine, Dead is my hart, which neuer more can liue, hard are my tormentes (repeat) [...]liueing thus in griefe, Harder yet hir hart, that yeeldeth no reliefe, harder [...]yet hir hart, that yeeldeth no reliefe.

IX.

[...] SOund out &c. With pleasant tunes re-cording, Sound out my [...]voice, with plesant tunes recording, The new delight, [...]that loue to me inspireth, that loue to mee inspireth, Pleas'd & content with y my [...]minde de- sireth, with that my minde de-sireth, Thanked bee loue, so heauenly ioies [...]affording, (repeat) so heauenly ioys affording.

X.

[...] SHee y my: With rigour long re-iected, shee that my [...]plaints, with rigour long reiected, Binding my hart, (repeat) [...]binding my hart, with those hir golden tresses, (repeat) In [...]recompence, (repeat) in recompence, of all my long dis­tresses, [...]distresses, said with a sigh, thy loue hath mee infec- ted, thy [...]loue hath mee infected, thy loue [...]hath mee infected,

XI.

[...] WHat shall. From you, whom death could not dis-seuer, (repeat) [...]Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly re­warded, [...]why then vaine hope, adew, (repeat) adew, adew for e- uer, [...]Is faithfull seruice thus cruelly re-warded, why then vaine hope, adew, adew [...]adew, adew for e- uer.

XII.

[...] SSorrow consumes mee, consumes mee, and in [...]stead of rest, with foulded armes I sad-ly sit & weep, [...]& if I winck it is (but) for feare to see, the fearefull dreames effectes (repeat) [...]that trouble mee, that trouble mee.

XIII

[...] OHeauens? Alas, Must I my selfe be murdrer of my selfe, be [...]murdrer of my selfe, must I my selfe, a- las be forst to [...]ope the way, wherat my soule in wounds may sal- ly forth, (repeat) [...]hard is my hap, (repeat) & thus in griefe I dye.

XIIII.

[...] WHy should I loue, (repeat) since shee doth [...]proue vngratefull, since for re- ward I reape [...]naught but disdaine. Loue thus to bee requited, it is hatefull, (repeat) [...]& reason would I should not loue in vaine, I should not loue in vaine, yet all in [...]vaine when all is out of season, for loue, for loue, hath no so-ci-e-tie with reason. [...]yet all in vaine, when all is out of season, for loue, for loue, hath no so-ci-e­tie [...]with reason.

XV.

[...] SWeet loue, sweet loue, O cease thy fly- ing, [...]and pitty mee, now dying, to ease my heart dis­tressed, [...]with hast make thy returning, and quench my restlesse burning, and [...]quench my restlesse burnning, That I by you redressed, may bee re- ui-ued, [...]may bee reuiu'd, and honor you as blessed. That I by you redressed, may be re­uiued, [...]may bee reuiu'd, & honor you as blessed.

XVI.

[...] THat Muse which soung, that Muse which [...]soung, the beauty of thy face, In sweet well [...]tuned songes, and harmo- ny that pleased, if still I bee diseased, can [...]carroll of thy wrongs, and blaze those faults, that wil thy worth disgrace, yet [...]if thou doost repent thee, I will forgiue, yet if thou doost repent thee, [...]I will forgiue, I will forgiue, (repeat) that mends shall well con­tent [...]mee.

XVII.

[...] SEe what a maze of error, and la- borinth [...]of terror, my loue hath tra- ced, my loue [...]hath tra- ced, wretched I, (repeat) whom loue paineth, [...]whom loue paineth, and true faith onely gaineth, hope vt- terly disgraced, [...]& by disdaine, & by disdaine defaced. & by disdaine, & by dis­daine [...]defaced.

XVIII.

[...] IF pittie reigne with beautie, then may I [...]bee assured, (repeat) that what my [...]harme procu- red, (repeat) will yeeld mee help of duety, For [...]wrongfull she was neuer, then why should I, for wrongfull she was neuer, then [...]why should I, still in dispaire perseuer.

Heere endeth the songs of fiue parts.

XIX

[...] AH cruell hatefull fortune, now must I death impor­tune, [...] (repeat) Nor but for sorrow, had [...]my soule suruiued, (repeat) one- ly this hope doth rest for my con­tentment, [...]that fortune tyr'd, that fortune tyr'd will yeeld mee some amendment, [...]one- ly this hope doth rest for my cōtentment; that fortune tir'd will yeeld me [...]some amendment, will yeeld mee some amendment.

XX

[...] I Loue alas, yet am I not belo-ued, I loue a- las [...]yet am &c. my sutes are all re-iected, (repeat) [...]& all my lookes suspected, Ex-pe-rience now too late hath proued, [...]that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was &c. that t'was in [...]vaine, that erst I loued, Ex-pe-rience now to late hath proued, that t'was in vaine, [...]that erst I loued, that t'was &c. that t'was in vaine, that erst I lo-ued.

XXI.

[...] MVst I part: Haplesse, must I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, must I [...]part ô my Iuell, haplesse, whose beames me nourish, A­las, [...]who now comforteth, or doth me cherish, Oh, oh if it so must needs [...]bee, my wicked fortune, how can shee further harme mee. Oh, if it so must needs [...]bee, my wicked fortune, how can shee further harme mee.

XXII.

[...] VP then, Melpomene: Such cause of mourning, neuer hadst afore, [...]Vp griesly gostes, & vp my rufull rime, matter of mirth now [...]shalt thou haue no more, for dead she is, that mirth thee made of yore, Dydo [...]my deare a- las is dead, (repeat) Dead & lyeth wrapt in lead, [...]Dead & lyeth wrapped in lead, O heauy hearse, Let streaming tears bee [...]pou- red out in store, Let streaming teares bee poured out in store, O [...]carefull verse, ô carefull verse.

XXIII.

[...] WHy waile we thus, why weary we the gods with [...]plaints, as if some e-uell were to hir beetight, shee [...]reignes a goddesse, now emong the saints, that whilome was the saint of shep­perds [...]light, that whilome was the saint of shepperds light, and is enstalled now in [...]heauens hight, I see thee blessed soule I see, walke in E-li-zi-an feilds [...]so free, E- li- zi- an feilds so free, O hap- py hearse, might I [...]once come to thee, (ô that I might) ô that I might, O ioy- full [...]verse. O ioyfull verse.

XXIIII.

[...] SLeep now my Muse, (repeat) and henceforth [...]take thy rest, which all to long, thy selfe in vaine had [...]wasted, Let it suffice, I still must liue opprest, and of my paines, (repeat) [...]the fruit must nere bee tasted, Fate cannot be withstood, [...]It's better sleep, Then sleepe my Muse, Fate cannot be withstood, It's [...]better sleep, then wake & dooe no good.

FINIS.
SEXTVS. The first se …

SEXTVS. The first set OF ENGLISH Madrigalls, to 4. 5. & 6. voyces.

Made and newly published by George Kirbye.

LONDON Printed by Thomas Este dwelling in aldersgate street. 1597.

To the vertuous, and very worthy Gentlewo­men, Mistris Anne: and Mistris Frauncis Iermin, daughters to the right worshipfull, Syr Robert Iermin Knight, (his very good Maister) G. K. wisheth in this life, increase of all vertues, and in the life to come, the full fruition of all happinesse.

IT were a thing very vnnecessary (thrise worthy & vertuous gentlewomen) for mee (although I were able) to speake any thing in commendation & praise of Musicke, considering (besides that many learned men haue learnedly written in commendation there­of) the examples of times past, and our owne expe­rience euery day, doth giue sufficient testimonie both of the pleasure and proffit that it bringeth to a di­stressed & melancholy mind. Also I think it conuenient not to answere (other­wise then with silence) to those (more sencelesse then brute beastes) that with open mouthes doein-veigh, & speake all the euill they can against that excellent knowledge. But it standeth mee in hand, rather to craue pardon, for this my boldnes, in putting to the veiw of so many learned Musitions, (which this age & Realme affordeth) these first fruites of my poore knowledge in Musicke, yet I hope, that as they themselues had small entrances, beefore they came to their perfection, so they will fauourably, accept of these beginnings, looking for better hereafter: And in hope of their better likings, I haue made choise of you to patronise these my labours, as well for the Haereditarie vertues of your godly parentes alreadie dwelling in you, as also for the delight, knowledge, and practise which you haue in Musicke, in the which few or none (that I know) can excell you. Vouch safe therefore (worthy Mistrisses) to vndertake the tuition of that, which by right & equitie, you may challenge for your owne, being no straungers, but home bredd, & which for your delight & cōtentments were first by me compiled: & as you seemed to like them, being mine, so I doe not doubt but you will more fauour them, now beeing your owne. Then I (your deuoted seruant) shall think my paines heerein very well rewarded, & be better encouraged to employ my time hereafter in your fur­ther seruice.

Yours in all duetie, George Kirbye.

THE TABLE

Songs to 4. voyces.
  • LOE heere my heart I leaue. I
  • Alas what hope of speeding. II
  • What can I doe my dearest. III
  • Woe am I my hart dies. IIII
  • Farewell my loue. V
  • Sleep now my Muse. VI
Songs to 5. voyces.
  • Ah sweet alas when first I saw. VII
  • Mourne now my soule. VIII
  • Sound out my voyce. 1. part. IX
  • Shee that my plaints. 2. part. X
  • What shall I part thus vnrewarded. XI
  • Sorrow consumes mee. 1. part. XII
  • Oh heauens. 2. part. XIII
  • Why should I loue. XIIII
  • Sweet loue, sweet loue. XV
  • That Muse which soung, XVI
  • See what a maze of error. XVII
  • If pittie reigne with beautie. XVIII
Songs to 6. voyces.
  • Ah cruell hatefull fortune. XIX
  • I loue alas, yet am I not beloued. XX
  • Must I part my sweet iewell. XXI
  • Vp then, Melpomene. 1. part. XXII
  • Why waile wee thus. 2. part. XXIII
  • Sleep now my Muse. XXIIII
FINIS.
[...]

XIX

[...] AH cruell hatefull fortune, (repeat) now [...]must I death importune, (repeat) since that [...]I am of all my hope depri- ued, nor but for sor- row, had my soule surui­ued, [...] (repeat) my soule suruiued, one-ly this hope doth rest for my con­tentment, [...] (repeat) that fortune tyr'd, that fortune tyr'd will [...]yeeld mee some amendment, some ameedment, that fortune &c. one­ly [...] th is hope doth rest for my cōtentment, that fortune tir'd will yeeld mee some a­mendment, [...] some amendment, that for-tune tyr'd will yeeld mee some amendment. [...] (repeat)

XX

[...] I Loue alas, yet am I not be- loued, I loue a-las [...] (repeat) yet am I not be- loued, my sutes are all re­iected, [...] & all my lookes suspected, suspected, Expe-rience now too late hath pro­ued, [...] now too late hath proued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in [...]vain, that t'was in vain, that erst I loued, I loued, Expe-rience now too late hath pro­ued, [...] now to late hath proued, that t'was in vaine, that erst I loued, that t'was in vain, [...]that t'was in vaine, that erst I lo-ued, I loued.

XXI.

[...] MVst I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, haplesse, haplesse, [...]must I part, ô my Iuell, haplesse, haplesse, frō my faire [...]sunne, whose beames me nourish, whose beames me nourish, Alas, who now comfor­teth, [...] a-las, who now comforteth, or doth mee cherish, payned with griefe so cruell, [...]Oh, if it so must needs bee, (repeat) my wicked fortune, how can shee further [...]harme mee further harme mee, Oh, if it so must needs bee, my wicked fortune, how [...]can shee further harme mee, further harme mee.

XXII.

[...] VP then, Melpomene, the mournfulst Muse of nine, [...]Such cause of mourning, (repeat) such cause of [...]mourning, ne- uer hadst afore, Vp griesly gostes, (repeat) & vp my ru- full [...]rime, matter of mirth now shalt y haue no more, (repeat) for dead she [...]is, that mirth thee made of yore, (repeat) Dydo my deare a-las is dead, (repeat) [...]Dy-do my deare, a-las, is dead, a-las is dead, Dead & lyeth [...]wrapt in lead, (repeat) ô heauy hearse, (repeat) ô heauy hearse, Let [...]streaming tears bee poured out in store, (repeat) Let streaming [...]teares bee pou- red out in store, O carefull verse, ô carefull verse.

XXIII.

[...] WHy waile: Why weary we the gods with plaints, why waile wee thus, why [...]weary wee the gods with plaints, as if some e-uell were to hir beetight, [...]as if &c. sheereignes a goddesse, now emong ye saints, y whilome [...]was the saint of shepperds light, (repeat) that whilome was the [...]saint of shepperds light, & is enstalled now in heauens hight, (repeat) [...]I see thee blessed soul I see, (repeat) walke in E-li-zi-an, walke [...]in E- li- zi- an feilds so free, O hap- py hearse, (repeat) [...]O that I might come to thee, might I once come to thee, (ô that I might) [...]O ioy- full verse. O ioy full verse. ô ioyfull verse.

XXIIII.

[...] SLeep now my Muse, (repeat) & henceforth take thy [...]rest, & hēceforth &c. henceforth take thy rest, which [...]all to long, thy selfe in vain had wasted, thy selfe &c. Let it suffice, I stil must [...]liue opprest, let it suffice, I still must liue, I still must liue opprest, and of my [...]paines, the fruit must nere bee tasted, and of my paines, (repeat) the [...]fruit must nere bee tasted, bee tasted, must nere be ta- sted, Then sleep my Muse, [...] (repeat) Fate cannot be withstood, It's better sleep, (repeat) then wake & [...]doe no good, Then sleep my Muse, (repeat) Fate cannot be withstood, [...]It's better sleep, (repeat) thē wake & do no good & do no good thē wake &c.

FINIS.

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