Newes From Rome concerning the blas­phemous sacrifice of the papisticall Masse / with dy­uers other treatises very Godlye & profitable.

Come awaye from Babilon my people, that ye be not partakers of her synnes, least ye receyue of her plages, for her syns are gone vp to heauen, and the Lorde hath remembered her wyckednes, Apoca. 18.

To my ryghte honorable lorde and mayster my lorde Tho­mas Hawarte / Randoll Hurleston wyssheth helthe in the Lorde.

AS ofte as I consyder (right honorable lorde) the wracke that ye chur­che suffered afore tyme I am compelled whether I wyll or no to lamēte greatly the blind­nes and ignoraunce wherin they were noseled all their lyfe tyme. And where as it was the mini­sters duties, to haue wonne, and brought them to Christe, frō their blyndnes they toke a contrarie waye, beatenge in to their heades a sorte of beggerly ceremonies fet ched out of the bottome of hell / howebeit there was many which for asmoche as they knewe the the lyghte, in no maner wolde re­tayne [Page]thē. Then they perceyuinge that their doctrine wold not roote in all mennes hartes, called to re­membraunce howe blody Iulian emperoure of Rome handled the christians, and as he whē he per­ceyued that by tyrannie he could not ouercome the Christians, made a decre wherby the Galileans bokes were forbidden to be tow­ched, for so they cauled the folow­ers of Christe. Euen so our spiri­tuall perceyuenge that by fyer, sworde, and roope, the vnlerned professours of the gospell coulde not be vanquesshed, sette such laues, and statutes wherin they for hade men to loke vpō their bokes whiche were sincere professours of the gospell. Coulde any thinge haue ben inuented more deuyl­lyshe then this to destroye the Christen religion? for they knewe well inough that after that men [Page]were shutte vp from theyr bokes which were published for the edi­fieng of other, they shuld become as it were vnarmed, and naked in euerie side so that they shulde not be able to withstand their gloses, commentaries, and scole poyn­tes, wherin the zeale that they ba­re to the christen religion aperith manifestlye. And all though they came to vs in shepe skynnes, yet inwardly they were rauenynge wolues not sparynge the flocke, as apereth most euydētly by their frutes. Howe be it many of them nowe do repent and forsake their accustomed naughtines, and submitte them selues to the scriptu­res, and to the kinges iniuncti­ons groūded vpon the scripture, in so moch that they knowe the night from the daye, of the which benefite a great sorte more had bene partakers of at this present [Page]had not the deuyll withstode the godly endeuours of oure yonge Iosias. And althoughe hetherto the religion haue not gone so prosperously forwarde, as some fayth full wold, yet it becometh not thē that professe the true religiou to ceasce at any tyme from exhor­ting other to ensue godlines, and vtterly to forsake their acustomed deuyllishnes. The which thinge must be done both wyth out feare and shame, for the wordliges will neuer ceasce from hurting them with her stinge, howbeit caull to remembraunce how wonderfully god deliuered his seruantes in the old tyme, as Daniel from the denne of lyones, the thre children from the fyry furnace, and in the newe testament leest the faithfull shulde leaue their seruice saith Christe in Mathewe in the tenth chapter feare you not them that [Page]kyll the bodys, and cānot kyll the soule, and to thintent they might ye more desierously serue out to ye ende he promised that if they con­tinued vntil the last breath they shuld be saued, wherfor leat feare wythdrawe no man from the set­tynge forth of Christes religion. And although the gospell semith mere folishnes in the wordly wise mēs eyes, yet be thou of an other mynd nothinge esteming the glo­rie of this worlde, which stinketh before the face of god and auelith nothing at all, but rather be min­ded to suffer with our maister Christe and his faythfull Aposto­les, bloues, checkes, taūtes, and death, for the gospels sake, and neuer of al this geare be one whit ashamed but say wyth Paule, I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of god from whose profession be thou by no meanes [Page]brought awaye, and be as feante in defendinge thy religion as the Ethnykes were in defendynge of theyrs. we reade that the men of Athens wo were wonderfully gyuen to supersticion as appereth in the Actes, vsed at certayne ty­mes to be sworne, whose othe was this, I wyll fyght for the religiō both my selfe alone & with other. Then seynge they whiche had no knowledge of god but by nature, were so earnest in defendīg their religion, howe moche more ernest ought Christians to be in defen­dinge their religion whiche was taught the congregacion by God him selfe? But of these wordes let no man gather, that I wolde the people whiche haue receyued the lyght to make an insurrecciō, for I take God to witnes I meane nothynge lesse, but that onely the temporall feare and shame shuld [Page]not withdrawe any man from the lyuynge God. Then let the example of the heathen moue vs, and make vs more earnest in delating of our religion then we haue ben in tymes paste. And suffre it not nowe, if it be Gods pleasure, as it is, to be troden vnder foote, but let vs thanks God for this we ha­ue receyuyd and desyer him to en­crease in vs the knowledge of his wyll, that we may cōuert the stubburne, and strengthen the weake. For this cause haue I taken in hande to set forth in englishe this lytle boke, wherin sondry maters wherby the people haue ben long seduced be well opened, the which boke I am so bolde as to set forth in your lordshyppes name / for as moche as it becometh all men to declare them selues thankefull to them of whome they haue recey­ued sundry commodities, and not [Page]for that cause onely but that your lordshyppes chyldrens chyldren, & your hole posteritie may knowe what religion youre lordshyp fo­lowed: forsakynge throughly the Romisshe ydoll, with al his toyes and inuencions contrary to gods holy words. Wherefore I praye God kepe your lordshyppe in the lyght of his worde, whiche you receyued beynge but a chylde, and encrease in you all Godlynes, that you may contynewe his ser­uaunte for euer.

To the reader.

THe truth when it hath ben hydden a longe tyme, commeth out at the length, the which hathe aproued trewe in these oure dayes as concernynge thynges yt belonge to relegion. For how the pope blynded oure fathers eyes it is not unknowen / and how many haue bene blinded in our dayes by winchesters gospels it nedith no probacyon. The whiche caste such a myst before mens eyes that they were not able to discerne chalke from chese. For when the lyue­ly worde of God was taken from men, there was nothing left wherby theyr feates myghte be tryed whether they were of God or no. And to thentent that theyr drea­mes myght more commodiously crepe into mens cōscience and not be utterly reiected, they threatned the people with sic volo, sit iubeo, and [Page]the authoritie of the churche. But nowe (thankes be to God, whiche hath deliuered vs frō theyr thral­dome) theyr authorities, without the scripture is nothynge worth. For we haue nowe free passage to the scryptures, that we maye trye whether it be chaffe or corne, that ye pope wt his noynted shauelyn­ges haue taught vs. And where as God cōmaūded them to speake nothynge of theyr owne brayne, the most part that they taught is deuylyshnes, and nothynge but deuylyshnes, in somoch that that sayenge of Christ in Mathewe is verefied of them. ye breake the ordinaunces of God to kepe youre owne tradicions. God ordayned that Christ shulde be a full and a­lonly sacrifice for mans synnes, but they say no. God sayth in Esaye, I alone haue troden the wyne presse, but they say no. And in Ex­odus, [Page]I am, I am, he my selfe whiche taketh away thyne iniquities and synnes for myne owne selues sake, but they saye no. The Apost­les teacheth there is none other waye to be saued then by Christe, but they saye no. And why? mary (saye they) oure mother the holy churche whiche can not erre, tea­cheth vs that our masses are a ful sacrifice ex opere operato for ye quicke and the dead. Our mother the holy churche teacheth that men by gyuinge of vestmentes, copes, al­terstones, platers, crosses chaly­ces, cruettes, and suche other beg­gerie, deserue forgyuenes of syn­nes, and worship God. Our mo­ther the holy church teacheth that the true worshypynge of sayntes is to cal vpon thē, to paynte their ymages, to set candels before thē, to bowe downe to thē, and make them mediatours betwixte God [Page]and man / althoughe the scripture be manifestly agaynst it, as ape­teth in the fyrste epistle vnto Ti­mothe in the seconde chapter. Therefore as often (good christen reader) as the authoritie of ye churche is layde agaynste the, marke whether it be grounded vpon the scrypture or no, yf it be grounded vpon the scrypture receyueit, for Christe sayth my shepe heare my voyce. But yf it be not, remembre what saynt Paule sayth. yf we or an angell from heauen preached you a gospell besydes that we ha­ue preached you, let him be acur­sed, as we sayd before. So I now saye agayne, yf any man preache you a gospel besydes that ye haue receyued let him be acursed. Then yf he that teacheth an other gos­pell be acursed, why shall not he be acursed that receyue it? Relyn­queshed therfore and forsake suche [Page]toyes as haue ben inuēted by mā contrarie to gods wyl & testamēt. And to thintente thou mayst for­sake them the soner I haue trans­lated these treatises ensuenge. Of whome the fyrst teacheth playnly that the papisticall Masse is no sacrifice, but rather a blasphemie of Christes passiō inuēted by mā. The next techeth how God must be worshypped aryght. The third how sayntes ought to be worshyp ped. The last what is Christianly bextie. And although their be ma­ny other thinges cōteyned in thē, yet these be the chefe & pryncipall maters which the aucthor toke in hande purposely to teache, whom reade thou with desyre of the tru­eth. And I doubte not but God wyll call the by them from many grosse errours, and encrease in the knowledge of his wyll, that & maist be partaker of the toyes prepared for the by christ. So be it.

Mithobius / Polilogus.

WHat Polilogues, when cam you out of Italy? I thought you wolde scarsely haue come a­gayne within thre ye­res, namely because you goynge frō hence to lerne sayd, as the end of my way is a great way hence, so it shall be a great whyle or that I come agayne.

Poli.

It is trewe I was so determined whē I wēt hence, but you must remēbre that in such viages many thynges do chaunce wherof it is lawefull to say I wyst not.

Mith.

Then bring you no dingnite vpon your shul­ders from Italie the fautour of lernynge.

Pol.

Yes a wonderfull dignite, as bare as may be, neuer a penye in my purse, and concer­nynge learnynge I brynge not one whit more thē I caried forth [Page]with me.

Mith.

Molde God that you came not hoome without all godlynes alsō as they do for the most part which come from thēce hyther.

Poli.

I myght haue done so, if I wold haue lefte the godli­nes that I learned in Germanie and played the Romane but if you knowe not, the belly goddes deuyllyshnes caused me to tarye no longer for although the Itali­ans be wel learned in humanitie, yet they so abhorte true religion that amonge thē there is nothing more despised.

Mith.

You remēber then what I sayd vnto you a li­tle before you went, the Italians be learned, but not godly.

Poli.

When I chaunced to talke som­what of godlines sometymes a­monge them, it came to passe that they then confirmed that name which you gaue me in tymes past cauling me a great talker, wher [Page]as by myne owne iudgement I am scarse worthie to be rekened amonge them which speake least.

Mith.

Amonge them that speake least whom I knowe if nede re­quire is fuller of tonge then any in all the hole worlde.

Poli.

You flater me now as you were wonte to do, but I neuertheles spoke frely against the Italians when ne­de required not caring thus moch whether they were offeded or no, so that I spoke the trueth.

Mith.

but as it is not safest to speake ye truthe alwayes amonge the Ita­lians, so it is not best. But what yf you had bene rewarded of the same forte for your talkynge as Theocritus Chius was of Anti­gamus., Calisthenes of Alexādre, and Antipho of Dionisius. I meruell greatly that your fre talking proued so well.

Poli.

all thynges proued very well,

Mith.

Whome [Page]thāke you for good fortune? your owne folishnes, or as the Germa­nes vse to saye, god of fooles,

Poli.

Forsoth god, for he fauored me so moch ether laboring by the waye, or tarienge for some space in the cities that I in dede plainely percepued that he pruided for me. Howbeit leest you shoulde be igno­rant in al places, and amonge all mē I pleyed not Polilogus.

Mith.

I wold haue beleued yt although you neuer had sworn, for I know howe necessarie such wisedome is in Italy.

Poli.

I marked the time, I marked the place, I marked such as were present.

Mith.

Uery well.

Poli.

yf I met with good mē and such as fauored the trueth me thought it a greate fault to lea­ue the truth, howbeit I brideled my tonge so, that I touched not them which are euell spoken of in Germanie for theyr hipocrise, and [Page]when I came in companie withe obstinate euel men, there I spake nothynge or very lytle.

Mith.

Bra­ke you neuer these bōdes, as long as you were abrode?

Poli.

I broke them twyse except my remēbraū ­ce fayle me, as we were typplyng by ouersyght, and that at Rome. The fyrste for asmoche as it was tollerable and made not greatly agaynst the estimacion of sacrifi­cers, was ascribed to dronkenes. The other because it semed to turne to the slaunder and reproche of the most holy, and of them which worshyppe this theyr beast for an ydoll, deserued pardon after that sort, that if certayne of my frindes had not cōueyed me awaye I had fedde fisshes in Tiber.

Mith.

What had you done I praye you?.

Poli.

I wil tel you. Upon a certayne daye that same highest byshoppe which fearith all heauen with his [Page]lokes dyd sacrifice, but with such pompe, such pride, such gorgeous­nes, that nothyng passed, nowe I thynkyng wyth my selfe that excepte I sawe wyth my eyes the religion vsed in the cytie, al my labour was loste I gote me in to the church and marked all thyn­ges very curiously.

Mith.

It is meruel if al thynges were not ful of hipocrisie.

Poli.

I praye god I dye Mithobius yf euer I sawe a­ny thynge more folysh or supersti­tious, for sauyng the proud vesti­mētes asses brayenges, the noy­se of musicians, a fewe childishe ceremonies, nothyng apeared in all that sacrifice worthie to be lo­ked vpon the wich be no parte of religion.

Mith.

Luther then and other good men note them not with out a cause as the destroyers of true godlines.

Poli.

I graunte that Luter is free in notyng them [Page]of hipocrisie and knauery, but my iudgement is that they are wor­thie for theyr deuyllyshnes to be described of some behementer mā, euen by some such as were in olde tyme, as Eupolis, or Cratinus, or Aristophanes, for as Horacesaith.

If any man for knauerie were worthie to be paynted.
For thefte or horedom, yf any were attaynied
If any for robbery had goten an euyll name
In paiting of such their tōges were not lame.
Mith.

I truste there wyll be euer more whiche wyll paynte theyr knauery acordynglye, for asmoch as it is knowen by the gospell. I am nowe very desirous to knowe howe you behaued youre selfe, whē you saw ye sacrifice, held you your tounge, or declared you your selfe to be angrie?

Poli.

I wente out of the church, and had muche ado to holde my tounge, but af­terwardes I wente to diner in [Page]myne Inne with a sorte of sacrifi­cers which wonderfully praysed this pompeus seruice as that daye in the church, whereby it came to passe that Luther was noted as one that vnworthilie reprouith the solemnitie of the Masse, and other godly honours. Many of them cursed the good man. Many of them sayde his heresie wold not contine we longe. Many of them sayede he was more deuylish and hurteful then any heretike which vexed the church in the fathets ty­me, wherfore Germanie is wor­thie seing it kepith thys monster, to be compelled by sworde and fi­er to obaye agayne, the Apostles seat.

Mith.

But threates wyll not ouercome the Germanes, for as much as they haue cast of the ser­uile yocke, and haue recouered ther former libertie, but made not thes folyssh wordes you to be an­grie? [Page]or mocked you those knaues by holdīg your peace? I although I be no scolder must nedes haue ā swered them as bitterly.

Poli.

I was somewhat heated with wyne the which also made me to be bol­de, for when they wold not ceace from reprouyng, and had hurt my charitie, at the length I set vpon them with wordes in lyke maner, but with such, that I made euery man, to loke vpon me and to har­ken to me, very anger lead me so farre, that I sayde not only the Pope dissentith not from Anti­christe both in tyrānie and in kna­uerie but also that al the table, of sacrificers and monkes whiche cleaue to him are vnworthie whō the earth shuld carie, to a certaine man asking whye so? sayde I, be­cause they crucifie Christ euery daye, whom the Iewes were con­tēte once only for to crucifie, with [Page]this euery one was madde, and to be shorte made suche a tumulte, beynge ready out of hande to cō ­playne of me vnto the officers, yt except certayne of my frendes had conueyghed me preuely vnto Tiber, and there had taken shyppe whiche as chaunce was, had her sayles spred redy to go, I had ben trymmed.

Mith.

yf you had spoken this in this place it had ben well, but to saye so at Rome can not be suffered of these chyldren of dar­kenes.

Poli.

And yet it can not be denyed but that to sacrifice as the papistes do, is to crucifie Christe a newe / and haue you no busines but that we may talke of this mater a fewe wordes? for I knowe that you be asmoche geuen to the scriptures as to phisike.

Mith.

The cure of the body, Eccle. 38. and confyrmaci­on of healthe be no thynges to be despysed, namely seynge the holy [Page]scrypture commaundeth men to worship the phisitian, but the cure of the soule passith thys farre as Christ teacheth in the gospel, who will then denye that a christiane ought especially to knowe the me­dicines for the soules.

Poli.

Then I praye you tel me, howe the Masse ought to be cauled a sacri­fice?

Mith.

They be greatly decey­ued in my iudgement, which toke the sacrifice of the Masse, for I wyl vse the comin worde, for a sa­tisfieng worke, which both satis­fieth for other mens sinnes, and pacifieth goddes wrath, that ys when the sacrificer, saieth that he offreth vp to god the father. Chri­stis body and Christis bloode, for the sinnes of the quicke and deade, for who wyl ve so madde to beleue that a sacrificer, cā a newe offce vp, Christe contrarye to the scriptures which once was offred Hebre. 9. [Page]vpon the crosse for our sinnes, he once died, he once was offred. Then as Paule sayth death hath no more power ouer hym, so he beyng once offred colde be offred no more.

Poli.

I am of the same, mynde, for I see yt cōfirmed eue­ry where in the holy scripture, but cheifly in the epistle to the He­brues, Hebre. 10. for on thys manet it is the­re, with one offring hath he made parfeit for euer them that be sanc­tified. Also in an other place, Hebre. 9. Christ was once offred to take a­waye the sinnes of many.

Mith.

And yet liturgia maye by a cer­tayne maner be cauled a sacrifice, yf we wyll vse to speake, of thys thynge as the olde mē vsed.

Poli.

I am ready to heare howe cer­tayne of ye old mē vsed to speake.

Mith.

Although Augustine folo­ing other mens maners caulieth the Masse a sacrifice, yet we maye [Page]gather of the wordes whiche he wrote concernyng fayth to Peter the deacon, howe thys maner of speakyng ought to be vnderstode and taken, for thus he sayeth. In those carnall sacrifices was a fy­gure of Christes flesshe whyche euen he that was without synne, was determined to offre for oure synnes, and of his blood, the whi­ch he was determined to shede for the forgyuenes of our sinnes, but in thys sacrifice is a thankys gy­uynge, and the remenbraunce of Chrstes flesshe the whiche he of­fred for vs, and of hys bloode the whiche the same god shed for vs. Cauleth he not here the sacrifice of the supper a thankes gyuynge and remenbraunce of Christes flessh?

Poli.

As farre as I can ga­ther of Augustines wordes, yf a mā take thys worde sacrifice for the remenbrauns of the sacryfice [Page]done ones vpon the crosse, he shal not be much deceyued.

Mith.

It is true, for after the same sorte Chri­sostome sayth plannely vpon the epistle to the Hebrues that this sacrifice is the remēbraūs of ye sacri­fice once done. And if ye offering of Christ done once vpon the crosse myght be done agayne by the sa­crificer, without doubt he wolde not haue sayd there, yf therfore he hath forgyuen our synnes by one sacrifice we nowe as yet haue no nede of the second.

Poli.

I wyll remēbre this place of Chrisostome well and truely, that I maye haue somewhat, to laye agaynste them whiche in euery place bragge of the doctours auctoritie.

Mith.

Bet narde, althoughe he was a mōke and somewhat supersticious affirmeth the same with Chrisostome in these wordes. Christe was ones made a healthfull sacrifice for the [Page]health of the worlde, whiche is a generall reconciliacion of the gyltie. Christes deth is a worke without example, humilitie without measure, a gyfte without pryce, fauoure without deseruynge, and Christe wolde that that alwayes shulde be cauled to remembraūce by a mysterie whiche ones was offered by for a ransom, and that that euerlastynge sacrifice shulde be in mynde, and alwayes be pre­sent with vs in grace. What can be more hardly spoken agaynste our sacrificers? he sayth yt Christe became a healthfull sacrifice for the health of the world but ones, and that this sacrifice is an euer­lastynge sacrifice, and ought al­waye to be in oure myndes. But yf this sacrifice be ones offred for our synnes, why is the same sacri­fice done-agayne cōtrarie to Christes cōmaundement by the sacri­ficers [Page]

Poli.

Paraduenture this shall be more playne yf you declare somwhat at large this worde sacrifice. Wherwith you shall do me both a pleasure and a profite, yf you wyll execute the office of a faythful scolemayster seynge you shall haue me an attent hearer.

Mith.

To speake ingenerally of this worde sacrifice the tyme suf­fiseth not, and it is not worth the labour I wyll speake therfore of the cleansinge sacrifice and the sa­crifice of thankes giuyng for thes chiefly pertene to the newe testa­ment seyng the old ys abrogated,

Poli.

Verywell.

Mith.

It ys mani­fest that ther ys one kinde of sa­crifice which purgith our sinnes, reconcyleth vs with god, and pa­cifieth hys wrath. They caule yt propiciatorie, for wyth out thys sacrifice we shuld neuer haue the father which is in heuen merciful [Page]to vswarde.

Poli.

Me thinkyth I perceiue ryght well what sacrifice you meane, euen that which was ones offred to god the father by the hie preist Christ vpō the crosse for our sinnes, as we sayed before.

Mith.

you saye trewe. There was certaine offeringes and sacrifices of whom as god was the author, so was moyses the setterfurth as types, and fygures of thys sacri­fice, for that which the hie preest was amōge the Iewes, for whom only to entre in to the holy place, yt was licēced but a certain tyme, Christ nowe wyth vs ys the selfe same for as much as the lawe ys abrogated, as the whiche alone & that ones, hath done sacrifice for our sines not by the blood of goa­tes, or calues, but by the offringe of hys owne bodie,

Poli.

Thes be most true and in my iugemēt they be more blinder thē moules which [Page]make an other purgīg thē Christ hym selfe, not without the mooste haynous reproche of Christes merites, but whie waye they not rather here what ys in the Epistle to the Hebrues concernynge that mater? Hebre. 9. Christ sayth he beynge an hie preest of good thinges to come entred in ones for all in to the ho­ly place, not by the blod of goates and caulues, and founde eternall redēption.

Mith.

The place which you haue syted a greith well to thys mater, but marke whether thes also ve not manifeste, Hebre. 9. but nowe a lytle before the ende of the worlde hath he apeared ones to put sinne to flight, by the offering vp of hym selfe. Hebre. 10. Also euery preest that ys of the old lawe, standieth daily doyng sacrifice, and for the moost parte offerith one maner of offerīg which cā neuer take away synnes, but thys man after that [Page]he had offered one sacrifice for sin­nes, sate hym downe for euer on the rigth hāde of god, and so fur­th. Thes places diligently mar­ked, and wel pōdered take forgi­uenes of sinnes, euen from those sacrifices whych were commāded the Iewes by god, as in whom was only the rightuousnes of the law, and outward iustice in Mo­ses comon wealth, now yf that in the old lawe sacrifices cōmanded by god obteined not the forgyue­nes of sīnes, who dare beleue that our sacrificers shal obteine the sa­me both for them selues and for o­ther by a rite to sacrifice inuented by man

Poli.

I wyll neuer thynke that they be able, what? mary as the sacrifices amōge the gentyles were of no valewe as when they offered a goate and an Asse to bac­chus, to Ceres a sowe, to Diana a harte, to Neptune a bulle, to the [Page]night a cockrel, to Maia a sow wt pigges, euen so I thinke that the sacrifices of oure sacrificers be with out strength, seing thei ne­ther haue the commandment nor word of god, but hange all togi­ther vpon mans traditions.

Mith.

I alowe your stedfastnes for tru­ly thes Massemongers can offre no suche sacrefice nether for them selues nor other. Thys honour most be gyuē to the one, and onely Christ, for asmoch as he hathe gy­uen his soule a sacrefice for oure synnes, Esa. 3. as Esaye wytnesseth ī the liii. chapter. Who wyll not beleue with all his harte that this sentē ce must be alwayes stedfast in the christianite? Take out of ye world the saccifice of this hyghe preest and all thynges shal be ful of vn­faythfulnes and incredulitie, on the contrarie, let this same be establesshed, and all thynges shall be [Page]full of spirituall goodnes.

Poli.

I moost constantlie beleue (thankes be to God) that mēnes synnes are forgeuen and blotted out by this onely sacrifice, that mennes con­sciences which byleue are purged frō the workes of death, that they are sāctified in dede which doubt not concernynge that mater, brefely that the gate of the kyngdome of heauen is opened for suche as hange of the merites and worthynes of this sacrifice.

Mith.

To by­leue on that maner is to be iusti­fied, as all the scrypture witne­sseth. Christe dyed (sayth Paule to the Romanes) for our synnes and rose againe to iustifie vs. Rom. 4. Yf faith laye handes on these thinges and determine with her selfe that they be certayne, as they be mooste certayne, without doute, she shall obtayne forgyuenes of synnes, ryghtuousnes, and lyfe euerlast­yuge, [Page]althoughe she neuer be at no papisticall Masse. We haue heare the word, and ceremonie of the supper, wherby suche treasure is accustomed to be gyuen. And therfore we haue no nede of this maskynge sacrifice of the Masse.

Poli.

yet I thynke the sacrifice of thankes geuynge maye be admytted in to the administracion of the supper.

Mith.

Whye not? but if the papistes when they speake of the sacrifice of the Masse, meaned the sacrifice of thankes giuinge there wolde be lesse contencion. But be cause they prate most folyshly de­fynynge the Masse to be a pur­gynge sacrifice, which beyng dayly offred for the quicke and the deed, taketh and putteth awaye not onely all veniall but also mortall synnes and so forthe. Luther not without a cause defendeth the dignitie of the mercifull sacrifice [Page]agaynst these asses, and the sacri­fice of thankes gyuynge is admitted onely in to the supper of the lorde, the whiche by vs maye be offred vp to God.

Poli.

This treasure whiche is gyuen in the sup­per to them that beleue, is suche & so great that there is nothynge in the worlde so precious, whiche maye in any wyse be conferred wt it, for it is no small thynge to be delyuered from synne, to be accōpted iust before God, yea and to be rewarded with eternall lyfe, and that frely for Christes sake. Then seynge it is so, in my iudgement it is naughtely done yf we lyke­wyse do declare no kyndnes to­wardes so merciful a God in praysynge, honorynge, and gyuynge hym thankes continually for so great benefites, for this the sacri­fice of thankes gyuynge (as I thynke) meaneth.

Mith.

Who wyll [Page]denye that, seinge we haue in that thynge the manyfest commaunde mente of God. And euen the holy goost also vseth to moue suche as beleue to the same. Psal. 49. Offre vp to God (sayth the psalme) a sacrifice of prayce, & perfourme thy vowes to the hyghest. And in the thyrde chapter of Malachie it is sayd, he wyll purge the sonnes of Leui, & wyll purifie them as golde or syl­uer, and they shall offre vnto the lorde sacrifices in tyghtuousnes, and the sacrifice of Iuda shall please the lorde, & so forth. There is no doubte but that these must be vnderstode of Messias tyme, wherfore this place contayneth bothe the sacrifices of the newe testamente. It must be taken of the purgynge sacrifice wherin he ge­ueth him selfe to vs, whiche sayth he shall purge the chyldren of Leui, and so forth. For as we can not [Page]be purged from oure synnes but by Christe, lykewyse by the same man we are become the sonnes of Leut, that is preestes, whome he wyll trye as golde or syluer. But that must be taken of the sacrifice of thankes gyuynge, which sayth they shall offre vnto the lorde in ryghtuousnes, for seynge we that beleue are become nowe a kyng­ly preesthod, it is mete that we of­fre incessauntly vnto the same the sacrifice of thankfulnes, for suche a benefite,

Poli.

you playe the phi­sician nowe in dede, not for the body but for the woūdes of the soule for who wold euer haue loked for such exactues in diuiuitie of a phisitiane I heare verely and beleue the same yt thes sacrefices of than­kes geuynge perteyne equally to all Christians, and for all this I thynke they be not all of one sort.

Mith.

They that professe diuinitie [Page]no we adayes make two kyndes of workes of suche as byleue, whiche maye be taken out of the two tables of the .x. commaundemen­tes. Thē what letteth that in thā ­kes gyuynge we maye not make two kindes of sacrifices.

Poli.

No thynge at all.

Mith.

Then let the sacrifices of the fyrst sorte be wher in we declare the kyndnes of our mynde towardes God, as truste of mercye, feare of God, mortyfy­enge of the fleshe, caulynge vpon God, confessynge of the truthe, prayse of God, and cōtynuall thā ­kes gyuynge for all our benefites eyther spirituall or corporal. For this kynde of sacrifices must ne­des be a moste pleasaunt sauour to God, seynge it pertayneth to the trewe worshyp of God aswell inwardly as outwardly.

Poli.

It is meruayle yf that continuall sa­crifice whiche the prophetes pro­phecied [Page]shulde be in the churche conteyne not all these.

Mith.

It is so, you muste remembre also that the workes of the second table be as certayne sacrifices whiche partayne to the other parte of the sa­crifice of thankes gyuynge. Is it not a moost sure token of a thanckeful mynde to obey thy parētes, & magistrates for his cause which cōmaunded the same? to abstayne from adultrie, from thefte, from robberie, from all sortes of false swearyng, from false witnessyng, and brefely from all suche wherby our neighbour may be hurt.

Poli.

They that be thus mynded to­wardes theyr neyghbour by the sterynge vp of the holy goost, me thynketh do a thynge most acceptable vnto God, so moche lacketh it that I accompte not suche workes for sygnes of a thanckefull mynde.

Mith.

And vnfaythfull me [Page]can speake very well outwardlye of suche thynges, the which thing euen Tullie alone approueth su­fficiently, and do some thynge in dede, as beyng taught by the law of nature that we muste hurte no mā, but because what soeuer they do, they do it with out fayth, they can by this kynde of sacrifice ple­ase God no more than they which in tymes past inuented Hecatom be, Lupcalia, Meditrinalia, No­uendialia, Fontanalia, Penetra­lia, Consualia, and a thousande suche other.

Poli.

Hyther I thyn­ke perteyneth that by fayth Abell offred vn to God a more plentu­ous sacrifice then Cyin, Hebre. 11. by which he obtayned wytnes that he was ryghtuous, God testifienge of his gyftes, by whiche also he beynge deed, yet speaketh.

Mith.

After the same sorte our sacrifices shall not please God onles they be seasoned [Page]with faythe, but whye do I lette you with many wordes? These thynges be taught euery daye in the pulpet, & you by youre selues maye reade inoughe concernyng this mater in bokes whiche be a­brode, that I nede not to teache you,

Poli.

Thē this is the summe of those thynges that you haue spoken of hytherto. This worde sacrifice agreeth not to the sup­per of the iorde, onles it be taken for the remembraunce of the sacrifice ones done, or for a thankes gyuynge.

Mith.

The sacrifice whi­che purgeth vs was ones fynys­shed by Christes death vpon the crosse, in somoch that as many as cleaue to hym by faythe shall cer­taynely obtayne forgyuenes of synnes and euerlastynge lyfe. Therfore it can not be done agayne by a sacrificer, but the sacrifice of thankes gyuynge pertayneth [Page]as well vnto all Christians as that we knowe that God hath gyuen vs innumerable benefites for whome we must thancke hym. Therfore we must nedes continually vse this sacrifice.

Poli.

I per­ceyue you, entendynge not from hence forthe to folowe lyghtly a contrarie iudgement,

Mith.

Then farewell and after suche tyme as you applye your mynde to diuinitie, se that of agreate talker you become a great praecher.

Poli.

It shal be done.

The trew worship of God. Curio / Alutarius.

FRom whence come you wt this youre Rosarie?

Aluta.

Out of S. Bla­ses church.

Curi.

What made you there?

Aluta.

As thoughe you knowe not what men do there.

Curi.

I aske not that with out a cause, for I meruayle howe it chaunceth that you had rather be in the churche whiche you haue hated alwayes as poy­sone, thā in the tauerne.

Aluta.

Wel what soeuer I haue done is myn owne harme and not yours. No the Lutherians haue bene onely the cause, that I haue gone so sel­dome to the church.

Curi.

What Lutherians? howe so?

Aluta.

I ne­uer come in to any churche where as they be gouernours, but that I fynde some man preachynge, or [Page]the people syngynge psalmes in the mother tonge, which thinges I can not abyde, and I thynke they be not well done, for who can abyde hym that in his sermon al­wayes rūneth aboute one stringe, and the people synging one song, but chefely the preachers here be so hote, yt they alwayes inueygh agaynst synne, they alwayes bete in to mennes heades repentaūce, they alwayes preache Christ, they alwayes moue men to fayth, they haue charyte alwayes in theyr mouthes, and I can not tell what crosse. Howe moche better were it for them to please the people, and caule them to the feare of God by chaunge of ceremonies, as our fathers dyd.

Curi.

I can not se howe that sermones of repentaunce, of Christe, of fayth, and of the crosse, can be odious to any man seynge in them is the foundacion of chri­sten [Page]religion. And verely whome sermons of the gospell moue not I can not tell what ceremonie wil moue them. What is the chiefest cause why the people be called to­gether? that the word may be preached and harde, and that then we maye cause to God to gyue the encrease, for I perceyue not howe he can be called a christē man which desyreth not moost feruently the truthe and the worde, as Christe sayth, Ioh. 8. he that is of God heareth the wordes of God, ye therfore heare not the wordes of God be­cause ye are not of God, verely I graunte that it semeth vayne lyp labour, to the and suche as thou arte, yf Christ be ofte spoken of, yf suche thynges be earnestly prea­ched as perteyne to the christiās, But we knowe with the apostle whiche reioyseth that he had preached nothynge to the Corinthiās [Page]but Christe, 1. Cor. 1. that these preachyn­ges of the gospell are the vertue and powre of God, Rom. 1. and that to saluacion to all that byleue. Then seynge that holy preachynge be thynges so necessarie to saluaciō, me thynke they do well and semely the whiche preferre no ceremo­nies althoughe it be neuer so co­mendable, before the preachynge of the worde, not that I condempne all ceremonies in lyke, but that I thynke Goddes worde muste not be robbed of his due honour.

Aluta.

here the comon prouerbe pleaseth me well. Nothing to moch. for in this thynge there must be a measure.

Curi.

There is no thyng in the hole world but causeth loth somnes, oneles there be measure. Onely desyre to heare the worde of God except, neyther knoweth fulnes, or feeleth lothsomnes, as it apeareth in Magdalene which Luc. 10. [Page]wolde not leue Christe as he was teachynge, no not by the cōplayntes of Martha.

Aluta.

I can be wel contented you thynke so, so that I maye also haue myne owne mynde. But nowe syr what euell spirite brought fyrst these songes in the mother tong, in to the churche? had not the fathers brought in ynoughe afore tyme?

Curi.

No what wytche hath bewytched thy head that thou darest reproue a thyng which is good of his owne nature, and take it for a naughty thynge. Arte not thou content to speake scornefully of the worde, whose authorite ought to be most holy amouge all men, except thou also imprudētly despyse Dauids psalmes and other spirituall son­ges. But why ponder you not di­ligently whom you dispise, for the lutheranes diuysed not fyrste to synge psalmes, and spirituall son [Page]ges on this maner in the congre­gation, Eph. 5: it was taught the churche by S. Paule, as profitable and necessary for a semely ordre, who­me seynge you dispyse, beware yt you dispyse not Christe hymselfe, to youre great daunger. Excepte paraduenture you thynke it was spoken in sport, and as they were in quassynge. Luc. 10. Mat 25. He that dispiseth you dispiseth me. And what soe­uer you haue done to one of the least of myne, you haue done it to me. But nowe what is in the hole stewes, church I wold haue said, that cā delyte moch a good mynd, & that loueth Christe?

Aluta.

Mary I wyll tell you. The walles be excellently paynted, the altares be excellently trymmed, the role of ye churche is gallantly furnyshed wt gyftes offred to sayntes, what shulde I speake of those holy and many colored vestmentes? of ve­ssels, [Page]and of all the geare wherby the sacrifice of the Masse hath ben accustomed to be furnysshed, he­ther belongeth the synginge vsed in the church, the agreynge of the synginge men, a wonderful ordre in all thynges, whiche be of suche strength that they can mollyfie e­uen a stonie harte, and drawe him to the contemplacion of heauenly thynges. I wyll speake nothinge of the sacrifice of the Masse, wher at to be in my iudgement is the greatest felicitie in the worlde, namely yf you tarie the ende, & take a blessynge of the preest. Beholde you nowe the rytes of those chur­ches whiche you be wonte to call the deuyls coūsell houses, behold the worshyppe wherby they ende­uour to wynne Goddes fauoure.

Curi.

As farre as I can perceyue you lacke no tonge in rehersynge of the worshyp that youre sacrifi­cers [Page]vse, yf the tauerne coulde for­beare you, you coulde playe the Ape amonge these Asses. And al­thoughe in maner you haue rekened all kyndes of ornamentes which they customably use itheyr churches, yet you haue lefte out one speciall thynge.

Aluta.

Haue I so? then I wolde be glad to know what it is,

Curi.

The apparell of their concubynes, which they fede at home, for as they haue them, nowe onely to loke vpon theyr pagines, euen so they trimme thē, and haue them in no lesse estima­cion thē theyr aulters, for I dare not saye they take thē for saintes.

Aluta.

You bad me to speake of the vsages in the churche, and not of theyr cōcubynes, although it gre­ueth me very sore that they con­ueygh no more cleanly.

Curi.

Ca­ke you then this abundance of apparell, vessels, and songes, for the [Page]worshyp whiche God commaun­ded and wold to be frequented in the churche.

Aluta.

Why not.

Curi.

Heare then whether you be of the same mynde with the fathers in this matter, whiche alwayes hast the fathers in thy mouthe. Hierō speaketh on this maner of this mater. Let other buyld churches, cloth walles, make great pyllers, and dresse the toppes of thē with golde, put a dyfference betwyxte gylded aulters by precious clo­thes and stones, but haue you an other thyng before your eyes that is to clothe Christ in the poore, to fede hym in the hungery, to vyset hym in the sicke, to gyue hymlog ynge in suche as lacke loginge. With whome agreeth Barnarde sayenge, Oh vanitie of vanities, but not more vayne than folyshe. The churche walles glyster, and the poore nede, it couereth her stones [Page]with golde, and leaueth her chyldren naked, the ryche mennes eyes be serued by the poore mens purses. Heare you nowe what the fathers set by this folishe worship ynge of God.

Aluta.

I thynke they condempne not the moderate vse of suche thynges, but they mode­rate superfluitie.

Curi.

No they af­fyrme that God is worshyped no­thynge at all by suche thynges. What? wyll you heare the trewe worship of God out of the gospel. Iho. 4. The owre shal com (sayth Christ) when you shal worshyp the father neyther in the mountayne, nor at Hierusalem, you worshyp you cā not tell what, we worship, for sal­uation comyth from the Iewes, but the houre shal come & is nowe when the true worshipers shall worship in spirite & trueth, wolde god thys thynge chaunced not both to the, & thy sacrificers that [Page]Christe speakyth heare of the Ie­wes, that is they wot not what they worship, for seyng they binde the worshiping of god as they did to places, tymes, and sett houres, I am afraied yt maye be aplied against them, the which Christe aplied vnto the Iewes.

Aluta.

But the Iewes, and the Christeanes be not a lyke, & that which ys spo­ken of the Iewes can not be apli­ed vnto the Christiāes.

Curi.

But what if they place the Iewes? yt is if for inwarde worshipe, they fo­low carnal worship as the Iewes did, must they not be here repro­ued, and it is true that you saye the Iewes and the Christianes be not a lyke, for the Iewish wor­shiping of God for the most parte was carnall, whereas on the con­trarie Christiās must pray & worshyp God in spryte & truth. The sprite for the most part in the scriptures [Page]is contrarie to the flessh, hipocrisie to trueth. Nowe seing Christ takith from the Iewes spi­rite, and trueth, and giuith them to his Christianes, it aperith that in that people was nothing but carnal worshiping and if you ex­cepte a fewe, euen were hipocrisie, or elis he wold haue sayed as the Iewes haue prayed hitherto in spirite and trueth, so my disciples shall praye here after, wherfore wete you nowe that they worship god aright, whiche feare him as the child the father, trust vpon him, caule vpon him, caste on him al the care of this wreched lif, the which worship afterwardes folo­ith almoste in dede to the poore

Aluta.

As thoug god liked carnall thinges not the Iewissh seremo­nies for the worde knit with them and the commandment.

Curi.

Yes they pleased god, but then only [Page]when faith was wt them, for what so euer she doth must nedes be ac­ceptable vnto god, because she al­wayes eyeth hys worde and cō ­mādmēt, but if ther were no faith it is manifest that those sacrifices were hated of god, so muche they were from pleasing of him, haue not all the prophetes in maner cō ­fessed this same? Psal. 50. Dauids sayenge is, yf thou woldest haue had sacrifice I had gyuen the it, for yu wylt not be delited with hole brent offe rynges. The sacrifice to God is a lowely spirite, thou wylte not despyse (oh God) a contryte and an humble harte. Moreouer adde hyther that of Esaye. Esa. 1. Wherfore bringe you to me the multitude of sa­crifices, I am fylled with the hole burnt offrynges of youre rāmes, and with the fatte of your fatlyn­ges, and desyred not the blood of youre oxen, lambes and goates, [Page]when you came to se my face who required this of you to treade myne aultares. You se how bold­ly the prophetes reiecte the carnal worshyp cōmaunded by the law. What thynke you they wolde say yf they lyued now, of our worship ynges, whiche haue not the wor­des on theyr sydes, and are mens mere dreames.

Aluta.

what wor­shyp then aloweth he?

Curi.

Althoughe this thynge were shewed a­fore, and as it were by a lanise, in fewe wordes, yet out of the selfe same prophetes, whom we sayde before set naught by this carnall worshyp, it shall be manifestly declared you. The psalme writer be­ynge aboute to shewe the trewe worshipinge of God sayth that he shall dwell in his tabernacle, Psal. 14. whiche walketh without spotte, and worketh iustice.

Aluta.

What cal­leth the prophete there to walke [Page]with out spot.

Curi.

Who soeuer hathe goten a contrite spirite, and beleueth suerly vpon Christ, wal­keth without spotte, for she as Peter wytnesseth in the actes, purifieth our hartes on that sorte that we maye be ryghtfully nombred amonge those, of whom it is spo­ken in an other place of the fore­sayd psalmes, Psal. 112 blessed are the vn­defyled in the waye, which walke in the lawe of the lorde, for he fea­reth God trewly, trewly trusteth God, finally trewly worshypeth God.

Aluta.

What calleth he to worke rightuousnes for I thinke the prophete discenteth not from hymselfe, as whiche alytle before ascribed (as you saye) ryghtuous­nes to fayth, no sayth the same cō sisteth by workes. Heare I kyll you with youre owne darte.

Curi.

I said that to walke without spot is the same that to beleue, because [Page]that faythe onely obtayneth the cleanes of the harte for Christes sake, that cleanes I meane which is most frutfull of good workes, he therfor workyth rightuousnes which by the outwarde innocēcie of life, and by doīg good alwayes to his nighbour declarith his fai­th openly, for that trust can not be true if it worke not, and aplie hir selfe holy to hir brethernes profi­tes. Moreouer seyng the scriptu­re, requirith not only the rightu­ousnes of the hearte, but also out­warde rightuousnes as a witnes of faith, it is necessarie that with inwarde cleanes we couple out­warde, that is the workes of loue, & after thys maner to walke with out spotte must be aplied to faith, to worke rightuousnes to the out­warde comendation of loue, Esa. 2, what saye you that Esaye saithe thes thinges be so, be ye wasshed sayth [Page]he, be ye cleane, take ye awaye the naughtines of youre endeuours from my sight, giue ouer troub­lyng, learne to doo well, seke for iugemēt amēde the troubled, iud­ge the fatherles, helpe ye wydowe, Fyrst of all the prophete commaū deth that we become cleane from the fylth of our synnes, and from all vncleanes. Then that we hyn der no mā, oppresse no man, brefe­ly that we be wel and trewly myn deo towardes all men. The fyrste parteineth to fayth, for we can not be wasshed from the acustomed fylth of synne but by fayth. The other to loue, that the sence maye be. This is the very and trewe worshyp of God, yf a man feare God, truste of God, confesse that Christ is verely in the father, and the father in Christe, call on God aright, thanke god aright, and fi­nally loue his neighboure as him [Page]self,

Aluta.

Whie then do ye Luthe­ranes, condemne all ceremonies, all outward worshipyng of god?

Curi.

Nothinge lesse, so that they be taken onely for an introducciō, and fyght not with the gospell. This is my mynde that nothyng ought to be in more estimacion amonge vs, then feare, faythe, and loue. After that ones we haue ob­tayned these thynges we maye gyue our iudgement of the ceremo­nies not leauynge the worde, an ynch besides thys I disalowe not in the church a decent vse of clo­thes, vessels, and such other thin­ges so that we be not persuaded that we gett goddes fauour by those thinges, yf moreouer ther be some measure, for the aparell a­monge the Canons is so tragical that when they come to sacrifice, a man wolde thinke they come to a stage. And although they be so [Page]farre from faith, loue, innocencie of life, knolege of the scriptures, as the North is from the South, yet they trustyng vpon thes their ceremonies, so dispise, so contēpne so excomunicate them that doe o­ther wise that no thyng passith it.

Aluta.

They vse to excomunicate heretikes, sowers of dissēsion, and Lutheranes els none. And whie be you moued with thys so gre­atly, seing that all bisshopes, the Pope, and the Emperour, strike you with the same thondre bolt, if you will not be condemned, if you will not be excomunicated, if you will not be euill spoken of agree with the fathers, with the church, and hereafter vndouptedly no mā shall hisse at you.

Curi.

Well thys dispising of other, thys pride, this sickenes of cōdemning other pro­ue sufficiētly what maner of wor­shipinge thys of yours is, for hy­pocrisie [Page]maketh suche dispysers, suche slaunderers, as with whom is alwayes pryde, wherby she is proude, and loketh at her neygh­bour as crepynge as it were on the grounde in comparison of her selfe, that to be so, euen that one Pharesey in the gospel the father of thy Canons, is able to proue, Luk. 15. whiche was not content with full chekes to vaunte his workes, his goodnes, his fastes, except he had dispysed with moost deuyllyshe iudgement, the synner standynge a far of. But trewe godlynes doth farre otherwyse / she, as she dispay ryth of her owne workes, & mea­sureth the worshyp of God onely by fayth / so she hath alwayes the workes of loue, but chefely modestie, wherby she submitteth her selfe to all men / remembrynge that no worke is acceptable vnto god, yf it be not seasoned with this as [Page]a sauce, acordinge to that, I wyll mercy and not sacrifice. Math. 9. Go thy wayes nowe and bragge of thy sacrificers ceremonies.

Aluta.

I knowe that they be good men whom you in mockage call sacri­ficers / wherfore I wyll not be se­parated from them neyther here nor in ye world to com.

Curi.

what heare I? a good man in dede / wyl not you leaue so holy a companye of good men? Then trewly you do them a pleasure in so doynge especially yf youre wyfe be of the same mynde / but in earnest hither to I sought youre helthe / but be­cause you resysted my warnynge stubburnely / and as yet wyllest not come into the waye I can be well contented that lyke companie with lyke, fare well.

Of the honouringe and callynge vpon sainctes. Sanderus. Glandorpius.

HOwe nowe Glandorpius?

Glan.

Men can be at no rest.

S.

As thoughe I knew not that / but I aske howe you do.

G.

As they whiche miserably spende all theyr tyme in the scole.

S.

yet you be lustie.

G.

So so.

S.

Chaunced there any newes here in myne absence?

G.

Nothynge whiche can delyte you.

S.

But I harde a late a very mery iest.

G.

So it is com­monly sene that they whiche goo in to stran̄ge contrees, come home agayne loden eyther with tales, or some pleasant histories. But what newes harde you?

S.

You wyl laugh when you heare them.

G.

Then tell them.

S.

A certayne citezen of Gotinga supped with me eyght dayes ago / a wyttie mā [Page]as farre as I coulde cōlecture of one metyng, and worthy to be trusted, for he had a sobre loke, he, af­ter that we were set to our supper tolde vs that saynt Nicolas cha­pell whiche was not farre from Gotinga was brokē in the nyght tyme not many moneths ago: and all the golde and syluer that the supersticious people had brought thether afore Luthers tyme / was vnchested and taken away.

G.

you tell me the robbynge of a church.

S.

There when a certayne cobler heard that the theues had taken theyr heeles, and escaped luckely after they had worked their facte / sayth, why shulde I seke for helpe of this saincte? we haue beleued hytherto that many by prayenge to Nicolas broke the prisons, and escaped the punishementes that they deserued / the whiche thynge yf it were not wrought by satans [Page]subteltie to destroye vs with all / howe chaunceth it that he whiche hathe delyuered many out of stynkynge prysons, and from punysh­mentes that they shulde haue suffred coulde not loke to hym selfe. This mannes sayenge (as the say enge of an vnlerned cobler) was cetayned wt laughter.

G.

I knowe well ynoughe you remembred thē the comon prouerbe / many tymes a gardener speaketh trew thīgis.

S.

I denie it not, but there was a certayne other man present not knowne to this, a very pleasaunt tester. This man as thoughe he wolde correcte the other sayth / it is the gospell that he can not be Christes disciple which forsaketh not all he hath and foloweth hym naked. Nowe seynge ryches haue ben hitherto the let that this wodden Nicolas coulde not folowe Christe it is very lyke that he is [Page]not greatly offēded that he being delyuered of this vnlucky burden maye nowe frely and somewhat more redely folowe Christe.

G.

A mery man.

S.

The thyrde felowe this sayd euyll goten euyll loste, was that substance / sayde I then euyll goten / beware you speake nothynge folyshly agaynste the sainctes / which answered agayne I laughe not at saynt Nicholas which paraduenture was a good man / and reasteth in Abrahams bosom with the chosen / but at disceiptfull Satan whiche hathe deceyued vs so diuersely. For I am not ignorant what resorte of peo­ple was there afore tyme / & howe fouly that same disceypfull spirit brought them from the true trust on Christ, to a most false opinion concerninge the helpe of sainctes, whiche here loste not onely theyr mony, but also theyr soules. Howbeit [Page]I alowe not the robbynge of churches, for those goodes myght haue bene turned to good vses, but I abhorre the fraude, gyle, & deceypte wherby they were gottē.

G.

When you harde these thinges sayed you nothinge?

S.

After that I had spoken a fewe wordes I helde my tonge / for when I per­ceyued that they were not greatly wyse whiche began that pastyme I thought it better to take plea­sure of theyr talkinge by hearing, then to seme wyse in a mater whi­che euery man throughly knewe.

G.

You dyd wysely, but yet these men spake true, for I wyll speake as I thynke, this carnall worship ynge of saynctes as I thynke is a thynge very euyll.

S.

I denye it not / for yf a man wyll seke more earnestly the cause of this thinge, he shall perceyue that this super­sticion came and toke his begyn­nynge [Page]of prophane fables / for as euery countrey in tymes past had seuerall Goddes, haue not so a­mōge vs euery cytie, euery castel, euery towne, fayned them selues peculiar patrones? Christe in the meane tyme despysed, or nought set by. And howe imprudently, re­uerently I wolde haue sayd, haue our sacrificers tryfled in theyr sermons of saynte Antone, to whom also they haue comitted the defēce of our cytie, peraduēture because they wolde not trouble Christe with ouer moch care, I will saye nothynge that oure fathers erec­ted and cōsecrated to euery sainct seuerall churches.

G.

These chur­ches myght haue bene suffred wel ynoughe, for asmoch as men now come together to heare the worde in them, yf there had bene no false doctryne annyxed with them for remissiō of synnes, ryghtuousnes, [Page]and lyfe euerlastynge, were pro­mysed to them that bestowed any cost of them, & that with the great iniurie of Christes merites.

S.

As thoughe these sumptuous buyl­dynges haue any peculyar thyng whiche the Gentyles afore tyme perfourmed not with more liberalitie. Knew not the Emperours of Rome in tymes past in theyr tem­ples yf that eyther a souldiour shuld be called home after that he had ronne awaye, or yf theyr ene­mie shulde turne his backe, or els yf theyr enemies armie were holy destroyed?

G.

But this is sōwhat more intollerable, that to euery saincte they haue attributed a se­ueral office / as Roche to heale the pestilence, Barbara to mittigate the toth ache / George to defende a man in the warres / Erasmus to gyue ryches / and this our Nicho­las to delyuer men out of prison, [Page]I wyll speake nothynge of that great Poliphemus whome they made captayne of laughter, wyt­nessynge in verses very folyshe that the inuencion of that fygure is more then folyshe. Howe chaunced it that we vouch saulued the virgine Mary Goddes mother greatter honoure then Christ him selfe.

S.

These in dede be intollerable, because they be not farre frō the maners of the Getiles, for the gentyles also assygned euery god a seuerall offyce. As to Iupiter lyghtnynge, to Iuno mydwyfe­ship, to Venus loue, to Mars battel, to Neptune the seas, to Aesculapius phisike, to Saturne, and Ceres husbandrie, to vulcane the Frogge / and who can reken all? But as yet there is an other thige behynde, then whiche coulde no­thynge be iuuented more dange­rous, that is they haue gyuen the [Page]sainctes the honour of mediaciō, of mediacion no, outwarde wor­shyp also / for this errour beynge ones receyued destroyeth Chry­stes preesthod, and office for euer.

G.

I knowe that so great prayses of sainctes are cōtugued with the great sclaunder of Christe. For what is more vnsemely then the seruaūt to be set before the master, the creature to be preferred before the creatour, and the scholer to be more estemed then the master, but partly the contempte of scripture, and partly oure synnes brought this blindnes in to the worlde, for after that the studie of the holy scripture be ganne to be despised it coulde not be but that many er­rours and those moost pernitious shuld be sowed in the church, but thankes be to god which hath gi­uen vs the lyght of the trueth a­gayne, takyng awaye the darke­nes [Page]of so great errours, for nowe nether thes whiche reade the gos­pel, or heare it, take thes sanctes for mediatours, but Christe hym selfe. As to whom perteynith pro­perly the honour of mediation, & to none els, 1. Tim. 2. wherof Paule saieth on thys maner, ther is one medi­atour of god and man, they mene Christe Iesus, whiche gaue hym selfe a redemption for all men.

S.

Paule makyth well oure media­tour betwene god and vs. That is Iesus Christ, for when the lawe was taken awaye, the dignitie of preesthode came to thys one, it is meete, that we both acknowelege, and defende his office. The office I saye of intercession, and pacifi­eng god for vs wt his owne bloo­de. The preestes whych were in the olde lawe were apoynted to offre giftes and sacrifices both for them selues and for the people, [Page]whose preesthode death suffered not to be perpetuall / but Christe as he had no nede of any sacrifi­ces for him selfe, euen so he offred to God the father for the people, not those sacrifices commaunded in the lawe and shadowes of thinges to come but his owne blood / beynge made a preest not for a tyme but an euerlastynge preest after the ordre of Melchisedech. Then why shulde we acknow­lage any other mediatour?

G.

I knowe not whether I reade these thinges handled more connyngly in any place then in the epistle dedicated to the Hebrues / for com­pareth not the aucthor of that epistle with a moste Godly collacyon Christes preesthod with the bene­fites / wherfore I can not refraine but that I muste cyte moche of it for the confirmacion of those thinges which you nowe haue sayde, [Page]for on this maner we reade there in the seuenth chapter. And they were made many preestes because by deathe they were not suffered to continewe / but this because he continueth for euer, hathe an euerlastynge preesthod, wherfore he can saue for euer, them that come to God by hym, alwayes beynge to make intercession for vs / for it was meete that we shulde haue suche a holy bysshoppe, harmeles vndefyled, seperated frō synners, and hygher then heauen, whithe neadeth not dayly as yonder high preestes to offre fyrst for his owne synnes and then for the people / for that he dyd when he offred vp hym selfe ones for all. I pray you what could be sayd more playnly bothe of Christes office and his preesthod. Fyrste he maketh the preesthod of the lawe for a tyme, but Christes preesthod for euer. [Page]Then he sayth that we be so saued by Christe if by hym we go vnto God, fynally he describeth vs an hygh preest holy and harmeles, & whiche offred not to God the fa­ther for hym selfe, but for vs, not a sacrifice cōmaunded by the law but his owne selfe. I thynke verely that they which heare or reade these thynges, and are not feared from the callynge vpon sainctes shall scarsely haue any part in the kyngdome of God.

S.

I thynke that that in Iohans gospell belō ­geth hither. Ioh. 14. Christe calleth hiselfe a way wherby it is gone vnto the father. Also that as oftē as Paule sayth the waye to the father is o­pen for vs by Christ onely.

G.

So it is, and therfore before all thyn­ges we haue nede that Christes glory here be cōfyrmed, moreouer when that it is confirmed, thē we must se that the sainctes be not depriued [Page]of theyr prayses. And truely for my part I know that Christ onely forgeueth synnes, geueth rightuousnes, and geueth euer­lastīge lyfe. For that cause he only is to be called vpon in all necessi­ties / for so it shall come to passe that seynge he is gyuen vs of the father in the stede of a patron, me­diatour and an atonemētmaker, he wyl helpe vs so moch the more diligently, these (I saye) I knowe, And this notwithstanding I can not abide the vnwise comunica­tion of certaine, which when they heare that holy mē or sainctes are deed, and reast in Abrahams bo­bosome dispyse thē strayght way­se so speakynge of them that yf they were ruffians, they coulde speake no more irreuerently of thē.

S.

Playnly you be of my iud­gement, for although they muste neyther be worshyped nor called [Page]vpon neyther taken for mediato­urs yet we must speake reuerētly of them, and god must moost ho­norably be praysed in them the which thynge as I hearde a late of a certaine preacher is two ma­ner of wayes.

G.

I loke what you wil saye of that thinge.

S.

First of all the examples of goddes good­nes & clementie are to be knowen, and marked in them sayed he, because that all before the pardonig of sinne and imputing of rightu­ousnes, lacked grace, as Paule sayed, god shut al mē vnder sinne that he might take petie of al men for to haue marked thys wel, is to haue learned the waye of iustifi­eng. No saith he here we be war­ned howe they were saued by the free goodnes of the lorde, and are freely receiued in to euerlastyng blessednes by Christe, so we also if we acknowelege our sinnes, & [Page]truste on Christe, in all poinctes shall be saued. As for an example. When I heard the haynous fau­le of Peter, and his fre receiuyng of him agayn conceyue I not he­are a certaine truste, that he will saue me as well as Peter, after yt I am faulen, and come in to the waye agayne, and when I cōsider the hatred, that Paule had agay­neste the christianes, and agayne hys turnyng what els am I tau­ght then that I, when I am war­ned if I repente shall be partaker of the same grace. Moreouer ther is no fault so haynous, but if it be acknouleged shall be pardoned, wherof Paule speakyth on thys maner. [...]. A sure sayeng and worthie whom by al meanes we maye em­brace, that Christe came in to the world to saue sinners. Of whom I am the cheif, but I therfor haue goten mercie, yt in me first Christe [Page]Iesus might shew all gentylnes, to gyue an example vnto them whiche shulde beleue on eueclast­ynge lyfe in hym. It is manifest (sayth he) by the wordes of Paul, that to haue marked on this ma­ner, is a worshyp moste attemptable vnto sainctes, whiche wolde that the beest parte of this prayse shulde not redounde vnto them but vnto God the aucthor of their helthe.

G.

Peraduenture this the psalme writer meaned when he sayde, prayse ye the lorde in his sainctes. Also when Paule reioy­sed that God was glorified in hi.

G.

there is (sayth he) an other worshypynge of sainctes as worthy to be knowen and marked / that is when we sette before oure eyes theyr faythe, loue, hope, lyfe, ma­ners, and cōuersacion, and folowe the same / for although they bothe lyued in the flesshe and cōmitted [Page]some tymes by the weakenes of the flesshe suche as ought not to haue bene done, yet it can not be denyed but that they dyd many thynges well whiche a man maye safely folowe. We reade that they were full of many good workes, that is the exercyse of charitie, the whiche when we heare let vs re­membre that by those examples we also are prouoked to loue. We reade they prayed incessauntly / they tamed theyr flesshe by moche watchinge and prayenge, toke aduersitie paciently, and dispysed at no tyme that whiche perteyned to Goddes glory and the wealth of theyr brethren. Although whiche thinges when we reade them or heare thē read let vs also perswa­de oure selues that they belonge vnto vs. And the diligent keping and folowynge of these workes is worship so acceptable vnto sainc­tes, [Page]that Paule also sayd be ye the folowers of me, 1. Cor. 1. as I am of Christ Sainctes knowe not nor requyre any other worshypers, any other worshypynge, any other inuocacions in theyr honour.

G.

I remembre an excellent sentence of Chri­sostome concernynge that mater, and whan al they ought to know perfectely which set more by sainctes then by Christ, the wordes be these, let hym that meruayleth at the sainctes by a religious loue, let him that prayseth often the gloryes of the rightuous folow their holy maners and rightuousnes, because whom the merite of any saincte dothe delite, lyke diligens ought to delyte hym concernynge the worshipinge of God, wherfore eyther he ought to folowe them if he prayse them, or ought not to prayse them if he refuse to folowe them, that he whiche merueyleth [Page]at sainctes merites, may him selfe become meruaylous in holynes of lyfe. What could haue bene spoken more Godly of the worshyp­ynge of sainctes, and more meete for the confirmate of the sayenge of that preacher, he maketh no mē cion of callynge vpon thē, of wor­shypenge them, of makynge intercession vnto them, beynge contēt to call thē to the desyre of a purer lyfe as was in the saincte. And what meane certayne vnlerned men to teache so ernestly the cal­linge vpon sainctes seynge Iohn̄ refused the honour dewe to Me­ssias? Peter wold not abyde to be worshyped of Cornelius. Barnabas and Paule wolde that in no case Godly honour shulde be gy­uen them at Listra. And is it lyke that the sainctes are otherwyse mynded nowe beynge deed then they were in theyr lyues tyme.

S.

[Page]No Gregorie some what a farre from good learning caulith the lif of sainctes a lyuely lessō, meanig in myne opinion that what so euer good the sainctes haue done is to be folowed, good I saye for that whiche dissentith from the worde of god can not be caulede good, what nede we many wordes, we shall honour sainctes so aright if as they ēdeuored to please god by their faith, and their bretheren by loue, so if we truste in Christe and goo about to please euery man by charitie.

G.

God graunt that we maye doo that lustely. But what shall we do nowe? George Curio Bartram Danus, & Henry winc­kell with many other dyne this daye with our frende Garo­licius, we wyll come to ye feast vnbydden.

S.

I am content.

Christen fredome. Philostatius. Vegetius.

IN Terence one is angrie rightfully, that it is vn­iustly prouyded that the poore must alwayes giue some what vnto the ryche. For what coulde haue bene spoken more truly of me, and suche as I am, I speake nothynge of the ty­thes, I speake nothynge of the annuall reuenewes, I speake no­thynge of the paymētes, I speake nothynge of the tributes, and all the comon burdens, for these al­though they be more heauy then reason requirith, yet if no other burden were layde on our neckes it were tollerable. But the pensi­ons yt we paye yerely to the knaue monckes and preestes, I am in doubt whether they maye be suff­red any longer.

V.

What is the [Page]matter that he murmurith on that maner with him selfe? with whom is he angrie? I wil go and speake vnto him, god saue you Philosta­tius.

P.

And god saue you also Vegetius, you come in good time, and I wolde that none els shulde haue come.

V.

Whie so.?

P.

That I maie cast myne angre vpon you wherwith I haue bene chaffed.

V.

On me? wherfore? what haue I done? what haue I desserued?

P

I thynke you knowe wel inough howe many busshels of wordes you haue spent in your sermones concernyng christin libertie.

V.

I graunte that I taugth Christian libertie / but what then?

P.

And yet neuerthelesse the preestes and braynelesse compaignie of shaue­linges sucke vp oure goodes. E­uē this daye hath tyrānously that same grosse steward of S, benets required I can not tel what reue­newes [Page]of my father.

V.

Yf you wil be free from suche bordens, couer your pate with a coule.

P.

What? in an earneste matter mocke you your old scholer, and frende? My question to you is of libertie.

V.

Of libertie? then what hath liber­tie to doo with those reuenewes, that you paye to munckes? it is more precious, then which ought to be mingled with those thynges which are brickel, and endure but for a tyme.

P.

Then if I be not frewhie teach & preach you libertie on that maner, must we so be de­ceiued?

V.

You take libertie other wise then it is taught by vs / for they that be free are not fre on ye sort in the Christentie, that euery thynge is laufull that they wyll, but a christian rather takith liber­tie so that he being deliuered from sinne and the curse of the lawe, re­membrith now that he is become [Page]euery mans seruante.

P.

What maye I be a seruant both & a free man? it is not lyke, in so m [...]e that the word meanith some other thynge farre from that.

V.

We u­se not to speake of that libertie, wherby ye people thynke it is law­ful to doo euel, and to be disobe­diēt, it is an other maner of thing as I sayed afore to be free in the christian pael.

P.

Then howe vsed the olde men thys worde libertie? Were not the cyties of Grecia called free because they were free frō kynges exactions?.

V.

Be it they were as free as coulde be from kynges exactions, yet they lyued after theyr owne lawes, as at this presēt many cities are caused soo, not be cause it is lawefull to doo in them what euery man wil, but because they lyue vnder ther ow­ne lawes / nowe to whom I pray you doo the lawes permitte to do [Page]euery thynge? but go to, let vs se how Tully vsed this word, what is libertie sayth he / power to lyue as thou wylte. Then who lyueth as he wyll, but he that foloweth good thynges, whiche is glad to do his dutie, whiche hathe consy­dered and prouyded how to lyue, whiche obeyeth the lawes not for feare, but fulfylleth and kepeth them because he iudgeth that to be moste profitable. Adde hyther that of Socrates, who beynge asked whether he had goten any profyte of the studie of Philosophie, answered that I may know how to be free, menynge from euyll de syers, whō a good mynd must not serue.

P.

Your sayenge comith to this end to make me bond, & free, although ther be not so greate distaunce betwene heauē & yearth as ther is betwenene fredom and bondage.

V.

I knowe yt emonge [Page]the Romanes the state, of a fre mā and a bond man were diuerse, but we speake of thes thynges christ­enly, with whome they be so con­ioyned that they can not be separated.

P.

you plainly make me to doubte, howe thes can be true / & first of all declare wherin Christi­an libertie consistith.

V.

Libertie amonge christian men is nothing els, then to be deliuered from sin­ne, from the curse of the lawe from death, from Satan, and from hel, and that trely for christis sake.

P.

Here is not one word concerneng exactions?

V.

Not one, for this fredom is ye fredō of the sprite, & cōscience, and can not be wrested to ci­uil exactions / in so moch that if it be wrested thither it can not be called libertie. And thynke you it but a trifle to be fre from the accu­sement of sinne, and cōdemnemēt of the lawe? I verely can not tell [Page]whether a greater libertie, can co­me to any man, as the which ma­keth vs lordes of all thynges for Christis sake. Nowhat shulde it profite vs to be free from certaine burdens for a tyme if we shuld cō ­tinuewe ye seruauntes of vnrigh­tuousnes. Nether the comon say­einge is folishe altogether, he is noughtily made fre on whom, the [...] hath power.

P.

yet I heard a certaine mā affirminge in a pul­ [...] as well the outwarde libertie, as the libertie of the conscience, & [...], that I maye saye nothing of that which I haue hard in the open lectours.

V.

That diuision well handeled and vnderstode a­right hathe no danger. But here you muste take hede leste whiles we teach a certaine outward kind of libertie, you gyue occasion for the fleshe to sinne / [...]for the Apostle sayed not without acause brethren [Page]you be cauled to libertie / so that you gyue not your libertie an oc­casiō vnto the flesh.

P.

Whie then put you not a difference betwene both the kindes of libertie?

V.

We touched euē now the inward and spiritual and the scripture for the mooste parte, speakith of that / as often as it makith mention of li­bertie / hither perteinith that in Iohn / if the sone shal delyuer you, Iohn. 8. ye be free in dede, and the trueth shall delyuer you / ther was a cō ­tention betwene Christe and the Iewes, the Iewes dreaming of a certaine corporall libertie, and Christ caulyng them by al wayes to an inwarde and a spiritual as the which consistith in the forgy­uenes of sinnes, in the giuyng of the holy goost, in the exchaunge of liuyng, finally in the fulfilling of the cōmandmentes willyngly. Vpō thys Paule sayth also, wher [Page]the spirite of the lorde is, ther is libertie / the Apostle grantith that there is a certaine libertie, but of the spirite of the heart of the con­science, and which can be taken by no meanes for ye deliueryng from ciuile burdens.

P.

And yet you cō ­fessed a certaine kinde of outward libertie.

V.

I denie it not.

P.

wher in cōsistith that same?

V.

That we maye knowe that we are deliuer­ed from ye parte of the lawe, which cōteineth the Iewesh ceremonies and iudgementes / for so we be fre that ther it is permitted vs to vse other ceremonies, especially such as be not agaynst the gospel, also other lawes after that god alow­ed the Gentiles sworde.

P.

What? are we not deliuered from all the lawe? Gala. 4. whie saith Paule, after that the fulnes of the tyme came, god sent his sone made of a woman, made vnder the lawe, yt he might [Page]redeme them, wihch were vnder the lawe. I thynke he speakith here ingenerally of al the law.

V.

Concerning our iustification we be deliuered from all the lawe, e­uen from the .x. commaundemēts as which threatē moost of al dam­nation onles they be kepte / for iustification comith not by fulfil­lyng of the .x. commaundmentes but of goddes mere ientlenes, whiche he gaue to the worlde by Christe. And as farre as we laye hold by faith vpon that goodnes, so farre we be iustified / but cōcer­nyng obediēce, we be so deliuered from the .x. commaundementes, that if thei be not kepte we can not be cauled christians, Mat. 19. as Christe sayeth also if thou wilt goo to life kepe the commaundementes / yet here there is one affection of the good man, an other of the hipo­crite / thei which are good men in [Page]dede doo willyngly, freely merely & finally for no fear of punishmēt, that which the lawe prescribith & apoyntith, takyng thes workes for nothyng els then the fruites of faith, but hipocrites what so e­uer thei doo of the lawe, doo it for aface, ascribinge thes workes notwithstanding to ther iustifica­tion.

P.

Thes paraduenture be true, but if it be lauful to vse other seremonies, that is inuented by man, nowe agayne a newe, you will make vs subiecte to mans traditions and that againste the mynde of saincte Paule / whose wordes be thes / ye be bought wt a price, Cor. 7. be ye not made the seruā ­tes of men.

V.

Ther be certaine rude feloes which whē thei heare mention of libertie in sermones, straightwayes with out iudge­ment despise all maners, lawes, & honestie. As though mens lyfe [Page]could be without lawes / but these defylers of the Israelites tentes must not in this matter be borne with, wherfore we haue nede here in these thinges of great wisdom, great iudgement, finally of great caution, that we do nothynge o­therwyse then it becometh christi­ans / for what do these lawes hurt the church yf they be not agaynst the worde / verely there be some constitucions both fyghtynge manyfestly with the worde of God, layenge snares for oure conscien­ces / as preestes synglenes, mon­kyshe vowes, sellynge of masses, and a thousande suche other / frō these we be fre because they fyght with the worde of God. And here the aucthorite of them which wylseme heades of the churche bynde no man, in so moche that it is boldly to be despysed, yf they wyll re­mytte nothynge of theyr tyrannie, [Page]as in the actes when the apostles were forbydden to preache, not only dyspysed theyr commaundemēt but also cōtynued to preache most boldly the deathe and resurrecciō of Christ, wherby health came to the world, in so moch that by whippes they could not be dreuen from theyr wyll.

P.

I commende this contempte.

V.

There be other constitucions cōmaundynge of thyn­ges indyfferent / those maye be despysed, and kepte partly for chari­ties sake, & partly for the common peace.

P.

Heare I loke whether you wyll saye any thynge that shall please me / but hoo, whē must such tradiciōs be brokē or kept?

V.

yf they shal neyther be takē for the worshyppe of God, nor haue no­thynge a doo with iustification, they muste be kepte bothe for the comon ease and also for a good ordre, wherunto the youthe from [Page]theyr cradels must be vsed / accor­dynge to that, 1. Cor. 14. Gal. 3. Amonge you let all thinges be done in a good ordre, also that the lawe is a scole may­ster to Christe. Adde hyther the waye of offension, which we must regarde by all meanes possible / for althoughe these indyfferent thynges haue lybertie adioyned with them / yet must we to the vt­termost of our power endeuoure that that which we do be not done to the offence of oure weake bro­ther. As Paule suffred Timothe to be circumcided for certayne weake mennes causes, wheras he wolde not suffre Titus to be cir­cumcided, of whome many requy­red circumcision as necessarie for saluacion. And who knoweth not that comune sayenge of Paule. 1. Cor. 1 [...] All thynges be laufull for me, but all thynges be not profitable, but yf they shall be nombred amonge [Page]them whiche are bothe necessarie for saluacion, and perteyne to the worshyp of God they muste then be dispised, and the libertie which Christ hathe gyuen vs must be defended / for the lorde spoke not wt out a cause by the prophete / they worshyp me in vayne, Eze. 20. Mat. 16. by mennes commaundementes.

P.

Exten­deth oure libertie any further? I haue hytherto thought that they which were taken in to libertie by Christ, were deliuered from pensions, and paymentes.

V.

In this mater you were amysse, for be it that the chyldren of the kyngdom be most free, yet for loue, and for escheuynge of offension they sub­mytte them selues to comon bur­dens and that by Christes exam­ple, whom we reade with Peter gaue a grote to them that were receiuers amōge the Caphernaites, and this loue althoughe I be free [Page]maketh me all mennes seruaunt, for faythe maketh a man free, but loue vonde, fredome pertayneth to the soule, bondage to the body. They be free whose synnes are pardoned for Christes sake, they are bonde which for Christes sake are equally in all mennes daun­ger. So Paule althoughe he was free, yet acknowledged hym selfe to be all mennes seruaunte. Whē as loue can not be seperated from sayth, nor heate from fyre, so can not bondage be seuered from christian libertie, bondage I meane whiche alwayes serueth her bro­thers comoditie. But Philostatiꝰ whye hunt you after so carefully this outwarde, no rather this carnall libertie, seynge the holy scripture neyther teacheth it, neyther any man proued luckely whiche at any tyme stumbled in this ma­ter. This I am able to proue by [Page]many examples of the olde men if we had not late examples / for as yet Muntzers endeuours be not forgoten / he also was of ye mynde that he thought the holy scripture dyd teach the libertie of the fleshe, wherin when he was a preacher to moche diligent it came to passe that he destroyed not hym selfe only but also a great nombre of vp­landyshmen with hym. Had it not bene better for hym here to haue bene content with the libertie of the soule, then by sekynge the fleshly to cast hym into so great daungers bothe of body and soule / worked he not here hym selfe a disple­sure? Adde hyther the example of the monasteriāas verie unserable, but where in the furie of souldi­ours commytted nothynge other­wyse then was deserued / by sedicion they putte the aldermen out of theyr places, they cast many good [Page]men out of the cytie, they toke a­waye other mennes goodes, finally occupied the sworde neyther cō maūded, nor called of God, wher­in when they were warned of cer­tayne prynces, and confederated cyties in vayne, neyther any man by suche admonitions was mo­ued to repētaunce, at the lyngthe were thie punished for ther nough tines.

P.

But I heare saye yt Mo­nasterians were destroyed not for the denieng of pensions, but be­cause they were Anabaptistes.

V.

You erre nothynge at all, so that you know ye secte of Anabaptistes hath sedition ioyned wyth it / for what sought thes madde men els, but the destruction of al thynges, and the ruine of beest thynges. They caule it a restoryuge they truely wil restore al thynges whi­che be decayed but peraduenture on the same sort as Mūtzer made [Page]the vplandish men free / ye which when he craked that he woulde shake of our neckes ye noble mens yocke, not only loost his labour in a thynge seditious and nothynge godly, but also doublid the selfe same yocke.

P.

What then shall I doo seing ye mater is so.

V.

Medle not with thes destroyers of chur­ches, and troublers of the comon weale. And seyng that in thys life we can not be with out thes comō burdens, nether we ought for god hath not wyth out acause alowed officers & the ciuile waye to liue, we must endeuore that we obaye those thynges that perteine to the comon tranquillitie and that not only for necessitie, but also for con­science. Thou shalt paye thy ty­thes of thyne owne acorde, thy yerely pensious of thyne owne a­corde, thy tribute of thyne owne acorde, and that to whom the ma­gistrates [Page]comaunde the. What nede you to care what thei be that receyue them, so you doo the duty of a christiane, and of a good man, for thys aboue al thynges endey­uore, that for as much as by na­ture we are desyrous of libertie, thou mayest atteyne that libertie, whiche is in danger of no faultes no desiers, no noughtie affectiōs, and whiche maye remembre that for thys cause she is delyuered frō sinne, to thintent she maye lyue only to rightuousnes and to hir neighbour / which kind of libertie Angustine speakith on this ma­ner / whom true libertie delitith, leat him desier to be free from the loue of thinges mutable / & whom it delitith to raigne leat hym be subiecte to the only god the raig­ner ouer al / by louyng him more then him selfe / for so it shal come to passe that whiche you wolde [Page]haue done afore against your will and vnwillyngly, ye shall doo it willyngly and merely.

P.

Go to, if it be so I wil vainquish my selfe and diligētly doo that you exhort me. Loke that you tell me of it yf I do any thyuge contrarie to my outie.

V.

yf you wyll be taught and folowe me whē I teache you, I wyl easely bryng it aboute that you go not out of the waye, for I knowe what is my dutie in that mater. On the contrarie partie you must also remembre your du­tie, wyll you any thynge elles.

P.

No forsoth, but yt you neuer do any worser, thē I wold my selfe to doo.

¶Prynted at Cantorbury by I Mychell. For E. Campion.

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