THE Faire Aethiopian. DEDICATED TO THE KING AND QVEENE. By their Maiesties most humble Subiect and Seruant, WILLIAM LISLE.

Horat. de Art. Poet.
Verùm ubi plura nitent in Carmine non ego paucis Offendar maculis.

LONDON, Printed by IOHN HAVILAND, at the Authors charge. 1631.

Ad Regem.
Prospera conservent Carolum tibi Fata Minorem;
Tu Britonum Carolus denique Magnus eris.
A la Reine.
Tant des perfections Ie Chanteray sans cesse;
Ou le Roy est Patron, la Reine est Patronesse.
[Rose]

[Fleur-de-lys]
Dum rotat astra polus, dum fixa est terra, Britannis
Gallica florescant Lilia juncta Rosis.
W. L.

THE Faire Aethiopian.

ABout the Tongues when diuers with me wrangle,
And count our English but a mingle mangle,
I tell them, all are such; and in conclusion
Will grow so more by curse of first Confusion.
The Latine, Greeke, and Hebrew are not free;
Though what their borrow'd words are know not wee;
Because their neighbour tongues we neuer knew;
Nor what they keepe of old; nor what haue new:
But count that language good, which can expresse
The more of sense, in doubtfull speech the lesse;
How euer now disguis'd with noueltie,
Yet, framing all to prop'r Analogie;
For Prose and Poetrie hath words to spare,
And all that man can thinke on can declare;
Will licence aske no more than others take,
And line as strong, and verse as nimble make.
Nor might we glorie more in sword than tongue,
But that we Trewants are, and stand not long
To file our Phrase: O all you Criticke blood;
Rude worke, and verse that was not blur'd a good,
Nor oft hath been with cunning singer scand,
Reproue and marke with peremptorie brand.
[Page 2]Yet iudge me not, as if I thought that I
Could mend the fault; but, what I can, to try,
I'le sing the Faire-One borne of Parents swart,
And her true Loue, and his that won her heart;
How each for other manifoldly crost
In warre and peace, at Sea and Land were lost;
Before they could in safetie set them downe,
Inioy their right, and weare th'Abissen Crowne:
And how Hydaspes, Queene Candaces sonne,
From Persian King Phile and Siene wonne.
Yet sometime tell I lesse, and often more,
Then read is in Greeke Prose of Heliodore:
That Poetrie may shorten Oratorie,
And with a Muses vaine improue the Storie.
O Branch of flowring Gold the best that growes
On face of Earth, consorted now with Rose
Both white and red; Sith Helicon is thine,
Me grant a sip of liquor Castaline;
That I in verse this Romant so endight,
As may thee and thy daintie Buds delight:
Thy rare endowments euer will I sing;
For Queene is Patronesse where Patron King.
Blacke-winged night flew to th'Antipodes
At sight of Morning Starre, and the Easterne seas
With-held the rising Beame, vntill it guilt
The top of trees, and turrets highest built.
Then armed Band of such as liue by spoile,
(A trade more old than iust) by seu'n-head Nile,
Began to proule; and clambring vp the steepes
Of Canopaean Outlet view'd the deepes.
But seeing nought there might giue hope of pray,
To neerest Strond looke backe; and thus it lay:
A ship unmann'd full-fraught as seem'd to view,
(For vp to th'vpper guyrt it water drew)
With Cable grosse is anchor'd fast to shore,
And ground there all about embrew'd with gore;
[Page 3]Yea strew'd with bodies wounded, some full dead,
Some mouing still, or leg, or hand, or head;
An argument of but-late-ended fight;
Yet warlike weapon lay there none in sight.
But luke-warme reliques of some dismall feast,
That had such end. The tables richly drest
Remaine yet standing some; and some are found
In dead mens hands, and ouerturn'd aground;
As vs'd for weapons at vnthought-on field;
And some the men thereunder seeme to shield.
The boules of gold from hand of some that drunke,
And some that meant to throw them, downeward sunke.
For sodaine broyle, neglecting proper parts,
Their boords their bucklers made, their pots their darts.
Here tumbleth one with ship-axe wounded sore;
Another brain'd with beach-stone found at shore;
A third his bones hath broke with woodden Mawle,
And some with blocks halfe-burnt are made to sprawle.
And others otherwise: the most were shot,
But knew not whence, with arrowes erring not.
So fight with feasting, sacrifice with slaughter,
And wine with blood was mixt, and grones with laughter.
Th'Aegyptian the eues beheld this from the Mount;
But knew not how it came: they see and count
A number slaine; who slew them they see none;
A conquest plaine; and yet no Victor knowen,
Nor spoile yet gather'd: though vnmann'd the ship,
Yet fraught with ware, and no man gan it strip.
As safe it seem'd there wauing all alone,
As if it were maintain'd with garrison.
Though case as yet they know not, downe they run,
For spoile and gaine, as they the day had won.
But comming neere the ship, and men so lying,
Much more agast they were, a Mayden spying
Of wondrous beautie, set vpon a rocke,
And Goddesse-like; bewailing yet the shocke
[Page 4]There late befall'n; but with so braue a sprite,
As nothing could her Princely minde affright.
With lawrell crown'd she was, and at her backe
Rich quiuer hung, her left arme falling slacke
With bow in hand, her right, with elbow bent,
And hand vpholding face, on knee she lent:
Her head not mouing, downeward glance her eyes
Vpon a Gallant that among them lies
Extremely wounded; yet as from a deepe
Began looke-up, as from a deadly sleepe;
Of manly beautie still, and purer white
Doe seeme his cheekes, for bloud on them allight.
His eyes opprest with paine to her drew shee;
Nor see he would, but only her to see.
Reuiu'd a little, straight he gan her greet,
And thus with feeble voice said; O my Sweet,
And art thou safe indeed, or made a part
Of this dayes slaught'r, and wilt not from me start?
Is this thy selfe aliue, or but thy ghost
Me still attends in this disaster'd coast?
In thee (quoth she) is all my loue of life;
Behold, (and shew'd him on her knee a knife)
This had I vs'd, if thou hadst deadly slept,
And saying so from off the rocke she leapt:
They daunted then with feare and admiration,
As strucke with lightning, sundrie in sundrie fashion
Them hide in shrubs; for more she seem'd diuine
Vpright now standing; so her garments shine
With glittering gould reflecting th'early Sun,
So clasht her arrowes like a sudden gun.
Her haire from vnder garland plaid vntide
With pleasant wind; yet all her backe did hide:
What now they saw done terrifi'd them more
(The cause vnknowen) than all was done before.
Some say 'tis Isis, Goddesse of the place;
But some, obseruing well her beauteous face,
[Page 5]Sweare 'tis Diana; some will wager ods
A Virgin Priestesse of their Heathen Gods;
Who, for reuenge of some vnlawfull trade,
(Not thinking on their owne) this slaughter made,
With holy rage inspir'd. But she forth stept
Vnto that wounded Gallant, wail'd and wept,
In diuers postures on the goarie ground;
Him kist, and cheer'd, and wip'd his euerie wound.
And, for his life, with much adoe repreeues it;
But, though she holds him fast, she scarce beleeues it:
Vnfained loue so reignes her heart th'rowout,
That of her ioy possest she stands in doubt.
The theeues obseruing all, one t'other sed;
Is this a Goddesse part to kisse the dead
With such compassion? courage we, and goe
(What'ere it be) the certaine truth to know.
So getting heart, they forward went, and found
The Virgin busie about his sorest wound.
Yet all behinde her backe amazed stay,
And gazing on her nothing doe they fay:
But at their armours sound and shadowes sight
She rais'd her selfe, lookt backe, and nought affright,
Or at their vgly shape, or theeuish plight,
Bowes downe againe to cure her wounded Knight,
All other good, or bad so Love despises,
And only that it loues, to keepe deuises.
The Robbers passing by before her stand,
Attempting somewhat: she leant on her hand,
And seeing faces blacke and ghastly, said;
What would you haue that looke thus ill apaid?
If yee the ghosts been of the men here laine,
You doe vs wrong; for you your selues haue slaine
Each others all: or, in case any wee,
'Twas in defence of sacred chastitie.
But, if you liue, a theeuish life you lead,
And come in time to send vs to the dead,
[Page 6]Then make an end of all our miseries;
Lamenting so, downe by her Loue she lies.
They knew not what she spoke, and nothing speake;
But, seeing both so safe, because so weake,
Them leaue a while, and haste the ship to rifle,
And (all ware else accounting but a trifle,
Though much there was) with silke and precious stone,
And gold, and siluer, load them euery chone.
So much they had, they could desire no more,
And all they lay in seuerall packs a shore;
Not shared out by worth of things, but way'd
For equall portage; as for Youth and Maid,
They after thinke take order: but, behold,
Another troope of theeues, more strong and bold,
With Leaders two on horse, came on, and then
The former fled; for why? they were but ten,
And thirtie these: nor take the gold or gem,
For giuing th'other cause to follow them.
So twice is taken, yet not captiue she,
At least in minde, now well reuiu'd is he.
These theeues, though bent to spoile, a while forbeare,
In part to know the cause, in part for feare:
And all that slaughter thinke was done by those
That ran away: When they the Maid disclose,
In glistring habit strange, and not dismaid
With that befell; nor at their sight afraid;
But wholly bent the wounded Knight to cure,
And seeming all his griefe her selfe t'endure;
Her minde and beautie moue them wondrously,
And his long body there that lay her by.
At length comes he that chiefe was of the Crew,
Layes hand on her, and bids her come; she drew
(Though knowing not, but ghessing what he said)
The Knight with her, and he fast held the Maid;
To shew themselues vnwilling both to part;
And, more to signe, she set knife at her heart:
[Page 7]Whereby th'Aegyptian saw the Maid was loth
To liue without her loue; so tooke them both;
Withall, considering what good vse he may
haue of so braue a Youth another day;
Alights himselfe, and makes his Squire alight
And sets vp first the Lady, and then the Knight.
Commands the rest to take and bring the pray;
Saith only these should be his charge to day.
So runs them by on foot, and all the way
Doth him with left and her with right hand stay,
Lest either chance to fall: how these distrest
Yet rode in pompe! the Conquerour is prest
To serue the Captiue; beautie and noble state
Is able saluage heart of theefe to mate.
Now in this equipage a mile and more
They trauelled along the Mid-sea shore,
T'a hill-foot turne; at right hand leaue the Maine,
And ore the Mountaine passe t'a watrie plaine
On th'other side; a grassie fen in stile
Of Aegypt call'd; where th'ouer-flouds of Nile
Fall int' a Dale vnmeatly midward deepe,
Though nigh the banks to muddy fen it creepe.
This Stouer breeds, which some for pasture take,
And as the Marsh to Sea, is Fen to Lake.
Here all th'Aegyptian Robbers make their Fort,
And bastard Common-wealth hold aft'r a sort.
Some euer fishing seldome come off hatches,
Some walke the pasture six foot high on skatches.
If Islet any aboue the water peepe,
Some build a Lodge there; some in boat on Deepe
Both carried are and dwell, and only there
Their women serue them, and their children beare.
The new-borne babe with mothers milke at first,
Then with Sun-rosted fish and fowle is nurst:
And when he stronger growes, is tide by th'heele
With rope to ship, that out he cannot reele,
[Page 8]Nor stagger farre: what men else euer tri'd
So new deuice, with bonds the feet to guide?
Though Kings of Aegypt would this Fen haue drain'd,
These would not suffert't, thinking better gain'd,
With ease, some fish, or fowle, or flag, or reed,
Than with due care the grazing herds to feed.
Where now a Pike, well might they feed an Oxe;
Yea meat, drinke, cloth, haue from their bleating stocks.
Yet some they graze, and Herdmen are they call'd,
Though from all hand of Iustice water-wall'd.
A theeuish Fort, and thither still recoyle
The lawlesse Crew, and such as liue by spoyle.
Their wondrous store of Cane, that on the marge
Of this their Lake shoots-out both long and large,
For Bulwarke serues them; hauing cut some wayes
To them, not others knowen, with crooked bayes;
That from assaults and sudden ouertures,
As Labyrinth, their dwelling-place secures.
And more than lake-fish hungry maw to soule,
Fruit, herbe, and root they haue, and store of fowle.
The Swan both swimming there, and flying freely,
The loftie Sternet crying t'Ely, t'Ely,
Th'Ibis, Halcyon, Crane with tufted rump,
Storke, Shov'ler, Herneshaw, Bittour sounding Bumpe,
Coot, Red-shanke, Sea-mew, Teale, Di-dapping-Chucke,
Goose, Sea-pie, Moore-hen, Osprey, Widgen, Ducke:
I had almost forgot that most of all
Remarkabl'is, the bird that here we call
The Cormorant, Embleme of Penall Law,
With long, sharpe, hooked bill, edg'd like a saw,
To hold an Eele, but great one seldome takes,
These are the fowle that haunt the fenny Lakes.
Now, as the Sunne declining lower goes,
To th'eye of man he great'r and greater showes;
And farther makes to shoot forth on the ground
The shade of things, till all in darke be drown'd.
[Page 9]But ere the Set came Captaine theefe to Lake,
Where his prey-loden men him ouertake.
The Knight and Lady some of them dismount;
Some beare aboord the spoile; but see th'account
They of their Captaine made! the most him meet
That went not with him, and as King him greet.
And when they laid to heart the goodly pray,
And her diuine aspect, they thought that day
Their Complices, who care not what they lurch,
Had got the spoyle of some well-furnisht Church,
And brought away Shee-Priest, or Goddesse selfe,
In whose compare they count the rest but pelse.
So they the Master-theefe congratulate,
And to his home attend him all in state.
His home an Islet was, of all the best,
For him and his diuided from the rest:
He thither brought, with thanks commends their care,
And bids them come to morrow for their share.
They so dismist, short supper, but no feasts,
For him prepar'd is, and his two young guests:
Whom after supper (for they could not speake
His language yet) he gaue in charget'a Greeke,
That late was taken pris'ner, faire and young,
And had by this time learn'd th'Aegyptian tongue:
So might interpret for them; bids him cure
The wounded Knight, and keepe the Lady sure;
So, wearie and carefull, went to sleepe: but she,
Now of the Greeke they also lodged be,
In bed full hard by straight command alone,
When all were husht time finding fit to mone,
With many a deepe-fet sigh, and showre of teares,
Thus unto Heau'n her piteous plaint arreares.
Appollo whom so carefully we serue,
Thou vs afflictest more than we deserue:
Is't not enough that we are diu'n from home,
Bereft of friends all ore the sea to rome;
[Page 10]By tempest tost, with roaring billowes shaken,
And, fearing worse than death, by pyrats taken;
But now at land (which most of all me greeues)
Are made a prey to first and second theeues?
What yet remaines? if death; so void of shame,
Content I am, and thereto will me frame;
Ere any get that of me, which I keepe
For one deserues it: he, not yet asleepe,
Her heard, and (Sweet) thou mayst bemoane thee said;
But not accuse the Gods: they must be prayd.
You warne me well, quoth she; but (pray) what rest?
The more (quoth he) since this young man me drest.
And more you shall haue, trust me, (quoth the Greeke)
To morrow morning such an herbe I seeke,
Where heretofore I often haue it found,
That after dressing thrice shall close your wound:
And maruell not that I should thus comply;
Your case is mine: you Greekes are, so am I.
A Greeke? (quoth they) and thereat much reioyce.
A Greeke, quoth he, both by my birth and voyce.
Thinke, after sorrow, hope there is of game.
Then, quoth Theagenes, but what's your name?
(He Cnemon said) Of whence? and how came here?
O aske no more, quoth he; too long it were
To tell, and matter sad; the night is deepe,
And after trauell you haue need of sleepe.
They instant are, and thinke it somewhat smothers
Their owne mis-haps, to heare the like of others.
Then he began; My father Aristippe
Athenian was, and, both by land and ship,
Of good estate; and when my mother did,
Thought much, for one sons sake, in world so wide
And full of change, to lead a widdow life;
But sets his minde to marrie a second wife.
So did, a handsome, but a cunning Dame
As euer liu'd; Demenet was her name.
[Page 11]She wrought my father soone to what she list,
And in his presence me full often kist.
I thought and tooke it as a token kinde
Of one that lou'd me with owne mothers minde:
But worse it was; and, when right well I konn'd it,
I hated it, and turn'd away, and shunn'd it.
Herewith enrag'd she turnes her loue to hate;
And one day, when my father came home late,
She faines her sicke a bed, and he bewailes her
(Good man) and askes her often times what ailes her.
Your goodly sonne (quoth she) whom (I protest)
I lou'd more than your selfe hath thus me drest.
For when some tokens were to him reueal'd,
That I was quicke with childe, which I conceal'd
From you, till all were sure; he watcht his time
Of your out-lying, and, besides the crime
I blush to tell, so sore hath punched mee,
As makes me lye in this poore case you see.
This hearing spoke he not a word; but all
Thought true she said; and when we met in hall,
He fiercely cufs me twice or thrice, and then
With rods me naked whips held by his men.
I knew not why; although by humane lawes
Should all, that are corrected, know the cause.
But, when his heat was ouer; Sir (quoth I)
That thus you beat me pray now tell me why.
But more enrag'd, O hypocrite quoth he,
That would his foule deed now haue told by me!
So turn'd his face away, and in a fret
Made all the haste he could to Demenet.
She, not suffis'd, inuents this other slight;
Makes faine her maid to loue me, Thisbe hight;
Whom I before had woo'd, and could not win,
Now woo's she me, and I t'aduise begin:
She seekes, I flye; she flyes, I seeke her still;
Will she? I will not: will she not? I will.
[Page 12]At length she tels how Demenet abus'd me,
And was the cause why so my Father vs'd me;
Yet false to him; saith, if I would, I might
Her with th' Adulter take in bed this night.
Prouokes me to reuenge my selfe; and I
Beleeuing all, as not vnlike, apply
My selfe thereto: she came at night, and said;
The time is come; beleeue your faithfull Maid.
Your father's forth, th'Adulter new gone in;
Now, if you be a man, reuenge the sinne.
With weap'n in hand I force the chamber dore,
And finde my selfe deceiued by that whore;
My fa [...]her there, with Demenet alone;
I Thisbe looke-for; but the queane was gone.
As thunder-strucke, then all amas'd I stand;
Then fals my sword out of my quaking hand,
Which she tooke-vp, that had contriu'd the plot;
And said (O husband) you beleeu'd me not,
When I you told that now so plaine appeares,
I pray deuise to rid vs of our feares.
No word he gaue, but me in prison cast;
And, when I thought to tell how all had past,
He would not heare me; but next day betimes
Accuses me of these so hainous crimes
Before the people: when I would haue spoke,
With question short thus doth a Clerke me choke:
Did you your fath'r assault with sword? I said,
I did, but heare you how; then all so bray'd
I was not heard, nor worthy thought to plead
Ought for my selfe. Some iudge I should be flead;
Some, cast int' Orcus-pit; and some with stones
To death would haue me batter'd flesh and bones.
As winter weather, be some friends of mine,
That wont to freeze in shade, and thaw in shine.
In all this hurly-burly still I crie
O, for my step-dame, thus vnheard I die.
[Page 13]They heard my words, and somewhat gan suspect;
Yet, so their hearing preiudice had checkt,
I might not speake: their voyces when they count,
T'a thousand and seu'n hundred full amount
The numb'r of those who me condemne to dye,
But diffring how; the rest vndiffringly,
In numb'r a thousand grant me banishment,
And they preuaile as most of one consent.
Thus was I cast from home; and Demenet
Not long enioy'd it: Heau'n aright will set
That men doe wry. But long it is to tell,
And you haue need of sleepe that are not well.
The night is spent; betake you to your rest.
So (quoth Theagenes) you more molest,
To leaue her wicked plot so practised,
And shew not how the wretch was punished.
Then Cnemon, heare then, sith it is your minde.
Soone after sentence there a ship I finde
For Aegin bound, where well I might abide
Among some kindred by my mothers side:
I went aboord, and safely there arriu'd,
Full merrily my time I spent vnwiu'd.
Let cleare and rainy dayes of all the yeare
Compared be, and more shall be the cleare;
But he that liues a whole yeare with a shrow,
More foule than faire dayes shall be sure to know.
Er long, at hau'n-side walking on a day,
As was my wont, I saw come-in a Cray;
Which while I marke well, what it brought and whom,
Er plancke lay fast, I saw leape out a groome,
Who came t'embrace me kindly, Charias hight,
And said, O Cnemon, now plucke vp thy sprite;
Good newes I bring thee; Demenet is dead,
And so, as well deseru'd her deu'lish head.
Thy father gan repent it, aft'r a while,
T'haue beene the cause of thine vniust exile;
[Page 14]And in his Countrey-village desolate
Selfe-fretting spent his time: but she gan hate
Herselfe and Thisbe, for her loues depart
(So thee she cals) and takes it so to heart,
That mad by fits she often threats her maid;
Who fear'd the worst, and thus preuenting said;
They say (forsooth) that Cnemon since his doome
Hath left the land; but he hath found a roome
To lurke in here, enquiring for your sake
This haue I learn'd; Arsinoe (I take
You know the Queane) she closely keepes him hid:
For this I tell you let me not be chid.
O happy she, quoth Demenet; but what
Is this to me? O mistresse, verie pat,
Repli'd the Maid; mine old acquaint is she,
And one whom I haue vs'd in that degree.
Ile say, I Cnemon loue, and pray, and pay,
That in her roome this night she will me lay.
And, if she grant, the turne shall not be mine,
But yours; and Ile him bring well soakt in wine.
The plot is lik'd, and hasted all they can;
But with Arsinoe turn'd cat in pan:
For vnto her the suttle Thisbe saith
She loves one Teledemus, and her pray'th;
Sweet, lodge vs both to night; he comes before;
And I when Dame a bed hath shut the dore.
Agreed she goes in haste to Aristippe,
And saith (Sir) I deserue more than the whip.
That you haue lost your sonne, not principall,
But instrument I was; your wiues at call:
Whom when I knew abuse your bed, I durst
Not tell to you, but vnto Cnemon first,
Her fault at night; he thought I said that night,
And start-vp suddenly with all his might;
Tooke sword in hand, and casting on his coat
Vnto your chamber went: the rest you wote.
[Page 15]But now forgiue m', and I will you light,
How to reuenge your sonne and you this night;
And take your wife in breach of Nuptialls,
Nor yet at home, nor yet within the walls.
Doe not (quoth he) from this thy proffer swerue,
But well performe't, thou shalt no longer serue;
Ile set thee free: it shall prolong my life.
To be reueng'd of such a wicked wife.
T her suspected by some marks aloofe;
But thought it best be silent, wanting proofe.
You know (qu [...]th she) the tombe of th'Epicures;
And garden where it stands; this parts is yours;
Expect me there at Eu'n; so went her way
To Demenet, and thus vnt'her gan say:
Come, make you fine; for that I promised
Is ready for you: he will straight to bed.
So led her forth, and comming nigh the place,
Shee wils her Mistres stay, and went a space
Before, and pray'd Arsinoe withdraw
T'anothter house; for Teledem but raw,
And yet a Nouice vnto Cupids Queene,
Would blush at first of strangers to be seene.
Arsinoe departs, then Thisbe fet,
And laid in bed, her Mistres Demenet;
Put out the candl', and said, lest you should know her,
(Who then at Aegin were) and shut the dore:
Then for her Master went, and wisht him hold
Th'Adulter fast. He comes in Iealous-bold,
And cries, O haue I caught thee wicked wretch!
Then Thisbe, as though some man thence made a breach,
Cries-out, th'adulter's gone, an [...] clasht the dore.
No matter (wench, quoth he) sith here's the whore;
And fast her holding brought her thence; but shee
Bethinking what a shame it would her bee,
What punishment to her offence was due,
And, by the Law, without all helpe t'ensue;
[Page 16]And mad, that by her maid she was so mockt;
While people wondring all about her flockt,
(You know the deepe pit where our Leaders won▪
Doe solemne Rites) when they came neere vpon't,
With (struggling much she broke his hold at last,
And thereinto her selfe downe headlong cast.
So broke her necke (full oft conioyned be
Bad life, bad death) so my reuenge, quoth he,
Preuents the Law; and forthwith to the States
Her life and death, and all thy case relates;
Gets hardly pardon for himselfe, the while
His friends entreat to call thee from exile:
But done, or not, as yet I know no whether,
Faire wind and sudden businesse call'd me hether:
That all the people giue consent, no doubt;
And soone thy father will goe seeke thee out.
This Charias told me; but what else befell,
And here how came I, more time askes to tell.
Then he, and they for company, gan weepe;
And eas'd with teares together fell asleepe.
But Thyamis (th'arch Outlawes name was so)
Had rested well, till houshold Cocke gan crow,
As all by kinde (some say because they feele
The Sunne returning with his mid-night wheele,
And would salute him; some, for natures heat
So quicke-digesting, and desire of meat,
They call to worke the men with whom they dwell)
Then dreampt, and had a vision, thus befell;
He seem'd at Memphis entring Isis Fane,
That all th'rowout with fire-brands it shane,
That th'Altars were with sacrifice besprent,
That in the porch and all about the [...]e went
Men all in tumult raising hideous cries,
As hauing tooke the Temple by surprise;
That, comming neere the shrine, the Goddesse met him
With his faire prise in hand, and thus she gret him;
[Page 17]This Maid (O Thyam) I command thee saue her
From hurt; but know, thou hauing shalt not haue her.
Thou shalt a guest kill, though against my Law,
But she shall liue: this when he heard and saw,
His minde was troubled how to conster it;
And thus he made all for his purpose fit.
Haue and not haue, a wife, no more a maid:
But how then kill? O Hymen stab he said:
For many a virgin her virginitie
May wounded haue, and of the wound not die.
When Sun began t'enamell th'Easterne sand,
He calls him-to the chiefe of his command,
And bids the Spoyle (so by more noble name
He tearm'd the Prey, to keepe vntainted Fame)
Be laid before him; Cnemon eke he wils
Bring forth the prisners: O (quoth they) what ills
Yet more betide vs? and him weeping pray'd,
And he them promis'd, if he could, some aid;
And cheer'd them vp, and told them how their Chiefe
Ne bore the minde of rude and sauage thiefe;
But noble and gentle was to iust complaint,
And would not liue thus but vpon constraint.
When all were come, and Thyam set on high
To speake them-to, as wont he commonly,
He Cnemon bids, vnto that Youth and Maid,
Report, in Greeke, this he in Gypsie said.
My Fellow souldiours, being, as you wist,
The first-borne sonne of Memphis highest Priest,
And from my right kept by my younger brother,
I fled to you; and me before all other
You chose for Chiefe: and't hath beene since my care,
Of all we got, to take no more than share.
The captiue men of strength I gaue to you,
The weaker sold; and this y'all know is true,
The free-borne women ransom'd, or set free
For pittie sake, the seruile sort had yee:
[Page 18]This one whose habit shewes, and goodly port,
Her some Deuore, and therefore meet Consort
For Bishops sonne, though of my selfe I might
Her choose, and take by only Captaines right
(As well you know) yet her of you I craue,
To be my wife; you all the rest shall haue.
They all consent, he thanks, and further saith;
Then speake you Faire-one, doe me plight your faith;
To liue with me in lawfull marriage;
And tell your Countrey, and your parentage.
She cast her modest eyes vpon the ground,
And staid a while, as 'twere in thought profound
What should she say; then him with blushing ey'd,
And thus, as Cnemon did relate, repli'd.
My brother better speake here may, than I,
A Maid before so manly company;
But sith you giue me leaue, and chiefly me
Concernes the meeting, know (I pray) that he
Apollo's Priest is, and Diana's I,
Of noble parentage in Ionie.
Our Office ending ('twas but for a yeere,
And not hereditarie like yours here)
With solemne pompe (as holy custome prest)
For Delos sail'd we, there vs to diuest.
When ran at sea was halfe our course and more,
Began a storme, that cast vs here a shore:
And, at a feast made for our late escape,
The Mariners our goods thought all to rape.
On either side there slaine were all but wee,
In wofull case left, as you chanc'd to see:
Yet happy in this, we your hands-into fell,
Who grant both life and loue; which I like well;
This one thing crauing, to remaine a Maid
Till solemne diuesture, meane time with aid
You Memphis may recouer; where is best
(If you so please) both marry, and diuest.
[Page 19]They all approue; and staid is his desire
By her Sirenish song (though more afire)
And by his dreame; wherein he thought was noted
He should at Memphis marry this Deuoted:
So breakes the moot, and they with hand and heart
Him promise aid; and leaue the richest part
Of spoile for him; and he them bids prepare
The tenth day after to the war to fare.
And, for his guests, that nothing might offend them,
Full well prouides; and Cnemon wils attend them,
Not now as Keeper, but Interpreter;
Himselfe forbearing once to looke on her,
For feare of being tempted. Cnemon, when
They brought were in, went forth beyond the Fen
Among the bushes, where he knew was best
To seeke that herbe he promised his guest.
Mean-while Theagenes, to her no words,
But vnto Heau'n complaines; and she him boords,
Is this for old, or for some late euent?
Forgetting me (quoth he) sh'is now content
To marry another. God forbid, quoth shee;
My promise euer will I keepe with thee.
O doe not then so much encrease my griefe!
Before Theagenes I choose a theefe?
I spoke but to delay the danger nigh,
You sooner will (I feare) be false, than I.
Indeed (quoth he) I lik'd well that inuent
Of broth'r and sist'r, and how from home we went:
But O, when you, when you so plainly granted,
Appointing place and time, how was I danted!
She then embrac'd and kist him, shedding teares,
And said, O how delight me these your feares!
They proue you costant notwithstanding all
The miseries that daily on vs fall.
But sure, we had not thus conferr'd to day,
If i had much oppos'd, and not giu'n way.
[Page 20]A Louer rude will ne're be calme without
Some hope, and that may still him, ne're so stour.
So thought and did I, thus farre for the best;
Our loues protector Phoebus worke the rest!
And wisely must we handle this our plot,
That Cnemon, though our friend, perceiue it not:
Or, if he chance by circumstance suspect,
We must deny't, and let him but coniect.
Th'vntruth that speaker helpes, and nought at all
The hearer hurts, may well be borne withall.
Thus had she said, and Cnemon from the field
Came running in, and lookt as almost wilde;
And said; Theagenes, loe here is found
That herbe, which once laid-on will heale your wound.
I cannot stay, but come yee both with mee;
And, what the cause is, you shall quickly see.
But haste we must; that wasting time in words
We be not ouertaken here with swords:
So led them fast away to Thyamis;
And found him fellow-like, with many of his,
His armour scowring; Sir, then said, 'tis well
Y'are so prouiding; for ill newes I tell.
There comes vpon you troopes of armed men;
I thinke they are by this time neere the Fen;
Or not farre off; from yonder hill I spide them,
And, as I came, haue wisht your men prouide them.
The Captaine then began himselfe aduance,
And armed Capapee, with sword and lance,
Before he stept a foot forth on his way,
Tooke present order for Chariclia.
A Caue there was, hand-wrought by Gypsie-wit,
To hide their spoyle; it opened well and shut
With narrow doore of stone, that threshold was
T'an vpper roome; within, a Maze it has
Of sundrie wayes entangled (like the roots
Of thicke-set trees, amids and all abouts)
[Page 21]That meet in plaine; with scales of Crocodile
The roofe is pau'd, brought thither from the Nile,
On pillars short vpheld; to helpe the sight,
From top thereof descends a beame of light:
He Cnemon wills her take (but in his eare,
That what he said none other man might heare)
And lead, and safely place her in this Caue,
Where all his treasure lay, and bids him haue
A speciall care the mouth thereof to close,
As wont it be. With heauie heart she goes,
Still looking backe at her Theagenes
With Thyam left; and Cnemon, her to please,
Vpon the Caue before he laid the doore,
Her promised, to bring him safe vnto her;
And not to suff'r a yet-raw-wounded Knight,
To vent'r his life in such vntimely fight.
She answer'd not a word; but of her loue,
(As soule) bereft, did little breathe or moue:
Nor without teares departed he, to thinke
How faire a creature there he left at brinke
As 'twere of death; nay buried had aliue
That shining beautie might the world reuiue.
To Thyam then he ran; with whom he found
Theagen armed royally; and round
About them flocke the rest; first low, then tall,
For better sight and hearing. Fellowes all,
Then said the Chiefe, your life is all a warre;
Your trust and courage tri'd; the foe not farre:
T'encourage you nor need I, nor haue leasure:
Is 't for our goodly citties, for our treasure;
Is 't for our children, for our wealth or wiues,
They set vpon vs? no 'tis for our liues.
For such as liue by spoile, as they and we,
We fight not who shall reigne; but who shall be.
Then neuer yeeld we to this enemy;
But fight it out, and conquer him or dye.
Then call'd he for Thermuti [...], could not get him;
[Page 22]Which made him angrie, and for his absence threat him.
So ran to Ferrie; for he saw the fight
Was now began, and his some put to flight,
And others slaine. Th'inuaders as they got
The mastrie of any, straight-way burnt his boat:
This cast a flame on all the cane and reed
Th'row-out the Fen; that Vulcan, set on speed,
Their eares with crackling, eyes with flashing smote;
And smoakie cinders all about them flote.
Then death with vgly face vpon them gapes,
Deuouring diuers men in diuers shapes.
By fire, by water, by the sword, by smoke,
They burne, they drowne, they shed life-bloud, they choke.
So wofull case was neuer seene, they say;
But at the siege of Troy, and Solyma.
Where bastard Common-wealth of Robbers stood,
Is nothing now but cinder, smoke, and mud.
For worke by Heau'n accurst, bee't ne're so great,
Shall fall as waue that seemes the skie to threat;
And downe his some regardlesse quickly sinkes
Amid the basest water 'twixt the brinks.
This Thyam seeing, thought vpon his dreame,
And of the meaning makes another theame;
Haue, and not haue; she should be from him tane
By force of Armes; and yet by him be slaine
With sword indeed, not as he thought before.
Against his Isis then he gan to rore,
As him deceiuing; thought it high disgrace,
That other should his deerest Loue embrace.
Thus on the Maid, the foe, the boat the weather,
His nimble thoughts disparteth heth'r and theth'r.
Now this, now that, right fast imagining;
Yet for that one neglects each other thing.
Then his exhorts againe to fight, not yeeld;
But, as they had done, still maintaine the field;
Till he Thermutis sought (that was pretent)
But all in haste vnto the Caue he went.
[Page 23]A barbarous man th'affection cannot tame
That once he set, nor from designe reclaime;
Selfe out of hope will take quite out of way
That most he loues, from being others prey:
And Thyam therefore all in-hand forgets;
Though compast round about with fearefull nets,
Enrag'd with anger, loue, and iealousie,
To Caue he went and rusht in suddenly;
Then cry'd aloud in Gypsie till he met
One answer'd Greeke: then left hand on her set,
And thrust her th'row with right; that there she lay,
And with her bloud her life flew quite away.
These are, quoth he, thy spousalls at my hand,
O worthy best! now none shall thee command.
So said, and comming forth he sigh'd and wept,
And shut the doore, and earth vpon it heapt.
When to the boats he came, this was the plight;
His, some, prepare to run away at sight
Of first-come enemie: Thermutis would
Doe sacrifice; whom Thyamis contrould;
And said, himselfe had offred with his blade
The fairest sacrifice that could be made:
He meant that in the Caue: so went aboord
Thermutis, he, and, them to row, a third.
The boat, as all the rest, was but a trunke
Of hollow tree; if more had come, had sunke:
In like went Cnemon and Theagenes;
And two by two, thus on fresh water seas,
A mightie number: but they made away
At first encounter. This made Cnemon say
Vnto his friend, What? shall we stay to fight,
When all the rest haue tooke them to their flight,
Saue Thyamis himselfe? so they withdrew.
But Thyamis when th'aduersaries knew,
They cry'd let all men set on him alone;
O had we him, though all the rest were gone!
Would any know the reason? these were they
[Page 24]That at the Canop-Outlet fled away,
And left so rich a spoyle for Thyamis;
And therefore hate they deadly him and his.
That him their minde was here to take aliue
(Though many slaine are thereto while they striue)
The cause was this: his brother Petosire,
Of heartenflamed with ambitious fire,
With-held the Priesthood from him, most vnkinde,
Against his birth-right, and his fathers minde.
Then of the Robbers was he chosen Chiefe,
And he that should haue beene Arch-Priest, Arch-theefe.
This put the younger brother much in feare,
Lest aft'r a while he should some tumult reare,
To get his right: beside, thought tract of time
Would manifest at length his further crime.
This likely mischiefe thinking to preuent,
Vnt'all th'Aegyptian Outlawes word he sent,
With summes of money, and promises of other
(Pretending, for 'twas thought he slew his brother)
For any man that should him bring aliue.
With much adoe at last they him depriue
Of (strong Thermutis helpe; who brauely fought;
Yet ouer-boord was throwen, and drowned thought:
But seeing Masters case so desperate,
With other matt'r in minde, away he gate,
And swimming came to land: for th' enemy
His taking Thyam counted victory;
Yea reck'ned him of all the warre compend,
None other minding; him away they send
With halfe their force to guard; and all the rest
His Islet ransackt: long they were in quest
Of that was left, and when they little found
(For all the treasure hid was vnderground)
The night approaching, staid they not; for feare
Of such as sled, and might surprise them there;
But, setting first the cottages afire,
Vnto their fellowes well in time retire.
Finis Libri primi.

THE Faire Aethiopian.

THe great light damps the lesse; and so, so long
As Phoebus shone, was Ʋulcan scarce among
The cinders seene: But, now is come the night,
Theagenes and Cnemon see the light
Of all that Isle on fire; and then began
The Louer true to cry, O wretched man,
(And tore his haire) I liue no more to day;
My danger, feare, hope, loue and care, away:
Now she is dead why should I longer breathe,
Not in my brest this bloudy weapon sheathe?
O thrice vnhappie! in vaine then did they see
Me flye the fight, to keepe my selfe for thee
So sudden lost, and by so fearfull death,
And where thou wouldst not, giuing vp thy breath!
And what a griefe is this, that so by fire,
As of thy beautie, perfect and entire,
No sparke is left. I gaue no last embrace,
Nor kist thy dying lips, nor saw thy face.
O cruell Heau'n! are these my nuptiall brands?
So tooke his sword; but Cnemon staid his hands,
And said, What meane you? much deceiu'd you be▪
Chariclia liues: You me deceiue, quoth he,
You haue vndone me, you no life haue left me,
That of so sweet a death haue thus bereft me.
Then Cnemon swore, and told all of the Caue,
And what commandment Thyamis him gaue.
[Page 26]This cheer'd Theagenes, and now they post
Themselues both rowing (hauing sculler lost
At first encounter) to th'encinder'd Isle;
Yet vp and downe they carried are a while
By gusts against them, and because they knew not
The Scullers Art, and iust together rew not.
Yet (want of skill supply'd with earnest minde)
They get to shore, and then, as swift as winde,
To caue they run, and by the doore it finde;
But (that which Cnemon maruells-at) vntin'd.
He takes (as there he found) some fired reed
To giue them light, and leads the way in speed;
Yet (lo) full soone on sudden starts he backe,
And cries, O Gods, what hap is this! Alacke
W' are quite vndone; Chariclia here is slaine;
And downe the candle cast, and wept amaine.
Theagenes, as smit downe by some force,
Fell, and embrac'd the bloud-embrued corse,
And long so lay; that Cnemon lest he should
Himselfe doe hurt, came softly; and was so bold
As draw his sword that hung downe by his side,
And went for light. Then lamentably cry'd
The Knight, and said, O griefe vnsufferable!
Malignant Starre, or Furie vnsatiable!
Was't not enough to banish me from home,
All vp and downe the world to make me rome:
To cast me where no comfort man releeues,
At sea to Pyrats, and at land to theeues;
Yea more than once; and take my ioyes away?
Of all but one was left; and that to day
Is also lost, my deare Chariclia,
Slaine in defence of vertue (dare I say)
To keepe her selfe for me. These eyes of thine
That all men cheer'd, as with a light diuine,
Be darke and nothing see; nor he them saw
Who thee assail'd, or hand had staid for awe.
[Page 27]But this of mine shall ioyne vs, and this Caue
Our bodies both shall keepe in hidden graue.
Then felt he where he thought his sword had hung,
And said (O Cnemon) this is double wrong
Both vnto her and me. As thus he said,
A slender voyce, as 'twere of boy or maid,
Was heard to call Theagenes, and he
Full well it heard, and answer'd, Call'st thou me?
Sweet soule I come: then Cnemon came with light.
And plainely heard the voyce of such a sprite,
As call'd Theagenes: O God, quoth he,
Chariclia liues, that was her voyce; 'tis she.
O Cnemon (quoth Theagenes) O leaue,
And doe me not thus often times deceiue.
I both deceiue (quoth he) and am deceiu'd,
If this dead-one be she, and therewith heau'd
The head from ground, and to them turn'd the face:
Whereat amaz'd, he started backe a space,
And cry'd (O wonder!) this the countenance
Of This be should be; what concealed chance
Should bring her hither? then Theagenes
Came to himfelfe, and feeles at heart some ease;
And comforts Cnemon, almost out of winde,
That with his helpe he might the sooner finde
His deere Chariclia; this now Cnemon knew
For Thisbe, chiefly by a ribban blue,
Which with a scroule from off her necke he tooke,
And, as he would vpon the writing looke,
Theagenes him bids forbeare as then,
And seeke Chariclia further in the den.
So he's content: but I had nigh forgot
The sword of Thyamis that in the plot
Was also found, well hatcht and richly guilt,
Which Cnemon said he knew well by that hilt.
Who sits in darke, sees such as come with light,
And knowes them sooner than is knowen; this might
[Page 28]Excuse Chariclia, that came first t'embrace,
And kisse Theagenes with modest grace:
The fairest thing is Iustice; Health, the best;
And most delightfull, that we loue, possest:
And haue I got th'againe, quoth she? And liues
My Deere, quoth he? thus each vnt'other giues
The kinde salute; and count'r embracing fell
For sudden ioy aswound: there was a well,
And Cnemon sprinkled wat'r vpon their faces,
Which brought againe their rosie-blushing graces.
For now asham'd they were, and chiefly she,
That Cnemon did, what past betweene them, see:
Though all but well: yet, as they had offended,
They pardon craue for that which he commended.
But you Theagenes, he said, for that
You did before, I cannot praise; for, what?
Embrace a stranger hauing no relation
To you at all, and in so foule a fashion?
While I stood by, and told you plaine that she,
Your best Beloued, liued yet? quoth he,
O charge me not before Chariclia;
I tooke that course for her. But can you say
Ought for your selfe, who first the same mistooke,
And wail'd my case, and started backe, and shooke
For feare of woman dead, an armed man?
O Souldiour stout! O braue Athenian!
Hereat they smil'd a little, but with teares,
As more to sorrow bent amid their feares.
And yet Chariclia scratching at her eare,
As if sh'had then concein'd some iealous feare
By thinking on't, broke out thus; Happie she,
Whom he so wail'd and kist, what ere she be!
And, but you both will thinke of iealousie
I aske thereof, faine would I know if thee,
Sweet heart, what one it was, that so for me
Was kist vnknowen? You maruell will, quoth he:
[Page 29]For Cnemon saith 'twas Thisbe that Athenian,
The Minstrellesse that wrought so with a wenian
'Gainst him and Demenet. Chariclia, scar'd
With newes thereof, askt Cnemon how it far'd
That Thisbe's brought from Greece into this den,
And neither he nor she perceiu'd her, when
They thither came. That, who can tell? quoth he;
But that of her I know, is this; when she
Had circumuented Demenet (the plot
Against me knowen) at first my father got
Himselfe a pardon, and my home-recall;
And me to seeke prepar'd a ship; and all
This while the queane had leisure t'exercise her
In minstralsie; Arsinoe enuies her;
Chiefly because the Merchant Nausicles
Became her loue, before Arsinoes;
She vnto friends of Demenet relates
The plot of Thisbe, they vnto the States;
And cause to plead procure with great expence
The men of greatest wit and eloquence.
They cry that Demenet was cast away
Vniudged, vnconuict, and further say,
This crime of wed-breach was deuis'd for shame
And way to death; where is he? what's his name,
That should commit this foule adulterie?
Him bring aliue or dead; or else, to trie
The cause aright that Thisbe let be rackt.
My father promis'd; but she closely packt
Herselfe away; what like to fall vpon her
Fore-seeing well: and then with much dishonour
My father (cleer'd of murder by the lawes,
As one that had related right the cause)
Yet lost his goods, and was himselfe exil'd,
For ouerthrowing so his guiltlesse childe,
And helping Thisbes plot against his wife;
That better had he led still widdow life.
[Page 30]The man that buries wife, and weds againe,
Doth after ship-wrack lanch into the Maine.
But this same Thisbe, here that hath her due
Now in my sight, from Athens came I knew
By Anticles at Aegin; therefore twice
With him int' Aegypt sail'd I with aduice
To finde her there: that by her meanes I might
Releeue my father; State enforming right.
But how to Lake, or how into this Den
She was conuey'd, I cannot tell, nor when.
But, if you please, let's see what's in the writ
I found about her; thus beginneth it:
Vnto my master Cnemon. Know you (Sir)
My mistres death, and I procur'd it her,
For your reuenge; but how, because (forsooth)
'Twere long to write, Ile tell by word of mouth.
If you be pleas'd your hand-maid to receiue,
And, while I tell the manner giue me leaue.
Ten dayes I haue beene here captiu'd t'a theefe,
Who vaunts himselfe Shield-bearer to the Chiefe.
So close he keepes me that I cannot moue
Vnt'any doore, and saith it is for loue;
I rather thinke, and liker 'tis, for feare
Lest any take me from him; yet (mine Here)
Some pow'r diuine me did the grace to shew me
Your face in passing-by, and I besh [...]ew me,
That out I ran not humbly to salute you;
The fault vnto my hard restraint impute you:
With much adoe yet pen and inke I got,
And wrote, and sent you this by that old Trot
Was set to keepe me; saue me (Sir) I pray you,
And I in all things humbly will obey you.
'Twas by constraint against you that I wrought;
But, you to right, of owne accord I sought.
And if your anger nothing can appease,
It vse against me (Sir) eu'n as your please.
[Page 31]For by your order rather had I die,
And buried be with Grecian obsequie,
That Attick am, than suffer, Worse than hate,
Of barbarous theefe the loue disordinate.
Thus had she wrote, and Cnemon thereto said;
Vnhappie Tib, (I cannot call thee maid)
That after death (yet so I count it well)
Thus to my selfe thou do'st thy storie tell.
Behold Reuenge about the world thee cast,
Nor staid her whip, till vnto me at last,
Whom thou hadst wrong'd, she brought thee; that with eye,
I might be witnesse of thy miserie.
But what a mischiefe hadst thou now in hand,
To worke by lett'r against me? for I stand
In doubt, that all is yet but some inuent
Of thine, to be so farre int'Aegypt sent,
To worke my woe. Theagenes burst out,
Still feare you shadowes? are ye still so stout?
You see she's slaine; but who hath blest you so,
How, when, and why 'tis done, faine would I know.
By Thyamis (quoth he) the deed was done,
I know his sword, and th'Eagle grau'n thereon:
But cannot ghesse, or how, or why, or when.
This is no such as was Trophony's den,
Whererein whos'euer enter'd, prophesi'd,
O Pythia then, O Delphi they two cry'd;
And both at once; not knowing what they ment,
He stood amaz'd thereat; and thus they spent
Some time in commoning. Now must you know,
That when Thermutis had receiu'd a blow,
And wounded swam to land, he came in haste
Vnto the Caue where he had Thisbe plac'd;
What time his Master sent him to deuise
(And long he staid) for solemne sacrifice.
And hard within the doore, as come but new,
Her Thyam finding, for Cariclia slew.
[Page 32]Now as the commoned Thermutis came
And called Thisbe, greeking but in name;
But when he found her dead, vpon her gaz'd,
And, word not vtt'ring long time stood amaz'd.
At last them hearing to them went, and thought
They had her slaine; and would reuenge haue wrought,
But naked was, eu'n as to land he swam,
And had no sword; O, then in what a stam
Was theeuish, barb'rous, loue-sicke, angrie minde,
That how to wreak his wrath could no way finde;
But must comply! and so he did; but yet
Meant, if he got a sword, vpon them set.
His looke declar'd his minde was not at ease,
And so came fawning to Theagenes:
Amaz'd they were before they heared him speake,
And suddenly Chariclia gaue a squeake,
And into th'inner mazie cabbin ran,
For feare, or shame, to see a naked man.
Theagenes opposed point of blade
Against the slie assault Thermutis made;
And bids keepe-off: when he the danger sees,
With humble shew he fell downe on his knees,
By fortune more than nature made so tame,
And him to plead-for Cnemon call'd by name;
And said, I late your fellow was, and crau'd
That both would thinke him worthy to be sau'd.
It moued Cnemon take him vp, and where
Sir Thyam was, and how he sped, to spere.
He told of Thyams taking, hardly more
The manner how, than I haue said before;
And said himselfe came now to seeke a slut,
Whom he in caue before the battell shut.
Her name was Thisbe, what is she to you?
Quoth they. Then he them told the manner how
He tooke her from the Merchants, lou'd her, left her;
And now he knowes not who had him bereft her.
[Page 33]Then Cnemon, them of all suspect to quit,
That Thyam kill'd her, said, this proueth it,
And shew'd the sword, that well Thermutis knew,
And saw it bloudy yet of slaughter new.
From barb'rous brest a deepe sigh then he drew,
And said, O Thisbe, my deere heart, adieu.
And Thisbe, Thisbe, rudely still he brai'd,
And on her brest his head all bloudy laid:
He kist her dying lips, and kissing wept,
Till charmie sleepe vpon his senses crept.
Than th'other three had time (it seem'd) to thinke
On their affaires, yet all begin to winke,
Opprest with former toyles, and Cnemon led
The way to sleepe; Theagenes his head
Leant on a stone, and she vpon his brest,
And all together sweetly tooke their rest.
Commanding Nature will enioy her season,
And make our senses ouercome our reason.
From this the carefull minde is not exempt;
And, while Chariclia rested, thus she dreampt.
A shag-hair'd fellow (dreaming thus she quak'd)
She thought pull'd out her eye, wherewith she wak'd,
And not remembring their now-present plight,
She gaue a sudden shreeke, that wak'd her Knight;
What ailes my loue, quoth he? She told the case,
And with her fingers felt about her face:
Then 'tis a dreame, quoth she, I haue mine eyes;
But what this meaneth can I not deuise.
And sore I feare, lest you that are mine eye
Be taken from me; Cnemon with her cry,
Awak'd, and heard, and answer'd by and by:
Good Lady thinke not so; not so thinke I;
But, if your parents liued late, shall one
Of them depart; for, this full well is knowne,
They made you see and seene: and therefore right
It is, to count them authors of your light;
[Page 34]And so your eyes. I thanke you (Sir) for this,
Quoth she, and pray, you hit the marke, I misse.
We doe but dreame then quoth Theagenes
Thus weighing dreames: 'twere better for our ease
We weigh our dangers, casting them decline;
And since you giu'n are by some Power Diuine,
T'assist vs Cnemon, vnderstanding well
Both tongue and wayes, which we doe not; pray tell
Your best aduice, while yonder Gypsie sleepes:
For fast away neglected season creepes.
Then he, In the Isle prouision is there none;
But hidden treasure much, to diuers known:
Consider then, if here we longer stay,
We starue forth with, or make our selues a pray
To some late on our side that all doe know,
And come for spoyle, or to returning foe.
Then haste we must away; but first deuise
To rid vs of Thermutis; otherwise
Who knows how long we shall be forc'd endure
A man vnconstant, barbarous, impure,
And something still suspecting vs for her
He loued so? if time he finde to stirre.
But how vs rid? by sending him t'enquire
Of Thyamis: and hereto they conspire.
And raise and tell him; he's content; but so
As Cnemon went with him; alone to goe
Vnwilling was, in case so dangerous:
And Cnemon thought it much more perillous,
T'haue such a mate: this saw Theagenes,
Who spoke him-to aside: the words were these.
Sir Cnemon, well you counsaile can, but want
Performing courage. Courage man: how can't
Be dangerous for you to goe with one
So naked man; you hauing sword, he none?
And hee'll suspect our flight if you refuse:
But goe togeth'r at first, and after vse
[Page 35]Your skill to leaue him; pointing vs to meet
At neerest ciuill place; and in the street
Of Chemmis was th'appointed place, a Towne
Both populous and rich, vpon a Downe,
Or side of hill, erected for defence
Against the spoyling Herdmens insolence,
At banke of Nilus, not farre from the mouth,
Beyond this poole some twelue mile off, at South.
This is too farre for her to walke at ease,
Not wont to foot it, quoth Theagenes:
But goe we will in beggars poore array,
T'auoid suspect, and get meat by the way.
A good deuice, quoth Cnemon, verily;
Deformed both, and she hath lost an eye:
But sure I thinke you looke for better fees,
Than can be got by begging bread and cheese.
Whereat they smile, and sweare fidelitie,
Not one to faile another willingly.
And on the morning Cnemon and Thermute
Their iourney take, and fall to some dispute,
Ere halfe a mile they past, at breake aday,
Concerning wheth'r of them should lead the way:
Which Cnemon will not, ignorance pretending,
But 'twas indeed to cast for his defending;
And take same offer'd opportunitie,
To rid him of such hatefull company.
They went not farre, but light vpon a slocke,
Whose Shepherds, hauing heard the fearfull shocke
Late at the poole, were gone, and all amid
The thickest neighbour woods themselues had hid.
This hungrie paire then caught a sheepe and flead,
And broyl'd it there vpon the Shepherds glead.
But (not to stay, for hunger, or for feare)
With hastie chaps the scorched meat they teare.
And bleeding send it downe the narrow gulfe,
As Indian Tiger wont, and Irish Woolfe.
[Page 36]Thus hauing fed, and drunke of milke their fill,
Now toward night they come vnto a hill,
At whose far-side was set, Thermutis said,
A towne where Thyam (as he thought) was staid.
But Cnemon feined cause to lag behinde,
As pained sore in guts with flux and winde,
And vpward casting his disorder'd maw,
For drinking milke, and eating meat so raw;
The Gypsie staying for him on that hill
In little time benighted was, and fill
Asleepe, where he had laid him on a stone,
And stung with Aspe ere morning di'd alone.
That Cnemon knew not, who ran still in feare
Of this so fell, now no more biting, Beare:
He lookt behinde him still and ran amaine;
And ran, and lookt, and ran, and lookt againe.
O how this sight would faire Chariclia please,
To laugh at him that mockt Theagenes.
A liuing Greeke from dead Aegyptian ran,
And long time that, which could not hurt him, shan.
As Coward arm'd with helmet, shield, and speare,
Lookt in a glasse, and ran away for feare.
At night he wraps himselfe in heape of leaues;
And yet for feare he neither turnes nor heaues,
Nor takes a nap, but dreaming of his case,
Still thinkes him running from Thermutis face.
When day began, which he thought longest when,
His haire that, for the custome of those men
With whom he liu'd, he let grow verie long,
(For thought it is elsewhere, and these among,
That shaggie locks will make a young man show
Both milde to friend, and terrible to foe)
He now cut short: and this was reason chiefe;
Because he would not still be tooke for theefe.
Then hasted he to Chemmis, by th'accord
Betweene them made; and neere to Nilus bord
[Page 37]Where o're he was to passe, he saw at hand
An old man walking vp and downe the strand;
(White haire he wore, in holy fashion long,
His beard alike downe vnt'his girdle hung,
More narrow toward point; in Greekish cloke,
And other garmenrs made of finest loke)
So full of thought, that with faire By-your-leaues,
Thrice passed-by, he no man yet perceiues:
Then comming face to face, him bids all-haile:
Of that (quoth he) my fortune will me faile.
Then Cnemon wondred, and was farre to seeke,
And said, I pray (Sir) are y'a stranger Greeke?
Nor Greeke, nor stranger, then repli'd th'old Sire:
Why then (quoth Cnemon) weare you Greeke attire?
That this I weare, though this more gallant bee,
Quoth he, the cause is my calamitee.
But th'other wondred why a man should weare
For sorrow gallant clothes, and faine would heare.
A tale (quoth he) too long and lamentable
For me to tell, for you vnsufferable.
But (young man) whither goe you? what to seeke?
And how in Aegypt (tell me) speake you Greeke?
I askt you first, quoth he, and you refuse:
Of mine affaires then will you know the newes?
I take't not ill (quoth th'old man) for you seeme
A Greeke well taught, and one of some esteeme;
And changed, as my selfe, for some designe;
But (O) I wish you better case than mine:
Which, if I should not tell, my heart would burst,
And therefore well am pleas'd to tell you first.
But let vs passe the Nile here running wide,
And goe to yonder towne on th'other side.
I haue no house mine owne there, but a friend
That me receiues, and all that I commend:
We shall be kindly vs'd, there full well
Our strange aduentures may both heare and tell.
[Page 38]Gow' then (saith Cnemon) let vs passe the Sound,
And to the towne: for thither was I bound,
To meet some friends. Then timely take they boat,
(For many there vpon the riuer float,
Expecting hire) and to the towne they bend,
And that mans house, which was this old mans frend.
The man abroad, his daughter marriageable,
And other maids attend them, set the table,
And furnish it with diuers daintie meats,
And make their bed, and lay them aired sheets,
And washt their feet: then Cnemon, we may call
This house the house of Iupin Hospitall:
Not so, but one that knowes the God so hight,
Reply'd the old man, and one that fauours right:
And in a word, to passe by all the rest,
He knowing well distresse will helpe distrest.
So did he me, and brought me to this place
With trauell weari'd, and in wofull case:
And still in what I need affordeth aid.
Why trauell you, quoth Cnemon? Th'old man said,
Of children robb'd I was by theeuish might,
And, though I know them, dare I not me right.
But here I mourne; nor can I take my rest
Or day, or night: as bird that hath her nest
Deuour'd by Dragon all afore her eyes;
Yet nigh she dare not come, no [...] farre she flyes.
Wilt please you then (quoth Cnemon, Sir) to show.
How this befell you, and how long agoe.
Hereafter Sir, quoth he; now time requires
To thinke vpon our stomack [...] iust desires.
But first doe seruice to the Gods, as vse
Th'Aegyptian Wise-men: nothing shall excuse
Me from this dutie; then vpon the ground
Faire water powring, said, this am I bound,
And doe, in honour of the Pow'rs Diuine
That hold this place, and such as well encline
[Page 39]To Greece, Apollo Delphicke, Cynthia,
Theagenes, and his Chariclia;
Whom I among the Gods will euer count:
So did, and said, and wept as from a fount.
This Cnemon hearing, on him wistly gaz'd,
And well obseruing him reply'd amaz'd;
If for my boldnesse (Sir) I be not blam'd,
What are to you the two that last you nam'd?
They are my children (quoth he) not by wife,
But giuen me from aboue; the griefe and strife,
Which I haue had for them, me them assure
As much as if they were my geniture.
As childen loue I them, they me as Sire:
But (Sir) it makes me greatly now t'admire
How you them know. I know (quoth he) and tell
This for your comfort, they are safe and well.
O Phoebus! O, where are they? tell m'I pray.
What will you giue to know, quoth he? why say
What will you aske (quoth th' old man?) Here no more
Than thanks well can I giue; and that for store
Of wealth doe good men take, and hoord in heart,
As treasure great: nor will they from it part
For any thing: but if I come well home
(And Isis promiseth so shall I come)
And safe receiue my deere boy and my guirle,
I will reward you both with gold and pearle.
Vncertaine this is and to come, quoth he;
You may in present better pleasure me.
Aske what you will, quoth old man: Promise now
(Quoth he) to tell me whence they are, and how
They were disseuer'd from you, and their birth;
For next your selfe none more them loues on earth.
A treasure great is this; but, sith you craue it,
I promise, after supper you shall haue it.
When they had eat their nuts, and figs, and dates,
And plums, and pears, and other such a chates,
[Page 40]As th'old man wont (for that which once had life,
He ne're would eat-of; nor it touch with knife)
And he had water drunke, and Cnemon wine:
The Greeke began, and said; O graue Diuine,
Bid one, I pray, come take away the boord;
For now is time that you performe your word.
I will (quoth he) and would good Nausicles
Were here to heare the tale, but Mitranes
Hath drawen him out on hunting; oft he pray'd
Me tell the same, and still I him delay'd.
The Greeke had heard, and startled-at the name
Of Nausicles, and askt what was the game
They went to chase: of beasts (quoth he) the worst,
That call'd are men, of all good men accurst.
They liue by spoyle, we hardly can them take;
For, for their den they keepe a noysome Lake.
What haue they done? quoth hee: surpris'd a guirle,
Which he esteem'd aboue or gold or pearle,
An Attick-borne, which, well could play and sing;
He meant present her to th'Abissen King;
His Queene to wait-on, hoping (in regard
She was a Greeke, so taught) for great reward,
As wont be giu'n there: Thisbe was her name.
O Gods! quoth he; and closely past the quame,
To heare the rest: and vnperceiued said,
What force of Armes hath Nausicles, what aid
For such emprize? He told him Mitranes,
A Leader vnder Lord Orondates,
The Kings Lieutenant there, with horse and foot
For some good summes of money's hir'd to doo't.
And I so counsail'd; for my minde me gaue,
I might some newes thence of my children haue.
O Sir (quoth Cnemon) I had nigh forgot,
Thus led along by your entising plot,
To put y'in minde of promise; what is this
To that, I pray? and th'old man said, it is
[Page 41]To that you askt me last; and now to that
You most desire I come: but first somewhat,
To make the matter cleere, I must premise,
And of my selfe, on whom that storie lyes.
In Memphis borne of father Calasire,
Whose name and office (he that shall enquire,
May finde) I had, and Isis minister
Was long therein, though now a wanderer.
Wife had by Citi's, lost by Natures hest:
When fne from body went t'another rest,
My life I led awhile without anoyes,
My selfe delighting with two pleasing boyes
I had by her: at length it thus befell;
Here came from Thrace (to me may seeme from hell)
A wanton Peece, nor ouer young nor old,
Of woman kinde, so tising and so bold;
That she to Temple came, and at her heeles,
A traine of seeming Maids as smug as Eeles.
Thus once she told me, from Philosophee
I can your schollers draw; you none fro mee
And I reply'd, 'tis easier to spill,
Than make the man: your draught is downe the hill,
A broad and easie way to vice; but I
Them vpward driue to vertue lodg'd on high.
Yet, after this, I blush to tell, but will;
Though long resisting that entising ill,
I faint at length, and lest I place profane,
(Twice marrie may not Metropolitane)
I rather chose obseruing holy Lawes
My selfe t'absent, pretending other cause;
To see my Thyamis, mine eldest son,
Which with his Grand-mother at Thebes won.
That name againe made Cnemon muse, but let
Th'old man say-on, to heare what issue set.
Besides (quoth he) the Goddesse whom I serue
Me told my fate, from which I could not swerue:
[Page 42]My sonnes, by some disaster waxen lewd,
Should fall at odds, and into deadly fewd.
The sight whereof t'auoid, I further went,
And punished my selfe with banishment.
The mid-time of my trauell will I balke,
As not concerning this whereof we talke.
When I at Thebes heard how great a fame
There ran of Delphos, and Apollo's name,
I long to see' [...], and landing at the Cirrhe
In Crissie Gulph, ere I the Towne came neere,
Of voyce diuine me thought I heard the sound,
And worshipped, and kist that holy ground:
The place is such indeed, quoth Cnemon then;
For right the same my father told me, when
He had been Legate there from Athens sent,
To meet in graue Heptarchie-Parlament.
And are you then Athenian, quoth he;
What name, I pray Sir? Cnemon call they me;
And of my state I tell you shall anon;
Now (pray) with that you haue begun, goe on.
Then he; deuoutly to the Templ' I come,
And aske, and answer get, thus much in summe:
From fruitfull banke of Nile why do'st thou flie,
T'auoyd the strong designe of Destinie?
Endure; int'Aegypt shortly will I send thee,
And there, in all that is to come, befrend thee.
And they that heard it, standing neere in place,
Said, since Lycurgus, no man had the grace
To be so welcom'd: and forth-with they all
Well entertaine me; still their friend me call,
And friend to that their God; so well prouide me
Of common purse, that nothing is deni'd me.
In temple-close I lodg'd was nigh the griest,
And grew acquaint with Charicles the Priest:
Who told me many things, and askt me some;
As whence those ouer-floods of Nilus come;
[Page 43]Who made th'enormous great Pyramides;
Of Crocodiles, Ichneumons, Ostridges;
And of the two-legg'd-winged Dragon, seene
To swim and flie the riuer banks betweene,
From out of Arabie; which he thought was
The right, not that which wings and fourefeet has.
And much the like: then I, Sir, how come you
To know our parts so well? to tell you true
(Quoth he) I trauell'd th'row them many a mile
To Catadupe, and Cataracts of Nile:
And as in Citie walking on a season,
I bought that was with us in Greece most geason,
Against returne, a man of comely port,
Though blacke, and speaking Greeke, as aft'r a sort,
Me met, saluted courteously, and pray'd
A word with me, and in the Temple said;
I saw you (Sir) buy many drugs to day,
Some Abissine, and some of India;
What I shall shew you, bee't with your good leaue,
And buy of mee; I will you not deceiue.
I will, let's see, quoth I: Nor doe you grutch
(Quothe he) to giue: Quoth I, nor aske you much.
And so from vnder's arme a casket drew,
With many precious stones, greene, red, and blue;
And oyly-shining pearle, as big as pease,
All perfit round, of South-East Indies seas;
When I beheld them dazled were mine eyes,
And (Sir) I said in vaine should I them prize;
Goe seeke a fitter chapman, if you please,
For all I haue will not buy one of these.
If you ne buy them can (quoth he) yet take them;
That can yee doe; and I your owne will make them.
I cannot set (quoth I) so great a rest,
Nor take this gift: but why so doe you iest?
I doe not iest, beleeue me (Sir) quoth he;
But am in earnest: hereby shall you see:
[Page 44]These all I giue you, so be that you please
Take one thing more, more worth than are all these.
I laught, he askt me why; at iest you make
To promise more (quoth I) if all I take.
I sweare the gift (quoth he) but sweare ye to
To vse it well: and for such hope, I doe.
Then with his right hand by the left he takes me,
And leads me home t'his house, and welcome makes me:
And shewes m'a faire one, putting off her masket,
More worth than all the Iewels in his casket.
He said she was no more than seu'n yeere ould,
But I no lesse than twice seu'n ghesse her could,
And fit for husband: beautie rare (I deeme)
Makes little Ladies often taller seeme.
I stood amaz'd, aswell at that was done,
As what I saw. He thus againe begunne.
This daintie guirle, her mother, for some drift
You shall hereafter know, her left to shift
With fickle Fortune, wrapt in cradle-bands;
I chance to finde and take her in my hands,
And saue her life; for our Gymnosophists,
When soule of man hath entred fleshie lists,
Hold that it ought in no wise be neglected,
But as the life of man, by man protected;
Besides I saw, as 'twere, a beame diuine,
When she beheld me, shoot forth of her eyne:
About her lay this heape of precious stones,
And silke with letters wrought, which for the nones
(I thinke) were done to proue another day
Whose th'Infant was, and hidden truth bewray.
When I them read, I saw well whose she was,
Yet vnto Shepherds nursing let her passe;
And kept the rest, for feare that for the pray
The childe might afterward be made away.
And while she was but verie small, I count
Her hidden safe: but flours of beautie mount,
[Page 45]And such as this apace; that vnder ground
(I thinke) though hid, would breake forth and befound.
Thus though a while I had it well conceal'd,
I feare it would by selfe light be reueal'd;
So hurt it selfe and me. Then suit I make
To be int'Aegypt sent, and her I take
Along with me; and now in this Embassage
I hope to finde for her some better passage;
And eu'n by you, Sir, whom this many a day
I well obserue: and take her you, I pray,
With all her dowrie, swearing first to me,
You will her keepe, and marrie well, as free.
But now no more, my businesse cals me hence,
This King to day appoints me audience.
In Isis Fane to morrow will I tell you
The rest of her, and so with her farewell you.
I take her home, and on the morrow went,
To know the rest; but he away was sent
With threats for haste; because he came to claime
A mine of Emrauds for the Melchusaim,
Hydaspes King of either Blackmoreland;
Then I, (because I could not vnderstand
Who, whence she was, and of what parents borne,
That had thereafter listned so beforne)
With discontent retire: I cannot blame
Him (then quoth Cnemon) for I feele the same:
But what he further said, quoth Calasire,
Now shall I tell, and make you much admire.
When I came in (thus said my Charicles)
At sight of her my heart had present ease:
In Catadup no longer dare I stay;
But homeward downe the Nile make haste away.
And here she now is with me, counted mine,
And beares my name: and doth in all encline
T'obey me like her father (so she takes me).
But of a husband will not heare (that makes me
[Page 46]Full, full of care) and yet in beautie exceeds
All maids of Greece, which emulation breeds:
For strangers here as well as Greekes admire her;
And many Suitors, men of worth, desire her.
She saith she will Diana follow she,
And hunting with her still a Maiden be:
With bow and shaft full well can hit the marke;
But vnto Cupids bow would neuer harke.
I thought bestow her on my sisters sonne,
A proper man; but nothing can be done;
In vaine is all my care and labour spent;
So strongly she maintains her said intent,
And most with reasons sometime heard of mee,
In commendation of Virginitee:
Now I beseech you (Sir) helpe what you may:
To talke with her she will not you say nay,
Nor any worthy man: she courteous is,
And opportunitie you cannot misse:
In Temple-close, as 'twere in house the same,
Now liuing both: me helpe maintaine my name;
For husband worthy long she shall not tarrie;
Pray, you perswade her what you can to marrie;
Lest, wanting whom to leaue-to mine estate,
I lead my latter dayes disconsolate.
So said he (Cnemon) shedding teares, and I
Him promise helpe, and weepe for company.
While thus we talke, a solemne Embasie
Of Achillaeans came to him; and I,
When he had told me what they were, desire
To see the principal; (he came t'enquire
Of Charicles the Priest for furtherance,
And what so might their Sacrifice aduance)
Let call him in (quoth he) and then came in
The goodli'st youth among them e're had bin:
Achilles-like in portlinesse and face,
And shew of courage with more louely grace.
[Page 47]Vs he saluted, we him resalute:
And Sir (quoth he to Charicles) impute
No fault to me; for haste I must the Rite,
That all the pompe may well come in ere night.
Goe then, quoth Charicles, and to me said,
If not before, now shall you see the Maid.
For she, Diana's seruant, must attend
This Sacrifice, from time it gin to th'end.
Now (Cnemon) I had seene the Maid before,
And with her ministred; and of the lore
Sh'hath askt me many points; now held my peace
To see the sequele: here our talke we cease,
And goe to Templ'; as all things were before
Made ready, when the Chiefe came in at dore.
We come to th'Altar, and with Priest his leaue,
Begins the young man orison conceiue.
By secret slight some cunning Priests will make
Diana's Image, and Apollo's shake:
And call it pious fraud: but thus thinke I,
Truth has no need helpt-out to be with lye.
For when came forth Diana's gallant Maid
With virgin traine, thus Pythia plainly said:
The youngest he and she, that here attends
In Priestly Rite, shall haue their wished ends:
By sea and land, by warre and tempest tost,
Shall come at length to hot Sun-parched coast,
For vertues due reward; and there allight,
Their tanned temples crowne with Turban white.
This Oracle not one of that Repaire
Could vnderstand, and least of all the faire,
That had no tanned temples, could be thought
Design'd thereby. But when the thing is wrought,
Then prophecies and dreames are vnderstood;
Then shewes the face, before kept vnder hood.
Finis Libri secundi.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

ALL other pompe to tell (quoth Calasire)
I ouerpasse, and for you most desire,
To know how bore themselues that solemne day
Theagenes and his Chariclia;
Though yet not his; when he came forth, what ere
Was seene before, is thought not worth a peare.
The gallant mounted on a Dapple-gray,
In shining rich attire reuiu'd the day,
As Sunne broke out of cloud; his abron haire
Wau'd vp and downe with Aeols gentlest aire.
Of purple veluet was his cloake, and wrought
With gold, how Lapiths with the Centaurs fought.
The Buckle-brooch thereof in fine Obryze
Had Pallas wrought with faire sky-colour'd eyes
Of Saphyr bright: her brest is couered
With stone-to-turning shield of Gorgons head.
Then in his hand the steely-pointed lance
So well became him; when he gan to prance,
(Helme had he none, his cheerely face to cloud)
I thought the horse was of the rider proud;
So wantonly to right, to lest he flings,
And neighing, snorting, yerking, trots the rings:
Foot after foot then on the grasse he stamps,
And golden bit with teeth all-foamy champs:
Now this, now that way, fore and backward flyes,
With prick-eare, tost-vp head and rowling eyes;
[Page 49]With many a short curuet, and loftie bound,
So daintie trampling, as he scorn'd the ground;
At length on tip-hoofe striking for a space,
His fiercenesse moderates with pleasant pace:
So horse to man, and man to horse complies,
Not two, but one, they seeme to fall and rise.
Amaz'd were all at him, and women kinde,
That could not hide th'affections of their minde,
Cast many fauours at him mouing mirth,
And all him thought the goodliest thing on earth.
But when, like rosie-finger'd morning-shine,
Came faire Chariclia from Diana's shrine;
Theagenes, how euer they commend him,
Himselfe and they confesse she goes beyend him.
And yet (well dare I say) no further sure,
Then doth a womans beautie more allure.
In purple silke to foot, orecast with lawne,
She rode in Coach with two white oxen drawne,
As there the state is; gold and precious stone,
From thicker garment th'row the thinner shone.
Two Serpents made of gold, enamell'd blew,
With tailes entangled from her shoulders drew
Each t'other side, close vnder either arme,
And re-entangled, as it were by charme,
Some place they seeke, wherein to take their rest,
And met, and hung their heads below her brest:
And this her girdle was; they seeme full deepe
Enchanted by the virgin pap to sleepe.
Her amber haire nor all bound-vp, nor yet
All hanging loose, aboue with Coronet
Of Laurell tide is (lest the winde it raise)
And vnderneath vpon her shoulder playes.
Below the right a perled quiuer hung
With siluer shafts, nor ouer short nor long;
Her left hand held a gilden bow, her right
A golden cansticke with wax taper light.
[Page 50]And eu'ry man her then beholding cryes,
How brighter than the taper been her eyes!
Then Cnemon suddenly burst-out; O these
Are true Chariclia, true Theagenes.
And Calasiris said, I pray now where?
As thinking Cnemon had espi'd them there.
Your speech, quoth he, so brought them me to minde,
As if I saw them. You shall neuer finde
The like, quoth Calasire, I speake it bold,
Sun neuer since did such a paire behold.
The man and wife like him and her that bee,
May thinke t'haue gotten immortalitee.
But come to point; when all the beasts were slaine
For sacrifice, some of the leaders traine,
Appointed thereunto, forthwith desire
Apollo's Priest begin, and tind the fire
Vpon his Altar; Charicles then said,
The Leader selfe must from Diana's Maid
The burning taper take, and fire the wood;
Mine office was to poure the wine and blood:
And so he did. Then came Theagenes
To fetch the taper: now (Sir, if you please)
By way obserue the soules diuinitee
In passage following, as seemes to me:
For, when each other first they gan behould,
They paus'd a while, as if they thought they should
Each other know. So minde and minde alike,
Though not acquainted, soone together strike:
As two quick-siluer drops each other nigh
Can hardly stand, but soone together flie.
With more assured countenance yet she
That holy candle gaue, than tooke it he.
A little smile they both, and blush the while,
As if they were asham'd be seene to smile;
And after pale, now all the face, now part,
Declareth' affection had possest their heart.
[Page 51]And still their count'nance alter'd, and their eyes,
In such a sort as troubled minde implyes.
Which none so markt as I, who nothing there
Had else to doe, and, what was said whilere
By th'Oracle, now thought-on: so remain'd,
When he the taper taking was constrain'd
To leaue the Virgin, nothing else to doe
But complement, and fire the wood, and goe
To banquet with his Achillaean Peeres;
And she to chamber presently reteeres;
Puts-off her robes, and puts-on oth'r attire▪
Not dwelling now with her supposed Sire,
For only feare of his importunance
To worke in her from purpose variance.
Now grew I curious marking what had past,
And Charicles to meet of purpose cast;
And haue you seene (quoth he) my ioy to day,
Yea Delphos ioy and mine, Chariclia?
Giue father leaue to dote on daughters face:
Pray, how d'ye like her? did she somewhat grace
The solemne shew? You aske as much, quoth I,
As if the Moone doe somewhat grace the skie.
I'me going to her, quoth he; goe with mee,
And how she doth, now all is past, let's see:
Lest any hurt she tooke amid the croud,
Or by the peoples roaring out so loud.
I gladly yeelded, making yet a show
Of other things neglect, with him to goe.
When there we come, we finde her sicke a bed▪
She saith she cannot sleepe for paine in head.
But well did I obserue, at this suprise,
Her broken speeches, and her loue-sicke eyes;
Her father did not: He giues straight command
They make no noise about her, then by th'hand
He leads m'abroad, and saith, What thinke you (friend)
Of her so sudden change at one hours end?
[Page 52]In such a prease (quoth I) or in, or out,
Some glance of eye bewitcht her hath, no doubt.
You then belike, in iesting wise quoth he,
And smil'd therewith, beleeue that such there be.
I doe, quoth I, and, as I thought to proue
The like by reason, both in hate and loue;
Comes one in haste (he seem'd well soak'd in wine)
And saith, My masters meane you not to dine?
You seeme as slow, as if to battell prest
You rather were, than bid to such a feast.
And this the ba-ba-braue Theagenes
In honour makes of Neoptolemes.
This man (quoth Charicles) doth so inuite vs,
As if to dinner he would driue and smite vs:
W'had best be gone. You doe but iest (quoth I)
But let vs goe indeed, intending why.
And when we came, he Charicles doth place
The next him-to, and for his sake me grace.
To passe the rest, this youth behau'd himselfe,
As well-became Embassadour to Delph.
Nor spake, nor lookt, as loue-sicke one, but strivve
Vnt'all his guests good entertaine to giue
With cheerly countenance: but I could see
How aft'r a sigh he fained a merrie glee,
Was fad sometime, yet would himselfe recall,
And into sundrie changes easly fall.
For Bacchus-like is Cupid, some men thinke;
And Drinkers soone will loue; and Louers drinke,
This Charicles perceiu'd, and softly twitcht
Me by the sleeue, and said, Hath eye bewitcht:
This gallant too? Quoth I, we may't inferre;
For who excell'd but he, next after her?
He drunke a health vnt'all, at length to me;
I thankt, but pledg'd him not, and thereat he
Seem'd discontent; me Charicles excus'd,
And said, drinke wine th'Aegyptian Priest not vs'd.
[Page 53]He now perceiuing what I was, and whence,
Me more esteem'd, and set aside offence.
And, glad as one that had a treasure found
Vpon a sudden, hidden in the ground,
To me againe he drunke in water cleere,
And said (Graue father) let our meeting here,
And this carouse in that you fancie best,
Confirme our loue, and setl'it fast in brest.
Content, most noble Prince (quoth I) for so
Was my desire: therewith we rise and goe.
When home I came, I so began to thinke
On these affaires, I covld not sleepe a winke:
But studied still what meant the latter part
Of th'Oracle, and found it past mine Art.
Now neere on midnight (wheth'r I wakt, or slept,
I cannot tell; but sure I am I wept,
Because I found not out the mysterie)
This vision had I from our Deitee:
Apollo with Diana came; and he
Theagenes me brought, Chariclia she;
And told me time was now I should retire
To natiue soyle: and said, O Calasire,
Now time is come, and Destinie commands:
Then take these two (and put them to my hands)
Int'Aegypt with you, neuer trust deceiue;
But keepe and guide them as the Gods giue leaue.
Glad was I (Cnemon) so much more to know,
That homeward now I with these two should goe:
But how my Charicles should be depriu'd,
And our departure handsomely contriu'd,
I could not see; When Gods will haue thing done
They tender meanes; This while I thought vpon,
At breake-aday one at my portall knockt,
And when my seruant had the doore vnlockt;
Who should it be, but selfe Theagenes!
My troubled minde me thought then felt some ease;
[Page 54]I thought (and likely 'twas) that when he knew
I was a Gypsie, not of common crew,
But Priest of Memphis; that he thought I might
In loue so faithfull helpe to doe him right;
And therefore came: we kindly consalute,
And on my bed he sate a while as mute.
What makes my Lord (quoth I) thus early rise?
And why to me? he wip'd his loue-sicke eyes,
And said, O father, neuer stood I more
I need of helpe. When I him askt, wherefore?
He blusht and held his peace: I saw my time
To play the Gypsie, and thus began to trie him.
What you conceale (quoth I) and tell me doubt,
I shall by cunning Gypsie-skill finde out:
And smiling rais'd myselfe, and counters tooke
Betwixt my fingers, nought to numb'r, and looke
As one possest, and wistly them remoue
From place to place, and say, my son's in loue.
He start thereat; but when I further said,
In loue (I say) and with Diana's Maid;
He thought indeed I spoke with Pow'r Diuine,
And me to worship gan himselfe encline:
Which I forbad him; but some teares he shed,
And softly stroakt my beard, and kist my head;
At length burst-out in these; yet am I glad,
And thanke the Gods, that (looke) what hope I had,
It failes me not; and pray'd me saue his life,
And helpe to make this goodly Nymph his wife:
And said he was a dead man else, and swore
He neuer woman knew, or lou'd before.
And wept as 'twere for griefe it should be said,
So stout a man was conquer'd by a Maid.
I comfort him, and feare not, say, my boy;
Wee'll ouercome her, be she ne're so coy;
So you be rul'd; he said, th'row sword and fire
He would obey his father Calasire:
[Page 55]And promis'd me reward, his whole estate.
As thus we talke, one raps hard at my gate,
And prayes me come with speed to Charicles,
Now in the Temple gone about t'appease
Apollo's wrath, for some vnpleasing sight,
And fearfull dreame that he hath had to night.
So more in hope departs Theagenes,
And glad I sent-for was by Charicles.
I sad and sighing finde him, aske him why:
O deerest friend (quoth he) this night had I
Most strange and fearfull dreames, and my Charic
(The rest a sob cut off) continues sicke.
Now shortly run our youth in armes, and she,
Diana's Nymph should their torch-holder be.
To keepe our custome, helpe and vse your skill,
In this I know you can doe what you will.
Vncharme that eye that so bewitcht my guirle,
And wee'll reward you both in gold and pearle.
I must confesse 'twas yet forgot (quoth I)
And time you must afford me, both t'apply
And make the med'cine; yea, the Maid you must
Perswade well of me, that she may me trust.
I will (quoth he) and come now let's goe to her.
No sooner entred at her chamber doore;
But I her sicknesse read could in her face:
Her colour's gone, her all-delighting grace
With pearly show'r allay'd; yet when she saw
Vs two, of whom she stood so much in awe,
Sate vp, compos'd her selfe, began t'aduance,
And call againe her former countenance.
Then Charicles her oft embracing kist,
And said, What ailes mine only childe? what is't
Hath wrought this change in you? and why conceale you▪
This hurt from me, who may deuise to heale you?
Ha' cheere my guirle, and be no whit dismaid,
This reu'rend Father promiseth his aid:
[Page 56]To cure your sicknesse hold him th'only man;
For, if he will doe what he can, he can.
She nothing said; but made vs well conceiue,
By signe, she yeelded: so we tooke our leaue.
And Charicles me pray'd along the way
To thinke vpon't, and make no more delay▪
Especially to worke in her a minde,
To loue a man, as ought all woman-kinde.
I made him answer, such as well him pleas'd,
'Tis nothing hard to cure one so diseas'd.
Finis Libri tertii.

THE Faire Aethiopian.

THe Pythian games are past, and now begun
The day wherein the Gallants armed run.
And Cupid President of all the sport,
Will shew, by these two, greatest his effort.
All Greece lookt-on, with City-Iudges seauen;
A Heraulds voyce, that seem'd to rend the Heauen,
Was heard: Come forth, O yee that meane to pace
So swift in armes. At farre-end of the race
Appear'd Chariclia like a morning Star;
As loth her absence should the custome bar,
Or (as I thinke) because, more for her ease,
She thought she might there see Theagenes.
A torch in left, a Palme she held in right,
And her-vpon straight all men cast their sight:
But first Theagenes; for, Loue entire
Is quicke to spie that is his most desire;
And he had time to marke, that heard whilere
What should be done; then whisper'd me i'th'eare
(Of purpose next me set) 'tis shee, 'tis shee:
I bid him peace; then comming forth we see
A Gallant armed point-deuis, that high
Of spirit seem'd, and no man would him trie;
So known he was, and had so great a name,
For winning alwayes, when he ran, the game.
The Iudges send him backe; nor might they giue
The garland him, that had not for it strivve.
[Page 58]He then obtain'd it might proclaimed be,
And 'tis, come who so will: He calleth me,
Then saith Theagenes. How now, quoth I,
Will you aduenture such a ieopardie?
It shall be so (quoth he) nor will I stand
To see another from Chariclia's hand
For running swift reward of conquest beare.
But losse (quoth I) and shame I wish you feare.
You say full well, quoth he; but this belieue;
Who nought will vndertake, shall nought achieue.
And, were this Challenger as swift as Larke,
He could not me out-run at such a marke.
With many men in this kinde had I strife,
But neuer was out-ran in all my life;
And loue hath wings: so said, and downe he leapt,
And forward on the Plaine full nimbly stept;
His name and countrey told, and tooke his place.
Was arm'd, and stood all ready for the race.
The people shout at th'vnexpected part,
And wish him well; So moueth eu'rie heart
The comely person: but the Ladies most.
I markt Chariclia how she clear'd the coast
With Sun-bright eye, the Cryer hearing name
What were the men that entred for the game:
To wit, the stout Ormene of Arcady,
And braue Theagenes of Thessaly:
Nor could she keepe her lookes with all her Art,
So mou'd she was: at trumpet sound they start,
And cheeke by cheeke on sudden passing-by
So swiftly ran, they seeme not run, but flie.
How did her panting heart then shake her seet!
How did she stirre by fits her hands and feet!
As if her spirit with his body ran
To helpe him run. And now did eu'rie man,
And most my selfe, with care expect th'euent;
With him as with a sonne my wishes went.
[Page 59]No maruell (Cnemon said) if so't affect
The lookers-on; for I with care expect
That doe but hear't; and quickly tell m'I pray,
If our Theagenes there got the day.
The day (quoth I) yes, and deseru'd the night:
For passing Ormen-by, as 'twere a flight,
And, faining at some stone his foot to clap,
Of purpose fell, but fell iust in her lap.
And when he tooke the Palme, I could perceiue
He closely kist her hand, and with her leaue.
But she went home now sicker than before;
This second enterview enflam'd her more;
As fuell twice at fire: and I that night
Could take no rest, for thinking on our flight.
I saw 'tas meant by sea (by sea and land,
Said th'Oracle) but whither, t'vnderstand,
I must goe learne of that embroydred silke,
Left with her when she left her mothers milke;
Which had, but vnderstood not, Charicles:
To him I goe; but finde him litl'at ease,
How fare you man, quoth I; he wept amaine,
And said (alas) my daught'r is more in paine.
Both you and all the rest (quoth I) depart;
And leaue m'alone with her, to proue mine Art.
A three-foot stoole me set, and bayes withall,
Perfume, and fire; and come not till I call.
'Tis done, and I, now hauing time to play
My Gypsie part, perfume and waue the Bay
Now here, now there, and o're her face and feet:
She wagg'd her head at me, and smil'd to see't;
And said (good father) doe not so deceiue
Your selfe in me: then (Lady) by your leaue,
(Quoth I, and left my tricks, and sat her neere)
I know't full well; but be you of good cheere;
A rise disease it is, and easly cur'd,
Some eye bewitching hath your heart allur'd,
[Page 60]And put you to some paine two dayes before;
But, since you saw the race, a great deale more.
I ghesse the man, and saw him cast that eye,
The swift Theagenes of Thessaly.
Whe'r he me hurt, or not, I wish him good,
Quoth she, what is he? Of Achilles blood
They say, quoth I; and so may well be thought,
By face, and stature; beautie, and spirit haught.
But only that he seemes more gentl' and milde,
As if a friend might rule him like a childe.
And hath (I warrant) tooke more hurt than done,
By glance at you; and, if he were my sonne,
So could I wish: Alacke (quoth she) and why?
He hurt me not at all, good Sir; but my
Disease has other cause: Yet thanke I you
(Good father) for so suffring with me now.
If other cause (quoth I) my guirle, reueale it;
And from your father neuer long conceale it.
Disease like new-set plant is; quickly taken,
With ease plucke-vp; but rooted, hardly shaken.
A fathers loue I beare you, and your father
Hath put m'in trust; O therefore then the rather,
What ere it be impart, I vow and sweare
To keepe your cousaile, and effect what ere.
Hereat she paus'd a while, and in her face
Had many changes, all with prettie grace
Declaring doubtfull minde: then said, I pray,
(I cannot yet resolue) forbeare to day:
And after, what it is (if by your spell
You know it not before) I shall you tell.
I rose, and yeelded (as ought yeelded bee)
A time to bashfull Maidens modestee.
Yet take my leaue as men of women vse;
Soone after meet with Charicles: what newes?
Quoth he; all well, quoth I; and eu'n to morrow
She shall be rid of all her griefe and sorrow.
[Page 61]Nay more I tell you; she intends a deed
Will giue you great content, and that with speed.
And ne'rthelesse I wish you counsaile take
Of some Physitian, safer all to make.
If further cause be, call me to my taske,
So part to th'end he then no more should aske.
And walking homeward meet Theagenes
In Temple-close: it did his heart some ease
To see but where she dwelt; I passe beside,
As not perceiuing him, then oh he cri'de,
Good Calasire! the verie man I sought.
I sudden turn'd, as somewhat else I thought,
And said, O braue Theagenes! how braue,
Quoth he, that can of her no fauour haue?
Ah will you still (quoth I) mistrust mine Art,
Which haue so well already plaid my part;
Which haue her ouercome, and made her loue yee?
As, if you stand in doubt still, I shall proue yee.
Y'are th'only man whom she desir's to see.
Then he, what, what? why longer tarrie wee?
And going was apace, till by the cloke
I pull'd him backe, and thus vnto him spoke.
Nay stay a while, good youth; though as a Son
Of great Achilles, verie swift you run;
The time in counsaile spent is neuer waste;
And this no worke is to be done in haste.
Her father chiefe man is of all the Delph:
Why, then (quoth he) let's goe vnto himselfe,
And for his daughter pray him giue consent;
I trust it shall be no disparagement.
But he (quoth I) her promis'd long agoe
T'his sisters sonne. It shall be for his woe,
His woe, quoth he, and little for his ease,
Who gets Chariclia from Theagenes.
Nor blunt my sword is, nor my hand so weake.
Good Sir, quoth I, what need you thus to speake?
[Page 62]'Tis better done another way: be wise,
And counsaile keeping, doe as I aduise.
Be little seene with me; our enteruiew
May breed suspect; so forc'd he bids m'adiew.
Then Charicles came, thankt, embrac'd, and said.
O th'only man to turne deuoted Maid!
This is your Art, and your great wisdome able:
My guirle is conquer'd, earst vnconquerable:
She's now in loue. Then I looke big, and strut;
And say, though little I gaue, I knew 'twold do't.
But how appeares it? you (quoth he) vs bid
Physitians counsaile aske; and so we did.
When they came in, she turning to the wall,
As if she minded not, or scorn'd them all,
That verse of Homer sung with dewie cheekes,
O great Achilles, chiefest of the Greekes.
The wise Acestin (sure you know the man)
Her caught by th'hand, the malady to scan,
And by the pulse her troubled heart bewray'd;
Then vnto me (good Charicles) he said,
In vaine you call vs; this is no disease,
Whereof our physicke can the fits appease.
O Gods, quoth I; and must I lose my deare
And only guirle! Peace you (quoth he) and heare:
So call'd m'aside, and softly told me thus,
The body, not the minde, is cure for vs:
She's sicke in minde; she loues, and only he,
That made her sicke, will best Physitian be.
So went his way: and I straight hither ran
To you my best Director for the man:
I would it were Alcamenes my lad,
Whom for her husband I appointed had.
'Twere good (quoth I) to try, and let him go
To visit her: he said it should be so,
And thankt me for th'aduice: and yet e're noone
The next day met m'and cry'd, I am vndone:
[Page 63]My daughter's mad; I sent as you aduis'd
Alcamenes, and him she so despis'd,
And turn'd away-from shreeking, as the sight
Of Gorgons head had put her in affright:
Nay, threat with cord to make her selfe away,
Except we left her suddenly that day.
'Twas time to goe: but now, good Calasire,
Proceed t'accomplish that which I require,
And make her leane to loue. I doubt (quoth I)
Lest some malignant counter-sorcerie
Be wrought vpon the silken scarffe you said
Was with her Iewels by that Infant laid.
Forthwith he ran and fetch it me, and so
I lookt thereon, and told him, this to know
Requires some time; then to my hand he sped it,
And I went home and all at leisure readde it.
In letters Aethiopick (not the same
Of common sort, but that the Kings they name,
And verie like the sacred Characters,
That Priests of Aegypt use) thus it refers.
Persina, wofull Queene of Blackmoreland,
This wrote her selfe in haste with trembling hand.
I know not how, except by pictures white,
Wherewith my King would haue his chamber dight.
I brought him forth this white-one: but affraid
Of that high crime would to my charge be laid,
Ne durst be known thereof, but said she di'de,
And by a trustie Groome her sent aside,
To saue both her and me from death and shame,
That hate th'Adultresse and the Bastards name.
And now, sweet Babe, in vaine so faire that art,
Whereby thy selfe and I were like to smart▪
These jewells and this swath-band I thee giue,
To make thee known, if be thy hap to liue.
Which O! and then thinke on thy Pedegree,
And like a Princesse guard thy chastitee:
[Page 64] Of all thy jewells this Pantarbe stone
Haue care to keepe; 'tis worth all them alone.
And more there was in lamentable fashion
Set downe t' expresse a tender mothers passion,
Which here I skip; but (Cnemon) when I saw
The name Persina, strooke I was with awe:
And in my minde were griefe and ioy at strife;
The griefe, to note this faire young Ladies life,
And what she was indeed, and what suppos'd:
The ioy, to see the Prophecie disclos'd.
That now I thought was meet fit season watch,
And what I did intend with speed dispatch.
To her I goe, and finde her all alone,
Nigh ouercome with languishing and mone;
Yet some what cheer'd to see me. Then I said,
I now expect the promise of a Maid;
Which was to tell me what's you griefe: I pray
Make, if you will haue ease, no more delay.
You know my trust, and that I can it know
Though you conceale: But why should you doe so?
She tooke and kist my hand, and said, O father,
Then by your wisdome vnderstand it rather.
Well then (quoth I) you are not th'only she;
But many braue and vertuous Ladies be
That loue a man: and he that hath you heart
(If any worthy be) hath all desart.
This, if you marke, may set your minde at ease;
For what is wanting in Theagenes?
But Sir, quoth she, you speake as if 'twere sure
My father would consent, and th'other endure
To wooe a Maid. Quoth I, to tell you true,
The man is deeper strooke in loue than you.
Then, as for your supposed father, he
Wife vnt'Alcamenes would haue you be.
Alcamenes (quoth she)? first let me die:
For, but Theagenes will no man I.
[Page 65]But why my father call you so, suppos'd?
Then I that written on the silke disclos'd;
And shew'd it her, and askt her if she knew't.
She said such-one she had; but he with-drew't,
To lay-vp safe, lest it be worne or stain'd:
Yet neuer knew before what it contain'd.
Then vp she lookt with courage void of pride;
With count'nance well assur'd, and stedfast e'yd;
And askt, what's to be done? I tell her how
I was my selfe in Blackmoreland ere now,
To learne the tongue, and ioyne Gymnosophie
With Gypsie skill, and Greeke Philosophie.
And that her fathers Court, without obstacle,
Of learned men was chiefest Receptacle.
That there so grew I known to Queene Persine,
And was esteemed as an Arch-Diuine.
She, when she heard that home returne I ment,
Sent form', and told me why she for me sent;
To wit (she durst but vnt'a stranger tell)
A childe she had, which fare it ill or well,
Dead, liuing, where, faine would she know, and pray'd,
That with my skill therein I would her aid.
And told your case, and said she could not finde
That any such now liu'd in land of Inde;
But made me first, to keepe her counsaile, sweare.
I learne of Isis that you liue, and where.
Your mother then me prayes in any wise,
I cast would how to finde you, and denise
To bring you home: and if you come in heale,
To King Hydaspes she will all reueale.
Now time hath well approu'd her loyaltie;
And, for succession of his royaltie,
Glad will he be to finde vnhoped heire,
And doubt not you are his, although so faire.
This all I knew, though nothing said, before
I got the silke, that might confirme it more.
[Page 66]Then ere against your will Alcamenes
Begin to worke, or father Charicles,
With vs your Parents, and your countrey seeke,
And there be married to this noble Greeke;
Remembring what, of him and of your selfe,
Was prophesi'd by th'Oracles of Delph.
Then sith (quoth she) that we this shall acheiue,
The Gods declare, you say, and I beleiue;
Shew how I pray. I say, make you a show
To like Alcamenes. Alas you know
'Tis hard, quoth she, to seeme loue that I hate,
Or, but Theagenes, like any Mate.
Yet, sith I yeeld me to the Gods and you,
(Suppose I could so counterfeit) say how
I may come-out of danger, once got in.
To that I answer'd, care not you a pin:
That leaue me. Something, ere woman knowes,
She boldly doth; but knowing it forestowes.
Comply with Charicles, and be not nice:
He will doe nothing without my aduice·
She wept, I left her, met wit Charicles,
So sad, as if his heart had no whit ease;
How now! quoth I; you cause haue to be glad;
Your daught'rs well, and why are you so sad?
I dreampt (quoth he) that from Apollo's hand
An Eagle came and snatcht my guirle t'a land
I know not how farre hence; where shadowes were
Me thought in stead of men. When this I heare,
I knew the meaning; but him tell it thus;
(T'auoid suspect of that was meant by vs)
Apollo's Eagle signifies that ho,
The God, whose Priest you are, will mindfull be
To send her that you wish; and, in few words,
A man excelling men, as Eagle birds.
Now marri'd once, she must your bosome leaue,
And, till she giue vp ghost, vnt' husband cleaue.
[Page 67]For that is meant I know by shadow of men,
Whereto she goes at length. To blame you then,
To blame you are, yet are you not the first,
That of the Gods good meaning make the worst.
Wherefore apply we to the better sense,
And make her willing with our conference.
My part is done, and now must you doe yours.
How, how, I pray? (quoth he) for yet she loures
(As much as can that face, quoth I) to heare
Alcamenes is her intended Feere:
If they (quoth I) be faln-out, what attones
A woman more than pearle and precious stones?
Such tokens carrie you her in his name;
And if it please her not, be mine the blame.
He did as I aduis'd, and brought her est
The jewels all that Queene Persina left
Laid-out with her, and said Alcamenes
In token of his loue had sent her these.
She plaid her part well, and when this I knew,
'Twas time to giue Theagenes his Q.
So did, and while I went to sacrifice;
Thus me preuenting Phoebus did aduise:
Away now strangers call. And some I saw,
But knew not, there according to their Law,
When some what they had offred, merrie making,
Carouses filling, emptying, giuing, taking.
And these enuite me. There I sate a while,
And ate, and dranke: then said I with a smile,
Sith your enuitement doth me thus embolden,
Pray let me know to whom I am beholden.
We Tyrians are, saith one, for Carthage bound,
With wares of Blackmore, and of Indy ground:
To morrow meane we plow the bracky Maine,
If winde thus hold, and all together sayen
To that effect. Then I, yet if you may,
And are content to tarrie but a day,
[Page 68](No more I craue to settle things at Dolph,
And for the way) Ile be your Fare my selfe.
We will, say they; for with so graue Diuine,
We more securely shall passe ore the Brine.
I left them set then all on merrie pin,
And each with other dancing Matakin;
(Of some call'd Anticke, as it well may bee,
It so presents old inciuilitee,
With rudely making faces, body wrying;
Now vp, now downe, on this and that side prying)
And bid my younglings ready make to go
Next day at eu'n. This night it fell out so,
That, ere the second Cocke was heard to crow,
A band of Thessall youths, whereof now know
Theagenes was chiefe, gan so to rore,
That all the Citie wak'd out of the snore
Of soundest sleepe: yet no man durst arise,
Affrighted were they so with hideous cries,
And clattring armour, such as shooke the ground;
And made Pernassus hill returne the sound
With doubled eccho: but amid the noyse,
There comes a troope of these vnruly boyes,
Breakes-ope Chariclia's doore with many a stroke,
(Of purpose left so, that it might be broke)
And takes the Ladie, litle saying nay,
And with her packet carries her away.
The rest the countrey flie; but he and she,
The louing paire, come hand in hand to me,
Where was appointed: Sane vs father crie;
And on her cheekes ran sudden blushing die,
As for a fault. I comfort them, and will
They keepe them there, vnseene of others, till
I come againe, and going was; but she
Fast held my cloke, and said, what! leaue you me
With him to keepe? O father, doe not so;
'Tis treason-like: I will not let you go
[Page 69]Before you make him solemnly to sweare,
That now and euermore he will forbeare
To touch me wantonly, till we be wedde,
And may enioy a lawfull marriage-bed:
Agreed and done. Then I to Charicles;
His house in tumult finde without appease,
For daughters losse. And what should now be done
They cannot tell, though all vnto him runne.
For all the beauteous virgin held so deare,
They would reuenge the fact, but know not where.
My masters then (quoth I) this sudden fit,
(What?) hath it quite bereft you of your wit?
Before the rape of Hellen, or Europe,
A beauteous Ladie was of war the scope.
Take armes, and follow this vnruly Crew
Of Thessall youths; 'tis they haue wronged you:
And specially that one (friend Charicles)
With whom you made m'acquaint, Theagenes.
So made them bend their force another way,
While we to ship, and on the surges play,
From Delphi safe-conuey'd by this complot:
But what was after done there know I not.
Finis Libri quarti.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

NOw let vs rest a while, though (Cnemon) you
Can hold-out well I see. Quoth he, nor now
Should I desire you stay; but that I heare
A noise below; or me deceiues mine eare.
I cannot heare so quicke (quoth Calasire)
Or for mine age, or for my set desire
To tell this storie. But, me thinkes, I see
Our Land-lord Nausicles come vp; 'tis hee.
What haue yee done, Sir? Nausicles repli'de,
Far better than we thought: but lookt aside,
And, seeing Cnemon, askt what was the man,
A Greeke, quoth Calasire; Hee's welcome than,
Quoth Nausicles; and then said Calasire,
But needs we must of your successe enquire.
Know now but this, quoth he; that I haue found
A better Thisbe than I did propound.
'Tis time to rest: and so he went to bed.
But Cnemon lay all night with troubled head,
For name of Thisbe; thought in Gypsiland
The dead reuiue so soone; and, t'vnderstand
The truth, arose, and groping in the darke,
At length t'a womans wofull crie doth harke.
And thus she said; O wretched I, tha [...], out
Of Spoylers hands escap'd, now had no doubt
[Page 71]T'attaine my libertie, and death acquit
With presence of my loue; yet faile of it,
A slaue become againe. But O that hee
May liue, and keepe himselfe from bondage free,
And sometime on his Thisbe thinke! for so
Now must he call me whe'r he will or no.
These words strooke Cnemon in so ghastly feare,
That all in haste he gate to bed, and there
With chattring teeth and quaking legs he lay,
Till Calasiris askt what did him fray.
That wicked Tib (quoth he) whom with mine eyes
I saw lye slaine, yet liues, and yonder cryes.
But he poore wretch deceiu'd was, and afraid
Of that which known will hold him best apaid;
Or make him laugh vntill he fret a rib;
For this Chariclia was, and not the Tib.
It thus befell: when in the mazie Den
Thermute and Cnemon left the Louers; then
They chastly clip and kisse, forgetting day,
Till at the length the man began to say,
Sweet heart, I know it is our most content
To liue together still; but sith th'euent
Of mens affaires vncertaine is; and we
By some misfortune may disseuer'd be,
(Which Gods forbid) let each a watch-word haue,
And priuie signe to vse, as need shall craue.
She lik'd the motion well, and both agree,
That he should Pythius write, and Pythia shee,
On eu'rie crosse-way-stone and monument,
Or famous Image, by the way they went,
To right, to left, to what towne, where, and when;
That so the sooner they may meet agen.
And for some signes, in case by crosse or quame
They could nor write, nor speake, he beare a paume,
And she a taper: yet a fearre had hee
Receiu'd by tuske of wilde Bore on his knee▪
[Page 72]And she of Iewels euer bore this one:
Her fathers ring with rich Pautarhe stone.
And this of all the confirmation is,
They kisse and cry, and kisse and cry, and kisse:
Among the riches left by theefe in Caue,
Although the choice of many there they haue;
(Behold consent of either Princely minde)
Th'ill-gotten treasure all they leaue behinde,
And take but of their owne a part, and goe,
She with her packe, he with her sheafe and bow.
When to the Lake they came, and were about
To take a boat, they see an armed rout,
With many boats, come rowing toward th'Isle;
And daunted much thereat stood still a while,
Till she for feare began to run aside,
And praid in Caue they might againe them hide:
Yet as they went were met withall by some,
Before vnseene that ore the Lake were come,
But loe, a faire and beautifull aspect
Will many times a barb'rous minde affect.
A cruell hand began to strike, and staid
Amaz'd at sight of such a beauteous Maid,
Or Goddesse so disguis'd, as then was thought;
And therefore to the Leader be they brought,
As all they found; his name was Mitranes,
Lieutenant vnto Lord Orondates;
That had all Aegypt in his gouerning.
Vnder the mightie Babylonish King.
And he against the Robbers of that Lake,
By Nausicles was hir'd for Thisbes sake.
And though the suttle Merchant saw full well
This was not she, but did her farre excell;
To put a tricke vpon the Don, he said,
O this is she my Thisbe, my faire Maid;
Embrac'd and kist, and whispring told her how,
To saue her selfe, she must be Thisbe now.
[Page 73]He spoke in Greeke which she well vnderstood,
And hoping well it might be for her good,
When Muranes her asked what's her name,
Him answer'd Thisbe: yea the verie same,
Said Nausicles, and kist the Captaines hand,
And call'd him man of fortunate command.
The Souldiour puft with praise, and gull'd with name,
Although he wisht himselfe so faire a Dame;
Yet, for reward that he before had tooke,
To Merchant gaue her with repenting looke.
Then on Theagenes his eyes he bent,
And said to Babylon he should be sent:
For, for his pers'nage and well featuring,
Well might he wait vpon the mightie King.
Then him with conuoy, and with letters sent
T'Orondates, and this was their content.
This Grecian youth is of so comely grace,
That I him thought deserue a better place,
Than vnder me. I thinke, like him, not one
This day attends the King of Babylon.
Wherefore (my Lord) him please you thither send,
And both our duties to that God commend.
Now broke the day, and longing Calasire,
With fearfull Cnemon, gan themselues attire:
Yet halfe vnready goe to Nausicles,
And for some further newes will hi [...] disease;
Who told them all that I know said before;
And how he got a virgin for a whore:
Yea, passing her as much for beautifull,
As doth a Goddesse passe a common Trull.
Then they began how matter stood conceiue,
And pray'd they might but see her with his leaue.
He cals her in, she muffled doth appeere,
And looking downe; he bids her haue good cheere:
She shewes her face; at once is seene and sees,
Is known and knowes; at Calasiris knees
[Page 74]Fals downe and cries, O father! he likewise,
O daughter! Cnemon, O Chariclia! cries:
That Nausicles the while vpon them gaz'd,
And at so strange encounter stood amaz'd;
Whom Calasiris spoke-to thus; O frend,
Though I not able, God shall thanke y'i'th'end.
You saue my daughter, you me giue the sight,
Wherein of all the world I most delight.
But, O Chariclia, what hath thee bereft
Of thy Theagenes, where hast him left?
O how this question dampt the royall guirle▪
She could not speake, till drops of liquid pearle,
Fell from her Diamond eyes t'asswage her heart;
And then told how their fortune was to part,
As said before. Then they from Nausicles
Desire to heare more of Theagenes.
I can but tell (quoth he) and you but heare;
For you are poore, and it will cost you deare
Him to redeeme; the Babylonian
Is couetous, yea more than any man.
Chariclia whisper'd Calasire i'th'eare,
And said, we haue enough about vs here;
Him promise what you will. Then Calasire
Said, Wise men haue as much as they desire
On iust occasion (fearing to detect
Chariclia's offer, lest it breed suspect)
Then tell vs what is he that hath our frend;
With helpe of Gods we shall him please, who send
What ere we need: so, when you list (he said)
You can be rich; and thereat smiling staid,
And said againe; them will I you beleiue,
When for your daughter you me ransome giue:
You know your Merchants money seeke and scan
As much as any Babylonian.
I doe, quoth I; but 'tis no Merchant feat
To grant so soone: you should me make entreat,
[Page 75]For this my daughter. Sir (quoth he) be bold;
Your happinesse I would not long with-hold.
Moreouer, now mine offring will I make,
Come you and yours, and pray for me, and take
What ere the Gods doe send: O, doe not iest,
Quoth Calasire: but on their Godheads rest.
So, when you will, begin, and we shall ioyne;
And you i'th'end shall see we want no coyne.
Chariclia t'offring neuer had beene brought
With Merchants daughter, but because she thought▪
for her fit time it was the Gods to please,
And pray vnto them for Theagenes.
Then goe they to the Templ' of Mercurie,
The most of-Merchants-honour'd Deitie.
When Calasiris th'entrals had beheld,
And saw good fortune bad-with entermeld,
As did his looke declare; he thrust his hand,
And tooke, as'twere from vnd'r a fire-brand,
A Iewell rich, and said, O Nausicles,
See what the Gods haue giuen; will this you please,
For this my daughters ransome? 'twas a ring
That sometime wore Hydaspes, Blackmore King.
The circle was fine gold, and siluer mist;
The Pale and Aethiopick Amethyst;
As big as Maidens eye, and of a vaine
Beyond the best of Britanie or Spaine;
And turn'd about, it sheds a golden streame
On each thing nigh, and from a deeper beame.
And thus engrau'n it had; a shepherds boy,
On hillocke set, there seemes to play and toy,
(Such leisure haue they) while his sheepe, him by,
Some share the tender grasse, some basking lye;
As 'twere in Sun-shine of that flaming stone,
And some in companies, and some alone.
The wanton Lambs there some start vp and leape,
Some all together run upon a heape,
[Page 76]As dansing to the boy, that seemes to play
Vpon his pipe, and harkning to the lay.
They seeme all golden-fleeced by the gleame
All ore them cast from th'Amethysticke beame.
Thus was the ring: Which Nausicles admiring,
Said (Calasiris) 'twas not my desiring
To make you pay so for your guirle, I ment
Her freely giue: but sith this ring is sent
From Pow'r Diuine, and 'tis not good you say
We such refuse, I take it for to day,
As sent by Mercurie my greatest frend
Of all the Gods, whom I serue most auend.
Then tooke a glasse of watercleere, and said,
This (Calasire) vnt'eu'rie Nymph and Maid
That is so cleere; and this to them I drinke,
Because your daughter such one is, I thinke.
For loe, no musicke, nor no dansing shee
Among the rest delights-in, but on knee
For her Beloued praying is; that he
May soone and safely meet her; yet haue we
Now leisure good to heare, that oft had I
Desire to know, your wandring historie.
Put-off no longer: Cnemon prayd the same.
Then Calasire, To sacrifice we came
Not telling tales. But sith you both desire
To know my roming, to the ship of Tyre
I must returne; wherein we sail'd from Delph,
Theagenes, my daughter, and my selfe;
Of Tyrian Merchant-venturers a troope;
And merrily we ran, with winde in poope,
That day and night; and all in safetie and ease,
With iron share broke vp the fallow feas:
The Straight of Calidon we passe ere night,
And of the sharp-point Islands lose the sight.
Next day betime, with winde now turn'd aslant,
Cast ank'r, and land before the towne of Zant;
[Page 77]To winter there: But, for the rude resort
Of Saylers running to and fro the Port,
I thought the ship not safe; nor yet the towne,
Left our escape might haply there be knowne:
And, other harbour seeking, light vpon
An aged Fisher-man, that on a Stone
Sat mending broken nets: I said, God speed,
Good father; can you tell a man, if need,
Of some good Inne here by? They all to rags
Were broke (quoth he) against some hidden crags.
What's that to me (quoth I)? you shall doe well,
Or me receiue yourselfe, or else one tell,
Where else I may be l [...]dg'd; 'twas not my fault,
Quoth he; Tyrrhenus is not so assault
With blinde and doting age; they were my wags,
Who cast in place vnknown among the [...]ags.
I then perceiue the man was deafe, and cry
In's eare aloud; God speed you (Sir) said I▪
And can you helpe vs some good lodging finde?
God speed you too (quoth he) and, if your minde
You serue thereto, come soiourne here with me;
Except you many and ouer [...]tious be.
But three (quoth I) my selfe and children twaine.
No more, but one (quoth he) with me remaine:
Mine elder children marri'd with my purse
Are gone: two boyes are lest me, with their Nurse:
The mother dead: you shall be welcome to vs;
And seeme a man that may some pleasure doe vs.
We come and there full well are entertain'd;
By day we all together still remain'd.
At night we laid Chariclia with the nurse;
And glad was she her lodging was no worse.
Alone Theagenes, alone lay I;
And old Tyrrhenus with his youngest frie:
Sit all at boord the same, and well we fare,
With fish he got at sea, and with our share
[Page 78]Laid-out on such achates, as marketby
Did eu'rie weeke afford; and pleasantly
So liu'd we there a while as heart could wish▪
And went sometime to fowle, sometime to fish.
For th'old man was prepar'd for either sport:
But pleasant times (alas) are ouer short.
Who long can lye at ease in Fortunes lap?
Mis-hap haue once, and [...] mis-hap.
Chariclia's beautie makes tumultua [...]ie
This verie place so meane and solitarie.
For he of Tyre, that won the [...]ythian game,
Now haughtie growen by that renowned name,
And more, because we sail'd with him in ship,
Her loues, and will not this occasion slip.
With tedious suit he daily beats mine eares;
And that the goods and ship [...] his he sweares▪
And saith his all shall hers be during life,
If I my daughter let him take to wife.
I pouertie pretend▪ yet say that she
Shall for no wealth so far be sent from me.
He saith he will her person more account
Than any dowrie, though it should amou [...]t
To many talents; and his kin forsake,
And whither so we will his voyage make,
To dwell with vs▪ I saw his feruent heat
On flat deniall might some mischiefe threat,
And promise that in Aegypt once arriu'd,
It should be done, if well the iourney thriu'd▪
He thus put-off, a while some rest we haue;
But in the necke of this another waue
Begins t'arise: Tyrrhenus neere the shore
Me tooke to walke, and much protesting swore,
For loue to me and mine he will reueale
That much concern'd vs, neither could conceale.
A Pyrat ship (quoth he) beyond the Cape
There lies in wait, your Tyrian hulke to rape.
[Page 79]Looke to your selfe and yours: I thanke, and pray
Him tell me how he knew't▪ But yesterday▪
(Quoth he) the Master-Pyrat askt me wh [...]n
Your ship puts-off; Trachinus was the man.
I say, I know not; but (Sir) why I pray
Demand you this? if be so bold I may.
(They loue me, Calasire, I dare you tell;
I bring them victails; for they pay me well;
And poore is house that hath not much to spare
For poore, for theefe, for waste, and want of care)
I loue the Maid (quoth he) your Soiourner,
And meane to set vpon them all for her.
To know his whole designe then thus I said,
What need you fight with Tyriant for the Maid
That is with me? before she goes abord▪
There may you take her neuer drawing sword.
'Tis for your sake (quoth he) that I fores [...]ow [...]
For Pyrats loue their friends: yet further know,
I two things aime at, wife and wealth to win:
I lose at sea, if I at land begin.
Consider'd well, quoth I; but, for the thing,
I thinke they will not goe vntill the spring.
So part we: now this villane us intent,
I hope your care and wisdome will preuent.
What did I then? It was my chance to meet
The Tyrian Merchant walking in the street.
He gaue occasion, asking my good will,
As heretofore; I tell, not all that ill,
But what I thought was meet▪ how earnestly
A great man of this countrey did apply
Himselfe to get my daughter for his wife:
But I had rather, so you lead your life
With vs in Aegypt, as you promised;
And for your wealth, that you (my Lord) her wed.
And therefore wish, before our minde be crost
By force or otherwise, we leaue the Coast.
[Page 80]He lik'd the motion well, and, though too soone
He said it was, yet hauing light of Moone,
Resolu'd that night be gone in any sort,
Although he got but int'another Port.
I tell my children, not Tyrrhene a word;
And after twy-light get vs all aboord.
Yet by the way our Host it gan perceiue,
And each of other kindly tooke our leaue.
The Moone kept counsaile, blabbed not our flight,
Yet gaue vs leaue to see our way by night.
With armed beake we cut the fomy brees,
Behinde the land, beside vs flie the trees.
The brother gan to quench the sisters light;
And day appearing droue away the night:
The winde that fill'd our saile now gan to stoope,
And Pyrats ship descri'd is from the poope
To follow vs, and this and that way twine
As if our hulke had tow'd her with a line.
A man of Zant, that wistly gan it marke,
Cryes-out Trachine it is, I know the Barke;
Prepare to fight or yeeld; he comes apace,
And all this day hath had our ship in chuce.
We though becalm'd, yet seeme with tempest shooke,
So stand w'amas'd, and one at other looke;
Run vp and downe, before, behinde, beside;
Some put on armes, some vnder decke them hide;
Some leaue the ship, and get into the boat
To make away: Theagenes, full hoat
Set on to fight, beseech we both to stay,
And hardly keepes him backe Charislia;
Desiring each might either liue or dye
In others armes; but on a point thinke I
That might vs helpe (now knowing 'twas Trachine;
That would not rashly kill or me, or mine)
And tooke effect. For when the Pyrate gaue
Vnt'all men leaue, that would their person saue,
[Page 81]In single clothes to leaue the ship, and go
Aboord the boat: we with the rest doe so.
He then Chariclia taking by the hand,
Saith, vnto you (sweet Lady) this command
No whit belongs, but all is for your sake,
That I this war and voyage vndertake.
Then feare you not; but be of heartie cheere;
For all is yours and mine that you see heere.
Then she (as wisdome was, obseruing case)
Of sorrow-damped looke recals the grace;
And tisie-smiling said; now Heau'n be thankt,
That I among these others am not rankt;
But shall I thinke indeed you louing be?
Grant this my first request, and keepe with me
This same my brother, that my father deere;
For them-without I cannot be of cheere:
So wept, entreated, fell vpon her knees
Embracing his; which when the Rouer sees
Therewith delighted, purposely delay'th
The grant a while, and then her raising, saith;
Your broth'r I giue you, likely man to stead vs
In feats of armes; and th'old man too may lead vs,
Sometime by counsell, which way best to take;
Yet both I grant for your owne only sake.
By this the Sun had ran his dayes careere,
And eu'ning signes of rising winde appeere:
That rais'd a sudden storme; when they in fine,
To spoyle our ship, had left their brigandine;
And thus surprised knew not what to doe;
For, want of skill is worse storme of the two.
Though little pinnace, whose each rope they knew,
Well could they rule how ere the Brothers blew;
To guide our ship, yet all with trembling hearts,
Are faine to play these vnacquainted parts.
Some to the poup, and some run to the prow;
And steere they know not what, they know not how:
[Page 82]Some awkly draw the cords, and some them loose;
And some vntie, where they should make a noofe;
Some beat their brests, and teare their hairie scalps,
To see the sea like Pireneis and Alps.
The wallowing hils now vp to Heau'n vs mount,
Now cast vs headlong to the waters fount.
And on the sides of that our floting grot,
Thump, thump, as loud as charge of Engine-shot.
The Pyrats barke, with salt sea-water drunke,
Her cable frat, and thrice turn'd round and sunke.
And we no more, than head lesse Common-weale,
Where all men may with all things entermefle,
And no man will obey, but all command,
In time of greatest danger, like to stand.
Yet shift the Pyrats made as long as light
From Heau'n appear'd, though like to drowne at night:
At night as darke as pitch, saue enterflashes
Of lighting mixt with fearfull thunder-crashes.
Thus then, and next day troubled were the seas,
And they therewith: which gaue me time and ease,
To thinke on our affaires: But aft'r a while,
The tempest o're, we safe embock the Nile.
The rest are glad, but we lament the more;
That rather wisht be drown'd, than come at shore,
In danger still of Pyrats proud command,
Who shew'd his foule intent new come to land.
For making shew with sacrifice to please,
And for their safetie thanke the God of Seas;
To countrey sends he men with store of coyne
For much prouision; lands the Tyrian wine;
With goodly Tissue Carpets spreds the tables,
Some on the ground, and some on roules of cables.
And sets on siluer-bowles, and cups of gold:
All for his marriage-feast, as he me told.
When (Sir) quoth I, may't please you celebrate
The same with all such complements and state,
[Page 83]As place and time affords; your ship may be
Bride-chamber then, and none there come but she
The Bride her selfe, to dresse and make her fit;
And for the time all others thence a acqiut,
When I haue there beene first, and taken care
She nothing want that might her well prepare.
He likt th'aduice, and gaue-out straight command
It should be so: Theagenes by th'hand
I take, and both vnto Chariclia goe,
And finde her almost ouercome with woe.
Then children, said I, this is not the way
T'auoid our present danger; what I say
Marke well and follow. So I both aduise,
And ending went to play another prize
With him that was the second of the Crew,
Pelorus call'd; and said (my sonne) for you
Good newes I haue, my daughter loues you well;
If how t'auoid Trachinus you can tell,
And like of her, shee'll be your wedded wife:
Than marrie him sh'had rather lose her life:
But time is short: the cheere he doth pretend
For sacrifice, is for that other end.
Well, feare you not, quoth he; I was of minde
T'haue mou'd the same; and could no season finde.
But now I know we thus agree in heart,
Trachinus neuer shall her from me part.
I haue a reason will our fellowes charme;
A sword as good as his, as strong an arme.
Thus hauing done, in haste, t'auoid suspect,
I turne to them, and further them direct.
Soone after sit we downe, and when I saw
The Pyrats well in wine, Pelore I claw
By sleeue, of purpose sitting next his side,
And aske him, haue you seene the gallant Bride?
He told me no. Then closely make a flip
(For'tis forbid, quoth I) into the ship:
[Page 84]There shall you see (yet haste, and doe but seek;
Lest otherwise take hurt both you and shee)
My daughter so attir'd in gold and pearle,
As might become the Bride of Prince or Earle.
He goes and sees her clad in Delphick pall;
(For that for triumph, or for funerall,
Was then put on) returning more on fire,
Now both with emulation and desire.
And set at boord, quoth he, why haue not I
That me belongs by Law of Pyracie,
For entring first this hulke? then said Trachine,
The parts yet are not made, nor yours, nor mine,
Nor anies here; nor yet vs told haue you,
What thing you claime: quoth he, then will I now.
The captiue Maid I claime. Trachine repli'de,
I her except, take what you will beside.
Then breake y'our Law, quoth he; quoth th' other, no.
But on the ground of other Law I go,
Which giues the Captaine choyce; and for I meane
My wife to make her: this cuts you off cleane;
And rest content, or this (and vp he rose
With massie pot in hand) shall crosse your nose.
Thus I (my fellowes, quoth Pelorus than)
Thus shall you be rewarded euerie man.
And after this (beleeue me Nausicles)
These men were like the sudden tossed seas:
So all on tumult run they foolish blinde,
When wine and anger stirr'd-vp had their minde.
And some with th' one, as equall share to make;
And some, for gouernment, with th' other take.
But as Trachinus at Pelorus stung,
Pelorus him at heart with dagger stung.
Though he were dead, in his or th' others right
Partaking still, the rest continue fight;
Are strooke, and strike like mad and drunken fooles,
With stones, with clubs, with tables, pots and stooles,
[Page 85]I closely stole away, and on a hill,
My selfe in safetie, looke on others ill.
Theagenes and his Chariclia
Fought also both, as I them told the way.
With sword in hand at first he tooke a part,
But holpe the weaker still, that equall Mart
Might all consume: and she made many grone
With arrowes shot from ship at all but one.
And now was left but he and that Pelore
At single combat: she had spent her store;
Or if a shaft remain'd, what might it boot?
For feare of hitting wrong she durst not shoot;
So neere their bodies were, and mouing still
At combat close: Theagenes she will,
But cannot helpe with hand; yet at her charme
Of Courage man, he smote-off Pelors arme.
The bloud so sprang out after g [...]isly stripe,
As water from a broken Condit-pipe.
This made him put the sturdie theefe to flight,
And chase him far: what more was done that night,
But that Theagenes return'd againe,
Of me vnseene, and lay among the slaine,
I cannot tell; For I continu'd still,
And durst not stir in darke from off that hill;
Chariclia knowes; for on the morne him by
I saw her sit, and him as like to dye.
A troope of theeues them carri'd both away,
With goods from out the ship. I thought to stay
For fitter time to helpe them, hauing scope,
(Whereof, as then, I cleane was out of hope)
And now with your good helpe, good Nausicles,
(The Gods reward you) freed is one of these.
So said, and wept; but Nausicles repli'de,
And said, they shall not th'other from you hide:
To morrow will we know of Mitranes,
If he be sent yet vnt' Orondates,
[Page 86]As was design'd. Done is this offring-feast,
And Nausicles his daughter with the rest
From out the Temple going are away;
But Calasiris mist Chariclia;
And sought with Cnemon, and at length her found.
Where she t'Apollo kneeled on the ground,
His Image feet embracing fast asleepe;
And when they wak'd her she began to weepe:
And said she drempt that her Theagenes
Had far to goe, and more by land than seas.
They comfort her, and tell her their intent;
And all with Nausicles to lodging went.
Finis Libri quinti.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

THe Princesse lay with daught'r of Nausicles,
A faire young maid, yet little tooke her ease;
And Cnemon thought it long with Calasire,
Before they went Theagenes t'enquire.
They raise their Host ther [...]ore by breake of day,
And him to Mitranes conduct them pray.
Content is he; faine would Chariclia
Then with them goe; but they perswade her stay,
Her promising, before they far remoue,
To come againe, and bring her lookt-for Loue.
So left her doubtfull, whether to be sad
For their depart, or, for their promise glad.
Now when they neere approach'd the banks of Nile,
There rusht them by a monstrous Crocodile.
A Serpent strongly scal'd, head, backe, and legge,
And twelue yards long, yet bred but of an egge.
Note when he gapes, his lower chap stands fast,
And th'vpper moues, some fiue foot long and past.
And this deuourer hauing fed his fill,
Will suffer Trochilos with slender bill
To picke his teeth, a bird no bigger, then
The little Titmouse, or the Iynny Wren:
Will follow such as run away, and run
From such as follow, both in shade and Sun.
Now these Aegyptians vs'd to such a sight,
Were nothing mou'd; but Cnemon much affright,
[Page 88]Start backe, and ready was to run away:
Whereat the Merchant laught; and Priest gan say,
I thought (Sir Cnemon) nothing could you feare
But in the darke, as th'other nights Bug-beare.
What's that (quoth Nausicles)? then Calasire,
To passe the time, and satisfie desire,
Him told how Cnemon tooke Chariclia
For Thisbe, when at Chemu [...]is first she lay.
Then Nausicles could laugh no more, but thought
Why name of Thisbe so on Cnemon wrought;
And askt the cause whereof he was to seeke,
And so to laughter now prouokt the Greeke:
Who said, behold how strange a name is this,
To moue my minde so first, and now so [...]
I thought our noble Host had beene more stout,
Than now be dampt, who late could others flout.
Ha'done, ha'done (quoth Nausicles) you have
Reueng'd your selfe enough: but let me craue;
By all that may to you most pleasing bee,
And by the Gods of Hospitalitee;
This name of Thisbe whence it is, and why
You turn't vpon me now so meerily.
Then Calasiris, Cnemon, time you see
Requires you satisfie both him and mee.
Then let vs heare your storie from the sourse:
For well is trauell eased with discourse.
He yeelds, and tels them what not many weekes
He told before vnto his fellow Greekes.
And how with them acquaint he grew, and frend,
Among the theeues; and of that Thisbes end.
And left out nought that was not, as their owne,
To Nausicles and Calasiris knowne.
It mou'd the Merchant so, that he full well
Could finde in heart the rest of her to tell,
And of himselfe; confest and said, 'tis I
That was that Merchant then of Naucratie;
[Page 89]And brought her out of Greece. Here one they meet
With Nausicles acquaint of Chemmis-street;
Who told them newes; that where as Mitranes
Had sent a young man vnt' Orondates,
To serue the great King; he by Thyamis
Now Chiefe of Bessans intercepted is;
And Mitranes with all his force is gone,
In iust reuenge their Towne to set vpon:
So past them by in hast. Then Nausicles
Perswades returne; and for Theagenes,
Because the iourney longer was, to goe
Prouided better: they determine so,
And comming home, at doore Chariclia found
Them looking-for: for, Loue is like a hound
That for his master waits. But, when she saw
They brought him not, she gan her haire to claw,
And tore asunder Natures finest thred,
And wept, and cry'd, alas my Loue is dead!
What all alone, and, as you went, returne?
O tell me quickly, lest I longer mourne
With griefe suspended. 'Tis a courtesie
Not to delay report of miserie.
Why doe you (then quoth Cnemon) so foretell
The worst, and false? Theagenes is well;
And told her how, and where. O blame her not,
Quoth Calasiris; felt you but a iot
Of loue so true, you would her soone excuse:
For such are ne're content with hearsay-newes:
But thinke they cannot each from oth'r absent
Without some sad and fearfull accident.
When such as you (Sir Cnemon) well I know
So speake of Loue as neuer bent his bow.
Aske Saints how faire in Heau'n, for they can tell;
And aske ye Fiends how foule it is in hell.
Then like a father led her in by th'hand,
And there not long they either sit or stand;
[Page 90]But Nausicles, to put them out of dump,
And hauing some thing else therewith to iump,
Prepar'd a feast that night with cheere and wine,
And made his daughter more than wonted fine.
And toward banquets end them spoke-to thus;
As heretofore so shall be still with vs;
My welcome guests (that so you are I call
The Gods to witnesse, and continue shall,
If please you stay) what I at sea or land
Haue any where, 'tis all at your command;
Not now as guests; but as my deerest frends.
But know my trade on Merchandise depends;
My ship my plow is, and the Southerne windes
Me call to Greece: then let me know your mindes;
That whether here I leaue, or with me lead you,
I may my voyage frame some way to stead you.
The Priest of Memphis, after pause repli'de,
Good Nausicles, haue happie winde and tide!
Let all the Gods of Merchandise attend you,
And home with gaine full-fraught in safetie send you!!
That, stay or goe we, doe so perfectly
The lawes obserue of hospitalitie.
Vnwilling we to part from such a frend,
Yet must be gone, you know, and for what end.
Thus much for me, and for Chariclia;
What Cnemon meanes to doe I cannot say.
The Greeke, about to speake, with sob is staid;
At last with sighs and bitter weeping said;
O this vncertaine state of humane life!
How full of doubt, and variable strife!
Depriu'd of fathers house, of Countrey and Towne
So deere to me, still rome I vp and downe?
Not long it is, a plurall scarce of weekes,
Since hope I had, with such two noble Greekes,
(Though hard put-to, as I) to finde some ease;
And shall I now bereaue my selfe of these?
[Page 91]What shall I doe? or which way shall I bend?
Tell (O) that can! I am at my wits-end.
To leaue Chariclia, can it but displease,
Before she finde-out her Theagenes?
Or if I seeke with her, O who can tell
How, where to finde him; when all will be well?
So shall I wander still: what if I craue
Of you, sweet Lady (shall I pardon haue?)
To take th'occasion giu'n by Nausicles,
And home returne, now call vs winde and seas?
Though helpe I little, I willing shall me show;
True seruants loue will creepe wher't cannot goe.
She had perceiu'd (and quickly, by your leaue,
A Louer can a Louers minde perceiue)
That Cnemon lou'd the daught'r of Nausicles;
And that it did the father greatly please:
Wherefore she said; I beare you thankfull heart,
Sir Cnemon, for your thus far friendly part;
And gladly shall requite it: for the rest,
I see no reason you be further prest
To follow mine affaires; but minde your owne,
And take th'occasion now so fitly showne.
My fath'r and I to th'end shall hold-out still;
Though no man else assist, the Gods yet will.
This hearing, Nausicles began to pray,
All good successe attend Chariclia,
So wise, so gracious! and (Cnemon) now
Vnt'Athens going, neuer grieue it you,
That Tib you bring not, sith you bring the man,
Who tooke her thence: and if you like it can
As well as I, now well I know your straine,
You shall both house, and land, and wife attaine
With dowrie great, this same mine only childe;
He gaue a quicke consent thereto, and smil'de;
And tooke her straight, of purpose ready drest,
And turn'd the supper to a marriage-feast.
[Page 92]While all the rest attending were the Bride,
The Princesse vnt'her chamber slipt aside;
And shut the doore, and (as she were distract)
Her rayment tore, and haire aboute her shakt.
Then wept, lamented, howled, beat her brest,
And said, this danse becomes my marriage-feast.
My bed-fellow Nausiclia from me taken?
And I now left alone, of all forsaken?
Is Cnemon married now at full hearts ease?
And still in bondage my Theagenes?
At their successe (O Gods) I not repine;
Though grieue you make no better his and mine.
But O Theagenes my sweet delight,
And only care, to thee I giue this night;
I consecrate these locks, then haire she tore,
And laid them on her bed, and wept them-o're.
So fell asleepe with griefe and passion tir'd,
And slept so long as next day was admir'd.
For Calasiris missing her, before
That wont rise early, knockt hard at her doore;
And wak'd her suddenly with such a din,
That, as she was, she rose and let him in.
But when he saw her haire and vesture rent,
And lookes vnsettled, ghessing what they ment;
He lookt aside, she slipt halfe into bed;
Then thus he chid her, while she drest her head.
What meane you (Lady) so your selfe to vex?
I thought you had in courage past your Sex:
And now me thinkes, but only for the name,
(So chang'd you are) you should not be the same.
Why will you kill your selfe, and not expect
Your better hopes? O doe not so neglect
Theagenes and me! a while she staid,
A blushing while, and modestly then said;
Good father pardon! 'tis no strange desire,
Nor common cause that sets me thus afire.
[Page 93]You know the loue I beare Theagenes,
And his to me; my heart cannot haue ease,
For his long absence, most because I feare,
And, wheth'r he liue, or dead be, cannot heare.
Feare not, quoth he; for that of him and you
Fore-told by th'Oracle must needs be true.
Nor doubt y'of that was told vs yesterday,
How he by Thyam carri'd was away:
But thinke him safe as with acquainted frend;
And vnto Bessa let vs goe or send,
As both haue cause; you for Theagenes,
And I my sonnes intended war t'appease;
But rather goe: she paus'd, and said, your sonne?
If that be Thyamis, I am vndone.
How so? quoth he. You know (quoth she) and where
Theagenes and I his pris'ners were.
My seeming beautie, mischieuous to me,
So there enflam'd your sonne (if this be he)
That I, to saue our libertie and life,
Delaying promise made to be his wife.
My sonne is not so far run out of way,
Quoth Calasire, but I shall make him stay.
Or if you doubt, inuent some how, I pray,
(For cunning y'are I see to make delay)
Some how we may enquire, and not be knowne.
She smil'd, and said; Sir, my way or your owne,
In iest or earnest, little skilth it now,
Theagenes and I had such a how:
But were preuented e're we could prepare;
And 'twas, in forme of beggars clad, to fare.
This (if you please) now [...] put in vre;
For pouertie makes all men walke secure,
Be pitti'd, not enui'd; and victailes get,
Which vnto trauellers are deerest set:
And world so false in now (that by your leaue)
[Page 94] Who will not be deceiued, must deceiue.
But thinke we not so long what must be wrought,
That we forget to practise that is thought.
He could not choose but at her reason smile.
And all in haste prepares them for that wile
Then there in Chemmis; after parted faire
With Nausicles and his new marri'd paire.
Now on the way, in place conuenient,
They change their clothes, and as a begging went,
She Doxy-like, and he, as Patrikoe,
With hundred-patched cloke lent on her bow,
And halted when he met or man or page,
And crookt his shoulders more than had his age;
Or as a blinde man poring on the land,
Sometime Chariclia led him by the hand.
He bore her quiuer bound-vp at his backe,
Like some thing else; and she in slubber'd packe
Her best attire, and jewels; then besmut
Her face, and hardly counterfeits a slut.
When fouler faces vse a Painters knacke,
To make them faire, she needs be painted blacke.
O all that looke in glasse, and finde you faire,
Doe nothing that the credit might impaire
Of those sored and white, and comely graces;
If beautie faile, with vertue mend your faces.
A shew may soone deceiue the vulgar eye;
But he that lookt on her iudicially,
Might well perceiue in black-well-featur'd face,
Of nose, of lip, of cheeke, eye, brow, the grace:
As when a cloud is o're Diana drawne,
Or Ʋenus looking th'row blacke cobweb lawne.
Was neuer seene a Maiden comlier,
Nor vnder duskie cloud so bright a sterre.
Yet Sir (quoth she) you seeme one of the Bench;
O, good your Worship, pitie a poore young wench:
[Page 95]Good Dame, quoth he; my right hand is me rest,
And no true finger least is on my left.
And she againe; once poore, and euer poore;
For wealth is giu'n to none, but had before.
Then he againe; yet winde in driuing snow,
From higher places oft fils vp the low.
Thus when between themselues they had protested,
As beggars doe, and each at other iested;
To Bessa-ward they trudge; and by Sun-set
Had seene the Towne; but see what was their let!
Dead bodies many finde they laid aground
On heapes, and all of some yet bleeding wound.
And while they view'd the carkasses they meet
An aged woman creeping hands and feet,
And much lamenting o're a young man slaine;
And t'aske of her they thought it not in vaine,
As Calasiris did in Gypsie toung,
What mischiefe had so many laid along.
And what was he whom she lamented so.
She said, my sonne, late forc'd to battell go
With Thyamis our Chiefe, against the powre
Of Mitranes and all his Persian flowre;
He came to sacke our Towne for one mans sake,
Whom he had sent to Memphis from the Lake:
This man by Thyamis pretending right
Was entercepted; cause of all this fight:
And willb' of more: for slaine is Mitranes,
And all his men by ours; Orondates
Will seeke reuenge; which our men to preuent,
And vnawares to take the Foe, haue sent
A puissant armie Memphis to beleaguer;
And Chiefe, and all, are thereon set more eager,
To get his right of Priesthood, by none other
With-held, but eu'n his owne, and younger brother,
But you are strangers here full well I see;
[Page 96]And whither goe yee? to the towne, quoth hee.
You cannot safely lodge (quoth she) in towne,
So late in time of war, and both vknowne.
Yet if you please (quoth he) vs entertaine,
We may (I trust) to night well there remaine.
Th'old woman answer'd, I haue now in hand
An earnest night-worke; if you further stand
Till all be done (and best you keepe aloofe)
To morrow will I doe for your behoofe.
Then what she said, he told the Lady in Greeke,
And they repose them in a bushie creeke.
He slept a while with quiuer vnd'r his head,
Chariclia made her packet serue for bed;
But only sate, and slept not on't, for feare;
And vnto Philomela's song gaue eare:
Till Cynthia rose, and shew'd (as tales imply)
Her man and bush, or (as Philosophy)
Her spoongie part; though we now vnderstand
'Tis nothing else, but face of sea and land,
As 'twere in glasse; for in the Torrid Zone,
Betwixt the Moon and th'earth thicke cloud is none:
She cleerly shining, three dayes dayes past the full,
Made seene how this old witch heau'd vp the skull
Of her dead sonne, and with her negromancie,
(A vice that Gypsie women greatly fancie)
Him forc'd to speake yet once more vnt'his mother,
And tell her if her second sonne, his brother,
Should safe returne from war; he told her no,
And that her selfe should soone receiue a blow
For iust reward; and specially because
She made the liuing know the dead-man lawes:
For here's a Priest (quoth he) and here's a Maid
That see your pranks: by him may be allaid
The war betwixt his sonnes, so bee't he haste:
And she shall get her Loue, and reigne. at last.
[Page 97] Chariclia wakt th'old man at first, to see
And heare this all, and all interprets hee.
And hearing this, the witch, all in a rage,
So playes her Scene vpon this deadly stage,
With sword in hand, that had she stranger found,
Sh'had laid them soone among the dead aground.
But as by Moon-light flourishing she lope,
Now here, now there, to hit vncertaine scope;
At vnawares, vpon the sharpest part
Of broken speare, she ran herselfe to th'heart.
So punisht was th'abominabl' offence:
So works of darknesse haue their recompence.
Finis Libri sexti.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

NO sooner gan appeare the dawning day,
But Calasiris and Chariclia;
With danger past affright, and fearing worse
By losse of time, as prophesied the Corse;
Depart, and trudge to Memphis-ward, and found,
When they came there, a Campe pight on the ground
Before the wals: for in the Towne the States
Had fortified themselues and shut their gates,
And let Portcullice downe, aduertised
Of enemies approach, by some that fled
(As alway scape in battaile more or lesse)
From Host of Mitranes o'rethrown at Besse.
Now therefore Thyamis, to siege addrest,
Thought meet his wearie companies to rest;
And wils, for doing good, and shunning harme,
They nigh the wall, and not too nigh disarme.
The Citizens, afeard of them before,
Now gan to scorne them, for they were no more:
And would with Archers lest in garrison,
And certaine troopes of horse, them set vpon;
But that a Noble-man, that was full wise,
With age authorized, gan thus aduise:
Why (Countrey-men) although our Gouerner
Be gone far hence about the Negroes werre,
We should, before we weaken any Fort,
Acquaint the great Kings sister, his Consort:
[Page 99]And better will the Souldiour make defence
In war begun with her intelligence.
They like th'aduice, and to the Palace run,
And aske Arsace what she please t'haue done.
She was a Faire-one of Diana's size,
And chaste as Venus, and as Pallas wise,
And minded-high as Iuno, for her birth;
That such another was not found on earth.
And true it was, though not in common vent,
Sh'had beene the cause of Thyams banishment.
For, when th'old Priest of Memphis secretly
Had left his Countrey for the Prophesie,
Came Thyamis his elder sonne to place;
That was a tall young man of comly grace:
She likt, and shew'd him such a fauour-token,
As of a Princesse ought not to be spoken:
But he, both young and vertuously dispos'd,
Not saw, or would not see't: And this disclos'd
His brother Petosire t'Orondates;
That (Thyam gone) he might the Priesthood seize:
For thus much of his owne he puts thereto,
That Thyamis was bent her will to doe.
The Gouernor, that knew her humour well,
Did soone beleeue't; and yet (the truth to tell)
He durst not vie it; wer't for want of card,
Or for that awe and reuerend regard
He bore th'imperiall bloud; yet tooke to heart
So, that he made young Thyamis to smart;
And euer threatte him death, vntill he went,
For feare of worse, to willing banishment.
This heretofore; but now the Citie comes,
And all defire her leaue to beat-vp Drums.
First let me know, quoth she, these enemies
How many, and what they be, and why they rise.
Ile offer parley to them from the wall;
And when I haue well markt and gather'd all
[Page 100]That may be therein safetie done aloofe,
Then will I cast the best for our behoofe.
They praise her wisdome: yet as turbulents
Run all on heapes vpon the battlements:
For out of hand there shew her selfe she would,
And did in throne of purple silke and gould;
Attended on with guilden armed Guard,
And clad as might with Empresse be compar'd:
In Crowne of gold, and precious stone, and pearles,
She stately sits her downe; and eye she whitles
On eu'rie side, and o're the Bessan Camp,
And hauing view'd it well she gaue a stamp,
And shew'd her Herauld, signe of parl; he calls
The Leaders forth to heare him from the walls·
Theagenes and Thyamis appeare
All arm'd but head, and this full soone they heare.
A [...]sace wife of Prince Orondates,
And sist'r of Babels great King Artabes,
Demands what are you? wherfore come you? whence?
Before she sends out force to driue you hence.
Then Thyam answers, telling them his name;
And how his right to get againe he came;
Which if he might obtaine, he would suppresse
his companies, th'Inhabitants of Besse:
But if Orondates and Petosire,
Who both him wrong, deny that they require,
He will by these, and others far and wide
Stirr'd vp to warre, the Controuers decide.
And Lady Arsace, if she call to minde,
What Petosire hath done, no cause shall finde
Him to defend against his elder brother;
For he 'twas, only he 'twas, and none other,
That made Orondates suspect her grace,
And thereupon put Thyam out of place.
The Memphits all are mou'd, and him they knew,
And what he said of th'others thinke is true;
[Page 101]And th'elder brothers exile all deplore;
The cause whereof they neuer heard before.
Arsace selfe now troubled most of all,
Doth sometime anger, sometime loue recall.
Her loue to Thyamis rekindles fire;
And anger, to reuenge on Petosire.
And one thing else distracts her more than these;
Her sight and new loue of Theagenes.
The verie standers-by may well perceiue,
How diuers passions in her shoue and heaue.
But when was o're this fit of Apoplex,
Thus stout and wisely spoke she past her sex.
You (yet my friends) and all that with you take;
Me thinks not well aduis'd are, here to make
Vnequall war: the mightie King my brother,
Although my Lord be gone, hath many an other,
To lead his forces here, that may be tri'de,
Enow to compasse you on eu'rie side:
And pitie 'tis, that you so comly and young,
And (as I ghesse) of linage noble sprung,
Should put your selues in danger for these thieues.
And for the common people me it grieues,
To shed their bloud: but sith on priuate lawes
The matter leanes, and is no publike cause;
The same me thinks the Combat should decide:
Then let the brothers only danger bide,
And trie their right. The Memphits all assent,
To saue their persons from a wars euent.
But (see) the Bessans loue their Captaine so,
They will not hazard him; and all say no:
Vntill himselfe entreated and them told,
His brother could not long against him hold;
A man vnexercis'd against a man,
That could in armes as much as any can.
And this she thought-on that the Combat mou'd,
To plague her hated man, by man she lou'd;
[Page 102]And void suspect. No sooner 'tis agreed;
But all for combat ready make with speed,
Saue Petosire, that, after great dilates,
At length is hardly thrust out at the gates.
For oth'r his armes than Thyamis doth aske;
Theagenes him puts-on gilden caske,
With goodly-shaking crest, and, though no need,
Encourageth and wisheth him good speed.
I trust (quoth he) to win, but haue no will,
Nor neuer had, my brothers bloud to spill,
For all the wrong me done: Yet chance of fight
Vncertaine is; and therefore if it light
I ouercome, to you my deerest frend,
Of all my happinesse I part intend.
And here with me at pleasure liue you may,
For I in towne shall beare the greatest sway:
But, if it fall (as oftentimes we see
Th'vnlikely come to passe) that slaine I bee;
Then of the Bessan forces take you charge,
And them commanding may you liue at large,
Till better fortune fall. They thus agreed
Doe kindly part; and Thyam went with speed
T'encounter Petosire; Theagenes
Sate there beholding, and beheld at ease.
The Ladies eyes are on him still, and his
Vpon his friend well-wished Thyamis:
Whose comming Petosiris could not bide;
But backe to gate he runs, and Open cri'de.
And then both from the gate, and from the wall,
Keepe-out, receiue him not, they cry out all.
He casts his armour off to make him light,
And round about the Citie takes his flight.
Then Thyam followes, then Theagenes,
To see what issue; both he could with ease
Outrun; but would not, lest be thought it might,
That for his friend he ran, and meant to fight:
[Page 103]Though shield and speare he left, when first he rase;
On which, for him, doth still Arsace gaze.
They run the wals about once and againe,
And all this while is Petosire not taine;
For anger cannot swifter be than feare;
And Thyam armed ran; yet now with speare
Is like to pricke him, charging him to stay,
Except he would be slaine vpon the way.
Then Calasiris, knowing both his sonnes,
By that fore-told him was, them after runnes,
And faster then might well endure his years,
And cries, O Thyamis! O Petosir's!
My sons, what meane you? what now? are you mad?
Respect your father, though as beggar clad.
They know him not, vntill the cause he spi'de
And cast his staffe and beggars cloke aside;
And grauely stood before them face to face;
With long white haire, and old Arch-Bishops grace:
And said behold your father Calasire;
'Tis I (my sonnes) O put away your ire!
They fall downe at his knees, and wistly view him
From head to foot, and so full quickly knew him.
And glad they were of his vnhoped life;
But sorrie that he found them so at strife.
At this the companies vpon the wall,
The lesse they knew, the more they wondred all.
And chiefly for they saw Chariclin,
When Calasiris ran from her away,
Him after fast to run; and when she spi'de
Theagenes a far (for loue quick-ey'd
To see the loued had him soone descri'd
By verie gesture) now the more her hied;
Him ouertooke, and hung about his necke
In case she was, vntill he gaue her checke
And cast her off, not knowing her; but shee
Comes-on againe, as loth to lose her fee;
[Page 104]And for her boldnesse got a box oth' eare,
He little thinking who she was, I sweare.
Then said she softly; Pythius hath forgot;
And shew'd her taper; then defers he not;
But, strooke with beautie shining th'row a cloud,
Her tooke in armes, and often kist aloud.
Arsace swells thereat, and all admire,
To see the strange euent; that Calasire
Who ten yeares had beene absent, came so pat
To stay the Duell 'twixt his sonnes; and that
Two Louers should thus vnexpected meet.
They passe in order th'row the Temple-street,
Th'old Priest betweene his sons led, and the Maid
By her Theagenes: the people staid
Them gazing-on, and all themselues delight,
The younger men to view the gallant Knight,
The Maids the Maid, old men the Priest, and childe,
That brothers had, the brothers reconcil'de.
And Thyamis to those of Bessa sent,
With many thanks and noble complement,
An hundred oxen and a thousand sheepe,
And Crownes a peece before he went to sleepe.
T'encrease the pomp Arsace went in pride
With all her traine, and still that young man ey'd;
For whose sake only so far came she forth,
And t'Isis offred things of greatest worth.
But when she saw him lead Chariclia
With one hand, and with other make her way;
Forth with she leaues-off all solemnitie,
And goes to Palace sicke of iealousie.
To both his sons now Calasire commends
Th'affaires of those his two young Grecian frends:
And when th'old man had done his whole deuotion,
Vnto the people neere he makes a motion,
And saith h'is old, and well foresees his death,
And to his sonne that first receiued breath,
[Page 105]A man not wanting parts for worke diuine
Of body or minde, the Priesthood doth resigne.
Then set the Mitr' vpon Sir Thyamis head;
And in the morning found was fairly dead.
His time was come. Which him did more oppresse,
I cannot tell, or ioy or wearinesse.
Arsace knowes it not: for when she came
To Court, her minde was all put out of frame.
To chamber went she, and on her bed she cast her▪
For loue was wholly now become her master.
She turn'd from side to side, and deeply sigh'd;
And now along she lay, then sate vpright:
Then downe againe halfe naked tumbled shee,
And wisht Theagenes were there to see.
As wanting something then she cals her Maid,
And sends her backe againe with nothing said.
And likely was't, that, were she long alone
In such distraction, all her wits had gone.
But Cybel came, her ancient houshold Bawd,
And thus in word her loue-sicke Lady claw'd.
What aile you Madam? Who hath hurt my deere
And fairest Nursling? haue good heart and cheere.
He liues not that your fauour shall refuse,
If please my Sweet-one so my service vse,
As oft-to-fore: then tell me, what's the man,
But I by suttl' enticing conquer can?
So said this Hag, and pidling kist her feet,
And swore as siluer white, as Amber sweet.
The praised Peacocke spreds abroad his traine,
That else would hide it: now is hit the vaine,
And gusheth-out. Good mother then, quoth she;
The peace that made was yesterday, to me
Began a warre: wherein, not from a part,
But ouer all I wounded was to th'heart:
The faire young stranger when I first espi'de,
That in the Duell ran by Thyams side;
[Page 106]You cannot choose but note the man, that are
Herein so skill'd; he past them all so farre.
I did forsooth (quoth she) and, be it spoken
Vnto your Ladiship, by certaine token;
That impudently fast about him clung
A ragged Trull, though somewhat faire and young.
Tush, faire? repli'd Arsace then, she paints:
But can a man abide so bold constraines?
More happie she, than I am, at this houre,
That hath her got so braue a Paramour.
The Bawd then smoyling said, Ah Dearling mine,
Ile make him cast-off her, Ile make him thine.
Sweet mother Cybling, quoth the Lady then,
And will you doe't indeed? (I pray) but when?
Leaue that to me, quoth she; and take your rest:
So tooke the candl' away, and to her nest.
By peep-aday she rose, and well aray'd,
A Groome before her, and behinde a Maid,
Vnt'Isis Temple went: and there she spoke
(As oft Deuotion's made of sinne a cloke)
With one that kept the doore, as if she ment
Come offer something that Arsace sent:
Who (as she said) was troubled sore last night
With verie fearfull dreame and grisly sight.
He said, as yet he could not serue her turne;
Now all that keepe within the Temple mourne
For Calasiris death, and none let in,
Till after this another weeke begin.
What shall your strangers then the while (quoth she)?
Our new Arch-Bishop Thyamis (quoth he)
Hath order giu'n, and well content they are,
T'another house, without the Close, to fare.
This Hag layes hold on th'opportunitie,
As on the chiefest point of Faulconrie,
And said, good master Sextain well you know
My Lady loues to talke with such as the;
[Page 107]And many noble Greekes hath entertain'd;
Her hospitalitie was neuer stain'd;
Then well of both you may deserue, as thus,
To say that Thyamis them sends vnt' vs.
The Sextain little knew the Bawds intent,
But as for good vnto the strangers went:
And found them both (as full great cause they had)
For losse of Calasiris weeping-sad.
He cheeres them vp, and tels them Thyamis,
As was his fath'r, of them right carefull is,
And hath prepar'd them lodgings fairly dight,
Which this good Lady (pointing at the spright)
Will bring them to: and bids no longer stay her,
But, as a mother to them both, obey her.
Well was his meaning, though it ill befell;
As, ill that ment is, often falls-out well.
They condescend; O ne're had been so gull'd
This louing paire, but that they had been dull'd
The day before with ioy; that night with griefe.
And so them stole this man-and-woman-thiefe.
No sooner came they to the Palace gate,
And saw the sumptuous buildings and the state;
Where workmanship excelled manifold
The matter selfe, though Porphyrite and gold;
But maruell'd much, and troubled were in minde;
For they had thought some priuate Host to finde,
And not belodg'd in Court: too late they thought
To start backe now; and further still are brought;
Vntill they came to Cybels lodging; where
She made them sit, and came and sate them neere;
And said, My children well I doe perceiue,
'Tis forth'Arch-Bishops death that you so greiue,
Your reuerend friend; it seemes he lou'd you well,
And you him also: but I pray me tell,
Of whence and who you be: of Greece I know,
And well descended, by the grace you show
[Page 108]In lineaments and lookes: but of what towne
Of Greece you be, and how thus vp and downe
You come to wander, let me know, I pray?
That to my Lady better may I say
For your behoofe: she loues a Greeke full well;
And in that language few can her excell
That are not Greekes: and is to strangers all,
Of worthy parts, most noble and hospitall.
The royall wife of Prince Orondates,
And sister to the great King Artabes.
You shall not speake it but t'a faithfull frend,
And one that will continue yours to th'end;
For Greeke I am, and Lesbis they me name,
Of that braue Isle and Citie whence I came.
From place to place a captiue did I rome;
But settled here far better than at home
I mannage all my Ladies great affaires;
And eu'rie stranger first to me repaires.
And I them bring acquainted with her Grace,
Then let me somewhat understand your case.
He then this hearing, vnto minde doth call
Arsaces wanton glances from the wall;
And thought no good was like to come thereon,
But rather mischiefe now he feares begon.
And as he gan to speake, Chariclia
Him rounds i'th'eare, and saith, in that you say
Your sister think-on. Mother (then quoth he)
We Grecian borne, and broth'r and sister be.
Our Parents were by Rouerstak'n away,
And we them seeking worse haue far'd than they:
Till now of late with holy Calasire
We fell acquaint; and at his kinde desire
Resolu'd to liue with him; this is our case;
Now, if you loue vs, doe vs but the grace,
To let vs lodge in place more solitarie;
For from the Court our habits greatly varie.
[Page 109]Then of your Ladies fauour make pause,
And trouble not her Highnesse for our cause.
Glad was the Grammer when she heard they were
A broth'r and sister: that she might not feare
Chariclia would be some impediment
For her t'effect Arsaces main intent:
And said, good sonne, you neuer would so say,
If you my Lady known had but a day:
So kinde to strangers, so compassionate
Vnt' all that suffer crosse in there estate:
Though Persian borne she loues the Grecian guise,
And of the two our Nation counts more wise.
Then feare not: you shall best preferment get
That fits a man; your sister shall be set
At boord with her, to keepe her company,
Both neere each other liuing merrily.
But now your names? Theagenes (quoth he)
My selfe am called, and Chariclia she.
Then bids she them her straight returne expect,
And vnt' her Lady Arsace runs direct.
And told what seruice sh'had already done,
To bring those young ones, hardly to be won,
Into the Court; where now, without offence,
May enterview be had, and conference.
She gaue command'ment first t'another Hag,
That kept her doore, no bolt thereof to wag,
For anies comming in, or going out.
What if your son (quoth she)? Keepe backe the Lout,
Cyb-hag reply'd. And she no sooner gone,
But comes, and knocks hard at the doore, her sonne.
Then O Theagen, O Chariclia,
Say th'one to th'other: she doth vs betray.
And, keeping Louers chaste and faithfull grace,
Embrace, and weepe, and kisse▪ kisse, weepe, embrace.
They then the losse of Calasire lament;
And chiefly she, that most time with him spent.
[Page 110]And said; O sweetest name of father quite
Bereft me now! for him that was my right
I neuer knew, and him that foster'd me,
Whose name I beare, how can I hope to see,
That left him so, no better than betray'd?
And this that was my best and surest aid
Lies flat aground embalmed for the beere;
And cruell custome lets me not come neere.
Then would she teare her locks, and on them weepe,
And said, thy funerall yet thus I keepe.
But he held both her hands; then she the more
Fell thus againe her Patron to deplore.
My guide in forraine lands, and as I rome
My staffe to lean-on; who shall bring me home?
Who shall me lead? Who shall my Parents finde?
Put-by my dangers, comfort me so kinde,
Now thou art gone? O were my head a fount,
To weepe my fill, and yeeld thee iust account!
Meane time Theagenes did inly grieue,
But hid his owne, her passion to relieue.
Achamenes, without doore all this while,
Against the Porteresse began to moyle.
Yet when he knew his mothers charge, I thinke,
He said no more; but peept in at a chincke,
And saw them both, and thought, how braue a Swain
Were that, and this a wench, in merrie vain;
Who so become their griefe! Again he peekes,
And bett'r obserues the count'nance of these Greekes;
For such he learn'd they were, and by his mother
Late thither brought; and viewes both one and other;
Till at the last is strooke, by th'Archer blinde,
In loue with her, and gan him call to minde;
And thought, is this not he, whom th'other day
The Male-contents of Bessa tooke away
From me and my Conuoy; by Mitranes
Sent, to present him vnt' Orondates?
[Page 111]And should he not (I haue it vnder ring)
From hence be sent to serue the mightie King?
But, not a word, vntill I know the rest;
And how my Lady likes of this her guest.
Now Cybel came againe, and chid her sonne,
For prying so into that she had done.
As oftentimes the curious are shent,
For searching things to them not pertinent.
He mutt'ring went his way; but thought, this youth
Was kept of-purpose for Arsaces tooth.
As for that wench, it shall goe hard, and if
By mothers helpe I get her not to wife.
The Bawd discern'd as soone as she came in,
Though now compos'd, in what case they had bin.
Why mourne my children so (quoth she) that reason
Haue more to laugh, for their good hap this season.
My Lady wils me that you nothing want,
(And here assure you no good cheere is scant)
To morrow must I you to her present:
Then doe not still so babishly lament:
But vnto cheerfulnesse now change your face,
And set your selues to please her noble grace.
Good mother pardon, quoth Theagenes;
Since death of friend we cannot finde that ease.
These are but toyes, quoth she; a man thus ould
As Calasiris, ripe was for the mould.
Now by this one thing all things may y'attain;
(Wealth, honour, pleasure) please my Ladies vain.
And I shall shew you fittest time, and how
That she commands must be perform'd by you.
An haughtie sprite hath shee, as come of Kings;
And hereto somewhat youth and beautie brings:
To be neglected highly will she scorne.
This more him strook than all was said beforne,
As filthy stuffe implying. Now there came
Some gallant Eunuchs from this haughtie Dame,
[Page 112]With best reuersions of her Princely table
Seru'd all in massie gold incomparable.
Which she, they said, these strangers t'honour, sent;
And set afore them, and away so went.
The Louers eat thereof, but more for fashion,
Than of their owne desire or inclination;
Who rather wisht for meaner cheere to pay:
This had at supper, this had eu'rie day.
At last these waiters come to call away
Theagenes vnto their Lady, and say;
Thrice happie you, our Lady for you sends;
Enioy the blisse that few men else attends.
He paus'd a while, and rose, and askt the Groome;
Must I alone, or with my sister come?
Alone, quoth he: for now she doth conuerse,
In stately wise among the Lords of Perse.
Another time your sister shall be call'd
Among the Ladies: he thereat appall'd,
Lent downe and softly said vnto his Loue,
I like not this: but wish it well may proue.
She answer'd softly, keeping well the close,
'Tis best you doe not flatly at first oppose:
And so he went. They taught him by the way,
Who need no teaching, what to doe and say:
And when he came her Statelinesse before,
They will'd him, yet he would not her adore;
But bolt-vpright salutes her with this verse;
All-haile ARSACE, royall bloud of Perse.
The Persian Courtiers murmur'd at the Greeke,
Who durst so boldly to their Lady speake
Without adoring her; she did but smile,
And said my Lords, when he hath seene a while
The state of Persian Court, he will doe more,
Than with an outward complement adore:
So saying mou'd her Coronet vpon't,
As Persian Queens in giuing thanks are wont.
[Page 113]And further said, y'are welcome gentle guest;
But aske, and haue, if ought you be distrest:
So sent him backe with fauourable signe
To th'Eunuchs made; whereto they all encline,
And lead him downe with stately pomp of Guard.
Achaemenes him met, and on him star'd,
To view him better now in open light;
And knew him better now at second sight:
Suspects the cause, and was therewith offended;
But mum, quoth he; few words are soone amended.
That night the Lady sent not only joynts
Of daintie meat, but goodly counter-points,
And suits of hangings wrought in Lyde and Tyre,
With purle and twist of gold and siluer wyre,
To sundrie-colour'd silke, Gem-stone and pearle;
A boy for him, and for his sist'r a guerle:
Then by themselues, to put-off irksome thought,
A while they looke what eu'rie peece had wrought.
I passe the rest; at one Chariclia gaz'd
Remarkably, and stood thereat amaz'd:
How now (quoth he) whereat so lookes my Deere?
With that she deeply sigh'd, and said, lo here,
Lo eu'n among my fathers enemies
Is better knowen his daughters miseries
Than to himselfe; behold a crowned paire
Of Black-ones here set high on royall chaire;
The Queene is great, as cunning hand and head
Hath well set-out, and yonder laid abed
With childe her-by; as far vnlike them both,
As snow to Ieat: behold and yonder go'th
With childe in arme the wise Sisimithres,
As Calasiris heard of Charicles,
And told it me: alas, alas the losse
Of such a guide is now our greatest crosse:
Yet eu'n in Aegypt (howsoe're we speed)
Is seene by this that vertue hath her meed.
[Page 114]Then Cyb came-in; and yet she durst not push
At what was ment: but goes about the bush.
She magnifies her Ladies great good will
To him and her; and much commends her still,
For beautie excelling any Persian Queen,
Yea beautie and parts as well vnseen as seen;
To gallant youths most amiable and kinde;
And so she tries him, how to lust inclin'de.
The vertuous Knight though seeing would not see
Whereat she shot; yet many thanks gaue hee
T'Arsace for her kindnesse shew'd the Greekes:
But Cybel knew she thought her howers weekes,
And promise would expect: and now no more
Can be put-off, as had been heretofore,
With idle excuse; as that the youth's affraid;
Or some mishap their forward purpose staid:
A sennight's past, and almost eu'rie day
Is call'd, and made-of much, Chariclia
For brothers sake; that now the Bawd is faine,
Against her will, thus speake the matter plaine;
My Lady loues you (Sir) I know you see't:
When will you leaue this sowre, and taste the sweet?
No danger is there▪ for her husband's gone;
And none shall know't but I: Wife haue you none,
Nor other loue; though many not far hence
I know, that would with such a bond dispence
In case the like, and scruple neuer make
Both wealth and honour with delight to take.
A meaner woman, when she loues a man,
And is not lou'd, by all the meanes she can
Will seeke reuenge: can royall bloud of Perse
Indure it, thinke you? call to minde your verse.
Behold how many men at armes attend her,
To guard her friends, and punish those offend her.
But you, but one, a stranger, friendlesse, weake.
At last she praid Chariclia for her speake;
[Page 115]And said, sweet heart, it will be good for you▪
My Lady will you fauour more than now,
Enrich, aduance, and set you at her bord,
And highly marrie to some Persian Lord.
Chariclia lookt askew at her, and said;
I wish the nobl' Arsace bett'r apaid;
And, if not otherwise, 'twere good that he
Her gaue content, so safely might it be:
And, lest it hurti'th'end both him and her,
From knowledge kept of th'absent Gouerner,
Who sees far-off. Hereat the Gammer skips,
Embraces her, and layes her on the lips;
And saith (Good daught'r) I thanke you for this grace:
Becomes a woman tend'r a womans case,
And sister brothers: but the coast is cleare
All round about, and nothing need you feare.
Forbeare, and let vs thinke vpon't, quoth he;
So forth went Cybel, and Chariclia she
Said, O (Theagenes) 'tis hard successe,
This happinesse in shew, in deed distresse!
But wisdome bids make vse of what we finde
To saue the maine: and so if be your minde,
Content am I. But if you thinke it grosse,
As out of doubt; yet set not all on losse;
Delude her with faire promises a while;
For time may helpe; to th'end she bring no vile
Disgrace on vs: and yet I pray take heed,
Lest often promising you doe't indeed.
He smil'd, and said, for no aduersitie
Will women leaue their fault of jealousie.
Thing ill to doe should not be said: and know,
Of such a minde I cannot make a show.
But, vs to rid of further suit, the scope
And way is, quite to put her out of hope.
Then present mischiefe must vpon vs fall,
Prepare you for't, quoth she; and therewithall
[Page 116]Comes Cybel in, late hauing comforted
The loue-sicke Lady, left yet on her bed.
This Gammar Bawd, this all-enticing spright,
Yet lets Theagenes alone to night;
And labours what she can Chariclia
To helpe her suit, as they together lay.
But in the morning sets on him againe,
And prayes him put her Mistris out of paine,
If yet he be resolu'd: he flat denies her;
And she againe vnto Arsace hies her,
With sad report. The Lady gaue her checke
In such a sort, as neere had broke her necke
Thrown down the staires: her selfe, both heart and head
Now like to burst with griefe, rowles on her bed;
And all to teares her cloths, her haire, her brest;
Nor all that day could take a minutes rest.
The Bawd no sooner left the Nurserie,
But meets her sonne, who saw her sadly crie;
And askt the cause thus of her sudden damp;
What ailes Arsace? What newes from the camp?
Hath Lord Orondates receiu'd a blow,
Or lost the field? good mother let me know!
And instant is to learne the reason why;
Nor will her leaue, though she would put him by.
Then him she conjur'd, and by hand him tooke
And led him forth aside t'a secret nooke:
And said, My sonne; this vnto none I would,
But vnto thee, mine only childe, haue tould;
Our Lady loues the Grecian here; and thence
Come all her fauours and beneuolence.
The vaine and foolish youth will not comply,
Doe what we can, her minde to satisfie.
Which her distracteth in so high degree,
I thinke 'twill make her kill her selfe and mee.
Then helpe vs sonne, if thou know wherewithall,
Or else prepare for mothers funerall.
[Page 117]What shall the man haue (quoth he) that procures
To be fulfill'd my Ladies minde and yours?
Aske what thou wilt, quoth she; Cup-bearer late
I made thee, and daily can encrease thy state.
Then he; I thought at first it would be so;
But held my peace to see how game would goe.
Ile worke my Ladies will, or lose my life,
If I may haue that Greeke wench to my wife;
And aske no more: for (mother) I so loue her,
That liue I cannot long, except I proue her.
Away with honour, and away with pelfe;
And let Arsace iudge me by her selfe.
Why sonne (quoth she) of this make you no doubt;
I thinke my selfe can well nigh bring't about;
Bed-fellowes are we: by some tricke or gin,
Not now to seeke, I quickly shall her win.
But how can you so bring about this geare?
A word not I (quoth he) vntill she sweare.
And mother deale not you, in Greeke, nor French,
Nor any language, with my daintie wench;
Lest hurt you doe: for I already finde
She lookes aloft, and beares a haughtie minde.
But let my Lady assure her selfe I will,
On that condition, all her minde fulfill.
With this Dame Cybel vnt'Arsace runs,
And tells her this faire promise of her sons:
Let call him in, quoth she; except you faine,
And, as before, will me delude againe.
Achaemenes comes-in, and him t'assure,
The Lady sweates, if he her loue procure,
He shall Theagens sister take to wife:
Then here (quoth he) shall ended be the strife.
The man your slaue is, and he must obay:
How so (quoth she)? I had him th'other day
In charge, quoth he, as sent from Mitranes
Vnto your husband Lord Orondates.
[Page 118]And tooke he was from me by strong impresse
Of Thyamis and Malecontents of Besse.
Whom if you aske, he can it not deny:
And yet a much more pregnant proofe haue I;
My Captaines letters firme and vnder seale,
Which (here behold) will all the case reueale;
And how he should to Babylon be sent.
This rude relation gaue her great content.
She makes no more adoe, but straight bids call
Her learned Councell to the Iudgement hall;
And there on loftie Throne she stately bore her;
And will'd Theagenes be brought before her:
He comes, and (Achaemen him standing by)
Know you that man (quoth he)? she answer'd, I.
And were you captiue left vnto his charge?
Confest it too: Then how (quoth she) at large?
By Thyamis, quoth he. Then she, my slaue
You are, and please me, or no mercie craue.
And of your sister thus I doe dispose;
She shall be wife to him that did disclose
This first to me; my seruant Achamen,
So well deseruing eu'rie where and when.
As for solemnities and marriage-day,
When things be fit, no longer shall we stay.
It strook Theagenes to th'heart: yet he
Made answer thus; Althovgh our fortune be
To serue, free-borne, and of no parent base,
Yet herein may we bett'r account our case;
And frownig fortunes bad intent conuince;
To serue so braue and gracious a Prince,
That will be pleas'd doe justice; which we craue:
My sister yet nor captiue is nor slaue.
Well (quoth Arsace) let him be brought vp
Among the slaues that wait vpon our Cup;
And Achaemen him teach in cu'rie thing,
That may him fit to serue the mightie King.
[Page 119]So forth they went; Theagenes distrest
In minde, and thinking what to doe were best;
Achaemenes, to haue him at his becke,
Insultingly, and thus began him checke:
Ah ha, Sir youth, you thought your selfe so free,
As no man else; now must you wait on mee.
Ile make you bend, that beare your head so high,
Or knocke y'about the sconce. Authoritie
In base mens hands is neuer well employ'd.
Arsace then commands the rest auoyd;
And thus to Cybel saith; now all excuse
Is tane away: this proud boy, for th'abuse
Me done to-fore, shall well and surely pay
(You tell him so) except he soone obay;
Which if he doe, then will I set him free,
And honour adde, and wealth to libertee.
She tels Theagenes the Ladies minde,
And of her owne some reasons more doth finde
Him to perswade, he craues to pause that day,
And talks alone first with Chariclia
Then saith (my Deere) now are we cleane vndone:
I must obey before the morrow Sunne
Hath ran his course; or suffer seruitude,
Yea both of vs, among this people rude:
With all disgrace that on the kept-in strict
May scorne inuent, or barbarisme inflict.
This could I beare; but that, far worse than this,
I neuer shall; though past her promise is;
That Achaemen (forsooth) should marrie thee:
While I haue life and sword, it shall not be.
Necessities are suttle Councellers:
I haue a tricke. Then thus with Cyb conferr's.
I am resolu'd: goe tell her now you Krone,
Alone-I wish to talke with her-alone.
She, glad he was so bold with her, as signe
Of yeelding minde, her Lady told; in fine,
[Page 120]That night he sent-for was, and softly led
In darke by Cyb, when all were gone to bed,
But Lady her selfe and these: and when they came
Within the chamber doore, the little flame,
That there was left, she takes, and would away.
Nay (Madame, quoth he) let kinde Cybel stay;
For she's no blab. Then Lady tooke by th'hand.
And said, thus long fore-slow'd I your command,
(Deere Lady and Mistris) that I might obay
With more securitie both night and day.
And, now good fortune me declares your slaue,
More willing am I you command and haue.
But (O!) this one thing grant me first I pray,
Renounce your promise of Chariclia
Vnt' Achamen (you shall her much disparage
(Such is her birth) by making such a marriage)
Or else, I sweare (befall what can befall)
At your command I will doe nought at all.
For ere I liue to see her suffer force,
You shall me see a selfe-dead-wounded corse.
Arsace then; Why thinke not (Sir) that I,
Who giue my selfe, can ought to you deny:
But I haue sworne before, and by my life,
Your sister shall be Achaemen his wife.
Well 'tis no worse, reply'd Theagenes;
Him giue my sister (Lady) when you please:
For sister none haue I; and, on my life
This is my spouse, and eu'n as good as wife.
For further proofe, appoint the day, and we
Shall gladly with your fauour married be;
Which broth'r and sister cannot. This to heare
The loue-sicke Lady toucht was verie neare:
Yet said, we grant. Then Ile doe your command
When that's vndone, quoth he; so tooke in hand
Her hand to kisse: but she it backward slips,
And bowes her downe, and layes him lips to lips.
[Page 121]Not kissing he, but kist forthwith arose,
And with her leaue for that time, out he goes;
And tels Chariclia what was done: but shee
Scarce heard the last without some jealousie.
This one thing done (quoth he) prevents the fall
Of many mischiefes on our heads; and shall
Achaemenes prouoke his case deplore,
And set this house forthwith in great vprore.
For Cyb will tell her sonne; and for that cause,
When forth she would of chamb'r, I made her pause:
And to th'intent she might a witnesse bee
Of what there past, and of my loue to thee.
For though it well suffise the guiltlesse brest,
To know his owne integritie and rest
Vpon the Gods: yet vnto men we ought,
With whom we liue, by deed declare our thought.
And said againe, be sure Achaemenes
Is like to lay some plot, that will disease
Arsace selfe; a mischiefe minding knaue,
Her discontent and disappointed slaue;
Who knowes her life, and leauing false inuent,
May worke reuenge on matters evident.
Exhorts her therefore courage haue, and hope
That something will befall to fit their scope.
The next day comes Achaemenes to call
Him forth to wait vpon the Lady in hall;
And brings a Persian suit which she him sent,
Laid all with gold, and pearly Passement;
This he, with greater state her cups to fill,
Must now put-on, though much against his will.
And when the Clowne would teach the Gentleman
Giue wine, he said, it needed not, and ran
Before his mast'r; and neatly did it skinke,
And with a comly grace her gaue to drinke.
She dranke more loue than wine, beholding still
Her waiters face, and had not yet her fill;
But left a little, through her wanton skill,
For him to drinke; though he had to't no will.
[Page 122]When feast was done, he prayes the Lady straight
He might not weare that robe, but if he wait.
She grants, he shifts him; and, for then, they part.
Achaemenes yet, sorely prickt at heart
With enuie, twits him for his bold attempt,
And saith, all were your Nouesie exempt
From checke at first, yet if you keepe that guise,
You shall offend: I friendly you aduise;
As one that shall, if Ladies hold their saw,
Ere long become your louing broth'r in law.
Theagenes held downe his head, and said
No word thereto: but th'other ill-apaid
Complaines his mother-to, that this new Lad
Of Lady Arsace greater fauours had
Than he himselfe; and, that which grieues him most,
With bold presumption hath her cup engrost;
To me no dutie yeelds, no thanke to me,
Who taught him all this skill; and yet if she
Had fauour'd him without my plaine disgrace,
It would not grieue me so to leaue the place;
Who further'd haue her purpose, and conceal'd
That long ere this had better beene reueal'd:
But time will come. Now (moth'r) on bed or bench,
Where lies, how does my daintie Grecian wench?
My loue, my spouse; faine would I see her snout:
(Thinke this a phrase that fits a clownish lout)
The sight of her perhaps will ease the pang
Of wound receiu'd from Angers rustie fang.
Why sonne (quoth she) while you at shadowes rap,
You lose the maine: It must not not be your hap
To marrie her you meane. Why so (quoth he)?
My fellow-seruant? y'are deceiu'd, quoth she.
Son, in the Sun the man that walks shall burne:
This, this, haue we for seruing still her turne;
Preferring still her lust before our liues.
A new-come slaue, that should be kept in gyues,
But once beheld, hath made her breake her oath,
And vnto him thy promised betroath:
[Page 123]He saith no sister sh'is, but his true loue,
And that by marriage ready is to proue.
And hath Arsace promis'd it (quoth he)?
I present was and heard her so, quoth she;
And verie few dayes hence will celebrate
Their marriage-feast, with great resort and state:
But promiseth she will for thee prouide
Another wife as good, what ere betide.
Betide what will, quoth he; (and clapt his pawes)
If any right there be, or care of Lawes,
Or men can women rule: good mother keepe
It off a while, and I shall make them weepe
All ere the marriage-day. If any aske
For me, them tell that I haue got a laske;
And keepe within doores at your Countrey Farme;
Then thus he mumbled as it were a charme.
T'Arsace rude before, now finely bowes;
His sister late, must now be call'd his spouse.
Who sees not this deuis'd to put me by?
What if he kisse her, if with her he lye?
(And th'one I'm well assured-of; he kist her)
Are these enough to proue her not his sister?
Goe to (ye foole) quoth she; bee't false or true,
Against my Ladies purpose stirre not you.
Or wise, or foole, quoth he; What wise hath knowne
Anothers case, as doth a foole his owne?
Doe what they can, I will not so be gull'd:
Nor will the Gods an oath be disanull'd.
Thus Anger, Loue, with Iealousie and Faile,
(Which might against the wisest man preuaile)
Him sets a-rage; and, what he first bethought,
Without consideration will haue wrought.
He takes th'Armenian Courser kept at ease,
For th' only pleasure of Orondates,
And on him flies o're Aegypts fruitfull glebes,
To tell his Lord at hundred-gated Thebes;
There now r'enforcing for the war began
Against the white-tooth'd Aethiopian.
Finis Libri septimi.

THE Faire Aethiopian.

WHen claime is iustly made in quiet passage,
And no iust answer giu'n to nobl' Embassage;
It matters not, if Kings obtaine their right
Against an Enemie, by force of slight.
So when Hydaspes by a warlike wile,
Pretending treatie, got his Mine of Phile;
A Towne whereon th'Outlawes of Aegypt prest,
That was before by th'Aethiop possest;
And stood at th'vpper Cataracts of Nile,
From Elpentine and Sien thirteene mile;
The Persian, driu'n in haste to muster men,
Was full of care, and busie about it, when
Achaemenes came in; yet said, What winde
Hath set you thus vnlookt for here? the Hinde,
Ile tell my Lord in priuate; and, when all
The rest were gone, declares the criminall:
What Grecian youth was sent by Mitranes,
To serue the King, if so his Lordship please;
And how by Thyam intercept, and how
In loue with him was faln Arsace now;
Had brought him to the Palace, entertain'd him,
And though he thought, sh'had not as yet constrain'd him;
(Because the modest youth resists her still,
And will not condescend vnto her will)
Yet lest more hurt be done, as may full well
In tract of time, he came his Lord to tell,
[Page 125]And doe the dutie longing to his trust.
This mou'd his anger; th'other mou'd his lust,
When Grecian wench he prais'd, and said she past
The fairest now on earth, from first to last.
Of her so spoke, as hoping, when his Lord
Had done, he might her get to bed and bord;
For iust reward of seruant diligent,
In this reuealing ere it further went.
The twice-enflamed Lord, to lose no time,
An Eunuch sends forthwith, of all the prime,
With fiftie horse to Memphis-ward that day,
To fetch the Grecian Captiues both away;
And letters by him; vnt' Arsace these:
This straightly thee commands Orondates;
The Grecian broth'r and sister send m'away;
By name Theagen and Chariclia;
To send the King: for captiue his they bee,
And fit to serue th'Imperiall Maiestee.
If you them send not willingly, they must
Be tane by force: thus Achaemen I trust.
And these, to th'Eunuch chiefe at Memphis Court,
Euphrates call'd; I heare of you report,
Which you shall answ'r another time; to day
Send vs Theagen and Chariclia,
By Bagoas, and, whether will or no
Arsace, send them: or we let you know,
We giue command you selfe with all disgrace,
Be brought in bonds, depriued of your place.
These vnder seale he gaue, to bring them downe
With more assurance by th'assisting Towne.
To Memphis th'Eunuch, and Orondates
To warre, and takes with him Achaemenes;
On whom he sets a priute watch beside,
To keepe him safe vntill the truth be trt'de:
For, wanting proofe, he wisely thought not good
Beleeue a tale defaming Royall Blood.
[Page 126]Meane-while at Memphis see what falne is out:
When Thyamis with all the Priests deuout,
Had ended Calasiris funerall,
And of the Priesthood had his full install;
That well he might, now after weeke of pause,
Conuerse with strangers, by their Cloyster-lawes:
The two young Greekes he quickly cals to minde,
And earnestly them casts-about to finde.
At length he learnes they in the Palace kept,
And for their sake straight vnt' Arsace stept:
And askt her for them, as his friends, and such
As, to prouide for, doth him neerly touch,
By fathers will; and thankt her for the grace
Sh'imparted them this mourning enterspace,
That barr'd him hitherto; and now 'tis ouer,
Praid that he might their company recouer.
But she replyes, I maruell (Thyamis)
Sith our estate so well prouided is,
And sith out entertainment you commend;
You seeme to doubt it will not hold to th'end,
Not so, quoth he; for well I know, that heere
Your Ladiship maintaines more daintie cheere
Than is with vs; and better may they liue;
Such royall entertainment wont you giue:
But they well-borne, now ending pilgrimage,
Are homeward bound to see their parentage.
My selfe some reason haue, and, for my father,
Prouide them would of all things much the rather.
'Tis well (quoth she) that, anger laid aside,
You will the point of equitie abide;
Which more is alwayes on Commanders side,
Than his that hath but barely to prouide.
Haue you command, quoth he? Quoth she, I haue;
By Law of Armes that makes a Captiue slaue.
He saw she ment th'exploit of Mitranes,
Who tooke them both, set-on by Nausicles
[Page 127]At th'outlaw Fen, and therefore meekly said,
No warre (good Lady) now; but all's a paid
With peace on either side. Peace setteth free,
All that in time of warre captiued bee.
This is the royall Law of Armes; and all
That this oppose are thought tyrannicall.
Besides (Arsace) let me tell you true,
'Tis no wayes honourabl' or good for you,
Such youth, so strange, with so peruerse a will,
To say and meane you must imprison still.
This madded her (as wantons of that age,
Concealed blush; but manifested rage)
And, thinking Thyamis conceiu'd the truth
Of her enclining to the Grecian youth,
She said, I care not for your Priesthood I;
Perhaps your selfe full deare yet shall abuy
The death of Mitranes: and, as forthese,
I will reserue them for Orondates.
In spight of Rhet'ricke and your lawfull bands,
It shall be done that Maiestie commands.
The King shall haue them; for his slaues they be;
And, as for you, be gone. So parted he,
Imploring helpe diuine: and thought to raise
The Citie vpon her, making known her wayes.
But she to chamber straight, and must aduise
With Gammer Cyb: In these perplexities,
What shall I doe (quoth she)? I cannot slake
This siame of loue, nor him more yeelding make:
But rather worse he seemes; that heretofore
With some hope fed me, promising still more;
Hee flatly now denies, as something heard,
Of Achaemen, that I am much afeard.
But let him be beleeu'd, or not beleeu'd,
If vnt'Orondates I shew me greeu'd,
And flattring weepe; all were he ne're so rough,
It makes him milde; I shall doe well enough.
[Page 128]But here's the mischiefe, that before I see
My minde fulfill'd, preuented shall I bee,
With tale him could, perhaps be made to die
Before he heare me speake, or see me crie.
Wherefore vse all your skill; and cast about
With what deuice you can to helpe me out.
Or, if my selfe to kill I doe not care,
Assure thy selfe I will not others spare:
And thou art like be first for this good deed
Of Achaemen thy sonne (ill mote he speed!)
And thou wert priuie to't, or I mistake.
Good Madam (quoth she) better reck'ning make
Of both your seruants; and take heart vnto you;
Or else this care will vtterly vndoe you.
Too milde you are, and flatter, not command
Theagenes your slaue: at former hand
'Twas not amisse, reputing him a boy;
But now he stands a tip-toe, proudly coy
Against his louing Lady, let him know
He shall be forc'd with many a stripe, and blow,
And other torments to performe your will;
Then doe not flatter so and please him still.
'Tis right (quoth she) you say: but how can I,
That loue him thus, endure his miserie?
O Madam, y'are too pitifull, quoth shee;
And cannot speed while thus affect you bee,
Not weighing well, how, aft'r a little paine,
Both he and you shall haue a merrie vaine.
Nor need you see't: but let Euphrates lay
Some small correction on him eu'rie day,
Till he relent; she likes her suttletee.
To heare a thing, so moues not, as to see.
And loue, when once it growes so desperate,
Can be content, that loued was to hate,
And venge repulse. Commandment then she gaue;
Euphrates should torment him like a slaue,
[Page 129]As for some fault in waiting. Eunuchs all
Are giu'n to jealousie; and he the more
Theagenes afflicts; for that before
He well obseru'd, and all the signes had seene
Of loue him-to that shew'd the wanton Queene:
With knottie whips he teares his tender skin,
While manacles and shackles hold him in:
With hung'r and thirst him pinches, and no light
By day him shewes; nor lets him rest at night.
Not so Arsace meant, yet worse than so
Did Gammer Cyb pretend her minde to know:
For none but she came there; though with pretence
To bring him meat, 'twas for intelligence.
And when she saw him so maintaine the field
Against her plot, and by no meanes would yeild;
The more his body is beaten downe, the more
His minde was rais'd with chaster loue to soare:
And thought, if this Chariclia did but know,
It tooke away the paine of eu'rie blow;
And cri'd in torment either night or day,
My loue, my light, my life Chariclia:
When this the Gammer heard and saw, she thought
This Virgin liuing all their plot was nought:
And now she feares, if by Achaemenes
(As like it was) be told Orondates,
Lest she be soundly paid for all; and left
Arsace kill her selfe; wherefore the beast
Is all on killing set now, to remoue
What euer hinder'd her sicke Ladies loue;
To bar intelligence, to saue her hide;
And one day to her Lady thus she cri'de;
Madam, we worke in vaine as long as she,
On whom builds all his hope this stubborne he
Is suffer'd still to liue: but, were she gone,
We should doe well enough with him alone,
The louesicke Lady on this laid present hold,
In ang'r and jealousie for that was told;
[Page 130]You tell me true, quoth she, and I ere night
Will order take she stand not in my light.
But how (quoth Cybel)? By the Persian Lawes
You may not kill, but shew and proue the cause;
Which asketh time to plot: but Ile to day,
If you thinke good, her rid quite out of way,
By draught of poys'n: it likes Arsace well;
About-it goes this Chamberlaine of Hell.
She found Chariclia weeping bitterly,
And, more than so, deuising how to dye:
For now she gan suspect the cruell case
Theagenes was in; that all space
Came not at her: though Cybel fain'd excuse,
And said he was restrain'd for some abuse,
Or little fault in seruice: but by my
Most earnest suit was dealt with graciously,
And shall be still, and out of doubt ere night
At libertie: therefore plucke-vp your sprite,
And doe not thus with mourning pine away;
My Lady makes her marriage-feast to day.
Refresh your selfe; that when your Louer comes,
You may with ioy receiue him and the Groomes.
Behold some dainties haue I brought you heere;
Come, let's fall-to, 'tis of my Ladies cheere.
You vse (quoth she) so much me to deceiue,
That, what you say, I hardly can beleiue.
Th'equiuocating witch deuoutly sweares
She should to day be rid of all her cares.
So downe they sit and eat, and lesse in feare
Chariclia now, for that she heard her sweare,
And hope of that she promis'd. What we wish
We soone beleeue. Then ate they flesh and fish,
And other dainties; Aura giues the cup,
Made ready for Chariclia to sup,
To Cybel-selfe; she drinkes it off mistooke,
And felt it straight, and cast a cruell looke
[Page 131]Vpon her Maid. I wish there might vnt' all,
That goe about such wickednesse, befall
The like mistake! the poyson was so strong
Prepar'd for youth; that soone it laid along
That aged witch. Yet she amids her maine
Convulsing, swelling, staring, twitching paine,
While belly bursts, and sinewes cracke, and shrinke,
Declares a minde more poys'nous than the drinke.
For signe she made, to some then standing-by,
As if Chariclia made her so to dye;
Poore innocent, amas'd at such a stound,
And oft attempting her to raise from ground.
But helpe of man or woman littl'auailes,
When poyson strong the vitall part assailes.
Her skin was blacke, and out start both her eyes,
And with her mouth awry there dead she lyes.
The guiltlesse Virgin, neuer vs'd to bands,
But silke, vnti'de and ti'de with softest hands,
In case she was is rapt from off the ground,
And with rough cord t'Arsace carri'd bound.
The iealous Lady threatens with excesse
Of paine to force her, but she would confesse
Her poys'ning Cybel. (Marke what innocence
Can make one doe, and guiltlesse conscience!)
She came not drooping; but with cheerfull grace
Of Princely courage (Feare attends the base)
And, glad to see, that, where through griefe she thought
To kill her selfe, it should by them be wrought,
Said, goodly Princesse, if Theagenes
Be yet aliue, then (set your heart at ease)
I did it not: but, if by your designe
He's made away, the deed was only mine:
I flue your Nurse, that hath so well you taught,
And in these honourable wayes vp-brought,
Come take reuenge, you cannot better please
Your refractorie man Theagenes.
[Page 132]O noble he, that could so well withstand
So wicked purpose and so cruell hand!
With this enrag'd, the lust-sicke Lady spent
Some blowes on her, and presently her sent
Bound as she was t'her chiefe Eunuch Euphrate;
There to behold her louers like estate;
And safe be kept, vntill the morning come,
When heare she should the Iudges deadly doome.
And as she's led away that Aura came,
Dame Cybels Maid, and lowdly gan exclame;
Alas poore innocent! the standers-by
Constraine her plainly speake; she said, 'twas I
The poyson'd cup mistooke, and gaue the same,
Which vnto this I should, vnto my Dame.
T'Arsace carri'd, there she sayes the like:
The raging Lady was about to strike,
Yet held, and said, this also had conspir'd
My Nurses death, thereto by th'other hir'd:
Away with her, away with her, and let her
Be safely kept in manacle and fetter
T'abide the doome. Then for the Iudges sent,
And next day shew'd the cause of their conuent.
She cri'd my Nurse, alas my Nurse is gone;
Yea poyson'd, poyson'd, by this wretched one,
Whom I receiu'd with all humanitie;
(My Lords, you know) and yet this thanke haue I.
And sobbing, sighing, weeping, wringing hand,
(Such women haue their teares at their command)
She said what could be said in such a mood;
And yet Chariclia made her saying good.
Nay more, confest she would Arsace selfe,
That wicked wretch, that lust-sicke wanton Else
Haue made away; but that she was preuented:
And that she mist her purpose much lamented.
Although, in truth, she ne're had such a thought,
But, miserie t'auoid, her death so sought,
[Page 133]As was in their conceit most like to speed;
And so in prison were they both agreed:
When hardest heart constraine it would to rue,
The lamentable sight of their adiew.
Her Iewels all the Cradle-band wrapt-in,
Were ti'd about her twixt her smocke and skin:
That at her death pretended criminall,
They might supply the want of funerall.
But now the Iudges hearing her confesse
The crime at large, and rather more than lesse;
According false Arsaces hearts desire,
Condemne the guiltlesse to be burnt with fire.
The crime proclaim'd nor better was nor worse,
Then for the poys'ning Lady Arsaces Nurse.
Tormentors lead her forth without the walls;
And such a sight the people much appals.
Arsace, for successe of her inuents,
Comes forth her selfe vpon the battlements:
And for she would not lose her pleasant sight,
Of louers torment standing in her light▪
But when the fire was ready and slam'd aloft,
Chariclia them that led her pray'd goe soft,
And giue her leaue to speake; and loud she cri'de,
O Sunne and Heauen! can any from you hide
This cruell fact? I suffer willingly,
But innocent, to put-off miserie.
For this I pardon craue: but as for her,
This woman monster, femall Gouerner,
That cares not what she doth in lusts-excesse,
To take my husband, filthy Adulteresse;
O pay her home! these words with resolution,
Made some prepare to stay that execution.
But she preuents them, mounting as to game,
And straight way sate as in a throne of flame:
For by degrees the pile about her stood
Of straw, of sedge, of reed and solid wood.
[Page 134]What need I names of sundrie trees compute?
Of eu'rie kinde there was that bore no fruit.
The bearing tree is priuiledg'd from fire,
Which vnto th'other payes deserued hire.
And now her beautie, by resplendent shine
Of flashing light, appeares the more diuine;
Yet burnt she not; although to speed her death,
And rid her of this vndelightsome breath,
Faine would she burne; and though from sted to sted
She follow'd still the fire, the fire her fled.
Whereat she wonders much and all that saw't:
Arsace sees it from the murall vault,
And threatens her tormentors; they fling-on
More straw, sedge, reed and wood; fire all anon
And more deuoures; and yet no whit the more
Came nigh the Maid; nor heat vnto her bore.
The peopl' are mou'd, and twice or thrice they said;
The Maid is guiltlesse, guiltlesse is the Maid;
And droue the Tortors off, by Thyamis
Stirr'd-vp thereto, that com'n was there by this.
And, though they could themselues approach do nier,
They stood aloofe, and call'd her from the fire.
Which when she heard and saw; the Gods she thought
To shew her innocence that wonder wrought.
And, lest she should vnthankfull seeme, she came
Forth all vnhurt amid the yeelding flame.
The Towne for ioy and wonder gaue a shout,
Which made Arsace as mad come running out,
With all her Guard, and Noblemen of Perse;
And on Chariclia she, then looking fierce,
Laid hand her selfe, and said with rage enflam'd;
What meane this peopl'? and are you not asham'd
To hinder justice on this wicked wretch?
Whom more condemnes that you to wonder stretch.
For poys'ners all, and witches are the same;
And by her witchcraft hath she scapt the flame.
[Page 135]Come all to morrow to the Iudgement Hall,
And there you shall be satisfied all:
Then her by shoulder griping led away,
As cruell Faulcon seiseth on her pray.
Such as liue wicked, woman bee't or man,
The noting scape not; doe they what they can,
They shall be curst aliue, and trod-on dead,
By all them knew: whereas the blamelesse head,
Th'vntainted life, such honours fame attaines,
As flies all ore the land-and-water Maines.
No sooner came they to the Palace gate,
But sent againe the Virgin is t'Euphrate,
And harder bound; not so to keepe her in,
As purposely to fret her tender skin.
Yet all in good she tooke, and more at ease,
As fellow-pris'ner with Theagenes.
Although Arsace will'd it so for spight,
That one might grieue the more at others sight;
For Louers more at paine of their Beloued.
Than at their owne, are lamentably moued;
But they to comfort turne it, while they striue
To shew their loue in bearing well the guiue.
And now each oth'r exhorts they stoutly stand
T'endure the worst Arsace could command,
Before they faile in faith so firmly plighted;
And so they talke-on till they were benighted.
Nor slept they then; because they deemed, either,
This was the last that they should talke together.
At length they minde the miracl' at the fire
And what might be the cause thereof enquire.
He said it was the grace of Pow'r Diuine,
That caus'd the fire an Innocent decline.
Why then (quoth she) abide we more and more,
Th'vniust commands of this vsurping whore?
But now I call to minde a dreame I had;
Thus Calasire me thought in verse it radde.
[Page 136] Pantarbe wearing feare thou not the flame;
With such a vertue Nature did it frame.
Therewith Theagenes, as much as guyues
Would suffer him, leaps, and his heart reuiues,
Remembring what he likewise dreampt last night:
That such a verse him Calasiris dight.
To Blackmorland the Maid with thee shall come;
And scape to morrow fell Arsaces doome.
I see (quoth he) whereto these verses tend;
To Blackmorland, that is vnto mine end,
The land of shaddowes, and Proserpina
The Maid is whom I must attend to day.
And scape Arsaces doome, that is, be free
From bodies bond, in Soules simplicitee.
And for your verse (sweet heart) what doth it say,
But may be turn'd or this, or th' other way?
Pantarbe signifies of all thing Feare.
Yet Feare not fire (it saith) yee that it weare.
Then she, my heart, my deere Theagenes,
O be not led with such conceits as these!
Whom Fortune much afflicts he cannot choose
But feare the worst, and still on ruine muse.
Ye men will say that women passe for toung;
And I haue liu'd so much the Greekes among,
That well I know this Tarbos oft is read,
As well for great amazement, as for dread:
And, for a stone so much t'oppose the fire,
It may amaze and make men all admire.
Then heare me rather, this your Maid is I,
Whom you shall bring home vnt'Aethiopie,
(For is not that the proper Blackmans roome?)
And so escape this fell Arsaces doome;
But how 'twill be I know not▪ though I know
The Power for showing can effect the show.
And who would thinke that I should hitherto
Ha scaped death? and yet you see I doe.
[Page 137]And when I bore my helpe about me, (loe!)
That then I knew not, now I plainly know:
Among my mothers jewels there is one,
That bindes in gold a rare Pantarbe stone:
I had them all about me when I went
Condemn'd to fire: for if I scapt, I ment
They should maintaine me; if I di'd withall;
Me stand in stead of solemne funerall.
And now I thinke that this so wondrous thing
Is only wrought by that Pantarbe-ring,
As pleas'd the Gods; And often Calasire
Me told it was an Antidote to fire;
Though then I thought not on't, nor euer since;
Till now the triall did the truth euince.
Well haue you said (quoth he) for that is past;
But what Pantarbe shall vs saue at last;
Or from to morrowes doome? Good hope, quoth she,
And trust in that to come, as that we see
Faln-out, according to the Pythian verse;
You know't so well, I need it not rehearse.
Our fatall rest we seeke through much anoy,
Whereon to thinke hereafter shall vs ioy.
Thus were they talking till the night grew deepe,
And neuer minded any rest or sleepe:
Till Bagoas his troope with quicke dispatch
To Memphis brought, and softly rais'd the watch,
Well known at first▪ let-in, he cast a list
About the Palace, lest the Court resist;
And, by a secret way he knew, forthright,
T'Euphrates came, the Moone affording light.
In bed asleepe he was, and thus awak'd,
Began to raue, till Bagoas him slak'd,
And said, 'tis I, and call'd t'a boy for light;
And when it came Euphrates said; by night
Thus vnexpected (Bago's)? what's the cause?
He said no more, but bid him read the clause
Of both those letters, marking seale and hand,
How 'twas Orondates did this command,
[Page 138]That must be done: he readd, and said, I dare not
Shew this t'Arsace; left her selfe she spare not,
Nor any about her: leaue them with her will
I know she cannot; rather kill, kill, kill
The first she meets, and all that her oppose;
For now vniust and tyrannous she growes;
To say no more. And you in time are come,
To saue these strangers from a deadly doome.
Then doe them good; for they haue suffer'd much;
Not with my will: but her command was such.
They are (no doubt) some Imps of noble blood;
So vertuously dispos'd, so milde, so good,
I finde their nature: then th'row prison led
His fellow Gelding to the manacled;
And hard it is to tell with what compassion,
The new-come Eunuch heard their lamentation;
Who sigh'd to see, for beauties excellence,
Of either sex, th'afflicted innocence.
But when they saw him come in so by night,
A man vnknown, at first they were affright:
But soone againe with liuely and cheerfull grace
Lift-vp their heads, and said; Thus thinkes Arsace
To hide her wicked deeds, and deadly spight?
No, no; the Gods shall bring them all to light:
But doe as y'are enioyn'd, with sword vs strike,
Or burne, or drowne, so both togeth'r alike.
To heare these words, it made those Eunuchs weepe;
But forth they lead them while the Court's asleepe.
Euphrates staies, and Bagoas proceeds;
Who mounts the pris'ners on two goodly steeds;
And, but for safetie, not to hurt them, bound;
Then, (ring of horsemen cast about them round)
With foure-foot hoofe they thund'r vpon the glebes,
And haste away for hundred-gated Thebes.
So rid they till the Sun was three houres high,
And neuer litte; then, wexing hot and drie,
And nodding some on horse for want of sleepe;
But chiefly that they might refresh, and keepe
[Page 139]In health the Maid, they turne aside and stay,
Where Nilus winding made a grassie Bay;
Almost an Island (that I may not faine)
With narrow land-necke joyned to the maine:
The place by nature was so fortifi'de,
That there they might all out of danger bide.
And there in shade of sweet and fruitfull plants,
In stead of tent, thought good supply their wants:
Eu'n vnder th'Arbours bearing sweetest gums,
Dates, berries, grapes, nuts, apples, peares and plums.
The Beame there burnes at quarter part of race;
So them to rest inuites both time and place:
For trees not only of eu'rie kinde there grew;
But Meddow-starres, white, yellow, red and blew.
The daintie Florist (said bee't vnder pardon)
Hath not so faire, so diuers in her garden.
For there together dwell Pomone and Flore:
Betwixt the trees sprung sleepie Mandragore,
The Marigold, the Buls-eye, th'Aemonine,
The duoble King-cup, Daisie, Sops-in-wine;
Cloue-Gilliuer, and Gilliuer of stocke,
Pinke, Vi'let, Cowslip, Primrose, Ladies-smocke;
And past them all for colour, sent, and juyce,
The crimson Rose, and golden Flow'r-de-luce.
So many dainties neuer was their borne
by wanton Nymph in Achelous horne.
And there the sweet and daintie plants among,
The winged Quiristers record their song.
There th'Eunuch broke his fast, and offer'd meat
To those young Greeks; they said 'twas needlesse t'eat,
For such as were so soone to die; but he
Perswaded them, and said; that should not be:
But strangers cheere yourselues, and take some ease;
To death you goe not, but t'Orondates.
The Sunne had left to shine right on their crest,
And side-ward shot his darts from out the west.
Then th'Eunuch thought it time to reset-on
And was preparing; but there comes anon
[Page 140]A running, panting, sweating messenger,
Who straight admitted rounded him i'th'eare.
He stood a while as in a muse; at length
Said, Courage you my guests, and gather strength:
Your enemie Arsace liues no more;
Sh'hath paid her debt so much ran on your score.
For when she heard that you were gone with mee,
She hung her selfe, preuenting Headmans fee.
This newes Euphrates sent; then doe not feare,
Now she is gone, by whom you wronged were,
That did no wrong. Thus (with some words to seeke)
He patcht them vp a speech in broken Greeke.
And glad himselfe t'escape the Tyrannesse,
Yet this he spoke to make them grieue the lesse;
And for he knew, his safe presenting these,
Would well be taken of Orondates:
Her, now Arsace's gone, to be his wife;
And him to wait, for neu'r in all his life
Had seene the like. And could the louing paire
But ioy thereat? Now pleasant eu'ning aire
(While westerne windes the Suns hot horses coole,
At point to drinke of Amphurites poole)
Inuites to trauell, th'Eunuch forward went,
And all that night and morne in iourney spent;
To finde his Lord among the Gypsie States,
Before they left that Towne of hundred gates.
But was deceiu'd: the King of Blackmorland,
Of late at Phile had got so great a hand;
That forc'd Orondates Siene-ward,
With all his pow'r, that other Towne to guard.
Th'intelligence had Bagoas that day;
So leauing Thebes, tooke Siene-way.
But comming neere the Towne, himselfe hath lost
Among fore-riders of the Blackmor Hoast;
And with his pris'ners, pris'ner is to those,
Who friends to them were, and his mortall foes.
Oh, this the dreame was, then began to say
Theagenes to his Chariclia;
[Page 141]And these be they, by whom we must be led,
Though captiue, to that Land with shadowes spred.
As faire to Sun-shine, blacke is like to shade,
And darke they seeme whose liuely colours fade.
Vncertaine lucke 'tis better seeke with these,
Than certaine danger with Orondates:
To these then let vs yeeld. Chariclia knew
Now well enough what was thereon t'ensue;
Or, by instinct that Nature often sends,
The blacke men thought not enemies but frends.
Yet told him not her thought; but was content
To yeeld with him, and to the blacke men went:
So forc'd was Bagoas; that with a fall
Had wrench'd his leg. The Moores then take them all;
And, wondring bid the two vnarm'd and bound,
In Gypsie or Persie what they were expound.
(For Spies are eu'r accompani'd with some
Who know the peoples languages, with whom
They haue to deale.) Theagenes discern'd
What was their minde, and, hauing Gypsie learn'd,
This answer made; Our Chiefe then (by your leaue)
An Eunuch is (and that they did perceiue
Soone by his face) attendant principall
T'Orondates th'Aegyptian Coronall
For Persian King: but as for her and me,
We Grecians are, and subiect (as you see)
To Persian bonds: and now much better hopes
Conceiue, to fall among you Aethiopes.
They take them, mount them, compasse them with ring;
And meane present them to their Blackmore King:
That now their case (to speake alludingly)
Was like the Prologue of a Comedy:
Two strangers young, that late before their eyes
Had nought but death, are here in captiue wise
Not led, but sent▪ and with a conuoy strong,
Of such as shall their subiects be ere long.
Finis Libri octaui.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

ORondates, when th'Aethiopian Hoast
He saw, past Cataracts, begin to coast
Siene-ward, he wisely them preuents,
By comming first, repairing battlements,
Renforcing Garrisons on Towre and wall,
Preparing engines th'enemy to gaule,
And barricading gates. Hydaspes thought
Be there before; and now his Armie brought,
And planted round about the wals; at least,
Some three-score hundred thousand, man and beast;
As Hunter plants his toyle on eu'rie side
The thicket, where the Stag himselfe doth hide;
So Blackmore King the Towne enuironed,
To take the Prince that Persian Armie led.
And there, without assault or skirmish lay
As quietly, as sitting at a play.
And when the spies their pris'ners him present,
He lookes vpon the Greekes with great content;
And as his children, knowing not their race,
Yet, for good liking, gaue them kinde embrace,
And for good lucke; for loe the Gods, he said,
Before vs bound our enemies haue laid;
And these, because the first, as is our guise,
We will be kept for humane sacrifice:
[Page 143]So gaue commandment they should take their rest,
Be neatly kept, and fare still of the best;
And leauing th'iron guiues be lockt in gold.
The man then smil'd, and said; sweet heart, behold
A braue exchange! we goe th'row diuers hands,
And captiue still; yet richest now in bands.
O flatt'ring Fortune! O deceitfull show!
Chariclia smil'd to; but soone made him know
Her better hopes: and what hath beene fore-told▪
Of their far trauell to the land of gold;
Her natiue soile, as she is borne in hand;
And gold for iron goes in Blackmorland.
Ere long the King in pers'n assaults the Towne;
And thought their courage would at first come downe:
But they defend themselues most valiantly,
With deed and word prouoking th'enemy.
At length, to make them soundly pay the price
Of that presumption, seekes he new deuice;
That shall full soone their heat of courage quench,
He sets his Hoast to cast a banke and trench
About the wals: there were so many men.
That soone 'tis done, by ten pole eu'rie ten.
Orondates, and Sienaeans all
Were well content to see another wall
About their Towne, and let them worke their fill,
And them derided all the while, vntill
They saw at Circles ends a fearfull signe:
For why? they met not: either, straight as line,
An hundred foot asunder ran a file,
Vnto the neerest banke of raging Nile,
And alway somewhat vp-hill: so the Towne,
Below the riuer, fit was made to drowne.
In riuers hether side they made a vent;
Then broader wat'r in narrow channell pent;
Ran downe amaine, and with so wrackfull streame,
As if it would haue ouerflow'd the Realme.
[Page 144]With hideous noise at Goole, at new-out throat,
And all the way it set the Towne afloat:
Which when the Townes-men heard, and saw, and waigh'd,
Their fearfull case; they labour all for aid.
And first with mucke and straw they stop the chinkes
Of eu'rie gate, that new-come water drinkes.
Then make they butrases and prop she wall
In many places, so preuent the fall.
Lest by the waters vndersoaking, straight
The spongie ground refuse to beare the wait.
Some wood, some stone, some clay, some lime and sand;
And some bring thither what came first to hand.
Not one sat idle, but in case of life
Will all take paines, old, young, man, maid, and wife;
They bend to worke their Sun-burnt hands and necks;
Not one desires excuse of state or sex.
The stronger men, and such as might beare armes,
With littl' offence to put-off greater harmes,
Within and vnder wall are set to mine,
By light of torch, by leauell and by line,
A ten-foot deepe and broad trench that may reach
Their foes new banke, and therein make a breach
With in-let waters. But (alas) before
It halfe was done, the floud came with a roare
So downe the new-cut channell from the goole;
That all within the banke was made a poole.
And so Siene quickly, that ere while
A mid-land Citie was, is made an Isle.
The wall endur'd, at first and for a day,
The waters force; and then began to sway
By waight opprest of floud now round about;
That soaking th'row the yawning chaps of drought,
Foundation wets, and makes new springs arise
All o're the Towne in lamentable wise.
And part of wall betwixt two Tow'rs that night
Aboue the water broke, t'encrease th'affright.
[Page 145]For though the waters yet no breach doe win,
It made them see what danger they were in.
Whereat they rais'd so lamentabl'a crie,
As heard was to the Camp of th'Enemie.
And cry to Heau'n to haue the water staid:
For out of hope they were of humane aide.
And yet to try, with much adoe, i'th'end
They ou'r-entreat Orondates to send
A yeelding message to the Blackmore King:
And wanting boat were faine to vse a sling;
Whereout they sent a letter ti'd t'a stone;
But short it fell; then striue they eu'richone,
That had the skill, with engine, bow, and string,
Now 'tis for life; and yet they cannot bring
Th'intent to passe, they cannot reach the road,
Or foot-way land; the waters are so broad.
Then make they signes, at first with held-vp hands,
As supplicating: then (intending bands)
Behinde them put: Hydaspes sees they craue
But only life, and meanes they shall it haue,
Nor was it other like: For grace t'impart,
The yeelding foe commands the gracious heart
Of such a King: yet wisely thus he tries
The faithfull meaning of his enemies.
When first he cut the goole came many a boat
From maine of Nilus downe his trench afloat;
That landed all at th'inbent of the banke;
And ten of these with Archers all in ranke
To Towne he sent, instructed what to say:
Now strange it was to see, in plow-mans way
An armed galley row'd; with men on land
A ship to fight: but this can war command.
The Sienaans seeing them draw neare
Their broken wall; as All thing puts in feare
Distressed men; it thought for townes behoofe
To shoot at them, and make them keepe aloofe.
[Page 146]But shot or short, or vp, or downe the winde;
As not to hurt, but make them know their minde.
For this declares of mans desire the prime,
Despairing life would gaine some little time.
The blacke men shoot againe with surer aime,
And many Townes-men kill, and many maime.
Great had the slaughter beene, but that a wise
And ancient man the Towne did thus aduise:
What meane you Sirs? Hath this calamitie
So dull'd your sense, that these you will put-by,
Who come to saue vs at our humble suit?
If ill they meanes vs, 'tis without dispute,
They cannot hurt vs here, although they land:
Yet if we slay them, can we get by th'hand,
When cloud so backe hath round about beset vs▪
At land and water? O then rather let vs
Them entertaine with speeches faire and kinde;
And giue attentiue eares vnto their minde.
The Gouernour himselfe and all the rest
Commend his words: and standing there abrest
On either side the breach, lay downe their armes,
To heare the Blacke mans oratorie charmes;
From ship, as 'twere at hau'n, who thus began:
Of Perse or Sien know you eu'rie man,
Both young and old, From meanest state to best;
Hydaspes King of Indies East and West,
Yours also now, can tame his proudest foes,
And yet is gracious euermore to those
That yeeld and mercie craue: on you therefore,
Whose life is in his hands, he layes no more,
Now after your so pitifull petitions,
Then turne to him and make your owne conditions
No Tyrant is he gouerning by lust;
But towards all his people kingly iust.
To this the Sienaans answer gaue;
That they, their wiues and children, all they haue▪
[Page 147]Were at his seruice; vse them as he please:
As for the Gouernour Orondates,
He promiseth to leaue the Smaragd-Mines,
With Towne of Phile, and all the next confines,
Which caus'd the warre; and only craues the grace,
That to his person nought be tender'd base:
And that they would two Persian Souldiours take,
And beare, and let goe safe beyond the Lake
Vnt'Elpentine, pretending thither sent,
To know if that Towne also were content,
To yeeld as doth Siene: they the two
Take to their King, and message quickly doe.
He smiles to see the Persian captiuate,
Now past all helpe of man, capitulate:
Yet, loth to stroy a multitude for one,
Forbeares him, yea and lets his spies alone;
As light-regarding, what they could in fine
Against his drift consult at Elpentine:
But sets his owne a worke with pin and planke
Of wood that grew on either side the banke;
And some whole trees, to make as tanke, and take
The goole of Nile, before they draine the Lake:
Then steele-shod piles are driu'n th'row channel-rocks.
With iron-bound commanders downe-right knocks.
And, for the draine, of trench they cut the band;
That inlet stopt, and outlet made, the land
About the Towne might sooner drie and beare
An Armies waight: and, as they labour there
(Though night her darknesse did vpon them send,
Ere either could their purpose bring t'an end)
So in the Citie nothing is forgot
To saue their liues; and now their mining plot
Is follow'd hard; from wall to banke the scope
Aboue with eye, below they meat with rope.
By torch their wall, by torch they view their cell,
And finding all, as for the time, but well;
[Page 148]Had thought to rest: yet were they sore affright,
By sudden fearfull sound they heard that night.
Themselues and enemies it thought a fall,
And of no lesse than their whole Citie-wall;
But was not so: part of that circle-bay
Relaps'd, the water made it selfe a way.
The morning light them put all out of doubt;
And shew'd the drained Lake all round about.
Aboue the mud are crawling seene by millions,
Ichneumonets, Lagartos, Crocodillions
New out of shell, and on the sandie sholts,
Sirenets, Sea-calues, Hippopotam-colts.
For th'elder monsters wont in channell deepe,
With seuen-head Nilus, or with Neptune keepe.
So wont the Pow'rs Diuine (as well they can)
In sauing life preuent the worke of man,
Though first by diligence the goole was caught:
The Gods will helpe such as for helpe haue wrought.
Though water's gone; yet neither t'other come,
Nor can, the ground o're-spred with muddy scum,
So soft as yet, will beare nor horse, nor man:
Thus two or three dayes passe they, and for than
In signe of peace the Blackemoore disarmates,
And they of Sien open wide their gates;
Nay celebrate a feast, that fell the while,
In honour of their mightie riuer Nile,
Whom they as God adore, and him to pray,
When Summer and Sunsted makes the longest day.
But, after feasting, when the night grew deepe,
And all the Sienaeans fast asleepe
Lay buried in their wines, Orondates
Occasion tooke to crosse those muddy seas;
Commanding eu'rie Souldiour beare a planke,
And one at others heeles succeed in ranke;
So made a sudden bridge, at hay now hay,
To liue or die; and closely stole away
[Page 149]With all his forces, leauing horse behinde,
For feare of noyse and waking those of Iude:
They soundly slept that night, and set no watch,
But such as were to finish and dispatch
That worke begun at Nilus broken flanke;
With stone and clay to ram the boorded stanke:
And earnest these, and busie about their charge
Perceiue them not: nor came they neere the marge
Of Nilus streame. And by this sleight so fine,
The Persian brought his men int'Elpentine:
A Towne (he knew) that soone receiue them ment,
Prepar'd thereto by those two men he sent.
The Sienaeans knew not they were fled,
Till such, as had the Souldiours billetted,
Them mist in house; and from the wall to banke,
At morning saw the ioyntlesse bridge of planke.
For this the Towne perplexed was the more,
Their second faults reuenge now fearing sore;
That, after mercie shew'd them, trayterously
May seeme gaue way for Persian force to fly.
To cleere themselues, and get a second grace,
Both old and young they come forth of their place;
And o're the planke-bridge toward th'Aethiopes,
In humble sort goe to renew their hopes.
And all afar-off kneeling on their knees
Made lowly signe of suite. Hydaspes sees,
And sends to know the cause, why came they then
Without the Persian Leader and his men.
Their Priests that went before declare the case,
And how the Persians, to their foule disgrace,
Vnknown to Sien, stole away by night,
When all the Towne was doing Nilus right.
What further meant was could they not define,
But thought, to gather force at Elpentine:
And pray'd Hydaspes ent'r and take the Towne,
And euermore command it as his owne.
[Page 150]He thought not meet himselfe to goe, but sent,
To sound yet furrher th'enemies intent,
And keepe the Towne, a Garrison of strong
And well appointed men; and sent along
The Sienaeans with them, promising
Both life and freedome like a gracious King.
Then led his Armie forth in good array,
To giue or take encounter by the way.
And forth with word was brought him by his Spies,
That fast were comming-on his enemies.
And now began the Persian pride appeare;
Orondates, and many in armour cleare
All double-guilt, against the rising Lamp
Reflects a lightning on the Blackmore Camp.
His right wing holds the Persian and the Mede▪
Of them the strongest-armed still precede:
And vnder these, more safe to shoot and fight,
Their Archers follow nimbl' and armed light.
Vpon his left wing care was had to range,
Th'Aegyptians, Afers, and all people strange:
And after them came other Bowes, and Slings,
To fight a flanke, and counterguard the wings.
Himselfe betweene them rode in charr'ot bright,
With sharp-edg'd hookes all round about bedight.
His strong Phalanges march on either side;
And troopes of Cataphracts before him ride:
With whom he counts himselfe most safe and sure:
And this the guise is of that Armature.
Some choyce well-timber'd man of courage stout
An helmet close puts-on, which round about
His head defends, and from the Crowne to necke;
His left hand holds the reine his horse to checke,
His right a launce whereof butte-end is set
In horses armed flanke that will not let
It backward slide, but guided with a span
Combines in thrust the strength of horse and man;
[Page 151]Which armed both in steele wrought smooth by file,
And ioynted close like scales of Crocodile,
When horse hath reine on necke, and spur at flanks,
As iron Statue breakes the formost ranks;
And piercing th'armour first, then flesh and bones,
Some two, or three, sometime thrusts th'row at once.
Now Persian Satrap, with such men and horses,
And as before had order'd all his forces;
He forward sets. And so the Blackmore King;
Who sets against the Mede-and-Persian wing,
His Meroans, not men of armour light,
But well appointed for a standing fight.
On th'other side his Troglodytes and those
Who dwell where all the best Amomy growes;
All armed light, and verie swift of foot,
And cunning all to hit whereat they shoot.
And when he saw in middle battaile most
Consist the strength of all the Persian Hoast;
Himselfe in person leads against the same
His towred Elephants, with Sere and Blame;
A people strong, who, fighting though on foot,
Such armour wore as none could thorow-shoot.
And these, although at first they meet at large,
Had, after battell ioyn'd, a speciall charge;
To creepe aground, accustom'd to such acts,
And gore th'vnarmed paunch of Cataphracts.
With trump the Persian, th'Aethiope with drum,
Both strike Alarm when they to th'Onset come.
The Persian came-on with a full careere
Of armed horse-men, thunder-like to heare:
Hydaspes softly, that the Persian horse,
Before th'encounter, might abate his force:
And lest he should, by speeding-on th'Auants,
Vngarded leaue his slow-pac'd Elephants:
But when [...]hey met, these hardy men of Blame
Creepe vnd'r vnarmed horses, hoh them lame,
[Page 152]And wound th'vnarmed paunch with th [...]st and cuts,
So make the gored beast run-out his guts,
And cast the riders: who, for armours waight,
Now cannot stirre, and are dispatched straight,
By first-come enemie: me thinkes to fight
Were bett'r on foot, both for pursuit and flight.
A whizzing cloud of arrowes dimd the Sun,
And blowes are strooke as loud as moderne gun
To cut-off armed limbs; the field is spred
With legs, armes, heads, and bodies but halfe-dead:
At right wing and at left, areare, avant.
The neighing Horse, and roring Elephant,
With fall of beast and man, some o're, some vnder,
Made such a noyse they could not heare it thunder.
And now begin the nimble men of Sere,
Retire to guard their Elephants areare.
The Persian horse, as many as scapt the gore,
At Seres run: yet backward start, and snore
At sight of th'Elephant, that hill of beast;
That with his snout can take of graine the least;
And yet enroule an armed man and send him
Aloft int' aire, and by the downfall rend him,
As then were many seru'd: each Elephant
Had two men on each side, and two avant,
In foure-square armed towre; there was no faile,
But only that way which was next the taile.
And fed the beasts were, more to make them fight,
With grapes and mulberries, their chiefe delight.
The Seres were so skill'd in Archeries,
They made their arrowes sticke in Persian eyes;
That on their browes they seem'd haue growing hornes,
Or in mid-forhead like our Vnicornes:
Yea, some in mouth receiu'd a hidden stripe,
And 'twixt their lips hung th'arrow like a pipe.
So Persian Leaders, troubled in their face,
Fly backe themselues, and draw the rest apace.
[Page 153] Orondates on swiftest horse of Nyze,
His chariot leauing, with the formost flyes.
And this the wise and valiant King of Blacke,
From turret, set on tallest Elpen backe,
Beholds, triumphing in his victorie;
And loth to shed much bloud of enemie,
Sends-out command to spare their liues, and bring
The Persian Duke aliue vnto the King.
And so they did, while he the manner view'd.
The Persian noting first the multitude
Of Blackemors Armie, kept the Nile behinde him;
For feare they should all round about enwinde him:
So barr'd himselfe the flight, and now forsaken
Of all his men, on banke aliue is taken;
Though Achaemen repenting what he told,
And fearing th'end in flying was so bold
To stab his Lord: it was no deadly blow;
And yet reueng'd with Aethiopian bow,
That surer strooke the Traytour; so with ease
Was into presence brought Orondates.
To whom the King; I hold it most renowne
By weapon standing, and by fauour downe,
To vanquish foe: and you doe freely giue
(Though euer false to me) this leaue to liue.
The Satrap answer'd; False I was to you;
But thereby more vnto my Master true.
The King reply'd; Say truth and doe not swerue,
Y'are ouercome; what doe you now deserue?
The same (quoth he) that would my King require
Of one of yours, that were to you entire.
But, O my friend, then quoth the King againe,
Although you trustie were, it was in vaine,
And part vnwise for you to set vpon
My forces here, that are ten to your one.
I knew it well, quoth he; but euer finde,
How much my King mislikes a fearfull minde.
[Page 154]And seeing plaine you meant to set on me,
Thought best begin. For oft a ieoperdee
May fall out well; and many a chance in war
May bring th'vnlikely lucke, the likely bar.
So might befall me well; and oft in doubt
Some friendly Fortune fauours courage stout;
But if it fell out so, I did but liue;
I might the bett'r account my Sou'raigne giue.
The King his answer lik'd, and straight him sent
To Sien Towne, and after softly went:
And, leauing th'armies Lieutenants charge,
In royall state vpon his Elpen large
Enters the gate; that strange it was to see,
On monster blacke so blacke a King as hee.
Then forth to meet him all the Citie went
Man, woman, childe, of high and low descent;
And cast him garlands, coronets, and posies
Of all the fairest lil [...]ies, pinks, and roses,
That grew on banke of Nile, congratulating
His victories, and him-to them prostrating.
He first of all vnto the Temple goes,
Pesents the Gods with sundrie solemne showes
For victorie: then lookes vpon the Well,
That wont with Nilus floud to sinke and swell:
The polisht stone within it hauing lines,
To count how much it rises or declines:
And Dials saw (though they no newes to him,
Because they had the like at Meroim
Both Citie and Isle) with Gnomons bolt-vpright,
That gaue no shade at noone, but round had light:
There also puits, that nere so deepe were sunke,
Had Sun at noone that of their water drunke:
For North and South on each side equall lay,
And Nadir mid-night, Zenith made mid-day:
For either Pole respectiue seene was there,
At landskop-end, South Crosse and Northerne Beare.
[Page 155]Then such as came from North-side of the Line,
To South-ward of Siene and Elpentine,
With much amazement saw, where now they stood,
To left-hand run the shadowes of the wood.
Of Vnicornes some to the King relate,
And shew them richly wrought on cloth of state;
Like cloue-foot horse (if wrought it were not wrong)
With horne in forhead straight some seu'n foot long.
There also painted shew they him the Rucke,
So huge a bird, as strong enough to tucke,
Or trusse (as Faulk'ners speake) an Elpen fierce,
With ell-long tallons) toughest hide to pierce:
Yea foure-foot winged Dragons wrought he saw,
And Gryffins also, contratie to Law,
That Nature keepes in other creatures all,
Affording them but foure limbs principall;
Not mingling kindes; as this to ramp and fly-on▪
Before an Eagl' is, and behinde a Lyon;
As here set-out by cunning workmans hand:
But, that there were such liuing in that land,
On furth'r enquirie made the truth to touch,
An old-man called Heare-say did auouch.
Then set they forth the praises of their Nile,
And in their praising giue him such a stile,
As if the Sun and Moone were lesse than hee
The causes of their Lands fertilitee,
With yeerely slime there filling eu'rie creeke;
Whereof that streame first got that name in Greeke.
They further say their Riuer was the Yeare,
And with some reasons make it thus appeare:
What other floud hath flowers like the Nile
To shew the Spring? and there the Crocodile
In winter-quarter breeds; by waters heape
The Summer's known; and Autumne time by Neape.
Besides, the letters of that name amount
To summe of dayes i'th' yeare by iust account.
[Page 156]For N his fiftie, and E his fiue commands,
And I for ten, and L for thirtie stands,
And O for seuentie, for two hundred Σ,
To tell in Greeke; and these all make no lesse,
(By rule of Adding if you them contriue)
Than dayes i'th' yeare three hundred sixtie fiue.
Then said the King, sith you this way haue trod,
And sith you worship Nilus for a God;
And him we send you downe from Blackmorland;
For this, me thinkes, we should your loue command,
You shall, repli'd the Priests; and much the more
For such a gracious King; whom we adore
For sauing vs more like a God than King,
And this his victorie still shall we sing.
With moderance (quoth he) your praises scan,
And still remeb'r, a King is but a man.
So part of day he spent in talke, the rest
With Negroes and Sienians in feast.
Then sent his Armie Goats, Sheepe, Oxen, Swine,
Whole Herds at once, and many Butts of wine.
The next day seated on a loftie throne,
His well-deseruing men cals eu'rychone:
And with the spoyle, before he thence depart,
Will see them all rewarded by desert.
To him that tooke Orondates, he said;
Aske what thou wilt: he saith, I'm well appaid
With that I haue, if please your Maiestee,
With your most royall, word confirme it mee:
And shew'd the ponyard of that Persian Earle,
Most richly set with precious stone and pearle,
That many a million cost: the standers-by,
Too much for priuate man, began to cry,
More fit to make a treasure for a King.
Hydaspes smiling said; is any thing
More Kingly, than to cast-off couetise,
And that, which common men admire, despise?
[Page 157]Besides now, bee't a thing of worth or trifle,
The man that takes a pris'ner, may him rifle
By Law of Armes; we grant him then his right,
Which he might well haue kept out of our sight.
And, after this man, call'd-for next are they
Who tooke Theagen and Chariclia,
And say (O King) nor gold, nor precious stone,
But fairest two we bring of flesh and bone:
To serue your Highnesse and your gracious Queene.
Well put in minde (quoth he) I haue them seene,
But did not marke them well; now then againe
Them bring before me: then one ran amaine
To Camp, and will'd the keepers quickly bring
That faire young man and maid before the King.
They asking whither now, and why they went,
Are told Hydaspes King hath for them sent.
O Gods, quoth they, at King Hydaspes name,
Till then not knowing still had raign'd the same.
Then he to her, sweet heart (in whisper-vaine)
Tell you our case; Hydaspes still doth raigne,
Your fath'r, as oft you told me. Whereto shee,
Haue patience a while (sweet heart) and see
Yet more; A matt'r of such a consequence
Must-not be dealt-in rashly, for offence.
And things, that haue beginnings intricate,
Are brought t'an end with some more solemne state.
Besides, my mother (though we heare she liues)
Of our estate most pregnant witnesse giues;
And is not here. Theagenes replies;
But, if we offer'd be for sacrifice,
Or giu'n to some as Captiues in reward;
Too late we make you known, I am afeard.
O feare it not, quoth she; we must be seene
At Meroë, and there shall meet the Queene
Ere sacrifice. Our ouer-hastie ioy
In matt'r unripe may breed vs much anoy.
[Page 158]To shew our case in absence of our proofe,
I thinke can no wayes make for our behoofe;
But rath'r offend the King, when such as we,
In seruile state, his heires shall claime to be.
But you haue euidence (quoth he) and show it:
'Tis euidence (quoth she) to them that know it,
And know the passage; otherwise, althow
The King himselfe some of these jewels know,
In such a case as this, he may deny them,
Or else suspect we came not truly by them.
Who knowes the Queene this writing e're compil'de,
Or as a mother left it with her childe?
It may be said that some confederate
This wrought, to raise a tumult in the state.
Instinct of Nature is a wondrous signe,
That at the first encounter will encline
The mother to the childe. Then is't not best
This signe to loose that makes good all the rest.
The Fable saith, one had a bird did lay
Him egges of gold; who, thinking long to stay
Till lay-day came (because he kept no measure)
Did kill his bird, for in-her-hidden treasure:
But true that saying is (thinke on't my Deare)
He hasteth well that wisely can forbeare.
And now they two, with Eunuch Bagoas,
Th'row all the Blackmore Guard haue way to passe,
And come before the King: he ey'd them well;
But how affected hard it is to tell:
He rose a littl' and said; me Heau'n excuse!
And sate him downe againe as in a muse.
The Peeres about him askt him what he ment.
He said, I drempt the Gods this night had sent
Me such a daught'r, and suddenly so grown;
I little thought theron, nor would it owne;
Till now is come before my waking sight
The verie same (me thinkes) I saw by night.
[Page 159]They told him, dreames sometime will let one see
A thing before-hand that will shortly bee.
Then setting light thereby, he askt them, what
And whence they were? Theagenes to that
Repli'd, we broth'r and sister be, and come
Late out of Greece. But is that Maiden dombe
(Repli'd the King)? Chariclia said, we heare,
We must to th'Altar; and my Parents there
Will soone be known. But heare (O King) the troth;
That one is here, and there they will be both.
To that Hydaspes said, and saying smil'de,
Me thinkes now dreameth this my dreame-borne childe;
Imagining her Parents, swift as thought,
Shall out of Greece to Meroë be brought:
Well, take and vse these two with all the grace
They had before: but what's that Eunuchs face?
The same, say they. The King then, let him passe
Along with them, to keepe vntaint the Lasse:
For Eunuch is a kinde of jealous Elfe,
Enuying others that he lacks himselfe.
Thus hauing said, all other Captiues there
He call'd, and view'd them well; and all that were,
As borne to serue, of fath'r and mother slaue,
Among his well-deseruing Souldiours gaue.
The rest, that seem'd of better birth to bee,
Without imposed ransome let goe free,
And whither so they lift; saue only ten
The fairest younger maids, and younger men,
T'encrease the Sacrifice: then Iustice found
All such as did their cases there propound.
And some there were who though they fought not hard,
For good intelligence obtain'd reward;
And some for counsaile, some for Engin-Art;
For victorie depends not all on Mart.
At last Orondates he cals him nigh,
And bids him hold his former Satrapie.
[Page 160]Thus further saying; When you come before
My broth'r of Babel, tell him I full sore
Against my will to bloudy war am forc'd,
Albee't as any King well mann'd and hors'd.
And yet, in bloud-shed though I not delight,
Must take vp arms and will to keepe my right;
Which now I haue recouer'd, strike no drum
T'enlarge my Territorie, as would doe some:
But am content with share on Nature grounded,
Which Aegypt hath from Aethiopie bounded
By Cataracts: so, if he will, let cease
This war betwixt vs for a friendly peace.
As for the Sienaeans, I release them
A ten yeares tribute; doe not you oppresse them.
But wish your Master grant that libertee,
I know he will, commended so by mee.
No wicked man I praise, although my friend;
Nor good man enemy will discommend.
The Persian hearing this, with hands before
His brest athwart, bow'd downe his head t'adore;
And prayd the Gods his royall dayes encrease,
That Perse and Indies euer keepe in peace.
Then all gaue thanks, deuoutly promising
Their loyaltie to such a gracious King.
Finis Libri Noni.

THE Faire AEthiopian.

THe King then sent his Army part before,
And followes with the rest along the shore
Of flowrie Nile, vntill he came beyond
The Cataracts, he there forsooke the strond,
And drew to Midland-ward as far as Phile,
From Sien (as I said) some thirteene mile.
And thence he sent another multitude,
Led well as need was (for they were but rude)
Of common Souldiours marching merrily
Before the King, who staid to fortifie.
When that was done, he sent two horse-men post,
To signifie, the King with all his Hoast
Is comming home, and means to gratifie
The Gods with Sacrifice for victorie:
As by his letters more at large is seene,
Both vnt' his sacred Councell and the Queene:
To Councell thus; These are to let you know
My conquest of the Persian forces; though
I vaunt not of it: Fortune is vnstable;
And all her turnings hold I venerable:
But you, that alwayes heretofore and now
Foretold me truth, I cannot but allow
This testimony for your Priesthoods sake;
And pray, and charge you further paines to take;
And come in person, answering our hopes,
At full Assembly of our Aethiopes,
[Page 162] To grace the businesse with your grauitie,
While we doe sacrifice for victorie:
And thus to Queene; We haue quite ouerthrown
Our enemies, and herewithall be known
(That most concerneth you) in health we are:
A solemne sacrifice therefore prepare,
And call our Wisemen to the sacred field,
And meet vs there your selfe, due thanks to yeeld
Vnto the Gods, protectors of our Land,
The Sun and Moone, and all that for vs stand,
I haue my dreame, quoth she; last night me thought,
A goodly daught'r into the world I brought,
Of marriageable state. The Warre my throwes,
And Victorie my goodly daughter showes.
Then to the Citie messengers she sent:
That Loto-garlands had for ornament;
A flowre (not much vnlike the flowre of Franks)
With growing gold that crowneth Nilus banks;
And shaking Palmes in hand on horse they road
Th'rowout the Citie and Suburbs all abroad.
The people know the signe without the voyce
Of Victorie, and greatly gan reioyce:
Yet more for safetie of that their gracious King,
Than for the Persian Army conquering.
They thicke and three-fold to the Temples crowd;
And offer sacrifice, and sing alowd
In Citie, Parish, Ward, and Family;
They him so loue, for right and clemencie;
For ruling them with tender pietie,
And neuer shewing point of tyrannie.
The Queene then sent into the sacred fields,
All manner beasts and fowle the Countrey yeelds;
Enough to sacrifice with foule and beast,
And furnish-out a solemne publike feast.
Then goes she to the wise Gym [...]osophers,
Acquaints them with the Kings desire and hers,
[Page 163]But stayes a while till they their Gods demand,
What should be done; and loe in turne of hand
Sisimithres comes forth, their chiefe Anoint,
And saith they come; for so the Gods appoint;
But some great tumult, by their prophesies,
It seemes there will be made at sacrifice;
Yet well shall end: as though part of your ground,
Or of your selfe, were lost, and shall be found.
I doe not feare (quoth she) those fearfull signes,
In presence of such reuerend Diuines:
But when I heare the King is come I shall
You certifie. That need you not at all,
Sisimithres reparted, I know't well;
And ere't be long a letter shall you tell.
And as they spoke came letters from the King
Vnto the Queene faire-sealed with his ring.
Then straight an Herauld sent is to proclame
Th'effect thereof; in Queene and Councels name;
Commanding there should be no woman seene,
But she, that was Diana's Priest, the Queene,
And such as must be sacrificed there,
As was the custome, then from eu'rywhere
The men come flocking; and, a day before
The time appointed, some crosse Astabore,
Some Arsasoba, some the broader Nile
In Reeden boats; for Meroë was an Isle
With these three riuers compassed for strength;
An hundred broad, three hundred mile in length:
A faire and fruitfull soyle; it bore a reed
That made a boat, would carrie three with speed,
All wer't but slit, at leauell line and poynt,
No more than Nature gaue twixt joynt and joynt.
It bore some wheat so high, would hide a packe,
Or man that sate on tallest horses backe:
And for the seed (so mellow was the mold)
It paid the husband-man three hundred-fold:
[Page 164]Nor only rich in these and other plants,
But yearely brought the hugest Elephants;
Whose ell-long tuskes (beleeue yee them that saw)
Grow not in the vnder, but in th'vpper jaw;
Nor were the lower jaw-bone deepe and strong
Enough, to beare a tooth so large and long.
And there Rhinocerots, [...]ight Vnicornes,
With all beasts else that haue, or haue not hornes,
This Island bred, of greatest height and size,
Whereof they brought for solemne Sacrifice,
And for the feast, a wondrous multitude
To satisfie both ciuill men and rude.
Some meet the King a great way off for ioy,
Some neare, and all cry-out Ʋive le Roy.
The graue Gymnosophists maintaine their state,
And meet the King not much beyond the gate
Of sacred field; and there they kisse his hands.
The Queene within the porch of Temple stands;
Receiues him there with men of noble ranks,
And all for victorie the Gods giue thanks.
Then out of Cloyster to the place they went
Of Sacrifice, and set them in their Tent:
Foure-square it was, and (pillarets in steed)
At eu'rie corner born-vp with a reed
As big as trunke of Oake; in Canopee
Met close aboue with boughs of Phoenix tree.
Another Tent there was two stories high;
Wherein, aboue, the pictures set are by
Of Memnon, Perseus, and Andromeda:
Of whom the Blackmore Kings (I cannot say
How true it is, but as it is pretended)
From time to time are lineally descended.
Hereunder sit the graue Gymnosophists,
Round about the Souldiours keepe the lists;
That force of people breake not vpon those,
Who should doe Sacrifice amid the close.
[Page 165]The King them told, what for the Common-wealth
Was lately done, and all pray for his health:
He then commands, according t'ancient guise,
Whom-to it long'd, proceed to Sacrifice;
For now the time of day grew toward Noone.
Three Altars were there, two for Sun and Moone
Together set, the third for Bacchus was
By't selfe alone; and this for offring has
All sorts of creatures: to the God of wine
Th'vncleane and cleane, th'impure and pure encline.
But th'other two, for either heau'nly light
That all the world about doe shine so bright,
The Sun white horses had, for swiftest flight;
The Moone, for helping tillage, oxen white.
And, while men busie be preparing those,
Confused cries among the peopl' arose
For humane Sacrifice of strangers tane,
That, after custome, first should there be slaine.
The King them all appeas'd with beck'ning hand,
And for the strangers bringing gaue command.
They brought are loose; the rest all heauie and sad;
The Greekes vndaunted; rather seeming glad;
And cheerfully Chariclia cast her eyes
Vpon Persina, which the Queene espies;
And marking was affected much, and said
With deep-set sigh, O husband what a Maid
Haue you pickt-out to kill? so sweet a face
I neuer saw. With what a cheerfull grace,
And haughtie courage comes she to her death?
The daught'r I brought you, had she drawn her breath
Till now, I thinke should beare the selfe-same age.
What pitie it is, that on this bloudy stage
The flowre of Maids is brought! I should delight
In such a waiter, if I saue her might
A Greeke I thinke, the more I pitie her case;
For, if you marke it, sh'hath no Gypsie face.
[Page 166]A Greeke indeed, quoth he, and though she said
Here parents will be here, it cannot aid.
I pittie her my selfe; but cannot stead,
Except it proue sh'hath lost her Maiden-head;
Which must be tri'd by fire. And, if't be so,
For you to take her, were it fit or no?
No matter, quoth the Queene, or maid, or wife,
Or otherwise; so I but saue her life.
Captiuitie, and warre, and banishment,
Though fault committed were, excuse intent.
So said sh'and hardly could her swelling eye
Conceale th'affection from the standers-by.
Then call'd the King for th'artificiall fire,
That wont discerne the broken from th'entire:
For, though it were with burning gold made hot,
Yet man or woman virgin burnt it not.
That gold by fire, and woman's tri'd by gold,
And men by women, cannot be control'd:
Though Maid to try, by scaping thus enfir'd,
It cannot be but from aboue inspir'd.
Theagenes is call'd, and all admire
So young, so goodly a man, t'endure the fire.
To see him tri'd so, was Chariclia glad,
Though no suspition of his loue she had.
And grieu'd againe (when triall was so done)
He should be sacrifis'd vnto the Sunne,
As said the King. To her Theagenes
Then softly said; among such peopl' as these
Is Sacrifice reward of chastity?
And death of honest life? Sweet heart, but why
Reueale you not your selfe, to saue our life?
You see me neere the Sacrificers knife.
Or will you stay vntill you see me dead?
Or till your mothers sword strike-off your head?
I prethee saue me! yet I care not, I,
So thou be sure to liue, although I die.
[Page 167]The time's at hand, quoth she; what shall I say?
Our fortunes now are all at Hay now hay:
Then op't her fardell, quickly drest her selfe
In sacred mantle that she brought from Delph,
Dispred her golden haire about her shoulders,
And, to th'amazement there of all beholders,
On fire she leapt in furie as 'twere diuine;
That made her beautie more and more to shine,
And hurt her not. All wonder, many weepe,
That she her maiden-head so well should keepe,
To make her die; Persina most of all
Affected is, and (rising from her stall)
Entreats the King. In vaine you speake, quoth he,
And troubl' vs all, for that which cannot be.
The Gods (you see) doe choose her, since she leapt
Vpon the fire, and therefore haue her kept
Vntainted hitherto: but, O yee Wise,
Wherefore begin you not the Sacrifice?
Sisimithres replies then out of hand,
In Greeke, that all there might not vnderstand;
Far bee't, O King! with Sacrifices such
Polluted are w'already too too much.
But wee'll aside into the Temple draw,
And not assist man-sacrifising Law;
Wherewith the Gods offended are we know;
Yet, sith the people needs will haue it so,
'Tis meet the King doe stay and see it done;
For feare the vulgar to disorder run.
And after shall your Maiestie haue need
Be cleansed, for assisting such a deed.
And yet not so, for done it shall not bee;
A beame about the strangers heads I see.
Which plainly tels me that some Pow'r Diuine,
In tok'n of aid hath cast on them this shine.
So saying rose, and all his company
So parting were Chariclia presently
[Page 168]From fire downe running fell before his way,
And said, O reu'rend Sire, beseek you stay:
I haue to plead against his royall grace;
And you are only iudge in such a case;
As I am told: then heare and quickly know
That such a death I ought not vndergoe.
The stranger then (quoth he) O King, appeales:
Now doe her right, as father of Common-weales.
Hydaspes smil'd, and said, how can it be,
Or what hath such an one to doe with me?
That shall you know (quoth he) if she declare.
But (Sir) repli'd the King) you must beware
You giue not way for iudgement or Appeale,
To wrong a King and Fath'r of Common-weale
(As you me terme) and doe me this disgrace,
Against a Captiue so to plead my case.
Sisimithres reparted: Equitie
Respects not high Degrees, or Maiestie;
But he that right with reason best maintaines
At Iustice bar, is only man that raignes.
But with mine owne (repli'd the King) and not
With strangers ought I thus to try my lot.
O Sir, a thing to subiect equitable
(Repli'd the Iudge) to stranger's honourable.
Then saith the King, 'tis plaine sh'hath nought to say,
But only seekes to trifie time away,
As loth to die: but let her speake, because
Sisimithres so forward that-way drawes.
Chariclia courage had enough before
And hope of safetie; that name gaue her more.
For she had heard that one Sisimithres
Was he that gaue her first to Charicles;
And then but seu'n yeeres old, ten yeeres agoe;
No maruell now that him she did not know;
Nor yet her he; who, then Gymnosophist
But one of common sort, now led the list,
[Page 169]And Primate was of all. That made her raise
Her hands and voyce to Heau'n; and thus she prayes;
O Sun, the Founder of my Pedegree,
And Gods, and Demi-Gods, mine Ancestree!
Me heare and helpe! To witnesse call I you,
That nothing shall I here alleage, but true.
And thus begin; O King, are they your owne
That thus mun die, or strangers and vnknowne?
And strangers only said the King: Then she;
Then must you seeke some other here for me.
For I shall easly proue and make it knowne,
That I no stranger am; but eu'n your owne.
He maruell'd much, and call'd her Counterfetter:
Small things are these (quoth he) now heare you greater:
For I shall proue me not borne only here,
But of Bloud royall, to your selfe full neere.
The King it scorn'd, and her, for words so vaine
And new deuised; she reparts againe,
With sober count'nance and behauiour milde;
Most royall father scorne not so your childe!
The King was wroth, and said, Sisimithres,
And you the rest, how long thus will it please
Your sacred Wisdome, that I this endure?
Away with her: I haue no childe I'm sure:
Though once I had a guirle that quickly di'de,
As all you know; and I had none beside;
Away with her. Not till the Iudge so say,
Quoth she; you iudge not, but are iudg'd to day.
Your Law perhaps you suffers stranger kill;
That childe you slay, nor Law, nor Nature will:
And that your childe I am, though you say no,
The Gods themselues this day will plainly show.
Two kindes of Arguments, as I am tould,
Are chiefly vs'd in proofe: the first enroul'd
By writing are, the second firmly stand
On witnesse vnexcept on either hand.
[Page 170]I bring them both; and offer'd to be seene
Her cradle-band displaid before the Queene:
She lookt thereon amaz'd at case so strange,
And at her guerle, with many a counter-change.
Now it, now her she view'd, then her, then it;
And fell a sweating with a shaking fit,
For ioy, and feare, and doubt what might befall;
And what the King would thinke, and what they all,
That she with honour could a daughter bring
So much vnlike her selfe, vnlike the King.
The King perceiu'd her passion, and, what ill,
(Sweet heart, quoth he) hath done thee that same Bill?
What ailes my Loue? she not a word, but O
King, Lord, and Husband, read it you and know:
Then sad and silent gaue it him; and hee
The Wisemen call'd, with him to read and see.
They looke well on it all, and, as they looke,
With much amaze Sisimithres was strooke;
And now the writing, then the Princesse ey'd:
And when the King was partly satisfi'd
About the Babe, and putting forth, and cause
That mou'd the Queene thereto; with little pause
He said, I know a guerle I had; but told
Was by Persina dead and laid in mold;
Put-out now first I heare: but where's the man
That tooke, brought-vp, and kept her? shew who can.
How came sh'int'Aegypt? wherefore was not he,
That brought her thither, tak'n as well as she?
How are we sure that this is she, and not
One foysted-in by politike complot
Of such as may true babe extinguished,
Or got these tokens after she was dead,
Abusing them and my well-known desire
Of childe, me to succeed in this Empire?
To that Sisimithres; Your Maiestie
Well knowes I may not, nor haue cause to lye.
[Page 171]What since became of her I little weene,
But I am he that tooke her from the Queene,
And seu'n yeeres kept her close, till you in fine
Me sent int'Aegypt for the Smaragd-mine.
Then thith'r I take her with me; there I seeke
To place her safe, and with an honest Greeke.
And this no doubt is her owne swadling-band,
A th'inside writ with Queene Persina's hand.
But heare (young Lady) said he more, and smil'de▪
I other things then left him with the childe.
Loe here, quoth she, and jewels shew'd, whereon
The Queene well looking, stood as still as stone.
How now (then quoth the King) what finde you more?
Something (quoth she) that Ile not speake before
So many men, but I shall be your debtor
To tell you all, albeit in priuate better.
Chariclia saw the King yet full of doubt,
And smilingly these words-into burst-out.
Sir, these my mothers tokens are, but (see)
This one is yours, and shew'd the Pantarbee.
The King it knew full fell, and said at sight,
This was mine owne indeed; how came you by't?
For why? your colour, here so peregrine,
Doth plainly shew you can be none of mine.
Then said Sisimithres, the childe was white
That I so tooke; and time accordeth right
With age of this young Damsell; yea me thinks
Her face the same, both when she lookes and winke:
And such a beautie neuer haue I seene
Before, nor since, and this had of the Queene.
More like a Patron than a Iudge you say,
Repli'd the King: but yet take heed, I pray,
Lest one doubt cleering, you a greater bring,
And moue suspect betwixt the Queene and King:
For how can we, that are a Blackmore paire,
Beget a childe so beautifull and faire?
[Page 172]The Wiseman lookt on King with twiring eyes,
And said, a Iudge must justice patronize.
Yet still (my Liege) I thinke I speake for you,
As well as her, and helpe you to your due.
And what if I for her, now growne, doe striue,
For whom, a childe, I stroue, to keepe aliue?
That of your body you might leaue an heire;
And will you cast her off, because so faire?
For that, the roule, of Queene Persina's hand,
Will satisfie you, if it well be scand.
To cleere the case yet further, call I pray
(At hand it is) for your Andromeda:
The picture's brought and set hard by the Maid,
And all that lookt on them admiring said;
O father know your childe, mistrust not mother,
For, but by life, we know not t'one from t'other.
Hydaspes doubts no more, but of his dreame
Then spoke againe, to ratifie the theame:
So did the Queene, and both the Parents gaze▪
On daughters face, and on Andromeda's.
Yet said Sisimithres; Royall Descent,
And Crowne, and Scept'r is waightie consequent:
And truth most waightie of all: another signe
I know, may best th'Imperiall cause define.
Your left arme (Lady) shew; 'tis no disgrace
To shew a naked arme in such a case.
If you be that same royall childe I knew,
Aboue your elbow a marke there is of blue.
She shew'd, and so it was; like azure ring
On pollisht Iu'rie; this when saw the King,
He was perswaded; and Persina then,
Forgetting state among so many men;
Ran from her Throne as if sh'had beene halfe wilde,
Embras'd, and kist, and hugg'd so fast her childe;
That, through so sudden ioyes extremitie
With mourning mixt, she fell int' extasie.
[Page 173] Hydaspes pittied her, yet like affect
He felt in minde with manly courage checkt.
But, when he saw them both together fall,
He rais'd them vp, and kist them both withall.
And on his daughter wept, to make amends
For hard beleefe: Yet thus said; You my frends,
And loyall people see this strange euent,
And will (I thinke) if I desire, consent
To saue the life of this vnhoped Heire
Apparent to my Crowne, although so faire:
But for your sake and safetie, for the Law,
I may not spare her; so began to draw
Her toward th'Altar; All cry-out on high,
The Gods haue well declar'd she should not die
This cruell death; O saue the Royall Bloud!
And stept betwixt, and crowding stiffly stood
To stay his passage; and yet further cry,
You fath'r of people fath'r a family!
I thanke you for your loue, quoth he, and staid,
And turn'd about, and to the Princesse said;
That you, so faire one, yet my daughter are,
Howeuer call'd, the Gods and these declare.
But what is he, that was with you surpris'd,
And stands at th'Altar to be sacrifiz'd?
How hapt you call'd him brother heretofore?
For, but your selfe, I children had no more.
Chariclia bent her eyes downe to the ground,
And blushing said; it was that fearfull stound
Constrain'd me so; but what he is indeed
(Please you him aske) himselfe can best arreed.
I crie you mercie (smiling quoth he than)
That blush I made you, speaking of the man.
But stay and keepe your mother companie,
And of your fortunes tell her th'historie;
So may you bring her now more ioy and mirth,
Than at the day of your admired birth.
[Page 174]Of solemne Sacrifice I must haue care,
And in your stead another Maid prepare
To die with him. The Princesse at that word
Was like to skreame, yet held, and said; my Lord
And royall father, sith the peoples minde
Is, for my sake, to spare the femall kinde;
They looke not for another, or if need
Require a paire must on your Altar bleed;
'Twere good you had another man; for he
Cannot be sacrificed, but with me.
The Gods forbid, quoth he; why say you so?
Because with him (quoth she) I stay, or goe;
I liue, or die, as Destin hath defin'd.
I like (quoth he) your charitable minde
To saue your fellow-pris'ner; but in truth
It cannot be: to th'Altar must this Youth:
And that the people were content to spare
Mine only thee, was heau'nly Powers care.
O King (quoth she) the Gods that had the care
This body of mine, so little worth, to spare;
Will spare my soule; and what that is they know,
That haue ordain'd (before) it should be so.
If otherwise, and that this man must dye;
This one thing grant m'I pray, that none but I
Him sacrifise, to shew these all about
Your daughters heart, like true bloud-royall stout.
The King was vext, and said; of this your minde,
So contrarie, no reason can I finde.
At first this stranger sought you to defend,
And now, as if he neuer were your frend,
But vtter foe, you would your selfe him kill:
I see no good can thence arise, but ill:
Nor can it with our reputation stand,
For you to take that office now in hand.
For none weilds here the sacrificing knife,
But Priest of Sun and Moone, the man and wife.
[Page 175]That hinders not, quoth she at mothers eare;
For I haue one that may that title beare.
You shall, repli'd the Queene in softly voyce,
When for your good and ours we make the choyce.
There need no choosing one already had,
Quoth she. Alas (quoth he) my daughter's mad;
Or, ouerjoy'd with sudden change, in chat,
As in a dreame, she speakes she knowes not what;
Him brother cals, that is not; saue him would
At first, and kill him now: She thinkes she could
Be maid and wife at once: Deere wife her take
Into your Tent, and see what you can make
Of these her words; or labour to recall
Her wits againe before she lose them all;
I must send-out to seeke some other Maid,
For her to die; and meane time shall be staid
To giue Embassadours their audience,
That late are come (I know not yet from whence)
I thinke our conquest to congratulate:
Soone after set himselfe in chaire of State,
And orderly them call'd Harmonias;
That for the time thereto appointed was.
Meroebus first, the Kings owne brothers son,
Comes-in, and with his present thus begun;
My Sou'raigne Lord and Father, (for entail'd
The Crowne was on him, if Kings Issue fail'd)
For safe returne of your high Maiestie,
And for our gladnesse of your victorie,
We all bring presents; and my selfe this man,
That oft hath plaid his prize, and euer wan;
At running, wrestling, cudgelling, and cuffes,
Can none come neere him. Then the fellow-puffes,
And makes a present challenge; Come who dare;
And naked gan there round about him stare.
The King makes proclamation; Come who would:
But not a man in all his Camp so bould.
[Page 176]So great his bulke was, post-like his vpholders,
And taller he than all by head and shoulders.
I thanke you sonne Meroebu [...], quoth the King;
And I will giue him such another thing.
So did; and Elephant so growne with yeares,
That all the rest about him seem'd but Steares.
The beast was brought, and like the man did stare;
And all the people laught at that compare.
Now next to these came in the men of Sere,
Who brought the King two silken robes to weare,
Of daintie sleaue drawne from their wormie trees;
And aske a boone vpon their naked knees.
And, what it was, is vtter'd be their Prime;
A pard'n of all their pris'ners for the time.
The King it grants: then came-in th'Embassie
Of such as dwelt in Happie Arabie.
Vnhappie since, for bringing forth the sword
Of Prophet false, that fights against the Word.
They brought a present did such odours yeeld,
As sweetly soone perfumed all the field,
With Aloës, Amomum, Cassia,
Canella, Stacte, Nardus Pistica,
Mirrh, Ambergris, Mahaca, Labdanum,
Keranna, Stor, and eu'rie precious gum;
Worth many tallents. Then brought they that haue
None other house, but eu'rie man his Caue;
The Troglodytes, of Countrey no where cold,
A yoke of Gryphons chain'd with that fine gold,
Which Emmots nigh as big as Norfolke sheepe,
At sand-hill-side are said to gath'r and keepe.
Then came that wore, for Turban, straw in net
With arrowes round about the brim beset,
Point vpward, feathers downe; a radiant show
They made, and stucke still ready for the bow:
And bow, with shafts of hurtfull Dragons bone,
These men of Blemmy brought, and thus saith one;
[Page 177]In all our Countrey (high and mightie King)
We haue no better present now to bring,
Than these; but hope your Maiestie will say
They did good seruice on the battaile-day.
They did indeed (repli'd the King) and were
The chiefest cause of other presents here:
Then aske what will you. They be seeke his Grace
T'abate their tribute. He for ten yeeres space
Remits it all. At last come th'Axumates,
No Tributaries, but Associates;
And they reioycing at this his victorie,
Present him with a Camelpardalie:
So strange a beast, as neuer there was seene;
With Beuer-colour'd haire all dappled greene.
As Camell high before, but low behinde,
Doth eu'rie way his small head nimbly winde;
With necke vpright, and long and slender throte,
And great and rowling eyes, that stare and glote,
As if he cruell were; yet is, to keepe,
As debonaire and tame as oxe or sheepe.
But sith his legs behinde both equall-short,
Both equall-long before, could not consort
With ambl' or trot, in pace his feet he sets
Iust as an horse doth when he well curuets;
Hath higher bounds and turnings vp and downe;
And but a cord, made fast vnto his Crowne,
To guide him by. When this strange beast appeer'd,
And with his eyes so goggle-gloting leer'd
At Horse and Bull, that ti'd were fast to th'Altars,
They, scar'd therewith, broke suddenly their halters;
And snorting Horse, and roaring Bull amaine
Ran vp and downe that Army-closed plaine.
The people gaue a shout thereat; and some
For feare of harme, the beasts so nigh them come:
And some cry-out and laugh, for game and sport;
Not so to see their trod-downe fellowes hurt;
[Page 178]As more to thinke in accident so rare
Of others harme, how safe themselues yet are.
The noyse so great, prouokt the Queene to draw
Her curtaine, so she and her daughter saw.
Theagenes at Altar kneel'd, expecting
The stroke of sword; yet herewithall erecting
Himselfe to see, and, seeing keepe [...] gone,
That other horse, which lest was, leapt vpon;
With faggot-sticke in hand from Altartane,
And for a bridle holding fast the mane,
And kicking hard, him se [...] to run so fast,
That Bull they chase, and ouertake at last.
At first attempt the standers by surmise
The pris'ner sled to scape the sacrifice:
But when they see him touch the beast behinde,
And course him round, they sudden change their minde;
Yea take delight, to see the Bull in drift,
And held by taile, and yet the man him shift
So nimble at eu'rie turne; and tame him so,
That close together side by side they goe,
As well acquainted now. And all admire
The man that made so Horse and Bull conspire;
And, that which many there admiring spoke,
As 'twere to draw, had joyn'd them without yoke.
But other thoughts had then the royall Maid;
She of his hurt, or fall, was sore afraid:
And that perceiu'd the Queene, and said; my childe,
You seeme t'affect the stranger now so wilde:
My selfe doe wish, him scapt these jeoperdies,
To keepe him sound and fit for sacrifice.
Good mother wish the man more graciously,
(Quoth she) than that he scape this death to dye;
Sith of your fauour this small signe you gaue him,
Doe somewhat more for my sake now, and saue him.
Persina thought it sauour'd of some loue,
But knew not all; and said, what should you moue
[Page 179]T'affect him so? for sure you make me muse;
Then tell me plaine: a mother can excuse
Her daughters weaknesse, and well with it beare▪
Chariclia then, downe dropping many a teare,
And sighing said; I speake before the wise▪
Yet am not vnderstood, and then she cries,
And speakes againe; I cannot so abuse
My selfe, to tell that shall my selfe accuse▪
And as she thought t'haue vtter'd somewhat more,
They interrupted were with great vp rore,
And shout the people made: For at the last
Theagenes that horse let goe, and cast
Himselfe vpon the Bull; and laid his head
Betwixt the roarers hornes, and roundly sored
His armes about them, clasping fast his hands
Before the front; and neither sits nor stands,
But on the beasts right shoulder hangs downe right,
And tires him so: at length by daintie sleight,
When he had run him thrice about the ring,
And came to place now iust before the King,
In course him tript, and on his backe with bound
He laid him flat, and pight his hornes aground;
They stucke so fast, he could not wag his head;
But kicking lay with all foure quarters spred.
The man with left hand held him downe (his right
Held vp to Heau'n) and made a cheerfull sight
To King and people: so much eke the more
For that, as trump, the Bull began to rore
And sound the praise of him that ouercame;
The roring multitude then did the same;
And cri'd, now let him trie his skill at full,
Th'old-Elpen-man, with him that cast the Bull:
Meroebus man they meane, and for him call;
That this young Greeke and he may try a fall.
Then at their instance was the King content;
And for the Champion a Waiter sent.
[Page 180]Full soone came in the gyant Aethiops,
On tip-toe strutting without coat or [...]ops,
And eu'rie way began to goggl and start,
To see the man that with him wrestle dare.
To th'other then in Greeke thus said the King;
You stranger, 'tis the will of all this ring,
To see a combat 'twixt this man and you.
I am content, quoth he; what shall we doe?
No more then wrestle, quoth the King. Nay, nay,
Lets fight at sharpe (quoth he) that I to day
May doe some famous deed, or with my death
Content Chariclia, that still holds her breath,
And all this while our cases would not tell;
Or hath alreadie bid me quite farewell.
I know not what you mean [...] by that same word,
Chariclia (quoth the King) but fight with sword
You may not: 'tis against the Law and guise,
That bloud she shed before the Sacrifice.
Theagenes, perceiuing King affraid
He should be slaine before his offring, said,
'Tis well you keepe me for the Gods, and they
I trust will thinke vpon my right to day.
But let him come: then strid, and strongly pight
H [...]s feet on chosen ground, with armes out-right,
Backe, necke, and shoulders bent; as I suppose,
To take the best aduantage at the close.
The Gyant comes, as 'twere at [...] where can,
But playes at first the Boobie more than man:
For catch he meant not, though he made a show;
But gaue Theagenes a waightie blow
With arme on necke, and laughing started backe,
And came againe to set his limbs in [...]acke:
Then both together grappling, tugging, springing,
Aduancing, crouching, heauing, shouing, swinging,
Retiring, spurning, locking, loosing, make
Both aire aboue, and earth beneath them shake.
[Page 181] Theagenes, that from a childe had ben
Instructed well by cunning wrestle-men,
Not only in Greece among the Mercurites,
But in Great Britain with the Cornwallites,
Got-vp this heauie Slouch at last on hip;
And all-asudden gaue him such a trip▪
(His owne wait helping) by a Cornish knacke;
That fetcht him o're, and laid him flat on's backe.
And as he fell, was ecchoed equall sound,
To lump of flesh so thrasht against the ground.
As dead he lay at first, stretcht out at full,
Then facing Heau'n shooke heeles as did the Bull.
Where at Meroebus anger'd gaue a stamp;
Though greatly pleas'd therewith was all the Camp.
Chariclia's colour went and came the while;
But at the fall she laught beyong a smile.
This Queene of Di'monds, fairest of the packe,
Was she that holpe the red suit win the blacke.
But soone was dampt her victorie; for loe,
The King arising from his Throne, said O
What pittie 'tis that such a man should die
Vntimely death! but helpe it cannot I.
Come young man now remaines that you be crown'd
For Sacrifice; and yet this deed renown'd
Deserues no lesse: then set a golden stem
Vpon his head, beset with pearle and Gem:
And weeping said, triumph; though, by our Lay,
The ioy thereof will haue an end to day.
But, sith I cannot free you, though I strivve,
Aske what I may doe for you, whilst you liue,
And I shall grant it. Then Theagenes,
If sacrific'd I must be, let it please
Your Maiestie, that your so new-found heire
May vse the sword vpon me, and Ile obey her.
The King was strook, remembring how that clause
Agreed with hers: yet would not search the cause;
[Page 182]But said, I promis'd what I might, but this
I may not doe; against the Law it is;
That saith the Sacrifice still out be laid
By one that is a wife; not by a Maid.
She hath an husband, quoth the Knight. To that
Repli'd the King; you speake you know not what,
And like a man to die: the fire hath cleane
Refuted that conceit; except you meane
Meroebus here, whom I intend t'aduance
By marrying her, as you haue heard perchance.
You neuer shall effect it, quoth the Knight▪
If I conceiue Chariclia's minde a right▪
And you may trust me as a Sacrifice▪
That of the truth diuinely prophesies.
To that Meroebus, Sacrifices slaine
Doe prophesie; not while they liue remaine.
And (father) well you said, and hit himpat;
At point of death he speakes he knowes not what.
'Twere good you sent him vnto th'Alt'r againe,
And at your leisure put him out of paine.
So sent he was. The Princesse that before
Had some small ioy receiu'd, with hope of more,
For game at wrestling won; now gan to droope,
When vnto death againe she saw him stoope.
Her mother comforts her, and saith; full well
He might be sau'd, if she would further tell
What was betwixt them. When she saw no way,
But plainly must a Maidens loue bewray,
And sith it was but to the Queene that bore her,
She pluckt-vp heart, and laid the case before her.
Meanewhile the King, Embassadours if moe
Yet were to come, a Sergeant sent to know.
The same brings word againe that from Sieen
Are letters come with gifts to King and Queene.
A graue old man comes in, as one elect
To bring the letters, and to this effect:
[Page 183]T'Hydaspes King of Indies West and East,
Orondates, of all his Traine the least.
By Deeds of Armes your valour all men see,
And bounteousnesse by fauour shew'd to mee.
And, sith your all-admired Maiestie,
Me gaue so soone th'Aegyptian Satrapie,
It makes me thinke, this little suit that I
Haue now to make, you will me not deny.
A certaine Maid to me from Memphis sent
(As I am told by some that with her went
And are escapt) is by your high command,
With others captiue brought to Meroland.
I pray, me send her; this I vndertake,
Both for her owne and for her fathers sake,
Who seeking her was tooke by some of mine
Before the peace, and left at Elpentine.
Now prayest' appeare before your Maiestie,
In hope to taste herein your clemencie.
O King, returne him not with heauie thought;
But glad to finde the grace we both haue sought.
When this was read, the King said, where is he
That seekes a daughter captiue? let me see.
Th'old man, who brought the letters said, 'tis I.
Then said the King, I will you not deny
A fathers suit; and well it shall me please,
To grant this first request t'Orondates.
There are but ten, and one hath Parents knowne;
Goe view the rest, and finding take your owne.
The man for verie ioy began to greet,
And fell before the King, and kist his feet;
Then view'd them all, but his there could not finde,
And told the King; you se (quoth he) my minde;
Th'old man hung downe his head and sorely wept,
Yet looking vp againe, to th'Altar stept,
And as in sudden furie fast he goes,
And on Theagenes, as'twere a noose,
[Page 184]His twisted tippet casts. The Knight gaue way
And let th'old man alone to doe or say
What ere he list: for, though by such a swing,
Content he was to come before the King,
And looke againe vpon Chariclia,
Deiected since he last was sent away.
The Dotard puls, and cries, I haue, I haue
That false Aeacide, maiden-stealing Slaue;
And drawes him, willing to be drawne, before
The King and State, and thus begins to rore.
O King behold! this is that wicked wight
Who stole my daught'r, and now, like hypocrite,
At Altar kneeles: they could not well arreed,
What 'twas he meant; but wonder'd at the deed.
And some it pittied, some it mou'd to laughter,
To heare him cry; My daughter, O my daughter!
My daughter thus far haue I sought in vaine?
O Templ' at Delph! O Phoebus! O Diane!
The King commands him tell his case more plaine;
'Twas Charicles, who thus began againe,
The maine truth hiding; Sire, I had a childe,
A guirle, although I say't, both faire and milde,
As any could be seene of flesh and blood;
Who seru'd Diana vowing maiden-hood,
In famous Templ' at Delph: this Thessalite,
Himselfe pretending Achillaean Knight,
From Phoebus Templ', and from within the gate,
Her stole a way, and left me desolate;
Wrong is't to you, that place if one profane;
Your Sun is Phoebus, and your Moone Diane.
When I had sought all ouer Thessalie,
Pelasgiot, Estaetin, Phthiotie,
And found them not, I had intelligence,
The Priest of Memphis had them guided thence:
And him then seeke I, but I found him dead;
A sonne of his then priesting in his stead;
[Page 185]Who told me all; how that my guirle was sent
T'Orondates: then to Siene I went,
And taken was, and staid at Elpentine;
Vntill the Satrap hither sent m'in fine;
And here I finde, yet her I cannot say,
But this the man that tooke her first a way.
So held his peace, and many brackish teares
Fell downe his cheekes vpon his siluer haires.
Then King to Knight, to this (Sir) what say you?
Theagenes repli'd; Sir, all is true.
Me thiefe and rauisher confesse I must,
As vnto him; but vnto you am just.
Restore him then the Damsell, quoth the King.
Not he that stole, but he that hath the thing
(Repli'd the Knight) restore it ought; your selfe
The Damsell haue the Priestesse was at Delph:
'Tis eu'n your daughter faire Chariclia;
And, if he see her, so the man will say.
They all are mou'd; and then Sisimithres,
Who knew it true, embraced Charicles,
And said, your nursling whom I once you gaue,
Is well, and her now her right parents haue.
With that Chariclia, this old man to meet,
Ran from the Queene, and fell downe at his feet,
And said, O father, deere to me as they
Who me begot; because I went away
So rudely leauing you and holy Delph,
Take what reuenge you will, I yeeld my selfe.
With that Persina kist the King, and said,
Beleeue, my Lord, of this our daughter maid
This all is true; and no man else but he,
That noble Grecian, must her husband be.
And now by many signes all vnderstood
The Gods would haue no more of humane blood▪
The King agreed, and glad was of such heires,
To beare with him the burd'n of Kings affaires.
[Page 182]Then on their head he set in full renowne,
The white silke Turban with the Blackmore Crowne:
And two by two to M [...]roë they ride;
Persina with her new-come daughter Bride;
Hydaspes with his sonne Theagenes;
And Priest of Delphos with Sisimithres:
There many dayes together and many nights
They celebrate with ioy the nuptiall rites.
And as they sate at boord with royall cheere,
What ere was daintie, were it ne're so deere,
A curle-head blacke-boy (taught by Zanzibar,
Who, th'Art to learne, had trauelled as far
As th'Isle of Britain) sung to th'Irish harp
How Sun and Moone about the Center warp,
And, passing thr'ow the signes of heauenly Ring,
Make Summer first, then Autumne, Winter Spring;
How Greeke Achilles Troian Hector slew,
And thrice about the Citie wall him drew;
How mightie Memnon, faire Aurora's son,
Before he fell, had many a battell won;
How Perseus came int'Aethiopia,
And from Sea-monster freed Andromeda;
Whose picture faire, in black Kings chamber seene,
That Faire-one made be borne of Blackmore Queene.
This haue I wrought with day-and-nightly swinke,
To file our tongue so rough: let no man thinke
It was for wealth, or any vaine desire
(As of a minde that aimes at nothing higher)
T'enable me to till, or let more land;
T'haue men and women-seruants at command;
To stretch my selfe on costly bed of state,
In faire-hung chamber furnished with plate;
Or in Caroch to whirle the Towne about,
With humble suitors follow'd home and out;
To quaffe in chrystall glasse the deerest grapes,
And make my guests therewith as merrie as Apes;
[Page 179]To weare the linnen fine and white as milke,
And purpl' engrain'd of softest wooll and silke;
With mule in street to see my foot-cloth fould;
In field on horse to stamp the grassie mould
At wilde-goose chase; or after hawke, or hound;
Or run for siluer bell, and hundred pound:
For none of these: what rhen? that abl' I bee
Without debt, or restraint of libertee,
At land and sea, peace and war, booke and sword,
With more effect to serue my Sou'raigne Lord;
To write, road, giue, keepe hospitalitee,
As heretofore haue done mine Ancestree:
That after-c [...]mmers know, when I am dead
I som [...] goo [...] [...] life endevoured [...]
I cannot mu [...] [...] to [...] vse▪ [...]
Make causey, drai [...], bridge, [...]mon [...]
Poore boyes binde Prentice, marrie [...],
When Common-wealth requires such kinde of aids:
Nor purchase and restore vnto the Church
Th'improued Tythes that Auarice did lurch:
Nor yet build wall, fort, hospitall, or schoole,
To keepe my name vndrown'd in Lethe poole:
Yet will I labour what I can with pen
To profit my succeeding Countrey-men:
In vaine (may seeme) is wealth or learning lent
To man that leaues thereof no monument.
FINIS.

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